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Sample records for identify eggshell proteins

  1. Gene expression profiling to identify eggshell proteins involved in physical defense of the chicken egg

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background As uricoletic animals, chickens produce cleidoic eggs, which are self-contained bacteria-resistant biological packages for extra-uterine development of the chick embryo. The eggshell constitutes a natural physical barrier against bacterial penetration if it forms correctly and remains intact. The eggshell's remarkable mechanical properties are due to interactions among mineral components and the organic matrix proteins. The purpose of our study was to identify novel eggshell proteins by examining the transcriptome of the uterus during calcification of the eggshell. An extensive bioinformatic analysis on genes over-expressed in the uterus allowed us to identify novel eggshell proteins that contribute to the egg's natural defenses. Results Our 14 K Del-Mar Chicken Integrated Systems microarray was used for transcriptional profiling in the hen's uterus during eggshell deposition. A total of 605 transcripts were over-expressed in the uterus compared with the magnum or white isthmus across a wide range of abundance (1.1- to 79.4-fold difference). The 605 highly-expressed uterine transcripts correspond to 469 unique genes, which encode 437 different proteins. Gene Ontology (GO) analysis was used for interpretation of protein function. The most over-represented GO terms are related to genes encoding ion transport proteins, which provide eggshell mineral precursors. Signal peptide sequence was found for 54 putative proteins secreted by the uterus during eggshell formation. Many functional proteins are involved in calcium binding or biomineralization--prerequisites for interacting with the mineral phase during eggshell fabrication. While another large group of proteins could be involved in proper folding of the eggshell matrix. Many secreted uterine proteins possess antibacterial properties, which would protect the egg against microbial invasion. A final group includes proteases and protease inhibitors that regulate protein activity in the acellular uterine fluid

  2. Differential label-free quantitative proteomic analysis of avian eggshell matrix and uterine fluid proteins associated with eggshell mechanical property.

    PubMed

    Sun, Congjiao; Xu, Guiyun; Yang, Ning

    2013-12-01

    Eggshell strength is a crucial economic trait for table egg production. During the process of eggshell formation, uncalcified eggs are bathed in uterine fluid that plays regulatory roles in eggshell calcification. In this study, a label-free MS-based protein quantification technology was used to detect differences in protein abundance between eggshell matrix from strong and weak eggs (shell matrix protein from strong eggshells and shell matrix protein from weak eggshells) and between the corresponding uterine fluids bathing strong and weak eggs (uterine fluid bathing strong eggs and uterine fluid bathing weak eggs) in a chicken population. Here, we reported the first global proteomic analysis of uterine fluid. A total of 577 and 466 proteins were identified in uterine fluid and eggshell matrix, respectively. Of 447 identified proteins in uterine fluid bathing strong eggs, up to 357 (80%) proteins were in common with proteins in uterine fluid bathing weak eggs. Similarly, up to 83% (328/396) of the proteins in shell matrix protein from strong eggshells were in common with the proteins in shell matrix protein from weak eggshells. The large amount of common proteins indicated that the difference in protein abundance should play essential roles in influencing eggshell strength. Ultimately, 15 proteins mainly relating to eggshell matrix specific proteins, calcium binding and transportation, protein folding and sorting, bone development or diseases, and thyroid hormone activity were considered to have closer association with the formation of strong eggshell. PMID:24151251

  3. Minor proteins and enzymes of the Drosophila eggshell matrix.

    PubMed

    Fakhouri, Mazen; Elalayli, Maggie; Sherling, Daniel; Hall, Jacklyn D; Miller, Eric; Sun, Xutong; Wells, Lance; LeMosy, Ellen K

    2006-05-01

    The Drosophila eggshell provides an in vivo model system for extracellular matrix assembly, in which programmed gene expression, cell migrations, extracellular protein trafficking, proteolytic processing, and cross-linking are all required to generate a multi-layered and regionally complex architecture. While abundant structural components of the eggshell are known and are being characterized, less is known about non-abundant structural, regulatory, and enzymatic components that are likely to play critical roles in eggshell assembly. We have used sensitive mass spectrometry-based analyses of fractionated eggshell matrices to validate six previously predicted eggshell proteins and to identify eleven novel components, and have characterized the expression patterns of many of their mRNAs. Among these are several putative structural or regulatory (non-enzymatic) proteins, most larger in mass than the major eggshell proteins and often showing preferential expression in follicle cells overlying specific structural features of the eggshell. Of particular note are the putative enzymes, some likely to be involved in matrix cross-linking (two yellow family members previously implicated in eggshell integrity, a heme peroxidase, and a small-molecule oxidoreductase) and others possibly involved in matrix proteolysis or adhesion (proteins related to cathepsins B and D). This work provides a framework for future molecular studies of eggshell assembly. PMID:16515779

  4. Possible eggshell protein gene from Schistosoma mansoni.

    PubMed

    Johnson, K S; Taylor, D W; Cordingley, J S

    1987-01-01

    We have identified and sequenced a cDNA clone of a mRNA found only in mature female schistosomes. This mRNA is not detectably synthesized by female worms from single sex infections (unisexual females), by males or by the developing miracidia in the eggs. The clone hybridises to a highly abundant polyadenylated mRNA of approximately 1500 nucleotides. The nucleotide sequence of the clone predicts a polypeptide comprising two repetitive regions. A pentapeptide repeat with the consensus sequence Gly-Tyr-Asp-Lys-Tyr, and a region rich in histidine residues. Hybrid selected mRNA translated in vitro with [3H]tyrosine as labelled amino acid yields a polypeptide of 48 kDa (p48) that corresponds to the major [3H]tyrosine labelled translation product of female worm total mRNA. p48 does not label with [35S]methionine and is absent from the translation products of male and unisexual female mRNAs. The amino acid sequence of p48 has significant homologies to silk moth chorion proteins and we suggest that it is one of the major components of the schistosome eggshell probably accounting for the high level of [3H]tyrosine incorporation into the vitellaria of Schistosoma mansoni. The tyrosine content of the polypeptide suggests that it may play a role in phenol oxidase mediated cross-linking of the schistosome eggshell and in support of this we find that mushroom phenol oxidase will cause the specific cross-linking of p48 in in vitro translation products. PMID:3100949

  5. Proteins of insoluble matrix of avian (gallus gallus) eggshell.

    PubMed

    Miksík, Ivan; Eckhardt, Adam; Sedláková, Pavla; Mikulikova, Katerina

    2007-01-01

    The protein composition of the insoluble avian eggshell matrix was studied. The determination of these proteins insoluble in water (EDTA-insoluble) was carried out using enzymatic cleavage followed by a high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry method. The influence of various enzymes on the protein splitting also was studied. The distribution of proteins depends on the type of layer (localization within the eggshell): ovocalyxin-32 was found mainly in the outer layer (the cuticle); ovocleidin-116 and 17 and ovocalyxin-36 were found throughout the whole eggshell, whereas ovalbumin was only found in the inner layer, the mammillary. The pigment (protoporphyrin IX) was mainly found in the cuticle and is incorporated into the protein network. PMID:17364661

  6. Integrating transcriptome and genome re-sequencing data to identify key genes and mutations affecting chicken eggshell qualities.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Quan; Zhu, Feng; Liu, Long; Zheng, Chuan Wei; Wang, De He; Hou, Zhuo Cheng; Ning, Zhong Hua

    2015-01-01

    Eggshell damages lead to economic losses in the egg production industry and are a threat to human health. We examined 49-wk-old Rhode Island White hens (Gallus gallus) that laid eggs having shells with significantly different strengths and thicknesses. We used HiSeq 2000 (Illumina) sequencing to characterize the chicken transcriptome and whole genome to identify the key genes and genetic mutations associated with eggshell calcification. We identified a total of 14,234 genes expressed in the chicken uterus, representing 89% of all annotated chicken genes. A total of 889 differentially expressed genes were identified by comparing low eggshell strength (LES) and normal eggshell strength (NES) genomes. The DEGs are enriched in calcification-related processes, including calcium ion transport and calcium signaling pathways as revealed by gene ontology (GO) and Kyoto encyclopedia of genes and genomes (KEGG) pathway analysis. Some important matrix proteins, such as OC-116, LTF and SPP1, were also expressed differentially between two groups. A total of 3,671,919 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and 508,035 Indels were detected in protein coding genes by whole-genome re-sequencing, including 1775 non-synonymous variations and 19 frame-shift Indels in DEGs. SNPs and Indels found in this study could be further investigated for eggshell traits. This is the first report to integrate the transcriptome and genome re-sequencing to target the genetic variations which decreased the eggshell qualities. These findings further advance our understanding of eggshell calcification in the chicken uterus. PMID:25974068

  7. Integrating Transcriptome and Genome Re-Sequencing Data to Identify Key Genes and Mutations Affecting Chicken Eggshell Qualities

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Long; Zheng, Chuan Wei; Wang, De He; Hou, Zhuo Cheng; Ning, Zhong Hua

    2015-01-01

    Eggshell damages lead to economic losses in the egg production industry and are a threat to human health. We examined 49-wk-old Rhode Island White hens (Gallus gallus) that laid eggs having shells with significantly different strengths and thicknesses. We used HiSeq 2000 (Illumina) sequencing to characterize the chicken transcriptome and whole genome to identify the key genes and genetic mutations associated with eggshell calcification. We identified a total of 14,234 genes expressed in the chicken uterus, representing 89% of all annotated chicken genes. A total of 889 differentially expressed genes were identified by comparing low eggshell strength (LES) and normal eggshell strength (NES) genomes. The DEGs are enriched in calcification-related processes, including calcium ion transport and calcium signaling pathways as reveled by gene ontology (GO) and Kyoto encyclopedia of genes and genomes (KEGG) pathway analysis. Some important matrix proteins, such as OC-116, LTF and SPP1, were also expressed differentially between two groups. A total of 3,671,919 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and 508,035 Indels were detected in protein coding genes by whole-genome re-sequencing, including 1775 non-synonymous variations and 19 frame-shift Indels in DEGs. SNPs and Indels found in this study could be further investigated for eggshell traits. This is the first report to integrate the transcriptome and genome re-sequencing to target the genetic variations which decreased the eggshell qualities. These findings further advance our understanding of eggshell calcification in the chicken uterus. PMID:25974068

  8. Fabrication of a biocomposite reinforced with hydrophilic eggshell proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Geun Hyung; Min, Taijin; Park, Su A.; Doo Kim, Wan; Koh, Young Ho

    2007-12-01

    Soluble eggshell proteins were used as a reinforcing material of electrospun micro/nanofibers for tissue engineering. A biocomposite composed of poly(ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL) micro/nanofibers and soluble eggshell protein was fabricated with a two-step fabrication method, which is an electrospinning process followed by an air-spraying process. To achieve a stable electrospinning process, we used an auxiliary cylindrical electrode connected with a spinning nozzle. PCL biocomposite was characterized in water contact angle and mechanical properties as well as cell proliferation for its application as a tissue engineering material. It showed an improved hydrophilic characteristic compared with that of a micro/nanofiber web generated from a pure PCL solution using a typical electrospinning process. Moreover, the fabricated biocomposite had good mechanical properties compared to a typical electrospun micro/nanofiber mat. The fabricated biocomposite made human dermal fibroblasts grow better than pure PCL. From the results, the reinforced polymeric micro/nanofiber scaffold can be easily achieved with these modified processes.

  9. Organic solvent-tolerant elastase efficiently hydrolyzes insoluble, cross-linked, protein fiber of eggshell membranes.

    PubMed

    Takenaka, Shinji; Hano, Shinpei; Cheng, Minyi; Yoshida, Ken-ichi; Aoki, Kenji

    2012-05-01

    Eggshell membrane is a mechanically stable and insoluble cross-linked fibrous protein. Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain ME-4 synthesizes a metalloprotease that degrades the eggshell membrane. We cloned the encoding gene in Escherichia coli. The recombinant protease, over-expressed in E. coli, was inactive but addition of acetone to crude cell extracts restored the activity and removed many E. coli proteins. We purified the active, acetone-treated protease to homogeneity in a single chromatography step with 57% recovery. The recombinant protease partially hydrolyzed eggshell membrane and produced more soluble peptides and proteins than commercial elastase, α-chymotrypsin, and collagenase. The soluble peptides produced from hydrolyzed eggshell membrane inhibited angiotensin-I-converting enzyme activity. The degradation of eggshell membrane by the recombinant elastase could be applied to the production of soluble bioactive peptides. PMID:22286207

  10. Structure of struthiocalcin-1, an intramineral protein from Struthio camelus eggshell, in two crystal forms.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Arellano, Rayana R; Medrano, Francisco J; Moreno, Abel; Romero, Antonio

    2015-04-01

    Biomineralization is the process by which living organisms produce minerals. One remarkable example is the formation of eggshells in birds. Struthiocalcins present in the ostrich (Struthio camellus) eggshell matrix act as biosensors of calcite growth during eggshell formation. Here, the crystal structure of struthiocalcin-1 (SCA-1) is reported in two different crystal forms. The structure is a compact single domain with an α/β fold characteristic of the C-type lectin family. In contrast to the related avian ovocleidin OC17, the electrostatic potential on the molecular surface is dominated by an acidic patch. Scanning electron microscopy combined with Raman spectroscopy indicates that these intramineral proteins (SCA-1 and SCA-2) induce calcium carbonate precipitation, leading to the formation of a stable form of calcite in the mature eggshell. Finally, the implications of these two intramineral proteins SCA-1 and SCA-2 in the nucleation of calcite during the formation of eggshells in ratite birds are discussed. PMID:25849392

  11. Drosophila dec-1 eggshell proteins are differentially distributed via a multistep extracellular processing and localization pathway.

    PubMed

    Noguerón, M I; Mauzy-Melitz, D; Waring, G L

    2000-09-15

    In Drosophila the multilayered eggshell forms during late oogenesis between the oocyte and the overlaying follicle cells. Proper eggshell assembly requires wild-type dec-1 gene function. Alternatively spliced dec-1 transcripts encode three proproteins that are cleaved extracellularly in a stage-specific manner to at least five distinct derivatives. Using polyclonal antibodies raised against fusion proteins containing different regions of the dec-1 proteins, we have localized several dec-1 derivatives in the assembling and completed eggshell. Although all of the dec-1 derivatives are generated in the oocyte proximal vitelline membrane layer, they are differentially distributed in the mature egg. Some derivatives are gradually released from the vitelline membrane and become localized within distinct regions of the chorion, while others are taken up by the oocyte or become concentrated in the endochorionic spaces or cavities. The diverse distributions of the dec-1 derivatives suggest that each derivative plays a distinct role in eggshell assembly. These results also suggest that the vitelline membrane layer, by acting as a transient storage site, may control the availability of molecules active in eggshell assembly and by extension perhaps other follicle cell products important in early embryonic pattern formation. PMID:10985863

  12. Quantitative expression of candidate genes affecting eggshell color.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Chuanwei; Li, Zesheng; Yang, Ning; Ning, Zhonghua

    2014-05-01

    There are three pigments that affect the color of an eggshell: protoporphyrin, biliverdin and biliverdin-zinc chelate. Protoporphyrin is the main pigment in brown and light-brown eggshells, whereas very little protoporphyrin is found in white eggshells. Eggshell protoporphyrin is derived from the heme formation in birds. Coproporphyrinogen III oxidase (CPOX) and ferrochelatase (FECH) represent rate-limiting enzymes for the heme-biosynthetic pathway. Breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), feline leukemia virus receptor (FLVCR), and heme-responsive gene-1 (HRG1) serve as primary transporters for both protoporphyrinogen and heme. Finally, four organic anion transporting polypeptide family members (including solute carrier organic anion transporter family, SLCO1C1, SLCO1A2, SLCO1B3 and LOC418189) may affect pigment transport within eggshells. Here we measured gene expression levels in key tissues of egg-producing hens. We analyzed three different types of hens that generated distinct eggshell colors: white, pink or brown. Our data revealed three ways in which eggshell color was genetically influenced. First, high-level expression of CPOX generated more protoporphyrinogen and a brown eggshell color. In contrast, high expression of FECH likely converted more protoporphyrinogen into heme, reduced protoporphyrinogen levels within the eggshell and generated a light color. Second, heme transporters also affected eggshell color. High-level expression of BCRP, HRG1 and FLVCR were associated with brown, white and generally lighter eggshell colors, respectively. Finally, protoporphyrin precipitation also affected eggshell color, as high expression of both SLCO1A2 and SLCO1C1 were associated with brown eggshell color. As such, we have identified seven genes in which expression levels in different tissues were associated with eggshell color. PMID:24612318

  13. Genetic variation in eggshell crystal size and orientation is large and these traits are correlated with shell thickness and are associated with eggshell matrix protein markers.

    PubMed

    Dunn, I C; Rodríguez-Navarro, A B; Mcdade, K; Schmutz, M; Preisinger, R; Waddington, D; Wilson, P W; Bain, M M

    2012-08-01

    The size and orientation of calcium carbonate crystals influence the structure and strength of the eggshells of chickens. In this study, estimates of heritability were found to be high (0.6) for crystal size and moderate (0.3) for crystal orientation. There was a strong positive correlation (0.65) for crystal size and orientation with the thickness of the shell and, in particular, with the thickness of the mammillary layer. Correlations with shell breaking strength were positive but with a high standard error. This was contrary to expectations, as in man-made materials smaller crystals would be stronger. We believe the results of this study support the hypothesis that the structural organization of shell, and in particular the mammillary layer, is influenced by crystal size and orientation, especially during the initial phase of calcification. Genetic associations for crystal measurements were observed between haplotype blocks or individual markers for a number of eggshell matrix proteins. Ovalbumin and ovotransferrin (LTF) markers for example were associated with crystal size, while ovocleidin-116 and ovocalyxin-32 (RARRES1) markers were associated with crystal orientation. The location of these proteins in the eggshell is consistent with different phases of the shell-formation process. In conclusion, the variability of crystal size, and to a lesser extent orientation, appears to have a large genetic component, and the formation of calcite crystals are intimately related to the ultrastructure of the eggshell. Moreover, this study also provides evidence that proteins in the shell influence the variability of crystal traits and, in turn, the shell's thickness profile. The crystal measurements and/or the associated genetic markers may therefore prove to be useful in selection programs to improve eggshell quality. PMID:22497523

  14. Antimicrobial properties of avian eggshell-specific C-type lectin-like proteins.

    PubMed

    Wellman-Labadie, Olivier; Lakshminarayanan, Rajamani; Hincke, Maxwell T

    2008-03-01

    C-type lectin-like proteins are major components of the calcified eggshell of multiple avian species. In this study, two representative avian C-type lectin-like proteins, ovocleidin-17 and ansocalcin, were purified from decalcified chicken and goose eggshell protein extracts and investigated for carbohydrate binding activity as well as antimicrobial activity. Purified ovocleidin-17 and ansocalcin were found to bind bacterial polysaccharides, and were bactericidal against Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomona aeruginosa. Bactericidal activity was found to be enhanced in the presence of calcium but was not dependent on its presence. The results suggest that avian C-type lectin-like proteins may play an important antimicrobial role in defence of the avian embryo. PMID:18258195

  15. Ovocalyxin-36 is a pattern recognition protein in chicken eggshell membranes.

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, Cristianne M M; Esmaili, Hamed; Ansah, George; Hincke, Maxwell T

    2013-01-01

    The avian eggshell membranes are essential elements in the fabrication of the calcified shell as a defense against bacterial penetration. Ovocalyxin-36 (OCX-36) is an abundant avian eggshell membrane protein, which shares protein sequence homology to bactericidal permeability-increasing protein (BPI), lipopolysaccharide-binding protein (LBP) and palate, lung and nasal epithelium clone (PLUNC) proteins. We have developed an efficient method to extract OCX-36 from chicken eggshell membranes for purification with cation and anion exchange chromatographies. Purified OCX-36 protein exhibited lipopolysaccharide (LPS) binding activity and bound lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from Escherichia coli O111:B4 in a dose-dependent manner. OCX-36 showed inhibitory activity against growth of Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 6538. OCX-36 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were verified at cDNA 211 position and the corresponding proteins proline-71 (Pro-71) or serine-71 (Ser-71) were purified from eggs collected from genotyped hens. A significant difference between Pro-71 and Ser-71 OCX-36 for S. aureus lipoteichoic acid (LTA) binding activity was detected. The current study is a starting point to understand the innate immune role that OCX-36 may play in protection against bacterial invasion of both embryonated eggs (relevant to avian reproductive success) and unfertilized table eggs (relevant to food safety). PMID:24391897

  16. Solubilization and identification of hen eggshell membrane proteins during different times of chicken embryo development using the proteomic approach.

    PubMed

    Kaweewong, Kritsda; Garnjanagoonchorn, Wunwiboon; Jirapakkul, Wannee; Roytrakul, Sittiruk

    2013-04-01

    A fertilized chicken egg is a unit of life. During hatching, transport of nutrients, including calcium, have been reported from the egg components to the developing embryo. Calcium is mobilized from the eggshell with the involvement of Ca(2+)-binding proteins. In addition, other unknown proteins may also play some important roles during embryo developing process. Therefore identification and prediction of biological functions of eggshell membrane (ESM) proteins during chick embryo development was conducted by proteome analysis. Comparison of different lysis solutions indicated that the highest ability to extract ESM proteins could be obtained with 1 % sodium dodecyl sulfate in 5 mM Tris-HCl buffer pH 8.8 containing 0.1 % 2-mercaptoethanol. In this study fertilized Cornish chicken eggs were incubated at 37 °C in humidified incubators for up to 21 days. At selected times (days 1, 9, 15 and 21), samples were taken and the ESMs were carefully separated by hand, washed with distilled water, and air-dried at room temperature. The ESM proteins were then solubilized and analyzed by proteome analysis. Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis combined with high performance liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry revealed 62 proteins in the ESM; only keratin is known ESM protein, 8 of which are egg white proteins and related while 53 others have not previously been reported. Some differences in the types of proteins and their molecular functions were noted in ESM at different incubation times. One protein which was present only at days 15 and 21 of egg incubation was identified as a calcium binding protein i.e. EGF like repeats and discoidin I like domain 3 (EDIL3 homologous protein). PMID:23636516

  17. Enhanced protein delivery by multi-ion containing eggshell derived apatitic-alginate composite nanocarriers.

    PubMed

    Sampath Kumar, T S; Madhumathi, K; Rajkamal, B; Zaheatha, S; Rajathi Malar, A; Alamelu Bai, S

    2014-11-01

    Eggshell is an attractive natural source of calcium for the synthesis of hydroxyapatite (HA) as it contains minor amounts of biologically relevant elements such as Mg, Sr, and Si. The mineral phase of the human bone is essentially a calcium deficient hydroxyapatite (CDHA) which shows more bioactivities and absorbance than stoichiometric HA does. Hence, we have attempted to develop a protein delivery system based on eggshell derived CDHA (ECDHA) nanoparticles for bone tissue engineering. Nanoparticles with Ca/P molar ratio of 1.67, 1.61 and 1.51 to form CDHAs with compositions covering the properties of stable HA phase (Ca/P=1.67) to degradable tricalcium phosphate (TCP) phase (Ca/P=1.5) were synthesized by microwave-accelerated wet chemical synthesis using eggshell as well as synthetic calcium hydroxide as calcium precursors. The delivery profiles of bovine serum albumin (BSA), a model protein by the nanocarriers, were studied. Both eggshells derived and synthetic CDHA samples showed maximum amount of loading of 57% and 37%, respectively at a Ca/P ratio of 1.51, comparing to stoichiometric HA. ECDHA also showed a much more BSA release (25%) than synthetically derived CDHA (6.5%) did. To further improve the release profile, alginate coating was carried out on CDHA nanoparticles and the BSA release profiles were evaluated. A maximum release of 65% was observed for alginate coated ECDHA at a Ca/P ratio of 1.51 for a period of 2 days. The ECDHA nanoparticle with a Ca/P ratio similar to degradable TCP and with alginate coating seems to be an ideal protein delivery agent. PMID:25444657

  18. Small gene family encoding an eggshell (chorion) protein of the human parasite Schistosoma mansoni

    SciTech Connect

    Bobek, L.A.; Rekosh, D.M.; Lo Verde, P.T.

    1988-08-01

    The authors isolated six independent genomic clones encoding schistosome chorion or eggshell proteins from a Schistosoma mansoni genomic library. A linkage map of five of the clones spanning 35 kilobase pairs (kbp) of the S. mansoni genome was constructed. The region contained two eggshell protein genes closely linked, separated by 7.5 kbp of intergenic DNA. The two genes of the cluster were arranged in the same orientation, that is, they were transcribed from the same strand. The sixth clone probably represents a third copy of the eggshell gene that is not contained within the 35-kbp region. The 5- end of the mRNA transcribed from these genes was defined by primer extension directly off the RNA. The ATCAT cap site sequence was homologous to a silkmoth chorion PuTCATT cap site sequence, where Pu indicates any purine. DNA sequence analysis showed that there were no introns in these genes. The DNA sequences of the three genes were very homologous to each other and to a cDNA clone, pSMf61-46, differing only in three or four nucleotices. A multiple TATA box was located at positions -23 to -31, and a CAAAT sequence was located at -52 upstream of the eggshell transcription unit. Comparison of sequences in regions further upstream with silkmoth and Drosophila sequences revealed very short elements that were shared. One such element, TCACGT, recently shown to be an essential cis-regulatory element for silkmoth chorion gene promoter function, was found at a similar position in all three organisms.

  19. Accumulation of the Drosophila Torso-like protein at the blastoderm plasma membrane suggests that it translocates from the eggshell.

    PubMed

    Mineo, Alessandro; Furriols, Marc; Casanova, Jordi

    2015-04-01

    The eggshell serves as a depository for proteins that play an important role in early embryonic development. In particular, the Drosophila eggshell is responsible for transferring asymmetries from the egg chamber to specify the regions at both ends of the embryo through the uneven activation of the Torso (Tor) receptor in its membrane. This process relies on the restricted expression of the gene torso-like (tsl) in subpopulations of follicle cells during oogenesis and its protein accumulation at both poles of the eggshell, but it is not known how this signal is transmitted to the embryo. Here, we show that Tsl accumulates at the embryonic plasma membrane, even in the absence of the Tor receptor. However, during oogenesis, we detected Tsl accumulation only at the eggshell. These results suggest that there is a two-step mechanism to transfer the asymmetric positional cues from the egg chamber into the early embryo: initial anchoring of Tsl at the eggshell as it is secreted, followed by its later translocation to the egg plasma membrane, where it enables Tor receptor activation. Translocation of anchored determinants from the eggshell might then regulate the spatial and temporal control of early embryonic developmental processes. PMID:25758463

  20. Hen uterine gene expression profiling during eggshell formation reveals putative proteins involved in the supply of minerals or in the shell mineralization process

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The chicken eggshell is a natural mechanical barrier to protect egg components from physical damage and microbial penetration. Its integrity and strength is critical for the development of the embryo or to ensure for consumers a table egg free of pathogens. This study compared global gene expression in laying hen uterus in the presence or absence of shell calcification in order to characterize gene products involved in the supply of minerals and / or the shell biomineralization process. Results Microarrays were used to identify a repertoire of 302 over-expressed genes during shell calcification. GO terms enrichment was performed to provide a global interpretation of the functions of the over-expressed genes, and revealed that the most over-represented proteins are related to reproductive functions. Our analysis identified 16 gene products encoding proteins involved in mineral supply, and allowed updating of the general model describing uterine ion transporters during eggshell calcification. A list of 57 proteins potentially secreted into the uterine fluid to be active in the mineralization process was also established. They were classified according to their potential functions (biomineralization, proteoglycans, molecular chaperone, antimicrobials and proteases/antiproteases). Conclusions Our study provides detailed descriptions of genes and corresponding proteins over-expressed when the shell is mineralizing. Some of these proteins involved in the supply of minerals and influencing the shell fabric to protect the egg contents are potentially useful biological markers for the genetic improvement of eggshell quality. PMID:24649854

  1. Data set for the proteomic inventory and quantitative analysis of chicken eggshell matrix proteins during the primary events of eggshell mineralization and the active growth phase of calcification.

    PubMed

    Marie, Pauline; Labas, Valérie; Brionne, Aurélien; Harichaux, Grégoire; Hennequet-Antier, Christelle; Rodriguez-Navarro, Alejandro B; Nys, Yves; Gautron, Joël

    2015-09-01

    Chicken eggshell is a biomineral composed of 95% calcite calcium carbonate mineral and of 3.5% organic matrix proteins. The assembly of mineral and its structural organization is controlled by its organic matrix. In a recent study [1], we have used quantitative proteomic, bioinformatic and functional analyses to explore the distribution of 216 eggshell matrix proteins at four key stages of shell mineralization defined as: (1) widespread deposition of amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC), (2) ACC transformation into crystalline calcite aggregates, (3) formation of larger calcite crystal units and (4) rapid growth of calcite as columnar structure with preferential crystal orientation. The current article detailed the quantitative analysis performed at the four stages of shell mineralization to determine the proteins which are the most abundant. Additionally, we reported the enriched GO terms and described the presence of 35 antimicrobial proteins equally distributed at all stages to keep the egg free of bacteria and of 81 proteins, the function of which could not be ascribed. PMID:26306314

  2. Data set for the proteomic inventory and quantitative analysis of chicken eggshell matrix proteins during the primary events of eggshell mineralization and the active growth phase of calcification

    PubMed Central

    Marie, Pauline; Labas, Valérie; Brionne, Aurélien; Harichaux, Grégoire; Hennequet-Antier, Christelle; Rodriguez-Navarro, Alejandro B.; Nys, Yves; Gautron, Joël

    2015-01-01

    Chicken eggshell is a biomineral composed of 95% calcite calcium carbonate mineral and of 3.5% organic matrix proteins. The assembly of mineral and its structural organization is controlled by its organic matrix. In a recent study [1], we have used quantitative proteomic, bioinformatic and functional analyses to explore the distribution of 216 eggshell matrix proteins at four key stages of shell mineralization defined as: (1) widespread deposition of amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC), (2) ACC transformation into crystalline calcite aggregates, (3) formation of larger calcite crystal units and (4) rapid growth of calcite as columnar structure with preferential crystal orientation. The current article detailed the quantitative analysis performed at the four stages of shell mineralization to determine the proteins which are the most abundant. Additionally, we reported the enriched GO terms and described the presence of 35 antimicrobial proteins equally distributed at all stages to keep the egg free of bacteria and of 81 proteins, the function of which could not be ascribed. PMID:26306314

  3. Outer eggshell membrane as delivery vehicle for polysaccharide/protein microcapsules incorporated with vitamin E.

    PubMed

    Chai, Zhi; Li, Yuanyuan; Liu, Fei; Du, Bingjian; Jiao, Tong; Zhang, Chunyue; Leng, Xiaojing

    2013-01-23

    This study investigates the features of a new type of delivery system prepared by combining a natural outer eggshell membrane (OESM) with emulsified microcapsules. The loading efficiency, controlled release properties, and forming mechanisms of the prepared system were studied. The polysaccharide/protein microcapsules incorporated with vitamin E can be attached to highly cross-linked protein fiber networks of OESM. This attachment could be reinforced more than 2-fold using glutaraldehyde as a cross-linking agent. The combined OESM/microcapsule delivery system significantly exhibited better controlled release properties than the microcapsules alone because of the steric blocking effect. Moreover, the OESM delivery system incorporated with microcapsules formed by pectin/protein as wall material showed more resistance against enzymatic attacks because of the formation of compact aggregates promoted by electrostatic effects. PMID:23244530

  4. Protective effect of soluble eggshell membrane protein hydrolysate on cardiac ischemia/reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Tao; Li, Yan; Ma, Meihu; Lin, Qinlu; Sun, Shuguo; Zhang, Bin; Feng, Xi; Liu, Junwen

    2015-01-01

    Background Soluble eggshell membrane protein (SEP) has been proved to hold the antioxidant activity. The functional role of SEP on cardioprotection was investigated in vivo and in vitro. Methods Rats and cardiomyocytes were pretreated with SP2, a hydrolysate attained from SEP, and then subjected to ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) or hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R) and hydrogen peroxide, respectively. The measurement of myocardial infarct size, cell apoptosis assay, cell viability assay, and caspase activity assay were performed on rats and cardiomyocytes. Results The results showed that the treatment of SP2 induced the resistance to I/R or H/R injury on rats and cardiomyocytes as indicated by decreased infarct size and decreased cellular apoptosis. The cardioprotective roles of SP2 were partly resulted from the downregulated expression and activity of caspase-3 in which the effect was similar to the caspase inhibitor, z-VAD-fmk, and could be rescued by caspase activator, PAC-1. Conclusions This investigation has demonstrated that SP2 attenuated the damage of I/R and H/R on rats and cardiomyocytes by the caspase-dependent pathway. This cardioprotective effect of SP2 suggested a novel therapeutic agent of SEP for ischemic-related heart diseases. PMID:26699793

  5. Correlation between hammerhead ribozyme-mediated eggshell protein gene cleavage and reproduction inhibition of Schistosoma japonicum

    PubMed Central

    LIANG, YU; ZHOU, YUELAN; YIN, WEIGUO; LI, YINGJU; YANG, QIULIN; GAO, YUAN; ZHANG, YUKUAI; YANG, YAOFEI; PENG, LI; XIAO, JIANHUA

    2012-01-01

    Schistosoma japonicum (S. japonicum) is an extremely harmful pathogen, which infects humans and causes severe public health problems. To date, no effective therapeutic drugs for this pathogen are available. In this study, we designed and constructed three hammerhead ribozymes targeting the eggshell protein gene of S. japonicum (SjESG). The cleavage activities of these three ribozymes were determined using cleavage experiments. The in vitro cleavage results showed that among the three synthesized ribozymes (Rz1, Rz2 and Rz3), Rz1 and Rz3 cleaved their target RNAs effectively. However, Rz2 did not cleave its target RNA detectably. The putative therapeutic roles of these three ribozymes to inhibit the reproduction of S. japonicum in mice were studied in vivo. Compared with the negative controls, Rz1 and Rz3 treatments resulted in increased levels of IFN-γ but decreased levels of IL-4 in mice. Rz2 affected levels of IFN-γ and IL-4 to degrees similar with those caused by the vector controls. In addition, Rz1 and Rz3 reduced the amounts of adult worms and eggs in the livers of mice more extensively than Rz2 and the vector controls. Altogether, these results suggest a correlation between the in vitro cleavage abilities of Rz1 and Rz3 and their roles in reproduction inhibition of S. japonicum. PMID:22246067

  6. Influence of eggshell matrix proteins on the precipitation of calcium carbonate (CaCO 3)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Hernández, A.; Vidal, M. L.; Gómez-Morales, J.; Rodríguez-Navarro, A. B.; Labas, V.; Gautron, J.; Nys, Y.; García Ruiz, J. M.

    2008-04-01

    To understand the role of eggshell organic matrix on the biomineralization process, we have tested the influence of different purified fractions of the eggshell organic matrix on calcium carbonate (CaCO 3) precipitation. Purification was carried out after successive anion-exchange chromatography, hydrophobic interaction chromatography and gel filtration chromatography of two different prepurified eggshell extracts (A) and (B); the purified fractions (named g, h, n and r) and ( c', g', i', k') respectively were diluted to 50 μg/ml before being tested in vitro and analysed by the sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) procedure and mass spectrometry. The precipitation experiments were carried out by the method of vapour diffusion on crystallization mushrooms. Each purified fraction showed a different effect on CaCO 3 precipitation. Some of them exhibited a strong inhibitory effect on nucleation, thus suppressing the precipitation of CaCO 3 almost totally while the others did not produce any notable effect. However, all fractions favoured the precipitation of calcite over the other CaCO 3 polymorphs. Additionally, all fractions modified in a different manner the size and morphology of the precipitated calcite crystals.

  7. Soluble eggshell membrane: A natural protein to improve the properties of biomaterials used for tissue engineering applications.

    PubMed

    Sah, Mahesh Kumar; Rath, Subha Narayan

    2016-10-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) acts as an instructing template for the cells contained in tissues. It plays a vital role in regulating cellular behavior by holding and interacting with various growth factors and signaling molecules. The ECM materials are either directly derived from a natural origin, or synthesized mimicking the natural ECM. In this review, we have addressed the ECM derived from eggshell membrane (ESM). The development of porous structures from natural biopolymers, such as ESM holds a number of advantages for tissue engineering applications. By using ESM in tissue engineering application, the cells attach and function to make a required tissue. Thereafter, the scaffold provides mechanical support as well as a platform for cellular interaction, hence, forming a fully functional tissue. The present review summarizes the structure-function relationship of ESM and advancement in its processing methods; the contribution of its soluble form (soluble eggshell membrane protein, SEP) in the development of promising hybrid biomaterials; and the recent advancement of their applications. In addition, this comprehensive review highlights the use of ESM for guided tissue regeneration; promising future applications of SEP in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. PMID:27287179

  8. Characterization and adsorption properties of eggshells and eggshell membrane.

    PubMed

    Tsai, W T; Yang, J M; Lai, C W; Cheng, Y H; Lin, C C; Yeh, C W

    2006-02-01

    The objective of this work was to study the chemical and physical characterization of eggshell and eggshell membrane particles prepared from the hen eggshell waste. Under the characterization measurements investigated, it was found that the pore structures of the two biomaterials belong to a typical Type II, indicating that they should be basically characteristic of nonporous materials or materials with macropores or open voids. Further, the chemical composition of the resulting eggshell particle was strongly associated with the presence of carbonate minerals from the Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra. In contrast to the resulting eggshell membrane particle, the presence of functional groups of amines and amides was observable because of its chemical composition of fibrous proteins. From the isotherm data of methylene blue at 25 degrees C, the Freundlich model yielded a somewhat better fit than the Langmuir model. The adsorption isotherms revealed the eggshell biosorbents could only uptake the basic dye of less than 1.0mg/g in aqueous medium, which was attributed to their poor pore properties. PMID:15896954

  9. Eggshells as an index of aedine mosquito production. 1: Distribution, movement and sampling of Aedes taeniorhynchus eggshells.

    PubMed

    Ritchie, S A; Addison, D S; van Essen, F

    1992-03-01

    The distribution of Aedes taeniorhynchus eggshells in Florida mangrove basin forests was determined and used to design a sampling plan. Eggshells were found in 10/11 sites (91%), with a mean +/- SE density of 1.45 +/- 0.75/cc; density did not change significantly year to year. Highest densities were located on the sloping banks of hummocks, ponds and potholes. Eggshells were less clumped in distribution than eggs and larvae and thus required a smaller sample size for a given precision level. While eggshells were flushed from compact soil that was subject to runoff during heavy rain, mangrove peat, the dominant soil of eggshell-bearing sites, was less dense and had little runoff or eggshell flushing. We suggest that eggshell surveys could be used to identify Ae. taeniorhynchus oviposition sites and oviposition patterns. PMID:1583486

  10. The eggshell: structure, composition and mineralization.

    PubMed

    Hincke, Maxwell T; Nys, Yves; Gautron, Joel; Mann, Karlheinz; Rodriguez-Navarro, Alejandro B; McKee, Marc D

    2012-01-01

    The calcareous egg is produced by all birds and most reptiles. Current understanding of eggshell formation and mineralization is mainly based on intensive studies of one species - the domesticated chicken Gallus gallus. The majority of constituents of the chicken eggshell have been identified. In this article we review eggshell microstructure and ultrastructure, and the results of recent genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic analyses of the chicken eggshell matrix to draw attention to areas of current uncertainty such as the potential role of amorphous calcium carbonate and the specific nature of the molecules that initiate (nucleate) mammillary cone formation and terminate palisade layer calcification. Comparative avian genomics and proteomics have only recently become possible with the publication of the Taeniopygia guttata (zebra finch) genome. Further rapid progress is highly anticipated with the soon-to-be-released genomes of turkey (Meleagris gallopavo) and duck (Anas platyrhynchos). These resources will allow rapid advances in comparative studies of the organic constituents of avian eggshell and their functional implications. PMID:22201802

  11. Quantitative proteomics provides new insights into chicken eggshell matrix protein functions during the primary events of mineralisation and the active calcification phase.

    PubMed

    Marie, Pauline; Labas, Valérie; Brionne, Aurélien; Harichaux, Grégoire; Hennequet-Antier, Christelle; Rodriguez-Navarro, Alejandro B; Nys, Yves; Gautron, Joël

    2015-08-01

    Eggshell is a bioceramic composed of 95% calcium carbonate mineral and 3.5% organic matrix. Its structural organisation is controlled by its organic matrix. We have used quantitative proteomics to study four key stages of shell mineralisation: 1) widespread deposition of amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC), 2) ACC transformation into crystalline calcite aggregates, 3) formation of larger calcite crystal units and 4) development of a columnar structure with preferential calcite crystal orientation. This approach explored the distribution of 216 shell matrix proteins found at the four stages. Variations in abundance according to these calcification events were observed for 175 proteins. A putative function related to the mineralisation process was predicted by bioinformatics for 77 of them and was further characterised. We confirmed the important role of lysozyme, ovotransferrin, ovocleidin-17 and ovocleidin-116 for shell calcification process, characterised major calcium binding proteins (EDIL3, ALB, MFGE8, NUCB2), and described novel proteoglycans core proteins (GPC4, HAPLN3). We suggest that OVAL and OC-17 play a role in the stabilisation of ACC. Finally, we report proteins involved in the regulation of proteins driving the mineralisation. They correspond to numerous molecular chaperones including CLU, PPIB and OCX21, protease and protease inhibitors including OVM and CST3, and regulators of phosphorylation. PMID:26049031

  12. Data set for the proteomic inventory and quantitative analysis of chicken uterine fluid during eggshell biomineralization.

    PubMed

    Marie, Pauline; Labas, Valérie; Brionne, Aurélien; Harichaux, Grégoire; Hennequet-Antier, Christelle; Nys, Yves; Gautron, Joël

    2014-12-01

    Chicken eggshell is the protective barrier of the egg. It is a biomineral composed of 95% calcium carbonate on calcitic form and 3.5% organic matrix proteins. Mineralization process occurs in uterus into the uterine fluid. This acellular fluid contains ions and organic matrix proteins precursors which are interacting with the mineral phase and control crystal growth, eggshell structure and mechanical properties. We performed a proteomic approach and identified 308 uterine fluid proteins. Gene Ontology terms enrichments were determined to investigate their potential functions. Mass spectrometry analyses were also combined to label free quantitative analysis to determine the relative abundance of 96 proteins at initiation, rapid growth phase and termination of shell calcification. Sixty four showed differential abundance according to the mineralization stage. Their potential functions have been annotated. The complete proteomic, bioinformatic and functional analyses are reported in Marie et al., J. Proteomics (2015) [1]. PMID:26217689

  13. Amorphous calcium carbonate controls avian eggshell mineralization: A new paradigm for understanding rapid eggshell calcification.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Navarro, Alejandro B; Marie, Pauline; Nys, Yves; Hincke, Maxwell T; Gautron, Joel

    2015-06-01

    Avian eggshell mineralization is the fastest biogenic calcification process known in nature. How this is achieved while producing a highly crystalline material composed of large calcite columnar single crystals remains largely unknown. Here we report that eggshell mineral originates from the accumulation of flat disk-shaped amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) particles on specific organic sites on the eggshell membrane, which are rich in proteins and sulfated proteoglycans. These structures known as mammillary cores promote the nucleation and stabilization of a amorphous calcium carbonate with calcitic short range order which predetermine the calcite composition of the mature eggshell. The amorphous nature of the precursor phase was confirmed by the diffuse scattering of X-rays and electrons. The nascent calcitic short-range order of this transient mineral phase was revealed by infrared spectroscopy and HRTEM. The ACC mineral deposited around the mammillary core sites progressively transforms directly into calcite crystals without the occurrence of any intermediate phase. Ionic speciation data suggest that the uterine fluid is equilibrated with amorphous calcium carbonate, throughout the duration of eggshell mineralization process, supporting that this mineral phase is constantly forming at the shell mineralization front. On the other hand, the transient amorphous calcium carbonate mineral deposits, as well as the calcite crystals into which they are converted, form by the ordered aggregation of nanoparticles that support the rapid mineralization of the eggshell. The results of this study alter our current understanding of avian eggshell calcification and provide new insights into the genesis and formation of calcium carbonate biominerals in vertebrates. PMID:25934395

  14. Manganese supplementation enhances the synthesis of glycosaminoglycan in eggshell membrane: a strategy to improve eggshell quality in laying hens.

    PubMed

    Xiao, J F; Zhang, Y N; Wu, S G; Zhang, H J; Yue, H Y; Qi, G H

    2014-02-01

    This study investigated the effect of dietary Mn supplementation on eggshell quality, ultrastructure, glycosaminoglycan (GAG), and uronic acid content, and mRNA and protein expression of Galβ1,3-glucuronosyltransferase (GlcAT-I). A total of 216 layers (Hy-Line Grey) at age of 50 wk were divided into 3 groups. In the first 8 wk of the 12-wk feeding trial, all groups were fed a basal diet that met all layer nutrient requirements except for Mn. In the last 4 wk, each group was fed 1 of 3 diets supplemented with Mn levels at 0, 25, or 100 mg Mn/kg. Dietary Mn deficiency did not affect the egg performance of layers. Dietary Mn supplementation significantly improved the breaking strength, thickness, and fracture toughness of eggshells (P < 0.05). In photographs of eggshell ultrastructure, the size of mammillary cones and cracks in the outer surface were decreased by dietary Mn supplementation. The contents of GAG and uronic acids in eggshell membrane were significantly increased by dietary Mn addition (P < 0.05). This result was further confirmed by increased mRNA expression and protein expression of GlcAT-I when Mn was added to the diet. This study suggests that dietary Mn supplementation can improve eggshell quality by enhancing the GAG and uronic acid synthesis in the eggshell glands, which can affect the ultrastructure of eggshells. PMID:24570460

  15. Investigation of the role of ansocalcin in the biomineralization in goose eggshell matrix

    PubMed Central

    Lakshminarayanan, Rajamani; Kini, R. Manjunatha; Valiyaveettil, Suresh

    2002-01-01

    The role of proteins in biomineralization and the mechanism of eggshell formation are not well understood. We have isolated and purified the major protein, ansocalcin from goose eggshell matrix. The amino acid sequence study indicates that ansocalcin is homologous to the chicken eggshell protein, ovocleidin 17, and C-type lectins. Ansocalcin nucleates polycrystalline aggregates of calcite crystals in in vitro mineralization experiments. The polycrystalline aggregates obtained at higher concentration of ansocalcin appears to be similar to the crystals observed at the mamillary layer of the eggshell. PMID:11959964

  16. High ambient temperature influences eggshell quality and calbindin-D28k localization of eggshell gland and all intestinal segments of laying hens.

    PubMed

    Ebeid, T A; Suzuki, T; Sugiyama, T

    2012-09-01

    Eggshell quality deterioration associated with heat stress is a well-known phenomenon. The involvement of the 28-kDa calcium-binding protein (calbindin, CaBP-D28k) localization in this failure is not clearly understood. To test a possible direct effect of ambient temperature on calbindin-D28k localization, 40 White Leghorn laying hens were housed in individual cages and exposed to high ambient temperature (30-33°C) and thermoneutral temperature (20-22°C) which served as a control. Eggshell quality characteristics and immunohistochemical localization of all intestinal segments and eggshell gland calbindin-D28k were performed under both environmental conditions. As expected, egg weight, eggshell thickness, eggshell percentage, and eggshell density were negatively affected by high ambient temperature (P ≤ 0.01). Immunohistochemistry showed that calbindin was localized in the intestinal enterocyte cytoplasm and glandular cell cytoplasm under thermoneutral conditions. However, the calbindin intensity was prominently decreased in ileum, cecum, colon, and eggshell gland under heat stress conditions. Therefore, it could be concluded that calbindin-D28k localization in intestinal segments and eggshell gland is negatively affected by high ambient temperature which might be related to the deterioration of eggshell quality characteristics under heat stress conditions. PMID:22912464

  17. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of struthiocalcin 1 from ostrich (Struthio camelus) eggshell

    SciTech Connect

    Reyes-Grajeda, Juan Pablo; Marín-García, Liliana; Stojanoff, Vivian; Moreno, Abel

    2007-11-01

    The purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction data of the protein struthiocalcin 1 isolated from ostrich eggshell are reported. The purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of struthiocalcin 1 (SCA-1), a protein obtained from the intramineral part of ostrich (Struthio camelus) eggshell, is reported.

  18. Polymorphisms in Ion Transport Genes Are Associated with Eggshell Mechanical Property.

    PubMed

    Duan, Zhongyi; Chen, Sirui; Sun, Congjiao; Shi, Fengying; Wu, Guiqin; Liu, Aiqiao; Xu, Guiyun; Yang, Ning

    2015-01-01

    Eggshell mechanical property traits such as eggshell breaking strength (ESS), eggshell thickness (EST) and eggshell weight (ESW) are most common and important indexes to evaluate eggshell quality in poultry industry. Uterine ion transporters involve in eggshell formation and might be associated with eggshell mechanical property traits. In this study, 99 SNPs in 15 ion transport genes were selected to genotype 976 pedigreed hens of Rhode Island Red. ESS, EST and ESW were measured for each bird at 55 weeks of age. The association study showed that 14 SNPs in 8 genes were significantly related (p < 0.05) with at least one trait, and their contributions to phenotypic variance ranged from 0.23% to 4.14%. Both ATP2A3 and SLC4A5 had a significant effect on all the three traits. Strong linkage disequilibrium (LD) was detected among SNPs in four genes: ATP2A3, ITPR1, SLC8A3, SCNN1a. The significant effects of those diplotypes on eggshell mechanical property traits were found, and their contributions to phenotypic variance ranged from 0.50% to 0.70%. It was concluded that the identified SNPs and diplotypes in this study were potential markers influencing the eggshell mechanical properties, which could contribute to the genetic improvement of eggshell quality. PMID:26106883

  19. Polymorphisms in Ion Transport Genes Are Associated with Eggshell Mechanical Property

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Congjiao; Shi, Fengying; Wu, Guiqin; Liu, Aiqiao; Xu, Guiyun; Yang, Ning

    2015-01-01

    Eggshell mechanical property traits such as eggshell breaking strength (ESS), eggshell thickness (EST) and eggshell weight (ESW) are most common and important indexes to evaluate eggshell quality in poultry industry. Uterine ion transporters involve in eggshell formation and might be associated with eggshell mechanical property traits. In this study, 99 SNPs in 15 ion transport genes were selected to genotype 976 pedigreed hens of Rhode Island Red. ESS, EST and ESW were measured for each bird at 55 weeks of age. The association study showed that 14 SNPs in 8 genes were significantly related (p < 0.05) with at least one trait, and their contributions to phenotypic variance ranged from 0.23% to 4.14%. Both ATP2A3 and SLC4A5 had a significant effect on all the three traits. Strong linkage disequilibrium (LD) was detected among SNPs in four genes: ATP2A3, ITPR1, SLC8A3, SCNN1a. The significant effects of those diplotypes on eggshell mechanical property traits were found, and their contributions to phenotypic variance ranged from 0.50% to 0.70%. It was concluded that the identified SNPs and diplotypes in this study were potential markers influencing the eggshell mechanical properties, which could contribute to the genetic improvement of eggshell quality. PMID:26106883

  20. Identifying Key Attributes for Protein Beverages.

    PubMed

    Oltman, A E; Lopetcharat, K; Bastian, E; Drake, M A

    2015-06-01

    This study identified key attributes of protein beverages and evaluated effects of priming on liking of protein beverages. An adaptive choice-based conjoint study was conducted along with Kano analysis to gain insight on protein beverage consumers (n = 432). Attributes evaluated included label claim, protein type, amount of protein, carbohydrates, sweeteners, and metabolic benefits. Utility scores for levels and importance scores for attributes were determined. Subsequently, two pairs of clear acidic whey protein beverages were manufactured that differed by age of protein source or the amount of whey protein per serving. Beverages were evaluated by 151 consumers on two occasions with or without priming statements. One priming statement declared "great flavor," the other priming statement declared 20 g protein per serving. A two way analysis of variance was applied to discern the role of each priming statement. The most important attribute for protein beverages was sweetener type, followed by amount of protein, followed by type of protein followed by label claim. Beverages with whey protein, naturally sweetened, reduced sugar and ≥15 g protein per serving were most desired. Three consumer clusters were identified, differentiated by their preferences for protein type, sweetener and amount of protein. Priming statements positively impacted concept liking (P < 0.05) but had no effect on overall liking (P > 0.05). Consistent with trained panel profiles of increased cardboard flavor with higher protein content, consumers liked beverages with 10 g protein more than beverages with 20 g protein (6.8 compared with 5.7, P < 0.05). Protein beverages must have desirable flavor for wide consumer appeal. PMID:25943857

  1. The eggshell in the C. elegans oocyte-to-embryo transition.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Wendy L; Dennis, James W

    2012-04-01

    In egg-laying animals, embryonic development takes place within the highly specialized environment provided by the eggshell and its underlying extracellular matrix. Far from being simply a passive physical support, the eggshell is a key player in many early developmental events. Herein, we review current understanding of eggshell structure, biosynthesis, and function in zygotic development of the nematode, C. elegans. Beginning at sperm contact or entry, eggshell layers are produced sequentially. The earlier outer layers are required for secretion or organization of inner layers, and layers differ in composition and function. Developmental events that depend on the eggshell include polyspermy barrier generation, high fidelity meiotic chromosome segregation, osmotic barrier synthesis, polar body extrusion, anterior-posterior polarization, and organization of membrane and cortical proteins. The C. elegans eggshell is proving to be an excellent, tractable system to study the molecular cues of the extracellular matrix that instruct cell polarity and early development. PMID:22083685

  2. The avian eggshell as a model of biomineralization

    SciTech Connect

    Arias, J.L.; Fernandez, M.S. ); Laraia, V.J.; Janicki, J.; Heuer, A.H.; Caplan, A.I. )

    1990-11-01

    The avian eggshell is one of the most rapidly mineralizing biological systems known. By understanding the key components and steps in this process, we hope to provide relevant information for fabrication of ceramic composites. The calcification of the eggshell occurs in three main steps: (1) fabrication of an organic matrix, (2) nucleation of an inorganic phase on the organic matrix, and (3) space-filling growth of the calcite phase. The different layers of an eggshell can be separately isolated and studied. In this preliminary communication, the organization of the shell matrix and membranes and their association with the crystal phase, the immunohistochemical occurrence and distribution of types I and X collagen, and of different proteoglycans are reviewed. Also the preliminary findings of the remineralization of the intact or modified eggshell are presented. These experiments allow us to identify the essential steps in forming a natural composite ceramic. 47 refs., 6 figs.

  3. Eggshell thickness in mallards fed methylmercury

    SciTech Connect

    Heinz, G.H.

    1980-09-01

    Eggshell thinning has been linked to impaired reproduction in many wild birds. Previous work of my own and others led me to believe that methylmercury may cause some eggshell thinning in birds. The present study was designed to determine whether methylmercury in the diet of mallards would thin their eggshells and whether it would add to eggshell thinning caused by DDE.

  4. Extreme multifunctional proteins identified from a human protein interaction network

    PubMed Central

    Chapple, Charles E.; Robisson, Benoit; Spinelli, Lionel; Guien, Céline; Becker, Emmanuelle; Brun, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Moonlighting proteins are a subclass of multifunctional proteins whose functions are unrelated. Although they may play important roles in cells, there has been no large-scale method to identify them, nor any effort to characterize them as a group. Here, we propose the first method for the identification of ‘extreme multifunctional' proteins from an interactome as a first step to characterize moonlighting proteins. By combining network topological information with protein annotations, we identify 430 extreme multifunctional proteins (3% of the human interactome). We show that the candidates form a distinct sub-group of proteins, characterized by specific features, which form a signature of extreme multifunctionality. Overall, extreme multifunctional proteins are enriched in linear motifs and less intrinsically disordered than network hubs. We also provide MoonDB, a database containing information on all the candidates identified in the analysis and a set of manually curated human moonlighting proteins. PMID:26054620

  5. Identifying Protein-Calorie Malnutrition Workshop.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Susan S.; Barker, Ellen M.

    Instructional materials are provided for a workshop to enable participants to assist in identifying patients at risk with protein-calorie malnutrition and in corrrecting this nutritional deficiency. Representative topics are nutrients; protein, mineral, and vitamin sources, functions, and deficiency symptoms; malnutrition; nutritional deficiency…

  6. Identifying the hub proteins from complicated membrane protein network systems.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yi-Zhen; Ding, Yong-Sheng; Gu, Quan; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2010-05-01

    The so-called "hub proteins" are those proteins in a protein-protein interaction network system that have remarkably higher interaction relations (or degrees) than the others. Therefore, the information of hub proteins can provide very useful insights for selecting or prioritizing targets during drug development. In this paper, by combining the multi-agent-based method with the graphical spectrum analysis and immune-genetic algorithm, a novel simulator for identifying the hub proteins from membrane protein interaction networks is proposed. As a demonstration of using the simulator, two hub membrane proteins, YPL227C and YIL147C, were identified from a complicated network system consisting of 1500 membrane proteins. Meanwhile, along with the two identified hub proteins, their molecular functions, biological processes, and cellular components were also revealed. It is anticipated that the hub-protein-simulator may become a very useful tool for system biology and drug development, particularly in deciphering unknown protein functions, determining protein complexes, and in identifying the key targets from a complicated disease system. PMID:20507268

  7. Antimicrobial properties of a nanostructured eggshell from a compost-nesting bird.

    PubMed

    D'Alba, Liliana; Jones, Darryl N; Badawy, Hope T; Eliason, Chad M; Shawkey, Matthew D

    2014-04-01

    Infection is an important source of mortality for avian embryos but parental behaviors and eggs themselves can provide a network of antimicrobial defenses. Mound builders (Aves: Megapodiidae) are unique among birds in that they produce heat for developing embryos not by sitting on eggs but by burying them in carefully tended mounds of soil and microbially decomposing vegetation. The low infection rate of eggs of one species in particular, the Australian brush-turkey (Alectura lathami), suggests that they possess strong defensive mechanisms. To identify some of these mechanisms, we first quantified antimicrobial albumen proteins and characterized eggshell structure, finding that albumen was not unusually antimicrobial, but that eggshell cuticle was composed of nanometer-sized calcite spheres. Experimental tests revealed that these modified eggshells were significantly more hydrophobic and better at preventing bacterial attachment and penetration into the egg contents than chicken eggs. Our results suggest that these mechanisms may contribute to the antimicrobial defense system of these eggs, and may provide inspiration for new biomimetic anti-fouling surfaces. PMID:24311808

  8. Eggshell Types and Their Evolutionary Correlation with Life-History Strategies in Squamates

    PubMed Central

    Hallmann, Konstantin; Griebeler, Eva Maria

    2015-01-01

    The eggshell is an important physiological structure for the embryo. It enables gas exchange, physical protection and is a calcium reserve. Most squamates (lizards, snakes, worm lizards) lay parchment-shelled eggs, whereas only some gekkotan species, a subgroup of lizards, have strongly calcified eggshells. In viviparous (live-bearing) squamates the eggshell is reduced or completely missing (hereafter “shell-less”). Recent studies showed that life-history strategies of gekkotan species differ between species with parchment- and rigid-shelled eggshells. Here we test if the three different eggshell types found in the squamates are also associated with different life-history strategies. We first investigated the influence of the phylogeny on the trait “eggshell type” and on six life-history traits of 32 squamate species. Phylogenetic principal component analysis (pPCA) was then conducted to identify an association between life-history strategies and eggshell types. Finally, we also considered adult weight in the pPCA to examine its potential effect on this association. Eggshell types in squamates show a strong phylogenetic signal at a low taxonomical level. Four out of the six life-history traits showed also a phylogenetic signal (birth size, clutch size, clutches per year and age at female maturity), while two had none (incubation time, maximum longevity). The pPCA suggested an association of life-history strategies and eggshell types, which disappeared when adult weight was included in the analysis. We conclude that the variability seen in eggshell types of squamates is weakly influenced by phylogeny. Eggshell types correlate with different life-history strategies, and mainly reflect differences in adult weights of species. PMID:26393343

  9. Eggshell Types and Their Evolutionary Correlation with Life-History Strategies in Squamates.

    PubMed

    Hallmann, Konstantin; Griebeler, Eva Maria

    2015-01-01

    The eggshell is an important physiological structure for the embryo. It enables gas exchange, physical protection and is a calcium reserve. Most squamates (lizards, snakes, worm lizards) lay parchment-shelled eggs, whereas only some gekkotan species, a subgroup of lizards, have strongly calcified eggshells. In viviparous (live-bearing) squamates the eggshell is reduced or completely missing (hereafter "shell-less"). Recent studies showed that life-history strategies of gekkotan species differ between species with parchment- and rigid-shelled eggshells. Here we test if the three different eggshell types found in the squamates are also associated with different life-history strategies. We first investigated the influence of the phylogeny on the trait "eggshell type" and on six life-history traits of 32 squamate species. Phylogenetic principal component analysis (pPCA) was then conducted to identify an association between life-history strategies and eggshell types. Finally, we also considered adult weight in the pPCA to examine its potential effect on this association. Eggshell types in squamates show a strong phylogenetic signal at a low taxonomical level. Four out of the six life-history traits showed also a phylogenetic signal (birth size, clutch size, clutches per year and age at female maturity), while two had none (incubation time, maximum longevity). The pPCA suggested an association of life-history strategies and eggshell types, which disappeared when adult weight was included in the analysis. We conclude that the variability seen in eggshell types of squamates is weakly influenced by phylogeny. Eggshell types correlate with different life-history strategies, and mainly reflect differences in adult weights of species. PMID:26393343

  10. The Protein Identifier Cross-Referencing (PICR) service: reconciling protein identifiers across multiple source databases

    PubMed Central

    Côté, Richard G; Jones, Philip; Martens, Lennart; Kerrien, Samuel; Reisinger, Florian; Lin, Quan; Leinonen, Rasko; Apweiler, Rolf; Hermjakob, Henning

    2007-01-01

    Background Each major protein database uses its own conventions when assigning protein identifiers. Resolving the various, potentially unstable, identifiers that refer to identical proteins is a major challenge. This is a common problem when attempting to unify datasets that have been annotated with proteins from multiple data sources or querying data providers with one flavour of protein identifiers when the source database uses another. Partial solutions for protein identifier mapping exist but they are limited to specific species or techniques and to a very small number of databases. As a result, we have not found a solution that is generic enough and broad enough in mapping scope to suit our needs. Results We have created the Protein Identifier Cross-Reference (PICR) service, a web application that provides interactive and programmatic (SOAP and REST) access to a mapping algorithm that uses the UniProt Archive (UniParc) as a data warehouse to offer protein cross-references based on 100% sequence identity to proteins from over 70 distinct source databases loaded into UniParc. Mappings can be limited by source database, taxonomic ID and activity status in the source database. Users can copy/paste or upload files containing protein identifiers or sequences in FASTA format to obtain mappings using the interactive interface. Search results can be viewed in simple or detailed HTML tables or downloaded as comma-separated values (CSV) or Microsoft Excel (XLS) files suitable for use in a local database or a spreadsheet. Alternatively, a SOAP interface is available to integrate PICR functionality in other applications, as is a lightweight REST interface. Conclusion We offer a publicly available service that can interactively map protein identifiers and protein sequences to the majority of commonly used protein databases. Programmatic access is available through a standards-compliant SOAP interface or a lightweight REST interface. The PICR interface, documentation and

  11. The thin eggshell problem

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stickel, L.F.; Rhodes, L.I.

    1970-01-01

    It has long been known that DDT and related chemicals can impair the reproduction of birds. In early years of organochlorine pesticide use, widespread mortality occurred immediately following heavy applications of these chemicals, and survivors contained substantial amounts of toxicant in their tissues. Repopulation from untreated areas tended to conceal the extent of the effects. DDT and dieldrin have become ubiquitous and the original source of the chemicals producing bird deaths often cannot be traced. The extent of sublethal effects cannot be fully appraised, although laboratory experiments continually reveal new and potentially deleterious physiological reactions. Thin eggshells have become prevalent among certain declining species of predatory birds. Shell thinning and associated reproductive effects have been produced experimentally in mallard ducks and in sparrow hawks. Coturnix quail fed dietary dosages of p,p'-DDT produced fewer eggs than did untreated birds and the eggs had thinner shells. Hatchability was not significantly altered. Comparisons between these results and those obtained in other studies indicate significant species differences.

  12. Eggshell apex abnormalities associated with Mycoplasma synoviae infection in layers.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Eun-Ok; Kim, Jong-Nyeo; Lee, Hae-Rim; Koo, Bon-Sang; Min, Kyeong-Cheol; Han, Moo-Sung; Lee, Seung-Baek; Bae, Yeon-Ji; Mo, Jong-Suk; Cho, Sun-Hyung; Lee, Chang-Hee; Mo, In-Pil

    2014-12-01

    Eggs exhibiting eggshell apex abnormalities (EAA) were evaluated for changes in shell characteristics such as strength, thickness, and ultrastructure. Mycoplasma synoviae (MS) infection was confirmed by serological assay along with isolation of MS from the trachea and oviduct. Changes in eggshell quality were shown to be statistically significant (p < 0.01). We also identified ultrastructural changes in the mammillary knob layer by Scanning Electron Microscopy. While eggs may seem to be structurally sound, ultrastructural evaluation showed that affected eggs do not regain their former quality. In our knowledge, this is the first report describing the occurrence of EAA in Korea. PMID:24962418

  13. Laser Cleaning of Avian Eggshell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornish, L.; Ball, A.; Russell, D.

    A low vacuum SEM was used to evaluate the effect of using an Nd:YAG laser as a non-contact technique for cleaning avian eggshells. The technique shows potential, since there are no obvious deleterious effects from cleaning, but further study is required to understand how the laser is interacting with the sample surface.

  14. Embryonic sex steroid hormones accumulate in the eggshell of loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta).

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Shohei; Saito, Yoshimichi; Osawa, Akihisa; Katsumata, Etsuko; Karaki, Isuke; Nagaoka, Kentaro; Taya, Kazuyoshi; Watanabe, Gen

    2015-12-01

    Steroids hormones such as estradiol-17β (E2) and testosterone (T) are involved in gonadal differentiation of oviparous animals with temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD), and are greatly distributed. This hypothesizes that these embryonic steroid hormones probably accumulate in the eggshell throughout blood or/and chorioallantoic fluid in sea turtle species with TSD, producing females at higher temperature. To demonstrate this hypothesis, concentrations of E2 and T in the blood plasma from the hatchling loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta) and in their eggshells were measured by radioimmunoassay. In the present study we propose that both concentrations of E2 and T in the blood plasma are correlated with amounts of these sex steroids in the eggshell. Moreover, contents of E2 in the eggshell showed a significant positive correlation with mean incubation temperatures during a thermosensitive period in the experimental nests, whereas T contents in the eggshell did not. Taken together, these findings indicated that embryonic E2 and T that accumulated in the eggshell can be extracted and measured. Furthermore, the present study suggested that contents of E2 in the eggshell may differ between male and female, and monitoring of these steroids is a useful method to identify the sex of loggerhead sea turtle hatchling. PMID:26050561

  15. Microwave Irradiation of Nanohydroxyapatite from Chicken Eggshells and Duck Eggshells

    PubMed Central

    Sajahan, Nor Adzliana; Wan Ibrahim, Wan Mohd Azhar

    2014-01-01

    Due to similarity in composition to the mineral component of bones and human hard tissues, hydroxyapatite with chemical formula Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2 has been widely used in medical field. Both chicken and duck eggshells are mainly composed of calcium carbonate. An attempt has been made to fabricate nanohydroxyapatite (nHA) by chicken (CES) and duck eggshells (DES) as calcium carbonate source (CaCO3). CES and DES were reacted with diammonium hydrogen [(NH4)2HPO4] solution and subjected to microwave heating at 15 mins. Under the effect of microwave irradiation, nHA was produced directly in the solution and involved in crystallographic transformation. Sample characterization was done using by X-ray diffraction (XRD), fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). PMID:25383364

  16. Structural neighboring property for identifying protein-protein binding sites

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background The protein-protein interaction plays a key role in the control of many biological functions, such as drug design and functional analysis. Determination of binding sites is widely applied in molecular biology research. Therefore, many efficient methods have been developed for identifying binding sites. In this paper, we calculate structural neighboring property through Voronoi diagram. Using 6,438 complexes, we study local biases of structural neighboring property on interface. Results We propose a novel statistical method to extract interacting residues, and interacting patches can be clustered as predicted interface residues. In addition, structural neighboring property can be adopted to construct a new energy function, for evaluating docking solutions. It includes new statistical property as well as existing energy items. Comparing to existing methods, our approach improves overall Fnat value by at least 3%. On Benchmark v4.0, our method has average Irmsd value of 3.31Å and overall Fnat value of 63%, which improves upon Irmsd of 3.89 Å and Fnat of 49% for ZRANK, and Irmsd of 3.99Å and Fnat of 46% for ClusPro. On the CAPRI targets, our method has average Irmsd value of 3.46 Å and overall Fnat value of 45%, which improves upon Irmsd of 4.18 Å and Fnat of 40% for ZRANK, and Irmsd of 5.12 Å and Fnat of 32% for ClusPro. Conclusions Experiments show that our method achieves better results than some state-of-the-art methods for identifying protein-protein binding sites, with the prediction quality improved in terms of CAPRI evaluation criteria. PMID:26356630

  17. The evolution of eggshell cuticle in relation to nesting ecology.

    PubMed

    D'Alba, Liliana; Maia, Rafael; Hauber, Mark E; Shawkey, Matthew D

    2016-08-17

    Avian eggs are at risk of microbial infection prior to and during incubation. A large number of defence mechanisms have evolved in response to the severe costs imposed by these infections. The eggshell's cuticle is an important component of antimicrobial defence, and its role in preventing contamination by microorganisms in domestic chickens is well known. Nanometer-scale cuticular spheres that reduce microbial attachment and penetration have recently been identified on eggs of several wild avian species. However, whether these spheres have evolved specifically for antimicrobial defence is unknown. Here, we use comparative data on eggshell cuticular structure and nesting ecology to test the hypothesis that birds nesting in habitats with higher risk of infection (e.g. wetter and warmer) are more likely to evolve cuticular nanospheres on their eggshells than those nesting in less risky habitats. We found that nanostructuring, present in 54 of 296 analysed species, is the ancestral condition of avian eggshells and has been retained more often in taxa that nest in humid infection-prone environments, suggesting that they serve critical roles in antimicrobial egg defence. PMID:27488648

  18. Fossil avian eggshell preserves ancient DNA

    PubMed Central

    Oskam, Charlotte L.; Haile, James; McLay, Emma; Rigby, Paul; Allentoft, Morten E.; Olsen, Maia E.; Bengtsson, Camilla; Miller, Gifford H.; Schwenninger, Jean-Luc; Jacomb, Chris; Walter, Richard; Baynes, Alexander; Dortch, Joe; Parker-Pearson, Michael; Gilbert, M. Thomas P.; Holdaway, Richard N.; Willerslev, Eske; Bunce, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Owing to exceptional biomolecule preservation, fossil avian eggshell has been used extensively in geochronology and palaeodietary studies. Here, we show, to our knowledge, for the first time that fossil eggshell is a previously unrecognized source of ancient DNA (aDNA). We describe the successful isolation and amplification of DNA from fossil eggshell up to 19 ka old. aDNA was successfully characterized from eggshell obtained from New Zealand (extinct moa and ducks), Madagascar (extinct elephant birds) and Australia (emu and owl). Our data demonstrate excellent preservation of the nucleic acids, evidenced by retrieval of both mitochondrial and nuclear DNA from many of the samples. Using confocal microscopy and quantitative PCR, this study critically evaluates approaches to maximize DNA recovery from powdered eggshell. Our quantitative PCR experiments also demonstrate that moa eggshell has approximately 125 times lower bacterial load than bone, making it a highly suitable substrate for high-throughput sequencing approaches. Importantly, the preservation of DNA in Pleistocene eggshell from Australia and Holocene deposits from Madagascar indicates that eggshell is an excellent substrate for the long-term preservation of DNA in warmer climates. The successful recovery of DNA from this substrate has implications in a number of scientific disciplines; most notably archaeology and palaeontology, where genotypes and/or DNA-based species identifications can add significantly to our understanding of diets, environments, past biodiversity and evolutionary processes. PMID:20219731

  19. Evolution of avian eggshell structure.

    PubMed

    Osterström, Ola; Lilja, Clas

    2012-03-01

    Data are presented suggesting that birds have evolved eggs with shells containing different structures (numbers of mammillae per unit of inner eggshell surface area, i.e., mammillary densities) to cope up with different calcium requirements imposed by different growth rates and modes of development. Precocial bird species grow slowly, but have high mammillary density, while altricial bird species grow rapidly, but have low mammillary density. These results suggest an adaptation associated with growth rate and mode of development and show, moreover, that the mammillary layer is indicative of the breeding biology of the bird. PMID:21987469

  20. Eggshell composition of squamate reptiles: relationship between eggshell permeability and amino acid distribution.

    PubMed

    Sexton, Owen J; Bramble, Judith E; Heisler, I Lorraine; Phillips, Christopher A; Cox, David L

    2005-10-01

    Most snakes and lizards produce eggs with flexible shells that interact with the environment to maintain water balance. Geckos produce rigid eggshells that are independent of an external source of water and can be oviposited in more open, dryer locations. In this study, we analyzed and compared the amino acid composition of 24 lizard species, six snake species, and four outgroups (including avian and reptilian elastin and chicken eggshell). Rigid Gecko eggshells had significantly lower levels of seven of the 17 amino acids evaluated. Multivariate analysis showed that proline was the most important amino acid in distinguishing between these two groups of eggshells, occurring at significantly higher levels in flexible eggshells. High levels of proline have also been observed in the eggshells of other species. Proline and other amino acids are associated with the alleviation of water and salt stress in plants. PMID:16195850

  1. Variability in Avian Eggshell Colour: A Comparative Study of Museum Eggshells

    PubMed Central

    Cassey, Phillip; Portugal, Steven J.; Maurer, Golo; Ewen, John G.; Boulton, Rebecca L.; Hauber, Mark E.; Blackburn, Tim M.

    2010-01-01

    Background The exceptional diversity of coloration found in avian eggshells has long fascinated biologists and inspired a broad range of adaptive hypotheses to explain its evolution. Three main impediments to understanding the variability of eggshell appearance are: (1) the reliable quantification of the variation in eggshell colours; (2) its perception by birds themselves, and (3) its relation to avian phylogeny. Here we use an extensive museum collection to address these problems directly, and to test how diversity in eggshell coloration is distributed among different phylogenetic levels of the class Aves. Methodology and Results Spectrophotometric data on eggshell coloration were collected from a taxonomically representative sample of 251 bird species to determine the change in reflectance across different wavelengths and the taxonomic level where the variation resides. As many hypotheses for the evolution of eggshell coloration assume that egg colours provide a communication signal for an avian receiver, we also modelled reflectance spectra of shell coloration for the avian visual system. We found that a majority of species have eggs with similar background colour (long wavelengths) but that striking differences are just as likely to occur between congeners as between members of different families. The region of greatest variability in eggshell colour among closely related species coincided with the medium-wavelength sensitive region around 500 nm. Conclusions The majority of bird species share similar background eggshell colours, while the greatest variability among species aligns with differences along a red-brown to blue axis that most likely corresponds with variation in the presence and concentration of two tetrapyrrole pigments responsible for eggshell coloration. Additionally, our results confirm previous findings of temporal changes in museum collections, and this will be of particular concern for studies testing intraspecific hypotheses relating

  2. A nanostructural basis for gloss of avian eggshells.

    PubMed

    Igic, Branislav; Fecheyr-Lippens, Daphne; Xiao, Ming; Chan, Andrew; Hanley, Daniel; Brennan, Patricia R L; Grim, Tomas; Waterhouse, Geoffrey I N; Hauber, Mark E; Shawkey, Matthew D

    2015-02-01

    The role of pigments in generating the colour and maculation of birds' eggs is well characterized, whereas the effects of the eggshell's nanostructure on the visual appearance of eggs are little studied. Here, we examined the nanostructural basis of glossiness of tinamou eggs. Tinamou eggs are well known for their glossy appearance, but the underlying mechanism responsible for this optical effect is unclear. Using experimental manipulations in conjunction with angle-resolved spectrophotometry, scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and chemical analyses, we show that the glossy appearance of tinamou eggshells is produced by an extremely smooth cuticle, composed of calcium carbonate, calcium phosphate and, potentially, organic compounds such as proteins and pigments. Optical calculations corroborate surface smoothness as the main factor producing gloss. Furthermore, we reveal the presence of weak iridescence on eggs of the great tinamou (Tinamus major), an optical effect never previously documented for bird eggs. These data highlight the need for further exploration into the nanostructural mechanisms for the production of colour and other optical effects of avian eggshells. PMID:25505139

  3. Subtleties of biomineralisation revealed by manipulation of the eggshell membrane.

    PubMed

    Li, Nan; Niu, Li-na; Qi, Yi-pin; Yiu, Cynthia K Y; Ryou, Heonjune; Arola, Dwayne D; Chen, Ji-hua; Pashley, David H; Tay, Franklin R

    2011-12-01

    Biocalcification of collagen matrices with calcium phosphate and biosilicification of diatom frustules with amorphous silica are two discrete processes that have intrigued biologists and materials scientists for decades. Recent advancements in the understanding of the mechanisms involved in these two biomineralisation processes have resulted in the use of biomimetic strategies to replicate these processes separately using polyanionic, polycationic or zwitterionic analogues of extracellular matrix proteins to stabilise amorphous mineral precursor phases. To date, there is a lack of a universal model that enables the subtleties of these two apparently dissimilar biomineralisation processes to be studied together. Here, we utilise the eggshell membrane as a universal model for differential biomimetic calcification and silicification. By manipulating the eggshell membrane to render it permeable to stabilised mineral precursors, it is possible to introduce nanostructured calcium phosphate or silica into eggshell membrane fibre cores or mantles. We provide a model for infiltrating the two compartmental niches of a biopolymer membrane with different intrafibre minerals to obtain materials with potentially improved structure-property relationships. PMID:21864897

  4. A nanostructural basis for gloss of avian eggshells

    PubMed Central

    Igic, Branislav; Fecheyr-Lippens, Daphne; Xiao, Ming; Chan, Andrew; Hanley, Daniel; Brennan, Patricia R. L.; Grim, Tomas; Waterhouse, Geoffrey I. N.; Hauber, Mark E.; Shawkey, Matthew D.

    2015-01-01

    The role of pigments in generating the colour and maculation of birds' eggs is well characterized, whereas the effects of the eggshell's nanostructure on the visual appearance of eggs are little studied. Here, we examined the nanostructural basis of glossiness of tinamou eggs. Tinamou eggs are well known for their glossy appearance, but the underlying mechanism responsible for this optical effect is unclear. Using experimental manipulations in conjunction with angle-resolved spectrophotometry, scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and chemical analyses, we show that the glossy appearance of tinamou eggshells is produced by an extremely smooth cuticle, composed of calcium carbonate, calcium phosphate and, potentially, organic compounds such as proteins and pigments. Optical calculations corroborate surface smoothness as the main factor producing gloss. Furthermore, we reveal the presence of weak iridescence on eggs of the great tinamou (Tinamus major), an optical effect never previously documented for bird eggs. These data highlight the need for further exploration into the nanostructural mechanisms for the production of colour and other optical effects of avian eggshells. PMID:25505139

  5. Systematic Characterization of Human Protein Complexes Identifies Chromosome Segregation Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Hutchins, James R.A.; Toyoda, Yusuke; Hegemann, Björn; Poser, Ina; Hériché, Jean-Karim; Sykora, Martina M.; Augsburg, Martina; Hudecz, Otto; Buschhorn, Bettina A.; Bulkescher, Jutta; Conrad, Christian; Comartin, David; Schleiffer, Alexander; Sarov, Mihail; Pozniakovsky, Andrei; Slabicki, Mikolaj Michal; Schloissnig, Siegfried; Steinmacher, Ines; Leuschner, Marit; Ssykor, Andrea; Lawo, Steffen; Pelletier, Laurence; Stark, Holger; Nasmyth, Kim; Ellenberg, Jan; Durbin, Richard; Buchholz, Frank; Mechtler, Karl; Hyman, Anthony A.; Peters, Jan-Michael

    2010-01-01

    Chromosome segregation and cell division are essential, highly ordered processes that depend on numerous protein complexes. Results from recent RNA interference (RNAi) screens indicate that the identity and composition of these protein complexes is incompletely understood. Using gene tagging on bacterial artificial chromosomes, protein localization and tandem affinity purification-mass spectrometry, the MitoCheck consortium has analyzed about 100 human protein complexes, many of which had not or only incompletely been characterized. This work has led to the discovery of previously unknown, evolutionarily conserved subunits of the anaphase-promoting complex (APC/C) and the γ-tubulin ring complex (γ-TuRC), large complexes which are essential for spindle assembly and chromosome segregation. The approaches we describe here are generally applicable to high throughput follow-up analyses of phenotypic screens in mammalian cells. PMID:20360068

  6. Systematic analysis of human protein complexes identifies chromosome segregation proteins.

    PubMed

    Hutchins, James R A; Toyoda, Yusuke; Hegemann, Björn; Poser, Ina; Hériché, Jean-Karim; Sykora, Martina M; Augsburg, Martina; Hudecz, Otto; Buschhorn, Bettina A; Bulkescher, Jutta; Conrad, Christian; Comartin, David; Schleiffer, Alexander; Sarov, Mihail; Pozniakovsky, Andrei; Slabicki, Mikolaj Michal; Schloissnig, Siegfried; Steinmacher, Ines; Leuschner, Marit; Ssykor, Andrea; Lawo, Steffen; Pelletier, Laurence; Stark, Holger; Nasmyth, Kim; Ellenberg, Jan; Durbin, Richard; Buchholz, Frank; Mechtler, Karl; Hyman, Anthony A; Peters, Jan-Michael

    2010-04-30

    Chromosome segregation and cell division are essential, highly ordered processes that depend on numerous protein complexes. Results from recent RNA interference screens indicate that the identity and composition of these protein complexes is incompletely understood. Using gene tagging on bacterial artificial chromosomes, protein localization, and tandem-affinity purification-mass spectrometry, the MitoCheck consortium has analyzed about 100 human protein complexes, many of which had not or had only incompletely been characterized. This work has led to the discovery of previously unknown, evolutionarily conserved subunits of the anaphase-promoting complex and the gamma-tubulin ring complex--large complexes that are essential for spindle assembly and chromosome segregation. The approaches we describe here are generally applicable to high-throughput follow-up analyses of phenotypic screens in mammalian cells. PMID:20360068

  7. Identification of uterine ion transporters for mineralisation precursors of the avian eggshell

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In Gallus gallus, eggshell formation takes place daily in the hen uterus and requires large amounts of the ionic precursors for calcium carbonate (CaCO3). Both elements (Ca2+, HCO3-) are supplied by the blood via trans-epithelial transport. Our aims were to identify genes coding for ion transporters that are upregulated in the uterine portion of the oviduct during eggshell calcification, compared to other tissues and other physiological states, and incorporate these proteins into a general model for mineral transfer across the tubular gland cells during eggshell formation. Results A total of 37 candidate ion transport genes were selected from our database of overexpressed uterine genes associated with eggshell calcification, and by analogy with mammalian transporters. Their uterine expression was compared by qRTPCR in the presence and absence of eggshell formation, and with relative expression levels in magnum (low Ca2+/HCO3- movement) and duodenum (high rates of Ca2+/HCO3- trans-epithelial transfer). We identified overexpression of eleven genes related to calcium movement: the TRPV6 Ca2+ channel (basolateral uptake of Ca2+), 28 kDa calbindin (intracellular Ca2+ buffering), the endoplasmic reticulum type 2 and 3 Ca2+ pumps (ER uptake), and the inositol trisphosphate receptors type 1, 2 and 3 (ER release). Ca2+ movement across the apical membrane likely involves membrane Ca2+ pumps and Ca2+/Na+ exchangers. Our data suggests that Na+ transport involved the SCNN1 channel and the Na+/Ca2+ exchangers SLC8A1, 3 for cell uptake, the Na+/K+ ATPase for cell output. K+ uptake resulted from the Na+/K+ ATPase, and its output from the K+ channels (KCNJ2, 15, 16 and KCNMA1). We propose that the HCO3- is mainly produced from CO2 by the carbonic anhydrase 2 (CA2) and that HCO3- is secreted through the HCO3-/Cl- exchanger SLC26A9. HCO3- synthesis and precipitation with Ca2+ produce two H+. Protons are absorbed via the membrane’s Ca2+ pumps ATP2B1, 2 in the apical

  8. Quantitative proteomic profiling identifies protein correlates to EGFR kinase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Kani, Kian; Faca, Vitor M; Hughes, Lindsey D; Zhang, Wenxuan; Fang, Qiaojun; Shahbaba, Babak; Luethy, Roland; Erde, Jonathan; Schmidt, Joanna; Pitteri, Sharon J; Zhang, Qing; Katz, Jonathan E; Gross, Mitchell E; Plevritis, Sylvia K; McIntosh, Martin W; Jain, Anjali; Hanash, Samir; Agus, David B; Mallick, Parag

    2012-05-01

    Clinical oncology is hampered by lack of tools to accurately assess a patient's response to pathway-targeted therapies. Serum and tumor cell surface proteins whose abundance, or change in abundance in response to therapy, differentiates patients responding to a therapy from patients not responding to a therapy could be usefully incorporated into tools for monitoring response. Here, we posit and then verify that proteomic discovery in in vitro tissue culture models can identify proteins with concordant in vivo behavior and further, can be a valuable approach for identifying tumor-derived serum proteins. In this study, we use stable isotope labeling of amino acids in culture (SILAC) with proteomic technologies to quantitatively analyze the gefitinib-related protein changes in a model system for sensitivity to EGF receptor (EGFR)-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors. We identified 3,707 intracellular proteins, 1,276 cell surface proteins, and 879 shed proteins. More than 75% of the proteins identified had quantitative information, and a subset consisting of 400 proteins showed a statistically significant change in abundance following gefitinib treatment. We validated the change in expression profile in vitro and screened our panel of response markers in an in vivo isogenic resistant model and showed that these were markers of gefitinib response and not simply markers of phospho-EGFR downregulation. In doing so, we also were able to identify which proteins might be useful as markers for monitoring response and which proteins might be useful as markers for a priori prediction of response. PMID:22411897

  9. Quantitative Proteomic profiling identifies protein correlates to EGFR kinase inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Kani, Kian; Faca, Vitor M.; Hughes, Lindsey D.; Zhang, Wenxuan; Fang, Qiaojun; Shahbaba, Babak; Luethy, Roland; Erde, Jonathan; Schmidt, Joanna; Pitteri, Sharon J.; Zhang, Qing; Katz, Jonathan E.; Gross, Mitchell E.; Plevritis, Sylvia K.; McIntosh, Martin W.; Jain, Anjali; Hanash, Sam; Agus, David B.; Mallick, Parag

    2014-01-01

    Clinical oncology is hampered by a lack of tools to accurately assess a patient’s response to pathway-targeted therapies. Serum and tumor cell surface proteins whose abundance, or change in abundance in response to therapy, differentiates patients responding to a therapy from patients not-responding to a therapy could be usefully incorporated into tools for monitoring response. Here we posit and then verify that proteomic discovery in in vitro tissue culture models can identify proteins with concordant in vivo behavior and further, can be a valuable approach for identifying tumor-derived serum proteins. In this study we use Stable Isotope Labeling of Amino acids in Culture (SILAC) with proteomic technologies to quantitatively analyze the gefitinib-related protein changes in a model system for sensitivity to EGFR targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitors. We identified 3,707 intracellular proteins, 1,276 cell surface proteins, and 879 shed proteins. More than 75% of the proteins identified had quantitative information and a subset consisting of [400] proteins showed a statistically significant change in abundance following gefitinib treatment. We validated the change in expression profile in vitro and screened our panel of response markers in an in vivo isogenic resistant model and demonstrated that these were markers of gefitinib response and not simply markers of phospho-EGFR downregulation. In doing so, we also were able to identify which proteins might be useful as markers for monitoring response and which proteins might be useful as markers for a priori prediction of response. PMID:22411897

  10. Productive performance, eggshell quality, and eggshell ultrastructure of laying hens fed diets supplemented with organic trace minerals.

    PubMed

    Stefanello, C; Santos, T C; Murakami, A E; Martins, E N; Carneiro, T C

    2014-01-01

    This study was carried out with the purpose of evaluating the effect of supplementing hens' diets with trace minerals from inorganic or organic sources on the productive performance, eggshell quality, and eggshell ultrastructure of laying hens. Three hundred sixty Hy-Line W36 laying hens between 47 to 62 wk of age were used and distributed in a completely randomized experimental design with 9 treatments, 5 replicates, and 8 birds for each experimental unit. The treatments consisted of a control diet without supplementation of the trace minerals Mn, Zn, and Cu; 4 supplementation levels of these trace minerals from an inorganic source; and the same levels of supplementation from an organic source (proteinates). The supplementation levels in milligrams per kilogram for Mn, Zn, and Cu, were, respectively, 35-30-05, 65-60-10, 95-90-15, and 125-120-20. There was no effect of supplementation of trace minerals on the rate of posture, feed intake, feed conversion, specific weight, and Haugh unit of eggs. However, there was a quadratic effect (P < 0.05) of the levels of trace mineral supplementation on average egg weight and egg mass; the results did not differ regarding the source used. The increase in the levels of supplementation of Mn, Zn, and Cu provided a linear increase (P < 0.05) in the breaking strength and the percentage of eggshell. There was a linear decrease (P < 0.05) in the egg loss and the number of mammillary buttons in the shell. The best results were obtained using diets supplemented with trace minerals from an organic source because these diets provided lower egg loss, higher thickness, and increased strength of the shell. Structurally, organic Mn, Zn, and Cu provided higher thickness of the palisade layer and lower mammillary density. The trace mineral supplementation improved the structural characteristics and the quality of the eggshells. PMID:24570429

  11. Direct visualization of identified and newly synthesized proteins in situ

    PubMed Central

    Dieck, Susanne tom; Kochen, Lisa; Hanus, Cyril; Bartnik, Ina; Nassim-Assir, Belquis; Merk, Katrin; Mosler, Thorsten; Garg, Sakshi; Bunse, Stefanie; Tirrell, David A.; Schuman, Erin M.

    2015-01-01

    Protein synthesis is a dynamic process to tune the cellular proteome to internal and external demands. Metabolic labeling approaches identify the general proteomic response but missing is a tool to visualize within cells specific newly synthesized proteins. Here we describe a technique that couples non-canonical amino acid tagging or puromycylation with the proximity-ligation assay to visualize identified newly synthesized proteins and monitor their origin, redistribution and turnover in situ. PMID:25775042

  12. A comprehensive strategy to identify stoichiometric membrane protein interactomes

    PubMed Central

    Gokhale, Avanti; Perez-Cornejo, Patricia; Duran, Charity; Hartzell, H. Criss; Faundez, Victor

    2012-01-01

    There are numerous experimental approaches to identify the interaction networks of soluble proteins, but strategies for the identification of membrane protein interactomes remain limited. We discuss in detail the logic of an experimental design that led us to identify the interactome of a membrane protein of complex membrane topology, the calcium activated chloride channel Anoctamin 1/Tmem16a (Ano1). We used covalent chemical stabilizers of protein-protein interactions combined with magnetic bead immuno-affinity chromatography, quantitative SILAC mass-spectrometry and in silico network construction. This strategy led us to define a putative Ano1 interactome from which we selected key components for functional testing. We propose a combination of procedures to narrow down candidate proteins interacting with a membrane protein of interest for further functional studies. PMID:23676845

  13. Not so colourful after all: eggshell pigments constrain avian eggshell colour space

    PubMed Central

    Hanley, Daniel; Grim, Tomáš; Cassey, Phillip; Hauber, Mark E.

    2015-01-01

    Birds' eggshells are renowned for their striking colours and varied patterns. Although often considered exceptionally diverse, we report that avian eggshell coloration, sampled here across the full phylogenetic diversity of birds, occupies only 0.08–0.10% of the avian perceivable colour space. The concentrations of the two known tetrapyrrole eggshell pigments (protoporphyrin and biliverdin) are generally poor predictors of colour, both intra- and interspecifically. Here, we show that the constrained diversity of eggshell coloration can be accurately predicted by colour mixing models based on the relative contribution of both pigments and we demonstrate that the models' predictions can be improved by accounting for the reflectance of the eggshell's calcium carbonate matrix. The establishment of these proximate links between pigmentation and colour will enable future tests of hypotheses on the functions of perceived avian eggshell colours that depend on eggshell chemistry. More generally, colour mixing models are not limited to avian eggshell colours but apply to any natural colour. Our approach illustrates how modelling can aid the understanding of constraints on phenotypic diversity. PMID:25994009

  14. Not so colourful after all: eggshell pigments constrain avian eggshell colour space.

    PubMed

    Hanley, Daniel; Grim, Tomáš; Cassey, Phillip; Hauber, Mark E

    2015-05-01

    Birds' eggshells are renowned for their striking colours and varied patterns. Although often considered exceptionally diverse, we report that avian eggshell coloration, sampled here across the full phylogenetic diversity of birds, occupies only 0.08-0.10% of the avian perceivable colour space. The concentrations of the two known tetrapyrrole eggshell pigments (protoporphyrin and biliverdin) are generally poor predictors of colour, both intra- and interspecifically. Here, we show that the constrained diversity of eggshell coloration can be accurately predicted by colour mixing models based on the relative contribution of both pigments and we demonstrate that the models' predictions can be improved by accounting for the reflectance of the eggshell's calcium carbonate matrix. The establishment of these proximate links between pigmentation and colour will enable future tests of hypotheses on the functions of perceived avian eggshell colours that depend on eggshell chemistry. More generally, colour mixing models are not limited to avian eggshell colours but apply to any natural colour. Our approach illustrates how modelling can aid the understanding of constraints on phenotypic diversity. PMID:25994009

  15. Shotgun Proteomics Identifies Proteins Specific for Acute Renal Transplant Rejection

    SciTech Connect

    Sigdel, Tara K.; Kaushal, Amit; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Norbeck, Angela D.; Qian, Weijun; Xiao, Wenzhong; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Sarwal, Minnie M.

    2010-01-04

    Acute rejection (AR) remains the primary risk factor for renal transplant outcome; development of non-invasive diagnostic biomarkers for AR is an unmet need. We used shotgun proteomics using LC-MS/MS and ELISA to analyze a set of 92 urine samples, from patients with AR, stable grafts (STA), proteinuria (NS), and healthy controls (HC). A total of 1446 urinary proteins were identified along with a number of NS specific, renal transplantation specific and AR specific proteins. Relative abundance of identified urinary proteins was measured by protein-level spectral counts adopting a weighted fold-change statistic, assigning increased weight for more frequently observed proteins. We have identified alterations in a number of specific urinary proteins in AR, primarily relating to MHC antigens, the complement cascade and extra-cellular matrix proteins. A subset of proteins (UMOD, SERPINF1 and CD44), have been further cross-validated by ELISA in an independent set of urine samples, for significant differences in the abundance of these urinary proteins in AR. This label-free, semi-quantitative approach for sampling the urinary proteome in normal and disease states provides a robust and sensitive method for detection of urinary proteins for serial, non-invasive clinical monitoring for graft rejection after

  16. How the oxygen isotope ratio of rain water influences the isotope ratio of chicken eggshell carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Gregory; Grimes, Stephen

    2015-04-01

    The stable oxygen isotope ratio of chicken eggshell carbonate was analysed from chicken eggs laid under free range, and organic farming regimes from across the UK. The eggshell carbonate oxygen isotope data shows a clear depletion in delta18O distribution from the southwest to the northeast. Although consistently offset by around 1 permil, the same isotopic distribution as that seen in eggshell carbonate is observed in the delta18O ratio of rainfall and groundwater from across the UK. This distribution is related to the Rayleigh distillation of rainfall driven by westerly winds across the UK landmass. The clear relationship observed between eggshell delta18O values and that of rainwater presumably reflects the nature of free range chickens which must be drinking locally derived rainwater and supplementing their diet and water intake with locally derived food. These results suggest that the oxygen isotope value of chicken eggshells can be used as a forensic tool to identify the locality that free range and organic eggs were laid within the UK. Furthermore, if suitable material is preserved in the archaeological and geological record then such a relationship can potentially be used to establish the oxygen isotope value of rainwater from which ancient and / or ancestral birds lived.

  17. The location of protoporphyrin in the eggshell of brown-shelled eggs.

    PubMed

    Samiullah, S; Roberts, J R

    2013-10-01

    Protoporphyrin has been identified as the main eggshell pigment in brown-shelled eggs. However, there has been some uncertainty concerning the distribution of the pigment within the shell (and cuticle) in brown-shelled eggs. Most previous studies have suggested that the bulk of the shell pigment is deposited in the cuticle of the shell. The present study measured the levels of protoporphyrin in intact eggshells and in shells from which the cuticle had been removed, using eggs from flocks at 3 different ages. This enabled the calculation of the relative amount of protoporphyrin in the calcareous eggshell and the cuticle layer of the eggshell. The majority of the protoporphyrin pigment was located in the calcareous part of the eggshell (80-87%) with a minority contained within the cuticle (13-20%). These findings suggest that studies focused on maintenance of shell color in brown-shelled eggs need to consider the stage of egg formation at which the reduction in pigment deposition is occurring. PMID:24046428

  18. Shifts in Bacterial Communities of Eggshells and Antimicrobial Activities in Eggs during Incubation in a Ground-Nesting Passerine

    PubMed Central

    Grizard, Stéphanie; Versteegh, Maaike A.; Ndithia, Henry K.; Salles, Joana F.; Tieleman, B. Irene

    2015-01-01

    Microbial invasion of egg contents is a cause of embryonic death. To counter infection risks, the embryo is protected physically by the eggshell and chemically by antimicrobial proteins. If microbial pressure drives embryo mortality, then females may have evolved, through natural selection, to adapt their immune investment into eggs. Although frequently hypothesized, this match between immune allocation and microorganisms has not been explored yet. To examine if correlations between microbes on eggs and immunity in eggs exist, we collected eggs from red-capped larks (Calandrella cinerea) and simultaneously examined their bacterial communities and antimicrobial components—pH, lysozyme and ovotransferrin—during natural incubation. Using molecular techniques, we find that bacterial communities are highly dynamic: bacterial abundance increases from the onset to late incubation, Shannon’s α-diversity index increases during early incubation stages, and β-diversity analysis shows that communities from 1 day-old clutches are phylogenetically more similar to each other than the older ones. Regarding the antimicrobials, we notice a decrease of pH and lysozyme concentration, while ovotransferrin concentration increases during incubation. Interestingly, we show that two eggs of the same clutch share equivalent immune protection, independent of clutch age. Lastly, our results provide limited evidence of significant correlation between antimicrobial compounds and bacterial communities. Our study examined simultaneously, for the first time in a wild bird, the dynamics of bacterial communities present on eggshells and of albumen-associated antimicrobial components during incubation and investigated their relationship. However, the link between microorganisms and immunity of eggs remains to be elucidated further. Identifying invading microbes and their roles in embryo mortality, as well as understanding the role of the eggshell microbiome, might be key to better understand

  19. Nutritional supplement of hatchery eggshell membrane improves poultry performance and provides resistance against endotoxin stress

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Eggshells are significant part of hatchery waste which consist of calcium carbonate crust, membranes, and proteins and peptides of embryonic origins along with other entrapped contaminants including microbes. We hypothesized that using this product as a nutritional additive in poultry diet may confe...

  20. Novel approaches to identify protein adducts produced by lipid peroxidation.

    PubMed

    Codreanu, S G; Liebler, D C

    2015-01-01

    Lipid peroxidation is responsible for the generation of chemically reactive, diffusible lipid-derived electrophiles (LDEs) that covalently modify cellular protein targets. These protein modifications modulate protein activity and macromolecular interactions and induce adaptive and toxic cell signaling. Protein modifications induced by LDEs can be identified and quantified by affinity enrichment and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS)-based techniques. Tagged LDE analog probes with different electrophilic groups can be covalently captured by click chemistry for LC-MS/MS analyses, thereby enabling in-depth studies of proteome damage at the protein and peptide sequence levels. Conversely, click-reactive, thiol-directed probes can be used to evaluate thiol damage caused by LDE by difference. These analytical approaches permit systematic study of the dynamics of protein damage caused by LDE and mechanisms by which oxidative stress contribute to toxicity and diseases. PMID:25819163

  1. Dietary supplementation with sodium bicarbonate improves calcium absorption and eggshell quality of laying hens during peak production.

    PubMed

    Jiang, M J; Zhao, J P; Jiao, H C; Wang, X J; Zhang, Q; Lin, H

    2015-01-01

    The advantage of supplemental sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) on eggshell quality in laying hens changes with age. Besides increasing calcium (Ca) secretion in the eggshell gland, it may improve Ca absorption in the intestine or kidney. Hy-Line Brown layers (n = 384), 25 weeks of age, were allocated to two treatment groups in two experiments, each of which included 4 replicates of 24 hens. Hens were fed a basal diet (control) or the basal diet containing 3 g NaHCO3 g/kg for 50 or 20 weeks in Experiment 1 or 2, respectively. A 24-h continuous lighting regimen was used to allow hens to consume the dietary supplements during the period of active eggshell formation. In Experiment 1, particularly from 25 to 50 weeks of age, and in Experiment 2, NaHCO3 supplementation favoured hen-d egg production at the expense of lower egg weight. The increased eggshell thickness should have nothing to do with the additional eggshell formation, because of the unchanged egg mass and daily eggshell calcification. At 35 weeks of age in both experiments, NaHCO3 supplementation increased duodenal expression of calbindin-d28k (CaBP-D28k) protein, contributing to higher Ca retention and balance. From 50 to 75 weeks of age in Experiment 1, the hens had little response to NaHCO3 supplementation and showed a negative trend on eggshell thickness and strength. It is concluded that dietary supplementation with 3 g NaHCO3 g/kg improves Ca absorption and eggshell quality of laying hens during the peak but not late production period, with the introduction of continuous lighting. PMID:26569471

  2. A Least Square Method Based Model for Identifying Protein Complexes in Protein-Protein Interaction Network

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Qiguo; Guo, Maozu; Guo, Yingjie; Liu, Xiaoyan; Liu, Yang; Teng, Zhixia

    2014-01-01

    Protein complex formed by a group of physical interacting proteins plays a crucial role in cell activities. Great effort has been made to computationally identify protein complexes from protein-protein interaction (PPI) network. However, the accuracy of the prediction is still far from being satisfactory, because the topological structures of protein complexes in the PPI network are too complicated. This paper proposes a novel optimization framework to detect complexes from PPI network, named PLSMC. The method is on the basis of the fact that if two proteins are in a common complex, they are likely to be interacting. PLSMC employs this relation to determine complexes by a penalized least squares method. PLSMC is applied to several public yeast PPI networks, and compared with several state-of-the-art methods. The results indicate that PLSMC outperforms other methods. In particular, complexes predicted by PLSMC can match known complexes with a higher accuracy than other methods. Furthermore, the predicted complexes have high functional homogeneity. PMID:25405206

  3. 40 CFR 174.529 - Bacillus thuringiensis modified Cry1Ab protein as identified under OECD Unique Identifier SYN...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... protein as identified under OECD Unique Identifier SYN-IR67B-1 in cotton; exemption from the requirement... Tolerance Exemptions § 174.529 Bacillus thuringiensis modified Cry1Ab protein as identified under OECD... Bacillus thuringiensis modified Cry1Ab protein as identified under OECD Unique Identifier SYN-IR67B-1...

  4. 40 CFR 174.529 - Bacillus thuringiensis modified Cry1Ab protein as identified under OECD Unique Identifier SYN...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... protein as identified under OECD Unique Identifier SYN-IR67B-1 in cotton; exemption from the requirement... Tolerance Exemptions § 174.529 Bacillus thuringiensis modified Cry1Ab protein as identified under OECD... Bacillus thuringiensis modified Cry1Ab protein as identified under OECD Unique Identifier SYN-IR67B-1...

  5. 40 CFR 174.529 - Bacillus thuringiensis modified Cry1Ab protein as identified under OECD Unique Identifier SYN...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... protein as identified under OECD Unique Identifier SYN-IR67B-1 in cotton; exemption from the requirement... Tolerance Exemptions § 174.529 Bacillus thuringiensis modified Cry1Ab protein as identified under OECD... Bacillus thuringiensis modified Cry1Ab protein as identified under OECD Unique Identifier SYN-IR67B-1...

  6. 40 CFR 174.529 - Bacillus thuringiensis modified Cry1Ab protein as identified under OECD Unique Identifier SYN...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... protein as identified under OECD Unique Identifier SYN-IR67B-1 in cotton; exemption from the requirement... Tolerance Exemptions § 174.529 Bacillus thuringiensis modified Cry1Ab protein as identified under OECD... Bacillus thuringiensis modified Cry1Ab protein as identified under OECD Unique Identifier SYN-IR67B-1...

  7. Proteomic Analysis of the Soybean Symbiosome Identifies New Symbiotic Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Victoria C.; Loughlin, Patrick C.; Gavrin, Aleksandr; Chen, Chi; Brear, Ella M.; Day, David A.; Smith, Penelope M.C.

    2015-01-01

    Legumes form a symbiosis with rhizobia in which the plant provides an energy source to the rhizobia bacteria that it uses to fix atmospheric nitrogen. This nitrogen is provided to the legume plant, allowing it to grow without the addition of nitrogen fertilizer. As part of the symbiosis, the bacteria in the infected cells of a new root organ, the nodule, are surrounded by a plant-derived membrane, the symbiosome membrane, which becomes the interface between the symbionts. Fractions containing the symbiosome membrane (SM) and material from the lumen of the symbiosome (peribacteroid space or PBS) were isolated from soybean root nodules and analyzed using nongel proteomic techniques. Bicarbonate stripping and chloroform-methanol extraction of isolated SM were used to reduce complexity of the samples and enrich for hydrophobic integral membrane proteins. One hundred and ninety-seven proteins were identified as components of the SM, with an additional fifteen proteins identified from peripheral membrane and PBS protein fractions. Proteins involved in a range of cellular processes such as metabolism, protein folding and degradation, membrane trafficking, and solute transport were identified. These included a number of proteins previously localized to the SM, such as aquaglyceroporin nodulin 26, sulfate transporters, remorin, and Rab7 homologs. Among the proteome were a number of putative transporters for compounds such as sulfate, calcium, hydrogen ions, peptide/dicarboxylate, and nitrate, as well as transporters for which the substrate is not easy to predict. Analysis of the promoter activity for six genes encoding putative SM proteins showed nodule specific expression, with five showing expression only in infected cells. Localization of two proteins was confirmed using GFP-fusion experiments. The data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001132. This proteome will provide a rich resource for the study of the legume-rhizobium symbiosis. PMID

  8. Proteomic analysis of the soybean symbiosome identifies new symbiotic proteins.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Victoria C; Loughlin, Patrick C; Gavrin, Aleksandr; Chen, Chi; Brear, Ella M; Day, David A; Smith, Penelope M C

    2015-05-01

    Legumes form a symbiosis with rhizobia in which the plant provides an energy source to the rhizobia bacteria that it uses to fix atmospheric nitrogen. This nitrogen is provided to the legume plant, allowing it to grow without the addition of nitrogen fertilizer. As part of the symbiosis, the bacteria in the infected cells of a new root organ, the nodule, are surrounded by a plant-derived membrane, the symbiosome membrane, which becomes the interface between the symbionts. Fractions containing the symbiosome membrane (SM) and material from the lumen of the symbiosome (peribacteroid space or PBS) were isolated from soybean root nodules and analyzed using nongel proteomic techniques. Bicarbonate stripping and chloroform-methanol extraction of isolated SM were used to reduce complexity of the samples and enrich for hydrophobic integral membrane proteins. One hundred and ninety-seven proteins were identified as components of the SM, with an additional fifteen proteins identified from peripheral membrane and PBS protein fractions. Proteins involved in a range of cellular processes such as metabolism, protein folding and degradation, membrane trafficking, and solute transport were identified. These included a number of proteins previously localized to the SM, such as aquaglyceroporin nodulin 26, sulfate transporters, remorin, and Rab7 homologs. Among the proteome were a number of putative transporters for compounds such as sulfate, calcium, hydrogen ions, peptide/dicarboxylate, and nitrate, as well as transporters for which the substrate is not easy to predict. Analysis of the promoter activity for six genes encoding putative SM proteins showed nodule specific expression, with five showing expression only in infected cells. Localization of two proteins was confirmed using GFP-fusion experiments. The data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001132. This proteome will provide a rich resource for the study of the legume-rhizobium symbiosis. PMID

  9. Biodegradation of thermoplastic starch/eggshell powder composites.

    PubMed

    Bootklad, Munlika; Kaewtatip, Kaewta

    2013-09-12

    Thermoplastic starch (TPS) was prepared using compression molding and chicken eggshell was used as a filler. The effect of the eggshell powder (EP) on the properties of TPS was compared with the effect of commercial calcium carbonate (CC). The organic compound on the surface of the eggshell powder acted as a coupling agent that resulted in a strong adhesion between the eggshell powder and the TPS matrix, as confirmed by SEM micrographs. The biodegradation was determined by the soil burial test. The TPS/EP composites were more rapidly degraded than the TPS/CC composites. In addition, the eggshell powder improved the water resistance and thermal stability of the TPS. PMID:23911451

  10. Proteomic Approach to Identify Nuclear Proteins in Wheat Grain.

    PubMed

    Bancel, Emmanuelle; Bonnot, Titouan; Davanture, Marlène; Branlard, Gérard; Zivy, Michel; Martre, Pierre

    2015-10-01

    The nuclear proteome of the grain of the two cultivated wheat species Triticum aestivum (hexaploid wheat; genomes A, B, and D) and T. monococcum (diploid wheat; genome A) was analyzed in two early stages of development using shotgun-based proteomics. A procedure was optimized to purify nuclei, and an improved protein sample preparation was developed to efficiently remove nonprotein substances (starch and nucleic acids). A total of 797 proteins corresponding to 528 unique proteins were identified, 36% of which were classified in functional groups related to DNA and RNA metabolism. A large number (107 proteins) of unknown functions and hypothetical proteins were also found. Some identified proteins may be multifunctional and may present multiple localizations. On the basis of the MS/MS analysis, 368 proteins were present in the two species, and in two stages of development, some qualitative differences between species and stages of development were also found. All of these data illustrate the dynamic function of the grain nucleus in the early stages of development. PMID:26228564

  11. The cuticle modulates ultraviolet reflectance of avian eggshells.

    PubMed

    Fecheyr-Lippens, Daphne C; Igic, Branislav; D'Alba, Liliana; Hanley, Daniel; Verdes, Aida; Holford, Mande; Waterhouse, Geoffrey I N; Grim, Tomas; Hauber, Mark E; Shawkey, Matthew D

    2015-01-01

    Avian eggshells are variedly coloured, yet only two pigments, biliverdin and protoporphyrin IX, are known to contribute to the dramatic diversity of their colours. By contrast, the contributions of structural or other chemical components of the eggshell are poorly understood. For example, unpigmented eggshells, which appear white to the human eye, vary in their ultraviolet (UV) reflectance, which may be detectable by birds. We investigated the proximate mechanisms for the variation in UV-reflectance of unpigmented bird eggshells using spectrophotometry, electron microscopy, chemical analyses, and experimental manipulations. We specifically tested how UV-reflectance is affected by the eggshell cuticle, the outermost layer of most avian eggshells. The chemical dissolution of the outer eggshell layers, including the cuticle, increased UV-reflectance for only eggshells that contained a cuticle. Our findings demonstrate that the outer eggshell layers, including the cuticle, absorb UV-light, probably because they contain higher levels of organic components and other chemicals, such as calcium phosphates, compared to the predominantly calcite-based eggshell matrix. These data highlight the need to examine factors other than the known pigments in studies of avian eggshell colour. PMID:25964661

  12. The cuticle modulates ultraviolet reflectance of avian eggshells

    PubMed Central

    Fecheyr-Lippens, Daphne C.; Igic, Branislav; D'Alba, Liliana; Hanley, Daniel; Verdes, Aida; Holford, Mande; Waterhouse, Geoffrey I. N.; Grim, Tomas; Hauber, Mark E.; Shawkey, Matthew D.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Avian eggshells are variedly coloured, yet only two pigments, biliverdin and protoporphyrin IX, are known to contribute to the dramatic diversity of their colours. By contrast, the contributions of structural or other chemical components of the eggshell are poorly understood. For example, unpigmented eggshells, which appear white to the human eye, vary in their ultraviolet (UV) reflectance, which may be detectable by birds. We investigated the proximate mechanisms for the variation in UV-reflectance of unpigmented bird eggshells using spectrophotometry, electron microscopy, chemical analyses, and experimental manipulations. We specifically tested how UV-reflectance is affected by the eggshell cuticle, the outermost layer of most avian eggshells. The chemical dissolution of the outer eggshell layers, including the cuticle, increased UV-reflectance for only eggshells that contained a cuticle. Our findings demonstrate that the outer eggshell layers, including the cuticle, absorb UV-light, probably because they contain higher levels of organic components and other chemicals, such as calcium phosphates, compared to the predominantly calcite-based eggshell matrix. These data highlight the need to examine factors other than the known pigments in studies of avian eggshell colour. PMID:25964661

  13. Thermal emissivity of avian eggshells.

    PubMed

    Björn, Lars Olof; Bengtson, Sven-Axel; Li, Shaoshan; Hecker, Christoph; Ullah, Saleem; Roos, Arne; Nilsson, Annica M

    2016-04-01

    The hypothesis has been tested that evolution has resulted in lower thermal emissivity of eggs of birds breeding openly in cold climates than of eggs of birds that nest under protective covering or in warmer climates. Directional thermal emissivity has been estimated from directional-hemispherical reflectance spectra. Due to several methodological difficulties the absolute emissivity is not accurately determined, but differences between species are obvious. Most notably, small waders of the genus Calidris, breeding in cold climates on the tundra, and in most cases with uniparental nest attendance, have low directional emissivity of their eggshells, about 0.92 when integration is carried out for wavelengths up to 16μm. Species belonging to Galloanserinae have the highest directional emissivity, about 0.96, of their eggs. No differences due to climate or breeding conditions were found within this group. Eggs of most other birds tested possess intermediate emissivity, but the values for Pica pica and Corvus corone cornix are as low as for Calidris. Large species-dependent differences in spectral reflectance were found at specific wavelengths. For instance, at 4.259μm the directional-hemispherical reflectance for galliforms range from 0.05 to 0.09, while for Fratercula arctica and Fulmarus glacialis it is about 0.3. The reflection peaks at 6.5 and 11.3μm due to calcite are differentially attenuated in different species. In conclusion, the hypothesis that evolution has resulted in lower thermal emissivity of bird eggs being exposed in cold climates is not supported by our results. The emissivity is not clearly related to nesting habits or climate, and it is unlikely that the small differences observed are ecologically important. The spectral differences between eggs that nevertheless exist should be taken into account when using infrared thermometers for estimating the surface temperature of avian eggs. PMID:27033033

  14. Recovery of Salmonella from eggshell wash, eggshell crush, and egg internal contents of unwashed commercial shell eggs in Australia.

    PubMed

    Chousalkar, K K; Roberts, J R

    2012-07-01

    The experiment was conducted to study the prevalence of Salmonella spp. on the eggshell surface, eggshell membranes or pores, and in egg internal contents from unwashed eggs collected from commercial caged layer farms in Australia. Eggshell rinsate, shell crush, and egg internal contents (yolk and albumen) of eggs were processed for Salmonella spp. Salmonella Infantis and Salmonella subspecies 1, serotype 4,12:d were isolated from the eggshell surface. Salmonella spp. were not isolated from any eggshell crush or egg internal contents. It would appear that the occurrence of Salmonella in the Australian egg industry is low. PMID:22700522

  15. Identifying protein complexes in protein-protein interaction networks by using clique seeds and graph entropy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bolin; Shi, Jinhong; Zhang, Shenggui; Wu, Fang-Xiang

    2013-01-01

    The identification of protein complexes plays a key role in understanding major cellular processes and biological functions. Various computational algorithms have been proposed to identify protein complexes from protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks. In this paper, we first introduce a new seed-selection strategy for seed-growth style algorithms. Cliques rather than individual vertices are employed as initial seeds. After that, a result-modification approach is proposed based on this seed-selection strategy. Predictions generated by higher order clique seeds are employed to modify results that are generated by lower order ones. The performance of this seed-selection strategy and the result-modification approach are tested by using the entropy-based algorithm, which is currently the best seed-growth style algorithm to detect protein complexes from PPI networks. In addition, we investigate four pairs of strategies for this algorithm in order to improve its accuracy. The numerical experiments are conducted on a Saccharomyces cerevisiae PPI network. The group of best predictions consists of 1711 clusters, with the average f-score at 0.68 after removing all similar and redundant clusters. We conclude that higher order clique seeds can generate predictions with higher accuracy and that our improved entropy-based algorithm outputs more reasonable predictions than the original one. PMID:23112006

  16. A Functional Genomic Yeast Screen to Identify Pathogenic Bacterial Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Slagowski, Naomi L; Kramer, Roger W; Morrison, Monica F; LaBaer, Joshua; Lesser, Cammie F

    2008-01-01

    Many bacterial pathogens promote infection and cause disease by directly injecting into host cells proteins that manipulate eukaryotic cellular processes. Identification of these translocated proteins is essential to understanding pathogenesis. Yet, their identification remains limited. This, in part, is due to their general sequence uniqueness, which confounds homology-based identification by comparative genomic methods. In addition, their absence often does not result in phenotypes in virulence assays limiting functional genetic screens. Translocated proteins have been observed to confer toxic phenotypes when expressed in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This observation suggests that yeast growth inhibition can be used as an indicator of protein translocation in functional genomic screens. However, limited information is available regarding the behavior of non-translocated proteins in yeast. We developed a semi-automated quantitative assay to monitor the growth of hundreds of yeast strains in parallel. We observed that expression of half of the 19 Shigella translocated proteins tested but almost none of the 20 non-translocated Shigella proteins nor ∼1,000 Francisella tularensis proteins significantly inhibited yeast growth. Not only does this study establish that yeast growth inhibition is a sensitive and specific indicator of translocated proteins, but we also identified a new substrate of the Shigella type III secretion system (TTSS), IpaJ, previously missed by other experimental approaches. In those cases where the mechanisms of action of the translocated proteins are known, significant yeast growth inhibition correlated with the targeting of conserved cellular processes. By providing positive rather than negative indication of activity our assay complements existing approaches for identification of translocated proteins. In addition, because this assay only requires genomic DNA it is particularly valuable for studying pathogens that are difficult to

  17. Fossil struthionid eggshells from Laetoli, Tanzania: Taxonomic and biostratigraphic significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Terry; Msuya, Charles P.

    2005-04-01

    Recent paleontological investigations at Laetoli and neighboring localities in northern Tanzania have produced a large collection of fossil ostrich eggshells from the Pliocene-aged Laetolil Beds (˜3.5-4.5 Ma) and Ndolanya Beds (˜2.6-2.7 Ma). A detailed analysis of the morphology of the eggshells and their taxonomic affinities indicates that two different species of Struthio are represented. In the Lower Laetolil Beds and in the Upper Laetolil Beds below Tuff 3 a new species is recognized— Struthio kakesiensis. This is replaced in the Upper Laetolil Beds by Struthio camelus, the modern species of ostrich. Since radiometric age determinations are available for the stratigraphic sequence at Laetoli, it is possible to precisely date the first appearance of S. camelus at ˜3.6-3.8 Ma. Comparisons of the Laetoli material with specimens from the well-dated sequences at Lothagam and Kanapoi in northern Kenya, allow the taxonomic and biochronological analysis to be extended back in time to the late Miocene. At about 6.5 Ma, Diamantornis and elephant birds were replaced in East Africa by ostriches belonging to the genus Struthio. Three time-successive species of ostriches are identified in the fossil record of East Africa, beginning with Struthio. cf. karingarabensis (˜6.5-4.2 Ma), followed by S. kakesiensis (˜4.5-3.6 Ma) and then S. camelus (˜3.8 Ma onwards). A similar sequence of taxa has previously been recorded from localities in Namibia, but at these sites there is no possibility to precisely calibrate the ages of the different species using radiometric dating. Nevertheless, the broadly similar evolutionary sequence and the close correspondence in inferred ages for the succession of species in East Africa and Namibia suggest that ostrich eggshells are a very useful tool for biochronological correlation of paleontological sites in sub-Saharan Africa.

  18. A novel approach to tag and identify geranylgeranylated proteins

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Lai N.; Hart, Courtenay; Guo, Lea; Nyberg, Tamara; Davies, Brandon S.J.; Fong, Loren G.; Young, Stephen G.; Agnew, Brian J.; Tamanoi, Fuyuhiko

    2010-01-01

    A recently developed proteomic strategy, the “GG-azide”-labeling approach, is described for the detection and proteomic analysis of geranylgeranylated proteins. This approach involves metabolic incorporation of a synthetic azido-geranylgeranyl analog and chemoselective derivatization of azido-geranylgeranyl-modified proteins by the “click” chemistry, using a tetramethylrhodamine-alkyne. The resulting conjugated proteins can be separated by 1-D or 2-D and pH fractionation, and detected by fluorescence imaging. This method is compatible with downstream LC-MS/MS analysis. Proteomic analysis of conjugated proteins by this approach identified several known geranylgeranylated proteins as well as Rap2c, a novel member of the Ras family. Furthermore, prenylation of progerin in mouse embryonic fibroblast cells was examined using this approach, demonstrating that this strategy can be used to study prenylation of specific proteins. The “GG-azide”-labeling approach provides a new tool for the detection and proteomic analysis of geranylgeranylated proteins, and it can readily be extended to other post-translational modifications. PMID:19784953

  19. EFFECTS OF DICOFOL ON MALLARD EGGSHELL QUALITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dicofol is an organochlorine acaricide structurally similar to DDE and there is concern that it may effect avian reproduction. Effects of dietary dicofol on mallard (Anas platyrhynchos) egg production and eggshell quality were evaluated; the mallard is moderately sensitive to ODE...

  20. Identifying Antioxidant Proteins by Using Optimal Dipeptide Compositions.

    PubMed

    Feng, Pengmian; Chen, Wei; Lin, Hao

    2016-06-01

    Antioxidant proteins are a kind of molecules that can terminate cellular and DNA damages caused by free radical intermediates. The use of antioxidant proteins for prevention of diseases has been intensively studied in recent years. Thus, accurate identification of antioxidant proteins is essential for understanding their roles in pharmacology. In this study, a support vector machine-based predictor called AodPred was developed for identifying antioxidant proteins. In this predictor, the sequence was formulated by using the optimal 3-gap dipeptides obtained by using feature selection method. It was observed by jackknife cross-validation test that AodPred can achieve an overall accuracy of 74.79 % in identifying antioxidant proteins. As a user-friendly tool, AodPred is freely accessible at http://lin.uestc.edu.cn/server/AntioxiPred . To maximize the convenience of the vast majority of experimental scientists, a step-by-step guide is provided on how to use the web server to obtain the desired results. PMID:26345449

  1. SRide: a server for identifying stabilizing residues in proteins

    PubMed Central

    Magyar, Csaba; Gromiha, M. Michael; Pujadas, Gerard; Tusnády, Gábor E.; Simon, István

    2005-01-01

    Residues expected to play key roles in the stabilization of proteins [stabilizing residues (SRs)] are selected by combining several methods based mainly on the interactions of a given residue with its spatial, rather than its sequential neighborhood and by considering the evolutionary conservation of the residues. A residue is selected as a stabilizing residue if it has high surrounding hydrophobicity, high long-range order, high conservation score and if it belongs to a stabilization center. The definition of all these parameters and the thresholds used to identify the SRs are discussed in detail. The algorithm for identifying SRs was originally developed for TIM-barrel proteins [M. M. Gromiha, G. Pujadas, C. Magyar, S. Selvaraj, and I. Simon (2004), Proteins, 55, 316–329] and is now generalized for all proteins of known 3D structure. SRs could be applied in protein engineering and homology modeling and could also help to explain certain folds with significant stability. The SRide server is located at . PMID:15980477

  2. SRide: a server for identifying stabilizing residues in proteins.

    PubMed

    Magyar, Csaba; Gromiha, M Michael; Pujadas, Gerard; Tusnády, Gábor E; Simon, István

    2005-07-01

    Residues expected to play key roles in the stabilization of proteins [stabilizing residues (SRs)] are selected by combining several methods based mainly on the interactions of a given residue with its spatial, rather than its sequential neighborhood and by considering the evolutionary conservation of the residues. A residue is selected as a stabilizing residue if it has high surrounding hydrophobicity, high long-range order, high conservation score and if it belongs to a stabilization center. The definition of all these parameters and the thresholds used to identify the SRs are discussed in detail. The algorithm for identifying SRs was originally developed for TIM-barrel proteins [M. M. Gromiha, G. Pujadas, C. Magyar, S. Selvaraj, and I. Simon (2004), Proteins, 55, 316-329] and is now generalized for all proteins of known 3D structure. SRs could be applied in protein engineering and homology modeling and could also help to explain certain folds with significant stability. The SRide server is located at http://sride.enzim.hu. PMID:15980477

  3. Advanced oxidation process sanitization of eggshell surfaces.

    PubMed

    Gottselig, Steven M; Dunn-Horrocks, Sadie L; Woodring, Kristy S; Coufal, Craig D; Duong, Tri

    2016-06-01

    The microbial quality of eggs entering the hatchery represents an important critical control point for biosecurity and pathogen reduction programs in integrated poultry production. The development of safe and effective interventions to reduce microbial contamination on the surface of eggs will be important to improve the overall productivity and microbial food safety of poultry and poultry products. The hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and ultraviolet (UV) light advanced oxidation process is a potentially important alternative to traditional sanitizers and disinfectants for egg sanitation. The H2O2/UV advanced oxidation process was demonstrated previously to be effective in reducing surface microbial contamination on eggs. In this study, we evaluated treatment conditions affecting the efficacy of H2O2/UV advanced oxidation in order to identify operational parameters for the practical application of this technology in egg sanitation. The effect of the number of application cycles, UV intensity, duration of UV exposure, and egg rotation on the recovery of total aerobic bacteria from the surface of eggs was evaluated. Of the conditions evaluated, we determined that reduction of total aerobic bacteria from naturally contaminated eggs was optimized when eggs were sanitized using 2 repeated application cycles with 5 s exposure to 14 mW cm(-2) UV light, and that rotation of the eggs between application cycles was unnecessary. Additionally, using these optimized conditions, the H2O2/UV process reduced Salmonella by greater than 5 log10 cfu egg(-1) on the surface of experimentally contaminated eggs. This study demonstrates the potential for practical application of the H2O2/UV advanced oxidation process in egg sanitation and its effectiveness in reducing Salmonella on eggshell surfaces. PMID:27030693

  4. Identifying Unstable Regions of Proteins Involved in Misfolding Diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guest, Will; Cashman, Neil; Plotkin, Steven

    2009-05-01

    Protein misfolding is a necessary step in the pathogenesis of many diseases, including Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) and familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (fALS). Identifying unstable structural elements in their causative proteins elucidates the early events of misfolding and presents targets for inhibition of the disease process. An algorithm was developed to calculate the Gibbs free energy of unfolding for all sequence-contiguous regions of a protein using three methods to parameterize energy changes: a modified G=o model, changes in solvent-accessible surface area, and all-atoms molecular dynamics. The entropic effects of disulfide bonds and post-translational modifications are treated analytically. It incorporates a novel method for finding local dielectric constants inside a protein to accurately handle charge effects. We have predicted the unstable parts of prion protein and superoxide dismutase 1, the proteins involved in CJD and fALS respectively, and have used these regions as epitopes to prepare antibodies that are specific to the misfolded conformation and show promise as therapeutic agents.

  5. Immobilization of the urease on eggshell membrane and its application in biosensor.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, S F; Kumar, Jitendra; Jha, Sandeep Kumar; Kubal, B S

    2013-03-01

    Eggshell membrane is a natural material, essentially made up of protein fibers having flexibility in the aqueous solution and possessing gas and water permeability. It is used as a biomembrane for immobilization of urease for the development of a potentiometric urea biosensor. Eggshell membrane was treated with polyethyleneimine (PEI) to impart polycation characteristics. Urease was immobilized on the PEI treated eggshell membrane through adsorption. SEM study was carried out to observe the changes in surface morphology after immobilization. FTIR study of membrane was carried out to observe the changes in IR spectra after immobilization of enzyme. Immobilized membrane was associated with ammonium ion selective electrode. Biosensor exhibited sigmoidal responses for the urea concentration range from 0.5 to 10mM. The response time of the biosensor was 120 s. A single membrane was reused for 270 reactions without loss of activity. The urease-eggshell membranes were stable for 2 months when stored in buffer even at room temperature. PMID:25427497

  6. Multivariate proteomic profiling identifies novel accessory proteins of coated vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Antrobus, Robin; Hirst, Jennifer; Bhumbra, Gary S.; Kozik, Patrycja; Jackson, Lauren P.; Sahlender, Daniela A.

    2012-01-01

    Despite recent advances in mass spectrometry, proteomic characterization of transport vesicles remains challenging. Here, we describe a multivariate proteomics approach to analyzing clathrin-coated vesicles (CCVs) from HeLa cells. siRNA knockdown of coat components and different fractionation protocols were used to obtain modified coated vesicle-enriched fractions, which were compared by stable isotope labeling of amino acids in cell culture (SILAC)-based quantitative mass spectrometry. 10 datasets were combined through principal component analysis into a “profiling” cluster analysis. Overall, 136 CCV-associated proteins were predicted, including 36 new proteins. The method identified >93% of established CCV coat proteins and assigned >91% correctly to intracellular or endocytic CCVs. Furthermore, the profiling analysis extends to less well characterized types of coated vesicles, and we identify and characterize the first AP-4 accessory protein, which we have named tepsin. Finally, our data explain how sequestration of TACC3 in cytosolic clathrin cages causes the severe mitotic defects observed in auxilin-depleted cells. The profiling approach can be adapted to address related cell and systems biological questions. PMID:22472443

  7. Eukaryotic protein synthesis inhibitors identified by comparison of cytotoxicity profiles

    PubMed Central

    CHAN, JENNY; KHAN, SHAKILA N.; HARVEY, ISABELLE; MERRICK, WILLIAM; PELLETIER, JERRY

    2004-01-01

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Human Tumor Cell Line Anti-Cancer Drug Screen has evaluated the cytotoxicity profiles of a large number of synthetic compounds, natural products, and plant extracts on 60 different cell lines. The data for each compound/extract can be assessed for similarity of cytotoxicity pattern, relative to a given test compound, using an algorithm called COMPARE. In applying a chemical biology approach to better understand the mechanism of eukaryotic protein synthesis, we used these resources to search for novel inhibitors of translation. The cytotoxicity profiles of 31 known protein synthesis inhibitors were used to identify compounds from the NCI database with similar activity profiles. Using this approach, two natural products, phyllanthoside and nagilactone C, were identified and characterized as novel protein synthesis inhibitors. Both compounds are specific for the eukaryotic translation apparatus, function in vivo and in vitro, and interfere with translation elongation. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of utilizing cytotoxicity profiles to identify new inhibitors of translation. PMID:14970397

  8. Irregularly calcified eggs and eggshells of Caiman latirostris (Alligatoridae: Crocodylia).

    PubMed

    Fernández, Mariela Soledad; Simoncini, Melina Soledad; Dyke, Gareth

    2013-05-01

    We describe irregularly calcified egg and eggshell morphologies for the first time in nests of the broad-snouted caiman, Caiman latirostris. Research is based on detailed descriptions of 270 eggs from a total sample of 46,800 collected between 2005 and 2011 in Santa Fe Province, Argentina, and encompasses animals from both natural habitats and held in captivity. We discuss possible reasons for the occurrence of eggs with different mineralisation patterns in our extensive C. latirostris field sample and its conservation significance; the chemistry of egg laying in amniotes is sensitive to environmental contamination which, in turn, has biological implications. Based on our egg sample, we identify two caiman eggshell abnormalities: (1) regularly calcified eggs with either calcitic nodules or superficial wrinkles at one egg end and (2) irregularly calcified eggs with structural gaps that weaken the shell. Some recently laid clutches we examined included eggs with most of the shell broken and detached from the flexible membrane. Most type 1 regularly calcified eggs lost their initial calcified nodules during incubation, suggesting that these deposits do not affect embryo survival rates. In contrast, irregularly calcified caiman eggs have a mean hatching success rate of 8.9% (range 0-38%) across our sample compared to a mean normal success of 75%. Most irregularly calcified caiman eggs probably die because of infections caused by fungi and bacteria in the organic nest material, although another possible explanation that merits further investigation could be an increase in permeability, leading to embryo dehydration. PMID:23604383

  9. Irregularly calcified eggs and eggshells of Caiman latirostris (Alligatoridae: Crocodylia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, Mariela Soledad; Simoncini, Melina Soledad; Dyke, Gareth

    2013-05-01

    We describe irregularly calcified egg and eggshell morphologies for the first time in nests of the broad-snouted caiman, Caiman latirostris. Research is based on detailed descriptions of 270 eggs from a total sample of 46,800 collected between 2005 and 2011 in Santa Fe Province, Argentina, and encompasses animals from both natural habitats and held in captivity. We discuss possible reasons for the occurrence of eggs with different mineralisation patterns in our extensive C. latirostris field sample and its conservation significance; the chemistry of egg laying in amniotes is sensitive to environmental contamination which, in turn, has biological implications. Based on our egg sample, we identify two caiman eggshell abnormalities: (1) regularly calcified eggs with either calcitic nodules or superficial wrinkles at one egg end and (2) irregularly calcified eggs with structural gaps that weaken the shell. Some recently laid clutches we examined included eggs with most of the shell broken and detached from the flexible membrane. Most type 1 regularly calcified eggs lost their initial calcified nodules during incubation, suggesting that these deposits do not affect embryo survival rates. In contrast, irregularly calcified caiman eggs have a mean hatching success rate of 8.9 % (range 0-38 %) across our sample compared to a mean normal success of 75 %. Most irregularly calcified caiman eggs probably die because of infections caused by fungi and bacteria in the organic nest material, although another possible explanation that merits further investigation could be an increase in permeability, leading to embryo dehydration.

  10. Engineering ecotin for identifying proteins with a trypsin fold.

    PubMed

    Sathler, Plínio C; Craik, Charles S; Takeuchi, Toshihiko; Zingali, Russolina B; Castro, Helena C

    2010-04-01

    Ecotin is a bidentate, fold-specific inhibitor of mammalian serine-proteases produced by Escherichia coli. This molecule may be engineered to increase and/or change its affinity and specificity providing significant biotechnological potential. Since ecotin binds tightly to serine proteases of the trypsin fold, it may help to identify the role of these enzymes in different biological processes. In this work, we tested ecotin variants as an affinity purification reagent for identifying enzymes in samples of tumor progression and mammary gland involution. Initially, we used a commercial source of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (u-PA) that remained fully active after elution from an affinity column of the ecotin variant (M84R, M85R). We then successfully identified u-PA from more complex mixtures including lysates from a prostate cancer cell line and involuting mouse mammary glands. Interestingly, a membrane-type serine protease 1 was isolated from the Triton X-100-solubilized PC-3 cell lysates, and surprisingly, haptoglobin, a serine-protease homolog protein, was also identified in mammary gland lysates and in blood. Haptoglobin does not prevent ecotin inhibition of u-PA, but it may act as a carrier within blood when ecotin is used in vivo. Finally, this affinity purification matrix was also able to identify a thrombin-like enzyme from snake venom using an ecotin variant directed against thrombin. Overall, the ecotin variants acted as robust tools for the isolation and characterization of proteins with a trypsin fold. Thus, they may assist in the understanding of the role of these serine proteases and homologous proteins in different biological processes. PMID:19728173

  11. Mitochondrial Protein Interaction Mapping Identifies Regulators of Respiratory Chain Function.

    PubMed

    Floyd, Brendan J; Wilkerson, Emily M; Veling, Mike T; Minogue, Catie E; Xia, Chuanwu; Beebe, Emily T; Wrobel, Russell L; Cho, Holly; Kremer, Laura S; Alston, Charlotte L; Gromek, Katarzyna A; Dolan, Brendan K; Ulbrich, Arne; Stefely, Jonathan A; Bohl, Sarah L; Werner, Kelly M; Jochem, Adam; Westphall, Michael S; Rensvold, Jarred W; Taylor, Robert W; Prokisch, Holger; Kim, Jung-Ja P; Coon, Joshua J; Pagliarini, David J

    2016-08-18

    Mitochondria are essential for numerous cellular processes, yet hundreds of their proteins lack robust functional annotation. To reveal functions for these proteins (termed MXPs), we assessed condition-specific protein-protein interactions for 50 select MXPs using affinity enrichment mass spectrometry. Our data connect MXPs to diverse mitochondrial processes, including multiple aspects of respiratory chain function. Building upon these observations, we validated C17orf89 as a complex I (CI) assembly factor. Disruption of C17orf89 markedly reduced CI activity, and its depletion is found in an unresolved case of CI deficiency. We likewise discovered that LYRM5 interacts with and deflavinates the electron-transferring flavoprotein that shuttles electrons to coenzyme Q (CoQ). Finally, we identified a dynamic human CoQ biosynthetic complex involving multiple MXPs whose topology we map using purified components. Collectively, our data lend mechanistic insight into respiratory chain-related activities and prioritize hundreds of additional interactions for further exploration of mitochondrial protein function. PMID:27499296

  12. An in vivo platform for identifying inhibitors of protein aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Mahood, Rachel A.; Jackson, Matthew P.; Revill, Charlotte H.; Foster, Richard J.; Smith, D. Alastair; Ashcroft, Alison E.; Brockwell, David J.; Radford, Sheena E.

    2015-01-01

    Protein aggregation underlies an array of human diseases, yet only one small molecule therapeutic has been successfully developed to date. Here, we introduce an in vivo system, based on a β-lactamase tripartite fusion construct, capable of identifying aggregation-prone sequences in the periplasm of Escherichia coli and inhibitors that prevent their aberrant self-assembly. We demonstrate the power of the system using a range of proteins, from small unstructured peptides (islet amyloid polypeptide and amyloid β) to larger, folded immunoglobulin domains. Configured in a 48-well format, the split β-lactamase sensor readily differentiates between aggregation-prone and soluble sequences. Performing the assay in the presence of 109 compounds enabled a rank ordering of inhibition and revealed a new inhibitor of IAPP aggregation. This platform can be applied to both amyloidogenic and other aggregation-prone systems, independent of sequence or size, and can identify small molecules or other factors able to ameliorate or inhibit protein aggregation. PMID:26656088

  13. An in vivo platform for identifying inhibitors of protein aggregation.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Janet C; Young, Lydia M; Mahood, Rachel A; Jackson, Matthew P; Revill, Charlotte H; Foster, Richard J; Smith, D Alastair; Ashcroft, Alison E; Brockwell, David J; Radford, Sheena E

    2016-02-01

    Protein aggregation underlies an array of human diseases, yet only one small-molecule therapeutic targeting this process has been successfully developed to date. Here, we introduce an in vivo system, based on a β-lactamase tripartite fusion construct, that is capable of identifying aggregation-prone sequences in the periplasm of Escherichia coli and inhibitors that prevent their aberrant self-assembly. We demonstrate the power of the system using a range of proteins, from small unstructured peptides (islet amyloid polypeptide and amyloid β) to larger, folded immunoglobulin domains. Configured in a 48-well format, the split β-lactamase sensor readily differentiates between aggregation-prone and soluble sequences. Performing the assay in the presence of 109 compounds enabled a rank ordering of inhibition and revealed a new inhibitor of islet amyloid polypeptide aggregation. This platform can be applied to both amyloidogenic and other aggregation-prone systems, independent of sequence or size, and can identify small molecules or other factors able to ameliorate or inhibit protein aggregation. PMID:26656088

  14. A promiscuous biotin ligase fusion protein identifies proximal and interacting proteins in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Roux, Kyle J; Kim, Dae In; Raida, Manfred; Burke, Brian

    2012-03-19

    We have developed a new technique for proximity-dependent labeling of proteins in eukaryotic cells. Named BioID for proximity-dependent biotin identification, this approach is based on fusion of a promiscuous Escherichia coli biotin protein ligase to a targeting protein. BioID features proximity-dependent biotinylation of proteins that are near-neighbors of the fusion protein. Biotinylated proteins may be isolated by affinity capture and identified by mass spectrometry. We apply BioID to lamin-A (LaA), a well-characterized intermediate filament protein that is a constituent of the nuclear lamina, an important structural element of the nuclear envelope (NE). We identify multiple proteins that associate with and/or are proximate to LaA in vivo. The most abundant of these include known interactors of LaA that are localized to the NE, as well as a new NE-associated protein named SLAP75. Our results suggest BioID is a useful and generally applicable method to screen for both interacting and neighboring proteins in their native cellular environment. PMID:22412018

  15. Eggshell Spottiness Reflects Maternally Transferred Antibodies in Blue Tits

    PubMed Central

    Holveck, Marie-Jeanne; Grégoire, Arnaud; Staszewski, Vincent; Guerreiro, Romain; Perret, Philippe; Boulinier, Thierry; Doutrelant, Claire

    2012-01-01

    Blue-green and brown-spotted eggshells in birds have been proposed as sexual signals of female physiological condition and egg quality, reflecting maternal investment in the egg. Testing this hypothesis requires linking eggshell coloration to egg content, which is lacking for brown protoporphyrin-based pigmentation. As protoporphyrins can induce oxidative stress, and a large amount in eggshells should indicate either high female and egg quality if it reflects the female's high oxidative tolerance, or conversely poor quality if it reflects female physiological stress. Different studies supported either predictions but are difficult to compare given the methodological differences in eggshell-spottiness measurements. Using the blue tit Cyanistes caeruleus as a model species, we aimed at disentangling both predictions in testing if brown-spotted eggshell could reflect the quality of maternal investment in antibodies and carotenoids in the egg, and at improving between-study comparisons in correlating several common measurements of eggshell coloration (spectral and digital measures, spotted surface, pigmentation indices). We found that these color variables were weakly correlated highlighting the need for comparable quantitative measurements between studies and for multivariate regressions incorporating several eggshell-color characteristics. When evaluating the potential signaling function of brown-spotted eggshells, we thus searched for the brown eggshell-color variables that best predicted the maternal transfer of antibodies and carotenoids to egg yolks. We also tested the effects of several parental traits and breeding parameters potentially affecting this transfer. While eggshell coloration did not relate to yolk carotenoids, the eggs with larger and less evenly-distributed spots had higher antibody concentrations, suggesting that both the quantity and distribution of brown pigments reflected the transfer of maternal immune compounds in egg yolks. As yolk antibody

  16. Eggshell spottiness reflects maternally transferred antibodies in blue tits.

    PubMed

    Holveck, Marie-Jeanne; Grégoire, Arnaud; Staszewski, Vincent; Guerreiro, Romain; Perret, Philippe; Boulinier, Thierry; Doutrelant, Claire

    2012-01-01

    Blue-green and brown-spotted eggshells in birds have been proposed as sexual signals of female physiological condition and egg quality, reflecting maternal investment in the egg. Testing this hypothesis requires linking eggshell coloration to egg content, which is lacking for brown protoporphyrin-based pigmentation. As protoporphyrins can induce oxidative stress, and a large amount in eggshells should indicate either high female and egg quality if it reflects the female's high oxidative tolerance, or conversely poor quality if it reflects female physiological stress. Different studies supported either predictions but are difficult to compare given the methodological differences in eggshell-spottiness measurements. Using the blue tit Cyanistes caeruleus as a model species, we aimed at disentangling both predictions in testing if brown-spotted eggshell could reflect the quality of maternal investment in antibodies and carotenoids in the egg, and at improving between-study comparisons in correlating several common measurements of eggshell coloration (spectral and digital measures, spotted surface, pigmentation indices). We found that these color variables were weakly correlated highlighting the need for comparable quantitative measurements between studies and for multivariate regressions incorporating several eggshell-color characteristics. When evaluating the potential signaling function of brown-spotted eggshells, we thus searched for the brown eggshell-color variables that best predicted the maternal transfer of antibodies and carotenoids to egg yolks. We also tested the effects of several parental traits and breeding parameters potentially affecting this transfer. While eggshell coloration did not relate to yolk carotenoids, the eggs with larger and less evenly-distributed spots had higher antibody concentrations, suggesting that both the quantity and distribution of brown pigments reflected the transfer of maternal immune compounds in egg yolks. As yolk antibody

  17. Blot-MS of Carbonylated Proteins: A Tool to Identify Oxidized Proteins.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Rita; Domingues, Pedro; Amado, Francisco; Vitorino, Rui

    2016-01-01

    The efficiency of proteostasis regulation declines during aging and the failure of protein homeostasis is common in age-related diseases. Protein oxidation is a major contributor to the loss of proteome homeostasis, also called "proteostasis," precluding protein misfolding and aggregation. So, the identification of the molecular pathways impaired by protein oxidation will increase the understanding of proteostasis and the pathophysiological conditions related to the loss of proteostasis. Sample derivatization with dinitrophenyl hydrazine and western blot immunoassay detection of carbonylated proteins (commonly known as Oxyblot™) coupled to mass spectrometry (blot-MS) is an attractive methodological approach to identify proteins that are more prone to carbonylation, a typical oxidative modification of amino acid residues. The integration of blot-MS data of carbonylated proteins with bioinformatics tools allows the identification of the biological processes more affected by protein oxidation and that, eventually, result in the loss of proteostasis.In this chapter, we describe a blot-MS methodology to identify the proteins more prone to oxidation in biological samples, as cell and tissue extracts, and biofluids. Analysis of mitochondria isolated from cardiac tissue is provided as an example. Bioinformatic strategy to deal with data retrieved from blot-MS experiments are proposed for the identification of relevant biological processes modulated by oxidative stress stimuli. PMID:27613049

  18. Dataset of integrin-linked kinase protein: Protein interactions in cardiomyocytes identified by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Traister, Alexandra; Lu, Mingliang; Coles, John G; Maynes, Jason T

    2016-06-01

    Using hearts from mice overexpressing integrin linked kinase (ILK) behind the cardiac specific promoter αMHC, we have performed immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry to identify novel ILK protein:protein interactions that regulate cardiomyocyte activity and calcium flux. Integrin linked kinase complexes were captured from mouse heart lysates using a commercial antibody, with subsequent liquid chromatography tandem mass spectral analysis. Interacting partners were identified using the MASCOT server, and important interactions verified using reverse immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry. All ILK interacting proteins were identified in a non-biased manner, and are stored in the ProteomeXchange Consortium via the PRIDE partner repository (reference ID PRIDE: PXD001053). The functional role of identified ILK interactions in cardiomyocyte function and arrhythmia were subsequently confirmed in human iPSC-cardiomyocytes. PMID:27408918

  19. Quantitative Tagless Copurification: A Method to Validate and Identify Protein-Protein Interactions.

    PubMed

    Shatsky, Maxim; Dong, Ming; Liu, Haichuan; Yang, Lee Lisheng; Choi, Megan; Singer, Mary E; Geller, Jil T; Fisher, Susan J; Hall, Steven C; Hazen, Terry C; Brenner, Steven E; Butland, Gareth; Jin, Jian; Witkowska, H Ewa; Chandonia, John-Marc; Biggin, Mark D

    2016-06-01

    Identifying protein-protein interactions (PPIs) at an acceptable false discovery rate (FDR) is challenging. Previously we identified several hundred PPIs from affinity purification - mass spectrometry (AP-MS) data for the bacteria Escherichia coli and Desulfovibrio vulgaris These two interactomes have lower FDRs than any of the nine interactomes proposed previously for bacteria and are more enriched in PPIs validated by other data than the nine earlier interactomes. To more thoroughly determine the accuracy of ours or other interactomes and to discover further PPIs de novo, here we present a quantitative tagless method that employs iTRAQ MS to measure the copurification of endogenous proteins through orthogonal chromatography steps. 5273 fractions from a four-step fractionation of a D. vulgaris protein extract were assayed, resulting in the detection of 1242 proteins. Protein partners from our D. vulgaris and E. coli AP-MS interactomes copurify as frequently as pairs belonging to three benchmark data sets of well-characterized PPIs. In contrast, the protein pairs from the nine other bacterial interactomes copurify two- to 20-fold less often. We also identify 200 high confidence D. vulgaris PPIs based on tagless copurification and colocalization in the genome. These PPIs are as strongly validated by other data as our AP-MS interactomes and overlap with our AP-MS interactome for D.vulgaris within 3% of expectation, once FDRs and false negative rates are taken into account. Finally, we reanalyzed data from two quantitative tagless screens of human cell extracts. We estimate that the novel PPIs reported in these studies have an FDR of at least 85% and find that less than 7% of the novel PPIs identified in each screen overlap. Our results establish that a quantitative tagless method can be used to validate and identify PPIs, but that such data must be analyzed carefully to minimize the FDR. PMID:27099342

  20. Structure-based protocol for identifying mutations that enhance protein-protein binding affinities.

    PubMed

    Sammond, Deanne W; Eletr, Ziad M; Purbeck, Carrie; Kimple, Randall J; Siderovski, David P; Kuhlman, Brian

    2007-08-31

    The ability to manipulate protein binding affinities is important for the development of proteins as biosensors, industrial reagents, and therapeutics. We have developed a structure-based method to rationally predict single mutations at protein-protein interfaces that enhance binding affinities. The protocol is based on the premise that increasing buried hydrophobic surface area and/or reducing buried hydrophilic surface area will generally lead to enhanced affinity if large steric clashes are not introduced and buried polar groups are not left without a hydrogen bond partner. The procedure selects affinity enhancing point mutations at the protein-protein interface using three criteria: (1) the mutation must be from a polar amino acid to a non-polar amino acid or from a non-polar amino acid to a larger non-polar amino acid, (2) the free energy of binding as calculated with the Rosetta protein modeling program should be more favorable than the free energy of binding calculated for the wild-type complex and (3) the mutation should not be predicted to significantly destabilize the monomers. The performance of the computational protocol was experimentally tested on two separate protein complexes; Galpha(i1) from the heterotrimeric G-protein system bound to the RGS14 GoLoco motif, and the E2, UbcH7, bound to the E3, E6AP from the ubiquitin pathway. Twelve single-site mutations that were predicted to be stabilizing were synthesized and characterized in the laboratory. Nine of the 12 mutations successfully increased binding affinity with five of these increasing binding by over 1.0 kcal/mol. To further assess our approach we searched the literature for point mutations that pass our criteria and have experimentally determined binding affinities. Of the eight mutations identified, five were accurately predicted to increase binding affinity, further validating the method as a useful tool to increase protein-protein binding affinities. PMID:17603074

  1. Identifying relevant positions in proteins by Critical Variable Selection.

    PubMed

    Grigolon, Silvia; Franz, Silvio; Marsili, Matteo

    2016-06-21

    Evolution in its course has found a variety of solutions to the same optimisation problem. The advent of high-throughput genomic sequencing has made available extensive data from which, in principle, one can infer the underlying structure on which biological functions rely. In this paper, we present a new method aimed at the extraction of sites encoding structural and functional properties from a set of protein primary sequences, namely a multiple sequence alignment. The method, called critical variable selection, is based on the idea that subsets of relevant sites correspond to subsequences that occur with a particularly broad frequency distribution in the dataset. By applying this algorithm to in silico sequences, to the response regulator receiver and to the voltage sensor domain of ion channels, we show that this procedure recovers not only the information encoded in single site statistics and pairwise correlations but also captures dependencies going beyond pairwise correlations. The method proposed here is complementary to statistical coupling analysis, in that the most relevant sites predicted by the two methods differ markedly. We find robust and consistent results for datasets as small as few hundred sequences that reveal a hidden hierarchy of sites that are consistent with the present knowledge on biologically relevant sites and evolutionary dynamics. This suggests that critical variable selection is capable of identifying a core of sites encoding functional and structural information in a multiple sequence alignment. PMID:26974515

  2. Automated Analysis of Fluorescence Microscopy Images to Identify Protein-Protein Interactions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Venkatraman, S.; Doktycz, M. J.; Qi, H.; Morrell-Falvey, J. L.

    2006-01-01

    The identification of protein interactions is important for elucidating biological networks. One obstacle in comprehensive interaction studies is the analyses of large datasets, particularly those containing images. Development of an automated system to analyze an image-based protein interaction dataset is needed. Such an analysis system is described here, to automatically extract features from fluorescence microscopy images obtained from a bacterial protein interaction assay. These features are used to relay quantitative values that aid in the automated scoring of positive interactions. Experimental observations indicate that identifying at least 50% positive cells in an image is sufficient to detect a protein interaction.more » Based on this criterion, the automated system presents 100% accuracy in detecting positive interactions for a dataset of 16 images. Algorithms were implemented using MATLAB and the software developed is available on request from the authors.« less

  3. Antimicrobial Characteristics of Heated Eggshell Powder.

    PubMed

    Ohshima, Yuki; Takada, Daisuke; Namai, Satoe; Sawai, Jun; Kikuchi, Mikio; Hotta, Mikinori

    2015-01-01

    Eggshells have high bioavailability and can be used as a source of calcium. The main component is CaCO3, which, when heated, is converted to CaO. Seashells are also mainly composed of CaCO3 and were previously found to exhibit antimicrobial activity after being heated. In this study, heated eggshell powder (HESP) was found to have antimicrobial activity against bacterial vegetative cells, fungi and bacterial spores. Parameters, such as the minimum inhibitory concentration, were determined with kinetic analysis using an indirect conductimetric assay. Moreover, HESP was able to kill the Bacillus subtilis spores. There were no significant differences in the activity between HESP, heated scallop-shell powder and pure CaO. The MIC values for HESP against bacteria and fungi were 0.29-0.43 and 1.3-1.5 mg/mL, respectively. Against B. subtilis spores, a reduction of two orders of magnitude of viability was confirmed following 20 min of treatment at 10 mg/mL at 60 ℃. The active oxygen generated from the HESP slurry was examined with chemiluminescence. The intensity of this increased with increasing concentrations of the HESP slurry. This suggests that HESP could be used as a natural antimicrobial agent. Although a high pH is the main contributor to this antimicrobial activity, active oxygen species generated from HESP are likely to be the main antimicrobial agents.. PMID:26699855

  4. Identifying hierarchical and overlapping protein complexes based on essential protein-protein interactions and "seed-expanding" method.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jun; Zhou, Wei; Wang, Jianxin

    2014-01-01

    Many evidences have demonstrated that protein complexes are overlapping and hierarchically organized in PPI networks. Meanwhile, the large size of PPI network wants complex detection methods have low time complexity. Up to now, few methods can identify overlapping and hierarchical protein complexes in a PPI network quickly. In this paper, a novel method, called MCSE, is proposed based on λ-module and "seed-expanding." First, it chooses seeds as essential PPIs or edges with high edge clustering values. Then, it identifies protein complexes by expanding each seed to a λ-module. MCSE is suitable for large PPI networks because of its low time complexity. MCSE can identify overlapping protein complexes naturally because a protein can be visited by different seeds. MCSE uses the parameter λ_th to control the range of seed expanding and can detect a hierarchical organization of protein complexes by tuning the value of λ_th. Experimental results of S. cerevisiae show that this hierarchical organization is similar to that of known complexes in MIPS database. The experimental results also show that MCSE outperforms other previous competing algorithms, such as CPM, CMC, Core-Attachment, Dpclus, HC-PIN, MCL, and NFC, in terms of the functional enrichment and matching with known protein complexes. PMID:25143945

  5. Identifying Hierarchical and Overlapping Protein Complexes Based on Essential Protein-Protein Interactions and “Seed-Expanding” Method

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Jun; Zhou, Wei; Wang, Jianxin

    2014-01-01

    Many evidences have demonstrated that protein complexes are overlapping and hierarchically organized in PPI networks. Meanwhile, the large size of PPI network wants complex detection methods have low time complexity. Up to now, few methods can identify overlapping and hierarchical protein complexes in a PPI network quickly. In this paper, a novel method, called MCSE, is proposed based on λ-module and “seed-expanding.” First, it chooses seeds as essential PPIs or edges with high edge clustering values. Then, it identifies protein complexes by expanding each seed to a λ-module. MCSE is suitable for large PPI networks because of its low time complexity. MCSE can identify overlapping protein complexes naturally because a protein can be visited by different seeds. MCSE uses the parameter λ_th to control the range of seed expanding and can detect a hierarchical organization of protein complexes by tuning the value of λ_th. Experimental results of S. cerevisiae show that this hierarchical organization is similar to that of known complexes in MIPS database. The experimental results also show that MCSE outperforms other previous competing algorithms, such as CPM, CMC, Core-Attachment, Dpclus, HC-PIN, MCL, and NFC, in terms of the functional enrichment and matching with known protein complexes. PMID:25143945

  6. Dynamics of bacterial and fungal communities associated with eggshells during incubation

    PubMed Central

    Grizard, Stéphanie; Dini-Andreote, Francisco; Tieleman, B Irene; Salles, Joana F

    2014-01-01

    Microorganisms are closely associated with eggs and may play a determinant role in embryo survival. Yet, the majority of studies focusing on this association relied on culture-based methodology, eventually leading to a skewed assessment of microbial communities. By targeting the 16S rRNA gene and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region, we, respectively, described bacterial and fungal communities on eggshells of the homing pigeon Columba livia. We explored their structure, abundance, and composition. Firstly, we showed that sampling technique affected the outcome of the results. While broadly used, the egg swabbing procedure led to a lower DNA extraction efficiency and provided different profiles of bacterial communities than those based on crushed eggshell pieces. Secondly, we observed shifts in bacterial and fungal communities during incubation. At late incubation, bacterial communities showed a reduction in diversity, while their abundance increased, possibly due to the competitive advantage of some species. When compared to their bacterial counterparts, fungal communities also decreased in diversity at late incubation. In that case, however, the decline was associated with a diminution of their overall abundance. Conclusively, our results showed that although incubation might inhibit microbial growth when compared to unincubated eggs, we observed the selective growth of specific bacterial species during incubation. Moreover, we showed that fungi are a substantial component of the microbial communities associated with eggshells and require further investigations in avian ecology. Identifying the functional roles of these microorganisms is likely to provide news insights into the evolutionary strategies that control embryo survival. We aimed to describe the dynamics of bacterial and fungal communities on homing pigeon eggshell surfaces. We investigated these communities at early and late incubation stages. PMID:24772289

  7. A simple and efficient method for extraction of PCR-amplifiable DNA from chicken eggshells.

    PubMed

    Rikimaru, Kazuhiro; Takahashi, Hideaki

    2009-04-01

    Recently, we reported a method for discriminating a Japanese brand of chicken, the Hinai-jidori. As an application of this method for discriminating Hinai-jidori eggs, we here report an efficient method for extracting maternal DNA from eggshells. Eggshell powder was completely decalcified with EDTA solution, and then DNA was isolated by conventional phenol-chloroform extraction and ethanol precipitation. The efficiency of DNA recovery from eggshells was 50-fold higher than that of a previously reported method. The recovered DNA could be used for PCR, and 10 markers for identifying the Hinai-jidori chicken were detected. The genotypes of the Hinai-jidori exactly matched those of the Hinai-dori breed. Using this method, Hinai-jidori and Hinai-dori eggs could be distinguished from the eggs of Rhode Island Reds. This is the first report of a technique that can be used to discriminate the eggs of Hinai-jidori from those of other chickens, and it can also be utilized to validate the labeling of Hinai-jidori eggs in the market. PMID:20163594

  8. Nanosized hydroxyapatite powder synthesized from eggshell and phosphoric acid.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Jin; Yoon, Young-Soo; Lee, Myung-Hyun; Oh, Nam-Sik

    2007-11-01

    The present research describes synthesis of highly sinterable, nano-sized hydroxyapatite (HAp) powders using a wet chemical route with recycled eggshell and phosphoric acid as calcium and phosphorous sources. The raw eggshell was easily turned to CaO by the calcining process, and phosphoric acid was mixed with the calcined eggshell by the wet, ball-milling method. The crystalline development and microstructures of the synthesized powders and sintered samples were examined by X-ray diffractometry and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. The observed phases on the powder synthesis process were dependent on the mixing ratio (wt%) of the calcined eggshell to phosphoric acid and the heating temperature. The ball-milled, nano-sized HAp powder, which has an average particle size of 70 nm, was fully densified at 1300 degrees C for 1h. The Ca/P ratio for stoichiometric composition of HAp was controlled by adjustment of the mixing ratio. PMID:18047119

  9. Respiratory Pores on Ostrich Struthio camelus (Aves: Struthionidae) Eggshells.

    PubMed

    Koyama, T; Tennyson, A J D

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory pores are essential for the survival of the embryo within the eggshell. Distribution patterns of such pores on ostrich (Struthio camelus) eggshells show remarkable variations in bird group. Eggshells preserved in the museum of New Zealand have long, superficial, winding grooves and ridges, with pores distributed densely in the bottom of grooves. Both the grooves and ridges that separate them are twisted. By contrast, the surfaces of eggs from farmed ostriches are mostly smooth, with only occasional, short grooves, and respiratory pores distributed more evenly. The cause of ridging and grooving of the surface of eggs from wild birds is unclear but may be due to the need for stronger shells and effects of environmental stresses. It appears that the arrangement of respiratory pores on ostrich eggshells seems to be changeable by surrounding stresses. PMID:27526124

  10. 15. April 1963 SPIRAL STAIRS AND EGGSHELL DORMER Shaker ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. April 1963 SPIRAL STAIRS AND EGG-SHELL DORMER - Shaker Centre Family Trustees' Office, South side of Village Road, North of U.S. Route 68 & State Route 33 intersection, Shakertown, Mercer County, KY

  11. 40 CFR 174.529 - Bacillus thuringiensis modified Cry1Ab protein as identified under OECD Unique Identifier SYN...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bacillus thuringiensis modified Cry1Ab protein as identified under OECD Unique Identifier SYN-IR67B-1 in cotton; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 174.529 Section 174.529 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS PROCEDURES...

  12. Eggshell defects detection based on color processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Alegre, Maria C.; Ribeiro, Angela; Guinea, Domingo; Cristobal, Gabriel

    2000-03-01

    The automatic classification of defective eggs constitutes a fundamental issue at the poultry industry for both economical and sanitary reasons. The early separation of eggs with spots and cracks is a relevant task as the stains can leak while progressing on the conveyor-belts, degrading all the mechanical parts. Present work is focused on the implementation of an artificial vision system for detecting in real time defective eggs at the poultry farm. First step of the algorithmic process is devoted to the detection of the egg shape to fix the region of interest. A color processing is then performed only on the eggshell to obtain an image segmentation that allows the discrimination of defective eggs from clean ones in critic time. The results are presented to demonstrate the validity of the proposed visual process on a wide sample of both defective and non-defective eggs.

  13. Avian eggshell thickness: Variability and sampling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Klaas, E.E.; Ohlendorf, H.M.; Heath, R.G.

    1974-01-01

    Measurements of shell thickness of the eggs of five species were subjected to nested analyses of variance. The analyses separated variation into two or three levels for which variances and percentages of the total variation were derived. The results show that differences among measurements of the same egg contribute little to the sample variance whereas differences among eggs within clutches contribute nearly as much as differences among clutches. It is more efficient and less costly to collect entire clutches of eggs in most studies of shell thickness. Using entire clutches, sample sizes needed to detect differences of 10 percent in shell thickness (at given significance levels and power) were estimated to be eight to 11 clutches for the species studied. For differences of five percent, 26 to 38 clutches are required. Guidelines are presented which may assist other workers in evaluating the efficiency of their sampling designs, and in estimating sample sizes for detecting differences in eggshell thickness in wild birds.

  14. Application of waste eggshell as low-cost solid catalyst for biodiesel production.

    PubMed

    Wei, Ziku; Xu, Chunli; Li, Baoxin

    2009-06-01

    Waste eggshell was investigated in triglyceride transesterification with a view to determine its viability as a solid catalyst for use in biodiesel synthesis. Effect of calcination temperature on structure and activity of eggshell catalysts was investigated. Reusability of eggshell catalysts was also examined. It was found that high active, reusable solid catalyst was obtained by just calcining eggshell. Utilization of eggshell as a catalyst for biodiesel production not only provides a cost-effective and environmental friendly way of recycling this solid eggshell waste, significantly reducing its environmental effects, but also reduces the price of biodiesel to make biodiesel competitive with petroleum diesel. PMID:19201602

  15. Eggshell thickness and DDE residue levels in vlulture eggs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kiff, L.F.; Peakall, D.B.; Morrison, M.L.; Wilbur, S.R.

    1983-01-01

    Post-DDT (post-1947) eggshell thickness was examined in samples of Turkey Vulture, Black Vulture, and Crested Caracara eggs from several parts of the United States. Highly significant post-DDT decreases in eggshell thickness indices of at least 10 percent were found in Turkey Vulture eggs from California, Florida, and Texas and in Black Vulture eggs from Texas and Florida. Over one-third of the Black VUlture eggs and about 30 percent of the Turkey Vulture eggs from Texas showed thinning exceeding 20 percent, a level associated with reproductive failure and population decline in other species. A strong negative correlation was found between eggshell thickness indices and DDE residues extracted from eggshell membranes in California and Texas samples of Turkey Vulture eggs and in Texas Black Vulture eggs. Crested Caracara eggs from Texas and Florida showed mean changes in eggshell thickness indices of only -5.6 and -8.2 percent, respectively, although thinning in a few eggs from both states exceeded 20 percent. Most of the post-DDT Old World vulture eggs examined appeared to be of normal thickness, with low DDE residue levels in eggshell membranes; but single eggs of Egyptian Vulture from India, Cinereous Vulture from Spain, and White-headed Vulture from Zambia showed apparent thinning. Further monitoring of vulture populations in tropical regions, where DDT use is still increasing, is recommended.

  16. Eggshell calcium in the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Rovenský, J; Stancíková, M; Masaryk, P; Svík, K; Istok, R

    2003-01-01

    In this paper the most significant biological and clinical aspects of a biopreparation made of chicken eggshells are reviewed. Eggshell powder is a natural source of calcium and other elements (e.g. strontium and fluorine) which may have a positive effect on bone metabolism. Experimental and clinical studies performed to date have shown a number of positive properties of eggshell powder, such as antirachitic effects in rats and humans. A positive effect was observed on bone density in animal models of postmenopausal osteoporosis in ovariectomized female rats. In vitro eggshell powder stimulates chondrocyte differentiation and cartilage growth. Clinical studies in postmenopausal women and women with senile osteoporosis showed that eggshell powder reduces pain and osteoresorption and increases mobility and bone density or arrests its loss. The bioavailability of calcium from this source, as tested in piglets, was similar or better than that of food grade purified calcium carbonate. Clinical and experimental studies showed that eggshell powder has positive effects on bone and cartilage and that it is suitable in the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis. PMID:15018022

  17. Identifying Protein Stabilizing Ligands Using GroEL

    PubMed Central

    Naik, Subhashchandra; Haque, Inamul; Degner, Nick; Kornilayev, Boris; Bomhoff, Gregory; Hodges, Jacob; Khorassani, Ara-Azad; Katayama, Hiroo; Morris, Jill; Kelly, Jeffery; Seed, John; Fisher, Mark T.

    2010-01-01

    Over the past five years, it has become increasingly apparent to researchers that the initial promise and excitement of using gene replacement therapies to ameliorate folding diseases are still far from being broadly or easily applicable. Because a large number of human diseases are protein folding diseases (~30 to 50%), many researchers now realize that more directed approaches to target and reverse the fundamental misfolding reactions preceding disease are highly feasible and offer the potential of developing more targeted drug therapies. This is also true with a large number of so called “orphan protein folding diseases”. The development of a broad-based general screening array method using the chaperonin as a detection platform will enable us to screen large chemical combinatorial libraries for specific ligands against the elusive transient, primary reactions that often lead to protein misfolding. This development will provide a highly desirable tool for the pharmaceutical, academic and medical professions. PMID:19802819

  18. Playing biology's name game: identifying protein names in scientific text.

    PubMed

    Hanisch, Daniel; Fluck, Juliane; Mevissen, Heinz-Theodor; Zimmer, Ralf

    2003-01-01

    A growing body of work is devoted to the extraction of protein or gene interaction information from the scientific literature. Yet, the basis for most extraction algorithms, i.e. the specific and sensitive recognition of protein and gene names and their numerous synonyms, has not been adequately addressed. Here we describe the construction of a comprehensive general purpose name dictionary and an accompanying automatic curation procedure based on a simple token model of protein names. We designed an efficient search algorithm to analyze all abstracts in MEDLINE in a reasonable amount of time on standard computers. The parameters of our method are optimized using machine learning techniques. Used in conjunction, these ingredients lead to good search performance. A supplementary web page is available at http://cartan.gmd.de/ProMiner/. PMID:12603045

  19. Transcriptome analyses of inhibitor-treated schistosome females provide evidence for cooperating Src-kinase and TGFβ receptor pathways controlling mitosis and eggshell formation.

    PubMed

    Buro, Christin; Oliveira, Katia C; Lu, Zhigang; Leutner, Silke; Beckmann, Svenja; Dissous, Colette; Cailliau, Katia; Verjovski-Almeida, Sergio; Grevelding, Christoph G

    2013-01-01

    Schistosome parasites cause schistosomiasis, one of the most prevalent parasitemias worldwide affecting humans and animals. Constant pairing of schistosomes is essential for female sexual maturation and egg production, which causes pathogenesis. Female maturation involves signaling pathways controlling mitosis and differentiation within the gonads. In vitro studies had shown before that a Src-specific inhibitor, Herbimycin A (Herb A), and a TGFβ receptor (TβR) inhibitor (TRIKI) have physiological effects such as suppressed mitoses and egg production in paired females. As one Herb A target, the gonad-specifically expressed Src kinase SmTK3 was identified. Here, we comparatively analyzed the transcriptome profiles of Herb A- and TRIKI-treated females identifying transcriptional targets of Src-kinase and TβRI pathways. After demonstrating that TRIKI inhibits the schistosome TGFβreceptor SmTβRI by kinase assays in Xenopus oocytes, couples were treated with Herb A, TRIKI, or both inhibitors simultaneously in vitro. RNA was isolated from females for microarray hybridizations and transcription analyses. The obtained data were evaluated by Gene Ontology (GO) and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA), but also by manual classification and intersection analyses. Finally, extensive qPCR experiments were done to verify differential transcription of candidate genes under inhibitor influence but also to functionally reinforce specific physiological effects. A number of genes found to be differentially regulated are associated with mitosis and differentiation. Among these were calcium-associated genes and eggshell-forming genes. In situ hybridization confirmed transcription of genes coding for the calcium sensor hippocalcin, the calcium transporter ORAI-1, and the calcium-binding protein calmodulin-4 in the reproductive system pointing to a role of calcium in parasite reproduction. Functional qPCR results confirmed an inhibitor-influenced, varying dependence of the

  20. Identifying protein interactions with metal-modified DNA using microarray technology.

    PubMed

    Stansfield, Hope E; Kulczewski, Bethany P; Lybrand, Kyle E; Jamieson, Elizabeth R

    2009-02-01

    Protein microarrays have been used extensively to identify protein-protein interactions; however, this technology has not been widely applied to protein-DNA interactions. In particular, this work demonstrates the utility of this technique for rapidly identifying interactions of proteins with metal-modified DNA. Protein macroarray experiments were carried out with high mobility group protein 1 (HMG-1) and cisplatin- and chromium-modified 50-mer oligonucleotides to demonstrate "proof of principle." Commercially available protein microarrays containing many different classes of human proteins were then employed to search for additional interactions with cisplatin-modified DNA. The results of the microarray experiments confirmed some known interactions and, more importantly, identified many novel protein interactions, demonstrating the utility of this method as a rapid, high-throughput technique to discover proteins that interact with metal-modified DNA. PMID:18936984

  1. Identifying Novel Candidate Genes Related to Apoptosis from a Protein-Protein Interaction Network

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Baoman; Yuan, Fei; Kong, Xiangyin; Hu, Lan-Dian; Cai, Yu-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis is the process of programmed cell death (PCD) that occurs in multicellular organisms. This process of normal cell death is required to maintain the balance of homeostasis. In addition, some diseases, such as obesity, cancer, and neurodegenerative diseases, can be cured through apoptosis, which produces few side effects. An effective comprehension of the mechanisms underlying apoptosis will be helpful to prevent and treat some diseases. The identification of genes related to apoptosis is essential to uncover its underlying mechanisms. In this study, a computational method was proposed to identify novel candidate genes related to apoptosis. First, protein-protein interaction information was used to construct a weighted graph. Second, a shortest path algorithm was applied to the graph to search for new candidate genes. Finally, the obtained genes were filtered by a permutation test. As a result, 26 genes were obtained, and we discuss their likelihood of being novel apoptosis-related genes by collecting evidence from published literature. PMID:26543496

  2. Paramagnetic Ligand Tagging To Identify Protein Binding Sites

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Transient biomolecular interactions are the cornerstones of the cellular machinery. The identification of the binding sites for low affinity molecular encounters is essential for the development of high affinity pharmaceuticals from weakly binding leads but is hindered by the lack of robust methodologies for characterization of weakly binding complexes. We introduce a paramagnetic ligand tagging approach that enables localization of low affinity protein–ligand binding clefts by detection and analysis of intermolecular protein NMR pseudocontact shifts, which are invoked by the covalent attachment of a paramagnetic lanthanoid chelating tag to the ligand of interest. The methodology is corroborated by identification of the low millimolar volatile anesthetic interaction site of the calcium sensor protein calmodulin. It presents an efficient route to binding site localization for low affinity complexes and is applicable to rapid screening of protein–ligand systems with varying binding affinity. PMID:26289584

  3. Protein networks identify novel symbiogenetic genes resulting from plastid endosymbiosis.

    PubMed

    Méheust, Raphaël; Zelzion, Ehud; Bhattacharya, Debashish; Lopez, Philippe; Bapteste, Eric

    2016-03-29

    The integration of foreign genetic information is central to the evolution of eukaryotes, as has been demonstrated for the origin of the Calvin cycle and of the heme and carotenoid biosynthesis pathways in algae and plants. For photosynthetic lineages, this coordination involved three genomes of divergent phylogenetic origins (the nucleus, plastid, and mitochondrion). Major hurdles overcome by the ancestor of these lineages were harnessing the oxygen-evolving organelle, optimizing the use of light, and stabilizing the partnership between the plastid endosymbiont and host through retargeting of proteins to the nascent organelle. Here we used protein similarity networks that can disentangle reticulate gene histories to explore how these significant challenges were met. We discovered a previously hidden component of algal and plant nuclear genomes that originated from the plastid endosymbiont: symbiogenetic genes (S genes). These composite proteins, exclusive to photosynthetic eukaryotes, encode a cyanobacterium-derived domain fused to one of cyanobacterial or another prokaryotic origin and have emerged multiple, independent times during evolution. Transcriptome data demonstrate the existence and expression of S genes across a wide swath of algae and plants, and functional data indicate their involvement in tolerance to oxidative stress, phototropism, and adaptation to nitrogen limitation. Our research demonstrates the "recycling" of genetic information by photosynthetic eukaryotes to generate novel composite genes, many of which function in plastid maintenance. PMID:26976593

  4. Protein networks identify novel symbiogenetic genes resulting from plastid endosymbiosis

    PubMed Central

    Méheust, Raphaël; Zelzion, Ehud; Bhattacharya, Debashish; Lopez, Philippe; Bapteste, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The integration of foreign genetic information is central to the evolution of eukaryotes, as has been demonstrated for the origin of the Calvin cycle and of the heme and carotenoid biosynthesis pathways in algae and plants. For photosynthetic lineages, this coordination involved three genomes of divergent phylogenetic origins (the nucleus, plastid, and mitochondrion). Major hurdles overcome by the ancestor of these lineages were harnessing the oxygen-evolving organelle, optimizing the use of light, and stabilizing the partnership between the plastid endosymbiont and host through retargeting of proteins to the nascent organelle. Here we used protein similarity networks that can disentangle reticulate gene histories to explore how these significant challenges were met. We discovered a previously hidden component of algal and plant nuclear genomes that originated from the plastid endosymbiont: symbiogenetic genes (S genes). These composite proteins, exclusive to photosynthetic eukaryotes, encode a cyanobacterium-derived domain fused to one of cyanobacterial or another prokaryotic origin and have emerged multiple, independent times during evolution. Transcriptome data demonstrate the existence and expression of S genes across a wide swath of algae and plants, and functional data indicate their involvement in tolerance to oxidative stress, phototropism, and adaptation to nitrogen limitation. Our research demonstrates the “recycling” of genetic information by photosynthetic eukaryotes to generate novel composite genes, many of which function in plastid maintenance. PMID:26976593

  5. Identifying and tracking proteins through the marine water column: insights into the inputs and preservation mechanisms of protein in sediments

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Eli K.; Nunn, Brook L.; Goodlett, David R.; Harvey, H. Rodger

    2012-01-01

    Proteins generated during primary production represent an important fraction of marine organic nitrogen and carbon, and have the potential to provide organism-specific information in the environment. The Bering Sea is a highly productive system dominated by seasonal blooms and was used as a model system for algal proteins to be tracked through the water column and incorporated into detrital sedimentary material. Samples of suspended and sinking particles were collected at multiple depths along with surface sediments on the continental shelf and deeper basin of the Bering Sea. Modified standard proteomic preparations were used in conjunction with high pressure liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry to identify the suite of proteins present and monitor changes in their distribution. In surface waters 207 proteins were identified, decreasing through the water column to 52 proteins identified in post-bloom shelf surface sediments and 24 proteins in deeper (3490 m) basin sediments. The vast majority of identified proteins in all samples were diatom in origin, reflecting their dominant contribution of biomass during the spring bloom. Identified proteins were predominantly from metabolic, binding/structural, and transport-related protein groups. Significant linear correlations were observed between the number of proteins identified and the concentration of total hydrolysable amino acids normalized to carbon and nitrogen. Organelle-bound, transmembrane, photosynthetic, and other proteins involved in light harvesting were preferentially retained during recycling. These findings suggest that organelle and membrane protection represent important mechanisms that enhance the preservation of protein during transport and incorporation into sediments. PMID:22711915

  6. Identifying and tracking proteins through the marine water column: Insights into the inputs and preservation mechanisms of protein in sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Eli K.; Nunn, Brook L.; Goodlett, David R.; Harvey, H. Rodger

    2012-04-01

    Proteins generated during primary production represent an important fraction of marine organic nitrogen and carbon, and have the potential to provide organism-specific information in the environment. The Bering Sea is a highly productive system dominated by seasonal blooms and was used as a model system for algal proteins to be tracked through the water column and incorporated into detrital sedimentary material. Samples of suspended and sinking particles were collected at multiple depths along with surface sediments on the continental shelf and deeper basin of the Bering Sea. Modified standard proteomic preparations were used in conjunction with high pressure liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry to identify the suite of proteins present and monitor changes in their distribution. In surface waters 207 proteins were identified, decreasing through the water column to 52 proteins identified in post-bloom shelf surface sediments and 24 proteins in deeper (3490 m) basin sediments. The vast majority of identified proteins in all samples were diatom in origin, reflecting their dominant contribution of biomass during the spring bloom. Identified proteins were predominantly from metabolic, binding/structural, and transport-related protein groups. Significant linear correlations were observed between the number of proteins identified and the concentration of total hydrolysable amino acids normalized to carbon and nitrogen. Organelle-bound, transmembrane, photosynthetic, and other proteins involved in light harvesting were preferentially retained during recycling. These findings suggest that organelle and membrane protection represent important mechanisms that enhance the preservation of protein during transport and incorporation into sediments.

  7. Safety evaluation of a natural eggshell membrane-derived product.

    PubMed

    Ruff, Kevin J; Endres, John R; Clewell, Amy E; Szabo, James R; Schauss, Alexander G

    2012-03-01

    Natural Eggshell Membrane (NEM®) is a novel dietary ingredient that contains naturally occurring glycosaminoglycans and proteins essential for maintaining healthy joint and connective tissues. NEM® was evaluated for safety via in vitro and in vivo toxicological studies. This included testing for cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, acute oral toxicity, and 90-day repeated-dose oral toxicity. NEM® did not exhibit any cytotoxic effects at a dose of 100 μg in an in vitro human cell viability assay after incubation for up to 20 h. NEM® did not exhibit any genotoxic effects in an in vitro assay of four strains of histidine-dependent Salmonella typhimurium and one strain of tryptophan-dependent Escherichia coli at a dose of up to 5000 μg/plate. NEM® did not exhibit any signs of acute toxicity in rats at a single oral dose of up to 2000 mg/kg body weight, nor signs of toxicity (via urinalysis, hematology, clinical chemistry, or histopathological evaluation) in rats at a repeated oral dose of up to 2000 mg/kg body weight per day for 90 days. The results of these studies suggest that NEM® may be safe for human consumption. PMID:22245377

  8. New method for effectively and quantitatively labeling cysteine residues on chicken eggshell membrane.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaojing; Li, Qian; Yuan, Yue; Mei, Bin; Huang, Rui; Tian, Ying; Sun, Jing; Cao, Chunyan; Lu, Guangming; Liang, Gaolin

    2012-10-28

    Using maleimidoethylmonoamide cysteine (Fmoc)(StBu) (1) as a medium, cysteine residues on proteins of chicken eggshell membrane (ESM) were successfully converted into N-terminal cysteines. After a biocompatible condensation reaction between the N-terminal cysteine and fluorescent probe 2-cyanobenzothiazole-Gly-Gly-Gly-fluorescein isothiocyanate (2), a new fluorogenic structure luciferin-Gly-Gly-Gly-FITC (3) was obtained, which exhibits a 2-fold fluorescence emission increase compared to that of 2. Thus, a new method for effectively labeling cysteine residues on ESMs was developed. Enhanced fluorescence images of ESMs were directly observed under a microscope and a small animal imaging machine. PMID:22961406

  9. Eggshell color in brown-egg laying hens - a review.

    PubMed

    Samiullah, S; Roberts, J R; Chousalkar, K

    2015-10-01

    The major pigment in eggshells of brown-egg laying hens is protoporphyrin IX, but traces of biliverdin and its zinc chelates are also present. The pigment appears to be synthesized in the shell gland. The protoporphyrin IX synthetic pathway is well defined, but precisely where and how it is synthesized in the shell gland of the brown-egg laying hen is still ambiguous. The pigment is deposited onto all shell layers including the shell membranes, but most of it is concentrated in the outermost layer of the calcareous shell and in the cuticle. Recently, the genes that are involved in pigment synthesis have been identified, but the genetic control of synthesis and deposition of brown pigment in the commercial laying hen is not fully understood. The brown coloration of the shell is an important shell quality parameter and has a positive influence on consumer preference. The extent of pigment deposition is influenced by the housing system, hen age, hen strain, diet, stressors, and certain diseases such as infectious bronchitis. In this article, the physiological and biochemical characteristics of the brown pigment in commercial brown-egg layers are reviewed in relation to its various functions in the poultry industry. PMID:26240390

  10. Experimental strategies for cloning or identifying genes encoding DNA-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Carey, Michael F; Peterson, Craig L; Smale, Stephen T

    2012-02-01

    This article describes experimental strategies for cloning or identifying genes encoding DNA-binding proteins. DNA-binding proteins are most commonly identified by electrophoretic mobility-shift assay (EMSA) or DNase I footprinting. To identify the gene encoding a protein detected by EMSA or DNase footprinting, the protein often needs to be purified and its sequence analyzed, as described here. Other methods are also available which do not resort to protein purification, including the one-hybrid screen, in vitro expression library screen, and mammalian expression cloning. These methods are outlined, and their advantages and disadvantages are discussed. PMID:22301659

  11. U-Th Burial Dates on Ostrich Eggshell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharp, W. D.; Fylstra, N. D.; Tryon, C. A.; Faith, J. T.; Peppe, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    Obtaining precise and accurate dates at archaeological sites beyond the range of radiocarbon dating is challenging but essential for understanding human origins. Eggshells of ratites (large flightless birds including ostrich, emu and others) are common in many archaeological sequences in Africa, Australia and elsewhere. Ancient eggshells are geochemically suitable for the U-Th technique (1), which has about ten times the range of radiocarbon dating (>500 rather than 50 ka), making eggshells attractive dating targets. Moreover, C and N isotopic studies of eggshell provide insights into paleovegetation and paleoprecipitation central to assessing past human-environment interactions (2,3). But until now, U-Th dates on ratite eggshell have not accounted for the secondary origin of essentially all of their U. We report a novel approach to U-Th dating of eggshell that explicitly accounts for secondary U uptake that begins with burial. Using ostrich eggshell (OES) from Pleistocene-Holocene east African sites, we have measured U and 232Th concentration profiles across OES by laser ablation ICP-MS. U commonly peaks at 10s to 100s of ppb and varies 10-fold or more across the ~2 mm thickness of OES, with gradients modulated by the layered structure of the eggshell. Common Th is high near the shell surfaces, but low in the middle "pallisade" layer of OES, making it optimal for U-Th dating. We determine U-Th ages along the U concentration gradient by solution ICP-MS analyses of two or more fractions of the pallisade layer. We then estimate OES burial dates using a simple model for diffusive uptake of uranium. Comparing such "U-Th burial dates" with radiocarbon dates for OES calcite from the same shells, we find good agreement in 7 out of 9 cases, consistent with rapid burial and confirming the accuracy of the approach. The remaining 2 eggshells have anomalous patterns of apparent ages that reveal they are unsuitable for U-Th dating, thereby providing reliability criteria innate

  12. Identification of discriminant proteins through antibody profiling, methods and apparatus for identifying an individual

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, Vicki S; Lacey, Jeffrey A; Gentillon, Cynthia A; Apel, William A

    2015-03-03

    A method for determining a plurality of proteins for discriminating and positively identifying an individual based from a biological sample. The method may include profiling a biological sample from a plurality of individuals against a protein array including a plurality of proteins. The protein array may include proteins attached to a support in a preselected pattern such that locations of the proteins are known. The biological sample may be contacted with the protein array such that a portion of antibodies in the biological sample reacts with and binds to the proteins forming immune complexes. A statistical analysis method, such as discriminant analysis, may be performed to determine discriminating proteins for distinguishing individuals. Proteins of interest may be used to form a protein array. Such a protein array may be used, for example, to compare a forensic sample from an unknown source with a sample from a known source.

  13. Identification of discriminant proteins through antibody profiling, methods and apparatus for identifying an individual

    DOEpatents

    Apel, William A.; Thompson, Vicki S; Lacey, Jeffrey A.; Gentillon, Cynthia A.

    2016-08-09

    A method for determining a plurality of proteins for discriminating and positively identifying an individual based from a biological sample. The method may include profiling a biological sample from a plurality of individuals against a protein array including a plurality of proteins. The protein array may include proteins attached to a support in a preselected pattern such that locations of the proteins are known. The biological sample may be contacted with the protein array such that a portion of antibodies in the biological sample reacts with and binds to the proteins forming immune complexes. A statistical analysis method, such as discriminant analysis, may be performed to determine discriminating proteins for distinguishing individuals. Proteins of interest may be used to form a protein array. Such a protein array may be used, for example, to compare a forensic sample from an unknown source with a sample from a known source.

  14. Identifying Interactions that Determine Fragment Binding at Protein Hotspots.

    PubMed

    Radoux, Chris J; Olsson, Tjelvar S G; Pitt, Will R; Groom, Colin R; Blundell, Tom L

    2016-05-12

    Locating a ligand-binding site is an important first step in structure-guided drug discovery, but current methods do little to suggest which interactions within a pocket are the most important for binding. Here we illustrate a method that samples atomic hotspots with simple molecular probes to produce fragment hotspot maps. These maps specifically highlight fragment-binding sites and their corresponding pharmacophores. For ligand-bound structures, they provide an intuitive visual guide within the binding site, directing medicinal chemists where to grow the molecule and alerting them to suboptimal interactions within the original hit. The fragment hotspot map calculation is validated using experimental binding positions of 21 fragments and subsequent lead molecules. The ligands are found in high scoring areas of the fragment hotspot maps, with fragment atoms having a median percentage rank of 97%. Protein kinase B and pantothenate synthetase are examined in detail. In each case, the fragment hotspot maps are able to rationalize a Free-Wilson analysis of SAR data from a fragment-based drug design project. PMID:27043011

  15. Identifying protein complexes from interaction networks based on clique percolation and distance restriction

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Identification of protein complexes in large interaction networks is crucial to understand principles of cellular organization and predict protein functions, which is one of the most important issues in the post-genomic era. Each protein might be subordinate multiple protein complexes in the real protein-protein interaction networks. Identifying overlapping protein complexes from protein-protein interaction networks is a considerable research topic. Result As an effective algorithm in identifying overlapping module structures, clique percolation method (CPM) has a wide range of application in social networks and biological networks. However, the recognition accuracy of algorithm CPM is lowly. Furthermore, algorithm CPM is unfit to identifying protein complexes with meso-scale when it applied in protein-protein interaction networks. In this paper, we propose a new topological model by extending the definition of k-clique community of algorithm CPM and introduced distance restriction, and develop a novel algorithm called CP-DR based on the new topological model for identifying protein complexes. In this new algorithm, the protein complex size is restricted by distance constraint to conquer the shortcomings of algorithm CPM. The algorithm CP-DR is applied to the protein interaction network of Sacchromyces cerevisiae and identifies many well known complexes. Conclusion The proposed algorithm CP-DR based on clique percolation and distance restriction makes it possible to identify dense subgraphs in protein interaction networks, a large number of which correspond to known protein complexes. Compared to algorithm CPM, algorithm CP-DR has more outstanding performance. PMID:21047377

  16. Proteome Analysis. Novel Proteins Identified at the Peribacteroid Membrane from Lotus japonicus Root Nodules1

    PubMed Central

    Wienkoop, Stefanie; Saalbach, Gerhard

    2003-01-01

    The peribacteroid membrane (PBM) forms the structural and functional interface between the legume plant and the rhizobia. The model legume Lotus japonicus was chosen to study the proteins present at the PBM by proteome analysis. PBM was purified from root nodules by an aqueous polymer two-phase system. Extracted proteins were subjected to a global trypsin digest. The peptides were separated by nanoscale liquid chromatography and analyzed by tandem mass spectrometry. Searching the nonredundant protein database and the green plant expressed sequence tag database using the tandem mass spectrometry data identified approximately 94 proteins, a number far exceeding the number of proteins reported for the PBM hitherto. In particular, a number of membrane proteins like transporters for sugars and sulfate; endomembrane-associated proteins such as GTP-binding proteins and vesicle receptors; and proteins involved in signaling, for example, receptor kinases, calmodulin, 14-3-3 proteins, and pathogen response-related proteins, including a so-called HIR protein, were detected. Several ATPases and aquaporins were present, indicating a more complex situation than previously thought. In addition, the unexpected presence of a number of proteins known to be located in other compartments was observed. Two characteristic protein complexes obtained from native gel electrophoresis of total PBM proteins were also analyzed. Together, the results identified specific proteins at the PBM involved in important physiological processes and localized proteins known from nodule-specific expressed sequence tag databases to the PBM. PMID:12644660

  17. Improving reproducibility and sensitivity in identifying human proteins by shotgun proteomics.

    PubMed

    Resing, Katheryn A; Meyer-Arendt, Karen; Mendoza, Alex M; Aveline-Wolf, Lauren D; Jonscher, Karen R; Pierce, Kevin G; Old, William M; Cheung, Hiu T; Russell, Steven; Wattawa, Joy L; Goehle, Geoff R; Knight, Robin D; Ahn, Natalie G

    2004-07-01

    Identifying proteins in cell extracts by shotgun proteomics involves digesting the proteins, sequencing the resulting peptides by data-dependent mass spectrometry (MS/MS), and searching protein databases to identify the proteins from which the peptides are derived. Manual analysis and direct spectral comparison reveal that scores from two commonly used search programs (Sequest and Mascot) validate less than half of potentially identifiable MS/MS spectra (class positive) from shotgun analyses of the human erythroleukemia K562 cell line. Here we demonstrate increased sensitivity and accuracy using a focused search strategy along with a peptide sequence validation script that does not rely exclusively on XCorr or Mowse scores generated by Sequest or Mascot, but uses consensus between the search programs, along with chemical properties and scores describing the nature of the fragmentation spectrum (ion score and RSP). The approach yielded 4.2% false positive and 8% false negative frequencies in peptide assignments. The protein profile is then assembled from peptide assignments using a novel peptide-centric protein nomenclature that more accurately reports protein variants that contain identical peptide sequences. An Isoform Resolver algorithm ensures that the protein count is not inflated by variants in the protein database, eliminating approximately 25% of redundant proteins. Analysis of soluble proteins from a human K562 cells identified 5130 unique proteins, with approximately 100 false positive protein assignments. PMID:15228325

  18. Pathway Analysis Incorporating Protein-Protein Interaction Networks Identified Candidate Pathways for the Seven Common Diseases.

    PubMed

    Lin, Peng-Lin; Yu, Ya-Wen; Chung, Ren-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Pathway analysis has become popular as a secondary analysis strategy for genome-wide association studies (GWAS). Most of the current pathway analysis methods aggregate signals from the main effects of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes within a pathway without considering the effects of gene-gene interactions. However, gene-gene interactions can also have critical effects on complex diseases. Protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks have been used to define gene pairs for the gene-gene interaction tests. Incorporating the PPI information to define gene pairs for interaction tests within pathways can increase the power for pathway-based association tests. We propose a pathway association test, which aggregates the interaction signals in PPI networks within a pathway, for GWAS with case-control samples. Gene size is properly considered in the test so that genes do not contribute more to the test statistic simply due to their size. Simulation studies were performed to verify that the method is a valid test and can have more power than other pathway association tests in the presence of gene-gene interactions within a pathway under different scenarios. We applied the test to the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium GWAS datasets for seven common diseases. The most significant pathway is the chaperones modulate interferon signaling pathway for Crohn's disease (p-value = 0.0003). The pathway modulates interferon gamma, which induces the JAK/STAT pathway that is involved in Crohn's disease. Several other pathways that have functional implications for the seven diseases were also identified. The proposed test based on gene-gene interaction signals in PPI networks can be used as a complementary tool to the current existing pathway analysis methods focusing on main effects of genes. An efficient software implementing the method is freely available at http://puppi.sourceforge.net. PMID:27622767

  19. Dating lacustrine episodes in the eastern Sahara by the epimerization of isoleucine in ostrich eggshells

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, G.H.; Wendorf, F.; Ernst, R.; Schild, R.; Close, A.E.; Friedman, I.; Schwarcz, H.P.

    1991-01-01

    The eggshell of the African ostrich, Struthio camelus, closely approximates a closed system for the retention of indigenous proteinaceous residues. Epimerization of the protein amino acid isoleucine follows linear first-order kinetics in laboratory simulations nearly to racemic equilibrium, and the variation in D/L ratio within a single fragment, or between fragments of the same age, is significantly less than in other carbonate systems. These observations suggest that the extent of isoleucine epimerization (aIle/Ile ratio) in ostrich eggshell offers the potential for high-resolution geochronology of Quaternary deposits. From the simulation experiments, and dated early Holocene samples for which we have in situ mean annual sediment temperature measurements, Arrhenius parameters have been calculated; the activation energy is 30.33 kcal mol-1, similar to that of other carbonate systems. We have measured the aIle/Ile ratio in ostrich eggshell associated with lacustrine episodes at Bir Tarfawi and Bir Sahara East, two depressions in what is currently the hyperarid eastern Sahara. The ratios can be used directly to indicate qualitatively the time represented by each series of lake sediment, and to correlate disjunct lacustrine deposits within and between the basins. Uranium-series disequilibrium dating of algal mats contained within some of the lake beds indicate that a major wet interval occurred about 130 ka ago. Using the U-series date for calibration, the amino acid ratios are used to date the most recent lacustrine interval to about 100 ka B.P., and two older intervals, one about 200 ?? 25 ka B.P., and an older interval that occurred prior to 250 ka ago. ?? 1991.

  20. Benchmark data for identifying multi-functional types of membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Wan, Shibiao; Mak, Man-Wai; Kung, Sun-Yuan

    2016-09-01

    Identifying membrane proteins and their multi-functional types is an indispensable yet challenging topic in proteomics and bioinformatics. In this article, we provide data that are used for training and testing Mem-ADSVM (Wan et al., 2016. "Mem-ADSVM: a two-layer multi-label predictor for identifying multi-functional types of membrane proteins" [1]), a two-layer multi-label predictor for predicting multi-functional types of membrane proteins. PMID:27294176

  1. Polymorphisms in eggshell organic matrix genes are associated with eggshell quality measurements in pedigree Rhode Island Red hens.

    PubMed

    Dunn, I C; Joseph, N T; Bain, M; Edmond, A; Wilson, P W; Milona, P; Nys, Y; Gautron, J; Schmutz, M; Preisinger, R; Waddington, D

    2009-02-01

    Novel and traditional eggshell quality measurements were made from up to 2000 commercial pedigree hens for a candidate gene association analysis with organic eggshell matrix genes: ovocleidin-116, osteopontin (SPP1), ovocalyxin-32 (RARRES1), ovotransferrin (LTF), ovalbumin and ovocalyxin-36, as well as key genes in the maintenance and function of the shell gland [estrogen receptor (ESR1) and carbonic anhydrase II (CAII)]. Associations were found for (i) ovalbumin with breaking strength and shell thickness; (ii) ovocleidin-116 with elastic modulus, shell thickness and egg shape; (iii) RARRES1 with mammillary layer thickness; (iv) ESR1 with dynamic stiffness; (v) SPP1 with fracture toughness and (vi) CAII with egg shape. The marker effects are as large as 17% of trait standard deviations and could be used to improve eggshell quality. PMID:18828860

  2. Embryonic eggshell thickness erosion: A literature survey re-assessing embryo-induced eggshell thinning in birds.

    PubMed

    Orłowski, Grzegorz; Hałupka, Lucyna

    2015-10-01

    Although eggshell thinning has been described mainly in the context of environmental pollution, it can also be the effect of reproductive changes induced by a developing embryo. On the basis of a literature survey of 25 bird species (26 published papers) we reviewed data on embryo-induced eggshell thinning (EET) in three groups of birds: precocials, semi-precocials and altricials. The average EET at the equator of the eggs was 6.4% (median = 4.7%). Our review did not confirm a general prediction of elevated EET at the egg equator in precocial species: altricial birds exhibited the highest EET (average = 12.0%), followed by precocials (7.6%) and semi-precocials (4.2%). We make certain critical recommendations based on the results of this study. Studies aiming to assess variation in eggshell thickness should examine intrinsic factors affecting shell properties of avian eggs, like thickness, which are the result of anatomical or reproductive changes. PMID:26074163

  3. Which Came First, the Eggshell or the Egg? Answering Biomineralization Riddles (442nd Brookhaven Lecture)

    SciTech Connect

    DiMasi, Elaine

    2008-11-12

    Some of the hardest and sturdiest materials are not made in the factory; they are made inside the bodies of animals through a process called biomineralization. Look no further than your refrigerator for one of the simplest products of this natural construction company: a chicken's eggshell. Made out of just about a half-millimeter of layered calcium carbonate and protein, eggshells might be thought of as fragile, but they also provide vital protection for the chick forming inside. Biomineralization, the process by which organisms form materials such as bones, mollusk shells, and other structures, has captured the attention of scientists for years. The cells in an animal's body have special ways of controlling the sizes and shapes of these mineral compounds and incorporating organic materials into the mix, making many materials that are stronger, harder, and more wear-resistant than rocks. Finding a way to mimic the properties of these sturdy and naturally made materials could lead to the medical engineering of replacement bone, teeth, and cartilage, as well as the development of new electronic and industrial materials. With collaborators at Stony Brook University, physicist Elaine DiMasi develops different biomineralization models, including a protein network that resembles real tissue. Then, the researchers use x-rays at the NSLS and a technique called shear modulation force microscopy to determine what biominerals look like and how they grow. In particular, DiMasi is interested in studying some of the earliest stages of biomineralization to find out what sets the process in motion.

  4. A local average connectivity-based method for identifying essential proteins from the network level.

    PubMed

    Li, Min; Wang, Jianxin; Chen, Xiang; Wang, Huan; Pan, Yi

    2011-06-01

    Identifying essential proteins is very important for understanding the minimal requirements of cellular survival and development. Fast growth in the amount of available protein-protein interactions has produced unprecedented opportunities for detecting protein essentiality from the network level. Essential proteins have been found to be more abundant among those highly connected proteins. However, there exist a number of highly connected proteins which are not essential. By analyzing these proteins, we find that few of their neighbors interact with each other. Thus, we propose a new local method, named LAC, to determine a protein's essentiality by evaluating the relationship between a protein and its neighbors. The performance of LAC is validated based on the yeast protein interaction networks obtained from two different databases: DIP and BioGRID. The experimental results of the two networks show that the number of essential proteins predicted by LAC clearly exceeds that explored by Degree Centrality (DC). More over, LAC is also compared with other seven measures of protein centrality (Neighborhood Component (DMNC), Betweenness Centrality (BC), Closeness Centrality (CC), Bottle Neck (BN), Information Centrality (IC), Eigenvector Centrality (EC), and Subgraph Centrality (SC)) in identifying essential proteins. The comparison results based on the validations of sensitivity, specificity, F-measure, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy consistently show that LAC outweighs these seven previous methods. PMID:21704260

  5. Engineering and Identifying Supercharged Proteins for Macromolecule Delivery into Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, David B.; Cronican, James J.; Liu, David R.

    2012-01-01

    Supercharged proteins are a class of engineered or naturally occurring proteins with unusually high net positive or negative theoretical charge. Both supernegatively and superpositively charged proteins exhibit a remarkable ability to withstand thermally or chemically induced aggregation. Superpositively charged proteins are also able to penetrate mammalian cells. Associating cargo with these proteins, such as plasmid DNA, siRNA, or other proteins, can enable the functional delivery of these macromolecules into mammalian cells both in vitro and in vivo. The potency of functional delivery in some cases can exceed that of other current methods for macromolecule delivery, including the use of cell-penetrating peptides such as Tat, and adenoviral delivery vectors. This chapter summarizes methods for engineering supercharged proteins, optimizing cell penetration, identifying naturally occurring supercharged proteins, and using these proteins for macromolecule delivery into mammalian cells. PMID:22230574

  6. Development of ‘Redox Arrays’ for identifying novel glutathionylated proteins in the secretome

    PubMed Central

    Mullen, Lisa; Seavill, Miles; Hammouz, Raneem; Bottazzi, Barbara; Chan, Philippe; Vaudry, David; Ghezzi, Pietro

    2015-01-01

    Proteomics techniques for analysing the redox status of individual proteins in complex mixtures tend to identify the same proteins due to their high abundance. We describe here an array-based technique to identify proteins undergoing glutathionylation and apply it to the secretome and the proteome of human monocytic cells. The method is based on incorporation of biotinylated glutathione (GSH) into proteins, which can then be identified following binding to a 1000-protein antibody array. We thus identify 38 secreted and 55 intracellular glutathionylated proteins, most of which are novel candidates for glutathionylation. Two of the proteins identified in these experiments, IL-1 sRII and Lyn, were then confirmed to be susceptible to glutathionylation. Comparison of the redox array with conventional proteomic methods confirmed that the redox array is much more sensitive, and can be performed using more than 100-fold less protein than is required for methods based on mass spectrometry. The identification of novel targets of glutathionylation, particularly in the secretome where the protein concentration is much lower, shows that redox arrays can overcome some of the limitations of established redox proteomics techniques. PMID:26416726

  7. A novel method to identify nucleic acid binding sites in proteins by scanning mutagenesis: application to iron regulatory protein.

    PubMed Central

    Neupert, B; Menotti, E; Kühn, L C

    1995-01-01

    We describe a new procedure to identify RNA or DNA binding sites in proteins, based on a combination of UV cross-linking and single-hit chemical peptide cleavage. Site-directed mutagenesis is used to create a series of mutants with single Asn-Gly sequences in the protein to be analysed. Recombinant mutant proteins are incubated with their radiolabelled target sequence and UV irradiated. Covalently linked RNA- or DNA-protein complexes are digested with hydroxylamine and labelled peptides identified by SDS-PAGE and autoradiography. The analysis requires only small amounts of protein and is achieved within a relatively short time. Using this method we mapped the site at which human iron regulatory protein (IRP) is UV cross-linked to iron responsive element RNA to amino acid residues 116-151. Images PMID:7544459

  8. Protein-protein interaction networks identify targets which rescue the MPP+ cellular model of Parkinson’s disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keane, Harriet; Ryan, Brent J.; Jackson, Brendan; Whitmore, Alan; Wade-Martins, Richard

    2015-11-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are complex multifactorial disorders characterised by the interplay of many dysregulated physiological processes. As an exemplar, Parkinson’s disease (PD) involves multiple perturbed cellular functions, including mitochondrial dysfunction and autophagic dysregulation in preferentially-sensitive dopamine neurons, a selective pathophysiology recapitulated in vitro using the neurotoxin MPP+. Here we explore a network science approach for the selection of therapeutic protein targets in the cellular MPP+ model. We hypothesised that analysis of protein-protein interaction networks modelling MPP+ toxicity could identify proteins critical for mediating MPP+ toxicity. Analysis of protein-protein interaction networks constructed to model the interplay of mitochondrial dysfunction and autophagic dysregulation (key aspects of MPP+ toxicity) enabled us to identify four proteins predicted to be key for MPP+ toxicity (P62, GABARAP, GBRL1 and GBRL2). Combined, but not individual, knockdown of these proteins increased cellular susceptibility to MPP+ toxicity. Conversely, combined, but not individual, over-expression of the network targets provided rescue of MPP+ toxicity associated with the formation of autophagosome-like structures. We also found that modulation of two distinct proteins in the protein-protein interaction network was necessary and sufficient to mitigate neurotoxicity. Together, these findings validate our network science approach to multi-target identification in complex neurological diseases.

  9. Protein-protein interaction networks identify targets which rescue the MPP+ cellular model of Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Keane, Harriet; Ryan, Brent J.; Jackson, Brendan; Whitmore, Alan; Wade-Martins, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are complex multifactorial disorders characterised by the interplay of many dysregulated physiological processes. As an exemplar, Parkinson’s disease (PD) involves multiple perturbed cellular functions, including mitochondrial dysfunction and autophagic dysregulation in preferentially-sensitive dopamine neurons, a selective pathophysiology recapitulated in vitro using the neurotoxin MPP+. Here we explore a network science approach for the selection of therapeutic protein targets in the cellular MPP+ model. We hypothesised that analysis of protein-protein interaction networks modelling MPP+ toxicity could identify proteins critical for mediating MPP+ toxicity. Analysis of protein-protein interaction networks constructed to model the interplay of mitochondrial dysfunction and autophagic dysregulation (key aspects of MPP+ toxicity) enabled us to identify four proteins predicted to be key for MPP+ toxicity (P62, GABARAP, GBRL1 and GBRL2). Combined, but not individual, knockdown of these proteins increased cellular susceptibility to MPP+ toxicity. Conversely, combined, but not individual, over-expression of the network targets provided rescue of MPP+ toxicity associated with the formation of autophagosome-like structures. We also found that modulation of two distinct proteins in the protein-protein interaction network was necessary and sufficient to mitigate neurotoxicity. Together, these findings validate our network science approach to multi-target identification in complex neurological diseases. PMID:26608097

  10. A computational tool for identifying minimotifs in protein-protein interactions and improving the accuracy of minimotif predictions.

    PubMed

    Rajasekaran, Sanguthevar; Merlin, Jerlin Camilus; Kundeti, Vamsi; Mi, Tian; Oommen, Aaron; Vyas, Jay; Alaniz, Izua; Chung, Keith; Chowdhury, Farah; Deverasatty, Sandeep; Irvey, Tenisha M; Lacambacal, David; Lara, Darlene; Panchangam, Subhasree; Rathnayake, Viraj; Watts, Paula; Schiller, Martin R

    2011-01-01

    Protein-protein interactions are important to understanding cell functions; however, our theoretical understanding is limited. There is a general discontinuity between the well-accepted physical and chemical forces that drive protein-protein interactions and the large collections of identified protein-protein interactions in various databases. Minimotifs are short functional peptide sequences that provide a basis to bridge this gap in knowledge. However, there is no systematic way to study minimotifs in the context of protein-protein interactions or vice versa. Here we have engineered a set of algorithms that can be used to identify minimotifs in known protein-protein interactions and implemented this for use by scientists in Minimotif Miner. By globally testing these algorithms on verified data and on 100 individual proteins as test cases, we demonstrate the utility of these new computation tools. This tool also can be used to reduce false-positive predictions in the discovery of novel minimotifs. The statistical significance of these algorithms is demonstrated by an ROC analysis (P = 0.001). PMID:20938975

  11. New proteins identified in epididymal fluid from the platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus).

    PubMed

    Dacheux, Jean-Louis; Dacheux, Francoise; Labas, Valerie; Ecroyd, Heath; Nixon, Brett; Jones, Russell C

    2009-01-01

    The platypus epididymal proteome is being studied because epididymal proteins are essential for male fertility in mammals and it is considered that knowledge of the epididymal proteome in an early mammal would be informative in assessing the convergence and divergence of proteins that are important in the function of the mammalian epididymis. Few of the epididymal proteins that have been identified in eutherian mammals were found in platypus caudal epididymal fluid, and the major epididymal proteins in the platypus (PXN-FBPL, SPARC and E-OR20) have never been identified in the epididymis of any other mammal. PMID:19874724

  12. KESTREL: a powerful method for identifying the physiological substrates of protein kinases

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Philip; Knebel, Axel

    2005-01-01

    The identification of all the substrates of every protein kinase is one of the major challenges of post-genomic research. Here we review a powerful method for tackling this problem that we have developed over the last 5 years. The method has so far been used to identify novel substrates for eight different protein kinases, demonstrating that it is of general utility. Importantly, the method can be used to identify distinct physiological substrates of protein kinases, such as PKB (protein kinase B) and SGK (serum- and glucocorticoid-induced kinase), that are closely related in structure and have similar specificity determinants. PMID:16336195

  13. MAS C-Terminal Tail Interacting Proteins Identified by Mass Spectrometry- Based Proteomic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Tirupula, Kalyan C.; Zhang, Dongmei; Osbourne, Appledene; Chatterjee, Arunachal; Desnoyer, Russ; Willard, Belinda; Karnik, Sadashiva S.

    2015-01-01

    Propagation of signals from G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) in cells is primarily mediated by protein-protein interactions. MAS is a GPCR that was initially discovered as an oncogene and is now known to play an important role in cardiovascular physiology. Current literature suggests that MAS interacts with common heterotrimeric G-proteins, but MAS interaction with proteins which might mediate G protein-independent or atypical signaling is unknown. In this study we hypothesized that MAS C-terminal tail (Ct) is a major determinant of receptor-scaffold protein interactions mediating MAS signaling. Mass-spectrometry based proteomic analysis was used to comprehensively identify the proteins that interact with MAS Ct comprising the PDZ-binding motif (PDZ-BM). We identified both PDZ and non-PDZ proteins from human embryonic kidney cell line, mouse atrial cardiomyocyte cell line and human heart tissue to interact specifically with MAS Ct. For the first time our study provides a panel of PDZ and other proteins that potentially interact with MAS with high significance. A ‘cardiac-specific finger print’ of MAS interacting PDZ proteins was identified which includes DLG1, MAGI1 and SNTA. Cell based experiments with wild-type and mutant MAS lacking the PDZ-BM validated MAS interaction with PDZ proteins DLG1 and TJP2. Bioinformatics analysis suggested well-known multi-protein scaffold complexes involved in nitric oxide signaling (NOS), cell-cell signaling of neuromuscular junctions, synapses and epithelial cells. Majority of these protein hits were predicted to be part of disease categories comprising cancers and malignant tumors. We propose a ‘MAS-signalosome’ model to stimulate further research in understanding the molecular mechanism of MAS function. Identifying hierarchy of interactions of ‘signalosome’ components with MAS will be a necessary step in future to fully understand the physiological and pathological functions of this enigmatic receptor. PMID

  14. Organochlorine residues and eggshell thinning in wood storks and anhingas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ohlendorf, H.M.; Klaas, E.E.; Kaiser, T.E.

    1978-01-01

    All 10 Wood Stork eggs collected at Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge in 1973 contained residues of DDE (geometric mean 4.0 ppm wet weight) and PCBs (1.2 ppm). Nine other organochlorines were found at lower frequencies in the eggs. Eggshells from the recent period were 8.9% thinner (P < 0.001) than pre-1947 samples; decrease in eggshell thickness was more closely correlated with DDE than other organochlorines and correlation of DDE and eggshell thickness approached significance (P = 0.115).....Anhinga eggs were collected at 7 localities; 45 of the 46 eggs analyzed contained DDE residues and 24 contained PCBs. Residues of other organochlorines were found less frequently. Shell thickness of recent eggs from Louisiana and Mississippi was significantly less (-7.5%; P < 0.05) than the mean for pre-1947 eggs, but there was no significant change in shell thickness of eggs from Florida. The change in clutch mean eggshell thickness was significantly negatively correlated (P < 0.05) with the concentration of DDE in the eggs.

  15. Dieldrin and DDT: effects on sparrow hawk eggshells and reproduction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Porter, Ron; Wiemeyer, Stanley N.

    1969-01-01

    Patterns of reproductive failure in declining populations of several European and North American raptorial species were duplicated experimentally with captive American sparrow hawks Falco sparverius that were given a diet containing two commonly used organochlorine insecticides. Major effects on reproduction were increased egg disappearance, increased egg destruction by parent birds, and reduced eggshell thickness.

  16. A Simple Approach for an Eggshell-Based 3D-Printed Osteoinductive Multiphasic Calcium Phosphate Scaffold.

    PubMed

    Dadhich, Prabhash; Das, Bodhisatwa; Pal, Pallabi; Srivas, Pavan K; Dutta, Joy; Ray, Sabyasachi; Dhara, Santanu

    2016-05-18

    Natural origin bioceramics are widely used for bone grafts. In the present study, an eggshell-derived bioceramic scaffold is fabricated by 3D printing as a potential bone-graft analogue. The eggshell, a biological waste material, was mixed with a specific ratio of phosphoric acid and chitosan to form a precursor toward the fabrication of an osteoinductive multiphasic calcium phosphate scaffold via a coagulation-assisted extrusion and sintering for a multiscalar hierarchical porous structure with improved mechanical properties. Physicochemical characterization of the formed scaffolds was carried out for phase analysis, surface morphology, and mechanical properties. A similar scaffold was prepared using a chemically synthesized calcium phosphate powder that was compared with the natural origin one. The higher surface area associated with the interconnected porosity along with multiple phases of the natural origin scaffold facilitated higher cell adhesion and proliferation compared to the chemically synthesized one. Further, the natural origin scaffold displayed relatively higher cell differentiation activity, as is evident by protein and gene expression studies. On subcutaneous implantation for 30 days, promising vascular tissue in-growth was observed, circumventing a major foreign body response. Collagen-rich vascular extracellular matrix deposition and osteocalcin secretion indicated bonelike tissue formation. Finally, the eggshell-derived multiphasic calcium phosphate scaffold displayed improvement in the mechanical properties with higher porosity and osteoinductivity compared to the chemically derived apatite and unveiled a new paradigm for utilization of biological wastes in bone-graft application. PMID:26853051

  17. Utilizing Yeast Surface Human Proteome Display Libraries to Identify Small Molecule-Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Bidlingmaier, Scott; Liu, Bin

    2016-01-01

    The identification of proteins that interact with small bioactive molecules is a critical but often difficult and time-consuming step in understanding cellular signaling pathways or molecular mechanisms of drug action. Numerous methods for identifying small molecule-interacting proteins have been developed and utilized, including affinity-based purification followed by mass spectrometry analysis, protein microarrays, phage display, and three-hybrid approaches. Although all these methods have been used successfully, there remains a need for additional techniques for analyzing small molecule-protein interactions. A promising method for identifying small molecule-protein interactions is affinity-based selection of yeast surface-displayed human proteome libraries. Large and diverse libraries displaying human protein fragments on the surface of yeast cells have been constructed and subjected to FACS-based enrichment followed by comprehensive exon microarray-based output analysis to identify protein fragments with affinity for small molecule ligands. In a recent example, a proteome-wide search has been successfully carried out to identify cellular proteins binding to the signaling lipids PtdIns(4,5)P2 and PtdIns(3,4,5)P3. Known phosphatidylinositide-binding proteins such as pleckstrin homology domains were identified, as well as many novel interactions. Intriguingly, many novel nuclear phosphatidylinositide-binding proteins were discovered. Although the existence of an independent pool of nuclear phosphatidylinositides has been known about for some time, their functions and mechanism of action remain obscure. Thus, the identification and subsequent study of nuclear phosphatidylinositide-binding proteins is expected to bring new insights to this important biological question. Based on the success with phosphatidylinositides, it is expected that the screening of yeast surface-displayed human proteome libraries will be of general use for the discovery of novel small

  18. Utilizing Yeast Surface Human Proteome Display Libraries to Identify Small Molecule-Protein Interactions.

    PubMed

    Bidlingmaier, Scott; Liu, Bin

    2015-01-01

    The identification of proteins that interact with small bioactive molecules is a critical but often difficult and time-consuming step in understanding cellular signaling pathways or molecular mechanisms of drug action. Numerous methods for identifying small molecule-interacting proteins have been developed and utilized, including affinity-based purification followed by mass spectrometry analysis, protein microarrays, phage display, and three-hybrid approaches. Although all these methods have been used successfully, there remains a need for additional techniques for analyzing small molecule-protein interactions. A promising method for identifying small molecule-protein interactions is affinity-based selection of yeast surface-displayed human proteome libraries. Large and diverse libraries displaying human protein fragments on the surface of yeast cells have been constructed and subjected to FACS-based enrichment followed by comprehensive exon microarray-based output analysis to identify protein fragments with affinity for small molecule ligands. In a recent example, a proteome-wide search has been successfully carried out to identify cellular proteins binding to the signaling lipids PtdIns(4,5)P2 and PtdIns(3,4,5)P3. Known phosphatidylinositide-binding proteins such as pleckstrin homology domains were identified, as well as many novel interactions. Intriguingly, many novel nuclear phosphatidylinositide-binding proteins were discovered. Although the existence of an independent pool of nuclear phosphatidylinositides has been known about for some time, their functions and mechanism of action remain obscure. Thus, the identification and subsequent study of nuclear phosphatidylinositide-binding proteins is expected to bring new insights to this important biological question. Based on the success with phosphatidylinositides, it is expected that the screening of yeast surface-displayed human proteome libraries will be of general use for the discovery of novel small

  19. A novel approach to identify genes that determine grain protein deviation in cereals.

    PubMed

    Mosleth, Ellen F; Wan, Yongfang; Lysenko, Artem; Chope, Gemma A; Penson, Simon P; Shewry, Peter R; Hawkesford, Malcolm J

    2015-06-01

    Grain yield and protein content were determined for six wheat cultivars grown over 3 years at multiple sites and at multiple nitrogen (N) fertilizer inputs. Although grain protein content was negatively correlated with yield, some grain samples had higher protein contents than expected based on their yields, a trait referred to as grain protein deviation (GPD). We used novel statistical approaches to identify gene transcripts significantly related to GPD across environments. The yield and protein content were initially adjusted for nitrogen fertilizer inputs and then adjusted for yield (to remove the negative correlation with protein content), resulting in a parameter termed corrected GPD. Significant genetic variation in corrected GPD was observed for six cultivars grown over a range of environmental conditions (a total of 584 samples). Gene transcript profiles were determined in a subset of 161 samples of developing grain to identify transcripts contributing to GPD. Principal component analysis (PCA), analysis of variance (ANOVA) and means of scores regression (MSR) were used to identify individual principal components (PCs) correlating with GPD alone. Scores of the selected PCs, which were significantly related to GPD and protein content but not to the yield and significantly affected by cultivar, were identified as reflecting a multivariate pattern of gene expression related to genetic variation in GPD. Transcripts with consistent variation along the selected PCs were identified by an approach hereby called one-block means of scores regression (one-block MSR). PMID:25400203

  20. Tandem Affinity Purification Combined with Mass Spectrometry to Identify Components of Protein Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Kaiser, Peter; Meierhofer, David; Wang, Xiaorong; Huang, Lan

    2011-01-01

    Most biological processes are governed by multiprotein complexes rather than individual proteins. Identification of protein complexes therefore is becoming increasingly important to gain a molecular understanding of cells and organisms. Mass spectrometry–based proteomics combined with affinity-tag-based protein purification is one of the most effective strategies to isolate and identify protein complexes. The development of tandem-affinity purification approaches has revolutionized proteomics experiments. These two-step affinity purification strategies allow rapid, effective purification of protein complexes and, at the same time, minimize background. Identification of even very low-abundant protein complexes with modern sensitive mass spectrometers has become routine. Here, we describe two general strategies for tandem-affinity purification followed by mass spectrometric identification of protein complexes. PMID:18370112

  1. Proteomic Analysis to Identify Tightly-Bound Cell Wall Protein in Rice Calli

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Won Kyong; Hyun, Tae Kyung; Kumar, Dhinesh; Rim, Yeonggil; Chen, Xiong Yan; Jo, Yeonhwa; Kim, Suwha; Lee, Keun Woo; Park, Zee-Yong; Lucas, William J.; Kim, Jae-Yean

    2015-01-01

    Rice is a model plant widely used for basic and applied research programs. Plant cell wall proteins play key roles in a broad range of biological processes. However, presently, knowledge on the rice cell wall proteome is rudimentary in nature. In the present study, the tightly-bound cell wall proteome of rice callus cultured cells using sequential extraction protocols was developed using mass spectrometry and bioinformatics methods, leading to the identification of 1568 candidate proteins. Based on bioinformatics analyses, 389 classical rice cell wall proteins, possessing a signal peptide, and 334 putative non-classical cell wall proteins, lacking a signal peptide, were identified. By combining previously established rice cell wall protein databases with current data for the classical rice cell wall proteins, a comprehensive rice cell wall proteome, comprised of 496 proteins, was constructed. A comparative analysis of the rice and Arabidopsis cell wall proteomes revealed a high level of homology, suggesting a predominant conservation between monocot and eudicot cell wall proteins. This study importantly increased information on cell wall proteins, which serves for future functional analyses of these identified rice cell wall proteins. PMID:26194822

  2. Proteomic Analysis to Identify Tightly-Bound Cell Wall Protein in Rice Calli.

    PubMed

    Cho, Won Kyong; Hyun, Tae Kyung; Kumar, Dhinesh; Rim, Yeonggil; Chen, Xiong Yan; Jo, Yeonhwa; Kim, Suwha; Lee, Keun Woo; Park, Zee-Yong; Lucas, William J; Kim, Jae-Yean

    2015-08-01

    Rice is a model plant widely used for basic and applied research programs. Plant cell wall proteins play key roles in a broad range of biological processes. However, presently, knowledge on the rice cell wall proteome is rudimentary in nature. In the present study, the tightly-bound cell wall proteome of rice callus cultured cells using sequential extraction protocols was developed using mass spectrometry and bioinformatics methods, leading to the identification of 1568 candidate proteins. Based on bioinformatics analyses, 389 classical rice cell wall proteins, possessing a signal peptide, and 334 putative non-classical cell wall proteins, lacking a signal peptide, were identified. By combining previously established rice cell wall protein databases with current data for the classical rice cell wall proteins, a comprehensive rice cell wall proteome, comprised of 496 proteins, was constructed. A comparative analysis of the rice and Arabidopsis cell wall proteomes revealed a high level of homology, suggesting a predominant conservation between monocot and eudicot cell wall proteins. This study importantly increased information on cell wall proteins, which serves for future functional analyses of these identified rice cell wall proteins. PMID:26194822

  3. Identifying transient protein-protein interactions in EphB2 signaling by Blue Native PAGE and Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Darie, Costel C.; Deinhardt, Katrin; Zhang, Guoan; Cardasis, Helene S.; Chao, Moses V.; Neubert, Thomas A.

    2012-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) are proteins that upon ligand stimulation undergo dimerization and autophosphorylation. Eph receptors (EphRs) are RTKs that are found in different cell types, from both tissues that are developing and from mature tissues and play important roles in the development of the central nervous system and peripheral nervous system. EphRs also play roles in synapse formation, neural crest formation, angiogenesis and in remodeling the vascular system. Interaction of EphRs with their ephrin ligands leads to activation of signal transduction pathways and to formation of many transient protein-protein interactions that ultimately leads to cytoskeletal remodeling. However, the sequence of events at the molecular level is not well-understood. We used Blue Native PAGE (BN-PAGE) and mass spectrometry (MS) to analyze the transient protein-protein interactions that resulted from stimulation of EphB2 receptors by their ephrinB1-Fc ligands. We analyzed the phosphotyrosine-containing protein complexes immunoprecipitated (pY-IPs) from the cell lysates of both unstimulated (−) and ephrinB1-Fc-stimulated (+) NG108 cells. Our experiments allowed us to identify many signaling proteins, either known to be part of EphB2 signaling or new for this pathway, which are involved in transient protein-protein interactions upon ephrinB1-Fc stimulation. These data led us to investigate the roles in EphB2 signaling of proteins such as FAK, WAVEs, and Nischarin. PMID:21932443

  4. A New Method for Identifying Essential Proteins Based on Network Topology Properties and Protein Complexes.

    PubMed

    Qin, Chao; Sun, Yongqi; Dong, Yadong

    2016-01-01

    Essential proteins are indispensable to the viability and reproduction of an organism. The identification of essential proteins is necessary not only for understanding the molecular mechanisms of cellular life but also for disease diagnosis, medical treatments and drug design. Many computational methods have been proposed for discovering essential proteins, but the precision of the prediction of essential proteins remains to be improved. In this paper, we propose a new method, LBCC, which is based on the combination of local density, betweenness centrality (BC) and in-degree centrality of complex (IDC). First, we introduce the common centrality measures; second, we propose the densities Den1(v) and Den2(v) of a node v to describe its local properties in the network; and finally, the combined strategy of Den1, Den2, BC and IDC is developed to improve the prediction precision. The experimental results demonstrate that LBCC outperforms traditional topological measures for predicting essential proteins, including degree centrality (DC), BC, subgraph centrality (SC), eigenvector centrality (EC), network centrality (NC), and the local average connectivity-based method (LAC). LBCC also improves the prediction precision by approximately 10 percent on the YMIPS and YMBD datasets compared to the most recently developed method, LIDC. PMID:27529423

  5. A New Method for Identifying Essential Proteins Based on Network Topology Properties and Protein Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Chao; Sun, Yongqi; Dong, Yadong

    2016-01-01

    Essential proteins are indispensable to the viability and reproduction of an organism. The identification of essential proteins is necessary not only for understanding the molecular mechanisms of cellular life but also for disease diagnosis, medical treatments and drug design. Many computational methods have been proposed for discovering essential proteins, but the precision of the prediction of essential proteins remains to be improved. In this paper, we propose a new method, LBCC, which is based on the combination of local density, betweenness centrality (BC) and in-degree centrality of complex (IDC). First, we introduce the common centrality measures; second, we propose the densities Den1(v) and Den2(v) of a node v to describe its local properties in the network; and finally, the combined strategy of Den1, Den2, BC and IDC is developed to improve the prediction precision. The experimental results demonstrate that LBCC outperforms traditional topological measures for predicting essential proteins, including degree centrality (DC), BC, subgraph centrality (SC), eigenvector centrality (EC), network centrality (NC), and the local average connectivity-based method (LAC). LBCC also improves the prediction precision by approximately 10 percent on the YMIPS and YMBD datasets compared to the most recently developed method, LIDC. PMID:27529423

  6. Unique secreted–surface protein complex of Lactobacillus rhamnosus, identified by phage display

    PubMed Central

    Gagic, Dragana; Wen, Wesley; Collett, Michael A; Rakonjac, Jasna

    2013-01-01

    Proteins are the most diverse structures on bacterial surfaces; hence, they are candidates for species- and strain-specific interactions of bacteria with the host, environment, and other microorganisms. Genomics has decoded thousands of bacterial surface and secreted proteins, yet the function of most cannot be predicted because of the enormous variability and a lack of experimental data that would allow deduction of function through homology. Here, we used phage display to identify a pair of interacting extracellular proteins in the probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus rhamnosus HN001. A secreted protein, SpcA, containing two bacterial immunoglobulin-like domains type 3 (Big-3) and a domain distantly related to plant pathogen response domain 1 (PR-1-like) was identified by screening of an L. rhamnosus HN001 library using HN001 cells as bait. The SpcA-“docking” protein, SpcB, was in turn detected by another phage display library screening, using purified SpcA as bait. SpcB is a 3275-residue cell-surface protein that contains general features of large glycosylated Serine-rich adhesins/fibrils from gram-positive bacteria, including the hallmark signal sequence motif KxYKxGKxW. Both proteins are encoded by genes within a L. rhamnosus-unique gene cluster that distinguishes this species from other lactobacilli. To our knowledge, this is the first example of a secreted-docking protein pair identified in lactobacilli. PMID:23233310

  7. Method for early detection of infectious mononucleosis by identifying Inmono proteins

    DOEpatents

    Willard, Karen E.

    1984-01-01

    Early detection of infectious mononucleosis is carried out using a sample of human blood by isolating and identifying the presence of Inmono proteins in the sample from a two-dimensional protein map with the proteins being characterized by having isoelectric banding as measured in urea of about -16 to -17 with respect to certain isoelectric point standards and molecular mass of about 70 to 75 K daltons as measured in the presence of sodium dodecylsulfate containing polyacrylamide gels, the presence of the Inmono proteins being correlated with the existence of infectious mononucleosis.

  8. Dissecting Protein Function: An Efficient Protocol for Identifying Separation-of-Function Mutations That Encode Structurally Stable Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Lubin, Johnathan W.; Rao, Timsi; Mandell, Edward K.; Wuttke, Deborah S.; Lundblad, Victoria

    2013-01-01

    Mutations that confer the loss of a single biochemical property (separation-of-function mutations) can often uncover a previously unknown role for a protein in a particular biological process. However, most mutations are identified based on loss-of-function phenotypes, which cannot differentiate between separation-of-function alleles vs. mutations that encode unstable/unfolded proteins. An alternative approach is to use overexpression dominant-negative (ODN) phenotypes to identify mutant proteins that disrupt function in an otherwise wild-type strain when overexpressed. This is based on the assumption that such mutant proteins retain an overall structure that is comparable to that of the wild-type protein and are able to compete with the endogenous protein (Herskowitz 1987). To test this, the in vivo phenotypes of mutations in the Est3 telomerase subunit from Saccharomyces cerevisiae were compared with the in vitro secondary structure of these mutant proteins as analyzed by circular-dichroism spectroscopy, which demonstrates that ODN is a more sensitive assessment of protein stability than the commonly used method of monitoring protein levels from extracts. Reverse mutagenesis of EST3, which targeted different categories of amino acids, also showed that mutating highly conserved charged residues to the oppositely charged amino acid had an increased likelihood of generating a severely defective est3− mutation, which nevertheless encoded a structurally stable protein. These results suggest that charge-swap mutagenesis directed at a limited subset of highly conserved charged residues, combined with ODN screening to eliminate partially unfolded proteins, may provide a widely applicable and efficient strategy for generating separation-of-function mutations. PMID:23307900

  9. Juvenile hormone-binding proteins of Melanoplus bivittatus identified by EFDA photoaffinity labeling

    SciTech Connect

    Winder, B.S.

    1988-01-01

    Proteins that bind juvenile hormone in the hemolymph and fat body of the grasshopper, Melanoplus bivittatus were identified by photoaffinity labeling with radiolabeled epoxyfarnesyl diazoacetate ({sup 3}H-EFDA), and were characterized by electrophoretic analysis. A protocol was developed which allowed detection of {sup 3}H-EFDA that was covalently linked to proteins upon exposure to ultraviolet light at 254 nm. Quantification of protein-linked {sup 3}H-EFDA by liquid scintillation spectrometry took advantage of the differential solubility of unlinked {sup 3}H-EFDA in toluene alone, and of the protein-linked {sup 3}H-EFDA in toluene plus the detergent, Triton X-100. Competition between EFDA and juvenile hormone (JH) for binding to JH-specific binding sites was measured by hydroxyapatite protein binding assays in the presence of radiolabeled JH or EFDA and competing non-radiolabeled hormone. The protein-linked EFDA was detected on fluorograms of SDS or nondenaturing polyacrylamide gels (PAGE), and by liquid scintillation spectrometry of membranes to which the proteins had been electrophoretically transferred. Proteins which specifically bound JH were identified by photolabeling proteins in the presence and absence of nonlabeled JH-III.

  10. Protein Abundance Changes and Ubiquitylation Targets Identified after Inhibition of the Proteasome with Syringolin A*

    PubMed Central

    Svozil, Julia; Hirsch-Hoffmann, Matthias; Dudler, Robert; Gruissem, Wilhelm; Baerenfaller, Katja

    2014-01-01

    As proteins are the main effectors inside cells, their levels need to be tightly regulated. This is partly achieved by specific protein degradation via the Ubiquitin-26S proteasome system (UPS). In plants, an exceptionally high number of proteins are involved in Ubiquitin-26S proteasome system-mediated protein degradation and it is known to regulate most, if not all, important cellular processes. Here, we investigated the response to the inhibition of the proteasome at the protein level treating leaves with the specific inhibitor Syringolin A (SylA) in a daytime specific manner and found 109 accumulated and 140 decreased proteins. The patterns of protein level changes indicate that the accumulating proteins cause proteotoxic stress that triggers various responses. Comparing protein level changes in SylA treated with those in a transgenic line over-expressing a mutated ubiquitin unable to form polyubiquitylated proteins produced little overlap pointing to different response pathways. To distinguish between direct and indirect targets of the UPS we also enriched and identified ubiquitylated proteins after inhibition of the proteasome, revealing a total of 1791 ubiquitylated proteins in leaves and roots and 1209 that were uniquely identified in our study. The comparison of the ubiquitylated proteins with those changing in abundance after SylA-mediated inhibition of the proteasome confirmed the complexity of the response and revealed that some proteins are regulated both at transcriptional and post-transcriptional level. For the ubiquitylated proteins that accumulate in the cytoplasm but are targeted to the plastid or the mitochondrion, we often found peptides in their target sequences, demonstrating that the UPS is involved in controlling organellar protein levels. Attempts to identify the sites of ubiquitylation revealed that the specific properties of this post-translational modification can lead to incorrect peptide spectrum assignments in complex peptide mixtures

  11. Identifying mutated proteins secreted by colon cancer cell lines using mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mathivanan, Suresh; Ji, Hong; Tauro, Bow J; Chen, Yuan-Shou; Simpson, Richard J

    2012-12-01

    Secreted proteins encoded by mutated genes (mutant proteins) are a particularly rich source of biomarkers being not only components of the cancer secretome but also actually implicated in tumorigenesis. One of the challenges of proteomics-driven biomarker discovery research is that the bulk of secreted mutant proteins cannot be identified directly and quantified by mass spectrometry due to the lack of mutated peptide information in extant proteomics databases. Here we identify, using an integrated genomics and proteomics strategy (referred to iMASp - identification of Mutated And Secreted proteins), 112 putative mutated tryptic peptides (corresponding to 57 proteins) in the collective secretomes derived from a panel of 18 human colorectal cancer (CRC) cell lines. Central to this iMASp was the creation of Human Protein Mutant Database (HPMD), against which experimentally-derived secretome peptide spectra were searched. Eight of the identified mutated tryptic peptides were confirmed by RT-PCR and cDNA sequencing of RNA extracted from those CRC cells from which the mutation was identified by mass spectrometry. The iMASp technology promises to improve the link between proteomics and genomic mutation data thereby providing an effective tool for targeting tryptic peptides with mutated amino acids as potential cancer biomarker candidates. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Integrated omics. PMID:22796352

  12. Proteomics informed by transcriptomics identifies novel secreted proteins in Dermacentor andersoni saliva.

    PubMed

    Mudenda, Lwiindi; Pierlé, Sebastián Aguilar; Turse, Joshua E; Scoles, Glen A; Purvine, Samuel O; Nicora, Carrie D; Clauss, Therese R W; Ueti, Massaro W; Brown, Wendy C; Brayton, Kelly A

    2014-11-01

    Dermacentor andersoni, known as the Rocky Mountain wood tick, is found in the western United States and transmits pathogens that cause diseases of veterinary and public health importance including Rocky Mountain spotted fever, tularemia, Colorado tick fever and bovine anaplasmosis. Tick saliva is known to modulate both innate and acquired immune responses, enabling ticks to feed for several days without detection. During feeding ticks subvert host defences such as hemostasis and inflammation, which would otherwise result in coagulation, wound repair and rejection of the tick. Molecular characterization of the proteins and pharmacological molecules secreted in tick saliva offers an opportunity to develop tick vaccines as an alternative to the use of acaricides, as well as new anti-inflammatory drugs. We performed proteomics informed by transcriptomics to identify D. andersoni saliva proteins that are secreted during feeding. The transcript data generated a database of 21,797 consensus sequences, which we used to identify 677 proteins secreted in the saliva of D. andersoni ticks fed for 2 and 5days, following proteomic investigations of whole saliva using mass spectrometry. Salivary gland transcript levels of unfed ticks were compared with 2 and 5day fed ticks to identify genes upregulated early during tick feeding. We cross-referenced the proteomic data with the transcriptomic data to identify 157 proteins of interest for immunomodulation and blood feeding. Proteins of unknown function as well as known immunomodulators were identified. PMID:25110293

  13. Proteomics informed by transcriptomics identifies novel secreted proteins in Dermacentor andersoni saliva

    SciTech Connect

    Mudenda, Lwiindi; Aguilar Pierle, Sebastian; Turse, Joshua E.; Scoles, Glen A.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Clauss, Therese RW; Ueti, Massaro W.; Brown, Wendy C.; Brayton, Kelly A.

    2014-08-07

    Dermacentor andersoni, known as the Rocky Mountain wood tick, is found in the western United States and transmits pathogens that cause diseases of veterinary and public health importance including Rocky Mountain spotted fever, tularemia, Colorado tick fever and bovine anaplasmosis. Tick saliva is known to modulate both innate and acquired immune responses, enabling ticks to feed for several days without detection. During feeding ticks subvert host defences such as hemostasis and inflammation, which would otherwise result in coagulation, wound repair and rejection of the tick. Molecular characterization of the proteins and pharmacological molecules secreted in tick saliva offers an opportunity to develop tick vaccines as an alternative to the use of acaricides, as well as new anti-inflammatory drugs. We performed proteomics informed by transcriptomics to identify D. andersoni saliva proteins that are secreted during feeding. The transcript data generated a database of 21,797 consensus sequences, which we used to identify 677 proteins secreted in the saliva of D. andersoni ticks fed for 2 and 5 days, following proteomic investigations of whole saliva using mass spectrometry. Salivary gland transcript levels of unfed ticks were compared with 2 and 5 day fed ticks to identify genes upregulated early during tick feeding. We cross-referenced the proteomic data with the transcriptomic data to identify 157 proteins of interest for immunomodulation and blood feeding. Proteins of unknown function as well as known immunomodulators were identified.

  14. HydroCalc Proteome: a tool to identify distinct characteristics of effector proteins.

    PubMed

    da Silva, G J; da Silva, R G T M; Silva, V A; C Caritá, E; Fachin, A L; Marins, M

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial pathogenicity is associated with secretion of effector proteins into intra- and extracellular spaces. These proteins interfere with cellular processes such as inhibition of phagosome-lysosome fusion, induction of apoptosis and autophagy, activation and suppression of kinases, regulation of receptor activity, and modulation of transcription factors. Knowledge regarding the characteristics of these proteins would assist in pathogenicity studies, and help to identify possible and novel targets for antibacterial drugs. Amino acid hydropathy is a property that can affect behavior patterns in effector proteins. The HydroCalc Proteome tool analyzes total hydropathy, average hydropathy, C-terminal hydropathy, C-terminal load, and basic polar amino acids at the C-terminus. These five properties could contribute to the identification of proteins with an effector potential. HydroCalc Proteome is a web tool that provides a simple interface for the analysis of hydropathy properties in proteins. This tool permits the analysis of a single protein or even the complete proteome, which cannot be achieved by using other hydropathy tools. The tool displays the result of five properties related to effector proteins in a single table. The HydroCalc Proteome (www.gmb.bio.br/hydrocalc) is a powerful tool for protein analysis, and can contribute to the study of effector proteins. PMID:27525880

  15. Network analysis identifies protein clusters of functional importance in juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Our objective was to utilise network analysis to identify protein clusters of greatest potential functional relevance in the pathogenesis of oligoarticular and rheumatoid factor negative (RF-ve) polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Methods JIA genetic association data were used to build an interactome network model in BioGRID 3.2.99. The top 10% of this protein:protein JIA Interactome was used to generate a minimal essential network (MEN). Reactome FI Cytoscape 2.83 Plugin and the Disease Association Protein-Protein Link Evaluator (Dapple) algorithm were used to assess the functionality of the biological pathways within the MEN and to statistically rank the proteins. JIA gene expression data were integrated with the MEN and clusters of functionally important proteins derived using MCODE. Results A JIA interactome of 2,479 proteins was built from 348 JIA associated genes. The MEN, representing the most functionally related components of the network, comprised of seven clusters, with distinct functional characteristics. Four gene expression datasets from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), neutrophils and synovial fluid monocytes, were mapped onto the MEN and a list of genes enriched for functional significance identified. This analysis revealed the genes of greatest potential functional importance to be PTPN2 and STAT1 for oligoarticular JIA and KSR1 for RF-ve polyarticular JIA. Clusters of 23 and 14 related proteins were derived for oligoarticular and RF-ve polyarticular JIA respectively. Conclusions This first report of the application of network biology to JIA, integrating genetic association findings and gene expression data, has prioritised protein clusters for functional validation and identified new pathways for targeted pharmacological intervention. PMID:24886659

  16. Influence of milling on the adsorption ability of eggshell waste.

    PubMed

    Baláž, Matej; Ficeriová, Jana; Briančin, Jaroslav

    2016-03-01

    Eggshell waste was successfully used for the removal of heavy metal ions from model solutions. The effect of ball milling on the structure and adsorption ability of eggshell (ES) and its membrane (ESM) was investigated, with the conclusion that milling is benefitial only for the ES. The adsorption experiments showed that the ESM is a selective adsorbent, as the adsorption ability toward different ions decreased in the following order: Ag(I) > Cd(II) > Zn(II). The obtained Qm values for Ag(I) adsorption on the ESM and ES were 52.9 and 55.7 mg g(-1), respectively. The potential industrial application of ES was also demonstrated by successful removal of Ag(I) from the technological waste. PMID:26741552

  17. Hydrogen peroxide treatment of eggshell membrane to control porosity.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Shuchen; Chou, Hsuan-Hung; Hsieh, Chiung-Wen; Wu, Deng-Chyang; Kuo, Chao-Hung; Lin, Feng-Huei

    2013-12-01

    The eggshell membrane (ESM) is a naturally occurring biological polymer, which can be extracted from eggshells, and has been used for adsorption of dyes or heavy metals, as a semipermeable membrane to control particle transport, and as a natural biocompatible material for tissue replacement. In this study, we used hydrogen peroxide to control the pore size and fibre crossing density of the ESM. Structural and chemical properties were investigated using AFM, optical microscopy, contact angle, and FTIR. We show that the structure and permeability of the ESM can be controlled by timed exposure to H2O2 and we demonstrate this effect using red blood cells. This process provides a simple method for preparing biocompatible membranes, with controlled selectivity for biofiltration applications. PMID:23870936

  18. Newly identified RNAs of raspberry leaf blotch virus encoding a related group of proteins.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yuwen; McGavin, Wendy; Cock, Peter J A; Schnettler, Esther; Yan, Fei; Chen, Jianping; MacFarlane, Stuart

    2015-11-01

    Members of the genus Emaravirus, including Raspberry leaf blotch virus (RLBV), are enveloped plant viruses with segmented genomes of negative-strand RNA, although the complete genome complement for any of these viruses is not yet clear. Currently, wheat mosaic virus has the largest emaravirus genome comprising eight RNAs. Previously, we identified five genomic RNAs for RLBV; here, we identify a further three RNAs (RNA6-8). RNA6-8 encode proteins that have clear homologies to one another, but not to any other emaravirus proteins. The proteins self-interacted in yeast two-hybrid and bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) experiments, and the P8 protein interacted with the virus nucleocapsid protein (P3) using BiFC. Expression of two of the proteins (P6 and P7) using potato virus X led to an increase in virus titre and symptom severity, suggesting that these proteins may play a role in RLBV pathogenicity; however, using two different tests, RNA silencing suppression activity was not detected for any of the RLBV proteins encoded by RNA2-8. PMID:26358478

  19. In Silico Designing and Analysis of Inhibitors against Target Protein Identified through Host-Pathogen Protein Interactions in Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Samant, Monika; Chadha, Nidhi; Tiwari, Anjani K.; Hasija, Yasha

    2016-01-01

    Malaria, a life-threatening blood disease, has been a major concern in the field of healthcare. One of the severe forms of malaria is caused by the parasite Plasmodium falciparum which is initiated through protein interactions of pathogen with the host proteins. It is essential to analyse the protein-protein interactions among the host and pathogen for better understanding of the process and characterizing specific molecular mechanisms involved in pathogen persistence and survival. In this study, a complete protein-protein interaction network of human host and Plasmodium falciparum has been generated by integration of the experimental data and computationally predicting interactions using the interolog method. The interacting proteins were filtered according to their biological significance and functional roles. α-tubulin was identified as a potential protein target and inhibitors were designed against it by modification of amiprophos methyl. Docking and binding affinity analysis showed two modified inhibitors exhibiting better docking scores of −10.5 kcal/mol and −10.43 kcal/mol and an improved binding affinity of −83.80 kJ/mol and −98.16 kJ/mol with the target. These inhibitors can further be tested and validated in vivo for their properties as an antimalarial drug. PMID:27057354

  20. Genetically encoded protein photocrosslinker with a transferable mass spectrometry-identifiable label

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yi; Song, Haiping; He, Dan; Zhang, Shuai; Dai, Shizhong; Lin, Shixian; Meng, Rong; Wang, Chu; Chen, Peng R.

    2016-01-01

    Coupling photocrosslinking reagents with mass spectrometry has become a powerful tool for studying protein–protein interactions in living systems, but it still suffers from high rates of false-positive identifications as well as the lack of information on interaction interface due to the challenges in deciphering crosslinking peptides. Here we develop a genetically encoded photo-affinity unnatural amino acid that introduces a mass spectrometry-identifiable label (MS-label) to the captured prey proteins after photocrosslinking and prey–bait separation. This strategy, termed IMAPP (In-situ cleavage and MS-label transfer After Protein Photocrosslinking), enables direct identification of photo-captured substrate peptides that are difficult to uncover by conventional genetically encoded photocrosslinkers. Taking advantage of the MS-label, the IMAPP strategy significantly enhances the confidence for identifying protein–protein interactions and enables simultaneous mapping of the binding interface under living conditions. PMID:27460181

  1. Preparation and properties of calcium oxide from eggshells via calcination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tangboriboon, N.; Kunanuruksapong, R.; Sirivat, A.

    2012-12-01

    Duck eggs are one of the most versatile cooking ingredients in which residue eggshells are discarded. Raw duck eggshells were calcined at temperatures between 300 to 900 °C, for 1, 3, and 5 h. Both the raw and calcined duck eggshells were characterized by FTIR, STA, XRD, XRF, TEM, BET, a particle size analyzer, and an impedance analyzer. The proper calcination conditions are: 900 °C and 1 h, yielding calcium oxide with a purity of 99.06 % w/w. The calcium carbonate of the rhombohedral form (CaCO3) transforms completely into the calcium oxide or lime of the face centered cubic form (CaO) at 900 °C, as shown by XRD diffraction patterns. The transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images of the calcium oxide reveal a moderately good dispersion of nearly uniform particles. The calcium oxide has a white color, a spherical shape, high porosity, and narrow particles size distribution. The percentage of ceramic yield of the calcium oxide is 53.53, as measured by STA (TG-DTA-DTG). The calcium oxide has a N2 adsorption-desorption isotherm indicating the meso-porosity range. The dielectric constant and the electrical conductivity of the calcined calcium oxide are 35 and 1:0×10-6(Ω·m)-1, respectively, at the frequency of 500 Hz.

  2. SCMMTP: identifying and characterizing membrane transport proteins using propensity scores of dipeptides

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Identifying putative membrane transport proteins (MTPs) and understanding the transport mechanisms involved remain important challenges for the advancement of structural and functional genomics. However, the transporter characters are mainly acquired from MTP crystal structures which are hard to crystalize. Therefore, it is desirable to develop bioinformatics tools for the effective large-scale analysis of available sequences to identify novel transporters and characterize such transporters. Results This work proposes a novel method (SCMMTP) based on the scoring card method (SCM) using dipeptide composition to identify and characterize MTPs from an existing dataset containing 900 MTPs and 660 non-MTPs which are separated into a training dataset consisting 1,380 proteins and an independent dataset consisting 180 proteins. The SCMMTP produced estimating propensity scores for amino acids and dipeptides as MTPs. The SCMMTP training and test accuracy levels respectively reached 83.81% and 76.11%. The test accuracy of support vector machine (SVM) using a complicated classification method with a low possibility for biological interpretation and position-specific substitution matrix (PSSM) as a protein feature is 80.56%, thus SCMMTP is comparable to SVM-PSSM. To identify MTPs, SCMMTP is applied to three datasets including: 1) human transmembrane proteins, 2) a photosynthetic protein dataset, and 3) a human protein database. MTPs showing α-helix rich structure is agreed with previous studies. The MTPs used residues with low hydration energy. It is hypothesized that, after filtering substrates, the hydrated water molecules need to be released from the pore regions. Conclusions SCMMTP yields estimating propensity scores for amino acids and dipeptides as MTPs, which can be used to identify novel MTPs and characterize transport mechanisms for use in further experiments. Availability http://iclab.life.nctu.edu.tw/iclab_webtools/SCMMTP/ PMID:26677931

  3. A Novel Proteomics Approach to Identify SUMOylated Proteins and Their Modification Sites in Human Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Galisson, Frederic; Mahrouche, Louiza; Courcelles, Mathieu; Bonneil, Eric; Meloche, Sylvain; Chelbi-Alix, Mounira K.; Thibault, Pierre

    2011-01-01

    The small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO) is a small group of proteins that are reversibly attached to protein substrates to modify their functions. The large scale identification of protein SUMOylation and their modification sites in mammalian cells represents a significant challenge because of the relatively small number of in vivo substrates and the dynamic nature of this modification. We report here a novel proteomics approach to selectively enrich and identify SUMO conjugates from human cells. We stably expressed different SUMO paralogs in HEK293 cells, each containing a His6 tag and a strategically located tryptic cleavage site at the C terminus to facilitate the recovery and identification of SUMOylated peptides by affinity enrichment and mass spectrometry. Tryptic peptides with short SUMO remnants offer significant advantages in large scale SUMOylome experiments including the generation of paralog-specific fragment ions following CID and ETD activation, and the identification of modified peptides using conventional database search engines such as Mascot. We identified 205 unique protein substrates together with 17 precise SUMOylation sites present in 12 SUMO protein conjugates including three new sites (Lys-380, Lys-400, and Lys-497) on the protein promyelocytic leukemia. Label-free quantitative proteomics analyses on purified nuclear extracts from untreated and arsenic trioxide-treated cells revealed that all identified SUMOylated sites of promyelocytic leukemia were differentially SUMOylated upon stimulation. PMID:21098080

  4. Use of a Probabilistic Motif Search to Identify Histidine Phosphotransfer Domain-Containing Proteins.

    PubMed

    Surujon, Defne; Ratner, David I

    2016-01-01

    The wealth of newly obtained proteomic information affords researchers the possibility of searching for proteins of a given structure or function. Here we describe a general method for the detection of a protein domain of interest in any species for which a complete proteome exists. In particular, we apply this approach to identify histidine phosphotransfer (HPt) domain-containing proteins across a range of eukaryotic species. From the sequences of known HPt domains, we created an amino acid occurrence matrix which we then used to define a conserved, probabilistic motif. Examination of various organisms either known to contain (plant and fungal species) or believed to lack (mammals) HPt domains established criteria by which new HPt candidates were identified and ranked. Search results using a probabilistic motif matrix compare favorably with data to be found in several commonly used protein structure/function databases: our method identified all known HPt proteins in the Arabidopsis thaliana proteome, confirmed the absence of such motifs in mice and humans, and suggests new candidate HPts in several organisms. Moreover, probabilistic motif searching can be applied more generally, in a manner both readily customized and computationally compact, to other protein domains; this utility is demonstrated by our identification of histones in a range of eukaryotic organisms. PMID:26751210

  5. Linking patient outcome to high throughput protein expression data identifies novel regulators of colorectal adenocarcinoma aggressiveness

    PubMed Central

    French, Christi L.; Ye, Fei; Revetta, Frank; Zhang, Bing; Coffey, Robert J.; Washington, M. Kay; Deane, Natasha G.; Beauchamp, R. Daniel; Weaver, Alissa M.

    2015-01-01

    A key question in cancer systems biology is how to use molecular data to predict the biological behavior of tumors from individual patients. While genomics data have been heavily used, protein signaling data are more directly connected to biological phenotype and might predict cancer phenotypes such as invasion, metastasis, and patient survival. In this study, we mined publicly available data for colorectal adenocarcinoma from the Cancer Genome Atlas and identified protein expression and signaling changes that are statistically associated with patient outcome. Our analysis identified a number of known and potentially new regulators of colorectal cancer. High levels of insulin growth factor binding protein 2 (IGFBP2) were associated with both recurrence and death, and this was validated by immunohistochemical staining of a tissue microarray for a secondary patient dataset. Interestingly, GATA binding protein 3 (GATA3) was the protein most frequently associated with death in our analysis, and GATA3 expression was significantly decreased in tumor samples from stage I-II deceased patients. Experimental studies using engineered colon cancer cell lines show that exogenous expression of GATA3 decreases three-dimensional colony growth and invasiveness of colon cancer cells but does not affect two-dimensional proliferation. These findings suggest that protein data are useful for biomarker discovery and identify GATA3 as a regulator of colorectal cancer  aggressiveness. PMID:26097693

  6. Use of a Probabilistic Motif Search to Identify Histidine Phosphotransfer Domain-Containing Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Surujon, Defne; Ratner, David I.

    2016-01-01

    The wealth of newly obtained proteomic information affords researchers the possibility of searching for proteins of a given structure or function. Here we describe a general method for the detection of a protein domain of interest in any species for which a complete proteome exists. In particular, we apply this approach to identify histidine phosphotransfer (HPt) domain-containing proteins across a range of eukaryotic species. From the sequences of known HPt domains, we created an amino acid occurrence matrix which we then used to define a conserved, probabilistic motif. Examination of various organisms either known to contain (plant and fungal species) or believed to lack (mammals) HPt domains established criteria by which new HPt candidates were identified and ranked. Search results using a probabilistic motif matrix compare favorably with data to be found in several commonly used protein structure/function databases: our method identified all known HPt proteins in the Arabidopsis thaliana proteome, confirmed the absence of such motifs in mice and humans, and suggests new candidate HPts in several organisms. Moreover, probabilistic motif searching can be applied more generally, in a manner both readily customized and computationally compact, to other protein domains; this utility is demonstrated by our identification of histones in a range of eukaryotic organisms. PMID:26751210

  7. Microfluidic screening and whole-genome sequencing identifies mutations associated with improved protein secretion by yeast

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Mingtao; Bai, Yunpeng; Sjostrom, Staffan L.; Hallström, Björn M.; Liu, Zihe; Petranovic, Dina; Uhlén, Mathias; Joensson, Haakan N.; Andersson-Svahn, Helene; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    There is an increasing demand for biotech-based production of recombinant proteins for use as pharmaceuticals in the food and feed industry and in industrial applications. Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is among preferred cell factories for recombinant protein production, and there is increasing interest in improving its protein secretion capacity. Due to the complexity of the secretory machinery in eukaryotic cells, it is difficult to apply rational engineering for construction of improved strains. Here we used high-throughput microfluidics for the screening of yeast libraries, generated by UV mutagenesis. Several screening and sorting rounds resulted in the selection of eight yeast clones with significantly improved secretion of recombinant α-amylase. Efficient secretion was genetically stable in the selected clones. We performed whole-genome sequencing of the eight clones and identified 330 mutations in total. Gene ontology analysis of mutated genes revealed many biological processes, including some that have not been identified before in the context of protein secretion. Mutated genes identified in this study can be potentially used for reverse metabolic engineering, with the objective to construct efficient cell factories for protein secretion. The combined use of microfluidics screening and whole-genome sequencing to map the mutations associated with the improved phenotype can easily be adapted for other products and cell types to identify novel engineering targets, and this approach could broadly facilitate design of novel cell factories. PMID:26261321

  8. Preparation of gold nanoparticles on eggshell membrane and their biosensing application.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Baozhan; Qian, Lei; Yuan, Hongyan; Xiao, Dan; Yang, Xiupei; Paau, Man Chin; Choi, Martin M F

    2010-06-30

    A facile green biosynthesis method has been successfully developed to prepare gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) of various core sizes (25+/-7 nm) using a natural biomaterial, eggshell membrane (ESM) at ambient conditions. In situ synthesis of AuNPs-immobilized ESM is conducted in a simple manner by immersing ESM in a pH 6.0 aqueous solution of HAuCl(4) without adding any reductant. The formation of AuNPs on ESM protein fibers is attributed to the reduction of Au(III) ions to Au(0) by the aldehyde moieties of the natural ESM fibers. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and X-ray powder diffraction unambiguously identify the presence of AuNPs on ESM. The effect of pH on the in situ synthesis of AuNPs on ESM has been investigated in detail. The pH of the gold precursor (HAuCl(4)) solution can influence the formation rate, dispersion and size of AuNPs on ESM. At pH < or =3.0 and > or =7.0, no AuNPs are observed on ESM while small AuNPs are homogeneously dispersed on ESM at pH 4.0-6.0. The optimal pH for AuNPs formation on ESM is 6.0. AuNPs/ESMs are used to immobilize glucose oxidase (GO(x)) for glucose biosensing. AuNPs on ESM can increase the enzyme activity of GO(x). The linear response range of the glucose biosensor is 20 microM to 0.80 mM glucose with a detection limit of 17 microM (S/N=3). The biosensor has been successfully applied to determine the glucose content in commercial glucose injections. Our work provides a very simple, non-toxic, convenient, and green route to synthesize AuNPs on ESM which is potentially useful in the biosensing field. PMID:20685454

  9. Laser capture microdissection to identify septum-associated proteins in Aspergillus nidulans.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Fischer, Reinhard; Teichert, Ines; Kück, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    To spatially resolve genetic differences at the cellular level, the laser-capture microdissection technique was developed. With this method cells can be cut from tissues with a laser beam and analyzed for DNA, RNA or protein composition. Here we adapted the technique to isolate septal microtubule-organizing center (MTOC)-associated proteins in Aspergillus nidulans About 3000 septa were collected and subjected to peptide fingerprinting by mass-spectrometric analysis. We identified the microtubule polymerase AlpA and found it interacts with ApsB specifically at sMTOCs, suggesting that AlpA might be involved in the assembly or the functioning of this protein complex. PMID:26951366

  10. Proteomics Approaches to Identify Mono(ADP-ribosyl)ated and Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ated proteins

    PubMed Central

    Vivelo, Christina A.; Leung, Anthony K. L.

    2015-01-01

    ADP-ribosylation refers to the addition of one or more ADP-ribose units onto protein substrates and this protein modification has been implicated in various cellular processes including DNA damage repair, RNA metabolism, transcription and cell cycle regulation. This review focuses on a compilation of large-scale proteomics studies that identify ADP-ribosylated proteins and their associated proteins by mass spectrometry using a variety of enrichment strategies. Some methods, such as the use of a poly(ADP-ribose)-specific antibody and boronate affinity chromatography and NAD+ analogues, have been employed for decades while others, such as the use of protein microarrays and recombinant proteins that bind ADP-ribose moieties (such as macrodomains), have only recently been developed. The advantages and disadvantages of each method and whether these methods are specific for identifying mono(ADP-ribosyl)ated and poly(ADP-ribosyl)ated proteins will be discussed. Lastly, since poly(ADP-ribose) is heterogeneous in length, it has been difficult to attain a mass signature associated with the modification sites. Several strategies on how to reduce polymer chain length heterogeneity for site identification will be reviewed. PMID:25263235

  11. Proteomics approaches to identify mono-(ADP-ribosyl)ated and poly(ADP-ribosyl)ated proteins.

    PubMed

    Vivelo, Christina A; Leung, Anthony K L

    2015-01-01

    ADP-ribosylation refers to the addition of one or more ADP-ribose units onto protein substrates and this protein modification has been implicated in various cellular processes including DNA damage repair, RNA metabolism, transcription, and cell cycle regulation. This review focuses on a compilation of large-scale proteomics studies that identify ADP-ribosylated proteins and their associated proteins by MS using a variety of enrichment strategies. Some methods, such as the use of a poly(ADP-ribose)-specific antibody and boronate affinity chromatography and NAD(+) analogues, have been employed for decades while others, such as the use of protein microarrays and recombinant proteins that bind ADP-ribose moieties (such as macrodomains), have only recently been developed. The advantages and disadvantages of each method and whether these methods are specific for identifying mono(ADP-ribosyl)ated and poly(ADP-ribosyl)ated proteins will be discussed. Lastly, since poly(ADP-ribose) is heterogeneous in length, it has been difficult to attain a mass signature associated with the modification sites. Several strategies on how to reduce polymer chain length heterogeneity for site identification will be reviewed. PMID:25263235

  12. Several Novel Nuclear Envelope Transmembrane Proteins Identified in Skeletal Muscle Have Cytoskeletal Associations*

    PubMed Central

    Wilkie, Gavin S.; Korfali, Nadia; Swanson, Selene K.; Malik, Poonam; Srsen, Vlastimil; Batrakou, Dzmitry G.; de las Heras, Jose; Zuleger, Nikolaj; Kerr, Alastair R. W.; Florens, Laurence; Schirmer, Eric C.

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear envelopes from liver and a neuroblastoma cell line have previously been analyzed by proteomics; however, most diseases associated with the nuclear envelope affect muscle. To determine whether muscle has unique nuclear envelope proteins, rat skeletal muscle nuclear envelopes were prepared and analyzed by multidimensional protein identification technology. Many novel muscle-specific proteins were identified that did not appear in previous nuclear envelope data sets. Nuclear envelope residence was confirmed for 11 of these by expression of fusion proteins and by antibody staining of muscle tissue cryosections. Moreover, transcript levels for several of the newly identified nuclear envelope transmembrane proteins increased during muscle differentiation using mouse and human in vitro model systems. Some of these proteins tracked with microtubules at the nuclear surface in interphase cells and accumulated at the base of the microtubule spindle in mitotic cells, suggesting they may associate with complexes that connect the nucleus to the cytoskeleton. The finding of tissue-specific proteins in the skeletal muscle nuclear envelope proteome argues the importance of analyzing nuclear envelopes from all tissues linked to disease and suggests that general investigation of tissue differences in organellar proteomes might yield critical insights. PMID:20876400

  13. Several novel nuclear envelope transmembrane proteins identified in skeletal muscle have cytoskeletal associations.

    PubMed

    Wilkie, Gavin S; Korfali, Nadia; Swanson, Selene K; Malik, Poonam; Srsen, Vlastimil; Batrakou, Dzmitry G; de las Heras, Jose; Zuleger, Nikolaj; Kerr, Alastair R W; Florens, Laurence; Schirmer, Eric C

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear envelopes from liver and a neuroblastoma cell line have previously been analyzed by proteomics; however, most diseases associated with the nuclear envelope affect muscle. To determine whether muscle has unique nuclear envelope proteins, rat skeletal muscle nuclear envelopes were prepared and analyzed by multidimensional protein identification technology. Many novel muscle-specific proteins were identified that did not appear in previous nuclear envelope data sets. Nuclear envelope residence was confirmed for 11 of these by expression of fusion proteins and by antibody staining of muscle tissue cryosections. Moreover, transcript levels for several of the newly identified nuclear envelope transmembrane proteins increased during muscle differentiation using mouse and human in vitro model systems. Some of these proteins tracked with microtubules at the nuclear surface in interphase cells and accumulated at the base of the microtubule spindle in mitotic cells, suggesting they may associate with complexes that connect the nucleus to the cytoskeleton. The finding of tissue-specific proteins in the skeletal muscle nuclear envelope proteome argues the importance of analyzing nuclear envelopes from all tissues linked to disease and suggests that general investigation of tissue differences in organellar proteomes might yield critical insights. PMID:20876400

  14. Egg-in-cube: design and fabrication of a novel artificial eggshell with functionalized surface.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wenjing; Arai, Fumihito; Kawahara, Tomohiro

    2015-01-01

    An eggshell is a porous microstructure that regulates the passage of gases to allow respiration. The chick embryo and its circulatory system enclosed by the eggshell has become an important model for biomedical research such as the control of angiogenesis, cancer therapy, and drug delivery test, because the use of embryo is ethically acceptable and it is inexpensive and small. However, chick embryo and extra-embryonic blood vessels cannot be accessed freely and has poor observability because the eggshell is tough and cannot be seen through, which limits its application. In this study, a novel artificial eggshell with functionalized surface is proposed, which allows the total amount of oxygen to pass into the egg for the chick embryo culturing and has high observability and accessibility for embryo manipulation. First, a 40-mm enclosed cubic-shaped eggshell consisting of a membrane structure and a rigid frame structure is designed, and then the threshold of the membrane thickness suitable for the embryo survival is figured out according to the oxygen-permeability of the membrane structure. The designed artificial eggshell was actually fabricated by using polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and polycarbonate (PC) in the current study. Using the fabricated eggshell, chick embryo and extra-embryonic blood vessels can be observed from multiple directions. To test the effectiveness of the design, the cubic eggshells were used to culture chick embryos and survivability was confirmed when PDMS membranes with adequate oxygen permeability were used. Since the surface of the eggshell is transparent, chick embryo tissue development could be observed during the culture period. Additionally, the chick embryo tissues could be accessed and manipulated from outside the cubic eggshell, by using mechanical tools without breakage of the eggshell. The proposed "Egg-in-Cube" with functionalized surface has great potential to serve as a promising platform for biomedical research. PMID:25768929

  15. Egg-in-Cube: Design and Fabrication of a Novel Artificial Eggshell with Functionalized Surface

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wenjing; Arai, Fumihito; Kawahara, Tomohiro

    2015-01-01

    An eggshell is a porous microstructure that regulates the passage of gases to allow respiration. The chick embryo and its circulatory system enclosed by the eggshell has become an important model for biomedical research such as the control of angiogenesis, cancer therapy, and drug delivery test, because the use of embryo is ethically acceptable and it is inexpensive and small. However, chick embryo and extra-embryonic blood vessels cannot be accessed freely and has poor observability because the eggshell is tough and cannot be seen through, which limits its application. In this study, a novel artificial eggshell with functionalized surface is proposed, which allows the total amount of oxygen to pass into the egg for the chick embryo culturing and has high observability and accessibility for embryo manipulation. First, a 40-mm enclosed cubic-shaped eggshell consisting of a membrane structure and a rigid frame structure is designed, and then the threshold of the membrane thickness suitable for the embryo survival is figured out according to the oxygen-permeability of the membrane structure. The designed artificial eggshell was actually fabricated by using polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and polycarbonate (PC) in the current study. Using the fabricated eggshell, chick embryo and extra-embryonic blood vessels can be observed from multiple directions. To test the effectiveness of the design, the cubic eggshells were used to culture chick embryos and survivability was confirmed when PDMS membranes with adequate oxygen permeability were used. Since the surface of the eggshell is transparent, chick embryo tissue development could be observed during the culture period. Additionally, the chick embryo tissues could be accessed and manipulated from outside the cubic eggshell, by using mechanical tools without breakage of the eggshell. The proposed “Egg-in-Cube” with functionalized surface has great potential to serve as a promising platform for biomedical research. PMID

  16. Nutritional Supplement of Hatchery Eggshell Membrane Improves Poultry Performance and Provides Resistance against Endotoxin Stress

    PubMed Central

    Makkar, S. K.; Rath, N. C.; Packialakshmi, B.; Zhou, Z. Y.; Huff, G. R.; Donoghue, A. M.

    2016-01-01

    Eggshells are significant part of hatchery waste which consist of calcium carbonate crust, membranes, and proteins and peptides of embryonic origins along with other entrapped contaminants including microbes. We hypothesized that using this product as a nutritional additive in poultry diet may confer better immunity to the chickens in the paradigm of mammalian milk that enhances immunity. Therefore, we investigated the effect of hatchery eggshell membranes (HESM) as a short term feed supplement on growth performance and immunity of chickens under bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenged condition. Three studies were conducted to find the effect of HESM supplement on post hatch chickens. In the first study, the chickens were fed either a control diet or diets containing 0.5% whey protein or HESM as supplement and evaluated at 5 weeks of age using growth, hematology, clinical chemistry, plasma immunoglobulins, and corticosterone as variables. The second and third studies were done to compare the effects of LPS on control and HESM fed birds at 5 weeks of age following at 4 and 24 h of treatment where the HESM was also sterilized with ethanol to deplete bacterial factors. HESM supplement caused weight gain in 2 experiments and decreased blood corticosterone concentrations. While LPS caused a significant loss in body weight at 24 h following its administration, the HESM supplemented birds showed significantly less body weight loss compared with the control fed birds. The WBC, heterophil/lymphocyte ratio, and the levels of IgG were low in chickens fed diets with HESM supplement compared with control diet group. LPS challenge increased the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokine gene IL-6 but the HESM fed birds showed its effect curtailed, also, which also, favored the up-regulation of anti-inflammatory genes compared with control diet fed chickens. Post hatch supplementation of HESM appears to improve performance, modulate immunity, and increase resistance of

  17. Nutritional Supplement of Hatchery Eggshell Membrane Improves Poultry Performance and Provides Resistance against Endotoxin Stress.

    PubMed

    Makkar, S K; Rath, N C; Packialakshmi, B; Zhou, Z Y; Huff, G R; Donoghue, A M

    2016-01-01

    Eggshells are significant part of hatchery waste which consist of calcium carbonate crust, membranes, and proteins and peptides of embryonic origins along with other entrapped contaminants including microbes. We hypothesized that using this product as a nutritional additive in poultry diet may confer better immunity to the chickens in the paradigm of mammalian milk that enhances immunity. Therefore, we investigated the effect of hatchery eggshell membranes (HESM) as a short term feed supplement on growth performance and immunity of chickens under bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenged condition. Three studies were conducted to find the effect of HESM supplement on post hatch chickens. In the first study, the chickens were fed either a control diet or diets containing 0.5% whey protein or HESM as supplement and evaluated at 5 weeks of age using growth, hematology, clinical chemistry, plasma immunoglobulins, and corticosterone as variables. The second and third studies were done to compare the effects of LPS on control and HESM fed birds at 5 weeks of age following at 4 and 24 h of treatment where the HESM was also sterilized with ethanol to deplete bacterial factors. HESM supplement caused weight gain in 2 experiments and decreased blood corticosterone concentrations. While LPS caused a significant loss in body weight at 24 h following its administration, the HESM supplemented birds showed significantly less body weight loss compared with the control fed birds. The WBC, heterophil/lymphocyte ratio, and the levels of IgG were low in chickens fed diets with HESM supplement compared with control diet group. LPS challenge increased the expression of pro-inflammatory cytokine gene IL-6 but the HESM fed birds showed its effect curtailed, also, which also, favored the up-regulation of anti-inflammatory genes compared with control diet fed chickens. Post hatch supplementation of HESM appears to improve performance, modulate immunity, and increase resistance of

  18. Comparative interactomics analysis of different ALS-associated proteins identifies converging molecular pathways.

    PubMed

    Blokhuis, Anna M; Koppers, Max; Groen, Ewout J N; van den Heuvel, Dianne M A; Dini Modigliani, Stefano; Anink, Jasper J; Fumoto, Katsumi; van Diggelen, Femke; Snelting, Anne; Sodaar, Peter; Verheijen, Bert M; Demmers, Jeroen A A; Veldink, Jan H; Aronica, Eleonora; Bozzoni, Irene; den Hertog, Jeroen; van den Berg, Leonard H; Pasterkamp, R Jeroen

    2016-08-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a devastating neurological disease with no effective treatment available. An increasing number of genetic causes of ALS are being identified, but how these genetic defects lead to motor neuron degeneration and to which extent they affect common cellular pathways remains incompletely understood. To address these questions, we performed an interactomic analysis to identify binding partners of wild-type (WT) and ALS-associated mutant versions of ATXN2, C9orf72, FUS, OPTN, TDP-43 and UBQLN2 in neuronal cells. This analysis identified several known but also many novel binding partners of these proteins. Interactomes of WT and mutant ALS proteins were very similar except for OPTN and UBQLN2, in which mutations caused loss or gain of protein interactions. Several of the identified interactomes showed a high degree of overlap: shared binding partners of ATXN2, FUS and TDP-43 had roles in RNA metabolism; OPTN- and UBQLN2-interacting proteins were related to protein degradation and protein transport, and C9orf72 interactors function in mitochondria. To confirm that this overlap is important for ALS pathogenesis, we studied fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP), one of the common interactors of ATXN2, FUS and TDP-43, in more detail in in vitro and in vivo model systems for FUS ALS. FMRP localized to mutant FUS-containing aggregates in spinal motor neurons and bound endogenous FUS in a direct and RNA-sensitive manner. Furthermore, defects in synaptic FMRP mRNA target expression, neuromuscular junction integrity, and motor behavior caused by mutant FUS in zebrafish embryos, could be rescued by exogenous FMRP expression. Together, these results show that interactomics analysis can provide crucial insight into ALS disease mechanisms and they link FMRP to motor neuron dysfunction caused by FUS mutations. PMID:27164932

  19. vProtein: Identifying Optimal Amino Acid Complements from Plant-Based Foods

    PubMed Central

    Woolf, Peter J.; Fu, Leeann L.; Basu, Avik

    2011-01-01

    Background Indispensible amino acids (IAAs) are used by the body in different proportions. Most animal-based foods provide these IAAs in roughly the needed proportions, but many plant-based foods provide different proportions of IAAs. To explore how these plant-based foods can be better used in human nutrition, we have created the computational tool vProtein to identify optimal food complements to satisfy human protein needs. Methods vProtein uses 1251 plant-based foods listed in the United States Department of Agriculture standard release 22 database to determine the quantity of each food or pair of foods required to satisfy human IAA needs as determined by the 2005 daily recommended intake. The quantity of food in a pair is found using a linear programming approach that minimizes total calories, total excess IAAs, or the total weight of the combination. Results For single foods, vProtein identifies foods with particularly balanced IAA patterns such as wheat germ, quinoa, and cauliflower. vProtein also identifies foods with particularly unbalanced IAA patterns such as macadamia nuts, degermed corn products, and wakame seaweed. Although less useful alone, some unbalanced foods provide unusually good complements, such as Brazil nuts to legumes. Interestingly, vProtein finds no statistically significant bias toward grain/legume pairings for protein complementation. These analyses suggest that pairings of plant-based foods should be based on the individual foods themselves instead of based on broader food group-food group pairings. Overall, the most efficient pairings include sweet corn/tomatoes, apple/coconut, and sweet corn/cherry. The top pairings also highlight the utility of less common protein sources such as the seaweeds laver and spirulina, pumpkin leaves, and lambsquarters. From a public health perspective, many of the food pairings represent novel, low cost food sources to combat malnutrition. Full analysis results are available online at http

  20. Mass Spectrometry-Based Methods for Identifying Oxidized Proteins in Disease: Advances and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Verrastro, Ivan; Pasha, Sabah; Tveen Jensen, Karina; Pitt, Andrew R.; Spickett, Corinne M.

    2015-01-01

    Many inflammatory diseases have an oxidative aetiology, which leads to oxidative damage to biomolecules, including proteins. It is now increasingly recognized that oxidative post-translational modifications (oxPTMs) of proteins affect cell signalling and behaviour, and can contribute to pathology. Moreover, oxidized proteins have potential as biomarkers for inflammatory diseases. Although many assays for generic protein oxidation and breakdown products of protein oxidation are available, only advanced tandem mass spectrometry approaches have the power to localize specific oxPTMs in identified proteins. While much work has been carried out using untargeted or discovery mass spectrometry approaches, identification of oxPTMs in disease has benefitted from the development of sophisticated targeted or semi-targeted scanning routines, combined with chemical labeling and enrichment approaches. Nevertheless, many potential pitfalls exist which can result in incorrect identifications. This review explains the limitations, advantages and challenges of all of these approaches to detecting oxidatively modified proteins, and provides an update on recent literature in which they have been used to detect and quantify protein oxidation in disease. PMID:25874603

  1. Crystallization Optimum Solubility Screening: using crystallization results to identify the optimal buffer for protein crystal formation

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Bernard; Stevens, Raymond C.; Page, Rebecca

    2005-12-01

    It is shown how protein crystallization results can be used to identify buffers that improve protein solubility and, in turn, crystallization success. An optimal solubility screen is described that uses the results of crystallization trials to identify buffers that improve protein solubility and, in turn, crystallization success. This screen is useful not only for standard crystallization experiments, but also can easily be implemented into any high-throughput structure-determination pipeline. As a proof of principle, the predicted novel-fold protein AF2059 from Archaeoglobus fulgidus, which was known to precipitate in most buffers and particularly during concentration experiments, was selected. Using the crystallization results of 192 independent crystallization trials, it was possible to identify a buffer containing 100 mM CHES pH 9.25 that significantly improves its solubility. After transferring AF2059 into this ‘optimum-solubility’ buffer, the protein was rescreened for crystal formation against these same 192 conditions. Instead of extensive precipitation, as observed initially, it was found that 24 separate conditions produced crystals and the exchange of AF2059 into CHES buffer significantly improved crystallization success. Fine-screen optimization of these conditions led to the production of a crystal suitable for high-resolution (2.2 Å) structure determination.

  2. Using distant supervised learning to identify protein subcellular localizations from full-text scientific articles.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wu; Blake, Catherine

    2015-10-01

    Databases of curated biomedical knowledge, such as the protein-locations reflected in the UniProtKB database, provide an accurate and useful resource to researchers and decision makers. Our goal is to augment the manual efforts currently used to curate knowledge bases with automated approaches that leverage the increased availability of full-text scientific articles. This paper describes experiments that use distant supervised learning to identify protein subcellular localizations, which are important to understand protein function and to identify candidate drug targets. Experiments consider Swiss-Prot, the manually annotated subset of the UniProtKB protein knowledge base, and 43,000 full-text articles from the Journal of Biological Chemistry that contain just under 11.5 million sentences. The system achieves 0.81 precision and 0.49 recall at sentence level and an accuracy of 57% on held-out instances in a test set. Moreover, the approach identifies 8210 instances that are not in the UniProtKB knowledge base. Manual inspection of the 50 most likely relations showed that 41 (82%) were valid. These results have immediate benefit to researchers interested in protein function, and suggest that distant supervision should be explored to complement other manual data curation efforts. PMID:26220461

  3. Identifying Similar Patterns of Structural Flexibility in Proteins by Disorder Prediction and Dynamic Programming

    PubMed Central

    Petrovich, Aidan; Borne, Adam; Uversky, Vladimir N.; Xue, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Computational methods are prevailing in identifying protein intrinsic disorder. The results from predictors are often given as per-residue disorder scores. The scores describe the disorder propensity of amino acids of a protein and can be further represented as a disorder curve. Many proteins share similar patterns in their disorder curves. The similar patterns are often associated with similar functions and evolutionary origins. Therefore, finding and characterizing specific patterns of disorder curves provides a unique and attractive perspective of studying the function of intrinsically disordered proteins. In this study, we developed a new computational tool named IDalign using dynamic programming. This tool is able to identify similar patterns among disorder curves, as well as to present the distribution of intrinsic disorder in query proteins. The disorder-based information generated by IDalign is significantly different from the information retrieved from classical sequence alignments. This tool can also be used to infer functions of disordered regions and disordered proteins. The web server of IDalign is available at (http://labs.cas.usf.edu/bioinfo/service.html). PMID:26086829

  4. N-Ace: using solvent accessibility and physicochemical properties to identify protein N-acetylation sites.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tzong-Yi; Hsu, Justin Bo-Kai; Lin, Feng-Mao; Chang, Wen-Chi; Hsu, Po-Chiang; Huang, Hsien-Da

    2010-11-30

    Protein acetylation, which is catalyzed by acetyltransferases, is a type of post-translational modification and crucial to numerous essential biological processes, including transcriptional regulation, apoptosis, and cytokine signaling. As the experimental identification of protein acetylation sites is time consuming and laboratory intensive, several computational approaches have been developed for identifying the candidates of experimental validation. In this work, solvent accessibility and the physicochemical properties of proteins are utilized to identify acetylated alanine, glycine, lysine, methionine, serine, and threonine. A two-stage support vector machine was applied to learn the computational models with combinations of amino acid sequences, and the accessible surface area and physicochemical properties of proteins. The predictive accuracy thus achieved is 5% to 14% higher than that of models trained using only amino acid sequences. Additionally, the substrate specificity of the acetylated site was investigated in detail with reference to the subcellular colocalization of acetyltransferases and acetylated proteins. The proposed method, N-Ace, is evaluated using independent test sets in various acetylated residues and predictive accuracies of 90% were achieved, indicating that the performance of N-Ace is comparable with that of other acetylation prediction methods. N-Ace not only provides a user-friendly input/output interface but also is a creative method for predicting protein acetylation sites. This novel analytical resource is now freely available at http://N-Ace.mbc.NCTU.edu.tw/. PMID:20839302

  5. Interactions between the Powdery Mildew Effector BEC1054 and Barley Proteins Identify Candidate Host Targets.

    PubMed

    Pennington, Helen G; Gheorghe, Dana M; Damerum, Annabelle; Pliego, Clara; Spanu, Pietro D; Cramer, Rainer; Bindschedler, Laurence V

    2016-03-01

    There are over 500 candidate secreted effector proteins (CSEPs) or Blumeria effector candidates (BECs) specific to the barley powdery mildew pathogen Blumeria graminis f.sp. hordei. The CSEP/BEC proteins are expressed and predicted to be secreted by biotrophic feeding structures called haustoria. Eight BECs are required for the formation of functional haustoria. These include the RNase-like effector BEC1054 (synonym CSEP0064). In order to identify host proteins targeted by BEC1054, recombinant BEC1054 was expressed in E. coli, solubilized, and used in pull-down assays from barley protein extracts. Many putative interactors were identified by LC-MS/MS after subtraction of unspecific binders in negative controls. Therefore, a directed yeast-2-hybrid assay, developed to measure the effectiveness of the interactions in yeast, was used to validate putative interactors. We conclude that BEC1054 may target several host proteins, including a glutathione-S-transferase, a malate dehydrogenase, and a pathogen-related-5 protein isoform, indicating a possible role for BEC1054 in compromising well-known key players of defense and response to pathogens. In addition, BEC1054 interacts with an elongation factor 1 gamma. This study already suggests that BEC1054 plays a central role in barley powdery mildew virulence by acting at several levels. PMID:26813582

  6. Towards identifying Brassica proteins involved in mediating resistance to Leptosphaeria maculans: a proteomics-based approach.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Nidhi; Hotte, Naomi; Rahman, Muhammad H; Mohammadi, Mohsen; Deyholos, Michael K; Kav, Nat N V

    2008-09-01

    To better understand the pathogen-stress response of Brassica species against the ubiquitous hemi-biotroph fungus Leptosphaeria maculans, we conducted a comparative proteomic analysis between blackleg-susceptible Brassica napus and blackleg-resistant Brassica carinata following pathogen inoculation. We examined temporal changes (6, 12, 24, 48 and 72 h) in protein profiles of both species subjected to pathogen-challenge using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. A total of 64 proteins were found to be significantly affected by the pathogen in the two species, out of which 51 protein spots were identified using tandem mass spectrometry. The proteins identified included antioxidant enzymes, photosynthetic and metabolic enzymes, and those involved in protein processing and signaling. Specifically, we observed that in the tolerant B. carinata, enzymes involved in the detoxification of free radicals increased in response to the pathogen whereas no such increase was observed in the susceptible B. napus. The expression of genes encoding four selected proteins was validated using quantitative real-time PCR and an additional one by Western blotting. Our findings are discussed with respect to tolerance or susceptibility of these species to the pathogen. PMID:18668695

  7. Multiple biomarker tissue arrays: A computational approach to identifying protein-protein interactions in the EGFR/ERK signalling pathway

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Many studies have demonstrated genetic and environmental factors that lead to renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and that occur during a protracted period of tumourigenesis. It appears suitable to identify and characterise potential molecular markers that appear during tumourigenesis and that might provide rapid and effective possibilities for the early detection of RCC. EGFR activation induces cell cycle progression, inhibition of apoptosis and angiogenesis, promotion of invasion/metastasis, and other tumour promoting activities. Over-expression of EGFR is thought to play an important role in tumour initiation and progression of RCC because up-regulation of EGFR has been associated with high grade cancers and a worse prognosis. Methods Characterisation of the protein profile interacting with EGFR was performed using the following: an immunohistochemical (IHC) study of EGFR, a comprehensive computational study of EGFR protein-protein interactions, an analysis correlating the expression levels of EGFR with other significant markers in the tumourigenicity of RCC, and finally, an analysis of the utility of EGFR for prognosis in a cohort of patients with renal cell carcinoma. Results The cases that showed a higher level of this protein fell within the clear cell histological subtype (p = 0.001). The EGFR significance statistic was found with respect to a worse prognosis. In vivo significant correlations were found with PDGFR-β, Flk-1, Hif1-α, proteins related to differentiation (such as DLL3 and DLL4 ligands), and certain metabolic proteins such as Glut5. In silico significant associations gave us a panel of 32 EGFR-interacting proteins (EIP) using the APID and STRING databases. Conclusions This work summarises the multifaceted role of EGFR in the pathology of RCC, and it identifies EIPs that could help to provide mechanistic explanations for the different behaviours observed in tumours. PMID:22937740

  8. Proteomic profiling of human plasma exosomes identifies PPAR{gamma} as an exosome-associated protein

    SciTech Connect

    Looze, Christopher; Yui, David; Leung, Lester; Ingham, Matthew; Kaler, Maryann; Yao, Xianglan; Wu, Wells W.; Shen Rongfong; Daniels, Mathew P.; Levine, Stewart J.

    2009-01-16

    Exosomes are nanovesicles that are released from cells as a mechanism of cell-free intercellular communication. Only a limited number of proteins have been identified from the plasma exosome proteome. Here, we developed a multi-step fractionation scheme incorporating gel exclusion chromatography, rate zonal centrifugation through continuous sucrose gradients, and high-speed centrifugation to purify exosomes from human plasma. Exosome-associated proteins were separated by SDS-PAGE and 66 proteins were identified by LC-MS/MS, which included both cellular and extracellular proteins. Furthermore, we identified and characterized peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma} (PPAR{gamma}), a nuclear receptor that regulates adipocyte differentiation and proliferation, as well as immune and inflammatory cell functions, as a novel component of plasma-derived exosomes. Given the important role of exosomes as intercellular messengers, the discovery of PPAR{gamma} as a component of human plasma exosomes identifies a potential new pathway for the paracrine transfer of nuclear receptors.

  9. Peptides identified in soybean protein increase plasma cholesterol in mice on hypercholesterolemic diets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The in vitro micellar cholesterol displacement assay has been used to identify peptides that may potentially reduce cholesterol in vivo. We tested two of these peptides, LPYPR and WGAPSI, derived from soybean protein (SP) that have been reported to displace cholesterol from micelles by feeding them...

  10. Distinct Host Tropism Protein Signatures to Identify Possible Zoonotic Influenza A Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Eng, Christine L. P.; Tong, Joo Chuan; Tan, Tin Wee

    2016-01-01

    Zoonotic influenza A viruses constantly pose a health threat to humans as novel strains occasionally emerge from the avian population to cause human infections. Many past epidemic as well as pandemic strains have originated from avian species. While most viruses are restricted to their primary hosts, zoonotic strains can sometimes arise from mutations or reassortment, leading them to acquire the capability to escape host species barrier and successfully infect a new host. Phylogenetic analyses and genetic markers are useful in tracing the origins of zoonotic infections, but there are still no effective means to identify high risk strains prior to an outbreak. Here we show that distinct host tropism protein signatures can be used to identify possible zoonotic strains in avian species which have the potential to cause human infections. We have discovered that influenza A viruses can now be classified into avian, human, or zoonotic strains based on their host tropism protein signatures. Analysis of all influenza A viruses with complete proteome using the host tropism prediction system, based on machine learning classifications of avian and human viral proteins has uncovered distinct signatures of zoonotic strains as mosaics of avian and human viral proteins. This is in contrast with typical avian or human strains where they show mostly avian or human viral proteins in their signatures respectively. Moreover, we have found that zoonotic strains from the same influenza outbreaks carry similar host tropism protein signatures characteristic of a common ancestry. Our results demonstrate that the distinct host tropism protein signature in zoonotic strains may prove useful in influenza surveillance to rapidly identify potential high risk strains circulating in avian species, which may grant us the foresight in anticipating an impending influenza outbreak. PMID:26915079

  11. An Ensemble Method with Hybrid Features to Identify Extracellular Matrix Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Runtao; Zhang, Chengjin; Gao, Rui; Zhang, Lina

    2015-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) is a dynamic composite of secreted proteins that play important roles in numerous biological processes such as tissue morphogenesis, differentiation and homeostasis. Furthermore, various diseases are caused by the dysfunction of ECM proteins. Therefore, identifying these important ECM proteins may assist in understanding related biological processes and drug development. In view of the serious imbalance in the training dataset, a Random Forest-based ensemble method with hybrid features is developed in this paper to identify ECM proteins. Hybrid features are employed by incorporating sequence composition, physicochemical properties, evolutionary and structural information. The Information Gain Ratio and Incremental Feature Selection (IGR-IFS) methods are adopted to select the optimal features. Finally, the resulting predictor termed IECMP (Identify ECM Proteins) achieves an balanced accuracy of 86.4% using the 10-fold cross-validation on the training dataset, which is much higher than results obtained by other methods (ECMPRED: 71.0%, ECMPP: 77.8%). Moreover, when tested on a common independent dataset, our method also achieves significantly improved performance over ECMPP and ECMPRED. These results indicate that IECMP is an effective method for ECM protein prediction, which has a more balanced prediction capability for positive and negative samples. It is anticipated that the proposed method will provide significant information to fully decipher the molecular mechanisms of ECM-related biological processes and discover candidate drug targets. For public access, we develop a user-friendly web server for ECM protein identification that is freely accessible at http://iecmp.weka.cc. PMID:25680094

  12. Distinct Host Tropism Protein Signatures to Identify Possible Zoonotic Influenza A Viruses.

    PubMed

    Eng, Christine L P; Tong, Joo Chuan; Tan, Tin Wee

    2016-01-01

    Zoonotic influenza A viruses constantly pose a health threat to humans as novel strains occasionally emerge from the avian population to cause human infections. Many past epidemic as well as pandemic strains have originated from avian species. While most viruses are restricted to their primary hosts, zoonotic strains can sometimes arise from mutations or reassortment, leading them to acquire the capability to escape host species barrier and successfully infect a new host. Phylogenetic analyses and genetic markers are useful in tracing the origins of zoonotic infections, but there are still no effective means to identify high risk strains prior to an outbreak. Here we show that distinct host tropism protein signatures can be used to identify possible zoonotic strains in avian species which have the potential to cause human infections. We have discovered that influenza A viruses can now be classified into avian, human, or zoonotic strains based on their host tropism protein signatures. Analysis of all influenza A viruses with complete proteome using the host tropism prediction system, based on machine learning classifications of avian and human viral proteins has uncovered distinct signatures of zoonotic strains as mosaics of avian and human viral proteins. This is in contrast with typical avian or human strains where they show mostly avian or human viral proteins in their signatures respectively. Moreover, we have found that zoonotic strains from the same influenza outbreaks carry similar host tropism protein signatures characteristic of a common ancestry. Our results demonstrate that the distinct host tropism protein signature in zoonotic strains may prove useful in influenza surveillance to rapidly identify potential high risk strains circulating in avian species, which may grant us the foresight in anticipating an impending influenza outbreak. PMID:26915079

  13. Proteomic analysis of exosomes from nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell identifies intercellular transfer of angiogenic proteins.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yuk-Kit; Zhang, Huoming; Liu, Pei; Tsao, Sai-Wah; Lung, Maria Li; Mak, Nai-Ki; Ngok-Shun Wong, Ricky; Ying-Kit Yue, Patrick

    2015-10-15

    Exosomes, a group of secreted extracellular nanovesicles containing genetic materials and signaling molecules, play a critical role in intercellular communication. During tumorigenesis, exosomes have been demonstrated to promote tumor angiogenesis and metastasis while their biological functions in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) are poorly understood. In this study, we focused on the role of NPC-derived exosomes on angiogenesis. Exosomes derived from the NPC C666-1 cells and immortalized nasopharyngeal epithelial cells (NP69 and NP460) were isolated using ultracentrifugation. The molecular profile and biophysical characteristics of exosomes were verified by Western blotting, sucrose density gradient and electron microscopy. We showed that the C666-1 exosomes (10 and 20 μg/ml) could significantly increase the tubulogenesis, migration and invasion of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in a dose-dependent manner. Subsequently, an iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomics was used to identify the differentially expressed proteins in C666-1 exosomes. Among the 640 identified proteins, 51 and 89 proteins were considered as up- and down-regulated (≥ 1.5-fold variations) in C666-1 exosomes compared to the normal counterparts, respectively. As expected, pro-angiogenic proteins including intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and CD44 variant isoform 5 (CD44v5) are among the up-regulated proteins, whereas angio-suppressive protein, thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) was down-regulated in C666-1 exosomes. Further confocal microscopic study and Western blotting clearly demonstrated that the alteration of ICAM-1 and TSP-1 expressions in recipient HUVECs are due to internalization of exosomes. Taken together, these data strongly indicated the critical roles of identified angiogenic proteins in the involvement of exosomes-induced angiogenesis, which could potentially be developed as therapeutic targets in future. PMID:25857718

  14. Trace-element interactions in Rook Corvus frugilegus eggshells along an urbanisation gradient.

    PubMed

    Orłowski, Grzegorz; Kasprzykowski, Zbigniew; Dobicki, Wojciech; Pokorny, Przemysław; Wuczyński, Andrzej; Polechoński, Ryszard; Mazgajski, Tomasz D

    2014-11-01

    Concentrations of seven trace elements [arsenic (As), chromium (Cr), nickel (Ni), lead (Pb), copper (Cu), zinc (Zn), and cadmium (Cd)] in the eggshells of Rooks Corvus frugilegus, a focal bird species of Eurasian agricultural environments, are increased above background levels and exceed levels of toxicological concern. The concentrations of Cr, Ni, Pb, Cu, and Zn are greater in eggshells from urban rookeries (large cities) compared with rural areas (small towns and villages) suggesting an urbanisation gradient effect among eggs laid by females. In the present study, the investigators assessed whether the pattern of relationships among the seven trace elements in eggshells change along an urbanisation/pollution gradient. Surprisingly, we found that eggshells with the greatest contaminant burden, i.e., from urban rookeries, showed far fewer significant relationships (n = 4) than eggshells from villages (n = 10), small towns (n = 6), or rural areas (n = 8). In most cases, the relationships were positive. As was an exception: Its concentration was negatively correlated with Ni and Cd levels in eggshells from small town rookeries (where As levels were the highest), whereas eggshells from villages (with a lower As level) showed positive relationships between As and Cd. Our findings suggest that at low to intermediate levels, interactions between the trace elements in Rook eggshells are of a synergistic character and appear to operate as parallel coaccumulation. A habitat-specific excess of some elements (primarily Cr, Ni, Cu, As) suggests their more competitively selective sequestration. PMID:24793193

  15. Sorption mechanism of Cd(II) from water solution onto chicken eggshell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores-Cano, Jose Valente; Leyva-Ramos, Roberto; Mendoza-Barron, Jovita; Guerrero-Coronado, Rosa María; Aragón-Piña, Antonio; Labrada-Delgado, Gladis Judith

    2013-07-01

    The mechanism and capacity of eggshell for sorbing Cd(II) from aqueous solution was examined in detail. The eggshell was characterized by several techniques. The eggshell was mainly composed of Calcite (CaCO3). The surface charge distribution was determined by acid-base titration and the point of zero charge (PZC) of the eggshell was found to be 11.4. The sorption equilibrium data were obtained in a batch adsorber, and the adsorption isotherm of Langmuir fitted the data quite well. The sorption capacity of eggshell increased while raising the pH from 4 to 6, this tendency was attributed to the electrostatic interaction between the Cd2+ in solution and the surface of the eggshell. Furthermore, the sorption capacity was augmented by increasing the temperature from 15 to 35 °C because the sorption was endothermic. The sorption of Cd(II) occurred mainly onto the calcareous layer of the eggshell, but slightly on the membrane layer. It was demonstrated that the sorption of Cd(II) was not reversible, and the main sorption mechanisms were precipitation and ion exchange. The precipitation of (Cd,Ca)CO3 on the surface of the eggshell was corroborated by SEM and XRD analysis.

  16. 9 CFR 147.13 - Procedure for bacteriological culturing of eggshells for colon bacilli organisms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... culturing of eggshells for colon bacilli organisms. 147.13 Section 147.13 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL... bacteriological culturing of eggshells for colon bacilli organisms. Proper precautions to avoid environmental... conclusion of the presence of colon bacilli organisms. (Approved by the Office of Management and Budget...

  17. 9 CFR 147.13 - Procedure for bacteriological culturing of eggshells for colon bacilli organisms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... culturing of eggshells for colon bacilli organisms. 147.13 Section 147.13 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL... bacteriological culturing of eggshells for colon bacilli organisms. Proper precautions to avoid environmental... conclusion of the presence of colon bacilli organisms. (Approved by the Office of Management and Budget...

  18. 9 CFR 147.13 - Procedure for bacteriological culturing of eggshells for colon bacilli organisms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... culturing of eggshells for colon bacilli organisms. 147.13 Section 147.13 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL... bacteriological culturing of eggshells for colon bacilli organisms. Proper precautions to avoid environmental... conclusion of the presence of colon bacilli organisms. (Approved by the Office of Management and Budget...

  19. 9 CFR 147.13 - Procedure for bacteriological culturing of eggshells for colon bacilli organisms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... culturing of eggshells for colon bacilli organisms. 147.13 Section 147.13 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL... bacteriological culturing of eggshells for colon bacilli organisms. Proper precautions to avoid environmental... conclusion of the presence of colon bacilli organisms. (Approved by the Office of Management and Budget...

  20. 9 CFR 147.13 - Procedure for bacteriological culturing of eggshells for colon bacilli organisms.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... culturing of eggshells for colon bacilli organisms. 147.13 Section 147.13 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL... bacteriological culturing of eggshells for colon bacilli organisms. Proper precautions to avoid environmental... conclusion of the presence of colon bacilli organisms. (Approved by the Office of Management and Budget...

  1. The use of Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteomic libraries to identify RNA-modifying proteins.

    PubMed

    Jackman, Jane E; Grayhack, Elizabeth J; Phizicky, Eric M

    2008-01-01

    Biochemical assay of proteomic libraries derived from the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome provides a powerful new tool for the assignment of activities to proteins. Particular advantages of this approach include the speed with which a protein can be identified and the generality for any biological activity for which an assay can be developed. We discuss the utility of this approach for the identification of RNA-modifying enzymes using a yeast proteomic library derived from a genomic set of strains expressing GST-ORF fusion proteins. This technique is also broadly applicable to other classes of RNA-protein interactions, including RNA binding and RNA degradation, and can be used with any of the proteomic libraries that are available. PMID:18982304

  2. A Machine Learning Approach To Identify Hydrogenosomal Proteins in Trichomonas vaginalis

    PubMed Central

    Burstein, David; Gould, Sven B.; Zimorski, Verena; Kloesges, Thorsten; Kiosse, Fuat; Major, Peter; Martin, William F.; Pupko, Tal

    2012-01-01

    The protozoan parasite Trichomonas vaginalis is the causative agent of trichomoniasis, the most widespread nonviral sexually transmitted disease in humans. It possesses hydrogenosomes—anaerobic mitochondria that generate H2, CO2, and acetate from pyruvate while converting ADP to ATP via substrate-level phosphorylation. T. vaginalis hydrogenosomes lack a genome and translation machinery; hence, they import all their proteins from the cytosol. To date, however, only 30 imported proteins have been shown to localize to the organelle. A total of 226 nuclear-encoded proteins inferred from the genome sequence harbor a characteristic short N-terminal presequence, reminiscent of mitochondrial targeting peptides, which is thought to mediate hydrogenosomal targeting. Recent studies suggest, however, that the presequences might be less important than previously thought. We sought to identify new hydrogenosomal proteins within the 59,672 annotated open reading frames (ORFs) of T. vaginalis, independent of the N-terminal targeting signal, using a machine learning approach. Our training set included 57 gene and protein features determined for all 30 known hydrogenosomal proteins and 576 nonhydrogenosomal proteins. Several classifiers were trained on this set to yield an import score for all proteins encoded by T. vaginalis ORFs, predicting the likelihood of hydrogenosomal localization. The machine learning results were tested through immunofluorescence assay and immunodetection in isolated cell fractions of 14 protein predictions using hemagglutinin constructs expressed under the homologous SCSα promoter in transiently transformed T. vaginalis cells. Localization of 6 of the 10 top predicted hydrogenosome-localized proteins was confirmed, and two of these were found to lack an obvious N-terminal targeting signal. PMID:22140228

  3. A yeast-based genetic screening to identify human proteins that increase homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Collavoli, Anita; Comelli, Laura; Rainaldi, Giuseppe; Galli, Alvaro

    2008-05-01

    To identify new human proteins implicated in homologous recombination (HR), we set up 'a papillae assay' to screen a human cDNA library using the RS112 strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae containing an intrachromosomal recombination substrate. We isolated 23 cDNAs, 11 coding for complete proteins and 12 for partially deleted proteins that increased HR when overexpressed in yeast. We characterized the effect induced by the overexpression of the complete human proteasome subunit beta 2, the partially deleted proteasome subunits alpha 3 and beta 8, the ribosomal protein L12, the brain abundant membrane signal protein (BASP1) and the human homologue to v-Ha-RAS (HRAS), which elevated HR by 2-6.5-fold over the control. We found that deletion of the RAD52 gene, which has a key role in most HR events, abolished the increase of HR induced by the proteasome subunits and HRAS; by contrast, the RAD52 deletion did not affect the high level of HR due to BASP1 and RPL12. This suggests that the proteins stimulated yeast HR via different mechanisms. Overexpression of the complete beta 2 human proteasome subunit or the partially deleted alpha 3 and beta 8 subunits increased methyl methanesulphonate (MMS) resistance much more in the rad52 Delta mutant than in the wild-type. Overexpression of RPL12 and BASP1 did not affect MMS resistance in both the wild-type and the rad52 Delta mutant, whereas HRAS decreased MMS resistance in the rad52 Delta mutant. The results indicate that these proteins may interfere with the pathway(s) involved in the repair of MMS-induced DNA damage. Finally, we provide further evidence that yeast is a helpful tool to identify human proteins that may have a regulatory role in HR. PMID:18248415

  4. Controllability analysis of the directed human protein interaction network identifies disease genes and drug targets.

    PubMed

    Vinayagam, Arunachalam; Gibson, Travis E; Lee, Ho-Joon; Yilmazel, Bahar; Roesel, Charles; Hu, Yanhui; Kwon, Young; Sharma, Amitabh; Liu, Yang-Yu; Perrimon, Norbert; Barabási, Albert-László

    2016-05-01

    The protein-protein interaction (PPI) network is crucial for cellular information processing and decision-making. With suitable inputs, PPI networks drive the cells to diverse functional outcomes such as cell proliferation or cell death. Here, we characterize the structural controllability of a large directed human PPI network comprising 6,339 proteins and 34,813 interactions. This network allows us to classify proteins as "indispensable," "neutral," or "dispensable," which correlates to increasing, no effect, or decreasing the number of driver nodes in the network upon removal of that protein. We find that 21% of the proteins in the PPI network are indispensable. Interestingly, these indispensable proteins are the primary targets of disease-causing mutations, human viruses, and drugs, suggesting that altering a network's control property is critical for the transition between healthy and disease states. Furthermore, analyzing copy number alterations data from 1,547 cancer patients reveals that 56 genes that are frequently amplified or deleted in nine different cancers are indispensable. Among the 56 genes, 46 of them have not been previously associated with cancer. This suggests that controllability analysis is very useful in identifying novel disease genes and potential drug targets. PMID:27091990

  5. Cardiovascular-related proteins identified in human plasma by the HUPO Plasma Proteome Project pilot phase.

    PubMed

    Berhane, Beniam T; Zong, Chenggong; Liem, David A; Huang, Aaron; Le, Steven; Edmondson, Ricky D; Jones, Richard C; Qiao, Xin; Whitelegge, Julian P; Ping, Peipei; Vondriska, Thomas M

    2005-08-01

    Proteomic profiling of accessible bodily fluids, such as plasma, has the potential to accelerate biomarker/biosignature development for human diseases. The HUPO Plasma Proteome Project pilot phase examined human plasma with distinct proteomic approaches across multiple laboratories worldwide. Through this effort, we confidently identified 3020 proteins, each requiring a minimum of two high-scoring MS/MS spectra. A critical step subsequent to protein identification is functional annotation, in particular with regard to organ systems and disease. Performing exhaustive literature searches, we have manually annotated a subset of these 3020 proteins that have cardiovascular-related functions on the basis of an existing body of published information. These cardiovascular-related proteins can be organized into eight groups: markers of inflammation and/or cardiovascular disease, vascular and coagulation, signaling, growth and differentiation, cytoskeletal, transcription factors, channels/receptors and heart failure and remodeling. In addition, analysis of the peptide per protein ratio for MS/MS identification reveals group-specific trends. These findings serve as a resource to interrogate the functions of plasma proteins, and moreover, the list of cardiovascular-related proteins in plasma constitutes a baseline proteomic blueprint for the future development of biosignatures for diseases such as myocardial ischemia and atherosclerosis. PMID:16052623

  6. Quantitative proteome analyses identify PrfA-responsive proteins and phosphoproteins in Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Misra, Sandeep Kumar; Moussan Désirée Aké, Francine; Wu, Zongfu; Milohanic, Eliane; Cao, Thanh Nguyen; Cossart, Pascale; Deutscher, Josef; Monnet, Véronique; Archambaud, Cristel; Henry, Céline

    2014-12-01

    Protein phosphorylation is a major mechanism of signal transduction in bacteria. Here, we analyzed the proteome and phosphoproteome of a wild-type strain of the food-borne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes that was grown in either chemically defined medium or rich medium containing glucose. We then compared these results with those obtained from an isogenic prfA* mutant that produced a constitutively active form of PrfA, the main transcriptional activator of virulence genes. In the prfA* mutant grown in rich medium, we identified 256 peptides that were phosphorylated on serine (S), threonine (T), or tyrosine (Y) residues, with a S/T/Y ratio of 155:75:12. Strikingly, we detected five novel phosphosites on the virulence protein ActA. This protein was known to be phosphorylated by a cellular kinase in the infected host, but phosphorylation by a listerial kinase had not previously been reported. Unexpectedly, SILAC experiments with the prfA* mutant grown in chemically defined medium revealed that, in addition to previously described PrfA-regulated proteins, several other proteins were significantly overproduced, among them were several proteins involved in purine biosynthesis. This work provides new information for our understanding of the correlation among protein phosphorylation, virulence mechanisms, and carbon metabolism. PMID:25383790

  7. A simple contact mapping algorithm for identifying potential peptide mimetics in protein–protein interaction partners

    PubMed Central

    Krall, Alex; Brunn, Jonathan; Kankanala, Spandana; Peters, Michael H

    2014-01-01

    A simple, static contact mapping algorithm has been developed as a first step at identifying potential peptide biomimetics from protein interaction partner structure files. This rapid and simple mapping algorithm, “OpenContact” provides screened or parsed protein interaction files based on specified criteria for interatomic separation distances and interatomic potential interactions. The algorithm, which uses all-atom Amber03 force field models, was blindly tested on several unrelated cases from the literature where potential peptide mimetics have been experimentally developed to varying degrees of success. In all cases, the screening algorithm efficiently predicted proposed or potential peptide biomimetics, or close variations thereof, and provided complete atom-atom interaction data necessary for further detailed analysis and drug development. In addition, we used the static parsing/mapping method to develop a peptide mimetic to the cancer protein target, epidermal growth factor receptor. In this case, secondary, loop structure for the peptide was indicated from the intra-protein mapping, and the peptide was subsequently synthesized and shown to exhibit successful binding to the target protein. The case studies, which all involved experimental peptide drug advancement, illustrate many of the challenges associated with the development of peptide biomimetics, in general. Proteins 2014; 82:2253–2262. © 2014 The Authors. Proteins: Structure, Function, and Bioinformatics Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:24756879

  8. Evaluation of chemical labeling methods for identifying functional arginine residues of proteins by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wanigasekara, Maheshika S K; Chowdhury, Saiful M

    2016-09-01

    Arginine residues undergo several kinds of post-translational modifications (PTMs). These PTMs are associated with several inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, atherosclerosis, and diabetes. Mass spectrometric studies of arginine modified proteins and peptides are very important, not only to identify the reactive arginine residues but also to understand the tandem mass spectrometry behavior of these peptides for assigning the sequences unambiguously. Herein, we utilize tandem mass spectrometry to report the performance of two widely used arginine labeling reagents, 1,2-cyclohexanedione (CHD) and phenylglyoxal (PG) with several arginine containing peptides and proteins. Time course labeling studies were performed to demonstrate the selectivity of the reagents in proteins or protein digests. Structural studies on the proteins were also explored to better understand the reaction sites and position of arginine residues. We found CHD showed better labeling efficiencies compared to phenylglyoxal. Reactive arginine profiling on a purified albumin protein clearly pointed out the cellular glycation modification site for this protein with high confidence. We believe these detailed mass-spectrometric studies will provide significant input to profile reactive arginine residues in large-scale studies; therefore, targeted proteomics can be performed to the short listed reactive sites for cellular arginine modifications. PMID:27543028

  9. A comparative protein profile of mammalian erythrocyte membranes identified by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Savita; Punjabi, Vinny; Zingde, Surekha M; Gokhale, Sadashiv M

    2014-11-01

    A comparative analysis of erythrocyte membrane proteins of economically important animals, goat (Capra aegagrus hircus), buffalo (Bubalus bubalis), pig (Sus scrofa), cow (Bos tauras), and human (Homo sapiens) was performed. Solubilized erythrocyte membrane proteins were separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacryamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), visualized by staining the gels with Commassie Brilliant Blue (CBB), and identified by matrix assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/MS). Emerging results show that all major erythrocyte membrane proteins present in human are also seen in all the animals except for band 4.5 which could not be identified. Band 3 is seen as more intense and compact, band 4.1 appears as a doublet in all the animal erythrocyte membranes, band 4.2 exhibits a slightly higher molecular weight (Mr) in buffalo, and cow and band 4.9 has a higher Mr in all the animals relative to the human protein. In addition, there are two new bands in the goat membrane, band G1, identified as HSP 90α, and band G2 identified as HSP 70. A new band C2 identified as HSP 70 is also seen in cow membranes. Peroxiredoxin II is of lower intensity and/or higher Mr in the animals. The difference in size of the proteins possibly indicates the variations in the composition of the amino acids. The difference in intensity of the proteins among these mammalians highlights the presence of less or more number of copies of that protein per cell. This data complement the earlier observations of differences in the sialoglycoprotein profile and effect of proteases and neuraminidase on agglutination among the mammalian erythrocytes. This study provides a platform to understand the molecular architecture of the individual erythrocytes, and in turn the dependent disorders, their phylogenetic relationship and also generates a database of erythrocyte membrane proteins of mammals. The animals selected for this study are of economic importance as

  10. Alumina supported carbon composite material with exceptionally high defluoridation property from eggshell waste.

    PubMed

    Lunge, Sneha; Thakre, Dilip; Kamble, Sanjay; Labhsetwar, Nitin; Rayalu, Sadhana

    2012-10-30

    A new alumina supported carbon composite material called "Eggshell Composite" (EC) was synthesized from eggshell waste as calcium source for selective fluoride adsorption from water. The effect of various synthesis parameters like eggshell (ES): Eggshell membrane (ESM) ratio, aluminium loading, mixing time and calcinations temperature to optimize the synthesis conditions for selective fluoride removal has been studied. It was observed that the synthesis parameters have significant influence on development of EC and in turn on fluoride removal capacity. EC synthesized was characterized for elemental composition, morphology, functionality and textural properties. Results showed that EC obtained from eggshell modified with alumina precursor is more selective and efficient for fluoride removal. Langmuir and Freundlich isotherm were used to obtain ultimate fluoride removal capacity. The calcium and alumina species in EC shows synergistic effect in fluoride adsorption process. Fluoride sorption studies were carried out in synthetic, groundwater and wastewater. EC proved to be a potential, indigenous and economic adsorbent for fluoride removal. PMID:22944591