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1

Jasmonate Biochemical Pathway  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Plants possess an interrelated family of potent fatty acid-derived regulators—the jasmonates. These compounds, which play roles in both defense and development, are derived from tri-unsaturated fatty acids [α-linolenic acid (18:3) or 7Z,10Z,13Z-hexadecatrienoic acid (16:3)]. The lipoxygenase-catalyzed addition of molecular oxygen to α-linolenic acid initiates jasmonate synthesis by providing a 13-hydroperoxide substrate for the formation of an unstable allene oxide that is then subject to enzyme-guided cyclization to produce 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid (OPDA). OPDA has several fates, including esterification into plastid lipids or transformation into the 12-carbon co-regulator jasmonic acid (JA). JA, the best-characterized member of the family, regulates both male and female fertility (depending on the plant species) and is an important mediator of defense gene expression. JA is itself a substrate for further diverse modifications. Genetic dissection of the pathway is revealing how the different jasmonates modulate different physiological processes. Each new family member that is discovered provides another key to understanding the fine control of gene expression in immune responses, in the initiation and maintenance of long-distance signal transfer in response to wounding, in the regulation of fertility, and in the turnover, inactivation, and sequestration of jasmonates, among other processes. The Jasmonate Biochemical Pathway provides an overview of the growing jasmonate family, and new members will be included in future versions of the Connections Map.

Robin Liechti (University of Lausanne;Gene Expression Laboratory and Faculty of Biology and Medicine REV); Edward E. Farmer (University of Lausanne;Gene Expression Laboratory and Faculty of Biology and Medicine REV)

2006-02-14

2

BIOCHEMICAL PATHWAYS OF CASPASE ACTIVATION DURING APOPTOSIS  

Microsoft Academic Search

? Abstract Caspase activation plays a central role in the execution of apoptosis. The key components,of the biochemical,pathways,of caspase activation have been recently elucidated. In this review, we focus on the two most well-studied pathways of caspase activation: the cell surface death receptor pathway,and the mitochondria- initiated pathway. In the cell surface death receptor pathway, activation of caspase-8 following its

Imawati Budihardjo; Holt Oliver; Michael Lutter; Xu Luo; Xiaodong Wang

1999-01-01

3

Network representations and methods for the analysis of chemical and biochemical pathways  

PubMed Central

Systems biologists increasingly use network representations to investigate biochemical pathways and their dynamic behaviours. In this critical review, we discuss four commonly used network representations of chemical and biochemical pathways. We illustrate how some of these representations reduce network complexity but result in the ambiguous representation of biochemical pathways. We also examine the current theoretical approaches available to investigate the dynamic behaviour of chemical and biochemical networks. Finally, we describe how the critical chemical and biochemical pathways responsible for emergent dynamic behaviour can be identified using network mining and functional mapping approaches. PMID:23857078

Sandefur, Conner I.; Mincheva, Maya; Schnell, Santiago

2013-01-01

4

Identifying biochemical phenotypic differences between cryptic species.  

PubMed

Molecular genetic methods can distinguish divergent evolutionary lineages in what previously appeared to be single species, but it is not always clear what functional differences exist between such cryptic species. We used a metabolomic approach to profile biochemical phenotype (metabotype) differences between two putative cryptic species of the earthworm Lumbricus rubellus. There were no straightforward metabolite biomarkers of lineage, i.e. no metabolites that were always at higher concentration in one lineage. Multivariate methods, however, identified a small number of metabolites that together helped distinguish the lineages, including uncommon metabolites such as N?-trimethyllysine, which is not usually found at high concentrations. This approach could be useful for characterizing functional trait differences, especially as it is applicable to essentially any species group, irrespective of its genome sequencing status. PMID:25252836

Liebeke, Manuel; Bruford, Michael W; Donnelly, Robert K; Ebbels, Timothy M D; Hao, Jie; Kille, Peter; Lahive, Elma; Madison, Rachael M; Morgan, A John; Pinto-Juma, Gabriela A; Spurgeon, David J; Svendsen, Claus; Bundy, Jacob G

2014-09-01

5

Deciphering diatom biochemical pathways via whole-cell proteomics  

PubMed Central

Diatoms play a critical role in the oceans’ carbon and silicon cycles; however, a mechanistic understanding of the biochemical processes that contribute to their ecological success remains elusive. Completion of the Thalassiosira pseudonana genome provided ‘blueprints’ for the potential biochemical machinery of diatoms, but offers only a limited insight into their biology under various environmental conditions. Using high-throughput shotgun proteomics, we identified a total of 1928 proteins expressed by T. pseudonana cultured under optimal growth conditions, enabling us to analyze this diatom’s primary metabolic and biosynthetic pathways. Of the proteins identified, 70% are involved in cellular metabolism, while 11% are involved in the transport of molecules. We identified all of the enzymes involved in the urea cycle, thereby describing the complete pathway to convert ammonia to urea, along with urea transporters, and the urea-degrading enzyme urease. Although metabolic exchange between these pathways remains ambiguous, their constitutive presence suggests complex intracellular nitrogen recycling. In addition, all C4 related enzymes for carbon fixation have been identified to be in abundance, with high protein sequence coverage. Quantification of mass spectra acquisitions demonstrated that the 20 most abundant proteins included an unexpectedly high expression of clathrin, which is the primary structural protein involved in endocytic transport. This result highlights a previously overlooked mechanism for the inter- and intra-cellular transport of nutrients and macromolecules in diatoms, potentially providing a missing link to organelle communication and metabolite exchange. Our results demonstrate the power of proteomics, and lay the groundwork for future comparative proteomic studies and directed analyses of specifically expressed proteins and biochemical pathways of oceanic diatoms. PMID:19829762

Nunn, Brook L.; Aker, Jocelyn R.; Shaffer, Scott A.; Tsai, Shannon; Strzepek, Robert F.; Boyd, Philip W.; Freeman, Theodore Larson; Brittnacher, Mitchell; Malmström, Lars; Goodlett, David R.

2009-01-01

6

Construction and engineering of large biochemical pathways via DNA assembler  

PubMed Central

Summary DNA assembler enables rapid construction and engineering of biochemical pathways in a one-step fashion by exploitation of the in vivo homologous recombination mechanism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. It has many applications in pathway engineering, metabolic engineering, combinatorial biology, and synthetic biology. Here we use two examples including the zeaxanthin biosynthetic pathway and the aureothin biosynthetic gene cluster to describe the key steps in the construction of pathways containing multiple genes using the DNA assembler approach. Methods for construct design, pathway assembly, pathway confirmation, and functional analysis are shown. The protocol for fine genetic modifications such as site-directed mutagenesis for engineering the aureothin gene cluster is also illustrated. PMID:23996442

Shao, Zengyi; Zhao, Huimin

2015-01-01

7

DNA assembler, an in vivo genetic method for rapid construction of biochemical pathways  

Microsoft Academic Search

The assembly of large recombinant DNA encoding a whole biochemical pathway or genome represents a significant challenge. Here, we report a new method, DNA assembler, which allows the assembly of an entire biochemical pathway in a single step via in vivo homologous recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We show that DNA assembler can rapidly assemble a functional D-xylose utilization pathway (~9kb

Zengyi Shao; Hua Zhao; Huimin Zhao

2008-01-01

8

Hierarchical modularization of biochemical pathways using fuzzy-c means clustering.  

PubMed

Biological systems that are representative of regulatory, metabolic, or signaling pathways can be highly complex. Mathematical models that describe such systems inherit this complexity. As a result, these models can often fail to provide a path toward the intuitive comprehension of these systems. More coarse information that allows a perceptive insight of the system is sometimes needed in combination with the model to understand control hierarchies or lower level functional relationships. In this paper, we present a method to identify relationships between components of dynamic models of biochemical pathways that reside in different functional groups. We find primary relationships and secondary relationships. The secondary relationships reveal connections that are present in the system, which current techniques that only identify primary relationships are unable to show. We also identify how relationships between components dynamically change over time. This results in a method that provides the hierarchy of the relationships among components, which can help us to understand the low level functional structure of the system and to elucidate potential hierarchical control. As a proof of concept, we apply the algorithm to the epidermal growth factor signal transduction pathway, and to the C3 photosynthesis pathway. We identify primary relationships among components that are in agreement with previous computational decomposition studies, and identify secondary relationships that uncover connections among components that current computational approaches were unable to reveal. PMID:24196983

de Luis Balaguer, Maria A; Williams, Cranos M

2014-08-01

9

Novel Biochemical Pathways of Endoglin in Vascular Cell Physiology  

PubMed Central

The broad role of the transforming growth factor beta (TGF?) signaling pathway in vascular development, homeostasis, and repair is well appreciated. Endoglin is emerging as a novel, complex, and poorly understood regulatory component of the TGF? receptor complex, whose importance is underscored by its recognition as the site of mutations causing hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) [McAllister et al., 1994]. Extensive analyses of endoglin function in normal developmental mouse models [Bourdeau et al., 1999; Li et al., 1999; Arthur et al., 2000] and in HHT animal models [Bourdeau et al., 2000; Torsney et al., 2003] exemplify the importance of understanding endoglin’s biochemical functions. However, novel mechanisms underlying the regulation of these pathways continue to emerge. These mechanisms include modification of TGF? receptor signaling at the ligand and receptor activation level, direct effects of endoglin on cell adhesion and migration, and emerging roles for endoglin in the determination of stem cell fate and tissue patterning. The purpose of this review is to highlight the cellular and molecular studies that underscore the central role of endoglin in vascular development and disease. PMID:17975795

Bernabeu, Carmelo; Conley, Barbara A.; Vary, Calvin P.H.

2007-01-01

10

Classification and Analysis of Regulatory Pathways Using Graph Property, Biochemical and Physicochemical Property, and Functional Property  

PubMed Central

Given a regulatory pathway system consisting of a set of proteins, can we predict which pathway class it belongs to? Such a problem is closely related to the biological function of the pathway in cells and hence is quite fundamental and essential in systems biology and proteomics. This is also an extremely difficult and challenging problem due to its complexity. To address this problem, a novel approach was developed that can be used to predict query pathways among the following six functional categories: (i) “Metabolism”, (ii) “Genetic Information Processing”, (iii) “Environmental Information Processing”, (iv) “Cellular Processes”, (v) “Organismal Systems”, and (vi) “Human Diseases”. The prediction method was established trough the following procedures: (i) according to the general form of pseudo amino acid composition (PseAAC), each of the pathways concerned is formulated as a 5570-D (dimensional) vector; (ii) each of components in the 5570-D vector was derived by a series of feature extractions from the pathway system according to its graphic property, biochemical and physicochemical property, as well as functional property; (iii) the minimum redundancy maximum relevance (mRMR) method was adopted to operate the prediction. A cross-validation by the jackknife test on a benchmark dataset consisting of 146 regulatory pathways indicated that an overall success rate of 78.8% was achieved by our method in identifying query pathways among the above six classes, indicating the outcome is quite promising and encouraging. To the best of our knowledge, the current study represents the first effort in attempting to identity the type of a pathway system or its biological function. It is anticipated that our report may stimulate a series of follow-up investigations in this new and challenging area. PMID:21980418

Cai, Yu-Dong; Chou, Kuo-Chen

2011-01-01

11

Characterization of Changes in Gene Expression and Biochemical Pathways at Low Levels of Benzene Exposure  

PubMed Central

Benzene, a ubiquitous environmental pollutant, causes acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Recently, through transcriptome profiling of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), we reported dose-dependent effects of benzene exposure on gene expression and biochemical pathways in 83 workers exposed across four airborne concentration ranges (from <1 ppm to >10 ppm) compared with 42 subjects with non-workplace ambient exposure levels. Here, we further characterize these dose-dependent effects with continuous benzene exposure in all 125 study subjects. We estimated air benzene exposure levels in the 42 environmentally-exposed subjects from their unmetabolized urinary benzene levels. We used a novel non-parametric, data-adaptive model selection method to estimate the change with dose in the expression of each gene. We describe non-parametric approaches to model pathway responses and used these to estimate the dose responses of the AML pathway and 4 other pathways of interest. The response patterns of majority of genes as captured by mean estimates of the first and second principal components of the dose-response for the five pathways and the profiles of 6 AML pathway response-representative genes (identified by clustering) exhibited similar apparent supra-linear responses. Responses at or below 0.1 ppm benzene were observed for altered expression of AML pathway genes and CYP2E1. Together, these data show that benzene alters disease-relevant pathways and genes in a dose-dependent manner, with effects apparent at doses as low as 100 ppb in air. Studies with extensive exposure assessment of subjects exposed in the low-dose range between 10 ppb and 1 ppm are needed to confirm these findings. PMID:24786086

Thomas, Reuben; Hubbard, Alan E.; McHale, Cliona M.; Zhang, Luoping; Rappaport, Stephen M.; Lan, Qing; Rothman, Nathaniel; Vermeulen, Roel; Guyton, Kathryn Z.; Jinot, Jennifer; Sonawane, Babasaheb R.; Smith, Martyn T.

2014-01-01

12

A computational model for the identification of biochemical pathways in the krebs cycle.  

PubMed

We have applied an algorithmic methodology which provably decomposes any complex network into a complete family of principal subcircuits to study the minimal circuits that describe the Krebs cycle. Every operational behavior that the network is capable of exhibiting can be represented by some combination of these principal subcircuits and this computational decomposition is linearly efficient. We have developed a computational model that can be applied to biochemical reaction systems which accurately renders pathways of such reactions via directed hypergraphs (Petri nets). We have applied the model to the citric acid cycle (Krebs cycle). The Krebs cycle, which oxidizes the acetyl group of acetyl CoA to CO(2) and reduces NAD and FAD to NADH and FADH(2), is a complex interacting set of nine subreaction networks. The Krebs cycle was selected because of its familiarity to the biological community and because it exhibits enough complexity to be interesting in order to introduce this novel analytic approach. This study validates the algorithmic methodology for the identification of significant biochemical signaling subcircuits, based solely upon the mathematical model and not upon prior biological knowledge. The utility of the algebraic-combinatorial model for identifying the complete set of biochemical subcircuits as a data set is demonstrated for this important metabolic process. PMID:12676051

Oliveira, Joseph S; Bailey, Colin G; Jones-Oliveira, Janet B; Dixon, David A; Gull, Dean W; Chandler, Mary L

2003-01-01

13

A Computational Model for the Identification of Biochemical Pathways in the Krebs Cycle  

SciTech Connect

We have applied an algorithmic methodology which provably decomposes any complex network into a complete family of principal subcircuits to study the minimal circuits that describe the Krebs cycle. Every operational behavior that the network is capable of exhibiting can be represented by some combination of these principal subcircuits and this computational decomposition is linearly efficient. We have developed a computational model that can be applied to biochemical reaction systems which accurately renders pathways of such reactions via directed hypergraphs (Petri nets). We have applied the model to the citric acid cycle (Krebs cycle). The Krebs cycle, which oxidizes the acetyl group of acetyl CoA to CO2 and reduces NAD and FAD to NADH and FADH2 is a complex interacting set of nine subreaction networks. The Krebs cycle was selected because of its familiarity to the biological community and because it exhibits enough complexity to be interesting in order to introduce this novel analytic approach. This study validates the algorithmic methodology for the identification of significant biochemical signaling subcircuits, based solely upon the mathematical model and not upon prior biological knowledge. The utility of the algebraic-combinatorial model for identifying the complete set of biochemical subcircuits as a data set is demonstrated for this important metabolic process.

Oliveira, Joseph S.; Bailey, Colin G.; Jones-Oliveira, Janet B.; Dixon, David A.; Gull, Dean W.; Chandler, Mary L.

2003-03-01

14

BioSM: A metabolomics tool for identifying endogenous mammalian biochemical structures in chemical structure space  

PubMed Central

The structural identification of unknown biochemical compounds in complex biofluids continues to be a major challenge in metabolomics research. Using LC/MS there are currently two major options for solving this problem: searching small biochemical databases, which often do not contain the unknown of interest, or searching large chemical databases which include large numbers of non-biochemical compounds. Searching larger chemical databases (larger chemical space) increases the odds of identifying an unknown biochemical compound, but only if non-biochemical structures can be eliminated from consideration. In this paper we present BioSM; a cheminformatics tool that uses known endogenous mammalian biochemical compounds (as scaffolds) and graph matching methods to identify endogenous mammalian biochemical structures in chemical structure space. The results of a comprehensive set of empirical experiments suggest that BioSM identifies endogenous mammalian biochemical structures with high accuracy. In a leave-one-out cross validation experiment, BioSM correctly predicted 95% of 1,388 Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) compounds as endogenous mammalian biochemicals using 1,565 scaffolds. Analysis of two additional biological datasets containing 2,330 human metabolites (HMDB) and 2,416 plant secondary metabolites (KEGG) resulted in biochemical annotations of 89% and 72% of the compounds respectively. When a dataset of 3,895 drugs (DrugBank and USAN) was tested, 48% of these structures were predicted to be biochemical. However, when a set of synthetic chemical compounds (Chembridge and Chemsynthesis databases) were examined, only 29% of the 458,207 structures were predicted to be biochemical. Moreover, BioSM predicted that 34% of 883,199 randomly selected compounds from PubChem were biochemical. We then expanded the scaffold list to 3,927 biochemical compounds and reevaluated the above datasets to determine whether scaffold number influenced model performance. Although there were significant improvements in model sensitivity and specificity using the larger scaffold list, the dataset comparison results were very similar. These results suggest that additional biochemical scaffolds will not further improve our representation of biochemical structure space and that the model is reasonably robust. BioSM provides a qualitative (yes/no) and quantitative (ranking) method for endogenous mammalian biochemical annotation of chemical space, and thus will be useful in the identification of unknown biochemical structures in metabolomics. BioSM is freely available at http://metabolomics.pharm.uconn.edu. PMID:23330685

Hamdalla, Mai A.; Mandoiu, Ion I.; Hill, Dennis W.; Rajasekaran, Sanguthevar; Grant, David F.

2013-01-01

15

UT Southwestern team identifies tumor-specific pathway:  

Cancer.gov

A research team led by UT Southwestern Medical Center scientists has identified an atypical metabolic pathway unique to some tumors, possibly providing a future target for drugs that could reduce or halt the spread of cancer.

16

Responding to directional cues: a tale of two cells [biochemical signaling pathways  

Microsoft Academic Search

The study of biochemical signaling pathways is of immense importance. Abnormalities in cell signaling have been linked to the development of many serious diseases. In this article, the author has presented two of the best-understood signaling pathways in eukaryotic cells and illustrated the similarities between traditional control engineering tasks, including step disturbance rejection and amplification. The illustrations have shown how

Saurabh Paliwal; Lan Ma; J. Krishnan; Andre Levchenko; Pablo A. Iglesias

2004-01-01

17

Fungal Indole Alkaloid Biosynthesis: Genetic and Biochemical Investigation of Tryptoquialanine Pathway in Penicillium aethiopicum  

PubMed Central

Tremorgenic mycotoxins are a group of indole alkaloids which include the quinazoline-containing tryptoquivaline 2 that are capable of eliciting intermittent or sustained tremors in vertebrate animals. The biosynthesis of this group of bioactive compounds, which are characterized by an acetylated quinazoline ring connected to a 6-5-5 imidazoindolone ring system via a 5-membered spirolactone, has remained uncharacterized. Here, we report the identification of a gene cluster (tqa) from P. aethiopicum that is involved in the biosynthesis of tryptoquialanine 1, which is structurally similar to 2. The pathway has been confirmed to go through an intermediate common to the fumiquinazoline pathway, fumiquinazoline F, which originates from a fungal trimodular nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS). By systematically inactivating every biosynthetic gene in the cluster, followed by isolation and characterization of the intermediates, we were able to establish the biosynthetic sequence of the pathway. An unusual oxidative opening of the pyrazinone ring by an FAD-dependent berberine bridge enzyme-like oxidoreductase has been proposed based on genetic knockout studies. Notably, a 2-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB)-utilizing NRPS module has been identified and reconstituted in vitro, along with two putative enzymes of unknown functions that are involved in the synthesis of the unnatural amino acid by genetic analysis. This work provides new genetic and biochemical insights into the biosynthesis of this group of fungal alkaloids, including the tremorgens related to 2. PMID:21299212

Gao, Xue; Chooi, Yit-Heng; Ames, Brian D.; Wang, Peng; Walsh, Christopher T.; Tang, Yi

2011-01-01

18

BN+1 Bayesian network expansion for identifying molecular pathway elements  

PubMed Central

A Bayesian network expansion algorithm called BN+1 was developed to identify undocumented gene interactions in a known pathway using microarray gene expression data. In our recent paper, the BN+1 algorithm has been successfully used to identify key regulators including uspE in the E. coli ROS pathway and biofilm formation.18 In this report, a synthetic network was designed to further evaluate this algorithm. The BN+1 method was found to identify both linear and nonlinear relationships and correctly identify variables near the starting network. Using experimentally derived data, the BN+1 method identifies the gene fdhE as a potentially new ROS regulator. Finally, a range of possible score cutoff methods are explored to identify a set of criteria for selecting BN+1 calls. PMID:21331236

Hodges, Andrew P; Woolf, Peter

2010-01-01

19

Biochemical pathways for the production of flavour compounds in cheeses during ripening: A review  

E-print Network

Review Biochemical pathways for the production of flavour compounds in cheeses during ripening) are reviewed. Depending on variety, microflora and ripening conditions, lac- tate may be metabolized dynamic product and undergoes significant changes during its ripening period. Freshly-made curds

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

20

Adaptive modeling of biochemical pathways J.W.G.University, Frankfurt, Germany  

E-print Network

@cs.uni-frankfurt.de Abstract In bioinformatics, biochemical pathways can be mod- eled by many differential equations by many differential equations. For complicated systems, differen- tial equations systems (DES) with up. In contrast, differential equations are used to model explicitly all relations. Here, the given

Brause, R.

21

Identifying Differentially Abundant Metabolic Pathways in Metagenomic Datasets  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Enabled by rapid advances in sequencing technology, metagenomic studies aim to characterize entire communities of microbes bypassing the need for culturing individual bacterial members. One major goal of such studies is to identify specific functional adaptations of microbial communities to their habitats. Here we describe a powerful analytical method (MetaPath) that can identify differentially abundant pathways in metagenomic data-sets, relying on a combination of metagenomic sequence data and prior metabolic pathway knowledge. We show that MetaPath outperforms other common approaches when evaluated on simulated datasets. We also demonstrate the power of our methods in analyzing two, publicly available, metagenomic datasets: a comparison of the gut microbiome of obese and lean twins; and a comparison of the gut microbiome of infant and adult subjects. We demonstrate that the subpathways identified by our method provide valuable insights into the biological activities of the microbiome.

Liu, Bo; Pop, Mihai

22

An integrative approach to identifying cancer chemoresistance-associated pathways  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  Resistance to chemotherapy severely limits the effectiveness of chemotherapy drugs in treating cancer. Still, the mechanisms\\u000a and critical pathways that contribute to chemotherapy resistance are relatively unknown. This study elucidates the chemoresistance-associated\\u000a pathways retrieved from the integrated biological interaction networks and identifies signature genes relevant for chemotherapy\\u000a resistance.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  An integrated network was constructed by collecting multiple metabolic interactions from public

Shih-Yi Chao; Jung-Hsien Chiang; A-Mei Huang; Woan-Shan Chang

2011-01-01

23

The biochemical pathways of central nervous system neural degeneration in niacin deficiency.  

PubMed

Neural degeneration is a very complicated process. In spite of all the advancements in the molecular chemistry, there are many unknown aspects of the phenomena of neurodegeneration which need to be put together. It is a common sequela of the conditions of niacin deficiency. Neural degeneration in Pellagra manifests as chromatolysis mainly in pyramidal followed by other neurons and glial cells. However, there is a gross lack of understanding of biochemical mechanisms of neurodegeneration in niacin deficiency states. Because of the necessity of niacin or its amide derivative NAD in a number of biochemical pathways, it is understandable that several of these pathways may be involved in the common outcome of neural degeneration. Here, we highlight five pathways that could be involved in the neuraldegeneration for which evidence has accumulated through several studies. These pathways are: 1) the tryptophan-kyneurenic acid pathway, 2) the mitochondrial ATP generation related pathways, 3) the poly (ADP-ibose) polymerase (PARP) pathway, 4) the BDNF-TRKB Axis abnormalities, 5) the genetic influences of niacin deficiency. PMID:25317166

Fu, Linshan; Doreswamy, Venkatesh; Prakash, Ravi

2014-08-15

24

The biochemical pathways of central nervous system neural degeneration in niacin deficiency  

PubMed Central

Neural degeneration is a very complicated process. In spite of all the advancements in the molecular chemistry, there are many unknown aspects of the phenomena of neurodegeneration which need to be put together. It is a common sequela of the conditions of niacin deficiency. Neural degeneration in Pellagra manifests as chromatolysis mainly in pyramidal followed by other neurons and glial cells. However, there is a gross lack of understanding of biochemical mechanisms of neurodegeneration in niacin deficiency states. Because of the necessity of niacin or its amide derivative NAD in a number of biochemical pathways, it is understandable that several of these pathways may be involved in the common outcome of neural degeneration. Here, we highlight five pathways that could be involved in the neuraldegeneration for which evidence has accumulated through several studies. These pathways are: 1) the tryptophan-kyneurenic acid pathway, 2) the mitochondrial ATP generation related pathways, 3) the poly (ADP-ibose) polymerase (PARP) pathway, 4) the BDNF-TRKB Axis abnormalities, 5) the genetic influences of niacin deficiency. PMID:25317166

Fu, Linshan; Doreswamy, Venkatesh; Prakash, Ravi

2014-01-01

25

A Three Stage Integrative Pathway Search (TIPS©) framework to identify toxicity relevant genes and pathways  

PubMed Central

Background The ability to obtain profiles of gene expressions, proteins and metabolites with the advent of high throughput technologies has advanced the study of pathway and network reconstruction. Genome-wide network reconstruction requires either interaction measurements or large amount of perturbation data, often not available for mammalian cell systems. To overcome these shortcomings, we developed a Three Stage Integrative Pathway Search (TIPS©) approach to reconstruct context-specific active pathways involved in conferring a specific phenotype, from limited amount of perturbation data. The approach was tested on human liver cells to identify pathways that confer cytotoxicity. Results This paper presents a systems approach that integrates gene expression and cytotoxicity profiles to identify a network of pathways involved in free fatty acid (FFA) and tumor necrosis factor-? (TNF-?) induced cytotoxicity in human hepatoblastoma cells (HepG2/C3A). Cytotoxicity relevant genes were first identified and then used to reconstruct a network using Bayesian network (BN) analysis. BN inference was used subsequently to predict the effects of perturbing a gene on the other genes in the network and on the cytotoxicity. These predictions were subsequently confirmed through the published literature and further experiments. Conclusion The TIPS© approach is able to reconstruct active pathways that confer a particular phenotype by integrating gene expression and phenotypic profiles. A web-based version of TIPS© that performs the analysis described herein can be accessed at . PMID:17570844

Li, Zheng; Srivastava, Shireesh; Mittal, Sheenu; Yang, Xuerui; Sheng, Lufang; Chan, Christina

2007-01-01

26

Inferring signaling pathway topologies from multiple perturbation measurements of specific biochemical species.  

PubMed

The specification of biological decisions by signaling pathways is encoded by the interplay between activation dynamics and network topologies. Although we can describe complex networks, we cannot easily determine which topology the cell actually uses to transduce a specific signal. Experimental testing of all plausible topologies is infeasible because of the combinatorially large number of experiments required to explore the complete hypothesis space. Here, we demonstrate that Bayesian inference-based modeling provides an approach to explore and constrain this hypothesis space,permitting the rational ranking of pathway models. Our approach can use measurements of a limited number of biochemical species when combined with multiple perturbations. As proof of concept, we examined the activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway by epidermal growth factor. The predicted and experimentally validated model shows that both Raf-1 and, unexpectedly,B-Raf are needed to fully activate ERK in two different cell lines. Thus, our formal methodology rationally infers evidentially supported pathway topologies even when a limited number of biochemical and kinetic measurements are available. PMID:20731071

Xu, Tian-Rui; Vyshemirsky, Vladislav; Gormand, Amélie; von Kriegsheim, Alex; Girolami, Mark; Baillie, George S; Ketley, Dominic; Dunlop, Allan J; Milligan, Graeme; Houslay, Miles D; Kolch, Walter

2010-01-01

27

Inferring signaling pathway topologies from multiple perturbation measurements of specific biochemical species.  

PubMed

The specification of biological decisions by signaling pathways is encoded by the interplay between activation dynamics and network topologies. Although we can describe complex networks, we cannot easily determine which topology the cell actually uses to transduce a specific signal. Experimental testing of all plausible topologies is infeasible because of the combinatorially large number of experiments required to explore the complete hypothesis space. Here, we demonstrate that Bayesian inference-based modeling provides an approach to explore and constrain this hypothesis space, permitting the rational ranking of pathway models. Our approach can use measurements of a limited number of biochemical species when combined with multiple perturbations. As proof of concept, we examined the activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway by epidermal growth factor. The predicted and experimentally validated model shows that both Raf-1 and, unexpectedly, B-Raf are needed to fully activate ERK in two different cell lines. Thus, our formal methodology rationally infers evidentially supported pathway topologies even when a limited number of biochemical and kinetic measurements are available. PMID:20234003

Xu, Tian-Rui; Vyshemirsky, Vladislav; Gormand, Amélie; von Kriegsheim, Alex; Girolami, Mark; Baillie, George S; Ketley, Dominic; Dunlop, Allan J; Milligan, Graeme; Houslay, Miles D; Kolch, Walter

2010-01-01

28

Diversity of Bile Salts in Fish and Amphibians: Evolution of a Complex Biochemical Pathway  

PubMed Central

Bile salts are the major end-metabolites of cholesterol and are also important in lipid and protein digestion, as well as shaping of the gut microflora. Previous studies had demonstrated variation of bile salt structures across vertebrate species. We greatly extend prior surveys of bile salt variation in fish and amphibians, particularly in analysis of the biliary bile salts of Agnatha and Chondrichthyes. While there is significant structural variation of bile salts across all fish orders, bile salt profiles are generally stable within orders of fish and do not correlate with differences in diet. This large data set allowed us to infer evolutionary changes in the bile salt synthetic pathway. The hypothesized ancestral bile salt synthetic pathway, likely exemplified in extant hagfish, is simpler and much shorter than the pathway of most teleost fish and terrestrial vertebrates. Thus, the bile salt synthetic pathway has become longer and more complex throughout vertebrate evolution. Analysis of the evolution of bile salt synthetic pathways provides a rich model system for the molecular evolution of a complex biochemical pathway in vertebrates. PMID:20113173

Hagey, Lee R.; Møller, Peter R.; Hofmann, Alan F.; Krasowski, Matthew D.

2010-01-01

29

Method to assemble and integrate biochemical pathways into the chloroplast genome of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.  

PubMed

Recombinant protein expression in the chloroplasts of green algae has recently become more routine; however, the heterologous expression of multiple proteins or complete biosynthetic pathways remains a significant challenge. Here, we show that a modified DNA Assembler approach can be used to rapidly assemble multiple-gene biosynthetic pathways in yeast and then integrate these assembled pathways at a site-specific location in the chloroplast genome of the microalgal species Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. As a proof of concept, this method was used to successfully integrate and functionally express up to three reporter proteins (AphA6, AadA, and GFP) in the chloroplast of C. reinhardtii. An analysis of the relative gene expression of the engineered strains showed significant differences in the mRNA expression levels of the reporter genes and thus highlights the importance of proper promoter/untranslated region selection when constructing a target pathway. This new method represents a useful genetic tool in the construction and integration of complex biochemical pathways into the chloroplast genome of microalgae and should aid current efforts to engineer algae for biofuels production and other desirable natural products. PMID:22674415

Noor-Mohammadi, Samaneh; Pourmir, Azadeh; Johannes, Tyler W

2012-11-01

30

GIST: A Gibbs sampler to identify intracellular signal transduction pathways  

Microsoft Academic Search

Identification of intracellular signal transduction pathways plays an important role in understanding the mechanisms of how cells respond to external stimuli. The availability of high throughput microarray expression data and accumulating knowledge of protein-protein interactions have provided us with useful information to infer condition-specific signal transduction pathways. We propose a novel method called Gibbs sampler to Infer Signal Transduction pathways

Jinghua Gu; Chen Wang; Ie-Ming Shih; Tian-Li Wang; Yue Wang; Robert Clarke; Jianhua Xuan

2011-01-01

31

Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic imaging identifies early biochemical markers of tissue damage  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopic imaging can allow for the rapid imaging of tissue biochemistry in a label-free and non-perturbing fashion. With the rapid adoption of new minimally invasive surgery (MIS) technologies over the last 20 years, adequate skill to safely and effectively use these technologies may not be achieved and risk of undue physical pressure being placed on tissues is a concern. Previous work has demonstrated that a number of histological stains can detect tissue damage, however, this process requires the initiation and progression of a signaling cascade that results in the epitope of interest being expressed. We proposed to identify the early biochemical markers associated with physical tissue damage from applied forces, thus not requiring transcriptional and translational protein synthesis as traditional immunohistochemistry does. To demonstrate that FT-IR can measure biochemical changes in tissues that have undergone physical force, we took ex-vivo lamb's liver that had been freshly excised and applied varying levels of physical pressure (0kPa to 30kPa). Tissues were then formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded, and sectioned on to glass for H and E staining to identify damage and on to an IR slide for FT-IR imaging. Regions of interest containing hepatocytes were identified and average FT-IR spectra were extracted from the damaged and undamaged livers. FT-IR spectra showed clear biochemical changes associated with tissue damage. In addition, chemical changes could be observed proceeding histological changes observed when using conventional staining approaches.

Varma, Vishal K.; Ohlander, Samuel; Nguyen, Peter; Vendryes, Christopher; Parthiban, Sujeeth; Hamilton, Blake; Wallis, M. Chad; Kajdacsy-Balla, Andre; Hannaford, Blake; Lendvay, Thomas; Hotaling, James M.; Walsh, Michael J.

2014-03-01

32

Identification of genetic bases of vibrio fluvialis species-specific biochemical pathways and potential virulence factors by comparative genomic analysis.  

PubMed

Vibrio fluvialis is an important food-borne pathogen that causes diarrheal illness and sometimes extraintestinal infections in humans. In this study, we sequenced the genome of a clinical V. fluvialis strain and determined its phylogenetic relationships with other Vibrio species by comparative genomic analysis. We found that the closest relationship was between V. fluvialis and V. furnissii, followed by those with V. cholerae and V. mimicus. Moreover, based on genome comparisons and gene complementation experiments, we revealed genetic mechanisms of the biochemical tests that differentiate V. fluvialis from closely related species. Importantly, we identified a variety of genes encoding potential virulence factors, including multiple hemolysins, transcriptional regulators, and environmental survival and adaptation apparatuses, and the type VI secretion system, which is indicative of complex regulatory pathways modulating pathogenesis in this organism. The availability of V. fluvialis genome sequences may promote our understanding of pathogenic mechanisms for this emerging pathogen. PMID:24441165

Lu, Xin; Liang, Weili; Wang, Yunduan; Xu, Jialiang; Zhu, Jun; Kan, Biao

2014-03-01

33

Identifying admitted patients at risk of dying: a prospective observational validation of four biochemical scoring systems  

PubMed Central

Objectives Risk assessment is an important part of emergency patient care. Risk assessment tools based on biochemical data have the advantage that calculation can be automated and results can be easily provided. However, to be used clinically, existing tools have to be validated by independent researchers. This study involved an independent external validation of four risk stratification systems predicting death that rely primarily on biochemical variables. Design Prospective observational study. Setting The medical admission unit at a regional teaching hospital in Denmark. Participants Of 5894 adult (age 15 or above) acutely admitted medical patients, 205 (3.5%) died during admission and 46 died (0.8%) within one calendar day. Interventions None. Main outcome measures The main outcome measure was the ability to identify patients at an increased risk of dying (discriminatory power) as area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUROC) and the accuracy of the predicted probability (calibration) using the Hosmer-Lemeshow goodness-of-fit test. The endpoint was all-cause mortality, defined in accordance with the original manuscripts. Results Using the original coefficients, all four systems were excellent at identifying patients at increased risk (discriminatory power, AUROC ?0.80). The accuracy was poor (we could assess calibration for two systems, which failed). After recalculation of the coefficients, two systems had improved discriminatory power and two remained unchanged. Calibration failed for one system in the validation cohort. Conclusions Four biochemical risk stratification systems can risk-stratify the acutely admitted medical patients for mortality with excellent discriminatory power. We could improve the models for use in our setting by recalculating the risk coefficient for the chosen variables. PMID:23794564

Brabrand, Mikkel; Knudsen, Torben; Hallas, Jesper

2013-01-01

34

De novo assembly of Euphorbia fischeriana root transcriptome identifies prostratin pathway related genes  

PubMed Central

Background Euphorbia fischeriana is an important medicinal plant found in Northeast China. The plant roots contain many medicinal compounds including 12-deoxyphorbol-13-acetate, commonly known as prostratin that is a phorbol ester from the tigliane diterpene series. Prostratin is a protein kinase C activator and is effective in the treatment of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) by acting as a latent HIV activator. Latent HIV is currently the biggest limitation for viral eradication. The aim of this study was to sequence, assemble and annotate the E. fischeriana transcriptome to better understand the potential biochemical pathways leading to the synthesis of prostratin and other related diterpene compounds. Results In this study we conducted a high throughput RNA-seq approach to sequence the root transcriptome of E. fischeriana. We assembled 18,180 transcripts, of these the majority encoded protein-coding genes and only 17 transcripts corresponded to known RNA genes. Interestingly, we identified 5,956 protein-coding transcripts with high similarity (> = 75%) to Ricinus communis, a close relative to E. fischeriana. We also evaluated the conservation of E. fischeriana genes against EST datasets from the Euphorbeacea family, which included R. communis, Hevea brasiliensis and Euphorbia esula. We identified a core set of 1,145 gene clusters conserved in all four species and 1,487 E. fischeriana paralogous genes. Furthermore, we screened E. fischeriana transcripts against an in-house reference database for genes implicated in the biosynthesis of upstream precursors to prostratin. This identified 24 and 9 candidate transcripts involved in the terpenoid and diterpenoid biosyntehsis pathways, respectively. The majority of the candidate genes in these pathways presented relatively low expression levels except for 1-hydroxy-2-methyl-2-(E)-butenyl 4-diphosphate synthase (HDS) and isopentenyl diphosphate/dimethylallyl diphosphate synthase (IDS), which are required for multiple downstream pathways including synthesis of casbene, a proposed precursor to prostratin. Conclusion The resources generated in this study provide new insights into the upstream pathways to the synthesis of prostratin and will likely facilitate functional studies aiming to produce larger quantities of this compound for HIV research and/or treatment of patients. PMID:22151917

2011-01-01

35

MetaMapp: mapping and visualizing metabolomic data by integrating information from biochemical pathways and chemical and mass spectral similarity  

PubMed Central

Background Exposure to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) leads to higher rates of pulmonary diseases and infections in children. To study the biochemical changes that may precede lung diseases, metabolomic effects on fetal and maternal lungs and plasma from rats exposed to ETS were compared to filtered air control animals. Genome- reconstructed metabolic pathways may be used to map and interpret dysregulation in metabolic networks. However, mass spectrometry-based non-targeted metabolomics datasets often comprise many metabolites for which links to enzymatic reactions have not yet been reported. Hence, network visualizations that rely on current biochemical databases are incomplete and also fail to visualize novel, structurally unidentified metabolites. Results We present a novel approach to integrate biochemical pathway and chemical relationships to map all detected metabolites in network graphs (MetaMapp) using KEGG reactant pair database, Tanimoto chemical and NIST mass spectral similarity scores. In fetal and maternal lungs, and in maternal blood plasma from pregnant rats exposed to environmental tobacco smoke (ETS), 459 unique metabolites comprising 179 structurally identified compounds were detected by gas chromatography time of flight mass spectrometry (GC-TOF MS) and BinBase data processing. MetaMapp graphs in Cytoscape showed much clearer metabolic modularity and complete content visualization compared to conventional biochemical mapping approaches. Cytoscape visualization of differential statistics results using these graphs showed that overall, fetal lung metabolism was more impaired than lungs and blood metabolism in dams. Fetuses from ETS-exposed dams expressed lower lipid and nucleotide levels and higher amounts of energy metabolism intermediates than control animals, indicating lower biosynthetic rates of metabolites for cell division, structural proteins and lipids that are critical for in lung development. Conclusions MetaMapp graphs efficiently visualizes mass spectrometry based metabolomics datasets as network graphs in Cytoscape, and highlights metabolic alterations that can be associated with higher rate of pulmonary diseases and infections in children prenatally exposed to ETS. The MetaMapp scripts can be accessed at http://metamapp.fiehnlab.ucdavis.edu. PMID:22591066

2012-01-01

36

Prediction and Biochemical Demonstration of a Catabolic Pathway for the Osmoprotectant Proline Betaine  

PubMed Central

ABSTRACT Through the use of genetic, enzymatic, metabolomic, and structural analyses, we have discovered the catabolic pathway for proline betaine, an osmoprotectant, in Paracoccus denitrificans and Rhodobacter sphaeroides. Genetic and enzymatic analyses showed that several of the key enzymes of the hydroxyproline betaine degradation pathway also function in proline betaine degradation. Metabolomic analyses detected each of the metabolic intermediates of the pathway. The proline betaine catabolic pathway was repressed by osmotic stress and cold stress, and a regulatory transcription factor was identified. We also report crystal structure complexes of the P. denitrificans HpbD hydroxyproline betaine epimerase/proline betaine racemase with l-proline betaine and cis-hydroxyproline betaine. PMID:24520058

Kumar, Ritesh; Zhao, Suwen; Vetting, Matthew W.; Wood, B. McKay; Sakai, Ayano; Cho, Kyuil; Solbiati, José; Almo, Steven C.; Sweedler, Jonathan V.; Jacobson, Matthew P.; Gerlt, John A.; Cronan, John E.

2014-01-01

37

Combinatorial Assembly of Large Biochemical Pathways into Yeast Chromosomes for Improved Production of Value-added Compounds.  

PubMed

Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a eukaryotic organism is particularly suitable as microbial cell factory because it has interesting features such as membrane environments for supporting membrane-associated enzymes and its capability for post-translational modifications of enzymes from plants. However, S. cerevisiae does not readily express polycistronic transcriptional units, which represents a significant challenge for constructing large biochemical pathways in budding yeast. In the present study, we developed a novel approach for rapid construction of large biochemical pathways into yeast chromosomes. Our approach takes advantage of antibiotic selection for combinatorial assembly of large pathways into the ?-sites of retrotransposon elements of yeast chromosomes. As proof-of-principle, a five-gene isobutanol pathway and an eight-gene mevalonate pathway were successfully assembled into yeast chromosomes in one-step fashion. To our knowledge, this is the first report to exploit ?-integration coupled with antibiotic selection for rapid assembly of large biochemical pathways in budding yeast. We envision our new approach could serve as a generalized technique for large pathway construction in yeast-a method that would be of significant interest to the synthetic biology community. PMID:24847678

Yuan, Jifeng; Ching, Chi Bun

2015-01-16

38

Pathways-Driven Sparse Regression Identifies Pathways and Genes Associated with High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol in Two Asian Cohorts  

PubMed Central

Standard approaches to data analysis in genome-wide association studies (GWAS) ignore any potential functional relationships between gene variants. In contrast gene pathways analysis uses prior information on functional structure within the genome to identify pathways associated with a trait of interest. In a second step, important single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) or genes may be identified within associated pathways. The pathways approach is motivated by the fact that genes do not act alone, but instead have effects that are likely to be mediated through their interaction in gene pathways. Where this is the case, pathways approaches may reveal aspects of a trait's genetic architecture that would otherwise be missed when considering SNPs in isolation. Most pathways methods begin by testing SNPs one at a time, and so fail to capitalise on the potential advantages inherent in a multi-SNP, joint modelling approach. Here, we describe a dual-level, sparse regression model for the simultaneous identification of pathways and genes associated with a quantitative trait. Our method takes account of various factors specific to the joint modelling of pathways with genome-wide data, including widespread correlation between genetic predictors, and the fact that variants may overlap multiple pathways. We use a resampling strategy that exploits finite sample variability to provide robust rankings for pathways and genes. We test our method through simulation, and use it to perform pathways-driven gene selection in a search for pathways and genes associated with variation in serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in two separate GWAS cohorts of Asian adults. By comparing results from both cohorts we identify a number of candidate pathways including those associated with cardiomyopathy, and T cell receptor and PPAR signalling. Highlighted genes include those associated with the L-type calcium channel, adenylate cyclase, integrin, laminin, MAPK signalling and immune function. PMID:24278029

Silver, Matt; Chen, Peng; Li, Ruoying; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Wong, Tien-Yin; Tai, E-Shyong; Teo, Yik-Ying; Montana, Giovanni

2013-01-01

39

Biodegradation of dimethyl terephthalate by Pasteurella multocida Sa follows an alternative biochemical pathway.  

PubMed

Pasteurella multocida Sa, a bacterial strain isolated from mangrove sediment by enrichment technique, was capable of transforming dimethyl terephthalate (DMT). Biodegradation of DMT was shown to take place as a series of sequential steps involving the hydrolysis of two ester linkages between the carboxyl groups of the terephthalate and the methyl side-chain initially to produce mono-methyl terephthalate (MMT) and then terephthalic acid (TA), respectively. However, with ethanol as the carrying solvent, there was a formation of one metabolite previously not observed. The two metabolites were characterized by high performance-liquid chromatography-electron ionization mass spectrometry as MMT and mono-ethyl terephthalate (MET), suggesting the existence of an alternative biochemical pathway in the degradation of DMT by P. multocida Sa. Since the presence of MMT and ethanol in culture inoculated with P. multocida Sa was prerequisites for the formation of MET, biologically mediated trans-esterification was proposed as a mechanism for the novel biochemical process observed. PMID:16676217

Li, Jiaxi; Gu, Ji-Dong

2006-05-01

40

Concordant Signaling Pathways Produced by Pesticide Exposure in Mice Correspond to Pathways Identified in Human Parkinson's Disease  

PubMed Central

Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disease in which the etiology of 90 percent of the patients is unknown. Pesticide exposure is a major risk factor for PD, and paraquat (PQ), pyridaben (PY) and maneb (MN) are amongst the most widely used pesticides. We studied mRNA expression using transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq) in the ventral midbrain (VMB) and striatum (STR) of PQ, PY and paraquat+maneb (MNPQ) treated mice, followed by pathway analysis. We found concordance of signaling pathways between the three pesticide models in both the VMB and STR as well as concordance in these two brain areas. The concordant signaling pathways with relevance to PD pathogenesis were e.g. axonal guidance signaling, Wnt/?-catenin signaling, as well as pathways not previously linked to PD, e.g. basal cell carcinoma, human embryonic stem cell pluripotency and role of macrophages, fibroblasts and endothelial cells in rheumatoid arthritis. Human PD pathways previously identified by expression analysis, concordant with VMB pathways identified in our study were axonal guidance signaling, Wnt/?-catenin signaling, IL-6 signaling, ephrin receptor signaling, TGF-? signaling, PPAR signaling and G-protein coupled receptor signaling. Human PD pathways concordant with the STR pathways in our study were Wnt/?-catenin signaling, axonal guidance signaling and G-protein coupled receptor signaling. Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor delta (Ppard) and G-Protein Coupled Receptors (GPCRs) were common genes in VMB and STR identified by network analysis. In conclusion, the pesticides PQ, PY and MNPQ elicit common signaling pathways in the VMB and STR in mice, which are concordant with known signaling pathways identified in human PD, suggesting that these pathways contribute to the pathogenesis of idiopathic PD. The analysis of these networks and pathways may therefore lead to improved understanding of disease pathogenesis, and potential novel therapeutic targets. PMID:22563483

Gollamudi, Seema; Johri, Ashu; Calingasan, Noel Y.; Yang, Lichuan; Elemento, Olivier; Beal, M. Flint

2012-01-01

41

A probabilistic approach to identify putative drug targets in biochemical networks  

PubMed Central

Network-based drug design holds great promise in clinical research as a way to overcome the limitations of traditional approaches in the development of drugs with high efficacy and low toxicity. This novel strategy aims to study how a biochemical network as a whole, rather than its individual components, responds to specific perturbations in different physiological conditions. Proteins exerting little control over normal cells and larger control over altered cells may be considered as good candidates for drug targets. The application of network-based drug design would greatly benefit from using an explicit computational model describing the dynamics of the system under investigation. However, creating a fully characterized kinetic model is not an easy task, even for relatively small networks, as it is still significantly hampered by the lack of data about kinetic mechanisms and parameters values. Here, we propose a Monte Carlo approach to identify the differences between flux control profiles of a metabolic network in different physiological states, when information about the kinetics of the system is partially or totally missing. Based on experimentally accessible information on metabolic phenotypes, we develop a novel method to determine probabilistic differences in the flux control coefficients between the two observable phenotypes. Knowledge of how differences in flux control are distributed among the different enzymatic steps is exploited to identify points of fragility in one of the phenotypes. Using a prototypical cancerous phenotype as an example, we demonstrate how our approach can assist researchers in developing compounds with high efficacy and low toxicity. PMID:21123256

Murabito, Ettore; Smallbone, Kieran; Swinton, Jonathan; Westerhoff, Hans V.; Steuer, Ralf

2011-01-01

42

A cross-study gene set enrichment analysis identifies critical pathways in endometriosis  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Endometriosis is an enigmatic disease. Gene expression profiling of endometriosis has been used in several studies, but few studies went further to classify subtypes of endometriosis based on expression patterns and to identify possible pathways involved in endometriosis. Some of the observed pathways are more inconsistent between the studies, and these candidate pathways presumably only represent a fraction of

Hongbo Zhao; Qishan Wang; Chunyan Bai; Kan He; Yuchun Pan

2009-01-01

43

Biochemical Pathways: An Atlas of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (edited by Gerhard Michal)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

For decades, a wall chart detailing living organisms' metabolic pathways has been a fixture in many classrooms and laboratories where biochemistry is taught. One of the most popular of those charts first appeared 30 years ago. Now its editor, Gerhard Michal, has produced a book that summarizes metabolism (broadly defined) in graphical and textual formats. The book retains the elegance of the chart. Names of molecules are printed in a crisp, easy-to-read font, and structural formulas are shown with exemplary clarity. Color coding serves multiple purposes: to differentiate enzymes, substrates, cofactors, and effector molecules; to indicate in which group or groups of organisms a reaction has been observed; and to distinguish enzymatic reactions from regulatory effects. The primary advantage of presenting this information in book format is immediately apparent. A typical metabolic chart covers about 2 m2; the book has a total surface area nearly 10 times greater. The extra space is used to add explanatory text to the figures and to include many topics not covered by the traditional definition of metabolism. Examples include replication, transcription, translation, reaction mechanisms for proteolytic enzymes, and the role of chaperones in protein folding. Illustrating these topics is not as straightforward as delineating a metabolic pathway, but the author has done an admirable job of designing figures that clarify these and other aspects of biochemistry and complement the accompanying text. A potential deficiency of book format is the inability to clearly show links between different realms of metabolism: carbohydrate and amino acid pathways, for example. The book overcomes this problem in two ways. A diagrammatic overview of metabolism (with references to applicable sections of the book) is printed inside its front cover, and key compounds (pyruvate, for example) have a distinctive green background to provide a visual link between pathways. (The author compares this feature to the hyperlinks in an electronic document.) The book's index is comprehensive and useful. Entries for "phenylketonuria" and "sickle cell anemia", for example, lead to commendably concise summaries of these hereditary diseases (and the relevant metabolic pathway, in the former case). Looking up a specific molecule, however, is less helpful. The listing for fumarate hydratase, a citric acid cycle enzyme, directs the reader to the chapter on special bacterial metabolism but not to the section on the citric acid cycle itself. Literature references are included at the end of each section and are mainly from the 1990s, but they could be more useful. A long section on heme proteins, for example, concludes with eight citations, but their titles are not included, so it is impossible to determine what topic each one addresses. This book will be most useful to those with a good understanding of the fundamentals of biochemistry. Some of the information it presents could easily confuse less experienced readers. For example, it classifies selenocysteine as a standard amino acid in a figure but not in the accompanying text. In the diagram of anaerobic glycolysis, a double-headed arrow for the hexokinase reaction reinforces the frustratingly common student misperception that the phosphoryl group of glucose-6-phosphate can be used to phosphorylate ADP. Biochemical Pathways compiles a large amount of information in a single source. Its good index and clear, concise text and diagrams should make it a reliable way of gaining insight into many biochemical topics. With a price similar to that of most textbooks, it merits a place in the libraries of individuals and academic departments that teach biochemistry.

Voige, Reviewed By William H.

2000-02-01

44

Identifiability and inference of pathway motifs by epistasis analysis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The accuracy of genetic network inference is limited by the assumptions used to determine if one hypothetical model is better than another in explaining experimental observations. Most previous work on epistasis analysis—in which one attempts to infer pathway relationships by determining equivalences among traits following mutations—has been based on Boolean or linear models. Here, we delineate the ultimate limits of epistasis-based inference by systematically surveying all two-gene network motifs and use symbolic algebra with arbitrary regulation functions to examine trait equivalences. Our analysis divides the motifs into equivalence classes, where different genetic perturbations result in indistinguishable experimental outcomes. We demonstrate that this partitioning can reveal important information about network architecture, and show, using simulated data, that it greatly improves the accuracy of genetic network inference methods. Because of the minimal assumptions involved, equivalence partitioning has broad applicability for gene network inference.

Phenix, Hilary; Perkins, Theodore; Kærn, Mads

2013-06-01

45

Biochemical assays for identifying seeds of lodgepole pine and other conifers fed on by Leptoglossus occidentalis Heidemann (Hemiptera: Coreidae)  

Microsoft Academic Search

Radiography is a valuable tool for assessing quality of conifer seeds, but it cannot differentiate between aborted seeds and seeds that have been emptied by western conifer seed bug (Leptoglossus occidentalis Heidemann) feeding. We tested three biochemical marker-based assays that were developed to identify L. occidentalis damage to seeds of Douglas-fir, Pseudostuga menziesii (Mirb.) Franco, for their use in lodgepole

Cameron G. Lait; Sarah L. Bates; Karen K. Morrissette; John H. Borden; Allison R. Kermode

2001-01-01

46

A Three Stage Integrative Pathway Search ( TIPS © ) framework to identify toxicity relevant genes and pathways  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  The ability to obtain profiles of gene expressions, proteins and metabolites with the advent of high throughput technologies\\u000a has advanced the study of pathway and network reconstruction. Genome-wide network reconstruction requires either interaction\\u000a measurements or large amount of perturbation data, often not available for mammalian cell systems. To overcome these shortcomings,\\u000a we developed a Three Stage Integrative Pathway Search (TIPS

Zheng Li; Shireesh Srivastava; Sheenu Mittal; Xuerui Yang; Lufang Sheng; Christina Chan

2007-01-01

47

Receptor-Drug Interaction: Europium Employment for Studying the Biochemical Pathway of G-Protein-Coupled Receptor Activation  

PubMed Central

In medicinal chemistry field, the biochemical pathways, involved in 7-transmembrane domains G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) activation, are commonly studied to establish the activity of ligands towards GPCRs. The most studied steps are the measurement of activated GTP-? subunit and stimulated intracellular cAMP. At the present, many researchers defined agonist or antagonist activity of potential GPCRs drugs employing [35S]GTP?S or [3H]cAMP as probes. Recently, the corresponding lanthanide labels Eu-GTP and Eu-cAMP as alternative to radiochemicals have been developed because they are highly sensitive, easy to automate, easily synthesized, they display a much longer shelf-life and they can be used in multilabel experiments. In the present review, the receptor-drug interaction by europium employment for studying the biochemical pathway of GPCR activation has been focused. Moreover, comparative studies between lanthanide label probes and the corresponding radiolabeled compounds have been carried out. PMID:18350113

Antonio, Colabufo Nicola; Grazia, Perrone Maria; Marialessandra, Contino; Francesco, Berardi; Roberto, Perrone

2007-01-01

48

Study of Biochemical Pathways and Enzymes Involved in Pyrene Degradation by Mycobacterium sp. Strain KMS?  

PubMed Central

Pyrene degradation is known in bacteria. In this study, Mycobacterium sp. strain KMS was used to study the metabolites produced during, and enzymes involved in, pyrene degradation. Several key metabolites, including pyrene-4,5-dione, cis-4,5-pyrene-dihydrodiol, phenanthrene-4,5-dicarboxylic acid, and 4-phenanthroic acid, were identified during pyrene degradation. Pyrene-4,5-dione, which accumulates as an end product in some gram-negative bacterial cultures, was further utilized and degraded by Mycobacterium sp. strain KMS. Enzymes involved in pyrene degradation by Mycobacterium sp. strain KMS were studied, using 2-D gel electrophoresis. The first protein in the catabolic pathway, aromatic-ring-hydroxylating dioxygenase, which oxidizes pyrene to cis-4,5-pyrene-dihydrodiol, was induced with the addition of pyrene and pyrene-4,5-dione to the cultures. The subcomponents of dioxygenase, including the alpha and beta subunits, 4Fe-4S ferredoxin, and the Rieske (2Fe-2S) region, were all induced. Other proteins responsible for further pyrene degradation, such as dihydrodiol dehydrogenase, oxidoreductase, and epoxide hydrolase, were also found to be significantly induced by the presence of pyrene and pyrene-4,5-dione. Several nonpathway-related proteins, including sterol-binding protein and cytochrome P450, were induced. A pyrene degradation pathway for Mycobacterium sp. strain KMS was proposed and confirmed by proteomic study by identifying almost all the enzymes required during the initial steps of pyrene degradation. PMID:17041157

Liang, Yanna; Gardner, Dale R.; Miller, Charles D.; Chen, Dong; Anderson, Anne J.; Weimer, Bart C.; Sims, Ronald C.

2006-01-01

49

Results Towards Identifiability Properties of Biochemical Reaction Networks Marcello Farina, Rolf Findeisen, Eric Bullinger,  

E-print Network

and analysis. This awareness has lead to the research direction of systems biology [12], [24]. One Findeisen, Eric Bullinger, Sergio Bittanti, Frank Allgöwer, Peter Wellstead Abstract-- In this paper we encountered in systems biology. Specifically, we are interested in deriving conditions on the biochemical

Sontag, Eduardo

50

Studies of the lamin proteinase reveal multiple parallel biochemical pathways during apoptotic execution.  

PubMed Central

Although specific proteinases play a critical role in the active phase of apoptosis, their substrates are largely unknown. We previously identified poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) as an apoptosis-associated substrate for proteinase(s) related to interleukin 1 beta-converting enzyme (ICE). Now we have used a cell-free system to characterize proteinase(s) that cleave the nuclear lamins during apoptosis. Lamin cleavage during apoptosis requires the action of a second ICE-like enyzme, which exhibits kinetics of cleavage and a profile of sensitivity to specific inhibitors that is distinct from the PARP proteinase. Thus, multiple ICE-like enzymes are required for apoptotic events in these cell-free extracts. Inhibition of the lamin proteinase with tosyllysine "chloromethyl ketone" blocks nuclear apoptosis prior to the packaging of condensed chromatin into apoptotic bodies. Under these conditions, the nuclear DNA is fully cleaved to a nucleosomal ladder. Our studies reveal that the lamin proteinase and the fragmentation nuclease function in independent parallel pathways during the final stages of apoptotic execution. Neither pathway alone is sufficient for completion of nuclear apoptosis. Instead, the various activities cooperate to drive the disassembly of the nucleus. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7568069

Lazebnik, Y A; Takahashi, A; Moir, R D; Goldman, R D; Poirier, G G; Kaufmann, S H; Earnshaw, W C

1995-01-01

51

Using soil moisture and spatial yield patterns to identify subsurface flow pathways.  

PubMed

Subsurface soil water dynamics can influence crop growth and the fate of surface-applied fertilizers and pesticides. Recently, a method was proposed using only ground-penetrating radar (GPR) and digital elevation maps (DEMs) to identify locations where subsurface water converged into discrete pathways. For this study, the GPR protocol for identifying horizontal subsurface flow pathways was extended to a 3.2-ha field, uncertainty is discussed, and soil moisture and yield patterns are presented as confirming evidence of the extent of the subsurface flow pathways. Observed soil water contents supported the existence of discrete preferential funnel flow processes occurring near the GPR-identified preferential flow pathways. Soil moisture also played a critical role in the formation of corn (Zea mays L.) grain yield patterns with yield spatial patterns being similar for mild and severe drought conditions. A buffer zone protocol was introduced that allowed the impact of subsurface flow pathways on corn grain yield to be quantified. Results indicate that when a GPR-identified subsurface clay layer was within 2 m of the soil surface, there was a beneficial impact on yield during a drought year. Furthermore, the buffer zone analysis demonstrated that corn grain yields decreased as the horizontal distance from the GPR-identified subsurface flow pathways increased during a drought year. Averaged real-time soil moisture contents at 0.1 m also decreased with increasing distance from the GPR-identified flow pathways. This research suggests that subsurface flow pathways exist and influence soil moisture and corn grain yield patterns. PMID:15647558

Gish, T J; Walthall, C L; Daughtry, C S T; Kung, K-J S

2005-01-01

52

Genomic, Proteomic, and Biochemical Analysis of the Organohalide Respiratory Pathway in Desulfitobacterium dehalogenans.  

PubMed

Desulfitobacterium dehalogenans is able to grow by organohalide respiration using 3-chloro-4-hydroxyphenyl acetate (Cl-OHPA) as an electron acceptor. We used a combination of genome sequencing, biochemical analysis of redox active components, and shotgun proteomics to study elements of the organohalide respiratory electron transport chain. The genome of Desulfitobacterium dehalogenans JW/IU-DC1(T) consists of a single circular chromosome of 4,321,753 bp with a GC content of 44.97%. The genome contains 4,252 genes, including six rRNA operons and six predicted reductive dehalogenases. One of the reductive dehalogenases, CprA, is encoded by a well-characterized cprTKZEBACD gene cluster. Redox active components were identified in concentrated suspensions of cells grown on formate and Cl-OHPA or formate and fumarate, using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), visible spectroscopy, and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis of membrane extracts. In cell suspensions, these components were reduced upon addition of formate and oxidized after addition of Cl-OHPA, indicating involvement in organohalide respiration. Genome analysis revealed genes that likely encode the identified components of the electron transport chain from formate to fumarate or Cl-OHPA. Data presented here suggest that the first part of the electron transport chain from formate to fumarate or Cl-OHPA is shared. Electrons are channeled from an outward-facing formate dehydrogenase via menaquinones to a fumarate reductase located at the cytoplasmic face of the membrane. When Cl-OHPA is the terminal electron acceptor, electrons are transferred from menaquinones to outward-facing CprA, via an as-yet-unidentified membrane complex, and potentially an extracellular flavoprotein acting as an electron shuttle between the quinol dehydrogenase membrane complex and CprA. PMID:25512312

Kruse, Thomas; van de Pas, Bram A; Atteia, Ariane; Krab, Klaas; Hagen, Wilfred R; Goodwin, Lynne; Chain, Patrick; Boeren, Sjef; Maphosa, Farai; Schraa, Gosse; de Vos, Willem M; van der Oost, John; Smidt, Hauke; Stams, Alfons J M

2015-03-01

53

Gene expression profiling identifies emerging oncogenic pathways operating in extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma, nasal-type  

E-print Network

1 Gene expression profiling identifies emerging oncogenic pathways operating in extranodal NK in the frequently deleted 6q21 region. This study highlights emerging oncogenic pathways in NKTCL and identifies

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

54

IndividualizedPath: identifying genetic alterations contributing to the dysfunctional pathways in glioblastoma individuals.  

PubMed

Due to the extensive complexity and high genetic heterogeneity of genetic alterations in cancer, comprehensively depicting the molecular mechanisms of cancer remains difficult. Characterizing personalized pathogenesis in cancer individuals can help to reveal new details of the complex mechanisms. In this study, we proposed an integrative method called IndividualizedPath to identify genetic alterations and their downstream risk pathways from the perspective of individuals through combining the DNA copy number, gene expression data and topological structures of biological pathways. By applying the method to TCGA glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) samples, we identified 394 gene-pathway pairs in 252 GBM individuals. We found that genes with copy number alterations showed high heterogeneity across GBM individuals, whereas they affected relatively consistent biological pathways. A global landscape of gene-pathway pairs showed that EGFR linked with multiple cancer-related biological pathways confers the highest risk of GBM. GBM individuals with MET-pathway pairs showed significantly shorter survival times than those with only MET amplification. Importantly, we found that the same risk pathways were affected by different genes in distinct groups of GBM individuals with a significant pattern of mutual exclusivity. Similarly, GBM subtype analysis revealed some subtype-specific gene-pathway pairs. In addition, we found that some rare copy number alterations had a large effect on contribution to numerous cancer-related pathways. In summary, our method offers the possibility to identify personalized cancer mechanisms, which can be applied to other types of cancer through the web server (http://bioinfo.hrbmu.edu.cn/IndividualizedPath/). PMID:24911613

Ping, Yanyan; Zhang, Hongyi; Deng, Yulan; Wang, Li; Zhao, Hongying; Pang, Lin; Fan, Huihui; Xu, Chaohan; Li, Feng; Zhang, Yong; Gong, Yonghui; Xiao, Yun; Li, Xia

2014-08-01

55

The Use of Functional Chemical-Protein Associations to Identify Multi-Pathway Renoprotectants  

PubMed Central

Typically, most nephropathies can be categorized as complex human diseases in which the cumulative effect of multiple minor genes, combined with environmental and lifestyle factors, determines the disease phenotype. Thus, multi-target drugs would be more likely to facilitate comprehensive renoprotection than single-target agents. In this study, functional chemical-protein association analysis was performed to retrieve multi-target drugs of high pathway wideness from the STITCH 3.1 database. Pathway wideness of a drug evaluated the efficiency of regulation of Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathways in quantity. We identified nine experimentally validated renoprotectants that exerted remarkable impact on KEGG pathways by targeting a limited number of proteins. We selected curcumin as an illustrative compound to display the advantage of multi-pathway drugs on renoprotection. We compared curcumin with hemin, an agonist of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), which significantly affects only one KEGG pathway, porphyrin and chlorophyll metabolism (adjusted p?=?1.5×10?5). At the same concentration (10 µM), both curcumin and hemin equivalently mitigated oxidative stress in H2O2-treated glomerular mesangial cells. The benefit of using hemin was derived from its agonistic effect on HO-1, providing relief from oxidative stress. Selective inhibition of HO-1 completely blocked the action of hemin but not that of curcumin, suggesting simultaneous multi-pathway intervention by curcumin. Curcumin also increased cellular autophagy levels, enhancing its protective effect; however, hemin had no effects. Based on the fact that the dysregulation of multiple pathways is implicated in the etiology of complex diseases, we proposed a feasible method for identifying multi-pathway drugs from compounds with validated targets. Our efforts will help identify multi-pathway agents capable of providing comprehensive protection against renal injuries. PMID:24830678

Xu, Jia; Meng, Kexin; Zhang, Rui; Yang, He; Liao, Chang; Zhu, Wenliang; Jiao, Jundong

2014-01-01

56

Targeting the Wnt pathway in zebrafish as a screening method to identify novel therapeutic compounds.  

PubMed

Activating mutations in the Wnt signaling pathway account for the initiation of greater than 90% of all colorectal cancers and this pathway has been implicated in numerous other diseases. Therefore, identifying small molecule inhibitors of this pathway is of critical importance towards identifying clinically relevant drugs. Numerous screens have been employed to identify therapeutic reagents, but none have made it to advanced clinical trials, suggesting that traditional screening methods are ineffective at identifying clinically relevant targets. Here, we describe a novel in vivo screen to identify small molecule inhibitors of the Wnt pathway. Specifically, treatment of zebrafish embryos with LiCl inhibits GSK3 kinase function, resulting in hyperactivation of the signaling pathway and an eyeless phenotype at 1 day post fertilization. Using the small molecule XAV939, a known inhibitor of Wnt signaling, we rescued the LiCl induced eyeless phenotype, confirming efficacy of the screen. We next tested our assay with 400 known small molecule kinase inhibitors, none of which should inhibit Wnt signaling below the level of GSK3 based on their known targets. Accordingly, none of these small molecules rescued the eyeless phenotype, which demonstrates the stringency of the assay. However, several of these small molecule kinase inhibitors did generate a non-Wnt phenotype in accordance with the kinase they targeted. Therefore, combining the efficacy, sensitivity, and stringency of this preliminary screen, this model will provide an alternative to the traditional in vitro screen, generating potentially clinical relevant drugs in a rapid and cost-effective way. PMID:24414478

Robertson, Joshua K; Danzmann, Kestral; Charles, Sherise; Blake, Katherine; Olivares, Annia; Bamikole, Solape; Olson, Meghan; Van Raay, Terence J

2014-02-01

57

Application of an integrated physical and functional screening approach to identify inhibitors of the Wnt pathway  

Microsoft Academic Search

Large-scale proteomic approaches have been used to study signaling pathways. However, identification of biologically relevant hits from a single screen remains challenging due to limitations inherent in each individual approach. To overcome these limitations, we implemented an integrated, multi-dimensional approach and used it to identify Wnt pathway modulators. The LUMIER protein–protein interaction mapping method was used in conjunction with two

Bryan W Miller; Garnet Lau; Chris Grouios; Emanuela Mollica; Miriam Barrios-Rodiles; Yongmei Liu; Alessandro Datti; Quaid Morris; Jeffrey L Wrana; Liliana Attisano

2009-01-01

58

Stratified Pathway Analysis to Identify Gene Sets Associated with Oral Contraceptive Use and Breast Cancer  

PubMed Central

Cancer biomarker discovery can facilitate drug development, improve staging of patients, and predict patient prognosis. Because cancer is the result of many interacting genes, analysis based on a set of genes with related biological functions or pathways may be more informative than single gene-based analysis for cancer biomarker discovery. The relevant pathways thus identified may help characterize different aspects of molecular phenotypes related to the tumor. Although it is well known that cancer patients may respond to the same treatment differently because of clinical variables and variation of molecular phenotypes, this patient heterogeneity has not been explicitly considered in pathway analysis in the literature. We hypothesize that combining pathway and patient clinical information can more effectively identify relevant pathways pertinent to specific patient subgroups, leading to better diagnosis and treatment. In this article, we propose to perform stratified pathway analysis based on clinical information from patients. In contrast to analysis using all the patients, this more focused analysis has the potential to reveal subgroup-specific pathways that may lead to more biological insights into disease etiology and treatment response. As an illustration, the power of our approach is demonstrated through its application to a breast cancer dataset in which the patients are stratified according to their oral contraceptive use. PMID:25574128

Pang, Herbert; Zhao, Hongyu

2014-01-01

59

Identifying Differences Between Biochemical Failure and Cure: Incidence Rates and Predictors  

SciTech Connect

Background: Patients treated with radiation therapy (RT) for prostate cancer were evaluated to estimate the length of time required to document biochemical cure (BC) after treatment and the variables associated with long-term treatment efficacy. Patients and Methods: 2,100 patients received RT alone for localized prostate carcinoma (external-beam RT, n = 1,504; brachytherapy alone, n = 241; or brachytherapy + pelvic radiation, n = 355). The median external-beam dose was 68.4 Gy, and the median follow-up time was 8.6 years. Biochemical failure (BF) was defined according to the Phoenix definition. Results: Biochemical failure was experienced by 685 patients (32.6%). The median times to BF for low-, intermediate-, and high-risk groups were 6.0, 5.6, and 4.5 years respectively (p < 0.001). The average annual incidence rates of BF for years 1-5, 5-10,11-15, and 16-20 in low-risk patients were 2.0%, 2.0%, 0.3%, and 0.06% (p < 0.001); for intermediate-risk patients, 4%, 3%, 0.3%, and 0% (p < 0.001); and for high-risk patients, 10.0%, 5.0%, 0.3%, and 0.3% (p < 0.001). After 5 years of treatment, 36.9% of all patients experienced BF. The percentage of total failures occurring during years 1-5, 5-10, 11-15, and 16-20 were 48.7%, 43.5%, 6.5%, and 1.3% for low-risk patients; 64.0%, 32.2%, 3.8%, and 0% for intermediate-risk patients; and 71.9%, 25.9%, 1.1%, and 1.1% for high-risk patients, respectively. Increasing time to nadir was associated with increased time to BF. On multivariate analysis, factors significantly associated with 10-year BC included prostate-specific antigen nadir and time to nadir. Conclusions: The incidence rates for BF did not plateau until later than 10 years after treatment, suggesting that extended follow-up time is required to monitor patients after treatment. Prostate-specific antigen nadir and time to nadir have the strongest association with long-term BC.

Vicini, Frank A., E-mail: fvicini@beaumont.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Shah, Chirag; Kestin, Larry; Ghilezan, Mihai; Krauss, Daniel; Ye Hong; Brabbins, Donald; Martinez, Alvaro A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States)

2011-11-15

60

A circuit model for Biochemical Cell signaling receptor protein and phosphorylation cascade pathway  

Microsoft Academic Search

Communication between cells in multicellular organisms such as animals, humans and plants is essential for co-ordinating the organismic activities of fertilization, growth, survival and reproduction. This bio-chemical communication between trillions of cells in organisms can be more complex than the Internet. This paper develops a CMOS circuit model of signal reception and signal transduction within a cell in response to

S. M. Rezaul Hasan

2008-01-01

61

Bacterial cytological profiling rapidly identifies the cellular pathways targeted by antibacterial molecules  

PubMed Central

Identifying the mechanism of action for antibacterial compounds is essential for understanding how bacteria interact with one another and with other cell types and for antibiotic discovery efforts, but determining a compound's mechanism of action remains a serious challenge that limits both basic research and antibacterial discovery programs. Here, we show that bacterial cytological profiling (BCP) is a rapid and powerful approach for identifying the cellular pathway affected by antibacterial molecules. BCP can distinguish between inhibitors that affect different cellular pathways as well as different targets within the same pathway. We use BCP to demonstrate that spirohexenolide A, a spirotetronate that is active against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, rapidly collapses the proton motive force. BCP offers a simple, one-step assay that can be broadly applied, solving the longstanding problem of how to rapidly determine the cellular target of thousands of compounds. PMID:24046367

Nonejuie, Poochit; Burkart, Michael; Pogliano, Kit; Pogliano, Joe

2013-01-01

62

INTEGRATIVE NETWORK ANALYSIS TO IDENTIFY ABERRANT PATHWAY NETWORKS IN OVARIAN CANCER  

PubMed Central

Ovarian cancer is often called the ‘silent killer’ since it is difficult to have early detection and prognosis. Understanding the biological mechanism related to ovarian cancer becomes extremely important for the purpose of treatment. We propose an integrative framework to identify pathway related networks based on large-scale TCGA copy number data and gene expression profiles. The integrative approach first detects highly conserved copy number altered genes and regards them as seed genes, and then applies a network-based method to identify subnetworks that can differentiate gene expression patterns between different phenotypes of ovarian cancer patients. The identified subnetworks are further validated on an independent gene expression data set using a network-based classification method. The experimental results show that our approach can not only achieve good prediction performance across different data sets, but also identify biological meaningful subnetworks involved in many signaling pathways related to ovarian cancer. PMID:22174260

CHEN, LI; GU, JINGHUA; WANG, YUE; ZHANG, ZHEN; WANG, TIAN-LI; SHIH, IE-MING

2013-01-01

63

Biochemical pathways analysis of microarray results: regulation of myogenesis in pigs  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Combining microarray results and biological pathway information will add insight into biological processes. Pathway information is widely available in databases through the internet. Mammalian muscle formation has been previously studied using microarray technology in pigs because these animals are an interesting animal model for muscle formation due to selection for increased muscle mass. Results indicated regulation of the expression

Marinus FW te Pas; Ina Hulsegge; Albart Coster; Marco H Pool; Henri H Heuven; Luc LG Janss

2007-01-01

64

IDENTIFYING DISEASE RESISTANCE GENES AND PATHWAYS THROUGH HOST-PATHOGEN PROTEIN INTERACTIONS  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

A major objective of both animal and plant genomics research is to identify disease resistance genes and pathways. Popular approaches to achieve this goal include candidate gene testing, genome-wide QTL screens, and DNA microarrays. We argue that the two-hybrid assay, which detects protein-protein...

65

Combinatorial drug screening identifies compensatory pathway interactions and adaptive resistance mechanisms  

PubMed Central

Constitutively activated signaling molecules are often the primary drivers of malignancy, and are favored targets for therapeutic intervention. However, the effectiveness of targeted inhibition of cell signaling can be blunted by compensatory signaling which generates adaptive resistance mechanisms and reduces therapeutic responses. Therefore, it is important to identify and target these compensatory pathways with combinations of targeted agents to achieve durable clinical benefit. In this report, we demonstrate the use of high-throughput combinatorial drug screening as a discovery tool to identify compensatory pathways that generate resistance to the cytotoxic effects of targeted therapy. We screened 420 drug combinations in 14 different cell lines representing three cancer lineages, and assessed the ability of each combination to cause synergistic cytotoxicity. Drug substitution studies were used to validate the functionally important drug targets. Of the 84 combinations that caused robust synergy in multiple cell lines, none were synergistic in more than half of the lines tested, and we observed no pattern of lineage specificity in the observed synergies. This reflects the plasticity of cell signaling networks, even among cell lines of the same tissue of origin. Mechanistic analysis of one novel synergistic combination identified in the screen, the multi-kinase inhibitor Ro31-8220 and lapatinib, demonstrated compensatory crosstalk between the p70S6 kinase and EGF receptor pathways. In addition, we identified BAD as a node of convergence between these two pathways that may be playing a role in the enhanced apoptosis observed upon combination treatment. PMID:23599172

Axelrod, Mark; Gordon, Vicki L.; Conaway, Mark; Tarcsafalvi, Adel; Neitzke, Daniel J.; Gioeli, Daniel; Weber, Michael J.

2013-01-01

66

Techno-economic comparison of biomass-to-transportation fuels via pyrolysis, gasification, and biochemical pathways  

Microsoft Academic Search

This analysis compares capital and operating cost for six near-term biomass-to-liquid fuels technology scenarios representing three conversion platforms: pyrolysis, gasification, and biochemical. These analyses employed similar assumptions to allow comparisons among the results. Most prominently, the feedstock is assumed to be corn stover and plant capacity was 2000tonne\\/day for each plant. There are large differences in the total capital investments

Robert P. Anex; Andy Aden; Feroz Kabir Kazi; Joshua Fortman; Ryan M. Swanson; Mark M. Wright; Justinus A. Satrio; Robert C. Brown; Daren E. Daugaard; Alex Platon; Geetha Kothandaraman; David D. Hsu; Abhijit Dutta

2010-01-01

67

Identifying novel glioma associated pathways based on systems biology level meta-analysis  

PubMed Central

Background With recent advances in microarray technology, including genomics, proteomics, and metabolomics, it brings a great challenge for integrating this "-omics" data to analysis complex disease. Glioma is an extremely aggressive and lethal form of brain tumor, and thus the study of the molecule mechanism underlying glioma remains very important. To date, most studies focus on detecting the differentially expressed genes in glioma. However, the meta-analysis for pathway analysis based on multiple microarray datasets has not been systematically pursued. Results In this study, we therefore developed a systems biology based approach by integrating three types of omics data to identify common pathways in glioma. Firstly, the meta-analysis has been performed to study the overlapping of signatures at different levels based on the microarray gene expression data of glioma. Among these gene expression datasets, 12 pathways were found in GeneGO database that shared by four stages. Then, microRNA expression profiles and ChIP-seq data were integrated for the further pathway enrichment analysis. As a result, we suggest 5 of these pathways could be served as putative pathways in glioma. Among them, the pathway of TGF-beta-dependent induction of EMT via SMAD is of particular importance. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that the meta-analysis based on systems biology level provide a more useful approach to study the molecule mechanism of complex disease. The integration of different types of omics data, including gene expression microarrays, microRNA and ChIP-seq data, suggest some common pathways correlated with glioma. These findings will offer useful potential candidates for targeted therapeutic intervention of glioma. PMID:24565222

2013-01-01

68

Identifying a Polymorphic ‘Switch’ That Influences miRNAs' Regulation of a Myasthenia Gravis Risk Pathway  

PubMed Central

The significant roles of genetic variants in myasthenia gravis (MG) pathogenesis have been demonstrated in many studies, and recently it has been revealed that aberrant level/regulation of microRNAs (miRNAs) might contribute to the initiation and progression of MG. However, the dysfunction of miRNA associated with single nucleotide polymorphisms (miRSNPs) has not been well investigated in MG. In this study, we created a contemporary catalog of 89 MG risk genes via manual literature-mining. Based on this risk gene catalog, we obtained 18 MG risk pathways. Furthermore, we identified 93 miRNAs that target MG risk pathways and revealed the miRSNPs ‘switches’ in miRNA regulation in the MG risk pathways by integrating the database information of miRSNPs. We also constructed a miRNA-mediated SNP switching pathway network (MSSPN) to intuitively analyze miRNA regulation of MG risk pathways and the relationship of the polymorphism ‘switch’ with these changes in regulation. Moreover, we carried out in-depth dissection on the correlation between hsa05200 (pathway in cancer) and MG development, and elaborated the significance of 4 high-risk genes. By network analysis and literature mining, we proposed a potential mechanism of miRSNPs?gene?pathway effects on MG pathogenesis, especially for rs28457673 (miR-15/16/195/424/497 family)?IGF1R?hsa05200 (pathway in cancer). Therefore, our studies have revealed a functional role for genetic modulators in MG pathogenesis at a systemic level, which could be informative for further miRNA and miRSNPs studies in MG. PMID:25118158

Cao, Yuze; Ning, Shangwei; Zhang, Huixue; Chen, Lixia; Li, Ronghong; Tian, Qinghua; Wang, Lihua; Wang, Weizhi; Li, Xia

2014-01-01

69

Quantitative gene expression assessment identifies appropriate cell line models for individual cervical cancer pathways  

PubMed Central

Background Cell lines have been used to study cancer for decades, but truly quantitative assessment of their performance as models is often lacking. We used gene expression profiling to quantitatively assess the gene expression of nine cell line models of cervical cancer. Results We find a wide variation in the extent to which different cell culture models mimic late-stage invasive cervical cancer biopsies. The lowest agreement was from monolayer HeLa cells, a common cervical cancer model; the highest agreement was from primary epithelial cells, C4-I, and C4-II cell lines. In addition, HeLa and SiHa cell lines cultured in an organotypic environment increased their correlation to cervical cancer significantly. We also find wide variation in agreement when we considered how well individual biological pathways model cervical cancer. Cell lines with an anti-correlation to cervical cancer were also identified and should be avoided. Conclusion Using gene expression profiling and quantitative analysis, we have characterized nine cell lines with respect to how well they serve as models of cervical cancer. Applying this method to individual pathways, we identified the appropriateness of particular cell lines for studying specific pathways in cervical cancer. This study will allow researchers to choose a cell line with the highest correlation to cervical cancer at a pathway level. This method is applicable to other cancers and could be used to identify the appropriate cell line and growth condition to employ when studying other cancers. PMID:17493265

Carlson, Mark W; Iyer, Vishwanath R; Marcotte, Edward M

2007-01-01

70

How Can Men Destined for Biochemical Failure After Androgen Deprivation and Radiotherapy Be Identified Earlier?  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The significance of prostate-specific antigen (PSA) increases during the recovery of androgen after androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) and radiotherapy for prostate cancer is not well understood. This study sought to determine whether the initial PSA increase from undetectable after completion of all treatment predicts for eventual biochemical failure (BF). Methods and Materials: Between July 1992 and March 2004, 163 men with a Gleason score of 8-10 or initial PSA level >20 ng/mL, or Stage T3 prostate cancer were treated with radiotherapy (median dose, 76 Gy) and ADT and achieved an undetectable PSA level. The first detectable PSA level after the cessation of ADT was defined as the PSA sentinel rise (SR). A PSA-SR of >0.25, >0.5, >0.75, and >1.0 ng/mL was studied as predictors of BF (nadir plus 2 ng/mL). Cox proportional hazards models were used for univariate and multivariate analyses for BF adjusting for pretreatment differences in Gleason score, stage, PSA level (continuous), dose (continuous), and ADT duration (<12 vs. {>=}12 months). Results: Of the 163 men, 41 had BF after therapy. The median time to BF was 25 months (range, 4-96). The 5-year BF rate stratified by a PSA-SR of {<=}0.25 vs. >0.25 ng/mL was 28% vs. 43% (p = 0.02), {<=}0.5 vs. >0.5 ng/mL was 30% vs. 56% (p = 0.0003), {<=}0.75 vs. >0.75 ng/mL was 29% vs. 66% (p < 0.0001), and {<=}1.0 vs. >1.0 ng/mL was 29% vs. 75% (p < 0.0001). All four PSA-SRs were independently predictive of BF on multivariate analysis. Conclusion: The PSA-SR predicts for BF. A PSA-SR of >0.5 ng/mL can be used for early identification of men at greater risk of BF.

D'Ambrosio, David J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Ruth, Karen [Department of Biostatistics, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Horwitz, Eric M.; Uzzo, Robert G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Pollack, Alan [Department of Urologic Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Buyyounouski, Mark K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)], E-mail: mark.buyyounouski@fccc.edu

2008-04-01

71

Elucidation of the biochemical pathway of 2-phenylethanol from shikimic acid using isolated protoplasts of rose flowers.  

PubMed

The isolated protoplasts of rose flowers were used to investigate the metabolic pathway in rose flower leading from shikimic acid or L-phenylalanine (L-Phe) to 2-phenylethanol (2PE), a dominant volatile compound in hybrid roses such as Rosa damascena Mill., R. 'Hoh-Jun', and R. 'Yves Piaget'. Deuterium-labeled L-Phe ([2H8]L-Phe) was supplied to the protoplasts isolated from R. 'Yves Piaget' petals. The volatile end products ([2Hn]-2PE, n=6-8) and their related intermediates ([2Hn]phenylacetaldehyde, n=6-8) were detected in the protoplasts by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). In addition, we chemically synthesized [2,3,4,5,6-13C5]shikimic acid, a new stable isotopomer, to investigate the formation of 2PE from shikimic acid by GC-MS and nuclear magnetic resonance. We proposed the hypothetical biochemical pathway of 2PE from shikimic acid via chorismic acid, L-Phe, and phenylacetaldehyde. This protoplast system facilitates findings of metabolic intermediates and simplifies the complex branching biosynthetic pathways of floral scents to distinct individual events. PMID:19097671

Yang, Ziyin; Sakai, Miwa; Sayama, Hironori; Shimeno, Taku; Yamaguchi, Koji; Watanabe, Naoharu

2009-05-15

72

Genomic and Biochemical Analysis of Lipid Biosynthesis in the Unicellular Rhodophyte Cyanidioschyzon merolae: Lack of a Plastidic Desaturation Pathway Results in the Coupled Pathway of Galactolipid Synthesis? †  

PubMed Central

The acyl lipids making up the plastid membranes in plants and algae are highly enriched in polyunsaturated fatty acids and are synthesized by two distinct pathways, known as the prokaryotic and eukaryotic pathways, which are located within the plastids and the endoplasmic reticulum, respectively. Here we report the results of biochemical as well as genomic analyses of lipids and fatty acids in the unicellular rhodophyte Cyanidioschyzon merolae. All of the glycerolipids usually found in photosynthetic algae were found, such as mono- and digalactosyl diacylglycerol, sulfolipid, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, and phosphatidylinositol. However, the fatty acid composition was extremely simple. Only palmitic, stearic, oleic, and linoleic acids were found as major acids. In addition, 3-trans-hexadecanoic acid was found as a very minor component in phosphatidylglycerol. Unlike the case for most other photosynthetic eukaryotes, polyenoic fatty acids having three or more double bonds were not detected. These results suggest that polyunsaturated fatty acids are not necessary for photosynthesis in eukaryotes. Genomic analysis suggested that C. merolae lacks acyl lipid desaturases of cyanobacterial origin as well as stearoyl acyl carrier protein desaturase, both of which are major desaturases in plants and green algae. The results of labeling experiments with radioactive acetate showed that the desaturation leading to linoleic acid synthesis occurs on phosphatidylcholine located outside the plastids. Monogalactosyl diacylglycerol is therefore synthesized by the coupled pathway, using plastid-derived palmitic acid and endoplasmic reticulum-derived linoleic acid. These results highlight essential differences in lipid biosynthetic pathways between the red algae and the green lineage, which includes plants and green algae. PMID:17416897

Sato, Naoki; Moriyama, Takashi

2007-01-01

73

Genomic and biochemical analysis of lipid biosynthesis in the unicellular rhodophyte Cyanidioschyzon merolae: lack of a plastidic desaturation pathway results in the coupled pathway of galactolipid synthesis.  

PubMed

The acyl lipids making up the plastid membranes in plants and algae are highly enriched in polyunsaturated fatty acids and are synthesized by two distinct pathways, known as the prokaryotic and eukaryotic pathways, which are located within the plastids and the endoplasmic reticulum, respectively. Here we report the results of biochemical as well as genomic analyses of lipids and fatty acids in the unicellular rhodophyte Cyanidioschyzon merolae. All of the glycerolipids usually found in photosynthetic algae were found, such as mono- and digalactosyl diacylglycerol, sulfolipid, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, and phosphatidylinositol. However, the fatty acid composition was extremely simple. Only palmitic, stearic, oleic, and linoleic acids were found as major acids. In addition, 3-trans-hexadecanoic acid was found as a very minor component in phosphatidylglycerol. Unlike the case for most other photosynthetic eukaryotes, polyenoic fatty acids having three or more double bonds were not detected. These results suggest that polyunsaturated fatty acids are not necessary for photosynthesis in eukaryotes. Genomic analysis suggested that C. merolae lacks acyl lipid desaturases of cyanobacterial origin as well as stearoyl acyl carrier protein desaturase, both of which are major desaturases in plants and green algae. The results of labeling experiments with radioactive acetate showed that the desaturation leading to linoleic acid synthesis occurs on phosphatidylcholine located outside the plastids. Monogalactosyl diacylglycerol is therefore synthesized by the coupled pathway, using plastid-derived palmitic acid and endoplasmic reticulum-derived linoleic acid. These results highlight essential differences in lipid biosynthetic pathways between the red algae and the green lineage, which includes plants and green algae. PMID:17416897

Sato, Naoki; Moriyama, Takashi

2007-06-01

74

Simulated annealing based algorithm for identifying mutated driver pathways in cancer.  

PubMed

With the development of next-generation DNA sequencing technologies, large-scale cancer genomics projects can be implemented to help researchers to identify driver genes, driver mutations, and driver pathways, which promote cancer proliferation in large numbers of cancer patients. Hence, one of the remaining challenges is to distinguish functional mutations vital for cancer development, and filter out the unfunctional and random "passenger mutations." In this study, we introduce a modified method to solve the so-called maximum weight submatrix problem which is used to identify mutated driver pathways in cancer. The problem is based on two combinatorial properties, that is, coverage and exclusivity. Particularly, we enhance an integrative model which combines gene mutation and expression data. The experimental results on simulated data show that, compared with the other methods, our method is more efficient. Finally, we apply the proposed method on two real biological datasets. The results show that our proposed method is also applicable in real practice. PMID:24982873

Li, Hai-Tao; Zhang, Yu-Lang; Zheng, Chun-Hou; Wang, Hong-Qiang

2014-01-01

75

Evidence from Biochemical Pathways in Favor of Unfinished Evolution Rather than Intelligent Design  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An argument is made in favor of imperfect or unfinished evolution based on some metabolic pathways in which it seems that intelligent design would have done better. The case studies noted indicate the absence of highly intelligent design and are not intended as comprehensive collection but as a limited sample of inefficient situations in…

Behrman, Edward J.; Marzluf, George A.

2004-01-01

76

Sulfolobus acidocaldarius synthesizes UMP via a standard de novo pathway: results of biochemical-genetic study.  

PubMed Central

A genetic approach was used to establish the route of UMP biosynthesis in Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, a member of the hyperthermophilic division (the Crenarchaeota) of the Archaea domain. Pyrimidine auxotrophs of S. acidocaldarius DG6 were isolated by direct selection and by brute-force methods. Enzymatic assay of extracts from wild-type S. acidocaldarius, from pyrimidine auxotrophs, and from phenotypic revertants demonstrated that S. acidocaldarius synthesizes UMP via orotate in six enzymatic steps corresponding to the de novo pathway of other organisms. The results also show that a single carbamoyl phosphate synthetase supplies both the pyrimidine and arginine pathways of this organism. To gain similar insight into pyrimidine salvage pathway(s), prototrophic mutants resistant to toxic pyrimidine analogs were also isolated and characterized. The results suggest that a single class of mutants which had acquired elevated resistance to four different 5-fluoropyrimidines had been isolated. These fluoropyrimidine-resistant mutants appear to have a regulatory defect leading to overproduction of one or more endogenous pyrimidine compounds. Images PMID:8444810

Grogan, D W; Gunsalus, R P

1993-01-01

77

Method for identifying biochemical and chemical reactions and micromechanical processes using nanomechanical and electronic signal identification  

DOEpatents

A scanning probe microscope, such as an atomic force microscope (AFM) or a scanning tunneling microscope (STM), is operated in a stationary mode on a site where an activity of interest occurs to measure and identify characteristic time-varying micromotions caused by biological, chemical, mechanical, electrical, optical, or physical processes. The tip and cantilever assembly of an AFM is used as a micromechanical detector of characteristic micromotions transmitted either directly by a site of interest or indirectly through the surrounding medium. Alternatively, the exponential dependence of the tunneling current on the size of the gap in the STM is used to detect micromechanical movement. The stationary mode of operation can be used to observe dynamic biological processes in real time and in a natural environment, such as polymerase processing of DNA for determining the sequence of a DNA molecule.

Holzrichter, John F. (Berkeley, CA); Siekhaus, Wigbert J. (Berkeley, CA)

1997-01-01

78

Method for identifying biochemical and chemical reactions and micromechanical processes using nanomechanical and electronic signal identification  

DOEpatents

A scanning probe microscope, such as an atomic force microscope (AFM) or a scanning tunneling microscope (STM), is operated in a stationary mode on a site where an activity of interest occurs to measure and identify characteristic time-varying micromotions caused by biological, chemical, mechanical, electrical, optical, or physical processes. The tip and cantilever assembly of an AFM is used as a micromechanical detector of characteristic micromotions transmitted either directly by a site of interest or indirectly through the surrounding medium. Alternatively, the exponential dependence of the tunneling current on the size of the gap in the STM is used to detect micromechanical movement. The stationary mode of operation can be used to observe dynamic biological processes in real time and in a natural environment, such as polymerase processing of DNA for determining the sequence of a DNA molecule. 6 figs.

Holzrichter, J.F.; Siekhaus, W.J.

1997-04-15

79

A genome-wide RNA interference screen identifies two novel components of the metazoan secretory pathway.  

PubMed

Genetic screens in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae have identified many proteins involved in the secretory pathway, most of which have orthologues in higher eukaryotes. To investigate whether there are additional proteins that are required for secretion in metazoans but are absent from yeast, we used genome-wide RNA interference (RNAi) to look for genes required for secretion of recombinant luciferase from Drosophila S2 cells. This identified two novel components of the secretory pathway that are conserved from humans to plants. Gryzun is distantly related to, but distinct from, the Trs130 subunit of the TRAPP complex but is absent from S. cerevisiae. RNAi of human Gryzun (C4orf41) blocks Golgi exit. Kish is a small membrane protein with a previously uncharacterised orthologue in yeast. The screen also identified Drosophila orthologues of almost 60% of the yeast genes essential for secretion. Given this coverage, the small number of novel components suggests that contrary to previous indications the number of essential core components of the secretory pathway is not much greater in metazoans than in yeasts. PMID:19942856

Wendler, Franz; Gillingham, Alison K; Sinka, Rita; Rosa-Ferreira, Cláudia; Gordon, David E; Franch-Marro, Xavier; Peden, Andrew A; Vincent, Jean-Paul; Munro, Sean

2010-01-20

80

Gene Set Enrichment in eQTL Data Identifies Novel Annotations and Pathway Regulators  

PubMed Central

Genome-wide gene expression profiling has been extensively used to generate biological hypotheses based on differential expression. Recently, many studies have used microarrays to measure gene expression levels across genetic mapping populations. These gene expression phenotypes have been used for genome-wide association analyses, an analysis referred to as expression QTL (eQTL) mapping. Here, eQTL analysis was performed in adipose tissue from 28 inbred strains of mice. We focused our analysis on “trans-eQTL bands”, defined as instances in which the expression patterns of many genes were all associated to a common genetic locus. Genes comprising trans-eQTL bands were screened for enrichments in functional gene sets representing known biological pathways, and genes located at associated trans-eQTL band loci were considered candidate transcriptional modulators. We demonstrate that these patterns were enriched for previously characterized relationships between known upstream transcriptional regulators and their downstream target genes. Moreover, we used this strategy to identify both novel regulators and novel members of known pathways. Finally, based on a putative regulatory relationship identified in our analysis, we identified and validated a previously uncharacterized role for cyclin H in the regulation of oxidative phosphorylation. We believe that the specific molecular hypotheses generated in this study will reveal many additional pathway members and regulators, and that the analysis approaches described herein will be broadly applicable to other eQTL data sets. PMID:18464898

Wu, Chunlei; Delano, David L.; Mitro, Nico; Su, Stephen V.; Janes, Jeff; McClurg, Phillip; Batalov, Serge; Welch, Genevieve L.; Zhang, Jie; Orth, Anthony P.; Walker, John R.; Glynne, Richard J.; Cooke, Michael P.; Takahashi, Joseph S.; Shimomura, Kazuhiro; Kohsaka, Akira; Bass, Joseph; Saez, Enrique; Wiltshire, Tim; Su, Andrew I.

2008-01-01

81

The biochemical pathway for the breakdown of methyl cyanide (acetonitrile) in bacteria.  

PubMed Central

[2-14C]Methyl cyanide (acetonitrile) is metabolized to citrate, succinate, fumarate, malate, glutamate, pyrrolidonecarboxylic acid and aspartate. Non-radioactive acetamide and acetate compete with 14C from methyl cyanide, and [2-14C]acetate and [2-14C]methyl cyanide are metabolized at similar rates, giving identical products. This evidence, combined with the inhibitory effect of fluoroacetate and arsenite on methyl cyanide metabolism, indicates that the pathway is: methyl cyanide leads to acetamide leads to acetate leads to tricarboxylic acid-cycle intermediates. The pathway was investigated in a species of Pseudomonas (group III; N.C.I.B. 10477), but comparison of labelling patterns suggests that it also exists in several higher plants. PMID:985423

Firmin, J L; Gray, D O

1976-01-01

82

Transcriptomic and biochemical analyses identify a family of chlorhexidine efflux proteins  

PubMed Central

Chlorhexidine is widely used as an antiseptic or disinfectant in both hospital and community settings. A number of bacterial species display resistance to this membrane-active biocide. We examined the transcriptomic response of a representative nosocomial human pathogen, Acinetobacter baumannii, to chlorhexidine to identify the primary chlorhexidine resistance elements. The most highly up-regulated genes encoded components of a major multidrug efflux system, AdeAB. The next most highly overexpressed gene under chlorhexidine stress was annotated as encoding a hypothetical protein, named here as AceI. Orthologs of the aceI gene are conserved within the genomes of a broad range of proteobacterial species. Expression of aceI or its orthologs from several other ?- or ?-proteobacterial species in Escherichia coli resulted in significant increases in resistance to chlorhexidine. Additionally, disruption of the aceI ortholog in Acinetobacter baylyi rendered it more susceptible to chlorhexidine. The AceI protein was localized to the membrane after overexpression in E. coli. This protein was purified, and binding assays demonstrated direct and specific interactions between AceI and chlorhexidine. Transport assays using [14C]-chlorhexidine determined that AceI was able to mediate the energy-dependent efflux of chlorhexidine. An E15Q AceI mutant with a mutation in a conserved acidic residue, although unable to mediate chlorhexidine resistance and transport, was still able to bind chlorhexidine. Taken together, these data are consistent with AceI being an active chlorhexidine efflux protein and the founding member of a family of bacterial drug efflux transporters. PMID:24277845

Hassan, Karl A.; Jackson, Scott M.; Penesyan, Anahit; Patching, Simon G.; Tetu, Sasha G.; Eijkelkamp, Bart A.; Brown, Melissa H.; Henderson, Peter J. F.; Paulsen, Ian. T.

2013-01-01

83

Biological and Biochemical Characterization of Anthrax Lethal Factor, a Proteolytic Inhibitor of MEK Signaling Pathways  

Microsoft Academic Search

The secretion of factors that block critical intracellular signaling pathways is a common strategy used by pathogenic bacteria for disabling host defenses and causing disease. Anthrax lethal toxin (LeTx) has been shown to cleave and inactivate mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) kinases (MKKs or MEKs) and to inhibit MKK signaling. Cleavage of MKKs by LeTx prevents activation of their downstream substrates,

Jennifer L. Bromberg-White; Nicholas S. Duesbery

2008-01-01

84

Molecular & Biochemical Parasitology 133 (2004) 4551 Arachidonic acid synthetic pathways of the oyster protozoan parasite,  

E-print Network

of the oyster protozoan parasite, Perkinsus marinus: evidence for usage of a delta-8 pathway Fu-Lin E. Chua Received 24 June 2003; accepted 28 August 2003 Abstract The meront stage of the oyster protozoan parasite, the parasite first desaturated 18:1(n - 9)-d6 to 18:2(n - 6)-d6 by -12 desaturase, then to 20:2(n - 6)-d6

Hartley, Troy W.

85

Steady and transient fluid shear stress stimulate NO release in osteoblasts through distinct biochemical pathways  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Fluid flow has been shown to be a potent stimulus in osteoblasts and osteocytes and may therefore play an important role in load-induced bone remodeling. The objective of this study was to investigate the characteristics of flow-activated pathways. Previously we reported that fluid flow stimulates rapid and continuous release of nitric oxide (NO) in primary rat calvarial osteoblasts. Here we demonstrate that flow-induced NO release is mediated by shear stress and that this response is distinctly biphasic. Transients in shear stress associated with the onset of flow stimulated a burst in NO production (8.2 nmol/mg of protein/h), while steady flow stimulated sustained NO production (2.2 nmol/mg of protein/h). Both G-protein inhibition and calcium chelation abolished the burst phase but had no effect on sustained production. Activation of G-proteins stimulated dose-dependent NO release in static cultures of both calvarial osteoblasts and UMR-106 osteoblast-like cells. Pertussis toxin had no effect on NO release. Calcium ionophore stimulated low levels of NO production within 15 minutes but had no effect on sustained production. Taken together, these data suggest that fluid shear stress stimulates NO release by two distinct pathways: a G-protein and calcium-dependent phase sensitive to flow transients, and a G-protein and calcium-independent pathway stimulated by sustained flow.

McAllister, T. N.; Frangos, J. A.

1999-01-01

86

Gene set enrichment analysis identifies key innate immune pathways in primary graft dysfunction after lung transplantation  

PubMed Central

We hypothesized alterations in gene expression could identify important pathways involved in transplant lung injury. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was sampled from donors prior to procurement and in recipients within an hour of reperfusion as part of the NIAID Clinical Trials in Organ Transplantation Study. 23 patients with Grade 3 PGD were frequency matched with controls based on donor age and recipient diagnosis. RNA was analyzed using the Human Gene 1.0 ST array. Normalized mRNA expression was transformed and differences between donor and post-reperfusion values were ranked then tested using Gene Set Enrichment Analysis. 362 gene sets were upregulated with 8 meeting significance (FWER p-value <0.05), including the NOD-like receptor inflammasome (NLR; p<0.001), toll-like receptors (TLR; p<0.001), IL-1 receptor (p=0.001), Myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (p=0.001), NF?B activation by nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (p=0.001), TLR 4 (p=0.008), and TLR 9 (p=0.018). The top 5 ranked individual transcripts from these pathways based on rank metric score are predominantly present in the NLR and TLR pathways, including IL1? (1.162), NLRP3 (1.135), IL1? (0.952), IL6 (0.931) and CCL4 (0.842). Gene set enrichment analyses implicate inflammasome mediated and innate immune signaling pathways as key mediators of the development of PGD in lung transplant patients. PMID:23710539

Cantu, E.; Lederer, D.J.; Meyer, K.; Milewski, K.; Suzuki, Y.; Shah, R.J.; Diamond, J.M.; Meyer, N.J.; Tobias, J.W.; Baldwin, D.A.; Van Deerlin, V.M.; Olthoff, K.M.; Shaked, A.; Christie, J.D.

2014-01-01

87

A cellular genetics approach identifies gene-drug interactions and pinpoints drug toxicity pathway nodes  

PubMed Central

New approaches to toxicity testing have incorporated high-throughput screening across a broad-range of in vitro assays to identify potential key events in response to chemical or drug treatment. To date, these approaches have primarily utilized repurposed drug discovery assays. In this study, we describe an approach that combines in vitro screening with genetic approaches for the experimental identification of genes and pathways involved in chemical or drug toxicity. Primary embryonic fibroblasts isolated from 32 genetically-characterized inbred mouse strains were treated in concentration-response format with 65 compounds, including pharmaceutical drugs, environmental chemicals, and compounds with known modes-of-action. Integrated cellular responses were measured at 24 and 72 h using high-content imaging and included cell loss, membrane permeability, mitochondrial function, and apoptosis. Genetic association analysis of cross-strain differences in the cellular responses resulted in a collection of candidate loci potentially underlying the variable strain response to each chemical. As a demonstration of the approach, one candidate gene involved in rotenone sensitivity, Cybb, was experimentally validated in vitro and in vivo. Pathway analysis on the combined list of candidate loci across all chemicals identified a number of over-connected nodes that may serve as core regulatory points in toxicity pathways. PMID:25221565

Suzuki, Oscar T.; Frick, Amber; Parks, Bethany B.; Trask, O. Joseph; Butz, Natasha; Steffy, Brian; Chan, Emmanuel; Scoville, David K.; Healy, Eric; Benton, Cristina; McQuaid, Patricia E.; Thomas, Russell S.; Wiltshire, Tim

2014-01-01

88

A new screening pathway for identifying asymptomatic patients using dental panoramic radiographs  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

To identify asymptomatic patients is the challenging task and the essential first step in diagnosis. Findings of dental panoramic radiographs include not only dental conditions but also radiographic signs that are suggestive of possible systemic diseases such as osteoporosis, arteriosclerosis, and maxillary sinusitis. Detection of such signs on panoramic radiographs has a potential to provide supplemental benefits for patients. However, it is not easy for general dental practitioners to pay careful attention to such signs. We addressed the development of a computer-aided detection (CAD) system that detects radiographic signs of pathology on panoramic images, and the design of the framework of new screening pathway by cooperation of dentists and our CAD system. The performance evaluation of our CAD system showed the sensitivity and specificity in the identification of osteoporotic patients were 92.6 % and 100 %, respectively, and those of the maxillary sinus abnormality were 89.6 % and 73.6 %, respectively. The detection rate of carotid artery calcifications that suggests the need for further medical evaluation was approximately 93.6 % with 4.4 false-positives per image. To validate the utility of the new screening pathway, preliminary clinical trials by using our CAD system were conducted. To date, 223 panoramic images were processed and 4 asymptomatic patients with suspected osteoporosis, 7 asymptomatic patients with suspected calcifications, and 40 asymptomatic patients with suspected maxillary sinusitis were detected in our initial trial. It was suggested that our new screening pathway could be useful to identify asymptomatic patients with systemic diseases.

Hayashi, Tatsuro; Matsumoto, Takuya; Sawagashira, Tsuyoshi; Tagami, Motoki; Katsumata, Akitoshi; Hayashi, Yoshinori; Muramatsu, Chisako; Zhou, Xiangrong; Iida, Yukihiro; Matsuoka, Masato; Katagi, Kiyoji; Fujita, Hiroshi

2012-03-01

89

Pathway analysis identifies perturbation of genetic networks induced by butyrate in a bovine kidney epithelial cell line  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ruminant species have evolved to metabolize the short-chain volatile fatty acids (VFA), acetate, propionate, and butyrate,\\u000a to fulfill up to 70% of their nutrient energy requirements. The inherent VFA dependence of ruminant cells was exploited to\\u000a add a level of increased sensitivity to the study of the role of butyrate gene-response elements in regulatory biochemical\\u000a pathways. Global gene expression profiles

Cong-jun Li; Robert W. Li; Yong-hong Wang; Ted H. Elsasser

2007-01-01

90

Genome-wide screen identifies signaling pathways that regulate autophagy during Caenorhabditis elegans development.  

PubMed

The mechanisms that coordinate the regulation of autophagy with developmental signaling during multicellular organism development remain largely unknown. Here, we show that impaired function of ribosomal protein RPL-43 causes an accumulation of SQST-1 aggregates in the larval intestine, which are removed upon autophagy induction. Using this model to screen for autophagy regulators, we identify 139 genes that promote autophagy activity upon inactivation. Various signaling pathways, including Sma/Mab TGF-? signaling, lin-35/Rb signaling, the XBP-1-mediated ER stress response, and the ATFS-1-mediated mitochondrial stress response, regulate the expression of autophagy genes independently of the TFEB homolog HLH-30. Our study thus provides a framework for understanding the role of signaling pathways in regulating autophagy under physiological conditions. PMID:24764321

Guo, Bin; Huang, Xinxin; Zhang, Peipei; Qi, Linxiang; Liang, Qianqian; Zhang, Xuebo; Huang, Jie; Fang, Bin; Hou, Wenru; Han, Jinghua; Zhang, Hong

2014-06-01

91

Genome-wide approaches to systematically identify substrates of the ubiquitin/proteasome pathway  

PubMed Central

The ubiquitin/proteasome system handles the majority of controlled proteolysis in eukaryotes. Defects in the ubiquitin/proteasome system have been implicated in diseases ranging from cancers to neurodegenerative disorders. However, the precise role of ubiquitin/proteasome-mediated degradation in health and disease is far from clear. A major challenge is to link specific substrates directly to a particular degradation pathway. Here, we review genome-wide approaches that have been developed in recent years to comprehensively identify ubiquitylated substrates of a particular pathway. The components of the ubiquitin/proteasome system are attractive drug targets, as illustrated by the efficacy of some proteasome inhibitors in the treatment of multiple myeloma. Information that has emerged from these studies could reveal novel drug targets and strategies for treating human diseases. PMID:20637515

Liu, Chang; Choe, Vitnary; Rao, Hai

2010-01-01

92

Biochemical and Structural Characterization of a Ureidoglycine Aminotransferase in the Klebsiella pneumoniae Uric Acid Catabolic Pathway  

SciTech Connect

Many plants, fungi, and bacteria catabolize allantoin as a mechanism for nitrogen assimilation. Recent reports have shown that in plants and some bacteria the product of hydrolysis of allantoin by allantoinase is the unstable intermediate ureidoglycine. While this molecule can spontaneously decay, genetic analysis of some bacterial genomes indicates that an aminotransferase may be present in the pathway. Here we present evidence that Klebsiella pneumoniae HpxJ is an aminotransferase that preferentially converts ureidoglycine and an {alpha}-keto acid into oxalurate and the corresponding amino acid. We determined the crystal structure of HpxJ, allowing us to present an explanation for substrate specificity.

French, Jarrod B.; Ealick, Steven E. (Cornell)

2010-09-03

93

Identifying the potential extracellular electron transfer pathways from a c-type cytochrome network.  

PubMed

Extracellular electron transfer (EET) is the key feature of some bacteria, such as Geobacter sulfurreducens and Shewanella oneidensis. Via EET processes, these bacteria can grow on electrode surfaces and make current output of microbial fuel cells. c-Type cytochromes can be used as carriers to transfer electrons, which play an important role in EET processes. Typically, from the inner (cytoplasmic) membrane through the periplasm to the outer membrane, they could form EET pathways. Recent studies suggest that a group of c-type cytochromes could form a network which extended the well-known EET pathways. We obtained the protein interaction information for all 41 c-type cytochromes in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, constructed a large-scale protein interaction network, and studied its structural characteristics and functional significance. Centrality analysis has identified the top 10 key proteins of the network, and 7 of them are associated with electricity production in the bacteria, which suggests that the ability of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 to produce electricity might be derived from the unique structure of the c-type cytochrome network. By modularity analysis, we obtained 5 modules from the network. The subcellular localization study has shown that the proteins in these modules all have diversiform cellular compartments, which reflects their potential to form EET pathways. In particular, combination of protein subcellular localization and operon analysis, the well-known and new candidate EET pathways are obtained from the Mtr-like module, indicating that potential EET pathways could be obtained from such a c-type cytochrome network. PMID:25227320

Ding, De-Wu; Xu, Jun; Li, Ling; Xie, Jian-Ming; Sun, Xiao

2014-12-01

94

Carbon and chlorine isotope analysis to identify abiotic degradation pathways of 1,1,1-trichloroethane.  

PubMed

This study investigates dual C-Cl isotope fractionation during 1,1,1-TCA transformation by heat-activated persulfate (PS), hydrolysis/dehydrohalogenation (HY/DH) and Fe(0). Compound-specific chlorine isotope analysis of 1,1,1-TCA was performed for the first time, and transformation-associated isotope fractionation ? bulk C and ? bulk Cl values were -4.0 ± 0.2‰ and no chlorine isotope fractionation with PS, -1.6 ± 0.2‰ and -4.7 ± 0.1‰ for HY/DH, -7.8 ± 0.4‰ and -5.2 ± 0.2‰ with Fe(0). Distinctly different dual isotope slopes (??13C/??37Cl): ? with PS, 0.33 ± 0.04 for HY/DH and 1.5 ± 0.1 with Fe(0) highlight the potential of this approach to identify abiotic degradation pathways of 1,1,1-TCA in the field. The trend observed with PS agreed with a C-H bond oxidation mechanism in the first reaction step. For HY/DH and Fe(0) pathways, different slopes were obtained although both pathways involve cleavage of a C-Cl bond in their initial reaction step. In contrast to the expected larger primary carbon isotope effects relative to chlorine for C-Cl bond cleavage, ? bulk C < ? bulk Cl was observed for HY/DH and in a similar range for reduction by Fe(0), suggesting the contribution of secondary chlorine isotope effects. Therefore, different magnitude of secondary chlorine isotope effects could at least be partly responsible for the distinct slopes between HY/DH and Fe(0) pathways. Following this dual isotope approach, abiotic transformation processes can unambiguously be identified and quantified. PMID:25379605

Palau, Jordi; Shouakar-Stash, Orfan; Hunkeler, Daniel

2014-12-16

95

Transcriptome and Biochemical Analyses Revealed a Detailed Proanthocyanidin Biosynthesis Pathway in Brown Cotton Fiber  

PubMed Central

Brown cotton fiber is the major raw material for colored cotton industry. Previous studies have showed that the brown pigments in cotton fiber belong to proanthocyanidins (PAs). To clarify the details of PA biosynthesis pathway in brown cotton fiber, gene expression profiles in developing brown and white fibers were compared via digital gene expression profiling and qRT-PCR. Compared to white cotton fiber, all steps from phenylalanine to PA monomers (flavan-3-ols) were significantly up-regulated in brown fiber. Liquid chromatography mass spectrometry analyses showed that most of free flavan-3-ols in brown fiber were in 2, 3-trans form (gallocatechin and catechin), and the main units of polymeric PAs were trihydroxylated on B ring. Consistent with monomeric composition, the transcript levels of flavonoid 3?, 5?-hydroxylase and leucoanthocyanidin reductase in cotton fiber were much higher than their competing enzymes acting on the same substrates (dihydroflavonol 4-reductase and anthocyanidin synthase, respectively). Taken together, our data revealed a detailed PA biosynthesis pathway wholly activated in brown cotton fiber, and demonstrated that flavonoid 3?, 5?-hydroxylase and leucoanthocyanidin reductase represented the primary flow of PA biosynthesis in cotton fiber. PMID:24466041

Xiao, Yue-Hua; Yan, Qian; Ding, Hui; Luo, Ming; Hou, Lei; Zhang, Mi; Yao, Dan; Liu, Hou-Sheng; Li, Xin; Zhao, Jia; Pei, Yan

2014-01-01

96

Transcriptional profiling of GBM invasion genes identifies effective inhibitors of the LIM kinase-Cofilin pathway.  

PubMed

Malignant gliomas are highly proliferative and invasive neoplasms where total surgical resection is often impossible and effective local radiation therapy difficult. Consequently, there is a need to develop a greater understanding of the molecular events driving invasion and to identify novel treatment targets. Using microarray analysis comparing normal brain samples and mesenchymal glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), we identified over 140 significant genes involved in cell migration and invasion. The cofilin (CFL) pathway, which disassembles actin filaments, was highly up-regulated compared to normal brain. Up-regulation of LIM domain kinase 1 and 2 (LIMK1/2), that phosphorylates and inactivates cofilin, was confirmed in an additional independent data set comparing normal brain to GBM. We identified and utilized two small molecule inhibitors BMS-5 and Cucurbitacin I directed against the cofilin regulating kinases, LIMK1 and LIMK2, to target this pathway. Significant decreases in cell viability were observed in glioma cells treated with BMS-5 and Cucurbitacin I, while no cytotoxic effects were seen in normal astrocytes that lack LIMK. BMS-5 and Cucurbitacin I promoted increased adhesion in GBM cells, and decreased migration and invasion. Collectively, these data suggest that use of LIMK inhibitors may provide a novel way to target the invasive machinery in GBM. PMID:25237832

Park, Jun-Bum; Agnihotri, Sameer; Golbourn, Brian; Bertrand, Kelsey C; Luck, Amanda; Sabha, Nesrin; Smith, Christian A; Byron, Sara; Zadeh, Gelareh; Croul, Sidney; Berens, Michael; Rutka, James T

2014-10-15

97

Gene expression signatures identify novel regulatory pathways during murine lung development: implications for lung tumorigenesis  

PubMed Central

Oligonucleotide array based analysis was conducted to examine the temporal pattern of gene expression across the various stages of lung development to identify regulatory pathways at key developmental time points. Whole embryo total RNA or embryonic lung total RNA was harvested from A/J mice at seven developmental stages. To investigate changes in gene expression during lung development, four samples from each stage were examined using Affymetrix U74Av2 murine oligonucleotide microarrays. From the over 12 000 genes and ESTs represented on the array, 1346 genes and ESTs were identified as having a significant change in expression between at least one time point and the others (p<0.001, Kruskal-Wallis test). Within this group of ?1300 genes, four patterns of expression were seen: (1) upregulation during the embryonic period of development (up-down); (2) upregulation during the postnatal period of lung development (down-up) and (3) fluctuating expression, up initially, down for one or more time points, and then up again (up-down-up); and (4) vice versa (down-up-down). Expression patterns of genes previously reported to be involved in pulmonary development were also examined. Using the pathway visualisation tool, GenMapp, at least three regulatory pathways were found to contain clusters of differentially expressed genes: Wnt signalling, cell cycle, and apoptosis. Furthermore, we have shown that many of the genes involved in lung development are either known oncogenes or tumour suppressor genes altered in lung cancer, such as Cyr61, Rassf1a, and Dutt1/Robo1, or putative lung cancer genes. In addition, the genes identified pertinent to early development may also serve as candidate susceptibility genes for various inherited lung cancer disorders as well as for various heritable disorders of lung development. These results will contribute to our understanding of novel aspects of the regulatory machinery for embryonic lung development and of the genes involved in lung tumorigenesis. PMID:12807961

Bonner, A; Lemon, W; You, M

2003-01-01

98

Physiological and biochemical characteristics of adrenergic receptors and pathways in brown adipocytes  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Mechanisms involved in the thermogenic response of brown adipose tissue (BAT) to sympathetic nervous stimulation (e.g., by cold exposure) and to norepinephrine (NE) release are investigated. Three effects appear to play a role in the increased oxygen consumption (and heat production) of the adipocytes: increased membrane permeability, activation of the beta-adrenergic pathway, and enhancement of Na(+)/K(+) membrane pump activity. Increased passive influx of Na(+) and efflux of K(+) due to greater permeability raise the energy demands of the Na/K pump; the pump is also stimulated by increased cyclic AMP synthesis resulting from activation by NE of membrane-bound adenyl cyclase. Studies with inhibitors such as propanolol, phentolamine, and ouabain support this hypothesis.

Horwitz, B. A.

1975-01-01

99

Anthropogenic Molecular Markers: Tools to Identify the Sources and Transport Pathways of Pollutants  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The activities of modern civilization have released to the oceans a wide variety of both mobilized natural compounds and synthetic compounds not found prior to modern times. Many of these compounds provide a means of identifying sources of inputs and pathways of movement of chemicals through oceanic ecosystems and serve as molecular markers of human activities. A coastal ocean (Tokyo Bay) and a deep ocean (Deep Water Dump Site 106 in the Western North Atlantic Ocean) example are presented. In the deep ocean study, the correlation between potential sewage marker, i.e. linear alkylbenzenes (LABs), and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) concentrations indicates a contribution of sewage sludge PCBs to the dump site sediments.

Takada, H.; Satoh, F.; Bothner, Michael H.; Tripp, B.W.; Johnson, C.G.; Farrington, J.W.

1997-01-01

100

Comparative biochemical and immunological studies of the glycine betaine synthesis pathway in diverse families of dicotyledons.  

PubMed

Members of the Chenopodiaceae can accumulate high levels (>100 ?mol·(g DW)(-1)) of glycine betaine (betaine) in leaves when salinized. Chenopodiaceae synthesize betaine by a two-step oxidation of choline (choline?betaine aldehyde? betaine), with the second step catalyzed by betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase (BADH, EC 1.2.1.8). High betaine levels have also been reported in leaves of species from several distantly-related families of dicotyledons, raising the question of whether the same betaine-synthesis pathway is used in all cases.Fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry showed that betaine levels of >100 ?mol·(g DW)(-1) are present in Lycium ferocissimum Miers (Solanaceae), Helianthus annuus L. (Asteraceae), Convolvulus arvensis L. (Convolvulaceae), and Amaranthus caudatus L. (Amaranthaceae), that salinization promotes betaine accumulation in these plants, and that they can convert supplied choline to betaine aldehyde and betaine. Nicotiana tabacum L. and Lycopersicon lycopersicum (L.) Karst. ex Farw. (Solanaceae), Lactuca sativa L. (Asteraceae) and Ipomoea purpurea L. (Convolvulaceae) also contained betaine, but at a low level (0.1-0.5 ?mol·(g DW)(-1). Betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase activity assays, immunotitration and immunoblotting demonstrated that the betaine-accumulating species have a BADH enzyme recognized by antibodies raised against BADH from Spinacia oleracea L. (Chenopodiaceae), and that the Mr of the BADH monomer is in all cases close to 63 000. These data indicate that the choline?betaine aldehyde?betaine pathway may have evolved by vertical descent from an early angiosperm ancestor, and might be widespread (albeit not always strongly expressed) among flowering plants. Consistent with these suggestions, Magnolia x soulangiana was found to have a low level of betaine, and to express a protein of Mr 63 000 which cross-reacted with antibodies to BADH from Spinacia oleracea. PMID:24212901

Weretilnyk, E A; Bednarek, S; McCue, K F; Rhodes, D; Hanson, A D

1989-06-01

101

Pan-cancer network analysis identifies combinations of rare somatic mutations across pathways and protein complexes.  

PubMed

Cancers exhibit extensive mutational heterogeneity, and the resulting long-tail phenomenon complicates the discovery of genes and pathways that are significantly mutated in cancer. We perform a pan-cancer analysis of mutated networks in 3,281 samples from 12 cancer types from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) using HotNet2, a new algorithm to find mutated subnetworks that overcomes the limitations of existing single-gene, pathway and network approaches. We identify 16 significantly mutated subnetworks that comprise well-known cancer signaling pathways as well as subnetworks with less characterized roles in cancer, including cohesin, condensin and others. Many of these subnetworks exhibit co-occurring mutations across samples. These subnetworks contain dozens of genes with rare somatic mutations across multiple cancers; many of these genes have additional evidence supporting a role in cancer. By illuminating these rare combinations of mutations, pan-cancer network analyses provide a roadmap to investigate new diagnostic and therapeutic opportunities across cancer types. PMID:25501392

Leiserson, Mark D M; Vandin, Fabio; Wu, Hsin-Ta; Dobson, Jason R; Eldridge, Jonathan V; Thomas, Jacob L; Papoutsaki, Alexandra; Kim, Younhun; Niu, Beifang; McLellan, Michael; Lawrence, Michael S; Gonzalez-Perez, Abel; Tamborero, David; Cheng, Yuwei; Ryslik, Gregory A; Lopez-Bigas, Nuria; Getz, Gad; Ding, Li; Raphael, Benjamin J

2015-02-01

102

Identifying genetic variants for heart rate variability in the acetylcholine pathway.  

PubMed

Heart rate variability is an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality. The acetylcholine pathway plays a key role in explaining heart rate variability in humans. We assessed whether 443 genotyped and imputed common genetic variants in eight key genes (CHAT, SLC18A3, SLC5A7, CHRNB4, CHRNA3, CHRNA, CHRM2 and ACHE) of the acetylcholine pathway were associated with variation in an established measure of heart rate variability reflecting parasympathetic control of the heart rhythm, the root mean square of successive differences (RMSSD) of normal RR intervals. The association was studied in a two stage design in individuals of European descent. First, analyses were performed in a discovery sample of four cohorts (n?=?3429, discovery stage). Second, findings were replicated in three independent cohorts (n?=?3311, replication stage), and finally the two stages were combined in a meta-analysis (n?=?6740). RMSSD data were obtained under resting conditions. After correction for multiple testing, none of the SNPs showed an association with RMSSD. In conclusion, no common genetic variants for heart rate variability were identified in the largest and most comprehensive candidate gene study on the acetylcholine pathway to date. Future gene finding efforts for RMSSD may want to focus on hypothesis free approaches such as the genome-wide association study. PMID:25384021

Riese, Harriëtte; Muñoz, Loretto M; Hartman, Catharina A; Ding, Xiuhua; Su, Shaoyong; Oldehinkel, Albertine J; van Roon, Arie M; van der Most, Peter J; Lefrandt, Joop; Gansevoort, Ron T; van der Harst, Pim; Verweij, Niek; Licht, Carmilla M M; Boomsma, Dorret I; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Willemsen, Gonneke; Penninx, Brenda W J H; Nolte, Ilja M; de Geus, Eco J C; Wang, Xiaoling; Snieder, Harold

2014-01-01

103

A whole-cell phenotypic screening platform for identifying methylerythritol phosphate pathway-selective inhibitors as novel antibacterial agents.  

PubMed

Isoprenoid biosynthesis is essential for survival of all living organisms. More than 50,000 unique isoprenoids occur naturally, with each constructed from two simple five-carbon precursors: isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) and dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMAPP). Two pathways for the biosynthesis of IPP and DMAPP are found in nature. Humans exclusively use the mevalonate (MVA) pathway, while most bacteria, including all Gram-negative and many Gram-positive species, use the unrelated methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway. Here we report the development of a novel, whole-cell phenotypic screening platform to identify compounds that selectively inhibit the MEP pathway. Strains of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium were engineered to have separately inducible MEP (native) and MVA (nonnative) pathways. These strains, RMC26 and CT31-7d, were then used to differentiate MVA pathway- and MEP pathway-specific perturbation. Compounds that inhibit MEP pathway-dependent bacterial growth but leave MVA-dependent growth unaffected represent MEP pathway-selective antibacterials. This screening platform offers three significant results. First, the compound is antibacterial and is therefore cell permeant, enabling access to the intracellular target. Second, the compound inhibits one or more MEP pathway enzymes. Third, the MVA pathway is unaffected, suggesting selectivity for targeting the bacterial versus host pathway. The cell lines also display increased sensitivity to two reported MEP pathway-specific inhibitors, further biasing the platform toward inhibitors selective for the MEP pathway. We demonstrate development of a robust, high-throughput screening platform that combines phenotypic and target-based screening that can identify MEP pathway-selective antibacterials simply by monitoring optical density as the readout for cell growth/inhibition. PMID:22777049

Testa, Charles A; Johnson, L Jeffrey

2012-09-01

104

Global biochemical profiling identifies beta-hydroxypyruvate as a potential mediator of type 2 diabetes in mice and humans.  

PubMed

Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) and glucagon-like pepide-1 (GLP-1) are incretins secreted by respective K and L enteroendocrine cells after eating and amplify glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS). This amplification has been coined the "incretin response". To determine the role(s) of K cells for the incretin response and T2DM, "DT" mice lacking GIP-producing cells were backcrossed 5 to 8 times onto the diabetogenic NONcNZO10/Ltj background. Like humans with T2DM, DT mice lacked an incretin response although GLP-1 release was maintained. With high fat (HF) feeding, DT mice remained lean but developed T2DM whereas WT mice developed obesity but not diabetes. Metabolomics identified biochemicals reflecting impaired glucose handling, insulin resistance, and diabetic complications in pre-diabetic DT/HF mice. Beta-hydroxypyruvate and benzoate levels were increased and decreased, respectively, suggesting beta-hydroxypyruvate production from D-serine. In vitro, beta-hydroxypyruvate altered excitatory properties of myenteric neurons and reduced islet insulin content but not GSIS. Beta-hydroxypyruvate/D-serine ratios were lower in humans with impaired glucose tolerance compared to normal glucose tolerance and T2DM. Earlier human studies unmasked a neural relay that amplifies GIP-mediated insulin secretion in a pattern reciprocal to beta-hydroxypyruvate/D-serine ratios in all groups. Thus, K cells may maintain long-term function of neurons and beta cells by regulating beta-hydroxypyruvate levels. PMID:25368100

Zhang, Sheng; Wang, Songyan; Puhl, Matthew D; Jiang, Xuntian; Hyrc, Krzysztof L; Laciny, Erin; Wallendorf, Michael J; Pappan, Kirk L; Coyle, Joseph T; Wice, Burton M

2014-11-01

105

Comprehensive profiling analysis of actively resorbing osteoclasts identifies critical signaling pathways regulated by bone substrate  

PubMed Central

As the only cells capable of efficiently resorbing bone, osteoclasts are central mediators of both normal bone remodeling and pathologies associates with excessive bone resorption. However, despite the clear evidence of interplay between osteoclasts and the bone surface in vivo, the role of the bone substrate in regulating osteoclast differentiation and activation at a molecular level has not been fully defined. Here, we present the first comprehensive expression profiles of osteoclasts differentiated on authentic resorbable bone substrates. This analysis has identified numerous critical pathways coordinately regulated by osteoclastogenic cytokines and bone substrate, including the transition from proliferation to differentiation, and sphingosine-1-phosphate signaling. Whilst, as expected, much of this program is dependent upon integrin beta 3, the pre-eminent mediator of osteoclast-bone interaction, a surprisingly significant portion of the bone substrate regulated expression signature is independent of this receptor. Together, these findings identify an important hitherto underappreciated role for bone substrate in osteoclastogenesis. PMID:25534583

Purdue, P. Edward; Crotti, Tania N.; Shen, Zhenxin; Swantek, Jennifer; Li, Jun; Hill, Jonathan; Hanidu, Adedayo; Dimock, Janice; Nabozny, Gerald; Goldring, Steven R.; McHugh, Kevin P.

2014-01-01

106

Identifying environmental health priorities for a whole nation: the use of principal environmental exposure pathways in the Philippines.  

PubMed

This paper presents a novel approach to establishing environmental health priorities for a large society, based upon the concept of principal environmental exposure pathways (PEEPs). Principal environmental exposure pathways extend the concept of a causal pathway backward from health outcome to exposure, then to the industrial, transportation, commercial, or living conditions that gave rise to the pollution of interest. In the Philippines, where the method was developed and used, five PEEPs were identified: an urban air-pollution pathway; a community water-supply pathway; an urban solid-waste pathway; a rural "point-source" pathway; and a pathway whereby fertilizers and pesticides affect food, worker health, and rural water supplies. Characterizing the PEEPs involved pinpointing the populations at risk necessary to estimate the burden of morbidity and mortality related to each as well as identifying the health outcomes that were experienced by those exposed along each pathway or that they could be expected to experience; determining where adequate health-outcome information was available or absent; where exposure sources were or were not adequately identified; where there were significant gaps in agency responsibilities; where new data flows were needed; and where things could have been improved by improving inter-agency cooperation. The most important success of the PEEP method was to reduce the "problem of everything" in a complex country of 65 million people to a small and manageable number of priority environmental exposures. PMID:10026472

Hertzman, C; Torres, E; Subida, R; Martins, J

1998-01-01

107

Whole-Genome Pathway Analysis on 132,497 Individuals Identifies Novel Gene-Sets Associated with Body Mass Index  

PubMed Central

Whole genome pathway analysis is a powerful tool for the exploration of the combined effects of gene-sets within biological pathways. This study applied Interval Based Enrichment Analysis (INRICH) to perform whole-genome pathway analysis of body-mass index (BMI). We used a discovery set composed of summary statistics from a meta-analysis of 123,865 subjects performed by the GIANT Consortium, and an independent sample of 8,632 subjects to assess replication of significant pathways. We examined SNPs within nominally significant pathways using linear mixed models to estimate their contribution to overall BMI heritability. Six pathways replicated as having significant enrichment for association after correcting for multiple testing, including the previously unknown relationships between BMI and the Reactome regulation of ornithine decarboxylase pathway, the KEGG lysosome pathway, and the Reactome stabilization of P53 pathway. Two non-overlapping sets of genes emerged from the six significant pathways. The clustering of shared genes based on previously identified protein-protein interactions listed in PubMed and OMIM supported the relatively independent biological effects of these two gene-sets. We estimate that the SNPs located in examined pathways explain ?20% of the heritability for BMI that is tagged by common SNPs (3.35% of the 16.93% total). PMID:24497910

Simonson, Matthew A.; McQueen, Matthew B.; Keller, Matthew C.

2014-01-01

108

A genome-wide deletion mutant screen identifies pathways affected by nickel sulfate in Saccharomyces cerevisiae  

PubMed Central

Background The understanding of the biological function, regulation, and cellular interactions of the yeast genome and proteome, along with the high conservation in gene function found between yeast genes and their human homologues, has allowed for Saccharomyces cerevisiae to be used as a model organism to deduce biological processes in human cells. Here, we have completed a systematic screen of the entire set of 4,733 haploid S. cerevisiae gene deletion strains (the entire set of nonessential genes for this organism) to identify gene products that modulate cellular toxicity to nickel sulfate (NiSO4). Results We have identified 149 genes whose gene deletion causes sensitivity to NiSO4 and 119 genes whose gene deletion confers resistance. Pathways analysis with proteins whose absence renders cells sensitive and resistant to nickel identified a wide range of cellular processes engaged in the toxicity of S. cerevisiae to NiSO4. Functional categories overrepresented with proteins whose absence renders cells sensitive to NiSO4 include homeostasis of protons, cation transport, transport ATPases, endocytosis, siderophore-iron transport, homeostasis of metal ions, and the diphthamide biosynthesis pathway. Functional categories overrepresented with proteins whose absence renders cells resistant to nickel include functioning and transport of the vacuole and lysosome, protein targeting, sorting, and translocation, intra-Golgi transport, regulation of C-compound and carbohydrate metabolism, transcriptional repression, and chromosome segregation/division. Interactome analysis mapped seven nickel toxicity modulating and ten nickel-resistance networks. Additionally, we studied the degree of sensitivity or resistance of the 111 nickel-sensitive and 72 -resistant strains whose gene deletion product has a similar protein in human cells. Conclusion We have undertaken a whole genome approach in order to further understand the mechanism(s) regulating the cell's toxicity to nickel compounds. We have used computational methods to integrate the data and generate global models of the yeast's cellular response to NiSO4. The results of our study shed light on molecular pathways associated with the cellular response of eukaryotic cells to nickel compounds and provide potential implications for further understanding the toxic effects of nickel compounds to human cells. PMID:19917080

2009-01-01

109

Parallel Genetic and Proteomic Screens Identify Msps as a CLASP–Abl Pathway Interactor in Drosophila  

PubMed Central

Regulation of cytoskeletal structure and dynamics is essential for multiple aspects of cellular behavior, yet there is much to learn about the molecular machinery underlying the coordination between the cytoskeleton and its effector systems. One group of proteins that regulate microtubule behavior and its interaction with other cellular components, such as actin-regulatory proteins and transport machinery, is the plus-end tracking proteins (MT+TIPs). In particular, evidence suggests that the MT+TIP, CLASP, may play a pivotal role in the coordination of microtubules with other cellular structures in multiple contexts, although the molecular mechanism by which it functions is still largely unknown. To gain deeper insight into the functional partners of CLASP, we conducted parallel genetic and proteome-wide screens for CLASP interactors in Drosophila melanogaster. We identified 36 genetic modifiers and 179 candidate physical interactors, including 13 that were identified in both data sets. Grouping interactors according to functional classifications revealed several categories, including cytoskeletal components, signaling proteins, and translation/RNA regulators. We focused our initial investigation on the MT+TIP Minispindles (Msps), identified among the cytoskeletal effectors in both genetic and proteomic screens. Here, we report that Msps is a strong modifier of CLASP and Abl in the retina. Moreover, we show that Msps functions during axon guidance and antagonizes both CLASP and Abl activity. Our data suggest a model in which CLASP and Msps converge in an antagonistic balance in the Abl signaling pathway. PMID:20498300

Lowery, L. A.; Lee, H.; Lu, C.; Murphy, R.; Obar, R. A.; Zhai, B.; Schedl, M.; Van Vactor, D.; Zhan, Y.

2010-01-01

110

Integrated Analysis of Mutation Data from Various Sources Identifies Key Genes and Signaling Pathways in Hepatocellular Carcinoma  

PubMed Central

Background Recently, a number of studies have performed genome or exome sequencing of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and identified hundreds or even thousands of mutations in protein-coding genes. However, these studies have only focused on a limited number of candidate genes, and many important mutation resources remain to be explored. Principal Findings In this study, we integrated mutation data obtained from various sources and performed pathway and network analysis. We identified 113 pathways that were significantly mutated in HCC samples and found that the mutated genes included in these pathways contained high percentages of known cancer genes, and damaging genes and also demonstrated high conservation scores, indicating their important roles in liver tumorigenesis. Five classes of pathways that were mutated most frequently included (a) proliferation and apoptosis related pathways, (b) tumor microenvironment related pathways, (c) neural signaling related pathways, (d) metabolic related pathways, and (e) circadian related pathways. Network analysis further revealed that the mutated genes with the highest betweenness coefficients, such as the well-known cancer genes TP53, CTNNB1 and recently identified novel mutated genes GNAL and the ADCY family, may play key roles in these significantly mutated pathways. Finally, we highlight several key genes (e.g., RPS6KA3 and PCLO) and pathways (e.g., axon guidance) in which the mutations were associated with clinical features. Conclusions Our workflow illustrates the increased statistical power of integrating multiple studies of the same subject, which can provide biological insights that would otherwise be masked under individual sample sets. This type of bioinformatics approach is consistent with the necessity of making the best use of the ever increasing data provided in valuable databases, such as TCGA, to enhance the speed of deciphering human cancers. PMID:24988079

Wei, Lin; Tang, Ruqi; Lian, Baofeng; Zhao, Yingjun; He, Xianghuo; Xie, Lu

2014-01-01

111

An isogenic cell panel identifies compounds that inhibit proliferation of mTOR-pathway addicted cells by different mechanisms.  

PubMed

The mTOR pathway is a critical integrator of nutrient and growth factor signaling. Once activated, mTOR promotes cell growth and proliferation. Several components of the mTOR pathway are frequently deregulated in tumors, leading to constitutive activation of the pathway and thus contribute to uncontrolled cell growth. We performed a high-throughput screen with an isogenic cell line system to identify compounds specifically inhibiting proliferation of PTEN/mTOR-pathway addicted cells. We show here the characterization and mode of action of two such compound classes. One compound class inhibits components of the PTEN/mTOR signaling pathway, such as S6 ribosomal protein phosphorylation, and leads to cyclin D3 downregulation. These compounds are not adenosine triphosphate competitive inhibitors for kinases in the pathway, nor do they require FKBP12 for activity like rapamycin. The other compound class turned out to be a farnesylation inhibitor, blocking the activity of GTPases, as well as an inducer of oxidative stress. Our results demonstrate that an isogenic cell system with few specific mutations in oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes can identify different classes of compounds selectively inhibiting proliferation of PTEN/mTOR pathway-addicted isogenic clones. The identified mechanisms are in line with the known cellular signaling networks activated by the altered oncogenes and suppressor genes in the isogenic system. PMID:23954931

Wyder Peters, Lorenza; Molle, Klaus D; Thiemeyer, Anke; Knopf, Agnes; Goxe, Marie; Guerry, Philippe; Brodbeck, Daniela; Colombi, Marco; Hall, Michael N; Moroni, Christoph; Regenass, Urs

2014-01-01

112

Significant Deregulated Pathways in Diabetes Type II Complications Identified through Expression Based Network Biology  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Type 2 Diabetes is a complex multifactorial disease, which alters several signaling cascades giving rise to serious complications. It is one of the major risk factors for cardiovascular diseases. The present research work describes an integrated functional network biology approach to identify pathways that get transcriptionally altered and lead to complex complications thereby amplifying the phenotypic effect of the impaired disease state. We have identified two sub-network modules, which could be activated under abnormal circumstances in diabetes. Present work describes key proteins such as P85A and SRC serving as important nodes to mediate alternate signaling routes during diseased condition. P85A has been shown to be an important link between stress responsive MAPK and CVD markers involved in fibrosis. MAPK8 has been shown to interact with P85A and further activate CTGF through VEGF signaling. We have traced a novel and unique route correlating inflammation and fibrosis by considering P85A as a key mediator of signals. The next sub-network module shows SRC as a junction for various signaling processes, which results in interaction between NF-kB and beta catenin to cause cell death. The powerful interaction between these important genes in response to transcriptionally altered lipid metabolism and impaired inflammatory response via SRC causes apoptosis of cells. The crosstalk between inflammation, lipid homeostasis and stress, and their serious effects downstream have been explained in the present analyses.

Ukil, Sanchaita; Sinha, Meenakshee; Varshney, Lavneesh; Agrawal, Shipra

113

Identifying biological pathways that underlie primordial short stature using network analysis  

PubMed Central

Mutations in CUL7, OBSL1 and CCDC8, leading to disordered ubiquitination, cause one of the commonest primordial growth disorders, 3-M syndrome. This condition is associated with i) abnormal p53 function, ii) GH and/or IGF1 resistance, which may relate to failure to recycle signalling molecules, and iii) cellular IGF2 deficiency. However the exact molecular mechanisms that may link these abnormalities generating growth restriction remain undefined. In this study, we have used immunoprecipitation/mass spectrometry and transcriptomic studies to generate a 3-M ‘interactome’, to define key cellular pathways and biological functions associated with growth failure seen in 3-M. We identified 189 proteins which interacted with CUL7, OBSL1 and CCDC8, from which a network including 176 of these proteins was generated. To strengthen the association to 3-M syndrome, these proteins were compared with an inferred network generated from the genes that were differentially expressed in 3-M fibroblasts compared with controls. This resulted in a final 3-M network of 131 proteins, with the most significant biological pathway within the network being mRNA splicing/processing. We have shown using an exogenous insulin receptor (INSR) minigene system that alternative splicing of exon 11 is significantly changed in HEK293 cells with altered expression of CUL7, OBSL1 and CCDC8 and in 3-M fibroblasts. The net result is a reduction in the expression of the mitogenic INSR isoform in 3-M syndrome. From these preliminary data, we hypothesise that disordered ubiquitination could result in aberrant mRNA splicing in 3-M; however, further investigation is required to determine whether this contributes to growth failure. PMID:24711643

Hanson, Dan; Stevens, Adam; Murray, Philip G; Black, Graeme C M; Clayton, Peter E

2014-01-01

114

An Integrative Framework for Bayesian Variable Selection with Informative Priors for Identifying Genes and Pathways  

PubMed Central

The discovery of genetic or genomic markers plays a central role in the development of personalized medicine. A notable challenge exists when dealing with the high dimensionality of the data sets, as thousands of genes or millions of genetic variants are collected on a relatively small number of subjects. Traditional gene-wise selection methods using univariate analyses face difficulty to incorporate correlational, structural, or functional structures amongst the molecular measures. For microarray gene expression data, we first summarize solutions in dealing with ‘large p, small n’ problems, and then propose an integrative Bayesian variable selection (iBVS) framework for simultaneously identifying causal or marker genes and regulatory pathways. A novel partial least squares (PLS) g-prior for iBVS is developed to allow the incorporation of prior knowledge on gene-gene interactions or functional relationships. From the point view of systems biology, iBVS enables user to directly target the joint effects of multiple genes and pathways in a hierarchical modeling diagram to predict disease status or phenotype. The estimated posterior selection probabilities offer probabilitic and biological interpretations. Both simulated data and a set of microarray data in predicting stroke status are used in validating the performance of iBVS in a Probit model with binary outcomes. iBVS offers a general framework for effective discovery of various molecular biomarkers by combining data-based statistics and knowledge-based priors. Guidelines on making posterior inferences, determining Bayesian significance levels, and improving computational efficiencies are also discussed. PMID:23844055

Ander, Bradley P.; Zhang, Xiaoshuai; Xue, Fuzhong; Sharp, Frank R.; Yang, Xiaowei

2013-01-01

115

Jasmonate Biochemical Pathway  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Plants possess a family of potent fatty acid–derived wound-response and developmental regulators: the jasmonates. These compounds are derived from the tri-unsaturated fatty acids α-linolenic acid (18:3) and, in plants such as Arabidopsis thaliana and tomato, 7(Z)-, 10(Z)-, and 13(Z)-hexadecatrienoic acid (16:3). The lipoxygenase-catalyzed addition of molecular oxygen to α-linolenic acid initiates jasmonate synthesis by providing a 13-hydroperoxide substrate for formation of an unstable allene oxide by allene oxide synthase (AOS). This allene oxide then undergoes enzyme-guided cyclization to produce 12-oxophytodienoic acid (OPDA). These first steps take place in plastids, but further OPDA metabolism occurs in peroxisomes. OPDA has several fates, including esterification into plastid lipids and transformation into the 12-carbon prohormone jasmonic acid (JA). JA is itself a substrate for further diverse modifications, including the production of jasmonoyl-isoleucine (JA-Ile), which is a major biologically active jasmonate among a growing number of jasmonate derivatives. Each new jasmonate family member that is discovered provides another key to understanding the fine control of gene expression in immune responses; in the initiation and maintenance of long-distance signal transfer in response to wounding; in the regulation of fertility; and in the turnover, inactivation, and sequestration of jasmonates, among other processes.

Aurelie Gfeller (Switzerland;University of Lausanne REV); Lucie Dubugnon (Lausanne;Institut de Chimie Clinique REV); Robin Liechti (Lausanne;Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics REV); Edward E. Farmer (Switzerland;University of Lausanne, Biophore REV)

2010-02-16

116

Transcriptional profiles of drought-responsive genes in modulating transcription signal transduction, and biochemical pathways in tomato.  

PubMed

To unravel the molecular mechanisms of drought responses in tomato, gene expression profiles of two drought-tolerant lines identified from a population of Solanum pennellii introgression lines, and the recurrent parent S. lycopersicum cv. M82, a drought-sensitive cultivar, were investigated under drought stress using tomato microarrays. Around 400 genes identified were responsive to drought stress only in the drought-tolerant lines. These changes in genes expression are most likely caused by the two inserted chromosome segments of S. pennellii, which possibly contain drought-tolerance quantitative trait loci (QTLs). Among these genes are a number of transcription factors and signalling proteins which could be global regulators involved in the tomato responses to drought stress. Genes involved in organism growth and development processes were also specifically regulated by drought stress, including those controlling cell wall structure, wax biosynthesis, and plant height. Moreover, key enzymes in the pathways of gluconeogenesis (fructose-bisphosphate aldolase), purine and pyrimidine nucleotide biosynthesis (adenylate kinase), tryptophan degradation (aldehyde oxidase), starch degradation (beta-amylase), methionine biosynthesis (cystathionine beta-lyase), and the removal of superoxide radicals (catalase) were also specifically affected by drought stress. These results indicated that tomato plants could adapt to water-deficit conditions through decreasing energy dissipation, increasing ATP energy provision, and reducing oxidative damage. The drought-responsive genes identified in this study could provide further information for understanding the mechanisms of drought tolerance in tomato. PMID:20643807

Gong, Pengjuan; Zhang, Junhong; Li, Hanxia; Yang, Changxian; Zhang, Chanjuan; Zhang, Xiaohui; Khurram, Ziaf; Zhang, Yuyang; Wang, Taotao; Fei, Zhangjun; Ye, Zhibiao

2010-08-01

117

Long-term recovery from hippocampal-related behavioral and biochemical abnormalities induced by noise exposure during brain development. Evaluation of auditory pathway integrity.  

PubMed

Sound is an important part of man's contact with the environment and has served as critical means for survival throughout his evolution. As a result of exposure to noise, physiological functions such as those involving structures of the auditory and non-auditory systems might be damaged. We have previously reported that noise-exposed developing rats elicited hippocampal-related histological, biochemical and behavioral changes. However, no data about the time lapse of these changes were reported. Moreover, measurements of auditory pathway function were not performed in exposed animals. Therefore, with the present work, we aim to test the onset and the persistence of the different extra-auditory abnormalities observed in noise-exposed rats and to evaluate auditory pathway integrity. Male Wistar rats of 15 days were exposed to moderate noise levels (95-97 dB SPL, 2 h a day) during one day (acute noise exposure, ANE) or during 15 days (sub-acute noise exposure, SANE). Hippocampal biochemical determinations as well as short (ST) and long term (LT) behavioral assessments were performed. In addition, histological and functional evaluations of the auditory pathway were carried out in exposed animals. Our results show that hippocampal-related behavioral and biochemical changes (impairments in habituation, recognition and associative memories as well as distortion of anxiety-related behavior, decreases in reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and increases in antioxidant enzymes activities) induced by noise exposure were almost completely restored by PND 90. In addition, auditory evaluation shows that increased cochlear thresholds observed in exposed rats were re-established at PND 90, although with a remarkable supra-threshold amplitude reduction. These data suggest that noise-induced hippocampal and auditory-related alterations are mostly transient and that the effects of noise on the hippocampus might be, at least in part, mediated by the damage on the auditory pathway. However, we cannot exclude that a different mechanism might be responsible for the observed hippocampal-related changes. PMID:24911434

Uran, S L; Gómez-Casati, M E; Guelman, L R

2014-10-01

118

Biochemical, Transcriptional and Translational Evidences of the Phenol-meta-Degradation Pathway by the Hyperthermophilic Sulfolobus solfataricus 98/2  

PubMed Central

Phenol is a widespread pollutant and a model molecule to study the biodegradation of monoaromatic compounds. After a first oxidation step leading to catechol in mesophilic and thermophilic microorganisms, two main routes have been identified depending on the cleavage of the aromatic ring: ortho involving a catechol 1,2 dioxygenase (C12D) and meta involving a catechol 2,3 dioxygenase (C23D). Our work aimed at elucidating the phenol-degradation pathway in the hyperthermophilic archaea Sulfolobus solfataricus 98/2. For this purpose, the strain was cultivated in a fermentor under different substrate and oxygenation conditions. Indeed, reducing dissolved-oxygen concentration allowed slowing down phenol catabolism (specific growth and phenol-consumption rates dropped 55% and 39%, respectively) and thus, evidencing intermediate accumulations in the broth. HPLC/Diode Array Detector and LC-MS analyses on culture samples at low dissolved-oxygen concentration (DOC ?=? 0.06 mg.L?1) suggested, apart for catechol, the presence of 2-hydroxymuconic acid, 4-oxalocrotonate and 4-hydroxy-2-oxovalerate, three intermediates of the meta route. RT-PCR analysis on oxygenase-coding genes of S. solfataricus 98/2 showed that the gene coding for the C23D was expressed only on phenol. In 2D-DIGE/MALDI-TOF analysis, the C23D was found and identified only on phenol. This set of results allowed us concluding that S. solfataricus 98/2 degrade phenol through the meta route. PMID:24349276

Davidson, Sylvain; Pophillat, Matthieu; Lorquin, Jean; Auria, Richard; Simon, Gwenola; Casalot, Laurence

2013-01-01

119

Biochemical, transcriptional and translational evidences of the phenol-meta-degradation pathway by the hyperthermophilic Sulfolobus solfataricus 98/2.  

PubMed

Phenol is a widespread pollutant and a model molecule to study the biodegradation of monoaromatic compounds. After a first oxidation step leading to catechol in mesophilic and thermophilic microorganisms, two main routes have been identified depending on the cleavage of the aromatic ring: ortho involving a catechol 1,2 dioxygenase (C12D) and meta involving a catechol 2,3 dioxygenase (C23D). Our work aimed at elucidating the phenol-degradation pathway in the hyperthermophilic archaea Sulfolobus solfataricus 98/2. For this purpose, the strain was cultivated in a fermentor under different substrate and oxygenation conditions. Indeed, reducing dissolved-oxygen concentration allowed slowing down phenol catabolism (specific growth and phenol-consumption rates dropped 55% and 39%, respectively) and thus, evidencing intermediate accumulations in the broth. HPLC/Diode Array Detector and LC-MS analyses on culture samples at low dissolved-oxygen concentration (DOC ?=? 0.06 mg x L(-1)) suggested, apart for catechol, the presence of 2-hydroxymuconic acid, 4-oxalocrotonate and 4-hydroxy-2-oxovalerate, three intermediates of the meta route. RT-PCR analysis on oxygenase-coding genes of S. solfataricus 98/2 showed that the gene coding for the C23D was expressed only on phenol. In 2D-DIGE/MALDI-TOF analysis, the C23D was found and identified only on phenol. This set of results allowed us concluding that S. solfataricus 98/2 degrade phenol through the meta route. PMID:24349276

Comte, Alexia; Christen, Pierre; Davidson, Sylvain; Pophillat, Matthieu; Lorquin, Jean; Auria, Richard; Simon, Gwenola; Casalot, Laurence

2013-01-01

120

Nontargeted metabolomics reveals biochemical pathways altered in response to captivity and food limitation in the freshwater mussel Amblema plicata.  

PubMed

Effective conservation of freshwater mussels (Mollusca: Bivalvia: Unionidae), one of the most endangered groups of animals in North America, is compromised by limited knowledge of their health. We address this gap in knowledge by characterizing the metabolic profile of Amblema plicata in the wild and in response to captivity and food limitation. Eight mussels brought into captivity from the wild were isolated for 18days without a food source. Hemolymph samples were taken prior to, and 9 and 18days after the start of the experiment; these samples were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. We detected and identified 71 biochemicals in the hemolymph of freshwater mussels; of these, 49 showed significant changes during captivity and/or food limitation (p<0.05). Fasting resulted in severe metabolite depletion. Captive (but fed) mussels experienced changes similar to (albeit less severe than) fasting mussels, suggesting that mussels may experience nutritional deficiency under common captive conditions. A. plicata responded to food limitation stress by preferentially using energy reserves for maintenance rather than growth. Carbohydrate and energy metabolism exhibited down-regulation in captive, food-limited, and wild mussels. Lipid metabolism was up-regulated in captive/food-limited mussels and unchanged in wild mussels. Amino acid metabolism was up-regulated in wild mussels and down-regulated in captive/food-limited mussels. Nucleotide metabolism was up-regulated in the wild mussels, down-regulated in food-limited mussels, and unchanged in captive mussels. The different responses between treatment groups suggest potential for nucleotide metabolism as a biomarker of health status for freshwater mussels. PMID:25463058

Roznere, Ieva; Watters, G Thomas; Wolfe, Barbara A; Daly, Marymegan

2014-10-01

121

GATA4 knockdown in MA-10 Leydig cells identifies multiple target genes in the steroidogenic pathway.  

PubMed

GATA4 is an essential transcription factor required for the initiation of genital ridge formation, for normal testicular and ovarian differentiation at the time of sex determination, and for male and female fertility in adulthood. In spite of its crucial roles, the genes and/or gene networks that are ultimately regulated by GATA4 in gonadal tissues remain to be fully understood. This is particularly true for the steroidogenic lineages such as Leydig cells of the testis where many in vitro (promoter) studies have provided good circumstantial evidence that GATA4 is a key regulator of Leydig cell gene expression and steroidogenesis, but formal proof is still lacking. We therefore performed a microarray screening analysis of MA-10 Leydig cells in which Gata4 expression was knocked down using an siRNA strategy. Analysis identified several GATA4-regulated pathways including cholesterol synthesis, cholesterol transport, and especially steroidogenesis. A decrease in GATA4 protein was associated with decreased expression of steroidogenic genes previously suspected to be GATA4 targets such as Cyp11a1 and Star. Gata4 knockdown also led to an important decrease in other novel steroidogenic targets including Srd5a1, Gsta3, Hsd3b1, and Hsd3b6, as well as genes known to participate in cholesterol metabolism such as Scarb1, Ldlr, Soat1, Scap, and Cyp51. Consistent with the decreased expression of these genes, a reduction in GATA4 protein compromised the ability of MA-10 cells to produce steroids both basally and under hormone stimulation. These data therefore provide strong evidence that GATA4 is an essential transcription factor that sits atop of the Leydig cell steroidogenic program. PMID:25504870

Bergeron, Francis; Nadeau, Gabriel; S Viger, Robert

2015-03-01

122

Genome-Wide Expression Profiling Identifies Type 1 Interferon Response Pathways in Active Tuberculosis  

PubMed Central

Tuberculosis (TB), caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M.tb), remains the leading cause of mortality from a single infectious agent. Each year around 9 million individuals newly develop active TB disease, and over 2 billion individuals are latently infected with M.tb worldwide, thus being at risk of developing TB reactivation disease later in life. The underlying mechanisms and pathways of protection against TB in humans, as well as the dynamics of the host response to M.tb infection, are incompletely understood. We carried out whole-genome expression profiling on a cohort of TB patients longitudinally sampled along 3 time-points: during active infection, during treatment, and after completion of curative treatment. We identified molecular signatures involving the upregulation of type-1 interferon (?/?) mediated signaling and chronic inflammation during active TB disease in an Indonesian population, in line with results from two recent studies in ethnically and epidemiologically different populations in Europe and South Africa. Expression profiles were captured in neutrophil-depleted blood samples, indicating a major contribution of lymphocytes and myeloid cells. Expression of type-1 interferon (?/?) genes mediated was also upregulated in the lungs of M.tb infected mice and in infected human macrophages. In patients, the regulated gene expression-signature normalized during treatment, including the type-1 interferon mediated signaling and a concurrent opposite regulation of interferon-gamma. Further analysis revealed IL15RA, UBE2L6 and GBP4 as molecules involved in the type-I interferon response in all three experimental models. Our data is highly suggestive that the innate immune type-I interferon signaling cascade could be used as a quantitative tool for monitoring active TB disease, and provide evidence that components of the patient’s blood gene expression signature bear similarities to the pulmonary and macrophage response to mycobacterial infection. PMID:23029268

Ottenhoff, Tom H. M.; Zhang, Mingzi M.; Wong, Hazel E. E.; Sahiratmadja, Edhyana; Khor, Chiea Chuen; Alisjahbana, Bachti; van Crevel, Reinout; Marzuki, Sangkot; Seielstad, Mark; van de Vosse, Esther; Hibberd, Martin L.

2012-01-01

123

Membrane properties of identified lateral and medial perforant pathway projection neurons.  

PubMed

The physiological characteristics of neurons that project to the hippocampus and dentate gyrus via the medial perforant pathway (projection neurons) are well known, but the characteristics of neurons that project to these areas via the lateral perforant pathway (projection neurons) are less well known. We have used retrograde tracing and whole-cell recording in brain slices to compare the membrane and firing properties of medial perforant pathway and lateral perforant pathway projection neurons in layer II of the medial and lateral entorhinal cortex. The properties of medial perforant pathway projection neurons were identical to those reported previously for spiny stellate neurons in the medial entorhinal cortex. In contrast, lateral perforant pathway projection neurons were characterized by a higher input resistance, a lack of time-dependent inward (anomalous) rectification, and a lack of prominent depolarizing spike afterpotentials. Voltage-clamp recordings suggest that the absence of anomalous rectification in lateral perforant pathway projection neurons is due to smaller hyperpolarization activated cation currents in these cells, and the lack of depolarizing afterpotential may be due to smaller low-threshold calcium currents. Persistent sodium current was also smaller in lateral perforant pathway projection neurons, but the difference in persistent sodium current between medial perforant pathway and lateral perforant projection neurons was much less pronounced than the difference in low voltage activated currents. These results underscore the functional differences between the medial entorhinal cortex and lateral entorhinal cortex, and may help to explain the differing abilities of these cortical areas to participate in certain types of network activity. PMID:12614688

Wang, X; Lambert, N A

2003-01-01

124

Integrated pathway-based approach identifies association between genomic regions at CTCF and CACNB2 and schizophrenia.  

PubMed

In the present study, an integrated hierarchical approach was applied to: (1) identify pathways associated with susceptibility to schizophrenia; (2) detect genes that may be potentially affected in these pathways since they contain an associated polymorphism; and (3) annotate the functional consequences of such single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the affected genes or their regulatory regions. The Global Test was applied to detect schizophrenia-associated pathways using discovery and replication datasets comprising 5,040 and 5,082 individuals of European ancestry, respectively. Information concerning functional gene-sets was retrieved from the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes, Gene Ontology, and the Molecular Signatures Database. Fourteen of the gene-sets or pathways identified in the discovery dataset were confirmed in the replication dataset. These include functional processes involved in transcriptional regulation and gene expression, synapse organization, cell adhesion, and apoptosis. For two genes, i.e. CTCF and CACNB2, evidence for association with schizophrenia was available (at the gene-level) in both the discovery study and published data from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium schizophrenia study. Furthermore, these genes mapped to four of the 14 presently identified pathways. Several of the SNPs assigned to CTCF and CACNB2 have potential functional consequences, and a gene in close proximity to CACNB2, i.e. ARL5B, was identified as a potential gene of interest. Application of the present hierarchical approach thus allowed: (1) identification of novel biological gene-sets or pathways with potential involvement in the etiology of schizophrenia, as well as replication of these findings in an independent cohort; (2) detection of genes of interest for future follow-up studies; and (3) the highlighting of novel genes in previously reported candidate regions for schizophrenia. PMID:24901509

Juraeva, Dilafruz; Haenisch, Britta; Zapatka, Marc; Frank, Josef; Witt, Stephanie H; Mühleisen, Thomas W; Treutlein, Jens; Strohmaier, Jana; Meier, Sandra; Degenhardt, Franziska; Giegling, Ina; Ripke, Stephan; Leber, Markus; Lange, Christoph; Schulze, Thomas G; Mössner, Rainald; Nenadic, Igor; Sauer, Heinrich; Rujescu, Dan; Maier, Wolfgang; Børglum, Anders; Ophoff, Roel; Cichon, Sven; Nöthen, Markus M; Rietschel, Marcella; Mattheisen, Manuel; Brors, Benedikt

2014-06-01

125

Genome Regions Involved in Multiple Regulatory Pathways Identified Using GSEL, a Genome-Wide Database of Regulatory Sequence Elements of  

E-print Network

Genome Regions Involved in Multiple Regulatory Pathways Identified Using GSEL, a Genome://www.geobacter.org/research/gsel/). It compiles information on predicted transcription regulatory elements in the genome of G. sulfurreducens. These elements were derived from analyses that employed genome-wide transcription profiling, comparative genomics

Lovley, Derek

126

A Functional Genome-Wide In Vivo Screen Identifies New Regulators of Signalling Pathways during Early Xenopus  

E-print Network

and performed a large-scale gain-of-function screen in Xenopus embryos aimed at identifying new regulators of MAPK/Erk, PI3K/Akt, BMP, and TGF-b/Nodal signalling pathways. Our gain-of-function screen is based

Amaya, Enrique

127

Pesticide transport pathways from a sloped Litchi orchard to an adjacent tropical stream as identified by hydrograph separation.  

PubMed

This study was performed to identify the transport pathways of pesticides from a sloped litchi ( Sonn.) orchard to a nearby stream based on a three-component hydrograph separation (baseflow, interflow, surface runoff). Dissolved silica and electrical conductivity were chosen as representative tracers. During the study period (30 d), 0.4 and 0.01% of the applied mass of atrazine and chlorpyrifos, respectively, were detected in the stream after 151 mm of rainfall. Baseflow (80-96%) was the dominant hydrological flow component, followed by interflow (3-18%) and surface runoff (1-7%). Despite its small contribution to total discharge, surface runoff was the dominant atrazine transport pathway during the first days after application because pesticide concentrations in the surface runoff flow component declined quickly within several days. Preferential transport with interflow became the dominant pathway of atrazine. Because chlorpyrifos was detected in the stream water only twice, it was not included in the hydrograph separation. A feature of the surface runoff pathway was the coincidence of pesticide and discharge peaks. In contrast, peak concentrations of pesticides transported by interflow occurred during the hydrograph recession phases. Stormflow generation and pesticide transport depended on antecedent rainfall. The combination of high-resolution pesticide concentration measurements with a three-component hydrograph separation has been shown to be a suitable method to identify pesticide transport pathways under tropical conditions. PMID:22751076

Duffner, Andreas; Ingwersen, Joachim; Hugenschmidt, Cindy; Streck, Thilo

2012-01-01

128

Comparative survival analysis of breast cancer microarray studies identifies important prognostic genetic pathways  

PubMed Central

Background An estimated 12% of females in the United States will develop breast cancer in their lifetime. Although, there are advances in treatment options including surgery and chemotherapy, breast cancer is still the second most lethal cancer in women. Thus, there is a clear need for better methods to predict prognosis for each breast cancer patient. With the advent of large genetic databases and the reduction in cost for the experiments, researchers are faced with choosing from a large pool of potential prognostic markers from numerous breast cancer gene expression profile studies. Methods Five microarray datasets related to breast cancer were examined using gene set analysis and the cancers were categorized into different subtypes using a scoring system based on genetic pathway activity. Results We have observed that significant genes in the individual studies show little reproducibility across the datasets. From our comparative analysis, using gene pathways with clinical variables is more reliable across studies and shows promise in assessing a patient's prognosis. Conclusions This study concludes that, in light of clinical variables, there are significant gene pathways in common across the datasets. Specifically, several pathways can further significantly stratify patients for survival. These candidate pathways should help to develop a panel of significant biomarkers for the prognosis of breast cancer patients in a clinical setting. PMID:20964848

2010-01-01

129

Gene expression profiling in whole blood identifies distinct biological pathways associated with obesity  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Obesity is reaching epidemic proportions and represents a significant risk factor for cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and cancer. METHODS: To explore the relationship between increased body mass and gene expression in blood, we conducted whole-genome expression profiling of whole blood from seventeen obese and seventeen well matched lean subjects. Gene expression data was analyzed at the individual gene and pathway

Sujoy Ghosh; Robert Dent; Mary-Ellen Harper; Shelby A Gorman; Joan S Stuart; Ruth McPherson

2010-01-01

130

Gene expression meta-analysis identifies metastatic pathways and transcription factors in breast cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Metastasis is believed to progress in several steps including different pathways but the determination and understanding of these mechanisms is still fragmentary. Microarray analysis of gene expression patterns in breast tumors has been used to predict outcome in recent studies. Besides classification of outcome, these global expression patterns may reflect biological mechanisms involved in metastasis of breast cancer. Our

Mads Thomassen; Qihua Tan; Torben A Kruse

2008-01-01

131

Pubertal Effects on Adjustment in Girls: Moving from Demonstrating Effects to Identifying Pathways  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The present investigation examines mediated pathways from pubertal development to changes in depressive affect and aggression. Participants were 100 white girls who were between the ages of 10 and 14 (M=12.13, SD=0.80); girls were from well-educated, middle-to upper-middle class families, and attended private schools in a major northeastern urban…

Graber, Julia A.; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne; Warren, Michelle P.

2006-01-01

132

Identifying Pathways and Processes Aff ecting Nitrate and Orthophosphate Inputs to Streams in Agricultural Watersheds  

Microsoft Academic Search

Understanding nutrient pathways to streams will improve nutrient management strategies and estimates of the time lag between when changes in land use practices occur and when water quality eff ects that result from these changes are observed. Nitrate and orthophosphate (OP) concentrations in several environmental compartments were examined in watersheds having a range of base fl ow index (BFI) values

Anthony J. Tesoriero; John H. Duff; David M. Wolock; Norman E. Spahr USGS

133

Identifying pathways and processes affecting nitrate and orthophosphate inputs to streams in agricultural watersheds  

USGS Publications Warehouse

Understanding nutrient pathways to streams will improve nutrient management strategies and estimates of the time lag between when changes in land use practices occur and when water quality effects that result from these changes are observed. Nitrate and orthophosphate (OP) concentrations in several environmental compartments were examined in watersheds having a range of base flow index (BFI) values across the continental United States to determine the dominant pathways for water and nutrient inputs to streams. Estimates of the proportion of stream nitrate that was derived from groundwater increased as BFI increased. Nitrate concentration gradients between groundwater and surface water further supported the groundwater source of nitrate in these high BFI streams. However, nitrate concentrations in stream-bed pore water in all settings were typically lower than stream or upland groundwater concentrations, suggesting that nitrate discharge to streams was not uniform through the bed. Rather, preferential pathways (e.g., springs, seeps) may allow high nitrate groundwater to bypass sites of high biogeochemical transformation. Rapid pathway compartments (e.g., overland flow, tile drains) had OP concentrations that were typically higher than in streams and were important OP conveyers in most of these watersheds. In contrast to nitrate, the proportion of stream OP that is derived from ground water did not systematically increase as BFI increased. While typically not the dominant source of OP, groundwater discharge was an important pathway of OP transport to streams when BFI values were very high and when geochemical conditions favored OP mobility in groundwater. Copyright ?? 2009 by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America. All rights reserved.

Tesoriero, A.J.; Duff, J.H.; Wolock, D.M.; Spahr, N.E.; Almendinger, J.E.

2009-01-01

134

Dominant Mutations in S. cerevisiae PMS1 Identify the Mlh1-Pms1 Endonuclease Active Site and an Exonuclease 1-Independent Mismatch Repair Pathway  

PubMed Central

Lynch syndrome (hereditary nonpolypsis colorectal cancer or HNPCC) is a common cancer predisposition syndrome. Predisposition to cancer in this syndrome results from increased accumulation of mutations due to defective mismatch repair (MMR) caused by a mutation in one of the mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 or PMS2/scPMS1. To better understand the function of Mlh1-Pms1 in MMR, we used Saccharomyces cerevisiae to identify six pms1 mutations (pms1-G683E, pms1-C817R, pms1-C848S, pms1-H850R, pms1-H703A and pms1-E707A) that were weakly dominant in wild-type cells, which surprisingly caused a strong MMR defect when present on low copy plasmids in an exo1? mutant. Molecular modeling showed these mutations caused amino acid substitutions in the metal coordination pocket of the Pms1 endonuclease active site and biochemical studies showed that they inactivated the endonuclease activity. This model of Mlh1-Pms1 suggested that the Mlh1-FERC motif contributes to the endonuclease active site. Consistent with this, the mlh1-E767stp mutation caused both MMR and endonuclease defects similar to those caused by the dominant pms1 mutations whereas mutations affecting the predicted metal coordinating residue Mlh1-C769 had no effect. These studies establish that the Mlh1-Pms1 endonuclease is required for MMR in a previously uncharacterized Exo1-independent MMR pathway. PMID:24204293

Smith, Catherine E.; Mendillo, Marc L.; Bowen, Nikki; Hombauer, Hans; Campbell, Christopher S.; Desai, Arshad; Putnam, Christopher D.; Kolodner, Richard D.

2013-01-01

135

Multi-SNP Analysis of GWAS Data Identifies Pathways Associated with Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease  

PubMed Central

Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a common liver disease; the histological spectrum of which ranges from steatosis to steatohepatitis. Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) often leads to cirrhosis and development of hepatocellular carcinoma. To better understand pathogenesis of NAFLD, we performed the pathway of distinction analysis (PoDA) on a genome-wide association study dataset of 250 non-Hispanic white female adult patients with NAFLD, who were enrolled in the NASH Clinical Research Network (CRN) Database Study, to investigate whether biologic process variation measured through genomic variation of genes within these pathways was related to the development of steatohepatitis or cirrhosis. Pathways such as Recycling of eIF2:GDP, biosynthesis of steroids, Terpenoid biosynthesis and Cholesterol biosynthesis were found to be significantly associated with NASH. SNP variants in Terpenoid synthesis, Cholesterol biosynthesis and biosynthesis of steroids were associated with lobular inflammation and cytologic ballooning while those in Terpenoid synthesis were also associated with fibrosis and cirrhosis. These were also related to the NAFLD activity score (NAS) which is derived from the histological severity of steatosis, inflammation and ballooning degeneration. Eukaryotic protein translation and recycling of eIF2:GDP related SNP variants were associated with ballooning, steatohepatitis and cirrhosis. Il2 signaling events mediated by PI3K, Mitotic metaphase/anaphase transition, and Prostanoid ligand receptors were also significantly associated with cirrhosis. Taken together, the results provide evidence for additional ways, beyond the effects of single SNPs, by which genetic factors might contribute to the susceptibility to develop a particular phenotype of NAFLD and then progress to cirrhosis. Further studies are warranted to explain potential important genetic roles of these biological processes in NAFLD. PMID:23894275

Chen, Qing-Rong; Braun, Rosemary; Hu, Ying; Yan, Chunhua; Brunt, Elizabeth M.; Meerzaman, Daoud

2013-01-01

136

A Genomewide Overexpression Screen Identifies Genes Involved in the Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinase Pathway in the Human Protozoan Parasite Entamoeba histolytica  

PubMed Central

Entamoeba histolytica is a protozoan parasite that causes amoebic dysentery and liver abscess. E. histolytica relies on motility, phagocytosis, host cell adhesion, and proteolysis of extracellular matrix for virulence. In eukaryotic cells, these processes are mediated in part by phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) signaling. Thus, PI3K may be critical for virulence. We utilized a functional genomics approach to identify genes whose products may operate in the PI3K pathway in E. histolytica. We treated a population of trophozoites that were overexpressing genes from a cDNA library with a near-lethal dose of the PI3K inhibitor wortmannin. This screen was based on the rationale that survivors would be overexpressing gene products that directly or indirectly function in the PI3K pathway. We sequenced the overexpressed genes in survivors and identified a cDNA encoding a Rap GTPase, a protein previously shown to participate in the PI3K pathway. This supports the validity of our approach. Genes encoding a coactosin-like protein, EhCoactosin, and a serine-rich E. histolytica protein (SREHP) were also identified. Cells overexpressing EhCoactosin or SREHP were also less sensitive to a second PI3K inhibitor, LY294002. This corroborates the link between these proteins and PI3K. Finally, a mutant cell line with an increased level of phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-triphosphate, the product of PI3K activity, exhibited increased expression of SREHP and EhCoactosin. This further supports the functional connection between these proteins and PI3K in E. histolytica. To our knowledge, this is the first forward-genetics screen adapted to reveal genes participating in a signal transduction pathway in this pathogen. PMID:24442890

Koushik, Amrita B.; Welter, Brenda H.; Rock, Michelle L.

2014-01-01

137

Rapamycin regulates biochemical metabolites  

PubMed Central

The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) kinase is a master regulator of protein synthesis that couples nutrient sensing to cell growth, and deregulation of this pathway is associated with tumorigenesis. p53, and its less investigated family member p73, have been shown to interact closely with mTOR pathways through the transcriptional regulation of different target genes. To investigate the metabolic changes that occur upon inhibition of the mTOR pathway and the role of p73 in this response primary mouse embryonic fibroblast from control and TAp73?/? were treated with the macrocyclic lactone rapamycin. Extensive gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) analysis were used to obtain a rapamycin-dependent global metabolome profile from control or TAp73?/? cells. In total 289 metabolites involved in selective pathways were identified; 39 biochemical metabolites were found to be significantly altered, many of which are known to be associated with the cellular stress response. PMID:23839040

Tucci, Paola; Porta, Giovanni; Agostini, Massimiliano; Antonov, Alexey; Garabadgiu, Alexander Vasilievich; Melino, Gerry; Willis, Anne E

2013-01-01

138

Adolescents Can Know Best: Using concept mapping to identify factors and pathways driving adolescent sexuality in Lima, Peru  

PubMed Central

The primary objective of this study was to identify and describe individual- and environmental-level factors that Peruvian adolescents perceive to be related to adolescent sexuality. A series of concept mapping sessions were carried out from January-March 2006 with 63 15–17 year olds from a low-income community near Lima in order for adolescents to (1) brainstorm items that they thought were related to sexuality (2) sort, group and rate items to score their importance for sexuality-related outcomes, and (3) create pathways from the groups of items to engaging in sex. Brainstorming resulted in 61 items, which participants grouped into 11 clusters. The highest rated clusters were personal values, respect and confidence in relationships, future achievements and parent-child communication. The pathway of decision-making about having sex primarily contained items rated as only moderately important. This study identified important understudied factors, new perspectives on previously-recognized factors, and possible pathways to sexual behavior. These interesting, provocative findings underscore the importance of directly integrating adolescent voices into future sexual and reproductive health research, policies and programs that target this population. PMID:20382462

Bayer, Angela M.; Cabrera, Lilia Z.; Gilman, Robert H.; Hindin, Michelle J.; Tsui, Amy O.

2011-01-01

139

Microarray analysis of perichondral and reserve growth plate zones identifies differential gene expressions and signal pathways  

PubMed Central

In the growth plate, the reserve and perichondral zones have been hypothesized to have similar functions, but their exact functions are poorly understood. Our hypothesis was that significant differential gene expression exists between perichondral and reserve chondrocytes that may differentiate the respective functions of these two zones. Normal Sprague-Dawley rat growth plate chondrocytes from the perichondral zone (PC) and reserve zone (RZ) were isolated by laser microdissection and then subjected to microarray analysis. In order to most comprehensively capture the unique features of the two zones, we analyzed both the most highly expressed genes and those that were most significantly different from the proliferative zone (PZ) as a single comparator. Confirmation of the differential expression of selected genes was done by quantitative real time RT-PCR. A total of 8 transcripts showing high expression unique to the PC included translationally-controlled tumor protein (Tpt1), connective tissue growth factor (Ctgf), mortality factor 4 (Morf4l1), growth arrest specific 6 (Gas6), type V procollagen (Col5a2), frizzled-related protein (Frzb), GDP dissociation inhibitor 2 (Gdi2) and Jun D proto-oncogene (Jund). In contrast, 8 transcripts showing unique high expression in the RZ included hyaluronan and proteoglycan link protein 1 (Hapln1), hemoglobin beta-2 subunit, type I procollagen (Col1a2), retinoblastoma binding protein 4 (LOC685491), Sparc related modular calcium binding 2 (Smoc2), and calpastatin (Cast). Other genes were highly expressed in cells from both PC and RZ zones, including collagen II, collagen IX, catenin (cadherin associated protein) beta 1, eukaryotic translation elongation factor, high mobility group, ribosomal protein, microtubule-associated protein, reticulocalbin, thrombospondin, retinoblastoma binding protein, carboxypeptidase E, carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1, cysteine rich glycoprotein, plexin B2 (Plxnb2), and gap junction membrane channel protein. Functional classification of the most highly expressed transcripts were analyzed, and the pathway analysis indicated that ossification, bone remodeling, and cartilage development were uniquely enriched in the PC whereas both the PC and RZ showed pathway enrichment for skeletal development, extracellular matrix structural constituent, proteinaceous extracellular matrix, collagen, extracellular matrix, and extracellular matrix part pathways. We conclude that differential gene expression exists between the RZ and PC chondrocytes and these differentially expressed genes have unique roles to play corresponding to the function of their respective zones. PMID:18579462

Zhang, Mingliang; Pritchard, Meredith R.; Middleton, Frank A.; Horton, Jason A.; Damron, Timothy A.

2008-01-01

140

A Fourteen Gene GBM Prognostic Signature Identifies Association of Immune Response Pathway and Mesenchymal Subtype with High Risk Group  

PubMed Central

Background Recent research on glioblastoma (GBM) has focused on deducing gene signatures predicting prognosis. The present study evaluated the mRNA expression of selected genes and correlated with outcome to arrive at a prognostic gene signature. Methods Patients with GBM (n?=?123) were prospectively recruited, treated with a uniform protocol and followed up. Expression of 175 genes in GBM tissue was determined using qRT-PCR. A supervised principal component analysis followed by derivation of gene signature was performed. Independent validation of the signature was done using TCGA data. Gene Ontology and KEGG pathway analysis was carried out among patients from TCGA cohort. Results A 14 gene signature was identified that predicted outcome in GBM. A weighted gene (WG) score was found to be an independent predictor of survival in multivariate analysis in the present cohort (HR?=?2.507; B?=?0.919; p<0.001) and in TCGA cohort. Risk stratification by standardized WG score classified patients into low and high risk predicting survival both in our cohort (p?=?<0.001) and TCGA cohort (p?=?0.001). Pathway analysis using the most differentially regulated genes (n?=?76) between the low and high risk groups revealed association of activated inflammatory/immune response pathways and mesenchymal subtype in the high risk group. Conclusion We have identified a 14 gene expression signature that can predict survival in GBM patients. A network analysis revealed activation of inflammatory response pathway specifically in high risk group. These findings may have implications in understanding of gliomagenesis, development of targeted therapies and selection of high risk cancer patients for alternate adjuvant therapies. PMID:23646114

Peddagangannagari, Sreekanthreddy; Srinivasan, Harish; Shailaja, Bangalore C.; Samuel, Cini; Patric, Irene Rosita Pia; Shukla, Sudhanshu; Thota, Balaram; Prasanna, Krishnarao Venkatesh; Pandey, Paritosh; Balasubramaniam, Anandh; Santosh, Vani; Chandramouli, Bangalore Ashwathnarayanara; Hegde, Alangar Sathyaranjandas; Kondaiah, Paturu; Sathyanarayana Rao, Manchanahalli R.

2013-01-01

141

Identifiable Achatina giant neurones: Their localizations in ganglia, axonal pathways and pharmacological features  

Microsoft Academic Search

1.1. An African giant snail (Achatina fulica Férussac), originally from East Africa, is now found abundantly in tropical and subtropical regions of Asia, including Okinawa in Japan. This is one of the largest land snail species in the world. The Achatina central nervous system is composed of the buccal, cerebral and suboesophageal ganglia. The 37 giant neurones were identified in

Hiroshi Takeuchi; Yoko Araki; Muhammad Emaduddin; Wei Zhang; Xiao Yan Han; Thucydides L. Salunga; Shu Min Wong

1996-01-01

142

MMTV insertional mutagenesis identifies genes, gene families and pathways involved in mammary cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

We performed a high-throughput retroviral insertional mutagenesis screen in mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV)-induced mammary tumors and identified 33 common insertion sites, of which 17 genes were previously not known to be associated with mammary cancer and 13 had not previously been linked to cancer in general. Although members of the Wnt and fibroblast growth factors (Fgf) families were frequently

Vassiliki Theodorou; Melanie A Kimm; Mandy Boer; Lodewyk Wessels; Wendy Theelen; Jos Jonkers; John Hilkens

2007-01-01

143

Transport of dissolved organic carbon from soil to surface water: Identifying the transport pathways  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Over the last decades, increasing concentrations of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) have been found in surface waters. It has also become clear that land use is an important driver for DOC export. However, causal factors controlling this temporal and spatial variation are not clear. Efforts to model DOC export on a catchment scale are rare. In this research, we aim to determine the factors controlling variations in DOC concentration and quality in surface waters. Secondly, the importance of the different pathways (surface runoff, subsurface flow and groundwater flow) for the transport of dissolved organic matter from the soil to the surface water is investigated. Six headwater catchments (100 - 400 ha) were selected in Belgium, representing three different types of land use, namely forest, grassland and arable land. At the outlet of each catchment, a flow-proportional sampler has been collecting samples of base flow and peak discharge since January 2010. In addition, samples of groundwater, subsurface water and precipitation water were collected on a regular base in three of the catchments. Samples were analyzed for DOC, specific UV absorbance (SUVA) and dissolved silica (DSi). Elemental analysis was carried out using ICP-OES. Since 2012, precipitation water and a selection of river water samples was also analyzed for O and H isotopes. Overall, DOC concentrations were highest in forest catchments and lowest in grassland catchments. For all land use types, measured DOC concentrations were highest during peak discharge. The rise in DOC concentrations was associated with a change in DOC quality. During periods of greater discharge, higher SUVA values were measured, indicating DOC with higher aromaticity (humic and fulvic fractions) reaches the outlet. ICP and DSi results also showed a significant difference in geochemical composition of the river water if peak events are compared to base flow samples. During an event, Ca, Mg, Na, S and DSi concentrations were lowered, while K concentrations rose. Isotope analysis showed more heavy O an H isotopes during peak events than during baseflow. Results of the river water were combined with analysis of possible end-members in the catchments, using the groundwater, soil water and precipitation samples. An end-member-mixing-analysis (EMMA) gained more insight into the contributing pathways for the transport of organic matter from the soil to the surface water during base and peak flow. Furthermore, results from the different catchments were compared, and allowed to relate DOC transport to land use type. This is an important step towards a model describing DOC transport at the catchment scale.

Van Gaelen, Nele

2013-04-01

144

Structural and biochemical characterization of Chlamydia trachomatis hypothetical protein CT263 supports that menaquinone synthesis occurs through the futalosine pathway.  

PubMed

The obligate intracellular human pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis is the etiological agent of blinding trachoma and sexually transmitted disease. Genomic sequencing of Chlamydia indicated this medically important bacterium was not exclusively dependent on the host cell for energy. In order for the electron transport chain to function, electron shuttling between membrane-embedded complexes requires lipid-soluble quinones (e.g. menaquionone or ubiquinone). The sources or biosynthetic pathways required to obtain these electron carriers within C. trachomatis are poorly understood. The 1.58Å crystal structure of C. trachomatis hypothetical protein CT263 presented here supports a role in quinone biosynthesis. Although CT263 lacks sequence-based functional annotation, the crystal structure of CT263 displays striking structural similarity to 5'-methylthioadenosine nucleosidase (MTAN) enzymes. Although CT263 lacks the active site-associated dimer interface found in prototypical MTANs, co-crystal structures with product (adenine) or substrate (5'-methylthioadenosine) indicate that the canonical active site residues are conserved. Enzymatic characterization of CT263 indicates that the futalosine pathway intermediate 6-amino-6-deoxyfutalosine (kcat/Km = 1.8 × 10(3) M(-1) s(-1)), but not the prototypical MTAN substrates (e.g. S-adenosylhomocysteine and 5'-methylthioadenosine), is hydrolyzed. Bioinformatic analyses of the chlamydial proteome also support the futalosine pathway toward the synthesis of menaquinone in Chlamydiaceae. This report provides the first experimental support for quinone synthesis in Chlamydia. Menaquinone synthesis provides another target for agents to combat C. trachomatis infection. PMID:25253688

Barta, Michael L; Thomas, Keisha; Yuan, Hongling; Lovell, Scott; Battaile, Kevin P; Schramm, Vern L; Hefty, P Scott

2014-11-14

145

A hormone-encoding gene identifies a pathway for cardiac but not skeletal muscle gene transcription.  

PubMed Central

In contrast to skeletal muscle, the mechanisms responsible for activation and maintenance of tissue-specific transcription in cardiac muscle remain poorly understood. A family of hormone-encoding genes is expressed in a highly specific manner in cardiac but not skeletal myocytes. This includes the A- and B-type natriuretic peptide (ANP and BNP) genes, which encode peptide hormones with crucial roles in the regulation of blood volume and pressure. Since these genes are markers of cardiac cells, we have used them to probe the mechanisms for cardiac muscle-specific transcription. Cloning and functional analysis of the rat BNP upstream sequences revealed unexpected structural resemblance to erythroid but not to muscle-specific promoters and enhancers, including a requirement for regulatory elements containing GATA motifs. A cDNA clone corresponding to a member of the GATA family of transcription factors was isolated from a cardiomyocyte cDNA library. Transcription of this GATA gene is restricted mostly to the heart and is undetectable in skeletal muscle. Within the heart, GATA transcripts are localized in ANP- and BNP-expressing myocytes, and forced expression of the GATA protein in heterologous cells markedly activates transcription from the natural cardiac muscle-specific ANP and BNP promoters. This GATA-dependent pathway defines the first mechanism for cardiac muscle-specific transcription. Moreover, the present findings reveal striking similarities between the mechanisms controlling gene expression in hematopoietic and cardiac cells and may have important implications for studies of cardiogenesis. Images PMID:8164667

Grépin, C; Dagnino, L; Robitaille, L; Haberstroh, L; Antakly, T; Nemer, M

1994-01-01

146

Quantitatively and Kinetically Identifying Binding Motifs of Amelogenin Proteins to Mineral Crystals Through Biochemical and Spectroscopic Assays  

PubMed Central

Tooth enamel is the hardest tissue in vertebrate animals. Consisting of millions of carbonated hydroxyapatite crystals, this highly mineralized tissue develops from a protein matrix in which amelogenin is the predominant component. The enamel matrix proteins are eventually and completely degraded and removed by proteinases to form mineral-enriched tooth enamel. Identification of the apatite-binding motifs in amelogenin is critical for understanding the amelogenin–crystal interactions and amelogenin–proteinases interactions during tooth enamel biomineralization. A stepwise strategy is introduced to kinetically and quantitatively identify the crystal-binding motifs in amelogenin, including a peptide screening assay, a competitive adsorption assay, and a kinetic-binding assay using amelogenin and gene-engineered amelogenin mutants. A modified enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay on crystal surfaces is also applied to compare binding amounts of amelogenin and its mutants on different planes of apatite crystals. We describe the detailed protocols for these assays and provide the considerations for these experiments in this chapter. PMID:24188774

Zhu, Li; Hwang, Peter; Witkowska, H. Ewa; Liu, Haichuan; Li, Wu

2014-01-01

147

Analysis of alternative signaling pathways of endoderm induction of human embryonic stem cells identifies context specific differences  

PubMed Central

Background Lineage specific differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) is largely mediated by specific growth factors and extracellular matrix molecules. Growth factors initiate a cascade of signals which control gene transcription and cell fate specification. There is a lot of interest in inducing hESCs to an endoderm fate which serves as a pathway towards more functional cell types like the pancreatic cells. Research over the past decade has established several robust pathways for deriving endoderm from hESCs, with the capability of further maturation. However, in our experience, the functional maturity of these endoderm derivatives, specifically to pancreatic lineage, largely depends on specific pathway of endoderm induction. Hence it will be of interest to understand the underlying mechanism mediating such induction and how it is translated to further maturation. In this work we analyze the regulatory interactions mediating different pathways of endoderm induction by identifying co-regulated transcription factors. Results hESCs were induced towards endoderm using activin A and 4 different growth factors (FGF2 (F), BMP4 (B), PI3KI (P), and WNT3A (W)) and their combinations thereof, resulting in 15 total experimental conditions. At the end of differentiation each condition was analyzed by qRT-PCR for 12 relevant endoderm related transcription factors (TFs). As a first approach, we used hierarchical clustering to identify which growth factor combinations favor up-regulation of different genes. In the next step we identified sets of co-regulated transcription factors using a biclustering algorithm. The high variability of experimental data was addressed by integrating the biclustering formulation with bootstrap re-sampling to identify robust networks of co-regulated transcription factors. Our results show that the transition from early to late endoderm is favored by FGF2 as well as WNT3A treatments under high activin. However, induction of late endoderm markers is relatively favored by WNT3A under high activin. Conclusions Use of FGF2, WNT3A or PI3K inhibition with high activin A may serve well in definitive endoderm induction followed by WNT3A specific signaling to direct the definitive endoderm into late endodermal lineages. Other combinations, though still feasible for endoderm induction, appear less promising for pancreatic endoderm specification in our experiments. PMID:23241383

2012-01-01

148

A systems biology approach to identify intelligence quotient score-related genomic regions, and pathways relevant to potential therapeutic treatments  

PubMed Central

Although the intelligence quotient (IQ) is the most popular intelligence test in the world, little is known about the underlying biological mechanisms that lead to the differences in human. To improve our understanding of cognitive processes and identify potential biomarkers, we conducted a comprehensive investigation of 158 IQ-related genes selected from the literature. A genomic distribution analysis demonstrated that IQ-related genes were enriched in seven regions of chromosome 7 and the X chromosome. In addition, these genes were enriched in target lists of seven transcription factors and sixteen microRNAs. Using a network-based approach, we further reconstructed an IQ-related pathway from known human pathway interaction data. Based on this reconstructed pathway, we incorporated enriched drugs and described the importance of dopamine and norepinephrine systems in IQ-related biological process. These findings not only reveal several testable genes and processes related to IQ scores, but also have potential therapeutic implications for IQ-related mental disorders. PMID:24566931

Zhao, Min; Kong, Lei; Qu, Hong

2014-01-01

149

Quantitative phosphoproteomic analysis identifies activation of the RET and IGF-1R/IR signaling pathways in neuroblastoma.  

PubMed

Neuroblastoma is an embryonal tumor of childhood with a heterogenous clinical presentation that reflects differences in activation of complex biological signaling pathways. Protein phosphorylation is a key component of cellular signal transduction and plays a critical role in processes that control cancer cell growth and survival. We used shotgun LC/MS to compare phosphorylation between a human MYCN amplified neuroblastoma cell line (NB10), modeling a resistant tumor, and a human neural precursor cell line (NPC), modeling a normal baseline neural crest cell. 2181 unique phosphorylation sites representing 1171 proteins and 2598 phosphopeptides were found. Protein kinases accounted for 6% of the proteome, with a predominance of tyrosine kinases, supporting their prominent role in oncogenic signaling pathways. Highly abundant receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) phosphopeptides in the NB10 cell line relative to the NPC cell line included RET, insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor/insulin receptor (IGF-1R/IR), and fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1). Multiple phosphorylated peptides from downstream mediators of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR and RAS pathways were also highly abundant in NB10 relative to NPC. Our analysis highlights the importance of RET, IGF-1R/IR and FGFR1 as RTKs in neuroblastoma and suggests a methodology that can be used to identify potential novel biological therapeutic targets. Furthermore, application of this previously unexploited technology in the clinic opens the possibility of providing a new wide-scale molecular signature to assess disease progression and prognosis. PMID:24349301

DeNardo, Bradley D; Holloway, Michael P; Ji, Qinqin; Nguyen, Kevin T; Cheng, Yan; Valentine, Marcus B; Salomon, Arthur; Altura, Rachel A

2013-01-01

150

RNAi-based functional selection identifies novel cell migration determinants dependent on PI3K and AKT pathways.  

PubMed

Lentiviral short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated genetic screening is a powerful tool for identifying loss-of-function phenotype in mammalian cells. Here, we report the identification of 91 cell migration-regulating genes using unbiased genome-wide functional genetic selection. Individual knockdown or cDNA overexpression of a set of 10 candidates reveals that most of these cell migration determinants are strongly dependent on the PI3K/PTEN/AKT pathway and on their downstream signals, such as FOXO1 and p70S6K1. ALK, one of the cell migration promoting genes, uniquely uses p55? regulatory subunit of PI3K, rather than more common p85 subunit, to trigger the activation of the PI3K-AKT pathway. Our method enables the rapid and cost-effective genome-wide selection of cell migration regulators. Our results emphasize the importance of the PI3K/PTEN/AKT pathway as a point of convergence for multiple regulators of cell migration. PMID:25347953

Seo, Minchul; Lee, Shinrye; Kim, Jong-Heon; Lee, Won-Ha; Hu, Guang; Elledge, Stephen J; Suk, Kyoungho

2014-01-01

151

How metal films de-wet substrates—identifying the kinetic pathways and energetic driving forces  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We study how single-crystal chromium films of uniform thickness on W(110) substrates are converted to arrays of three-dimensional (3D) Cr islands during annealing. We use low-energy electron microscopy (LEEM) to directly observe a kinetic pathway that produces trenches that expose the wetting layer. Adjacent film steps move simultaneously uphill and downhill relative to the staircase of atomic steps on the substrate. This step motion thickens the film regions where steps advance. Where film steps retract, the film thins, eventually exposing the stable wetting layer. Since our analysis shows that thick Cr films have a lattice constant close to bulk Cr, we propose that surface and interface stress provide a possible driving force for the observed morphological instability. Atomistic simulations and analytic elastic models show that surface and interface stress can cause a dependence of film energy on thickness that leads to an instability to simultaneous thinning and thickening. We observe that de-wetting is also initiated at bunches of substrate steps in two other systems, Ag/W(110) and Ag/Ru(0001). We additionally describe how Cr films are converted into patterns of unidirectional stripes as the trenches that expose the wetting layer lengthen along the W[001] direction. Finally, we observe how 3D Cr islands form directly during film growth at elevated temperature. The Cr mesas (wedges) form as Cr film steps advance down the staircase of substrate steps, another example of the critical role that substrate steps play in 3D island formation.

McCarty, Kevin F.; Hamilton, John C.; Sato, Yu; Saá, Angela; Stumpf, Roland; de la Figuera, Juan; Thürmer, Konrad; Jones, Frank; Schmid, Andreas K.; Talin, A. Alec; Bartelt, Norman C.

2009-04-01

152

How metal films de-wet substrates : identifying the kinetic pathways and energetic driving forces.  

SciTech Connect

We study how single-crystal chromium films of uniform thickness on W(110) substrates are converted to arrays of three-dimensional (3D) Cr islands during annealing. We use low-energy electron microscopy (LEEM) to directly observe a kinetic pathway that produces trenches that expose the wetting layer. Adjacent film steps move simultaneously uphill and downhill relative to the staircase of atomic steps on the substrate. This step motion thickens the film regions where steps advance. Where film steps retract, the film thins, eventually exposing the stable wetting layer. Since our analysis shows that thick Cr films have a lattice constant close to bulk Cr, we propose that surface and interface stress provide a possible driving force for the observed morphological instability. Atomistic simulations and analytic elastic models show that surface and interface stress can cause a dependence of film energy on thickness that leads to an instability to simultaneous thinning and thickening. We observe that de-wetting is also initiated at bunches of substrate steps in two other systems, Ag/W(110) and Ag/Ru(0001). We additionally describe how Cr films are converted into patterns of unidirectional stripes as the trenches that expose the wetting layer lengthen along the W[001] direction. Finally, we observe how 3D Cr islands form directly during film growth at elevated temperature. The Cr mesas (wedges) form as Cr film steps advance down the staircase of substrate steps, another example of the critical role that substrate steps play in 3D island formation.

Thurmer, Konrad; Schmid, Andreas (Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Madrid, Spain); Sato, Yu (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA); Hamilton, John C.; Saa, Angela (Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Madrid, Spain); McCarty, Kevin F.; de la Figuera, Juan (Instituto de Quimica-Fisica "Rocasolano", CSIC, Madrid, Spain); Bartelt, Norman Charles

2008-10-01

153

Ectopic Pregnancy as a Model to Identify Endometrial Genes and Signaling Pathways Important in Decidualization and Regulated by Local Trophoblast  

PubMed Central

The endometrium in early pregnancy undergoes decidualization and functional changes induced by local trophoblast, which are not fully understood. We hypothesized that endometrium from tubal ectopic pregnancy (EP) could be interrogated to identify novel genes and pathways involved in these processes. Gestation-matched endometrium was collected from women with EP (n?=?11) and intrauterine pregnancies (IUP) (n?=?13). RNA was extracted from the tissue. In addition, tissues were prepared for histological analysis for degree of decidualization. We compared a) the samples from EP that were decidualized (n?=?6) with non-decidualized samples (n?=?5), and b) the decidualized EP (n?=?6) with decidualization-matched IUP (n?=?6) samples using an Affymetrix gene array platform, with Ingenuity Pathway Analysis, combined with quantitative RT-PCR. Expression of PRL and IGFBP1 was used to confirm the degree of decidualization in each group. There were no differences in PRL or IGFBP1 expression in the decidualization-matched samples but a marked reduction (P<0.001) in the non-decidualized samples. Decidualization was associated with increased expression of 428 genes including SCARA5 (181-fold), DKK1 (71-fold) and PROK1 (32-fold), and decreased expression of 230 genes including MMP-7 (35-fold) and SFRP4 (21-fold). The top canonical pathways associated with these differentially expressed genes were Natural Killer Cell and Wnt/b-Catenin signaling. Local trophoblast was associated with much less alteration of endometrial gene expression with an increase in 56 genes, including CSH1 (8-fold), and a reduction in 29 genes including CRISP3 (8-fold). The top associated canonical pathway was Antigen Presentation. The study of endometrium from tubal EP may promote novel insights into genes involved in decidualization and those influenced by factors from neighboring trophoblast. This has afforded unique information not highlighted by previous studies and adds to our understanding of the endometrium in early pregnancy. PMID:21858178

Burgess, Stewart; McDonald, Sarah E.; Critchley, Hilary O. D.; Horne, Andrew W.

2011-01-01

154

Integrated Genomics Identifies Five Medulloblastoma Subtypes with Distinct Genetic Profiles, Pathway Signatures and Clinicopathological Features  

PubMed Central

Background Medulloblastoma is the most common malignant brain tumor in children. Despite recent improvements in cure rates, prediction of disease outcome remains a major challenge and survivors suffer from serious therapy-related side-effects. Recent data showed that patients with WNT-activated tumors have a favorable prognosis, suggesting that these patients could be treated less intensively, thereby reducing the side-effects. This illustrates the potential benefits of a robust classification of medulloblastoma patients and a detailed knowledge of associated biological mechanisms. Methods and Findings To get a better insight into the molecular biology of medulloblastoma we established mRNA expression profiles of 62 medulloblastomas and analyzed 52 of them also by comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) arrays. Five molecular subtypes were identified, characterized by WNT signaling (A; 9 cases), SHH signaling (B; 15 cases), expression of neuronal differentiation genes (C and D; 16 and 11 cases, respectively) or photoreceptor genes (D and E; both 11 cases). Mutations in ?-catenin were identified in all 9 type A tumors, but not in any other tumor. PTCH1 mutations were exclusively identified in type B tumors. CGH analysis identified several fully or partly subtype-specific chromosomal aberrations. Monosomy of chromosome 6 occurred only in type A tumors, loss of 9q mostly occurred in type B tumors, whereas chromosome 17 aberrations, most common in medulloblastoma, were strongly associated with type C or D tumors. Loss of the inactivated X-chromosome was highly specific for female cases of type C, D and E tumors. Gene expression levels faithfully reflected the chromosomal copy number changes. Clinicopathological features significantly different between the 5 subtypes included metastatic disease and age at diagnosis and histology. Metastatic disease at diagnosis was significantly associated with subtypes C and D and most strongly with subtype E. Patients below 3 yrs of age had type B, D, or E tumors. Type B included most desmoplastic cases. We validated and confirmed the molecular subtypes and their associated clinicopathological features with expression data from a second independent series of 46 medulloblastomas. Conclusions The new medulloblastoma classification presented in this study will greatly enhance the understanding of this heterogeneous disease. It will enable a better selection and evaluation of patients in clinical trials, and it will support the development of new molecular targeted therapies. Ultimately, our results may lead to more individualized therapies with improved cure rates and a better quality of life. PMID:18769486

Kool, Marcel; Koster, Jan; Bunt, Jens; Hasselt, Nancy E.; Lakeman, Arjan; van Sluis, Peter; Troost, Dirk; Meeteren, Netteke Schouten-van; Caron, Huib N.; Cloos, Jacqueline; Mrši?, Alan; Ylstra, Bauke; Grajkowska, Wieslawa; Hartmann, Wolfgang; Pietsch, Torsten; Ellison, David; Clifford, Steven C.; Versteeg, Rogier

2008-01-01

155

Non-host disease resistance response in pea (Pisum sativum) pods: Biochemical function of DRR206 and phytoalexin pathway localization.  

PubMed

Continually exposed to potential pathogens, vascular plants have evolved intricate defense mechanisms to recognize encroaching threats and defend themselves. They do so by inducing a set of defense responses that can help defeat and/or limit effects of invading pathogens, of which the non-host disease resistance response is the most common. In this regard, pea (Pisum sativum) pod tissue, when exposed to Fusarium solani f. sp. phaseoli spores, undergoes an inducible transcriptional activation of pathogenesis-related genes, and also produces (+)-pisatin, its major phytoalexin. One of the inducible pathogenesis-related genes is Disease Resistance Response-206 (DRR206), whose role in vivo was unknown. DRR206 is, however, related to the dirigent protein (DP) family. In this study, its biochemical function was investigated in planta, with the metabolite associated with its gene induction being pinoresinol monoglucoside. Interestingly, both pinoresinol monoglucoside and (+)-pisatin were co-localized in pea pod endocarp epidermal cells, as demonstrated using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry imaging. In addition, endocarp epidermal cells are also the site for both chalcone synthase and DRR206 gene expression. Taken together, these data indicate that both (+)-pisatin and pinoresinol monoglucoside function in the overall phytoalexin responses. PMID:25457488

Seneviratne, Herana Kamal; Dalisay, Doralyn S; Kim, Kye-Won; Moinuddin, Syed G A; Yang, Hong; Hartshorn, Christopher M; Davin, Laurence B; Lewis, Norman G

2014-11-20

156

Kinetic Studies and Biochemical Pathway Analysis of Anaerobic Poly-(R)-3-Hydroxybutyric Acid Synthesis in Escherichia coli  

PubMed Central

Poly-(R)-3-hydroxybutyric acid (PHB) was synthesized anaerobically in recombinant Escherichia coli. The host anaerobically accumulated PHB to more than 50% of its cell dry weight during cultivation in either growth or nongrowth medium. The maximum specific PHB production rate during growth-associated synthesis was approximately 2.3 ± 0.2 mmol of PHB/g of residual cell dry weight/h. The by-product secretion profiles differed significantly between the PHB-synthesizing strain and the control strain. PHB production decreased acetate accumulation for both growth and nongrowth-associated PHB synthesis. For instance under nongrowth cultivation, the PHB-synthesizing culture produced approximately 66% less acetate on a glucose yield basis as compared to a control culture. A theoretical biochemical network model was used to provide a rational basis to interpret the experimental results like the fermentation product secretion profiles and to study E. coli network capabilities under anaerobic conditions. For example, the maximum theoretical carbon yield for anaerobic PHB synthesis in E. coli is 0.8. The presented study is expected to be generally useful for analyzing, interpreting, and engineering cellular metabolisms. PMID:15691921

Carlson, Ross; Wlaschin, Aaron; Srienc, Friedrich

2005-01-01

157

Predicting and analyzing DNA-binding domains using a systematic approach to identifying a set of informative physicochemical and biochemical properties  

PubMed Central

Background Existing methods of predicting DNA-binding proteins used valuable features of physicochemical properties to design support vector machine (SVM) based classifiers. Generally, selection of physicochemical properties and determination of their corresponding feature vectors rely mainly on known properties of binding mechanism and experience of designers. However, there exists a troublesome problem for designers that some different physicochemical properties have similar vectors of representing 20 amino acids and some closely related physicochemical properties have dissimilar vectors. Results This study proposes a systematic approach (named Auto-IDPCPs) to automatically identify a set of physicochemical and biochemical properties in the AAindex database to design SVM-based classifiers for predicting and analyzing DNA-binding domains/proteins. Auto-IDPCPs consists of 1) clustering 531 amino acid indices in AAindex into 20 clusters using a fuzzy c-means algorithm, 2) utilizing an efficient genetic algorithm based optimization method IBCGA to select an informative feature set of size m to represent sequences, and 3) analyzing the selected features to identify related physicochemical properties which may affect the binding mechanism of DNA-binding domains/proteins. The proposed Auto-IDPCPs identified m=22 features of properties belonging to five clusters for predicting DNA-binding domains with a five-fold cross-validation accuracy of 87.12%, which is promising compared with the accuracy of 86.62% of the existing method PSSM-400. For predicting DNA-binding sequences, the accuracy of 75.50% was obtained using m=28 features, where PSSM-400 has an accuracy of 74.22%. Auto-IDPCPs and PSSM-400 have accuracies of 80.73% and 82.81%, respectively, applied to an independent test data set of DNA-binding domains. Some typical physicochemical properties discovered are hydrophobicity, secondary structure, charge, solvent accessibility, polarity, flexibility, normalized Van Der Waals volume, pK (pK-C, pK-N, pK-COOH and pK-a(RCOOH)), etc. Conclusions The proposed approach Auto-IDPCPs would help designers to investigate informative physicochemical and biochemical properties by considering both prediction accuracy and analysis of binding mechanism simultaneously. The approach Auto-IDPCPs can be also applicable to predict and analyze other protein functions from sequences. PMID:21342579

2011-01-01

158

Comparative genomic analyses identify common molecular pathways modulated upon exposure to low doses of arsenic and cadmium  

PubMed Central

Background Exposure to the toxic metals arsenic and cadmium is associated with detrimental health effects including cancers of various organs. While arsenic and cadmium are well known to cause adverse health effects at high doses, the molecular impact resulting from exposure to environmentally relevant doses of these metals remains largely unexplored. Results In this study, we examined the effects of in vitro exposure to either arsenic or cadmium in human TK6 lymphoblastoid cells using genomics and systems level pathway mapping approaches. A total of 167 genes with differential expression were identified following exposure to either metal with surprisingly no overlap between the two. Real-time PCR was used to confirm target gene expression changes. The gene sets were overlaid onto protein-protein interaction maps to identify metal-induced transcriptional networks. Interestingly, both metal-induced networks were significantly enriched for proteins involved in common biological processes such as tumorigenesis, inflammation, and cell signaling. These findings were further supported by gene set enrichment analysis. Conclusions This study is the first to compare the transcriptional responses induced by low dose exposure to cadmium and arsenic in human lymphoblastoid cells. These results highlight that even at low levels of exposure both metals can dramatically influence the expression of important cellular pathways. PMID:21457566

2011-01-01

159

Evolution of a pathogen: a comparative genomics analysis identifies a genetic pathway to pathogenesis in Acinetobacter.  

PubMed

Acinetobacter baumannii is an emergent and global nosocomial pathogen. In addition to A. baumannii, other Acinetobacter species, especially those in the Acinetobacter calcoaceticus-baumannii (Acb) complex, have also been associated with serious human infection. Although mechanisms of attachment, persistence on abiotic surfaces, and pathogenesis in A. baumannii have been identified, the genetic mechanisms that explain the emergence of A. baumannii as the most widespread and virulent Acinetobacter species are not fully understood. Recent whole genome sequencing has provided insight into the phylogenetic structure of the genus Acinetobacter. However, a global comparison of genomic features between Acinetobacter spp. has not been described in the literature. In this study, 136 Acinetobacter genomes, including 67 sequenced in this study, were compared to identify the acquisition and loss of genes in the expansion of the Acinetobacter genus. A whole genome phylogeny confirmed that A. baumannii is a monophyletic clade and that the larger Acb complex is also a well-supported monophyletic group. The whole genome phylogeny provided the framework for a global genomic comparison based on a blast score ratio (BSR) analysis. The BSR analysis demonstrated that specific genes have been both lost and acquired in the evolution of A. baumannii. In addition, several genes associated with A. baumannii pathogenesis were found to be more conserved in the Acb complex, and especially in A. baumannii, than in other Acinetobacter genomes; until recently, a global analysis of the distribution and conservation of virulence factors across the genus was not possible. The results demonstrate that the acquisition of specific virulence factors has likely contributed to the widespread persistence and virulence of A. baumannii. The identification of novel features associated with transcriptional regulation and acquired by clades in the Acb complex presents targets for better understanding the evolution of pathogenesis and virulence in the expansion of the genus. PMID:23365658

Sahl, Jason W; Gillece, John D; Schupp, James M; Waddell, Victor G; Driebe, Elizabeth M; Engelthaler, David M; Keim, Paul

2013-01-01

160

Exploring critical pathways for urban water management to identify robust strategies under deep uncertainties.  

PubMed

Long-term projections for key drivers needed in urban water infrastructure planning such as climate change, population growth, and socio-economic changes are deeply uncertain. Traditional planning approaches heavily rely on these projections, which, if a projection stays unfulfilled, can lead to problematic infrastructure decisions causing high operational costs and/or lock-in effects. New approaches based on exploratory modelling take a fundamentally different view. Aim of these is, to identify an adaptation strategy that performs well under many future scenarios, instead of optimising a strategy for a handful. However, a modelling tool to support strategic planning to test the implication of adaptation strategies under deeply uncertain conditions for urban water management does not exist yet. This paper presents a first step towards a new generation of such strategic planning tools, by combing innovative modelling tools, which coevolve the urban environment and urban water infrastructure under many different future scenarios, with robust decision making. The developed approach is applied to the city of Innsbruck, Austria, which is spatially explicitly evolved 20 years into the future under 1000 scenarios to test the robustness of different adaptation strategies. Key findings of this paper show that: (1) Such an approach can be used to successfully identify parameter ranges of key drivers in which a desired performance criterion is not fulfilled, which is an important indicator for the robustness of an adaptation strategy; and (2) Analysis of the rich dataset gives new insights into the adaptive responses of agents to key drivers in the urban system by modifying a strategy. PMID:25240118

Urich, Christian; Rauch, Wolfgang

2014-12-01

161

Alternate dissociation pathways identified in charge-reduced protein complex ions.  

PubMed

Tandem mass spectrometry (MS) of large protein complexes has proven to be capable of assessing the stoichiometry, connectivity, and structural details of multiprotein assemblies. While the utility of tandem MS is without question, a deeper understanding of the mechanism of protein complex dissociation will undoubtedly drive the technology into new areas of enhanced utility and information content. We present here the systematic analysis of the charge state dependent decay of the noncovalently associated complex of human transthyretin, generated by collision-induced dissociation (CID). A crown ether based charge reduction approach was applied to generate intact transthyretin tetramers with charge states ranging from 15+ to 7+. These nine charge states were subsequently analyzed by means of tandem MS and ion mobility spectrometry. Three different charge-dependent mechanistic regimes were identified: (1) common asymmetric dissociation involving ejection of unfolded monomers, (2) expulsion of folded monomers from the intact tetramer, and (3) release of C-terminal peptide fragments from the intact complex. Taken together, the results presented highlight the potential of charge state modulation as a method for directing the course of gas-phase dissociation and unfolding of protein complexes. PMID:20481443

Pagel, Kevin; Hyung, Suk-Joon; Ruotolo, Brandon T; Robinson, Carol V

2010-06-15

162

Soluble Signals from Cells Identified at the Cell Wall Establish a Developmental Pathway in Carrot.  

PubMed Central

Cells in a plant differentiate according to their positions and use cell-cell communication to assess these positions. Similarly, single cells in suspension cultures can develop into somatic embryos, and cell-cell communication is thought to control this process. The monoclonal antibody JIM8 labels an epitope on cells in specific positions in plants. JIM8 also labels certain cells in carrot embryogenic suspension cultures. We have used JIM8 and secondary antibodies coupled to paramagnetic beads to label and immunomagnetically sort single cells in a carrot embryogenic suspension culture into pure populations. Cells in the JIM8(+) population develop into somatic embryos, whereas cells in the JIM8(-) population do not form somatic embryos. However, certain cells in JIM8(+) cultures (state B cells) undergo asymmetric divisions, resulting in daughter cells (state C cells) that do not label with JIM8 and that sort to JIM8(-) cultures. State C cells are competent to form somatic embryos, and we show here that a conditioned growth medium from a culture of JIM8(+) cells allows state C cells in a JIM8(-) culture to go on and develop into somatic embryos. JIM8 labels cells in suspension cultures at the cell wall. Therefore, a cell with a role in cell-cell communication and early cell fate selection can be identified by an epitope in its cell wall. PMID:12237357

McCabe, P. F.; Valentine, T. A.; Forsberg, L. S.; Pennell, R. I.

1997-01-01

163

Proteomic Approaches Identify Members of Cofilin Pathway Involved in Oral Tumorigenesis  

PubMed Central

The prediction of tumor behavior for patients with oral carcinomas remains a challenge for clinicians. The presence of lymph node metastasis is the most important prognostic factor but it is limited in predicting local relapse or survival. This highlights the need for identifying biomarkers that may effectively contribute to prediction of recurrence and tumor spread. In this study, we used one- and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, mass spectrometry and immunodetection methods to analyze protein expression in oral squamous cell carcinomas. Using a refinement for classifying oral carcinomas in regard to prognosis, we analyzed small but lymph node metastasis-positive versus large, lymph node metastasis-negative tumors in order to contribute to the molecular characterization of subgroups with risk of dissemination. Specific protein patterns favoring metastasis were observed in the “more-aggressive” group defined by the present study. This group displayed upregulation of proteins involved in migration, adhesion, angiogenesis, cell cycle regulation, anti-apoptosis and epithelial to mesenchymal transition, whereas the “less-aggressive” group was engaged in keratinocyte differentiation, epidermis development, inflammation and immune response. Besides the identification of several proteins not yet described as deregulated in oral carcinomas, the present study demonstrated for the first time the role of cofilin-1 in modulating cell invasion in oral carcinomas. PMID:23227181

Polachini, Giovana M.; Sobral, Lays M.; Mercante, Ana M. C.; Paes-Leme, Adriana F.; Xavier, Flávia C. A.; Henrique, Tiago; Guimarães, Douglas M.; Vidotto, Alessandra; Fukuyama, Erica E.; Góis-Filho, José F.; Cury, Patricia M.; Curioni, Otávio A.; Michaluart Jr, Pedro; Silva, Adriana M. A.; Wünsch-Filho, Victor; Nunes, Fabio D.; Leopoldino, Andréia M.; Tajara, Eloiza H.

2012-01-01

164

AMD-Associated Genes Encoding Stress-Activated MAPK Pathway Constituents Are Identified by Interval-Based Enrichment Analysis  

PubMed Central

Purpose To determine whether common DNA sequence variants within groups of genes encoding elements of stress-activated mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways are, in aggregate, associated with advanced AMD (AAMD). Methods We used meta-regression and exact testing methods to identify AAMD-associated SNPs in 1177 people with AAMD and 1024 AMD-free elderly peers from 3 large-scale genotyping projects on the molecular genetics of AMD. SNPs spanning independent AAMD-associated genomic intervals were examined with a multi-locus-testing method (INRICH) for enrichment within five sets of genes encoding constituents of stress-activated MAPK signaling cascades. Results Four-of-five pathway gene sets showed enrichment with AAMD-associated SNPs; findings persisted after adjustment for multiple testing in two. Strongest enrichment signals (P?=?0.006) existed in a c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)/MAPK cascade (Science Signaling, STKE CMP_10827). In this pathway, seven independent AAMD-associated regions were resident in 6 of 25 genes examined. These included sequence variants in: 1) three MAP kinase kinase kinases (MAP3K4, MAP3K5, MAP3K9) that phosphorylate and activate the MAP kinase kinases MAP2K4 and MAP2K7 (molecules that phosphorylate threonine and tyrosine residues within the activation loop of JNK); 2) a target of MAP2K7 (JNK3A1) that activates complexes involved in transcriptional regulation of stress related genes influencing cell proliferation, apoptosis, motility, metabolism and DNA repair; and 3) NR2C2, a transcription factor activated by JNK1A1 (a drugable molecule influencing retinal cell viability in model systems). We also observed AAMD-related sequence variants resident in genes encoding PPP3CA (a drugable molecule that inactivates MAP3K5), and two genes (TGFB2, TGFBR2) encoding factors involved in MAPK sensing of growth factors/cytokines. Conclusions Linkage disequilibrium (LD)-independent genomic enrichment analysis yielded associations of AAMD with aggregates of functionally related genes encoding constituents of the JNK MAPK signaling pathway. FDA-approved drugs now exist to target constituents of stress-activated MAPK pathways and may offer reasonable approaches to preventing or treating AAMD. PMID:23940728

SanGiovanni, John Paul; Lee, Phil H.

2013-01-01

165

Forward genetic screen for malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor formation identifies new genes and genetic pathways driving tumorigenesis  

PubMed Central

Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) are sarcomas of Schwann cell-lineage origin that occur sporadically or in association with the inherited syndrome, Neurofibromatosis Type 1. To identify genetic drivers of MPNST development, we utilized the Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon-based somatic mutagenesis system in mice with somatic loss of tumor protein p53 (Trp53) function and/or overexpression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Common insertion site (CIS) analysis of 269 neurofibromas and 106 MPNSTs identified 695 and 87 sites with a statistically significant number of recurrent transposon insertions, respectively. Comparison to human data sets revealed novel and known driver genes for MPNST formation at these sites. Pairwise co-occurrence analysis of CIS-associated genes identified many cooperating mutations that are enriched for in Wnt/CTNNB1, PI3K/Akt/mTor, and growth factor receptor signaling pathways. Lastly, we identified several novel proto-oncogenes including forkhead box R2 (Foxr2), which we functionally validated as a proto-oncogene involved in MPNST maintenance. PMID:23685747

Rahrmann, Eric P; Watson, Adrienne L; Keng, Vincent W; Choi, Kwangmin; Moriarity, Branden S; Beckmann, Dominic A; Wolf, Natalie; Sarver, Aaron; Collins, Margaret H; Moertel, Christopher L; Wallace, Margaret R; Gel, Bernat; Serra, Eduard; Ratner, Nancy; Largaespada, David A

2013-01-01

166

A Pathway Closely Related to the d-Tagatose Pathway of Gram-Negative Enterobacteria Identified in the Gram-Positive Bacterium Bacillus licheniformis  

PubMed Central

We report the first identification of a gene cluster involved in d-tagatose catabolism in Bacillus licheniformis. The pathway is closely related to the d-tagatose pathway of the Gram-negative bacterium Klebsiella oxytoca, in contrast to the d-tagatose 6-phosphate pathway described in the Gram-positive bacterium Staphylococcus aureus. PMID:23524682

Van der Heiden, Edwige; Lebrun, Sarah; Freichels, Régine; Brans, Alain; Vastenavond, Christian M.; Galleni, Moreno; Joris, Bernard

2013-01-01

167

Notch pathway activity identifies cells with cancer stem cell-like properties and correlates with worse survival in lung adenocarcinoma  

PubMed Central

Purpose The cancer stem cell theory postulates that tumors contain a subset of cells with stem cell properties of self-renewal, differentiation and tumor-initiation. The purpose of this study is to determine the role of Notch activity in identifying lung cancer stem cells. Experimental Design We investigated the role of Notch activity in lung adenocarcinoma utilizing a Notch GFP-reporter construct and a gamma-secretase inhibitor (GSI), which inhibits Notch pathway activity. Results Transduction of lung cancer cells with Notch GFP-reporter construct identified a subset of cells with high Notch activity (GFP-bright). GFP-bright cells had the ability to form more tumor spheres in serum-free media, and were able to generate both GFP-bright and GFP-dim (lower Notch activity) cell populations. GFP-bright cells were resistant to chemotherapy and were tumorigenic in serial xenotransplantation assays. Tumor xenografts of mice treated with GSI had decreased expression of downstream effectors of Notch pathway and failed to regenerate tumors upon reimplantation in NOD/SCID mice. Using multivariate analysis, we detected a statistically significant correlation between poor clinical outcome and Notch activity (reflected in increased Notch ligand expression or decreased expression of the negative modulators), in a group of 441 lung adenocarcinoma patients. This correlation was further confirmed in an independent group of 89 adenocarcinoma patients where Hes-1 overexpression correlated with poor overall survival. Conclusions Notch activity can identify lung cancer stem cell-like population and its inhibition may be an appropriate target for treating lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:23444212

Hassan, Khaled A.; Wang, Luo; Korkaya, Hasan; Chen, Guoan; Maillard, Ivan; Beer, David G.; Kalemkerian, Gregory P.; Wicha, Max S.

2013-01-01

168

A genetic screen identifies an LKB1/PAR1 signaling axis controlling the Hippo/YAP pathway  

PubMed Central

The Hippo/YAP pathway is an emerging signaling cascade involved in the regulation of stem cell activity and organ size. Alterations in Hippo signaling are also a common feature of human epithelial malignancies, although the molecular bases for this misregulation are unclear. As most of the current knowledge has been derived from work in the fruit fly, our understanding of mammalian Hippo/YAP signaling is still incomplete. To identify novel components of this pathway, we performed an RNAi-based kinome screen in human cells. Our screen identified several kinases not previously associated with Hippo signaling that strongly regulate the activity of the Hippo transducer YAP. Some of these kinases control processes such as response to stress, boundary formation, cell cycle and adhesion, and reflect novel inputs that may impinge on Hippo signaling and growth control. One of the hits, LKB1 (also known as Stk11), is a common tumor suppressor whose mechanism of action is only partially understood. We demonstrate that LKB1 acts through its substrates of the PAR-1 family (MARK1-4) to regulate the localization of the baso-lateral polarity complex and the activity of the core Hippo kinases. Murine and human LKB1-deficient tumors exhibit mislocalization of the basolateral determinant Scribble, reduced Hippo kinase activity, and enhanced YAP-driven transcription. Using xenograft assays and genetic analysis, we demonstrate that YAP is functionally important for the tumor suppressive effects of LKB1. Our results identify an important signaling axis that links YAP activation with LKB1 mutations, and have significant implications for the treatment of LKB1-mutant human malignancies. Additionally, our findings provide novel insight into the nature of inputs that speak to the Hippo/YAP signaling cascade. PMID:24362629

Mohseni, Morvarid; Sun, Jianlong; Lau, Allison; Curtis, Stephen; Goldsmith, Jeffrey; Fox, Victor L.; Wei, Chongjuan; Frazier, Marsha; Samson, Owen; Wong, Kwok-Kim; Kim, Carla; Camargo, Fernando D.

2014-01-01

169

Altered Transmission of HOX and Apoptotic SNPs Identify a Potential Common Pathway for Clubfoot  

PubMed Central

Clubfoot is a common birth defect that affects 135,000 newborns each year worldwide. It is characterized by equinus deformity of one or both feet and hypoplastic calf muscles. Despite numerous study approaches, the cause(s) remains poorly understood although a multifactorial etiology is generally accepted. We considered the HOXA and HOXD gene clusters and insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 (IGFBP3) as candidate genes because of their important roles in limb and muscle morphogenesis. Twenty SNPs from the HOXA and HOXD gene clusters and 12 SNPs in IGFBP3 were genotyped in a sample composed of nonHispanic white and Hispanic multiplex and simplex families (discovery samples) and a second sample of nonHispanic white simplex trios (validation sample). Four SNPs (rs6668, rs2428431, rs3801776 and rs3779456) in the HOXA cluster demonstrated altered transmission in the discovery sample, but only rs3801776, located in the HOXA basal promoter region, showed altered transmission in both the discovery and validation samples (p=0.004 and p=0.028). Interestingly, HOXA9 is expressed in muscle during development. A SNP in IGFBP3, rs13223993, also showed altered transmission (p=0.003) in the discovery sample. Gene-gene interactions were identified between variants in HOXA, HOXD and IGFBP3 and with previously associated SNPs in mitochondrial-mediated apoptotic genes. The most significant interactions were found between CASP3 SNPS and variants in HOXA, HOXD and IGFBP3. These results suggest a biologic model for clubfoot in which perturbation of HOX and apoptotic genes together affect muscle and limb development, which may cause the downstream failure of limb rotation into a plantar grade position. PMID:19938081

Ester, Audrey R.; Weymouth, Katelyn S.; Burt, Amber; Wise, Carol; Scott, Allison; Gurnett, Christina A; Dobbs, Matthew B.; Blanton, Susan H.; Hecht, Jacqueline T.

2009-01-01

170

Dissecting the Gene Network of Dietary Restriction to Identify Evolutionarily Conserved Pathways and New Functional Genes  

PubMed Central

Dietary restriction (DR), limiting nutrient intake from diet without causing malnutrition, delays the aging process and extends lifespan in multiple organisms. The conserved life-extending effect of DR suggests the involvement of fundamental mechanisms, although these remain a subject of debate. To help decipher the life-extending mechanisms of DR, we first compiled a list of genes that if genetically altered disrupt or prevent the life-extending effects of DR. We called these DR–essential genes and identified more than 100 in model organisms such as yeast, worms, flies, and mice. In order for other researchers to benefit from this first curated list of genes essential for DR, we established an online database called GenDR (http://genomics.senescence.info/diet/). To dissect the interactions of DR–essential genes and discover the underlying lifespan-extending mechanisms, we then used a variety of network and systems biology approaches to analyze the gene network of DR. We show that DR–essential genes are more conserved at the molecular level and have more molecular interactions than expected by chance. Furthermore, we employed a guilt-by-association method to predict novel DR–essential genes. In budding yeast, we predicted nine genes related to vacuolar functions; we show experimentally that mutations deleting eight of those genes prevent the life-extending effects of DR. Three of these mutants (OPT2, FRE6, and RCR2) had extended lifespan under ad libitum, indicating that the lack of further longevity under DR is not caused by a general compromise of fitness. These results demonstrate how network analyses of DR using GenDR can be used to make phenotypically relevant predictions. Moreover, gene-regulatory circuits reveal that the DR–induced transcriptional signature in yeast involves nutrient-sensing, stress responses and meiotic transcription factors. Finally, comparing the influence of gene expression changes during DR on the interactomes of multiple organisms led us to suggest that DR commonly suppresses translation, while stimulating an ancient reproduction-related process. PMID:22912585

Wuttke, Daniel; Connor, Richard; Vora, Chintan; Craig, Thomas; Li, Yang; Wood, Shona; Vasieva, Olga; Shmookler Reis, Robert; Tang, Fusheng; de Magalhães, João Pedro

2012-01-01

171

Transcellular transport of polymeric IgA in the rat hepatocyte: biochemical and morphological characterization of the transport pathway  

PubMed Central

Polymeric IgA (pIgA) is transported by liver parenchymal cells (hepatocytes) from blood to bile via a receptor-mediated process. We have studied the intracellular pathway taken by a TEPC15 mouse myeloma pIgA. When from 1 microgram to 1 mg 125I-pIgA was injected into the saphenous vein of a rat, 36% was transported as intact protein into the bile over a 3-h period. The concentration of transported 125I-pIgA was maximal in bile 30-60 min after injection, and approximately 80% of the total 125I-pIgA ultimately transported had been secreted into bile by 90 min. A horseradish peroxidase-pIgA conjugate (125I-pIgA-HRP) was transported to a similar extent and with kinetics similar to that of unconjugated 125I-pIgA and was therefore used to visualize the transport pathway. Peroxidase cytochemistry of livers fixed in situ 2.5 to 10 min after 125I-pIgA-HRP injection demonstrated a progressive redistribution of labeled structures from the sinusoidal area to intermediate and bile canalicular regions of the hepatocyte cytoplasm. Although conjugate-containing structures began accumulating in the bile canalicular region at these early times, no conjugate was present in bile until 20 min. From 7.5 to 45 min after injection approximately 30% of the labeled structures were in regions that contained Golgi complexes and lysosomes; however, we found no evidence that either organelle contained 125I-pIgA-HRP. At least 85% of all positive structures in the hepatocyte were vesicles of 110-160-nm median diameters, with the remaining structures accounted for by tubules and multivesicular bodies. Vesicles in the bile canalicular region tended to be larger than those in the sinusoidal region. Serial sectioning showed that the 125I-pIgA-HRP-containing structures were relatively simple (predominantly vesicular) and that extensive interconnections did not exist between structures in the sinusoidal and bile canalicular regions. PMID:4066752

1985-01-01

172

Identifying Yersinia YopH-targeted signal transduction pathways that impair neutrophil responses during in vivo murine infection  

PubMed Central

Summary Identifying molecular targets of Yersinia virulence effectors, or Yops, during animal infection is challenging because few cells are targeted by Yops in an infected organ and isolating these sparse effector-containing cells is difficult. YopH, a tyrosine phosphatase, is essential for full virulence of Yersinia. Investigating the YopH-targeted signal-transduction pathway(s) in neutrophils during infection of a murine host, we find that several host proteins, including the essential signaling adapter SLP-76, are dephosphorylated in the presence of YopH in neutrophils isolated from infected tissues. YopH inactivated PRAM-1/SKAP-HOM and the SLP-76/Vav/PLC?2 signal-transduction axes, leading to an inhibition of calcium response in isolated neutrophils. Consistent with a failure to mount a calcium response, IL-10 production was reduced in neutrophils containing YopH from infected tissues. Finally, a yopH mutant survived better in the absence of neutrophils, indicating that neutrophil inactivation by YopH by targeting PRAM-1/SKAP-HOM and SLP-76/Vav/PLC?2 signaling hubs may be critical for Yersinia survival. PMID:24034616

Rolán, Hortensia G.; Durand, Enrique A.; Mecsas, Joan

2013-01-01

173

Biochemical and genetic interaction between the fragile X mental retardation protein and the microRNA pathway  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fragile X syndrome is caused by a loss of expression of the fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP). FMRP is a selective RNA-binding protein which forms a messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP) complex that associates with polyribosomes. Recently, mRNA ligands associated with FMRP have been identified. However, the mechanism by which FMRP regulates the translation of its mRNA ligands remains unclear. MicroRNAs

Peng Jin; Daniela C Zarnescu; Stephanie Ceman; Mika Nakamoto; Julie Mowrey; Thomas A Jongens; David L Nelson; Kevin Moses; Stephen T Warren

2004-01-01

174

Computer-assisted morphometry and microdensitometry of transmitter- identified neurons with special reference to the mesostriatal dopamine pathway. Methodological aspects.  

PubMed

New morphometrical and microdensitometrical approaches for evaluation of transmitter-identified neurons in the central nervous system have been developed. These rely at the presynaptic level on the use of immunocytochemistry and at the postsynaptic level on the use of receptor autoradiography. The immunocytochemical analysis involves the indirect immunofluorescence method and the indirect immunoperoxidase method utilizing cryostat and vibratome sections, respectively. In the postsynaptic analysis cryostat sections and tritium-sensitive film were employed. A block diagram representation of the system of the image analyzer used and its connection with its host computer is given. Furthermore, flow charts of the original software developed by our group in presented. The morphometrical analysis has been performed on coronal sections of rat brain resulting in determinations of cell body and cell group parameters. Based on this information, objective criteria have been introduced to assess the existence of a cell group of transmitter-identified neurons in a three-dimensional frame and to give a morphometrical description of this group in the space. Moreover, new quantitative approaches to describe the dendritic and terminal fields have been introduced and for the first time in this type of morphometrical analysis, the Lorenz curves and the Gini index have been utilized in the description of the pattern of dendritic and terminal networks. By means of these morphometrical approaches it became possible to analyze topological and biochemical heterogeneities within cell groups defined in the rostrocaudal frame. In particular, it has been possible to develop a quantitative method for the evaluation of coexistence in nerve cell bodies. This method has been called the overlap method and allows an analysis cell by cell of the possible coexistence of two or more antigens. PMID:6149667

Agnati, L F; Fuxe, K; Benfenati, F; Zini, I; Zoli, M; Fabbri, L; Härfstrand, A

1984-01-01

175

Cohesion Group Approach for Evolutionary Analysis of Aspartokinase, an Enzyme That Feeds a Branched Network of Many Biochemical Pathways  

PubMed Central

Summary: Aspartokinase (Ask) exists within a variable network that supports the synthesis of 9 amino acids and a number of other important metabolites. Lysine, isoleucine, aromatic amino acids, and dipicolinate may arise from the ASK network or from alternative pathways. Ask proteins were subjected to cohesion group analysis, a methodology that sorts a given protein assemblage into groups in which evolutionary continuity is assured. Two subhomology divisions, ASK? and ASK?, have been recognized. The ASK? subhomology division is the most ancient, being widely distributed throughout the Archaea and Eukarya and in some Bacteria. Within an indel region of about 75 amino acids near the N terminus, ASK? sequences differ from ASK? sequences by the possession of a proposed ancient deletion. ASK? sequences are present in most Bacteria and usually exhibit an in-frame internal translational start site that can generate a small Ask subunit that is identical to the C-terminal portion of the larger subunit of a heterodimeric unit. Particularly novel are ask genes embedded in gene contexts that imply specialization for ectoine (osmotic agent) or aromatic amino acids. The cohesion group approach is well suited for the easy recognition of relatively recent lateral gene transfer (LGT) events, and many examples of these are described. Given the current density of genome representation for Proteobacteria, it is possible to reconstruct more ancient landmark LGT events. Thus, a plausible scenario in which the three well-studied and iconic Ask homologs of Escherichia coli are not within the vertical genealogy of Gammaproteobacteria, but rather originated via LGT from a Bacteroidetes donor, is supported. PMID:19946135

Lo, Chien-Chi; Bonner, Carol A.; Xie, Gary; D'Souza, Mark; Jensen, Roy A.

2009-01-01

176

Biochemical characterization of the initial steps of the Kennedy pathway in Trypanosoma brucei: the ethanolamine and choline kinases  

PubMed Central

Ethanolamine and choline are major components of the trypanosome membrane phospholipids, in the form of GPEtn (glycerophosphoethanolamine) and GPCho (glycerophosphocholine). Ethanolamine is also found as an integral component of the GPI (glycosylphosphatidylinositol) anchor that is required for membrane attachment of cell-surface proteins, most notably the variant-surface glycoproteins. The de novo synthesis of GPEtn and GPCho starts with the generation of phosphoethanolamine and phosphocholine by ethanolamine and choline kinases via the Kennedy pathway. Database mining revealed two putative C/EKs (choline/ethanolamine kinases) in the Trypanosoma brucei genome, which were cloned, overexpressed, purified and characterized. TbEK1 (T. brucei ethanolamine kinase 1) was shown to be catalytically active as an ethanolamine-specific kinase, i.e. it had no choline kinase activity. The Km values for ethanolamine and ATP were found to be 18.4±0.9 and 219±29 ?M respectively. TbC/EK2 (T. brucei choline/ethanolamine kinase 2), on the other hand, was found to be able to phosphorylate both ethanolamine and choline, even though choline was the preferred substrate, with a Km 80 times lower than that of ethanolamine. The Km values for choline, ethanolamine and ATP were 31.4±2.6 ?M, 2.56±0.31 mM and 20.6±1.96 ?M respectively. Further substrate specificity analysis revealed that both TbEK1 and TbC/EK2 were able to tolerate various modifications at the amino group, with the exception of a quaternary amine for TbEK1 (choline) and a primary amine for TbC/EK2 (ethanolamine). Both enzymes recognized analogues with substituents on C-2, but substitutions on C-1 and elongations of the carbon chain were not well tolerated. PMID:18489261

Gibellini, Federica; Hunter, William N.; Smith, Terry K.

2008-01-01

177

Neuro magnetic resonance spectroscopy using wavelet decomposition and statistical testing identifies biochemical changes in people with spinal cord injury and pain.  

PubMed

Spinal cord injury (SCI) can be accompanied by chronic pain, the mechanisms for which are poorly understood. Here we report that magnetic resonance spectroscopy measurements from the brain, collected at 3T, and processed using wavelet-based feature extraction and classification algorithms, can identify biochemical changes that distinguish control subjects from subjects with SCI as well as subdividing the SCI group into those with and without chronic pain. The results from control subjects (n=10) were compared to those with SCI (n=10). The SCI cohort was made up of subjects with chronic neuropathic pain (n=5) and those without chronic pain (n=5). The wavelet-based decomposition of frequency domain MRS signals employs statistical significance testing to identify features best suited to discriminate different classes. Moreover, the features benefit from careful attention to the post-processing of the spectroscopy data prior to the comparison of the three cohorts. The spectroscopy data, from the thalamus, best distinguished control subjects without SCI from those with SCI with a sensitivity and specificity of 0.9 (Percentage of Correct Classification). The spectroscopy data obtained from the prefrontal cortex and anterior cingulate cortex both distinguished between SCI subjects with chronic neuropathic pain and those without pain with a sensitivity and specificity of 1.0. In this study, where two underlying mechanisms co-exist (i.e. SCI and pain), the thalamic changes appear to be linked more strongly to SCI, while the anterior cingulate cortex and prefrontal cortex changes appear to be specifically linked to the presence of pain. PMID:20600973

Stanwell, Peter; Siddall, Philip; Keshava, Nirmal; Cocuzzo, Daniel; Ramadan, Saadallah; Lin, Alexander; Herbert, David; Craig, Ashley; Tran, Yvonne; Middleton, James; Gautam, Shiva; Cousins, Michael; Mountford, Carolyn

2010-11-01

178

Pathway-based analysis of GWAs data identifies association of sex determination genes with susceptibility to testicular germ cell tumors.  

PubMed

Genome-wide association (GWA) studies of testicular germ cell tumor (TGCT) have identified 18 susceptibility loci, some containing genes encoding proteins important in male germ cell development. Deletions of one of these genes, DMRT1, lead to male-to-female sex reversal and are associated with development of gonadoblastoma. To further explore genetic association with TGCT, we undertook a pathway-based analysis of SNP marker associations in the Penn GWAs (349 TGCT cases and 919 controls). We analyzed a custom-built sex determination gene set consisting of 32 genes using three different methods of pathway-based analysis. The sex determination gene set ranked highly compared with canonical gene sets, and it was associated with TGCT (FDRG = 2.28 × 10(-5), FDRM = 0.014 and FDRI = 0.008 for Gene Set Analysis-SNP (GSA-SNP), Meta-Analysis Gene Set Enrichment of Variant Associations (MAGENTA) and Improved Gene Set Enrichment Analysis for Genome-wide Association Study (i-GSEA4GWAS) analysis, respectively). The association remained after removal of DMRT1 from the gene set (FDRG = 0.0002, FDRM = 0.055 and FDRI = 0.009). Using data from the NCI GWA scan (582 TGCT cases and 1056 controls) and UK scan (986 TGCT cases and 4946 controls), we replicated these findings (NCI: FDRG = 0.006, FDRM = 0.014, FDRI = 0.033, and UK: FDRG = 1.04 × 10(-6), FDRM = 0.016, FDRI = 0.025). After removal of DMRT1 from the gene set, the sex determination gene set remains associated with TGCT in the NCI (FDRG = 0.039, FDRM = 0.050 and FDRI = 0.055) and UK scans (FDRG = 3.00 × 10(-5), FDRM = 0.056 and FDRI = 0.044). With the exception of DMRT1, genes in the sex determination gene set have not previously been identified as TGCT susceptibility loci in these GWA scans, demonstrating the complementary nature of a pathway-based approach for genome-wide analysis of TGCT. PMID:24943593

Koster, Roelof; Mitra, Nandita; D'Andrea, Kurt; Vardhanabhuti, Saran; Chung, Charles C; Wang, Zhaoming; Loren Erickson, R; Vaughn, David J; Litchfield, Kevin; Rahman, Nazneen; Greene, Mark H; McGlynn, Katherine A; Turnbull, Clare; Chanock, Stephen J; Nathanson, Katherine L; Kanetsky, Peter A

2014-11-15

179

Structural and Biochemical Characterization of the Salicylyl-acyltranferase SsfX3 from a Tetracycline Biosynthetic Pathway  

SciTech Connect

SsfX3 is a GDSL family acyltransferase that transfers salicylate to the C-4 hydroxyl of a tetracycline intermediate in the penultimate step during biosynthesis of the anticancer natural product SF2575. The C-4 salicylate takes the place of the more common C-4 dimethylamine functionality, making SsfX3 the first acyltransferase identified to act on a tetracycline substrate. The crystal structure of SsfX3 was determined at 2.5 {angstrom}, revealing two distinct domains as follows: an N-terminal {beta}-sandwich domain that resembles a carbohydrate-binding module, and a C-terminal catalytic domain that contains the atypical {alpha}/{beta}-hydrolase fold found in the GDSL hydrolase family of enzymes. The active site lies at one end of a large open binding pocket, which is spatially defined by structural elements from both the N- and C-terminal domains. Mutational analysis in the putative substrate binding pocket identified residues from both domains that are important for binding the acyl donor and acceptor. Furthermore, removal of the N-terminal carbohydrate-binding module-like domain rendered the stand-alone {alpha}/{beta}-hydrolase domain inactive. The additional noncatalytic module is therefore proposed to be required to define the binding pocket and provide sufficient interactions with the spatially extended tetracyclic substrate. SsfX3 was also demonstrated to accept a variety of non-native acyl groups. This relaxed substrate specificity toward the acyl donor allowed the chemoenzymatic biosynthesis of C-4-modified analogs of the immediate precursor to the bioactive SF2575; these were used to assay the structure activity relationships at the C-4 position.

Pickens, Lauren B.; Sawaya, Michael R.; Rasool, Huma; Pashkov, Inna; Yeates, Todd O.; Tang, Yi (UCLA)

2012-03-14

180

Candidate Agtr2 influenced genes and pathways identified by expression profiling in the developing brain of Agtr2?/y mice  

PubMed Central

Intellectual disability (ID) is a common developmental disability observed in one to three percent of the human population. A possible role for the Angiotensin II type 2 receptor (AGTR2) in brain function, affecting learning, memory, and behavior, has been suggested in humans and rodents. Mice lacking the Agtr2 gene (Agtr2?/y) showed significant impairment in their spatial memory and exhibited abnormal dendritic spine morphology. To identify Agtr2 influenced genes and pathways, we performed whole genome microarray analysis on RNA isolated from brains of Agtr2?/y and control male mice at embryonic day 15 (E15) and postnatal day one (P1). The gene expression profiles of the Agtr2?/y brain samples were significantly different when compared to profiles of the age-matched control brains. We identified 62 differently expressed genes (p ? 0.005) at E15 and in P1 brains of the Agtr2?/y mice. We verified the differential expression of several of these genes in brain samples using quantitative RT-PCR. Differentially expressed genes encode molecules involved in multiple cellular processes including microtubule functions associated with dendritic spine morphology. This study provides insight into Agtr2 influenced candidate genes and suggests that expression dysregulation of these genes may modulate Agtr2 actions in the brain that influences learning and memory. PMID:19501643

Pawlowski, Traci L.; Heringer-Walther, Silvia; Cheng, Chun-Huai; Archie, John G.; Chen, Chin-Fu; Walther, Thomas; Srivastava, Anand K.

2009-01-01

181

A New Modified ortho Cleavage Pathway of 3-Chlorocatechol Degradation by Rhodococcus opacus 1CP: Genetic and Biochemical Evidence  

PubMed Central

The 4-chloro- and 2,4-dichlorophenol-degrading strain Rhodococcus opacus 1CP has previously been shown to acquire, during prolonged adaptation, the ability to mineralize 2-chlorophenol. In addition, homogeneous chlorocatechol 1,2-dioxygenase from 2-chlorophenol-grown biomass has shown relatively high activity towards 3-chlorocatechol. Based on sequences of the N terminus and tryptic peptides of this enzyme, degenerate PCR primers were now designed and used for cloning of the respective gene from genomic DNA of strain 1CP. A 9.5-kb fragment containing nine open reading frames was obtained on pROP1. Besides other genes, a gene cluster consisting of four chlorocatechol catabolic genes was identified. As judged by sequence similarity and correspondence of predicted N termini with those of purified enzymes, the open reading frames correspond to genes for a second chlorocatechol 1,2-dioxygenase (ClcA2), a second chloromuconate cycloisomerase (ClcB2), a second dienelactone hydrolase (ClcD2), and a muconolactone isomerase-related enzyme (ClcF). All enzymes of this new cluster are only distantly related to the known chlorocatechol enzymes and appear to represent new evolutionary lines of these activities. UV overlay spectra as well as high-pressure liquid chromatography analyses confirmed that 2-chloro-cis,cis-muconate is transformed by ClcB2 to 5-chloromuconolactone, which during turnover by ClcF gives cis-dienelactone as the sole product. cis-Dienelactone was further hydrolyzed by ClcD2 to maleylacetate. ClcF, despite its sequence similarity to muconolactone isomerases, no longer showed muconolactone-isomerizing activity and thus represents an enzyme dedicated to its new function as a 5-chloromuconolactone dehalogenase. Thus, during 3-chlorocatechol degradation by R. opacus 1CP, dechlorination is catalyzed by a muconolactone isomerase-related enzyme rather than by a specialized chloromuconate cycloisomerase. PMID:12218013

Moiseeva, Olga V.; Solyanikova, Inna P.; Kaschabek, Stefan R.; Gröning, Janosch; Thiel, Monika; Golovleva, Ludmila A.; Schlömann, Michael

2002-01-01

182

Implementation of a High-Throughput Screen for Identifying Small Molecules to Activate the Keap1-Nrf2-ARE Pathway  

PubMed Central

Nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) is a transcription factor that induces a battery of cytoprotective genes involved in antioxidant defense through binding to Antioxidant Response Elements (ARE) located in the promoter regions of these genes. To identify Nrf2 activators for the treatment of oxidative/electrophilic stress-induced diseases, the present study developed a high-throughput assay to evaluate Nrf2 activation using AREc32 cells that contain a luciferase gene under the control of ARE promoters. Of the 47,000 compounds screened, 238 (top 0.5% hits) of the chemicals increased the luminescent signal more than 14.4-fold and were re-tested at eleven concentrations in a range of 0.01–30 µM. Of these 238 compounds, 231 (96%) increased the luminescence signal in a concentration-dependent manner. Chemical structure relationship analysis of these 231 compounds indicated enrichment of four chemical scaffolds (diaryl amides and diaryl ureas, oxazoles and thiazoles, pyranones and thiapyranones, and pyridinones and pyridazinones). In addition, 30 of these 231 compounds were highly effective and/or potent in activating Nrf2, with a greater than 80-fold increase in luminescence, or an EC50 lower than 1.6 µM. These top 30 compounds were also screened in Hepa1c1c7 cells for an increase in Nqo1 mRNA, the prototypical Nrf2-target gene. Of these 30 compounds, 17 increased Nqo1 mRNA in a concentration-dependent manner. In conclusion, the present study documents the development, implementation, and validation of a high-throughput screen to identify activators of the Keap1-Nrf2-ARE pathway. Results from this screening identified Nrf2 activators, and provide novel insights into chemical scaffolds that might prevent oxidative/electrophilic stress-induced toxicity and carcinogenesis. PMID:23056183

Liu, Jie Jerry; Chaguturu, Rathnam; Klaassen, Curtis D.

2012-01-01

183

Selection of personalized patient therapy through the use of knowledge-based computational models that identify tumor-driving signal transduction pathways.  

PubMed

Increasing knowledge about signal transduction pathways as drivers of cancer growth has elicited the development of "targeted drugs," which inhibit aberrant signaling pathways. They require a companion diagnostic test that identifies the tumor-driving pathway; however, currently available tests like estrogen receptor (ER) protein expression for hormonal treatment of breast cancer do not reliably predict therapy response, at least in part because they do not adequately assess functional pathway activity. We describe a novel approach to predict signaling pathway activity based on knowledge-based Bayesian computational models, which interpret quantitative transcriptome data as the functional output of an active signaling pathway, by using expression levels of transcriptional target genes. Following calibration on only a small number of cell lines or cohorts of patient data, they provide a reliable assessment of signaling pathway activity in tumors of different tissue origin. As proof of principle, models for the canonical Wnt and ER pathways are presented, including initial clinical validation on independent datasets from various cancer types. PMID:24695361

Verhaegh, Wim; van Ooijen, Henk; Inda, Márcia A; Hatzis, Pantelis; Versteeg, Rogier; Smid, Marcel; Martens, John; Foekens, John; van de Wiel, Paul; Clevers, Hans; van de Stolpe, Anja

2014-06-01

184

Mutations in TLR/MYD88 pathway identify a subset of young chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients with favorable outcome.  

PubMed

Mutations in Toll-like receptor (TLR) and myeloid differentiation primary response 88 (MYD88) genes have been found in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) at low frequency. We analyzed the incidence, clinicobiological characteristics, and outcome of patients with TLR/MYD88 mutations in 587 CLL patients. Twenty-three patients (3.9%) had mutations, 19 in MYD88 (one with concurrent IRAK1 mutation), 2 TLR2 (one with concomitant TLR6 mutation), 1 IRAK1, and 1 TLR5. No mutations were found in IRAK2 and IRAK4. TLR/MYD88-mutated CLL overexpressed genes of the nuclear factor ?B pathway. Patients with TLR/MYD88 mutations were significantly younger (83% age ?50 years) than those with no mutations. TLR/MYD88 mutations were the most frequent in young patients. Patients with mutated TLR/MYD88 CLL had a higher frequency of mutated IGHV and low expression of CD38 and ZAP-70. Overall survival (OS) was better in TLR/MYD88-mutated than unmutated patients in the whole series (10-year OS, 100% vs 62%; P = .002), and in the subset of patients age ?50 years (100% vs 70%; P = .02). In addition, relative OS of TLR/MYD88-mutated patients was similar to that in the age- and gender-matched population. In summary, TLR/MYD88 mutations identify a population of young CLL patients with favorable outcome. PMID:24782504

Martínez-Trillos, Alejandra; Pinyol, Magda; Navarro, Alba; Aymerich, Marta; Jares, Pedro; Juan, Manel; Rozman, María; Colomer, Dolors; Delgado, Julio; Giné, Eva; González-Díaz, Marcos; Hernández-Rivas, Jesús M; Colado, Enrique; Rayón, Consolación; Payer, Angel R; Terol, Maria José; Navarro, Blanca; Quesada, Victor; Puente, Xosé S; Rozman, Ciril; López-Otín, Carlos; Campo, Elías; López-Guillermo, Armando; Villamor, Neus

2014-06-12

185

The combination of transcriptomics and informatics identifies pathways targeted by miR-204 during neurogenesis and axon guidance.  

PubMed

Vertebrate organogenesis is critically sensitive to gene dosage and even subtle variations in the expression levels of key genes may result in a variety of tissue anomalies. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are fundamental regulators of gene expression and their role in vertebrate tissue patterning is just beginning to be elucidated. To gain further insight into this issue, we analysed the transcriptomic consequences of manipulating the expression of miR-204 in the Medaka fish model system. We used RNA-Seq and an innovative bioinformatics approach, which combines conventional differential expression analysis with the behavior expected by miR-204 targets after its overexpression and knockdown. With this approach combined with a correlative analysis of the putative targets, we identified a wider set of miR-204 target genes belonging to different pathways. Together, these approaches confirmed that miR-204 has a key role in eye development and further highlighted its putative function in neural differentiation processes, including axon guidance as supported by in vivo functional studies. Together, our results demonstrate the advantage of integrating next-generation sequencing and bioinformatics approaches to investigate miRNA biology and provide new important information on the role of miRNAs in the control of axon guidance and more broadly in nervous system development. PMID:24895435

Conte, Ivan; Merella, Stefania; Garcia-Manteiga, Jose Manuel; Migliore, Chiara; Lazarevic, Dejan; Carrella, Sabrina; Marco-Ferreres, Raquel; Avellino, Raffaella; Davidson, Nathan Paul; Emmett, Warren; Sanges, Remo; Bockett, Nicholas; Van Heel, David; Meroni, Germana; Bovolenta, Paola; Stupka, Elia; Banfi, Sandro

2014-07-01

186

The combination of transcriptomics and informatics identifies pathways targeted by miR-204 during neurogenesis and axon guidance  

PubMed Central

Vertebrate organogenesis is critically sensitive to gene dosage and even subtle variations in the expression levels of key genes may result in a variety of tissue anomalies. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are fundamental regulators of gene expression and their role in vertebrate tissue patterning is just beginning to be elucidated. To gain further insight into this issue, we analysed the transcriptomic consequences of manipulating the expression of miR-204 in the Medaka fish model system. We used RNA-Seq and an innovative bioinformatics approach, which combines conventional differential expression analysis with the behavior expected by miR-204 targets after its overexpression and knockdown. With this approach combined with a correlative analysis of the putative targets, we identified a wider set of miR-204 target genes belonging to different pathways. Together, these approaches confirmed that miR-204 has a key role in eye development and further highlighted its putative function in neural differentiation processes, including axon guidance as supported by in vivo functional studies. Together, our results demonstrate the advantage of integrating next-generation sequencing and bioinformatics approaches to investigate miRNA biology and provide new important information on the role of miRNAs in the control of axon guidance and more broadly in nervous system development. PMID:24895435

Conte, Ivan; Merella, Stefania; Garcia-Manteiga, Jose Manuel; Migliore, Chiara; Lazarevic, Dejan; Carrella, Sabrina; Marco-Ferreres, Raquel; Avellino, Raffaella; Davidson, Nathan Paul; Emmett, Warren; Sanges, Remo; Bockett, Nicholas; Van Heel, David; Meroni, Germana; Bovolenta, Paola; Stupka, Elia; Banfi, Sandro

2014-01-01

187

Construction and analysis of biochemical networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Bioprocesses are being implemented for a range of different applications including the production of fuels, chemicals and drugs. Hence, it is becoming increasingly important to understand and model how they function and how they can be modified or designed to give the optimal performance. Here we discuss the construction and analysis of biochemical networks which are the first logical steps towards this goal. The construction of a reaction network is possible through reconstruction: extracting information from literature and from databases. This can be supplemented by reaction prediction methods which can identify steps which are missing from the current knowledge base. Analysis of biochemical systems generally requires some experimental input but can be used to identify important reactions and targets for enhancing the performance of the organism involved. Metabolic flux, pathway and metabolic control analysis can be used to determine the limits, capabilities and potential targets for enhancement respectively.

Binns, Michael; Theodoropoulos, Constantinos

2012-09-01

188

Signature pathways identified from gene expression profiles in the human uterine cervix before and after spontaneous term parturition  

Microsoft Academic Search

STUDY DESIGN: The cervical transcriptome was characterized previously from biopsy specimens taken before and after term labor. Pathway analysis was used to study the differentially expressed genes, based on 2 gene-to- pathway annotation databases (Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Ge- nomes (Kanehisa Laboratories, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan) and Meta- core software (GeneGo, Inc, St. Joseph, MI)). Overrepresented and highly impacted

Sonia S. Hassan; Roberto Romero; Adi L. Tarca; Sorin Draghici; Beth Pineles; Andrej Bugrim; Nahla Khalek; Natalia Camacho; Pooja Mittal; Bo Hyun Yoon; Jimmy Espinoza; Chong Jai Kim; Yoram Sorokin; John Malone Jr

189

Hydrograph Separations can Identify Contaminant-Specific Pathways for Conservation Targeting in a Tile-Drained Watershed  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Water quality issues continue to vex agriculture, partly due to perceived tradeoffs among different contaminants. Yet, agricultural water quality is influenced by contaminant-transport pathways unique to each watershed that are not well defined. More accurate information on contaminant pathways coul...

190

Identifying putative candidate genes and pathways involved in immune responses to porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) infection  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Differences in gene expression were compared between RNAs from lungs of high (HR) and low (LR) PRRSV burden pigs using the swine protein-annotated long oligonucleotide microarray, the Pigoligoarray. Pathway analyses were carried out to determine biological processes, pathways and networks that diffe...

191

Whole Blood Transcriptomics and Urinary Metabolomics to Define Adaptive Biochemical Pathways of High-Intensity Exercise in 50-60 Year Old Masters Athletes  

PubMed Central

Exercise is beneficial for a variety of age-related disorders. However, the molecular mechanisms mediating the beneficial adaptations to exercise in older adults are not well understood. The aim of the current study was to utilize a dual approach to characterize the genetic and metabolic adaptive pathways altered by exercise in veteran athletes and age-matched untrained individuals. Two groups of 50–60 year old males: competitive cyclists (athletes, n?=?9; VO2peak 59.1±5.2 ml·kg?1·min?1; peak aerobic power 383±39 W) and untrained, minimally active individuals (controls, n?=?8; VO2peak 35.9±9.7 ml·kg?1·min?1; peak aerobic power 230±57 W) were examined. All participants completed an acute bout of submaximal endurance exercise, and blood and urine samples pre- and post-exercise were analyzed for gene expression and metabolic changes utilizing genome-wide DNA microarray analysis and NMR spectroscopy-based metabolomics, respectively. Our results indicate distinct differences in gene and metabolite expression involving energy metabolism, lipids, insulin signaling and cardiovascular function between the two groups. These findings may lead to new insights into beneficial signaling pathways of healthy aging and help identify surrogate markers for monitoring exercise and training load. PMID:24643011

Mukherjee, Kamalika; Edgett, Brittany A.; Burrows, Harrison W.; Castro, Cecilia; Griffin, Julian L.; Schwertani, Adel Giaid; Gurd, Brendon J.; Funk, Colin D.

2014-01-01

192

PROFILING GENE EXPRESSION IN HUMAN H295R ADRENOCORTICAL CARCINOMA CELLS AND RAT TESTES TO IDENTIFY PATHWAYS OF TOXICITY FOR CONAZOLE FUNGICIDES  

EPA Science Inventory

Profiling Gene Expression in Human H295R Adrenocortical Carcinoma Cells and Rat Testes to Identify Pathways of Toxicity for Conazole Fungicides Ren1, H., Schmid1, J., Retief2, J., Turpaz2, Y.,Zhang3, X.,Jones3, P., Newsted3, J.,Giesy3, J., Wolf1, D.,Wood1, C., Bao1, W., Dix1, ...

193

Multi-membership gene regulation in pathway based microarray analysis  

PubMed Central

Background Gene expression analysis has been intensively researched for more than a decade. Recently, there has been elevated interest in the integration of microarray data analysis with other types of biological knowledge in a holistic analytical approach. We propose a methodology that can be facilitated for pathway based microarray data analysis, based on the observation that a substantial proportion of genes present in biochemical pathway databases are members of a number of distinct pathways. Our methodology aims towards establishing the state of individual pathways, by identifying those truly affected by the experimental conditions based on the behaviour of such genes. For that purpose it considers all the pathways in which a gene participates and the general census of gene expression per pathway. Results We utilise hill climbing, simulated annealing and a genetic algorithm to analyse the consistency of the produced results, through the application of fuzzy adjusted rand indexes and hamming distance. All algorithms produce highly consistent genes to pathways allocations, revealing the contribution of genes to pathway functionality, in agreement with current pathway state visualisation techniques, with the simulated annealing search proving slightly superior in terms of efficiency. Conclusions We show that the expression values of genes, which are members of a number of biochemical pathways or modules, are the net effect of the contribution of each gene to these biochemical processes. We show that by manipulating the pathway and module contribution of such genes to follow underlying trends we can interpret microarray results centred on the behaviour of these genes. PMID:21939531

2011-01-01

194

New Variants Including ARG1 Polymorphisms Associated with C-Reactive Protein Levels Identified by Genome-Wide Association and Pathway Analysis  

PubMed Central

C-reactive protein (CRP) is a general marker of systemic inflammation and cardiovascular disease (CVD). The genetic contribution to differences in CRP levels remains to be explained, especially in non-European populations. Thus, the aim of this study was to identify genetic loci associated with CRP levels in Korean population. We performed genome-wide association studies (GWAS) using SNPs from 8,529 Korean individuals (7,626 for stage 1 and 903 for stage 2). We also performed pathway analysis. We identified a new genetic locus associated with CRP levels upstream of ARG1 gene (top significant SNP: rs9375813, Pmeta?=?2.85×10?8), which encodes a key enzyme of the urea cycle counteract the effects of nitric oxide, in addition to known CRP (rs7553007, Pmeta?=?1.72×10?16) and HNF1A loci (rs2259816, Pmeta?=?2.90×10?10). When we evaluated the associations between the CRP-related SNPs with cardiovascular disease phenotypes, rs9375813 (ARG1) showed a marginal association with hypertension (P?=?0.0440). To identify more variants and pathways, we performed pathway analysis and identified six candidate pathways comprised of genes related to inflammatory processes and CVDs (CRP, HNF1A, PCSK6, CD36, and ABCA1). In addition to the previously reported loci (CRP, HNF1A, and IL6) in diverse ethnic groups, we identified novel variants in the ARG1 locus associated with CRP levels in Korean population and a number of interesting genes related to inflammatory processes and CVD through pathway analysis. PMID:24763700

Yim, Seon-Hee; Jung, Seung-Hyun; Jo, Jaeseong; Jee, Sun Ha; Chung, Yeun-Jun

2014-01-01

195

A large-scale RNAi screen in human cells identifies new components of the p53 pathway  

Microsoft Academic Search

RNA interference (RNAi) is a powerful new tool with which to perform loss-of-function genetic screens in lower organisms and can greatly facilitate the identification of components of cellular signalling pathways. In mammalian cells, such screens have been hampered by a lack of suitable tools that can be used on a large scale. We and others have recently developed expression vectors

Katrien Berns; E. Marielle Hijmans; Jasper Mullenders; Thijn R. Brummelkamp; Arno Velds; Mike Heimerikx; Ron M. Kerkhoven; Mandy Madiredjo; Wouter Nijkamp; Britta Weigelt; Reuven Agami; Wei Ge; Guy Cavet; Peter S. Linsley; Roderick L. Beijersbergen; René Bernards

2004-01-01

196

Differential Expression of Wnt Pathway Genes in Sporadic Hepatocellular Carcinomas Infected With Hepatitis B Virus Identified With OligoGE Arrays  

PubMed Central

Background Epidemiological evidence has clearly indicated that chronic infection with the hepatitis B virus (HBV) is the major risk factor for developing hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Nonetheless, the mechanisms by which HBV contributes to the pathogenesis of HCC have not been fully elucidated. Objectives Our aim was to characterize differential gene expression profiles related to the Wnt signaling pathway between primary tumor and adjacent normal tissues in HCC patients with concomitant HBVinfection . Materials and Methods An oligoGEArray® (an oligonucleotide-based gene expression array platform) containing 126 Wnt signaling pathway-related genes was used to compare gene expressions between primary HCC and adjacent non-tumorous liver tissues from 10 patients with HCC. Selected differential genes were identified with real-time RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry (IHC). In particular, the protein of the differential gene DVL3 (disheveled, dsh homolog 3 [Drosophila]) was chosen to investigate whether it is up regulated in primary tumor correlated with the clinic pathological characteristics of HCC patients. For this purpose we examined 56 HCC tissue samples via IHC for the presence of DVL3 protein. Results Sixteen genes were identified with significant differential expression between HCC and adjacent non-tumorous liver tissue. These genes have been previously associated with the Frizzled signaling pathway, cell cycle, transcription, or protein degradation. All (100%) of the tumor samples results from 56 HCC patients tested were positive for DVL3 via IHC. Based on the intensity of DVL3 immunoreactivity, 25 (44.6%) and 31 (55.4%) of the patients were classified aslow and high-DVL3, respectively, which correlated with tumor stage (P = 0.029). Conclusions This study clarified a number of Wnt pathway-related genes which are dysregulated in HBV-associated HCC. These genes may be contributedto the frequent activation of the Wnt signaling pathway. Our results promote the role of the Wnt signaling pathway in HBV-associated HCC. PMID:23483081

Lin, Xiaoyan; Wang, Qiangxiu; Cao, Zhixin; Geng, Ming; Cao, Yongcheng; Liu, Xiaohong

2013-01-01

197

Analysis of TETRAKETIDE ?-PYRONE REDUCTASE Function in Arabidopsis thaliana Reveals a Previously Unknown, but Conserved, Biochemical Pathway in Sporopollenin Monomer Biosynthesis[C][W  

PubMed Central

The precise structure of the sporopollenin polymer that is the major constituent of exine, the outer pollen wall, remains poorly understood. Recently, characterization of Arabidopsis thaliana genes and corresponding enzymes involved in exine formation has demonstrated the role of fatty acid derivatives as precursors of sporopollenin building units. Fatty acyl-CoA esters synthesized by ACYL-COA SYNTHETASE5 (ACOS5) are condensed with malonyl-CoA by POLYKETIDE SYNTHASE A (PKSA) and PKSB to yield ?-pyrone polyketides required for exine formation. Here, we show that two closely related genes encoding oxidoreductases are specifically and transiently expressed in tapetal cells during microspore development in Arabidopsis anthers. Mutants compromised in expression of the reductases displayed a range of pollen exine layer defects, depending on the mutant allele. Phylogenetic studies indicated that the two reductases belong to a large reductase/dehydrogenase gene family and cluster in two distinct clades with putative orthologs from several angiosperm lineages and the moss Physcomitrella patens. Recombinant proteins produced in bacteria reduced the carbonyl function of tetraketide ?-pyrone compounds synthesized by PKSA/B, and the proteins were therefore named TETRAKETIDE ?-PYRONE REDUCTASE1 (TKPR1) and TKPR2 (previously called DRL1 and CCRL6, respectively). TKPR activities, together with those of ACOS5 and PKSA/B, identify a conserved biosynthetic pathway leading to hydroxylated ?-pyrone compounds that were previously unknown to be sporopollenin precursors. PMID:21193572

Grienenberger, Etienne; Kim, Sung Soo; Lallemand, Benjamin; Geoffroy, Pierrette; Heintz, Dimitri; Souza, Clarice de Azevedo; Heitz, Thierry; Douglas, Carl J.; Legrand, Michel

2010-01-01

198

Identifying developmental toxicity pathways for a subset of ToxCast chemicals using human embryonic stem cells and metabolomics  

SciTech Connect

Metabolomics analysis was performed on the supernatant of human embryonic stem (hES) cell cultures exposed to a blinded subset of 11 chemicals selected from the chemical library of EPA's ToxCast Trade-Mark-Sign chemical screening and prioritization research project. Metabolites from hES cultures were evaluated for known and novel signatures that may be indicative of developmental toxicity. Significant fold changes in endogenous metabolites were detected for 83 putatively annotated mass features in response to the subset of ToxCast chemicals. The annotations were mapped to specific human metabolic pathways. This revealed strong effects on pathways for nicotinate and nicotinamide metabolism, pantothenate and CoA biosynthesis, glutathione metabolism, and arginine and proline metabolism pathways. Predictivity for adverse outcomes in mammalian prenatal developmental toxicity studies used ToxRefDB and other sources of information, including Stemina Biomarker Discovery's predictive DevTox Registered-Sign model trained on 23 pharmaceutical agents of known developmental toxicity and differing potency. The model initially predicted developmental toxicity from the blinded ToxCast compounds in concordance with animal data with 73% accuracy. Retraining the model with data from the unblinded test compounds at one concentration level increased the predictive accuracy for the remaining concentrations to 83%. These preliminary results on a 11-chemical subset of the ToxCast chemical library indicate that metabolomics analysis of the hES secretome provides information valuable for predictive modeling and mechanistic understanding of mammalian developmental toxicity. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We tested 11 environmental compounds in a hESC metabolomics platform. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Significant changes in secreted small molecule metabolites were observed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Perturbed mass features map to pathways critical for normal development and pregnancy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Arginine, proline, nicotinate, nicotinamide and glutathione pathways were affected.

Kleinstreuer, N.C., E-mail: kleinstreuer.nicole@epa.gov [NCCT, US EPA, RTP, NC 27711 (United States); Smith, A.M.; West, P.R.; Conard, K.R.; Fontaine, B.R. [Stemina Biomarker Discovery, Inc., Madison, WI 53719 (United States)] [Stemina Biomarker Discovery, Inc., Madison, WI 53719 (United States); Weir-Hauptman, A.M. [Covance, Inc., Madison, WI 53704 (United States)] [Covance, Inc., Madison, WI 53704 (United States); Palmer, J.A. [Stemina Biomarker Discovery, Inc., Madison, WI 53719 (United States)] [Stemina Biomarker Discovery, Inc., Madison, WI 53719 (United States); Knudsen, T.B.; Dix, D.J. [NCCT, US EPA, RTP, NC 27711 (United States)] [NCCT, US EPA, RTP, NC 27711 (United States); Donley, E.L.R. [Stemina Biomarker Discovery, Inc., Madison, WI 53719 (United States)] [Stemina Biomarker Discovery, Inc., Madison, WI 53719 (United States); Cezar, G.G. [Stemina Biomarker Discovery, Inc., Madison, WI 53719 (United States) [Stemina Biomarker Discovery, Inc., Madison, WI 53719 (United States); University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

2011-11-15

199

The formation, pathway and destination of the North Pacific subduction water identified by a simulated passive tracer  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The formation, pathway and destination of the North Pacific subduction water are investigated by using a simulated passive traceradjoint, based on circulation estimates of a global general circulation model.Results confirm that the North Pacific subduction rate corresponds well with the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO),especial highly correlated to the March(winter) PDO index. The effect of mixing increases this correlation from 0.7 to 0.8. The subduction water then particpate in the subtropic gyre of North Pacific. About 30% of the water obducts up to the local mixed layer in early 2-3 years, and more and more water obducts along the pathway of the Subtropical Cell (STC)towrds Equator. Despite the fact that only a part of water can reach the tropical zone, the signal of sudduction rate which is highly correlated to the PDO keeps very well in the process of the transport of STC.

Gao, S.; Chen, Y.

2011-12-01

200

Mutational Analysis of EGFR and Related Signaling Pathway Genes in Lung Adenocarcinomas Identifies a Novel Somatic Kinase Domain Mutation in FGFR4  

PubMed Central

Background Fifty percent of lung adenocarcinomas harbor somatic mutations in six genes that encode proteins in the EGFR signaling pathway, i.e., EGFR, HER2/ERBB2, HER4/ERBB4, PIK3CA, BRAF, and KRAS. We performed mutational profiling of a large cohort of lung adenocarcinomas to uncover other potential somatic mutations in genes of this signaling pathway that could contribute to lung tumorigenesis. Methodology/Principal Findings We analyzed genomic DNA from a total of 261 resected, clinically annotated non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) specimens. The coding sequences of 39 genes were screened for somatic mutations via high-throughput dideoxynucleotide sequencing of PCR-amplified gene products. Mutations were considered to be somatic only if they were found in an independent tumor-derived PCR product but not in matched normal tissue. Sequencing of 9MB of tumor sequence identified 239 putative genetic variants. We further examined 22 variants found in RAS family genes and 135 variants localized to exons encoding the kinase domain of respective proteins. We identified a total of 37 non-synonymous somatic mutations; 36 were found collectively in EGFR, KRAS, BRAF, and PIK3CA. One somatic mutation was a previously unreported mutation in the kinase domain (exon 16) of FGFR4 (Glu681Lys), identified in 1 of 158 tumors. The FGFR4 mutation is analogous to a reported tumor-specific somatic mutation in ERBB2 and is located in the same exon as a previously reported kinase domain mutation in FGFR4 (Pro712Thr) in a lung adenocarcinoma cell line. Conclusions/Significance This study is one of the first comprehensive mutational analyses of major genes in a specific signaling pathway in a sizeable cohort of lung adenocarcinomas. Our results suggest the majority of gain-of-function mutations within kinase genes in the EGFR signaling pathway have already been identified. Our findings also implicate FGFR4 in the pathogenesis of a subset of lung adenocarcinomas. PMID:17487277

Marks, Jenifer L.; McLellan, Michael D.; Zakowski, Maureen F.; Lash, Alex E.; Kasai, Yumi; Broderick, Stephen; Sarkaria, Inderpal S.; Pham, DuyKhanh; Singh, Bhuvanesh; Miner, Tracie L.; Fewell, Ginger A.; Fulton, Lucinda L.; Mardis, Elaine R.; Wilson, Richard K.; Kris, Mark G.; Rusch, Valerie W.; Varmus, Harold; Pao, William

2007-01-01

201

Implementation of a High-Throughput Screen for Identifying Small Molecules to Activate the Keap1-Nrf2-ARE Pathway  

E-print Network

compounds protect against oxidative/ electrophilic stress-induced toxicity, at least partially through activating Nrf2. For example, curcumin protects against focal ischemia of the cerebrum through upregulation of Nrf2 [16], and oltipraz protects against... pathway [18]. To date, a number of compounds with diverse chemical structures have been shown to activate Keap1- Nrf2, including oxidizable diphenols (tBHQ), dithiolethiones (oltipraz), isothiocyanates (sulforaphane), and Michael acceptors (curcumin...

Wu, Kai Connie; McDonald, Peter R.; Liu, Jie Jerry; Chaguturu, Rathnam; Klaassen, Curtis D.

2012-10-08

202

Hearing function and thresholds: a genome-wide association study in European isolated populations identifies new loci and pathways  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundHearing is a complex trait, but until now only a few genes are known to contribute to variability of this process. In order to discover genes and pathways that underlie auditory function, a genome-wide association study was carried out within the International Consortium G-EAR.MethodsMeta-analysis of genome-wide association study's data from six isolated populations of European ancestry for an overall number

Giorgia Girotto; Nicola Pirastu; Rossella Sorice; Ginevra Biino; Harry Campbell; Adamo P dAdamo; Nicholas D Hastie; Teresa Nutile; Ozren Polasek; Laura Portas; Igor Rudan; Sheila Ulivi; Tatijana Zemunik; Alan F Wright; Marina Ciullo; Caroline Hayward; Mario Pirastu; Paolo Gasparini

2011-01-01

203

Method for identifying subsurface fluid migration and drainage pathways in and among oil and gas reservoirs using 3-D and 4-D seismic imaging  

DOEpatents

The invention utilizes 3-D and 4-D seismic surveys as a means of deriving information useful in petroleum exploration and reservoir management. The methods use both single seismic surveys (3-D) and multiple seismic surveys separated in time (4-D) of a region of interest to determine large scale migration pathways within sedimentary basins, and fine scale drainage structure and oil-water-gas regions within individual petroleum producing reservoirs. Such structure is identified using pattern recognition tools which define the regions of interest. The 4-D seismic data sets may be used for data completion for large scale structure where time intervals between surveys do not allow for dynamic evolution. The 4-D seismic data sets also may be used to find variations over time of small scale structure within individual reservoirs which may be used to identify petroleum drainage pathways, oil-water-gas regions and, hence, attractive drilling targets. After spatial orientation, and amplitude and frequency matching of the multiple seismic data sets, High Amplitude Event (HAE) regions consistent with the presence of petroleum are identified using seismic attribute analysis. High Amplitude Regions are grown and interconnected to establish plumbing networks on the large scale and reservoir structure on the small scale. Small scale variations over time between seismic surveys within individual reservoirs are identified and used to identify drainage patterns and bypassed petroleum to be recovered. The location of such drainage patterns and bypassed petroleum may be used to site wells. 22 figs.

Anderson, R.N.; Boulanger, A.; Bagdonas, E.P.; Xu, L.; He, W.

1996-12-17

204

Method for identifying subsurface fluid migration and drainage pathways in and among oil and gas reservoirs using 3-D and 4-D seismic imaging  

DOEpatents

The invention utilizes 3-D and 4-D seismic surveys as a means of deriving information useful in petroleum exploration and reservoir management. The methods use both single seismic surveys (3-D) and multiple seismic surveys separated in time (4-D) of a region of interest to determine large scale migration pathways within sedimentary basins, and fine scale drainage structure and oil-water-gas regions within individual petroleum producing reservoirs. Such structure is identified using pattern recognition tools which define the regions of interest. The 4-D seismic data sets may be used for data completion for large scale structure where time intervals between surveys do not allow for dynamic evolution. The 4-D seismic data sets also may be used to find variations over time of small scale structure within individual reservoirs which may be used to identify petroleum drainage pathways, oil-water-gas regions and, hence, attractive drilling targets. After spatial orientation, and amplitude and frequency matching of the multiple seismic data sets, High Amplitude Event (HAE) regions consistent with the presence of petroleum are identified using seismic attribute analysis. High Amplitude Regions are grown and interconnected to establish plumbing networks on the large scale and reservoir structure on the small scale. Small scale variations over time between seismic surveys within individual reservoirs are identified and used to identify drainage patterns and bypassed petroleum to be recovered. The location of such drainage patterns and bypassed petroleum may be used to site wells.

Anderson, Roger N. (New York, NY); Boulanger, Albert (New York, NY); Bagdonas, Edward P. (Brookline, MA); Xu, Liqing (New Milford, NJ); He, Wei (New Milford, NJ)

1996-01-01

205

Experimentally-Derived Fibroblast Gene Signatures Identify Molecular Pathways Associated with Distinct Subsets of Systemic Sclerosis Patients in Three Independent Cohorts  

PubMed Central

Genome-wide expression profiling in systemic sclerosis (SSc) has identified four ‘intrinsic’ subsets of disease (fibroproliferative, inflammatory, limited, and normal-like), each of which shows deregulation of distinct signaling pathways; however, the full set of pathways contributing to this differential gene expression has not been fully elucidated. Here we examine experimentally derived gene expression signatures in dermal fibroblasts for thirteen different signaling pathways implicated in SSc pathogenesis. These data show distinct and overlapping sets of genes induced by each pathway, allowing for a better understanding of the molecular relationship between profibrotic and immune signaling networks. Pathway-specific gene signatures were analyzed across a compendium of microarray datasets consisting of skin biopsies from three independent cohorts representing 80 SSc patients, 4 morphea, and 26 controls. IFN? signaling showed a strong association with early disease, while TGF? signaling spanned the fibroproliferative and inflammatory subsets, was associated with worse MRSS, and was higher in lesional than non-lesional skin. The fibroproliferative subset was most strongly associated with PDGF signaling, while the inflammatory subset demonstrated strong activation of innate immune pathways including TLR signaling upstream of NF-?B. The limited and normal-like subsets did not show associations with fibrotic and inflammatory mediators such as TGF? and TNF?. The normal-like subset showed high expression of genes associated with lipid signaling, which was absent in the inflammatory and limited subsets. Together, these data suggest a model by which IFN? is involved in early disease pathology, and disease severity is associated with active TGF? signaling. PMID:25607805

Johnson, Michael E.; Mahoney, J. Matthew; Taroni, Jaclyn; Sargent, Jennifer L.; Marmarelis, Eleni; Wu, Ming-Ru; Varga, John; Hinchcliff, Monique E.; Whitfield, Michael L.

2015-01-01

206

Transcript Profiling of Paoenia ostii during Artificial Chilling Induced Dormancy Release Identifies Activation of GA Pathway and Carbohydrate Metabolism  

PubMed Central

Endo-dormant flower buds must pass through a period of chilling to reinitiate growth and subsequent flowering, which is a major obstacle to the forcing culture of tree peony in winter. Customized cDNA microarray (8×15 K element) was used to investigate gene expression profiling in tree peony ‘Feng Dan Bai’ buds during 24 d chilling treatment at 0–4°C. According to the morphological changes after the whole plants were transferred to green house, endo-dormancy was released after 18 d chilling treatment, and prolonged chilling treatment increased bud break rate. Pearson correlation hierarchical clustering of sample groups was highly consistent with the dormancy transitions revealed by morphological changes. Totally 3,174 significantly differentially-expressed genes (P<0.05) were observed through endo-dormancy release process, of which the number of up-regulated (1,611) and that of down-regulated (1,563) was almost the same. Functional annotation of differentially-expressed genes revealed that cellular process, metabolic process, response to stimulus, regulation of biological process and development process were well-represented. Hierarchical clustering indicated that activation of genes involved in carbohydrate metabolism (Glycolysis, Citrate cycle and Pentose phosphate pathway), energy metabolism and cell growth. Based on the results of GO analysis, totally 51 probes presented in the microarray were associated with GA response and GA signaling pathway, and 22 of them were differently expressed. The expression profiles also revealed that the genes of GA biosynthesis, signaling and response involved in endo-dormancy release. We hypothesized that activation of GA pathway played a central role in the regulation of dormancy release in tree peony. PMID:23405132

Liu, Chunying; Zhang, Yang; Zheng, Guosheng

2013-01-01

207

Novel spinal pathways identified by neuronal c-Fos expression after urethrogenital reflex activation in female guinea pigs.  

PubMed

Pudendal nerve-spinal pathways are involved in urethrogenital sensation, pain and sexual activity. However, details of these pathways and their modulation are unclear. We examined spinal pathways activated by the urethrogenital reflex (UGR) and visualized by c-Fos immunoreactivity in reflexly activated neurons within spinal cord. In anesthetized female guinea pigs, a balloon was inserted into the urethra and inflated with short-repeat or long-continuous distension to activate the UGR. A second balloon recorded reflex contractions of the vagina and uterus. Two control groups had either no balloon or a vaginal balloon (VB) only. Ninety minutes after UGR activation, c-Fos immunoreactivity in L3 and S2 spinal segments was examined. Reflex activated c-Fos immunoreactivity also was investigated in some animals with acute spinal transections at either L4 or T12 levels. There was no significant difference in spinal c-Fos expression between the control groups. Short-repeat distension reliably induced a UGR and a two- to threefold increase in c-Fos-expressing neurons throughout dorsal, intermediate and lateral spinal gray matter at S2 and about twofold increase in superficial dorsal horn at L3. T12 transection had little effect on c-Fos expression at either spinal level. However, after L4 transection, UGR generation was associated with a four- to sixfold increase in c-Fos-expressing neurons in lateral horn (LH) and central canal areas at S2, and but only 20-30% increase at L3. Thus, UGR activates preganglionic neurons projecting to pelvic viscera in both sacral and lumbar spinal cord. The reflex also must activate ascending and descending spinal inhibitory circuits that suppress c-Fos-expression in neurons at both sacral and lumbar spinal levels. PMID:25549834

Yuan, S Y; Vilimas, P I; Zagorodnyuk, V P; Gibbins, I L

2015-03-12

208

Genome wide association study of SNP-, gene-, and pathway-based approaches to identify genes influencing susceptibility to Staphylococcus aureus infections  

PubMed Central

Background: We conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) to identify specific genetic variants that underlie susceptibility to diseases caused by Staphylococcus aureus in humans. Methods: Cases (n = 309) and controls (n = 2925) were genotyped at 508,921 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Cases had at least one laboratory and clinician confirmed disease caused by S. aureus whereas controls did not. R-package (for SNP association), EIGENSOFT (to estimate and adjust for population stratification) and gene- (VEGAS) and pathway-based (DAVID, PANTHER, and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis) analyses were performed. Results: No SNP reached genome-wide significance. Four SNPs exceeded the p < 10?5 threshold including two (rs2455012 and rs7152530) reaching a p-value < 10?7. The nearby genes were PDE4B (rs2455012), TXNRD2 (rs3804047), VRK1 and BCL11B (rs7152530), and PNPLA5 (rs470093). The top two findings from the gene-based analysis were NMRK2 (pgene = 1.20E-05), which codes an integrin binding molecule (focal adhesion), and DAPK3 (pgene = 5.10E-05), a serine/threonine kinase (apoptosis and cytokinesis). The pathway analyses identified epithelial cell responses to mechanical and non-mechanical stress. Conclusion: We identified potential susceptibility genes for S. aureus diseases in this preliminary study but confirmation by other studies is needed. The observed associations could be relevant given the complexity of S. aureus as a pathogen and its ability to exploit multiple biological pathways to cause infections in humans. PMID:24847357

Ye, Zhan; Vasco, Daniel A.; Carter, Tonia C.; Brilliant, Murray H.; Schrodi, Steven J.; Shukla, Sanjay K.

2014-01-01

209

40 CFR 158.2010 - Biochemical pesticides data requirements.  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

...REQUIREMENTS FOR PESTICIDES Biochemical Pesticides § 158.2010 Biochemical pesticides data requirements. (a) Sections 158.2030 through 158.2070 identify the data requirements that are required to support registration of biochemical...

2010-07-01

210

Patient-Based Transcriptome-Wide Analysis Identify Interferon and Ubiquination Pathways as Potential Predictors of Influenza A Disease Severity  

PubMed Central

Background The influenza A virus is an RNA virus that is responsible for seasonal epidemics worldwide with up to five million cases of severe illness and 500,000 deaths annually according to the World Health Organization estimates. The factors associated with severe diseases are not well defined, but more severe disease is more often seen among persons aged >65 years, infants, pregnant women, and individuals of any age with underlying health conditions. Methodology/Principal Findings Using gene expression microarrays, the transcriptomic profiles of influenza-infected patients with severe (N?=?11), moderate (N?=?40) and mild (N?=?83) symptoms were compared with the febrile patients of unknown etiology (N?=?73). We found that influenza-infected patients, regardless of their clinical outcomes, had a stronger induction of antiviral and cytokine responses and a stronger attenuation of NK and T cell responses in comparison with those with unknown etiology. More importantly, we found that both interferon and ubiquitination signaling were strongly attenuated in patients with the most severe outcomes in comparison with those with moderate and mild outcomes, suggesting the protective roles of these pathways in disease pathogenesis. Conclusion/Significances The attenuation of interferon and ubiquitination pathways may associate with the clinical outcomes of influenza patients. PMID:25365328

Hoang, Long Truong; Tolfvenstam, Thomas; Ooi, Eng Eong; Khor, Chiea Chuen; Naim, Ahmand Nazri Mohamed; Ho, Eliza Xin Pei; Ong, Swee Hoe; Wertheim, Heiman F.; Fox, Annette; Van Vinh Nguyen, Chau; Nghiem, Ngoc My; Ha, Tuan Manh; Thi Ngoc Tran, Anh; Tambayah, Paul; Lin, Raymond; Sangsajja, Chariya; Manosuthi, Weerawat; Chuchottaworn, Chareon; Sansayunh, Piamlarp; Chotpitayasunondh, Tawee; Suntarattiwong, Piyarat; Chokephaibulkit, Kulkanya; Puthavathana, Pilaipan; de Jong, Menno D.; Farrar, Jeremy; van Doorn, H. Rogier; Hibberd, Martin Lloyd

2014-01-01

211

Drug Intervention Response Predictions with PARADIGM (DIRPP) identifies drug resistant cancer cell lines and pathway mechanisms of resistance.  

PubMed

The revolution in sequencing techniques in the past decade has provided an extensive picture of the molecular mechanisms behind complex diseases such as cancer. The Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia (CCLE) and The Cancer Genome Project (CGP) have provided an unprecedented opportunity to examine copy number, gene expression, and mutational information for over 1000 cell lines of multiple tumor types alongside IC50 values for over 150 different drugs and drug related compounds. We present a novel pipeline called DIRPP, Drug Intervention Response Predictions with PARADIGM7, which predicts a cell line's response to a drug intervention from molecular data. PARADIGM (Pathway Recognition Algorithm using Data Integration on Genomic Models) is a probabilistic graphical model used to infer patient specific genetic activity by integrating copy number and gene expression data into a factor graph model of a cellular network. We evaluated the performance of DIRPP on endometrial, ovarian, and breast cancer related cell lines from the CCLE and CGP for nine drugs. The pipeline is sensitive enough to predict the response of a cell line with accuracy and precision across datasets as high as 80 and 88% respectively. We then classify drugs by the specific pathway mechanisms governing drug response. This classification allows us to compare drugs by cellular response mechanisms rather than simply by their specific gene targets. This pipeline represents a novel approach for predicting clinical drug response and generating novel candidates for drug repurposing and repositioning. PMID:24297540

Brubaker, Douglas; Difeo, Analisa; Chen, Yanwen; Pearl, Taylor; Zhai, Kaide; Bebek, Gurkan; Chance, Mark; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill

2014-01-01

212

Meta-analyses identify 13 loci associated with age at menopause and highlight DNA repair and immune pathways  

Microsoft Academic Search

To newly identify loci for age at natural menopause, we carried out a meta-analysis of 22 genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in 38,968 women of European descent, with replication in up to 14,435 women. In addition to four known loci, we identified 13 loci newly associated with age at natural menopause (at P < 5 × 10?8). Candidate genes located at

Lisette Stolk; John R B Perry; Daniel I Chasman; Chunyan He; Massimo Mangino; Patrick Sulem; Maja Barbalic; Linda Broer; Enda M Byrne; Florian Ernst; Tõnu Esko; Nora Franceschini; Daniel F Gudbjartsson; Jouke-Jan Hottenga; Peter Kraft; Patrick F McArdle; Eleonora Porcu; So-Youn Shin; Albert V Smith; Sophie van Wingerden; Guangju Zhai; Wei V Zhuang; Eva Albrecht; Behrooz Z Alizadeh; Thor Aspelund; Stefania Bandinelli; Lovorka Barac Lauc; Jacques S Beckmann; Mladen Boban; Eric Boerwinkle; Frank J Broekmans; Andrea Burri; Harry Campbell; Stephen J Chanock; Constance Chen; Marilyn C Cornelis; Tanguy Corre; Andrea D Coviello; Pio d'Adamo; Gail Davies; Ulf de Faire; Eco J C de Geus; Ian J Deary; George V Z Dedoussis; Panagiotis Deloukas; Shah Ebrahim; Gudny Eiriksdottir; Valur Emilsson; Johan G Eriksson; Bart C J M Fauser; Liana Ferreli; Luigi Ferrucci; Krista Fischer; Aaron R Folsom; Melissa E Garcia; Paolo Gasparini; Christian Gieger; Nicole Glazer; Diederick E Grobbee; Per Hall; Toomas Haller; Susan E Hankinson; Merli Hass; Caroline Hayward; Andrew C Heath; Albert Hofman; Erik Ingelsson; A Cecile J W Janssens; Andrew D Johnson; David Karasik; Sharon L R Kardia; Jules Keyzer; Douglas P Kiel; Ivana Kolcic; Zoltán Kutalik; Jari Lahti; Sandra Lai; Triin Laisk; Joop S E Laven; Debbie A Lawlor; Jianjun Liu; Lorna M Lopez; Yvonne V Louwers; Patrik K E Magnusson; Mara Marongiu; Nicholas G Martin; Irena Martinovic Klaric; Corrado Masciullo; Barbara McKnight; Sarah E Medland; David Melzer; Vincent Mooser; Pau Navarro; Anne B Newman; Dale R Nyholt; N Charlotte Onland-Moret; Aarno Palotie; Guillaume Paré; Alex N Parker; Nancy L Pedersen; Petra H M Peeters; Giorgio Pistis; Andrew S Plump; Ozren Polasek; Victor J M Pop; Bruce M Psaty; Katri Räikkönen; Emil Rehnberg; Jerome I Rotter; Igor Rudan; Cinzia Sala; Andres Salumets; Angelo Scuteri; Andrew Singleton; Jennifer A Smith; Harold Snieder; Nicole Soranzo; Simon N Stacey; John M Starr; Maria G Stathopoulou; Kathleen Stirrups; Ronald P Stolk; Unnur Styrkarsdottir; Yan V Sun; Albert Tenesa; Barbara Thorand; Daniela Toniolo; Laufey Tryggvadottir; Kim Tsui; Sheila Ulivi; Rob M van Dam; Yvonne T van der Schouw; Carla H van Gils; Peter van Nierop; Jacqueline M Vink; Peter M Visscher; Marlies Voorhuis; Gérard Waeber; Henri Wallaschofski; H Erich Wichmann; Elisabeth Widen; Colette J M Wijnands-van Gent; Gonneke Willemsen; James F Wilson; Bruce H R Wolffenbuttel; Alan F Wright; Laura M Yerges-Armstrong; Tatijana Zemunik; Lina Zgaga; M Carola Zillikens; Marek Zygmunt; Alice M Arnold; Dorret I Boomsma; Julie E Buring; Laura Crisponi; Ellen W Demerath; Vilmundur Gudnason; Tamara B Harris; Frank B Hu; David J Hunter; Lenore J Launer; Andres Metspalu; Grant W Montgomery; Ben A Oostra; Paul M Ridker; Serena Sanna; David Schlessinger; Tim D Spector; Kari Stefansson; Elizabeth A Streeten; Unnur Thorsteinsdottir; Manuela Uda; André G Uitterlinden; Cornelia M van Duijn; Henry Völzke; Joanne M Murabito; Jenny A Visser; Anna Murray; Kathryn L Lunetta

2012-01-01

213

An arrayed RNA interference genome-wide screen identifies candidate genes involved in the MicroRNA 21 biogenesis pathway.  

PubMed

MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are evolutionary conserved noncoding molecules that regulate gene expression. They influence a number of diverse biological functions, such as development and differentiation. However, their dysregulation has been shown to be associated with disease states, such as cancer. Genes and pathways regulating their biogenesis remain unknown and are highly sought after. For this purpose, we have validated a multiplexed high-content assay strategy to screen for such modulators. Here, we describe its implementation that makes use of a cell-based gain-of-function reporter assay monitoring enhanced green fluorescent protein expression under the control of miRNA 21 (miR-21); combined with measures of both cell metabolic activities through the use of Alamar Blue and cell death through imaged Hoechst-stained nuclei. The strategy was validated using a panel of known genes and enabled us to successfully progress to and complete an arrayed genome-wide short interfering RNA (siRNA) screen against the Ambion Silencer Select v4.0 library containing 64,755 siRNA duplexes covering 21,565 genes. We applied a high-stringency hit analysis method, referred to as the Bhinder-Djaballah analysis method, leading to the nomination of 1,273 genes as candidate inhibitors of the miR-21 biogenesis pathway; after several iterations eliminating those genes with only one active duplex and those enriched in seed sequence mediated off-target effects. Biological classifications revealed four major control junctions among them vesicular transport via clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Altogether, our screen has uncovered a number of novel candidate regulators that are potentially good druggable targets allowing for the discovery and development of small molecules for regulating miRNA function. PMID:23153064

Shum, David; Bhinder, Bhavneet; Ramirez, Christina N; Radu, Constantin; Calder, Paul A; Beauchamp, Lesslie; Farazi, T; Landthaler, M; Tuschi, T; Magdaleno, Susan; Djaballah, Hakim

2013-04-01

214

An Arrayed RNA Interference Genome-Wide Screen Identifies Candidate Genes Involved in the MicroRNA 21 Biogenesis Pathway  

PubMed Central

Abstract MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are evolutionary conserved noncoding molecules that regulate gene expression. They influence a number of diverse biological functions, such as development and differentiation. However, their dysregulation has been shown to be associated with disease states, such as cancer. Genes and pathways regulating their biogenesis remain unknown and are highly sought after. For this purpose, we have validated a multiplexed high-content assay strategy to screen for such modulators. Here, we describe its implementation that makes use of a cell-based gain-of-function reporter assay monitoring enhanced green fluorescent protein expression under the control of miRNA 21 (miR-21); combined with measures of both cell metabolic activities through the use of Alamar Blue and cell death through imaged Hoechst-stained nuclei. The strategy was validated using a panel of known genes and enabled us to successfully progress to and complete an arrayed genome-wide short interfering RNA (siRNA) screen against the Ambion Silencer Select v4.0 library containing 64,755 siRNA duplexes covering 21,565 genes. We applied a high-stringency hit analysis method, referred to as the Bhinder–Djaballah analysis method, leading to the nomination of 1,273 genes as candidate inhibitors of the miR-21 biogenesis pathway; after several iterations eliminating those genes with only one active duplex and those enriched in seed sequence mediated off-target effects. Biological classifications revealed four major control junctions among them vesicular transport via clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Altogether, our screen has uncovered a number of novel candidate regulators that are potentially good druggable targets allowing for the discovery and development of small molecules for regulating miRNA function. PMID:23153064

Shum, David; Bhinder, Bhavneet; Ramirez, Christina N.; Radu, Constantin; Calder, Paul A.; Beauchamp, Lesslie; Farazi, T.; Landthaler, M.; Tuschi, T.; Magdaleno, Susan

2013-01-01

215

Multigene pathway-based analyses identify nasopharyngeal carcinoma risk associations for cumulative adverse effects of TERT-CLPTM1L and DNA double-strand breaks repair.  

PubMed

The genetic etiology of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) and mechanisms for inherited susceptibility remain unclear. To examine genetic risk factors for NPC, we hypothesized that heritable risk is attributable to cumulative effects of multiple common low-risk variants. With the premise that individual SNPs only confer subtle effects for cancer risk, a multigenic pathway-based approach was used to systematically examine associations between NPC genetic susceptibility with SNPs in genes in DNA repair pathways and from previously identified cancer genome-wide association study analyses. This case-control study covers 161 genes/loci and focuses on pathway-based analyses in 2,349 Hong Kong individuals, allowing stratification according to NPC familial status for meaningful association analysis. Three SNPs (rs401681, rs6774494 and rs3757318) corresponding to TERT/CLPTM1L (OR 95% CI = 0.77, 0.68-0.88), MDS1-EVI1 (OR 95% CI=0.79 0.69-0.89) and CCDC170 (OR 95% CI = 0.76, 0.66-0.86) conferred modest protective effects individually for NPC risk by the logistic regression analysis after multiple testing adjustment (p(Bonferroni) ?< 0.05). Stratification of NPC according to familial status identified rs2380165 in BLM (OR 95% CI = 1.49, 1.20-1.86, p(Bonferroni) ?< 0.05) association with family history-positive NPC (FH+ NPC) patients. Multiple SNPs pathway-based analysis revealed that the combined gene dosage effects for increasing numbers of unfavorable genotypes in TERT-CLPTM1L and double-strand break repair (DSBR) conferred elevated risk in FH+ and sporadic NPC patients (ORs per allele, 95% CIs = 1.37, 1.22-1.55, p(Bonferroni) ?= 5.00 × 10(-6); 1.17, 1.09-1.26, p(Bonferroni) ?= 4.58 × 10(-4) , respectively, in TERT/NHEJ pathways). Our data suggested cumulative increased NPC risk associations with TERT-CLPTM1L and DSBR pathways contribute to genetic susceptibility to NPC and have potential translational relevance for patient stratification and therapeutics. PMID:24615621

Yee Ko, Josephine Mun; Dai, Wei; Wun Wong, Elibe Hiu; Kwong, Dora; Tong Ng, Wai; Lee, Anne; Kai Cheong Ngan, Roger; Chung Yau, Chun; Tung, Stewart; Li Lung, Maria

2014-10-01

216

Phosphoproteomics combined with quantitative 14-3-3-affinity capture identifies SIRT1 and RAI as novel regulators of cytosolic double-stranded RNA recognition pathway.  

PubMed

Viral double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) is the most important viral structure recognized by cytosolic pattern-recognition receptors of the innate immune system, and its recognition results in the activation of signaling cascades that stimulate the production of antiviral cytokines and apoptosis of infected cells. 14-3-3 proteins are ubiquitously expressed regulatory molecules that participate in a variety of cellular processes, and 14-3-3 protein-mediated signaling pathways are activated by cytoplasmic dsRNA in human keratinocytes. However, the functional role of 14-3-3 protein-mediated interactions during viral dsRNA stimulation has remained uncharacterized. Here, we used functional proteomics to identify proteins whose phosphorylation and interaction with 14-3-3 is modulated by dsRNA and to characterize the signaling pathways activated during cytosolic dsRNA-induced innate immune response in human HaCaT keratinocytes. Phosphoproteome analysis showed that several MAPK- and immune-response-related signaling pathways were activated after dsRNA stimulation. Interactome analysis identified RelA-associated inhibitor, high-mobility group proteins, and several proteins associated with host responses to viral infection as novel 14-3-3 target proteins. Functional studies showed that RelA-associated inhibitor regulated dsRNA-induced apoptosis and TNF production. Integrated network analyses of proteomic data revealed that sirtuin1 was a central molecule regulated by 14-3-3s during dsRNA stimulation. Further experiments showed that sirtuin 1 negatively regulated dsRNA-induced NF?B transcriptional activity, suppressed expression of antiviral cytokines, and protected cells from apoptosis in dsRNA-stimulated and encephalomyocarditis-virus-infected keratinocytes. In conclusion, our data highlight the importance of 14-3-3 proteins in antiviral responses and identify RelA-associated inhibitor and sirtuin 1 as novel regulators of antiviral innate immune responses. PMID:24997996

Öhman, Tiina; Söderholm, Sandra; Hintsanen, Petteri; Välimäki, Elina; Lietzén, Niina; MacKintosh, Carol; Aittokallio, Tero; Matikainen, Sampsa; Nyman, Tuula A

2014-10-01

217

Proteomic Profiling Identifies Dysregulated Pathways in Small Cell Lung Cancer and Novel Therapeutic Targets Including PARP1  

PubMed Central

Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is an aggressive malignancy distinct from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in its metastatic potential and treatment response. Using an integrative proteomic and transcriptomic analysis, we investigated molecular differences contributing to the distinct clinical behavior of SCLC and NSCLC. SCLC demonstrated lower levels of several receptor tyrosine kinases and decreased activation of PI3K and Ras/MEK pathways, but significantly increased levels of E2F1-regulated factors including EZH2, thymidylate synthase, apoptosis mediators, and DNA repair proteins. Additionally, poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1), a DNA repair protein and E2F1 co-activator, was highly expressed at the mRNA and protein levels in SCLC. SCLC growth was inhibited by PARP1 and EZH2 knockdown. Furthermore, SCLC was significantly more sensitive to PARP inhibitors than NSCLC, and PARP inhibition downregulated key components of the DNA repair machinery and enhanced the efficacy of chemotherapy. PMID:22961666

Byers, Lauren Averett; Wang, Jing; Nilsson, Monique B.; Fujimoto, Junya; Saintigny, Pierre; Yordy, John; Giri, Uma; Peyton, Michael; Fan, You Hong; Diao, Lixia; Masrorpour, Fatemeh; Shen, Li; Liu, Wenbin; Duchemann, Boris; Tumula, Praveen; Bhardwaj, Vikas; Welsh, James; Weber, Stephanie; Glisson, Bonnie S.; Kalhor, Neda; Wistuba, Ignacio I.; Girard, Luc; Lippman, Scott M.; Mills, Gordon B.; Coombes, Kevin R.; Weinstein, John N.; Minna, John D.; Heymach, John V.

2013-01-01

218

Specific inhibitors for identifying pathways for methane production from carbon monoxide by a nonadapted anaerobic mixed culture.  

PubMed

Specific inhibitors such as 2-bromoethanesulfonate (BES) and vancomycin were employed in activity batch tests to decipher metabolic pathways that are preferentially used by a mixed anaerobic consortium (sludge from an anaerobic digester) to transform carbon monoxide (CO) into methane (CH4). We first evaluated the inhibitory effect of both BES and vancomycin on the microbial community, as well as the efficiency and stability of vancomycin at 35 °C, over time. The activity tests with CO2-H2, CO, glucose, acetate, formate, propionate, butyrate, methanol, and ethanol showed that vancomycin does not inhibit some Gram-negative bacteria, and 50 mmol/L BES effectively blocks CH4 production in the sludge. However, when sludge was incubated with propionate, butyrate, methanol, or ethanol as the sole energy and carbon source, methanogenesis was only partially inhibited by BES. Separate tests showed that 0.07 mmol/L vancomycin is enough to maintain its inhibitory efficiency and stability in the population for at least 32 days at 35 °C. Using the inhibitors above, it was demonstrated that CO conversion to CH4 is an indirect, 2-step process, in which the CO is converted first to acetate and subsequently to CH4. PMID:24896194

Navarro, Silvia Sancho; Cimpoia, Ruxandra; Bruant, Guillaume; Guiot, Serge R

2014-06-01

219

Characterization of the nasopharyngeal carcinoma methylome identifies aberrant disruption of key signaling pathways and methylated tumor suppressor genes.  

PubMed

Aims: Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is a common tumor consistently associated with Epstein-Barr virus infection and prevalent in South China, including Hong Kong, and southeast Asia. Current genomic sequencing studies found only rare mutations in NPC, indicating its critical epigenetic etiology, while no epigenome exists for NPC as yet. Materials & methods: We profiled the methylomes of NPC cell lines and primary tumors, together with normal nasopharyngeal epithelial cells, using methylated DNA immunoprecipitation (MeDIP). Results: We observed extensive, genome-wide methylation of cellular genes. Epigenetic disruption of Wnt, MAPK, TGF-? and Hedgehog signaling pathways was detected. Methylation of Wnt signaling regulators (SFRP1, 2, 4 and 5, DACT2, DKK2 and DKK3) was frequently detected in tumor and nasal swab samples from NPC patients. Functional studies showed that these genes are bona fide tumor-suppressor genes for NPC. Conclusion: The NPC methylome shows a special high-degree CpG methylation epigenotype, similar to the Epstein-Barr virus-infected gastric cancer, indicating a critical epigenetic etiology for NPC pathogenesis. PMID:25479246

Li, Lili; Zhang, Yuan; Fan, Yichao; Sun, Kun; Su, Xianwei; Du, Zhenfang; Tsao, Sai Wah; Loh, Thomas Ks; Sun, Hao; Chan, Anthony Tc; Zeng, Yi-Xin; Chan, Wai Yee; Chan, Francis Kl; Tao, Qian

2014-12-01

220

The pathway of auxin biosynthesis in plants.  

PubMed

The plant hormone auxin, which is predominantly represented by indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), is involved in the regulation of plant growth and development. Although IAA was the first plant hormone identified, the biosynthetic pathway at the genetic level has remained unclear. Two major pathways for IAA biosynthesis have been proposed: the tryptophan (Trp)-independent and Trp-dependent pathways. In Trp-dependent IAA biosynthesis, four pathways have been postulated in plants: (i) the indole-3-acetamide (IAM) pathway; (ii) the indole-3-pyruvic acid (IPA) pathway; (iii) the tryptamine (TAM) pathway; and (iv) the indole-3-acetaldoxime (IAOX) pathway. Although different plant species may have unique strategies and modifications to optimize their metabolic pathways, plants would be expected to share evolutionarily conserved core mechanisms for auxin biosynthesis because IAA is a fundamental substance in the plant life cycle. In this review, the genes now known to be involved in auxin biosynthesis are summarized and the major IAA biosynthetic pathway distributed widely in the plant kingdom is discussed on the basis of biochemical and molecular biological findings and bioinformatics studies. Based on evolutionarily conserved core mechanisms, it is thought that the pathway via IAM or IPA is the major route(s) to IAA in plants. PMID:22447967

Mano, Yoshihiro; Nemoto, Keiichirou

2012-05-01

221

Identifying Resistance Mechanisms against Five Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors Targeting the ERBB/RAS Pathway in 45 Cancer Cell Lines  

PubMed Central

Because of the low overall response rates of 10–47% to targeted cancer therapeutics, there is an increasing need for predictive biomarkers. We aimed to identify genes predicting response to five already approved tyrosine kinase inhibitors. We tested 45 cancer cell lines for sensitivity to sunitinib, erlotinib, lapatinib, sorafenib and gefitinib at the clinically administered doses. A resistance matrix was determined, and gene expression profiles of the subsets of resistant vs. sensitive cell lines were compared. Triplicate gene expression signatures were obtained from the caArray project. Significance analysis of microarrays and rank products were applied for feature selection. Ninety-five genes were also measured by RT-PCR. In case of four sunitinib resistance associated genes, the results were validated in clinical samples by immunohistochemistry. A list of 63 top genes associated with resistance against the five tyrosine kinase inhibitors was identified. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis confirmed 45 of 63 genes identified by microarray analysis. Only two genes (ANXA3 and RAB25) were related to sensitivity against more than three inhibitors. The immunohistochemical analysis of sunitinib-treated metastatic renal cell carcinomas confirmed the correlation between RAB17, LGALS8, and EPCAM and overall survival. In summary, we determined predictive biomarkers for five tyrosine kinase inhibitors, and validated sunitinib resistance biomarkers by immunohistochemistry in an independent patient cohort. PMID:23555683

Szász, A. Marcell; Sztupinszki, Zsófia; Likó, István; Szendr?i, Attila; Schäfer, Reinhold; Gy?rffy, Balázs

2013-01-01

222

Arachidonic Acid Pathway Members PLA2G7, HPGD, EPHX2, and CYP4F8 Identified as Putative Novel Therapeutic Targets in Prostate Cancer  

PubMed Central

The arachidonic acid and prostaglandin pathway has been implicated in prostate carcinogenesis, but comprehensive studies of the individual members in this key pathway are lacking. Here, we first conducted a systematic bioinformatic study of the expression of 36 arachidonic acid pathway genes across 9783 human tissue samples. The results showed that the PLA2G7, HPGD, EPHX2, and CYP4F8 genes are highly expressed in prostate cancer. Functional studies using RNA interference in prostate cancer cells indicated that all four genes are also essential for cell growth and survival. Clinical validation confirmed high PLA2G7 expression, especially in ERG oncogene-positive prostate cancers, and its silencing sensitized ERG-positive prostate cancer cells to oxidative stress. HPGD was highly expressed in androgen receptor (AR)-overexpressing advanced tumors, as well as in metastatic prostate cancers. EPHX2 mRNA correlated with AR in primary prostate cancers, and its inhibition in vitro reduced AR signaling and potentiated the effect of antiandrogen flutamide in cultured prostate cancer cells. In summary, we identified four novel putative therapeutic targets with biomarker potential for different subtypes of prostate cancer. In addition, our results indicate that inhibition of these enzymes may be particularly powerful when combined with other treatments, such as androgen deprivation or induction of oxidative stress. PMID:21281786

Vainio, Paula; Gupta, Santosh; Ketola, Kirsi; Mirtti, Tuomas; Mpindi, John-Patrick; Kohonen, Pekka; Fey, Vidal; Perälä, Merja; Smit, Frank; Verhaegh, Gerald; Schalken, Jack; Alanen, Kalle A.; Kallioniemi, Olli; Iljin, Kristiina

2011-01-01

223

Three-Dimensional Pharmacophore Design and Biochemical Screening Identifies Substituted 1,2,4-Triazoles as Inhibitors of the Annexin?A2–S100A10 Protein Interaction  

PubMed Central

Abstract Protein interactions are increasingly appreciated as targets in small-molecule drug discovery. The interaction between the adapter protein S100A10 and its binding partner annexin?A2 is a potentially important drug target. To obtain small-molecule starting points for inhibitors of this interaction, a three-dimensional pharmacophore model was constructed from the X-ray crystal structure of the complex between S100A10 and annexin A2. The pharmacophore model represents the favourable hydrophobic and hydrogen bond interactions between the two partners, as well as spatial and receptor site constraints (excluded volume spheres). Using this pharmacophore model, UNITY flex searches were carried out on a 3D library of 0.7 million commercially available compounds. This resulted in 568 hit compounds. Subsequently, GOLD docking studies were performed on these hits, and a set of 190 compounds were purchased and tested biochemically for inhibition of the protein interaction. Three compounds of similar chemical structure were identified as genuine inhibitors of the binding of annexin A2 to S100A10. The binding modes predicted by GOLD were in good agreement with their UNITY-generated conformations. We synthesised a series of analogues revealing areas critical for binding. Thus computational predictions and biochemical screening can be used successfully to derive novel chemical classes of protein–protein interaction blockers. PMID:22644793

Reddy, Tummala R K; Li, Chan; Fischer, Peter M; Dekker, Lodewijk V

2012-01-01

224

A Genome-Wide Association Study of the Maize Hypersensitive Defense Response Identifies Genes That Cluster in Related Pathways  

PubMed Central

Much remains unknown of molecular events controlling the plant hypersensitive defense response (HR), a rapid localized cell death that limits pathogen spread and is mediated by resistance (R-) genes. Genetic control of the HR is hard to quantify due to its microscopic and rapid nature. Natural modifiers of the ectopic HR phenotype induced by an aberrant auto-active R-gene (Rp1-D21), were mapped in a population of 3,381 recombinant inbred lines from the maize nested association mapping population. Joint linkage analysis was conducted to identify 32 additive but no epistatic quantitative trait loci (QTL) using a linkage map based on more than 7000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Genome-wide association (GWA) analysis of 26.5 million SNPs was conducted after adjusting for background QTL. GWA identified associated SNPs that colocalized with 44 candidate genes. Thirty-six of these genes colocalized within 23 of the 32 QTL identified by joint linkage analysis. The candidate genes included genes predicted to be in involved programmed cell death, defense response, ubiquitination, redox homeostasis, autophagy, calcium signalling, lignin biosynthesis and cell wall modification. Twelve of the candidate genes showed significant differential expression between isogenic lines differing for the presence of Rp1-D21. Low but significant correlations between HR-related traits and several previously-measured disease resistance traits suggested that the genetic control of these traits was substantially, though not entirely, independent. This study provides the first system-wide analysis of natural variation that modulates the HR response in plants. PMID:25166276

Venkata, Bala P.; Marla, Sandeep; Ji, Jiabing; Gachomo, Emma; Chu, Kevin; Negeri, Adisu; Benson, Jacqueline; Nelson, Rebecca; Bradbury, Peter; Nielsen, Dahlia; Holland, James B.; Balint-Kurti, Peter J.; Johal, Gurmukh

2014-01-01

225

SFGD: a comprehensive platform for mining functional information from soybean transcriptome data and its use in identifying acyl-lipid metabolism pathways  

PubMed Central

Background Soybean (Glycine max L.) is one of the world’s most important leguminous crops producing high-quality protein and oil. Increasing the relative oil concentration in soybean seeds is many researchers’ goal, but a complete analysis platform of functional annotation for the genes involved in the soybean acyl-lipid pathway is still lacking. Following the success of soybean whole-genome sequencing, functional annotation has become a major challenge for the scientific community. Whole-genome transcriptome analysis is a powerful way to predict genes with biological functions. It is essential to build a comprehensive analysis platform for integrating soybean whole-genome sequencing data, the available transcriptome data and protein information. This platform could also be used to identify acyl-lipid metabolism pathways. Description In this study, we describe our construction of the Soybean Functional Genomics Database (SFGD) using Generic Genome Browser (Gbrowse) as the core platform. We integrated microarray expression profiling with 255 samples from 14 groups’ experiments and mRNA-seq data with 30 samples from four groups’ experiments, including spatial and temporal transcriptome data for different soybean development stages and environmental stresses. The SFGD includes a gene co-expression regulatory network containing 23,267 genes and 1873 miRNA-target pairs, and a group of acyl-lipid pathways containing 221 enzymes and more than 1550 genes. The SFGD also provides some key analysis tools, i.e. BLAST search, expression pattern search and cis-element significance analysis, as well as gene ontology information search and single nucleotide polymorphism display. Conclusion The SFGD is a comprehensive database integrating genome and transcriptome data, and also for soybean acyl-lipid metabolism pathways. It provides useful toolboxes for biologists to improve the accuracy and robustness of soybean functional genomics analysis, further improving understanding of gene regulatory networks for effective crop improvement. The SFGD is publically accessible at http://bioinformatics.cau.edu.cn/SFGD/, with all data available for downloading. PMID:24712981

2014-01-01

226

YlxM Is a Newly Identified Accessory Protein That Influences the Function of Signal Recognition Particle Pathway Components in Streptococcus mutans  

PubMed Central

Streptococcus mutans is a cariogenic oral pathogen whose virulence is determined largely by its membrane composition. The signal recognition particle (SRP) protein-targeting pathway plays a pivotal role in membrane biogenesis. S. mutans SRP pathway mutants demonstrate growth defects, cannot contend with environmental stress, and exhibit multiple changes in membrane composition. This study sought to define a role for ylxM, which in S. mutans and numerous other bacteria resides directly upstream of the ffh gene, encoding a major functional element of the bacterial SRP. YlxM was observed as a produced protein in S. mutans. Its predicted helix-turn-helix motif suggested that it has a role as a transcriptional regulator of components within the SRP pathway; however, no evidence of transcriptional regulation was found. Instead, capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), affinity chromatography, and bio-layer interferometry (BLI) demonstrated that S. mutans YlxM interacts with the SRP components Ffh and small cytoplasmic RNA (scRNA) but not with the SRP receptor FtsY. In the absence of FtsY, YlxM increased the GTP hydrolysis activity of Ffh alone and in complex with scRNA. However, in the presence of FtsY, YlxM caused an overall diminution of net GTPase activity. Thus, YlxM appears to modulate GTP hydrolysis, a process necessary for proper recycling of SRP pathway components. The presence of YlxM conferred a significant competitive growth advantage under nonstress and acid stress conditions when wild-type and ylxM mutant strains were cultured together. Our results identify YlxM as a component of the S. mutans SRP and suggest a regulatory function affecting GTPase activity. PMID:24659773

Williams, Matthew L.; Crowley, Paula J.; Hasona, Adnan

2014-01-01

227

Hippocampal Gene Expression Meta-Analysis Identifies Aging and Age-Associated Spatial Learning Impairment (ASLI) Genes and Pathways  

PubMed Central

A number of gene expression microarray studies have been carried out in the past, which studied aging and age-associated spatial learning impairment (ASLI) in the hippocampus in animal models, with varying results. Data from such studies were never integrated to identify the most significant ASLI genes and to understand their effect. In this study we integrated these data involving rats using meta-analysis. Our results show that proper removal of batch effects from microarray data generated from different laboratories is necessary before integrating them for meta-analysis. Our meta-analysis has identified a number of significant differentially expressed genes across age or across ASLI. These genes affect many key functions in the aged compared to the young rats, which include viability of neurons, cell-to-cell signalling and interaction, migration of cells, neuronal growth, and synaptic plasticity. These functional changes due to the altered gene expression may manifest into various neurodegenerative diseases and disorders, some of which leading into syndromic memory impairments. While other aging related molecular changes can result into altered synaptic plasticity simply causing normal aging related non-syndromic learning or spatial learning impairments such as ASLI. PMID:23874995

Uddin, Raihan K.; Singh, Shiva M.

2013-01-01

228

The use of conditional probability functions and potential source contribution functions to identify source regions and advection pathways of hydrocarbon emissions in Houston, Texas  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this study, we demonstrate the utility of conditional probability functions (CPFs), potential source contribution functions (PSCFs), and hierarchical clustering analysis (HAC) to identify the source region and transport pathways of hydrocarbons measured at five photochemical assessment monitoring stations (PAMS) near the Houston Ship Channel from June to October 2003. In contrast to scatter plots, which only show the pair-wise correlation of species, commonality in CPF figures shows both correlation and information on the source region of the species in question. In this study, we use over 50 hourly volatile organic compound (VOC) concentrations and surface wind observations to show that VOCs with similar CPF patterns likely have common transport pathways. This was established with the multivariate technique, which uses the hierarchical clustering analysis to define clusters of VOCs having similar CPF patterns. This method revealed that alkenes, and in particular those with geometric isomers such as cis-/ trans-2-butene and cis-/ trans-2-pentene, have similar CPF patterns and hence, a common area of origin. The alkane isomers often show CPF patterns among themselves, and similarly, aromatic compounds often show similar patterns. We also show how calculated trajectory information can be used in the PSCF analysis to produce a graphic picture that identifies specific geographic areas associated with a given VOC (or other pollutant). The use of these techniques in the chemically and meteorologically complex environment of Houston, Texas, suggests its further utility in other areas with relatively simpler conditions.

Xie, Yulong; Berkowitz, Carl M.

229

Large-scale association analyses identify new loci influencing glycemic traits and provide insight into the underlying biological pathways.  

PubMed

Through genome-wide association meta-analyses of up to 133,010 individuals of European ancestry without diabetes, including individuals newly genotyped using the Metabochip, we have increased the number of confirmed loci influencing glycemic traits to 53, of which 33 also increase type 2 diabetes risk (q < 0.05). Loci influencing fasting insulin concentration showed association with lipid levels and fat distribution, suggesting impact on insulin resistance. Gene-based analyses identified further biologically plausible loci, suggesting that additional loci beyond those reaching genome-wide significance are likely to represent real associations. This conclusion is supported by an excess of directionally consistent and nominally significant signals between discovery and follow-up studies. Functional analysis of these newly discovered loci will further improve our understanding of glycemic control. PMID:22885924

Scott, Robert A; Lagou, Vasiliki; Welch, Ryan P; Wheeler, Eleanor; Montasser, May E; Luan, Jian'an; Mägi, Reedik; Strawbridge, Rona J; Rehnberg, Emil; Gustafsson, Stefan; Kanoni, Stavroula; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J; Yengo, Loïc; Lecoeur, Cecile; Shungin, Dmitry; Sanna, Serena; Sidore, Carlo; Johnson, Paul C D; Jukema, J Wouter; Johnson, Toby; Mahajan, Anubha; Verweij, Niek; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Shah, Sonia; Smith, Albert V; Sennblad, Bengt; Gieger, Christian; Salo, Perttu; Perola, Markus; Timpson, Nicholas J; Evans, David M; Pourcain, Beate St; Wu, Ying; Andrews, Jeanette S; Hui, Jennie; Bielak, Lawrence F; Zhao, Wei; Horikoshi, Momoko; Navarro, Pau; Isaacs, Aaron; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; Stirrups, Kathleen; Vitart, Veronique; Hayward, Caroline; Esko, Tõnu; Mihailov, Evelin; Fraser, Ross M; Fall, Tove; Voight, Benjamin F; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Chen, Han; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Morris, Andrew P; Rayner, Nigel W; Robertson, Neil; Rybin, Denis; Liu, Ching-Ti; Beckmann, Jacques S; Willems, Sara M; Chines, Peter S; Jackson, Anne U; Kang, Hyun Min; Stringham, Heather M; Song, Kijoung; Tanaka, Toshiko; Peden, John F; Goel, Anuj; Hicks, Andrew A; An, Ping; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Franco-Cereceda, Anders; Folkersen, Lasse; Marullo, Letizia; Jansen, Hanneke; Oldehinkel, Albertine J; Bruinenberg, Marcel; Pankow, James S; North, Kari E; Forouhi, Nita G; Loos, Ruth J F; Edkins, Sarah; Varga, Tibor V; Hallmans, Göran; Oksa, Heikki; Antonella, Mulas; Nagaraja, Ramaiah; Trompet, Stella; Ford, Ian; Bakker, Stephan J L; Kong, Augustine; Kumari, Meena; Gigante, Bruna; Herder, Christian; Munroe, Patricia B; Caulfield, Mark; Antti, Jula; Mangino, Massimo; Small, Kerrin; Miljkovic, Iva; Liu, Yongmei; Atalay, Mustafa; Kiess, Wieland; James, Alan L; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Palmer, Colin N A; Doney, Alex S F; Willemsen, Gonneke; Smit, Johannes H; Campbell, Susan; Polasek, Ozren; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Hercberg, Serge; Dimitriou, Maria; Bolton, Jennifer L; Fowkes, Gerard R; Kovacs, Peter; Lindström, Jaana; Zemunik, Tatijana; Bandinelli, Stefania; Wild, Sarah H; Basart, Hanneke V; Rathmann, Wolfgang; Grallert, Harald; Maerz, Winfried; Kleber, Marcus E; Boehm, Bernhard O; Peters, Annette; Pramstaller, Peter P; Province, Michael A; Borecki, Ingrid B; Hastie, Nicholas D; Rudan, Igor; Campbell, Harry; Watkins, Hugh; Farrall, Martin; Stumvoll, Michael; Ferrucci, Luigi; Waterworth, Dawn M; Bergman, Richard N; Collins, Francis S; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Watanabe, Richard M; de Geus, Eco J C; Penninx, Brenda W; Hofman, Albert; Oostra, Ben A; Psaty, Bruce M; Vollenweider, Peter; Wilson, James F; Wright, Alan F; Hovingh, G Kees; Metspalu, Andres; Uusitupa, Matti; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Kyvik, Kirsten O; Kaprio, Jaakko; Price, Jackie F; Dedoussis, George V; Deloukas, Panos; Meneton, Pierre; Lind, Lars; Boehnke, Michael; Shuldiner, Alan R; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Morris, Andrew D; Toenjes, Anke; Peyser, Patricia A; Beilby, John P; Körner, Antje; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laakso, Markku; Bornstein, Stefan R; Schwarz, Peter E H; Lakka, Timo A; Rauramaa, Rainer; Adair, Linda S; Smith, George Davey; Spector, Tim D; Illig, Thomas; de Faire, Ulf; Hamsten, Anders; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Kivimaki, Mika; Hingorani, Aroon; Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka M; Saaristo, Timo E; Boomsma, Dorret I; Stefansson, Kari; van der Harst, Pim; Dupuis, Josée; Pedersen, Nancy L; Sattar, Naveed; Harris, Tamara B; Cucca, Francesco; Ripatti, Samuli; Salomaa, Veikko; Mohlke, Karen L; Balkau, Beverley; Froguel, Philippe; Pouta, Anneli; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Wareham, Nicholas J; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; McCarthy, Mark I; Franks, Paul W; Meigs, James B; Teslovich, Tanya M; Florez, Jose C; Langenberg, Claudia; Ingelsson, Erik; Prokopenko, Inga; Barroso, Inês

2012-09-01

230

Large-scale association analyses identify new loci influencing glycemic traits and provide insight into the underlying biological pathways  

PubMed Central

Through genome-wide association meta-analyses of up to 133,010 individuals of European ancestry without diabetes, including individuals newly genotyped using the Metabochip, we have raised the number of confirmed loci influencing glycemic traits to 53, of which 33 also increase type 2 diabetes risk (q < 0.05). Loci influencing fasting insulin showed association with lipid levels and fat distribution, suggesting impact on insulin resistance. Gene-based analyses identified further biologically plausible loci, suggesting that additional loci beyond those reaching genome-wide significance are likely to represent real associations. This conclusion is supported by an excess of directionally consistent and nominally significant signals between discovery and follow-up studies. Functional follow-up of these newly discovered loci will further improve our understanding of glycemic control. PMID:22885924

Scott, Robert A; Lagou, Vasiliki; Welch, Ryan P; Wheeler, Eleanor; Montasser, May E; Luan, Jian’an; Mägi, Reedik; Strawbridge, Rona J; Rehnberg, Emil; Gustafsson, Stefan; Kanoni, Stavroula; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J; Yengo, Loïc; Lecoeur, Cecile; Shungin, Dmitry; Sanna, Serena; Sidore, Carlo; Johnson, Paul C D; Jukema, J Wouter; Johnson, Toby; Mahajan, Anubha; Verweij, Niek; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Shah, Sonia; Smith, Albert V; Sennblad, Bengt; Gieger, Christian; Salo, Perttu; Perola, Markus; Timpson, Nicholas J; Evans, David M; Pourcain, Beate St; Wu, Ying; Andrews, Jeanette S; Hui, Jennie; Bielak, Lawrence F; Zhao, Wei; Horikoshi, Momoko; Navarro, Pau; Isaacs, Aaron; O’Connell, Jeffrey R; Stirrups, Kathleen; Vitart, Veronique; Hayward, Caroline; Esko, Tönu; Mihailov, Evelin; Fraser, Ross M; Fall, Tove; Voight, Benjamin F; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Chen, Han; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Morris, Andrew P; Rayner, Nigel W; Robertson, Neil; Rybin, Denis; Liu, Ching-Ti; Beckmann, Jacques S; Willems, Sara M; Chines, Peter S; Jackson, Anne U; Kang, Hyun Min; Stringham, Heather M; Song, Kijoung; Tanaka, Toshiko; Peden, John F; Goel, Anuj; Hicks, Andrew A; An, Ping; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Franco-Cereceda, Anders; Folkersen, Lasse; Marullo, Letizia; Jansen, Hanneke; Oldehinkel, Albertine J; Bruinenberg, Marcel; Pankow, James S; North, Kari E; Forouhi, Nita G; Loos, Ruth J F; Edkins, Sarah; Varga, Tibor V; Hallmans, Göran; Oksa, Heikki; Antonella, Mulas; Nagaraja, Ramaiah; Trompet, Stella; Ford, Ian; Bakker, Stephan J L; Kong, Augustine; Kumari, Meena; Gigante, Bruna; Herder, Christian; Munroe, Patricia B; Caulfield, Mark; Antti, Jula; Mangino, Massimo; Small, Kerrin; Miljkovic, Iva; Liu, Yongmei; Atalay, Mustafa; Kiess, Wieland; James, Alan L; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Palmer, Colin N A; Doney, Alex S F; Willemsen, Gonneke; Smit, Johannes H; Campbell, Susan; Polasek, Ozren; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Hercberg, Serge; Dimitriou, Maria; Bolton, Jennifer L; Fowkes, Gerard R; Kovacs, Peter; Lindström, Jaana; Zemunik, Tatijana; Bandinelli, Stefania; Wild, Sarah H; Basart, Hanneke V; Rathmann, Wolfgang; Grallert, Harald; Maerz, Winfried; Kleber, Marcus E; Boehm, Bernhard O; Peters, Annette; Pramstaller, Peter P; Province, Michael A; Borecki, Ingrid B; Hastie, Nicholas D; Rudan, Igor; Campbell, Harry; Watkins, Hugh; Farrall, Martin; Stumvoll, Michael; Ferrucci, Luigi; Waterworth, Dawn M; Bergman, Richard N; Collins, Francis S; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Watanabe, Richard M; de Geus, Eco J C; Penninx, Brenda W; Hofman, Albert; Oostra, Ben A; Psaty, Bruce M; Vollenweider, Peter; Wilson, James F; Wright, Alan F; Hovingh, G Kees; Metspalu, Andres; Uusitupa, Matti; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Kyvik, Kirsten O; Kaprio, Jaakko; Price, Jackie F; Dedoussis, George V; Deloukas, Panos; Meneton, Pierre; Lind, Lars; Boehnke, Michael; Shuldiner, Alan R; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Morris, Andrew D; Toenjes, Anke; Peyser, Patricia A; Beilby, John P; Körner, Antje; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laakso, Markku; Bornstein, Stefan R; Schwarz, Peter E H; Lakka, Timo A; Rauramaa, Rainer; Adair, Linda S; Smith, George Davey; Spector, Tim D; Illig, Thomas; de Faire, Ulf; Hamsten, Anders; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Kivimaki, Mika; Hingorani, Aroon; Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka M; Saaristo, Timo E; Boomsma, Dorret I; Stefansson, Kari; van der Harst, Pim; Dupuis, Josée; Pedersen, Nancy L; Sattar, Naveed; Harris, Tamara B; Cucca, Francesco; Ripatti, Samuli; Salomaa, Veikko; Mohlke, Karen L; Balkau, Beverley; Froguel, Philippe; Pouta, Anneli; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Wareham, Nicholas J; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; McCarthy, Mark I; Franks, Paul W; Meigs, James B; Teslovich, Tanya M; Florez, Jose C; Langenberg, Claudia; Ingelsson, Erik; Prokopenko, Inga; Barroso, Inês

2012-01-01

231

An RNAi-based chemical genetic screen identifies three small-molecule inhibitors of the Wnt/wingless signaling pathway  

PubMed Central

Misregulated ?-catenin responsive transcription (CRT) has been implicated in the genesis of various malignancies, including colorectal carcinomas, and it is a key therapeutic target in combating various cancers. Despite significant effort, successful clinical implementation of CRT inhibitory therapeutics remains a challenging goal. This is, in part, because of the challenge of identifying inhibitory compounds that specifically modulate the nuclear transcriptional activity of ?-catenin while not affecting its cytoskeletal function in stabilizing adherens junctions at the cell membrane. Here, we report an RNAi-based modifier screening strategy for the identification of CRT inhibitors. Our data provide support for the specificity of these inhibitory compounds in antagonizing the transcriptional function of nuclear ?-catenin. We show that these inhibitors efficiently block Wnt/?-catenin–induced target genes and phenotypes in various mammalian and cancer cell lines. Importantly, these Wnt inhibitors are specifically cytotoxic to human colon tumor biopsy cultures as well as colon cancer cell lines that exhibit deregulated Wnt signaling. PMID:21393571

Gonsalves, Foster C.; Klein, Keren; Carson, Brittany B.; Katz, Shauna; Ekas, Laura A.; Evans, Steve; Nagourney, Robert; Cardozo, Timothy; Brown, Anthony M. C.; DasGupta, Ramanuj

2011-01-01

232

Global transcriptome analysis identifies regulated transcripts and pathways activated during oogenesis and early embryogenesis in atlantic cod  

PubMed Central

The molecular mechanisms underlying oogenesis and maternally controlled embryogenesis in fish are not fully understood, especially in marine species. Our aim was to study the egg and embryo transcriptome during oogenesis and early embryogenesis in Atlantic cod. Follicles from oogenesis stages (pre-, early-, and late-vitellogenic), ovulated eggs, and two embryonic stages (blastula, gastrula) were collected from broodstock fish and fertilized eggs. Gene expression profiles were measured in a 44?K oligo microarray consisting of 23,000 cod genes. Hundreds of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified in the follicle stages investigated, implicating a continuous accumulation and degradation of polyadenylated transcripts throughout oogenesis. Very few DEGs were identified from ovulated egg to blastula, showing a more stable maternal RNA pool in early embryonic stages. The highest induction of expression was observed between blastula and gastrula, signifying the onset of zygotic transcription. During early vitellogenesis, several of the most upregulated genes are linked to nervous system signaling, suggesting increasing requirements for ovarian synaptic signaling to stimulate the rapid growth of oocytes. Highly upregulated genes during late vitellogenesis are linked to protein processing, fat metabolism, osmoregulation, and arrested meiosis. One of the genes with the highest upregulation in the ovulated egg is involved in oxidative phosphorylation, reflecting increased energy requirements during fertilization and the first rapid cell divisions of early embryogenesis. In conclusion, this study provides a large-scale presentation of the Atlantic cod's maternally controlled transcriptome in ovarian follicles through oogenesis, ovulated eggs, and early embryos. Mol. Reprod. Dev. 81: 619–635, 2014. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:24687555

Kleppe, Lene; Edvardsen, Rolf Brudvik; Furmanek, Tomasz; Taranger, Geir Lasse; Wargelius, Anna

2014-01-01

233

Heterogeneous activation of the TGF? pathway in glioblastomas identified by gene expression-based classification using TGF?-responsive genes  

PubMed Central

Background TGF? has emerged as an attractive target for the therapeutic intervention of glioblastomas. Aberrant TGF? overproduction in glioblastoma and other high-grade gliomas has been reported, however, to date, none of these reports has systematically examined the components of TGF? signaling to gain a comprehensive view of TGF? activation in large cohorts of human glioma patients. Methods TGF? activation in mammalian cells leads to a transcriptional program that typically affects 5–10% of the genes in the genome. To systematically examine the status of TGF? activation in high-grade glial tumors, we compiled a gene set of transcriptional response to TGF? stimulation from tissue culture and in vivo animal studies. These genes were used to examine the status of TGF? activation in high-grade gliomas including a large cohort of glioblastomas. Unsupervised and supervised classification analysis was performed in two independent, publicly available glioma microarray datasets. Results Unsupervised and supervised classification using the TGF?-responsive gene list in two independent glial tumor gene expression data sets revealed various levels of TGF? activation in these tumors. Among glioblastomas, one of the most devastating human cancers, two subgroups were identified that showed distinct TGF? activation patterns as measured from transcriptional responses. Approximately 62% of glioblastoma samples analyzed showed strong TGF? activation, while the rest showed a weak TGF? transcriptional response. Conclusion Our findings suggest heterogeneous TGF? activation in glioblastomas, which may cause potential differences in responses to anti-TGF? therapies in these two distinct subgroups of glioblastomas patients. PMID:19192267

Xu, Xie L; Kapoun, Ann M

2009-01-01

234

Pyrococcus furiosus flagella: biochemical and transcriptional analyses identify the newly detected flaB0 gene to encode the major flagellin  

PubMed Central

We have described previously that the flagella of the Euryarchaeon Pyrococcus furiosus are multifunctional cell appendages used for swimming, adhesion to surfaces and formation of cell-cell connections. Here, we characterize these organelles with respect to their biochemistry and transcription. Flagella were purified by shearing from cells followed by CsCl-gradient centrifugation and were found to consist mainly of a ca. 30 kDa glycoprotein. Polymerization studies of denatured flagella resulted in an ATP-independent formation of flagella-like filaments. The N-terminal sequence of the main flagellin was determined by Edman degradation, but none of the genes in the complete genome code for a protein with that N-terminus. Therefore, we resequenced the respective region of the genome, thereby discovering that the published genome sequence is not correct. A total of 771 bp are missing in the data base, resulting in the correction of the previously unusual N-terminal sequence of flagellin FlaB1 and in the identification of a third flagellin. To keep in line with the earlier nomenclature we call this flaB0. Very interestingly, the previously not identified flaB0 codes for the major flagellin. Transcriptional analyses of the revised flagellar operon identified various different cotranscripts encoding only a single protein in case of FlaB0 and FlaJ or up to five proteins (FlaB0-FlaD). Analysing the RNA of cells from different growth phases, we found that the length and number of detected cotranscript increased over time suggesting that the flagellar operon is transcribed mostly in late exponential and stationary growth phase. PMID:25566211

Näther-Schindler, Daniela J.; Schopf, Simone; Bellack, Annett; Rachel, Reinhard; Wirth, Reinhard

2014-01-01

235

Gene-centric analysis identifies variants associated with interleukin-6 levels and shared pathways with other inflammation markers.  

PubMed

BACKGROUND- Inflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6), a possible risk factor for coronary heart disease, has an estimated heritability of >60%, but to date few genetic variants influencing IL-6 levels are known. METHODS AND RESULTS- We used the ITMAT-Broad-Care (IBC) HumanCVD disease BeadChip in the Whitehall II study (N=4911) and British Women's Heart and Health Study (N=3445) to identify single-nucleotide polymorphisms associated with circulating IL-6 levels. Twenty-two single-nucleotide polymorphisms from 7 loci (IL6R/TDRD10, HLA-DRB1, BUD13, SEZ6L, IL1RN, TRIB3, and ABO) were associated with IL-6 (P<10(-5)), although none were associated with the IL6 gene itself. With the exception of TRIB3, all loci have been previously reported in genome-wide association studies for autoimmune and cardiovascular diseases. Fourteen single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the IL6R region in high-linkage disequilibrium (r(2)>0.9) with a nonsynonymous variant, rs2228145, were also associated with IL-6 and C-reactive protein concentration (P<10(-5)). An IL-6-specific weighted allele score explained 2% of the variance of log IL-6 levels (P=2.4410(-22)) in Whitehall II and 1% (P=1.910(-8)) in British Women's Heart and Health Studies. CONCLUSIONS- Multiple common genetic variants of modest effect influence IL-6 concentration. Several loci contain single-nucleotide polymorphisms, exhibiting overlapping associations with autoimmune and cardiovascular disorders and other circulating biomarkers. Genetic variants associated with IL-6 provide important tools for probing the causal relevance of IL-6 signaling in a range of cardiometabolic diseases. PMID:23505291

Shah, Tina; Zabaneh, Delilah; Gaunt, Tom; Swerdlow, Daniel I; Shah, Sonia; Talmud, Philippa J; Day, Ian N; Whittaker, John; Holmes, Michael V; Sofat, Reecha; Humphries, Steve E; Kivimaki, Mika; Kumari, Meena; Hingorani, Aroon D; Casas, Juan P

2013-04-01

236

Pharmacogenomic profiling and pathway analyses identify MAPK-dependent migration as an acute response to SN38 in p53 null and mutant colorectal cancer cells  

PubMed Central

The topoisomerase I inhibitor irinotecan is used to treat advanced colorectal cancer and has been shown to have p53-independent anti-cancer activity. The aim of this study was to identify the p53-independent signalling mechanisms activated by irinotecan. Transcriptional profiling of isogenic HCT116 p53 wild-type and p53 null cells was carried out following treatment with the active metabolite of irinotecan, SN38. Unsupervised analysis methods demonstrated that p53 status had a highly significant impact on gene expression changes in response to SN38. Pathway analysis indicated that pathways involved in cell motility (adherens junction, focal adhesion, MAPK and regulation of the actin cytoskeleton) were significantly activated in p53 null cells, but not p53 wild-type cells, following SN38 treatment. In functional assays, SN38 treatment increased the migratory potential of p53 null and mutant colorectal cancer cell lines, but not p53 wild-type lines. Moreover, p53 null SN38-resistant cells were found to migrate at a faster rate than parental drug-sensitive p53 null cells, whereas p53 wild-type SN38-resistant cells failed to migrate. Notably, co-treatment with inhibitors of the MAPK pathway inhibited the increased migration observed following SN38 treatment in p53 null and mutant cells. Thus, in the absence of wild-type p53, SN38 promotes migration of colorectal cancer cells, and inhibiting MAPK blocks this potentially pro-metastatic adaptive response to this anti-cancer drug. PMID:22665525

Allen, Wendy L.; Turkington, Richard C.; Stevenson, Leanne; Carson, Gail; Coyle, Vicky M.; Hector, Suzanne; Dunne, Philip; Van Schaeybroeck, Sandra; Longley, Daniel B.; Johnston, Patrick G.

2012-01-01

237

The Use of Conditional Probability Functions and Potential Source Contribution Functions to Identify Source Regions and Advection Pathways of Hydrocarbon Emissions in Houston, Texas  

SciTech Connect

In this study, we demonstrate the utility of conditional probability functions (CPFs), potential source contribution functions (PSCFs), and hierarchical clustering analysis to identify the source region and transport pathways of hydrocarbons measured at five photochemical assessment monitoring stations (PAMS) near the Houston ship channel from June to October 2003. Over 50 volatile organic compound (VOC) concentrations were measured on the hourly collected samples. Routine surface observations of wind directions measured at each of the receptor sites were used extensively. We show that VOCs with similar CPF patterns likely have common transport pathways. This was established with the multivariate technique, which uses the hierarchical clustering analysis to allow clusters of groups of VOCs to form with similar CPF patterns. This method revealed that alkenes, and in particular those with geometric isomers such as cis-/trans-2-butene and cis-/trans-2-pentene, have similar CPF patterns. The alkane isomers often show CPF patterns among themselves, and similarly, aromatic compounds often show similar patterns among themselves too. We also show how trajectory information can be used in conjunction with the PSCF analysis to produce a graphic analysis suggesting specific source areas for a given VOC. The use of these techniques in the chemically and meteorologically complex environment of Houston, Texas, suggests its further utility in other areas with relatively simpler conditions.

Xie, YuLong; Berkowitz, Carl M.

2007-09-01

238

Time Point-based Integrative Analyses of Deep-transcriptome Identify Four Signal Pathways in Blastemal Regeneration of Zebrafish Lower Jaw.  

PubMed

There has been growing interest in applying tissue engineering to stem cell-based regeneration therapies. We have previously reported that zebrafish can faithfully regenerate complicated tissue structures through blastemal cell type conversions and tissue reorganization. To unveil the regenerative factors and engineering arts of blastemal regeneration, we conducted transcriptomal analyses at four time points corresponding to preamputation, reepitheliation, blastemal formation, and respecification. By combining the hierarchical Gene Ontology (GO) term network, the DAVID annotation system, and Euclidean distance clustering, we identified four signaling pathways: foxi1-foxo1b-pou3f1, pax3a-mant3a- col11/col2, pou5f1-cdx4- kdrl, and isl1-wnt11 PCP-sox9a. Results from immunohistochemical staining and promoter-driven transgenic fish suggest that these pathways respectively define wound epidermis reconstitution, cell type conversions, blastemal angiogenesis/vasculogenesis, and cartilage matrix-orientation. Foxi1 morpholino-knockdown caused expansions of Foxo1b- and Pax3a-expression in the basal layer-blastemal junction region. Moreover, foxi1 morphants displayed increased sox9a and hoxa2b transcripts in the embryonic pharyngeal arches. Thus, a Foxi1 signal switch is required to establish correct tissue patterns, including reepitheliation and blastema formation. This study provides novel insight into a blastema regeneration strategy devised by epithelial cell transdifferentiation, blood vessel engineering, and cartilage matrix deposition. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. PMID:25420467

Zhang, Hui; Wang, Xuelong; Lv, Kailun; Gao, Siqi; Wang, Guan; Fan, Chunxin; Zhang, Xin A; Yan, Jizhou

2014-11-25

239

Metabolic Engineering of Light and Dark Biochemical Pathways in Wild-Type and Mutant Strains of Synechocystis PCC 6803 for Maximal, 24-Hour Production of Hydrogen Gas  

SciTech Connect

This project used the cyanobacterial species Synechocystis PCC 6803 to pursue two lines of inquiry, with each line addressing one of the two main factors affecting hydrogen (H2) production in Synechocystis PCC 6803: NADPH availability and O2 sensitivity. H2 production in Synechocystis PCC 6803 requires a very high NADPH:NADP+ ratio, that is, the NADP pool must be highly reduced, which can be problematic because several metabolic pathways potentially can act to raise or lower NADPH levels. Also, though the [NiFe]-hydrogenase in PCC 6803 is constitutively expressed, it is reversibly inactivated at very low O2 concentrations. Largely because of this O2 sensitivity and the requirement for high NADPH levels, a major portion of overall H2 production occurs under anoxic conditions in the dark, supported by breakdown of glycogen or other organic substrates accumulated during photosynthesis. Also, other factors, such as N or S limitation, pH changes, presence of other substances, or deletion of particular respiratory components, can affect light or dark H2 production. Therefore, in the first line of inquiry, under a number of culture conditions with wild type (WT) Synechocystis PCC 6803 cells and a mutant with impaired type I NADPH-dehydrogenase (NDH-1) function, we used H2 production profiling and metabolic flux analysis, with and without specific inhibitors, to examine systematically the pathways involved in light and dark H2 production. Results from this work provided rational bases for metabolic engineering to maximize photobiological H2 production on a 24-hour basis. In the second line of inquiry, we used site-directed mutagenesis to create mutants with hydrogenase enzymes exhibiting greater O2 tolerance. The research addressed the following four tasks: 1. Evaluate the effects of various culture conditions (N, S, or P limitation; light/dark; pH; exogenous organic carbon) on H2 production profiles of WT cells and an NDH-1 mutant; 2. Conduct metabolic flux analyses for enhanced H2 production profiles using selected culture conditions and inhibitors of specific pathways in WT cells and an NDH-1 mutant; 3. Create Synechocystis PCC 6803 mutant strains with modified hydrogenases exhibiting increased O2 tolerance and greater H2 production; and 4. Integrate enhanced hydrogenase mutants and culture and metabolic factor studies to maximize 24-hour H2 production.

Ely, Roger L.; Chaplen, Frank W.R.

2014-03-11

240

Expression Microarray Meta-Analysis Identifies Genes Associated with Ras/MAPK and Related Pathways in Progression of Muscle-Invasive Bladder Transition Cell Carcinoma  

PubMed Central

The effective detection and management of muscle-invasive bladder Transition Cell Carcinoma (TCC) continues to be an urgent clinical challenge. While some differences of gene expression and function in papillary (Ta), superficial (T1) and muscle-invasive (?T2) bladder cancers have been investigated, the understanding of mechanisms involved in the progression of bladder tumors remains incomplete. Statistical methods of pathway-enrichment, cluster analysis and text-mining can extract and help interpret functional information about gene expression patterns in large sets of genomic data. The public availability of patient-derived expression microarray data allows open access and analysis of large amounts of clinical data. Using these resources, we investigated gene expression differences associated with tumor progression and muscle-invasive TCC. Gene expression was calculated relative to Ta tumors to assess progression-associated differences, revealing a network of genes related to Ras/MAPK and PI3K signaling pathways with increased expression. Further, we identified genes within this network that are similarly expressed in superficial Ta and T1 stages but altered in muscle-invasive T2 tumors, finding 7 genes (COL3A1, COL5A1, COL11A1, FN1, ErbB3, MAPK10 and CDC25C) whose expression patterns in muscle-invasive tumors are consistent in 5 to 7 independent outside microarray studies. Further, we found increased expression of the fibrillar collagen proteins COL3A1 and COL5A1 in muscle-invasive tumor samples and metastatic T24 cells. Our results suggest that increased expression of genes involved in mitogenic signaling may support the progression of muscle-invasive bladder tumors that generally lack activating mutations in these pathways, while expression changes of fibrillar collagens, fibronectin and specific signaling proteins are associated with muscle-invasive disease. These results identify potential biomarkers and targets for TCC treatments, and provide an integrated systems-level perspective of TCC pathobiology to inform future studies. PMID:23383328

Ewald, Jonathan A.; Downs, Tracy M.; Cetnar, Jeremy P.; Ricke, William A.

2013-01-01

241

Integrating Bayesian variable selection with Modular Response Analysis to infer biochemical network topology  

PubMed Central

Background Recent advancements in genetics and proteomics have led to the acquisition of large quantitative data sets. However, the use of these data to reverse engineer biochemical networks has remained a challenging problem. Many methods have been proposed to infer biochemical network topologies from different types of biological data. Here, we focus on unraveling network topologies from steady state responses of biochemical networks to successive experimental perturbations. Results We propose a computational algorithm which combines a deterministic network inference method termed Modular Response Analysis (MRA) and a statistical model selection algorithm called Bayesian Variable Selection, to infer functional interactions in cellular signaling pathways and gene regulatory networks. It can be used to identify interactions among individual molecules involved in a biochemical pathway or reveal how different functional modules of a biological network interact with each other to exchange information. In cases where not all network components are known, our method reveals functional interactions which are not direct but correspond to the interaction routes through unknown elements. Using computer simulated perturbation responses of signaling pathways and gene regulatory networks from the DREAM challenge, we demonstrate that the proposed method is robust against noise and scalable to large networks. We also show that our method can infer network topologies using incomplete perturbation datasets. Consequently, we have used this algorithm to explore the ERBB regulated G1/S transition pathway in certain breast cancer cells to understand the molecular mechanisms which cause these cells to become drug resistant. The algorithm successfully inferred many well characterized interactions of this pathway by analyzing experimentally obtained perturbation data. Additionally, it identified some molecular interactions which promote drug resistance in breast cancer cells. Conclusions The proposed algorithm provides a robust, scalable and cost effective solution for inferring network topologies from biological data. It can potentially be applied to explore novel pathways which play important roles in life threatening disease like cancer. PMID:23829771

2013-01-01

242

Genome-Wide Association Study Identifies Novel Loci Associated With Concentrations of Four Plasma Phospholipid Fatty Acids in the De Novo Lipogenesis Pathway: Results from the CHARGE Consortium  

PubMed Central

Background Palmitic acid(16:0), stearic acid(18:0), palmitoleic acid(16:1n-7), and oleic acid(18:1n-9) are major saturated and mono-unsaturated fatty acids that affect cellular signaling and metabolic pathways. They are synthesized via de novo lipogenesis (DNL) and are the main saturated and mono-unsaturated fatty acids in the diet. Levels of these fatty acids have been linked to diseases including type 2 diabetes and coronary heart disease. Methods and Results Genome-wide association studies were conducted in 5 population-based cohorts comprising 8,961 participants of European ancestry to investigate the association of common genetic variation with plasma levels of these four fatty acids. We identified polymorphisms in 7 novel loci associated with circulating levels of one or more of these fatty acids. ALG14 (asparagine-linked glycosylation 14 homolog) polymorphisms were associated with higher 16:0(P=2.7×10-11) and lower 18:0(P=2.2×10-18). FADS1 and FADS2 (desaturases) polymorphisms were associated with higher 16:1n-7(P=6.6×10-13) and 18:1n-9(P=2.2×10-32), and lower 18:0(P =1.3×10-20). LPGAT1 (lysophosphatidylglycerol acyltransferase) polymorphisms were associated with lower 18:0(P=2.8×10-9). GCKR(glucokinase regulator, P =9.8×10-10) and HIF1AN(factor inhibiting hypoxia-inducible factor-1, P=5.7×10-9) polymorphisms were associated with higher 16:1n-7, whereas PKD2L1(polycystic kidney disease 2-like 1, P=5.7×10-15) and a locus on chromosome 2(not near known genes) were associated with lower 16:1n-7(P=4.1×10-8). Conclusion Our findings provide novel evidence that common variations in genes with diverse functions, including protein-glycosylation, polyunsaturated fatty acid metabolism, phospholipid modeling, and glucose- and oxygen-sensing pathways, are associated with circulating levels of four fatty acids in the DNL pathway. These results expand our knowledge of genetic factors relevant to DNL and fatty acid biology. PMID:23362303

Wu, Jason H.Y.; Lemaitre, Rozenn N.; Manichaikul, Ani; Guan, Weihua; Tanaka, Toshiko; Foy, Millennia; Kabagambe, Edmond K.; Djousse, Luc; Siscovick, David; Fretts, Amanda M.; Johnson, Catherine; King, Irena B.; Psaty, Bruce M.; McKnight, Barbara; Rich, Stephen S.; Chen, Yii-Der I.; Nettleton, Jennifer A.; Tang, Weihong; Bandinelli, Stefania; Jacobs, David R.; Browning, Brian L.; Laurie, Cathy C.; Gu, Xiangjun; Tsai, Michael Y.; Steffen, Lyn M.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Fornage, Myriam; Mozaffarian, Dariush

2013-01-01

243

Next-generation sequencing of salivary high-grade neuroendocrine carcinomas identifies alterations in RB1 and the mTOR pathway.  

PubMed

Salivary gland high-grade neuroendocrine carcinomas are rare, aggressive tumors that are morphologically and immunohistochemically similar to cutaneous high-grade neuroendocrine (Merkel cell) carcinomas. The majority of Merkel cell carcinomas harbor Merkel cell polyomavirus, while the virus is rare or absent in salivary high-grade neuroendocrine carcinomas. Inactivation of retinoblastoma 1 (RB1) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of both virus-positive and -negative Merkel cell carcinomas but by different mechanisms. In virus-positive tumors, a portion of the viral genome, the large T antigen, may inactivate RB1, and in virus-negative Merkel cell carcinomas truncating mutations in the RB1 gene have been identified. The molecular genetics of salivary high-grade neuroendocrine carcinomas are not well understood. Here, we performed targeted next-generation sequencing of 151 cancer-related genes on 4 four Merkel cell polyomavirus-negative primary salivary gland high-grade neuroendocrine carcinoma cases. Somatic mutations were predominantly found within tumor suppressor genes [TP53 (3 cases), PTEN (2 cases), RB1 (1 case)]. Truncating RB1 mutations, as seen in virus-negative Merkel cell carcinomas, were not identified. However, 3 of 4 cases had RB1 deletions by copy number variation analysis. The 4th case had loss of heterozygosity for RB1. Fluorescence in situ hybridization confirmed RB1 deletions in 2 of 3 cases, and the absence of RB1 deletion in the 4th case that had loss of heterozygosity. All 4 cases showed loss of RB1 protein expression by immunohistochemistry, indicating that RB1 inactivation is important. However, the mechanism of RB1 inactivation appears different than that seen in Merkel cell carcinomas. In addition, copy number variation consistent with activation of the PI3KCA/AKT/mTOR pathway was also observed in all 4 cases. The mTOR pathway may be a potential therapeutic target in these tumors as mTOR inhibitors are currently used to treat other tumor types. PMID:25446844

Goyal, Bella; Duncavage, Eric J; Martinez, David; Lewis, James S; Chernock, Rebecca D

2014-12-01

244

Microarray-Assisted Pathway Analysis Identifies MT1X & NF?B as Mediators of TCRP1-Associated Resistance to Cisplatin in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma  

PubMed Central

We recently reported that TCRP1, a novel multidrug-resistance associated human gene, can mediate cisplatin resistance in OSCC cells. However, the molecular mechanism underlying this role of TCRP1 remained to be elucidated. In this study, by using Human Toxicology and Drug Resistance Microarray, we identified 30 genes with significantly different expression levels between Tca/PYM and TCRP1 knockdown cell lines. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments and GST-pull down assays showed that metallothionein1X (MT1X) and Akt interact with TCRP1. siRNA-mediated knockdown of TCRP1 and MT1X was found to sensitize cells to cisplatin, leading to increased apoptosis and inhibition of cell proliferation. These functions of TCRP1 may be caused at least in part via activation of the PI3K/Akt/NF-?B signaling pathway. Taken together, our findings indicate that TCRP1 may be an important drug target for improvement of the treatment and survival of patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:23251525

Peng, Bo; Gu, Yixue; Xiong, Yan; Zheng, Guopei; He, Zhimin

2012-01-01

245

Soya bean G? proteins with distinct biochemical properties exhibit differential ability to complement Saccharomyces cerevisiae gpa1 mutant.  

PubMed

Signalling pathways mediated by heterotrimeric G-proteins are common to all eukaryotes. Plants have a limited number of each of the G-protein subunits, with the most elaborate G-protein network discovered so far in soya bean (Glycine max, also known as soybean) which has four G?, four G? and ten G? proteins. Biochemical characterization of G? proteins from plants suggests significant variation in their properties compared with the well-characterized non-plant proteins. Furthermore, the four soya bean G? (GmG?) proteins exhibit distinct biochemical activities among themselves, but the extent to which such biochemical differences contribute to their in vivo function is also not known. We used the yeast gpa1 mutant which displays constitutive signalling and growth arrest in the pheromone-response pathway as an in vivo model to evaluate the effect of distinct biochemical activities of GmG? proteins. We showed that specific GmG? proteins can be activated during pheromone-dependent receptor-mediated signalling in yeast and they display different strengths towards complementation of yeast gpa1 phenotypes. We also identified amino acids that are responsible for differential complementation abilities of specific G? proteins. These data establish that specific plant G? proteins are functional in the receptor-mediated pheromone-response pathway in yeast and that the subtle biochemical differences in their activity are physiologically relevant. PMID:24694027

Roy Choudhury, Swarup; Wang, Yuqi; Pandey, Sona

2014-07-01

246

Genomic and Biochemical Analysis of the Diaminopimelate and Lysine Biosynthesis Pathway in Verrucomicrobium spinosum: Identification and Partial Characterization of L,L-Diaminopimelate Aminotransferase and UDP-N-Acetylmuramoylalanyl-D-glutamyl-2,6-meso-Diaminopimelate Ligase  

PubMed Central

The Gram-negative bacterium Verrucomicrobium spinosum has attracted interest in recent years following the sequencing and annotation of its genome. Comparative genomic analysis of V. spinosum using diaminopimelate/lysine metabolic genes from Chlamydia trachomatis suggests that V. spinosum employs the L,L-diaminopimelate aminotransferase (DapL) pathway for diaminopimelate/lysine biosynthesis. The open reading frame corresponding to the putative dapL ortholog was cloned and the recombinant enzyme was shown to possess L,L-diaminopimelate aminotransferase activity in vitro. In vivo analysis using functional complementation confirmed that the dapL ortholog was able to functionally complement an E. coli mutant that confers auxotrophy for diaminopimelate and lysine. In addition to its role in lysine biosynthesis, the intermediate diaminopimelate has an integral role in peptidoglycan biosynthesis. To this end, the UDP-N-acetylmuramoylalanyl-d-glutamyl-2,6-meso-diaminopimelate ligase ortholog was also identified, cloned, and was shown to possess meso-diaminopimelate ligase activity in vivo. The L,L-diaminopimelate aminotransferase pathway has been experimentally confirmed in several bacteria, some of which are deemed pathogenic to animals. Since animals, and particularly humans, lack the genetic machinery for the synthesis of diaminopimelate/lysine de novo, the enzymes involved in this pathway are attractive targets for development of antibiotics. Whether dapL is an essential gene in any bacteria is currently not known. V. spinosum is an excellent candidate to investigate the essentiality of dapL, since the bacterium employs the DapL pathway for lysine and cell wall biosynthesis, is non-pathogenic to humans, facile to grow, and can be genetically manipulated. PMID:22783236

Nachar, Victoria R.; Savka, Francisco C.; McGroty, Sean E.; Donovan, Katherine A.; North, Rachel A.; Dobson, Renwick C. J.; Buckley, Larry J.; Hudson, André O.

2012-01-01

247

A Genome-Wide RNAi Screen Identifies FOXO4 as a Metastasis-Suppressor through Counteracting PI3K/AKT Signal Pathway in Prostate Cancer  

PubMed Central

Activation of the PI3K/AKT signal pathway is a known driving force for the progression to castration-recurrent prostate cancer (CR-CaP), which constitutes the major lethal phenotype of CaP. Here, we identify using a genomic shRNA screen the PI3K/AKT-inactivating downstream target, FOXO4, as a potential CaP metastasis suppressor. FOXO4 protein levels inversely correlate with the invasive potential of a panel of human CaP cell lines, with decreased mRNA levels correlating with increased incidence of clinical metastasis. Knockdown (KD) of FOXO4 in human LNCaP cells causes increased invasion in vitro and lymph node (LN) metastasis in vivo without affecting indices of proliferation or apoptosis. Increased Matrigel invasiveness was found by KD of FOXO1 but not FOXO3. Comparison of differentially expressed genes affected by FOXO4-KD in LNCaP cells in culture, in primary tumors and in LN metastases identified a panel of upregulated genes, including PIP, CAMK2N1, PLA2G16 and PGC, which, if knocked down by siRNA, could decrease the increased invasiveness associated with FOXO4 deficiency. Although only some of these genes encode FOXO promoter binding sites, they are all RUNX2-inducible, and RUNX2 binding to the PIP promoter is increased in FOXO4-KD cells. Indeed, the forced expression of FOXO4 reversed the increased invasiveness of LNCaP/shFOXO4 cells; the forced expression of FOXO4 did not alter RUNX2 protein levels, yet it decreased RUNX2 binding to the PIP promoter, resulting in PIP downregulation. Finally, there was a correlation between FOXO4, but not FOXO1 or FOXO3, downregulation and decreased metastasis-free survival in human CaP patients. Our data strongly suggest that increased PI3K/AKT-mediated metastatic invasiveness in CaP is associated with FOXO4 loss, and that mechanisms to induce FOXO4 re-expression might suppress CaP metastatic aggressiveness. PMID:24983969

Su, Bing; Gao, Lingqiu; Baranowski, Catherine; Gillard, Bryan; Wang, Jianmin; Ransom, Ryan; Ko, Hyun-Kyung; Gelman, Irwin H.

2014-01-01

248

Transcription Factor Pathways and Congenital Heart Disease  

PubMed Central

Congenital heart disease is a major cause of morbidity and mortality throughout life. Mutations in numerous transcription factors have been identified in patients and families with some of the most common forms of cardiac malformations and arrhythmias. This review discusses factor pathways known to be important for normal heart development and how abnormalities in these pathways have been linked to morphological and functional forms of congenital heart defects. A comprehensive, current list of known transcription factor mutations associated with congenital heart disease is provided, but the review focuses primarily on three key transcription factors, Nkx2-5, GATA4, and Tbx5, and their known biochemical and genetic partners. By understanding the interaction partners, transcriptional targets, and upstream activators of these core cardiac transcription factors, additional information about normal heart formation and further insight into genes and pathways affected in congenital heart disease should result. PMID:22449847

McCulley, David J.; Black, Brian L.

2013-01-01

249

Biochemical effects of mercury, cadmium, and lead  

Microsoft Academic Search

A review is presented of the chemical and biochemical effects of mercury, acadmium and lead. Similarities and diversities are emphasized and the means available to identify their biochemical sites of action are discussed. Toxic effects and alterations in enzyme activity are described. 551 references.

B. L. Vallee; D. D. Ulmer

1972-01-01

250

Converging biochemical pathways in psychiatric disorders  

E-print Network

According to the World Health Organization, neuropsychiatric diseases account for approximately one third of years lost to disability. Yet, despite this huge disease burden, there is a lack of new treatments under development: ...

Soda, Takahiro

2012-01-01

251

A Global Genomic and Genetic Strategy to Identify, Validate and Use Gene Signatures of Xenobiotic-Responsive Transcription Factors in Prediction of Pathway Activation in the Mouse Liver  

EPA Science Inventory

Many drugs and environmentally-relevant chemicals activate xenobiotic-responsive transcription factors. Identification of target genes of these factors would be useful in predicting pathway activation in in vitro chemical screening as well as their involvement in disease states. ...

252

CSNK1A1 and Gli2 as Novel Targets Identified Through an Integrative Analysis of Gene Expression Data, Protein-Protein Interaction and Pathways Networks in Glioblastoma Tumors: Can These Two Be Antagonistic Proteins?  

PubMed Central

Glioblastoma (GBM) is the malignant form of glioma, and the interplay of different pathways working in concert in GBM development and progression needs to be fully understood. Wnt signaling and sonic hedgehog (SHH) signaling pathways, having basic similarities, are among the major pathways aberrantly activated in GBM, and hence, need to be targeted. It becomes imperative, therefore, to explore the functioning of these pathways in context of each other in GBM. An integrative approach may help provide new biological insights, as well as solve the problem of identifying common drug targets for simultaneous targeting of these pathways. The beauty of this approach is that it can recapitulate several known facts, as well as decipher new emerging patterns, identifying those targets that could be missed when relying on one type of data at a time. This approach can be easily extended to other systems to discover key patterns in the functioning of signaling molecules. Studies were designed to assess the relationship between significant differential expression of genes of the Wnt (Wnt/?-catenin canonical and Wnt non-canonical) and SHH signaling pathways and their connectivity patterns in interaction and signaling networks. Further, the aim was to decipher underlying mechanistic patterns that may be involved in a more specific way and to generate a ranked list of genes that can be used as markers or drug targets. These studies predict that Wnt pathway plays a relatively more pro-active role than the SHH pathway in GBM. Further, CTNNB1, CSNK1A1, and Gli2 proteins may act as key drug targets common to these pathways. While CTNNB1 is a widely studied molecule in the context of GBM, the likely roles of CSNK1A1 and Gli2 are found to be relatively novel. It is surmised that Gli2 may be antagonistic to CSNK1A1, preventing the phosphorylation of CTNNB1 and SMO proteins in Wnt and SHH signaling pathway, respectively, by CSNK1A1, and thereby, aberrant activation. New insights into the possible behavior of these pathway molecules relative to each other in GBM reveal some key interesting patterns. PMID:25374452

Mishra, Seema

2014-01-01

253

A genetic screen for novel components of the Ras/Mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway that interact with the yan gene of Drosophila identifies split ends, a new RNA recognition motif-containing protein.  

PubMed Central

The receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) signaling pathway is used reiteratively during the development of all multicellular organisms. While the core RTK/Ras/MAPK signaling cassette has been studied extensively, little is known about the nature of the downstream targets of the pathway or how these effectors regulate the specificity of cellular responses. Drosophila yan is one of a few downstream components identified to date, functioning as an antagonist of the RTK/Ras/MAPK pathway. Previously, we have shown that ectopic expression of a constitutively active protein (yan(ACT)) inhibits the differentiation of multiple cell types. In an effort to identify new genes functioning downstream in the Ras/MAPK/yan pathway, we have performed a genetic screen to isolate dominant modifiers of the rough eye phenotype associated with eye-specific expression of yan(ACT). Approximately 190,000 mutagenized flies were screened, and 260 enhancers and 90 suppressors were obtained. Among the previously known genes we recovered are four RTK pathway components, rolled (MAPK), son-of-sevenless, Star, and pointed, and two genes, eyes absent and string, that have not been implicated previously in RTK signaling events. We also isolated mutations in five previously uncharacterized genes, one of which, split ends, we have characterized molecularly and have shown to encode a member of the RRM family of RNA-binding proteins. PMID:10655223

Rebay, I; Chen, F; Hsiao, F; Kolodziej, P A; Kuang, B H; Laverty, T; Suh, C; Voas, M; Williams, A; Rubin, G M

2000-01-01

254

Biochemical Characterization of dTDP-d-Qui4N and dTDP-d-Qui4NAc Biosynthetic Pathways in Shigella dysenteriae Type 7 and Escherichia coli O7? †  

PubMed Central

O-antigen variation due to the presence of different types of sugars and sugar linkages is important for the survival of bacteria threatened by host immune systems. The O antigens of Shigella dysenteriae type 7 and Escherichia coli O7 contain 4-(N-acetylglycyl)amino-4,6-dideoxy-d-glucose (d-Qui4NGlyAc) and 4-acetamido-4,6-dideoxy-d-glucose (d-Qui4NAc), respectively, which are sugars not often found in studied polysaccharides. In this study, we characterized the biosynthetic pathways for dTDP-d-Qui4N and dTDP-d-Qui4NAc (the nucleotide-activated precursors of d-Qui4NGlyAc and d-Qui4NAc in O antigens). Predicted genes involved in the synthesis of the two sugars were cloned, and the gene products were overexpressed and purified as His-tagged fusion proteins. In vitro enzymatic reactions were carried out using the purified proteins, and the reaction products were analyzed by capillary electrophoresis, electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. It is shown that in S. dysenteriae type 7 and E. coli O7, dTDP-d-Qui4N is synthesized from ?-d-glucose-1-phosphate in three reaction steps catalyzed by glucose-1-phosphate thymidyltransferase (RmlA), dTDP-d-glucose 4,6-dehydratase (RmlB), and dTDP-4-keto-6-deoxy-d-glucose aminotransferase (VioA). An additional acetyltransferase (VioB) catalyzes the conversion of dTDP-d-Qui4N into dTDP-d-Qui4NAc in E. coli O7. Kinetic parameters and some other properties of VioA and VioB are described and differences between VioA proteins from S. dysenteriae type 7 (VioAD7) and E. coli O7 (VioAO7) discussed. To our knowledge, this is the first time that functions of VioA and VioB have been biochemically characterized. This study provides valuable enzyme sources for the production of dTDP-d-Qui4N and dTDP-d-Qui4NAc, which are potentially useful in the pharmaceutical industry for drug development. PMID:17905981

Wang, Ying; Xu, Yanli; Perepelov, Andrei V.; Qi, Yuanyuan; Knirel, Yuriy A.; Wang, Lei; Feng, Lu

2007-01-01

255

The Use of Item Analysis for Improvement of Biochemical Teaching  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Item analysis was used to find out which biochemical explanations need to be improved in biochemical teaching, not which items are to be discarded, improved, or reusable in biochemical examinations. The analysis revealed the basic facts of which less able students had more misunderstanding than able students. Identifying these basic facts helps…

Nagata, Ryoichi

2004-01-01

256

The Leaf Epidermome of Catharanthus roseus Reveals Its Biochemical Specialization[W][OA  

PubMed Central

Catharanthus roseus is the sole commercial source of the monoterpenoid indole alkaloids (MIAs), vindoline and catharanthine, components of the commercially important anticancer dimers, vinblastine and vincristine. Carborundum abrasion technique was used to extract leaf epidermis–enriched mRNA, thus sampling the epidermome, or complement, of proteins expressed in the leaf epidermis. Random sequencing of the derived cDNA library established 3655 unique ESTs, composed of 1142 clusters and 2513 singletons. Virtually all known MIA pathway genes were found in this remarkable set of ESTs, while only four known genes were found in the publicly available Catharanthus EST data set. Several novel MIA pathway candidate genes were identified, as demonstrated by the cloning and functional characterization of loganic acid O-methyltransferase involved in secologanin biosynthesis. The pathways for triterpene biosynthesis were also identified, and metabolite analysis showed that oleanane-type triterpenes were localized exclusively to the cuticular wax layer. The pathways for flavonoid and very-long-chain fatty acid biosynthesis were also located in this cell type. The results illuminate the biochemical specialization of Catharanthus leaf epidermis for the production of multiple classes of metabolites. The value and versatility of this EST data set for biochemical and biological analysis of leaf epidermal cells is also discussed. PMID:18326827

Murata, Jun; Roepke, Jonathon; Gordon, Heather; De Luca, Vincenzo

2008-01-01

257

Arabidopsis Ethylene Signaling Pathway  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In plants, ethylene gas functions as a potent endogenous growth regulator. In the model system Arabidopsis thaliana, the molecular mechanisms that underlie perception and transduction of the ethylene signal to the nucleus, where the transcription of hundreds of genes is altered, are being elucidated. In the current view, ethylene is sensed by a family of five receptors that show similarity to the bacterial two-component histidine kinases, and in plants function as negative regulators of the pathway. Binding of the ethylene gas turns off the receptors, resulting in the inactivation of another negative regulator of ethylene signaling, CTR1, a Raf-like protein kinase that directly interacts with the receptors. EIN2, a protein of unknown biochemical activity that functions as a positive regulator of the pathway, acts downstream of CTR. Derepression of EIN2 by ethylene upon disabling of the receptors and CTR1 leads to the activation of EIN3 and EIN3-like transcription factors. In the absence of ethylene, the levels of EIN3 protein are extremely low because of the function of two F-box-containing proteins, EBF1 and EBF2, that target EIN3 for proteosome-mediated degradation. In the presence of ethylene, the EIN3 protein accumulates in the nucleus and initiates a transcriptional cascade, resulting in the activation and repression of hundreds of genes. To date, the only empirically demonstrated direct target of EIN3 is the APETALA2 (AP2)-domain–containing transcription factor gene ERF1. The coregulation of ERF1 by another plant hormone, jasmonic acid, illustrates how a transcriptional cascade could be utilized in a combinatorial fashion to generate a large diversity of responses using a limited number of input signals. As new components and points of intersection with other pathways are identified, the Connections Map will be updated.

Anna N. Stepanova (North Carolina State University; Department of Genetics REV)

2005-03-22

258

Integrated analyses of genome-wide DNA occupancy and expression profiling identify key genes and pathways involved in cellular transformation by a Marek's disease virus oncoprotein, Meq.  

PubMed

Marek's disease (MD) is an economically significant disease in chickens that is caused by the highly oncogenic Marek's disease virus (MDV). A major unanswered question is the mechanism of MDV-induced tumor formation. Meq, a bZIP transcription factor discovered in the 1990s, is critically involved in viral oncogenicity, but only a few of its host target genes have been described, impeding our understanding of MDV-induced tumorigenesis. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing (ChIP-seq) and microarray analysis, a high-confidence list of Meq binding sites in the chicken genome and a global transcriptome of Meq-responsive genes were generated. Meq binding sites were found to be enriched in the promoter regions of upregulated genes but not in those of downregulated genes. ChIP-seq was also performed for c-Jun, a known heterodimeric partner of Meq. The close location of binding sites of Meq and c-Jun was noted, suggesting cooperativity between these two factors in modulating transcription. Pathway analysis indicated that Meq transcriptionally regulates many genes that are part of several signaling pathways including the extracellular signal-regulated kinase /mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK/MAPK), Jak-STAT, and ErbB pathways, which are critical for oncogenesis and/or include signaling mediators involved in apoptosis. Meq activates oncogenic signaling cascades by transcriptionally activating major kinases in the ERK/MAPK pathway and simultaneously repressing phosphatases, as verified using inhibitors of MEK and ERK1/2 in a cell proliferation assay. This study provides significant insights into the mechanistic basis of Meq-dependent cell transformation. PMID:23740999

Subramaniam, Sugalesini; Johnston, John; Preeyanon, Likit; Brown, C Titus; Kung, Hsing-Jien; Cheng, Hans H

2013-08-01

259

Expression profiling of 22 genes involved in the PI3K–AKT pathway identifies two subgroups of high-grade endometrial carcinomas with different molecular alterations  

Microsoft Academic Search

Previously, we showed that PIK3CA and p53 alterations in uterine endometrial carcinomas correlate with poor prognosis. However, the contribution of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) –AKT deregulation to endometrial carcinogenesis is not completely understood. The purpose of this study was to analyze alterations of this pathway in endometrial carcinomas and correlate them with the most common genetic abnormalities. Expression profiling of 22

Lluis Catasus; Emanuela D'Angelo; Cristina Pons; Iñigo Espinosa; Jaime Prat

2010-01-01

260

Heterologous protein production using the twin arginine translocation pathway  

DOEpatents

Provided are means for evaluating and identifying putative substrates of the twin arginine translocation (Tat) secretory pathway in Streptomyces and other bacterial species. Also provided, therefore, are simple ways to express, secrete and purify correctly folded heterologous proteins on a large scale using host microorganisms, such as, Streptomyces and the Tat pathway therein. Many of the thus-produced proteins are of significant therapeutic value in the pharmaceutical and biochemical industries, particularly when they can be secreted from the host in fully-folded active form. Accordingly, there are further provided the heterologous proteins produced by the Tat secretion pathway using the foregoing methods, and the computer algorithm used to identify the Tat signal sequence and putative substrates.

Pohlschroder, Mechtild (Philadelphia, PA); Kissinger, Jessica C (Athens, GA); Rose, R. Wesley (Glenside, PA); Brueser, Thomas (Halle, DE); Dilks, Kieran (Collingswood, NJ)

2008-11-04

261

Epigenetic Pathways and Glioblastoma Treatment: Insights From Signaling Cascades.  

PubMed

There is an urgent need to identify novel therapies for glioblastoma (GBM) as most therapies are ineffective. A first step in this process is to identify and validate targets for therapeutic intervention. Epigenetic modulators have emerged as attractive drug targets in several cancers including GBM. These epigenetic regulators affect gene expression without changing the DNA sequence. Recent studies suggest that epigenetic regulators interact with drivers of GBM cell and stem-like cell proliferation. These drivers include components of the Notch, Hedgehog, and Wingless (WNT) pathways. We highlight recent studies connecting epigenetic and signaling pathways in GBM. We also review systems and big data approaches for identifying patient specific therapies in GBM. Collectively, these studies will identify drug combinations that may be effective therapeutically in GBM and other cancers. J. Cell. Biochem. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25290986

Allen, Bryce K; Stathias, Vasileios; Maloof, Marie E; Vidovic, Dusica; Winterbottom, Emily F; Capobianco, Anthony J; Clarke, Jennifer; Schurer, Stephan; Robbins, David J; Ayad, Nagi G

2014-10-01

262

Biosynthetic pathways of ergot alkaloids.  

PubMed

Ergot alkaloids are nitrogen-containing natural products belonging to indole alkaloids. The best known producers are fungi of the phylum Ascomycota, e.g., Claviceps, Epichloë, Penicillium and Aspergillus species. According to their structures, ergot alkaloids can be divided into three groups: clavines, lysergic acid amides and peptides (ergopeptines). All of them share the first biosynthetic steps, which lead to the formation of the tetracyclic ergoline ring system (except the simplest, tricyclic compound: chanoclavine). Different modifications on the ergoline ring by specific enzymes result in an abundance of bioactive natural products, which are used as pharmaceutical drugs or precursors thereof. From the 1950s through to recent years, most of the biosynthetic pathways have been elucidated. Gene clusters from several ergot alkaloid producers have been identified by genome mining and the functions of many of those genes have been demonstrated by knock-out experiments or biochemical investigations of the overproduced enzymes. PMID:25513893

Gerhards, Nina; Neubauer, Lisa; Tudzynski, Paul; Li, Shu-Ming

2014-01-01

263

Biosynthetic Pathways of Ergot Alkaloids  

PubMed Central

Ergot alkaloids are nitrogen-containing natural products belonging to indole alkaloids. The best known producers are fungi of the phylum Ascomycota, e.g., Claviceps, Epichloë, Penicillium and Aspergillus species. According to their structures, ergot alkaloids can be divided into three groups: clavines, lysergic acid amides and peptides (ergopeptines). All of them share the first biosynthetic steps, which lead to the formation of the tetracyclic ergoline ring system (except the simplest, tricyclic compound: chanoclavine). Different modifications on the ergoline ring by specific enzymes result in an abundance of bioactive natural products, which are used as pharmaceutical drugs or precursors thereof. From the 1950s through to recent years, most of the biosynthetic pathways have been elucidated. Gene clusters from several ergot alkaloid producers have been identified by genome mining and the functions of many of those genes have been demonstrated by knock-out experiments or biochemical investigations of the overproduced enzymes. PMID:25513893

Gerhards, Nina; Neubauer, Lisa; Tudzynski, Paul; Li, Shu-Ming

2014-01-01

264

Robust simplifications of multiscale biochemical networks  

PubMed Central

Background Cellular processes such as metabolism, decision making in development and differentiation, signalling, etc., can be modeled as large networks of biochemical reactions. In order to understand the functioning of these systems, there is a strong need for general model reduction techniques allowing to simplify models without loosing their main properties. In systems biology we also need to compare models or to couple them as parts of larger models. In these situations reduction to a common level of complexity is needed. Results We propose a systematic treatment of model reduction of multiscale biochemical networks. First, we consider linear kinetic models, which appear as "pseudo-monomolecular" subsystems of multiscale nonlinear reaction networks. For such linear models, we propose a reduction algorithm which is based on a generalized theory of the limiting step that we have developed in [1]. Second, for non-linear systems we develop an algorithm based on dominant solutions of quasi-stationarity equations. For oscillating systems, quasi-stationarity and averaging are combined to eliminate time scales much faster and much slower than the period of the oscillations. In all cases, we obtain robust simplifications and also identify the critical parameters of the model. The methods are demonstrated for simple examples and for a more complex model of NF-?B pathway. Conclusion Our approach allows critical parameter identification and produces hierarchies of models. Hierarchical modeling is important in "middle-out" approaches when there is need to zoom in and out several levels of complexity. Critical parameter identification is an important issue in systems biology with potential applications to biological control and therapeutics. Our approach also deals naturally with the presence of multiple time scales, which is a general property of systems biology models. PMID:18854041

Radulescu, Ovidiu; Gorban, Alexander N; Zinovyev, Andrei; Lilienbaum, Alain

2008-01-01

265

Morphoproteomics identifies constitutive activation of the mTORC2/Akt and NF-?B pathways and expressions of IGF-1R, Sirt1, COX-2, and FASN in peripheral T-cell lymphomas: pathogenetic implications and therapeutic options  

PubMed Central

Background: Gaining a better understanding of the molecular circuitries and pathways implicated in the malignant growth and biological behavior of T cell lymphomas may identify potential cellular targets with clinical therapeutic potential. The immunohistochemical characterization of key cellular proteins participating in these pathways can provide surrogate markers of biological activity. The mammalian target of rapamycin complex (mTORC) signaling pathway has been implicated in T-cell lymphopoiesis. The mTORC2 pathway involves downstream activation of nuclear factor (NF)-?B and p-Akt (Ser 473). Fatty acid synthase (FASN) and insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) are expressed upstream of the mTORC and NF-?B signaling pathways. Cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 products influence these pathways. Our goal was to use morphoproteomics to characterize the expression patterns of the proteins in various peripheral T-cell lymphomas. Design: Ten cases of peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL) were examined for expression of proteins along the mTORC, Akt and NF-?B pathways and affiliated tumorigenic molecules. These included two angioimmunoblastic PTCL, one natural killer/PTCL, one anaplastic large PTCL, and six PTCL not otherwise specified. Immunostaining for phosphorylated (p) mTOR (Ser 2448), p-Akt (Ser 473), p-NF-?Bp65 (Ser 536), IGF-1R (Tyr1165/1166), silent mating type information regulation 2 homolog 1 (Sirt1), COX-2 and FASN was performed on paraffin-embedded tissue for each case. Percent expression was scored using bright-field microscopy with high expression designated as more than 50% of the cells with positive stain in the appropriate subcellular compartment. Results: All ten cases demonstrated nuclear staining for p-mTOR (Ser 2448) corresponding to mTORC 2, and all cases showed strong, diffuse nuclear staining for p-NF-?Bp65 (Ser 536). All ten also showed nuclear and cytoplasmic staining for p-Akt (Ser 473) and cytoplasmic staining for IGF-1R. High expressions for nuclear Sirt1, and cytoplasmic COX-2 and FASN were detected in 7, 9, and 8 out of 10 cases, respectively. Six out of 10 cases demonstrated high expression of all the mentioned markers. Conclusion: The constitutive activation of mTORC2, NF-?B, p-Akt and the concomitant expression of IGF-1R suggests convergence of these molecular pathways in T-cell lymphoma. The results of this study also suggest that mTORC2 may be a common denominator among this heterogeneous group of lymphomas. Interference of key nodes of this pathway may carry a clinical therapeutic benefit. Agents that may be considered based on existing data include: bortezomib to inhibit NF-?B pathway activation; metformin to inhibit both NF-?B and mTORC2 and histone deacteylase inhibitors to inhibit mTORC2 pathway signaling. Furthermore, panobinostat inhibits Sirt1 pathway when present, and celecoxib inhibits NF-?B pathway activation independent of COX2.

Quesada, Andrés E; Nguyen, Nghia D; Rios, Adan; Brown, Robert E

2014-01-01

266

Large-scale comparative phenotypic and genomic analyses reveal ecological preferences of shewanella species and identify metabolic pathways conserved at the genus level.  

PubMed

The use of comparative genomics for the study of different microbiological species has increased substantially as sequence technologies become more affordable. However, efforts to fully link a genotype to its phenotype remain limited to the development of one mutant at a time. In this study, we provided a high-throughput alternative to this limiting step by coupling comparative genomics to the use of phenotype arrays for five sequenced Shewanella strains. Positive phenotypes were obtained for 441 nutrients (C, N, P, and S sources), with N-based compounds being the most utilized for all strains. Many genes and pathways predicted by genome analyses were confirmed with the comparative phenotype assay, and three degradation pathways believed to be missing in Shewanella were confirmed as missing. A number of previously unknown gene products were predicted to be parts of pathways or to have a function, expanding the number of gene targets for future genetic analyses. Ecologically, the comparative high-throughput phenotype analysis provided insights into niche specialization among the five different strains. For example, Shewanella amazonensis strain SB2B, isolated from the Amazon River delta, was capable of utilizing 60 C compounds, whereas Shewanella sp. strain W3-18-1, isolated from deep marine sediment, utilized only 25 of them. In spite of the large number of nutrient sources yielding positive results, our study indicated that except for the N sources, they were not sufficiently informative to predict growth phenotypes from increasing evolutionary distances. Our results indicate the importance of phenotypic evaluation for confirming genome predictions. This strategy will accelerate the functional discovery of genes and provide an ecological framework for microbial genome sequencing projects. PMID:21642407

Rodrigues, Jorge L M; Serres, Margrethe H; Tiedje, James M

2011-08-01

267

Combined miRNA and mRNA signature identifies key molecular players and pathways involved in chikungunya virus infection in human cells.  

PubMed

Since its discovery, Chikungunya fever caused by a virus (CHIKV) has ravaged most of Africa and Southeast Asia. Despite there being more than a million reported cases in India alone and the seriousness of the disease in the chronic phase, a clear understanding of the disease pathogenesis and host response remains elusive. Here, we use microarray technology and quantitative PCR method to establish the complete miRNA, snoRNA and mRNA signature of host response upon CHIKV infection in human cell line infection model, HEK293T. The results were further validated in human primary cells (dermal fibroblasts). miRNA expression profiling revealed regulation of 152 miRNAs post CHIKV infection. An interesting overlap in miRNA signature was seen majorly with HCV, HPV and HIV1 virus. The microarray data further validated by qRT-PCR revealed induction of miR-744, miR-638, miR-503 and others among the top upregulated miRNAs. Notably, we found induction of snoRNAs belonging to C/D cluster including close paralogs of U3, U44, U76 and U78 snoRNAs. Genes were found to be differentially expressed along 3 major pathways; TGF-?, endocytosis and the cell cycle pathways. qRT-PCR data confirmed strong induction of TGF-? (SMAD6, JUN, SKIL) and endocytosis pathway (CXCR4, HSPA8, ADRB1) genes while downregulation of cell cycle genes (CDC27 and CDC23). Interestingly, use of TGF-? inhibitor, SB-431542, increased CHIKV mediated cell death. Overall, this study aims at providing the first complete transcriptome signature of host response upon CHIKV infection to aid identification of possible biomarkers and therapeutic targets. PMID:24278205

Saxena, Tanvi; Tandon, Bhavna; Sharma, Shivani; Chameettachal, Shibu; Ray, Pratima; Ray, Alok R; Kulshreshtha, Ritu

2013-01-01

268

Reconstruction of the Central Carbohydrate Metabolism of Thermoproteus tenax by Use of Genomic and Biochemical Data  

PubMed Central

The hyperthermophilic, facultatively heterotrophic crenarchaeum Thermoproteus tenax was analyzed using a low-coverage shotgun-sequencing approach. A total of 1.81 Mbp (representing 98.5% of the total genome), with an average gap size of 100 bp and 5.3-fold coverage, are reported, giving insights into the genome of T. tenax. Genome analysis and biochemical studies enabled us to reconstruct its central carbohydrate metabolism. T. tenax uses a variant of the reversible Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas (EMP) pathway and two different variants of the Entner-Doudoroff (ED) pathway (a nonphosphorylative variant and a semiphosphorylative variant) for carbohydrate catabolism. For the EMP pathway some new, unexpected enzymes were identified. The semiphosphorylative ED pathway, hitherto supposed to be active only in halophiles, is found in T. tenax. No evidence for a functional pentose phosphate pathway, which is essential for the generation of pentoses and NADPH for anabolic purposes in bacteria and eucarya, is found in T. tenax. Most genes involved in the reversible citric acid cycle were identified, suggesting the presence of a functional oxidative cycle under heterotrophic growth conditions and a reductive cycle for CO2 fixation under autotrophic growth conditions. Almost all genes necessary for glycogen and trehalose metabolism were identified in the T. tenax genome. PMID:15028704

Siebers, Bettina; Tjaden, Britta; Michalke, Klaus; Dörr, Christine; Ahmed, Hatim; Zaparty, Melanie; Gordon, Paul; Sensen, Christoph W.; Zibat, Arne; Klenk, Hans-Peter; Schuster, Stephan C.; Hensel, Reinhard

2004-01-01

269

Probabilistic Inference of Biochemical Reactions in Microbial Communities from Metagenomic Sequences  

PubMed Central

Shotgun metagenomics has been applied to the studies of the functionality of various microbial communities. As a critical analysis step in these studies, biological pathways are reconstructed based on the genes predicted from metagenomic shotgun sequences. Pathway reconstruction provides insights into the functionality of a microbial community and can be used for comparing multiple microbial communities. The utilization of pathway reconstruction, however, can be jeopardized because of imperfect functional annotation of genes, and ambiguity in the assignment of predicted enzymes to biochemical reactions (e.g., some enzymes are involved in multiple biochemical reactions). Considering that metabolic functions in a microbial community are carried out by many enzymes in a collaborative manner, we present a probabilistic sampling approach to profiling functional content in a metagenomic dataset, by sampling functions of catalytically promiscuous enzymes within the context of the entire metabolic network defined by the annotated metagenome. We test our approach on metagenomic datasets from environmental and human-associated microbial communities. The results show that our approach provides a more accurate representation of the metabolic activities encoded in a metagenome, and thus improves the comparative analysis of multiple microbial communities. In addition, our approach reports likelihood scores of putative reactions, which can be used to identify important reactions and metabolic pathways that reflect the environmental adaptation of the microbial communities. Source code for sampling metabolic networks is available online at http://omics.informatics.indiana.edu/mg/MetaNetSam/. PMID:23555216

Jiao, Dazhi; Ye, Yuzhen; Tang, Haixu

2013-01-01

270

Manganese Catalysts for C–H activation: An Experimental/Theoretical Study Identifies the Stereoelectronic Factor that Controls the Switch between Hydroxylation and Desaturation Pathways  

PubMed Central

We describe competitive C–H activation chemistry of two types, desaturation and hydroxylation, using synthetic manganese catalysts with several substrates. 9,10-dihydrophenanthrene (DHP) gives the highest desaturation activity, the final products being phenanthrene (P1) and phenanthrene-9,10-oxide (P3), the latter being thought to arise from epoxidation of some of the phenanthrene. The hydroxylase pathway also occurs as suggested by the presence of the dione product, phenanthrene-9,10-dione (P2), thought to arise from further oxidation of hydroxylation intermediate 9-hydroxy-9,10-dihydrophenanthrene. The experimental work together with the DFT calculations shows that the postulated Mn oxo active species, [Mn(O)(tpp)(Cl)] (tpp = tetraphenyl porphyrin), can promote the oxidation of dihydrophenanthrene by either desaturation or hydroxylation pathways. The calculations show that these two competing reactions have a common initial step – radical H abstraction from one of the DHP sp3 C–H bonds. The resulting Mn hydroxo intermediate is capable of promoting not only OH rebound (hydroxylation) but also a second H abstraction adjacent to the first (desaturation). Like the active MnV=O species, this MnIV-OH species also has radical character on oxygen and can thus give H abstraction. Both steps have very low and therefore very similar energy barriers, leading to a product mixture. Since the radical character of the catalyst is located on the oxygen p orbital perpendicular to the MnIV-OH plane, the orientation of the organic radical with respect to this plane determines which reaction, desaturation or hydroxylation, will occur. Stereoelectronic factors such as the rotational orientation of the OH in the enzyme active site is thus likely to constitute the switch between hydroxylation and desaturation behavior. PMID:20481432

Hull, Jonathan F.; Balcells, David; Sauer, Effiette L. O.; Raynaud, Christophe; Brudvig, Gary W.; Crabtree, Robert H.; Eisenstein, Odile

2010-01-01

271

Compound library screening identified Akt/PKB kinase pathway inhibitors as potential key molecules for the development of new chemotherapeutics against schistosomiasis.  

PubMed

Protein kinases (PKs) are one of the largest protein families in most eukaryotic organisms. These enzymes are involved in the control of cell proliferation, differentiation and metabolism and a large number of the anticancer drugs currently used are directed against PKs. The structure and function of PKs are well conserved throughout evolution. In schistosome parasites, PKs were shown to be involved in essential functions at every stage of the parasite life cycle, making these enzymes promising anti-parasite drug targets. In this study, we tested a panel of commercial inhibitors for various PKs and analyzed their effects on pairing and egg production by schistosomes as well as their toxicity towards schistosomula larvae. Results obtained confirmed the deleterious effect of PK targeting on Schistosoma mansoni physiology and the important function of different tyrosine and serine/threonine kinases in the biology and reproduction of this parasite. They also indicated for the first time that the Protein kinase B (also called Akt) which is a major downstream target of many receptor tyrosine kinases and a central player at the crossroads of signal transduction pathways activated in response to growth factors and insulin, can constitute a novel target for anti-schistosome chemotherapy. Structural and functional studies have shown that SmAkt is a conserved kinase and that its activity can be inhibited by commercially available Akt inhibitors. In treated adult worms, Akt/PKB kinase pathway inhibitors induced profound alterations in pairing and egg laying and they also greatly affected the viability of schistosomula larvae. PMID:25516836

Morel, Marion; Vanderstraete, Mathieu; Cailliau, Katia; Lescuyer, Arlette; Lancelot, Julien; Dissous, Colette

2014-12-01

272

Compound library screening identified Akt/PKB kinase pathway inhibitors as potential key molecules for the development of new chemotherapeutics against schistosomiasis  

PubMed Central

Protein kinases (PKs) are one of the largest protein families in most eukaryotic organisms. These enzymes are involved in the control of cell proliferation, differentiation and metabolism and a large number of the anticancer drugs currently used are directed against PKs. The structure and function of PKs are well conserved throughout evolution. In schistosome parasites, PKs were shown to be involved in essential functions at every stage of the parasite life cycle, making these enzymes promising anti-parasite drug targets. In this study, we tested a panel of commercial inhibitors for various PKs and analyzed their effects on pairing and egg production by schistosomes as well as their toxicity towards schistosomula larvae. Results obtained confirmed the deleterious effect of PK targeting on Schistosoma mansoni physiology and the important function of different tyrosine and serine/threonine kinases in the biology and reproduction of this parasite. They also indicated for the first time that the Protein kinase B (also called Akt) which is a major downstream target of many receptor tyrosine kinases and a central player at the crossroads of signal transduction pathways activated in response to growth factors and insulin, can constitute a novel target for anti-schistosome chemotherapy. Structural and functional studies have shown that SmAkt is a conserved kinase and that its activity can be inhibited by commercially available Akt inhibitors. In treated adult worms, Akt/PKB kinase pathway inhibitors induced profound alterations in pairing and egg laying and they also greatly affected the viability of schistosomula larvae. PMID:25516836

Morel, Marion; Vanderstraete, Mathieu; Cailliau, Katia; Lescuyer, Arlette; Lancelot, Julien; Dissous, Colette

2014-01-01

273

Putative cold acclimation pathways in Arabidopsis thaliana identified by a combined analysis of mRNA co-expression patterns, promoter motifs and transcription factors  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: With the advent of microarray technology, it has become feasible to identify virtually all genes in an organism that are induced by developmental or environmental changes. However, relying solely on gene expression data may be of limited value if the aim is to infer the underlying genetic networks. Development of computational methods to combine microarray data with other information

Aakash Chawade; Marcus Bräutigam; Angelica Lindlöf; Olof Olsson; Björn Olsson

2007-01-01

274

Combinatorial genetic transformation generates a library of metabolic phenotypes for the carotenoid pathway in maize  

PubMed Central

Combinatorial nuclear transformation is a novel method for the rapid production of multiplex-transgenic plants, which we have used to dissect and modify a complex metabolic pathway. To demonstrate the principle, we transferred 5 carotenogenic genes controlled by different endosperm-specific promoters into a white maize variety deficient for endosperm carotenoid synthesis. We recovered a diverse population of transgenic plants expressing different enzyme combinations and showing distinct metabolic phenotypes that allowed us to identify and complement rate-limiting steps in the pathway and to demonstrate competition between ?-carotene hydroxylase and bacterial ?-carotene ketolase for substrates in 4 sequential steps of the extended pathway. Importantly, this process allowed us to generate plants with extraordinary levels of ?-carotene and other carotenoids, including complex mixtures of hydroxycarotenoids and ketocarotenoids. Combinatorial transformation is a versatile approach that could be used to modify any metabolic pathway and pathways controlling other biochemical, physiological, or developmental processes. PMID:19011084

Zhu, Changfu; Naqvi, Shaista; Breitenbach, Jürgen; Sandmann, Gerhard; Christou, Paul; Capell, Teresa

2008-01-01

275

Mechanism of salinity tolerance in plants: physiological, biochemical, and molecular characterization.  

PubMed

Salinity is a major abiotic stress limiting growth and productivity of plants in many areas of the world due to increasing use of poor quality of water for irrigation and soil salinization. Plant adaptation or tolerance to salinity stress involves complex physiological traits, metabolic pathways, and molecular or gene networks. A comprehensive understanding on how plants respond to salinity stress at different levels and an integrated approach of combining molecular tools with physiological and biochemical techniques are imperative for the development of salt-tolerant varieties of plants in salt-affected areas. Recent research has identified various adaptive responses to salinity stress at molecular, cellular, metabolic, and physiological levels, although mechanisms underlying salinity tolerance are far from being completely understood. This paper provides a comprehensive review of major research advances on biochemical, physiological, and molecular mechanisms regulating plant adaptation and tolerance to salinity stress. PMID:24804192

Gupta, Bhaskar; Huang, Bingru

2014-01-01

276

A hierarchical approach employing metabolic and gene expression profiles to identify the pathways that confer cytotoxicity in HepG2 cells  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Free fatty acids (FFA) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-?) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of many obesity-related metabolic disorders. When human hepatoblastoma cells (HepG2) were exposed to different types of FFA and TNF-?, saturated fatty acid was found to be cytotoxic and its toxicity was exacerbated by TNF-?. In order to identify the processes associated with the

Zheng Li; Shireesh Srivastava; Xuerui Yang; Sheenu Mittal; Paul Norton; James Resau; Brian Haab; Christina Chan

2007-01-01

277

Private Selective Sweeps Identified from Next-Generation Pool-Sequencing Reveal Convergent Pathways under Selection in Two Inbred Schistosoma mansoni Strains  

PubMed Central

Background The trematode flatworms of the genus Schistosoma, the causative agents of schistosomiasis, are among the most prevalent parasites in humans, affecting more than 200 million people worldwide. In this study, we focused on two well-characterized strains of S. mansoni, to explore signatures of selection. Both strains are highly inbred and exhibit differences in life history traits, in particular in their compatibility with the intermediate host Biomphalaria glabrata. Methodology/Principal Findings We performed high throughput sequencing of DNA from pools of individuals of each strain using Illumina technology and identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) and copy number variations (CNV). In total, 708,898 SNPs were identified and roughly 2,000 CNVs. The SNPs revealed low nucleotide diversity (??=?2×10?4) within each strain and a high differentiation level (Fst?=?0.73) between them. Based on a recently developed in-silico approach, we further detected 12 and 19 private (i.e. specific non-overlapping) selective sweeps among the 121 and 151 sweeps found in total for each strain. Conclusions/Significance Functional annotation of transcripts lying in the private selective sweeps revealed specific selection for functions related to parasitic interaction (e.g. cell-cell adhesion or redox reactions). Despite high differentiation between strains, we identified evolutionary convergence of genes related to proteolysis, known as a key virulence factor and a potential target of drug and vaccine development. Our data show that pool-sequencing can be used for the detection of selective sweeps in parasite populations and enables one to identify biological functions under selection. PMID:24349597

Clément, Julie A. J.; Toulza, Eve; Gautier, Mathieu; Parrinello, Hugues; Roquis, David; Boissier, Jérôme; Rognon, Anne; Moné, Hélène; Mouahid, Gabriel; Buard, Jérôme; Mitta, Guillaume; Grunau, Christoph

2013-01-01

278

Catabolite Degradation of Fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase in the Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae: A Genome-wide Screen Identifies Eight Novel GID Genes and Indicates the Existence of Two Degradation Pathways  

PubMed Central

Metabolic adaptation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells from a nonfermentable carbon source to glucose induces selective, rapid breakdown of the gluconeogenetic key enzyme fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (FBPase), a process called catabolite degradation. Herein, we identify eight novel GID genes required for proteasome-dependent catabolite degradation of FBPase. Four yeast proteins contain the CTLH domain of unknown function. All of them are Gid proteins. The site of catabolite degradation has been controversial until now. Two FBPase degradation pathways have been described, one dependent on the cytosolic ubiquitin-proteasome machinery, and the other dependent on vacuolar proteolysis. Interestingly, three of the novel Gid proteins involved in ubiquitin-proteasome–dependent degradation have also been reported by others to affect the vacuolar degradation pathway. As shown herein, additional genes suggested to be essential for vacuolar degradation are unnecessary for proteasome-dependent degradation. These data raise the question as to whether two FBPase degradation pathways exist that share components. Detailed characterization of Gid2p demonstrates that it is part of a soluble, cytosolic protein complex of at least 600 kDa. Gid2p is necessary for FBPase ubiquitination. Our studies have not revealed any involvement of vesicular intermediates in proteasome-dependent FBPase degradation. The influence of Ubp14p, a deubiquitinating enzyme, on proteasome-dependent catabolite degradation was further uncovered. PMID:12686616

Regelmann, Jochen; Schüle, Thomas; Josupeit, Frank S.; Horak, Jaroslav; Rose, Matthias; Entian, Karl-Dieter; Thumm, Michael; Wolf, Dieter H.

2003-01-01

279

Catabolite degradation of fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae: a genome-wide screen identifies eight novel GID genes and indicates the existence of two degradation pathways.  

PubMed

Metabolic adaptation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells from a nonfermentable carbon source to glucose induces selective, rapid breakdown of the gluconeogenetic key enzyme fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (FBPase), a process called catabolite degradation. Herein, we identify eight novel GID genes required for proteasome-dependent catabolite degradation of FBPase. Four yeast proteins contain the CTLH domain of unknown function. All of them are Gid proteins. The site of catabolite degradation has been controversial until now. Two FBPase degradation pathways have been described, one dependent on the cytosolic ubiquitin-proteasome machinery, and the other dependent on vacuolar proteolysis. Interestingly, three of the novel Gid proteins involved in ubiquitin-proteasome-dependent degradation have also been reported by others to affect the vacuolar degradation pathway. As shown herein, additional genes suggested to be essential for vacuolar degradation are unnecessary for proteasome-dependent degradation. These data raise the question as to whether two FBPase degradation pathways exist that share components. Detailed characterization of Gid2p demonstrates that it is part of a soluble, cytosolic protein complex of at least 600 kDa. Gid2p is necessary for FBPase ubiquitination. Our studies have not revealed any involvement of vesicular intermediates in proteasome-dependent FBPase degradation. The influence of Ubp14p, a deubiquitinating enzyme, on proteasome-dependent catabolite degradation was further uncovered. PMID:12686616

Regelmann, Jochen; Schüle, Thomas; Josupeit, Frank S; Horak, Jaroslav; Rose, Matthias; Entian, Karl-Dieter; Thumm, Michael; Wolf, Dieter H

2003-04-01

280

The endocytic pathway mediates cell entry of dsRNA to induce RNAi silencing  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many metazoan cells can take up exogenous double-stranded (ds) RNA and use it to initiate an RNA silencing response, however, the mechanism for this uptake is ill-defined. Here, we identify the pathway for dsRNA uptake in Drosophila melanogaster S2 cells. Biochemical and cell biological analyses, and a genome-wide screen for components of the dsRNA-uptake machinery, indicated that dsRNA is taken

Maria-Carla Saleh; Ronald P. van Rij; Armin Hekele; Amethyst Gillis; Edan Foley; Patrick H. O'Farrell; Raul Andino

2006-01-01

281

Biochemical transformation of coals  

DOEpatents

A method of biochemically transforming macromolecular compounds found in solid carbonaceous materials, such as coal is provided. The preparation of new microorganisms, metabolically weaned through challenge growth processes to biochemically transform solid carbonaceous materials at extreme temperatures, pressures, pH, salt and toxic metal concentrations is also disclosed. 7 figs.

Lin, M.S.; Premuzic, E.T.

1999-03-23

282

Biochemical transformation of coals  

DOEpatents

A method of biochemically transforming macromolecular compounds found in solid carbonaceous materials, such as coal is provided. The preparation of new microorganisms, metabolically weaned through challenge growth processes to biochemically transform solid carbonaceous materials at extreme temperatures, pressures, pH, salt and toxic metal concentrations is also disclosed.

Lin, Mow S. (Rocky Point, NY); Premuzic, Eugene T. (East Moriches, NY)

1999-03-23

283

DRoP: a water analysis program identifies Ras-GTP-specific pathway of communication between membrane-interacting regions and the active site.  

PubMed

Ras GTPase mediates several cellular signal transduction pathways and is found mutated in a large number of cancers. It is active in the GTP-bound state, where it interacts with effector proteins, and at rest in the GDP-bound state. The catalytic domain is tethered to the membrane, with which it interacts in a nucleotide-dependent manner. Here we present the program Detection of Related Solvent Positions (DRoP) for crystallographic water analysis on protein surfaces and use it to study Ras. DRoP reads and superimposes multiple Protein Data Bank coordinates, transfers symmetry-related water molecules to the position closest to the protein surface, and ranks the waters according to how well conserved and tightly clustered they are in the set of structures. Coloring according to this rank allows visualization of the results. The effector-binding region of Ras is hydrated with highly conserved water molecules at the interface between the P-loop, switch I, and switch II, as well as at the Raf-RBD binding pocket. Furthermore, we discovered a new conserved water-mediated H-bonding network present in Ras-GTP, but not in Ras-GDP, that links the nucleotide sensor residues R161 and R164 on helix 5 to the active site. The double mutant RasN85A/N86A, where the final link between helix 5 and the nucleotide is not possible, is a severely impaired enzyme, while the single mutant RasN86A, with partial connection to the active site, has a wild-type hydrolysis rate. DRoP was instrumental in determining the water-mediated connectivity networks that link two lobes of the catalytic domain in Ras. PMID:24189050

Kearney, Bradley M; Johnson, Christian W; Roberts, Daniel M; Swartz, Paul; Mattos, Carla

2014-02-01

284

Can bio-inspired information processing steps be realized as synthetic biochemical processes?  

E-print Network

We consider possible designs and experimental realiza-tions in synthesized rather than naturally occurring bio-chemical systems of a selection of basic bio-inspired information processing steps. These include feed-forward loops, which have been identified as the most common information processing motifs in many natural pathways in cellular functioning, and memory-involving processes, specifically, associative memory. Such systems should not be designed to literally mimic nature. Rather, we can be guided by nature's mechanisms for experimenting with new information/signal processing steps which are based on coupled biochemical reactions, but are vastly simpler than natural processes, and which will provide tools for the long-term goal of understanding and harnessing nature's information processing paradigm. Our biochemical processes of choice are enzymatic cascades because of their compatibility with physiological processes in vivo and with electronics (e.g., electrodes) in vitro allowing for networking and interfacing of enzyme-catalyzed processes with other chemical and biochemical reactions. In addition to designing and realizing feed-forward loops and other processes, one has to develop approaches to probe their response to external control of the time-dependence of the input(s), by measuring the resulting time-dependence of the output. The goal will be to demonstrate the expected features, for example, the delayed response and stabilizing effect of the feed-forward loops.

Vladimir Privman; Evgeny Katz

2014-11-07

285

Comparative Analysis of Salmonella Genomes Identifies a Metabolic Network for Escalating Growth in the Inflamed Gut  

PubMed Central

ABSTRACT The Salmonella genus comprises a group of pathogens associated with illnesses ranging from gastroenteritis to typhoid fever. We performed an in silico analysis of comparatively reannotated Salmonella genomes to identify genomic signatures indicative of disease potential. By removing numerous annotation inconsistencies and inaccuracies, the process of reannotation identified a network of 469 genes involved in central anaerobic metabolism, which was intact in genomes of gastrointestinal pathogens but degrading in genomes of extraintestinal pathogens. This large network contained pathways that enable gastrointestinal pathogens to utilize inflammation-derived nutrients as well as many of the biochemical reactions used for the enrichment and biochemical discrimination of Salmonella serovars. Thus, comparative genome analysis identifies a metabolic network that provides clues about the strategies for nutrient acquisition and utilization that are characteristic of gastrointestinal pathogens. PMID:24643865

Nuccio, Sean-Paul; Bäumler, Andreas J.

2014-01-01

286

MicroRNA profiling identifies miR-29 as a regulator of disease-associated pathways in experimental biliary atresia.  

PubMed

Biliary atresia (BA) is a pediatric liver disease of unknown underlying etiology, in which fibroinflammatory destruction of the extrahepatic biliary system leads to obstructive cholestasis. MicroRNAs are a class of short (18-23 nucleotide), noncoding RNA molecules, which act as negative regulators of target mRNA stability and translation. The importance of these molecules in normal and diseased liver has been demonstrated, but their potential role in the pathogenesis of BA has not been addressed. We have profiled changes in liver microRNA levels in an established mouse model of the disease, identified significantly altered transcripts, and defined the spatial expression patterns of selected microRNAs. Two of these, miR-29a/29b1, are upregulated in experimental BA. Using antisense oligonucleotide-mediated inhibition in mice, we have delineated the full set of hepatic genes regulated by miR-29 and identified 2 mRNA targets of potential pathological relevance in experimental BA, Igf1 and Il1RAP. We have used reporter assays to confirm that Igf1 and Il1RAP are direct targets of miR-29. PMID:22167021

Hand, Nicholas J; Horner, Amber M; Master, Zankhana R; Boateng, LaTasha A; LeGuen, Claire; Uvaydova, Marina; Friedman, Joshua R

2012-02-01

287

Putative cold acclimation pathways in Arabidopsis thaliana identified by a combined analysis of mRNA co-expression patterns, promoter motifs and transcription factors  

PubMed Central

Background With the advent of microarray technology, it has become feasible to identify virtually all genes in an organism that are induced by developmental or environmental changes. However, relying solely on gene expression data may be of limited value if the aim is to infer the underlying genetic networks. Development of computational methods to combine microarray data with other information sources is therefore necessary. Here we describe one such method. Results By means of our method, previously published Arabidopsis microarray data from cold acclimated plants at six different time points, promoter motif sequence data extracted from ~24,000 Arabidopsis promoters and known transcription factor binding sites were combined to construct a putative genetic regulatory interaction network. The inferred network includes both previously characterised and hitherto un-described regulatory interactions between transcription factor (TF) genes and genes that encode other TFs or other proteins. Part of the obtained transcription factor regulatory network is presented here. More detailed information is available in the additional files. Conclusion The rule-based method described here can be used to infer genetic networks by combining data from microarrays, promoter sequences and known promoter binding sites. This method should in principle be applicable to any biological system. We tested the method on the cold acclimation process in Arabidopsis and could identify a more complex putative genetic regulatory network than previously described. However, it should be noted that information on specific binding sites for individual TFs were in most cases not available. Thus, gene targets for the entire TF gene families were predicted. In addition, the networks were built solely by a bioinformatics approach and experimental verifications will be necessary for their final validation. On the other hand, since our method highlights putative novel interactions, more directed experiments could now be performed. PMID:17764576

Chawade, Aakash; Bräutigam, Marcus; Lindlöf, Angelica; Olsson, Olof; Olsson, Björn

2007-01-01

288

Identifying systems failures in the pathway to a catastrophic event: an analysis of national incident report data relating to vinca alkaloids  

PubMed Central

Background Catastrophic errors in healthcare are rare, yet the consequences are so serious that where possible, special procedures are put in place to prevent them. As systems become safer, it becomes progressively more difficult to detect the remaining vulnerabilities. Using inadvertent intrathecal administration of vinca alkaloids as an example, we investigated whether analysis of incident report data describing low-harm events could bridge this gap. Methods We studied nine million patient safety incidents reported from England and Wales between November 2003 and May 2013. We searched for reports relating to administration of vinca alkaloids in patients also receiving intrathecal medication, and classified the failures identified against steps in the relevant national protocol. Results Of 38 reports that met our inclusion criteria, none resulted in actual harm. The stage of the medication process most commonly involved was ‘supply, transport and storage’ (15 cases). Seven cases related to dispensing, six to documentation, and four each to prescribing and administration. Defences most commonly breached related to separation of intravenous vinca alkaloids and intrathecal medication in timing (n=16) and location (n=8); potential for confusion due to inadequate separation of these drugs therefore remains. Problems involved in six cases did not align with the procedural defences in place, some of which represented major hazards. Conclusions We identified areas of concern even within the context of a highly controlled standardised national process. If incident reporting systems include and encourage reports of no-harm incidents in addition to actual patient harm, they can facilitate monitoring the resilience of healthcare processes. Patient safety incidents that produce the most serious harm are often rare, and it is difficult to know whether patients are adequately protected. Our approach provides a potential solution. PMID:24643293

Franklin, Bryony Dean; Panesar, Sukhmeet S; Vincent, Charles; Donaldson, Liam J

2014-01-01

289

A biochemical framework for RNA silencing in plants  

Microsoft Academic Search

RNA silencing phenomena were first discovered in plants, yet only the RNA interference pathway in animals has been subject to biochemical analysis. Here, we extend biochemical analysis to plant RNA silencing. We find that standard wheat germ extract contains Dicer-like enzymes that convert double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) into two classes of small interfering RNAs, as well as an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase

Guiliang Tang; Brenda J. Reinhart; David P. Bartel; Phillip D. Zamore

2003-01-01

290

BIOCHEMICAL AND GENETIC CHARACTERIZATION OF AN EARLY STEP IN A NOVEL PATHWAY FOR THE BIOSYNTHESIS OF AROMATIC AMINO ACIDS AND P-AMINOBENZOIC ACID IN THE ARCHAEON METHANOCOCCUS MARIPALUDIS  

EPA Science Inventory

Methanococcus maripaludis is a strictly anaerobic, methane-producing archaeon and facultative autotroph capable of biosynthesizing all the amino acids and vitamins required for growth. In this work, the novel 6-deoxy-5-ketofructose-1-phosphate (DKFP) pathway for the biosynthesis ...

291

Short hairpin RNA library-based functional screening identified ribosomal protein L31 that modulates prostate cancer cell growth via p53 pathway.  

PubMed

Androgen receptor is a primary transcription factor involved in the proliferation of prostate cancer cells. Thus, hormone therapy using antiandrogens, such as bicalutamide, is a first-line treatment for the disease. Although hormone therapy initially reduces the tumor burden, many patients eventually relapse, developing tumors with acquired endocrine resistance. Elucidation of the molecular mechanisms underlying endocrine resistance is therefore a fundamental issue for the understanding and development of alternative therapeutics for advanced prostate cancer. In the present study, we performed short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated functional screening to identify genes involved in bicalutamide-mediated effects on LNCaP prostate cancer cells. Among such candidate genes selected by screening using volcano plot analysis, ribosomal protein L31 (RPL31) was found to be essential for cell proliferation and cell-cycle progression in bicalutamide-resistant LNCaP (BicR) cells, based on small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown experiments. Of note, RPL31 mRNA is more abundantly expressed in BicR cells than in parental LNCaP cells, and clinical data from ONCOMINE and The Cancer Genome Altas showed that RPL31 is overexpressed in prostate carcinomas compared with benign prostate tissues. Intriguingly, protein levels of the tumor suppressor p53 and its targets, p21 and MDM2, were increased in LNCaP and BicR cells treated with RPL31 siRNA. We observed decreased degradation of p53 protein after RPL31 knockdown. Moreover, the suppression of growth and cell cycle upon RPL31 knockdown was partially recovered with p53 siRNA treatment. These results suggest that RPL31 is involved in bicalutamide-resistant growth of prostate cancer cells. The shRNA-mediated functional screen in this study provides new insight into the molecular mechanisms and therapeutic targets of advanced prostate cancer. PMID:25285958

Maruyama, Yojiro; Miyazaki, Toshiaki; Ikeda, Kazuhiro; Okumura, Toshiyuki; Sato, Wataru; Horie-Inoue, Kuniko; Okamoto, Koji; Takeda, Satoru; Inoue, Satoshi

2014-01-01

292

Short Hairpin RNA Library-Based Functional Screening Identified Ribosomal Protein L31 That Modulates Prostate Cancer Cell Growth via p53 Pathway  

PubMed Central

Androgen receptor is a primary transcription factor involved in the proliferation of prostate cancer cells. Thus, hormone therapy using antiandrogens, such as bicalutamide, is a first-line treatment for the disease. Although hormone therapy initially reduces the tumor burden, many patients eventually relapse, developing tumors with acquired endocrine resistance. Elucidation of the molecular mechanisms underlying endocrine resistance is therefore a fundamental issue for the understanding and development of alternative therapeutics for advanced prostate cancer. In the present study, we performed short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated functional screening to identify genes involved in bicalutamide-mediated effects on LNCaP prostate cancer cells. Among such candidate genes selected by screening using volcano plot analysis, ribosomal protein L31 (RPL31) was found to be essential for cell proliferation and cell-cycle progression in bicalutamide-resistant LNCaP (BicR) cells, based on small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown experiments. Of note, RPL31 mRNA is more abundantly expressed in BicR cells than in parental LNCaP cells, and clinical data from ONCOMINE and The Cancer Genome Altas showed that RPL31 is overexpressed in prostate carcinomas compared with benign prostate tissues. Intriguingly, protein levels of the tumor suppressor p53 and its targets, p21 and MDM2, were increased in LNCaP and BicR cells treated with RPL31 siRNA. We observed decreased degradation of p53 protein after RPL31 knockdown. Moreover, the suppression of growth and cell cycle upon RPL31 knockdown was partially recovered with p53 siRNA treatment. These results suggest that RPL31 is involved in bicalutamide-resistant growth of prostate cancer cells. The shRNA-mediated functional screen in this study provides new insight into the molecular mechanisms and therapeutic targets of advanced prostate cancer. PMID:25285958

Maruyama, Yojiro; Miyazaki, Toshiaki; Ikeda, Kazuhiro; Okumura, Toshiyuki; Sato, Wataru; Horie-Inoue, Kuniko; Okamoto, Koji; Takeda, Satoru; Inoue, Satoshi

2014-01-01

293

Genetic analysis of photoreceptor action pathways in Arabidopsis thaliana  

SciTech Connect

The specific strategies and long-term goals of this proposal remain intact relative to the original proposal. We continue to isolate and characterize photomorphogenic mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana. The molecular and biochemical characterization of one of these mutants, det1, has led to one publication of original data and to one Society for Experimental Biology Symposium paper (see below). The phenotype of a second mutant, det2, has also been studied during this funding period. In addition, we have continued work on a general strategy to isolate mutations in trans-acting regulatory factors that mediate light-regulated gene expression, and have identified several potentially interesting regulatory mutants. In the third funding period, we will concentrate on the genetical, biochemical, and molecular characterization of these new mutants. Construction of double mutants between the new mutants and the previously characterized morphological mutants should allow us to construct a pathway for light-regulated seedling development in Arabidopsis.

Not Available

1991-01-01

294

Constructing de novo biosynthetic pathways for chemical synthesis inside living cells†  

PubMed Central

Living organisms have evolved a vast array of catalytic functions that make them ideally suited for the production of medicinally and industrially relevant small-molecule targets. Indeed, native metabolic pathways in microbial hosts have long been exploited and optimized for the scalable production of both fine and commodity chemicals. Our increasing capacity for DNA sequencing and synthesis has revealed the molecular basis for the biosynthesis of a variety of complex and useful metabolites and enables the de novo construction of novel metabolic pathways for the production of new and exotic molecular targets in genetically tractable microbes. However, the development of commercially viable processes for these engineered pathways is currently limited by our ability to quickly identify or engineer enzymes with the correct reaction and substrate selectivity as well as the speed by which metabolic bottlenecks can be determined and corrected. Efforts in understanding the relationship between sequence, structure, and function in the basic biochemical sciences can advance these goals for synthetic biology applications while also serving as an experimental platform to elucidate the in vivo specificity and function of enzymes and to reconstitute complex biochemical traits for study in a living model organism. Furthermore, the continuing discovery of natural mechanisms for the regulation of metabolic pathways has revealed new principles for the design of high-flux pathways with minimized metabolic burden and has inspired the development of new tools and approaches to engineer synthetic pathways in microbial hosts for chemical production. PMID:21591680

Weeks, Amy M.; Chang, Michelle C. Y.

2011-01-01

295

The entry of [1- 13C]glucose into biochemical pathways reveals a complex compartmentation and metabolite trafficking between glia and neurons: a study by 13C-NMR spectroscopy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Glial–neuronal interactions were investigated in rats injected intraperitoneally with [1-13C]glucose and killed after 15, 30, 45, or 60 min. Brain extracts were analyzed by 13C-NMR spectroscopy and the fractional 13C-enrichment at individual carbon positions was measured for amino acids, lactate, and N-acetyl-aspartate. [1-13C]Glucose was shown to be metabolized by both neurons and glia, with the anaplerotic pathway through pyruvate carboxylase

Tommaso Aureli; Maria Enrica Di Cocco; Menotti Calvani; Filippo Conti

1997-01-01

296

Biochemical analyses of indole-3-acetaldoxime-dependent auxin biosynthesis in Arabidopsis.  

PubMed

Auxins are hormones that regulate many aspects of plant growth and development. The main plant auxin is indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), whose biosynthetic pathway is not fully understood. Indole-3-acetaldoxime (IAOx) has been proposed to be a key intermediate in the synthesis of IAA and several other indolic compounds. Genetic studies of IAA biosynthesis in Arabidopsis have suggested that 2 distinct pathways involving the CYP79B or YUCCA (YUC) genes may contribute to IAOx synthesis and that several pathways are also involved in the conversion of IAOx to IAA. Here we report the biochemical dissection of IAOx biosynthesis and metabolism in plants by analyzing IAA biosynthesis intermediates. We demonstrated that the majority of IAOx is produced by CYP79B genes in Arabidopsis because IAOx production was abolished in CYP79B-deficient mutants. IAOx was not detected from rice, maize, and tobacco, which do not have apparent CYP79B orthologues. IAOx levels were not significantly altered in the yuc1 yuc2 yuc4 yuc6 quadruple mutants, suggesting that the YUC gene family probably does not contribute to IAOx synthesis. We determined the pathway for conversion of IAOx to IAA by identifying 2 likely intermediates, indole-3-acetamide (IAM) and indole-3-acetonitrile (IAN), in Arabidopsis. When (13)C(6)-labeled IAOx was fed to CYP79B-deficient mutants, (13)C(6) atoms were efficiently incorporated to IAM, IAN, and IAA. This biochemical evidence indicates that IAOx-dependent IAA biosynthesis, which involves IAM and IAN as intermediates, is not a common but a species-specific pathway in plants; thus IAA biosynthesis may differ among plant species. PMID:19279202

Sugawara, Satoko; Hishiyama, Shojiro; Jikumaru, Yusuke; Hanada, Atsushi; Nishimura, Takeshi; Koshiba, Tomokazu; Zhao, Yunde; Kamiya, Yuji; Kasahara, Hiroyuki

2009-03-31

297

Mutant huntingtin alters MAPK signaling pathways in PC12 and striatal cells: ERK1/2 protects against mutant huntingtin-associated toxicity.  

PubMed

Huntington's disease (HD) is a devastating neurodegenerative disorder caused by an expanded polyglutamine (polyQ) tract within the huntingtin protein (Htt). Identifying the pathways that are altered in response to the mutant protein is crucial for understanding the cellular processes impacted by the disease as well as for the rational development of effective pharmacological interventions. Here, expression profiling of a cellular HD model identifies genes that implicate altered mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling. Targeted biochemical studies and pharmacological modulation of these MAPK pathways suggest that mutant Htt affects signaling at upstream points such that both ERK and JNK are activated. Modulation of the ERK pathway suggests that this pathway is associated with cell survival, whereas inhibition of JNK was found to effectively suppress pathogenesis. These studies suggest that pharmacological intervention in MAPK pathways, particularly at the level of ERK activation, may be an appropriate approach to HD therapy. PMID:16330479

Apostol, Barbara L; Illes, Katalin; Pallos, Judit; Bodai, Laszlo; Wu, Jun; Strand, Andrew; Schweitzer, Erik S; Olson, James M; Kazantsev, Aleksey; Marsh, J Lawrence; Thompson, Leslie Michels

2006-01-15

298

Biochemical analysis of TssK, a core component of the bacterial Type VI secretion system, reveals distinct oligomeric states of TssK and identifies a TssK–TssFG subcomplex  

PubMed Central

Gram-negative bacteria use the Type VI secretion system (T6SS) to inject toxic proteins into rival bacteria or eukaryotic cells. However, the mechanism of the T6SS is incompletely understood. In the present study, we investigated a conserved component of the T6SS, TssK, using the antibacterial T6SS of Serratia marcescens as a model system. TssK was confirmed to be essential for effector secretion by the T6SS. The native protein, although not an integral membrane protein, appeared to localize to the inner membrane, consistent with its presence within a membrane-anchored assembly. Recombinant TssK purified from S. marcescens was found to exist in several stable oligomeric forms, namely trimer, hexamer and higher-order species. Native-level purification of TssK identified TssF and TssG as interacting proteins. TssF and TssG, conserved T6SS components of unknown function, were required for T6SS activity, but not for correct localization of TssK. A complex containing TssK, TssF and TssG was subsequently purified in vitro, confirming that these three proteins form a new subcomplex within the T6SS. Our findings provide new insight into the T6SS assembly, allowing us to propose a model whereby TssK recruits TssFG into the membrane-associated T6SS complex and different oligomeric states of TssK may contribute to the dynamic mechanism of the system. PMID:24779861

English, Grant; Byron, Olwyn; Cianfanelli, Francesca R.; Prescott, Alan R.; Coulthurst, Sarah J.

2014-01-01

299

Biochemical upgrading of oils  

DOEpatents

A process for biochemical conversion of heavy crude oils is provided. The process includes contacting heavy crude oils with adapted biocatalysts. The resulting upgraded oil shows, a relative increase in saturated hydrocarbons, emulsions and oxygenates and a decrease in compounds containing organic sulfur, organic nitrogen and trace metals. Adapted microorganisms which have been modified under challenged growth processes are also disclosed. 121 figs.

Premuzic, E.T.; Lin, M.S.

1999-01-12

300

Measures of Biochemical Sociology  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In a previous article, the authors introduced a new sub field in sociology that we labeled "biochemical sociology." We introduced the definition of a sociology that encompasses sociological measures, psychological measures, and biological indicators Snell & Marsh (2003). In this article, we want to demonstrate a research strategy that would assess…

Snell, Joel; Marsh, Mitchell

2008-01-01

301

Biochemical upgrading of oils  

DOEpatents

A process for biochemical conversion of heavy crude oils is provided. The process includes contacting heavy crude oils with adapted biocatalysts. The resulting upgraded oil shows, a relative increase in saturated hydrocarbons, emulsions and oxygenates and a decrease in compounds containing in organic sulfur, organic nitrogen and trace metals. Adapted microorganisms which have been modified under challenged growth processes are also disclosed.

Premuzic, Eugene T. (East Moriches, NY); Lin, Mow S. (Rocky Point, NY)

1999-01-12

302

Potential drug targets in Mycobacterium tuberculosis through metabolic pathway analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

The emergence of multidrug resistant varieties of Mycobacterium tuberculosis has led to a search for novel drug targets. We have performed an insilico comparative analysis of metabolic pathways of the host Homo sapiens and the pathogen M. tuberculosis. Enzymes from the biochemical pathways of M. tuberculosis from the KEGG metabolic pathway database were compared with proteins from the hostH. sapiens,

Sharmila Anishetty; Mrudula Pulimi; Pennathur Gautam

2005-01-01

303

Biochemical and Structural Characterization of the Arabidopsis Bifunctional Enzyme Dethiobiotin  

E-print Network

Biochemical and Structural Characterization of the Arabidopsis Bifunctional Enzyme Dethiobiotin by a single enzyme encoded by a bifunctional gene originating from the fusion of prokaryotic monofunctional of a bifunctional enzyme in biotin synthesis pathway in eukaryotes and the relative implication of each

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

304

Biochemical differentiation of the porphyrias  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives: To differentiate the porphyrias by clinical and biochemical methods.Design and methods: We describe levels of blood, urine, and fecal porphyrins and their precursors in the porphyrias and present an algorithm for their biochemical differentiation. Diagnoses were established using clinical and biochemical data. Porphyrin analyses were performed by high performance liquid chromatography.Results and conclusions: Plasma and urine porphyrin patterns were

J. Thomas Hindmarsh; Linda Oliveras; Donald C. Greenway

1999-01-01

305

Identifying, Assisting the Disturbed Adolescent.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Educators are in an excellent position to identify seriously troubled young people. Major causes of adolescent problems are discussed, including drugs, parental failure, and biochemical disturbances. Educators can best intervene by becoming aware of support services within their own school and community. (TE)

Carlson, Patricia L.; Schaefer, William

1986-01-01

306

Use of the Metallothionein Promoter-Human Growth Hormone-Releasing Hormone (GHRH) Mouse to Identify Regulatory Pathways that Suppress Pituitary Somatotrope Hyperplasia and Adenoma Formation due to GHRH-Receptor Hyperactivation  

PubMed Central

Hyperactivation of the GHRH receptor or downstream signaling components is associated with hyperplasia of the pituitary somatotrope population, in which adenomas form relatively late in life, with less than 100% penetrance. Hyperplastic and adenomatous pituitaries of metallothionein promoter-human GHRH transgenic (Tg) mice (4 and > 10 months, respectively) were used to identify mechanisms that may prevent or delay adenoma formation in the presence of excess GHRH. In hyperplastic pituitaries, expression of the late G1/G2 marker Ki67 increased, whereas the proportion of 5-bromo-2?-deoxyuridine-labeled cells (S phase marker) did not differ from age-matched controls. These results indicate cell cycle progression is blocked, with further evidence suggesting that enhanced p27 activity may contribute to this process. For adenomas, formation was associated with loss of p27 activity (nuclear localization and mRNA). Increased endogenous somatostatin (SST) tone may also slow the conversion from hyperplastic to adenomatous state because mRNA levels for SST receptors, sst2 and sst5, were elevated in hyperplastic pituitaries, whereas adenomas were associated with a decline in sst1 and sst5 mRNA. Also, SST-knockout Tg pituitaries were larger and adenomas formed earlier compared with those of SST-intact Tg mice. Unexpectedly, these changes were independent of changes in proliferation rate within the hyperplastic tissue, suggesting that endogenous SST controls GHRH-induced adenoma formation primarily via modulation of apoptotic and/or cellular senescence pathways, consistent with the predicted function of some of the most differentially expressed genes (Casp1, MAP2K1, TNFR2) identified by membrane arrays and confirmed by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. PMID:19342460

Luque, Raul M.; Soares, Beatriz S.; Peng, Xiao-ding; Krishnan, Sonia; Cordoba-Chacon, Jose; Frohman, Lawrence A.; Kineman, Rhonda D.

2009-01-01

307

Microarray and biochemical analysis of lovastatin-induced apoptosis of squamous cell carcinomas.  

PubMed

We recently identified 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase, the rate-limiting enzyme of the mevalonate pathway, as a potential therapeutic target of the head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC) and cervical carcinomas (CC). The products of this complex biochemical pathway, including de novo cholesterol, are vital for a variety of key cellular functions affecting membrane integrity, cell signaling, protein synthesis, and cell cycle progression. Lovastatin, a specific inhibitor of HMG-CoA reductase, induces a pronounced apoptotic response in a specific subset of tumor types, including HNSCC and CC. The mediators of this response are not well established. Identification of differentially expressed genes represents a feasible approach to delineate these mediators as lovastatin has the potential to modulate transcription indirectly by perturbing levels of sterols and other mevalonate metabolites. Expression analysis following treatment of the HNSCC cell lines SCC9 or SCC25 with 10 microM lovastatin for 1 day showed that less than 2% (9 cDNAs) of the 588 cDNAs on this microarray were affected in both cell lines. These included diazepam-binding inhibitor/acyl-CoA-binding protein, the activated transcription factor 4 and rhoA. Because the biosynthesis of mevalonate leads to its incorporation into more than a dozen classes of end products, their role in lovastatin-induced apoptosis was also evaluated. Addition of the metabolites of all the major branches of the mevalonate pathway indicated that only the nonsterol moiety, geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (GGPP), significantly inhibited the apoptotic effects of lovastatin in HNSCC and CC cells. Because rhoA requires GGPP for its function, this links the microarray and biochemical data and identifies rhoA as a potential mediator of the anticancer properties of lovastatin. Our data suggest that the depletion of nonsterol mevalonate metabolites, particularly GGPP, can be potential mediators of lovastatin-induced apoptosis of HNSCC and CC cells. PMID:12082550

Dimitroulakos, Jim; Marhin, Wilson H; Tokunaga, Jason; Irish, Jonathan; Gullane, Patrick; Penn, Linda Z; Kamel-Reid, Suzanne

2002-01-01

308

COMPARATIVE ANALYSES OF DIFFERENTIALLY-INDUCED TCR-MEDIATED PHOSPHORYLATION PATHWAYS IN T LYMPHOMA CELLS  

PubMed Central

Activation of T lymphoma cells expressing Syk, but not ZAP-70 tyrosine kinase, has been shown to negatively regulate cell activation and activation induced cell death (AICD), perhaps due to differential induction of tyrosine phosphorylation modified proteins. To better understand the role of these proteins and their associated molecules/pathways, we studied a previously described model of T lymphoma cells expressing either a kinase-activated chimeric Syk or ZAP-70 genetically linked to TCR ? chain (Z/Syk or Z/ZAP cells, respectively). To help identify molecules and pathways linked to cell activation or AICD, a comparative semi-quantitative proteomics-based approach was utilized to analyze tyrosine phosphorylated protein immunoprecipitates from 2 min short-term activated Z/Syk or Z/ZAP cells. Using the resulting bioinformatics datasets, we identified several differentially immunoprecipitated proteins that could be validated biochemically. More tyrosine-phosphorylated and phosphotyrosine-associated proteins were found in Z/Syk than in Z/ZAP cells. Proteins involved in different unique functional pathways were induced in these cells and showed altered intermolecular interactions in varied pathways. Remarkably, 41% of differentially identified proteins in Z/Syk cells belonged to cell cycle or vesicle/trafficking pathways. In contrast, 21% of such proteins in Z/ZAP cells belonged to metabolism pathways. Therefore, molecular pathways involved in post-translational modifications linked to distinct cellular/physiological functions are differentially activated, which may contribute to varied activation and AICD responses of these cells. In summary, we identified proteins belonging to novel differentially activated pathways involved in TCR-mediated signaling, which may be targets for regulating activation and AICD of T lymphoma cells and for potential cancer therapy. PMID:21127342

Ortiz, Serina; Lee, Wenhui; Smith, David; Forman, Stephen J.; Lee, Terry D.; Liu, Chih-Pin

2011-01-01

309

mzGroupAnalyzer--predicting pathways and novel chemical structures from untargeted high-throughput metabolomics data.  

PubMed

The metabolome is a highly dynamic entity and the final readout of the genotype x environment x phenotype (GxExP) relationship of an organism. Monitoring metabolite dynamics over time thus theoretically encrypts the whole range of possible chemical and biochemical transformations of small molecules involved in metabolism. The bottleneck is, however, the sheer number of unidentified structures in these samples. This represents the next challenge for metabolomics technology and is comparable with genome sequencing 30 years ago. At the same time it is impossible to handle the amount of data involved in a metabolomics analysis manually. Algorithms are therefore imperative to allow for automated m/z feature extraction and subsequent structure or pathway assignment. Here we provide an automated pathway inference strategy comprising measurements of metabolome time series using LC- MS with high resolution and high mass accuracy. An algorithm was developed, called mzGroupAnalyzer, to automatically explore the metabolome for the detection of metabolite transformations caused by biochemical or chemical modifications. Pathways are extracted directly from the data and putative novel structures can be identified. The detected m/z features can be mapped on a van Krevelen diagram according to their H/C and O/C ratios for pattern recognition and to visualize oxidative processes and biochemical transformations. This method was applied to Arabidopsis thaliana treated simultaneously with cold and high light. Due to a protective antioxidant response the plants turn from green to purple color via the accumulation of flavonoid structures. The detection of potential biochemical pathways resulted in 15 putatively new compounds involved in the flavonoid-pathway. These compounds were further validated by product ion spectra from the same data. The mzGroupAnalyzer is implemented in the graphical user interface (GUI) of the metabolomics toolbox COVAIN (Sun & Weckwerth, 2012, Metabolomics 8: 81-93). The strategy can be extended to any biological system. PMID:24846183

Doerfler, Hannes; Sun, Xiaoliang; Wang, Lei; Engelmeier, Doris; Lyon, David; Weckwerth, Wolfram

2014-01-01

310

Electronic modulation of biochemical signal generation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Microelectronic devices that contain biological components are typically used to interrogate biology rather than control biological function. Patterned assemblies of proteins and cells have, however, been used for in vitro metabolic engineering, where coordinated biochemical pathways allow cell metabolism to be characterized and potentially controlled on a chip. Such devices form part of technologies that attempt to recreate animal and human physiological functions on a chip and could be used to revolutionize drug development. These ambitious goals will, however, require new biofabrication methodologies that help connect microelectronics and biological systems and yield new approaches to device assembly and communication. Here, we report the electrically mediated assembly, interrogation and control of a multi-domain fusion protein that produces a bacterial signalling molecule. The biological system can be electrically tuned using a natural redox molecule, and its biochemical response is shown to provide the signalling cues to drive bacterial population behaviour. We show that the biochemical output of the system correlates with the electrical input charge, which suggests that electrical inputs could be used to control complex on-chip biological processes.

Gordonov, Tanya; Kim, Eunkyoung; Cheng, Yi; Ben-Yoav, Hadar; Ghodssi, Reza; Rubloff, Gary; Yin, Jun-Jie; Payne, Gregory F.; Bentley, William E.

2014-08-01

311

Pathway of Glycine Betaine Biosynthesis in Aspergillus fumigatus  

PubMed Central

The choline oxidase (CHOA) and betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase (BADH) genes identified in Aspergillus fumigatus are present as a cluster specific for fungal genomes. Biochemical and molecular analyses of this cluster showed that it has very specific biochemical and functional features that make it unique and different from its plant and bacterial homologs. A. fumigatus ChoAp catalyzed the oxidation of choline to glycine betaine with betaine aldehyde as an intermediate and reduced molecular oxygen to hydrogen peroxide using FAD as a cofactor. A. fumigatus Badhp oxidized betaine aldehyde to glycine betaine with reduction of NAD+ to NADH. Analysis of the AfchoA?::HPH and AfbadA?::HPH single mutants and the AfchoA?AfbadA?::HPH double mutant showed that AfChoAp is essential for the use of choline as the sole nitrogen, carbon, or carbon and nitrogen source during the germination process. AfChoAp and AfBadAp were localized in the cytosol of germinating conidia and mycelia but were absent from resting conidia. Characterization of the mutant phenotypes showed that glycine betaine in A. fumigatus functions exclusively as a metabolic intermediate in the catabolism of choline and not as a stress protectant. This study in A. fumigatus is the first molecular, cellular, and biochemical characterization of the glycine betaine biosynthetic pathway in the fungal kingdom. PMID:23563483

Lambou, Karine; Pennati, Andrea; Valsecchi, Isabel; Tada, Rui; Sherman, Stephen; Sato, Hajime; Beau, Remi

2013-01-01

312

Biochem. J. (2003) 376, 4348 (Printed in Great Britain) 43 ACCELERATED PUBLICATION  

E-print Network

biochemical pathways for the synthesis of the micro- nutrients thiamine and folate. Cellular requirements show that the two human thiamine transporters are differentially targeted in polarized cells transporter isoforms and allows for inde- pendent regulation of thiamine import and export pathways in cells

Marchant, Jonathan

313

The plant stigma exudate: a biochemically active extracellular environment for pollen germination?  

PubMed

During sexual reproduction, pollen performance is greatly influenced by the female tissues. The stigma exudate, i.e., the extracellular secretion that covers the stigma outermost surface, has been usually regarded as a reservoir of water, secondary metabolites, cell wall precursors and compounds that serve as energy supply for rapid pollen tube growth. In an attempt to identify the proteins present in the stigma secretome, we performed a large-scale analysis in two species (Lilium longiflorum and Olea europaea) following a proteomic-based approach. The resulting data strongly suggest that the stigma exudate is not a mere storage site but also a biochemically active environment with a markedly catabolic nature. Thus, this secretion may modulate early pollen tube growth and contribute to the senescence of stigma after pollination. In addition, a putative cross-talk between genetic programs that regulate stress/defense and pollination responses in the stigma is also suggested. The stigma exudate might also functionally diverge between species on the basis on their ecology and the biochemical, morphological and anatomical features of their stigmas. Unexpectedly, we identified in both exudates some intracellular proteins, suggesting that a mechanism other than the canonical ER-Golgi exocytic pathway may exist in the stigma and contribute to exudate secretion. PMID:24589550

Rejón, Juan David; Delalande, François; Schaeffer-Reiss, Christine; Carapito, Christine; Zienkiewicz, Krzysztof; de Dios Alché, Juan; Isabel Rodríguez-García, María; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Castro, Antonio J

2014-01-01

314

Evolution of a new bacterial pathway for 4-nitrotoluene degradation.  

PubMed

Bacteria that assimilate synthetic nitroarene compounds represent unique evolutionary models, as their metabolic pathways are in the process of adaptation and optimization for the consumption of these toxic chemicals. We used Acidovorax sp. strain JS42, which is capable of growth on nitrobenzene and 2-nitrotoluene, in experiments to examine how a nitroarene degradation pathway evolves when its host strain is challenged with direct selective pressure to assimilate non-native substrates. Although the same enzyme that initiates the degradation of nitrobenzene and 2-nitrotoluene also oxidizes 4-nitrotoluene to 4-methylcatechol, which is a growth substrate for JS42, the strain is incapable of growth on 4-nitrotoluene. Using long-term laboratory evolution experiments, we obtained JS42 mutants that gained the ability to grow on 4-nitrotoluene via a new degradation pathway. The underlying basis for this new activity resulted from the accumulation of specific mutations in the gene encoding the dioxygenase that catalyses the initial oxidation of nitroarene substrates, but at positions distal to the active site and previously unknown to affect activity in this or related enzymes. We constructed additional mutant dioxygenases to identify the order of mutations that led to the improved enzymes. Biochemical analyses revealed a defined, step-wise pathway for the evolution of the improved dioxygenases. PMID:21895789

Ju, Kou-San; Parales, Rebecca E

2011-10-01

315

The Energy Costs of Insulators in Biochemical Networks  

PubMed Central

Complex networks of biochemical reactions, such as intracellular protein signaling pathways and genetic networks, are often conceptualized in terms of modules—semiindependent collections of components that perform a well-defined function and which may be incorporated in multiple pathways. However, due to sequestration of molecular messengers during interactions and other effects, collectively referred to as retroactivity, real biochemical systems do not exhibit perfect modularity. Biochemical signaling pathways can be insulated from impedance and competition effects, which inhibit modularity, through enzymatic futile cycles that consume energy, typically in the form of ATP. We hypothesize that better insulation necessarily requires higher energy consumption. We test this hypothesis through a combined theoretical and computational analysis of a simplified physical model of covalent cycles, using two innovative measures of insulation, as well as a possible new way to characterize optimal insulation through the balancing of these two measures in a Pareto sense. Our results indicate that indeed better insulation requires more energy. While insulation may facilitate evolution by enabling a modular plug-and-play interconnection architecture, allowing for the creation of new behaviors by adding targets to existing pathways, our work suggests that this potential benefit must be balanced against the metabolic costs of insulation necessarily incurred in not affecting the behavior of existing processes. PMID:23528097

Barton, John P.; Sontag, Eduardo D.

2013-01-01

316

Genomic analysis of thermophilic Bacillus coagulans strains: efficient producers for platform bio-chemicals  

PubMed Central

Microbial strains with high substrate efficiency and excellent environmental tolerance are urgently needed for the production of platform bio-chemicals. Bacillus coagulans has these merits; however, little genetic information is available about this species. Here, we determined the genome sequences of five B. coagulans strains, and used a comparative genomic approach to reconstruct the central carbon metabolism of this species to explain their fermentation features. A novel xylose isomerase in the xylose utilization pathway was identified in these strains. Based on a genome-wide positive selection scan, the selection pressure on amino acid metabolism may have played a significant role in the thermal adaptation. We also researched the immune systems of B. coagulans strains, which provide them with acquired resistance to phages and mobile genetic elements. Our genomic analysis provides comprehensive insights into the genetic characteristics of B. coagulans and paves the way for improving and extending the uses of this species. PMID:24473268

Su, Fei; Xu, Ping

2014-01-01

317

Analysis of common bean expressed sequence tags identifies sulfur metabolic pathways active in seed and sulfur-rich proteins highly expressed in the absence of phaseolin and major lectins  

PubMed Central

Background A deficiency in phaseolin and phytohemagglutinin is associated with a near doubling of sulfur amino acid content in genetically related lines of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris), particularly cysteine, elevated by 70%, and methionine, elevated by 10%. This mostly takes place at the expense of an abundant non-protein amino acid, S-methyl-cysteine. The deficiency in phaseolin and phytohemagglutinin is mainly compensated by increased levels of the 11S globulin legumin and residual lectins. Legumin, albumin-2, defensin and albumin-1 were previously identified as contributing to the increased sulfur amino acid content in the mutant line, on the basis of similarity to proteins from other legumes. Results Profiling of free amino acid in developing seeds of the BAT93 reference genotype revealed a biphasic accumulation of gamma-glutamyl-S-methyl-cysteine, the main soluble form of S-methyl-cysteine, with a lag phase occurring during storage protein accumulation. A collection of 30,147 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) was generated from four developmental stages, corresponding to distinct phases of gamma-glutamyl-S-methyl-cysteine accumulation, and covering the transitions to reserve accumulation and dessication. Analysis of gene ontology categories indicated the occurrence of multiple sulfur metabolic pathways, including all enzymatic activities responsible for sulfate assimilation, de novo cysteine and methionine biosynthesis. Integration of genomic and proteomic data enabled the identification and isolation of cDNAs coding for legumin, albumin-2, defensin D1 and albumin-1A and -B induced in the absence of phaseolin and phytohemagglutinin. Their deduced amino acid sequences have a higher content of cysteine than methionine, providing an explanation for the preferential increase of cysteine in the mutant line. Conclusion The EST collection provides a foundation to further investigate sulfur metabolism and the differential accumulation of sulfur amino acids in seed of common bean. Identification of sulfur-rich proteins whose levels are elevated in seed lacking phaseolin and phytohemagglutinin and sulfur metabolic genes may assist the improvement of protein quality. PMID:21615926

2011-01-01

318

Genetic analysis of photoreceptor action pathways in Arabidopsis thaliana. Progress report  

SciTech Connect

The specific strategies and long-term goals of this proposal remain intact relative to the original proposal. We continue to isolate and characterize photomorphogenic mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana. The molecular and biochemical characterization of one of these mutants, det1, has led to one publication of original data and to one Society for Experimental Biology Symposium paper (see below). The phenotype of a second mutant, det2, has also been studied during this funding period. In addition, we have continued work on a general strategy to isolate mutations in trans-acting regulatory factors that mediate light-regulated gene expression, and have identified several potentially interesting regulatory mutants. In the third funding period, we will concentrate on the genetical, biochemical, and molecular characterization of these new mutants. Construction of double mutants between the new mutants and the previously characterized morphological mutants should allow us to construct a pathway for light-regulated seedling development in Arabidopsis.

Not Available

1991-12-31

319

How to model biochemical pathways-an ODE approach  

E-print Network

can bind and activate a substrate S Well mixed system ­ explain. #12; [S]= ST -[SCa] ; [Ca]= CaT -[SCa] d[SCa] dt = k1[S][Ca]- k-1[SCa] = k1 ST -[SCa]( ) CaT -[SCa]( )- k-1[SCa] = k1ST CaT - k1(ST + CaT )+ k-1( )[SCa]+ k-1[SCa]2 OOPS Can assume: CaT>>ST, so that [Ca]=CaT This simplifies matters. #12

Shouval, Harel

320

BPS University of Glasgow 1 BPS: Biochemical Pathway Simulator  

E-print Network

Receptorreceptor Ras kinase Raf P P P P MEK P ERK P P cytoplasmic substrates Elk SAP Gene Mitogens Growth factors Receptorreceptor Ras kinase Raf P P P P MEK P ERK P P Mitogens Growth factors Receptorreceptor Mitogens Growth P P P P MEK P ERK P P Raf P P P P MEK P ERK P P cytoplasmic substrates Elk SAP Gene cytoplasmic

Hillston, Jane

321

Modular modelling of signalling pathways and their Robin Donaldsona  

E-print Network

Abstract Signalling pathways are well-known abstractions that explain the mech- anisms whereby cells combinations of variable sharing, synchronisation labels and reaction renaming. The approach is il- lustrated pathways1 are well-known abstractions that explain how cells respond to signals. They comprise biochemical

Calder, Muffy

322

Original Research B-cell Ligand Processing Pathways Detected  

E-print Network

) in elucidating biochemical pathways involved in complex signaling events in cells. Keywords: Ligand recognition and bacteria to the recognition of cancerous cells. B-cells act as the body's most effective line of defenseOriginal Research B-cell Ligand Processing Pathways Detected by Large-scale Comparative Analysis

Honavar, Vasant

323

A Competitive Stapled Peptide Screen Identifies a Selective Small Molecule that Overcomes MCL-1-dependent Leukemia Cell Survival  

PubMed Central

SUMMARY Cancer cells hijack BCL-2 family survival proteins to suppress the death effectors and thereby enforce an immortal state. This is accomplished biochemically by an anti-apoptotic surface groove that neutralizes the pro-apoptotic BH3 ?-helix of death proteins. Anti-apoptotic MCL-1 in particular has emerged as a ubiquitous resistance factor in cancer. Whereas targeting the BCL-2 anti-apoptotic subclass effectively restores the death pathway in BCL-2-dependent cancer, the development of molecules tailored to the binding specificity of MCL-1 has lagged. We previously discovered that a hydrocarbon-stapled MCL-1 BH3 helix is an exquisitely selective MCL-1 antagonist. By deploying this unique reagent in a competitive screen, we identified an MCL-1 inhibitor molecule that selectively targets the BH3-binding groove of MCL-1, neutralizes its biochemical lockhold on apoptosis, and induces caspase activation and leukemia cell death in the specific context of MCL-1 dependence. PMID:22999885

Cohen, Nicole A.; Stewart, Michelle L.; Gavathiotis, Evripidis; Tepper, Jared L.; Bruekner, Susanne R.; Koss, Brian; Opferman, Joseph T.; Walensky, Loren D.

2012-01-01

324

Ammonia-oxidizing archaea use the most energy-efficient aerobic pathway for CO2 fixation.  

PubMed

Archaea of the phylum Thaumarchaeota are among the most abundant prokaryotes on Earth and are widely distributed in marine, terrestrial, and geothermal environments. All studied Thaumarchaeota couple the oxidation of ammonia at extremely low concentrations with carbon fixation. As the predominant nitrifiers in the ocean and in various soils, ammonia-oxidizing archaea contribute significantly to the global nitrogen and carbon cycles. Here we provide biochemical evidence that thaumarchaeal ammonia oxidizers assimilate inorganic carbon via a modified version of the autotrophic hydroxypropionate/hydroxybutyrate cycle of Crenarchaeota that is far more energy efficient than any other aerobic autotrophic pathway. The identified genes of this cycle were found in the genomes of all sequenced representatives of the phylum Thaumarchaeota, indicating the environmental significance of this efficient CO2-fixation pathway. Comparative phylogenetic analysis of proteins of this pathway suggests that the hydroxypropionate/hydroxybutyrate cycle emerged independently in Crenarchaeota and Thaumarchaeota, thus supporting the hypothesis of an early evolutionary separation of both archaeal phyla. We conclude that high efficiency of anabolism exemplified by this autotrophic cycle perfectly suits the lifestyle of ammonia-oxidizing archaea, which thrive at a constantly low energy supply, thus offering a biochemical explanation for their ecological success in nutrient-limited environments. PMID:24843170

Könneke, Martin; Schubert, Daniel M; Brown, Philip C; Hügler, Michael; Standfest, Sonja; Schwander, Thomas; Schada von Borzyskowski, Lennart; Erb, Tobias J; Stahl, David A; Berg, Ivan A

2014-06-01

325

Ammonia-oxidizing archaea use the most energy-efficient aerobic pathway for CO2 fixation  

PubMed Central

Archaea of the phylum Thaumarchaeota are among the most abundant prokaryotes on Earth and are widely distributed in marine, terrestrial, and geothermal environments. All studied Thaumarchaeota couple the oxidation of ammonia at extremely low concentrations with carbon fixation. As the predominant nitrifiers in the ocean and in various soils, ammonia-oxidizing archaea contribute significantly to the global nitrogen and carbon cycles. Here we provide biochemical evidence that thaumarchaeal ammonia oxidizers assimilate inorganic carbon via a modified version of the autotrophic hydroxypropionate/hydroxybutyrate cycle of Crenarchaeota that is far more energy efficient than any other aerobic autotrophic pathway. The identified genes of this cycle were found in the genomes of all sequenced representatives of the phylum Thaumarchaeota, indicating the environmental significance of this efficient CO2-fixation pathway. Comparative phylogenetic analysis of proteins of this pathway suggests that the hydroxypropionate/hydroxybutyrate cycle emerged independently in Crenarchaeota and Thaumarchaeota, thus supporting the hypothesis of an early evolutionary separation of both archaeal phyla. We conclude that high efficiency of anabolism exemplified by this autotrophic cycle perfectly suits the lifestyle of ammonia-oxidizing archaea, which thrive at a constantly low energy supply, thus offering a biochemical explanation for their ecological success in nutrient-limited environments. PMID:24843170

Könneke, Martin; Schubert, Daniel M.; Brown, Philip C.; Hügler, Michael; Standfest, Sonja; Schwander, Thomas; Schada von Borzyskowski, Lennart; Erb, Tobias J.; Stahl, David A.; Berg, Ivan A.

2014-01-01

326

Identifying Erosion  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this environmental science activity (page 3 of the PDF), leaners will identify and explain the causes of erosion. They will observe the effects of erosion on the surrounding area and further explore examples of erosion online. An extension activity allows learners to make a hands-on model of soil erosion. Though this was created as a pre-visit activity for a workshop about water flow and erosion, it makes a great stand-alone activity as well!

Cosi

2009-01-01

327

A Course in... Biochemical Engineering.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a chemical engineering course for senior undergraduates and first year graduate students in biochemical engineering. Discusses five experiments used in the course: aseptic techniques, dissolved oxygen measurement, oxygen uptake by yeast, continuous sterilization, and cultivation of microorganisms. (MVL)

Ng, Terry K-L.; And Others

1988-01-01

328

ICT Pathways  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This page, from the Mid-Pacific Information and Communications Technology Center, provides a useful diagram for ICT educators that highlights employment pathways for students pursuing this career track. Users may click on the diagram to view a larger version.

329

Algebraic Methods for Inferring Biochemical Networks: a Maximum Likelihood Approach  

PubMed Central

We present a novel method for identifying a biochemical reaction network based on multiple sets of estimated reaction rates in the corresponding reaction rate equations arriving from various (possibly different) experiments. The current method, unlike some of the graphical approaches proposed in the literature, uses the values of the experimental measurements only relative to the geometry of the biochemical reactions under the assumption that the underlying reaction network is the same for all the experiments. The proposed approach utilizes algebraic statistical methods in order to parametrize the set of possible reactions so as to identify the most likely network structure, and is easily scalable to very complicated biochemical systems involving a large number of species and reactions. The method is illustrated with a numerical example of a hypothetical network arising form a “mass transfer”-type model. PMID:19709932

Craciun, Gheorghe; Pantea, Casian; Rempala, Grzegorz A.

2009-01-01

330

Genome-scale functional profiling of the mammalian AP-1 signaling pathway  

PubMed Central

Large-scale functional genomics approaches are fundamental to the characterization of mammalian transcriptomes annotated by genome sequencing projects. Although current high-throughput strategies systematically survey either transcriptional or biochemical networks, analogous genome-scale investigations that analyze gene function in mammalian cells have yet to be fully realized. Through transient overexpression analysis, we describe the parallel interrogation of ?20,000 sequence annotated genes in cancer-related signaling pathways. For experimental validation of these genome data, we apply an integrative strategy to characterize previously unreported effectors of activator protein-1 (AP-1) mediated growth and mitogenic response pathways. These studies identify the ADP-ribosylation factor GTPase-activating protein Centaurin ?1 and a Tudor domain-containing hypothetical protein as putative AP-1 regulatory oncogenes. These results provide insight into the composition of the AP-1 signaling machinery and validate this approach as a tractable platform for genome-wide functional analysis. PMID:14514886

Chanda, Sumit K.; White, Suhaila; Orth, Anthony P.; Reisdorph, Richard; Miraglia, Loren; Thomas, Russell S.; DeJesus, Paul; Mason, Daniel E.; Huang, Qihong; Vega, Raquel; Yu, De-Hua; Nelson, Christian G.; Smith, Brendan M.; Terry, Robert; Linford, Alicia S.; Yu, Yang; Chirn, Gung-wei; Song, Chuanzheng; Labow, Mark A.; Cohen, Dalia; King, Frederick J.; Peters, Eric C.; Schultz, Peter G.; Vogt, Peter K.; Hogenesch, John B.; Caldwell, Jeremy S.

2003-01-01

331

The semi-phosphorylative Entner–Doudoroff pathway in hyperthermophilic archaea: a re-evaluation  

PubMed Central

Biochemical studies have suggested that, in hyperthermophilic archaea, the metabolic conversion of glucose via the ED (Entner–Doudoroff) pathway generally proceeds via a non-phosphorylative variant. A key enzyme of the non-phosphorylating ED pathway of Sulfolobus solfataricus, KDG (2-keto-3-deoxygluconate) aldolase, has been cloned and characterized previously. In the present study, a comparative genomics analysis is described that reveals conserved ED gene clusters in both Thermoproteus tenax and S. solfataricus. The corresponding ED proteins from both archaea have been expressed in Escherichia coli and their specificity has been identified, revealing: (i) a novel type of gluconate dehydratase (gad gene), (ii) a bifunctional 2-keto-3-deoxy-(6-phospho)-gluconate aldolase (kdgA gene), (iii) a 2-keto-3-deoxygluconate kinase (kdgK gene) and, in S. solfataricus, (iv) a GAPN (non-phosphorylating glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase; gapN gene). Extensive in vivo and in vitro enzymatic analyses indicate the operation of both the semi-phosphorylative and the non-phosphorylative ED pathway in T. tenax and S. solfataricus. The existence of this branched ED pathway is yet another example of the versatility and flexibility of the central carbohydrate metabolic pathways in the archaeal domain. PMID:15869466

2005-01-01

332

Determination of antifungal, biochemical and physiological features of Trichoderma koningiopsis  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Trichoderma koningiopsis is a species that has been recently identified and has not yet been published, but is in press. Due to the absence of reported data on this species, antifungal, biochemical and physiological features were analyzed for the Trichoderma koningiopsis strain isolated from root se...

333

Exploring biological electron transfer pathway dynamics with the Pathways plugin for VMD.  

PubMed

We describe the new Pathways plugin for the molecular visualization program visual molecular dynamics. The plugin identifies and visualizes tunneling pathways and pathway families in biomolecules, and calculates relative electronic couplings. The plugin includes unique features to estimate the importance of individual atoms for mediating the coupling, to analyze the coupling sensitivity to thermal motion, and to visualize pathway fluctuations. The Pathways plugin is open source software distributed under the terms of the GNU's Not Unix (GNU) public license. PMID:22298319

Balabin, Ilya A; Hu, Xiangqian; Beratan, David N

2012-03-30

334

CONSTRICTOR: Constraint Modification Provides Insight into Design of Biochemical Networks  

PubMed Central

Advances in computational methods that allow for exploration of the combinatorial mutation space are needed to realize the potential of synthetic biology based strain engineering efforts. Here, we present Constrictor, a computational framework that uses flux balance analysis (FBA) to analyze inhibitory effects of genetic mutations on the performance of biochemical networks. Constrictor identifies engineering interventions by classifying the reactions in the metabolic model depending on the extent to which their flux must be decreased to achieve the overproduction target. The optimal inhibition of various reaction pathways is determined by restricting the flux through targeted reactions below the steady state levels of a baseline strain. Constrictor generates unique in silico strains, each representing an “expression state”, or a combination of gene expression levels required to achieve the overproduction target. The Constrictor framework is demonstrated by studying overproduction of ethylene in Escherichia coli network models iAF1260 and iJO1366 through the addition of the heterologous ethylene-forming enzyme from Pseudomonas syringae. Targeting individual reactions as well as combinations of reactions reveals in silico mutants that are predicted to have as high as 25% greater theoretical ethylene yields than the baseline strain during simulated exponential growth. Altering the degree of restriction reveals a large distribution of ethylene yields, while analysis of the expression states that return lower yields provides insight into system bottlenecks. Finally, we demonstrate the ability of Constrictor to scan networks and provide targets for a range of possible products. Constrictor is an adaptable technique that can be used to generate and analyze disparate populations of in silico mutants, select gene expression levels and provide non-intuitive strategies for metabolic engineering. PMID:25422896

Erickson, Keesha E.; Gill, Ryan T.; Chatterjee, Anushree

2014-01-01

335

Modeling Pathways for Low Bone Mass in Children With Malignancies  

Microsoft Academic Search

Children with malignancies have low bone mass. Pathways for metabolic bone disease were investigated in children with cancer by concomitantly assessing lifestyle, clinical, and biochemical predictors of bone mass. Forty-one children who were receiving cancer therapy for 61 weeks and 39 controls were studied. Data on lifestyle factors, biochemical and hormonal parameters, dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry bone mass measurements, body composition,

Joumana Chaiban; Samar Muwakkit; Asma Arabi; Lamis Jomaa; Lina Onsi Daouk; Rola El-Rassi; Miguel Abboud; Ghada El-Hajj Fuleihan

2009-01-01

336

A comprehensive urinary metabolomic approach for identifying kidney cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

The diagnosis of cancer by examination of the urine has the potential to improve patient outcomes by means of earlier detection. Due to the fact that the urine contains metabolic signatures of many biochemical pathways, this biofluid is ideally suited for metabolomic analysis, especially involving diseases of the kidney and urinary system. In this pilot study, we test three independent

Tobias Kind; Vladimir Tolstikov; Oliver Fiehn; Robert H. Weiss

2007-01-01

337

Reconstruction of Arbitrary Biochemical Reaction Networks: A Compressive Sensing Approach  

E-print Network

Reconstruction of biochemical reaction networks is a central topic in systems biology which raises crucial theoretical challenges in system identification. Nonlinear Ordinary Differential Equations (ODEs) that involve polynomial and rational functions are typically used to model biochemical reaction networks. Such nonlinear models make the problem of determining the connectivity of biochemical networks from time-series experimental data quite difficult. In this paper, we present a network reconstruction algorithm that can deal with model descriptions under the form of polynomial and rational functions. Rather than identifying the parameters of linear or nonlinear ODEs characterised by pre-defined equation structures, our methodology allows us to determine the nonlinear ODEs structure together with their associated reaction constants. To solve the network reconstruction problem, we cast it as a Compressive Sensing (CS) problem and use Bayesian Sparse Learning (BSL) algorithms as an efficient way to obtain its ...

Pan, Wei; Stan, Guy-Bart

2012-01-01

338

Biochemical network-based drug-target prediction.  

PubMed

The use of networks to aid the drug discovery process is a rather new but booming endeavor. A vast variety of different types of networks are being constructed and analyzed for various different tasks in drug discovery. The analysis may be at the level of establishing connectivity, topology, and graphs, or may go to a more quantitative level. We discuss here how computational systems biology approaches can aid the quantitative analysis of biochemical networks for drug-target prediction. We focus on networks and pathways in which the components are related by physical interactions or biochemical processes. We particularly discuss the potential of mathematical modeling to aid the analysis of proteins for druggability. PMID:20554441

Klipp, Edda; Wade, Rebecca C; Kummer, Ursula

2010-08-01

339

Identification of Biochemical Network Modules Based on Shortest Retroactive Distances  

PubMed Central

Modularity analysis offers a route to better understand the organization of cellular biochemical networks as well as to derive practically useful, simplified models of these complex systems. While there is general agreement regarding the qualitative properties of a biochemical module, there is no clear consensus on the quantitative criteria that may be used to systematically derive these modules. In this work, we investigate cyclical interactions as the defining characteristic of a biochemical module. We utilize a round trip distance metric, termed Shortest Retroactive Distance (ShReD), to characterize the retroactive connectivity between any two reactions in a biochemical network and to group together network components that mutually influence each other. We evaluate the metric on two types of networks that feature feedback interactions: (i) epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling and (ii) liver metabolism supporting drug transformation. For both networks, the ShReD partitions found hierarchically arranged modules that confirm biological intuition. In addition, the partitions also revealed modules that are less intuitive. In particular, ShReD-based partition of the metabolic network identified a ‘redox’ module that couples reactions of glucose, pyruvate, lipid and drug metabolism through shared production and consumption of NADPH. Our results suggest that retroactive interactions arising from feedback loops and metabolic cycles significantly contribute to the modularity of biochemical networks. For metabolic networks, cofactors play an important role as allosteric effectors that mediate the retroactive interactions. PMID:22102800

Sridharan, Gautham Vivek; Hassoun, Soha; Lee, Kyongbum

2011-01-01

340

The Genetic and Biochemical Basis of FANCD2 Monoubiquitination  

PubMed Central

Summary Fanconi anaemia (FA) is a cancer predisposition syndrome characterized by cellular sensitivity to DNA interstrand crosslinkers. The molecular defect in FA is an impaired DNA repair pathway. The critical event in activating this pathway is monoubiquitination of FANCD2. In vivo, a multisubunit FA core complex catalyzes this step, but its mechanism is unclear. Here, we report purification of a native avian FA core complex and biochemical reconstitution of FANCD2 monoubiquitination. This demonstrates that the catalytic FANCL E3 ligase subunit must be embedded within the complex for maximal activity and site specificity. We genetically and biochemically define a minimal subcomplex comprising just three proteins (FANCB, FANCL, and FAAP100) that functions as the monoubiquitination module. Residual FANCD2 monoubiquitination activity is retained in cells defective for other FA core complex subunits. This work describes the in vitro reconstitution and characterization of this multisubunit monoubiquitin E3 ligase, providing key insight into the conserved FA DNA repair pathway. PMID:24905007

Rajendra, Eeson; Oestergaard, Vibe H.; Langevin, Frédéric; Wang, Meng; Dornan, Gillian L.; Patel, Ketan J.; Passmore, Lori A.

2014-01-01

341

Pregnancy diagnosis by biochemical assay.  

PubMed

If pregnancy diagnosis by biochemical assay is to become practical, new marker characterization will be required. Pregnancy marker development is reviewed in dogs and other species, as are molecular biology techniques that have the potential to reveal previously inaccessible targets in the dog. PMID:1421818

Kuniyuki, A H; Hughes, M J

1992-09-01

342

Hyponatraemia: biochemical and clinical perspectives  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hyponatraemia is a common bio-chemical abnormality, occurring in about 15% of hospital inpatients. It is often associated with severe illness and relatively poor outcome. Pathophysiologically, hyponatraemia may be spurious, dilutional, depletional or redistributional. Particularly difficult causes and concepts of hyponatraemia are the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuresis and the sick cell syndrome, which are discussed here in detail. Therapy should always

G. Gill; G. Leese

1998-01-01

343

A new thiamin salvage pathway.  

PubMed

The physiological function for thiaminase II, a thiamin-degrading enzyme, has eluded investigators for more than 50 years. Here, we demonstrate that this enzyme is involved in the regeneration of the thiamin pyrimidine rather than in thiamin degradation, and we identify a new pathway involved in the salvage of base-degraded forms of thiamin. This pathway is widely distributed among bacteria, archaea and eukaryotes. In this pathway, thiamin hydrolysis products such as N-formyl-4-amino-5-aminomethyl-2-methylpyrimidine (formylaminopyrimidine; 15) are transported into the cell using the ThiXYZ transport system, deformylated by the ylmB-encoded amidohydrolase and hydrolyzed to 4-amino-5-hydroxymethyl-2-methylpyrimidine (HMP; 6)-an intermediate on the de novo thiamin biosynthetic pathway. To our knowledge this is the first example of a thiamin salvage pathway involving thiamin analogs generated by degradation of one of the heterocyclic rings of the cofactor. PMID:17618314

Jenkins, Amy Haas; Schyns, Ghislain; Potot, Sébastien; Sun, Guangxing; Begley, Tadhg P

2007-08-01

344

Phylobiochemical characterization of class-Ib aspartate/prephenate aminotransferases reveals evolution of the plant arogenate phenylalanine pathway.  

PubMed

The aromatic amino acid Phe is required for protein synthesis and serves as the precursor of abundant phenylpropanoid plant natural products. While Phe is synthesized from prephenate exclusively via a phenylpyruvate intermediate in model microbes, the alternative pathway via arogenate is predominant in plant Phe biosynthesis. However, the molecular and biochemical evolution of the plant arogenate pathway is currently unknown. Here, we conducted phylogenetically informed biochemical characterization of prephenate aminotransferases (PPA-ATs) that belong to class-Ib aspartate aminotransferases (AspAT Ibs) and catalyze the first committed step of the arogenate pathway in plants. Plant PPA-ATs and succeeding arogenate dehydratases (ADTs) were found to be most closely related to homologs from Chlorobi/Bacteroidetes bacteria. The Chlorobium tepidum PPA-AT and ADT homologs indeed efficiently converted prephenate and arogenate into arogenate and Phe, respectively. A subset of AspAT Ib enzymes exhibiting PPA-AT activity was further identified from both Plantae and prokaryotes and, together with site-directed mutagenesis, showed that Thr-84 and Lys-169 play key roles in specific recognition of dicarboxylic keto (prephenate) and amino (aspartate) acid substrates. The results suggest that, along with ADT, a gene encoding prephenate-specific PPA-AT was transferred from a Chlorobi/Bacteroidetes ancestor to a eukaryotic ancestor of Plantae, allowing efficient Phe and phenylpropanoid production via arogenate in plants today. PMID:25070637

Dornfeld, Camilla; Weisberg, Alexandra J; K C, Ritesh; Dudareva, Natalia; Jelesko, John G; Maeda, Hiroshi A

2014-07-01

345

Signalling functions and biochemical properties of pertussis toxin-resistant G-proteins.  

PubMed Central

Pertussis toxin (PTX) has been widely used as a reagent to characterize the involvement of heterotrimeric G-proteins in signalling. This toxin catalyses the ADP-ribosylation of specific G-protein alpha subunits of the Gi family, and this modification prevents the occurrence of the receptor-G-protein interaction. This review focuses on the biochemical properties and signalling of those G-proteins historically classified as 'PTX-resistant' due to the inability of the toxin to influence signalling through them. These G-proteins include members of the Gq and G12 families and one Gi family member, i.e. Gz. Signalling pathways controlled by these G-proteins are well characterized only for Gq family members, which activate specific isoforms of phospholipase C, resulting in increases in intracellular calcium and activation of protein kinase C (PKC), among other responses. While members of the G12 family have been implicated in processes that regulate cell growth, and Gz has been shown to inhibit adenylate cyclase, the specific downstream targets to these G-proteins in vivo have not been clearly established. Since two of these proteins, G12 alpha and Gz alpha, are excellent substrates for PKC, there is the potential for cross-talk between their signalling and Gq-dependent processes leading to activation of PKC. In tissues that express these G-proteins, a number of guanine-nucleotide-dependent, PTX-resistant, signalling pathways have been defined for which the G-protein involved has not been identified. This review summarizes these pathways and discusses the evidence both for the participation of specific PTX-resistant G-proteins in them and for the regulation of these processes by PKC. PMID:9032437

Fields, T A; Casey, P J

1997-01-01

346

Biochemical Features and Functional Implications of the RNA-Based T-Box Regulatory Mechanism  

PubMed Central

Summary: The T-box mechanism is a common regulatory strategy used for modulating the expression of genes of amino acid metabolism-related operons in gram-positive bacteria, especially members of the Firmicutes. T-box regulation is usually based on a transcription attenuation mechanism in which an interaction between a specific uncharged tRNA and the 5? region of the transcript stabilizes an antiterminator structure in preference to a terminator structure, thereby preventing transcription termination. Although single T-box regulatory elements are common, double or triple T-box arrangements are also observed, expanding the regulatory range of these elements. In the present study, we predict the functional implications of T-box regulation in genes encoding aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, proteins of amino acid biosynthetic pathways, transporters, and regulatory proteins. We also consider the global impact of the use of this regulatory mechanism on cell physiology. Novel biochemical relationships between regulated genes and their corresponding metabolic pathways were revealed. Some of the genes identified, such as the quorum-sensing gene luxS, in members of the Lactobacillaceae were not previously predicted to be regulated by the T-box mechanism. Our analyses also predict an imbalance in tRNA sensing during the regulation of operons containing multiple aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase genes or biosynthetic genes involved in pathways common to more than one amino acid. Based on the distribution of T-box regulatory elements, we propose that this regulatory mechanism originated in a common ancestor of members of the Firmicutes, Chloroflexi, Deinococcus-Thermus group, and Actinobacteria and was transferred into the Deltaproteobacteria by horizontal gene transfer. PMID:19258532

Gutiérrez-Preciado, Ana; Henkin, Tina M.; Grundy, Frank J.; Yanofsky, Charles; Merino, Enrique

2009-01-01

347

Targeting the PI3-kinase/Akt/mTOR Signaling Pathway  

PubMed Central

Synopsis This article presents an overview of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway. As a central regulator of cell growth, protein translation, survival, and metabolism, activation of this signaling pathway contributes to the pathogenesis of many tumor types. Biochemical and genetic aberrations of this pathway observed in various cancer types will be explored. Lastly, pathway inhibitors both in development and already FDA-approved will be discussed. PMID:24012393

Hassan, Burhan; Akcakanat, Argun; Holder, Ashley M.; Meric-Bernstam, Funda

2013-01-01

348

A novel dysregulated pathway-identification analysis based on global influence of within-pathway effects and crosstalk between pathways.  

PubMed

Identifying dysregulated pathways from high-throughput experimental data in order to infer underlying biological insights is an important task. Current pathway-identification methods focus on single pathways in isolation; however, consideration of crosstalk between pathways could improve our understanding of alterations in biological states. We propose a novel method of pathway analysis based on global influence (PAGI) to identify dysregulated pathways, by considering both within-pathway effects and crosstalk between pathways. We constructed a global gene–gene network based on the relationships among genes extracted from a pathway database. We then evaluated the extent of differential expression for each gene, and mapped them to the global network. The random walk with restart algorithm was used to calculate the extent of genes affected by global influence. Finally, we used cumulative distribution functions to determine the significance values of the dysregulated pathways. We applied the PAGI method to five cancer microarray datasets, and compared our results with gene set enrichment analysis and five other methods. Based on these analyses, we demonstrated that PAGI can effectively identify dysregulated pathways associated with cancer, with strong reproducibility and robustness. We implemented PAGI using the freely available R-based and Web-based tools (http://bioinfo.hrbmu.edu.cn/PAGI). PMID:25551156

Han, Junwei; Li, Chunquan; Yang, Haixiu; Xu, Yanjun; Zhang, Chunlong; Ma, Jiquan; Shi, Xinrui; Liu, Wei; Shang, Desi; Yao, Qianlan; Zhang, Yunpeng; Su, Fei; Feng, Li; Li, Xia

2015-01-01

349

Biochemical Characterization of Prion Strains in Bank Voles  

PubMed Central

Prions exist as different strains exhibiting distinct disease phenotypes. Currently, the identification of prion strains is still based on biological strain typing in rodents. However, it has been shown that prion strains may be associated with distinct PrPSc biochemical types. Taking advantage of the availability of several prion strains adapted to a novel rodent model, the bank vole, we investigated if any prion strain was actually associated with distinctive PrPSc biochemical characteristics and if it was possible to univocally identify strains through PrPSc biochemical phenotypes. We selected six different vole-adapted strains (three human-derived and three animal-derived) and analyzed PrPSc from individual voles by epitope mapping of protease resistant core of PrPSc (PrPres) and by conformational stability and solubility assay. Overall, we discriminated five out of six prion strains, while two different scrapie strains showed identical PrPSc types. Our results suggest that the biochemical strain typing approach here proposed was highly discriminative, although by itself it did not allow us to identify all prion strains analyzed. PMID:25437201

Pirisinu, Laura; Marcon, Stefano; Di Bari, Michele Angelo; D’Agostino, Claudia; Agrimi, Umberto; Nonno, Romolo

2013-01-01

350

The Role of Gene Duplication in the Evolution of Purine Nucleotide Salvage Pathways  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Purine nucleotides are formed de novo by a widespread biochemical route that may be of monophyletic origin, or are synthesized from preformed purine bases and nucleosides through different salvage pathways. Three monophyletic sets of purine salvage enzymes, each of which catalyzes mechanistically similar reactions, can be identified: (a) adenine-, xanthine-, hypoxanthine- and guanine-phosphoribosyltransferases, which are all homologous among themselves, as well as to nucleoside phosphorylases; (b) adenine deaminase, adenosine deaminase, and adenosine monophophate deaminase; and (c) guanine reductase and inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase. These homologies support the idea that substrate specificity is the outcome of gene duplication, and that the purine nucleotide salvage pathways were assembled by a patchwork process that probably took place before the divergence of the three cell domains (Bacteria, Archaea, and Eucarya). Based on the ability of adenine PRTase to catalyze the condensation of PRPP with 4-aminoimidazole-5-carboxamide (AICA), a simpler scheme of purine nucleotide biosynthesis is presented. This hypothetical route requires the prior evolution of PRPP biosynthesis. Since it has been argued that PRPP, nucleosides, and nucleotides are susceptible to hydrolysis, they are very unlikely prebiotic compounds. If this is the case, it implies that many purine salvage pathways appeared only after the evolution of phosphorylated sugar biosynthetic pathways made ribosides available.

Becerra, Arturo; Lazcano, Antonio

1998-10-01

351

Method for inverting reflection trace data from 3-D and 4-D seismic surveys and identifying subsurface fluid and pathways in and among hydrocarbon reservoirs based on impedance models  

DOEpatents

A method is disclosed for inverting 3-D seismic reflection data obtained from seismic surveys to derive impedance models for a subsurface region, and for inversion of multiple 3-D seismic surveys (i.e., 4-D seismic surveys) of the same subsurface volume, separated in time to allow for dynamic fluid migration, such that small scale structure and regions of fluid and dynamic fluid flow within the subsurface volume being studied can be identified. The method allows for the mapping and quantification of available hydrocarbons within a reservoir and is thus useful for hydrocarbon prospecting and reservoir management. An iterative seismic inversion scheme constrained by actual well log data which uses a time/depth dependent seismic source function is employed to derive impedance models from 3-D and 4-D seismic datasets. The impedance values can be region grown to better isolate the low impedance hydrocarbon bearing regions. Impedance data derived from multiple 3-D seismic surveys of the same volume can be compared to identify regions of dynamic evolution and bypassed pay. Effective Oil Saturation or net oil thickness can also be derived from the impedance data and used for quantitative assessment of prospective drilling targets and reservoir management.

He, Wei (New Milford, NJ); Anderson, Roger N. (New York, NY)

1998-01-01

352

Method for inverting reflection trace data from 3-D and 4-D seismic surveys and identifying subsurface fluid and pathways in and among hydrocarbon reservoirs based on impedance models  

DOEpatents

A method is disclosed for inverting 3-D seismic reflection data obtained from seismic surveys to derive impedance models for a subsurface region, and for inversion of multiple 3-D seismic surveys (i.e., 4-D seismic surveys) of the same subsurface volume, separated in time to allow for dynamic fluid migration, such that small scale structure and regions of fluid and dynamic fluid flow within the subsurface volume being studied can be identified. The method allows for the mapping and quantification of available hydrocarbons within a reservoir and is thus useful for hydrocarbon prospecting and reservoir management. An iterative seismic inversion scheme constrained by actual well log data which uses a time/depth dependent seismic source function is employed to derive impedance models from 3-D and 4-D seismic datasets. The impedance values can be region grown to better isolate the low impedance hydrocarbon bearing regions. Impedance data derived from multiple 3-D seismic surveys of the same volume can be compared to identify regions of dynamic evolution and bypassed pay. Effective Oil Saturation or net oil thickness can also be derived from the impedance data and used for quantitative assessment of prospective drilling targets and reservoir management. 20 figs.

He, W.; Anderson, R.N.

1998-08-25

353

Phylogeny and photosynthetic pathway distribution in Anticharis Endl. (Scrophulariaceae).  

PubMed

C(4) photosynthesis independently evolved >62 times, with the majority of origins within 16 dicot families. One origin occurs in the poorly studied genus Anticharis Endl. (Scrophulariaceae), which consists of ~10 species from arid regions of Africa and southwest Asia. Here, the photosynthetic pathway of 10 Anticharis species and one species from each of the sister genera Aptosimum and Peliostomum was identified using carbon isotope ratios (?(13)C). The photosynthetic pathway was then mapped onto an internal transcribed spacer (ITS) phylogeny of Anticharis and its sister genera. Leaf anatomy was examined for nine Anticharis species and plants from Aptosimum and Peliostomum. Leaf ultrastructure, gas exchange, and enzyme distributions were assessed in Anticharis glandulosa collected in SE Iran. The results demonstrate that C(3) photosynthesis is the ancestral condition, with C(4) photosynthesis occurring in one clade containing four species. C(4) Anticharis species exhibit the atriplicoid type of C(4) leaf anatomy and the NAD-malic enzyme biochemical subtype. Six Anticharis species had C(3) or C(3)-C(4) ?(13)C values and branched at phylogenetic nodes that were sister to the C(4) clade. The rest of Anticharis species had enlarged bundle sheath cells, close vein spacing, and clusters of chloroplasts along the centripetal (inner) bundle sheath walls. These traits indicate that basal-branching Anticharis species are evolutionary intermediates between the C(3) and C(4) conditions. Anticharis appears to be an important new group in which to study the dynamics of C(4) evolution. PMID:22945938

Khoshravesh, Roxana; Hossein, Akhani; Sage, Tammy L; Nordenstam, Bertil; Sage, Rowan F

2012-09-01

354

Oscillatory Dynamics of the Extracellular Signal-regulated Kinase Pathway  

SciTech Connect

The extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway is a central signaling pathway in development and disease and is regulated by multiple negative and positive feedback loops. Recent studies have shown negative feedback from ERK to upstream regulators can give rise to biochemical oscillations with a periodicity of between 15-30 minutes. Feedback due to the stimulated transcription of negative regulators of the ERK pathway can also give rise to transcriptional oscillations with a periodicity of 1-2h. The biological significance of these oscillations is not clear, but recent evidence suggests that transcriptional oscillations participate in developmental processes, such as somite formation. Biochemical oscillations are more enigmatic, but could provide a mechanism for encoding different types of inputs into a common signaling pathway.

Shankaran, Harish; Wiley, H. S.

2010-12-01

355

Biochemical and Genetic Insights into Asukamycin Biosynthesis*  

PubMed Central

Asukamycin, a member of the manumycin family metabolites, is an antimicrobial and potential antitumor agent isolated from Streptomyces nodosus subsp. asukaensis. The entire asukamycin biosynthetic gene cluster was cloned, assembled, and expressed heterologously in Streptomyces lividans. Bioinformatic analysis and mutagenesis studies elucidated the biosynthetic pathway at the genetic and biochemical level. Four gene sets, asuA–D, govern the formation and assembly of the asukamycin building blocks: a 3-amino-4-hydroxybenzoic acid core component, a cyclohexane ring, two triene polyketide chains, and a 2-amino-3-hydroxycyclopent-2-enone moiety to form the intermediate protoasukamycin. AsuE1 and AsuE2 catalyze the conversion of protoasukamycin to 4-hydroxyprotoasukamycin, which is epoxidized at C5–C6 by AsuE3 to the final product, asukamycin. Branched acyl CoA starter units, derived from Val, Leu, and Ile, can be incorporated by the actions of the polyketide synthase III (KSIII) AsuC3/C4 as well as the cellular fatty acid synthase FabH to produce the asukamycin congeners A2–A7. In addition, the type II thioesterase AsuC15 limits the cellular level of ?-cyclohexyl fatty acids and likely maintains homeostasis of the cellular membrane. PMID:20522559

Rui, Zhe; Pet?í?ková, Kate?ina; Škanta, František; Pospíšil, Stanislav; Yang, Yanling; Chen, Chung-Yung; Tsai, Shih-Feng; Floss, Heinz G.; Pet?í?ek, Miroslav; Yu, Tin-Wein

2010-01-01

356

Biochemical characteristics of Edwardsiella ictaluri.  

PubMed Central

A total of 119 isolates of Edwardsiella ictaluri collected over the last 7 years from several states were biochemically characterized. Although not very reactive biochemically, this bacterium shows a high degree of homogeneity. Differences were found only in the production of gas from formate or from glucose at 37 degrees C and in the production of hydrogen sulfide as detected by lead acetate paper. Analysis of E. ictaluri by year of geographic area indicated that some differences existed, but no clear-cut biotypic variations were found. All isolates studied were capable of degrading chondroitin sulfate, a major component of cartilage, which may be an important virulence factor in the formation of the hole-in-the-head lesion characteristic of infected fish. PMID:3954336

Waltman, W D; Shotts, E B; Hsu, T C

1986-01-01

357

A novel component of the disulfide-reducing pathway required for cytochrome c assembly in plastids.  

PubMed

In plastids, the conversion of energy in the form of light to ATP requires key electron shuttles, the c-type cytochromes, which are defined by the covalent attachment of heme to a CXXCH motif. Plastid c-type cytochrome biogenesis occurs in the thylakoid lumen and requires a system for transmembrane transfer of reductants. Previously, CCDA and CCS5/HCF164, found in all plastid-containing organisms, have been proposed as two components of the disulfide-reducing pathway. In this work, we identify a small novel protein, CCS4, as a third component in this pathway. CCS4 was genetically identified in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii on the basis of the rescue of the ccs4 mutant, which is blocked in the synthesis of holoforms of plastid c-type cytochromes, namely cytochromes f and c(6). Although CCS4 does not display sequence motifs suggestive of redox or heme-binding function, biochemical and genetic complementation experiments suggest a role in the disulfide-reducing pathway required for heme attachment to apoforms of cytochromes c. Exogenous thiols partially rescue the growth phenotype of the ccs4 mutant concomitant with recovery of holocytochrome f accumulation, as does expression of an ectopic copy of the CCDA gene, encoding a trans-thylakoid transporter of reducing equivalents. We suggest that CCS4 might function to stabilize CCDA or regulate its activity. PMID:21220358

Gabilly, Stéphane T; Kropat, Janette; Karamoko, Mohamed; Page, M Dudley; Nakamoto, Stacie S; Merchant, Sabeeha S; Hamel, Patrice P

2011-03-01

358

Scorpion peptide LqhIT2 activates phenylpropanoid pathways via jasmonate to increase rice resistance to rice leafrollers.  

PubMed

LqhIT2 is an insect-specific toxin peptide identified in Leiurus quinquestriatus hebraeus that can be toxic to lepidoptera pests. However, whether LqhIT2 induces insect resistance in rice, and how the LqhIT2 influences the biochemical metabolism of rice plants remains unknown. Here, purified LqhIT2-GST fusion protein had toxicity to rice leafrollers. Meanwhile, in vitro and field trials showed that LqhIT2 transgenic rice plants were less damaged by rice leafrollers compared to the wild type plants. Introducing LqhIT2 primed the elevated expression of lipoxygenase, a key component of the jasmonic acid biosynthetic pathway, together with enhanced linolenic acid, cis-(+)-12-oxophytodienoic acid, jasmonic acid, and jasmonic acid-isoleucine levels. In addition, phenylalanine ammonia-lyase, a key gene of the phenylpropanoid pathway, was up-regulated. Correspondingly, the contents of downstream products of the phenylpropanoid pathway such as flavonoids and lignins, were also increased in LqhIT2 transgenic plants. These changes were paralleled by decreased starch, glucose, and glucose-6-phosphate accumulation, the key metabolites of glycolysis pathway that supplies the raw material and intermediate carbon products for phenylpropanoids biosyntheses. These findings suggest that, in addition to its own toxicity against pests, LqhIT2 activate the phenylpropanoid pathway via jasmonate-mediated priming, which subsequently increases flavonoid and lignin content and improves insect resistance in rice. PMID:25480003

Tianpei, Xiuzi; Li, Dong; Qiu, Ping; Luo, Jie; Zhu, Yingguo; Li, Shaoqing

2015-01-01

359

Jasmonate Signaling Pathway  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Jasmonates in plants are cyclic fatty acid–derived regulators structurally similar to prostaglandins in metazoans. These chemicals mediate many of plants' transcriptional responses to wounding and pathogenesis by acting as potent regulators for the expression of numerous frontline immune response genes, including those for defensins and antifungal proteins. Additionally, the pathway is critical for fertility. Ongoing genetic screens and protein-protein interaction assays are identifying components of the canonical jasmonate signaling pathway. A massive molecular machine, based on two multiprotein complexes, SCFCOI1 and the COP9 signalosome (CNS), plays a central role in jasmonate signaling. This machine functions in vivo as a ubiquitin ligase complex, probably targeting regulatory proteins, some of which are expected to be transcriptional repressors. Some defense-related mediators, notably salicylic acid, antagonize jasmonates in controlling the expression of many genes. In Arabidopsis, NONEXPRESSOR OF PR GENES (NPR1) mediates part of this interaction, with another layer of control provided further downstream by the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) homolog MPK4. Numerous other interpathway connections influence the jasmonate pathway. Insights from Arabidopsis have shown that an allele of the auxin signaling gene AXR1, for example, reduces the sensitivity of plants to jasmonate. APETALA2 (AP2)-domain transcription factors, such as ETHYLENE RESPONSE FACTOR 1 (ERF1), link the jasmonate pathway to the ethylene signaling pathway. As progress in characterizing several new mutants (some of which are hypersensitive to jasmonic acid) augments our understanding of jasmonate signaling, the Connections Map will be updated to include this new information.

Robin Liechti (University of Lausanne;Gene Expression Laboratory and Faculty of Biology and Medicine REV); Aurelie Gfeller (University of Lausanne;Gene Expression Laboratory and Faculty of Biology and Medicine REV); Edward E. Farmer (University of Lausanne;Gene Expression Laboratory and Faculty of Biology and Medicine REV)

2006-02-14

360

Biochemical Requirements for Two Dicer-Like Activities from Wheat Germ  

PubMed Central

RNA silencing pathways were first discovered in plants. Through genetic analysis, it has been established that the key silencing components called Dicer-like (DCL) genes have been shown to cooperatively process RNA substrates of multiple origin into distinct 21, 22 and 24 nt small RNAs. However, only few detailed biochemical analysis of the corresponding complexes has been carried out in plants, mainly due to the large unstable complexes that are hard to obtain or reconstitute in heterologous systems. Reconstitution of activity needs thorough understanding of all protein partners in the complex, something that is still an ongoing process in plant systems. Here, we use biochemical analysis to uncover properties of two previously identified native dicer-like activities from wheat germ. We find that standard wheat germ extract contains Dicer-like enzymes that convert double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) into two classes of small interfering RNAs of 21 and 24 nt in size. The 21 nt dicing activity, likely an siRNA producing complex known as DCL4, is 950 kDa-1.2 mDa in size and is highly unstable during purification processes but has a rather vast range for activity. On the contrary, the 24 nt dicing complex, likely the DCL3 activity, is relatively stable and comparatively smaller in size, but has stricter conditions for effective processing of dsRNA substrates. While both activities could process completely complementary dsRNA albeit with varying abilities, we show that DCL3-like 24 nt producing activity is equally good in processing incompletely complementary RNAs. PMID:25615604

Shivaprasad, Padubidri V.; Hohn, Thomas; Akbergenov, Rashid

2015-01-01

361

Biochemical requirements for two dicer-like activities from wheat germ.  

PubMed

RNA silencing pathways were first discovered in plants. Through genetic analysis, it has been established that the key silencing components called Dicer-like (DCL) genes have been shown to cooperatively process RNA substrates of multiple origin into distinct 21, 22 and 24 nt small RNAs. However, only few detailed biochemical analysis of the corresponding complexes has been carried out in plants, mainly due to the large unstable complexes that are hard to obtain or reconstitute in heterologous systems. Reconstitution of activity needs thorough understanding of all protein partners in the complex, something that is still an ongoing process in plant systems. Here, we use biochemical analysis to uncover properties of two previously identified native dicer-like activities from wheat germ. We find that standard wheat germ extract contains Dicer-like enzymes that convert double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) into two classes of small interfering RNAs of 21 and 24 nt in size. The 21 nt dicing activity, likely an siRNA producing complex known as DCL4, is 950 kDa-1.2 mDa in size and is highly unstable during purification processes but has a rather vast range for activity. On the contrary, the 24 nt dicing complex, likely the DCL3 activity, is relatively stable and comparatively smaller in size, but has stricter conditions for effective processing of dsRNA substrates. While both activities could process completely complementary dsRNA albeit with varying abilities, we show that DCL3-like 24 nt producing activity is equally good in processing incompletely complementary RNAs. PMID:25615604

Shivaprasad, Padubidri V; Hohn, Thomas; Akbergenov, Rashid

2015-01-01

362

Urinary Metabolomics on the Biochemical Profiles in Diet-Induced Hyperlipidemia Rat Using Ultraperformance Liquid Chromatography Coupled with Quadrupole Time-of-Flight SYNAPT High-Definition Mass Spectrometry  

PubMed Central

Ultraperformance liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole time-of-flight synapt high-definition mass spectrometry metabolomics was used to characterize the urinary metabolic profiling of diet-induced hyperlipidaemia in a rat model. Analysis was done by orthogonal partial least squares discriminant analysis, correlation analysis, heat map analysis, and KEGG pathways analysis. Potential biomarkers were chosen by S-plot and were identified by accurate mass, isotopic pattern, and MS/MS fragments information. Significant differences in fatty acid, amino acid, nucleoside, and bile acid were observed, indicating the perturbations of fatty acid, amino acid, nucleoside, and bile acid metabolisms in diet-induced hyperlipidaemia rats. This study provides further insight into the metabolic profiling across a wide range of biochemical pathways in response to diet-induced hyperlipidaemia. PMID:24757578

Miao, Hua; Chen, Hua; Zhang, Xu; Yin, Lu; Chen, Dan-Qian; Cheng, Xian-Long; Bai, Xu; Wei, Feng

2014-01-01

363

Urinary Metabolomics on the Biochemical Profiles in Diet-Induced Hyperlipidemia Rat Using Ultraperformance Liquid Chromatography Coupled with Quadrupole Time-of-Flight SYNAPT High-Definition Mass Spectrometry.  

PubMed

Ultraperformance liquid chromatography coupled with quadrupole time-of-flight synapt high-definition mass spectrometry metabolomics was used to characterize the urinary metabolic profiling of diet-induced hyperlipidaemia in a rat model. Analysis was done by orthogonal partial least squares discriminant analysis, correlation analysis, heat map analysis, and KEGG pathways analysis. Potential biomarkers were chosen by S-plot and were identified by accurate mass, isotopic pattern, and MS/MS fragments information. Significant differences in fatty acid, amino acid, nucleoside, and bile acid were observed, indicating the perturbations of fatty acid, amino acid, nucleoside, and bile acid metabolisms in diet-induced hyperlipidaemia rats. This study provides further insight into the metabolic profiling across a wide range of biochemical pathways in response to diet-induced hyperlipidaemia. PMID:24757578

Miao, Hua; Chen, Hua; Zhang, Xu; Yin, Lu; Chen, Dan-Qian; Cheng, Xian-Long; Bai, Xu; Wei, Feng

2014-01-01

364

Characterization of the CDP-2-Glycerol Biosynthetic Pathway in Streptococcus pneumoniae? †  

PubMed Central

Capsule polysaccharide (CPS) plays an important role in the virulence of Streptococcus pneumoniae and is usually used as the pneumococcal vaccine target. Glycerol-2-phosphate is found in the CPS of S. pneumoniae types 15A and 23F and is rarely found in the polysaccharides of other bacteria. The biosynthetic pathway of the nucleotide-activated form of glycerol-2-phosphate (NDP-2-glycerol) has never been identified. In this study, three genes (gtp1, gtp2, and gtp3) from S. pneumoniae 23F that have been proposed to be involved in the synthesis of NDP-2-glycerol were cloned and the enzyme products were expressed, purified, and assayed for their respective activities. Capillary electrophoresis was used to detect novel products from the enzyme-substrate reactions, and the structure of the product was elucidated using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Gtp1 was identified as a reductase that catalyzes the conversion of 1,3-dihydroxyacetone to glycerol, Gtp3 was identified as a glycerol-2-phosphotransferase that catalyzes the conversion of glycerol to glycerol-2-phosphate, and Gtp2 was identified as a cytidylyltransferase that transfers CTP to glycerol-2-phosphate to form CDP-2-glycerol as the final product. The kinetic parameters of Gtp1 and Gtp2 were characterized in depth, and the effects of temperature, pH, and cations on these two enzymes were analyzed. This is the first time that the biosynthetic pathway of CDP-2-glycerol has been identified biochemically; this pathway provides a method to enzymatically synthesize this compound. PMID:20729354

Wang, Quan; Xu, Yanli; Perepelov, Andrei V.; Xiong, Wei; Wei, Dongmei; Shashkov, Alexander S.; Knirel, Yuriy A.; Feng, Lu; Wang, Lei

2010-01-01

365

Oncogenic Pathway Combinations Predict Clinical Prognosis in Gastric Cancer  

E-print Network

Many solid cancers are known to exhibit a high degree of heterogeneity in their deregulation of different oncogenic pathways. We sought to identify major oncogenic pathways in gastric cancer (GC) with significant relationships ...

Ooi, Chia Huey

366

The ethylene signaling pathway: new insights Hongwei Guo and Joseph R Ecker1  

E-print Network

, molecular genetic studies on the reference plant Arabidopsis have established a largely linear signalThe ethylene signaling pathway: new insights Hongwei Guo and Joseph R Ecker1 During the past decade transduction pathway for the response to ethylene gas. The biochemical modes of action of many of the signaling

Wurtele, Eve Syrkin

367

Proteomics approach combined with biochemical attributes to elucidate compatible and incompatible plant-virus interactions between Vigna mungo and Mungbean Yellow Mosaic India Virus  

PubMed Central

Background Vigna mungo, a tropical leguminous plant, highly susceptible to yellow mosaic disease caused by Mungbean Yellow Mosaic India Virus (MYMIV) resulting in high yield penalty. The molecular events occurring during compatible and incompatible interactions between V. mungo and MYMIV pathosystem are yet to be explored. In this study biochemical analyses in conjunction with proteomics of MYMIV-susceptible and -resistant V. mungo genotypes were executed to get an insight in the molecular events during compatible and incompatible plant-virus interactions. Results Biochemical analysis revealed an increase in phenolics, hydrogen peroxide and carbohydrate contents in both compatible and incompatible interactions; but the magnitudes were higher during incompatible interaction. In the resistant genotype the activities of superoxide dismutase and ascorbate peroxidase increased significantly, while catalase activity decreased. Comparative proteome analyses using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis coupled with mass spectrometry identified 109 differentially abundant proteins at 3, 7 and 14 days post MYMIV-inoculation. Proteins of several functional categories were differentially changed in abundance during both compatible and incompatible interactions. Among these, photosynthesis related proteins were mostly affected in the susceptible genotype resulting in reduced photosynthesis rate under MYMIV-stress. Differential intensities of chlorophyll fluorescence and chlorophyll contents are in congruence with proteomics data. It was revealed that Photosystem II electron transports are the primary targets of MYMIV during pathogenesis. Quantitative real time PCR analyses of selected genes corroborates with respective protein abundance during incompatible interaction. The network of various cellular pathways that are involved in inducing defense response contains several conglomerated cores of nodal proteins, of which ascorbate peroxidase, rubisco activase and serine/glycine hydroxymethyl transferase are the three major hubs with high connectivity. These nodal proteins play the crucial role of key regulators in bringing about a coordinated defense response in highly orchestrated manner. Conclusions Biochemical and proteomic analyses revealed early accumulation of the defense/stress related proteins involved in ROS metabolism during incompatible interaction. The robustness in induction of defense/stress and signal transduction related proteins is the key factor in inducing resistance. The mechanism of MYMIV-resistance in V. mungo involves redirection of carbohydrate flux towards pentose phosphate pathway. Some of these identified, differentially regulated proteins are also conferring abiotic stress responses illustrating harmony amongst different stress responses. To the best of our knowledge, this is the lone study deciphering differential regulations of V. mungo leaf proteome upon MYMIV infection elucidating the mode of resistance response at the biochemical level. PMID:23587433

2013-01-01

368

A Sox10 Expression Screen Identifies an Amino Acid Essential for Erbb3 Function  

PubMed Central

The neural crest (NC) is a population of embryonic stem cells that gives rise to numerous cell types, including the glia and neurons of the peripheral and enteric nervous systems and the melanocytes of the skin and hair. Mutations in genes and genetic pathways regulating NC development lead to a wide spectrum of human developmental disorders collectively called neurocristopathies. To identify molecular pathways regulating NC development and to understand how alterations in these processes lead to disease, we established an N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) mutagenesis screen utilizing a mouse model sensitized for NC defects, Sox10LacZ/+. Out of 71 pedigrees analyzed, we identified and mapped four heritable loci, called modifier of Sox10 expression pattern 1–4 (msp1–4), which show altered NC patterning. In homozygous msp1 embryos, Sox10LacZ expression is absent in cranial ganglia, cranial nerves, and the sympathetic chain; however, the development of other Sox10-expressing cells appears unaffected by the mutation. Linkage analysis, sequencing, and complementation testing confirmed that msp1 is a new allele of the receptor tyrosine kinase Erbb3, Erbb3msp1, that carries a single amino acid substitution in the extracellular region of the protein. The ENU-induced mutation does not alter protein expression, however, it is sufficient to impair ERBB3 signaling such that the embryonic defects observed in msp1 resemble those of Erbb3 null alleles. Biochemical analysis of the mutant protein showed that ERBB3 is expressed on the cell surface, but its ligand-induced phosphorylation is dramatically reduced by the msp1 mutation. These findings highlight the importance of the mutated residue for ERBB3 receptor function and activation. This study underscores the utility of using an ENU mutagenesis to identify genetic pathways regulating NC development and to dissect the roles of discrete protein domains, both of which contribute to a better understanding of gene function in a cellular and developmental setting. PMID:18773073

Loftus, Stacie K.; Larson, Denise M.; Incao, Arturo; Gibney, Gretchen; Pavan, William J.

2008-01-01

369

Ras pathways in Caenorhabditis elegans.  

PubMed

The let-60 ras gene of Caenorhabditis elegans is required for multiple aspects of development. The vulvar differentiation pathway is the most intensively studied of these, but the ras pathway has now been shown to also be essential for male spicule development. Using vulval differentiation, molecular genetic techniques are now being used to study structure/function relationships of particular signaling components and to identify new positively and negatively acting proteins of Ras-mediated signaling pathways. Mutations affecting LET-23, a receptor tyrosine kinase homolog, which cause tissue-specific defects have been localized to the carboxyl terminus. SH2 domain specificity has been analyzed through Src/SEM-5 chimeric proteins in transgenic nematodes. A mitogen-activated protein kinase that acts downstream of LET-60 Ras in vulval differentiation has been identified. Negative regulatory genes have been cloned and found to encode novel proteins and a clathrin adaptor protein. PMID:7749323

Kayne, P S; Sternberg, P W

1995-02-01

370

Biochemical DSB-repair model for mammalian cells in G1 and early S phases of the cell cycle.  

PubMed

The paper presents a model of double strand breaks (DSB) repair in G1 and early S phases of the cell cycle. The model is based on a plethora of published information on biochemical modification of DSB induced by ionizing radiation. So far, three main DSB repair pathways have been identified, including nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ), homologous recombination (HR), and microhomology-mediated end-joining (MMEJ). During G1 and early S phases of the cell cycle, NHEJ and MMEJ repair pathways are activated dependent on the type of double strand breaks. Simple DSB are a substrate for NHEJ, while complex DSB and DSB in heterochromatin require further end processing. Repair of all DSB start with NHEJ presynaptic processes, and depending on the type of DSB pursue simple ligation, further end processing prior to ligation, or resection. Using law of mass action the model is translated into a mathematical formalism. The solution of the formalism provides the step by step and overall repair kinetics. The overall repair kinetics are compared with the published experimental measurements. Our calculations are in agreement with the experimental results and show that the complex types of DSBs are repaired with slow repair kinetics. The G1 and early S phase model could be employed to predict the kinetics of DSB repair for damage induced by high LET radiation. PMID:23792210