Sample records for identify chemical compounds

  1. USE OF BIOASSAY-DIRECTED CHEMICAL ANALYSIS FOR IDENTIFYING MUTAGENIC COMPOUNDS IN URBAN AIR AND COMBUSTION EMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Bioassay-directed chemical analysis fractionation has been used for 30 years to identify mutagenic classes of compounds in complex mixtures. Most studies have used the Salmonella (Ames) mutagenicity assay, and we have recently applied this methodology to two standard reference sa...

  2. Phenotype-driven chemical screening in zebrafish for compounds that inhibit collective cell migration identifies multiple pathways potentially involved in metastatic invasion

    PubMed Central

    Gallardo, Viviana E.; Varshney, Gaurav K.; Lee, Minnkyong; Bupp, Sujata; Xu, Lisha; Shinn, Paul; Crawford, Nigel P.; Inglese, James; Burgess, Shawn M.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT In the last decade, high-throughput chemical screening has become the dominant approach for discovering novel compounds with therapeutic properties. Automated screening using in vitro or cultured cell assays have yielded thousands of candidate drugs for a variety of biological targets, but these approaches have not resulted in an increase in drug discovery despite major increases in expenditures. In contrast, phenotype-driven screens have shown a much stronger success rate, which is why we developed an in vivo assay using transgenic zebrafish with a GFP-marked migrating posterior lateral line primordium (PLLp) to identify compounds that influence collective cell migration. We then conducted a high-throughput screen using a compound library of 2160 annotated bioactive synthetic compounds and 800 natural products to identify molecules that block normal PLLp migration. We identified 165 compounds that interfere with primordium migration without overt toxicity in vivo. Selected compounds were confirmed in their migration-blocking activity by using additional assays for cell migration. We then proved the screen to be successful in identifying anti-metastatic compounds active in vivo by performing orthotopic tumor implantation assays in mice. We demonstrated that the Src inhibitor SU6656, identified in our screen, can be used to suppress the metastatic capacity of a highly aggressive mammary tumor cell line. Finally, we used CRISPR/Cas9-targeted mutagenesis in zebrafish to genetically validate predicted targets of compounds. This approach demonstrates that the migrating PLLp in zebrafish can be used for large-scale, high-throughput screening for compounds that inhibit collective cell migration and, potentially, anti-metastatic compounds. PMID:25810455

  3. Phenotype-driven chemical screening in zebrafish for compounds that inhibit collective cell migration identifies multiple pathways potentially involved in metastatic invasion.

    PubMed

    Gallardo, Viviana E; Varshney, Gaurav K; Lee, Minnkyong; Bupp, Sujata; Xu, Lisha; Shinn, Paul; Crawford, Nigel P; Inglese, James; Burgess, Shawn M

    2015-06-01

    In the last decade, high-throughput chemical screening has become the dominant approach for discovering novel compounds with therapeutic properties. Automated screening using in vitro or cultured cell assays have yielded thousands of candidate drugs for a variety of biological targets, but these approaches have not resulted in an increase in drug discovery despite major increases in expenditures. In contrast, phenotype-driven screens have shown a much stronger success rate, which is why we developed an in vivo assay using transgenic zebrafish with a GFP-marked migrating posterior lateral line primordium (PLLp) to identify compounds that influence collective cell migration. We then conducted a high-throughput screen using a compound library of 2160 annotated bioactive synthetic compounds and 800 natural products to identify molecules that block normal PLLp migration. We identified 165 compounds that interfere with primordium migration without overt toxicity in vivo. Selected compounds were confirmed in their migration-blocking activity by using additional assays for cell migration. We then proved the screen to be successful in identifying anti-metastatic compounds active in vivo by performing orthotopic tumor implantation assays in mice. We demonstrated that the Src inhibitor SU6656, identified in our screen, can be used to suppress the metastatic capacity of a highly aggressive mammary tumor cell line. Finally, we used CRISPR/Cas9-targeted mutagenesis in zebrafish to genetically validate predicted targets of compounds. This approach demonstrates that the migrating PLLp in zebrafish can be used for large-scale, high-throughput screening for compounds that inhibit collective cell migration and, potentially, anti-metastatic compounds. PMID:25810455

  4. Devices for collecting chemical compounds

    DOEpatents

    Scott, Jill R; Groenewold, Gary S

    2013-12-24

    A device for sampling chemical compounds from fixed surfaces and related methods are disclosed. The device may include a vacuum source, a chamber and a sorbent material. The device may utilize vacuum extraction to volatilize the chemical compounds from a fixed surface so that they may be sorbed by the sorbent material. The sorbent material may then be analyzed using conventional thermal desorption/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (TD/GC/MS) instrumentation to determine presence of the chemical compounds. The methods may include detecting release and presence of one or more chemical compounds and determining the efficacy of decontamination. The device may be useful in collection and analysis of a variety of chemical compounds, such as residual chemical warfare agents, chemical attribution signatures and toxic industrial chemicals.

  5. International chemical identifier for chemical reactions

    E-print Network

    Grethe, Guenter; Goodman, Jonathan; Allen, Chad

    2013-03-22

    ORAL PRESENTATION Open Access International chemical identifier for chemical reactions Guenter Grethe1*, Jonathan Goodman2, Chad Allen2 From 8th German Conference on Chemoinformatics: 26 CIC-Workshop Goslar, Germany. 11-13 November 2012 An open... -access software for creating a unique, text-based identifier for reactions (RInChI) was developed by the Goodman group at the University of Cambridge, based on the IUPAC International Chemical Identifier (InChI) stan- dard. RInChIs describe the substances...

  6. Complex Compound Chemical Heat Pumps

    E-print Network

    Rockenfeller, U.; Langeliers, J.; Horn, G.

    Complex-compound solid-vapor fluid pairs can be used in heat of reaction heat pumps for temperature amplifier (TA) as well as heat amplifier (HA) cycle configurations. This report describes the conceptual hardware design for complex compound...

  7. FREQUENCY OF ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IDENTIFIED IN WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study was initiated for the purpose of compiling a list of all organic compounds that have been found in water. This report contains the names of compounds found, their location or a reference to a published study, the type of water in which they are found, and the date of s...

  8. Identifying developmental vascular disruptor compounds using a predictive signature and alternative toxicity models

    EPA Science Inventory

    Identifying Developmental Vascular Disruptor Compounds Using a Predictive Signature and Alternative Toxicity Models Presenting Author: Tamara Tal Affiliation: U.S. EPA/ORD/ISTD, RTP, NC, USA Chemically induced vascular toxicity during embryonic development can result in a wide...

  9. IDENTIFYING CHEMICAL COMPOUNDS IN THE ENVIRONMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The quality of drinking and recreational water is currently ascertained using indicator bacteria. The tests to analyze for these bacteria require a considerable length of time to complete, and do not discriminate between human and animal fecal material sources. To shorten the t...

  10. USING AN ACCURATE MASS, TRIPLE QUADRUPOLE MASS SPECTROMETER AND AN ION CORRELATION PROGRAM TO IDENTIFY COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Most compounds are not found in mass spectral libraries and must be identified by other means. Often, compound identities can be deduced from the compositions of the ions in their mass spectra and review of the chemical literature. Confirmation is provided by mass spectra and r...

  11. Microfluidic in vivo screen identifies compounds enhancing neuronal

    E-print Network

    Haggarty, Stephen

    Compound screening is a powerful tool to identify new therapeutic targets, drug leads, and elucidate the fundamental mechanisms of biological processes. We report here the results of the first in vivo small-molecule screens ...

  12. Lifetime of a Chemically Bound Helium Compound

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chaban, Galina M.; Lundell, Jan; Gerber, R. Benny; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The rare-gas atoms are chemically inert, to an extent unique among all elements. This is due to the stable electronic structure of the atoms. Stable molecules with chemically bound rare-gas atoms are, however, known. A first such compound, XePtF6, W2S prepared in 1962 and since then a range of molecules containing radon, xenon and krypton have been obtained. Most recently, a first stable chemically bound compound of argon was prepared, leaving neon and helium as the only elements for which stable chemically bound molecules are not yet known. Electronic structure calculations predict that a metastable species HHeF exists, but significance of the result depends on the unknown lifetime. Here we report quantum dynamics calculations of the lifetime of HHeF, using accurate interactions computed from electronic structure theory. HHeF is shown to disintegrate by tunneling through energy barriers into He + HF and H + He + F the first channel greatly dominating. The lifetime of HHeF is more than 120 picoseconds, that of DHeF is 14 nanoseconds. The relatively long lifetimes are encouraging for the preparation prospects of this first chemically bound helium compound.

  13. Exposure Levels for Chemical Threat Compounds; Information to Facilitate Chemical Incident Response

    SciTech Connect

    Hauschild, Veronique [U.S. Army Public Health Command] [U.S. Army Public Health Command; Watson, Annetta Paule [ORNL] [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    Exposure Standards, Limits and Guidelines for Chemical Threat Compunds ABSTRACT Exposure criteria for chemical warfare (CW) agents and certain toxic industrial chemicals (TICs) used as CW agents (such as chlorine fill in an improvised explosive device) have been developed for protection of the civilian general public, civilian employees in chemical agent processing facilities and deployed military populations. In addition, compound-specific concentrations have been developed to serve as how clean is clean enough clearance criteria guiding facility recovery following chemical terrorist or other hazardous release events. Such criteria are also useful to verify compound absence, identify containment boundaries and expedite facility recovery following chemical threat release. There is no single right value or concentration appropriate for all chemical hazard control applications. It is acknowledged that locating and comparing the many sources of CW agent and TIC exposure criteria has not been previously well-defined. This paper summarizes many of these estimates and assembles critical documentation regarding their derivation and use.

  14. Chemical Transformations That Yield Compounds with Distinct Activity Profiles

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    We have systematically searched for chemical changes that generate compounds with distinct biological activity profiles. For this purpose, activity profiles were generated for ?42000 compounds active against human targets. Unique activity profiles involving multiple target proteins were determined, and all possible matched molecular pairs (MMPs) were identified for compounds representing these profiles. An MMP is defined as a pair of compounds that are distinguished from each other only at a single site such as an R group or ring system. For example, in an MMP, a hydroxyl group might be replaced by a halogen atom or a benzene ring by an amide group. From ?37500 MMPs, more than 300 nonredundant chemical transformations were isolated that yielded compounds with distinct activity profiles. None of these transformations was found in pairs of compounds with overlapping activity profiles. These transformations were ranked according to the number of MMPs, the number of activity profiles, and the total number of targets that they covered. In many instances, prioritized transformations involved ring systems of varying complexity. All transformations that were found to switch activity profiles are provided to enable further analysis and aid in compound design efforts. PMID:24900343

  15. Chemical Trends for Transition Metal Compound Bonding to Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lange, Bjoern; Blum, Volker

    2015-03-01

    Transition metal compounds are of interest as catalysts for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). However, a perfect candidate to replace expensive platinum has not yet been identified. To tailor a specific compound, several properties come into play. One is the bonding to the underlying substrate, for which ?-bonded carbon nanostructures are promising candidates. Here we analyze the bonding of small transition metal compound nanoclusters to a graphene layer for a range of chemical compositions: MxAy (M = Mo, Ti; A = S, O, B, N, C). The clusters are generated by an unbiased random search algorithm. We perform total energy calculations based on density functional theory to identify lowest energy clusters. We calculate binding energies using the PBE and HSE functionals with explicit van der Waals treatment and benchmark those against RPA cluster calculations. Our results indicate that molybdenum-carbides and -nitrides tend to bond tightly to graphene. Mo-oxides and -sulfides show small binding energies, indicating van der Waals bonding.

  16. A staining protocol for identifying secondary compounds in Myrtaceae1

    PubMed Central

    Retamales, Hernan A.; Scharaschkin, Tanya

    2014-01-01

    • Premise of the study: Here we propose a staining protocol using toluidine blue (TBO) and ruthenium red to reliably identify secondary compounds in the leaves of some species of Myrtaceae. • Methods and Results: Leaves of 10 species representing 10 different genera of Myrtaceae were processed and stained using five different combinations of ruthenium red and TBO. Optimal staining conditions were determined as 1 min of ruthenium red (0.05% aqueous) and 45 s of TBO (0.1% aqueous). Secondary compounds clearly identified under this treatment include mucilage in the mesophyll, polyphenols in the cuticle, lignin in fibers and xylem, tannins and carboxylated polysaccharides in the epidermis, and pectic substances in the primary cell walls. • Conclusions: Potential applications of this protocol include systematic, phytochemical, and ecological investigations in Myrtaceae. It might be applicable to other plant families rich in secondary compounds and could be used as a preliminary screening method for extraction of these elements. PMID:25309840

  17. Rules for identifying potentially reactive or promiscuous compounds.

    PubMed

    Bruns, Robert F; Watson, Ian A

    2012-11-26

    This article describes a set of 275 rules, developed over an 18-year period, used to identify compounds that may interfere with biological assays, allowing their removal from screening sets. Reasons for rejection include reactivity (e.g., acyl halides), interference with assay measurements (fluorescence, absorbance, quenching), activities that damage proteins (oxidizers, detergents), instability (e.g., latent aldehydes), and lack of druggability (e.g., compounds lacking both oxygen and nitrogen). The structural queries were profiled for frequency of occurrence in druglike and nondruglike compound sets and were extensively reviewed by a panel of experienced medicinal chemists. As a means of profiling the rules and as a filter in its own right, an index of biological promiscuity was developed. The 584 gene targets with screening data at Lilly were assigned to 17 subfamilies, and the number of subfamilies at which a compound was active was used as a promiscuity index. For certain compounds, promiscuous activity disappeared after sample repurification, indicating interference from occult contaminants. Because this type of interference is not amenable to substructure search, a "nuisance list" was developed to flag interfering compounds that passed the substructure rules. PMID:23061697

  18. Antiapicoplast and Gametocytocidal Screening To Identify the Mechanisms of Action of Compounds within the Malaria Box

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, Jessica D.; Merino, Emilio F.; Brooks, Carrie F.; Striepen, Boris; Carlier, Paul R.

    2014-01-01

    Malaria remains a significant infectious disease that causes millions of clinical cases and >800,000 deaths per year. The Malaria Box is a collection of 400 commercially available chemical entities that have antimalarial activity. The collection contains 200 drug-like compounds, based on their oral absorption and the presence of known toxicophores, and 200 probe-like compounds, which are intended to represent a broad structural diversity. These compounds have confirmed activities against the asexual intraerythrocytic stages of Plasmodium falciparum and low cytotoxicities, but their mechanisms of action and their activities in other stages of the parasite's life cycle remain to be determined. The apicoplast is considered to be a promising source of malaria-specific targets, and its main function during intraerythrocytic stages is to provide the isoprenoid precursor isopentenyl diphosphate, which can be used for phenotype-based screens to identify compounds targeting this organelle. We screened 400 compounds from the Malaria Box using apicoplast-targeting phenotypic assays to identify their potential mechanisms of action. We identified one compound that specifically targeted the apicoplast. Further analyses indicated that the molecular target of this compound may differ from those of the current antiapicoplast drugs, such as fosmidomycin. Moreover, in our efforts to elucidate the mechanisms of action of compounds from the Malaria Box, we evaluated their activities against other stages of the life cycle of the parasite. Gametocytes are the transmission stage of the malaria parasite and are recognized as a priority target in efforts to eradicate malaria. We identified 12 compounds that were active against gametocytes with 50% inhibitory concentration values of <1 ?M. PMID:24247137

  19. Device for collecting chemical compounds and related methods

    DOEpatents

    Scott, Jill R.; Groenewold, Gary S.; Rae, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    A device for sampling chemical compounds from fixed surfaces and related methods are disclosed. The device may include a vacuum source, a chamber and a sorbent material. The device may utilize vacuum extraction to volatilize the chemical compounds from the fixed surfaces so that they may be sorbed by the sorbent material. The sorbent material may then be analyzed using conventional thermal desorption/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (TD/GC/MS) instrumentation to determine presence of the chemical compounds. The methods may include detecting release and presence of one or more chemical compounds and determining the efficacy of decontamination. The device may be useful in collection and analysis of a variety of chemical compounds, such as residual chemical warfare agents, chemical attribution signatures and toxic industrial chemicals.

  20. How can Databases assist with the Prediction of Chemical Compounds?

    PubMed Central

    Schön, J Christian

    2014-01-01

    An overview is given on the ways databases can be employed to aid in the prediction of chemical compounds, in particular inorganic crystalline compounds. Methods currently employed and possible future approaches are discussed.

  1. High Content Screening of Diverse Compound Libraries Identifies Potent Modulators of Tubulin Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Tubulin modulating agents such as the taxanes are among the most effective antimitotic cancer drugs, although resistance and toxicity present significant problems in their clinical use. However, most tubulin modulators are derived from complex natural products, which can make modification of their structure to address these problems difficult. Here, we report the discovery of new antimitotic compounds with simple structures that can be rapidly synthesized, through the phenotypic screening of a diverse compound library for the induction of mitotic arrest. We first identified a compound, which induced mitotic arrest in human cells at submicromolar concentrations. Its simple structure enabled rapid exploration of activity, defining a biphenylacetamide moiety required for activity, A family of analogues was synthesized, yielding optimized compounds that caused mitotic arrest and cell death in the low nanomolar range, comparable to clinically used antimitotic agents. These compounds can be synthesized in 1–3 steps and good yields. We show that one such compound targets tubulin, partially inhibiting colchicine but not vinblastine binding, suggesting that it acts allosterically to the known colchicine-binding site. Thus, our results exemplify the use of phenotypic screening to identify novel antimitotic compounds from diverse chemical libraries and characterize a family of biphenylacetamides (biphenabulins) that show promise for further development. PMID:24900887

  2. Classification of chemical compounds by protein-compound docking for use in designing a focused library.

    PubMed

    Fukunishi, Yoshifumi; Mikami, Yoshiaki; Takedomi, Kei; Yamanouchi, Masaya; Shima, Hideaki; Nakamura, Haruki

    2006-01-26

    We developed a new method for the classification of chemical compounds and protein pockets and applied it to a random screening experiment for macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF). The principal component analysis (PCA) method was applied to the protein-compound interaction matrix, which was given by thorough docking calculations between a set of many protein pockets and chemical compounds. Each compound and protein pocket was depicted as a point in the PCA spaces of compounds and proteins, respectively. This method was applied to distinguish active compounds from negative compounds of MIF. A random screening experiment for MIF was performed, and our method revealed that the active compounds were localized in the PCA space of compounds, while the negative compounds showed a wide distribution. Furthermore, protein pockets, which bind similar compounds, were classified and were found to form a cluster in the PCA space. PMID:16420039

  3. LOSS OF ORGANIC CHEMICALS IN SOIL: PURE COMPOUND TREATABILITY STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Comprehensive screening data on the treatability of 32 organic chemicals in soil were developed. Of the evaluated chemicals, 22 were phenolic compounds. Aerobic batch laboratory microcosm experiments were conducted using two soils: an acidic clay soil with ...

  4. Quantitative high-throughput screening: A titration-based approach that efficiently identifies biological activities in large chemical libraries

    Microsoft Academic Search

    James Inglese; Douglas S. Auld; Ajit Jadhav; Ronald L. Johnson; Anton Simeonov; Adam Yasgar; Wei Zheng; Christopher P. Austin

    2006-01-01

    High-throughput screening (HTS) of chemical compounds to identify modulators of molecular targets is a mainstay of pharmaceutical development. Increasingly, HTS is being used to identify chemical probes of gene, pathway, and cell functions, with the ultimate goal of comprehensively delineating relationships between chemical structures and biological activities. Achieving this goal will require methodologies that efficiently generate pharmacological data from the

  5. APPLICATION OF AN ANALYSIS PROTOCOL TO IDENTIFY ORGANIC COMPOUNDS NOT IDENTIFIED BY SPECTRUM MATCHING. PART 2: APPENDICES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Industrial wastewater survey samples were analyzed for organic compounds not identified by spectrum matching. Analysis of the samples proceeded from an initial packed column GC/MS analysis for Priority Pollutants, through computerized spectrum matching for other compounds, to the...

  6. APPLICATION OF AN ANALYSIS PROTOCOL TO IDENTIFY ORGANIC COMPOUNDS NOT IDENTIFIED BY SPECTRUM MATCHING. PART 1: TEXT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Industrial wastewater survey samples were analyzed for organic compounds not identified by spectrum matching. Analysis of the samples proceeded from an initial packed column GC/MS analysis for Priority Pollutants, through computerized spectrum matching for other compounds, to the...

  7. Analysis of Pfizer compounds in EPA's ToxCast chemicals-assay space.

    PubMed

    Shah, Falgun; Greene, Nigel

    2014-01-21

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) launched the ToxCast program in 2007 with the goal of evaluating high-throughput in vitro assays to prioritize chemicals that need toxicity testing. Their goal was to develop predictive bioactivity signatures for toxic compounds using a set of in vitro assays and/or in silico properties. In 2009, Pfizer joined the ToxCast initiative by contributing 52 compounds with preclinical and clinical data for profiling across the multiple assay platforms available. Here, we describe the initial analysis of the Pfizer subset of compounds within the ToxCast chemical (n = 1814) and in vitro assay (n = 486) space. An analysis of the hit rate of Pfizer compounds in the ToxCast assay panel allowed us to focus our mining of assays potentially most relevant to the attrition of our compounds. We compared the bioactivity profile of Pfizer compounds to other compounds in the ToxCast chemical space to gain insights into common toxicity pathways. Additionally, we explored the similarity in the chemical and biological spaces between drug-like compounds and environmental chemicals in ToxCast and compared the in vivo profiles of a subset of failed pharmaceuticals having high similarity in both spaces. We found differences in the chemical and biological spaces of pharmaceuticals compared to environmental chemicals, which may question the applicability of bioactivity signatures developed exclusively based on the latter to drug-like compounds if used without prior validation with the ToxCast Phase-II chemicals. Finally, our analysis has allowed us to identify novel interactions for our compounds in particular with multiple nuclear receptors that were previously not known. This insight may help us to identify potential liabilities with future novel compounds. PMID:24328225

  8. LIGAND: database of chemical compounds and reactions in biological pathways

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Susumu Goto; Yasushi Okuno; Masahiro Hattori; Takaaki Nishioka; Minoru Kanehisa

    2002-01-01

    LIGAND is a composite database comprising three sections: COMPOUND for the information about metabolites and other chemical compounds, REACTION for the collection of substrate-product relations representing metabolic and other reactions, and ENZYME for the information about enzyme molecules. The current release (as of September 7, 2001) includes 7298 compounds, 5166 reactions and 3829 enzymes. In addition to the keyword search

  9. An Approach in Building a Chemical Compound Search Engine in Oracle Database

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Wang; P. Volarath; R. Harrison

    2005-01-01

    A searching or identifying of chemical compounds is an important process in drug design and in chemistry research. An efficient search engine involves a close coupling of the search algorithm and database implementation. The database must process chemical structures, which demands the approaches to represent, store, and retrieve structures in a database system. In this paper, a general database framework

  10. Process for preparing a chemical compound enriched in isotope content

    SciTech Connect

    Michaels, E.D.

    1982-08-10

    A process to prepare a chemical enriched in isotope content which includes: (A) a chemical exchange reaction between a first and second compound which yields an isotopically enriched first compound and an isotopically depleted second compound; (B) the removal of a portion of the first compound as product and the removal of a portion of the second compound as spent material; (C) the conversion of the remainder of the first compound to the second compound for reflux at the product end of the chemical exchange reaction region; (D) the conversion of the remainder of the second compound to the first compound for reflux at the spent material end of the chemical exchange region; and the cycling of the additional chemicals produced by one conversion reaction to the other conversion reaction, for consumption therein. One of the conversion reactions is an oxidation reaction, and the energy that it yields is used to drive the other conversion reaction, a reduction. The reduction reaction is carried out in a solid polymer electrolyte electrolytic reactor. The overall process is energy efficient and yields no waste by-products.

  11. Process for preparing a chemical compound enriched in isotope content

    DOEpatents

    Michaels, Edward D. (Spring Valley, OH)

    1982-01-01

    A process to prepare a chemical enriched in isotope content which includes: (a) A chemical exchange reaction between a first and second compound which yields an isotopically enriched first compound and an isotopically depleted second compound; (b) the removal of a portion of the first compound as product and the removal of a portion of the second compound as spent material; (c) the conversion of the remainder of the first compound to the second compound for reflux at the product end of the chemical exchange reaction region; (d) the conversion of the remainder of the second compound to the first compound for reflux at the spent material end of the chemical exchange region; and the cycling of the additional chemicals produced by one conversion reaction to the other conversion reaction, for consumption therein. One of the conversion reactions is an oxidation reaction, and the energy that it yields is used to drive the other conversion reaction, a reduction. The reduction reaction is carried out in a solid polymer electrolyte electrolytic reactor. The overall process is energy efficient and yields no waste by-products.

  12. Zebrafish screen identifies novel compound with selective toxicity against leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ridges, Suzanne; Heaton, Will L; Joshi, Deepa; Choi, Henry; Eiring, Anna; Batchelor, Lance; Choudhry, Priya; Manos, Elizabeth J; Sofla, Hossein; Sanati, Ali; Welborn, Seth; Agarwal, Archana; Spangrude, Gerald J; Miles, Rodney R; Cox, James E; Frazer, J Kimble; Deininger, Michael; Balan, Kaveri; Sigman, Matthew; Müschen, Markus; Perova, Tatiana; Johnson, Radia; Montpellier, Bertrand; Guidos, Cynthia J; Jones, David A; Trede, Nikolaus S

    2012-06-14

    To detect targeted antileukemia agents we have designed a novel, high-content in vivo screen using genetically engineered, T-cell reporting zebrafish. We exploited the developmental similarities between normal and malignant T lymphoblasts to screen a small molecule library for activity against immature T cells with a simple visual readout in zebrafish larvae. After screening 26 400 molecules, we identified Lenaldekar (LDK), a compound that eliminates immature T cells in developing zebrafish without affecting the cell cycle in other cell types. LDK is well tolerated in vertebrates and induces long-term remission in adult zebrafish with cMYC-induced T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). LDK causes dephosphorylation of members of the PI3 kinase/AKT/mTOR pathway and delays sensitive cells in late mitosis. Among human cancers, LDK selectively affects survival of hematopoietic malignancy lines and primary leukemias, including therapy-refractory B-ALL and chronic myelogenous leukemia samples, and inhibits growth of human T-ALL xenografts. This work demonstrates the utility of our method using zebrafish for antineoplastic candidate drug identification and suggests a new approach for targeted leukemia therapy. Although our efforts focused on leukemia therapy, this screening approach has broad implications as it can be translated to other cancer types involving malignant degeneration of developmentally arrested cells. PMID:22490804

  13. Zebrafish screen identifies novel compound with selective toxicity against leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Ridges, Suzanne; Heaton, Will L.; Joshi, Deepa; Choi, Henry; Eiring, Anna; Batchelor, Lance; Choudhry, Priya; Manos, Elizabeth J.; Sofla, Hossein; Sanati, Ali; Welborn, Seth; Agarwal, Archana; Spangrude, Gerald J.; Miles, Rodney R.; Cox, James E.; Frazer, J. Kimble; Deininger, Michael; Balan, Kaveri; Sigman, Matthew; Müschen, Markus; Perova, Tatiana; Johnson, Radia; Montpellier, Bertrand; Guidos, Cynthia J.; Jones, David A.

    2012-01-01

    To detect targeted antileukemia agents we have designed a novel, high-content in vivo screen using genetically engineered, T-cell reporting zebrafish. We exploited the developmental similarities between normal and malignant T lymphoblasts to screen a small molecule library for activity against immature T cells with a simple visual readout in zebrafish larvae. After screening 26 400 molecules, we identified Lenaldekar (LDK), a compound that eliminates immature T cells in developing zebrafish without affecting the cell cycle in other cell types. LDK is well tolerated in vertebrates and induces long-term remission in adult zebrafish with cMYC-induced T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). LDK causes dephosphorylation of members of the PI3 kinase/AKT/mTOR pathway and delays sensitive cells in late mitosis. Among human cancers, LDK selectively affects survival of hematopoietic malignancy lines and primary leukemias, including therapy-refractory B-ALL and chronic myelogenous leukemia samples, and inhibits growth of human T-ALL xenografts. This work demonstrates the utility of our method using zebrafish for antineoplastic candidate drug identification and suggests a new approach for targeted leukemia therapy. Although our efforts focused on leukemia therapy, this screening approach has broad implications as it can be translated to other cancer types involving malignant degeneration of developmentally arrested cells. PMID:22490804

  14. InChI - the worldwide chemical structure identifier standard

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Since its public introduction in 2005 the IUPAC InChI chemical structure identifier standard has become the international, worldwide standard for defined chemical structures. This article will describe the extensive use and dissemination of the InChI and InChIKey structure representations by and for the world-wide chemistry community, the chemical information community, and major publishers and disseminators of chemical and related scientific offerings in manuscripts and databases. PMID:23343401

  15. Chemical compounds of the foraging recruitment pheromone in bumblebees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granero, Angeles Mena; Sanz, José M. Guerra; Gonzalez, Francisco J. Egea; Vidal, José L. Martinez; Dornhaus, Anna; Ghani, Junaid; Serrano, Ana Roldán; Chittka, Lars

    2005-08-01

    When the frenzied and irregular food-recruitment dances of bumblebees were first discovered, it was thought that they might represent an evolutionary prototype to the honeybee waggle dance. It later emerged that the primary function of the bumblebee dance was the distribution of an alerting pheromone. Here, we identify the chemical compounds of the bumblebee recruitment pheromone and their behaviour effects. The presence of two monoterpenes and one sesquiterpene (eucalyptol, ocimene and farnesol) in the nest airspace and in the tergal glands increases strongly during foraging. Of these, eucalyptol has the strongest recruitment effect when a bee nest is experimentally exposed to it. Since honeybees use terpenes for marking food sources rather than recruiting foragers inside the nest, this suggests independent evolutionary roots of food recruitment in these two groups of bees.

  16. Fluorescence image screening for chemical compounds modifying cholesterol metabolism and distribution.

    PubMed

    Ishitsuka, Reiko; Saito, Tamio; Osada, Hiroyuki; Ohno-Iwashita, Yoshiko; Kobayashi, Toshihide

    2011-11-01

    An automated fluorescence microscopy assay using a nontoxic cholesterol binding protein, toxin domain 4, (D4), was developed in order to identify chemical compounds modifying intracellular cholesterol metabolism and distribution. Using this method, we screened a library of 1,056 compounds and identified 35 compounds that decreased D4 binding to the cell surface. Among them, 8 compounds were already reported to alter the biosynthesis or the intracellular distribution of cholesterol. The remaining 27 hit compounds were further analyzed biochemically and histochemically. Cell staining with another fluorescent cholesterol probe, filipin, revealed that 17 compounds accumulated cholesterol in the late endosomes. Five compounds decreased cholesterol biosynthesis, and two compounds inhibited the binding of D4 to the membrane. This visual screening method, based on the cholesterol-specific probe D4 in combination with biochemical analyses, is a cell-based, sensitive technique for identifying new chemical compounds and modifying cholesterol distribution and metabolism. Furthermore, it is suitable for high-throughput analysis for drug discovery. PMID:21862703

  17. (The Futility of) Trying to Predict Carcinogenicity of Chemical Compounds

    E-print Network

    Pfahringer, Bernhard

    (The Futility of) Trying to Predict Carcinogenicity of Chemical Compounds Bernhard Pfahringer Toxicology Challenge 2001. The challenge is to predict the carcinogenicity of chemicals based on structural conclude that reliable prediction of carcinogenicity is still a far away goal. 1 Introduction

  18. The Use of Chemical-Chemical Interaction and Chemical Structure to Identify New Candidate Chemicals Related to Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Mingyue; Kong, Xiangyin; Huang, Tao; Cai, Yu-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer causes over one million deaths every year worldwide. However, prevention and treatment methods for this serious disease are limited. The identification of new chemicals related to lung cancer may aid in disease prevention and the design of more effective treatments. This study employed a weighted network, constructed using chemical-chemical interaction information, to identify new chemicals related to two types of lung cancer: non-small lung cancer and small-cell lung cancer. Then, a randomization test as well as chemical-chemical interaction and chemical structure information were utilized to make further selections. A final analysis of these new chemicals in the context of the current literature indicates that several chemicals are strongly linked to lung cancer. PMID:26047514

  19. LIGAND: database of chemical compounds and reactions in biological pathways

    PubMed Central

    Goto, Susumu; Okuno, Yasushi; Hattori, Masahiro; Nishioka, Takaaki; Kanehisa, Minoru

    2002-01-01

    LIGAND is a composite database comprising three sections: COMPOUND for the information about metabolites and other chemical compounds, REACTION for the collection of substrate–product relations representing metabolic and other reactions, and ENZYME for the information about enzyme molecules. The current release (as of September 7, 2001) includes 7298 compounds, 5166 reactions and 3829 enzymes. In addition to the keyword search provided by the DBGET/LinkDB system, a substructure search to the COMPOUND and REACTION sections is now available through the World Wide Web (http://www.genome.ad.jp/ligand/). LIGAND may be also downloaded by anonymous FTP (ftp://ftp.genome.ad.jp/pub/kegg/ligand/). PMID:11752349

  20. LIGAND: Database of Chemical Compounds and Reactions in Biological Pathways

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    The Institute for Chemical Research at Kyoto University provides this frequently updated and well-documented database of enzyme reactions. With more than 9,300 entries, the LIGAND Chemical Database includes over 3,700 entries for enzymes (the Enzyme Reaction Database) and 5,600 entries for compounds (Chemical Compound Database). The database is searchable by keyword using DBGET (which supports numerous other databases and gene catalogs as well) and is accompanied by clear instructions. The LIGAND database, updated weekly, may be downloaded via anonymous FTP.

  1. EPA's efforts to identify and control harmful chemicals in use

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bowsher

    1984-01-01

    Under the Toxic Substances Control Act of 1976, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is responsible for identifying, assessing, and controlling unreasonable risks to health or the environment from the manufacture, processing, distribution, use, or disposal of new and existing chemicals - those currently in commerce. This report focuses on EPA's efforts to review and control existing chemicals. To date, EPA

  2. Chemical compounds isolated from Talinum triangulare (Portulacaceae).

    PubMed

    de Oliveira Amorim, Ana Paula; de Carvalho, Almir Ribeiro; Lopes, Norberto Peporine; Castro, Rosane Nora; de Oliveira, Marcia Cristina Campos; de Carvalho, Mário Geraldo

    2014-10-01

    This first phytochemical study of Talinum triangulare Leach (Portulacaceae), also known as 'cariru', which is a commonly consumed food in Northern Brazil, allowed the isolation and structural determination of four new compounds: one acrylamide, 3-N-(acryloyl, N-pentadecanoyl) propanoic acid (5), and three new phaeophytins named (15(1)S, 17R, 18R)-Ficuschlorin D acid (3(1),3(2)-didehydro-7-oxo-17(3)-O-phytyl-rhodochlorin-15-acetic acid), (13), Talichorin A (17R, 18R)-phaeophytin b-15(1)-hidroxy, 15(2),15(3)-acetyl-13(1)-carboxilic acid (14), and (15(1)S, 17R, 18R)-phaeophytin b peroxylactone or (15(1)S, 17R, 18R)-hydroperoxy-ficuschlorin D (16), together with twelve known compounds, including four phaeophytins (11,12, 15 and 17). The structures of the compounds were established on the basis of 1D and 2D NMR, IR, HRESI-MS spectra, including GC-MS, and HPLC-UV analysis, as well as comparisons with the literature data. The CD spectra data analysis were used to define the absolute configuration of phaeophytins 12 (13(2)R, 17R, 18R)-13(2)-hydroxyphaeophytin a, 13 and 16, 15 (15(1)S, 17R, 18R)-3(1),3(2)-didehydro-15(1)-hydroxyrhodochlorin-15-acetic acid ?-lactone-15(2)-methyl-17(3)-phytyl ester and 17 (17R, 18R)-purpurin 18-phytyl ester. PMID:24799228

  3. Compound prioritization methods increase rates of chemical probe discovery in model organisms

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Iain M; Urbanus, Malene L; Luciani, Genna M; Burns, Andrew R; Han, Mitchell KL; Wang, Hao; Arora, Kriti; Heisler, Lawrence E; Proctor, Michael; St. Onge, Robert P; Roemer, Terry; Roy, Peter J; Cummins, Carolyn L; Bader, Gary D; Nislow, Corey; Giaever, Guri

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Pre-selection of compounds that are more likely to induce a phenotype can increase the efficiency and reduce the costs for model organism screening. To identify such molecules, we screened ~81,000 compounds in S. cerevisiae and identified ~7,500 that inhibit cell growth. Screening these growth-inhibitory molecules across a diverse panel of model organisms resulted in an increased phenotypic hit-rate. This data was used to build a model to predict compounds that inhibit yeast growth. Empirical and in silico application of the model enriched the discovery of bioactive compounds in diverse model organisms. To demonstrate the potential of these molecules as lead chemical probes we used chemogenomic profiling in yeast and identified specific inhibitors of lanosterol synthase and of stearoyl-CoA 9-desaturase. As community resources, the ~7,500 growth-inhibitory molecules has been made commercially available and the computational model and filter used are provided. PMID:22035796

  4. Chemical reactions of organic compounds on clay surfaces.

    PubMed Central

    Soma, Y; Soma, M

    1989-01-01

    Chemical reactions of organic compounds including pesticides at the interlayer and exterior surfaces of clay minerals and with soil organic matter are reviewed. Representative reactions under moderate conditions possibly occurring in natural soils are described. Attempts have been made to clarify the importance of the chemical nature of molecules, their structures and their functional groups, and the Brönsted or Lewis acidity of clay minerals. PMID:2533556

  5. Chemical Compound Navigator: A Web-Based Chem-BLAST, Chemical Taxonomy-Based Search Engine for Browsing

    E-print Network

    Chemical Compound Navigator: A Web-Based Chem-BLAST, Chemical Taxonomy-Based Search Engine, query, and analyze chemical compounds has been developed and is illustrated by using the inhibitor data on HIV protease-inhibitor complexes. In this method, all chemical compounds are annotated in terms

  6. NMR characterization of chemically synthesized branched ?-dextrin model compounds.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Bent O; Motawie, Mohammed Saddik; Møller, Birger Lindberg; Hindsgaul, Ole; Meier, Sebastian

    2015-02-11

    1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts were accurately determined by consistent referencing for an extensive set of chemically synthesized branched ?-glucan model compounds. The model compounds include anomerically fixed and reducing oligosaccharides ranging in size from isomaltose to a doubly branched decasaccharide. Both the 13C1 chemical shift and the 13C6 chemical shifts in ?-(1?6) glycosidic bonds are strongly dependent on the chemical structure in the vicinity of the branch point, especially on the addition of glucopyranosyl units towards the non-reducing end of the backbone chain. The conformational sampling at the branch point of the branched ?-glucan model compounds was experimentally probed with homo-nuclear scalar couplings. Substitution at O6 consistently increases the fraction of C6-O6 trans conformations, but to a lesser extent, if the attachment occurs at the reducing end residue. Increasingly complex structures in the vicinity of the branch point increase the population of the gauche-trans conformation of the C5-C6 bond. This population change is found to correlate with the 13C6 chemical shift. PMID:24957577

  7. Photo and radiation chemical induced degradation of lignin model compounds

    Microsoft Academic Search

    O. Lanzalunga; M. Bietti

    2000-01-01

    The basic mechanistic aspects of the photo- and radiation chemistry of lignin model compounds (LMCs) are discussed with respect to important processes related to lignin degradation. Several reactions occur after direct irradiation, photosensitized or radiation chemically induced oxidation of LMCs. Direct irradiation studies on LMCs have provided supportive evidence for the involvement of hydrogen abstraction reactions from phenols, ?-cleavage of

  8. Chronic Rat Toxicity Prediction of Chemical Compounds Using Kernel Machines

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Georg Hinselmann; Andreas Jahn; Nikolas Fechner; Andreas Zell

    2009-01-01

    A recently published study showed the feasibility of chronic rat toxicity prediction, an important task to reduce the number of animal experiments using the knowledge of previous experiments. We bench-marked various kernel learning approaches for the prediction of chronic toxicity on a set of 565 chemical compounds, labeled with the Lowest Observed Adverse Effect Level, and achieved a prediction error

  9. Chemical bath deposition of II-VI compound thin films

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Isaiah Olatunde Oladeji

    1999-01-01

    II-VI compounds are direct bandgap semiconductors with great potentials in optoelectronic applications. Solar cells, where these materials are in greater demand, require a low cost production technology that will make the final product more affordable. Chemical bath deposition (CBD) a low cost growth technique capable of producing good quality thin film semiconductors over large area and at low temperature then

  10. Identifying non-point sources of endocrine active compounds and their biological impacts in freshwater lakes.

    PubMed

    Baker, Beth H; Martinovic-Weigelt, Dalma; Ferrey, Mark; Barber, Larry B; Writer, Jeffery H; Rosenberry, Donald O; Kiesling, Richard L; Lundy, James R; Schoenfuss, Heiko L

    2014-10-01

    Contaminants of emerging concern, particularly endocrine active compounds (EACs), have been identified as a threat to aquatic wildlife. However, little is known about the impact of EACs on lakes through groundwater from onsite wastewater treatment systems (OWTS). This study aims to identify specific contributions of OWTS to Sullivan Lake, Minnesota, USA. Lake hydrology, water chemistry, caged bluegill sunfish (Lepomis macrochirus), and larval fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) exposures were used to assess whether EACs entered the lake through OWTS inflow and the resultant biological impact on fish. Study areas included two OWTS-influenced near-shore sites with native bluegill spawning habitats and two in-lake control sites without nearby EAC sources. Caged bluegill sunfish were analyzed for plasma vitellogenin concentrations, organosomatic indices, and histological pathologies. Surface and porewater was collected from each site and analyzed for EACs. Porewater was also collected for laboratory exposure of larval fathead minnow, before analysis of predator escape performance and gene expression profiles. Chemical analysis showed EACs present at low concentrations at each study site, whereas discrete variations were reported between sites and between summer and fall samplings. Body condition index and liver vacuolization of sunfish were found to differ among study sites as did gene expression in exposed larval fathead minnows. Interestingly, biological exposure data and water chemistry did not match. Therefore, although results highlight the potential impacts of seepage from OWTS, further investigation of mixture effects and life history factor as well as chemical fate is warranted. PMID:24974177

  11. Sensitivity, robustness, and identifiability in stochastic chemical kinetics models

    E-print Network

    Millar, Andrew J.

    Sensitivity, robustness, and identifiability in stochastic chemical kinetics models Michal' performances is sensitivity analysis (2). Large sensitivity to a parameter suggests that the system's output in an insensitive parameter will have little effect on the behavior. Traditionally, the concept of sensitivity has

  12. New variable chemically peculiar stars identified in the HIPPARCOS archive

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. Paunzen; H. M. Maitzen

    1998-01-01

    Since variability of chemically peculiar (CP) stars plays an important role for the astrophysical explanation of their outstanding behaviour, we have identified new variable CP stars listed in Renson's catalogue using the extensive Hipparcos Variability Annex. From the 293 objects found, 33 were excluded because they are no CP stars and\\/or have no period listed, half of the remaining stars

  13. Applications of swept-frequency acoustic interferometer for nonintrusive detection and identification of chemical warfare compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Sinha, D.N.; Springer, K.; Han, W.; Lizon, D.; Kogan, S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Electronic Materials and Devices Group

    1997-12-01

    Swept-Frequency Acoustic Interferometry (SFAI) is a nonintrusive liquid characterization technique developed specifically for detecting and identifying chemical warfare (CW) compounds inside sealed munitions. The SFAI technique can rapidly (less than 20 seconds) and accurately determine sound speed and sound attenuation of a liquid inside a container over a wide frequency range (1 kHz-15 MHz). From the frequency-dependent sound attenuation measurement, liquid density is determined. These three physical properties are used to uniquely identify the CW compounds. In addition, various chemical relaxation processes in liquids and particle size distribution in emulsions can also be determined from the frequency-dependent attenuation measurement. The SFAI instrument is battery-operated and highly portable (< 6 lb.). The instrument has many potential application in industry ranging from sensitive detection (ppm level) of contamination to process control. The theory of the technique will be described and examples of several chemical industry applications will be presented.

  14. Chemical-genetic profile analysis of five inhibitory compounds in yeast

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Chemical-genetic profiling of inhibitory compounds can lead to identification of their modes of action. These profiles can help elucidate the complex interactions between small bioactive compounds and the cell machinery, and explain putative gene function(s). Results Colony size reduction was used to investigate the chemical-genetic profile of cycloheximide, 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole, paromomycin, streptomycin and neomycin in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. These compounds target the process of protein biosynthesis. More than 70,000 strains were analyzed from the array of gene deletion mutant yeast strains. As expected, the overall profiles of the tested compounds were similar, with deletions for genes involved in protein biosynthesis being the major category followed by metabolism. This implies that novel genes involved in protein biosynthesis could be identified from these profiles. Further investigations were carried out to assess the activity of three profiled genes in the process of protein biosynthesis using relative fitness of double mutants and other genetic assays. Conclusion Chemical-genetic profiles provide insight into the molecular mechanism(s) of the examined compounds by elucidating their potential primary and secondary cellular target sites. Our follow-up investigations into the activity of three profiled genes in the process of protein biosynthesis provided further evidence concerning the usefulness of chemical-genetic analyses for annotating gene functions. We termed these genes TAE2, TAE3 and TAE4 for translation associated elements 2-4. PMID:20691087

  15. Identifying Bioaccumulative Halogenated Organic Compounds Using a Nontargeted Analytical Approach: Seabirds as Sentinels

    PubMed Central

    Millow, Christopher J.; Mackintosh, Susan A.; Lewison, Rebecca L.; Dodder, Nathan G.; Hoh, Eunha

    2015-01-01

    Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) are typically monitored via targeted mass spectrometry, which potentially identifies only a fraction of the contaminants actually present in environmental samples. With new anthropogenic compounds continuously introduced to the environment, novel and proactive approaches that provide a comprehensive alternative to targeted methods are needed in order to more completely characterize the diversity of known and unknown compounds likely to cause adverse effects. Nontargeted mass spectrometry attempts to extensively screen for compounds, providing a feasible approach for identifying contaminants that warrant future monitoring. We employed a nontargeted analytical method using comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC×GC/TOF-MS) to characterize halogenated organic compounds (HOCs) in California Black skimmer (Rynchops niger) eggs. Our study identified 111 HOCs; 84 of these compounds were regularly detected via targeted approaches, while 27 were classified as typically unmonitored or unknown. Typically unmonitored compounds of note in bird eggs included tris(4-chlorophenyl)methane (TCPM), tris(4-chlorophenyl)methanol (TCPMOH), triclosan, permethrin, heptachloro-1'-methyl-1,2'-bipyrrole (MBP), as well as four halogenated unknown compounds that could not be identified through database searching or the literature. The presence of these compounds in Black skimmer eggs suggests they are persistent, bioaccumulative, potentially biomagnifying, and maternally transferring. Our results highlight the utility and importance of employing nontargeted analytical tools to assess true contaminant burdens in organisms, as well as to demonstrate the value in using environmental sentinels to proactively identify novel contaminants. PMID:26020245

  16. Three Packets of Minerals of the Periodic Table of Chemical Elements and Chemical Compounds

    E-print Network

    Labushev, Mikhail M

    2013-01-01

    The concepts of alpha- and beta-packets of the periodic table of chemical elements and chemical compounds are defined. The first of the 47 minerals alpha-packets is composed. In it all minerals are arranged in increasing Iav index of proportionality of atomic weights of composing chemical elements, the same way as chemical elements are located in increasing atomic weights in the Periodic table. The packet includes 93 known minerals and two compounds - N2O5 and CO2 - being actually minerals. Beta-packet of oxides and hydroxides minerals includes 88 known minerals and five chemical compounds - N2O5, CO2, CO, SO3 and SO2. Two minerals of the packet have not been determined yet. Besides, beta-packet of minerals with sulfur, selenium or arsenic is composed, with one mineral not defined yet. The results of the calculations can be used for further development of the Periodic Table of Chemical Elements and Chemical Compounds and their properties investigation.

  17. Hazard Labeling Elements 1. Product identifier: how the hazardous chemical is identified. This can be (but is not

    E-print Network

    Chapman, Michael S.

    Hazard Labeling Elements 1. Product identifier: how the hazardous chemical is identified. This can be (but is not limited to) the chemical name, code number or batch number. The manufacturer, importer or distributor can decide the appropriate product identifier. The same product identifier must be both

  18. An approach in building a chemical compound search engine in oracle database.

    PubMed

    Wang, H; Volarath, P; Harrison, R

    2005-01-01

    A searching or identifying of chemical compounds is an important process in drug design and in chemistry research. An efficient search engine involves a close coupling of the search algorithm and database implementation. The database must process chemical structures, which demands the approaches to represent, store, and retrieve structures in a database system. In this paper, a general database framework for working as a chemical compound search engine in Oracle database is described. The framework is devoted to eliminate data type constrains for potential search algorithms, which is a crucial step toward building a domain specific query language on top of SQL. A search engine implementation based on the database framework is also demonstrated. The convenience of the implementation emphasizes the efficiency and simplicity of the framework. PMID:17282834

  19. Chemical Biology Drug Sensitivity Screen Identifies Sunitinib as Synergistic Agent with Disulfiram in Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ketola, Kirsi; Kallioniemi, Olli; Iljin, Kristiina

    2012-01-01

    Background Current treatment options for castration- and treatment-resistant prostate cancer are limited and novel approaches are desperately needed. Our recent results from a systematic chemical biology sensitivity screen covering most known drugs and drug-like molecules indicated that aldehyde dehydrogenase inhibitor disulfiram is one of the most potent cancer-specific inhibitors of prostate cancer cell growth, including TMPRSS2-ERG fusion positive cancers. However, the results revealed that disulfiram alone does not block tumor growth in vivo nor induce apoptosis in vitro, indicating that combinatorial approaches may be required to enhance the anti-neoplastic effects. Methods and Findings In this study, we utilized a chemical biology drug sensitivity screen to explore disulfiram mechanistic details and to identify compounds potentiating the effect of disulfiram in TMPRSS2-ERG fusion positive prostate cancer cells. In total, 3357 compounds including current chemotherapeutic agents as well as drug-like small molecular compounds were screened alone and in combination with disulfiram. Interestingly, the results indicated that androgenic and antioxidative compounds antagonized disulfiram effect whereas inhibitors of receptor tyrosine kinase, proteasome, topoisomerase II, glucosylceramide synthase or cell cycle were among compounds sensitizing prostate cancer cells to disulfiram. The combination of disulfiram and an antiangiogenic agent sunitinib was studied in more detail, since both are already in clinical use in humans. Disulfiram-sunitinib combination induced apoptosis and reduced androgen receptor protein expression more than either of the compounds alone. Moreover, combinatorial exposure reduced metastatic characteristics such as cell migration and 3D cell invasion as well as induced epithelial differentiation shown as elevated E-cadherin expression. Conclusions Taken together, our results propose novel combinatorial approaches to inhibit prostate cancer cell growth. Disulfiram-sunitinib combination was identified as one of the potent synergistic approaches. Since sunitinib alone has been reported to lack efficacy in prostate cancer clinical trials, our results provide a rationale for novel combinatorial approach to target prostate cancer more efficiently. PMID:23251544

  20. International chemical identifier for reactions (RInChI)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The IUPAC International Chemical Identifier (InChI) provides a method to generate a unique text descriptor of molecular structures. Building on this work, we report a process to generate a unique text descriptor for reactions, RInChI. By carefully selecting the information that is included and by ordering the data carefully, different scientists studying the same reaction should produce the same RInChI. If differences arise, these are most likely the minor layers of the InChI, and so may be readily handled. RInChI provides a concise description of the key data in a chemical reaction, and will help enable the rapid searching and analysis of reaction databases. PMID:24152584

  1. High Throughput Screening Identifies a Novel Compound Protecting Cardiomyocytes from Doxorubicin-Induced Damage

    PubMed Central

    Gergely, Szabolcs; Heged?s, Csaba; Lakatos, Petra; Kovács, Katalin; Gáspár, Renáta; Csont, Tamás; Virág, László

    2015-01-01

    Antracyclines are effective antitumor agents. One of the most commonly used antracyclines is doxorubicin, which can be successfully used to treat a diverse spectrum of tumors. Application of these drugs is limited by their cardiotoxic effect, which is determined by a lifetime cumulative dose. We set out to identify by high throughput screening cardioprotective compounds protecting cardiomyocytes from doxorubicin-induced injury. Ten thousand compounds of ChemBridge's DIVERSet compound library were screened to identify compounds that can protect H9C2 rat cardiomyocytes against doxorubicin-induced cell death. The most effective compound proved protective in doxorubicin-treated primary rat cardiomyocytes and was further characterized to demonstrate that it significantly decreased doxorubicin-induced apoptotic and necrotic cell death and inhibited doxorubicin-induced activation of JNK MAP kinase without having considerable radical scavenging effect or interfering with the antitumor effect of doxorubicin. In fact the compound identified as 3-[2-(4-ethylphenyl)-2-oxoethyl]-1,2-dimethyl-1H-3,1-benzimidazol-3-ium bromide was toxic to all tumor cell lines tested even without doxorubicine treatment. This benzimidazole compound may lead, through further optimalization, to the development of a drug candidate protecting the heart from doxorubicin-induced injury. PMID:26137186

  2. Electrolytic photodissociation of chemical compounds by iron oxide electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Somorjai, Gabor A. (Berkeley, CA); Leygraf, Christofer H. (Berkeley, CA)

    1984-01-01

    Chemical compounds can be dissociated by contacting the same with a p/n type semi-conductor diode having visible light as its sole source of energy. The diode consists of low cost, readily available materials, specifically polycrystalline iron oxide doped with silicon in the case of the n-type semi-conductor electrode, and polycrystalline iron oxide doped with magnesium in the case of the p-type electrode. So long as the light source has an energy greater than 2.2 electron volts, no added energy source is needed to achieve dissociation.

  3. Electrolytic photodissociation of chemical compounds by iron oxide photochemical diodes

    DOEpatents

    Somorjai, Gabor A. (Berkeley, CA); Leygraf, Christofer H. (Berkeley, CA)

    1985-01-01

    Chemical compounds can be dissociated by contacting the same with a p/n type semi-conductor photochemical diode having visible light as its sole source of energy. The photochemical diode consists of low cost, readily available materials, specifically polycrystalline iron oxide doped with silicon in the case of the n-type semi-conductor electrode, and polycrystalline iron oxide doped with magnesium in the case of the p-type electrode. So long as the light source has an energy greater than 2.2 electron volts, no added energy source is needed to achieve dissociation.

  4. Relationship between chemical structure and the occupational asthma hazard of low molecular weight organic compounds

    PubMed Central

    Jarvis, J; Seed, M; Elton, R; Sawyer, L; Agius, R

    2005-01-01

    Aims: To investigate quantitatively, relationships between chemical structure and reported occupational asthma hazard for low molecular weight (LMW) organic compounds; to develop and validate a model linking asthma hazard with chemical substructure; and to generate mechanistic hypotheses that might explain the relationships. Methods: A learning dataset used 78 LMW chemical asthmagens reported in the literature before 1995, and 301 control compounds with recognised occupational exposures and hazards other than respiratory sensitisation. The chemical structures of the asthmagens and control compounds were characterised by the presence of chemical substructure fragments. Odds ratios were calculated for these fragments to determine which were associated with a likelihood of being reported as an occupational asthmagen. Logistic regression modelling was used to identify the independent contribution of these substructures. A post-1995 set of 21 asthmagens and 77 controls were selected to externally validate the model. Results: Nitrogen or oxygen containing functional groups such as isocyanate, amine, acid anhydride, and carbonyl were associated with an occupational asthma hazard, particularly when the functional group was present twice or more in the same molecule. A logistic regression model using only statistically significant independent variables for occupational asthma hazard correctly assigned 90% of the model development set. The external validation showed a sensitivity of 86% and specificity of 99%. Conclusions: Although a wide variety of chemical structures are associated with occupational asthma, bifunctional reactivity is strongly associated with occupational asthma hazard across a range of chemical substructures. This suggests that chemical cross-linking is an important molecular mechanism leading to the development of occupational asthma. The logistic regression model is freely available on the internet and may offer a useful but inexpensive adjunct to the prediction of occupational asthma hazard. PMID:15778257

  5. A Forward Chemical Screen in Zebrafish Identifies a Retinoic Acid Derivative with Receptor Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Das, Bhaskar C.; McCartin, Kellie; Liu, Ting-Chun; Peterson, Randall T.; Evans, Todd

    2010-01-01

    Background Retinoids regulate key developmental pathways throughout life, and have potential uses for differentiation therapy. It should be possible to identify novel retinoids by coupling new chemical reactions with screens using the zebrafish embryonic model. Principal Findings We synthesized novel retinoid analogues and derivatives by amide coupling, obtaining 80–92% yields. A small library of these compounds was screened for bioactivity in living zebrafish embryos. We found that several structurally related compounds significantly affect development. Distinct phenotypes are generated depending on time of exposure, and we characterize one compound (BT10) that produces specific cardiovascular defects when added 1 day post fertilization. When compared to retinoic acid (ATRA), BT10 shows similar but not identical changes in the expression pattern of embryonic genes that are known targets of the retinoid pathway. Reporter assays determined that BT10 interacts with all three RAR receptor sub-types, but has no activity for RXR receptors, at all concentrations tested. Conclusions Our screen has identified a novel retinoid with specificity for retinoid receptors. This lead compound may be useful for manipulating components of retinoid signaling networks, and may be further derivatized for enhanced activity. PMID:20368991

  6. Identifying Sources of Volatile Organic Compounds and Aldehydes in a High Performance Building

    SciTech Connect

    Ortiz, Anna C.; Russell, Marion; Lee, Wen-Yee; Apte, Michael; Maddalena, Randy

    2010-09-20

    The developers of the Paharpur Business Center (PBC) and Software Technology Incubator Park in New Delhi, India offer an environmentally sustainable building with a strong emphasis on energy conservation, waste minimization and superior indoor air quality (IAQ). To achieve the IAQ goal, the building utilizes a series of air cleaning technologies for treating the air entering the building. These technologies include an initial water wash followed by ultraviolet light treatment and biolfiltration using a greenhouse located on the roof and numerous plants distributed throughout the building. Even with the extensive treatment of makeup air and room air in the PBC, a recent study found that the concentrations of common volatile organic compounds and aldehydes appear to rise incrementally as the air passes through the building from the supply to the exhaust. This finding highlights the need to consider the minimization of chemical sources in buildings in combination with the use of advanced air cleaning technologies when seeking to achieve superior IAQ. The goal of this project was to identify potential source materials for indoor chemicals in the PBC. Samples of building materials, including wood paneling (polished and unpolished), drywall, and plastic from a hydroponic drum that was part of the air cleaning system, were collected from the building for testing. All materials were collected from the PBC building and shipped to the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) for testing. The materials were pre-conditioned for two different time periods before measuring material and chemical specific emission factors for a range of VOCs and Aldehydes. Of the six materials tested, we found that the highest emitter of formaldehyde was new plywood paneling. Although polish and paint contribute to some VOC emissions, the main influence of the polish was in altering the capacity of the surface to accumulate formaldehyde. Neither the new nor aged polish contributed significantly to formaldehyde emissions. The VOC emission stream (excluding formaldehyde) was composed of up to 18 different chemicals and the total VOC emissions ranged in magnitude from 7 mu g/m2/h (old wood with old polish) to>500 mu g/m2/h (painted drywall). The formaldehyde emissions from drywall and old wood with either new or old polish were ~;;15 mu g/m2/h while the new wood material emitted>100 mu g/m2/h. However, when the projected surface area of each material in the building was considered, the new wood, old wood and painted drywall material all contributed substantially to the indoor formaldehyde loading while the coatings contributed primarily to the VOCs.

  7. Indoor Volatile Organic Compounds and Chemical Sensitivity Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Win-Shwe, Tin-Tin; Arashidani, Keiichi; Kunugita, Naoki

    2013-01-01

    Studies of unexplained symptoms observed in chemically sensitive subjects have increased the awareness of the relationship between neurological and immunological diseases due to exposure to volatile organic compounds (VOCs). However, there is no direct evidence that links exposure to low doses of VOCs and neurological and immunological dysfunction. We review animal model data to clarify the role of VOCs in neuroimmune interactions and discuss our recent studies that show a relationship between chronic exposure of C3H mice to low levels of formaldehyde and the induction of neural and immune dysfunction. We also consider the possible mechanisms by which VOC exposure can induce the symptoms presenting in patients with a multiple chemical sensitivity. PMID:24228055

  8. New compound sets identified from high throughput phenotypic screening against three kinetoplastid parasites: an open resource.

    PubMed

    Peña, Imanol; Pilar Manzano, M; Cantizani, Juan; Kessler, Albane; Alonso-Padilla, Julio; Bardera, Ana I; Alvarez, Emilio; Colmenarejo, Gonzalo; Cotillo, Ignacio; Roquero, Irene; de Dios-Anton, Francisco; Barroso, Vanessa; Rodriguez, Ana; Gray, David W; Navarro, Miguel; Kumar, Vinod; Sherstnev, Alexander; Drewry, David H; Brown, James R; Fiandor, Jose M; Julio Martin, J

    2015-01-01

    Using whole-cell phenotypic assays, the GlaxoSmithKline high-throughput screening (HTS) diversity set of 1.8 million compounds was screened against the three kinetoplastids most relevant to human disease, i.e. Leishmania donovani, Trypanosoma cruzi and Trypanosoma brucei. Secondary confirmatory and orthogonal intracellular anti-parasiticidal assays were conducted, and the potential for non-specific cytotoxicity determined. Hit compounds were chemically clustered and triaged for desirable physicochemical properties. The hypothetical biological target space covered by these diversity sets was investigated through bioinformatics methodologies. Consequently, three anti-kinetoplastid chemical boxes of ~200 compounds each were assembled. Functional analyses of these compounds suggest a wide array of potential modes of action against kinetoplastid kinases, proteases and cytochromes as well as potential host-pathogen targets. This is the first published parallel high throughput screening of a pharma compound collection against kinetoplastids. The compound sets are provided as an open resource for future lead discovery programs, and to address important research questions. PMID:25740547

  9. Propolis volatile compounds: chemical diversity and biological activity: a review

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Propolis is a sticky material collected by bees from plants, and used in the hive as building material and defensive substance. It has been popular as a remedy in Europe since ancient times. Nowadays, propolis use in over-the-counter preparations, “bio”-cosmetics and functional foods, etc., increases. Volatile compounds are found in low concentrations in propolis, but their aroma and significant biological activity make them important for propolis characterisation. Propolis is a plant-derived product: its chemical composition depends on the local flora at the site of collection, thus it offers a significant chemical diversity. The role of propolis volatiles in identification of its plant origin is discussed. The available data about chemical composition of propolis volatiles from different geographic regions are reviewed, demonstrating significant chemical variability. The contribution of volatiles and their constituents to the biological activities of propolis is considered. Future perspectives in research on propolis volatiles are outlined, especially in studying activities other than antimicrobial. PMID:24812573

  10. A chemical rescue screen identifies a Plasmodium falciparum apicoplast inhibitor targeting MEP isoprenoid precursor biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wesley; Herrera, Zachary; Ebert, Danny; Baska, Katie; Cho, Seok H; DeRisi, Joseph L; Yeh, Ellen

    2015-01-01

    The apicoplast is an essential plastid organelle found in Plasmodium parasites which contains several clinically validated antimalarial-drug targets. A chemical rescue screen identified MMV-08138 from the "Malaria Box" library of growth-inhibitory antimalarial compounds as having specific activity against the apicoplast. MMV-08138 inhibition of blood-stage Plasmodium falciparum growth is stereospecific and potent, with the most active diastereomer demonstrating a 50% effective concentration (EC50) of 110 nM. Whole-genome sequencing of 3 drug-resistant parasite populations from two independent selections revealed E688Q and L244I mutations in P. falciparum IspD, an enzyme in the MEP (methyl-d-erythritol-4-phosphate) isoprenoid precursor biosynthesis pathway in the apicoplast. The active diastereomer of MMV-08138 directly inhibited PfIspD activity in vitro with a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 7.0 nM. MMV-08138 is the first PfIspD inhibitor to be identified and, together with heterologously expressed PfIspD, provides the foundation for further development of this promising antimalarial drug candidate lead. Furthermore, this report validates the use of the apicoplast chemical rescue screen coupled with target elucidation as a discovery tool to identify specific apicoplast-targeting compounds with new mechanisms of action. PMID:25367906

  11. A Chemical Rescue Screen Identifies a Plasmodium falciparum Apicoplast Inhibitor Targeting MEP Isoprenoid Precursor Biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wesley; Herrera, Zachary; Ebert, Danny; Baska, Katie; Cho, Seok H.

    2014-01-01

    The apicoplast is an essential plastid organelle found in Plasmodium parasites which contains several clinically validated antimalarial-drug targets. A chemical rescue screen identified MMV-08138 from the “Malaria Box” library of growth-inhibitory antimalarial compounds as having specific activity against the apicoplast. MMV-08138 inhibition of blood-stage Plasmodium falciparum growth is stereospecific and potent, with the most active diastereomer demonstrating a 50% effective concentration (EC50) of 110 nM. Whole-genome sequencing of 3 drug-resistant parasite populations from two independent selections revealed E688Q and L244I mutations in P. falciparum IspD, an enzyme in the MEP (methyl-d-erythritol-4-phosphate) isoprenoid precursor biosynthesis pathway in the apicoplast. The active diastereomer of MMV-08138 directly inhibited PfIspD activity in vitro with a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of 7.0 nM. MMV-08138 is the first PfIspD inhibitor to be identified and, together with heterologously expressed PfIspD, provides the foundation for further development of this promising antimalarial drug candidate lead. Furthermore, this report validates the use of the apicoplast chemical rescue screen coupled with target elucidation as a discovery tool to identify specific apicoplast-targeting compounds with new mechanisms of action. PMID:25367906

  12. Identifying inhibitory compounds in lignocellulosic biomass hydrolysates using an exometabolomics approach

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Inhibitors are formed that reduce the fermentation performance of fermenting yeast during the pretreatment process of lignocellulosic biomass. An exometabolomics approach was applied to systematically identify inhibitors in lignocellulosic biomass hydrolysates. Results We studied the composition and fermentability of 24 different biomass hydrolysates. To create diversity, the 24 hydrolysates were prepared from six different biomass types, namely sugar cane bagasse, corn stover, wheat straw, barley straw, willow wood chips and oak sawdust, and with four different pretreatment methods, i.e. dilute acid, mild alkaline, alkaline/peracetic acid and concentrated acid. Their composition and that of fermentation samples generated with these hydrolysates were analyzed with two GC-MS methods. Either ethyl acetate extraction or ethyl chloroformate derivatization was used before conducting GC-MS to prevent sugars are overloaded in the chromatograms, which obscure the detection of less abundant compounds. Using multivariate PLS-2CV and nPLS-2CV data analysis models, potential inhibitors were identified through establishing relationship between fermentability and composition of the hydrolysates. These identified compounds were tested for their effects on the growth of the model yeast, Saccharomyces. cerevisiae CEN.PK 113-7D, confirming that the majority of the identified compounds were indeed inhibitors. Conclusion Inhibitory compounds in lignocellulosic biomass hydrolysates were successfully identified using a non-targeted systematic approach: metabolomics. The identified inhibitors include both known ones, such as furfural, HMF and vanillin, and novel inhibitors, namely sorbic acid and phenylacetaldehyde. PMID:24655423

  13. Chemical screen identifies FDA-approved drugs and target pathways that induce precocious pancreatic endocrine differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Rovira, Meritxell; Huang, Wei; Yusuff, Shamila; Shim, Joong Sup; Ferrante, Anthony A.; Liu, Jun O.; Parsons, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    Pancreatic ?-cells are an essential source of insulin and their destruction because of autoimmunity causes type I diabetes. We conducted a chemical screen to identify compounds that would induce the differentiation of insulin-producing ?-cells in vivo. To do this screen, we brought together the use of transgenic zebrafish as a model of ?-cell differentiation, a unique multiwell plate that allows easy visualization of lateral views of swimming larval fish and a library of clinical drugs. We identified six hits that can induce precocious differentiation of secondary islets in larval zebrafish. Three of these six hits were known drugs with a considerable background of published data on mechanism of action. Using pharmacological approaches, we have identified and characterized two unique pathways in ?-cell differentiation in the zebrafish, including down-regulation of GTP production and retinoic acid biosynthesis. PMID:22084084

  14. Increasing analytical capacity in the search to identify compounds that kill young wheat stem sawfly larvae

    E-print Network

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    Increasing analytical capacity in the search to identify compounds that kill young wheat stem insect pest species in wheat. Two examples that have some relevance to Montana are antibiosis to Hessian fly (HF) and to orange wheat blossom midge (OWBM), both occasional pests of wheat. In the case of both

  15. IDENTIFYING COMPOUNDS USING SOURCE CID ON AN ORTHOGONAL ACCELERATION TIME-OF-FLIGHT MASS SPECTROMETER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exact mass libraries of ESI and APCI mass spectra are not commercially available In-house libraries are dependent on CID parameters and are instrument specific. The ability to identify compounds without reliance on mass spectral libraries is therefore more crucial for liquid sam...

  16. A NEW MASS SPECTROMETRIC TECHNIQUE FOR IDENTIFYING TRACE-LEVEL ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN COMPLEX MIXTURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Most organic compounds are not found in mass spectral libraries and cannot be easily identified from low resolution mass spectra. Ion Composition Elucidation (ICE) utilizes selected ion recording with a double focusing mass spectrometer in a new way to determine exact mas...

  17. High-throughput chemical screens identify disulfiram as an inhibitor of human glioblastoma stem cells.

    PubMed

    Hothi, Parvinder; Martins, Timothy J; Chen, Liping; Deleyrolle, Loic; Yoon, Jae-Geun; Reynolds, Brent; Foltz, Greg

    2012-10-01

    Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) continues to have a poor patient prognosis despite optimal standard of care. Glioma stem cells (GSCs) have been implicated as the presumed cause of tumor recurrence and resistance to therapy. With this in mind, we screened a diverse chemical library of 2,000 compounds to identify therapeutic agents that inhibit GSC proliferation and therefore have the potential to extend patient survival. High-throughput screens (HTS) identified 78 compounds that repeatedly inhibited cellular proliferation, of which 47 are clinically approved for other indications and 31 are experimental drugs. Several compounds (such as digitoxin, deguelin, patulin and phenethyl caffeate) exhibited high cytotoxicity, with half maximal inhibitory concentrations (IC50) in the low nanomolar range. In particular, the FDA approved drug for the treatment of alcoholism, disulfiram (DSF), was significantly potent across multiple patient samples (IC50 of 31.1 nM). The activity of DSF was potentiated by copper (Cu), which markedly increased GSC death. DSF-Cu inhibited the chymotrypsin-like proteasomal activity in cultured GSCs, consistent with inactivation of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and the subsequent induction of tumor cell death. Given that DSF is a relatively non-toxic drug that can penetrate the blood-brain barrier, we suggest that DSF should be tested (as either a monotherapy or as an adjuvant) in pre-clinical models of human GBM. Data also support targeting of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway as a therapeutic approach in the treatment of GBM. PMID:23165409

  18. High-Throughput Chemical Screens Identify Disulfiram as an Inhibitor of Human Glioblastoma Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hothi, Parvinder; Martins, Timothy J.; Chen, LiPing; Deleyrolle, Loic; Yoon, Jae-Geun; Reynolds, Brent; Foltz, Greg

    2012-01-01

    Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) continues to have a poor patient prognosis despite optimal standard of care. Glioma stem cells (GSCs) have been implicated as the presumed cause of tumor recurrence and resistance to therapy. With this in mind, we screened a diverse chemical library of 2,000 compounds to identify therapeutic agents that inhibit GSC proliferation and therefore have the potential to extend patient survival. High-throughput screens (HTS) identified 78 compounds that repeatedly inhibited cellular proliferation, of which 47 are clinically approved for other indications and 31 are experimental drugs. Several compounds (such as digitoxin, deguelin, patulin and phenethyl caffeate) exhibited high cytotoxicity, with half maximal inhibitory concentrations (IC50) in the low nanomolar range. In particular, the FDA approved drug for the treatment of alcoholism, disulfiram (DSF), was significantly potent across multiple patient samples (IC50 of 31.1 nM). The activity of DSF was potentiated by copper (Cu), which markedly increased GSC death. DSF–Cu inhibited the chymotrypsin-like proteasomal activity in cultured GSCs, consistent with inactivation of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and the subsequent induction of tumor cell death. Given that DSF is a relatively non-toxic drug that can penetrate the blood-brain barrier, we suggest that DSF should be tested (as either a monotherapy or as an adjuvant) in pre-clinical models of human GBM. Data also support targeting of the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway as a therapeutic approach in the treatment of GBM. PMID:23165409

  19. Chemical Compound Targets for SHIP - Production, Properties, and Application

    SciTech Connect

    Kindler, B.; Ackermann, D.; Gembalies-Datz, D.; Hartmann, W.; Hessberger, F.P.; Hofmann, S.; Klemm, J.; Lommel, B.; Mann, R.; Steiner, J. [Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung (GSI), D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

    2003-08-26

    The use of metallic lead or bismuth targets is limited at high beam currents due to their low melting point. In order to increase the intensity for irradiation, we investigated chemical compound targets with higher melting temperature. The properties of these targets are promising for further increase of the sensitivity in experiments searching for superheavy elements. The target material is controlled in each step of the production process as well as after the irradiation by optical microscopy, weighing, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy-dispersive x-ray analysis (EDX). In some cases also wavelength dispersive x-ray analysis (WDX), and Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) are applied. We report on the synthesis of the target material, the production of the targets and their application in heavy-ion experiments.

  20. Cyclodextrin-based chemical microsensors for Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs)

    SciTech Connect

    Li, DeQuan

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This project addressed the development of surface-acoustic-wave (SAW)-based chemical sensors for remote, real-time sensing in air, groundwater, and possibly soil, of chlorinated and aromatic hydrocarbons using innovative molecular self-assembly techniques. Our goal is parts per billion (ppb) sensitivity to specific aromatic and chlorinated hydrocarbons using cyclodextrin as the selective layer of a SAW-based mass sensor. We have demonstrated that SAW sensors can differentiate between compounds with similar composition, structure, and polarity. These efforts, however, can be enhanced by using sensor arrays and smart data processing systems. Secondly, ionic interactions provide a convenient way to fabricate thin films for sensor applications. The potential of these thin films for sensor applications is currently being evaluated. 3 figs.

  1. On the prediction of thermal stability of nitroaromatic compounds using quantum chemical calculations

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ranks at top of physicochemical hazards that may be feared from the use of a given chemical [11 On the prediction of thermal stability of nitroaromatic compounds using quantum chemical a new approach to predict thermal stability of nitroaromatic compounds based on quantum chemical

  2. [Physical, chemical and bioactive compounds of tree tomato (Cyphomandra betacea)].

    PubMed

    Torres, Alexia

    2012-12-01

    Tree tomato (Cyphomandra betacea) is appreciated for its excellent nutritional qualities, being considered a good source of antioxidants compounds, calcium, phosphorus, potassium and iron, sugars, organic acids, pectins and flavonoids. In this study, were evaluated physical parameters (weight, size, compression strength and humidity) and chemical (degrees Brix, titratable acidity, pH, protein, dietary fiber, ash, minerals and their bioaccesibility, pectin, antioxidants compounds) of the fruit from the Aragua State, Venezuela, as a contribution to stimulate and diversify the consumption of the tree tomato. The characterization showed that the fruits were at the ripening stage for consumption (degrees Brix 10.51, pH 3.5, acidity 0.02 g/100ml and 4.32 Kgf/cm2 compression strength) gave a yield of 74% pulp. The analytical results of the ripped pulp showed a content of 30 Kcal/100 g, dietary fiber (4.10 g/100 g), and minerals such as phosphorous, calcium, magnesium, potassium and iron (331.32, 21.25, 21.18, 17.03 and 7.44 mg/100 g, respectively). Bioaccesibility values of 6.71 and 1.86% were reported for calcium and iron. The extracted pectin (1.00 g/100 g) was classified as high methoxyl with high degree of esterification. The antioxidant capacity of the ripped pulp (EC50 of 165.00 g/g DPPH and reducing power of 0.07 mmol Fe +2/100 g), could be attributed to the presence of ascorbic acid (23.32 mg/100 g), lycopene (1.22 mg/100 g), and phenolic compounds (1.39 mg GAE/g), anthocyanins (0.29 mg cyanidin/g) and tannins (0.40 mg catechin/100 g).The results obtained encourage the nutritional benefits and suggest applications as a functional ingredient in food product development. PMID:24020259

  3. Chemical environment and Ce valence: Global trends in transition-metal compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Neifeld, R.A.; Croft, M.; Mihalisin, T.; Segre, C.U.; Madigan, M.; Torikachvili, M.S.; Maple, M.B.; DeLong, L.E.

    1985-11-15

    Results of L/sub III/ absorption spectroscopy measurements on a wide range of Ce--transition-metal (T) compounds are presented and Ce valence-state estimates are made. We are able to identify extremely regular trends in the response of the Ce valence and Ce-T hybridization strength to systematic variations in the solid-state chemical environment. Our work facilitates identification of the specific elements in the T-metal electronic structure which drive the Ce valence-state change.

  4. The Periodic Table as a Part of the Periodic Table of Chemical Compounds

    E-print Network

    Labushev, Mikhail M

    2011-01-01

    The numbers of natural chemical elements, minerals, inorganic and organic chemical compounds are determined by 1, 2, 3 and 4-combinations of a set 95 and are respectively equal to 95, 4,465, 138,415 and 3,183,545. To explain these relations it is suggested the concept of information coefficient of proportionality as mathematical generalization of the proportionality coefficient for any set of positive numbers. It is suggested a hypothesis that the unimodal distributions of the sets of information coefficients of proportionality for atomic weights of chemical elements of minerals and chemical compounds correspond to unimodal distributions of the above sets for combination of 2, 3 and 4 atomic weights of 95 natural chemical elements. The expected values of symmetrized distributions of information coefficients of proportionality sets for atomic weights of minerals and chemical compounds are proposed to be used to define chemical compounds, like atomic weights define chemical elements. Variational series of the e...

  5. A Focused Small-Molecule Screen Identifies 14 Compounds with Distinct Effects on Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Kamau, Edwin T.; Srinivasan, Ananth R.; Brown, Mark J.; Fair, Matthew G.; Caraher, Erin J.

    2012-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is a globally ubiquitous pathogen that can cause severe disease in immunocompromised humans and the developing fetus. Given the proven role of Toxoplasma-secreted kinases in the interaction of Toxoplasma with its host cell, identification of novel kinase inhibitors could precipitate the development of new anti-Toxoplasma drugs and define new pathways important for parasite survival. We selected a small (n = 527) but diverse set of putative kinase inhibitors and screened them for effects on the growth of Toxoplasma in vitro. We identified and validated 14 noncytotoxic compounds, all of which had 50% effective concentrations in the nanomolar to micromolar range. We further characterized eight of these compounds, four inhibitors and four enhancers, by determining their effects on parasite motility, invasion, and the likely cellular target (parasite or host cell). Only two compounds had an effect on parasite motility and invasion. All the inhibitors appeared to target the parasite, and interestingly, two of the enhancers appeared to rather target the host cell, suggesting modulation of host cell pathways beneficial for parasite growth. For the four inhibitors, we also tested their efficacy in a mouse model, where one compound proved potent. Overall, these 14 compounds represent a new and diverse set of small molecules that are likely targeting distinct parasite and host cell pathways. Future work will aim to characterize their molecular targets in both the host and parasite. PMID:22908155

  6. UniChem: a unified chemical structure cross-referencing and identifier tracking system.

    PubMed

    Chambers, Jon; Davies, Mark; Gaulton, Anna; Hersey, Anne; Velankar, Sameer; Petryszak, Robert; Hastings, Janna; Bellis, Louisa; McGlinchey, Shaun; Overington, John P

    2013-01-01

    UniChem is a freely available compound identifier mapping service on the internet, designed to optimize the efficiency with which structure-based hyperlinks may be built and maintained between chemistry-based resources. In the past, the creation and maintenance of such links at EMBL-EBI, where several chemistry-based resources exist, has required independent efforts by each of the separate teams. These efforts were complicated by the different data models, release schedules, and differing business rules for compound normalization and identifier nomenclature that exist across the organization. UniChem, a large-scale, non-redundant database of Standard InChIs with pointers between these structures and chemical identifiers from all the separate chemistry resources, was developed as a means of efficiently sharing the maintenance overhead of creating these links. Thus, for each source represented in UniChem, all links to and from all other sources are automatically calculated and immediately available for all to use. Updated mappings are immediately available upon loading of new data releases from the sources. Web services in UniChem provide users with a single simple automatable mechanism for maintaining all links from their resource to all other sources represented in UniChem. In addition, functionality to track changes in identifier usage allows users to monitor which identifiers are current, and which are obsolete. Lastly, UniChem has been deliberately designed to allow additional resources to be included with minimal effort. Indeed, the recent inclusion of data sources external to EMBL-EBI has provided a simple means of providing users with an even wider selection of resources with which to link to, all at no extra cost, while at the same time providing a simple mechanism for external resources to link to all EMBL-EBI chemistry resources. PMID:23317286

  7. Bioautography and chemical characterization of antimicrobial compound(s) in commercial water-soluble annatto extracts.

    PubMed

    Galindo-Cuspinera, Veronica; Rankin, Scott A

    2005-04-01

    Annatto preparations based on extracts of the seed of tropical bush Bixa orellana L consist of carotenoid-type pigments. Previous reports indicate that commercial annatto extracts have biological activities against microorganisms of significance to food fermentation, preservation, and safety. The objective of this study was to separate and identify the compound(s) responsible for the antimicrobial activity of annatto preparations. Commercial water-soluble annatto extracts were screened by thin-layer chromatography and bioautography followed by liquid chromatography/photodiode array/mass spectrometry (LC/PDA/MS) analysis of active fractions. Bioautography revealed two fractions with antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus. LC/PDA/MS analysis of both fractions revealed 9'-cis-norbixin (UV(max) 460 and 489 nm) and all-trans-norbixin (UV(max) 287, 470, and 494 nm) as the major components. Structure confirmation was achieved by (1)H NMR spectroscopy. Results indicate that 9'-cis-norbixin and all-trans-norbixin are responsible for the antimicrobial properties of annatto. PMID:15796589

  8. Chemical and biological characterisation of nutraceutical compounds of broccoli.

    PubMed

    Moreno, D A; Carvajal, M; López-Berenguer, C; García-Viguera, C

    2006-08-28

    People's diet offers a greater and more diverse group of plant bioactives than do drugs, and they often do not realise that many drugs are derived from the compounds originally discovered in plant foods. Numerous epidemiological studies indicate that Brassica vegetables in general, and broccoli in particular, protect humans against cancer since they are rich sources of glucosinolates as well as possessing a high content of flavonoids, vitamins and mineral nutrients. One unusual phytotherapeutic role of broccoli is for skin diseases--the juice of the leaves is used to treat warts. However, the main use of broccoli stems from its health-promoting properties. Some criteria have been proposed to evaluate the possibilities of developing new "functional foods" to reduce the risk of specific cancers; largely in broccoli, which is associated with cancer protection. Processing conditions, transport, domestic cooking, etc., affect the health-promoting properties of broccoli and these have been widely studied. This review makes an in-depth study of the chemical and biological characterization of the phytochemicals of broccoli and the effects on the bioactive composition of broccoli. PMID:16713696

  9. Machine learning of molecular electronic properties in chemical compound space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montavon, Grégoire; Rupp, Matthias; Gobre, Vivekanand; Vazquez-Mayagoitia, Alvaro; Hansen, Katja; Tkatchenko, Alexandre; Müller, Klaus-Robert; Anatole von Lilienfeld, O.

    2013-09-01

    The combination of modern scientific computing with electronic structure theory can lead to an unprecedented amount of data amenable to intelligent data analysis for the identification of meaningful, novel and predictive structure-property relationships. Such relationships enable high-throughput screening for relevant properties in an exponentially growing pool of virtual compounds that are synthetically accessible. Here, we present a machine learning model, trained on a database of ab initio calculation results for thousands of organic molecules, that simultaneously predicts multiple electronic ground- and excited-state properties. The properties include atomization energy, polarizability, frontier orbital eigenvalues, ionization potential, electron affinity and excitation energies. The machine learning model is based on a deep multi-task artificial neural network, exploiting the underlying correlations between various molecular properties. The input is identical to ab initio methods, i.e. nuclear charges and Cartesian coordinates of all atoms. For small organic molecules, the accuracy of such a ‘quantum machine’ is similar, and sometimes superior, to modern quantum-chemical methods—at negligible computational cost.

  10. Oxidative properties and chemical stability of fluoronanotubes in matrixes of binary inorganic compounds.

    PubMed

    Peng, Haiqing; Gu, Zhenning; Liu, Yu; Chiang, Ivana W; Smalley, Richard E; Hauge, Robert H; Khabashesku, Valery N; Margrave, John L

    2003-01-01

    The chemical stability of fluoronanotubes in selected solid inorganic matrixes has been studied by initially mixing and mechanically grinding the components and subsequently heating them at temperatures ranging from 35 to 600 degrees C. The inorganic compounds selected for matrixes included halides (KBr, KI, Lil, LiBr, LiCl, NaCl, Znl2), oxides (Li2O, Fe2O3, PbO, MnO), lithium peroxide (Li2O2), potassium superoxide (KO2), sulfides (Li2S and ZnS), zinc selenide (ZnSe), lithium nitride (Li3N), and aluminum phosphide (AIP). Solid products, resulting from the proceeding chemical reactions, were analyzed by X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, and SEM/EDX elemental analysis. Gaseous and volatile products were identified with the help of the TGA/MS technique. Experimental data presented in this paper provide clear evidence that fluoronanotubes are not chemically inert toward the solid matrixes studied and exhibit significant oxidative properties in the redox reactions occurring under various temperatures, depending on the nature of the inorganic compound. PMID:12908234

  11. In situ Analysis of Organic Compounds on Mars using Chemical Derivatization and Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavin, D. P.; Buch, A.; Cabane, M.; Coll, P.; Navarro-Gonzalez, R.; Mahaffy, P. R.

    2005-01-01

    One of the core science objectives of NASA's 2009 Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) mission is to determine the past or present habitability of Mars. The search for key organic compounds relevant to terrestrial life will be an important part of that assessment. We have developed a protocol for the analysis of amino acids and carboxylic acids in Mars analogue materials using gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS). As shown, a variety of carboxylic acids were readily identified in soil collected from the Atacama Desert in Chile at part-per-billion levels by GCMS after extraction and chemical derivatization using the reagent N,N-tert.-butyl (dimethylsilyl) trifluoroacetamide (MTBSTFA). Several derivatized amino acids including glycine and alanine were also detected by GCMS in the Atacama soil at lower concentrations (chromatogram not shown). Lacking derivatization capability, the Viking pyrolysis GCMS instruments could not have detected amino acids and carboxylic acids, since these non-volatile compounds require chemical transformation into volatile species that are stable in a GC column. We are currently optimizing the chemical extraction and derivatization technique for in situ GCMS analysis on Mars. Laboratory results of analyses of Atacama Desert samples and other Mars analogue materials using this protocol will be presented.

  12. Identification and quantification of individual chemical compounds in biogenic secondary organic aerosols using GCxGC-VUV/EI-HRTOFMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Decker, M.; Worton, D. R.; Isaacman, G. A.; Chan, A. W.; Ruehl, C.; Zhao, Y.; Wilson, K. R.; Goldstein, A. H.

    2012-12-01

    Atmospheric aerosols have adverse effects on human health and air quality and affect radiative forcing and thus climate. While the organic fraction of aerosols is substantial, the sources and chemistry leading to the formation of secondary organic aerosols are very poorly understood. Characterizing individual compounds present in organic aerosol provides insights into the sources, formation mechanisms and oxidative transformations that have taken place. Fifteen aerosol samples collected over a 5 day period at the Blodgett Forest Research Station in the Sierra Nevada Mountains, part of the Biosphere Effects on Aerosols and Photochemistry Experiment (BEARPEX) in July 2009, were analyzed using comprehensive two dimensional gas chromatography with high resolution time of flight mass spectrometry (GCxGC-HRTOFMS). Approximately 600 compounds were observed in each sample as significant peaks in the chromatogram. Of these, around a third were identified by matching the unique electron ionization (EI) mass spectrum of each compound to the NIST library of characteristic fragmentation patterns. One filter sample was also analyzed using vacuum ultraviolet ionization (VUV) instead of EI. This 'soft' ionization technique results in much less fragmentation yielding the molecular ion of each compound, from which the exact mass was determined. If the formula of the EI library matched compound equaled the high mass resolution VUV molecular weight within a certain tolerance (< 30 ppm), then the library match was considered confirmed; 226 compounds were identified in this way. Using the VUV technique 234 additional compounds that were not in the EI mass spectral database were assigned chemical formulas based on the observed molecular weights. The chemical formulas in conjunction with the location of the compound in the GCxGC chromatogram were used to provide further classification of these compounds based on their likely functionalization. The broad array of observed oxygenated compounds provide important constraints on the origins and secondary organic aerosol formation pathways in this region.

  13. Gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC\\/MS) system for quantitative analysis of reactive chemical compounds

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Grindstaff; Quirinus G

    1992-01-01

    Described is a new gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC\\/MS) system and method for quantitative analysis of reactive chemical compounds. All components of such a GC\\/MS system external to the oven of the gas chromatograph are programmably temperature controlled to operate at a volatilization temperature specific to the compound(s) sought to be separated and measured.

  14. Gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC/MS) system for quantitative analysis of reactive chemical compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Grindstaff, Quirinus G. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1992-01-01

    Described is a new gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC/MS) system and method for quantitative analysis of reactive chemical compounds. All components of such a GC/MS system external to the oven of the gas chromatograph are programmably temperature controlled to operate at a volatilization temperature specific to the compound(s) sought to be separated and measured.

  15. From Leaf Metabolome to In Vivo Testing: Identifying Antifeedant Compounds for Ecological Studies of Marsupial Diets.

    PubMed

    Marsh, Karen J; Yin, Baofa; Singh, Inder Pal; Saraf, Isha; Choudhary, Alka; Au, Jessie; Tucker, David J; Foley, William J

    2015-06-01

    Identifying specific plant secondary metabolites that influence feeding behavior can be challenging, but a solid understanding of animal preferences can guide efforts. Common brushtail possums (Trichosurus vulpecula) predominantly eat Eucalyptus species belonging to the subgenus Symphyomyrtus, and avoid eating those belonging to the Monocalyptus subgenus (also called subgenus Eucalyptus). Using an unbiased (1)H NMR metabolomics approach, a previous study identified unsubstituted B ring flavanones in most species of monocalypts examined, whereas these compounds were absent from symphyomyrtles. We hypothesised that unsubstituted B ring flavanones act as feeding deterrents for common brushtail possums. In the current study, we tested this hypothesis by comparing how much possums ate of a basal diet, with diets containing one of four structurally related compounds; pinocembrin, flavanone (unsubstituted B ring flavanones), chrysin (the flavone analogue of pinocembrin), and naringenin (a flavanone with B ring substitution). We found that pinocembrin and flavanone deterred feeding relative to the basal diet, but that chrysin and naringenin did not at equivalent concentrations. Thus, unsubstituted B-ring flavanones may explain why brushtail possums avoid eating monocalypt species. Furthermore, small differences in the structure of secondary compounds can have a large impact on antifeedant properties. These results demonstrate that metabolomics can be a valuable tool for ecologists seeking to understand herbivore feeding preferences. PMID:25994224

  16. Genomic Models of Short-Term Exposure Accurately Predict Long-Term Chemical Carcinogenicity and Identify Putative Mechanisms of Action

    PubMed Central

    Gusenleitner, Daniel; Auerbach, Scott S.; Melia, Tisha; Gómez, Harold F.; Sherr, David H.; Monti, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite an overall decrease in incidence of and mortality from cancer, about 40% of Americans will be diagnosed with the disease in their lifetime, and around 20% will die of it. Current approaches to test carcinogenic chemicals adopt the 2-year rodent bioassay, which is costly and time-consuming. As a result, fewer than 2% of the chemicals on the market have actually been tested. However, evidence accumulated to date suggests that gene expression profiles from model organisms exposed to chemical compounds reflect underlying mechanisms of action, and that these toxicogenomic models could be used in the prediction of chemical carcinogenicity. Results In this study, we used a rat-based microarray dataset from the NTP DrugMatrix Database to test the ability of toxicogenomics to model carcinogenicity. We analyzed 1,221 gene-expression profiles obtained from rats treated with 127 well-characterized compounds, including genotoxic and non-genotoxic carcinogens. We built a classifier that predicts a chemical's carcinogenic potential with an AUC of 0.78, and validated it on an independent dataset from the Japanese Toxicogenomics Project consisting of 2,065 profiles from 72 compounds. Finally, we identified differentially expressed genes associated with chemical carcinogenesis, and developed novel data-driven approaches for the molecular characterization of the response to chemical stressors. Conclusion Here, we validate a toxicogenomic approach to predict carcinogenicity and provide strong evidence that, with a larger set of compounds, we should be able to improve the sensitivity and specificity of the predictions. We found that the prediction of carcinogenicity is tissue-dependent and that the results also confirm and expand upon previous studies implicating DNA damage, the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor, the aryl hydrocarbon receptor, and regenerative pathology in the response to carcinogen exposure. PMID:25058030

  17. Self-reported multiple chemical sensitivity symptoms and personal volatile organic compounds exposure concentrations in construction workers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chungyoon Chun; Kichul Sung; Eunjung Kim; Junseok Park

    2010-01-01

    The relationship between high chemical compound exposure and human health has been an important worldwide issue. High exposure to chemical compounds can make harmful health effect. One of the mostly risky groups to this high exposure to chemical compounds is the construction worker. In this study, their exposure level and self-reported Multiple Chemical Sensitivity were investigated. In the first part

  18. Emission and Chemical Transformation of Biogenic Volatile Organic Compounds (echo)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koppmann, R.; Hoffmann, T.; Kesselmeier, J.; Schatzmann, M.

    Forests are complex sources of biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOC) in the planetary boundary layer. The impact of biogenic VOC on tropospheric photochem- istry, air quality, and the formation of secondary products affects our climate on a regional and global scale but is far from being understood. A considerable lack of knowledge exists concerning a forest stand as a net source of reactive trace com- pounds, which are transported directly into the planetary boundary layer (PBL). In particular, little is known about the amounts of VOC which are processed within the canopy. The goal of ECHO, which is presented in this poster, is to investigate these questions and to improve our understanding of biosphere-atmosphere interactions and their effects on the PBL. The investigation of emissions, chemical processing and vertical transport of biogenic VOC will be carried out in and above a mixed forest stand in Jülich, Germany. A large set of trace gases, free radicals and meteorologi- cal parameters will be measured at different heights in and above the canopy, covering concentrations of VOC, CO, O3, organic nitrates und NOx as well as organic aerosols. For the first time concentration profiles of OH, HO2, RO2 und NO3 radicals will be measured as well together with the actinic UV radiation field and photolysis frequen- cies of all relevant radical precursors (O3, NO2, peroxides, oxygenated VOC). The different tasks of the field experiments will be supported by simulation experiments investigating the primary emission and the uptake of VOC by the plants in stirred tank reactors, soil parameters and soil emissions in lysimeter experiments, and the chem- ical processing of the trace gases as observed in and above the forest stand in the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR. The planning and interpretation of the field experiments is supported by simulations of the field site in a wind tunnel.

  19. A cell-based fascin bioassay identifies compounds with potential anti-metastasis or cognition-enhancing functions

    PubMed Central

    Kraft, Robert; Kahn, Allon; Medina-Franco, José L.; Orlowski, Mikayla L.; Baynes, Cayla; López-Vallejo, Fabian; Barnard, Kobus; Maggiora, Gerald M.; Restifo, Linda L.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY The actin-bundling protein fascin is a key mediator of tumor invasion and metastasis and its activity drives filopodia formation, cell-shape changes and cell migration. Small-molecule inhibitors of fascin block tumor metastasis in animal models. Conversely, fascin deficiency might underlie the pathogenesis of some developmental brain disorders. To identify fascin-pathway modulators we devised a cell-based assay for fascin function and used it in a bidirectional drug screen. The screen utilized cultured fascin-deficient mutant Drosophila neurons, whose neurite arbors manifest the ‘filagree’ phenotype. Taking a repurposing approach, we screened a library of 1040 known compounds, many of them FDA-approved drugs, for filagree modifiers. Based on scaffold distribution, molecular-fingerprint similarities, and chemical-space distribution, this library has high structural diversity, supporting its utility as a screening tool. We identified 34 fascin-pathway blockers (with potential anti-metastasis activity) and 48 fascin-pathway enhancers (with potential cognitive-enhancer activity). The structural diversity of the active compounds suggests multiple molecular targets. Comparisons of active and inactive compounds provided preliminary structure-activity relationship information. The screen also revealed diverse neurotoxic effects of other drugs, notably the ‘beads-on-a-string’ defect, which is induced solely by statins. Statin-induced neurotoxicity is enhanced by fascin deficiency. In summary, we provide evidence that primary neuron culture using a genetic model organism can be valuable for early-stage drug discovery and developmental neurotoxicity testing. Furthermore, we propose that, given an appropriate assay for target-pathway function, bidirectional screening for brain-development disorders and invasive cancers represents an efficient, multipurpose strategy for drug discovery. PMID:22917928

  20. Identification of IAA transport inhibitors including compounds affecting cellular PIN trafficking by two chemical screening approaches using maize coleoptile systems.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Takeshi; Matano, Naoyuki; Morishima, Taichi; Kakinuma, Chieko; Hayashi, Ken-Ichiro; Komano, Teruya; Kubo, Minoru; Hasebe, Mitsuyasu; Kasahara, Hiroyuki; Kamiya, Yuji; Koshiba, Tomokazu

    2012-10-01

    The monocot coleoptile tip region has been generally supposed to be the source of IAA to supply IAA to basal parts by the polar IAA transport system, which results in gravi- and phototropic curvature of coleoptiles. Based on this IAA transport system and gravitropism of maize coleoptiles, we have developed two screening methods to identify small molecules from a large chemical library that inhibit IAA transport. The methods detect molecules that affect (i) gravitropic curvature of coleoptiles; and (ii) the amount of IAA transported from the tip. From 10,000 chemicals, eight compounds were identified and categorized into two groups. Four chemicals in group A decreased IAA transport from the tip, and increased endogenous IAA levels in the tip. The structures of two compounds resembled that of 1-N-naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA), but those of the other two differed from structures of known IAA transport inhibitors. Four chemicals in group B strongly inhibited IAA transport from the tip, but IAA levels at the tip were only slightly affected. At higher concentrations, group B compounds inhibited germination of Arabidopsis, similarly to brefeldin A (BFA). Analysis of the cellular distribution of PIN2-green fluorescent protein (GFP) and PIN1-GFP in Arabidopsis revealed that one of the four chemicals in group B induced internalization of PIN1 and PIN2 proteins into vesicles smaller than BFA bodies, suggesting that this compound affects cellular vesicle trafficking systems related to PIN trafficking. The eight chemicals identified here will be a useful tool for understanding the mechanisms of IAA transport in plants. PMID:22875609

  1. Identifying and designing chemicals with minimal acute aquatic toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Kostal, Jakub; Voutchkova-Kostal, Adelina; Anastas, Paul T.; Zimmerman, Julie Beth

    2015-01-01

    Industrial ecology has revolutionized our understanding of material stocks and flows in our economy and society. For this important discipline to have even deeper impact, we must understand the inherent nature of these materials in terms of human health and the environment. This paper focuses on methods to design synthetic chemicals to reduce their intrinsic ability to cause adverse consequence to the biosphere. Advances in the fields of computational chemistry and molecular toxicology in recent decades allow the development of predictive models that inform the design of molecules with reduced potential to be toxic to humans or the environment. The approach presented herein builds on the important work in quantitative structure–activity relationships by linking toxicological and chemical mechanistic insights to the identification of critical physical–chemical properties needed to be modified. This in silico approach yields design guidelines using boundary values for physiochemical properties. Acute aquatic toxicity serves as a model endpoint in this study. Defining value ranges for properties related to bioavailability and reactivity eliminates 99% of the chemicals in the highest concern for acute aquatic toxicity category. This approach and its future implementations are expected to yield very powerful tools for life cycle assessment practitioners and molecular designers that allow rapid assessment of multiple environmental and human health endpoints and inform modifications to minimize hazard. PMID:24639521

  2. Identifying and designing chemicals with minimal acute aquatic toxicity.

    PubMed

    Kostal, Jakub; Voutchkova-Kostal, Adelina; Anastas, Paul T; Zimmerman, Julie Beth

    2015-05-19

    Industrial ecology has revolutionized our understanding of material stocks and flows in our economy and society. For this important discipline to have even deeper impact, we must understand the inherent nature of these materials in terms of human health and the environment. This paper focuses on methods to design synthetic chemicals to reduce their intrinsic ability to cause adverse consequence to the biosphere. Advances in the fields of computational chemistry and molecular toxicology in recent decades allow the development of predictive models that inform the design of molecules with reduced potential to be toxic to humans or the environment. The approach presented herein builds on the important work in quantitative structure-activity relationships by linking toxicological and chemical mechanistic insights to the identification of critical physical-chemical properties needed to be modified. This in silico approach yields design guidelines using boundary values for physiochemical properties. Acute aquatic toxicity serves as a model endpoint in this study. Defining value ranges for properties related to bioavailability and reactivity eliminates 99% of the chemicals in the highest concern for acute aquatic toxicity category. This approach and its future implementations are expected to yield very powerful tools for life cycle assessment practitioners and molecular designers that allow rapid assessment of multiple environmental and human health endpoints and inform modifications to minimize hazard. PMID:24639521

  3. The Use of Functional Chemical-Protein Associations to Identify Multi-Pathway Renoprotectants

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jia; Meng, Kexin; Zhang, Rui; Yang, He; Liao, Chang; Zhu, Wenliang; Jiao, Jundong

    2014-01-01

    Typically, most nephropathies can be categorized as complex human diseases in which the cumulative effect of multiple minor genes, combined with environmental and lifestyle factors, determines the disease phenotype. Thus, multi-target drugs would be more likely to facilitate comprehensive renoprotection than single-target agents. In this study, functional chemical-protein association analysis was performed to retrieve multi-target drugs of high pathway wideness from the STITCH 3.1 database. Pathway wideness of a drug evaluated the efficiency of regulation of Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathways in quantity. We identified nine experimentally validated renoprotectants that exerted remarkable impact on KEGG pathways by targeting a limited number of proteins. We selected curcumin as an illustrative compound to display the advantage of multi-pathway drugs on renoprotection. We compared curcumin with hemin, an agonist of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), which significantly affects only one KEGG pathway, porphyrin and chlorophyll metabolism (adjusted p?=?1.5×10?5). At the same concentration (10 µM), both curcumin and hemin equivalently mitigated oxidative stress in H2O2-treated glomerular mesangial cells. The benefit of using hemin was derived from its agonistic effect on HO-1, providing relief from oxidative stress. Selective inhibition of HO-1 completely blocked the action of hemin but not that of curcumin, suggesting simultaneous multi-pathway intervention by curcumin. Curcumin also increased cellular autophagy levels, enhancing its protective effect; however, hemin had no effects. Based on the fact that the dysregulation of multiple pathways is implicated in the etiology of complex diseases, we proposed a feasible method for identifying multi-pathway drugs from compounds with validated targets. Our efforts will help identify multi-pathway agents capable of providing comprehensive protection against renal injuries. PMID:24830678

  4. Process for preparing a chemical compound enriched in isotope content. [nitrogen 15-enriched nitric acid

    DOEpatents

    Michaels, E.D.

    1981-02-25

    A process to prepare a chemical enriched in isotope content includes: a chemical exchange reaction between a first and second compound which yields an isotopically enriched first compound and an isotopically depleted second compound; the removal of a portion of the first compound as product and the removal of a portion of the second compound as spent material; the conversion of the remainder of the first compound to the second compound for reflux at the product end of the chemical exchange reaction region; the conversion of the remainder of the second compound to the first compound for reflux at the spent material end of the chemical exchange region; and the cycling of the additional chemicals produced by one conversion reaction to the other conversion reaction, for consumption therein. One of the conversion reactions is an oxidation reaction, and the energy that it yields is used to drive the other conversion reaction, a reduction. The reduction reaction is carried out in a solid polymer electrolyte electrolytic reactor. The overall process is energy efficient and yields no waste by-products. A particular embodiment of the process in the production of nitrogen-15-enriched nitric acid.

  5. Effects-driven chemical fractionation of heavy fuel oil to isolate compounds toxic to trout embryos.

    PubMed

    Bornstein, Jason M; Adams, Julie; Hollebone, Bruce; King, Thomas; Hodson, Peter V; Brown, R Stephen

    2014-04-01

    Heavy fuel oil (HFO) spills account for approximately 60% of ship-source oil spills and are up to 50 times more toxic than medium and light crude oils. Heavy fuel oils contain elevated concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and alkyl-PAHs, known to be toxic to fish; however, little direct characterization of HFO toxicity has been reported. An effects-driven chemical fractionation was conducted on HFO 7102 to separate compounds with similar chemical and physical properties, including toxicity, to isolate the groups of compounds most toxic to trout embryos. After each separation, toxicity tests directed the next phase of fractionation, and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis correlated composition with toxicity, with a focus on PAHs. Low-temperature vacuum distillation permitted the separation of HFO into 3 fractions based on boiling point ranges. The most toxic of these fractions underwent wax precipitation to remove long-chain n-alkanes. The remaining PAH-rich extract was further separated using open column chromatography, which provided distinct fractions that were grouped according to increasing aromatic ring count. The most toxic of these fractions was richest in PAHs and alkyl-PAHs. The results of the present study were consistent with previous crude oil studies that identified PAH-rich fractions as the most toxic. PMID:24375845

  6. Refinement of the ECETOC approach to identify endocrine disrupting properties of chemicals in ecotoxicology.

    PubMed

    Weltje, Lennart; Wheeler, James R; Weyers, Arnd; Galay-Burgos, Malyka

    2013-12-16

    To use and implement an assessment scheme for the evaluation of endocrine disrupting properties of chemicals in ecotoxicology, the types of effect need to be agreed. Effects that merit further consideration in this context should fulfil the following three criteria: caused by an endocrine mode of action, be adverse, and be relevant at the population level to reflect the protection goal of ecotoxicological assessments. Thereafter, a comparison of effect values, regardless of the causative mechanisms, should be made, firstly to determine if endocrine toxicity generates the lowest endpoint within a taxon, and secondly if it is the lowest endpoint compared to that of other taxa living in the same compartment. These comparisons inform on two levels of specificity and determine if endocrine-mediated side-effects determine the ecotoxicological profile of a chemical. Various quantitative measures for the assessment of potency are also presented, which could assist in determining how to handle substances in the risk assessment when a regulatory concern is identified. Finally, derogation criteria should be defined for compounds that were designed as endocrine disruptors for non-vertebrates and those for which there is 'negligible exposure'. This paper discusses and provides proposals on how to apply these concepts for assessment of substances. PMID:23467018

  7. Apatite Formation: Why It May Not Work as Planned, and How to Conclusively Identify Apatite Compounds

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Calcium phosphate apatites are inorganic compounds encountered in many different mineralized tissues. Bone mineral, for example, is constituted of nanocrystalline nonstoichiometric apatite, and the production of “analogs” through a variety of methods is frequently reported. In another context, the ability of solid surfaces to favor the nucleation and growth of “bone-like” apatite upon immersion in supersaturated fluids such as SFB is commonly used as one evaluation index of the “bioactivity” of such surfaces. Yet, the compounds or deposits obtained are not always thoroughly characterized, and their apatitic nature is sometimes not firmly assessed by appropriate physicochemical analyses. Of particular importance are the “actual” conditions in which the precipitation takes place. The precipitation of a white solid does not automatically indicate the formation of a “bone-like carbonate apatite layer” as is sometimes too hastily concluded: “all that glitters is not gold.” The identification of an apatite phase should be carefully demonstrated by appropriate characterization, preferably using complementary techniques. This review considers the fundamentals of calcium phosphate apatite characterization discussing several techniques: electron microscopy/EDX, XRD, FTIR/Raman spectroscopies, chemical analyses, and solid state NMR. It also underlines frequent problems that should be kept in mind when making “bone-like apatites.” PMID:23984373

  8. Apatite formation: why it may not work as planned, and how to conclusively identify apatite compounds.

    PubMed

    Drouet, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    Calcium phosphate apatites are inorganic compounds encountered in many different mineralized tissues. Bone mineral, for example, is constituted of nanocrystalline nonstoichiometric apatite, and the production of "analogs" through a variety of methods is frequently reported. In another context, the ability of solid surfaces to favor the nucleation and growth of "bone-like" apatite upon immersion in supersaturated fluids such as SFB is commonly used as one evaluation index of the "bioactivity" of such surfaces. Yet, the compounds or deposits obtained are not always thoroughly characterized, and their apatitic nature is sometimes not firmly assessed by appropriate physicochemical analyses. Of particular importance are the "actual" conditions in which the precipitation takes place. The precipitation of a white solid does not automatically indicate the formation of a "bone-like carbonate apatite layer" as is sometimes too hastily concluded: "all that glitters is not gold." The identification of an apatite phase should be carefully demonstrated by appropriate characterization, preferably using complementary techniques. This review considers the fundamentals of calcium phosphate apatite characterization discussing several techniques: electron microscopy/EDX, XRD, FTIR/Raman spectroscopies, chemical analyses, and solid state NMR. It also underlines frequent problems that should be kept in mind when making "bone-like apatites." PMID:23984373

  9. Cyanobacterium sp. host cell and vector for production of chemical compounds in cyanobacterial cultures

    DOEpatents

    Piven, Irina; Friedrich, Alexandra; Duhring, Ulf; Uliczka, Frank; Baier, Kerstin; Inaba, Masami; Shi, Tuo; Wang, Kui; Enke, Heike; Kramer, Dan

    2014-09-30

    A cyanobacterial host cell, Cyanobacterium sp., that harbors at least one recombinant gene for the production of a chemical compounds is provided, as well as vectors derived from an endogenous plasmid isolated from the cell.

  10. ESTIMATION OF PHYSICAL PROPERTIES AND CHEMICAL REACTIVITY PARAMETERS OF ORGANIC COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The computer program SPARC (Sparc Performs Automated Reasoning in Chemistry)has been under development for several years to estimate physical properties and chemical reactivity parameters of organic compounds strictly from molecular structure. SPARC uses computational algorithms ...

  11. EVALUATION USING AN ORGANOPHILIC CLAY TO CHEMICALLY STABILIZE WASTE CONTAINING ORGANIC COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A modified clay (organophilic) was utilized to evaluate the potential for chemically stabilizing a waste containing organic compounds. hemical bonding between the binder and the contaminants was indicated. eachate testing also indicated strong binding. Copy available at NTIS as ...

  12. Identifying the chemical composition of "brown carbon" in the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2013-07-01

    Aerosol particles in the atmosphere can either absorb or scatter incoming solar radiation, thus either heating or cooling the atmosphere. One of the most studied types of aerosols that absorb radiation is black carbon (also called soot), which comes from incomplete combustion of fossil fuels, biofuel, and biomass. Black carbon has been identified as a significant factor contributing to global warming. Somewhat less well studied is brown carbon, which also absorbs solar radiation but does so slightly differently than black carbon: Brown carbon absorbs light most strongly in ultraviolet and short visible wavelengths, giving it a yellowish or brownish appearance. Biomass burning is a major source of brown carbon.

  13. Antimalarial efficacy of dynamic compound of plumbagin chemical constituent from Plumbago zeylanica Linn (Plumbaginaceae) against the malarial vector Anopheles stephensi Liston (Diptera: Culicidae).

    PubMed

    Pradeepa, Venkatraman; Sathish-Narayanan, Subbiah; Kirubakaran, Suyambulingam Arunachalam; Senthil-Nathan, Sengottayan

    2014-08-01

    In the present investigation, the effective root compound of plumbagin of Plumbago zeylanica (Plumbaginaceae) was evaluated for chemical constituent and antimalarial effect against the fourth instar larvae of Anopheles stephensi Liston (Diptera). In the chromatographic analyses of root compound with Rf value of 0.788 and NMR analyses also revealed that the effective compound contain naphthoquinone plumbagin were identified as the major chemical constituent. Larval mortality was observed after 3 h of exposure period. The plumbagin compound showed remarkable larvicidal activity against A. stephensi (LC50 32.65 and LC9072.27 ppm). Histopathological effects of compound was observed in the treated larvae. Based on the results, the plumbagin compound of P. zeylanica can be considered as a new source of natural larvicide for the control of malarial vector. PMID:25028206

  14. LOW VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND (VOC) CHEMICAL AGENT RESISTANT COATING (CARC)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemical warfare causes many problems on the battlefield, among which is decontamination of exposed equipment. Because of this threat, the US Army ahs required the use of a Chemical Agent Resistant Coating (CARC) system on its equipment, beginning in FY 85. The equipment covere...

  15. Chemical properties and methods of analysis of refractory compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samsonov, G. V. (editor); Frantsevich, I. N. (editor); Yeremenko, V. N. (editor); Nazarchuk, T. N. (editor); Popova, O. I. (editor)

    1978-01-01

    Reactions involving refractory metals and the alloys based on them are discussed. Chemical, electrochemical, photometric, spectrophotometric, and X-ray analysis are among the methods described for analyzing the results of the reactions and for determining the chemical properties of these materials.

  16. Assigning Unique Keys to Chemical Compounds for Data Integration: Some Interesting Counter Examples

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Greeshma Neglur; Robert L. Grossman; Bing Liu

    2005-01-01

    Integrating data involving chemical structures is simplified when unique identifiers (UIDs) can be associated with chemical structures. For example, these identifiers can be used as database keys. One com- mon approach is to use the Unique SMILES notation introduced in (2). The Unique SMILES views a chemical structure as a graph with atoms as nodes and bonds as edges and

  17. Inhibition of the compound action potentials of frog sciatic nerves by aroma oil compounds having various chemical structures

    PubMed Central

    Ohtsubo, Sena; Fujita, Tsugumi; Matsushita, Akitomo; Kumamoto, Eiichi

    2015-01-01

    Plant-derived chemicals including aroma oil compounds have an ability to inhibit nerve conduction and modulate transient receptor potential (TRP) channels. Although applying aroma oils to the skin produces a local anesthetic effect, this has not been yet examined throughly. The aim of the present study was to know how nerve conduction inhibitions by aroma oil compounds are related to their chemical structures and whether these activities are mediated by TRP activation. Compound action potentials (CAPs) were recorded from the frog sciatic nerve by using the air-gap method. Citral (aldehyde), which activates various types of TRP channels, attenuated the peak amplitude of CAP with the half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) value of 0.46 mmol/L. Another aldehyde (citronellal), alcohol (citronellol, geraniol, (±)-linalool, (?)-linalool, (+)-borneol, (?)-borneol, ?-terpineol), ester (geranyl acetate, linalyl acetate, bornyl acetate), and oxide (rose oxide) compounds also reduced CAP peak amplitudes (IC50: 0.50, 0.35, 0.53, 1.7, 2.0, 1.5, 2.3, 2.7, 0.51, 0.71, 0.44, and 2.6 mmol/L, respectively). On the other hand, the amplitudes were reduced by a small extent by hydrocarbons (myrcene and p-cymene) and ketone (camphor) at high concentrations (2–5 mmol/L). The activities of citral and other TRP agonists ((+)-borneol and camphor) were resistant to TRP antagonist ruthenium red. An efficacy sequence for the CAP inhibitions was generally aldehydes ? esters ? alcohols > oxides >> hydrocarbons. The CAP inhibition by the aroma oil compound was not related to its octanol–water partition coefficient. It is suggested that aroma oil compounds inhibit nerve conduction in a manner specific to their chemical structures without TRP activation. PMID:26038703

  18. Inhibition of the compound action potentials of frog sciatic nerves by aroma oil compounds having various chemical structures.

    PubMed

    Ohtsubo, Sena; Fujita, Tsugumi; Matsushita, Akitomo; Kumamoto, Eiichi

    2015-03-01

    Plant-derived chemicals including aroma oil compounds have an ability to inhibit nerve conduction and modulate transient receptor potential (TRP) channels. Although applying aroma oils to the skin produces a local anesthetic effect, this has not been yet examined throughly. The aim of the present study was to know how nerve conduction inhibitions by aroma oil compounds are related to their chemical structures and whether these activities are mediated by TRP activation. Compound action potentials (CAPs) were recorded from the frog sciatic nerve by using the air-gap method. Citral (aldehyde), which activates various types of TRP channels, attenuated the peak amplitude of CAP with the half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) value of 0.46 mmol/L. Another aldehyde (citronellal), alcohol (citronellol, geraniol, (±)-linalool, (-)-linalool, (+)-borneol, (-)-borneol, ?-terpineol), ester (geranyl acetate, linalyl acetate, bornyl acetate), and oxide (rose oxide) compounds also reduced CAP peak amplitudes (IC50: 0.50, 0.35, 0.53, 1.7, 2.0, 1.5, 2.3, 2.7, 0.51, 0.71, 0.44, and 2.6 mmol/L, respectively). On the other hand, the amplitudes were reduced by a small extent by hydrocarbons (myrcene and p-cymene) and ketone (camphor) at high concentrations (2-5 mmol/L). The activities of citral and other TRP agonists ((+)-borneol and camphor) were resistant to TRP antagonist ruthenium red. An efficacy sequence for the CAP inhibitions was generally aldehydes ? esters ? alcohols > oxides > hydrocarbons. The CAP inhibition by the aroma oil compound was not related to its octanol-water partition coefficient. It is suggested that aroma oil compounds inhibit nerve conduction in a manner specific to their chemical structures without TRP activation. PMID:26038703

  19. Chemical class separation and characterization of organic compounds in synthetic fuels

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Douglas W. Later; Milton L. Lee; Keith D. Bartle; Robert C. Kong; Daniel L. Vassilaros

    1981-01-01

    A separation method is described for the identification of organic compounds in synthetic fuel products. Prefractionation of crude synfuel materials into discrete chemical classes was prformed by adsorption column chromatography using small quantities of neutral aluminum oxide and silicic acid. Subsequent high-resolution separation of individual components was achieved by using capillary column gas chromatography, and specific compound types were determined

  20. Combined Rational Design and a High Throughput Screening Platform for Identifying Chemical Inhibitors of a Ras-activating Enzyme.

    PubMed

    Evelyn, Chris R; Biesiada, Jacek; Duan, Xin; Tang, Hong; Shang, Xun; Papoian, Ruben; Seibel, William L; Nelson, Sandra; Meller, Jaroslaw; Zheng, Yi

    2015-05-15

    The Ras family small GTPases regulate multiple cellular processes, including cell growth, survival, movement, and gene expression, and are intimately involved in cancer pathogenesis. Activation of these small GTPases is catalyzed by a special class of enzymes, termed guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs). Herein, we developed a small molecule screening platform for identifying lead hits targeting a Ras GEF enzyme, SOS1. We employed an ensemble structure-based virtual screening approach in combination with a multiple tier high throughput experimental screen utilizing two complementary fluorescent guanine nucleotide exchange assays to identify small molecule inhibitors of GEF catalytic activity toward Ras. From a library of 350,000 compounds, we selected a set of 418 candidate compounds predicted to disrupt the GEF-Ras interaction, of which dual wavelength GDP dissociation and GTP-loading experimental screening identified two chemically distinct small molecule inhibitors. Subsequent biochemical validations indicate that they are capable of dose-dependently inhibiting GEF catalytic activity, binding to SOS1 with micromolar affinity, and disrupting GEF-Ras interaction. Mutagenesis studies in conjunction with structure-activity relationship studies mapped both compounds to different sites in the catalytic pocket, and both inhibited Ras signaling in cells. The unique screening platform established here for targeting Ras GEF enzymes could be broadly useful for identifying lead inhibitors for a variety of small GTPase-activating GEF reactions. PMID:25825487

  1. 76 FR 63304 - Guidance for Industry on Incorporation of Physical-Chemical Identifiers Into Solid Oral Dosage...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-12

    ...Guidance for Industry on Incorporation of Physical-Chemical Identifiers...guidance for industry entitled...of Physical-Chemical Identifiers...guidance for industry entitled...of Physical-Chemical...

  2. Chemical and biological characterisation of nutraceutical compounds of broccoli

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. A. Moreno; M. Carvajal; C. López-Berenguer; C. García-Viguera

    2006-01-01

    People's diet offers a greater and more diverse group of plant bioactives than do drugs, and they often do not realise that many drugs are derived from the compounds originally discovered in plant foods.Numerous epidemiological studies indicate that Brassica vegetables in general, and broccoli in particular, protect humans against cancer since they are rich sources of glucosinolates as well as

  3. Chemical genomic profiling via barcode sequencing to predict compound mode of action

    PubMed Central

    Piotrowski, Jeff S.; Simpkins, Scott W.; Li, Sheena C.; Deshpande, Raamesh; McIlwain, Sean; Ong, Irene; Myers, Chad L.; Boone, Charlie; Andersen, Raymond J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Chemical genomics is an unbiased, whole-cell approach to characterizing novel compounds to determine mode of action and cellular target. Our version of this technique is built upon barcoded deletion mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and has been adapted to a high-throughput methodology using next-generation sequencing. Here we describe the steps to generate a chemical genomic profile from a compound of interest, and how to use this information to predict molecular mechanism and targets of bioactive compounds. PMID:25618354

  4. Quantitative detection of chemical compounds in human hair with coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering

    E-print Network

    Potma, Eric Olaf

    Quantitative detection of chemical compounds in human hair with coherent anti-Stokes Raman to selectively detect molecular agents in hair fibers is of direct relevance to understanding the chemical for inspecting the morphology of both the surface and interior of the hair.5,6 Although morphology stud- ies

  5. Use of cell-based screening to identify small-molecule compounds that modulate claudin-4 expression.

    PubMed

    Watari, Akihiro; Hashegawa, Maki; Muangman, Thanchanok; Yagi, Kiyohito; Kondoh, Masuo

    2015-06-01

    Claudins constitute a family of at least 27 proteins with four transmembrane domains, and play a pivotal role in maintaining tight-junctions seals in diverse epithelial tissues. The expression of claudin-4 often changes in intestinal tissues of inflammatory bowel disease and various human cancers. Therefore, claudin-4 is a promising target for treatment of these diseases. In our previous study, we established a reporter cell line to monitor claudin-4 expression on the basis of a functional claudin-4 promoter. Using this cell line, we have performed a cell-based screen of a library containing 2642 biologically active small-molecule compounds to identify modulators of claudin-4 expression. The screen identified 24 potential modulators of the claudin-4 promoter activity. Fourteen of these compounds (12 of them novel) induced endogenous claudin-4 expression. The identified compounds might serve as lead compounds targeting aberrant gene expression in inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:25700824

  6. Investigating the Effect of Emetic Compounds on Chemotaxis in Dictyostelium Identifies a Non-Sentient Model for Bitter and Hot Tastant Research

    PubMed Central

    Robery, Steven; Mukanowa, Janina; Percie du Sert, Nathalie; Andrews, Paul L. R.; Williams, Robin S. B.

    2011-01-01

    Novel chemical entities (NCEs) may be investigated for emetic liability in a range of unpleasant experiments involving retching, vomiting or conditioned taste aversion/food avoidance in sentient animals. We have used a range of compounds with known emetic /aversive properties to examine the possibility of using the social amoeba, Dictyostelium discoideum, for research into identifying and understanding emetic liability, and hence reduce adverse animal experimentation in this area. Twenty eight emetic or taste aversive compounds were employed to investigate the acute (10 min) effect of compounds on Dictyostelium cell behaviour (shape, speed and direction of movement) in a shallow chemotaxic gradient (Dunn chamber). Compound concentrations were chosen based on those previously reported to be emetic or aversive in in vivo studies and results were recorded and quantified by automated image analysis. Dictyostelium cell motility was rapidly and strongly inhibited by four structurally distinct tastants (three bitter tasting compounds - denatonium benzoate, quinine hydrochloride, phenylthiourea, and the pungent constituent of chilli peppers - capsaicin). In addition, stomach irritants (copper chloride and copper sulphate), and a phosphodiesterase IV inhibitor also rapidly blocked movement. A concentration-dependant relationship was established for five of these compounds, showing potency of inhibition as capsaicin (IC50?=?11.9±4.0 µM) > quinine hydrochloride (IC50?=?44.3±6.8 µM) > denatonium benzoate (IC50?=?129±4 µM) > phenylthiourea (IC50?=?366±5 µM) > copper sulphate (IC50?=?1433±3 µM). In contrast, 21 compounds within the cytotoxic and receptor agonist/antagonist classes did not affect cell behaviour. Further analysis of bitter and pungent compounds showed that the effect on cell behaviour was reversible and not cytotoxic, suggesting an uncharacterised molecular mechanism of action for these compounds. These results therefore demonstrate that Dictyostelium has potential as a non-sentient model in the analysis of the molecular effects of tastants, although it has limited utility in identification of emetic agents in general. PMID:21931717

  7. Radiation induced chemical changes of phenolic compounds in strawberries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breitfellner, F.; Solar, S.; Sontag, G.

    2003-06-01

    In unirradiated strawberries four phenolic acids (gallic acid, p-coumaric acid, caffeic acid and 4-hydroxybenzoic acid), the flavonoids (+)-catechin, (-)-epicatechin and glycosides from kaempferol and quercetin were determined by reversed phase chromatography with diode array detection. Characteristic linear dose/concentration relationships were found for 4-hydroxybenzoic acid and two unidentified compounds. One of them may be usable as marker to prove an irradiation treatment.

  8. Aroma chemicals isolated and identified from leaves of Aloe arborescens Mill. Var. Natalensis Berger.

    PubMed

    Umano, K; Nakahara, K; Shoji, A; Shibamoto, T

    1999-09-01

    Extracts from leaves of aloe (Aloe arborescens Mill. var. natalensis Berger) were obtained using two methods: steam distillation under reduced pressure followed by dichloromethane extraction (DRP) and simultaneous purging and extraction (SPE). A total of 123 aroma chemicals were identified in the extracts obtained by both methods using gas chromatography and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. There were 42 alcohols, 23 terpenoids, 21 aldehydes, 9 esters, 8 ketones, 6 acids, 5 phenols, and 9 miscellaneous compounds. The major aroma constituents of this extract by DRP were (Z)-3-hexenol (29.89%), (Z)-3-hexenal (18.86%), (E)-hexenal (7.31%), 4-methyl-3-pentenol (5.66%), and butanol (4.29%). The major aroma constituents of this extract by SPE were (E)-2-hexenal (45.46%), (Z)-3-hexenal (32.12%), hexanal (9.14%), (Z)-3-hexenol (1.60%), and 3-pentanone (1.41%). Terpenoids were also found as one of the major constituents. The fresh green note of aloe leaves is due to the presence of these C(6) alcohols and aldehydes as well as terpenoids. PMID:10552708

  9. CHEMICAL SPECIATION OF INORGANIC COMPOUNDS UNDER HYDROTHERMAL CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This research will utilize the high-intensity x-rays available at the Advance Photon Source (APS) to study the inorganic chemistry occurring during the hydrothermal oxidation of tank waste and the chemistry associated with tank waste vitrification. Although the chemical conversio...

  10. Frequent Sub-Structure-Based Approaches for Classifying Chemical Compounds

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mukund Deshpande; Michihiro Kuramochi; George Karypis

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we study the problem of classifying chemical com- pound datasets. We present a sub-structure-based classifica- tion algorithm that decouples the sub-structure discovery pro- cess from the classification model construction and uses frequent subgraph discovery algorithms to find all topological and geo- metric sub-structures present in the dataset. The advantage of our approach is that during classification model

  11. Gametocytocidal Screen Identifies Novel Chemical Classes with Plasmodium falciparum Transmission Blocking Activity

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Natalie G.; Sullivan, David J.; Mlambo, Godfree; Dimopoulos, George; Tripathi, Abhai K.

    2014-01-01

    Discovery of transmission blocking compounds is an important intervention strategy necessary to eliminate and eradicate malaria. To date only a small number of drugs that inhibit gametocyte development and thereby transmission from the mosquito to the human host exist. This limitation is largely due to a lack of screening assays easily adaptable to high throughput because of multiple incubation steps or the requirement for high gametocytemia. Here we report the discovery of new compounds with gametocytocidal activity using a simple and robust SYBR Green I- based DNA assay. Our assay utilizes the exflagellation step in male gametocytes and a background suppressor, which masks the staining of dead cells to achieve healthy signal to noise ratio by increasing signal of viable parasites and subtracting signal from dead parasites. By determining the contribution of exflagellation to fluorescent signal and using appropriate cutoff values, we were able to screen for gametocytocidal compounds. After assay validation and optimization, we screened an FDA approved drug library of approximately 1500 compounds, as well as the 400 compound MMV malaria box and identified 44 gametocytocidal compounds with sub to low micromolar IC50s. Major classes of compounds with gametocytocidal activity included quaternary ammonium compounds with structural similarity to choline, acridine-like compounds similar to quinacrine and pyronaridine, as well as antidepressant, antineoplastic, and anthelminthic compounds. Top drug candidates showed near complete transmission blocking in membrane feeding assays. This assay is simple, reproducible and demonstrated robust Z-factor values at low gametocytemia levels, making it amenable to HTS for identification of novel and potent gametocytocidal compounds. PMID:25157792

  12. A chemical biology approach identified PI3K as a potential therapeutic target for neurofibromatosis type 2

    PubMed Central

    Petrilli, Alejandra M; Fuse, Marisa A; Donnan, Mathew S; Bott, Marga; Sparrow, Nicklaus A; Tondera, Daniel; Huffziger, Julia; Frenzel, Corina; Malany, C Siobhan; Echeverri, Christophe J; Smith, Layton; Fernández-Valle, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the merlin tumor suppressor gene cause Neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2), which is a disease characterized by development of multiple benign tumors in the nervous system. The current standard of care for NF2 calls for surgical resection of the characteristic tumors, often with devastating neurological consequences. There are currently no approved non-surgical therapies for NF2. In an attempt to identify much needed targets and therapeutically active compounds for NF2 treatment, we employed a chemical biology approach using ultra-high-throughput screening. To support this goal, we created a merlin-null mouse Schwann cell (MSC) line to screen for compounds that selectively decrease their viability and proliferation. We optimized conditions for 384-well plate assays and executed a proof-of-concept screen of the Library of Pharmacologically Active Compounds. Further confirmatory and selectivity assays identified phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) as a potential NF2 drug target. Notably, loss of merlin function is associated with activation of the PI3K/Akt pathway in human schwannomas. We report that AS605240, a PI3K inhibitor, decreased merlin-null MSC viability in a dose-dependent manner without significantly decreasing viability of control Schwann cells. AS605240 exerted its action on merlin-null MSCs by promoting caspase-dependent apoptosis and inducing autophagy. Additional PI3K inhibitors tested also decreased viability of merlin-null MSCs in a dose-dependent manner. In summary, our chemical genomic screen and subsequent hit validation studies have identified PI3K as potential target for NF2 therapy. PMID:25360213

  13. Prediction of the rodent carcinogenicity of organic compounds from their chemical structures using the FALS method.

    PubMed Central

    Moriguchi, I; Hirano, H; Hirono, S

    1996-01-01

    Fuzzy adaptive least-squares (FALS), a pattern recognition method recently developed in our laboratory for correlating structure with activity rating, was used to generate quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models on the carcinogenicity of organic compounds of several chemical classes. Using the predictive models obtained from the chemical class-based FALS QSAR approach, the rodent carcinogenicity or noncarcinogenicity of a group of organic chemicals currently being tested by the U.S. National Toxicology Program was estimated from their chemical structures. PMID:8933054

  14. Improving solubitity and chemical stability of natural compounds for medicinal use by incorporation into liposomes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. J. Gomes Coimbra; B. Isacchi; L. van Bloois; J. Sastre Torano; A. Ket; X. Wu; F. Broere; J. M. Metselaar; C. J. F. Rijcken; G. Storm; R. Bilia; R. M. Schiffelers

    2011-01-01

    Natural bioactive compounds have been studied for a long time for their chemopreventive and therapeutic\\u000apotential in several chronic inflammatory diseases, including cancer. However, their physicochemical\\u000aproperties generally result in poor chemical stability and lack of in vivo bioavailability. Very few human\\u000aclinical trials have addressed absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion of these compounds in\\u000arelation to efficacy. This limits

  15. Identification strategy for unknown pollutants using high-resolution mass spectrometry: Androgen-disrupting compounds identified through effect-directed analysis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jana M. Weiss; Eszter Simon; Gerard J. Stroomberg; Ronald de Boer; Jacob de Boer; Sander C. van der Linden; Pim E. G. Leonards; Marja H. Lamoree

    2011-01-01

    Effect-directed analysis has been applied to a river sediment sample of concern to identify the compounds responsible for\\u000a the observed effects in an in vitro (anti-)androgenicity assay. For identification after non-target analysis performed on\\u000a a high-resolution LTQ-Orbitrap, we developed a de novo identification strategy including physico-chemical parameters derived\\u000a from the effect-directed analysis approach. With this identification strategy, we were able

  16. Closed tube sample introduction for gas chromatography–ion mobility spectrometry analysis of water contaminated with a chemical warfare agent surrogate compound

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richard P. Erickson; Ashish Tripathi; Waleed M. Maswadeh; A. Peter Snyder; Philip A. Smith

    2006-01-01

    Ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) is a proven technology for detection of vapor phase chemical warfare agents. The technology is suitable for field portable instrumentation due to its small size, high sensitivity, speed of analysis, and low power consumption. However, it suffers from a limited dynamic range and potential difficulties in identifying compounds in complex matrices. The use of gas chromatography

  17. Large-scale neurochemical metabolomics analysis identifies multiple compounds associated with methamphetamine exposure.

    PubMed

    McClay, Joseph L; Adkins, Daniel E; Vunck, Sarah A; Batman, Angela M; Vann, Robert E; Clark, Shaunna L; Beardsley, Patrick M; van den Oord, Edwin J C G

    2013-04-01

    Methamphetamine (MA) is an illegal stimulant drug of abuse with serious negative health consequences. The neurochemical effects of MA have been partially characterized, with a traditional focus on classical neurotransmitter systems. However, these directions have not yet led to novel drug treatments for MA abuse or toxicity. As an alternative approach, we describe here the first application of metabolomics to investigate the neurochemical consequences of MA exposure in the rodent brain. We examined single exposures at 3 mg/kg and repeated exposures at 3 mg/kg over 5 days in eight common inbred mouse strains. Brain tissue samples were assayed using high-throughput gas and liquid chromatography mass spectrometry, yielding quantitative data on >300 unique metabolites. Association testing and false discovery rate control yielded several metabolome-wide significant associations with acute MA exposure, including compounds such as lactate (p = 4.4 × 10(-5), q = 0.013), tryptophan (p = 7.0 × 10(-4), q = 0.035) and 2-hydroxyglutarate (p = 1.1 × 10(-4), q = 0.022). Secondary analyses of MA-induced increase in locomotor activity showed associations with energy metabolites such as succinate (p = 3.8 × 10(-7)). Associations specific to repeated (5 day) MA exposure included phosphocholine (p = 4.0 × 10(-4), q = 0.087) and ergothioneine (p = 3.0 × 10(-4), q = 0.087). Our data appear to confirm and extend existing models of MA action in the brain, whereby an initial increase in energy metabolism, coupled with an increase in behavioral locomotion, gives way to disruption of mitochondria and phospholipid pathways and increased endogenous antioxidant response. Our study demonstrates the power of comprehensive MS-based metabolomics to identify drug-induced changes to brain metabolism and to develop neurochemical models of drug effects. PMID:23554582

  18. Hexyl decanoate, the first trail pheromone compound identified in a stingless bee, Trigona recursa.

    PubMed

    Jarau, Stefan; Schulz, Claudia M; Hrncir, Michael; Francke, Wittko; Zucchi, Ronaldo; Barth, Friedrich G; Ayasse, Manfred

    2006-07-01

    Foragers of many species of stingless bees guide their nestmates to food sources by means of scent trails deposited on solid substrates between the food and the nest. The corresponding trail pheromones are generally believed to be produced in the mandibular glands, although definitive experimental proof has never been provided. We tested the trail following behavior of recruits of Trigona recursa in field experiments with artificial scent trails branching off from natural scent trails of this stingless bee. First-time recruits (newcomers) did not follow these trails when they were laid with pure solvent or mandibular gland extract. However, they did follow trails made with labial gland extract. Chemical analyses of labial gland secretions revealed that hexyl decanoate was the dominant component (72.4 +/- 1.9% of all volatiles). Newcomers were significantly attracted to artificial trails made with synthetic hexyl decanoate, demonstrating its key function in eliciting scent-following behavior. According to our experiments with T. recursa, the trail pheromone is produced in the labial glands and not in the mandibular glands. Hexyl decanoate is the first component of a trail pheromone identified and proved to be behaviorally active in stingless bees. PMID:16718558

  19. Solubility of single chemical compounds from an atmospheric aerosol in pure water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, P.; Dedik, A. N.; Deutsch, F.; Sinner, T.; Weber, S.; Eichler, R.; Sterkel, S.; Sastri, C. S.; Ortner, H. M.

    The water-solubility differentiates atmospheric particles into cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and interstitial aerosol. This interaction between aerosol and cloud influences the climate in different known and hypothetical ways [Hansson et al. (1994) In Proceedings of EUROTRAC Symposium' 94, (edited by Borrell P. M.), p. 984. SPB Academic Publishing, The Hague; Schwartz et al. (1995) In Aerosol Forcing of Climate (edited by Charlson R. J. and Heintzanberg J.), p. 251. Wiley, London]. Some authors studied the fraction of water-soluble amounts with particle size [Mészáros (1968) Tellus20, 443; Winkler (1974) Meteorol. Rdsch.27, 129; Fuzzi et al. (1988) Journal of geophysics Research93, 11141; Svenningsson et al. (1992) Tellus44B, 556; (1994) Journal of Atmospheric Chemistry19, 129). As the water-solubility (or hygroscopicity) is a property of chemical compounds it is of great interest to identify the chemical composition of aerosols and of the dissolved fraction. Using an optimal combination of analytical methods, the elemental and species concentrations were determined in the original aerosol as well as in the resulting solutions. The fraction of soluble species were calculated from the measured values and three groups were found: with high (50-73%), medium (20-26%), and low (2%) dissolved fraction. In a further series of experiments the rate constants of dissolution of various species were determined. These can be arranged in the order of decreasing rate of dissolution: the alkaline and alkaline earth elements K + ? Mg 2+ > NH 4+ > Na + > Ca 2+ the anions NO 3- ? SO 42- Cl -, and for the iron oxidation states Fe 3+ ? Fe 2+. A photolytic reduction of Fe 3+ to Fe 2+ was also observed. For Mg 2+, Ca 2+, and SO 42- a dependance of the rate constants for dissolution on time was discovered. This can be explained by the presence of different chemical compounds in the aerosol. The discussion of the results with regard to the time scale of the formation of cloud or fog droplets shows that the slightly soluble inventory of a solid aerosol of the alkaline and alkaline earth elements, as well as of the anions, is dissolved into the aqueous phase in a relatively short time interval of 10-700s. On the other hand, Fe 3+ is dissolved in a time period of 3000-4500s, whereas Fe 2+ appears in the solution in a time period of up to 7000s.

  20. Acute toxicity to Daphnia pulex of six classes of chemical compounds potentially hazardous to Great Lakes aquatic biota

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Stephen B. Smith; Jacqueline F. Savino; Marc A. Blouin

    1988-01-01

    Of the six classes of chemicals potentially hazardous to Great Lakes aquatic biota, derivatives of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were the most acutely toxic (48-h EC 50) to Daphnia pulex. The other classes, listed in order of decreasing toxicity, were alkyl halides, nitrogen-containing compounds, cyclic alkanes, heterocyclic nitrogen compounds, silicon-containing compounds. Of the 41 compounds representing the six chemical classes, 6

  1. The Periodic Table as a Part of the Periodic Table of Chemical Compounds

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mikhail M. Labushev

    2011-01-01

    The numbers of natural chemical elements, minerals, inorganic and organic chemical compounds are determined by 1, 2, 3 and 4-combinations of a set 95 and are respectively equal to 95, 4,465, 138,415 and 3,183,545. To explain these relations it is suggested the concept of information coefficient of proportionality as mathematical generalization of the proportionality coefficient for any set of positive

  2. Relationships between chemical structure and rat repellency. II. Compounds screened between 1950 and 1960

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bowles, W.A.; Adomaitis, V.A.; DeWitt, J.B.; Pratt, J.J., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Over 4,600 compounds, chiefly organic types, were evaluated using both a food acceptance test (Part A) and a barrier penetration bioassay (Part B), to correlate relationships between chemical structure and rodent repellency.These chemicals are indexed and classified according to the functional groups present and to the degree of substitution within their molecular structures. The results of reduction in foot consumption for each compound appraised are calculated and their K values listed in Table I.The repellent activities of the functional groups represented, alone or in combinations, are expressed in Table II by a Functional Group Repellency Index. A ranking of these indices suggests that acyclic and heteroyclic compounds containing tri- or pentavalent nitrogen would be a parent compound of choice for synthesizing novel repellents. Other molecular arrangements, spatial configurations and combinations of functional groups are compared.There were 123 active, interesting or promising compounds included in the 699 having K values of 85 or greater, which were selected for the barrier appraisal study. These chemicals were formulated in selective solvents at several concentrations and applied to burlap. Small foot bags were fashioned using the fabric impregnated with the candidate formulation, and exposed to rodent attack following storage periods of varying intervals. The results of these tests are listed in Table III. Again, those compounds containing nitrogen in the functional groupings indicated a high order of effectiveness. Several commercial patents covering rodent repellents were issued using the data from the food acceptance and barrier studies.Organizations and cooperators which supplied samples for the program are listed in Appendix I. The Wiswesser cipher for compounds in Table I is used in Appendix II to facilitate location of chemicals by sample code number as they appear under the index headings, and for computer storage and analysis.

  3. Relationships between chemical structure and rat repellency: II. compounds screened between 1950 and 1960

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bowles, Walter A.; Adomaitis, V.A.; DeWitt, J.B.; Pratt, J.J., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Over 4,600 compounds, chiefly organic types, were evaluated using both a food acceptance test (Part A) and a barrier penetration bioassay (Part B), to correlate relationships between chemical structure and rodent repellency. These chemicals are indexed and classified according to the functional groups present and to the degree of substitution within their molecular structures. The results of reduction in food consumption for each compound appraised are calculated and their K values listed in Table 1. The repellent activities of the functional groups represented, alone or in combinations, are expressed in Table II by a Functional Group Repellency Index.. A ranking of these indices suggests that acyclic and heteroyclic compounds containing tri- or pentavalent nitrogen would be a parent compound of choice for synthesizing novel repellents. Other molecular arrangements, spatial configurations and combinations of functional groups are compared. There were 123 active, interesting or promising compounds included in the 699 having K values of 85 or greater, which were selected for the barrier appraisal study. These chemicals were formulated in selective solvents at several concentrations and applied to burlap. Small food bags were fashioned using the fabric impregnated with the candidate formulation, and exposed to rodent attack following storage periods of varying intervals. The results of these tests are listed in Table III. Again, those compounds containing nitrogen in the functional groupings indicated a high order of effectiveness. Several commercial patents covering rodent repellents were issued using the data from the food acceptance and barrier studies. Organizations and cooperators which supplied samples for the program are listed in Appendix I. The Wiswesser cipher for compounds in Table I is used in Appendix II to facilitate location of chemicals by sample code number as they appear under the index headings, and for computer storage and analysis.

  4. 3D numerical simulation of the transport of chemical signature compounds from buried landmines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irrazabal, Maik; Borrero, Ernesto; Briano, Julio G.; Castro, Miguel; Hernandez, Samuel P.

    2005-06-01

    The transport of the chemical signature compounds from buried landmines in a three-dimensional (3D) array has been numerically modeled using the finite-volume technique. Compounds such as trinitrotoluene, dinitrotoluene, and their degradation products, are semi volatile and somewhat soluble in water. Furthermore, they can strongly adsorb to the soil and undergo chemical and biological degradation. Consequently, the spatial and temporal concentration distributions of such chemicals depend on the mobility of the water and gaseous phases, their molecular and mechanical diffusion, adsorption characteristics, soil water content, compaction, and environmental factors. A 3D framework is required since two-dimensional (2D) symmetry may easily fade due to terrain topography: non-flat surfaces, soil heterogeneity, or underground fractures. The spatial and temporal distribution of the chemical-signature-compounds, in an inclined grid has been obtained. The fact that the chemicals may migrate horizontally, giving higher surface concentrations at positions not directly on top of the objects, emphasizes the need for understanding the transport mechanism when a chemical detector is used. Deformation in the concentration contours after rainfall is observed in the inclined surface and is attributed to both: the advective flux, and to the water flux at the surface caused by the slope. The analysis of the displacements in the position of the maximum concentrations at the surface, respect to the actual location of the mine, in an inclined system, is presented.

  5. Methodological approach to identify chemical oviposition stimulants from maize for European corn borer.

    PubMed

    Stockel, J; Bar, M; Boidron, J N; Bourgeois, G

    1987-03-01

    The noncontingent distribution ofO. nubilalis Hbn. eggs on various corn varieties has allowed their classification as either "favorable" or "nonfavorable" hybrids. This classification is based on a chemical communication system using volatile compounds active at a distance from the insect or active when in contact with the insect as soluble sugar components. Under this hypothesis, gas chromatography is the best way of investigating for the chemical differences between corn silk extracts from the two types of hybrids. A first experiment, using a "desorption-trapping" system on Tenax coupled to a gas chromatograph showed a quantitative difference between two compounds from the two hybrids. A second experiment showed the advantages and disadvantages of this method and allowed the development of two complementary techniques: (1) direct extraction of corn silk with trichlorofluo-romethane and direct injection into a capillary column with an apolar stationary phase using an "on-column" system; and (2) extraction under vacuum of volatile compounds from corn silk and their trapping on Tenax, followed by a second desorption. This allows a direct injection on the same capillary column. The first technique allows identification by mass spectrometry of many alkanes with high molecular weights. The second technique seems to confirm the presence of phenylacetaldehyde. Both techniques show quantitative differences in the composition of corn silk extracts from "favorable" and "nonfavorable" hybrids; however, the biologically active chemicals remain unknown. PMID:24301894

  6. Controlled Chemical and Drug Delivery via the Internal and External Surfaces of Layered Compounds

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joseph F. Bringley; Nancy B. Liebert

    2003-01-01

    We demonstrate, and review the very small, but growing body of literature regarding a recently discovered application of layered compounds, which involves the ability of layered materials to sequester and later release molecules of chemical and biological significance. The application relies upon intercalation chemistry; a reversible process whereby atoms, molecules, macromolecules, and polymers may be inserted into the interstices of

  7. Combustion chemical kinetics of biodiesel and related compounds (methyl and ethyl esters): Experiments and

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Combustion chemical kinetics of biodiesel and related compounds (methyl and ethyl esters and reduced exhaust emissions have led to the emergence of new fuels and combustion devices. Over the past ten years, considerable effort has gone into understanding combustion phenomena in relation to emerging fuel

  8. Determining the chemical activity of hydrophobic organic compounds in soil using polymer coated vials

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fredrik Reichenberg; Foppe Smedes; Jan-Åke Jönsson; Philipp Mayer

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In soils contaminated by hydrophobic organic compounds, the concentrations are less indicative of potential exposure and distribution than are the associated chemical activities, fugacities and freely dissolved concentrations. The latter can be measured by diffusive sampling into thin layers of polymer, as in, for example, solid phase micro-extraction. Such measurements require equilibrium partitioning of analytes into the polymer while

  9. Measurements of Formaldehyde Fluxes in Houston, Texas Formaldehyde (HCHO) is a chemical compound that has

    E-print Network

    Collins, Gary S.

    Measurements of Formaldehyde Fluxes in Houston, Texas Formaldehyde (HCHO) is a chemical compound - May 31, 2009. ·To determine the HCHO fluxes in Texas City from industrial sources ·To understand the production of HCHO in the area ·To contribute to models of the effects these industrial emissions have

  10. Predicting partitioning of volatile organic compounds from air into plant cuticular matrix by quantum chemical descriptors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Chunlei Zhang; Liu Feng; Jie Wei

    2002-01-01

    Based on theoretical linear solvation energy relationship and quantum chemical descriptors computed by AM1 Hamiltonian, a\\u000a new model is developed to predict the partitioning of some volatile organic compounds between the plant cuticular matrix and\\u000a air.

  11. Improving solubility and chemical stability of natural compounds for medicinal use by incorporation into liposomes.

    PubMed

    Coimbra, Maria; Isacchi, Benedetta; van Bloois, Louis; Torano, Javier Sastre; Ket, Aldo; Wu, Xiaojie; Broere, Femke; Metselaar, Josbert M; Rijcken, Cristianne J F; Storm, Gert; Bilia, Rita; Schiffelers, Raymond M

    2011-09-20

    Natural bioactive compounds have been studied for a long time for their chemopreventive and therapeutic potential in several chronic inflammatory diseases, including cancer. However, their physicochemical properties generally result in poor chemical stability and lack of in vivo bioavailability. Very few human clinical trials have addressed absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion of these compounds in relation to efficacy. This limits the use of these valuable natural compounds in the clinic. In this study, we examined caffeic acid (derivatives), carvacrol (derivatives), thymol, pterostilbene (derivatives), and N-(3-oxo-dodecanoyl)-l-homoserine lactone. These are natural compounds with strong anti-inflammatory properties derived from plants and bacteria. However, these compounds have poor water solubility or are chemically unstable. To overcome these limitations we have prepared liposomal formulations. Our results show that lipophilic 3-oxo-C(12)-homoserine lactone and stilbene derivatives can be loaded into liposomal lipid bilayer with efficiencies of 50-70%. Thereby, the liposomes solubilize these compounds, allowing intravenous administration without use of solvents. When compounds could not be loaded into the lipid bilayer (carvacrol and thymol) or are rapidly extracted from the liposomes in the presence of serum albumin (3-oxo-C(12)-homoserine lactone and pterostilbene derivatives), derivatization of the compound into a water-soluble prodrug was shown to improve loading efficiency and encapsulation stability. The phosphate forms of carvacrol and pterostilbene were loaded into the aqueous interior of the liposomes and encapsulation was unaffected by the presence of serum albumin. Chemical instability of resveratrol was improved by liposome-encapsulation, preventing inactivating cis-trans isomerization. For caffeic acid, liposomal encapsulation did not prevent oxidation into a variety of products. Still, by derivatization into a phenyl ester, the compound could be stably encapsulated without chemical degradation. Despite the instability of liposome-association of 3-oxo-C(12)-homoserine lactone and resveratrol, intravenous administration of these compounds inhibited tumor growth for approximately 70% in a murine tumor model, showing that simple solubilization can have important therapeutic benefits. PMID:21291975

  12. FTIR Method to Distinguish Mold Compound Types and Identify the Presence of Post-Mold-Cure (PMC) Treatment on Electronic Packaging

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yan-Shan Ng; Wan-Keong Hooi

    2007-01-01

    In electronic packaging, molding compounds have been widely used for encapsulation. Mold compound with different epoxy resin & hardener formulation will have different mechanical and chemical properties. Mold compounds reacts as a protection material by isolating the electronic devices from moisture and pollutants in order to achieve its robustness expectancy. In addition, enhancing proper polymerization through post mold cure (PMC)

  13. Parallelization of enumerating tree-like chemical compounds by breadth-first search order

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Enumeration of chemical compounds greatly assists designing and finding new drugs, and determining chemical structures from mass spectrometry. In our previous study, we developed efficient algorithms, BfsSimEnum and BfsMulEnum for enumerating tree-like chemical compounds without and with multiple bonds, respectively. For many instances, our previously proposed algorithms were able to enumerate chemical structures faster than other existing methods. Latest processors consist of multiple processing cores, and are able to execute many tasks at the same time. In this paper, we develop three parallelized algorithms BfsEnumP1-3 by modifying BfsSimEnum in simple manners to further reduce execution time. BfsSimEnum constructs a family tree in which each vertex denotes a molecular tree. BfsEnumP1-3 divide a set of vertices with some given depth of the family tree into several subsets, each of which is assigned to each processor. For evaluation, we perform experiments for several instances with varying the division depth and the number of processors, and show that BfsEnumP1-3 are useful to reduce the execution time for enumeration of tree-like chemical compounds. In addition, we show that BfsEnumP3 achieves more than 80% parallelization efficiency using up to 11 processors, and reduce the execution time using 12 processors to about 1/10 of that by BfsSimEnum. PMID:26044861

  14. Highly efficient direct conversion of human fibroblasts to neuronal cells by chemical compounds

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Ping; Harada, Yoshinori; Takamatsu, Tetsuro

    2015-01-01

    Direct conversion of mammalian fibroblasts into induced neuronal (iN) cells has been attained by forced expression of pro-neural transcriptional factors, or by combining defined factors with either microRNAs or small molecules. Here, we show that neuronal cells can be converted from postnatal human fibroblasts into cell populations with neuronal purities of up to >80% using a combination of six chemical compounds. The chemical compound-induced neuronal cells (CiNCs) express neuron-specific proteins and functional neuron markers. The efficiency of CiNCs is unaffected by either the donor’s age or cellular senescence (passage number). We propose this chemical direct converting strategy as a potential approach for highly efficient generation of neuronal cells from human fibroblasts for such uses as in neural disease modeling and regenerative medicine.

  15. Chemical constituents of peppers (Piper spp.) and application to food preservation: naturally occurring antioxidative compounds.

    PubMed Central

    Nakatani, N; Inatani, R; Ohta, H; Nishioka, A

    1986-01-01

    In a structure analysis of the compounds of the genus Piper (Family Piperaceae), we identified five phenolic amides from Piper nigrum, seven compounds from P. retrofractum, and two compounds from P. baccatum. All the phenolic amides possess significant antioxidant activities that are more effective than the naturally occurring antioxidant, alpha-tocopherol. One amide, feruperine, has antioxidant activity as high as the synthetic antioxidants, butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA) and butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT). Naturally occurring antioxidants, therefore, may surpass BHA and BHT in their ability to inactivate mutagens in food. PMID:3757949

  16. Genetic and environmental factors affecting host response to drugs and other chemical compounds in our environment.

    PubMed

    Vesell, E S; Passananti, G T

    1977-10-01

    Compared to laboratory animals, humans are extremely heterogenous with respect to the many factors that can influence the distribution and biological effects of toxic chemicals. This heterogeneity can prevent an accurate assessment of the impact of a particular toxic compound on the health of an individual subject. Some of the factors that can significantly modify the host response to certain drugs, which serve in this review as a model for environmental chemicals, are enumerated and discussed. Although the mechanisms by which many of these factors modify the biological effects of certain environmental chemicals and drugs have been determined in some cases, better definition of the nature of interactions between these factors and environmental chemicals in a particular individual is required at a biochemical and molecular level. Recommendations are offered for the further development of our knowledge concerning interactions between environmental chemicals and such factors in a particular individual. PMID:598349

  17. Prediction of compounds in different local structure-activity relationship environments using emerging chemical patterns.

    PubMed

    Namasivayam, Vigneshwaran; Gupta-Ostermann, Disha; Balfer, Jenny; Heikamp, Kathrin; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2014-05-27

    Active compounds can participate in different local structure-activity relationship (SAR) environments and introduce different degrees of local SAR discontinuity, depending on their structural and potency relationships in data sets. Such SAR features have thus far mostly been analyzed using descriptive approaches, in particular, on the basis of activity landscape modeling. However, compounds in different local SAR environments have not yet been predicted. Herein, we adapt the emerging chemical patterns (ECP) method, a machine learning approach for compound classification, to systematically predict compounds with different local SAR characteristics. ECP analysis is shown to accurately assign many compounds to different local SAR environments across a variety of activity classes covering the entire range of observed local SARs. Control calculations using random forests and multiclass support vector machines were carried out and a variety of statistical performance measures were applied. In all instances, ECP calculations yielded comparable or better performance than controls. The approach presented herein can be applied to predict compounds that complement local SARs or prioritize compounds with different SAR characteristics. PMID:24803014

  18. UTSW Investigators Develop Functional Signature Ontology (FUSION), a Method for Identifying Compounds That Target Cancer Pathways

    Cancer.gov

    In a new study published in Science Signaling, CTD2 investigators from University of Texas (UTSW) Southwestern Medical Center devised a novel bioinformatics approach that, when coupled with high-throughput screening, helps reveal compounds that may target potential cancer-related pathways.

  19. 40 CFR 721.9970 - o-Xylene compound (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false o-Xylene compound (generic name). 721...Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9970 o-Xylene compound (generic name). ...chemical substance identified generically as an o -xylene compound (PMN...

  20. 40 CFR 721.9970 - o-Xylene compound (generic name).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false o-Xylene compound (generic name). 721...Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9970 o-Xylene compound (generic name). ...chemical substance identified generically as an o -xylene compound (PMN...

  1. A rapid and sensitive high-throughput screening method to identify compounds targeting protein-nucleic acids interactions.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Nicole; Guillen, Roboan; Chambers, Jeremy W; Leng, Fenfei

    2015-04-30

    DNA-binding and RNA-binding proteins are usually considered 'undruggable' partly due to the lack of an efficient method to identify inhibitors from existing small molecule repositories. Here we report a rapid and sensitive high-throughput screening approach to identify compounds targeting protein-nucleic acids interactions based on protein-DNA or protein-RNA interaction enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (PDI-ELISA or PRI-ELISA). We validated the PDI-ELISA method using the mammalian high-mobility-group protein AT-hook 2 (HMGA2) as the protein of interest and netropsin as the inhibitor of HMGA2-DNA interactions. With this method we successfully identified several inhibitors and an activator for HMGA2-DNA interactions from a collection of 29 DNA-binding compounds. Guided by this screening excise, we showed that netropsin, the specific inhibitor of HMGA2-DNA interactions, strongly inhibited the differentiation of the mouse pre-adipocyte 3T3-L1 cells into adipocytes, most likely through a mechanism by which the inhibition is through preventing the binding of HMGA2 to the target DNA sequences. This method should be broadly applicable to identify compounds or proteins modulating many DNA-binding or RNA-binding proteins. PMID:25653160

  2. USE OF THE RIBONUCLEASE PROTECTION ASSAY FOR IDENTIFYING CHEMICALS WHICH ELLICIT HYPERSENSITIVITY RESPONSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Use of the Ribonuclease Protection Assay (RPA) for Identifying Chemicals that Elicit Hypersensitivity Responses. L.M. Plitnick, 1, D.M. Sailstad, 2, and R.J. Smialowicz, 2 1UNC, Curriculum in Toxicology, Chapel Hill, NC and 2USEPA, NHEERL, RTP, NC. The incidence of aller...

  3. Development of a Fundamental Understanding of Chemical Bonding and Electronic Structure in Spinel Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Sickafus, K.E.; Wills, J.M.; Chen, S.-P.; Terry, J.H., Jr.; Hartmann, T.; Sheldon, R.I.

    1999-05-14

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos national Laboratory (LANL). Hundreds of ceramic compounds possess the spinel crystal structure and exhibit a remarkable variety of properties, ranging from compounds that are electrical insulators to compounds that are superconducting, or from compounds with ferri- and antiferromagnetic behavior to materials with colossal magnetoresistive characteristics. The unique crystal structure of spinel compounds is in many ways responsible for the widely varying physical properties of spinels. The objective of this project is to investigate the nature of chemical bonding, point defects, and electronic structure in compounds with the spinel crystal structure. Our goal is to understand and predict the stability of the spinel structure as a function of chemical composition, stoichiometry, and cation disorder. The consequences of cation disorder in spinel materials can be profound . The ferromagnetic characteristics of magnesioferrite, for instance, are entirely attributable to disorder on the cation sublattices. Our studies provide insight into the mechanisms of point defect formation and cation disorder and their effects on the electronic band structure and crystal structure of spinel-structure materials. our ultimate objective is to develop a more substantive knowledge of the spinel crystal structure and to promote new and novel uses for spinel compounds. The technical approach to achieve our goals is to combine first-principles calculations with experimental measurements. The structural and electronic properties of spinel samples were experimentally determined primarily with X-ray and neutron scattering, optical and X-ray absorption, and electron energy-loss spectroscopy. Total energy electronic structure calculations were performed to determine structural stability, band structure, density of states, and electron distribution. We also used shell-model total -energy calculations to assess point-defect formation and migration energies in magnesio-aluminate spinel.

  4. Development of a Fundamental Understanding of Chemical Bonding and Electronic Structure in Spinel Compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Sickafus, K.E.; Wills, J.M.; Chen, S.-P.; Terry, J.H., Jr.; Hartmann, T.; Sheldon, R.I.

    1999-06-03

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Hundreds of ceramic compounds possess the spinel crystal structure and exhibit a remarkable variety of properties, ranging from compounds that are electrical insulators to compounds that are superconducting, or from compounds with ferri- and antiferromagnetic behavior to materials with colossal magnetoresistive characteristics. The unique crystal structure of spinel compounds is in many ways responsible for the widely varying physical properties of spinels. The objective of this project is to investigate the nature of chemical bonding, point defects, and electronic structure in compounds with the spinel crystal structure. Our goal is to understand and predict the stability of the spinel structure as a function of chemical composition, stoichiometry, and cation disorder. The consequences of cation disorder in spinel materials can be profound . The ferromagnetic characteristics of magnesioferrite, for instance, are entirely attributable to disorder on the cation sublattices. Our studies provide insight into the mechanisms of point defect formation and cation disorder and their effects on the electronic band structure and crystal structure of spinel-structure materials. Our ultimate objective is to develop a more substantive knowledge of the spinel crystal structure and to promote new and novel uses for spinel compounds. The technical approach to achieve our goals is to combine first-principles calculations with experimental measurements. The structural and electronic properties of spinel samples were experimentally determined primarily with X-ray and neutron scattering, optical and X-ray absorption, and electron energy-loss spectroscopy. Total energy electronic structure calculations were performed to determine structural stability, band structure, density of states, and electron distribution. We also used shell-model total -energy calculations to assess point-defect formation and migration energies in magnesio-aluminate spinel.

  5. Identifying key non-volatile compounds in ready-to-drink green tea and their impact on taste profile.

    PubMed

    Yu, Peigen; Yeo, Angelin Soo-Lee; Low, Mei-Yin; Zhou, Weibiao

    2014-07-15

    Thirty-nine non-volatile compounds in seven ready-to-drink (RTD) green tea samples were analysed and quantified using liquid chromatography. Taste reconstruction experiments using thirteen selected compounds were conducted to identify the key non-volatile tastants. Taste profiles of the reconstructed samples did not differ significantly from the RTD tea samples. To investigate the taste contribution and significance of individual compounds, omission experiments were carried out by removing individual or a group of compounds. Sensory evaluation revealed that the astringent- and bitter-tasting (-)-epigallocatechin gallate, bitter-tasting caffeine, and the umami-tasting l-glutamic acid were the main contributors to the taste of RTD green tea. Subsequently, the taste profile of the reduced recombinant, comprising of a combination of these three compounds and l-theanine, was found to not differ significantly from the sample recombinant and RTD tea sample. Lastly, regression models were developed to objectively predict and assess the intensities of bitterness and astringency in RTD green teas. PMID:24594147

  6. FAF-Drugs3: a web server for compound property calculation and chemical library design.

    PubMed

    Lagorce, David; Sperandio, Olivier; Baell, Jonathan B; Miteva, Maria A; Villoutreix, Bruno O

    2015-07-01

    Drug attrition late in preclinical or clinical development is a serious economic problem in the field of drug discovery. These problems can be linked, in part, to the quality of the compound collections used during the hit generation stage and to the selection of compounds undergoing optimization. Here, we present FAF-Drugs3, a web server that can be used for drug discovery and chemical biology projects to help in preparing compound libraries and to assist decision-making during the hit selection/lead optimization phase. Since it was first described in 2006, FAF-Drugs has been significantly modified. The tool now applies an enhanced structure curation procedure, can filter or analyze molecules with user-defined or eight predefined physicochemical filters as well as with several simple ADMET (absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicity) rules. In addition, compounds can be filtered using an updated list of 154 hand-curated structural alerts while Pan Assay Interference compounds (PAINS) and other, generally unwanted groups are also investigated. FAF-Drugs3 offers access to user-friendly html result pages and the possibility to download all computed data. The server requires as input an SDF file of the compounds; it is open to all users and can be accessed without registration at http://fafdrugs3.mti.univ-paris-diderot.fr. PMID:25883137

  7. FAF-Drugs3: a web server for compound property calculation and chemical library design

    PubMed Central

    Lagorce, David; Sperandio, Olivier; Baell, Jonathan B.; Miteva, Maria A.; Villoutreix, Bruno O.

    2015-01-01

    Drug attrition late in preclinical or clinical development is a serious economic problem in the field of drug discovery. These problems can be linked, in part, to the quality of the compound collections used during the hit generation stage and to the selection of compounds undergoing optimization. Here, we present FAF-Drugs3, a web server that can be used for drug discovery and chemical biology projects to help in preparing compound libraries and to assist decision-making during the hit selection/lead optimization phase. Since it was first described in 2006, FAF-Drugs has been significantly modified. The tool now applies an enhanced structure curation procedure, can filter or analyze molecules with user-defined or eight predefined physicochemical filters as well as with several simple ADMET (absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicity) rules. In addition, compounds can be filtered using an updated list of 154 hand-curated structural alerts while Pan Assay Interference compounds (PAINS) and other, generally unwanted groups are also investigated. FAF-Drugs3 offers access to user-friendly html result pages and the possibility to download all computed data. The server requires as input an SDF file of the compounds; it is open to all users and can be accessed without registration at http://fafdrugs3.mti.univ-paris-diderot.fr. PMID:25883137

  8. 8 - N Rule and Chemical Bonding in Main-Group MgAgAs-Type Compounds.

    PubMed

    Bende, David; Wagner, Frank R; Grin, Yuri

    2015-04-20

    The chemical bonding of main-group MgAgAs-type compounds is analyzed with quantum chemical direct-space techniques. A new bonding concept is developed that unites the former ionic bonding and polyanionic network models. Polar and nonpolar contributions to the bonding are extracted by the combined analysis of electron density and electron localizability. A direct-space representation of the 8 - N rule is introduced. In this approach, the anions' heteropolar bonds are treated as a superposition of covalent (nonpolar) and lone-pair closed-shell (polar) contributions. The relation between covalent (nonpolar) and lone-pair (polar) character is obtained with the ELI-D/QTAIM basin intersection technique. This ratio depends on the constituting elements. On basis of this approach, MgAgAs-type compounds are compared with Zintl phases, where covalent bonds and lone pairs are spatially separated. PMID:25836014

  9. Image-Based Chemical Screening Identifies Drug Efflux Inhibitors In Lung Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Xiaofeng; Yang, Jian; Li, Fuhai; Li, Ying; Zhou, Xiaobo; Dai, Yue; Wong, Stephen T C

    2010-01-01

    Cancer cells with active drug-efflux capability are multidrug resistant and pose a significant obstacle for the efficacy of chemotherapy. Moreover, recent evidence suggests that high drug-efflux cancer cells (HDECCs) may be selectively enriched with stem-like cancer cells, which are believed to be the cause for tumor initiation and recurrence. There is a great need for therapeutic reagents that are capable of eliminating HDECCs. We developed an image-based high-content screening (HCS) system to specifically identify and analyze the HDECC population in lung cancer cells. Using the system, we screened 1,280 pharmacologically active compounds which identified twelve potent HDECC inhibitors. It is shown that these inhibitors are able to overcome MDR and sensitize HDECCs to chemotherapeutic drugs, or directly reduce the tumorigenicity of lung cancer cells possibly by affecting stem-like cancer cells. The HCS system we established provides a new approach for identifying therapeutic reagents overcoming MDR. The compounds identified by the screening may potentially be used as potential adjuvant to improve the efficacy of chemotherapeutic drugs. PMID:20841476

  10. The interaction of chemical compounds with the functional state of the liver

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. R. F. Notten; P. Th. Henderson

    1977-01-01

    At the present time, numerous chemicals are known to affect the activities of various hepatic enzymes, which find expression in an altered metabolism of both xenobiotic compounds and normal body constituents. A well-known example of the latter phenomenon is the stimulation of the D-glucuronic acid pathway resulting in an enhanced urinary excretion of D-glucaric acid. The results described in this

  11. Thermal Decomposition of Some Chemical Compounds Used As Food Preservatives and Kinetic Parameters of This Process

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Mas?owska; M. Wi?d?ocha

    2000-01-01

    Thermal decomposition processes of selected chemicals used as food preservatives such as sodium formate, sodium propionate,\\u000a sodium nitrates(V and III) and sodium sulphate(IV) were examined by the derivatographic method. Based on the curves obtained,\\u000a the number of decomposition stages and characteristic temperatures of these compounds have been found. Mass decrements calculated\\u000a from TG curves ranged from 28.9% for sodium formate

  12. Real-time monitoring of volatile organic compounds using chemical ionization mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Mowry, Curtis Dale (Albuquerque, NM); Thornberg, Steven Michael (Peralta, NM)

    1999-01-01

    A system for on-line quantitative monitoring of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) includes pressure reduction means for carrying a gaseous sample from a first location to a measuring input location maintained at a low pressure, the system utilizing active feedback to keep both the vapor flow and pressure to a chemical ionization mode mass spectrometer constant. A multiple input manifold for VOC and gas distribution permits a combination of calibration gases or samples to be applied to the spectrometer.

  13. Effect of chemical and external pressure on the structure of intermetallic compound CeNi

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. Mirmelstein; E. Clementyev; V. Voronin; Yu. Akshentsev; D. Kozlenko; A. Kutepov; A. Petrovtsev; Yu. Zuev

    2007-01-01

    Neutron powder diffraction was employed to study the structural modifications of the intermediate-valence compound CeNi at room temperature induced by either chemical or external pressure. For the first time we were able to record the diffraction pattern resulting from the pressure-induced first-order phase transition occurring in CeNi at 300K. At pressure P=2GPa we observe the coexistence of two phases while

  14. Metal organic chemical vapor deposition of 111-v compounds on silicon

    DOEpatents

    Vernon, Stanley M. (Wellesley, MA)

    1986-01-01

    Expitaxial composite comprising thin films of a Group III-V compound semiconductor such as gallium arsenide (GaAs) or gallium aluminum arsenide (GaAlAs) on single crystal silicon substrates are disclosed. Also disclosed is a process for manufacturing, by chemical deposition from the vapor phase, epitaxial composites as above described, and to semiconductor devices based on such epitaxial composites. The composites have particular utility for use in making light sensitive solid state solar cells.

  15. Optical methods for creating delivery systems of chemical compounds to plant roots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, Pavel E.; Rogacheva, Svetlana M.; Arefeva, Oksana A.; Minin, Dmitryi V.; Tolmachev, Sergey A.; Kupadze, Machammad S.

    2004-08-01

    Spectrophotometric and fluorescence methods have been used for creation and investigation of various systems of target delivery of chemical compounds to roots of plants. The possibility of using liposomes, incrusted by polysaccharides of the external surface of nitrogen-fixing rizospheric bacteria Azospirillum brasilense SP 245, and nanoparticles incrusted by polysaccharides of wheat roots, as the named systems has been shown. The important role of polysaccharide-polysaccharide interaction in the adsorption processes of bacteria on wheat roots has been demonstrated.

  16. Small molecule screening in zebrafish: an in vivo approach to identifying new chemical tools and drug leads

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kerrie L Taylor; Nicola J Grant; Nicholas D Temperley; E. Elizabeth Patton

    2010-01-01

    In the past two decades, zebrafish genetic screens have identified a wealth of mutations that have been essential to the understanding of development and disease biology. More recently, chemical screens in zebrafish have identified small molecules that can modulate specific developmental and behavioural processes. Zebrafish are a unique vertebrate system in which to study chemical genetic systems, identify drug leads,

  17. Disputable issues in interpreting the results of chemical extraction of iron compounds from soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vodyanitskii, Yu. N.; Shoba, S. A.

    2014-06-01

    In Russia, iron is chemically fractionated according to a parallel scheme. Pyrophosphate-soluble iron (Fepyr) is considered to participate in organomineral complexes, oxalate-soluble iron (Feox) is believed to enter amorphous + poorly crystallized compounds, and dithionite-soluble iron (Fedit) is meant to represent the free (nonsilicate) compounds. However, the investigations prove that the commonly used subtraction operations (Feox - Fepyr) and (Fedit - Feox) are invalid because of the nonadditive action of the reagents in the parallel scheme of extraction. The low selectivity of reagents requires a new interpretation of chemically extracted iron compounds. In automorphic soils, the content of oxalate-soluble iron should be interpreted as the amount of Fe(III) capable of complexing with organic ligands; in hydromorphic soils with a stagnant moisture regime, it should be interpreted as the amount of iron (III) capable of being reduced in a short time. The content of dithionite-soluble compounds should be regarded as the amount of iron (III) within both (hydr)oxides and silicates potentially prone to reduction.

  18. Miniaturized sequential injection analyzer for the monitoring and quantitation of chemical weapons degradation compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lancaster, Herbert L., III; Postlethwaite, Timothy A.; Zhang, Peng; Sorrells, Richard

    2002-06-01

    The ability to monitor and detect chemical warfare agents and their degradation compounds continues to be of utmost importance. Remote on-site field analysis of these compounds is also extremely important as it relates to treaty verification for the Chemical Weapons Convention, as well as the minimization and elimination of human exposure. A portable instrument has been developed and miniaturized that allows for the detection of these compounds in the field with better quantitative results and higher reproducibility than traditional field test kits. All sample and reagent manipulations are conducted in a completely automated fashion. Quantitative results may be determined colorimetrically using the molybdenum blue reaction for the final degradation product of phosphonic acid based chemical warfare agents with a detection limit of 0.05 ppm. The instrument is based on the flow analysis technique of sequential injection analysis (SIA). The benefits of this approach are that the method provides rapid response, high reproducibility of results, high sensitivity and minimal waste production.

  19. Crystal chemical and quantum chemical studies of Ba(Sr)-Nb oxide compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zubkov, V. G.; Turzhevsky, S. A.; Pereliaev, V. A.; Liechtenstein, A. I.; Gubanov, V. A.

    1990-01-01

    The information available on the BaO(SrO)-NbO-NbO2 system with the niobium atom in the lower oxidation degree is very limited. Very few compounds have been found previously in this system. They are BaNbO3, SrxNbO3(0,7=x=1), Ba2Nb2O9, SrNb8O14; and some suggestions on the BaNb8O14 existence have been made also. At the same time Nb-based oxide compounds could be quite interesting in the search of new noncopper high T(sub c) superconductors Researchers studied Ba(Sr) NbxO2x-2 and Ba2(Sr2)-NbxO2x-1 compositions in the phase diagram of BaO(SrO)-NbO-NbO2 system. The synthesis of the materials was carried out in vacuum at the temperatures of 1000 to 1500 C. Barium carbonate and niobium pentoxide were used as initial components. X-ray analysis was carried out.

  20. Source and plume investigation of chlorinated compounds in groundwater at a chemical plant

    SciTech Connect

    Trahan, D.B. [PSI, Inc., Baton Rouge, LA (United States)

    1995-10-01

    A site assessment was conducted to determine the distribution of chlorinated compounds in soil and groundwater at a chemical plant in Geismar, Louisiana. The assessment first included an investigation of the source(S) of the contaminants using aerial photos, interviews and plant records. Next, the stratigraphic framework of the site was defined with a hydrogeological investigation using historic borin logs and cone penetrometer testing (CPT). Finally, a plume investigation was performed to determine the horizontal and vertical extent of the contamination using direct-push methods for sampling of soil and groundwater. It was determined that chlorinated compounds originated from leaking drums and cleaning operations prior to 1975. Downward migration of these compounds may have been promoted by the installation of uncased 50-foot wooden pillings. The contamination is limited both vertical and horizontally, to three hydrogeologic zones: (1) the first water-bearing silt zone; (2) an intermediate zone consisting of interlayered silt and clay; and (3) the second water-bearing silt zone. The concentration of chlorinated compounds are greatest in the intermediate zone. There is some evidence of natural degradation of the chlorinated compounds, particularly in the first water-bearing zone.

  1. Flue gas compounds and microalgae: (bio-)chemical interactions leading to biotechnological opportunities.

    PubMed

    Van Den Hende, Sofie; Vervaeren, Han; Boon, Nico

    2012-01-01

    Flue gases are a resource yet to be fully utilised in microalgal biotechnology, not only to moderate the anthropogenic effects on our climate, but also to steer microalgal resource management towards innovative applications of microalgal biomass compounds. These gases, both untreated and treated into current discharge standards, contain CO2, N2, H2O, O2, NOx, SOx, CxHy, CO, particulate matter, halogen acids and heavy metals. To better steer and engineer flue gas-fed microalgal cultures, all these compounds need to be considered. Therefore, here, we review (i) the chemical composition and treatment technologies of flue gas, (ii) the uptake pathways and removal of the different compounds in microalgae reactors, and (iii) the tolerance and effects on microalgae of all flue gas compounds. By emphasising the interactions between microalgae and flue gas compounds, we envisage new pathways for microalgal biomass valorisation such as enzyme production for environmental technology, novel biogas production and biosequestration of minerals. Furthermore, we highlight fundamental and applied research niches that merit further investigation. PMID:22425735

  2. Chemicals identified in human biological media: a data base. Third annual report, October 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Cone, M.V.; Baldauf, M.F.; Martin, F.M. (comps.) [comps.

    1981-12-01

    Data from almost 1600 of the 3800 body-burden documents collected to date have been entered in the data base as of October 1981. The emphasis on including recent literature and significant research documents has resulted in a chronological mix of articles from 1974 to the present. When body-burden articles are identified, data are extracted and entered in the data base by chemical and tissue/body fluid. Each data entry comprises a single record (or line entry) and is assigned a record number. If a particular document deals with more than one chemical and/or tissue, there will be multiple records for that document. For example, a study of 5 chemicals in each of 3 tissues has 15 different records (or 15 line entries) in the data base with 15 record numbers. Record numbers are assigned consecutively throughout the entire data base and appear in the upper left corner of the first column for each record.

  3. Quantitative global studies of reactomes and metabolomes using a vectorial representation of reactions and chemical compounds

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Global studies of the protein repertories of organisms are providing important information on the characteristics of the protein space. Many of these studies entail classification of the protein repertory on the basis of structure and/or sequence similarities. The situation is different for metabolism. Because there is no good way of measuring similarities between chemical reactions, there is a barrier to the development of global classifications of "metabolic space" and subsequent studies comparable to those done for protein sequences and structures. Results In this work, we propose a vectorial representation of chemical reactions, which allows them to be compared and classified. In this representation, chemical compounds, reactions and pathways may be represented in the same vectorial space. We show that the representation of chemical compounds reflects their physicochemical properties and can be used for predictive purposes. We use the vectorial representations of reactions to perform a global classification of the reactome of the model organism E. coli. Conclusions We show that this unsupervised clustering results in groups of enzymes more coherent in biological terms than equivalent groupings obtained from the EC hierarchy. This hierarchical clustering produces an optimal set of 21 groups which we analyzed for their biological meaning. PMID:20406431

  4. A Substrate Pharmacophore for the Human Organic Cation/Carnitine Transporter Identifies Compounds Associated with Rhabdomyolysis

    PubMed Central

    Ekins, Sean; Diao, Lei; Polli, James E.

    2012-01-01

    The human Organic Cation/Carnitine Transporter (hOCTN2), is a high affinity cation/carnitine transporter expressed widely in human tissues and is physiologically important for the homeostasis of L-carnitine. The objective of this study was to elucidate the substrate requirements of this transporter via computational modelling based on published in vitro data. Nine published substrates of hOCTN2 were used to create a common features pharmacophore that was validated by mapping other known OCTN2 substrates. The pharmacophore was used to search a drug database and retrieved molecules that were then used as search queries in PubMed for instances of a side effect (rhabdomyolysis) associated with interference with L-carnitine transport. The substrate pharmacophore was comprised of two hydrogen bond acceptors, a positive ionizable feature and ten excluded volumes. The substrate pharmacophore also mapped 6 out of 7 known substrate molecules used as a test set. After searching a database of ~800 known drugs, thirty drugs were predicted to map to the substrate pharmacophore with L-carnitine shape restriction. At least 16 of these molecules had case reports documenting an association with rhabdomyolysis and represent a set for prioritizing for future testing as OCTN2 substrates or inhibitors. This computational OCTN2 substrate pharmacophore derived from published data partially overlaps a previous OCTN2 inhibitor pharmacophore and is also able to select compounds that demonstrate rhabdomyolysis, further confirming the possible linkage between this side effect and hOCTN2. PMID:22339151

  5. Selective targeting of neuroblastoma tumour-initiating cells by compounds identified in stem cell-based small molecule screens

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Kristen M; Datti, Alessandro; Fujitani, Mayumi; Grinshtein, Natalie; Zhang, Libo; Morozova, Olena; Blakely, Kim M; Rotenberg, Susan A; Hansford, Loen M; Miller, Freda D; Yeger, Herman; Irwin, Meredith S; Moffat, Jason; Marra, Marco A; Baruchel, Sylvain; Wrana, Jeffrey L; Kaplan, David R

    2010-01-01

    Neuroblastoma (NB) is the most deadly extra-cranial solid tumour in children necessitating an urgent need for effective and less toxic treatments. One reason for the lack of efficacious treatments may be the inability of existing drugs to target the tumour-initiating or cancer stem cell population responsible for sustaining tumour growth, metastases and relapse. Here, we describe a strategy to identify compounds that selectively target patient-derived cancer stem cell-like tumour-initiating cells (TICs) while sparing normal paediatric stem cells (skin-derived precursors, SKPs) and characterize two therapeutic candidates. DECA-14 and rapamycin were identified as NB TIC-selective agents. Both compounds induced TIC death at nanomolar concentrations in vitro, significantly reduced NB xenograft tumour weight in vivo, and dramatically decreased self-renewal or tumour-initiation capacity in treated tumours. These results demonstrate that differential drug sensitivities between TICs and normal paediatric stem cells can be exploited to identify novel, patient-specific and potentially less toxic therapies. PMID:20721990

  6. Photocatalytic and chemical oxidation of organic compounds in supercritical carbon dioxide. 1998 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Blake, D.M.

    1998-06-01

    'This report summarizes the results of work done during the first 1.3 years of a three year project. During the first nine months effort focussed on the design, construction and testing of a closed recirculating system that can be used to study photochemistry in supercritical carbon dioxide at pressures up to 5,000 psi and temperatures up to about 50 C. This was followed by a period of work in which the photocatalytic oxidation of benzene and acetone in supercritical, liquid, and gaseous carbon dioxide containing dissolved oxygen was demonstrated. The photocatalyst was titanium dioxide supported on glass spheres. This was the first time it was possible to observe photocatalytic oxidation in a supercritical fluid and to compare reaction in the three fluid phases of a solvent. This also demonstrated that it is possible to purify supercritical and liquid carbon dioxide using photochemical oxidation with no chemical additions other than oxygen. The oxidation of benzene produced no intermediates detectable using on line spectroscopic analysis or by gas chromatographic analysis of samples taken from the flow system. The catalyst surface did darken as the reaction proceeded indicating that oxidation products were accumulating on the surface. This is analogous to the behavior of aromatic compounds in air phase photocatalytic oxidation. The reaction of acetone under similar conditions resulted in the formation of low levels of by-products. Two were identified as products of the reaction of acetone with itself (4-methyl-3-penten-2-one and 4-hydroxy-4-methyl-2-pentanone) using gas chromatography with a mass spectrometer detector. Two other by-products also appear to be from the self-reaction of acetone. By-products of this type had not been observed in prior studies of the gas-phase photocatalytic oxidation of acetone. The by-products that have been observed can also be oxidized under the treatment conditions. The above results establish that photocatalytic oxidation of organic compounds in supercritical carbon dioxide can be achieved. Until recently it was not possible for us to obtain high quality, quantitative kinetic data. The original flow cell used to obtain UV-Visible spectra on the recirculating fluid did not provide quantitative concentration data because the sapphire windows did not have adequate transmission characteristics below about 240 nm. A pair of windows with better transmission properties arrived as this report was being prepared. While waiting for the replacement windows for the flow cell, the concentration of reactants was monitored by withdrawing samples of the fluid stream for gas chromatographic analysis. This allowed progress to be made in determining some of the factors that affected the rates of reaction in a qualitative sense but the results had large error bars due to the difficulty in obtaining reproducible samples from the pressurized system using gas tight syringes. This problem was recently solved by incorporating a gas chromatograph with automatic sampling valves into the flow system. The two on line analytical methods will now result in reliable analytical data that can be used to follow the reaction kinetics and detect and identify reaction intermediates and by-products, if any are formed.'

  7. [Quantification assessment of the relationship between chemical and olfactory concentrations for malodorous volatile organic compounds].

    PubMed

    Liu, Shu-Le; Wang, Bo-Guang; He, Jie; Tang, Xiao-Dong; Zhao, De-Jun; Guo, Wei

    2011-12-01

    Using self-made cold-traps and gas bags, the odor samples were collected from 6 sewage treatment workshops of a typical municipal sewage treatment plant in Guangzhou City. The chemical composition and olfactory concentrations of these samples were respectively analyzed by thermal-desorption/GC-MS and triangle odor bag method. Finally, a mathematical equation was built for assessing the relationship between principal organic odorants and the olfactory concentrations. The result showing that: (1) More than 70 volatile organic compounds were detected in municipal sewage treatment plant, among which were 30 malodorous volatile organic compounds (MVOCs), ranging from 0.37 to 1 872.24 microg x m(-3) and appearing in sludge dewatering, thickening and aeration tank with the highest concentrations. (2) Principle component analysis was used to group the target MVOCs into 5 categories: benzenes, halohydrocarbons, aldehydes, hydrocarbons and S, N-containing organic compounds. (3) Multiple lineal regression analysis was used to build a quantified relationship between chemical and olfactory concentrations of MVOCs. The result indicated that 25% of the odor problem of sewage treatment unit was due to MVOCs. The predicted values were fitting well with measured values. The sensitivity of mathematical equation for measuring odor concentration was higher than that of human olfactory system. PMID:22468522

  8. Design and characterization of chemical space networks for different compound data sets.

    PubMed

    Zwierzyna, Magdalena; Vogt, Martin; Maggiora, Gerald M; Bajorath, Jürgen

    2015-02-01

    Chemical Space Networks (CSNs) are generated for different compound data sets on the basis of pairwise similarity relationships. Such networks are thought to complement and further extend traditional coordinate-based views of chemical space. Our proof-of-concept study focuses on CSNs based upon fingerprint similarity relationships calculated using the conventional Tanimoto similarity metric. The resulting CSNs are characterized with statistical measures from network science and compared in different ways. We show that the homophily principle, which is widely considered in the context of social networks, is a major determinant of the topology of CSNs of bioactive compounds, designed as threshold networks, typically giving rise to community structures. Many properties of CSNs are influenced by numerical features of the conventional Tanimoto similarity metric and largely dominated by the edge density of the networks, which depends on chosen similarity threshold values. However, properties of different CSNs with constant edge density can be directly compared, revealing systematic differences between CSNs generated from randomly collected or bioactive compounds. PMID:25465052

  9. PINS chemical identification software

    DOEpatents

    Caffrey, Augustine J.; Krebs, Kennth M.

    2004-09-14

    An apparatus and method for identifying a chemical compound. A neutron source delivers neutrons into the chemical compound. The nuclei of chemical elements constituting the chemical compound emit gamma rays upon interaction with the neutrons. The gamma rays are characteristic of the chemical elements constituting the chemical compound. A spectrum of the gamma rays is generated having a detection count and an energy scale. The energy scale is calibrated by comparing peaks in the spectrum to energies of pre-selected chemical elements in the spectrum. A least-squares fit completes the calibration. The chemical elements constituting the chemical compound can be readily determined, which then allows for identification of the chemical compound.

  10. FP Tethering: a screening technique to rapidly identify compounds that disrupt protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Lodge, Jean M; Rettenmaier, T Justin; Wells, James A; Pomerantz, William C; Mapp, Anna K

    2014-03-01

    Tethering is a screening technique for discovering small-molecule fragments that bind to pre-determined sites via formation of a disulphide bond. Tethering screens traditionally rely upon mass spectrometry to detect disulphide bind formation, which requires a time-consuming liquid chromatography step. Here we show that Tethering can be performed rapidly and inexpensively using a homogenous fluorescence polarization (FP) assay that detects displacement of a peptide ligand from the protein target as an indirect readout of disulphide formation. We apply this method, termed FP Tethering, to identify fragments that disrupt the protein-protein interaction between the KIX domain of the transcriptional coactivator CBP and the transcriptional activator peptide pKID. PMID:24795804

  11. Quantum chemical and statistical study of megazol-derived compounds with trypanocidal activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosselli, F. P.; Albuquerque, C. N.; da Silva, A. B. F.

    In this work we performed a structure-activity relationship (SAR) study with the aim to correlate molecular properties of the megazol compound and 10 of its analogs with the biological activity against Trypanosoma cruzi (trypanocidal or antichagasic activity) presented by these molecules. The biological activity indication was obtained from in vitro tests and the molecular properties (variables or descriptors) were obtained from the optimized chemical structures by using the PM3 semiempirical method. It was calculated ˜80 molecular properties selected among steric, constitutional, electronic, and lipophilicity properties. In order to reduce dimensionality and investigate which subset of variables (descriptors) would be more effective in classifying the compounds studied, according to their degree of trypanocidal activity, we employed statistical methodologies (pattern recognition and classification techniques) such as principal component analysis (PCA), hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA), K-nearest neighbor (KNN), and discriminant function analysis (DFA). These methods showed that the descriptors molecular mass (MM), energy of the second lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO+1), charge on the first nitrogen at substituent 2 (qN'), dihedral angles (D1 and D2), bond length between atom C4 and its substituent (L4), Moriguchi octanol-partition coefficient (MLogP), and length-to-breadth ratio (L/Bw) were the variables responsible for the separation between active and inactive compounds against T. cruzi. Afterwards, the PCA, KNN, and DFA models built in this work were used to perform trypanocidal activity predictions for eight new megazol analog compounds.

  12. Numerical simulation of the chemical-signature-compounds transport from a mine field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borrero, Ernesto E.; Briano, Julio G.; Castro, Miguel E.; Hernandez-Rivera, Samuel P.

    2004-09-01

    The transport of the chemical signature compounds from buried landmines in a three-dimensional minefield array has been numerically modeled using the finite-volume technique. Compounds such as trinitrotoluene and dinitrotoluene are semi-volatile and somewhat soluble in water; furthermore, they can strongly adsorb to the soil and undergo chemical and biological degradation. Consequently, the spatial and temporal distributions of such chemicals depend on the mobility of the water and gaseous phases, their molecular and mechanical diffusion, adsorption characteristics, soil water content and compaction, and environmental factors. Surface concentrations decrease, when precipitation occurs due to advective flux around the object. Deformation in the concentrations contours after rainfall is observed in the inclined surface case and it is attributed to both: the advective flux, and to the water flux at the surface caused by the inclination. The LaGrit code developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) was used to generate the 3D grid array and to place several landmines at different underground positions. The simulations were performed by using the Finite-Element Heat and Mass-transfer code also developed originally at LANL.

  13. [Emission characteristics and hazard assessment analysis of volatile organic compounds from chemical synthesis pharmaceutical industry].

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Wang, Zhe-Ming; Song, Shuang; Xu, Zhi-Rong; Xu, Ming-Zhu; Xu, Wei-Li

    2014-10-01

    In this study, volatile organic compounds (VOCs) released from chemical synthesis pharmaceutical industry in Taizhou, Zhejiang province were analyzed quantitatively and qualitatively. The total volatile organic compounds (TVOCs) was in the range of 14.9-308.6 mg · m(-3). Evaluation models of ozone formation potentials (OFP) and health risk assessment were adopted to preliminarily assess the environmental impact and health risk of VOCs. The results showed that the values of OFP of VOCs were in the range of 3.1-315.1 mg · m(-3), based on the maximum incremental reactivity, the main principal contribution was toluene, tetrahydrofuran (THF), acetic ether etc. The non-carcinogenic risk and the carcinogen risk fell in the ranges of 9.48 x 10(-7)-4.98 x 10(-4) a(-1) and 3.17 x 10(-5)- 6.33 x 10(-3). The principal contribution of VOCs was benzene, formaldehyde and methylene chloride. PMID:25693367

  14. Stereoregularity of poly (lactic acid) and their model compounds as studied by NMR and quantum chemical calculations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In order to understand the origin of the tacticity splitting in the NMR spectrum of poly(lactic acid), monomer model compound and dimer model compounds (both isotactic and syndiotactic) were synthesized and their 1H and 13C NMR chemical shifts observed. Two energetically stable conformations were o...

  15. Chemical effect on the K shell x-ray fluorescence parameters of some Ce compounds.

    PubMed

    Tur?ucu, A; Demir, D

    2013-07-01

    Chemical effects on the K?/K? x-ray intensity ratios, fluorescence yields wK and vacancy transfer probabilities ?KL for some Ce compounds were investigated. In this study, the samples were excited by 59.54 keV ?-rays from a 5Ci (241)Am annular radioactive source. K x-rays emitted by samples were counted by an HPGe detector with a resolution of 182 eV at 5.9 keV. The experimental values were compared with the theoretical and other experimental values. The aim of these measurements was to characterize the dependence of the line position and line width with the chemical environment changes. PMID:23500654

  16. Glutathione S-transferase activity: enhancement by compounds inhibiting chemical carcinogenesis and by dietary constituents.

    PubMed

    Sparnins, V L; Venegas, P L; Wattenberg, L W

    1982-03-01

    Benzyl isothiocyanate, beta-naphthoflavone, coumarin, alpha-angelicalactone, disulfiram, indole-3-carbinol and indole-3-acetonitrile induced increased glutathione (GSH) S-transferase activity in the liver and small intestine in female ICR/Ha mice. All seven compounds are inhibitors of chemical carcinogenesis. In additional work, several dietary constituents increased GSH S-transferase activity. Consumption of diets containing dried powdered preparations of brussels sprouts, cabbage, coffee beans, or tea leaves resulted in increased GSH S-transferase activity. Mice fed an unrefined diet (Purina Rat Chow) had a higher GSH S-transferase activity than those fed a semipurified diet. The results of the present study indicated that the composition of the diet can alter the activity of an important enzyme system having the capacity to detoxify chemical carcinogens. PMID:6278195

  17. Coordination compounds of tetravalent silicon, germanium and tin: the structure, chemical bonding and intermolecular interactions in them

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korlyukov, A. A.

    2015-04-01

    The review is devoted to analysis and generalization of the results of (i) quantum chemical studies on the structure, chemical bonding and intermolecular interactions in coordination compounds of tetravalent silicon, germanium and tin in crystals, in solutions and in the gas phase and (ii) experimental investigations of the electron density distribution in these systems. The bibliography includes 147 references.

  18. Identifying chemical carcinogens and assessing potential risk in short-term bioassays using transgenic mouse models.

    PubMed Central

    Tennant, R W; French, J E; Spalding, J W

    1995-01-01

    Cancer is a worldwide public health concern. Identifying carcinogens and limiting their exposure is one approach to the problem of reducing risk. Currently, epidemiology and rodent bioassays are the means by which putative human carcinogens are identified. Both methods have intrinsic limitations: they are slow and expensive processes with many uncertainties. The development of methods to modify specific genes in the mammalian genome has provided promising new tools for identifying carcinogens and characterizing risk. Transgenic mice may provide advantages in shortening the time required for bioassays and improving the accuracy of carcinogen identification; transgenic mice might now be included in the testing armamentarium without abandoning the two-year bioassay, the current standard. We show that mutagenic carcinogens can be identified with increased sensitivity and specificity using hemizygous p53 mice in which one allele of the p53 gene has been inactivated. Furthermore, the TG.AC transgenic model, carrying a v-Ha-ras construct, has developed papillomas and malignant tumors in response to a number of mutagenic and nonmutagenic carcinogens and tumor promoters, but not to noncarcinogens. We present a decision-tree approach that permits, at modest extra cost, the testing of more chemicals with improved ability to extrapolate from rodents to humans. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. PMID:8529591

  19. Assessment of multi-chemical pollution in aquatic ecosystems using toxic units: compound prioritization, mixture characterization and relationships with biological descriptors.

    PubMed

    Ginebreda, Antoni; Kuzmanovic, Maja; Guasch, Helena; de Alda, Miren López; López-Doval, Julio C; Muñoz, Isabel; Ricart, Marta; Romaní, Anna M; Sabater, Sergi; Barceló, Damià

    2014-01-15

    Chemical pollution is typically characterized by exposure to multiple rather than to single or a limited number of compounds. Parent compounds, transformation products and other non-targeted compounds yield mixtures whose composition can only be partially identified by monitoring, while a substantial proportion remains unknown. In this context, risk assessment based on the application of additive ecotoxicity models, such as concentration addition (CA), is rendered somewhat misleading. Here, we show that ecotoxicity risk information can be better understood upon consideration of the probabilistic distribution of risk among the different compounds. Toxic units of the compounds identified in a sample fit a lognormal probability distribution. The parameters characterizing this distribution (mean and standard deviation) provide information which can be tentatively interpreted as a measure of the toxic load and its apportionment among the constituents in the mixture (here interpreted as mixture complexity). Furthermore, they provide information for compound prioritization tailored to each site and enable prediction of some of the functional and structural biological variables associated with the receiving ecosystem. The proposed approach was tested in the Llobregat River basin (NE Spain) using exposure and toxicity data (algae and Daphnia) corresponding to 29 pharmaceuticals and 22 pesticides, and 5 structural and functional biological descriptors related to benthic macroinvertebrates (diversity, biomass) and biofilm metrics (diatom quality, chlorophyll-a content and photosynthetic capacity). Aggregated toxic units based on Daphnia and algae bioassays provided a good indication of the pollution pattern of the Llobregat River basin. Relative contribution of pesticides and pharmaceuticals to total toxic load was variable and highly site dependent, the latter group tending to increase its contribution in urban areas. Contaminated sites' toxic load was typically dominated by fewer compounds as compared to cleaner sites where more compounds contribute. PMID:24070871

  20. An Automated High-Throughput Cell-Based Multiplexed Flow Cytometry Assay to Identify Novel Compounds to Target Candida albicans Virulence-Related Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Bernardo, Stella M.; Allen, Christopher P.; Waller, Anna; Young, Susan M.; Oprea, Tudor; Sklar, Larry A.; Lee, Samuel A.

    2014-01-01

    Although three major classes of systemic antifungal agents are clinically available, each is characterized by important limitations. Thus, there has been considerable ongoing effort to develop novel and repurposed agents for the therapy of invasive fungal infections. In an effort to address these needs, we developed a novel high-throughput, multiplexed screening method that utilizes small molecules to probe candidate drug targets in the opportunistic fungal pathogen Candida albicans. This method is amenable to high-throughput automated screening and is based upon detection of changes in GFP levels of individually tagged target proteins. We first selected four GFP-tagged membrane-bound proteins associated with virulence or antifungal drug resistance in C. albicans. We demonstrated proof-of-principle that modulation of fluorescence intensity can be used to assay the expression of specific GFP-tagged target proteins to inhibitors (and inducers), and this change is measurable within the HyperCyt automated flow cytometry sampling system. Next, we generated a multiplex of differentially color-coded C. albicans strains bearing C-terminal GFP-tags of each gene encoding candidate drug targets incubated in the presence of small molecules from the Prestwick Chemical Library in 384-well microtiter plate format. Following incubation, cells were sampled through the HyperCyt system and modulation of protein levels, as indicated by changes in GFP-levels of each strain, was used to identify compounds of interest. The hit rate for both inducers and inhibitors identified in the primary screen did not exceed 1% of the total number of compounds in the small-molecule library that was probed, as would be expected from a robust target-specific, high-throughput screening campaign. Secondary assays for virulence characteristics based on null mutant strains were then used to further validate specificity. In all, this study presents a method for the identification and verification of new antifungal drugs targeted to fungal virulence proteins using C. albicans as a model fungal pathogen. PMID:25350399

  1. Quinones and Aromatic Chemical Compounds in Particulate Matter Induce Mitochondrial Dysfunction: Implications for Ultrafine Particle Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Tian; Korge, Paavo; Weiss, James N.; Li, Ning; Venkatesen, M. Indira; Sioutas, Constantinos; Nel, Andre

    2004-01-01

    Particulate pollutants cause adverse health effects through the generation of oxidative stress. A key question is whether these effects are mediated by the particles or their chemical compounds. In this article we show that aliphatic, aromatic, and polar organic compounds, fractionated from diesel exhaust particles (DEPs), exert differential toxic effects in RAW 264.7 cells. Cellular analyses showed that the quinone-enriched polar fraction was more potent than the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)–enriched aromatic fraction in O2•? generation, decrease of membrane potential (??m), loss of mitochondrial membrane mass, and induction of apoptosis. A major effect of the polar fraction was to promote cyclosporin A (CsA)–sensitive permeability transition pore (PTP) opening in isolated liver mitochondria. This opening effect is dependent on a direct effect on the PTP at low doses as well as on an effect on ??m at high doses in calcium (Ca2+)-loaded mitochondria. The direct PTP effect was mimicked by redox-cycling DEP quinones. Although the aliphatic fraction failed to perturb mitochondrial function, the aromatic fraction increased the Ca2+ retention capacity at low doses and induced mitochondrial swelling and a decrease in ??m at high doses. This swelling effect was mostly CsA insensitive and could be reproduced by a mixture of PAHs present in DEPs. These chemical effects on isolated mitochondria could be reproduced by intact DEPs as well as ambient ultrafine particles (UFPs). In contrast, commercial polystyrene nanoparticles failed to exert mitochondrial effects. These results suggest that DEP and UFP effects on the PTP and ??m are mediated by adsorbed chemicals rather than the particles themselves. PMID:15471724

  2. Crystal-Chemical Approach to Predicting the Thermal Expansion of Compounds in the NZP Family

    Microsoft Academic Search

    V. I. Pet'kov; A. I. Orlova

    2003-01-01

    The general structural aspects of phosphates with {[L2(PO4)3]p–}38 frameworks (L = octahedral cation) are considered, and the possible isomorphous substitutions in NaZr2(PO4)3 (NZP) phosphates are analyzed. The available data on the thermal expansion of NZP materials in the range 293–1273 K, together with crystal-chemical data on their structure, are used to identify the processes underlying the thermal expansion of these

  3. Ligand-based virtual screening and molecular docking studies to identify the critical chemical features of potent cathepsin D inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Sakkiah, Sugunadevi; Thangapandian, Sundarapandian; Lee, Keun Woo

    2012-07-01

    Cathepsin D is a major component of lysosomes and plays a major role in catabolism and degenerative diseases. The quantitative structure-activity relationship study was used to explore the critical chemical features of cathepsin D inhibitors. Top 10 hypotheses were built based on 36 known cathepsin D inhibitors using HypoGen/Discovery Studio v2.5. The best hypothesis Hypo1 consists of three hydrophobic, one hydrogen bond acceptor lipid, and one hydrogen bond acceptor features. The selected Hypo1 model was cross-validated using Fischer's randomization method to identify the strong correlation between experimental and predicted activity value as well as the test set and decoy sets used to validate its predictability. Moreover, the best hypothesis was used as a 3D query in virtual screening of Scaffold database. Subsequently, the screened hit molecules were filtered by applying Lipinski's rule of five, absorption, distribution, metabolism, and toxicity, and molecular docking studies. Finally, 49 compounds were obtained as potent cathepsin D inhibitors based on the consensus scoring values, critical interactions with protein active site residues, and predicted activity values. Thus, we suggest that the application of Hypo1 could assist in the selection of potent cathepsin D leads from various databases. Hence, this model was used as a valuable tool to design new candidate for cathepsin D inhibitors. PMID:22269155

  4. System and method for preconcentrating, identifying, and quantifying chemical and biological substances

    DOEpatents

    Yu, Conrad M. (Antioch, CA); Koo, Jackson C. (San Ramon, CA)

    2000-01-01

    A system and method for preconcentrating, identifying, and quantifying chemical and biological substances is disclosed. An input valve directs a first volume of a sample gas to a surface acoustic wave (SAW) device. The SAW device preconcentrates and detects a mass of a substance within the sample gas. An output valve receives a second volume of the sample gas containing the preconcentrated substance from the SAW device and directs the second volume to a gas chromatograph (GC). The GC identifies the preconcentrated substance within the sample gas. A shunt valve exhausts a volume of the sample gas equal to the first volume minus the second volume away from the SAW device and the GC. The method of the present invention includes the steps of opening an input valve for passing a first volume of a sample gas to a SAW device; preconcentrating and detecting a mass of a substance within the sample gas using the SAW device; opening an output valve for passing a second volume of the sample gas containing the preconcentrated substance to a gas chromatograph (GC); and then identifying the preconcentrated substance within the sample gas using the GC.

  5. Chemical composition and major odor-active compounds of essential oil from PINELLIA TUBER (dried rhizome of Pinellia ternata) as crude drug.

    PubMed

    Iwasa, Megumi; Iwasaki, Toshiki; Ono, Toshirou; Miyazawa, Mitsuo

    2014-01-01

    The chemical composition of the essential oil from PINELLIA TUBER (Japanese name: Hange), the dried rhizome of Pinellia ternata, was investigated by capillary gas chromatography (GC) and GC-mass spectrometry (MS) analyses. The oil obtained from Pinellia tuber was revealed the presence of 114 compounds, representing 90.6% of the total oil identified. This colorless oil had a spicy and woody odor. The main components of the oil were ?-cubebene (8.8%), atractylon (7.8%), methyl eugenol (6.2%), and ?-cadinene (5.3%). Fifteen major odor-active compounds were identified in the essential oil from PINELLIA TUBER by the GC-olfactometry (GC-O) and aroma extract dilution analysis (AEDA). Among these, safrole (spicy) and ?-vatirenene (woody) showed the highest flavor dilution (FD) factor (128), followed by paeonol (FD = 64; woody, spicy), ?-humulene (FD = 64; woody), and ?-phenylnaphthalene (FD = 64; spicy). PMID:24500103

  6. Method for identifying biochemical and chemical reactions and micromechanical processes using nanomechanical and electronic signal identification

    DOEpatents

    Holzrichter, John F. (Berkeley, CA); Siekhaus, Wigbert J. (Berkeley, CA)

    1997-01-01

    A scanning probe microscope, such as an atomic force microscope (AFM) or a scanning tunneling microscope (STM), is operated in a stationary mode on a site where an activity of interest occurs to measure and identify characteristic time-varying micromotions caused by biological, chemical, mechanical, electrical, optical, or physical processes. The tip and cantilever assembly of an AFM is used as a micromechanical detector of characteristic micromotions transmitted either directly by a site of interest or indirectly through the surrounding medium. Alternatively, the exponential dependence of the tunneling current on the size of the gap in the STM is used to detect micromechanical movement. The stationary mode of operation can be used to observe dynamic biological processes in real time and in a natural environment, such as polymerase processing of DNA for determining the sequence of a DNA molecule.

  7. Method for identifying biochemical and chemical reactions and micromechanical processes using nanomechanical and electronic signal identification

    DOEpatents

    Holzrichter, J.F.; Siekhaus, W.J.

    1997-04-15

    A scanning probe microscope, such as an atomic force microscope (AFM) or a scanning tunneling microscope (STM), is operated in a stationary mode on a site where an activity of interest occurs to measure and identify characteristic time-varying micromotions caused by biological, chemical, mechanical, electrical, optical, or physical processes. The tip and cantilever assembly of an AFM is used as a micromechanical detector of characteristic micromotions transmitted either directly by a site of interest or indirectly through the surrounding medium. Alternatively, the exponential dependence of the tunneling current on the size of the gap in the STM is used to detect micromechanical movement. The stationary mode of operation can be used to observe dynamic biological processes in real time and in a natural environment, such as polymerase processing of DNA for determining the sequence of a DNA molecule. 6 figs.

  8. Neutron interrogation to identify chemical elements with an ion-tube neutron source (INS)

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarez, R.A.; Dougan, A.D.; Rowland, M.R.; Wang, T.F.

    1994-04-07

    A non-destructive analysis technique using a portable, electric ion-tube neutron source (INS) and gamma ray detector has been used to identify the key constituent elements in a number of sealed munitions, and from the elemental makeup, infer the types of agent within each. The high energy (14 MeV) and pulsed character of the neutron flux from an INS provide a method of measuring, quantitatively, the oxygen, carbon, and fluorine content of materials in closed containers, as well as the other constituents that can be measured with low-energy neutron probes. The broad range of elements that can be quantitatively measured with INS-based instruments provides a capability of verifying common munition fills; it provides the greatest specificity of any portable neutron-based technique for determining the full matrix of chemical elements in completely unrestricted sample scenarios. The specific capability of quantifying the carbon and oxygen content of materials should lead to a fast screening technique which, can discriminate very quickly between high-explosive and chemical agent-filled containers.

  9. The parent populations of six groups identified from chemical tagging in the solar neighbourhood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quillen, Alice C.; Anguiano, Borja; De Silva, Gayandhi; Freeman, Ken; Zucker, Dan B.; Minchev, Ivan; Bland-Hawthorn, Joss

    2015-07-01

    We estimate the size and distribution of the parent populations for the six largest (at least 20 stars in the solar neighbourhood) chemical groups identified in the chemical tagging experiment by Mitschang et al. Stars in the abundance groups tend to lie near a boundary in angular momentum versus eccentricity space where the probability is highest for a star to be found in the solar neighbourhood and where orbits have apocentre approximately equal to the Sun's galactocentric radius. Assuming that the parent populations are uniformly distributed at all azimuthal angles in the Galaxy, we estimate that the parent populations of these abundance groups contain at least 200 000 members. The spread in angular momentum of the groups implies that the assumption of a uniform azimuthal distribution only fails for the two youngest groups and only for the highest angular momentum stars in them. The parent populations of three thin disc groups have narrow angular momentum distributions, but tails in the eccentricity and angular momentum distributions suggest that only a small fraction of stars have migrated and increased in eccentricity. In contrast, the parent populations of the thick disc groups exhibit both wide angular momentum and eccentricity distributions implying that both heating and radial migration has taken place.

  10. A chemical screen identifies class a g-protein coupled receptors as regulators of cilia.

    PubMed

    Avasthi, Prachee; Marley, Aaron; Lin, Henry; Gregori-Puigjane, Elisabet; Shoichet, Brian K; von Zastrow, Mark; Marshall, Wallace F

    2012-05-18

    Normal cilia length and motility are critical for proper cellular function. Prior studies of the regulation of ciliary structure and length have primarily focused on the intraflagellar transport machinery and motor proteins required for ciliary assembly and disassembly. However, several mutants with abnormal length flagella highlight the importance of signaling proteins as well. In this study, an unbiased chemical screen was performed to uncover signaling pathways that are critical for ciliogenesis and length regulation using flagella of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii as a model. The annotated Sigma LOPAC1280 chemical library was screened for effects on flagellar length, motility, and severing as well as cell viability. Assay data were clustered to identify pathways regulating flagella. The most frequent target found to be involved in flagellar length regulation was the family of dopamine binding G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). In mammalian cells, cilium length could indeed be altered with expression of the dopamine D1 receptor. Our screen thus reveals signaling pathways that are potentially critical for ciliary formation, resorption, and length maintenance, which represent candidate targets for therapeutic intervention of disorders involving ciliary malformation and malfunction. PMID:22375814

  11. Reconstitution of anti-allergic activities of PG102 derived from Actinidia arguta by combining synthetic chemical compounds.

    PubMed

    Kim, Donghyun; Choi, Jinyong; Kim, Mi-Jeong; Kim, Seon Hee; Cho, Sang Heon; Kim, Sunyoung

    2013-06-01

    PG102, a water-soluble extract from an edible fruit, Actinidia arguta, has previously been shown to control various factors involved in allergy pathogenesis. It was investigated whether the original activities of PG102 could be reconstituted by mixing chemical compounds present in PG102. Six compounds present in PG102 were, individually or in the form of mixtures, tested for their effects on the expression of various Th2 cytokines and inflammatory mediators in the cell-based assay. Each chemical inhibited IL-4 expression to varying degrees. The chemical compounds were combined at a ratio present in PG102, resulting in two formulations, CQMIIH and CQM, consisting of all or the first three of the following chemicals, citric, quinic, and malic acids, myo-inositol, isoquercitrin, and 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furaldehyde. The mixtures reconstituted original activities of PG102 to a significant level. In the murine asthma model, CQM ameliorated asthmatic symptoms and significantly decreased the level of IgE and IL-5. The decreased phosphorylation of ERK1/2 was observed in cells and mice treated with PG102 and the mixtures. Our data indicated that the substantial portion of PG102's anti-allergic activities could be reconstituted, in vitro and in vivo, by mixing six chemical compounds, suggesting the possibility of developing a new type of anti-allergic agent. This approach may be useful for developing chemically defined functional products from complex botanical extracts. PMID:23918875

  12. Active chemical compounds of traditional Chinese medicine Herba Leonuri: implications for cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin H; Pan, Li L; Zhu, Yi Z

    2012-03-01

    1.?Herba Leonuri, a traditional Chinese medicine, has a long history of development and application in China. In particular, Herba Leonuri has been widely used in the treatment of gynaecological and obstetric disorders for thousands of years. Recent studies have shown that Herba Leonuri has many different effects. 2.?Herba Leonuri contains several active components, including alkaloids, flavonoids, diterpenes compounds and fatty acids. Recent studies have shown that these molecules exert beneficial effects in coronary artery disease and cerebral ischaemia. Thus, these molecules may become novel candidates for drug discovery and development. 3.?The present review provides an overview of the chemical composition, with a focus on biological activity, of Herba Leonuri to stimulate new studies on traditional Chinese medicine. PMID:22004449

  13. Chemical composition and antibacterial activity of selected essential oils and some of their main compounds.

    PubMed

    Wanner, Juergen; Schmidt, Erich; Bail, Stefanie; Jirovetz, Leopold; Buchbauer, Gerhard; Gochev, Velizar; Girova, Tanya; Atanasova, Teodora; Stoyanova, Albena

    2010-09-01

    The chemical composition of essential oils of cabreuva (Myrocarpus fastigiatus Allemao, Fabaceae) from Brazil, cedarwood (Juniperus ashei, Cupressaceae) from Texas, Juniper berries (Juniperus communis L., Cupressaceae) and myrrh (Commiphora myrrha (Nees) Engl., Burseraceae) were analyzed using GC/FID and GC/MS. The antimicrobial activity of these essential oils and some of their main compounds were tested against eleven different strains of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria by using agar diffusion and agar serial dilution methods. Animal and plant pathogens, food poisoning and spoilage bacteria were selected. The volatile oils exhibited considerable inhibitory effects against all tested organisms, except Pseudomonas, using both test methods. Higher activity was observed against Gram-positive strains in comparison with Gram-negative bacteria. Cabreuva oil from Brazil showed similar results, but in comparison with the other oils tested, only when higher concentrations of oil were used. PMID:20922991

  14. Big data in chemical toxicity research: the use of high-throughput screening assays to identify potential toxicants.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hao; Zhang, Jun; Kim, Marlene T; Boison, Abena; Sedykh, Alexander; Moran, Kimberlee

    2014-10-20

    High-throughput screening (HTS) assays that measure the in vitro toxicity of environmental compounds have been widely applied as an alternative to in vivo animal tests of chemical toxicity. Current HTS studies provide the community with rich toxicology information that has the potential to be integrated into toxicity research. The available in vitro toxicity data is updated daily in structured formats (e.g., deposited into PubChem and other data-sharing web portals) or in an unstructured way (papers, laboratory reports, toxicity Web site updates, etc.). The information derived from the current toxicity data is so large and complex that it becomes difficult to process using available database management tools or traditional data processing applications. For this reason, it is necessary to develop a big data approach when conducting modern chemical toxicity research. In vitro data for a compound, obtained from meaningful bioassays, can be viewed as a response profile that gives detailed information about the compound's ability to affect relevant biological proteins/receptors. This information is critical for the evaluation of complex bioactivities (e.g., animal toxicities) and grows rapidly as big data in toxicology communities. This review focuses mainly on the existing structured in vitro data (e.g., PubChem data sets) as response profiles for compounds of environmental interest (e.g., potential human/animal toxicants). Potential modeling and mining tools to use the current big data pool in chemical toxicity research are also described. PMID:25195622

  15. Clinical breath analysis: Discriminating between human endogenous compounds and exogenous (environmental) chemical confounders

    EPA Science Inventory

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in exhaled breath originate from current or previous environmental exposures (exogenous compounds) and internal metabolic anabolic and catabolic) production (endogenous compounds). The origins of certain VOCs in breath presumed to be endogenous ...

  16. Safety in the Chemical Laboratory: Nitric Acid, Nitrates, and Nitro Compounds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bretherick, Leslie

    1989-01-01

    Discussed are the potential hazards associated with nitric acid, inorganic and organic nitrate salts, alkyl nitrates, acyl nitrates, aliphatic nitro compounds, aromatic nitro compounds, and nitration reactions. (CW)

  17. Acute toxicity of Daphnia pulex to six classes of chemical compounds potentially hazardous to Great Lakes aquatic biota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Stephen B.; Savino, Jacqueline F.; Blouin, Marc A.

    1988-01-01

    Of the six classes of chemicals potentially hazardous to Great Lakes aquatic biota, derivatives of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were the most acutely toxic (48-h EC 50) to Daphnia pulex. The other classes, listed in order of decreasing toxicity were alkyl halides, nitrogen-containing compounds, cyclic alkanes, heterocyclic nitrogen compounds, silicon-containing compounds. O f the 41 compounds representing the six chemical classes, 6 were extremely toxic (> 0.01 - 0.1 mg/L), 11 highly toxic (> 01. - 1.0 mg/L), 20 moderately toxic (> 1.0 - 10.0 mg/L), and 4 slightly toxic (>10 - 100 mg/L). The reference compound, p, p'DDT, was super toxic (< 0.01 mg/L). Based on toxicity and relative abundance (hazard ranking) of the 21 compounds that were detected in tissue of Great Lakes fishes, the classes of compounds that present the greatest threat to Great Lakes aquatic biota are PAH derivatives, alkyl halides, and cyclic aklanes.

  18. Chemical and metabolomic screens identify novel biomarkers and antidotes for cyanide exposure

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Anjali K.; Roberts, Lee D.; Liu, Yan; Mahon, Sari B.; Kim, Sonia; Ryu, Justine H.; Werdich, Andreas; Januzzi, James L.; Boss, Gerry R.; Rockwood, Gary A.; MacRae, Calum A.; Brenner, Matthew; Gerszten, Robert E.; Peterson, Randall T.

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to cyanide causes a spectrum of cardiac, neurological, and metabolic dysfunctions that can be fatal. Improved cyanide antidotes are needed, but the ideal biological pathways to target are not known. To understand better the metabolic effects of cyanide and to discover novel cyanide antidotes, we developed a zebrafish model of cyanide exposure and scaled it for high-throughput chemical screening. In a screen of 3120 small molecules, we discovered 4 novel antidotes that block cyanide toxicity. The most potent antidote was riboflavin. Metabolomic profiling of cyanide-treated zebrafish revealed changes in bile acid and purine metabolism, most notably by an increase in inosine levels. Riboflavin normalizes many of the cyanide-induced neurological and metabolic perturbations in zebrafish. The metabolic effects of cyanide observed in zebrafish were conserved in a rabbit model of cyanide toxicity. Further, humans treated with nitroprusside, a drug that releases nitric oxide and cyanide ions, display increased circulating bile acids and inosine. In summary, riboflavin may be a novel treatment for cyanide toxicity and prophylactic measure during nitroprusside treatment, inosine may serve as a biomarker of cyanide exposure, and metabolites in the bile acid and purine metabolism pathways may shed light on the pathways critical to reversing cyanide toxicity.—Nath, A. K., Roberts, L. D., Liu, Y., Mahon, S. B., Kim, S., Ryu, J. H., Werdich, A., Januzzi, J. L., Boss, G. R., Rockwood, G. A., MacRae, C. A., Brenner, M., Gerszten, R. E., Peterson, R. T. Chemical and metabolomic screens identify novel biomarkers and antidotes for cyanide exposure. PMID:23345455

  19. A covalent peptide inhibitor of RGS4 identified in a focused one-bead, one compound library screen

    PubMed Central

    Roof, Rebecca A; Roman, David L; Clements, Samuel T; Sobczyk-Kojiro, Katarzyna; Blazer, Levi L; Ota, Shodai; Mosberg, Henry I; Neubig, Richard R

    2009-01-01

    Background Regulators of G protein signaling (RGSs) accelerate GTP hydrolysis by G? subunits and profoundly inhibit signaling by G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). The distinct expression patterns and pathophysiologic regulation of RGS proteins suggest that inhibitors may have therapeutic potential. We recently described a focused one-bead, one-compound (OBOC) library screen to identify peptide inhibitors of RGS4. Here we extend our observations to include another peptide with a different mechanism of action. Results Peptide 5nd (Tyr-Trp-c [Cys-Lys-Gly-Leu-Cys]-Lys-NH2, S-S) blocks the RGS4-G?o interaction with an IC50 of 28 ?M. It forms a covalent, dithiothreitol (DTT) sensitive adduct with a mass consistent with the incorporation of one peptide per RGS. Peptide 5nd activity is abolished by either changing its disulfide bridge to a methylene dithioether bridge, which cannot form disulfide bridges to the RGS, or by removing all cysteines from the RGS protein. However, no single cysteine in RGS4 is completely necessary or sufficient for 5nd activity. Conclusion Though it has some RGS selectivity, 5nd appears to be a partially random cysteine modifier. These data suggest that it inhibits RGS4 by forming disulfide bridges with the protein. PMID:19463173

  20. Using Cs-137, C-14 and biomarker compounds to identify reasons for C and N losses in resampled profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baisden, W. T.; Parfitt, R. L.; Schipper, L. A.; Filley, T. R.; Ross, C.

    2008-12-01

    A New Zealand data set of archived and resampled pasture soil profiles has identified a systematic pattern large soil C and N losses and gains that appear to be related to land-use intensity. We use isotope and organic geochemistry techniques in selected archived and resampled soil horizons to identify reasons for the observed large soil C and N losses and gains in intensive flat non-allophanic pasture and hill country soil profiles, respectively. These techniques allow us to examine 3 of the ~10 hypotheses proposed to explain the large losses initially observed in intensive pasture soils. These three hypotheses are: (1) soil C and N changes may be due to erosion and deposition; (2) pre-European forest-derived organic matter is being lost; and (3) changes in litter quality are reducing the amount of plant C and N stabilized in soil. To test hypothesis (1), we use 137Cs, accumulated in the soil clay fraction from nuclear fallout between 1945 and 1965. Measurements comparing archived (post-1965) and resampled horizons show losses or gains of 137Cs, which we interpret as erosion and deposition, respectively. Apparent wind erosion of up to ~6 cm of surface soil explains large surface soil C losses in 2 flat profiles, while apparent deposition explains soil C gains in two hill country profiles. Measurements of 14C assist in the evaluation of hypothesis (2) by suggesting that, after accounting for 137Cs-estimated erosion or deposition, surface soils are mainly losing C fixed since bomb 14C was injected into the atmosphere (post-1950). In contrast, soil C losses below 40 cm depth are dominated by C derived from pre-European forests. Biomarker compounds, particularly lignin-derivatives, allow us to evaluate hypotheses (2) and (3). Results to date suggest that failure to stabilize grass-derived C is more important than losses of forest-derived C in explaining soil C losses in the upper 30 cm. More broadly, biomarker and 137Cs measurements suggest that steady-state assumptions must be carefully applied in models of C and N in New Zealand pasture soils, and will be inappropriate in some circumstances. Based on these studies of 3-5 selected profiles, we examine approaches to broaden the use of these techniques to identify reasons for C and N losses and gains as the resampling of archived New Zealand soil profiles continues.

  1. Chemical compounds released from five different woods used to make barrels for aging wines and spirits: volatile compounds and polyphenols

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mirko De Rosso; Davide Cancian; Annarita Panighel; Antonio Dalla Vedova; Riccardo Flamini

    2009-01-01

    Aging wine and spirits in wooden barrels is an industrial process used to stabilize color and improve limpidity; many compounds\\u000a are released from the wood and enrich the sensorial characteristics of the product. The main wood species used for making\\u000a barrels is oak, but in particular cases also acacia, chestnut, cherry and mulberry. In this work, polyphenols contained in\\u000a the

  2. High-Resolution Transcriptional Profiling of Chemical-Stimulated Dendritic Cells Identifies Immunogenic Contact Allergens, but Not Prohaptens

    Microsoft Academic Search

    H. Ott; T. Wiederholt; M. Andresen Bergström; R. Heise; C. Skazik; K. Czaja; Y. Marquardt; A.-T. Karlberg; H.-F. Merk; J. M. Baron

    2010-01-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis is a complex syndrome and knowledge about the in vitro detection of small-molecular-weight compounds, particularly prohaptens, is limited. Therefore, we investigated chemical-induced gene expression changes in human antigen-presenting cells upon stimulation with immunogenic contact allergens, prohaptens and irritants. Monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDCs) and THP-1 cells were stimulated with the prohapten cinnamic alcohol (CAlc), the hapten cinnamic aldehyde

  3. Engineering nanoparticles surface for biosensing: "Chemical noses" to detect and identify proteins, bacteria and cancerous cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miranda-Sanchez, Oscar Ramon

    Rapid and sensitive detection of biomolecules is an important issue in nanomedicine. Many disorders are manifested by changes in protein levels of serum and other biofluids. Rapid and effective differentiation between normal and cancerous cells is an important challenge for the diagnosis and treatment of tumor. Likewise, rapid and effective identification of pathogens is a key target in both biomedical and environmental monitoring. Most biological recognition processes occur via specific interactions. Gold nanoparticles (AuNP s) feature sizes commensurate with biomacromolecules, coupled with useful physical and optical properties. A key issue in the use of nanomaterials is controlling the interfacial interactions of these complex systems. Modulation of these physicochemical properties can be readily achieved by engineering nanoparticles surface. Inspired by the idea of mimicking nature, a convenient, precise and rapid method for sensing proteins, cancerous cells and bacteria has been developed by overtaking the superb performance of biological olfactory systems in odor detection, identification, tracking, and location. On the fundamental side, an array-based/'chemical nose' sensor composed of cationic functionalized AuNPs as receptors and anionic fluorescent conjugated polymers or green fluorescent proteins or enzyme/substrates as transducers that can properly detect and identify proteins, bacteria, and cancerous cells has been successfully fabricated.

  4. Chemical genomic profiling to identify intracellular targets of a multiplex kinase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Kung, Charles; Kenski, Denise M; Dickerson, Scott H; Howson, Russell W; Kuyper, Lee F; Madhani, Hiten D; Shokat, Kevan M

    2005-03-01

    The identification of the kinase or kinases targeted by protein kinase inhibitors is a critical challenge in validating their use as therapeutic agents or molecular probes. Here, to address this problem, we describe a chemical genomics strategy that uses a direct comparison between microarray transcriptional signatures elicited by an inhibitor of unknown specificity and those elicited by highly specific pharmacological inhibition of engineered candidate kinase targets. By using this approach, we have identified two cyclin-dependent kinases, Cdk1 and Pho85, as the targets of the inhibitor GW400426 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We demonstrate that simultaneous inhibition of Cdk1 and Pho85, and not inhibition of either kinase alone, by GW400426 controls the expression of specific transcripts involved in polarized cell growth, thus revealing a cellular process that is uniquely sensitive to the multiplex inhibition of these two kinases. Our results suggest that the cellular responses induced by multiplex protein kinase inhibitors may be an emergent property that cannot be understood fully by considering only the sum of individual inhibitor-kinase interactions. PMID:15738404

  5. Chemical genomic profiling to identify intracellular targets of a multiplex kinase inhibitor

    PubMed Central

    Kung, Charles; Kenski, Denise M.; Dickerson, Scott H.; Howson, Russell W.; Kuyper, Lee F.; Madhani, Hiten D.; Shokat, Kevan M.

    2005-01-01

    The identification of the kinase or kinases targeted by protein kinase inhibitors is a critical challenge in validating their use as therapeutic agents or molecular probes. Here, to address this problem, we describe a chemical genomics strategy that uses a direct comparison between microarray transcriptional signatures elicited by an inhibitor of unknown specificity and those elicited by highly specific pharmacological inhibition of engineered candidate kinase targets. By using this approach, we have identified two cyclin-dependent kinases, Cdk1 and Pho85, as the targets of the inhibitor GW400426 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We demonstrate that simultaneous inhibition of Cdk1 and Pho85, and not inhibition of either kinase alone, by GW400426 controls the expression of specific transcripts involved in polarized cell growth, thus revealing a cellular process that is uniquely sensitive to the multiplex inhibition of these two kinases. Our results suggest that the cellular responses induced by multiplex protein kinase inhibitors may be an emergent property that cannot be understood fully by considering only the sum of individual inhibitor–kinase interactions. PMID:15738404

  6. Biogeographical Analysis of Chemical Co-Occurrence Data to Identify Priorities for Mixtures Research

    EPA Science Inventory

    A challenge with multiple chemical risk assessment is the need to consider the joint behavior of chemicals in mixtures. To address this need, pharmacologists and toxicologists have developed methods over the years to evaluate and test chemical interaction. In practice, however, t...

  7. Microwave heating of different commercial categories of olive oil: Part I. Effect on chemical oxidative stability indices and phenolic compounds

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lorenzo Cerretani; Alessandra Bendini; Maria Teresa Rodriguez-Estrada; Elena Vittadini; Emma Chiavaro

    2009-01-01

    The effect of microwave heating of extra virgin olive oil (EVOo), olive oil (Oo) and pomace olive oil (Po) in domestic appliances, was investigated in terms of chemical oxidative indices (peroxide, p-anisidine and Totox values), free acidity, water content, total phenol content and different classes of phenolic compounds.Water content of unheated EVOo was higher as compared to the other two

  8. Overview of Toxicity Data and Risk Assessment Methods for Evaluating the Chemical Effects of Depleted Uranium Compounds

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Heidi M. Hartmann; Frederick A. Monette; Halil I. Avci

    2000-01-01

    In the United States, depleted uranium is handled or used in several chemical forms by both governmental agencies and private industry (primarily companies producing and machining depleted uranium metal for military applications). Human exposure can occur as a result of handling these compounds, routine low-level effluent releases to the environment from processing facilities, or materials being accidentally released from storage

  9. Study on the Chemical Character of Water Soluble Organic Compounds in Fine Atmospheric Aerosol at the Jungfraujoch

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zoltán Krivácsy; András Gelencsér; Gyula Kiss; Ern? Mészáros; Ágnes Molnár; András Hoffer; Tamás Mészáros; Zsolt Sárvári; Dóra Temesi; Bálint Varga; Urs Baltensperger; Stephan Nyeki; Ernest Weingartner

    2001-01-01

    In this study the chemical nature of the bulk of water soluble organic compounds in fine atmospheric aerosol collected during summer 1998 at the Jungfraujoch, Switzerland (3580 m asl) is characterised. The mass concentration of water soluble organic substances was similar to those of major inorganic ions, and the water soluble organic matter was found to be composed of two

  10. jCompoundMapper: An open source Java library and command-line tool for chemical fingerprints

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Georg Hinselmann; Lars Rosenbaum; Andreas Jahn; Nikolas Fechner; Andreas Zell

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The decomposition of a chemical graph is a convenient approach to encode information of the corresponding organic compound. While several commercial toolkits exist to encode molecules as so-called fingerprints, only a few open source implementations are available. The aim of this work is to introduce a library for exactly defined molecular decompositions, with a strong focus on the application

  11. CFam: a chemical families database based on iterative selection of functional seeds and seed-directed compound clustering

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Cheng; Tao, Lin; Qin, Chu; Zhang, Peng; Chen, Shangying; Zeng, Xian; Xu, Feng; Chen, Zhe; Yang, Sheng Yong; Chen, Yu Zong

    2015-01-01

    Similarity-based clustering and classification of compounds enable the search of drug leads and the structural and chemogenomic studies for facilitating chemical, biomedical, agricultural, material and other industrial applications. A database that organizes compounds into similarity-based as well as scaffold-based and property-based families is useful for facilitating these tasks. CFam Chemical Family database http://bidd2.cse.nus.edu.sg/cfam was developed to hierarchically cluster drugs, bioactive molecules, human metabolites, natural products, patented agents and other molecules into functional families, superfamilies and classes of structurally similar compounds based on the literature-reported high, intermediate and remote similarity measures. The compounds were represented by molecular fingerprint and molecular similarity was measured by Tanimoto coefficient. The functional seeds of CFam families were from hierarchically clustered drugs, bioactive molecules, human metabolites, natural products, patented agents, respectively, which were used to characterize families and cluster compounds into families, superfamilies and classes. CFam currently contains 11 643 classes, 34 880 superfamilies and 87 136 families of 490 279 compounds (1691 approved drugs, 1228 clinical trial drugs, 12 386 investigative drugs, 262 881 highly active molecules, 15 055 human metabolites, 80 255 ZINC-processed natural products and 116 783 patented agents). Efforts will be made to further expand CFam database and add more functional categories and families based on other types of molecular representations. PMID:25414339

  12. An evaluation of the SemiVOST method for non-halogenated compounds at a agricultural chemical manufacturing facility

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, M.D. [Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Bursey, J.T.; McGaughey, J.F.; Merrill, R.G. [Eastern Research Group, Inc., Morrisville, NC (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Laboratory testing and one field evaluation study have been performed to assess the performance of the SemiVOST method for non-halogenated semivolatile organic analytes listed in Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. This paper reports on a second field evaluation study performed at a different source category to demonstrate that the methodology is not source-specific. An incinerator that burned chemical waste was selected as the second test site. The field test was designed according to the guidelines of EPA Method 301, using liquid dynamic spiking with two spiking schemes. The semivolatile organic compounds were spiked as a liquid spike into two of four quadruple SemiVOST trains either as a solution of Acid/Neutral compounds or Base/Neutral compounds. These two solutions were spiked in separate sampling runs to avoid compound losses due to known acid/base chemical reactions. A minimum of ten quadruple sampling runs each was performed for Acid/Neutral and Base/Neutral SemiVOST. Statistical analysis of the results was performed according to the guidelines of EPA Method 301. Of the 55 semivolatile organic compounds tested by the SemiVOST method, 24 met Method 301 acceptance criteria. Bias and precision were good for the Neutrals, but poor for the Acidic and Basic compounds.

  13. Optimal Design of Experiments for Identifying the Model Parameters of Gyroscope on a Centrifuge and Vibration Table Compound Test Syste

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wang Yuegang

    2006-01-01

    Overloading and vibration compound test system which is combined by centrifuge and vibration table offers a new way for ground test to simulate flight. It is an important thing must be solved in the design of experiments for gyroscope under compound environment how to meet the requirement of linear acceleration and avoid influence of angle velocity of centrifuge. After analyzing

  14. Catalytic conversion of biomass pyrolysis-derived compounds with chemical liquid deposition (CLD) modified ZSM-5.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huiyan; Luo, Mengmeng; Xiao, Rui; Shao, Shanshan; Jin, Baosheng; Xiao, Guomin; Zhao, Ming; Liang, Junyu

    2014-03-01

    Chemical liquid deposition (CLD) with KH550, TEOS and methyl silicone oil as the modifiers was used to modify ZSM-5 and deposit its external acid sites. The characteristics of modified catalysts were tested by catalytic conversion of biomass pyrolysis-derived compounds. The effects of different modifying conditions (deposited amount, temperature, and time) on the product yields and selectivities were investigated. The results show KH550 modified ZSM-5 (deposited amount of 4%, temperature of 20°C and time of 6h) produced the maximum yields of aromatics (24.5%) and olefins (16.5%), which are much higher than that obtained with original ZSM-5 catalyst (18.8% aromatics and 9.8% olefins). The coke yield decreased from 44.1% with original ZSM-5 to 26.7% with KH550 modified ZSM-5. The selectivities of low-molecule-weight hydrocarbons (ethylene and benzene) decreased, while that of higher molecule-weight hydrocarbons (propylene, butylene, toluene, and naphthalene) increased comparing with original ZSM-5. PMID:24413482

  15. Two-Dimensional Carbon Compounds Derived from Graphyne with Chemical Properties Superior to Those of Graphene

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Jia-Jia; Zhao, Xiang; Zhao, Yuliang; Gao, Xingfa

    2013-01-01

    Computational studies considering both thermodynamic and kinetic aspects revealed that graphyne, a carbon material that has recently been of increasing interest, favours unprecedented homogeneous “in-plane” addition reactions. The addition of dichlorocarbene to the C(sp)-C(sp) bond, a site with outstanding regioselectivity in graphyne, proceeds via a stepwise mechanism. Due to their homogeneous nature, additions occurring at C(sp)-C(sp) bonds yield structurally ordered two-dimensional carbon compounds (2DCCs). 2DCCs have electronic band structures near the Fermi level that are similar to those of graphene and are either electrically semi-conductive or metallic depending on whether the reactions break the hexagonal symmetry. Notably, 2DCCs can be further functionalised through substitution reactions with little damage to the extended ?-electron conjugation system. These results suggest that 2DCCs derived from graphyne have physical properties comparable to those of graphene and chemical properties superior to those of graphene. Therefore, 2DCCs are expected to be better suited to practical applications. PMID:23429350

  16. Two-dimensional carbon compounds derived from graphyne with chemical properties superior to those of graphene.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jia-Jia; Zhao, Xiang; Zhao, Yuliang; Gao, Xingfa

    2013-01-01

    Computational studies considering both thermodynamic and kinetic aspects revealed that graphyne, a carbon material that has recently been of increasing interest, favours unprecedented homogeneous "in-plane" addition reactions. The addition of dichlorocarbene to the C(sp)-C(sp) bond, a site with outstanding regioselectivity in graphyne, proceeds via a stepwise mechanism. Due to their homogeneous nature, additions occurring at C(sp)-C(sp) bonds yield structurally ordered two-dimensional carbon compounds (2DCCs). 2DCCs have electronic band structures near the Fermi level that are similar to those of graphene and are either electrically semi-conductive or metallic depending on whether the reactions break the hexagonal symmetry. Notably, 2DCCs can be further functionalised through substitution reactions with little damage to the extended ?-electron conjugation system. These results suggest that 2DCCs derived from graphyne have physical properties comparable to those of graphene and chemical properties superior to those of graphene. Therefore, 2DCCs are expected to be better suited to practical applications. PMID:23429350

  17. Device quality Sb-based compound semiconductor surface: A comparative study of chemical cleaning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nainani, Aneesh; Sun, Yun; Irisawa, Toshifumi; Yuan, Ze; Kobayashi, Masaharu; Pianetta, Piero; Bennett, Brian. R.; Brad Boos, J.; Saraswat, Krishna C.

    2011-06-01

    We have studied the surface cleaning of Sb-based compound semiconductors using HF, NH4OH, and HCl cleans and the metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) capacitors fabricated subsequently. GaSb, InGaSb, and AlGaSb surfaces are investigated using low-energy radiation from the synchrotron. Capacitance-voltage (C-V) and photoluminescence measurements are carried out on capacitors made with Al2O3 from atomic layer deposition and corroborated with the results from synchrotron spectroscopy. Excellent C-V characteristics with a mid-band-gap interface state density of 3 × 1011/cm2eV are obtained on samples with the HCl clean. This is consistent with the finding that only the HCl acid clean is able to remove the native oxides present on GaSb and InGaSb surfaces, and produce clean and stable surfaces suitable for MOSFET development. Complete removal of AlOx on the AlGaSb surface was not possible using chemical cleaning. Termination of AlGaSb with two monolayers of GaSb is proposed as a solution.

  18. Eryngial (trans-2-dodecenal), a bioactive compound from Eryngium foetidum: its identification, chemical isolation, characterization and comparison with ivermectin in vitro.

    PubMed

    Forbes, W M; Gallimore, W A; Mansingh, A; Reese, P B; Robinson, R D

    2014-02-01

    Methanol-water (4:1, v/v) crude extracts (50 mg mL(-1)) of 25 Jamaican medicinal plants were screened in vitro for anthelmintic activity using infective third-stage larvae of Strongyloides stercoralis. The most effective extract was further chemically scrutinized to isolate and identify the source of the bioactivity, and the efficacy of this compound was compared with ivermectin. Eosin exclusion (0.1 mg mL(-1)) served as the indicator of mortality in all bioassays. A crude extract of Eryngium foetidum (Apiaceae) was significantly (Probit Analysis, P<0.05) more potent than the other plant extracts, taking 18.9 h to kill 50% (LT50) of the larvae. Further, the petrol extract of E. foetidum was significantly more effective (Probit Analysis, P<0.05) at killing the larvae (LT50, 4.7 h) than either its methanol-water or dichloromethane extract. The latter two effected less than 1% larval mortality after 120 h. With bioassay-driven column chromatography of the petrol extract, trans-2-dodecenal (eryngial) was identified and chemically isolated as the main anthelmintic compound in E. foetidum. There was a significant difference between the 24 h LD50 values (mm) of trans-2-dodecenal (0.461) and ivermectin (2.251) but there was none between the 48 h LD50 values (mm): trans-2-dodecenal (0.411) and ivermectin (0.499) in vitro. PMID:24139239

  19. Identifying unknown minerals and compounds from X-ray diffraction patterns using the Johnson and Vand FORTRAN 4 computer program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kyte, F. T.

    1976-01-01

    Automated computer identification of minerals and compounds from unknown samples is provided along with detailed instructions and worked examples for use in graduate level courses in mineralogy and X-ray analysis applications.

  20. Using in Vitro High Throughput Screening Assays to Identify Potential Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals

    EPA Science Inventory

    Over the past 20 years, an increased focus on detecting environmental chemicals posing a risk of adverse effects due to endocrine disruption has driven the creation of the U.S. EPA Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program (EDSP). Thousands of chemicals are subject to the EDSP, whic...

  1. The chemical processing of gas-phase carbonyl compounds by sulfuric acid aerosols: 2,4-pentanedione

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nozière, Barbara; Riemer, Daniel D.

    This work investigates the interactions between gas-phase carbonyl compounds and sulfuric acid aerosols. It focuses on understanding the chemical processes, giving a first estimate of their importance in the atmosphere, and suggesting directions for further investigations. The solubility and reactivity of a compound with a large enolization constant, 2,4-pentanedione, in water/sulfuric acid solutions 0-96 wt% have been investigated at room temperature using the bubble column/GC-FID technique. 2,4-pentanedione was found to undergo aldol condensation at acidities as low as 20 wt% H 2SO 4, that is, well in the tropospheric range of aerosol composition. In agreement with well-established organic chemical knowledge, this reaction resulted in changes of color of the solutions of potential importance for the optical properties of the aerosols. 2,4-pentanedione was also found to undergo retroaldol reaction, specific to dicarbonyl compounds, producing acetone and acetaldehyde. The Henry's law coefficient for 2,4-pentanedione was found to be a factor 5 larger than the one of acetone over the whole range of acidity, with a value in water of H (297 K)=(155±27) M atm -1. A chemical system is proposed to describe the transformations of carbonyl compounds in sulfuric acid aerosols. Aldol condensation is likely to be the most common reaction for these compounds, probably involving a large number of the ones present in the atmosphere and a wide range of aerosol compositions. The enolization constant contributes as a proportional factor to the rate constant for aldol condensation, and is shown in this work to contribute as an additive constant to the Henry's law coefficient. In addition to the many important aspects of these reactions illustrated in this work, the rate of aldol condensation was estimated to be potentially fast enough for the losses of some compounds in acidic aerosols to compete with their gas-phase chemistry in the atmosphere.

  2. Drug Discovery for Schistosomiasis: Hit and Lead Compounds Identified in a Library of Known Drugs by Medium-Throughput Phenotypic Screening

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Maha-Hamadien Abdulla; Debbie S. Ruelas; Brian Wolff; June Snedecor; Kee-Chong Lim; Fengyun Xu; Adam R. Renslo; Janice Williams; James H. McKerrow; Conor R. Caffrey

    2009-01-01

    BackgroundPraziquantel (PZQ) is the only widely available drug to treat schistosomiasis. Given the potential for drug resistance, it is prudent to search for novel therapeutics. Identification of anti-schistosomal chemicals has traditionally relied on phenotypic (whole organism) screening with adult worms in vitro and\\/or animal models of disease—tools that limit automation and throughput with modern microtiter plate-formatted compound libraries.MethodsA partially automated,

  3. ASSESSMENT OF A FATHEAD MINNOW REPRODUCTION ASSAY FOR IDENTIFYING ENDOCRINE-DISRUPTING CHEMICALS WITH DIVERSE MODES OF ACTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The US EPA has developed a short-term reproduction test with the fathead minnow to identify potential endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs). The assay is initiated by collecting baseline spawning data from reproductively-active adult fathead minnows for 21 d, followed by a 21 d e...

  4. Natural chemical markers identify source and date of introduction of an exotic species: lake trout ( Salvelinus namaycush ) in Yellowstone Lake

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andrew R. Munro; Thomas E. McMahon; James R. Ruzycki

    2005-01-01

    Exotic species invasions pose a pervasive threat to aquatic ecosystems worldwide, yet fundamental questions about the geographic origin and timing of invasions or introductions are frequently difficult to answer. We used natural chemical markers (Sr:Ca ratios) in otoliths to identify probable source and date of introduction of exotic lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) into Yellowstone Lake, Wyoming, USA. Otolith Sr:Ca ratios

  5. Micro-Spectroscopic Chemical Imaging of Individual Identified Marine Biogenic and Ambient Organic Ice Nuclei (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knopf, D. A.; Alpert, P. A.; Wang, B.; OBrien, R. E.; Moffet, R. C.; Aller, J. Y.; Laskin, A.; Gilles, M.

    2013-12-01

    Atmospheric ice formation represents one of the least understood atmospheric processes with important implications for the hydrological cycle and climate. Current freezing descriptions assume that ice active sites on the particle surface initiate ice nucleation, however, the nature of these sites remains elusive. Here, we present a new experimental method that allows us to relate physical and chemical properties of individual particles with observed water uptake and ice nucleation ability using a combination of micro-spectroscopic and optical single particle analytical techniques. We apply this method to field-collected particles and particles generated via bursting of bubbles produced by glass frit aeration and plunging water impingement jets in a mesocosm containing artificial sea water and bacteria and/or phytoplankton. The most efficient ice nuclei (IN) within a particle population are identified and characterized. Single particle characterization is achieved by computer controlled scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (CCSEM/EDX) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy with near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy. A vapor controlled cooling-stage coupled to an optical microscope is used to determine the onsets of water uptake, immersion freezing, and deposition ice nucleation of the individual particles as a function of temperature (T) as low as 200 K and relative humidity (RH) up to water saturation. In addition, we perform CCSEM/EDX to obtain on a single particle level the elemental composition of the entire particle population. Thus, we can determine if the IN are exceptional in nature or belong to a major particle type class with respect to composition and size. We find that ambient and sea spray particles are coated by organic material and can induce ice formation under tropospheric relevant conditions. Micro-spectroscopic single particle analysis of the investigated particle samples invokes a potential paradigm shift: Individual ice nucleating particle composition indicates that IN are similar to the majority of particles in the population and not exceptional. This suggests that composition alone may not be a determinant for IN identification. Furthermore, the results suggest that particle abundance may be a crucial parameter for IN efficiency when predicting cloud glaciation processes. These findings would have important consequences for cloud modeling, laboratory ice nucleation experiments, and field measurements.

  6. Identifiers Identifiers

    E-print Network

    Brass, Stefan

    , July 1998. . Tim Berners­Lee: Cool URIs don't change. [http://www.w3.org/Provider/Style/URI] . Uniform://archive.ncsa.uiuc.edu/demoweb/url­primer.html] . T. Berners­Lee, R. Fielding, L. Masinter: Uniform Resource Identifiers (URI): Generic Syntax. RFC Names. RFC 1737, December 1994, 7 pages. . T. Berners­Lee, L. Masinter, M. McCahill: Uniform Resource

  7. Identifiers Identifiers

    E-print Network

    Brass, Stefan

    , July 1998. . Tim Berners­Lee: Cool URIs don't change. [http://www.w3.org/Provider/Style/URI] Stefan://archive.ncsa.uiuc.edu/demoweb/url­primer.html] . T. Berners­Lee, R. Fielding, L. Masinter: Uniform Resource Identifiers (URI): Generic Syntax. RFC Names. RFC 1737, December 1994, 7 pages. . T. Berners­Lee, L. Masinter, M. McCahill: Uniform Resource

  8. Associations between self-reported odour annoyance and volatile organic compounds in 'Chemical Valley', Sarnia, Ontario.

    PubMed

    Atari, Dominic Odwa; Luginaah, Isaac N; Gorey, Kevin; Xu, Xiaohong; Fung, Karen

    2013-06-01

    Annoyance produced by air pollution has been suggested as a useful proxy for determining ambient air pollution exposure. However, most of the studies, to date, have focused on nitrogen dioxide and sulphur dioxide, with no work done on volatile organic compounds (VOC). This study is aimed at examining the associations between odour annoyance and VOC in 'Chemical Valley', Sarnia, Ontario, Canada. Annoyance scores were extracted from a community health survey (N = 774), and exposures to VOC were estimated from respondents' six-digit alphanumeric postal codes using land use regression models. Univariate analyses were used to explore the relationships between odour annoyance and modelled pollutants, whilst multivariate ordinal logistic regression was utilized to examine the determinants of odour annoyance. The results indicate that odour annoyance is significantly associated with modelled benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, o-xylene and (m + p) xylene (BTEX) pollutants. The findings also show that the determinants of odour annoyance in the context of VOC include gender, number of relatives in the community, perception of air pollution, community satisfaction, medical checkups, ability to cope with daily life demands and general symptoms. When compared, the analysis indicates that Sarnia residents respond to considerably lower BTEX concentrations than the allowable 'safe' levels in the province of Ontario. In general, the results exhibit a dose-response gradient with annoyance score increasing with rising modelled pollutant concentrations. The observed relationships suggest that odour annoyance might be a function of true exposure and may serve as a proxy for air quality and ambient air pollution monitoring. However, questionnaire-based odour annoyance scores need to be longitudinally validated across different geographical scales and pollutants if they are to be adopted at the national level. PMID:23014924

  9. Inhibitory effects of opioids on compound action potentials in frog sciatic nerves and their chemical structures.

    PubMed

    Mizuta, Kotaro; Fujita, Tsugumi; Nakatsuka, Terumasa; Kumamoto, Eiichi

    2008-08-01

    An opioid tramadol more effectively inhibits compound action potentials (CAPs) than its metabolite mono-O-demethyl-tramadol (M1). To address further this issue, we examined the effects of opioids (morphine, codeine, ethylmorphine and dihydrocodeine) and cocaine on CAPs by applying the air-gap method to the frog sciatic nerve. All of the opioids at concentrations less than 10 mM reduced the peak amplitude of the CAP in a reversible and dose-dependent manner. The sequence of the CAP peak amplitude reductions was ethylmorphine>codeine>dihydrocodeine> or = morphine; the effective concentration for half-maximal inhibition (IC(50)) of ethylmorphine was 4.6 mM. All of the CAP inhibitions by opioids were resistant to a non-specific opioid-receptor antagonist naloxone. The CAP peak amplitude reductions produced by morphine, codeine and ethylmorphine were related to their chemical structures in such that this extent enhanced with an increase in the number of -CH(2) in a benzene ring, as seen in the inhibitory actions of tramadol and M1. Cocaine reduced CAP peak amplitudes with an IC(50) value of 0.80 mM. It is concluded that opioids reduce CAP peak amplitudes in a manner being independent of opioid-receptor activation and with an efficacy being much less than that of cocaine. It is suggested that the substituted groups of -OH bound to the benzene ring of morphine, codeine and ethylmorphine as well as of tramadol and M1, the structures of which are quite different from those of the opioids, may play an important role in producing nerve conduction block. PMID:18593589

  10. Xlink-Identifier: An Automated Data Analysis Platform for Confident Identifications of Chemically Cross-linked Peptides using Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Du, Xiuxia; Chowdhury, Saiful M.; Manes, Nathan P.; Wu, Si; Mayer, M. Uljana; Adkins, Joshua N.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Smith, Richard D.

    2011-01-01

    Chemical cross-linking combined with mass spectrometry provides a powerful method for identifying protein-protein interactions and probing the structure of protein complexes. A number of strategies have been reported that take advantage of the high sensitivity and high resolution of modern mass spectrometers. Approaches typically include synthesis of novel cross-linking compounds, and/or isotopic labelling of the cross-linking reagent and/or protein, and label-free methods. We report Xlink-Identifier, a comprehensive data analysis platform that has been developed to support label-free analyses. It can identify inter-peptide, intra-peptide, and deadend cross-links as well as underivatized peptides. The software streamlines data pre-processing, peptide scoring, and visualization and provides an overall data analysis strategy for studying protein-protein interactions and protein structure using mass spectrometry. The software has been evaluated using a custom synthesized cross-linking reagent that features an enrichment tag. Xlink-Identifier offers the potential to perform large-scale identifications of protein-protein interactions using tandem mass spectrometry. PMID:21175198

  11. Hot wire chemical vapor deposition chemistry in the gas phase and on the catalyst surface with organosilicon compounds.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yujun

    2015-02-17

    CONSPECTUS: Hot wire chemical vapor deposition (HWCVD), also referred to as catalytic CVD (Cat-CVD), has been used to produce Si-containing thin films, nanomaterials, and functional polymer coatings that have found wide applications in microelectronic and photovoltaic devices, in automobiles, and in biotechnology. The success of HWCVD is largely due to its various advantages, including high deposition rate, low substrate temperatures, lack of plasma-induced damage, and large-area uniformity. Film growth in HWCVD is induced by reactive species generated from primary decomposition on the metal wire or from secondary reactions in the gas phase. In order to achieve a rational and efficient optimization of the process, it is essential to identify the reactive species and to understand the chemical kinetics that govern the production of these precursor species for film growth. In this Account, we report recent progress in unraveling the complex gas-phase reaction chemistry in the HWCVD growth of silicon carbide thin films using organosilicon compounds as single-source precursors. We have demonstrated that laser ionization mass spectrometry is a powerful diagnostic tool for studying the gas-phase reaction chemistry when combined with the methods of isotope labeling and chemical trapping. The four methyl-substituted silane molecules, belonging to open-chain alkylsilanes, dissociatively adsorb on W and Ta filaments to produce methyl radical and H2 molecule. Under the typical deposition pressures, with increasing number of methyl substitution, the dominant chemistry occurring in the gas phase switches from silylene/silene reactions to free-radical short chain reactions. This change in dominant reaction intermediates from silylene/silene to methyl radicals explains the observation from thin film deposition that silicon carbide films become more C-rich with a decreasing number of Si-H bonds in the four precursor molecules. In the case of cyclic monosilacyclobutanes, we have shown that ring-opening reactions play a vital role in characterizing the reaction chemistry. On the other hand, exocyclic Si-H(CH3) bond cleavages are more important in the less-puckered disilacyclobutane molecules. Metal filaments are essential in HWCVD since they serve as catalysts to decompose precursor gases to reactive species, which initiate gas-phase reaction chemistry and thin film growth. We discuss the structural changes in metal filaments when exposed to various precursor gases. Depending on the nature of the radical intermediates formed from the hot-wire decomposition and subsequent gas-phase reactions, metal silicides and carbides can be formed. Overall, study of the gas-phase reaction chemistry in HWCVD provides important knowledge of the chemical species produced prior to their deposition on a substrate surface. This helps in identifying the major contributor to alloy formation on the filament itself and the film growth, and consequently, in determining the properties of the deposited films. An integrated knowledge of the gas-phase reaction chemistry, filament alloy formation, and thin film deposition is required for an efficient deposition of high-quality thin films and nanomaterials. PMID:25586211

  12. Adverse Outcome Pathways for Embryonic Vascular Disruption and Alternative Methods to Identify Chemical Vascular Disruptor

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemically induced vascular toxicity during embryonic development can result in a wide range of adverse prenatal outcomes. We used information from genetic mouse models linked to phenotypic outcomes and a vascular toxicity knowledge base to construct an embryonic vascular disrupt...

  13. Direct atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation ion trap mass spectrometry for aroma analysis: Speed, sensitivity and resolution of isobaric compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jublot, Lionel; Linforth, Robert S. T.; Taylor, Andrew J.

    2005-06-01

    Atmospheric pressure chemical ionisation (APCI) sources were developed for real time analysis of volatile release from foods using an ion trap (IT) mass spectrometer (MS). Key objectives were spectral simplicity (minimal fragmentation), response time and signal to noise ratio. The benefits of APCI-IT-MS were assessed by comparing the performance for in vivo and headspace analyses with that obtained using APCI coupled to a quadrupole mass analyser. Using MS-MS, direct APCI-IT-MS was able to differentiate mixtures of some C6 and terpene isobaric aroma compounds. Resolution could be achieved for some compounds by monitoring specific secondary ions. Direct resolution was also achieved with two of the three isobaric compounds released from chocolate with time as the sample was eaten.

  14. Case-control study of multiple chemical sensitivity, comparing haematology, biochemistry, vitamins and serum volatile organic compound measures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Cornelia Johanna Baines; Gail Elizabeth; Nicole Riley; David Edward; C. Cole; Lynn Marshall; Barry Loescher; Vartouhi Jazmaji

    Background Multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS), although poorly understood, is associated with considerable morbidity. Aim To investigate potential biological mechanisms underlying MCS in a case-control study. Methods Two hundred and twenty-three MCS cases and 194 controls (urban females, aged 30-64 years) fulfilled reproducible eligibility criteria with discriminant validity. Routine laboratory results and serum levels of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were compared.

  15. Heteroepitaxial growth of 3-5 semiconductor compounds by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition for device applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collis, Ward J.; Abul-Fadl, Ali

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to design, install and operate a metal-organic chemical vapor deposition system which is to be used for the epitaxial growth of 3-5 semiconductor binary compounds, and ternary and quaternary alloys. The long-term goal is to utilize this vapor phase deposition in conjunction with existing current controlled liquid phase epitaxy facilities to perform hybrid growth sequences for fabricating integrated optoelectronic devices.

  16. Comparison of predicted and derived measures of volatile organic compounds inside four relocatable classrooms due to identified interior finish sources

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alfred T. Hodgson; Derek G. Shendell; William J. Fisk; Michael G. Apte

    2003-01-01

    Indoor exposures to toxic and odorous volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are of general concern. Recently, VOCs in portable or relocatable classrooms (RCs) have received particular attention. However, very little was known about indoor environmental quality (IEQ) and the sources, composition, and indoor concentrations of VOCs in RCs. This project task focused on developing and demonstrating a process for selecting interior

  17. UTSW Investigators Develop Functional Signature Ontology (FUSION), a Method for Identifying Compounds That Target Cancer Pathways | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    In a new study published in Science Signaling, CTD2 investigators from University of Texas (UTSW) Southwestern Medical Center devised a novel bioinformatics approach that, when coupled with high-throughput screening, helps reveal compounds that may target potential cancer-related pathways.

  18. Hydrous pyrolysis transformation of organic sulfur compounds: Part 1. Reactivity and chemical changes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Zhiguang Song; Maochun Wang; B. D. Batts; Xianming Xiao

    2005-01-01

    The geochemical transformations of a number of individual model sulfur compounds were investigated using laboratory hydrous pyrolysis under conditions of constant temperature between 200 and 330°C and in the presence of low-sulfur brown coal. The results show that most of the compounds were reactive and could eventually be transformed largely into secondary sulfur species, whereas only aryl sulphides and condensed

  19. CHEMICAL IDENTIFICATION OF COMPOUNDS EMANATED BY BIRDS TO DISCOVER HOST-FINDING ATTRACTANTS OF CULEX MOSQUITOES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Human emanations that affect host-seeking by mosquitoes have been studied; this work has resulted in the identification of over 300 compounds that characterize the volatile “odor profile” of humans. Some of these compounds, tested alone and combined in blends, have been shown to attract Aedes aegyp...

  20. Bacterial release of arsenic ions and organoarsenic compounds from soil contaminated by chemical warfare agents

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Manfred Köhler; Klaus Hofmann; Fernando Völsgen; Kerstin Thurow; Andreas Koch

    2001-01-01

    The objective of this paper was to investigate possible participation of microorganisms in the release of soluble arsenical compounds from organoarsenic warfare agents in contaminated soil.A number of bacterial strains were isolated with high resistance against As3+ and As5+ ions which are able to degrade the water insoluble compounds triphenylarsine (TP) and triphenylarsineoxide (TPO). These strains belong to different genera

  1. A Quantum Chemical and Statistical Study of Cytotoxic Activity of Compounds Isolated from Curcuma zedoaria

    PubMed Central

    Hamdi, Omer Abdalla Ahmed; Anouar, El Hassane; Shilpi, Jamil A.; Trabolsy, Zuhra Bashir Khalifa Al; Zain, Sharifuddin Bin Md; Zakaria, Nur Shahidatul Shida; Zulkefeli, Mohd; Weber, Jean-Frédéric F.; Malek, Sri Nurestri A.; Rahman, Syarifah Nur Syed Abdul; Awang, Khalijah

    2015-01-01

    A series of 21 compounds isolated from Curcuma zedoaria was subjected to cytotoxicity test against MCF7; Ca Ski; PC3 and HT-29 cancer cell lines; and a normal HUVEC cell line. To rationalize the structure–activity relationships of the isolated compounds; a set of electronic; steric and hydrophobic descriptors were calculated using density functional theory (DFT) method. Statistical analyses were carried out using simple and multiple linear regressions (SLR; MLR); principal component analysis (PCA); and hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA). SLR analyses showed that the cytotoxicity of the isolated compounds against a given cell line depend on certain descriptors; and the corresponding correlation coefficients (R2) vary from 0%–55%. MLR results revealed that the best models can be achieved with a limited number of specific descriptors applicable for compounds having a similar basic skeleton. Based on PCA; HCA and MLR analyses; active compounds were classified into subgroups; which was in agreement with the cell based cytotoxicity assay. PMID:25923077

  2. A Quantum Chemical and Statistical Study of Cytotoxic Activity of Compounds Isolated from Curcuma zedoaria.

    PubMed

    Hamdi, Omer Abdalla Ahmed; Anouar, El Hassane; Shilpi, Jamil A; Trabolsy, Zuhra Bashir Khalifa Al; Zain, Sharifuddin Bin Md; Zakaria, Nur Shahidatul Shida; Zulkefeli, Mohd; Weber, Jean-Frédéric F; Malek, Sri Nurestri A; Rahman, Syarifah Nur Syed Abdul; Awang, Khalijah

    2015-01-01

    A series of 21 compounds isolated from Curcuma zedoaria was subjected to cytotoxicity test against MCF7; Ca Ski; PC3 and HT-29 cancer cell lines; and a normal HUVEC cell line. To rationalize the structure-activity relationships of the isolated compounds; a set of electronic; steric and hydrophobic descriptors were calculated using density functional theory (DFT) method. Statistical analyses were carried out using simple and multiple linear regressions (SLR; MLR); principal component analysis (PCA); and hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA). SLR analyses showed that the cytotoxicity of the isolated compounds against a given cell line depend on certain descriptors; and the corresponding correlation coefficients (R2) vary from 0%-55%. MLR results revealed that the best models can be achieved with a limited number of specific descriptors applicable for compounds having a similar basic skeleton. Based on PCA; HCA and MLR analyses; active compounds were classified into subgroups; which was in agreement with the cell based cytotoxicity assay. PMID:25923077

  3. Estrogenic Activity Assessment of Environmental Chemicals Using in Vitro Assays: Identification of Two New Estrogenic Compounds

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Isabelle Lascombe; Dominique Beffa; Urs Rüegg; Joseph Tarradellas; Walter Wahli

    Environmental chemicals with estrogenic activities have been suggested to be associated with deleterious effects in animals and humans. To characterize estrogenic chemicals and their mecha- nisms of action, we established in vitro and cell culture assays that detect human estrogen recep- tor ? (hER?)-mediated estrogenicity. First, we assayed chemicals to determine their ability to modulate direct interaction between the hER?

  4. Evaluation of high-resolution X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy for the chemical speciation of binary titanium compounds.

    PubMed

    Reinhardt, F; Beckhoff, B; Eba, H; Kanngiesser, B; Kolbe, M; Mizusawa, M; Müller, M; Pollakowski, B; Sakurai, K; Ulm, G

    2009-03-01

    For the chemical speciation of binary compounds of tri- and tetravalent titanium, high-resolution X-ray absorption and emission spectra were recorded in different energy regimes in order to evaluate and to qualify both near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS or XANES) spectroscopy and wavelength-dispersive X-ray emission spectroscopy (WDXES) as spectroscopic methods for this analytical task. A high resolving power in the excitation channel was ensured by use of monochromatic synchrotron radiation provided by BESSY II, where the soft X-ray emission spectra were recorded as well. In the hard X-ray range, emission measurements were performed at SPring-8. For a comparison of the information gained from the various methods, the titanium compounds were classified according to the bonded titanium's oxidation state. Thus, it was possible to distinguish between inner atomic effects due to different oxidation states and external effects related to the respective ligand and the surrounding structure. It becomes evident, that certain compounds, while hardly distinguishable in their Ti-K XANES spectra, still show significant differences in their emission characteristics. On the other hand, some compounds with little difference in their emission spectra are easily distinguished by their NEXAFS structures. Only the combined use of the complementary methods both in the soft and the hard X-ray range allows for a reliable speciation of tri- and tetravalent titanium compounds. PMID:19203285

  5. Using the chemical equilibrium partitioning space to explore factors influencing the phase distribution of compounds involved in secondary organic aerosol formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wania, F.; Lei, Y. D.; Wang, C.; Abbatt, J. P. D.; Goss, K.-U.

    2015-03-01

    Many atmospheric and chemical variables influence the partitioning equilibrium between gas phase and condensed phases of compounds implicated in the formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). The large number of factors and their interaction makes it often difficult to assess their relative importance and concerted impact. Here we introduce a two-dimensional space which maps regions of dominant atmospheric phase distribution within a coordinate system defined by equilibrium partition coefficients between the gas phase, an aqueous phase and a water-insoluble organic matter (WIOM) phase. Placing compounds formed from the oxidation of n-alkanes, terpenes and mono-aromatic hydrocarbons on the maps based on their predicted partitioning properties allows for a simple graphical assessment of their equilibrium phase distribution behaviour. Specifically, it allows for the simultaneous visualisation and quantitative comparison of the impact on phase distribution of changes in atmospheric parameters (such as temperature, salinity, WIOM-phase polarity, organic aerosol load, and liquid water content) and chemical properties (such as oxidation state, molecular size, functionalisation, and dimerisation). The graphical analysis reveals that the addition of hydroxyl, carbonyl and carboxyl groups increases the affinity of aliphatic, alicyclic and aromatic hydrocarbons for the aqueous phase more rapidly than their affinity for WIOM, suggesting that the aqueous phase may often be relevant even for substances that are considerably larger than the C2 and C3 compounds that are typically believed to be associated with aqueous SOA. In particular, the maps identify some compounds that contribute to SOA formation if partitioning to both WIOM and aqueous phase is considered but would remain in the gas phase if either condensed phase were neglected. For example, many semi-volatile ?-pinene oxidation products will contribute to aqueous SOA under the conditions of high liquid water content encountered in clouds but would remain vapours in wet aerosol. It is conceivable to develop parameterisations of "partitioning basis sets" that group compounds with comparable partitioning properties, which - when combined with data on the abundance of those groups of compounds - could serve in the simulation of SOA formation.

  6. Thymine vanadyl(II) compound as a diabetic drug model: chemical spectroscopic and antimicrobial assessments.

    PubMed

    El-Sayed, Mohamed Y; Refat, Moamen S

    2014-09-15

    The aim of this study was to synthesize a novel bifunctionalized thymine vanadyl(II) compound. The solid vanadyl(II) compound has been characterized by elemental analyses (CHN), Raman laser, infrared spectra, molar conductivity, electronic spectra, thermogravimetric analyses (TGA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) studies. Electronic and magnetic measurements have confirmed that the speculated geometry of vanadyl(II) compound is square pyramidal geometry. The microbial test was performed for the vanadyl complex against some kinds of bacteria and fungi. The results suggested that [VO(Thy)2] adduct has an anti-diabetic profile. PMID:24785088

  7. Thymine vanadyl(II) compound as a diabetic drug model: Chemical spectroscopic and antimicrobial assessments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Sayed, Mohamed Y.; Refat, Moamen S.

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to synthesize a novel bifunctionalized thymine vanadyl(II) compound. The solid vanadyl(II) compound has been characterized by elemental analyses (CHN), Raman laser, infrared spectra, molar conductivity, electronic spectra, thermogravimetric analyses (TGA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) studies. Electronic and magnetic measurements have confirmed that the speculated geometry of vanadyl(II) compound is square pyramidal geometry. The microbial test was performed for the vanadyl complex against some kinds of bacteria and fungi. The results suggested that [VO(Thy)2] adduct has an anti-diabetic profile.

  8. Use of basic nitrogen to chemically clean coal:. [Containing nitrogen compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Silver, H.F.

    1988-03-16

    Studies of the effect of the concentration of basic model nitrogen compounds in coal derived distillate solvents were continued. Based on results obtained from runs made using solvents containing 5 wt% basic nitrogen compounds, studies of the effect of adding 25 wt% of two of the more effective basic nitrogen compounds were initiated. Results obtained using 2, 2, 6, 6-tetramethylpiperidine (TMP) have been analyzed. Increasing the weight ratio of TMP to solvent increased the desulfurization reaction of the lignite in an atmosphere of carbon monoxide plus water and of the subbituminous coal in an atmosphere of hydrogen. Otherwise no significant positive effectson desulfurization or pyridine conversion were found. 2 tabs.

  9. [Pollution status of phenolic compounds in the soil and sediment from a chemical industrial park along the Yangtze River].

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiexia; Wei, Enze; Xian, Qiming

    2014-08-01

    A determination method of 12 phenolic compounds in soil and sediment samples by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis coupled with accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) and gel permeation chromatography (GPC) for clean-up was developed. The method detection limits (MDLs) varied from 0. 410 ?g/kg to 13. 1 ?g/kg (dry weight), and the average recoveries ranged from 70. 7% to 122% with the relative standard deviations (RSDs) of 1. 2% to 16%. Based on this method, the levels of 12 phenolic compounds were investigated in 17 soil surrounding a chemical industrial park along the Yangtze River and seven sediment samples collected in the river. It was found that 11 of the 12 phenolic compounds were detected in all of the 24 samples, and only hydroquinone was below the MDL. The contents of the total 12 phenolic compounds were 10. 16-30. 66 mg/kg in the soil and 18. 00-29. 83 mg/kg in the sediment, with the average contents of 18. 26 and 22. 51 mg/kg respectively. It showed that 4-nitro- phenol, 4-chloro-3-methylphenol, 2-chlorohydroquinone, 2-methyl-4,6-dinitrophenol and 2,4,6- trichlorophenol were five major phenolic contaminants in the soil and sediment in this study. The pollution levels of the 12 phenolic compounds were low in the soil of the chemical industrial park as well as in the sediment of the Yangtze River, which implied a comparatively low risk for the environment. PMID:25434120

  10. [Pollution status of phenolic compounds in the soil and sediment from a chemical industrial park along the Yangtze River].

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiexia; Wei, Enze; Xian, Qiming

    2014-08-01

    A determination method of 12 phenolic compounds in soil and sediment samples by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis coupled with accelerated solvent extraction (ASE) and gel permeation chromatography (GPC) for clean-up was developed. The method detection limits (MDLs) varied from 0. 410 ?g/kg to 13. 1 ?g/kg (dry weight), and the average recoveries ranged from 70. 7% to 122% with the relative standard deviations (RSDs) of 1. 2% to 16%. Based on this method, the levels of 12 phenolic compounds were investigated in 17 soil surrounding a chemical industrial park along the Yangtze River and seven sediment samples collected in the river. It was found that 11 of the 12 phenolic compounds were detected in all of the 24 samples, and only hydroquinone was below the MDL. The contents of the total 12 phenolic compounds were 10. 16-30. 66 mg/kg in the soil and 18. 00-29. 83 mg/kg in the sediment, with the average contents of 18. 26 and 22. 51 mg/kg respectively. It showed that 4-nitro- phenol, 4-chloro-3-methylphenol, 2-chlorohydroquinone, 2-methyl-4,6-dinitrophenol and 2,4,6- trichlorophenol were five major phenolic contaminants in the soil and sediment in this study. The pollution levels of the 12 phenolic compounds were low in the soil of the chemical industrial park as well as in the sediment of the Yangtze River, which implied a comparatively low risk for the environment. PMID:25507718

  11. Characterization, chemical optimization and anti-tumour activity of a tubulin poison identified by a p53-based phenotypic screen

    PubMed Central

    Staples, Oliver D.; Hollick, Jonathan J.; Campbell, Johanna; Higgins, Maureen; McCarthy, Anna R.; Appleyard, Virginia; Murray, Karen E.; Baker, Lee; Thompson, Alastair; Ronseaux, Sebastien; Slawin, Alexandra M.Z.; Lane, David P.; Westwood, Nicholas J.; Lain, Sonia

    2009-01-01

    A robust p53 cell-based assay that exploits p53’s function as a transcription factor was used to screen a small molecule library and identify bioactive small molecules with potential antitumor activity. Unexpectedly, the majority of the highest ranking hit compounds from this screen arrest cells in mitosis and most of them impair polymerization of tubulin in cells and in vitro. One of these novel compounds, JJ78:1, was subjected to structure-activity relationship studies and optimized leading to the identification of JJ78:12. This molecule is significantly more potent than the original hit JJ78:1, as it is active in cells at two-digit nanomolar concentrations and shows clear antitumor activity in a mouse xenograft model as a single agent. The effects of nocodazole, a well established tubulin poison, and JJ78:12 on p53 levels are remarkably similar, supporting that tubulin depolymerization is the main mechanism by which JJ78:12 treatment leads to p53 activation in cells. In summary, these results identify JJ78:12 as a potential cancer therapeutic, demonstrate that screening for activators of p53 in a cell-based assay is an effective way to identify inhibitors of mitosis progression and highlights p53’s sensitivity to alterations during mitosis. PMID:18971638

  12. Isolation and Chemical Structural Characterisation of a Compound with Antioxidant Activity from the Roots of Senna italica

    PubMed Central

    Mokgotho, Matlou Phineas; Gololo, Stanley Sechene; Masoko, Peter; Shai, Leshwene Jeremiah; Bagla, Victor Patrick; Eloff, Jacobus Nicolaas

    2013-01-01

    Senna italica, a member of the Fabaceae family (subfamily Caesalpiniaceae), is widely used in South African traditional medicine to treat a number of disease conditions. Aqueous extracts of the plant are mainly used to treat sexually transmitted infections and intestinal complications. The roots of S. italica were ground to a fine powder and sequentially extracted with n-hexane, dichloromethane, acetone, and methanol using serial exhaustive extraction (SEE) method. Thin layer chromatography was used to analyse the phytochemical composition of the extracts and DPPH radical scavenging method to detect the presence of antioxidant compounds. The bioassay guided fractionation of the acetone fraction afforded an antioxidant compound with free radical scavenging activity. The isolated compound was subsequently identified as 3,4?,5-trihydroxystilbene (resveratrol). This study represents the first report of the stilbene resveratrol in S. italica. PMID:23843877

  13. Merging bioactivity with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry-based chemometrics to identify minor immunomodulatory compounds from a Micronesian adaptogen, Phaleria nisidai.

    PubMed

    Kulakowski, Daniel M; Wu, Shi-Biao; Balick, Michael J; Kennelly, Edward J

    2014-10-17

    This study presents a strategy based on repeatable reversed-phase LC-TOF-MS methods and chemometric statistical tools, including untargeted PCA and supervised OPLS-DA models, to identify low-yielding compounds with potent immunostimulant activity in Phaleria nisidai (Thymelaeaceae), a plant with a history of use as an adaptogen on the islands of Palau in Micronesia. IFN? ELISA assays were used to classify chromatographic fractions according to imunomodulatory activity prior to LC-TOF-MS chemometric analysis to target and identify compounds likely to contribute to observed activity. Simplexin, a daphnane diterpene ester, was identified for the first time from this genus and caused an increase in the production of cytokines (IFN?, IL1?, IL6, and IL13) by peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Five other daphnane diterpene esters were tentatively identified for the first time from this plant based on mass spectral data and are marker metabolites distinguishing active from inactive fractions. This analytical approach increased the efficiency of bioactivity-guided fractionation and has the potential to minimize redundant isolation and identify minor constituents with potent activity from a complex matrix. PMID:25218635

  14. Liquid chromatography, chemical oxidation, and online carbon isotope dilution mass spectrometry as a universal quantification system for nonvolatile organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Sergio Cueto; Encinar, Jorge Ruiz; Sanz-Medel, Alfredo; Alonso, J Ignacio García

    2013-02-01

    A procedure for the universal detection and quantification of polar organic compounds separated by liquid chromatography (LC) based on postcolumn carbon isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS) was developed. The eluent from the LC column is mixed online with a continuous flow of (13)C-enriched sodium bicarbonate, and the sodium persulfate oxidation reaction in acidic media is employed to achieve isotope equilibration. All carbon-containing compounds eluting from the column are oxidized to (12)CO(2) and (13)CO(2), respectively, and the carbon dioxide is separated from the aqueous phase using a gas-permeable membrane. The gaseous carbon dioxide is then carried to the mass spectrometer for isotope ratio measurements. Different water-soluble organic compounds were evaluated using a flow injection configuration to assess the efficiency of the oxidation process. Most water-soluble organic compounds tested showed quantitative oxidation. However, chemical structures involving conjugated C?N double bounds and guanidinium-like structures were found to be resistant to the oxidation and were further studied. For this purpose, (13)C(1)-labeled creatine (with the isotopic label in the guanidinium group) was employed as model compound. Specific conditions for the quantitative oxidation of these compounds required lower flow rates and the addition of metallic catalysts. This novel approach was tested as a universal detection and quantification system for LC. A simple standard mixture of four amino acids was separated under 100% aqueous conditions and quantified without the need for specific standards with good accuracy and precision using potassium hydrogen phthalate as internal standard. The main field of application of the developed method is for the purity assessment of organic standards with direct traceability to the International System of Units (SI). PMID:23252800

  15. Natural chemical markers identify source and date of introduction of an exotic species: lake trout

    E-print Network

    McMahon, Thomas E.

    (Salvelinus namaycush) in Yellowstone Lake Andrew R. Munro, Thomas E. McMahon, and James R. Ruzycki Abstract of introduction of exotic lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) into Yellowstone Lake, Wyoming, USA. Otolith Sr identifier la source probable et la date d'introduction des touladis (Salvelinus namaycush) exoti- ques du

  16. hERGAPDbase: a database documenting hERG channel inhibitory potentials and APD-prolongation activities of chemical compounds.

    PubMed

    Hishigaki, Haretsugu; Kuhara, Satoru

    2011-01-01

    Drug-induced QT interval prolongation is one of the most common reasons for the withdrawal of drugs from the market. In the past decade, at least nine drugs, i.e. terfenadine, astemizole, grepafloxacin, terodiline, droperidol, lidoflazine, sertindole, levomethadyl and cisapride, have been removed from the market or their use has been severely restricted because of drug-induced QT interval prolongation. Therefore, this irregularity is a major safety concern in the case of drugs submitted for regulatory approval. The most common mechanism of drug-induced QT interval prolongation may be drug-related inhibition of the human ether-á-go-go-related gene (hERG) channel, which subsequently results in prolongation of the cardiac action potential duration (APD). hERGAPDbase is a database of electrophysiological experimental data documenting potential hERG channel inhibitory actions and the APD-prolongation activities of chemical compounds. All data entries are manually collected from scientific papers and curated by a person. With hERGAPDbase, we aim to provide useful information for chemical and pharmacological scientists and enable easy access to electrophysiological experimental data on chemical compounds. Database URL: http://www.grt.kyushu-u.ac.jp/hergapdbase/. PMID:21586548

  17. Bacterial release of arsenic ions and organoarsenic compounds from soil contaminated by chemical warfare agents.

    PubMed

    Köhler, M; Hofmann, K; Völsgen, F; Thurow, K; Koch, A

    2001-02-01

    The objective of this paper was to investigate possible participation of microorganisms in the release of soluble arsenical compounds from organoarsenic warfare agents in contaminated soil. A number of bacterial strains were isolated with high resistance against As3+ and As5+ ions which are able to degrade the water insoluble compounds triphenylarsine (TP) and triphenylarsineoxide (TPO). These strains belong to different genera of bacteria. Release of arsenic ions and soluble organoarsenic compounds from soil by the activity of autochthonic soil bacteria and a mixture of the isolated pure cultures was demonstrated by percolation experiments with undisturbed soil samples (core drills) from the contaminated site. This release increased after addition of nutrients (mineral nitrogen and phosphorus, sodium acetate and ethanol) and is nearly independent of the percolation temperature (5 degrees C and 22 degrees C). These results show that bacteria play an important role in the release of arsenical compounds from organoarsenic warfare agent contaminated soil. This release is limited by shortage of water and, above all, of nutrients for the microorganisms in the sandy forest soil. These results are important both for the management and security and possibly for bioremediation of military waste sites containing similar contaminations. Furthermore, this is the first report on bacterial degradation of organoarsenic warfare compounds. PMID:11100795

  18. Stimulation of Ideas through Compound-Based Bibliometrics: Counting and Mapping Chemical Compounds for Analyzing Research Topics in Chemistry, Physics, and Materials Science

    PubMed Central

    Barth, Andreas; Marx, Werner

    2012-01-01

    Counting compounds (rather than papers or citations) offers a new perspective for quantitative analyses of research activities. First of all, we can precisely define (compound-related) research topics and access the corresponding publications (scientific papers as well as patents) as a measure of research activity. We can also establish the time evolution of the publications dealing with specific compounds or compound classes. Moreover, the mapping of compounds by establishing compound-based landscapes has some potential to visualize the compound basis of research topics for further research activities. We have analyzed the rare earth compounds to give an example of a broad compound class. We present the number of the currently existing compounds and of the corresponding publications as well as the time evolution of the papers and patents. Furthermore, we have analyzed the rare earth cuprates (copper oxides) as an example of a narrower compound class to demonstrate the potential of mapping compounds by compound-based landscapes. We have quantified the various element combinations of the existing compounds and revealed all element combinations not yet realized in the synthesis within this compound class. Finally, we have analyzed the quasicrystal compound category as an example of a compound class that is not defined by a specific element combination or a molecular structure. PMID:24551517

  19. Stimulation of Ideas through Compound-Based Bibliometrics: Counting and Mapping Chemical Compounds for Analyzing Research Topics in Chemistry, Physics, and Materials Science.

    PubMed

    Barth, Andreas; Marx, Werner

    2012-12-01

    Counting compounds (rather than papers or citations) offers a new perspective for quantitative analyses of research activities. First of all, we can precisely define (compound-related) research topics and access the corresponding publications (scientific papers as well as patents) as a measure of research activity. We can also establish the time evolution of the publications dealing with specific compounds or compound classes. Moreover, the mapping of compounds by establishing compound-based landscapes has some potential to visualize the compound basis of research topics for further research activities. We have analyzed the rare earth compounds to give an example of a broad compound class. We present the number of the currently existing compounds and of the corresponding publications as well as the time evolution of the papers and patents. Furthermore, we have analyzed the rare earth cuprates (copper oxides) as an example of a narrower compound class to demonstrate the potential of mapping compounds by compound-based landscapes. We have quantified the various element combinations of the existing compounds and revealed all element combinations not yet realized in the synthesis within this compound class. Finally, we have analyzed the quasicrystal compound category as an example of a compound class that is not defined by a specific element combination or a molecular structure. PMID:24551517

  20. Chemicals identified in human biological media: a data base. Third annual report, October 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Cone, M.V.; Baldauf, M.F.; Martin, F.M. (comps.) [comps.

    1981-12-01

    Part 2 contains the data base in tabular format. There are two sections, the first with records on nondrug substances, and the second with records on drugs. Chemicals in each section are arranged alphabetically by CAS preferred name, CAS registry number, formula, atomic weight, melting point, boiling point, and vapor pressure. Tissues are listed alphabetically with exposure route, analytical method, number of cases, range, and mean - when available in the source document. A variety of information may also be included that is pertinent to the range and mean as well as experimental design, demography, health effects, pathology, morphology, and toxicity. Review articles are included in the data base; however, no data have been extracted from such documents because the original research articles are included.

  1. EVALUATION OF THE SEMIVOST METHOD FOR HALOGENATED COMPOUNDS AT A CHEMICAL MANUFACTURING FACILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A field test was conducted to determine the applicability of the SemiVOST method (SW-846 Method 0010 (Sampling), SW-846 Draft Method 3542 (Sample Preparation), and SW-846 Method 8270 (Analysis)) to semivolatile halogenated organic compounds listed in Title Ill of the 1990 Clean A...

  2. A Thermal Desorption Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometer for the In Situ Measurement of Aerosol Organic Compounds

    Microsoft Academic Search

    T. Thornberry; D. M. Murphy; E. R. Lovejoy

    2005-01-01

    Organic material has been observed to comprise a significant fraction of organic aerosol mass in many regions of the troposphere. The organic compounds that comprise the organic fraction of atmospheric aerosol have the potential to affect the radiative and microphysical properties of the aerosol, with concomitant impacts on the role of the aerosol in climate forcing through direct and indirect

  3. Chemical characterization of volatile organic compounds near the World Trade Center: Ambient concentrations and source apportionment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David A. Olson; Gary A. Norris; Robert L. Seila; Matthew S. Landis; Alan F. Vette

    2007-01-01

    Concentrations of 53 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are reported from four locations near the World Trade Center (WTC) (New York, USA) complex for canister samples collected from September 2001 through January 2002. Across the four sampling sites, mean concentrations ranged from 94.5 to 219?gm-3 for total VOCs. The highest mean concentrations for individual VOCs at any site were for ethane

  4. A study of the tropospheric oxidation of volatile organic compounds using chemical ionization mass spectrometry

    E-print Network

    Broekhuizen, Keith Edward, 1974-

    2002-01-01

    The mechanisms and kinetics of reactions important to the troposphere have been investigated using a high pressure, turbulent, discharge-flow technique coupled to a chemical ionization mass spectrometer. The ability to ...

  5. ANALYSIS OF SOCMI (SYNTHETIC ORGANIC CHEMICAL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRY) VOC (VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUND) FUGITIVE EMISSIONS DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of an examination of fugitive emission data from Synthetic Organic Chemical Manufacturing Industry (SOCMI) processing units (Collected under earlier EPA studies) for correlations between process variables and leak frequency. Although line temperature did ...

  6. REDUCTION OF TOXIC AND UNDESIRABLE CHEMICAL COMPOUNDS IN FOOD BY IONIZING IRRADIATION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Possible toxic and carcinogenic chemicals such as furan, acrylamide, nitrosamines, biogenic amines, and mycotoxins (aflatoxin B1, patulin, fumonisin, etc.) can accumulate in various foods during thermal processing, preservation and storage. Recent studies have suggested that irradiation reduces leve...

  7. Estimation of Physical Properties and Chemical Reactivity Parameters of Organic Compounds for Environmental Modeling by SPARC

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mathematical models for predicting the transport and fate of pollutants in the environment require reactivity parameter values that is value of the physical and chemical constants that govern reactivity. Although empirical structure activity relationships have been developed th...

  8. Chemical decomposition of iron in Spanish coal pyrolysis identified by Moessbauer spectroscopy at different temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmed, M.A.; Blesa, M.J.; Moliner, R. [Taif University, El Taif (Saudi Arabia). Faculty of Science

    2007-07-01

    Three chars from lignite (Se), sub bituminous (AA6), bituminous (BCA) Spanish coals produced at 673 K, 773 K, and 873 K were analyzed by Moessbauer spectroscopy at room temperature, and 80 K, except BCA char produced at 873 K, its analysis was extended down to 10 K. Least square fit analysis for the spectra of Se chars showed that, jarosite/Fe{sup 3+} was hydrolyzed into rozenite/Fe2+ at 873 K. Pyrite was reduced to troilite (FeS) at 773 K. Both jarosite and very broad doublet were observed at T = 673 K. The hyperfine parameters of this phase gave close values to microcrystalline iron in either Fe (II) or Fe (III) states. On the other hand, the spectral analysis of AA6 chars ascertained that rozenite was hydrolyzed to goethite (FeOOH) in the range of 773 K-873 K, whereas pyrite was reduced to pyrrohotite (Fe{sub 1-x}S). However, no chemical changes were observed for jarosite in all AA6-chars. Likewise, siderite was changed into magnetite in the BCA chars produced at 673 K and 773 K. Spectrum performed at 10 K for char produced at 873 K proved the presence of ferrihydrite (H = 489.2 kOe), troilite (H = 355.3 kOe) and a broad paramagnetic doublet belonging to an organic iron. These phases and still remaining siderite inferred also that such transformations are incomplete.

  9. Feasibility studies on newly identified LiCrP2O7 compound for lithium insertion behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangulibabu; Bhuvaneswari, D.; Kalaiselvi, N.

    2009-08-01

    A new category of lithium intercalating cathode candidates, namely LiCrP2O7, was synthesized at 800°C using a citric acid assisted modified (CAM) sol-gel method and examined for possible lithium insertion behavior. The formation of a phase pure and monoclinic LiCrP2O7 compound with finer crystallite size was confirmed from the X-ray diffraction patterns. The presence of nano-sized particles as observed from a transmittance electron microscope image of LiCrP2O7 and the presence of a preferred local cation environment, evidenced from Fourier transform infra-red and 7Li nuclear magnetic resonance studies, are the added advantages of the present study. Further, cyclic voltametry study performed on 2016 coin cells consisting of the synthesized LiCrP2O7 cathode revealed an excellent cycling reversibility and structural stability. Hence, CAM sol-gel synthesized LiCrP2O7 is found to possess desirable physical as well as electrochemical properties, leading one to consider the same as a possible lithium intercalating cathode material.

  10. A comparison of {sup 252}Cf and 14-MeV neutron excitation to identify chemical warfare agents by PGNAA

    SciTech Connect

    Caffrey, A.J.; Harlow, B.D.; Edwards, A.J.; Krebs, K.M.; Jones, J.L.; Yoon, W.; Zabriskie, J.M.; Dougan, A.D.

    2000-07-01

    Since 1992, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory's portable isotopic neutron spectrometry (PINS) system has been widely used for the nondestructive assessment of munitions suspected to contain chemical warfare agents, such as the nerve agent sarin. PINS is a {sup 252}Cf-based prompt gamma-ray neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) system. The standard PINS system employs a partially moderated 5-{micro}g {sup 252}Cf source emitting 10{sup 7} n/s to excite the atomic nuclei inside the item under test. The chemical elements inside the item are revealed by their characteristic gamma-ray spectrum, measured by a high-resolution high-purity germanium gamma-ray spectrometer. The system computer then infers the fill compound or mixture from the elemental data extracted from the gamma-ray spectrum. Reliable PINS assessments can be completed in as little as 100 s for favorable cases such as white phosphorus smoke munitions, but normally, a 1000 to 3000 live-second counting interval is required. To improve PINS throughput when hundreds or more munitions must be assessed, they are evaluating the possible advantages of 14-MeV neutron excitation over their current radioisotopic source.

  11. Utilizing Chemical Genomics to Identify Cytochrome b as a Novel Drug Target for Chagas Disease

    PubMed Central

    Khare, Shilpi; Roach, Steven L.; Barnes, S. Whitney; Hoepfner, Dominic; Walker, John R.; Chatterjee, Arnab K.; Neitz, R. Jeffrey; Arkin, Michelle R.; McNamara, Case W.; Ballard, Jaime; Lai, Yin; Fu, Yue; Molteni, Valentina; Yeh, Vince; McKerrow, James H.; Glynne, Richard J.; Supek, Frantisek

    2015-01-01

    Unbiased phenotypic screens enable identification of small molecules that inhibit pathogen growth by unanticipated mechanisms. These small molecules can be used as starting points for drug discovery programs that target such mechanisms. A major challenge of the approach is the identification of the cellular targets. Here we report GNF7686, a small molecule inhibitor of Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease, and identification of cytochrome b as its target. Following discovery of GNF7686 in a parasite growth inhibition high throughput screen, we were able to evolve a GNF7686-resistant culture of T. cruzi epimastigotes. Clones from this culture bore a mutation coding for a substitution of leucine by phenylalanine at amino acid position 197 in cytochrome b. Cytochrome b is a component of complex III (cytochrome bc1) in the mitochondrial electron transport chain and catalyzes the transfer of electrons from ubiquinol to cytochrome c by a mechanism that utilizes two distinct catalytic sites, QN and QP. The L197F mutation is located in the QN site and confers resistance to GNF7686 in both parasite cell growth and biochemical cytochrome b assays. Additionally, the mutant cytochrome b confers resistance to antimycin A, another QN site inhibitor, but not to strobilurin or myxothiazol, which target the QP site. GNF7686 represents a promising starting point for Chagas disease drug discovery as it potently inhibits growth of intracellular T. cruzi amastigotes with a half maximal effective concentration (EC50) of 0.15 µM, and is highly specific for T. cruzi cytochrome b. No effect on the mammalian respiratory chain or mammalian cell proliferation was observed with up to 25 µM of GNF7686. Our approach, which combines T. cruzi chemical genetics with biochemical target validation, can be broadly applied to the discovery of additional novel drug targets and drug leads for Chagas disease. PMID:26186534

  12. Chemical compounds from anthropogenic environment and immune evasion mechanisms: potential interactions.

    PubMed

    Kravchenko, Julia; Corsini, Emanuela; Williams, Marc A; Decker, William; Manjili, Masoud H; Otsuki, Takemi; Singh, Neetu; Al-Mulla, Faha; Al-Temaimi, Rabeah; Amedei, Amedeo; Colacci, Anna Maria; Vaccari, Monica; Mondello, Chiara; Scovassi, A Ivana; Raju, Jayadev; Hamid, Roslida A; Memeo, Lorenzo; Forte, Stefano; Roy, Rabindra; Woodrick, Jordan; Salem, Hosni K; Ryan, Elizabeth P; Brown, Dustin G; Bisson, William H; Lowe, Leroy; Lyerly, H Kim

    2015-06-01

    An increasing number of studies suggest an important role of host immunity as a barrier to tumor formation and progression. Complex mechanisms and multiple pathways are involved in evading innate and adaptive immune responses, with a broad spectrum of chemicals displaying the potential to adversely influence immunosurveillance. The evaluation of the cumulative effects of low-dose exposures from the occupational and natural environment, especially if multiple chemicals target the same gene(s) or pathway(s), is a challenge. We reviewed common environmental chemicals and discussed their potential effects on immunosurveillance. Our overarching objective was to review related signaling pathways influencing immune surveillance such as the pathways involving PI3K/Akt, chemokines, TGF-?, FAK, IGF-1, HIF-1?, IL-6, IL-1?, CTLA-4 and PD-1/PDL-1 could individually or collectively impact immunosurveillance. A number of chemicals that are common in the anthropogenic environment such as fungicides (maneb, fluoxastrobin and pyroclostrobin), herbicides (atrazine), insecticides (pyridaben and azamethiphos), the components of personal care products (triclosan and bisphenol A) and diethylhexylphthalate with pathways critical to tumor immunosurveillance. At this time, these chemicals are not recognized as human carcinogens; however, it is known that they these chemicalscan simultaneously persist in the environment and appear to have some potential interfere with the host immune response, therefore potentially contributing to promotion interacting with of immune evasion mechanisms, and promoting subsequent tumor growth and progression. PMID:26002081

  13. Antidepressant-like and anxiolytic-like effects of cannabidiol: a chemical compound of Cannabis sativa.

    PubMed

    de Mello Schier, Alexandre R; de Oliveira Ribeiro, Natalia P; Coutinho, Danielle S; Machado, Sergio; Arias-Carrión, Oscar; Crippa, Jose A; Zuardi, Antonio W; Nardi, Antonio E; Silva, Adriana C

    2014-01-01

    Anxiety and depression are pathologies that affect human beings in many aspects of life, including social life, productivity and health. Cannabidiol (CBD) is a constituent non-psychotomimetic of Cannabis sativa with great psychiatric potential, including uses as an antidepressant-like and anxiolytic-like compound. The aim of this study is to review studies of animal models using CBD as an anxiolytic-like and antidepressant-like compound. Studies involving animal models, performing a variety of experiments on the above-mentioned disorders, such as the forced swimming test (FST), elevated plus maze (EPM) and Vogel conflict test (VCT), suggest that CBD exhibited an anti-anxiety and antidepressant effects in animal models discussed. Experiments with CBD demonstrated non-activation of neuroreceptors CB1 and CB2. Most of the studies demonstrated a good interaction between CBD and the 5-HT1A neuro-receptor. PMID:24923339

  14. Inhibitory effects of opioids on compound action potentials in frog sciatic nerves and their chemical structures

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kotaro Mizuta; Tsugumi Fujita; Terumasa Nakatsuka; Eiichi Kumamoto

    2008-01-01

    An opioid tramadol more effectively inhibits compound action potentials (CAPs) than its metabolite mono-O-demethyl-tramadol (M1). To address further this issue, we examined the effects of opioids (morphine, codeine, ethylmorphine and dihydrocodeine) and cocaine on CAPs by applying the air-gap method to the frog sciatic nerve. All of the opioids at concentrations less than 10 mM reduced the peak amplitude of the

  15. Detection of volatile compounds correlated to human diseases through breath analysis with chemical sensors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Maximilian Fleischer; Elfriede Simon; Eva Rumpel; Heiko Ulmer; Mika Harbeck; Michael Wandel; Christopher Fietzek; Udo Weimar; Hans Meixner

    2002-01-01

    The analysis of volatile compounds in the breath of humans was investigated by the application of different sensor principles. The detection of nitrogen oxide, an asthma marker, in breath at the low ppb-level (2–100ppb) can be carried out by work function measurements. By the use of Cu–phthalocyanine dye as gas sensitive layer a calculated detection limit of 1.3ppb is attainable.

  16. Effect of ultrasound-assisted freezing on the physico-chemical properties and volatile compounds of red radish.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bao-Guo; Zhang, Min; Bhandari, Bhesh; Cheng, Xin-Feng; Islam, Md Nahidul

    2015-11-01

    Power ultrasound, which can enhance nucleation rate and crystal growth rate, can also affect the physico-chemical properties of immersion frozen products. In this study, the influence of slow freezing (SF), immersion freezing (IF) and ultrasound-assisted freezing (UAF) on physico-chemical properties and volatile compounds of red radish was investigated. Results showed that ultrasound application significantly improved the freezing rate; the freezing time of ultrasound application at 0.26W/cm(2) was shorten by 14% and 90%, compared to IF and SF, respectively. UAF products showed significant (p<0.05) reduction in drip loss and phytonutrients (anthocyanins, vitamin C and phenolics) loss. Compared to SF products, IF and UAF products showed better textural preservation and higher calcium content. The radish tissues exhibited better cellular structures under ultrasonic power intensities of 0.17 and 0.26W/cm(2) with less cell separation and disruption. Volatile compound data revealed that radish aromatic profile was also affected in the freezing process. PMID:26186850

  17. An in vivo chemical genetic screen identifies phosphodiesterase 4 as a pharmacological target for hedgehog signaling inhibition.

    PubMed

    Williams, Charles H; Hempel, Jonathan E; Hao, Jijun; Frist, Audrey Y; Williams, Michelle M; Fleming, Jonathan T; Sulikowski, Gary A; Cooper, Michael K; Chiang, Chin; Hong, Charles C

    2015-04-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) signaling plays an integral role in vertebrate development, and its dysregulation has been accepted widely as a driver of numerous malignancies. While a variety of small molecules target Smoothened (Smo) as a strategy for Hh inhibition, Smo gain-of-function mutations have limited their clinical implementation. Modulation of targets downstream of Smo could define a paradigm for treatment of Hh-dependent cancers. Here, we describe eggmanone, a small molecule identified from a chemical genetic zebrafish screen, which induced an Hh-null phenotype. Eggmanone exerts its Hh-inhibitory effects through selective antagonism of phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4), leading to protein kinase A activation and subsequent Hh blockade. Our study implicates PDE4 as a target for Hh inhibition, suggests an improved strategy for Hh-dependent cancer therapy, and identifies a unique probe of downstream-of-Smo Hh modulation. PMID:25818300

  18. Chemical oxidation of volatile and semi-volatile organic compounds in soil

    SciTech Connect

    Gates, D.D.; Siegrist, R.L.; Cline, S.R.

    1995-06-01

    Subsurface contamination with fuel hydrocarbons or chlorinated hydrocarbons is prevalent throughout the Department of Energy (DOE) complex and in many sites managed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Superfund program. The most commonly reported chlorinated hydrocarbons (occurring > 50% of DOE contaminated sites) were trichloroethylene (TCE), 1, 1, 1,-trichloroethane (TCA), and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) with concentrations in the range of 0.2 {mu}g/kg to 12,000 mg/kg. The fuel hydrocarbons most frequently reported as being present at DOE sites include aromatic compounds and polyaromatic compounds such as phenanthrene, pyrene, and naphthalene. The primary sources of these semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) are coal waste from coal fired electric power plants used at many of these facilities in the past and gasoline spills and leaks. Dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs) can migrate within the subsurface for long periods of time along a variety of pathways including fractures, macropores, and micropores. Diffusion of contaminants in the non-aqueous, aqueous, and vapor phase can occur from the fractures and macropores into the matrix of fine-textured media. As a result of these contamination processes, removal of contaminants from the subsurface and the delivery of treatment agents into and throughout contaminated regions are often hindered, making rapid and extensive remediation difficult.

  19. Leaf Surface Lipophilic Compounds as One of the Factors of Silver Birch Chemical Defense against Larvae of Gypsy Moth

    PubMed Central

    Martemyanov, Vyacheslav V.; Pavlushin, Sergey V.; Dubovskiy, Ivan M.; Belousova, Irina A.; Yushkova, Yuliya V.; Morosov, Sergey V.; Chernyak, Elena I.; Glupov, Victor V.

    2015-01-01

    Plant chemical defense against herbivores is a complex process which involves a number of secondary compounds. It is known that the concentration of leaf surface lipophilic compounds (SLCs), particularly those of flavonoid aglycones are increased with the defoliation treatment of silver birch Betula pendula. In this study we investigated how the alteration of SLCs concentration in the food affects the fitness and innate immunity of the gypsy moth Lymantria dispar. We found that a low SLCs concentrations in consumed leaves led to a rapid larval development and increased females’ pupae weight (= fecundity) compared to larvae fed with leaves with high SLCs content. Inversely, increasing the compounds concentration in an artificial diet produced the reverse effects: decreases in both larval weight and larval survival. Low SLCs concentrations in tree leaves differently affected larval innate immunity parameters. For both sexes, total hemocytes count in the hemolymph increased, while the activity of plasma phenoloxidase decreased when larvae consume leaves with reduced content of SLCs. Our results clearly demonstrate that the concentration of SLCs in silver birch leaves affects not only gypsy moth fitness but also their innate immune status which might alter the potential resistance of insects against infections and/or parasitoids. PMID:25816371

  20. Leaf surface lipophilic compounds as one of the factors of silver birch chemical defense against larvae of gypsy moth.

    PubMed

    Martemyanov, Vyacheslav V; Pavlushin, Sergey V; Dubovskiy, Ivan M; Belousova, Irina A; Yushkova, Yuliya V; Morosov, Sergey V; Chernyak, Elena I; Glupov, Victor V

    2015-01-01

    Plant chemical defense against herbivores is a complex process which involves a number of secondary compounds. It is known that the concentration of leaf surface lipophilic compounds (SLCs), particularly those of flavonoid aglycones are increased with the defoliation treatment of silver birch Betula pendula. In this study we investigated how the alteration of SLCs concentration in the food affects the fitness and innate immunity of the gypsy moth Lymantria dispar. We found that a low SLCs concentrations in consumed leaves led to a rapid larval development and increased females' pupae weight (= fecundity) compared to larvae fed with leaves with high SLCs content. Inversely, increasing the compounds concentration in an artificial diet produced the reverse effects: decreases in both larval weight and larval survival. Low SLCs concentrations in tree leaves differently affected larval innate immunity parameters. For both sexes, total hemocytes count in the hemolymph increased, while the activity of plasma phenoloxidase decreased when larvae consume leaves with reduced content of SLCs. Our results clearly demonstrate that the concentration of SLCs in silver birch leaves affects not only gypsy moth fitness but also their innate immune status which might alter the potential resistance of insects against infections and/or parasitoids. PMID:25816371

  1. New Approach to Evaluate the Antennal Response of an Adult Predator Insect to Different Volatile Chemical Compounds by using Electroantennogram Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shonouda, Mourad L.

    The antennal response of adult syrphid flies to selected plant volatile chemical compounds was investigated in the present study. The main chemical classes and their chemical compounds were aldehydes (nonanal and benzaldehyde), monoterpene-alcohols (linalool and alpha-terpineol), ketones (6-methyl-5-heptene-2-one and 2-undecanone), hydrocarbons (tetradecane) and benzoids (methyl salicylate). Electroantennogram (EAG) records showed that the syrphid antennae were strongly responded to linalool, 6-methyl-5-heptene-2-one and methyl salicylate even at low concentrations, in addition to the high dose concentration of nonanal comparably to the other chemical compounds. The antennae of old syrphid adults were more responsive and elicited higher levels of responses to all compounds rather than young syrphid adults. The antennal sensitivity may differ from one compound to another according to the sex. The difference in responses could be attributed to the sensitivity of olfactory receptors and/or the characterization of binding protein(s). The quality of biocontrol agent could be improved if the chemical interaction between beneficial natural enemies and the surrounding environment is intensively studied and we clearly understand the chemical ecology of each natural enemy.

  2. Odor-causing volatile organic compounds in wastewater treatment plant units and sludge management areas

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Faruk Dincer; Aysen Muezzinoglu

    2008-01-01

    Odors due to malodorous gas and vapor emissions from units of Izmir Wastewater Treatment Plant (WWTP) were studied and evaluated with respect to chemical composition. Altogether 29 target compounds consisting of 4 different groups of chemicals were identified and quantified in the odorous gas samples from wastewater and sludges. Total volatile malodorous organic compounds (VMOC) consisted of reduced sulfur compounds

  3. DESI-MS\\/MS of Chemical Warfare Agents and Related Compounds

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paul A. D'Agostino

    2011-01-01

    Solid phase microextraction (SPME) fibers were used to headspace ­sample chemical warfare agents and their hydrolysis products from glass vials and glass vials containing spiked media, including Dacron swabs, office carpet, paper and fabric. The interface of the Z-spray source was modified to permit safe introduction of the SPME fibers for desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometric (DESI-MS) analysis. A \\

  4. Chemical compounds and toxicological assessments of drinking water stored in polyethylene terephthalate (PET)

    E-print Network

    Short, Daniel

    6 December 2011 Keywords: Bottled water Mutagenicity Genotoxicity Endocrine disruptors NIAS a b and additives. Genotoxic and estrogenic activities in PET-bottled water have been reported. Chemical mixtures in bottled water have been suggested as the source of these toxicological effects. Furthermore, sample

  5. RESPONSE OF PORTABLE VOC (VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS) ANALYZERS TO CHEMICAL MIXTURES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives the responses of two types of portable VOC analyzers (Century Systems OVA-108 and Bacharach TLV Sniffer), calibrated with methane and used to measure a variety of chemical vapor mixtures. Instrument response data for both binary and ternary mixtures of selected c...

  6. Hiding in plain sight: cuticular compound profile matching conceals a larval tortoise beetle in its host chemical cloud.

    PubMed

    Massuda, Kamila Ferreira; Trigo, José Roberto

    2014-04-01

    Larvae of tortoise beetles are postulated to have fecal shields as the main defensive strategy against predators. Such a device protects beetles both physically and chemically. In order to examine how larvae Chelymorpha reimoseri are protected against predatory ants, which frequently visit extrafloral nectaries in their host plant, the morning glory Ipomoea carnea, we conducted anti-predation bioassays with live 5th instars. In the field, larvae in contact with ants had survival between 40 and 73 %, independently of shield presence. In the laboratory, when exposed to Camponotus crassus, larvae with shields had significantly higher survival (85 %) than those without shields (64 %). In both scenarios, larval survival was significantly higher when compared with palatable Spodoptera frugiperda larvae, as the latter were all consumed. We also observed that when C. reimoseri larvae showed no movement, the ants walked on them without attacking. We hypothesized that if the larval integument has a pattern of cuticular compounds (CCs) similar to that of its host plant, larvae would be rendered chemically camouflaged. In the field and laboratory, the freeze-dried palatable larvae of S. frugiperda treated with CCs of 5th instar C. reimoseri and left on I. carnea leaves were significantly less removed by ants than controls without these compounds. We also found a similarity of approximately 50 % between the CCs in C. reimoseri larvae and I. carnea host leaves. Both findings provide evidence in support of the hypothesis that chemical camouflage plays an important role in larval defense, which is reported for the first time in an ectophagous leaf beetle larva. PMID:24744044

  7. Determination of chemical warfare agents and related compounds in environmental samples by solid-phase microextraction with gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Popiel, Stanis?aw; Sankowska, Monika

    2011-11-25

    Solid phase microextraction (SPME) is an increasingly common method of sample isolation and enhancement. SPME is a convenient and simple sample preparation technique for chromatographic analysis and a useful alternative to liquid-liquid extraction and solid phase extraction. SPME is speed and simply method, which has been widely used in environmental analysis because it is a rather safe method when dealing with highly toxic chemicals. A combination of SPME and gas chromatography (GC) permits both the qualitative and quantitative analysis of toxic industrial compounds, pesticides and chemical warfare agents (CWAs), including their degradation products, in air, water and soil samples. This work presents a combination of SPME and GC methods with various types of detectors in the analysis of CWAs and their degradation products in air, water, soil and other matrices. The combination of SPME and GC methods allows for low detection limits depending on the analyte, matrix and detection system. Commercially available fibers have been mainly used to extract CWAs in headspace analysis. However, attempts have been made to introduce new fiber coatings that are characterized by higher selectivities towards different analytes of interest. Environmental decomposition of CWAs leads to the formation of more hydrophilic products. These compounds may be isolated from samples using SPME and analyzed using GC however, they must often be derivatized first to produce good chromatography. In these cases, one must ensure that the SPME method also meets the same needs. Otherwise, it is helpful to use derivatization methods. SPME may also be used with fieldportable mass spectrometry (MS) and GC-MS instruments for chemical defense applications, including field sampling and analysis. SPME fibers can be taken into contaminated areas to directly sample air, headspaces above solutions, soils and water. PMID:22015307

  8. Quantitative Chemical Proteomics Identifies Novel Targets of the Anti-cancer Multi-kinase Inhibitor E-3810*

    PubMed Central

    Colzani, Mara; Noberini, Roberta; Romanenghi, Mauro; Colella, Gennaro; Pasi, Maurizio; Fancelli, Daniele; Varasi, Mario; Minucci, Saverio; Bonaldi, Tiziana

    2014-01-01

    Novel drugs are designed against specific molecular targets, but almost unavoidably they bind non-targets, which can cause additional biological effects that may result in increased activity or, more frequently, undesired toxicity. Chemical proteomics is an ideal approach for the systematic identification of drug targets and off-targets, allowing unbiased screening of candidate interactors in their natural context (tissue or cell extracts). E-3810 is a novel multi-kinase inhibitor currently in clinical trials for its anti-angiogenic and anti-tumor activity. In biochemical assays, E-3810 targets primarily vascular endothelial growth factor and fibroblast growth factor receptors. Interestingly, E-3810 appears to inhibit the growth of tumor cells with low to undetectable levels of these proteins in vitro, suggesting that additional relevant targets exist. We applied chemical proteomics to screen for E-3810 targets by immobilizing the drug on a resin and exploiting stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture to design experiments that allowed the detection of novel interactors and the quantification of their dissociation constant (Kd imm) for the immobilized drug. In addition to the known target FGFR2 and PDGFR?, which has been described as a secondary E-3810 target based on in vitro assays, we identified six novel candidate kinase targets (DDR2, YES, LYN, CARDIAK, EPHA2, and CSBP). These kinases were validated in a biochemical assay and—in the case of the cell-surface receptor DDR2, for which activating mutations have been recently discovered in lung cancer—cellular assays. Taken together, the success of our strategy—which integrates large-scale target identification and quality-controlled target affinity measurements using quantitative mass spectrometry—in identifying novel E-3810 targets further supports the use of chemical proteomics to dissect the mechanism of action of novel drugs. PMID:24696502

  9. Studies of the microscopic physical and chemical properties of graphite intercalation compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Eklund, P C

    1982-01-01

    Progress in the following studies is reported: optical properties; Raman and inelastic neutron scattering; hydrogen storage in alkali metal-graphite intercalation compounds (GIC's); intercalation chemistry of the MX/sub 5/-graphite intercalation compounds (M = As, Sb, X = Cl, F); and low-temperature magnetoresistance (acceptor-GIC's) and pressure-dependent superconductivity (donor GIC's). The objective of the optical reflectance measurements is to determine the frequency dependent dielectric constant for several important graphite intercalation compounds and to correlate this constant with theoretical predictions. Our recent Raman scattering work has primarily focused on the intercalation-induced shifts of zone-center, zone-interior and zone-edge graphitic, phonon frequencies in prototypical acceptor (SbCl/sub 5/-graphite) and donor (Rb-graphite) cmpounds. The inelastic neutron scattering work has focused on the low energy (..omega.. < 500 cm/sup -1/) c-axis modes with displacement and wavevector parallel to the c-axis. Pure phase (single stage) C/sub 24/Rb and C/sub 24/K which are the starting materials for hydrogen storage were synthesized. The x-ray and Moessbauer results are in good agreement and indicate the presence of large concentrations of Sb/sup 5 +/(SbX/sub 6//sup -/) and Sb/sup 3 +/ (SbX/sub 3/) (X = Cl,F) in the intercalate layer. The samples of graphite-SbCl/sub 5/ and graphite-SbF/sub 5/ were prepared and x-ray characterized at the University of Kentucky. Shubnikov-de Haas measurements on SbCl/sub 5/-graphite are being conducted.

  10. Attomole detection of isotope-labeled compounds in chemical defense research

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, J.S.; Buchholz, B.A.; Pawley, N.H.; Mauthe, R.E.; Dingley, K.; Turteltaub, K.

    1996-11-01

    AMS detects 14C at zeptomole to femtomole sensitivities. We detected the effect of ChE-blocking pyridostigmine bromide on the CNS uptake of a pyrethroid insecticide at scaled human-equivalent exposures in rats. Significant blood to brain protection from permethrin dosed at 5mg/kg is seen in the CNS of rats receiving pyridostigmine bromide pretreatments in chow at 2mg/kg/day. The synergy of these compounds was suggested as a precursor to some symptoms of `Gulf War Syndrome`.

  11. Chemical genetic approach identifies microtubule affinity-regulating kinase 1 as a leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 substrate.

    PubMed

    Krumova, Petranka; Reyniers, Lauran; Meyer, Marc; Lobbestael, Evy; Stauffer, Daniela; Gerrits, Bertran; Muller, Lionel; Hoving, Sjouke; Kaupmann, Klemens; Voshol, Johannes; Fabbro, Doriano; Bauer, Andreas; Rovelli, Giorgio; Taymans, Jean-Marc; Bouwmeester, Tewis; Baekelandt, Veerle

    2015-07-01

    Mutations in leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) are the most common cause of autosomal-dominant forms of Parkinson's disease. LRRK2 is a modular, multidomain protein containing 2 enzymatic domains, including a kinase domain, as well as several protein-protein interaction domains, pointing to a role in cellular signaling. Although enormous efforts have been made, the exact pathophysiologic mechanisms of LRRK2 are still not completely known. In this study, we used a chemical genetics approach to identify LRRK2 substrates from mouse brain. This approach allows the identification of substrates of 1 particular kinase in a complex cellular environment. Several of the identified peptides are involved in the regulation of microtubule (MT) dynamics, including microtubule-associating protein (MAP)/microtubule affinity-regulating kinase 1 (MARK1). MARK1 is a serine/threonine kinase known to phosphorylate MT-binding proteins such as Tau, MAP2, and MAP4 at KXGS motifs leading to MT destabilization. In vitro kinase assays and metabolic-labeling experiments in living cells confirmed MARK1 as an LRRK2 substrate. Moreover, we also showed that LRRK2 and MARK1 are interacting in eukaryotic cells. Our findings contribute to the identification of physiologic LRRK2 substrates and point to a potential mechanism explaining the reported effects of LRRK2 on neurite morphology.-Krumova, P., Reyniers, L., Meyer, M., Lobbestael, E., Stauffer, D., Gerrits, B., Muller, L., Hoving, S., Kaupmann, K., Voshol, J., Fabbro, D., Bauer, A., Rovelli, G., Taymans, J.-M., Bouwmeester, T., Baekelandt, V. Chemical genetic approach identifies microtubule affinity-regulating kinase 1 as a leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 substrate. PMID:25854701

  12. Lithium isotope separation by chemical exchange with polymer-bound azacrown compounds

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dong Won Kim; Young Shin Jeon; Young Kyu Jeong; Moo Yul Suh; Kih Soo Joe

    1995-01-01

    The chromatographic separation of lithium isotopes was investigated by chemical exchange with the recently synthesized polymer-bound dibenzo pyridino diamide azacrown (DBPDA) and reduced dibenzo pyridino diamide azacrown (RDBPDA). Column chromatography was employed for the determination of the effect of solvents and ligand conformation on the separation coefficients. The maximum separation coefficients, , for the DBPDA and RDBPDA at 20.0±0.02°C with

  13. DESI-MS\\/MS of Chemical Warfare Agents and Related Compounds

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paul A. D’Agostino

    \\u000a Solid phase microextraction (SPME) fibers were used to headspace ­sample chemical warfare agents and their hydrolysis products\\u000a from glass vials and glass vials containing spiked media, including Dacron swabs, office carpet, paper and fabric. The interface\\u000a of the Z-spray source was modified to permit safe introduction of the SPME fibers for desorption electrospray ionization mass\\u000a spectrometric (DESI-MS) analysis. A “dip

  14. Physico-chemical transformations of sulfated compounds during the leaching of highly sulfated cemented wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Lovera, P.; Bescop, P. le; Adenot, F. [CEA Centre de`Etudes de Saclay, Gif/Yvette (France)] [CEA Centre de`Etudes de Saclay, Gif/Yvette (France); Li, G. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Saclay, Gif/Yvette (France)] [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Saclay, Gif/Yvette (France); [Ecole Normale Superieure de Cachan (France). Lab. de Mecanique et de Technologie; Tanaka, Y. [Japan Nuclear Fuel Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)] [Japan Nuclear Fuel Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Owaki, E. [Taisei Corp., Yokohama (Japan). Technology Research Center] [Taisei Corp., Yokohama (Japan). Technology Research Center

    1997-10-01

    Cementation of sulfated evaporator concentrates leads to highly sulfated low level wastes, (ca. 25% w/w sodium sulfate solution as mix water), which exhibit the presence of U-phase, a sodium-bearing calcium monosulfphoaluminate-like phase. During the leaching of simulated highly sulfated OPC/BFS cements, cured at room temperature and containing U-phase, sodium sulfate, and ettringite, physico-chemical transformations have been pointed out (transformation of U-phase into ettringite). Samples having the same chemical composition, but cured at high temperature (maximal temperature during curing: 120 C), do not contain ettringite initially, but secondary ettringite is formed during leaching. XRD spectra point out the existence of precipitation fronts (or of phase formation fronts) varying linearly versus the square root of time. The analysis of leaching solutions has provided complementary data used in a code, the aim of which is to assess cement degradation, based on coupling between transport by diffusion and chemical reactions (DIFFUZON code). The U-phase-ettringite transformation is confirmed.

  15. Gas chromatography analysis with olfactometric detection (GC-O) as a useful methodology for chemical characterization of odorous compounds.

    PubMed

    Brattoli, Magda; Cisternino, Ezia; Dambruoso, Paolo Rosario; de Gennaro, Gianluigi; Giungato, Pasquale; Mazzone, Antonio; Palmisani, Jolanda; Tutino, Maria

    2013-01-01

    The gas chromatography-olfactometry (GC-O) technique couples traditional gas chromatographic analysis with sensory detection in order to study complex mixtures of odorous substances and to identify odor active compounds. The GC-O technique is already widely used for the evaluation of food aromas and its application in environmental fields is increasing, thus moving the odor emission assessment from the solely olfactometric evaluations to the characterization of the volatile components responsible for odor nuisance. The aim of this paper is to describe the state of the art of gas chromatography-olfactometry methodology, considering the different approaches regarding the operational conditions and the different methods for evaluating the olfactometric detection of odor compounds. The potentials of GC-O are described highlighting the improvements in this methodology relative to other conventional approaches used for odor detection, such as sensoristic, sensorial and the traditional gas chromatographic methods. The paper also provides an examination of the different fields of application of the GC-O, principally related to fragrances and food aromas, odor nuisance produced by anthropic activities and odorous compounds emitted by materials and medical applications. PMID:24316571

  16. Gas Chromatography Analysis with Olfactometric Detection (GC-O) as a Useful Methodology for Chemical Characterization of Odorous Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Brattoli, Magda; Cisternino, Ezia; Dambruoso, Paolo Rosario; de Gennaro, Gianluigi; Giungato, Pasquale; Mazzone, Antonio; Palmisani, Jolanda; Tutino, Maria

    2013-01-01

    The gas chromatography-olfactometry (GC-O) technique couples traditional gas chromatographic analysis with sensory detection in order to study complex mixtures of odorous substances and to identify odor active compounds. The GC-O technique is already widely used for the evaluation of food aromas and its application in environmental fields is increasing, thus moving the odor emission assessment from the solely olfactometric evaluations to the characterization of the volatile components responsible for odor nuisance. The aim of this paper is to describe the state of the art of gas chromatography-olfactometry methodology, considering the different approaches regarding the operational conditions and the different methods for evaluating the olfactometric detection of odor compounds. The potentials of GC-O are described highlighting the improvements in this methodology relative to other conventional approaches used for odor detection, such as sensoristic, sensorial and the traditional gas chromatographic methods. The paper also provides an examination of the different fields of application of the GC-O, principally related to fragrances and food aromas, odor nuisance produced by anthropic activities and odorous compounds emitted by materials and medical applications. PMID:24316571

  17. A wireless hybrid chemical sensor for detection of environmental volatile organic compounds

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Cheng; Tsow, Francis; Campbell, Katherine Driggs; Iglesias, Rodrigo; Forzani, Erica; Tao, N.J.

    2013-01-01

    A hybrid sensor for monitoring volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in air is developed. The device combines two orthogonal sensing principles, selective molecular binding with a microfabricated quartz tuning fork detector and separation of analytes with a column. The tuning fork detector is functionalized with molecular imprinted polymers for selective binding to benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX), and the separation column provides further discrimination of the analytes for real world complex sample analysis. The device is wireless, portable, battery-powered, and cell-phone operated, and it allows reliable detection in parts per billion (ppb) by volume-levels of BTEX in the presence of complex interferents. The hybrid device is suitable for occupational, environmental health, and epidemiological applications. PMID:24078793

  18. Evaluated Chemical Kinetic Data for the Reactions of Atomic Oxygen O(3P) with Sulfur Containing Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singleton, D. L.; Cvetanovi?, R. J.

    1988-10-01

    Chemical kinetic data for reactions of O(3P) atoms with sulfur containing compounds are compiled and critically evaluated. Specifically, the reactions considered include the interactions of the ground electronic state of oxygen atoms, O(3P), with S2, SF2, SF5, SOF, S2O, SO, SO2, SO3, SH, H2S, D2S, H2SO4, CS, CS2, COS, CH3SH, C2H5SH, C4H9SH, C5H11SH, CH3SCH3, cy-CH2SCH2, cy-CHCHSCHCH, CH3SSCH3, SCF2, SCCl2, and cy-CF2SCF2S. With one exception, the liquid phase reaction O(3P)+H2SO4?products, all the data considered were for gas phase reactions. Where possible, ``Recommended'' values of the rate parameters have been assessed and conservative uncertainty limits assigned to them.

  19. DRAR-CPI: a server for identifying drug repositioning potential and adverse drug reactions via the chemical–protein interactome

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Heng; Chen, Jian; Shi, Leming; Mikailov, Mike; Zhu, Huang; Wang, Kejian; He, Lin; Yang, Lun

    2011-01-01

    Identifying new indications for existing drugs (drug repositioning) is an efficient way of maximizing their potential. Adverse drug reaction (ADR) is one of the leading causes of death among hospitalized patients. As both new indications and ADRs are caused by unexpected chemical–protein interactions on off-targets, it is reasonable to predict these interactions by mining the chemical–protein interactome (CPI). Making such predictions has recently been facilitated by a web server named DRAR-CPI. This server has a representative collection of drug molecules and targetable human proteins built up from our work in drug repositioning and ADR. When a user submits a molecule, the server will give the positive or negative association scores between the user’s molecule and our library drugs based on their interaction profiles towards the targets. Users can thus predict the indications or ADRs of their molecule based on the association scores towards our library drugs. We have matched our predictions of drug–drug associations with those predicted via gene-expression profiles, achieving a matching rate as high as 74%. We have also successfully predicted the connections between anti-psychotics and anti-infectives, indicating the underlying relevance of anti-psychotics in the potential treatment of infections, vice versa. This server is freely available at http://cpi.bio-x.cn/drar/. PMID:21558322

  20. [Simultaneous determination of o-phthalaldehyde, p-chloro-m-xylenol and triclosan in compound chemical disinfectants and daily chemicals by micellar electrokinetic chromatography].

    PubMed

    Xie, N; Ding, Xiaojing; Song, Baohu; Li, Jia; Wang, Zhi

    2013-01-01

    A novel method for the separation and determination of o-phthalaldehyde (OPA), p-chloro-m-xylenol (PCMX) and triclosan in daily chemicals and compound chemical disinfectants in a single run by micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC) was established. The factors such as the buffer concentration and pH, the concentration of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), and the sample buffer, were investigated in detail. The analysis was carried out using a 50 microm uncoated capillary of 40.2 cm in total length (effective length: 30 cm). The running buffer was 20 mmol/L Na2B4O7, and 80 mmol/L SDS. The sample buffer was 2 mmol/L Na2B4O7-8 mmol/L SDS (without pH adjustment) containing 10% (v/v) methanol. The detection wavelength was 214 nm. The relative standard deviations (RSDs) of the corrected peak areas of the three components were in the range of 1.1% - 3.8%, and the RSDs of migration times were less than 0.9%. The limits of detection (LODs, S/N = 3) were 4.0, 0.4 and 0.4 mg/L, and the limits of quantification (LOQs, S/N = 10) were 12, 1.2, and 1.2 mg/L for OPA, PCMX and triclosan, respectively. The corrected peak areas and the concentrations of the three components showed good linear relationship within the ranges of 12 - 2 000 mg/L, 1.2 - 200 mg/L and 1.2 - 200 mg/L with the correlation coefficients of 0.999 4, 0.999 3 and 0.999 5 for OPA, PCMX and triclosan, respectively. The method was used for the determination of the three components in compound chemical disinfectants, hand washing liquids, soaps and a toothpaste. The results showed that the three components could be assayed in a single run with simple sample pretreatment, rapidity, accuracy and low cost, and the method is convenient for routine analysis. PMID:23667992

  1. Emission characteristics of nitrogen- and sulfur-containing odorous compounds during different sewage sludge chemical conditioning processes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huan; Luo, Guang-Qian; Hu, Hong-Yun; Zhang, Qiang; Yang, Jia-Kuan; Yao, Hong

    2012-10-15

    Chemical conditioners are often used to enhance sewage sludge dewaterability through altering sludge properties and flocs structure, both affect odorous compounds emissions not only during sludge conditioning but also in subsequent sludge disposal. This study was to investigate emission characteristics of ammonia (NH(3)), sulfur dioxide (SO(2)), hydrogen sulfide (H(2)S) and carbonyl sulfide (COS) generated from sewage sludge conditioned by three representative conditioners, i.e., organic polymers, iron salts and skeleton builders, F-S (Fenton's reagent and skeleton builders) composite conditioner. The results demonstrate that polyacrylamide (PAM) has an insignificant effect on emission characteristics of nitrogen- and sulfur-containing odorous compounds, because the properties, sulfur and nitrogen speciations are similar in PAM-conditioned sludge and raw sludge (RS). Significant increases of SO(2) and H(2)S emissions in the H(2)SO(4) conditioning process were observed due to the accelerated decomposition of sulfur-containing amino acids in acidic environment. Fenton peroxidation facilitates the formation of COS. CaO can reduce sulfur-containing gases emission via generation of calcium sulfate. However, under strong alkaline conditions, free ammonia or protonated amine in sludge can be easily converted to volatile ammonia, resulting in a significant release of NH(3). PMID:22902143

  2. Crystal chemical aspects of superconductivity in BaFe2As2 and related compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johrendt, Dirk

    2010-03-01

    BaFe2As2 is the parent compound of the 122-type iron arsenides.^1 Superconductivity can be induced by several kinds of doping^2-4 or by pressure.^5 It is widely accepted that superconductivity in iron arsenides is unconventional and a number of experiments agree with the s±-scenario.^6 The latter relies on Fermi surface nesting which depends on both the electron count and the lattice. However, the coincidence of doping and pressure effects on the structure of BaFe2As2 supports the role of the structure.^7 Another open issue is the co-existence of superconductivity and AF magnetic ordering. Our ^57Fe-M"ossbauer experiments with underdoped Ba0.8K0.2Fe2As2 (Tc = 24 K) revealed full magnetic splitting, which indicates such a co-existence.^8 Compounds like Sr2VO3FeAs (Tc = 37-45 K) are promising candidates for higher Tc, but their crystal chemistry is not yet understood. In non-superconducting Sr2CrO3FeAs, we have detected a non-stoichiometry of the Fe-site (Fe0.93(1)Cr0.07(1)) and C-type AF ordering of the Cr^3+-layers.^9 The Cr-doping of the FeAs layer is probably detrimental to superconductivity in Sr2CrO3FeAs, but a similar non-stoichiometry may play a vital role in Sr2VO3FeAs.-^1 M. Rotter, M. Tegel, I. Schellenberg, et al., Phys. Rev. B 78, 020503 (2008).^2 M. Rotter, M. Tegel, and D. Johrendt, Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 107006 (2008).^3 S. Jiang, C. Wang, Z. Ren, et al., J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 21, 382203 (2009).^4 A. S. Sefat, R. Jin, M. A. McGuire, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 117004 (2008).^5 P. L. Alireza, Y. T. C. Ko, J. Gillett, et al., J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 21, 012208 (2009).^6 I. Mazin, D. J. Singh, M. D. Johannes, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 057003 (2008).^7 M. Rotter, M. Pangerl, M. Tegel, et al., Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 47, 7949 (2008).^8 M. Rotter, M. Tegel, I. Schellenberg, et al., New J. Phys. 11, 025014 (2009).^9 M. Tegel, Y. Su, F. Hummel, et al., arXiv0911.0450.

  3. Discovery of compounds blocking the proliferation of Toxoplasma gondii and Plasmodium falciparum in a chemical space based on piperidinyl-benzimidazolone analogs.

    PubMed

    Saïdani, Nadia; Botté, Cyrille Y; Deligny, Michael; Bonneau, Anne-Laure; Reader, Janette; Lasselin, Ronald; Merer, Goulven; Niepceron, Alisson; Brossier, Fabien; Cintrat, Jean-Christophe; Rousseau, Bernard; Birkholtz, Lyn-Marie; Cesbron-Delauw, Marie-France; Dubremetz, Jean-François; Mercier, Corinne; Vial, Henri; Lopez, Roman; Maréchal, Eric

    2014-05-01

    A piperidinyl-benzimidazolone scaffold has been found in the structure of different inhibitors of membrane glycerolipid metabolism, acting on enzymes manipulating diacylglycerol and phosphatidic acid. Screening a focus library of piperidinyl-benzimidazolone analogs might therefore identify compounds acting against infectious parasites. We first evaluated the in vitro effects of (S)-2-(dibenzylamino)-3-phenylpropyl 4-(1,2-dihydro-2-oxobenzo[d]imidazol-3-yl)piperidine-1-carboxylate (compound 1) on Toxoplasma gondii and Plasmodium falciparum. In T. gondii, motility and apical complex integrity appeared to be unaffected, whereas cell division was inhibited at compound 1 concentrations in the micromolar range. In P. falciparum, the proliferation of erythrocytic stages was inhibited, without any delayed death phenotype. We then explored a library of 250 analogs in two steps. We selected 114 compounds with a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) cutoff of 2 ?M for at least one species and determined in vitro selectivity indexes (SI) based on toxicity against K-562 human cells. We identified compounds with high gains in the IC50 (in the 100 nM range) and SI (up to 1,000 to 2,000) values. Isobole analyses of two of the most active compounds against P. falciparum indicated that their interactions with artemisinin were additive. Here, we propose the use of structure-activity relationship (SAR) models, which will be useful for designing probes to identify the target compound(s) and optimizations for monotherapy or combined-therapy strategies. PMID:24550329

  4. Discovery of Compounds Blocking the Proliferation of Toxoplasma gondii and Plasmodium falciparum in a Chemical Space Based on Piperidinyl-Benzimidazolone Analogs

    PubMed Central

    Saïdani, Nadia; Botté, Cyrille Y.; Deligny, Michael; Bonneau, Anne-Laure; Reader, Janette; Lasselin, Ronald; Merer, Goulven; Niepceron, Alisson; Brossier, Fabien; Cintrat, Jean-Christophe; Rousseau, Bernard; Birkholtz, Lyn-Marie; Cesbron-Delauw, Marie-France; Dubremetz, Jean-François; Mercier, Corinne; Vial, Henri; Lopez, Roman

    2014-01-01

    A piperidinyl-benzimidazolone scaffold has been found in the structure of different inhibitors of membrane glycerolipid metabolism, acting on enzymes manipulating diacylglycerol and phosphatidic acid. Screening a focus library of piperidinyl-benzimidazolone analogs might therefore identify compounds acting against infectious parasites. We first evaluated the in vitro effects of (S)-2-(dibenzylamino)-3-phenylpropyl 4-(1,2-dihydro-2-oxobenzo[d]imidazol-3-yl)piperidine-1-carboxylate (compound 1) on Toxoplasma gondii and Plasmodium falciparum. In T. gondii, motility and apical complex integrity appeared to be unaffected, whereas cell division was inhibited at compound 1 concentrations in the micromolar range. In P. falciparum, the proliferation of erythrocytic stages was inhibited, without any delayed death phenotype. We then explored a library of 250 analogs in two steps. We selected 114 compounds with a 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) cutoff of 2 ?M for at least one species and determined in vitro selectivity indexes (SI) based on toxicity against K-562 human cells. We identified compounds with high gains in the IC50 (in the 100 nM range) and SI (up to 1,000 to 2,000) values. Isobole analyses of two of the most active compounds against P. falciparum indicated that their interactions with artemisinin were additive. Here, we propose the use of structure-activity relationship (SAR) models, which will be useful for designing probes to identify the target compound(s) and optimizations for monotherapy or combined-therapy strategies. PMID:24550329

  5. Screening of an FDA-approved compound library identifies four small-molecule inhibitors of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus replication in cell culture.

    PubMed

    de Wilde, Adriaan H; Jochmans, Dirk; Posthuma, Clara C; Zevenhoven-Dobbe, Jessika C; van Nieuwkoop, Stefan; Bestebroer, Theo M; van den Hoogen, Bernadette G; Neyts, Johan; Snijder, Eric J

    2014-08-01

    Coronaviruses can cause respiratory and enteric disease in a wide variety of human and animal hosts. The 2003 outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) first demonstrated the potentially lethal consequences of zoonotic coronavirus infections in humans. In 2012, a similar previously unknown coronavirus emerged, Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV), thus far causing over 650 laboratory-confirmed infections, with an unexplained steep rise in the number of cases being recorded over recent months. The human MERS fatality rate of ? 30% is alarmingly high, even though many deaths were associated with underlying medical conditions. Registered therapeutics for the treatment of coronavirus infections are not available. Moreover, the pace of drug development and registration for human use is generally incompatible with strategies to combat emerging infectious diseases. Therefore, we have screened a library of 348 FDA-approved drugs for anti-MERS-CoV activity in cell culture. If such compounds proved sufficiently potent, their efficacy might be directly assessed in MERS patients. We identified four compounds (chloroquine, chlorpromazine, loperamide, and lopinavir) inhibiting MERS-CoV replication in the low-micromolar range (50% effective concentrations [EC(50)s], 3 to 8 ?M). Moreover, these compounds also inhibit the replication of SARS coronavirus and human coronavirus 229E. Although their protective activity (alone or in combination) remains to be assessed in animal models, our findings may offer a starting point for treatment of patients infected with zoonotic coronaviruses like MERS-CoV. Although they may not necessarily reduce viral replication to very low levels, a moderate viral load reduction may create a window during which to mount a protective immune response. PMID:24841269

  6. Chemical speciation and equilibria of some nucleic acid compounds and their iron(III) complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masoud, Mamdouh S.; Abd El-Kaway, Marwa Y.; Hindawy, Ahmed M.; Soayed, Amina A.

    The pH effect on electronic absorption spectra of some biologically active nucleic acid constituents have been studied at room temperature and the mechanism of ionization was explained. These compounds are of two categories (pyrimidines: [barbital; 5,5'-diethyl-barbituric acid], [SBA; 4,6-dihydroxy-2-mercapto-pyrimidin], [NBA; 5-nitro-2,4,6(1H,3H,5H)-pyrimidine trione] and [TU; 2,3-dihydro-2-thioxo-pyrimidin-4(1H)-one]) and (purines: [adenine; 6-amino purine], its [Schiff bases derived from adenine-acetylacetone; (Z)-4-(7H-purin-6-ylimino)pentan-2-one) and adenine-salicylaldehyde; 2-((7H-purin-6-ylimino) methyl) phenol] and its [Azo derived from adenine-resorcinol; 4-((7H-purin-6-yl)-diazenyl) benzene-1,3-diol]. The phenomena of tautomerization assigned different tautomers. Different spectrophotometric methods are applied to evaluate the pK's values that explained with their molecular structures. The interaction of Fe3+ with some selected pyrimidines (barbital, NBA and SBA) was explained using familiar six spectrophotometric methods. The data typified the existence of different absorbing species with the different stoichiometries 1:1, 1:2, 1:3 and 2:3. The stability constant of the complexes was computed. More approach was deduced to assign the existence of different species applying the distribution diagrams.

  7. Calcium isotope separation by chemical exchange with polymer-bound crown compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Jepson, B.E.

    1990-01-01

    Chromatographic separation of calcium isotopes by chemical exchange with polymer-bound 18-crown-6 was investigated. The breakthrough technique of column chromatography was employed to determine the influence of solvent composition and ligand-tether structure on separation coefficients and heterogeneous calcium complex stability. The separation coefficient, {epsilon}, was found to be strongly dependent upon solvent composition. An {epsilon} of 0. 0025{plus minus}0.0002 (95% C.L.) for the {sup 44}Ca/{sup 40}Ca isotope pair was obtained with a 70/30 (by volume) methanol/chloroform solvent mixture at 20.0{degree}C. Differences in the structure of the tether binding the crown ring to the polymer had no influence on {epsilon} at that solvent composition. 8 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  8. ADAPTATION OF NATURAL MICROBIAL MMUNITIES TO DEGRADATION OF XENOBIOTIC COMPOUNDS: EFFECTS OF CONCENTRATION, EXPOSURE TIME, INOCULUM, AND CHEMICAL STRUCTURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adaptation of microbial populations to degrade xenobiotic compounds faster after exposure to the compound was studied in eco-cores. Radiolabeled test compounds were added to cores that contained natural water and sediment samples. Adaptation was detected by comparing mineralizati...

  9. Field tests of polyethylene-membrane diffusion samplers for characterizing volatile organic compounds in stream-bottom sediments, Nyanza Chemical Waste Dump Superfund site, Ashland, Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lyford, Forest P.; Willey, Richard E.; Clifford, Scott

    2000-01-01

    A plume of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in ground water extends from the Nyanza Chemical Waste Dump Superfund site in Ashland, Massachusetts, northward toward a mill pond on the Sudbury River and eastward toward the Sudbury River and former mill raceway downstream from the mill pond. Polyethylene-membrane water-to-vapor (vapor) and water-to-water (water) diffusion samplers were installed January 1999 in bottom sediments along the Sudbury River and former mill raceway in a pilot study to determine if vapor samplers would be useful in this setting for delineating a plume of contaminants in ground water near the river and raceway, to evaluate equilibration time for vapor-diffusion samplers, and to determine if diffusion samplers might be an alternative to seepage meters (inverted steel drums) and sediment sampling for evaluating concentrations of VOCs in bottom sediments. Of five tested compounds (benzene, trichloroethene, toluene, tetrachloroethene, and chlorobenzene), chlorobenzene and trichloroethene were most frequently detected in vapor from vapor-diffusion samplers. The distribution of VOCs was generally consistent with a previously mapped plume of contaminants in ground water. The field evaluation of equilibration times for vapor-diffusion samplers was inconclusive because of changing hydrologic conditions that may have affected concentrations of VOCs, possible variations in concentrations ofVOCs over short distances, and imprecise sampling and analytical methods. The limited data, however, indicated that equilibration may require 3 weeks or more in some settings. VOCs detected in samples from water-diffusion samplers and their concentrations were comparable to results from seepage meters, and VOCs detected in vapor-diffusion samplers correlated with VOCs detected in water-diffusion samplers. These results indicate that either vapor-or water-diffusion samplers would serve as an economical alternative to seepage meters for sampling of VOCs in pore water from stream-bottom sediments. Results from diffusion samplers correlated poorly with results from sediment samples, partly because of high quantitation limits for chemical analyses of sediments. In general, results from the diffusion samplers better represented the distribution of VOCs than the results from the sediment samples. This pilot study indicates that diffusion samplers are an economical means of identifying 'hotspots' for contaminants in bottom sediments and can provide insights on transport pathways for contaminants near surface-water bodies. After establishing equilibration times for a particular site, diffusion samplers also may be useful for studying variations in concentrations of VOCs over short distances, variations with time and changing hydrologic conditions, and processes such as chemical transformations by biodegradation and exchanges between surface water and ground water in the hyporheic zone.

  10. Distribution of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in surface water, soil, and groundwater within a chemical industry park in Eastern China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Benhua; Chen, Liang; Huang, Linxian; Wang, Yongseng; Li, Yuehua

    2015-01-01

    This paper focuses on the distribution of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the surface water, soil, and groundwater within a chemical industry park in Eastern China. At least one VOC was detected in each of the 20 sampling sites, and the maximum number of VOCs detected in the surface water, groundwater, and soil were 13, 16, and 14, respectively. Two of the 10 VOCs with elevated concentrations detected in surface water, groundwater, and soil were chloroform and 1,2-dichloroethane. The characteristics of VOCs, which include volatility, boiling point, and solubility, could significantly affect their distribution in surface water, soil, and groundwater. However, due to the direct discharging of chemical industry wastewater into surface water, higher concentrations of VOCs (except chloroform) were detected in surface water than in soil and groundwater. Fortunately, the higher volatility of VOCs prevents the VOCs from impacting groundwater, which helps to maintain a lower concentration of VOCs in the groundwater than in both surface water and soil. This is because pollutants with relatively higher boiling points and lower solubilities have higher detection frequencies in soil, and contaminants with relatively lower boiling points and higher solubilities have higher detection frequencies in water, notably in surface water. PMID:25633950

  11. National Inventory of Alkylphenol Ethoxylate Compounds in U.S. Sewage Sludges and Chemical Fate in Outdoor Soil Mesocosms

    PubMed Central

    Venkatesan, Arjun K.; Halden, Rolf U.

    2012-01-01

    We determined the first nationwide inventories of alkylphenol surfactants in U.S. sewage sludges (SS) using samples from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's 2001 national SS survey. Additionally, analysis of archived 3-year outdoor mesocosm samples served to determine chemical fates in SS-amended soil. Nonylphenol (NP) was the most abundant analyte (534±192 mg/kg) in SS composites, followed by its mono- and di-ethoxylates (62.1±28 and 59.5±52 mg/kg, respectively). The mean annual load of NP and its ethoxylates in SS was estimated at 2408–7149 metric tonnes, of which 1204–4289 is applied on U.S. land. NP compounds showed observable loss from SS/soil mixtures (1:2), with mean half-lives ranging from 301 to 495 days. Surfactant levels in U.S. SS ten-times in excess of European regulations, substantial releases to U.S. soils, and prolonged half-lives found under field conditions, all argue for the U.S. to follow Europe's move from 20 years ago to regulate these chemicals. PMID:23274446

  12. National inventory of alkylphenol ethoxylate compounds in U.S. sewage sludges and chemical fate in outdoor soil mesocosms.

    PubMed

    Venkatesan, Arjun K; Halden, Rolf U

    2013-03-01

    We determined the first nationwide inventories of alkylphenol surfactants in U.S. sewage sludges (SS) using samples from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's 2001 national SS survey. Additionally, analysis of archived 3-year outdoor mesocosm samples served to determine chemical fates in SS-amended soil. Nonylphenol (NP) was the most abundant analyte (534 ± 192 mg/kg) in SS composites, followed by its mono- and di-ethoxylates (62.1 ± 28 and 59.5 ± 52 mg/kg, respectively). The mean annual load of NP and its ethoxylates in SS was estimated at 2408-7149 metric tonnes, of which 1204-4289 is applied on U.S. land. NP compounds showed observable loss from SS/soil mixtures (1:2), with mean half-lives ranging from 301 to 495 days. Surfactant levels in U.S. SS ten-times in excess of European regulations, substantial releases to U.S. soils, and prolonged half-lives found under field conditions, all argue for the U.S. to follow Europe's move from 20 years ago to regulate these chemicals. PMID:23274446

  13. Chemical Stabilization of Soil Organic Nitrogen by Phenolic Lignin Compounds in Anaerobic Agrosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olk, D. C.

    2004-12-01

    In tropical Asia, continuous cropping of paddy rice promotes the covalent binding of soil organic nitrogen (N) by phenolic lignin residues, which in turns appears to contribute to substantial long-term declines in availability of soil organic N and in grain yield. A newly developed technique of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy that selects for carbon atoms bound to N was applied to a young humic fraction to directly observe an agronomically significant greater quantity of organic N (difference of 55 kg per hectare) that was bound by lignin residues in a triple-cropped rice soil compared to a nearby aerated soil. The resulting compound was an anilide. Crop residues are the parent material of soil organic matter in agricultural soils, and their anaerobic decomposition was found to slow microbially driven mineralization of both soil organic N and soil phenols during the rice season, compared to aerobic decomposition. Through use of 15N-labeled fertilizer, stabilization of soil organic N was shown to be more extensive than binding of inorganic fertilizer N. Similar results were gained in eastern Arkansas when comparing a more anaerobic continuous rice rotation to the conventional rice-soybean rotation. Future studies of covalently bound N will consider both its seasonal dynamics and its significance to long-term yield trends. Agronomic observations suggest that covalent binding of nutrients by lignin residues might also occur in other agrosystems with anaerobic decomposition of crop residues, including paddy taro in Hawaii and to a lesser extent no-tilled crops in regions with cool, wet springtime weather.

  14. The relationship between mutagenicity and chemical composition of polycyclic aromatic compounds from coal pyrolysis.

    PubMed Central

    Wornat, M J; Braun, A G; Hawiger, A; Longwell, J P; Sarofim, A F

    1990-01-01

    The polycyclic aromatic compounds (PAC) produced from the pyrolysis of a bituminous coal at temperatures of 1125 to 1425 degrees K prove to be mutagenic to S. typhimurium, both in the presence and in the absence of postmitochondrial supernatant (PMS) prepared from Aroclor 1254-induced rat liver. Mutagenicity of the PAC samples measured in the absence of PMS exhibits little dependence on pyrolysis temperature; that measured in its presence is higher at the higher pyrolysis temperatures. However, because of the decrease in PAC yield as the temperature is raised, mutagenicity per mass of coal consumed falls with an increase in temperature if measured without PMS (-PMS) and peaks at an intermediate temperature of 1378 degrees K if measured with PMS (+PMS). Using a new chromatographic technique, we have split each coal-derived PAC sample into two fractions: LC1, containing PAC with alkyl and O-containing substitutions and LC2, consisting of unsubstituted PAC. Substituted (LC1) fractions show no significant +PMS mutagenicity, indicating that, as a whole, the alkylated PAC in our coal pyrolysis products are not mutagenic. Only at the higher temperatures do the substituted fractions exhibit significant -PMS mutagenicity, attributed to PAC with carbonyl or etheric functionalities. The extremely low yields of the substituted PAC under the conditions where they show some activity, however, ensure that they contribute little to overall mutagenicity. In contrast to the substituted fractions, the unsubstituted (LC2) fractions display significant mutagenicity under all conditions and appear to be responsible for virtually all of the mutagenicity in these coal-derived PAC samples. In this fraction, -PMS activity is attributed to nitrogen-containing heterocyclic aromatics. PMID:2190813

  15. Data Analysis of Multi-Laser Standoff Spectral identification of chemical and biological compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Farahi, R H [ORNL; Zaharov, Viktor [ORNL; Tetard, Laurene [ORNL; Thundat, Thomas George [ORNL; Passian, Ali [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    With the availability of tunable broadband coherent sources that emit mid-infrared radiation with well-defined beam characteristics, spectroscopies that were traditionally not practical for standoff detection1 or for develop- ment of miniaturized infrared detectors2, 3 have renewed interest. While obtaining compositional information for objects from a distance remains a major challenge in chemical and biological sensing, recently we demonstrated that capitalizing on mid-infrared excitation of target molecules by using quantum cascade lasers and invoking a pump probe scheme can provide spectral fingerprints of substances from a variable standoff distance.3 However, the standoff data is typically associated with random fluctuations that can corrupt the fine spectral features and useful data. To process the data from standoff experiments toward better recognition we consider and apply two types of denoising techniques, namely, spectral analysis and Karhunen-Loeve Transform (KLT). Using these techniques, infrared spectral data have been effectively improved. The result of the analysis illustrates that KLT can be adapted as a powerful data denoising tool for the presented pump-probe infrared standoff spectroscopy.

  16. Organic Chemistry Jasperse Acid-Base Practice Problems A. Identify each chemical as either an "acid" or a "base" in the following reactions, and

    E-print Network

    Jasperse, Craig P.

    Organic Chemistry Jasperse Acid-Base Practice Problems A. Identify each chemical as either an "acid" or a "base" in the following reactions, and identify "conjugate" relationships. -You should have one acid the More Acidic for Each of the Following Pairs: Single Variable Problems 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. O O O OH

  17. Organic Chemistry Jasperse Acid-Base Practice Problems A. Identify each chemical as either an "acid" or a "base" in the following reactions, and

    E-print Network

    Jasperse, Craig P.

    Organic Chemistry Jasperse Acid-Base Practice Problems A. Identify each chemical as either an "acid" or a "base" in the following reactions, and identify "conjugate" relationships. -You should have one acid?) 27. 28. G. For the following acid-base reaction, a. put a box around the weakest base in the reaction

  18. Measurements of Oxidized Organic Compounds during SOAS 2013 using nitrate ion chemical ionization coupled with High Resolution Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massoli, P.; Stark, H.; Cnagaratna, M.; Junninen, H.; Hakala, J. P.; Mauldin, R.; Ehn, M.; Sipila, M.; Krechmer, J.; Kimmel, J.; Jimenez, J. L.; Jayne, J. T.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2013-12-01

    We present ambient measurements of gaseous organic compounds by means of a High Resolution Time-of-Flight Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry (HR-ToF-CIMS) using nitrate ion (NO3-) chemistry. This technique allows to selectively detect oxidized gas-phase species, e.g., oxidized organic molecules and sulfuric acid via clustering with NO3- and its high order clusters. The capability of making such measurements is important because both sulfuric acid and organic gas molecules have a recognized key role in new particle formation (NPF) processes and likely have an important role in particulate phase chemistry and formation of secondary organic aerosols (SOA). The HR-ToF-CIMS was deployed during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) at the forest supersite in Centreville, AL, from June 1 to July 15, 2013. The main goal of the SOAS campaign was to investigate the composition and sources of SOA in the Southeast US, where emissions are mainly represented by biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC) emissions and in less extent by anthropogenic emissions (AVOC). During SOAS, the HR-ToF-CIMS detected a range of organic ions that based on previous literature could be identified as oxidation products of both isoprene and terpenes. The isoprene products were 5 to 10 times more abundant than the terpene products. The isoprene-related molecules showed a diurnal cycle with a day time peak, typically after 1500 local time, while the terpene products were higher at night (between 2000 and 0600 local time). These results are consistent with the diurnal trends of primary BVOC emissions from other co-located instruments. The ambient data are also compared to laboratory measurements where oxidized organic vapors are produced using a Potential Aerosol Mass (PAM) flow reactor by the OH oxidation of biogenic gas-phase precursors (isoprene, a-pinene) over multiple days of equivalent atmospheric exposure.

  19. Magnesium compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2003-01-01

    Seawater and natural brines accounted for about 60 percent of U.S. magnesium compounds production during 2002. Dead-burned and caustic-calcined magnesias were recovered from seawater by Premier Chemicals in Florida. They were also recovered from well brines in Michigan by Dow Chemical, Martin Marietta Magnesia Specialties and Rohm & Haas. And they were recovered from magnesite in Nevada by Premier Chemicals.

  20. Novel compound heterozygous mutations in the MYO15A gene in autosomal recessive hearing loss identified by whole-exome sequencing

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Inherited genetic defects play an important role in congenital hearing loss, contributing to about 60% of deafness occurring in infants. Hereditary nonsyndromic hearing loss is highly heterogeneous, and most patients with a presumed genetic etiology lack a specific molecular diagnosis. Methods By whole exome sequencing, we identified responsible gene of family 4794 with autosomal recessively nonsyndromic hearing loss (ARNSHL). We also used DNA from 56 Chinese familial patients with ARNSHL (autosomal recessive nonsyndromic hearing loss) and 108 ethnicity-matched negative samples to perform extended variants analysis. Results We identified MYO15A c.IVS25?+?3G?>?A and c.8375 T?>?C (p.V2792A) as the disease-causing mutations. Both mutations co-segregated with hearing loss in family 4794, but were absent in the 56 index patients and 108 ethnicity-matched controls. Conclusions Our results demonstrated that the hearing loss of family 4794 was caused by novel compound heterozygous mutations in MYO15A. PMID:24206587

  1. Photocatalytic and chemical oxidation of organic compounds in supercritical carbon dioxide. Progress report for FY97

    SciTech Connect

    Blake, D.M.; Bryant, D.L.; Reinsch, V.

    1997-09-30

    'The background for the project is briefly reviewed and the work done during the nine months since funding was received is documented. Work began in January, 1997. A post doctoral fellow joined the team in April. The major activities completed this fiscal year were: staffing the project, design of the experimental system, procurement of components, assembly of the system. preparation of the Safe Operating Procedure and ES and H compliance, pressure testing, establishing data collection and storage methodology, and catalyst preparation. Objective The objective of the project is to develop new chemistry for the removal of organic contaminants from supercritical carbon dioxide. This has application in processes used for continuous cleaning and extraction of parts and waste materials. A secondary objective is to increase the fundamental understanding of photocatalytic chemistry. Cleaning and extraction using supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO{sub 2}) can be applied to the solution of a wide range of environmental and pollution prevention problems in the DOE complex. Work is being done that explores scCO{sub 2} in applications ranging from cleaning contaminated soil to cleaning components constructed from plutonium. The rationale for use of scCO{sub 2} are based on the benign nature, availability and low cost, attractive solvent properties, and energy efficient separation of the extracted solute from the solvent by moderate temperature or pressure changes. To date, R and D has focussed on the methods and applications of the extraction steps of the process. Little has been done that addresses methods to polish the scCO{sub 2} for recycle in the cleaning or extraction operations. In many applications it will be desirable to reduce the level of contamination from that which would occur at steady state operation of a process. This proposal addresses chemistry to achieve that. This would be an alternative to removing a fraction of the contaminated scCO{sub 2} for disposal and using makeup scCO{sub 2}. A chemical polishing operation can reduce the release of CO{sub 2} from the process. It can also reduce the consumption of reagents that may be used in the process to enhance extraction and cleaning. A polishing operation will also reduce or avoid formation of an additional waste stream. Photocatalytic and other photochemical oxidation chemistry have not been investigated in scCO{sub 2}. The large base of information for these reactions in water, organic solvents, or air suggest that the chemistry will work in carbon dioxide. There are compelling reasons to believe that the properties of scCO{sub 2} should increase the performance of photocatalytic chemistry over that found in more conventional fluid phases.'

  2. jCompoundMapper: An open source Java library and command-line tool for chemical fingerprints

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The decomposition of a chemical graph is a convenient approach to encode information of the corresponding organic compound. While several commercial toolkits exist to encode molecules as so-called fingerprints, only a few open source implementations are available. The aim of this work is to introduce a library for exactly defined molecular decompositions, with a strong focus on the application of these features in machine learning and data mining. It provides several options such as search depth, distance cut-offs, atom- and pharmacophore typing. Furthermore, it provides the functionality to combine, to compare, or to export the fingerprints into several formats. Results We provide a Java 1.6 library for the decomposition of chemical graphs based on the open source Chemistry Development Kit toolkit. We reimplemented popular fingerprinting algorithms such as depth-first search fingerprints, extended connectivity fingerprints, autocorrelation fingerprints (e.g. CATS2D), radial fingerprints (e.g. Molprint2D), geometrical Molprint, atom pairs, and pharmacophore fingerprints. We also implemented custom fingerprints such as the all-shortest path fingerprint that only includes the subset of shortest paths from the full set of paths of the depth-first search fingerprint. As an application of jCompoundMapper, we provide a command-line executable binary. We measured the conversion speed and number of features for each encoding and described the composition of the features in detail. The quality of the encodings was tested using the default parametrizations in combination with a support vector machine on the Sutherland QSAR data sets. Additionally, we benchmarked the fingerprint encodings on the large-scale Ames toxicity benchmark using a large-scale linear support vector machine. The results were promising and could often compete with literature results. On the large Ames benchmark, for example, we obtained an AUC ROC performance of 0.87 with a reimplementation of the extended connectivity fingerprint. This result is comparable to the performance achieved by a non-linear support vector machine using state-of-the-art descriptors. On the Sutherland QSAR data set, the best fingerprint encodings showed a comparable or better performance on 5 of the 8 benchmarks when compared against the results of the best descriptors published in the paper of Sutherland et al. Conclusions jCompoundMapper is a library for chemical graph fingerprints with several tweaking possibilities and exporting options for open source data mining toolkits. The quality of the data mining results, the conversion speed, the LPGL software license, the command-line interface, and the exporters should be useful for many applications in cheminformatics like benchmarks against literature methods, comparison of data mining algorithms, similarity searching, and similarity-based data mining. PMID:21219648

  3. Advances in X-Ray Chemical Analysis, Japan, 41 (2010) ISSN 0911-7806 Analysis of Compound Ratios of Titanium Dioxides with

    E-print Network

    Jun, Kawai

    2010-01-01

    Advances in X-Ray Chemical Analysis, Japan, 41 (2010) ISSN 0911-7806 © X Analysis of Compound Ratios of Titanium Dioxides with Various Crystallite Sizes Using X-Ray Diffraction Broadenings Hiroya MIYAUCHI, Hiroshi KITAGAKI, Tomohiko NAKAMURA, Sadahiro NAKANISHI and Jun KAWAI #12;#12;41 75 X Adv. X

  4. Identification of adducts between an odoriferous volatile thiol and oxidized grape phenolic compounds: kinetic study of adduct formation under chemical and enzymatic oxidation conditions.

    PubMed

    Nikolantonaki, Maria; Jourdes, Michael; Shinoda, Kentaro; Teissedre, Pierre-Louis; Quideau, Stéphane; Darriet, Philippe

    2012-03-14

    HPLC-MS and (1)H, (13)C, and 2D NMR analyses were used to identify new addition products between 3-sulfanylhexan-1-ol (3SH) and o-quinones derived from (+)-catechin, (-)-epicatechin, and caftaric acid. The kinetics of formation of these adducts were monitored in a wine model solution and in a must-like medium by HPLC-UV-MS with the aim of understanding the chemical mechanism involved in reactions between volatile thiols and o-quinones. One o-quinone-caftaric acid/3SH adduct, three o-quinone-(+)-catechin/3SH adducts, and three o-quinone-(-)-epicatechin/3SH adducts were characterized. Caftaric acid was oxidized faster than (-)-epicatechin and (+)-catechin when these phenolic compounds were incubated in a one-component mixture with polyphenoloxidase (PPO) in the presence of 3SH. Consequently, o-quinone-caftaric acid formed adducts with 3SH more rapidly than o-quinone-(+)-catechin and o-quinone-(-)-epicatechin in the absence of other nucleophilic species. Furthermore, o-quinone-(-)-epicatechin reacted faster than o-quinone-(+)-catechin with 3SH. Sulfur dioxide decreased the yield of adduct formation to a significant extent. Under chemical oxidation conditions, the rates and yields of adduct formation were lower than those observed in the presence of PPO, and o-quinone-caftaric acid was slightly less reactive with 3SH, compared to oxidized flavan-3-ols. The identification of o-quinone-caftaric acid/3SH and o-quinone-(+)-catechin/3SH adducts in a must matrix suggests that the proposed reaction mechanism is responsible for 3SH loss in dry wines during their vinification and aging process. PMID:22324817

  5. TOXICOGENOMIC STUDY OF TRIAZOLE FUNGICIDES AND PERFLUOROALKYL ACIDS IN RAT LIVERS ACCURATELY CATEGORIZES CHEMICALS AND IDENTIFIES MECHANISMS OF TOXICITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Toxicogenomic analysis of five environmental chemicals was performed to investigate the ability of genomics to predict toxicity, categorize chemicals, and elucidate mechanisms of toxicity. Three triazole antifungals (myclobutanil, propiconazole, and triadimefon) and two perfluori...

  6. Impact of the chemical and physical stability of ketoprofen compounded in various pharmaceutical bases on its topical and transdermal delivery.

    PubMed

    Nornoo, Adwoa O; Wulz, Jordan; Yoon, Haena; Nan, Yu; Lese, Michele

    2014-11-28

    Abstract Increasing demands for individualized drug treatment has led to an increase in the practice of compounded medications. In this study, we determined the impact of the chemical and physical stability of ketoprofen (10%w/w) cream on its topical/transdermal delivery over a 6-month period. The shelf life of ketoprofen at 25?°C in the pharmaceutical bases LipoDerm and LipoBase (109.94 and 85.9 days) was significantly longer than that in Pluronic Lecithin Organogel (PLO; 44.81 days), justifying extending its beyond use date (BUD) from 30 (USP37/NF32) to at least 60 days in LipoDerm and LipoBase. All the creams evaluated exhibited shear-thinning flow behavior with moderate thixotropy, while the flow properties for LipoBase and PLO creams were altered at storage times greater than 90 days. The percentage of ketoprofen permeated through porcine ear skin was 13.7, 19.1 and 12.7% of the dose from LipoDerm, LipoBase and PLO, respectively and decreased 2- to 3-fold after 28 days of storage. Flux ranging from 85.3 to 446.7?µg/cm(2)/h and topical delivery, on the other hand, were not influenced by storage duration past 28 days. In conclusion, this study justifies extending the BUD of ketoprofen in LipoDerm and LipoBase to 60 days if used for topical delivery only. PMID:25431959

  7. Application of 31P NMR Spectroscopy and Chemical Derivatization for Metabolite Profiling of Lipophilic Compounds in Human Serum

    PubMed Central

    DeSilva, M. Aruni; Shanaiah, Narasimhamurthy; Gowda, G. A. Nagana; Rosa-Pérez, Kellymar; Hanson, Bryan A.; Raftery, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    New methods for obtaining metabolic fingerprints of biological samples with improved resolution and sensitivity are highly sought for early disease detection, studies of human health and pathophysiology, and for better understanding systems biology. Considering the complexity of biological samples, interest in biochemical class selection through the use of chemoselective probes for improved resolution and quantitation is increasing. Considering the role of lipids in the pathogenesis of a number of diseases, in this study fingerprinting of lipid metabolites was achieved by 31P labeling using the derivatizing agent 2-chloro-4,4,5,5-tetramethyldioxaphospholane. Lipids containing hydroxyl, aldehyde and carboxyl groups were selectively tagged with 31P and then detected with good resolution using 31P NMR by exploiting the 100% natural abundance and wide chemical shift range of 31P. After standardizing the reaction conditions using representative compounds, the derivatization approach was used to profile lipids in human serum. The results show that the 31P derivatization approach is simple, reproducible and highly quantitative, and has the potential to profile a number of important lipids in complex biological samples. PMID:19610016

  8. Identification of responsible volatile chemicals that induce hypersensitive reactions to multiple chemical sensitivity patients

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Naohide Shinohara; Atsushi Mizukoshi; Yukio Yanagisawa

    2004-01-01

    Multiple chemical sensitivity (MCS) has become a serious problem as a result of airtight techniques in modern construction. The mechanism of the MCS, however, has not been clarified. Responsible chemicals and their exposure levels for patient's hypersensitive reactions need to be identified. We measured the exposure of 15 MCS patients to both carbonyl compounds and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that

  9. An array of Escherichia coli clones over-expressing essential proteins: A new strategy of identifying cellular targets of potent antibacterial compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, H. Howard [Department of Biological Sciences, California State University, Los Angeles, CA 90032 (United States)]. E-mail: hxu3@calstatela.edu; Real, Lilian [Department of Biological Sciences, California State University, Los Angeles, CA 90032 (United States); Bailey, Melissa Wu [Department of Biological Sciences, California State University, Los Angeles, CA 90032 (United States)

    2006-11-03

    With the advancement of high throughput screening, it has become easier and faster to discover hit compounds that inhibit proliferation of bacterial cells. However, development in technologies used to identify cellular targets of potent antibacterial inhibitors has lagged behind. Here, we describe a novel strategy of target identification for antibacterial inhibitors using an array of Escherichia coli clones each over-expressing one essential protein. In a proof-of-concept study, eight essential genes were cloned into pLex5BA vector under the control of an inducible promoter. Over-expression of target proteins was confirmed. For two clones, one over-expressing FabI and the other over-expressing MurA enzymes, the host cells became 17- and 139-fold more resistant to the specific inhibitors triclosan and phosphomycin, respectively, while the susceptibility of other clones towards these inhibitors remained unchanged after induction of gene expression. Target identification via target protein over-expression was demonstrated using both mixed clone and individual clone assay formats.

  10. Targeted next-generation sequencing identifies novel compound heterozygous mutations of DYNC2H1 in a fetus with short rib-polydactyly syndrome, type III.

    PubMed

    Mei, Libin; Huang, Yanru; Pan, Qian; Su, Wei; Quan, Yi; Liang, Desheng; Wu, Lingqian

    2015-07-20

    A 26-year-old woman with a past history of fetal skeletal dysplasia was referred to our institution at 24weeks of gestation following a routine sonographic diagnosis of short limbs in the fetus. A fetal ultrasound showed short limbs, a narrow thorax, short ribs with marginal spurs, and polydactyly. Conventional cytogenetics analysis of cultured amniocytes demonstrated that the fetal karyotype was normal. Using targeted exome sequencing of 226 known genes implicated in inherited skeletal dysplasia, we identified compound heterozygous mutations in the DYNC2H1 gene in the fetus with short rib-polydactyly syndrome, type III (SRPS III), c.1151 C>T(p.Ala384Val) and c.4351 C>T (p.Gln1451*), which were inherited from paternally and maternally, respectively. These variants were further confirmed using Sanger sequencing and have not been previously reported. To our knowledge, this is the first report of DYNC2H1 mutations causing SRPS III, in the Chinese population. Our findings expand the number of reported cases of this rare disease, and indicate that targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) is an accurate, rapid, and cost-effective method in the genetic diagnosis of fetal skeletal dysplasia. PMID:25982780

  11. The TSCA Interagency Testing Committee (ITC) proposed strategy for identifying and coordinating U.S. government data needs for endocrine-disrupting chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, J.D. [ITC, Washington, DC (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The ITC`s Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals Subcommittee will implement a proposed strategy for identifying and coordinating the US government ecological and health effects data needs for endocrine-disrupting chemicals, These include chemicals with potential to cause reproductive, developmental, immunological, neurologic or other biological effects by adversely affecting endocrine tissues, hormones or receptors in fish, wildlife or humans. To meet these needs, the Subcommittee will consider three options. First, the information collecting authority of the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) will be considered as a cost-effective mechanism to rapidly (within 60 days) obtain unpublished health and ecological effects studies related to reproductive effects and endocrine-disrupting activity. Second, the chemical testing authority of TSCA will be considered as a method to request that the manufacturers of endocrine-disrupting chemicals conduct tests that are amenable to standardization. Third, consideration will be given to coordinating standardized testing with testing related to research and to using the results of this research to develop standardized methods for assessing the effects of endocrine-disrupting chemicals. The Subcommittee will focus on 16 alkylphenol and alkylphenol ethoxylates with 1989 production or importation volumes greater than 1 million pounds that were identified using the Substructure based Computerized Chemical Selection Expert System (SuCCSES). The ITC`s proposed strategy will be discussed.

  12. Reactive Transport Modeling of Chemical and Isotope Data to Identify Degradation Processes of Chlorinated Ethenes in a Diffusion-Dominated Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chambon, J. C.; Damgaard, I.; Jeannottat, S.; Hunkeler, D.; Broholm, M. M.; Binning, P. J.; Bjerg, P. L.

    2012-12-01

    Chlorinated ethenes are among the most widespread contaminants in the subsurface and a major threat to groundwater quality at numerous contaminated sites. Many of these contaminated sites are found in low-permeability media, such as clay tills, where contaminant transport is controlled by diffusion. Degradation and transport processes of chlorinated ethenes are not well understood in such geological settings, therefore risk assessment and remediation at these sites are particularly challenging. In this work, a combined approach of chemical and isotope analysis on core samples, and reactive transport modeling has been used to identify the degradation processes occurring at the core scale. The field data was from a site located at Vadsby, Denmark, where chlorinated solvents were spilled during the 1960-70's, resulting in contamination of the clay till and the underlying sandy layer (15 meters below surface). The clay till is heavily contaminated between 4 and 15 mbs, both with the mother compounds PCE/TCE and TCA and the daughter products (DCE, VC, ethene, DCA), indicating the occurrence of natural dechlorination of both PCE/TCE and TCA. Intact core samples of length 0.5m were collected from the source zone (between 6 and 12 mbs). Concentrations and stable isotope ratios of the mother compounds and their daughter products, as well as redox parameters, fatty acids and microbial data, were analyzed with discrete sub-sampling along the cores. More samples (each 5 mm) were collected around the observed higher permeability zones such as sand lenses, sand stringers and fractures, where a higher degradation activity was expected. This study made use of a reactive transport model to investigate the appropriateness of several conceptual models. The conceptual models considered the location of dechlorination and degradation pathways (biotic reductive dechlorination or abiotic ?-elimination with iron minerals) in three core profiles. The model includes diffusion in the matrix, sequential reductive dechlorination, abiotic degradation, isotope fractionation due to degradation and due to diffusion in the clay matrix, as heavier isotopes are expected to diffuse slower than lighter ones. The isotope data are shown to be crucial to distinguish between the tested conceptual models for transport and degradation, and made it possible to select a unique conceptual model for each core profile. This study reveals that biotic and abiotic degradation occurred concurrently in several zones inside the clay matrix, and that abiotic degradation of cis-DCE was the dominant attenuation process in the cores. Furthermore reductive dechlorination of cis-DCE to VC, and further to ethene, was documented in several zones in the low-permeability media. Previous studies have shown that degradation might be limited to high permeability zones in clay tills, thus limiting the applicability of remediation strategies based on enhanced biodegradation. Therefore the occurrence of degradation inside the clay matrix is an important finding, that is further supported by microbial and chemical data. Improved understanding of degradation processes in clay tills is useful for improving the reliability of risk assessment and the design of remediation schemes for chlorinated solvents.

  13. Modeling explicit tropospheric oxidation through identifying volatile organic compound (VOC) sources, their impact on air quality and their signatures in South China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Hairong

    Photochemical smog, characterized by high concentrations of ozone (O 3) and fine particles, is of great concern in the urban areas like the Pearl River Delta (PRD). Ambient O3 and its precursors were simultaneously measured for the first time at a site within the inland PRD region (WQS) and a site in Hong Kong (TC) from 22 October to 01 December 2007, in order to improve our understanding of the interplay of O3 pollution between Hong Kong and the inland PRD region, to explore the relationships between O3 and its precursors, and to identify the key volatile organic compound (VOC) species and emission source categories contributing to the O3 formation. Ratio analyses for trace gases and VOCs and back trajectory calculation revealed that the air masses arriving at WQS were more aged due to regional influence, whereas the air masses at TC were mainly affected by local emissions and/or regional transport. An observation-Based Model (OBM) was employed to determine the O 3-precursor relationship. At both sites, O3 production was found to be VOC-limited. Anthropogenic hydrocarbons played a key role in O 3 production, while reducing NO emissions aided the build up of O 3 concentrations. The contribution of carbonyls to O3 formation was firstly input in the OBM by using measured data, the results showed that the net O3 production derived from the OBM agreed better with the observed O3 increment after hourly carbonyl concentrations were included. A photochemical trajectory model was developed and used for the first time to simulate the formation of photochemical pollutants at WQS, Guangzhou during photochemical pollution episodes between 12 and 17 November, 2007. Calculated photochemical ozone creation potential (POCP) indices indicated that alkanes and oxygenated organic compounds had relatively low reactivity, while alkenes and aromatics presented high reactivity. Analysis of the emission inventory found that the sum of 60 of the 139 VOC species accounted for 91% of the total POCP-weighted emission. The findings obtained in this study would advance our knowledge of air quality in the PRD region, and provide useful information to local government on effective control of photochemical smog in the region.

  14. Preliminary use of compound-specific stable isotope (CSSI) technique to identify and apportion sediment origin in a small Austrian catchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mabit, Lionel; Gibbs, Max; Chen, Xu; Meusburger, Katrin; Toloza, Arsenio; Resch, Christian; Klik, Andreas; Eder, Alexander; Strauss, Peter; Alewell, Christine

    2015-04-01

    The overall impacts of climate change on agriculture are expected to be negative, threatening global food security. In the agricultural areas of the European Union, water erosion risk is expected to increase by about 80% by the year 2050. Reducing soil erosion and sedimentation-related environmental problems represent a key requirement for mitigating the impact of climate change. A new forensic stable isotope technique, using the compound specific stable isotope (CSSI) signatures of inherent soil organic biomarkers, can discriminate and apportion the source soil contribution from different land uses. Plant communities label the soil where they grow by exuding organic biomarkers. Although all plants produce the same biomarkers, the stable isotopic signature of those biomarkers is different for each plant species. For agri-environmental investigation, the CSSI technique is based on the measurement of carbon-13 (13-C) natural abundance signatures of specific organic compounds such as natural fatty acids (FAs) in the soil. By linking fingerprints of land use to the sediment in deposition zones, this approach has been shown to be a useful technique for determining the source of eroded soil and thereby identifying areas prone to soil degradation. The authors have tested this innovative stable isotopic approach in a small Austrian agricultural catchment located 60 km north of Vienna. A previous fallout radionuclide (i.e. 137-Cs) based investigation established a sedimentation rate of 4 mm/yr in the lowest part of the study site. To gain knowledge about the origin of these sediments, the CSSI technique was then tested using representative samples from the different land-uses of the catchment as source material. Values of 13-C signatures of specific FAs (i.e. C22:0 = Behenic Acid ; C24:0 = Lignoceric Acid) and the bulk 13-C of the sediment mixture and potential landscape sources were analyzed with the mixing models IsoSource and CSSIAR v1.00. Using both mixing models, preliminary results highlighted that about 50-55% of the sediment located in the deposition area originated from the main grassed waterway of the catchment.

  15. Fast gas chromatography negative chemical ionization tandem mass spectrometry of explosive compounds using dynamic collision-induced dissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collin, Olivier L.; Zimmermann, Carolyn M.; Jackson, Glen P.

    2009-01-01

    The analysis of nine explosive compounds by gas chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS) using negative chemical ionization (NCI) was performed under two different conditions: first, a conventional GC separation coupled with a standard ion dissociation method in a quadrupole ion trap (QIT) was performed in segmented selected reaction monitoring mode; second, a fast GC separation on a microbore capillary column was combined with a faster method of collisional activation in ion traps wherein fragmentation is deliberately accomplished during the mass acquisition scan. The conventional GC-MS/MS method provided separation times in 10 min with detection limits between 0.8 and 280 pg on column. The fast GC method with dynamic collision-induced dissociation (DCID) offered a confirmatory method for the analysis of high explosives with separation times under 2.5 min and detection limits between 0.5 and 5 pg on column, without any hardware modifications to the instrument. The implementation of DCID in combination with three-times-faster mass scanning allows the acquisition of tandem mass spectra to at least 5 Hz (while averaging three scans per spectrum). Although detection limits for GC-NCI-MS/MS using conventional CID or DCID are not quite on par with LODs achieved by GC-ECD, the combination of NCI with DCID tandem MS leads to detection limits at least comparable, if not superior, to other mass spectrometric methods. Selected reaction monitoring in the negative ionization mode is anticipated to offer the most selective approach to detecting explosives and eliminating potential interferences, which could ultimately lead to the best detection limits for real, contaminated samples.

  16. Determination of nitrated phenolic compounds in rain by liquid chromatography/atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kohler, Martin; Heeb, Norbert V

    2003-07-01

    A sensitive, specific, and rapid analytical method based on liquid-liquid extraction and liquid chromatography/atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry has been developed for trace analysis of nitrated phenolic compounds in rain samples. Selective detection in the low nanogram-per-milliliter range was achieved on the basis of selected ion monitoring of the respective phenolate anions [M - H]-. The presence of alkylated (C1-C3) and nonalkylated nitrophenols (C0) was confirmed by their characteristic neutral loss of nitrogen dioxide upon collision-induced dissociation in tandem mass spectrometry mode. In individual rain samples, 27 C0-C3-nitrophenol isomers as well as 16 C0-C3-dinitrophenol isomers were detected. Total levels of nitro- and dinitrophenol isomers were estimated on the basis of 2-nitrophenol and 2,6-dinitrophenol. Concentrations between 0.66 and 2.0, 12-29, 12-36, and 5.5-12 microg/L were obtained for the C0-, C1-, C2-, and C3-nitrophenols, respectively. Lower levels of 0.19-1.4, 0.39-2.1, 0.053-0.55, and 0.081-0.10 microg/L were estimated for the corresponding C0-, C1-, C2-, and C3-dinitrophenols. The highest number of individual isomers was found in winter rain samples, and distinctive isomeric patterns were observed for individual samples. Mono- and dialkylated nitrophenols and non- and monoalkylated dinitrophenols represent the major part of nitro- and dinitrophenol species. Comparing the pattern of Co-, C1-, and C2-nitrophenols in rain with the corresponding Co-, C1-, and C2-benzene pattern in ambient air suggests that atmospheric oxidation and nitration processes of alkylbenzenes are favored, as compared to those of benzene. PMID:12964759

  17. A comparison of the chemical properties of drugs and FEMA\\/FDA notified GRAS chemical compounds used in the food industry

    Microsoft Academic Search

    D. G. Sprous; F. R. Salemme

    2007-01-01

    The range of molecular properties of generally recognized as safe (GRAS) compounds that are typically used in food and beverage products is compared to marketed drugs. It is observed that GRAS compounds differ from marketed drugs with respect to several molecular descriptors, including molecular weight, H-bond acceptor count, H-bond donor count, aromatic ring count, basic group count, acidic group count,

  18. 40 CFR 721.9597 - Salt of a substituted sulfonated aryl azo compound (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Salt of a substituted sulfonated aryl azo compound...Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9597 Salt of a substituted sulfonated aryl azo compound...chemical substance identified generically as salt of a substituted sulfonated aryl...

  19. 40 CFR 721.9597 - Salt of a substituted sulfonated aryl azo compound (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Salt of a substituted sulfonated aryl azo compound...Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9597 Salt of a substituted sulfonated aryl azo compound...chemical substance identified generically as salt of a substituted sulfonated aryl...

  20. 40 CFR 721.9597 - Salt of a substituted sulfonated aryl azo compound (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Salt of a substituted sulfonated aryl azo compound...Specific Chemical Substances § 721.9597 Salt of a substituted sulfonated aryl azo compound...chemical substance identified generically as salt of a substituted sulfonated aryl...

  1. 40 CFR 721.3320 - Ethanol, 2-amino-, com-pound with N-hydroxy-N-nitro-soben-zena-mine (1:1).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Ethanol, 2-amino-, com-pound with N-hydroxy-N-nitro-soben-zena-mine...Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3320 Ethanol, 2-amino-, com-pound with N -hydroxy-N...The chemical substance identified as ethanol, 2-amino-, compound with N...

  2. 40 CFR 721.3320 - Ethanol, 2-amino-, com-pound with N-hydroxy-N-nitro-soben-zena-mine (1:1).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Ethanol, 2-amino-, com-pound with N-hydroxy-N-nitro-soben-zena-mine...Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3320 Ethanol, 2-amino-, com-pound with N -hydroxy-N...The chemical substance identified as ethanol, 2-amino-, compound with N...

  3. 40 CFR 721.3320 - Ethanol, 2-amino-, com-pound with N-hydroxy-N-nitro-soben-zena-mine (1:1).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ethanol, 2-amino-, com-pound with N-hydroxy-N-nitro-soben-zena-mine...Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3320 Ethanol, 2-amino-, com-pound with N -hydroxy-N...The chemical substance identified as ethanol, 2-amino-, compound with N...

  4. 40 CFR 721.3320 - Ethanol, 2-amino-, com-pound with N-hydroxy-N-nitro-soben-zena-mine (1:1).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Ethanol, 2-amino-, com-pound with N-hydroxy-N-nitro-soben-zena-mine...Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3320 Ethanol, 2-amino-, com-pound with N -hydroxy-N...The chemical substance identified as ethanol, 2-amino-, compound with N...

  5. 40 CFR 721.3320 - Ethanol, 2-amino-, com-pound with N-hydroxy-N-nitro-soben-zena-mine (1:1).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Ethanol, 2-amino-, com-pound with N-hydroxy-N-nitro-soben-zena-mine...Specific Chemical Substances § 721.3320 Ethanol, 2-amino-, com-pound with N -hydroxy-N...The chemical substance identified as ethanol, 2-amino-, compound with N...

  6. NMR fingerprints of the drug-like natural-product space identify iotrochotazine A: a chemical probe to study Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Grkovic, Tanja; Pouwer, Rebecca H; Vial, Marie-Laure; Gambini, Luca; Noël, Alba; Hooper, John N A; Wood, Stephen A; Mellick, George D; Quinn, Ronald J

    2014-06-10

    The NMR spectrum of a mixture of small molecules is a fingerprint of all of its components. Herein, we present an NMR fingerprint method that takes advantage of the fact that fractions contain simplified NMR profiles, with minimal signal overlap, to allow the identification of unique spectral patterns. The approach is exemplified in the identification of a novel natural product, iotrochotazine?A (1), sourced from an Australian marine sponge Iotrochota?sp. Compound 1 was used as a chemical probe in a phenotypic assay panel based on human olfactory neurosphere-derived cells (hONS) from idiopathic Parkinson's disease patients. Compound 1 at 1??M was not cytotoxic but specifically affected the morphology and cellular distribution of lysosomes and early endosomes. PMID:24737726

  7. NMR Fingerprints of the Drug-like Natural-Product Space Identify Iotrochotazine A: A Chemical Probe to Study Parkinson’s Disease**

    PubMed Central

    Grkovic, Tanja; Pouwer, Rebecca H; Vial, Marie-Laure; Gambini, Luca; Noël, Alba; Hooper, John N A; Wood, Stephen A; Mellick, George D; Quinn, Ronald J

    2014-01-01

    The NMR spectrum of a mixture of small molecules is a fingerprint of all of its components. Herein, we present an NMR fingerprint method that takes advantage of the fact that fractions contain simplified NMR profiles, with minimal signal overlap, to allow the identification of unique spectral patterns. The approach is exemplified in the identification of a novel natural product, iotrochotazine A (1), sourced from an Australian marine sponge Iotrochota sp. Compound 1 was used as a chemical probe in a phenotypic assay panel based on human olfactory neurosphere-derived cells (hONS) from idiopathic Parkinson’s disease patients. Compound 1 at 1 ?m was not cytotoxic but specifically affected the morphology and cellular distribution of lysosomes and early endosomes. PMID:24737726

  8. Adverse Outcome Pathway for Embryonic Vascular Disruption and Alternative Methods to Identify Chemical Vascular Disruptors During Development

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemically induced vascular toxicity during embryonic development can result in a wide range of adverse prenatal outcomes. We used information from genetic mouse models linked to phenotypic outcomes and a vascular toxicity knowledge base to construct an embryonic vascular disrupt...

  9. Effect of exposure to volatile organic compounds on plasma levels of neuropeptides, nerve growth factor and histamine in patients with self-reported multiple chemical sensitivity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hajime Kimata

    2004-01-01

    Plasma levels of substance P, vasoactive intestinal peptide and nerve growth factor, but not histamine, were elevated in patients with self-reported multiple chemical sensitivity (sMCS). Exposure to volatile organic compounds (VOC) increased plasma levels of all parameters in these patients, while it had no effect in normal subjects or patients with atopic eczema\\/dermatitis syndrome (AEDS). Exposure to VOC also enhanced

  10. The chemical bonds in MeSb2O4 (Me = Mn, Ni, Fe, Zn) isomorphous compounds: Thermal expansion, force constants, energies

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. R. Gavarri; R. Chater; J. Ziólkowski

    1988-01-01

    The various chemical bonds (Me-O, Sb-O) in the MeSb2O4 isomorphous compounds (Me = Mn, Ni, Fe, Zn) are characterized by four quantities: the interatomic distance (rij), the force constant (fij), the thermal expansion (alphaij = 1\\/r dr\\/dT), the bond energy. Using structural evolution data (neutron diffraction) and Raman infrared spectroscopic studies at low temperature (5-300 K), it has been possible

  11. Effects of the external magnetic field and chemical combination on K ?\\/K ? X-ray intensity ratios of some nickel and cobalt compounds

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Porikli; Y. Kurucu

    2008-01-01

    A systematic study of X-ray intensity ratios of the K-series lines was made on compounds of nickel and cobalt to examine the influence of chemical state and 0.6 and 1.2T external magnetic fields on energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence analysis. The samples were excited by 22.69keV X-rays emitted from a Cd-109 radioisotope source and characteristic K X-rays emitted from the samples were

  12. Direct quantification of chemical warfare agents and related compounds at low ppt levels: comparing active capillary dielectric barrier discharge plasma ionization and secondary electrospray ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Jan-Christoph; Schaer, Martin; Siegenthaler, Peter; Zenobi, Renato

    2015-01-01

    A novel active capillary dielectric barrier discharge plasma ionization (DBDI) technique for mass spectrometry is applied to the direct detection of 13 chemical warfare related compounds, including sarin, and compared to secondary electrospray ionization (SESI) in terms of selectivity and sensitivity. The investigated compounds include an intact chemical warfare agent and structurally related molecules, hydrolysis products and/or precursors of highly toxic nerve agents (G-series, V-series, and "new" nerve agents), and blistering and incapacitating warfare agents. Well-defined analyte gas phase concentrations were generated by a pressure-assisted nanospray with consecutive thermal evaporation and dilution. Identification was achieved by selected reaction monitoring (SRM). The most abundant fragment ion intensity of each compound was used for quantification. For DBDI and SESI, absolute gas phase detection limits in the low ppt range (in MS/MS mode) were achieved for all compounds investigated. Although the sensitivity of both methods was comparable, the active capillary DBDI sensitivity was found to be dependent on the applied AC voltage, thus enabling direct tuning of the sensitivity and the in-source fragmentation, which may become a key feature in terms of field applicability. Our findings underline the applicability of DBDI and SESI for the direct, sensitive detection and quantification of several CWA types and their degradation products. Furthermore, they suggest the use of DBDI in combination with hand-held instruments for CWAs on-site monitoring. PMID:25427190

  13. Magnesium compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2001-01-01

    Seawater and natural brines accounted for about 63% of US magnesium compounds production during 2000. Premier Services in Florida, Dow Chemical in Michigan, Martin Marietta Magnesia Specialties, and Rohm & Haas recovered dead-burned and caustic-calcined magnesias from seawater. And Premier Services' recoveries, in Nevada, were from magnasite.

  14. CARBON-13 NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE. 13C CHEMICAL SHIFTS AND 13C-199HG COUPLING CONSTANTS FOR SOME ORGANOMERCURY COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The (13)C shieldings and (13)C-(199)Hg coupling constants of fourteen phenyl- and seven alkyl- and alkenyl-mercury compounds have been obtained. Substituent effects on the (13)C shieldings are similar to those in nonmercurated phenyl compounds, with a similar relationship between...

  15. Magnesium compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2002-01-01

    Seawater and natural brines accounted for about 60% of US magnesium compounds production in 2001. Dead-burned and caustic-calcined magnesias were recovered from seawater in Florida by Premier Chemicals. They were also recovered from Michigan well brines by Dow Chemical, Martin Marietta Magnesia Specialties and Rohm & Haas. And Premier Chemicals recovered dead-burned and caustic-calcined magnesias from magnesite in Nevada. Reilly Industries and Great Salt Lake Minerals recovered magnesium chloride brines from the Great Salt Lake in Utah.

  16. Magnesium compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2010-01-01

    Seawater and natural brines accounted for about 40 percent of U.S. magnesium compounds production in 2009. Dead-burned magnesia was produced by Martin Marietta Magnesia Specialties from well brines in Michigan. Caustic-calcined magnesia was recovered from seawater by Premier Chemicals in Florida, from well brines in Michigan by Martin Marietta and from magnesite in Nevada by Premier Chemicals. Intrepid Potash-Wendover, and Great Salt Lake Minerals Corp. recovered magnesium chloride brines from the Great Salt Lake in Utah. Magnesium hydroxide was produced from seawater by SPI Pharma in Delaware and Premier Chemicals in Florida, and by Martin Marietta from its operation mentioned above.

  17. 15 CFR 710.1 - Definitions of terms used in the Chemical Weapons Convention Regulations (CWCR).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...consisting of all compounds of carbon, except for its oxides, sulfides, and metal carbonates, identifiable by chemical name, by...produced in a chemical process but, because it is in a transition state in terms of thermodynamics and...

  18. 15 CFR 710.1 - Definitions of terms used in the Chemical Weapons Convention Regulations (CWCR).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...consisting of all compounds of carbon, except for its oxides, sulfides, and metal carbonates, identifiable by chemical name, by...produced in a chemical process but, because it is in a transition state in terms of thermodynamics and...

  19. 15 CFR 710.1 - Definitions of terms used in the Chemical Weapons Convention Regulations (CWCR).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...consisting of all compounds of carbon, except for its oxides, sulfides, and metal carbonates, identifiable by chemical name, by...produced in a chemical process but, because it is in a transition state in terms of thermodynamics and...

  20. 15 CFR 710.1 - Definitions of terms used in the Chemical Weapons Convention Regulations (CWCR).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...consisting of all compounds of carbon, except for its oxides, sulfides, and metal carbonates, identifiable by chemical name, by...produced in a chemical process but, because it is in a transition state in terms of thermodynamics and...

  1. Using novel fluorescent polymers as sensory materials for above-ground sensing of chemical signature compounds emanating from buried landmines

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Colin J. Cumming; Craig Aker; Mark Fisher; M. Fok; Marcus J. la Grone; Dennis Reust; Mark G. Rockley; Timothy M. Swager; Eric Towers; Vance Williams

    2001-01-01

    Chemical vapors originating from the explosive charge within landmines and unexploded ordnance (UXO) form a chemical “signature” unique to these devices. The fact that canines can detect this signature was a primary motivation for the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency's (DARPA) Dog's Nose Program. One goal of this program was to develop electronic chemical sensors that mimic the canine's ability

  2. Chemical synthesis of two series of nerve agent model compounds and their stereoselective interaction with human acetylcholinesterase and human butyrylcholinesterase

    PubMed Central

    Barakat, Nora H.; Zheng, Xueying; Gilley, Cynthia B.; MacDonald, Mary; Okolotowicz, Karl; Cashman, John R.; Vyas, Shubham; Beck, Jeremy M.; Hadad, Christopher M.; Zhang, Jun

    2009-01-01

    Both G- and V-type nerve agents possess a center of chirality about phosphorus. The Sp-enantiomers are generally more potent inhibitors than their Rp-counterparts toward acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE). To develop model compounds with defined centers of chirality that mimic the target nerve agent structures, we synthesized both the Sp and Rp stereoisomers of two series of G-type nerve agent model compounds in enantiomerically enriched form. The two series of model compounds contained identical substituents on the phosphorus as the G-type agents, except that thiomethyl (CH3-S-) and thiocholine ((CH3)3NCH2CH2-S-) groups were used to replace the traditional nerve agent leaving groups (i.e., fluoro for GB, GF, and GD; and cyano for GA). Inhibition kinetic studies of the thiomethyl- and thiocholine-substituted series of nerve agent model compounds revealed that the Sp enantiomers of both series of compounds showed greater inhibition potency toward AChE and BChE. The level of stereoselectivity, as indicated by the ratio of the bimolecular inhibition rate constants between Sp and Rp enantiomers, was greatest for the GF model compounds in both series. The thiocholine analogs were much more potent than the corresponding thiomethyl analogs. With the exception of the GA model compounds, both series showed greater potency against AChE than BChE. The stereoselectivity (i.e., Sp > Rp), enzyme selectivity, and dynamic range of inhibition potency contributed from these two series of compounds suggest that the combined application of these model compounds will provide useful research tools for understanding interactions of nerve agents with cholinesterase and other enzymes involved in nerve agent and organophosphate pharmacology. The potential of and limitations for using these model compounds in the development of biological therapeutics against nerve agent toxicity are also discussed. PMID:19715346

  3. Characteristic Chemical Components and Aroma-active Compounds of the Essential Oils from Ranunculus nipponicus var. submersus Used in Japanese Traditional Food.

    PubMed

    Nakaya, Satoshi; Usami, Atsushi; Yorimoto, Tomohito; Miyazawa, Mitsuo

    2015-06-01

    Ranunculus nipponicus var. submersus is an aquatic macrophyte; it is known as a wild edible plant in Japan for a long time. In this study, the essential oils from the fresh and dried aerial parts of R. nipponicus var. submersus were extracted by hydrodistillation and analyzed by gas chromatography (GC) and GC-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Moreover, important aroma-active compounds were also detected in the oil using GC-olfactometry (GC-O) and aroma extract dilution analysis (AEDA). Thus, 98 compounds (accounting for 93.86%) of the oil were identified. The major compounds in fresh plant oil were phytol (41.94%), heptadecane (5.92%), and geranyl propionate (5.76%), while those of. Dried plant oil were ?-ionone (23.54%), 2-hexenal (8.75%), and dihydrobovolide (4.81%). The fresh and dried oils had the green-floral and citrus-floral odor, respectively. The GC-O and AEDA results show that phenylacetaldehyde (green, floral odor, FD-factor = 8) and ?-ionone (violet-floral odor, FD-factor = 8) were the most characteristic odor compounds of the fresh oils. ?-Cyclocitral (citrus odor, FD-factor = 64) and ?-ionone (violet-floral odor, FD-factor = 64) were the most characteristic odor compounds of the dried oil. These compounds are thought to contribute to the flavor of R. nipponicus var. submersus. PMID:25891110

  4. Screen of FDA-approved drug library identifies maprotiline, an antibiofilm and antivirulence compound with QseC sensor-kinase dependent activity in Francisella novicida.

    PubMed

    Dean, Scott N; van Hoek, Monique L

    2015-07-01

    Development of new therapeutics against Select Agents such as Francisella is critical preparation in the event of bioterrorism. Testing FDA-approved drugs for this purpose may yield new activities unrelated to their intended purpose and may hasten the discovery of new therapeutics. A library of 420 FDA-approved drugs was screened for antibiofilm activity against a model organism for human tularemia, Francisella (F.) novicida, excluding drugs that significantly inhibited growth. The initial screen was based on the 2-component system (TCS) dependent biofilm effect, thus, the QseC dependence of maprotiline anti-biofilm action was demonstrated. By comparing their FDA-approved uses, chemical structures, and other properties of active drugs, toremifene and polycyclic antidepressants maprotiline and chlorpromazine were identified as being highly active against F. novicida biofilm formation. Further down-selection excluded toremifene for its membrane active activity and chlorpromazine for its high antimicrobial activity. The mode of action of maprotiline against F. novicida was sought. It was demonstrated that maprotiline was able to significantly down-regulate the expression of the virulence factor IglC, encoded on the Francisella Pathogenicity Island (FPI), suggesting that maprotiline is exerting an effect on bacterial virulence. Further studies showed that maprotiline significantly rescued F. novicida infected wax worm larvae. In vivo studies demonstrated that maprotiline treatment could prolong time to disease onset and survival in F. novicida infected mice. These results suggest that an FDA-approved drug such as maprotiline has the potential to combat Francisella infection as an antivirulence agent, and may have utility in combination with antibiotics. PMID:26155740

  5. A chemical genetic screen in Mycobacterium tuberculosis identifies carbon-source-dependent growth inhibitors devoid of in vivo efficacy

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kevin Pethe; Patricia C. Sequeira; Sanjay Agarwalla; Kyu Rhee; Kelli Kuhen; Wai Yee Phong; Viral Patel; David Beer; John R. Walker; Jeyaraj Duraiswamy; Jan Jiricek; Thomas H. Keller; Arnab Chatterjee; Mai Ping Tan; Manjunatha Ujjini; Srinivasa P. S. Rao; Luis Camacho; Pablo Bifani; Puiying A. Mak; Ida Ma; S. Whitney Barnes; Zhong Chen; David Plouffe; Pamela Thayalan; Seow Hwee Ng; Melvin Au; Boon Heng Lee; Bee Huat Tan; Sindhu Ravindran; Mahesh Nanjundappa; Xiuhua Lin; Anne Goh; Suresh B. Lakshminarayana; Carolyn Shoen; Michael Cynamon; Barry Kreiswirth; Veronique Dartois; Eric C. Peters; Richard Glynne; Sydney Brenner; Thomas Dick

    2010-01-01

    Candidate antibacterials are usually identified on the basis of their in vitro activity. However, the apparent inhibitory activity of new leads can be misleading because most culture media do not reproduce an environment relevant to infection in vivo. In this study, while screening for novel anti-tuberculars, we uncovered how carbon metabolism can affect antimicrobial activity. Novel pyrimidine-imidazoles (PIs) were identified

  6. 77 FR 41406 - Evaluation of In Vitro Tests for Identifying Eye Injury Hazard Potential of Chemicals and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-13

    ...HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Evaluation of In Vitro Tests for Identifying Eye Injury Hazard...to assess the validation status of in vitro tests and integrated non-animal testing...submission of data from substances tested in in vitro tests for identifying eye injury...

  7. CSI 3.0: a web server for identifying secondary and super-secondary structure in proteins using NMR chemical shifts

    PubMed Central

    Hafsa, Noor E.; Arndt, David; Wishart, David S.

    2015-01-01

    The Chemical Shift Index or CSI 3.0 (http://csi3.wishartlab.com) is a web server designed to accurately identify the location of secondary and super-secondary structures in protein chains using only nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) backbone chemical shifts and their corresponding protein sequence data. Unlike earlier versions of CSI, which only identified three types of secondary structure (helix, ?-strand and coil), CSI 3.0 now identifies total of 11 types of secondary and super-secondary structures, including helices, ?-strands, coil regions, five common ?-turns (type I, II, I?, II? and VIII), ? hairpins as well as interior and edge ?-strands. CSI 3.0 accepts experimental NMR chemical shift data in multiple formats (NMR Star 2.1, NMR Star 3.1 and SHIFTY) and generates colorful CSI plots (bar graphs) and secondary/super-secondary structure assignments. The output can be readily used as constraints for structure determination and refinement or the images may be used for presentations and publications. CSI 3.0 uses a pipeline of several well-tested, previously published programs to identify the secondary and super-secondary structures in protein chains. Comparisons with secondary and super-secondary structure assignments made via standard coordinate analysis programs such as DSSP, STRIDE and VADAR on high-resolution protein structures solved by X-ray and NMR show >90% agreement between those made with CSI 3.0. PMID:25979265

  8. CSI 3.0: a web server for identifying secondary and super-secondary structure in proteins using NMR chemical shifts.

    PubMed

    Hafsa, Noor E; Arndt, David; Wishart, David S

    2015-07-01

    The Chemical Shift Index or CSI 3.0 (http://csi3.wishartlab.com) is a web server designed to accurately identify the location of secondary and super-secondary structures in protein chains using only nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) backbone chemical shifts and their corresponding protein sequence data. Unlike earlier versions of CSI, which only identified three types of secondary structure (helix, ?-strand and coil), CSI 3.0 now identifies total of 11 types of secondary and super-secondary structures, including helices, ?-strands, coil regions, five common ?-turns (type I, II, I', II' and VIII), ? hairpins as well as interior and edge ?-strands. CSI 3.0 accepts experimental NMR chemical shift data in multiple formats (NMR Star 2.1, NMR Star 3.1 and SHIFTY) and generates colorful CSI plots (bar graphs) and secondary/super-secondary structure assignments. The output can be readily used as constraints for structure determination and refinement or the images may be used for presentations and publications. CSI 3.0 uses a pipeline of several well-tested, previously published programs to identify the secondary and super-secondary structures in protein chains. Comparisons with secondary and super-secondary structure assignments made via standard coordinate analysis programs such as DSSP, STRIDE and VADAR on high-resolution protein structures solved by X-ray and NMR show >90% agreement between those made with CSI 3.0. PMID:25979265

  9. Chemicals identified in feral and food animals: a data base. First annual report, October 1981. Volume I. Records 1-532

    SciTech Connect

    Cone, M.V.; Faust, R.A.; Baldauf, M.F. (comps.)

    1981-12-01

    This data file is a companion to Chemicals Identified in Human Biological Media, A Data Base, and follows basically the same format. The data base on human burden is in its third year of publication. This is the first annual report for the feral and food animal file. Data were obtained primarily from the open literature through manual searches (retrospective to 1979) of the journals listed in Appendix A. The data base now contains information on 60 different substances. Chemicals are listed by Chemical Abstracts Service (CAS) registry numbers and preferred names in Appendix B. For the user's convenience, cross-referenced chemical lists of CAS preferred and common names are provided in Appendix C. The animals, tissues, and body fluids found to be contaminated by these chemicals are listed in Appendix D. The data base is published annually in tabular format with indices and chemical listings that allow specific searching. A limited number of custom computer searches of the data base are available in special cases when the published format does not allow for retrieval of needed information.

  10. Computer simulation of structure and mobility of water hydrogen bonds net in aqueous solutions of some chemical compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsov, Pavel E.; Rogacheva, Svetlana M.; Popyhova, Era B.; Simonova, Zoya A.; Pylaev, Timophey E.

    2005-06-01

    Computer simulation of aqueous solutions of some biological active and inactive compounds has been carried out. Molecular dynamics method and TIP3P potential were used. The parameters of hydrogen bonds net were calculated by using the developed computer program. The simulation showed that relatively large clusters of water molecules appeared and the average number of hydrogen bonds decreased in the aqueous solutions of biological active compounds. It points to the fact that these compounds may induce the phase k-transition in the surrounding water. Molecular mechanisms ofthese effects are discussed.

  11. [Studies on chemical protectors against radiation. XXXIII. Protective mechanisms of various compounds against skin injury induced by radiation].

    PubMed

    Sato, Y; Kumazawa, N; Suzuki, M; Wang, C M; Ohta, S; Shinoda, M

    1991-01-01

    The radiation protective mechanisms on skin injury induced by soft X-irradiation were investigated by use of various radiation protective agents such as sulfur compounds (MEA, MEG, thiourea), nucleic acid constitutional compounds (adenosine, inosine), antioxidative compounds (sesamol, ferulic acid, ascorbic acid), crude drugs (Rosae Fructus, Anemarrhenae Rhizoma, Trapae Fructus, Forsythiae Fructus, Aloe arborescens). Scavenge action of activated oxygen, inhibitory effect of lipid peroxidation, induction of antioxidative protein and protective effect against damage of deoxyribonucleic acid and superoxide dismutase by X-irradiation were evaluated as the radiation protective mechanisms, and relationship between these results and protective effect of skin injury induced by radiation was studied. PMID:1905349

  12. Using Synchrotron-based X-ray Absorption Spectrometry to Identify the Arsenic Chemical Forms in Mine Waste Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matanitobua, Vitukawalu P.; Noller, Barry N.; Chiswell, Barry; Ng, Jack C.; Bruce, Scott L.; Huang, Daphne; Riley, Mark; Harris, Hugh H.

    2007-01-01

    X-ray Absorption Near Edge Spectroscopy (XANES) gives arsenic form directly in the solid phase and has lower detection limits than extraction techniques. An important and common application of XANES is to use the shift of the edge position to determine the valence state. XANES speciation analysis is based on fitting linear combinations of known spectra from model compounds to determine the ratios of valence states and/or phases present. As(V)/As(III) ratios were determined for various Australian mine waste samples and dispersed mine waste samples from river/creek sediments in Vatukoula, Fiji.

  13. Identifying military impacts on archaeology deposits based on differences in soil organic carbon and chemical elements at soil horizon interfaces

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The National Historic Preservation Act requires land-managing agencies to identify and account for their impacts on archaeological resources. Regulatory agencies that oversee compliance with historic preservation legislation frequently assume military training adversely affects archaeological resou...

  14. [Chemical composition and bioactive compounds of flour of orange (Citrus sinensis), tangerine (Citrus reticulata) and grapefruit (Citrus paradisi) peels cultivated in Venezuela].

    PubMed

    Rincón, Alicia M; Vásquez, A Marina; Padilla, Fanny C

    2005-09-01

    The purpose of this research was to evaluate the chemical composition and some bioactive compounds in the peel's flour of some of the most consumed citrus fruits cultivated in Venezuela. Chemical composition as well as some trace elements, ascorbic acid, carotenoids dietary fiber, total polyphenols and their antiradical efficiency, using the 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhidracyl (DPPH) were assessed in the dried peels of orange (Citrus sinensis), tangerine (Citrus reticulata) and white grapefruit (Citrus paradisi). Moisture, fat, protein and ash content for all samples showed statistical differences (p < 0.05). Tangerine's peel showed the highest magnesium and carotenoid content, while highest ascorbic acid and carotenoid content was found in the grapefruit's peel. Dietary fiber content presented significant high value in the tangerine peel. All samples presented high content of extractable polyphenols (4.33; 7.6 and 5.1 g/100g). The highest antiradical efficiency was shown by the tangerine's peel, value which correlates with the polyphenol content. These results suggest that tangerine peel should be the most suitable, to reduce risk of some diseases such as cardiovascular and some associated to lipid oxidation. Studied samples are good sources of dietary fiber and phenolic compounds, whose use could be useful in the formulation of functional foods, taking advantage of the presence of dietary fiber and antioxidant compounds in only one ingredient. PMID:16454058

  15. Mortality study of workers employed in 1,3-butadiene production units identified from a large chemical workers cohort

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Elizabeth M. Ward; John M. Fajen; Avima M. Ruder; Robert A. Rinsky; William E. Halperin; Cindy A. Fessler-Flesch

    1996-01-01

    The IARC has given the designations of “sufficient evidence” of carcinogenicity of 1,3-butadiene in experimental animals and “limited evidence” of carcinogenicity in humans. To investigate the carcinogenic effect in humans, a cohort mortality study was conducted among 364 men who were assigned to any of three 1,3-butadiene production units located within several chemical plants in the Kanawha Valley of West

  16. Chemical reactions identified in the Titan 2, Titan 4, and Delta 2 propellant systems and their application to source modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prince, S. P.; Banning, D. W.; Wiseman, F. L.

    1994-08-01

    A series of tests involving the combustion of solid and liquid propellants used to fuel the Titan 2, Titan 4, and Delta 2 launch vehicles was performed. The purpose of these tests was to evaluate the nature and amounts of combustion gases from reacting these propellants in various proportions, and to apply the derived data to predicting toxic chemical emissions arising from a launch vehicle explosion. Propellants tested in this study included Aerozine-50 and nitrogen tetroxide (liquid propellants used in the Titan 2 and Titan 4 launch vehicles), PBAN solid propellant (used on the Titan 4 solid rocket motor), RP-1 and liquid oxygen (liquid propellants used to fuel the Delta 2 launch vehicle), and the Castor IVA solid rocket propellant used on the Delta 2 first stage engine. Tests were conducted in a 150-liter stainless steel combustion chamber in air at nominal pressure (0.8 atmospheres at Denver barometric conditions). Measurements of the chamber gas temperature and internal pressure were taken and gas samples were withdrawn and analyzed for expected combustion gases, unreacted propellants, organic vapors, and oxygen reacted from the air. A stainless steel witness plate was used to collect condensates which formed during the course of the propellant combustion tests. Results of this study suggest significantly different chemical fates for some of the rocket propellants than those predicted by chemical theory only. A description of the test parameters, results, and application to source predictions is presented.

  17. Phosphorus chemical shift tensors of phosphido ligands in ruthenium carbonyl compounds: (31)P NMR spectroscopy of single-crystal and powder samples and ab initio calculations.

    PubMed

    Eichele, Klaus; Wasylishen, Roderick E; Corrigan, John F; Taylor, Nicholas J; Carty, Arthur J; Feindel, Kirk W; Bernard, Guy M

    2002-02-20

    The phosphorus chemical shift (CS) tensors of several ruthenium carbonyl compounds containing a phosphido ligand, micro), bridging a Ru [bond] Ru bond were characterized by solid-state (31)P NMR spectroscopy. As well, an analogous osmium compound was examined. The structures of most of the clusters investigated have approximate local C(2v) symmetry about the phosphorus atom. Compared to the "isolated" PH(2)(-) anion, the phosphorus nucleus of a bridging phosphido ligand exhibits considerable deshielding. The phosphorus CS tensors of most of the compounds have spans ranging from 230 to 350 ppm and skews of approximately zero. Single-crystal NMR was used to investigate the orientation of the phosphorus CS tensors for two of the compounds, Ru(2)(CO)(6)(mu(2)-C [triple bond] C [bond] Ph)(mu(2)-PPh(2)) and Ru(3)(CO)(9)(mu(2)-H)(mu(2)-PPh(2)). The intermediate component of the phosphorus CS tensor, delta(22), lies along the local C(2) axis in both compounds. The least shielded component, delta(11), lies perpendicular to the Ru [bond] P [bond] Ru plane while the most shielded component, delta(33), lies perpendicular to the C [bond]P [bond] C plane. The orientation of the phosphorus CS tensor for a third compound, Ru(2)(CO)(6)(mu(2)-PPh(2))(2), was investigated by the dipolar-chemical shift NMR technique and was found to be analogous, suggesting it to be the same in all compounds. Ab initio calculations of phosphorus magnetic shielding tensors have been carried out and reproduce the orientations found experimentally. The orientation of the CS tensor has been rationalized using simple frontier MO theory. Splittings due to (99,101)Ru [bond] (31)P spin-spin coupling have been observed for several of the complexes. A rare example of (189)Os [bond] (31)P spin-spin splittings is observed in the (31)P MAS NMR spectrum of the osmium cluster, where (1)J((189)Os, (31)P) is 367 Hz. For this complex, the (189)Os nuclear quadrupolar coupling constant is on the order of several hundred megahertz. PMID:11841326

  18. A Novel Way To Identify Precursors That Degrade To Perfluorinated Compounds In Activated Sludge Using Ion-Trap Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometry

    EPA Science Inventory

    An increasing number of studies have been conducted to investigate the environmental distribution of perfluorinated alkyl compounds (PFCs), many of which are known to be toxic in laboratory animals. Despite growing public concerns, fate and transport of PFCs are little known. M...

  19. Adaptation of natural microbial communities to degradation of xenobiotic compounds: effects of concentration, exposure time, inoculum, and chemical structure

    SciTech Connect

    Spain, U.C. (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Gulf Breeze, FL); Van Veld, P.A.

    1983-02-01

    Adaptation of microbial communities to faster degradation of xenobiotic compounds after exposure to the compound was studied in ecocores. Radiolabeled test compounds were added to cores that contained natural water and sediment. Adaptation was detected by comparing mineralization rates or disappearance of a parent compound in preexposed and unexposed cores. Microbial communities in preexposed cores from a number of freshwater sampling sites adapted to degrade p-nitrophenol faster; communities from estuarine or marine sites did not show any increase in rates of degradation as a result of preexposure. Adaptation was maximal after 2 weeks and was not detectable after 6 weeks. A threshold concentration of 10 ppb (10 ng/ml) was observed; below this concentration no adaptation was detected. With concentrations of 20 to 100 ppb (20 to 100 ng/ml), the biodegradation rates in preexposed cores were much higher than the rates in control cores and were proportional to the concentration of the test compound. In addition, trifluralin, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, and p-cresol were tested to determine whether preexposure affected subsequent biodegradation. Microbial communities did not adapt to trifluralin. Adaptation to 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid was similar to adaptation to nitrophenol. p-Cresol was mineralized rapidly in both preexposed and unexposed communities.

  20. Chemical Constituents of Descurainia sophia L. and its Biological Activity

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nawal H. Mohamed; Atta E. Mahrous

    Seven coumarin compounds were isolated for the first time from the aerial parts of Descurainia Sophia L. identified as scopoletine, scopoline, isoscopoline, xanthtoxol, xanthtoxin, psoralene and bergaptane. Three flavonoids namely kaempferol, quercetine and isorhamnetine and three terpenoid compounds ?-sitosterol ?-amyrine and cholesterol were also isolated and identified by physical and chemical methods; melting point, R f values, UV and 1H

  1. Application of bicyclic and cage compounds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, R. D.; Archuleta, B. S.

    1976-01-01

    The results of a literature survey of the field of bicyclic and cage compounds were presented, with the objective of identifying those types of compounds with unusual physical and chemical stability, and determining what practical applications have been found for these compounds. Major applications have been as polymers, polymer additives, medicinals, and pesticides. Lesser applications have included fuels, fuel additives, lubricants, lubricant additives, and perfumes. Several areas where further work might be useful were also outlined; these are primarily in the areas of polymers, polymer additives, medicinals, and synthetic lubricants.

  2. Unbiased Screening of Marine Sponge Extracts for Anti-Inflammatory Agents Combined with Chemical Genomics Identifies Girolline as an Inhibitor of Protein Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Fung, Shan-Yu; Sofiyev, Vladimir; Schneiderman, Julia; Hirschfeld, Aaron F.; Victor, Rachel E.; Woods, Kate; Piotrowski, Jeff S.; Deshpande, Raamesh; Li, Sheena C.; de Voogd, Nicole J.; Myers, Chad L.; Boone, Charlie; Andersen, Raymond J.; Turvey, Stuart E.

    2013-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) play a critical role in innate immunity, but activation of TLR signaling pathways is also associated with many harmful inflammatory diseases. Identification of novel anti-inflammatory molecules targeting TLR signaling pathways is central to the development of new treatment approaches for acute and chronic inflammation. We performed high throughput screening from crude marine sponge extracts on TLR5 signaling and identified girolline. We demonstrated that girolline inhibits signaling through both MyD88-dependent and –independent TLRs (i.e. TLR2, 3, 4, 5 and 7), and reduces cytokine (IL-6 and IL-8) production in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and macrophages. Using a chemical genomics approach, we identified Elongation factor 2 as the molecular target of girolline, which inhibits protein synthesis at the elongation step. Together these data identify the sponge natural product girolline as a potential anti-inflammatory agent acting through inhibition of protein synthesis. PMID:24117378

  3. [Chemical constituents of flower of David lily].

    PubMed

    Feng, S L; He, L; Wang, M; Jiao, K J

    1994-10-01

    Three compounds were isolated from the flower of Lilium devidii. On the basis of chemical reaction, UV, MS, 1HNMR and 13CNMR spectral data, they were identified as beta-sitosterol, stigmasterol and emodin. These compounds are obtained from the plant for the first time. PMID:7873081

  4. [Chemical constituents of Sageretia theezans Brongn].

    PubMed

    Xu, L Z; Yang, X J; Li, B

    1994-11-01

    Six compounds were isolated from Sageretia theezans and identified as friedeline (1), syringic acid (2), beta-sitosterol (3), daucosterol (4), gluco-syringic acid (5) and taraxerol (6) on the basis of spectral data (1H-NMR, IR, MS) and physico-chemical constants. Among them, compounds 5 and 6 were obtained from the species for the first time. PMID:7893385

  5. Quantum chemical studies on the inhibition potentials of some Penicillin compounds for the corrosion of mild steel in 0.1 M HCl.

    PubMed

    Eddy, Nnabuk Okon; Ebenso, Eno E

    2010-07-01

    Inhibitive and adsorption properties of Penicillin G, Amoxicillin and Penicillin V potassium were studied using gravimetric, gasometric and quantum chemical methods. The results obtained indicate that these compounds are good adsorption inhibitors for the corrosion of mild steel in HCl solution. The adsorption of the inhibitors on mild steel surface is spontaneous, exothermic and supports the mechanism of physical adsorption. From DFT results, the sites for nucleophilic attacks in the inhibitors are the carboxylic acid functional group while the sites for electrophilic attacks are in the phenyl ring. There was a strong correlation between theoretical and experimental inhibition efficiencies. PMID:20112037

  6. Magnesium compounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kramer, D.A.

    2007-01-01

    Seawater and natural brines accounted for about 52 percent of U.S. magnesium compounds production in 2006. Dead-burned magnesia was produced by Martin Marietta Magnesia Specialties from well brines in Michigan. Caustic-calcined magnesia was recovered from sea-water by Premier Chemicals in Florida; from well brines in Michigan by Martin Marietta and Rohm and Haas; and from magnesite in Nevada by Premier Chemicals. Intrepid Potash-Wendover and Great Salt Lake Minerals recovered magnesium chloride brines from the Great Salt Lake in Utah. Magnesium hydroxide was produced from brucite by Applied Chemical Magnesias in Texas, from seawater by SPI Pharma in Delaware and Premier Chemicals in Florida, and by Martin Marietta and Rohm and Haas from their operations mentioned above. About 59 percent of the magnesium compounds consumed in the United States was used for refractories that are used mainly to line steelmaking furnaces. The remaining 41 percent was consumed in agricultural, chemical, construction, environmental and industrial applications.

  7. Reduced weight decontamination formulation utilizing a solid peracid compound for neutralization of chemical and biological warfare agents

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mark D

    2011-01-01

    A reduced weight decontamination formulation that utilizes a solid peracid compound (sodium borate peracetate) and a cationic surfactant (dodecyltrimethylammonium chloride) that can be packaged with all water removed. This reduces the packaged weight of the decontamination formulation by .about.80% (as compared to the \\

  8. Code for Chemical Ring Compounds with Application of Fusion Lines, Suited for Calculation of Their Physical Properties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romanec, Michael J.

    1974-01-01

    The boundary between two neighboring rings is called the fusion lines, which is enclosed by external segments called arcs. In the code, the separation of fusion line(s) from arcs takes place in such a way that proper matching is achieved. By this procedure, the structure of a compound is recreated. (Author)

  9. Physical-chemical and maternal determinants of the accumulation of organochlorine compounds in four-year-old children.

    PubMed

    Carrizo, Daniel; Grimalt, Joan O; Ribas-Fito, Nuria; Sunyer, Jordi; Torrent, Maties

    2006-03-01

    A cohort study representing a general population (Minorca Island, birth year 1997-1998) showed that in utero transfer of organochlorine compounds (OCs) in children was strongly correlated with the age of the mother and, in the case of hexachlorobenzene (HCB), 4,4'-DDE, and 4,4'-DDT, with the maternal body mass index. Some of these correlations remained significant for the serum concentrations collected in these children at four years. No significant correlations with length of gestation were observed. Breastfeeding and age of lactation were strong determinants of most OC concentrations at four years of age. At this age, the body burden of these compounds was higher than at birth irrespective of maternal or formula feeding, but they accumulated at higher extent in the former case involving concentration increments in blood that surpassed the growth dilution effects, with the only exceptions being pentachlorobenzene (PeCB), HCB, and 4,4'-DDT. 4,4'-DDE exhibited the highest increase in association with breastfeeding, pointing to a specific accumulation pathway via this mode. Compounds with low K(ow) values such as beta-hexachlorocyclohexane showed significant accumulation in four-year-old children but with small differences between the groups that had been raised on either breast milk or formula. Compounds having low K(oa) values such as HCB showed decreases in concentration and small body burden variation between birth and four years of age, which points to their preferential elimination in these initial periods of infant growth. PMID:16568751

  10. Profiling of the Tox21 Chemical Collection for Mitochondrial Function: I. Compounds that Decrease Mitochondrial Membrane Potential

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mitochondrial dysfunction has been implicated in the pathogenesis of a variety of disorders including cancer, diabetes, and neurodegenerative and cardiovascular diseases. Understanding how different environmental chemicals and drug-like molecules impact mitochondrial function rep...

  11. Dioxins and dioxin-like compounds in composts and digestates from European countries as determined by the in vitro bioassay and chemical analysis.

    PubMed

    Beníšek, Martin; Kuku?ka, Petr; Mariani, Giulio; Suurkuusk, Gert; Gawlik, Bernd M; Locoro, Giovanni; Giesy, John P; Bláha, Lud?k

    2015-03-01

    Aerobic composting and anaerobic digestion plays an important role in reduction of organic waste by transforming the waste into humus, which is an excellent soil conditioner. However, applications of chemical-contaminated composts on soils may have unwanted consequences such as accumulation of persistent compounds and their transfer into food chains. The present study investigated burden of composts and digestates collected in 16 European countries (88 samples) by the compounds causing dioxin-like effects as determined by use of an in vitro transactivation assay to quantify total concentrations of aryl hydrocarbon receptor-(AhR) mediated potency. Measured concentrations of 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibeno-p-dioxin (2,3,7,8-TCDD) equivalents (TEQbio) were compared to concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and selected chlorinated compounds, including polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins/furans (PCDD/Fs), co-planar polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), indicator PCB congeners and organochlorine pesticides (OCPs). Median concentrations of TEQbio (dioxin-like compounds) determined by the in vitro assay in crude extracts of various types of composts ranged from 0.05 to 1.2 with a maximum 8.22?g (TEQbio)kg(-1) dry mass. Potencies were mostly associated with less persistent compounds such as PAHs because treatment with sulfuric acid removed bioactivity from most samples. The pan-European investigation of contamination by organic contaminants showed generally good quality of the composts, the majority of which were in compliance with conservative limits applied in some countries. Results demonstrate performance and added value of rapid, inexpensive, effect-based monitoring, and points out the need to derive corresponding effect-based trigger values for the risk assessment of complex contaminated matrices such as composts. PMID:25522853

  12. Mortality study of workers in 1,3-butadiene production units identified from a chemical workers cohort.

    PubMed Central

    Ward, E M; Fajen, J M; Ruder, A M; Rinsky, R A; Halperin, W E; Fessler-Flesch, C A

    1995-01-01

    The International Agency for Research on Cancer has given the designations of "sufficient evidence" of carcinogenicity of 1,3-butadiene in experimental animals and "limited evidence" of carcinogenicity in humans. To investigate the carcinogenic effect in humans, we conducted a cohort mortality study among 364 men who were assigned to any of three 1,3-butadiene production units located within several chemical plants in the Kanawha Valley of West Virginia, including 277 men employed in a U.S. Rubber Reserve Plant which operated during World War II. The butadiene production units included in this study were selected from an index developed by the Union Carbide Corporation, which listed for each chemical production unit within their South Charleston, West Virginia and Institute, West Virginia, plants all products, by-products, and reactants. Departments included in the study were those where butadiene was a primary product and neither benzene nor ethylene oxide was present. A total of 185 deaths were observed; the standardized mortality ratio (SMR) for all causes of death was 91, reflecting lower mortality among the study population than the U.S. population. The study found a significantly elevated standardized mortality ratio (SMR) for lymphosarcoma and reticulosarcoma based on four observed cases (SMR = 577; 95% CI = 157-1480), which persisted in an analysis using county referent rates. An excess of lymphosarcoma and reticulosarcoma among all workers and among workers with routine exposure to 1,3-butadiene was also observed in the only other cohort of 1,3-butadiene production workers previously studied.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7556014

  13. The phytochemical and genetic survey of common and dwarf juniper (Juniperus communis and Juniperus nana) identifies chemical races and close taxonomic identity of the species.

    PubMed

    Filipowicz, Natalia; Piotrowski, Arkadiusz; Ochocka, J Renata; Asztemborska, Monika

    2006-07-01

    Juniperus communis L. (= J. communis var. communis) and Juniperus nana Willd. (= J. communis var. SAXATILIS) are subspecies of juniper. J. communis grows widely in both hemispheres, primarily in lower elevations while J. nana is mainly observed in high mountains. Although they can be distinguished by morphological features, it is not known whether they are genetically and phytochemically distinct entities. We aimed to check whether it is possible to distinguish these two plants (i) by pharmaceutically important chemical traits and (ii) on the basis of intraspecifically highly polymorphic fragment of chloroplast DNA. We used GC with achiral as well as with enantioselective stationary phase columns to identify the main monoterpenes of the essential oil. Sequence analysis of the TRNL (UAA)- TRNF (GAA) intergenic spacer of the chloroplast genome was used as a genetic marker of taxonomic identity between these two subspecies. The chromatographic analysis showed the existence of three chemical races - the alpha-pinene type, the sabinene type and one with intermediate contents of these terpenes among both J. communis and J. nana. Surprisingly, sequence analysis of TRNL (UAA)- TRNF (GAA) revealed 100 % similarity between the common and the dwarf juniper. Thus, the monoterpene pattern is related to geographical origin, and not to the species identity. We suggest that the three chemical races identified in the present study should be considered as separate sources of pharmaceutical raw material. Our results demonstrate that the contents of alpha-pinene and sabinene may be applied as a quick diagnostic test for preliminary evaluation of plant material. PMID:16783703

  14. Mass-dependent and Mass-independent Sulphur Isotope Fractionation Accompanying Thermal- and Photo-chemical Decomposition of Sulphur Bearing Organic Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oduro, Harry; Izon, Gareth; Ono, Shuhei

    2014-05-01

    The bimodal S-isotope record, specifically the transition from mass independent (MIF) to mass dependent fractionation (MDF), is perhaps the most widely cited line of evidence for an irreversible rise in atmospheric oxygen at ca. 2.4Ga. The production and preservation of S-MIF, manifested in both ?33S and ?36S, within the geological record are linked to atmospheric O2 via a number of arguments. However, to date, the only mechanism capable of generating S-MIF consistent with the Archaean sedimentary records involves gas-phase ultraviolet irradiation of SO21 photolysis. More recently, ?33S S-MIF trends have been reported from en vitro thermochemical sulphate reduction (TSR) experiments, prompting authors to question the importance of S-MIF as a proxy for Earth oxidation2. Importantly, whilst emerging TSR experiments3,4 affirm the reported ?33S trends2, these experiments fail to identify correlated S-MIF between ?33S and ?36S values3,4. Realization that S-MIF is confined to ?33S during TSR, precludes TSR as a mechanism responsible for the origin of the Archaean S-MIF record but strongly suggests the effect originating from a magnetic isotope effect (MIE) associated with 33S nucleus3,4. Clearly, photochemical and thermochemical processes impart different ?36S/?33S trends with significant variation in ?34S; however, a complete experimental elucidation of mechanisms responsible for the S-MIF and S-MIE signatures is lacking. Interestingly, a complete understanding of the S-isotope chemistry during thermal- and photo-chemical decomposition may reveal wavelength and thermal dependence archived in the sedimentary record. Here we extend the experimental database to explore the magnitude and sign of ?36S/?33S and ?34S produced during both photo- and thermochemical processes. Here the organic sulphur compounds (OSC) utilized in these experiments carries diagnostic ?36S/?33S patterns that differ from those reported from photolysis experiment SO2 and from the Archaean sedimentary record. Further thermal decomposition of several sulphur containing compounds with; 1) an aliphatic-S (e.g., diphenyl disulphide), 2) tri-substituted aromatic-S (trithiane), and S-amino acids (e.g., cysteine, methionine, taurine, and glutathionine) were tested for four S-isotope fractionation under vacuum. Among these, aromatic trithiane produced anomalous 33S up to 1.3‰, indicating thermal decomposition through radical chemistry, producing S-MIE. While taurine with sulphonic acid (R-SO2OH) functional groups yielded S-MDF up to 15‰ (between the AVS and the residual OSC), which is consistent with estimated zero-point energy shifts for thiol (R-SH), and thiyl (R-S-CH3) groups of cysteine and methionine, respectively. These results suggest that OSC might undergo either thermal or photochemical decomposition and the S-MIF, S-MDF, and S-MIE signatures may be archived in the geologic record. The emerging mechanisms responsible for these isotope signals and their implications will be discussed in more detail. Ultimately this work offers a framework where these signals can be used as a diagnostic marker to distinguish between thermo- and photochemical processes. References: 1. Farquhar et al., Science 2000 2. Watanabe et al., Science 2010; 3. Oduro et al., PNAS 2011; 4. Kopf and Ono, GCA 2012.

  15. Integrating chemical and genetic silencing strategies to identify host kinase-phosphatase inhibitor networks that control bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Albers, Harald M H G; Kuijl, Coenraad; Bakker, Jeroen; Hendrickx, Loes; Wekker, Sharida; Farhou, Nadha; Liu, Nora; Blasco-Moreno, Bernat; Scanu, Tiziana; den Hertog, Jeroen; Celie, Patrick; Ovaa, Huib; Neefjes, Jacques

    2014-02-21

    Every year three million people die as a result of bacterial infections, and this number may further increase due to resistance to current antibiotics. These antibiotics target almost all essential bacterial processes, leaving only a few new targets for manipulation. The host proteome has many more potential targets for manipulation in order to control bacterial infection, as exemplified by the observation that inhibiting the host kinase Akt supports the elimination of different intracellular bacteria including Salmonella and M. tuberculosis. If host kinases are involved in the control of bacterial infections, phosphatases could be as well. Here we present an integrated small interference RNA and small molecule screen to identify host phosphatase-inhibitor combinations that control bacterial infection. We define host phosphatases inhibiting intracellular growth of Salmonella and identify corresponding inhibitors for the dual specificity phosphatases DUSP11 and 27. Pathway analysis places many kinases and phosphatases controlling bacterial infection in an integrated pathway centered around Akt. This network controls host cell metabolism, survival, and growth and bacterial survival and reflect a natural host cell response to bacterial infection. Inhibiting two enzyme classes with opposite activities-kinases and phosphatases-may be a new strategy to overcome infections by antibiotic-resistant bacteria. PMID:24274083

  16. PHEROMONAL ACTIVITY OF COMPOUNDS IDENTIFIED FROM MALE PHYLLOTRETA CRUCIFERAE: FIELD TESTS OF RACEMIC MIXTURES, PURE ENANTIOMERS, AND COMBINATIONS WITH ALLYL ISOTHIOCYANATE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Four himachalene sesquiterpenes and (+)-'-cadinene, previously identified as possible pheromone components from males of a North American population of Phyllotreta cruciferae Goeze (Coleoptera, Chrysomelidae), were tested for attractiveness in field traps in Hungary. A mixture of the four synthetic...

  17. The origins of light and heavy r-process elements identified by chemical tagging of metal-poor stars

    E-print Network

    Tsujimoto, Takuji

    2014-01-01

    Growing interests in neutron star (NS) mergers as the origin of r-process elements have sprouted since the discovery of evidence for the ejection of these elements from a short-duration gamma-ray burst. The hypothesis of a NS merger origin is reinforced by a theoretical update of nucleosynthesis in NS mergers successful in yielding r-process nuclides with A>130. On the other hand, whether the origin of light r-process elements are associated with nucleosynthesis in NS merger events remains unclear. We find a signature of nucleosynthesis in NS mergers from peculiar chemical abundances of stars belonging to the Galactic globular cluster M15. This finding combined with the recent nucleosynthesis results implies a potential diversity of nucleosynthesis in NS mergers. Based on these considerations, we are successful in the interpretation of an observed correlation between [light r-process/Eu] and [Eu/Fe] among Galactic halo stars and accordingly narrow down the role of supernova nucleosynthesis in the r-process pr...

  18. Sanskrit Compound Processor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Anil; Mittal, Vipul; Kulkarni, Amba

    Sanskrit is very rich in compound formation. Typically a compound does not code the relation between its components explicitly. To understand the meaning of a compound, it is necessary to identify its components, discover the relations between them and finally generate a paraphrase of the compound. In this paper, we discuss the automatic segmentation and type identification of a compound using simple statistics that results from the manually annotated data.

  19. Pollinia-borne chemicals that induce early postpollination effects in Dendrobium flowers move rapidly into agar blocks and include ACC and compounds with auxin activity.

    PubMed

    Promyou, Surassawadee; Ketsa, Saichol; van Doorn, Wouter G

    2014-11-15

    The early visible effects of pollination in orchids are likely due to pollinia-borne chemicals. In Dendrobium we tested whether such compounds were water soluble and would diffuse in solid-aqueous phase, and determined both 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) concentrations and auxin activity. Following pollination, the flower peduncle showed epinastic movement, followed by yellowing of the flower lip, flower senescence and ovary growth. Placing pollinia on agar blocks for 3, 6, 9 or 12h, prior to transferring them to the stigma, increased the time to these early postpollination effects or prevented them. Placing agar blocks that had been used for contact with the pollinia on the stigma also induced the early postpollination effects. The concentrations of ACC, the direct precursor of ethylene, in pollinia was lower the longer the pollinia had been in contact with the agar blocks, whilst the ACC content in the agar blocks increased with the period of contact. The auxin activity of the agar blocks also increased with the time of contact with pollinia. It is concluded that chemicals in the pollinia are responsible for the early visible postpollination effects, and that these (a) rapidly diffuse in aqueous media, and (b) comprise at least ACC and compounds with auxin activity. The idea is discussed that ACC plus auxin is adequate for the production of the early postpollination effects. PMID:25240156

  20. Computational and Experimental Assessment of Benzene Cation Chemistry for the Measurement of Marine Derived Biogenic Volatile Organic Compounds with Chemical Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoerb, M.; Kim, M.; Zimmermann, K.; Bertram, T. H.

    2013-12-01

    Chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) is a highly selective and sensitive technique for the measurement of trace gases in the atmosphere. However, competing side reactions and dependence on relative humidity (RH) can make the transition from the laboratory to the field challenging. Effective implementation of chemical ionization requires a thorough knowledge of the elementary steps leading to ionization of the analyte. We have recently investigated benzene cations for the detection of marine derived biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs), such isoprene and terpene compounds, from algal bloom events. Our experimental results indicate that benzene ion chemistry is an attractive candidate for field measurements, and the RH dependence is weak. To further understand the advantages and limitations of this approach, we have also used electronic structure theory calculations to compliment the experimental work. These theoretical methods can provide valuable insight into the physical chemistry of ion molecule reactions including thermodynamical information, the stability of ions to fragmentation, and potential sources of interference such as dehydration to form isobaric ions. The combined experimental and computational approach also allows validation of the theoretical methods and will provide useful information towards gaining predictive power for the selection of appropriate reagent ions for future experiments.

  1. Chemistry and photochemistry of 2,6-bis(2-hydroxybenzilidene)cyclohexanone. An example of a compound following the anthocyanins network of chemical reactions.

    PubMed

    Moro, Artur J; Pana, Ana-Maria; Cseh, Liliana; Costisor, Otilia; Parola, Jorge; Cunha-Silva, L; Puttreddy, Rakesh; Rissanen, Kari; Pina, Fernando

    2014-08-14

    The kinetics and thermodynamics of the 2,6-bis(2-hydroxybenzilidene)cyclohexanone chemical reactions network was studied at different pH values using NMR, UV-vis, continuous irradiation, and flash photolysis. The chemical behavior of the system partially resembles anthocyanins and their analogue compounds. 2,6-Bis(2-hydroxybenzilidene)cyclohexanone exhibits a slow color change from yellow to red styrylflavylium under extreme acidic conditions. The rate constant for this process (5 × 10(-5) s(-1)) is pH independent and controlled by the cis-trans isomerization barrier. However, the interesting feature is the appearance of the colorless compound, 7,8-dihydro-6H-chromeno[3,2-d]xanthene, isolated from solutions of acid to neutral range, characterized by (1)H NMR and single crystal X-ray diffraction. Light absorption by 2,6-bis(2-hydroxybenzilidene)cyclohexanone solutions immediately after preparation exclusively results in cis-isomer as photoproduct, which via hemiketal formation yields (i) red styrylflavylium by dehydration under extremely acidic solutions (pH < 1) and (ii) colorless 7,8-dihydro-6H-chromeno[3,2-d]xanthene by cyclization in solutions of acid to neutral range. PMID:25058169

  2. Variability in Human Bitter Taste Sensitivity to Chemically Diverse Compounds Can Be Accounted for by Differential TAS2R Activation.

    PubMed

    Roura, Eugeni; Aldayyani, Asya; Thavaraj, Pridhuvi; Prakash, Sangeeta; Greenway, Delma; Thomas, Walter G; Meyerhof, Wolfgang; Roudnitzky, Natacha; Foster, Simon R

    2015-07-01

    The human population displays high variation in taste perception. Differences in individual taste sensitivity may also impact on nutrient intake and overall appetite. A well-characterized example is the variable perception of bitter compounds such as 6-n-propylthiouracil (PROP) and phenylthiocarbamide (PTC), which can be accounted for at the molecular level by polymorphic variants in the specific type 2 taste receptor (TAS2R38). This phenotypic variation has been associated with influencing dietary preference and other behaviors, although the generalization of PROP/PTC taster status as a predictor of sensitivity to other tastes is controversial. Here, we proposed that the taste sensitivities of different bitter compounds would be correlated only when they activate the same bitter taste receptor. Thirty-four volunteers were exposed to 8 bitter compounds that were selected based on their potential to activate overlapping and distinct repertoires of TAS2Rs. Taste intensity ratings were evaluated using the general Labeled Magnitude Scale. Our data demonstrate a strong interaction between the intensity for bitter substances when they activate common TAS2Rs. Consequently, PROP/PTC sensitivity was not a reliable predictor of general bitter sensitivity. In addition, our findings provide a novel framework to predict taste sensitivity based on their specific T2R activation profile. PMID:25999325

  3. Literature survey of bacterial, fungal, and Drosophila assay systems used in the evaluation of selected chemical compounds for mutagenic activity.

    PubMed

    Brown, M M; Wassom, J S; Malling, H V; Shelby, M D; Von Halle, E S

    1979-04-01

    Literature reports were surveyed, with results noted from experiments in seven nonmammalian assay systems used for the detection of mutagenicity or other related genetic effects. A comparison was made of the activities of 54 selected noncarcinogens, procarcinogens, and ultimate carcinogens as revealed by these test systems. Of the compounds tested, 49 (91%) were active in one or more of the assays, and 42 (78%) were positive in at least one system without having to be metabolically activated. In one or more test systems, 17/17 (100%) of the ultimate carcinogens, 27/28 (96%) of the procarcinogens, and 6/9 (67%) of the noncarcinogens were positive. The Ames Salmonella-microsome assay responded with increased mutation frequency to 37/44 (84%) of the carcinogenic compounds but to only 2/8 (25%) of the noncarcinogens tested. The Drosophila system responded to 19/21 (90%) of the carcinogens and to 3/6 (50%) of the noncarcinogens. Prophages were induced when lysogenic bacteria were exposed to 12/21 (57%) of the carcinogens, but not enough tests were done with the noncarcinogens (1/3, or 33%) for a comparison. The other systems reviewed, such as the killing of repair-deficient bacteria, mutations in Escherichia coli and Neurospora crassa, and the host-mediated assay, were not challenged by enough of the compounds for valid comparisons. PMID:155170

  4. Lattice parameters and stability of the spinel compounds in relation to the ionic radii and electronegativities of constituting chemical elements.

    PubMed

    Brik, Mikhail G; Suchocki, Andrzej; Kami?ska, Agata

    2014-05-19

    A thorough consideration of the relation between the lattice parameters of 185 binary and ternary spinel compounds, on one side, and ionic radii and electronegativities of the constituting ions, on the other side, allowed for establishing a simple empirical model and finding its linear equation, which links together the above-mentioned quantities. The derived equation gives good agreement between the experimental and modeled values of the lattice parameters in the considered group of spinels, with an average relative error of about 1% only. The proposed model was improved further by separate consideration of several groups of spinels, depending on the nature of the anion (oxygen, sulfur, selenium/tellurium, nitrogen). The developed approach can be efficiently used for prediction of lattice constants for new isostructural materials. In particular, the lattice constants of new hypothetic spinels ZnRE2O4, CdRE2S4, CdRE2Se4 (RE = rare earth elements) are predicted in the present Article. In addition, the upper and lower limits for the variation of the ionic radii, electronegativities, and their certain combinations were established, which can be considered as stability criteria for the spinel compounds. The findings of the present Article offer a systematic overview of the structural properties of spinels and can serve as helpful guides for synthesis of new spinel compounds. PMID:24784795

  5. Online volatile organic compound measurements using a newly developed proton-transfer ion-trap mass spectrometry instrument during New England Air Quality Study--Intercontinental Transport and Chemical Transformation 2004: performance, intercomparison, and compound identification.

    PubMed

    Warneke, Carsten; Kato, Shuji; De Gouw, Joost A; Goldan, Paul D; Kuster, William C; Shao, Min; Lovejoy, Edward R; Fall, Ray; Fehsenfeld, Fred C

    2005-07-15

    We have used a newly developed proton-transfer ion-trap mass spectrometry (PIT-MS) instrument for online trace gas analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) during the 2004 New England Air Quality Study-Intercontinental Transport and Chemical Transformation study. The PIT-MS instrument uses proton-transfer reactions with H3O+ ions to ionize VOCs, similarto a PTR-MS (proton-transfer reaction mass spectrometry) instrument but uses an ion trap mass spectrometer to analyze the product ions. The advantages of an ion trap are the improved identification of VOCs and a near 100% duty cycle. During the experiment, the PIT-MS instrument had a detection limit between 0.05 and 0.3 pbbv (S/N = 3 (signal-to-noise ratio)) for 2-min integration time for most tested VOCs. PIT-MS was used for ambient air measurements onboard a research ship and agreed well with a gas chromatography mass spectrometer). The comparison included oxygenated VOCs, aromatic compounds, and others such as isoprene, monoterpenes, acetonitrile, and dimethyl sulfide. Automated collision-induced dissociation measurements were used to determine the contributions of acetone and propanal to the measured signal at 59 amu; both species are detected at this mass and are thus indistinguishable in conventional PTR-MS. PMID:16082971

  6. Nitroaromatic Compounds, from Synthesis to Biodegradation

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Kou-San; Parales, Rebecca E.

    2010-01-01

    Summary: Nitroaromatic compounds are relatively rare in nature and have been introduced into the environment mainly by human activities. This important class of industrial chemicals is widely used in the synthesis of many diverse products, including dyes, polymers, pesticides, and explosives. Unfortunately, their extensive use has led to environmental contamination of soil and groundwater. The nitro group, which provides chemical and functional diversity in these molecules, also contributes to the recalcitrance of these compounds to biodegradation. The electron-withdrawing nature of the nitro group, in concert with the stability of the benzene ring, makes nitroaromatic compounds resistant to oxidative degradation. Recalcitrance is further compounded by their acute toxicity, mutagenicity, and easy reduction into carcinogenic aromatic amines. Nitroaromatic compounds are hazardous to human health and are registered on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's list of priority pollutants for environmental remediation. Although the majority of these compounds are synthetic in nature, microorganisms in contaminated environments have rapidly adapted to their presence by evolving new biodegradation pathways that take advantage of them as sources of carbon, nitrogen, and energy. This review provides an overview of the synthesis of both man-made and biogenic nitroaromatic compounds, the bacteria that have been identified to grow on and completely mineralize nitroaromatic compounds, and the pathways that are present in these strains. The possible evolutionary origins of the newly evolved pathways are also discussed. PMID:20508249

  7. BIOASSAY-DIRECTED CHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF ORGANIC EXTRACTS OF EMISSIONS FROM A LABORATORY-SCALE INCINERATOR: COMBUSTION OF SURROGATE COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper describes using a prototype/pilot-scale rotary kiln (73 kill) to examine the chemical composition and biological effect's of emissions produced when operating the kiln under suboptimal conditions resulting from batch charging. he surrogate wastes evaluated included comb...

  8. On using film boiling to thermally decompose liquid organic chemicals: Application to ethyl acetate as a model compound

    E-print Network

    Walter, M.Todd

    flux (CHF) Leidenfrost point a b s t r a c t Film boiling on a horizontal tube is used to studyOn using film boiling to thermally decompose liquid organic chemicals: Application to ethyl acetate 21 August 2013 Keywords: Film boiling Thermal decomposition Pyrolysis Ethyl acetate Critical heat

  9. Chromatography and mass spectrometry of chemical warfare agents, toxins and related compounds: state of the art and future prospects

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ch. E. Kientz

    1998-01-01

    Methods for the identification of chemical warfare agents, toxins, bioregulators and related products are frequently reported in literature. These methods are often based on instrumental analysis using chromatography (gas and liquid) and mass spectrometry. Here, these instrumental techniques are discussed in several applications, new developments and trends based on a review of the literature published since 1990. Apart from new

  10. Major carcinogenic pathways identified by gene expression analysis of peritoneal mesotheliomas following chemical treatment in F344 rats

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yongbaek [Environmental Toxicology Program, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, MD B3-08, 111 Alexander Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Thai-Vu Ton [Environmental Toxicology Program, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, MD B3-08, 111 Alexander Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); De Angelo, Anthony B. [Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Morgan, Kevin [Aventis, Bridgewater, NJ 08807 (United States); Devereux, Theodora R. [Environmental Carcinogenesis Program, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Anna, Colleen [Environmental Carcinogenesis Program, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Collins, Jennifer B. [Microarray Group, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Paules, Richard S. [Microarray Group, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States); Crosby, Lynn M. [Wyeth Research, Chazy, NY 12921 (United States); Sills, Robert C. [Environmental Toxicology Program, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, MD B3-08, 111 Alexander Drive, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 (United States)]. E-mail: sills@niehs.nih.gov

    2006-07-15

    This study was performed to characterize the gene expression profile and to identify the major carcinogenic pathways involved in rat peritoneal mesothelioma (RPM) formation following treatment of Fischer 344 rats with o-nitrotoluene (o-NT) or bromochloracetic acid (BCA). Oligo arrays, with over 20,000 target genes, were used to evaluate o-NT- and BCA-induced RPMs, when compared to a non-transformed mesothelial cell line (Fred-PE). Analysis using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis software revealed 169 cancer-related genes that were categorized into binding activity, growth and proliferation, cell cycle progression, apoptosis, and invasion and metastasis. The microarray data were validated by positive correlation with quantitative real-time RT-PCR on 16 selected genes including igf1, tgfb3 and nov. Important carcinogenic pathways involved in RPM formation included insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), p38 MAPkinase, Wnt/{beta}-catenin and integrin signaling pathways. This study demonstrated that mesotheliomas in rats exposed to o-NT- and BCA were similar to mesotheliomas in humans, at least at the cellular and molecular level.

  11. First-Principles Studies on Cd Doping in CuInSe2 and Related Compounds during Chemical Bath Deposition of CdS Buffer Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, Tsuyoshi; Wada, Takahiro

    2013-06-01

    First-principles calculations using plane-wave basis functions were performed to quantitatively evaluate the substitution energies of Cd atom for Cu atom and for In atoms in chalcopyrite-type CuInSe2 (CIS) and related compounds, CuGaSe2 (CGS) and CuAlSe2 (CAS). The substitution energies of Cd atoms in CIS and the related compounds were calculated in considering of the atomic chemical potentials of the constituent elements of Cu and In, and doping Cd atoms. During the chemical bath deposition (CBD) of the CdS layer on the CIGS layer, Cu and Cd atoms dissolved in the ammonia aqueous solution and formed [Cu(NH3)2]+ and [Cd(NH3)4]2+ complex ions. Therefore, the chemical potentials of Cu and Cd atoms in [Cu(NH3)2]+ and [Cd(NH3)4]2+ complex ions were calculated. We found that the substitution energy of n-type CdCu is smaller than that of p-type CdIn. The substitution energy of CdCu in CIS is smaller than those in CGS and CAS. However, the substitution energies of CdCu and CdIn in CIS are positive values. The formation energy of charge-neutral Cd doping with the Cu vacancy (CdCu+VCu) pair is a negative value and greatly smaller than those of n-type CdCu in CIS, CGS, and CAS. These results indicate that the charge-neutral (CdCu+VCu) vacancy pair is easily formed during the CBD of the CdS layer on the CIS layer and a small amount of n-type CdCu would also be formed.

  12. Characterization of microbial and chemical composition of shuttle wet waste with permanent gas and volatile organic compound analyses.

    PubMed

    Peterson, B V; Hummerick, M; Roberts, M S; Krumins, V; Kish, A L; Garland, J L; Maxwell, S; Mills, A

    2004-01-01

    Solid-waste treatment in space for Advanced Life Support, ALS, applications requires that the material can be safely processed and stored in a confined environment. Many solid-wastes are not stable because they are wet (40-90% moisture) and contain levels of soluble organic compounds that can contribute to the growth of undesirable microorganisms with concomitant production of noxious odors. In the absence of integrated Advanced Life Support systems on orbit, permanent gas, trace volatile organic and microbiological analyses were performed on crew refuse returned from the volume F "wet" trash of three consecutive Shuttle missions (STS-105, 109, and 110). These analyses were designed to characterize the short-term biological stability of the material and assess potential crew risks resulting from microbial decay processes during storage. Waste samples were collected post-orbiter landing and sorted into packaging material, food waste, toilet waste, and bulk liquid fractions deposited during flight in the volume F container. Aerobic and anaerobic microbial loads were determined in each fraction by cultivation on R2A and by acridine orange direct count (AODC). Dry and ash weights were performed to determine both water and organic content of the materials. Experiments to determine the aerobic and anaerobic biostability of refuse stored for varying periods of time were performed by on-line monitoring of CO2 and laboratory analysis for production of hydrogen sulfide and methane. Volatile organic compounds and permanent gases were analyzed using EPA Method TO15 by USEPA et al. [EPA Method TO15, The Determination of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) in Ambient Air using SUMMA, Passivated Canister Sampling and Gas Chromatographic Analysis,1999] with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and by gas chromatography with selective detectors. These baseline measures of waste stream content, labile organics, and microbial load in the volume F Shuttle trash provide data for waste subsystem analysis and atmospheric management within the ALS Project. PMID:15846874

  13. Characterization of microbial and chemical composition of shuttle wet waste with permanent gas and volatile organic compound analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, B. V.; Hummerick, M.; Roberts, M. S.; Krumins, V.; Kish, A. L.; Garland, J. L.; Maxwell, S.; Mills, A.

    2004-01-01

    Solid-waste treatment in space for Advanced Life Support, ALS, applications requires that the material can be safely processed and stored in a confined environment. Many solid-wastes are not stable because they are wet (40-90% moisture) and contain levels of soluble organic compounds that can contribute to the growth of undesirable microorganisms with concomitant production of noxious odors. In the absence of integrated Advanced Life Support systems on orbit, permanent gas, trace volatile organic and microbiological analyses were performed on crew refuse returned from the volume F "wet" trash of three consecutive Shuttle missions (STS-105, 109, and 110). These analyses were designed to characterize the short-term biological stability of the material and assess potential crew risks resulting from microbial decay processes during storage. Waste samples were collected post-orbiter landing and sorted into packaging material, food waste, toilet waste, and bulk liquid fractions deposited during flight in the volume F container. Aerobic and anaerobic microbial loads were determined in each fraction by cultivation on R2A and by acridine orange direct count (AODC). Dry and ash weights were performed to determine both water and organic content of the materials. Experiments to determine the aerobic and anaerobic biostability of refuse stored for varying periods of time were performed by on-line monitoring of CO2 and laboratory analysis for production of hydrogen sulfide and methane. Volatile organic compounds and permanent gases were analyzed using EPA Method TO15 by USEPA et al. [EPA Method TO15, The Determination of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) in Ambient Air using SUMMA, Passivated Canister Sampling and Gas Chromatographic Analysis,1999] with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and by gas chromatography with selective detectors. These baseline measures of waste stream content, labile organics, and microbial load in the volume F Shuttle trash provide data for waste subsystem analysis and atmospheric management within the ALS Project. Published by Elsevier Ltd on behalf of COSPAR.

  14. Chemical mechanism of dioxygen activation by manganese(III) Schiff base compound in the presence of aliphatic aldehydes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Miyuki Suzuki; Takashi Ishikawa; Akihiko Harada; Shigeru Ohba; Masatomi Sakamoto; Yuzo Nishida

    1997-01-01

    The manganese(III) complexes with tetradentate Schiff base [H2(L)] derived from salicylaldehyde and 2-amino-1-benzylamine [abbreviated as H2(salabza)], ethylenedimaine and 2-hydroxybenzophenone [H2(7-Phe-salen)], ethylenediamine and 2-hydroxyacetophenone [H2(7-Me-salen)] showed much higher activity for degradation of tetraphenylcyclopentadienone(TCPN) the singlet oxygen (1?g) scavenger, in the presence of cyclohexanecarboxaldehyde than those of the compounds with H2(salen) and H2(salphen), which are derived from salicyaldehyde and ethylenediamine, and o-phenylenediamine,

  15. Identifying an interaction site between MutH and the C-terminal domain of MutL by crosslinking, affinity purification, chemical coding and mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Ahrends, Robert; Kosinski, Jan; Kirsch, Dieter; Manelyte, Laura; Giron-Monzon, Luis; Hummerich, Lars; Schulz, Oliver; Spengler, Bernhard; Friedhoff, Peter

    2006-01-01

    To investigate protein–protein interaction sites in the DNA mismatch repair system we developed a crosslinking/mass spectrometry technique employing a commercially available trifunctional crosslinker with a thiol-specific methanethiosulfonate group, a photoactivatable benzophenone moiety and a biotin affinity tag. The XACM approach combines photocrosslinking (X), in-solution digestion of the crosslinked mixtures, affinity purification via the biotin handle (A), chemical coding of the crosslinked products (C) followed by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry (M). We illustrate the feasibility of the method using a single-cysteine variant of the homodimeric DNA mismatch repair protein MutL. Moreover, we successfully applied this method to identify the photocrosslink formed between the single-cysteine MutH variant A223C, labeled with the trifunctional crosslinker in the C-terminal helix and its activator protein MutL. The identified crosslinked MutL-peptide maps to a conserved surface patch of the MutL C-terminal dimerization domain. These observations are substantiated by additional mutational and chemical crosslinking studies. Our results shed light on the potential structures of the MutL holoenzyme and the MutH–MutL–DNA complex. PMID:16772401

  16. Proteomic strategy for identifying mollusc shell proteins using mild chemical degradation and trypsin digestion of insoluble organic shell matrix: a pilot study on Haliotis tuberculata.

    PubMed

    Bédouet, Laurent; Marie, Arul; Berland, Sophie; Marie, Benjamin; Auzoux-Bordenave, Stéphanie; Marin, Frédéric; Milet, Christian

    2012-08-01

    A successful strategy for the identification of shell proteins is based on proteomic analyses where soluble and insoluble fractions isolated from organic shell matrix are digested with trypsin with the aim of generating peptides, which are used to identify novel shell proteins contained in databases. However, using trypsin as a sole degradative agent is limited by the enzyme's cleavage specificity and is dependent upon the occurrence of lysine and arginine in the shell protein sequence. To bypass this limitation, we investigated the ability of trifluoroacetic acid (TFA), a low-specificity chemical degradative agent, to generate clusters of analyzable peptides from organic shell matrix, suitable for database annotation. Acetic acid-insoluble fractions from Haliotis tuberculata shell were processed by trypsin followed by TFA digestion. The hydrolysates were used to annotate an expressed sequence tag library constructed from the mantle tissue of Haliotis asinina, a tropical abalone species. The characterization of sequences with repeat motifs featured in some of the shell matrix proteins benefited from TFA-induced serial cutting, which can result in peptide ladder series. Using the degradative specificities of TFA and trypsin, we were able to identify five novel shell proteins. This pilot study indicates that a mild chemical digestion of organic shell matrix combined with trypsin generates peptides suitable for proteomic analysis for better characterization of mollusc shell matrix proteins. PMID:22160345

  17. Formation and reactions of negative ions relevant to chemical ionization mass spectrometry. I. Cl mass spectra of organic compounds produced by F? reactions

    PubMed Central

    Tiernan, T. O.; Chang, C.; Cheng, C. C.

    1980-01-01

    A systematic study of the negative-ion chemical ionization mass spectra produced by the reaction of F? with a wide variety of organic compounds has been accomplished. A time-of-flight mass spectrometer fitted with a modified high pressure ion source was employed for these experiments. The F? reagent ion was generated from CF3H or NF3, typically at an ion source pressure of 100 ?m. In pure NF3, F? is the major ion formed and constitutes more than 90% of the total ion intensity. While F? is also the major primary ion formed in pure CF3H, it undergoes rapid ion-molecule reactions at elevated source pressures, yielding (HF)nF? (n = 1?3) ions, which makes CF3H less suitable as a chemical ionization reagent gas. Among the organic compounds investigated were carboxylic acids, ketones, aldehydes, esters, alcohols, phenols, halides, nitriles, nitrobenzene, ethers, amines and hydrocarbons. An intense (M ? 1)? ion was observed in the F? chemical ionization mass spectra of carboxylic acids, ketones, aldehydes and phenols. Alcohols yield only (M + F)? ions upon reaction with F?. A weaker (M + F)? ion was also detected in the F? chemical ionization spectra of carboxylic acids, aldehydes, ketones and nitriles. The F? chemical ionization mass spectra of esters, halides, nitriles, nitrobenzene and ethers are characterized primarily by the ions, RCOO?, X?, CN?, NO2?, and OR?, respectively. In addition, esters show a very weak (M ? 1)? ion (except formates). In the F? chemical ionization spectra of some aliphatic alkanes and o-xylene, a very weak (M + F)? ion was observed. Amines and aliphatic alkenes exhibit only insignificant fragment ions under similar conditions, while aromatic hydrocarbons, such as benzene and toluene are not reactive at all with the F? ion. The mechanisms of the various reactions mentioned are discussed, and several experimental complications are noted. In still other studies, the effects of varying several experimental parameters, including source pressure, relative proportions of the reagent and analyte, and other ion source parameters, on the observed chemical ionization mass spectra were also investigated. In a mixture of NF3 and n-butanol, for example, the ratio of the intensities of the ions characteristic of the alcohol to that of the (HF)nF? ion was found to decrease with increasing sample pressure, with increasing NF3 pressure, and with increasing electron energy. No significant effects on the spectra were observed to result from variation of the source repeller field or the source temperature. The addition of argon to the source as a potential moderator did not alter the F? chemical ionization spectrum significantly, but the use of oxygen appears to inhibit formation of the (HF)nF? cluster ion. The advantages of using F? as a chemical ionization reagent are discussed, and comparisons are made with other reagent ions. PMID:7428746

  18. Chemical effects on the K?? and K?2,5 x-ray lines of titanium and its compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandi?, Luka; Fazini?, Stjepko; Jakši?, Milko

    2009-10-01

    High-resolution K? x-ray spectra induced by 2 MeV protons in thick Ti, TiO, Ti2O3 , TiO2 , MgTiO3 , FeTiO3 , TiC, TiN, and TiB2 targets were measured using a wavelength dispersive spectrometer combined with a position-sensitive detector. The intensities and energies of the K?2,5 and K?? lines relative to the K?1,3 line were extracted. The influence of self-absorption in thick targets was investigated using related x-ray-absorption near-edge-structure spectra that are available in the literature to extract mass absorption coefficients close to the K absorption edge. The correlation of the relative position of the K?2,5 line with a titanium formal oxidation state in oxide compounds confirmed that the oxidation state of Ti in FeTiO3 is probably a mixture of Ti III and Ti IV states, which has been recently reported by other authors using different methods. The strengths of the K?2,5 and K?? transition probabilities per titanium-ligand pair were found to decrease exponentially as the average titanium-ligand bond distance increased, which is similar to results obtained for various compounds with vanadium or manganese as the central 3d metal atoms.

  19. Characterization of volatile organic compounds in human leukocyte antigen heterologous expression systems: a cell's "chemical odor fingerprint".

    PubMed

    Aksenov, Alexander A; Gojova, Andrea; Zhao, Weixiang; Morgan, Joshua T; Sankaran, Shankar; Sandrock, Christian E; Davis, Cristina E

    2012-05-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC), or human leukocyte antigen (HLA) gene-coding region in humans, plays a significant role in infectious disease response, autoimmunity, and cellular recognition. This super locus is essential in mate selection and kin recognition because of the organism-specific odor which can be perceived by other individuals. However, how the unique MHC genetic combination of an organism correlates with generation of the organism-specific odor is not well understood. In the present work, we have shown that human B-cells produce a set of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) that can be measured by GC-MS. More importantly, our results show that specific HLA alleles are related to production of selected VOCs, and that this leads to a cell-specific odor "fingerprint". We used a C1R HLA class I?A and B locus negative cell line, along with C1R cell lines that were stably transfected with specific A and B alleles. Our work demonstrates for the first time that HLA alleles can directly influence production of specific odor compounds at the cellular level. Given that the resulting odor fingerprint depends on expression of specific HLA sequences, it may yield information on unique human scent profiles, composition of exhaled breath, as well as immune response states in future studies. PMID:22488873

  20. Propolis Standardized Extract (EPP-AF®), an Innovative Chemically and Biologically Reproducible Pharmaceutical Compound for Treating Wounds

    PubMed Central

    Berretta, Andresa Aparecida; Nascimento, Andresa Piacezzi; Bueno, Paula Carolina Pires; de Oliveira Lima Leite Vaz, Mirela Mara; Marchetti, Juliana Maldonado

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a formulation, containing the propolis standardized extract (EPP-AF®), which can assist in the healing of skin lesions. To achieve this objective the antimicrobial activity and chemical composition of the propolis extract was determined. The final product was subjected to in vitro and in vivo pre-clinical evaluation. The broth macrodilution method was used to determine the antimicrobial activity of the extracts and formulations against the microorganisms most commonly found in burns, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis. Wistar rats with puncture wounded skin were used to evaluate the wound healing properties of propolis. The results of chemical and biological characterization demonstrated the batch-to-batch reproducibility of the standardized extract which is an unprecedented result. The antimicrobial and wound healing activity of the pharmaceutical studied showed the best results when samples contain 3.6% propolis, suggesting that this is the most promising composition. PMID:22457606

  1. Radiation damage in scintillator detector chemical compounds: a new approach using PPO-Toluene liquid scintillator as a model

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. H. Mesquita; J. M. Fernandes Neto; C. L. Duarte; P. R. Rela; M. M. Hamada

    2002-01-01

    The effect of radiation damage was evaluated in PPO-Toluene liquid scintillator solution. Samples containing PPO (1% w\\/v) diluted in toluene were prepared and irradiated at different doses, using a 60Co irradiator at 1.8 Gy\\/s. The effect of radiation on transmittance, light output, and chemical modification in the PPO were evaluated before and after irradiation. Transmittance loss at 360 nm decayed

  2. THP-1 monocytes but not macrophages as a potential alternative for CD34{sup +} dendritic cells to identify chemical skin sensitizers

    SciTech Connect

    Lambrechts, Nathalie [Flemish Institute for Technological Research (VITO N.V.), Centre of Expertise in Environmental Toxicology, Mol (Belgium)], E-mail: nathalie.lambrechts@vito.be; Verstraelen, Sandra [Flemish Institute for Technological Research (VITO N.V.), Centre of Expertise in Environmental Toxicology, Mol (Belgium)], E-mail: sandra.verstraelen@vito.be; Lodewyckx, Hanne; Felicio, Ana; Hooyberghs, Jef; Witters, Hilda [Flemish Institute for Technological Research (VITO N.V.), Centre of Expertise in Environmental Toxicology, Mol (Belgium); Tendeloo, Viggo van [University of Antwerp (Ukraine), Vaccine and Infectious Disease Institute, Laboratory of Experimental Hematology (Belgium); Cauwenberge, Paul van [University of Ghent (UGhent), Department of Otolaryngology (Belgium); Nelissen, Inge; Heuvel, Rosette van den [Flemish Institute for Technological Research (VITO N.V.), Centre of Expertise in Environmental Toxicology, Mol (Belgium); Schoeters, Greet [Flemish Institute for Technological Research (VITO N.V.), Centre of Expertise in Environmental Toxicology, Mol (Belgium); University of Antwerp (Ukraine), Department of Biomedical Sciences (Belgium)

    2009-04-15

    Early detection of the sensitizing potential of chemicals is an emerging issue for chemical, pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries. In our institute, an in vitro classification model for prediction of chemical-induced skin sensitization based on gene expression signatures in human CD34{sup +} progenitor-derived dendritic cells (DC) has been developed. This primary cell model is able to closely mimic the induction phase of sensitization by Langerhans cells in the skin, but it has drawbacks, such as the availability of cord blood. The aim of this study was to investigate whether human in vitro cultured THP-1 monocytes or macrophages display a similar expression profile for 13 predictive gene markers previously identified in DC and whether they also possess a discriminating capacity towards skin sensitizers and non-sensitizers based on these marker genes. To this end, the cell models were exposed to 5 skin sensitizers (ammonium hexachloroplatinate IV, 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene, eugenol, para-phenylenediamine, and tetramethylthiuram disulfide) and 5 non-sensitizers (L-glutamic acid, methyl salicylate, sodium dodecyl sulfate, tributyltin chloride, and zinc sulfate) for 6, 10, and 24 h, and mRNA expression of the 13 genes was analyzed using real-time RT-PCR. The transcriptional response of 7 out of 13 genes in THP-1 monocytes was significantly correlated with DC, whereas only 2 out of 13 genes in THP-1 macrophages. After a cross-validation of a discriminant analysis of the gene expression profiles in the THP-1 monocytes, this cell model demonstrated to also have a capacity to distinguish skin sensitizers from non-sensitizers. However, the DC model was superior to the monocyte model for discrimination of (non-)sensitizing chemicals.

  3. Hirsutellones and beyond: figuring out the biological and synthetic logics toward chemical complexity in fungal PKS-NRPS compounds.

    PubMed

    Li, Xu-Wen; Ear, Alexandre; Nay, Bastien

    2013-06-01

    Covering: up to early 2013. Fungal polyketides and their hybrid non ribosomal peptide derivatives are characterized by often striking structural features and biological activities. Their diversity and their complexity arise from highly organized and programmable biosynthetic pathways and have been challenged by many synthetic chemists. This review will conceptually illustrate how complexity can be generated, starting from a general biosynthetic purpose (the fundaments of PKS-NRPS assembly lines) and finally showing how the particular class of hirsutellone compounds has emerged from such processes in relation to post-elongation and secondary tailoring events. Synthetic efforts to produce these natural products will be described with a special emphasis on complexity-generating strategies and steps. Thus, the biosynthetic and synthetic works will be analyzed in a continuous flow, focusing on both the logic of Nature and organic chemists. PMID:23640165

  4. Quantum chemical study on HKrC?N, HXeC?N, and related rare gas compounds.

    PubMed

    Gronowski, Marcin; Turowski, Micha?; Ko?os, Robert

    2015-03-19

    The recent identification of HRgC5N (Rg = Kr, Xe) in a cryogenic matrix calls for an in-depth theoretical study on these compounds. Here we present the results of CCSD(T), MP2, and DFT calculations concerning the molecular structure, stability, and vibrational spectroscopy. The procedure combining CCSD(T) calculations for variable H-Rg distances with the anharmonic description of the corresponding stretching vibration, based on a Morse-type potential energy function, was proposed and has led to good agreement between computational and experimental values for H-Rg stretching frequencies, at relatively low computational costs. High Raman scattering activity of HRgC5N and of its isomers, predicted at the DFT level, gives some prospects for the detection of these molecules with a method alternative to the IR absorption spectroscopy. PMID:25535950

  5. Two-dimensional metal-organic framework with wide channels and responsive turn-on fluorescence for the chemical sensing of volatile organic compounds.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Mei; Feng, Guangxue; Song, Zhegang; Zhou, Yu-Peng; Chao, Hsiu-Yi; Yuan, Daqiang; Tan, Tristan T Y; Guo, Zhengang; Hu, Zhigang; Tang, Ben Zhong; Liu, Bin; Zhao, Dan

    2014-05-21

    We report a 2D layered metal-organic framework (MOF) with wide channels named NUS-1 and its activated analogue NUS-1a composed of Zn4O-like secondary building units and tetraphenylethene (TPE)-based ligand 4,4'-(2,2-diphenylethene-1,1-diyl)dibenzoic acid. Due to its special structure, NUS-1a exhibits unprecedented gas sorption behavior, glass-transition-like phase transition under cryogenic conditions, and responsive turn-on fluorescence to various volatile organic compounds. Our approach using angular ligand containing partially fixed TPE units paves a way toward highly porous MOFs with fluorescence turn-on response that will find wide applications in chemical sensing. PMID:24824627

  6. Mixed 3d/4f polynuclear complexes with 2,2?-oxydiacetate as bridging ligand: Synthesis, structure and chemical speciation of La M compounds (M = bivalent cation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domínguez, Sixto; Torres, Julia; Peluffo, Florencia; Mederos, Alfredo; González-Platas, Javier; Castiglioni, Jorge; Kremer, Carlos

    2007-03-01

    Heterometallic compounds containing La(III), bivalent cations M (M = Co, Ni, Ca), and 2,2?-oxydiacetate (oda) as connecting ligand have been prepared and characterized. The complexes can be formulated as [La2M3(oda)6(H2O)6] · 12H2O. The structure of [La2Co3(oda)6(H2O)6] shows the presence of the La(III) coordinated by six carboxy and three ether oxygen atoms, and the Co(II) cation bonded to four carboxy oxygens and two molecules of water. An open 3D framework is observed, containing large hexagonal channels. The chemical systems were also investigated in solution (25.0 °C, I = 0.5 M Me4NCl) by potentiometry. The same kind of polynuclear species have been found in aqueous solution.

  7. HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SPILL MONITORING: SAFETY HANDBOOK AND CHEMICAL HAZARD GUIDE. PART B - CHEMICAL DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    This two-part document is intended to serve as a guide to the hazards associated with a broad range of chemical compounds which may be encountered in hazardous materials spills. The document addresses 655 chemicals identified on the basis of known toxicity or spill history and de...

  8. Use of solid waste for chemical stabilization: Adsorption isotherms and {sup 13}C solid-state NMR study of hazardous organic compounds sorbed on coal fly ash

    SciTech Connect

    Netzel, D.A.; Lane, D.C.; Rovani, J.F.; Cox, J.D.; Clark, J.A.; Miknis, F.P.

    1993-09-01

    Adsorption of hazardous organic compounds on the Dave Johnston plant fly ash is described. Fly ash from Dave Johnston and Laramie River power plants were characterized using elemental, x-ray, and {sup 29}Si NMR; the Dave Johnston (DJ) fly ash had higher quartz contents, while the Laramie River fly ash had more monomeric silicate anions. Adsorption data for hydroaromatics and chlorobenzenes indicate that the adsorption capacity of DJ coal fly ash is much less than that of activated carbon by a factor of >3000; but it is needed to confirm that solid-gas and solid-liquid equilibrium isotherms can indeed be compared. However, for pyridine, pentachlorophenol, naphthalene, and 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane, the DJ fly ash appears to adsorb these compounds nearly as well as activated carbon. {sup 13}C NMR was used to study the adsorption of hazardous org. cpds on coal fly ash; the nuclear spin relaxation times often were very long, resulting in long experimental times to obtain a spectrum. Using a jumbo probe, low concentrations of some hazardous org. cpds could be detected; for pentachlorophenol adsorbed onto fly ash, the chemical shift of the phenolic carbon was changed. Use of NMR to study the adsorption needs further study.

  9. Photoluminescence and secondary ion mass spectrometry investigation of unintentional doping in epitaxial germanium thin films grown on III-V compound by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Yu; Bulsara, Mayank T.; Fitzgerald, Eugene A.

    2012-01-01

    High quality epitaxial germanium (Ge) thin films grown on lattice matched and mismatched III-V compound may lead to development of new electronic and optoelectronic devices. Understanding the doping and electronic properties of these Ge thin films is the first step in this development. In this paper, we report on high-quality epitaxial Ge thin films grown on GaAs and AlAs by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy reveal the high structural quality of the Ge thin films. Using photoluminescence, secondary ion mass spectrometry, and spreading resistance analysis, we investigated the unintentional doping characteristics of the fabricated Ge-on-III-V thin films. We found that arsenic (n-type doping) concentration is determined by the background partial pressure of volatile As-species (e.g., As2 and As4), which incorporate into the Ge thin films via gas phase transport during the growth. Group III element (p-type doping) incorporation in the Ge thin films occurs during the growth through a surface exchange process. There exists a trade-off between Ge film structural quality and group III element "auto-doping." III-V compound surfaces that are group III element-rich facilitate the initiation of Ge thin films with high crystalline quality and low surface roughness. However, the group-III-rich surfaces also result in high group III element (p-type doping) concentrations in the Ge thin films.

  10. Organic sulphur-containing compounds as corrosion inhibitors for mild steel in acidic media: correlation between inhibition efficiency and chemical structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özcan, M.; Dehri, ?.; Erbil, M.

    2004-09-01

    The effects of thiourea (TU), methylthiourea (MTU) and phenylthiourea (PTU) on the corrosion behaviour of mild steel in 0.1 M solution of H 2SO 4 have been investigated in relation to the concentration of thioamides (?CS?NH 2). These compounds are all similar on one side of the thiocarbonly group and different on the other. The experimental data obtained using the techniques of Rp (polarisation resistance) and EIS (electrochemical impedance spectroscopy). The results showed that these compounds revaled a good corrosion inhibition, phenylthiourea being the most efficient and thiourea the least. The effect of molecular structure on the inhibition efficiency on corrosion has been investigated by ab initio quantum chemical calculations. The electronic properties such as highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO), lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) energy levels, LUMO-HOMO energy gap and molecular orbital densities were calculated. The relations between the inhibition efficiency and some quantum parameters have been discussed and obvious correlations were found. The highest values of the HOMO densities were found in the vicinity of the sulphur atom indicating it as most probable adsorption centre.

  11. Use of Fingerprinting and Marker Compounds for Identification and Standardization of Botanical Drugs: Strategies for Applying Pharmaceutical HPLC Analysis to Herbal Products

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Natalie J. Lazarowych; Peter Pekos

    1998-01-01

    For standardization of natural product drugs, single chemical entities, “marker compounds,” may be used as potency standards in high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis. Using well-characterized marker compounds, conventional pharmaceutical manufacturing criteria for assay and content uniformity may be applied. These marker compounds may be used to help identify herbal materials, set specifications for raw materials, standardize botanical preparations during

  12. Combination of Biological Screening in a Cellular Model of Viral Latency and Virtual Screening Identifies Novel Compounds That Reactivate HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Gallastegui, Edurne; Marshall, Brett; Vidal, David; Sanchez-Duffhues, Gonzalo; Collado, Juan A.; Alvarez-Fernández, Carmen; Luque, Neus; Terme, Jean-Michel; Gatell, Josep M.; Sánchez-Palomino, Sonsoles; Muñoz, Eduardo; Mestres, Jordi; Verdin, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Although highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has converted HIV into a chronic disease, a reservoir of HIV latently infected resting T cells prevents the eradication of the virus from patients. To achieve eradication, HAART must be combined with drugs that reactivate the dormant viruses. We examined this problem in an established model of HIV postintegration latency by screening a library of small molecules. Initially, we identified eight molecules that reactivated latent HIV. Using them as templates, additional hits were identified by means of similarity-based virtual screening. One of those hits, 8-methoxy-6-methylquinolin-4-ol (MMQO), proved to be useful to reactivate HIV-1 in different cellular models, especially in combination with other known reactivating agents, without causing T-cell activation and with lower toxicity than that of the initial hits. Interestingly, we have established that MMQO produces Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK) activation and enhances the T-cell receptor (TCR)/CD3 stimulation of HIV-1 reactivation from latency but inhibits CD3-induced interleukin-2 (IL-2) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-?) gene transcription. Moreover, MMQO prevents TCR-induced cell cycle progression and proliferation in primary T cells. The present study documents that the combination of biological screening in a cellular model of viral latency with virtual screening is useful for the identification of novel agents able to reactivate HIV-1. Moreover, we set the bases for a hypothetical therapy to reactivate latent HIV by combining MMQO with physiological or pharmacological TCR/CD3 stimulation. PMID:22258251

  13. Phytochemical and physical-chemical analysis of Polish willow (Salix spp.) honey: identification of the marker compounds.

    PubMed

    Jerkovi?, Igor; Ku?, Piotr Marek; Tuberoso, Carlo Ignazio Giovanni; Šaroli?, Mladenka

    2014-02-15

    The case study of Polish Salix spp. honey was compared with published data on willow honey from other regions. GC-FID/MS (after HS-SPME and ultrasonic solvent extraction) and targeted HPLC-DAD were applied. Phenolic content, FRAP/DPPH assays and the colour coordinates were determined spectrophotometrically. Beside ubiquitous linalool derivatives, borneol (up to 10.9%), bicyclic monoterpenes with pinane skeleton (pinocarvone up to 10.6%, myrtenal up to 4.8% and verbenone up to 3.4%) and trans-?-damascenone (up to 13.0%) dominated in the headspace. The main compounds of the extractives were vomifoliol (up to 39.6%) and methyl syringate (up to 16.5%) along with not common 4-hydroxy-3-(1-methylethyl)benzaldehyde (up to 11.1%). Abscisic acid (ABA) was found (up to 53.7 mg/kg) with the isomeric ratio (Z,E)-ABA:(E,E)-ABA=1:2. The honey exhibited low antioxidant potential with pale yellow colour. The composition of Polish willow honey is similar to Mediterranean willow honeys with several relevant differences. PMID:24128442

  14. Activation of complement by plicatic acid, the chemical compound responsible for asthma due to western red cedar (Thuja plicata).

    PubMed

    Chan-Yeung, M; Giclas, P C; Henson, P M

    1980-05-01

    Plicatic acid, a low-molecular-weight compound responsible for western red cedar (Thuja plicata) asthma was tested for its ability to activate complement and to generate chemotactic activity from pooled normal human serum (NHS). Dose-dependent complement consumption was found as determined by hemolytic assay (CH50). Activation of complement by plicatic acid was also confirmed by the demonstration of conversion of C3 to C3b on immunoelectrophoresis. This activation was completely prevented by pretreating the serum with either edetate (EDTA) or ethylene glycol tetraacetic acid (EGTA), suggesting that complement was activated via the classical pathway. No conversion of factor B was seen in any of the samples. Leukocyte chemotactic activity was also generated when serum was incubated with plicatic acid. The consumption of C3 and CH50 was unimpaired in two samples of serum from patients with severe, untreated hypogammaglobulinemia and thus appears to be immunoglobulin independent. These observations suggest that plicatic acid could activate complement in vivo, thereby inducing an inflammatory response in the airways and contributing to the higher prevalence of industrial chronic bronchitis in exposed subjects. The pathogenetic role of complement activation in red cedar asthma has yet to elucidated. PMID:6768786

  15. A new alkali metal titanotantalate, KTi 2Ta 5O 17—A compound that exhibits the "chemically twinned" rutile structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatehouse, B. M.; Nesbit, M. C.

    1980-07-01

    KTi 2Ta 5O 17 crystallizes in the orthorhombic system with unit-cell dimensions (from single-crystal data) a = 6.672(4) Å, b = 8.948(5) Å, c = 21.403(9) Å and space group Cmcm, Z = 4. The structure was solved using three-dimensional Patterson and Fourier techniques. Of the 1034 reflections measured by counter techniques, 704 with I ? 3 ?( I) were used in the least-squares refinement of the model to a conventional R of 0.041 ( ?R = 0.043). The structure consists of edge- and corner-shared tantalum octahedra joined such that tunnels are formed in which the potassium ions are located. Slabs of octahedra are of the rutile (TiO 2) type related to one another by mirror planes (in which the potassium ions are located), producing a structure that may be considered as a "chemical twin" of the rutile structure.

  16. Chemical Stimulation of Engineered Geothermal Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, Peter, E.

    2008-08-08

    The objective of this project is to design, develop and demonstrate methods for the chemical stimulation of candidate EGS reservoirs as well as the chemical treatment of mineral-scaled wellbores. First, a set of candidate chemical compounds capable of dissolving calcite was identified. A series of tests was then performed on each candidate in order to screen it for thermal stability and reactivity towards calcite. A detailed analysis was then performed on each compound that emerged from the screening tests in order to characterize its decay kinetics and reaction kinetics as functions of temperature and chemical composition. From among the compounds emerging from the laboratory studies, one compounds was chosen for a field experiment in order to verify the laboratory predictions.

  17. Regulating compounding pharmacies.

    PubMed

    Noble, Ashley

    2015-06-01

    (1) The Pew Charitable Trusts identified 27 compounding incidents that resulted in 89 deaths since 2001. (2) Unlike drug manufacturers, compounding pharmacies are generally not required to report adverse events associated with their products to the FDA. (3) Federal law on drug compounding was updated in 2013 to create a new group of compounders called "outsourcing facilities." Over 50 facilities in 23 states are now registered with the FDA. PMID:26137607

  18. Ozonation of sludge-press liquors: Determination of carbonyl compounds by the PFBOA method and the effect on the chemical oxygen demand

    SciTech Connect

    Boyle, L.L.; McCullough, N.H. [Univ. Chemical Lab., Kent (United Kingdom); Poppelen, P. van [Southern Water Services Limited, Kent (United Kingdom)

    1996-12-31

    The European Community Urban Waste Water Treatment Directive, May 1991, requires water service companies to provide sufficient wastewater treatment to meet a new limit set for the Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) in final effluent and new legislation has placed limits on the levels of COD that can be discharged from wastewater treatment works using secondary treatment processes. The current permitted upper level for COD in the final effluent is 125 mg per litre. Ozone is a strong oxidant and disinfectant and in contrast to chlorine, does not produce chlorinated by-products from its reaction with natural organic matter in water. In spite of the successful use of ozone for the treatment of potable waters since the early part of the century very few studies have been undertaken into possible chemical by-products which might arise from ozonation. Since the amount of ozone applied is always lower than that required to oxidize all the organic matter to carbon dioxide and water, a number of semi-oxidation products such as aromatic, phenolic and aliphatic carboxylic acids, aldehydes and ketones can be expected to be formed. The ozonation of sludge-press liquors and the resultant effect on COD was investigated. The concentration of carbonyl compounds was analyzed using O-(pentafluorobenzyl) hydroxylamine (PFBOA) as a derivatising agent in Gas Chromatographic (GC) determination.

  19. Effect of phenolic compound removal on rheological, thermal and physico-chemical properties of soybean and flaxseed proteins.

    PubMed

    Alu'datt, Muhammad H; Rababah, Taha; Alli, Inteaz

    2014-03-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of removal of phenolics on physico-chemical properties of protein isolates obtained from flaxseed and soybean. Proteins were isolated (I) from full-fat (F) and defatted (D) soybean (s) and flaxseed (f) using isoelectric precipitation. Free and bound phenolics were removed from the protein isolates. Thermal and gelation properties of protein isolates before and after removal of phenolics were investigated. Protein isolates from defatted soybean after removal of free and bound phenolics were showed a decrease in thermal stability of glycinin. For protein isolate from full-fat soybean, the results showed the removal of free phenolics increase thermal stability of glycinin with increase water holding capacity (WHC) and produce more viscous and less elastic gels as compared to protein isolate after removal of bound phenolics. Removal of free and bound phenolics from flaxseed protein isolates decrease thermal stability, WHC and viscoelastic properties as compared to protein isolate after removal of free phenolics. PMID:24176388

  20. Studies on the chemical constituents of the roots of Rhododendron molle G. Don.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Yanni; Zhang, Changgong; Zheng, Yajie

    2004-01-01

    The compounds from the root of Rhododendron molle G. Don were isolated, purified by various chromatographic techniques, and their structures were identified according to the physical and chemical features and spectral data. Three compounds were separated from the root of Rhododendron molle G. Don and identified as Rhodojaponin-III, taraxerol, beta-sitosterol for the first time. PMID:15315181

  1. Chemical, pharmacological, and in vitro metabolic stability studies on enantiomerically pure RC-33 compounds: promising neuroprotective agents acting as ?? receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Daniela; Pedrali, Alice; Gaggeri, Raffaella; Marra, Annamaria; Pignataro, Luca; Laurini, Erik; Dal Col, Valentina; Fermeglia, Maurizio; Pricl, Sabrina; Schepmann, Dirk; Wünsch, Bernhard; Peviani, Marco; Curti, Daniela; Collina, Simona

    2013-09-01

    Our recent research efforts identified racemic RC-33 as a potent and metabolically stable ?? receptor agonist. Herein we describe the isolation of pure RC-33 enantiomers by chiral chromatography, assignment of their absolute configuration, and in vitro biological studies in order to address the role of chirality in the biological activity of these compounds and their metabolic processing. The binding of enantiopure RC-33 to the ?? receptor was also investigated in silico by molecular dynamics simulations. Both RC-33 enantiomers showed similar affinities for the ?? receptor and appeared to be almost equally effective as ?? receptor agonists. However, the R-configured enantiomer showed higher in vitro hepatic metabolic stability in the presence of NADPH than the S enantiomer. Overall, the results presented herein led us to select (R)-RC-33 as the optimal candidate for further in vivo studies in an animal model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. PMID:23832823

  2. Identification of volatile compounds released from biological tissue during CO2 laser treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francke, Wittko; Fleck, Olaf; Mihalache, Doina-Lucia; Woellmer, Wolfgang

    1995-01-01

    A total of 148 volatile compounds were identified from the laser plume produced by a 10 W CO2 laser upon irradiation of pig liver. Structure elucidation was carried out by coupled gas chromatography mass spectrometry using reference samples. The identified compounds include hydrocarbons, alcohols, aldehydes, acids, esters, amides nitriles, ketones, furans, phenols, pyrazines, pyridines, and sulphur-compounds. Toluene, styrene, methylpyrazine, benzaldehyde, benzylcyanide, 4-methylphenol, indol and scatol for the major components of the pyrolysis products; derivatives may also reach higher concentrations. An interesting group of O/N-compounds with closely related chemical structures remained unknown.

  3. Some chemical contaminant of surface sediments at the Baltic Sea coastal region with special emphasis on androgenic and anti-androgenic compounds.

    PubMed

    Falandysz, J; Albanis, T; Bachmann, J; Bettinetti, R; Bochentin, I; Boti, V; Bristeau, S; Daehne, B; Dagnac, T; Galassi, S; Jeannot, R; Oehlmann, J; Orlikowska, A; Sakkas, V; Szczerski, R; Valsamaki, V; Schulte-Oehlmann, U

    2006-01-01

    Androgenic and anti-androgenic compounds including p,p'-DDE, Diuron, Linuron, Fenarimol, Vinclozolin, 1-(3,4-dichlorophenyl) urea (DCPU), 1-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-3-methylurea, (DCPMU), tributyltin (TBT) and triphenyltin (TPT) and their metabolites (DBT, MBT, DPT, MPT) as well as metallic elements (Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Cd, Pb, Co, Tl, Cr, Fe, Mn, Al, K, Mg, Na, Ca, Ba, Ti, Sn), PAHs (16 indicator compounds), DDTs and PCBs have been quantified in top layer (0-10 cm) of up to 37 surface sediment samples collected from several sites in costal zone of the Gulf of Gda?sk, an inland freshwater area of Brdyuj?cie in Poland and the tidal flats of the Norderney Island, Wadden Sea in 2002-2003. These sites differed in the degree of anthropogenic activities, including chemical pollution and related impact on biota. Especially in sediments near shipyards, ship repair facilities, harbours, other industrial activities or close to municipal sewage treatment plant outlets butyltins, PAHs and some metallic elements were found at high concentrations. Diuron, Linuron and DCPMU were detected at a few sites, Fenarimol only once, while Vinclozolin and DCPU were not detected. DDT concentrations in the sediments from the Gda?sk and Gdynia region of the Gulf show a stepwise decrease following the ban for production and use, while diffusion of PCBs at some industrial sites seems to continue. Elevated PAH concentrations in sediments seem to be mainly due to pyrogenic and less to mixed pyrogenic and petrogenic sources, while for a few sites rather petrogenic sources dominated. The reference sites in the Norderney Island, Wadden Sea showed similar or slightly higher loads of DDTs, BTs, PAHs, PCBs and metallic elements when compared to sediments from the least contaminated sites in the coastal Gulf of Gda?sk area, while phenyltins were not detected at both spatially distant European areas. PMID:17018405

  4. Identification of organic compounds on diesel engine soot

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ming-Li. Yu; Ronald A. Hites

    1981-01-01

    Several studies have shown that extracts of soot collected from light-duty diesel engines cause mutations in bacteria and mammalian cells both with and without metabolic activation. To help identify the specific compounds responsible for these biological effects, the detailed chemical composition of one such extract by gas chromatographic mass spectrometry was investigated. The two most mutagenic fractions contain alkylated phenanthrenes,

  5. MEASUREMENT OF VOLATILE SULFUR COMPOUNDS ASSOCIATED WITH ANIMAL FEEDING OPERATIONS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Volatile sulfur compounds (VSC) are a major class of chemicals associated with odor from animal feeding operations. Identifying and quantifying VSC in air is challenging due to their volatility, reactivity, and low concentrations. In this study, a canister based method is presented that allowed fo...

  6. EVALUATION OF THE REMOVAL OF POTENTIALLY HORMONALLY ACTIVE COMPOUNDS (ENDOCRINE DISRUPTING COMPOUNDS) BY DRINKING WATER TREATMENT PROCESSES.

    EPA Science Inventory

    A number of the chemicals identified as potential EDCs may be present in surface or ground waters used as drinking water sources due to their introduction from domestic and industrial sewage treatment systems and wet-weather runoff. Many of these compounds have already been show...

  7. A novel chemical footprinting approach identifies critical lysine residues involved in the binding of receptor-associated protein to cluster II of LDL receptor-related protein.

    PubMed

    Bloem, Esther; Ebberink, Eduard H T M; van den Biggelaar, Maartje; van der Zwaan, Carmen; Mertens, Koen; Meijer, Alexander B

    2015-05-15

    Tandem mass tags (TMTs) were utilized in a novel chemical footprinting approach to identify lysine residues that mediate the interaction of receptor-associated protein (RAP) with cluster II of LDL (low-density lipoprotein) receptor (LDLR)-related protein (LRP). The isolated RAP D3 domain was modified with TMT-126 and the D3 domain-cluster II complex with TMT-127. Nano-LC-MS analysis revealed reduced modification with TMT-127 of peptides including Lys256, Lys270 and Lys305-Lys306 suggesting that these residues contribute to cluster II binding. This agrees with previous findings that Lys256 and Lys270 are critical for binding cluster II sub-domains [Fisher, Beglova and Blacklow (2006) Mol. Cell 22, 277-283]. Cluster II-binding studies utilizing D3 domain variants K256A, K305A and K306A now showed that Lys306 contributes to cluster II binding as well. For full-length RAP, we observed that peptides including Lys60, Lys191, Lys256, Lys270 and Lys305-Lys306 exhibited reduced modification with TMT in the RAP-cluster II complex. Notably, Lys60 has previously been implicated to mediate D1 domain interaction with cluster II. Our results suggest that also Lys191 of the D2 domain contributes to cluster II binding. Binding studies employing the RAP variants K191A, K256A, K305A and K306A, however, revealed a modest reduction in cluster II binding for the K256A variant only. This suggests that the other lysine residues can compensate for the absence of a single lysine residue for effective complex assembly. Collectively, novel insight has been obtained into the contribution of lysine residues of RAP to cluster II binding. In addition, we propose that TMTs can be utilized to identify lysine residues critical for protein complex formation. PMID:25728577

  8. Molecular Docking and NMR Binding Studies to Identify Novel Inhibitors of Human Phosphomevalonate Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Boonsri, Pornthip; Neumann, Terrence S.; Olson, Andrew L.; Cai, Sheng; Herdendorf, Timothy J.; Miziorko, Henry M.; Hannongbua, Supa; Sem, Daniel S.

    2012-01-01

    Phosphomevalonate kinase (PMK) phosphorylates mevalonate-5-phosphate (M5P) in the mevalonate pathway, which is the sole source of isoprenoids and steroids in humans. We have identified new PMK inhibitors with virtual screening, using Autodock. Promising hits were verified and their affinity measured using NMR-based 1H-15N Heteronuclear Single Quantum Coherence (HSQC) chemical shift perturbation and fluorescence titrations. Chemical shift changes were monitored, plotted, and fitted to obtain dissociation constants (Kd). Tight binding compounds with Kd’s ranging from 6–60 µM were identified. These compounds tended to have significant polarity and negative charge, similar to the natural substrates (M5P and ATP). HSQC crosspeak changes suggest that binding induces a global conformational change, such as domain closure. Compounds identified in this study serve as chemical genetic probes of human PMK, to explore pharmacology of the mevalonate pathway, as well as starting points for further drug development. PMID:23146631

  9. Chemical proteomics-driven discovery of oleocanthal as an Hsp90 inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Margarucci, Luigi; Monti, Maria Chiara; Cassiano, Chiara; Mozzicafreddo, Matteo; Angeletti, Mauro; Riccio, Raffaele; Tosco, Alessandra; Casapullo, Agostino

    2013-07-01

    Hsp90, a key target in cancer therapy, has been identified as the main partner of oleocanthal, an olive oil bioactive compound. A combination of chemical and biological assays disclosed its mechanism of action at the molecular level. PMID:23703283

  10. Identifying Inter-Residue Resonances in Crowded 2D 13C-13C Chemical Shift Correlation Spectra of Membrane Proteins by Solid-State MAS NMR Difference Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Yimin; Cross, Timothy A.; Fu, Riqiang

    2013-01-01

    The feasibility of using difference spectroscopy, i.e. subtraction of two correlation spectra at different mixing times, for substantially enhanced resolution in crowded two-dimensional 13C-13C chemical shift correlation spectra is presented. With the analyses of 13C-13C spin diffusion in simple spin systems, difference spectroscopy is proposed to partially separate the spin diffusion resonances of relatively short intra-residue distances from the longer inter-residue distances, leading to a better identification of the inter-residue resonances. Here solid-state magic-angle-spinning (MAS) NMR spectra of the full length M2 protein embedded in synthetic lipid bilayers have been used to illustrate the resolution enhancement in the difference spectra. The integral membrane M2 protein of Influenza A virus assembles as a tetrameric bundle to form a protonconducting channel that is activated by low pH and is essential for the viral lifecycle. Based on known amino acid resonance assignments from amino acid specific labeled samples of truncated M2 sequences or from time-consuming 3D experiments of uniformly labeled samples, some inter-residue resonances of the full length M2 protein can be identified in the difference spectra of uniformly 13C labeled protein that are consistent with the high resolution structure of the M2 (22–62) protein (Sharma et al. 2010). PMID:23708936

  11. [Studies on the chemical constituents of Vaccinium iteophyllum].

    PubMed

    Wei, Jian; Zhu, Hai-yan; Shen, De-feng; Yang, Bo; Yang, Xiao-sheng

    2007-01-01

    7 compounds were isolated from the ethyl-acetate extract of Vaccinium iteophyllum Hance by using repeated silical gel column chromatography. These 7 compounds were identified by means of physico-chemical propertic and spectroscopic analysis as beta-sitosterol (I), ursolic acid (II), taraxerol (III), taraxerone (IV), friedelin (V), friedelinol (VI), 19,24-dihydroxyurs-12-en-3-one-28-oic acid (VII). The chemical constituents from this plant were reported here for the first time. PMID:17539303

  12. Effects of complexometric compounds found in liquid and solid oil shale waste products on release of chemical elements from retorted shale

    SciTech Connect

    Esmaili, E.; Carroll, R.B.; Jackson, L.P.

    1985-05-01

    Complexometric compounds found in oil shale wastes may have the ability to increase the release of trace elements from retorted oil shale when the solid and liquid wastes are codisposed. A laboratory investigation was conducted on the effects of various complexing agents found in liquid and solid oil shale wastes on the leachability of retorted shales. In batch experiments retorted shale samples were contacted with deionized-distilled water (DDW) and 10 different aqueous solutions of complexing agents. These agents included sodium-oxalate, ammonium-carbonate, sodium-thiosulfate, 2-pyridone, 2-hydroxy-6-methylpyridine, potassium-thiocyanate, acetonitrile, sodium-acetate, acetamide, and nicotinic acid. DDW leachate results were used as a baseline to compare with the results for aqueous complexometric leachates. Some of these agents aided in higher release of arsenic, boron, selenium, lead, and vanadium from the solids. The same complexing agents had different effects on different retorted shales, indicating that the results for one retorted shale may or may not be representative of other retorted shales. This is due to differences in mineralogical residence of elements in various retorted shales and differences in leachate chemical systems of various retorted shales. Concentration of cadium and cobalt did not exceed the quantitation limits of these elements in any of the leachates in this study. 10 refs., 15 tabs.

  13. Sensory effects of capsaicin congeners. Part II: Importance of chemical structure and pungency in desensitizing activity of capsaicin-type compounds.

    PubMed

    Szolcsányi, J; Jancsó-Gábor, A

    1976-01-01

    The characteristic insensitivity of sensory nerve endings to chemically induced pain brought about by capsaicin could be reproduced on the rat's eye by pungent vanillylamides, homovanilloyl-alkylamides and piperine, while homovanilloyl-cycloalkylamides, -azacycloalkylamides, - alkylesters, -alkyl-homovanillylamides, undecenoyl-3-aminopropranololand zingerone were practically ineffective in this respect. Desensitizing potency was not parallel with the stimulating effect of the compounds, e.g. the strongly pungent homovanilloyl-octylester failed to desensitize the receptors, while the less pungent homovanilloyl-dodecylamide proved to be a more potent desensitizing agent than capsaicin itself. It is concluded that the inverse position of the acylamide linkage does not modify, while its replacement by an esteric group completely abolishes the desensitizing activity. In contrast to the stimulating effect, in desensitizing action the presence of an alkyl chain is essential and its optimal length corresponds to 10-12 C atoms. On the basis of these results the possible molecular interactions at the site of action are discussed. PMID:947170

  14. Analysis of the Hypersensitivity of the (29)Si NMR Chemical Shift of the Pentacoordinate Silicon Compounds to the Temperature Effect. N-(Silylmethyl)acetamides.

    PubMed

    Doronina, Evgeniya P; Sidorkin, Valery F; Lazareva, Nataliya F

    2015-04-16

    Theoretical investigation of the phenomenon of hypersensitivity of the (29)Si NMR chemical shift, ?, in the pentacoordinate silicon compounds to the temperature effect has been performed by the example of N-(silylmethyl)acetamides MeC(O)NMeCH2SiX3 (X = Me, 1; OMe, 2; F, 3) and MeC(O)NMeCH2SiMe2F (4) with the use of experimental dynamic NMR (DNMR) (29)Si data. It is based on the following: (i) the analysis of the potential energy surface of molecules 1-4 in polar solvents and the energetics of interconversion between their possible isomeric forms; (ii) the calculations of ? at different temperatures taking into account the dependence of the dielectric constant (?) of the medium on T, and (iii) the isolation of dynamic, geometrical, and polar contributions to the temperature drift of ?. The results obtained allowed us to give a consistent explanation of the DNMR (29)Si spectra of acetamides 1-4 and to elucidate the nature of an unusual effect of T on ?. PMID:25803817

  15. The formation of SOA and chemical tracer compounds from the photooxidation of naphthalene and its methyl analogs in the presence and absence of nitrogen oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleindienst, T. E.; Jaoui, M.; Lewandowski, M.; Offenberg, J. H.; Docherty, K. S.

    2012-09-01

    Laboratory smog chamber experiments have been carried out to investigate secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from the photooxidation of naphthalene and its methyl analogs, 1- and 2-methylnaphthalene (1-MN and 2-MN, respectively). Laboratory smog chamber irradiations were conducted in a flow mode to ensure adequate collection of the aerosol at reasonably low reactant concentrations and in the presence and absence of nitrogen oxides. Phthalic acid and methyl analogs were identified following BSTFA derivatization of the aerosol extract. These compounds were examined to determine whether they could serve as reasonable molecular tracers to estimate the contributions of these precursors to ambient PM2.5. Measurements were also made to determine aerosol parameters from secondary organic aerosol from naphthalene, 1-MN, and 2-MN. A mass fraction approach was used to establish factors which could be applied to phthalic acid concentrations in ambient aerosols, assuming a negligible contribution from primary sources. Phthalic anhydride uptake (and hydrolysis) was tested and found to represent a moderate filter artifact in filter measurements with and without in-line denuders. This study provided the opportunity to examine differences using authentic standards for phthalic acid compared to surrogate standards. While the mass fraction based on a surrogate compounds was somewhat lower, the differences are largely unimportant. For naphthalene, mass fractions of 0.0199 (recommended for ambient samples) and 0.0206 were determined in the presence and absence of nitrogen oxides, respectively, based on phthalic acid standards. The mass fractions determined from the laboratory data were applied to ambient samples where phthalic acid was found and expressed "as naphthalene" since phthalic acid was found to be produced in the particle phase from other methylnaphthalenes. The mass fraction values were applied to samples taken during the 2005 SOAR Study in Riverside, CA and 2010 CalNex Study in Pasadena. In both studies an undetermined isomer of methylphthalic acid was detected in addition to phthalic acid. Laboratory experiment retention times and mass spectra suggest that the major precursor for this compound is 2-MN. For the CalNex Study, SOC values for the 2-ring precursor PAHs (as naphthalene) were found to range from below the detection limit to 20 ngC m-3 which with the laboratory mass fraction data suggests an upper limit of approximately 1 ?g m-3 for SOA due to 2-ring PAHs. Temporal data over the course of the one-month CalNex study suggest that primary sources of phthalic acid were probably negligible during this study period. However, the values must still be considered upper limits given a potential hydrolysis reaction or uptake of phthalic anhydride (subsequently hydrolyzed) onto the collection media.

  16. Analysis of the Bacterial Response to Ru(CO)3Cl(Glycinate) (CORM-3) and the Inactivated Compound Identifies the Role Played by the Ruthenium Compound and Reveals Sulfur-Containing Species as a Major Target of CORM-3 Action

    PubMed Central

    Begg, Ronald; Jesse, Helen E.; Mann, Brian E.; Sanguinetti, Guido; Poole, Robert K.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Carbon monoxide (CO)-releasing molecules (CO-RMs) are being developed with the ultimate goal of safely utilizing the therapeutic potential of CO clinically. One such application is antimicrobial activity; therefore, we aimed to characterize and compare the effects of the CO-RM, CORM-3, and its inactivated counterpart, where all labile CO has been removed, at the transcriptomic and cellular level. Results: We found that both compounds are able to penetrate the cell, but the inactive form is not inhibitory to bacterial growth under conditions where CORM-3 is. Transcriptomic analyses revealed that the bacterial response to inactivated CORM-3 (iCORM-3) is much lower than to the active compound and that a wide range of processes appear to be affected by CORM-3 and to a lesser extent iCORM-3, including energy metabolism, membrane transport, motility, and the metabolism of many sulfur-containing species, including cysteine and methionine. Innovation: This work has demonstrated that both CORM-3 and its inactivated counterpart react with cellular functions to yield a complex response at the transcriptomic level. A full understanding of the actions of both compounds is vital to understand the toxic effects of CO-RMs. Conclusion: This work has furthered our understanding of how CORM-3 behaves at the cellular level and identifies the responses that occur when the host is exposed to the Ru compound as well as those that result from the released CO. This is a vital step in laying the groundwork for future development of optimized CO-RMs for eventual use in antimicrobial therapy. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 19, 1999–2012. PMID:23472713

  17. Lost in chemical space? Maps to support organometallic catalysis.

    PubMed

    Fey, Natalie

    2015-01-01

    Descriptors calculated from molecular structures have been used to map different areas of chemical space. A number of applications for such maps can be identified, ranging from the fine-tuning and optimisation of catalytic activity and compound properties to virtual screening of novel compounds, as well as the exhaustive exploration of large areas of chemical space by automated combinatorial building and evaluation. This review focuses on organometallic catalysis, but also touches on other areas where similar approaches have been used, with a view to assessing the extent to which chemical space has been explored. Graphical abstractCartoon representation of a chemical space map. PMID:26113874

  18. Complex Compound Chemical Heat Pumps 

    E-print Network

    Rockenfeller, U.; Langeliers, J.; Horn, G.

    1987-01-01

    industrial heat pumps. The main emphasis was directed towards a conceptual temperature amplifier bench scale prototype design, which allows for the conversion to heat amplifier operation by the mere exchange of adsorbent working fluid component without...

  19. Composition and Transport of Volatile Organic Compounds Near a Chemical and Radioactive Waste Disposal Facility in an Arid Environment with a Thick Unsaturated Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, R. J.; Andraski, B. J.; Stonestrom, D. A.; Luo, W.

    2010-12-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and low-level radioactive waste (LLRW) materials commonly occur together in mixed-waste disposal facilities. Volatile components of both waste types can be transported simultaneously away from the site through the unsaturated zone. Concentrations, variability, and transport of VOCs near mixed-waste-disposal facilities in arid environments remain poorly understood. In this study, plume-scale VOC composition of the deep and shallow unsaturated zone near such a facility in southwestern Nevada was observed over a 10-year period. Spatial and temporal variability of VOC concentrations were monitored, and vertical (upward) fluxes of VOCs through the unsaturated zone to the land surface were estimated. Vapor-phase samples were collected from two boreholes, each instrumented with 10-12 vapor-sampling ports at irregular intervals that extend the entire depth of the110-m unsaturated zone and are located 100 and 160 m away from the nearest LLRW trench. Also, an array of eight shallow (0.5- and 1.5-m depths) vapor-probe sets extending from 0-400 m from the LLRW facility was monitored. Chlorfluorocarbons (CFCs) constitute ~60 percent of total VOC mass, far more than any other compound or class. Chlorinated solvent chemicals (~29 percent) and gasoline-range hydrocarbons (~1 percent) also were detected in most sampling locations. Shallow and deep samples indicate VOC concentrations in the vapor plume are increasing with time and moving further off site. The highest total VOC concentration observed was about 47,000 ppbv. Vertical profiles of VOC concentrations implies a preferential lateral flow path at 20-40 m below land surface, and upward and downward diffusive fluxes away from the zone of peak concentrations. The coarse gravel in this depth interval appears to provide less resistance to vapor-phase transport than the finer-textured sediment layers above and below. VOC concentrations at 0.5 and 1.5 m below land surface and laboratory-measured sediment transport properties were used to estimate vertical fluxes of individual compounds within the shallow unsaturated zone. The highest vertical flux of total VOCs was 915 g m-2 y-1 and fluxes decreased with distance from the facility. These flux values are conservative, and do not consider advective mechanisms or atmospheric pumping. This study shows that VOCs can be transported substantial distances (>300 m) and depths (>100 m) from an arid waste-disposal facility, and large amounts of VOCs can be transported through the unsaturated zone toward land surface. In addition to the release of CFCs, which are green-house and ozone-depleting species, the results may have health-effect implications near disposal facilities in populated areas, where VOC vapors may intercept basements or other subsurface structures.

  20. Characterization of Nitrogen-Containing Species in Coal andPetroleum-Derived Products by ammonia Chemical Ionization-High Resolution MassSpectrometry.

    SciTech Connect

    None

    1997-01-01

    A coal-derived light distillate and a petroleum-derived residuum have been studied by high resolution mass spectrometry using both low-pressure ammonia chemical ionization and low-voltage electron impact ionization. A mass calibration mixture for use with ammonia chemical ionization has been developed. Selective ionization of the basic nitrogen-containing compounds by ammonia chemical ionization and compound type characterization of the resulting quasi-molecular species has been demonstrated. Several homologous series of nitrogen-containing compounds were identified in a basic extract by electron impact ionization and compared with quasimolecular analogs identified by ammonia chemical ionization.

  1. Small zebrafish in a big chemical pond

    PubMed Central

    Helenius, I. Taneli; Yeh, J.-R. Joanna

    2012-01-01

    The number of possible small organic molecules of different structure is virtually limitless. One of the main goals of chemical biologists is to identify, from this “chemical space”, entities that affect biological processes or systems in a specific manner. This can lead to a better understanding of the regulation and components of various biological machineries, as well as provide insights into efficacious therapeutic targets and drug candidates. However, the challenges confronting chemical biologists are multiple. How do we efficiently identify compounds that possess desirable activities without unwanted off-target effects? Once a candidate compound has been found, how do we determine its mode of action? In this Prospects piece, we call attention to recent studies using embryonic and larval zebrafish to illustrate the breadth and depth of questions in chemical biology that may be addressed using this model, and hope that they can serve as catalysts for future investigational ideas. PMID:22396148

  2. Bioassay-directed chemical analysis in environmental research

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dennis Schuetzle; Joellen Lewtas

    1986-01-01

    The use of short-term bioassay tests in conjunction with analytical measurements, constitute a powerful tool for identifying important environmental contaminants. The authors have coined the terminology bioassay directed chemical analysis to best describe this marriage of analytical chemistry and biology. The objective of this methodology is to identify key compounds in various types of air-pollutant samples. Once that task is

  3. Sulfur compounds in coal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Attar, A.; Corcoran, W. H.

    1977-01-01

    The literature on the chemical structure of the organic sulfur compounds (or functional groups) in coal is reviewed. Four methods were applied in the literature to study the sulfur compounds in coal: direct spectrometric and chemical analysis, depolymerization in drastic conditions, depolymerization in mild conditions, and studies on simulated coal. The data suggest that most of the organic sulfur in coal is in the form of thiophenic structures and aromatic and aliphatic sulfides. The relative abundance of the sulfur groups in bituminous coal is estimated as 50:30:20%, respectively. The ratio changes during processing and during the chemical analysis. The main effects are the transformation during processing of sulfides to the more stable thiophenic compounds and the elimination of hydrogen sulfide.

  4. Ultraviolet radiation screening compounds

    Microsoft Academic Search

    CHARLES S. COCKELL; JOHN KNOWLAND

    1988-01-01

    Amongst the diversity of methods used by organisms to reduce damage caused by ultraviolet (UV) radiation, the synthesis of UV-screening compounds is almost ubiquitous. UV-screening compounds provide a passive method for the reduction of UV-induced damage and they are widely distributed across the microbial, plant and animal kingdoms. They share some common chemical features. It is likely that on early

  5. The formation of SOA and chemical tracer compounds from the photooxidation of naphthalene and its methyl analogs in the presence and absence of nitrogen oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleindienst, T. E.; Jaoui, M.; Lewandowski, M.; Offenberg, J. H.; Docherty, K. S.

    2012-05-01

    Laboratory smog chamber experiments have been carried out to investigate secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation from the photooxidation of naphthalene and its methyl analogs, 1- and 2-methylnaphthalene (1-MN and 2-MN, respectively). Laboratory smog chamber irradiations were conducted in a flow mode to ensure adequate collection of the aerosol at reasonably low reactant concentrations and in the presence and absence of nitrogen oxides. Phthalic acid and methyl analogs were identified following BSTFA derivatization of the aerosol extract. These compounds were examined to determine whether they could serve as reasonable molecular tracers to estimate the contributions of these precursors to ambient PM2.5. Measurements were also made to determine aerosol parameters from secondary organic aerosol from naphthalene, 1-MN, and 2-MN. A mass fraction approach was used to establish factors which could be applied to phthalic acid concentrations in ambient aerosols, assuming a negligible contribution from primary sources. In addition, the hydrolysis of phthalic anhydride was tested and found to represent a moderate filter artifact in side-by-side filter measurements with and without in-line denuders. This study also provided the opportunity to examine numeric differences using authentic standards for phthalic acid compared to surrogate standards. While the mass fraction based on a surrogate compounds was somewhat lower, the differences are largely unimportant. For naphthalene, mass fractions of 0.023 and 0.019 were determined in the presence and absence of nitrogen oxides, respectively, based on the phthalic acid standards. The mass fractions determined from the laboratory data were then applied to ambient samples where phthalic acid was found and expressed "as naphthalene" since phthalic acid was found to be produced in the particle phase from other PAHs tested. The mass fraction values were applied to samples taken during the 2005 SOAR Study in Riverside, CA and 2010 CalNex Study in Pasadena. In both studies an undetermined isomer of methylphthalic acid was detected in addition to phthalic acid. Laboratory experiment retention times and mass spectra suggest that the major precursor for this compound is 2-MN. For the CalNex Study, SOC values for the gas-phase PAHs (as naphthalene) were found to range from below the detection limit to 20 ng C m-3 which together with the laboratory mass fraction data suggests an upper limit of 1 ?g m-3 for SOA due to PAHs. Temporal data over the course of the one-month CalNex study suggest that primary sources of phthalic acid were probably negligible during this study period. However, the values must still be considered upper limits given a potential gas-phase hydrolysis reaction or uptake of phthalic anhydride (subsequently hydrolyzed) onto the collection medium.

  6. New Hits as Antagonists of GPR103 Identified by HTS

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Preclinical data indicate that GPR103 receptor and its endogenous neuropeptides QRFP26 and QRFP43 are involved in appetite regulation. A high throughput screening (HTS) for small molecule GPR103 antagonists was performed with the clinical goal to target weight management by modulation of appetite. A high hit rate from the HTS and initial low confirmation with respect to functional versus affinity data challenged us to revise the established screening cascade. To secure high quality data while increasing throughput, the binding assay was optimized on quality to run at single concentration. This strategy enabled evaluation of a larger fraction of chemical clusters and singletons delivering 17 new compound classes for GPR103 antagonism. Representative compounds from three clusters are presented. One of the identified clusters was further investigated, and an initial structure–activity relationship study is reported. The most potent compound identified had a pIC50 of 7.9 with an improved ligand lipophilic efficiency. PMID:24900874

  7. Organic Compounds Database

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Bell, Harold M.

    2000-01-01

    The Colby College Department of Chemistry offers the Organic Compounds Database, which was compiled by Harold Bell of the Virginia Polytechnic Institute. Visitors can search by the compounds melting point, boiling point, index of refraction, molecular weight, formula, absorption wavelength, mass spectral peak, chemical type, and by partial name. Once entered, results are returned with basically the same type of information that can be searched, plus any other critical information. References are provided for the close to 2500 organic compounds included in the database; yet, because the site was last modified in 1995, varying the data may be required to fully authenticate its accuracy.

  8. A microwave and quantum chemical study of (trifluoromethyl)thiolacetic acid, CF3COSH, a compound with an unusual double-minimum potential.

    PubMed

    Møllendal, Harald

    2007-03-15

    The microwave spectra of CF3COSH and one deuterated species, CF3COSD, have been investigated by Stark spectroscopy in the 40-80 GHz spectral range at -78 degrees C and by quantum chemical calculations using the HF, MP2, and B3LYP procedures with the aug-cc-pVTZ basis set. The microwave spectrum of one conformer was assigned. The conformations of the COSH and CF3 groups determine the overall conformation of this rotamer. It was not possible experimentally to find precise values for the associated dihedral angles, but it appears that the COSH group is distorted somewhat from an exact synperiplanar arrangement, while the CF3 group is rotated several degrees from a position where one of the C-F bonds eclipses the C-S bond. This rotamer tunnels through a transition state that has an exact Cs symmetry, where one C-F bond eclipses the C-S bond and the COSH group is synperiplanar. Relative intensity measurements yielded 28(15) cm-1 for the tunneling frequency. Two additional vibrationally excited states were assigned and their frequencies determined to be 94(30) and 184(40) cm-1, respectively. The theoretical calculations predict conflicting conformational properties for the identified rotamer. The B3LYP calculations find an exact synperiplanar arrangement for the COSH group, whereas the MP2 and HF calculations predict that this group is distorted slightly form this conformation. One of the C-F bonds is found to eclipse the C-S bond in the B3LYP calculations, while the MP2 calculations predict a slight deviation and the HF calculations a large deviation from the eclipsed position, as the corresponding F-C-C-S dihedral angle is calculated to be 0.9 degrees (MP2) and 27.6 degrees (HF). All three methods of calculations predict that a second rotamer coexists with the identified form but is several kJ/mol less stable. The spectrum of this form, which has overall Cs symmetry and is predicted to have an antiperiplanar conformation for the COSH group with one of the C-F bonds eclipsing the C=O bond, was not identified. PMID:17388280

  9. Enantiomer distribution of major chiral volatile organic compounds in selected types of herbal honeys.

    PubMed

    Pažitná, Alexandra; Džúrová, Jana; Spánik, Ivan

    2014-10-01

    In this article, volatile organic compounds in 14 honey samples (rosemary, eucalyptus, orange, thyme, sage, and lavender) were identified. Volatile organic compounds were extracted using a solid phase microextraction method followed by gas chromatography connected with mass spectrometry analysis. The studied honey samples were compared based on their volatile organic compounds composition. In total, more than 180 compounds were detected in the studied samples. The detected compounds belong to various chemical classes such as terpenes, alcohols, acids, aldehydes, ketones, esters, norisoprenoids, benzene and furane derivatives, and organic compounds containing sulfur and nitrogen heteroatom. Ten chiral compounds (linalool, trans-linalool oxide, cis-linalool oxide, 4-terpineol, ?-terpineol, hotrienol, and four stereoisomers of lilac aldehydes) were selected for further chiral separation. PMID:25099214

  10. METHODS TO IDENTIFY YEAST

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Yeasts are commonly identified from either phenotype or, more recently, from diagnostic gene sequences. Methods based on phenotype include fermentation reactions on a select set of sugars and growth responses on various carbon and nitrogen sources or on other diagnostic compounds. Isolates are fur...

  11. Foreign language translation of chemical nomenclature by computer.

    PubMed

    Sayle, Roger

    2009-03-01

    Chemical compound names remain the primary method for conveying molecular structures between chemists and researchers. In research articles, patents, chemical catalogues, government legislation, and textbooks, the use of IUPAC and traditional compound names is universal, despite efforts to introduce more machine-friendly representations such as identifiers and line notations. Fortunately, advances in computing power now allow chemical names to be parsed and generated (read and written) with almost the same ease as conventional connection tables. A significant complication, however, is that although the vast majority of chemistry uses English nomenclature, a significant fraction is in other languages. This complicates the task of filing and analyzing chemical patents, purchasing from compound vendors, and text mining research articles or Web pages. We describe some issues with manipulating chemical names in various languages, including British, American, German, Japanese, Chinese, Spanish, Swedish, Polish, and Hungarian, and describe the current state-of-the-art in software tools to simplify the process. PMID:19239237

  12. Foreign Language Translation of Chemical Nomenclature by Computer

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Chemical compound names remain the primary method for conveying molecular structures between chemists and researchers. In research articles, patents, chemical catalogues, government legislation, and textbooks, the use of IUPAC and traditional compound names is universal, despite efforts to introduce more machine-friendly representations such as identifiers and line notations. Fortunately, advances in computing power now allow chemical names to be parsed and generated (read and written) with almost the same ease as conventional connection tables. A significant complication, however, is that although the vast majority of chemistry uses English nomenclature, a significant fraction is in other languages. This complicates the task of filing and analyzing chemical patents, purchasing from compound vendors, and text mining research articles or Web pages. We describe some issues with manipulating chemical names in various languages, including British, American, German, Japanese, Chinese, Spanish, Swedish, Polish, and Hungarian, and describe the current state-of-the-art in software tools to simplify the process. PMID:19239237

  13. [Chemical constituents from rizomes of Homalomena occulta].

    PubMed

    Xie, Xiao-Yu; Wang, Rui; Shi, Yan-Ping

    2013-07-01

    Column chromatography on silica gel and Sephadex LH-20 was used to study the chemical constituents of Homalomena occulta. The chemical structures of the separated compounds were elucidated by spectroscopic data analyseS. Twelve compounds were obtained and identified as 5-pentylresorcinol-b-glucoside (1), protocatechuic acid (2), 4-hydroxybenzoic acid (3), vanillic acid (4), 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furancarboxylic acid (5), 2-furoic acid (6), 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furfural (7), (R) -malic acid (8), (R) -dimethyl malate (9), trimethyl 1,2,3-propanetricarboxylate (10), 4-hydroxytetrahydrofuran-2-one (11) and (1S, 2S, 4S)-p-menthane-1,2, 4-triol (12). Among them, compound 1 was a new natural product, and compounds 4-12 were isolated from the genus for the first time. PMID:24199565

  14. Development and application of in vitro and in vivo reporter gene assays for he assessment of (xeno-)estrogenic compounds in the aquatic environment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Legler

    2001-01-01

    In recent years, both scientific and public concern about the possible threat of estrogenic compounds in the environment that may impact the reproduction of humans and wildlife has increased. Many substances have been demonstrated to possess estrogenic potency using in vitro test systems, and these compounds have been identified in the environment using chemical analysis. However, up until now, it

  15. Effects of twenty-five compounds on four species of aquatic fungi (Saprolegniales) pathogenic to fish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bailey, T.A.

    1984-01-01

    Four species of aquatic fungi (Achlya flagellata, A. racemosa, Saprolegnia hypogyna, and S. megasperma) were exposed to 25 chemicals representing seven classes of compounds for 15 and 60 min, in an effort to identify potential fungicidal agents for use in fish culture. The antifungal activity of each chemical was compared with that of malachite green, a reference compound with known fungicidal properties but not registered for fishery use. Six compounds which inhibited fungal growth on artificial media at concentrations of < 100 mg/l (listed in order of decreasing antifungal activity) were the cationics Du-terA? and copper oxychloride sulfate, the amine LesanA?, the amide BAS-389-O1F and the cationics CuprimyxinA? and RoccalA? II. Certain chemicals from these classes of compounds may have promise as aquatic fungicides.

  16. [Chemical constituents in higher polar substances from Desmodium caudatum].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Dan; Wang, Di; Wang, Guang-Hui; Guo, Zhi-Jian; Zou, Xiu-Hong; Lin, Ting; Chen, Hai-Feng

    2014-08-01

    In this study the chemical constituents of the higher polar sustances from Desmodium caudatum were investigated.The compounds were isolated by using column chromatographies over silicagel, polyamide, ODS, Sephadex LH-20, and preparative HPLC. The structures of these compounds were identified on the basis of NMR and MS spectra. Thirteen compounds were obtained and their structures were identified as vanillin(1), loliolide(2), indole-3-carboxaldehyde(3), salicylic acid(4), swertisin(5), saccharumoside C(6), isosinensin (7), kaempferol 3-O-?-D-glucopyranoside-7-O-?-L-rhamnopyranoside (8), isovitexin (9), vitexin (10), nothofagin(11), resveratroloside (12), and 2"-?-rhamnopyranosyl-7-O-methylvitexin (13). Except for compound 5, the remaining compounds were isolated from D. caudatum for the first time. Compounds 2, 3, 6-8, 11-13 were separated from the genus Desmodium for the first time. PMID:25509297

  17. [Studies on chemical constituents of Valeriana officinalis].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xia; Zhang, Jian-chao; Liu, Yan-wen; Fang, Yin

    2007-11-01

    From Valeriana officinalis L., 4 compounds were isolated and identified by various spectral analysis and chemical conversion, as valerenic acid, beta-sitosterol, ursolic acid, 4, 4', 8, 8'-tetrahydroxy-3, 3'-dimethoxyl-dibenzyl-ditetrahydrofuran and caryophyllene acide,valerane, naphthalene, linoleic acid, ethyl ester, myrtenyl acetate were identified by GC-MS. Ursolic acid and 4, 4', 8, 8'-tetrahydroxy-3, 3'-dimethoxyl-dibenzyl-ditetrahydrofuran were discovered in this plant for the first time. PMID:18323205

  18. Integrated automation for continuous high-throughput synthetic chromosome assembly and transformation to identify improved yeast strains for industrial production of biofuels and bio-based chemicals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An exponential increase in our understanding of genomes, proteomes, and metabolomes provides greater impetus to address critical biotechnological issues such as sustainable production of biofuels and bio-based chemicals and, in particular, the development of improved microbial biocatalysts for use i...

  19. A Ring Distortion Strategy to Construct Stereochemically Complex and Structurally Diverse Compounds from Natural Products

    PubMed Central

    Huigens, Robert W.; Morrison, Karen C.; Hicklin, Robert W.; Flood, Timothy A.; Richter, Michelle F.; Hergenrother, Paul J.

    2014-01-01

    High-throughput screening is the dominant method to identify lead compounds in drug discovery. As such, the makeup of screening libraries will largely dictate the biological targets that can be modulated and the therapeutics that can be developed. Unfortunately, most compound screening collections consist principally of planar molecules with little structural or stereochemical complexity, compounds that do not offer the arrangement of chemical functionality necessary for modulation of many drug targets. Here we describe a novel, general, and facile strategy for the creation of diverse compounds with high structural and stereochemical complexity using readily available natural products as synthetic starting points. We show, through evaluation of chemical properties including fraction of sp3 carbons, ClogP, and the number of stereogenic centers, that these compounds are significantly more complex and diverse than those in standard screening collections, and guidelines are given for the application of this strategy to any suitable natural product. PMID:23422561

  20. Characterization of cytochrome P450-mediated bioactivation of a compound containing the chemical scaffold, 4,5-dihydropyrazole-1-carboxylic acid-(4-chlorophenyl amide), to a chemically reactive p-chlorophenyl isocyanate intermediate in human liver microsomes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hao; Zientek, Michael; Jalaie, Mehran; Zhang, Yanhua; Bigge, Christopher; Mutlib, Abdul

    2009-09-01

    Compound A (Cmpd A) was previously reported to form p-chlorophenyl isocyanate (CPIC), which was trapped by GSH to yield S- (N- [p-chlorophenyl] carbamoyl) glutathione adduct (SCPG) in the presence of human liver microsomes. In this study, P450 3A4 and 2C9 were demonstrated to be the enzymes mediating the activation of Cmpd A to CPIC in human liver microsomes based on inhibitory and correlation studies. Enzyme kinetics studies indicated that P450 3A4 was the primary enzyme involved in the activation of Cmpd A. In silico P450 3A4 active site docking of Cmpd A exhibited a low energy pose that orientated the pyrazole ring proximate to the heme iron atom, in which the distance between the C-3 and potential activated oxygen species was shown to be 3.4 A. Quantum molecular calculations showed that the electron density on C-3 was relatively higher than those on C-4 and C-5. These measurements suggested that the C-3 of Cmpd A was the preferred site of oxidation and hence predisposed Cmpd A in forming CPIC as previously proposed. The in silico prediction was corroborated by studies with the C-3 substituted analogue (methyl at C-3), which showed minimal conversion to CPIC in human liver microsomes. These results demonstrated a pivotal role for P450 3A4 in bioactivating Cmpd A by oxidizing at C-3 of the pyrazoline, hence facilitating the CPIC formation. Evidence of the bioactivation to CPIC in vivo was obtained by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC/MS) analysis of urine samples from human subjects administered a structural analogue of Cmpd A. The presence of S-(N-[p-chlorophenyl] carbamoyl) N-acetyl l-cysteine (SCPAC) as well as p-chlorophenyl aniline (CPA) was unequivocally demonstrated in the urine samples. The chemical scaffold, 4,5-dihydropyrazole-1-carboxylic acid-[(4-chlorophenyl)-amide], was demonstrated to possess potential metabolic liability in forming a reactive intermediate, CPIC, in humans. Bioactivation to CPIC may cause undesirable side effects through its reactivity and subsequent conversion to CPA, an established rodent carcinogen. PMID:19697924