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Last update: November 12, 2013.
1

Provenance: Promise and Practice  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Capturing provenance is one of the fundamental principles of archive theory. Provenance consists of information about the creation of an object, its ownership, and how this information has changed over time. The data management community has been discussing how to apply the concepts of provenance to science data. Considerable attention has been paid to developing mechanisms to record how data were created, since this is key to reproducing research results. Less attention has been paid to the other elements of provenance, even though data and the organizations that archive data are dynamic and ever changing. Some practice is coming into play; but there is a large gap between theory and practice. This talk will review the current state of the art, discuss the gap between theory and practice, and describe what could be done to close the gap.

Duerr, R. E.

2008-12-01

2

Promising Practices: Teaching the Disadvantaged Gifted.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Intended for teachers, the document offers 10 articles on educating the disadvantaged gifted student. Included are the following titles: "Four Promising Practices for Teaching Gifted Disadvantaged Students" (which describes a workshop with problem solving and creative expressive activities) by E. Paul Torrance; "Cultural Diversity and the…

Miley, James F., Comp.; And Others

3

Promising Practices: Spotlighting Excellence in Comprehensive Internationalization.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The future of the United States hinges on its ability to educate a globally competent citizenry. This report showcases internationalization at eight colleges and universities selected to participate in "Promising Practices," a project organized and administered by the American Council on Education (Washington, DC), with funding from the Carnegie…

Engberg, David, Ed.; Green, Madeleine F., Ed.

4

Developing Model Student Information Systems: Promising Practices.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This paper describes promising practices in developing model student information systems, with a focus on information management and administrative record keeping. Three school districts with exemplary information systems are profiled, using data derived from document analysis, on-site observation, and interviews with district and site-level…

Hafner, Anne L.

5

Promising Practices in Drug Treatment: An Overview of Methodology  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This paper describes a research project sponsored and funded by the State Department's Bureau of International Narcotics and Affairs (INL) on substance abuse and treatment in ten countries. The purpose of the study was to identify promising practices in drug treatment in Europe, Latin America, and Southeast Asia. The steps taken to complete this…

Garrett, Gerald; Nemes, Susanna; Hoffman, Jeffrey; Libretto, Salvatore; Skinstadt, Anne Helene; Hess, Lauren

2005-01-01

6

Promising Practices in Drug Treatment: Findings from Europe  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|In a study to evaluate the drug treatment and aftercare efforts sponsored by the State Department's International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs Bureau, residential Therapeutic Community (TC) treatment programs in four European countries-Poland, Spain, Slovenia, and Italy-were examined to identify promising practices and to assess lessons…

Nemes, Susanna; Libretto, Salvatore; Skinstad, Anne Helene; Garrett, Gerald; Hoffman, Jeffrey A.

2005-01-01

7

Promising Practices in Drug Treatment: Findings from Southeast Asia  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|In a study to evaluate the drug treatment and aftercare efforts sponsored by the State Department's International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs Bureau, residential Therapeutic Community (TC) treatment programs in three countries in Southeast Asia--Malaysia, Singapore, and Thailand--were examined to identify promising practices and to…

Libretto, Salvatore; Nemes, Susanna; Namur, Jenny; Garrett, Gerald; Hess, Lauren; Kaplan, Linda

2005-01-01

8

Promising Practices in Drug Treatment: Findings from Latin America  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|In a study to evaluate the drug treatment and aftercare efforts sponsored by the State Department's International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs Bureau, residential Therapeutic Community (TC) treatment programs in three Latin American countries--Brazil, Peru and Argentina--were examined to identify promising practices and to assess lessons…

Nemes, Susanna; Libretto, Salvatore; Garrett, Gerald; Johansson, Anna Carin; Hess, Lauren

2005-01-01

9

Resistance Training: Identifying Best Practices.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Resistance training increases muscle strength. Muscle strength gains are influenced by program design. This review attempted to identify design choices that would be best practices. A best practice is a design option that produces significantly better res...

A. C. Barnard J. R. Vickers L. K. Hervig

2010-01-01

10

Promising Practices: A Teacher Resource (Grades K-3).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|A collection of promising instructional practices for teachers of limited-English-speaking primary grade students is organized as a series of lessons on planning, classroom management, teaching procedures, and evaluation in a variety of content areas. Examples of basic learning activities intended to serve as a framework for teacher…

Provenzano, Johanna Z., Ed.

11

Promise  

Microsoft Academic Search

What is the promise of occupational science? Occupational science is under construction in response to differing historical intents, but the time for visions of what occupational science should be has passed. The nature of occupational science is evident in its body of work, in its underlying structures, and in the remaining challenges to its development. How will occupational science fulfill

Doris Pierce

2012-01-01

12

Contexts for Promise: Noteworthy Practices and Innovations in the Identification of Gifted Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This monograph contains 11 papers describing model projects that address the identification of gifted students. An introduction by Carolyn M. Callahan and Carol A. Tomlinson identifies commonalities and themes in the promising practices highlighted in the papers. The papers include: (1) "Project STREAM: Support, Training and Resources for…

Callahan, Carolyn M., Ed.; And Others

13

The Recipe for Promising Practices in Community Colleges  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study identifies and examines the key practices of California community college programs that have demonstrated success in improving (or that have shown significant potential to improve) the achievement of underrepresented groups whose educational attainment often lags behind the attainment of relatively well-off White students. Unlike many…

Levin, John S.; Cox, Elizabeth M.; Cerven, Christine; Haberler, Zachary

2010-01-01

14

Vocational Improvement Practices. Promising Practices in Connecticut Vocational and Adult Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This compendium provides information concerning promising methods and techniques in vocational and adult education in Connecticut during the 1984-85 school year. It is targeted at educators who wish to improve their own vocational and adult education programs and services. Practices described in the document were selected by a panel of educators…

Connecticut State Board of Education, Hartford.

15

Promises, Promises  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article, the author discusses her personal experience of coming up with a mission statement for her library. A significant part of that goal was to identify what a best-practice library looked like so that she could emulate the model in her library. The entire process is described in this article.

Braxton, Barbara

2005-01-01

16

Identifying, analysing and solving problems in practice.  

PubMed

When a problem is identified in practice, it is important to clarify exactly what it is and establish the cause before seeking a solution. This solution-seeking process should include input from those directly involved in the problematic situation, to enable individuals to contribute their perspective, appreciate why any change in practice is necessary and what will be achieved by the change. This article describes some approaches to identifying and analysing problems in practice so that effective solutions can be devised. It includes a case study and examples of how the Five Whys analysis, fishbone diagram, problem tree analysis, and Seven-S Model can be used to analyse a problem. PMID:22848969

Hewitt-Taylor, Jaqui

17

Wikis for Knowledge Management: Business Cases, Best Practices, Promises, & Pitfalls  

Microsoft Academic Search

This chapter describes how wikis and related tools can be used for knowledge management (KM), and describes processes and best practices for creating and deploying wiki-based KM systems. In particular, we consider the business cases from multiple perspectives, including: participating in KM systems; initiating KM projects; and developing wiki platforms. Thus, the chapter seeks to help readers understand what KM

Clif Kussmaul; Roger Jack

18

Implementing Career Academies Schoolwide: 2001-2002 Developments, Promising Practices.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document, which is based on the findings of case studies of how four high schools from across the country have successfully implemented the schoolwide career academy model, presents recent developments and best practices in schoolwide career academies. The document consists of a brief introduction describing the case studies and one chapter…

Stern, David; Dayton, Charles; Lenz, Robert; Tidyman, Susan

19

Development of a Contextualized ESL Bridge Curriculum. Promising Practice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Black Hawk College (BHC) is a comprehensive community college serving all or part of nine counties and a population of approximately 224,510 residents in a mostly rural area of north-west Illinois. This practice was fully developed and implemented for the Shifting Gears (SG) initiative during the 2007-08 academic years. Heeding BHC's strategic…

Office of Community College Research and Leadership, 2010

2010-01-01

20

Promising Practices in Statewide Articulation and Transfer Systems  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This guide is based on a study funded by Lumina Foundation for Education and conducted by Hezel Associates and the Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education (WICHE). Designed to aid policymakers and others, this report takes a state-by-state look at practices related to transfer and articulation between two- and four-year public…

Hezel Associates (NJ1), 2010

2010-01-01

21

Promising and Emerging Practices for Enhancing the Employment of Individuals with Disabilities Included in Plans Submitted by Federal Agencies Under Executive Order 13548. Summary.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This summary report identifies promising and emerging practices for advancing the recruitment, hiring, and retention of individuals with disabilities identified in 10 selected agency plans submitted under Executive Order 13548. This summary report does no...

2012-01-01

22

The Promise of Mindfulness for Clinical Practice Education  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article reviews the recent trend in mindfulness-based psychotherapies and explores the utility of mindfulness training for clinical practice education. It presents the current literature and evidence suggesting that mindfulness training may provide a vehicle to foster essential clinical skills and attitudes, increase self-care and reduce the impact of occupational stress, and prepare students to understand and use mindfulness-based interventions

Annemarie Gockel

2010-01-01

23

Mobile teledermatology: a promising future in clinical practice.  

PubMed

Background:As a product of electronic health, teledermatology is a cost-effective means of improving access to care, facilitating specialist consultations, and supporting patient self-management. Even so, use of traditional teledermatology services is limited by infrastructure and costs in the form of digital cameras, computers, and Internet access.Methods:Considering the significant improvement in smartphone camera resolution and the rapidly increasing number of physicians using smartphones, we explored the use of smartphones as reliable, effective clinical tools in store-and-forward teledermatology. We describe the technical specifications of modern smartphone cameras, the widespread use of smartphones by physicians, and the advantages of smartphones over traditional camera and Internet teledermatology, and we propose recommendations as to how mobile teledermatology may be more effectively used in modern dermatologic practice. PMID:24138974

Zuo, Kevin J; Guo, Danny; Rao, Jaggi

24

Identifying domestic violence in primary care practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE: To improve detection of domestic violence as a problem for women seeking primary care, we compared the addition of a single\\u000a question about domestic violence on an existing self-administered health history form, to discretionary inquiry alone. We\\u000a studied 689 consecutive new women patients in an internal medicine practice. Domestic violence identification rose from 0%\\u000a in the control group with

Karen M. Freund; Sharon M. Bak; Leslie Blackhall

1996-01-01

25

Promising Physical Activity Inclusion Practices for Chinese Immigrant Women in Vancouver, Canada  

Microsoft Academic Search

Even though the number of immigrants coming to Canada continues to rise (Statistics Canada, 2010) and there is some evidence to suggest that participation in community sport and recreation can ease the stress associated with settlement (Stodolska & Alexandris 2004), our previous research has shown there is little or no information sharing about promising inclusion practices between local, provincial, and

Wendy Frisby

2011-01-01

26

Training Components for the Secondary Resource Specialist in California: Promising Practices.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Designed to accompany the volume "The Secondary Resource Specialist in California--Promising Practices", the document presents the components of a program for training secondary resource specialists for mildly and moderately handicapped students. Covered are three training components, each including a listinq of objectives, reading assignments,…

Carroll, Andrea; And Others

27

Seeing is Believing: Promising Practices for How School Districts Promote Family Engagement. Issue Brief  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Harvard Family Research Project (HFRP) and the National Parent-Teacher Association (PTA) have teamed up to bring you a ground-breaking policy brief that examines the role of school districts in promoting family engagement. "Seeing is Believing: Promising Practices for How School Districts Promote Family Engagement" spotlights how six school…

Westmoreland, Helen; Rosenberg, Heidi M.; Lopez, M. Elena; Weiss, Heather

2009-01-01

28

Best Practices for Identifying Gifted Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Parents often go to principals to ask for help in supporting their gifted children. They may request acceleration for their child in mathematics, a specialized curriculum or course, extracurricular activities, a pullout program, or even a different teacher. Since misconceptions about identifying gifted students are prevalent, it's important that…

Johnsen, Susan K.

2009-01-01

29

The Evidence. Supported Education: A Promising Practice. Evidence-Based Practices KIT (Knowledge Informing Transformation)  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Supported Employment is an evidence-based practice that helps people with mental illness find and keep meaningful jobs in the community. Given these outcomes the challenge for Supported Employment programs is to rethink the emphasis on immediate work for everyone and help consumers utilize appropriate education and training opportunities…

Unger, Karen V.

2011-01-01

30

Approach to Identify Internal Best Practices in a Software Organization  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Current approaches to software process improvements (SPI) in software organizations is based on identifying gaps by comparing the way organizations work with respect to practices contained in the reference models. Later, these gaps will be targeted for establishing software process improvements. This paper presents an approach for identifying best practices within the organization. This is considered a key element in order to compare the way software organizations work with the reference models. After that, these practices will be complemented with practices contained in these models depending on the organization's business goals.

Jose A., Calvo-Manzano; Gonzalo, Cuevas; Jezreel, Mejia; Mirna, Muñoz; Tomás, San Feliu; Ángel, Sánchez; Álvaro, Rocha

31

An Empirical Study Identifying High Perceived Value Requirements Engineering Practices  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a In order to reduce requirements problems many Requirements Engineering (RE) practices have been suggested [1]. Though there have already been many surveys identifying requirements problems (e.g. [2], [3]), as researchers, we need to be constantly aware of what is really going on in practice and to understand what RE practices\\u000a are perceived to be useful by practitioners. This will enable

Mahmood Niazi; Karl A. Cox; June M. Verner

32

Identifying Communities of Practice through Ontology Network Analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article describes Ontocopi, a tool for identifying communities of practice by analyzing ontologies of relevant working domains. Ontocopi spots patterns in ontological formal relations, traversing the ontology from instance to instance via selected relations.

Harith Alani; Srinandan Dasmahapatra; Kieron O'hara; Nigel Shadbolt

2003-01-01

33

Examination of Leadership Practices of Principals Identified as Servant Leaders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study was to examine the leadership practices of principals identified as servant leaders. The conceptual framework used to access the leadership behaviours was the leadership practices advocated by Kouzes and Posner. Statistical analysis included a multivariate test to determine if the demographic variables were significantly…

Taylor, Tim; Martin, Barbara N.; Hutchinson, Sandy; Jinks, Michael

2007-01-01

34

ASSESSMENT OF PROMISING FOREST MANAGEMENT PRACTICES AND TECHNOLOGIES FOR ENHANCING THE CONSERVATION AND SEQUESTRATION OF ATMOSPHERIC CARBON AND THEIR COSTS AT SITE LEVEL  

EPA Science Inventory

The objectives of this report are to assess and synthesize current knowledge on three policy-science topics: ) Identify promising technologies and practices that could be utilized at technically suitable sites in the world to manage forests and agroforestry systems for sequesteri...

35

VLSI Technology: Impact and Promise. Identifying Emerging Issues and Trends in Technology for Special Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As part of a 3-year study to identify emerging issues and trends in technology for special education, this paper addresses the implications of very large scale integrated (VLSI) technology. The first section reviews the development of educational technology, particularly microelectronics technology, from the 1950s to the present. The implications…

Bayoumi, Magdy

36

The Promise of Virtual Teams: Identifying Key Factors in Effectiveness and Failure  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: The aim of the investigation is to identify enabling and disenabling factors in the development and operation of virtual teams; to evaluate the importance of factors such as team development, cross-cultural variables, leadership, communication and social cohesion as contributors to virtual team effectiveness. Design/methodology/approach:…

Horwitz, Frank M.; Bravington, Desmond; Silvis, Ulrik

2006-01-01

37

The Promise of Virtual Teams: Identifying Key Factors in Effectiveness and Failure  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Purpose: The aim of the investigation is to identify enabling and disenabling factors in the development and operation of virtual teams; to evaluate the importance of factors such as team development, cross-cultural variables, leadership, communication and social cohesion as contributors to virtual team effectiveness. Design/methodology/approach:…

Horwitz, Frank M.; Bravington, Desmond; Silvis, Ulrik

2006-01-01

38

Assessment of promising forest-management practices and technologies for enhancing the conservation and sequestration of atmospheric carbon and their costs at the site level  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of the report are to assess and synthesize current knowledge on three policy-science topics: (1) Identify promising technologies and practices that could be utilized at technically suitable sites in the world to manage forests and agroforestry systems for sequestering and conserving carbon; (2) Assess available data on costs at the site level for promising forest and agroforestry management practices; and (3) Evaluate estimates of land technically suitable in forested nations and biomes of the world to help meet the Noordwijk forestation targets and the proposed Global Forest Agreement goals.

Dixon, R.K.; Schroeder, P.E.; Winjum, J.K.

1991-10-01

39

Building a Career Pathways System: Promising Practices in Community College-Centered Workforce Development.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This report follows an initial study that identified evolving best practices in workforce development. The prior study defined three themes that reflect a developing consensus among policymakers and researchers and point to the opportunities for a career pathways model. These themes included: (1) individuals need some form of postsecondary…

Alssid, Julian L.; Gruber, David; Jenkins, Davis; Mazzeo, Christopher; Roberts, Brandon; Stanback-Stroud, Regina

40

Understanding Evidence-Based Information for the Early Childhood Field: Tips from RAND's Promising Practices Network  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|With the growing and diverse use of the term "evidence-based practice" it can be difficult for policymakers, funders, program officers, and other professionals to separate the good evidence from the flawed. Furthermore, once good evidence has been identified, it can be difficult to know how to use it. This article discusses key issues to consider…

Mattox, Teryn; Kilburn, M. Rebecca

2012-01-01

41

Practical identifiability of a biokinetic model of activated sludge respiration  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper deals with the estimation of the parameters of the Monod model for the activated sludge process on the basis of oxygen uptake rate data only. The objective of the paper is to concentrate on the practical identifiability properties of the model and on the design of informative experiments for parameter estimation. The results are illustrated by experimental data.

Peter A. Vanrolleghem; Marc Van Daele; D. Dochain

1995-01-01

42

Australian Nurse Educators Identify Gaps in Expert Practice.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A Delphi panel of 28 Australian nurse educators and 42 clinicians identified 58 practice items in which reality was far from ideal. In particular, for 16 items related to patient empowerment, nursing research, and technology policy, clinical behavior was rated below the median. (SK)

Pelletier, Dianne; Duffield, Christine; Adams, Anne; Nagy, Sue; Crisp, Jackie; Mitten-Lewis, Suzanne

2000-01-01

43

Using NVDRS data for suicide prevention: promising practices in seven states  

PubMed Central

Objectives This article describes how seven states participating in a new public health surveillance system for violent death in the US, the National Violent Death Reporting System (NVDRS), have used data to support local suicide prevention activities. Setting The NVDRS is unique in that it augments death certificate data with event and circumstance information from death investigation reports filed by coroners, medical examiners, and law enforcement. These data illuminate why the victim ended his or her life, fatal injury patterns, and toxicological findings at death. Results Current suicide prevention efforts using these data fall into three categories: describing the problem of suicide and identifying opportunities for intervention; collaborating on statewide suicide prevention plans; and forming new partnerships for targeted prevention initiatives. Taken together, these three areas show early promise for state suicide prevention efforts. Conclusions In each of the states, NVDRS data analyses are being shared with injury prevention colleagues, suicide prevention planning groups and policymakers, and adapted to respond to unique state and local suicide problems. A powerful surveillance tool, the NVDRS is bringing new clarity and direction to these state?based efforts. The NVDRS can serve as a model for other countries looking to establish timely suicide surveillance systems and data driven prevention strategies.

Powell, V; Barber, C W; Hedegaard, H; Hempstead, K; Hull-Jilly, D; Shen, X; Thorpe, G E; Weis, M A

2006-01-01

44

Promising Website Practices for Disseminating Research on Family-School Partnerships to the Community  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The issue of research dissemination via websites is part of the larger research utilization question, and the authors begin with a review of literature on the theory and best practices in dissemination. The second part of the study involves an exploratory examination of the websites and dissemination practices of 30 research centers focusing on…

Chavkin, Nancy Feyl; Chavkin, Allan

2008-01-01

45

A practical guideline for identifying research intent with projects that collect private, identifiable health information.  

PubMed

Radiation oncologists frequently engage in activities that involve the collection and analysis of data from medical records. Access to health information is an ethical issue because, if not done according to appropriate guidelines, it constitutes an invasion of privacy or breach in confidentiality. To protect patients for the social harm that may result from medical record review, our society has established laws and regulations that apply to projects that require medical record review. A major branch point in the guidelines for such projects is whether private information will be collected for research or nonresearch purposes. However, a problem with discussing privacy protection in terms of a research versus nonresearch model is that it is difficult to make this distinction for many kinds of projects. The purpose of this paper is to establish a practical guideline that can be used to decide if a project that involves analysis of private, identifiable medical information should be considered research from the regulatory standpoint. PMID:12796610

Amdur, Robert J; Speers, Marjorie A

2003-06-01

46

Resource Guide on Racial Profiling Data Collection Systems. Promising Practices and Lessons Learned.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

One of the ways that law enforcement agencies are addressing concerns and allegations regarding discriminatory policing is through data collection. By collecting information on the nature, character, and demographics of police enforcement practices, we en...

D. Ramirez J. McDevitt A. Farrell

2000-01-01

47

Community Lessons: Integrating Service-Learning into K-12 Curriculum. A Promising Practices Guide.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This guide was developed to share successful Community Service Learning (CSL) instructional practices. It presents units that can be replicated and adapted for varying grade levels and curricular goals. The guide notes that as students use newly acquired academic knowledge and skills to address real issues in their communities, they often gain…

Bartsch, Julie

48

Research-Practice Interactions as Reported in Recent Design Studies: Still Promising, Still Hazy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study portrays recent research-practice connections found in 18 design research reports focusing on the creation of instructional solutions. Solutions in different stages of development varied greatly in duration, ranging from one lesson to a whole year curriculum, spanned all levels of education, many subjects (science, math, language,…

Ormel, Bart J. B.; Pareja Roblin, Natalie N.; McKenney, Susan E.; Voogt, Joke M.; Pieters, Jules M.

2012-01-01

49

Technological Advances in the Treatment of Trauma: A Review of Promising Practices  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Given the availability of empirically supported practices for addressing posttraumatic stress disorder and other forms of trauma-related distress, the development and implementation of new technology to deliver these treatments is exciting. Technological innovations in this literature aim to expand availability of empirically based intervention,…

Paul, Lisa A.; Hassija, Christina M.; Clapp, Joshua D.

2012-01-01

50

Research-Practice Interactions as Reported in Recent Design Studies: Still Promising, Still Hazy  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study portrays recent research-practice connections found in 18 design research reports focusing on the creation of instructional solutions. Solutions in different stages of development varied greatly in duration, ranging from one lesson to a whole year curriculum, spanned all levels of education, many subjects (science, math, language,…

Ormel, Bart J. B.; Pareja Roblin, Natalie N.; McKenney, Susan E.; Voogt, Joke M.; Pieters, Jules M.

2012-01-01

51

Promising Homework Practices: Teachers' Perspectives on Making Homework Work for Newcomer Immigrant Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examines the homework practices of eight teachers working in a high school designed to serve newcomer immigrant students. Individual structured interviews were conducted in which teachers working in an innovative setting explained their purposes of assigning homework, their beliefs about factors affecting their students' homework…

Bang, Hee Jin

2012-01-01

52

Promising Practices To Connect Schools with the Community. Family, School, Community Partnership.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This monograph is the second in a series, whose purpose is to provide practitioners and researchers a forum for securing the most current knowledge pertinent to family, school, and community partnership issues. This publication focuses on emerging practices that link communities and schools, especially creating the school as the hub for…

Hiatt-Michael, Diana B., Ed.

53

The Red Book and the Practice of Environmental Public Health: Promise, Pitfalls, and Progress  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper examines the impact of the National Research Council's report Risk Assessment in the Federal Government: Managing the Process, known as the “Red Book,” on the practice of risk assessment, risk management, and the education of public health and risk professionals. The four-step approach to risk assessment was broadly adopted by the regulatory community and has a profound impact

Thomas A. Burke

2003-01-01

54

Promising Practices to Meet Global Challenges in Science and Mathematics Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The chapters in this book reflect the work of science and mathematics educators who have worked for many years at the international level. As members of the International Consortium for Research in Science and Mathematics Education, their work provides readers with issues, models, practices, and research results that have applicability and…

Berlin, Donna F., Ed.; White, Arthur L., Ed.

2010-01-01

55

Technological advances in the treatment of trauma: a review of promising practices.  

PubMed

Given the availability of empirically supported practices for addressing posttraumatic stress disorder and other forms of trauma-related distress, the development and implementation of new technology to deliver these treatments is exciting. Technological innovations in this literature aim to expand availability of empirically based intervention, increase treatment adherence and acceptability, and overcome barriers commonly encountered with conventional trauma-focused treatment. Much of the current research on these technological developments consists of brief reviews and case studies of the separate therapy modalities. Although this work serves to document the appeal and utility of these innovations, it does not provide comprehensive information about the host of options available. To that end, the three general categories of technological advances in trauma therapy (i.e., videoconferencing, e-Health, virtual reality) are reviewed here, including information regarding their empirical support and suggestions for future research and clinical practice. PMID:22956588

Paul, Lisa A; Hassija, Christina M; Clapp, Joshua D

2012-09-05

56

Promising practices in the prevention of intimate partner violence among adolescents.  

PubMed

To inform practitioners and researchers interested in the prevention of intimate partner violence (IPV) among adolescents, 9 principles of effective prevention programs (Nation et al., 2003) were described and examples of how these principles have been incorporated into existing teen dating violence prevention programs were provided. An investigation of current prevention practices for adolescent IPV resulted in one noteworthy program that has successfully incorporated all 9 principles of effective prevention programming-Safe Dates (Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, National Registry of Evidence-based Programs and Practices [SAMHSA-NREPP], 2006). Although Safe Dates serves as a model teen dating violence prevention program, it may not be equally effective across contexts and diverse groups. Therefore, as researchers and practitioners continue to develop and refine programs to reduce adolescent IPV, the principles of effective prevention programs should serve as a guiding framework. PMID:23393949

De Grace, Alyssa; Clarke, Angela

2012-01-01

57

The Promise of Response to Intervention: Evaluating Current Science and Practice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|As response to intervention (RTI) is adopted by increasing numbers of schools and districts, knowledge about "what works" continues to grow. This much-needed book analyzes the key components of RTI service delivery and identifies the characteristics of successful implementation. Critically reviewing the available research, leading authorities…

Glover, Todd A., Ed.; Vaughn, Sharon, Ed.

2010-01-01

58

Mental health treatment of child abuse and neglect: the promise of evidence-based practice.  

PubMed

In 2006, 3.6 million children in the United States received a child protective services' investigation and 905,000 children (about one-quarter of those investigated) were found to have been abused or neglected. Children who have been maltreated are at risk for experiencing a host of mental health problems, including depression, posttraumatic stress, dissociation, reactive attachment, low self-esteem, social problems, suicidal behavior, aggression, conduct disorder, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and problem behaviors, including delinquency, risky sexual behavior and substance use. Given the high rate of mental health problems, it is not surprising that maltreated youth are in need of mental health services. Unfortunately, only a fraction of these children and adolescents receive services. Recently, several evidence-based practices have been rigorously tested and are demonstrating efficacy in reducing mental health problems associated with maltreatment. This article details these developments. PMID:19358925

Shipman, Kimberly; Taussig, Heather

2009-04-01

59

Immersive Virtual Environment Technology: A Promising Tool for Future Social and Behavioral Genomics Research and Practice  

PubMed Central

Social and behavioral research needs to get started now if we are to direct genomic discoveries to address pressing public health problems. Advancing social and behavioral science will require innovative and rigorous communication methodologies that move us beyond reliance on traditional tools and their inherent limitations. One such emerging research tool is immersive virtual environment technology (aka: virtual reality), a methodology that gives researchers the ability to maintain high experimental control and mundane realism of scenarios, portray and manipulate complex, abstract objects and concepts, and implement innovative implicit behavioral measurement. This report suggests the role that immersive virtual environment technology can play in furthering future research in genomics-related: education, decision-making, test intentions, behavior change, and healthcare provider behaviors. Practical implementation and challenges are also discussed.

Persky, Susan; McBride, Colleen M.

2009-01-01

60

Registry to Referral: A Promising Means for Identifying and Referring Infants and Toddlers for Early Intervention Services.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article proposes use of birth defects registries in facilitating early intervention. It reports results of a survey to identify state programs that are using, or planning to use, birth defects surveillance systems to identify and refer children and families for services. It provides four case examples and recommended steps to encourage use of…

Farel, Anita M.; Meyer, Robert E.; Hicken, Margaret; Edmonds, Larry

2003-01-01

61

Promising Practices: School to Career and Postsecondary Education for Foster Care Youth. A Guide for Policymakers and Practitioners.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Focus of this guide is a project to identify best practices and programs in preparing foster care youth for career opportunities and economic self-sufficiency. Foster care program context is described as an economy characterized by jobs clustering into two categories (high wage positions with a continuing career pathway and low wage entry-level…

Workforce Strategy Center, Brooklyn, NY.

62

Identifying best practices in short-term eruption forecasting  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Volcano Observatory Best Practices Workshop: Near-Term Eruption Forecasting; Erice, Italy, 11-15 September 2011 Eighty volcanologists associated with volcano observatories in 27 countries gathered at the Ettore Majorana Foundation and Centre for Scientific Culture in Italy to share experiences and develop synergy in shortterm forecasting of eruptions. The meeting was conducted under the aegis of the World Organization of Volcano Observatories (WOVO); sponsored by the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV), U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), United States Agency for International Development (USAID), and International Association of Volcanology and Chemistry of the Earth's Interior (IAVCEI); and endorsed by the Group on Earth Observations (GEO) and United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO).

Eichelberger, John; Marzocchi, Warner; Papale, Paolo

2012-01-01

63

Promising Practices in CTS.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This document contains 85 articles taken from previously published issues of the "CTS Communication Network Update," a publication about the career and technology studies (CTS) program of career education designed for Alberta, Canada, high school juniors and seniors. Following an introductory section and a section on general CTS, the document…

Alberta Dept. of Education, Edmonton. Curriculum Standards Branch.

64

Bridging the gap between alcoholism treatment research and practice: Identifying what works and why  

Microsoft Academic Search

Despite the proliferation of alcoholism treatment research over the past 2 decades, there is a continued gap between what has been shown to be promising in the extant literature and what is commonly practiced by clinicians in the alcohol treatment field. The present article is an effort to bridge this gap by examining findings from the broad body of alcoholism

Jennifer P. Read; Christopher W. Kahler; John F. Stevenson

2001-01-01

65

An algorithm to identify medical practices common to both the General Practice Research Database and The Health Improvement Network database.  

PubMed

PURPOSE: To identify practices common to both the General Practice Research Database and The Health Improvement Network database for purposes of combining the databases for analysis without duplicate records. METHODS: We developed two independent algorithms to identify practices common to the two databases. The first used the total number of patients in the therapy and clinical data sets and the total number of etoricoxib and celecoxib users each year during the study period. The second used the total number of patients stratified by gender and four different categories of birth year. Further checking of potential matched practice pairs identified by the two algorithms was performed by comparing the patient-level medical records by birth year, dates of clinical visits, and diagnosis codes. RESULTS: Three hundred twelve potential matched pairs of practices were found by both algorithms. Fifteen additional potential pairs were matched by only one algorithm: 13 by algorithm 1 (A1) only and 2 by algorithm 2 (A2) only. The examination of the patient-level visit dates and diagnosis codes for the matches revealed that all of the 327 potential pairs of duplicate practices were in fact the same practice in the two databases. CONCLUSIONS: The two algorithms successfully found the practices common to the two different databases without de-identifying the practices. The identification of the common practices allows for combining the two databases without duplicate records to create a larger data set for analysis, with 168 more practices than when using the General Practice Research Database alone, or with 268 more practices than when using The Health Improvement Network alone. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:22544805

Cai, Bing; Xu, Weifeng; Bortnichak, Edward; Watson, Douglas J

2012-04-30

66

Identifying Student Competencies in Macro Practice: Articulating the Practice Wisdom of Field Instructors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Although a growing literature examines competencies in clinical practice, competencies of students in macro social work practice have received comparatively little attention. A grounded-theory methodology was used to elicit field instructor views of student competencies in community, organization, and policy contexts. Competencies described by…

Regehr, Cheryl; Bogo, Marion; Donovan, Kirsten; Lim, April; Anstice, Susan

2012-01-01

67

Practical and Theoretical Aspects of Adjoint Parameter Estimation and Identifiability in Meteorology and Oceanography  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present paper has two aims. One is to survey briefly the state of the art of parameter estimation in meteorology and oceanography in view of applications of 4-D variational data assimilation techniques to inverse parameter estimation problems, which bear promise of serious positive impact on improving model prediction. The other aim is to present crucial aspects of identifiability and

I. M. Navon

1997-01-01

68

Practical and theoretical aspects of adjoint parameter estimation and identifiability in meteorology and oceanography  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present paper has two aims. One is to survey briefly the state of the art of parameter estimation in meteorology and oceanography in view of applications of 4-D variational data assimilation techniques to inverse parameter estimation problems, which bear promise of serious positive impact on improving model prediction. The other aim is to present crucial aspects of identifiability and

I. M. Navon

1998-01-01

69

Multiple Media Use in Organizations: Identifying Practices Leading to an Alignment Paradox  

Microsoft Academic Search

A case study was conducted in a department of a Fortune 500 company to explore multiple media practices. Existing research has been dominated by a focus on the use of single media, and the valuable insights and knowledge gained in this research largely ignore the characteristics and consequences of multiple media use in organizational settings. Three interrelated practices were identified

Keith Munkejord

2007-01-01

70

Best Practices in Identifying Students for Gifted and Talented Education Programs  

Microsoft Academic Search

As school psychologists move from dichotomous categorizations of students as gifted or nongifted toward a more comprehensive approach to identification, their task becomes increasingly complex. In the present article, the authors outline practices at the planning, programming, and data collection stages of the identification process in hopes of providing practical guidance for identifying gifted students. The authors begin with a

Frank C. Worrell; Jesse O. Erwin

2011-01-01

71

Identifying Good Practice in the use of PBL to teach computing  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents the findings of an initial study to identify the use of Problem-based Learning in the teaching of computing within higher education programmes. The study aimed to identify examples of the use of PBL, as well as examples of good practice and issues that needed consideration for successful implementation. Practitioners were surveyed in the UK, Singapore, Australia, Sweden

Chris Beaumont; Andrew Sackville; Chew Swee Cheng

2004-01-01

72

Promising Partnership Practices, 2002: The 5th Annual Collection from Members of the National Network of Partnership Schools.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This publication highlights 93 exemplary practices of school, family, and community partnerships selected from members of the National Network of Partnerships Schools at Johns Hopkins University, Maryland. Network member sites represent 18 states and 2 Canadian provinces. The publication highlights six types of practices: parenting (e.g., parent…

Jansorn, Natalie Rodriguez, Ed.; Salinas, Karen Clark, Ed.

73

"Use of Current Best Evidence": Promises and Illusions, Limitations and Contradictions in the Triangle of Research, Policy and Practice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This paper explores the methodological and epistemological implications of the relationships between R&D, policy and practice. The proposals towards "evidence-based policy and practice" are analysed with respect to this triangle from three angles: (1) meaning; (2) production; and (3) use of evidence. A comprehensive model of the research cycle,…

Lassnigg, Lorenz

2012-01-01

74

Identifying industrial best practices for the waste minimization of low-level radioactive materials  

SciTech Connect

In US DOE, changing circumstances are affecting the management and disposal of solid, low-level radioactive waste (LLW). From 1977 to 1991, the nuclear power industry achieved major reductions in solid waste disposal, and DOE is interested in applying those practices to reduce solid waste at DOE facilities. Project focus was to identify and document commercial nuclear industry best practices for radiological control programs supporting routine operations, outages, and decontamination and decommissioning activities. The project team (DOE facility and nuclear power industry representatives) defined a Work Control Process Model, collected nuclear power industry Best Practices, and made recommendations to minimize LLW at DOE facilities.

Levin, V.

1996-04-01

75

Identifying and transforming dysfunctional nurse-nurse relationships through reflective practice and action research.  

PubMed

This project facilitated reflective practice processes in experienced Registered Nurses (RNs) in order to raise critical awareness of practice problems, work systematically through problem-solving processes to uncover constraints, and improve the quality of care given by nurses in light of the identified constraints and possibilities. Twelve experienced female RNs working in a large Australian rural hospital shared their experiences of nursing during three action research cycles. A thematic concern of dysfunctional nurse-nurse relationships was identified, as evidenced by bullying and horizontal violence. The negotiated action plan was put into place and participants reported varying degrees of success in attempting to improve nurse-nurse relationships. PMID:11785443

Taylor, B

2001-12-01

76

Liposomal solubilization of new 3-hydroxy-quinolinone derivatives with promising anticancer activity: a screening method to identify maximum incorporation capacity.  

PubMed

Four new 3-hydroxy-quinolinone derivatives with promising anticancer activity could be solubilized using liposomes as vehicle to an extent that allows their in vitro and in vivo testing without use of toxic solvent(s). A screening method to identify the maximum incorporation capacity of hydrophobic drugs within liposomes was successfully applied. The compounds and lipid(s) were dissolved in methanol, and the solvent was removed by rotary evaporation. The film was resuspended with phosphate buffer (pH 7.4), and the dispersion was sonicated to reduce vesicle size. Ultracentrifugation was used to separate liposome-associated drug from free (i.e., precipitated) drug, and the amount of drug incorporated within the liposomes was quantified using high-performance liquid chromatography. All four compounds were found to be significantly incorporated within soy phosphatidylcholine (SPC) liposomes, resulting in a 200-500-fold increase in apparent solubility. Drug-to-lipid ratios in the range of 2-5 ?g/mg were obtained. Interestingly, the four quinolinone derivatives have shown different association tendencies with liposomes, probably due to the physicochemical properties of the different group bonded in position 2 of the quinolinone ring. None of the alternative lipids/lipid blends tested incorporated as much drug as SPC. Photon correlation spectroscopy analyses indicated that use of ultrasounds produced an efficient reduction in liposome size. The present approach appears suitable for incorporation capacity studies of any lipophilic drug in liposomes. PMID:21323606

di Cagno, Massimiliano; Styskala, Jakub; Hlavá?, Jan; Brandl, Martin; Bauer-Brandl, Annette; Skalko-Basnet, Natasa

2011-02-17

77

Engaging staff nurses in evidence-based research to identify nursing practice problems and solutions  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article illustrates how one academic health science center in a large metropolitan area sought to improve the quality of patient care by soliciting the input of their nursing staff in devising an action plan for change. The research model incorporated both survey and focus group methods used by nursing leaders in administration and practice to identify and prioritize nursing

Peri Rosenfeld; Elizabeth Duthie; Jacqueline Bier; Susan Bowar-Ferres; Terry Fulmer; Linda Iervolino; Margaret L. McClure; Diane O. McGivern; Marianne Roncoli

2000-01-01

78

Identifying Evidence-Based Practices in Special Education through High Quality Meta-Analysis  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The purpose of this study was to determine if meta-analysis can be used to enhance efforts to identify evidence-based practices (EBPs). In this study, the quality of included studies acted as the moderating variable. I used the quality indicators for experimental and quasi-experimental research developed by Gersten, Fuchs, Coyne, Greenwood, and…

Friedt, Brian

2012-01-01

79

Towards a Multicultural World: Identifying Work Systems, Practices and Employee Attitudes that Embrace Diversity  

Microsoft Academic Search

The research program described focuses on identifying the role of organisational culture, as reflected in workplace systems and practices, and employee and group attitudes in the outcomes of interactions among dissimilar parties. A systematic, theory-testing approach underlies the program, which aims to both develop and validate the diversity openness construct. The Perceived Dissimilarity-Openness Moderator Model developed from the research asserts

C. E. J. Hartel

2004-01-01

80

How Secondary History Teachers Use and Think About Museums: Current Practices and Untapped Promise for Promoting Historical Understanding  

Microsoft Academic Search

Museums have great potential to help secondary students develop a deep understanding of the past; however, we know little about what history teachers actually do or want to accomplish when they utilize museums. In this study, the authors draw on questionnaire and interview data from 94 secondary history teachers in Connecticut in an effort to understand teachers' objectives, practices, and

Alan S. Marcus; Thomas H. Levine; Robin S. Grenier

2012-01-01

81

siRNA library screen of human kinases and phosphatases identifies polo-like kinase 1 as a promising new target for the treatment of pediatric rhabdomyosarcomas  

PubMed Central

Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS), consisting of alveolar (aRMS) and embryonal (eRMS) subtypes, is the most common type of sarcoma in children. Currently, there are no targeted drug therapies available for RMS. In searching for new molecular therapeutic targets, we performed genome-wide siRNA library screens targeting human phosphatases (n=206) and kinases (n=691) initially against an aRMS cell line, RH30. Sixteen phosphatases and 50 kinases were identified based on growth inhibition after 72 hours. Inhibiting polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) had the most remarkable impact on growth inhibition (~80%) and apoptosis on all three RMS cell lines tested including RH30, CW9019 (aRMS) and RD (eRMS), while there was no effect in normal muscle cells. The loss of PLK1 expression and subsequent growth inhibition correlated with decreased p-CDC25C and Cyclin B1. Increased expression of WEE 1 was also noted. The induction of apoptosis after PLK1 silencing was confirmed by increased p-H2AX, propidium iodide uptake, chromatin condensation, as well as caspase-3 and PARP cleavage. Pediatric Ewing’s sarcoma (TC-32), neuroblastoma (IMR32 and KCNR) and glioblastoma (SF188) models were also highly sensitive to PLK1 inhibition. Finally, based upon cDNA microarray analyses, PLK1 mRNA was over-expressed (>1.5 fold) in 10/10 RMS cell lines and in 47% and 51% of primary aRMS (17/36 samples) and eRMS (21/41 samples) tumors, respectively, compared to normal muscles. Similarly, pediatric Ewing’s sarcoma, neuroblastoma and osteosarcoma tumors expressed high PLK1. We conclude that PLK1 could be a promising therapeutic target for the treatment of a wide range of pediatric solid tumors including RMS.

Hu, Kaiji; Lee, Cathy; Qiu, Dexin; Fotovati, Abbas; Davies, Alastair; Abu-Ali, Samah; Wai, Daniel; Lawlor, Elizabeth R.; Triche, Timothy J.; Pallen, Catherine J.; Dunn, Sandra E.

2009-01-01

82

Proactive Screening for Emotional/Behavioral Concerns in Head Start Preschools: Promising Practices and Challenges in Applied Research.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A study assessed the cross-cultural psychometric characteristics and validity of a multiple-gating screening procedure used by the Early Screening Project (ESP) to screen and identify 126 children at risk for behavioral problems in Head Start centers. Results indicate that the ESP was effective in identifying children exhibiting serious behavioral…

Feil, Edward G.; Walker, Hill; Severson, Herbert; Ball, Alison

2000-01-01

83

Classroom Practices in Teaching English--1965-66: A Third Report of the NCTE Committee to Report Promising Practices in the Teaching of English.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The 13 articles in this report fall into four categories: programs for the culturally disadvantaged, teaching composition, curriculum revision, and detailed classroom practices. Mildred A. Dawson outlines compensatory programs used in Sacramento, California, to prevent drop-outs; Lois Grose concentrates on the pattern-practice method of teaching…

National Council of Teachers of English, Champaign, IL.

84

Classroom Practices in Teaching English--1965-66: A Third Report of the NCTE Committee to Report Promising Practices in the Teaching of English.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The 13 articles in this report fall into four categories: programs for the culturally disadvantaged, teaching composition, curriculum revision, and detailed classroom practices. Mildred A. Dawson outlines compensatory programs used in Sacramento, California, to prevent drop-outs; Lois Grose concentrates on the pattern-practice method of teaching…

National Council of Teachers of English, Champaign, IL.

85

Barcode Identifiers as a Practical Tool for Reliable Species Assignment of Medically Important Black Yeast Species  

PubMed Central

Herpotrichiellaceous black yeasts and relatives comprise severe pathogens flanked by nonpathogenic environmental siblings. Reliable identification by conventional methods is notoriously difficult. Molecular identification is hampered by the sequence variability in the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) domain caused by difficult-to-sequence homopolymeric regions and by poor taxonomic attribution of sequences deposited in GenBank. Here, we present a potential solution using short barcode identifiers (27 to 50 bp) based on ITS2 ribosomal DNA (rDNA), which allows unambiguous definition of species-specific fragments. Starting from proven sequences of ex-type and authentic strains, we were able to describe 103 identifiers. Multiple BLAST searches of these proposed barcode identifiers in GenBank revealed uniqueness for 100 taxonomic entities, whereas the three remaining identifiers each matched with two entities, but the species of these identifiers could easily be discriminated by differences in the remaining ITS regions. Using the proposed barcode identifiers, a 4.1-fold increase of 100% matches in GenBank was achieved in comparison to the classical approach using the complete ITS sequences. The proposed barcode identifiers will be made accessible for the diagnostic laboratory in a permanently updated online database, thereby providing a highly practical, reliable, and cost-effective tool for identification of clinically important black yeasts and relatives.

Heinrichs, Guido; de Hoog, G. Sybren

2012-01-01

86

Development of a Tool to Identify Poverty in a Family Practice Setting: A Pilot Study  

PubMed Central

Objective. The goal of this pilot study was to develop and field-test questions for use as a poverty case-finding tool to assist primary care providers in identifying poverty in clinical practice. Methods. 156 questionnaires were completed by a convenience sample of urban and rural primary care patients presenting to four family practices in British Columbia, Canada. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses compared questionnaire responses with low-income cut-off (LICO) levels calculated for each respondent. Results. 35% of respondents were below the “poverty line” (LICO). The question “Do you (ever) have difficulty making ends meet at the end of the month?” was identified as a good predictor of poverty (sensitivity 98%; specificity 60%; OR 32.3, 95% CI 5.4–191.5). Multivariate analysis identified a 3-item case-finding tool including 2 additional questions about food and housing security (sensitivity 64.3%; specificity 94.4%; OR 30.2, 95% CI 10.3–88.1). 85% of below-LICO respondents felt that poverty screening was important and 67% felt comfortable speaking to their family physician about poverty. Conclusions. Asking patients directly about poverty may help identify patients with increased needs in primary care.

Brcic, Vanessa; Eberdt, Caroline; Kaczorowski, Janusz

2011-01-01

87

The Role of Social Work in Advancing the Practice of Indigenous Education: Obstacles and Promises in Empowerment-Oriented Social Work Practice.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The mission of social work is to help people meet their basic needs and enhance their well-being. Through a strong empowerment orientation, the profession can aid people vulnerable to oppression as a result of racism, discrimination, and poverty. Social work can be a powerful force in advancing the practice of Indigenous education. Social workers…

Yellow Bird, Michael J.; Chenault, Venida

88

Identifying individual competency in emerging areas of practice: an applied approach.  

PubMed

Competency designation is important for any discipline to define individual performance expectations. Although public health (PH) agencies have always responded to emergencies, individual expectations have not been specified. The authors identified individual competencies necessary for organizations to meet performance standards. In the first stage, a Delphi survey served to identify competencies needed by staff to respond to any emergency, including bio-terrorism, yielding competency sets for four levels of workers. In the second stage, focus groups were used to assess the competencies with public health agencies. This feedback validated the Delphi-identified competencies as accurate and necessary for emergency response. The authors demonstrate the feasibility of using these methods to arrive at statements of value to PH practice at a reasonable investment of resources. PMID:12214683

Gebbie, Kristine; Merrill, Jacqueline; Hwang, Inseon; Gupta, Meera; Btoush, Rula; Wagner, Monte

2002-09-01

89

Identifying Knowledge-Attitude-Practice Gaps to Enhance HPV Vaccine Diffusion.  

PubMed

To examine differences in knowledge, attitudes, and related practices among adopters and nonadopters of the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, the researchers conducted 83 in-depth interviews with 18- to 26-year-old women. The study identified knowledge-attitude-practice gaps in the context of the HPV vaccine to explain why diffusion of a preventive innovation (such as the HPV vaccine) requires targeted risk communication strategies in order to increase demand. Salient findings included similarities between vaccinated and unvaccinated women's lack of knowledge and uncertainties about HPV and cervical cancer. Vaccinated women who had no knowledge of HPV or no-risk/low-risk perceptions of HPV reported receiving vaccination, indicating HPV risk protection behavior could precede knowledge acquisition for vaccinated women. These vaccinated women identified an interpersonal network supportive of vaccination and reported supportive social influences. Among unvaccinated women, unsupportive vaccination attitudes included low perceived personal risk of HPV. In contrast, unvaccinated women often cited erroneous beliefs that HPV could be avoided by abstinence, monogamy, and knowledge of their partners' sexual history as reasons that the vaccine was not personally relevant. Unvaccinated women cited interpersonal influences that activated short- and long-term vaccination safety and efficacy concerns. Different levels of fear regarding the HPV vaccine may underlie (a) attitudinal differences between vaccinated and unvaccinated women in perceived vaccination value and (b) attitude-practice gaps. PMID:23767775

Cohen, Elisia L; Head, Katharine J

2013-06-14

90

Practical method to identify orbital anomaly as spacecraft breakup in the geostationary region  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Identifying a spacecraft breakup is an essential issue to define the current orbital debris environment. This paper proposes a practical method to identify an orbital anomaly, which appears as a significant discontinuity in the observation data, as a spacecraft breakup. The proposed method is applicable to orbital anomalies in the geostationary region. Long-term orbital evolutions of breakup fragments may conclude that their orbital planes will converge into several corresponding regions in inertial space even if the breakup epoch is not specified. This empirical method combines the aforementioned conclusion with the search strategy developed at Kyushu University, which can identify origins of observed objects as fragments released from a specified spacecraft. This practical method starts with selecting a spacecraft that experienced an orbital anomaly, and formulates a hypothesis to generate fragments from the anomaly. Then, the search strategy is applied to predict the behavior of groups of fragments hypothetically generated. Outcome of this predictive analysis specifies effectively when, where and how we should conduct optical measurements using ground-based telescopes. Objects detected based on the outcome are supposed to be from the anomaly, so that we can confirm the anomaly as a spacecraft breakup to release the detected objects. This paper also demonstrates observation planning for a spacecraft anomaly in the geostationary region.

Hanada, Toshiya; Uetsuhara, Masahiko; Nakaniwa, Yoshitaka

2012-07-01

91

Searching Usenet for Virtual Communities of Practice: Using Mixed Methods to Identify the Constructs of Wenger's Theory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Introduction: This research set out to determine whether communities of practice can be entirely Internet-based by formally applying Wenger's theoretical framework to Internet collectives. Method: A model of a virtual community of practice was developed which included the constructs Wenger identified in co-located communities of practice: mutual…

Murillo, Enrique

2008-01-01

92

Lessons learnt from promising practices in community engagement for the elimination of new HIV infections in children by 2015 and keeping their mothers alive: summary of a desk review  

PubMed Central

Introduction Through The Global Plan Towards the Elimination of New HIV Infections Among Children by 2015 and Keeping their Mothers Alive, leaders have called for broader action to strengthen the involvement of communities. The Global Plan aspires to reduce new HIV infections among children by 90 percent, and to reduce AIDS-related maternal mortality by half. This article summarizes the results of a review commissioned by UNAIDS to help inform stakeholders on promising practices in community engagement to accelerate progress towards these ambitious goals. Methods This research involved extensive literature review and key informant interviews. Community engagement was defined to include participation, mobilization and empowerment while excluding activities that involve communities solely as service recipients. A promising practice was defined as one for which there is documented evidence of its effectiveness in achieving intended results and some indication of replicability, scale up and/or sustainability. Results Promising practices that increased the supply of preventing mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) services included extending community cadres, strengthening linkages with community- and faith-based organizations and civic participation in programme monitoring. Practices to improve demand for PMTCT included community-led social and behaviour change communication, peer support and participative approaches to generate local solutions. Practices to create an enabling environment included community activism and government leadership for greater involvement of communities. Committed leadership at all levels, facility, community, district and national, is crucial to success. Genuine community engagement requires a rights-based, capacity-building approach and sustained financial and technical investment. Participative formative research is a first step in building community capacity and helps to ensure programme relevance. Building on existing structures, rather than working in parallel to them, improves programme efficiency, effectiveness and sustainability. Monitoring, innovation and information sharing are critical to scale up. Conclusions Ten recommendations on community engagement are offered for ending vertical transmission and enhancing the health of mothers and families: (1) expand the frontline health workforce, (2) increase engagement with community- and faith-based organizations, (3) engage communities in programme monitoring and accountability, (4) promote community-driven social and behaviour change communication including grassroots campaigns and dialogues, (5) expand peer support, (6) empower communities to address programme barriers, (7) support community activism for political commitment, (8) share tools for community engagement, (9) develop better indicators for community involvement and (10) conduct cost analyses of various community engagement strategies. As programmes expand, care should be taken to support and not to undermine work that communities are already doing, but rather to actively identify and build on such efforts.

Gulaid, Laurie Ackerman; Kiragu, Karusa

2012-01-01

93

Interactive Multimedia: Practice and Promise.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This book describes developments in interactive multimedia (IMM) in the early 1990s. Its aim is to provide educators, students, trainers, librarians, managers, and practitioners with an overview, not only of the directions and uses of the technology, but also of the research foundations and educational and contextual issues that need to be…

Latchem, Colin, Ed.; And Others

94

Client-identified important events in psychotherapy: interactional structures and practices.  

PubMed

This study describes interactional structures and practices in client-identified important events in psychotherapy sessions. Twelve of 16 events from seven client-therapist dyads were found to contain disagreement. A turn-by-turn investigation using conversation analysis displayed three different ways that therapists used to handle disagreement. The first was to orient to the client's disagreement cues by inviting the client to elaborate his or her point and to establish a shared understanding. The second was to orient to the client's disagreement cues but define the therapist's point of view as more relevant to the project at hand. The third was a single case where the therapist did not orient to the client's disagreement cues. The results suggest that disagreement patterns may be an interesting focus for further exploration of microprocesses within therapy sessions. PMID:19821183

Viklund, Erika; Holmqvist, Rolf; Zetterqvist Nelson, Karin

2010-03-01

95

[Approach to a practical method for screening and identifying microorganism genera from urine (author's transl)].  

PubMed

In this study the author reported upon a practical new system for screening and identifying the microbial agents causing urinary tract infections. This system is composed of a combination of 3 screening procedures (pH-value + nitrite-test + catalase-test) and 8 selective culture media for the purpose of genus identification within 24 hours (Uripret-G). A total of 130 cultures was investigated. The employed microorganisms were mainly recovered from urine samples. They included the following species: Candida albicans, Citrobacter freundii, Enterobacter aerogenes, Enterobacter cloacae, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Proteus inconstans, Proteus mirabilis, Proteus morganii, Proteus rettgeri, Proteus vulgaris, Serratia liquefaciens, Serratia marcescens, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Streptococcus faecalis and Streptococcus faecium. Employing coded cultures not only monoinfections but also multiinfections in urine samples were simulated. Under the circumstances of investigation it was possible with the help of the new system to reidentify the genera of all but two of the 130 employed microorganisms. PMID:11179

Abdou, M A

1976-10-01

96

Identifying context factors explaining physician's low performance in communication assessment: an explorative study in general practice  

PubMed Central

Background Communication is a key competence for health care professionals. Analysis of registrar and GP communication performance in daily practice, however, suggests a suboptimal application of communication skills. The influence of context factors could reveal why communication performance levels, on average, do not appear adequate. The context of daily practice may require different skills or specific ways of handling these skills, whereas communication skills are mostly treated as generic. So far no empirical analysis of the context has been made. Our aim was to identify context factors that could be related to GP communication. Methods A purposive sample of real-life videotaped GP consultations was analyzed (N = 17). As a frame of reference we chose the MAAS-Global, a widely used assessment instrument for medical communication. By inductive reasoning, we analyzed the GP behaviour in the consultation leading to poor item scores on the MAAS-Global. In these cases we looked for the presence of an intervening context factor, and how this might explain the actual GP communication behaviour. Results We reached saturation after having viewed 17 consultations. We identified 19 context factors that could potentially explain the deviation from generic recommendations on communication skills. These context factors can be categorized into doctor-related, patient-related, and consultation-related factors. Conclusions Several context factors seem to influence doctor-patient communication, requiring the GP to apply communication skills differently from recommendations on communication. From this study we conclude that there is a need to explicitly account for context factors in the assessment of GP (and GP registrar) communication performance. The next step is to validate our findings.

2011-01-01

97

ENHANCING RESERVOIR MANAGEMENT IN THE APPALACHIAN BASIN BY IDENTIFYING TECHNICAL BARRIER AND PREFERRED PRACTICES  

SciTech Connect

The Preferred Upstream Management Practices (PUMP) project, a two-year study sponsored by the United States Department of Energy (USDOE), had three primary objectives: (1) the identification of problems, problematic issues, potential solutions and preferred practices related to oil production; (2) the creation of an Appalachian Regional Council to oversee and continue this investigation beyond the end of the project; and (3) the dissemination of investigative results to the widest possible audience, primarily by means of an interactive website. Investigation and identification of oil production problems and preferred management practices began with a Problem Identification Workshop in January of 2002. Three general issues were selected by participants for discussion: Data Management; Reservoir Engineering; and Drilling Practices. At the same meeting, the concept of the creation of an oversight organization to evaluate and disseminated preferred management practices (PMP's) after the end of the project was put forth and volunteers were solicited. In-depth interviews were arranged with oil producers to gain more insight into problems and potential solutions. Project members encountered considerable reticence on the part of interviewees when it came to revealing company-specific production problems or company-specific solutions. This was the case even though interviewees were assured that all responses would be held in confidence. Nevertheless, the following production issues were identified and ranked in order of decreasing importance: Water production including brine disposal; Management of production and business data; Oil field power costs; Paraffin accumulation; Production practices including cementing. An number of secondary issues were also noted: Problems associated with Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) and Waterflooding; Reservoir characterization; Employee availability, training, and safety; and Sale and Purchase problems. One item was mentioned both in interviews and in the Workshop, as, perhaps, the key issue related to oil production in the Appalachian region - the price of a barrel of oil. Project members sought solutions to production problems from a number of sources. In general, the Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) website, both regional and national, proved to be a fertile source of information. Technical issues included water production, paraffin accumulation, production practices, EOR and waterflooding were addressed in a number of SPE papers. Articles on reservoir characterization were found in both the AAPG Bulletin and in SPE papers. Project members extracted topical and keyword information from pertinent articles and websites and combined them in a database that was placed on the PUMP website. Because of difficulties finding potential members with the qualifications, interests, and flexibility of schedule to allow a long-term commitment, it was decided to implement the PMP Regional Council as a subcommittee of the Producer Advisory Group (PAG) sponsored by Appalachian Region PTTC. The advantages of this decision are that the PAG is in already in existence as a volunteer group interested in problem identification and implementation of solutions and that PAG members are unpaid, so no outside funds will be required to sustain the group. The PUMP website became active in October of 2002. The site is designed to evolve; as new information becomes available, it can be readily added to the site or the site can be modified to accommodate it. The site is interactive allowing users to search within the PUMP site, within the Appalachian Region PTTC site, or within the whole internet through the input of user-supplied key words for information on oil production problems and solutions. Since its inception in the Fall of 2002, the PUMP site has experienced a growing number of users of increasingly diverse nature and from an increasing geographic area. This indicates that the site is reaching its target audience in the Appalachian region and beyond. Following up on a commitment to technology transfer, a tota

Ronald R. McDowell; Khashayar Aminian; Katharine L. Avary; John M. Bocan; Michael Ed. Hohn; Douglas G. Patchen

2003-09-01

98

A Case Study with an Identified Bully: Policy and Practice Implications  

PubMed Central

Objective: Bullying is a serious public health problem that may include verbal or physical injury as well as social isolation or exclusion. As a result, research is needed to establish a database for policies and interventions designed to prevent bullying and its negative effects. This paper presents a case study that contributes to the literature by describing an intervention for bullies that has implications for practice and related policies regarding bullying. Methods: An individualized intervention for an identified bully was implemented using the Participatory Culture-Specific Intervention Model (PCSIM; Nastasi, Moore, & Varjas, 2004) with a seventh-grade middle school student. Ecological and culture-specific perspectives were used to develop and implement the intervention that included psychoeducational sessions with the student and consultation with the parent and school personnel. A mixed methods intervention design was used with the following informants: the target student, the mother of the student, a teacher and the school counselor. Qualitative data included semi-structured interviews with the parent, teacher and student, narrative classroom observations and evaluation/feedback forms filled out by the student and interventionist. Quantitative data included the following quantitative surveys (i.e., Child Self Report Post Traumatic Stress Reaction Index and the Behavior Assessment Scale for Children). Both qualitative and quantitative data were used to evaluate the acceptability, integrity and efficacy of this intervention. Results: The process of intervention design, implementation and evaluation are described through an illustrative case study. Qualitative and quantitative findings indicated a decrease in internalizing, externalizing and bullying behaviors as reported by the teacher and the mother, and a high degree of acceptability and treatment integrity as reported by multiple stakeholders. Conclusion: This case study makes important contributions by describing an intervention that is targeted to specific needs of the bully by designing culture specific interventions and working with the student’s unique environmental contexts. Contributions also are made by illustrating the use of mixed methods to document acceptability, integrity and efficacy of an intervention with documented positive effects in these areas. In addition, implications for policy and practice related to the treatment of students identified as bullies and future research needs are discussed.

Huddleston, Lillie B.; Varjas, Kris; Meyers, Joel; Cadenhead, Catherine

2011-01-01

99

Identifying factors that encourage and hinder knowledge sharing in a longstanding online community of practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

Despite the strong interests among practitioners, there is a knowledge gap with regard to online communities of practice. This study examines knowledge sharing among critical-care and advanced-practice nurses, who are engaged in a longstanding online community of practice. Data were collected about members' online knowledge contribution as well as motivations for sharing or not sharing knowledge with others. In sum,

Khe Foon Hew; Noriko Hara

2006-01-01

100

Using Exemplary Business Practices to Identify Buddhist and Confucian Ethical Value Systems 1  

Microsoft Academic Search

ABSTRACTInitially, a brief history of Buddhism and Confucianism describes for the reader a framework developed to determine right versus wrong action and to guide followers of these religions to do the right thing in social or business practice. In addition, this article uncovers exemplary business practices grounded in Buddhist and Confucian ethical values system and practiced in the global business

JAMES WEBER

101

Stories of Change: Narrative Perspectives on Elementary Teachers' Identifying and Implementation of New Mathematics Teaching Practices  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Recent mathematics education reforms (NCTM, 2000) have resulted in increased opportunities for teachers to learn new teaching practices. However, the relationship between teacher professional development and the actual implementation of new practices is unclear. I posit that a teachers' decision to implement newly learned practices is strongly…

Oslund, Joy Ann

2009-01-01

102

Stories of Change: Narrative Perspectives on Elementary Teachers' Identifying and Implementation of New Mathematics Teaching Practices  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Recent mathematics education reforms (NCTM, 2000) have resulted in increased opportunities for teachers to learn new teaching practices. However, the relationship between teacher professional development and the actual implementation of new practices is unclear. I posit that a teachers' decision to implement newly learned practices is strongly…

Oslund, Joy Ann

2009-01-01

103

Identifying key factors in homeowner's adoption of water quality best management practices.  

PubMed

The recognition of the significance of the residential environment in contributing to non-point source (NPS) pollution and the inherently dispersed nature of NPS pollution itself that presents significant challenges to effective regulation has led to the creation and dissemination of best management practices (BMPs) that can reduce the impacts of NPS pollution (Environmental Protection Agency US, Protecting water quality from urban runoff, http://www.epa.gov/npdes/pubs/nps_urban-facts_final.pdf , 2003). However, very few studies have examined the factors that influence the adoption of BMPs by residential homeowners, despite the fact that residential environments have been identified as one of the most significant contributors to NPS pollution. Given this need, the purpose of this project was to explore how demographic and knowledge-based factors predict adoption of residential BMPs in an urbanizing watershed in Northern Illinois using statistical analyses of survey data collected as part of a watershed planning process. The findings indicate that broad knowledge of BMPs is the strongest predictor of use for a specific BMP. Knowledge of BMPs is strongly correlated with their use, which reinforces the need for educational programs, even among those assumed to be knowledgeable about BMPs. PMID:23609309

Brehm, Joan M; Pasko, Danielle K; Eisenhauer, Brian W

2013-04-23

104

Identifying Perceived Barriers and Facilitators to Culturally Competent Practice for School Social Workers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study presents descriptive findings from self-reported qualitative and quantitative data on barriers and facilitators to culturally competent school social work practice. The study highlights the need for the development of evaluative methods for the purpose of examining how elements within the practice environment affect school social work…

Teasley, Martell; Gourdine, Ruby; Canfield, James

2010-01-01

105

Using Relative Physician Effort to Identify Mispriced Procedures: The 1987 Physicians' Practice Follow-Up Survey.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The 1987 Physicians' Practice Follow-up Survey was sponsored jointly by the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation (ASPE) and the Health Care Financing Administration (HCFA) and was designed to address several high priority health policy issues. ...

J. B. Mitchell J. Cromwell M. L. Rosenbach S. Hurdle W. B. Stason

1988-01-01

106

The Education for Homeless Children and Youth Program: Learning To Succeed. Executive Summary. Volume I: Reducing Barriers for Homeless Children and Youth for Access and Achievement. Volume II: Educating Homeless Children and Youth: A Resource Guide for Promising Practices.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document, which summarizes the study, "Reducing Barriers for Homeless Children and Youth for Access and Achievement," and the guide, "Educating Homeless Children and Youth: A Resource Guide for Promising Practices," provides evidence that state education agencies and local educational agencies have made significant progress in revising laws,…

Department of Education, Washington, DC. Planning and Evaluation Service.

107

Noteworthy practices as identified by the US Department of Energy environmental, safety, and health first 31 Tiger Team assessments  

SciTech Connect

Noteworthy Practices are exceptional ways of accomplishing a performance objective or some aspect of it. Other DOE facilities are encouraged to adopt these practices when they are applicable to their operation. Noteworthy Practices included in this report have been drawn from the first 31 Tiger Team Assessments at DOE sites. This report includes all noteworthy practices listed in an earlier tabulation (June 1990) which the Secretary of the US Department of Energy distributed for information on July 31, 1990. This earlier tabulation included noteworthy practices from the first thirteen Tiger Team Assessments. A brief key-word title has been assigned to each Noteworthy Practice. This title provides a brief description of each Noteworthy Practice. The reader may peruse these titles in the table of contents to identify Noteworthy Practices that may be applicable to their site, facility, or operations. A flexible-disk copy of this compilation is also available in ASCII format on personal-computer, DOS-formatted disks from the Office of Special Projects in the Office of Environment, Safety, and Health at the Headquarters of the US Department of Energy. The ASCII file may be used in combination with word processing software for more detailed word and text-string searches.

Not Available

1992-05-01

108

The use of benchmarking to identify top performing critical care units: A preliminary assessment of their policies and practices  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose: To describe the policies and practices of intensive care units (ICUs) with good patient survival and highly efficient resource use and to identify relevant variables for future investigation. Materials and Methods: We used clinical data for 359,715 patients from 108 ICUs to compare the ratios of actual with Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) III predicted hospital mortality,

Jack E. Zimmerman; Carlos Alzola; Kathryn T. Von Rueden

2003-01-01

109

Identifying and Clarifying Values and Reason Statements that Promote Effective Food Parenting Practices, Using Intensive Interviews  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: Generate and test parents' understanding of values and associated reason statements to encourage effective food parenting practices. Methods: This study was cross-sectional. Sixteen parents from different ethnic groups (African American, white, and Hispanic) living with their 3- to 5-year-old child were recruited. Interested parents…

Beltran, Alicia; Hingle, Melanie D.; Knesek, Jessica; O'Connor, Teresia; Baranowski, Janice; Thompson, Debbe; Baranowski, Tom

2011-01-01

110

The Use of Single-Subject Research to Identify Evidence-Based Practice in Special Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Single-subject research plays an important role in the development of evidence-based practice in special education. The defining features of single-subject research are presented, the contributions of single-subject research for special education are reviewed, and a specific proposal is offered for using single-subject research to document…

Horner, Robert H.; Carr, Edward G.; Halle, James; McGee, Gail; Odom, Samuel; Wolery, Mark

2005-01-01

111

Within a Family-Centered Practice, How Can Family Outcomes Be Identified?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Family-centered practice (care, intervention, services, or help giving) and family-focused, and family-based care are terms used interchangeably over the past 60 years to describe an approach to working with children with disabilities and their families. Common beliefs fundamental to the implementation of a program that incorporates…

Jeffries, Lynn

2009-01-01

112

The Evolution of a Teacher Community of Practice: Identifying Facilitating and Constraining Factors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper presents findings from a larger, qualitative study that explored the potential of a school-based teacher community of practice as a model for a transformative form of teacher professional development. This paper reports on initial findings from a grounded theory exploration of the factors that facilitated and constrained the evolution…

Borg, Tracey

2012-01-01

113

Identifying Best Practices for Multicultural Education in a Psychology Graduate Program  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study was designed to examine teaching practices at Fuller Theological Seminary's graduate psychology program, using secondary analysis of existing data. Lee, Shields, and Oh (2008) collected data from approximately 300 students who evaluated the helpfulness of 18 different instructional methodologies used at Fuller, and answered questions…

Hunnicutt, Adrienne D.

2010-01-01

114

The Evolution of a Teacher Community of Practice: Identifying Facilitating and Constraining Factors  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This paper presents findings from a larger, qualitative study that explored the potential of a school-based teacher community of practice as a model for a transformative form of teacher professional development. This paper reports on initial findings from a grounded theory exploration of the factors that facilitated and constrained the evolution…

Borg, Tracey

2012-01-01

115

Identifying the medical practice after total hip arthroplasty using an integrated hybrid approach.  

PubMed

A critical option of total hip arthroplasty (THA) is considered only when tried more conservative treatments but continued to have pain, stiffness, or problems with the function of ones hip. THA plays one of major concerns under the waves of the rapid growth of aging populations and the constrained health care resources in Taiwan. Moreover, prior studies indicated that imbalanced class distribution problems do exist in the constructed classification model and cause seriously negative effects on model performances in the health care industry. Therefore, this study proposes an integrated hybrid approach to provide an alternate method for classifying the quality (e.g., the staying length in hospital) of medical practice with an imbalanced class problem after performing a THA procedure for hip replacement patients and their doctors in the health care industry. The proposed approach is constituted by seven components: expert knowledge, global discretization, imbalanced bootstrap technique, reduct and core methods, rough sets, rule induction, and rule filter. The proposed approach is illustrated in practice by examining an experimental dataset from the National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD) in Taiwan. The experimental results reveal that the proposed approach has better performance than the listed methods under evaluation criteria. The output created by the rough set LEM2 algorithm is a comprehensible decision rule set that can be applied in knowledge-based health care services as desired. The analytical results provide useful THA information for both academics and practitioners and these results could be applicable to other diseases or to other countries with similar social and cultural practices. PMID:22795228

Chen, You-Shyang; Cheng, Ching-Hsue

2012-07-15

116

Identifying suicidal ideation among older adults in a general practice setting  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: Up to 70% of older people who commit suicide consult a general practitioner (GP) in the month prior to their death. The purpose of this study was to identify the clinical and demographic characteristics of older adults who are contemplating suicide and are in contact with a GP. Methods: We utilised a cross-sectional study to investigate the association between

Jon J. Pfaff; Osvaldo P. Almeida

2004-01-01

117

Obstructive sleep apnea among commercial motor vehicle drivers: using evidence-based practice to identify risk factors.  

PubMed

Commercial motor vehicle driving is a hazardous occupation, having the third highest fatality rate among common U.S. jobs. Among the estimated 14 million U.S. commercial motor vehicle drivers, the prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea is reported to be 17% to 28%. Despite the identified increased prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea among commercial motor vehicle drivers, federal law does not require that they be screened for obstructive sleep apnea. This article presents an evidence-based practice change project; the authors developed, implemented, and evaluated a screening program to identify commercial motor vehicle drivers' risk for obstructive sleep apnea during commercial driver medical examinations. The results of this practice change indicated screening for obstructive sleep apnea during the commercial driver medical examination led to improved identification of obstructive sleep apnea risk among commercial motor vehicle drivers and should be a clinical standard in occupational health clinics. [Workplace Health Saf 2013;61(11):479-484.]. PMID:24144003

Olszewski, Kimberly; Wolf, Debra

2013-10-23

118

The reality of identifying early oral cancer in the general dental practice.  

PubMed

Oral cancer has a good prognosis when detected at an early stage yet half of patients diagnosed with oral cancer in the UK have advanced stage disease, for which prognosis is poor. Although most oral tumours are preceded by pre-malignant lesions, the asymptomatic nature of oral cancer, diagnostic delay, and the possibility of hidden tumours, limit the ease at which oral cancer is detected early. Furthermore, in the UK, oral cancer is a relatively rare disease and does not have mutually exclusive signs or symptoms. Responsibility for the early detection of oral cancer is currently placed on the general dental practitioner. However, the current recommendations to screen for oral cancer at every routine check-up is not practical and has not produced the intended results. Selective opportunistic screening may be a more realistic and effective solution and a simple alert system is proposed to assist its implementation. PMID:20418830

McGurk, M; Scott, S E

2010-04-24

119

Three year follow up of patients with raised blood pressure identified at health checks in general practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE--To assess the extent of three year follow up of blood pressure, weight, and smoking habit in patients with raised blood pressure identified at health checks. DESIGN--Retrospective audit of medical and nursing records. SETTING--Three general practices in Oxfordshire. PATIENTS--386 of 448 patients with raised blood pressure (diastolic greater than or equal to 90 or systolic greater than or equal to

D. Mant; C. McKinlay; A. Fuller; T. Randall; E. M. Fullard; J. Muir

1989-01-01

120

Practical method to identify orbital anomaly as spacecraft breakup in the geostationary region  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Identifying spacecraft breakup events is an essential issue for better understanding of the current orbital debris environment. This paper proposes an observation planning approach to identify an orbital anomaly, which appears as a significant discontinuity in archived orbital history, as a spacecraft breakup. The proposed approach is applicable to orbital anomalies in the geostationary region. The proposed approach selects a spacecraft that experienced an orbital anomaly, and then predicts trajectories of possible fragments of the spacecraft at an observation epoch. This paper theoretically demonstrates that observation planning for the possible fragments can be conducted. To do this, long-term behaviors of the possible fragments are evaluated. It is concluded that intersections of their trajectories will converge into several corresponding regions in the celestial sphere even if the breakup epoch is not specified and it has uncertainty of the order of several weeks.

Uetsuhara, Masahiko; Hanada, Toshiya

2013-09-01

121

Separating Contract and Promise  

Microsoft Academic Search

Contract has been conceptualized as a species of promise. Treating contractual promise as a kind of promise highlights certain important aspects of contracting, but it also obscures essential differences between legally binding and everyday, or what I will call “private,” promises. The moral character of a private promise depends on the fact that it is not only freely made but

Aditi Bagchi

2007-01-01

122

Best practices to identify gay, lesbian, bisexual, or questioning youth in primary care.  

PubMed

Compared to heterosexual youth, gay, lesbian, bisexual, and questioning (GLBQ) adolescents engage disproportionately in a variety of health risk behaviors and are at risk for numerous negative health outcomes. Adolescents reporting same-sex sexual attraction, romantic relationships, and sexual experience are also at increased risk, regardless of self-identified sexual orientation. While adolescents feel it is important to discuss sexuality with primary care providers, they are unlikely to initiate discussion about sexuality or to openly disclose GLBQ sexual orientation to their providers. Primary care providers should identify GLBQ youth to increase delivery of targeted preventive health services to this at-risk population. However, providers do not routinely address sexual orientation in their clinical encounters with adolescents, and the majority of GLBQ youth are not identified in the primary care setting. To better serve the needs of this population, providers should initiate open, sensitive, nonjudgmental, and confidential discussion of sexuality with all adolescents. Providers should inquire about sexual orientation, sexual attraction, romantic relationships, and sexual partners. PMID:23705302

Chaplic, Kyle C; Allen, Patricia Jackson

123

Identifying specific language impairment in deaf children acquiring British Sign Language: implications for theory and practice.  

PubMed

This paper presents the first ever group study of specific language impairment (SLI) in users of sign language. A group of 50 children were referred to the study by teachers and speech and language therapists. Individuals who fitted pre-determined criteria for SLI were then systematically assessed. Here, we describe in detail the performance of 13 signing deaf children aged 5-14 years on normed tests of British Sign Language (BSL) sentence comprehension, repetition of nonsense signs, expressive grammar and narrative skills, alongside tests of non-verbal intelligence and fine motor control. Results show these children to have a significant language delay compared to their peers matched for age and language experience. This impaired development cannot be explained by poor exposure to BSL, or by lower general cognitive, social, or motor abilities. As is the case for SLI in spoken languages, we find heterogeneity within the group in terms of which aspects of language are affected and the severity of the impairment. We discuss the implications of the existence of language impairments in a sign language for theories of SLI and clinical practice. PMID:20306624

Mason, Kathryn; Rowley, Katherine; Marshall, Chloe R; Atkinson, Joanna R; Herman, Rosalind; Woll, Bencie; Morgan, Gary

2010-03-01

124

[Promising technologies in surgery].  

PubMed

In modern conditions of local wars and armed conflicts, the basic principle of medical care is to reduce injuries stages of medical evacuation, aimed at accelerating the provision of specialized surgical care. In this regard, significantly increases the need for the development and implementation of new high-tech methods that can improve quality of care, both on the battlefield and on the stages of specialized surgical care. A promising direction is the introduction into clinical practice: minimally invasive technologies, the concept of hybrid navigation surgery, operations with the use of laser technology and robotics, advanced and extremely extensive interventions to cancer patients; technology reduces blood loss, use of cell therapy, transplantation techniques, the development of the concept of organ transplantation, lost in combat trauma, the creation of artificial organs and tissues, the creation of personal protective equipment, integrated with a system of combat, etc. PMID:24000635

Kotiv, B N; Ma?strenko, N A

2013-06-01

125

Pharmaceutical Care Plan Examinations to Identify Students at Risk for Poor Performance in Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experiences  

PubMed Central

Objectives To evaluate early predictors of advanced pharmacy practice experience (APPE) performance using either timed pharmaceutical care plan (TPCP) reports of 4 case histories or traditional lecture-based pharmacotherapy course examinations. Methods Statistical process control (SPC) methods were used to identify a group of third-year pharmacy students “at risk” for poor APPE performance (defined as an APPE grade point average of < 3.0). Examination scores from an integrated lecture-based pharmacotherapy sequence were used for comparison. Results TPCP scores but not lecture-based examination scores successfully identified 6 of 10 students who ultimately performed poorly in their APPEs. Conclusion Adaptation of SPC methods to assess student performance during problem-based learning (PBL) case reports is a useful technique for identifying students “at risk” for poor APPE performance.

2008-01-01

126

Persistent Identifiers in the Publication and Citation of Scientific Data - Theory and Practice  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In the last decade data driven research has become a third pillar of scientific work alongside with theoretical reasoning and experiment. Greatly increased computing power and storage, together with web services and other electronic resources have facilitated a quantum leap in new research based on the analysis of great amounts of data. However, traditional scientific communication only slowly changes to new media other than an emulation of paper. This leaves many data inaccessible and, in the long run exposes valuable data to the risk of loss. To improve access to data and to create incentives for scientists to make their data accessible, a group of German data centres initiated the project "Publication and Citation of Scientific Data" (STD-DOI) which was funded by the German Science Foundation DFG for the periods 2003-2005 and 2006-2008. In this project the German National Library for Science and Technology (TIB Hannover), together with the German Research Centre for Geoscience (GFZ Potsdam), Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research (AWI) Bremerhaven, University of Bremen, the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology in Hamburg, and the DLR German Remote Sensing Data Center set up the first system to assign DOIs to data sets and for their publication. A prerequisite for data to be made available is a proper citation. This means that all fields mandatory for a bibliographic citation are included. In addition, a mechanism is needed that ensures that the location of the referenced data on the internet can be resolved at any time. In the past, this was a problematic issue because URLs are short-lived, many becoming invalid after only a few months. Data publication on the internet therefore needs a system of reliable pointers to a web publication to make these publications citeable. To achieve this persistence of identifiers for their conventional publications many scientific publishers use Digital Object Identifiers (DOI). The identifier is resolved through the handle system to the valid location (URL) where the dataset can be found. This approach meets one of the prerequisites for citeability of scientific data published online. In addition, the valid bibliographic citation can be included in the catalogues of German National Library of Science and Technology (TIB). The data publications themselves are held at discipline specific data centres, for instance ICSU World Data Centers. The data providers take on the role of publication agents and are responsible for the long-term availability of the data. The discipline specific publication agents are also responsible for the quality of the published data. Syntactic and semantic quality checks are used to secure data quality. Data may come as data supplements to scientific papers, or as time series from environmental monitoring systems, or as novel form of publication in a data journal. The latter requires a peer-review process, analogous to conventional science publications.

Klump, J.; Brase, J.; Diepenbroek, M.; Grobe, H.; Hildenbrand, B.; Hoeck, H.; Lautenschlager, M.; Sens, I.

2008-12-01

127

Defense Programs benchmarking in Chicago, April 1994: Identifying best practices in the pollution prevention programs of selected private industries  

SciTech Connect

The Office of Defense Programs (DP) was the first US Department of Energy (DOE) Cognizant Secretarial Office (CSO) to attempt to benchmark private industries for best-in-class practices in the field of pollution prevention. Defense Programs` intent in this effort is to identify and bring to DOE field offices strategic and technological tools that have helped private companies minimize waste and prevent pollution. Defense Programs` premier benchmarking study focused on business practices and process improvements used to implement exceptional pollution prevention programs in four privately owned companies. The current interest in implementing partnerships information exchange, and technology transfer with the private sector prompted DP to continue to seek best practices in the area of pollution prevention through a second benchmarking endeavor in May 1994. This report presents the results of that effort. The decision was made to select host facilities that own processes similar to those at DOE plants and laboratories, that have programs that have been recognized on a local or national level, that have an interest in partnering with the Department on an information-sharing basis, and that are located in proximity to each other. The DP benchmarking team assessed the pollution prevention programs of five companies in the Chicago area--GE Plastics, Navistar, Northrop Corporation, Sundstrand and Caterpillar. At all facilities visited, Ozone Depleting Compounds (ODCs), hazardous wastes, releases under the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA), waste water and non-hazardous wastes are being eliminated, replaced, reduced, recycled and reused whenever practicable.

NONE

1995-12-01

128

Exploring the Promise of Eudaimonic Well-Being Within the Practice of Health Promotion: The “How” is as Important as the “What”  

Microsoft Academic Search

A brief historical and philosophical analysis suggests that the biomedical model and prevention have been the pillars of health\\u000a promotion practices with the underlying assumption that these concepts provide answers to people’s health woes. Another observation\\u000a resulting from this analysis is that biomedical, prevention, and more recently, wellness, do not differ much from each other\\u000a paradigmatically (e.g., instrumental rationality) and,

Jay Kimiecik

2011-01-01

129

Using the Delphi Approach to Identify Priority Areas for Health Visiting Practice in an Area of Deprivation  

PubMed Central

Families with children living in areas of high deprivation face multiple health and social challenges, and this high level of need has impacts on the work of health practitioners working in such areas. All families in the UK with children under five years have access to health visiting services, and health visitors have a key role in mitigating the effects of deprivation by addressing health needs through evidence based practice. This paper reports the first stage of a project in Tower Hamlets, London, an area of significant deprivation, which aims to develop an evidence-based toolkit to support health visitors in their practice with families. The first stage used a modified Delphi process to identify the priority health needs of families in the area between June and July 2012. The three-stage Delphi process involved 25 people: four health visitors, four other members of the health visiting service, and 17 representatives of other services working with families. A focus group event was followed by a second event where individuals completed a questionnaire ranking the 27 priorities identified in the first event. The consultation process concluded with participants completing a second questionnaire, by email, confirming or changing their prioritisation of the topics.

Bryar, Rosamund; Anto-Awuakye, Sandra; Christie, Janice; Davis, Claire; Plumb, Karen

2013-01-01

130

Developing Mathematically Promising Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This book, written on the recommendation of the Task Force on Mathematically Promising Students, investigates issues involving the development of promising mathematics students. Recommendations are made concerning topics such as the definition of promising students; the identification of such students; appropriate curriculum, instruction, and…

Sheffield, Linda Jensen, Ed.

131

Developing Mathematically Promising Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book, written on the recommendation of the Task Force on Mathematically Promising Students, investigates issues involving the development of promising mathematics students. Recommendations are made concerning topics such as the definition of promising students; the identification of such students; appropriate curriculum, instruction, and…

Sheffield, Linda Jensen, Ed.

132

Developing clinical practice guidelines: target audiences, identifying topics for guidelines, guideline group composition and functioning and conflicts of interest.  

PubMed

Clinical practice guidelines are one of the foundations of efforts to improve health care. In 1999, we authored a paper about methods to develop guidelines. Since it was published, the methods of guideline development have progressed both in terms of methods and necessary procedures and the context for guideline development has changed with the emergence of guideline clearing houses and large scale guideline production organisations (such as the UK National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence). It therefore seems timely to, in a series of three articles, update and extend our earlier paper. In this first paper we discuss: the target audience(s) for guidelines and their use of guidelines; identifying topics for guidelines; guideline group composition (including consumer involvement) and the processes by which guideline groups function and the important procedural issue of managing conflicts of interest in guideline development. PMID:22762776

Eccles, Martin P; Grimshaw, Jeremy M; Shekelle, Paul; Schünemann, Holger J; Woolf, Steven

2012-07-04

133

Developing clinical practice guidelines: target audiences, identifying topics for guidelines, guideline group composition and functioning and conflicts of interest  

PubMed Central

Clinical practice guidelines are one of the foundations of efforts to improve health care. In 1999, we authored a paper about methods to develop guidelines. Since it was published, the methods of guideline development have progressed both in terms of methods and necessary procedures and the context for guideline development has changed with the emergence of guideline clearing houses and large scale guideline production organisations (such as the UK National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence). It therefore seems timely to, in a series of three articles, update and extend our earlier paper. In this first paper we discuss: the target audience(s) for guidelines and their use of guidelines; identifying topics for guidelines; guideline group composition (including consumer involvement) and the processes by which guideline groups function and the important procedural issue of managing conflicts of interest in guideline development.

2012-01-01

134

Digital biology: an emerging and promising discipline.  

PubMed

This article examines the role of computation and quantitative methods in modern biomedical research to identify emerging scientific, technical, policy and organizational trends. It identifies common concerns and practices in the emerging community of computationally-oriented bio-scientists by reviewing a national symposium, Digital Biology: the Emerging Paradigm, held at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland, November 6th and 7th 2003. This meeting showed how biomedical computing promises scientific breakthroughs that will yield significant health benefits. Three key areas that define the emerging discipline of digital biology are: scientific data integration, multi-scale modeling and networked science. Each area faces unique technical challenges and information policy issues that must be addressed as the field matures. Here we summarize the emergent challenges and offer suggestions to academia, industry and government on how best to expand the role of computation in their scientific activities. PMID:15734552

Morris, Richard W; Bean, Carol A; Farber, Gregory K; Gallahan, Daniel; Jakobsson, Eric; Liu, Yuan; Lyster, Peter M; Peng, Grace C Y; Roberts, Fred S; Twery, Michael; Whitmarsh, John; Skinner, Karen

2005-03-01

135

Newly identified psychiatric illness in one general practice: 12-month outcome and the influence of patients' personality.  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND. Relatively little is known about the natural history and outcome of psychological problems in patients who present to general practitioners. Only a small proportion of such patients are seen by specialists. Clinical experience suggests that patient personality is one of the factors influencing outcome in patients diagnosed as having psychiatric illness. AIM. This study set out to examine prospectively the progress and 12-month outcome of patients with newly identified psychiatric illness, and the association of patients' personality with outcome. METHOD. One hundred and seventy one patients with clinically significant psychiatric illness attending one practice in a Scottish new town were followed up prospectively (96 presented with psychological symptoms and 75 with somatic symptoms), and were compared with a group of 127 patients with chronic physical illness. Patients were assessed in terms of psychiatric state, social problems and personality using both computer-based and pencil and paper tests in addition to clinical assessments at each consultation during the follow-up year and structured interview one year after recruitment. RESULTS. Most of the improvement in psychiatric state scores on the 28-item general health questionnaire occurred in the first six months of the illness. Of the 171 patients with psychiatric illness 34% improved quickly and remained well, 54% had an intermittent course but had improved at 12-month follow up while 12% pursued a chronic course without improvement. The mean number of consultations in the follow-up year was 8.4 for patients presenting with psychological symptoms, 7.2 for those presenting with somatic symptoms and 6.6 for patients with chronic physical illness. The Eysenck N score proved a strong predictor of the outcome of new psychiatric illness. CONCLUSION. Only one in three patients with newly identified psychiatric illness improved quickly and and remained well, reflecting the importance of continuing care of patients with psychological problems. This study has confirmed the feasibility of simple personality testing in everyday practice and shown a link between Eysenck N score and the outcome of new psychiatric illness. The predictive value of the Eysenck N score in general practice requires further research.

Wright, A F; Anderson, A J

1995-01-01

136

Differences in HIV Risk Practices Sought by Self-Identified Gay and Bisexual Men Who Use Internet Websites to Identify Potential Sexual Partners  

Microsoft Academic Search

Men who have sex with men (MSM) account for the largest number of persons diagnosed with AIDS in the United States, with higher-than-average rates of drug use and unprotected sex being cited as the principal reasons underlying their high rates of HIV infection. Recent evidence has suggested that the use of Websites specifically designed to promote unsafe sexual practices (e.g.,

Hugh Klein

2009-01-01

137

The Flat Stanley Project. Promising Practices.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Students make paper "Flat Stanleys" and send them with blank journals to classes in other states or countries. Recipients treat Stanley as a guest, record the things they do with him, and return him with the completed journals to the senders. Flat Stanley has sparked teacher and student creativity and motivation in 2,500 classes in 18 countries.…

Hubert, Dale

2003-01-01

138

Best and Promising Practices in Developmental Disabilities.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Twenty-six papers on the education of students with developmental disabilities are divided into 7 sections on: (1) definition and placement; (2) assessment and curriculum; (3) instructional strategies; (4) individual needs; (5) systematic and data-based instruction and management; (6) family involvement and community attitudes; and (7)…

Hilton, Alan, Ed.; Ringlaben, Ravic, Ed.

139

Multicultural Science Education: Theory, Practice, and Promise  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|As a relatively new area of investigation, the study of multicultural education as it relates to science teaching and learning has spawned numerous interpretations by researchers and authors worldwide. The contributors of this international volume--among them are science teacher educators, science teachers, scientists, researchers, program…

Hines, S. Maxwell, Ed.

2007-01-01

140

Promising Practices for Home/School Partnerships.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This report contains profiles of 18 innovative and successful parent involvement programs for migrant families. The programs were selected based on recommendations from State Directors of Migrant Education and migrant educators and on a search of the ERIC database. Each profile includes sponsoring institution or agency, program format, program…

Salerno, Anne; Fink, Mary

141

Promising Practices for Urban Reading Instruction.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This collection of research-based articles is framed around the International Reading Association's 10 "literacy rights" of every child, outlining what children need to become competent readers and writers. Under Right 1--Children have a right to appropriate early reading instruction based on their individual needs--are the following articles:…

Mason, Pamela A., Ed.; Schumm, Jeanne Shay, Ed.

142

Best and Promising Practices in Developmental Disabilities.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Twenty-six papers on the education of students with developmental disabilities are divided into 7 sections on: (1) definition and placement; (2) assessment and curriculum; (3) instructional strategies; (4) individual needs; (5) systematic and data-based instruction and management; (6) family involvement and community attitudes; and (7) appropriate…

Hilton, Alan, Ed.; Ringlaben, Ravic, Ed.

143

Adolescent Literacy Instruction: Policies and Promising Practices  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This comprehensive resource explores how adolescence and academic achievement are defined within today's political context, examines the in-school potential of teens' out-of-school immersion in digital technologies and popular culture, and shows teachers how to embed comprehension strategies into classroom instruction. The book contains innovative…

Lewis, Jill, Ed.; Moorman, Gary, Ed.

2007-01-01

144

Adolescent Literacy Instruction: Policies and Promising Practices  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This comprehensive resource explores how adolescence and academic achievement are defined within today's political context, examines the in-school potential of teens' out-of-school immersion in digital technologies and popular culture, and shows teachers how to embed comprehension strategies into classroom instruction. The book contains…

Lewis, Jill, Ed.; Moorman, Gary, Ed.

2007-01-01

145

Identifying indicators of the spatial variation of agricultural practices by a tree partitioning method: The case of weed control practices in a vine growing catchment  

Microsoft Academic Search

Environmental impact assessments of agricultural practices on a regional scale may be computed by running spatially distributed biophysical models using mapped input data on agricultural practices. In cases of hydrological impact assessments, such as herbicide pollution through runoff, methods for generating these data over the entire water resource catchment and at the plot resolution are needed. In this study, we

A. Biarnès; J. S. Bailly; Y. Boissieux

2009-01-01

146

Progress and promise.  

PubMed

This editorial introduces the current issue of the journal School Psychology Quarterly (SPQ).There has been an impressive and promising progress of school psychology science has been reflected in every issue of SPQ, including the current one. PMID:23294232

Kamphaus, Randy W

2012-12-01

147

Promises of Emerging Technology  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Emerging technology promises to give US theater commanders the ability to destroy enemy aircraft on the ground. The Air Force's current doctrine, and predictive studies are unanimous - destroying enemy aircraft on the ground is the most effective method o...

C. W. Nystrom

1991-01-01

148

Identifying Instructional Targets for Early Childhood via Authentic Assessment: Alignment of Professional Standards and Practice-Based Evidence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Now at middle age, the field of Early Childhood Intervention (ECI) and its professionals have demonstrated a unique capacity to develop their own practice-based evidence (PBE) and professional standards to forge solutions to challenging professional practice dilemmas. This innovative capacity is no more evident than in designing and implementing…

Bagnato, Stephen J.; McLean, Mary; Macy, Marisa; Neisworth, John T.

2011-01-01

149

Using Relative Physician Effort to Identify Mispriced Procedures: The 1987 Physicians' Practice Follow-Up Survey. Appendix.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The 1987 Physicians' Practice Follow-up Survey was sponsored jointly by the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation (ASPE) and the Health Care Financing Administration (HCFA) and was designed to address several high priority health policy issues. ...

J. B. Mitchell J. Cromwell M. L. Rosenbach S. Hurdle W. B. Stason

1988-01-01

150

Off-label prescriptions: how to identify them, frame them, announce them and monitor them in practice?  

PubMed

Following the Mediator crisis and the passage of the Health and Safety Law of December 2011, off-label prescriptions are a real concern shared by all those involved in healthcare system. Off-label, in the strictest sense of the term, is defined as all prescriptions that do not correspond to the summary of product characteristics (SPC), particularly those that fail to comply with the indications and dosage regimens defined by the marketing authorization (MA) for clear safety reasons. There are various rasons for off-label prescriptions, both conscious and unconscious. They are intended to respond to unmet medical needs, the needs of poorly studied populations or not studied at all in trials, but in relation to whom it is reasonable to extrapolate that MA would be given (common-sense prescriptions) and, additionally, to urgent public health needs (such as baclofen, pregnant women, and HIV drugs). All these prescriptions would deserve to be studied for a potential MA. However, there are off-label prescriptions that need to be restricted or even penalized in the case of compassionate prescriptions or unjustified prescriptions or prescriptions not based on any scientific grounds. Off-label prescriptions are not easy to track down because if the prescriber has to write "off-label" on his prescription, then clearly, in practice, he will only do so in exceptional cases. Neither the pharmacists who dispense the drug nor the Social Security that reimburses it, have access to the diagnosis (or targeted indication). Thus, in order to identify the off-label prescription, we must be able to cross reference the available databases (such as pharmacovigilance database, medicalized information system program [programme de médicalisation des systèmes d'information, PMSI], hospital drug formularies, general sample of beneficiaries [échantillon généraliste de bénéficiaires, EGB] or national inter-regional Health Insurance Information System [système national d'informations inter-régions d'Assurance maladie, SNIIRAM], sales data, and data from market surveys). The shared computerized patient file may resolve this problem. The temporary use recommendation (TUR) proposed by the Drug Safety Law will only partially deal with this problem for recently marketed molecules. This temporary and exceptional mechanism will authorize a recognized off-label prescription, which may be reimbursed and monitored for 3 years. These TURs will only concern a small portion of "off-label" drugs having yet a positive risk/benefit ratio (conditional MA) but this is far from matching with majority of off-label prescriptions. As such, and in order to improve the use of drugs, it is important to propose a control system for all "off-label" prescriptions with a dedicated committee: the "off-label" committee which would determine the frame of the "off-label" prescriptions. PMID:23981260

Le Jeunne, Claire; Billon, Nathalie; Dandon, Anne; Berdaï, Driss; Adgibi, Yolande; Bergmann, Jean-François; Bordet, Régis; Carpentier, Anne; Cohn, Emmanuelle; Courcier, Soizic; Girault, Danièle; Goni, Sylvia; Jolliet, Pascale; Liard, François; Prot-Labarthe, Sonia; Simon, Tabassome; Vernotte, Christine; Westerloppe, Jérémie

2013-08-28

151

A study of state and trait anxiety and perceived causes of anxiety identified by licensed practical nurses returning to an associate degree nursing program  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to identify the state and trait anxiety and the perceived causes of anxiety in licensed practical nurses (LPNs) returning to an associate degree nursing program in order to become registered nurses (RNs). The subjects for this study were 98 students enrolled in a transitional LPN\\/RN associate degree nursing program in two community colleges in

Sally Ann Weiss

1997-01-01

152

Do Workshops in Evidence-Based Practice Equip Participants to Identify and Answer Questions Requiring Consideration of Clinical Research? A Diagnostic Skill Assessment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Evidence-based practice (EBP) requires practitioners to identify and formulate questions in response to patient encounters, and to seek, select, and appraise applicable clinical research. A standardized workshop format serves as the model for training of medical educators in these skills. We developed an evaluation exercise to assess the ability…

Wyer, Peter C,; Naqvi, Zoon; Dayan, Peter S.; Celentano, James J.; Eskin, Barnet; Graham, Mark J.

2009-01-01

153

Alzheimer's Disease and Other Dementias: An Organizational Approach to Identifying and Addressing Practices and Learning Needs of Family Physicians  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Caring for patients with dementia is complex and demanding. Since family physicians (FPs) provide much of this care, we examined their practices, learning needs, and barriers to care concerning Alzheimer's disease and other dementias. We surveyed 392 (approximately 50%) Nova Scotia FPs and conducted focus groups and interviews with: FPs; staff of…

Allen, Michael; Ferrier, Suzanne; Sargeant, Joan; Loney, Elaine; Bethune, Graeme; Murphy, Gerard

2005-01-01

154

On the Reliability and Accuracy of the Evaluative Method for Identifying Evidence-Based Practices in Autism  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a The editors of this book recently described the development and application of an “evaluative method” for assessing evidence-based\\u000a practices (EBP) in Autism (Reichow et al. 2008). The major results of this investigation, which were presented at the International\\u000a Meeting for Autism Research (Reichow et al. 2007) indicated that the method produced highly reliable and valid results, whether\\u000a deriving from an

Domenic V. Cicchetti

155

Surgical site infection prevention: a survey to identify the gap between evidence and practice in University of Toronto teaching hospitals  

PubMed Central

Background A gap exists between the best evidence and practice with regards to surgical site infection (SSI) prevention. Awareness of evidence is the first step in knowledge translation. Methods A web-based survey was distributed to 59 general surgeons and 68 residents at University of Toronto teaching hospitals. Five domains pertaining to SSI prevention with questions addressing knowledge of prevention strategies, efficacy of antibiotics, strategies for changing practice and barriers to implementation of SSI prevention strategies were investigated. Results Seventy-six individuals (60%) responded. More than 90% of respondents stated there was evidence for antibiotic prophylaxis and perioperative normothermia and reported use of these strategies. There was a discrepancy in the perceived evidence for and the self-reported use of perioperative hyperoxia, omission of hair removal and bowel preparation. Eighty-three percent of respondents felt that consulting published guidelines is important in making decisions regarding antibiotics. There was also a discrepancy between what respondents felt were important strategies to ensure timely administration of antibiotics and what strategies were in place. Checklists, standardized orders, protocols and formal surveillance programs were rated most highly by 75%–90% of respondents, but less than 50% stated that these strategies were in place at their institutions. Conclusion Broad-reaching initiatives that increase surgeon and trainee awareness and implementation of multifaceted hospital strategies that engage residents and attending surgeons are needed to change practice.

Eskicioglu, Cagla; Gagliardi, Anna R.; Fenech, Darlene S.; Forbes, Shawn S.; McKenzie, Marg; McLeod, Robin S.; Nathens, Avery B.

2012-01-01

156

The sensitivity and specificity of four questions (HARK) to identify intimate partner violence: a diagnostic accuracy study in general practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Intimate partner violence (IPV) including physical, sexual and emotional violence, causes short and long term ill-health. Brief questions that reliably identify women experiencing IPV who present in clinical settings are a pre-requisite for an appropriate response from health services to this substantial public health problem. We estimated the sensitivity and specificity of four questions (HARK) developed from the Abuse

Hardip Sohal; Sandra Eldridge; Gene Feder

2007-01-01

157

Aquaculture: Challenges and promise  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Aquaculture is the culture of aquatic organisms, which includes fish, mollusks, crustaceans, algae and plants. People have been involved in different forms of aquaculture for thousands of years, with early documented evidence dating back as far as 500 BC in China (Ling 1977). Today, the practice of ...

158

Building resilience into practical conservation: identifying local management responses to global climate change in the southern Great Barrier Reef  

Microsoft Academic Search

Climate change is now considered the greatest long-term threat to coral reefs, with some future change inevitable despite\\u000a mitigation efforts. Managers must therefore focus on supporting the natural resilience of reefs, requiring that resilient\\u000a reefs and reef regions be identified. We develop a framework for assessing resilience and trial it by applying the framework\\u000a to target management responses to climate

J. A. Maynard; P. A. Marshall; J. E. Johnson; S. Harman

2010-01-01

159

Promising Workforce Development Practices for Faith-Based and Community Organizations. Compassion at Work: Promising Practices.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The project recognized the potential of such a partnership and the mutual goal that grassroots organizations offering workforce development services share with the One-Stop Career Centers: improving the quality of life for community residents through work...

2005-01-01

160

Applying psychological theories to evidence-based clinical practice: identifying factors predictive of lumbar spine x-ray for low back pain in UK primary care practice  

PubMed Central

Background Psychological models predict behaviour in a wide range of settings. The aim of this study was to explore the usefulness of a range of psychological models to predict the health professional behaviour 'referral for lumbar spine x-ray in patients presenting with low back pain' by UK primary care physicians. Methods Psychological measures were collected by postal questionnaire survey from a random sample of primary care physicians in Scotland and north England. The outcome measures were clinical behaviour (referral rates for lumbar spine x-rays), behavioural simulation (lumbar spine x-ray referral decisions based upon scenarios), and behavioural intention (general intention to refer for lumbar spine x-rays in patients with low back pain). Explanatory variables were the constructs within the Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB), Social Cognitive Theory (SCT), Common Sense Self-Regulation Model (CS-SRM), Operant Learning Theory (OLT), Implementation Intention (II), Weinstein's Stage Model termed the Precaution Adoption Process (PAP), and knowledge. For each of the outcome measures, a generalised linear model was used to examine the predictive value of each theory individually. Linear regression was used for the intention and simulation outcomes, and negative binomial regression was used for the behaviour outcome. Following this 'theory level' analysis, a 'cross-theoretical construct' analysis was conducted to investigate the combined predictive value of all individual constructs across theories. Results Constructs from TPB, SCT, CS-SRM, and OLT predicted behaviour; however, the theoretical models did not fit the data well. When predicting behavioural simulation, the proportion of variance explained by individual theories was TPB 11.6%, SCT 12.1%, OLT 8.1%, and II 1.5% of the variance, and in the cross-theory analysis constructs from TPB, CS-SRM and II explained 16.5% of the variance in simulated behaviours. When predicting intention, the proportion of variance explained by individual theories was TPB 25.0%, SCT 21.5%, CS-SRM 11.3%, OLT 26.3%, PAP 2.6%, and knowledge 2.3%, and in the cross-theory analysis constructs from TPB, SCT, CS-SRM, and OLT explained 33.5% variance in intention. Together these results suggest that physicians' beliefs about consequences and beliefs about capabilities are likely determinants of lumbar spine x-ray referrals. Conclusions The study provides evidence that taking a theory-based approach enables the creation of a replicable methodology for identifying factors that predict clinical behaviour. However, a number of conceptual and methodological challenges remain.

2011-01-01

161

Applying psychological theories to evidence-based clinical practice: identifying factors predictive of placing preventive fissure sealants  

PubMed Central

Background Psychological models are used to understand and predict behaviour in a wide range of settings, but have not been consistently applied to health professional behaviours, and the contribution of differing theories is not clear. This study explored the usefulness of a range of models to predict an evidence-based behaviour -- the placing of fissure sealants. Methods Measures were collected by postal questionnaire from a random sample of general dental practitioners (GDPs) in Scotland. Outcomes were behavioural simulation (scenario decision-making), and behavioural intention. Predictor variables were from the Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB), Social Cognitive Theory (SCT), Common Sense Self-regulation Model (CS-SRM), Operant Learning Theory (OLT), Implementation Intention (II), Stage Model, and knowledge (a non-theoretical construct). Multiple regression analysis was used to examine the predictive value of each theoretical model individually. Significant constructs from all theories were then entered into a 'cross theory' stepwise regression analysis to investigate their combined predictive value Results Behavioural simulation - theory level variance explained was: TPB 31%; SCT 29%; II 7%; OLT 30%. Neither CS-SRM nor stage explained significant variance. In the cross theory analysis, habit (OLT), timeline acute (CS-SRM), and outcome expectancy (SCT) entered the equation, together explaining 38% of the variance. Behavioural intention - theory level variance explained was: TPB 30%; SCT 24%; OLT 58%, CS-SRM 27%. GDPs in the action stage had significantly higher intention to place fissure sealants. In the cross theory analysis, habit (OLT) and attitude (TPB) entered the equation, together explaining 68% of the variance in intention. Summary The study provides evidence that psychological models can be useful in understanding and predicting clinical behaviour. Taking a theory-based approach enables the creation of a replicable methodology for identifying factors that may predict clinical behaviour and so provide possible targets for knowledge translation interventions. Results suggest that more evidence-based behaviour may be achieved by influencing beliefs about the positive outcomes of placing fissure sealants and building a habit of placing them as part of patient management. However a number of conceptual and methodological challenges remain.

2010-01-01

162

Therapeutic promise and principles  

PubMed Central

For a number of disease entities, oxidative stress becomes a significant factor in the etiology and progression of cell dysfunction and injury. Therapeutic strategies that can identify novel signal transduction pathways to ameliorate the toxic effects of oxidative stress may lead to new avenues of treatment for a spectrum of disorders that include diabetes, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and immune system dysfunction. In this respect, metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) may offer exciting prospects for several disorders since these receptors can limit or prevent apoptotic cell injury as well as impact upon cellular development and function. Yet the role of mGluRs is complex in nature and may require specific mGluR modulation for a particular disease entity to maximize clinical efficacy and limit potential disability. Here we discuss the potential clinical translation of mGluRs and highlight the role of novel signal transduction pathways in the metabotropic glutamate system that may be vital for the clinical utility of mGluRs.

Chong, Zhao Zhong; Shang, Yan Chen; Hou, Jinling

2008-01-01

163

Promising Investment Opportunities in South Central Alaska.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The report summarizes findings and recommendations which were developed during the 3-week field survey of South Central Alaska by a two-man team in September of 1964. The purpose was to identify promising investment opportunities in this area, establish t...

1965-01-01

164

Promising Investment Opportunities in South Central Alaska.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The purpose of this survey was to identify promising investment opportunities in the South Central Alaska area. Emphasis was placed on restoring the economic activities destroyed or damaged by the March 27, 1964, earthquake, as well as creating new jobs i...

1965-01-01

165

Promising Strategies for Improving Student Behavior.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|In response to growing public concern over declining educational quality and discipline problems in today's schools, this paper reviews research on the causes of school disruption and student misbehavior, identifies promising ameliorative strategies, and examines specific research-practitioner collaborations that have successfully reduced school…

Gottfredson, Denise C.

166

The promise of proteomics in animal science  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Proteomics hold significant promise as a method for advancing animal science research. The use of this technology in animal science is still in its infancy. The ability of proteomics to simultaneously identify and quantify potentially thousands of proteins is unparalleled. In this review, we will...

167

Crime Prevention: Promise or Threat?  

Microsoft Academic Search

In many Western countries, traditional criminal justice responses to crime are being questioned. Crime prevention has been endorsed as a policy objective by a range of governments including Australia's, with most States and Territories implementing programs. The paper summarises approaches to prevention and reviews promises and threats these developments pose. Promises include less divisive and ‘exclusionary’ modes of social control,

Adam Sutton

1994-01-01

168

Integrated Implementation of Programs Targeting Neglected Tropical Diseases through Preventive Chemotherapy: Identifying Best Practices to Roll Out Programs at National Scale  

PubMed Central

In 2006 the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) established the Neglected Tropical Disease (NTD) Control Program to support national governments in developing successful, cost-efficient NTD programs that integrate disease-specific programs into coordinated national initiatives, in accord with the World Health Organization recommendations. A 3-stage “roll-out package” has been developed for effectively integrating and scaling up such programs to full-national scale. Stage-1 lays the groundwork—identifying NTD leadership within the Ministry of Health, conducting a national Situation Analysis, formulating a multiyear Plan of Action, and undertaking a funding gap analysis. Stage-2 focuses on scaling up the integrated NTD program—convening national stakeholder meetings, developing annual work plans, carrying out disease mapping, and establishing monitoring and evaluation activities. Stage-3 aims at ensuring effective management—identifying clear roles and responsibilities for partners, and creating a central coordinating mechanism. Assessment and reassessment of these complex NTD programs that target literally billions of people are essential to establish “best practice” strategies for long-term public health success.

Hanson, Christy; Weaver, Angela; Zoerhoff, Kathryn L.; Kabore, Achille; Linehan, Mary; Doherty, Amy; Engels, Dirk; Savioli, Lorenzo; Ottesen, Eric A.

2012-01-01

169

Integrated implementation of programs targeting neglected tropical diseases through preventive chemotherapy: identifying best practices to roll out programs at national scale.  

PubMed

In 2006 the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) established the Neglected Tropical Disease (NTD) Control Program to support national governments in developing successful, cost-efficient NTD programs that integrate disease-specific programs into coordinated national initiatives, in accord with the World Health Organization recommendations. A 3-stage "roll-out package" has been developed for effectively integrating and scaling up such programs to full-national scale. Stage-1 lays the groundwork-identifying NTD leadership within the Ministry of Health, conducting a national Situation Analysis, formulating a multiyear Plan of Action, and undertaking a funding gap analysis. Stage-2 focuses on scaling up the integrated NTD program-convening national stakeholder meetings, developing annual work plans, carrying out disease mapping, and establishing monitoring and evaluation activities. Stage-3 aims at ensuring effective management-identifying clear roles and responsibilities for partners, and creating a central coordinating mechanism. Assessment and reassessment of these complex NTD programs that target literally billions of people are essential to establish "best practice" strategies for long-term public health success. PMID:22403327

Hanson, Christy; Weaver, Angela; Zoerhoff, Kathryn L; Kabore, Achille; Linehan, Mary; Doherty, Amy; Engels, Dirk; Savioli, Lorenzo; Ottesen, Eric A

2012-03-01

170

Identifying harms.  

PubMed

Moral disagreements often revolve around the issue of harm to others. Identifying harms, however, is a contested enterprise. This paper provides a conceptual toolbox for identifying harms, and so possible wrongdoing, by drawing several distinctions. First, I distinguish between four modes of human vulnerability, forming four ways in which one can be in a harmed state. Second, I argue for the intrinsic disvalue of harm and so distinguish the presence of harm from the fact that it is instrumental to or constitutive of a valued act, practice or way of life. Finally, I distinguish between harm and wrongdoing, arguing that while harm is a normative concept requiring justification, not all harmed states are automatically unjustified. The advantage of this view is that it refocuses the moral debate on the normative issues involved while establishing a common basis to which both sides can agree: the presence of harm to others. PMID:21434956

Harrosh, Shlomit

2011-03-25

171

Nanotechnology: Its Promise and Challenges  

ScienceCinema

Vicki Colvin of Rice University talks about how nanotechnology-enabled systems, with dimensions on the scale of a billionth of a meter, offer great promise for solving difficult social problems and creating enormous possibilities.

172

A Bold and Promising Model with a Few Loose Ends  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Without a doubt the authors' proposal of viewing gifted education in systemic terms is a promising one. In fact, it is most refreshing to read something eclectic like this with an aim to synthesize a field of research and practice which for too long has lacked consensus in both practice and theory. The author agrees with them that a mechanistic…

Persson, Roland S.

2012-01-01

173

A Bold and Promising Model with a Few Loose Ends  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Without a doubt the authors' proposal of viewing gifted education in systemic terms is a promising one. In fact, it is most refreshing to read something eclectic like this with an aim to synthesize a field of research and practice which for too long has lacked consensus in both practice and theory. The author agrees with them that a mechanistic…

Persson, Roland S.

2012-01-01

174

Top five most promising algorithms in scheduling  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper aims to be a short literature review, presenting the top five most promising algorithms for scheduling, as identified by us from the technical and scientific literature of the past years: Task Swap, Squeaky Wheel Optimization, Value-Biased Stochastic Search, Bee Colony Optimization And Temporal Difference (lambda), from reinforcement learning. We wanted to cover permutation-state methods, search-state methods, bias methods,

Andrei Lihu; Stefan Holban

2009-01-01

175

AMLCD cockpit: promise and payoffs  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The active matrix liquid crystal display (AMLCD) has become the preferred flight instrument technology in avionics multifunction display applications. Current bubble canopy fighter cockpit applications involve sizes up to 7.8 X 7.8 in. active display. Dual use avionics versions of AMLCD technology are now as large as 6.7 X 6.7 in. active display area in the ARINC D sized color multifunction display (MFD). This is the standard instrument in all new Boeing transport aircraft and is being retrofitted into the C-17A. A special design of the ARINC D instrument is used in the Space Shuttle cockpit upgrade. Larger sizes of AMLCD were desired when decisions were made in the early 1990s for the F-22. Commercial AMLCD technology has now produced monitors at 1280 X 1024 resolution (1.3 megapixels) in sizes of 16 to 21 in. diagonal. Each of these larger AMLCDs has more information carrying capacity than the entire F-22A cockpit instrument panel shipset, comprising six separate smaller AMLCDs (1.2 megapixels total). The larger AMLCDs are being integrated into airborne mission crewstations for use in dim ambient lighting conditions. It is now time to identify and address the technology challenges of upgrading these larger AMLCDs for sunlight readable application and of developing concepts for their integration into advanced bubble canopy fighter cockpits. The overall goals are to significantly increase the informational carrying capacity to bring both sensor and information fusion into the cockpit and, thereby, to enable a significant increase in warfighter situational awareness and effectiveness. A research cockpit was built using specialized versions of the IBM 16.1 in and two smaller 10 in. AMLCDs to examine human factors and display design issues associated with these next-generation AMLCD cockpit displays. This cockpit was later upgraded to allow greater reconfigurability and flexibility in the display hardware used to conduct part- task mission simulations. The objective optical characterization of the AMLCDs used in this simulator and the cockpit design are described. Display formats under consideration for test in this cockpit are described together with some of the basic human factors engineering issues involved. Studies conducted in this cockpit will be part of an ongoing joint effort of the hardware-focused aerospace displays team and the pilot-focused human factors team in the Air Force Research Laboratory's Crew System Interface Division. The objective of these studies is to ascertain the payoffs of the large AMLCD promise in combat cockpits.

Snow, Michael P.; Jackson, Timothy W.; Meyer, Frederick M.; Reising, John M.; Hopper, Darrel G.

1999-08-01

176

Promising Characteristics of Nanocomposite Dielectrics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Polymer nanocomposites possess promising high performances as engineering materials, if they are prepared and fabricated properly. It was also clarified that they could provide favorable performances as dielectrics and electrical insulation. Comprehensive reviews were given in literatures by the author firstly in 2004 and secondly in 2005. This review is based on the second paper and covers recent significant findings.

Toshikatsu Tanaka

2006-01-01

177

Fulfilling the Promise through CTE  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Americans live in a great nation, one in which every child is entitled to an education that will help that child reach success. But the debate has raged for years about whether the nation's education system is fulfilling the promise of not just an education, but an education of the highest caliber. Whenever the issue of school reform is…

Reese, Susan

2012-01-01

178

Teacher in the Promised Land.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The promised land is our own bodies, our own senses, our own minds and imaginations. Those who accept this inheritance are qualified to be teachers, for in teaching we either replenish or frustrate a wondrous expectation. Ultimately, teaching is aimed at one thing--celebration. (Author/IRT)|

Starratt, Robert J.

1979-01-01

179

Adaptive management: Promises and pitfalls  

Microsoft Academic Search

Proponents of the scientific adaptive management approach argue that it increases knowledge acquisition rates, enhances information flow among policy actors, and provides opportunities for creating shared understandings. However, evidence from efforts to implement the approach in New Brunswick, British Columbia, Canada, and the Columbia River Basin indicates that these promises have not been met. The data show that scientific adaptive

Rebecca J. McLain; Robert G. Lee

1996-01-01

180

Wood power, its promises and problems  

Microsoft Academic Search

Large volumes of biomass have been identified as physically available for energy use, but serious questions remain about their economic availability. Sources of biomass today include bark and mill residues that accumulate at manufacturing plants; logging residues; noncommercial timber; and material removed in silvicultural practices. In addition, the concept of energy farming has been advanced, but considerable research is required

N. Engalichev; V. K. Mathur

1981-01-01

181

Geology of promising Holbrook Basin  

Microsoft Academic Search

Lying across east central Arizona and west central New Mexico, the 200-mile-long, 100-mile-wide Holbrook basin is truly sedimentary, expressed in subsurface Permian rocks. Triassic redbeds and Permian limestones and sandstones form much of the basin's surface, with the Permian system holding the most promise of commercial hydrocarbon reserves. The Permian's Supai formation contains gypsum, anhydrite, and salt, along with interbedded

Heylmun

1980-01-01

182

The validity of searching routinely collected general practice computer data to identify patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD): a manual review of 500 medical records  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background. We conducted a search of 12 practices' routinely collected computer data in three localities across the UK and found that 4.9% of the registered population had an estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR) of <60 ml\\/min\\/1.73 m2 (equivalent to stages 3-5 CKD). Only 3.6% of these were known to have renal disease. Although UK general practice is com- puterized, important

Sobana Anandarajah; Tracy Tai; Simon de Lusignan; Paul Stevens; Donal O'Donoghue; Mel Walker; Sean Hilton

183

Identifying characteristics associated with performing recommended practices in maternal and newborn care among health facilities in Rwanda: a cross-sectional study  

PubMed Central

Background Although rates of maternal and neonatal mortality have decreased in many countries over the last two decades, they remain unacceptably high, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa. Nevertheless, we know little about the quality of facility-based maternal and newborn care in low-income countries and little about the association between quality of care and health worker training, supervision, and incentives in these settings. We therefore sought to examine the quality of facility-based maternal and newborn health care by describing the implementation of recommended practices for maternal and newborn care among health care facilities. We also aimed to determine whether increased training, supervision, and incentives for health workers were associated with implementing these recommended practices. We chose to study these aims in the Republic of Rwanda, where rates of maternal and newborn mortality are high and where substantial attention is currently focused on strengthening health workforce capacity and quality. Methods We used data from the 2007 Rwanda Service Provision Assessment. Using observations from 455 facilities and interviews from 1357 providers, we generated descriptive statistics to describe the use of recommended practices and frequencies of provider training, supervision, and incentives in the areas of antenatal, delivery, and newborn care. We then constructed multivariable regression models to examine the associations between using recommended practices and health provider training, supervision, and incentives. Results Use of recommended practices varied widely, and very few facilities performed all recommended practices. Furthermore, in most areas of care, less than 25% of providers reported having had any pre-service or in-service training in the last 3?years. Contrary to our hypotheses, we found no evidence that training, supervision, or incentives were consistently associated with using recommended practices. Conclusion Our findings highlight the need to improve facility-based maternal and newborn care in Rwanda and suggest that current approaches to workforce training, supervision, and incentives may not be adequate for improving these critical practices.

2012-01-01

184

Professional promises: Summary and next steps.  

PubMed

A summary of the key themes discussed during the sessions is provided highlighting the participants' recommendations for addressing the ethics of access. Areas reviewed included strategies utilizing ethics as an educational tool. The need for professional associations and accrediting and licensing bodies to address access to care in their guidelines is an additional recommendation. Networking, sharing resources, and continuing the dialogue about ethics and access to care are identified as important strategies following the workshop. The summary also highlights promises made to continue the dialogue about the issue in various forums. PMID:17106042

Zarkowski, Pamela

2006-11-01

185

Promises unfulfilled: implementation of expanded coverage for the elderly poor.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: To examine implementation of the Qualified Medicare Beneficiary (QMB) and Specified Low-Income Medicare Beneficiary (SLMB) programs, enacted in 1988. The article summarizes the origin of the QMB and SLMB programs, describes what we have learned about QMB and SLMB enrollment in state Medicaid programs and, despite some encouraging news on the federal front, identifies policy issues that remain in assuring access to health care for the low-income elderly. SOURCE: Based in part on research that assessed state variations in Medicaid QMB and SLMB enrollment of low-income Medicare beneficiaries and identified best practices among states in administration of the QMB and SLMB programs. STUDY DESIGN: Telephone interviews were conducted with officials in ten states to elicit qualitative information about how state Medicaid programs have implemented federal protections for low-income Medicare beneficiaries. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The QMB and SLMB programs fail to reach a sizable proportion of potentially eligible individuals in most states. Fragmentation of Medicare and Medicaid benefits, complex Medicaid eligibility and income verification processes, and rigid federal and state administrative and data systems, impede efforts to achieve promised protection for low-income elderly persons. CONCLUSIONS: For low-income Medicare beneficiaries, obtaining financial protection against their high out-of-pocket health care costs remains an important issue. The complexities associated with aligning Medicare and Medicaid to deliver health benefits to low-income older persons makes improved coordination across federal and state agencies uncertain.

Lamphere, J A; Rosenbach, M L

2000-01-01

186

Intentions of Chiropractic Interns Regarding use of Health Promotion in Practice: Applying Theory of Reasoned Action to Identify Attitudes, Beliefs, and Influencing Factors  

PubMed Central

Purpose: The theory of reasoned action is a health behavioral theory that has been used to predict personal health behaviors and intentions as well as those of providers delivering health care. The purpose of this study was to determine interns' future practices regarding the use of health promotion using this model to develop survey questions and to determine attitudes and perceived influences on their prospective behaviors in general, toward the use of health promotion once in practice. Methods: Across the course of one year, all graduating interns at a chiropractic college were queried with a 20 question survey designed using the theory of reasoned action. Frequencies and inferential statistics were performed including prediction modeling using logistic regression. Results: A majority (>85%) of interns indicated they would use health promotion in practice. Differences were noted based on perceived skill levels, perception of educational emphasis, various normative beliefs, and gender. Conclusion: Most interns will use some form of health promotion in practice. Normative influences including those seen as key influencers are as powerful a predictor as perceived education or skill levels on future practice of health promotion.

Evans, Marion W.; Ndetan, Harrison; Williams, Ronald D.

2009-01-01

187

Geology of promising Holbrook Basin  

SciTech Connect

Lying across east central Arizona and west central New Mexico, the 200-mile-long, 100-mile-wide Holbrook basin is truly sedimentary, expressed in subsurface Permian rocks. Triassic redbeds and Permian limestones and sandstones form much of the basin's surface, with the Permian system holding the most promise of commercial hydrocarbon reserves. The Permian's Supai formation contains gypsum, anhydrite, and salt, along with interbedded limestone and dolomite and thick zones of red sandstone, siltstone, and shale. The Fort Apache dolomite member of the Supai is one of the prime target zones for hydrocarbon development, though the entire basin offers some excellent wildcatting opportunities.

Heylmun, E.B.

1980-01-05

188

Drawing a Line in the Sand: Identifying the Borderzone between Self and Other in EL1 and EL2 Citation Practices  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Current concerns about academic plagiarism in student writing assume qualitative and quantitative differences in the writing of students for whom English is a first language (EL1) and English is a second language (EL2), but lack precision in measuring those differences. I examined the citation practices of EL1 and EL2 students in a timed writing…

Hyland, Theresa Ann

2009-01-01

189

Socialization in Online Programs. Promising Practices in Online Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Researchers studying socialization in online learning note that definitions are quite broad, suggesting that "Socialization is about people being able to mingle and establish connections on one or more levels. They speak[with] one another; share ideas and information and confirm the connections made through an agreed upon means." More broadly,…

Watson, John; Gemin, Butch

2008-01-01

190

Practical Rationality and the Questionable Promise of Positive Psychology  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is argued that positive psychology is committed to an ideology of technical and instrumental scientific rationality. The article describes features of this ideology, its historical emergence and adoption by disciplinary psychology, its pervasive influence across contemporary life, its problems and dangers, and the way in which it is promoted by positive psychology. By failing to grasp the extent of

Jeff Sugarman

2007-01-01

191

Focus on Student Retention: Promising Practices in Community Colleges  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

With increased interest in learning college initiatives, growing awareness of the need to promote higher levels of student success, and continuing emphasis on state accountability measures, many community colleges are seeing the need for a comprehensive evaluation of their retention and student success initiatives. Given continuing resource…

McClenney, Kay M.; Waiwaiole, Evelyn N.

2005-01-01

192

The Pitfalls and Promises of Special Education Practice.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This commentary outlines problems found within the regular education system; problems with equity in special education, especially as they relate to services for African-American students with disabilities; and new models of special education that focus on Reuven Feuerstein's approach using dynamic assessment procedures and remedial strategies.…

Hillard, Asa G, III

1992-01-01

193

Developmental Mathematics: Challenges, Promising Practices, and Recent Initiatives  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Developmental education has increasingly become part of the national debate in higher education. This is particularly true for developmental mathematics courses which, in general, have the highest rates of failure and noncompletion of any developmental subject area. This manuscript describes the current state of the art in developmental…

Bonham, Barbara S.; Boylan, Hunter R.

2011-01-01

194

Managing Educator Talent: Promising Practices and Lessons from Midwestern States  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This policy analysis explains the need for a system approach to educator talent management. The report analyzes how state policies in the Midwest support the development of effective teachers and leaders throughout their career. The report focuses on state policies in teacher preparation including certification and licensure, recruitment and…

Bhatt, Monica P.; Behrstock, Ellen

2010-01-01

195

MEASURING RISKS IN HUMANS: THE PROMISE AND PRACTICE OF EPIDEMIOLOGY  

EPA Science Inventory

Epidemiology has been considered the fundamental science of public health policy. The use of epidemiologic data in environmental health policy has been limited particularly in the environmental regulatory arena. Epidemiologic risk assessment (ERA) is different from risk ass...

196

Student Advisory. Center for School Success Promising Practices Series  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This publication focuses on student advisory programs. High school students often feel disconnected and have few personalized relationships with the adults who educate them. Advisory programs are based on the belief that students need the opportunity to develop trusting relationships with adult educators and that doing so benefits students in a…

Imbimbo, Josephine; Morgan, Samuel; Plaza, Eileen

2009-01-01

197

From Promise to Practice: Enhancing Student Internet Learning.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Discusses findings of the U.S. Congress' Web-Based Education Commission that examined how the Internet is being used to enhance learning opportunities for students. Addresses each of the seven areas in which the Commission suggested there is a strong need for action: broadband access; professional development; research and development; quality of…

Fulton, Kathleen

2001-01-01

198

Promising Practices in Career and Technology Studies (CTS).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This document contains profiles of 130 successful programs and partnerships in Career and Technology Studies (CTS) in Alberta, Canada. Following an introduction to the CTS program and its implementation, the profiles are organized into 23 sections that follow the strands of the program. The sections cover the following topics: CTS general;…

Alberta Learning, Edmonton. Learning and Teaching Resources Branch.

199

Molten Salts Are Promising Catalysts. How to Apply in Practice?  

Microsoft Academic Search

A diesel soot filter with a Cs2SO4·V2O5 molten salt diesel soot oxidation catalyst has been developed. An engine test-bench was used to test it in diesel exhaust gas with ELPI analysis and to deposit diesel soot on filters for temperature programmed oxidation experiments. Molten salt (Cs2SO4·V2O5) based catalytic foam has an onset temperature for catalytic oxidation of 320°C. This is

B. A. A. L. van Setten; C. van Gulijk; M. Makkee; J. A. Moulijn

2001-01-01

200

Promising Practices in Using the Internet to Teach Social Studies  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This article presents several teachers and school Web sites that offer teaching strategies in using the Internet to teach social sciences. These Web sites include: (1) Mrs. Cori Culp's Website (www.bv229.k12.ks.us/bvw_culp); (2) Mr. Williams's 5th Grade(teachers.santee.k12.ca.us/cwilliams/index.htm); (3) Ms. Stewart's Classroom Page…

Risinger, C. Frederick

2006-01-01

201

Early Childhood Education: Promising Practices in Rural Areas.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Intended to suggest types of early childhood education programs which may be implemented in rural areas at reasonable cost and which capitalize upon the rural environment's unique characteristics, this booklet describes 12 programs (many of which use Elementary and Secondary Education Title I or III funds) currently operating in rural areas. The…

Lehnhoff, Nora; And Others

202

Promising Practices in Florida: Integrating Academic and Vocational Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This document is a compilation of 90 successful interdisciplinary projects and activities and integrated academic and vocational curriculum ideas implemented in Florida during the past 3 years. The activities and projects have been submitted by teachers and have not been officially evaluated or reviewed. Each description provides this…

Jones, Betty, Comp.

203

Promising Practices in Career and Technology Studies (CTS).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document contains profiles of 130 successful programs and partnerships in Career and Technology Studies (CTS) in Alberta, Canada. Following an introduction to the CTS program and its implementation, the profiles are organized into 23 sections that follow the strands of the program. The sections cover the following topics: CTS general;…

Alberta Learning, Edmonton. Learning and Teaching Resources Branch.

204

Campus Security: A First Look at Promising Practices.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This booklet is designed to assist colleges and universities as they develop policies, procedures, and programs to increase safety, respond appropriately to victims of crime, and fully comply with federal requirements established by the Crime Awareness and Campus Security Act of 1990. Part 1 presents 11 topics for helping define comprehensive,…

Kirkland, Connie J.; Siegel, Dorothy G.

205

Promising Practices in Florida: Integrating Academic and Vocational Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document is a compilation of 90 successful interdisciplinary projects and activities and integrated academic and vocational curriculum ideas implemented in Florida during the past 3 years. The activities and projects have been submitted by teachers and have not been officially evaluated or reviewed. Each description provides this information:…

Jones, Betty, Comp.

206

Poverty, Race and Youth: Challenges and Promising Practices in Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The transition from high school to adult life is an exciting time for many young people. Youth from high poverty backgrounds, however, are considered at-risk for a host of unfavorable outcomes including academic failure, school dropout, drug abuse, unemployment and incarceration. These adolescents are more likely than their more affluent peers to…

Hughes, Carolyn; Stenhjem, Pamela H.; Newkirk, Reginald

2007-01-01

207

Special Education Inclusion. Center for School Success Promising Practices Series  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This publication focuses on special education inclusion. Inclusion is a term that expresses commitment to providing specially designed instruction and support for students with special needs in the context of a general education classroom. All students in the school are full members of the community, participating equitably in the opportunities…

Imbimbo, Josephine; Knopf, Naomi

2009-01-01

208

Implementing Promising Practices to Prepare Quality Teacher Educators  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The United States does more than just talk; it invests a lot of money in public education. While students are the major focus of concern, teachers are a mainstay in the enterprise. In 2002, the U.S. invested $192 billion in teacher pay and benefits. More than 50% of all dollars allocated by the government for education is paid in salaries for…

Gentry, Ruben

2012-01-01

209

Prosecuting Human Trafficking Cases: Lessons Learned and Promising Practices.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Human trafficking involves the use of force, fraud, or coercion to exploit a person for profit. Trafficking victims are subjected to sexual exploitation, forced labor, or both. Labor exploitation includes slavery, forced labor, and debt bondage, while sex...

H. J. Clawson N. Dutch S. Lopez S. Tiapula

2008-01-01

210

Identifying Plane Figures  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Here you can practice identifying triangles, quadrilaterals and other polygons. Spring training is here so work on you baseball skills while studying your math! Baseball Angle Review and Baseball Triangle Practice will help your game in and out of the classroom. Make Benchmark a breeze with the Quadrilateral Sorter. ...

West, Mrs.

2013-03-07

211

MFTF-progress and promise  

SciTech Connect

The Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF) has been in construction at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for 3 years, and most of the major subsystems are nearing completion. Recently, the scope of this project was expanded to meet new objectives, principally to reach plasma conditions corresponding to energy break-even. To fulfill this promise, the single-cell minimum-B mirror configuration will be replaced with a tandem mirror configuration (MFTF-B). The facility must accordingly be expanded to accomodate the new geometry. This paper briefly discusses the status of the major MFTF subsystems and describes how most of the technological objectives of MFTF will be demonstrated before we install the additional systems necessary to make the tandem. It also summarizes the major features of the expanded facility.

Thomassen, K.I.

1980-10-03

212

Promising therapeutic targets in neuroblastoma  

PubMed Central

Neuroblastoma, the most common extra- cranial solid tumor in children, is derived from neural crest cells. Nearly half of patients present with metastatic disease, and have 5-year EFS of less than 50%. New approaches with targeted therapy may improve efficacy without increased toxicity. The current review will evaluate three promising targeted therapies, including 131I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG), a radiopharmaceutical taken up by the human norepinephrine transporter expressed in 90% of neuroblastomas, immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies targeting the GD2 ganglioside, expressed on 98% of neuroblastoma cells, and inhibitors of ALK, a tyrosine kinase which is mutated or amplified in approximately 10% of neuroblastoma and expressed on the surface of most neuroblastoma cells. Early phase trials have confirmed the activity of 131I-MIBG in relapsed neuroblastoma, with response rates of about 30%, but the technical aspects of administration of large amounts of radioactivity in young children and the limited access have hindered incorporation into treatment of newly diagnosed patients. Anti-GD2 antibodies have also demonstrated activity in relapsed disease, and a recent phase III randomized trial showed a significant improvement in event-free survival for patients receiving chimeric anti-GD2 (ch14.18) combined with cytokines and isotretinoin after myeloablative consolidation therapy. A recently approved small molecule inhibitor of ALK has promising pre-clinical activity for neuroblastoma, and is currently in phase I and II trials. This is the first agent directed to a specific mutation in neuroblastoma, and marks a new step toward personalized therapy for neuroblastoma. Further clinical development of targeted treatments offers new hope for children with neuroblastoma.

Matthay, Katherine K.; George, Rani E.; Yu, Alice L.

2012-01-01

213

Promising therapeutic targets in neuroblastoma.  

PubMed

Neuroblastoma, the most common extracranial solid tumor in children, is derived from neural crest cells. Nearly half of patients present with metastatic disease and have a 5-year event-free survival of <50%. New approaches with targeted therapy may improve efficacy without increased toxicity. In this review we evaluate 3 promising targeted therapies: (i) (131)I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG), a radiopharmaceutical that is taken up by human norepinephrine transporter (hNET), which is expressed in 90% of neuroblastomas; (ii) immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies targeting the GD2 ganglioside, which is expressed on 98% of neuroblastoma cells; and (iii) inhibitors of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK), a tyrosine kinase that is mutated or amplified in ~10% of neuroblastomas and expressed on the surface of most neuroblastoma cells. Early-phase trials have confirmed the activity of (131)I-MIBG in relapsed neuroblastoma, with response rates of ~30%, but the technical aspects of administering large amounts of radioactivity in young children and limited access to this agent have hindered its incorporation into treatment of newly diagnosed patients. Anti-GD2 antibodies have also shown activity in relapsed disease, and a recent phase III randomized trial showed a significant improvement in event-free survival for patients receiving chimeric anti-GD2 (ch14.18) combined with cytokines and isotretinoin after myeloablative consolidation therapy. A recently approved small-molecule inhibitor of ALK has shown promising preclinical activity for neuroblastoma and is currently in phase I and II trials. This is the first agent directed to a specific mutation in neuroblastoma, and marks a new step toward personalized therapy for neuroblastoma. Further clinical development of targeted treatments offers new hope for children with neuroblastoma. PMID:22589483

Matthay, Katherine K; George, Rani E; Yu, Alice L

2012-05-15

214

The neural circuitry of a broken promise.  

PubMed

Promises are one of the oldest human-specific psychological mechanisms fostering cooperation and trust. Here, we study the neural underpinnings of promise keeping and promise breaking. Subjects first make a promise decision (promise stage), then they anticipate whether the promise affects the interaction partner's decision (anticipation stage) and are subsequently free to keep or break the promise (decision stage). Findings revealed that the breaking of the promise is associated with increased activation in the DLPFC, ACC, and amygdala, suggesting that the dishonest act involves an emotional conflict due to the suppression of the honest response. Moreover, the breach of the promise can be predicted by a perfidious brain activity pattern (anterior insula, ACC, inferior frontal gyrus) during the promise and anticipation stage, indicating that brain measurements may reveal malevolent intentions before dishonest or deceitful acts are actually committed. PMID:20005830

Baumgartner, Thomas; Fischbacher, Urs; Feierabend, Anja; Lutz, Kai; Fehr, Ernst

2009-12-10

215

The validity of searching routinely collected general practice computerdata to identify patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD): a manualreview of 500 medical records  

Microsoft Academic Search

We conducted a search of 12 practices' routinely collected computer\\u000d\\u000a\\u0009data in three localities across the UK and found that 4.9\\\\% of the\\u000d\\u000a\\u0009registered population had an estimated glomerular filtration rate\\u000d\\u000a\\u0009(GFR) of 60 ml\\/min\\/1.73 m(2) (equivalent to stages 3-5 CKD). Only\\u000d\\u000a\\u00093.6\\\\% of these were known to have renal disease. Although UK general\\u000d\\u000a\\u0009practice is computerized, important clinical data

Sobana Anandarajah; Tracy Tai; Simon de Lusignan; Paul Stevens; Donal O'Donoghue; Mel Walker; Sean Hilton

2005-01-01

216

Promising Practices in Early Childhood Mental Health. Systems of Care: Promising Practices in Children's Mental Health, 2001 Series.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Part of a series designed to provide guidance for communities interested in building systems of care for children with emotional disturbances, this volume addresses mental health services for very young children and their families. A literature review was conducted, and four Community Mental Health Services for Children and Their Families Program…

Simpson, Jennifer S.; Jivanjee, Pauline; Koroloff, Nancy; Doerfler, Andrea; Garcia, Maria

217

Organ printing: promises and challenges.  

PubMed

Organ printing or biomedical application of rapid prototyping, also defined as additive layer-by-layer biomanufacturing, is an emerging transforming technology that has potential for surpassing traditional solid scaffold-based tissue engineering. Organ printing has certain advantages: it is an automated approach that offers a pathway for scalable reproducible mass production of tissue engineered products; it allows a precised simultaneous 3D positioning of several cell types; it enables creation tissue with a high level of cell density; it can solve the problem of vascularization in thick tissue constructs; finally, organ printing can be done in situ. The ultimate goal of organ-printing technology is to fabricate 3D vascularized functional living human organs suitable for clinical implantation. The main practical outcomes of organ-printing technology are industrial scalable robotic biofabrication of complex human tissues and organs, automated tissue-based in vitro assays for clinical diagnostics, drug discovery and drug toxicity, and complex in vitro models of human diseases. This article describes conceptual framework and recent developments in organ-printing technology, outlines main technological barriers and challenges, and presents potential future practical applications. PMID:18154465

Mironov, Vladimir; Kasyanov, Vladimir; Drake, Christopher; Markwald, Roger R

2008-01-01

218

Present But Not Accounted for: Exploring the Sexual Risk Practices and Intervention Needs of Nonheterosexually Identified Women in a Prevention Program for Women with HIV\\/AIDS  

Microsoft Academic Search

Nonheterosexually identified (NHI) women may be present, but not accounted for, in HIV and sexually transmitted infection (STI) prevention interventions. This study used quantitative and qualitative methods to examine the sexual risk behaviors and intervention needs of NHI women in Protect and Respect, a safer sex intervention for HIV-positive women. Study participants (n = 32) were predominantly Black, low income,

Michelle Teti; Lisa Bowleg; Susan Rubinstein; Linda Lloyd; Zek Berhane; Marla Gold

2008-01-01

219

A Practice/Research Collaborative: An Innovative Approach to Identifying and Responding to Psychosocial Functioning Problems and Recidivism Risk among Juvenile Arrestees  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Effectively identifying and responding to the psychosocial problems and recidivism risk of arrested youths remain critical needs in the field. Centralized intake facilities, such as juvenile assessment centers (JACs), can play a key role in this process. As part of a U.S. National Demonstration Project, the Miami-Dade JAC, serving a…

Dembo, Richard; Walters, Wansley; Meyers, Kathleen

2005-01-01

220

Approaches for Advancing Girls' Education in Ghana: A Symposium To Examine Current Practices and Identify Future Directions (1st, Ajumako, Central Region, Ghana, June 25-26, 2001).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The Girls' Education Unit (GEU) of the Basic Education Division of Ghana Education Service (GES) organized this Approaches for Advancing Girls' Education (AAGE) symposium to address the issues of girls' education, to construct a comprehensive picture of what interventions related to girls' education are currently being implemented, and identify

Academy for Educational Development, Washington, DC.

221

Magnetic refrigeration: the promise and the problems  

SciTech Connect

Magnetic refrigeration uses the temperature- and field-dependence of the entropy of some magnetic materials to accomplish cooling. Because of the intrinsically high efficiency of the magnetization and demagnetization process and because of the potential for excellent heat transfer between solids and fluids, magnetic refrigerators promise to have higher efficiency than existing gas-cycle refrigerators. Many ground-based and space-based applications could benefit significantly from the cost savings implied by higher efficiency. Other attributes of these devices are high reliability and low volume and mass per unit cooling power. The development of these refrigerators is underway at several places around the world, including the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The progress to date has been encouraging but some problems have been clearly identified. The arguments for high efficiency and the problems that will need to be solved to achieve this goal are discussed.

Barclay, J.A.

1984-01-01

222

A Preliminary Examination of Presidential Anticrime Promises  

Microsoft Academic Search

Presidential candidates make many promises about crime control policies during a campaign. Once they are elected to office, do presidents follow through with their campaign promises about crime? Previous studies show that presidents tend to keep most of the promises that they make as candidates across a wide range of topics. However, a specific study of crime issues is heretofore

Nancy Marion; Rick Farmer

2004-01-01

223

Siah: a promising anticancer target.  

PubMed

Siah ubiquitin ligases play important roles in a number of signaling pathways involved in the progression and spread of cancer in cell-based models, but their role in tumor progression remains controversial. Siah proteins have been described to be both oncogenic and tumor suppressive in a variety of patient cohort studies and animal cancer models. This review collates the current knowledge of Siah in cancer progression and identifies potential methods of translation of these findings into the clinic. Furthermore, key experiments needed to close the gaps in our understanding of the role Siah proteins play in tumor progression are suggested. PMID:23455005

Wong, Christina S F; Möller, Andreas

2013-03-01

224

Pharmacologic Preconditioning: Translating the Promise  

PubMed Central

A transient, ischemia-resistant phenotype known as “ischemic tolerance” can be established in brain in a rapid or delayed fashion by a preceding noninjurious “preconditioning” stimulus. Initial preclinical studies of this phenomenon relied primarily on brief periods of ischemia or hypoxia as preconditioning stimuli, but it was later realized that many other stressors, including pharmacologic ones, are also effective. This review highlights the surprisingly wide variety of drugs now known to promote ischemic tolerance, documented and to some extent mechanistically characterized in preclinical animal models of stroke. Although considerably more experimentation is needed to thoroughly validate the ability of any currently identified preconditioning agent to protect ischemic brain, the fact that some of these drugs are already clinically approved for other indications implies that the growing enthusiasm for translational success in the field of pharmacologic preconditioning may be well justified.

Gidday, Jeffrey M.

2010-01-01

225

The Promise of Motivational Interviewing in School Mental Health  

Microsoft Academic Search

In recent years, the science of developing and implementing interventions addressing school-related risk factors has produced\\u000a many advances. This article addresses the promise of a cross-disciplinary practice approach known as motivational interviewing\\u000a in school settings. Specifically, the supporting evidence as well as the process and principles of motivational interviewing\\u000a are described for those unfamiliar with motivational interviewing nomenclature. A description

Andy J. FreyRichard; Richard N. Cloud; Jon Lee; Jason W. Small; John R. Seeley; Edward G. Feil; Hill M. Walker; Annemieke Golly

2011-01-01

226

The Utility, Limitations, and Promise of Proteomics in Animal Science  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Proteomics experiments have the ability to simultaneously identify and quantify potentially thousands of proteins in one experiment. The use of this technology in animal science is still in its infancy, yet it holds significant promise as a method for advancing animal science research. Examples of...

227

AmeriCorps Promise Fellows Handbook: Delivering on America's Promise to Youth.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This handbook provides AmeriCorps Promise Fellows with important information about their participation in this special initiative of AmeriCorps and America's Promise--The Alliance for Youth. Section 1 is an overview of AmeriCorps, including its mission, the mission of America's Promise--The Alliance for Youth, and the role of AmeriCorps Promise

Corporation for National Service, Washington, DC.

228

Cancer and Inflammation: Promise for Biological Therapy  

PubMed Central

Cancers often arise as the end stage of inflammation in adults, but not in children. As such there is a complex interplay between host immune cells during neoplastic development, with both an ability to promote cancer as well as limit or eliminate it, most often complicit with the host. In humans, defining inflammation and the presence of inflammatory cells within or surrounding the tumor is a critical aspect of modern pathology. Groups defining staging for neoplasms are strongly encouraged to assess and incorporate measures of the presence of apoptosis, autophagy, and necrosis as well as the nature and quality of the immune infiltrate. Both environmental as well as genetic factors enhance the risk of cigarette smoking, H. pylori, hepatitis B/C, human papilloma virus, solar irradiation, asbestos, pancreatitis, or other causes of chronic inflammation. Identifying suitable genetic polymorphisms in cytokines, cytokine receptors, and Toll-like receptors among other immune response genes is also seen as high value as genomic sequencing becomes less expensive. Animal models which incorporate and assess not only the genetic anlagen but also the inflammatory cells and the presence of microbial pathogen [PAMPs] and damage associated molecular pattern molecules [DAMPs] are necessary. Identifying micro-RNAs involved in regulating the response to damage or injury are seen as highly promising. Although no therapeutic strategies to prevent or treat cancers based on insights into inflammatory pathways are currently approved for the common epithelial malignancies, there remains substantial interest in agents targeting COX2 or PPAR?, ethyl pyruvate, as well as steroids and several novel agents on the horizon.

Demaria, Sandra; Pikarsky, Eli; Karin, Michael; Coussens, Lisa M.; Chen, Yen-Ching; El-Omar, Emad M.; Trinchieri, Giorgio; Dubinett, Steven M.; Mao, Jenny T.; Szabo, Eva; Krieg, Arthur; Weiner, George J.; Fox, Bernard A.; Coukos, George; Wang, Ena; Abraham, Robert T.; Carbone, Michele; Lotze, Michael T.

2010-01-01

229

Integrated digital avionic systems - Promise and threats  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The progress being made in effective systems design implementation for digital equipment for aircraft avionics sytems is assayed. The history of digital systems integration in avionics hardware is traced from use of 16-transistor chips to emerging 100,000 gate chips, and attention is given to architectural considerations for future hardware. Design considerations include top-down or bottom-up architecture, distributed microprocessor and computer resources, integrated components or data fusion, etc. Systems decomposition practices in design permit separate design of flight safety systems, redundancy, fault tolerance, and identifying components that feature different technologies. Present flight control systems sport a MBTF of 1,000,000 hr when separate controls are installed for each flight system.

Zempolich, B. A.

1983-10-01

230

Wood power, its promises and problems  

SciTech Connect

Large volumes of biomass have been identified as physically available for energy use, but serious questions remain about their economic availability. Sources of biomass today include bark and mill residues that accumulate at manufacturing plants; logging residues; noncommercial timber; and material removed in silvicultural practices. In addition, the concept of energy farming has been advanced, but considerable research is required before commercialization can be achieved. Energy can be derived from wood biomass using a number of processes namely: direct combustion for process heat; thermochemical gasification for synthesis gas production; and processing for the production of ethanol and methanol. Finally, electric power and steam generation from wood in New England is examined and the environmental impacts of harvesting, transporting, and converting wood for energy discussed. (Refs. 44).

Engalichev, N.; Mathur, V.K.

1981-01-01

231

Wood power, its promises and problems  

SciTech Connect

Large volumes of forest biomass have been identified as physically available for energy use, but serious questions remain about their economic availability. Sources of biomass today include bark and mill residues that accumulate at manufacturing plants; rest residues composed of logging residues, excess biomass growth over what is harvested; noncommercial timber and material removed in silvicultural practices. In addition, the concept of biomass farming has recently been advanced as a potential source of material. Energy can be derived from wood biomass using a number of processes; namely: (a) direct combustion for process heat, (b) thermochemical gasification of wood biomass for synthesis gas production, and (c) aqueous processing for the production of ethanol and methanol. The overall objectives of the U.S. Department of Energy is to develop the capability for converting renewable wood biomass resource into clean fuels, petrochemical substitutes, and other energy intensive products that can supplement similar products made from conventional fossil fuels. 44 refs.

Engalichev, N.; Mathur, V.K.

1981-01-01

232

Managed care and dentistry: promises and problems.  

PubMed

At its inception in the mid-1950s, managed care held a number of promises for dental care providers and dental patients. Sometime during the development of managed care, however, many programs lost sight of the importance of provider equity. Using data from current programs, the authors contrast the original promises with the realities of managed care in dentistry. PMID:7722104

Marcus, M; Coulter, I D; Freed, J R; Atchison, K A; Gershen, J A; Spolsky, V W

1995-04-01

233

The Promising Syllabus Enacted: One Teacher's Experience  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The purpose of this report is to describe a rationale and strategies for use of the Promising Syllabus (in Bain, 2004, What the best college teachers do). This syllabus reflects the learner-centered paradigm where students take charge of their own learning. The syllabus creates a series of promises between teacher and student, focusing on a…

Hirsch, Christine Courtade

2010-01-01

234

Online promise problems with online width metrics  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this article we introduce a new program that applies ideas from parameterized complexity, and topological graph theory, to online problems. We focus on parameterized promise problems, where we are promised that the problem input obeys certain properties, or is presented in a certain fashion. We present some algorithmic ramifications of such problems in the online setting. We explore the

Rodney G. Downey; Catherine Mccartin

2007-01-01

235

Identify Symmetry  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This unit will teach you how to identify symmetry in everyday objects and mathematical shapes in lines and rotational symmetry. What is line symmetry? Click on the link to find out: Line Symmetry Here is a line activity to see if you understand it: Line Symmetry Class Zone See if you understand the concepts by doing the following quiz: Line Symmetry Work Now for rotational symmetry: Rotational Symmetry See if you understand rotational symmetry by taking this quiz: Rotational Symmetry Work ...

Neubert, Mrs.

2011-03-03

236

Identifying Erosion  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this environmental science activity (page 3 of the PDF), leaners will identify and explain the causes of erosion. They will observe the effects of erosion on the surrounding area and further explore examples of erosion online. An extension activity allows learners to make a hands-on model of soil erosion. Though this was created as a pre-visit activity for a workshop about water flow and erosion, it makes a great stand-alone activity as well!

Cosi

2009-01-01

237

Identifying Rural Tourism Markets: A Practical Tool  

Microsoft Academic Search

Product attributes of rural tourism are inherently green, and have the potential to appeal to the increasingly overstretched consumers who are in search for a personalized response to their need for physical, emotional, and social appreciation in a simpler environment. The same consumers also become more independent, involved, and discriminatory in the destination selection process. Despite their rich green assets,

Liping A. Cai; Jingrong Liu; Zhuowei Huang

2008-01-01

238

Identifying Species  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This two part activity will allow students to investigate biological diversity in the area of their school. They will first prepare a taxonomic key to distinguish between the four insects or spiders that they have selected. All of the keys are combined and students then perform a transect study of a neighborhood field or school playing ground. Finally as a class students will compile a list of the animals and plants that are found within a mile of their school. They may need to use field guides, local resources, taxonomic keys, and species lists to help identify these organisms. Once they have compiled their list they will organize the species into the taxonomic groups they have studied.

Dispezio, Michael

239

Two New Promising Treatment Regimens for Gonorrhea  

MedlinePLUS

... niaid.nih.gov Skip Content Marketing Share this: Two New Promising Treatment Regimens for Gonorrhea Additional Options Urgently Needed Two new antibiotic regimens using existing drugs—injectable gentamicin ...

240

A Promising Approach for Expanding and Sustaining School-Wide Positive Behavior Support  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Educators and psychologists are concerned about problem behavior. Fortunately, effective interventions and practices have been documented for addressing this problem behavior. However, sustained and expanded uses of these interventions and practices have not been consistent or widespread. One promising approach to the systemic and sustained…

Sugai, George; Horner, Robert R.

2006-01-01

241

Defining Normal and Abnormal Fetal Growth: Promises and Challenges  

PubMed Central

Normal fetal growth is a critical component of a healthy pregnancy and influences the long-term health of the offspring. However, defining normal and abnormal fetal growth has been a long-standing challenge in clinical practice and research. The authors review various references and standards that are widely used to evaluate fetal growth, and discuss common pitfalls of current definitions of abnormal fetal growth. Pros and cons of different approaches to customize fetal growth standards are described. The authors further discuss recent advances towards an integrated definition for fetal growth restriction. Such a definition may incorporate fetal size with the status of placental health measured by maternal and fetal Doppler velocimetry and biomarkers, biophysical findings and genetics. Although the concept of an integrated definition appears promising, further development and testing are required. An improved definition of abnormal fetal growth should benefit both research and clinical practice.

Zhang, Jun; Merialdi, Mario; Platt, Lawrence D.; Kramer, Michael S.

2010-01-01

242

Stem cell research and economic promises.  

PubMed

In the context of stem cell research, the promise of economic growth has become a common policy argument for adoption of permissive policies and increased government funding. However, declarations of economic and commercial benefit, which can be found in policy reports, the scientific literature, public funding policies, and the popular press, have arguably created a great deal of expectation. Can stem cell research deliver on the economic promise? And what are the implications of this economic ethos for the researchers who must work under its shadow? PMID:20579253

Caulfield, Timothy

2010-01-01

243

The promise of nucleic acid vaccines  

Microsoft Academic Search

Establishing the effective use of ‘naked’ nucleic acids as vaccines would undoubtedly be one of the most important advances in the history of vaccinology. While nucleic acids show much promise for use as vaccine vectors in experimental animals, not a single naked nucleic acid vector has been approved for use in humans. Indeed, data from human clinical trials is scant:

N P Restifo; H Ying; L Hwang; W W Leitner

2000-01-01

244

A promise to our supporters and friends  

Microsoft Academic Search

In 1874, the founders of Providence Public Library (PPL) made a promise to generations of Rhode Islanders when they established the Library as a private, non-profit organization. That commitment ensured the people of Providence and Rhode Island of a strong public library with the enduring mission of supporting their lifelong learning needs. Throughout the Library's 135 years, visionary leaders and

Oliver H. Bennett

245

The Promise of Wave Power (Invited)  

Microsoft Academic Search

The solutions to today's energy challenges need to be explored through alternative, renewable and clean energy sources to enable diverse energy resource plans. An extremely abundant and promising source of energy exists in the world's oceans: it is estimated that if 0.2 % of the oceans' untapped energy could be harnessed, it could provide power sufficient for the entire world.

T. Brekken

2010-01-01

246

Promise in Action: Examples of Institutional Success  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|In this article, the author illustrates how three campuses have, in their own way, attempted to bring coherence to the student experience and enrich that experience by more closely matching what was promised to what each student actually experiences while enrolled. Fulfilling students' expectations that were purposefully articulated in the…

Kuh, George D.

2013-01-01

247

The Promise of Parents as Advocates  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This article discusses the promise of parents as advocates on behalf of family support and high-quality care for infants and toddlers. The authors note that parents organize around specific issues or immediate problems. Parent action grows from the bottom up--from community advocacy to national issues. Effective public policy promotes parent…

Weissbourd, Bernice; Lombardi, Joan

2003-01-01

248

Promise or political risk for Mexican tourism  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mexico today is a major tourism power and its potential in resorts, ecotourism, touring, cruises, and other growing sectors of the industry is bright. But the country is threatened by mounting political, economic, and social problems which could undermine that promise. Mexico has become an increasingly unsafe place to visit. Street crime, drug trafficking, rebel activity, and government corruption have

Dan A. Cothran; Cheryl Cole Cothran

1998-01-01

249

Fulfilling the Promise of Educational Accountability  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|When No Child Left Behind (NCLB) was signed into law, the President and secretary of education promised sweeping reform of the American education system. In the five years since the law took effect, U.S. public schools have, indeed, seen remarkable change. However, not all of the changes have been well received. Policy makers, scholars, and…

Nelson, Sarah W.; McGhee, Marla W.; Meno, Lionel R.; Slater, Charles L.

2007-01-01

250

The Promise of Zoomable User Interfaces  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Zoomable user interfaces (ZUIs) have received a significant amount of attention in the 18 years since they were introduced. They have enjoyed some success, and elements of ZUIs are widely used in computers today, although the grand vision of a zoomable desktop has not materialised. This paper describes the premise and promise of ZUIs along with…

Bederson, Benjamin B.

2011-01-01

251

Problems and promises of the protocol  

Microsoft Academic Search

Creating protocols (or guidelines, standards) for medical work is becoming big business. The pros and cons of protocols have been reiterated many times: advocates argue that protocols may enhance the quality of care, reduce unwanted variations in practice, and may help to render medical practice more scientific. Critics, on the contrary, argue that protocols will lead to cookbook medicine, to

Marc Berg

1997-01-01

252

Delivering on the promise of open innovation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – For all the rhetoric – and hype – about open innovation, the reality is that few corporations have institutionalized open innovation practices in ways that have enabled substantial growth or industry leadership. This paper aims to explain how open innovation can achieve its potential in most companies. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – Three cases of companies that practice various types of

Jorge Rufat-Latre; Amy Muller; Dave Jones

2010-01-01

253

Implementing Evidence-Based Social Work Practice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Recently, social work has been influenced by new forms of practice that hold promise for bringing practice and research together to strengthen the scientific knowledge base supporting social work intervention. The most recent new practice framework is evidence-based practice. However, although evidence-based practice has many qualities that might…

Mullen, Edward J.; Bledsoe, Sarah E.; Bellamy, Jennifer L.

2008-01-01

254

Teen Risk-Taking: Promising Prevention Programs and Approaches.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This guidebook explores some of the practical issues associated with finding, choosing, and starting potentially effective prevention programs for at-risk preteens and teens. The guidebook is based on a study of 51 intervention programs that identified elements and delivery mechanisms that were associated with their effectiveness. A closer look at…

Eisen, Marvin; Pallitto, Christina; Bradner, Carolyn; Bolshun, Natalya

255

Teen Risk-Taking: Promising Prevention Programs and Approaches.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This guidebook explores some of the practical issues associated with finding, choosing, and starting potentially effective prevention programs for at-risk preteens and teens. The guidebook is based on a study of 51 intervention programs that identified elements and delivery mechanisms that were associated with their effectiveness. A closer look…

Eisen, Marvin; Pallitto, Christina; Bradner, Carolyn; Bolshun, Natalya

256

The Promise of Standardized Data Collection: School Health Variables Identified by States  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|A gap in data prevents measurement of the needs of school-age children and the influence of school nursing interventions on student health and education outcomes. Its remedy is in the data collected in school health rooms. A national clinical database describing school health will allow education and health leaders to build evidence-based…

Johnson, Kathleen H.; Bergren, Martha Dewey; Westbrook, Linda Oakes

2012-01-01

257

Childhood Executive Function Inventory (CHEXI): A promising measure for identifying young children with ADHD?  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study investigated whether the Childhood Executive Function Inventory (CHEXI) can discriminate between young children fulfilling the diagnostic criteria for attention-deficit\\/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and normally developing children. Unlike other executive function rating instruments, the CHEXI focuses specifically on inhibitory control and working memory, without including items that overlap with the diagnostic criteria of ADHD. The CHEXI was found to

Lisa B. Thorell; Lilianne Eninger; Karin C. Brocki; Gunilla Bohlin

2010-01-01

258

Assessing College Students' Attitudes Toward Responsible Drinking Messages to Identify Promising Binge Drinking Intervention Strategies  

Microsoft Academic Search

Health communication appeals were utilized through a Web site simulation to evaluate the potential effectiveness of 3 intervention approaches to promote responsible drinking among college students. Within the Web site simulation, participants were exposed to a persuasive message designed to represent either the generalized social norms advertising approach (based on others' behavior), the personalized behavioral feedback approach (tailored to the

Valerie K. Pilling; Laura A. Brannon

2007-01-01

259

Promising Aedes aegypti Repellent Chemotypes Identified through Integrated QSAR, Virtual Screening, Synthesis, and Bioassay.  

PubMed

Molecular field topology analysis, scaffold hopping, and molecular docking were used as complementary computational tools for the design of repellents for Aedes aegypti, the insect vector for yellow fever, chikungunya, and dengue fever. A large number of analogues were evaluated by virtual screening with Glide molecular docking software. This produced several dozen hits that were either synthesized or procured from commercial sources. Analysis of these compounds by a repellent bioassay resulted in a few highly active chemicals (in terms of minimum effective dosage) as viable candidates for further hit-to-lead and lead optimization effort. PMID:24039693

Oliferenko, Polina V; Oliferenko, Alexander A; Poda, Gennadiy I; Osolodkin, Dmitry I; Pillai, Girinath G; Bernier, Ulrich R; Tsikolia, Maia; Agramonte, Natasha M; Clark, Gary G; Linthicum, Kenneth J; Katritzky, Alan R

2013-09-06

260

The Promise of Wave Power (Invited)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The solutions to today's energy challenges need to be explored through alternative, renewable and clean energy sources to enable diverse energy resource plans. An extremely abundant and promising source of energy exists in the world's oceans: it is estimated that if 0.2 % of the oceans' untapped energy could be harnessed, it could provide power sufficient for the entire world. Ocean energy exists in the forms of wave, tidal, marine currents, thermal (temperature gradient) and salinity. Among these forms, significant opportunities and benefits have been identified in the area of ocean wave energy extraction, i.e., harnessing the motion of the ocean waves, and converting that motion into electrical energy. Ocean wave energy refers to the kinetic and potential energy in the heaving motion of ocean waves. Wave energy is essentially concentrated solar energy (as is wind energy). The heating of the earth’s surface by the sun (with other complex processes) drives the wind, which in turn blows across the surface of the ocean to create waves. At each stage of conversion, the power density increases. Ocean wave power offers several attractive qualities, including high power density, low variability, and excellent forecastability. A typical large ocean wave propogates at around 12 m/s with very little attenuation across the ocean. If the waves can be detected several hundred kilometers off shore, there can be 10 hours or more of accurate forecast horizon. In fact, analysis has shown good forecast accuracy up to 48 hours in advance. Off the coast Oregon, the yearly average wave power is approximately 30 kW per meter of crestlength (i.e., unit length transverse to the direction of wave propagation and parallel to the shore.) This compares very favorably with power densities of solar and wind, which typically range in the several hundreds of Watts per square meter. Globally, the wave energy resource is stronger on the west coasts of large landmasses and increases in strength toward the poles. This phenomenon is due to the prevailing west to east global winds known as the "westerlies" found in the Northern and Southern hemispheres between 30 and 60 degrees latitude. Correspondingly, the west coast of the United States, the west coast of Australia, and the coastal regions of Europe have seen the greatest wave energy industrial activity to date. Ocean wave energy has great potential to be a significant contributor of renewable power for many regions in the world. For the West coast of the US alone, the total wave energy resource is estimated at 440 TWh/yr, which is more than the typical total US annual hydroelectric production (270 TWh in 2003). For US west coast states, a fully developed wave energy industry could be a significant contributor to renewable energy portfolio standards. Within the next few years, several utility-scale wave energy converters are planned for grid connection (e.g., Ocean Power Technologies and Columbia Power Technologies in Oregon, USA), with plans for more utility-scale development to follow soon after. This presentation will cover the physical basics of wave energy, examples of commercial technology, challenges opportunities for research, and an update on the wave energy research and developments at leading commercial, industrial, and academic institutions around the world.

Brekken, T.

2010-12-01

261

The promise of molecular epidemiology in defining the association between radiation and cancer  

SciTech Connect

Molecular epidemiology involves the inclusion in epidemiologic studies of biologic measurements made at a genetic and molecular level and aims to improve the current knowledge of disease etiology and risk. One of the goals of molecular epidemiology studies of cancer is to determine the role of environmental and genetic factors in initiation and progression of malignancies and to use this knowledge to develop preventive strategies. This approach promises extraordinary opportunities for revolutionizing the practice of medicine and reducing risk. However, this will be accompanied by the need to address and resolve many challenges, such as ensuring the appropriate interpretation of molecular testing and resolving associated ethical, legal, and social issues. Traditional epidemiologic approaches determined that exposure to ionizing radiation poses significantly increased risk of leukemia and several other types of cancer. Such studies provided the basis for setting exposure standards to protect the public and the workforce from potentially adverse effects of ionizing radiation. These standards were set by using modeling approaches to extrapolate from the biological effects observed in high-dose radiation studies to predicted, but mostly immeasurable, effects at low radiation doses. It is anticipated that the addition of the molecular parameters to the population-based studies will help identify the genes and pathways characteristic of cancers due to radiation exposure of individuals, as well as identify susceptible or resistant subpopulations. In turn, the information about the molecular mechanisms should aid to improve risk assessment. While studies on radiogenic concerns are currently limited to only a few candidate genes, the exponential growth of scientific knowledge and technology promises expansion of knowledge about identity of participating genes and pathways in the future. This article is meant to provide an introductory overview of recent advances in understanding of carcinogenesis at the molecular level, with an emphasis of the aspects that may be of use in establishing the association between radiation and cancer.

Neta, R.

2000-07-01

262

Parity Reform in France: Promises and Pitfalls  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the 1990s, a new social movement emerged in France to address the underrepresentation of women in elected bodies and to promote womens's and men's equal representation, in French called parité. On the eve of the twenty-first century, the movement achieved its main goal-a constitutional reform. The purpose of this article is to present both the promises of the parity

CLAUDIE BAUDINO

2003-01-01

263

Realizing the promises of marine biotechnology.  

PubMed

High-quality research in the field of marine biotechnology is one of the key-factors for successful innovation in exploiting the vast diversity of marine life. However, fascinating scientific research with promising results and claims on promising potential applications (e.g. for pharmaceuticals, nutritional supplements, (feed-)products for aquaculture and bioremediation solutions) is not the only factor to realise the commercial applications of marine biotechnology. What else is needed to exploit the promising potential of marine biotechnology and to create new industrial possibilities? In the study project 'Ocean Farming-Sustainable exploitation of marine organisms', we explore the possibilities of marine organisms to fulfill needs, such as safe and healthy food, industrial (raw) materials and renewable energy in a sustainable way. One of the three design groups is envisioning the future of strong land-based 'marine' market chains. Marine biotechnology is one of the foci of attention in this design group. This article provides a model of future-oriented thinking in which a variety of experts actively participate. PMID:12919830

Luiten, Esther E M; Akkerman, Ida; Koulman, Albert; Kamermans, Pauline; Reith, Hans; Barbosa, Maria J; Sipkema, Detmer; Wijffels, René H

2003-07-01

264

Selection of promising sites for magma energy experiments  

SciTech Connect

The Long Valley and Coso Hot Springs areas of California have been identified as the most promising sites for conducting a magma energy extraction experiment. These two locations were selected from among the potential sites on the basis of several factors that are critical to the success of the proposed long-term energy extraction experiment. These factors include the likelihood of the existence of shallow magma targets as well as several other drilling, energy extraction and programmatic considerations. As the magma energy extraction program continues, these sites will be analyzed in detail so that one can be selected as the site for the planned magma experiment.

Carson, C.C.

1985-01-01

265

Bioavailability of quercetin: problems and promises.  

PubMed

Quercetin (QC) is a typical plant flavonoid, possesses diverse pharmacologic effects including antiinflammatory, antioxidant, anti-cancer, anti-anaphylaxis effects and against aging. However, the application of QC in pharmaceutical field is limited due to its poor solubility, low bioavailability, poor permeability and instability. To improve the bioavailability of QC, numerous approaches have been undertaken, involving the use of promising drug delivery systems such as inclusion complexes, liposomes, nanoparticles or micelles, which appear to provide higher solubility and bioavailability. Enhanced bioavailability of QC in the near future is likely to bring this product to the forefront of therapeutic agents for treatment of human disease. PMID:23514412

Cai, X; Fang, Z; Dou, J; Yu, A; Zhai, G

2013-01-01

266

Some promising dimensions for behavioral community technology  

PubMed Central

In recent years, the search for effective and replicable approaches to planned change in communities has escalated. Applied behavior analysts have participated in these efforts to remedy existing community problems and to increase the capacities of community residents to meet their goals. Examples of behavioral technologies for community settings are described and their advantages are noted. Criteria for more contextually appropriate community technologies are suggested and strategies for developing behavioral methods according to these criteria are described. This paper outlines some promising dimensions for behavioral community technology and discusses several possible limitations to a behavioral approach to addressing societal problems.

Fawcett, Stephen B.; Mathews, R. Mark; Fletcher, R. Kay

1980-01-01

267

The Promise and Perils of Stem Cell Therapeutics  

PubMed Central

Stem cells are the seeds of tissue repair and regeneration and a promising source for novel therapies. However, apart from hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation for hematologic disease, essentially all other stem cell treatments remain experimental. High hopes have inspired numerous clinical trials, but it has been difficult to obtain unequivocal evidence for robust clinical benefit, likely owing to our primitive state of knowledge about therapeutic mechanisms. Outside the standard clinical trial network unproven therapies are being widely practiced in an open market, which threatens the cause of legitimate clinical investigation of the safety and efficacy of stem cell interventions. Here is one practitioner's perspective on the challenges and technical barriers that must be overcome for novel stem cell therapies to achieve meaningful clinical impact.

Daley, George Q.

2013-01-01

268

Gene expression profile analysis by DNA microarrays: promise and pitfalls.  

PubMed

DNA microarrays represent a technological intersection between biology and computers that enables gene expression analysis in human tissues on a genome-wide scale. This application can be expected to prove extremely valuable for the study of the genetic basis of complex diseases. Despite the enormous promise of this revolutionary technology, there are several issues and possible pitfalls that may undermine the authority of the microarray platform. We discuss some of the conceptual, practical, statistical, and logistical issues surrounding the use of microarrays for gene expression profiling. These issues include the imprecise definition of normal in expression comparisons; the cellular and subcellular heterogeneity of the tissues being studied; the difficulty in establishing the statistically valid comparability of arrays; the logistical logjam in analysis, presentation, and archiving of the vast quantities of data generated; and the need for confirmational studies that address the functional relevance of findings. Although several complicated issues must be resolved, the potential payoff remains large. PMID:11710894

King, H C; Sinha, A A

2001-11-14

269

PROMISING STRATEGIES FOR THE PREVENTION OF DEMENTIA  

PubMed Central

The incidence and prevalence of dementia is expected to increase several fold in the coming decades. Given that the current pharmaceutical treatment of dementia can only modestly improve symptoms, risk factor modification remains the cornerstone for dementia prevention. Some of the most promising strategies for the prevention of dementia include vascular risk factor control, cognitive activity, physical activity, social engagement, diet, and recognition of depression. In observational studies, vascular risk factors - including diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and obesity - are fairly consistently associated with increased risk of dementia. In addition, people with depression are at high risk of cognitive impairment. Other studies have reported that intake of anti-oxidants or polyunsaturated fats may be associated with reduced incidence of dementia in population studies and that people who are cognitively, socially, and physically active have reduced risk of cognitive impairment. However, randomized trials of risk factor modification have been mixed. Most promisingly, interventions of cognitive and physical activity improve cognitive performance and slow cognitive decline. Future studies should continue to examine the implication of risk factor modification in controlled trials, with particular focus on whether several simultaneous interventions may have additive or multiplicative effects.

Middleton, Laura; Yaffe, Kristine

2009-01-01

270

Nanotechnology: Promises and challenges for tomorrow  

SciTech Connect

Nanotechnology is based on the ability to create and utilize materials, devices and systems through control of the matter at the nanometer scale. If successful, nanotechnology is expected to lead to broad new technological developments. The efficiency of energy conversion can be increased through the use of nanostructured materials with enhanced magnetic, light emission or wear resistant properties. Energy generation using nanostructured photovoltaics or nanocluster driven photocatalysis could fundamentally change the economic viability of renewable energy sources. In addition, the ability to imitate molecular processes found in living organisms may be key to developing highly sensitive and discriminating chemical and biological sensors. Such sensors could greatly expand the range of medical home testing as well as provide new technologies to counter the spread of chemical and biological weapons. Even the production of chemicals and materials could be revolutionized through the development of molecular reactors that can promote low energy chemical pathways for materials synthesis. Although nanotechnologies hold great promise, significant scientific challenges must be addressed before they can convert that promise into a reality. A key challenge in nanoscience is to understand how nano-scale tailoring of materials can lead to novel and enhanced functions. The authors' laboratory, for example, is currently making broad contributions in this area by synthesizing and exploring nanomaterials ranging from layered structures for electronics/photonics to novel nanocrystalline catalysts. They are even adapting functions from biological molecules to synthesize new forms of nanostructured materials.

ROMIG JR.,ALTON D.; MICHAEL,JOSEPH R.; MICHALSKE,TERRY A.

2000-02-29

271

THE PROMISE OF BAYESIAN INFERENCE FOR ASTROPHYSICS  

Microsoft Academic Search

The 'frequentist' approach to statistics, currently dominating statistical practice in astrophysics, is compared to the historically older Bayesian approach, which is now growing in pop- ularity in other scientic disciplines, and which provides unique, optimal solutions to well-posed problems. The two approaches address the same questions with very dieren t calculations, but in simple cases often give the same nal

T. J. Loredo

1992-01-01

272

A Promising Parenting Intervention in Foster Care  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a 2-component intervention for biological and foster parent (pairs) to improve parenting practices, co-parenting, and child externalizing problems. Participants were biological and foster parents (N = 128) of primarily neglected children (ages 3 to 10 years) placed in regular foster homes. Biological and foster parents were randomly assigned in

L. Oriana Linares; Daniela Montalto; MinMin Li; Vikash S. Oza

2006-01-01

273

Promises and Pitfalls of Learning Objects  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Learning objects (LOs), generally understood as digital learning resources shared through the Internet and reused in multiple learning contexts, have aroused worldwide enthusiasm in the field of educational technology during the last years. Although LOs and LO systems offer tremendous possibilities to improve educational practices, there are many…

Nurmi, Sami; Jaakkola, Tomi

2006-01-01

274

Reducing Class Size: Promises and Perils  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Reducing class size, especially in primary grades, can have tremendous academic and social benefits for children--benefits that endure well beyond those first years of school. But smaller class sizes are not a cure-all. Beyond the hoopla of enthusiasm for this seemingly simple change in educational practice lie serious consequences for students…

Bascia, Nina; Fredua-Kwarteng, Eric

2008-01-01

275

A Promising Parenting Intervention in Foster Care  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a 2-component intervention for biological and foster parent (pairs) to improve parenting practices, co-parenting, and child externalizing problems. Participants were biological and foster parents (N = 128) of primarily neglected children (ages 3 to 10 years) placed in regular foster…

Linares, L. Oriana; Montalto, Daniela; Li, MinMin; Oza, Vikash S.

2006-01-01

276

The Impact of Advanced Curriculum on the Achievement of Mathematically Promising Elementary Students  

Microsoft Academic Search

The primary aim of Project M3: Mentoring Mathematical Minds was to develop and field test advanced units for mathematically promising elementary students based on exemplary practices in gifted and mathematics education. This article describes the development of the units and reports on mathematics achievement results for students in Grades 3 to 5 from 11 urban and suburban schools after exposure

M. Katherine Gavin; Tutita M. Casa; Jill L. Adelson; Susan R. Carroll; Linda Jensen Sheffield

2009-01-01

277

The Impact of Advanced Curriculum on the Achievement of Mathematically Promising Elementary Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The primary aim of Project M[superscript 3]: Mentoring Mathematical Minds was to develop and field test advanced units for mathematically promising elementary students based on exemplary practices in gifted and mathematics education. This article describes the development of the units and reports on mathematics achievement results for students in…

Gavin, M. Katherine; Casa, Tutita M.; Adelson, Jill L.; Carroll, Susan R.; Sheffield, Linda Jensen

2009-01-01

278

PS1-44: Reviewing Electronic Medical Records of Patients Assessed for Polycythemia Vera by a Multiphysician/Multicenter Group Practice Can Both Identify Physician Errors and Lead to Targeted Medical Education.  

PubMed

Background/Aims In 2005, researchers described an acquired mutation in JAK-STAT signaling, the JAK2V617F mutation which is present in 95% of patients with P. vera (PV). Within three years, testing for this mutation led to new World Health Organization (WHO) criteria for the diagnosis of PV, and other related myeloproliferative neoplasms. This project was initiated to assess the impact of molecular testing within a multiphysician, multicenter group practice and ultimately to use this knowledge to develop educational programs regarding how best to evaluate patients with polycythemia. Methods In 2001, Geisinger Health Systems implemented use of an electronic medical records system including most outpatient sites. This database was searched, identifying 268 patients who had at least one office visit between 2004 and 2009 with a primary (billing) code of PV. The clinician's diagnosis, when available, was determined from progress notes. There were 204 cases with complete records, which were scanned for JAK2V617F mutation testing, serum erythropoietin level, splenomegaly, and bone marrow histology. Results of the diagnostic evaluation, and the clinician's diagnosis, were compared with both the PV Study Group and subsequent 2008 WHO criteria. Results Of the 204 fully evaluable patients, 56 never underwent JAK2V617F mutation testing, and only 11 met the 1971 PV study group criteria for that diagnosis. There were 87 patients who were positive for the JAK2V617F mutation, but only 48 met the 2008 WHO criteria for the diagnosis of PV. JAK2V617F mutation testing, when performed, led to a diagnosis change in 10% of patients originally diagnosed with PV prior to molecular testing. Serum erythropoietin levels were obtained in only 118 of the 204 fully evaluable patients, and were below 4 in only 52 of these patients. Conclusions From this data, we created a cost-effective approach to the assessment of PV, and a continuing medical education lecture. This lecture has subsequently been delivered at numerous hospitals ranging from small community hospitals in the PV cluster region to several major university centers. This presentation will provide details of both the diagnostic paradigm and the subsequent lecture. PMID:24085884

Roda, Paul; Erlich, Porat; Ferrari, Ashley; Tang, Xiaoqin Amy

2013-09-01

279

PS1-44: Reviewing Electronic Medical Records of Patients Assessed for Polycythemia Vera by a Multiphysician/Multicenter Group Practice Can Both Identify Physician Errors and Lead to Targeted Medical Education  

PubMed Central

Background/Aims In 2005, researchers described an acquired mutation in JAK-STAT signaling, the JAK2V617F mutation which is present in 95% of patients with P. vera (PV). Within three years, testing for this mutation led to new World Health Organization (WHO) criteria for the diagnosis of PV, and other related myeloproliferative neoplasms. This project was initiated to assess the impact of molecular testing within a multiphysician, multicenter group practice and ultimately to use this knowledge to develop educational programs regarding how best to evaluate patients with polycythemia. Methods In 2001, Geisinger Health Systems implemented use of an electronic medical records system including most outpatient sites. This database was searched, identifying 268 patients who had at least one office visit between 2004 and 2009 with a primary (billing) code of PV. The clinician’s diagnosis, when available, was determined from progress notes. There were 204 cases with complete records, which were scanned for JAK2V617F mutation testing, serum erythropoietin level, splenomegaly, and bone marrow histology. Results of the diagnostic evaluation, and the clinician’s diagnosis, were compared with both the PV Study Group and subsequent 2008 WHO criteria. Results Of the 204 fully evaluable patients, 56 never underwent JAK2V617F mutation testing, and only 11 met the 1971 PV study group criteria for that diagnosis. There were 87 patients who were positive for the JAK2V617F mutation, but only 48 met the 2008 WHO criteria for the diagnosis of PV. JAK2V617F mutation testing, when performed, led to a diagnosis change in 10% of patients originally diagnosed with PV prior to molecular testing. Serum erythropoietin levels were obtained in only 118 of the 204 fully evaluable patients, and were below 4 in only 52 of these patients. Conclusions From this data, we created a cost-effective approach to the assessment of PV, and a continuing medical education lecture. This lecture has subsequently been delivered at numerous hospitals ranging from small community hospitals in the PV cluster region to several major university centers. This presentation will provide details of both the diagnostic paradigm and the subsequent lecture.

Roda, Paul; Erlich, Porat; Ferrari, Ashley; Tang, Xiaoqin (Amy)

2013-01-01

280

Promises in French children: Comprehension and metapragmatic knowledge  

Microsoft Academic Search

The present study focuses on children's comprehension and metapragmatic knowledge of promises. Searle (1969) defines a promise as a commitment on the part of a speaker to accomplish a future action. Two conditions govern the fulfillment of a promise: the preparatory condition (the listener wants the promised action to be accomplished) and a sincerity condition (the speaker intends to accomplish

Josie Bernicot; Virginie Laval

1996-01-01

281

A GLOBAL ATP COMPUTING SYSTEM FOR ORDER PROMISING  

Microsoft Academic Search

Providing realistic order promise dates or answering customer order quotation on a timely basis offers the key to fulfill customers demand for the growth of global customers. ATP (available-to-promise) is the uncommitted portion of stocks to support customer order promising. This order promising mechanism cannot reserve capacity and material resource for important customer in advance. Moreover, the assumptions of infinite

James T. Lin; Juin-Han Chen

282

The promise of Lean in health care.  

PubMed

An urgent need in American health care is improving quality and efficiency while controlling costs. One promising management approach implemented by some leading health care institutions is Lean, a quality improvement philosophy and set of principles originated by the Toyota Motor Company. Health care cases reveal that Lean is as applicable in complex knowledge work as it is in assembly-line manufacturing. When well executed, Lean transforms how an organization works and creates an insatiable quest for improvement. In this article, we define Lean and present 6 principles that constitute the essential dynamic of Lean management: attitude of continuous improvement, value creation, unity of purpose, respect for front-line workers, visual tracking, and flexible regimentation. Health care case studies illustrate each principle. The goal of this article is to provide a template for health care leaders to use in considering the implementation of the Lean management system or in assessing the current state of implementation in their organizations. PMID:23274021

Toussaint, John S; Berry, Leonard L

2013-01-01

283

Turning Ideas into Practice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This article features five schools (John P. Oldham Elementary, Norwood, Massachusetts; R. J. Richey Elementary, Burnet, Texas; Pittsburgh Carmalt Science and Technology Academy, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; John D. Shaw Elementary, Wasilla, Alaska; and Springville K-8, Portland Oregon) that offer five promising practices. From fourth graders…

Adams, Caralee

2011-01-01

284

Turning Ideas into Practice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article features five schools (John P. Oldham Elementary, Norwood, Massachusetts; R. J. Richey Elementary, Burnet, Texas; Pittsburgh Carmalt Science and Technology Academy, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; John D. Shaw Elementary, Wasilla, Alaska; and Springville K-8, Portland Oregon) that offer five promising practices. From fourth graders learning…

Adams, Caralee

2011-01-01

285

Background, Principles and Promise of Nanodielectrics  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Electrical insulation based on nanodielectric technology stems from the use of fillers in polymeric materials which has been\\u000a common practice since polymer insulation was first introduced. However, when the filler size is reduced to nanometric size,\\u000a the internal interface becomes dominant and unique properties can be obtained. The basic processes and effects are introduced\\u000a in order to provide background and

J. Keith Nelson

286

Discrimination of SM-Identified Individuals  

Microsoft Academic Search

The belief that sadomasochism (SM) is violence or abusive behavior has resulted in harassment, physical attacks, and discrimination against SM-identified individuals. Historically, they were often opposed by self-identified feminists. One reason the women who practiced SM were targeted was the official opposition to sadomasochistic practices promulgated by the National Organization for Women (NOW). Current statistics of incidents of discrimination, harassment

Susan Wright

2006-01-01

287

Furfural--a promising platform for lignocellulosic biofuels.  

PubMed

Furfural offers a promising, rich platform for lignocellulosic biofuels. These include methylfuran and methyltetrahydrofuran, valerate esters, ethylfurfuryl and ethyltetrahydrofurfuryl ethers as well as various C(10)-C(15) coupling products. The various production routes are critically reviewed, and the needs for improvements are identified. Their relative industrial potential is analysed by defining an investment index and CO(2) emissions as well as determining the fuel properties for the resulting products. Finally, the most promising candidate, 2-methylfuran, was subjected to a road trial of 90,000 km in a gasoline blend. Importantly, the potential of the furfural platform relies heavily on the cost-competitive production of furfural from lignocellulosic feedstock. Conventional standalone and emerging coproduct processes-for example, as a coproduct of cellulosic ethanol, levulinic acid or hydroxymethyl furfural-are expensive and energetically demanding. Challenges and areas that need improvement are highlighted. In addition to providing a critical review of the literature, this paper also presents new results and analysis in this area. PMID:22213717

Lange, Jean-Paul; van der Heide, Evert; van Buijtenen, Jeroen; Price, Richard

2011-12-23

288

E-cigarettes: promise or peril?  

PubMed

Electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) use a heating element to vaporize nicotine and other ingredients, simulating the visual, sensory, and behavioral aspects of smoking without the combustion of tobacco. An ever-growing number of companies around the world manufacture a wide variety of e-cigarette brands, despite scant information on the safety of the ingredients for human inhalation. This article provides an overview of the history, production, and marketing of e-cigarettes, the contents of e-cigarettes and vapor, how they are used, public health concerns, and implications for nursing practice, research, and policy development. PMID:22289406

Riker, Carol A; Lee, Kiyoung; Darville, Audrey; Hahn, Ellen J

2012-03-01

289

Lung Cancer Screening: Promise and Pitfalls  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVES To provide an overview of the status of lung cancer screening. DATA SOURCES Published articles, book chapters, websites, and research studies on lung cancer screening. CONCLUSION Screening with chest x-ray and sputum cytology has not been shown to be effective in reducing lung cancer mortality. Although screening with helical CT is currently under investigation in randomized clinical trials, observational studies have not shown evidence that it can detect lung cancer that is curable. IMPLICATION FOR NURSING PRACTICE As healthcare educators and caregivers, nurses should be informed of the status and current controversies associated with lung cancer screening.

Berg, Christine D.

2008-01-01

290

Mesenchymal stem cells: promising for myocardial regeneration?  

PubMed

The pandemic of cardiovascular disease is continuously expanding as the result of changing life styles and diets throughout the Old and New World. Immediate intervention therapy saves the lives of many patients after acute myocardial infarction (MI). However, for many this comes at the price of adverse cardiac remodeling and heart failure. Currently, no conventional therapy can prevent the negative aftermath of MI and alternative treatments are warranted. Therefore, cardiac stem cell therapy has been put forward over the past decade, albeit with modest successes. Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSC) are promising because these are genuine cellular factories of a host of secreted therapeutic factors. MSC are obtained from bone marrow or adipose tissue (ADSC). However, the heart itself also contains mesenchymal- like stem cells, though more difficult to acquire than ADSC. Interestingly, mesenchymal cells such as fibroblasts can be directly or indirectly reprogrammed to all myocardial cell types that require replacement after MI. To date, the paracrine and juxtacrine mechanisms of ADSC and other MSC on vessel formation are best understood. The preconditioning of, otherwise naive, stem cells is gaining more interest: previously presumed deleterious stimuli such as hypoxia and inflammation, i.e. causes of myocardial damage, have the opposite effect on mesenchymal stem cells. MSC gain a higher therapeutic capacity under hypoxia and inflammatory conditions. In this review, mesenchymal stem cells and their working mechanisms are put into the perspective of clinical cardiac stem cell therapy. PMID:23547963

Przybyt, Ewa; Harmsen, Martin C

2013-07-01

291

GEOTEC-a promising energy alternative  

SciTech Connect

Geothermal reconnaissance has shown a promising resource at the base of three clustered volcanoes on Adak Island, located along the Aleutian arc of Alaska. Geophysical surveys revealed areas of abrupt and steep gravitational gradients and high electrical conductivity over the volcanoes, indicating possible subsurface magma. Geochemical analyses indicated a potential reservoir temperature of 180/sup 0/C. The nearby Bering Sea has a surface temperature ranging between 3/sup 0/ and 8/sup 0/C year-round and would provide for high heat reinjection. The combination of geothermal and ocean sink resources could result in a GEOTEC plant having an overall thermal efficiency approaching one-third that of the present diesel-electric generating system at the Naval Air Station on Adak. The more than 5000 permanently stationed personnel at the station consume over 8 million gal of JP-5 fuel for space heating and electrical power. Presently, electric energy on Adak costs 250-350 mils/kilowatt-hour. Preliminary estimates of the cost of electric power from a GEOTEC plant are about 200 mils/kilowatt-hour. A GEOTEC plant would also be a secure alternative energy source for the US Navy.

Gerrard, C.S.; Gelb, G.H.; Lowrie, A.

1986-07-01

292

Choline alkylsulfates--new promising green surfactants.  

PubMed

In this work we show how a new promising green and highly water-soluble surfactant can be designed based on recent progress in the knowledge of counterion-headgroup binding and crystallization behavior. The result is the combination of a most classical surfactant anion, dodecylsulfate (DS), with choline (Ch), a natural green cation. The advantage of the physiological metabolite choline is its bulky structure that prevents ChDS from easy crystallization and thus leads to a considerable lowering of the Krafft point down to 0°C. The counterion-headgroup binding is reflected by the aqueous phase behavior of ChDS. Conductivity, surface tension, and cryo-TEM measurements allow the characterization of the dilute micellar region, while the penetration scan technique enables the establishment of a preliminary aqueous phase diagram. In addition, the influence of different mono- and divalent salts on the solubility of ChDS is investigated. The results are compared to the alkali sulfate and alkylcarboxylate homologs, and reveal that ChDS is less sensitive towards addition of salts than, for instance, choline carboxylates due to an increased counterion-headgroup association. Further, cytotoxicity tests on HeLa and SK-Mel 28 cells are presented and compared to other surfactants, showing that ChDS is no more harmful than its sodium counterpart SDS. Taken together, our findings highlight that the harmless green cation choline is of great potential for the design of new surfactants. PMID:23200100

Klein, Regina; Kellermeier, Matthias; Touraud, Didier; Müller, Eva; Kunz, Werner

2012-10-16

293

Promising biomarkers for systemic lupus erythematosus.  

PubMed

Introduction: Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a systemic autoimmune disease with heterogeneous manifestations. Of particular importance for clinicians are the precise assessment of disease activity and the ability to make appropriate therapeutic decisions. Therefore, interest has increased in biomarkers that can be measured as indicators of pathogenic processes, disease activity and response to management. Areas covered: This article introduces well-studied, as well as newly discovered, biomarkers related to SLE, divided into categories for diagnosis, disease activity and organ involvement. Expert opinion: The lack of reliable biomarkers for lupus hampers the assessment of disease activity and impedes the evaluation of treatment response. Although many reports of lupus biomarkers have been published, few longitudinal and interventional studies have validated the utility of any biomarker for monitoring disease activity. Consortiums of investigators will certainly help in recruiting sufficient number of patients and facilitating the development of standardized assays. Moreover, owing to the multifactorial nature of lupus, a multiplexed approach will clearly be essential. Another promising approach is the use of high-throughput technology, including DNA and antibody microarrays, flow cytometry and proteomic techniques. PMID:24099307

Jung, Ju-Yang; Bae, Chang-Bum; Suh, Chang-Hee

2013-10-08

294

Promising molecular targeted therapies in breast cancer  

PubMed Central

In recent years, there has been a significant improvement in the understanding of molecular events and critical pathways involved in breast cancer. This has led to the identification of novel targets and development of anticancer therapies referred to as targeted therapy. Targeted therapy has high specificity for the molecules involved in key molecular events that are responsible for cancer phenotype such as cell growth, survival, migration, invasion, metastasis, apoptosis, cell-cycle progression, and angiogenesis. Targeted agents that have been approved for breast cancer include trastuzumab and lapatinib, directed against human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) and bevacizumab, directed against vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Several other targeted agents currently under evaluation in preclinical and clinical trials include inhibitors of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), dual EGFR and HER2 inhibitors, VEGF/VEGFR inhibitors, and agents that interfere with crucial signaling pathways such as PI3K/AKT/mTOR and RAS/MEK/ERK; agents against other tyrosine kinases such as Src, insulin-like growth factor (IGF)/IGF-receptor (IGFR); agents that promote apoptosis such as Poly ADP ribose polymerase inhibitors; agents that target invasion and metastasis such as matrix metalloproteinases inhibitors and others. In this review, we highlight the most promising targeted agents and their combination with mainstream chemotherapeutic drugs in clinical trials.

Munagala, Radha; Aqil, Farrukh; Gupta, Ramesh C.

2011-01-01

295

Parkinson's Disease: Challenges, Progress, and Promise.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Ever since PD was first described in 1817, scientists have pursued the causes and treatment of the disease. In the early 1960s, scientists identified the primary problem underlying the disease: the loss of brain cells that produce a chemical called dopami...

2004-01-01

296

Five promising methods for health foresight  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose – This paper aims to show through empirical examples how five foresight methods have provided value in medicine and global health, and to argue for greater use of health foresight. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – Through evaluation, literature search, and personal experiences, five approaches were identified where health foresight has shown strong value: forecasting, scenario planning, Delphi, technology roadmapping, and mass collaboration.

Hassan Masum; Jody Ranck; Peter A. Singer

2010-01-01

297

Enantioselectivity of mass spectrometry: Challenges and promises.  

PubMed

With the fast growing market of pure enantiomer drugs and bioactive molecules, new chiral-selective analytical tools have been instigated including the use of mass spectrometry (MS). Even though MS is one of the best analytical tools that has efficiently been used in several pharmaceutical and biological applications, traditionally MS is considered as a "chiral-blind" technique. This limitation is due to the MS inability to differentiate between two enantiomers of a chiral molecule based merely on their masses. Several approaches have been explored to assess the potential role of MS in chiral analysis. The first approach depends on the use of MS-hyphenated techniques utilizing fast and sensitive chiral separation tools such as liquid chromatography (LC), gas chromatography (GC), and capillary electrophoresis (CE) coupled to MS detector. More recently, several alternative separation techniques have been evaluated such as supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) and capillary electrochromatography (CEC); the latter being a hybrid technique that combines the efficiency of CE with the selectivity of LC. The second approach is based on using the MS instrument solely for the chiral recognition. This method depends on the behavioral differences between enantiomers towards a foreign molecule and the ability of MS to monitor such differences. These behavioral differences can be divided into three types: (i) differences in the enantiomeric affinity for association with the chiral selector, (ii) differences of the enantiomeric exchange rate with a foreign reagent, and (iii) differences in the complex MS dissociation behaviors of the enantiomers. Most recently, ion mobility spectrometry was introduced to qualitatively and quantitatively evaluate chiral compounds. This article provides an overview of MS role in chiral analysis by discussing MS based methodologies and presenting the challenges and promises associated with each approach. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Mass Spec Rev 32:466-483, 2013. PMID:23775620

Awad, Hanan; El-Aneed, Anas

2013-06-15

298

Systematic evaluation of satellite remote sensing for identifying uranium mines and mills.  

SciTech Connect

In this report, we systematically evaluate the ability of current-generation, satellite-based spectroscopic sensors to distinguish uranium mines and mills from other mineral mining and milling operations. We perform this systematic evaluation by (1) outlining the remote, spectroscopic signal generation process, (2) documenting the capabilities of current commercial satellite systems, (3) systematically comparing the uranium mining and milling process to other mineral mining and milling operations, and (4) identifying the most promising observables associated with uranium mining and milling that can be identified using satellite remote sensing. The Ranger uranium mine and mill in Australia serves as a case study where we apply and test the techniques developed in this systematic analysis. Based on literature research of mineral mining and milling practices, we develop a decision tree which utilizes the information contained in one or more observables to determine whether uranium is possibly being mined and/or milled at a given site. Promising observables associated with uranium mining and milling at the Ranger site included in the decision tree are uranium ore, sulfur, the uranium pregnant leach liquor, ammonia, and uranyl compounds and sulfate ion disposed of in the tailings pond. Based on the size, concentration, and spectral characteristics of these promising observables, we then determine whether these observables can be identified using current commercial satellite systems, namely Hyperion, ASTER, and Quickbird. We conclude that the only promising observables at Ranger that can be uniquely identified using a current commercial satellite system (notably Hyperion) are magnesium chlorite in the open pit mine and the sulfur stockpile. Based on the identified magnesium chlorite and sulfur observables, the decision tree narrows the possible mineral candidates at Ranger to uranium, copper, zinc, manganese, vanadium, the rare earths, and phosphorus, all of which are milled using sulfuric acid leaching.

Blair, Dianna Sue; Stork, Christopher Lyle; Smartt, Heidi Anne; Smith, Jody Lynn

2006-01-01

299

Materializing research promises: opportunities, priorities and conflicts in translational medicine  

PubMed Central

There is considerable evidence that the translation rate of major basic science promises to clinical applications has been inefficient and disappointing. The deficiencies of translational science have often been proposed as an explanation for this failure. An alternative explanation is that until recently basic science advances have made oversimplified assumptions that have not matched the true etiological complexity of most common diseases; while clinical science has suffered from poor research practices, overt biases and conflicts of interest. The advent of molecular medicine and the recasting of clinical science along the principles of evidence-based medicine provide a better environment where translational research may now materialize its goals. At the same time, priority issues need to be addressed in order to exploit the new opportunities. Translational research should focus on diseases with global impact, if true progress is to be made against human suffering. The health outcomes of interest for translational efforts need to be carefully defined and a balance must be struck between the subjective needs of healthcare consumers and objective health outcomes. Development of more simple, practical and safer interventions may be as important a target for translational research as the development of cures for diseases where no effective interventions are available at all. Moreover, while the role of the industry is catalytic in translating research advances to licensed interventions, academic independence needs to be sustained and strengthened at a global level. Conflicts of interest may stifle translational research efforts internationally. The profit motive is unlikely to be sufficient alone to advance biomedical research towards genuine progress.

Ioannidis, John PA

2004-01-01

300

Ford Cleveland: Inside-Out Analysis Identifies Energy and Cost Savings Opportunities at Metal Casting Plant; Industrial Technologies Program Metal Casting BestPractices Plant-Wide Assessment Case Study  

SciTech Connect

The Ford Cleveland Casting Plant used results from its plant-wide energy efficiency assessment to identify 16 energy- and cost-saving projects. These projects addressed combustion, compressed air, water, steam, motor drive, and lighting systems. When implemented, the projects should save a total of$3.28 million per year. In addition, two long-term projects were identified that together would represent another$9.5 million in cost savings.

Not Available

2003-09-01

301

[Radiotherapy promises: focus on lung cancer].  

PubMed

Radiotherapy is a key cancer treatment, which greatly modified its practice in recent years thanks to medical imaging and technical improvements. The systematic use of computed tomography (CT) for treatment planning, the imaging fusion/co-registration between CT/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or CT/positron emission tomography (PET) improve target identification/selection and delineation. New irradiation techniques such as image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT), stereotactic radiotherapy or hadron therapy offer a more diverse therapeutic armamentarium to patients together with lower toxicity. Radiotherapy, as well as medical oncology, tends to offer a personalized treatment to patients thanks to the IGRT, which takes into account the inter- or intra-fraction anatomic variations. IGRT leads to adaptive radiotherapy (ART) with a new planification in the treatment course in order to decrease toxicity and improve tumor control. The use of systemic therapies with radiations needs to be studied in order to improve efficiency without increasing toxicities from these multimodal approaches. Finally, radiotherapy advances were impacted by radiotherapy accidents like Epinal. They led to an increased quality control with the intensification of identity control, the emergence of in vivo dosimetry or the experience feedback committee in radiotherapy. We will illustrate through the example of lung cancer. PMID:23719541

Jouin, Anaïs; Durand-Labrunie, Jérôme; Leroy, Thomas; Pannier, Diane; Wagner, Antoine; Rault, Erwan; Lartigau, Eric

2013-06-01

302

Homogeneous Immunoassays: Historical Perspective and Future Promise  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The founding and growth of Syva Company is examined in the context of its leadership role in the development of homogeneous immunoassays. The simple mix and read protocols of these methods offer advantages in routine analytical and clinical applications. Early homogeneous methods were based on insensitive detection of immunoprecipitation during antigen/antibody binding. The advent of reporter groups in biology provided a means of quantitating immunochemical binding by labeling antibody or antigen and physically separating label incorporated into immune complexes from free label. Although high sensitivity was achieved, quantitative separations were experimentally demanding. Only when it became apparent that reporter groups could provide information, not only about the location of a molecule but also about its microscopic environment, was it possible to design practical non-separation methods. The evolution of early homogenous immunoassays was driven largely by the development of improved detection strategies. The first commercial spin immunoassays, developed by Syva for drug abuse testing during the Vietnam war, were followed by increasingly powerful methods such as immunochemical modulation of enzyme activity, fluorescence, and photo-induced chemiluminescence. Homogeneous methods that quantify analytes at femtomolar concentrations within a few minutes now offer important new opportunities in clinical diagnostics, nucleic acid detection and drug discovery.

Ullman, Edwin F.

1999-06-01

303

Neuroimaging in psychiatric pharmacogenetics research: the promise and pitfalls.  

PubMed

The integration of research on neuroimaging and pharmacogenetics holds promise for improving treatment for neuropsychiatric conditions. Neuroimaging may provide a more sensitive early measure of treatment response in genetically defined patient groups, and could facilitate development of novel therapies based on an improved understanding of pathogenic mechanisms underlying pharmacogenetic associations. This review summarizes progress in efforts to incorporate neuroimaging into genetics and treatment research on major psychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia, major depressive disorder, bipolar disorder, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, and addiction. Methodological challenges include: performing genetic analyses in small study populations used in imaging studies; inclusion of patients with psychiatric comorbidities; and the extensive variability across studies in neuroimaging protocols, neurobehavioral task probes, and analytic strategies. Moreover, few studies use pharmacogenetic designs that permit testing of genotype × drug effects. As a result of these limitations, few findings have been fully replicated. Future studies that pre-screen participants for genetic variants selected a priori based on drug metabolism and targets have the greatest potential to advance the science and practice of psychiatric treatment. PMID:23793356

Falcone, Mary; Smith, Ryan M; Chenoweth, Meghan J; Kumar Bhattacharjee, Abesh; Kelsoe, John R; Tyndale, Rachel F; Lerman, Caryn

2013-06-24

304

Smaller sulfur molecules promise better lithium-sulfur batteries.  

PubMed

The lithium-sulfur battery holds a high theoretical energy density, 4-5 times that of today's lithium-ion batteries, yet its applications have been hindered by poor electronic conductivity of the sulfur cathode and, most importantly, the rapid fading of its capacity due to the formation of soluble polysulfide intermediates (Li(2)S(n), n = 4-8). Despite numerous efforts concerning this issue, combatting sulfur loss remains one of the greatest challenges. Here we show that this problem can be effectively diminished by controlling the sulfur as smaller allotropes. Metastable small sulfur molecules of S(2-4) were synthesized in the confined space of a conductive microporous carbon matrix. The confined S(2-4) as a new cathode material can totally avoid the unfavorable transition between the commonly used large S(8) and S(4)(2-). Li-S batteries based on this concept exhibit unprecedented electrochemical behavior with high specific capacity, good cycling stability, and superior rate capability, which promise a practicable battery with high energy density for applications in portable electronics, electric vehicles, and large-scale energy storage systems. PMID:23101502

Xin, Sen; Gu, Lin; Zhao, Na-Hong; Yin, Ya-Xia; Zhou, Long-Jie; Guo, Yu-Guo; Wan, Li-Jun

2012-10-31

305

The promise--and peril--of integrated cost systems.  

PubMed

Recent advances in managerial accounting have helped executives get the information they need to make good strategic decisions. But today's enterprise resource planning systems promise even greater benefits--the chance to integrate activity-based costing, operational-control, and financial reporting systems. But managers need to approach integration very thoughtfully, or they could end up with a system that drives decision making in the wrong direction. Operational-control and ABC systems have fundamentally different purposes. Their requirements for accuracy, timeliness, and aggregation are so different that no single, fully integrated approach can be adequate for both purposes. If an integrated system used real-time cost data instead of standard rates in its ABC subsystem, for example, the result would be dangerously distorted messages about individual product profitability--and that's precisely the problem ABC systems were originally designed to address. Proper linkage and feedback between the two systems is possible, however. Through activity-based budgeting, the ABC system is linked directly to operations control: managers can determine the supply and practical capacity of resources in forthcoming periods. Linking operational control to ABC is also possible. The activity-based portion of an operational control system collects information that, while it mustn't be fed directly into the activity-based strategic cost system, can be extremely useful once it's been properly analyzed. Finally, ABC and operational control can be linked to financial reporting to generate cost of goods sold and inventory valuations--but again, with precautions. PMID:10181585

Cooper, R; Kaplan, R S

306

Identifying service quality strengths and weaknesses using SERVQUAL: a study of dental services.  

PubMed

The goal of this study was to examine responses among dental patients to the most recent version of SERVQUAL, and to evaluate that instrument as a tool for measuring satisfaction in a dental practice. Items on the reliability and responsiveness dimensions produced the lowest satisfaction ratings, while improvements in providing services as promised and instilling confidence have the greatest potential for producing higher satisfaction among patients. Finally, using open-ended questions, we identified a number of patient events or experiences which caused either high or low scores on individual SERVQUAL items. PMID:10179451

Kaldenberg, D; Becker, B W; Browne, B A; Browne, W G

1997-01-01

307

Phenanthroindolizidines and Phenanthroquinolizidines: Promising Alkaloids for Anti-Cancer Therapy  

PubMed Central

The phenanthroindolizidine and phenanthroquinolizidine alkaloids, typified by tylophorine and cryptopleurine, are a family of plant-derived small molecules with significant therapeutic potential. The plant extracts have been used in herbal medicine and the isolated compounds have displayed a range of promising therapeutic activity such as anti-ameobicidal, anti-viral, anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer activity. Despite their therapeutic protential, no compounds in this class have fully passed clinical trials. Drawbacks include low in vivo anti-cancer activity, central nervous system toxicity and low natural availability. A number of biological effects of these compounds, such as protein and nucleic acid synthesis suppression, have been identified, but the specific biomolecular targets have not yet been identified. Significant effort has been expended in the synthesis and structure-activity-relationship (SAR) studies of these compounds with the hope that a new drug will emerge. This review will highlight important contributions to the isolation, synthesis, SAR and mechanism of action of the phenanthroindolizidine and pheanthroquinolizidine alkaloids.

Chemler, Sherry R.

2009-01-01

308

Two antioxidative lactobacilli strains as promising probiotics.  

PubMed

Two antioxidative strains tentatively identified as Lactobacillus fermentum, E-3 and E-18, were isolated from intestinal microflora of a healthy child. Survival time of these strains in the presence of reactive oxygen species (ROS), like hydrogen peroxide, superoxide anions and hydroxyl radicals, was significantly increased compared with a non-antioxidative strain, and also was quite similar to a highly ROS resistant strain of Salmonella typhimurium. E-3 and E-8 contain a remarkable level of glutathione, express Mn-SOD, which is important for the prevention of lipid peroxidation, and secrete hydrogen peroxide. Their significant antimicrobial activity combined with antioxidative properties may serve as defensive principles in the intestinal microbial ecosystem and overcome exo- and endogenous oxidative stress. PMID:11845820

Kullisaar, Tiiu; Zilmer, Mihkel; Mikelsaar, Marika; Vihalemm, Tiiu; Annuk, Heidi; Kairane, Ceslava; Kilk, Ann

2002-02-01

309

Kairos and practice wisdom in social work practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

Practice wisdom is a form of practical moral reasoning when social workers face the complexity and uncertainty encountered in practice. Following a literature review on practice wisdom in social work, its essential features are discussed, identifying a neglected element in the literature—the element of time. The element of time is found to be implicitly considered in models of social work

Nai Ming Tsang

2008-01-01

310

Identifying Two-Sided Markets  

Microsoft Academic Search

We review the burgeoning literature on two-sided markets focusing on the different definitions that have been proposed. In particular, we show how the well-known definition given by Evans is a particular case of the more general definition proposed by Rochet and Tirole. We then identify the crucial elements that make a market two-sided and, drawing from both theory and practice,

Lapo Filistrucchi; Damien Geradin; Eric van Damme

2012-01-01

311

Identifying Two-Sided Markets  

Microsoft Academic Search

We review the burgeoning literature on two-sided markets focusing on the different definitions that have been proposed. In particular, we show that the well-known definition given by Evans is a particular case of the more general definition proposed by Rochet and Tirole. We then identify the crucial elements that make a market two-sided and, drawing from both theory and practice,

L. Filistrucchi; D. A. A. G. Geradin; E. E. C. van Damme

2012-01-01

312

Src kinase inhibitors: promising cancer therapeutics?  

PubMed

Src is the cellular counterpart of the first identified viral oncogene v-Src. It forms part of a large family of nonreceptor tyrosine kinases that have been extensively studied over the last few decades. This has led to the realization that Src can regulate a number of signaling pathways that impact on the behavior of tumor cells, including proliferation, survival, migration, invasion, and angiogenesis. There are currently four Src inhibitors (dasatinib, saracatinib, bosutinib, and KX01) in clinical development, and although there is a plethora of information on their activity in preclinical models their clinical efficacy has been disappointing. Here we review the current status of the Src inhibitors and highlight the difficulties involved in assessing these therapeutics in the clinical setting. In the future it will be important to combine our knowledge of basic Src biology with the use of appropriate preclinical models to aid the design of clinical trials. Taking this integrated approach will hopefully help to realize the true potential of Src kinase inhibitors. PMID:22471705

Creedon, Helen; Brunton, Valerie G

2012-01-01

313

The copepod Tigriopus: A promising marine model organism for ecotoxicology and environmental genomics  

Microsoft Academic Search

There is an increasing body of evidence to support the significant role of invertebrates in assessing impacts of environmental contaminants on marine ecosystems. Therefore, in recent years massive efforts have been directed to identify viable and ecologically relevant invertebrate toxicity testing models. Tigriopus, a harpacticoid copepod has a number of promising characteristics which make it a candidate worth consideration in

Sheikh Raisuddin; Kevin W. H. Kwok; Kenneth M. Y. Leung; Daniel Schlenk; Jae-Seong Lee

2007-01-01

314

Practical ethics: establishing a pathway to benefit for complex pharmacogenomic tests.  

PubMed

Pharmacogenomic tests offer a promising strategy to improve the safety and efficacy of drug treatment. Compelling examples, such as HLA-B*5701 testing to identify patients at risk for abacavir-associated hypersensitivity, are already changing clinical care. However, the level of evidence required to establish clinical utility is often the subject of debate. Determining the most efficient and effective pathway to benefit for a given test is therefore both a practical and an ethical concern. PMID:21691271

Haga, S B; Burke, W

2011-07-01

315

Toward unique identifiers  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper discusses the creation and use of unique identifiers for intellectual property. General concepts applicable to unique identifiers are defined and discussed [identifier, digital object, dumb and intelligent identifiers, readability, affordance or computability, multiple identification, resolution, metadata, persistence, granularity, derivatives (e.g., versions, formats, manifestations, and copies), check digits, and intermediate objects]. Requirements for unique identifiers are reviewed. Capacity issues

NORMAN PASKIN

1999-01-01

316

Polymer Electrolytes:. Problems, Prospects, and Promises  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In 1975 P. V. Wright observed ionic conduction at elevated temperatures in polyethylene oxide (PEO) thin film electrolyte containing sodium salt. This seminal research generated wide spread interest in all-solid-state rechargeable lithium batteries. Armand took the cue from this observation and demonstrated the use of PEO/salt complex as electrolyte in lithium batteries. Soon after this a number of researchers have followed suit and studied the physical, electrical and transport properties of thin film PEO electrolyte. These studies have clearly identified the limitations of the PEO electrolyte. Chief among the limitations are a low cation transport number (t+), high glass transition temperature (Tg), and segmental motion of the polymer chain, which carries the cation through the bulk electrolyte. While low t+ leads to cell polarization and increase in cell resistance high Tg reduces conductivity at and around room temperature. For example, the conductivity of PEO electrolyte containing lithium salt is ~10-8 S/cm at room temperature. Attempts have been made to reduce Tg of PEO polymer by attaching PEO macromolecules to polyphosphazene (N=P) inorganic backbone, which is very flexible. Another material that has been investigated as a backbone material consists of Si-O chain. These two polymers exhibit a lower Tg and higher room temperature conductivity than the unmodified PEO. For example, the room temperature conductivity of the two polymers is around 10-5 S/cm - a 3 orders of magnitude increase in conductivity compared to unmodified PEO at around room temperature. Although this approach has yielded polymers with lower Tg, the t+ is still very low - ~0.25 - for lithium ion. Nano-ceramic particles of Al2O3, TiO2 etc. mechanically mixed with PEO electrolyte seem to increase t+. This approach also has inherent limitations regarding phase separation. The latest approach appears to involve integrating nano domains of inorganic moieties such as Si-O as part of the polymer chain. This approach not only has yielded an organic-inorganic polymer electrolyte with higher conductivity but appears to increase the t+ as well. An overview of the evolution of the all-solid-state polymer electrolyte in the last 25 years will be presented. This article addresses mainly the electrical and electrochemical properties and doesn't discuss the physicochemical and spectroscopic properties of dry polymer electrolytes.

Nagasubramanian, G.; Doughty, D. H.

2002-12-01

317

Current and Future Practices in Hospital Foodservice  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives To identify current operational practices and expectations for future practices in hospital foodservice; establish the probability that current practices will change; and determine whether differences in practices exist on the basis of profit status and hospital size.Design A questionnaire, to determine current practices, probability of change, and expectations for future practices, was mailed to foodservice directors.Subjects A random sample

MELANIE R SILVERMAN; MARY B GREGOIRE; LINDA J LAFFERTY; REBECCA A DOWLING

2000-01-01

318

Order Promising Rolling Planning with ATP\\/CTP Reallocation Mechanism  

Microsoft Academic Search

Available-to-promise (ATP) exhibiting availability of manufacturing resources can be used to sup- port customer order promising. Recently, one advanced function called Capable-to-promise (CTP) is provided by several modern APS (advanced planning system) that checks available capacity for placing new production orders or increasing already scheduled production orders. At the customer enquiry stage while considering the order delivery date and quantity

Juin-Han Chen; James T. Lin; Yi-Sheng Wu

2008-01-01

319

Identity Management Systems in Healthcare: The Issue of Patient Identifiers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

According to a recent recommendation of the European Commission, now is the time for Europe to enhance interoperability in eHealth. Although interoperability of patient identifiers seems promising for matters of patient mobility, patient empowerment and effective access to care, we see that today there is indeed a considerable lack of interoperability in the field of patient identification. Looking from a socio-technical rather than a merely technical point of view, one can understand the fact that the development and implementation of an identity management system in a specific healthcare context is influenced by particular social practices, affected by socio-economical history and the political climate and regulated by specific data protection legislations. Consequently, the process of making patient identification in Europe more interoperable is a development beyond semantic and syntactic levels. In this paper, we gives some examples of today’s patient identifier systems in Europe, discuss the issue of interoperability of (unique) patient identifiers from a socio-technical point of view and try not to ignore the ‘privacy side’ of the story.

Soenens, Els

320

Exploring the promises of intersectionality for advancing women's health research  

PubMed Central

Women's health research strives to make change. It seeks to produce knowledge that promotes action on the variety of factors that affect women's lives and their health. As part of this general movement, important strides have been made to raise awareness of the health effects of sex and gender. The resultant base of knowledge has been used to inform health research, policy, and practice. Increasingly, however, the need to pay better attention to the inequities among women that are caused by racism, colonialism, ethnocentrism, heterosexism, and able-bodism, is confronting feminist health researchers and activists. Researchers are seeking new conceptual frameworks that can transform the design of research to produce knowledge that captures how systems of discrimination or subordination overlap and "articulate" with one another. An emerging paradigm for women's health research is intersectionality. Intersectionality places an explicit focus on differences among groups and seeks to illuminate various interacting social factors that affect human lives, including social locations, health status, and quality of life. This paper will draw on recently emerging intersectionality research in the Canadian women's health context in order to explore the promises and practical challenges of the processes involved in applying an intersectionality paradigm. We begin with a brief overview of why the need for an intersectionality approach has emerged within the context of women's health research and introduce current thinking about how intersectionality can inform and transform health research more broadly. We then highlight novel Canadian research that is grappling with the challenges in addressing issues of difference and diversity. In the analysis of these examples, we focus on a largely uninvestigated aspect of intersectionality research - the challenges involved in the process of initiating and developing such projects and, in particular, the meaning and significance of social locations for researchers and participants who utilize an intersectionality approach. The examples highlighted in the paper represent important shifts in the health field, demonstrating the potential of intersectionality for examining the social context of women's lives, as well as developing methods which elucidate power, create new knowledge, and have the potential to inform appropriate action to bring about positive social change.

2010-01-01

321

Perspective: Physician education: a promising strategy to prevent adolescent suicide.  

PubMed

Many young people who present to primary care providers (PCPs) have high levels of emotional distress and/or suicidal ideation. Therefore, PCPs are in an ideal position to recognize and respond to early symptoms and distress signals that accompany suicide warning signs, yet they underrecognize mood disorders and suicidality among youth. Medical school and residency programs typically provide inadequate training on pediatric mental health and adolescent suicide prevention. Thus, PCPs lack complete knowledge of risk factors and feel unprepared to handle mental health problems among youth. In this article, the authors provide an overview of the epidemiology of adolescent suicide and describe risk factors, protective factors, and warning signs. They propose that physician education represents a promising strategy to prevent adolescent suicide, and they establish the need for improved educational opportunities that would provide PCPs with the necessary skills and supports to identify and respond to psychosocial concerns that may increase suicide risk among youth. They recommend strategies, methods, and content areas for addressing educational gaps, as well as organizational approaches to support enhanced physician education. They also suggest areas for future research. PMID:21248597

Taliaferro, Lindsay A; Borowsky, Iris Wagman

2011-03-01

322

Selective induction of apoptosis: promising therapy in pancreatic cancer.  

PubMed

Pancreatic cancer is one of lethal and poor prognostic malignancies. Due to the absence of effective detecting methods, quite a number of efforts have been made to improve a survival advantage for treatment in patients with pancreatic cancer. Over the past decade, single-agent gemcitabine and gemcitabine-containing combinations were considered standard first-line therapies for advanced pancreatic cancer. Although these routine uses of chemotherapy failed to significantly improve survival benefit for most therapies, these trials provided insights into the molecular mechanisms involved in the development of pancreatic cancer and therefore opened up new therapeutic avenues. Apoptotic inducer as a therapeutic concept has been widely proposed and experimentally identified in some works. Some reviews have revealed that apoptosis-inducing was a promising therapy in cancers with the least side effects and more effectiveness. Apoptosis is a highly controlled physiological mechanism and proceeds through two major pathways for apoptosis-inducing. Some anticancer drugs kill cancer cells by inducing apoptosis via death receptor pathway; however, other chemotherapeutic drugs trigger apoptosis via mitochondrial pathway. In this review, we summarize briefly current chemotherapy in pancreatic cancer, describe the apoptotic mechanisms, and provide a novel therapeutic strategy by targeting Ras intermediate. PMID:23082976

Liu, Zuojia; Li, Dan; Zheng, Xiliang; Wang, Erkang; Wang, Jin

2013-01-01

323

Predicting response to TNF antagonists in rheumatoid arthritis: the promise of pharmacogenetics research using clinical registries.  

PubMed

Despite the demonstrated efficacy of three different classes of biologic response modifiers (BRMs) for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), there are currently no clinical predictors or biomarkers that can rationally guide physicians in the selection of BRMs for individual patients. One promising area of translational research for patients with RA is the field of pharmacogenetics. In the absence of industry-sponsored pharmacogenetic studies of BRMs, longitudinal clinical registries may represent the most promising setting for identifying genetic biomarkers. This review focuses on published pharmacogenetic studies of TNF antagonists and discusses related methodologic issues for pharmacogenetic research using clinical registries. PMID:17581108

Greenberg, Jeffrey D; Ostrer, Harry

2007-01-01

324

Adjacent segment disease and C-ADR: promises fulfilled?  

PubMed Central

Study design:?Systematic review. Clinical question:?Do the rates and timing of adjacent segment disease (ASD) differ between cervical total disc arthroplasty (C-ADR) and anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) in patients treated for cervical degenerative disc disease? Methods:?A systematic search of MEDLINE/PubMed and bibliographies of key articles was done to identify studies with long-term follow-up for symptomatic and/or radiographic ASD comparing C-ADR with fusion for degenerative disc disease of the cervical spine. The focus was on studies with longer follow-up (48–60 months) of primary US Food and Drug Administration trials of Prestige ST, Prodisc-C, and Bryan devices as available. Trials of other discs with a minimum of 24 months follow-up were considered for inclusion. Studies evaluating lordosis/angle changes at adjacent segments and case series were excluded. Results:?From 14 citations identified, four reports from three randomized controlled trials and four nonrandomized studies are summarized. Risk differences between C-ADR and ACF for symptomatic ASD were 1.5%–2.3% and were not significant across RCT reports. Time to development of ASD did not significantly differ between treatments. Rates of radiographic ASD were variable. No meaningful comparison of ASD rates based on disc design was possible. No statistical differences in adjacent segment range of motion were noted between treatment groups. Conclusion:?Our analysis reveals that, to date, there is no evidence that arthroplasty decreases ASD compared with ACDF; the promise of arthroplasty decreasing ASD has not been fulfilled.

Riew, K Daniel; Schenk-Kisser, Jeannette M.; Skelly, Andrea C.

2012-01-01

325

Frontier Tertiary basins with promising hydrocarbon potential, offshore California  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dwindling domestic petroleum reserves have drawn attention to areas of promising potential within the United States. The federal outer continental shelf (OCS) off of California remains one of the most likely sources of future domestic oil and gas. The Federal Government, as mandated by the OCS Lands Act, must evaluate the OCS for hydrocarbon potential and to make promising areas

J. M. Galloway; P. R. Simon; M. R. Brickey

1991-01-01

326

Delaware Pushes to Meet Race to Top Promises  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This article reports on how Delaware pushes to meet Race to the Top promises. The Delcastle Technical High School teachers are on the front lines of the push to deliver on promises that last year won Delaware, 10 other states, and the District of Columbia shares of the Race to the Top pie, the $4 billion competition that is driving much of the…

McNeil, Michele

2011-01-01

327

Practicing Interdisciplinarity  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This peer-reviewed resource from BioScience is about the practice of interdisciplinary research. We explore the practical difficulties of interdisciplinary research in the context of a regional- or local-scale project. We posit four barriers to interdisciplinarity that are common across many disciplines and draw on our own experience and on other sources to explore how these barriers are manifested. Values enter into scientific theories and data collection through scientists' hidden assumptions about disciplines other than their own, through the differences between quantitative and interpretive social sciences, and through roadblocks created by the organization of academia and the relationship between academics and the larger society. Participants in interdisciplinary projects need to be self-reflective about the value judgments embedded in their choice of variables and models. They should identify and use a core set of shared concerns to motivate the effort, be willing to respect and to learn more about the other, be able to work with new models and alternative taxonomies, and allow for plurality and incompleteness.

SHARACHCHANDRA LÃÂÃÂLÃÂÃÂ and RICHARD B. NORGAARD (;)

2005-11-01

328

Practicing gender or practicing science? Gender practices of women scientists  

Microsoft Academic Search

The subtle biases women face in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) fields have been the subject of many studies and initiatives in recent years. Many programs hoping to increase the numbers of women in these fields and to contribute to women's advancement have focused on identifying and remedying gendered institutional barriers and practices that ultimately disadvantage women. This dissertation

Laura Anne Rhoton

2009-01-01

329

Pitfalls and Promising Practices of Youth-Adult Partnerships: An Evaluator's Reflections  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Youth-adult partnerships (Y-APs) are an innovation being used increasingly as a key strategy for promoting youth development, as well as for building strong programs and communities. This article discusses three pitfalls that can undermine their effectiveness: (1) the assumption that youth should do everything of importance; (2) the belief that…

Camino, Linda

2005-01-01

330

The Changing Faculty and Student Success: Non-Tenure-Track Faculty Promising Practices  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The nature of the American academic workforce has fundamentally shifted over the past several decades. Whereas full-time tenured and tenure-track faculty were once the norm, more than two-thirds of the professoriate in non-profit postsecondary education is now comprised of non-tenure-track faculty. New hires across all institutional types are now…

Kezar, Adrianna; Maxey, Daniel

2012-01-01

331

A Matter of Degrees: Promising Practices for Community College Student Success--A First Look  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Community colleges across the country have created innovative, data-informed programs that are models for educating underprepared students, engaging traditionally underserved students, and helping students from all backgrounds succeed. However, because most of these programs have limited scope, the field now has pockets of success rather than…

Center for Community College Student Engagement, 2012

2012-01-01

332

Management and Operations of Online Programs: Ensuring Quality and Accountability. Promising Practices in Online Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Online learning is growing rapidly as states and districts are creating new online schools, and existing programs are adding new courses and students. The growth reflects the spreading understanding that online courses and programs can serve a wide variety of students and needs. These include: (1) Creating opportunities for small and rural school…

Watson, John; Gemin, Butch

2009-01-01

333

Incorporating a Course Website into Teaching: A Promising Practice, Especially for Teacher Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Preparing teachers to incorporate technology into teaching is a requirement in teacher education. Using a course Web site as an instructional method expands students' understanding of technology applications. One aspect of a course Web site particularly suited to facilitating and improving learning is a discussion area (bulletin board) where…

Lindsey-North, Jill L.

334

Promise and performance in CCTV surveillance: The need for an appraisal of practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

Based upon evaluations conducted over three years, this paper examines the implementation, effectiveness and purpose of public street CCTV systems. The usefulness of local CCTV evaluations is discussed and also the extent to which they can provide insights into the working of local community safety and crime reduction partnerships. This research suggests that at this stage during the continuing nation-wide

Alyson Brown

2002-01-01

335

Promising School Social Work Practices of the 1920s: Reflections for Today  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|As we celebrate the centennial of school social work, the field faces many of the same professional and social situations first encountered at the turn of the past century. Immigrant populations are growing rapidly, social worker-student ratios continue to be high, and schools remain bureaucratic, inflexible, and slow to change. The "Roaring…

Shaffer, Gary L.

2006-01-01

336

Education for Adult English Language Learners in the United States: Trends, Research, and Promising Practices  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Adult English language learners comprise a substantial proportion of the adult education population in the United States. In program year 2006-2007, 46% of participants enrolled in state-administered adult education programs were in English as a second language (ESL) classes. This percentage does not include English language learners enrolled in…

Schaetzel, Kirsten; Young, Sarah

2010-01-01

337

Addressing the Needs of Victims of Human Trafficking: Challenges, Barriers, and Promising Practices.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Funded in the fall of 2006, the purpose of this exploratory project is to develop information on how HHS programs are currently addressing the needs of victims of human trafficking, including domestic victims, with a priority focus on domestic youth. This...

H. J. Clawson N. Dutch

2008-01-01

338

Social Inclusion for South Australian schooling? Trying to reconcile the promise and the practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper will trace the adoption of a policy of Social Inclusion in schools in one Australian state in terms of the way in which the policy direction, its discourses and adoption reflect a rhetoric of what Ball has labelled a ‘paradigm of convergence’. The analysis will show that the policy discourse, especially in its focus on school retention, appears

Judith Gill

2008-01-01

339

Promises and practices: job evaluation and equal pay forty years on!  

Microsoft Academic Search

ABSTRACTThis article examines the claim made by Barbara Castle when introducing the Equal Pay Act (EPA) in 1970 that there is nothing preventing unions pressing for job evaluation schemes to achieve equal pay. It does this by examining the research on potential hurdles to job evaluation and those that can be found in the UK law since the introduction of

Kay Gilbert

2012-01-01

340

Rural School-Based Enterprise: Promise and Practice in the Southeast.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

School-based enterprise (SBE) is a hands-on educational program in which students create and manage a business in their community. SBE programs address two general concerns about education today--lack of student motivation and the need for schools to teach students the skills to survive in and contribute to their communities. SBE makes the…

Baker, Karen Nelson

341

Making Education Work for Mexican-Americans: Promising Community Practices. ERIC Digest.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Hispanic students have higher dropout rates and lower academic achievement than Anglo students. While schools have begun to address the issue of underachievement, some community groups have implemented enrichment programs that focus on the affective domain--self-esteem, family values, and cultural pride. This digest describes and synthesizes the…

Sosa, Alicia

342

The status, recent progress and promise of superconducting materials for practical applications  

SciTech Connect

This paper summarizes the progress in materials science and engineering that created today's superconducting technology. The state-of-the-art is contrasted with the present understanding of the high Tc oxide materials. The author reviews the achievements of the past in the field of applied superconductivity, and reviews the present situation concerning the high Tc materials. He concentrates on two particular applications, first, that of the large scale applications involving conductors, for example magnets and second, the electronics and instrumentation applications. Finally, he provides his impressions of where we stand with the new oxide materials. The future of the oxide materials will become clear only in later Applied Superconductivity Conferences.

Rowell, J.M.

1989-03-01

343

Using Online Learning for At-Risk Students and Credit Recovery. Promising Practices in Online Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Online learning programs are designed to expand high-quality educational opportunities and to meet the needs of diverse students. While the primary reason online courses are offered in school districts is to expand offerings to courses that would otherwise be unavailable, the second most commonly cited reason for offering online learning is to…

Watson, John; Gemin, Butch

2008-01-01

344

The Premise and Promise of Inquiry Based Mathematics in Pre-Service Teacher Education: A Poststructuralist Analysis  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Many teacher educators have recently implemented inquiry based instructional practices into their programs (Crawford & Deer, 1993 ; Foss & Kleinsasser, 1996 ; Klein, 1996 , 1997 , 1998 , 2001 ; Schuck, 1996 ; Tillema & Knol, 1997). In mathematics education the promise has been that pre-service teachers' socialization into new interactive…

Klein, Mary

2004-01-01

345

The premise and promise of inquiry based mathematics in pre?service teacher education: a poststructuralist analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many teacher educators have recently implemented inquiry based instructional practices into their programs (Crawford & Deer, 1993; Foss & Kleinsasser, 1996; Klein, 1996, 1997, 1998, 2001; Schuck, 1996; Tillema & Knol, 1997). In mathematics education the promise has been that pre?service teachers’ socialization into new interactive ways of learning will not only lead to the (re)construction of powerful mathematical ideas

Mary Klein

2004-01-01

346

PS1-1a: Use of the CER Hub to Identify Out-of-Control Asthma and Compare Therapeutic Classes of Step-Up Asthma Medications in Clinical Practice.  

PubMed

Background/Aims Asthma is a chronic inflammatory condition that imposes a substantial burden on patients and society. A major target in asthma care is guideline adherence to disease control assessment and therapy. Our aim was to develop an electronic medical record (EMR) based measure of provider determination of asthma control and use it to assess different treatment modalities employed in out-of-control asthma to allow observational comparative effectiveness research (CER) on different types of step-up therapy. Methods We developed EMR-based abstraction rules to allow automated determination of asthma control during clinical encounters, a construct that indicates need for treatment intensification. The EMR-based measure operationalizes components in the Expert Panel Report-3 recommendations for assessing a patient's level of asthma control across the domains of risk and impairment. We used manual chart abstraction on samples of encounter records provided by six diverse health systems participating in the CER Hub project, to develop and validate the EMR-based measure of asthma control. Results We identified over 185,000 patients diagnosed with asthma across CER-Hub during 2006-2010. Provider documentation (predominantly text clinical notes) was rich in data related to asthma control including aspects of impairment (patient-reported symptom frequency, nighttime awakenings, interference with activity, frequency of rescue inhaler use, and lung function) and risk to patient well-being such as asthma exacerbations and use of systemic corticosteroids. Using the automated medical record classifier MediClass, which enables access to both coded and free-text components of the record, we will assess patients on low-dose inhaled corticosteroid therapy whose asthma is not well controlled. We are using the EMR-based measure to investigate the comparative effectiveness of the following step-up therapies (1) addition of a leukotriene modifier, (2) addition of a long-acting beta-agonist, and (3) increase to higher dose inhaled corticosteroids. Conclusions Traditional large database studies have been unable to assess elements of asthma control, such as symptom frequencies or activity limitations, because these clinical data are typically only available within free-text progress notes documenting the patient visit. The CER Hub asthma control measure provides new capacity to evaluate the comparative effectiveness of asthma interventions across diverse healthcare settings and in large real-world populations. PMID:24085922

Mularski, Richard; McBurnie, Maryann; Schatz, Michael; Krishnan, Jerry; Puro, Jon; Williams, Andrew; Au, David; Hazlehurst, Brian

2013-09-01

347

PS1-1a: Use of the CER Hub to Identify Out-of-Control Asthma and Compare Therapeutic Classes of Step-Up Asthma Medications in Clinical Practice  

PubMed Central

Background/Aims Asthma is a chronic inflammatory condition that imposes a substantial burden on patients and society. A major target in asthma care is guideline adherence to disease control assessment and therapy. Our aim was to develop an electronic medical record (EMR) based measure of provider determination of asthma control and use it to assess different treatment modalities employed in out-of-control asthma to allow observational comparative effectiveness research (CER) on different types of step-up therapy. Methods We developed EMR-based abstraction rules to allow automated determination of asthma control during clinical encounters, a construct that indicates need for treatment intensification. The EMR-based measure operationalizes components in the Expert Panel Report-3 recommendations for assessing a patient’s level of asthma control across the domains of risk and impairment. We used manual chart abstraction on samples of encounter records provided by six diverse health systems participating in the CER Hub project, to develop and validate the EMR-based measure of asthma control. Results We identified over 185,000 patients diagnosed with asthma across CER-Hub during 2006–2010. Provider documentation (predominantly text clinical notes) was rich in data related to asthma control including aspects of impairment (patient-reported symptom frequency, nighttime awakenings, interference with activity, frequency of rescue inhaler use, and lung function) and risk to patient well-being such as asthma exacerbations and use of systemic corticosteroids. Using the automated medical record classifier MediClass, which enables access to both coded and free-text components of the record, we will assess patients on low-dose inhaled corticosteroid therapy whose asthma is not well controlled. We are using the EMR-based measure to investigate the comparative effectiveness of the following step-up therapies (1) addition of a leukotriene modifier, (2) addition of a long-acting beta-agonist, and (3) increase to higher dose inhaled corticosteroids. Conclusions Traditional large database studies have been unable to assess elements of asthma control, such as symptom frequencies or activity limitations, because these clinical data are typically only available within free-text progress notes documenting the patient visit. The CER Hub asthma control measure provides new capacity to evaluate the comparative effectiveness of asthma interventions across diverse healthcare settings and in large real-world populations.

Mularski, Richard; McBurnie, MaryAnn; Schatz, Michael; Krishnan, Jerry; Puro, Jon; Williams, Andrew; Au, David; Hazlehurst, Brian

2013-01-01

348

Comparison of Two Computer Algorithms To Identify Surgical Site Infections  

PubMed Central

Abstract Background Surgical site infections (SSIs), the second most common healthcare-associated infections, increase hospital stay and healthcare costs significantly. Traditional surveillance of SSIs is labor-intensive. Mandatory reporting and new non-payment policies for some SSIs increase the need for efficient and standardized surveillance methods. Computer algorithms using administrative, clinical, and laboratory data collected routinely have shown promise for complementing traditional surveillance. Methods Two computer algorithms were created to identify SSIs in inpatient admissions to an urban, academic tertiary-care hospital in 2007 using the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) diagnosis codes (Rule A) and laboratory culture data (Rule B). We calculated the number of SSIs identified by each rule and both rules combined and the percent agreement between the rules. In a subset analysis, the results of the rules were compared with those of traditional surveillance in patients who had undergone coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG). Results Of the 28,956 index hospital admissions, 5,918 patients (20.4%) had at least one major surgical procedure. Among those and readmissions within 30 days, the ICD-9-CM-only rule identified 235 SSIs, the culture-only rule identified 287 SSIs; combined, the rules identified 426 SSIs, of which 96 were identified by both rules. Positive and negative agreement between the rules was 36.8% and 97.1%, respectively, with a kappa of 0.34 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.27–0.41). In the subset analysis of patients who underwent CABG, of the 22 SSIs identified by traditional surveillance, Rule A identified 19 (86.4%) and Rule B identified 13 (59.1%) cases. Positive and negative agreement between Rules A and B within these “positive controls” was 81.3% and 50.0% with a kappa of 0.37 (95% CI 0.04–0.70). Conclusion Differences in the rates of SSI identified by computer algorithms depend on sources and inherent biases in electronic data. Different algorithms may be appropriate, depending on the purpose of case identification. Further research on the reliability and validity of these algorithms and the impact of changes in reimbursement on clinician practices and electronic reporting is suggested.

Apte, Mandar; Landers, Timothy; Furuya, Yoko; Hyman, Sandra

2011-01-01

349

Exemplary Practices in Adolescent Development  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|In 2003, Sierra Health Foundation's Board of Directors selected school-aged youth as the target for its next focused grantmaking effort. As part of the program research and development phase, staff and consultants examined evidenced-based practices that appear promising in positively affecting adolescent health and development for young people…

Birtwhistle, Amy; Lefkovitz, Bina; Meehan, Dorothy; Needham, Heather; Paul, Andy

2004-01-01

350

The promise of stem cell research for neuropsychiatric disorders  

PubMed Central

The study of the developing brain has begun to shed light on the underpinnings of both early and adult onset neuropsychiatric disorders. Neuroimaging of the human brain across developmental time points and the use of model animal systems have combined to reveal brain systems and gene products that may play a role in autism spectrum disorders, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, obsessive compulsive disorder and many other neurodevelopmental conditions. However, precisely how genes may function in human brain development and how they interact with each other leading to psychiatric disorders is unknown. Because of an increasing understanding of neural stem cells and how the nervous system subsequently develops from these cells, we have now the ability to study disorders of the nervous system in a new way—by rewinding and reviewing the development of human neural cells. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), developed from mature somatic cells, have allowed the development of specific cells in patients to be observed in real-time. Moreover, they have allowed some neuronal-specific abnormalities to be corrected with pharmacological intervention in tissue culture. These exciting advances based on the use of iPSCs hold great promise for understanding, diagnosing and, possibly, treating psychiatric disorders. Specifically, examination of iPSCs from typically developing individuals will reveal how basic cellular processes and genetic differences contribute to individually unique nervous systems. Moreover, by comparing iPSCs from typically developing individuals and patients, differences at stem cell stages, through neural differentiation, and into the development of functional neurons may be identified that will reveal opportunities for intervention. The application of such techniques to early onset neuropsychiatric disorders is still on the horizon but has become a reality of current research efforts as a consequence of the revelations of many years of basic developmental neurobiological science.

Vaccarino, Flora M.; Urban, Alexander Eckehart; Stevens, Hanna; Szekely, Anna; Abyzov, Alexej; Grigorenko, Elena; Gerstein, Mark; Weissman, Sherman

2011-01-01

351

Promising Strategies from the Field: A National Overview.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The Office of Community Oriented Policing Services (the COPS Office) is pleased to announce a new COPS Innovations: Promising Strategies from the Field series featuring COPS grantees from around the country. The COPS Office has partnered with communities ...

2003-01-01

352

MEK: A Single Drug Target Shows Promise in Multiple Cancers  

Cancer.gov

Drugs that block the MEK protein have shown promise in several cancers. Trametinib has had encouraging results in patients with advanced melanoma, and selumetinib has been tested in patients with advanced thyroid and ovarian cancers.

353

Media spaces: past visions, current realities, future promise  

Microsoft Academic Search

Established researchers and practitioners active in the development and deployment of media spaces review what seemed to be promised twenty years ago, what has actually been achieved, and what we might anticipate over the next twenty years.

Ronald Baecker; Steve R. Harrison; William Buxton; Steven E. Poltrock; Elizabeth F. Churchill

2008-01-01

354

Massage Therapy Holds Promise for Low Back Pain  

MedlinePLUS

Massage Therapy Holds Promise for Low-Back Pain Massage therapy helped reduce pain and improve function more ... short-term and long-term effects of structural massage, relaxation massage, and usual care for people with ...

355

Broken Promises: Evaluating the Native American Health Care System.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The United States Commission on Civil Rights presents this report, Broken Promises: Evaluating the Native American Health Care System, pursuant to Public Law 103-419. It has long been recognized that Native Americans are dying of diabetes, alcoholism, tub...

2004-01-01

356

Realizing the promise of population biobanks: a new model for translation.  

PubMed

The promise of science lies in expectations of its benefits to societies and is matched by expectations of the realisation of the significant public investment in that science. In this paper, we undertake a methodological analysis of the science of biobanking and a sociological analysis of translational research in relation to biobanking. Part of global and local endeavours to translate raw biomedical evidence into practice, biobanks aim to provide a platform for generating new scientific knowledge to inform development of new policies, systems and interventions to enhance the public's health. Effectively translating scientific knowledge into routine practice, however, involves more than good science. Although biobanks undoubtedly provide a fundamental resource for both clinical and public health practice, their potentiating ontology--that their outputs are perpetually a promise of scientific knowledge generation--renders translation rather less straightforward than drug discovery and treatment implementation. Biobanking science, therefore, provides a perfect counterpoint against which to test the bounds of translational research. We argue that translational research is a contextual and cumulative process: one that is necessarily dynamic and interactive and involves multiple actors. We propose a new multidimensional model of translational research which enables us to imagine a new paradigm: one that takes us from bench to bedside to backyard and beyond, that is, attentive to the social and political context of translational science, and is cognisant of all the players in that process be they researchers, health professionals, policy makers, industry representatives, members of the public or research participants, amongst others. PMID:21706184

Murtagh, Madeleine J; Demir, Ipek; Harris, Jennifer R; Burton, Paul R

2011-06-25

357

Identification of Monoraphidium contortum as a promising species for liquid biofuel production.  

PubMed

In this work, 30 microalgae strains from 17 genera were investigated in regard to biomass productivity in photoautotrophic growth conditions, lipid amount, lipid quality and biomass degradability. Six strains could be identified with robust phototrophic growth properties and high biomass productivities equal or above 300 mg l(-1) day(-1). Anaerobic fermentation of the algal biomass was most efficient for the marine members of the genera Dunaliella and Navicula, while biogas production with the freshwater strains generally resulted in lower methane yields. Monoraphidium contortum was identified as promising candidate for liquid biofuel production, characterized by high biomass productivity during maximum growth (maximum increase of 896 mg dry biomass weight (DW) l(-1) day(-1)) and a promising lipid profile. Neutral lipid production was strongly induced in M. contortum by nitrogen deficient conditions and accumulated to up to 20.4±2.2% of DW. PMID:23453981

Bogen, Christian; Klassen, Viktor; Wichmann, Julian; La Russa, Marco; Doebbe, Anja; Grundmann, Michael; Uronen, Pauliina; Kruse, Olaf; Mussgnug, Jan H

2013-02-09

358

Practice-based small group learning programs  

PubMed Central

Abstract Objective To identify the format, content, and effects of practice-based small group learning (PBSGL) programs involving FPs. Data sources The Ovid MEDLINE, EMBASE, and ERIC databases were searched from inception to the second week of November 2011, yielding 99 articles. Study selection Articles were included in the analysis if they described the format or content of or evaluated PBSGL programs among FPs. Thirteen articles were included in the analysis. Synthesis Two main PBSGL formats exist. The first is self-directed learning, which includes review and discussion of troubling or challenging patient cases. The contents of such programs vary with different teaching styles. The second format targets specific problems from practice to improve certain knowledge or skills or implement new guidelines by using patient cases to stimulate discussion of the selected topic. Both formats are similar in their ultimate goal, equally important, and well accepted by learners and facilitators. Evaluations of learners’ perceptions and learning outcomes indicate that PBSGL constitutes a feasible and effective method of professional development. Conclusion Current evidence suggests that PBSGL is a promising method of continuing professional development for FPs. Such programs can be adapted according to learning needs. Future studies that focus on the changes in practice effected by PBSGL will strengthen the evidence for this form of learning and motivate physicians and institutions to adopt it.

Zaher, Eman; Ratnapalan, Savithiri

2012-01-01

359

Huntsman Cancer Institute study in zebrafish finds a new compound showing promise in leukemia  

Cancer.gov

A new compound, studied in zebrafish, shows promise in patient leukemia samples when current treatments fail, say researchers from Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah. Their report appears online in Blood, the Journal of the American Society of Hematology... The researchers used a novel approach that may have a broad range of potential future applications in identifying new drugs for cancer treatment: a line of zebrafish in which immature T cells glow green under fluorescent light.

360

Gang Identifiers and Terminology.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Provides lists of gang identifiers and terminology. Suggests that, to find out names and associated identifiers of local gangs, readers should talk to their local police. Included in listing are descriptions of gang-related symbols, physical signals, graffiti, slogans, right-left rules, colors, clothing, jewelry, hair styles, and fingernails.…

Cantrell, Mary Lynn

1992-01-01

361

Identifiability of Finite Mixtures  

Microsoft Academic Search

In general, the class of mixtures of the family of normal distributions or of Gamma (Type III) distributions or binomial distributions is not identifiable (see [3], [4] or Section 2 below for the meaning of this statement). In [4] it was shown that the class of all mixtures of a one-parameter additively-closed family of distributions is identifiable. Here, attention will

Henry Teicher

1963-01-01

362

Preserving and Using Institutional Memory through Knowledge Management Practices. A Synthesis of Highway Practice.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

This synthesis report documents practices regarding the preservation and use of institutional memory through the knowledge management (KM) practices of U.S. and Canadian transportation agencies. It identifies the practices for the effective organization, ...

M. A. Ward

2007-01-01

363

High-Quality Traineeships: Identifying What Works. Good Practice Guide  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Traineeships were introduced alongside apprenticeships to increase the reach of contracted training to a wider range of occupations and industries and to a broader range of learners (particularly women) and to improve the labour market prospects of young people. Traineeships have given hundreds of thousands of Australians access to nationally…

National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER), 2009

2009-01-01

364

Identifying potential market niches for Demand Responsive Transport  

Microsoft Academic Search

In principle, Demand Responsive Transport services, or paratransit in US nomenclature, offer public transport providers a more flexible and potentially more cost effective delivery option than conventional bus services, particularly in situations of low demand. However in practice, there are many examples of promising DRT schemes that have failed, for a number of reasons. One recurring feature appears to be

Lisa Davison; Marcus Enoch; Tim Ryley; Mohammed Quddus; Chao Wang

2012-01-01

365

Practice wisdom.  

PubMed

A participatory process approach in research and scholarship is proposed in the context of the postmodern movement and a disciplinary emphasis on practice. Two sequential studies are presented to illustrate praxis in nursing in which health is expanding consciousness. A framework of personal practice was developed from the first study and reconceptualized in the second as a process of modeling practice involving partnership, dialogue, pattern recognition, and health as dialectic. This praxis illustrates the merging of theory, practice and research as practice wisdom. Health and caring can be seen as the same process. PMID:10634188

Litchfield, M

1999-12-01

366

Identifying Breast Cancer Oncogenes.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Breast cancer is attributed to genetic alterations, the majority of which are yet to be characterized. Oncogenic alterations that give rise to breast tumors need to be identified to develop targeted treatment options and consequently, improve clinical out...

Y. Shrestha

2009-01-01

367

Identifying Breast Cancer Oncogenes.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Breast cancer is attributed to genetic alterations, the majority of which are yet to be characterized. Oncogenic alterations that give rise to breast tumors need to be identified in order to drive development of more efficient targeted or personalized can...

Y. Shrestha

2010-01-01

368

Identifying Recalled Products  

MedlinePLUS Videos and Cool Tools

... Most Popular Searches Home Food Drugs Medical Devices Radiation-Emitting Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary Cosmetics ... Cosmetics Dietary Supplements Drugs Food Medical Devices Nutrition Radiation-Emitting Products Tobacco Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Identifying ...

369

Identifying Extreme Exposure Values  

Cancer.gov

There are various perspectives on whether to exclude potentially unlikely exposure values. If the researcher chooses to do so, several approaches exist for identifying extreme values. We examined the plausibility of the reported frequencies for each food item in the NHANES 2009-10 DSQ and chose to exclude extreme values using a method that identifies them based on the actual distribution of the sample, but also minimizes the number of values excluded.

370

Stem and progenitor cell-based therapy in ischaemic heart disease: promise, uncertainties, and challenges  

PubMed Central

In the absence of effective endogenous repair mechanisms after cardiac injury, cell-based therapies have rapidly emerged as a potential novel therapeutic approach in ischaemic heart disease. After the initial characterization of putative endothelial progenitor cells and their potential to promote cardiac neovascularization and to attenuate ischaemic injury, a decade of intense research has examined several novel approaches to promote cardiac repair in adult life. A variety of adult stem and progenitor cells from different sources have been examined for their potential to promote cardiac repair and regeneration. Although early, small-scale clinical studies underscored the potential effects of cell-based therapy largely by using bone marrow (BM)-derived cells, subsequent randomized-controlled trials have revealed mixed results that might relate, at least in part, to differences in study design and techniques, e.g. differences in patient population, cell sources and preparation, and endpoint selection. Recent meta-analyses have supported the notion that administration of BM-derived cells may improve cardiac function on top of standard therapy. At this stage, further optimization of cell-based therapy is urgently needed, and finally, large-scale clinical trials are required to eventually proof its clinical efficacy with respect to outcomes, i.e. morbidity and mortality. Despite all promises, pending uncertainties and practical limitations attenuate the therapeutic use of stem/progenitor cells for ischaemic heart disease. To advance the field forward, several important aspects need to be addressed in carefully designed studies: comparative studies may allow to discriminate superior cell populations, timing, dosing, priming of cells, and delivery mode for different applications. In order to predict benefit, influencing factors need to be identified with the aim to focus resources and efforts. Local retention and fate of cells in the therapeutic target zone must be improved. Further understanding of regenerative mechanisms will enable optimization at all levels. In this context, cell priming, bionanotechnology, and tissue engineering are emerging tools and may merge into a combined biological approach of ischaemic tissue repair.

Tongers, Jorn; Losordo, Douglas W.; Landmesser, Ulf

2011-01-01

371

From boots to buoys: promises and challenges of dielectric elastomer energy harvesting  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Dielectric elastomers offer the promise of energy harvesting with few moving parts. Power can be produced simply by stretching and contracting a relatively low-cost rubbery material. This simplicity, combined with demonstrated high energy density and high efficiency, suggests that dielectric elastomers are promising for a wide range of energy harvesting applications. Indeed, dielectric elastomers have been demonstrated to harvest energy from human walking, ocean waves, flowing water, blowing wind, and pushing buttons. While the technology is promising, there are challenges that must be addressed if dielectric elastomers are to be a successful and economically viable energy harvesting technology. These challenges include developing materials and packaging that sustains long lifetime over a range of environmental conditions, design of the devices that stretch the elastomer material, as well as system issues such as practical and efficient energy harvesting circuits. Progress has been made in many of these areas. We have demonstrated energy harvesting transducers that have operated over 5 million cycles. We have also shown the ability of dielectric elastomer material to survive for months underwater while undergoing voltage cycling. We have shown circuits capable of 78% energy harvesting efficiency. While the possibility of long lifetime has been demonstrated at the watt level, reliably scaling up to the power levels required for providing renewable energy to the power grid or for local use will likely require further development from the material through to the systems level.

Kornbluh, Roy D.; Pelrine, Ron; Prahlad, Harsha; Wong-Foy, Annjoe; McCoy, Brian; Kim, Susan; Eckerle, Joseph; Low, Tom

2011-03-01

372

Important caves to be identified  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Criteria to identify significant caves on federal land are being developed by the Interior Department's Bureau of Land Management and the Agriculture Department's Forest Service under requirements of the Federal Cave Resources Protection Act of 1988. The departments gave advance notice of proposed rulemaking March 3 and invited suggestions and comments from the public for 30 days.The law requires protection, to the extent practical, of significant caves on lands administered by the Secretaries of Agriculture and Interior and includes authority to issue and revoke permits for collection and removal of cave resources and special provisions for regulation of cave resources on Indian lands. Final regulations must be published by August 18, 1989.

373

Promise and Challenges of Microalgal-Derived Biofuels  

Microsoft Academic Search

Microalgae offer great promise to contribute a significant portion of the renewable fuels that will be required by the Renewable Fuels Standard described in the 2007 Energy Independence and Security Act of the United States. Algal biofuels would be based mainly on the high lipid content of the algal cell and thus would be an ideal feedstock for high energy

Philip T. Pienkos; Al Darzins

2009-01-01

374

FLOW IN COMPUTER-MEDIATED ENVIRONMENTS: PROMISES AND CHALLENGES  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper provides a critical review to analyze the promises and important challenges of studying flow, a psychological state, in the computer-mediated environments (CME). Despite the strong interest in IS, HCI, Marketing, Education, and other research disciplines over more than a decade, adapting the phenomenon of flow to computer users shows high inconsistencies and discrepancies in the literature. In addition,

Christina M. Finneran; Ping Zhang

2005-01-01

375

The Kalamazoo Promise and Perceived Changes in School Climate  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Kalamazoo Promise was announced in the fall of 2005, offering free college tuition at any public state college or university for graduates of the district who have gained acceptance to a postsecondary institution. This program was funded through the generous support of anonymous donors, and a federally-funded evaluation is underway to examine…

Miron, Gary; Jones, Jeffrey N.; Kelaher-Young, Allison J.

2011-01-01

376

The Promise of Global Networks. 1999 Annual Review.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This collection of commissioned papers provides a variety of perspectives on the impact of global information networks. The following articles are included: "The Promise of Global Networks: An Introduction" (Jorge Reina Schement); "Architecture and Expectations: Networks of the World--Unite!" (Marjory S. Blumenthal); "The Regulation of Global…

Institute for Information Studies, Queenstown, MD.

377

The Promise of the College and Career Transitions Initiative  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Although there is no single program or idea that will fix the entire American educational system, findings from the national demonstration project College and Career Transitions Initiative (CCTI) demonstrate considerable promise of the role pathways can play in helping students find their way through education to work and on to their careers.…

Kempner, Ken; Warford, Laurance

2009-01-01

378

Hepatocyte growth factor in renal failure: Promise and reality  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hepatocyte growth factor in renal failure: Promise and reality. Can science discover some secrets of Greek mythology? In the case of Prometheus, we can now suppose that his amazing hepatic regeneration was caused by a peptide growth factor called hepatocyte growth factor (HGF). Increasing evidence indicates that HGF acts as a multifunctional cytokine on different cell types. This review addresses

Gustavo A Vargas; Andreas Hoeflich; Peter M Jehle

2000-01-01

379

The Challenge and Promise of a Catholic University.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This book offers 30 papers on the continuing discussion of the nature of a Catholic university. The papers are: "Introduction: The Challenge and Promise of a Catholic University" (Theodore M. Hesburgh); "Reflections on the Mission of a Catholic University" (Harold W. Attridge); "The Difference of a Catholic University" (Otto Bird); "A Catholic…

Hesburgh, Theodore M., Ed.

380

The promise of genetically engineered mice for cancer prevention studies  

Microsoft Academic Search

Sophisticated genetic technologies have led to the development of mouse models of human cancers that recapitulate important features of human oncogenesis. Many of these genetically engineered mouse models promise to be very relevant and relatively rapid systems for determining the efficacy of chemopreventive agents and their mechanisms of action. The validation of such models for chemoprevention will help the selection

Tamaro Hudson; Jeffrey E. Green

2005-01-01

381

Promising pharmacological, molecular and cellular treatments of autoimmune hepatitis.  

PubMed

Current corticosteroid regimens are effective in autoimmune hepatitis, but therapy can be complicated by side effects, disease progression, incomplete response, and relapse after drug withdrawal. The aims of this review are to describe the promising pharmacological, molecular and cellular interventions for autoimmune hepatitis and to stimulate further investigations that can refresh or replace current treatments. Murine models that introduce pertinent human disease-related antigens by vaccination or viral infection promise a resource by which to evaluate new treatments. Promising new drug therapies include the calcineurin-inhibitors (cyclosporine, tacrolimus), next generation purine antagonists (mycophenolate mofetil, 6-thioguanine nucleotides), next generation glucocorticoids (budesonide, deflazacort), and inhibitors of the mammalian target of rapamycin (rapamycin). Feasible molecular interventions are recombinant molecules that affect immune regulatory pathways (cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen 4, recombinant interleukin 10), monoclonal antibodies that disrupt activation pathways (antibodies to CD3, CD28, CD 20, or tumor necrosis factor-?), and synthetic peptides that block antigen display or promote antigen desensitization (oral tolerance). New methods to stimulate or replenish regulatory T cell populations (adoptive transfer, mesenchymal stem cell or autologous bone marrow transplantation) are feasible as are genetic manipulations (gene silencing) and gene supplementations (gene replacement therapy). The emergence of new therapies for autoimmune hepatitis requires a standardized and universalized animal model of the human disease, consensus regarding the most promising modality to be tested, and formation of a cooperative international network of committed clinical investigators to evaluate new therapies in a pre-designed rigorous yet expeditious fashion. PMID:21902661

Czaja, Albert J

2011-01-01

382

Emerging Neurotechnologies for Lie-Detection: Promises and Perils  

Microsoft Academic Search

Detection of deception and confirmation of truth telling with conventional polygraphy raised a host of technical and ethical issues. Recently, newer methods of recording electromagnetic signals from the brain show promise in permitting the detection of deception or truth telling. Some are even being promoted as more accurate than conventional polygraphy. While the new technologies raise issues of personal privacy,

Henry T. Greely

383

Molecular entomology: a new promising tool for malaria control.  

PubMed

The recent biotechnological revolution in Molecular Entomology explores new promising tools for the control of vector borne diseases through genetic manipulation of vectorial competence. The gene transfer technology is hoped to make the malaria vectors incapable of supporting the development of malaria parasite which will ultimately lead to eradication of the parasites and the disease. PMID:16479904

Joardar, G K

384

Promising applications of the liquid metal MHD energy conversion technology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Applications of the liquid-metal MHD (magnetohydrodynamic) energy conversion technology that could benefit from its unique features are reviewed with emphasis on applications that might be realized in the relatively near future and on the OMACON (optimized magnetohydrodynamic conversion) concept. Included among the promising applications are cogeneration, energy recovery from industrial processes involving the use of molten metals, energy conversion from

H. Branover; A. El-Boher; E. Greenspan; A. Barak

1989-01-01

385

The Promise of Global Networks. 1999 Annual Review.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This collection of commissioned papers provides a variety of perspectives on the impact of global information networks. The following articles are included: "The Promise of Global Networks: An Introduction" (Jorge Reina Schement); "Architecture and Expectations: Networks of the World--Unite!" (Marjory S. Blumenthal); "The Regulation of Global…

Institute for Information Studies, Queenstown, MD.

386

Race to Top Promises Come Home to Roost  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Grant recipients risk losing millions of dollars in Race to the Top money if they fail to live up to their promises, federal education officials make clear. By threatening to revoke Hawaii's $75 million Race to the Top award for failing to make "adequate progress" on key milestones of its education reform plan, U.S. Secretary of Education Arne…

McNeil, Michele

2012-01-01

387

Glycerol: A promising and abundant carbon source for industrial microbiology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Petroleum is the main energy source utilized in the world, but its availability is limited and the search for new renewable energy sources is of major interest. Biofuels, such as ethanol and biodiesel, are among the most promising sources for the substitution of fossil fuels. Biodiesel can replace petroleum diesel, as it is produced from animal fats and vegetable oils,

Gervásio Paulo da Silva; Matthias Mack; Jonas Contiero

2009-01-01

388

The Kalamazoo Promise: A New Twist on Tuition Guarantees  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In 2005, Kalamazoo, Michigan launched a bold and innovative economic development strategy, The Kalamazoo Promise (KP), which guarantees tuition to every high school graduate in the district. Since KP inception, high school enrollments are up and college attendance has increased, creating national attention. This paper analyzes the benefits and…

Daun-Barnett, Nathan J.

2011-01-01

389

The Promise and Peril of Parallel Governance Structures  

Microsoft Academic Search

A recent survey of 146 postsecondary institutions found that 55% formed change task forces in the past 5 years. This article presents a detailed case of one private college that utilized task forces as a key strategy during a comprehensive change effort. Analysis describes the promise and peril of these innovative decision-making structures. Unburdened by day-today operational issues, the task

Matthew Hartley

2003-01-01

390

Emerging Neurotechnologies for Lie-Detection: Promises and Perils  

Microsoft Academic Search

Detection of deception and confirmation of truth telling with conventional polygraphy raised a host of technical and ethical issues. Recently, newer methods of recording electromagnetic signals from the brain show promise in permitting the detection of deception or truth telling. Some are even being promoted as more accurate than conventional polygraphy. While the new technologies raise issues of personal privacy,

Paul Root Wolpe; Kenneth R. Foster; Daniel D. Langleben

2010-01-01

391

Emerging Neurotechnologies for Lie-Detection: Promises and Perils  

Microsoft Academic Search

Detection of deception and confirmation of truth telling with conventional polygraphy raised a host of technical and ethical issues. Recently, newer methods of recording electromagnetic signals from the brain show promise in permitting the detection of deception or truth telling. Some are even being promoted as more accurate than conventional polygraphy. While the new technologies raise issues of personal privacy,

Paul Root Wolpe; Kenneth R. Foster; Daniel D. Langleben

2005-01-01

392

Passport to College: Promise Scholarship Program Status Report  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The Passport to College Promise Scholarship program was created by the 2007 Washington State Legislature (House Bill 1131) to help former foster youth prepare for and succeed in college. This status report addresses four areas: (1) proposed scholarship and student support approaches; (2) estimates of the number of students who will receive…

Washington Higher Education Coordinating Board, 2008

2008-01-01

393

Contextualized Teaching & Learning: A Promising Approach for Basic Skills Instruction  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Contextualized teaching and learning (CTL), or the concept of relating subject matter content to meaningful situations that are relevant to students' lives, offers one promising approach to helping students learn more effectively. This brief offers instructors, college leaders, policy makers and funders a high-level summary of the CTL…

Baker, Elaine DeLott; Hope, Laura; Karandjeff, Kelley

2009-01-01

394

78 FR 63913 - Proposed Priority-Promise Zones  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...have the opportunity to earn a decent living when they reach adulthood. Since 2009, the President has provided tools to combat poverty...plan to ensure that hard-working Americans make it to the middle class. Promise Zones will align the work of multiple...

2013-10-25

395

Capitol Capsule. The Voc-Ed Regulations: A Broken Promise?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Many vocational educators, special populations advocates, and legal experts are convinced that, without some very specific changes, the Perkins Act vocational education regulations threaten to destroy the promise of the act for special population students. Practitioners should monitor the situation to ensure services for this population.…

Kochhar, Carol A.

1993-01-01

396

The Comprehensive Community College--Promises to Keep.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The philosophy of the comprehensive community colleges, as well as their promises, has resulted in a revolution in higher education. The philosophy is that everyone should have access to higher education, at a price he can afford to pay, and that curricula should be geared to the real needs of persons. Most comprehensive community colleges offer…

Trueblood, Roy W.

397

REALITIES, VISIONS, AND PROMISES OF A MULTICULTURAL FUTURE  

Microsoft Academic Search

Religious education has changed considerably over the 100 years of the Religious Education Association (REA); urgency has increased for human communities to honor diversity. The focus of this article is realities, visions, and promises of cultural diversity. The article includes an overview of REA's recent history, exemplifying its efforts and limitations in diversity. It then turns to five commentaries on

Mary Elizabeth Moore; Boyung Lee; Katherine Turpin; Ralph Casas; Lynn Bridgers; Veronice Miles

2004-01-01

398

The Promise of Sustainability in Higher Education: A Synthesis  

Microsoft Academic Search

The promise of various perspectives that have been offered in Part Two each will resonate in varying degrees depending on the reader’s own background, biases and preferences. It would be naïve to say that they are all complementary and, when combined in the ‘right’ way, will lead to a ‘best’ version of sustainability in higher education. When studying the many

Arjen Wals; Peter Corcoran

399

Fulfilling the Promise of School Choice. Education Outlook. No. 5  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Nearly two decades have passed since the Wisconsin legislature enacted the landmark Milwaukee Parental Choice Program. Advocates had hoped and promised that this experiment in school choice would lead the way in transforming American schools. But it is clear by now that voucher programs and charter school laws have failed to live up to their…

Hess, Frederick M.

2008-01-01

400

Diversity's Promise for Higher Education: Making It Work  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Daryl G. Smith's career has been devoted to studying and fostering diversity in higher education. She has witnessed and encouraged the evolution of diversity from an issue addressed sporadically on college campuses to an imperative if institutions want to succeed. In "Diversity's Promise for Higher Education", she analyzes how diversity is…

Smith, Daryl G.

2009-01-01

401

Reducing Incarceration Rates: The Promise of Experimental Criminology  

Microsoft Academic Search

The central promise of experimental criminology is its potential to lower the extraordinarily high incarceration rates in the United States. Imagining the counterfactual scenario of medicine without experiments suggests that major changes would be much slower and less effective without randomized field trials (RFTs). Imagining alternatives to our current high rates of imprisonment suggests that we might discover more effective

Lawrence W. Sherman

2000-01-01

402

Protein kinase Cs in lung cancer: A promising target for therapies.  

PubMed

Lung cancer has been identified as one of the most deadly oncologies. The most influential causes for disease progression include smoking, genetic mutation and inflammatory lung diseases. Conventional therapies for lung cancer including chemo and radio-treatments often cause serious adverse effects. The advent of novel therapeutics that specifically target signalling pathways activated by genetic alterations has revolutionized the way patients with lung cancer are treated. These are comprised of various molecular targets on its carcinogen signalling pathways, among which the protein kinase C (PKC) family is a promising target. The 12 isotypes in the family demonstrate complex interactions. This inter-linked signalling loop has added complexity of developing effective therapies. An improved understanding of different molecules involved in these signalling pathways will provide several profound implications, ranging from preclinical work on the mechanisms to trial design. Therapies developed targeting individual/multiple PKCs combined with conventional strategies offer promising future combating cancer. PMID:24135246

Fan, Chenfang; Li, Yong; Jia, Jack

2013-09-01

403

The p53 Pathway as a Target in Cancer Therapeutics: Obstacles and Promise  

PubMed Central

A large fraction of human tumors carry p53 mutations, which allow tumor initiation and progression; furthermore, it is now clear that restoration or reactivation of wild-type p53 function prompts rapid elimination of tumors. The discovery and design of compounds that reactivate or enhance the p53 pathway has resulted in the identification of promising drug candidates that have now entered clinical trials for anti-cancer strategies. However, some of these agents appear to elicit undesirable toxic effects on normal cells and tissues and therefore are restricted in the dose that can be applied in tumors. In this Review, we discuss the concerns about and promise of these p53 activators and propose ways to expand and optimize screening strategies to identify such molecules.

Mandinova, Anna

2013-01-01

404

Identifying Fallacies of Reference in Argumentation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The experience of teaching informal logic (sometimes called practical logic) at the introductory level over the last fifteen years has allowed the author the opportunity to identify some interesting problems. These problems have been encountered by students attempting to understand some of the ideas presented in the informal logic course and by…

Gough, Jim

2009-01-01

405

The promise of action research for critically reflective teacher education  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper is an analysis of the potential that action research theory and practice hold for educating preservice teachers to become more critically reflective. First, action research theory, especially as it informs current notions of educational research and practice, is reviewed. Then critically reflective teaching is described by grounding the term in critical social science views supportive of the social

Todd Dinkelman

1997-01-01

406

Educational Leadership at 2050: Conjectures, Challenges, and Promises  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This is a practical, bold, no-holds barred look at challenges facing educational leaders and the university programs that prepare them through mid-century. It examines key continuities and discontinuities of current times for school, education, and society. Both practice and preparation occur in contested social space, the implications of which…

Papa, Rosemary; Mullen, Carol A.; English, Fenwick W.; Creighton, Theodore

2012-01-01

407

Identifying Marine Phytoplankton  

Microsoft Academic Search

Until recently, anyone who needed to accurately identify marine phytoplankton had one of four choices: use the outdated Englishlanguage volumes by E. E. Cupp and N. I. Hendey plus the more recent book by J. Dodge, acquire a working knowledge of German and use the old volumes by Schiller and Hustedt, spend huge amounts of time in an exceedingly well-equipped

Paul E. Hargraves

1998-01-01

408

ECG to identify individuals  

Microsoft Academic Search

The electrocardiogram (ECG also called EKG) trace expresses cardiac features that are unique to an individual. The ECG processing followed a logical series of experiments with quantifiable metrics. Data filters were designed based upon the observed noise sources. Fiducial points were identified on the filtered data and extracted digitally for each heartbeat. From the fiducial points, stable features were computed

Steven A. Israel; John M. Irvine; Andrew Cheng; Mark D. Wiederhold; Brenda K. Wiederhold

2005-01-01

409

Toward Teaching a Liberating Sociological Practicality: Challenges for Teaching, Learning and Practice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Though C. Wright Mills made a pivotal contribution to the discipline by raising sociologists' awareness of the ideological and bureaucratic content of sociological practicality, he may have placed unyielding limits on "the promise" he profoundly proclaimed in the "sociological imagination." By defining types of practicality in such rigidly…

Finkelstein, Marv

2009-01-01

410

Toward Teaching a Liberating Sociological Practicality: Challenges for Teaching, Learning and Practice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Though C. Wright Mills made a pivotal contribution to the discipline by raising sociologists' awareness of the ideological and bureaucratic content of sociological practicality, he may have placed unyielding limits on "the promise" he profoundly proclaimed in the "sociological imagination." By defining types of practicality in such rigidly…

Finkelstein, Marv

2009-01-01

411

Changing Practice.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This serial issue contains nine articles all on the subject of "changing practice," i.e., innovative practices of rural English teachers in the Bread Loaf Rural Teacher Network. "Byte-ing into Medieval Literature" (John Fyler) describes an online conference on medieval literature for rural high school students. "Literacy in Cattle Country" (Dan…

Benson, Chris, Ed.

1999-01-01

412

Identifying topic sentencehood  

Microsoft Academic Search

Four experiments were conducted to assess two models of topic sentencehood identification: the derived model and the free model. According to the derived model, topic sentences are identified in the context of the paragraph and in terms of how well\\u000a each sentence in the paragraph captures the paragraph’s theme. In contrast, according to the free model, topic sentences can\\u000a be

Philip M. McCarthy; Adam M. Renner; Michael G. Duncan; Nicholas D. Duran; Erin J. Lightman; Danielle S. McNamara

2008-01-01

413

Practicing modelling in manufacturing  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper is about understanding modelling practices in manufacturing and contribute in methodologies and approaches facilitating introduction of modelling in a company. Based on ethnographic studies at real work environments and scenario-building workshops, we could identify and analyse several issues like how to involve and engage domain workers in modelling activities, that there are four different levels of formal and

H. Tellioglu

2009-01-01

414

Preventing Crime: What Works, What Doesn't, What's Promising. Research in Brief. National Institute of Justice.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This Research in Brief describes the scientific methodologies used to perform a review of crime prevention programs and then discusses what research has shown to work, what it has shown not to work, and what approaches seem promising for crime prevention. The first step was to identify and review reports evaluating the effectiveness of crime…

Sherman, Lawrence W.; Gottfredson, Denise C.; MacKenzie, Doris L.; Eck, John; Reuter, Peter; Bushway, Shawn D.

415

Monolayer metallic nanotube interconnects: promising candidates for short local interconnects  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mono- or bi-layer metallic single-wall carbon nanotube interconnects have lateral capacitances more than four times smaller than those of copper interconnects. The resistance and time-of-flight of these monolayer nanotubes would be larger than that of copper interconnects. For short lengths, however, driver resistance is quite dominant, and latency is determined by interconnect capacitance. Monolayer nanotube interconnects are therefore promising candidates

Azad Naeemi; J. D. Meindl

2005-01-01

416

Dental Pulp Stem Cells: A Promising Tool for Bone Regeneration  

Microsoft Academic Search

Human tissues are different in term of regenerative properties. Stem cells are a promising tool for tissue regeneration, thanks\\u000a to their particular characteristics of proliferation, differentiation and plasticity. Several “loci” or “niches” within the\\u000a adult human body are colonized by a significant number of stem cells. However, access to these potential collection sites\\u000a often is a limiting point. The interaction

Riccardo d’Aquino; Gianpaolo Papaccio; Gregorio Laino; Antonio Graziano

2008-01-01

417

Studies of threespine stickleback developmental evolution: progress and promise  

Microsoft Academic Search

A promising route for understanding the origin and diversification of organismal form is through studies at the intersection\\u000a of evolution and development (evo-devo). While much has been learned over the last two decades concerning macroevolutionary\\u000a patterns of developmental change, a fundamental gap in the evo-devo synthesis is the integration of mathematical population\\u000a and quantitative genetics with studies of how genetic

William A. Cresko; Katrina L. McGuigan; Patrick C. Phillips; John H. Postlethwait

2007-01-01

418

Hitting the Spot: The Promise of Protein Microarrays  

Microsoft Academic Search

With the thrust of scientific endeavormoving from genomics to proteomics, the protein array provides a powerful means by which\\u000a to examine hundreds to thousands of proteins in parallel. A result of the many genome projects has been the advance of automation\\u000a and robotic procedures to manipulate biomolecules using a high-throughput, systematic approach. The promise of the protein\\u000a microarray is the

Joanna S. Albala

419

Medical Geography: A Promising Field of Application for Geostatistics  

Microsoft Academic Search

The analysis of health data and putative covariates, such as environmental, socio-economic, behavioral or demographic factors,\\u000a is a promising application for geostatistics. However, it presents several methodological challenges that arise from the fact\\u000a that data is typically aggregated over irregular spatial supports and consists of a numerator and a denominator (e.g., population\\u000a size). This paper presents an overview of recent

P. Goovaerts

2009-01-01

420

Twenty Years of Promises: Fullerene in Medicinal Chemistry  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Many biological activities have been envisioned for fullerenes and some of them seem to be very promising. The lack of solubility\\u000a in biologically friendly environments is the major obstacle in the development of this field. The possibility of multiple\\u000a fuctionalization can be exploited to get more soluble compounds but, up to now, only a few polyadducts, presenting perfectly\\u000a defined geometry,

Tatiana Da Ros

421

Phytochemical Density of Some Promising Commercial Tea Brands  

Microsoft Academic Search

Black Tea (Camellia sinensis) is an important source of phytochemicals with proven health benefits. The core objective of the present investigation was to characterize some promising commercial tea brands available in Pakistan for their active ingredients with special reference to flavanols. The results indicated that total phenolic contents were in the range of 26.42 to 29.74 g\\/100 g liquid tea,

A. Imran; M. S. Butt; M. K. Sharif

2012-01-01

422

HARVESTING OF ATMOSPHERIC WATER: A PROMISING LOW-COST TECHNOLOGY  

Microsoft Academic Search

A research study conducted in eastern part of Nepal to assess the possibility of harvesting two atmospheric water sources, namely fog and rain, has indicated that it is a promising new technology. It is an integrated, community manageable and sustainable water collection system. The system collected 2.5 m3\\/m2 of mesh area per year of fog water and 1.2 m3\\/m2 of

Mohan Bahadur Karkee

423

Promises of stem cell therapy for retinal degenerative diseases  

Microsoft Academic Search

With the development of stem cell technology, stem cell-based therapy for retinal degeneration has been proposed to restore\\u000a the visual function. Many animal studies and some clinical trials have shown encouraging results of stem cell-based therapy\\u000a in retinal degenerative diseases. While stem cell-based therapy is a promising strategy to replace damaged retinal cells and\\u000a ultimately cure retinal degeneration, there are

Ian Yat-Hin Wong; Ming-Wai Poon; Rosita Tsz-Wai Pang; Qizhou Lian; David Wong

424

Sporting embodiment: sports studies and the (continuing) promise of phenomenology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Whilst in recent years sports studies have addressed the calls ‘to bring the body back in’ to theorisations of sport and physical activity, the ‘promise of phenomenology’ remains largely under?realised with regard to sporting embodiment. Relatively few accounts are grounded in the ‘flesh’ of the lived sporting body, and phenomenology offers a powerful framework for such analysis. A wide?ranging, multi?stranded

2009-01-01

425

Amaryllidaceae Isocarbostyril Alkaloids and Their Derivatives as Promising Antitumor Agents  

PubMed Central

This review covers the isolation, total synthesis, biologic activity, and more particularly the in vitro and in vivo antitumor activities of naturally occurring isocarbostyril alkaloids from the Amaryllidaceae family. Starting from these natural products, new derivatives have been synthesized to explore structure-activity relationships within the chemical class and to obtain potential candidates for preclinical development. This approach appears to be capable of providing novel promising anticancer agents.

Ingrassia, Laurent; Lefranc, Florence; Mathieu, Veronique; Darro, Francis; Kiss, Robert

2008-01-01

426

Retinal stem cells: promising candidates for retina transplantation  

Microsoft Academic Search

Stem cell transplantation is widely considered as a promising therapeutic approach for photoreceptor degeneration, one of\\u000a the major causes of blindness. In this review, we focus on the biology of retinal stem cells (RSCs) and progenitor cells (RPCs)\\u000a isolated from fetal, postnatal, and adult animals, with emphasis on those from rodents and humans. We discuss the origin of\\u000a RSCs\\/RPCs, the

Meta W. Djojosubroto; Yvan Arsenijevic

2008-01-01

427

Cell-based immune therapy shows promise in leukemia patients  

Cancer.gov

Memorial Sloan-Kettering investigators report that genetically modified immune cells have shown great promise in killing the cancer cells of patients with relapsed B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). In fact, all five of the patients who have received the new therapy – known as targeted immunotherapy – have gone into complete remission, with no detectable cancer cells. The results of this ongoing clinical trial are reported online on March 20 in the journal Science Translational Medicine.

428

Family practice registered nurses  

PubMed Central

ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To provide a picture of the unique role and competencies of family practice registered nurses (FP-RNs). DESIGN Case-study approach using interviews and focus groups. SETTING Ontario. PARTICIPANTS Seven FP-RNs identified as exemplary by family medicine and nursing peers. METHODS An e-mail was sent to 9200 health care providers from nursing and family medicine, asking them to identify names of exemplary family practice nurses. Using a purposive sampling methodology, 7 exemplary FP-RNs were selected, taking into consideration the number of years in practice as a nurse, location of practice, length of practice as an FP-RN, and type of family practice. Individual interviews were held, and focus groups were organized with colleagues. Narratives were analyzed iteratively by the project team. MAIN FINDINGS Four main themes emerged: The first theme relates to the relationship-centred approach to care delivered by FP-RNs, founded upon trust. The second theme highlights the FP-RN’s unique skills in balancing the priorities of patients, colleagues, and the clinic as a whole. The third theme capitalizes on the nurses’ commitment to advancing their learning to enhance their abilities to be FP-RNs. The fourth theme illuminates the perspectives shared by FP-RNs that family practice is uniquely different from acute care in the manner in which care is delivered. We draw attention to the approach and role of FP-RNs in Ontario. The 4 themes that emerged have striking similarities to stories shared by family physicians and to the evolutionary development of the discipline of family medicine. CONCLUSION We believe the findings from this paper can help shape the role of the FP-RN within clinical practice and that they will propagate discussion among nursing educators to consider the necessary educational preparation required to develop the FP-RNs needed in this country.

Oandasan, Ivy F.; Hammond, Melanie; Conn, Lesley Gotlib; Callahan, Sheilagh; Gallinaro, Anna; Moaveni, Azadeh

2010-01-01

429

Proactive approach identifies benefits.  

PubMed

The University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics in Iowa City, has developed strategies to identify uninsured patients early in the stay, and help them access ongoing care in the community. Twelve healthcare benefit assistance program social workers educate patients and families about financial options and help them apply for government-sponsored programs. Through a Revolving Fund agreement, the hospital pays the Medicaid rate to post-acute facilities while patients' Social Security Disability is pending and is paid back when the disability coverage is approved. Dedicated social workers help patients who need brand name medications and can't afford them sign up for national pharmaceutical assistance programs. PMID:22462097

2012-04-01

430

Practice Makes Perfect?: Effective Practice Instruction in Large Ensembles  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Helping young musicians learn how to practice effectively is a challenge faced by all music educators. This article presents a system of individual music practice instruction that can be seamlessly integrated within large-ensemble rehearsals. Using a step-by-step approach, large-ensemble conductors can teach students to identify and isolate…

Prichard, Stephanie

2012-01-01

431

Toward cardiovascular MRI at 7 T: clinical needs, technical solutions and research promises  

PubMed Central

Objective To consider potential clinical needs, technical solutions and research promises of ultrahigh-field strength cardiovascular MR (CMR). Methods A literature review is given, surveying advantages and disadvantages of CMR at ultrahigh fields (UHF). Key concepts, emerging technologies, practical considerations and applications of UHF CMR are provided. Examples of UHF CMR imaging strategies and their added value are demonstrated, including the numerous unsolved problems. A concluding section explores future directions in UHF CMR. Results UHF CMR can be regarded as one of the most challenging MRI applications. Image quality achievable at UHF is not always exclusively defined by signal-to-noise considerations. Some of the inherent advantages of UHF MRI are offset by practical challenges. But UHF CMR can boast advantages over its kindred lower field counterparts by trading the traits of high magnetic fields for increased temporal and/or spatial resolution. Conclusions CMR at ultrahigh-field strengths is a powerful motivator, since speed and signal may be invested to overcome the fundamental constraints that continue to hamper traditional CMR. If practical challenges can be overcome, UHF CMR will help to open the door to new approaches for basic science and clinical research.

Sodickson, Daniel K.; Krombach, Gabriele A.; Schulz-Menger, Jeanette

2010-01-01

432

IDENTIFYING COLLISIONAL FAMILIES IN THE KUIPER BELT  

SciTech Connect

The identification and characterization of numerous collisional families-clusters of bodies with a common collisional origin-in the asteroid belt has added greatly to the understanding of asteroid belt formation and evolution. More recent study has also led to an appreciation of physical processes that had previously been neglected (e.g., the Yarkovsky effect). Collisions have certainly played an important role in the evolution of the Kuiper Belt as well, though only one collisional family has been identified in that region to date, around the dwarf planet Haumea. In this paper, we combine insights into collisional families from numerical simulations with the current observational constraints on the dynamical structure of the Kuiper Belt to investigate the ideal sizes and locations for identifying collisional families. We find that larger progenitors (r {approx} 500 km) result in more easily identifiable families, given the difficulty in identifying fragments of smaller progenitors in magnitude-limited surveys, despite their larger spread and less frequent occurrence. However, even these families do not stand out well from the background. Identifying families as statistical overdensities is much easier than characterizing families by distinguishing individual members from interlopers. Such identification seems promising, provided the background population is well known. In either case, families will also be much easier to study where the background population is small, i.e., at high inclinations. Overall, our results indicate that entirely different techniques for identifying families will be needed for the Kuiper Belt, and we provide some suggestions.

Marcus, Robert A.; Ragozzine, Darin; Murray-Clay, Ruth A.; Holman, Matthew J., E-mail: rmarcus@cfa.harvard.edu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

2011-05-20

433

Advising Practices.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Suggests that those who work with collegiate student publications must understand and practice freedom of the press on their campuses. Provides evidence for this argument from a survey of college publications advisers. (RL)|

Kopenhaver, Lillian Lodge

1981-01-01

434

Camouflage Practices.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Results are presented of a survey of the state of the art of camouflage, comprising examination of literature on the subject and interviews with persons working in the field. The practice of camouflage is reviewed under seven headings: principles, locatio...

R. E. Sell

1967-01-01

435

A policy analysis of adult literacy promotion in the Third World: An accounting of promises made and promises fulfilled  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

To the individual, literacy has promised a new mentality, a new social definition, and new economic capacities. At the collective level, literacy has promised modernization of institutions, democratization of political systems, and cultural renewal of societies in the Third World. Have the promises of literacy been fulfilled? The processes of policy formulation, policy analysis and policy assessment are essentially social processes and a search for `proof' of the effects of literacy is naive, to say the least. What we need is a position on literacy promotion that is plausible, credible and probable, and thereby compelling for action. While both the enthusiasts for literacy and the sceptics continue to draw different conclusions from the same research and experience, a consensus is emerging that the question `Why Literacy?' should now be laid to rest. The question to ask now should be: `How Literacy?' In regard to the question of `How Literacy?', there are two basic positions: Should literacy be taught within the specific small-frame of the selective and intensive approach to literacy, with the provision of basic needs? Or, should literacy be taught within a large-frame of literacy as a `potential added', on a mass-scale and with the political orientation? This paper clearly opts for literacy as generative rather than merely instrumental.

Bhola, H. S.

1985-09-01

436

Limits to Communities of Practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

abstract? The purpose of this paper is to critically explore the communities of practice approach to managing knowledge and its use among management academics and practitioners in recent years. In so doing, the aim is to identify the limits of the approach in the field of knowledge management. The paper begins with a brief description of the communities of practice

Joanne Roberts

2006-01-01

437

Genetic identifiers of epilepsy.  

PubMed

Epilepsy affects >0.5% of the world's population and has a large genetic component. The most common human genetic epilepsies display a complex pattern of inheritance, and the identity of the susceptibility genes is largely unknown despite recent advances in molecular biology. However, genetic identifiers of certain types of epilepsy with neurodegenerative characteristics and of a small number of familial idiopathic epilepsies have been uncovered to date. This article reviews recent progress made in molecular genetics of epilepsy, focusing mostly on idiopathic epilepsy together with our own discovery of novel mutations in the genes of autosomal dominant nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy and benign familial neonatal convulsions (BFNCs), and the genetic locus of benign adult familial myoclonic epilepsy. Pathogenesis of epilepsy as a channelopathy and of BFNC also is discussed. PMID:12383274

Kaneko, Sunao; Iwasa, Hiroto; Okada, Motohiro

2002-01-01

438

Hombres Sanos: Evaluation of a Social Marketing Campaign for Heterosexually Identified Latino Men Who Have Sex With Men and Women  

PubMed Central

Objectives. We evaluated the effectiveness of Hombres Sanos [Healthy Men] a social marketing campaign to increase condom use and HIV testing among heterosexually identified Latino men, especially among heterosexually identified Latino men who have sex with men and women (MSMW). Methods. Hombres Sanos was implemented in northern San Diego County, California, from June 2006 through December 2006. Every other month we conducted cross-sectional surveys with independent samples of heterosexually identified Latino men before (n = 626), during (n = 752), and after (n = 385) the campaign. Respondents were randomly selected from 12 targeted community venues to complete an anonymous, self-administered survey on sexual practices and testing for HIV and other sexually transmitted infections. About 5.6% of respondents (n = 98) were heterosexually identified Latino MSMW. Results. The intervention was associated with reduced rates of recent unprotected sex with both females and males among heterosexually identified Latino MSMW. The campaign was also associated with increases in perception of HIV risk, knowledge of testing locations, and condom carrying among heterosexual Latinos. Conclusions. Social marketing represents a promising approach for abating HIV transmission among heterosexually identified Latinos, particularly for heterosexually identified Latino MSMW. Given the scarcity of evidence-based HIV prevention interventions for these populations, this prevention strategy warrants further investigation.

Zellner, Jennifer A.; Sanudo, Fernando; Fernandez-Cerdeno, Araceli; Hovell, Melbourne F.; Sipan, Carol L.; Engelberg, Moshe; Carrillo, Hector

2010-01-01

439

N-cinnamoylated aminoquinolines as promising antileishmanial agents.  

PubMed

A series of cinnamic acid conjugates of primaquine and chloroquine were evaluated for their in vitro antileishmanial activities. Although primaquine derivatives had modest activity, chloroquine conjugates exhibited potent activity against both promastigotes (50% inhibitory concentration [IC50] = 2.6 to 21.8 ?M) and intramacrophagic amastigotes (IC50 = 1.2 to 9.3 ?M) of Leishmania infantum. Both the high activity of these chloroquine analogues and their mild-to-low toxicity toward host cells make them promising leads for the discovery of new antileishmanial agents. PMID:23917315

Vale-Costa, S; Costa-Gouveia, J; Pérez, B; Silva, T; Teixeira, C; Gomes, P; Gomes, M S

2013-08-05

440

Huperzine A (shuangyiping): a promising drug for Alzheimer's disease.  

PubMed

Hup A, a novel alkaloid isolated from Chineses herb Huperzia serrata, is a potent and selective inhibitor of AChE, with a rapid absorption and penetration into the brain in experimental animals. The inhibition is reversible with a longer duration of action. Hup A exhibited memory-enhancing activities in a broad range of animal cognitive model. Compared to Phy, Tac, and Gal, Hup A has better therapeutic indices, and peripheral cholinergic side effects are minimal at therapeutic doses. These findings suggest that Hup A is a promising candidate for clinical development as a symptomatic treatment for AD. PMID:9863136

Tang, X C

1996-11-01

441

NREL Designs Promising New Oxides for Solar Cells (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

High-efficiency, thin-film solar cells require electrical contacts with high electrical conductivity, and the top contact must also have high optical transparency. This need is currently met by transparent conducting oxides (TCOs), which conduct electricity but are 90% transparent to visible light. Scientists at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have derived three key design principles for selecting promising materials for TCO contacts. NREL's application of these design principles has resulted in a 10,000-fold improvement in conductivity for one TCO material.

Not Available

2012-04-01

442

Ecotourism: the Promise and Perils of Environmentally Oriented Travel  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Cambridge Scientific Abstracts (CSA) latest Hot Topics feature is Ecotourism: the Promise and Perils of Environmentally-Oriented Travel, prepared by Heather E. Lindsay. The detailed report explores the opportunities and pitfalls of ecotourism, for which "finding a compromise between preservation and development is often challenging, and can generate additional environmental problems for the very regions it is intended to protect." Key citations for the report link to the full-text articles from scholarly journals in the CSA database, and over two dozen related Web links are also provided. Anyone interested in reviewing the impact of ecotourism will appreciate this well-organized, thorough report.

Lindsay, Heather E.

2003-01-01

443

Community care in Northern Ireland: a promising start.  

PubMed Central

Integrated health and social services, generous funding, and a special sense of community have got Northern Ireland off to a promising start after the government's community care reforms. Public ignorance about the new arrangements remains a problem, but there is little evidence of serious hardship in any client group. The biggest threat is to nursing and residential homes, which face closure as increasing numbers of elderly and disabled people opt to stay at home. After only a year and without the benefit of formal evaluation, however, the real problems for disabled people and their carers may not yet have emerged. Images p841-a p842-a

Tonks, A.

1994-01-01

444

The microeconomics of personalized medicine: today's challenge and tomorrow's promise.  

PubMed

'Personalized medicine' promises to increase the quality of clinical care and, in some cases, decrease health-care costs. Despite this, only a handful of diagnostic tests have made it to market, with mixed success. Historically, the challenges in this field were scientific. However, as discussed in this article, with the maturation of the '-omics' sciences, it now seems that the major barriers are increasingly related to economics. Overcoming the poor microeconomic alignment of incentives among key stakeholders is therefore crucial to catalysing the further development and adoption of personalized medicine, and we propose several actions that could help achieve this goal. PMID:19300459

Davis, Jerel C; Furstenthal, Laura; Desai, Amar A; Norris, Troy; Sutaria, Saumya; Fleming, Edd; Ma, Philip

2009-03-20

445

Promising Sige Superlattice And Quantum Well Laser Candidates  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a Strained-layer SiGe\\/Si heterostructures with 1D quantum confinement offer a pathway to lasing at long, very long, and far-infrared\\u000a wavelengths (also known as TeraHertz). The purpose of this paper is to describe promising SiGe\\/Si superlattice (SL) and multi-quantum-\\u000a well (MQW) laser candidates that would be pumped electrically or optically or by phonons only. The designs are IV-IV strained-balanced QW\\/barrier heterostructures. We

Greg Sun; Richard Soref; Zoran Ikonic

446

New cancer drug shows promise for treating advanced melanoma  

Cancer.gov

Researchers from UCLA's Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center report that a new drug in preliminary tests has shown promising results with very manageable side effects for treating patients with melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer. The results were presented at the 2013 meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology today in Chicago by Dr. Antoni Ribas, professor of medicine in the UCLA division of hematology-oncology, who led the research. Following Ribas’ presentation, the study was published online ahead of press in the New England Journal of Medicine.

447

Lessons from the past and promises for the future for carotid intima-media thickness.  

PubMed

Carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) measurements have been used in cardiovascular research for more than 2 decades. There is a wealth of evidence showing that CIMT can be assessed in a reproducible manner and that increased CIMT relates to unfavorable risk factor levels and atherosclerosis elsewhere in the arterial system and to the risk of vascular events. Change in CIMT over time can be readily assessed, and trials showed that the rate of change is modifiable by treatment. Several issues important for the cardiovascular research community and its application in clinical practice are still outstanding. Promising future areas for CIMT measurements are: 1) application in studies among children and adolescents; 2) use of CIMT trials positioned decisively before the start of a morbidity and mortality trial; and 3) the use of CIMT measurement in risk stratification in those with an intermediate 10-year risk estimate. PMID:22999720

Bots, Michiel L; Sutton-Tyrrell, Kim

2012-09-19

448

Identifying compartmentalization in gas reservoirs  

SciTech Connect

Compartmentalization as a function of depositional systems is now recognized as a common type of reservoir heterogeneity that limits recovery from oil and gas reservoirs. US Department of Energy (DOE) estimates indicate that substantial quantities of gas resources will not be recovered from presently identified reservoirs under historic development practices. The Secondary Natural Gas Recovery (SGR) project sponsored by the Gas Research Institute (GRI), state of Texas and DOE quantified compartmentalization over intervals as large as 2,000 feet in several different fluvial deltaic reservoirs. Early recognition of compartmentalized behavior can be used to pursue a more rapid development plan including efficient well spacing and elimination of redundant wells. Three classes of reservoir compartment sizes were delineated in the SGR project using methods discussed in this article. Forward stochastic modeling of gas recovery from these compartment-size classes established well spacing requirements that would yield maximum gas contact efficiency. The presence of reservoir compartmentalization was also shown to correlate with reserve growth. Also, those reservoirs classified as having smaller compartment sizes exhibited the greatest reserve growth potential. Utilization of tools, such as personal computer-based methods discussed, enables better engineering interpretation of actual field behavior. Some of these tools require minimal production data, which is readily available on CD-ROM or via modem at very low cost.

Junkin, J.; Cooper, K. [Petrotek Engineering Corp., Englewood, CO (United States); Sippel, M. [Sippel (Mark), Englewood, CO (United States)

1997-01-01

449

The promise of clinical interventions for hepatocellular carcinoma from the west to mainland China.  

PubMed

Objective: Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) presents a major health problem with its steadily increasing incidence in Western countries, and persistent high fatality rates worldwide. The well-recognized complexity and toxicity of its treatment as well as inadequate care and limited resources in mainland China exacerbate the difficulty of maintaining quality of remaining life of patients living with this illness. The goal of this comprehensive literature review was to identify promising clinical interventions for improving quality of life (QOL) of people with advanced HCC in mainland China. Method: A comprehensive literature review was performed in China Academic Journals (CAJ), Cochrane, and PubMed databases. The review was confined to studies of randomized controlled trials (RCT) for adults, in Chinese and English, from 1980 to 2012. Results: A total of 676 studies in Chinese and 391 studies in English were identified. Eighteen RCTs were selected for the final review, among which three were conducted in mainland China. Significance of results: Nurse-led home-based comprehensive interventions using a collaborative care approach addressing multiple dimensions of QOL show promise for enhancing clinical outcomes for people with advanced HCC in mainland China. Education and psychosocial support combined with symptom management early in the illness trajectory and ongoing close attention to physical symptoms, emotional distress, as well as spiritual well-being are crucial for maintaining QOL of people with advanced HCC. Telephone monitoring appears to be a feasible way in rural as well as urban areas. Families are advised to be part of overall interventions. It is warranted that promising interventions aiming at improving QOL for advanced cancer patients reported in Western literature be further tested in mainland China. PMID:23398641

Bai, Mei; Reynolds, Nancy R; McCorkle, Ruth

2013-02-11

450

Assessing the Impact of Lesson Study on the Teaching Practice of Middle School Science Teachers  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Despite wave after wave of educational reform in the United States our students continue to lag behind their peers in other industrialized countries on virtually all measures of academic achievement. Effective professional development (PD) is seen as a key to improving instructional practice and therefore student learning, but traditional forms of PD have been wholly unsuccessful in changing teaching practice. Over the last two decades an emerging body of research has identified some key features of effective PD that seem to create meaningful change and improvement in instructional practice. Some of this research highlights the promise of adapting Japanese lesson study (LS) to the American context as a means of incrementally improving instruction. Much of the existing research around LS is descriptive in nature and offers little insight into if and how participation in LS impacts subsequent instructional practice. This study utilized case study methodology to examine the instructional practice of one group of four middle school science teachers before, during, and after participation in LS. The study attempted to identify specific learning outcomes of a LS process, to identify influences on teacher learning during LS, and to identify subsequent changes in the instructional practice of participants resulting from participation in LS. Key findings from the study include significant teacher learning derived from the LS process, the identification of influences that enhanced or inhibited teacher learning, and clear evidence that participants successfully integrated learning from the LS into subsequent instructional practice. Learning outcomes included deepening of subject matter knowledge, increased understanding of student thinking and abilities, clarity of expectations for student performance, recognition of the ineffectiveness of past instructional practice, specific instructional strategies, shared student learning goals, and an increased commitment to future development of student learning. Influences supporting teacher learning were trust and honest dialogue among participants, focused collaboration, examination of student work, and the opportunity to watch other teachers deliver instruction. Influences inhibiting teacher learning related to failure to adhere to key features of the LS protocol. The study offers initial evidence confirming the promise of LS as a model of effective PD.

Grove, Michael C.

451

Practical Semantic Astronomy  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Many activities in the era of data-intensive astronomy are predicated upon some transference of domain knowledge and expertise from human to machine. The semantic infrastructure required to support this is no longer a pipe dream of computer science but a set of practical engineering challenges, more concerned with deployment and performance details than AI abstractions. The application of such ideas promises to help in such areas as contextual data access, exploiting distributed annotation and heterogeneous sources, and intelligent data dissemination and discovery. In this talk, we will review the status and use of semantic technologies in astronomy, particularly to address current problems in astroinformatics, with such projects as SKUA and AstroCollation.

Graham, Matthew; Gray, N.; Burke, D.

2010-01-01

452

Nanostructures as promising tools for delivery of antimicrobial peptides.  

PubMed

Antimicrobial peptides have been extensively investigated for their potential applications as therapeutics and food biopreservatives. The antimicrobial activity may be impaired by the susceptibility for proteolytic degradation and undesirable interactions of the antimicrobial peptide in the biological environment. Development of nanostructures for entrapment and delivery of antimicrobial peptides may represent an alternative to the direct application of these substances. Lipid nanovesicles have been developed for encapsulation of antimicrobial peptides. Phosphatidylcholine is often employed in liposome manufacture, which is mostly achieved by the thin-film hydration method. Nanofibers may allow different physical modes of drug loading, including direct adsorption on the nanofiber surface or the assembly of drug-loaded nanoparticles. Self-assembled peptides reveal attractive features as nanostructures for applications in drug delivery and promising as antimicrobial agent for treatment of brain infections. Magnetic nanoparticles and nanotubules are also potential structures for entrapment of antimicrobial peptides. Nanoparticles can be also chemically modified with specific cell surface ligands to enhance cell adhesion and site specific delivery. This article reviews the most important nanostructures as promising tools for peptide delivery systems. PMID:22512554

Brandelli, A

2012-07-01

453

Public health's promise for the future: 1989 Presidential address  

SciTech Connect

Public health's promise for the future is inextricably related to efforts which maximize human potential and which realize the world's interdependence. Public health challenges are not only constant and complex but frequently surrounded by political activities. In this environment, the public health enterprise has been enhanced by the Institute of Medicine, National Academy of Sciences' report on The Future of Public Health and the assessment framework it provides. Risk reduction through preventive and health promotion activities is the primary focus of public health, but facilitation is often dependent upon society's understanding and willingness-to-pay for such services. The effectiveness of public health is related to an ability to coordinate public and private efforts at national, state, and local levels. Also in this environment, public health is empowered through its multidisciplinary approach. However, epidemiology provides a unifying framework for the collective public health effort. Based on the use of epidemiology, public health is empowered to make the argument for a national health program and to support the concept of health as a determinant of life options. Public health's promise for the future can be fulfilled by continuing to increase its scientific base for decision-making, by self-examination and correction, by advocating and promoting self-examination and correction, by advocating and promoting social justice and by promoting firm partnerships with the public.

Shannon, I.S. (Rush Univ., Chicago, IL (USA))

1990-08-01

454

Public health's promise for the future: 1989 presidential address.  

PubMed Central

Public health's promise for the future is inextricably related to efforts which maximize human potential and which realize the world's interdependence. Public health challenges are not only constant and complex but frequently surrounded by political activities. In this environment, the public health enterprise has been enhanced by the Institute of Medicine, National Academy of Sciences' report on The Future of Public Health and the assessment framework it provides. Risk reduction through preventive and health promotion activities is the primary focus of public health, but facilitation is often dependent upon society's understanding and willingness-to-pay for such services. The effectiveness of public health is related to an ability to coordinate public and private efforts at national, state, and local levels. Also in this environment, public health is empowered through its multidisciplinary approach. However, epidemiology provides a unifying framework for the collective public health effort. Based on the use of epidemiology, public health is empowered to make the argument for a national health program and to support the concept of health as a determinant of life options. Public health's promise for the future can be fulfilled by continuing to increase its scientific base for decision-making, by self-examination and correction, by advocating and promoting self-examination and correction, by advocating and promoting social justice and by promoting firm partnerships with the public.

Shannon, I S

1990-01-01

455

Identifying Adolescent Sleep Problems  

PubMed Central

Objectives To examine the efficacy of self-report and parental report of adolescent sleep problems and compare these findings to the incidence of adolescents who fulfill clinical criteria for a sleep problem. Sleep and daytime functioning factors that predict adolescents’ self-identification of a sleep problem will also be examined. Method 308 adolescents (aged 13–17 years) from eight socioeconomically diverse South Australian high schools participated in this study. Participants completed a survey battery during class time, followed by a 7-day Sleep Diary and the Flinders Fatigue Scale completed on the final day of the study. Parents completed a Sleep, Medical, Education and Family History Survey. Results The percentage of adolescents fulfilling one or more of the criteria for a sleep problem was inordinately high at 66%. Adolescent self-reporting a sleep problem was significantly lower than the adolescents who had one or more of the clinical criteria for a sleep problem (23.1% vs. 66.6%; ?2?=?17.46, p<.001). Parental report of their adolescent having a sleep problem was significantly lower than adolescent self-report (14.3% vs. 21.1%, p<.001). Adolescents who reported unrefreshing sleep were 4.81 times more likely to report a sleep problem. For every hour that bedtime was delayed, the odds of self-reporting a sleep problem increased by 1.91 times, while each additional 10 minutes taken to fall asleep increased the odds 1.40 times. Conclusion While many adolescents were found to have sleep patterns indicative of a sleep problem, only a third of this number self-identify having a sleep problem, while only a sixth of this number are indicated by parental report. This study highlights important features to target in future sleep education and intervention strategies for both adolescents and parents.

Short, Michelle A.; Gradisar, Michael; Gill, Jason; Camfferman, Danny

2013-01-01

456

Practice management.  

PubMed

Laser treatment is now state-of-the-art in many disciplines of dentistry and is rapidly being recognized as the standard of care for many procedures. Seamless, efficient, and successful integration of lasers into a dental practice takes time and effort on the part of the dentist. Restructuring of fee schedules to reflect superior laser-based care and an internal and external marketing plan are essential for the dentist to recoup his or her investment in this new technology. Training the staff in laser technology and becoming familiar with new reimbursement codes (for medical and dental insurance) may become necessary. The mission statement and practice philosophy of providing superior care with less discomfort now can be realized with the integration of lasers into a dental practice. PMID:11048279

Weiser, M T

2000-10-01

457

Identifying Nuclear Material via Prompt PhotoNeutron Multiplicity Measurements  

Microsoft Academic Search

Proof-of-principle measurements are reported demonstrating that multiplicity techniques can be used to identify prompt fission neutrons from photonuclear interrogation under circumstances where the fission neutrons may be accompanied by photodissociated neutrons of an identical energy spectrum, and where the emitted neutrons are naturally bunched in time by the pulsed nature of the interrogating photon beam. The technique shows promise as

P. A. Hausladen; J. T. Mihalczo; B. W. Blackburn; S. M. Watson; J. L. Jones; A. W. Hunt; S. Thompson

2009-01-01

458

Pharmacogenomics: The Promise of Personalized Medicine for CNS Disorders  

Microsoft Academic Search

This review focuses first on the concept of pharmacogenomics and its related concepts (biomarkers and personalized prescription). Next, the first generation of five DNA pharmacogenomic tests used in the clinical practice of psychiatry is briefly reviewed. Then the possible involvement of these pharmacogenomic tests in the exploration of early clinical proof of mechanism is described by using two of the

Jose de Leon

2009-01-01

459

The Geier Consent Decree years: Fulfilled or unfulfilled promises?  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Geier Consent Decree, an agreement stemming from the landmark case Geier v. State of Tennessee was approved by the United States district Court for the Middle District of Tennessee, Nashville Division in 2001, with the intent of eliminating vestiges of past discrimination in higher education in Tennessee. Professional development and recruitment programs as well as affirmative action practices were

Jewell Winn

2008-01-01

460

The Promise and the Caution of Resilience Models for Schools  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Resilience is a very useful construct for framing school mental health services to children and is particularly applicable to mental health services in school settings. Still, resilience perspectives should not be overgeneralized to school mental health practice because risk and resilience wax and wane over time and daily decisions about…

Doll, Beth; Jones, Kristin; Osborn, Allison; Dooley, Kadie; Turner, April

2011-01-01

461

Cultural Capital: The Promises and Pitfalls in Education Research  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The past three decades have seen the increased use of the term "cultural capital" in classrooms, research articles, and discussions in education. This monograph is an attempt to buttress a theoretical understanding of the cultural capital construct and its applicability to educational research and practice. In educational research, cultural…

Winkle-Wagner, Rachelle

2010-01-01

462

Fifty Years after "Brown": Tarnished Gold, Broken Promises  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|May 17, 2004 marked the fifty years that have passed since the United States Supreme Court handed down one of its most famous, compelling and iconic decisions, "Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, Kansas." Certainly the decision itself, labeling the practice of "separate but equal" as unconstitutional, deserves the fanfare and celebration of a…

Gantz, Julie

2004-01-01

463

Gene Therapy for the Inner Ear: Challenges and Promises  

Microsoft Academic Search

Since the recognition of genes as the discrete units of heritability, and of DNA as their molecular substrate, the utilization of genes for therapeutic purposes has been recognized as a potential means of correcting genetic disorders. The tools of molecular biology, which allow the manipulation of DNA sequence, provided the means to put this concept into practice. However, progress in

Allen F. Ryan; Stefan Dazert

2009-01-01

464

Policy promise: community policing and domestic violence victim satisfaction  

Microsoft Academic Search

Police policy regarding domestic violence has been severely altered over the last decade. The social control approach of pro-arrest policies has coincided with a service approach promoted by community policing philosophy. But community policing practice has largely ignored the role of victim satisfaction. The evaluation of domestic violence victims must be considered in determining police accountability, because of both the

Margaret E. Martin

1997-01-01

465

Technology Effect: The Promise of Enhanced Academic Achievement.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this paper is to examine the literature in regard to technology and its effect on learner academic achievement. It explores early assumptions and current academic practices, examines several seminal studies on technology effect, and looks at possible future directions for technology and learning research. The paper offers the…

Rampp, Lary C.; Guffey, J. Stephen

466

Reducing the Risk, Increasing the Promise: Strategies for Student Success  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|In their new book, Bergmann and Brough provide a clear path to follow for helping your at-risk students achieve success in and out of the classroom. Packed with classroom-tested, practical strategies and lesson plans for teaching respect, responsibility, resilience, reading, and other essential skills to at-risk students, this is a must-have book…

Bergmann, Sherrel; Brough, Judith Allen

2012-01-01

467

Substance Abuse and Child Welfare: Clear Linkages and Promising Responses.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines the prevalence of substance abuse among families involved with the child welfare system and the impact of substance abuse on child welfare practice. Discusses how both the Adoption and Safe Families Act of 1997 and welfare reform legislation intensify the need to address parental substance abuse effectively. Considers strategies for…

Semidei, Joseph; Radel, Laura Feig; Nolan, Catherine

2001-01-01

468

Sharing Success in the Southeast: Promising Service-Learning Programs.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The SouthEastern Regional Vision for Education (SERVE) Sharing Success program recognizes exemplary public school efforts and practices in the southeastern United States for the purpose of increasing the awareness and use of exemplary educational programs. This document highlights more than 30 elementary- and/or secondary-level programs that have…

Watkins, James; Wilkes, Dianne

469

A Promising New Approach to Eliminating Selection Bias  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This article presents a creative and practical process for dealing with the problem of selection bias. Taking an algorithmic approach and capitalizing on the known treatment-associated variance in the X matrix, we propose a data transformation that allows estimating unbiased treatment effects. The approach does not call for modelling the data,…

Peck, Laura R.; Camillo, Furio; D'Attoma, Ida

2009-01-01

470

Identifying and genotyping transgene integration loci  

Microsoft Academic Search

The random germline integration of genetically engineered transgenes has been a powerful technique to study the role of particular\\u000a genes in variety of biological processes. Although the identification of the transgene insertion site is often not essential\\u000a for functional analysis of the transgene, identifying the site can have practical benefit. Enabling one to distinguish between\\u000a animals that are homozygous or

Zhong Liang; Amy Marie Breman; Brenda R. Grimes; Elliot D. Rosen

2008-01-01

471

Strengthening chronic disease prevention programming: the Toward Evidence-Informed Practice (TEIP) Program Evidence Tool.  

PubMed

In public health and chronic disease prevention there is increasing priority for effective use of evidence in practice. In Ontario, Canada, despite various models being advanced, public health practitioners are seeking ways to identify and apply evidence in their work in practical and meaningful ways. In a companion article, "Strengthening Chronic Disease Prevention Programming: The Toward Evidence-Informed Practice (TEIP) Program Assessment Tool," we describe use of a tool to assess and strengthen program planning and implementation processes using 19 criteria derived from best and promising practices literature. In this article, we describe use of a complementary Program Evidence Tool to identify, synthesize, and apply a range of evidence sources to strengthen the content of chronic disease prevention programming.The Program Evidence Tool adapts tools of evidence-based medicine to the unique contexts of community-based health promotion and chronic disease prevention. Knowledge management tools and a guided dialogue process known as an Evidence Forum enable community stakeholders to make appropriate use of evidence in diverse social, political, and structural contexts. Practical guidelines and worksheets direct users through 5 steps: 1) define an evidence question, 2) develop a search strategy, 3) collect and synthesize evidence, 4) interpret and adapt evidence, and 5) implement and evaluate. We describe the Program Evidence Tool's benefits, strengths, challenges, and what was learned from its application in 4 Ontario public health departments. The Program Evidence Tool contributes to the development and understanding of the complex use of evidence in community-based chronic disease prevention. PMID:23721788

Albert, Dayna; Fortin, Rebecca; Herrera, Christine; Riley, Barbara; Hanning, Rhona; Lessio, Anne; Rush, Brian

2013-05-30

472

Change What? Identifying Quality Improvement Targets by Investigating Usual Mental Health Care  

Microsoft Academic Search

Efforts to improve community-based children’s mental health care should be based on valid information about effective practices\\u000a and current routine practices. Emerging research on routine care practices and outcomes has identified discrepancies between\\u000a evidence-based practices and “usual care.” These discrepancies highlight potentially potent quality improvement interventions.\\u000a This article reviews existing research on routine or “usual care” practice, identifies strengths and

Ann F. Garland; Leonard Bickman; Bruce F. Chorpita

2010-01-01

473

Assessing the promise of user involvement in health service development: ethnographic study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objectives To understand how the policy of user involvement is interpreted in health service organisations and to identify factors that influence how user involvement is put into practice.Design Ethnographic study using participant observation, interviews, and collection of documentary evidence.Setting A multiagency modernisation programme to improve stroke services in two London boroughs.Participants Service users, National Health Service managers, and clinicians.Results User

Nina Fudge; Charles D A Wolfe; Christopher McKevitt

2008-01-01

474

Best Practices  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Front-page articles in science and education periodicals and journals give voice to the growing concern that scores on nationwide science exams have either declined or, at best, have had a minute increase even after several years of pushing for better science learning. With this reality facing science education, being knowledgeable about some best practices in science instruction is important.

Swango, C. J.; Steward, Sally B.

2003-01-01

475

The Practice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Consulting for a moment such luminaries as Mahatma Gandhi, Dr. King, Cesar Chavez--I would say that personal revelation is not less necessary to radical change than public revolution. Amen? "Backing Away From The Product" really has to be both a spiritual practice and a public embarrassment so extreme that its witnesses won't stop talking about it…

Billy, Reverend

2008-01-01

476

Comminution practices  

SciTech Connect

The Proceedings of a Comminution Practices Symposium held February 24-27, 1997 in Denver Colorado are presented. The symposium covered such topics as: grinding circuits; comminution process control and instrumentation; high pressure grinding rolls; fine grinding; recycling; and mill design. Separate abstracts were prepared for three of the papers for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

Kawatra, S.K. [ed.

1997-11-01

477

An algorithm for identifying digital image orientation based on c#  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In research for machine vision, the discrimination of image orientation is one of practical problems. An algorithm for identifying image orientation was proposed, and to be realized by c# programming.

Jia, Da-Chun; Yao, Xu-Dong; Jia, Xin

2011-04-01

478

Stem cells as promising therapeutic options for neurological disorders.  

PubMed

Due to the limitations of pharmacological and other current therapeutic strategies, stem cell therapies have emerged as promising options for treating many incurable neurologic diseases. A variety of stem cells including pluripotent stem cells (i.e., embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells) and multipotent adult stem cells (i.e., fetal brain tissue, neural stem cells, and mesenchymal stem cells from various sources) have been explored as therapeutic options for treating many neurologic diseases, and it is becoming obvious that each type of stem cell has pros and cons as a source for cell therapy. Wise selection of stem cells with regard to the nature and status of neurologic dysfunctions is required to achieve optimal therapeutic efficacy. To this aim, the stem cell-mediated therapeutic efforts on four major neurological diseases, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and stroke, will be introduced, and current problems and future directions will be discussed. PMID:23097262

Yoo, Jongman; Kim, Han-Soo; Hwang, Dong-Youn

2013-04-01

479

NKT cell costimulation: experimental progress and therapeutic promise  

PubMed Central

Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells are innate lymphocytes with unique specificity for glycolipid antigens and remarkable immunomodulatory properties. The role of costimulatory interactions in iNKT cell responses has recently come under scrutiny. Although iNKT cells and their prototype glycolipid agonist ?-galactosylceramide (?-GalCer) have shown promise in several clinical trials conducted in patients with cancer or viral diseases, current iNKT cell-based therapies are far from effective. The concomitant targeting of T cell receptors (TCRs) and costimulatory molecules on iNKT cells represents an exciting new opportunity to optimize such therapeutic approaches. Here, we review recent advances in our understanding of iNKT cell costimulation and discuss potential treatment modalities based on the responsiveness of iNKT cells to disease-tailored glycolipids and select costimulatory ligands.

van den Heuvel, Marianne J.; Garg, Nitan; Van Kaer, Luc; Haeryfar, S.M. Mansour

2013-01-01

480

The neuroscience of empathy: progress, pitfalls and promise.  

PubMed

The last decade has witnessed enormous growth in the neuroscience of empathy. Here, we survey research in this domain with an eye toward evaluating its strengths and weaknesses. First, we take stock of the notable progress made by early research in characterizing the neural systems supporting two empathic sub-processes: sharing others' internal states and explicitly considering those states. Second, we describe methodological and conceptual pitfalls into which this work has sometimes fallen, which can limit its validity. These include the use of relatively artificial stimuli that differ qualitatively from the social cues people typically encounter and a lack of focus on the relationship between brain activity and social behavior. Finally, we describe current research trends that are overcoming these pitfalls through simple but important adjustments in focus, and the future promise of empathy research if these trends continue and expand. PMID:22504346

Zaki, Jamil; Ochsner, Kevin

2012-04-15

481

Metallacarboranes: Towards promising hydrogen storage metal organic framework  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Using first principles calculations we show the high hydrogen storage capacity of metallacarboranes,ootnotetextA. K. Singh, A. Sadrzadeh, and B. I. Yakobson, Metallacarboranes: Toward Promising Hydrogen Storage Metal Organic Frameworks, JACS 132,14126 (2010). where the transition metal (TM) atoms bind hydrogen via Kubas interaction. The average binding energy of ˜0.3 eV/H favorably lies within the reversible adsorption range The Sc and Ti are found to be the optimum metal atoms maximizing the number of stored H2 molecules. Depending upon the structure, metallacarboranes can adsorb up to 8 wt% of hydrogen, which exceeds DOE goal for 2015. Being integral part of the cage, TMs do not suffer from the aggregation problem. Furthermore, the presence of carbon atom in the cages permits linking the metallacarboranes to form metal organic frameworks (MOF), thus able to adsorb hydrogen via Kubas interaction, in addition to van der Waals physisorption.

Singh, Abhishek; Sadrzadeh, Arta; Yakobson, Boris

2011-03-01

482

The promise of N-acetylcysteine in neuropsychiatry.  

PubMed

N-Acetylcysteine (NAC) targets a diverse array of factors germane to the pathophysiology of multiple neuropsychiatric disorders including glutamatergic transmission, the antioxidant glutathione, neurotrophins, apoptosis, mitochondrial function, and inflammatory pathways. This review summarises the areas where the mechanisms of action of NAC overlap with known pathophysiological elements, and offers a précis of current literature regarding the use of NAC in disorders including cocaine, cannabis, and smoking addictions, Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, autism, compulsive and grooming disorders, schizophrenia, depression, and bipolar disorder. There are positive trials of NAC in all these disorders, and although many of these require replication and are methodologically preliminary, this makes it one of the most promising drug candidates in neuropsychiatric disorders. The efficacy pattern of NAC interestingly shows little respect for the current diagnostic systems. Its benign tolerability profile, its action on multiple operative pathways, and the emergence of positive trial data make it an important target to investigate. PMID:23369637

Berk, Michael; Malhi, Gin S; Gray, Laura J; Dean, Olivia M

2013-01-29

483

Capturing the Imagination: The Promise of the Webb Space Telescope  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Webb Space Telescope will take us on a journey back to the beginning, enabling us to see the first galaxies, the birth of stars, the creation of planets, and the origins of galactic structure. News, education, and outreach activities led by the Space Telescope Science Institute Office of Public Outreach use the promise of Webb's scientific return and technical prowess to capture the imagination—inspiring and educating youth and adults about key science, technology, engineering, and mathematics concepts and the process of science itself. We highlight activities designed to introduce cutting-edge Webb science and technology to established audiences cultivated through a decade of Hubble-based Amazing Space, ViewSpace, HubbleSite, and NewsCenter products and services. Critical underlying components include a commitment to evaluation of audience needs and partnerships between scientists and educators.

Smith, D. A.; Livio, M.; Eisenhammer, B.; Kakadelis, S.; Villard, R.; Stiavelli, M.; Stockman, P.

2010-08-01

484

Scrap tire recycling: Promising high value applications. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Surface modification of scrap tire rubber (rubber particles treated with chlorine gas) show promise for ameliorating the scrap tire problem (the treated rubber can be used as a component in high- performance, expensive polymer systems). The process has been proven in Phase I. Phase II covers market/applications, process development (Forberg-design mixer reactor was chosen), plant design, capital cost estimate, economics environmental/safety/health, and energy impact. Almost of the small amount of chlorine is consumed. The capital costs for a rubber particle treatment facility are attractive, being at least two orders of magnitude less than that of facilities for making new polymer materials. Large volume markets using treated rubber are needed. The amount of scrap rubber available is small compared to the polymers available for replacement. 7 tabs, 16 figs.

Bauman, B.D.; Leskovyansky, P.J.; Drela, H.

1993-11-01

485

Salt caverns show promise for nonhazardous oil field waste disposal  

SciTech Connect

Salt caverns show promise for the disposal of non-hazardous oil field wastes, and there are no apparent regulatory barriers to this application. Solution-mined salt caverns have been used for many years for storing hydrocarbon products. Argonne National laboratory has reviewed the legality, technical suitability, and feasibility of disposing of nonhazardous oil and gas exploration and production wastes in salt caverns. An analysis of regulations indicates that there are no outright regulatory prohibitions on cavern disposal of oil field wastes at either the federal level or in the 11 oil-producing states that were studied (Kansas, Louisiana, Michigan, Mississippi, New Mexico, New York, North Dakota, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, and Texas). The paper discusses the two types of salt deposits in the US, regulatory concerns, wastes, cavern design, disposal operations, closure and remediation, and results of the feasibility study.

Veil, J.A. [Argonne National Lab., Washington, DC (United States)

1996-11-18

486

Neuronal Signal Transduction Pathways: Wasteland or the Promised Land?  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Proteins used in signal transduction pathways are commonly found in different cell types and organs. However, specific proteins whose expression is highly restricted are also utilized for allowing discrete responsiveness to signals that are otherwise ignored by other cells. How the brain uses common and specific signal proteins for communication within and beyond the cerebrum has been an area of intense study. A new book concentrates on the signaling that occurs in the brain under normal and pathological conditions--memory, apoptosis, neurodegeneration, depression, and drug dependence--and is filled with chapters written by experts in neurobiology and neurophysiology. Bryan Roth reviews the book and discusses in detail several chapters that may lead to promising future research.

Bryan L. Roth (Cleveland;Case Western Reserve University REV)

2000-08-15

487

Targeting aerobic glycolysis: 3-bromopyruvate as a promising anticancer drug.  

PubMed

The Warburg effect refers to the phenomenon whereby cancer cells avidly take up glucose and produce lactic acid under aerobic conditions. Although the molecular mechanisms underlying tumor reliance on glycolysis remains not completely clear, its inhibition opens feasible therapeutic windows for cancer treatment. Indeed, several small molecules have emerged by combinatorial studies exhibiting promising anticancer activity both in vitro and in vivo, as a single agent or in combination with other therapeutic modalities. Therefore, besides reviewing the alterations of glycolysis that occur with malignant transformation, this manuscript aims at recapitulating the most effective pharmacological therapeutics of its targeting. In particular, we describe the principal mechanisms of action and the main targets of 3-bromopyruvate, an alkylating agent with impressive antitumor effects in several models of animal tumors. Moreover, we discuss the chemo-potentiating strategies that would make unparalleled the putative therapeutic efficacy of its use in clinical settings. PMID:22328057

Cardaci, Simone; Desideri, Enrico; Ciriolo, Maria Rosa

2012-02-01

488

Targeting Cyclooxygenase-2 in Hematological Malignancies: Rationale and Promise  

PubMed Central

There is much interest in the potential use of Cox-2 selective inhibitors in combination with other cancer therapeutics. Malignancies of hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic origin often have increased expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2), a key modulator of inflammation. For example, hematological malignancies such as chronic lymphocytic leukemia, chronic myeloid leukemia, Hodgkin’s lymphoma, non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma and multiple myeloma often highly express Cox-2, which correlates with poor patient prognosis. Expression of Cox-2 enhances survival and proliferation of malignant cells, while negatively influencing anti-tumor immunity. Hematological malignancies expressing elevated levels of Cox-2 potentially avoid immune responses by producing factors that enhance angiogenesis and metastases. Cellular immune responses regulated by natural killer cells, cytotoxic T lymphocytes, and T regulatory cells are also influenced by Cox-2 expression. Therefore, Cox-2 selective inhibitors have promising therapeutic potential in patients suffering from certain hematological malignancies.

Bernard, M. P.; Bancos, S.; Sime, P. J.; Phipps, R. P.

2009-01-01

489

Cardiac stem cells: A promising treatment option for heart failure  

PubMed Central

Cardiovascular diseases are the most common cause of death in the world. The development of heart failure is mainly due to the loss of cardiomyocytes following myocardial infarction and the absence of endogenous myocardial repair. Numerous studies have focused on cardiac stem cells (CSCs) due to their therapeutic benefit, particularly in the treatment of heart failure. It has previously been demonstrated that CSCs are able to promote the regeneration of cardiomyocytes in animals following myocardial infarction. However, the underlying mechanism(s) remain unclear. This review mainly discusses the cardioprotective effect of CSCs and the effect of CSCs on the function of cardiomyocytes, and compares the efficacies of CSCs from rats, mice and humans, thereby contributing to an improved understanding of CSCs as a promising treatment option for heart failure.

ZHAO, XIAOHUI; HUANG, LAN

2013-01-01

490

Cardiac stem cells: A promising treatment option for heart failure.  

PubMed

Cardiovascular diseases are the most common cause of death in the world. The development of heart failure is mainly due to the loss of cardiomyocytes following myocardial infarction and the absence of endogenous myocardial repair. Numerous studies have focused on cardiac stem cells (CSCs) due to their therapeutic benefit, particularly in the treatment of heart failure. It has previously been demonstrated that CSCs are able to promote the regeneration of cardiomyocytes in animals following myocardial infarction. However, the underlying mechanism(s) remain unclear. This review mainly discusses the cardioprotective effect of CSCs and the effect of CSCs on the function of cardiomyocytes, and compares the efficacies of CSCs from rats, mice and humans, thereby contributing to an improved understanding of CSCs as a promising treatment option for heart failure. PMID:23407679

Zhao, Xiaohui; Huang, Lan

2012-12-05

491

Herbal remedies for alcoholism: promises and possible pitfalls.  

PubMed

This review summarizes the findings of the effects on alcohol intake in alcohol-preferring rats of extracts or purified compounds from two of the most promising herbs: kudzu (Pueraria lobata) and St. John's Wort (Hypericum perforatum). It is a summary of a symposium presented at the 2002 RSA meeting in San Francisco. The meeting organizers/co-chairs were David Overstreet and Wing-Ming Keung. The presentations were (1) Introduction to the symposium, by David Y. W. Lee and David H. Overstreet; (2) Effects of daidzin on alcohol intake-search for mechanisms of action, by Wing-Ming Keung; (3) Long-term suppressive effects of puerarin on alcohol drinking in rats, by David Overstreet and David Y. W. Lee; (4) St. John's Wort extract reduces alcohol intake in FH and P rats, by Amir Rezvani and David Overstreet; and (5) extracts reduce alcohol intake in Marchigian Sardinian alcohol-preferring rats, by Maurizio Massi. PMID:12605067

Overstreet, David H; Keung, Wing-Ming; Rezvani, Amir H; Massi, Maurizio; Lee, David Y W

2003-02-01

492

PAI-1 Antagonists: The Promise and the Peril  

PubMed Central

The plasminogen activator (i.e., fibrinolytic) system is one of the key endogenous defense mechanisms against intravascular thrombosis. Thrombolytic agents represent the only direct way of augmenting fibrinolytic activity in humans, and have proven to be of value in the treatment of acute myocardial infarction and stroke. Although these agents are efficacious in the acute setting, they are not a viable option for long-term use. Net fibrinolytic activity is plasma is largely determined by the balance between tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) and its natural, fast-acting inhibitor, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1). The recent development of specific PAI-1 antagonists promises to expand the limits of understanding of the role of the fibrinolytic system in human disease, and to break through the current confines of therapeutic options that can effectively restore and augment the activity of the fibrinolytic system.

Vaughan, Douglas E.

2011-01-01

493

Study to treat deadly form of thyroid cancer shows promise  

Cancer.gov

A combination of therapies may prove to be a promising advance for the treatment of anaplastic thyroid cancer based on results of a phase I clinical trial. The collaborative study, published in the April 16 online issue of the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, reports that combining paclitaxel chemotherapy with an experimental agent known as efatutazone was safe and well tolerated by patients. Organizations participating in the study were: the Mayo Clinic, the University of Pennsylvania Abramson Cancer Center, Eastern Virginia University, the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Ohio State University (home to the OSU Comprehensive Cancer Center), the University of Oregon Medical Center (home to the Knight Cancer Institute), the University of Colorado School of Medicine (home to the University of Colorado Cancer Center), Emory University Hospital (home of the Winship Cancer Institute), Weill Cornell Medical College, and Japanese pharmaceutical company, Daiichi Sankyo.