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1

A Grounded Theory for Identifying Students with Emotional Disturbance: Promising Practices for Assessment, Intervention, and Service Delivery  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A qualitative grounded theory study examined how practicing professionals involved in the ED identification process reconstructed the category of "emotional disturbance" as it applied to students in an alternative educational setting. A grounded theory integrates six emergent themes and essentially reframes the existing ED criteria in contemporary…

Barnett, Dori

2012-01-01

2

Collaboration: Perks, Problems, and Promising Practices.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

General educator-special educator collaboration is discussed. Advantages include professional exchange of ideas and sharing of resources; barriers include a feeling by staff of lack of ownership and lack of power in decision making, and the perception that goals are incompatible; promising practices include clarifying goals and developing…

Campbell-Whatley, Gloria; And Others

1994-01-01

3

Promising Practices in Drug Treatment: An Overview of Methodology  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper describes a research project sponsored and funded by the State Department's Bureau of International Narcotics and Affairs (INL) on substance abuse and treatment in ten countries. The purpose of the study was to identify promising practices in drug treatment in Europe, Latin America, and Southeast Asia. The steps taken to complete this evaluation are described, including the instruments

Gerald Garrett; Susanna Nemes; Jeffrey Hoffman; Salvatore Libretto; Anne Helene Skinstadt; Lauren Hess

2005-01-01

4

Promising Practices in Drug Treatment: Findings from Europe  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In a study to evaluate the drug treatment and aftercare efforts sponsored by the State Department's International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs Bureau, residential Therapeutic Community (TC) treatment programs in four European countries-Poland, Spain, Slovenia, and Italy-were examined to identify promising practices and to assess lessons…

Nemes, Susanna; Libretto, Salvatore; Skinstad, Anne Helene; Garrett, Gerald; Hoffman, Jeffrey A.

2005-01-01

5

Promising Practices in Drug Treatment: Findings from Latin America  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In a study to evaluate the drug treatment and aftercare efforts sponsored by the State Department's International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs Bureau, residential Therapeutic Community (TC) treatment programs in three Latin American countries--Brazil, Peru and Argentina--were examined to identify promising practices and to assess lessons…

Nemes, Susanna; Libretto, Salvatore; Garrett, Gerald; Johansson, Anna Carin; Hess, Lauren

2005-01-01

6

Promising Practices in Drug Treatment: Findings from Southeast Asia  

Microsoft Academic Search

In a study to evaluate the drug treatment and aftercare efforts sponsored by the State Department's International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs Bureau, residential Therapeutic Community (TC) treatment programs in three countries in Southeast Asia–Malaysia, Singapore, and Thailand–were examined to identify promising practices and to assess lessons learned. Based on field visits, in-person interviews, focus groups, and document analyses, the

Salvatore Libretto; Susanna Nemes; Jenny Namur; Gerald Garrett; Lauren Hess; Linda Kaplan

2005-01-01

7

Promising Practices in Drug Treatment: Findings from Latin America  

Microsoft Academic Search

In a study to evaluate the drug treatment and aftercare efforts sponsored by the State Department's International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs Bureau, residential Therapeutic Community (TC) treatment programs in three Latin American countries–Brazil, Peru and Argentina–were examined to identify promising practices and to assess lessons learned. Based on field visits, in-person interviews, focus groups, and document analyses, the authors

Susanna Nemes; Salvatore Libretto; Gerald Garrett; Anna Carin Johansson; Lauren Hess

2005-01-01

8

Promising Practices: Vocational Education Resource Package.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Developed to assist community college administrators and faculty in enhancing vocational educational programs and services, this Vocational Education Resource Package profiles four vocational education programs at California community colleges that show promise in serving special population students. First, the Applied Mathematics for Electronics…

Evaluation and Training Inst., Los Angeles, CA.

9

What If? Promising Practices for Improving Schools  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Today, there is little deviation from the standard, business-as-usual practices in the world of education. This book challenges these stale practices and asks the important questions that can improve schools beyond the current state of mediocrity. Written for administrators, supervisors, teachers, parents--even politicians and corporate…

Dunn, Rita, Ed.; Griggs, Shirley A., Ed.

2007-01-01

10

Women in CS @ HMC: Three Promising Practices  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Five years after introducing three key recruitment and retention strategies, women now make up around 42% of Harvey Mudd CollegeâÂÂs computer science program. In this Google Tech Talk video, Christine Alvarado shares the three practices Harvey Mudd College implemented to increase the number of women in their CS program: 1) new curriculum for CS1, 2) scholarship trips for female freshman to the Grace Hopper Celebration of Women in Computer Science, and 3) hands-on research projects for female sophomore CS students.

2012-11-29

11

Exposure Databases and Exposure Surveillance: Promise and Practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

Based on recent developments in occupational health and a review of industry practices, it is argued that integrated exposure database and surveillance systems hold considerable promise for improving workplace health and safety. A foundation from which to build practical and effective exposure surveillance systems is proposed based on the integration of recent developments in electronic exposure databases, the codification of

Anthony D. LaMontagne; Robert F. Herrick; Michael V. Van Dyke; John W. Martyny; A. James Ruttenber

2002-01-01

12

Promising Practices: A Teacher Resource (Grades K-3).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A collection of promising instructional practices for teachers of limited-English-speaking primary grade students is organized as a series of lessons on planning, classroom management, teaching procedures, and evaluation in a variety of content areas. Examples of basic learning activities intended to serve as a framework for teacher…

Provenzano, Johanna Z., Ed.

13

Promising Practices: New Ways To Improve Teacher Quality.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This publication explains promising practices in improving teacher quality. Chapter 1, Achieving Excellence in the Teaching Profession, discusses educational, economic, and social change; teacher recruitment and development challenges; and opportunities for renewing the teaching profession. Chapter 2, Recruiting Talented and Diverse People into…

Department of Education, Washington, DC. Office of the Secretary.

14

The Four Cs of Promising Practices in Community Colleges  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To address the achievement or opportunity gap of underrepresented populations in community colleges, this qualitative field methods study investigated five California community college programs that have demonstrated progress in improving (or show significant potential to improve) student achievement. This research found that promising practices

Haberler, Zachary; Levin, John S.

2014-01-01

15

Promising Practices in Mathematics & Science Education: A Collection of Promising Educational Programs & Practices from the Laboratory Network Program.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This volume of 66 promising practices in mathematics and science education developed by the 10 regional educational laboratories funded by the U.S. Department of Education's Office of Educational Research and Improvement. The laboratories' collection of programs emerged from a broad-based search, nomination, and review process reaching educators…

Office of Educational Research and Improvement (ED), Washington, DC.

16

Contexts for Promise: Noteworthy Practices and Innovations in the Identification of Gifted Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This monograph contains 11 papers describing model projects that address the identification of gifted students. An introduction by Carolyn M. Callahan and Carol A. Tomlinson identifies commonalities and themes in the promising practices highlighted in the papers. The papers include: (1) "Project STREAM: Support, Training and Resources for…

Callahan, Carolyn M., Ed.; And Others

17

Enhancing Parent Child Interactions through Home Visiting: Promising Practice or Unfulfilled Promise?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Many intervention programs use home visiting to target enhanced parent-child interactions; however, few studies have examined specific intervention strategies, limiting the potential utility of evaluation results to guide practice, research, or policy effectively. In this paper, we recommend that researchers and program evaluators open the \\

Carla A. Peterson; Gayle J. Luze; Elaine M. Eshbaugh; Hyun-Joo Jeon; Kelly Ross Kantz

2007-01-01

18

Enhancing Parent-Child Interactions through Home Visiting: Promising Practice or Unfulfilled Promise?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Many intervention programs use home visiting to target enhanced parent-child interactions; however, few studies have examined specific intervention strategies, limiting the potential utility of evaluation results to guide practice, research, or policy effectively. In this paper, we recommend that researchers and program evaluators open the "black…

Peterson, C. A.; Luze, G. L.; Eshbaugh, E. M.; Hyun-Joo, J.; Kantz, K. R.

2007-01-01

19

Women in CS: an evaluation of three promising practices  

Microsoft Academic Search

Historically, Harvey Mudd College (HMC) has had very little success attracting women to the study of computer science: women have chosen CS less than any other field of study. In 2006 HMC began three practices in order to increase the number of women studying and majoring in CS; these practices have now been in place for 3 years. With this

Christine Alvarado; Zachary Dodds

2010-01-01

20

Identifying Promising Compounds in Drug Discovery: Genetic Algorithms and Some New Statistical Techniques  

E-print Network

Identifying Promising Compounds in Drug Discovery: Genetic Algorithms and Some New Statistical, Michigan 48105 Received December 14, 2006 Throughout the drug discovery process, discovery teams are asked to prioritize compounds for subsequent stages of the drug discovery process, given results from

Wu, Jeff

21

A Community College and Employer Partnership. Promising Practice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As a pilot site selected to participate in Illinois' Shifting Gears (SG) initiative in 2007, Oakton Community College (OCC) partnered with Presbyterian Homes to develop a bridge course to prepare a cadre of their employed Certified Nurse Assistants (CNAs) to enter college-credit level prerequisite courses to a Practical Nursing program. Oakton…

Office of Community College Research and Leadership, 2010

2010-01-01

22

Implementing Career Academies Schoolwide: 2001-2002 Developments, Promising Practices.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document, which is based on the findings of case studies of how four high schools from across the country have successfully implemented the schoolwide career academy model, presents recent developments and best practices in schoolwide career academies. The document consists of a brief introduction describing the case studies and one chapter…

Stern, David; Dayton, Charles; Lenz, Robert; Tidyman, Susan

23

Development of a Contextualized ESL Bridge Curriculum. Promising Practice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Black Hawk College (BHC) is a comprehensive community college serving all or part of nine counties and a population of approximately 224,510 residents in a mostly rural area of north-west Illinois. This practice was fully developed and implemented for the Shifting Gears (SG) initiative during the 2007-08 academic years. Heeding BHC's strategic…

Office of Community College Research and Leadership, 2010

2010-01-01

24

Engaging Women in Computer Science and Engineering: Promising Practices for Promoting Gender Equity in Undergraduate Research Experiences  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Building on research that identifies and addresses issues of women's underrepresentation in computing, this article describes promising practices in undergraduate research experiences that promote women's long-term interest in computer science and engineering. Specifically, this article explores whether and how REU programs include programmatic…

Kim, Karen A.; Fann, Amy J.; Misa-Escalante, Kimberly O.

2011-01-01

25

The Promise of the Affordable Care Act, the Practical Realities of Implementation  

E-print Network

transitions. Our initial brief, Maximizing Health Care Enrollment through Seamless Coverage for Families of a work or life transition. INTRODUCTION The promise of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) is that if someoneThe Promise of the Affordable Care Act, the Practical Realities of Implementation: Maintaining

Militzer, Burkhard

26

Identifying domestic violence in primary care practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

OBJECTIVE: To improve detection of domestic violence as a problem for women seeking primary care, we compared the addition of a single\\u000a question about domestic violence on an existing self-administered health history form, to discretionary inquiry alone. We\\u000a studied 689 consecutive new women patients in an internal medicine practice. Domestic violence identification rose from 0%\\u000a in the control group with

Karen M. Freund; Sharon M. Bak; Leslie Blackhall

1996-01-01

27

Education for Civic Engagement in Democracy: Service Learning and Other Promising Practices.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This collection of essays and references addresses the problem of the disengagement in public affairs and politics by U.S. youth and young adults. The collection brings together evidence of youth disengagement and reports on promising practices for civic education. Several chapters are devoted to research findings on the impact of service and…

Mann, Sheilah, Ed.; Patrick, John J., Ed.

28

Women in CS: An Evaluation of Three Promising Practices Christine Alvarado  

E-print Network

remains that a large num- ber of beginning college students, especially women, still have little courses have improved women's interest and success in CS1 [15]. Others themes include AI, roboticsWomen in CS: An Evaluation of Three Promising Practices Christine Alvarado Harvey Mudd College

Alvarado, Christine

29

Promising Practices in Professional Growth & Support: "Case Study of Agile Mind"  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Four organizations with promising practices in teacher Professional Growth & Support have significantly raised outcomes for low-income students. The charter management networks, Achievement First and Aspire Public Schools, and the two reform organizations, Teach Plus and Agile Mind, have successfully increased student achievement with a…

Education Resource Strategies, 2013

2013-01-01

30

Promising Practices in Professional Growth & Support: "Case Study of Achievement First"  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Four organizations with promising practices in teacher Professional Growth & Support have significantly raised outcomes for low-income students. The charter management networks, Achievement First and Aspire Public Schools, and the two reform organizations, Teach Plus and Agile Mind, have successfully increased student achievement with a…

Education Resource Strategies, 2013

2013-01-01

31

Promising Practices in Professional Growth & Support: "Case Study of Aspire Public Schools"  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Four organizations with promising practices in teacher Professional Growth & Support have significantly raised outcomes for low-income students. The charter management networks, Achievement First and Aspire Public Schools, and the two reform organizations, Teach Plus and Agile Mind, have successfully increased student achievement with a…

Education Resource Strategies, 2013

2013-01-01

32

Promising Practices in Professional Growth & Support: "Case Study of Teach Plus"  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Four organizations with promising practices in teacher Professional Growth & Support have significantly raised outcomes for low-income students. The charter management networks, Achievement First and Aspire Public Schools, and the two reform organizations, Teach Plus and Agile Mind, have successfully increased student achievement with a…

Education Resource Strategies, 2013

2013-01-01

33

Best Practices for Identifying Gifted Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Parents often go to principals to ask for help in supporting their gifted children. They may request acceleration for their child in mathematics, a specialized curriculum or course, extracurricular activities, a pullout program, or even a different teacher. Since misconceptions about identifying gifted students are prevalent, it's important that…

Johnsen, Susan K.

2009-01-01

34

Promising practices: how leading safety-net plans are managing the care of Medicaid clients.  

PubMed

Health plans formed by safety-net providers serve large numbers of Medicaid beneficiaries. Through a series of case studies, we examined the care management tools used by leading safety-net plans. These plans do not rely on the coercive, command-style tools of managed care. They rely instead on tools that emphasize partnership with providers: sharing data about practice patterns, using provider profiles and financial bonuses to encourage particular practice patterns, and developing disease management programs that encourage patient compliance with treatment decisions that the plans make little effort to shape. The evidence suggests that these are promising practices but that even these leaders still have a long way to go. PMID:12224894

Sparer, Michael S; Brown, Lawrence D; Gusmano, Michael K; Rowe, Catherine; Gray, Bradford H

2002-01-01

35

Safe Start: Promising Practices from the Evaluation of the Demonstration Project Association for the Study and Development of Community  

Microsoft Academic Search

Several activities were used to evaluate the Safe Start Demonstration Project (2000–2006). Findings from two of the evaluation activities (i.e., process evaluations, promising practices reports) have been combined in this article to discuss systems change strategies implemented to better serve children exposed to violence and the promising practices that supported them. Together, these two evaluation processes yield valuable information for

Mary M. Hyde; Yvette H. Lamb; David Chavis

2008-01-01

36

Nipple aspirate fluid: a promising non-invasive method to identify cellular markers of breast cancer risk  

Microsoft Academic Search

To evaluate the feasibility of nipple aspiration and to identify intermediate markers of breast cancer risk, nipple aspirate fluid (NAF) was collected from 177 subjects using a modified breast pump. The first 33 subjects demonstrated that we could obtain NAF quickly, reliably and repeatedly. Specimens from the remaining 144 subjects were collected to evaluate promising cellular biomarkers. NAF was obtained

ER Sauter; E Ross; M Daly; A Klein-Szanto; PF Engstrom; A Sorling; J Malick; H Ehya

1997-01-01

37

Approach to Identify Internal Best Practices in a Software Organization  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Current approaches to software process improvements (SPI) in software organizations is based on identifying gaps by comparing the way organizations work with respect to practices contained in the reference models. Later, these gaps will be targeted for establishing software process improvements. This paper presents an approach for identifying best practices within the organization. This is considered a key element in order to compare the way software organizations work with the reference models. After that, these practices will be complemented with practices contained in these models depending on the organization's business goals.

Jose A., Calvo-Manzano; Gonzalo, Cuevas; Jezreel, Mejia; Mirna, Muñoz; Tomás, San Feliu; Ángel, Sánchez; Álvaro, Rocha

38

The Promise of Virtual Teams: Identifying Key Factors in Effectiveness and Failure  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Purpose: The aim of the investigation is to identify enabling and disenabling factors in the development and operation of virtual teams; to evaluate the importance of factors such as team development, cross-cultural variables, leadership, communication and social cohesion as contributors to virtual team effectiveness. Design/methodology/approach:…

Horwitz, Frank M.; Bravington, Desmond; Silvis, Ulrik

2006-01-01

39

Understanding Evidence-Based Information for the Early Childhood Field: Tips from RAND's Promising Practices Network  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

With the growing and diverse use of the term "evidence-based practice" it can be difficult for policymakers, funders, program officers, and other professionals to separate the good evidence from the flawed. Furthermore, once good evidence has been identified, it can be difficult to know how to use it. This article discusses key issues to consider…

Mattox, Teryn; Kilburn, M. Rebecca

2012-01-01

40

Assessment of promising forest-management practices and technologies for enhancing the conservation and sequestration of atmospheric carbon and their costs at the site level  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of the report are to assess and synthesize current knowledge on three policy-science topics: (1) Identify promising technologies and practices that could be utilized at technically suitable sites in the world to manage forests and agroforestry systems for sequestering and conserving carbon; (2) Assess available data on costs at the site level for promising forest and agroforestry management practices; and (3) Evaluate estimates of land technically suitable in forested nations and biomes of the world to help meet the Noordwijk forestation targets and the proposed Global Forest Agreement goals.

Dixon, R.K.; Schroeder, P.E.; Winjum, J.K.

1991-10-01

41

Enacting the ‘neuro’ in practice: Translational research, adhesion and the promise of porosity  

PubMed Central

This article attends to the processes through which neuroscience and the neuro are enacted in a specific context: a translational neuroscience research group that was the setting of an ethnographic study. The article therefore provides a close-up perspective on the intersection of neuroscience and translational research. In the scientific setting we studied, the neuro was multiple and irreducible to any particular entity or set of practices across a laboratory and clinical divide. Despite this multiplicity, the group’s work was held together through the ‘promise of porosity’ – that one day there would be translation of lab findings into clinically effective intervention. This promise was embodied in the figure of the Group Leader whose expertise spanned clinical and basic neurosciences. This is theorized in terms of a contrast between cohesion and adhesion in interdisciplinary groupings. We end by speculating on the role of ‘vivification’ – in our case mediated by the Group Leader – in rendering ‘alive’ the expectations of interdisciplinary collaboration. PMID:25362829

Michael, Mike

2014-01-01

42

Mining pesticide use data to identify best management practices  

E-print Network

Mining pesticide use data to identify best management practices Emily Oakley1, *, Minghua Zhang1, CA 95616, USA. 2 California Department of Pesticide Regulation, Sacramento, CA 95814, USA. 3 growers using the California Pesticide Use Reports (PUR) database. Analysis was performed for prunes

Zhang, Minghua

43

Australian Nurse Educators Identify Gaps in Expert Practice.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A Delphi panel of 28 Australian nurse educators and 42 clinicians identified 58 practice items in which reality was far from ideal. In particular, for 16 items related to patient empowerment, nursing research, and technology policy, clinical behavior was rated below the median. (SK)

Pelletier, Dianne; Duffield, Christine; Adams, Anne; Nagy, Sue; Crisp, Jackie; Mitten-Lewis, Suzanne

2000-01-01

44

Promising Practices in Wraparound for Children with Serious Emotional Disturbance and Their Families. Systems of Care: Promising Practices in Children's Mental Health 1998 Series. Volume IV.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This is the fourth volume in a series of monographs from the Comprehensive Community Mental Health Service for Children and Their Families Program, which currently supports 41 comprehensive system of care sites to meet the needs of children with serious emotional disturbances (SED). This volume identifies the essential elements of wraparound…

Burns, Barbara J., Ed.; Goldman, Sybil K., Ed.

45

The Art of Collaboration: Promising Practices for Integrating the Arts and School Reform. AEP Research and Policy Brief  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In June 2007, the Arts Education Partnership (AEP) convened the directors of eight collaborative entities to discuss promising practices for integrating the arts into the lives and curricula of urban public schools as a means of fostering system-wide educational improvement. The seven school-community collaboratives and one higher education…

Nelson, Andrew L.

2008-01-01

46

The frontline clinical manager identifying direct reports' level of practice.  

PubMed

Patricia Benner applied the Dreyfus Model of Skill Acquisition to describe and interpret skill acquisition and clinical judgment in nursing practice. Operational definitions for the 5 levels of her original Novice to Expert Theory were used by the study participants in a large Midwestern pediatric hospital to self-identify their level of practice. The frontline clinical managers of these direct care registered nurses (RNs) used the same tool to rate their direct reports. The aim of this portion of a larger study was to determine if the clinical manager's perception of their direct reports was the same as that of the RNs. The results of this study are being used by one study unit's clinical managers as the basis for implementing the Hersey and Blanchard Situational Leadership Model. The clinical managers work with their direct reports depending on the level of practice and the details of the task to be performed. One example is creating therapeutic relationships with each other and with families to ensure a safe environment for all. PMID:23934257

Longo, M Anne; Roussel, Linda; Pennington, Sandra L; Hoying, Cheryl

2013-01-01

47

77 FR 56194 - Promising and Practical Strategies to Increase Postsecondary Success; Request for Information  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...www.ed.gov/college-completion/promising-strategies...information (name, title, phone number, and email address...services, early and middle college programs, successful...Clear descriptions of the college completion obstacle addressed...Communities Mentoring Mobile Devices Modular...

2012-09-12

48

Using the integrative model of behavioral prediction to identify promising message strategies to promote healthy sleep behavior among college students.  

PubMed

This research used the Integrative Model of Behavioral Prediction (IMBP) to examine cognitive predictors of intentions to engage in healthy sleep behavior among a population of college students. In doing so, we identify promising message strategies to increase healthy sleep behavior during college. In Phase 1, members of a small sample of undergraduates (n = 31) were asked to describe their beliefs about expected outcomes, norms, and perceived behavioral control associated with sleep on an open-ended questionnaire. We analyzed these qualitative responses to create a closed-ended survey about sleep-related attitudes, perceived norms, control beliefs, behavioral intentions, and behavior. In Phase 2, a larger sample of undergraduate students (n = 365) completed the survey. Attitudes and perceived behavioral control were the strongest predictors of both intentions to engage in sleep behavior and self-reported sleep behavior. Control beliefs associated with time management and stress also had substantial room to change, suggesting their potential as message strategies to better promote healthy sleep behavior in college. We conclude with a broader discussion of the study's implications for message design and intervention. PMID:24446927

Robbins, Rebecca; Niederdeppe, Jeff

2015-01-01

49

Pursuing Promise Neighborhoods: With or without the Grant Program. A Center Policy & Practice Brief. Revised  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The federal "Promise Neighborhoods" program underscores the importance of all children and youth having "access to great schools and strong systems of family and community support that will prepare them to attain an excellent education and successfully transition to college and a career." From this perspective, this brief stresses the importance…

Center for Mental Health in Schools at UCLA, 2012

2012-01-01

50

Laminin, gamma 2 (LAMC2): A Promising New Putative Pancreatic Cancer Biomarker Identified by Proteomic Analysis of Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma Tissues*  

PubMed Central

In pancreatic cancer, the incidence and mortality curves coincide. One major reason for this high mortality rate in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) patients is the dearth of effective diagnostic, prognostic, and disease-monitoring biomarkers. Unfortunately, existing tumor markers, as well as current imaging modalities, are not sufficiently sensitive and/or specific for early-stage diagnosis. There is, therefore, an urgent need for improved serum markers of the disease. Herein, we performed Orbitrap® mass spectrometry proteomic analysis of four PDAC tissues and their adjacent benign tissues and identified a total of 2190 nonredundant proteins. Sixteen promising candidates were selected for further scrutiny using a systematic scoring algorithm. Our preliminary serum verification of the top four candidates (DSP, LAMC2, GP73, and DSG2) in 20 patients diagnosed with pancreatic cancer and 20 with benign pancreatic cysts, showed a significant (p < 0.05) elevation of LAMC2 in pancreatic cancer serum. Extensive validation of LAMC2 in healthy, benign, and PDAC sera from geographically diverse cohorts (n = 425) (Japan, Europe, and USA) demonstrated a significant increase in levels in early-stage PDAC compared with benign diseases. The sensitivity of LAMC2 was comparable to CA19.9 in all data sets, with an AUC value greater than 0.85 in discriminating healthy patients from early-stage PDAC patients. LAMC2 exhibited diagnostic complementarity with CA19.9 by showing significant (p < 0.001 in two out of three cohorts) elevation in PDAC patients with clinically low CA19.9 levels. PMID:23798558

Kosanam, Hari; Prassas, Ioannis; Chrystoja, Caitlin C.; Soleas, Ireena; Chan, Alison; Dimitromanolakis, Apostolos; Blasutig, Ivan M.; Ruckert, Felix; Gruetzmann, Robert; Pilarsky, Christian; Maekawa, Masato; Brand, Randall; Diamandis, Eleftherios P.

2013-01-01

51

Promising Practices for Effective Transition for Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders (E/BD) have been consistently experiencing dismal outcomes. The purpose of this chapter is to provide a brief overview of outcomes for this population, examine school-based instructional and behavioral strategies, and discuss transition related practices intended to improve present and future…

Katsiyannis, Antonis; Zhang, Dalun; Mackiewicz, Sara Moore

2012-01-01

52

Promising Practices to Meet Global Challenges in Science and Mathematics Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The chapters in this book reflect the work of science and mathematics educators who have worked for many years at the international level. As members of the International Consortium for Research in Science and Mathematics Education, their work provides readers with issues, models, practices, and research results that have applicability and…

Berlin, Donna F., Ed.; White, Arthur L., Ed.

2010-01-01

53

Innovative Contextualized Curriculum for a CNA to LPN Bridge Course. Promising Practice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As a pilot site selected to participate in Illinois' Shifting Gears (SG) initiative in 2007, Oakton Community College (OCC) partnered with Presbyterian Homes to develop a bridge course to prepare a cadre of their employed Certified Nursing Assistants (CNAs) to enter college-credit prerequisite courses to a Practical Nursing program. Oakton…

Office of Community College Research and Leadership, 2010

2010-01-01

54

Promising Homework Practices: Teachers' Perspectives on Making Homework Work for Newcomer Immigrant Students  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study examines the homework practices of eight teachers working in a high school designed to serve newcomer immigrant students. Individual structured interviews were conducted in which teachers working in an innovative setting explained their purposes of assigning homework, their beliefs about factors affecting their students' homework…

Bang, Hee Jin

2012-01-01

55

Moving Toward Self-Directed Learning. Highlights of Relevant Research and of Promising Practice.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This document describes self-directed learning, summarizes practices and research since 1930, examines sociocultural influences on teaching and learning, and describes methods for initiating self-directed programs at all levels. Chapter I describes areas in which students could take responsibility for their own learning: selecting methods and…

Della-Dora, Delmo, Ed.; Blanchard, Lois Jerry, Ed.

56

The Promise and Practice of Pragmatism-Based Music Education in Democratic Societies  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In his book, "What's So Important about Music Education?" (2010), Goble J. Scott argues from a foundation of C. S. Peirce's pragmatist philosophy that school music education that enables students to understand and engage with the musical practices (or "praxes") of different cultural communities in terms of their…

Goble, J. Scott

2013-01-01

57

Promising practices in the prevention of intimate partner violence among adolescents.  

PubMed

To inform practitioners and researchers interested in the prevention of intimate partner violence (IPV) among adolescents, 9 principles of effective prevention programs (Nation et al., 2003) were described and examples of how these principles have been incorporated into existing teen dating violence prevention programs were provided. An investigation of current prevention practices for adolescent IPV resulted in one noteworthy program that has successfully incorporated all 9 principles of effective prevention programming-Safe Dates (Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, National Registry of Evidence-based Programs and Practices [SAMHSA-NREPP], 2006). Although Safe Dates serves as a model teen dating violence prevention program, it may not be equally effective across contexts and diverse groups. Therefore, as researchers and practitioners continue to develop and refine programs to reduce adolescent IPV, the principles of effective prevention programs should serve as a guiding framework. PMID:23393949

De Grace, Alyssa; Clarke, Angela

2012-01-01

58

Identifying and Extinguishing Dysfunctional and Deadly Organizational Practices  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

It is possible to define an organization's culture in terms of its dominant behavioral practices and their molar consequences, from the shop floor to the executive suite (Redmon & Mason, 2001). Dysfunctional and potentially deadly practices (for the organization as a whole) can be "latent." They often go undetected until their dramatic…

Mawhinney, Thomas C.

2009-01-01

59

Resource Guide on Racial Profiling Data Collections Systems: Promising Practices and Lessons Learned  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Prepared by staff at Northeastern University for the US Department of Justice, this report is a resource guide on racial profiling. The report offers an overview of the nature of racial profiling; gives information on data collection and its purpose; describes current activities in California, New Jersey, North Carolina, and Great Britain; and offers some recommendations for the future. Non-specialists may not be interested in the particulars of data collection, but the report still contains much of interest to anyone concerned with racial profiling and efforts to stop the practice.

Farrell, Amy.; Mcdevitt, Jack.; Ramirez, Deborah.

2000-01-01

60

Promising practices for delivery of court-supervised substance abuse treatment: Perspectives from six high-performing California counties operating Proposition 36  

PubMed Central

Operative for nearly a decade, California's voter-initiated Proposition 36 program offers many offenders community-based substance abuse treatment in lieu of likely incarceration. Research has documented program successes and plans for replication have proliferated, yet very little is known about how the Proposition 36 program works or practices for achieving optimal program outcomes. In this article, we identify policies and practices that key stakeholders perceive to be most responsible for the successful delivery of court-supervised substance abuse treatment to offenders under Proposition 36. Data was collected via focus groups conducted with 59 county stakeholders in six high-performing counties during 2009. Discussion was informed by seven empirical indicators of program performance and outcomes and was focused on identifying and describing elements contributing to success. Program success was primarily attributed to four strategies, those that: (1) fostered program engagement, monitored participant progress, and sustained cooperation among participants; (2) cultivated buy-in among key stakeholders; (3) capitalized on the role of the court and the judge; and (4) created a setting which promoted a high-quality treatment system, utilization of existing resources, and broad financial and political support for the program. Goals and practices for implementing each strategy are discussed. Findings provide a “promising practices” resource for Proposition 36 program evaluation and improvement and inform the design and study of other similar types of collaborative justice treatment efforts. PMID:20965568

Evans, Elizabeth; Anglin, M. Douglas; Urada, Darren; Yang, Joy

2010-01-01

61

Promising practices for delivery of court-supervised substance abuse treatment: perspectives from six high-performing California counties operating Proposition 36.  

PubMed

Operative for nearly a decade, California's voter-initiated Proposition 36 program offers many offenders community-based substance abuse treatment in lieu of likely incarceration. Research has documented program successes and plans for replication have proliferated, yet very little is known about how the Proposition 36 program works or practices for achieving optimal program outcomes. In this article, we identify policies and practices that key stakeholders perceive to be most responsible for the successful delivery of court-supervised substance abuse treatment to offenders under Proposition 36. Data was collected via focus groups conducted with 59 county stakeholders in six high-performing counties during 2009. Discussion was informed by seven empirical indicators of program performance and outcomes and was focused on identifying and describing elements contributing to success. Program success was primarily attributed to four strategies, those that: (1) fostered program engagement, monitored participant progress, and sustained cooperation among participants; (2) cultivated buy-in among key stakeholders; (3) capitalized on the role of the court and the judge; and (4) created a setting which promoted a high-quality treatment system, utilization of existing resources, and broad financial and political support for the program. Goals and practices for implementing each strategy are discussed. Findings provide a "promising practices" resource for Proposition 36 program evaluation and improvement and inform the design and study of other similar types of collaborative justice treatment efforts. PMID:20965568

Evans, Elizabeth; Anglin, M Douglas; Urada, Darren; Yang, Joy

2011-05-01

62

Practice-based Research Networks (PBRNs) Are Promising Laboratories for Conducting Dissemination and Implementation Research.  

PubMed

Dissemination and implementation science addresses the application of research findings in varied health care settings. Despite the potential benefit of dissemination and implementation work to primary care, ideal laboratories for this science have been elusive. Practice-based research networks (PBRNs) have a long history of conducting research in community clinical settings, demonstrating an approach that could be used to execute multiple research projects over time in broad and varied settings. PBRNs also are uniquely structured and increasingly involved in pragmatic trials, a research design central to dissemination and implementation science. We argue that PBRNs and dissemination and implementation scientists are ideally suited to work together and that the collaboration of these 2 groups will yield great value for the future of primary care and the delivery of evidence-based health care. PMID:25381072

Heintzman, John; Gold, Rachel; Krist, Alexander; Crosson, Jay; Likumahuwa, Sonja; DeVoe, Jennifer E

2014-01-01

63

Mental health treatment of child abuse and neglect: the promise of evidence-based practice.  

PubMed

In 2006, 3.6 million children in the United States received a child protective services' investigation and 905,000 children (about one-quarter of those investigated) were found to have been abused or neglected. Children who have been maltreated are at risk for experiencing a host of mental health problems, including depression, posttraumatic stress, dissociation, reactive attachment, low self-esteem, social problems, suicidal behavior, aggression, conduct disorder, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and problem behaviors, including delinquency, risky sexual behavior and substance use. Given the high rate of mental health problems, it is not surprising that maltreated youth are in need of mental health services. Unfortunately, only a fraction of these children and adolescents receive services. Recently, several evidence-based practices have been rigorously tested and are demonstrating efficacy in reducing mental health problems associated with maltreatment. This article details these developments. PMID:19358925

Shipman, Kimberly; Taussig, Heather

2009-04-01

64

Doped Sodium Aluminum Hydride: Fundamental Studies and Practical Development of a Promising New Hydrogen Storage Material  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In 1997, Bogdanovic and Schwickardi reported that the elimination of hydrogen from solid NaAlH4 is markedly accelerated and rendered reversible under moderate conditions upon mixing the hydride with a few mole percent of selected transition metal complexes. We found that doping the hydride through an alternative, mechanical milling method leads to considerable improvements in the practical hydrogen cycling performance of the hydride. It now appears that a variation of the doped hydride could possibly be developed as a viable means for the onboard storage of hydrogen. However, no dopant precursors have been found that give a greater kinetic enhancement than those cataloged in Bogdanovic's original, 1995 patent. Similarly, only the sodium and mixed sodium, lithium salts of the alanates have been found undergo largely reversible dehydrogenation under moderate conditions upon doping. This lack of progress is surprising in view of the recent "gold rush" flurry of activity that has been direct towards the development of alanates as practical onboard hydrogen carriers. Clearly, these efforts have been handicapped by a lack of understanding of the nature and mechanism of action the dopants. We have therefore initiated efforts to elucidate the fundamental basis of the remarkable hydrogen storage properties of this material. Our efforts have pointed to a model of the material in which the dopants are substituted into the bulk hydride lattice. A detailed version of this model has emerged from our recent infra red, Raman, and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopic studies as well as neutron diffraction, inelastic neutron scattering, and kinetic investigations of the doped hydride. The results of these studies will be presented and discussed in terms of their relationship to our "substitutional" model of the doped hydride.

Jensen, Craig

2004-03-01

65

Promise and dismay: The state of strategic environmental assessment systems and practices in Canada  

SciTech Connect

Has strategic environmental assessment (SEA) finally reached a point of maturity in Canada? Or, is it still stumbling to find its place in the impact assessment family? Strategic environmental assessment has been ongoing in Canada for a number of years, both formally and informally, and under a variety of labels and institutional models. The result is a system of SEA that is diverse, founded on a range of principles and frameworks, and not well understood. This paper provides a critical review of Canadian SEA systems and practices. To accomplish this objective, a manageable and diverse set of past and recent SEA and SEA-like frameworks and applications are described and critically analyzed based on a set of input, process, and output evaluation criteria. Results suggest considerable variability in SEA experience and value added. This is due in large part to the institutional and methodological pluralism of SEA, the boundaries of which are not well defined. Under the federal system, since the formalization of SEA, many applications have been disappointing in light of broader SEA good-practice principles and criteria. Indeed, some of the better examples of SEA have neither carried the SEA name tag nor occurred under formal SEA requirements. Further, many of the same challenges to project-based impact assessment also plague the development and value added of SEA. Of particular concern is the systematic separation of SEA from downstream decision inputs and assessment activities. As Canada commences review of its federal SEA Directive in preparation for the next generation of SEA, this paper reflects on what it has achieved in the prior.

Noble, Bram F. [Department of Geography, University of Saskatchewan, 117 Science Place, Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, S7N 5C8 (Canada)], E-mail: b.noble@usask.ca

2009-01-15

66

Identifying drug safety issues: from research to practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

Purpose. Adverse drug events (ADEs), or injuries due to drugs, are common and often preventable. However, identifying ADEs, potential ADEs, and medication errors can be a major challenge. In this review, we describe methodologies that have been used to identify these events and give strategies for identification in non-study settings. Results. Methods such as voluntary reporting, chart review, and computerized

TEJAL K. GANDHI; DIANE L. SEGER; DAVID W. BATES

67

Identifying best practices in short-term eruption forecasting  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Volcano Observatory Best Practices Workshop: Near-Term Eruption Forecasting; Erice, Italy, 11-15 September 2011 Eighty volcanologists associated with volcano observatories in 27 countries gathered at the Ettore Majorana Foundation and Centre for Scientific Culture in Italy to share experiences and develop synergy in shortterm forecasting of eruptions. The meeting was conducted under the aegis of the World Organization of Volcano Observatories (WOVO); sponsored by the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV), U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), United States Agency for International Development (USAID), and International Association of Volcanology and Chemistry of the Earth's Interior (IAVCEI); and endorsed by the Group on Earth Observations (GEO) and United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO).

Eichelberger, John; Marzocchi, Warner; Papale, Paolo

2012-01-01

68

From Promise to Practice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

For the last year, an independent panel chaired by Sir Adrian Webb has been evaluating the role of the further education (FE) sector in the delivery of education, lifelong learning, and skills in Wales. The challenges facing the panel were considerable and its remit broader than that of the Foster review in England. In response, the final report…

Spear, Richard

2008-01-01

69

Global tyrosine kinome profiling of human thyroid tumors identifies Src as a promising target for invasive cancers  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Kinome profiling is a novel technique for identifying activated kinases in human cancers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Src activity is increased in invasive thyroid cancers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inhibition of Src activity decreased proliferation and invasion in vitro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Further investigation of Src targeted therapies in thyroid cancer is warranted. -- Abstract: Background: Novel therapies are needed for the treatment of invasive thyroid cancers. Aberrant activation of tyrosine kinases plays an important role in thyroid oncogenesis. Because current targeted therapies are biased toward a small subset of tyrosine kinases, we conducted a study to reveal novel therapeutic targets for thyroid cancer using a bead-based, high-throughput system. Methods: Thyroid tumors and matched normal tissues were harvested from twenty-six patients in the operating room. Protein lysates were analyzed using the Luminex immunosandwich, a bead-based kinase phosphorylation assay. Data was analyzed using GenePattern 3.0 software and clustered according to histology, demographic factors, and tumor status regarding capsular invasion, size, lymphovascular invasion, and extrathyroidal extension. Survival and invasion assays were performed to determine the effect of Src inhibition in papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) cells. Results: Tyrosine kinome profiling demonstrated upregulation of nine tyrosine kinases in tumors relative to matched normal thyroid tissue: EGFR, PTK6, BTK, HCK, ABL1, TNK1, GRB2, ERK, and SRC. Supervised clustering of well-differentiated tumors by histology, gender, age, or size did not reveal significant differences in tyrosine kinase activity. However, supervised clustering by the presence of invasive disease showed increased Src activity in invasive tumors relative to non-invasive tumors (60% v. 0%, p < 0.05). In vitro, we found that Src inhibition in PTC cells decreased cell invasion and proliferation. Conclusion: Global kinome analysis enables the discovery of novel targets for thyroid cancer therapy. Further investigation of Src targeted therapy for advanced thyroid cancer is warranted.

Cho, Nancy L., E-mail: nlcho@partners.org [Department of Surgery, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Lin, Chi-Iou [Department of Surgery, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA 02115 (United States)] [Department of Surgery, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Du, Jinyan [Broad Institute, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02142 (United States)] [Broad Institute, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02142 (United States); Whang, Edward E. [Department of Surgery, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA 02115 (United States)] [Department of Surgery, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Ito, Hiromichi [Department of Surgery, Michigan State University, Lansing, MI 48912 (United States)] [Department of Surgery, Michigan State University, Lansing, MI 48912 (United States); Moore, Francis D.; Ruan, Daniel T. [Department of Surgery, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA 02115 (United States)] [Department of Surgery, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA 02115 (United States)

2012-05-11

70

"Use of Current Best Evidence": Promises and Illusions, Limitations and Contradictions in the Triangle of Research, Policy and Practice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper explores the methodological and epistemological implications of the relationships between R&D, policy and practice. The proposals towards "evidence-based policy and practice" are analysed with respect to this triangle from three angles: (1) meaning; (2) production; and (3) use of evidence. A comprehensive model of the research cycle,…

Lassnigg, Lorenz

2012-01-01

71

Promising practices for delivery of court-supervised substance abuse treatment: Perspectives from six high-performing California counties operating Proposition 36  

Microsoft Academic Search

Operative for nearly a decade, California's voter-initiated Proposition 36 program offers many offenders community-based substance abuse treatment in lieu of likely incarceration. Research has documented program successes and plans for replication have proliferated, yet very little is known about how the Proposition 36 program works or practices for achieving optimal program outcomes. In this article, we identify policies and practices

Elizabeth Evans; M. Douglas Anglin; Darren Urada; Joy Yang

2011-01-01

72

Identifying competencies required for medication prescribing for general practice residents: a nominal group technique study  

PubMed Central

Background Teaching of medication prescribing is a specific challenge in general practice curriculum. The aim of this study was to identify and rank the competencies required for prescribing medication for general practice residents in France. Methods Qualitative consensus study using the nominal group technique. We invited different stakeholders of the general practice curriculum and medication use in primary care to a series of meetings. The nominal group technique allowed for the quick development of a list of consensual and ranked answers to the following question: “At the end of their general practice curriculum, in terms of medication prescribing, what should residents be able to do?”. Results Four meetings were held that involved a total of 31 participants, enabling the creation of a final list of 29 ranked items, grouped in 4 domains. The four domains identified were ‘pharmacology’, ‘regulatory standards’, ‘therapeutics’, and ‘communication (both with patients and healthcare professionals)’. Overall, the five items the most highly valued across the four meetings were: ‘write a legible and understandable prescription’, ‘identify specific populations’, ‘prescribe the doses and durations following the indication’, ‘explain a lack of medication prescription to the patient’, ‘decline inappropriate medication request’. The ‘communication skills’ domain was the domain with the highest number of items (10 items), and with the most highly-valued items. Conclusion The study results suggest a need for developing general practice residents’ communication skills regarding medication prescribing. PMID:25084813

2014-01-01

73

Identifying a Gender-Inclusive Pedagogy from Maltese Teachers' Personal Practical Knowledge  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Teachers bring with them into the science classrooms their own gendered identities and their views and perceptions about how boys and girls learn and achieve in science. This paper tries to explore the way in which 14 Maltese science teachers use their own "personal practical knowledge" to identify their views about gender and science and to…

Chetcuti, Deborah

2009-01-01

74

Engaging staff nurses in evidence-based research to identify nursing practice problems and solutions  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article illustrates how one academic health science center in a large metropolitan area sought to improve the quality of patient care by soliciting the input of their nursing staff in devising an action plan for change. The research model incorporated both survey and focus group methods used by nursing leaders in administration and practice to identify and prioritize nursing

Peri Rosenfeld; Elizabeth Duthie; Jacqueline Bier; Susan Bowar-Ferres; Terry Fulmer; Linda Iervolino; Margaret L. McClure; Diane O. McGivern; Marianne Roncoli

2000-01-01

75

Identifying standards, meeting expectations: comparing regulatory standards and community health nursing practice standards.  

PubMed

In Canada, standards from regulatory and professional bodies provide a framework for nursing practice. In a research study, the authors compared the national standards of practice developed for community health nurses by the Community Health Nurses Association of Canada (CHNAC) with those in the standards of practice developed by provincial/territorial regulatory bodies. The results of the study revealed that of 210 separate ideas, or categories of ideas, the authors identified in all 13 documents, only 58 appeared in both the regulatory and CHNAC documents; 122 were unique to the regulatory standards; 30 were unique to the CHNAC standards. These results suggest a need for associations and specialty groups, notably national ones, to integrate regulatory standards into their own documents and build upon them to reflect the dimensions of specialty practice. PMID:18856225

Fuller, Erin; Kneeshaw, Christine; Baumann, Andrea; Deber, Raisa

2008-09-01

76

An examination of theory and promising practice for achieving permanency for teens before they age out of foster care  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this paper research is presented that examines the efficacy of Independent Living (IL) services in preparing foster youth to live “independently”, and calls into question the appropriateness of an “independence” goal for youth aging out of foster care. The paper then reviews the emerging conceptualization of youth permanency in child welfare practice that focuses on lifelong connections to kin

Rosemary J. Avery

2010-01-01

77

Revisiting an Old Friend: The Practice and Promise of Cooperative Learning for the Twenty-First Century  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Cooperative learning has long been at the disposal of school teachers. However, it is often misunderstood by some teachers as just another form of collaborative group work. This article revisits cooperative learning, including a sampling of its popular variations, with practical approaches toward effectively integrating it into classroom…

Schul, James E.

2011-01-01

78

Promising Practices in the State of Florida for Dropout Prevention and Transition for Students with Special Needs.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Project RETAIN (Retention in Education Technical Assistance and Information Network) is a Florida project that assists school districts through identification and dissemination of effective practices that keep students with mild disabilities in school. One part of the project examined dropout rates from Florida's 67 school districts and their…

Perry, Laura J.; And Others

79

Identifying some important success factors in adopting agile software development practices  

Microsoft Academic Search

Agile software development (ASD) is an emerging approach in software engineering, initially advocated by a group of 17 software professionals who practice a set of “lightweight” methods, and share a common set of values of software development. In this paper, we advance the state-of-the-art of the research in this area by conducting a survey-based ex-post-facto study for identifying factors from

Subhas Chandra Misra; Vinod Kumar; Uma Kumar

2009-01-01

80

Barcode Identifiers as a Practical Tool for Reliable Species Assignment of Medically Important Black Yeast Species  

PubMed Central

Herpotrichiellaceous black yeasts and relatives comprise severe pathogens flanked by nonpathogenic environmental siblings. Reliable identification by conventional methods is notoriously difficult. Molecular identification is hampered by the sequence variability in the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) domain caused by difficult-to-sequence homopolymeric regions and by poor taxonomic attribution of sequences deposited in GenBank. Here, we present a potential solution using short barcode identifiers (27 to 50 bp) based on ITS2 ribosomal DNA (rDNA), which allows unambiguous definition of species-specific fragments. Starting from proven sequences of ex-type and authentic strains, we were able to describe 103 identifiers. Multiple BLAST searches of these proposed barcode identifiers in GenBank revealed uniqueness for 100 taxonomic entities, whereas the three remaining identifiers each matched with two entities, but the species of these identifiers could easily be discriminated by differences in the remaining ITS regions. Using the proposed barcode identifiers, a 4.1-fold increase of 100% matches in GenBank was achieved in comparison to the classical approach using the complete ITS sequences. The proposed barcode identifiers will be made accessible for the diagnostic laboratory in a permanently updated online database, thereby providing a highly practical, reliable, and cost-effective tool for identification of clinically important black yeasts and relatives. PMID:22785187

Heinrichs, Guido; de Hoog, G. Sybren

2012-01-01

81

Development of a Tool to Identify Poverty in a Family Practice Setting: A Pilot Study  

PubMed Central

Objective. The goal of this pilot study was to develop and field-test questions for use as a poverty case-finding tool to assist primary care providers in identifying poverty in clinical practice. Methods. 156 questionnaires were completed by a convenience sample of urban and rural primary care patients presenting to four family practices in British Columbia, Canada. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses compared questionnaire responses with low-income cut-off (LICO) levels calculated for each respondent. Results. 35% of respondents were below the “poverty line” (LICO). The question “Do you (ever) have difficulty making ends meet at the end of the month?” was identified as a good predictor of poverty (sensitivity 98%; specificity 60%; OR 32.3, 95% CI 5.4–191.5). Multivariate analysis identified a 3-item case-finding tool including 2 additional questions about food and housing security (sensitivity 64.3%; specificity 94.4%; OR 30.2, 95% CI 10.3–88.1). 85% of below-LICO respondents felt that poverty screening was important and 67% felt comfortable speaking to their family physician about poverty. Conclusions. Asking patients directly about poverty may help identify patients with increased needs in primary care. PMID:22312547

Brcic, Vanessa; Eberdt, Caroline; Kaczorowski, Janusz

2011-01-01

82

Examining the practice of generalist expertise: a qualitative study identifying constraints and solutions  

PubMed Central

Objectives Provision of person-centred generalist care is a core component of quality primary care systems. The World Health Organisation believes that a lack of generalist primary care is contributing to inefficiency, ineffectiveness and inequity in healthcare. In UK primary care, General Practitioners (GPs) are the largest group of practising generalists. Yet GPs fulfil multiple roles and the pressures of delivering these roles along with wider contextual changes create real challenges to generalist practice. Our study aimed to explore GP perceptions of enablers and constraints for expert generalist care, in order to identify what is needed to ensure health systems are designed to support the generalist role. Design Qualitative study in General Practice. Setting UK primary care. Main outcome measures A qualitative study – interviews, surveys and focus groups with GPs and GP trainees. Data collection and analysis was informed by Normalisation Process Theory. Design and setting Qualitative study in General Practice. We conducted interviews, surveys and focus groups with GPs and GP trainees based mainly, but not exclusively, in the UK. Data collection and analysis were informed by Normalization Process Theory. Participants UK based GPs (interview and surveys); European GP trainees (focus groups). Results Our findings highlight key gaps in current training and service design which may limit development and implementation of expert generalist practice (EGP). These include the lack of a consistent and universal understanding of the distinct expertise of EGP, competing priorities inhibiting the delivery of EGP, lack of the consistent development of skills in interpretive practice and a lack of resources for monitoring EGP. Conclusions We describe four areas for change: Translating EGP, Priority setting for EGP, Trusting EGP and Identifying the impact of EGP. We outline proposals for work needed in each area to help enhance the expert generalist role. PMID:24475347

Reeve, Joanne; Dowrick, Christopher F; Freeman, George K; Gunn, Jane; Mair, Frances; May, Carl; Mercer, Stewart; Palmer, Victoria; Howe, Amanda; Irving, Greg; Shiner, Alice; Watson, Jessica

2013-01-01

83

Tailored interventions to overcome identified barriers to change: effects on professional practice and health care outcomes  

PubMed Central

Background In the previous version of this review, the effectiveness of interventions tailored to barriers to change was found to be uncertain. Objectives To assess the effectiveness of interventions tailored to address identified barriers to change on professional practice or patient outcomes. Search methods For this update, in addition to the EPOC Register and pending files, we searched the following databases without language restrictions, from inception until August 2007: MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, BNI and HMIC. We searched the National Research Register to November 2007. We undertook further searches to October 2009 to identify potentially eligible published or ongoing trials. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of interventions tailored to address prospectively identified barriers to change that reported objectively measured professional practice or healthcare outcomes in which at least one group received an intervention designed to address prospectively identified barriers to change. Data collection and analysis Two reviewers independently assessed quality and extracted data. We undertook quantitative and qualitative analyses. The quantitative analyses had two elements. We carried out a meta-regression to compare interventions tailored to address identified barriers to change with either no interventions or an intervention(s) not tailored to the barriers.We carried out heterogeneity analyses to investigate sources of differences in the effectiveness of interventions. These included the effects of: risk of bias, concealment of allocation, rigour of barrier analysis, use of theory, complexity of interventions, and the reported presence of administrative constraints. Main results We included 26 studies comparing an intervention tailored to address identified barriers to change to no intervention or an intervention(s) not tailored to the barriers. The effect sizes of these studies varied both across and within studies. Twelve studies provided enough data to be included in the quantitative analysis. A meta-regression model was fitted adjusting for baseline odds by fitting it as a covariate, to obtain the pooled odds ratio of 1.54 (95% CI, 1.16 to 2.01) from Bayesian analysis and 1.52 (95% CI, 1.27 to 1.82, P < 0.001) from classical analysis. The heterogeneity analyses found that no study attributes investigated were significantly associated with effectiveness of the interventions. Authors’ conclusions Interventions tailored to prospectively identified barriers are more likely to improve professional practice than no intervention or dissemination of guidelines. However, the methods used to identify barriers and tailor interventions to address them need further development. Research is required to determine the effectiveness of tailored interventions in comparison with other interventions. PMID:20238340

Baker, Richard; Camosso-Stefinovic, Janette; Gillies, Clare; Shaw, Elizabeth J; Cheater, Francine; Flottorp, Signe; Robertson, Noelle

2014-01-01

84

Promising Practices and Strategies for Using Trauma-Informed Child Welfare Practice to Improve Foster Care Placement Stability: A Breakthrough Series Collaborative  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This paper will provide information on a recent Breakthrough Series Collaborative (BSC) conducted by the National Child Traumatic Stress Network on Using Trauma-Informed Child Welfare Practice to Improve Foster Care Placement Stability. Information on this particular BSC will be provided, followed by initial findings gathered from an evaluation of…

Conradi, Lisa; Agosti, Jen; Tullberg, Erika; Richardson, Lisa; Langan, Heather; Ko, Susan; Wilson, Charles

2011-01-01

85

A practical approach to identifying maternal deaths missed from routine hospital reports: lessons from Indonesia  

PubMed Central

Background Accurate estimates of the number of maternal deaths in both the community and facility are important, in order to allocate adequate resources to address such deaths. On the other hand, current studies show that routine methods of identifying maternal deaths in facilities underestimate the number by more than one-half. Objective To assess the utility of a new approach to identifying maternal deaths in hospitals. Method Deaths of women of reproductive age were retrospectively identified from registers in two district hospitals in Indonesia over a 24-month period. Based on information retrieved, deaths were classified as ‘maternal’ or ‘non-maternal’ where possible. For deaths that remained unclassified, a detailed case note review was undertaken and the extracted data were used to facilitate classification. Results One hundred and fifty-five maternal deaths were identified, mainly from the register review. Only 67 maternal deaths were recorded in the hospitals’ routine reports over the same period. This underestimation of maternal deaths was partly due to the incomplete coverage of the routine reporting system; however, even in the wards where routine reports were made, the study identified twice as many deaths. Conclusion The RAPID method is a practical method that provides a more complete estimate of hospital maternal mortality than routine reporting systems. PMID:20027272

Qomariyah, Siti Nurul; Bell, Jacqueline S.; Pambudi, Eko S.; Anggondowati, Trisari; Latief, Kamaluddin; Achadi, Endang L.; Graham, Wendy J.

2009-01-01

86

Identifying individuals for primary cardiovascular disease prevention in UK general practice: priorities and resource implications.  

PubMed

Targeted cardiovascular disease prevention relies on risk-factor information held in primary care records. A risk algorithm, the 'e-Nudge', was applied to data from a population of >or=50-year-olds in 19 West Midlands practices, to identify those individuals at risk of cardiovascular disease. Altogether, 5.9% were identified aged 50-74 years at >or=20% 10-year risk based on existing data, and a further 26.4% were potentially at risk but had missing risk-factor information; 9.2% of patients aged over 50 years with established cardiovascular disease had at least one modifiable risk factor outside the audit target of the Quality and Outcomes Framework. Implications for resource allocation are discussed. PMID:18611316

Holt, Tim A; Thorogood, Margaret; Griffiths, Frances; Munday, Stephen; Stables, David

2008-07-01

87

Searching Usenet for Virtual Communities of Practice: Using Mixed Methods to Identify the Constructs of Wenger's Theory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Introduction: This research set out to determine whether communities of practice can be entirely Internet-based by formally applying Wenger's theoretical framework to Internet collectives. Method: A model of a virtual community of practice was developed which included the constructs Wenger identified in co-located communities of practice: mutual…

Murillo, Enrique

2008-01-01

88

Perceptions, Promising Practices, and Pitfalls  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

university/school partnership. These teachers were selected from a group of 65 teachers who had participated in the online mentoring program. In this program of two time periods lasting two months each,…

Binkley, Russell; Scales, Roya; Unruh, Lori; Holt, Janice; Nichols, Janet

2013-01-01

89

Promising Practices in Community Colleges  

E-print Network

and stress management  while they transition to the role of competent  college student college recoups  approximately 40% of overall costs from “initial  positive attendance and both weekly student  contact hours and noncredit positive  attendance,” and stresses 

2010-01-01

90

Accelerating Evidence Reviews and Broadening Evidence Standards to Identify Effective, Promising, and Emerging Policy and Environmental Strategies for Prevention of Childhood Obesity  

Microsoft Academic Search

The childhood obesity epidemic has stimulated the emergence of many policy and environmental strategies to increase healthy eating and active living, with relatively few research recommendations identifying the most effective and generalizable strategies. Yet, local, state, and national decision makers have an urgent need to take action, particularly with respect to lower-income and racial and ethnic populations at greatest risk.

Laura Brennan; Sarah Castro; Ross C. Brownson; Julie Claus; C. Tracy Orleans

2011-01-01

91

Accelerating Evidence Reviews and Broadening Evidence Standards to Identify Effective, Promising, and Emerging Policy and Environmental Strategies for Prevention of Childhood Obesity  

Microsoft Academic Search

The childhood obesity epidemic has stimulated the emergence of many policy and environmental strategies to increase healthy eating and active living, with relatively few research recommendations identifying the most effective and generalizable strategies. Yet, local, state, and national decision makers have an urgent need to take action, particularly with respect to lower-income and racial and ethnic populations at greatest risk.

Laura Brennan; Sarah Castro; Ross C. Brownson; Julie Claus; C. Tracy Orleans

92

How to identify patients with a poor prognosis in daily clinical practice.  

PubMed

Predicting poor outcomes in daily practice is challenging. As well as prior episodes of low back pain and pain intensity, various psychosocial risk factors have been identified, although the independent prognostic value of these is rather low. This supports the necessity for a multidimensional view of the transition from acute to chronic pain and/or the development of disability. Psychological distress has been found to increase the risk of such a transition. Patients' beliefs and expectations about their pain seem to influence the recovery process; pain-related fear and fear avoidance can be influential psychological variables, from pain inception to its chronic stage. The influence of occupational factors such as job satisfaction, low workplace support or physical workload has also been emphasized. Treatment provider factors and the relationship between patients and care providers also contribute to the realistic or unrealistic expectations and meaningful or acceptable outcomes. PMID:15949777

Cedraschi, C; Allaz, A F

2005-08-01

93

Evidence-based practice in Beh?et's disease: identifying areas of unmet need for 2014  

PubMed Central

Background Behçet’s Disease (BD) is characterized by a relapsing-remitting course, with symptoms of varying severity across almost all organ systems. There is a diverse array of therapeutic options with no universally accepted treatment regime, and it is thus important that clinical practice is evidence-based. We reviewed all currently available literature describing management of BD, and investigated whether evidence-based practice is possible for all disease manifestations, and assessed the range of therapeutic options tested. Methods We conducted an internet search of all literature describing management of BD up to August 2013, including pharmacological and non-pharmacological interventions. We recorded treatment options investigated and disease manifestations reported as primary and secondary study outcomes. Quality of data was assessed according to the Scottish Intercollegiate Guideline Network (SIGN) hierarchy of evidence. Results Whilst there is much literature describing treatment of ocular and mucocutaneous disease, there is little to guide management of rheumatoid, cardiovascular and neurological disease. This broadly reflects the prevalence of disease manifestations of BD, but not the severity. Biologic therapies are the most commonly investigated intervention. The proportion of SIGN-1 graded studies is declining, and there are no SIGN-1 graded studies investigating neurological or gastrointestinal manifestations of BD. Conclusions This is the first study to investigate trends in published literature for management of BD over time. It identifies neurological, cardiovascular and gastro-intestinal disease as particular areas of unmet need and suggests that overall quality of evidence is declining. Future research should be designed to address these areas of insufficiency to facilitate evidence-based practice in BD. PMID:24475935

2014-01-01

94

CWC Best Practices in Wood Waste Recycling Visually Identifying Common Wood Waste Contaminants  

E-print Network

Issue: Various sources generate wood waste; this variability causes it to usually contain contaminants. These contaminants might not interfere with processing for particular end-products. For example, compost end-markets could be indifferent to the dirt and grit commonly found in wood waste, whereas composite panel-board markets could have trouble during manufacturing and with end-product performance. However, the end-uses that tolerate contaminants in recovered wood waste generally have the lowest-value markets. To successfully compete with virgin wood materials in higher-value markets, wood-waste processors must minimize the presence of contaminants in their end products. Best Practice: This Best Practice recommends that operators become aware of the common woodwaste contaminants that pose problems for end users. This awareness is among the first steps in achieving satisfactory quality control in wood-waste processing. Visually inspect all incoming loads of material to identify contamination. Following is a listing of the contaminants that frequently enter a processing facility along with recovered wood waste: • Dirt and grit • Ferrous metals (nails, screws, staples,

Material Wood Waste

95

Utilizing LibQUAL+ ® to Identify Best Practices in Academic Research Library Website Design  

E-print Network

The intent of this research paper is to discover if LibQUAL+ ® results can be used to identify “best practices ” in academic research library website design. As demonstrated by responses to the LibQUAL+ ® survey item “A library Web site enabling me to locate information on my own”, website design is an important consideration for academic research library users. This paper examines websites from members of the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) who participated in LibQUAL+ ® in 2010, with a particular focus on the websites with the highest scores for this specific LibQUAL+ ® question. Three primary functional criteria – Visual Layout, Information Architecture and Content – were used to evaluate if the academic research library websites with the highest LibQUAL+ ® scores in 2010 provided insight into best practices for contemporary academic research library website design. Background: LibQUAL+ ® was developed with the intent of assessing user perceptions of service quality. The long-standing goals of LibQUAL+ ® are to: • Foster a culture of excellence in providing library service

Raynna Bowlby; Brinley Franklin; Carolyn A. Lin; Raynna Bowlby; Brinley Franklin; Carolyn Lin

96

Modeling of 2D diffusion processes based on microscopy data: parameter estimation and practical identifiability analysis  

PubMed Central

Background Diffusion is a key component of many biological processes such as chemotaxis, developmental differentiation and tissue morphogenesis. Since recently, the spatial gradients caused by diffusion can be assessed in-vitro and in-vivo using microscopy based imaging techniques. The resulting time-series of two dimensional, high-resolutions images in combination with mechanistic models enable the quantitative analysis of the underlying mechanisms. However, such a model-based analysis is still challenging due to measurement noise and sparse observations, which result in uncertainties of the model parameters. Methods We introduce a likelihood function for image-based measurements with log-normal distributed noise. Based upon this likelihood function we formulate the maximum likelihood estimation problem, which is solved using PDE-constrained optimization methods. To assess the uncertainty and practical identifiability of the parameters we introduce profile likelihoods for diffusion processes. Results and conclusion As proof of concept, we model certain aspects of the guidance of dendritic cells towards lymphatic vessels, an example for haptotaxis. Using a realistic set of artificial measurement data, we estimate the five kinetic parameters of this model and compute profile likelihoods. Our novel approach for the estimation of model parameters from image data as well as the proposed identifiability analysis approach is widely applicable to diffusion processes. The profile likelihood based method provides more rigorous uncertainty bounds in contrast to local approximation methods. PMID:24267545

2013-01-01

97

A Case Study with an Identified Bully: Policy and Practice Implications  

PubMed Central

Objective: Bullying is a serious public health problem that may include verbal or physical injury as well as social isolation or exclusion. As a result, research is needed to establish a database for policies and interventions designed to prevent bullying and its negative effects. This paper presents a case study that contributes to the literature by describing an intervention for bullies that has implications for practice and related policies regarding bullying. Methods: An individualized intervention for an identified bully was implemented using the Participatory Culture-Specific Intervention Model (PCSIM; Nastasi, Moore, & Varjas, 2004) with a seventh-grade middle school student. Ecological and culture-specific perspectives were used to develop and implement the intervention that included psychoeducational sessions with the student and consultation with the parent and school personnel. A mixed methods intervention design was used with the following informants: the target student, the mother of the student, a teacher and the school counselor. Qualitative data included semi-structured interviews with the parent, teacher and student, narrative classroom observations and evaluation/feedback forms filled out by the student and interventionist. Quantitative data included the following quantitative surveys (i.e., Child Self Report Post Traumatic Stress Reaction Index and the Behavior Assessment Scale for Children). Both qualitative and quantitative data were used to evaluate the acceptability, integrity and efficacy of this intervention. Results: The process of intervention design, implementation and evaluation are described through an illustrative case study. Qualitative and quantitative findings indicated a decrease in internalizing, externalizing and bullying behaviors as reported by the teacher and the mother, and a high degree of acceptability and treatment integrity as reported by multiple stakeholders. Conclusion: This case study makes important contributions by describing an intervention that is targeted to specific needs of the bully by designing culture specific interventions and working with the student’s unique environmental contexts. Contributions also are made by illustrating the use of mixed methods to document acceptability, integrity and efficacy of an intervention with documented positive effects in these areas. In addition, implications for policy and practice related to the treatment of students identified as bullies and future research needs are discussed. PMID:21731789

Huddleston, Lillie B.; Varjas, Kris; Meyers, Joel; Cadenhead, Catherine

2011-01-01

98

Identifying and developing rugby talent among 10-year-old boys: a practical model.  

PubMed

The re-entry of South Africa into the international sporting arena and the resultant need for the identification and development of talent, especially among formerly deprived groups of people, provided the incentive for this study. Its aim was to identify the physical, motor and anthropometric variables that will enable coaches to identify 10-year-old boys, based on their abilities, who could become successful rugby players. Altogether, 173 ten-year-old boys with no rugby experience from a cross-section of the population were selected at random and subjected to 14 physical and motor tests and 14 anthropometric measurements. From 22 schools which participated in the Western Transvaal primary schools under-11 rugby league, the three top teams (n = 45 individuals) were selected and also tested. The results from these three teams were used as the criteria for rugby talent among 10-year-old boys. To establish the best predictors of talent, a stepwise discriminant analysis was conducted: this indicated eight variables (four motor and four anthropometric) that discriminated maximally between the talented and the rest of the players of this age. With classification functions based on these eight variables, 93.8% of all the subjects were classified correctly, indicating good validity. A canonical analysis, based on the selected variables, was then conducted on all the under-11 teams that played in the league in the region (n = 330), and they were ranked according to the scores of the first canonical variable from the most to the least talented. By comparing these results with the players who were chosen for the region's primary schools team, a success rate of 88% in prediction of talent was established. We conclude that this is a successful and practical method to aid the teacher and the coach in selecting and developing talent among 10-year-old rugby players in South Africa. PMID:10189074

Pienaar, A E; Spamer, M J; Steyn, H S

1998-11-01

99

Practical approach in hepatitis B e antigen-negative individuals to identify treatment candidates.  

PubMed

The natural history of chronic hepatitis B is characterized by different phases of infection, and patients may evolve from one phase to another or may revert to a previous phase. The hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg)-negative form is the predominant infection worldwide, which consists of individuals with a range of viral replication and liver disease severity. Although alanine transaminase (ALT) remains the most accessible test available to clinicians for monitoring the liver disease status, further evaluations are required for some patients to assess if treatment is warranted. Guidance from practice guidelines together with thorough investigations and classifications of patients ensure recognition of who needs which level of care. This article aims to assist physicians in the assessment of HBeAg-negative individuals using liver biopsy or non-invasive tools such as hepatitis B s antigen quantification and transient elastography in addition to ALT and hepatitis B virus DNA, to identify who will remain stable, who will reactivate or at risk of disease progression hence will benefit from timely initiation of anti-viral therapy. PMID:25232242

Azmi, Ahmad Najib; Tan, Soek-Siam; Mohamed, Rosmawati

2014-09-14

100

Identifying key factors in homeowner's adoption of water quality best management practices.  

PubMed

The recognition of the significance of the residential environment in contributing to non-point source (NPS) pollution and the inherently dispersed nature of NPS pollution itself that presents significant challenges to effective regulation has led to the creation and dissemination of best management practices (BMPs) that can reduce the impacts of NPS pollution (Environmental Protection Agency US, Protecting water quality from urban runoff, http://www.epa.gov/npdes/pubs/nps_urban-facts_final.pdf , 2003). However, very few studies have examined the factors that influence the adoption of BMPs by residential homeowners, despite the fact that residential environments have been identified as one of the most significant contributors to NPS pollution. Given this need, the purpose of this project was to explore how demographic and knowledge-based factors predict adoption of residential BMPs in an urbanizing watershed in Northern Illinois using statistical analyses of survey data collected as part of a watershed planning process. The findings indicate that broad knowledge of BMPs is the strongest predictor of use for a specific BMP. Knowledge of BMPs is strongly correlated with their use, which reinforces the need for educational programs, even among those assumed to be knowledgeable about BMPs. PMID:23609309

Brehm, Joan M; Pasko, Danielle K; Eisenhauer, Brian W

2013-07-01

101

A system-wide analysis using a senior-friendly hospital framework identifies current practices and opportunities for improvement in the care of hospitalized older adults.  

PubMed

Older adults are vulnerable to hospital-associated complications such as falls, pressure ulcers, functional decline, and delirium, which can contribute to prolonged hospital stay, readmission, and nursing home placement. These vulnerabilities are exacerbated when the hospital's practices, services, and physical environment are not sufficiently mindful of the complex, multidimensional needs of frail individuals. Several frameworks have emerged to help hospitals examine how organization-wide processes can be customized to avoid these complications. This article describes the application of one such framework-the Senior-Friendly Hospital (SFH) framework adopted in Ontario, Canada-which comprises five interrelated domains: organizational support, processes of care, emotional and behavioral environment, ethics in clinical care and research, and physical environment. This framework provided the blueprint for a self-assessment of all 155 adult hospitals across the province of Ontario. The system-wide analysis identified practice gaps and promising practices within each domain of the SFH framework. Taken together, these results informed 12 recommendations to support hospitals at all stages of development in becoming friendly to older adults. Priorities for system-wide action were identified, encouraging hospitals to implement or further develop their processes to better address hospital-acquired delirium and functional decline. These recommendations led to collaborative action across the province, including the development of an online toolkit and the identification of accountability indicators to support hospitals in quality improvement focusing on senior-friendly care. PMID:25355067

Wong, Ken S; Ryan, David P; Liu, Barbara A

2014-11-01

102

Identifying Perceived Barriers and Facilitators to Culturally Competent Practice for School Social Workers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study presents descriptive findings from self-reported qualitative and quantitative data on barriers and facilitators to culturally competent school social work practice. The study highlights the need for the development of evaluative methods for the purpose of examining how elements within the practice environment affect school social work…

Teasley, Martell; Gourdine, Ruby; Canfield, James

2010-01-01

103

Identifying a Core Set of Science Teaching Practices: A Delphi Expert Panel Approach  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The "Framework for K-12 Science Education" details ambitious goals for students' learning of science content and practices. However, this document provides science teachers little guidance about instructional practices that are central to helping students achieve these goals. Research indicates that a teacher's instructional…

Kloser, Matthew

2014-01-01

104

Identifying effective leadership practices for implementing a new mathematics curriculum in Taipei  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study explores successful junior high school principals' leadership practices for implementing the reformed mathematics curriculum in Taipei. Avolio and Bass's (2002) full range leadership theory was used to record data through interviews and observations of five Taipei \\

Brandon Kao; Peter Hudson

2009-01-01

105

Food Safety Knowledge and Practices among Older Adults: Identifying Causes and Solutions for Risky Behaviors  

Microsoft Academic Search

Adults aged 60 years and older are more likely than younger adults to experience complications, hospitalization, and death because of food-borne infections. Recognizing this risk, we conducted a nationally representative survey (n = 1,140) to characterize older adults’ food safety knowledge, attitudes, and practices as well as the demographic characteristics of older adults with risky food handling practices. The survey was conducted

Sheryl C. Cates; Katherine M. Kosa; Shawn Karns; Sandria L. Godwin; Leslie Speller-Henderson; Robert Harrison; F. Ann Draughon

2009-01-01

106

The Use of Single Subject Research to Identify Evidence-based Practice in Special Education  

Microsoft Academic Search

Single-subject research plays an important role in the development of evidence-based practice in special education. The defining features of single-subject research are presented, the con- tributions of single-subject research for special education are reviewed, and a specific proposal is of- fered for using single-subject research to document evidence-based practice. This article allows readers to determine if a specific study is

Robert H. Horner; EDWARD G. CARR; JAMES HALLE

2005-01-01

107

Noteworthy practices as identified by the US Department of Energy environmental, safety, and health first 31 Tiger Team assessments  

SciTech Connect

Noteworthy Practices are exceptional ways of accomplishing a performance objective or some aspect of it. Other DOE facilities are encouraged to adopt these practices when they are applicable to their operation. Noteworthy Practices included in this report have been drawn from the first 31 Tiger Team Assessments at DOE sites. This report includes all noteworthy practices listed in an earlier tabulation (June 1990) which the Secretary of the US Department of Energy distributed for information on July 31, 1990. This earlier tabulation included noteworthy practices from the first thirteen Tiger Team Assessments. A brief key-word title has been assigned to each Noteworthy Practice. This title provides a brief description of each Noteworthy Practice. The reader may peruse these titles in the table of contents to identify Noteworthy Practices that may be applicable to their site, facility, or operations. A flexible-disk copy of this compilation is also available in ASCII format on personal-computer, DOS-formatted disks from the Office of Special Projects in the Office of Environment, Safety, and Health at the Headquarters of the US Department of Energy. The ASCII file may be used in combination with word processing software for more detailed word and text-string searches.

Not Available

1992-05-01

108

Practical identifiability of photophysical parameters in photodynamic Simona Dobre, Thierry Bastogne,Muriel Barberi-Heyob, Alain Richard  

E-print Network

Practical identifiability of photophysical parameters in photodynamic therapy Simona Dobre, Thierry. 1 I. INTRODUCTION Photodynamic therapy (PDT) [1], [2], [9] is a therapy for displastic tissues Vautrin, 54511 Vandoeuvre-l`es-Nancy Cedex, France, m.barberi@nancy.fnclcc.fr Abstract-- Photodynamic

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

109

Now that we own it, what do I do with it? Identifying risk management issues in acquired physician practices.  

PubMed

Healthcare risk managers now have responsibility for identifying and managing the unique exposures of the physician's office practice. This article focuses on exposures related to general communication systems and functions including telephone routing systems, voice mail, faxing, e-mail, and more, which can be found in the clinic environment. PMID:10538436

Mouse-Young, D

1999-01-01

110

Best Practices in Identifying Students for Gifted and Talented Education Programs  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As school psychologists move from dichotomous categorizations of students as "gifted" or "nongifted" toward a more comprehensive approach to identification, their task becomes increasingly complex. In the present article, the authors outline practices at the planning, programming, and data collection stages of the identification process in hopes…

Worrell, Frank C.; Erwin, Jesse O.

2011-01-01

111

Identifying and Clarifying Values and Reason Statements that Promote Effective Food Parenting Practices, Using Intensive Interviews  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Objective: Generate and test parents' understanding of values and associated reason statements to encourage effective food parenting practices. Methods: This study was cross-sectional. Sixteen parents from different ethnic groups (African American, white, and Hispanic) living with their 3- to 5-year-old child were recruited. Interested parents…

Beltran, Alicia; Hingle, Melanie D.; Knesek, Jessica; O'Connor, Teresia; Baranowski, Janice; Thompson, Debbe; Baranowski, Tom

2011-01-01

112

Food Safety Knowledge and Practices among Older Adults: Identifying Causes and Solutions for Risky Behaviors.  

PubMed

Adults aged 60 years and older are more likely than younger adults to experience complications, hospitalization, and death because of food-borne infections. Recognizing this risk, we conducted a nationally representative survey (n = 1,140) to characterize older adults' food safety knowledge, attitudes, and practices as well as the demographic characteristics of older adults with risky food handling practices. The survey was conducted using a Web-enabled panel. We found that although older adults consider themselves to be knowledgeable about food safety, many are not following recommended food safety practices. Areas for improvement include the following: reheating deli meats to steaming hot, not eating store-bought deli salads, cooking eggs properly, monitoring refrigerator temperature using a thermometer, using a food thermometer to check doneness of meat/poultry/egg dishes, and storing leftovers properly. The survey results also suggest that food safety education targeting older adults is needed and that such initiatives should emphasize practices to prevent listeriosis, a potentially fatal illness among older adults. Our findings suggest that, in particular, men, individuals with higher incomes, and college-educated individuals would benefit from food safety education. PMID:21184361

Cates, Sheryl C; Kosa, Katherine M; Karns, Shawn; Godwin, Sandria L; Speller-Henderson, Leslie; Harrison, Robert; Ann Draughon, F

2009-04-01

113

Within a Family-Centered Practice, How Can Family Outcomes Be Identified?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Family-centered practice (care, intervention, services, or help giving) and family-focused, and family-based care are terms used interchangeably over the past 60 years to describe an approach to working with children with disabilities and their families. Common beliefs fundamental to the implementation of a program that incorporates…

Jeffries, Lynn

2009-01-01

114

Identifying the effects of different construction practices on the spectral characteristics of concrete  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of different construction practices on the spectral characteristics of the concrete. Concrete blocks of identical shape and size (20×20×6 cm3) were prepared using different treatment processes to establish eight different concrete characteristics. The different concrete treatments were: TC (control), TNC (no cure), TCL (cool cure), TH (heat cure), THW (high water

B. B. Maruthi Sridhar; T. L. Chapin; R. K. Vincent; M. J. Axe; J. P. Frizado

2008-01-01

115

Identifying men at high risk of heart attacks: strategy for use in general practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

A strategy was devised for identifying men at high risk of acute myocardial infarction or sudden ischaemic death. A risk score was devised using cigarette smoking, mean blood pressure, recall of ischaemic heart disease or diabetes mellitus diagnosed by a doctor, history of parental death from \\

A G Shaper; S J Pocock; A N Phillips; M Walker

1986-01-01

116

Identifying lettuce species ( Lactuca subsect. Lactuca , Asteraceae): A practical application of flow cytometry  

Microsoft Academic Search

The wild lettuce species L. serriola, L. saligna, and L. virosa are important genitors in lettuce (L. sativa) breeding. Identifying these wild species can be problematic because in some cases they look very similar. Flow cytometry\\u000a was tested for its reliability and general applicability as a tool to distinguish them. Three series of tests were conducted:\\u000a (1) Tests with three

Wim J. M. Koopman

2000-01-01

117

The predictive value of asthma medications to identify individuals with asthma--a study in German general practices.  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND: The assessment of prescribing performance by aggregated measures mainly developed from automated databases is often helpful for general practitioners. For asthma treatment, the frequently applied ratio of anti-inflammatory to bronchodilator drugs may, however, be misleading if the specificity of a drug for the treatment of asthma, compared with other diseases, is unknown. AIM: To test the association of specific drugs with the diagnosis of asthma compared with other diagnoses. DESIGN OF STUDY: Cross-sectional study analysing prescription data from a retrospective chart review. SETTING: Eight general practices and one community respiratory practice in a town in Northern Germany. METHOD: All patients in the participating practices who received at least one of the 50 asthma drugs most frequently prescribed in Germany within the past 12 weeks were identified. Odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (ClI) were calculated to reveal any association between a specific drug and the diagnosis of asthma. The unit of analysis was the item prescribed. RESULTS: Topical betamimetics (e.g salbutamol, fenoterol) were the most often prescribed asthma drugs in the general practices (52.1 ) and in the respiratory practice (57.6%). Inhaled steroids accounted for 15% and 13%; systemic steroids accounted for 10% and 13%, respectively. In the general practices, inhaled betamimetics had a moderate marker function for asthma (OR = 2.0; 95% CI = 1.14-3.58). A fixed oral combination drug of clenbuterol plus ambroxol was a marker drug against asthma (OR = 0.35; 95% CI = 0.20-0.61). In the respiratory practice, the diagnosis of asthma was strongly marked by fixed combinations of cromoglycate plus betamimetics (OR = 29.0; 95% CI = 6.86-122.24) and moderately by inhaled betamimetics (OR = 2.6; 95% CI = 1.28-5.14). In contrast, systemic steroids (OR = 0.24; 95% CI 0.10-0.57) and even inhaled steroids (OR = 0.46; 95% ClI= 0.22-0.96) proved to contradict the diagnosis of asthma. CONCLUSION: Only betamimetics were markers for asthma patients in both types of practices; inhaled steroids, however, were not. Combinations of cromoglycate were markers in the respiratory practice only. Limited specificity of drugs for a disease (e.g asthma) should be taken into account when analysing prescribing data that are not diagnosis linked. PMID:11761200

Himmel, W; Hummers-Pradier, E; Schumann, H; Kochen, M M

2001-01-01

118

Practical Challenges and Considerations in Designing Digital Object Identifiers for Data  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

While the basic idea of Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs) is fairly simple, a robust implementation must consider a number of factors that are not necessarily obvious at first glance. This is especially true when attempting to apply the DOI framework -- which was designed for use with published works -- to datasets for which concepts like identity, provenance, and lifecycle may be much more complex or ambiguous. The IRIS Data Management Center (DMC) recently undertook an effort to build DOIs for various parts of its data holdings, and we share some of the particular challenges and solutions that emerged from this process, including: - The often conflicting priorities of the various interested parties (the data creator, the data curator, the researcher citing the data, and the reader following the citation back to its source), - The need to define a proper data granularity, and the options for representing data subsets, variations, and collections, - The advantages and disadvantages of DOI opacity, - The challenges imposed by the DOI framework's fundamentally unidirectional nature, - Building a scalable and maintainable system for serving DOI target URLs.

Clark, A.

2013-12-01

119

Defense Programs benchmarking in Chicago, April 1994: Identifying best practices in the pollution prevention programs of selected private industries  

SciTech Connect

The Office of Defense Programs (DP) was the first US Department of Energy (DOE) Cognizant Secretarial Office (CSO) to attempt to benchmark private industries for best-in-class practices in the field of pollution prevention. Defense Programs` intent in this effort is to identify and bring to DOE field offices strategic and technological tools that have helped private companies minimize waste and prevent pollution. Defense Programs` premier benchmarking study focused on business practices and process improvements used to implement exceptional pollution prevention programs in four privately owned companies. The current interest in implementing partnerships information exchange, and technology transfer with the private sector prompted DP to continue to seek best practices in the area of pollution prevention through a second benchmarking endeavor in May 1994. This report presents the results of that effort. The decision was made to select host facilities that own processes similar to those at DOE plants and laboratories, that have programs that have been recognized on a local or national level, that have an interest in partnering with the Department on an information-sharing basis, and that are located in proximity to each other. The DP benchmarking team assessed the pollution prevention programs of five companies in the Chicago area--GE Plastics, Navistar, Northrop Corporation, Sundstrand and Caterpillar. At all facilities visited, Ozone Depleting Compounds (ODCs), hazardous wastes, releases under the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA), waste water and non-hazardous wastes are being eliminated, replaced, reduced, recycled and reused whenever practicable.

NONE

1995-12-01

120

Lessons to be Learned from Evidence-based Medicine: Practice and Promise of Evidence-based Medicine and Evidence-based Education.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents statistics of deaths caused by medical errors and argues the effects of misconceptions in diagnosis and treatment. Suggests evidence-based medicine to enhance the quality of practice and minimize error rates. Presents 10 evidence-based lessons and discusses the possible benefits of evidence-based medicine to evidence-based education and…

Wolf, Fredric M.

2000-01-01

121

The Promise of Indian Youth.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Promising practices were shared during the American Indian School-to-Work Conference (Seattle, Washington, May 2000). Successful programs included such elements as emphasis on Indian cultural values, partnerships with local businesses and tribal colleges, cooperation among Indian school-to-work programs, community service, and connections to…

Stone, Patricia Mackey

2000-01-01

122

The Promise of Transformative Partnerships  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The promise, potential, and problems associated with school-university partnerships interested in better preparing teachers for the challenges they face teaching in today's schools rest in educators' ability to actualize transformative practices within partnership contexts. To date, most partnerships have focused on less complex forms of…

Yendol-Hoppey, Diane

2010-01-01

123

Identifying best practices across three countries: hospital antimicrobial stewardship in the United kingdom, france, and the United States.  

PubMed

Rational antimicrobial use can be achieved through antimicrobial stewardship-a coordinated set of strategies designed to improve the appropriate use of antimicrobial agents. There are encouraging examples of antimicrobial stewardship programs from different parts of the world; however, the structure of these programs varies by hospital and country. In an effort to identify best practices in hospitals, we describe legislative requirements, antimicrobial stewardship program infrastructure, strategies and outcomes in 3 countries that have established programs-the United Kingdom, France, and the United States. PMID:25261544

Trivedi, Kavita K; Dumartin, Catherine; Gilchrist, Mark; Wade, Paul; Howard, Philip

2014-10-15

124

Exploring the Promise of Eudaimonic Well-Being Within the Practice of Health Promotion: The “How” is as Important as the “What”  

Microsoft Academic Search

A brief historical and philosophical analysis suggests that the biomedical model and prevention have been the pillars of health\\u000a promotion practices with the underlying assumption that these concepts provide answers to people’s health woes. Another observation\\u000a resulting from this analysis is that biomedical, prevention, and more recently, wellness, do not differ much from each other\\u000a paradigmatically (e.g., instrumental rationality) and,

Jay Kimiecik

2011-01-01

125

Laboratory test ordering and results management systems: a qualitative study of safety risks identified by administrators in general practice  

PubMed Central

Objective To explore experiences and perceptions of frontline administrators involved in the systems-based management of laboratory test ordering and results handling in general medical practice. Design Qualitative using focus group interviews. Setting West of Scotland general medical practices in three National Health Service (NHS) territorial board areas. Participants Convenience samples of administrators (receptionists, healthcare assistants and phlebotomists). Methods Transcript data were subjected to content analysis. Results A total of 40 administrative staff were recruited. Four key themes emerged: (1) system variations and weaknesses (eg, lack of a tracking process is a known risk that needs to be addressed). (2) Doctor to administrator communication (eg, unclear information can lead to emotional impacts and additional workload). (3) Informing patients of test results (eg, levels of anxiety and uncertainty are experienced by administrators influenced by experience and test result outcome) and (4) patient follow-up and confidentiality (eg, maintaining confidentiality in a busy reception area can be challenging). The key findings were explained in terms of sociotechnical systems theory. Conclusions The study further confirms the safety-related problems associated with results handling systems and adds to our knowledge of the communication and psychosocial issues that can affect the health and well-being of staff and patients alike. However, opportunities exist for practices to identify barriers to safe care, and plan and implement system improvements to accommodate or mitigate the potential for human error in this complex area. PMID:24503302

Bowie, Paul; Halley, Lyn; McKay, John

2014-01-01

126

Developing Mathematically Promising Students.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book, written on the recommendation of the Task Force on Mathematically Promising Students, investigates issues involving the development of promising mathematics students. Recommendations are made concerning topics such as the definition of promising students; the identification of such students; appropriate curriculum, instruction, and…

Sheffield, Linda Jensen, Ed.

127

Developing clinical practice guidelines: target audiences, identifying topics for guidelines, guideline group composition and functioning and conflicts of interest  

PubMed Central

Clinical practice guidelines are one of the foundations of efforts to improve health care. In 1999, we authored a paper about methods to develop guidelines. Since it was published, the methods of guideline development have progressed both in terms of methods and necessary procedures and the context for guideline development has changed with the emergence of guideline clearing houses and large scale guideline production organisations (such as the UK National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence). It therefore seems timely to, in a series of three articles, update and extend our earlier paper. In this first paper we discuss: the target audience(s) for guidelines and their use of guidelines; identifying topics for guidelines; guideline group composition (including consumer involvement) and the processes by which guideline groups function and the important procedural issue of managing conflicts of interest in guideline development. PMID:22762776

2012-01-01

128

Development of a theory-based instrument to identify barriers and levers to best hand hygiene practice among healthcare practitioners  

PubMed Central

Background A theoretical approach to assessing the barriers and levers to evidence-based practice (EBP) with subsequent tailoring of theoretically informed strategies to address these may go some way to positively influencing the delay in implementing research findings into practice. Hand hygiene is one such example of EBP, chosen for this study due to its importance in preventing death through healthcare associated infections (HCAI). The development of an instrument to assess barriers and levers to hand hygiene and to allow the subsequent tailoring of theoretically informed implementation strategies is reported here. Methods A comprehensive list of barriers and levers to hand hygiene were categorised to the Theoretical Domains Framework (TDF) in a Delphi survey. These items formed the basis of an instrument that was tested to establish validity and reliability. The relationship between self-reported compliance with hand hygiene and barriers and levers to hand hygiene was also examined along with compliance according to where the barriers and levers fit within the domains of the TDF framework. Results A 33-item instrument that tested well for internal consistency (??=?0.84) and construct validity (?2/df?=?1.9 [p?identified by participants (total barrier score) (r?=?0.41, n?=?276, p <0.001). The greater the number of barriers reported, the lower the level of compliance. A one-way between groups multivariate analysis of variance was performed to investigate differences between those adopting high or low compliance with hand hygiene. Compliance was highest for this sample of participants among practitioners with high levels of motivation, strong beliefs about capabilities, when there were positive social influences, when hand hygiene was central to participants’ sense of professional identity and was easier to remember to do. Conclusions This study has produced encouraging findings suggesting the potential for improved hand hygiene and resulting effects on the human and financial costs of healthcare associated infection. This study identifies a further potential use for the TDF. PMID:24059289

2013-01-01

129

Of birds, carbon and water: integrating multiple ecosystem service impacts to identify locations for agricultural conservation practice adoption  

EPA Science Inventory

Human use of the landscape for crop production can degrade ecosystem services. A number of agricultural conservation practices are touted as mitigating these impacts. Many of these practices are encouraged by incentive programs such as the Conservation Reserve Program administere...

130

Identifying geriatric malnutrition in nursing practice: the Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA®)-an evidence-based screening tool.  

PubMed

Protein calorie malnutrition (PCM) is common and often undiagnosed in older adults. Left untreated, PCM carries both clinical and financial risks, including decreased quality of life, declining functionality, the inability to live independently, and increased health care costs. The prevalence of PCM in older adults calls for a systematic and standardized approach to nutrition screening that includes the use of a validated screening tool. Recommended by international organizations, the Mini Nutritional Assessment® (MNA) is highly specific and reliable and the most well-validated nutrition screening tool for adults 65 and older. Simple, noninvasive, inexpensive, and easy for nurses and other clinicians to use, the newest MNA-short form (MNA-SF) can quickly and easily identify older adults who are at risk for malnutrition or malnourished. Nurses are key players in successful malnutrition screening in hospitals, long-term care, home care, and community settings. It is strongly recommended that nurses incorporate the newest MNA-SF into all practice settings where older adults receive care. PMID:22329392

Skates, Janet J; Anthony, Patricia S

2012-03-01

131

Organic Chemistry Jasperse Acid-Base Practice Problems A. Identify each chemical as either an "acid" or a "base" in the following reactions, and  

E-print Network

Organic Chemistry Jasperse Acid-Base Practice Problems A. Identify each chemical as either an "acid" or a "base" in the following reactions, and identify "conjugate" relationships. -You should have one acid the More Acidic for Each of the Following Pairs: Single Variable Problems 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. O O O OH

Jasperse, Craig P.

132

Educating Able Learners: Programs and Promising Practices.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The text reports on findings of the Richardson study, a 4-year examination of current programing for gifted and talented students. An introductory chapter comments upon current attention to gifted education and summarizes reflections on home and school influences of MacArthur Fellows. Chapter 2 reviews results of a national survey of school…

Cox, June; And Others

133

Best and Promising Practices in Developmental Disabilities.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Twenty-six papers on the education of students with developmental disabilities are divided into 7 sections on: (1) definition and placement; (2) assessment and curriculum; (3) instructional strategies; (4) individual needs; (5) systematic and data-based instruction and management; (6) family involvement and community attitudes; and (7) appropriate…

Hilton, Alan, Ed.; Ringlaben, Ravic, Ed.

134

Promising Practices for Home/School Partnerships.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report contains profiles of 18 innovative and successful parent involvement programs for migrant families. The programs were selected based on recommendations from State Directors of Migrant Education and migrant educators and on a search of the ERIC database. Each profile includes sponsoring institution or agency, program format, program…

Salerno, Anne; Fink, Mary

135

Restructuring Schools: Promising Practices and Policies.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Chapters in this book focus on a wide array of educational issues that command attention at the end of the 20th century. Various aspects of contemporary schooling are explored, and models of school organization and functioning are proposed in the following chapters: (1) "Achievement-Oriented School Design" (James S. Coleman); (2) "Lost in…

Hallinan, Maureen T., Ed.

136

Multicultural Science Education: Theory, Practice, and Promise  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

As a relatively new area of investigation, the study of multicultural education as it relates to science teaching and learning has spawned numerous interpretations by researchers and authors worldwide. The contributors of this international volume--among them are science teacher educators, science teachers, scientists, researchers, program…

Hines, S. Maxwell, Ed.

2007-01-01

137

Silicon solar cell efficiency: Practice and promise  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The maximum efficiency of silicon solar cells was calculated and yielded a value near 18%. Additionally, the performance of these high efficiency cells in a synchronous orbit radiation field was calculated and it is suggested that these cells would be superior to present silicon cells. The performance of conventional cells was analyzed and several areas in which performance gains may be achieved are discussed. These areas include improvements in diffused region profile, in reduction of excess forward currents in cells made from low resistivity material, and in the theory for describing complex solar cell structures.

Brandhorst, H. W., Jr.

1972-01-01

138

Promising Practices for Urban Reading Instruction.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This collection of research-based articles is framed around the International Reading Association's 10 "literacy rights" of every child, outlining what children need to become competent readers and writers. Under Right 1--Children have a right to appropriate early reading instruction based on their individual needs--are the following articles:…

Mason, Pamela A., Ed.; Schumm, Jeanne Shay, Ed.

139

Adolescent Literacy Instruction: Policies and Promising Practices  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This comprehensive resource explores how adolescence and academic achievement are defined within today's political context, examines the in-school potential of teens' out-of-school immersion in digital technologies and popular culture, and shows teachers how to embed comprehension strategies into classroom instruction. The book contains innovative…

Lewis, Jill, Ed.; Moorman, Gary, Ed.

2007-01-01

140

Examining the Culture of Poverty: Promising Practices  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Spurred by preservice teachers' perceptions that diversity issues such as poverty would not affect their teaching, professors in 1 southeastern U.S. elementary teacher-preparation program took action, which resulted in this examination of the culture of poverty and the identification of strategies to best serve children living in poverty. The…

Cuthrell, Kristen; Stapleton, Joy; Ledford, Carolyn

2009-01-01

141

CSWE Core Competencies and Practice Behaviors 1. Identify with the SW profession, its mission and core values, and conduct oneself  

E-print Network

problems Negotiate, mediate, and advocate for clients Facilitate transitions and endings 10(d) Evaluation of assessment, prevention, intervention, and evaluation 4. Engage diversity and difference in practice of assessment, intervention, and evaluation 8. Engage in policy practice to address social and economic well

Gilbert, Matthew

142

Identifying Instructional Targets for Early Childhood via Authentic Assessment: Alignment of Professional Standards and Practice-Based Evidence  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Now at middle age, the field of Early Childhood Intervention (ECI) and its professionals have demonstrated a unique capacity to develop their own practice-based evidence (PBE) and professional standards to forge solutions to challenging professional practice dilemmas. This innovative capacity is no more evident than in designing and implementing…

Bagnato, Stephen J.; McLean, Mary; Macy, Marisa; Neisworth, John T.

2011-01-01

143

Off-label prescriptions: how to identify them, frame them, announce them and monitor them in practice?  

PubMed

Following the Mediator crisis and the passage of the Health and Safety Law of December 2011, off-label prescriptions are a real concern shared by all those involved in healthcare system. Off-label, in the strictest sense of the term, is defined as all prescriptions that do not correspond to the summary of product characteristics (SPC), particularly those that fail to comply with the indications and dosage regimens defined by the marketing authorization (MA) for clear safety reasons. There are various rasons for off-label prescriptions, both conscious and unconscious. They are intended to respond to unmet medical needs, the needs of poorly studied populations or not studied at all in trials, but in relation to whom it is reasonable to extrapolate that MA would be given (common-sense prescriptions) and, additionally, to urgent public health needs (such as baclofen, pregnant women, and HIV drugs). All these prescriptions would deserve to be studied for a potential MA. However, there are off-label prescriptions that need to be restricted or even penalized in the case of compassionate prescriptions or unjustified prescriptions or prescriptions not based on any scientific grounds. Off-label prescriptions are not easy to track down because if the prescriber has to write "off-label" on his prescription, then clearly, in practice, he will only do so in exceptional cases. Neither the pharmacists who dispense the drug nor the Social Security that reimburses it, have access to the diagnosis (or targeted indication). Thus, in order to identify the off-label prescription, we must be able to cross reference the available databases (such as pharmacovigilance database, medicalized information system program [programme de médicalisation des systèmes d'information, PMSI], hospital drug formularies, general sample of beneficiaries [échantillon généraliste de bénéficiaires, EGB] or national inter-regional Health Insurance Information System [système national d'informations inter-régions d'Assurance maladie, SNIIRAM], sales data, and data from market surveys). The shared computerized patient file may resolve this problem. The temporary use recommendation (TUR) proposed by the Drug Safety Law will only partially deal with this problem for recently marketed molecules. This temporary and exceptional mechanism will authorize a recognized off-label prescription, which may be reimbursed and monitored for 3 years. These TURs will only concern a small portion of "off-label" drugs having yet a positive risk/benefit ratio (conditional MA) but this is far from matching with majority of off-label prescriptions. As such, and in order to improve the use of drugs, it is important to propose a control system for all "off-label" prescriptions with a dedicated committee: the "off-label" committee which would determine the frame of the "off-label" prescriptions. PMID:23981260

Le Jeunne, Claire; Billon, Nathalie; Dandon, Anne; Berdaï, Driss; Adgibi, Yolande; Bergmann, Jean-François; Bordet, Régis; Carpentier, Anne; Cohn, Emmanuelle; Courcier, Soizic; Girault, Danièle; Goni, Sylvia; Jolliet, Pascale; Liard, François; Prot-Labarthe, Sonia; Simon, Tabassome; Vernotte, Christine; Westerloppe, Jérémie

2013-01-01

144

Do Workshops in Evidence-Based Practice Equip Participants to Identify and Answer Questions Requiring Consideration of Clinical Research? A Diagnostic Skill Assessment  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Evidence-based practice (EBP) requires practitioners to identify and formulate questions in response to patient encounters, and to seek, select, and appraise applicable clinical research. A standardized workshop format serves as the model for training of medical educators in these skills. We developed an evaluation exercise to assess the ability…

Wyer, Peter C,; Naqvi, Zoon; Dayan, Peter S.; Celentano, James J.; Eskin, Barnet; Graham, Mark J.

2009-01-01

145

A study of state and trait anxiety and perceived causes of anxiety identified by licensed practical nurses returning to an associate degree nursing program  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to identify the state and trait anxiety and the perceived causes of anxiety in licensed practical nurses (LPNs) returning to an associate degree nursing program in order to become registered nurses (RNs). The subjects for this study were 98 students enrolled in a transitional LPN\\/RN associate degree nursing program in two community colleges in

Sally Ann Weiss

1997-01-01

146

Identifying and Promoting Transition Evidence-Based Practices and Predictors of Success: A Position Paper of the Division on Career Development and Transition  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This position paper describes the Division of Career Development and Transition's stance and recommendations for identifying and promoting secondary transition evidence-based practices and predictors of postschool success for students with disabilities. Recommendations for experimental research, correlational research, and secondary analysis…

Mazzotti, Valerie L.; Rowe, Dawn A.; Cameto, Renee; Test, David W.; Morningstar, Mary E.

2013-01-01

147

Identifying the midwifery practice component of Australian midwifery education programs. Results of the Australian midwifery action project (AMAP) education survey  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper is the first in a series of papers reporting on the findings of the AMAP Education Survey of the 27 universities providing a program for initial authorisation to practise midwifery. It concentrates on issues related to the practice component of courses. Subsequent papers will present findings related to workforce issues and the barriers to effective midwifery education as

Nicky Leap

2002-01-01

148

Use of a Biographical Data Inventory to Identify Behavioral Correlates of Practicing Medical Technologists: An Exploratory Study  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A Biographical Data Inventory (BDI) and a standard final evaluation form were developed and administered to practicing medical technologists and senior year medical technology students at a State university. A correlation of .68 between scores reinforced findings of other studies, suggesting that BDI's are useful in advisement and selection of…

Blume, Christiana S.

1976-01-01

149

Doing Archaeology?: cultural heritage management and its role in identifying the link between archaeological practice and theory  

Microsoft Academic Search

Using a case study of the recent history of archaeology in Australia, the paper details how Cultural Heritage Management, in addition to protecting the archaeological data base, actually protects archaeological access to it. In offering this protection, archaeologists involved in Cultural Heritage Management become the regulators of archaeological practice and theory. Here archaeology comes into direct contact and conflict with

Laurajane Smith

2000-01-01

150

INVITATION TO IDENTIFY The University of Utah is required to implement affirmative action procedures in its employment practices. Federal  

E-print Network

INVITATION TO IDENTIFY The University of Utah is required to implement affirmative action.asp Please fax the completed form to the Office of Equal Opportunity and Affirmative Action at: (801) 585-5746 or Return through Campus Mail to: Office of Equal Opportunity & Affirmative Action, 135 Park

Provancher, William

151

The sensitivity and specificity of four questions (HARK) to identify intimate partner violence: a diagnostic accuracy study in general practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Intimate partner violence (IPV) including physical, sexual and emotional violence, causes short and long term ill-health. Brief questions that reliably identify women experiencing IPV who present in clinical settings are a pre-requisite for an appropriate response from health services to this substantial public health problem. We estimated the sensitivity and specificity of four questions (HARK) developed from the Abuse

Hardip Sohal; Sandra Eldridge; Gene Feder

2007-01-01

152

Effective Teaching Practices in Reading that Enhance the Success of Students Identified as At-Risk for Reading Failure  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The goal of this descriptive study was to investigate the use of decoding strategies, specifically phonemic awareness, alphabetic principle, accuracy and fluency, and vocabulary, to determine if applying the identified decoding strategies would have an effect on the students at-risk for reading failure. The purpose was to determine if these…

Sambucci, Joan N.

2010-01-01

153

The Promise of Mindfulness Stewart Mercer  

E-print Network

The Promise of Mindfulness Stewart Mercer Professor of Primary Care Research #12;http practices � Learning to pay attention � Moment by moment � Intentionally � With curiosity and compassion #12, curiosity , compassion,) � View or perspective ( of self and others) #12;But mindfulness needs to be tasted

Swain, Peter

154

A Legal Brief--Unfulfilled Hiring Promises.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Using a specific case, this article reviews some common areas of contract and tort law applicable to principals and employment practices in public and private schools. The question/answer format treats contract validity, negligent misrepresentation, and constitutionality issues involved in a case based on unfulfilled hiring promises. Includes four…

Zirkel, Perry A.; Gluckman, Ivan B.

1988-01-01

155

Building resilience into practical conservation: identifying local management responses to global climate change in the southern Great Barrier Reef  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Climate change is now considered the greatest long-term threat to coral reefs, with some future change inevitable despite mitigation efforts. Managers must therefore focus on supporting the natural resilience of reefs, requiring that resilient reefs and reef regions be identified. We develop a framework for assessing resilience and trial it by applying the framework to target management responses to climate change on the southern Great Barrier Reef. The framework generates a resilience score for a site based on the evaluation of 19 differentially weighted indicators known or thought to confer resilience to coral reefs. Scores are summed, and sites within a region are ranked in terms of (1) their resilience relative to the other sites being assessed, and (2) the extent to which managers can influence their resilience. The framework was applied to 31 sites in Keppel Bay of the southern Great Barrier Reef, which has a long history of disturbance and recovery. Resilience and ‘management influence potential’ were both found to vary widely in Keppel Bay, informing site selection for the staged implementation of resilience-based management strategies. The assessment framework represents a step towards making the concept of resilience operational to reef managers and conservationists. Also, it is customisable, easy to teach and implement and effective in building support among local communities and stakeholders for management responses to climate change.

Maynard, J. A.; Marshall, P. A.; Johnson, J. E.; Harman, S.

2010-06-01

156

Performance Scores in General Practice: A Comparison between the Clinical versus Medication-Based Approach to Identify Target Populations  

PubMed Central

Context From one country to another, the pay-for-performance mechanisms differ on one significant point: the identification of target populations, that is, populations which serve as a basis for calculating the indicators. The aim of this study was to compare clinical versus medication-based identification of populations of patients with diabetes and hypertension over the age of 50 (for men) or 60 (for women), and any consequences this may have on the calculation of P4P indicators. Methods A comparative, retrospective, observational study was carried out with clinical and prescription data from a panel of general practitioners (GPs), the Observatory of General Medicine (OMG) for the year 2007. Two indicators regarding the prescription for statins and aspirin in these populations were calculated. Results We analyzed data from 21.690 patients collected by 61 GPs via electronic medical files. Following the clinical-based approach, 2.278 patients were diabetic, 8,271 had hypertension and 1.539 had both against respectively 1.730, 8.511 and 1.304 following the medication-based approach (% agreement?=?96%, kappa?=?0.69). The main reasons for these differences were: forgetting to code the morbidities in the clinical approach, not taking into account the population of patients who were given life style and diet rules only or taking into account patients for whom morbidities other than hypertension could justify the use of antihypertensive drugs in the medication-based approach. The mean (confidence interval) per doctor was 33.7% (31.5–35.9) for statin indicator and 38.4% (35.4–41.4) for aspirin indicator when the target populations were identified on the basis of clinical criteria whereas they were 37.9% (36.3–39.4) and 43.8% (41.4–46.3) on the basis of treatment criteria. Conclusion The two approaches yield very “similar” scores but these scores cover different realities and offer food for thought on the possible usage of these indicators in the framework of P4P programmes. PMID:22536430

Saint-Lary, Olivier; Boisnault, Philippe; Naiditch, Michel; Szidon, Philippe; Duhot, Didier; Bourgueil, Yann; Pelletier-Fleury, Nathalie

2012-01-01

157

Is Divorce Promise-Breaking?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Wedding vows seem to be promises. So they go: “I promise to love, honour, and cherish ....” But this poses a problem. Divorce\\u000a is not widely seen as a serious moral wrong, but breaking a promise is. I first consider, and defend against preliminary objections,\\u000a a ‘hard-line’ response: divorce is indeed prima facie impermissible promise-breaking. I next consider the ‘hardship’

Elizabeth Brake

2011-01-01

158

Applying psychological theories to evidence-based clinical practice: Identifying factors predictive of managing upper respiratory tract infections without antibiotics  

PubMed Central

Background Psychological models can be used to understand and predict behaviour in a wide range of settings. However, they have not been consistently applied to health professional behaviours, and the contribution of differing theories is not clear. The aim of this study was to explore the usefulness of a range of psychological theories to predict health professional behaviour relating to management of upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs) without antibiotics. Methods Psychological measures were collected by postal questionnaire survey from a random sample of general practitioners (GPs) in Scotland. The outcome measures were clinical behaviour (using antibiotic prescription rates as a proxy indicator), behavioural simulation (scenario-based decisions to managing URTI with or without antibiotics) and behavioural intention (general intention to managing URTI without antibiotics). Explanatory variables were the constructs within the following theories: Theory of Planned Behaviour (TPB), Social Cognitive Theory (SCT), Common Sense Self-Regulation Model (CS-SRM), Operant Learning Theory (OLT), Implementation Intention (II), Stage Model (SM), and knowledge (a non-theoretical construct). For each outcome measure, multiple regression analysis was used to examine the predictive value of each theoretical model individually. Following this 'theory level' analysis, a 'cross theory' analysis was conducted to investigate the combined predictive value of all significant individual constructs across theories. Results All theories were tested, but only significant results are presented. When predicting behaviour, at the theory level, OLT explained 6% of the variance and, in a cross theory analysis, OLT 'evidence of habitual behaviour' also explained 6%. When predicting behavioural simulation, at the theory level, the proportion of variance explained was: TPB, 31%; SCT, 26%; II, 6%; OLT, 24%. GPs who reported having already decided to change their management to try to avoid the use of antibiotics made significantly fewer scenario-based decisions to prescribe. In the cross theory analysis, perceived behavioural control (TPB), evidence of habitual behaviour (OLT), CS-SRM cause (chance/bad luck), and intention entered the equation, together explaining 36% of the variance. When predicting intention, at the theory level, the proportion of variance explained was: TPB, 30%; SCT, 29%; CS-SRM 27%; OLT, 43%. GPs who reported that they had already decided to change their management to try to avoid the use of antibiotics had a significantly higher intention to manage URTIs without prescribing antibiotics. In the cross theory analysis, OLT evidence of habitual behaviour, TPB attitudes, risk perception, CS-SRM control by doctor, TPB perceived behavioural control and CS-SRM control by treatment entered the equation, together explaining 49% of the variance in intention. Conclusion The study provides evidence that psychological models can be useful in understanding and predicting clinical behaviour. Taking a theory-based approach enables the creation of a replicable methodology for identifying factors that predict clinical behaviour. However, a number of conceptual and methodological challenges remain. PMID:17683558

Eccles, Martin P; Grimshaw, Jeremy M; Johnston, Marie; Steen, Nick; Pitts, Nigel B; Thomas, Ruth; Glidewell, Elizabeth; Maclennan, Graeme; Bonetti, Debbie; Walker, Anne

2007-01-01

159

Promising Strategies for Improving Student Behavior.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In response to growing public concern over declining educational quality and discipline problems in today's schools, this paper reviews research on the causes of school disruption and student misbehavior, identifies promising ameliorative strategies, and examines specific research-practitioner collaborations that have successfully reduced school…

Gottfredson, Denise C.

160

Nuclear energy: A failed promise or a promising future  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article examines nuclear energy in light of its original promise as clean, cheap energy and the current and future promises and problems associated with it. Nuclear's share of US electricity production and new capacity is reviewed as well as renewed interest because of global climate change and clean air. Licensing, siting and waste disposal are also addressed.

1990-01-01

161

Promising ethanologens for xylose fermentation  

SciTech Connect

An economical biomass-to-ethanol process depends on the efficient conversion of both its cellulose and hemicellulose components. On a dry weight basis, the typical feedstock contains approx 25-50% (w/w) glucose, 10-30% (w/w) xylose, 15-30% (w/w) lignin, and 1-5% (w/w) of other minor pentose and hexose sugars. Although many microorganisms can ferment the glucose component in cellulose to ethanol, conversion of pentose sugars in the hemicellulose fraction, particularly xylose, has been hindered by the lack of a suitable biocatalyst. Despite the development of recombinant strains with improved fermentation performance, increased ethanol yields and concentrations and shorter fermentation times are key targets that have yet to be achieved from lignocellulosic hydrolyzates. Our objective is to develop biocatalysts for the rapid and efficient conversion of xylose by engineering key metabolic pathways in selected organisms. To identify promising biocatalysts for these efforts, we have surveyed several industrial microorganisms according to several primary traits considered to be essential, as well as a number of secondary traits considered to be desirable, in a commercial biomass-to-ethanol process.

Zhang, M.; Franden, M.A.; Newman, M. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)] [and others

1995-12-31

162

Identifying bacteria in human urine: current practice and the potential for rapid, near-patient diagnosis by sensing volatile organic compounds.  

PubMed

Urinary tract infection (UTI) represents a significant burden for the National Health Service. Extensive research has been directed towards rapid detection of UTI in the last thirty years. A wide range of microbiological and chemical techniques are now available to identify and quantify bacteria in urine. However, there is a clear and present need for near, rapid, sensitive, reliable analytical methods, preferably with low-running costs, that could allow early detection of UTI and other diseases in urine. Here we review the "state of the art" of current practice for the detection of bacteria in urine and describe the advantages of the recent "e-nose" technology as a potential tool for rapid, near-patient diagnosis of UTI, by sensing volatile organic compounds (VOCs). PMID:11758602

Guernion, N; Ratcliffe, N M; Spencer-Phillips, P T; Howe, R A

2001-10-01

163

Integrated Implementation of Programs Targeting Neglected Tropical Diseases through Preventive Chemotherapy: Identifying Best Practices to Roll Out Programs at National Scale  

PubMed Central

In 2006 the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) established the Neglected Tropical Disease (NTD) Control Program to support national governments in developing successful, cost-efficient NTD programs that integrate disease-specific programs into coordinated national initiatives, in accord with the World Health Organization recommendations. A 3-stage “roll-out package” has been developed for effectively integrating and scaling up such programs to full-national scale. Stage-1 lays the groundwork—identifying NTD leadership within the Ministry of Health, conducting a national Situation Analysis, formulating a multiyear Plan of Action, and undertaking a funding gap analysis. Stage-2 focuses on scaling up the integrated NTD program—convening national stakeholder meetings, developing annual work plans, carrying out disease mapping, and establishing monitoring and evaluation activities. Stage-3 aims at ensuring effective management—identifying clear roles and responsibilities for partners, and creating a central coordinating mechanism. Assessment and reassessment of these complex NTD programs that target literally billions of people are essential to establish “best practice” strategies for long-term public health success. PMID:22403327

Hanson, Christy; Weaver, Angela; Zoerhoff, Kathryn L.; Kabore, Achille; Linehan, Mary; Doherty, Amy; Engels, Dirk; Savioli, Lorenzo; Ottesen, Eric A.

2012-01-01

164

Identifying strategies to maximise recruitment and retention of practices and patients in a multicentre randomised controlled trial of an intervention to optimise secondary prevention for coronary heart disease in primary care. | accrualnet.cancer.gov  

Cancer.gov

Identifying strategies to maximise recruitment and retention of practices and patients in a multicentre randomised controlled trial of an intervention to optimise secondary prevention for coronary heart disease in primary care.

165

Under the radar: a cross-sectional study of the challenge of identifying at-risk alcohol consumption in the general practice setting  

PubMed Central

Background Primary care providers are an important source of information regarding appropriate alcohol consumption. As early presentation to a provider for alcohol-related concerns is unlikely, it is important that providers are able to identify at-risk patients in order to provide appropriate advice. This study aimed to report the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of General Practitioner (GP) assessment of alcohol consumption compared to patient self-report, and explore characteristics associated with GP non-detection of at-risk status. Method GP practices were selected from metropolitan and regional locations in Australia. Eligible patients were adults presenting for general practice care who were able to understand English and provide informed consent. Patients completed a modified AUDIT-C by touchscreen computer as part of an omnibus health survey while waiting for their appointment. GPs completed a checklist for each patient, including whether the patient met current Australian guidelines for at-risk alcohol consumption. Patient self-report and GP assessments were compared for each patient. Results GPs completed the checklist for 1720 patients, yielding 1565 comparisons regarding alcohol consumption. The sensitivity of GPs’ detection of at-risk alcohol consumption was 26.5%, with specificity of 96.1%. Higher patient education was associated with GP non-detection of at-risk status. Conclusions GP awareness of which patients might benefit from advice regarding at-risk alcohol consumption appears low. Given the complexities associated with establishing whether alcohol consumption is ‘at-risk’, computer-based approaches to routine screening of patients are worthy of exploration as a method for prompting the provision of advice in primary care. PMID:24766913

2014-01-01

166

Investigating the Promise of Learner Corpora: Methodological Issues  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Researchers working with learner corpora promise quantitative results that would be of greater practical value in areas such as CALL than those from small-scale and qualitative studies. However, learner corpus research has not yet had an impact on practices in teaching and assessment. Significant methodological issues need to be examined if…

Pendar, Nick; Chapelle, Carol A.

2008-01-01

167

Enteric Immunization: Promises and Challenges  

Microsoft Academic Search

Immunization to prevent many intestinal infections is inadequate because most available vaccines are given parenterally, a route that does not effectively stimulate the intestinal immune system. Thus, investigators are pursuing several strategies for achieving enteric protection through oral immunization. The most promising approaches are the incorporation of immunogens into microparticles for protection and enhanced uptake of the immunogen by intestinal

William R. Brown

1996-01-01

168

America: No Promise Without Agony.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

We may discover signs of promise in the midst of agony if we make some shifts of perspective. (1) "Our fear of overt violence must be countered by our acknowledgement of covert violence." Covert violence is subtle and more destructive than physical violence because it is the "denial of personhood"--the insinuation by an act or by neglect that a…

Brown, Robert McAfee

169

Current social work perspectives on clinical practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

Several forms of progress in the development of clinical practice theory and method are identified. There is a renewed positive valuation of psychodynamic approaches, a general acceptance of a systems framework, and a greater operationalization of procedures. The current controversy between the social work scientists and artists concerning research strategies is discussed. Three promising new perspectives—of morality, spirituality, and hermeneutics-are

Max Siporin

1985-01-01

170

Understanding success and failure in multimorbidity: protocol for using realist synthesis to identify how social learning and workplace practices can be optimised  

PubMed Central

Background Multimorbidity is increasingly prevalent but, aside from epidemiological work, the impact on associated provision of healthcare and/or education is little understood. For example, it is unclear how or why healthcare interventions meet (or do not meet) people’s multiple needs. Professionals working in primary care training sites must reconcile two goals: provision of appropriate individualised healthcare and provision of constructive workplace-based learning for future professionals. Given that professionals, learners and patients may have differing priorities and conceptualisations of success and failure in the absence of cure, achievement of both goals depends on social and cultural mechanisms. This review aims to make sense of how healthcare delivery for, and education about, multimorbidity can be concurrently delivered in primary care through identification of relevant theoretical frameworks. Methods/design Realist synthesis identifies and makes sense of variable outcomes caused by interaction between mechanisms and contexts. This review will produce a synthesis of social science, education and primary care literature. Our objective is to understand interactivity between models of workplace-based education and models of patient-centred/integrated care with a focus on perceptions of 'success’ and 'failure’ in multimorbidity. We intend to build a conceptual map and a realist programme theory, populated with evidence from the literature, as the first step towards answering our review question: what is known about how and why concurrent health service delivery and professional medical education interact together to generate outcomes valued by professionals, learners and patients for patients with multimorbidity in primary care? To answer this we are focusing on relationship-based negotiation of needs-based learning and needs-based care as our primary outcome of interest. In this protocol we outline our search strategy and proposed methods of analysis and synthesis of credible and trustworthy data judged to be relevant to our research question. Discussion Findings will be submitted for peer-reviewed publication. Identification of how mechanisms of social learning and workplace practices could be optimised to improve quality and utility of patient care in multimorbidity is important. This can inform the future research regarding interventions that will produce a sustainable medical workforce equipped to provide healthcare, when the possibility of cure is absent. PMID:24066719

2013-01-01

171

Small fusion reactors: problems, promise, and pathways  

SciTech Connect

The prevalent vision of magnetic fusion as a central-station power plant projects a high-technology, low-power-density nuclear boiler that may require high energy costs to be economic. Smaller, higher-power-density approaches can reduce the impact of the fusion power core and associated support equipment on the overall cost equation for fusion. In the course of attaining sizes, power capacity, and costs that are more in line with alternative energy sources, a range of problems, promise, and pathways can be identified. The issues related to these more compact systems are addressed on the basis of generic reactor models.

Krakowski, R.A.; Hagenson, R.L.; Miller, R.L.

1984-09-24

172

Promises unfulfilled: implementation of expanded coverage for the elderly poor.  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE: To examine implementation of the Qualified Medicare Beneficiary (QMB) and Specified Low-Income Medicare Beneficiary (SLMB) programs, enacted in 1988. The article summarizes the origin of the QMB and SLMB programs, describes what we have learned about QMB and SLMB enrollment in state Medicaid programs and, despite some encouraging news on the federal front, identifies policy issues that remain in assuring access to health care for the low-income elderly. SOURCE: Based in part on research that assessed state variations in Medicaid QMB and SLMB enrollment of low-income Medicare beneficiaries and identified best practices among states in administration of the QMB and SLMB programs. STUDY DESIGN: Telephone interviews were conducted with officials in ten states to elicit qualitative information about how state Medicaid programs have implemented federal protections for low-income Medicare beneficiaries. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The QMB and SLMB programs fail to reach a sizable proportion of potentially eligible individuals in most states. Fragmentation of Medicare and Medicaid benefits, complex Medicaid eligibility and income verification processes, and rigid federal and state administrative and data systems, impede efforts to achieve promised protection for low-income elderly persons. CONCLUSIONS: For low-income Medicare beneficiaries, obtaining financial protection against their high out-of-pocket health care costs remains an important issue. The complexities associated with aligning Medicare and Medicaid to deliver health benefits to low-income older persons makes improved coordination across federal and state agencies uncertain. PMID:10778810

Lamphere, J A; Rosenbach, M L

2000-01-01

173

Evaluation of a Nurse Led Annual Review of Patients with Severe Intellectual Disabilities, Needs Identified and Needs Met, in a Large Group Practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

A learning disabilities nurse led health review, with doctor backup, was offered to patients with learning disabilities during 2002 in a large general practice. Prior to the check, patients completed an agenda sheet. During the check, the nurse discussed issues with patient and carer and completed a structured questionnaire. Patient and carer were then seen by doctor and nurse and

Graham Martin; Lynn Philip; Louise Bates; Jenny Warwick

2004-01-01

174

Drawing a Line in the Sand: Identifying the Borderzone between Self and Other in EL1 and EL2 Citation Practices  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Current concerns about academic plagiarism in student writing assume qualitative and quantitative differences in the writing of students for whom English is a first language (EL1) and English is a second language (EL2), but lack precision in measuring those differences. I examined the citation practices of EL1 and EL2 students in a timed writing…

Hyland, Theresa Ann

2009-01-01

175

Identifying Key Elements of Community-Based ESD: ESD-J's Projects to Collect ESD in Practice in Japan and Asia  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Since its establishment in 2003, the Japan Council on the UN Decade of Education for Sustainable Development (ESD-J) has paid close attention to informal learning processes in community-based efforts to promote local sustainable development. ESD-J carried out two projects to collect information on and visualise community-based ESD practice: the…

Noguchi, Fumiko

2010-01-01

176

Theorizing Practice and Practicing Theory  

E-print Network

his paper describes the emerging field of practice theory as it is practiced in relation to organizational phenomena. We identify three approaches—empirical, theoretical, and philosophical—that relate to the what, the how, ...

Feldman, Martha S.

177

Ultrasequencing of the meiofaunal biosphere: practice, pitfalls and promises  

E-print Network

. The effects of major anthropogenic stressors on global ecosystems, including elevated CO2, pollution, habitat of Southampton, National Oceanography Centre, European Way, Southampton, SO14 3ZH, UK Abstract Biodiversity, but there is a well-acknowledged biodiversity identi- fication gap related to eukaryotic meiofaunal organisms

Pfrender, Michael

178

Early Commitment Financial Aid Programs: Promises, Practices, and Policies  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Student financial assistance has long been a means to promote access to postsecondary education and attainment of college degrees. Numerous types of financial aid programs have proliferated over the years, including a relatively new concept that specifically targets high-risk, low-income students, focusing not just on getting them to go to college…

Blanco, Cheryl D.

2005-01-01

179

Developmental Mathematics: Challenges, Promising Practices, and Recent Initiatives  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Developmental education has increasingly become part of the national debate in higher education. This is particularly true for developmental mathematics courses which, in general, have the highest rates of failure and noncompletion of any developmental subject area. This manuscript describes the current state of the art in developmental…

Bonham, Barbara S.; Boylan, Hunter R.

2011-01-01

180

Developmental Mathematics: Challenges, Promising Practices, and Recent Initiatives  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Developmental education has increasingly become part of the national debate in higher education. This is particularly true for developmental mathematics courses which, in general, have the highest rates of failure and non-completion of any developmental subject area. This manuscript describes the current state of the art in developmental…

Bonham, Barbara S.; Boylan, Hunter R.

2012-01-01

181

Promising Practices in Using the Internet to Teach Social Studies  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article presents several teachers and school Web sites that offer teaching strategies in using the Internet to teach social sciences. These Web sites include: (1) Mrs. Cori Culp's Website (www.bv229.k12.ks.us/bvw_culp); (2) Mr. Williams's 5th Grade(teachers.santee.k12.ca.us/cwilliams/index.htm); (3) Ms. Stewart's Classroom Page…

Risinger, C. Frederick

2006-01-01

182

State Scholars Initiative in Review: Promising Practices and Lessons Learned  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In response to the demands of the changing economy and the business community's need for better-educated, more highly skilled workers, the U.S. Department of Education, through the Office of Vocational and Adult Education (OVAE), developed the State Scholars Initiative (SSI), which encourages students to take a rigorous course of study in high…

Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education, 2009

2009-01-01

183

Disability, inclusion and the Christian Church: practice, paradox or promise.  

PubMed

In Western society, Christian Churches historically have been, and contemporarily are, involved with people perceived with disability. While they may practise biblical ethical imperatives such as care, compassion, mercy, support, welfare and charity, Churches have, paradoxically, only minimally offered cohesive or explicit moral notions for the 'inclusion' of people with disability in communities. Importantly, Churches have paid little attention to the historical construction of 'exclusion'. This paper proposes that matrices of patriarchal theology and patriarchal ethics continue to sustain structural positions of societal exclusion for people with disability because of implicit assumptions and values in the matrices about difference and different bodies. By examining a conjunction between feminism and disability around the issue of embodiment, the paper contends that 'inclusion' needs to be explored through the formation and embracing of matrices of feminist theology and feminist ethics. PMID:9368093

Clapton, J

1997-10-01

184

Curriculum Integration. Center for School Success Promising Practices Series  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This publication focuses on curriculum integration. Integrative curriculum focuses on a theme or themes upon which two or more disciplines is organized. Curriculum integration has been proposed as a way of organizing the life skills, or "common learnings," considered essential for citizens in a democracy. The curriculum is organized around…

Imbimbo, Josephine; Knopf, Naomi

2009-01-01

185

Annual Outcomes and Assessment Conference Designing and Assessing Promising Practices  

E-print Network

Speakers Updates from the Workforce, Academic Affairs and Research Division at the Texas Higher Education Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board Workforce, Academic Affairs and Research 1200 East Anderson Director at the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board in the Division of Workforce, Academic Affairs

Mohanty, Saraju P.

186

Translating Genomic Research into Clinical Practice: Promise and Pitfalls  

E-print Network

with DNA polymerase and termination with dideoxynucleo- tides described in 1975, then modified in 1977, Harry Ostrer, MD, and Paraic A. Kenny, PhD OVERVIEW Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease associated with variable clinical outcomes despite standard local therapy for the primary tumor and systemic adjuvant

Kenny, Paraic

187

Improving Community College Student Persistence: An Investigation of Promising Practices  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In recent years, community colleges have garnered national attention in terms of their potential to produce graduates and assist in the revitalization of the national economy. This has resulted in an increased need for both community college researchers and practitioners to understand more fully the factors that influence student persistence. The…

Schwartz, Mary Beth McJunkin

2010-01-01

188

Block Scheduling: Center for School Success Promising Practices Series  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This publication focuses on block scheduling. Alternative scheduling models--usually called "block scheduling" because they involve blocks of time for student learning--restructure the school day. Schools may adopt block scheduling to create more productive and personal relationships among teachers and students, to design challenging curricula…

Imbimbo, Josephine; Gilkes, Alwyn

2009-01-01

189

Teaching Combined Grade Classes: Real Problems and Promising Practices.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study, conducted by a group of teachers, examined various aspects of multigrade classrooms in Virginia through a mail survey of the state's multigrade teachers whose names and addresses were available (87 responded). A 21-item Grade Combination Teacher Experience and Perceptions Survey developed by the study group was used to collect…

Appalachia Educational Lab., Charleston, WV.

190

Student Advisory. Center for School Success Promising Practices Series  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This publication focuses on student advisory programs. High school students often feel disconnected and have few personalized relationships with the adults who educate them. Advisory programs are based on the belief that students need the opportunity to develop trusting relationships with adult educators and that doing so benefits students in a…

Imbimbo, Josephine; Morgan, Samuel; Plaza, Eileen

2009-01-01

191

Socialization in Online Programs. Promising Practices in Online Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Researchers studying socialization in online learning note that definitions are quite broad, suggesting that "Socialization is about people being able to mingle and establish connections on one or more levels. They speak[with] one another; share ideas and information and confirm the connections made through an agreed upon means." More broadly,…

Watson, John; Gemin, Butch

2008-01-01

192

Illinois Adult Education Bridges: Promising Practices. Transition Highlights. Issue 4  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

To enhance state-level adult education and employment policy, in 2007 the Joyce Foundation began the Shifting Gears (SG) initiative to assist six states (Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio and Wisconsin) to integrate adult education, workforce development and postsecondary education policies and improve job opportunities for low-skilled…

Bragg, Debra; Oertle, Kathleen Marie; Kim, Sujung; Kirby, Catherine; Taylor, Jason; Harmon, Tim; Liss, Loralea

2011-01-01

193

Oregon's Coordinated Care Organizations: A Promising and Practical Reform Model.  

PubMed

Continuing its path of Medicaid program innovation, Oregon recently embarked on a major reform that gives regional coordinated care organizations (CCOs) global budgets and accountability for the physical, behavioral, and dental care of the state's Medicaid beneficiaries (Howard et al. 2014). There are some who maintain that the state's bold reform initiative is overly aggressive in scope and unrealistically optimistic in schedule and may prove to be a costly debacle to the state of Oregon. We argue that the Oregon CCO model is not only bold in its aims and timetable but also realistically achievable. PMID:24842975

Howard, Steven W; Bernell, Stephanie L; Yoon, Jangho; Luck, Jeff

2014-08-01

194

Cultural Neuroscience: Progress and Promise  

PubMed Central

The nature and origin of human diversity has been a source of intellectual curiosity since the beginning of human history. Contemporary advances in cultural and biological sciences provide unique opportunities for the emerging field of cultural neuroscience. Research in cultural neuroscience examines how cultural and genetic diversity shape the human mind, brain and behavior across multiple time scales: situation, ontogeny and phylogeny. Recent progress in cultural neuroscience provides novel theoretical frameworks for understanding the complex interaction of environmental, cultural and genetic factors in the production of adaptive human behavior. Here, we provide a brief history of cultural neuroscience, theoretical and methodological advances, as well as empirical evidence of the promise of and progress in the field. Implications of this research for population health disparities and public policy are discussed. PMID:23914126

Chiao, Joan Y.; Cheon, Bobby K.; Pornpattanangkul, Narun; Mrazek, Alissa J.; Blizinsky, Katherine D.

2013-01-01

195

New promise for the electric car: plastic-metal batteries  

Microsoft Academic Search

Plastic metals are much more than a laboratory curiosity. They might find practical application in many products in which metal or semiconductor materials are now used--electromagnetic shielding, photovoltaic cells, diodes and transistors, even wiring. But the most promising potential use is in batteries. Two different organic polymers (long-chain hydrocarbon molecules) are being investigated for possible use in batteries; polyacetylene (the

1982-01-01

196

Nano-Manufacturing While nanotechnology promises to revolutionize everything from  

E-print Network

Nano-Manufacturing While nanotechnology promises to revolutionize everything from energy production futuristic systems will remain science fiction without practical and scalable nano-manufacturing capabilities. Researchers at the University of Maryland's NanoCenter have the manufacturing capabilities needed for turning

Hill, Wendell T.

197

The Ambivalence of Promising Technology  

PubMed Central

Issues of responsibility in the world of nanotechnology are becoming explicit with the emergence of a discourse on ‘responsible development’ of nanoscience and nanotechnologies. Much of this discourse centres on the ambivalences of nanotechnology and of promising technology in general. Actors must find means of dealing with these ambivalences. Actors’ actions and responses to ambivalence are shaped by their position and context, along with strategic games they are involved in, together with other actors. A number of interviews were conducted with industrial actors with the aim of uncovering their ethical stances towards responsible development of nanotechnology. The data shows that standard repertoires of justification of nanotechnological development were used. Thus, the industrial actors fell back on their position and associated responsibilities. Such responses reinforce a division of moral labour in which industrial actors and scientists can focus on the progress of science and technology, while other actors, such as NGOs, are expected to take care of broader considerations, such as ethical and social issues. PMID:20835398

2010-01-01

198

Magnetic refrigeration: the promise and the problems  

SciTech Connect

Magnetic refrigeration uses the temperature- and field-dependence of the entropy of some magnetic materials to accomplish cooling. Because of the intrinsically high efficiency of the magnetization and demagnetization process and because of the potential for excellent heat transfer between solids and fluids, magnetic refrigerators promise to have higher efficiency than existing gas-cycle refrigerators. Many ground-based and space-based applications could benefit significantly from the cost savings implied by higher efficiency. Other attributes of these devices are high reliability and low volume and mass per unit cooling power. The development of these refrigerators is underway at several places around the world, including the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The progress to date has been encouraging but some problems have been clearly identified. The arguments for high efficiency and the problems that will need to be solved to achieve this goal are discussed.

Barclay, J.A.

1984-01-01

199

Organ printing: promises and challenges.  

PubMed

Organ printing or biomedical application of rapid prototyping, also defined as additive layer-by-layer biomanufacturing, is an emerging transforming technology that has potential for surpassing traditional solid scaffold-based tissue engineering. Organ printing has certain advantages: it is an automated approach that offers a pathway for scalable reproducible mass production of tissue engineered products; it allows a precised simultaneous 3D positioning of several cell types; it enables creation tissue with a high level of cell density; it can solve the problem of vascularization in thick tissue constructs; finally, organ printing can be done in situ. The ultimate goal of organ-printing technology is to fabricate 3D vascularized functional living human organs suitable for clinical implantation. The main practical outcomes of organ-printing technology are industrial scalable robotic biofabrication of complex human tissues and organs, automated tissue-based in vitro assays for clinical diagnostics, drug discovery and drug toxicity, and complex in vitro models of human diseases. This article describes conceptual framework and recent developments in organ-printing technology, outlines main technological barriers and challenges, and presents potential future practical applications. PMID:18154465

Mironov, Vladimir; Kasyanov, Vladimir; Drake, Christopher; Markwald, Roger R

2008-01-01

200

Approaches for Advancing Girls' Education in Ghana: A Symposium To Examine Current Practices and Identify Future Directions (1st, Ajumako, Central Region, Ghana, June 25-26, 2001).  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Girls' Education Unit (GEU) of the Basic Education Division of Ghana Education Service (GES) organized this Approaches for Advancing Girls' Education (AAGE) symposium to address the issues of girls' education, to construct a comprehensive picture of what interventions related to girls' education are currently being implemented, and identify

Academy for Educational Development, Washington, DC.

201

Rearing practices identified as risk factors for ostreid herpesvirus 1 (OsHV-1) infection in Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas spat.  

PubMed

Early detection of Pacific oyster spat infected with ostreid herpesvirus 1 (OsHV-1) could prevent introduction of OsHV-1-infected individuals into farming areas or onshore rearing facilities, thus reducing the risk of infection of naïve oysters in such production systems. Experiments were conducted on several hundred oyster spat provided by producers in order to examine whether early rearing practices could be considered as potential risk factors for (1) OsHV-1 infection as detected by molecular methods and (2) spat mortality experimentally induced through thermal challenge. Spat groups collected on oyster beds and hatchery spat reared in growout areas during summer exhibited higher viral DNA contamination and mortalities during the trial than spat kept in onshore rearing facilities. Quantification of viral DNA before and during the trial showed that infection prevalence and intensity changed over time and revealed latent infection initially unsuspected in 3 of 10 groups. Thermal challenge induced a clear increase in the probability of detecting infected individuals, particularly for groups exhibiting significant prevalence of OsHV-1-contaminated spat prior to the challenge. The use of detection methods are discussed in relation to early rearing practices and disease control strategies. PMID:25114044

Normand, Julien; Blin, Jean-Louis; Jouaux, Aude

2014-08-11

202

Preventing ARDS: Progress, Promise, and Pitfalls.  

PubMed

Advances in critical care practice have led to a substantial decline in the incidence of ARDS over the past several years. Low tidal volume ventilation, timely resuscitation and antimicrobial administration, restrictive transfusion practices, and primary prevention of aspiration and nosocomial pneumonia have likely contributed to this reduction. Despite decades of research, there is no proven pharmacologic treatment of ARDS, and mortality from ARDS remains high. Consequently, recent initiatives have broadened the scope of lung injury research to include targeted prevention of ARDS. Prediction scores have been developed to identify patients at risk for ARDS, and clinical trials testing aspirin and inhaled budesonide/formoterol for ARDS prevention are ongoing. Future trials aimed at preventing ARDS face several key challenges. ARDS has not been validated as an end point for pivotal clinical trials, and caution is needed when testing toxic therapies that may prevent ARDS yet potentially increase mortality. PMID:25288000

Beitler, Jeremy R; Schoenfeld, David A; Thompson, B Taylor

2014-10-01

203

K-12 and University Educators Working Together toward Change: Initiating a Conversation about Practice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This case study of a joint school/university professional development opportunity explored how 12 practitioners came together to examine change in light of discrepancies between current practice in local schools and promising practices recommended in the literature for students identified as having significant disabilities. The group met monthly…

Fisher, Mary; Rogan, Patricia M.

2012-01-01

204

Fulfilling the promise of biotechnology.  

PubMed

Genetic engineering has produced pharmaceuticals, disease-resistant plants, cloned animals and research and industrial products. While the comparably mature field of medical biotechnology now reveals its true potential, marine biotechnology is still in the realm of the future. As we explore the earth for new sources of natural chemicals, we now search the waters. Myriad organisms, most unknown to us, live there. Many produce compounds that can be commercialized, or the organisms themselves may be commercialized, through genetic engineering methods. For decades, scientists studied the ocean depths searching for unique molecules and organisms. But not until the early 1980s was there a synthesis uniting marine natural products, ecology, aquaculture and bioremediation research under the heading of marine biotechnology. As harvesting enough products from marine sources to produce sufficient amounts, even for study, is nearly impossible, we need to use genomics techniques to identify biologically active compounds. As we damage our oceanic ecosystems through pollution, overfishing and destructive fishing methods, opportunities to learn more about marine organisms and their commercial potential may be limited. Although governments and intergovernmental agencies are committed to funding and expanding oceanic research, more funding is needed to discover and study the ocean's vast, unplumbed resources. PMID:14550029

Colwell, Rita R

2002-11-01

205

The promise and pitfalls of systematic conservation planning  

E-print Network

The promise and pitfalls of systematic conservation planning Robert I. McDonald1 Worldwide Office, The Nature Conservancy, 4245 North Fairfax Drive, Arlington, VA 22203 S ystematic conservation planning conservation planning (2). In this corpus, the first focus historically was simply on identifying where differ

Kark, Salit

206

A comparison between the efficiency of the Xpert MTB/RIF assay and nested PCR in identifying Mycobacterium tuberculosis during routine clinical practice  

PubMed Central

Objectives Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) is more sensitive, specific, and rapid than the conventional methods of acid-fast bacilli (AFB) smear and culture. The aim of this study was to determine if the Xpert MTB/rifampicin (RIF) assay had additional advantages over nested PCR for the detection of MTB in a geographical area with intermediate tuberculosis (TB) incidence. Methods Between February and December 2013, the Xpert MTB/RIF assay and MTB nested PCR, as well as AFB smear and culture, were simultaneously performed on 198 clinical samples (160 pulmonary and 38 non-pulmonary specimens) collected from 171 patients hospitalized at Hallym University Medical Center for possible TB. The accuracy of the diagnosis of MTB culture-positive TB and the turnaround time of reporting laboratory results were calculated and compared. Rifampin resistance by the Xpert MTB/RIF assay was reviewed with that of conventional drug susceptibility testing (DST). Results The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of the Xpert MTB/RIF assay and MTB nested PCR for diagnosis of MTB culture-positive pulmonary TB were 86.1% vs. 69.4% (P=0.1563), 97.8% vs. 94.1% (P=0.2173), 91.2% vs. 75.8% (P=0.1695), and 96.4% vs. 92.0% (P=0.2032), respectively. The median turnaround times of the Xpert MTB/RIF assay and MTB nested PCR were 0 [0-4] days and 4 [1-11] days, respectively (P<0.001). Two cases of rifampin resistance, as determined by the Xpert MTB/RIF assay, were found to be multi-drug resistant (MDR) pulmonary TB by DST. Conclusions The Xpert MTB/RIF assay seemed to be sensitive, specific, and comparable to nested PCR for identifying MTB among clinically suspected TB patients, and the assay can be valuable in giving a timely identification of resistance to rifampin. PMID:24976983

Kim, Cheol-Hong; Woo, Heungjeong; Kim, Changhwan; Choi, Jeong-Hee; Jang, Seung-Hun; Park, Sang Myeon; Lee, Myung Goo; Jung, Ki-Suck; Hyun, Jeongwon; Kim, Hyun Soo

2014-01-01

207

Cancer and Inflammation: Promise for Biological Therapy  

PubMed Central

Cancers often arise as the end stage of inflammation in adults, but not in children. As such there is a complex interplay between host immune cells during neoplastic development, with both an ability to promote cancer as well as limit or eliminate it, most often complicit with the host. In humans, defining inflammation and the presence of inflammatory cells within or surrounding the tumor is a critical aspect of modern pathology. Groups defining staging for neoplasms are strongly encouraged to assess and incorporate measures of the presence of apoptosis, autophagy, and necrosis as well as the nature and quality of the immune infiltrate. Both environmental as well as genetic factors enhance the risk of cigarette smoking, H. pylori, hepatitis B/C, human papilloma virus, solar irradiation, asbestos, pancreatitis, or other causes of chronic inflammation. Identifying suitable genetic polymorphisms in cytokines, cytokine receptors, and Toll-like receptors among other immune response genes is also seen as high value as genomic sequencing becomes less expensive. Animal models which incorporate and assess not only the genetic anlagen but also the inflammatory cells and the presence of microbial pathogen [PAMPs] and damage associated molecular pattern molecules [DAMPs] are necessary. Identifying micro-RNAs involved in regulating the response to damage or injury are seen as highly promising. Although no therapeutic strategies to prevent or treat cancers based on insights into inflammatory pathways are currently approved for the common epithelial malignancies, there remains substantial interest in agents targeting COX2 or PPAR?, ethyl pyruvate, as well as steroids and several novel agents on the horizon. PMID:20386472

Demaria, Sandra; Pikarsky, Eli; Karin, Michael; Coussens, Lisa M.; Chen, Yen-Ching; El-Omar, Emad M.; Trinchieri, Giorgio; Dubinett, Steven M.; Mao, Jenny T.; Szabo, Eva; Krieg, Arthur; Weiner, George J.; Fox, Bernard A.; Coukos, George; Wang, Ena; Abraham, Robert T.; Carbone, Michele; Lotze, Michael T.

2010-01-01

208

Identifying and Managing Risk.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The role of the college or university chief financial officer in institutional risk management is (1) to identify risk (physical, casualty, fiscal, business, reputational, workplace safety, legal liability, employment practices, general liability), (2) to develop a campus plan to reduce and control risk, (3) to transfer risk, and (4) to track and…

Abraham, Janice M.

1999-01-01

209

Integrated digital avionic systems - Promise and threats  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The progress being made in effective systems design implementation for digital equipment for aircraft avionics sytems is assayed. The history of digital systems integration in avionics hardware is traced from use of 16-transistor chips to emerging 100,000 gate chips, and attention is given to architectural considerations for future hardware. Design considerations include top-down or bottom-up architecture, distributed microprocessor and computer resources, integrated components or data fusion, etc. Systems decomposition practices in design permit separate design of flight safety systems, redundancy, fault tolerance, and identifying components that feature different technologies. Present flight control systems sport a MBTF of 1,000,000 hr when separate controls are installed for each flight system.

Zempolich, B. A.

1983-10-01

210

Detecting Promising Areas by Evolutionary Clustering Search  

Microsoft Academic Search

A challenge in hybrid evolutionary algorithms is to deÞne ecient strategies to cover all search space, applying local search only in actually promising search areas. This paper proposes a way of detecting promising search areas based on clustering. In this approach, an iterative clustering works simultaneously to an evolutionary algorithm account- ing the activity (selections or updatings) in search areas

Alexandre César Muniz De Oliveira; Luiz Antonio Nogueira Lorena

2004-01-01

211

Inferences from counterfactual threats and promises.  

PubMed

We examine how people understand and reason from counterfactual threats, for example, "if you had hit your sister, I would have grounded you" and counterfactual promises, for example, "if you had tidied your room, I would have given you ice-cream." The first experiment shows that people consider counterfactual threats, but not counterfactual promises, to have the illocutionary force of an inducement. They also make the immediate inference that the action mentioned in the "if" part of the counterfactual threat and promise did not occur. The second experiment shows that people make more negative inferences (modus tollens and denial of the antecedent) than affirmative inferences (modus ponens and affirmation of the consequent) from counterfactual threats and promises, unlike indicative threats and promises. We discuss the implications of the results for theories of the mental representations and cognitive processes that underlie conditional inducements. PMID:22580411

Egan, Suzanne M; Byrne, Ruth M J

2012-01-01

212

Identifying Best Practices in Hydraulic Fracturing Using  

E-print Network

in Medina and Whirlpool sands of southwest New York State Using Virtual Intelligence Techniques #12;SPE Medina and Whirlpool sands of southwest New York State are considered to be tight gas sands. Most wells 72385 METHODOLOGY Although the terms data mining and knowledge discovery are not new, the combination

Mohaghegh, Shahab

213

Promise-based management: the essence of execution.  

PubMed

Critical initiatives stall for a variety of reasons--employee disengagement, a lack of coordination between functions, complex organizational structures that obscure accountability, and so on. To overcome such obstacles, managers must fundamentally rethink how work gets done. Most of the challenges stem from broken or poorly crafted commitments. That's because every company is, at its heart, a dynamic network of promises made between employees and colleagues, customers, outsourcing partners, or other stakeholders. Executives can overcome many problems in the short-term and foster productive, reliable workforces for the long-term by practicing what the authors call "promise-based management," which involves cultivating and coordinating commitments in a systematic way. Good promises share five qualities: They are public, active, voluntary, explicit, and mission based. To develop and execute an effective promise, the "provider" and the "customer" in the deal should go through three phases of conversation. The first, achieving a meeting of minds, entails exploring the fundamental questions of coordinated effort: What do you mean? Do you understand what I mean? What should I do? What will you do? Who else should we talk to? In the next phase, making it happen, the provider executes on the promise. In the final phase, closing the loop, the customer publicly declares that the provider has either delivered the goods or failed to do so. Leaders must weave and manage their webs of promises with great care-encouraging iterative conversation and making sure commitments are fulfilled reliably. If they do, they can enhance coordination and cooperation among colleagues, build the organizational agility required to seize new business opportunities, and tap employees' entrepreneurial energies. PMID:17432155

Sull, Donald N; Spinosa, Charles

2007-04-01

214

New study on acupuncture contains promising findings  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

The Great Beyond: Acupuncture 'works in mice'http://blogs.nature.com/news/thegreatbeyond/2010/05/acupuncture_works_in_mice.htmlYankees starter A.J. Burnett credits acupuncture with helping him stay healthyhttp://www.nj.com/yankees/index.ssf/2010/05/yankees_starter_aj_burnett_cre.htmlNational Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine: Acupuncturehttp://nccam.nih.gov/health/acupuncture/Acupuncture: MedlinePlushttp://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/acupuncture.htmlAmerican Academy of Medical Acupuncture [pdf]http://www.medicalacupuncture.org/Acupuncture has been practiced for thousands of year, but some medical scholars and health care experts remain skeptical of its benefits. Some have claimed that establishing a control group in clinical trails to prove the treatment's efficacy is difficult, if not impossible. This week, a team of researchers at the Center for Translational Neuromedicine at the University of Rochester Medical Center announced that the needle pricks involved in acupuncture might help relieve pain by triggering a natural painkilling chemical. Medical researcher and lead author Dr. Maiken Nedergaard and her colleagues reported their findings in the journal Nature Neuroscience. The findings were based on studies that administered half-hour acupuncture treatments to a group of mice with paw discomfort. Dr. Nedergaard and her colleagues found that adenosine (the natural painkiller in question) levels in the affected areas near the needle insertion points were 24 times greater after treatment. This particular chemical is best known for regulating sleep by inhibiting nerve signals and inflammation. While these are certainly early days for this work, the initial results are promising and it will be interesting to track follow-up studies.The first link will take visitors to a piece from this Monday's Bloomburg Businessweek which reports on this recent study. The second link will take interested parties to an entry from the Nature blog, "The Great Beyond". The entry talks a bit about the new study and also has several additional links. The third link will lead visitors to a recent article from the Newark Star-Ledger about New York Yankee A.J. Burnett's use of acupuncture. Moving on the fourth link leads to the acupuncture information page, provided by the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine. The fifth link will whisk users away to more information on acupuncture from MedlinePlus and the National Institutes of Health. The last link leads to the homepage of the American Academy of Medical Acupuncture, which has information on their professional work and the world of acupuncture.

Grinnell, Max

2010-06-04

215

Early Trial Promising for Ebola Vaccine  

MedlinePLUS

... page, please enable JavaScript. Early Trial Promising for Ebola Vaccine Injections appear safe, but one expert is ... 2015) Wednesday, November 26, 2014 Related MedlinePlus Pages Ebola Immunization WEDNESDAY, Nov. 26, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- An ...

216

Synthetic Peptide Vaccine for Melanoma Holds Promise  

Cancer.gov

Early clinical trials of a synthetic vaccine are showing promise in obtaining an immune response from patients with melanoma, an often-deadly form of skin cancer, according to researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI).

217

Realizing the promises of marine biotechnology  

Microsoft Academic Search

High-quality research in the field of marine biotechnology is one of the key-factors for successful innovation in exploiting the vast diversity of marine life. However, fascinating scientific research with promising results and claims on promising potential applications (e.g. for pharmaceuticals, nutritional supplements, (feed-)products for aquaculture and bioremediation solutions) is not the only factor to realise the commercial applications of marine

Esther E. M. Luiten; Ida Akkerman; Albert Koulman; Pauline Kamermans; Hans Reith; Maria J. Barbosa; Detmer Sipkema; René H. Wijffels

2003-01-01

218

The Promise and Reality of Pharmacogenetics in Psychiatry  

PubMed Central

Summary Existing psychotropic medications for the treatment of mental illnesses, including antidepressants, mood stabilizers, and antipsychotics, are clinically sub-optimal. They are effective in only a subset of patients or produce partial responses, and they are often associated with debilitating side effects that discourage adherence. There is growing enthusiasm in the promise of pharmacogenetics to personalize the use of these treatments to maximize their efficacy and tolerability. However, there is still a long way to go before this promise becomes a reality. In this article, we review the progress that has been made in research towards understanding how genetic factors influence psychotropic drug responses and the challenges that lie ahead in translating the research findings into clinical practices that yield tangible benefits for patients with mental illnesses. PMID:20159346

Zandi, Peter P.; Judy, Jennifer T.

2011-01-01

219

Promising alternative settings for HPV vaccination of US adolescents.  

PubMed

Vaccination in alternative settings, defined here as being outside of traditional primary care, can help address the pressing public health problem of low human papillomavirus vaccine coverage among adolescents in the United States. Pharmacies are promising because they are highly accessible and have well established immunization practices. However, pharmacies currently face policy and reimbursement challenges. School-located mass vaccination programs are also promising because of their high reach and demonstrated success in providing other vaccines, but control by local policymakers and challenges in establishing community partnerships complicate widespread implementation. Health centers in schools are currently too few to greatly increase access to human papillomavirus vaccine. Specialty clinics have experience with vaccination, but the older age of their patient populations limits their reach. Future steps to making alternative settings a success include expanding their use of statewide vaccine registries and improving their coordination with primary care providers. PMID:24405401

Shah, Parth D; Gilkey, Melissa B; Pepper, Jessica K; Gottlieb, Sami L; Brewer, Noel T

2014-02-01

220

Product line management: its meaning and future promise.  

PubMed

The concept of product line management has recently drawn much attention in the health care field. The impetus has come from both marketing and accounting professionals as they have sought to find solutions to identified problems. Examined here are the roots of product line management, the reasons for the growth in the application of the concept in health care, and whether it promises to solve the problems faced by health care organizations in the current highly competitive environment. PMID:10300870

Salter, V

1986-05-01

221

The promise and challenges of blood spot methylomics  

PubMed Central

Epigenome-wide association studies (EWAS) are being extensively performed to identify epigenetic variants associated to complex diseases. However, EWAS may identify variants that are disease-induced rather than disease-causal. Recent studies have highlighted the use of Guthrie cards to profile the methylome at birth, permitting researchers to find epigenetic variants present in patients before they are diagnosed with clinical disease, with the implicit suggestion that these variants are more likely to be disease causal. The use of Guthrie cards for research purposes throws up a number of ethical issues. We review here the promises and pitfalls of Guthrie cards for disease research. PMID:23880534

Ramagopalan, Sreeram V; Rakyan, Vardhman K

2013-01-01

222

Identifying the potential rural optometrist.  

PubMed

Rural optometrists were found to differ from urban optometrists in background, environmental attitude, and interest patterns. Attitude toward the urban environment and place of origin were the best predictors of an optometrist's practice location. When "urbanism" and "origin" were scaled and placed in a multiple regression equation to predict practice location, identification of an optometrist's location as rural or urban was highly accurate. Most importantly, scores on the equation were predictive of optometry students' future practice locations. A single cut-off point on the equation correctly identified 79% of students who entered rural or isolated small city practice and 81% of those who entered urban practice. The findings suggest that optometry students most likely to enter rural (or indeed urban) practice can be objectively identified early in, or even prior to, training. Such identification may assist educators in selecting and training optometrists who will deliver vision care to people in areas of greatest need. PMID:984177

Kegel-Flom, P

1976-09-01

223

Putting more practice into communities of practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Paper is based on the evaluation of a sample of communities of practice formed with funding from Reframing the Future in 2002. The paper provides three good practice examples from the 2002 communities that were effective in identifying, reflecting upon and improving their practice, such as their ideas, tools and work styles. This reflection on practice was particularly apparent

Susan Young; John Mitchell

224

New promise for the electric car: plastic-metal batteries  

SciTech Connect

Plastic metals are much more than a laboratory curiosity. They might find practical application in many products in which metal or semiconductor materials are now used--electromagnetic shielding, photovoltaic cells, diodes and transistors, even wiring. But the most promising potential use is in batteries. Two different organic polymers (long-chain hydrocarbon molecules) are being investigated for possible use in batteries; polyacetylene (the material Pennsylvania University researchers use) and polyparaphenylene (developed at Allied Corp.'s research center in Morristown, N.J.).

Ruby, D.

1982-02-01

225

Identifying Elements of a Biography  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

In this resource, students will identify and describe evidence in a text showing that it is a biography. In guided and independent practice students will use A Picture Book of Anne Frank by David A. Adler.

Readworks

2012-03-23

226

Do promises matter? An exploration of the role of promises in psychological contract breach.  

PubMed

Promises are positioned centrally in the study of psychological contract breach and are argued to distinguish psychological contracts from related constructs, such as employee expectations. However, because the effects of promises and delivered inducements are confounded in most research, the role of promises in perceptions of, and reactions to, breach remains unclear. If promises are not an important determinant of employee perceptions, emotions, and behavioral intentions, this would suggest that the psychological contract breach construct might lack utility. To assess the unique role of promises, the authors manipulated promises and delivered inducements separately in hypothetical scenarios in Studies 1 (558 undergraduates) and 2 (441 employees), and they measured them separately (longitudinally) in Study 3 (383 employees). The authors' results indicate that breach perceptions do not represent a discrepancy between what employees believe they were promised and were given. In fact, breach perceptions can exist in the absence of promises. Further, promises play a negligible role in predicting feelings of violation and behavioral intentions. Contrary to the extant literature, the authors' findings suggest that promises may matter little; employees are concerned primarily with what the organization delivers. PMID:19702368

Montes, Samantha D; Zweig, David

2009-09-01

227

Konjac glucomannan, a promising polysaccharide for OCDDS.  

PubMed

Oral colon targeting drug delivery system (OCDDS) is a highly effective formulation for drugs absorbed by colon, or to treat colonic diseases specifically. To obtain colon targeting, many pharmaceutical approaches have been studied, among which, taking advantage of specific degradation of excipients by colon enzymes is one of the most promising strategies. With properties of specific colon ?-mannanase degradation, biocompatibility, gel-forming, low toxicity and high stability, konjac glucomannan (KGM) becomes a promising natural excipient for oral OCDDS. This paper summaries structure and properties of KGM, reviews achievements and prospects on KGM and modified konjac glucomannan about their application as pharmaceutic excipient for the OCDDS recently. PMID:24607175

Zhang, Cui; Chen, Ji-da; Yang, Feng-Qing

2014-04-15

228

Stem cell research and economic promises.  

PubMed

In the context of stem cell research, the promise of economic growth has become a common policy argument for adoption of permissive policies and increased government funding. However, declarations of economic and commercial benefit, which can be found in policy reports, the scientific literature, public funding policies, and the popular press, have arguably created a great deal of expectation. Can stem cell research deliver on the economic promise? And what are the implications of this economic ethos for the researchers who must work under its shadow? PMID:20579253

Caulfield, Timothy

2010-01-01

229

An intensive search for promising fungal biological control agents of ticks, particularly Rhipicephalus microplus  

Microsoft Academic Search

Entomopathogenic fungi have been investigated worldwide as promising biological control agents of the cattle tick Rhipicephalus microplus. The current study evaluates the virulence of several fungal isolates to R. microplus larva in the laboratory as part of an effort to identify isolates with promise for effective biocontrol of R. microplus in the field. Sixty fungal isolates, encompassing 5 Beauveria spp.

Éverton K. K. Fernandes; Isabele C. Angelo; Drauzio E. N. Rangel; Thiago C. Bahiense; Áurea M. L. Moraes; Donald W. Roberts; Vânia R. E. P. Bittencourt

2011-01-01

230

The Promises of Moral Foundations Theory  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In this article I examine whether Moral Foundations Theory can fulfil the promises that Haidt claims for the theory: that it will help in developing new approaches to moral education and to the moral conflicts that divide our diverse society. I argue that, first, the model that Haidt suggests for understanding the plurality of moralities--a shared…

Musschenga, Bert

2013-01-01

231

Microarray Technology: A Promising Tool in Nutrigenomics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Microarray technology is a powerful tool for the global evaluation of gene expression profiles in tissues and for understanding many of the factors controlling the regulation of gene transcription. This technique not only provides a considerable amount of information on markers and predictive factors that may potentially characterize a specific clinical picture, but also promises new applications for therapy. One

Andrea Masotti; Letizia Da Sacco; Gian Franco Bottazzo; Anna Alisi

2010-01-01

232

Knowledge Management: Problems, Promises, Realities, and Challenges  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article explores the implications of a design perspective for knowledge management (KM). We examine the major problems which our approach must address, the promises it offers, the realities we have explored in our work and the continuing challenges. The authors' KM approach assumes that knowledge is not a commodity but that it is collaboratively designed and constructed.

Gerhard Fischer; Jonathan L. Ostwald

2001-01-01

233

TOMORROW'S READING INSTRUCTION--PARADOX AND PROMISE.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

THE PARADOXES AND PROMISES OF TOMORROWS READING INSTRUCTION ARE PROJECTED AND ANALYZED. CURRENT AND FUTURE DEVELOPMENTS IN THE AREAS OF TRANSPORTATION, COMMUNICATION, CHEMISTRY, PSYCHOLOGY, AND MEDICINE ARE DISCUSSED IN LIGHT OF THE IMPACT THESE INNOVATIONS WILL MAKE ON SOCIETY. THE CHANGES IN EDUCATION IN GENERAL AND IN THE TEACHING OF READING IN…

SMITH, NILA BANTON

234

Alcohol Research: Promise for the Decade.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Over the past 20 years, alcohol researchers have made intensive efforts to understand alcohol use and its outcomes. To date, researchers have made much progress toward understanding the causes and consequences of alcoholism and its related problems. This publication attempts to convey the great spirit and promise of alcohol research. Established…

Gordis, Enoch

235

Fulfilling the Promise of Educational Accountability  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

When No Child Left Behind (NCLB) was signed into law, the President and secretary of education promised sweeping reform of the American education system. In the five years since the law took effect, U.S. public schools have, indeed, seen remarkable change. However, not all of the changes have been well received. Policy makers, scholars, and…

Nelson, Sarah W.; McGhee, Marla W.; Meno, Lionel R.; Slater, Charles L.

2007-01-01

236

Order promising/fulfillment and customer/channel collaboration in supply chain management  

E-print Network

This research investigates the order promising and fulfillment and customer and channel collaboration functions of a company. In addition to presenting more precise definitions, we identify and analyze current and emerging ...

An, Yimin, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2006-01-01

237

Promise and Pitfalls of Using Grain Size Analysis to Identify Glacial Sediments in Alpine Lake Cores.  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Lakes fed by glacier outwash should have a clastic particle-size record distinct from non-glacial lakes in the same area, but do they? The unique turquoise color of alpine glacial lakes reflects the flux of suspended clastic glacial rock flour to those lakes; conversely, lakes not fed by outwash are generally clear with sediments dominated by organics or slope-wash from nearby hillslopes. This contrast in sediment types and sources should produce a distinct and measureable different in grain sizes between the two settings. Results from a variety of lakes suggest the actual situation is often more subtle and complex. I compare grain size results to other proxies to assess the value of grain size analysis for paleoglacier studies. Over the past 10 years, my colleagues and I have collected and analyzed sediment cores from a wide variety of lakes below small alpine glaciers in an attempt to constrain the timing and magnitude of alpine glaciation in those basins. The basic concept is that these lakes act as continuous catchments for any rock flour produced upstream by glacier abrasion; as a glacier grows, the flux of rock flour to the lake will also increase. If the glacier disappears entirely, rock flour deposition will also cease in short order. We have focused our research in basins with simple sedimentologic settings: mostly small, high-altitude, stripped granitic or metamorphic cirques in which the cirque glaciers are the primary source of clastic sediments. In most cases, the lakes are fed by meltwater from a modern glacier, but were ice free during the earlier Holocene. In such cases, the lake cores should record formation of and changes in activity of the glacier upstream. We used a Malvern Mastersizer 2000 laser particle size analyzer for our grain size analyses, as well as recording magnetic susceptibility, color, and organics for the same cores. The results indicate that although lakes often experience increases in silt and clay-size (<0.63 mm) clastic particles when a glacier is present upstream, the signal can be highly variable and complex, most likely the result of stochastic processes in the basin. Our analyses indicate that although particle size reflects glacier activity upstream, it is rarely the best record of glacier change and is most useful in combination with other proxies, most notably MS, color, and organic content.

Clark, D. H.

2011-12-01

238

Assessing College Students' Attitudes Toward Responsible Drinking Messages to Identify Promising Binge Drinking Intervention Strategies  

Microsoft Academic Search

Health communication appeals were utilized through a Web site simulation to evaluate the potential effectiveness of 3 intervention approaches to promote responsible drinking among college students. Within the Web site simulation, participants were exposed to a persuasive message designed to represent either the generalized social norms advertising approach (based on others' behavior), the personalized behavioral feedback approach (tailored to the

Valerie K. Pilling; Laura A. Brannon

2007-01-01

239

Promising Aedes aegypti Repellent Chemotypes Identified through Integrated QSAR, Virtual Screening, Synthesis, and Bioassay  

PubMed Central

Molecular field topology analysis, scaffold hopping, and molecular docking were used as complementary computational tools for the design of repellents for Aedes aegypti, the insect vector for yellow fever, chikungunya, and dengue fever. A large number of analogues were evaluated by virtual screening with Glide molecular docking software. This produced several dozen hits that were either synthesized or procured from commercial sources. Analysis of these compounds by a repellent bioassay resulted in a few highly active chemicals (in terms of minimum effective dosage) as viable candidates for further hit-to-lead and lead optimization effort. PMID:24039693

Oliferenko, Polina V.; Oliferenko, Alexander A.; Poda, Gennadiy I.; Osolodkin, Dmitry I.; Pillai, Girinath G.; Bernier, Ulrich R.; Tsikolia, Maia; Agramonte, Natasha M.; Clark, Gary G.; Linthicum, Kenneth J.; Katritzky, Alan R.

2013-01-01

240

promises, promises As a matter of stated policy, there is no doubt that Washington is  

E-print Network

promises, promises As a matter of stated policy, there is no doubt that Washington is committed of recipient countries, fails to tap into the vast U.S. capacity for providing aid, does not fulfill Washington.S. actually provides. Without a new approach, Washington risks undermining the most important international

241

Teen Risk-Taking: Promising Prevention Programs and Approaches.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This guidebook explores some of the practical issues associated with finding, choosing, and starting potentially effective prevention programs for at-risk preteens and teens. The guidebook is based on a study of 51 intervention programs that identified elements and delivery mechanisms that were associated with their effectiveness. A closer look at…

Eisen, Marvin; Pallitto, Christina; Bradner, Carolyn; Bolshun, Natalya

242

Mentoring School Leaders: Professional Promise or Predictable Problems?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article provides an overview of the use of mentoring programs as a tool to be used in the preservice preparation, induction, and ongoing in-service education of school administrators. Typical practices are described, along with the assumed value found in mentoring. In addition, the limitations and potential problems are identified. The…

Daresh, John

2004-01-01

243

The Promise of Wave Power (Invited)  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The solutions to today's energy challenges need to be explored through alternative, renewable and clean energy sources to enable diverse energy resource plans. An extremely abundant and promising source of energy exists in the world's oceans: it is estimated that if 0.2 % of the oceans' untapped energy could be harnessed, it could provide power sufficient for the entire world. Ocean energy exists in the forms of wave, tidal, marine currents, thermal (temperature gradient) and salinity. Among these forms, significant opportunities and benefits have been identified in the area of ocean wave energy extraction, i.e., harnessing the motion of the ocean waves, and converting that motion into electrical energy. Ocean wave energy refers to the kinetic and potential energy in the heaving motion of ocean waves. Wave energy is essentially concentrated solar energy (as is wind energy). The heating of the earth’s surface by the sun (with other complex processes) drives the wind, which in turn blows across the surface of the ocean to create waves. At each stage of conversion, the power density increases. Ocean wave power offers several attractive qualities, including high power density, low variability, and excellent forecastability. A typical large ocean wave propogates at around 12 m/s with very little attenuation across the ocean. If the waves can be detected several hundred kilometers off shore, there can be 10 hours or more of accurate forecast horizon. In fact, analysis has shown good forecast accuracy up to 48 hours in advance. Off the coast Oregon, the yearly average wave power is approximately 30 kW per meter of crestlength (i.e., unit length transverse to the direction of wave propagation and parallel to the shore.) This compares very favorably with power densities of solar and wind, which typically range in the several hundreds of Watts per square meter. Globally, the wave energy resource is stronger on the west coasts of large landmasses and increases in strength toward the poles. This phenomenon is due to the prevailing west to east global winds known as the "westerlies" found in the Northern and Southern hemispheres between 30 and 60 degrees latitude. Correspondingly, the west coast of the United States, the west coast of Australia, and the coastal regions of Europe have seen the greatest wave energy industrial activity to date. Ocean wave energy has great potential to be a significant contributor of renewable power for many regions in the world. For the West coast of the US alone, the total wave energy resource is estimated at 440 TWh/yr, which is more than the typical total US annual hydroelectric production (270 TWh in 2003). For US west coast states, a fully developed wave energy industry could be a significant contributor to renewable energy portfolio standards. Within the next few years, several utility-scale wave energy converters are planned for grid connection (e.g., Ocean Power Technologies and Columbia Power Technologies in Oregon, USA), with plans for more utility-scale development to follow soon after. This presentation will cover the physical basics of wave energy, examples of commercial technology, challenges opportunities for research, and an update on the wave energy research and developments at leading commercial, industrial, and academic institutions around the world.

Brekken, T.

2010-12-01

244

Identifying Equivalent Fractions  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This site helps students understand how to identify equivalent fractions by explaining what equivalent fractions are and how to compare two fractions to see if they are equivalent. There is also a list of fractions equivalent to 1/2, 1/3, 1/4, 1/5, and 2/5 so students can begin to see the pattern that emerges. Finally, the site presents an interactive game in which students can practice by naming the equivalent fraction to a given fraction.

Banfill, J. C.

2007-12-12

245

Seeking Best Practices: A Conceptual Framework for Planning and Improving Evidence-Based Practices  

PubMed Central

How can we encourage ongoing development, refinement, and evaluation of practices to identify and build an evidence base for best practices? On the basis of a review of the literature and expert input, we worked iteratively to create a framework with 2 interrelated components. The first — public health impact — consists of 5 elements: effectiveness, reach, feasibility, sustainability, and transferability. The second — quality of evidence — consists of 4 levels, ranging from weak to rigorous. At the intersection of public health impact and quality of evidence, a continuum of evidence-based practice emerges, representing the ongoing development of knowledge across 4 stages: emerging, promising, leading, and best. This conceptual framework brings together important aspects of impact and quality to provide a common lexicon and criteria for assessing and strengthening public health practice. We hope this work will invite and advance dialogue among public health practitioners and decision makers to build and strengthen a diverse evidence base for public health programs and strategies. PMID:24331280

Schooley, Michael W.; Anderson, Lynda A.; Kochtitzky, Chris S.; DeGroff, Amy S.; Devlin, Heather M.; Mercer, Shawna L.

2013-01-01

246

Seeking best practices: a conceptual framework for planning and improving evidence-based practices.  

PubMed

How can we encourage ongoing development, refinement, and evaluation of practices to identify and build an evidence base for best practices? On the basis of a review of the literature and expert input, we worked iteratively to create a framework with 2 interrelated components. The first - public health impact - consists of 5 elements: effectiveness, reach, feasibility, sustainability, and transferability. The second - quality of evidence - consists of 4 levels, ranging from weak to rigorous. At the intersection of public health impact and quality of evidence, a continuum of evidence-based practice emerges, representing the ongoing development of knowledge across 4 stages: emerging, promising, leading, and best. This conceptual framework brings together important aspects of impact and quality to provide a common lexicon and criteria for assessing and strengthening public health practice. We hope this work will invite and advance dialogue among public health practitioners and decision makers to build and strengthen a diverse evidence base for public health programs and strategies. PMID:24331280

Spencer, Lorine M; Schooley, Michael W; Anderson, Lynda A; Kochtitzky, Chris S; DeGroff, Amy S; Devlin, Heather M; Mercer, Shawna L

2013-01-01

247

Parity Reform in France: Promises and Pitfalls  

Microsoft Academic Search

In the 1990s, a new social movement emerged in France to address the underrepresentation of women in elected bodies and to promote womens's and men's equal representation, in French called parité. On the eve of the twenty-first century, the movement achieved its main goal-a constitutional reform. The purpose of this article is to present both the promises of the parity

CLAUDIE BAUDINO

2003-01-01

248

The La Crosse Promise: Economic Impact Study  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Upjohn Institute conducted an economic impact study of a universal, place-based scholarship program for La Crosse, Wisconsin. This study examines the possibility of developing a program similar to the Kalamazoo Promise for the La Crosse area. The La Crosse area is facing a population decline, growing concentrations of low-income students, an aging infrastructure in the region’s largest school district,

George Erickcek

2008-01-01

249

Antimicrobial peptides: promising compounds against pathogenic microorganisms.  

PubMed

In the last decades, the indiscriminate use of conventional antibiotics has generated high rates of microbial resistance. This situation has increased the need for obtaining new antimicrobial compounds against infectious diseases. Among these, antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) constitute a promising alternative as therapeutic agents against various pathogenic microbes. These therapeutic agents can be isolated from different organisms, being widespread in nature and synthesized by microorganisms, plants and animals (both invertebrates and vertebrates). Additionally, AMPs are usually produced by a non-specific innate immune response. These peptides are involved in the inhibition of cell growth and in the killing of several microorganisms, such as bacteria, fungi, enveloped viruses, protozoans and other parasites. They have many interesting properties as potential antibiotics, such as relatively small sizes (below 25-30 kDa), amphipathic structures, cationic nature, and offer low probability for the generation of microbial resistance. In recent years, many novel AMPs, with very promising therapeutic properties, have been discovered. These peptides have been the base for the production of chemical analogs, which have been designed, chemically synthesized and tested in vitro for their antimicrobial activity. This review is focused on antibacterial (against Gram (-) and Gram (+) bacteria) and antifungal peptides, discussing action mode of AMPs, and recent advances in the study of the molecular basis of their anti-microbial activity. Finally, we emphasize on their current pharmacological development, future directions and applications of AMPs as promising antibiotics of therapeutic use for microbial infections. PMID:24533812

Cruz, J; Ortiz, C; Guzmán, F; Fernández-Lafuente, R; Torres, R

2014-01-01

250

Implementing Evidence-Based Social Work Practice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Recently, social work has been influenced by new forms of practice that hold promise for bringing practice and research together to strengthen the scientific knowledge base supporting social work intervention. The most recent new practice framework is evidence-based practice. However, although evidence-based practice has many qualities that might…

Mullen, Edward J.; Bledsoe, Sarah E.; Bellamy, Jennifer L.

2008-01-01

251

Some promising dimensions for behavioral community technology.  

PubMed

In recent years, the search for effective and replicable approaches to planned change in communities has escalated. Applied behavior analysts have participated in these efforts to remedy existing community problems and to increase the capacities of community residents to meet their goals. Examples of behavioral technologies for community settings are described and their advantages are noted. Criteria for more contextually appropriate community technologies are suggested and strategies for developing behavioral methods according to these criteria are described. This paper outlines some promising dimensions for behavioral community technology and discusses several possible limitations to a behavioral approach to addressing societal problems. PMID:16795630

Fawcett, S B; Mathews, R M; Fletcher, R K

1980-01-01

252

Evaluability assessment to improve public health policies, programs, and practices.  

PubMed

Evaluability assessment, also commonly known as exploratory evaluation, has assisted the field of public health to improve programs and to develop a pragmatic, practice-based research agenda. Evaluability assessment was originally developed as a low-cost pre-evaluation activity to prepare better for conventional evaluations of programs, practices, and some policies. For public health programs, however, it serves several other important purposes: (a) giving program staff rapid, constructive feedback about program operations; (b) assisting the core public health planning and assurance functions by helping to develop realistic objectives and providing low-cost, rapid feedback on implementation; (c) navigating federal performance measurement requirements; (d) translating research into practice by examining the feasibility, acceptability, and adaptation of evidence-based practices in new settings and populations; and (e) translating practice into research by identifying promising new approaches to achieve public health goals. PMID:20235852

Leviton, Laura C; Khan, Laura Kettel; Rog, Debra; Dawkins, Nicola; Cotton, David

2010-01-01

253

Nanotechnology: Promises and challenges for tomorrow  

SciTech Connect

Nanotechnology is based on the ability to create and utilize materials, devices and systems through control of the matter at the nanometer scale. If successful, nanotechnology is expected to lead to broad new technological developments. The efficiency of energy conversion can be increased through the use of nanostructured materials with enhanced magnetic, light emission or wear resistant properties. Energy generation using nanostructured photovoltaics or nanocluster driven photocatalysis could fundamentally change the economic viability of renewable energy sources. In addition, the ability to imitate molecular processes found in living organisms may be key to developing highly sensitive and discriminating chemical and biological sensors. Such sensors could greatly expand the range of medical home testing as well as provide new technologies to counter the spread of chemical and biological weapons. Even the production of chemicals and materials could be revolutionized through the development of molecular reactors that can promote low energy chemical pathways for materials synthesis. Although nanotechnologies hold great promise, significant scientific challenges must be addressed before they can convert that promise into a reality. A key challenge in nanoscience is to understand how nano-scale tailoring of materials can lead to novel and enhanced functions. The authors' laboratory, for example, is currently making broad contributions in this area by synthesizing and exploring nanomaterials ranging from layered structures for electronics/photonics to novel nanocrystalline catalysts. They are even adapting functions from biological molecules to synthesize new forms of nanostructured materials.

ROMIG JR.,ALTON D.; MICHAEL,JOSEPH R.; MICHALSKE,TERRY A.

2000-02-29

254

The promise of microfluidic artificial lungs.  

PubMed

Microfluidic or microchannel artificial lungs promise to enable a new class of truly portable, therapeutic artificial lungs through feature sizes and blood channel designs that closely mimic those found in their natural counterpart. These new artificial lungs could potentially: 1) have surface areas and priming volumes that are a fraction of current technologies thereby decreasing device size and reducing the foreign body response; 2) contain blood flow networks in which cells and platelets experience pressures, shear stresses, and branching angles that copy those in the human lung thereby improving biocompatibility; 3) operate efficiently with room air, eliminating the need for gas cylinders and complications associated with hyperoxemia; 4) exhibit biomimetic hydraulic resistances, enabling operation with natural pressures and eliminating the need for blood pumps; and, 5) provide increased gas exchange capacity enabling respiratory support for active patients. This manuscript reviews recent research efforts in microfluidic artificial lungs targeted at achieving the advantages above, investigates the ultimate performance and scaling limits of these devices using a proven mathematical model, and discusses the future challenges that must be overcome in order for microfluidic artificial lungs to be applied in the clinic. If all of these promising advantages are realized and the remaining challenges are met, microfluidic artificial lungs could revolutionize the field of pulmonary rehabilitation. PMID:25198427

Potkay, Joseph A

2014-11-01

255

Someone promised mentors: will you deliver?  

PubMed

What are recruiters promising? Many new hires say that they accepted a job because of a promised mentoring program--one that never materializes, and one that the manager doesn't know was part of the discussions. Where does that leave the manager who may not be aware of this expectation? Faced with anchoring mobile Gen Xers, organizations are exploring mentoring as an inexpensive way to improve retention. But mentoring is not a technique that can be applied like a warm blanket to solve the problems of orientation, training, skills development, and retention. There are two reasons why mentoring isn't foolproof--the mentor and the protégé. If you are considering a mentoring program, or becoming a mentor yourself, here are some points to ponder: (1) If you can't (or won't) do it, give convincing reasons up front; (2) establish the rules of engagement; (3) a mentoring relationship doesn't guarantee loyalty; (4) having a protégé has political risks; (5) you can't force anyone to take advice; and (6) expect a quid pro quo. PMID:11291226

Kennedy, M M

2001-01-01

256

THE PROMISE OF BAYESIAN INFERENCE FOR ASTROPHYSICS  

Microsoft Academic Search

The 'frequentist' approach to statistics, currently dominating statistical practice in astrophysics, is compared to the historically older Bayesian approach, which is now growing in pop- ularity in other scientic disciplines, and which provides unique, optimal solutions to well-posed problems. The two approaches address the same questions with very dieren t calculations, but in simple cases often give the same nal

T. J. Loredo

1992-01-01

257

The promising trajectory of autism therapeutics discovery.  

PubMed

Pharmacological interventions for neurodevelopmental disorders are increasingly tractable. Autism is a neurodevelopmental disorder that affects approximately 1% of the population. Currently, the standard of care is early behavioral therapy. No approved medical treatments for the diagnostic symptoms are available. Strong evidence for genetic causes of autism implicates proteins that mediate synaptic transmission and structure. Mouse models with targeted mutations in these synaptic genes display behavioral symptoms relevant to the social communication abnormalities and repetitive behaviors that define autism spectrum disorder (ASD), along with biological abnormalities in synaptic physiology and morphology. As we discuss here, promising pharmacological targets, emerging from the mouse model studies, are now being pursued in early clinical trials. Thus, a high-prevalence disorder that was previously considered to be medically untreatable is now moving into the therapeutic arena. PMID:24362109

Silverman, Jill L; Crawley, Jacqueline N

2014-07-01

258

Review of Some Promising Fractional Physical Models  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Fractional dynamics is a field of study in physics and mechanics investigating the behavior of objects and systems that are characterized by power-law nonlocality, power-law long-term memory or fractal properties by using integrations and differentiation of non-integer orders, i.e., by methods in the fractional calculus. This paper is a review of physical models that look very promising for future development of fractional dynamics. We suggest a short introduction to fractional calculus as a theory of integration and differentiation of noninteger order. Some applications of integro-differentiations of fractional orders in physics are discussed. Models of discrete systems with memory, lattice with long-range inter-particle interaction, dynamics of fractal media are presented. Quantum analogs of fractional derivatives and model of open nano-system systems with memory are also discussed.

Tarasov, Vasily E.

2013-04-01

259

Cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors: promise or peril?  

PubMed Central

The discovery of two isoforms of the cyclooxygenase enzyme, COX-1 and COX-2, and the development of COX-2-specific inhibitors as anti-inflammatories and analgesics have offered great promise that the therapeutic benefits of NSAIDs could be optimized through inhibition of COX-2, while minimizing their adverse side effect profile associated with inhibition of COX-1. While COX-2 specific inhibitors have proven to be efficacious in a variety of inflammatory conditions, exposure of large numbers of patients to these drugs in postmarketing studies have uncovered potential safety concerns that raise questions about the benefit/risk ratio of COX-2-specific NSAIDs compared to conventional NSAIDs. This article reviews the efficacy and safety profiles of COX-2-specific inhibitors, comparing them with conventional NSDAIDs. PMID:12467519

Mengle-Gaw, Laurel J; Schwartz, Benjamin D

2002-01-01

260

Diabetic macular edema: New promising therapies  

PubMed Central

The treatment of diabetic macular edema is rapidly evolving. The era of laser therapy is being quickly replaced by an era of pharmacotherapy. Several pharmacotherapies have been recently developed for the treatment of retinal vascular diseases such as diabetic macular edema. Several intravitreal injections or sustained delivery devices have undergone phase 3 testing while others are currently being evaluated. The results of clinical trials have shown the superiority of some of these agents to laser therapy. However, with the availability of several of these newer agents, it may be difficult to individualize treatment options especially those patients respond differently to various therapies. As such, more effort is still needed in order to determine the best treatment regimen for a given patient. In this article, we briefly summarize the major new therapeutic additions for the treatment of diabetic macular edema and allude to some future promising therapies. PMID:24379924

Shamsi, Hanan N Al; Masaud, Jluwi S; Ghazi, Nicola G

2013-01-01

261

Cobalt Derivatives as Promising Therapeutic Agents  

PubMed Central

Inorganic complexes are versatile platforms for the development of potent and selective pharmaceutical agents. Cobalt possesses a diverse array of properties that can be manipulated to yield promising drug candidates. Investigations into the mechanism of cobalt therapeutic agents can provide valuable insight into the physicochemical properties that can be harnessed for drug development. This review presents examples of bioactive cobalt complexes with special attention to their mechanisms of action. Specifically, cobalt complexes that elicit biological effects through protein inhibition, modification of drug activity, and bioreductive activation are discussed. Insights gained from these examples reveal features of cobalt that can be rationally tuned to produce therapeutics with high specificity and improved efficacy for the biomolecule or pathway of interest. PMID:23270779

Heffern, Marie C.; Yamamoto, Natsuho; Holbrook, Robert J.; Eckermann, Amanda L.; Meade, Thomas J.

2013-01-01

262

The promise of Lean in health care.  

PubMed

An urgent need in American health care is improving quality and efficiency while controlling costs. One promising management approach implemented by some leading health care institutions is Lean, a quality improvement philosophy and set of principles originated by the Toyota Motor Company. Health care cases reveal that Lean is as applicable in complex knowledge work as it is in assembly-line manufacturing. When well executed, Lean transforms how an organization works and creates an insatiable quest for improvement. In this article, we define Lean and present 6 principles that constitute the essential dynamic of Lean management: attitude of continuous improvement, value creation, unity of purpose, respect for front-line workers, visual tracking, and flexible regimentation. Health care case studies illustrate each principle. The goal of this article is to provide a template for health care leaders to use in considering the implementation of the Lean management system or in assessing the current state of implementation in their organizations. PMID:23274021

Toussaint, John S; Berry, Leonard L

2013-01-01

263

Motivating farmers for soil and water conservation: A promising strategy from the Bolivian mountain valleys  

Microsoft Academic Search

Successful examples of strategies that motivate farmers for the large-scale execution of soil and water conservation (SWC) practices are scarce. This paper presents a promising strategy for changing mostly passive Bolivian Andes farmers into active participators in natural resources conservation. In this logical strategy, first a solid foundation is laid of intrinsically motivated and genuinely participating villagers with a progress-driven

C. A. Kessler

2007-01-01

264

Early Childhood Education: The Promise, The Challenges  

Microsoft Academic Search

The benefits of high quality early childhood programs have been documented. Good programs engage students in developmentally appropriate practices that include pre-literacy, pre-numeracy activities, language, social and physical development in these preschool programs. Studies have shown that literacy skills such as letter-name recognition, phonological and print awareness affect the reading achievement of children. However, in the rush to provide these

Joanne Sadler

265

"Geriatricizing" Hospitalists: Identifying Educational Opportunities  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The objective of this study was to identify differences between geriatricians and hospitalists in caring for hospitalized older adults, so as to inform faculty development programs that have the goal of improving older patient care. Eleven hospitalists and 13 geriatricians were surveyed regarding knowledge, confidence, and practice patterns in…

Friedman, Susan M.; Gillespie, Suzanne M.; Medina-Walpole, Annette M.; Caprio, Thomas V.; Karuza, Jurgis; McCann, Robert M.

2013-01-01

266

Bringing Promise to Washington, DC. The DC Promise Neighborhood Initiative. Program on Neighborhoods and Youth Development  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The U.S. Department of Education's Promise Neighborhood Initiative (DCPNI) is one of the Obama administration's major antipoverty initiatives and a core strategy of the White House's Neighborhood Revitalization Initiative. It is intended to improve educational outcomes by creating a continuum of school readiness, academic services, and family and…

Comey, Jennifer; Scott, Molly M.; Popkin, Susan J.; Falkenburger, Elsa

2012-01-01

267

Fulfilling The Pittsburgh Promise[R]: Early Progress of Pittsburgh's Postsecondary Scholarship Program. Monograph  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report presents a detailed assessment of the extent to which "The Pittsburgh Promise"--a postsecondary education scholarship intended to remedy the area's population decline, foster high school completion and college readiness among Pittsburgh district students, and prepare a capable and energetic workforce for the city--has met its goals to…

Gonzalez, Gabriella C.; Bozick, Robert; Tharp-Taylor, Shannah; Phillips, Andrea

2011-01-01

268

Turning Ideas into Practice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article features five schools (John P. Oldham Elementary, Norwood, Massachusetts; R. J. Richey Elementary, Burnet, Texas; Pittsburgh Carmalt Science and Technology Academy, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; John D. Shaw Elementary, Wasilla, Alaska; and Springville K-8, Portland Oregon) that offer five promising practices. From fourth graders learning…

Adams, Caralee

2011-01-01

269

Best Environmental Management Practices  

E-print Network

on odor strength, the flow rate of the source odor air stream, the hedonic tone of the odorBest Environmental Management Practices Farm Animal Production Odor Control Options for Confined manure systems. Exhaust Air Treatment The most promising air treatment technology for reducing odor from

270

GEOTEC-a promising energy alternative  

SciTech Connect

Geothermal reconnaissance has shown a promising resource at the base of three clustered volcanoes on Adak Island, located along the Aleutian arc of Alaska. Geophysical surveys revealed areas of abrupt and steep gravitational gradients and high electrical conductivity over the volcanoes, indicating possible subsurface magma. Geochemical analyses indicated a potential reservoir temperature of 180/sup 0/C. The nearby Bering Sea has a surface temperature ranging between 3/sup 0/ and 8/sup 0/C year-round and would provide for high heat reinjection. The combination of geothermal and ocean sink resources could result in a GEOTEC plant having an overall thermal efficiency approaching one-third that of the present diesel-electric generating system at the Naval Air Station on Adak. The more than 5000 permanently stationed personnel at the station consume over 8 million gal of JP-5 fuel for space heating and electrical power. Presently, electric energy on Adak costs 250-350 mils/kilowatt-hour. Preliminary estimates of the cost of electric power from a GEOTEC plant are about 200 mils/kilowatt-hour. A GEOTEC plant would also be a secure alternative energy source for the US Navy.

Gerrard, C.S.; Gelb, G.H.; Lowrie, A.

1986-07-01

271

Enhancing Aboriginal Teacher Education: One Promising Approach.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In contextual supervision (an adaptation of situational leadership), supervising teachers synchronize their leadership style to the teacher-intern's level of skill development. Application of the method with 15 Native student teachers helped the supervisor to identify contextual factors enhancing or impeding student-teacher progress, and…

Ralph, Edwin G.

1993-01-01

272

Flight-deck automation: Promises and problems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The state of the art in human factors in flight-deck automation is presented. A number of critical problem areas are identified and broad design guidelines are offered. Automation-related aircraft accidents and incidents are discussed as examples of human factors problems in automated flight.

Wiener, E. L.; Curry, R. E.

1980-01-01

273

Challenges and promises in modeling dermatologic disorders with bioengineered skin.  

PubMed

The tremendous cost of drug development is often attributed to the long time interval between identifying lead compounds in preclinical studies to assessing clinical efficacy in randomized clinical trials. Many candidate molecules show promise in cell culture or animal models, only to fail in late stage in human investigations. There is a need for novel technologies that allow investigators to quickly and reliably predict drug safety and efficacy. The advent of microtechnology has made it possible to integrate multiple microphysiologic organ systems into a single microfabricated chip. This review focuses on three-dimensional engineered skin, which has enjoyed a long history of uses both in clinical treatments of refractory ulcers and as a laboratory model. We discuss current biological and engineering challenges in construction of a robust bioengineered skin and provide a blueprint for its potential utility to model dermatologic disorders such as psoriasis or cutaneous drug reactions. PMID:24951469

Eungdamrong, Narat J; Higgins, Claire; Guo, Zongyou; Lee, Wen-Han; Gillette, Brian; Sia, Samuel; Christiano, Angela M

2014-09-01

274

The Promise of Neuroprotective Agents in Parkinson's Disease  

PubMed Central

Parkinson’s disease (PD) is characterized by loss of dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra of the brain. Since there are limited treatment options for PD, neuroprotective agents are currently being tested as a means to slow disease progression. Agents targeting oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, and inflammation are prime candidates for neuroprotection. This review identifies Rasagiline, Minocycline, and creatine, as the most promising neuroprotective agents for PD, and they are all currently in phase III trials. Other agents possessing protective characteristics in delaying PD include stimulants, vitamins, supplements, and other drugs. Additionally, combination therapies also show benefits in slowing PD progression. The identification of neuroprotective agents for PD provides us with therapeutic opportunities for modifying the course of disease progression and, perhaps, reducing the risk of onset when preclinical biomarkers become available. PMID:22125548

Seidl, Stacey E.; Potashkin, Judith A.

2011-01-01

275

Promising anti-leukemic activity of atorvastatin.  

PubMed

There is a current need for novel therapeutic strategies for the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), a still incurable hematological cancer involving mainly deregulated apoptosis. The purpose of the present study was to determine ex vivo the effect of the synthetic statin, atorvastatin, a known cholesterol-lowering drug, on peripheral blood mononuclear cells obtained from CLL patients. Using flow cytometry, we investigated the viability and induction of apoptosis in leukemic cells exposed to statin by the Vybrant apoptosis assay kit #4, compared with untreated control cells. We also examined the expression levels of apoptosis-regulatory proteins (Mcl-1, Bcl-2 and Bax), as well as products of the expression/proteolysis of lamin B, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase?1 (PARP?1) and p27Kip1 by western blot analysis. Moreover, the number of sub-G1 cells and DNA fragmentation in atorvastatin-treated leukemic cells were examined by flow cytometry and agarose gel electrophoresis, respectively. The obtained results indicated that CLL cells ex vivo were extremely sensitive to atorvastatin. The cytotoxic effect of this statin was caused by the induction of apoptosis in the leukemic cells. The induction of apoptosis in the drug-treated model cells was confirmed by the reduction or proteolysis of apoptotic markers, such as PARP-1, lamin B and p27Kip1, the increase in the number of sub-G1 cells and DNA ladder formation. During atorvastatin-triggered apoptosis, changes in the expression levels of mitochondrial outer membrane permeability regulatory proteins of the Bcl-2 family were also observed. Ex vivo promising data indicate the strong cytotoxic and pro-apoptotic potential of atorvastatin against leukemic cells, but not normal cells. The obtained data suggest that atorvastatin be considered as a therapeutic option for the treatment of CLL. PMID:23440293

?o?nierczyk, Jolanta D; Borowiak, Arleta; Hikisz, Pawe?; Cebula-Obrzut, Barbara; B?o?ski, Jerzy Z; Smolewski, Piotr; Robak, Tadeusz; Kilia?ska, Zofia M

2013-05-01

276

Predictors of student success in the Army Medical Department (AMEDD) Licensed Practical Nurse training program (91WM6) as identified by expert nurse educators, instructors, and administrators at Fort Sam Houston Post, San Antonio, Texas  

E-print Network

The U.S. Army Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN) dates back to the fall of 1947 and evolved from severe professional nursing shortages of World War II. Today, as in the past, to sustain U.S. Army readiness the highly medically trained combat soldier...

Scialdo, Antonia

2006-04-12

277

A general method for identifying node spreading influence via the adjacent matrix and spreading rate  

E-print Network

With great theoretical and practical significance, identifying the node spreading influence of complex network is one of the most promising domains. So far, various topology-based centrality measures have been proposed to identify the node spreading influence in a network. However, the node spreading influence is a result of the interplay between the network topology structure and spreading dynamics. In this paper, we build up the systematic method by combining the network structure and spreading dynamics to identify the node spreading influence. By combining the adjacent matrix $A$ and spreading parameter $\\beta$, we theoretical give the node spreading influence with the eigenvector of the largest eigenvalue. Comparing with the Susceptible-Infected-Recovered (SIR) model epidemic results for four real networks, our method could identify the node spreading influence more accurately than the ones generated by the degree, K-shell and eigenvector centrality. This work may provide a systematic method for identifyi...

Lin, Jian-Hong; Guo, Qiang

2014-01-01

278

Vaccine Shows Promise Against Mosquito-Borne Virus  

MedlinePLUS

... enable JavaScript. Vaccine Shows Promise Against Mosquito-Borne Virus Volunteers developed antibodies to chikungunya in first human ... to protect people from the mosquito-borne chikungunya virus has shown promise in its first human trial. " ...

279

Systematic evaluation of satellite remote sensing for identifying uranium mines and mills.  

SciTech Connect

In this report, we systematically evaluate the ability of current-generation, satellite-based spectroscopic sensors to distinguish uranium mines and mills from other mineral mining and milling operations. We perform this systematic evaluation by (1) outlining the remote, spectroscopic signal generation process, (2) documenting the capabilities of current commercial satellite systems, (3) systematically comparing the uranium mining and milling process to other mineral mining and milling operations, and (4) identifying the most promising observables associated with uranium mining and milling that can be identified using satellite remote sensing. The Ranger uranium mine and mill in Australia serves as a case study where we apply and test the techniques developed in this systematic analysis. Based on literature research of mineral mining and milling practices, we develop a decision tree which utilizes the information contained in one or more observables to determine whether uranium is possibly being mined and/or milled at a given site. Promising observables associated with uranium mining and milling at the Ranger site included in the decision tree are uranium ore, sulfur, the uranium pregnant leach liquor, ammonia, and uranyl compounds and sulfate ion disposed of in the tailings pond. Based on the size, concentration, and spectral characteristics of these promising observables, we then determine whether these observables can be identified using current commercial satellite systems, namely Hyperion, ASTER, and Quickbird. We conclude that the only promising observables at Ranger that can be uniquely identified using a current commercial satellite system (notably Hyperion) are magnesium chlorite in the open pit mine and the sulfur stockpile. Based on the identified magnesium chlorite and sulfur observables, the decision tree narrows the possible mineral candidates at Ranger to uranium, copper, zinc, manganese, vanadium, the rare earths, and phosphorus, all of which are milled using sulfuric acid leaching.

Blair, Dianna Sue; Stork, Christopher Lyle; Smartt, Heidi Anne; Smith, Jody Lynn

2006-01-01

280

Promises and cooperation: Evidence from a TV game show  

Microsoft Academic Search

We study the role of communication in a high stakes prisoner’s dilemma, using data from a television game show. 40 Percent of the players voluntarily promise to cooperate, and these players are 50 percentage points more likely to cooperate than players who do not volunteer a promise. However, promises that arise in response to an explicit question by the presenter

Michèle Belot; V. Bhaskar; Jeroen van de Ven

2010-01-01

281

Multivariate meta-analysis: Potential and promise  

PubMed Central

The multivariate random effects model is a generalization of the standard univariate model. Multivariate meta-analysis is becoming more commonly used and the techniques and related computer software, although continually under development, are now in place. In order to raise awareness of the multivariate methods, and discuss their advantages and disadvantages, we organized a one day ‘Multivariate meta-analysis’ event at the Royal Statistical Society. In addition to disseminating the most recent developments, we also received an abundance of comments, concerns, insights, critiques and encouragement. This article provides a balanced account of the day's discourse. By giving others the opportunity to respond to our assessment, we hope to ensure that the various view points and opinions are aired before multivariate meta-analysis simply becomes another widely used de facto method without any proper consideration of it by the medical statistics community. We describe the areas of application that multivariate meta-analysis has found, the methods available, the difficulties typically encountered and the arguments for and against the multivariate methods, using four representative but contrasting examples. We conclude that the multivariate methods can be useful, and in particular can provide estimates with better statistical properties, but also that these benefits come at the price of making more assumptions which do not result in better inference in every case. Although there is evidence that multivariate meta-analysis has considerable potential, it must be even more carefully applied than its univariate counterpart in practice. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:21268052

Jackson, Dan; Riley, Richard; White, Ian R

2011-01-01

282

[Radiotherapy promises: focus on lung cancer].  

PubMed

Radiotherapy is a key cancer treatment, which greatly modified its practice in recent years thanks to medical imaging and technical improvements. The systematic use of computed tomography (CT) for treatment planning, the imaging fusion/co-registration between CT/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or CT/positron emission tomography (PET) improve target identification/selection and delineation. New irradiation techniques such as image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT), stereotactic radiotherapy or hadron therapy offer a more diverse therapeutic armamentarium to patients together with lower toxicity. Radiotherapy, as well as medical oncology, tends to offer a personalized treatment to patients thanks to the IGRT, which takes into account the inter- or intra-fraction anatomic variations. IGRT leads to adaptive radiotherapy (ART) with a new planification in the treatment course in order to decrease toxicity and improve tumor control. The use of systemic therapies with radiations needs to be studied in order to improve efficiency without increasing toxicities from these multimodal approaches. Finally, radiotherapy advances were impacted by radiotherapy accidents like Epinal. They led to an increased quality control with the intensification of identity control, the emergence of in vivo dosimetry or the experience feedback committee in radiotherapy. We will illustrate through the example of lung cancer. PMID:23719541

Jouin, Anaïs; Durand-Labrunie, Jérôme; Leroy, Thomas; Pannier, Diane; Wagner, Antoine; Rault, Erwan; Lartigau, Eric

2013-06-01

283

Vernonia condensata Baker (Asteraceae): A Promising Source of Antioxidants  

PubMed Central

The present study evaluated the antioxidant potential of Vernonia condensata Baker (Asteraceae). Dried and powdered leaves were exhaustively extracted with ethanol by static maceration followed by partition to obtain the hexane, dichloromethane, ethyl acetate, and butanol fractions. Total phenols and flavonoids contents were determined through spectrophotometry and flavonoids were identified by HPLC-DAD system. The antioxidant activity was assessed by DPPH radical scavenging activity, TLC-bioautography, reducing power of Fe+3, phosphomolybdenum, and TBA assays. The total phenolic content and total flavonoids ranged from 0.19 to 23.11?g/100?g and from 0.13 to 4.10 g/100?g, respectively. The flavonoids apigenin and luteolin were identified in the ethyl acetate fraction. The IC50 of DPPH assay varied from 4.28 to 75.10?µg/mL and TLC-bioautography detected the antioxidant compounds. The reducing power of Fe+3 was 19.98 to 336.48??g/mL, while the reaction with phosphomolybdenum ranged from 13.54% to 32.63% and 56.02% to 135.00% considering ascorbic acid and rutin as reference, respectively. At 30?mg/mL, the ethanolic extract and fractions revealed significant effect against lipid peroxidation. All these data sustain that V. condensata is an important and promising source of bioactive substances with antioxidant activity. PMID:24489987

da Silva, Jucélia Barbosa; Temponi, Vanessa dos Santos; Gasparetto, Carolina Miranda; Fabri, Rodrigo Luiz; Aragão, Danielle Maria de Oliveira; Pinto, Nícolas de Castro Campos; Ribeiro, Antônia; Scio, Elita; Del-Vechio-Vieira, Glauciemar; de Sousa, Orlando Vieira

2013-01-01

284

Stem cells: current challenges and future promise.  

PubMed

Stem cells have two remarkable properties. They can either renew themselves or they can differentiate into one or more adult cell types. Stem cells derived from a human embryo appear to have an unlimited capacity to self-renew in cell culture, and they are also able to differentiate into hundreds of adult cell types. Human embryonic stem cell lines offer a platform technology that has the potential to elucidate the molecular mechanisms that determine adult cell fate, generate cellular models for discovery of new drugs, and create populations of differentiated cells for novel transplantation therapies. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) has identified some of the rate-limiting steps toward realizing this potential, and has forged funding initiatives to accelerate research progress. Given the remarkable potential, NIH support for research using stem cells is an important priority for the foreseeable future. PMID:17584855

Battey, James F

2007-12-01

285

Pharmacogenomics: the promise of personalized medicine.  

PubMed

Pharmacogenetics and pharmacogenomics deal with the genetic basis underlying variable drug response in individual patients. The traditional pharmacogenetic approach relies on studying sequence variations in candidate genes suspected of affecting drug response. On the other hand, pharmacogenomic studies encompass the sum of all genes, i.e., the genome. Numerous genes may play a role in drug response and toxicity, introducing a daunting level of complexity into the search for candidate genes. The high speed and specificity associated with newly emerging genomic technologies enable the search for relevant genes and their variants to include the entire genome. These new technologies have essentially spawned a new discipline, termed pharmacogenomics, which seeks to identify the variant genes affecting the response to drugs in individual patients. Moreover, pharmacogenomic analysis can identify disease susceptibility genes representing potential new drug targets. All of this will lead to novel approaches in drug discovery, an individualized application of drug therapy, and new insights into disease prevention. Current concepts in drug therapy often attempt treatment of large patient populations as groups, irrespective of the potential for individual, genetically-based differences in drug response. In contrast, pharmacogenomics may help focus effective therapy on smaller patient subpopulations which although demonstrating the same disease phenotype are characterized by distinct genetic profiles. Whether and to what extent this individual, genetics-based approach to medicine results in improved, economically feasible therapy remain to be seen. To exploit these opportunities in genetic medicine, novel technologies will be needed, legal and ethical questions must be clarified, health care professionals must be educated, and the public must be informed about the implications of genetic testing in drug therapy and disease management. PMID:11741220

Mancinelli, L; Cronin, M; Sadée, W

2000-01-01

286

Smaller sulfur molecules promise better lithium-sulfur batteries.  

PubMed

The lithium-sulfur battery holds a high theoretical energy density, 4-5 times that of today's lithium-ion batteries, yet its applications have been hindered by poor electronic conductivity of the sulfur cathode and, most importantly, the rapid fading of its capacity due to the formation of soluble polysulfide intermediates (Li(2)S(n), n = 4-8). Despite numerous efforts concerning this issue, combatting sulfur loss remains one of the greatest challenges. Here we show that this problem can be effectively diminished by controlling the sulfur as smaller allotropes. Metastable small sulfur molecules of S(2-4) were synthesized in the confined space of a conductive microporous carbon matrix. The confined S(2-4) as a new cathode material can totally avoid the unfavorable transition between the commonly used large S(8) and S(4)(2-). Li-S batteries based on this concept exhibit unprecedented electrochemical behavior with high specific capacity, good cycling stability, and superior rate capability, which promise a practicable battery with high energy density for applications in portable electronics, electric vehicles, and large-scale energy storage systems. PMID:23101502

Xin, Sen; Gu, Lin; Zhao, Na-Hong; Yin, Ya-Xia; Zhou, Long-Jie; Guo, Yu-Guo; Wan, Li-Jun

2012-11-14

287

The promise--and peril--of integrated cost systems.  

PubMed

Recent advances in managerial accounting have helped executives get the information they need to make good strategic decisions. But today's enterprise resource planning systems promise even greater benefits--the chance to integrate activity-based costing, operational-control, and financial reporting systems. But managers need to approach integration very thoughtfully, or they could end up with a system that drives decision making in the wrong direction. Operational-control and ABC systems have fundamentally different purposes. Their requirements for accuracy, timeliness, and aggregation are so different that no single, fully integrated approach can be adequate for both purposes. If an integrated system used real-time cost data instead of standard rates in its ABC subsystem, for example, the result would be dangerously distorted messages about individual product profitability--and that's precisely the problem ABC systems were originally designed to address. Proper linkage and feedback between the two systems is possible, however. Through activity-based budgeting, the ABC system is linked directly to operations control: managers can determine the supply and practical capacity of resources in forthcoming periods. Linking operational control to ABC is also possible. The activity-based portion of an operational control system collects information that, while it mustn't be fed directly into the activity-based strategic cost system, can be extremely useful once it's been properly analyzed. Finally, ABC and operational control can be linked to financial reporting to generate cost of goods sold and inventory valuations--but again, with precautions. PMID:10181585

Cooper, R; Kaplan, R S

1998-01-01

288

Flight deck automation: Promises and realities  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Issues of flight deck automation are multifaceted and complex. The rapid introduction of advanced computer-based technology onto the flight deck of transport category aircraft has had considerable impact both on aircraft operations and on the flight crew. As part of NASA's responsibility to facilitate an active exchange of ideas and information among members of the aviation community, a NASA/FAA/Industry workshop devoted to flight deck automation, organized by the Aerospace Human Factors Research Division of NASA Ames Research Center. Participants were invited from industry and from government organizations responsible for design, certification, operation, and accident investigation of transport category, automated aircraft. The goal of the workshop was to clarify the implications of automation, both positive and negative. Workshop panels and working groups identified issues regarding the design, training, and procedural aspects of flight deck automation, as well as the crew's ability to interact and perform effectively with the new technology. The proceedings include the invited papers and the panel and working group reports, as well as the summary and conclusions of the conference.

Norman, Susan D. (editor); Orlady, Harry W. (editor)

1989-01-01

289

Realizing the Promise of Chemical Glycobiology  

PubMed Central

Chemical glycobiology is emerging as one of the most uniquely powerful sub-disciplines of chemical biology. The previous scarcity of chemical strategies and the unparalleled structural diversity have created a uniquely fertile ground that is both rich in challenges and potentially very profound in implications. Glycans (oligosaccharides, polysaccharides, and glycoconjugates) are everywhere in biological systems and yet remain disproportionately neglected – reviews highlighting this ‘Cinderella status’ abound. Yet, the last two decades have witnessed tremendous progress, notably in chemical and chemoenzymatic synthesis, ‘sequencing’ and arraying, metabolic engineering and imaging. These vital steps serve to highlight not only the great potential but just how much more remains to be done. The vast chemical and functional space of glycans remains to be truly explored. Top-down full-scale glycomic and glycoproteomic studies coupled with hypothesis-driven, bottom-up innovative chemical strategies will be required to properly realize the potential impact of glycoscience on human health, energy, and economy. In this review, we cherry-pick far-sighted advances and use these to identify possible challenges, opportunities and avenues in chemical glycobiology. PMID:23914294

Wang, Lai-Xi; Davis, Benjamin G.

2013-01-01

290

Flight-deck automation - Promises and problems  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The paper analyzes the role of human factors in flight-deck automation, identifies problem areas, and suggests design guidelines. Flight-deck automation using microprocessor technology and display systems improves performance and safety while leading to a decrease in size, cost, and power consumption. On the other hand negative factors such as failure of automatic equipment, automation-induced error compounded by crew error, crew error in equipment set-up, failure to heed automatic alarms, and loss of proficiency must also be taken into account. Among the problem areas discussed are automation of control tasks, monitoring of complex systems, psychosocial aspects of automation, and alerting and warning systems. Guidelines are suggested for designing, utilising, and improving control and monitoring systems. Investigation into flight-deck automation systems is important as the knowledge gained can be applied to other systems such as air traffic control and nuclear power generation, but the many problems encountered with automated systems need to be analyzed and overcome in future research.

Wiener, E. L.; Curry, R. E.

1980-01-01

291

Ethnography in community psychology: promises and tensions.  

PubMed

Community psychology recognizes the need for research methods that illuminate context, culture, diversity, and process. One such method, ethnography, has crossed into multiple disciplines from anthropology, and indeed, community psychologists are becoming community ethnographers. Ethnographic work stands at the intersection of bridging universal questions with the particularities of people and groups bounded in time, geographic location, and social location. Ethnography is thus historical and deeply contextual, enabling a rich, in-depth understanding of communities that is aligned with the values and goals of community psychology. The purpose of this paper is to elucidate the potential of ethnography for community psychology and to encourage its use within the field as a method to capture culture and context, to document process, and to reveal how social change and action occur within and through communities. We discuss the method of ethnography, draw connections to community psychology values and goals, and identify tensions from our experiences doing ethnography. Overall, we assert that ethnography is a method that resonates with community psychology and present this paper as a resource for those interested in using this method in their research or community activism. PMID:24733402

Case, Andrew D; Todd, Nathan R; Kral, Michael J

2014-09-01

292

Nanorobotics is an emerging interdisciplinary technology area raising new scientific challenges and promising revolution-  

E-print Network

and promising revolution- ary advancements in applications such as medicine, biology and industrial function, as well as for identifying ways of designing protein-based nano- mechanical systems. Industrial Nanorobotics The papers in the second group of this special issue are rel- evant to industrial nanorobotics (or

Mavroidis, Constantinos

293

Mexican Immigrant Youth and Resiliency: Research and Promising Programs. ERIC Digest.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Mexican immigrant youth lag behind other immigrant groups in educational completion and achievement, but many resilient Mexican immigrant youth have overcome tough odds to succeed. This digest examines the research about resiliency and some promising programs for Mexican American youth. Resiliency theory identifies protective factors present in…

Chavkin, Nancy Feyl; Gonzalez, John

294

ognitive radio (CR) is an enabling technology for dynamic spectrum access (DSA) that promises to  

E-print Network

ognitive radio (CR) is an enabling technology for dynamic spectrum access (DSA) that promises or referring to the geolocation databases, a CR (or a CR-enabled secondary user) is able to intelligently networks. Many security and privacy problems have been identified in both the sensing-based and database

295

Identifying tier one key suppliers.  

PubMed

In today's global marketplace, businesses are becoming increasingly reliant on suppliers for the provision of key processes, activities, products and services in support of their strategic business goals. The result is that now, more than ever, the failure of a key supplier has potential to damage reputation, productivity, compliance and financial performance seriously. Yet despite this, there is no recognised standard or guidance for identifying a tier one key supplier base and, up to now, there has been little or no research on how to do so effectively. This paper outlines the key findings of a BCI-sponsored research project to investigate good practice in identifying tier one key suppliers, and suggests a scalable framework process model and risk matrix tool to help businesses effectively identify their tier one key supplier base. PMID:23615061

Wicks, Steve

2013-01-01

296

Cethromycin: a promising new ketolide antibiotic for respiratory infections.  

PubMed

Community-acquired pneumonia remains the primary infectious cause of death in the United States. At current levels of antimicrobial resistance, conventional agents are at risk of becoming less effective, and the need for new agents is pressing. Cethromycin is a new ketolide antibiotic being investigated for use in respiratory tract infections. To review its pharmacology, in vitro susceptibilities, pharmacokinetics, efficacy, safety, and drug interactions, we conducted a MEDLINE search restricted to English-language articles citing cethromycin or ABT-773 (its original designation) from 1990-May 2009. Additional data sources were identified from the references of selected articles. All published trials and available poster data citing cethromycin were selected for review. In vitro, cethromycin displays more potent antibacterial effects than its predecessor telithromycin. Cethromycin exhibits potent inhibition of both gram-positive and gram-negative respiratory pathogens. A new drug application for cethromycin was submitted to the United States Food and Drug Administration in 2008 for the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia. Clinical trial data in the treatment of respiratory tract infections support cethromycin's efficacy. The limited safety data have not included any reports of hepatotoxicity. If cethromycin proves to be safe with regard to hepatotoxicity, it has great promise as an alternative to current standard therapy for community-acquired respiratory infections, especially pneumonia. Given current resistance levels, cethromycin could provide more reliable coverage against common respiratory pathogens than traditional agents in the beta-lactam and macrolide classes. PMID:20180612

Rafie, Sally; MacDougall, Conan; James, Charles L

2010-03-01

297

Circulating endothelial progenitor cell: a promising biomarker in clinical oncology.  

PubMed

Human cancers are endowed with sustained vascularization capability, and their growth, invasion, and metastasis are vascularization dependent. Recently, accumulated body of evidence suggests that endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) can support vasculogenesis and induce angiogenesis through paracrine mechanisms. In addition, numerous clinical studies have revealed the increase in the number of EPCs in the peripheral blood of cancer patients and demonstrated the correlation of circulating EPCs (CEPCs) with the clinical outcomes. This review highlights current enrichment procedures and methods for the detection of CEPCs and different biomarkers to identify CEPCs as well as the functions of EPCs in tumor vascularization. Furthermore, we systematically review available studies on the clinical relevance of CEPCs in cancer patients to explore the potential diagnostic and prognostic values of CEPCs. Although several contrasting results exist, CEPCs can conceivably serve as a promising biomarker for the early diagnosis, prognosis prediction, and treatment response indication in the future. Additionally, further well-designed clinical studies with larger sample size and unique, specific enumeration procedures are warranted to achieve further insight into the clinical implications of CEPCs. PMID:25428376

Ge, Yu-Zheng; Wu, Ran; Lu, Tian-Ze; Xin, Hui; Yu, Peng; Zhao, Yan; Liu, Hao; Xu, Zheng; Xu, Lu-Wei; Shen, Jiang-Wei; Xu, Xiao; Zhou, Liu-Hua; Li, Wen-Cheng; Zhu, Jia-Geng; Jia, Rui-Peng

2015-01-01

298

Relationship of osteopathic medical licensure examinations with undergraduate admission measures and predictive value of identifying future performance in osteopathic principles and practice/osteopathic manipulative medicine courses and rotations.  

PubMed

Two hundred sixty-five students from four classes at one school of osteopathic medicine were studied to determine the correlation between several frequently used premedical admission criteria to predict performance on the early and current versions of the osteopathic medical licensure examinations. Further analysis evaluated the predictive value of the examination of the National Board of Osteopathic Medical Examiners (NBOME) and its successor, the Comprehensive Osteopathic Medical Licensing Examination-USA (COMLEX-USA) in determining subsequent performance in the ascending levels of the examination sequence, as well as to predict performance in the courses and rotations of osteopathic principles and practice (OPP) and osteopathic manipulative medicine (OMM). This study also investigated the relationship between the early and later parts of the osteopathic medical licensure examinations. Analysis showed that of all premedical parameters, only the Medical College Aptitude Test score was positively correlated with performance on COMLEX-USA. In addition, a positive correlation was demonstrated between the performance in either Level 1 of COMLEX-USA or in the earlier form of the NBOME examination Part I and subsequent performance on the current Level 2 of COMLEX-USA or the old NBOME Part II. Finally, analysis indicated that COMLEX-USA predicted performance in OPP knowledge and skills. PMID:12462306

Meoli, Frederick G; Wallace, Warren S; Kaiser-Smith, Joanne; Shen, Linjun

2002-11-01

299

Exploring the promises of intersectionality for advancing women's health research.  

PubMed

Women's health research strives to make change. It seeks to produce knowledge that promotes action on the variety of factors that affect women's lives and their health. As part of this general movement, important strides have been made to raise awareness of the health effects of sex and gender. The resultant base of knowledge has been used to inform health research, policy, and practice. Increasingly, however, the need to pay better attention to the inequities among women that are caused by racism, colonialism, ethnocentrism, heterosexism, and able-bodism, is confronting feminist health researchers and activists. Researchers are seeking new conceptual frameworks that can transform the design of research to produce knowledge that captures how systems of discrimination or subordination overlap and "articulate" with one another. An emerging paradigm for women's health research is intersectionality. Intersectionality places an explicit focus on differences among groups and seeks to illuminate various interacting social factors that affect human lives, including social locations, health status, and quality of life. This paper will draw on recently emerging intersectionality research in the Canadian women's health context in order to explore the promises and practical challenges of the processes involved in applying an intersectionality paradigm. We begin with a brief overview of why the need for an intersectionality approach has emerged within the context of women's health research and introduce current thinking about how intersectionality can inform and transform health research more broadly. We then highlight novel Canadian research that is grappling with the challenges in addressing issues of difference and diversity. In the analysis of these examples, we focus on a largely uninvestigated aspect of intersectionality research - the challenges involved in the process of initiating and developing such projects and, in particular, the meaning and significance of social locations for researchers and participants who utilize an intersectionality approach. The examples highlighted in the paper represent important shifts in the health field, demonstrating the potential of intersectionality for examining the social context of women's lives, as well as developing methods which elucidate power, create new knowledge, and have the potential to inform appropriate action to bring about positive social change. PMID:20181225

Hankivsky, Olena; Reid, Colleen; Cormier, Renee; Varcoe, Colleen; Clark, Natalie; Benoit, Cecilia; Brotman, Shari

2010-01-01

300

Catalytically active nanomaterials: a promising candidate for artificial enzymes.  

PubMed

Natural enzymes, exquisite biocatalysts mediating every biological process in living organisms, are able to accelerate the rate of chemical reactions up to 10(19) times for specific substrates and reactions. However, the practical application of enzymes is often hampered by their intrinsic drawbacks, such as low operational stability, sensitivity of catalytic activity to environmental conditions, and high costs in preparation and purification. Therefore, the discovery and development of artificial enzymes is highly desired. Recently, the merging of nanotechnology with biology has ignited extensive research efforts for designing functional nanomaterials that exhibit various properties intrinsic to enzymes. As a promising candidate for artificial enzymes, catalytically active nanomaterials (nanozymes) show several advantages over natural enzymes, such as controlled synthesis in low cost, tunability in catalytic activities, as well as high stability against stringent conditions. In this Account, we focus on our recent progress in exploring and constructing such nanoparticulate artificial enzymes, including graphene oxide, graphene-hemin nanocomposites, carbon nanotubes, carbon nanodots, mesoporous silica-encapsulated gold nanoparticles, gold nanoclusters, and nanoceria. According to their structural characteristics, these enzyme mimics are categorized into three classes: carbon-, metal-, and metal-oxide-based nanomaterials. We aim to highlight the important role of catalytic nanomaterials in the fields of biomimetics. First, we provide a practical introduction to the identification of these nanozymes, the source of the enzyme-like activities, and the enhancement of activities via rational design and engineering. Then we briefly describe new or enhanced applications of certain nanozymes in biomedical diagnosis, environmental monitoring, and therapeutics. For instance, we have successfully used these biomimetic catalysts as colorimetric probes for the detection of cancer cells, nucleic acids, proteins, metal ions, and other small molecules. In addition, we also introduce three exciting advances in the use of efficient modulators on artificial enzyme systems to improve the catalytic performance of existing nanozymes. For example, we report that graphene oxide could serve as a modulator to greatly improve the catalytic activity of lysozyme-stabilized gold nanoclusters at neutral pH, which will have great potential for applications in biological systems. We show that, through the incorporation of modulator into artificial enzymes, we can offer a facile but highly effective way to improve their overall catalytic performance or realize the catalytic reactions that were not possible in the past. We expect that nanozymes with unique properties and functions will attract increasing research interest and lead to new opportunities in various fields of research. PMID:24437921

Lin, Youhui; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

2014-04-15

301

The Place and Promise of Theory in Rehabilitation Psychology  

PubMed Central

Objective Although rehabilitation psychology is more focused on empirical evidence and clinical application than theory development, we argue for the primacy of theory, and explain why theories are needed in and useful for rehabilitation psychology. Impediments to theory development are discussed, including the difficulties of applying psychological theories in multidisciplinary enterprises, and the difficulties in developing a theory-driven research program. We offer suggestions by reviewing research settings, knowledge gained through controlled studies, grantsmanship, and then identify topical areas where new theories are needed. We remind researcher-practitioners that rehabilitation psychology benefits from a judicious mix of scientific rigor and real-world vigor. Conclusions We close by advocating for theory-driven research programs that embrace a methodological pluralism, which will in turn advance new theory, produce meaningful research programs that inform practice, and realize the goals of this special issue of Rehabilitation Psychology—advances in research and methodology. PMID:19649146

Dunn, Dana S.; Elliott, Timothy R.

2008-01-01

302

Wind energy offers considerable promise; the wind itself is free,  

E-print Network

and research institutions. Career prospects The number of jobs in the wind energy sector in Europe is expectedWind energy offers considerable promise; the wind itself is free, wind power is clean. One of these sources, wind energy, offers considerable promise; the wind itself is free, wind power

Langendoen, Koen

303

Delaware Pushes to Meet Race to Top Promises  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article reports on how Delaware pushes to meet Race to the Top promises. The Delcastle Technical High School teachers are on the front lines of the push to deliver on promises that last year won Delaware, 10 other states, and the District of Columbia shares of the Race to the Top pie, the $4 billion competition that is driving much of the…

McNeil, Michele

2011-01-01

304

Some Glorious and Incomparable Promises of the Bible  

Microsoft Academic Search

During the first half of World War II General Douglas MacArthur was forced to leave the Philippines in the Pacific Theater by the Japanese. Upon his departure he made a promise to the Philippino people: “I will return.” General MacArthur, through the strength and power of the American military was able to keep his promise. If humanity can make and

Thomas D. Ice

2009-01-01

305

The Glorious and Incomparable Promises of the Bible  

Microsoft Academic Search

During the first half of World War II General Douglas MacArthur was forced to leave the Philippines in the Pacific Theater by the Japanese. Upon his departure he made a promise to the Philippino people: “I will return.” General MacArthur, through the strength and power of the American military was able to keep his promise. If humanity can make and

Thomas D. Ice

2009-01-01

306

The Effects of the Kalamazoo Promise on College Choice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

On November 10, 2005, then Superintendent of the Kalamazoo Public School System, Janice Brown announced--to the surprise of Kalamazoo's residents--the beginning of the Kalamazoo Promise. Fully funded by a set of anonymous donors, the Kalamazoo Promise is an urban revitalization program that offers up to four years of free tuition to any public…

Andrews, Rodney J.; DesJardins, Stephen; Ranchhod, Vimal

2010-01-01

307

The Struggle between Conflicting Beliefs: On the Promise of Education  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Education is thought to provide a certain outcome--a "promise". I argue that a promise that education will counteract cultural and social disintegration involves a risk of engendering narrow social and cultural incorporation. On what reasonable basis could education contribute to civic life, when contemporary Western society is represented by a…

Boman, Ylva

2006-01-01

308

Identifying, Measuring, and Teaching Helping Skills.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Addressed is the need in social work education to identify the skills required for effective practice, to develop instruments to measure these skills, and to design an approach to teach them effectively. In the first chapter, "Identifying the Worker Helping Skills," 27 communication, relationship, and problem-solving skills are described. The…

Shulman, Lawrence

309

Immersive Virtual Environment Technology: A Promising Tool for Future Social and Behavioral Genomics Research and Practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

Social and behavioral research needs to get started now if scientists are to direct genomic discoveries to address pressing public health problems. Advancing social and behavioral science will require innovative and rigorous communication methodologies that move researchers beyond reliance on traditional tools and their inherent limitations. One such emerging research tool is immersive virtual environment technology (virtual reality), a methodology

Susan Persky; Colleen M. McBride

2009-01-01

310

Management and Operations of Online Programs: Ensuring Quality and Accountability. Promising Practices in Online Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Online learning is growing rapidly as states and districts are creating new online schools, and existing programs are adding new courses and students. The growth reflects the spreading understanding that online courses and programs can serve a wide variety of students and needs. These include: (1) Creating opportunities for small and rural school…

Watson, John; Gemin, Butch

2009-01-01

311

Two-Way Bilingual Program: Promise, Practice, and Precautions. Report No. 47.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

In spite of political pressure, bilingualism is emerging as a strategy for improving the academic achievement of all students. Two-way bilingual or dual-language programs integrate language-minority and language-majority students for instruction in two la...

A. Carreon, M. Calderon

2000-01-01

312

How To Work Effectively with Girls: Promising Practices in Gender-Specific Interventions.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Presents the necessary foundations of gender-specific interventions for adolescent girls within the juvenile justice and special education systems and outlines the three components of gender-specific programming: comprehensive programming, safe and nurturing environment, and relationships and connections. Includes a discussion of an "all-girls"…

Ryan, Charlotte A.; Lindgren, Sandra J.

1999-01-01

313

Education for Adult English Language Learners in the United States: Trends, Research, and Promising Practices  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Adult English language learners comprise a substantial proportion of the adult education population in the United States. In program year 2006-2007, 46% of participants enrolled in state-administered adult education programs were in English as a second language (ESL) classes. This percentage does not include English language learners enrolled in…

Schaetzel, Kirsten; Young, Sarah

2010-01-01

314

Promising Practices in Afterschool Program and School Partnerships. After School Issues. Volume 3, Issue 1  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The National Institute on Out-of-School-Time (NIOST) investigated partnership strategies between community-based organizations conducting afterschool programs and the schools they serve. NIOST used in-depth phone interviews and site visits to collect information on several community-based organization afterschool programs and their affiliated…

National Institute on Out-of-School Time, Wellesley College, 2007

2007-01-01

315

Partnerships for Learning: Promising Practices in Integrating School and Out-of-School Time Program Supports  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Across the country many schools and communities are trying to create and support efforts to institutionalize partnerships for learning, including those that rethink the use of time across the school day and year, and across the developmental continuum. Referred to by different terms--integrated, expanded, or complementary learning--the concept has…

Harvard Family Research Project, 2010

2010-01-01

316

The Changing Faculty and Student Success: Non-Tenure-Track Faculty Promising Practices  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The nature of the American academic workforce has fundamentally shifted over the past several decades. Whereas full-time tenured and tenure-track faculty were once the norm, more than two-thirds of the professoriate in non-profit postsecondary education is now comprised of non-tenure-track faculty. New hires across all institutional types are now…

Kezar, Adrianna; Maxey, Daniel

2012-01-01

317

Lean Premixed Combustion Stabilized by Low Swirl a Promising Concept for Practical Applications  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Since its inception, the low-swirl burner (LSB) has shown to be a useful laboratory apparatus for fundamental studies of premixed turbulent flames. The LSB operates under wide ranges of equivalence ratios, flow rates, and turbulence intensities. Its flame is lifted and detached from the burner and allows easy access for laser diagnostics. The flame brush is axisymmetric and propagates normal to the incident reactants. Therefore, the LSB is well suited for investigating detailed flame structures and empirical coefficients such as flame speed, turbulence transport, and flame generated turbulence. Due to its capability to stabilize ultra-lean premixed turbulent flames (phi approx. = 0.55), the LSB has generated interest from the gas appliance industry for use as an economical low-NO(x) burner. Lean premixed combustion emits low levels of NO(x), due primarily to the low flame temperature. Therefore, it is a very effective NO(x) prevention method without involving selective catalytic reduction (SCR), fuel-air staging, or flue gas recirculation (FGR). En the gas turbine industry, substantial research efforts have already been undertaken and engines with lean premixed combustors are already in use. For commercial and residential applications, premixed pulsed combustors and premixed ceramic matrix burners are commercially available. These lean premixed combustion technologies, however, tend to be elaborate but have relatively limited operational flexibility, and higher capital, operating and maintenance costs. Consequently, these industries are continuing the development of lean premixed combustion technologies as well as exploring new concepts. This paper summarizes the research effects we have undertaken in the past few years to demonstrate the feasibility of applying the low-swirl flame stabilization method for a wide range of heating and power generation systems. The principle of flame stabilization by low-swirl is counter to the conventional high-swirl methods that rely on a recirculation zone to anchor the flame. In LSBS, flow recirculation is not promoted to allow the premixed turbulent flames to propagate freely. A LSB with an air-jet swirler is essentially an open tube with the swirler at its mid section. The small air-jets generate swirling motion only in the annular region and leaving the central core of the flow undisturbed, When this flow exits the burner tube, the angular momentum generates radial mean pressure gradient to diverge the non-swirling reactants stream. Consequently, the mean flow velocity decreases linearly. Propagating against this decelerating flow, the flame self-sustains at the position where the local flow velocity equals the flame speed, S(sub f). The LSB operates with a swirl number, S, between 0.02 to 0.1. This is much lower than the minimum S of 0.6 required for the high-swirl burners. We found that the swirl number needed for flame stabilization varies only slightly with fuel type, flow velocity, turbulent conditions and burner dimensions (i.e. throat diameter and swirl injection angle).

Cheng, R. K.

1999-01-01

318

Noopur Raje, MD, Director, Center for Multiple Myeloma From Promise to Practice  

E-print Network

of advanced procedures for both common and rare cancers. We offer highly precise radiation therapies, including the Francis H. Burr Proton Therapy Center, the only proton beam radiation therapy facility in New England, and one of the region's only intra-operative electron radiation therapy (IOERT) programs. We

Mootha, Vamsi K.

319

Promising Practices in Undergraduate Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Education: Summary of Two Workshops  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Numerous teaching, learning, assessment, and institutional innovations in undergraduate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education have emerged in the past decade. Because virtually all of these innovations have been developed independently of one another, their goals and purposes vary widely. Some focus on making science…

Nielsen, Natalie

2011-01-01

320

Making Education Work for Mexican-Americans: Promising Community Practices. ERIC Digest.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Hispanic students have higher dropout rates and lower academic achievement than Anglo students. While schools have begun to address the issue of underachievement, some community groups have implemented enrichment programs that focus on the affective domain--self-esteem, family values, and cultural pride. This digest describes and synthesizes the…

Sosa, Alicia

321

Using Assessment Results: Promising Practices of Institutions That Do It Well  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Most institutions are collecting evidence of student learning, but it is not clear how these results are being used to improve student outcomes. To learn more about what colleges and universities are doing to use assessment data productively to inform and strengthen undergraduate education, the National Institute for Learning Outcomes Assessment…

Baker, Gianina R.; Jankowski, Natasha A.; Provezis, Staci; Kinzie, Jillian

2012-01-01

322

Culturally Responsive Pedagogy for African American Students: Promising Programs and Practices for Enhanced Academic Performance  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The academic outcomes for African American students continue to lag behind their White, Latino, and Asian American counterparts. Culturally responsive pedagogy has been purported to be an intervention that may help to reverse the persistent under performance for African American students. This article highlights findings from a three-year study of…

Howard, Tyrone; Terry, Clarence L., Sr.

2011-01-01

323

Tying Early Childhood Education More Closely to Schooling: Promise, Perils and Practical Problems  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: Over the past decade or so, the idea of joining early childhood education (ECE) and schooling has gained currency in the educational reform arena. Numerous education reform proposals and plans include ECE as a component. Scores of school districts around the country have added preschool classrooms to at least some of their elementary…

Halpern, Robert

2013-01-01

324

Using Online Learning for At-Risk Students and Credit Recovery. Promising Practices in Online Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Online learning programs are designed to expand high-quality educational opportunities and to meet the needs of diverse students. While the primary reason online courses are offered in school districts is to expand offerings to courses that would otherwise be unavailable, the second most commonly cited reason for offering online learning is to…

Watson, John; Gemin, Butch

2008-01-01

325

Understanding the Functions and Forms of Racism: Toward the Development of Promising Practices.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The public looks to schools to address prejudice and discrimination. Several models of and approaches to multicultural education are described. Racism is not eradicated by preaching tolerance or by providing information that contradicts stereotypes. Racism is best overcome through a political education that explains the social and political…

Moodley, Kogila

2000-01-01

326

Practicing Interdisciplinarity  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This peer-reviewed resource from BioScience is about the practice of interdisciplinary research. We explore the practical difficulties of interdisciplinary research in the context of a regional- or local-scale project. We posit four barriers to interdisciplinarity that are common across many disciplines and draw on our own experience and on other sources to explore how these barriers are manifested. Values enter into scientific theories and data collection through scientists' hidden assumptions about disciplines other than their own, through the differences between quantitative and interpretive social sciences, and through roadblocks created by the organization of academia and the relationship between academics and the larger society. Participants in interdisciplinary projects need to be self-reflective about the value judgments embedded in their choice of variables and models. They should identify and use a core set of shared concerns to motivate the effort, be willing to respect and to learn more about the other, be able to work with new models and alternative taxonomies, and allow for plurality and incompleteness.

SHARACHCHANDRA LÃÂÃÂLÃÂÃÂ and RICHARD B. NORGAARD (;)

2005-11-01

327

The promise of stem cell research for neuropsychiatric disorders  

PubMed Central

The study of the developing brain has begun to shed light on the underpinnings of both early and adult onset neuropsychiatric disorders. Neuroimaging of the human brain across developmental time points and the use of model animal systems have combined to reveal brain systems and gene products that may play a role in autism spectrum disorders, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, obsessive compulsive disorder and many other neurodevelopmental conditions. However, precisely how genes may function in human brain development and how they interact with each other leading to psychiatric disorders is unknown. Because of an increasing understanding of neural stem cells and how the nervous system subsequently develops from these cells, we have now the ability to study disorders of the nervous system in a new way—by rewinding and reviewing the development of human neural cells. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), developed from mature somatic cells, have allowed the development of specific cells in patients to be observed in real-time. Moreover, they have allowed some neuronal-specific abnormalities to be corrected with pharmacological intervention in tissue culture. These exciting advances based on the use of iPSCs hold great promise for understanding, diagnosing and, possibly, treating psychiatric disorders. Specifically, examination of iPSCs from typically developing individuals will reveal how basic cellular processes and genetic differences contribute to individually unique nervous systems. Moreover, by comparing iPSCs from typically developing individuals and patients, differences at stem cell stages, through neural differentiation, and into the development of functional neurons may be identified that will reveal opportunities for intervention. The application of such techniques to early onset neuropsychiatric disorders is still on the horizon but has become a reality of current research efforts as a consequence of the revelations of many years of basic developmental neurobiological science. PMID:21204834

Vaccarino, Flora M.; Urban, Alexander Eckehart; Stevens, Hanna; Szekely, Anna; Abyzov, Alexej; Grigorenko, Elena; Gerstein, Mark; Weissman, Sherman

2011-01-01

328

Pthlh, a promising cancer modifier gene in rat tongue carcinogenesis  

PubMed Central

Susceptibly to the induction of rat tongue cancer (TC) by oral 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide (4NQO) exposure is a polygenic trait. Among several quantitative trait loci identified by crosses between TC-susceptible Dark Agouti (DA) rats and TC-resistant Wistar-Furth (WF) rats, we focused on tongue cancer susceptibility locus (Tcas3) of chromosome 4. We examined tongue carcinogenesis in the reciprocal congenic strains DA.WF-Tcas3 and WF.DA-Tcas3 and in their parental strains. The Tcas3DA allele, and not the Tcas3WF allele, significantly favored tumor latency, incidence and TC number/size. In genomic DNA of TCs induced in (DA × WF) F1 rats, the resistant Tcas3WF allele was frequently and selectively lost, particularly in larger tumors. Thus, we searched the possible candidate genes in the Tcas3 region using microarray analysis of TCs in F1 rats and revealed significant upregulation of 2 cancer-related genes, parathyroid hormone-like hormone (Pthlh) and Kras2. The relevance of the WF allele of Pthlh as a cancer modifier was indicated by 3 single nucleotide polymorphisms specific to this strain. In contrast, no consistent strain-specific variations were found in Kras2. Moreover, the plasma Ca2+ level was consistently higher in DA rats when compared to the level in WF rats bearing TCs; moreover, the Pthlh-mRNA expression level was >30-fold higher in TCs when compared to this level in the normal tongue mucosa. Immunostaining experiments showed strong PTHrP protein expression in TCs of DA rats, and the signal was intensified in larger TCs. Kras2 was also upregulated in TCs, but to a lesser degree than PTHrP. Thus, Pthlh is a promising candidate modifier gene in the development and progression of rat TCs. PMID:24253735

SUWA, HIROHIKO; HIRANO, MASATO; KAWARADA, KOUJI; NAGAYAMA, MOTOHIKO; EHARA, MICHIKO; MURAKI, TOMONARI; SHISA, HAYASE; SUGIYAMA, AIKO; SUGIMOTO, MASAHIRO; HIAI, HIROSHI; KITANO, MOTOO; TANUMA, JUN-ICHI

2014-01-01

329

Classroom Practices in Teaching English, 1968-1969: A Sixth Report of the NCTE Committee on Promising Practices.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Twenty-five articles describing techniques for teaching English are organized under four headings: language, literature, composition, and miscellany. Included in the language section are discussions of an oral language program for 3- to 5-year-old disadvantaged children, of language development through creative dramatics, of a junior high school…

National Council of Teachers of English, Champaign, IL.

330

A Thirty Year Old Conjecture about Promise Andrew Hughes1  

E-print Network

algorithm that tells whether an instance x lies in y or not, under the promise that x is in y n separators are NP-hard via bounded-truth- table reductions. We provide evidence for this conjecture. We also

Aduri, Pavan

331

Nanotechnology Medical Applications Breakthroughs in nanotechnology promise to revolutionize drug  

E-print Network

Nanotechnology Medical Applications Breakthroughs in nanotechnology promise to revolutionize drug manufacturing, drug delivery, and medical diagnostics. By learning how substances behave differently's Nanotechnology Center are creating novel tools and developing new methods for crucial research areas of drug

Hill, Wendell T.

332

MEK: A Single Drug Target Shows Promise in Multiple Cancers  

Cancer.gov

Drugs that block the MEK protein have shown promise in several cancers. Trametinib has had encouraging results in patients with advanced melanoma, and selumetinib has been tested in patients with advanced thyroid and ovarian cancers.

333

Salivary Gland Biopsy Shows Promise to Helping to Diagnose Parkinson's  

MedlinePLUS

Parkinson's HelpLine Learn More Educational Materials Do you want to know more about Parkinson's? PDF's materials provide ... Gland Biopsy Shows Promise to Helping to Diagnose Parkinson’s - Mar 20 2014 A simple outpatient procedure that ...

334

Clinical knowledge management at scale: fulfilling the promise of pervasive  

E-print Network

Clinical knowledge management at scale: fulfilling the promise of pervasive computerized clinical. Corporate Manager Clinical Knowledge Management and Decision Support, Clinical Informatics Research and application results 2. Clinical Knowledge Management System Typical knowledge engineering processes

Gabrieli, John

335

Bone Drug Holds Promise as Therapy for People with OA  

MedlinePLUS

... 2000 1999 Spotlight on Research 2012 January 2012 Bone Drug Holds Promise as Therapy for People with ... have shown that a medication that triggers new bone formation in people with osteoporosis can restore cartilage ...

336

Broccoli Compound Shows Promise for Autism Symptoms in Small Study  

MedlinePLUS

... please enable JavaScript. Broccoli Compound Shows Promise for Autism Symptoms in Small Study Researchers caution that not ... 2015) Monday, October 13, 2014 Related MedlinePlus Page Autism Spectrum Disorder MONDAY, Oct. 13, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- ...

337

78 FR 63913 - Proposed Priority-Promise Zones  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...Nation's persistent pockets of poverty. Building on those efforts...the next 4 years, 20 high- poverty communities as ``Promise...Housing and Urban Development, Education, Agriculture, and Justice...Federal programs in high-poverty urban, rural, and...

2013-10-25

338

Evidence-Based Practices in Secondary Transition  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A literature review was conducted to identify evidence-based practices in secondary transition using quality indicator checklists for experimental research. Practices were categorized by the Taxonomy for Transition Programming. Overall, 32 secondary transition evidence-based practices were identified. Two practices had a strong level of evidence,…

Test, David W.; Fowler, Catherine H.; Richter, Sharon M.; White, James; Mazzotti, Valerie; Walker, Allison R.; Kohler, Paula; Kortering, Larry

2009-01-01

339

Preceptors’ Perception of Students in Supervised Practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

LEARNING OUTCOME: Identify preceptors’ suggestions for improving student success in the supervised practice settingSupervised practice instruction is a valuable component of undergraduate dietetic education and post-graduate internship programs. The practice setting offers opportunities for learning experiences not always feasible in the classroom. The purposes of this study were to identify preceptors’ expectations of dietetic students in the supervised practice setting

N. Hill; K. Wolf; B. Bossetti; A. Saddam

1997-01-01

340

Promising Areas for Energy Efficiency in Industrial Process  

E-print Network

Promising Areas for Energy Efficiency in Industrial Process Babu Joseph Ph.D Southern California Edison Company Almost all of the electric utilities in the US have some sort of energy efficiency improvement program for their customers. In all...Promising Areas for Energy Efficiency in Industrial Process Babu Joseph Ph.D Southern California Edison Company Almost all of the electric utilities in the US have some sort of energy efficiency improvement program for their customers. In all...

Joseph, B.

341

Predictors of rural practice location.  

PubMed

Attitudes toward the urban environment and place of origin were found to be the best predictors of an optometrist's practice location. When urbanism attitude and origin were scaled and placed in an equation to predict practice location, identification of an optometrist's practice location as rural or urban was highly accurate. Most important, scores on the equation were predictive of optometry students' future practice location. A single cutoff point on the equation correctly identified 79 percent of students who entered a rural or isolated small city practice and 81 percent of those who entered urban practice. The findings imply that optometry students most likely to enter rural practice can be objectively identified early in their training. If certain factors affecting choice of practice location are common to all health professions, the predictive equation presented here may be useful in the selection of students for rural practice in medicine. PMID:839513

Kegel-Flom, P

1977-03-01

342

The reading-science learning-writing connection: Breakthroughs, barriers, and promises  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article establishes a broad framework from which to interpret and evaluate the reading-science learning-writing connection. The presentation of breakthroughs, barriers, and promises is intended to outline the established links between, to identify current bottlenecks in thinking about, and to highlight productive inquiries into, print-based languages and scientific understanding. The ideas presented come from various disciplines connected to science education.

William G. Holliday; Larry D. Yore; Donna E. Alvermann

1994-01-01

343

Identifiability of Finite Mixtures  

Microsoft Academic Search

In general, the class of mixtures of the family of normal distributions or of Gamma (Type III) distributions or binomial distributions is not identifiable (see [3], [4] or Section 2 below for the meaning of this statement). In [4] it was shown that the class of all mixtures of a one-parameter additively-closed family of distributions is identifiable. Here, attention will

Henry Teicher

1963-01-01

344

Identifying opportunities Overcoming barriers  

E-print Network

of localised culling on neighbouring populations and on woodlands. · deer-related road traffic accidents management involves and affects many people with diverse aims and values. Our objective is to understand issues and management, and identify those involved and who is affected. · identify opportunities

345

Exemplary Practices in Adolescent Development  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In 2003, Sierra Health Foundation's Board of Directors selected school-aged youth as the target for its next focused grantmaking effort. As part of the program research and development phase, staff and consultants examined evidenced-based practices that appear promising in positively affecting adolescent health and development for young people…

Birtwhistle, Amy; Lefkovitz, Bina; Meehan, Dorothy; Needham, Heather; Paul, Andy

2004-01-01

346

Gene-alcohol interactions identify several novel blood pressure loci including a promising locus near SLC16A9  

PubMed Central

Alcohol consumption is a known risk factor for hypertension, with recent candidate studies implicating gene-alcohol interactions in blood pressure (BP) regulation. We used 6882 (predominantly) Caucasian participants aged 20–80 years from the Framingham SNP Health Association Resource (SHARe) to perform a genome-wide analysis of SNP-alcohol interactions on BP traits. We used a two-step approach in the ABEL suite to examine genetic interactions with three alcohol measures (ounces of alcohol consumed per week, drinks consumed per week, and the number of days drinking alcohol per week) on four BP traits [systolic (SBP), diastolic (DBP), mean arterial (MAP), and pulse (PP) pressure]. In the first step, we fit a linear mixed model of each BP trait onto age, sex, BMI, and antihypertensive medication while accounting for the phenotypic correlation among relatives. In the second step, we conducted 1 degree-of-freedom (df) score tests of the SNP main effect, alcohol main effect, and SNP-alcohol interaction using the maximum likelihood estimates (MLE) of the parameters from the first step. We then calculated the joint 2 df score test of the SNP main effect and SNP-alcohol interaction using MixABEL. The effect of SNP rs10826334 (near SLC16A9) on SBP was significantly modulated by both the number of alcoholic drinks and the ounces of alcohol consumed per week (p-values of 1.27E-08 and 3.92E-08, respectively). Each copy of the G-allele decreased SBP by 3.79 mmHg in those consuming 14 drinks per week vs. a 0.461 mmHg decrease in non-drinkers. Index SNPs in 20 other loci exhibited suggestive (p-value ? 1E-06) associations with BP traits by the 1 df interaction test or joint 2 df test, including 3 rare variants, one low-frequency variant, and SNPs near/in genes ESRRG, FAM179A, CRIPT-SOCS5, KAT2B, ADCY2, GLI3, ZNF716, SLIT1, PDE3A, KERA-LUM, RNF219-AS1, CLEC3A, FBXO15, and IGSF5. SNP-alcohol interactions may enhance discovery of novel variants with large effects that can be targeted with lifestyle modifications. PMID:24376456

Simino, Jeannette; Sung, Yun Ju; Kume, Rezart; Schwander, Karen; Rao, D. C.

2013-01-01

347

Breast Cancer Startup Challenge announces ten winning teams of entrepreneurs; Promising technologies identified to speed cancer research  

Cancer.gov

Ten winners of a world-wide competition to bring emerging breast cancer research technologies to market faster were announced today by the Avon Foundation for Women, in partnership with NCI and the Center for Advancing Innovation (CAI). Avon is providing $250,000 in funding for this Challenge.

348

Summary Xylem vulnerability to cavitation is a promising criterion for identifying trees with high drought tolerance, but  

E-print Network

drought tolerance, but traditional techniques for measuring cavitation resistance are unsuitablefor safety and growth potential. Keywords: drought resistance, embolism, genotypic variabil- ity, xylem droughts will increase re- gionally in the future (e.g., Hulme et al. 2002, Barnett et al. 2006

Mencuccini, Maurizio

349

Using first principles calculations to identify new destabilized metal hydride reactions for reversible hydrogen storage.  

PubMed

Hydrides of period 2 and 3 elements are promising candidates for hydrogen storage, but typically have heats of reaction that are too high to be of use for fuel cell vehicles. Recent experimental work has focused on destabilizing metal hydrides through mixing metal hydrides with other compounds. A very large number of possible destabilized metal hydride reaction schemes exist, but the thermodynamic data required to assess the enthalpies of these reactions are not available in many cases. We have used density functional theory calculations to predict the reaction enthalpies for more than 300 destabilization reactions that have not previously been reported. The large majority of these reactions are predicted not to be useful for reversible hydrogen storage, having calculated reaction enthalpies that are either too high or too low, and hence these reactions need not be investigated experimentally. Our calculations also identify multiple promising reactions that have large enough hydrogen storage capacities to be useful in practical applications and have reaction thermodynamics that appear to be suitable for use in fuel cell vehicles and are therefore promising candidates for experimental work. PMID:17356751

Alapati, Sudhakar V; Karl Johnson, J; Sholl, David S

2007-03-28

350

Health Practices of School Nurses  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The health practices of school nurses affect our role as advocates and educators to promote the health of youth. This study describes the health practices of a convenience sample of 388 school nurses who attended the business meeting at an annual school nurse conference. A self-administered, 40-item questionnaire identified health practices of…

Petch-Levine, Deborah; Cureton, Virginia Young; Canham, Daryl; Murray, Meg

2003-01-01

351

Identifying Students with Emotional Disturbance: School Psychologists' Practices and Perceptions  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

From its inception as a disability category in the Education for All Handicapped Children Act, serving students under the special education category Emotional Disturbance (ED) has been a challenging task for school psychologists. In particular, the vague and ambiguous federal definition has created an environment in which inconsistent assessment…

Hanchon, Timothy A.; Allen, Ryan A.

2013-01-01

352

Identifying best practices for supporting broadband growth: Methodology and analysis  

E-print Network

to the 19th Century and the Interstate Highway System and basic telephone networks were to the 20th Century, Greece a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 13 December 2007 Received in revised form 16

Bouras, Christos

353

Encouraging SME Participation in Training: Identifying Practical Approaches.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

A case study of training for small- to medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) at a university found that the following factors influenced SME participation: preliminary consultation with SMEs on design and delivery, free half-day workshops in repeated cycles, individual pacing of learning, and business focus. (Contains 14 references.) (JOW)

Johnston, Karen; Loader, Kim

2003-01-01

354

Identifying Extreme Exposure Values  

Cancer.gov

There are various perspectives on whether to exclude potentially unlikely exposure values. If the researcher chooses to do so, several approaches exist for identifying extreme values. We examined the plausibility of the reported frequencies for each food item in the NHANES 2009-10 DSQ and chose to exclude extreme values using a method that identifies them based on the actual distribution of the sample, but also minimizes the number of values excluded.

355

Identifying eating disorders.  

PubMed

While most nurses are familiar with anorexia and bulimia, how many nurses have heard of compulsive overeating, also known as binge eating? This is not a new condition but the medical profession has been very slow to recognize it as a problem, let alone as an eating disorder. This article looks at the different types of eating disorders, their differences, how to identify sufferers and where to refer them. Identifying patients with eating disorders is a very hard task since sufferers have learned the art of secrecy, denial and deception. PMID:16301950

Jenkins, Alison

356

Cognition and Identifying Reference  

E-print Network

of 0 is a D-IC; or (iii) is a non- descriptive IC and 0 is not analyzable as D-IC. However, Russell's views imply that a person may have non- descriptive knowledge with respect to items with which » he is "acquainted," i.e., his own mental states... COGNITION AND IDENTIFYING REFERENCE Gary Rosenkrantz An examination of the relevant literature indicates that few attempts have been made to provide a comprehen­ sive cognitive account of identifying reference. Much of the work on the subject...

Rosenkrantz, Gary

1978-11-01

357

From boots to buoys: promises and challenges of dielectric elastomer energy harvesting  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Dielectric elastomers offer the promise of energy harvesting with few moving parts. Power can be produced simply by stretching and contracting a relatively low-cost rubbery material. This simplicity, combined with demonstrated high energy density and high efficiency, suggests that dielectric elastomers are promising for a wide range of energy harvesting applications. Indeed, dielectric elastomers have been demonstrated to harvest energy from human walking, ocean waves, flowing water, blowing wind, and pushing buttons. While the technology is promising, there are challenges that must be addressed if dielectric elastomers are to be a successful and economically viable energy harvesting technology. These challenges include developing materials and packaging that sustains long lifetime over a range of environmental conditions, design of the devices that stretch the elastomer material, as well as system issues such as practical and efficient energy harvesting circuits. Progress has been made in many of these areas. We have demonstrated energy harvesting transducers that have operated over 5 million cycles. We have also shown the ability of dielectric elastomer material to survive for months underwater while undergoing voltage cycling. We have shown circuits capable of 78% energy harvesting efficiency. While the possibility of long lifetime has been demonstrated at the watt level, reliably scaling up to the power levels required for providing renewable energy to the power grid or for local use will likely require further development from the material through to the systems level.

Kornbluh, Roy D.; Pelrine, Ron; Prahlad, Harsha; Wong-Foy, Annjoe; McCoy, Brian; Kim, Susan; Eckerle, Joseph; Low, Tom

2011-04-01

358

ECG to identify individuals  

Microsoft Academic Search

The electrocardiogram (ECG also called EKG) trace expresses cardiac features that are unique to an individual. The ECG processing followed a logical series of experiments with quantifiable metrics. Data filters were designed based upon the observed noise sources. Fiducial points were identified on the filtered data and extracted digitally for each heartbeat. From the fiducial points, stable features were computed

Steven A. Israel; John M. Irvine; Andrew Cheng; Mark D. Wiederhold; Brenda K. Wiederhold

2005-01-01

359

Identifying Technical Vocabulary  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This study compared four different approaches to identifying technical words in an anatomy text. The first approach used a four step rating scale, and was used as the comparison for evaluating the other three approaches. It had a high degree of reliability. The least successful approach was that using clues provided by the writer such as labels in…

Chung, Teresa Mihwa; Nation, Paul

2004-01-01

360

eHealth communication and behavior change: promise and performance  

Microsoft Academic Search

Traditional health communication interventions have often failed to show significant changes in people's behaviors. Guidance from social semiotic frameworks suggests that health communication interventions can be improved by incorporating greater participation by the intended audiences of users, paying greater attention to social contexts, and increasing broad use of integrated multimedia dissemination strategies. The use of eHealth communication has great promise

Linda Neuhauser; Gary L. Kreps

2010-01-01

361

Contextualized Teaching & Learning: A Promising Approach for Basic Skills Instruction  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Contextualized teaching and learning (CTL), or the concept of relating subject matter content to meaningful situations that are relevant to students' lives, offers one promising approach to helping students learn more effectively. This brief offers instructors, college leaders, policy makers and funders a high-level summary of the CTL…

Baker, Elaine DeLott; Hope, Laura; Karandjeff, Kelley

2009-01-01

362

Parent Trigger Laws and the Promise of Parental Voice  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Parent trigger laws have gained momentum nationally under the premise that they will increase local authority by amplifying parental voice in the decision to turn around "failing" schools. Using Hirschman's exit, voice, and loyalty framework we create two conceptual models of voice and evaluate the promise of voice in California,…

Smith, William C.; Rowland, Julie

2014-01-01

363

Solar Eclipse: The Failure of a Promising Technology  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study analyzes the reasons a promising technology fails and brings forth the ramifications of such a failure. The analysis is done on solar car technology; specifically, the path of the MIT Solar Electric Vehicle Team, the conversion of its founder to electric v ehicle manufacturing, and the absence of solar cars from the market today. The results show that

Amit Goyal; Rania Khalaf; Amar Mehta; Ashutosh Somani; Paritosh Somani

364

Journey to Freedom: Reflecting on Our Responsibilities, Renewing Our Promises  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Over the past four decades, tribal colleges and universities (TCUs) have emerged as a cutting-edge approach to post-secondary education in the United States and across the world. They have emerged as exceptional institutions--and their leaders still have promises to keep and new goals to achieve. As people look to the future of the tribal…

Bull, Cheryl Crazy

2012-01-01

365

The Kalamazoo Promise and Perceived Changes in School Climate  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The Kalamazoo Promise was announced in the fall of 2005, offering free college tuition at any public state college or university for graduates of the district who have gained acceptance to a postsecondary institution. This program was funded through the generous support of anonymous donors, and a federally-funded evaluation is underway to examine…

Miron, Gary; Jones, Jeffrey N.; Kelaher-Young, Allison J.

2011-01-01

366

Tarryn Miller: Fueling biofuel's promise August 27, 2013  

E-print Network

- 1 - Tarryn Miller: Fueling biofuel's promise August 27, 2013 � Return to homepage Student intern and technology. At Los Alamos, mentored by David Fox and his algal biofuels team, Miller is focused adds. "They are great candidates for biofuel and bio-product production, and they produce a carbon

367

Promise and Challenges of Microalgal-Derived Biofuels  

Microsoft Academic Search

Microalgae offer great promise to contribute a significant portion of the renewable fuels that will be required by the Renewable Fuels Standard described in the 2007 Energy Independence and Security Act of the United States. Algal biofuels would be based mainly on the high lipid content of the algal cell and thus would be an ideal feedstock for high energy

Philip T. Pienkos; Al Darzins

2009-01-01

368

Experimental Cervical Cancer Vaccine Looks Promising in Trial  

MedlinePLUS

... features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Experimental Cervical Cancer Vaccine Looks Promising in Trial Research suggests the ... Preidt Wednesday, October 1, 2014 Related MedlinePlus Pages Cervical Cancer HPV WEDNESDAY, Oct. 1, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- An ...

369

Nanomedicine: Perspective and promises with ligand-directed molecular imaging  

Microsoft Academic Search

Molecular imaging and targeted drug delivery play an important role toward personalized medicine, which is the future of patient management. Of late, nanoparticle-based molecular imaging has emerged as an interdisciplinary area, which shows promises to understand the components, processes, dynamics and therapies of a disease at a molecular level. The unprecedented potential of nanoplatforms for early detection, diagnosis and personalized

Dipanjan Pan; Gregory M. Lanza; Samuel A. Wickline; Shelton D. Caruthers

2009-01-01

370

Keeping the Promise? The Debate over Charter Schools  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

"Keeping the Promise?" examines one of the most complex reforms in education: charter schools. This wide-ranging and thought-provoking collection of essays examines the charter school movement's founding visions, on-the-ground realities, and untapped potential-within the context of an unswerving commitment to democratic, equitable public schools.…

Walters, Stephanie

2008-01-01

371

Race to Top Promises Come Home to Roost  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Grant recipients risk losing millions of dollars in Race to the Top money if they fail to live up to their promises, federal education officials make clear. By threatening to revoke Hawaii's $75 million Race to the Top award for failing to make "adequate progress" on key milestones of its education reform plan, U.S. Secretary of Education Arne…

McNeil, Michele

2012-01-01

372

Every Child Every Promise Workforce Readiness. Issue Brief  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The third "Every Child, Every Promise" research brief focuses on the large percentage of the children and youth who will enter the workforce over the next two decades are lacking enough of the "soft" or applied skills--such as teamwork, decision-making, and communication--that will help them become effective employees and managers. The report…

America's Promise Alliance (NJ1), 2007

2007-01-01

373

THE CHALLENGE AND PROMISE OF BLENDED-WING-BODY OPTIMIZATION  

Microsoft Academic Search

Multidisciplinary design optimization (MDO) is an important part of the Blended-Wing-Body (BWB) aircraft design process. It is a promising technology, but faces many challenges in routine application to aircraft advanced design. This paper describes current approaches, recent results, and future challenges for MDO as reflected in our experience with BWB design over the past four years. Current efforts have employed

Sean Wakayama; Ilan Kroo

374

The clinical-economic trial: Promise, problems, and challenges  

Microsoft Academic Search

The clinical-economic trial is a study design that is appearing with greater frequency in medical and public health literature. Some experienced investigators view these trials with skepticism; to policy makers they represent a promising step in the control of rising health care costs. The success of clinical-economic trials in meeting the important goal of more rational and efficient use of

Neil R. Powe; Robert I. Griffiths

1995-01-01

375

Prevention of Mental Disorders: Promises, Limitations, and Barriers  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In the past few years, the field of psychology has seen a dramatic increase in interest in the prevention of mental disorder and emotional difficulties. This special series provides some excellent examples of the promises held by a variety of prevention programs. At the same time, the papers in this volume highlight several important issues to…

Rapee, Ronald M.

2008-01-01

376

The Promise of Fuzzy Logic in Generalised Music Composition  

E-print Network

present goal is to produce a theoretical model of music that is applicable across all genres of musicThe Promise of Fuzzy Logic in Generalised Music Composition Wendy Suiter University of Wollongong Logic framework are that ambiguity in the music is maintained, while allowing the evolution of unfolding

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

377

The Promise of Patronage: Adapting and Adopting Neoliberal Development  

E-print Network

The Promise of Patronage: Adapting and Adopting Neoliberal Development Kathleen O'Reilly Department is underway which leads to the dispersal of neoliberal ideals. Drawing on 2 years of ethnographic research-operative socio-economic relations already operating on the ground. It argues that in contradiction to neoliberal

378

Gemcitabine versus modified gemcitabine: a review of several promising chemical  

E-print Network

1 Gemcitabine versus modified gemcitabine: a review of several promising chemical modifications300370t #12;2 Abstract Gemcitabine, an anticancer agent which acts against a wide range of solid tumors, gemcitabine is administered at high dose (1000mg/m²) causing sides effects (neutropenia, nausea...).To improve

Boyer, Edmond

379

The Promise of Global Networks. 1999 Annual Review.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This collection of commissioned papers provides a variety of perspectives on the impact of global information networks. The following articles are included: "The Promise of Global Networks: An Introduction" (Jorge Reina Schement); "Architecture and Expectations: Networks of the World--Unite!" (Marjory S. Blumenthal); "The Regulation of Global…

Institute for Information Studies, Queenstown, MD.

380

REALITIES, VISIONS, AND PROMISES OF A MULTICULTURAL FUTURE  

Microsoft Academic Search

Religious education has changed considerably over the 100 years of the Religious Education Association (REA); urgency has increased for human communities to honor diversity. The focus of this article is realities, visions, and promises of cultural diversity. The article includes an overview of REA's recent history, exemplifying its efforts and limitations in diversity. It then turns to five commentaries on

Mary Elizabeth Moore; Boyung Lee; Katherine Turpin; Ralph Casas; Lynn Bridgers; Veronice Miles

2004-01-01

381

Plasmonics: The Promise of Highly Integrated Optical Devices  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper reviews the fundamentals of surface plasmon polariton (SPP) excitations sustained by interfaces between metallic and insulating media, with a focus on applications in waveguiding of electromagnetic waves at visible and near-infrared frequencies. The large wavevectors accessible via SPP oscillations allow for significantly reduced wavelengths and thus increased confinement of the propagating modes, promising a subwavelength photonic infrastructure suitable

Stefan A. Maier

2006-01-01

382

The Challenge and Promise of a Catholic University.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This book offers 30 papers on the continuing discussion of the nature of a Catholic university. The papers are: "Introduction: The Challenge and Promise of a Catholic University" (Theodore M. Hesburgh); "Reflections on the Mission of a Catholic University" (Harold W. Attridge); "The Difference of a Catholic University" (Otto Bird); "A Catholic…

Hesburgh, Theodore M., Ed.

383

Emerging Neurotechnologies for Lie-Detection: Promises and Perils  

Microsoft Academic Search

Detection of deception and confirmation of truth telling with conventional polygraphy raised a host of technical and ethical issues. Recently, newer methods of recording electromagnetic signals from the brain show promise in permitting the detection of deception or truth telling. Some are even being promoted as more accurate than conventional polygraphy. While the new technologies raise issues of personal privacy,

Henry T. Greely

384

Meet the Promise of Content Standards: Investing in Professional Learning  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

New standards alone will not prepare all students for college and careers. The success of the Common Core State Standards depends on educators' capacity to make the instructional shifts the standards require. Meeting the promise of content standards cannot be achieved merely by agreeing on and publishing the new standards. Effective teaching of…

Killion, Joellen; Hirsh, Stephanie

2012-01-01

385

The microeconomics of personalized medicine: today's challenge and tomorrow's promise  

Microsoft Academic Search

'Personalized medicine' promises to increase the quality of clinical care and, in some cases, decrease health-care costs. Despite this, only a handful of diagnostic tests have made it to market, with mixed success. Historically, the challenges in this field were scientific. However, as discussed in this article, with the maturation of the '-omics' sciences, it now seems that the major

Jerel C. Davis; Laura Furstenthal; Amar A. Desai; Troy Norris; Saumya Sutaria; Edd Fleming; Philip Ma

2009-01-01

386

Realities, Visions, and Promises of a Multicultural Future  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Religious education has changed considerably over the 100 years of the Religious Education Association (REA); urgency has increased for human communities to honor diversity. The focus of this article is realities, visions, and promises of cultural diversity. The article includes an overview of REA's recent history, exemplifying its efforts and…

Moore, Mary Elizabeth; Lee, Boyung; Turpin, Katherine; Casas, Ralph; Bridgers, Lynn; Miles, Veronice

2004-01-01

387

Identifying Fallacies of Reference in Argumentation  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The experience of teaching informal logic (sometimes called practical logic) at the introductory level over the last fifteen years has allowed the author the opportunity to identify some interesting problems. These problems have been encountered by students attempting to understand some of the ideas presented in the informal logic course and by…

Gough, Jim

2009-01-01

388

Identifying and Supporting Gifted African American Men.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Examines the unique challenges faced by the gifted and talented Black man. Reviews issues of identifying gifted African-American male college students and factors affecting retention. Profiles the Meyerhoff Scholars Program at the University of Maryland. Outlines seven recommendations that address campuswide attitudes and practices impeding the…

Fries-Britt, Sharon

1997-01-01

389

[Identifying Gifted American Indian Students.] What Works.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In Hardin (Montana) schools, where 55% of students are American Indians, the same identification methods are used to identify gifted students among all cultural groups. These methods include nonverbal standardized tests and subjective recommendations based on the Frasier Talent Assessment Profile. Other equitable practices include equal…

Davidson, Karen

1997-01-01

390

Hunting Icebergs: Identifying Icebergs  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This self-paced, interactive tutorial guides learners through the decision-making process in locating data that will enable the identification of tabular icebergs, including: selecting the appropriate satellite orbit, and identifying the optimal solar and infrared wavelength values to discriminate between water and ice in remotely-sensed images. This resource is part of the tutorial series, Satellite Observations in Science Education, and is the first of three modules in the tutorial, Hunting Icebergs. (Note: requires Java plug-in)

391

The Promise of the Cross Examination Debate Association.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Provides a three-part overview of Cross Examination Debate Association (CEDA): a brief history of the origins and growth of CEDA, an introduction to current practices, and a summary of the strengths of CEDA debate theory and practice. Suggests that CEDA's strengths include student participation patterns, sensitivity to argumentative complexity,…

Schiappa, Edward; Keehner, Mary F.

1990-01-01

392

Preventing Crime: What Works, What Doesn't, What's Promising. Research in Brief. National Institute of Justice.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This Research in Brief describes the scientific methodologies used to perform a review of crime prevention programs and then discusses what research has shown to work, what it has shown not to work, and what approaches seem promising for crime prevention. The first step was to identify and review reports evaluating the effectiveness of crime…

Sherman, Lawrence W.; Gottfredson, Denise C.; MacKenzie, Doris L.; Eck, John; Reuter, Peter; Bushway, Shawn D.

393

On identified predictive control  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Self-tuning control algorithms are potential successors to manually tuned PID controllers traditionally used in process control applications. A very attractive design method for self-tuning controllers, which has been developed over recent years, is the long-range predictive control (LRPC). The success of LRPC is due to its effectiveness with plants of unknown order and dead-time which may be simultaneously nonminimum phase and unstable or have multiple lightly damped poles (as in the case of flexible structures or flexible robot arms). LRPC is a receding horizon strategy and can be, in general terms, summarized as follows. Using assumed long-range (or multi-step) cost function the optimal control law is found in terms of unknown parameters of the predictor model of the process, current input-output sequence, and future reference signal sequence. The common approach is to assume that the input-output process model is known or separately identified and then to find the parameters of the predictor model. Once these are known, the optimal control law determines control signal at the current time t which is applied at the process input and the whole procedure is repeated at the next time instant. Most of the recent research in this field is apparently centered around the LRPC formulation developed by Clarke et al., known as generalized predictive control (GPC). GPC uses ARIMAX/CARIMA model of the process in its input-output formulation. In this paper, the GPC formulation is used but the process predictor model is derived from the state space formulation of the ARIMAX model and is directly identified over the receding horizon, i.e., using current input-output sequence. The underlying technique in the design of identified predictive control (IPC) algorithm is the identification algorithm of observer/Kalman filter Markov parameters developed by Juang et al. at NASA Langley Research Center and successfully applied to identification of flexible structures.

Bialasiewicz, Jan T.

1993-01-01

394

Identifying Harmful Marine Dinoflagellates  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This Smithsonian Institution website features the publication "Identifying Harmful Marine Dinoflagellates", a fully illustrated identification guide for harmful dinoflagellate taxa. The website reviews general information on dinoflagellate morphology and other criteria used in species identification. Each taxon is presented with a species overview, and a taxonomic description of cell and thecal plate morphology, reproduction, life cycle, ecology, toxicity, species comparison, habitat and locality, and etymology. This is supplemented with a number of high-resolution light and scanning electron photomicrographs and line drawings. Taxonomic treatment of harmful dinoflagellate taxa includes nomenclatural types, type locality, and common synonyms. An extensive glossary of terms and relevant literature citations are also provided.

Faust, Maria A.; Gulledge, Rose A.; Institution, The S.

2009-11-25

395

Practice management.  

PubMed

The practicing orthopaedic traumatologist must have a sound knowledge of business fundamentals to be successful in the changing healthcare environment. Practice management encompasses multiple topics including governance, the financial aspects of billing and coding, physician extender management, ancillary service development, information technology, transcription utilization, and marketing. Some of these are universal, but several of these areas may be most applicable to the private practice of medicine. Attention to each component is vital to develop an understanding of the intricacies of practice management. PMID:24918826

Althausen, Peter L; Mead, Lisa

2014-07-01

396

Health Literacy Practices and Educational Competencies for Health Professionals: A Consensus Study  

PubMed Central

Health care professionals often lack adequate knowledge about health literacy and the skills needed to address low health literacy among patients and their caregivers. Many promising practices for mitigating the effects of low health literacy are not used consistently. Improving health literacy training for health care professionals has received increasing emphasis in recent years. The development and evaluation of curricula for health professionals has been limited by the lack of agreed-upon educational competencies in this area. This study aimed to identify a set of health literacy educational competencies and target behaviors, or practices, relevant to the training of all health care professionals. The authors conducted a thorough literature review to identify a comprehensive list of potential health literacy competencies and practices, which they categorized into 1 or more educational domains (i.e., knowledge, skills, attitudes) or a practice domain. The authors stated each item in operationalized language following Bloom's Taxonomy. The authors then used a modified Delphi method to identify consensus among a group of 23 health professions education experts representing 11 fields in the health professions. Participants rated their level of agreement as to whether a competency or practice was both appropriate and important for all health professions students. A predetermined threshold of 70% agreement was used to define consensus. After 4 rounds of ratings and modifications, consensus agreement was reached on 62 out of 64 potential educational competencies (24 knowledge items, 27 skill items, and 11 attitude items), and 32 out of 33 potential practices. This study is the first known attempt to develop consensus on a list of health literacy practices and to translate recommended health literacy practices into an agreed-upon set of measurable educational competencies for health professionals. Further work is needed to prioritize the competencies and practices in terms of relative importance. PMID:24093348

Coleman, Clifford A.; Hudson, Stan; Maine, Lucinda L.

2013-01-01

397

Dental Pulp Stem Cells: A Promising Tool for Bone Regeneration  

Microsoft Academic Search

Human tissues are different in term of regenerative properties. Stem cells are a promising tool for tissue regeneration, thanks\\u000a to their particular characteristics of proliferation, differentiation and plasticity. Several “loci” or “niches” within the\\u000a adult human body are colonized by a significant number of stem cells. However, access to these potential collection sites\\u000a often is a limiting point. The interaction

Riccardo d’Aquino; Gianpaolo Papaccio; Gregorio Laino; Antonio Graziano

2008-01-01

398

Promises and challenges in solid-state lighting  

Microsoft Academic Search

Lighting technologies based on semiconductor light-emitting diodes (LEDs) offer unprecedented promises that include three major benefits: (i) Gigantic energy savings enabled by efficient conversion of electrical energy to optical energy; (ii) Substantial positive contributions to sustainability through reduced emissions of global-warming gases, acid-rain gases, and toxic substances such as mercury; and (iii) The creation of new paradigms in lighting driven

Fred Schubert

2010-01-01

399

Resource based view: a promising new theory for healthcare organizations  

PubMed Central

This commentary reviews a recent piece by Burton and Rycroft-Malone on the use of Resource Based View (RBV) in healthcare organizations. It first outlines the core content of their piece. It then discusses their attempts to extend RBV to the analysis of large scale quality improvement efforts in healthcare. Some critique is elaborated. The broader question of why RBV seems to be migrating into healthcare management research is considered. They conclude RBV is a promising new theory for healthcare organizations.

Ferlie, Ewan

2014-01-01

400

Sporting embodiment: sports studies and the (continuing) promise of phenomenology  

Microsoft Academic Search

Whilst in recent years sports studies have addressed the calls ‘to bring the body back in’ to theorisations of sport and physical activity, the ‘promise of phenomenology’ remains largely under?realised with regard to sporting embodiment. Relatively few accounts are grounded in the ‘flesh’ of the lived sporting body, and phenomenology offers a powerful framework for such analysis. A wide?ranging, multi?stranded

2009-01-01

401

[Promising technologies of packed red blood cells production and storage].  

PubMed

The current article is dedicated to promising technologies of packed red blood cells production and storage. The following new technical approaches are presented: (1) erythrocytes storage in strict anaerobic argon-hydrogen environment, (2) lyophilization of erythrocyte suspension by its atomization in nitrogen gas, (3) lyophilization of erythrocytes by directional freezing under the influence of radio frequency radiation, (4) automated pharming of antigen free packed red blood cells from progenitor cell directly at the battlefield. PMID:24611298

Maksimov, A G; Golota, A S; Krassi?, A B

2013-10-01

402

Promises of stem cell therapy for retinal degenerative diseases  

Microsoft Academic Search

With the development of stem cell technology, stem cell-based therapy for retinal degeneration has been proposed to restore\\u000a the visual function. Many animal studies and some clinical trials have shown encouraging results of stem cell-based therapy\\u000a in retinal degenerative diseases. While stem cell-based therapy is a promising strategy to replace damaged retinal cells and\\u000a ultimately cure retinal degeneration, there are

Ian Yat-Hin Wong; Ming-Wai Poon; Rosita Tsz-Wai Pang; Qizhou Lian; David Wong

403

Cell-based immune therapy shows promise in leukemia patients  

Cancer.gov

Memorial Sloan-Kettering investigators report that genetically modified immune cells have shown great promise in killing the cancer cells of patients with relapsed B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). In fact, all five of the patients who have received the new therapy – known as targeted immunotherapy – have gone into complete remission, with no detectable cancer cells. The results of this ongoing clinical trial are reported online on March 20 in the journal Science Translational Medicine.

404

Identifying Distant AGNs  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The Baldwin, Phillips, and Terlevich emission-line ratio diagnostic ([OIII]/H? versus [NII]/H?, hereafter BPT diagram) efficiently separates galaxies whose signal is dominated by star formation (BPT-SF) from those dominated by AGN activity (BPT-AGN). Yet the BPT diagram is limited to z<0.5, the redshift at which [NII]?6584 leaves the optical spectral window. Using the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS), we construct a new diagnostic, or TBT diagram, that is based on rest-frame g-z color, [NeIII]?3869, and [OII]??3726+3729 and can be used for galaxies out to z<1.4. The TBT diagram identifies 98.7% of the SDSS BPT-AGN as TBT-AGN and 97% of the SDSS BPT-SF as TBT-SF. Furthermore, it identifies 97% of the OPTX Chandra X-ray selected AGNs as TBT-AGN. This is in contrast to the BPT diagram, which misidentifies 20% of X-ray selected AGNs as BPT-SF.

Trouille, Laura; Barger, Amy; Tremonti, Christy

2014-07-01

405

IDENTIFYING COLLISIONAL FAMILIES IN THE KUIPER BELT  

SciTech Connect

The identification and characterization of numerous collisional families-clusters of bodies with a common collisional origin-in the asteroid belt has added greatly to the understanding of asteroid belt formation and evolution. More recent study has also led to an appreciation of physical processes that had previously been neglected (e.g., the Yarkovsky effect). Collisions have certainly played an important role in the evolution of the Kuiper Belt as well, though only one collisional family has been identified in that region to date, around the dwarf planet Haumea. In this paper, we combine insights into collisional families from numerical simulations with the current observational constraints on the dynamical structure of the Kuiper Belt to investigate the ideal sizes and locations for identifying collisional families. We find that larger progenitors (r {approx} 500 km) result in more easily identifiable families, given the difficulty in identifying fragments of smaller progenitors in magnitude-limited surveys, despite their larger spread and less frequent occurrence. However, even these families do not stand out well from the background. Identifying families as statistical overdensities is much easier than characterizing families by distinguishing individual members from interlopers. Such identification seems promising, provided the background population is well known. In either case, families will also be much easier to study where the background population is small, i.e., at high inclinations. Overall, our results indicate that entirely different techniques for identifying families will be needed for the Kuiper Belt, and we provide some suggestions.

Marcus, Robert A.; Ragozzine, Darin; Murray-Clay, Ruth A.; Holman, Matthew J., E-mail: rmarcus@cfa.harvard.edu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

2011-05-20

406

The Promises And Pitfalls Of Evidence-Based Medicine  

Microsoft Academic Search

ABSTRACT: Evidence-based medicine,(EBM) aims to address,the persistent problem,of clinical practice variation with the help of various tools, including standardized practice guidelines. While advocates welcome the stronger scientific foundation of such guidelines, critics fear that they will lead to “cookbook medicine.” Studies show, however, that few guidelines lead to consistent changes in provider behavior. The hopes, fears, and mixed re- cord

Stefan Timmermans; Aaron Mauck

2005-01-01

407

Currently in press, Games and Culture Journal The Promise of Play: A New Approach towards Productive Play  

E-print Network

critic Raymond Williams identified electronic media such as television as crucial factors self-imagining as part of everyday practice. Williams suggested that technological innovation to other developments and broader social, political and economic change. Williams' early tackling of media

Dourish,Paul

408

Hombres Sanos: Evaluation of a Social Marketing Campaign for Heterosexually Identified Latino Men Who Have Sex With Men and Women  

PubMed Central

Objectives. We evaluated the effectiveness of Hombres Sanos [Healthy Men] a social marketing campaign to increase condom use and HIV testing among heterosexually identified Latino men, especially among heterosexually identified Latino men who have sex with men and women (MSMW). Methods. Hombres Sanos was implemented in northern San Diego County, California, from June 2006 through December 2006. Every other month we conducted cross-sectional surveys with independent samples of heterosexually identified Latino men before (n = 626), during (n = 752), and after (n = 385) the campaign. Respondents were randomly selected from 12 targeted community venues to complete an anonymous, self-administered survey on sexual practices and testing for HIV and other sexually transmitted infections. About 5.6% of respondents (n = 98) were heterosexually identified Latino MSMW. Results. The intervention was associated with reduced rates of recent unprotected sex with both females and males among heterosexually identified Latino MSMW. The campaign was also associated with increases in perception of HIV risk, knowledge of testing locations, and condom carrying among heterosexual Latinos. Conclusions. Social marketing represents a promising approach for abating HIV transmission among heterosexually identified Latinos, particularly for heterosexually identified Latino MSMW. Given the scarcity of evidence-based HIV prevention interventions for these populations, this prevention strategy warrants further investigation. PMID:21068423

Zellner, Jennifer A.; Sanudo, Fernando; Fernandez-Cerdeno, Araceli; Hovell, Melbourne F.; Sipan, Carol L.; Engelberg, Moshe; Carrillo, Hector

2010-01-01

409

Identifying Young, Nearby Stars  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Young stars have certain characteristics, e.g., high atmospheric abundance of lithium and chromospheric activity, fast rotation, distinctive space motion and strong X-ray flux compared to that of older main sequence stars. We have selected a list of candidate young (<100Myr) and nearby (<60pc) stars based on their space motion and/or strong X-ray flux. To determine space motion of a star, one needs to know its coordinates (RA, DEC), proper motion, distance, and radial velocity. The Hipparcos and Tycho catalogues provide all this information except radial velocities. We anticipate eventually searching approx. 1000 nearby stars for signs of extreme youth. Future studies of the young stars so identified will help clarify the formation of planetary systems for times between 10 and 100 million years. Certainly, the final output of this study will be a very useful resource, especially for adaptive optics and space based searches for Jupiter-mass planets and dusty proto-planetary disks. We have begun spectroscopic observations in January, 2001 with the 2.3 m telescope at Siding Spring Observatory (SSO) in New South Wales, Australia. These spectra will be used to determine radial velocities and other youth indicators such as Li 6708A absorption strength and Hydrogen Balmer line intensity. Additional observations of southern hemisphere stars from SSO are scheduled in April and northern hemisphere observations will take place in May and July at the Lick Observatory of the University of California. AT SSO, to date, we have observed about 100 stars with a high resolution spectrometer (echelle) and about 50 stars with a medium spectral resolution spectrometer (the "DBS"). About 20% of these stars turn out to be young stars. Among these, two especially noteworthy stars appear to be the closest T-Tauri stars ever identified. Interestingly, these stars share the same space motions as that of a very famous star with a dusty circumstellar disk--beta Pictoris. This new finding better constrains the age of beta Pictoris to be approx. 10 Myr.

Webb, Rich; Song, Inseok; Zuckerman, Ben; Bessell, Mike

2001-01-01

410

NREL Designs Promising New Oxides for Solar Cells (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

High-efficiency, thin-film solar cells require electrical contacts with high electrical conductivity, and the top contact must also have high optical transparency. This need is currently met by transparent conducting oxides (TCOs), which conduct electricity but are 90% transparent to visible light. Scientists at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have derived three key design principles for selecting promising materials for TCO contacts. NREL's application of these design principles has resulted in a 10,000-fold improvement in conductivity for one TCO material.

Not Available

2012-04-01

411

Ecotourism: the Promise and Perils of Environmentally Oriented Travel  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Cambridge Scientific Abstracts (CSA) latest Hot Topics feature is Ecotourism: the Promise and Perils of Environmentally-Oriented Travel, prepared by Heather E. Lindsay. The detailed report explores the opportunities and pitfalls of ecotourism, for which "finding a compromise between preservation and development is often challenging, and can generate additional environmental problems for the very regions it is intended to protect." Key citations for the report link to the full-text articles from scholarly journals in the CSA database, and over two dozen related Web links are also provided. Anyone interested in reviewing the impact of ecotourism will appreciate this well-organized, thorough report.

Lindsay, Heather E.

2003-01-01

412

Investigation of new superhard carbon allotropes with promising electronic properties  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

During the systematic search for a new superhard carbon allotrope, we predicted three structures with promising physical properties. Our electronic structure calculations show that these materials have a semiconducting band gap and a high carrier mobility comparable with diamond. The simulated x-ray diffraction patterns of the proposed materials are in a good agreement with the experimental X-ray spectra. Evaluated phase transition pressures from graphite to the new proposed carbon phases are smaller than 25 GPa and close to the experimental values.

Kvashnina, Yulia A.; Kvashnin, Alexander G.; Sorokin, Pavel B.

2013-11-01

413

The promise of air cargo: System aspects and vehicle design  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

The current operation of the air cargo system is reviewed. An assessment of the future of air cargo is provided by: (1) analyzing statistics and trends, (2) by noting system problems and inefficiencies, (3) by analyzing characteristics of 'air eligible' commodities, and (4) by showing the promise of new technology for future cargo aircraft with significant improvements in costs and efficiency. The following topics are discussed: (1) air cargo demand forecasts; (2) economics of air cargo transport; (3) the integrated air cargo system; (4) evolution of airfreighter design; and (5) the span distributed load concept.

Whitehead, A. H., Jr.

1976-01-01

414

Excitation of promising nuclear fusion reactions in picosecond laser plasmas  

Microsoft Academic Search

The results of experiments devoted to studying the excitation of the promising nuclear fusion reactions 6Li(d, ?)4He, 3He(d, p)4He, 11B(p, 3?), and 7Li(p, ?)4He, along with the standard reaction D(d, n)3He, in picosecond laser plasmas are presented. For the first time, it was shown that these reactions may proceed at a moderate\\u000a laser-radiation intensity of 2 × 1018 W\\/cm2, the

V. S. Belyaev; V. I. Vinogradov; A. P. Matafonov; S. M. Rybakov; V. P. Krainov; V. S. Lisitsa; V. P. Andrianov; G. N. Ignatiev; V. S. Bushuev; A. I. Gromov; A. S. Rusetsky; V. A. Dravin

2009-01-01

415

Post-conditioning: Promising answers and more questions  

PubMed Central

Volatile anesthetic agents have been used for decades in the peri-operative setting. Data from the past 15 years have shown that pre-injury administration of volatile anesthetic can decrease the impact of ischemia-reperfusion injury on the heart, brain, and kidney. Recent data demonstrated that volatile agents administered shortly after injury can decrease the ischemia-reperfusion injury. Several questions need to be answered to optimize this therapeutic target, but this is a promising era of secondary injury mitigation. PMID:23176148

2012-01-01

416

Identifying Adolescent Sleep Problems  

PubMed Central

Objectives To examine the efficacy of self-report and parental report of adolescent sleep problems and compare these findings to the incidence of adolescents who fulfill clinical criteria for a sleep problem. Sleep and daytime functioning factors that predict adolescents’ self-identification of a sleep problem will also be examined. Method 308 adolescents (aged 13–17 years) from eight socioeconomically diverse South Australian high schools participated in this study. Participants completed a survey battery during class time, followed by a 7-day Sleep Diary and the Flinders Fatigue Scale completed on the final day of the study. Parents completed a Sleep, Medical, Education and Family History Survey. Results The percentage of adolescents fulfilling one or more of the criteria for a sleep problem was inordinately high at 66%. Adolescent self-reporting a sleep problem was significantly lower than the adolescents who had one or more of the clinical criteria for a sleep problem (23.1% vs. 66.6%; ?2?=?17.46, p<.001). Parental report of their adolescent having a sleep problem was significantly lower than adolescent self-report (14.3% vs. 21.1%, p<.001). Adolescents who reported unrefreshing sleep were 4.81 times more likely to report a sleep problem. For every hour that bedtime was delayed, the odds of self-reporting a sleep problem increased by 1.91 times, while each additional 10 minutes taken to fall asleep increased the odds 1.40 times. Conclusion While many adolescents were found to have sleep patterns indicative of a sleep problem, only a third of this number self-identify having a sleep problem, while only a sixth of this number are indicated by parental report. This study highlights important features to target in future sleep education and intervention strategies for both adolescents and parents. PMID:24086501

Short, Michelle A.; Gradisar, Michael; Gill, Jason; Camfferman, Danny

2013-01-01

417

Predicting sudden cardiac death from T wave alternans of the surface electrocardiogram: promise and pitfalls  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Sudden cardiac death remains a preeminent public health problem. Despite advances in preventative treatment for patients known to be at risk, to date we have been able to identify, and thus treat, only a small minority of these patients. Therefore, there is a major need to develop noninvasive diagnostic technologies to identify patients at risk. Recent studies have demonstrated that measurement of microvolt-level T wave alternans is a promising technique for the accurate identification of patients at risk for ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. In this article, we review the clinical data establishing the relationship between microvolt T wave alternans and susceptibility to ventricular arrhythmias. We also review the methods and technology that have been developed to measure microvolt levels of T wave alternans noninvasively in broad populations of ambulatory patients. In particular, we examine techniques that permit the accurate measurement of T wave alternans during exercise stress testing.

Rosenbaum, D. S.; Albrecht, P.; Cohen, R. J.

1996-01-01

418

Cognitive Rehabilitation for Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD): Promises and Problems  

PubMed Central

Objective: Cognitive training entails the repeated exercise of a specific cognitive process over a period of time to improve performance on the trained task as well as on tasks that were not specifically trained (transfer effect). Cognitive training shows promise in remediating deficits in children with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) – a disorder believed to stem from deficient cognitive processes – where the focus has been primarily on training working memory and attention. We discuss evidence from studies that have produced broad, limited, or no transfer effects with the goal of identifying factors that may be responsible for this heterogeneity. Results: There are several implicit assumptions that appear to drive researchers’ decisions regarding both the selection of cognitive abilities to train as well as the training tasks chosen to target those abilities. We identify these implicit assumptions and their weaknesses. We also draw attention to design limitations that may be contributing to lack of transfer. Conclusion: Although the overall pattern of findings from these studies is promising, the methodological and theoretical limitations associated with the literature limit conclusions about the efficacy of cognitive training as a rehabilitation method for ADHD. We hypothesize several suggestions that may improve training effects and summarize the evidence which led to our hypotheses.

Tajik-Parvinchi, Diana; Wright, Leah; Schachar, Russell

2014-01-01

419

Practical Action  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Founded over 40 years ago by an economist, Practical Action's aim is to help impoverished people "use technology to challenge poverty", to gain "access to technical options and knowledge", and "influence the social, economic and institutional systems for innovation and use of technology." The "Downloads" tab has a link to "Practical Answers" that cover almost two dozen themes and lets users browse the extensive library, submit technical questions to expert, and it also provides users with a section entitled "Share" which documents peoples' experience with Practical Action. Visitors will also find the "Featured Articles" section of the Downloads useful and full of such practical information as "Build Your Own Tippy Tap", for hand washing after toileting and a "Solar Voltaic System Design Info Sheet" that covers electrical design issues. Back on the homepage, visitors will find links to their social networking, e-newsletter, and the latest from their series of blogs.

420

Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act: promise and peril for primary care.  

PubMed

The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) of 2010 brings both promise and peril for primary care. This Act has the potential to reestablish primary care as the foundation of U.S. health care delivery. The legislation authorizes specific programs to stabilize and expand the primary care physician workforce, provides an immediate 10% increase in primary care physician payment, creates an opportunity to correct the skewed resource-based relative value scale, and supports innovation in primary care practice. Nevertheless, the peril is that the PPACA initiatives may not alter the current trend toward an increasingly specialized physician workforce. To realize the potential for the PPACA to achieve a more equitable balance between generalist and specialist physicians, all primary care advocates must actively engage in the long rebuilding process. PMID:20404263

Goodson, John D

2010-06-01

421

Theorizing Practice  

Microsoft Academic Search

\\u000a In educational research, learning theories represent alternative conceptualizations of what we take learning to be. This volume\\u000a examines three contemporary theories of learning with particular relevance to the study of practice, namely, situated learning,\\u000a dialogic theory (or dialogism), and Deweyan transactionism. The chapter authors address themselves to two basic questions:\\u000a How might we go about studying instructional practice in a

Timothy Koschmann

422

Rose garden promises of intelligent tutoring systems: Blossom or thorn  

NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

Intelligent tutoring systems (ITS) have been in existence for over a decade. However, few controlled evaluation studies have been conducted comparing the effectiveness of these systems to more traditional instruction methods. Two main promises of ITSs are examined: (1) Engender more effective and efficient learning in relation to traditional formats; and (2) Reduce the range of learning outcome measures where a majority of individuals are elevated to high performance levels. Bloom (1984) has referred to these as the two sigma problem; to achieve two standard deviation improvements with tutoring over traditional instruction methods. Four ITSs are discussed in relation to the two promises. These tutors have undergone systematic, controlled evaluations: (1) The LISP tutor (Anderson Farrell and Sauers, 1984); (2) Smithtown (Shute and Glaser, in press); (3) Sherlock (Lesgold, Lajoie, Bunzo and Eggan, 1990); and (4) The Pascal ITS (Bonar, Cunningham, Beatty and Well, 1988). Results show that these four tutors do accelerate learning with no degradation in final outcome. Suggestions for improvements to the design and evaluation of ITSs are discussed.

Shute, Valerie J.

1991-01-01

423

Emerging Cancer Vaccines: The Promise of Genetic Vectors  

PubMed Central

Therapeutic vaccination against cancer is an important approach which, when combined with other therapies, can improve long-term control of cancer. In fact, the induction of adaptive immune responses against Tumor Associated Antigens (TAAs) as well as innate immunity are important factors for tumor stabilization/eradication. A variety of immunization technologies have been explored in last decades and are currently under active evaluation, such as cell-based, protein, peptide and heat-shock protein-based cancer vaccines. Genetic vaccines are emerging as promising methodologies to elicit immune responses against a wide variety of antigens, including TAAs. Amongst these, Adenovirus (Ad)-based vectors show excellent immunogenicity profile and have achieved immunological proof of concept in humans. In vivo electroporation of plasmid DNA (DNA-EP) is also a desirable vaccine technology for cancer vaccines, as it is repeatable several times, a parameter required for the long-term maintenance of anti-tumor immunity. Recent findings show that combinations of different modalities of immunization (heterologous prime/boost) are able to induce superior immune reactions as compared to single-modality vaccines. In this review, we will discuss the challenges and requirements of emerging cancer vaccines, particularly focusing on the genetic cancer vaccines currently under active development and the promise shown by Ad and DNA-EP heterologous prime-boost. PMID:24212974

Aurisicchio, Luigi; Ciliberto, Gennaro

2011-01-01

424

Can hospital audit teams identify case management problems, analyse their causes, identify and implement improvements? A cross-sectional process evaluation of obstetric near-miss case reviews in Benin  

PubMed Central

Background Obstetric near-miss case reviews are being promoted as a quality assurance intervention suitable for hospitals in low income countries. We introduced such reviews in five district, regional and national hospitals in Benin, West Africa. In a cross-sectional study we analysed the extent to which the hospital audit teams were able to identify case management problems (CMPs), analyse their causes, agree on solutions and put these solutions into practice. Methods We analysed case summaries, women’s interview transcripts and audit minutes produced by the audit teams for 67 meetings concerning one woman with near-miss complications each. We compared the proportion of CMPs identified by an external assessment team to the number found by the audit teams. For the latter, we described the CMP causes identified, solutions proposed and implemented by the audit teams. Results Audit meetings were conducted regularly and were well attended. Audit teams identified half of the 714 CMPs; they were more likely to find managerial ones (71%) than the ones relating to treatment (30%). Most identified CMPs were valid. Almost all causes of CMPs were plausible, but often too superficial to be of great value for directing remedial action. Audit teams suggested solutions, most of them promising ones, for 38% of the CMPs they had identified, but recorded their implementation only for a minority (8.5%). Conclusions The importance of following-up and documenting the implementation of solutions should be stressed in future audit interventions. Tools facilitating the follow-up should be made available. Near-miss case reviews hold promise, but their effectiveness to improve the quality of care sustainably and on a large scale still needs to be established. PMID:23057707

2012-01-01

425

Catholic Spirituality in Practice by colleen m. griffith  

E-print Network

and on the Internet con- tinue to multiply at a staggering pace, as people from all walks of life and religious it perplexing to sort through everything that presents itself as spiritual practice. How does one decide about baptismal promises. At the heart of these promises stands the rejection of everything that is not of God

Huang, Jianyu

426

Review of "Charter School Autonomy: A Half-Broken Promise"  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This report concludes that autonomy is a prerequisite for innovative and effective charter schools to emerge. Especially important is freedom from external bureaucratic control. Yet there is nothing in this report that addresses levels of autonomy in relationship to financial performance, resource allocation practices, academic results, and other…

Gulosino, Charisse

2010-01-01

427

Games for Learning: Vast Wasteland or a Digital Promise?  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Research about emerging best practices in the learning sciences points to the potential of deploying digital games as one possible solution to the twin challenges of weak student engagement and the need for more robust achievement in literacy, science, technology, and math. This chapter reviews key cross-cutting themes in this special volume,…

Levine, Michael H.; Vaala, Sarah E.

2013-01-01

428

Reducing the Risk, Increasing the Promise: Strategies for Student Success  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

In their new book, Bergmann and Brough provide a clear path to follow for helping your at-risk students achieve success in and out of the classroom. Packed with classroom-tested, practical strategies and lesson plans for teaching respect, responsibility, resilience, reading, and other essential skills to at-risk students, this is a must-have book…

Bergmann, Sherrel; Brough, Judith Allen

2012-01-01

429

Cultural Capital: The Promises and Pitfalls in Education Research  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The past three decades have seen the increased use of the term "cultural capital" in classrooms, research articles, and discussions in education. This monograph is an attempt to buttress a theoretical understanding of the cultural capital construct and its applicability to educational research and practice. In educational research, cultural…

Winkle-Wagner, Rachelle

2010-01-01

430

Fulfilling the Promise: Biology Education in the Nation's Schools.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Some experts believe that dismal learning experiences in biology classes cause the vast majority of students to miss information that could help them lead healthier lives and make more intelligent decisions as adults. This book offers a vision of what biology education in the schools could be along with practical recommendations on how to make the…

National Academy of Sciences - National Research Council, Washington, DC. Commission on Life Sciences.

431

An algorithm for identifying digital image orientation based on c#  

Microsoft Academic Search

In research for machine vision, the discrimination of image orientation is one of practical problems. An algorithm for identifying image orientation was proposed, and to be realized by c# programming.

Da-Chun Jia; Xu-Dong Yao; Xin Jia

2011-01-01

432

Ultrahigh porosity in mesoporous MOFs: promises and limitations.  

PubMed

Mesoporous MOFs are currently record holders in terms of the specific surface area with values exceeding 7000 m(2) g(-1), a textural feature unattained by traditional porous solids such as zeolites, carbons and even by graphene. They are promising candidates for high pressure gas storage and also for conversion or separation of larger molecules, whose size exceeds the pore size of zeolites. The rational strategies for synthesis of mesoporous MOF are outlined and the unambiguous consistent assessment of the surface area of such ultrahighly porous materials, as well as present challenges in the exciting research field, of mesoporous MOFs are discussed. The crystallinity, dynamic properties, functional groups, and wide range tunability render these materials as exceptional solids, but for the implementation in functional devices and even in industrial processes several aspects and effective characteristics (such as volumetric storage capacities, recyclability, mechanical and chemical stability, activation) should be addressed. PMID:24722662

Senkovska, Irena; Kaskel, Stefan

2014-07-11

433

Neuronal Signal Transduction Pathways: Wasteland or the Promised Land?  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Proteins used in signal transduction pathways are commonly found in different cell types and organs. However, specific proteins whose expression is highly restricted are also utilized for allowing discrete responsiveness to signals that are otherwise ignored by other cells. How the brain uses common and specific signal proteins for communication within and beyond the cerebrum has been an area of intense study. A new book concentrates on the signaling that occurs in the brain under normal and pathological conditions--memory, apoptosis, neurodegeneration, depression, and drug dependence--and is filled with chapters written by experts in neurobiology and neurophysiology. Bryan Roth reviews the book and discusses in detail several chapters that may lead to promising future research.

Bryan L. Roth (Cleveland;Case Western Reserve University REV)

2000-08-15

434

Emerging neurotechnologies for lie-detection: promises and perils.  

PubMed

Detection of deception and confirmation of truth telling with conventional polygraphy raised a host of technical and ethical issues. Recently, newer methods of recording electromagnetic signals from the brain show promise in permitting the detection of deception or truth telling. Some are even being promoted as more accurate than conventional polygraphy. While the new technologies raise issues of personal privacy, acceptable forensic application, and other social issues, the focus of this paper is the technical limitations of the developing technology. Those limitations include the measurement validity of the new technologies, which remains largely unknown. Another set of questions pertains to the psychological paradigms used to model or constrain the target behavior. Finally, there is little standardization in the field, and the vulnerability of the techniques to countermeasures is unknown. Premature application of these technologies outside of research settings should be resisted, and the social conversation about the appropriate parameters of its civil, forensic, and security use should begin. PMID:16036700

Wolpe, Paul Root; Foster, Kenneth R; Langleben, Daniel D

2005-01-01

435

Emerging neurotechnologies for lie-detection: promises and perils.  

PubMed

Detection of deception and confirmation of truth telling with conventional polygraphy raised a host of technical and ethical issues. Recently, newer methods of recording electromagnetic signals from the brain show promise in permitting the detection of deception or truth telling. Some are even being promoted as more accurate than conventional polygraphy. While the new technologies raise issues of personal privacy, acceptable forensic application, and other social issues, the focus of this paper is the technical limitations of the developing technology. Those limitations include the measurement validity of the new technologies, which remains largely unknown. Another set of questions pertains to the psychological paradigms used to model or constrain the target behavior. Finally, there is little standardization in the field, and the vulnerability of the techniques to countermeasures is unknown. Premature application of these technologies outside of research settings should be resisted, and the social conversation about the appropriate parameters of its civil, forensic, and security use should begin. PMID:20945266

Wolpe, Paul Root; Foster, Kenneth R; Langleben, Daniel D

2010-10-01

436

Pityriasis rubra pilaris: evolution of challenges in promising treatment options.  

PubMed

Pityriasis rubra pilaris is an uncommon inflammatory dermatosis that is well recognized across the globe. Erythroderma is a common presentation. A precise diagnosis of pityriasis rubra pilaris is based on morphologic features and is classified into 6 types: classic adult onset (type I), atypical adult (type II), classic juvenile (type III), circumscribed juvenile (type IV), atypical juvenile (type V), and human immunodeficiency virus-associated (type VI). Several conventional systemic and/or topical treatments are currently in use. Largely, their results are unsatisfactory and limited by long-term toxicity. The authors investigate the efficacy of a wide spectrum of drugs by examining historical (archive) and promising (modern) treatment modalities for the treatment of pityriasis rubra pilaris. PMID:22324172

Sehgal, Virendra N; Srivastava, Govind; Verma, Prashant

2012-01-01

437

Study to treat deadly form of thyroid cancer shows promise  

Cancer.gov

A combination of therapies may prove to be a promising advance for the treatment of anaplastic thyroid cancer based on results of a phase I clinical trial. The collaborative study, published in the April 16 online issue of the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, reports that combining paclitaxel chemotherapy with an experimental agent known as efatutazone was safe and well tolerated by patients. Organizations participating in the study were: the Mayo Clinic, the University of Pennsylvania Abramson Cancer Center, Eastern Virginia University, the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Ohio State University (home to the OSU Comprehensive Cancer Center), the University of Oregon Medical Center (home to the Knight Cancer Institute), the University of Colorado School of Medicine (home to the University of Colorado Cancer Center), Emory University Hospital (home of the Winship Cancer Institute), Weill Cornell Medical College, and Japanese pharmaceutical company, Daiichi Sankyo.

438

Targeting aerobic glycolysis: 3-bromopyruvate as a promising anticancer drug.  

PubMed

The Warburg effect refers to the phenomenon whereby cancer cells avidly take up glucose and produce lactic acid under aerobic conditions. Although the molecular mechanisms underlying tumor reliance on glycolysis remains not completely clear, its inhibition opens feasible therapeutic windows for cancer treatment. Indeed, several small molecules have emerged by combinatorial studies exhibiting promising anticancer activity both in vitro and in vivo, as a single agent or in combination with other therapeutic modalities. Therefore, besides reviewing the alterations of glycolysis that occur with malignant transformation, this manuscript aims at recapitulating the most effective pharmacological therapeutics of its targeting. In particular, we describe the principal mechanisms of action and the main targets of 3-bromopyruvate, an alkylating agent with impressive antitumor effects in several models of animal tumors. Moreover, we discuss the chemo-potentiating strategies that would make unparalleled the putative therapeutic efficacy of its use in clinical settings. PMID:22328057

Cardaci, Simone; Desideri, Enrico; Ciriolo, Maria Rosa

2012-02-01

439

Peptide vaccines for hematological malignancies: a missed promise?  

PubMed

Despite the crucial aid that newly developed target therapies are providing to chemotherapy and stem cell transplant, the cure for many hematological malignancies is still an unmet need. Although available therapies are able to induce an effective debulking of the tumor, most of the time, an insidious minimal residual disease survives current treatments and it is responsible for an immediate or delayed relapse. Peptide-derived antitumor vaccines have been developed with the idea that an artificially "educated" immune system may exert an active specific antitumor response able to control and ultimately eradicate underlying post-treatment residual disease. This review will summarize current knowledge of peptide vaccines for hematological malignancies, trying to analyze promises and pitfalls of a safe and intelligent tool that after many years from its first appearance has not yet established its potential role as alternative immune mediated therapeutic approach for hematopoietic tumors. PMID:24399190

Bocchia, Monica; Defina, Marzia; Aprile, Lara; Sicuranza, Anna

2014-02-01

440

?-secretase inhibitor; a promising novel therapeutic drug in Alzheimer's disease  

PubMed Central

Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and vascular dementia are responsible for up to 90% of dementia cases. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), a staggering number of 35.6 million people are currently diagnosed with dementia. Blocking disease progression or preventing AD altogether is desirable for both social and economic reasons and recently focus has shifted to a new and promising drug: the ?-secretase inhibitor. Much of AD research has investigated the amyloid cascade hypothesis, which postulates that AD is caused by changes in amyloid beta (A?) stability and aggregation. Blocking A? production by inhibiting the first protease required for its generation, ?-secretase/BACE1, may be the next step in blocking AD progression. In April 2012, promising phase I data on inhibitor MK-8931 was presented. This drug reduced A? cerebral spinal fluids (CSF) levels up to 92% and was well tolerated by patients. In March 2013 data was added from a one week trial in 32 mild to moderate AD patients, showing CSF A? levels decreased up to 84%. However, ?-site APP cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) inhibitors require further research. First, greatly reducing A? levels through BACE1 inhibition may have harmful side effects. Second, BACE1 inhibitors have yet to pass clinical trial phase II/III and no data on possible side effects on AD patients are available. And third, there remains doubt about the clinical efficacy of BACE1 inhibitors. In moderate AD patients, A? plaques have already been formed. BACE1 inhibitors prevent production of new A? plaques, but hypothetically do not influence already existing A? peptides. Therefore, BACE1 inhibitors are potentially better at preventing AD instead of having therapeutic use. PMID:25100992

Menting, Kelly Willemijn; Claassen, Jurgen A. H. R.

2014-01-01

441

Identifying spiders through DNA barcodes  

Microsoft Academic Search

With almost 40 000 species, the spiders provide important model systems for studies of sociality, mating systems, and sexual dimorphism. However, work on this group is regularly constrained by difficulties in species identi- fication. DNA-based identification systems represent a promising approach to resolve this taxonomic impediment, but their efficacy has only been tested in a few groups. In this study,

Rowan D. H. Barrett; Paul D. N. Hebert

2005-01-01

442

Practical leadership  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This study examines conceptions of leadership and leadership enactment by teachers to develop a conceptual foundation for teacher leadership. The research question driving this study was: How do elementary school teacher leaders within a curricular and instructional reform effort describe their conceptions and enactment of leadership within their school and district contexts? Two program sites for elementary school science reform were selected, and six teachers from each program were invited to participate in the study. First-hand reports of conceptions of leadership and stories of enactment, collected through individual and focus group interviews with the teachers, served as the primary data for the study. A case for each of the twelve teachers is presented and analyzed. The outcome of the study is a theory of practical leadership. This conception draws upon the intellectual tradition of practical reasoning, which emphasizes deliberation and action of the individual when faced with a decision or a problematic situation. Practical leadership draws primarily from three dimensions: the self of the leader; the contexts in which the leader is acting; and the purposes that drive the leader's actions. Examples of leadership enactment from the cases are presented with attention to how these enactment stories demonstrate the teachers' use of practical reasoning in the situations described. The final analysis looks more specifically at the idea of practical leadership using a dynamic model called "leadership space" to demonstrate interactions among self, contexts, and purposes over time. The dissertation highlights three conclusions: (1) practical reasoning as the theoretical foundation for analyzing leadership provides a useful and valid analytical framework since it locates the leadership enactment in the deliberation and actions of the leader rather than understanding leadership as the application of a generalized set of principles about how to lead; (2) conceptions of leadership influence leadership enactment; and (3) teacher leadership roles are crafted, not filled.

Sato, Mistilina Dawn

443

Experiential knowledge of expert coaches can help identify informational constraints on performance of dynamic interceptive actions.  

PubMed

Coordination of dynamic interceptive movements is predicated on cyclical relations between an individual's actions and information sources from the performance environment. To identify dynamic informational constraints, which are interwoven with individual and task constraints, coaches' experiential knowledge provides a complementary source to support empirical understanding of performance in sport. In this study, 15 expert coaches from 3 sports (track and field, gymnastics and cricket) participated in a semi-structured interview process to identify potential informational constraints which they perceived to regulate action during run-up performance. Expert coaches' experiential knowledge revealed multiple information sources which may constrain performance adaptations in such locomotor pointing tasks. In addition to the locomotor pointing target, coaches' knowledge highlighted two other key informational constraints: vertical reference points located near the locomotor pointing target and a check mark located prior to the locomotor pointing target. This study highlights opportunities for broadening the understanding of perception and action coupling processes, and the identified information sources warrant further empirical investigation as potential constraints on athletic performance. Integration of experiential knowledge of expert coaches with theoretically driven empirical knowledge represents a promising avenue to drive future applied science research and pedagogical practice. PMID:24016400

Greenwood, Daniel; Davids, Keith; Renshaw, Ian

2014-01-01

444

The Road to Nowhere: The Illusion and Broken Promises of Special Education in the Baltimore City and Other Public School Systems. The Abell Report. Volume 17, No.4  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Students with disabilities across the nation, including Baltimore City, are failing to achieve their academic potential. Inadequate instruction and other inappropriate or unlawful practices cause and conceal the dysfunction of special education. At long last, the illusion and broken promises of special education have been publicly exposed. Under…

Hettleman, Kalman R.

2004-01-01

445

Pyrethroids as Promising Marine Antifoulants: Laboratory and Field Studies  

Microsoft Academic Search

Due to the regulations and bans regarding the use of traditional toxic chemicals against marine fouling organisms and the\\u000a practical impediments to the commercialization of natural product antifoulants, there is an urgent need for compounds that\\u000a are antifouling-active, environmentally friendly, and have a potential for commercial application. In this study, a series\\u000a of common, commercially available pyrethroid products, which are

Danqing Feng; Caihuan Ke; Shaojing Li; Changyi Lu; Feng Guo

2009-01-01

446

A fresh look at paralytics in the critically ill: real promise and real concern  

PubMed Central

Neuromuscular blocking agents (NMBAs), or “paralytics,” often are deployed in the sickest patients in the intensive care unit (ICU) when usual care fails. Despite the publication of guidelines on the use of NMBAs in the ICU in 2002, clinicians have needed more direction to determine which patients would benefit from NMBAs and which patients would be harmed. Recently, new evidence has shown that paralytics hold more promise when used in carefully selected lung injury patients for brief periods of time. When used in early acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), NMBAs assist to establish a lung protective strategy, which leads to improved oxygenation, decreased pulmonary and systemic inflammation, and potentially improved mortality. It also is increasingly recognized that NMBAs can cause harm, particularly critical illness polyneuromyopathy (CIPM), when used for prolonged periods or in septic shock. In this review, we address several practical considerations for clinicians who use NMBAs in their practice. Ultimately, we conclude that NMBAs should be considered a lung protective adjuvant in early ARDS and that clinicians should consider using an alternative NMBA to the aminosteroids in septic shock with less severe lung injury pending further studies. PMID:23062076

2012-01-01

447

Preparing Mathematics and Science Teachers for Diverse Classrooms: Promising Strategies for Transformative Pedagogy  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This book provides a theoretical basis and practical strategies to counter resistance to learning to teach for diversity (in culturally and gender-inclusive ways), and resistance to teaching for understanding (using student-centered and inquiry-based pedagogical approaches). Teacher educators from across the United States present rich narratives of their experiences in helping prospective and practicing teachers learn to teach for diversity and for understanding in a variety of mathematics and science contexts. Mathematics and science education has been slow to respond to issues of diversity and equity. Preparing Mathematics and Science Teachers for Diverse Classrooms: Promising Strategies for Transformative Pedagogy helps to begin a network for support and collaboration among teacher educators in science and mathematics who work for multicultural education and equity. A unique and much-needed contribution, this book is an essential resource for teacher educators, K-12 teachers who work as student teacher supervisors and cooperating teachers, and graduate students in mathematics and science education, and a compelling text for science and mathematics methods courses.

2010-05-04

448

Identifying influential nodes in complex networks  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Identifying influential nodes that lead to faster and wider spreading in complex networks is of theoretical and practical significance. The degree centrality method is very simple but of little relevance. Global metrics such as betweenness centrality and closeness centrality can better identify influential nodes, but are incapable to be applied in large-scale networks due to the computational complexity. In order to design an effective ranking method, we proposed a semi-local centrality measure as a tradeoff between the low-relevant degree centrality and other time-consuming measures. We use the Susceptible-Infected-Recovered (SIR) model to evaluate the performance by using the spreading rate and the number of infected nodes. Simulations on four real networks show that our method can well identify influential nodes.

Chen, Duanbing; Lü, Linyuan; Shang, Ming-Sheng; Zhang, Yi-Cheng; Zhou, Tao

2012-02-01

449

An intensive search for promising fungal biological control agents of ticks, particularly Rhipicephalus microplus.  

PubMed

Entomopathogenic fungi have been investigated worldwide as promising biological control agents of the cattle tick Rhipicephalus microplus. The current study evaluates the virulence of several fungal isolates to R. microplus larva in the laboratory as part of an effort to identify isolates with promise for effective biocontrol of R. microplus in the field. Sixty fungal isolates, encompassing 5 Beauveria spp. and 1 Engyodontium albus (=Beauveria alba), were included in this study. In addition to bioassays, the isolates were characterized morphologically and investigated as to their potential for conidial mass production. These findings were correlated with previous reports on the same fungal isolates of their natural UV-B tolerance (Fernandes et al., 2007), thermotolerance and cold activity (Fernandes et al., 2008), and genotypes (Fernandes et al., 2009). R. microplus larvae obtained from artificially infested calves were less susceptible to Beauveria bassiana infection than ticks acquired from naturally infested cattle from a different location. Isolates CG 464, CG 500 and CG 206 were among the most virulent Beauveria isolates tested in this study. All fungal isolates presented morphological features consistent with their species descriptions. Of the 53 B. bassiana isolates, five (CG 481, CG 484, CG 206, CG 235 and CG 487) had characteristics that qualified them as promising candidates for biological control agents of R. microplus, viz., mean LC(50) between 10(7) and 10(8)conidiaml(-1); produced 5000 conidia or more on 60mm(2) surface area of PDAY medium; and, in comparison to untreated (control) conidia, had the best conidial tolerances to UV-B (7.04 kJ m(-2)) and heat (45°C, 2h) of 50% or higher, and conidial cold (5°C, 15d) activity (mycelial growth) higher than 60%. The current study of 60 Beauveria spp. isolates, therefore, singles out a few (five) with high potential for controlling ticks under field conditions. PMID:21705145

Fernandes, Everton K K; Angelo, Isabele C; Rangel, Drauzio E N; Bahiense, Thiago C; Moraes, Aurea M L; Roberts, Donald W; Bittencourt, Vânia R E P

2011-12-15

450

Best Practices  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Front-page articles in science and education periodicals and journals give voice to the growing concern that scores on nationwide science exams have either declined or, at best, have had a minute increase even after several years of pushing for better science learning. With this reality facing science education, being knowledgeable about some best practices in science instruction is important.

Swango, C. J.; Steward, Sally B.

2003-01-01

451

Stereological approaches to identifying neuropathology in psychosis  

PubMed Central

The challenges involved in identifying the neuropathological substrates of the clinical syndrome recognized as schizophrenia are well known. Stereological sampling provides a means to obtain accurate and precise quantitative estimates of components of neural circuits, and thus offers promise of an enhanced capacity to detect subtle alterations in brain structure associated with schizophrenia. In this review, we 1) consider the importance and rationale for robust quantitative studies of brain abnormalities in postmortem studies of schizophrenia, 2) provide a brief overview of stereological methods for obtaining such measures, 3) discuss the methodological details that should be reported to document the robustness of a stereological study, 4) given the constraints of postmortem human studies, suggest how to approach the limitations of less robust designs, and 5) present an overview of methodologically sound stereological estimates from postmortem studies of schizophrenia. PMID:20678756

Dorph-Petersen, Karl-Anton; Lewis, David A.

2010-01-01

452

Chalcones as promising pesticidal agents against diamondback moth ( Plutella xylostella ): microwave-assisted synthesis and structure–activity relationship  

Microsoft Academic Search

A series of chalcones (A–CH=CH–CO–B) were synthesized under microwave irradiation, and for the first time their pesticidal activity against diamondback moth\\u000a (Plutella xylostella) was evaluated to identify the promising lead structures. The structure–activity relationship (SAR) analysis revealed that\\u000a electron-withdrawing substituents on ring A of chalcone provided good pesticidal agents, whereas, ring B can bear either electron-withdrawing or electron-releasing substituents. Moreover,

Rakesh Kumar; Prabha Sharma; Amit Shard; Dhananjay Kumar Tewary; Gireesh Nadda; Arun Kumar Sinha

453

The promise of e-health--a Canadian perspective.  

PubMed

Canadians value their health care system above any other social programme. Canada's system of health care faces significant financial and population pressures, relating to cost, access, quality, accountability, and the intergration of information and communication technologies (ICTs). The health-system also faces certain unique challenges that include care delivery within a highly decentralised system of financing and accountability, and care delivery to a significant portion of the population sparsely distributed across a land mass of 10 million square kilometres, in areas of extreme climatic conditions. All of these challenges are significant catalysts in the development of technologies that aim to significantly mitigate or eliminate these selfsame challenges. The system is undergoing widespread review, nationally and within each province and territory, where the bulk of care provision is financed and managed. The challenges are being addressed by national, regional and provincial initiatives in the public, private and not-for-profit sectors. The promise of e-health lies in the manner and degree to which it can mitigate or resolve these challenges to the health system and build on advancements in ICTs supporting the development of a health infostructure. Canada is actively developing and implementing technological solutions to deliver health information and health care services across the country. These solutions, while exciting and promising, also present new challenges, particularly in regard to acceptable standards, choice of technologies, overcoming traditional jurisdictional boundaries, up-front investment, and privacy and confidentiality. Many organizations and governments are working to address these challenges. Canada Health Infoway, a not-for-profit corporation, was founded by the first ministers in 2001 to accelerate the establishment of an interoperable, pan-Canadian electronic health record. It works with partners in the federal, provincial and territorial jurisdictions to define replicable solutions for establishment of the major elements necessary to achieve this goal. The Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI) will also continue to play an increasingly significant role in these initiatives, as the management of health information becomes a more crucial factor in the successful delivery of health care services in the new millennium. PMID:15751551

Alvarez, Richard C

2004-01-01

454

Evaluation of N,N-dialkylamides as promising process extractants  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Studies carried out at BARC, India on the development of new extractants for reprocessing of spent fuel suggested that while straight chain N,N-dihexyloctanamide (DHOA) is promising alternative to TBP for the reprocessing of irradiated uranium based fuels, branched chain N,N-di(2-ethylhexyl)isobutyramide (D2EHIBA) is suitable for the selective recovery of 233U from irradiated Th. In advanced fuel cycle scenarios, the coprocessing of U/Pu stream appears attractive particularly with respect to development of proliferation resistant technologies. DHOA extracted Pu(IV) more efficiently than TBP, both at trace-level concentration as well as under uranium/plutonium loading conditions. Uranium extraction behavior of DHOA was however, similar to that of TBP during the extraction cycle. Stripping behavior of U and Pu (without any reductant) was better for DHOA than that of TBP. It was observed during batch studies that whereas 99% Pu is stripped in four stages in case of DHOA, only 89% Pu is stripped in case of TBP under identical experimental conditions. DHOA offered better fission product decontamination than that of TBP. GANEX (Group ActiNide EXtraction) and ARTIST (Amide-based Radio-resources Treatment with Interim Storage of Transuranics) processes proposed for actinide partitioning use branched chain amides for the selective extraction of uranium from spent fuel feed solutions. The branched-alkyl monoamide (BAMA) proposed to be used in ARTIST process is N,N-di-(2-ethylhexyl)butyramide (D2EHBA). In this context, the extraction behavior of U(VI) and Pu(IV) were compared using D2EHIBA, TBP, and D2EHBA under similar concentration of nitric acid (0.5 — 6M) and of uranium (0-50g/L). These studies suggested that D2EHIBA is a promising extractant for selective extraction of uranium over plutonium in process streams. Similarly, D2EHIBA offered distinctly better decontamination of 233U over Th and fission products under THOREX feed conditions. The possibility of simultaneous stripping and precipitation of thorium (as oxalate) from loaded organic phase was explored using 0.05M oxalic acid. Ammonium diuranate (ADU) precipitation was performed on the oxalate supernatant for the recovery of uranium. Quantitative recovery (>99.9%) of Th as well as of U was achieved. Radiolytic studies suggested that irradiated DHOA and D2EHIBA behaved better with respect to fission product decontamination as compared to that of TBP.

Pathak, P. N.; Prabhu, D. R.; Kanekar, A. S.; Manchanda, V. K.

2010-03-01

455

Improving the Nurse-Family Partnership in Community Practice  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND: Evidence-based preventive interventions are rarely final products. They have reached a stage of development that warrant public investment but require additional research and development to strengthen their effects. The Nurse-Family Partnership (NFP), a program of nurse home visiting, is grounded in findings from replicated randomized controlled trials. OBJECTIVE: Evidence-based programs require replication in accordance with the models tested in the original randomized controlled trials in order to achieve impacts comparable to those found in those trials, and yet they must be changed in order to improve their impacts, given that interventions require continuous improvement. This article provides a framework and illustrations of work our team members have developed to address this tension. METHODS: Because the NFP is delivered in communities outside of research contexts, we used quantitative and qualitative research to identify challenges with the NFP program model and its implementation, as well as promising approaches for addressing them. RESULTS: We describe a framework used to address these issues and illustrate its use in improving nurses’ skills in retaining participants, reducing closely spaced subsequent pregnancies, responding to intimate partner violence, observing and promoting caregivers’ care of their children, addressing parents’ mental health problems, classifying families’ risks and strengths as a guide for program implementation, and collaborating with indigenous health organizations to adapt and evaluate the program for their populations. We identify common challenges encountered in conducting research in practice settings and translating findings from these studies into ongoing program implementation. CONCLUSIONS: The conduct of research focused on quality improvement, model improvement, and implementation in NFP practice settings is challenging, but feasible, and holds promise for improving the impact of the NFP. PMID:24187112

Donelan-McCall, Nancy; O'Brien, Ruth; MacMillan, Harriet; Jack, Susan; Jenkins, Thomas; Dunlap, Wallace P.; O'Fallon, Molly; Yost, Elly; Thorland, Bill; Pinto, Francesca; Gasbarro, Mariarosa; Baca, Pilar; Melnick, Alan; Beeber, Linda

2013-01-01

456

Games for learning: vast wasteland or a digital promise?  

PubMed

Research about emerging best practices in the learning sciences points to the potential of deploying digital games as one possible solution to the twin challenges of weak student engagement and the need for more robust achievement in literacy, science, technology, and math. This chapter reviews key cross-cutting themes in this special volume, drawing perspective from the context of the current United States program and policy reform. The authors conclude that digital games have some unique potential to address pressing educational challenges, but that new mechanisms for advancing purposeful research and development must be adopted by both policymakers and industry leaders. PMID:23483695

Levine, Michael H; Vaala, Sarah E

2013-01-01

457

Promises and challenges in solid-state lighting  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Lighting technologies based on semiconductor light-emitting diodes (LEDs) offer unprecedented promises that include three major benefits: (i) Gigantic energy savings enabled by efficient conversion of electrical energy to optical energy; (ii) Substantial positive contributions to sustainability through reduced emissions of global-warming gases, acid-rain gases, and toxic substances such as mercury; and (iii) The creation of new paradigms in lighting driven by the unique controllability of solid-state lighting sources. Due to the powerful nature of these benefits, the transition from conventional lighting sources to solid-state lighting is virtually assured. This presentation will illustrate the new world of lighting and illustrate the pervasive changes to be expected in lighting, displays, communications, and biotechnology. The presentation will also address the formidable challenges that must be addressed to continue the further advancement of solid-state lighting technology. These challenges offer opportunities for research and innovation. Specific challenges include light management, carrier transport, and optical design. We will present some innovative approaches in order to solve known technical challenges faced by solid-state lighting. These approaches include the demonstration and use of new optical thin-film materials with a continuously tunable refractive index. These approaches also include the use of polarization-matched structures that reduce the polarization fields in GaInN LEDs and the hotly debated efficiency droop, that is, the decreasing LED efficiency at high currents.

Schubert, Fred

2010-03-01

458

Promising directions in the diagnosis of childhood tuberculosis.  

PubMed

Estimates of the burden of childhood tuberculosis have been hampered by the lack of a reliable diagnostic test. Clinical scoring systems, radiological findings and tuberculin skin testing (the traditional methods used for diagnosis) are unreliable, particularly in the era of HIV. Microbiologic confirmation using induced sputum is feasible and has become increasingly important to define the burden of disease and to enable appropriate treatment. The availability of a rapid molecular diagnostic test (Xpert® MTB/RIF; Cepheid) is an important advance that can improve case detection in children and enable rapid detection of mycobacterial drug resistance. Xpert testing of two induced sputum specimens detected approximately 75% of children with culture-confirmed disease. Urine lipoarabinomannan has shown promise as a rapid diagnostic in a subgroup of HIV-infected severely immunocompromised adults, but there have been no data in children so far. Further research is needed to develop a rapid point-of-care, reliable and affordable diagnostic test for childhood tuberculosis that can be widely used. PMID:22971064

Whittaker, Elizabeth; Zar, Heather J

2012-08-01

459

Mesenchymal stem cell-derived microparticles: a promising therapeutic strategy.  

PubMed

Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent stem cells that give rise to various cell types of the mesodermal germ layer. Because of their unique ability to home in on injured and cancerous tissues, MSCs are of great potential in regenerative medicine. MSCs also contribute to reparative processes in different pathological conditions, including cardiovascular diseases and cancer. However, many studies have shown that only a small proportion of transplanted MSCs can actually survive and be incorporated into host tissues. The effects of MSCs cannot be fully explained by their number. Recent discoveries suggest that microparticles (MPs) derived from MSCs may be important for the physiological functions of their parent. Though the physiological role of MSC-MPs is currently not well understood, inspiring results indicate that, in tissue repair and anti-cancer therapy, MSC-MPs have similar pro-regenerative and protective properties as their cellular counterparts. Thus, MSC-MPs represent a promising approach that may overcome the obstacles and risks associated with the use of native or engineered MSCs. PMID:25196436

Tan, Xi; Gong, Yong-Zhen; Wu, Ping; Liao, Duan-Fang; Zheng, Xi-Long

2014-01-01

460

Promising antimicrobial capability of thin film metallic glasses.  

PubMed

Thin film metallic glasses (TFMGs) are demonstrated to exhibit excellent surface flatness, high corrosion resistance and satisfactory hydrophobic properties. Moreover, the antimicrobial and biocompatibility abilities of TFMGs are examined and the results are compared with the behavior of pure Ag and 316L stainless steel. Three TFMGs, Al48Ag37Ti15, Zr54Ti35Si11, and Zr59Ti22Ag19, are prepared by sputtering to assess the antimicrobial performance against Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which are the most common nosocomial infection pathogens. Experimental results show that the antimicrobial effect of the Al- or Ag-containing AlAgTi and ZrTiAg TFMGs is similar to that of the pure Ag coating. The ZrTiSi TFMG with no Ag or Al shows poor antimicrobial capability. The physical properties of highly smooth surface and hydrophobic nature alone are not sufficient to result in promising antimicrobial ability. The chemical metal ion release still plays a major role, which should be born in mind in designing biomedical devices. PMID:24433907

Chu, Y Y; Lin, Y S; Chang, C M; Liu, J-K; Chen, C H; Huang, J C

2014-03-01

461

CARMENES ultra-stable cooling system: very promising results  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

CARMENES is a high resolution spectrograph to detect planets through the variation of radial velocity, destined for the Calar Alto Observatory in Almeria, Spain. The optical bench has a working temperature of 140K with a 24 hours stability of ±0,1K; goal ±0,01K. It is enclosed with a radiation shield actively cooled with thermalized nitrogen gas that flows through strategically positioned heat exchangers to remove its radiative load. The cooling system has an external preparation unit (N2GPU), which provides the nitrogen gas through actively vaporizing liquid nitrogen with heating resistances and a three stage circuit flow, each one controlled by an independent PID. Since CARMENES is still in the construction phase, a dedicated test facility has been built in order to simulate the instrument and correctly establish the N2GPU parameters. Furthermore, the test facility allows a wide range of configurations set-ups, which enables a full characterization of the N2GPU and the cooling system. The N2GPU has been designed to offer a wide temperature range of thermally stabilized nitrogen gas flow, which apart from CARMENES could also be used to provide ultra-high thermal stability in other cryogenic instruments. The present paper shows the testing of the cooling performance, the hardware used and the very promising results obtained.

Mirabet, E.; Carvas, P.; Lizon, J.-L.; Becerril, S.; Rodríguez, E.; Abril, M.; Cárdenas, M. C.; Morales, R.; Pérez, D.; Sánchez Carrasco, M. A.; Amado, P. J.; Seifert, W.; Quirrenbach, A.; Caballero, J. A.; Ribas, I.; Reiners, A.; Dreizler, S.

2014-07-01

462

Acetylcholinesterase inhibition by somes promising Brazilian medicinal plants.  

PubMed

A microplate assay and a thin-layer chromatography (TLC) "in situ" assay based on the Ellman assay was used to screen for acetylcholinesterase inhibitors from ethyl acetate and methanol extracts of Brazilian medicinal plants of families that, according to the literature, have traditional uses that might be connected with acetylcholinesterase inhibition. Eighteen species belonging to Convolvulaceae, Crassulaceae, Euphorbiaceae, Leguminosae, Malvaceae, Moraceae, Nyctaginaceae and Rutaceae families were tested. The most active plants were Ipomoea asarifolia (IC50 = 0.12 mg/mL), Jatropha curcas (IC50 = 0.25 mg/mL), Jatropha gossypiifolia (IC50 = 0.05 mg/mL), Kalanchoe brasiliensis (IC50 = 0.16 mg/mL) and Senna alata (IC50 = 0.08 mg/mL). The most promising extracts were the Jatropha gossypiifolia and Senna alata species assuming there were compounds with a similar activity to galanthamine, which should contain about 1% of an active compound, or if present at lower levels even more active compounds than galanthamine (IC50 = 0.37 x 10-3 mg/mL) should be present. PMID:21881804

Feitosa, C M; Freitas, R M; Luz, N N N; Bezerra, M Z B; Trevisan, M T S

2011-08-01

463

[Euphorbiaceae diterpenes: plant toxins or promising molecules for the therapy?].  

PubMed

Most of the species of Euphorbiaceae are known to be toxic and poisonous plants because their milky latex has strong skin irritant activity, and chronic exposure can result carcinogenic effect. The toxic constituents of Euphorbiaceae species are specific diterpenes, called in common as phorboids. These compounds (tigliane, ingenane and daphnane derivatives) possess extreme pro-inflammatory and tumour promoting effects due to the activation of protein kinase C enzyme. The present article gives a survey about the present estimation of Euphorbiaceae diterpenes on the basis of own experimental results and literature data. The study tries to answer the question whether these compounds can be regarded as plant toxins or they may have therapeutic relevance? It was concluded that one group of diterpenes, such as most of phorbol and ingenol esters can be considered exclusively as toxins without any possible medicinal use. The other group of diterpenes comprises compounds, which display toxicity, but in adequate dose they have therapeutic perspective (e.g. the resiniferatoxin with capsaicine-like effect). The third group of compounds such as diterpenes of non-phorboid type with macrocyclic or polycyclic structures do not have toxic effect or this property is markedly reduced, however demonstrate interesting biological activities (anti-MDR, antiproliferative and tubulin-interacting effects). Thus, these compounds may be promising lead compounds for natural product based drug developments. PMID:16318224

Hohmann, Judit; Molnár, József

2004-01-01

464

Microencapsulation: A promising technique for controlled drug delivery  

PubMed Central

Microparticles offer various significant advantages as drug delivery systems, including: (i) an effective protection of the encapsulated active agent against (e.g. enzymatic) degradation, (ii) the possibility to accurately control the release rate of the incorporated drug over periods of hours to months, (iii) an easy administration (compared to alternative parenteral controlled release dosage forms, such as macro-sized implants), and (iv) Desired, pre-programmed drug release profiles can be provided which match the therapeutic needs of the patient. This article gives an overview on the general aspects and recent advances in drug-loaded microparticles to improve the efficiency of various medical treatments. An appropriately designed controlled release drug delivery system can be a foot ahead towards solving problems concerning to the targeting of drug to a specific organ or tissue, and controlling the rate of drug delivery to the target site. The development of oral controlled release systems has been a challenge to formulation scientist due to their inability to restrain and localize the system at targeted areas of gastrointestinal tract. Microparticulate drug delivery systems are an interesting and promising option when developing an oral controlled release system. The objective of this paper is to take a closer look at microparticles as drug delivery devices for increasing efficiency of drug delivery, improving the release profile and drug targeting. In order to appreciate the application possibilities of microcapsules in drug delivery, some fundamental aspects are briefly reviewed. PMID:21589795

Singh, M.N.; Hemant, K.S.Y.; Ram, M.; Shivakumar, H.G.

2010-01-01

465

The pacific coast: a reluctant area of promise  

SciTech Connect

America's first offshore well was drilled from a wooden pier extending outward from the coastal town of Summerland, Calif., just east of Santa Barbara. That was in 1894, and in the 90 years since then some 4,000 additional wells have been drilled off the California coast. But the region still qualifies as a legitimate Area of Promise because those 4,000 wells account for only 13% of all U.S. offshore wells, and leases offshore California accounted for only 7% of the 12.6 million acres under lease around the U.S. as of the end of 1982. platform plans already have been announced. But installing the platforms won't be without problems-most of them caused by the environmental concerns of coastal residents. During the course of drilling 30,000 wells around the U.S. there has been only one serious mishap. And that, unfortunately, was the 1969 Santa Barbara blowout. Besides coating beaches and wildlife along the Santa Barbara Channel with crude oil, the blowout had a more-lasting effect in that it galvanized and unified the environmental movement. So now there is a virtual cartel of some 30 environmental groups that must be dealt with by oil companies that want to drill offshore the U.S. Pacific Coast.

McNally, R.

1983-12-01

466

Entrapment in plasma microparticles: a promising strategy for antigen delivery.  

PubMed

We report the preparation of plasma microparticles (PMPs) from autologous blood plasma for sustained in vivo delivery of the entrapped antigens. The PMPs were prepared by high speed-stirring of calcium-enriched plasma, mixed with the antigen to be entrapped, in mineral oil. The preparation of PMPs did not necessitate addition of any external protein/enzyme nor special laboratory setup. Our results suggest that the PMPs release the entrapped invertase in a sustained manner both in vitro and in vivo, especially after crosslinking with glutaraldehyde. The preparations are reasonably stable to proteolysis and constitute strong candidates for eliciting immune response. Induction of humoral immune response by the PMP-entrapped invertase, as evident from the high antibody titers, was remarkable and comparable with that observed in animals receiving the antigen emulsified with Freund's Complete Adjuvant. Isotypic analysis of antibodies showed a Th1-biased immune response in animals administered uncrosslinked or crosslinked PMPs-entrapped invertase, especially after a booster dose. The analysis in animals of the group immunized with adjuvant-emulsified antigen suggested a combined Th1 and Th2 response. PMP-entrapment also caused high expression of surface markers (CD80 and CD86) on antigen presenting cells, as well as effector T-cells surface markers (CD4(+) and CD8(+) ) as revealed by FACS. The study suggests that PMPs offer remarkable promise as adjuvant-free and biocompatible vaccine delivery systems. PMID:24500854

Fatima, Munazza T; Ahmad, Ejaj; Saleemuddin, Mohammed

2014-08-01

467

Shear exfoliation in liquids : a promising way to produce graphene.  

E-print Network

My initial project was to install and test a new spectrometer for the solid state physics group. However, due to a delay in the construction of the new photoluminescence laboratory this project had to be abandoned. Graphene is a one atom thick 2D material that presents remarkable physical properties whose applications are very promising. However, the current means of production present several limitations. They are costly in terms of energy consumption and yields are ridiculously low. Thus, to progress from the laboratory to industrial production it will be necessary to find a method to produce large quantities of defect graphene. In April 2014, a paper \\cite{graphene_shear} came out in \\emph{Nature Material} demonstrating that shear exfoliation in liquids would be a scalable way to produce defect-free grahene. The aim of my project was to test this new method by trying to reproduce some of the results published in this article. It involved the setting up of the experiment, the production of samples and fin...

Mougeot, Maxime

2014-01-01

468

Para rubber seed oil: new promising unconventional oil for cosmetics.  

PubMed

Para rubber seed was macerated in petroleum ether and n-hexane, individually, for 30 min. The extraction was additionally performed by reflux and soxhlet for 6 h with the same solvent and proportion. Soxhlet extraction by petroleum ether afforded the greatest extractive yield (22.90 ± 0.92%). Although antioxidant activity by means of 1, 1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assay was insignificantly differed in soxhleted (8.90 ± 1.15%) and refluxed (9.02 ± 0.71%) by n-hexane, soxhlet extraction by n-hexane was significantly (p < 0.05) potent scavenged 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothaiazoline)-6-sulfonic acid) or ABTS radical with trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC) of 66.54 ± 6.88 mg/100 g oil. This extract was non cytotoxic towards normal human fibroblast cells. In addition, oleic acid and palmitic acid were determined at a greater content than in the seed of para rubber cultivated in Malaysia, although linoleic and stearic acid contents were not differed. This bright yellow extract was further evaluated on other physicochemical characters. The determined specific gravity, refractive index, iodine value, peroxide value and saponification value were in the range of commercialized vegetable oils used as cosmetic raw material. Therefore, Para rubber seed oil is highlighted as the promising ecological ingredient appraisal for cosmetics. Transforming of the seed that is by-product of the important industrial crop of Thailand into cosmetics is encouraged accordingly. PMID:24976614

Lourith, Nattaya; Kanlayavattanakul, Mayuree; Sucontphunt, Apirada; Ondee, Thunnicha

2014-01-01

469

Exploring predisposition and treatment response--the promise of genomics.  

PubMed

Spurred by large-scale public and private efforts as well as technological developments, the last few years have seen a major leap forward in our understanding of the genetic basis of cardiovascular disease. This revolution is in its infancy and will continue to alter the medical landscape for years to come. There is a need within the general cardiology community to develop a better understanding about how these developments may alter routine clinical care. In this review, we will provide an overview of the current state of genetics as pertains to rare cardiovascular diseases and then review advances in the discovery of the genetic basis of common disease with the potential for improved risk assessment and drug development. We will also outline a few recent examples of pharmacogenetic advances that are already starting to become a part of clinical management and finally discuss the promise as well as the challenges in using next-generation sequencing technologies to provide personalized cardiovascular care. PMID:22824110

Pan, Stephen; Knowles, Joshua W

2012-01-01

470

NANOG: A promising target for digestive malignant tumors  

PubMed Central

NANOG has been extensively researched since its discovery by Chambers et al. NANOG is a homeodomain transcription factor and an essential regulator of embryonic stem cell (ESC) self-renewal, which inhibits differentiation. Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are a small subset of cells that are thought to drive uncontrolled tumor growth; CSCs retain the tumor capabilities of self-renewal and propagation. The existence of CSCs was recently shown by direct experimental evidence. NANOG is expressed in CSCs and ESCs, although it remains unclear whether ESCs and CSCs share similar mechanisms in the regulation of physical and biological processes. Several studies suggest that the expression level of NANOG is high in cancer tissues and low or absent in normal tissues. High levels of NANOG expression are associated with advanced stages of cancer and a poor prognosis, indicating that it plays a vital role in tumor transformation, tumorigenesis, and tumor metastasis. NANOG is part of a complex regulatory network that controls cell fate determination, proliferation, and apoptosis. NANOG cooperates with other regulators, such as microflora, transcription factors, and kinases, in cancer cells. NANOG might have a promising future in anti-cancer and other therapeutic treatments, which could improve human health.

Sun, Ai-Xi; Liu, Chang-Jiang; Sun, Zi-Qin; Wei, Zhi

2014-01-01

471

Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Derived Microparticles: A Promising Therapeutic Strategy  

PubMed Central

Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent stem cells that give rise to various cell types of the mesodermal germ layer. Because of their unique ability to home in on injured and cancerous tissues, MSCs are of great potential in regenerative medicine. MSCs also contribute to reparative processes in different pathological conditions, including cardiovascular diseases and cancer. However, many studies have shown that only a small proportion of transplanted MSCs can actually survive and be incorporated into host tissues. The effects of MSCs cannot be fully explained by their number. Recent discoveries suggest that microparticles (MPs) derived from MSCs may be important for the physiological functions of their parent. Though the physiological role of MSC-MPs is currently not well understood, inspiring results indicate that, in tissue repair and anti-cancer therapy, MSC-MPs have similar pro-regenerative and protective properties as their cellular counterparts. Thus, MSC-MPs represent a promising approach that may overcome the obstacles and risks associated with the use of native or engineered MSCs. PMID:25196436

Tan, Xi; Gong, Yong-Zhen; Wu, Ping; Liao, Duan-Fang; Zheng, Xi-Long

2014-01-01

472

The Professionalization of Comparative and International Education: Promises and Problems  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

The purpose of this study is to identify, describe, and analyze historical trends in the professionalization of the field of comparative and international education, as indicated by the founding, expansion, and evolution of the professional associations and graduate programs serving the field. Using historical and university data as well as unique…

Wiseman, Alexander W.; Matherly, Cheryl

2009-01-01

473

Objectivity in Grading: The Promise of Bar Codes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This article proposes the use of a new technology to assure student anonymity and reduce bias hazards: identifying students by using bar codes. The limited finding suggests that the use of bar codes for assuring student anonymity could potentially cause students to perceive that grades are assigned more fairly and reassure teachers that they are…

Jae, Haeran; Cowling, John

2009-01-01

474

Global Studies: Problems and Promises for Elementary Teachers.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

This publication identifies rationale, content, and materials for teaching about world problems in the elementary school. Intended predominantly for use by classroom teachers and supervisors, the publication is also a useful resource for teacher training. It contains four chapters. Chapter I, A Perspective on Global Studies, reviews the historical…

Overly, Norman V., Ed.; Kimpston, Richard D., Ed.

475

Dynamic Assessment and Giftedness: The Promise of Assessing Training Responsiveness.  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Dynamic assessment is presented as a method of measuring intellectual ability which addresses criticisms of traditional intelligence tests. Dynamic assessment can be used to identify children's learning abilities, determine how and/or what to teach, assess giftedness in minority and poor children, control for individual differences, and explore…

Bolig, Erika E.; Day, Jeanne D.

1993-01-01

476

Dynamic assessment and giftedness: The promise of assessing training responsiveness  

Microsoft Academic Search

Dynamic assessment is presented as an alternative method of measuring intellectual ability, and ways in which dynamic assessment addresses common criticisms of traditional intelligence tests are discussed. Dynamic assessment can be used to identify children's learning abilities, determine how and\\/or what to teach, assess giftedness in minority and poor children, control for individual differences, and explore different domains of giftedness

Erika E. Bolig; Jeanne D. Day

1993-01-01

477

Genetic susceptibility to coronary artery disease: from promise to progress  

Microsoft Academic Search

Family history is an important independent risk factor for coronary artery disease (CAD), and identification of susceptibility genes for this common, complex disease is a vital goal. Although there has been considerable success in identifying genetic variants that influence well-known risk factors, such as cholesterol levels, progress in unearthing novel CAD genes has been slow. However, advances are now being

Martin Farrall; Hugh Watkins

2006-01-01

478

Aptamer-based analysis: a promising alternative for food safety control.  

PubMed

Ensuring food safety is nowadays a top priority of authorities and professional players in the food supply chain. One of the key challenges to determine the safety of food and guarantee a high level of consumer protection is the availability of fast, sensitive and reliable analytical methods to identify specific hazards associated to food before they become a health problem. The limitations of existing methods have encouraged the development of new technologies, among them biosensors. Success in biosensor design depends largely on the development of novel receptors with enhanced affinity to the target, while being stable and economical. Aptamers fulfill these characteristics, and thus have surfaced as promising alternatives to natural receptors. This Review describes analytical strategies developed so far using aptamers for the control of pathogens, allergens, adulterants, toxins and other forbidden contaminants to ensure food safety. The main progresses to date are presented, highlighting potential prospects for the future. PMID:24287543

Amaya-González, Sonia; de-los-Santos-Alvarez, Noemí; Miranda-Ordieres, Arturo J; Lobo-Castañón, Maria Jesús

2013-01-01

479

Aptamer-Based Analysis: A Promising Alternative for Food Safety Control  

PubMed Central

Ensuring food safety is nowadays a top priority of authorities and professional players in the food supply chain. One of the key challenges to determine the safety of food and guarantee a high level of consumer protection is the availability of fast, sensitive and reliable analytical methods to identify specific hazards associated to food before they become a health problem. The limitations of existing methods have encouraged the development of new technologies, among them biosensors. Success in biosensor design depends largely on the development of novel receptors with enhanced affinity to the target, while being stable and economical. Aptamers fulfill these characteristics, and thus have surfaced as promising alternatives to natural receptors. This Review describes analytical strategies developed so far using aptamers for the control of pathogens, allergens, adulterants, toxins and other forbidden contaminants to ensure food safety. The main progresses to date are presented, highlighting potential prospects for the future. PMID:24287543

Amaya-Gonzalez, Sonia; de-los-Santos-Alvarez, Noemi; Miranda-Ordieres, Arturo J.; Lobo-Castanon, Maria Jesus

2013-01-01

480