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1

Metabolomic profiling identifies biochemical pathways associated with castrate resistant prostate cancer  

PubMed Central

Despite recent developments in treatment strategies, castrate resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) is still the second leading cause of cancer associated mortality among American men, the biological underpinnings of which are not well understood. To this end, we measured levels of 150 metabolites and examined the rate of utilization of 184 metabolites in metastatic androgen dependent prostate cancer (AD) and CRPC cell lines using a combination of targeted mass spectrometry and metabolic phenotyping. Metabolic data were used to derive biochemical pathways that were enriched in CRPC, using Oncomine Concept Maps (OCM). The enriched pathways were then examined in-silico for their association with treatment failure (i.e., prostate specific antigen (PSA) recurrence or biochemical recurrence) using published clinically annotated gene expression data sets. Our results indicate that a total of 19 metabolites were altered in CRPC compared to AD cell lines. These altered metabolites mapped to a highly interconnected network of biochemical pathways that describe UDP glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) activity. We observed an association with time to treatment failure in an analysis employing genes restricted to this pathway in three independent gene expression data sets. In summary, our studies highlight the value of employing metabolomic strategies in cell lines to derive potentially clinically useful predictive tools. PMID:24359151

Kaushik, Akash K; Vareed, Shaiju K; Basu, Sumanta; Putluri, Vasanta; Putluri, Nagireddy; Panzitt, Katrin; Brennan, Christine A; Chinnaiyan, Arul M; Vergara, Ismael A.; Erho, Nicholas; Weigel, Nancy L; Mitsiades, Nicholas; Shojaie, Ali; Palapattu, Ganesh; Michailidis, George; Sreekumar, Arun

2014-01-01

2

BIOCHEMICAL PATHWAYS OF CASPASE ACTIVATION DURING APOPTOSIS  

Microsoft Academic Search

? Abstract Caspase activation plays a central role in the execution of apoptosis. The key components,of the biochemical,pathways,of caspase activation have been recently elucidated. In this review, we focus on the two most well-studied pathways of caspase activation: the cell surface death receptor pathway,and the mitochondria- initiated pathway. In the cell surface death receptor pathway, activation of caspase-8 following its

Imawati Budihardjo; Holt Oliver; Michael Lutter; Xu Luo; Xiaodong Wang

1999-01-01

3

"Which Pathway Am I?" Using a Game Approach to Teach Students about Biochemical Pathways  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This game was designed to provide students with an alternative way to learn biochemical pathways through an interactive approach. In this game, students worked in pairs to help each other identify pathways taped to each other's backs by asking simple "yes or no" questions related to these pathways. This exercise was conducted after the traditional…

Ooi, Beng Guat; Sanger, Michael J.

2009-01-01

4

Network representations and methods for the analysis of chemical and biochemical pathways  

PubMed Central

Systems biologists increasingly use network representations to investigate biochemical pathways and their dynamic behaviours. In this critical review, we discuss four commonly used network representations of chemical and biochemical pathways. We illustrate how some of these representations reduce network complexity but result in the ambiguous representation of biochemical pathways. We also examine the current theoretical approaches available to investigate the dynamic behaviour of chemical and biochemical networks. Finally, we describe how the critical chemical and biochemical pathways responsible for emergent dynamic behaviour can be identified using network mining and functional mapping approaches. PMID:23857078

Sandefur, Conner I.; Mincheva, Maya; Schnell, Santiago

2013-01-01

5

Stochastic Parameter Estimation in Biochemical Signalling Pathways  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is common when modelling biochemical networks to use qualitative information such as the general ODE model structure so as to proceed in parameter estimation while at the same time retaining the basic model structure the best represents the biochemical process governing the cell. This is not the case however when the population of the available molecules from each of

George Papadopoulos; Martin Brown

6

[Biochemical tests for identifying Pasteurella multocida].  

PubMed

Studied was the biochemical activity of a total of 168 strains of Pasteurella--73 isolated from birds (48 from cases of acute fowl cholera, and 25--of chronic cholera), and 95 isolated from mammals (3 from lambs, 24 from pigs, 36 from cattle, and 32 from rabbits) with regard to the tests determining the hemolytic activity, production of indol, reduction of nitrates, breakdown of urea, beta galactosidase activity, production of hydrogen sulfide, ornitin-, arginine-, lysine-decarboxylase-, and phosphatase activity, and the fermentation of substrates such as manite, glucose, galactose, saccharose, manose, levulose, dulcite, lactose, maltose, rafinose, trechalose, salicin, melobiose, icelobiose, arabinose, xylose, and sorbite. To differentiate Pasteurella multocida strains isolated from mamals from those isolated from birds the phosphatase activity test on solid media with sodium phenolphtalein diphosphate had to be employed Pasteurella organisms isolated from mammals showed positive phosphatase activity, while those isolated from birds exhibited a negative one. Arabinose and xylose fermentation tests could simultaneously be used. Pasteurellae isolated in cases of acute fowl cholera showed positive reaction for arabinose and a negative one for xylose, while the strains isolated from mammals showed the reverse activity. The strains isolated in cases of chronic fowl cholera were shown to belong to this group. PMID:6528479

Karaivanov, L

1984-01-01

7

Pathways to Pathological Gambling: Identifying Typologies  

Microsoft Academic Search

The majority of explanatory models of pathological gambling fail to differentiate specific typologies of gamblers despite recognition of the multi-factorial causal pathways to its development. All models inherently assume that gamblers are a homogenous population; therefore theoretically derived treatments can be effectively applied to all pathological gamblers. This article describes a comprehensive and alternative conceptual-pathway model that identifies three main

Alex Blaszczynski

2000-01-01

8

Using Bioinformatic Approaches to Identify Pathways Targeted by Human Leukemogens  

PubMed Central

We have applied bioinformatic approaches to identify pathways common to chemical leukemogens and to determine whether leukemogens could be distinguished from non-leukemogenic carcinogens. From all known and probable carcinogens classified by IARC and NTP, we identified 35 carcinogens that were associated with leukemia risk in human studies and 16 non-leukemogenic carcinogens. Using data on gene/protein targets available in the Comparative Toxicogenomics Database (CTD) for 29 of the leukemogens and 11 of the non-leukemogenic carcinogens, we analyzed for enrichment of all 250 human biochemical pathways in the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) database. The top pathways targeted by the leukemogens included metabolism of xenobiotics by cytochrome P450, glutathione metabolism, neurotrophin signaling pathway, apoptosis, MAPK signaling, Toll-like receptor signaling and various cancer pathways. The 29 leukemogens formed 18 distinct clusters comprising 1 to 3 chemicals that did not correlate with known mechanism of action or with structural similarity as determined by 2D Tanimoto coefficients in the PubChem database. Unsupervised clustering and one-class support vector machines, based on the pathway data, were unable to distinguish the 29 leukemogens from 11 non-leukemogenic known and probable IARC carcinogens. However, using two-class random forests to estimate leukemogen and non-leukemogen patterns, we estimated a 76% chance of distinguishing a random leukemogen/non-leukemogen pair from each other. PMID:22851955

Thomas, Reuben; Phuong, Jimmy; McHale, Cliona M.; Zhang, Luoping

2012-01-01

9

Inferring biochemical reaction pathways: the case of the gemcitabine pharmacokinetics  

PubMed Central

Background The representation of a biochemical system as a network is the precursor of any mathematical model of the processes driving the dynamics of that system. Pharmacokinetics uses mathematical models to describe the interactions between drug, and drug metabolites and targets and through the simulation of these models predicts drug levels and/or dynamic behaviors of drug entities in the body. Therefore, the development of computational techniques for inferring the interaction network of the drug entities and its kinetic parameters from observational data is raising great interest in the scientific community of pharmacologists. In fact, the network inference is a set of mathematical procedures deducing the structure of a model from the experimental data associated to the nodes of the network of interactions. In this paper, we deal with the inference of a pharmacokinetic network from the concentrations of the drug and its metabolites observed at discrete time points. Results The method of network inference presented in this paper is inspired by the theory of time-lagged correlation inference with regard to the deduction of the interaction network, and on a maximum likelihood approach with regard to the estimation of the kinetic parameters of the network. Both network inference and parameter estimation have been designed specifically to identify systems of biotransformations, at the biochemical level, from noisy time-resolved experimental data. We use our inference method to deduce the metabolic pathway of the gemcitabine. The inputs to our inference algorithm are the experimental time series of the concentration of gemcitabine and its metabolites. The output is the set of reactions of the metabolic network of the gemcitabine. Conclusions Time-lagged correlation based inference pairs up to a probabilistic model of parameter inference from metabolites time series allows the identification of the microscopic pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of a drug with a minimal a priori knowledge. In fact, the inference model presented in this paper is completely unsupervised. It takes as input the time series of the concetrations of the parent drug and its metabolites. The method, applied to the case study of the gemcitabine pharmacokinetics, shows good accuracy and sensitivity. PMID:22640931

2012-01-01

10

Hierarchical modularization of biochemical pathways using fuzzy-c means clustering.  

PubMed

Biological systems that are representative of regulatory, metabolic, or signaling pathways can be highly complex. Mathematical models that describe such systems inherit this complexity. As a result, these models can often fail to provide a path toward the intuitive comprehension of these systems. More coarse information that allows a perceptive insight of the system is sometimes needed in combination with the model to understand control hierarchies or lower level functional relationships. In this paper, we present a method to identify relationships between components of dynamic models of biochemical pathways that reside in different functional groups. We find primary relationships and secondary relationships. The secondary relationships reveal connections that are present in the system, which current techniques that only identify primary relationships are unable to show. We also identify how relationships between components dynamically change over time. This results in a method that provides the hierarchy of the relationships among components, which can help us to understand the low level functional structure of the system and to elucidate potential hierarchical control. As a proof of concept, we apply the algorithm to the epidermal growth factor signal transduction pathway, and to the C3 photosynthesis pathway. We identify primary relationships among components that are in agreement with previous computational decomposition studies, and identify secondary relationships that uncover connections among components that current computational approaches were unable to reveal. PMID:24196983

de Luis Balaguer, Maria A; Williams, Cranos M

2014-08-01

11

Using the Biochemical Pathway Model To Teach the Concepts of Gene Interaction and Epistasis.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the successful use of giving examples of genes affecting various steps in biochemical pathways to teach gene interaction. Finds that once students grasp the notion that genes can interact because they control different steps within biochemical pathways, the reason why phenotypic ratios appear to be non-Mendelian becomes more obvious and…

Chinnici, Joseph P.

1999-01-01

12

Classification and Analysis of Regulatory Pathways Using Graph Property, Biochemical and Physicochemical Property, and Functional Property  

PubMed Central

Given a regulatory pathway system consisting of a set of proteins, can we predict which pathway class it belongs to? Such a problem is closely related to the biological function of the pathway in cells and hence is quite fundamental and essential in systems biology and proteomics. This is also an extremely difficult and challenging problem due to its complexity. To address this problem, a novel approach was developed that can be used to predict query pathways among the following six functional categories: (i) “Metabolism”, (ii) “Genetic Information Processing”, (iii) “Environmental Information Processing”, (iv) “Cellular Processes”, (v) “Organismal Systems”, and (vi) “Human Diseases”. The prediction method was established trough the following procedures: (i) according to the general form of pseudo amino acid composition (PseAAC), each of the pathways concerned is formulated as a 5570-D (dimensional) vector; (ii) each of components in the 5570-D vector was derived by a series of feature extractions from the pathway system according to its graphic property, biochemical and physicochemical property, as well as functional property; (iii) the minimum redundancy maximum relevance (mRMR) method was adopted to operate the prediction. A cross-validation by the jackknife test on a benchmark dataset consisting of 146 regulatory pathways indicated that an overall success rate of 78.8% was achieved by our method in identifying query pathways among the above six classes, indicating the outcome is quite promising and encouraging. To the best of our knowledge, the current study represents the first effort in attempting to identity the type of a pathway system or its biological function. It is anticipated that our report may stimulate a series of follow-up investigations in this new and challenging area. PMID:21980418

Cai, Yu-Dong; Chou, Kuo-Chen

2011-01-01

13

Classification and analysis of regulatory pathways using graph property, biochemical and physicochemical property, and functional property.  

PubMed

Given a regulatory pathway system consisting of a set of proteins, can we predict which pathway class it belongs to? Such a problem is closely related to the biological function of the pathway in cells and hence is quite fundamental and essential in systems biology and proteomics. This is also an extremely difficult and challenging problem due to its complexity. To address this problem, a novel approach was developed that can be used to predict query pathways among the following six functional categories: (i) "Metabolism", (ii) "Genetic Information Processing", (iii) "Environmental Information Processing", (iv) "Cellular Processes", (v) "Organismal Systems", and (vi) "Human Diseases". The prediction method was established trough the following procedures: (i) according to the general form of pseudo amino acid composition (PseAAC), each of the pathways concerned is formulated as a 5570-D (dimensional) vector; (ii) each of components in the 5570-D vector was derived by a series of feature extractions from the pathway system according to its graphic property, biochemical and physicochemical property, as well as functional property; (iii) the minimum redundancy maximum relevance (mRMR) method was adopted to operate the prediction. A cross-validation by the jackknife test on a benchmark dataset consisting of 146 regulatory pathways indicated that an overall success rate of 78.8% was achieved by our method in identifying query pathways among the above six classes, indicating the outcome is quite promising and encouraging. To the best of our knowledge, the current study represents the first effort in attempting to identity the type of a pathway system or its biological function. It is anticipated that our report may stimulate a series of follow-up investigations in this new and challenging area. PMID:21980418

Huang, Tao; Chen, Lei; Cai, Yu-Dong; Chou, Kuo-Chen

2011-01-01

14

Characterization of Changes in Gene Expression and Biochemical Pathways at Low Levels of Benzene Exposure  

PubMed Central

Benzene, a ubiquitous environmental pollutant, causes acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Recently, through transcriptome profiling of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), we reported dose-dependent effects of benzene exposure on gene expression and biochemical pathways in 83 workers exposed across four airborne concentration ranges (from <1 ppm to >10 ppm) compared with 42 subjects with non-workplace ambient exposure levels. Here, we further characterize these dose-dependent effects with continuous benzene exposure in all 125 study subjects. We estimated air benzene exposure levels in the 42 environmentally-exposed subjects from their unmetabolized urinary benzene levels. We used a novel non-parametric, data-adaptive model selection method to estimate the change with dose in the expression of each gene. We describe non-parametric approaches to model pathway responses and used these to estimate the dose responses of the AML pathway and 4 other pathways of interest. The response patterns of majority of genes as captured by mean estimates of the first and second principal components of the dose-response for the five pathways and the profiles of 6 AML pathway response-representative genes (identified by clustering) exhibited similar apparent supra-linear responses. Responses at or below 0.1 ppm benzene were observed for altered expression of AML pathway genes and CYP2E1. Together, these data show that benzene alters disease-relevant pathways and genes in a dose-dependent manner, with effects apparent at doses as low as 100 ppb in air. Studies with extensive exposure assessment of subjects exposed in the low-dose range between 10 ppb and 1 ppm are needed to confirm these findings. PMID:24786086

Thomas, Reuben; Hubbard, Alan E.; McHale, Cliona M.; Zhang, Luoping; Rappaport, Stephen M.; Lan, Qing; Rothman, Nathaniel; Vermeulen, Roel; Guyton, Kathryn Z.; Jinot, Jennifer; Sonawane, Babasaheb R.; Smith, Martyn T.

2014-01-01

15

Identifying differential correlation in gene/pathway combinations  

PubMed Central

Background An important emerging trend in the analysis of microarray data is to incorporate known pathway information a priori. Expression level "summaries" for pathways, obtained from the expression data for the genes constituting the pathway, permit the inclusion of pathway information, reduce the high dimensionality of microarray data, and have the power to elucidate gene-interaction dependencies which are not already accounted for through known pathway identification. Results We present a novel method for the analysis of microarray data that identifies joint differential expression in gene-pathway pairs. This method takes advantage of known gene pathway memberships to compute a summary expression level for each pathway as a whole. Correlations between the pathway expression summary and the expression levels of genes not already known to be associated with the pathway provide clues to gene interaction dependencies that are not already accounted for through known pathway identification, and statistically significant differences between gene-pathway correlations in phenotypically different cells (e.g., where the expression level of a single gene and a given pathway summary correlate strongly in normal cells but weakly in tumor cells) may indicate biologically relevant gene-pathway interactions. Here, we detail the methodology and present the results of this method applied to two gene-expression datasets, identifying gene-pathway pairs which exhibit differential joint expression by phenotype. Conclusion The method described herein provides a means by which interactions between large numbers of genes may be identified by incorporating known pathway information to reduce the dimensionality of gene interactions. The method is efficient and easily applied to data sets of ~102 arrays. Application of this method to two publicly-available cancer data sets yields suggestive and promising results. This method has the potential to complement gene-at-a-time analysis techniques for microarray analysis by indicating relationships between pathways and genes that have not previously been identified and which may play a role in disease. PMID:19017408

Braun, Rosemary; Cope, Leslie; Parmigiani, Giovanni

2008-01-01

16

Identifying mutant pathways in the histiocytoses.  

PubMed

In this issue of Blood, the findings of Chakraborty et al and Emile et al support a model in which the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and PI3K/AKT pathways are critical in the pathogenesis of 2 of the most common histiocytoses—Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) and Erdheim-Chester disease (ECD)—whereas their respective mutational profiles demonstrate important similarities and differences. PMID:25377560

Prince, H Miles

2014-11-01

17

Unraveling biochemical pathways affected by mitochondrial dysfunctions using metabolomic approaches.  

PubMed

Mitochondrial dysfunction(s) (MDs) can be defined as alterations in the mitochondria, including mitochondrial uncoupling, mitochondrial depolarization, inhibition of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, mitochondrial network fragmentation, mitochondrial or nuclear DNA mutations and the mitochondrial accumulation of protein aggregates. All these MDs are known to alter the capacity of ATP production and are observed in several pathological states/diseases, including cancer, obesity, muscle and neurological disorders. The induction of MDs can also alter the secretion of several metabolites, reactive oxygen species production and modify several cell-signalling pathways to resolve the mitochondrial dysfunction or ultimately trigger cell death. Many metabolites, such as fatty acids and derived compounds, could be secreted into the blood stream by cells suffering from mitochondrial alterations. In this review, we summarize how a mitochondrial uncoupling can modify metabolites, the signalling pathways and transcription factors involved in this process. We describe how to identify the causes or consequences of mitochondrial dysfunction using metabolomics (liquid and gas chromatography associated with mass spectrometry analysis, NMR spectroscopy) in the obesity and insulin resistance thematic. PMID:25257998

Demine, Stéphane; Reddy, Nagabushana; Renard, Patricia; Raes, Martine; Arnould, Thierry

2014-01-01

18

Unraveling Biochemical Pathways Affected by Mitochondrial Dysfunctions Using Metabolomic Approaches  

PubMed Central

Mitochondrial dysfunction(s) (MDs) can be defined as alterations in the mitochondria, including mitochondrial uncoupling, mitochondrial depolarization, inhibition of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, mitochondrial network fragmentation, mitochondrial or nuclear DNA mutations and the mitochondrial accumulation of protein aggregates. All these MDs are known to alter the capacity of ATP production and are observed in several pathological states/diseases, including cancer, obesity, muscle and neurological disorders. The induction of MDs can also alter the secretion of several metabolites, reactive oxygen species production and modify several cell-signalling pathways to resolve the mitochondrial dysfunction or ultimately trigger cell death. Many metabolites, such as fatty acids and derived compounds, could be secreted into the blood stream by cells suffering from mitochondrial alterations. In this review, we summarize how a mitochondrial uncoupling can modify metabolites, the signalling pathways and transcription factors involved in this process. We describe how to identify the causes or consequences of mitochondrial dysfunction using metabolomics (liquid and gas chromatography associated with mass spectrometry analysis, NMR spectroscopy) in the obesity and insulin resistance thematic. PMID:25257998

Demine, Stéphane; Reddy, Nagabushana; Renard, Patricia; Raes, Martine; Arnould, Thierry

2014-01-01

19

Genetic variants in the Hippo pathway predict biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy for localized prostate cancer.  

PubMed

While localized prostate cancer is potentially curative, many patients still show biochemical recurrence (BCR) after curative treatments such as radical prostatectomy (RP). The Hippo pathway has recently been shown to be an evolutionarily conserved regulator of tissue growth, and its perturbation can trigger tumorigenesis. We hypothesize that genetic variants of the Hippo pathway may influence clinical outcomes in localized prostate cancer patients. We genotyped 53 tagging single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from seven core Hippo pathway genes in 246 localized prostate cancer patients treated with RP. Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox proportional hazard models were utilized to identify significant SNPs that correlated with BCR. For replication, five associated SNPs were genotyped in an independent cohort of 212 patients. After adjusting for known clinicopathologic factors, the association between STK3 rs7827435 and BCR (P = 0.018) was replicated in the second stage (P = 0.026; Pcombined = 0.001). Additional integrated in silico analysis provided evidence that rs7827435 affects STK3 expression, which in turn is significantly correlated with tumor aggressiveness and patient prognosis. In conclusion, genetic variants of the Hippo pathway contribute to the variable outcomes of prostate cancer, and the discovery of these biomarkers provides a molecular approach for prognostic risk assessment. PMID:25707771

Huang, Chao-Yuan; Huang, Shu-Pin; Lin, Victor C; Yu, Chia-Cheng; Chang, Ta-Yuan; Juang, Shin-Hun; Bao, Bo-Ying

2015-01-01

20

Genetic variants in the Hippo pathway predict biochemical recurrence after radical prostatectomy for localized prostate cancer  

PubMed Central

While localized prostate cancer is potentially curative, many patients still show biochemical recurrence (BCR) after curative treatments such as radical prostatectomy (RP). The Hippo pathway has recently been shown to be an evolutionarily conserved regulator of tissue growth, and its perturbation can trigger tumorigenesis. We hypothesize that genetic variants of the Hippo pathway may influence clinical outcomes in localized prostate cancer patients. We genotyped 53 tagging single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from seven core Hippo pathway genes in 246 localized prostate cancer patients treated with RP. Kaplan-Meier analysis and Cox proportional hazard models were utilized to identify significant SNPs that correlated with BCR. For replication, five associated SNPs were genotyped in an independent cohort of 212 patients. After adjusting for known clinicopathologic factors, the association between STK3 rs7827435 and BCR (P = 0.018) was replicated in the second stage (P = 0.026; Pcombined = 0.001). Additional integrated in silico analysis provided evidence that rs7827435 affects STK3 expression, which in turn is significantly correlated with tumor aggressiveness and patient prognosis. In conclusion, genetic variants of the Hippo pathway contribute to the variable outcomes of prostate cancer, and the discovery of these biomarkers provides a molecular approach for prognostic risk assessment. PMID:25707771

Huang, Chao-Yuan; Huang, Shu-Pin; Lin, Victor C.; Yu, Chia-Cheng; Chang, Ta-Yuan; Juang, Shin-Hun; Bao, Bo-Ying

2015-01-01

21

A Biochemical Screen for Identification of Small-Molecule Regulators of the Wnt Pathway Using Xenopus Egg Extracts  

PubMed Central

Misregulation of the Wnt pathway has been shown to be responsible for a variety of human diseases, most notably cancers. Screens for inhibitors of this pathway have been performed almost exclusively using cultured mammalian cells or with purified proteins. We have previously developed a biochemical assay using Xenopus egg extracts to recapitulate key cytoplasmic events in the Wnt pathway. Using this biochemical system, we show that a recombinant form of the Wnt coreceptor, LRP6, regulates the stability of two key components of the Wnt pathway (?-catenin and Axin) in opposing fashion. We have now fused ?-catenin and Axin to firefly and Renilla luciferase, respectively, and demonstrate that the fusion proteins behave similarly as their wild-type counterparts. Using this dual luciferase readout, we adapted the Xenopus extracts system for high-throughput screening. Results from these screens demonstrate signal distribution curves that reflect the complexity of the library screened. Of several compounds identified as cytoplasmic modulators of the Wnt pathway, one was further validated as a bona fide inhibitor of the Wnt pathway in cultured mammalian cells and Xenopus embryos. We show that other embryonic pathways may be amendable to screening for inhibitors/modulators in Xenopus egg extracts. PMID:21859680

Thorne, Curtis A.; Lafleur, Bonnie; Lewis, Michelle; Hanson, Alison J.; Jernigan, Kristin K.; Weaver, David C.; Huppert, Kari A.; Chen, Tony W.; Wichadiit, Chonlarat; Cselenyi, Christopher S.; Tahinci, Emilios; Meyers, Kelly C.; Waskow, Emily; Orton, Darren; Salic, Adrian; Lee, Laura A.; Robbins, David J.; Huppert, Stacey S.; Lee, Ethan

2013-01-01

22

Integrated Analysis Identifies Interaction Patterns between Small Molecules and Pathways  

PubMed Central

Previous studies have indicated that the downstream proteins in a key pathway can be potential drug targets and that the pathway can play an important role in the action of drugs. So pathways could be considered as targets of small molecules. A link map between small molecules and pathways was constructed using gene expression profile, pathways, and gene expression of cancer cell line intervened by small molecules and then we analysed the topological characteristics of the link map. Three link patterns were identified based on different drug discovery implications for breast, liver, and lung cancer. Furthermore, molecules that significantly targeted the same pathways tended to treat the same diseases. These results can provide a valuable reference for identifying drug candidates and targets in molecularly targeted therapy. PMID:25114931

Li, Yan; Li, Weiguo; Chen, Xin; Sun, Jiatong; Chen, Huan; Lv, Sali

2014-01-01

23

Fungal Indole Alkaloid Biosynthesis: Genetic and Biochemical Investigation of Tryptoquialanine Pathway in Penicillium aethiopicum  

PubMed Central

Tremorgenic mycotoxins are a group of indole alkaloids which include the quinazoline-containing tryptoquivaline 2 that are capable of eliciting intermittent or sustained tremors in vertebrate animals. The biosynthesis of this group of bioactive compounds, which are characterized by an acetylated quinazoline ring connected to a 6-5-5 imidazoindolone ring system via a 5-membered spirolactone, has remained uncharacterized. Here, we report the identification of a gene cluster (tqa) from P. aethiopicum that is involved in the biosynthesis of tryptoquialanine 1, which is structurally similar to 2. The pathway has been confirmed to go through an intermediate common to the fumiquinazoline pathway, fumiquinazoline F, which originates from a fungal trimodular nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS). By systematically inactivating every biosynthetic gene in the cluster, followed by isolation and characterization of the intermediates, we were able to establish the biosynthetic sequence of the pathway. An unusual oxidative opening of the pyrazinone ring by an FAD-dependent berberine bridge enzyme-like oxidoreductase has been proposed based on genetic knockout studies. Notably, a 2-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB)-utilizing NRPS module has been identified and reconstituted in vitro, along with two putative enzymes of unknown functions that are involved in the synthesis of the unnatural amino acid by genetic analysis. This work provides new genetic and biochemical insights into the biosynthesis of this group of fungal alkaloids, including the tremorgens related to 2. PMID:21299212

Gao, Xue; Chooi, Yit-Heng; Ames, Brian D.; Wang, Peng; Walsh, Christopher T.; Tang, Yi

2011-01-01

24

Fungal indole alkaloid biosynthesis: genetic and biochemical investigation of the tryptoquialanine pathway in Penicillium aethiopicum.  

PubMed

Tremorgenic mycotoxins are a group of indole alkaloids which include the quinazoline-containing tryptoquivaline (2) that are capable of eliciting intermittent or sustained tremors in vertebrate animals. The biosynthesis of this group of bioactive compounds, which are characterized by an acetylated quinazoline ring connected to a 6-5-5 imidazoindolone ring system via a 5-membered spirolactone, has remained uncharacterized. Here, we report the identification of a gene cluster (tqa) from P. aethiopicum that is involved in the biosynthesis of tryptoquialanine (1), which is structurally similar to 2. The pathway has been confirmed to go through an intermediate common to the fumiquinazoline pathway, fumiquinazoline F, which originates from a fungal trimodular nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS). By systematically inactivating every biosynthetic gene in the cluster, followed by isolation and characterization of the intermediates, we were able to establish the biosynthetic sequence of the pathway. An unusual oxidative opening of the pyrazinone ring by an FAD-dependent berberine bridge enzyme-like oxidoreductase has been proposed based on genetic knockout studies. Notably, a 2-aminoisobutyric acid (AIB)-utilizing NRPS module has been identified and reconstituted in vitro, along with two putative enzymes of unknown functions that are involved in the synthesis of the unnatural amino acid by genetic analysis. This work provides new genetic and biochemical insights into the biosynthesis of this group of fungal alkaloids, including the tremorgens related to 2. PMID:21299212

Gao, Xue; Chooi, Yit-Heng; Ames, Brian D; Wang, Peng; Walsh, Christopher T; Tang, Yi

2011-03-01

25

BPS University of Glasgow 1 BPS: Biochemical Pathway Simulator  

E-print Network

The Problem · The behaviour of cells is governed and coordinated by biochemical signalling networks such as cell proliferation, specialisation or death, and metabolic control. · Since regulatory malfunction underlies many diseases such as cancer, a deep understanding is crucial for drug development and other

Hillston, Jane

26

UT Southwestern team identifies tumor-specific pathway:  

Cancer.gov

A research team led by UT Southwestern Medical Center scientists has identified an atypical metabolic pathway unique to some tumors, possibly providing a future target for drugs that could reduce or halt the spread of cancer.

27

Genetic and Biochemical Characterization of the Pathway in Pantoea citrea Leading to Pink Disease of Pineapple  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pink disease of pineapple, caused by Pantoea citrea, is characterized by a dark coloration on fruit slices after autoclaving. This coloration is initiated by the oxidation of glucose to gluconate, which is followed by further oxidation of gluconate to as yet unknown chromogenic compounds. To elucidate the biochemical pathway leading to pink disease, we generated six coloration-defective mutants of P.

CATHERINE J. PUJOL; CLARENCE I. KADO

2000-01-01

28

The biochemical pathways of central nervous system neural degeneration in niacin deficiency  

PubMed Central

Neural degeneration is a very complicated process. In spite of all the advancements in the molecular chemistry, there are many unknown aspects of the phenomena of neurodegeneration which need to be put together. It is a common sequela of the conditions of niacin deficiency. Neural degeneration in Pellagra manifests as chromatolysis mainly in pyramidal followed by other neurons and glial cells. However, there is a gross lack of understanding of biochemical mechanisms of neurodegeneration in niacin deficiency states. Because of the necessity of niacin or its amide derivative NAD in a number of biochemical pathways, it is understandable that several of these pathways may be involved in the common outcome of neural degeneration. Here, we highlight five pathways that could be involved in the neuraldegeneration for which evidence has accumulated through several studies. These pathways are: 1) the tryptophan-kyneurenic acid pathway, 2) the mitochondrial ATP generation related pathways, 3) the poly (ADP-ibose) polymerase (PARP) pathway, 4) the BDNF-TRKB Axis abnormalities, 5) the genetic influences of niacin deficiency. PMID:25317166

Fu, Linshan; Doreswamy, Venkatesh; Prakash, Ravi

2014-01-01

29

Identifying Differentially Abundant Metabolic Pathways in Metagenomic Datasets  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Enabled by rapid advances in sequencing technology, metagenomic studies aim to characterize entire communities of microbes bypassing the need for culturing individual bacterial members. One major goal of such studies is to identify specific functional adaptations of microbial communities to their habitats. Here we describe a powerful analytical method (MetaPath) that can identify differentially abundant pathways in metagenomic data-sets, relying on a combination of metagenomic sequence data and prior metabolic pathway knowledge. We show that MetaPath outperforms other common approaches when evaluated on simulated datasets. We also demonstrate the power of our methods in analyzing two, publicly available, metagenomic datasets: a comparison of the gut microbiome of obese and lean twins; and a comparison of the gut microbiome of infant and adult subjects. We demonstrate that the subpathways identified by our method provide valuable insights into the biological activities of the microbiome.

Liu, Bo; Pop, Mihai

30

c-Kit-Mediated Overlapping and Unique Functional and Biochemical Outcomes via Diverse Signaling Pathways  

PubMed Central

A critical issue in understanding receptor tyrosine kinase signaling is the individual contribution of diverse signaling pathways in regulating cellular growth, survival, and migration. We generated a functionally and biochemically inert c-Kit receptor that lacked the binding sites for seven early signaling pathways. Restoring the Src family kinase (SFK) binding sites in the mutated c-Kit receptor restored cellular survival and migration but only partially rescued proliferation and was associated with the rescue of the Ras/mitogen-activated protein kinase, Rac/JNK kinase, and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI-3 kinase)/Akt pathways. In contrast, restoring the PI-3 kinase binding site in the mutated receptor did not affect cellular proliferation but resulted in a modest correction in cell survival and migration, despite a complete rescue in the activation of the PI-3 kinase/Akt pathway. Surprisingly, restoring the binding sites for Grb2, Grb7, or phospholipase C-? had no effect on cellular growth or survival, migration, or activation of any of the downstream signaling pathways. These results argue that SFKs play a unique role in the control of multiple cellular functions and in the activation of distinct biochemical pathways via c-Kit. PMID:14729982

Hong, Li; Munugalavadla, Veerendra; Kapur, Reuben

2004-01-01

31

Invariant features of metabolic networks: a data analysis application on scaling properties of biochemical pathways  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The network metaphor is currently one of the most common general paradigms in biological sciences: this paradigm spans different scales of definition going from gene regulation to protein-protein interaction studies and metabolic regulation networks. Generally, the networks are defined by the nature of the connected elements (nodes) and their relative relations (edges). In this paper we demonstrate how the same biochemical regulation network can assume different shapes in terms of both constituting elements and intervening relations while remaining recognizable as a specific entity. This behaviour can be explained by the general scaling properties of biological networks and points to regulation pathways as emergent features of biochemical systems posited at a different hierarchical level with respect to the intervening metabolites.

Giuliani, Alessandro; Zbilut, Joseph P.; Conti, Filippo; Manetti, Cesare; Miccheli, Alfredo

2004-06-01

32

Method to assemble and integrate biochemical pathways into the chloroplast genome of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.  

PubMed

Recombinant protein expression in the chloroplasts of green algae has recently become more routine; however, the heterologous expression of multiple proteins or complete biosynthetic pathways remains a significant challenge. Here, we show that a modified DNA Assembler approach can be used to rapidly assemble multiple-gene biosynthetic pathways in yeast and then integrate these assembled pathways at a site-specific location in the chloroplast genome of the microalgal species Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. As a proof of concept, this method was used to successfully integrate and functionally express up to three reporter proteins (AphA6, AadA, and GFP) in the chloroplast of C. reinhardtii. An analysis of the relative gene expression of the engineered strains showed significant differences in the mRNA expression levels of the reporter genes and thus highlights the importance of proper promoter/untranslated region selection when constructing a target pathway. This new method represents a useful genetic tool in the construction and integration of complex biochemical pathways into the chloroplast genome of microalgae and should aid current efforts to engineer algae for biofuels production and other desirable natural products. PMID:22674415

Noor-Mohammadi, Samaneh; Pourmir, Azadeh; Johannes, Tyler W

2012-11-01

33

Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic imaging identifies early biochemical markers of tissue damage  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopic imaging can allow for the rapid imaging of tissue biochemistry in a label-free and non-perturbing fashion. With the rapid adoption of new minimally invasive surgery (MIS) technologies over the last 20 years, adequate skill to safely and effectively use these technologies may not be achieved and risk of undue physical pressure being placed on tissues is a concern. Previous work has demonstrated that a number of histological stains can detect tissue damage, however, this process requires the initiation and progression of a signaling cascade that results in the epitope of interest being expressed. We proposed to identify the early biochemical markers associated with physical tissue damage from applied forces, thus not requiring transcriptional and translational protein synthesis as traditional immunohistochemistry does. To demonstrate that FT-IR can measure biochemical changes in tissues that have undergone physical force, we took ex-vivo lamb's liver that had been freshly excised and applied varying levels of physical pressure (0kPa to 30kPa). Tissues were then formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded, and sectioned on to glass for H and E staining to identify damage and on to an IR slide for FT-IR imaging. Regions of interest containing hepatocytes were identified and average FT-IR spectra were extracted from the damaged and undamaged livers. FT-IR spectra showed clear biochemical changes associated with tissue damage. In addition, chemical changes could be observed proceeding histological changes observed when using conventional staining approaches.

Varma, Vishal K.; Ohlander, Samuel; Nguyen, Peter; Vendryes, Christopher; Parthiban, Sujeeth; Hamilton, Blake; Wallis, M. Chad; Kajdacsy-Balla, Andre; Hannaford, Blake; Lendvay, Thomas; Hotaling, James M.; Walsh, Michael J.

2014-03-01

34

De novo assembly of Euphorbia fischeriana root transcriptome identifies prostratin pathway related genes  

PubMed Central

Background Euphorbia fischeriana is an important medicinal plant found in Northeast China. The plant roots contain many medicinal compounds including 12-deoxyphorbol-13-acetate, commonly known as prostratin that is a phorbol ester from the tigliane diterpene series. Prostratin is a protein kinase C activator and is effective in the treatment of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) by acting as a latent HIV activator. Latent HIV is currently the biggest limitation for viral eradication. The aim of this study was to sequence, assemble and annotate the E. fischeriana transcriptome to better understand the potential biochemical pathways leading to the synthesis of prostratin and other related diterpene compounds. Results In this study we conducted a high throughput RNA-seq approach to sequence the root transcriptome of E. fischeriana. We assembled 18,180 transcripts, of these the majority encoded protein-coding genes and only 17 transcripts corresponded to known RNA genes. Interestingly, we identified 5,956 protein-coding transcripts with high similarity (> = 75%) to Ricinus communis, a close relative to E. fischeriana. We also evaluated the conservation of E. fischeriana genes against EST datasets from the Euphorbeacea family, which included R. communis, Hevea brasiliensis and Euphorbia esula. We identified a core set of 1,145 gene clusters conserved in all four species and 1,487 E. fischeriana paralogous genes. Furthermore, we screened E. fischeriana transcripts against an in-house reference database for genes implicated in the biosynthesis of upstream precursors to prostratin. This identified 24 and 9 candidate transcripts involved in the terpenoid and diterpenoid biosyntehsis pathways, respectively. The majority of the candidate genes in these pathways presented relatively low expression levels except for 1-hydroxy-2-methyl-2-(E)-butenyl 4-diphosphate synthase (HDS) and isopentenyl diphosphate/dimethylallyl diphosphate synthase (IDS), which are required for multiple downstream pathways including synthesis of casbene, a proposed precursor to prostratin. Conclusion The resources generated in this study provide new insights into the upstream pathways to the synthesis of prostratin and will likely facilitate functional studies aiming to produce larger quantities of this compound for HIV research and/or treatment of patients. PMID:22151917

2011-01-01

35

Serum Metabolomic Profiling in Acute Alcoholic Hepatitis Identifies Multiple Dysregulated Pathways  

PubMed Central

Background and Objectives While animal studies have implicated derangements of global energy homeostasis in the pathogenesis of acute alcoholic hepatitis (AAH), the relevance of these findings to the development of human AAH remains unclear. Using global, unbiased serum metabolomics analysis, we sought to characterize alterations in metabolic pathways associated with severe AAH and identify potential biomarkers for disease prognosis. Methods This prospective, case-control study design included 25 patients with severe AAH and 25 ambulatory patients with alcoholic cirrhosis. Serum samples were collected within 24 hours of the index clinical encounter. Global, unbiased metabolomics profiling was performed. Patients were followed for 180 days after enrollment to determine survival. Results Levels of 234 biochemicals were altered in subjects with severe AAH. Random-forest analysis, principal component analysis, and integrated hierarchical clustering methods demonstrated that metabolomics profiles separated the two cohorts with 100% accuracy. Severe AAH was associated with enhanced triglyceride lipolysis, impaired mitochondrial fatty acid beta oxidation, and upregulated omega oxidation. Low levels of multiple lysolipids and related metabolites suggested decreased plasma membrane remodeling in severe AAH. While most measured bile acids were increased in severe AAH, low deoxycholate and glycodeoxycholate levels indicated intestinal dysbiosis. Several changes in substrate utilization for energy homeostasis were identified in severe AAH, including increased glucose consumption by the pentose phosphate pathway, altered tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle activity, and enhanced peptide catabolism. Finally, altered levels of small molecules related to glutathione metabolism and antioxidant vitamin depletion were observed in patients with severe AAH. Univariable logistic regression revealed 15 metabolites associated with 180-day survival in severe AAH. Conclusion Severe AAH is characterized by a distinct metabolic phenotype spanning multiple pathways. Metabolomics profiling revealed a panel of biomarkers for disease prognosis, and future studies are planned to validate these findings in larger cohorts of patients with severe AAH. PMID:25461442

Rachakonda, Vikrant; Gabbert, Charles; Raina, Amit; Bell, Lauren N.; Cooper, Sara; Malik, Shahid; Behari, Jaideep

2014-01-01

36

Path2Models: large-scale generation of computational models from biochemical pathway maps  

PubMed Central

Background Systems biology projects and omics technologies have led to a growing number of biochemical pathway models and reconstructions. However, the majority of these models are still created de novo, based on literature mining and the manual processing of pathway data. Results To increase the efficiency of model creation, the Path2Models project has automatically generated mathematical models from pathway representations using a suite of freely available software. Data sources include KEGG, BioCarta, MetaCyc and SABIO-RK. Depending on the source data, three types of models are provided: kinetic, logical and constraint-based. Models from over 2 600 organisms are encoded consistently in SBML, and are made freely available through BioModels Database at http://www.ebi.ac.uk/biomodels-main/path2models. Each model contains the list of participants, their interactions, the relevant mathematical constructs, and initial parameter values. Most models are also available as easy-to-understand graphical SBGN maps. Conclusions To date, the project has resulted in more than 140 000 freely available models. Such a resource can tremendously accelerate the development of mathematical models by providing initial starting models for simulation and analysis, which can be subsequently curated and further parameterized. PMID:24180668

2013-01-01

37

Prediction and Biochemical Demonstration of a Catabolic Pathway for the Osmoprotectant Proline Betaine  

PubMed Central

ABSTRACT Through the use of genetic, enzymatic, metabolomic, and structural analyses, we have discovered the catabolic pathway for proline betaine, an osmoprotectant, in Paracoccus denitrificans and Rhodobacter sphaeroides. Genetic and enzymatic analyses showed that several of the key enzymes of the hydroxyproline betaine degradation pathway also function in proline betaine degradation. Metabolomic analyses detected each of the metabolic intermediates of the pathway. The proline betaine catabolic pathway was repressed by osmotic stress and cold stress, and a regulatory transcription factor was identified. We also report crystal structure complexes of the P. denitrificans HpbD hydroxyproline betaine epimerase/proline betaine racemase with l-proline betaine and cis-hydroxyproline betaine. PMID:24520058

Kumar, Ritesh; Zhao, Suwen; Vetting, Matthew W.; Wood, B. McKay; Sakai, Ayano; Cho, Kyuil; Solbiati, José; Almo, Steven C.; Sweedler, Jonathan V.; Jacobson, Matthew P.; Gerlt, John A.; Cronan, John E.

2014-01-01

38

Combinatorial assembly of large biochemical pathways into yeast chromosomes for improved production of value-added compounds.  

PubMed

Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a eukaryotic organism is particularly suitable as microbial cell factory because it has interesting features such as membrane environments for supporting membrane-associated enzymes and its capability for post-translational modifications of enzymes from plants. However, S. cerevisiae does not readily express polycistronic transcriptional units, which represents a significant challenge for constructing large biochemical pathways in budding yeast. In the present study, we developed a novel approach for rapid construction of large biochemical pathways into yeast chromosomes. Our approach takes advantage of antibiotic selection for combinatorial assembly of large pathways into the ?-sites of retrotransposon elements of yeast chromosomes. As proof-of-principle, a five-gene isobutanol pathway and an eight-gene mevalonate pathway were successfully assembled into yeast chromosomes in one-step fashion. To our knowledge, this is the first report to exploit ?-integration coupled with antibiotic selection for rapid assembly of large biochemical pathways in budding yeast. We envision our new approach could serve as a generalized technique for large pathway construction in yeast-a method that would be of significant interest to the synthetic biology community. PMID:24847678

Yuan, Jifeng; Ching, Chi Bun

2015-01-16

39

Coordinate expression and functional profiling identify an extracellular proteolytic signaling pathway  

PubMed Central

A multidisciplinary method combining transcriptional data, specificity profiling, and biological characterization of an enzyme may be used to predict novel substrates. By integrating protease substrate profiling with microarray gene coexpression data from nearly 2,000 human normal and cancerous tissue samples, three fundamental components of a protease-activated signaling pathway were identified. We find that MT-SP1 mediates extracellular signaling by regulating the local activation of the prometastatic growth factor MSP-1. We demonstrate MT-SP1 expression in peritoneal macrophages, and biochemical methods confirm the ability of MT-SP1 to cleave and activate pro-MSP-1 in vitro and in a cellular context. MT-SP1 induced the ability of MSP-1 to inhibit nitric oxide production in bone marrow macrophages. Addition of HAI-1 or an MT-SP1-specific antibody inhibitor blocked the proteolytic activation of MSP-1 at the cell surface of peritoneal macrophages. Taken together, our work indicates that MT-SP1 is sufficient for MSP-1 activation and that MT-SP1, MSP-1, and the previously shown MSP-1 tyrosine kinase receptor RON are required for peritoneal macrophage activation. This work shows that this triad of growth factor, growth factor activator protease, and growth factor receptor is a protease-activated signaling pathway. Individually, MT-SP1 and RON overexpression have been implicated in cancer progression and metastasis. Transcriptional coexpression of these genes suggests that this signaling pathway may be involved in several human cancers. PMID:17389401

Bhatt, Ami S.; Welm, Alana; Farady, Christopher J.; Vásquez, Maximiliano; Wilson, Keith; Craik, Charles S.

2007-01-01

40

Pathways-Driven Sparse Regression Identifies Pathways and Genes Associated with High-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol in Two Asian Cohorts  

PubMed Central

Standard approaches to data analysis in genome-wide association studies (GWAS) ignore any potential functional relationships between gene variants. In contrast gene pathways analysis uses prior information on functional structure within the genome to identify pathways associated with a trait of interest. In a second step, important single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) or genes may be identified within associated pathways. The pathways approach is motivated by the fact that genes do not act alone, but instead have effects that are likely to be mediated through their interaction in gene pathways. Where this is the case, pathways approaches may reveal aspects of a trait's genetic architecture that would otherwise be missed when considering SNPs in isolation. Most pathways methods begin by testing SNPs one at a time, and so fail to capitalise on the potential advantages inherent in a multi-SNP, joint modelling approach. Here, we describe a dual-level, sparse regression model for the simultaneous identification of pathways and genes associated with a quantitative trait. Our method takes account of various factors specific to the joint modelling of pathways with genome-wide data, including widespread correlation between genetic predictors, and the fact that variants may overlap multiple pathways. We use a resampling strategy that exploits finite sample variability to provide robust rankings for pathways and genes. We test our method through simulation, and use it to perform pathways-driven gene selection in a search for pathways and genes associated with variation in serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in two separate GWAS cohorts of Asian adults. By comparing results from both cohorts we identify a number of candidate pathways including those associated with cardiomyopathy, and T cell receptor and PPAR signalling. Highlighted genes include those associated with the L-type calcium channel, adenylate cyclase, integrin, laminin, MAPK signalling and immune function. PMID:24278029

Silver, Matt; Chen, Peng; Li, Ruoying; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Wong, Tien-Yin; Tai, E-Shyong; Teo, Yik-Ying; Montana, Giovanni

2013-01-01

41

Biochemical Pathways: An Atlas of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (edited by Gerhard Michal)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

For decades, a wall chart detailing living organisms' metabolic pathways has been a fixture in many classrooms and laboratories where biochemistry is taught. One of the most popular of those charts first appeared 30 years ago. Now its editor, Gerhard Michal, has produced a book that summarizes metabolism (broadly defined) in graphical and textual formats. The book retains the elegance of the chart. Names of molecules are printed in a crisp, easy-to-read font, and structural formulas are shown with exemplary clarity. Color coding serves multiple purposes: to differentiate enzymes, substrates, cofactors, and effector molecules; to indicate in which group or groups of organisms a reaction has been observed; and to distinguish enzymatic reactions from regulatory effects. The primary advantage of presenting this information in book format is immediately apparent. A typical metabolic chart covers about 2 m2; the book has a total surface area nearly 10 times greater. The extra space is used to add explanatory text to the figures and to include many topics not covered by the traditional definition of metabolism. Examples include replication, transcription, translation, reaction mechanisms for proteolytic enzymes, and the role of chaperones in protein folding. Illustrating these topics is not as straightforward as delineating a metabolic pathway, but the author has done an admirable job of designing figures that clarify these and other aspects of biochemistry and complement the accompanying text. A potential deficiency of book format is the inability to clearly show links between different realms of metabolism: carbohydrate and amino acid pathways, for example. The book overcomes this problem in two ways. A diagrammatic overview of metabolism (with references to applicable sections of the book) is printed inside its front cover, and key compounds (pyruvate, for example) have a distinctive green background to provide a visual link between pathways. (The author compares this feature to the hyperlinks in an electronic document.) The book's index is comprehensive and useful. Entries for "phenylketonuria" and "sickle cell anemia", for example, lead to commendably concise summaries of these hereditary diseases (and the relevant metabolic pathway, in the former case). Looking up a specific molecule, however, is less helpful. The listing for fumarate hydratase, a citric acid cycle enzyme, directs the reader to the chapter on special bacterial metabolism but not to the section on the citric acid cycle itself. Literature references are included at the end of each section and are mainly from the 1990s, but they could be more useful. A long section on heme proteins, for example, concludes with eight citations, but their titles are not included, so it is impossible to determine what topic each one addresses. This book will be most useful to those with a good understanding of the fundamentals of biochemistry. Some of the information it presents could easily confuse less experienced readers. For example, it classifies selenocysteine as a standard amino acid in a figure but not in the accompanying text. In the diagram of anaerobic glycolysis, a double-headed arrow for the hexokinase reaction reinforces the frustratingly common student misperception that the phosphoryl group of glucose-6-phosphate can be used to phosphorylate ADP. Biochemical Pathways compiles a large amount of information in a single source. Its good index and clear, concise text and diagrams should make it a reliable way of gaining insight into many biochemical topics. With a price similar to that of most textbooks, it merits a place in the libraries of individuals and academic departments that teach biochemistry.

Voige, Reviewed By William H.

2000-02-01

42

A probabilistic approach to identify putative drug targets in biochemical networks  

PubMed Central

Network-based drug design holds great promise in clinical research as a way to overcome the limitations of traditional approaches in the development of drugs with high efficacy and low toxicity. This novel strategy aims to study how a biochemical network as a whole, rather than its individual components, responds to specific perturbations in different physiological conditions. Proteins exerting little control over normal cells and larger control over altered cells may be considered as good candidates for drug targets. The application of network-based drug design would greatly benefit from using an explicit computational model describing the dynamics of the system under investigation. However, creating a fully characterized kinetic model is not an easy task, even for relatively small networks, as it is still significantly hampered by the lack of data about kinetic mechanisms and parameters values. Here, we propose a Monte Carlo approach to identify the differences between flux control profiles of a metabolic network in different physiological states, when information about the kinetics of the system is partially or totally missing. Based on experimentally accessible information on metabolic phenotypes, we develop a novel method to determine probabilistic differences in the flux control coefficients between the two observable phenotypes. Knowledge of how differences in flux control are distributed among the different enzymatic steps is exploited to identify points of fragility in one of the phenotypes. Using a prototypical cancerous phenotype as an example, we demonstrate how our approach can assist researchers in developing compounds with high efficacy and low toxicity. PMID:21123256

Murabito, Ettore; Smallbone, Kieran; Swinton, Jonathan; Westerhoff, Hans V.; Steuer, Ralf

2011-01-01

43

Concordant Signaling Pathways Produced by Pesticide Exposure in Mice Correspond to Pathways Identified in Human Parkinson's Disease  

PubMed Central

Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disease in which the etiology of 90 percent of the patients is unknown. Pesticide exposure is a major risk factor for PD, and paraquat (PQ), pyridaben (PY) and maneb (MN) are amongst the most widely used pesticides. We studied mRNA expression using transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq) in the ventral midbrain (VMB) and striatum (STR) of PQ, PY and paraquat+maneb (MNPQ) treated mice, followed by pathway analysis. We found concordance of signaling pathways between the three pesticide models in both the VMB and STR as well as concordance in these two brain areas. The concordant signaling pathways with relevance to PD pathogenesis were e.g. axonal guidance signaling, Wnt/?-catenin signaling, as well as pathways not previously linked to PD, e.g. basal cell carcinoma, human embryonic stem cell pluripotency and role of macrophages, fibroblasts and endothelial cells in rheumatoid arthritis. Human PD pathways previously identified by expression analysis, concordant with VMB pathways identified in our study were axonal guidance signaling, Wnt/?-catenin signaling, IL-6 signaling, ephrin receptor signaling, TGF-? signaling, PPAR signaling and G-protein coupled receptor signaling. Human PD pathways concordant with the STR pathways in our study were Wnt/?-catenin signaling, axonal guidance signaling and G-protein coupled receptor signaling. Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor delta (Ppard) and G-Protein Coupled Receptors (GPCRs) were common genes in VMB and STR identified by network analysis. In conclusion, the pesticides PQ, PY and MNPQ elicit common signaling pathways in the VMB and STR in mice, which are concordant with known signaling pathways identified in human PD, suggesting that these pathways contribute to the pathogenesis of idiopathic PD. The analysis of these networks and pathways may therefore lead to improved understanding of disease pathogenesis, and potential novel therapeutic targets. PMID:22563483

Gollamudi, Seema; Johri, Ashu; Calingasan, Noel Y.; Yang, Lichuan; Elemento, Olivier; Beal, M. Flint

2012-01-01

44

Pathway-GPS and SIGORA: identifying relevant pathways based on the over-representation of their gene-pair signatures  

PubMed Central

Motivation. Predominant pathway analysis approaches treat pathways as collections of individual genes and consider all pathway members as equally informative. As a result, at times spurious and misleading pathways are inappropriately identified as statistically significant, solely due to components that they share with the more relevant pathways. Results. We introduce the concept of Pathway Gene-Pair Signatures (Pathway-GPS) as pairs of genes that, as a combination, are specific to a single pathway. We devised and implemented a novel approach to pathway analysis, Signature Over-representation Analysis (SIGORA), which focuses on the statistically significant enrichment of Pathway-GPS in a user-specified gene list of interest. In a comparative evaluation of several published datasets, SIGORA outperformed traditional methods by delivering biologically more plausible and relevant results. Availability. An efficient implementation of SIGORA, as an R package with precompiled GPS data for several human and mouse pathway repositories is available for download from http://sigora.googlecode.com/svn/. PMID:24432194

Foroushani, Amir B.K.; Brinkman, Fiona S.L.

2013-01-01

45

Viral tracing identifies parallel disynaptic pathways to the hippocampus.  

PubMed

Electrophysiological and lesion studies in rodents have shown that the dorsal (septal) and ventral (temporal) segments of the hippocampus have functional specializations that can be understood in terms of their anatomical connections with distinct brain areas. Here we explore the circuitry associated with the hippocampus using the pseudorabies virus-Bartha strain (PRV-Bartha) tracer in the rat to examine both direct (first-order) and indirect (second-order) projections to the hippocampus. Based on analysis of PRV-Bartha infection density, we demonstrate two parallel pathways from the limbic cortex to the hippocampus. A dorsal "spatial cognition" pathway provides disynaptic input from the retrosplenial, anterior cingulate, and orbital cortex to the dorsal hippocampus, with potential synaptic relays in the anterior thalamic nuclei and dorsolateral entorhinal cortex. A ventral "executive control" pathway provides disynaptic input from the prelimbic, infralimbic, and orbital cortex to the ventral hippocampus, with potential synaptic relays in the midline thalamic nuclei and the rostral caudomedial entorhinal cortex. These data suggest a new anatomical framework for understanding the functional interactions between the cortex and hippocampus, especially in cognitive disorders that involve both structures, such as frontotemporal dementia. PMID:23658186

Prasad, Judy A; Chudasama, Yogita

2013-05-01

46

Molecular and Biochemical Analysis of Chalcone Synthase from Freesia hybrid in Flavonoid Biosynthetic Pathway.  

PubMed

Chalcone synthase (CHS) catalyzes the first committed step in the flavonoid biosynthetic pathway. In this study, the cDNA (FhCHS1) encoding CHS from Freesia hybrida was successfully isolated and analyzed. Multiple sequence alignments showed that both the conserved CHS active site residues and CHS signature sequence were found in the deduced amino acid sequence of FhCHS1. Meanwhile, crystallographic analysis revealed that protein structure of FhCHS1 is highly similar to that of alfalfa CHS2, and the biochemical analysis results indicated that it has an enzymatic role in naringenin biosynthesis. Moreover, quantitative real-time PCR was performed to detect the transcript levels of FhCHS1 in flowers and different tissues, and patterns of FhCHS1 expression in flowers showed significant correlation to the accumulation patterns of anthocyanin during flower development. To further characterize the functionality of FhCHS1, its ectopic expression in Arabidopsis thaliana tt4 mutants and Petunia hybrida was performed. The results showed that overexpression of FhCHS1 in tt4 mutants fully restored the pigmentation phenotype of the seed coats, cotyledons and hypocotyls, while transgenic petunia expressing FhCHS1 showed flower color alteration from white to pink. In summary, these results suggest that FhCHS1 plays an essential role in the biosynthesis of flavonoid in Freesia hybrida and may be used to modify the components of flavonoids in other plants. PMID:25742495

Sun, Wei; Meng, Xiangyu; Liang, Lingjie; Jiang, Wangshu; Huang, Yafei; He, Jing; Hu, Haiyan; Almqvist, Jonas; Gao, Xiang; Wang, Li

2015-01-01

47

Characterization of the biochemical-pathway of uranium (VI) reduction in facultative anaerobic bacteria.  

PubMed

Cultures of U(VI) reducing bacteria sourced from abandoned uranium mine tailing dam were evaluated for their ability to reduce U(VI) to U(IV). The species in the cultures reduced U(VI) in solutions with initial U(VI) concentration up to 400mgL(-)(1) under a near neutral pH of 6.5. The electron flow pathway and fate of reduced species was also analysed in the individual species in order to evaluate the potential for control and optimisation of the reduction potential at the biochemical level. The results showed that U(VI) reduction in live cells was completely blocked by the NADH-dehydrogenase inhibitor, rotenone (C23H22O6), and thioredoxin inhibitor, cadmium chloride (CdCl2), showing that U(VI) reduction involves the electron flow through NADH-dehydrogenase, a primary electron donor to the electron transport respiratory (ETR) system. Mass balance analysis of uranium species aided by visual and electron microscopy suggest that most U(VI) reduction occurred on the cell surface of the isolated species. This finding indicates the possibility of easy uranium recovery for beneficial use through biological remediation. Should the U(VI) be reduced inside the cell, recovery would require complete disruption of the cells and therefore would be difficult. The study contributes new knowledge on the underlying mechanisms in the U(VI) reduction in facultative anaerobes. PMID:25065785

Mtimunye, Phalazane J; Chirwa, Evans M N

2014-10-01

48

Molecular and Biochemical Analysis of Chalcone Synthase from Freesia hybrid in Flavonoid Biosynthetic Pathway  

PubMed Central

Chalcone synthase (CHS) catalyzes the first committed step in the flavonoid biosynthetic pathway. In this study, the cDNA (FhCHS1) encoding CHS from Freesia hybrida was successfully isolated and analyzed. Multiple sequence alignments showed that both the conserved CHS active site residues and CHS signature sequence were found in the deduced amino acid sequence of FhCHS1. Meanwhile, crystallographic analysis revealed that protein structure of FhCHS1 is highly similar to that of alfalfa CHS2, and the biochemical analysis results indicated that it has an enzymatic role in naringenin biosynthesis. Moreover, quantitative real-time PCR was performed to detect the transcript levels of FhCHS1 in flowers and different tissues, and patterns of FhCHS1 expression in flowers showed significant correlation to the accumulation patterns of anthocyanin during flower development. To further characterize the functionality of FhCHS1, its ectopic expression in Arabidopsis thaliana tt4 mutants and Petunia hybrida was performed. The results showed that overexpression of FhCHS1 in tt4 mutants fully restored the pigmentation phenotype of the seed coats, cotyledons and hypocotyls, while transgenic petunia expressing FhCHS1 showed flower color alteration from white to pink. In summary, these results suggest that FhCHS1 plays an essential role in the biosynthesis of flavonoid in Freesia hybrida and may be used to modify the components of flavonoids in other plants. PMID:25742495

Sun, Wei; Meng, Xiangyu; Liang, Lingjie; Jiang, Wangshu; Huang, Yafei; He, Jing; Hu, Haiyan; Almqvist, Jonas; Gao, Xiang; Wang, Li

2015-01-01

49

Receptor-Drug Interaction: Europium Employment for Studying the Biochemical Pathway of G-Protein-Coupled Receptor Activation  

PubMed Central

In medicinal chemistry field, the biochemical pathways, involved in 7-transmembrane domains G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) activation, are commonly studied to establish the activity of ligands towards GPCRs. The most studied steps are the measurement of activated GTP-? subunit and stimulated intracellular cAMP. At the present, many researchers defined agonist or antagonist activity of potential GPCRs drugs employing [35S]GTP?S or [3H]cAMP as probes. Recently, the corresponding lanthanide labels Eu-GTP and Eu-cAMP as alternative to radiochemicals have been developed because they are highly sensitive, easy to automate, easily synthesized, they display a much longer shelf-life and they can be used in multilabel experiments. In the present review, the receptor-drug interaction by europium employment for studying the biochemical pathway of GPCR activation has been focused. Moreover, comparative studies between lanthanide label probes and the corresponding radiolabeled compounds have been carried out. PMID:18350113

Antonio, Colabufo Nicola; Grazia, Perrone Maria; Marialessandra, Contino; Francesco, Berardi; Roberto, Perrone

2007-01-01

50

Bioinformatic and biochemical characterizations of C-S bond formation and cleavage enzymes in the fungus Neurospora crassa ergothioneine biosynthetic pathway.  

PubMed

Ergothioneine is a histidine thiol derivative. Its mycobacterial biosynthetic pathway has five steps (EgtA-E catalysis) with two novel reactions: a mononuclear nonheme iron enzyme (EgtB) catalyzed oxidative C-S bond formation and a PLP-mediated C-S lyase (EgtE) reaction. Our bioinformatic and biochemical analyses indicate that the fungus Neurospora crassa has a more concise ergothioneine biosynthetic pathway because its nonheme iron enzyme, Egt1, makes use of cysteine instead of ?-Glu-Cys as the substrate. Such a change of substrate preference eliminates the competition between ergothioneine and glutathione biosyntheses. In addition, we have identified the N. crassa C-S lyase (NCU11365) and reconstituted its activity in vitro, which makes the future ergothioneine production through metabolic engineering feasible. PMID:25275953

Hu, Wen; Song, Heng; Sae Her, Ampon; Bak, Daniel W; Naowarojna, Nathchar; Elliott, Sean J; Qin, Li; Chen, Xiaoping; Liu, Pinghua

2014-10-17

51

Identifiability and inference of pathway motifs by epistasis analysis  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The accuracy of genetic network inference is limited by the assumptions used to determine if one hypothetical model is better than another in explaining experimental observations. Most previous work on epistasis analysis—in which one attempts to infer pathway relationships by determining equivalences among traits following mutations—has been based on Boolean or linear models. Here, we delineate the ultimate limits of epistasis-based inference by systematically surveying all two-gene network motifs and use symbolic algebra with arbitrary regulation functions to examine trait equivalences. Our analysis divides the motifs into equivalence classes, where different genetic perturbations result in indistinguishable experimental outcomes. We demonstrate that this partitioning can reveal important information about network architecture, and show, using simulated data, that it greatly improves the accuracy of genetic network inference methods. Because of the minimal assumptions involved, equivalence partitioning has broad applicability for gene network inference.

Phenix, Hilary; Perkins, Theodore; Kærn, Mads

2013-06-01

52

Identifiability and inference of pathway motifs by epistasis analysis.  

PubMed

The accuracy of genetic network inference is limited by the assumptions used to determine if one hypothetical model is better than another in explaining experimental observations. Most previous work on epistasis analysis-in which one attempts to infer pathway relationships by determining equivalences among traits following mutations-has been based on Boolean or linear models. Here, we delineate the ultimate limits of epistasis-based inference by systematically surveying all two-gene network motifs and use symbolic algebra with arbitrary regulation functions to examine trait equivalences. Our analysis divides the motifs into equivalence classes, where different genetic perturbations result in indistinguishable experimental outcomes. We demonstrate that this partitioning can reveal important information about network architecture, and show, using simulated data, that it greatly improves the accuracy of genetic network inference methods. Because of the minimal assumptions involved, equivalence partitioning has broad applicability for gene network inference. PMID:23822501

Phenix, Hilary; Perkins, Theodore; Kærn, Mads

2013-06-01

53

Biochemical and genomic analysis of the denitrification pathway within the genus Neisseria  

PubMed Central

Since Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Neisseria meningitidis are obligate human pathogens, a comparison with commensal species of the same genus could reveal differences important in pathogenesis. The recent completion of commensal Neisseria genome draft assemblies allowed us to perform a comparison of the genes involved in the catalysis, assembly and regulation of the denitrification pathway, which has been implicated in the virulence of several bacteria. All species contained a highly conserved nitric oxide reductase (NorB) and a nitrite reductase (AniA or NirK) that was highly conserved in the catalytic but divergent in the N-terminal lipid modification and C-terminal glycosylation domains. Only Neisseria mucosa contained a nitrate reductase (Nar), and only Neisseria lactamica, Neisseria cinerea, Neisseria subflava, Neisseria flavescens and Neisseria sicca contained a nitrous oxide reductase (Nos) complex. The regulators of the denitrification genes, FNR, NarQP and NsrR, were highly conserved, except for the GAF domain of NarQ. Biochemical examination of laboratory strains revealed that all of the neisserial species tested except N. mucosa had a two- to fourfold lower nitrite reductase activity than N. gonorrhoeae, while N. meningitidis and most of the commensal Neisseria species had a two- to fourfold higher nitric oxide (NO) reductase activity. For N. meningitidis and most of the commensal Neisseria, there was a greater than fourfold reduction in the NO steady-state level in the presence of nitrite as compared with N. gonorrhoeae. All of the species tested generated an NO steady-state level in the presence of an NO donor that was similar to that of N. gonorrhoeae. The greatest difference between the Neisseria species was the lack of a functional Nos system in the pathogenic species N. gonorrhoeae and N. meningitidis. PMID:19762442

Barth, Kenneth R.; Isabella, Vincent M.; Clark, Virginia L.

2009-01-01

54

Biochemical and genomic analysis of the denitrification pathway within the genus Neisseria.  

PubMed

Since Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Neisseria meningitidis are obligate human pathogens, a comparison with commensal species of the same genus could reveal differences important in pathogenesis. The recent completion of commensal Neisseria genome draft assemblies allowed us to perform a comparison of the genes involved in the catalysis, assembly and regulation of the denitrification pathway, which has been implicated in the virulence of several bacteria. All species contained a highly conserved nitric oxide reductase (NorB) and a nitrite reductase (AniA or NirK) that was highly conserved in the catalytic but divergent in the N-terminal lipid modification and C-terminal glycosylation domains. Only Neisseria mucosa contained a nitrate reductase (Nar), and only Neisseria lactamica, Neisseria cinerea, Neisseria subflava, Neisseria flavescens and Neisseria sicca contained a nitrous oxide reductase (Nos) complex. The regulators of the denitrification genes, FNR, NarQP and NsrR, were highly conserved, except for the GAF domain of NarQ. Biochemical examination of laboratory strains revealed that all of the neisserial species tested except N. mucosa had a two- to fourfold lower nitrite reductase activity than N. gonorrhoeae, while N. meningitidis and most of the commensal Neisseria species had a two- to fourfold higher nitric oxide (NO) reductase activity. For N. meningitidis and most of the commensal Neisseria, there was a greater than fourfold reduction in the NO steady-state level in the presence of nitrite as compared with N. gonorrhoeae. All of the species tested generated an NO steady-state level in the presence of an NO donor that was similar to that of N. gonorrhoeae. The greatest difference between the Neisseria species was the lack of a functional Nos system in the pathogenic species N. gonorrhoeae and N. meningitidis. PMID:19762442

Barth, Kenneth R; Isabella, Vincent M; Clark, Virginia L

2009-12-01

55

A Three Stage Integrative Pathway Search ( TIPS © ) framework to identify toxicity relevant genes and pathways  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  The ability to obtain profiles of gene expressions, proteins and metabolites with the advent of high throughput technologies\\u000a has advanced the study of pathway and network reconstruction. Genome-wide network reconstruction requires either interaction\\u000a measurements or large amount of perturbation data, often not available for mammalian cell systems. To overcome these shortcomings,\\u000a we developed a Three Stage Integrative Pathway Search (TIPS

Zheng Li; Shireesh Srivastava; Sheenu Mittal; Xuerui Yang; Lufang Sheng; Christina Chan

2007-01-01

56

Hypericin biosynthesis in Hypericum hookerianum Wight and Arn: investigation on biochemical pathways using metabolite inhibitors and suppression subtractive hybridization.  

PubMed

The biochemical pathway to hypericin biosynthesis is presumed to be polyketide synthase (PKS) mediated, but it has not been experimentally validated, and no alternate route (chorismate/o-succinylbenzoate pathway) has been analyzed. We report here our earlier developed auxin inducible culture systems of Hypericum hookerianum as a model, to study the metabolic pathway to hypericin synthesis. Inhibitors of the alternate pathway at varying concentrations showed steady synthesis of total hypericins with means of 2.80±0.22, 18.75±0.01; 16.39±3.75, 29.60±1.90 (mevinolin) 2.53±0.10, 18.12±0.56; 0.14±0.01, 14.28±1.11 (fosmidomycin) and 2.7±0.35, 18.75±0.61; 0.14±0.01, 12.80±1.09 mg g(-1) DW (glyphosate) in the control and auxin-induced shoot and shoot-forming callus cultures, respectively. SSH analysis classified the differentially expressed sequences into protein synthesis (38%), modification (20%), electron transport (9%) and remaining as unclassified (11%) and unknown proteins (22%). Functional annotation of sequences indicates the presence of additional protein components besides PKS activity. Our results demonstrate direct biochemical and molecular evidence of PKS hypothesis of hypericin biosynthesis for the first time. PMID:25282172

Pillai, Padmesh P; Nair, Aswati R

2014-10-01

57

RNAi-based biosynthetic pathway screens to identify in vivo functions of non-nucleic acid-based metabolites such as lipids.  

PubMed

The field of metabolomics continues to catalog new compounds, but their functional analysis remains technically challenging, and roles beyond metabolism are largely unknown. Unbiased genetic/RNAi screens are powerful tools to identify the in vivo functions of protein-encoding genes, but not of nonproteinaceous compounds such as lipids. They can, however, identify the biosynthetic enzymes of these compounds-findings that are usually dismissed, as these typically synthesize multiple products. Here, we provide a method using follow-on biosynthetic pathway screens to identify the endpoint biosynthetic enzyme and thus the compound through which they act. The approach is based on the principle that all subsequently identified downstream biosynthetic enzymes contribute to the synthesis of at least this one end product. We describe how to systematically target lipid biosynthetic pathways; optimize targeting conditions; take advantage of pathway branchpoints; and validate results by genetic assays and biochemical analyses. This approach extends the power of unbiased genetic/RNAi screens to identify in vivo functions of non-nucleic acid-based metabolites beyond their metabolic roles. It will typically require several months to identify a metabolic end product by biosynthetic pathway screens, but this time will vary widely depending, among other factors, on the end product's location in the pathway, which determines the number of screens required for its identification. PMID:25837419

Zhang, Hongjie; Abraham, Nessy; Khan, Liakot A; Gobel, Verena

2015-05-01

58

Genomic, proteomic, and biochemical analysis of the organohalide respiratory pathway in Desulfitobacterium dehalogenans.  

PubMed

Desulfitobacterium dehalogenans is able to grow by organohalide respiration using 3-chloro-4-hydroxyphenyl acetate (Cl-OHPA) as an electron acceptor. We used a combination of genome sequencing, biochemical analysis of redox active components, and shotgun proteomics to study elements of the organohalide respiratory electron transport chain. The genome of Desulfitobacterium dehalogenans JW/IU-DC1(T) consists of a single circular chromosome of 4,321,753 bp with a GC content of 44.97%. The genome contains 4,252 genes, including six rRNA operons and six predicted reductive dehalogenases. One of the reductive dehalogenases, CprA, is encoded by a well-characterized cprTKZEBACD gene cluster. Redox active components were identified in concentrated suspensions of cells grown on formate and Cl-OHPA or formate and fumarate, using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), visible spectroscopy, and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis of membrane extracts. In cell suspensions, these components were reduced upon addition of formate and oxidized after addition of Cl-OHPA, indicating involvement in organohalide respiration. Genome analysis revealed genes that likely encode the identified components of the electron transport chain from formate to fumarate or Cl-OHPA. Data presented here suggest that the first part of the electron transport chain from formate to fumarate or Cl-OHPA is shared. Electrons are channeled from an outward-facing formate dehydrogenase via menaquinones to a fumarate reductase located at the cytoplasmic face of the membrane. When Cl-OHPA is the terminal electron acceptor, electrons are transferred from menaquinones to outward-facing CprA, via an as-yet-unidentified membrane complex, and potentially an extracellular flavoprotein acting as an electron shuttle between the quinol dehydrogenase membrane complex and CprA. PMID:25512312

Kruse, Thomas; van de Pas, Bram A; Atteia, Ariane; Krab, Klaas; Hagen, Wilfred R; Goodwin, Lynne; Chain, Patrick; Boeren, Sjef; Maphosa, Farai; Schraa, Gosse; de Vos, Willem M; van der Oost, John; Smidt, Hauke; Stams, Alfons J M

2015-03-01

59

Influence of anabolic combinations of an androgen plus an estrogen on biochemical pathways in bovine uterine endometrium and ovary.  

PubMed

The application of anabolic steroids in food producing animals is forbidden in the EU since 1988, but the abuse of such drugs is a potential problem. The existing test systems are based on known compounds and can be eluded by newly emerging substances. The examination of physiological effects of anabolic hormones on different tissues to indirectly detect misuse might overcome this problem. Two studies were conducted with post-pubertal 24-months old Nguni heifers and pre-pubertal female 2-4 weeks old Holstein Friesian calves, respectively. The animals of the accordant treatment groups were administered combinations of estrogenic and androgenic compounds. The measurement of the gene expression pattern was undertaken with RT-qPCR. Target genes of different functional groups (receptors, angiogenesis, steroid synthesis, proliferation, apoptosis, nutrient metabolism and others) have been quantified. Several biochemical pathways were shown to be influenced by anabolic treatment. Both studies identified significant regulations in steroid and growth factor receptors (AR, ER?, LHR, FSHR, Flt-1, PR, IGF-1R, Alk-6), angiogenic and tissue remodeling factors (VEGFs, FGFs, BMPs, ANGPT-2, MMPs, TIMP-2, CTSB), steroid synthesis (S5A1, HSD17, CYP19A1), proliferation (TNF?, IGF-1, IGFBPs, p53, c-fos; CEBPD, c-kit), apoptosis (CASP3, FasL, p53) and others (C7, INHA, STAR). Several genes were regulated to opposite directions in post-pubertal compared to pre-pubertal animals. PCA for Nguni heifers demonstrated a distinct separation between the control and the treatment group. In conclusion, anabolics modify hormone sensitivity and steroid synthesis, and they induce proliferative effects in the whole reproductive tract (uterus and ovary) as well as anti-angiogenic effects in the ovary. However, the extent will depend on the developmental stage of the animals. PMID:21272641

Becker, C; Riedmaier, I; Reiter, M; Tichopad, A; Groot, M J; Stolker, A A M; Pfaffl, M W; Nielen, M F W; Meyer, H H D

2011-07-01

60

Biochemical Characterization of the CDP-d-Arabinitol Biosynthetic Pathway in Streptococcus pneumoniae 17F  

PubMed Central

Streptococcus pneumoniae is a major human pathogen associated with many diseases worldwide. Capsular polysaccharides (CPSs) are the major virulence factor. The biosynthetic pathway of d-arabinitol, which is present in the CPSs of several S. pneumoniae serotypes, has never been identified. In this study, the genes abpA (previously known as abp1) and abpB (previously known as abp2), which have previously been reported to be responsible for nucleoside diphosphate (NDP)-d-arabinitol (the nucleotide-activated form of d-arabinitol) synthesis, were cloned. The enzyme products were overexpressed, purified, and analyzed for their respective activities. Novel products produced by AbpA- and AbpB-catalyzing reactions were detected by capillary electrophoresis, and the structures of the products were elucidated using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. As a result, abpA was identified to be a d-xylulose-5-phosphate cytidylyltransferase-encoding gene, responsible for the transfer of CTP to d-xylulose-5-phosphate (d-Xlu-5-P) to form CDP-d-xylulose, and abpB was characterized to be a CDP-d-xylulose reductase-encoding gene, responsible for the conversion of CDP-d-xylulose to CDP-d-arabinitol as the final product. The kinetic parameters of AbpA for the substrates d-Xlu-5-P and CTP and those of AbpB for the substrate CDP-d-xylulose and the cofactors NADH or NADPH were measured, and the effects of temperature, pH, and cations on the two enzymes were analyzed. This study confirmed the involvement of the genes abpA and abpB and their products in the biosynthetic pathway of CDP-d-arabinitol. PMID:22328666

Wang, Quan; Xu, Yanli; Perepelov, Andrei V.; Knirel, Yuriy A.; Reeves, Peter R.; Shashkov, Alexander S.; Guo, Xi; Ding, Peng

2012-01-01

61

Patient-Specific Pathway Analysis Using PARADIGM Identifies Key Activities in Multiple Cancers - Josh Stuart, TCGA Scientific Symposium 2011  

Cancer.gov

Home News and Events Multimedia Library Videos Patient-Specific Pathway Analysis Using PARADIGM Identifies Key Activities in Cancers - Josh Stuart Patient-Specific Pathway Analysis Using PARADIGM Identifies Key Activities in Multiple Cancers - Josh

62

Gene expression profiling identifies emerging oncogenic pathways operating in extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma, nasal-type  

E-print Network

1 Gene expression profiling identifies emerging oncogenic pathways operating in extranodal NK in the frequently deleted 6q21 region. This study highlights emerging oncogenic pathways in NKTCL and identifies

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

63

Using soil moisture and spatial yield patterns to identify subsurface flow pathways.  

PubMed

Subsurface soil water dynamics can influence crop growth and the fate of surface-applied fertilizers and pesticides. Recently, a method was proposed using only ground-penetrating radar (GPR) and digital elevation maps (DEMs) to identify locations where subsurface water converged into discrete pathways. For this study, the GPR protocol for identifying horizontal subsurface flow pathways was extended to a 3.2-ha field, uncertainty is discussed, and soil moisture and yield patterns are presented as confirming evidence of the extent of the subsurface flow pathways. Observed soil water contents supported the existence of discrete preferential funnel flow processes occurring near the GPR-identified preferential flow pathways. Soil moisture also played a critical role in the formation of corn (Zea mays L.) grain yield patterns with yield spatial patterns being similar for mild and severe drought conditions. A buffer zone protocol was introduced that allowed the impact of subsurface flow pathways on corn grain yield to be quantified. Results indicate that when a GPR-identified subsurface clay layer was within 2 m of the soil surface, there was a beneficial impact on yield during a drought year. Furthermore, the buffer zone analysis demonstrated that corn grain yields decreased as the horizontal distance from the GPR-identified subsurface flow pathways increased during a drought year. Averaged real-time soil moisture contents at 0.1 m also decreased with increasing distance from the GPR-identified flow pathways. This research suggests that subsurface flow pathways exist and influence soil moisture and corn grain yield patterns. PMID:15647558

Gish, T J; Walthall, C L; Daughtry, C S T; Kung, K-J S

2005-01-01

64

Biochemical and structural characterization of mouse mitochondrial aspartate aminotransferase, a newly identified kynurenine aminotransferase-IV  

SciTech Connect

Mammalian mAspAT (mitochondrial aspartate aminotransferase) is recently reported to have KAT (kynurenine aminotransferase) activity and plays a role in the biosynthesis of KYNA (kynurenic acid) in rat, mouse and human brains. This study concerns the biochemical and structural characterization of mouse mAspAT. In this study, mouse mAspAT cDNA was amplified from mouse brain first stand cDNA and its recombinant protein was expressed in an Escherichia coli expression system. Sixteen oxo acids were tested for the co-substrate specificity of mouse mAspAT and 14 of them were shown to be capable of serving as co-substrates for the enzyme. Structural analysis of mAspAT by macromolecular crystallography revealed that the cofactor-binding residues of mAspAT are similar to those of other KATs. The substrate-binding residues of mAspAT are slightly different from those of other KATs. Our results provide a biochemical and structural basis towards understanding the overall physiological role of mAspAT in vivo and insight into controlling the levels of endogenous KYNA through modulation of the enzyme in the mouse brain.

Han, Q.; Robinson, H.; Cai, T.; Tagle, D. A.; Li, J.

2011-10-01

65

Identifying Differences Between Biochemical Failure and Cure: Incidence Rates and Predictors  

SciTech Connect

Background: Patients treated with radiation therapy (RT) for prostate cancer were evaluated to estimate the length of time required to document biochemical cure (BC) after treatment and the variables associated with long-term treatment efficacy. Patients and Methods: 2,100 patients received RT alone for localized prostate carcinoma (external-beam RT, n = 1,504; brachytherapy alone, n = 241; or brachytherapy + pelvic radiation, n = 355). The median external-beam dose was 68.4 Gy, and the median follow-up time was 8.6 years. Biochemical failure (BF) was defined according to the Phoenix definition. Results: Biochemical failure was experienced by 685 patients (32.6%). The median times to BF for low-, intermediate-, and high-risk groups were 6.0, 5.6, and 4.5 years respectively (p < 0.001). The average annual incidence rates of BF for years 1-5, 5-10,11-15, and 16-20 in low-risk patients were 2.0%, 2.0%, 0.3%, and 0.06% (p < 0.001); for intermediate-risk patients, 4%, 3%, 0.3%, and 0% (p < 0.001); and for high-risk patients, 10.0%, 5.0%, 0.3%, and 0.3% (p < 0.001). After 5 years of treatment, 36.9% of all patients experienced BF. The percentage of total failures occurring during years 1-5, 5-10, 11-15, and 16-20 were 48.7%, 43.5%, 6.5%, and 1.3% for low-risk patients; 64.0%, 32.2%, 3.8%, and 0% for intermediate-risk patients; and 71.9%, 25.9%, 1.1%, and 1.1% for high-risk patients, respectively. Increasing time to nadir was associated with increased time to BF. On multivariate analysis, factors significantly associated with 10-year BC included prostate-specific antigen nadir and time to nadir. Conclusions: The incidence rates for BF did not plateau until later than 10 years after treatment, suggesting that extended follow-up time is required to monitor patients after treatment. Prostate-specific antigen nadir and time to nadir have the strongest association with long-term BC.

Vicini, Frank A., E-mail: fvicini@beaumont.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States); Shah, Chirag; Kestin, Larry; Ghilezan, Mihai; Krauss, Daniel; Ye Hong; Brabbins, Donald; Martinez, Alvaro A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, William Beaumont Hospital, Royal Oak, MI (United States)

2011-11-15

66

Stratified Pathway Analysis to Identify Gene Sets Associated with Oral Contraceptive Use and Breast Cancer  

PubMed Central

Cancer biomarker discovery can facilitate drug development, improve staging of patients, and predict patient prognosis. Because cancer is the result of many interacting genes, analysis based on a set of genes with related biological functions or pathways may be more informative than single gene-based analysis for cancer biomarker discovery. The relevant pathways thus identified may help characterize different aspects of molecular phenotypes related to the tumor. Although it is well known that cancer patients may respond to the same treatment differently because of clinical variables and variation of molecular phenotypes, this patient heterogeneity has not been explicitly considered in pathway analysis in the literature. We hypothesize that combining pathway and patient clinical information can more effectively identify relevant pathways pertinent to specific patient subgroups, leading to better diagnosis and treatment. In this article, we propose to perform stratified pathway analysis based on clinical information from patients. In contrast to analysis using all the patients, this more focused analysis has the potential to reveal subgroup-specific pathways that may lead to more biological insights into disease etiology and treatment response. As an illustration, the power of our approach is demonstrated through its application to a breast cancer dataset in which the patients are stratified according to their oral contraceptive use. PMID:25574128

Pang, Herbert; Zhao, Hongyu

2014-01-01

67

Path2Models: large-scale generation of computational models from biochemical pathway maps  

E-print Network

consistent kinetic characterisation of all its enzymes. FEBSab initio kinetic laws for revers- ible enzyme-catalyzedand kinetic parameters, and in the case of metabolic pathway modeling [11], initial concentrations of metabolites [12] and enzymes [

2013-01-01

68

Biosynthesis of UDP-N,N?-Diacetylbacillosamine in Acinetobacter baumannii: Biochemical Characterization and Correlation to Existing Pathways  

PubMed Central

The Gram-negative, opportunistic pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii has recently captured headlines due to its ability to circumvent current antibiotic therapies. Herein we show that the multi-drug resistant (MDR) AYE strain of A. baumannii contains a gene locus that encodes three enzymes responsible for the biosynthesis of the highly-modified bacterial nucleotide sugar, UDP-N,N -diacetylbacillosamine (UDP-diNAcBac). Previously, this UDP-sugar has been implicated in the pgl pathway of Campylobacter jejuni. Here we report the overexpression, purification, and biochemical characterization of the A. baumannii enzymes WeeK, WeeJ, and WeeI that are responsible for the production of UDP-diNAcBac. We also demonstrate the function of the phosphoglycosyltransferase (WeeH), which transfers the diNAcBac moiety to undecaprenyl-phosphate. UDP-diNAcBac biosynthesis in A. baumannii is also directly compared to the homologous pathways in the pathogens C. jejuni and Neisseria gonorrhoeae. This work demonstrates for the first time the ability of A. baumannii to generate the highly-modified, UDP-diNAcBac nucleotide sugar found previously in other bacteria adding to the growing list of pathogens that assemble glycoconjugates including bacillosamine. Additionally, characterization of these pathway enzymes highlights the opportunity for investigating the significance of highly-modified sugars in bacterial pathogenesis. PMID:23747578

Morrison, Michael J.; Imperiali, Barbara

2013-01-01

69

Genetic modifier screens to identify components of a redox-regulated cell adhesion and migration pathway.  

PubMed

Under normal physiological conditions, cells use oxidants, particularly H2O2, for signal transduction during processes such as proliferation and migration. Though recent progress has been made in determining the precise role H2O2 plays in these processes, many gaps still remain. To further understand this, we describe the use of a dominant enhancer screen to identify novel components of a redox-regulated cell migration and adhesion pathway in Drosophila melanogaster. Here, we discuss our methodology and progress as well as the benefits and limitations of applying such an approach to study redox-regulated pathways. Depending on the nature of these pathways, unbiased genetic modifier screens may prove a productive way to identify novel redox-regulated signaling components. PMID:23849867

Hurd, Thomas Ryan; Leblanc, Michelle Gail; Jones, Leonard Nathaniel; DeGennaro, Matthew; Lehmann, Ruth

2013-01-01

70

Genetic network identifies novel pathways contributing to atherosclerosis susceptibility in the innominate artery  

PubMed Central

Background Atherosclerosis, the underlying cause of cardiovascular disease, results from both genetic and environmental factors. Methods In the current study we take a systems-based approach using weighted gene co-expression analysis to identify a candidate pathway of genes related to atherosclerosis. Bioinformatic analyses are performed to identify candidate genes and interactions and several novel genes are characterized using in-vitro studies. Results We identify 1 coexpression module associated with innominate artery atherosclerosis that is also enriched for inflammatory and macrophage gene signatures. Using a series of bioinformatics analysis, we further prioritize the genes in this pathway and identify Cd44 as a critical mediator of the atherosclerosis. We validate our predictions generated by the network analysis using Cd44 knockout mice. Conclusion These results indicate that alterations in Cd44 expression mediate inflammation through a complex transcriptional network involving a number of previously uncharacterized genes. PMID:25115202

2014-01-01

71

A zebrafish chemical suppressor screening identifies small molecule inhibitors of the Wnt/?-catenin pathway.  

PubMed

Genetic screening for suppressor mutants has been successfully used to identify important signaling regulators. Using an analogy to genetic suppressor screening, we developed a chemical suppressor screening method to identify inhibitors of the Wnt/?-catenin signaling pathway. We used zebrafish embryos in which chemically induced ?-catenin accumulation led to an "eyeless" phenotype and conducted a pilot screening for compounds that restored eye development. This approach allowed us to identify geranylgeranyltransferase inhibitor 286 (GGTI-286), a geranylgeranyltransferase (GGTase) inhibitor. Our follow-up studies showed that GGTI-286 reduces nuclear localization of ?-catenin and transcription dependent on ?-catenin/T cell factor in mammalian cells. In addition to pharmacological inhibition, GGTase gene knockdown also attenuates the nuclear function of ?-catenin. Overall, we validate our chemical suppressor screening as a method for identifying Wnt/?-catenin pathway inhibitors and implicate GGTase as a potential therapeutic target for Wnt-activated cancers. PMID:24684907

Nishiya, Naoyuki; Oku, Yusuke; Kumagai, Yusuke; Sato, Yuki; Yamaguchi, Emi; Sasaki, Akari; Shoji, Momoko; Ohnishi, Yukimi; Okamoto, Hitoshi; Uehara, Yoshimasa

2014-04-24

72

Landscape and Watershed Processes Using Soil Moisture and Spatial Yield Patterns to Identify Subsurface Flow Pathways  

Microsoft Academic Search

experimental protocol using primarily GPR and DEMs to identify the location of subsurface convergent flow Subsurface soil water dynamics can influence crop growth and the pathways was developed (Gish et al., 2002). Unfortu- fate of surface-applied fertilizers and pesticides. Recently, a method was proposed using only ground-penetrating radar (GPR) and digital nately, collection and analysis of sufficient GPR data elevation

T. J. Gish; C. L. Walthall; C. S. T. Daughtry; K.-J. S. Kung

73

IDENTIFYING DISEASE RESISTANCE GENES AND PATHWAYS THROUGH HOST-PATHOGEN PROTEIN INTERACTIONS  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

A major objective of both animal and plant genomics research is to identify disease resistance genes and pathways. Popular approaches to achieve this goal include candidate gene testing, genome-wide QTL screens, and DNA microarrays. We argue that the two-hybrid assay, which detects protein-protein...

74

Hydrograph Separations can Identify Contaminant-Specific Pathways for Conservation Targeting in a Tile-Drained Watershed  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Water quality issues continue to vex agriculture. Understanding contaminant-specific pathways could help clarify effective water quality management strategies in watersheds. Hypothesis: If conducted at nested scales, hydrograph separation techniques can identify contaminant-specific pathways that co...

75

Genomic and Biochemical Analysis of Lipid Biosynthesis in the Unicellular Rhodophyte Cyanidioschyzon merolae: Lack of a Plastidic Desaturation Pathway Results in the Coupled Pathway of Galactolipid Synthesis? †  

PubMed Central

The acyl lipids making up the plastid membranes in plants and algae are highly enriched in polyunsaturated fatty acids and are synthesized by two distinct pathways, known as the prokaryotic and eukaryotic pathways, which are located within the plastids and the endoplasmic reticulum, respectively. Here we report the results of biochemical as well as genomic analyses of lipids and fatty acids in the unicellular rhodophyte Cyanidioschyzon merolae. All of the glycerolipids usually found in photosynthetic algae were found, such as mono- and digalactosyl diacylglycerol, sulfolipid, phosphatidylglycerol, phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, and phosphatidylinositol. However, the fatty acid composition was extremely simple. Only palmitic, stearic, oleic, and linoleic acids were found as major acids. In addition, 3-trans-hexadecanoic acid was found as a very minor component in phosphatidylglycerol. Unlike the case for most other photosynthetic eukaryotes, polyenoic fatty acids having three or more double bonds were not detected. These results suggest that polyunsaturated fatty acids are not necessary for photosynthesis in eukaryotes. Genomic analysis suggested that C. merolae lacks acyl lipid desaturases of cyanobacterial origin as well as stearoyl acyl carrier protein desaturase, both of which are major desaturases in plants and green algae. The results of labeling experiments with radioactive acetate showed that the desaturation leading to linoleic acid synthesis occurs on phosphatidylcholine located outside the plastids. Monogalactosyl diacylglycerol is therefore synthesized by the coupled pathway, using plastid-derived palmitic acid and endoplasmic reticulum-derived linoleic acid. These results highlight essential differences in lipid biosynthetic pathways between the red algae and the green lineage, which includes plants and green algae. PMID:17416897

Sato, Naoki; Moriyama, Takashi

2007-01-01

76

Molecular & Biochemical Parasitology 133 (2004) 4551 Arachidonic acid synthetic pathways of the oyster protozoan parasite,  

E-print Network

of the oyster protozoan parasite, Perkinsus marinus: evidence for usage of a delta-8 pathway Fu-Lin E. Chua Received 24 June 2003; accepted 28 August 2003 Abstract The meront stage of the oyster protozoan parasite; Oyster; Oyster parasite; Perkinsus marinus 1. Introduction Although parasitic protozoans effectively

Hartley, Troy W.

2004-01-01

77

Identifying a Polymorphic ‘Switch’ That Influences miRNAs' Regulation of a Myasthenia Gravis Risk Pathway  

PubMed Central

The significant roles of genetic variants in myasthenia gravis (MG) pathogenesis have been demonstrated in many studies, and recently it has been revealed that aberrant level/regulation of microRNAs (miRNAs) might contribute to the initiation and progression of MG. However, the dysfunction of miRNA associated with single nucleotide polymorphisms (miRSNPs) has not been well investigated in MG. In this study, we created a contemporary catalog of 89 MG risk genes via manual literature-mining. Based on this risk gene catalog, we obtained 18 MG risk pathways. Furthermore, we identified 93 miRNAs that target MG risk pathways and revealed the miRSNPs ‘switches’ in miRNA regulation in the MG risk pathways by integrating the database information of miRSNPs. We also constructed a miRNA-mediated SNP switching pathway network (MSSPN) to intuitively analyze miRNA regulation of MG risk pathways and the relationship of the polymorphism ‘switch’ with these changes in regulation. Moreover, we carried out in-depth dissection on the correlation between hsa05200 (pathway in cancer) and MG development, and elaborated the significance of 4 high-risk genes. By network analysis and literature mining, we proposed a potential mechanism of miRSNPs?gene?pathway effects on MG pathogenesis, especially for rs28457673 (miR-15/16/195/424/497 family)?IGF1R?hsa05200 (pathway in cancer). Therefore, our studies have revealed a functional role for genetic modulators in MG pathogenesis at a systemic level, which could be informative for further miRNA and miRSNPs studies in MG. PMID:25118158

Cao, Yuze; Ning, Shangwei; Zhang, Huixue; Chen, Lixia; Li, Ronghong; Tian, Qinghua; Wang, Lihua; Wang, Weizhi; Li, Xia

2014-01-01

78

The biochemical pathway for the breakdown of methyl cyanide (acetonitrile) in bacteria.  

PubMed Central

[2-14C]Methyl cyanide (acetonitrile) is metabolized to citrate, succinate, fumarate, malate, glutamate, pyrrolidonecarboxylic acid and aspartate. Non-radioactive acetamide and acetate compete with 14C from methyl cyanide, and [2-14C]acetate and [2-14C]methyl cyanide are metabolized at similar rates, giving identical products. This evidence, combined with the inhibitory effect of fluoroacetate and arsenite on methyl cyanide metabolism, indicates that the pathway is: methyl cyanide leads to acetamide leads to acetate leads to tricarboxylic acid-cycle intermediates. The pathway was investigated in a species of Pseudomonas (group III; N.C.I.B. 10477), but comparison of labelling patterns suggests that it also exists in several higher plants. PMID:985423

Firmin, J L; Gray, D O

1976-01-01

79

Method for identifying biochemical and chemical reactions and micromechanical processes using nanomechanical and electronic signal identification  

DOEpatents

A scanning probe microscope, such as an atomic force microscope (AFM) or a scanning tunneling microscope (STM), is operated in a stationary mode on a site where an activity of interest occurs to measure and identify characteristic time-varying micromotions caused by biological, chemical, mechanical, electrical, optical, or physical processes. The tip and cantilever assembly of an AFM is used as a micromechanical detector of characteristic micromotions transmitted either directly by a site of interest or indirectly through the surrounding medium. Alternatively, the exponential dependence of the tunneling current on the size of the gap in the STM is used to detect micromechanical movement. The stationary mode of operation can be used to observe dynamic biological processes in real time and in a natural environment, such as polymerase processing of DNA for determining the sequence of a DNA molecule. 6 figs.

Holzrichter, J.F.; Siekhaus, W.J.

1997-04-15

80

Method for identifying biochemical and chemical reactions and micromechanical processes using nanomechanical and electronic signal identification  

DOEpatents

A scanning probe microscope, such as an atomic force microscope (AFM) or a scanning tunneling microscope (STM), is operated in a stationary mode on a site where an activity of interest occurs to measure and identify characteristic time-varying micromotions caused by biological, chemical, mechanical, electrical, optical, or physical processes. The tip and cantilever assembly of an AFM is used as a micromechanical detector of characteristic micromotions transmitted either directly by a site of interest or indirectly through the surrounding medium. Alternatively, the exponential dependence of the tunneling current on the size of the gap in the STM is used to detect micromechanical movement. The stationary mode of operation can be used to observe dynamic biological processes in real time and in a natural environment, such as polymerase processing of DNA for determining the sequence of a DNA molecule.

Holzrichter, John F. (Berkeley, CA); Siekhaus, Wigbert J. (Berkeley, CA)

1997-01-01

81

Steady and transient fluid shear stress stimulate NO release in osteoblasts through distinct biochemical pathways  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Fluid flow has been shown to be a potent stimulus in osteoblasts and osteocytes and may therefore play an important role in load-induced bone remodeling. The objective of this study was to investigate the characteristics of flow-activated pathways. Previously we reported that fluid flow stimulates rapid and continuous release of nitric oxide (NO) in primary rat calvarial osteoblasts. Here we demonstrate that flow-induced NO release is mediated by shear stress and that this response is distinctly biphasic. Transients in shear stress associated with the onset of flow stimulated a burst in NO production (8.2 nmol/mg of protein/h), while steady flow stimulated sustained NO production (2.2 nmol/mg of protein/h). Both G-protein inhibition and calcium chelation abolished the burst phase but had no effect on sustained production. Activation of G-proteins stimulated dose-dependent NO release in static cultures of both calvarial osteoblasts and UMR-106 osteoblast-like cells. Pertussis toxin had no effect on NO release. Calcium ionophore stimulated low levels of NO production within 15 minutes but had no effect on sustained production. Taken together, these data suggest that fluid shear stress stimulates NO release by two distinct pathways: a G-protein and calcium-dependent phase sensitive to flow transients, and a G-protein and calcium-independent pathway stimulated by sustained flow.

McAllister, T. N.; Frangos, J. A.

1999-01-01

82

Transcriptomic and biochemical analyses identify a family of chlorhexidine efflux proteins  

PubMed Central

Chlorhexidine is widely used as an antiseptic or disinfectant in both hospital and community settings. A number of bacterial species display resistance to this membrane-active biocide. We examined the transcriptomic response of a representative nosocomial human pathogen, Acinetobacter baumannii, to chlorhexidine to identify the primary chlorhexidine resistance elements. The most highly up-regulated genes encoded components of a major multidrug efflux system, AdeAB. The next most highly overexpressed gene under chlorhexidine stress was annotated as encoding a hypothetical protein, named here as AceI. Orthologs of the aceI gene are conserved within the genomes of a broad range of proteobacterial species. Expression of aceI or its orthologs from several other ?- or ?-proteobacterial species in Escherichia coli resulted in significant increases in resistance to chlorhexidine. Additionally, disruption of the aceI ortholog in Acinetobacter baylyi rendered it more susceptible to chlorhexidine. The AceI protein was localized to the membrane after overexpression in E. coli. This protein was purified, and binding assays demonstrated direct and specific interactions between AceI and chlorhexidine. Transport assays using [14C]-chlorhexidine determined that AceI was able to mediate the energy-dependent efflux of chlorhexidine. An E15Q AceI mutant with a mutation in a conserved acidic residue, although unable to mediate chlorhexidine resistance and transport, was still able to bind chlorhexidine. Taken together, these data are consistent with AceI being an active chlorhexidine efflux protein and the founding member of a family of bacterial drug efflux transporters. PMID:24277845

Hassan, Karl A.; Jackson, Scott M.; Penesyan, Anahit; Patching, Simon G.; Tetu, Sasha G.; Eijkelkamp, Bart A.; Brown, Melissa H.; Henderson, Peter J. F.; Paulsen, Ian. T.

2013-01-01

83

Genetic screens to identify elements of the decapentaplegic signaling pathway in Drosophila.  

PubMed

Pathways for regulation of signaling by transforming growth factor-beta family members are poorly understood at present. The best genetically characterized member of this family is encoded by the Drosophila gene decapentaplegic (dpp), which is required for multiple events during fly development. We describe here the results of screens for genes required to maximize dpp signaling during embryonic dorsal-ventral patterning. Screens for genetic interactions in the zygote have identified an allele of tolloid, as well as two novel alleles of screw, a gene recently shown to encode another bone morphogenetic protein-like polypeptide. Both genes are required for patterning the dorsalmost tissues of the embryo. Screens for dpp interactions with maternally expressed genes have identified loss of function mutations in Mothers against dpp and Medea. These mutations are homozygous pupal lethal, engendering gut defects and severely reduced imaginal disks, reminiscent of dpp mutant phenotypes arising during other dpp-dependent developmental events. Genetic interaction phenotypes are consistent with reduction of dpp activity in the early embryo and in the imaginal disks. We propose that the novel screw mutations identified here titrate out some component(s) of the dpp signaling pathway. We propose that Mad and Medea encode rate-limiting components integral to dpp pathways throughout development. PMID:7705627

Raftery, L A; Twombly, V; Wharton, K; Gelbart, W M

1995-01-01

84

Transcriptome and Biochemical Analyses Revealed a Detailed Proanthocyanidin Biosynthesis Pathway in Brown Cotton Fiber  

PubMed Central

Brown cotton fiber is the major raw material for colored cotton industry. Previous studies have showed that the brown pigments in cotton fiber belong to proanthocyanidins (PAs). To clarify the details of PA biosynthesis pathway in brown cotton fiber, gene expression profiles in developing brown and white fibers were compared via digital gene expression profiling and qRT-PCR. Compared to white cotton fiber, all steps from phenylalanine to PA monomers (flavan-3-ols) were significantly up-regulated in brown fiber. Liquid chromatography mass spectrometry analyses showed that most of free flavan-3-ols in brown fiber were in 2, 3-trans form (gallocatechin and catechin), and the main units of polymeric PAs were trihydroxylated on B ring. Consistent with monomeric composition, the transcript levels of flavonoid 3?, 5?-hydroxylase and leucoanthocyanidin reductase in cotton fiber were much higher than their competing enzymes acting on the same substrates (dihydroflavonol 4-reductase and anthocyanidin synthase, respectively). Taken together, our data revealed a detailed PA biosynthesis pathway wholly activated in brown cotton fiber, and demonstrated that flavonoid 3?, 5?-hydroxylase and leucoanthocyanidin reductase represented the primary flow of PA biosynthesis in cotton fiber. PMID:24466041

Xiao, Yue-Hua; Yan, Qian; Ding, Hui; Luo, Ming; Hou, Lei; Zhang, Mi; Yao, Dan; Liu, Hou-Sheng; Li, Xin; Zhao, Jia; Pei, Yan

2014-01-01

85

Identifying low variance pathways for free energy calculations of molecular transformations in solution phase  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Improving the efficiency of free energy calculations is important for many biological and materials design applications, such as protein-ligand binding affinities in drug design, partitioning between immiscible liquids, and determining molecular association in soft materials. We show that for any pair potential, moderately accurate estimation of the radial distribution function for a solute molecule is sufficient to accurately estimate the statistical variance of a sampling along a free energy pathway. This allows inexpensive analytical identification of low statistical error free energy pathways. We employ a variety of methods to estimate the radial distribution function (RDF) and find that the computationally cheap two-body "dilute gas" limit performs as well or better than 3D-RISM theory and other approximations for identifying low variance free energy pathways. With a RDF estimate in hand, we can search for pairwise interaction potentials that produce low variance. We give an example of a search minimizing statistical variance of solvation free energy over the entire parameter space of a generalized "soft core" potential. The free energy pathway arising from this optimization procedure has lower curvature in the variance and reduces the total variance by at least 50% compared to the traditional soft core solvation pathway. We also demonstrate that this optimized pathway allows free energies to be estimated with fewer intermediate states due to its low curvature. This free energy variance optimization technique is generalizable to solvation in any homogeneous fluid and for any type of pairwise potential and can be performed in minutes to hours, depending on the method used to estimate g(r).

Pham, Tri T.; Shirts, Michael R.

2011-07-01

86

Biochemical characterization of GDP-L-fucose de novo synthesis pathway in fungus Mortierella alpina  

SciTech Connect

Mortierella alpina is a filamentous fungus commonly found in soil, which is able to produce large amount of polyunsaturated fatty acids. L-Fucose is an important sugar found in a diverse range of organisms, playing a variety of biological roles. In this study, we characterized the de novo biosynthetic pathway of GDP-L-fucose (the nucleotide-activated form of L-fucose) in M. alpina. Genes encoding GDP-D-mannose 4,6-dehydratase (GMD) and GDP-keto-6-deoxymannose 3,5-epimerase/4-reductase (GMER) were expressed heterologously in Escherichia coli. The recombinant enzymes were produced as His-tagged fusion proteins. Conversion of GDP-mannose to GDP-4-keto-6-deoxy mannose by GMD and GDP-4-keto-6-deoxy mannose to GDP-L-fucose by GMER were analyzed by capillary electrophoresis, electro-spray ionization-mass spectrometry, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The k{sub m} values of GMD for GDP-mannose and GMER for GDP-4-keto-6-deoxy mannose were determined to be 0.77 mM and 1.047 mM, respectively. Both NADH and NADPH may be used by GMER as the coenzyme. The optimum temperature and pH were determined to be 37 {sup o}C and pH 9.0 (GMD) or pH 7.0 (GMER). Divalent cations are not required for GMD and GMER activity, and the activities of both enzymes may be enhanced by DTT. To our knowledge this is the first report on the characterization of GDP-L-fucose biosynthetic pathway in fungi.

Ren, Yan [TEDA School of Biological Sciences and Biotechnology, Nankai University, Tianjin Economic-Technological Development Area, Tianjin 300457 (China)] [TEDA School of Biological Sciences and Biotechnology, Nankai University, Tianjin Economic-Technological Development Area, Tianjin 300457 (China); Perepelov, Andrei V. [N.D. Zelinsky Institute of Organic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninsky Prospekt 47, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation)] [N.D. Zelinsky Institute of Organic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninsky Prospekt 47, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Wang, Haiyan [TEDA School of Biological Sciences and Biotechnology, Nankai University, Tianjin Economic-Technological Development Area, Tianjin 300457 (China)] [TEDA School of Biological Sciences and Biotechnology, Nankai University, Tianjin Economic-Technological Development Area, Tianjin 300457 (China); Zhang, Hao [State Key Laboratory of Food Science and Technology, School of Food Science and Technology, Jiangnan University, Wuxi, Jiangsu 214122 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Food Science and Technology, School of Food Science and Technology, Jiangnan University, Wuxi, Jiangsu 214122 (China); Knirel, Yuriy A. [N.D. Zelinsky Institute of Organic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninsky Prospekt 47, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation)] [N.D. Zelinsky Institute of Organic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninsky Prospekt 47, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Wang, Lei [TEDA School of Biological Sciences and Biotechnology, Nankai University, Tianjin Economic-Technological Development Area, Tianjin 300457 (China)] [TEDA School of Biological Sciences and Biotechnology, Nankai University, Tianjin Economic-Technological Development Area, Tianjin 300457 (China); Chen, Wei, E-mail: weichen@jiangnan.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Food Science and Technology, School of Food Science and Technology, Jiangnan University, Wuxi, Jiangsu 214122 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Food Science and Technology, School of Food Science and Technology, Jiangnan University, Wuxi, Jiangsu 214122 (China)

2010-01-22

87

Biochemical characterization of GDP-L-fucose de novo synthesis pathway in fungus Mortierella alpina.  

PubMed

Mortierella alpina is a filamentous fungus commonly found in soil, which is able to produce large amount of polyunsaturated fatty acids. L-fucose is an important sugar found in a diverse range of organisms, playing a variety of biological roles. In this study, we characterized the de novo biosynthetic pathway of GDP-L-fucose (the nucleotide-activated form of L-fucose) in M. alpina. Genes encoding GDP-D-mannose 4,6-dehydratase (GMD) and GDP-keto-6-deoxymannose 3,5-epimerase/4-reductase (GMER) were expressed heterologously in Escherichia coli. The recombinant enzymes were produced as His-tagged fusion proteins. Conversion of GDP-mannose to GDP-4-keto-6-deoxy mannose by GMD and GDP-4-keto-6-deoxy mannose to GDP-L-fucose by GMER were analyzed by capillary electrophoresis, electro-spray ionization-mass spectrometry, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The k(m) values of GMD for GDP-mannose and GMER for GDP-4-keto-6-deoxy mannose were determined to be 0.77 mM and 1.047 mM, respectively. Both NADH and NADPH may be used by GMER as the coenzyme. The optimum temperature and pH were determined to be 37 degrees C and pH 9.0 (GMD) or pH 7.0 (GMER). Divalent cations are not required for GMD and GMER activity, and the activities of both enzymes may be enhanced by DTT. To our knowledge this is the first report on the characterization of GDP-L-fucose biosynthetic pathway in fungi. PMID:20035716

Ren, Yan; Perepelov, Andrei V; Wang, Haiyan; Zhang, Hao; Knirel, Yuriy A; Wang, Lei; Chen, Wei

2010-01-22

88

A new screening pathway for identifying asymptomatic patients using dental panoramic radiographs  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

To identify asymptomatic patients is the challenging task and the essential first step in diagnosis. Findings of dental panoramic radiographs include not only dental conditions but also radiographic signs that are suggestive of possible systemic diseases such as osteoporosis, arteriosclerosis, and maxillary sinusitis. Detection of such signs on panoramic radiographs has a potential to provide supplemental benefits for patients. However, it is not easy for general dental practitioners to pay careful attention to such signs. We addressed the development of a computer-aided detection (CAD) system that detects radiographic signs of pathology on panoramic images, and the design of the framework of new screening pathway by cooperation of dentists and our CAD system. The performance evaluation of our CAD system showed the sensitivity and specificity in the identification of osteoporotic patients were 92.6 % and 100 %, respectively, and those of the maxillary sinus abnormality were 89.6 % and 73.6 %, respectively. The detection rate of carotid artery calcifications that suggests the need for further medical evaluation was approximately 93.6 % with 4.4 false-positives per image. To validate the utility of the new screening pathway, preliminary clinical trials by using our CAD system were conducted. To date, 223 panoramic images were processed and 4 asymptomatic patients with suspected osteoporosis, 7 asymptomatic patients with suspected calcifications, and 40 asymptomatic patients with suspected maxillary sinusitis were detected in our initial trial. It was suggested that our new screening pathway could be useful to identify asymptomatic patients with systemic diseases.

Hayashi, Tatsuro; Matsumoto, Takuya; Sawagashira, Tsuyoshi; Tagami, Motoki; Katsumata, Akitoshi; Hayashi, Yoshinori; Muramatsu, Chisako; Zhou, Xiangrong; Iida, Yukihiro; Matsuoka, Masato; Katagi, Kiyoji; Fujita, Hiroshi

2012-03-01

89

Whole-Animal Chemical Screen Identifies Colistin as a New Immunomodulator That Targets Conserved Pathways  

PubMed Central

ABSTRACT The purpose of this study was to take advantage of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans to perform a whole-animal chemical screen to identify potential immune activators that may confer protection against bacterial infections. We identified 45 marketed drugs, out of 1,120 studied compounds, that are capable of activating a conserved p38/PMK-1 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway required for innate immunity. One of these drugs, the last-resort antibiotic colistin, protected against infections by the Gram-negative pathogens Yersinia pestis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa but not by the Gram-positive pathogens Enterococcus faecalis and Staphylococcus aureus. Protection was independent of the antibacterial activity of colistin, since the drug was administered prophylactically prior to the infections and it was also effective against antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Immune activation by colistin is mediated not only by the p38/PMK-1 pathway but also by the conserved FOXO transcription factor DAF-16 and the transcription factor SKN-1. Furthermore, p38/PMK-1 was found to be required in the intestine for immune activation by colistin. Enhanced p38/PMK-1-mediated immune responses by colistin did not reduce the bacterial burden, indicating that the pathway plays a role in the development of host tolerance to infections by Gram-negative bacteria. PMID:25118236

Cai, Yun; Cao, Xiou

2014-01-01

90

A cellular genetics approach identifies gene-drug interactions and pinpoints drug toxicity pathway nodes  

PubMed Central

New approaches to toxicity testing have incorporated high-throughput screening across a broad-range of in vitro assays to identify potential key events in response to chemical or drug treatment. To date, these approaches have primarily utilized repurposed drug discovery assays. In this study, we describe an approach that combines in vitro screening with genetic approaches for the experimental identification of genes and pathways involved in chemical or drug toxicity. Primary embryonic fibroblasts isolated from 32 genetically-characterized inbred mouse strains were treated in concentration-response format with 65 compounds, including pharmaceutical drugs, environmental chemicals, and compounds with known modes-of-action. Integrated cellular responses were measured at 24 and 72 h using high-content imaging and included cell loss, membrane permeability, mitochondrial function, and apoptosis. Genetic association analysis of cross-strain differences in the cellular responses resulted in a collection of candidate loci potentially underlying the variable strain response to each chemical. As a demonstration of the approach, one candidate gene involved in rotenone sensitivity, Cybb, was experimentally validated in vitro and in vivo. Pathway analysis on the combined list of candidate loci across all chemicals identified a number of over-connected nodes that may serve as core regulatory points in toxicity pathways. PMID:25221565

Suzuki, Oscar T.; Frick, Amber; Parks, Bethany B.; Trask, O. Joseph; Butz, Natasha; Steffy, Brian; Chan, Emmanuel; Scoville, David K.; Healy, Eric; Benton, Cristina; McQuaid, Patricia E.; Thomas, Russell S.; Wiltshire, Tim

2014-01-01

91

Biochemical, Transcriptional and Translational Evidences of the Phenol-meta-Degradation Pathway by the  

E-print Network

accumulations in the broth. HPLC/Diode Array Detector and LC-MS analyses on culture samples at low dissolved-oxalocrotonate and 4-hydroxy-2-oxovalerate, three intermediates of the meta route. RT-PCR analysis on oxygenase on phenol. In 2D-DIGE/ MALDI-TOF analysis, the C23D was found and identified only on phenol. This set

Boyer, Edmond

92

Genetic and expression analysis of cattle identifies candidate genes in pathways responding to Trypanosoma congolense infection  

PubMed Central

African bovine trypanosomiasis caused by Trypanosoma sp., is a major constraint on cattle productivity in sub-Saharan Africa. Some African Bos taurus breeds are highly tolerant of infection, but the potentially more productive Bos indicus zebu breeds are much more susceptible. Zebu cattle are well adapted for plowing and haulage, and increasing their tolerance of trypanosomiasis could have a major impact on crop cultivation as well as dairy and beef production. We used three strategies to obtain short lists of candidate genes within QTL that were previously shown to regulate response to infection. We analyzed the transcriptomes of trypanotolerant N'Dama and susceptible Boran cattle after infection with Trypanosoma congolense. We sequenced EST libraries from these two breeds to identify polymorphisms that might underlie previously identified quantitative trait loci (QTL), and we assessed QTL regions and candidate loci for evidence of selective sweeps. The scan of the EST sequences identified a previously undescribed polymorphism in ARHGAP15 in the Bta2 trypanotolerance QTL. The polymorphism affects gene function in vitro and could contribute to the observed differences in expression of the MAPK pathway in vivo. The expression data showed that TLR and MAPK pathways responded to infection, and the former contained TICAM1, which is within a QTL on Bta7. Genetic analyses showed that selective sweeps had occurred at TICAM1 and ARHGAP15 loci in African taurine cattle, making them strong candidates for the genes underlying the QTL. Candidate QTL genes were identified in other QTL by their expression profile and the pathways in which they participate. PMID:21593421

Noyes, Harry; Brass, Andy; Obara, Isaiah; Anderson, Susan; Archibald, Alan L.; Bradley, Dan G.; Fisher, Paul; Freeman, Abigail; Gibson, John; Gicheru, Michael; Hall, Laurence; Hanotte, Olivier; Hulme, Helen; McKeever, Declan; Murray, Caitriona; Oh, Sung Jung; Tate, Catriona; Smith, Ken; Tapio, Miika; Wambugu, John; Williams, Diana J.; Agaba, Morris; Kemp, Stephen J.

2011-01-01

93

SNPsea: an algorithm to identify cell types, tissues and pathways affected by risk loci  

PubMed Central

Summary: We created a fast, robust and general C++ implementation of a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) set enrichment algorithm to identify cell types, tissues and pathways affected by risk loci. It tests trait-associated genomic loci for enrichment of specificity to conditions (cell types, tissues and pathways). We use a non-parametric statistical approach to compute empirical P-values by comparison with null SNP sets. As a proof of concept, we present novel applications of our method to four sets of genome-wide significant SNPs associated with red blood cell count, multiple sclerosis, celiac disease and HDL cholesterol. Availability and implementation: http://broadinstitute.org/mpg/snpsea Contact: soumya@broadinstitute.org Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:24813542

Slowikowski, Kamil; Hu, Xinli; Raychaudhuri, Soumya

2014-01-01

94

Identifying the potential extracellular electron transfer pathways from a c-type cytochrome network.  

PubMed

Extracellular electron transfer (EET) is the key feature of some bacteria, such as Geobacter sulfurreducens and Shewanella oneidensis. Via EET processes, these bacteria can grow on electrode surfaces and make current output of microbial fuel cells. c-Type cytochromes can be used as carriers to transfer electrons, which play an important role in EET processes. Typically, from the inner (cytoplasmic) membrane through the periplasm to the outer membrane, they could form EET pathways. Recent studies suggest that a group of c-type cytochromes could form a network which extended the well-known EET pathways. We obtained the protein interaction information for all 41 c-type cytochromes in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, constructed a large-scale protein interaction network, and studied its structural characteristics and functional significance. Centrality analysis has identified the top 10 key proteins of the network, and 7 of them are associated with electricity production in the bacteria, which suggests that the ability of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 to produce electricity might be derived from the unique structure of the c-type cytochrome network. By modularity analysis, we obtained 5 modules from the network. The subcellular localization study has shown that the proteins in these modules all have diversiform cellular compartments, which reflects their potential to form EET pathways. In particular, combination of protein subcellular localization and operon analysis, the well-known and new candidate EET pathways are obtained from the Mtr-like module, indicating that potential EET pathways could be obtained from such a c-type cytochrome network. PMID:25227320

Ding, De-Wu; Xu, Jun; Li, Ling; Xie, Jian-Ming; Sun, Xiao

2014-12-01

95

Carbon and chlorine isotope analysis to identify abiotic degradation pathways of 1,1,1-trichloroethane.  

PubMed

This study investigates dual C-Cl isotope fractionation during 1,1,1-TCA transformation by heat-activated persulfate (PS), hydrolysis/dehydrohalogenation (HY/DH) and Fe(0). Compound-specific chlorine isotope analysis of 1,1,1-TCA was performed for the first time, and transformation-associated isotope fractionation ? bulk C and ? bulk Cl values were -4.0 ± 0.2‰ and no chlorine isotope fractionation with PS, -1.6 ± 0.2‰ and -4.7 ± 0.1‰ for HY/DH, -7.8 ± 0.4‰ and -5.2 ± 0.2‰ with Fe(0). Distinctly different dual isotope slopes (??13C/??37Cl): ? with PS, 0.33 ± 0.04 for HY/DH and 1.5 ± 0.1 with Fe(0) highlight the potential of this approach to identify abiotic degradation pathways of 1,1,1-TCA in the field. The trend observed with PS agreed with a C-H bond oxidation mechanism in the first reaction step. For HY/DH and Fe(0) pathways, different slopes were obtained although both pathways involve cleavage of a C-Cl bond in their initial reaction step. In contrast to the expected larger primary carbon isotope effects relative to chlorine for C-Cl bond cleavage, ? bulk C < ? bulk Cl was observed for HY/DH and in a similar range for reduction by Fe(0), suggesting the contribution of secondary chlorine isotope effects. Therefore, different magnitude of secondary chlorine isotope effects could at least be partly responsible for the distinct slopes between HY/DH and Fe(0) pathways. Following this dual isotope approach, abiotic transformation processes can unambiguously be identified and quantified. PMID:25379605

Palau, Jordi; Shouakar-Stash, Orfan; Hunkeler, Daniel

2014-12-16

96

Chemical screen identifies FDA-approved drugs and target pathways that induce precocious pancreatic endocrine differentiation  

PubMed Central

Pancreatic ?-cells are an essential source of insulin and their destruction because of autoimmunity causes type I diabetes. We conducted a chemical screen to identify compounds that would induce the differentiation of insulin-producing ?-cells in vivo. To do this screen, we brought together the use of transgenic zebrafish as a model of ?-cell differentiation, a unique multiwell plate that allows easy visualization of lateral views of swimming larval fish and a library of clinical drugs. We identified six hits that can induce precocious differentiation of secondary islets in larval zebrafish. Three of these six hits were known drugs with a considerable background of published data on mechanism of action. Using pharmacological approaches, we have identified and characterized two unique pathways in ?-cell differentiation in the zebrafish, including down-regulation of GTP production and retinoic acid biosynthesis. PMID:22084084

Rovira, Meritxell; Huang, Wei; Yusuff, Shamila; Shim, Joong Sup; Ferrante, Anthony A.; Liu, Jun O.; Parsons, Michael J.

2011-01-01

97

Global Biochemical Profiling Identifies ?-Hydroxypyruvate as a Potential Mediator of Type 2 Diabetes in Mice and Humans.  

PubMed

Glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) and GLP-1 are incretins secreted by respective K and L enteroendocrine cells after eating and amplify glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS). This amplification has been termed the "incretin response." To determine the role(s) of K cells for the incretin response and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), diphtheria toxin-expressing (DT) mice that specifically lack GIP-producing cells were backcrossed five to eight times onto the diabetogenic NONcNZO10/Ltj background. As in humans with T2DM, DT mice lacked an incretin response, although GLP-1 release was maintained. With high-fat (HF) feeding, DT mice remained lean but developed T2DM, whereas wild-type mice developed obesity but not diabetes. Metabolomics identified biochemicals reflecting impaired glucose handling, insulin resistance, and diabetes complications in prediabetic DT/HF mice. ?-Hydroxypyruvate and benzoate levels were increased and decreased, respectively, suggesting ?-hydroxypyruvate production from d-serine. In vitro, ?-hydroxypyruvate altered excitatory properties of myenteric neurons and reduced islet insulin content but not GSIS. ?-Hydroxypyruvate-to-d-serine ratios were lower in humans with impaired glucose tolerance compared with normal glucose tolerance and T2DM. Earlier human studies unmasked a neural relay that amplifies GIP-mediated insulin secretion in a pattern reciprocal to ?-hydroxypyruvate-to-d-serine ratios in all groups. Thus, K cells may maintain long-term function of neurons and ?-cells by regulating ?-hydroxypyruvate levels. PMID:25368100

Zhang, Sheng; Wang, Songyan; Puhl, Matthew D; Jiang, Xuntian; Hyrc, Krzysztof L; Laciny, Erin; Wallendorf, Michael J; Pappan, Kirk L; Coyle, Joseph T; Wice, Burton M

2015-04-01

98

Transcriptional profiling of GBM invasion genes identifies effective inhibitors of the LIM kinase-Cofilin pathway  

PubMed Central

Malignant gliomas are highly proliferative and invasive neoplasms where total surgical resection is often impossible and effective local radiation therapy difficult. Consequently, there is a need to develop a greater understanding of the molecular events driving invasion and to identify novel treatment targets. Using microarray analysis comparing normal brain samples and mesenchymal glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), we identified over 140 significant genes involved in cell migration and invasion. The cofilin (CFL) pathway, which disassembles actin filaments, was highly up-regulated compared to normal brain. Up-regulation of LIM domain kinase 1 and 2 (LIMK1/2), that phosphorylates and inactivates cofilin, was confirmed in an additional independent data set comparing normal brain to GBM. We identified and utilized two small molecule inhibitors BMS-5 and Cucurbitacin I directed against the cofilin regulating kinases, LIMK1 and LIMK2, to target this pathway. Significant decreases in cell viability were observed in glioma cells treated with BMS-5 and Cucurbitacin I, while no cytotoxic effects were seen in normal astrocytes that lack LIMK. BMS-5 and Cucurbitacin I promoted increased adhesion in GBM cells, and decreased migration and invasion. Collectively, these data suggest that use of LIMK inhibitors may provide a novel way to target the invasive machinery in GBM. PMID:25237832

Golbourn, Brian; Bertrand, Kelsey C.; Luck, Amanda; Sabha, Nesrin; Smith, Christian A.; Byron, Sara; Zadeh, Gelareh; Croul, Sidney; Berens, Michael; Rutka, James T.

2014-01-01

99

Anthropogenic Molecular Markers: Tools to Identify the Sources and Transport Pathways of Pollutants  

USGS Publications Warehouse

The activities of modern civilization have released to the oceans a wide variety of both mobilized natural compounds and synthetic compounds not found prior to modern times. Many of these compounds provide a means of identifying sources of inputs and pathways of movement of chemicals through oceanic ecosystems and serve as molecular markers of human activities. A coastal ocean (Tokyo Bay) and a deep ocean (Deep Water Dump Site 106 in the Western North Atlantic Ocean) example are presented. In the deep ocean study, the correlation between potential sewage marker, i.e. linear alkylbenzenes (LABs), and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) concentrations indicates a contribution of sewage sludge PCBs to the dump site sediments.

Takada, H.; Satoh, F.; Bothner, Michael H.; Tripp, B.W.; Johnson, C.G.; Farrington, J.W.

1997-01-01

100

Identifying Genetic Variants for Heart Rate Variability in the Acetylcholine Pathway  

PubMed Central

Heart rate variability is an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality. The acetylcholine pathway plays a key role in explaining heart rate variability in humans. We assessed whether 443 genotyped and imputed common genetic variants in eight key genes (CHAT, SLC18A3, SLC5A7, CHRNB4, CHRNA3, CHRNA, CHRM2 and ACHE) of the acetylcholine pathway were associated with variation in an established measure of heart rate variability reflecting parasympathetic control of the heart rhythm, the root mean square of successive differences (RMSSD) of normal RR intervals. The association was studied in a two stage design in individuals of European descent. First, analyses were performed in a discovery sample of four cohorts (n?=?3429, discovery stage). Second, findings were replicated in three independent cohorts (n?=?3311, replication stage), and finally the two stages were combined in a meta-analysis (n?=?6740). RMSSD data were obtained under resting conditions. After correction for multiple testing, none of the SNPs showed an association with RMSSD. In conclusion, no common genetic variants for heart rate variability were identified in the largest and most comprehensive candidate gene study on the acetylcholine pathway to date. Future gene finding efforts for RMSSD may want to focus on hypothesis free approaches such as the genome-wide association study. PMID:25384021

Riese, Harriëtte; Muñoz, Loretto M.; Hartman, Catharina A.; Ding, Xiuhua; Su, Shaoyong; Oldehinkel, Albertine J.; van Roon, Arie M.; van der Most, Peter J.; Lefrandt, Joop; Gansevoort, Ron T.; van der Harst, Pim; Verweij, Niek; Licht, Carmilla M. M.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Willemsen, Gonneke; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.; Nolte, Ilja M.; de Geus, Eco J. C.; Wang, Xiaoling; Snieder, Harold

2014-01-01

101

Biochemical analysis of the biosynthetic pathway of an anticancer tetracycline SF2575.  

PubMed

SF2575 1 is a tetracycline polyketide produced by Streptomyces sp. SF2575 and displays exceptionally potent anticancer activity toward a broad range of cancer cell lines. The structure of SF2575 is characterized by a highly substituted tetracycline aglycon. The modifications include methylation of the C-6 and C-12a hydroxyl groups, acylation of the 4-(S)-hydroxyl with salicylic acid, C-glycosylation of the C-9 of the D-ring with D-olivose and further acylation of the C4'-hydroxyl of D-olivose with the unusual angelic acid. Understanding the biosynthesis of SF2575 can therefore expand the repertoire of enzymes that can modify tetracyclines, and facilitate engineered biosynthesis of SF2575 analogues. In this study, we identified, sequenced, and functionally analyzed the ssf biosynthetic gene cluster which contains 40 putative open reading frames. Genes encoding enzymes that can assemble the tetracycline aglycon, as well as installing these unique structural features, are found in the gene cluster. Biosynthetic intermediates were isolated from the SF2575 culture extract to suggest the order of pendant-group addition is C-9 glycosylation, C-4 salicylation, and O-4' angelylcylation. Using in vitro assays, two enzymes that are responsible for C-4 acylation of salicylic acid were identified. These enzymes include an ATP-dependent salicylyl-CoA ligase SsfL1 and a putative GDSL family acyltransferase SsfX3, both of which were shown to have relaxed substrate specificity toward substituted benzoic acids. Since the salicylic acid moiety is critically important for the anticancer properties of SF2575, verification of the activities of SsfL1 and SsfX3 sets the stage for biosynthetic modification of the C-4 group toward structure-activity relationship studies of SF2575. Using heterologous biosynthesis in Streptomyces lividans, we also determined that biosynthesis of the SF2575 tetracycline aglycon 8 parallels that of oxytetracycline 4 and diverges after the assembly of 4-keto-anhydrotetracycline 51. The minimal ssf polyketide synthase together with the amidotransferase SsfD produced the amidated decaketide backbone that is required for the formation of 2-naphthacenecarboxamide skeleton. Additional enzymes, such as cyclases C-6 methyltransferase and C-4/C-12a dihydroxylase, were functionally reconstituted. PMID:19908837

Pickens, Lauren B; Kim, Woncheol; Wang, Peng; Zhou, Hui; Watanabe, Kenji; Gomi, Shuichi; Tang, Yi

2009-12-01

102

Comprehensive profiling analysis of actively resorbing osteoclasts identifies critical signaling pathways regulated by bone substrate  

PubMed Central

As the only cells capable of efficiently resorbing bone, osteoclasts are central mediators of both normal bone remodeling and pathologies associates with excessive bone resorption. However, despite the clear evidence of interplay between osteoclasts and the bone surface in vivo, the role of the bone substrate in regulating osteoclast differentiation and activation at a molecular level has not been fully defined. Here, we present the first comprehensive expression profiles of osteoclasts differentiated on authentic resorbable bone substrates. This analysis has identified numerous critical pathways coordinately regulated by osteoclastogenic cytokines and bone substrate, including the transition from proliferation to differentiation, and sphingosine-1-phosphate signaling. Whilst, as expected, much of this program is dependent upon integrin beta 3, the pre-eminent mediator of osteoclast-bone interaction, a surprisingly significant portion of the bone substrate regulated expression signature is independent of this receptor. Together, these findings identify an important hitherto underappreciated role for bone substrate in osteoclastogenesis. PMID:25534583

Purdue, P. Edward; Crotti, Tania N.; Shen, Zhenxin; Swantek, Jennifer; Li, Jun; Hill, Jonathan; Hanidu, Adedayo; Dimock, Janice; Nabozny, Gerald; Goldring, Steven R.; McHugh, Kevin P.

2014-01-01

103

Identifying Components of the NF B Pathway in the Beneficial Euprymna scolopes-Vibrio fischeri Light Organ Symbiosis  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Toll\\/NF-B pathway is a common, evolutionarily conserved innate immune pathway that modulates the responses of animal cells to microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs). Because MAMPs have been implicated as critical elements in the signaling of symbiont-induced development, an expressed sequence tag library from the juvenile light organ of Euprymna scolopes was used to identify members of the Toll\\/NF-B pathway. Full-length

Michael S. Goodson; Mila Kojadinovic; Joshua V. Troll; Todd E. Scheetz; Thomas L. Casavant; M. Bento Soares; Margaret J. McFall-Ngai

2005-01-01

104

From L-Dopa to Dihydroxyphenylacetaldehyde: A Toxic Biochemical Pathway Plays a Vital Physiological Function in Insects  

PubMed Central

One protein in Aedes aegypti, classified into the aromatic amino acid decarboxylase (AAAD) family based on extremely high sequence homology (?70%) with dopa decarboxylase (Ddc), was biochemically investigated. Our data revealed that this predicted AAAD protein use L-dopa as a substrate, as does Ddc, but it catalyzes the production of 3,4-dihydroxylphenylacetaldehyde (DHPAA) directly from L-dopa and apparently has nothing to do with the production of any aromatic amine. The protein is therefore named DHPAA synthase. This subsequently led to the identification of the same enzyme in Drosophila melanogaster, Anopheles gambiae and Culex quinquefasciatus by an initial prediction of putative DHPAA synthase based on sequence homology and subsequent verification of DHPAA synthase identity through protein expression and activity assays. DHPAA is highly toxic because its aldehyde group readily reacts with the primary amino groups of proteins, leading to protein crosslinking and inactivation. It has previously been demonstrated by several research groups that Drosophila DHPAA synthase was expressed in tissues that produce cuticle materials and apparent defects in regions of colorless, flexible cuticular structures have been observed in its gene mutants. The presence of free amino groups in proteins, the high reactivity of DHPAA with the free amino groups, and the genetically ascertained function of the Drosophila DHPAA synthase in the formation of colorless, flexible cuticle, when taken together, suggest that mosquito and Drosophila DHPAA synthases are involved in the formation of flexible cuticle through their reactive DHPAA-mediated protein crosslinking reactions. Our data illustrate how a seemingly highly toxic pathway can serve for an important physiological function in insects. PMID:21283636

Vavricka, Christopher; Han, Qian; Huang, Yongping; Erickson, Sara M.; Harich, Kim; Christensen, Bruce M.; Li, Jianyong

2011-01-01

105

Whole-Genome Pathway Analysis on 132,497 Individuals Identifies Novel Gene-Sets Associated with Body Mass Index  

PubMed Central

Whole genome pathway analysis is a powerful tool for the exploration of the combined effects of gene-sets within biological pathways. This study applied Interval Based Enrichment Analysis (INRICH) to perform whole-genome pathway analysis of body-mass index (BMI). We used a discovery set composed of summary statistics from a meta-analysis of 123,865 subjects performed by the GIANT Consortium, and an independent sample of 8,632 subjects to assess replication of significant pathways. We examined SNPs within nominally significant pathways using linear mixed models to estimate their contribution to overall BMI heritability. Six pathways replicated as having significant enrichment for association after correcting for multiple testing, including the previously unknown relationships between BMI and the Reactome regulation of ornithine decarboxylase pathway, the KEGG lysosome pathway, and the Reactome stabilization of P53 pathway. Two non-overlapping sets of genes emerged from the six significant pathways. The clustering of shared genes based on previously identified protein-protein interactions listed in PubMed and OMIM supported the relatively independent biological effects of these two gene-sets. We estimate that the SNPs located in examined pathways explain ?20% of the heritability for BMI that is tagged by common SNPs (3.35% of the 16.93% total). PMID:24497910

Simonson, Matthew A.; McQueen, Matthew B.; Keller, Matthew C.

2014-01-01

106

Exome sequencing in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis identifies risk genes and pathways.  

PubMed

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a devastating neurological disease with no effective treatment. We report the results of a moderate-scale sequencing study aimed at increasing the number of genes known to contribute to predisposition for ALS. We performed whole-exome sequencing of 2869 ALS patients and 6405 controls. Several known ALS genes were found to be associated, and TBK1 (the gene encoding TANK-binding kinase 1) was identified as an ALS gene. TBK1 is known to bind to and phosphorylate a number of proteins involved in innate immunity and autophagy, including optineurin (OPTN) and p62 (SQSTM1/sequestosome), both of which have also been implicated in ALS. These observations reveal a key role of the autophagic pathway in ALS and suggest specific targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:25700176

Cirulli, Elizabeth T; Lasseigne, Brittany N; Petrovski, Slavé; Sapp, Peter C; Dion, Patrick A; Leblond, Claire S; Couthouis, Julien; Lu, Yi-Fan; Wang, Quanli; Krueger, Brian J; Ren, Zhong; Keebler, Jonathan; Han, Yujun; Levy, Shawn E; Boone, Braden E; Wimbish, Jack R; Waite, Lindsay L; Jones, Angela L; Carulli, John P; Day-Williams, Aaron G; Staropoli, John F; Xin, Winnie W; Chesi, Alessandra; Raphael, Alya R; McKenna-Yasek, Diane; Cady, Janet; Vianney de Jong, J M B; Kenna, Kevin P; Smith, Bradley N; Topp, Simon; Miller, Jack; Gkazi, Athina; Al-Chalabi, Ammar; van den Berg, Leonard H; Veldink, Jan; Silani, Vincenzo; Ticozzi, Nicola; Shaw, Christopher E; Baloh, Robert H; Appel, Stanley; Simpson, Ericka; Lagier-Tourenne, Clotilde; Pulst, Stefan M; Gibson, Summer; Trojanowski, John Q; Elman, Lauren; McCluskey, Leo; Grossman, Murray; Shneider, Neil A; Chung, Wendy K; Ravits, John M; Glass, Jonathan D; Sims, Katherine B; Van Deerlin, Vivianna M; Maniatis, Tom; Hayes, Sebastian D; Ordureau, Alban; Swarup, Sharan; Landers, John; Baas, Frank; Allen, Andrew S; Bedlack, Richard S; Harper, J Wade; Gitler, Aaron D; Rouleau, Guy A; Brown, Robert; Harms, Matthew B; Cooper, Gregory M; Harris, Tim; Myers, Richard M; Goldstein, David B

2015-03-27

107

Integrated Analysis of Mutation Data from Various Sources Identifies Key Genes and Signaling Pathways in Hepatocellular Carcinoma  

PubMed Central

Background Recently, a number of studies have performed genome or exome sequencing of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and identified hundreds or even thousands of mutations in protein-coding genes. However, these studies have only focused on a limited number of candidate genes, and many important mutation resources remain to be explored. Principal Findings In this study, we integrated mutation data obtained from various sources and performed pathway and network analysis. We identified 113 pathways that were significantly mutated in HCC samples and found that the mutated genes included in these pathways contained high percentages of known cancer genes, and damaging genes and also demonstrated high conservation scores, indicating their important roles in liver tumorigenesis. Five classes of pathways that were mutated most frequently included (a) proliferation and apoptosis related pathways, (b) tumor microenvironment related pathways, (c) neural signaling related pathways, (d) metabolic related pathways, and (e) circadian related pathways. Network analysis further revealed that the mutated genes with the highest betweenness coefficients, such as the well-known cancer genes TP53, CTNNB1 and recently identified novel mutated genes GNAL and the ADCY family, may play key roles in these significantly mutated pathways. Finally, we highlight several key genes (e.g., RPS6KA3 and PCLO) and pathways (e.g., axon guidance) in which the mutations were associated with clinical features. Conclusions Our workflow illustrates the increased statistical power of integrating multiple studies of the same subject, which can provide biological insights that would otherwise be masked under individual sample sets. This type of bioinformatics approach is consistent with the necessity of making the best use of the ever increasing data provided in valuable databases, such as TCGA, to enhance the speed of deciphering human cancers. PMID:24988079

Wei, Lin; Tang, Ruqi; Lian, Baofeng; Zhao, Yingjun; He, Xianghuo; Xie, Lu

2014-01-01

108

Identifying components of the NF-kappaB pathway in the beneficial Euprymna scolopes-Vibrio fischeri light organ symbiosis.  

PubMed

The Toll/NF-kappaB pathway is a common, evolutionarily conserved innate immune pathway that modulates the responses of animal cells to microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs). Because MAMPs have been implicated as critical elements in the signaling of symbiont-induced development, an expressed sequence tag library from the juvenile light organ of Euprymna scolopes was used to identify members of the Toll/NF-kappaB pathway. Full-length transcripts were identified by using 5' and 3' RACE PCR. Seven transcripts critical for MAMP-induced triggering of the Toll/NF-kappaB phosphorylation cascade have been identified, including receptors, signal transducers, and a transcription factor. Further investigations should elucidate the role of the Toll/NF-kappaB pathway in the initiation of the beneficial symbiosis between E. scolopes and Vibrio fischeri. PMID:16269728

Goodson, Michael S; Kojadinovic, Mila; Troll, Joshua V; Scheetz, Todd E; Casavant, Thomas L; Soares, M Bento; McFall-Ngai, Margaret J

2005-11-01

109

Identification of Biochemically Distinct Properties of the Small Ubiquitin-related Modifier (SUMO) Conjugation Pathway in Plasmodium falciparum*  

PubMed Central

Small ubiquitin-related modifiers (SUMOs) are post-translationally conjugated to other proteins and are thereby essential regulators of a wide range of cellular processes. Sumoylation, and enzymes of the sumoylation pathway, are conserved in the malaria causing parasite, Plasmodium falciparum. However, the specific functions of sumoylation in P. falciparum, and the degree of functional conservation between enzymes of the human and P. falciparum sumoylation pathways, have not been characterized. Here, we demonstrate that sumoylation levels peak during midstages of the intra-erythrocyte developmental cycle, concomitant with hemoglobin consumption and elevated oxidative stress. In vitro studies revealed that P. falciparum E1- and E2-conjugating enzymes interact effectively to recognize and modify RanGAP1, a model mammalian SUMO substrate. However, in heterologous reactions, P. falciparum E1 and E2 enzymes failed to interact with cognate human E2 and E1 partners, respectively, to modify RanGAP1. Structural analysis, binding studies, and functional assays revealed divergent amino acid residues within the E1-E2 binding interface that define organism-specific enzyme interactions. Our studies identify sumoylation as a potentially important regulator of oxidative stress response during the P. falciparum intra-erythrocyte developmental cycle, and define E1 and E2 interactions as a promising target for development of parasite-specific inhibitors of sumoylation and parasite replication. PMID:23943616

Reiter, Katherine; Mukhopadhyay, Debaditya; Zhang, Hong; Boucher, Lauren E.; Kumar, Nirbhay; Bosch, Jürgen; Matunis, Michael J.

2013-01-01

110

Biochemical and genetic interaction between the fragile X mental retardation protein and the microRNA pathway.  

PubMed

Fragile X syndrome is caused by a loss of expression of the fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP). FMRP is a selective RNA-binding protein which forms a messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP) complex that associates with polyribosomes. Recently, mRNA ligands associated with FMRP have been identified. However, the mechanism by which FMRP regulates the translation of its mRNA ligands remains unclear. MicroRNAs are small noncoding RNAs involved in translational control. Here we show that in vivo mammalian FMRP interacts with microRNAs and the components of the microRNA pathways including Dicer and the mammalian ortholog of Argonaute 1 (AGO1). Using two different Drosophila melanogaster models, we show that AGO1 is critical for FMRP function in neural development and synaptogenesis. Our results suggest that FMRP may regulate neuronal translation via microRNAs and links microRNAs with human disease. PMID:14703574

Jin, Peng; Zarnescu, Daniela C; Ceman, Stephanie; Nakamoto, Mika; Mowrey, Julie; Jongens, Thomas A; Nelson, David L; Moses, Kevin; Warren, Stephen T

2004-02-01

111

Genomic Profiling Identifies Novel Mutations and SNPs in ABCD1 Gene: A Molecular, Biochemical and Clinical Analysis of X-ALD Cases in India  

Microsoft Academic Search

X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD) affects the nervous system white matter and adrenal cortex secondary to mutations in the ABCD1 gene that encode the peroxisomal membrane protein. We conducted a genomic and protein expression study of susceptibility gene with its clinical and biochemical analysis. To the best of our knowledge this is the first preliminary comprehensive study in Indian population that identified

Neeraj Kumar; Krishna Kant Taneja; Veena Kalra; Madhuri Behari; Satinder Aneja; Surendra Kumar Bansal; Mark R. Cookson

2011-01-01

112

An isogenic cell panel identifies compounds that inhibit proliferation of mTOR-pathway addicted cells by different mechanisms.  

PubMed

The mTOR pathway is a critical integrator of nutrient and growth factor signaling. Once activated, mTOR promotes cell growth and proliferation. Several components of the mTOR pathway are frequently deregulated in tumors, leading to constitutive activation of the pathway and thus contribute to uncontrolled cell growth. We performed a high-throughput screen with an isogenic cell line system to identify compounds specifically inhibiting proliferation of PTEN/mTOR-pathway addicted cells. We show here the characterization and mode of action of two such compound classes. One compound class inhibits components of the PTEN/mTOR signaling pathway, such as S6 ribosomal protein phosphorylation, and leads to cyclin D3 downregulation. These compounds are not adenosine triphosphate competitive inhibitors for kinases in the pathway, nor do they require FKBP12 for activity like rapamycin. The other compound class turned out to be a farnesylation inhibitor, blocking the activity of GTPases, as well as an inducer of oxidative stress. Our results demonstrate that an isogenic cell system with few specific mutations in oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes can identify different classes of compounds selectively inhibiting proliferation of PTEN/mTOR pathway-addicted isogenic clones. The identified mechanisms are in line with the known cellular signaling networks activated by the altered oncogenes and suppressor genes in the isogenic system. PMID:23954931

Wyder Peters, Lorenza; Molle, Klaus D; Thiemeyer, Anke; Knopf, Agnes; Goxe, Marie; Guerry, Philippe; Brodbeck, Daniela; Colombi, Marco; Hall, Michael N; Moroni, Christoph; Regenass, Urs

2014-01-01

113

Significant Deregulated Pathways in Diabetes Type II Complications Identified through Expression Based Network Biology  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Type 2 Diabetes is a complex multifactorial disease, which alters several signaling cascades giving rise to serious complications. It is one of the major risk factors for cardiovascular diseases. The present research work describes an integrated functional network biology approach to identify pathways that get transcriptionally altered and lead to complex complications thereby amplifying the phenotypic effect of the impaired disease state. We have identified two sub-network modules, which could be activated under abnormal circumstances in diabetes. Present work describes key proteins such as P85A and SRC serving as important nodes to mediate alternate signaling routes during diseased condition. P85A has been shown to be an important link between stress responsive MAPK and CVD markers involved in fibrosis. MAPK8 has been shown to interact with P85A and further activate CTGF through VEGF signaling. We have traced a novel and unique route correlating inflammation and fibrosis by considering P85A as a key mediator of signals. The next sub-network module shows SRC as a junction for various signaling processes, which results in interaction between NF-kB and beta catenin to cause cell death. The powerful interaction between these important genes in response to transcriptionally altered lipid metabolism and impaired inflammatory response via SRC causes apoptosis of cells. The crosstalk between inflammation, lipid homeostasis and stress, and their serious effects downstream have been explained in the present analyses.

Ukil, Sanchaita; Sinha, Meenakshee; Varshney, Lavneesh; Agrawal, Shipra

114

Identifying biological pathways that underlie primordial short stature using network analysis.  

PubMed

Mutations in CUL7, OBSL1 and CCDC8, leading to disordered ubiquitination, cause one of the commonest primordial growth disorders, 3-M syndrome. This condition is associated with i) abnormal p53 function, ii) GH and/or IGF1 resistance, which may relate to failure to recycle signalling molecules, and iii) cellular IGF2 deficiency. However the exact molecular mechanisms that may link these abnormalities generating growth restriction remain undefined. In this study, we have used immunoprecipitation/mass spectrometry and transcriptomic studies to generate a 3-M 'interactome', to define key cellular pathways and biological functions associated with growth failure seen in 3-M. We identified 189 proteins which interacted with CUL7, OBSL1 and CCDC8, from which a network including 176 of these proteins was generated. To strengthen the association to 3-M syndrome, these proteins were compared with an inferred network generated from the genes that were differentially expressed in 3-M fibroblasts compared with controls. This resulted in a final 3-M network of 131 proteins, with the most significant biological pathway within the network being mRNA splicing/processing. We have shown using an exogenous insulin receptor (INSR) minigene system that alternative splicing of exon 11 is significantly changed in HEK293 cells with altered expression of CUL7, OBSL1 and CCDC8 and in 3-M fibroblasts. The net result is a reduction in the expression of the mitogenic INSR isoform in 3-M syndrome. From these preliminary data, we hypothesise that disordered ubiquitination could result in aberrant mRNA splicing in 3-M; however, further investigation is required to determine whether this contributes to growth failure. PMID:24711643

Hanson, Dan; Stevens, Adam; Murray, Philip G; Black, Graeme C M; Clayton, Peter E

2014-06-01

115

An Integrative Framework for Bayesian Variable Selection with Informative Priors for Identifying Genes and Pathways  

PubMed Central

The discovery of genetic or genomic markers plays a central role in the development of personalized medicine. A notable challenge exists when dealing with the high dimensionality of the data sets, as thousands of genes or millions of genetic variants are collected on a relatively small number of subjects. Traditional gene-wise selection methods using univariate analyses face difficulty to incorporate correlational, structural, or functional structures amongst the molecular measures. For microarray gene expression data, we first summarize solutions in dealing with ‘large p, small n’ problems, and then propose an integrative Bayesian variable selection (iBVS) framework for simultaneously identifying causal or marker genes and regulatory pathways. A novel partial least squares (PLS) g-prior for iBVS is developed to allow the incorporation of prior knowledge on gene-gene interactions or functional relationships. From the point view of systems biology, iBVS enables user to directly target the joint effects of multiple genes and pathways in a hierarchical modeling diagram to predict disease status or phenotype. The estimated posterior selection probabilities offer probabilitic and biological interpretations. Both simulated data and a set of microarray data in predicting stroke status are used in validating the performance of iBVS in a Probit model with binary outcomes. iBVS offers a general framework for effective discovery of various molecular biomarkers by combining data-based statistics and knowledge-based priors. Guidelines on making posterior inferences, determining Bayesian significance levels, and improving computational efficiencies are also discussed. PMID:23844055

Ander, Bradley P.; Zhang, Xiaoshuai; Xue, Fuzhong; Sharp, Frank R.; Yang, Xiaowei

2013-01-01

116

Nontargeted metabolomics reveals biochemical pathways altered in response to captivity and food limitation in the freshwater mussel Amblema plicata.  

PubMed

Effective conservation of freshwater mussels (Mollusca: Bivalvia: Unionidae), one of the most endangered groups of animals in North America, is compromised by limited knowledge of their health. We address this gap in knowledge by characterizing the metabolic profile of Amblema plicata in the wild and in response to captivity and food limitation. Eight mussels brought into captivity from the wild were isolated for 18 days without a food source. Hemolymph samples were taken prior to, and 9 and 18 days after the start of the experiment; these samples were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. We detected and identified 71 biochemicals in the hemolymph of freshwater mussels; of these, 49 showed significant changes during captivity and/or food limitation (p<0.05). Fasting resulted in severe metabolite depletion. Captive (but fed) mussels experienced changes similar to (albeit less severe than) fasting mussels, suggesting that mussels may experience nutritional deficiency under common captive conditions. A. plicata responded to food limitation stress by preferentially using energy reserves for maintenance rather than growth. Carbohydrate and energy metabolism exhibited down-regulation in captive, food-limited, and wild mussels. Lipid metabolism was up-regulated in captive/food-limited mussels and unchanged in wild mussels. Amino acid metabolism was up-regulated in wild mussels and down-regulated in captive/food-limited mussels. Nucleotide metabolism was up-regulated in the wild mussels, down-regulated in food-limited mussels, and unchanged in captive mussels. The different responses between treatment groups suggest potential for nucleotide metabolism as a biomarker of health status for freshwater mussels. PMID:25463058

Roznere, Ieva; Watters, G Thomas; Wolfe, Barbara A; Daly, Marymegan

2014-12-01

117

Biochemical, Transcriptional and Translational Evidences of the Phenol-meta-Degradation Pathway by the Hyperthermophilic Sulfolobus solfataricus 98/2  

PubMed Central

Phenol is a widespread pollutant and a model molecule to study the biodegradation of monoaromatic compounds. After a first oxidation step leading to catechol in mesophilic and thermophilic microorganisms, two main routes have been identified depending on the cleavage of the aromatic ring: ortho involving a catechol 1,2 dioxygenase (C12D) and meta involving a catechol 2,3 dioxygenase (C23D). Our work aimed at elucidating the phenol-degradation pathway in the hyperthermophilic archaea Sulfolobus solfataricus 98/2. For this purpose, the strain was cultivated in a fermentor under different substrate and oxygenation conditions. Indeed, reducing dissolved-oxygen concentration allowed slowing down phenol catabolism (specific growth and phenol-consumption rates dropped 55% and 39%, respectively) and thus, evidencing intermediate accumulations in the broth. HPLC/Diode Array Detector and LC-MS analyses on culture samples at low dissolved-oxygen concentration (DOC ?=? 0.06 mg.L?1) suggested, apart for catechol, the presence of 2-hydroxymuconic acid, 4-oxalocrotonate and 4-hydroxy-2-oxovalerate, three intermediates of the meta route. RT-PCR analysis on oxygenase-coding genes of S. solfataricus 98/2 showed that the gene coding for the C23D was expressed only on phenol. In 2D-DIGE/MALDI-TOF analysis, the C23D was found and identified only on phenol. This set of results allowed us concluding that S. solfataricus 98/2 degrade phenol through the meta route. PMID:24349276

Davidson, Sylvain; Pophillat, Matthieu; Lorquin, Jean; Auria, Richard; Simon, Gwenola; Casalot, Laurence

2013-01-01

118

Selective ?v integrin depletion identifies a core, targetable molecular pathway that regulates fibrosis across solid organs  

PubMed Central

Myofibroblasts are the major source of extracellular matrix components that accumulate during tissue fibrosis, and hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) are the major source of myofibroblasts in the liver. To date, robust systems to genetically manipulate these cells have not existed. We report that Pdgfrb-Cre inactivates genes in murine HSCs with high efficiency. We used this system to delete the ?v integrin subunit because of the suggested role of multiple ?v integrins as central mediators of fibrosis in multiple organs. Depletion of the ?v integrin subunit in HSCs protected mice from CCl4-induced hepatic fibrosis, whereas global loss of ?v?3, ?v?5 or ?v?6 or conditional loss of ?v?8 on HSCs did not. Pdgfrb-Cre effectively targeted myofibroblasts in multiple organs, and depletion of ?v integrins using this system was also protective in models of pulmonary and renal fibrosis. Critically, pharmacological blockade of ?v integrins by a novel small molecule (CWHM 12) attenuated both liver and lung fibrosis, even when administered after fibrosis was established. These data identify a core pathway that regulates fibrosis, and suggest that pharmacological targeting of all ?v integrins may have clinical utility in the treatment of patients with a broad range of fibrotic diseases. PMID:24216753

Henderson, Neil C; Arnold, Thomas D; Katamura, Yoshio; Giacomini, Marilyn M; Rodriguez, Juan D; McCarty, Joseph H; Pellicoro, Antonella; Raschperger, Elisabeth; Betsholtz, Christer; Ruminski, Peter G; Griggs, David W; Prinsen, Michael J; Maher, Jacquelyn J; Iredale, John P; Lacy-Hulbert, Adam; Adams, Ralf H; Sheppard, Dean

2013-01-01

119

Pathways to obesity: identifying local, modifiable determinants of physical activity and diet.  

PubMed

Many studies document small area inequalities in morbidity and mortality and show associations between area deprivation and health. However, few studies unpack the "black box" of area deprivation to show which specific local social and physical environmental characteristics impact upon health, and might be amenable to modification. We theorised a model of the potential causal pathways to obesity and employed path analysis using a rich data set from national studies in England and Scotland to test the model empirically. Significant associations between obesity and neighbourhood disorder and access to local high street facilities (local shops, financial services and health-related stores found in a typical small UK town) were found. There was a tendency for lower levels of obesity in areas with more swimming pools and supermarkets. In turn, policing levels, physical dereliction and recorded violent crime were associated with neighbourhood disorder. The analysis identifies several factors that are associated with (and are probably determinants of) obesity and which are outside the standard remit of the healthcare sector. They highlight the role that public and private sector organisations have in promoting the nation's health. Public health professionals should seek to work alongside or within these organisations to capitalise on opportunities to improve health. PMID:17640787

Stafford, Mai; Cummins, Steven; Ellaway, Anne; Sacker, Amanda; Wiggins, Richard D; Macintyre, Sally

2007-11-01

120

Genetic analysis of the two zebrafish patched homologues identifies novel roles for the hedgehog signaling pathway  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Aberrant activation of the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway in different organisms has shown the importance of this family of morphogens during development. Genetic screens in zebrafish have assigned specific roles for Hh in proliferation, differentiation and patterning, but mainly as a result of a loss of its activity. We attempted to fully activate the Hh pathway by removing both

Marco J Koudijs; Marjo J den Broeder; Evelyn Groot; Fredericus JM van Eeden

2008-01-01

121

GATA4 knockdown in MA-10 Leydig cells identifies multiple target genes in the steroidogenic pathway.  

PubMed

GATA4 is an essential transcription factor required for the initiation of genital ridge formation, for normal testicular and ovarian differentiation at the time of sex determination, and for male and female fertility in adulthood. In spite of its crucial roles, the genes and/or gene networks that are ultimately regulated by GATA4 in gonadal tissues remain to be fully understood. This is particularly true for the steroidogenic lineages such as Leydig cells of the testis where many in vitro (promoter) studies have provided good circumstantial evidence that GATA4 is a key regulator of Leydig cell gene expression and steroidogenesis, but formal proof is still lacking. We therefore performed a microarray screening analysis of MA-10 Leydig cells in which Gata4 expression was knocked down using an siRNA strategy. Analysis identified several GATA4-regulated pathways including cholesterol synthesis, cholesterol transport, and especially steroidogenesis. A decrease in GATA4 protein was associated with decreased expression of steroidogenic genes previously suspected to be GATA4 targets such as Cyp11a1 and Star. Gata4 knockdown also led to an important decrease in other novel steroidogenic targets including Srd5a1, Gsta3, Hsd3b1, and Hsd3b6, as well as genes known to participate in cholesterol metabolism such as Scarb1, Ldlr, Soat1, Scap, and Cyp51. Consistent with the decreased expression of these genes, a reduction in GATA4 protein compromised the ability of MA-10 cells to produce steroids both basally and under hormone stimulation. These data therefore provide strong evidence that GATA4 is an essential transcription factor that sits atop of the Leydig cell steroidogenic program. PMID:25504870

Bergeron, Francis; Nadeau, Gabriel; S Viger, Robert

2015-03-01

122

Integrated pathway-based approach identifies association between genomic regions at CTCF and CACNB2 and schizophrenia.  

PubMed

In the present study, an integrated hierarchical approach was applied to: (1) identify pathways associated with susceptibility to schizophrenia; (2) detect genes that may be potentially affected in these pathways since they contain an associated polymorphism; and (3) annotate the functional consequences of such single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the affected genes or their regulatory regions. The Global Test was applied to detect schizophrenia-associated pathways using discovery and replication datasets comprising 5,040 and 5,082 individuals of European ancestry, respectively. Information concerning functional gene-sets was retrieved from the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes, Gene Ontology, and the Molecular Signatures Database. Fourteen of the gene-sets or pathways identified in the discovery dataset were confirmed in the replication dataset. These include functional processes involved in transcriptional regulation and gene expression, synapse organization, cell adhesion, and apoptosis. For two genes, i.e. CTCF and CACNB2, evidence for association with schizophrenia was available (at the gene-level) in both the discovery study and published data from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium schizophrenia study. Furthermore, these genes mapped to four of the 14 presently identified pathways. Several of the SNPs assigned to CTCF and CACNB2 have potential functional consequences, and a gene in close proximity to CACNB2, i.e. ARL5B, was identified as a potential gene of interest. Application of the present hierarchical approach thus allowed: (1) identification of novel biological gene-sets or pathways with potential involvement in the etiology of schizophrenia, as well as replication of these findings in an independent cohort; (2) detection of genes of interest for future follow-up studies; and (3) the highlighting of novel genes in previously reported candidate regions for schizophrenia. PMID:24901509

Juraeva, Dilafruz; Haenisch, Britta; Zapatka, Marc; Frank, Josef; Witt, Stephanie H; Mühleisen, Thomas W; Treutlein, Jens; Strohmaier, Jana; Meier, Sandra; Degenhardt, Franziska; Giegling, Ina; Ripke, Stephan; Leber, Markus; Lange, Christoph; Schulze, Thomas G; Mössner, Rainald; Nenadic, Igor; Sauer, Heinrich; Rujescu, Dan; Maier, Wolfgang; Børglum, Anders; Ophoff, Roel; Cichon, Sven; Nöthen, Markus M; Rietschel, Marcella; Mattheisen, Manuel; Brors, Benedikt

2014-06-01

123

Integrated Pathway-Based Approach Identifies Association between Genomic Regions at CTCF and CACNB2 and Schizophrenia  

PubMed Central

In the present study, an integrated hierarchical approach was applied to: (1) identify pathways associated with susceptibility to schizophrenia; (2) detect genes that may be potentially affected in these pathways since they contain an associated polymorphism; and (3) annotate the functional consequences of such single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the affected genes or their regulatory regions. The Global Test was applied to detect schizophrenia-associated pathways using discovery and replication datasets comprising 5,040 and 5,082 individuals of European ancestry, respectively. Information concerning functional gene-sets was retrieved from the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes, Gene Ontology, and the Molecular Signatures Database. Fourteen of the gene-sets or pathways identified in the discovery dataset were confirmed in the replication dataset. These include functional processes involved in transcriptional regulation and gene expression, synapse organization, cell adhesion, and apoptosis. For two genes, i.e. CTCF and CACNB2, evidence for association with schizophrenia was available (at the gene-level) in both the discovery study and published data from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium schizophrenia study. Furthermore, these genes mapped to four of the 14 presently identified pathways. Several of the SNPs assigned to CTCF and CACNB2 have potential functional consequences, and a gene in close proximity to CACNB2, i.e. ARL5B, was identified as a potential gene of interest. Application of the present hierarchical approach thus allowed: (1) identification of novel biological gene-sets or pathways with potential involvement in the etiology of schizophrenia, as well as replication of these findings in an independent cohort; (2) detection of genes of interest for future follow-up studies; and (3) the highlighting of novel genes in previously reported candidate regions for schizophrenia. PMID:24901509

Zapatka, Marc; Frank, Josef; Witt, Stephanie H.; Mühleisen, Thomas W.; Treutlein, Jens; Strohmaier, Jana; Meier, Sandra; Degenhardt, Franziska; Giegling, Ina; Ripke, Stephan; Leber, Markus; Lange, Christoph; Schulze, Thomas G.; Mössner, Rainald; Nenadic, Igor; Sauer, Heinrich; Rujescu, Dan; Maier, Wolfgang; Børglum, Anders; Ophoff, Roel; Cichon, Sven; Nöthen, Markus M.; Rietschel, Marcella; Mattheisen, Manuel; Brors, Benedikt

2014-01-01

124

Major carcinogenic pathways identified by gene expression analysis of peritoneal mesotheliomas following chemical treatment in F344 rats  

EPA Science Inventory

This study was performed to characterize the gene expression profile and to identify the major carcinogenic pathways involved in rat peritoneal mesothelioma (RPM) formation following treatment of Fischer 344 rats with o-nitrotoluene (o-NT) or bromochloracetic acid (BCA). Oligo a...

125

M. truncatula histidine-containing phosphotransfer protein: structural and biochemical insights into cytokinin transduction pathway in plants  

PubMed Central

Histidine-containing phosphotransfer proteins (HPts) take part in hormone signal transduction in higher plants. The overall pathway of this process is reminiscent of the two-component system initially identified in prokaryotes. HPts function in histidine-aspartate phosphorelays where they mediate the signal from sensory kinases (usually membrane proteins) to response regulators in the nucleus. Here we report the crystal structure of an HPt protein from Medicago truncatula (MtHPt1) determined at 1.45 Å resolution and refined to an R factor of 16.7% using low-temperature synchrotron-radiation X-ray diffraction data. There is one MtHPt1 molecule in the asymmetric unit of the crystal lattice with P212121 symmetry. The protein fold consists of six ?-helices, four of which form a C-terminal helix bundle. The coiled-coil structure of the bundle is stabilized by a network of S-aromatic interactions involving highly conserved sulfur-containing residues. The structure reveals a solvent-exposed side chain of His79, which is the phosphorylation site, as demonstrated by autoradiography combined with site-directed mutation. It is surrounded by highly conserved residues present in all plant HPts. These residues form a putative docking interface for either the receiver domain of the sensory kinase, or for the response regulator. The biological activity of MtHPt1 was tested by autoradiography. It demonstrated phosphorylation by the intracellular kinase domain of the cytokinin receptor MtCRE1. Complex formation between MtHPt1 and the intracellular fragment of MtCRE1 was confirmed by thermophoresis, with a dissociation constant Kd of 14 ?M. PMID:23721763

Ruszkowski, M.; Brzezinski, K.; Jedrzejczak, R.; Dauter, M.; Dauter, Z.; Sikorski, M.; Jaskolski, M.

2013-01-01

126

Identifiable Achatina giant neurones: their localizations in ganglia, axonal pathways and pharmacological features.  

PubMed

1. An African giant snail (Achatina fulica Férussac), originally from East Africa, is now found abundantly in tropical and subtropical regions of Asia, including Okinawa in Japan. This is one of the largest land snail species in the world. The Achatina central nervous system is composed of the buccal, cerebral and suboesophageal ganglia. The 37 giant neurones were identified in these ganglia by the series of studies conducted over about 20 years. The identifications were made by the localization of these neurones in the ganglia, their axonal pathways and their pharmacological features. 2. In the left buccal ganglion, the four giant neurones, d-LBAN, d-LBMB, d-LBCN and d-LBPN, were identified. In the left and right cerebral ganglia, d-LCDN, d-RCDN, v-LCDN and v-RCDN were identified. The suboesophageal ganglia are further composed of the left and right parietal, the visceral, the left and right pleural, and the left and right pedal ganglia. In the right parietal ganglion, PON, TAN, TAN-2, TAN-3, RAPN, d-RPLN, BAPN, LPPN, LBPN, LAPN and v-RPLN were identified. In the visceral ganglion, VIN, FAN, INN, d-VLN, v-VLN, v-VAN, LVMN, RVMN and v-VNAN were identified. In the left parietal ganglion, v-LPSN was identified. In the left and right pedal ganglia, LPeNLN, RPeNLN, d-LPeLN, d-LPeCN, d-RPeAN, d-LPeDN, d-LPeMN and d-LPeEN were identified. 3. Of the small molecule compounds tested, dopamine, 5-hydroxytryptamine, GABA, L-glutamic acid, threo- or erythro-beta-hydroxy-L-glutamic acid were effective on the Achatina giant neurones. We suppose that these compounds act as the neurotransmitters for these neurones. 4. Of the neuroactive peptides, achatin-I(Gly-D-Phe-Ala-Asp). APGW-amide(Ala-Pro-Gly-Trp-NH2) and Achatina cardioexcitatory peptide (ACEP-1)(Ser-Gly-Gln-Ser-Trp-Arg-Pro-Gln-Gly-Arg-Phe-NH2) were proposed as neurotransmitters, because these were effective on the Achatina giant neurones and their presence was demonstrated in the Achatina ganglia. Further, myomodulin (Pro-Met-Ser-Met-Leu-Arg-Leu-NH2), buccalin (Gly-Met-Asp-Ser-Leu-Ala-Phe-Ser-Gly-Gly-Leu-NH2), FMRFamide (Phe-Met-Arg-Phe-NH2). [Ser2]-Mytilus inhibitory peptide ([Ser2]-MIP) (Gly-Ser-Pro-Met-Phe-Val-NH2), catch-relaxing peptide (CARP) (Ala-Met-Pro-Met-Leu-Arg-Leu-NH2), oxytocin (Cys-Tyr-Ile-Gln-Asn-Cys-Pro-Leu-Gly-NH2) and small cardioactive peptideB (SCPB) (Met-Asn-Tyr-Leu-Ala-Phe-Pro-Arg-Met-NH2) could also be neurotransmitters because these peptides were also effective on the Achatina giant neurones, though their presence in the ganglia of this animal has not yet been demonstrated. 5. Calcium current (ICa) was recorded from Achatina giant neurones in the Na(+)-free solution containing K(+)-channel blockers under voltage clamp. The Ca2+ antagonistic effects of brovincamine, verapamil, eperisone, diltiazem, monatepil, etc., were compared using the ICa of the Achatina neurones. 6. Almost all of the mammalian small molecule neurotransmitters were effective on the Achatina giant neurones, suggesting that these compounds are acting on the neurones of a wide variety of animal species. However, the pharmacological features of the Achatina neurone receptors to these compounds were not fully comparable to those of the mammalian receptors. For example, we proposed that beta-hydroxy-L-glutamic acid (either threo- or erythro-) could be an inhibitory neurotransmitter for an Achatina neurone. 7. In contrast, the Achatina giant neurones appear to have no receptor for the mammalian neuroactive peptides, except for oxytocin and Arg-vasotocin. On the other hand, many neuroactive peptides were isolated from invertebrate nervous tissues, including achatin-I, a neuroexcitatory tetrapeptide having a D-phenylalanine residue. PMID:8742492

Takeuchi, H; Araki, Y; Emaduddin, M; Zhang, W; Han, X Y; Salunga, T L; Wong, S M

1996-01-01

127

Pesticide transport pathways from a sloped Litchi orchard to an adjacent tropical stream as identified by hydrograph separation.  

PubMed

This study was performed to identify the transport pathways of pesticides from a sloped litchi ( Sonn.) orchard to a nearby stream based on a three-component hydrograph separation (baseflow, interflow, surface runoff). Dissolved silica and electrical conductivity were chosen as representative tracers. During the study period (30 d), 0.4 and 0.01% of the applied mass of atrazine and chlorpyrifos, respectively, were detected in the stream after 151 mm of rainfall. Baseflow (80-96%) was the dominant hydrological flow component, followed by interflow (3-18%) and surface runoff (1-7%). Despite its small contribution to total discharge, surface runoff was the dominant atrazine transport pathway during the first days after application because pesticide concentrations in the surface runoff flow component declined quickly within several days. Preferential transport with interflow became the dominant pathway of atrazine. Because chlorpyrifos was detected in the stream water only twice, it was not included in the hydrograph separation. A feature of the surface runoff pathway was the coincidence of pesticide and discharge peaks. In contrast, peak concentrations of pesticides transported by interflow occurred during the hydrograph recession phases. Stormflow generation and pesticide transport depended on antecedent rainfall. The combination of high-resolution pesticide concentration measurements with a three-component hydrograph separation has been shown to be a suitable method to identify pesticide transport pathways under tropical conditions. PMID:22751076

Duffner, Andreas; Ingwersen, Joachim; Hugenschmidt, Cindy; Streck, Thilo

2012-01-01

128

Gene Network Inference and Biochemical Assessment Delineates GPCR Pathways and CREB Targets in Small Intestinal Neuroendocrine Neoplasia  

PubMed Central

Small intestinal (SI) neuroendocrine tumors (NET) are increasing in incidence, however little is known about their biology. High throughput techniques such as inference of gene regulatory networks from microarray experiments can objectively define signaling machinery in this disease. Genome-wide co-expression analysis was used to infer gene relevance network in SI-NETs. The network was confirmed to be non-random, scale-free, and highly modular. Functional analysis of gene co-expression modules revealed processes including ‘Nervous system development’, ‘Immune response’, and ‘Cell-cycle’. Importantly, gene network topology and differential expression analysis identified over-expression of the GPCR signaling regulators, the cAMP synthetase, ADCY2, and the protein kinase A, PRKAR1A. Seven CREB response element (CRE) transcripts associated with proliferation and secretion: BEX1, BICD1, CHGB, CPE, GABRB3, SCG2 and SCG3 as well as ADCY2 and PRKAR1A were measured in an independent SI dataset (n?=?10 NETs; n?=?8 normal preparations). All were up-regulated (p<0.035) with the exception of SCG3 which was not differently expressed. Forskolin (a direct cAMP activator, 10?5 M) significantly stimulated transcription of pCREB and 3/7 CREB targets, isoproterenol (a selective ß-adrenergic receptor agonist and cAMP activator, 10?5 M) stimulated pCREB and 4/7 targets while BIM-53061 (a dopamine D2 and Serotonin [5-HT2] receptor agonist, 10?6 M) stimulated 100% of targets as well as pCREB; CRE transcription correlated with the levels of cAMP accumulation and PKA activity; BIM-53061 stimulated the highest levels of cAMP and PKA (2.8-fold and 2.5-fold vs. 1.8–2-fold for isoproterenol and forskolin). Gene network inference and graph topology analysis in SI NETs suggests that SI NETs express neural GPCRs that activate different CRE targets associated with proliferation and secretion. In vitro studies, in a model NET cell system, confirmed that transcriptional effects are signaled through the cAMP/PKA/pCREB signaling pathway and that a SI NET cell line was most sensitive to a D2 and 5-HT2 receptor agonist BIM-53061. PMID:21853033

Drozdov, Ignat; Svejda, Bernhard; Gustafsson, Bjorn I.; Mane, Shrikant; Pfragner, Roswitha; Kidd, Mark; Modlin, Irvin M.

2011-01-01

129

A tumor suppressor is identified as an inhibitor of inflammatory pathways  

Cancer.gov

Scientists at NCI have found that a protein, FBXW7, which acts as a tumor suppressor, is also important for the reduction in strength of inflammatory pathways. It has long been recognized that a complex interaction exists between cancer causing mechanisms and inflammation.

130

Pubertal Effects on Adjustment in Girls: Moving from Demonstrating Effects to Identifying Pathways  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The present investigation examines mediated pathways from pubertal development to changes in depressive affect and aggression. Participants were 100 white girls who were between the ages of 10 and 14 (M=12.13, SD=0.80); girls were from well-educated, middle-to upper-middle class families, and attended private schools in a major northeastern urban…

Graber, Julia A.; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne; Warren, Michelle P.

2006-01-01

131

Genome-wide association study identifies TH1 pathway genes associated with lung function in asthmatic patients  

PubMed Central

Background Recent meta-analyses of genome-wide association studies in general populations of European descent have identified 28 loci for lung function. Objective We sought to identify novel lung function loci specifically for asthma and to confirm lung function loci identified in general populations. Methods Genome-wide association studies of lung function (percent predicted FEV1 [ppFEV1], percent predicted forced vital capacity, and FEV1/forced vital capacity ratio) were performed in 4 white populations of European descent (n = 1544), followed by meta-analyses. Results Seven of 28 previously identified lung function loci (HHIP, FAM13A, THSD4, GSTCD, NOTCH4-AGER, RARB, and ZNF323) identified in general populations were confirmed at single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) levels (P < .05). Four of 32 loci (IL12A, IL12RB1, STAT4, and IRF2) associated with ppFEV1 (P < 10?4) belong to the TH1 or IL-12 cytokine family pathway. By using a linear additive model, these 4 TH1 pathway SNPs cumulatively explained 2.9% to 7.8% of the variance in ppFEV1 values in 4 populations (P = 3 × 10?11). Genetic scores of these 4 SNPs were associated with ppFEV1 values (P = 2 × 10?7) and the American Thoracic Society severe asthma classification (P = .005) in the Severe Asthma Research Program population. TH2 pathway genes (IL13, TSLP, IL33, and IL1RL1) conferring asthma susceptibility were not associated with lung function. Conclusion Genes involved in airway structure/remodeling are associated with lung function in both general populations and asthmatic subjects. TH1 pathway genes involved in anti-virus/bacterial infection and inflammation modify lung function in asthmatic subjects. Genes associated with lung function that might affect asthma severity are distinct from those genes associated with asthma susceptibility. PMID:23541324

Li, Xingnan; Hawkins, Gregory A.; Ampleford, Elizabeth J.; Moore, Wendy C.; Li, Huashi; Hastie, Annette T.; Howard, Timothy D.; Boushey, Homer A.; Busse, William W.; Calhoun, William J.; Castro, Mario; Erzurum, Serpil C.; Israel, Elliot; Lemanske, Robert F.; Szefler, Stanley J.; Wasserman, Stephen I.; Wenzel, Sally E.; Peters, Stephen P.; Meyers, Deborah A.; Bleecker, Eugene R.

2013-01-01

132

Biochemical characterization of the O-linked glycosylation pathway in Neisseria gonorrhoeae responsible for biosynthesis of protein glycans containing N,N'-diacetylbacillosamine.  

PubMed

The O-linked protein glycosylation pathway in Neisseria gonorrhoeae is responsible for the synthesis of a complex oligosaccharide on undecaprenyl diphosphate and subsequent en bloc transfer of the glycan to serine residues of select periplasmic proteins. Protein glycosylation (pgl) genes have been annotated on the basis of bioinformatics and top-down mass spectrometry analysis of protein modifications in pgl-null strains [Aas, F. E., et al. (2007) Mol. Microbiol. 65, 607-624; Vik, A., et al. (2009) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 106, 4447-4452], but relatively little biochemical analysis has been performed to date. In this report, we present the expression, purification, and functional characterization of seven Pgl enzymes. Specifically, the enzymes studied are responsible for synthesis of an uncommon uridine diphosphate (UDP)-sugar (PglD, PglC, and PglB-acetyltransferase domain), glycan assembly (PglB-phospho-glycosyltransferase domain, PglA, PglE, and PglH), and final oligosaccharide transfer (PglO). UDP-2,4-diacetamido-2,4,6-trideoxy-?-d-hexose (DATDH), which is the first sugar in glycan biosynthesis, was produced enzymatically, and the stereochemistry was assigned as uridine diphosphate N'-diacetylbacillosamine (UDP-diNAcBac) by nuclear magnetic resonance characterization. In addition, the substrate specificities of the phospho-glycosyltransferase, glycosyltransferases, and oligosaccharyltransferase (OTase) were analyzed in vitro, and in most cases, these enzymes exhibited strong preferences for the native substrates relative to closely related glycans. In particular, PglO, the O-linked OTase, and PglB(Cj), the N-linked OTase from Campylobacter jejuni, preferred the native N. gonorrhoeae and C. jejuni substrates, respectively. This study represents the first comprehensive biochemical characterization of this important O-linked glycosylation pathway and provides the basis for further investigations of these enzymes as antibacterial targets. PMID:21542610

Hartley, Meredith D; Morrison, Michael J; Aas, Finn Erik; Børud, Bente; Koomey, Michael; Imperiali, Barbara

2011-06-01

133

Biochemical characterization of the O-linked glycosylation pathway in Neisseria gonorrhoeae responsible for biosynthesis of protein glycans containing N,N’-diacetylbacillosamine†  

PubMed Central

The O-linked protein glycosylation pathway in Neisseria gonorrhoeae is responsible for the synthesis of a complex oligosaccharide on undecaprenyl diphosphate and subsequent en bloc transfer of the glycan to serine residues of select periplasmic proteins. Protein glycosylation (pgl) genes have been annotated on the basis of bioinformatics and top-down mass spectrometry analysis of protein modifications in pgl-null strains (1, 2), but relatively little biochemical analysis has been performed to date. In this report, we present the expression, purification and functional characterization of seven Pgl enzymes. Specifically, the enzymes studied are responsible for synthesis of an uncommon uridine diphosphate (UDP)-sugar (PglD, PglC, and PglB-acetyltransferase domain), glycan assembly (PglB-phospho-glycosyltransferase domain, PglA, PglE, and PglH) and final oligosaccharide transfer (PglO). UDP-2,4-diacetamido-2,4,6-trideoxy-?-D-hexose (DATDH), which is the first sugar in glycan biosynthesis, was produced enzymatically and the stereochemistry was assigned as uridine diphosphate N’-diacetylbacillosamine (UDP-diNAcBac) by NMR characterization. In addition, the substrate specificities of the phospho-glycosyltransferase, glycosyltransferases and oligosaccharyltransferase (OTase) were analyzed in vitro and in most cases, these enzymes showed strong preferences for the native substrates relative to closely related glycans. In particular, PglO, the O-linked OTase, and PglB(Cj), the N-linked OTase from Campylobacter jejuni, preferred the native N. gonorrhoeae or C. jejuni substrates, respectively. This study represents the first comprehensive biochemical characterization of this important O-linked glycosylation pathway and provides the basis for further investigations of these enzymes as antibacterial targets. PMID:21542610

Hartley, Meredith D.; Morrison, Michael J.; Aas, Finn Erik; Børud, Bente; Koomey, Michael; Imperiali, Barbara

2011-01-01

134

Dominant mutations in S. cerevisiae PMS1 identify the Mlh1-Pms1 endonuclease active site and an exonuclease 1-independent mismatch repair pathway.  

PubMed

Lynch syndrome (hereditary nonpolypsis colorectal cancer or HNPCC) is a common cancer predisposition syndrome. Predisposition to cancer in this syndrome results from increased accumulation of mutations due to defective mismatch repair (MMR) caused by a mutation in one of the mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 or PMS2/scPMS1. To better understand the function of Mlh1-Pms1 in MMR, we used Saccharomyces cerevisiae to identify six pms1 mutations (pms1-G683E, pms1-C817R, pms1-C848S, pms1-H850R, pms1-H703A and pms1-E707A) that were weakly dominant in wild-type cells, which surprisingly caused a strong MMR defect when present on low copy plasmids in an exo1? mutant. Molecular modeling showed these mutations caused amino acid substitutions in the metal coordination pocket of the Pms1 endonuclease active site and biochemical studies showed that they inactivated the endonuclease activity. This model of Mlh1-Pms1 suggested that the Mlh1-FERC motif contributes to the endonuclease active site. Consistent with this, the mlh1-E767stp mutation caused both MMR and endonuclease defects similar to those caused by the dominant pms1 mutations whereas mutations affecting the predicted metal coordinating residue Mlh1-C769 had no effect. These studies establish that the Mlh1-Pms1 endonuclease is required for MMR in a previously uncharacterized Exo1-independent MMR pathway. PMID:24204293

Smith, Catherine E; Mendillo, Marc L; Bowen, Nikki; Hombauer, Hans; Campbell, Christopher S; Desai, Arshad; Putnam, Christopher D; Kolodner, Richard D

2013-10-01

135

Dominant Mutations in S. cerevisiae PMS1 Identify the Mlh1-Pms1 Endonuclease Active Site and an Exonuclease 1-Independent Mismatch Repair Pathway  

PubMed Central

Lynch syndrome (hereditary nonpolypsis colorectal cancer or HNPCC) is a common cancer predisposition syndrome. Predisposition to cancer in this syndrome results from increased accumulation of mutations due to defective mismatch repair (MMR) caused by a mutation in one of the mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 or PMS2/scPMS1. To better understand the function of Mlh1-Pms1 in MMR, we used Saccharomyces cerevisiae to identify six pms1 mutations (pms1-G683E, pms1-C817R, pms1-C848S, pms1-H850R, pms1-H703A and pms1-E707A) that were weakly dominant in wild-type cells, which surprisingly caused a strong MMR defect when present on low copy plasmids in an exo1? mutant. Molecular modeling showed these mutations caused amino acid substitutions in the metal coordination pocket of the Pms1 endonuclease active site and biochemical studies showed that they inactivated the endonuclease activity. This model of Mlh1-Pms1 suggested that the Mlh1-FERC motif contributes to the endonuclease active site. Consistent with this, the mlh1-E767stp mutation caused both MMR and endonuclease defects similar to those caused by the dominant pms1 mutations whereas mutations affecting the predicted metal coordinating residue Mlh1-C769 had no effect. These studies establish that the Mlh1-Pms1 endonuclease is required for MMR in a previously uncharacterized Exo1-independent MMR pathway. PMID:24204293

Smith, Catherine E.; Mendillo, Marc L.; Bowen, Nikki; Hombauer, Hans; Campbell, Christopher S.; Desai, Arshad; Putnam, Christopher D.; Kolodner, Richard D.

2013-01-01

136

Pubertal Effects on Adjustment in Girls: Moving from Demonstrating Effects to Identifying Pathways  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present investigation examines mediated pathways from pubertal development to changes in depressive affect and aggression. Participants were 100 white girls who were between the ages of 10 and 14 (M=12.13, SD=.80); girls were from well-educated, middle- to upper-middle class families, and attended private schools in a major northeastern urban area. Three aspects of pubertal development were examined: (a) estradiol

Julia A. Graber; Jeanne Brooks-Gunn; Michelle P. Warren

2006-01-01

137

Modulation of nitrergic pathway by sesamol prevents cognitive deficits and associated biochemical alterations in intracerebroventricular streptozotocin administered rats.  

PubMed

Alzheimer's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive cognitive decline and widespread loss of neurons and their synapses in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus. Increasing evidence indicates that factors such as oxidative-nitrergic stress, glutathione depletion, impaired protein metabolism and cholinergic deficit can interact in a vicious cycle, which is central to Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis. Intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) streptozotocin induced-cognitive impairment has been widely used as an experimental paradigm to study Alzheimer's disease. In the present study, i.c.v. streptozotocin produced significant cognitive deficits as measured in Morris water maze and elevated plus maze task coupled with increased serum TNF-? levels and marked rise in brain acetylcholinesterase and oxidative-nitrergic stress in female Wistar rats. Sesamol (5-hydroxy-1,3-benzodioxole or 3,4-methylenedioxyphenol), a potent anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory molecule markedly improved cognitive impairment, reduced acetylcholinesterase activity, TNF-? levels and attenuated oxidative-nitrergic stress in brain of i.c.v.-streptozotocin treated rats. Administration of L-arginine (125 mg/kg i.p), a nitric oxide donor, alone to i.c.v.-streptozotocin treated rats accentuated behavioral and biochemical deficits and also abolished the protective effect of sesamol (8 mg/kg). L-NAME (10 mg/kgi.p.), a non-specific NOS inhibitor significantly restored all the behavioral and biochemical indices in i.c.v.-streptozotocin rats. Moreover, combination of L-NAME with sub-effective dose of sesamol (4 mg/kg) potentiated its protective effect. Our findings demonstrate the effectiveness of sesamol in preventing intracerebroventricular streptozotocin-induced cognitive deficits by modulating nitrergic signaling and oxido-inflammatory cascade. PMID:21463622

Misra, Shubham; Tiwari, Vinod; Kuhad, Anurag; Chopra, Kanwaljit

2011-06-01

138

Activation of Two Different but Complementary Biochemical Pathways Stimulates Release of Hypothalamic Luteinizing Hormone-Releasing Hormone  

Microsoft Academic Search

Evidence exists that a norepinephrine\\/prostaglandin E2 (PGE2)\\/cAMP pathway is involved in the regulation of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) secretion. The aim of the present experiments was to determine if release of LHRH from the immature rat hypothalamus could also be stimulated by activation of protein kinase C. Median eminences from 28-day-old female rats were incubated in vitro with either dioctanoylglycerol

S. R. Ojeda; H. F. Urbanski; K. H. Katz; M. E. Costa; P. M. Conn

1986-01-01

139

Structural and biochemical characterization of Chlamydia trachomatis hypothetical protein CT263 supports that menaquinone synthesis occurs through the futalosine pathway.  

PubMed

The obligate intracellular human pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis is the etiological agent of blinding trachoma and sexually transmitted disease. Genomic sequencing of Chlamydia indicated this medically important bacterium was not exclusively dependent on the host cell for energy. In order for the electron transport chain to function, electron shuttling between membrane-embedded complexes requires lipid-soluble quinones (e.g. menaquionone or ubiquinone). The sources or biosynthetic pathways required to obtain these electron carriers within C. trachomatis are poorly understood. The 1.58Å crystal structure of C. trachomatis hypothetical protein CT263 presented here supports a role in quinone biosynthesis. Although CT263 lacks sequence-based functional annotation, the crystal structure of CT263 displays striking structural similarity to 5'-methylthioadenosine nucleosidase (MTAN) enzymes. Although CT263 lacks the active site-associated dimer interface found in prototypical MTANs, co-crystal structures with product (adenine) or substrate (5'-methylthioadenosine) indicate that the canonical active site residues are conserved. Enzymatic characterization of CT263 indicates that the futalosine pathway intermediate 6-amino-6-deoxyfutalosine (kcat/Km = 1.8 × 10(3) M(-1) s(-1)), but not the prototypical MTAN substrates (e.g. S-adenosylhomocysteine and 5'-methylthioadenosine), is hydrolyzed. Bioinformatic analyses of the chlamydial proteome also support the futalosine pathway toward the synthesis of menaquinone in Chlamydiaceae. This report provides the first experimental support for quinone synthesis in Chlamydia. Menaquinone synthesis provides another target for agents to combat C. trachomatis infection. PMID:25253688

Barta, Michael L; Thomas, Keisha; Yuan, Hongling; Lovell, Scott; Battaile, Kevin P; Schramm, Vern L; Hefty, P Scott

2014-11-14

140

Multi-SNP Analysis of GWAS Data Identifies Pathways Associated with Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease  

PubMed Central

Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a common liver disease; the histological spectrum of which ranges from steatosis to steatohepatitis. Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) often leads to cirrhosis and development of hepatocellular carcinoma. To better understand pathogenesis of NAFLD, we performed the pathway of distinction analysis (PoDA) on a genome-wide association study dataset of 250 non-Hispanic white female adult patients with NAFLD, who were enrolled in the NASH Clinical Research Network (CRN) Database Study, to investigate whether biologic process variation measured through genomic variation of genes within these pathways was related to the development of steatohepatitis or cirrhosis. Pathways such as Recycling of eIF2:GDP, biosynthesis of steroids, Terpenoid biosynthesis and Cholesterol biosynthesis were found to be significantly associated with NASH. SNP variants in Terpenoid synthesis, Cholesterol biosynthesis and biosynthesis of steroids were associated with lobular inflammation and cytologic ballooning while those in Terpenoid synthesis were also associated with fibrosis and cirrhosis. These were also related to the NAFLD activity score (NAS) which is derived from the histological severity of steatosis, inflammation and ballooning degeneration. Eukaryotic protein translation and recycling of eIF2:GDP related SNP variants were associated with ballooning, steatohepatitis and cirrhosis. Il2 signaling events mediated by PI3K, Mitotic metaphase/anaphase transition, and Prostanoid ligand receptors were also significantly associated with cirrhosis. Taken together, the results provide evidence for additional ways, beyond the effects of single SNPs, by which genetic factors might contribute to the susceptibility to develop a particular phenotype of NAFLD and then progress to cirrhosis. Further studies are warranted to explain potential important genetic roles of these biological processes in NAFLD. PMID:23894275

Chen, Qing-Rong; Braun, Rosemary; Hu, Ying; Yan, Chunhua; Brunt, Elizabeth M.; Meerzaman, Daoud

2013-01-01

141

Identifying competing aerobic nitrobenzene biodegradation pathways by compound-specific isotope analysis.  

PubMed

Nitroaromatic compounds that contaminate soil and groundwater can be biodegraded by different, sometimes competing reaction pathways. We evaluated the combined use of compound-specific stable C and N isotope analysis to distinguish between enzymatic nitrobenzene oxidation by Comamonas sp. strain JS765 and partial reduction by Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes strain JS45 under aerobic conditions. Bulk 13C and 15N enrichment factors for nitrobenzene dioxygenation with JS765 were -3.9 per thousand +/- 0.09 per thousand (+/- 1sigma) and -0.75 per thousand +/- 0.09 per thousand, respectively. The corresponding primary apparent kinetic isotope effects (AKIE) of 1.0241 +/- 0.0005 for 13C and a secondary 15N AKIE of 1.0008 +/- 0.0001 are in very good agreement with the proposed enzymatic addition of dioxygen to the aromatic ring to form a cis-dihydrodiol in the rate-limiting step of nitrobenzene degradation. For the partial reduction pathway with JS45, epsilonC and epsilonN values were -0.57 per thousand +/- 0.06 per thousand and -26.6 per thousand +/- 0.7 per thousand. The 13C and 15N AKIEs amount to 1.0034 +/- 0.0003 and 1.0273 +/- 0.0008, respectively, and are consistent with the two-electron reduction and dehydration of the aromatic NO2 group to nitrosobenzene. The combined evaluation of delta13C and delta15N changes in nitrobenzene, based on the isotope enrichment behavior found in this laboratory study, provide an excellent starting point for assessing of the extent of nitrobenzene biodegradation via competing pathways in contaminated environments. PMID:18678003

Hofstetter, Thomas B; Spain, Jim C; Nishino, Shirley F; Bolotin, Jakov; Schwarzenbach, Rene P

2008-07-01

142

Computational Biophysical, Biochemical, and Evolutionary Signature of Human R-Spondin Family Proteins, the Member of Canonical Wnt/?-Catenin Signaling Pathway  

PubMed Central

In human, Wnt/?-catenin signaling pathway plays a significant role in cell growth, cell development, and disease pathogenesis. Four human (Rspo)s are known to activate canonical Wnt/?-catenin signaling pathway. Presently, (Rspo)s serve as therapeutic target for several human diseases. Henceforth, basic understanding about the molecular properties of (Rspo)s is essential. We approached this issue by interpreting the biochemical and biophysical properties along with molecular evolution of (Rspo)s thorough computational algorithm methods. Our analysis shows that signal peptide length is roughly similar in (Rspo)s family along with similarity in aa distribution pattern. In Rspo3, four N-glycosylation sites were noted. All members are hydrophilic in nature and showed alike GRAVY values, approximately. Conversely, Rspo3 contains the maximum positively charged residues while Rspo4 includes the lowest. Four highly aligned blocks were recorded through Gblocks. Phylogenetic analysis shows Rspo4 is being rooted with Rspo2 and similarly Rspo3 and Rspo1 have the common point of origin. Through phylogenomics study, we developed a phylogenetic tree of sixty proteins (n = 60) with the orthologs and paralogs seed sequences. Protein-protein network was also illustrated. Results demonstrated in our study may help the future researchers to unfold significant physiological and therapeutic properties of (Rspo)s in various disease models. PMID:25276837

Sharma, Ashish Ranjan; Lee, Sang-Soo; Yoon, Jeong Kyo; George Priya Doss, C.; Song, Dong-Keun

2014-01-01

143

Metabolic, genomic, and biochemical analyses of glandular trichomes from the wild tomato species Lycopersicon hirsutum identify a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of methylketones.  

PubMed

Medium-length methylketones (C7-C15) are highly effective in protecting plants from numerous pests. We used a biochemical genomics approach to elucidate the pathway leading to synthesis of methylketones in the glandular trichomes of the wild tomato Lycopersicon hirsutum f glabratum (accession PI126449). A comparison of gland EST databases from accession PI126449 and a second L. hirsutum accession, LA1777, whose glands do not contain methylketones, showed that the expression of genes for fatty acid biosynthesis is elevated in PI126449 glands, suggesting de novo biosynthesis of methylketones. A cDNA abundant in the PI126449 gland EST database but rare in the LA1777 database was similar in sequence to plant esterases. This cDNA, designated Methylketone Synthase 1 (MKS1), was expressed in Escherichia coli and the purified protein used to catalyze in vitro reactions in which C12, C14, and C16 beta-ketoacyl-acyl-carrier-proteins (intermediates in fatty acid biosynthesis) were hydrolyzed and decarboxylated to give C11, C13, and C15 methylketones, respectively. Although MKS1 does not contain a classical transit peptide, in vitro import assays showed that it was targeted to the stroma of plastids, where fatty acid biosynthesis occurs. Levels of MKS1 transcript, protein, and enzymatic activity were correlated with levels of methylketones and gland density in a variety of tomato accessions and in different plant organs. PMID:15772286

Fridman, Eyal; Wang, Jihong; Iijima, Yoko; Froehlich, John E; Gang, David R; Ohlrogge, John; Pichersky, Eran

2005-04-01

144

Metabolic, Genomic, and Biochemical Analyses of Glandular Trichomes from the Wild Tomato Species Lycopersicon hirsutum Identify a Key Enzyme in the Biosynthesis of MethylketonesW?  

PubMed Central

Medium-length methylketones (C7-C15) are highly effective in protecting plants from numerous pests. We used a biochemical genomics approach to elucidate the pathway leading to synthesis of methylketones in the glandular trichomes of the wild tomato Lycopersicon hirsutum f glabratum (accession PI126449). A comparison of gland EST databases from accession PI126449 and a second L. hirsutum accession, LA1777, whose glands do not contain methylketones, showed that the expression of genes for fatty acid biosynthesis is elevated in PI126449 glands, suggesting de novo biosynthesis of methylketones. A cDNA abundant in the PI126449 gland EST database but rare in the LA1777 database was similar in sequence to plant esterases. This cDNA, designated Methylketone Synthase 1 (MKS1), was expressed in Escherichia coli and the purified protein used to catalyze in vitro reactions in which C12, C14, and C16 ?-ketoacyl–acyl-carrier-proteins (intermediates in fatty acid biosynthesis) were hydrolyzed and decarboxylated to give C11, C13, and C15 methylketones, respectively. Although MKS1 does not contain a classical transit peptide, in vitro import assays showed that it was targeted to the stroma of plastids, where fatty acid biosynthesis occurs. Levels of MKS1 transcript, protein, and enzymatic activity were correlated with levels of methylketones and gland density in a variety of tomato accessions and in different plant organs. PMID:15772286

Fridman, Eyal; Wang, Jihong; Iijima, Yoko; Froehlich, John E.; Gang, David R.; Ohlrogge, John; Pichersky, Eran

2005-01-01

145

The Prognostic Value of the Apoptosis Pathway in Colorectal Cancer: A Review of the Literature on Biomarkers Identified by Immunohistochemistry  

PubMed Central

Research towards biomarkers that predict patient outcome in colorectal cancer (CRC) is rapidly expanding. However, none of these biomarkers have been recommended by the American Association of Clinical Oncology or the European Group on Tumor Markers. Current staging criteria result in substantial under-and over-treatment of CRC patients. Evasion of apoptosis, a characteristic feature of tumorigenesis, is known to correlate with patient outcome. We reviewed the literature on immunohistochemistry-based studies between 1998 and 2011 describing biomarkers in this pathway in CRC and identified 26 markers. Most frequently described were p53, Bcl-2, survivin, and the Fas and TRAILR1 receptors and their ligands. None of the studies reviewed provided sufficient support for implementing a single marker into current clinical practice. This is likely due to the complex biology of this pathway. We suggest focusing on the combination of key markers within the apoptosis pathway that together represent an ‘apoptotic tumor profile’, which better reflects the status of this pathway in a tumor. PMID:24179395

Zeestraten, Eliane C.M.; Benard, Anne; Reimers, Marlies S.; Schouten, Philip C.; Liefers, Gerrit J.; van de Velde, Cornelis J.H.; Kuppen, Peter J.K.

2013-01-01

146

Major carcinogenic pathways identified by gene expression analysis of peritoneal mesotheliomas following chemical treatment in F344 rats  

SciTech Connect

This study was performed to characterize the gene expression profile and to identify the major carcinogenic pathways involved in rat peritoneal mesothelioma (RPM) formation following treatment of Fischer 344 rats with o-nitrotoluene (o-NT) or bromochloracetic acid (BCA). Oligo arrays, with over 20,000 target genes, were used to evaluate o-NT- and BCA-induced RPMs, when compared to a non-transformed mesothelial cell line (Fred-PE). Analysis using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis software revealed 169 cancer-related genes that were categorized into binding activity, growth and proliferation, cell cycle progression, apoptosis, and invasion and metastasis. The microarray data were validated by positive correlation with quantitative real-time RT-PCR on 16 selected genes including igf1, tgfb3 and nov. Important carcinogenic pathways involved in RPM formation included insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), p38 MAPkinase, Wnt/{beta}-catenin and integrin signaling pathways. This study demonstrated that mesotheliomas in rats exposed to o-NT- and BCA were similar to mesotheliomas in humans, at least at the cellular and molecular level.

Kim, Yongbaek [Environmental Toxicology Program, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, MD B3-08, 111 Alexander Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Thai-Vu Ton [Environmental Toxicology Program, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, MD B3-08, 111 Alexander Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); De Angelo, Anthony B. [Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Morgan, Kevin [Aventis, Bridgewater, NJ 08807 (United States); Devereux, Theodora R. [Environmental Carcinogenesis Program, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Anna, Colleen [Environmental Carcinogenesis Program, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Collins, Jennifer B. [Microarray Group, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Paules, Richard S. [Microarray Group, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Crosby, Lynn M. [Wyeth Research, Chazy, NY 12921 (United States); Sills, Robert C. [Environmental Toxicology Program, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, MD B3-08, 111 Alexander Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States)]. E-mail: sills@niehs.nih.gov

2006-07-15

147

Global analysis of gene expression in NGF-deprived sympathetic neurons identifies molecular pathways associated with cell death  

PubMed Central

Background Developing sympathetic neurons depend on nerve growth factor (NGF) for survival and die by apoptosis after NGF withdrawal. This process requires de novo gene expression but only a small number of genes induced by NGF deprivation have been identified so far, either by a candidate gene approach or in mRNA differential display experiments. This is partly because it is difficult to obtain large numbers of sympathetic neurons for in vitro studies. Here, we describe for the first time, how advances in gene microarray technology have allowed us to investigate the expression of all known genes in sympathetic neurons cultured in the presence and absence of NGF. Results We have used Affymetrix Exon arrays to study the pattern of expression of all known genes in NGF-deprived sympathetic neurons. We identified 415 up- and 813 down-regulated genes, including most of the genes previously known to be regulated in this system. NGF withdrawal activates the mixed lineage kinase (MLK)-c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)-c-Jun pathway which is required for NGF deprivation-induced death. By including a mixed lineage kinase (MLK) inhibitor, CEP-11004, in our experimental design we identified which of the genes induced after NGF withdrawal are potential targets of the MLK-JNK-c-Jun pathway. A detailed Gene Ontology and functional enrichment analysis also identified genetic pathways that are highly enriched and overrepresented amongst the genes expressed after NGF withdrawal. Five genes not previously studied in sympathetic neurons - trib3, ddit3, txnip, ndrg1 and mxi1 - were validated by real time-PCR. The proteins encoded by these genes also increased in level after NGF withdrawal and this increase was prevented by CEP-11004, suggesting that these genes are potential targets of the MLK-JNK-c-Jun pathway. Conclusions The sympathetic neuron model is one of the best studied models of neuronal apoptosis. Overall, our microarray data gives a comprehensive overview of, and provides new information about, signalling pathways and transcription factors that are regulated by NGF withdrawal. PMID:22067274

2011-01-01

148

Microarray analysis of perichondral and reserve growth plate zones identifies differential gene expressions and signal pathways  

PubMed Central

In the growth plate, the reserve and perichondral zones have been hypothesized to have similar functions, but their exact functions are poorly understood. Our hypothesis was that significant differential gene expression exists between perichondral and reserve chondrocytes that may differentiate the respective functions of these two zones. Normal Sprague-Dawley rat growth plate chondrocytes from the perichondral zone (PC) and reserve zone (RZ) were isolated by laser microdissection and then subjected to microarray analysis. In order to most comprehensively capture the unique features of the two zones, we analyzed both the most highly expressed genes and those that were most significantly different from the proliferative zone (PZ) as a single comparator. Confirmation of the differential expression of selected genes was done by quantitative real time RT-PCR. A total of 8 transcripts showing high expression unique to the PC included translationally-controlled tumor protein (Tpt1), connective tissue growth factor (Ctgf), mortality factor 4 (Morf4l1), growth arrest specific 6 (Gas6), type V procollagen (Col5a2), frizzled-related protein (Frzb), GDP dissociation inhibitor 2 (Gdi2) and Jun D proto-oncogene (Jund). In contrast, 8 transcripts showing unique high expression in the RZ included hyaluronan and proteoglycan link protein 1 (Hapln1), hemoglobin beta-2 subunit, type I procollagen (Col1a2), retinoblastoma binding protein 4 (LOC685491), Sparc related modular calcium binding 2 (Smoc2), and calpastatin (Cast). Other genes were highly expressed in cells from both PC and RZ zones, including collagen II, collagen IX, catenin (cadherin associated protein) beta 1, eukaryotic translation elongation factor, high mobility group, ribosomal protein, microtubule-associated protein, reticulocalbin, thrombospondin, retinoblastoma binding protein, carboxypeptidase E, carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1, cysteine rich glycoprotein, plexin B2 (Plxnb2), and gap junction membrane channel protein. Functional classification of the most highly expressed transcripts were analyzed, and the pathway analysis indicated that ossification, bone remodeling, and cartilage development were uniquely enriched in the PC whereas both the PC and RZ showed pathway enrichment for skeletal development, extracellular matrix structural constituent, proteinaceous extracellular matrix, collagen, extracellular matrix, and extracellular matrix part pathways. We conclude that differential gene expression exists between the RZ and PC chondrocytes and these differentially expressed genes have unique roles to play corresponding to the function of their respective zones. PMID:18579462

Zhang, Mingliang; Pritchard, Meredith R.; Middleton, Frank A.; Horton, Jason A.; Damron, Timothy A.

2008-01-01

149

Quantitatively and Kinetically Identifying Binding Motifs of Amelogenin Proteins to Mineral Crystals Through Biochemical and Spectroscopic Assays  

PubMed Central

Tooth enamel is the hardest tissue in vertebrate animals. Consisting of millions of carbonated hydroxyapatite crystals, this highly mineralized tissue develops from a protein matrix in which amelogenin is the predominant component. The enamel matrix proteins are eventually and completely degraded and removed by proteinases to form mineral-enriched tooth enamel. Identification of the apatite-binding motifs in amelogenin is critical for understanding the amelogenin–crystal interactions and amelogenin–proteinases interactions during tooth enamel biomineralization. A stepwise strategy is introduced to kinetically and quantitatively identify the crystal-binding motifs in amelogenin, including a peptide screening assay, a competitive adsorption assay, and a kinetic-binding assay using amelogenin and gene-engineered amelogenin mutants. A modified enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay on crystal surfaces is also applied to compare binding amounts of amelogenin and its mutants on different planes of apatite crystals. We describe the detailed protocols for these assays and provide the considerations for these experiments in this chapter. PMID:24188774

Zhu, Li; Hwang, Peter; Witkowska, H. Ewa; Liu, Haichuan; Li, Wu

2014-01-01

150

Quantitatively and kinetically identifying binding motifs of amelogenin proteins to mineral crystals through biochemical and spectroscopic assays.  

PubMed

Tooth enamel is the hardest tissue in vertebrate animals. Consisting of millions of carbonated hydroxyapatite crystals, this highly mineralized tissue develops from a protein matrix in which amelogenin is the predominant component. The enamel matrix proteins are eventually and completely degraded and removed by proteinases to form mineral-enriched tooth enamel. Identification of the apatite-binding motifs in amelogenin is critical for understanding the amelogenin-crystal interactions and amelogenin-proteinases interactions during tooth enamel biomineralization. A stepwise strategy is introduced to kinetically and quantitatively identify the crystal-binding motifs in amelogenin, including a peptide screening assay, a competitive adsorption assay, and a kinetic-binding assay using amelogenin and gene-engineered amelogenin mutants. A modified enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay on crystal surfaces is also applied to compare binding amounts of amelogenin and its mutants on different planes of apatite crystals. We describe the detailed protocols for these assays and provide the considerations for these experiments in this chapter. PMID:24188774

Zhu, Li; Hwang, Peter; Witkowska, H Ewa; Liu, Haichuan; Li, Wu

2013-01-01

151

Non-host disease resistance response in pea (Pisum sativum) pods: Biochemical function of DRR206 and phytoalexin pathway localization.  

PubMed

Continually exposed to potential pathogens, vascular plants have evolved intricate defense mechanisms to recognize encroaching threats and defend themselves. They do so by inducing a set of defense responses that can help defeat and/or limit effects of invading pathogens, of which the non-host disease resistance response is the most common. In this regard, pea (Pisum sativum) pod tissue, when exposed to Fusarium solani f. sp. phaseoli spores, undergoes an inducible transcriptional activation of pathogenesis-related genes, and also produces (+)-pisatin, its major phytoalexin. One of the inducible pathogenesis-related genes is Disease Resistance Response-206 (DRR206), whose role in vivo was unknown. DRR206 is, however, related to the dirigent protein (DP) family. In this study, its biochemical function was investigated in planta, with the metabolite associated with its gene induction being pinoresinol monoglucoside. Interestingly, both pinoresinol monoglucoside and (+)-pisatin were co-localized in pea pod endocarp epidermal cells, as demonstrated using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry imaging. In addition, endocarp epidermal cells are also the site for both chalcone synthase and DRR206 gene expression. Taken together, these data indicate that both (+)-pisatin and pinoresinol monoglucoside function in the overall phytoalexin responses. PMID:25457488

Seneviratne, Herana Kamal; Dalisay, Doralyn S; Kim, Kye-Won; Moinuddin, Syed G A; Yang, Hong; Hartshorn, Christopher M; Davin, Laurence B; Lewis, Norman G

2014-11-20

152

Study identifies pathway in human lymphoma, points way to new blood cancer treatments  

Cancer.gov

A pathway called the "Unfolded Protein Response," or UPR, a cell's way of responding to unfolded and misfolded proteins, helps tumor cells escape programmed cell death during the development of lymphoma. Research, led by scientists in the Department of Radiation Oncology from the Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania (home of the Abramson Cancer Center), and the Department of Urology, University of California, San Francisco (home of the UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center), shows for the first time that the UPR is active in patients with human lymphomas and mice genetically bred to develop lymphomas. Importantly, when the UPR is inactivated, lymphoma cells readily undergo cell death. Their findings appear online in the Journal of Clinical Investigation and will appear in the December 2012 issue.

153

A metabolomics approach using juvenile cystic mice to identify urinary biomarkers and altered pathways in polycystic kidney disease  

PubMed Central

Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most common inherited kidney disease and affects 1 in 1,000 individuals. Ultrasound is most often used to diagnose ADPKD; such a modality is only useful late in the disease after macroscopic cysts are present. There is accumulating evidence suggesting that there are common cellular and molecular mechanisms responsible for cystogenesis in human and murine PKD regardless of the genes mutated, and, in the case of complex metabolomic analysis, the use of a mouse model has distinct advantages for proof of principle over a human study. Therefore, in this study we utilized a urinary metabolomics-based investigation using gas chromatography-time of flight mass spectrometry to demonstrate that the cystic mouse can be discriminated from its wild-type counterpart by urine analysis alone. At day 26 of life, before there is serological evidence of kidney dysfunction, affected mice are distinguishable by urine metabolomic analysis; this finding persists through 45 days until 64 days, at which time body weight differences confound the results. Using functional score analysis and the KEGG pathway database, we identify several biologically relevant metabolic pathways which are altered very early in this disease, the most highly represented being the purine and galactose metabolism pathways. In addition, we identify several specific candidate biomarkers, including allantoic acid and adenosine, which are augmented in the urine of young cystic mice. These markers and pathway components, once extended to human disease, may prove useful as a noninvasive means of diagnosing cystic kidney diseases and to suggest novel therapeutic approaches. Thus, urine metabolomics has great diagnostic potential for cystic renal disorders and deserves further study. PMID:20130118

Taylor, Sandra L.; Ganti, Sheila; Bukanov, Nikolay O.; Chapman, Arlene; Fiehn, Oliver; Osier, Michael; Kim, Kyoungmi

2010-01-01

154

Integrated genome-wide association, coexpression network, and expression single nucleotide polymorphism analysis identifies novel pathway in allergic rhinitis  

PubMed Central

Background Allergic rhinitis is a common disease whose genetic basis is incompletely explained. We report an integrated genomic analysis of allergic rhinitis. Methods We performed genome wide association studies (GWAS) of allergic rhinitis in 5633 ethnically diverse North American subjects. Next, we profiled gene expression in disease-relevant tissue (peripheral blood CD4+ lymphocytes) collected from subjects who had been genotyped. We then integrated the GWAS and gene expression data using expression single nucleotide (eSNP), coexpression network, and pathway approaches to identify the biologic relevance of our GWAS. Results GWAS revealed ethnicity-specific findings, with 4 genome-wide significant loci among Latinos and 1 genome-wide significant locus in the GWAS meta-analysis across ethnic groups. To identify biologic context for these results, we constructed a coexpression network to define modules of genes with similar patterns of CD4+ gene expression (coexpression modules) that could serve as constructs of broader gene expression. 6 of the 22 GWAS loci with P-value???1x10?6 tagged one particular coexpression module (4.0-fold enrichment, P-value 0.0029), and this module also had the greatest enrichment (3.4-fold enrichment, P-value 2.6?×?10?24) for allergic rhinitis-associated eSNPs (genetic variants associated with both gene expression and allergic rhinitis). The integrated GWAS, coexpression network, and eSNP results therefore supported this coexpression module as an allergic rhinitis module. Pathway analysis revealed that the module was enriched for mitochondrial pathways (8.6-fold enrichment, P-value 4.5?×?10?72). Conclusions Our results highlight mitochondrial pathways as a target for further investigation of allergic rhinitis mechanism and treatment. Our integrated approach can be applied to provide biologic context for GWAS of other diseases. PMID:25085501

2014-01-01

155

Meta-analyses identify 13 novel loci associated with age at menopause and highlights DNA repair and immune pathways  

PubMed Central

To identify novel loci for age at natural menopause, we performed a meta-analysis of 22 genome-wide association studies in 38,968 women of European descent, with replication in up to 14,435 women. In addition to four known loci, we identified 13 new age at natural menopause loci (P < 5 × 10?8). The new loci included genes implicated in DNA repair (EXO1, HELQ, UIMC1, FAM175A, FANCI, TLK1, POLG, PRIM1) and immune function (IL11, NLRP11, BAT2). Gene-set enrichment pathway analyses using the full GWAS dataset identified exodeoxyribonuclease, NF?B signalling and mitochondrial dysfunction as biological processes related to timing of menopause. PMID:22267201

Stolk, Lisette; Perry, John RB; Chasman, Daniel I; He, Chunyan; Mangino, Massimo; Sulem, Patrick; Barbalic, Maja; Broer, Linda; Byrne, Enda M; Ernst, Florian; Esko, Tõnu; Franceschini, Nora; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Kraft, Peter; McArdle, Patick F; Porcu, Eleonora; Shin, So-Youn; Smith, Albert V; van Wingerden, Sophie; Zhai, Guangju; Zhuang, Wei V; Albrecht, Eva; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z; Aspelund, Thor; Bandinelli, Stefania; Lauc, Lovorka Barac; Beckmann, Jacques S; Boban, Mladen; Boerwinkle, Eric; Broekmans, Frank J; Burri, Andrea; Campbell, Harry; Chanock, Stephen J; Chen, Constance; Cornelis, Marilyn C; Corre, Tanguy; Coviello, Andrea D; d’Adamo, Pio; Davies, Gail; de Faire, Ulf; de Geus, Eco JC; Deary, Ian J; Dedoussis, George VZ; Deloukas, Panagiotis; Ebrahim, Shah; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Emilsson, Valur; Eriksson, Johan G; Fauser, Bart CJM; Ferreli, Liana; Ferrucci, Luigi; Fischer, Krista; Folsom, Aaron R; Garcia, Melissa E; Gasparini, Paolo; Gieger, Christian; Glazer, Nicole; Grobbee, Diederick E; Hall, Per; Haller, Toomas; Hankinson, Susan E; Hass, Merli; Hayward, Caroline; Heath, Andrew C; Hofman, Albert; Ingelsson, Erik; Janssens, A Cecile JW; Johnson, Andrew D; Karasik, David; Kardia, Sharon LR; Keyzer, Jules; Kiel, Douglas P; Kolcic, Ivana; Kutalik, Zoltán; Lahti, Jari; Lai, Sandra; Laisk, Triin; Laven, Joop SE; Lawlor, Debbie A; Liu, Jianjun; Lopez, Lorna M; Louwers, Yvonne V; Magnusson, Patrik KE; Marongiu, Mara; Martin, Nicholas G; Klaric, Irena Martinovic; Masciullo, Corrado; McKnight, Barbara; Medland, Sarah E; Melzer, David; Mooser, Vincent; Navarro, Pau; Newman, Anne B; Nyholt, Dale R; Onland-Moret, N. Charlotte; Palotie, Aarno; Paré, Guillaume; Parker, Alex N; Pedersen, Nancy L; Peeters, Petra HM; Pistis, Giorgio; Plump, Andrew S; Polasek, Ozren; Pop, Victor JM; Psaty, Bruce M; Räikkönen, Katri; Rehnberg, Emil; Rotter, Jerome I; Rudan, Igor; Sala, Cinzia; Salumets, Andres; Scuteri, Angelo; Singleton, Andrew; Smith, Jennifer A; Snieder, Harold; Soranzo, Nicole; Stacey, Simon N; Starr, John M; Stathopoulou, Maria G; Stirrups, Kathleen; Stolk, Ronald P; Styrkarsdottir, Unnur; Sun, Yan V; Tenesa, Albert; Thorand, Barbara; Toniolo, Daniela; Tryggvadottir, Laufey; Tsui, Kim; Ulivi, Sheila; van Dam, Rob M; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; van Gils, Carla H; van Nierop, Peter; Vink, Jacqueline M; Visscher, Peter M; Voorhuis, Marlies; Waeber, Gérard; Wallaschofski, Henri; Wichmann, H Erich; Widen, Elisabeth; Gent, Colette JM Wijnands-van; Willemsen, Gonneke; Wilson, James F; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce HR; Wright, Alan F; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M; Zemunik, Tatijana; Zgaga, Lina; Zillikens, M. Carola; Zygmunt, Marek; Arnold, Alice M; Boomsma, Dorret I; Buring, Julie E.; Crisponi, Laura; Demerath, Ellen W; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Harris, Tamara B; Hu, Frank B; Hunter, David J; Launer, Lenore J; Metspalu, Andres; Montgomery, Grant W; Oostra, Ben A; Ridker, Paul M; Sanna, Serena; Schlessinger, David; Spector, Tim D; Stefansson, Kari; Streeten, Elizabeth A; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Uda, Manuela; Uitterlinden, André G; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Völzke, Henry; Murray, Anna; Murabito, Joanne M; Visser, Jenny A; Lunetta, Kathryn L

2011-01-01

156

Expression profiling after induction of demethylation in MCF-7 breast cancer cells identifies involvement of TNF-? mediated cancer pathways.  

PubMed

Epigenetic methylation change is a major process that occurs during cancer development. Even though many tumor-related genes have been identified based on their relationship between methylation and expression, few studies have been conducted to investigate the relevant biological pathways involved in these changes. To identify essential pathways likely to be affected by methylation in breast cancer, we examined a pool of genes in which expression was upregulated after induction of demethylation by 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine (Aza) in the MCF-7 breast cancer cell line. Genome-wide demethylation was confirmed by monitoring the demethylation of a previously known gene, SULT1A1. Overall, 210 and 213 genes were found to be upregulated and downregulated (fold change ? 2), respectively, in common in cells treated with 5 and 10 ?M of Aza. Network analysis of these 423 genes with altered expression patterns identified the involvement of a cancer related network of genes that were heavily regulated by TNF-? in breast tumorigenesis. Our results suggest that epigenetic dysregulation of cellular processes relevant to TNF-?-dependent apoptosis may be intimately involved in tumorigenesis in MCF-7 cells. PMID:22228181

Kim, Ju Hee; Kang, Seongeun; Kim, Tae Woo; Yin, Lihong; Liu, Ran; Kim, Sun Jung

2012-02-01

157

Ventral encoding of functional affordances: a neural pathway for identifying errors in action.  

PubMed

Functional tool usage is a critical aspect of our daily lives. Not only must we know which tools to use for a specific action goal, we must also know how to manipulate those tools in meaningful way to achieve the goal of the action. The purpose of this study was to identify the regions of the brain critical to supporting the process of understanding errors in tool manipulation. Using fMRI, neural activations were recorded while subjects were presented with images demonstrating typical action scenes (screwdriver used on a screw), but with the tool being manipulated either correctly (screwdriver held by handle) or incorrectly (screwdriver held by bit rather than handle). Activations in fMRI for identifying correct over incorrect tool manipulation were seen along the canonical parietofrontal action network, while activations for identifying incorrect over correct tool manipulation were primarily seen at superior temporal areas and insula. We expand our hypotheses about ventral brain networks identifying contextual error to further suggest mechanisms for understanding functional tool actions, which collectively we regard as functional affordances. This proposes a fundamental role for ventral brain areas in functional action understanding. PMID:23733029

Mizelle, J C; Kelly, Rachel L; Wheaton, Lewis A

2013-08-01

158

Identifiable Achatina giant neurones: Their localizations in ganglia, axonal pathways and pharmacological features  

Microsoft Academic Search

1.1. An African giant snail (Achatina fulica Férussac), originally from East Africa, is now found abundantly in tropical and subtropical regions of Asia, including Okinawa in Japan. This is one of the largest land snail species in the world. The Achatina central nervous system is composed of the buccal, cerebral and suboesophageal ganglia. The 37 giant neurones were identified in

Hiroshi Takeuchi; Yoko Araki; Muhammad Emaduddin; Wei Zhang; Xiao Yan Han; Thucydides L. Salunga; Shu Min Wong

1996-01-01

159

Cell-Based Assay To Identify Inhibitors of the Hfq-sRNA Regulatory Pathway  

PubMed Central

Noncoding small RNAs (sRNAs) act in conjunction with the RNA chaperone Hfq to regulate gene expression in bacteria. Because Hfq is required for virulence in several bacterial pathogens, the Hfq-sRNA system is an attractive target for antibiotic development. A reporter strain in which the expression of yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) is controlled by Hfq-sRNA was engineered to identify inhibitors of this system. A reporter that is targeted by Hfq in conjunction with the RybB sRNA was used in a genetic screen to identify inhibitors from a library of cyclic peptides produced in Escherichia coli using split-intein circular ligation of peptides and proteins (SICLOPPS), an intein-based technology. One cyclic peptide identified in this screen, RI20, inhibited Hfq-mediated repression of gene expression in conjunction with both RybB and an unrelated sRNA, MicF. Gel mobility shift assays showed that RI20 inhibited binding of Hfq to RybB and MicF with similar Ki values. These data suggest that RI20 inhibits Hfq activity by blocking interactions with sRNAs and provide a paradigm for inhibiting virulence genes in Gram-negative pathogens. PMID:25001303

El-Mowafi, Shaima A.; Alumasa, John N.; Ades, Sarah E.

2014-01-01

160

Quantitative Phosphoproteomic Analysis Identifies Activation of the RET and IGF-1R/IR Signaling Pathways in Neuroblastoma  

PubMed Central

Neuroblastoma is an embryonal tumor of childhood with a heterogenous clinical presentation that reflects differences in activation of complex biological signaling pathways. Protein phosphorylation is a key component of cellular signal transduction and plays a critical role in processes that control cancer cell growth and survival. We used shotgun LC/MS to compare phosphorylation between a human MYCN amplified neuroblastoma cell line (NB10), modeling a resistant tumor, and a human neural precursor cell line (NPC), modeling a normal baseline neural crest cell. 2181 unique phosphorylation sites representing 1171 proteins and 2598 phosphopeptides were found. Protein kinases accounted for 6% of the proteome, with a predominance of tyrosine kinases, supporting their prominent role in oncogenic signaling pathways. Highly abundant receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) phosphopeptides in the NB10 cell line relative to the NPC cell line included RET, insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor/insulin receptor (IGF-1R/IR), and fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1). Multiple phosphorylated peptides from downstream mediators of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR and RAS pathways were also highly abundant in NB10 relative to NPC. Our analysis highlights the importance of RET, IGF-1R/IR and FGFR1 as RTKs in neuroblastoma and suggests a methodology that can be used to identify potential novel biological therapeutic targets. Furthermore, application of this previously unexploited technology in the clinic opens the possibility of providing a new wide-scale molecular signature to assess disease progression and prognosis. PMID:24349301

DeNardo, Bradley D.; Holloway, Michael P.; Ji, Qinqin; Nguyen, Kevin T.; Cheng, Yan; Valentine, Marcus B.; Salomon, Arthur; Altura, Rachel A.

2013-01-01

161

Abiogenic hydrocarbon isotopic signatures in granitic rocks: Identifying pathways of formation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The stability and isotopic composition of hydrocarbons formed in the mantle are controversial subjects. Knowing the range in isotopic compositions of abiogenically-derived hydrocarbons is important for recognising biological signatures in ancient and extra-terrestrial materials. In an effort to enhance this database, stable isotope results are reported here for hydrocarbon-bearing fluid inclusions hosted in two peralkaline igneous complexes from Lovozero, Russia and Strange Lake, Canada. Based on the distribution of isotopic compositions, we propose three pathways for abiogenically-generated hydrocarbons. Type-1 (?13CCH4 > ?13CCO2 and ?13CC2 +) represents mantle-derived hydrocarbons generated in equilibrium with hyperagpaitic magmas in the upper mantle, and suggests that mantle CH4 and C2H6?13C and ?2H could have values of ~ - 5.3 and ~ - 112‰, and ~ - 10.8 and - 162‰, respectively. Type-2 (?13CCO2 > ?13CCH4 > ?13CC2 +) represents Fischer-Tropsch-type hydrocarbon generation in quartz-bearing peralkaline rocks with CO2 as the initial magmatic gas phase. For Type-2, ?13CCO2 values are ~ - 2‰, whereas ?13CCH4 and ?2HCH4 values range from - 32 to - 20‰ and - 170 and - 160‰, respectively. The ?13CC2H6 values are slightly lower than associated ?13CCH4 values. Type-3 (?13CCO2 > ?13CCH4 < ?13CC2 +) represents an overprint of Type-2, formed during low temperature alteration of quartz-bearing peralkaline rocks. Here, ?13CCO2 values are variable, - 14.0 to - 9.5‰, ?13CCH4 values range from - 30.8 to - 20.8‰ while ?13CC2H6 values are higher than associated ?13CCH4 values. Both Type-2 and Type-3 isotopic compositions mimic patterns normally considered to be thermogenic in origin, thus demonstrating that isotopic data alone cannot be used reliably to distinguish between hydrocarbons of abiogenic versus biogenic origin.

Potter, Joanna; Salvi, Stefano; Longstaffe, Fred J.

2013-12-01

162

Molecular and Biochemical Characterization of the 5-Nitroanthranilic Acid Degradation Pathway in Bradyrhizobium sp. Strain JS329 ? †  

PubMed Central

Biodegradation pathways of synthetic nitroaromatic compounds and anilines are well documented, but little is known about those of nitroanilines. We previously reported that the initial step in 5-nitroanthranilic acid (5NAA) degradation by Bradyrhizobium sp. strain JS329 is a hydrolytic deamination to form 5-nitrosalicylic acid (5NSA), followed by ring fission catalyzed by 5NSA dioxygenase. The mechanism of release of the nitro group was unknown. In this study, we subcloned, sequenced, and expressed the genes encoding 5NAA deaminase (5NAA aminohydrolase, NaaA), 5NSA dioxygenase (NaaB) and lactonase (NaaC), the key genes responsible for 5NAA degradation. Sequence analysis and enzyme characterization revealed that NaaA is a hydrolytic metalloenzyme with a narrow substrate range. The nitro group is spontaneously eliminated as nitrite concomitant with the formation of a lactone from the ring fission product of 5NSA dioxygenation. The elimination of the nitro group during lactone formation is a previously unreported mechanism for denitration of nitro aliphatic compounds. PMID:21498645

Qu, Yi; Spain, Jim C.

2011-01-01

163

Enhanced Sequential Search Methodology for Identifying Cost-Optimal Building Pathways  

SciTech Connect

The BEopt software is a building energy optimization tool that generates a cost-optimal path of building designs from a reference building up to zero-net energy. It employs a sequential search methodology to account for complex energy interactions between building efficiency measures. Enhancement strategies to this search methodology are developed to increase accuracy (ability to identify the true cost-optimal curve) and speed (number of required energy simulations). A test suite of optimizations is used to gauge the effectiveness of each strategy. Combinations of strategies are assembled into packages, ranging from conservative to aggressive, with so up to 71% fewer required simulations are required.

Horowitz, S.; Christensen, C.; Brandemuehl, M.; Krarti, M.

2008-06-01

164

Biochemical and genetic interaction between the fragile X mental retardation protein and the microRNA pathway  

Microsoft Academic Search

Fragile X syndrome is caused by a loss of expression of the fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP). FMRP is a selective RNA-binding protein which forms a messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP) complex that associates with polyribosomes. Recently, mRNA ligands associated with FMRP have been identified. However, the mechanism by which FMRP regulates the translation of its mRNA ligands remains unclear. MicroRNAs

Peng Jin; Daniela C Zarnescu; Stephanie Ceman; Mika Nakamoto; Julie Mowrey; Thomas A Jongens; David L Nelson; Kevin Moses; Stephen T Warren

2004-01-01

165

Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Microarray Analysis in Cortisol-Secreting Adrenocortical Adenomas Identifies New Candidate Genes and Pathways1 2  

PubMed Central

The genetic mechanisms underlying adrenocortical tumor development are still largely unknown. We used high-resolution single nucleotide polymorphism microarrays (Affymetrix SNP 6.0) to detect copy number alterations (CNAs) and copy-neutral losses of heterozygosity (cnLOH) in 15 cortisol-secreting adrenocortical adenomas with matched blood samples. We focused on microalterations aiming to discover new candidate genes involved in early tumorigenesis and/or autonomous cortisol secretion. We identified 962 CNAs with a median of 18 CNAs per sample. Half of them involved noncoding regions, 89% were less than 100 kb, and 28% were found in at least two samples. The most frequently gained regions were 5p15.33, 6q16.1, 7p22.3-22.2, 8q24.3, 9q34.2-34.3, 11p15.5, 11q11, 12q12, 16q24.3, 20p11.1-20q21.11, and Xq28 (?20% of cases), most of them being identified in the same three adenomas. These regions contained among others genes like NOTCH1, CYP11B2, HRAS, and IGF2. Recurrent losses were less common and smaller than gains, being mostly localized at 1p, 6q, and 11q. Pathway analysis revealed that Notch signaling was the most frequently altered. We identified 46 recurrent CNAs that each affected a single gene (31 gains and 15 losses), including genes involved in steroidogenesis (CYP11B1) or tumorigenesis (CTNNB1, EPHA7, SGK1, STIL, FHIT). Finally, 20 small cnLOH in four cases affecting 15 known genes were found. Our findings provide the first high-resolution genome-wide view of chromosomal changes in cortisol-secreting adenomas and identify novel candidate genes, such as HRAS, EPHA7, and SGK1. Furthermore, they implicate that the Notch1 signaling pathway might be involved in the molecular pathogenesis of adrenocortical tumors. PMID:22496620

Ronchi, Cristina L; Leich, Ellen; Sbiera, Silviu; Weismann, Dirk; Rosenwald, Andreas; Allolio, Bruno; Fassnacht, Martin

2012-01-01

166

Cohesion Group Approach for Evolutionary Analysis of Aspartokinase, an Enzyme That Feeds a Branched Network of Many Biochemical Pathways  

PubMed Central

Summary: Aspartokinase (Ask) exists within a variable network that supports the synthesis of 9 amino acids and a number of other important metabolites. Lysine, isoleucine, aromatic amino acids, and dipicolinate may arise from the ASK network or from alternative pathways. Ask proteins were subjected to cohesion group analysis, a methodology that sorts a given protein assemblage into groups in which evolutionary continuity is assured. Two subhomology divisions, ASK? and ASK?, have been recognized. The ASK? subhomology division is the most ancient, being widely distributed throughout the Archaea and Eukarya and in some Bacteria. Within an indel region of about 75 amino acids near the N terminus, ASK? sequences differ from ASK? sequences by the possession of a proposed ancient deletion. ASK? sequences are present in most Bacteria and usually exhibit an in-frame internal translational start site that can generate a small Ask subunit that is identical to the C-terminal portion of the larger subunit of a heterodimeric unit. Particularly novel are ask genes embedded in gene contexts that imply specialization for ectoine (osmotic agent) or aromatic amino acids. The cohesion group approach is well suited for the easy recognition of relatively recent lateral gene transfer (LGT) events, and many examples of these are described. Given the current density of genome representation for Proteobacteria, it is possible to reconstruct more ancient landmark LGT events. Thus, a plausible scenario in which the three well-studied and iconic Ask homologs of Escherichia coli are not within the vertical genealogy of Gammaproteobacteria, but rather originated via LGT from a Bacteroidetes donor, is supported. PMID:19946135

Lo, Chien-Chi; Bonner, Carol A.; Xie, Gary; D'Souza, Mark; Jensen, Roy A.

2009-01-01

167

Exploring critical pathways for urban water management to identify robust strategies under deep uncertainties.  

PubMed

Long-term projections for key drivers needed in urban water infrastructure planning such as climate change, population growth, and socio-economic changes are deeply uncertain. Traditional planning approaches heavily rely on these projections, which, if a projection stays unfulfilled, can lead to problematic infrastructure decisions causing high operational costs and/or lock-in effects. New approaches based on exploratory modelling take a fundamentally different view. Aim of these is, to identify an adaptation strategy that performs well under many future scenarios, instead of optimising a strategy for a handful. However, a modelling tool to support strategic planning to test the implication of adaptation strategies under deeply uncertain conditions for urban water management does not exist yet. This paper presents a first step towards a new generation of such strategic planning tools, by combing innovative modelling tools, which coevolve the urban environment and urban water infrastructure under many different future scenarios, with robust decision making. The developed approach is applied to the city of Innsbruck, Austria, which is spatially explicitly evolved 20 years into the future under 1000 scenarios to test the robustness of different adaptation strategies. Key findings of this paper show that: (1) Such an approach can be used to successfully identify parameter ranges of key drivers in which a desired performance criterion is not fulfilled, which is an important indicator for the robustness of an adaptation strategy; and (2) Analysis of the rich dataset gives new insights into the adaptive responses of agents to key drivers in the urban system by modifying a strategy. PMID:25240118

Urich, Christian; Rauch, Wolfgang

2014-12-01

168

Using End-Member Mixing Analysis to Identify Transport Pathways in Agricultural Watersheds  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Concentrations of naturally occurring solutes were monitored in six agricultural watersheds as part of the Agricultural Chemical Sources, Transport and Fate study of the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Assessment Program. The watersheds, located in Indiana (IN), Iowa (IA), Maryland (MD), Nebraska (NE), Mississippi (MS) and Washington (WA), ranged in size from 5 to 1300 square kilometers, and agricultural land use accounted for 60 - 98% of the watershed area. Concentrations of chloride, calcium, magnesium, sodium, potassium, fluoride, sulfate and silica in stream water were analyzed using principal components analysis (PCA) to identify the dominant processes controlling stream water chemistry. Concentrations measured in wells, streambed piezometers, unsaturated zone lysimeters, overland flow, and tile drains were then used to project the chemistry of these flow compartments/components onto the stream chemistry PCA transformation. This facilitated the identification of end members explaining observed stream chemistry, and the source of the water for these end members. The majority of the variance in stream chemistry could be explained by the mixing of three end-members: 94% for Leary Weber Ditch, IN; 84% for South Fork Iowa River, IA; 91% for Morgan Creek, MD; 81% for Maple Creek, NE; 92% for Tommie Bayou, MS; and, 97% for DR2, WA. The chemistry of overland flow and tile drainage was also contained within the end member concentrations. The end members were generally represented by two groundwater components and a very low solute concentration component (precipitation or irrigation water) that diluted the groundwater signal. Generally, one groundwater component represented recently recharged water that resembled the concentration of water in the deepest unsaturated zone lysimeters, and the other groundwater component was representative of regional groundwater conditions. Compared to regional groundwater, the recent groundwater component had lower concentrations of solutes derived from rock weathering (such as silica) and higher concentrations of solutes derived from the land surface (such as sulfate, nitrate and phosphorous).The two groundwater components represented shallow versus deep groundwater (as in IN, MD and WA), oxic versus anoxic GW (as in IA and MS), and groundwater from two different rock types (as in NE where groundwater from loess had higher solute concentrations than water from unconsolidated deposits). Examination of stream water chemistry for nested drainages within a single watershed indicated that the contribution from the deep (often anoxic) GW component increased as watershed size increased. The conclusions from this principal components and end-member-mixing analysis are being used to help identify and quantify the sources of nitrogen transport to the streams.

Essaid, H.

2013-12-01

169

Genetic and Biochemical Characterization of a 2,4,6-Trichlorophenol Degradation Pathway in Ralstonia eutropha JMP134  

PubMed Central

Ralstonia eutropha JMP134 can grow on several chlorinated aromatic pollutants, including 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetate and 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (2,4,6-TCP). Although a 2,4,6-TCP degradation pathway in JMP134 has been proposed, the enzymes and genes responsible for 2,4,6-TCP degradation have not been characterized. In this study, we found that 2,4,6-TCP degradation by JMP134 was inducible by 2,4,6-TCP and subject to catabolic repression by glutamate. We detected 2,4,6-TCP-degrading activities in JMP134 cell extracts. Our partial purification and initial characterization of the enzyme indicated that a reduced flavin adenine dinucleotide (FADH2)-utilizing monooxygenase converted 2,4,6-TCP to 6-chlorohydroxyquinol (6-CHQ). The finding directed us to PCR amplify a 3.2-kb fragment containing a gene cluster (tcpABC) from JMP134 by using primers designed from conserved regions of FADH2-utilizing monooxygenases and hydroxyquinol 1,2-dioxygenases. Sequence analysis indicated that tcpA, tcpB, and tcpC encoded an FADH2-utilizing monooxygenase, a probable flavin reductase, and a 6-CHQ 1,2-dioxygenase, respectively. The three genes were individually inactivated in JMP134. The tcpA mutant failed to degrade 2,4,6-TCP, while both tcpB and tcpC mutants degraded 2,4,6-TCP to an oxidized product of 6-CHQ. Insertional inactivation of tcpB may have led to a polar effect on downstream tcpC, and this probably resulted in the accumulation of the oxidized form of 6-CHQ. For further characterization, TcpA was produced, purified, and shown to transform 2,4,6-TCP to 6-CHQ when FADH2 was supplied by an Escherichia coli flavin reductase. TcpC produced in E. coli oxidized 6-CHQ to 2-chloromaleylacetate. Thus, our data suggest that JMP134 transforms 2,4,6-TCP to 2-chloromaleylacetate by TcpA and TcpC. Sequence analysis suggests that tcpB may function as an FAD reductase, but experimental data did not support this hypothesis. The function of TcpB remains unknown. PMID:12057943

Louie, Tai Man; Webster, Christopher M.; Xun, Luying

2002-01-01

170

Alternate dissociation pathways identified in charge-reduced protein complex ions.  

PubMed

Tandem mass spectrometry (MS) of large protein complexes has proven to be capable of assessing the stoichiometry, connectivity, and structural details of multiprotein assemblies. While the utility of tandem MS is without question, a deeper understanding of the mechanism of protein complex dissociation will undoubtedly drive the technology into new areas of enhanced utility and information content. We present here the systematic analysis of the charge state dependent decay of the noncovalently associated complex of human transthyretin, generated by collision-induced dissociation (CID). A crown ether based charge reduction approach was applied to generate intact transthyretin tetramers with charge states ranging from 15+ to 7+. These nine charge states were subsequently analyzed by means of tandem MS and ion mobility spectrometry. Three different charge-dependent mechanistic regimes were identified: (1) common asymmetric dissociation involving ejection of unfolded monomers, (2) expulsion of folded monomers from the intact tetramer, and (3) release of C-terminal peptide fragments from the intact complex. Taken together, the results presented highlight the potential of charge state modulation as a method for directing the course of gas-phase dissociation and unfolding of protein complexes. PMID:20481443

Pagel, Kevin; Hyung, Suk-Joon; Ruotolo, Brandon T; Robinson, Carol V

2010-06-15

171

Soluble Signals from Cells Identified at the Cell Wall Establish a Developmental Pathway in Carrot.  

PubMed Central

Cells in a plant differentiate according to their positions and use cell-cell communication to assess these positions. Similarly, single cells in suspension cultures can develop into somatic embryos, and cell-cell communication is thought to control this process. The monoclonal antibody JIM8 labels an epitope on cells in specific positions in plants. JIM8 also labels certain cells in carrot embryogenic suspension cultures. We have used JIM8 and secondary antibodies coupled to paramagnetic beads to label and immunomagnetically sort single cells in a carrot embryogenic suspension culture into pure populations. Cells in the JIM8(+) population develop into somatic embryos, whereas cells in the JIM8(-) population do not form somatic embryos. However, certain cells in JIM8(+) cultures (state B cells) undergo asymmetric divisions, resulting in daughter cells (state C cells) that do not label with JIM8 and that sort to JIM8(-) cultures. State C cells are competent to form somatic embryos, and we show here that a conditioned growth medium from a culture of JIM8(+) cells allows state C cells in a JIM8(-) culture to go on and develop into somatic embryos. JIM8 labels cells in suspension cultures at the cell wall. Therefore, a cell with a role in cell-cell communication and early cell fate selection can be identified by an epitope in its cell wall. PMID:12237357

McCabe, P. F.; Valentine, T. A.; Forsberg, L. S.; Pennell, R. I.

1997-01-01

172

Forward genetic screen for malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor formation identifies new genes and genetic pathways driving tumorigenesis  

PubMed Central

Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) are sarcomas of Schwann cell-lineage origin that occur sporadically or in association with the inherited syndrome, Neurofibromatosis Type 1. To identify genetic drivers of MPNST development, we utilized the Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon-based somatic mutagenesis system in mice with somatic loss of tumor protein p53 (Trp53) function and/or overexpression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Common insertion site (CIS) analysis of 269 neurofibromas and 106 MPNSTs identified 695 and 87 sites with a statistically significant number of recurrent transposon insertions, respectively. Comparison to human data sets revealed novel and known driver genes for MPNST formation at these sites. Pairwise co-occurrence analysis of CIS-associated genes identified many cooperating mutations that are enriched for in Wnt/CTNNB1, PI3K/Akt/mTor, and growth factor receptor signaling pathways. Lastly, we identified several novel proto-oncogenes including forkhead box R2 (Foxr2), which we functionally validated as a proto-oncogene involved in MPNST maintenance. PMID:23685747

Rahrmann, Eric P; Watson, Adrienne L; Keng, Vincent W; Choi, Kwangmin; Moriarity, Branden S; Beckmann, Dominic A; Wolf, Natalie; Sarver, Aaron; Collins, Margaret H; Moertel, Christopher L; Wallace, Margaret R; Gel, Bernat; Serra, Eduard; Ratner, Nancy; Largaespada, David A

2013-01-01

173

A pathway-based approach for identifying biomarkers of tumor progression to trastuzumab-resistant breast cancer.  

PubMed

Although trastuzumab is a successful targeted therapy for breast cancer patients with tumors expressing HER2 (ERBB2), many patients eventually progress to drug resistance. Here, we identified subpathways differentially expressed between trastuzumab-resistant vs. -sensitive breast cancer cells, in conjunction with additional transcriptomic preclinical and clinical gene datasets, to rigorously identify overexpressed, resistance-associated genes. From this approach, we identified 32 genes reproducibly upregulated in trastuzumab resistance. 25 genes were upregulated in drug-resistant JIMT-1 cells, which also downregulated HER2 protein by >80% in the presence of trastuzumab. 24 genes were downregulated in trastuzumab-sensitive SKBR3 cells. Trastuzumab sensitivity was restored by siRNA knockdown of these genes in the resistant cells, and overexpression of 5 of the 25 genes was found in at least one of five refractory HER2?+?breast cancer. In summary, our rigorous computational approach, followed by experimental validation, significantly implicate ATF4, CHEK2, ENAH, ICOSLG, and RAD51 as potential biomarkers of trastuzumab resistance. These results provide further proof-of-concept of our methodology for successfully identifying potential biomarkers and druggable signal pathways involved in tumor progression to drug resistance. PMID:25449779

Nam, Seungyoon; Chang, Hae Ryung; Jung, Hae Rim; Gim, Youme; Kim, Nam Youl; Grailhe, Regis; Seo, Haeng Ran; Park, Hee Seo; Balch, Curt; Lee, Jinhyuk; Park, Inhae; Jung, So Youn; Jeong, Kyung-Chae; Powis, Garth; Liang, Han; Lee, Eun Sook; Ro, Jungsil; Kim, Yon Hui

2015-01-28

174

Filaggrin-stratified transcriptomic analysis of pediatric skin identifies mechanistic pathways in patients with atopic dermatitis  

PubMed Central

Background Atopic dermatitis (AD; eczema) is characterized by a widespread abnormality in cutaneous barrier function and propensity to inflammation. Filaggrin is a multifunctional protein and plays a key role in skin barrier formation. Loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding filaggrin (FLG) are a highly significant risk factor for atopic disease, but the molecular mechanisms leading to dermatitis remain unclear. Objective We sought to interrogate tissue-specific variations in the expressed genome in the skin of children with AD and to investigate underlying pathomechanisms in atopic skin. Methods We applied single-molecule direct RNA sequencing to analyze the whole transcriptome using minimal tissue samples. Uninvolved skin biopsy specimens from 26 pediatric patients with AD were compared with site-matched samples from 10 nonatopic teenage control subjects. Cases and control subjects were screened for FLG genotype to stratify the data set. Results Two thousand four hundred thirty differentially expressed genes (false discovery rate, P < .05) were identified, of which 211 were significantly upregulated and 490 downregulated by greater than 2-fold. Gene ontology terms for “extracellular space” and “defense response” were enriched, whereas “lipid metabolic processes” were downregulated. The subset of FLG wild-type cases showed dysregulation of genes involved with lipid metabolism, whereas filaggrin haploinsufficiency affected global gene expression and was characterized by a type 1 interferon–mediated stress response. Conclusion These analyses demonstrate the importance of extracellular space and lipid metabolism in atopic skin pathology independent of FLG genotype, whereas an aberrant defense response is seen in subjects with FLG mutations. Genotype stratification of the large data set has facilitated functional interpretation and might guide future therapy development. PMID:24880632

Cole, Christian; Kroboth, Karin; Schurch, Nicholas J.; Sandilands, Aileen; Sherstnev, Alexander; O'Regan, Grainne M.; Watson, Rosemarie M.; Irwin McLean, W.H.; Barton, Geoffrey J.; Irvine, Alan D.; Brown, Sara J.

2014-01-01

175

Pathway-Centric Integrative Analysis Identifies RRM2 as a Prognostic Marker in Breast Cancer Associated with Poor Survival and Tamoxifen Resistance123  

PubMed Central

Breast cancer (BCa) molecular subtypes include luminal A, luminal B, normal-like, HER-2–enriched, and basal-like tumors, among which luminal B and basal-like cancers are highly aggressive. Biochemical pathways associated with patient survival or treatment response in these more aggressive subtypes are not well understood. With the limited availability of pathologically verified clinical specimens, cell line models are routinely used for pathway-centric studies. We measured the metabolome of luminal and basal-like BCa cell lines using mass spectrometry, linked metabolites to biochemical pathways using Gene Set Analysis, and developed a novel rank-based method to select pathways on the basis of their enrichment in patient-derived omics data sets and prognostic relevance. Key mediators of the pathway were then characterized for their role in disease progression. Pyrimidine metabolism was altered in luminal versus basal BCa, whereas the combined expression of its associated genes or expression of one key gene, ribonucleotide reductase subunit M2 (RRM2) alone, associated significantly with decreased survival across all BCa subtypes, as well as in luminal patients resistant to tamoxifen. Increased RRM2 expression in tamoxifen-resistant patients was verified using tissue microarrays, whereas the metabolic products of RRM2 were higher in tamoxifen-resistant cells and in xenograft tumors. Both genetic and pharmacological inhibition of this key enzyme in tamoxifen-resistant cells significantly decreased proliferation, reduced expression of cell cycle genes, and sensitized the cells to tamoxifen treatment. Our study suggests for evaluating RRM2-associated metabolites as noninvasive markers for tamoxifen resistance and its pharmacological inhibition as a novel approach to overcome tamoxifen resistance in BCa. PMID:25016594

Putluri, Nagireddy; Maity, Suman; Kommangani, Ramakrishna; Creighton, Chad J.; Putluri, Vasanta; Chen, Fengju; Nanda, Sarmishta; Bhowmik, Salil Kumar; Terunuma, Atsushi; Dorsey, Tiffany; Nardone, Agostina; Fu, Xiaoyong; Shaw, Chad; Sarkar, Tapasree Roy; Schiff, Rachel; Lydon, John P.; O’Malley, Bert W.; Ambs, Stefan; Das, Gokul M.; Michailidis, George; Sreekumar, Arun

2014-01-01

176

Adaptative biochemical pathways and regulatory networks in Klebsiella oxytoca BAS-10 producing a biotechnologically relevant exopolysaccharide during Fe(III)-citrate fermentation  

PubMed Central

Background A bacterial strain previously isolated from pyrite mine drainage and named BAS-10 was tentatively identified as Klebsiella oxytoca. Unlikely other enterobacteria, BAS-10 is able to grow on Fe(III)-citrate as sole carbon and energy source, yielding acetic acid and CO2 coupled with Fe(III) reduction to Fe(II) and showing unusual physiological characteristics. In fact, under this growth condition, BAS-10 produces an exopolysaccharide (EPS) having a high rhamnose content and metal-binding properties, whose biotechnological applications were proven as very relevant. Results Further phylogenetic analysis, based on 16S rDNA sequence, definitively confirmed that BAS-10 belongs to K. oxytoca species. In order to rationalize the biochemical peculiarities of this unusual enterobacteriun, combined 2D-Differential Gel Electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) analysis and mass spectrometry procedures were used to investigate its proteomic changes: i) under aerobic or anaerobic cultivation with Fe(III)-citrate as sole carbon source; ii) under anaerobic cultivations using Na(I)-citrate or Fe(III)-citrate as sole carbon source. Combining data from these differential studies peculiar levels of outer membrane proteins, key regulatory factors of carbon and nitrogen metabolism and enzymes involved in TCA cycle and sugar biosynthesis or required for citrate fermentation and stress response during anaerobic growth on Fe(III)-citrate were revealed. The protein differential regulation seems to ensure efficient cell growth coupled with EPS production by adapting metabolic and biochemical processes in order to face iron toxicity and to optimize energy production. Conclusion Differential proteomics provided insights on the molecular mechanisms necessary for anaeorobic utilization of Fe(III)-citrate in a biotechnologically promising enterobacteriun, also revealing genes that can be targeted for the rational design of high-yielding EPS producer strains. PMID:23176641

2012-01-01

177

A mutation in the pale aleurone color1 gene identifies a novel regulator of the maize anthocyanin pathway.  

PubMed Central

By screening for new seed color mutations, we have identified a new gene, pale aleurone color1 (pac1), which when mutated causes a reduction in anthocyanin pigmentation. The pac1 gene is not allelic to any known anthocyanin biosynthetic or regulatory gene. The pac1-ref allele is recessive, nonlethal, and only reduces pigment in kernels, not in vegetative tissues. Genetic and molecular evidence shows that the pac1-ref allele reduces pigmentation by reducing RNA levels of the biosynthetic genes in the pathway. The mutant does not reduce the RNA levels of either of the two regulatory genes, b and c1. Introduction of an anthocyanin structural gene promoter (a1) driving a reporter gene into maize aleurones shows that pac1-ref kernels have reduced expression resulting from the action of the a1 promoter. Introduction of the reporter gene with constructs that express the regulatory genes b and c1 or the phlobaphene pathway regulator p shows that this reduction in a1-driven expression occurs in both the presence and absence of these regulators. Our results imply that pac1 is required for either b/c1 or p activation of anthocyanin biosynthetic gene expression and that pac1 acts independently of these regulatory genes. PMID:9878628

Selinger, D A; Chandler, V L

1999-01-01

178

Functional genomics identifies five distinct molecular subtypes with clinical relevance and pathways for growth control in epithelial ovarian cancer  

PubMed Central

Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is hallmarked by a high degree of heterogeneity. To address this heterogeneity, a classification scheme was developed based on gene expression patterns of 1538 tumours. Five, biologically distinct subgroups — Epi-A, Epi-B, Mes, Stem-A and Stem-B — exhibited significantly distinct clinicopathological characteristics, deregulated pathways and patient prognoses, and were validated using independent datasets. To identify subtype-specific molecular targets, ovarian cancer cell lines representing these molecular subtypes were screened against a genome-wide shRNA library. Focusing on the poor-prognosis Stem-A subtype, we found that two genes involved in tubulin processing, TUBGCP4 and NAT10, were essential for cell growth, an observation supported by a pathway analysis that also predicted involvement of microtubule-related processes. Furthermore, we observed that Stem-A cell lines were indeed more sensitive to inhibitors of tubulin polymerization, vincristine and vinorelbine, than the other subtypes. This subtyping offers new insights into the development of novel diagnostic and personalized treatment for EOC patients. PMID:23666744

Tan, Tuan Zea; Miow, Qing Hao; Huang, Ruby Yun-Ju; Wong, Meng Kang; Ye, Jieru; Lau, Jieying Amelia; Wu, Meng Chu; Bin Abdul Hadi, Luqman Hakim; Soong, Richie; Choolani, Mahesh; Davidson, Ben; Nesland, Jahn M; Wang, Ling-Zhi; Matsumura, Noriomi; Mandai, Masaki; Konishi, Ikuo; Goh, Boon-Cher; Chang, Jeffrey T; Thiery, Jean Paul; Mori, Seiichi

2013-01-01

179

Functional Genetic Screen Identifies Increased Sensitivity to WEE1 Inhibition in Cells with Defects in Fanconi Anemia and HR Pathways.  

PubMed

WEE1 kinase regulates CDK1 and CDK2 activity to facilitate DNA replication during S-phase and to prevent unscheduled entry into mitosis. WEE1 inhibitors synergize with DNA-damaging agents that arrest cells in S-phase by triggering direct mitotic entry without completing DNA synthesis, resulting in catastrophic chromosome fragmentation and apoptosis. Here, we investigated how WEE1 inhibition could be best exploited for cancer therapy by performing a functional genetic screen to identify novel determinants of sensitivity to WEE1 inhibition. Inhibition of kinases that regulate CDK activity, CHK1 and MYT1, synergized with WEE1 inhibition through both increased replication stress and forced mitotic entry of S-phase cells. Loss of multiple components of the Fanconi anemia (FA) and homologous recombination (HR) pathways, in particular DNA helicases, sensitized to WEE1 inhibition. Silencing of FA/HR genes resulted in excessive replication stress and nucleotide depletion following WEE1 inhibition, which ultimately led to increased unscheduled mitotic entry. Our results suggest that cancers with defects in FA and HR pathways may be targeted by WEE1 inhibition, providing a basis for a novel synthetic lethal strategy for cancers harboring FA/HR defects. Mol Cancer Ther; 14(4); 865-76. ©2015 AACR. PMID:25673822

Aarts, Marieke; Bajrami, Ilirjana; Herrera-Abreu, Maria T; Elliott, Richard; Brough, Rachel; Ashworth, Alan; Lord, Christopher J; Turner, Nicholas C

2015-04-01

180

Long-term consequences of pubertal timing for youth depression: Identifying personal and contextual pathways of risk.  

PubMed

This research explored sex differences in the pathways linking pubertal timing to depression across 4 years. A sample of 167 youth (M age = 12.41 years, SD = 1.19) and their caregivers completed measures of puberty and semistructured interviews of interpersonal stress and youth depression. Youth reported on psychological (negative self-focus, anxious arousal) and social-behavioral (coping) characteristics; parents reported on youths' social-behavioral characteristics (withdrawal/social problems) and deviant peer affiliations. Early maturation predicted stable high trajectories of depression in girls; although early maturing boys showed low initial levels of depression, they did not differ from girls by the final wave of the study. Latent growth curve analyses identified several psychological, social-behavioral, and interpersonal pathways accounting for the contribution of pubertal timing to initial and enduring risk for depression in girls as well as emerging risk for depression in boys. These findings provide novel insight into multilevel processes accounting for sex differences in depression across the adolescent transition. PMID:25422971

Rudolph, Karen D; Troop-Gordon, Wendy; Lambert, Sharon F; Natsuaki, Misaki N

2014-11-01

181

What makes the lac-pathway switch: identifying the fluctuations that trigger phenotype switching in gene regulatory systems  

PubMed Central

Multistable gene regulatory systems sustain different levels of gene expression under identical external conditions. Such multistability is used to encode phenotypic states in processes including nutrient uptake and persistence in bacteria, fate selection in viral infection, cell-cycle control and development. Stochastic switching between different phenotypes can occur as the result of random fluctuations in molecular copy numbers of mRNA and proteins arising in transcription, translation, transport and binding. However, which component of a pathway triggers such a transition is generally not known. By linking single-cell experiments on the lactose-uptake pathway in E. coli to molecular simulations, we devise a general method to pinpoint the particular fluctuation driving phenotype switching and apply this method to the transition between the uninduced and induced states of the lac-genes. We find that the transition to the induced state is not caused only by the single event of lac-repressor unbinding, but depends crucially on the time period over which the repressor remains unbound from the lac-operon. We confirm this notion in strains with a high expression level of the lac-repressor (leading to shorter periods over which the lac-operon remains unbound), which show a reduced switching rate. Our techniques apply to multistable gene regulatory systems in general and allow to identify the molecular mechanisms behind stochastic transitions in gene regulatory circuits. PMID:25245949

Bhogale, Prasanna M.; Sorg, Robin A.; Veening, Jan-Willem; Berg, Johannes

2014-01-01

182

DrGaP: a powerful tool for identifying driver genes and pathways in cancer sequencing studies.  

PubMed

Cancers are caused by the accumulation of genomic alterations. Driver mutations are required for the cancer phenotype, whereas passenger mutations are irrelevant to tumor development and accumulate through DNA replication. A major challenge facing the field of cancer genome sequencing is to identify cancer-associated genes with mutations that drive the cancer phenotype. Here, we describe a powerful and flexible statistical framework for identifying driver genes and driver signaling pathways in cancer genome-sequencing studies. Biological knowledge of the mutational process in tumors is fully integrated into our statistical models and includes such variables as the length of protein-coding regions, transcript isoforms, variation in mutation types, differences in background mutation rates, the redundancy of genetic code, and multiple mutations in one gene. This framework provides several significant features that are not addressed or naively obtained by previous methods. In particular, on the observation of low prevalence of somatic mutations in individual tumors, we propose a heuristic strategy to estimate the mixture proportion of chi-square distribution of likelihood ratio test (LRT) statistics. This provides significantly increased statistical power compared to regular LRT. Through a combination of simulation and analysis of TCGA cancer sequencing study data, we demonstrate high accuracy and sensitivity in our methods. Our statistical methods and several auxiliary bioinformatics tools have been incorporated into a computational tool, DrGaP. The newly developed tool is immediately applicable to cancer genome-sequencing studies and will lead to a more complete identification of altered driver genes and driver signaling pathways in cancer. PMID:23954162

Hua, Xing; Xu, Haiming; Yang, Yaning; Zhu, Jun; Liu, Pengyuan; Lu, Yan

2013-09-01

183

Structural and Logical Analysis of a Comprehensive Hedgehog Signaling Pathway to Identify Alternative Drug Targets for Glioma, Colon and Pancreatic Cancer  

PubMed Central

Hedgehog is an evolutionarily conserved developmental pathway, widely implicated in controlling various cellular responses such as cellular proliferation and stem cell renewal in human and other organisms, through external stimuli. Aberrant activation of this pathway in human adult stem cell line may cause different types of cancers. Hence, targeting this pathway in cancer therapy has become indispensable, but the non availability of detailed molecular interactions, complex regulations by extra- and intra-cellular proteins and cross talks with other pathways pose a serious challenge to get a coherent understanding of this signaling pathway for making therapeutic strategy. This motivated us to perform a computational study of the pathway and to identify probable drug targets. In this work, from available databases and literature, we reconstructed a complete hedgehog pathway which reports the largest number of molecules and interactions to date. Using recently developed computational techniques, we further performed structural and logical analysis of this pathway. In structural analysis, the connectivity and centrality parameters were calculated to identify the important proteins from the network. To capture the regulations of the molecules, we developed a master Boolean model of all the interactions between the proteins and created different cancer scenarios, such as Glioma, Colon and Pancreatic. We performed perturbation analysis on these cancer conditions to identify the important and minimal combinations of proteins that can be used as drug targets. From our study we observed the under expressions of various oncoproteins in Hedgehog pathway while perturbing at a time the combinations of the proteins GLI1, GLI2 and SMO in Glioma; SMO, HFU, ULK3 and RAS in Colon cancer; SMO, HFU, ULK3, RAS and ERK12 in Pancreatic cancer. This reconstructed Hedgehog signaling pathway and the computational analysis for identifying new combinatory drug targets will be useful for future in-vitro and in-vivo analysis to control different cancers. PMID:23935937

Chowdhury, Saikat; Pradhan, Rachana N.; Sarkar, Ram Rup

2013-01-01

184

Systems-Based Analysis of the Sarcocystis neurona Genome Identifies Pathways That Contribute to a Heteroxenous Life Cycle  

PubMed Central

ABSTRACT Sarcocystis neurona is a member of the coccidia, a clade of single-celled parasites of medical and veterinary importance including Eimeria, Sarcocystis, Neospora, and Toxoplasma. Unlike Eimeria, a single-host enteric pathogen, Sarcocystis, Neospora, and Toxoplasma are two-host parasites that infect and produce infectious tissue cysts in a wide range of intermediate hosts. As a genus, Sarcocystis is one of the most successful protozoan parasites; all vertebrates, including birds, reptiles, fish, and mammals are hosts to at least one Sarcocystis species. Here we sequenced Sarcocystis neurona, the causal agent of fatal equine protozoal myeloencephalitis. The S. neurona genome is 127 Mbp, more than twice the size of other sequenced coccidian genomes. Comparative analyses identified conservation of the invasion machinery among the coccidia. However, many dense-granule and rhoptry kinase genes, responsible for altering host effector pathways in Toxoplasma and Neospora, are absent from S. neurona. Further, S. neurona has a divergent repertoire of SRS proteins, previously implicated in tissue cyst formation in Toxoplasma. Systems-based analyses identified a series of metabolic innovations, including the ability to exploit alternative sources of energy. Finally, we present an S. neurona model detailing conserved molecular innovations that promote the transition from a purely enteric lifestyle (Eimeria) to a heteroxenous parasite capable of infecting a wide range of intermediate hosts. PMID:25670772

Blazejewski, Tomasz; Nursimulu, Nirvana; Pszenny, Viviana; Dangoudoubiyam, Sriveny; Namasivayam, Sivaranjani; Chiasson, Melissa A.; Chessman, Kyle; Tonkin, Michelle; Swapna, Lakshmipuram S.; Hung, Stacy S.; Bridgers, Joshua; Ricklefs, Stacy M.; Boulanger, Martin J.; Dubey, Jitender P.; Porcella, Stephen F.; Kissinger, Jessica C.; Howe, Daniel K.

2015-01-01

185

Interactome analysis identifies a new paralogue of XRCC4 in non-homologous end joining DNA repair pathway  

PubMed Central

Non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) is a major pathway to repair DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), which can display different types of broken ends. However, it is unclear how NHEJ factors organize to repair diverse types of DNA breaks. Here, through systematic analysis of the human NHEJ factor interactome, we identify PAXX as a direct interactor of Ku. The crystal structure of PAXX is similar to those of XRCC4 and XLF. Importantly, PAXX-deficient cells are sensitive to DSB-causing agents. Moreover, epistasis analysis demonstrates that PAXX functions together with XLF in response to ionizing radiation-induced complex DSBs, whereas they function redundantly in response to Topo2 inhibitor-induced simple DSBs. Consistently, PAXX and XLF coordinately promote the ligation of complex but not simple DNA ends in vitro. Altogether, our data identify PAXX as a new NHEJ factor and provide insight regarding the organization of NHEJ factors responding to diverse types of DSB ends. PMID:25670504

Xing, Mengtan; Yang, Mingrui; Huo, Wei; Feng, Feng; Wei, Leizhen; Jiang, Wenxia; Ning, Shaokai; Yan, Zhenxin; Li, Wen; Wang, Qingsong; Hou, Mei; Dong, Chunxia; Guo, Rong; Gao, Ge; Ji, Jianguo; Zha, Shan; Lan, Li; Liang, Huanhuan; Xu, Dongyi

2015-01-01

186

Interactome analysis identifies a new paralogue of XRCC4 in non-homologous end joining DNA repair pathway.  

PubMed

Non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) is a major pathway to repair DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), which can display different types of broken ends. However, it is unclear how NHEJ factors organize to repair diverse types of DNA breaks. Here, through systematic analysis of the human NHEJ factor interactome, we identify PAXX as a direct interactor of Ku. The crystal structure of PAXX is similar to those of XRCC4 and XLF. Importantly, PAXX-deficient cells are sensitive to DSB-causing agents. Moreover, epistasis analysis demonstrates that PAXX functions together with XLF in response to ionizing radiation-induced complex DSBs, whereas they function redundantly in response to Topo2 inhibitor-induced simple DSBs. Consistently, PAXX and XLF coordinately promote the ligation of complex but not simple DNA ends in vitro. Altogether, our data identify PAXX as a new NHEJ factor and provide insight regarding the organization of NHEJ factors responding to diverse types of DSB ends. PMID:25670504

Xing, Mengtan; Yang, Mingrui; Huo, Wei; Feng, Feng; Wei, Leizhen; Jiang, Wenxia; Ning, Shaokai; Yan, Zhenxin; Li, Wen; Wang, Qingsong; Hou, Mei; Dong, Chunxia; Guo, Rong; Gao, Ge; Ji, Jianguo; Zha, Shan; Lan, Li; Liang, Huanhuan; Xu, Dongyi

2015-01-01

187

Global gene expression profiling of somatic motor neuron populations with different vulnerability identify molecules and pathways of degeneration and protection  

PubMed Central

Different somatic motor neuron subpopulations show a differential vulnerability to degeneration in diseases such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, spinal muscular atrophy and spinobulbar muscular atrophy. Studies in mutant superoxide dismutase 1 over-expressing amyotrophic lateral sclerosis model mice indicate that initiation of disease is intrinsic to motor neurons, while progression is promoted by astrocytes and microglia. Therefore, analysis of the normal transcriptional profile of motor neurons displaying differential vulnerability to degeneration in motor neuron disease could give important clues to the mechanisms of relative vulnerability. Global gene expression profiling of motor neurons isolated by laser capture microdissection from three anatomical nuclei of the normal rat, oculomotor/trochlear (cranial nerve 3/4), hypoglossal (cranial nerve 12) and lateral motor column of the cervical spinal cord, displaying differential vulnerability to degeneration in motor neuron disorders, identified enriched transcripts for each neuronal subpopulation. There were striking differences in the regulation of genes involved in endoplasmatic reticulum and mitochondrial function, ubiquitination, apoptosis regulation, nitrogen metabolism, calcium regulation, transport, growth and RNA processing; cellular pathways that have been implicated in motor neuron diseases. Confirmation of genes of immediate biological interest identified differential localization of insulin-like growth factor II, guanine deaminase, peripherin, early growth response 1, soluble guanylate cyclase 1A3 and placental growth factor protein. Furthermore, the cranial nerve 3/4-restricted genes insulin-like growth factor II and guanine deaminase protected spinal motor neurons from glutamate-induced toxicity (P < 0.001, ANOVA), indicating that our approach can identify factors that protect or make neurons more susceptible to degeneration. PMID:20826431

Karlsson, Martin; Osborn, Teresia; Ludwig, Wesley

2010-01-01

188

Construction and analysis of biochemical networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Bioprocesses are being implemented for a range of different applications including the production of fuels, chemicals and drugs. Hence, it is becoming increasingly important to understand and model how they function and how they can be modified or designed to give the optimal performance. Here we discuss the construction and analysis of biochemical networks which are the first logical steps towards this goal. The construction of a reaction network is possible through reconstruction: extracting information from literature and from databases. This can be supplemented by reaction prediction methods which can identify steps which are missing from the current knowledge base. Analysis of biochemical systems generally requires some experimental input but can be used to identify important reactions and targets for enhancing the performance of the organism involved. Metabolic flux, pathway and metabolic control analysis can be used to determine the limits, capabilities and potential targets for enhancement respectively.

Binns, Michael; Theodoropoulos, Constantinos

2012-09-01

189

Whole Blood Transcriptomics and Urinary Metabolomics to Define Adaptive Biochemical Pathways of High-Intensity Exercise in 50-60 Year Old Masters Athletes  

PubMed Central

Exercise is beneficial for a variety of age-related disorders. However, the molecular mechanisms mediating the beneficial adaptations to exercise in older adults are not well understood. The aim of the current study was to utilize a dual approach to characterize the genetic and metabolic adaptive pathways altered by exercise in veteran athletes and age-matched untrained individuals. Two groups of 50–60 year old males: competitive cyclists (athletes, n?=?9; VO2peak 59.1±5.2 ml·kg?1·min?1; peak aerobic power 383±39 W) and untrained, minimally active individuals (controls, n?=?8; VO2peak 35.9±9.7 ml·kg?1·min?1; peak aerobic power 230±57 W) were examined. All participants completed an acute bout of submaximal endurance exercise, and blood and urine samples pre- and post-exercise were analyzed for gene expression and metabolic changes utilizing genome-wide DNA microarray analysis and NMR spectroscopy-based metabolomics, respectively. Our results indicate distinct differences in gene and metabolite expression involving energy metabolism, lipids, insulin signaling and cardiovascular function between the two groups. These findings may lead to new insights into beneficial signaling pathways of healthy aging and help identify surrogate markers for monitoring exercise and training load. PMID:24643011

Mukherjee, Kamalika; Edgett, Brittany A.; Burrows, Harrison W.; Castro, Cecilia; Griffin, Julian L.; Schwertani, Adel Giaid; Gurd, Brendon J.; Funk, Colin D.

2014-01-01

190

Metabolic pathway predictions for metabolomics: a molecular structure matching approach.  

PubMed

Metabolic pathways are composed of a series of chemical reactions occurring within a cell. In each pathway, enzymes catalyze the conversion of substrates into structurally similar products. Thus, structural similarity provides a potential means for mapping newly identified biochemical compounds to known metabolic pathways. In this paper, we present TrackSM, a cheminformatics tool designed to associate a chemical compound to a known metabolic pathway based on molecular structure matching techniques. Validation experiments show that TrackSM is capable of associating 93% of tested structures to their correct KEGG pathway class and 88% to their correct individual KEGG pathway. This suggests that TrackSM may be a valuable tool to aid in associating previously unknown small molecules to known biochemical pathways and improve our ability to link metabolomics, proteomic, and genomic data sets. TrackSM is freely available at http://metabolomics.pharm.uconn.edu/?q=Software.html . PMID:25668446

Hamdalla, Mai A; Rajasekaran, Sanguthevar; Grant, David F; M?ndoiu, Ion I

2015-03-23

191

Pathway-based Genome-Wide Association Analysis Identified the Importance of EphrinA-EphR pathway for Femoral Neck Bone Geometry  

PubMed Central

Femoral neck (FN) bone geometry is an important predictor of bone strength with high heritability. Previous studies have revealed certain candidate genes for FN bone geometry. However, the majority of the underlying genetic factors remain to be discovered. In this study, pathway-based genome-wide association analysis was performed to explore the joint effects of genes within biological pathways on FN bone geometry variations in a cohort of 1,000 unrelated U.S. whites. Nominal significant associations (nominal p value < 0.05) were observed between 76 pathways and a key FN bone geometry variable - section modulus (Z), biomechanically indicative of bone strength subject to bending. Among them, EphrinA-EphR pathway was most significantly associated with FN Z even after multiple testing adjustments (pFWER value = 0.035). The association of EphrinA-EphR pathway with FN Z was also observed in an independent sample from Framingham Osteoporosis Study. Overall, these results suggest the significant genetic contribution of EphrinA-EphR pathway to femoral neck bone geometry. PMID:19786129

Chen, Yuan; Xiong, Dong-Hai; Guo, Yan-Fang; Pan, Feng; Zhou, Qi; Zhang, Feng; Deng, Hong-Wen

2009-01-01

192

Eimeria falciformis infection of the mouse caecum identifies opposing roles of IFN?-regulated host pathways for the parasite development.  

PubMed

Intracellular parasites reprogram host functions for their survival and reproduction. The extent and relevance of parasite-mediated host responses in vivo remains poorly studied, however. We utilized Eimeria falciformis, a parasite infecting the mouse intestinal epithelium, to identify and validate host determinants of parasite infection. Most prominent mouse genes induced during the onset of asexual and sexual growth of parasite comprise interferon ? (IFN?)-regulated factors, e.g., immunity-related GTPases (IRGA6/B6/D/M2/M3), guanylate-binding proteins (GBP2/3/5/6/8), chemokines (CxCL9-11), and several enzymes of the kynurenine pathway including indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 (IDO1). These results indicated a multifarious innate defense (tryptophan catabolism, IRG, GBP, and chemokine signaling), and a consequential adaptive immune response (chemokine-cytokine signaling and lymphocyte recruitment). The inflammation- and immunity-associated transcripts were increased during the course of infection, following influx of B cells, T cells, and macrophages to the parasitized caecum tissue. Consistently, parasite growth was enhanced in animals inhibited for CxCr3, a major receptor for CxCL9-11 present on immune cells. Interestingly, despite a prominent induction, mouse IRGB6 failed to bind and disrupt the parasitophorous vacuole, implying an immune evasion by E. falciformis. Furthermore, oocyst output was impaired in IFN?-R(-/-) and IDO1(-/-) mice, both of which suggest a subversion of IFN? signaling by the parasite to promote its growth. PMID:24368565

Schmid, Manuela; Heitlinger, Emanuel; Spork, Simone; Mollenkopf, Hans-Joachim; Lucius, Richard; Gupta, Nishith

2014-07-01

193

Mutations in TLR/MYD88 pathway identify a subset of young chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients with favorable outcome.  

PubMed

Mutations in Toll-like receptor (TLR) and myeloid differentiation primary response 88 (MYD88) genes have been found in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) at low frequency. We analyzed the incidence, clinicobiological characteristics, and outcome of patients with TLR/MYD88 mutations in 587 CLL patients. Twenty-three patients (3.9%) had mutations, 19 in MYD88 (one with concurrent IRAK1 mutation), 2 TLR2 (one with concomitant TLR6 mutation), 1 IRAK1, and 1 TLR5. No mutations were found in IRAK2 and IRAK4. TLR/MYD88-mutated CLL overexpressed genes of the nuclear factor ?B pathway. Patients with TLR/MYD88 mutations were significantly younger (83% age ?50 years) than those with no mutations. TLR/MYD88 mutations were the most frequent in young patients. Patients with mutated TLR/MYD88 CLL had a higher frequency of mutated IGHV and low expression of CD38 and ZAP-70. Overall survival (OS) was better in TLR/MYD88-mutated than unmutated patients in the whole series (10-year OS, 100% vs 62%; P = .002), and in the subset of patients age ?50 years (100% vs 70%; P = .02). In addition, relative OS of TLR/MYD88-mutated patients was similar to that in the age- and gender-matched population. In summary, TLR/MYD88 mutations identify a population of young CLL patients with favorable outcome. PMID:24782504

Martínez-Trillos, Alejandra; Pinyol, Magda; Navarro, Alba; Aymerich, Marta; Jares, Pedro; Juan, Manel; Rozman, María; Colomer, Dolors; Delgado, Julio; Giné, Eva; González-Díaz, Marcos; Hernández-Rivas, Jesús M; Colado, Enrique; Rayón, Consolación; Payer, Angel R; Terol, Maria José; Navarro, Blanca; Quesada, Victor; Puente, Xosé S; Rozman, Ciril; López-Otín, Carlos; Campo, Elías; López-Guillermo, Armando; Villamor, Neus

2014-06-12

194

Identification of the major A?1–42-degrading catabolic pathway in brain parenchyma: Suppression leads to biochemical and pathological deposition  

Microsoft Academic Search

Alzheimer amyloid ?-peptide (A?) is a physiological peptide constantly anabolized and catabolized under normal conditions. We investigated the mechanism of catabolism by tracing multiple-radiolabeled synthetic peptide injected into rat hippocampus. The A?1–42 peptide underwent full degradation through limited proteolysis conducted by neutral endopeptidase (NEP) similar or identical to neprilysin as biochemically analyzed. Consistently, NEP inhibitor infusion resulted in both biochemical

Nobuhisa Iwata; Satoshi Tsubuki; Yoshie Takaki; Kaori Watanabe; Misaki Sekiguchi; Emi Hosoki; Maho Kawashima-Morishima; Hahn-Jun Lee; Emi Hama; Yoko Sekine-Aizawa; Takaomi C. Saido

2000-01-01

195

Use of an Activated Beta-Catenin to Identify Wnt Pathway Target Genes in Caenorhabditis elegans, Including a Subset of Collagen Genes Expressed in Late Larval Development  

PubMed Central

The Wnt signaling pathway plays a fundamental role during metazoan development, where it regulates diverse processes, including cell fate specification, cell migration, and stem cell renewal. Activation of the beta-catenin?dependent/canonical Wnt pathway up-regulates expression of Wnt target genes to mediate a cellular response. In the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, a canonical Wnt signaling pathway regulates several processes during larval development; however, few target genes of this pathway have been identified. To address this deficit, we used a novel approach of conditionally activated Wnt signaling during a defined stage of larval life by overexpressing an activated beta-catenin protein, then used microarray analysis to identify genes showing altered expression compared with control animals. We identified 166 differentially expressed genes, of which 104 were up-regulated. A subset of the up-regulated genes was shown to have altered expression in mutants with decreased or increased Wnt signaling; we consider these genes to be bona fide C. elegans Wnt pathway targets. Among these was a group of six genes, including the cuticular collagen genes, bli-1col-38, col-49, and col-71. These genes show a peak of expression in the mid L4 stage during normal development, suggesting a role in adult cuticle formation. Consistent with this finding, reduction of function for several of the genes causes phenotypes suggestive of defects in cuticle function or integrity. Therefore, this work has identified a large number of putative Wnt pathway target genes during larval life, including a small subset of Wnt-regulated collagen genes that may function in synthesis of the adult cuticle. PMID:24569038

Jackson, Belinda M.; Abete-Luzi, Patricia; Krause, Michael W.; Eisenmann, David M.

2014-01-01

196

PROFILING GENE EXPRESSION IN HUMAN H295R ADRENOCORTICAL CARCINOMA CELLS AND RAT TESTES TO IDENTIFY PATHWAYS OF TOXICITY FOR CONAZOLE FUNGICIDES  

EPA Science Inventory

Profiling Gene Expression in Human H295R Adrenocortical Carcinoma Cells and Rat Testes to Identify Pathways of Toxicity for Conazole Fungicides Ren1, H., Schmid1, J., Retief2, J., Turpaz2, Y.,Zhang3, X.,Jones3, P., Newsted3, J.,Giesy3, J., Wolf1, D.,Wood1, C., Bao1, W., Dix1, ...

197

ABSTRACT: Identifying phosphorus (P) source areas and trans-port pathways is a key step in decreasing P loading to natural  

E-print Network

ABSTRACT: Identifying phosphorus (P) source areas and trans- port pathways is a key step generation processes ­ saturation excess and infil- tration excess ­ on total phosphorus (TP) and soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) concentrations in 10 catchment streams of a Catskill mountain watershed

Walter, M.Todd

198

Analysis of TETRAKETIDE ?-PYRONE REDUCTASE Function in Arabidopsis thaliana Reveals a Previously Unknown, but Conserved, Biochemical Pathway in Sporopollenin Monomer Biosynthesis[C][W  

PubMed Central

The precise structure of the sporopollenin polymer that is the major constituent of exine, the outer pollen wall, remains poorly understood. Recently, characterization of Arabidopsis thaliana genes and corresponding enzymes involved in exine formation has demonstrated the role of fatty acid derivatives as precursors of sporopollenin building units. Fatty acyl-CoA esters synthesized by ACYL-COA SYNTHETASE5 (ACOS5) are condensed with malonyl-CoA by POLYKETIDE SYNTHASE A (PKSA) and PKSB to yield ?-pyrone polyketides required for exine formation. Here, we show that two closely related genes encoding oxidoreductases are specifically and transiently expressed in tapetal cells during microspore development in Arabidopsis anthers. Mutants compromised in expression of the reductases displayed a range of pollen exine layer defects, depending on the mutant allele. Phylogenetic studies indicated that the two reductases belong to a large reductase/dehydrogenase gene family and cluster in two distinct clades with putative orthologs from several angiosperm lineages and the moss Physcomitrella patens. Recombinant proteins produced in bacteria reduced the carbonyl function of tetraketide ?-pyrone compounds synthesized by PKSA/B, and the proteins were therefore named TETRAKETIDE ?-PYRONE REDUCTASE1 (TKPR1) and TKPR2 (previously called DRL1 and CCRL6, respectively). TKPR activities, together with those of ACOS5 and PKSA/B, identify a conserved biosynthetic pathway leading to hydroxylated ?-pyrone compounds that were previously unknown to be sporopollenin precursors. PMID:21193572

Grienenberger, Etienne; Kim, Sung Soo; Lallemand, Benjamin; Geoffroy, Pierrette; Heintz, Dimitri; Souza, Clarice de Azevedo; Heitz, Thierry; Douglas, Carl J.; Legrand, Michel

2010-01-01

199

Transcriptome Analysis in Prenatal IGF1-Deficient Mice Identifies Molecular Pathways and Target Genes Involved in Distal Lung Differentiation  

PubMed Central

Background Insulin-like Growth Factor 1 (IGF1) is a multifunctional regulator of somatic growth and development throughout evolution. IGF1 signaling through IGF type 1 receptor (IGF1R) controls cell proliferation, survival and differentiation in multiple cell types. IGF1 deficiency in mice disrupts lung morphogenesis, causing altered prenatal pulmonary alveologenesis. Nevertheless, little is known about the cellular and molecular basis of IGF1 activity during lung development. Methods/Principal Findings Prenatal Igf1?/? mutant mice with a C57Bl/6J genetic background displayed severe disproportional lung hypoplasia, leading to lethal neonatal respiratory distress. Immuno-histological analysis of their lungs showed a thickened mesenchyme, alterations in extracellular matrix deposition, thinner smooth muscles and dilated blood vessels, which indicated immature and delayed distal pulmonary organogenesis. Transcriptomic analysis of Igf1?/? E18.5 lungs using RNA microarrays identified deregulated genes related to vascularization, morphogenesis and cellular growth, and to MAP-kinase, Wnt and cell-adhesion pathways. Up-regulation of immunity-related genes was verified by an increase in inflammatory markers. Increased expression of Nfib and reduced expression of Klf2, Egr1 and Ctgf regulatory proteins as well as activation of ERK2 MAP-kinase were corroborated by Western blot. Among IGF-system genes only IGFBP2 revealed a reduction in mRNA expression in mutant lungs. Immuno-staining patterns for IGF1R and IGF2, similar in both genotypes, correlated to alterations found in specific cell compartments of Igf1?/? lungs. IGF1 addition to Igf1?/? embryonic lungs cultured ex vivo increased airway septa remodeling and distal epithelium maturation, processes accompanied by up-regulation of Nfib and Klf2 transcription factors and Cyr61 matricellular protein. Conclusions/Significance We demonstrated the functional tissue specific implication of IGF1 on fetal lung development in mice. Results revealed novel target genes and gene networks mediators of IGF1 action on pulmonary cellular proliferation, differentiation, adhesion and immunity, and on vascular and distal epithelium maturation during prenatal lung development. PMID:24391734

Hernández-Porras, Isabel; López, Icíar Paula; De Las Rivas, Javier; Pichel, José García

2013-01-01

200

Bilateral dorsal and ventral fiber pathways for the processing of affective prosody identified by probabilistic fiber tracking.  

PubMed

Dorsal and ventral pathways for syntacto-semantic speech processing in the left hemisphere are represented in the dual-stream model of auditory processing. Here we report new findings for the right dorsal and ventral temporo-frontal pathway during processing of affectively intonated speech (i.e. affective prosody) in humans, together with several left hemispheric structural connections, partly resembling those for syntacto-semantic speech processing. We investigated white matter fiber connectivity between regions responding to affective prosody in several subregions of the bilateral superior temporal cortex (secondary and higher-level auditory cortex) and of the inferior frontal cortex (anterior and posterior inferior frontal gyrus). The fiber connectivity was investigated by using probabilistic diffusion tensor based tractography. The results underscore several so far underestimated auditory pathway connections, especially for the processing of affective prosody, such as a right ventral auditory pathway. The results also suggest the existence of a dual-stream processing in the right hemisphere, and a general predominance of the dorsal pathways in both hemispheres underlying the neural processing of affective prosody in an extended temporo-frontal network. PMID:25583613

Frühholz, Sascha; Gschwind, Markus; Grandjean, Didier

2015-04-01

201

Gene Expression Meta-Analysis Identifies Cytokine Pathways and 5q Aberrations Involved in Metastasis of ERBB2 Amplified and Basal Breast Cancer  

PubMed Central

Background Breast tumors have been described by molecular subtypes characterized by pervasively different gene expression profiles. The subtypes are associated with different clinical parameters and origin of precursor cells. However, the biological pathways and chromosomal aberrations that differ between the subgroups are less well characterized. The molecular subtypes are associated with different risk of metastatic recurrence of the disease. Nevertheless, the performance of these overall patterns to predict outcome is far from optimal, suggesting that biological mechanisms that extend beyond the subgroups impact metastasis. Results We have scrutinized publicly available gene expression datasets and identified molecular subtypes in 1,394 breast tumors with outcome data. By analysis of chromosomal regions and pathways using “Gene set enrichment analysis” followed by a meta-analysis, we identified comprehensive mechanistic differences between the subgroups. Furthermore, the same approach was used to investigate mechanisms related to metastasis within the subgroups. A striking finding is that the molecular subtypes account for the majority of biological mechanisms associated with metastasis. However, some mechanisms, aside from the subtypes, were identified in a training set of 1,239 tumors and confirmed by survival analysis in two independent validation datasets from the same type of platform and consisting of very comparable node-negative patients that did not receive adjuvant medical therapy. The results show that high expression of 5q14 genes and low levels of TNFR2 pathway genes were associated with poor survival in basal-like cancers. Furthermore, low expression of 5q33 genes and interleukin-12 pathway genes were associated with poor outcome exclusively in ERBB2-like tumors. Conclusion The identified regions, genes, and pathways may be potential drug targets in future individualized treatment strategies. PMID:24327800

Thomassen, Mads; Tan, Qihua; Burton, Mark; Kruse, Torben A.

2013-01-01

202

Identifiers Identifiers  

E-print Network

, July 1998. . Tim Berners­Lee: Cool URIs don't change. [http://www.w3.org/Provider/Style/URI] Stefan://archive.ncsa.uiuc.edu/demoweb/url­primer.html] . T. Berners­Lee, R. Fielding, L. Masinter: Uniform Resource Identifiers (URI): Generic Syntax. RFC Names. RFC 1737, December 1994, 7 pages. . T. Berners­Lee, L. Masinter, M. McCahill: Uniform Resource

Brass, Stefan

203

Identifiers Identifiers  

E-print Network

, July 1998. . Tim Berners­Lee: Cool URIs don't change. [http://www.w3.org/Provider/Style/URI] . Uniform://archive.ncsa.uiuc.edu/demoweb/url­primer.html] . T. Berners­Lee, R. Fielding, L. Masinter: Uniform Resource Identifiers (URI): Generic Syntax. RFC Names. RFC 1737, December 1994, 7 pages. . T. Berners­Lee, L. Masinter, M. McCahill: Uniform Resource

Brass, Stefan

204

Genomic and Molecular Characterization of Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor Identifies the IGF1R Pathway as a Primary Target for Treatment  

PubMed Central

Purpose Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPNST) is a rare sarcoma that lacks effective therapeutic strategies. We gain insight into the most recurrent genetically altered pathways with the purpose of scanning possible therapeutic targets. Experimental design We performed a microarray based-comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) profiling of two cohorts of primary MPNST tissue samples including 25 patients treated at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center and 26 patients from Tianjin Cancer Hospital. IHC and cell biology detection and validation were performed on human MPNST tissues and cell lines. Results Genomic characterization of 51 MPNST tissue samples identified several frequently amplified regions harboring 2,599 genes and regions of deletion including 4,901 genes. At the pathway level, we identified a significant enrichment of copy number–altering events in the insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R) pathway, including frequent amplifications of the IGF1R gene itself. To validate the IGF1R pathway as a potential target in MPNSTs, we first confirmed that high IGF1R protein correlated with worse tumor-free survival in an independent set of samples using immunohistochemistry. Two MPNST cell lines (ST88-14 and STS26T) were used to determine the effect of attenuating IGF1R. Inhibition of IGF1R in ST88-14 cells using small interfering RNAs or an IGF1R inhibitor, MK-0646, led to significant decreases in cell proliferation, invasion, and migration accompanied by attenuation of the PI3K/AKT and MAPK pathways. Conclusion These integrated genomic and molecular studies provide evidence that the IGF1R pathway is a potential therapeutic target for patients with MPNST. PMID:22042973

Yang, Jilong; Ylipää, Antti; Sun, Yan; Zheng, Hong; Chen, Kexin; Nykter, Matti; Trent, Jonathan; Ratner, Nancy; Lev, Dina C.; Zhang, Wei

2011-01-01

205

A large-scale RNAi screen in human cells identifies new components of the p53 pathway  

Microsoft Academic Search

RNA interference (RNAi) is a powerful new tool with which to perform loss-of-function genetic screens in lower organisms and can greatly facilitate the identification of components of cellular signalling pathways. In mammalian cells, such screens have been hampered by a lack of suitable tools that can be used on a large scale. We and others have recently developed expression vectors

Katrien Berns; E. Marielle Hijmans; Jasper Mullenders; Thijn R. Brummelkamp; Arno Velds; Mike Heimerikx; Ron M. Kerkhoven; Mandy Madiredjo; Wouter Nijkamp; Britta Weigelt; Reuven Agami; Wei Ge; Guy Cavet; Peter S. Linsley; Roderick L. Beijersbergen; René Bernards

2004-01-01

206

Identifying developmental toxicity pathways for a subset of ToxCast chemicals using human embryonic stem cells and metabolomics  

SciTech Connect

Metabolomics analysis was performed on the supernatant of human embryonic stem (hES) cell cultures exposed to a blinded subset of 11 chemicals selected from the chemical library of EPA's ToxCast Trade-Mark-Sign chemical screening and prioritization research project. Metabolites from hES cultures were evaluated for known and novel signatures that may be indicative of developmental toxicity. Significant fold changes in endogenous metabolites were detected for 83 putatively annotated mass features in response to the subset of ToxCast chemicals. The annotations were mapped to specific human metabolic pathways. This revealed strong effects on pathways for nicotinate and nicotinamide metabolism, pantothenate and CoA biosynthesis, glutathione metabolism, and arginine and proline metabolism pathways. Predictivity for adverse outcomes in mammalian prenatal developmental toxicity studies used ToxRefDB and other sources of information, including Stemina Biomarker Discovery's predictive DevTox Registered-Sign model trained on 23 pharmaceutical agents of known developmental toxicity and differing potency. The model initially predicted developmental toxicity from the blinded ToxCast compounds in concordance with animal data with 73% accuracy. Retraining the model with data from the unblinded test compounds at one concentration level increased the predictive accuracy for the remaining concentrations to 83%. These preliminary results on a 11-chemical subset of the ToxCast chemical library indicate that metabolomics analysis of the hES secretome provides information valuable for predictive modeling and mechanistic understanding of mammalian developmental toxicity. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We tested 11 environmental compounds in a hESC metabolomics platform. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Significant changes in secreted small molecule metabolites were observed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Perturbed mass features map to pathways critical for normal development and pregnancy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Arginine, proline, nicotinate, nicotinamide and glutathione pathways were affected.

Kleinstreuer, N.C., E-mail: kleinstreuer.nicole@epa.gov [NCCT, US EPA, RTP, NC 27711 (United States); Smith, A.M.; West, P.R.; Conard, K.R.; Fontaine, B.R. [Stemina Biomarker Discovery, Inc., Madison, WI 53719 (United States)] [Stemina Biomarker Discovery, Inc., Madison, WI 53719 (United States); Weir-Hauptman, A.M. [Covance, Inc., Madison, WI 53704 (United States)] [Covance, Inc., Madison, WI 53704 (United States); Palmer, J.A. [Stemina Biomarker Discovery, Inc., Madison, WI 53719 (United States)] [Stemina Biomarker Discovery, Inc., Madison, WI 53719 (United States); Knudsen, T.B.; Dix, D.J. [NCCT, US EPA, RTP, NC 27711 (United States)] [NCCT, US EPA, RTP, NC 27711 (United States); Donley, E.L.R. [Stemina Biomarker Discovery, Inc., Madison, WI 53719 (United States)] [Stemina Biomarker Discovery, Inc., Madison, WI 53719 (United States); Cezar, G.G. [Stemina Biomarker Discovery, Inc., Madison, WI 53719 (United States) [Stemina Biomarker Discovery, Inc., Madison, WI 53719 (United States); University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

2011-11-15

207

Biochemical Characterization of the O-Linked Glycosylation Pathway in Neisseria gonorrhoeae Responsible for Biosynthesis of Protein Glycans Containing N,N '-Diacetylbacillosamine  

E-print Network

The O-linked protein glycosylation pathway in Neisseria gonorrhoeae is responsible for the synthesis of a complex oligosaccharide on undecaprenyl diphosphate and subsequent en bloc transfer of the glycan to serine residues ...

Hartley, Meredith D.

208

Genetic and Biochemical Characterization of 4Carboxy2-Hydroxymuconate-6Semialdehyde Dehydrogenase and Its Role in the Protocatechuate 4,5Cleavage Pathway in Sphingomonas paucimobilis SYK-6  

Microsoft Academic Search

Protocatechuate (PCA) is the key intermediate metabolite in the lignin degradation pathway of Sphingomo- nas paucimobilis SYK-6 and is metabolized to pyruvate and oxaloacetate via the PCA 4,5-cleavage pathway. We characterized the 4-carboxy-2-hydroxymuconate-6-semialdehyde (CHMS) dehydrogenase gene (ligC). CHMS is the 4,5-cleavage product of PCA and is converted into 2-pyrone-4,6-dicarboxylate (PDC) by LigC. We found that ligC was located 295 bp

EIJI MASAI; KIYOTAKA MOMOSE; HIROFUMI HARA; SEIJI NISHIKAWA; YOSHIHIRO KATAYAMA; MASAO FUKUDA

2000-01-01

209

The formation, pathway and destination of the North Pacific subduction water identified by a simulated passive tracer  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The formation, pathway and destination of the North Pacific subduction water are investigated by using a simulated passive traceradjoint, based on circulation estimates of a global general circulation model.Results confirm that the North Pacific subduction rate corresponds well with the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO),especial highly correlated to the March(winter) PDO index. The effect of mixing increases this correlation from 0.7 to 0.8. The subduction water then particpate in the subtropic gyre of North Pacific. About 30% of the water obducts up to the local mixed layer in early 2-3 years, and more and more water obducts along the pathway of the Subtropical Cell (STC)towrds Equator. Despite the fact that only a part of water can reach the tropical zone, the signal of sudduction rate which is highly correlated to the PDO keeps very well in the process of the transport of STC.

Gao, S.; Chen, Y.

2011-12-01

210

Native fluorescence spectroscopy of blood plasma of rats with experimental diabetes: identifying fingerprints of glucose-related metabolic pathways.  

PubMed

We present the results of a native fluorescence spectroscopy study of blood plasma of rats with experimental diabetes. It was shown that the fluorescence emission band shape at 320 nm excitation is the most indicative of hyperglycemia in the blood plasma samples. We provide the interpretation of this fact based on the changes in reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate concentration due to glucose-related metabolic pathways and protein fluorescent cross-linking formation following nonenzymatic glycation. PMID:25692658

Shirshin, Evgeny; Cherkasova, Olga; Tikhonova, Tatiana; Berlovskaya, Elena; Priezzhev, Alexander; Fadeev, Victor

2015-05-01

211

Implementation of a High-Throughput Screen for Identifying Small Molecules to Activate the Keap1-Nrf2-ARE Pathway  

E-print Network

compounds protect against oxidative/ electrophilic stress-induced toxicity, at least partially through activating Nrf2. For example, curcumin protects against focal ischemia of the cerebrum through upregulation of Nrf2 [16], and oltipraz protects against... pathway [18]. To date, a number of compounds with diverse chemical structures have been shown to activate Keap1- Nrf2, including oxidizable diphenols (tBHQ), dithiolethiones (oltipraz), isothiocyanates (sulforaphane), and Michael acceptors (curcumin...

Wu, Kai Connie; McDonald, Peter R.; Liu, Jie Jerry; Chaguturu, Rathnam; Klaassen, Curtis D.

2012-10-08

212

Chemical and biochemical microreactors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Research into the fundamental and practical advantages of using micrometre scale reactors for chemical and biochemical applications is now growing at a considerable rate. This review tracks such developments, illustrating their inherent strengths and identifying areas where further development of a technology is poised to revolutionise significant areas of synthetic chemistry and biochemistry.

Stephen J Haswell; Victoria Skelton

2000-01-01

213

Experimentally-derived fibroblast gene signatures identify molecular pathways associated with distinct subsets of systemic sclerosis patients in three independent cohorts.  

PubMed

Genome-wide expression profiling in systemic sclerosis (SSc) has identified four 'intrinsic' subsets of disease (fibroproliferative, inflammatory, limited, and normal-like), each of which shows deregulation of distinct signaling pathways; however, the full set of pathways contributing to this differential gene expression has not been fully elucidated. Here we examine experimentally derived gene expression signatures in dermal fibroblasts for thirteen different signaling pathways implicated in SSc pathogenesis. These data show distinct and overlapping sets of genes induced by each pathway, allowing for a better understanding of the molecular relationship between profibrotic and immune signaling networks. Pathway-specific gene signatures were analyzed across a compendium of microarray datasets consisting of skin biopsies from three independent cohorts representing 80 SSc patients, 4 morphea, and 26 controls. IFN? signaling showed a strong association with early disease, while TGF? signaling spanned the fibroproliferative and inflammatory subsets, was associated with worse MRSS, and was higher in lesional than non-lesional skin. The fibroproliferative subset was most strongly associated with PDGF signaling, while the inflammatory subset demonstrated strong activation of innate immune pathways including TLR signaling upstream of NF-?B. The limited and normal-like subsets did not show associations with fibrotic and inflammatory mediators such as TGF? and TNF?. The normal-like subset showed high expression of genes associated with lipid signaling, which was absent in the inflammatory and limited subsets. Together, these data suggest a model by which IFN? is involved in early disease pathology, and disease severity is associated with active TGF? signaling. PMID:25607805

Johnson, Michael E; Mahoney, J Matthew; Taroni, Jaclyn; Sargent, Jennifer L; Marmarelis, Eleni; Wu, Ming-Ru; Varga, John; Hinchcliff, Monique E; Whitfield, Michael L

2015-01-01

214

Method for identifying subsurface fluid migration and drainage pathways in and among oil and gas reservoirs using 3-D and 4-D seismic imaging  

DOEpatents

The invention utilizes 3-D and 4-D seismic surveys as a means of deriving information useful in petroleum exploration and reservoir management. The methods use both single seismic surveys (3-D) and multiple seismic surveys separated in time (4-D) of a region of interest to determine large scale migration pathways within sedimentary basins, and fine scale drainage structure and oil-water-gas regions within individual petroleum producing reservoirs. Such structure is identified using pattern recognition tools which define the regions of interest. The 4-D seismic data sets may be used for data completion for large scale structure where time intervals between surveys do not allow for dynamic evolution. The 4-D seismic data sets also may be used to find variations over time of small scale structure within individual reservoirs which may be used to identify petroleum drainage pathways, oil-water-gas regions and, hence, attractive drilling targets. After spatial orientation, and amplitude and frequency matching of the multiple seismic data sets, High Amplitude Event (HAE) regions consistent with the presence of petroleum are identified using seismic attribute analysis. High Amplitude Regions are grown and interconnected to establish plumbing networks on the large scale and reservoir structure on the small scale. Small scale variations over time between seismic surveys within individual reservoirs are identified and used to identify drainage patterns and bypassed petroleum to be recovered. The location of such drainage patterns and bypassed petroleum may be used to site wells. 22 figs.

Anderson, R.N.; Boulanger, A.; Bagdonas, E.P.; Xu, L.; He, W.

1996-12-17

215

Method for identifying subsurface fluid migration and drainage pathways in and among oil and gas reservoirs using 3-D and 4-D seismic imaging  

DOEpatents

The invention utilizes 3-D and 4-D seismic surveys as a means of deriving information useful in petroleum exploration and reservoir management. The methods use both single seismic surveys (3-D) and multiple seismic surveys separated in time (4-D) of a region of interest to determine large scale migration pathways within sedimentary basins, and fine scale drainage structure and oil-water-gas regions within individual petroleum producing reservoirs. Such structure is identified using pattern recognition tools which define the regions of interest. The 4-D seismic data sets may be used for data completion for large scale structure where time intervals between surveys do not allow for dynamic evolution. The 4-D seismic data sets also may be used to find variations over time of small scale structure within individual reservoirs which may be used to identify petroleum drainage pathways, oil-water-gas regions and, hence, attractive drilling targets. After spatial orientation, and amplitude and frequency matching of the multiple seismic data sets, High Amplitude Event (HAE) regions consistent with the presence of petroleum are identified using seismic attribute analysis. High Amplitude Regions are grown and interconnected to establish plumbing networks on the large scale and reservoir structure on the small scale. Small scale variations over time between seismic surveys within individual reservoirs are identified and used to identify drainage patterns and bypassed petroleum to be recovered. The location of such drainage patterns and bypassed petroleum may be used to site wells.

Anderson, Roger N. (New York, NY); Boulanger, Albert (New York, NY); Bagdonas, Edward P. (Brookline, MA); Xu, Liqing (New Milford, NJ); He, Wei (New Milford, NJ)

1996-01-01

216

Expression-based network biology identifies alteration in key regulatory pathways of type 2 diabetes and associated risk/complications.  

PubMed

Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D) is a multifactorial and genetically heterogeneous disease which leads to impaired glucose homeostasis and insulin resistance. The advanced form of disease causes acute cardiovascular, renal, neurological and microvascular complications. Thus there is a constant need to discover new and efficient treatment against the disease by seeking to uncover various novel alternate signalling mechanisms that can lead to diabetes and its associated complications. The present study allows detection of molecular targets by unravelling their role in altered biological pathways during diabetes and its associated risk factors and complications. We have used an integrated functional networks concept by merging co-expression network and interaction network to detect the transcriptionally altered pathways and regulations involved in the disease. Our analysis reports four novel significant networks which could lead to the development of diabetes and other associated dysfunctions. (a) The first network illustrates the up regulation of TGFBRII facilitating oxidative stress and causing the expression of early transcription genes via MAPK pathway leading to cardiovascular and kidney related complications. (b) The second network demonstrates novel interactions between GAPDH and inflammatory and proliferation candidate genes i.e., SUMO4 and EGFR indicating a new link between obesity and diabetes. (c) The third network portrays unique interactions PTPN1 with EGFR and CAV1 which could lead to an impaired vascular function in diabetic nephropathy condition. (d) Lastly, from our fourth network we have inferred that the interaction of beta-catenin with CDH5 and TGFBR1 through Smad molecules could contribute to endothelial dysfunction. A probability of emergence of kidney complication might be suggested in T2D condition. An experimental investigation on this aspect may further provide more decisive observation in drug target identification and better understanding of the pathophysiology of T2D and its complications. PMID:19997558

Sengupta, Urmi; Ukil, Sanchaita; Dimitrova, Nevenka; Agrawal, Shipra

2009-01-01

217

Genome wide association study of SNP-, gene-, and pathway-based approaches to identify genes influencing susceptibility to Staphylococcus aureus infections  

PubMed Central

Background: We conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) to identify specific genetic variants that underlie susceptibility to diseases caused by Staphylococcus aureus in humans. Methods: Cases (n = 309) and controls (n = 2925) were genotyped at 508,921 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Cases had at least one laboratory and clinician confirmed disease caused by S. aureus whereas controls did not. R-package (for SNP association), EIGENSOFT (to estimate and adjust for population stratification) and gene- (VEGAS) and pathway-based (DAVID, PANTHER, and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis) analyses were performed. Results: No SNP reached genome-wide significance. Four SNPs exceeded the p < 10?5 threshold including two (rs2455012 and rs7152530) reaching a p-value < 10?7. The nearby genes were PDE4B (rs2455012), TXNRD2 (rs3804047), VRK1 and BCL11B (rs7152530), and PNPLA5 (rs470093). The top two findings from the gene-based analysis were NMRK2 (pgene = 1.20E-05), which codes an integrin binding molecule (focal adhesion), and DAPK3 (pgene = 5.10E-05), a serine/threonine kinase (apoptosis and cytokinesis). The pathway analyses identified epithelial cell responses to mechanical and non-mechanical stress. Conclusion: We identified potential susceptibility genes for S. aureus diseases in this preliminary study but confirmation by other studies is needed. The observed associations could be relevant given the complexity of S. aureus as a pathogen and its ability to exploit multiple biological pathways to cause infections in humans. PMID:24847357

Ye, Zhan; Vasco, Daniel A.; Carter, Tonia C.; Brilliant, Murray H.; Schrodi, Steven J.; Shukla, Sanjay K.

2014-01-01

218

Drug Intervention Response Predictions with PARADIGM (DIRPP) identifies drug resistant cancer cell lines and pathway mechanisms of resistance.  

PubMed

The revolution in sequencing techniques in the past decade has provided an extensive picture of the molecular mechanisms behind complex diseases such as cancer. The Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia (CCLE) and The Cancer Genome Project (CGP) have provided an unprecedented opportunity to examine copy number, gene expression, and mutational information for over 1000 cell lines of multiple tumor types alongside IC50 values for over 150 different drugs and drug related compounds. We present a novel pipeline called DIRPP, Drug Intervention Response Predictions with PARADIGM7, which predicts a cell line's response to a drug intervention from molecular data. PARADIGM (Pathway Recognition Algorithm using Data Integration on Genomic Models) is a probabilistic graphical model used to infer patient specific genetic activity by integrating copy number and gene expression data into a factor graph model of a cellular network. We evaluated the performance of DIRPP on endometrial, ovarian, and breast cancer related cell lines from the CCLE and CGP for nine drugs. The pipeline is sensitive enough to predict the response of a cell line with accuracy and precision across datasets as high as 80 and 88% respectively. We then classify drugs by the specific pathway mechanisms governing drug response. This classification allows us to compare drugs by cellular response mechanisms rather than simply by their specific gene targets. This pipeline represents a novel approach for predicting clinical drug response and generating novel candidates for drug repurposing and repositioning. PMID:24297540

Brubaker, Douglas; Difeo, Analisa; Chen, Yanwen; Pearl, Taylor; Zhai, Kaide; Bebek, Gurkan; Chance, Mark; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill

2014-01-01

219

Patient-Based Transcriptome-Wide Analysis Identify Interferon and Ubiquination Pathways as Potential Predictors of Influenza A Disease Severity  

PubMed Central

Background The influenza A virus is an RNA virus that is responsible for seasonal epidemics worldwide with up to five million cases of severe illness and 500,000 deaths annually according to the World Health Organization estimates. The factors associated with severe diseases are not well defined, but more severe disease is more often seen among persons aged >65 years, infants, pregnant women, and individuals of any age with underlying health conditions. Methodology/Principal Findings Using gene expression microarrays, the transcriptomic profiles of influenza-infected patients with severe (N?=?11), moderate (N?=?40) and mild (N?=?83) symptoms were compared with the febrile patients of unknown etiology (N?=?73). We found that influenza-infected patients, regardless of their clinical outcomes, had a stronger induction of antiviral and cytokine responses and a stronger attenuation of NK and T cell responses in comparison with those with unknown etiology. More importantly, we found that both interferon and ubiquitination signaling were strongly attenuated in patients with the most severe outcomes in comparison with those with moderate and mild outcomes, suggesting the protective roles of these pathways in disease pathogenesis. Conclusion/Significances The attenuation of interferon and ubiquitination pathways may associate with the clinical outcomes of influenza patients. PMID:25365328

Hoang, Long Truong; Tolfvenstam, Thomas; Ooi, Eng Eong; Khor, Chiea Chuen; Naim, Ahmand Nazri Mohamed; Ho, Eliza Xin Pei; Ong, Swee Hoe; Wertheim, Heiman F.; Fox, Annette; Van Vinh Nguyen, Chau; Nghiem, Ngoc My; Ha, Tuan Manh; Thi Ngoc Tran, Anh; Tambayah, Paul; Lin, Raymond; Sangsajja, Chariya; Manosuthi, Weerawat; Chuchottaworn, Chareon; Sansayunh, Piamlarp; Chotpitayasunondh, Tawee; Suntarattiwong, Piyarat; Chokephaibulkit, Kulkanya; Puthavathana, Pilaipan; de Jong, Menno D.; Farrar, Jeremy; van Doorn, H. Rogier; Hibberd, Martin Lloyd

2014-01-01

220

A sensitized genetic screen to identify novel regulators and components of the Drosophila janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription pathway.  

PubMed Central

The JAK/STAT pathway exerts pleiotropic effects on a wide range of developmental processes in Drosophila. Four key components have been identified: Unpaired, a secreted ligand; Domeless, a cytokine-like receptor; Hopscotch, a JAK kinase; and Stat92E, a STAT transcription factor. The identification of additional components and regulators of this pathway remains an important issue. To this end, we have generated a transgenic line where we misexpress the upd ligand in the developing Drosophila eye. GMR-upd transgenic animals have dramatically enlarged eye-imaginal discs and compound eyes that are normally patterned. We demonstrate that the enlarged-eye phenotype is a result of an increase in cell number, and not cell volume, and arises from additional mitoses in larval eye discs. Thus, the GMR-upd line represents a system in which the proliferation and differentiation of eye precursor cells are separable. Removal of one copy of stat92E substantially reduces the enlarged-eye phenotype. We performed an F1 deficiency screen to identify dominant modifiers of the GMR-upd phenotype. We have identified 9 regions that enhance this eye phenotype and two specific enhancers: C-terminal binding protein and Daughters against dpp. We also identified 20 regions that suppress GMR-upd and 13 specific suppressors: zeste-white 13, pineapple eye, Dichaete, histone 2A variant, headcase, plexus, kohtalo, crumbs, hedgehog, decapentaplegic, thickveins, saxophone, and Mothers against dpp. PMID:14668372

Bach, Erika A; Vincent, Stephane; Zeidler, Martin P; Perrimon, Norbert

2003-01-01

221

Meta-analyses identify 13 loci associated with age at menopause and highlight DNA repair and immune pathways  

Microsoft Academic Search

To newly identify loci for age at natural menopause, we carried out a meta-analysis of 22 genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in 38,968 women of European descent, with replication in up to 14,435 women. In addition to four known loci, we identified 13 loci newly associated with age at natural menopause (at P < 5 × 10?8). Candidate genes located at

Lisette Stolk; John R B Perry; Daniel I Chasman; Chunyan He; Massimo Mangino; Patrick Sulem; Maja Barbalic; Linda Broer; Enda M Byrne; Florian Ernst; Tõnu Esko; Nora Franceschini; Daniel F Gudbjartsson; Jouke-Jan Hottenga; Peter Kraft; Patrick F McArdle; Eleonora Porcu; So-Youn Shin; Albert V Smith; Sophie van Wingerden; Guangju Zhai; Wei V Zhuang; Eva Albrecht; Behrooz Z Alizadeh; Thor Aspelund; Stefania Bandinelli; Lovorka Barac Lauc; Jacques S Beckmann; Mladen Boban; Eric Boerwinkle; Frank J Broekmans; Andrea Burri; Harry Campbell; Stephen J Chanock; Constance Chen; Marilyn C Cornelis; Tanguy Corre; Andrea D Coviello; Pio d'Adamo; Gail Davies; Ulf de Faire; Eco J C de Geus; Ian J Deary; George V Z Dedoussis; Panagiotis Deloukas; Shah Ebrahim; Gudny Eiriksdottir; Valur Emilsson; Johan G Eriksson; Bart C J M Fauser; Liana Ferreli; Luigi Ferrucci; Krista Fischer; Aaron R Folsom; Melissa E Garcia; Paolo Gasparini; Christian Gieger; Nicole Glazer; Diederick E Grobbee; Per Hall; Toomas Haller; Susan E Hankinson; Merli Hass; Caroline Hayward; Andrew C Heath; Albert Hofman; Erik Ingelsson; A Cecile J W Janssens; Andrew D Johnson; David Karasik; Sharon L R Kardia; Jules Keyzer; Douglas P Kiel; Ivana Kolcic; Zoltán Kutalik; Jari Lahti; Sandra Lai; Triin Laisk; Joop S E Laven; Debbie A Lawlor; Jianjun Liu; Lorna M Lopez; Yvonne V Louwers; Patrik K E Magnusson; Mara Marongiu; Nicholas G Martin; Irena Martinovic Klaric; Corrado Masciullo; Barbara McKnight; Sarah E Medland; David Melzer; Vincent Mooser; Pau Navarro; Anne B Newman; Dale R Nyholt; N Charlotte Onland-Moret; Aarno Palotie; Guillaume Paré; Alex N Parker; Nancy L Pedersen; Petra H M Peeters; Giorgio Pistis; Andrew S Plump; Ozren Polasek; Victor J M Pop; Bruce M Psaty; Katri Räikkönen; Emil Rehnberg; Jerome I Rotter; Igor Rudan; Cinzia Sala; Andres Salumets; Angelo Scuteri; Andrew Singleton; Jennifer A Smith; Harold Snieder; Nicole Soranzo; Simon N Stacey; John M Starr; Maria G Stathopoulou; Kathleen Stirrups; Ronald P Stolk; Unnur Styrkarsdottir; Yan V Sun; Albert Tenesa; Barbara Thorand; Daniela Toniolo; Laufey Tryggvadottir; Kim Tsui; Sheila Ulivi; Rob M van Dam; Yvonne T van der Schouw; Carla H van Gils; Peter van Nierop; Jacqueline M Vink; Peter M Visscher; Marlies Voorhuis; Gérard Waeber; Henri Wallaschofski; H Erich Wichmann; Elisabeth Widen; Colette J M Wijnands-van Gent; Gonneke Willemsen; James F Wilson; Bruce H R Wolffenbuttel; Alan F Wright; Laura M Yerges-Armstrong; Tatijana Zemunik; Lina Zgaga; M Carola Zillikens; Marek Zygmunt; Alice M Arnold; Dorret I Boomsma; Julie E Buring; Laura Crisponi; Ellen W Demerath; Vilmundur Gudnason; Tamara B Harris; Frank B Hu; David J Hunter; Lenore J Launer; Andres Metspalu; Grant W Montgomery; Ben A Oostra; Paul M Ridker; Serena Sanna; David Schlessinger; Tim D Spector; Kari Stefansson; Elizabeth A Streeten; Unnur Thorsteinsdottir; Manuela Uda; André G Uitterlinden; Cornelia M van Duijn; Henry Völzke; Joanne M Murabito; Jenny A Visser; Anna Murray; Kathryn L Lunetta

2012-01-01

222

An RNA interference screen for identifying downstream effectors of the p53 and pRB tumour suppressor pathways involved in senescence  

PubMed Central

Background Cellular senescence is an irreversible cell cycle arrest that normal cells undergo in response to progressive shortening of telomeres, changes in telomeric structure, oncogene activation or oxidative stress and acts as an important tumour suppressor mechanism. Results To identify the downstream effectors of the p53-p21 and p16-pRB tumour suppressor pathways crucial for mediating entry into senescence, we have carried out a loss-of-function RNA interference screen in conditionally immortalised human fibroblasts that can be induced to rapidly undergo senescence, whereas in primary cultures senescence is stochastic and occurs asynchronously. These cells are immortal but undergo a rapid irreversible arrest upon activation of the p53-p21 and p16-pRB pathways that can be readily bypassed upon their inactivation. The primary screen identified 112 known genes including p53 and another 29 shRNAmirs targetting as yet unidentified loci. Comparison of these known targets with genes known to be up-regulated upon senescence in these cells, by micro-array expression profiling, identified 4 common genes TMEM9B, ATXN10, LAYN and LTBP2/3. Direct silencing of these common genes, using lentiviral shRNAmirs, bypassed senescence in the conditionally immortalised cells. Conclusion The senescence bypass screen identified TMEM9B, ATXN10, LAYN and LTBP2/3 as novel downstream effectors of the p53-p21 and p16-pRB tumour suppressor pathways. Although none of them has previously been linked to cellular senescence, TMEM9B has been suggested to be an upstream activator of NF-?B signalling which has been found to have a causal role in promoting senescence. Future studies will focus on determining on how many of the other primary hits also have a casual role in senescence and what is the mechanism of action. PMID:21740549

2011-01-01

223

Transcriptional Profiling with a Pathway-Oriented Analysis Identifies Dysregulated Molecular Phenotypes in the Endometrium of Patients with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome  

PubMed Central

Context: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common endocrine disorder characterized by chronic oligo/anovulation, hyperandrogenemia, infertility, and metabolic alterations related to insulin resistance. These abnormalities in PCOS may have complex effects on pathophysiology of the endometrium, contributing to infertility and endometrial disorders. Objective: The objective of this study was to examine dysregulated signaling pathways in the endometrium of patients with PCOS (PCOSE) by analyzing expression profiles with a pathway-oriented method. Design: Microarrays, RT-PCR, laser capture microdissection, and immunohistochemistry were performed with endometrial tissues. Setting: This study was performed at a university hospital laboratory. Patients: This study comprised 12 regularly cycling women and 12 PCOS patients. Main Outcome Measure: Dysregulated signaling pathways in PCOSE were identified as a gene set. Results: Hierarchical clustering revealed distinct expression profiles for PCOSE and the endometrium of normal cycling women. Gene sets associated with androgen signaling were not enriched in PCOSE, although they affect ovarian physiology of PCOS patients. Several biological pathways including cell cycle, apoptosis, glycolysis, and integrin-Rho-cytoskeleton network were aberrantly down-regulated in PCOSE. Expression of genes constituting these gene sets enriched in normal cycling women was systemically down-regulated in PCOSE. Laser capture microdissection-coupled real-time RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry further demonstrated that cell proliferation in the stroma, but not the epithelium, is significantly reduced in PCOSE. Conclusions: Systemic down-regulation of various signaling pathways in PCOSE with extremely prolonged proliferative phase provides insight into the abnormal phenotypes that reflect pathophysiology of PCOS in the endometrium, possibly leading to increased risks of endometrial disorders. PMID:19141577

Kim, Jin Yeong; Song, Haengseok; Kim, Hyunjoo; Kang, Hee Jung; Jun, Jin Hyun; Hong, Sung Ran; Koong, Mi Kyoung; Kim, In Sun

2009-01-01

224

An Arrayed RNA Interference Genome-Wide Screen Identifies Candidate Genes Involved in the MicroRNA 21 Biogenesis Pathway  

PubMed Central

Abstract MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are evolutionary conserved noncoding molecules that regulate gene expression. They influence a number of diverse biological functions, such as development and differentiation. However, their dysregulation has been shown to be associated with disease states, such as cancer. Genes and pathways regulating their biogenesis remain unknown and are highly sought after. For this purpose, we have validated a multiplexed high-content assay strategy to screen for such modulators. Here, we describe its implementation that makes use of a cell-based gain-of-function reporter assay monitoring enhanced green fluorescent protein expression under the control of miRNA 21 (miR-21); combined with measures of both cell metabolic activities through the use of Alamar Blue and cell death through imaged Hoechst-stained nuclei. The strategy was validated using a panel of known genes and enabled us to successfully progress to and complete an arrayed genome-wide short interfering RNA (siRNA) screen against the Ambion Silencer Select v4.0 library containing 64,755 siRNA duplexes covering 21,565 genes. We applied a high-stringency hit analysis method, referred to as the Bhinder–Djaballah analysis method, leading to the nomination of 1,273 genes as candidate inhibitors of the miR-21 biogenesis pathway; after several iterations eliminating those genes with only one active duplex and those enriched in seed sequence mediated off-target effects. Biological classifications revealed four major control junctions among them vesicular transport via clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Altogether, our screen has uncovered a number of novel candidate regulators that are potentially good druggable targets allowing for the discovery and development of small molecules for regulating miRNA function. PMID:23153064

Shum, David; Bhinder, Bhavneet; Ramirez, Christina N.; Radu, Constantin; Calder, Paul A.; Beauchamp, Lesslie; Farazi, T.; Landthaler, M.; Tuschi, T.; Magdaleno, Susan

2013-01-01

225

Evaluation of microbial triglyceride oil purification requirements for the CelTherm process: an efficient biochemical pathway to renewable fuels and chemicals.  

PubMed

CelTherm is a biochemical process to produce renewable fuels and chemicals from lignocellulosic biomass. The present study's objective was to determine the level of treatment/purity of the microbial triacylglyceride oil (TAG) necessary to facilitate fuel production. After a unique microbe aerobically synthesizes TAG from biomass-derived sugars, the microbes were harvested and dried then crude TAG was chemically extracted from the residual biomass. Some TAGs were further purified to hydrotreating process requirements. Both grades were then noncatalytically cracked into a petroleum-like intermediate characterized by gas chromatography. Experiments were repeated using refined soybean oil for comparison to previous studies. The products from crude microbial TAG cracking were then further refined into a jet fuel product. Fuel tests indicate that this jet fuel corresponds to specifications for JP-8 military turbine fuel. It was thus concluded that the crude microbial TAG is a suitable feedstock with no further purification required, demonstrating CelTherm's commercial potential. PMID:24781206

Linnen, Michael; Seames, Wayne; Kubatova, Alena; Menon, Suresh; Alisala, Kashinatham; Hash, Sara

2014-10-01

226

Three-Dimensional Pharmacophore Design and Biochemical Screening Identifies Substituted 1,2,4-Triazoles as Inhibitors of the Annexin?A2–S100A10 Protein Interaction  

PubMed Central

Abstract Protein interactions are increasingly appreciated as targets in small-molecule drug discovery. The interaction between the adapter protein S100A10 and its binding partner annexin?A2 is a potentially important drug target. To obtain small-molecule starting points for inhibitors of this interaction, a three-dimensional pharmacophore model was constructed from the X-ray crystal structure of the complex between S100A10 and annexin A2. The pharmacophore model represents the favourable hydrophobic and hydrogen bond interactions between the two partners, as well as spatial and receptor site constraints (excluded volume spheres). Using this pharmacophore model, UNITY flex searches were carried out on a 3D library of 0.7 million commercially available compounds. This resulted in 568 hit compounds. Subsequently, GOLD docking studies were performed on these hits, and a set of 190 compounds were purchased and tested biochemically for inhibition of the protein interaction. Three compounds of similar chemical structure were identified as genuine inhibitors of the binding of annexin A2 to S100A10. The binding modes predicted by GOLD were in good agreement with their UNITY-generated conformations. We synthesised a series of analogues revealing areas critical for binding. Thus computational predictions and biochemical screening can be used successfully to derive novel chemical classes of protein–protein interaction blockers. PMID:22644793

Reddy, Tummala R K; Li, Chan; Fischer, Peter M; Dekker, Lodewijk V

2012-01-01

227

A novel biochemical method to identify target genes of individual microRNAs: Identification of a new Caenorhabditis elegans let-7 target  

PubMed Central

MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are roughly 22-nucleotide regulatory RNAs that play important roles in many developmental and physiological processes. Animal miRNAs down-regulate target genes by forming imperfect base pairs with 3? untranslated regions (3? UTRs) of their mRNAs. Thousands of miRNAs have been discovered in several organisms. However, the target genes of almost all of these miRNAs remain to be identified. Here, we describe a method for isolating cDNA clones of target mRNAs that form base pairs in vivo with an endogenous miRNA of interest, in which the cDNAs are synthesized from the mRNAs using the miRNA as a reverse-transcription primer. The application of this method to Caenorhabditis elegans miRNA lin-4 under test conditions yielded many clones of the known target gene lin-14 that correspond to partial sequences 5? to lin-4 binding sites in the 3? UTR. The method was also applied to C. elegans miRNA let-7 and a new target gene responsible for the lethal phenotype in let-7 mutants was identified. These results demonstrate that the method is a useful way to identify targets on the basis of base pairing with individual miRNAs. PMID:18824511

Andachi, Yoshiki

2008-01-01

228

Proteomic Profiling Identifies Dysregulated Pathways in Small Cell Lung Cancer and Novel Therapeutic Targets Including PARP1  

PubMed Central

Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is an aggressive malignancy distinct from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in its metastatic potential and treatment response. Using an integrative proteomic and transcriptomic analysis, we investigated molecular differences contributing to the distinct clinical behavior of SCLC and NSCLC. SCLC demonstrated lower levels of several receptor tyrosine kinases and decreased activation of PI3K and Ras/MEK pathways, but significantly increased levels of E2F1-regulated factors including EZH2, thymidylate synthase, apoptosis mediators, and DNA repair proteins. Additionally, poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1), a DNA repair protein and E2F1 co-activator, was highly expressed at the mRNA and protein levels in SCLC. SCLC growth was inhibited by PARP1 and EZH2 knockdown. Furthermore, SCLC was significantly more sensitive to PARP inhibitors than NSCLC, and PARP inhibition downregulated key components of the DNA repair machinery and enhanced the efficacy of chemotherapy. PMID:22961666

Byers, Lauren Averett; Wang, Jing; Nilsson, Monique B.; Fujimoto, Junya; Saintigny, Pierre; Yordy, John; Giri, Uma; Peyton, Michael; Fan, You Hong; Diao, Lixia; Masrorpour, Fatemeh; Shen, Li; Liu, Wenbin; Duchemann, Boris; Tumula, Praveen; Bhardwaj, Vikas; Welsh, James; Weber, Stephanie; Glisson, Bonnie S.; Kalhor, Neda; Wistuba, Ignacio I.; Girard, Luc; Lippman, Scott M.; Mills, Gordon B.; Coombes, Kevin R.; Weinstein, John N.; Minna, John D.; Heymach, John V.

2013-01-01

229

Stromal Transcriptional Profiles Reveal Hierarchies of Anatomical Site, Serum Response and Disease and Identify Disease Specific Pathways  

PubMed Central

Synovial fibroblasts in persistent inflammatory arthritis have been suggested to have parallels with cancer growth and wound healing, both of which involve a stereotypical serum response programme. We tested the hypothesis that a serum response programme can be used to classify diseased tissues, and investigated the serum response programme in fibroblasts from multiple anatomical sites and two diseases. To test our hypothesis we utilized a bioinformatics approach to explore a publicly available microarray dataset including rheumatoid arthritis (RA), osteoarthritis (OA) and normal synovial tissue, then extended those findings in a new microarray dataset representing matched synovial, bone marrow and skin fibroblasts cultured from RA and OA patients undergoing arthroplasty. The classical fibroblast serum response programme discretely classified RA, OA and normal synovial tissues. Analysis of low and high serum treated fibroblast microarray data revealed a hierarchy of control, with anatomical site the most powerful classifier followed by response to serum and then disease. In contrast to skin and bone marrow fibroblasts, exposure of synovial fibroblasts to serum led to convergence of RA and OA expression profiles. Pathway analysis revealed three inter-linked gene networks characterising OA synovial fibroblasts: Cell remodelling through insulin-like growth factors, differentiation and angiogenesis through _3 integrin, and regulation of apoptosis through CD44. We have demonstrated that Fibroblast serum response signatures define disease at the tissue level, and that an OA specific, serum dependent repression of genes involved in cell adhesion, extracellular matrix remodelling and apoptosis is a critical discriminator between cultured OA and RA synovial fibroblasts. PMID:25807374

Parsonage, Greg N.; Legault, Holly M.; O’Toole, Margot; Pearson, Mark J.; Thomas, Andrew M.; Scheel-Toellner, Dagmar; Raza, Karim; Buckley, Christopher D.; Falciani, Francesco

2015-01-01

230

A clinically relevant model of human pancreatic adenocarcinoma identifies patterns of metastasis associated with alterations of the TGF-?\\/Smad4 signaling pathway  

Microsoft Academic Search

Genetic alterations impacting the TGF-?\\/Smad4 pathway are found in nearly all pancreatic adenocarcinomas, and recent reports\\u000a have identified a relationship between DPC4\\/Smad4 expression and patient survival. In this study we use a clinically relevant\\u000a animal model of pancreatic cancer to examine the impact of these genetic changes on the biology of pancreatic cancer.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods: Using high-density oligonucleotide DNA microarray technology,

Shane Holloway; Mishel Davis; Raffat Jaber; Jason Fleming

2003-01-01

231

Screening a genome wide S. pombe deletion library identifies novel genes and pathways involved in the DNA damage response  

PubMed Central

The maintenance of genome stability is essential for an organism to avoid cell death and cancer. Based on screens for mutant sensitivity against DNA damaging agents a large number of DNA repair and DNA damage checkpoint genes have previously been identified in genetically amenable model organisms. These screens have however not been exhaustive and various genes have been, and remain to be, identified by other means. We therefore screened a genome wide Schizosaccharomyces pombe deletion library for mutants sensitive against various DNA damaging agents. Screening the library on different concentrations of these genotoxins allowed us to assign a semi-quantitative score to each mutant expressing the degree of sensitivity. We isolated a total of 229 mutants which show sensitivity to one or more of the DNA damaging agents used. This set of mutants was significantly enriched for processes involved in DNA replication, DNA repair, DNA damage checkpoint, response to UV, mating type switching, telomere length maintenance and meiosis, and also for processes involved in the establishment and maintenance of chromatin architecture (notably members of the SAGA complex), transcription (members of the CCr4-Not complex) and microtubule related processes (members of the DASH complex). We also identified 23 sensitive mutants which had previously been classified as “sequence orphan” or as “conserved hypothetical”. Among these, we identified genes showing extensive homology to CtIP, Stra13, Ybp1/Ybp2, Human Fragile X mental retardation interacting protein NUFIP1, and Aprataxin. The identification of these homologues will provide a basis for the further characterisation of the role of these conserved proteins in the genetically amenable model organism S. pombe. PMID:19264558

Deshpande, Gaurang P.; Hayles, Jacqueline; Hoe, Kwang-Lae; Kim, Dong-Uk; Park, Han-Oh; Hartsuiker, Edgar

2009-01-01

232

Parallel processing of afferent input by identified interneurones in the auditory pathway of the noctuid moth Noctua pronuba (L.)  

Microsoft Academic Search

1.Interneurones 501 and 504 are identified sound-sensitive interneurones in the pterothoracic ganglion of the noctuid moth Noctua pronuba (Fig. 1). Both neurones receive monosynaptic input from the A1 afferent (Figs. 2, 3) and experiments with current injection suggest that the synapse is chemical (Fig. 4). The EPSPs evoked in either IN 501 or 504 by the A1 afferent do not

G. S. Boyan; Lee A. Miller

1991-01-01

233

Structure-Activity Studies of RFamide-related Peptide-1 Identify a Functional Receptor Antagonist and Novel Cardiac Myocyte Signaling Pathway Involved in Contractile Performance  

PubMed Central

Human RFamide-related peptide-1 (hRFRP-1; MPHSFANLPLRF-NH2) binds to neuropeptide FF receptor 2 (NPFF2R) to dramatically diminish cardiovascular performance. hRFRP-1 and its signaling pathway may provide targets to address cardiac dysfunction. Here, structure-activity relationship, transcript, Ca2+ transient, and phospholabeling data indicate the presence of a hRFRP-1 pathway in cardiomyocytes. Alanyl-substituted and N-terminal truncated analogs identified R11 was essential for activity, hRFRP-1(8-12) mimicked hRFRP-1, and [A11] hRFRP-1(8-12) antagonized the effect of hRFRP-1 in cellular and integrated cardiac performance. RFRP and NPFF2R transcripts were amplified from cardiomyocytes and heart. Maintenance of the Ca2+ transient when hRFRP-1 impaired myocyte shortening indicated the myofilament was its primary downstream target. Enhanced myofilament protein phosphorylation detected after hRFRP-1 treatment but absent in [A11] hRFRP-1(8-12) treated cells was consistent with this result. Protein kinase C (PKC) but not PKA inhibitor diminished the influence of hRFRP-1 on the Ca2+ transient. Molecules targeting this pathway may help address cardiovascular disease. PMID:22909119

Nichols, Ruthann; Bass, Chloe; Demers, Leslie; Larsen, Brian; Li, Elton; Blewett, Nathan; Converso-Baran, Kimber; Russell, Mark W.; Westfall, Margaret V.

2012-01-01

234

Arachidonic Acid Pathway Members PLA2G7, HPGD, EPHX2, and CYP4F8 Identified as Putative Novel Therapeutic Targets in Prostate Cancer  

PubMed Central

The arachidonic acid and prostaglandin pathway has been implicated in prostate carcinogenesis, but comprehensive studies of the individual members in this key pathway are lacking. Here, we first conducted a systematic bioinformatic study of the expression of 36 arachidonic acid pathway genes across 9783 human tissue samples. The results showed that the PLA2G7, HPGD, EPHX2, and CYP4F8 genes are highly expressed in prostate cancer. Functional studies using RNA interference in prostate cancer cells indicated that all four genes are also essential for cell growth and survival. Clinical validation confirmed high PLA2G7 expression, especially in ERG oncogene-positive prostate cancers, and its silencing sensitized ERG-positive prostate cancer cells to oxidative stress. HPGD was highly expressed in androgen receptor (AR)-overexpressing advanced tumors, as well as in metastatic prostate cancers. EPHX2 mRNA correlated with AR in primary prostate cancers, and its inhibition in vitro reduced AR signaling and potentiated the effect of antiandrogen flutamide in cultured prostate cancer cells. In summary, we identified four novel putative therapeutic targets with biomarker potential for different subtypes of prostate cancer. In addition, our results indicate that inhibition of these enzymes may be particularly powerful when combined with other treatments, such as androgen deprivation or induction of oxidative stress. PMID:21281786

Vainio, Paula; Gupta, Santosh; Ketola, Kirsi; Mirtti, Tuomas; Mpindi, John-Patrick; Kohonen, Pekka; Fey, Vidal; Perälä, Merja; Smit, Frank; Verhaegh, Gerald; Schalken, Jack; Alanen, Kalle A.; Kallioniemi, Olli; Iljin, Kristiina

2011-01-01

235

RNA sequencing identifies upregulated kyphoscoliosis peptidase and phosphatidic Acid signaling pathways in muscle hypertrophy generated by transgenic expression of myostatin propeptide.  

PubMed

Myostatin (MSTN), a member of the transforming growth factor-? superfamily, plays a crucial negative role in muscle growth. MSTN mutations or inhibitions can dramatically increase muscle mass in most mammal species. Previously, we generated a transgenic mouse model of muscle hypertrophy via the transgenic expression of the MSTN N-terminal propeptide cDNA under the control of the skeletal muscle-specific MLC1 promoter. Here, we compare the mRNA profiles between transgenic mice and wild-type littermate controls with a high-throughput RNA sequencing method. The results show that 132 genes were significantly differentially expressed between transgenic mice and wild-type control mice; 97 of these genes were up-regulated, and 35 genes were down-regulated in the skeletal muscle. Several genes that had not been reported to be involved in muscle hypertrophy were identified, including up-regulated myosin binding protein H (mybph), and zinc metallopeptidase STE24 (Zmpste24). In addition, kyphoscoliosis peptidase (Ky), which plays a vital role in muscle growth, was also up-regulated in the transgenic mice. Interestingly, a pathway analysis based on grouping the differentially expressed genes uncovered that cardiomyopathy-related pathways and phosphatidic acid (PA) pathways (Dgki, Dgkz, Plcd4) were up-regulated. Increased PA signaling may increase mTOR signaling, resulting in skeletal muscle growth. The findings of the RNA sequencing analysis help to understand the molecular mechanisms of muscle hypertrophy caused by MSTN inhibition. PMID:25860951

Miao, Yuanxin; Yang, Jinzeng; Xu, Zhong; Jing, Lu; Zhao, Shuhong; Li, Xinyun

2015-01-01

236

Noncanonical PAR3 activation by factor Xa identifies a novel pathway for Tie2 activation and stabilization of vascular integrity.  

PubMed

Endothelial barrier protective effects of activated protein C (APC) require the endothelial protein C receptor (EPCR), protease-activated receptor (PAR) 1, and PAR3. In contrast, PAR1 and PAR3 activation by thrombin results in barrier disruption. Noncanonical PAR1 and PAR3 activation by APC vs canonical activation by thrombin provides an explanation for the functional selectivity of these proteases. Here we found that factor Xa (FXa) activated PAR1 at canonical Arg41 similar to thrombin but cleaved PAR3 at noncanonical Arg41 similar to APC. This unique PAR1-PAR3 activation profile permitted the identification of noncanonical PAR3 activation as a novel activation pathway for barrier protective tunica intima endothelial receptor tyrosine kinase 2 (Tie2). APC, FXa, and the noncanonical PAR3 tethered-ligand peptide induced prolonged activation of Tie2, whereas thrombin and the canonical PAR3 tethered-ligand peptide did not. Tie2 activation by FXa required PAR3 and EPCR. FXa and the noncanonical PAR3 tethered-ligand peptide induced Tie2- and PAR3-dependent upregulation of tight-junction-associated protein zona occludens 1 (ZO-1), translocation of ZO-1 to cell-cell borders, and the formation of typical ZO-1 honeycomb patterns that are indicative of tight-junction stabilization. These data provide intriguing novel insights into the diversification of functional selectivity of protease signaling achievable by canonical and noncanonical PAR activation, such as the activation of vascular-protective Tie2 by noncanonical PAR3 activation. PMID:25320242

Stavenuiter, Fabian; Mosnier, Laurent O

2014-11-27

237

SFGD: a comprehensive platform for mining functional information from soybean transcriptome data and its use in identifying acyl-lipid metabolism pathways  

PubMed Central

Background Soybean (Glycine max L.) is one of the world’s most important leguminous crops producing high-quality protein and oil. Increasing the relative oil concentration in soybean seeds is many researchers’ goal, but a complete analysis platform of functional annotation for the genes involved in the soybean acyl-lipid pathway is still lacking. Following the success of soybean whole-genome sequencing, functional annotation has become a major challenge for the scientific community. Whole-genome transcriptome analysis is a powerful way to predict genes with biological functions. It is essential to build a comprehensive analysis platform for integrating soybean whole-genome sequencing data, the available transcriptome data and protein information. This platform could also be used to identify acyl-lipid metabolism pathways. Description In this study, we describe our construction of the Soybean Functional Genomics Database (SFGD) using Generic Genome Browser (Gbrowse) as the core platform. We integrated microarray expression profiling with 255 samples from 14 groups’ experiments and mRNA-seq data with 30 samples from four groups’ experiments, including spatial and temporal transcriptome data for different soybean development stages and environmental stresses. The SFGD includes a gene co-expression regulatory network containing 23,267 genes and 1873 miRNA-target pairs, and a group of acyl-lipid pathways containing 221 enzymes and more than 1550 genes. The SFGD also provides some key analysis tools, i.e. BLAST search, expression pattern search and cis-element significance analysis, as well as gene ontology information search and single nucleotide polymorphism display. Conclusion The SFGD is a comprehensive database integrating genome and transcriptome data, and also for soybean acyl-lipid metabolism pathways. It provides useful toolboxes for biologists to improve the accuracy and robustness of soybean functional genomics analysis, further improving understanding of gene regulatory networks for effective crop improvement. The SFGD is publically accessible at http://bioinformatics.cau.edu.cn/SFGD/, with all data available for downloading. PMID:24712981

2014-01-01

238

A Genome-Wide Association Study of the Maize Hypersensitive Defense Response Identifies Genes That Cluster in Related Pathways  

PubMed Central

Much remains unknown of molecular events controlling the plant hypersensitive defense response (HR), a rapid localized cell death that limits pathogen spread and is mediated by resistance (R-) genes. Genetic control of the HR is hard to quantify due to its microscopic and rapid nature. Natural modifiers of the ectopic HR phenotype induced by an aberrant auto-active R-gene (Rp1-D21), were mapped in a population of 3,381 recombinant inbred lines from the maize nested association mapping population. Joint linkage analysis was conducted to identify 32 additive but no epistatic quantitative trait loci (QTL) using a linkage map based on more than 7000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Genome-wide association (GWA) analysis of 26.5 million SNPs was conducted after adjusting for background QTL. GWA identified associated SNPs that colocalized with 44 candidate genes. Thirty-six of these genes colocalized within 23 of the 32 QTL identified by joint linkage analysis. The candidate genes included genes predicted to be in involved programmed cell death, defense response, ubiquitination, redox homeostasis, autophagy, calcium signalling, lignin biosynthesis and cell wall modification. Twelve of the candidate genes showed significant differential expression between isogenic lines differing for the presence of Rp1-D21. Low but significant correlations between HR-related traits and several previously-measured disease resistance traits suggested that the genetic control of these traits was substantially, though not entirely, independent. This study provides the first system-wide analysis of natural variation that modulates the HR response in plants. PMID:25166276

Venkata, Bala P.; Marla, Sandeep; Ji, Jiabing; Gachomo, Emma; Chu, Kevin; Negeri, Adisu; Benson, Jacqueline; Nelson, Rebecca; Bradbury, Peter; Nielsen, Dahlia; Holland, James B.; Balint-Kurti, Peter J.; Johal, Gurmukh

2014-01-01

239

Pyrococcus furiosus flagella: biochemical and transcriptional analyses identify the newly detected flaB0 gene to encode the major flagellin.  

PubMed

We have described previously that the flagella of the Euryarchaeon Pyrococcus furiosus are multifunctional cell appendages used for swimming, adhesion to surfaces and formation of cell-cell connections. Here, we characterize these organelles with respect to their biochemistry and transcription. Flagella were purified by shearing from cells followed by CsCl-gradient centrifugation and were found to consist mainly of a ca. 30 kDa glycoprotein. Polymerization studies of denatured flagella resulted in an ATP-independent formation of flagella-like filaments. The N-terminal sequence of the main flagellin was determined by Edman degradation, but none of the genes in the complete genome code for a protein with that N-terminus. Therefore, we resequenced the respective region of the genome, thereby discovering that the published genome sequence is not correct. A total of 771 bp are missing in the data base, resulting in the correction of the previously unusual N-terminal sequence of flagellin FlaB1 and in the identification of a third flagellin. To keep in line with the earlier nomenclature we call this flaB0. Very interestingly, the previously not identified flaB0 codes for the major flagellin. Transcriptional analyses of the revised flagellar operon identified various different cotranscripts encoding only a single protein in case of FlaB0 and FlaJ or up to five proteins (FlaB0-FlaD). Analysing the RNA of cells from different growth phases, we found that the length and number of detected cotranscript increased over time suggesting that the flagellar operon is transcribed mostly in late exponential and stationary growth phase. PMID:25566211

Näther-Schindler, Daniela J; Schopf, Simone; Bellack, Annett; Rachel, Reinhard; Wirth, Reinhard

2014-01-01

240

Pyrococcus furiosus flagella: biochemical and transcriptional analyses identify the newly detected flaB0 gene to encode the major flagellin  

PubMed Central

We have described previously that the flagella of the Euryarchaeon Pyrococcus furiosus are multifunctional cell appendages used for swimming, adhesion to surfaces and formation of cell-cell connections. Here, we characterize these organelles with respect to their biochemistry and transcription. Flagella were purified by shearing from cells followed by CsCl-gradient centrifugation and were found to consist mainly of a ca. 30 kDa glycoprotein. Polymerization studies of denatured flagella resulted in an ATP-independent formation of flagella-like filaments. The N-terminal sequence of the main flagellin was determined by Edman degradation, but none of the genes in the complete genome code for a protein with that N-terminus. Therefore, we resequenced the respective region of the genome, thereby discovering that the published genome sequence is not correct. A total of 771 bp are missing in the data base, resulting in the correction of the previously unusual N-terminal sequence of flagellin FlaB1 and in the identification of a third flagellin. To keep in line with the earlier nomenclature we call this flaB0. Very interestingly, the previously not identified flaB0 codes for the major flagellin. Transcriptional analyses of the revised flagellar operon identified various different cotranscripts encoding only a single protein in case of FlaB0 and FlaJ or up to five proteins (FlaB0-FlaD). Analysing the RNA of cells from different growth phases, we found that the length and number of detected cotranscript increased over time suggesting that the flagellar operon is transcribed mostly in late exponential and stationary growth phase. PMID:25566211

Näther-Schindler, Daniela J.; Schopf, Simone; Bellack, Annett; Rachel, Reinhard; Wirth, Reinhard

2014-01-01

241

Structure/function analysis of a type iii polyketide synthase in the brown alga Ectocarpus siliculosus reveals a biochemical pathway in phlorotannin monomer biosynthesis.  

PubMed

Brown algal phlorotannins are structural analogs of condensed tannins in terrestrial plants and, like plant phenols, they have numerous biological functions. Despite their importance in brown algae, phlorotannin biosynthetic pathways have been poorly characterized at the molecular level. We found that a predicted type III polyketide synthase in the genome of the brown alga Ectocarpus siliculosus, PKS1, catalyzes a major step in the biosynthetic pathway of phlorotannins (i.e., the synthesis of phloroglucinol monomers from malonyl-CoA). The crystal structure of PKS1 at 2.85-Å resolution provided a good quality electron density map showing a modified Cys residue, likely connected to a long chain acyl group. An additional pocket not found in other known type III PKSs contains a reaction product that might correspond to a phloroglucinol precursor. In vivo, we also found a positive correlation between the phloroglucinol content and the PKS III gene expression level in cells of a strain of Ectocarpus adapted to freshwater during its reacclimation to seawater. The evolution of the type III PKS gene family in Stramenopiles suggests a lateral gene transfer event from an actinobacterium. PMID:23983220

Meslet-Cladière, Laurence; Delage, Ludovic; Leroux, Cédric J-J; Goulitquer, Sophie; Leblanc, Catherine; Creis, Emeline; Gall, Erwan Ar; Stiger-Pouvreau, Valérie; Czjzek, Mirjam; Potin, Philippe

2013-08-01

242

Large-scale association analyses identify new loci influencing glycemic traits and provide insight into the underlying biological pathways  

PubMed Central

Through genome-wide association meta-analyses of up to 133,010 individuals of European ancestry without diabetes, including individuals newly genotyped using the Metabochip, we have raised the number of confirmed loci influencing glycemic traits to 53, of which 33 also increase type 2 diabetes risk (q < 0.05). Loci influencing fasting insulin showed association with lipid levels and fat distribution, suggesting impact on insulin resistance. Gene-based analyses identified further biologically plausible loci, suggesting that additional loci beyond those reaching genome-wide significance are likely to represent real associations. This conclusion is supported by an excess of directionally consistent and nominally significant signals between discovery and follow-up studies. Functional follow-up of these newly discovered loci will further improve our understanding of glycemic control. PMID:22885924

Scott, Robert A; Lagou, Vasiliki; Welch, Ryan P; Wheeler, Eleanor; Montasser, May E; Luan, Jian’an; Mägi, Reedik; Strawbridge, Rona J; Rehnberg, Emil; Gustafsson, Stefan; Kanoni, Stavroula; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J; Yengo, Loïc; Lecoeur, Cecile; Shungin, Dmitry; Sanna, Serena; Sidore, Carlo; Johnson, Paul C D; Jukema, J Wouter; Johnson, Toby; Mahajan, Anubha; Verweij, Niek; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Shah, Sonia; Smith, Albert V; Sennblad, Bengt; Gieger, Christian; Salo, Perttu; Perola, Markus; Timpson, Nicholas J; Evans, David M; Pourcain, Beate St; Wu, Ying; Andrews, Jeanette S; Hui, Jennie; Bielak, Lawrence F; Zhao, Wei; Horikoshi, Momoko; Navarro, Pau; Isaacs, Aaron; O’Connell, Jeffrey R; Stirrups, Kathleen; Vitart, Veronique; Hayward, Caroline; Esko, Tönu; Mihailov, Evelin; Fraser, Ross M; Fall, Tove; Voight, Benjamin F; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Chen, Han; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Morris, Andrew P; Rayner, Nigel W; Robertson, Neil; Rybin, Denis; Liu, Ching-Ti; Beckmann, Jacques S; Willems, Sara M; Chines, Peter S; Jackson, Anne U; Kang, Hyun Min; Stringham, Heather M; Song, Kijoung; Tanaka, Toshiko; Peden, John F; Goel, Anuj; Hicks, Andrew A; An, Ping; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Franco-Cereceda, Anders; Folkersen, Lasse; Marullo, Letizia; Jansen, Hanneke; Oldehinkel, Albertine J; Bruinenberg, Marcel; Pankow, James S; North, Kari E; Forouhi, Nita G; Loos, Ruth J F; Edkins, Sarah; Varga, Tibor V; Hallmans, Göran; Oksa, Heikki; Antonella, Mulas; Nagaraja, Ramaiah; Trompet, Stella; Ford, Ian; Bakker, Stephan J L; Kong, Augustine; Kumari, Meena; Gigante, Bruna; Herder, Christian; Munroe, Patricia B; Caulfield, Mark; Antti, Jula; Mangino, Massimo; Small, Kerrin; Miljkovic, Iva; Liu, Yongmei; Atalay, Mustafa; Kiess, Wieland; James, Alan L; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Palmer, Colin N A; Doney, Alex S F; Willemsen, Gonneke; Smit, Johannes H; Campbell, Susan; Polasek, Ozren; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Hercberg, Serge; Dimitriou, Maria; Bolton, Jennifer L; Fowkes, Gerard R; Kovacs, Peter; Lindström, Jaana; Zemunik, Tatijana; Bandinelli, Stefania; Wild, Sarah H; Basart, Hanneke V; Rathmann, Wolfgang; Grallert, Harald; Maerz, Winfried; Kleber, Marcus E; Boehm, Bernhard O; Peters, Annette; Pramstaller, Peter P; Province, Michael A; Borecki, Ingrid B; Hastie, Nicholas D; Rudan, Igor; Campbell, Harry; Watkins, Hugh; Farrall, Martin; Stumvoll, Michael; Ferrucci, Luigi; Waterworth, Dawn M; Bergman, Richard N; Collins, Francis S; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Watanabe, Richard M; de Geus, Eco J C; Penninx, Brenda W; Hofman, Albert; Oostra, Ben A; Psaty, Bruce M; Vollenweider, Peter; Wilson, James F; Wright, Alan F; Hovingh, G Kees; Metspalu, Andres; Uusitupa, Matti; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Kyvik, Kirsten O; Kaprio, Jaakko; Price, Jackie F; Dedoussis, George V; Deloukas, Panos; Meneton, Pierre; Lind, Lars; Boehnke, Michael; Shuldiner, Alan R; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Morris, Andrew D; Toenjes, Anke; Peyser, Patricia A; Beilby, John P; Körner, Antje; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laakso, Markku; Bornstein, Stefan R; Schwarz, Peter E H; Lakka, Timo A; Rauramaa, Rainer; Adair, Linda S; Smith, George Davey; Spector, Tim D; Illig, Thomas; de Faire, Ulf; Hamsten, Anders; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Kivimaki, Mika; Hingorani, Aroon; Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka M; Saaristo, Timo E; Boomsma, Dorret I; Stefansson, Kari; van der Harst, Pim; Dupuis, Josée; Pedersen, Nancy L; Sattar, Naveed; Harris, Tamara B; Cucca, Francesco; Ripatti, Samuli; Salomaa, Veikko; Mohlke, Karen L; Balkau, Beverley; Froguel, Philippe; Pouta, Anneli; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Wareham, Nicholas J; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; McCarthy, Mark I; Franks, Paul W; Meigs, James B; Teslovich, Tanya M; Florez, Jose C; Langenberg, Claudia; Ingelsson, Erik; Prokopenko, Inga; Barroso, Inês

2012-01-01

243

Large-scale association analyses identify new loci influencing glycemic traits and provide insight into the underlying biological pathways.  

PubMed

Through genome-wide association meta-analyses of up to 133,010 individuals of European ancestry without diabetes, including individuals newly genotyped using the Metabochip, we have increased the number of confirmed loci influencing glycemic traits to 53, of which 33 also increase type 2 diabetes risk (q < 0.05). Loci influencing fasting insulin concentration showed association with lipid levels and fat distribution, suggesting impact on insulin resistance. Gene-based analyses identified further biologically plausible loci, suggesting that additional loci beyond those reaching genome-wide significance are likely to represent real associations. This conclusion is supported by an excess of directionally consistent and nominally significant signals between discovery and follow-up studies. Functional analysis of these newly discovered loci will further improve our understanding of glycemic control. PMID:22885924

Scott, Robert A; Lagou, Vasiliki; Welch, Ryan P; Wheeler, Eleanor; Montasser, May E; Luan, Jian'an; Mägi, Reedik; Strawbridge, Rona J; Rehnberg, Emil; Gustafsson, Stefan; Kanoni, Stavroula; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J; Yengo, Loïc; Lecoeur, Cecile; Shungin, Dmitry; Sanna, Serena; Sidore, Carlo; Johnson, Paul C D; Jukema, J Wouter; Johnson, Toby; Mahajan, Anubha; Verweij, Niek; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Shah, Sonia; Smith, Albert V; Sennblad, Bengt; Gieger, Christian; Salo, Perttu; Perola, Markus; Timpson, Nicholas J; Evans, David M; Pourcain, Beate St; Wu, Ying; Andrews, Jeanette S; Hui, Jennie; Bielak, Lawrence F; Zhao, Wei; Horikoshi, Momoko; Navarro, Pau; Isaacs, Aaron; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; Stirrups, Kathleen; Vitart, Veronique; Hayward, Caroline; Esko, Tõnu; Mihailov, Evelin; Fraser, Ross M; Fall, Tove; Voight, Benjamin F; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Chen, Han; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Morris, Andrew P; Rayner, Nigel W; Robertson, Neil; Rybin, Denis; Liu, Ching-Ti; Beckmann, Jacques S; Willems, Sara M; Chines, Peter S; Jackson, Anne U; Kang, Hyun Min; Stringham, Heather M; Song, Kijoung; Tanaka, Toshiko; Peden, John F; Goel, Anuj; Hicks, Andrew A; An, Ping; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Franco-Cereceda, Anders; Folkersen, Lasse; Marullo, Letizia; Jansen, Hanneke; Oldehinkel, Albertine J; Bruinenberg, Marcel; Pankow, James S; North, Kari E; Forouhi, Nita G; Loos, Ruth J F; Edkins, Sarah; Varga, Tibor V; Hallmans, Göran; Oksa, Heikki; Antonella, Mulas; Nagaraja, Ramaiah; Trompet, Stella; Ford, Ian; Bakker, Stephan J L; Kong, Augustine; Kumari, Meena; Gigante, Bruna; Herder, Christian; Munroe, Patricia B; Caulfield, Mark; Antti, Jula; Mangino, Massimo; Small, Kerrin; Miljkovic, Iva; Liu, Yongmei; Atalay, Mustafa; Kiess, Wieland; James, Alan L; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Palmer, Colin N A; Doney, Alex S F; Willemsen, Gonneke; Smit, Johannes H; Campbell, Susan; Polasek, Ozren; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Hercberg, Serge; Dimitriou, Maria; Bolton, Jennifer L; Fowkes, Gerard R; Kovacs, Peter; Lindström, Jaana; Zemunik, Tatijana; Bandinelli, Stefania; Wild, Sarah H; Basart, Hanneke V; Rathmann, Wolfgang; Grallert, Harald; Maerz, Winfried; Kleber, Marcus E; Boehm, Bernhard O; Peters, Annette; Pramstaller, Peter P; Province, Michael A; Borecki, Ingrid B; Hastie, Nicholas D; Rudan, Igor; Campbell, Harry; Watkins, Hugh; Farrall, Martin; Stumvoll, Michael; Ferrucci, Luigi; Waterworth, Dawn M; Bergman, Richard N; Collins, Francis S; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Watanabe, Richard M; de Geus, Eco J C; Penninx, Brenda W; Hofman, Albert; Oostra, Ben A; Psaty, Bruce M; Vollenweider, Peter; Wilson, James F; Wright, Alan F; Hovingh, G Kees; Metspalu, Andres; Uusitupa, Matti; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Kyvik, Kirsten O; Kaprio, Jaakko; Price, Jackie F; Dedoussis, George V; Deloukas, Panos; Meneton, Pierre; Lind, Lars; Boehnke, Michael; Shuldiner, Alan R; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Morris, Andrew D; Toenjes, Anke; Peyser, Patricia A; Beilby, John P; Körner, Antje; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laakso, Markku; Bornstein, Stefan R; Schwarz, Peter E H; Lakka, Timo A; Rauramaa, Rainer; Adair, Linda S; Smith, George Davey; Spector, Tim D; Illig, Thomas; de Faire, Ulf; Hamsten, Anders; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Kivimaki, Mika; Hingorani, Aroon; Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka M; Saaristo, Timo E; Boomsma, Dorret I; Stefansson, Kari; van der Harst, Pim; Dupuis, Josée; Pedersen, Nancy L; Sattar, Naveed; Harris, Tamara B; Cucca, Francesco; Ripatti, Samuli; Salomaa, Veikko; Mohlke, Karen L; Balkau, Beverley; Froguel, Philippe; Pouta, Anneli; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Wareham, Nicholas J; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; McCarthy, Mark I; Franks, Paul W; Meigs, James B; Teslovich, Tanya M; Florez, Jose C; Langenberg, Claudia; Ingelsson, Erik; Prokopenko, Inga; Barroso, Inês

2012-09-01

244

Global transcriptome analysis identifies regulated transcripts and pathways activated during oogenesis and early embryogenesis in atlantic cod  

PubMed Central

The molecular mechanisms underlying oogenesis and maternally controlled embryogenesis in fish are not fully understood, especially in marine species. Our aim was to study the egg and embryo transcriptome during oogenesis and early embryogenesis in Atlantic cod. Follicles from oogenesis stages (pre-, early-, and late-vitellogenic), ovulated eggs, and two embryonic stages (blastula, gastrula) were collected from broodstock fish and fertilized eggs. Gene expression profiles were measured in a 44?K oligo microarray consisting of 23,000 cod genes. Hundreds of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified in the follicle stages investigated, implicating a continuous accumulation and degradation of polyadenylated transcripts throughout oogenesis. Very few DEGs were identified from ovulated egg to blastula, showing a more stable maternal RNA pool in early embryonic stages. The highest induction of expression was observed between blastula and gastrula, signifying the onset of zygotic transcription. During early vitellogenesis, several of the most upregulated genes are linked to nervous system signaling, suggesting increasing requirements for ovarian synaptic signaling to stimulate the rapid growth of oocytes. Highly upregulated genes during late vitellogenesis are linked to protein processing, fat metabolism, osmoregulation, and arrested meiosis. One of the genes with the highest upregulation in the ovulated egg is involved in oxidative phosphorylation, reflecting increased energy requirements during fertilization and the first rapid cell divisions of early embryogenesis. In conclusion, this study provides a large-scale presentation of the Atlantic cod's maternally controlled transcriptome in ovarian follicles through oogenesis, ovulated eggs, and early embryos. Mol. Reprod. Dev. 81: 619–635, 2014. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:24687555

Kleppe, Lene; Edvardsen, Rolf Brudvik; Furmanek, Tomasz; Taranger, Geir Lasse; Wargelius, Anna

2014-01-01

245

Metabolic Engineering of Light and Dark Biochemical Pathways in Wild-Type and Mutant Strains of Synechocystis PCC 6803 for Maximal, 24-Hour Production of Hydrogen Gas  

SciTech Connect

This project used the cyanobacterial species Synechocystis PCC 6803 to pursue two lines of inquiry, with each line addressing one of the two main factors affecting hydrogen (H2) production in Synechocystis PCC 6803: NADPH availability and O2 sensitivity. H2 production in Synechocystis PCC 6803 requires a very high NADPH:NADP+ ratio, that is, the NADP pool must be highly reduced, which can be problematic because several metabolic pathways potentially can act to raise or lower NADPH levels. Also, though the [NiFe]-hydrogenase in PCC 6803 is constitutively expressed, it is reversibly inactivated at very low O2 concentrations. Largely because of this O2 sensitivity and the requirement for high NADPH levels, a major portion of overall H2 production occurs under anoxic conditions in the dark, supported by breakdown of glycogen or other organic substrates accumulated during photosynthesis. Also, other factors, such as N or S limitation, pH changes, presence of other substances, or deletion of particular respiratory components, can affect light or dark H2 production. Therefore, in the first line of inquiry, under a number of culture conditions with wild type (WT) Synechocystis PCC 6803 cells and a mutant with impaired type I NADPH-dehydrogenase (NDH-1) function, we used H2 production profiling and metabolic flux analysis, with and without specific inhibitors, to examine systematically the pathways involved in light and dark H2 production. Results from this work provided rational bases for metabolic engineering to maximize photobiological H2 production on a 24-hour basis. In the second line of inquiry, we used site-directed mutagenesis to create mutants with hydrogenase enzymes exhibiting greater O2 tolerance. The research addressed the following four tasks: 1. Evaluate the effects of various culture conditions (N, S, or P limitation; light/dark; pH; exogenous organic carbon) on H2 production profiles of WT cells and an NDH-1 mutant; 2. Conduct metabolic flux analyses for enhanced H2 production profiles using selected culture conditions and inhibitors of specific pathways in WT cells and an NDH-1 mutant; 3. Create Synechocystis PCC 6803 mutant strains with modified hydrogenases exhibiting increased O2 tolerance and greater H2 production; and 4. Integrate enhanced hydrogenase mutants and culture and metabolic factor studies to maximize 24-hour H2 production.

Ely, Roger L.; Chaplen, Frank W.R.

2014-03-11

246

Parallel processing of afferent input by identified interneurones in the auditory pathway of the noctuid moth Noctua pronuba (L.).  

PubMed

1. Interneurones 501 and 504 are identified sound-sensitive interneurones in the pterothoracic ganglion of the noctuid moth Noctua pronuba. Both neurones receive monosynaptic input from the A1 afferent and experiments with current injection suggest that the synapse is chemical. The EPSPs evoked in either IN 501 or 504 by the A1 afferent do not facilitate. 2. Temporal integration in INs 501 and 504 was compared by presenting the moth with tones at repetition rates found in the search, approach and terminal phases of the echolocating call of a hunting bat. INs 501 and 504 differ in their capacity to resolve stimulus repetition rates because the mean decay times of their compound EPSPs differ by a factor of three, although both interneurones receive monosynaptic input from the A1 afferent. 3. The features extracted from the authentic, prerecorded, call of an echolocating bat at the level of the pterothoracic ganglion were examined by recording sequentially from a range of interneurones in the same preparation. The capacity of INs 501 and 504 to encode the various phases of the call was examined in the light of their measured mean decay times and related to the avoidance behaviour of the insect. PMID:1920166

Boyan, G S; Miller, L A

1991-06-01

247

Genome-wide screen identifies a novel p97/CDC-48-dependent pathway regulating ER-stress-induced gene transcription.  

PubMed

The accumulation of misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) activates the Unfolded Protein Response (UPR(ER)) to restore ER homeostasis. The AAA(+) ATPase p97/CDC-48 plays key roles in ER stress by promoting both ER protein degradation and transcription of UPR(ER) genes. Although the mechanisms associated with protein degradation are now well established, the molecular events involved in the regulation of gene transcription by p97/CDC-48 remain unclear. Using a reporter-based genome-wide RNAi screen in combination with quantitative proteomic analysis in Caenorhabditis elegans, we have identified RUVB-2, a AAA(+) ATPase, as a novel repressor of a subset of UPR(ER) genes. We show that degradation of RUVB-2 by CDC-48 enhances expression of ER stress response genes through an XBP1-dependent mechanism. The functional interplay between CDC-48 and RUVB-2 in controlling transcription of select UPR(ER) genes appears conserved in human cells. Together, these results describe a novel role for p97/CDC-48, whereby its role in protein degradation is integrated with its role in regulating expression of ER stress response genes. PMID:25652260

Marza, Esther; Taouji, Saïd; Barroso, Kim; Raymond, Anne-Aurélie; Guignard, Léo; Bonneu, Marc; Pallares-Lupon, Néstor; Dupuy, Jean-William; Fernandez-Zapico, Martin E; Rosenbaum, Jean; Palladino, Francesca; Dupuy, Denis; Chevet, Eric

2015-03-01

248

Gene expression profiling of precursor T-cell lymphoblastic leukemia/lymphoma identifies oncogenic pathways that are potential therapeutic targets.  

PubMed

We compared the gene expression pattern of thymic tumors from precursor T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma/leukemia (pre-T LBL) that arose in transgenic mice that overexpressed SCL, LMO1 or NUP98-HOXD13 (NHD13) with that of thymocytes from normal littermates. Only two genes, Ccl8 and Mrpl38, were consistently more than fourfold overexpressed in pre-T LBL from all three genotypes analyzed, and a single gene, Prss16 was consistently underexpressed. However, we identified a number of genes, such as Cfl1, Tcra, Tcrb, Pbx3, Eif4a, Eif4b and Cox8b that were over or under-expressed in pre-T LBL that arose in specific transgenic lines. Similar to the situation seen with human pre-T LBL, the SCL/LMO1 leukemias displayed an expression profile consistent with mature, late cortical thymocytes, whereas the NHD13 leukemias displayed an expression profile more consistent with immature thymocytes. We evaluated two of the most differentially regulated genes as potential therapeutic targets. Cfl1 was specifically overexpressed in SCL-LMO1 tumors; inactivation of Cfl1 using okadaic acid resulted in suppression of leukemic cell growth. Overexpression of Ccl8 was a consistent finding in all three transgenic lines, and an antagonist for the Ccl8 receptor-induced death of leukemic cell lines, suggesting a novel therapeutic approach. PMID:17429429

Lin, Y-W; Aplan, P D

2007-06-01

249

A program impact pathway analysis identifies critical steps in the implementation and utilization of a behavior change communication intervention promoting infant and child feeding practices in Bangladesh.  

PubMed

Mapping pathways of how interventions are implemented and utilized enables contextually grounded interpretation of results, differentiates poor design from poor implementation, and identifies factors that might influence the utilization of interventions. Few studies in nutrition have comprehensively examined the steps of implementation and utilization in behavior change communication (BCC) interventions, thus limiting the interpretation of variable impacts of BCC interventions. A program impact pathway (PIP) analysis was used to study a BCC intervention implemented in Bangladesh to improve infant and young child feeding (IYCF) practices. The PIP was developed through an iterative process with the program implementation team; the PIP then guided the choice of methods and tools. Using mixed methods, we reviewed the content of training materials for implementation staff, measured their IYCF knowledge (n = 100), observed their communication with mothers (n = 37), and examined factors influencing promotion of IYCF practices and their trial and adoption by mothers (n = 64). Implementation staff demonstrated good knowledge and maintained fidelity to the intervention to a large extent. Mothers identified them as their primary sources of information, and a majority of mothers tried recommended IYCF practices. Key facilitators included family support and availability of resources, whereas lack of time, maternal and family perceptions of age-appropriate feeding, and lack of resources were salient barriers to adopting recommended practices. Using a PIP analysis identified critical issues pertaining to implementation (e.g., the role of paid and volunteer staff) and utilization (e.g., resource and time constraints that require complementary interventions) and the need for further research and programmatic attention. PMID:24068790

Avula, Rasmi; Menon, Purnima; Saha, Kuntal K; Bhuiyan, Mahbubul Islam; Chowdhury, Anita S; Siraj, Saiqa; Haque, Raisul; Jalal, Chowdhury S B; Afsana, Kaosar; Frongillo, Edward A

2013-12-01

250

A System Biology Approach to Identify Regulatory Pathways Underlying the Neuroendocrine Control of Female Puberty in Rats and Nonhuman Primates  

PubMed Central

Puberty is a major developmental milestone controlled by the interaction of genetic factors and environmental cues of mostly metabolic and circadian nature. An increased pulsatile release of the decapeptide gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) from hypothalamic neurosecretory neurons is required for both the initiation and progression of the pubertal process. This increase is brought about by coordinated changes that occur in neuronal and glial networks associated with GnRH neurons. These changes ultimately result in increased neuronal and glial stimulatory inputs to the GnRH neuronal network and a reduction of transsynaptic inhibitory influences. While some of the major players controlling pubertal GnRH secretion have been identified using gene-centric approaches, much less is known about the system-wide control of the overall process. Because the pubertal activation of GnRH release involves a diversity of cellular phenotypes, and a myriad of intracellular and cell-to-cell signaling molecules, it appears that the overall process is controlled by a highly coordinated and interactive regulatory system involving hundreds, if not thousands, of gene products. In this article we will discuss emerging evidence suggesting that these genes are arranged as functionally connected networks organized, both internally and across sub-networks, in a hierarchical fashion. According to this concept, the core of these networks is composed of transcriptional regulators that, by directing expression of downstream subordinate genes, provide both stability and coordination to the cellular networks involved in initiating the pubertal process. The integrative response of these gene networks to external inputs is postulated to be coordinated by epigenetic mechanisms. PMID:23998662

Lomniczi, Alejandro; Wright, Hollis; Castellano, Juan Manuel; Sonmez, Kemal; Ojeda, Sergio R.

2014-01-01

251

Pharmacogenomic profiling and pathway analyses identify MAPK-dependent migration as an acute response to SN38 in p53 null and mutant colorectal cancer cells  

PubMed Central

The topoisomerase I inhibitor irinotecan is used to treat advanced colorectal cancer and has been shown to have p53-independent anti-cancer activity. The aim of this study was to identify the p53-independent signalling mechanisms activated by irinotecan. Transcriptional profiling of isogenic HCT116 p53 wild-type and p53 null cells was carried out following treatment with the active metabolite of irinotecan, SN38. Unsupervised analysis methods demonstrated that p53 status had a highly significant impact on gene expression changes in response to SN38. Pathway analysis indicated that pathways involved in cell motility (adherens junction, focal adhesion, MAPK and regulation of the actin cytoskeleton) were significantly activated in p53 null cells, but not p53 wild-type cells, following SN38 treatment. In functional assays, SN38 treatment increased the migratory potential of p53 null and mutant colorectal cancer cell lines, but not p53 wild-type lines. Moreover, p53 null SN38-resistant cells were found to migrate at a faster rate than parental drug-sensitive p53 null cells, whereas p53 wild-type SN38-resistant cells failed to migrate. Notably, co-treatment with inhibitors of the MAPK pathway inhibited the increased migration observed following SN38 treatment in p53 null and mutant cells. Thus, in the absence of wild-type p53, SN38 promotes migration of colorectal cancer cells, and inhibiting MAPK blocks this potentially pro-metastatic adaptive response to this anti-cancer drug. PMID:22665525

Allen, Wendy L.; Turkington, Richard C.; Stevenson, Leanne; Carson, Gail; Coyle, Vicky M.; Hector, Suzanne; Dunne, Philip; Van Schaeybroeck, Sandra; Longley, Daniel B.; Johnston, Patrick G.

2012-01-01

252

Integrating Bayesian variable selection with Modular Response Analysis to infer biochemical network topology  

PubMed Central

Background Recent advancements in genetics and proteomics have led to the acquisition of large quantitative data sets. However, the use of these data to reverse engineer biochemical networks has remained a challenging problem. Many methods have been proposed to infer biochemical network topologies from different types of biological data. Here, we focus on unraveling network topologies from steady state responses of biochemical networks to successive experimental perturbations. Results We propose a computational algorithm which combines a deterministic network inference method termed Modular Response Analysis (MRA) and a statistical model selection algorithm called Bayesian Variable Selection, to infer functional interactions in cellular signaling pathways and gene regulatory networks. It can be used to identify interactions among individual molecules involved in a biochemical pathway or reveal how different functional modules of a biological network interact with each other to exchange information. In cases where not all network components are known, our method reveals functional interactions which are not direct but correspond to the interaction routes through unknown elements. Using computer simulated perturbation responses of signaling pathways and gene regulatory networks from the DREAM challenge, we demonstrate that the proposed method is robust against noise and scalable to large networks. We also show that our method can infer network topologies using incomplete perturbation datasets. Consequently, we have used this algorithm to explore the ERBB regulated G1/S transition pathway in certain breast cancer cells to understand the molecular mechanisms which cause these cells to become drug resistant. The algorithm successfully inferred many well characterized interactions of this pathway by analyzing experimentally obtained perturbation data. Additionally, it identified some molecular interactions which promote drug resistance in breast cancer cells. Conclusions The proposed algorithm provides a robust, scalable and cost effective solution for inferring network topologies from biological data. It can potentially be applied to explore novel pathways which play important roles in life threatening disease like cancer. PMID:23829771

2013-01-01

253

Time point-based integrative analyses of deep-transcriptome identify four signal pathways in blastemal regeneration of zebrafish lower jaw.  

PubMed

There has been growing interest in applying tissue engineering to stem cell-based regeneration therapies. We have previously reported that zebrafish can faithfully regenerate complicated tissue structures through blastemal cell type conversions and tissue reorganization. To unveil the regenerative factors and engineering arts of blastemal regeneration, we conducted transcriptomal analyses at four time points corresponding to preamputation, re-epitheliation, blastemal formation, and respecification. By combining the hierarchical gene ontology term network, the DAVID annotation system, and Euclidean distance clustering, we identified four signaling pathways: foxi1-foxo1b-pou3f1, pax3a-mant3a-col11/col2, pou5f1-cdx4-kdrl, and isl1-wnt11 PCP-sox9a. Results from immunohistochemical staining and promoter-driven transgenic fish suggest that these pathways, respectively, define wound epidermis reconstitution, cell type conversions, blastemal angiogenesis/vasculogenesis, and cartilage matrix-orientation. Foxi1 morpholino-knockdown caused expansions of Foxo1b- and Pax3a-expression in the basal layer-blastemal junction region. Moreover, foxi1 morphants displayed increased sox9a and hoxa2b transcripts in the embryonic pharyngeal arches. Thus, a Foxi1 signal switch is required to establish correct tissue patterns, including re-epitheliation and blastema formation. This study provides novel insight into a blastema regeneration strategy devised by epithelial cell transdifferentiation, blood vessel engineering, and cartilage matrix deposition. Stem Cells 2015;33:806-818. PMID:25420467

Zhang, Hui; Wang, Xuelong; Lyu, Kailun; Gao, Siqi; Wang, Guan; Fan, Chunxin; Zhang, Xin A; Yan, Jizhou

2015-03-01

254

A Novel Peptide-Based SILAC Method to Identify the Posttranslational Modifications Provides Evidence for Unconventional Ubiquitination in the ER-Associated Degradation Pathway  

PubMed Central

The endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD) pathway is responsible for disposing misfolded proteins from the endoplasmic reticulum by inducing their ubiquitination and degradation. Ubiquitination is conventionally observed on lysine residues and has been demonstrated on cysteine residues and protein N-termini. Ubiquitination is fundamental to the ERAD process; however, a mutant T-cell receptor ? (TCR?) lacking lysine residues is targeted for the degradation by the ERAD pathway. We have shown that ubiquitination of lysine-less TCR? occurs on internal, non-lysine residues and that the same E3 ligase conjugates ubiquitin to TCR? in the presence or absence of lysine residues. Mass-spectrometry indicates that WT-TCR? is ubiquitinated on multiple lysine residues. Recent publications have provided indirect evidence that serine and threonine residues may be modified by ubiquitin. Using a novel peptide-based stable isotope labeling in cell culture (SILAC) approach, we show that specific lysine-less TCR? peptides become modified. In this study, we demonstrate that it is possible to detect both ester and thioester based ubiquitination events, although the exact linkage on lysine-less TCR? remains elusive. These findings demonstrate that SILAC can be used as a tool to identify modified peptides, even those with novel modifications that may not be detected using conventional proteomic work flows or informatics algorithms. PMID:23431445

Anania, Veronica G.; Bustos, Daisy J.; Lill, Jennie R.; Kirkpatrick, Donald S.; Coscoy, Laurent

2013-01-01

255

A 1,536-well ultra-high-throughput siRNA screen to identify regulators of the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway.  

PubMed

High-throughput siRNA screens are now widely used for identifying novel drug targets and mapping disease pathways. Despite their popularity, there remain challenges related to data variability, primarily due to measurement errors, biological variance, uneven transfection efficiency, the efficacy of siRNA sequences, or off-target effects, and consequent high false discovery rates. Data variability can be reduced if siRNA screens are performed in replicate. Running a large-scale siRNA screen in replicate is difficult, however, because of the technical challenges related to automating complicated steps of siRNA transfection, often with multiplexed assay readouts, and controlling environmental humidity during long incubation periods. Small-molecule screens have greatly benefited in the past decade from assay miniaturization to high-density plates such that 1,536-well nanoplate screenings are now a routine process, allowing fast, efficient, and affordable operations without compromising underlying biology or important assay characteristics. Here, we describe the development of a 1,536-well nanoplate siRNA transfection protocol that utilizes the instruments commonly found in small-molecule high throughput screening laboratories. This protocol was then successfully demonstrated in a triplicate large-scale siRNA screen for the identification of regulators of the Wnt/beta-catenin pathway. PMID:20578927

Chung, Namjin; Marine, Shane; Smith, Emily A; Liehr, Robert; Smith, S Todd; Locco, Louis; Hudak, Edward; Kreamer, Anthony; Rush, Alison; Roberts, Brian; Major, Michael B; Moon, Randall T; Arthur, William; Cleary, Michele; Strulovici, Berta; Ferrer, Marc

2010-06-01

256

Physiological genomics identifies estrogen-related receptor alpha as a regulator of renal sodium and potassium homeostasis and the renin-angiotensin pathway.  

PubMed

Estrogen-related receptor alpha (ERRalpha) is an orphan nuclear receptor highly expressed in the kidney, an organ playing a central role in blood pressure regulation through electrolyte homeostasis and the renin-angiotensin system. Physiological analysis revealed that, relative to wild-type mice, ERRalpha null mice are hypotensive despite significant hypernatremia, hypokalemia, and slight hyperreninemia. Using a combination of genome-wide location analysis and expression profiling, we demonstrate that ERRalpha regulates the expression of channels involved in renal Na(+) and K(+) handling (Scnn1a, Atp1a1, Atp1b1) and altered in Bartter syndrome (Bsnd, Kcnq1). In addition, ERRalpha regulates the expression of receptors implicated in the systemic regulation of blood pressure (Ghr, Gcgr, Lepr, Npy1r) and of genes within the renin-angiotensin pathway (Ren1, Agt, Ace2). Our study thus identifies ERRalpha as a pleiotropic regulator of renal control of blood pressure, renal Na(+)/K(+) homeostasis, and renin-angiotensin pathway and suggests that modulation of ERRalpha activity could represent a potential avenue for the management of hypertension. PMID:19901197

Tremblay, Annie M; Dufour, Catherine R; Ghahremani, Majid; Reudelhuber, Timothy L; Giguère, Vincent

2010-01-01

257

Functional characterization of the atypical integral membrane lipid phosphatase PDP1/PPAPDC2 identifies a pathway for interconversion of isoprenols and isoprenoid phosphates in mammalian cells.  

PubMed

The polyisoprenoid diphosphates farnesyl diphosphate (FPP) and geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGPP) are intermediates in the synthesis of cholesterol and related sterols by the mevalonate pathway and precursors for the addition of isoprenyl anchors to many membrane proteins. We developed tandem mass spectrometry assays to evaluate polyisoprenoid diphosphate phosphatase activity of an unusual integral membrane lipid enzyme: type 1 polyisoprenoid diphosphate phosphatase encoded by the PPAPDC2 gene (PDP1/PPAPDC2). In vitro, recombinant PDP1/PPAPDC2 preferentially hydrolyzed polyisoprenoid diphosphates, including FPP and GGPP over a variety of glycerol- and sphingo-phospholipid substrates. Overexpression of mammalian PDP1/PPAPDC2 in budding yeast depletes cellular pools of FPP leading to growth defects and sterol auxotrophy. In mammalian cells, PDP1/PPAPDC2 localizes to the endoplasmic reticulum and nuclear envelope and, unlike the structurally related lipid phosphate phosphatases, is predicted to be oriented with key residues of its catalytic domain facing the cytoplasmic face of the membrane. Studies using synthetic isoprenols with chemical properties that facilitate detection by mass spectrometry identify a pathway for interconversion of isoprenols and isoprenoid diphosphates in intact mammalian cells and demonstrate a role for PDP1/PPAPDC2 in this process. Overexpression of PDP1/PPAPDC2 in mammalian cells substantially decreases protein isoprenylation and results in defects in cell growth and cytoskeletal organization that are associated with dysregulation of Rho family GTPases. Taken together, these results focus attention on integral membrane lipid phosphatases as regulators of isoprenoid phosphate metabolism and suggest that PDP1/PPAPDC2 is a functional isoprenoid diphosphate phosphatase. PMID:20110354

Miriyala, Sumitra; Subramanian, Thangaiah; Panchatcharam, Manikandan; Ren, Hongmei; McDermott, Mark I; Sunkara, Manjula; Drennan, Tracy; Smyth, Susan S; Spielmann, H Peter; Morris, Andrew J

2010-04-30

258

Genome-Wide Association Study Identifies Novel Loci Associated With Concentrations of Four Plasma Phospholipid Fatty Acids in the De Novo Lipogenesis Pathway: Results from the CHARGE Consortium  

PubMed Central

Background Palmitic acid(16:0), stearic acid(18:0), palmitoleic acid(16:1n-7), and oleic acid(18:1n-9) are major saturated and mono-unsaturated fatty acids that affect cellular signaling and metabolic pathways. They are synthesized via de novo lipogenesis (DNL) and are the main saturated and mono-unsaturated fatty acids in the diet. Levels of these fatty acids have been linked to diseases including type 2 diabetes and coronary heart disease. Methods and Results Genome-wide association studies were conducted in 5 population-based cohorts comprising 8,961 participants of European ancestry to investigate the association of common genetic variation with plasma levels of these four fatty acids. We identified polymorphisms in 7 novel loci associated with circulating levels of one or more of these fatty acids. ALG14 (asparagine-linked glycosylation 14 homolog) polymorphisms were associated with higher 16:0(P=2.7×10-11) and lower 18:0(P=2.2×10-18). FADS1 and FADS2 (desaturases) polymorphisms were associated with higher 16:1n-7(P=6.6×10-13) and 18:1n-9(P=2.2×10-32), and lower 18:0(P =1.3×10-20). LPGAT1 (lysophosphatidylglycerol acyltransferase) polymorphisms were associated with lower 18:0(P=2.8×10-9). GCKR(glucokinase regulator, P =9.8×10-10) and HIF1AN(factor inhibiting hypoxia-inducible factor-1, P=5.7×10-9) polymorphisms were associated with higher 16:1n-7, whereas PKD2L1(polycystic kidney disease 2-like 1, P=5.7×10-15) and a locus on chromosome 2(not near known genes) were associated with lower 16:1n-7(P=4.1×10-8). Conclusion Our findings provide novel evidence that common variations in genes with diverse functions, including protein-glycosylation, polyunsaturated fatty acid metabolism, phospholipid modeling, and glucose- and oxygen-sensing pathways, are associated with circulating levels of four fatty acids in the DNL pathway. These results expand our knowledge of genetic factors relevant to DNL and fatty acid biology. PMID:23362303

Wu, Jason H.Y.; Lemaitre, Rozenn N.; Manichaikul, Ani; Guan, Weihua; Tanaka, Toshiko; Foy, Millennia; Kabagambe, Edmond K.; Djousse, Luc; Siscovick, David; Fretts, Amanda M.; Johnson, Catherine; King, Irena B.; Psaty, Bruce M.; McKnight, Barbara; Rich, Stephen S.; Chen, Yii-Der I.; Nettleton, Jennifer A.; Tang, Weihong; Bandinelli, Stefania; Jacobs, David R.; Browning, Brian L.; Laurie, Cathy C.; Gu, Xiangjun; Tsai, Michael Y.; Steffen, Lyn M.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Fornage, Myriam; Mozaffarian, Dariush

2013-01-01

259

Functional screening for miRNAs targeting Smad4 identified miR-199a as a negative regulator of TGF-? signalling pathway  

PubMed Central

The transforming growth factor-? (TGF-?) signalling pathway participates in various biological processes. Dysregulation of Smad4, a central cellular transducer of TGF-? signalling, is implicated in a wide range of human diseases and developmental disorders. However, the mechanisms underlying Smad4 dysregulation are not fully understood. Using a functional screening approach based on luciferase reporter assays, we identified 39 microRNAs (miRNAs) as potential regulators of Smad4 from an expression library of 388 human miRNAs. The screening was supported by bioinformatic analysis, as 24 of 39 identified miRNAs were also predicted to target Smad4. MiR-199a, one of the identified miRNAs, was inversely correlated with Smad4 expression in various human cancer cell lines and gastric cancer tissues, and repressed Smad4 expression and blocked canonical TGF-? transcriptional responses in cell lines. These effects were dependent on the presence of a conserved, but not perfect seed paired, miR-199a-binding site in the Smad4 3?-untranslated region (UTR). Overexpression of miR-199a significantly inhibited the ability of TGF-? to induce gastric cancer cell growth arrest and apoptosis in vitro, and promoted anchorage-independent growth in soft agar, suggesting that miR-199a plays an oncogenic role in human gastric tumourigenesis. In conclusion, our functional screening uncovers multiple miRNAs that regulate the cellular responsiveness to TGF-? signalling and reveals important roles of miR-199a in gastric cancer by directly targeting Smad4. PMID:22821565

Zhang, Yan; Fan, Kai-Ji; Sun, Qiang; Chen, Ai-Zhong; Shen, Wen-Long; Zhao, Zhi-Hu; Zheng, Xiao-Fei; Yang, Xiao

2012-01-01

260

Ethylene Signaling Pathway  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The structural simplicity of the plant hormone ethylene contrasts with its dramatic effects in various developmental processes, as well as in the cellular processes that ethylene initiates in response to a diversity of environmental signals. A single well-conserved signaling cascade mediates this broad spectrum of responses. Ethylene is perceived by a family of two-component histidine kinase receptors that become inactivated upon ethylene binding. In the absence of the hormone, the receptors activate CTR1, a negative regulator of ethylene responses. Sequence similarity between CTR1 and the Raf protein kinases implies involvement of a mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade in this signaling pathway. The protein EIN2 acts downstream of CTR1 and the possible kinase cascade. Although the biochemical function of EIN2 is not understood, its critical role is manifested by the complete ethylene insensitivity of EIN2 loss-of-function mutants. Downstream of EIN2, a family of plant-specific EIN3-like transcription factors mediate ethylene responses. The regulation of EIN3 stability by ethylene is accomplished by F-box–containing proteins that participate in the formation of a SKP1/cullin/F-box complex that targets proteins for degradation by the proteasome. A large number of ethylene-regulated genes have been identified, including the APETALA2 domain–containing transcription factor genes ERF1 and EDF1 to 4, which suggests the participation of a transcriptional cascade in the ethylene response. The differential regulation of some components of this complex nuclear cascade by other signaling pathways provides a possible mechanism for interaction and signal integration. As new points of intersection with other pathways and additional participants in the pathway are identified, the Connections Map will be updated to include this new information.

Anna N. Stepanova (North Carolina State University; Department of Genetics REV)

2005-03-22

261

BIOSYNTHETIC PATHWAYS: Biosynthesis Meets Bioinformatics  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Access to the article is free, however registration and sign-in are required. In his Perspective, Cane discusses the increasing importance of the study of biosynthetic pathways in the discovery of biochemical reactions and pathways. Two recent papers (Rohdich et al. and Khaleeli et al.) highlight the increasing role of molecular biology and genomics in the study of biosynthetic pathways.

David E. Cane (Brown University; Department of Chemistry)

2000-02-04

262

Microarray-assisted pathway analysis identifies MT1X & NF?B as mediators of TCRP1-associated resistance to cisplatin in oral squamous cell carcinoma.  

PubMed

We recently reported that TCRP1, a novel multidrug-resistance associated human gene, can mediate cisplatin resistance in OSCC cells. However, the molecular mechanism underlying this role of TCRP1 remained to be elucidated. In this study, by using Human Toxicology and Drug Resistance Microarray, we identified 30 genes with significantly different expression levels between Tca/PYM and TCRP1 knockdown cell lines. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments and GST-pull down assays showed that metallothionein1X (MT1X) and Akt interact with TCRP1. siRNA-mediated knockdown of TCRP1 and MT1X was found to sensitize cells to cisplatin, leading to increased apoptosis and inhibition of cell proliferation. These functions of TCRP1 may be caused at least in part via activation of the PI3K/Akt/NF-?B signaling pathway. Taken together, our findings indicate that TCRP1 may be an important drug target for improvement of the treatment and survival of patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:23251525

Peng, Bo; Gu, Yixue; Xiong, Yan; Zheng, Guopei; He, Zhimin

2012-01-01

263

Microarray-Assisted Pathway Analysis Identifies MT1X & NF?B as Mediators of TCRP1-Associated Resistance to Cisplatin in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma  

PubMed Central

We recently reported that TCRP1, a novel multidrug-resistance associated human gene, can mediate cisplatin resistance in OSCC cells. However, the molecular mechanism underlying this role of TCRP1 remained to be elucidated. In this study, by using Human Toxicology and Drug Resistance Microarray, we identified 30 genes with significantly different expression levels between Tca/PYM and TCRP1 knockdown cell lines. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments and GST-pull down assays showed that metallothionein1X (MT1X) and Akt interact with TCRP1. siRNA-mediated knockdown of TCRP1 and MT1X was found to sensitize cells to cisplatin, leading to increased apoptosis and inhibition of cell proliferation. These functions of TCRP1 may be caused at least in part via activation of the PI3K/Akt/NF-?B signaling pathway. Taken together, our findings indicate that TCRP1 may be an important drug target for improvement of the treatment and survival of patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:23251525

Peng, Bo; Gu, Yixue; Xiong, Yan; Zheng, Guopei; He, Zhimin

2012-01-01

264

ChIP-Seq and RNA-Seq Analyses Identify Components of the Wnt and Fgf Signaling Pathways as Prep1 Target Genes in Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells  

PubMed Central

The Prep1 (Pknox1) homeodomain transcription factor is essential at multiple stages of embryo development. In the E11.5 embryo trunk, we previously estimated that Prep1 binds about 3,300 genomic sites at a highly specific decameric consensus sequence, mainly governing basal cellular functions. We now show that in embryonic stem (ES) cells Prep1 binding pattern only partly overlaps that of the embryo trunk, with about 2,000 novel sites. Moreover, in ES cells Prep1 still binds mostly to promoters, as in total embryo trunk but, among the peaks bound exclusively in ES cells, the percentage of enhancers was three-fold higher. RNA-seq identifies about 1800 genes down-regulated in Prep1-/- ES cells which belong to gene ontology categories not enriched in the E11.5 Prep1i/i differentiated embryo, including in particular essential components of the Wnt and Fgf pathways. These data agree with aberrant Wnt and Fgf expression levels in the Prep1-/- ES cells with a deficient embryoid bodies (EBs) formation and differentiation. Re-establishment of the Prep1 level rescues the phenotype. PMID:25875616

Laurent, Audrey; Calabrese, Manuela; Warnatz, Hans-Jörg; Yaspo, Marie-Laure; Tkachuk, Vsevolod; Torres, Miguel; Blasi, Francesco; Penkov, Dmitry

2015-01-01

265

In vitro analysis of ovarian cancer response to cisplatin, carboplatin, and paclitaxel identifies common pathways that are also associated with overall patient survival  

PubMed Central

Background: Carboplatin and cisplatin, alone or in combination with paclitaxel, have similar efficacies against ovarian cancer (OVCA) yet exhibit different toxicity profiles. We characterised the common and unique cellular pathways that underlie OVCA response to these drugs and analyse whether they have a role in OVCA survival. Methods: Ovarian cancer cell lines (n=36) were treated with carboplatin, cisplatin, paclitaxel, or carboplatin–paclitaxel (CPTX). For each cell line, IC50 levels were quantified and pre-treatment gene expression analyses were performed. Genes demonstrating expression/IC50 correlations (measured by Pearson; P<0.01) were subjected to biological pathway analysis. An independent OVCA clinico-genomic data set (n=142) was evaluated for clinical features associated with represented pathways. Results: Cell line sensitivity to carboplatin, cisplatin, paclitaxel, and CPTX was associated with the expression of 77, 68, 64, and 25 biological pathways (P<0.01), respectively. We found three common pathways when drug combinations were compared. Expression of one pathway (‘Transcription/CREB pathway') was associated with OVCA overall survival. Conclusion: The identification of the Transcription/CREB pathway (associated with OVCA cell line platinum sensitivity and overall survival) could improve patient stratification for treatment with current therapies and the rational selection of future OVCA therapy agents targeted to these pathways. PMID:22596241

Bicaku, E; Xiong, Y; Marchion, D C; Chon, H S; Stickles, X B; Chen, N; Judson, P L; Hakam, A; Gonzalez-Bosquet, J; Wenham, R M; Apte, S M; Fulp, W; Cubitt, C L; Chen, D-T; Lancaster, J M

2012-01-01

266

Biochemical effects of mercury, cadmium, and lead  

Microsoft Academic Search

A review is presented of the chemical and biochemical effects of mercury, acadmium and lead. Similarities and diversities are emphasized and the means available to identify their biochemical sites of action are discussed. Toxic effects and alterations in enzyme activity are described. 551 references.

B. L. Vallee; D. D. Ulmer

1972-01-01

267

Simulation studies in biochemical signaling and enzyme reactions  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Biochemical pathways characterize various biochemical reaction schemes that involve a set of species and the manner in which they are connected. Determination of schematics that represent these pathways is an important task in understanding metabolism and signal transduction. Examples of these Pathways are: DNA and protein synthesis, and production of several macro-molecules essential for cell survival. A sustained feedback mechanism arises in gene expression and production of mRNA that lead to protein synthesis if the protein so synthesized serves as a transcription factor and becomes a repressor of the gene expression. The cellular regulations are carried out through biochemical networks consisting of reactions and regulatory proteins. Systems biology is a relatively new area that attempts to describe the biochemical pathways analytically and develop reliable mathematical models for the pathways. A complete understanding of chemical reaction kinetics is prohibitively hard thanks to the nonlinear and highly complex mechanisms that regulate protein formation, but attempting to numerically solve some of the governing differential equations seems to offer significant insight about their biochemical picture. To validate these models, one can perform simple experiments in the lab. This paper introduces fundamental ideas in biochemical signaling and attempts to take first steps into the understanding of biochemical oscillations. Initially, the two-pool model of calcium is used to describe the dynamics behind the oscillations. Later we present some elementary results showing biochemical oscillations arising from solving differential equations of Elowitz and Leibler using MATLAB software.

Nelatury, Sudarshan R.; Vagula, Mary C.

2014-06-01

268

Regulation of biochemical pathways involved in neurodegeneration  

E-print Network

Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by cognitive decline and memory loss. Although much is known about how AD affects the brain, the cause of this disease remains elusive. Current AD ...

Pooler, Amy Melissa

2005-01-01

269

Microarray gene expression analysis of the Fob3b obesity QTL identifies positional candidate gene Sqle and perturbed cholesterol and glycolysis pathways  

E-print Network

Sqle and perturbed cholesterol and glycolysis pathways Ioannis M. Stylianou,1,4 Michael Clinton,1 Peter candidate gene Sqle and perturbed cholesterol and glycolysis pathways. Physiol Genomics 20: 224­232, 2005 containing only the Fob3b QTL (Fob3b- line). Our study suggests squalene epoxidase (Sqle), a cholesterol

Keightley, Peter

270

A combined remote sensing and modeling based approach to identify sustainable pathways for urban and peri-urban agriculture in China  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

As the world's biggest economy, China is becoming the biggest consumer of resources globally. Given this trend, the over-proportional fast increase in urbanization presents China with fundamental problems. Among the most urgent ones is the increasing loss of agricultural land as urbanization takes place in the most productive regions along the coast. The latter is being responsible for a shift in agriculture production towards climatically less favorable areas. At the same time, the loss of green areas in and around growing cities is increasing the effect of the urban heat island. The perception of the potential risks related to this phenomenon, in the context of climate change, has led the Shanghai city administration to increase its urban-greening efforts, expanding the per capita area of green from 1m2 in 1990 to 12.5m2 in 2008. In this context, this paper aims at identifying the influence of urban and peri-urban agriculture (UPA) on the sustainability of the urban regions of Shanghai and Nanjing. In particular, it focuses on the effects of UPA on the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, soil nutrients and water balances, local climate and the structure and functions of the urbanized areas. We propose an interdisciplinary framework combining remote sensing, model simulations and GHG field observations and targeted at identifying "win-win" strategies for sustainable planning pathways showing high potentials for UPA. The framework is based on spatial scenario modeling, automatic classification of urban structure types and on a prototype of a high-quality spatial database consisting of a 3D city model. Dynamic boundary conditions for climate and urban development are provided by state of the art models. These approaches meet the needs of stakeholders and planners in China. A special emphasis is put on interdependencies between small holder farming in the urban and peri-urban zone and climate change adaptation and mitigation strategies focusing on improved management of local water and nutrient cycles. The whole database generated will be structured and made accessible for planners and stakeholders in the form of a 3D city visualization model.

Wattenbach, M.; Delgado, J. M.; Roessner, S.; Bochow, M.; Güntner, A.; Kropp, J.; Cantu Ros, A. G.; Hattermann, F.; Kolbe, T.; Sodoudi, S.; Cubasch, U. Ulrich; Zeitz, J.; Ross, L.; Böckel, K.; Fang, C.; Bo, L.; Pan, G.

2012-04-01

271

Transcript Profiling Identifies Dynamic Gene Expression Patterns and an Important Role for Nrf2/Keap1 Pathway in the Developing Mouse Esophagus  

PubMed Central

Background and Aims Morphological changes during human and mouse esophageal development have been well characterized. However, changes at the molecular level in the course of esophageal morphogenesis remain unclear. This study aims to globally profile critical genes and signaling pathways during the development of mouse esophagus. By using microarray analysis this study also aims to determine how the Nrf2/Keap1 pathway regulates the morphogenesis of the esophageal epithelium. Methods Gene expression microarrays were used to survey gene expression in the esophagus at three critical phases: specification, metaplasia and maturation. The esophagi were isolated from wild-type, Nrf2?/?, Keap1?/?, or Nrf2?/?Keap1?/? embryos or young adult mice. Array data were statistically analyzed for differentially expressed genes and pathways. Histochemical and immunohistochemical staining were used to verify potential involvement of the Wnt pathway, Ppar?/? and the PI3K/Akt pathway in the development of esophageal epithelium. Results Dynamic gene expression patterns accompanied the morphological changes of the developing esophagus at critical phases. Particularly, the Nrf2/Keap1 pathway had a baseline activity in the metaplasia phase and was further activated in the maturation phase. The Wnt pathway was active early and became inactive later in the metaplasia phase. In addition, Keap1?/? mice showed increased expression of Nrf2 downstream targets and genes involved in keratinization. Microarray and immunostaining data also suggested that esophageal hyperkeratosis in the Keap1?/? mice was due to activation of Ppar?/? and the PI3K/Akt pathway. Conclusions Morphological changes of the esophageal epithelium are associated with dynamic changes in gene expression. Nrf2/Keap1 pathway activity is required for maturation of mouse esophageal epithelium. PMID:22567161

Li, Haiyan; Hu, Yuhui; Tevebaugh, Whitney; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Que, Jianwen; Chen, Xiaoxin

2012-01-01

272

THE PHYTOCHROMES: A BIOCHEMICAL MECHANISM OF SIGNALING IN SIGHT?  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The biochemical mechanism by which the phytochrome family of plant sensory photoreceptors transmit perceived informational light signals downstream to transduction pathway components is undetermined. However, the recent sequencing of the entire genome of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis has reveale...

273

CSNK1A1 and Gli2 as Novel Targets Identified Through an Integrative Analysis of Gene Expression Data, Protein-Protein Interaction and Pathways Networks in Glioblastoma Tumors: Can These Two Be Antagonistic Proteins?  

PubMed Central

Glioblastoma (GBM) is the malignant form of glioma, and the interplay of different pathways working in concert in GBM development and progression needs to be fully understood. Wnt signaling and sonic hedgehog (SHH) signaling pathways, having basic similarities, are among the major pathways aberrantly activated in GBM, and hence, need to be targeted. It becomes imperative, therefore, to explore the functioning of these pathways in context of each other in GBM. An integrative approach may help provide new biological insights, as well as solve the problem of identifying common drug targets for simultaneous targeting of these pathways. The beauty of this approach is that it can recapitulate several known facts, as well as decipher new emerging patterns, identifying those targets that could be missed when relying on one type of data at a time. This approach can be easily extended to other systems to discover key patterns in the functioning of signaling molecules. Studies were designed to assess the relationship between significant differential expression of genes of the Wnt (Wnt/?-catenin canonical and Wnt non-canonical) and SHH signaling pathways and their connectivity patterns in interaction and signaling networks. Further, the aim was to decipher underlying mechanistic patterns that may be involved in a more specific way and to generate a ranked list of genes that can be used as markers or drug targets. These studies predict that Wnt pathway plays a relatively more pro-active role than the SHH pathway in GBM. Further, CTNNB1, CSNK1A1, and Gli2 proteins may act as key drug targets common to these pathways. While CTNNB1 is a widely studied molecule in the context of GBM, the likely roles of CSNK1A1 and Gli2 are found to be relatively novel. It is surmised that Gli2 may be antagonistic to CSNK1A1, preventing the phosphorylation of CTNNB1 and SMO proteins in Wnt and SHH signaling pathway, respectively, by CSNK1A1, and thereby, aberrant activation. New insights into the possible behavior of these pathway molecules relative to each other in GBM reveal some key interesting patterns. PMID:25374452

Mishra, Seema

2014-01-01

274

A Global Genomic and Genetic Strategy to Identify, Validate and Use Gene Signatures of Xenobiotic-Responsive Transcription Factors in Prediction of Pathway Activation in the Mouse Liver  

EPA Science Inventory

Many drugs and environmentally-relevant chemicals activate xenobiotic-responsive transcription factors. Identification of target genes of these factors would be useful in predicting pathway activation in in vitro chemical screening as well as their involvement in disease states. ...

275

Ethylmalonic encephalopathy: application of improved biochemical and molecular diagnostic approaches.  

PubMed

Ethylmalonic encephalopathy (EE, OMIM # 602473) is an autosomal recessive metabolic disorder of infancy affecting the brain, the gastrointestinal tract and peripheral vessels. It is caused by a defect in the ETHE1 gene product, which was recently shown to be part of a metabolic pathway devoted to sulphide detoxification. We report the application of improved biochemical and molecular approaches to the diagnosis of three cases of EE from two unrelated Cypriot families. The children presented all the typical biochemical hallmarks of the disease including elevated lactate and butyrylcarnitine in blood and elevated urinary excretion of ethylmalonic acid, 2-methylsuccinate, isobutyrylglycine and isovalerylglycine. We also detected an elevated level of thiosulphate in urine, which we propose as an additional biochemical marker of the disease. The proband of the first family was shown to be a compound heterozygote for a missense mutation in exon 5, L185R, and a deletion of exon 4. The deletion was identified using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Using the same technique, the proband of the second family was found to be homozygous for the exon 4 deletion. A prenatal diagnosis was performed for the second family using qRT-PCR, thus establishing the usefulness of RT-PCR in prenatal diagnosis. PMID:20528888

Drousiotou, A; DiMeo, I; Mineri, R; Georgiou, Th; Stylianidou, G; Tiranti, V

2011-04-01

276

Arabidopsis Ethylene Signaling Pathway  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In plants, ethylene gas functions as a potent endogenous growth regulator. In the model system Arabidopsis thaliana, the molecular mechanisms that underlie perception and transduction of the ethylene signal to the nucleus, where the transcription of hundreds of genes is altered, are being elucidated. In the current view, ethylene is sensed by a family of five receptors that show similarity to the bacterial two-component histidine kinases, and in plants function as negative regulators of the pathway. Binding of the ethylene gas turns off the receptors, resulting in the inactivation of another negative regulator of ethylene signaling, CTR1, a Raf-like protein kinase that directly interacts with the receptors. EIN2, a protein of unknown biochemical activity that functions as a positive regulator of the pathway, acts downstream of CTR. Derepression of EIN2 by ethylene upon disabling of the receptors and CTR1 leads to the activation of EIN3 and EIN3-like transcription factors. In the absence of ethylene, the levels of EIN3 protein are extremely low because of the function of two F-box-containing proteins, EBF1 and EBF2, that target EIN3 for proteosome-mediated degradation. In the presence of ethylene, the EIN3 protein accumulates in the nucleus and initiates a transcriptional cascade, resulting in the activation and repression of hundreds of genes. To date, the only empirically demonstrated direct target of EIN3 is the APETALA2 (AP2)-domain–containing transcription factor gene ERF1. The coregulation of ERF1 by another plant hormone, jasmonic acid, illustrates how a transcriptional cascade could be utilized in a combinatorial fashion to generate a large diversity of responses using a limited number of input signals. As new components and points of intersection with other pathways are identified, the Connections Map will be updated.

Anna N. Stepanova (North Carolina State University; Department of Genetics REV)

2005-03-22

277

Heterologous protein production using the twin arginine translocation pathway  

DOEpatents

Provided are means for evaluating and identifying putative substrates of the twin arginine translocation (Tat) secretory pathway in Streptomyces and other bacterial species. Also provided, therefore, are simple ways to express, secrete and purify correctly folded heterologous proteins on a large scale using host microorganisms, such as, Streptomyces and the Tat pathway therein. Many of the thus-produced proteins are of significant therapeutic value in the pharmaceutical and biochemical industries, particularly when they can be secreted from the host in fully-folded active form. Accordingly, there are further provided the heterologous proteins produced by the Tat secretion pathway using the foregoing methods, and the computer algorithm used to identify the Tat signal sequence and putative substrates.

Pohlschroder, Mechtild (Philadelphia, PA); Kissinger, Jessica C (Athens, GA); Rose, R. Wesley (Glenside, PA); Brueser, Thomas (Halle, DE); Dilks, Kieran (Collingswood, NJ)

2008-11-04

278

Biosynthetic Pathways of Ergot Alkaloids  

PubMed Central

Ergot alkaloids are nitrogen-containing natural products belonging to indole alkaloids. The best known producers are fungi of the phylum Ascomycota, e.g., Claviceps, Epichloë, Penicillium and Aspergillus species. According to their structures, ergot alkaloids can be divided into three groups: clavines, lysergic acid amides and peptides (ergopeptines). All of them share the first biosynthetic steps, which lead to the formation of the tetracyclic ergoline ring system (except the simplest, tricyclic compound: chanoclavine). Different modifications on the ergoline ring by specific enzymes result in an abundance of bioactive natural products, which are used as pharmaceutical drugs or precursors thereof. From the 1950s through to recent years, most of the biosynthetic pathways have been elucidated. Gene clusters from several ergot alkaloid producers have been identified by genome mining and the functions of many of those genes have been demonstrated by knock-out experiments or biochemical investigations of the overproduced enzymes. PMID:25513893

Gerhards, Nina; Neubauer, Lisa; Tudzynski, Paul; Li, Shu-Ming

2014-01-01

279

A screen for genes involved in the anaphase proteolytic pathway identifies tsm1(+), a novel Schizosaccharomyces pombe gene important for microtubule integrity.  

PubMed Central

The growth of several mitotic mutants of Schizosaccharomyces pombe, including nuc2-663, is inhibited by the protease inhibitor N-Tosyl-L-Phenylalanine Chloromethyl Ketone (TPCK). Because nuc2(+) encodes a presumptive component of the Anaphase Promoting Complex, which is required for the ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis of certain proteins during exit from mitosis, we have used sensitivity to TPCK as a criterion by which to search for novel S. pombe mutants defective in the anaphase-promoting pathway. In a genetic screen for temperature-sensitive mitotic mutants that were also sensitive to TPCK at a permissive temperature, we isolated three tsm (TPCK-sensitive mitotic) strains. Two of these are alleles of cut1(+), but tsm1-512 maps to a novel genetic location. The tsm1-512 mutation leads to delayed nuclear division at restrictive temperatures, apparently as a result of an impaired ability to form a metaphase spindle. After shift of early G2 cells to 36 degrees, tsm1-512 arrests transiently in the second mitotic division and then exits mitosis, as judged by spindle elongation and septation. The chromosomes, however, often fail to segregate properly. Genetic interactions between tsm1-512 and components of the anaphase proteolytic pathway suggest a functional involvement of the Tsm1 protein in this pathway. PMID:9649518

Grishchuk, E L; Howe, J L; McIntosh, J R

1998-01-01

280

A screen for upstream components of the yeast protein kinase C signal transduction pathway identifies the product of the SLG1 gene.  

PubMed

We employed the constitutive BCK1-20 allele of the gene for the MAP kinase kinase kinase (MAP-KKK) in the yeast Pkc signal transduction pathway to develop a genetic screen for mutants in genes encoding upstream components. Transposon mutagenesis yielded a mutant that was completely dependent on the active allele in the absence of osmotic stabilization. The transposon had integrated at the yeast SLG1 (HCS77) locus. This gene encodes a putative membrane protein. Haploid slg1 deletion strains are sensitive to caffeine, as expected for mutants in the Pkc pathway, as well as a variety of other drugs. The response to elevated temperatures and the dependence on osmotic stabilization depends on the genetic background. Thus, in the strain used for mutagenesis, disruption of SLG1 causes the cells to become non-viable in the absence of osmotic stabilization at both 30 degrees C and 37 degrees C. In a different genetic background this phenotype was not observed. Sensitivity of the haploid deletion mutants to caffeine can be partially suppressed by overexpression of genes for other components of the Pkc pathway, such as PKC1, SLT2, ROM2, and STE20. In addition, a SLG1-lacZ reporter construct shows higher expression in the presence of caffeine or magnesium chloride in a wild-type diploid background. PMID:9613583

Jacoby, J J; Nilius, S M; Heinisch, J J

1998-04-01

281

An evidence-based knowledgebase of pulmonary arterial hypertension to identify genes and pathways relevant to pathogenesis† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c3mb70496c Click here for additional data file.  

PubMed Central

Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a major progressive form of pulmonary hypertension (PH) with more than 4800 patients in the United States. In the last two decades, many studies have identified numerous genes associated with this disease. However, there is no comprehensive research resource for PAH or other PH types that integrates various genetic studies and their related biological information. Thus, the number of associated genes, and their strength of evidence, is unclear. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that a web-based knowledgebase could be used to develop a biological map of highly interrelated, functionally important genes in PAH. We developed the pulmonary arterial hypertension knowledgebase (PAHKB, http://bioinfo.mc.vanderbilt.edu/PAHKB/), a comprehensive database with a user-friendly web interface. PAHKB extracts genetic data from all available sources, including those from association studies, genetic mutation, gene expression, animal model, supporting literature, various genomic annotations, gene networks, cellular and regulatory pathways, as well as microRNAs. Moreover, PAHKB provides online tools for data browsing and searching, data integration, pathway graphical presentation, and gene ranking. In the current release, PAHKB contains 341 human PH-related genes (293 protein coding and 48 non-coding genes) curated from over 1000 PubMed abstracts. Based on the top 39 ranked PAH-related genes in PAHKB, we constructed a core biological map. This core map was enriched with the TGF-beta signaling pathway, focal adhesion, cytokine–cytokine receptor interaction, and MAPK signaling. In addition, the reconstructed map elucidates several novel cancer signaling pathways, which may provide clues to support the application of anti-cancer therapeutics to PAH. In summary, we have developed a system for the identification of core PH-related genes and identified critical signaling pathways that may be relevant to PAH pathogenesis. This system can be easily applied to other pulmonary diseases. PMID:24448676

Zhao, Min; Austin, Eric D.; Hemnes, Anna R.; Loyd, James E.

2014-01-01

282

Morphoproteomics identifies constitutive activation of the mTORC2/Akt and NF-?B pathways and expressions of IGF-1R, Sirt1, COX-2, and FASN in peripheral T-cell lymphomas: pathogenetic implications and therapeutic options  

PubMed Central

Background: Gaining a better understanding of the molecular circuitries and pathways implicated in the malignant growth and biological behavior of T cell lymphomas may identify potential cellular targets with clinical therapeutic potential. The immunohistochemical characterization of key cellular proteins participating in these pathways can provide surrogate markers of biological activity. The mammalian target of rapamycin complex (mTORC) signaling pathway has been implicated in T-cell lymphopoiesis. The mTORC2 pathway involves downstream activation of nuclear factor (NF)-?B and p-Akt (Ser 473). Fatty acid synthase (FASN) and insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R) are expressed upstream of the mTORC and NF-?B signaling pathways. Cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 products influence these pathways. Our goal was to use morphoproteomics to characterize the expression patterns of the proteins in various peripheral T-cell lymphomas. Design: Ten cases of peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL) were examined for expression of proteins along the mTORC, Akt and NF-?B pathways and affiliated tumorigenic molecules. These included two angioimmunoblastic PTCL, one natural killer/PTCL, one anaplastic large PTCL, and six PTCL not otherwise specified. Immunostaining for phosphorylated (p) mTOR (Ser 2448), p-Akt (Ser 473), p-NF-?Bp65 (Ser 536), IGF-1R (Tyr1165/1166), silent mating type information regulation 2 homolog 1 (Sirt1), COX-2 and FASN was performed on paraffin-embedded tissue for each case. Percent expression was scored using bright-field microscopy with high expression designated as more than 50% of the cells with positive stain in the appropriate subcellular compartment. Results: All ten cases demonstrated nuclear staining for p-mTOR (Ser 2448) corresponding to mTORC 2, and all cases showed strong, diffuse nuclear staining for p-NF-?Bp65 (Ser 536). All ten also showed nuclear and cytoplasmic staining for p-Akt (Ser 473) and cytoplasmic staining for IGF-1R. High expressions for nuclear Sirt1, and cytoplasmic COX-2 and FASN were detected in 7, 9, and 8 out of 10 cases, respectively. Six out of 10 cases demonstrated high expression of all the mentioned markers. Conclusion: The constitutive activation of mTORC2, NF-?B, p-Akt and the concomitant expression of IGF-1R suggests convergence of these molecular pathways in T-cell lymphoma. The results of this study also suggest that mTORC2 may be a common denominator among this heterogeneous group of lymphomas. Interference of key nodes of this pathway may carry a clinical therapeutic benefit. Agents that may be considered based on existing data include: bortezomib to inhibit NF-?B pathway activation; metformin to inhibit both NF-?B and mTORC2 and histone deacteylase inhibitors to inhibit mTORC2 pathway signaling. Furthermore, panobinostat inhibits Sirt1 pathway when present, and celecoxib inhibits NF-?B pathway activation independent of COX2. PMID:25674239

Quesada, Andrés E; Nguyen, Nghia D; Rios, Adan; Brown, Robert E

2014-01-01

283

Large-scale comparative phenotypic and genomic analyses reveal ecological preferences of shewanella species and identify metabolic pathways conserved at the genus level.  

PubMed

The use of comparative genomics for the study of different microbiological species has increased substantially as sequence technologies become more affordable. However, efforts to fully link a genotype to its phenotype remain limited to the development of one mutant at a time. In this study, we provided a high-throughput alternative to this limiting step by coupling comparative genomics to the use of phenotype arrays for five sequenced Shewanella strains. Positive phenotypes were obtained for 441 nutrients (C, N, P, and S sources), with N-based compounds being the most utilized for all strains. Many genes and pathways predicted by genome analyses were confirmed with the comparative phenotype assay, and three degradation pathways believed to be missing in Shewanella were confirmed as missing. A number of previously unknown gene products were predicted to be parts of pathways or to have a function, expanding the number of gene targets for future genetic analyses. Ecologically, the comparative high-throughput phenotype analysis provided insights into niche specialization among the five different strains. For example, Shewanella amazonensis strain SB2B, isolated from the Amazon River delta, was capable of utilizing 60 C compounds, whereas Shewanella sp. strain W3-18-1, isolated from deep marine sediment, utilized only 25 of them. In spite of the large number of nutrient sources yielding positive results, our study indicated that except for the N sources, they were not sufficiently informative to predict growth phenotypes from increasing evolutionary distances. Our results indicate the importance of phenotypic evaluation for confirming genome predictions. This strategy will accelerate the functional discovery of genes and provide an ecological framework for microbial genome sequencing projects. PMID:21642407

Rodrigues, Jorge L M; Serres, Margrethe H; Tiedje, James M

2011-08-01

284

Combined miRNA and mRNA Signature Identifies Key Molecular Players and Pathways Involved in Chikungunya Virus Infection in Human Cells  

PubMed Central

Since its discovery, Chikungunya fever caused by a virus (CHIKV) has ravaged most of Africa and Southeast Asia. Despite there being more than a million reported cases in India alone and the seriousness of the disease in the chronic phase, a clear understanding of the disease pathogenesis and host response remains elusive. Here, we use microarray technology and quantitative PCR method to establish the complete miRNA, snoRNA and mRNA signature of host response upon CHIKV infection in human cell line infection model, HEK293T. The results were further validated in human primary cells (dermal fibroblasts). miRNA expression profiling revealed regulation of 152 miRNAs post CHIKV infection. An interesting overlap in miRNA signature was seen majorly with HCV, HPV and HIV1 virus. The microarray data further validated by qRT-PCR revealed induction of miR-744, miR-638, miR-503 and others among the top upregulated miRNAs. Notably, we found induction of snoRNAs belonging to C/D cluster including close paralogs of U3, U44, U76 and U78 snoRNAs. Genes were found to be differentially expressed along 3 major pathways; TGF-?, endocytosis and the cell cycle pathways. qRT-PCR data confirmed strong induction of TGF-? (SMAD6, JUN, SKIL) and endocytosis pathway (CXCR4, HSPA8, ADRB1) genes while downregulation of cell cycle genes (CDC27 and CDC23). Interestingly, use of TGF-? inhibitor, SB-431542, increased CHIKV mediated cell death. Overall, this study aims at providing the first complete transcriptome signature of host response upon CHIKV infection to aid identification of possible biomarkers and therapeutic targets. PMID:24278205

Saxena, Tanvi; Tandon, Bhavna; Sharma, Shivani; Chameettachal, Shibu; Ray, Pratima; Ray, Alok R.; Kulshreshtha, Ritu

2013-01-01

285

Identifying beach sand sources and pathways in the San Francisco Bay Coastal System through the integration of bed characteristics, geochemical tracers, current measurements, and numerical modeling  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

A unique, multi-faceted provenance study was performed to definitively establish the primary sources, sinks, and transport pathways of beach sized-sand in the San Francisco Bay Coastal System. This integrative program is based on comprehensive surficial sediment sampling of the San Francisco Bay Coastal System, including the seabed, bay floor, area beaches, adjacent rock units, and major drainages. Analyses of sample morphometrics and biological composition (e.g., foraminifera) were then integrated with a suite of tracers including 87Sr/86Sr and 143Nd/144Nd isotopes, rare earth elements, semi-quantitative X-ray diffraction mineralogy, and heavy minerals, and with process-based numerical modeling, in situ current measurements, and bedform asymmetry, to robustly determine the provenance of beach-sized sand in the region. Cross-validating geochemical analyses, numerical modeling, physical process measurements, and proxy-based techniques (e.g., bedform asymmetry, grain size morphometrics) is proved an effective technique for confidently defining sources, pathways, and sinks of sand in complex coastal-estuarine systems. The consensus results highlight the regional impact of a sharp reduction in the primary sediment source, the Sierras, to the San Francisco Bay Coastal System over the last century in driving erosion of the bay floor, ebb-tidal delta, and the outer coast south of the Golden Gate.A) Calculated transport directions based on the integration of the provenance techniques. B) Number of techniques applied for each grid cell to determine the final transport directions.

Barnard, P.; Foxgrover, A. C.; Elias, E.; Erikson, L. H.; Hein, J. R.; McGann, M. L.; Mizell, K.; Rosenbauer, R. J.; Swarzenski, P. W.; Takesue, R. K.; Wong, F. L.; Woodrow, D. L.

2012-12-01

286

Biochemical transformation of coals  

DOEpatents

A method of biochemically transforming macromolecular compounds found in solid carbonaceous materials, such as coal is provided. The preparation of new microorganisms, metabolically weaned through challenge growth processes to biochemically transform solid carbonaceous materials at extreme temperatures, pressures, pH, salt and toxic metal concentrations is also disclosed.

Lin, Mow S. (Rocky Point, NY); Premuzic, Eugene T. (East Moriches, NY)

1999-03-23

287

Biochemical transformation of coals  

DOEpatents

A method of biochemically transforming macromolecular compounds found in solid carbonaceous materials, such as coal is provided. The preparation of new microorganisms, metabolically weaned through challenge growth processes to biochemically transform solid carbonaceous materials at extreme temperatures, pressures, pH, salt and toxic metal concentrations is also disclosed. 7 figs.

Lin, M.S.; Premuzic, E.T.

1999-03-23

288

Mechanism of Salinity Tolerance in Plants: Physiological, Biochemical, and Molecular Characterization  

PubMed Central

Salinity is a major abiotic stress limiting growth and productivity of plants in many areas of the world due to increasing use of poor quality of water for irrigation and soil salinization. Plant adaptation or tolerance to salinity stress involves complex physiological traits, metabolic pathways, and molecular or gene networks. A comprehensive understanding on how plants respond to salinity stress at different levels and an integrated approach of combining molecular tools with physiological and biochemical techniques are imperative for the development of salt-tolerant varieties of plants in salt-affected areas. Recent research has identified various adaptive responses to salinity stress at molecular, cellular, metabolic, and physiological levels, although mechanisms underlying salinity tolerance are far from being completely understood. This paper provides a comprehensive review of major research advances on biochemical, physiological, and molecular mechanisms regulating plant adaptation and tolerance to salinity stress. PMID:24804192

Huang, Bingru

2014-01-01

289

Can bio-inspired information processing steps be realized as synthetic biochemical processes?  

E-print Network

We consider possible designs and experimental realiza-tions in synthesized rather than naturally occurring bio-chemical systems of a selection of basic bio-inspired information processing steps. These include feed-forward loops, which have been identified as the most common information processing motifs in many natural pathways in cellular functioning, and memory-involving processes, specifically, associative memory. Such systems should not be designed to literally mimic nature. Rather, we can be guided by nature's mechanisms for experimenting with new information/signal processing steps which are based on coupled biochemical reactions, but are vastly simpler than natural processes, and which will provide tools for the long-term goal of understanding and harnessing nature's information processing paradigm. Our biochemical processes of choice are enzymatic cascades because of their compatibility with physiological processes in vivo and with electronics (e.g., electrodes) in vitro allowing for networking and interfacing of enzyme-catalyzed processes with other chemical and biochemical reactions. In addition to designing and realizing feed-forward loops and other processes, one has to develop approaches to probe their response to external control of the time-dependence of the input(s), by measuring the resulting time-dependence of the output. The goal will be to demonstrate the expected features, for example, the delayed response and stabilizing effect of the feed-forward loops.

Vladimir Privman; Evgeny Katz

2014-11-07

290

Manganese Catalysts for C–H activation: An Experimental/Theoretical Study Identifies the Stereoelectronic Factor that Controls the Switch between Hydroxylation and Desaturation Pathways  

PubMed Central

We describe competitive C–H activation chemistry of two types, desaturation and hydroxylation, using synthetic manganese catalysts with several substrates. 9,10-dihydrophenanthrene (DHP) gives the highest desaturation activity, the final products being phenanthrene (P1) and phenanthrene-9,10-oxide (P3), the latter being thought to arise from epoxidation of some of the phenanthrene. The hydroxylase pathway also occurs as suggested by the presence of the dione product, phenanthrene-9,10-dione (P2), thought to arise from further oxidation of hydroxylation intermediate 9-hydroxy-9,10-dihydrophenanthrene. The experimental work together with the DFT calculations shows that the postulated Mn oxo active species, [Mn(O)(tpp)(Cl)] (tpp = tetraphenyl porphyrin), can promote the oxidation of dihydrophenanthrene by either desaturation or hydroxylation pathways. The calculations show that these two competing reactions have a common initial step – radical H abstraction from one of the DHP sp3 C–H bonds. The resulting Mn hydroxo intermediate is capable of promoting not only OH rebound (hydroxylation) but also a second H abstraction adjacent to the first (desaturation). Like the active MnV=O species, this MnIV-OH species also has radical character on oxygen and can thus give H abstraction. Both steps have very low and therefore very similar energy barriers, leading to a product mixture. Since the radical character of the catalyst is located on the oxygen p orbital perpendicular to the MnIV-OH plane, the orientation of the organic radical with respect to this plane determines which reaction, desaturation or hydroxylation, will occur. Stereoelectronic factors such as the rotational orientation of the OH in the enzyme active site is thus likely to constitute the switch between hydroxylation and desaturation behavior. PMID:20481432

Hull, Jonathan F.; Balcells, David; Sauer, Effiette L. O.; Raynaud, Christophe; Brudvig, Gary W.; Crabtree, Robert H.; Eisenstein, Odile

2010-01-01

291

Compound library screening identified Akt/PKB kinase pathway inhibitors as potential key molecules for the development of new chemotherapeutics against schistosomiasis.  

PubMed

Protein kinases (PKs) are one of the largest protein families in most eukaryotic organisms. These enzymes are involved in the control of cell proliferation, differentiation and metabolism and a large number of the anticancer drugs currently used are directed against PKs. The structure and function of PKs are well conserved throughout evolution. In schistosome parasites, PKs were shown to be involved in essential functions at every stage of the parasite life cycle, making these enzymes promising anti-parasite drug targets. In this study, we tested a panel of commercial inhibitors for various PKs and analyzed their effects on pairing and egg production by schistosomes as well as their toxicity towards schistosomula larvae. Results obtained confirmed the deleterious effect of PK targeting on Schistosoma mansoni physiology and the important function of different tyrosine and serine/threonine kinases in the biology and reproduction of this parasite. They also indicated for the first time that the Protein kinase B (also called Akt) which is a major downstream target of many receptor tyrosine kinases and a central player at the crossroads of signal transduction pathways activated in response to growth factors and insulin, can constitute a novel target for anti-schistosome chemotherapy. Structural and functional studies have shown that SmAkt is a conserved kinase and that its activity can be inhibited by commercially available Akt inhibitors. In treated adult worms, Akt/PKB kinase pathway inhibitors induced profound alterations in pairing and egg laying and they also greatly affected the viability of schistosomula larvae. PMID:25516836

Morel, Marion; Vanderstraete, Mathieu; Cailliau, Katia; Lescuyer, Arlette; Lancelot, Julien; Dissous, Colette

2014-12-01

292

Compound library screening identified Akt/PKB kinase pathway inhibitors as potential key molecules for the development of new chemotherapeutics against schistosomiasis  

PubMed Central

Protein kinases (PKs) are one of the largest protein families in most eukaryotic organisms. These enzymes are involved in the control of cell proliferation, differentiation and metabolism and a large number of the anticancer drugs currently used are directed against PKs. The structure and function of PKs are well conserved throughout evolution. In schistosome parasites, PKs were shown to be involved in essential functions at every stage of the parasite life cycle, making these enzymes promising anti-parasite drug targets. In this study, we tested a panel of commercial inhibitors for various PKs and analyzed their effects on pairing and egg production by schistosomes as well as their toxicity towards schistosomula larvae. Results obtained confirmed the deleterious effect of PK targeting on Schistosoma mansoni physiology and the important function of different tyrosine and serine/threonine kinases in the biology and reproduction of this parasite. They also indicated for the first time that the Protein kinase B (also called Akt) which is a major downstream target of many receptor tyrosine kinases and a central player at the crossroads of signal transduction pathways activated in response to growth factors and insulin, can constitute a novel target for anti-schistosome chemotherapy. Structural and functional studies have shown that SmAkt is a conserved kinase and that its activity can be inhibited by commercially available Akt inhibitors. In treated adult worms, Akt/PKB kinase pathway inhibitors induced profound alterations in pairing and egg laying and they also greatly affected the viability of schistosomula larvae. PMID:25516836

Morel, Marion; Vanderstraete, Mathieu; Cailliau, Katia; Lescuyer, Arlette; Lancelot, Julien; Dissous, Colette

2014-01-01

293

Combinatorial genetic transformation generates a library of metabolic phenotypes for the carotenoid pathway in maize  

PubMed Central

Combinatorial nuclear transformation is a novel method for the rapid production of multiplex-transgenic plants, which we have used to dissect and modify a complex metabolic pathway. To demonstrate the principle, we transferred 5 carotenogenic genes controlled by different endosperm-specific promoters into a white maize variety deficient for endosperm carotenoid synthesis. We recovered a diverse population of transgenic plants expressing different enzyme combinations and showing distinct metabolic phenotypes that allowed us to identify and complement rate-limiting steps in the pathway and to demonstrate competition between ?-carotene hydroxylase and bacterial ?-carotene ketolase for substrates in 4 sequential steps of the extended pathway. Importantly, this process allowed us to generate plants with extraordinary levels of ?-carotene and other carotenoids, including complex mixtures of hydroxycarotenoids and ketocarotenoids. Combinatorial transformation is a versatile approach that could be used to modify any metabolic pathway and pathways controlling other biochemical, physiological, or developmental processes. PMID:19011084

Zhu, Changfu; Naqvi, Shaista; Breitenbach, Jürgen; Sandmann, Gerhard; Christou, Paul; Capell, Teresa

2008-01-01

294

Signal pathways JNK and NF-?B, identified by global gene expression profiling, are involved in regulation of TNF?-induced mPGES-1 and COX-2 expression in gingival fibroblasts  

PubMed Central

Background Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is involved in several chronic inflammatory diseases including periodontitis, which causes loss of the gingival tissue and alveolar bone supporting the teeth. We have previously shown that tumor necrosis factor ? (TNF?) induces PGE2 synthesis in gingival fibroblasts. In this study we aimed to investigate the global gene expression profile of TNF?-stimulated primary human gingival fibroblasts, focusing on signal pathways related to the PGE2-synthesizing enzymes prostaglandin E synthases (PGES), as well as the upstream enzyme cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and PGE2 production. Results Microarray and western blot analyses showed that the mRNA and protein expression of the inflammatory induced microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-1 (mPGES-1) was up-regulated by the cytokine TNF?, accompanied by enhanced expression of COX-2 and increased production of PGE2. In contrast, the expression of the isoenzymes microsomal prostaglandin E synthase-2 (mPGES-2) and cytosolic prostaglandin E synthase (cPGES) was unaffected by TNF? treatment. Using oligonucleotide microarray analysis in a time-course factorial design including time points 1, 3 and 6 h, differentially expressed genes in response to TNF? treatment were identified. Enrichment analysis of microarray data indicated two positively regulated signal transduction pathways: c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and Nuclear Factor-?B (NF-?B). To evaluate their involvement in the regulation of mPGES-1 and COX-2 expression, we used specific inhibitors as well as phosphorylation analysis. Phosphorylation analysis of JNK (T183/Y185) and NF-?B p65 (S536) showed increased phosphorylation in response to TNF? treatment, which was decreased by specific inhibitors of JNK (SP600125) and NF-?B (Bay 11-7082, Ro 106-9920). Inhibitors of JNK and NF-?B also decreased the TNF?-stimulated up-regulation of mPGES-1 and COX-2 as well as PGE2 production. Conclusion In the global gene expression profile, the enrichment analysis of microarray data identified the two signal transduction pathways JNK and NF-?B as positively regulated by the cytokine TNF?. Inhibition of these TNF?-activated signal pathways reduced the expression of mPGES-1 and COX-2 as well as their end product PGE2 in gingival fibroblasts. The involvement of the signal pathways JNK and NF-?B in the regulation of PGE2 induced by TNF? may suggest these two pathways as possible attractive targets in the chronic inflammatory disease periodontitis. PMID:20398340

2010-01-01

295

Adverse Outcome Pathways: From Definition to Application  

EPA Science Inventory

A challenge for both human health and ecological toxicologists is the transparent application of mechanistic (e.g., molecular, biochemical, histological) data to risk assessments. The adverse outcome pathway (AOP) is a conceptual framework designed to meet this need. Specifical...

296

The endocytic pathway mediates cell entry of dsRNA to induce RNAi silencing  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many metazoan cells can take up exogenous double-stranded (ds) RNA and use it to initiate an RNA silencing response, however, the mechanism for this uptake is ill-defined. Here, we identify the pathway for dsRNA uptake in Drosophila melanogaster S2 cells. Biochemical and cell biological analyses, and a genome-wide screen for components of the dsRNA-uptake machinery, indicated that dsRNA is taken

Maria-Carla Saleh; Ronald P. van Rij; Armin Hekele; Amethyst Gillis; Edan Foley; Patrick H. O'Farrell; Raul Andino

2006-01-01

297

An SNP-guided microRNA map of fifteen common human disorders identifies a consensus disease phenocode aiming at principal components of the nuclear import pathway.  

PubMed

Recent large-scale genome-wide association (GWA) studies of SNP variations captured many thousands individual genetic profiles of H. sapiens and facilitated identification of significant genetic traits which are highly likely to influence the pathogenesis of several major human diseases. Here we apply the integrative genomics principles to interrogate relationships between structural features and gene expression patterns of disease-linked SNPs, microRNAs and mRNAs of protein-coding genes in association to phenotypes of 15 major human disorders, namely bipolar disease (BD); rheumatoid arthritis (RA); coronary artery disease (CAD); Crohn's disease (CD); type 1 diabetes (T1D); type 2 diabetes (T2D); hypertension (HT); ankylosing spondylitis (AS); Graves' disease (autoimmune thyroid disease; AITD); multiple sclerosis (MS); breast cancer (BC); prostate cancer (PC); systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE); vitiligo-associated multiple autoimmune disease (VIT); and ulcerative colitis (UC). We selected for sequence homology profiling a set of approximately 250 SNPs which were unequivocally associated with common human disorders based on multiple independent studies of 220,124 individual samples comprising 85,077 disease cases and 129,506 controls. Our analysis reveals a systematic primary sequence homology/complementarity-driven pattern of associations between disease-linked SNPs, microRNAs and protein-coding mRNAs defined here as a human disease phenocode. We utilize this approach to draw SNP-guided microRNA maps of major human diseases and define a consensus disease phenocode for fifteen major human disorders. A consensus disease phenocode comprises 72 SNPs and 18 microRNAs with an apparent propensity to target mRNA sequences derived from a single protein-coding gene, KPNA1. Each of microRNAs in this elite set appears linked to at least three common human diseases and has potential protein-coding mRNA targets among the principal components of the nuclear import pathway. We confirmed the validity of our findings by analyzing independent sets of most significant disease-linked SNPs and demonstrating statistically significant KPNA1-gene expression phenotypes associated with human genotypes of CD, BD, T2D and RA populations. Our analysis supports the idea that variations in DNA sequences associated with multiple human diseases may affect phenotypes in trans via non-protein-coding RNA intermediaries interfering with functions of microRNAs and defines the nuclear import pathway as a potential major target in 15 common human disorders. PMID:18719369

Glinsky, Gennadi V

2008-08-15

298

Transcriptional Profiling of Wnt3a Mutants Identifies Sp Transcription Factors as Essential Effectors of the Wnt/?-catenin Pathway in Neuromesodermal Stem Cells  

PubMed Central

Neuromesodermal (NM) stem cells reside in the primitive streak (PS) of gastrulating vertebrate embryos and generate precursors of the spinal cord and musculoskeletal system. Although Wnt3a/?-catenin signaling is crucial for NM stem cell maintenance and differentiation, few key transcriptional effectors have been identified. Through a concerted transcriptional profiling and genetic approach we have determined that two Zn2+-finger transcription factors, Sp5 and Sp8, are regulated by Wnt3a in the PS, and are essential for neural and musculoskeletal patterning. These results identify Sp5 and Sp8 as pivotal downstream effectors of Wnt3a, and suggest that they are essential for the self-renewal and differentiation of NM stem cells. PMID:24475213

Chalamalasetty, Ravindra B.; Campbell, Kenneth; Yamaguchi, Terry P.

2014-01-01

299

Transcriptional profiling of Wnt3a mutants identifies Sp transcription factors as essential effectors of the Wnt/?-catenin pathway in neuromesodermal stem cells.  

PubMed

Neuromesodermal (NM) stem cells reside in the primitive streak (PS) of gastrulating vertebrate embryos and generate precursors of the spinal cord and musculoskeletal system. Although Wnt3a/?-catenin signaling is crucial for NM stem cell maintenance and differentiation, few key transcriptional effectors have been identified. Through a concerted transcriptional profiling and genetic approach we have determined that two Zn(2+)-finger transcription factors, Sp5 and Sp8, are regulated by Wnt3a in the PS, and are essential for neural and musculoskeletal patterning. These results identify Sp5 and Sp8 as pivotal downstream effectors of Wnt3a, and suggest that they are essential for the self-renewal and differentiation of NM stem cells. PMID:24475213

Dunty, William C; Kennedy, Mark W L; Chalamalasetty, Ravindra B; Campbell, Kenneth; Yamaguchi, Terry P

2014-01-01

300

Biochemical Conversion Pilot Plant  

E-print Network

· Process engineering and economic analysis · Molecular biology · Microscopy analysis · Rheology reduction of biochemical conversion processes. Our capabilities accommodate research from bench-jacketed and steam-injected batch paddle- type mixed reactor limited to

301

BIOCHEMICAL AND GENETIC CHARACTERIZATION OF AN EARLY STEP IN A NOVEL PATHWAY FOR THE BIOSYNTHESIS OF AROMATIC AMINO ACIDS AND P-AMINOBENZOIC ACID IN THE ARCHAEON METHANOCOCCUS MARIPALUDIS  

EPA Science Inventory

Methanococcus maripaludis is a strictly anaerobic, methane-producing archaeon and facultative autotroph capable of biosynthesizing all the amino acids and vitamins required for growth. In this work, the novel 6-deoxy-5-ketofructose-1-phosphate (DKFP) pathway for the biosynthesis ...

302

Novel inositol catabolic pathway in Thermotoga maritima.  

PubMed

myo-inositol (MI) is a key sugar alcohol component of various metabolites, e.g. phosphatidylinositol-based phospholipids that are abundant in animal and plant cells. The seven-step pathway of MI degradation was previously characterized in various soil bacteria including Bacillus subtilis. Through a combination of bioinformatics and experimental techniques we identified a novel variant of the MI catabolic pathway in the marine hyperthermophilic bacterium Thermotoga maritima. By using in vitro biochemical assays with purified recombinant proteins we characterized four inositol catabolic enzymes encoded in the TM0412-TM0416 chromosomal gene cluster. The novel catabolic pathway in T.?maritima starts as the conventional route using the myo-inositol dehydrogenase IolG followed by three novel reactions. The first 2-keto-myo-inositol intermediate is oxidized by another, previously unknown NAD-dependent dehydrogenase TM0412 (named IolM), and a yet unidentified product of this reaction is further hydrolysed by TM0413 (IolN) to form 5-keto-l-gluconate. The fourth step involves epimerization of 5-keto-l-gluconate to d-tagaturonate by TM0416 (IolO). T.?maritima is unable to grow on myo-inositol as a single carbon source. The determined in vitro specificity of the InoEFGK (TM0418-TM0421) transporter to myo-inositol-phosphate suggests that the novel pathway in Thermotoga utilizes a phosphorylated derivative of inositol. PMID:23441918

Rodionova, Irina A; Leyn, Semen A; Burkart, Michael D; Boucher, Nathalie; Noll, Kenneth M; Osterman, Andrei L; Rodionov, Dmitry A

2013-08-01

303

Biological Pathways A pathway to explore diseases mechanism  

E-print Network

1 Biological Pathways ­ A pathway to explore diseases mechanism Ming Guo Abstract Diseases are increasingly identified with genetic modules, such as molecular pathways. Pathway role in understanding diseases mechanism from genetic studies. This paper is a review of the various

304

MicroRNA profiling identifies miR-29 as a regulator of disease-associated pathways in experimental biliary atresia.  

PubMed

Biliary atresia (BA) is a pediatric liver disease of unknown underlying etiology, in which fibroinflammatory destruction of the extrahepatic biliary system leads to obstructive cholestasis. MicroRNAs are a class of short (18-23 nucleotide), noncoding RNA molecules, which act as negative regulators of target mRNA stability and translation. The importance of these molecules in normal and diseased liver has been demonstrated, but their potential role in the pathogenesis of BA has not been addressed. We have profiled changes in liver microRNA levels in an established mouse model of the disease, identified significantly altered transcripts, and defined the spatial expression patterns of selected microRNAs. Two of these, miR-29a/29b1, are upregulated in experimental BA. Using antisense oligonucleotide-mediated inhibition in mice, we have delineated the full set of hepatic genes regulated by miR-29 and identified 2 mRNA targets of potential pathological relevance in experimental BA, Igf1 and Il1RAP. We have used reporter assays to confirm that Igf1 and Il1RAP are direct targets of miR-29. PMID:22167021

Hand, Nicholas J; Horner, Amber M; Master, Zankhana R; Boateng, LaTasha A; LeGuen, Claire; Uvaydova, Marina; Friedman, Joshua R

2012-02-01

305

Comparison of the Gene Expression Profiles of Human Fetal Cortical Astrocytes with Pluripotent Stem Cell Derived Neural Stem Cells Identifies Human Astrocyte Markers and Signaling Pathways and Transcription Factors Active in Human Astrocytes  

PubMed Central

Astrocytes are the most abundant cell type in the central nervous system (CNS) and have a multitude of functions that include maintenance of CNS homeostasis, trophic support of neurons, detoxification, and immune surveillance. It has only recently been appreciated that astrocyte dysfunction is a primary cause of many neurological disorders. Despite their importance in disease very little is known about global gene expression for human astrocytes. We have performed a microarray expression analysis of human fetal astrocytes to identify genes and signaling pathways that are important for astrocyte development and maintenance. Our analysis confirmed that the fetal astrocytes express high levels of the core astrocyte marker GFAP and the transcription factors from the NFI family which have been shown to play important roles in astrocyte development. A group of novel markers were identified that distinguish fetal astrocytes from pluripotent stem cell-derived neural stem cells (NSCs) and NSC-derived neurons. As in murine astrocytes, the Notch signaling pathway appears to be particularly important for cell fate decisions between the astrocyte and neuronal lineages in human astrocytes. These findings unveil the repertoire of genes expressed in human astrocytes and serve as a basis for further studies to better understand astrocyte biology, especially as it relates to disease. PMID:24848099

Malik, Nasir; Wang, Xiantao; Shah, Sonia; Efthymiou, Anastasia G.; Yan, Bin; Heman-Ackah, Sabrina; Zhan, Ming; Rao, Mahendra

2014-01-01

306

Putative cold acclimation pathways in Arabidopsis thaliana identified by a combined analysis of mRNA co-expression patterns, promoter motifs and transcription factors  

PubMed Central

Background With the advent of microarray technology, it has become feasible to identify virtually all genes in an organism that are induced by developmental or environmental changes. However, relying solely on gene expression data may be of limited value if the aim is to infer the underlying genetic networks. Development of computational methods to combine microarray data with other information sources is therefore necessary. Here we describe one such method. Results By means of our method, previously published Arabidopsis microarray data from cold acclimated plants at six different time points, promoter motif sequence data extracted from ~24,000 Arabidopsis promoters and known transcription factor binding sites were combined to construct a putative genetic regulatory interaction network. The inferred network includes both previously characterised and hitherto un-described regulatory interactions between transcription factor (TF) genes and genes that encode other TFs or other proteins. Part of the obtained transcription factor regulatory network is presented here. More detailed information is available in the additional files. Conclusion The rule-based method described here can be used to infer genetic networks by combining data from microarrays, promoter sequences and known promoter binding sites. This method should in principle be applicable to any biological system. We tested the method on the cold acclimation process in Arabidopsis and could identify a more complex putative genetic regulatory network than previously described. However, it should be noted that information on specific binding sites for individual TFs were in most cases not available. Thus, gene targets for the entire TF gene families were predicted. In addition, the networks were built solely by a bioinformatics approach and experimental verifications will be necessary for their final validation. On the other hand, since our method highlights putative novel interactions, more directed experiments could now be performed. PMID:17764576

Chawade, Aakash; Bräutigam, Marcus; Lindlöf, Angelica; Olsson, Olof; Olsson, Björn

2007-01-01

307

Medical treatment for biochemical relapse after radiotherapy.  

PubMed

This article's purpose was to review the medical data justifying the use of a medical treatment for biochemical relapse after external beam radiotherapy. The MEDLINE database was searched to identify relevant information with the following medical subject headings: "prostate cancer", "radiotherapy" and "biochemical relapse". Prognostic factors affecting the overall survival of patients with a biochemical relapse after external beam radiotherapy have been identified: short prostate specific antigen (PSA)-doubling time (< 12 months), high PSA value (> 10 ng/mL) and short interval between treatment and biochemical relapse (< 18 months). If a second local treatment is not feasible, timing to initiate a salvage medical treatment is not defined. Particularly, randomized trials did not demonstrate a significant benefit of an early initiation of androgen deprivation treatment. Some retrospective studies suggest that an early androgen deprivation is justified if poor prognostic factors are found. However, if an androgen deprivation treatment is prescribed, intermittent schedule is non-inferior to a continuous administration and seems to offer a better quality of life. Many non-hormonal treatments have also been evaluated in this setting: only 5-alpha-reductase inhibitors could be proposed in some specific situations. In conclusion, the judicious use of a medical treatment for biochemical relapse is still debated. Given the natural history of this clinical situation, a simple surveillance is justified in many cases. PMID:25179255

Quero, L; Hennequin, C

2014-10-01

308

The entry of [1- 13C]glucose into biochemical pathways reveals a complex compartmentation and metabolite trafficking between glia and neurons: a study by 13C-NMR spectroscopy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Glial–neuronal interactions were investigated in rats injected intraperitoneally with [1-13C]glucose and killed after 15, 30, 45, or 60 min. Brain extracts were analyzed by 13C-NMR spectroscopy and the fractional 13C-enrichment at individual carbon positions was measured for amino acids, lactate, and N-acetyl-aspartate. [1-13C]Glucose was shown to be metabolized by both neurons and glia, with the anaplerotic pathway through pyruvate carboxylase

Tommaso Aureli; Maria Enrica Di Cocco; Menotti Calvani; Filippo Conti

1997-01-01

309

Biochemical Applications in the Analytical Chemistry Lab  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

An HPLC and a UV-visible spectrophotometer are identified as instruments that helps to incorporate more biologically-relevant experiments into the course, in order to increase the students understanding of selected biochemistry topics and enhances their ability to apply an analytical approach to biochemical problems. The experiment teaches…

Strong, Cynthia; Ruttencutter, Jeffrey

2004-01-01

310

Genome-wide Screen Identifies Pathways that Govern GAA/TTC Repeat Fragility and Expansions in Dividing and Nondividing Yeast Cells  

PubMed Central

SUMMARY Triplex structure-forming GAA/TTC repeats pose a dual threat to the eukaryotic genome integrity. Their potential to expand can lead to gene inactivation, the cause of Friedreich’s ataxia disease in humans. In model systems, long GAA/TTC tracts also act as chromosomal fragile sites that can trigger gross chromosomal rearrangements. The mechanisms that regulate the metabolism of GAA/TTC repeats are poorly understood. We have developed an experimental system in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae that allows us to systematically identify genes crucial for maintaining the repeat stability. Two major groups of mutants defective in DNA replication or transcription initiation are found to be prone to fragility and large-scale expansions. We demonstrate that problems imposed by the repeats during DNA replication in actively dividing cells and during transcription initiation in nondividing cells can culminate in genome instability. We propose that similar mechanisms can mediate detrimental metabolism of GAA/TTC tracts in human cells. PMID:22959270

Zhang, Yu; Shishkin, Alexander A.; Nishida, Yuri; Marcinkowski-Desmond, Dana; Saini, Natalie; Volkov, Kirill V.; Mirkin, Sergei M.; Lobachev, Kirill S.

2013-01-01

311

Constructing de novo biosynthetic pathways for chemical synthesis inside living cells†  

PubMed Central

Living organisms have evolved a vast array of catalytic functions that make them ideally suited for the production of medicinally and industrially relevant small-molecule targets. Indeed, native metabolic pathways in microbial hosts have long been exploited and optimized for the scalable production of both fine and commodity chemicals. Our increasing capacity for DNA sequencing and synthesis has revealed the molecular basis for the biosynthesis of a variety of complex and useful metabolites and enables the de novo construction of novel metabolic pathways for the production of new and exotic molecular targets in genetically tractable microbes. However, the development of commercially viable processes for these engineered pathways is currently limited by our ability to quickly identify or engineer enzymes with the correct reaction and substrate selectivity as well as the speed by which metabolic bottlenecks can be determined and corrected. Efforts in understanding the relationship between sequence, structure, and function in the basic biochemical sciences can advance these goals for synthetic biology applications while also serving as an experimental platform to elucidate the in vivo specificity and function of enzymes and to reconstitute complex biochemical traits for study in a living model organism. Furthermore, the continuing discovery of natural mechanisms for the regulation of metabolic pathways has revealed new principles for the design of high-flux pathways with minimized metabolic burden and has inspired the development of new tools and approaches to engineer synthetic pathways in microbial hosts for chemical production. PMID:21591680

Weeks, Amy M.; Chang, Michelle C. Y.

2011-01-01

312

Cross-talk between Wnt/?-catenin and Hippo signaling pathways: a brief review  

PubMed Central

Department of Life Science, The University of Seoul, Seoul 130-743, Korea Balanced cell growth is crucial in animal development as well as tissue homeostasis. Concerted cross-regulation of multiple signaling pathways is essential for those purposes, and the dysregulation of signaling may lead to a variety of human diseases such as cancer. The time-honored Wnt/?-catenin and recently identified Hippo signaling pathways are evolutionarily conserved in both Drosophila and mammals, and are generally considered as having positive and negative roles in cell proliferation, respectively. While most mainstream regulators of the Wnt/?-catenin signaling pathway have been fairly well identified, the regulators of the Hippo pathway need to be more defined. The Hippo pathway controls organ size primarily by regulating cell contact inhibition. Recently, several crossregulations occurring between the Wnt/?-catenin and Hippo signaling pathways were determined through biochemical and genetic approaches. In the present mini-review, we mainly discuss the signal transduction mechanism of the Hippo signaling pathway, along with cross-talk between the regulators of the Wnt/?-catenin and Hippo signaling pathways. [BMB Reports 2014; 47(10): 540-545] PMID:25154721

Kim, Minseong; Jho, Eek-hoon

2014-01-01

313

Short Hairpin RNA Library-Based Functional Screening Identified Ribosomal Protein L31 That Modulates Prostate Cancer Cell Growth via p53 Pathway  

PubMed Central

Androgen receptor is a primary transcription factor involved in the proliferation of prostate cancer cells. Thus, hormone therapy using antiandrogens, such as bicalutamide, is a first-line treatment for the disease. Although hormone therapy initially reduces the tumor burden, many patients eventually relapse, developing tumors with acquired endocrine resistance. Elucidation of the molecular mechanisms underlying endocrine resistance is therefore a fundamental issue for the understanding and development of alternative therapeutics for advanced prostate cancer. In the present study, we performed short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated functional screening to identify genes involved in bicalutamide-mediated effects on LNCaP prostate cancer cells. Among such candidate genes selected by screening using volcano plot analysis, ribosomal protein L31 (RPL31) was found to be essential for cell proliferation and cell-cycle progression in bicalutamide-resistant LNCaP (BicR) cells, based on small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown experiments. Of note, RPL31 mRNA is more abundantly expressed in BicR cells than in parental LNCaP cells, and clinical data from ONCOMINE and The Cancer Genome Altas showed that RPL31 is overexpressed in prostate carcinomas compared with benign prostate tissues. Intriguingly, protein levels of the tumor suppressor p53 and its targets, p21 and MDM2, were increased in LNCaP and BicR cells treated with RPL31 siRNA. We observed decreased degradation of p53 protein after RPL31 knockdown. Moreover, the suppression of growth and cell cycle upon RPL31 knockdown was partially recovered with p53 siRNA treatment. These results suggest that RPL31 is involved in bicalutamide-resistant growth of prostate cancer cells. The shRNA-mediated functional screen in this study provides new insight into the molecular mechanisms and therapeutic targets of advanced prostate cancer. PMID:25285958

Maruyama, Yojiro; Miyazaki, Toshiaki; Ikeda, Kazuhiro; Okumura, Toshiyuki; Sato, Wataru; Horie-Inoue, Kuniko; Okamoto, Koji; Takeda, Satoru; Inoue, Satoshi

2014-01-01

314

Methods to identify molecular expression of mTOR pathway: a rationale approach to stratify patients affected by clear cell renal cell carcinoma for more likely response to mTOR inhibitors  

PubMed Central

Since target therapy with mTOR inhibitors plays an important role in the current management of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (RCC), there is an increasing demand for predictive biomarkers, which may help to select patients that are most likely to benefit from personalized treatment. When dealing with formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) cancer tissue specimens, several techniques may be used to identify potential molecular markers, yielding different outcome in terms of accuracy. We sought to investigate and compare the capability of three main techniques to detect molecules performing an active function in mTOR pathway in RCC. Immunohistochemistry (IHC), Western blot (WB) and immunofluorescence (IF) analyses were performed on FFPE RCC tissue specimens from 16 patients by using the following mTOR pathway-related: mTOR (Ser235/236), phospho-mTOR (p-mTOR/Ser2448), phospho-p70S6k (p-p70S6k/Thr389), both monoclonal and polyclonal, phospho-S6Rb (p-S6Rb) and phospho-4EBP1 (p-4EBP1/Thr37/46). No single molecule was simultaneously revealed by all three techniques. Only p-p70S6k was detected by two methods (IHC and IF) using a monoclonal antibody. The other molecules were detected exclusively by one technique, as follows: p-mTOR and polyclonal p-p70S6K by IHC, p70S6K, p-S6Rb and p-4EBP1 by WB, and, finally, mTOR by IF. We found significant differences in detecting mTOR pathway-related active biomarkers by using three common techniques such as IHC, WB and IF on RCC samples. Such results have important implications in terms of predictive biomarker testing, and need to be related to clinical end-points such as responsiveness to targeted drugs by prospective studies. PMID:25520878

Fiorini, Claudia; Massari, Francesco; Pedron, Serena; Sanavio, Sara; Ciccarese, Chiara; Porcaro, Antonio Benito; Artibani, Walter; Bertoldo, Francesco; Zampini, Claudia; Sava, Teodoro; Ficial, Miriam; Caliò, Anna; Chilosi, Marco; D’Amuri, Alessandro; Sanguedolce, Francesca; Tortora, Giampaolo; Scarpa, Aldo; Delahunt, Brett; Porta, Camillo; Martignoni, Guido; Brunelli, Matteo

2014-01-01

315

Genomic encyclopedia of sugar utilization pathways in the Shewanella genus  

PubMed Central

Background Carbohydrates are a primary source of carbon and energy for many bacteria. Accurate projection of known carbohydrate catabolic pathways across diverse bacteria with complete genomes constitutes a substantial challenge due to frequent variations in components of these pathways. To address a practically and fundamentally important challenge of reconstruction of carbohydrate utilization machinery in any microorganism directly from its genomic sequence, we combined a subsystems-based comparative genomic approach with experimental validation of selected bioinformatic predictions by a combination of biochemical, genetic and physiological experiments. Results We applied this integrated approach to systematically map carbohydrate utilization pathways in 19 genomes from the Shewanella genus. The obtained genomic encyclopedia of sugar utilization includes ~170 protein families (mostly metabolic enzymes, transporters and transcriptional regulators) spanning 17 distinct pathways with a mosaic distribution across Shewanella species providing insights into their ecophysiology and adaptive evolution. Phenotypic assays revealed a remarkable consistency between predicted and observed phenotype, an ability to utilize an individual sugar as a sole source of carbon and energy, over the entire matrix of tested strains and sugars. Comparison of the reconstructed catabolic pathways with E. coli identified multiple differences that are manifested at various levels, from the presence or absence of certain sugar catabolic pathways, nonorthologous gene replacements and alternative biochemical routes to a different organization of transcription regulatory networks. Conclusions The reconstructed sugar catabolome in Shewanella spp includes 62 novel isofunctional families of enzymes, transporters, and regulators. In addition to improving our knowledge of genomics and functional organization of carbohydrate utilization in Shewanella, this study led to a substantial expansion of our current version of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Carbohydrate Utilization. A systematic and iterative application of this approach to multiple taxonomic groups of bacteria will further enhance it, creating a knowledge base adequate for the efficient analysis of any newly sequenced genome as well as of the emerging metagenomic data. PMID:20836887

2010-01-01

316

Nanoparticles as biochemical sensors  

PubMed Central

There is little doubt that nanoparticles offer real and new opportunities in many fields, such as biomedicine and materials science. Such particles are small enough to enter almost all areas of the body, including cells and organelles, potentially leading to new approaches in nanomedicine. Sensors for small molecules of biochemical interest are of critical importance. This review is an attempt to trace the use of nanomaterials in biochemical sensor design. The possibility of using nanoparticles functionalized with antibodies as markers for proteins will be elucidated. Moreover, capabilities and applications for nanoparticles based on gold, silver, magnetic, and semiconductor materials (quantum dots), used in optical (absorbance, luminescence, surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy, surface plasmon resonance), electrochemical, and mass-sensitive sensors will be highlighted. The unique ability of nanosensors to improve the analysis of biochemical fluids is discussed either through considering the use of nanoparticles for in vitro molecular diagnosis, or in the biological/biochemical analysis for in vivo interaction with the human body. PMID:24198472

El-Ansary, Afaf; Faddah, Layla M

2010-01-01

317

Tara Watkins Biochem 218  

E-print Network

1 Tara Watkins Biochem 218 Final Project June 4, 2004 Full-Atom Refinement Methods: The Key to High the discovery of new proteins is certainly exciting, it is difficult to put this new knowledge to use without proteins here on earth. It is thus necessary to develop refinement methods employing full atom

318

Biochemical upgrading of oils  

DOEpatents

A process for biochemical conversion of heavy crude oils is provided. The process includes contacting heavy crude oils with adapted biocatalysts. The resulting upgraded oil shows, a relative increase in saturated hydrocarbons, emulsions and oxygenates and a decrease in compounds containing organic sulfur, organic nitrogen and trace metals. Adapted microorganisms which have been modified under challenged growth processes are also disclosed. 121 figs.

Premuzic, E.T.; Lin, M.S.

1999-01-12

319

Biochemical upgrading of oils  

DOEpatents

A process for biochemical conversion of heavy crude oils is provided. The process includes contacting heavy crude oils with adapted biocatalysts. The resulting upgraded oil shows, a relative increase in saturated hydrocarbons, emulsions and oxygenates and a decrease in compounds containing in organic sulfur, organic nitrogen and trace metals. Adapted microorganisms which have been modified under challenged growth processes are also disclosed.

Premuzic, Eugene T. (East Moriches, NY); Lin, Mow S. (Rocky Point, NY)

1999-01-12

320

Nonlinear biochemical signal processing via noise propagation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Single-cell studies often show significant phenotypic variability due to the stochastic nature of intra-cellular biochemical reactions. When the numbers of molecules, e.g., transcription factors and regulatory enzymes, are in low abundance, fluctuations in biochemical activities become significant and such "noise" can propagate through regulatory cascades in terms of biochemical reaction networks. Here we develop an intuitive, yet fully quantitative method for analyzing how noise affects cellular phenotypes based on identifying a system's nonlinearities and noise propagations. We observe that such noise can simultaneously enhance sensitivities in one behavioral region while reducing sensitivities in another. Employing this novel phenomenon we designed three biochemical signal processing modules: (a) A gene regulatory network that acts as a concentration detector with both enhanced amplitude and sensitivity. (b) A non-cooperative positive feedback system, with a graded dose-response in the deterministic case, that serves as a bistable switch due to noise-induced ultra-sensitivity. (c) A noise-induced linear amplifier for gene regulation that requires no feedback. The methods developed in the present work allow one to understand and engineer nonlinear biochemical signal processors based on fluctuation-induced phenotypes.

Kim, Kyung Hyuk; Qian, Hong; Sauro, Herbert M.

2013-10-01

321

Identifying positive selection candidate loci for high-altitude adaptation in Andean populations.  

PubMed

High-altitude environments (>2,500 m) provide scientists with a natural laboratory to study the physiological and genetic effects of low ambient oxygen tension on human populations. One approach to understanding how life at high altitude has affected human metabolism is to survey genome-wide datasets for signatures of natural selection. In this work, we report on a study to identify selection-nominated candidate genes involved in adaptation to hypoxia in one highland group, Andeans from the South American Altiplano. We analysed dense microarray genotype data using four test statistics that detect departures from neutrality. Using a candidate gene, single nucleotide polymorphism-based approach, we identified genes exhibiting preliminary evidence of recent genetic adaptation in this population. These included genes that are part of the hypoxia-inducible transcription factor ( HIF ) pathway, a biochemical pathway involved in oxygen homeostasis, as well as three other genomic regions previously not known to be associated with high-altitude phenotypes. In addition to identifying selection-nominated candidate genes, we also tested whether the HIF pathway shows evidence of natural selection. Our results indicate that the genes of this biochemical pathway as a group show no evidence of having evolved in response to hypoxia in Andeans. Results from particular HIF -targeted genes, however, suggest that genes in this pathway could play a role in Andean adaptation to high altitude, even if the pathway as a whole does not show higher relative rates of evolution. These data suggest a genetic role in high-altitude adaptation and provide a basis for genotype/phenotype association studies that are necessary to confirm the role of putative natural selection candidate genes and gene regions in adaptation to altitude. PMID:20038496

Bigham, Abigail W; Mao, Xianyun; Mei, Rui; Brutsaert, Tom; Wilson, Megan J; Julian, Colleen Glyde; Parra, Esteban J; Akey, Joshua M; Moore, Lorna G; Shriver, Mark D

2009-12-01

322

Biochem. J. (1969) 118, 369 Printed in Great Britain  

E-print Network

Biochem. J. (1969) 118, 369 Printed in Great Britain The Rate-Determining Step in Pepsin further the pathway of pepsin-catalysed reactions, three types of experiments were performed: (a to observing the rate- determining breakdown of a common intermediate; (b) the interaction of pepsin

323

Biochemical and Structural Characterization of the Arabidopsis Bifunctional Enzyme Dethiobiotin  

E-print Network

Biochemical and Structural Characterization of the Arabidopsis Bifunctional Enzyme Dethiobiotin by a single enzyme encoded by a bifunctional gene originating from the fusion of prokaryotic monofunctional of a bifunctional enzyme in biotin synthesis pathway in eukaryotes and the relative implication of each

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

324

Computing Atom Mappings for Biochemical Reactions without Subgraph Isomorphism  

Microsoft Academic Search

The ability to trace the fate of individual atoms through the metabolic pathways is needed in many applications of systems biology and drug discovery. However, this information is not immediately available from the most common metabolome studies and needs to be separately acquired. Automatic discovery of correspondence of atoms in biochemical reactions is called the atom mapping problem. We suggest

Markus Heinonen; Sampsa Lappalainen; Taneli Mielikainen; Juho Rousu

325

Biochemical analysis of TssK, a core component of the bacterial Type VI secretion system, reveals distinct oligomeric states of TssK and identifies a TssK–TssFG subcomplex  

PubMed Central

Gram-negative bacteria use the Type VI secretion system (T6SS) to inject toxic proteins into rival bacteria or eukaryotic cells. However, the mechanism of the T6SS is incompletely understood. In the present study, we investigated a conserved component of the T6SS, TssK, using the antibacterial T6SS of Serratia marcescens as a model system. TssK was confirmed to be essential for effector secretion by the T6SS. The native protein, although not an integral membrane protein, appeared to localize to the inner membrane, consistent with its presence within a membrane-anchored assembly. Recombinant TssK purified from S. marcescens was found to exist in several stable oligomeric forms, namely trimer, hexamer and higher-order species. Native-level purification of TssK identified TssF and TssG as interacting proteins. TssF and TssG, conserved T6SS components of unknown function, were required for T6SS activity, but not for correct localization of TssK. A complex containing TssK, TssF and TssG was subsequently purified in vitro, confirming that these three proteins form a new subcomplex within the T6SS. Our findings provide new insight into the T6SS assembly, allowing us to propose a model whereby TssK recruits TssFG into the membrane-associated T6SS complex and different oligomeric states of TssK may contribute to the dynamic mechanism of the system. PMID:24779861

English, Grant; Byron, Olwyn; Cianfanelli, Francesca R.; Prescott, Alan R.; Coulthurst, Sarah J.

2014-01-01

326

Biochemical analysis of TssK, a core component of the bacterial Type VI secretion system, reveals distinct oligomeric states of TssK and identifies a TssK-TssFG subcomplex.  

PubMed

Gram-negative bacteria use the Type VI secretion system (T6SS) to inject toxic proteins into rival bacteria or eukaryotic cells. However, the mechanism of the T6SS is incompletely understood. In the present study, we investigated a conserved component of the T6SS, TssK, using the antibacterial T6SS of Serratia marcescens as a model system. TssK was confirmed to be essential for effector secretion by the T6SS. The native protein, although not an integral membrane protein, appeared to localize to the inner membrane, consistent with its presence within a membrane-anchored assembly. Recombinant TssK purified from S. marcescens was found to exist in several stable oligomeric forms, namely trimer, hexamer and higher-order species. Native-level purification of TssK identified TssF and TssG as interacting proteins. TssF and TssG, conserved T6SS components of unknown function, were required for T6SS activity, but not for correct localization of TssK. A complex containing TssK, TssF and TssG was subsequently purified in vitro, confirming that these three proteins form a new subcomplex within the T6SS. Our findings provide new insight into the T6SS assembly, allowing us to propose a model whereby TssK recruits TssFG into the membrane-associated T6SS complex and different oligomeric states of TssK may contribute to the dynamic mechanism of the system. PMID:24779861

English, Grant; Byron, Olwyn; Cianfanelli, Francesca R; Prescott, Alan R; Coulthurst, Sarah J

2014-07-15

327

Induction of ?Np63 by the Newly Identified Keratinocyte-Specific Transforming Growth Factor ? Signaling Pathway with Smad2 and I?B Kinase ? in Squamous Cell Carcinoma12  

PubMed Central

The expression of p63 (TP63/p51) occurs in the basal cells of stratified epithelia and is strongly enhanced at the early stages of squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) of the head and neck, skin, cervix, and others. We analyzed a promoter/enhancer region (2k?N) that drives the predominant expression of ?Np63 for sensitivity to Smad signaling pathways. Reporter assays in HepG2 cells showed a moderate activation of 2k?N by Smad2 and I?B kinase ? (IKK?), partners of the newly identified keratinocyte-specific transforming growth factor ? (TGF-?) signaling, but not by other Smad molecules. In A431 cells, 2k?N was activated by Smad2 and IKK?, for which a Smad binding element (SMD2) at -204 was essential. Binding of Smad2 to the chromosomal SMD2 site was detectable. The association of Smad2 with IKK? was evident in the nucleus of A431, accounting for the enhancement of ?Np63 expression by TGF-?. Moreover, both ?Np63 and IKK? were necessary to maintain the noninvasive phenotype of this cell line. FaDu, an invasive, Smad4-deficient SCC, also allowed 2k?N transactivation by transfected Smad2 in the presence of endogenous IKK?. Reflecting the lack of chromosomal SMD2-Smad2 association and the absence of nuclear IKK?, however, endogenous ?Np63 was not controlled by TGF-? or IKK? in FaDu. SCC tissue arrays showed nuclear accumulation of IKK? and p63 intensification in well-differentiated noninvasive lesions. This study indicates that p63 is a target gene of the proposed keratinocyte-specific TGF-? signal pathway for suppression of the malignant conversion of SCC. PMID:21170261

Fukunishi, Nahoko; Katoh, Iyoko; Tomimori, Yoshiya; Tsukinoki, Keiichi; Hata, Ryu-Ichiro; Nakao, Atsuhito; Ikawa, Yoji; Kurata, Shun-ichi

2010-01-01

328

The genetic and biochemical basis of FANCD2 monoubiquitination.  

PubMed

Fanconi anaemia (FA) is a cancer predisposition syndrome characterized by cellular sensitivity to DNA interstrand crosslinkers. The molecular defect in FA is an impaired DNA repair pathway. The critical event in activating this pathway is monoubiquitination of FANCD2. In vivo, a multisubunit FA core complex catalyzes this step, but its mechanism is unclear. Here, we report purification of a native avian FA core complex and biochemical reconstitution of FANCD2 monoubiquitination. This demonstrates that the catalytic FANCL E3 ligase subunit must be embedded within the complex for maximal activity and site specificity. We genetically and biochemically define a minimal subcomplex comprising just three proteins (FANCB, FANCL, and FAAP100) that functions as the monoubiquitination module. Residual FANCD2 monoubiquitination activity is retained in cells defective for other FA core complex subunits. This work describes the in vitro reconstitution and characterization of this multisubunit monoubiquitin E3 ligase, providing key insight into the conserved FA DNA repair pathway. PMID:24905007

Rajendra, Eeson; Oestergaard, Vibe H; Langevin, Frédéric; Wang, Meng; Dornan, Gillian L; Patel, Ketan J; Passmore, Lori A

2014-06-01

329

Electronic modulation of biochemical signal generation.  

PubMed

Microelectronic devices that contain biological components are typically used to interrogate biology rather than control biological function. Patterned assemblies of proteins and cells have, however, been used for in vitro metabolic engineering, where coordinated biochemical pathways allow cell metabolism to be characterized and potentially controlled on a chip. Such devices form part of technologies that attempt to recreate animal and human physiological functions on a chip and could be used to revolutionize drug development. These ambitious goals will, however, require new biofabrication methodologies that help connect microelectronics and biological systems and yield new approaches to device assembly and communication. Here, we report the electrically mediated assembly, interrogation and control of a multi-domain fusion protein that produces a bacterial signalling molecule. The biological system can be electrically tuned using a natural redox molecule, and its biochemical response is shown to provide the signalling cues to drive bacterial population behaviour. We show that the biochemical output of the system correlates with the electrical input charge, which suggests that electrical inputs could be used to control complex on-chip biological processes. PMID:25064394

Gordonov, Tanya; Kim, Eunkyoung; Cheng, Yi; Ben-Yoav, Hadar; Ghodssi, Reza; Rubloff, Gary; Yin, Jun-Jie; Payne, Gregory F; Bentley, William E

2014-08-01

330

Electronic modulation of biochemical signal generation  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Microelectronic devices that contain biological components are typically used to interrogate biology rather than control biological function. Patterned assemblies of proteins and cells have, however, been used for in vitro metabolic engineering, where coordinated biochemical pathways allow cell metabolism to be characterized and potentially controlled on a chip. Such devices form part of technologies that attempt to recreate animal and human physiological functions on a chip and could be used to revolutionize drug development. These ambitious goals will, however, require new biofabrication methodologies that help connect microelectronics and biological systems and yield new approaches to device assembly and communication. Here, we report the electrically mediated assembly, interrogation and control of a multi-domain fusion protein that produces a bacterial signalling molecule. The biological system can be electrically tuned using a natural redox molecule, and its biochemical response is shown to provide the signalling cues to drive bacterial population behaviour. We show that the biochemical output of the system correlates with the electrical input charge, which suggests that electrical inputs could be used to control complex on-chip biological processes.

Gordonov, Tanya; Kim, Eunkyoung; Cheng, Yi; Ben-Yoav, Hadar; Ghodssi, Reza; Rubloff, Gary; Yin, Jun-Jie; Payne, Gregory F.; Bentley, William E.

2014-08-01

331

A novel cost function to estimate parameters of oscillatory biochemical systems  

PubMed Central

Oscillatory pathways are among the most important classes of biochemical systems with examples ranging from circadian rhythms and cell cycle maintenance. Mathematical modeling of these highly interconnected biochemical networks is needed to meet numerous objectives such as investigating, predicting and controlling the dynamics of these systems. Identifying the kinetic rate parameters is essential for fully modeling these and other biological processes. These kinetic parameters, however, are not usually available from measurements and most of them have to be estimated by parameter fitting techniques. One of the issues with estimating kinetic parameters in oscillatory systems is the irregularities in the least square (LS) cost function surface used to estimate these parameters, which is caused by the periodicity of the measurements. These irregularities result in numerous local minima, which limit the performance of even some of the most robust global optimization algorithms. We proposed a parameter estimation framework to address these issues that integrates temporal information with periodic information embedded in the measurements used to estimate these parameters. This periodic information is used to build a proposed cost function with better surface properties leading to fewer local minima and better performance of global optimization algorithms. We verified for three oscillatory biochemical systems that our proposed cost function results in an increased ability to estimate accurate kinetic parameters as compared to the traditional LS cost function. We combine this cost function with an improved noise removal approach that leverages periodic characteristics embedded in the measurements to effectively reduce noise. The results provide strong evidence on the efficacy of this noise removal approach over the previous commonly used wavelet hard-thresholding noise removal methods. This proposed optimization framework results in more accurate kinetic parameters that will eventually lead to biochemical models that are more precise, predictable, and controllable. PMID:22587221

2012-01-01

332

Rescue of an in vitro neuron phenotype identified in Niemann-Pick disease, type C1 induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neurons by modulating the WNT pathway and calcium signaling.  

PubMed

Niemann-Pick disease, type C1 (NPC1) is a familial disorder that has devastating consequences on postnatal development with multisystem effects, including neurodegeneration. There is no Food and Drug Administration-approved treatment option for NPC1; however, several potentially therapeutic compounds have been identified in assays using yeast, rodent models, and NPC1 human fibroblasts. Although these discoveries were made in fibroblasts from NPC1 subjects and were in some instances validated in animal models of the disease, testing these drugs on a cell type more relevant for NPC1 neurological disease would greatly facilitate both study of the disease and identification of more relevant therapeutic compounds. Toward this goal, we have generated an induced pluripotent stem cell line from a subject homozygous for the most frequent NPC1 mutation (p.I1061T) and subsequently created a stable line of neural stem cells (NSCs). These NSCs were then used to create neurons as an appropriate disease model. NPC1 neurons display a premature cell death phenotype, and gene expression analysis of these cells suggests dysfunction of important signaling pathways, including calcium and WNT. The clear readout from these cells makes them ideal candidates for high-throughput screening and will be a valuable tool to better understand the development of NPC1 in neural cells, as well as to develop better therapeutic options for NPC1. PMID:25637190

Efthymiou, Anastasia G; Steiner, Joe; Pavan, William J; Wincovitch, Stephen; Larson, Denise M; Porter, Forbes D; Rao, Mahendra S; Malik, Nasir

2015-03-01

333

mzGroupAnalyzer--predicting pathways and novel chemical structures from untargeted high-throughput metabolomics data.  

PubMed

The metabolome is a highly dynamic entity and the final readout of the genotype x environment x phenotype (GxExP) relationship of an organism. Monitoring metabolite dynamics over time thus theoretically encrypts the whole range of possible chemical and biochemical transformations of small molecules involved in metabolism. The bottleneck is, however, the sheer number of unidentified structures in these samples. This represents the next challenge for metabolomics technology and is comparable with genome sequencing 30 years ago. At the same time it is impossible to handle the amount of data involved in a metabolomics analysis manually. Algorithms are therefore imperative to allow for automated m/z feature extraction and subsequent structure or pathway assignment. Here we provide an automated pathway inference strategy comprising measurements of metabolome time series using LC- MS with high resolution and high mass accuracy. An algorithm was developed, called mzGroupAnalyzer, to automatically explore the metabolome for the detection of metabolite transformations caused by biochemical or chemical modifications. Pathways are extracted directly from the data and putative novel structures can be identified. The detected m/z features can be mapped on a van Krevelen diagram according to their H/C and O/C ratios for pattern recognition and to visualize oxidative processes and biochemical transformations. This method was applied to Arabidopsis thaliana treated simultaneously with cold and high light. Due to a protective antioxidant response the plants turn from green to purple color via the accumulation of flavonoid structures. The detection of potential biochemical pathways resulted in 15 putatively new compounds involved in the flavonoid-pathway. These compounds were further validated by product ion spectra from the same data. The mzGroupAnalyzer is implemented in the graphical user interface (GUI) of the metabolomics toolbox COVAIN (Sun & Weckwerth, 2012, Metabolomics 8: 81-93). The strategy can be extended to any biological system. PMID:24846183

Doerfler, Hannes; Sun, Xiaoliang; Wang, Lei; Engelmeier, Doris; Lyon, David; Weckwerth, Wolfram

2014-01-01

334

mzGroupAnalyzer-Predicting Pathways and Novel Chemical Structures from Untargeted High-Throughput Metabolomics Data  

PubMed Central

The metabolome is a highly dynamic entity and the final readout of the genotype x environment x phenotype (GxExP) relationship of an organism. Monitoring metabolite dynamics over time thus theoretically encrypts the whole range of possible chemical and biochemical transformations of small molecules involved in metabolism. The bottleneck is, however, the sheer number of unidentified structures in these samples. This represents the next challenge for metabolomics technology and is comparable with genome sequencing 30 years ago. At the same time it is impossible to handle the amount of data involved in a metabolomics analysis manually. Algorithms are therefore imperative to allow for automated m/z feature extraction and subsequent structure or pathway assignment. Here we provide an automated pathway inference strategy comprising measurements of metabolome time series using LC- MS with high resolution and high mass accuracy. An algorithm was developed, called mzGroupAnalyzer, to automatically explore the metabolome for the detection of metabolite transformations caused by biochemical or chemical modifications. Pathways are extracted directly from the data and putative novel structures can be identified. The detected m/z features can be mapped on a van Krevelen diagram according to their H/C and O/C ratios for pattern recognition and to visualize oxidative processes and biochemical transformations. This method was applied to Arabidopsis thaliana treated simultaneously with cold and high light. Due to a protective antioxidant response the plants turn from green to purple color via the accumulation of flavonoid structures. The detection of potential biochemical pathways resulted in 15 putatively new compounds involved in the flavonoid-pathway. These compounds were further validated by product ion spectra from the same data. The mzGroupAnalyzer is implemented in the graphical user interface (GUI) of the metabolomics toolbox COVAIN (Sun & Weckwerth, 2012, Metabolomics 8: 81–93). The strategy can be extended to any biological system. PMID:24846183

Wang, Lei; Engelmeier, Doris; Lyon, David; Weckwerth, Wolfram

2014-01-01

335

Identification of possible pathogenic pathways in Behçet's disease using genome-wide association study data from two different populations.  

PubMed

Behçet's disease (BD) is a multi-system inflammatory disorder of unknown etiology. Two recent genome-wide association studies (GWASs) of BD confirmed a strong association with the MHC class I region and identified two non-HLA common genetic variations. In complex diseases, multiple factors may target different sets of genes in the same pathway and thus may cause the same disease phenotype. We therefore hypothesized that identification of disease-associated pathways is critical to elucidate mechanisms underlying BD, and those pathways may be conserved within and across populations. To identify the disease-associated pathways, we developed a novel methodology that combines nominally significant evidence of genetic association with current knowledge of biochemical pathways, protein-protein interaction networks, and functional information of selected SNPs. Using this methodology, we searched for the disease-related pathways in two BD GWASs in Turkish and Japanese case-control groups. We found that 6 of the top 10 identified pathways in both populations were overlapping, even though there were few significantly conserved SNPs/genes within and between populations. The probability of random occurrence of such an event was 2.24E-39. These shared pathways were focal adhesion, MAPK signaling, TGF-? signaling, ECM-receptor interaction, complement and coagulation cascades, and proteasome pathways. Even though each individual has a unique combination of factors involved in their disease development, the targeted pathways are expected to be mostly the same. Hence, the identification of shared pathways between the Turkish and the Japanese patients using GWAS data may help further elucidate the inflammatory mechanisms in BD pathogenesis. PMID:25227143

Bakir-Gungor, Burcu; Remmers, Elaine F; Meguro, Akira; Mizuki, Nobuhisa; Kastner, Daniel L; Gul, Ahmet; Sezerman, Osman U

2015-05-01

336

Biochemical characterization of the phosphatase domain of the tumor suppressor PH domain leucine-rich repeat protein phosphatase.  

PubMed

PH domain leucine-rich repeat protein phosphatase (PHLPP) directly dephosphorylates and inactivates Akt and protein kinase C and is therefore a prime target for pharmacological intervention of two key signaling pathways, the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and diacylglycerol signaling pathways. Here we report on the first biochemical characterization of the phosphatase domain of a PHLPP family member. The human PHLPP1 and PHLPP2 phosphatase domains were expressed and purified from bacteria or insect cells and their activities compared to that of full-length proteins immunoprecipitated from mammalian cells. Biochemical analyses reveal that the PHLPP phosphatase domain effectively dephosphorylates synthetic and peptidic substrates, that its activity is modulated by metals and lipophilic compounds, and that it has relatively high thermal stability. Mutational analysis of PHLPP2 reveals an unusual active site architecture compared to the canonical architecture of PP2C phosphatases and identifies key acidic residues (Asp 806, Glu 989, and Asp 1024) and bulky aromatic residues (Phe 783 and Phe 808) whose mutation impairs activity. Consistent with a unique active site architecture, we identify inhibitors that discriminate between PHLPP2 and PP2C?. These data establish PHLPP as a member of the PP2C family of phosphatases with a unique active site architecture. PMID:24892992

Sierecki, Emma; Newton, Alexandra C

2014-06-24

337

A biochemical approach to wound healing through the use of modalities  

Microsoft Academic Search

Wound healing is a complex pathway that is energy dependent. Nonhealing wounds frequently require the use of physical modalities to achieve healing. There is much debate over which treatment modality to use, with varying clinical results in the literature. This review paper describes a common biochemical pathway that helps the clinician understand, at a molecular level, how the transference of

William J. Ennis; Claudia Lee; Patricio Meneses

2007-01-01

338

Biochemical Networks and Epistasis Shape the Arabidopsis thaliana Metabolome[W  

PubMed Central

Genomic approaches have accelerated the study of the quantitative genetics that underlie phenotypic variation. These approaches associate genome-scale analyses such as transcript profiling with targeted phenotypes such as measurements of specific metabolites. Additionally, these approaches can help identify uncharacterized networks or pathways. However, little is known about the genomic architecture underlying data sets such as metabolomics or the potential of such data sets to reveal networks. To describe the genetic regulation of variation in the Arabidopsis thaliana metabolome and test our ability to integrate unknown metabolites into biochemical networks, we conducted a replicated metabolomic analysis on 210 lines of an Arabidopsis population that was previously used for targeted metabolite quantitative trait locus (QTL) and global expression QTL analysis. Metabolic traits were less heritable than the average transcript trait, suggesting that there are differences in the power to detect QTLs between transcript and metabolite traits. We used statistical analysis to identify a large number of metabolite QTLs with moderate phenotypic effects and found frequent epistatic interactions controlling a majority of the variation. The distribution of metabolite QTLs across the genome included 11 QTL clusters; 8 of these clusters were associated in an epistatic network that regulated plant central metabolism. We also generated two de novo biochemical network models from the available data, one of unknown function and the other associated with central plant metabolism. PMID:18515501

Rowe, Heather C.; Hansen, Bjarne Gram; Halkier, Barbara Ann; Kliebenstein, Daniel J.

2008-01-01

339

Genomic analysis of thermophilic Bacillus coagulans strains: efficient producers for platform bio-chemicals  

PubMed Central

Microbial strains with high substrate efficiency and excellent environmental tolerance are urgently needed for the production of platform bio-chemicals. Bacillus coagulans has these merits; however, little genetic information is available about this species. Here, we determined the genome sequences of five B. coagulans strains, and used a comparative genomic approach to reconstruct the central carbon metabolism of this species to explain their fermentation features. A novel xylose isomerase in the xylose utilization pathway was identified in these strains. Based on a genome-wide positive selection scan, the selection pressure on amino acid metabolism may have played a significant role in the thermal adaptation. We also researched the immune systems of B. coagulans strains, which provide them with acquired resistance to phages and mobile genetic elements. Our genomic analysis provides comprehensive insights into the genetic characteristics of B. coagulans and paves the way for improving and extending the uses of this species. PMID:24473268

Su, Fei; Xu, Ping

2014-01-01

340

Biochemical Reversal of Aging  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

We cite our progress on biochemical reversal of aging. However, it may be circa 2 years before we have necessary substances at low cost. Meanwhile, without them, a number of measures can be adopted providing marked improvement for the problems of aging in modern societies. For example, enzymes are needed to excrete toxins that accelerate aging; Hg is the ultimate toxin that disables all enzymes (including those needed to excrete Hg itself). Low Hg level in the urine, due to loss of excretory ability, causes the diagnosis of Hg toxicity to almost always be missed. Hg sources must be removed from the body! Another example is excess sugar; hyperglycemia decreases intracellular ascorbic acid (AA) by competitively inhibiting the insulin- mediated active transport of AA into cells. Thus, immunity is impaired by low leucocyte AA. AA is needed for new proteins in aging tissues. Humans must supplement AA; their need same as in AA-synthesizing mammals.

Ely, John T. A.

2006-03-01

341

Thermodynamics of biochemical networks and duality theorems  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

One interesting yet difficult computational issue has recently been posed in biophysics in regard to the implementation of thermodynamic constraints to complex networks. Biochemical networks of enzymes inside cells are among the most efficient, robust, differentiated, and flexible free-energy transducers in nature. How is the second law of thermodynamics encoded for these complex networks? In this article it is demonstrated that for chemical reaction networks in the steady state the exclusion (presence) of closed reaction cycles makes possible (impossible) the definition of a chemical potential vector. Interestingly, this statement is encoded in one of the key results in combinatorial optimization, i.e., the Gordan theorem of the alternatives. From a computational viewpoint, the theorem reveals that calculating a reaction's free energy and identifying infeasible loops in flux states are dual problems whose solutions are mutually exclusive, and this opens the way for efficient and scalable methods to perform the energy balance analysis of large-scale biochemical networks.

De Martino, Daniele

2013-05-01

342

Biochemical Applications of Nonlinear Optical  

E-print Network

Time-Resolved X-Ray Diffraction and Four- Wave Mixing Spectroscopy Valerica Raicu, Marius SchmidtBiochemical Applications of Nonlinear Optical Spectroscopy Edited by Vladislav V. Yakovlev CRC Biochemical applications of nonlinear optical spectroscopy / editor, Vladislav Yakovlev. p. ; cm. -- (Optical

Schmidt, Marius

343

Plant B vitamin pathways and their compartmentation: a guide for the perplexed.  

PubMed

The B vitamins and the cofactors derived from them are essential for life. B vitamin synthesis in plants is consequently as crucial to plants themselves as it is to humans and animals, whose B vitamin nutrition depends largely on plants. The synthesis and salvage pathways for the seven plant B vitamins are now broadly known, but certain enzymes and many transporters have yet to be identified, and the subcellular locations of various reactions are unclear. Although very substantial, what is not known about plant B vitamin pathways is regrettably difficult to discern from the literature or from biochemical pathway databases. Nor do databases accurately represent all that is known about B vitamin pathways-above all their compartmentation-because the facts are scattered throughout the literature, and thus hard to piece together. These problems (i) deter discoveries because newcomers to B vitamins cannot see which mysteries still need solving; and (ii) impede metabolic reconstruction and modelling of B vitamin pathways because genes for reactions or transport steps are missing. This review therefore takes a fresh approach to capture current knowledge of B vitamin pathways in plants. The synthesis pathways, key salvage routes, and their subcellular compartmentation are surveyed in depth, and encoded in the SEED database (http://pubseed.theseed.org/seedviewer.cgi?page=PlantGateway) for Arabidopsis and maize. The review itself and the encoded pathways specifically identify enigmatic or missing reactions, enzymes, and transporters. The SEED-encoded B vitamin pathway collection is a publicly available, expertly curated, one-stop resource for metabolic reconstruction and modeling. PMID:22915736

Gerdes, Svetlana; Lerma-Ortiz, Claudia; Frelin, Océane; Seaver, Samuel M D; Henry, Christopher S; de Crécy-Lagard, Valérie; Hanson, Andrew D

2012-09-01

344

[Therapy for actinomycosis in the lacrimal pathway].  

PubMed

Canaliculitis is a rare disease of the lacrimal pathway, especially of the canaliculi. It is often not identified, therefore misdiagnosed and inadequately treated. It accounts 2 % of all lacrimal diseases. False diagnoses are usually conjunctivitis, blepharitis, dacryocystitis, hordeolum and chalazion. Besides viruses and fungi a variety of bacteria can cause a canaliculitis. Actinomyces is the most common pathogenic agent of canaliculitis. Its generic name was first described by Harz in 1877. In 1854 von Graefe as well as Kipp and others in 1883 identified actinomyces as the agent for intracanalicular dacryoliths. Although for years actinomyces has wrongly been attributed to ray fungi because of its filamentary and branched nature it actually belongs to facultative anaerobic, non-motile, non-spore-forming, non-acid-fast, pleomorphic bacilli. In the context of canaliculitis caused by actinomyces sulphur granules, also called plagues or actinomyces granules, can often be found in the affected canaliculi. Actinomyces can be identified by light microscopy, culture, biochemical and molecular biological procedures. The most appropriate treatment is to incise the lacrimal punctum, to perform a canaliculotomy and canalicular curettage and if necessary to perform a silicone intubation of the lacrimal system for prophylaxis of stenosis. A postoperative local therapy with a broad-spectrum antibiotic should be initiated for 1 - 2 weeks. PMID:20645230

Vujancevi?, S; Meyer-Rüsenberg, H-W

2010-07-01

345

Protein Design for Pathway Engineering  

PubMed Central

Design and construction of biochemical pathways has increased the complexity of biosynthetically-produced compounds when compared to single enzyme biocatalysis. However, the coordination of multiple enzymes can introduce a complicated set of obstacles to overcome in order to achieve a high titer and yield of the desired compound. Metabolic engineering has made great strides in developing tools to optimize the flux through a target pathway, but the inherent characteristics of a particular enzyme within the pathway can still limit the productivity. Thus, judicious protein design is critical for metabolic and pathway engineering. This review will describe various strategies and examples of applying protein design to pathway engineering to optimize the flux through the pathway. The proteins can be engineered for altered substrate specificity/selectivity, increased catalytic activity, reduced mass transfer limitations through specific protein localization, and reduced substrate/product inhibition. Protein engineering can also be expanded to design biosensors to enable high through-put screening and to customize cell signaling networks. These strategies have successfully engineered pathways for significantly increased productivity of the desired product or in the production of novel compounds. PMID:23558037

Eriksen, Dawn T.; Lian, Jiazhang; Zhao, Huimin

2013-01-01

346

Analysis of common bean expressed sequence tags identifies sulfur metabolic pathways active in seed and sulfur-rich proteins highly expressed in the absence of phaseolin and major lectins  

PubMed Central

Background A deficiency in phaseolin and phytohemagglutinin is associated with a near doubling of sulfur amino acid content in genetically related lines of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris), particularly cysteine, elevated by 70%, and methionine, elevated by 10%. This mostly takes place at the expense of an abundant non-protein amino acid, S-methyl-cysteine. The deficiency in phaseolin and phytohemagglutinin is mainly compensated by increased levels of the 11S globulin legumin and residual lectins. Legumin, albumin-2, defensin and albumin-1 were previously identified as contributing to the increased sulfur amino acid content in the mutant line, on the basis of similarity to proteins from other legumes. Results Profiling of free amino acid in developing seeds of the BAT93 reference genotype revealed a biphasic accumulation of gamma-glutamyl-S-methyl-cysteine, the main soluble form of S-methyl-cysteine, with a lag phase occurring during storage protein accumulation. A collection of 30,147 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) was generated from four developmental stages, corresponding to distinct phases of gamma-glutamyl-S-methyl-cysteine accumulation, and covering the transitions to reserve accumulation and dessication. Analysis of gene ontology categories indicated the occurrence of multiple sulfur metabolic pathways, including all enzymatic activities responsible for sulfate assimilation, de novo cysteine and methionine biosynthesis. Integration of genomic and proteomic data enabled the identification and isolation of cDNAs coding for legumin, albumin-2, defensin D1 and albumin-1A and -B induced in the absence of phaseolin and phytohemagglutinin. Their deduced amino acid sequences have a higher content of cysteine than methionine, providing an explanation for the preferential increase of cysteine in the mutant line. Conclusion The EST collection provides a foundation to further investigate sulfur metabolism and the differential accumulation of sulfur amino acids in seed of common bean. Identification of sulfur-rich proteins whose levels are elevated in seed lacking phaseolin and phytohemagglutinin and sulfur metabolic genes may assist the improvement of protein quality. PMID:21615926

2011-01-01

347

Molecular genetics of nucleotide sugar interconversion pathways in plants  

Microsoft Academic Search

Nucleotide sugar interconversion pathways represent a series of enzymatic reactions by which plants synthesize activated monosaccharides for the incorporation into cell wall material. Although biochemical aspects of these metabolic pathways are reasonably well understood, the identification and characterization of genes encoding nucleotide sugar interconversion enzymes is still in its infancy. Arabidopsis mutants defective in the activation and interconversion of specific

Wolf-Dieter Reiter; Gary F. Vanzin

2001-01-01

348

Biochemical Engineering and Industrial Biotechnology.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes the biochemical engineering and industrial biotechnology programs of the University of Waterloo (Ontario, Canada). Provides descriptions of graduate courses, along with a sample of current research activities. Includes a discussion of the programs' mechanisms for technology transfer. (TW)

Moo-Young, Murray

1986-01-01

349

A Course in... Biochemical Engineering.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes a chemical engineering course for senior undergraduates and first year graduate students in biochemical engineering. Discusses five experiments used in the course: aseptic techniques, dissolved oxygen measurement, oxygen uptake by yeast, continuous sterilization, and cultivation of microorganisms. (MVL)

Ng, Terry K-L.; And Others

1988-01-01

350

Pathway Analysis  

Cancer.gov

Surprising failures of new cancer treatments have made it clear that we do not know enough about how molecules in RAS signaling pathways interact with each other. For example, in the context of mutant KRAS, inhibitors of BRAF increase signaling through ERK. RAS Initiative scientists at the FNLCR are expanding our knowledge of signaling through RAS pathways using in silico and wet lab methods.

351

Mifepristone induced progesterone withdrawal reveals novel regulatory pathways in human endometrium.  

PubMed

In women, a single dose of the antiprogestin mifepristone (RU486) in the secretory phase rapidly renders the endometrium unreceptive and is followed by endometrial breakdown and menstruation within 72 h. This model provides a system to identify progesterone-regulated genes, which may be involved in endometrial receptivity and the induction of menstruation. We used cDNA microarrays to monitor the response of the endometriuim over 24 h following administration of mifepristone in the mid-secretory phase. We identified 571 transcripts whose expression was significantly altered, representing 131 biochemical pathways. These include new progesterone regulated members of the Wnt, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP), prostaglandin (PG) and chemokine regulatory pathways. Transcripts involved in thyroid hormone metabolism and signalling such as type II iodothyronine deiodinase and thyroid receptors were also found to be highly regulated by progesterone antagonism in the endometrium. Transcripts required for thyroid hormone synthesis such as thyroid peroxidase (TPO) and thyroglobulin (TG) were also expressed, indicating that the endometrium may be a site of thyroxin production. These results add to the existing knowledge of the role of the Wnt, chemokine, MMP and PG pathways in receptivity and early menstrual events. They provide in vivo evidence supporting direct or indirect regulation of many new transcripts by progesterone. We have also identified for the first time the very early transcriptional changes in vivo in response to progesterone withdrawal. This greatly increases our understanding of the pathways leading to menstruation and may provide new approaches to diagnose and treat menstrual disorders. PMID:17584828

Catalano, R D; Critchley, H O; Heikinheimo, O; Baird, D T; Hapangama, D; Sherwin, J R A; Charnock-Jones, D S; Smith, S K; Sharkey, A M

2007-09-01

352

Biochemical changes of ischemia.  

PubMed

Normothermic ischemic arrest by aortic cross-clamping, a widely used clinical technique, is associated with metabolic changes in the myocardium that are incompletely understood. The effects of aortic cross-clamping on glycolytic pathways as well as associated morphological changes are discussed. Emphasis is placed on the conservation of high-energy phosphate moieties during the period of cross-clamping as well as during reperfusion. A marked reduction in total high-energy phosphates (62%) and glycogen (63%) and an increase in lactate production (243%) denote a shift to anaerobic metabolism during the period of arrest. Despite reperfusion, total high-energy nucleotides remained depressed. The data suggest that persistent abnormal myocardial carbohydrate metabolism and low levels of high-energy nucleotides prevent recovery of contractility following normothermic ischemic arrest and reperfusion. PMID:803171

Levitsky, S; Feinberg, H

1975-07-01

353

Malaria Parasite Metabolic Pathways  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This tremendously comprehensive Web site aims to facilitate "post-genomic" research on the biochemical processes of _Plasmodium_, the species of protists that cause malaria. The Web site, sponsored by the Computation Authority of The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, offers a compilation of _Plasmodium_ metabolic pathway maps culled from other, more general biochemistry sites. Each map is linked to others so that users may trace the fate or origin of each metabolite. The maps include links to PubMed abstracts and related Web pages for more detailed information. Through an ask-the-expert feature several experts on the biochemistry of malaria parasites are also available to tackle questions from "active investigators" making use of the Web site.

Ginsburg, Hagai.

354

Ammonia-oxidizing archaea use the most energy-efficient aerobic pathway for CO2 fixation  

PubMed Central

Archaea of the phylum Thaumarchaeota are among the most abundant prokaryotes on Earth and are widely distributed in marine, terrestrial, and geothermal environments. All studied Thaumarchaeota couple the oxidation of ammonia at extremely low concentrations with carbon fixation. As the predominant nitrifiers in the ocean and in various soils, ammonia-oxidizing archaea contribute significantly to the global nitrogen and carbon cycles. Here we provide biochemical evidence that thaumarchaeal ammonia oxidizers assimilate inorganic carbon via a modified version of the autotrophic hydroxypropionate/hydroxybutyrate cycle of Crenarchaeota that is far more energy efficient than any other aerobic autotrophic pathway. The identified genes of this cycle were found in the genomes of all sequenced representatives of the phylum Thaumarchaeota, indicating the environmental significance of this efficient CO2-fixation pathway. Comparative phylogenetic analysis of proteins of this pathway suggests that the hydroxypropionate/hydroxybutyrate cycle emerged independently in Crenarchaeota and Thaumarchaeota, thus supporting the hypothesis of an early evolutionary separation of both archaeal phyla. We conclude that high efficiency of anabolism exemplified by this autotrophic cycle perfectly suits the lifestyle of ammonia-oxidizing archaea, which thrive at a constantly low energy supply, thus offering a biochemical explanation for their ecological success in nutrient-limited environments. PMID:24843170

Könneke, Martin; Schubert, Daniel M.; Brown, Philip C.; Hügler, Michael; Standfest, Sonja; Schwander, Thomas; Schada von Borzyskowski, Lennart; Erb, Tobias J.; Stahl, David A.; Berg, Ivan A.

2014-01-01

355

Ammonia-oxidizing archaea use the most energy-efficient aerobic pathway for CO2 fixation.  

PubMed

Archaea of the phylum Thaumarchaeota are among the most abundant prokaryotes on Earth and are widely distributed in marine, terrestrial, and geothermal environments. All studied Thaumarchaeota couple the oxidation of ammonia at extremely low concentrations with carbon fixation. As the predominant nitrifiers in the ocean and in various soils, ammonia-oxidizing archaea contribute significantly to the global nitrogen and carbon cycles. Here we provide biochemical evidence that thaumarchaeal ammonia oxidizers assimilate inorganic carbon via a modified version of the autotrophic hydroxypropionate/hydroxybutyrate cycle of Crenarchaeota that is far more energy efficient than any other aerobic autotrophic pathway. The identified genes of this cycle were found in the genomes of all sequenced representatives of the phylum Thaumarchaeota, indicating the environmental significance of this efficient CO2-fixation pathway. Comparative phylogenetic analysis of proteins of this pathway suggests that the hydroxypropionate/hydroxybutyrate cycle emerged independently in Crenarchaeota and Thaumarchaeota, thus supporting the hypothesis of an early evolutionary separation of both archaeal phyla. We conclude that high efficiency of anabolism exemplified by this autotrophic cycle perfectly suits the lifestyle of ammonia-oxidizing archaea, which thrive at a constantly low energy supply, thus offering a biochemical explanation for their ecological success in nutrient-limited environments. PMID:24843170

Könneke, Martin; Schubert, Daniel M; Brown, Philip C; Hügler, Michael; Standfest, Sonja; Schwander, Thomas; Schada von Borzyskowski, Lennart; Erb, Tobias J; Stahl, David A; Berg, Ivan A

2014-06-01

356

Biochemical analysis of secretory trafficking in mammalian cells.  

PubMed

Protein trafficking within the secretory pathway of mammalian cells is amenable to analysis by biochemical methods. This can be achieved by monitoring posttranslational modifications that occur naturally within the secretory pathway, or by measuring the delivery of cargo to the cell surface or extracellular medium. These approaches can be combined with additional manipulations such as specific temperature blocks that permit analysis of distinct trafficking steps. Biochemical analysis is advantageous in that it permits both a sensitive and quantitative measure of trafficking along the pathway. The methods discussed in this chapter permit the analysis of trafficking of both endogenous cargo proteins and ectopically expressed model cargos, which can be followed using either Western blotting or metabolic pulse-chase approaches. These methods are relatively straightforward and suitable for use in most modern cell biology laboratories. In addition to the well-established methods that we describe here in detail, we also refer to the development of more recent tailored approaches that add further to the arsenal of tools that can be used to assess trafficking in the secretory pathway. PMID:24295302

Roboti, Peristera; Witkos, Tomasz M; Lowe, Martin

2013-01-01

357

Benfotiamine blocks three major pathways of hyperglycemic damage and prevents experimental diabetic retinopathy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Three of the major biochemical pathways implicated in the pathogenesis of hyperglycemia induced vascular damage (the hexosamine pathway, the advanced glycation end product (AGE) formation pathway and the diacylglycerol (DAG)–protein kinase C (PKC) pathway) are activated by increased availability of the glycolytic metabolites glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate and fructose-6-phosphate. We have discovered that the lipid-soluble thiamine derivative benfotiamine can inhibit these three pathways,

Hans-Peter Hammes; Xueliang Du; Diane Edelstein; Tetsuya Taguchi; Takeshi Matsumura; Qida Ju; Jihong Lin; Angelika Bierhaus; Peter Nawroth; Dieter Hannak; Michael Neumaier; Regine Bergfeld; Ida Giardino; Michael Brownlee

2003-01-01

358

Biochemical characterisation and antioxidant activity of mycelium of Ganoderma lucidum from Central Italy  

Microsoft Academic Search

Ganoderma lucidum species is currently popular and used in the formulation of nutraceuticals and as functional foods, but a broad biochemical characterisation of its mycelium has not yet been reported. In this study new Italian and Chinese isolates, both identified as G. lucidum, were molecularly and biochemically characterised and compared. The mycelia differ both in terms of the enzymatic activities

Roberta Saltarelli; Paola Ceccaroli; Mirco Iotti; Alessandra Zambonelli; Michele Buffalini; Lucia Casadei; Luciana Vallorani; Vilberto Stocchi

2009-01-01

359

ICT Pathways  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This page, from the Mid-Pacific Information and Communications Technology Center, provides a useful diagram for ICT educators that highlights employment pathways for students pursuing this career track. Users may click on the diagram to view a larger version.

360

Determination of antifungal, biochemical and physiological features of Trichoderma koningiopsis  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Trichoderma koningiopsis is a species that has been recently identified and has not yet been published, but is in press. Due to the absence of reported data on this species, antifungal, biochemical and physiological features were analyzed for the Trichoderma koningiopsis strain isolated from root se...

361

Microarray-Assisted Pathway Analysis Identifies Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Signaling as a Mediator of Resistance to the Green Tea Polyphenol Epigallocatechin 3Gallate in Her2\\/neu-Overexpressing Breast Cancer Cells  

Microsoft Academic Search

Overexpression of the epidermal growth factor receptor family member Her-2\\/neu in breast cancer leads to autophos- phorylation of the receptor and induction of multiple downstream signaling pathways, including the Akt kinase to nuclear factor-nB (NF-nB) cascade that is associated with poor prognosis. Previously, we showed that the green tea polyphenol epigallocatechin 3-gallate (EGCG) inhibits growth of NF639 Her-2\\/neu-driven breast cancer

Shangqin Guo; Jun Lu; Aravind Subramanian; Gail E. Sonenshein

2006-01-01

362

The Tor Pathway Regulates Gene Expression by Linking Nutrient Sensing to Histone Acetylation  

PubMed Central

The Tor pathway mediates cell growth in response to nutrient availability, in part by inducing ribosomal protein (RP) gene expression via an unknown mechanism. Expression of RP genes coincides with recruitment of the Esa1 histone acetylase to RP gene promoters. We show that inhibition of Tor with rapamycin releases Esa1 from RP gene promoters and leads to histone H4 deacetylation without affecting promoter occupancy by Rap1 and Abf1. Genetic and biochemical evidence identifies Rpd3 as the major histone deacetylase responsible for reversing histone H4 acetylation at RP gene promoters in response to Tor inhibition by rapamycin or nutrient limitation. Our results illustrate that the Tor pathway links nutrient sensing with histone acetylation to control RP gene expression and cell growth. PMID:12509460

Rohde, John R.; Cardenas, Maria E.

2003-01-01

363

CONSTRICTOR: Constraint Modification Provides Insight into Design of Biochemical Networks  

PubMed Central

Advances in computational methods that allow for exploration of the combinatorial mutation space are needed to realize the potential of synthetic biology based strain engineering efforts. Here, we present Constrictor, a computational framework that uses flux balance analysis (FBA) to analyze inhibitory effects of genetic mutations on the performance of biochemical networks. Constrictor identifies engineering interventions by classifying the reactions in the metabolic model depending on the extent to which their flux must be decreased to achieve the overproduction target. The optimal inhibition of various reaction pathways is determined by restricting the flux through targeted reactions below the steady state levels of a baseline strain. Constrictor generates unique in silico strains, each representing an “expression state”, or a combination of gene expression levels required to achieve the overproduction target. The Constrictor framework is demonstrated by studying overproduction of ethylene in Escherichia coli network models iAF1260 and iJO1366 through the addition of the heterologous ethylene-forming enzyme from Pseudomonas syringae. Targeting individual reactions as well as combinations of reactions reveals in silico mutants that are predicted to have as high as 25% greater theoretical ethylene yields than the baseline strain during simulated exponential growth. Altering the degree of restriction reveals a large distribution of ethylene yields, while analysis of the expression states that return lower yields provides insight into system bottlenecks. Finally, we demonstrate the ability of Constrictor to scan networks and provide targets for a range of possible products. Constrictor is an adaptable technique that can be used to generate and analyze disparate populations of in silico mutants, select gene expression levels and provide non-intuitive strategies for metabolic engineering. PMID:25422896

Erickson, Keesha E.; Gill, Ryan T.; Chatterjee, Anushree

2014-01-01

364

The semi-phosphorylative Entner–Doudoroff pathway in hyperthermophilic archaea: a re-evaluation  

PubMed Central

Biochemical studies have suggested that, in hyperthermophilic archaea, the metabolic conversion of glucose via the ED (Entner–Doudoroff) pathway generally proceeds via a non-phosphorylative variant. A key enzyme of the non-phosphorylating ED pathway of Sulfolobus solfataricus, KDG (2-keto-3-deoxygluconate) aldolase, has been cloned and characterized previously. In the present study, a comparative genomics analysis is described that reveals conserved ED gene clusters in both Thermoproteus tenax and S. solfataricus. The corresponding ED proteins from both archaea have been expressed in Escherichia coli and their specificity has been identified, revealing: (i) a novel type of gluconate dehydratase (gad gene), (ii) a bifunctional 2-keto-3-deoxy-(6-phospho)-gluconate aldolase (kdgA gene), (iii) a 2-keto-3-deoxygluconate kinase (kdgK gene) and, in S. solfataricus, (iv) a GAPN (non-phosphorylating glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase; gapN gene). Extensive in vivo and in vitro enzymatic analyses indicate the operation of both the semi-phosphorylative and the non-phosphorylative ED pathway in T. tenax and S. solfataricus. The existence of this branched ED pathway is yet another example of the versatility and flexibility of the central carbohydrate metabolic pathways in the archaeal domain. PMID:15869466

2005-01-01

365

Identifying Erosion  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this environmental science activity (page 3 of the PDF), leaners will identify and explain the causes of erosion. They will observe the effects of erosion on the surrounding area and further explore examples of erosion online. An extension activity allows learners to make a hands-on model of soil erosion. Though this was created as a pre-visit activity for a workshop about water flow and erosion, it makes a great stand-alone activity as well!

COSI

2009-01-01

366

Differential Expression Analysis for Pathways  

PubMed Central

Life science technologies generate a deluge of data that hold the keys to unlocking the secrets of important biological functions and disease mechanisms. We present DEAP, Differential Expression Analysis for Pathways, which capitalizes on information about biological pathways to identify important regulatory patterns from differential expression data. DEAP makes significant improvements over existing approaches by including information about pathway structure and discovering the most differentially expressed portion of the pathway. On simulated data, DEAP significantly outperformed traditional methods: with high differential expression, DEAP increased power by two orders of magnitude; with very low differential expression, DEAP doubled the power. DEAP performance was illustrated on two different gene and protein expression studies. DEAP discovered fourteen important pathways related to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and interferon treatment that existing approaches omitted. On the interferon study, DEAP guided focus towards a four protein path within the 26 protein Notch signalling pathway. PMID:23516350

Haynes, Winston A.; Higdon, Roger; Stanberry, Larissa; Collins, Dwayne; Kolker, Eugene

2013-01-01

367

Interaction analysis identifies semenogelin I fragments as new binding partners of PIP in human seminal plasma.  

PubMed

Identification of protein-protein interactions is vital for complete understanding of a biological process and for functional characterization of a protein in related biochemical pathways. In this study, we performed analysis of prolactin inducible protein (PIP) interactions in human seminal plasma. PIP and its interacting partners were co-immunoprecipitated, analyzed by SDS-PAGE and identified by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. Three major interacting partners were identified, viz. human serum albumin, zinc-?-2 glycoprotein and semenogelin I fragments. This is the first report of interaction between PIP and semenogelin I fragments in human seminal plasma or elsewhere with a suggestive role in reproductive physiology which might be helpful for spermatozoa to acquire their motility. PMID:23085372

Tomar, Anil Kumar; Sooch, Balwinder Singh; Raj, Isha; Singh, Sarman; Yadav, Savita

2013-01-01

368

Dragon Plant Biology Explorer. A text-mining tool for integrating associations between genetic and biochemical entities with genome annotation and biochemical terms lists.  

PubMed

We introduce a tool for text mining, Dragon Plant Biology Explorer (DPBE) that integrates information on Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) genes with their functions, based on gene ontologies and biochemical entity vocabularies, and presents the associations as interactive networks. The associations are based on (1) user-provided PubMed abstracts; (2) a list of Arabidopsis genes compiled by The Arabidopsis Information Resource; (3) user-defined combinations of four vocabulary lists based on the ones developed by the general, plant, and Arabidopsis GO consortia; and (4) three lists developed here based on metabolic pathways, enzymes, and metabolites derived from AraCyc, BRENDA, and other metabolism databases. We demonstrate how various combinations can be applied to fields of (1) gene function and gene interaction analyses, (2) plant development, (3) biochemistry and metabolism, and (4) pharmacology of bioactive compounds. Furthermore, we show the suitability of DPBE for systems approaches by integration with "omics" platform outputs. Using a list of abiotic stress-related genes identified by microarray experiments, we show how this tool can be used to rapidly build an information base on the previously reported relationships. This tool complements the existing biological resources for systems biology by identifying potentially novel associations using text analysis between cellular entities based on genome annotation terms. Thus, it allows researchers to efficiently summarize existing information for a group of genes or pathways, so as to make better informed choices for designing validation experiments. Last, DPBE can be helpful for beginning researchers and graduate students to summarize vast information in an unfamiliar area. DPBE is freely available for academic and nonprofit users at http://research.i2r.a-star.edu.sg/DRAGON/ME2/. PMID:16172098

Bajic, Vladimir B; Veronika, Merlin; Veladandi, Pardha Sarathi; Meka, Archana; Heng, Mok-Wei; Rajaraman, Kanagasabai; Pan, Hong; Swarup, Sanjay

2005-08-01

369

Pattern selection by dynamical biochemical signals.  

PubMed

The development of multicellular organisms involves cells to decide their fate upon the action of biochemical signals. This decision is often spatiotemporally coordinated such that a spatial pattern arises. The dynamics that drive pattern formation usually involve genetic nonlinear interactions and positive feedback loops. These complex dynamics may enable multiple stable patterns for the same conditions. Under these circumstances, pattern formation in a developing tissue involves a selection process: why is a certain pattern formed and not another stable one? Herein we computationally address this issue in the context of the Notch signaling pathway. We characterize a dynamical mechanism for developmental selection of a specific pattern through spatiotemporal changes of the control parameters of the dynamics, in contrast to commonly studied situations in which initial conditions and noise determine which pattern is selected among multiple stable ones. This mechanism can be understood as a path along the parameter space driven by a sequence of biochemical signals. We characterize the selection process for three different scen