Sample records for identify promising practices

  1. Successful Bilingual Education Programs: Development and the Dissemination of Criteria To Identify Promising and Exemplary Practices in Bilingual Education at the National Level.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robledo Montecel, Maria; Cortez, Josie Danini

    2002-01-01

    A study examined 10 exemplary bilingual educational programs to identify characteristics that contributed to the high academic performance of their students. Twenty-five indicators of success were identified in the areas of school leadership, support, and instructional practices. All 10 programs were committed to maintaining students' primary…

  2. Promising Practices in Community Colleges

    E-print Network

    2010-01-01

    ESL program at City College of San Francisco (CCSF)  79 Accelerated Careers in Technology (ESL faculty and staff.   Vocational Program   Accelerated Careers in Technology (ESL program at CCSF where  program practices help close the achievement  gap.     Accelerated Careers in  Technology (

  3. Promising Practices in Drug Treatment: Findings from Southeast Asia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Libretto, Salvatore; Nemes, Susanna; Namur, Jenny; Garrett, Gerald; Hess, Lauren; Kaplan, Linda

    2005-01-01

    In a study to evaluate the drug treatment and aftercare efforts sponsored by the State Department's International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs Bureau, residential Therapeutic Community (TC) treatment programs in three countries in Southeast Asia--Malaysia, Singapore, and Thailand--were examined to identify promising practices and to…

  4. Promising Practices in Drug Treatment: Findings from Europe

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nemes, Susanna; Libretto, Salvatore; Skinstad, Anne Helene; Garrett, Gerald; Hoffman, Jeffrey A.

    2005-01-01

    In a study to evaluate the drug treatment and aftercare efforts sponsored by the State Department's International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs Bureau, residential Therapeutic Community (TC) treatment programs in four European countries-Poland, Spain, Slovenia, and Italy-were examined to identify promising practices and to assess lessons…

  5. Using Multimedia to Introduce Your Promising Practice. Supported Education: A Promising Practice. Evidence-Based Practices KIT (Knowledge Informing Transformation)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Unger, Karen V.

    2011-01-01

    Supported Education is a promising practice that helps people with mental illnesses who are interested in education and training return to school. Current research shows that Supported Education has demonstrated results. While more research is needed, Supported Education services show promise of becoming an evidence-based practice. Education…

  6. Promising Practices: Vocational Education Resource Package.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evaluation and Training Inst., Los Angeles, CA.

    Developed to assist community college administrators and faculty in enhancing vocational educational programs and services, this Vocational Education Resource Package profiles four vocational education programs at California community colleges that show promise in serving special population students. First, the Applied Mathematics for Electronics…

  7. What If? Promising Practices for Improving Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunn, Rita, Ed.; Griggs, Shirley A., Ed.

    2007-01-01

    Today, there is little deviation from the standard, business-as-usual practices in the world of education. This book challenges these stale practices and asks the important questions that can improve schools beyond the current state of mediocrity. Written for administrators, supervisors, teachers, parents--even politicians and corporate…

  8. Women in CS @ HMC: Three Promising Practices

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Five years after introducing three key recruitment and retention strategies, women now make up around 42% of Harvey Mudd Collegeâ??s computer science program. In this Google Tech Talk video, Christine Alvarado shares the three practices Harvey Mudd College implemented to increase the number of women in their CS program: 1) new curriculum for CS1, 2) scholarship trips for female freshman to the Grace Hopper Celebration of Women in Computer Science, and 3) hands-on research projects for female sophomore CS students.

  9. Promising Practices for Connecting High School to the Real World.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blank, W. E., Ed.; Harwell, Sandra, Ed.

    This monograph, containing 24 articles by 11 authors, describes a number of practices that have shown promise for better connecting high school with the broader world beyond school. The monograph begins with "Connecting High School with the Real World" (Sandi Harwell, William Blank), which discusses the concept of "real life" and various ways of…

  10. Promising practices for faculty in accelerated nursing programs.

    PubMed

    Rico, Janet Sweeney; Beal, Judy; Davies, Terry

    2010-03-01

    Accelerated nursing programs for college graduates have been graduating RNs since 1971. The question of how best to educate this cohort is a concern and even more of a priority because these students have different learning needs. Anecdotally, faculty know accelerated students tend to be challenging to teach. Administrators of nursing programs also are aware that some faculty prefers teaching this cohort and other faculty does not. This descriptive qualitative study collected data during focus groups using an open-ended interview guide. The focus groups consisted of accelerated second-degree nursing students. Participants identified six themes as best faculty practices: appreciate accelerated students as adult learners, communicate passion for the profession, challenge and motivate, practice while teaching and share their experiences, support accelerated students, and use varied teaching styles. PMID:20143760

  11. Getting Started with Evidence-Based and Promising Practices. Supported Education: A Promising Practice. Evidence-Based Practices KIT (Knowledge Informing Transformation)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Unger, Karen V.

    2011-01-01

    Within a system, change affects stakeholders differently. Consequently, when making changes in the mental health system, mental health agencies should expect varied reactions from staff, community members, consumers, and families. Since misunderstandings can stymie efforts to implement evidence-based and promising practices, it is important to…

  12. Vocational Improvement Practices. Promising Practices in Connecticut Vocational and Adult Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connecticut State Board of Education, Hartford.

    This compendium provides information concerning promising methods and techniques in vocational and adult education in Connecticut during the 1984-85 school year. It is targeted at educators who wish to improve their own vocational and adult education programs and services. Practices described in the document were selected by a panel of educators…

  13. Enhancing Parent-Child Interactions through Home Visiting: Promising Practice or Unfulfilled Promise?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, C. A.; Luze, G. L.; Eshbaugh, E. M.; Hyun-Joo, J.; Kantz, K. R.

    2007-01-01

    Many intervention programs use home visiting to target enhanced parent-child interactions; however, few studies have examined specific intervention strategies, limiting the potential utility of evaluation results to guide practice, research, or policy effectively. In this paper, we recommend that researchers and program evaluators open the "black…

  14. Identifying, analysing and solving problems in practice.

    PubMed

    Hewitt-Taylor, Jaqui

    When a problem is identified in practice, it is important to clarify exactly what it is and establish the cause before seeking a solution. This solution-seeking process should include input from those directly involved in the problematic situation, to enable individuals to contribute their perspective, appreciate why any change in practice is necessary and what will be achieved by the change. This article describes some approaches to identifying and analysing problems in practice so that effective solutions can be devised. It includes a case study and examples of how the Five Whys analysis, fishbone diagram, problem tree analysis, and Seven-S Model can be used to analyse a problem. PMID:22848969

  15. Promising Afterschool Practices: A Showcase of Innovative, Creative and Successful Afterschool Programs. Fourth Annual

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Institute on Out-of-School Time, 2009

    2009-01-01

    A "Promising Practice" is a system, process, or activity in a program that works and leads to good results. It is something that would work in other programs, if only they were aware about it. "Promising Practices" capture some of the most innovative, creative and successful ways that programs serve youth. This publication provides a selection of…

  16. Assessing Leadership Dispositions: Issues, Challenges, and Promising Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, James; Chirichello, Michael; Mallory, Barbara; Melton, Teri; Lindahl, Ronald

    2011-01-01

    Although researchers have succeeded in identifying knowledge and skills and personal traits and characteristics of effective leaders, they have not been nearly as successful in identifying or defining those elusive leadership qualities that fall into the affective domain--what the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE)…

  17. The Practice and Promise of Prison Programming. Research Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawrence, Sarah; Mears, Daniel P.; Dubin, Glenn; Travis, Jeremy

    This study focused on employment-related programs in prison, exploring what the research literature tells about the effectiveness of prison-based education, vocational training, and prison industry on postrelease outcomes. Also studied was the state of practice of such programs and strategic opportunities for improving existing employment-related…

  18. A Community College and Employer Partnership. Promising Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Community College Research and Leadership, 2010

    2010-01-01

    As a pilot site selected to participate in Illinois' Shifting Gears (SG) initiative in 2007, Oakton Community College (OCC) partnered with Presbyterian Homes to develop a bridge course to prepare a cadre of their employed Certified Nurse Assistants (CNAs) to enter college-credit level prerequisite courses to a Practical Nursing program. Oakton…

  19. Kaleidoscope 3; A Descriptive Collection of Promising Educational Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Patricia R.; Powell, Helen

    Innovative programs taking place in Massachusetts elementary and secondary schools in the areas of school environment, exceptional children, curriculum areas, and wholesale experimentation, are described in this issue. Project descriptions provide background, objectives, practices, and indications of success, as well as contacts for information…

  20. Engaging Women in Computer Science and Engineering: Promising Practices for Promoting Gender Equity in Undergraduate Research Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Karen A.; Fann, Amy J.; Misa-Escalante, Kimberly O.

    2011-01-01

    Building on research that identifies and addresses issues of women's underrepresentation in computing, this article describes promising practices in undergraduate research experiences that promote women's long-term interest in computer science and engineering. Specifically, this article explores whether and how REU programs include programmatic…

  1. The Promise of Mindfulness for Clinical Practice Education

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Annemarie Gockel

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews the recent trend in mindfulness-based psychotherapies and explores the utility of mindfulness training for clinical practice education. It presents the current literature and evidence suggesting that mindfulness training may provide a vehicle to foster essential clinical skills and attitudes, increase self-care and reduce the impact of occupational stress, and prepare students to understand and use mindfulness-based interventions

  2. The Promise of the Affordable Care Act, the Practical Realities of Implementation

    E-print Network

    Militzer, Burkhard

    The Promise of the Affordable Care Act, the Practical Realities of Implementation: Maintaining coverage under the Affordable Care Act for individuals and families who lose health insurance because of a work or life transition. INTRODUCTION The promise of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) is that if someone

  3. Promising Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piland, William E.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Examines selected programs and methodologies in multicultural education designed to foster greater understanding of diverse cultures and lessen racial, class, and gender biases. Highlighted programs include a doctoral program in multicultural education and a staff development program for dealing with workplace diversity. Guidelines for eliminating…

  4. Seeing is Believing: Promising Practices for How School Districts Promote Family Engagement. Issue Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westmoreland, Helen; Rosenberg, Heidi M.; Lopez, M. Elena; Weiss, Heather

    2009-01-01

    Harvard Family Research Project (HFRP) and the National Parent-Teacher Association (PTA) have teamed up to bring you a ground-breaking policy brief that examines the role of school districts in promoting family engagement. "Seeing is Believing: Promising Practices for How School Districts Promote Family Engagement" spotlights how six school…

  5. Educating Emotionally Disturbed Children--Promising Practices. Journal within a Journal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michael, Robert, Ed.

    1987-01-01

    Seven articles by educators with a variety of perspectives examine promising educational practices for use with children having emotional disturbances. Lee Bell offers strategies for using group activities in "All Together Now: Group Techniques for Teaching Students with Emotional Disturbances." Lyn Sarda and Rik Flynn discuss benefits and…

  6. Education for Civic Engagement in Democracy: Service Learning and Other Promising Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mann, Sheilah, Ed.; Patrick, John J., Ed.

    This collection of essays and references addresses the problem of the disengagement in public affairs and politics by U.S. youth and young adults. The collection brings together evidence of youth disengagement and reports on promising practices for civic education. Several chapters are devoted to research findings on the impact of service and…

  7. Promising Practices in Professional Growth & Support: "Case Study of Achievement First"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Resource Strategies, 2013

    2013-01-01

    Four organizations with promising practices in teacher Professional Growth & Support have significantly raised outcomes for low-income students. The charter management networks, Achievement First and Aspire Public Schools, and the two reform organizations, Teach Plus and Agile Mind, have successfully increased student achievement with a…

  8. Promising Practices in Professional Growth & Support: "Case Study of Agile Mind"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Education Resource Strategies, 2013

    2013-01-01

    Four organizations with promising practices in teacher Professional Growth & Support have significantly raised outcomes for low-income students. The charter management networks, Achievement First and Aspire Public Schools, and the two reform organizations, Teach Plus and Agile Mind, have successfully increased student achievement with a…

  9. Excellence and Equity for Language Minority Students: Critical Issues and Promising Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basterra, Maria del Rosario, Ed.

    The chapters in this collection provide the reader with a unified and systemic framework in which issues of excellence and equity are presented and discussed. The publication is structured to address critical issues and promising practices for linguistically and culturally diverse students in the areas of instruction, assessment, and parent…

  10. Childhood executive function inventory (CHEXI): a promising measure for identifying young children with ADHD?

    PubMed

    Thorell, Lisa B; Eninger, Lilianne; Brocki, Karin C; Bohlin, Gunilla

    2010-01-01

    The present study investigated whether the Childhood Executive Function Inventory (CHEXI) can discriminate between young children fulfilling the diagnostic criteria for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and normally developing children. Unlike other executive function rating instruments, the CHEXI focuses specifically on inhibitory control and working memory, without including items that overlap with the diagnostic criteria of ADHD. The CHEXI was found to discriminate very well between children fulfilling the criteria for ADHD and normally developing children, also when controlling for the effect of IQ and socioeconomic status (SES). Both sensitivity and specificity of the two CHEXI subscales were shown to be high using either parent or teacher ratings. The highest overall classification rate was found for parent ratings on the inhibition subscale, with sensitivity and specificity reaching 93.3. To summarize, the CHEXI should be considered a promising measure for identifying young children with ADHD, although it is for future research to determine whether the CHEXI can be successfully used to also discriminate between different psychopathological groups. PMID:19381995

  11. Best Practices for Identifying Gifted Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnsen, Susan K.

    2009-01-01

    Parents often go to principals to ask for help in supporting their gifted children. They may request acceleration for their child in mathematics, a specialized curriculum or course, extracurricular activities, a pullout program, or even a different teacher. Since misconceptions about identifying gifted students are prevalent, it's important that…

  12. The Evidence. Supported Education: A Promising Practice. Evidence-Based Practices KIT (Knowledge Informing Transformation)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Unger, Karen V.

    2011-01-01

    Supported Employment is an evidence-based practice that helps people with mental illness find and keep meaningful jobs in the community. Given these outcomes the challenge for Supported Employment programs is to rethink the emphasis on immediate work for everyone and help consumers utilize appropriate education and training opportunities available…

  13. Training Frontline Staff. Supported Education: A Promising Practice. Evidence-Based Practices KIT (Knowledge Informing Transformation)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Unger, Karen V.

    2011-01-01

    This four-part workbook will help program leaders teach education specialists the principles, processes, and skills necessary to deliver effective Supported Education services. The workbook includes the following: (1) Basic elements and practice principles of Supported Education; (2) Knowledge and skills to help consumers make informed choices…

  14. ASSESSMENT OF PROMISING FOREST MANAGEMENT PRACTICES AND TECHNOLOGIES FOR ENHANCING THE CONSERVATION AND SEQUESTRATION OF ATMOSPHERIC CARBON AND THEIR COSTS AT SITE LEVEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objectives of this report are to assess and synthesize current knowledge on three policy-science topics: ) Identify promising technologies and practices that could be utilized at technically suitable sites in the world to manage forests and agroforestry systems for sequesteri...

  15. Bonded labour practice in Nepal the promise of education as a magnet of child bondedness.

    PubMed

    Giri, Birendra Raj

    2010-01-01

    This article highlights that in Nepal, the promise of education seems to have become a magnet of child bondedness. After some government intervention in 2000, the haliya and kamaiya bonded labour practices have become a socially stigmatising matter for adults, and a legal hurdle for kisan (landlord) employers, but the practices continue. Both parties to these bonded labour practices seem to have found the idea of education as a safe meeting point. While parents send their children to work with the hope of obtaining education for them, besides other material benefits, employers seek to pay as little as possible and will often not give sufficient time to their young workers to study. Though most children have little or no say during the contract, they, too, are initially attracted by the promise of education. Based on detailed fieldwork, this article explores to what extent the largely unfulfilled educational aspirations for Musahar and Tharu working children can be seen as a restrained form of empowerment or a continuing system of bonded labour in Nepal. PMID:20648975

  16. Gene prioritization aims to identify the most promising genes (or proteins) among a larger pool of candidates

    E-print Network

    Gene prioritization aims to identify the most promising genes (or proteins) among a larger pool for prioritization are useful at several stages of any gene-hunting process. These bioinformatics tools were on a few of the most likely candidate genes1­3 . For instance, a linkage analysis on patients

  17. Understanding Evidence-Based Information for the Early Childhood Field: Tips from RAND's Promising Practices Network

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattox, Teryn; Kilburn, M. Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    With the growing and diverse use of the term "evidence-based practice" it can be difficult for policymakers, funders, program officers, and other professionals to separate the good evidence from the flawed. Furthermore, once good evidence has been identified, it can be difficult to know how to use it. This article discusses key issues to consider…

  18. The Promise of Virtual Teams: Identifying Key Factors in Effectiveness and Failure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horwitz, Frank M.; Bravington, Desmond; Silvis, Ulrik

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of the investigation is to identify enabling and disenabling factors in the development and operation of virtual teams; to evaluate the importance of factors such as team development, cross-cultural variables, leadership, communication and social cohesion as contributors to virtual team effectiveness. Design/methodology/approach:…

  19. Enacting the ‘neuro’ in practice: Translational research, adhesion and the promise of porosity

    PubMed Central

    Michael, Mike

    2014-01-01

    This article attends to the processes through which neuroscience and the neuro are enacted in a specific context: a translational neuroscience research group that was the setting of an ethnographic study. The article therefore provides a close-up perspective on the intersection of neuroscience and translational research. In the scientific setting we studied, the neuro was multiple and irreducible to any particular entity or set of practices across a laboratory and clinical divide. Despite this multiplicity, the group’s work was held together through the ‘promise of porosity’ – that one day there would be translation of lab findings into clinically effective intervention. This promise was embodied in the figure of the Group Leader whose expertise spanned clinical and basic neurosciences. This is theorized in terms of a contrast between cohesion and adhesion in interdisciplinary groupings. We end by speculating on the role of ‘vivification’ – in our case mediated by the Group Leader – in rendering ‘alive’ the expectations of interdisciplinary collaboration. PMID:25362829

  20. Partnership and measurement: the promise, practice and theory of a successful health social networking strategy.

    PubMed

    Montague, Terrence; Nemis-White, Joanna; Cochrane, Bonnie; Meisner, Janice; Trasler, Tessa

    2013-01-01

    Patient health management (PHM) was launched as a promising paradigm to close care gaps, the inequities between usual and best care, for whole patient populations. PHM's core premise was that interventions of multidisciplinary, community-oriented partnerships that used repeated measurement and feedback of provider practices, clinical and economic outcomes and general communication of relevant health knowledge to all stakeholders would continuously make things better. This article reviews the evolution of PHM from its genesis in a series of casual hospital-based networks to its maturation in a province-wide, community-focused, clustered-lattice social network that facilitated the improved clinical and cost-efficient care and outcomes of whole patient populations. The factors underlying PHM's clinical and cost efficacy, specifically its patient-centric social networking structures and integral measurement and knowledge translation processes, offer continuing promise to optimally manage the care of our increasingly aged patient populations, with their high burden of chronic diseases and disproportionately large care gaps. In an era when patients are demanding and leading change, and governments are struggling fiscally, PHM's clinical efficacy and cost-efficiency are especially resonant. Things can be better. PMID:24863305

  1. Mining pesticide use data to identify best management practices

    E-print Network

    Zhang, Minghua

    Mining pesticide use data to identify best management practices Emily Oakley1, *, Minghua Zhang1, CA 95616, USA. 2 California Department of Pesticide Regulation, Sacramento, CA 95814, USA. 3 growers using the California Pesticide Use Reports (PUR) database. Analysis was performed for prunes

  2. Case Study of Manor New Tech High School: Promising Practices in STEM Education for Comprehensive High Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gourgey, Hannah; Asiabanpour, Bahram; Fenimore, Carol

    2010-01-01

    The following paper culminates a year of research conducted by researchers at E[superscript 3] Alliance and Texas State University and sponsored by the National Science Foundation. The following reports on promising practices observed and reported at Manor New Tech High School (MNTH), a Texas Science Technology Engineering Mathematics (T-STEM)…

  3. A Historical Perspective on Title VII Bilingual Education Projects in Hawai'i: Compendium of Promising Practices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pablo, Josephine Dicsen; Ongteco, Belen C.; Koki, Stan

    This paper reviews the history of Title VII bilingual education in Hawaii for the purpose of sharing promising practices that have emerged. The implementation of these models in Hawaii has resulted in such outcomes as the following: (1) improvement in students' English language skills; (2) improvement in students' academic achievement; (3)…

  4. Using the integrative model of behavioral prediction to identify promising message strategies to promote healthy sleep behavior among college students.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Rebecca; Niederdeppe, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    This research used the Integrative Model of Behavioral Prediction (IMBP) to examine cognitive predictors of intentions to engage in healthy sleep behavior among a population of college students. In doing so, we identify promising message strategies to increase healthy sleep behavior during college. In Phase 1, members of a small sample of undergraduates (n = 31) were asked to describe their beliefs about expected outcomes, norms, and perceived behavioral control associated with sleep on an open-ended questionnaire. We analyzed these qualitative responses to create a closed-ended survey about sleep-related attitudes, perceived norms, control beliefs, behavioral intentions, and behavior. In Phase 2, a larger sample of undergraduate students (n = 365) completed the survey. Attitudes and perceived behavioral control were the strongest predictors of both intentions to engage in sleep behavior and self-reported sleep behavior. Control beliefs associated with time management and stress also had substantial room to change, suggesting their potential as message strategies to better promote healthy sleep behavior in college. We conclude with a broader discussion of the study's implications for message design and intervention. PMID:24446927

  5. Power and promise of narrative for advancing physical therapist education and practice.

    PubMed

    Greenfield, Bruce H; Jensen, Gail M; Delany, Clare M; Mostrom, Elizabeth; Knab, Mary; Jampel, Ann

    2015-06-01

    This perspective article provides a justification for and an overview of the use of narrative as a pedagogical tool for educators to help physical therapist students, residents, and clinicians develop skills of reflection and reflexivity in clinical practice. The use of narratives is a pedagogical approach that provides a reflective and interpretive framework for analyzing and making sense of texts, stories, and other experiences within learning environments. This article describes reflection as a well-established method to support critical analysis of clinical experiences; to assist in uncovering different perspectives of patients, families, and health care professionals involved in patient care; and to broaden the epistemological basis (ie, sources of knowledge) for clinical practice. The article begins by examining how phronetic (ie, practical and contextual) knowledge and ethical knowledge are used in physical therapy to contribute to evidence-based practice. Narrative is explored as a source of phronetic and ethical knowledge that is complementary but irreducible to traditional objective and empirical knowledge-the type of clinical knowledge that forms the basis of scientific training. The central premise is that writing narratives is a cognitive skill that should be learned and practiced to develop critical reflection for expert practice. The article weaves theory with practical application and strategies to foster narrative in education and practice. The final section of the article describes the authors' experiences with examples of integrating the tools of narrative into an educational program, into physical therapist residency programs, and into a clinical practice. PMID:25524869

  6. Promising practices for delivery of court-supervised substance abuse treatment: Perspectives from six high-performing California counties operating Proposition 36

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Elizabeth; Anglin, M. Douglas; Urada, Darren; Yang, Joy

    2010-01-01

    Operative for nearly a decade, California's voter-initiated Proposition 36 program offers many offenders community-based substance abuse treatment in lieu of likely incarceration. Research has documented program successes and plans for replication have proliferated, yet very little is known about how the Proposition 36 program works or practices for achieving optimal program outcomes. In this article, we identify policies and practices that key stakeholders perceive to be most responsible for the successful delivery of court-supervised substance abuse treatment to offenders under Proposition 36. Data was collected via focus groups conducted with 59 county stakeholders in six high-performing counties during 2009. Discussion was informed by seven empirical indicators of program performance and outcomes and was focused on identifying and describing elements contributing to success. Program success was primarily attributed to four strategies, those that: (1) fostered program engagement, monitored participant progress, and sustained cooperation among participants; (2) cultivated buy-in among key stakeholders; (3) capitalized on the role of the court and the judge; and (4) created a setting which promoted a high-quality treatment system, utilization of existing resources, and broad financial and political support for the program. Goals and practices for implementing each strategy are discussed. Findings provide a “promising practices” resource for Proposition 36 program evaluation and improvement and inform the design and study of other similar types of collaborative justice treatment efforts. PMID:20965568

  7. The Red Book and the Practice of Environmental Public Health: Promise, Pitfalls, and Progress

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thomas A. Burke

    2003-01-01

    This paper examines the impact of the National Research Council's report Risk Assessment in the Federal Government: Managing the Process, known as the “Red Book,” on the practice of risk assessment, risk management, and the education of public health and risk professionals. The four-step approach to risk assessment was broadly adopted by the regulatory community and has a profound impact

  8. GLOBAL ASSESSMENT OF PROMISING FOREST MANAGEMENT PRACTICES FOR SEQUESTRATION OF CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    The assessment produced productivity and cost data for forest and agroforestry management practices in 94 nations. hat is, out of a total of 140 nations in the world with forest resources, about two-thirds are represented in the database at present. he total forest and woodland a...

  9. Innovative Contextualized Curriculum for a CNA to LPN Bridge Course. Promising Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Community College Research and Leadership, 2010

    2010-01-01

    As a pilot site selected to participate in Illinois' Shifting Gears (SG) initiative in 2007, Oakton Community College (OCC) partnered with Presbyterian Homes to develop a bridge course to prepare a cadre of their employed Certified Nursing Assistants (CNAs) to enter college-credit prerequisite courses to a Practical Nursing program. Oakton…

  10. From Person-in-Environment to Strengths: The Promise of Postmodern Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dybicz, Phillip

    2015-01-01

    Social work relies heavily on its value base to guide practice; however, there are no conceptual models--on par with person-in-environment (PIE)--to describe how these values are implemented within an evidence-based approach. However, the philosophical foundation of empiricism and positivism that lends PIE its strength also brings with it inherent…

  11. Research-Practice Interactions as Reported in Recent Design Studies: Still Promising, Still Hazy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ormel, Bart J. B.; Pareja Roblin, Natalie N.; McKenney, Susan E.; Voogt, Joke M.; Pieters, Jules M.

    2012-01-01

    This study portrays recent research-practice connections found in 18 design research reports focusing on the creation of instructional solutions. Solutions in different stages of development varied greatly in duration, ranging from one lesson to a whole year curriculum, spanned all levels of education, many subjects (science, math, language,…

  12. A decade of research and development in disability, virtual reality and associated technologies: promise or practice?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S V G Cobb; P M Sharkey

    The International Conference on Disability, Virtual Reality and Associated Technologies (ICDVRAT) this year holds its sixth biennial conference and celebrates ten years of research and development in this field. A total of 180 papers have been presented at the first five conferences, addressing potential, development, exploration and examination of how these technologies can be applied in disabilities research and practice.

  13. Collaborative supply chain management : The most promising practice for building efficient and sustainable supply chains

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mohsen Attaran; Sharmin Attaran

    2007-01-01

    Purpose – The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of contemporary supply-chain management systems. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – The paper highlights the examples of state-of-the-art practice in supply-chain management, and speculates about where this movement is headed. Some of the collaborative supply chain management products generating the most interest will also be examined. Findings – Collaborative planning, forecasting and

  14. Resource Guide on Racial Profiling Data Collections Systems: Promising Practices and Lessons Learned

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Farrell, Amy.

    2000-01-01

    Prepared by staff at Northeastern University for the US Department of Justice, this report is a resource guide on racial profiling. The report offers an overview of the nature of racial profiling; gives information on data collection and its purpose; describes current activities in California, New Jersey, North Carolina, and Great Britain; and offers some recommendations for the future. Non-specialists may not be interested in the particulars of data collection, but the report still contains much of interest to anyone concerned with racial profiling and efforts to stop the practice.

  15. The Promise of Response to Intervention: Evaluating Current Science and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glover, Todd A., Ed.; Vaughn, Sharon, Ed.

    2010-01-01

    As response to intervention (RTI) is adopted by increasing numbers of schools and districts, knowledge about "what works" continues to grow. This much-needed book analyzes the key components of RTI service delivery and identifies the characteristics of successful implementation. Critically reviewing the available research, leading authorities…

  16. Identifying and Extinguishing Dysfunctional and Deadly Organizational Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mawhinney, Thomas C.

    2009-01-01

    It is possible to define an organization's culture in terms of its dominant behavioral practices and their molar consequences, from the shop floor to the executive suite (Redmon & Mason, 2001). Dysfunctional and potentially deadly practices (for the organization as a whole) can be "latent." They often go undetected until their dramatic…

  17. Immersive Virtual Environment Technology: A Promising Tool for Future Social and Behavioral Genomics Research and Practice

    PubMed Central

    Persky, Susan; McBride, Colleen M.

    2009-01-01

    Social and behavioral research needs to get started now if we are to direct genomic discoveries to address pressing public health problems. Advancing social and behavioral science will require innovative and rigorous communication methodologies that move us beyond reliance on traditional tools and their inherent limitations. One such emerging research tool is immersive virtual environment technology (aka: virtual reality), a methodology that gives researchers the ability to maintain high experimental control and mundane realism of scenarios, portray and manipulate complex, abstract objects and concepts, and implement innovative implicit behavioral measurement. This report suggests the role that immersive virtual environment technology can play in furthering future research in genomics-related: education, decision-making, test intentions, behavior change, and healthcare provider behaviors. Practical implementation and challenges are also discussed. PMID:20183376

  18. Natural capital and ecosystem services informing decisions: From promise to practice.

    PubMed

    Guerry, Anne D; Polasky, Stephen; Lubchenco, Jane; Chaplin-Kramer, Rebecca; Daily, Gretchen C; Griffin, Robert; Ruckelshaus, Mary; Bateman, Ian J; Duraiappah, Anantha; Elmqvist, Thomas; Feldman, Marcus W; Folke, Carl; Hoekstra, Jon; Kareiva, Peter M; Keeler, Bonnie L; Li, Shuzhuo; McKenzie, Emily; Ouyang, Zhiyun; Reyers, Belinda; Ricketts, Taylor H; Rockström, Johan; Tallis, Heather; Vira, Bhaskar

    2015-06-16

    The central challenge of the 21st century is to develop economic, social, and governance systems capable of ending poverty and achieving sustainable levels of population and consumption while securing the life-support systems underpinning current and future human well-being. Essential to meeting this challenge is the incorporation of natural capital and the ecosystem services it provides into decision-making. We explore progress and crucial gaps at this frontier, reflecting upon the 10 y since the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment. We focus on three key dimensions of progress and ongoing challenges: raising awareness of the interdependence of ecosystems and human well-being, advancing the fundamental interdisciplinary science of ecosystem services, and implementing this science in decisions to restore natural capital and use it sustainably. Awareness of human dependence on nature is at an all-time high, the science of ecosystem services is rapidly advancing, and talk of natural capital is now common from governments to corporate boardrooms. However, successful implementation is still in early stages. We explore why ecosystem service information has yet to fundamentally change decision-making and suggest a path forward that emphasizes: (i) developing solid evidence linking decisions to impacts on natural capital and ecosystem services, and then to human well-being; (ii) working closely with leaders in government, business, and civil society to develop the knowledge, tools, and practices necessary to integrate natural capital and ecosystem services into everyday decision-making; and (iii) reforming institutions to change policy and practices to better align private short-term goals with societal long-term goals. PMID:26082539

  19. Natural capital and ecosystem services informing decisions: From promise to practice

    PubMed Central

    Guerry, Anne D.; Polasky, Stephen; Lubchenco, Jane; Chaplin-Kramer, Rebecca; Daily, Gretchen C.; Griffin, Robert; Ruckelshaus, Mary; Bateman, Ian J.; Duraiappah, Anantha; Elmqvist, Thomas; Feldman, Marcus W.; Folke, Carl; Hoekstra, Jon; Kareiva, Peter M.; Keeler, Bonnie L.; Li, Shuzhuo; McKenzie, Emily; Ouyang, Zhiyun; Reyers, Belinda; Ricketts, Taylor H.; Rockström, Johan; Tallis, Heather; Vira, Bhaskar

    2015-01-01

    The central challenge of the 21st century is to develop economic, social, and governance systems capable of ending poverty and achieving sustainable levels of population and consumption while securing the life-support systems underpinning current and future human well-being. Essential to meeting this challenge is the incorporation of natural capital and the ecosystem services it provides into decision-making. We explore progress and crucial gaps at this frontier, reflecting upon the 10 y since the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment. We focus on three key dimensions of progress and ongoing challenges: raising awareness of the interdependence of ecosystems and human well-being, advancing the fundamental interdisciplinary science of ecosystem services, and implementing this science in decisions to restore natural capital and use it sustainably. Awareness of human dependence on nature is at an all-time high, the science of ecosystem services is rapidly advancing, and talk of natural capital is now common from governments to corporate boardrooms. However, successful implementation is still in early stages. We explore why ecosystem service information has yet to fundamentally change decision-making and suggest a path forward that emphasizes: (i) developing solid evidence linking decisions to impacts on natural capital and ecosystem services, and then to human well-being; (ii) working closely with leaders in government, business, and civil society to develop the knowledge, tools, and practices necessary to integrate natural capital and ecosystem services into everyday decision-making; and (iii) reforming institutions to change policy and practices to better align private short-term goals with societal long-term goals. PMID:26082539

  20. Promising Practices: School to Career and Postsecondary Education for Foster Care Youth. A Guide for Policymakers and Practitioners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Workforce Strategy Center, Brooklyn, NY.

    Focus of this guide is a project to identify best practices and programs in preparing foster care youth for career opportunities and economic self-sufficiency. Foster care program context is described as an economy characterized by jobs clustering into two categories (high wage positions with a continuing career pathway and low wage entry-level…

  1. A collaborative accountable care model in three practices showed promising early results on costs and quality of care.

    PubMed

    Salmon, Richard B; Sanderson, Mark I; Walters, Barbara A; Kennedy, Karen; Flores, Robert C; Muney, Alan M

    2012-11-01

    Cigna's Collaborative Accountable Care initiative provides financial incentives to physician groups and integrated delivery systems to improve the quality and efficiency of care for patients in commercial open-access benefit plans. Registered nurses who serve as care coordinators employed by participating practices are a central feature of the initiative. They use patient-specific reports and practice performance reports provided by Cigna to improve care coordination, identify and close care gaps, and address other opportunities for quality improvement. We report interim quality and cost results for three geographically and structurally diverse provider practices in Arizona, New Hampshire, and Texas. Although not statistically significant, these early results revealed favorable trends in total medical costs and quality of care, suggesting that a shared-savings accountable care model and collaborative support from the payer can enable practices to take meaningful steps toward full accountability for care quality and efficiency. PMID:23129667

  2. Promising Practices in CTS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Dept. of Education, Edmonton. Curriculum Standards Branch.

    This document contains 85 articles taken from previously published issues of the "CTS Communication Network Update," a publication about the career and technology studies (CTS) program of career education designed for Alberta, Canada, high school juniors and seniors. Following an introductory section and a section on general CTS, the document…

  3. From Promise to Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spear, Richard

    2008-01-01

    For the last year, an independent panel chaired by Sir Adrian Webb has been evaluating the role of the further education (FE) sector in the delivery of education, lifelong learning, and skills in Wales. The challenges facing the panel were considerable and its remit broader than that of the Foster review in England. In response, the final report…

  4. Genome Wide Association Study Identifies 20 Novel Promising Genes Associated with Milk Fatty Acid Traits in Chinese Holstein

    PubMed Central

    Li, Cong; Sun, Dongxiao; Zhang, Shengli; Wang, Sheng; Wu, Xiaoping; Zhang, Qin; Liu, Lin; Li, Yanhua; Qiao, Lv

    2014-01-01

    Detecting genes associated with milk fat composition could provide valuable insights into the complex genetic networks of genes underling variation in fatty acids synthesis and point towards opportunities for changing milk fat composition via selective breeding. In this study, we conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) for 22 milk fatty acids in 784 Chinese Holstein cows with the PLINK software. Genotypes were obtained with the Illumina BovineSNP50 Bead chip and a total of 40,604 informative, high-quality single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were used. Totally, 83 genome-wide significant SNPs and 314 suggestive significant SNPs associated with 18 milk fatty acid traits were detected. Chromosome regions that affect milk fatty acid traits were mainly observed on BTA1, 2, 5, 6, 7, 9, 13, 14, 18, 19, 20, 21, 23, 26 and 27. Of these, 146 SNPs were associated with more than one milk fatty acid trait; most of studied fatty acid traits were significant associated with multiple SNPs, especially C18:0 (105 SNPs), C18 index (93 SNPs), and C14 index (84 SNPs); Several SNPs are close to or within the DGAT1, SCD1 and FASN genes which are well-known to affect milk composition traits of dairy cattle. Combined with the previously reported QTL regions and the biological functions of the genes, 20 novel promising candidates for C10:0, C12:0, C14:0, C14:1, C14 index, C18:0, C18:1n9c, C18 index, SFA, UFA and SFA/UFA were found, which composed of HTR1B, CPM, PRKG1, MINPP1, LIPJ, LIPK, EHHADH, MOGAT1, ECHS1, STAT1, SORBS1, NFKB2, AGPAT3, CHUK, OSBPL8, PRLR, IGF1R, ACSL3, GHR and OXCT1. Our findings provide a groundwork for unraveling the key genes and causal mutations affecting milk fatty acid traits in dairy cattle. PMID:24858810

  5. Genome wide association study identifies 20 novel promising genes associated with milk fatty acid traits in Chinese Holstein.

    PubMed

    Li, Cong; Sun, Dongxiao; Zhang, Shengli; Wang, Sheng; Wu, Xiaoping; Zhang, Qin; Liu, Lin; Li, Yanhua; Qiao, Lv

    2014-01-01

    Detecting genes associated with milk fat composition could provide valuable insights into the complex genetic networks of genes underling variation in fatty acids synthesis and point towards opportunities for changing milk fat composition via selective breeding. In this study, we conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) for 22 milk fatty acids in 784 Chinese Holstein cows with the PLINK software. Genotypes were obtained with the Illumina BovineSNP50 Bead chip and a total of 40,604 informative, high-quality single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were used. Totally, 83 genome-wide significant SNPs and 314 suggestive significant SNPs associated with 18 milk fatty acid traits were detected. Chromosome regions that affect milk fatty acid traits were mainly observed on BTA1, 2, 5, 6, 7, 9, 13, 14, 18, 19, 20, 21, 23, 26 and 27. Of these, 146 SNPs were associated with more than one milk fatty acid trait; most of studied fatty acid traits were significant associated with multiple SNPs, especially C18:0 (105 SNPs), C18 index (93 SNPs), and C14 index (84 SNPs); Several SNPs are close to or within the DGAT1, SCD1 and FASN genes which are well-known to affect milk composition traits of dairy cattle. Combined with the previously reported QTL regions and the biological functions of the genes, 20 novel promising candidates for C10:0, C12:0, C14:0, C14:1, C14 index, C18:0, C18:1n9c, C18 index, SFA, UFA and SFA/UFA were found, which composed of HTR1B, CPM, PRKG1, MINPP1, LIPJ, LIPK, EHHADH, MOGAT1, ECHS1, STAT1, SORBS1, NFKB2, AGPAT3, CHUK, OSBPL8, PRLR, IGF1R, ACSL3, GHR and OXCT1. Our findings provide a groundwork for unraveling the key genes and causal mutations affecting milk fatty acid traits in dairy cattle. PMID:24858810

  6. Identifying best practices in short-term eruption forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichelberger, John; Marzocchi, Warner; Papale, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    Volcano Observatory Best Practices Workshop: Near-Term Eruption Forecasting; Erice, Italy, 11-15 September 2011 Eighty volcanologists associated with volcano observatories in 27 countries gathered at the Ettore Majorana Foundation and Centre for Scientific Culture in Italy to share experiences and develop synergy in shortterm forecasting of eruptions. The meeting was conducted under the aegis of the World Organization of Volcano Observatories (WOVO); sponsored by the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV), U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), United States Agency for International Development (USAID), and International Association of Volcanology and Chemistry of the Earth's Interior (IAVCEI); and endorsed by the Group on Earth Observations (GEO) and United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (UNESCO).

  7. An algorithm to identify medical practices common to both the General Practice Research Database and The Health Improvement Network database.

    PubMed

    Cai, Bing; Xu, Weifeng; Bortnichak, Edward; Watson, Douglas J

    2012-07-01

    PURPOSE: To identify practices common to both the General Practice Research Database and The Health Improvement Network database for purposes of combining the databases for analysis without duplicate records. METHODS: We developed two independent algorithms to identify practices common to the two databases. The first used the total number of patients in the therapy and clinical data sets and the total number of etoricoxib and celecoxib users each year during the study period. The second used the total number of patients stratified by gender and four different categories of birth year. Further checking of potential matched practice pairs identified by the two algorithms was performed by comparing the patient-level medical records by birth year, dates of clinical visits, and diagnosis codes. RESULTS: Three hundred twelve potential matched pairs of practices were found by both algorithms. Fifteen additional potential pairs were matched by only one algorithm: 13 by algorithm 1 (A1) only and 2 by algorithm 2 (A2) only. The examination of the patient-level visit dates and diagnosis codes for the matches revealed that all of the 327 potential pairs of duplicate practices were in fact the same practice in the two databases. CONCLUSIONS: The two algorithms successfully found the practices common to the two different databases without de-identifying the practices. The identification of the common practices allows for combining the two databases without duplicate records to create a larger data set for analysis, with 168 more practices than when using the General Practice Research Database alone, or with 268 more practices than when using The Health Improvement Network alone. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:22544805

  8. Identifying high perceived value practices of CMMI level 2: An empirical study

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mahmood Niazi; Muhammad Ali Babar

    2009-01-01

    ObjectiveIn this paper, we present findings from an empirical study that was aimed at identifying the relative “perceived value” of CMMI level 2 specific practices based on the perceptions and experiences of practitioners of small and medium size companies. The objective of this study is to identify the extent to which a particular CMMI practice is used in order to

  9. Promising Perceptions, Divergent Practices and Barriers to Integrated Malaria Prevention in Wakiso District, Uganda: A Mixed Methods Study

    PubMed Central

    Musoke, David; Miiro, George; Karani, George; Morris, Keith; Kasasa, Simon; Ndejjo, Rawlance; Nakiyingi-Miiro, Jessica; Guwatudde, David; Musoke, Miph Boses

    2015-01-01

    Background The World Health Organization recommends use of multiple approaches to control malaria. The integrated approach to malaria prevention advocates the use of several malaria prevention methods in a holistic manner. This study assessed perceptions and practices on integrated malaria prevention in Wakiso district, Uganda. Methods A clustered cross-sectional survey was conducted among 727 households from 29 villages using both quantitative and qualitative methods. Assessment was done on awareness of various malaria prevention methods, potential for use of the methods in a holistic manner, and reasons for dislike of certain methods. Households were classified as using integrated malaria prevention if they used at least two methods. Logistic regression was used to test for factors associated with the use of integrated malaria prevention while adjusting for clustering within villages. Results Participants knew of the various malaria prevention methods in the integrated approach including use of insecticide treated nets (97.5%), removing mosquito breeding sites (89.1%), clearing overgrown vegetation near houses (97.9%), and closing windows and doors early in the evenings (96.4%). If trained, most participants (68.6%) would use all the suggested malaria prevention methods of the integrated approach. Among those who would not use all methods, the main reasons given were there being too many (70.2%) and cost (32.0%). Only 33.0% households were using the integrated approach to prevent malaria. Use of integrated malaria prevention by households was associated with reading newspapers (AOR 0.34; 95% CI 0.22 –0.53) and ownership of a motorcycle/car (AOR 1.75; 95% CI 1.03 – 2.98). Conclusion Although knowledge of malaria prevention methods was high and perceptions on the integrated approach promising, practices on integrated malaria prevention was relatively low. The use of the integrated approach can be improved by promoting use of multiple malaria prevention methods through various communication channels such as mass media. PMID:25837978

  10. Identifying Student Competencies in Macro Practice: Articulating the Practice Wisdom of Field Instructors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regehr, Cheryl; Bogo, Marion; Donovan, Kirsten; Lim, April; Anstice, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Although a growing literature examines competencies in clinical practice, competencies of students in macro social work practice have received comparatively little attention. A grounded-theory methodology was used to elicit field instructor views of student competencies in community, organization, and policy contexts. Competencies described by…

  11. Practical and theoretical aspects of adjoint parameter estimation and identifiability in meteorology and oceanography

    Microsoft Academic Search

    I. M. Navon

    1998-01-01

    The present paper has two aims. One is to survey briefly the state of the art of parameter estimation in meteorology and oceanography in view of applications of 4-D variational data assimilation techniques to inverse parameter estimation problems, which bear promise of serious positive impact on improving model prediction. The other aim is to present crucial aspects of identifiability and

  12. Practical and Theoretical Aspects of Adjoint Parameter Estimation and Identifiability in Meteorology and Oceanography

    Microsoft Academic Search

    I. M. Navon

    1997-01-01

    The present paper has two aims. One is to survey briefly the state of the art of parameter estimation in meteorology and oceanography in view of applications of 4-D variational data assimilation techniques to inverse parameter estimation problems, which bear promise of serious positive impact on improving model prediction. The other aim is to present crucial aspects of identifiability and

  13. The Promise and Reality of Formative Assessment Practice in a Continuous Assessment Scheme: The Case of Trinidad and Tobago

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Lisle, Jerome

    2015-01-01

    Continuous Assessment (CA) systems are externally directed, curriculum-based assessment schemes used for both summative and formative purposes within classrooms. CA has been implemented as national policy in several postcolonial developing countries and is believed to hold great promise for improving education outcomes. This theory-driven…

  14. "Use of Current Best Evidence": Promises and Illusions, Limitations and Contradictions in the Triangle of Research, Policy and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lassnigg, Lorenz

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores the methodological and epistemological implications of the relationships between R&D, policy and practice. The proposals towards "evidence-based policy and practice" are analysed with respect to this triangle from three angles: (1) meaning; (2) production; and (3) use of evidence. A comprehensive model of the research cycle,…

  15. Identifying industrial best practices for the waste minimization of low-level radioactive materials

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, V.

    1996-04-01

    In US DOE, changing circumstances are affecting the management and disposal of solid, low-level radioactive waste (LLW). From 1977 to 1991, the nuclear power industry achieved major reductions in solid waste disposal, and DOE is interested in applying those practices to reduce solid waste at DOE facilities. Project focus was to identify and document commercial nuclear industry best practices for radiological control programs supporting routine operations, outages, and decontamination and decommissioning activities. The project team (DOE facility and nuclear power industry representatives) defined a Work Control Process Model, collected nuclear power industry Best Practices, and made recommendations to minimize LLW at DOE facilities.

  16. Identifying competencies required for medication prescribing for general practice residents: a nominal group technique study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Teaching of medication prescribing is a specific challenge in general practice curriculum. The aim of this study was to identify and rank the competencies required for prescribing medication for general practice residents in France. Methods Qualitative consensus study using the nominal group technique. We invited different stakeholders of the general practice curriculum and medication use in primary care to a series of meetings. The nominal group technique allowed for the quick development of a list of consensual and ranked answers to the following question: “At the end of their general practice curriculum, in terms of medication prescribing, what should residents be able to do?”. Results Four meetings were held that involved a total of 31 participants, enabling the creation of a final list of 29 ranked items, grouped in 4 domains. The four domains identified were ‘pharmacology’, ‘regulatory standards’, ‘therapeutics’, and ‘communication (both with patients and healthcare professionals)’. Overall, the five items the most highly valued across the four meetings were: ‘write a legible and understandable prescription’, ‘identify specific populations’, ‘prescribe the doses and durations following the indication’, ‘explain a lack of medication prescription to the patient’, ‘decline inappropriate medication request’. The ‘communication skills’ domain was the domain with the highest number of items (10 items), and with the most highly-valued items. Conclusion The study results suggest a need for developing general practice residents’ communication skills regarding medication prescribing. PMID:25084813

  17. Identifying Evidence-Based Practices in Special Education through High Quality Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedt, Brian

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if meta-analysis can be used to enhance efforts to identify evidence-based practices (EBPs). In this study, the quality of included studies acted as the moderating variable. I used the quality indicators for experimental and quasi-experimental research developed by Gersten, Fuchs, Coyne, Greenwood, and…

  18. A methodology to identify efficient collaborative practices of decision-making

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    A methodology to identify efficient collaborative practices of decision-making in industrial human well-being. Making decisions effectively and without delays would help achieve the goals have undertaken systematic efforts to enhance decision-making processes. This paper investigates

  19. Best Management Practices Identified in the 201011 Cycle of Site Visits

    E-print Network

    1 Best Management Practices Identified in the 201011 Cycle of Site Visits California Sea. The SRT determined that the data management system developed and used by HISG may be one of the best the students and HISG. #12;2 IllinoisIndiana Sea Grant Fostering good partnership among IISG, host

  20. Collaborative action research and project work: Promising practices for developing collaborative inquiry among early childhood preservice teachers

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mary Jane Moran

    2007-01-01

    Excerpts from case studies of two preservice teaching teams exemplify a new approach for merging research and practice within an introductory early childhood methods course. Through participation in cycles of collaborative action research focused on the joint task of implementing long-term projects, preservice teachers evidenced change in the ways they participated in and developed an inquiry-oriented teaching stance. In particular,

  1. Revisiting an Old Friend: The Practice and Promise of Cooperative Learning for the Twenty-First Century

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schul, James E.

    2011-01-01

    Cooperative learning has long been at the disposal of school teachers. However, it is often misunderstood by some teachers as just another form of collaborative group work. This article revisits cooperative learning, including a sampling of its popular variations, with practical approaches toward effectively integrating it into classroom…

  2. Promising and Successful Programs and practices in Schools with Intermediate Grade Levels: Programs, Projects & Activities. Information & Dissemination Series 18.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawaii State Dept. of Education, Honolulu. Office of Instructional Services.

    Outlined are the following 11 successful programs, projects, and activities functioning in Hawaii's intermediate schools: Alternative Learning Center (Waipahu and Pearl City Highlands); Career Awareness Exploring through Basic Practical Arts; Career Education Guidance (Kailua); Creating a Positive School Climate; Learning through the Arts;…

  3. Targeted In-Depth Assessment of Promising Practices in Secondary Vocational Education: What Can NAVE Do? NAVE Design Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stern, David

    A proposed strategy for the National Assessment of Vocational Education (NAVE) uses school-wide data to identify secondary schools where students' academic achievement has been improving at a relatively fast rate and those where it has not. Schools with the most involvement in vocational education can be selected from the two groups. These two…

  4. Eliciting, Identifying, Interpreting, and Responding to Students' Ideas: Teacher Candidates' Growth in Formative Assessment Practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gotwals, Amelia Wenk; Birmingham, Daniel

    2015-03-01

    With the goal of helping teacher candidates become well-started beginners, it is important that methods courses in teacher education programs focus on high-leverage practices. Using responsive teaching practices, specifically eliciting, identifying, interpreting, and responding to students' science ideas (i.e., formative assessment), can be used to support all students in learning science successfully. This study follows seven secondary science teacher candidates in a yearlong practice-based methods course. Course assignments (i.e., plans for and reflections on teaching) as well as teaching videos were analyzed using a recursive qualitative approach. In this paper, we present themes and patterns in teacher candidates' abilities to elicit, identify, interpret, and respond to students' ideas. Specifically, we found that those teacher candidates who grew in the ways in which they elicited students' ideas from fall to spring were also those who were able to adopt a more balanced reflection approach (considering both teacher and student moves). However, we found that even the teacher candidates who grew in these practices did not move toward seeing students' ideas as nuanced; rather, they saw students' ideas in a dichotomous fashion: right or wrong. We discuss implications for teacher preparation, specifically for how to promote productive reflection and tools for better understanding students' ideas.

  5. Examining the practice of generalist expertise: a qualitative study identifying constraints and solutions

    PubMed Central

    Reeve, Joanne; Dowrick, Christopher F; Freeman, George K; Gunn, Jane; Mair, Frances; May, Carl; Mercer, Stewart; Palmer, Victoria; Howe, Amanda; Irving, Greg; Shiner, Alice; Watson, Jessica

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Provision of person-centred generalist care is a core component of quality primary care systems. The World Health Organisation believes that a lack of generalist primary care is contributing to inefficiency, ineffectiveness and inequity in healthcare. In UK primary care, General Practitioners (GPs) are the largest group of practising generalists. Yet GPs fulfil multiple roles and the pressures of delivering these roles along with wider contextual changes create real challenges to generalist practice. Our study aimed to explore GP perceptions of enablers and constraints for expert generalist care, in order to identify what is needed to ensure health systems are designed to support the generalist role. Design Qualitative study in General Practice. Setting UK primary care. Main outcome measures A qualitative study – interviews, surveys and focus groups with GPs and GP trainees. Data collection and analysis was informed by Normalisation Process Theory. Design and setting Qualitative study in General Practice. We conducted interviews, surveys and focus groups with GPs and GP trainees based mainly, but not exclusively, in the UK. Data collection and analysis were informed by Normalization Process Theory. Participants UK based GPs (interview and surveys); European GP trainees (focus groups). Results Our findings highlight key gaps in current training and service design which may limit development and implementation of expert generalist practice (EGP). These include the lack of a consistent and universal understanding of the distinct expertise of EGP, competing priorities inhibiting the delivery of EGP, lack of the consistent development of skills in interpretive practice and a lack of resources for monitoring EGP. Conclusions We describe four areas for change: Translating EGP, Priority setting for EGP, Trusting EGP and Identifying the impact of EGP. We outline proposals for work needed in each area to help enhance the expert generalist role. PMID:24475347

  6. Promising Practices and Strategies for Using Trauma-Informed Child Welfare Practice to Improve Foster Care Placement Stability: A Breakthrough Series Collaborative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conradi, Lisa; Agosti, Jen; Tullberg, Erika; Richardson, Lisa; Langan, Heather; Ko, Susan; Wilson, Charles

    2011-01-01

    This paper will provide information on a recent Breakthrough Series Collaborative (BSC) conducted by the National Child Traumatic Stress Network on Using Trauma-Informed Child Welfare Practice to Improve Foster Care Placement Stability. Information on this particular BSC will be provided, followed by initial findings gathered from an evaluation of…

  7. Identifying knowledge-attitude-practice gaps to enhance HPV vaccine diffusion.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Elisia L; Head, Katharine J

    2013-01-01

    To examine differences in knowledge, attitudes, and related practices among adopters and nonadopters of the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, the researchers conducted 83 in-depth interviews with 18- to 26-year-old women. The study identified knowledge-attitude-practice gaps in the context of the HPV vaccine to explain why diffusion of a preventive innovation (such as the HPV vaccine) requires targeted risk communication strategies in order to increase demand. Salient findings included similarities between vaccinated and unvaccinated women's lack of knowledge and uncertainties about HPV and cervical cancer. Vaccinated women who had no knowledge of HPV or no-risk/low-risk perceptions of HPV reported receiving vaccination, indicating HPV risk protection behavior could precede knowledge acquisition for vaccinated women. These vaccinated women identified an interpersonal network supportive of vaccination and reported supportive social influences. Among unvaccinated women, unsupportive vaccination attitudes included low perceived personal risk of HPV. In contrast, unvaccinated women often cited erroneous beliefs that HPV could be avoided by abstinence, monogamy, and knowledge of their partners' sexual history as reasons that the vaccine was not personally relevant. Unvaccinated women cited interpersonal influences that activated short- and long-term vaccination safety and efficacy concerns. Different levels of fear regarding the HPV vaccine may underlie (a) attitudinal differences between vaccinated and unvaccinated women in perceived vaccination value and (b) attitude-practice gaps. PMID:23767775

  8. Practical method to identify orbital anomaly as spacecraft breakup in the geostationary region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanada, Toshiya; Uetsuhara, Masahiko; Nakaniwa, Yoshitaka

    2012-07-01

    Identifying a spacecraft breakup is an essential issue to define the current orbital debris environment. This paper proposes a practical method to identify an orbital anomaly, which appears as a significant discontinuity in the observation data, as a spacecraft breakup. The proposed method is applicable to orbital anomalies in the geostationary region. Long-term orbital evolutions of breakup fragments may conclude that their orbital planes will converge into several corresponding regions in inertial space even if the breakup epoch is not specified. This empirical method combines the aforementioned conclusion with the search strategy developed at Kyushu University, which can identify origins of observed objects as fragments released from a specified spacecraft. This practical method starts with selecting a spacecraft that experienced an orbital anomaly, and formulates a hypothesis to generate fragments from the anomaly. Then, the search strategy is applied to predict the behavior of groups of fragments hypothetically generated. Outcome of this predictive analysis specifies effectively when, where and how we should conduct optical measurements using ground-based telescopes. Objects detected based on the outcome are supposed to be from the anomaly, so that we can confirm the anomaly as a spacecraft breakup to release the detected objects. This paper also demonstrates observation planning for a spacecraft anomaly in the geostationary region.

  9. Fostering More-Effective Public Health by Identifying Administrative Evidence-Based Practices

    PubMed Central

    Brownson, Ross C.; Allen, Peg; Duggan, Kathleen; Stamatakis, Katherine A.; Erwin, Paul C.

    2013-01-01

    Context The aim of evidence-based decision-making in public health involves the integration of science-based interventions with community preferences to improve population health. Although considerable literature is available on the development and adoption of evidence-based guidelines and barriers to their implementation, the evidence base specific to public health administration is less developed. This article reviews the literature from public health and related disciplines to identify administrative evidence-based practices (A-EBPs; i.e., agency-level structures and activities that are positively associated with performance measures). Evidence acquisition A “review of reviews” was carried out to assess the evidence for the effectiveness of A-EBPs covering the time frame January 2000 through March 2012. The following steps were used: (1) select databases; (2) determine search parameters and conduct the search; (3) screen titles and abstracts; (4) obtain selected documents; (5) perform initial synthesis; (6) abstract data; and (7) synthesize evidence. Evidence synthesis In both the reviews and original empiric studies, the most common outcome reported was performance of the local health department or local public health system. On the basis of a synthesis of data from 20 reviews, a total of 11 high-priority A-EBPs were identified (i.e., practices that local public health systems potentially can modify within a few years). The A-EBPs covered five major domains of workforce development, leadership, organizational climate and culture, relationships and partnerships, and financial processes. Conclusions As the body of practice-based research continues to grow and the ability to measure administrative evidence-based practices improves, this initial list can be further developed and improved. PMID:22898125

  10. Aircraft absorbers - Promise and practice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. O. Andersson

    1981-01-01

    Attention is given to the application of sound absorbers to aircraft engine ducts. Fan duct application is discussed with reference to the frequency spectrum of fan noise, the wave number spectrum of fan noise, and both local and extended reactions to lining types. The design of duct linings is examined, noting a number of analysis techniques for non-uniform ducts and

  11. Interactive Multimedia: Practice and Promise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latchem, Colin, Ed.; And Others

    This book describes developments in interactive multimedia (IMM) in the early 1990s. Its aim is to provide educators, students, trainers, librarians, managers, and practitioners with an overview, not only of the directions and uses of the technology, but also of the research foundations and educational and contextual issues that need to be…

  12. Perceptions, Promising Practices, and Pitfalls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Binkley, Russell; Scales, Roya; Unruh, Lori; Holt, Janice; Nichols, Janet

    2013-01-01

    university/school partnership. These teachers were selected from a group of 65 teachers who had participated in the online mentoring program. In this program of two time periods lasting two months each,…

  13. The Trouble with Triplets in Biodiversity Informatics: A Data-Driven Case against Current Identifier Practices

    PubMed Central

    Guralnick, Robert; Conlin, Tom; Deck, John; Stucky, Brian J.; Cellinese, Nico

    2014-01-01

    The biodiversity informatics community has discussed aspirations and approaches for assigning globally unique identifiers (GUIDs) to biocollections for nearly a decade. During that time, and despite misgivings, the de facto standard identifier has become the “Darwin Core Triplet”, which is a concatenation of values for institution code, collection code, and catalog number associated with biocollections material. Our aim is not to rehash the challenging discussions regarding which GUID system in theory best supports the biodiversity informatics use case of discovering and linking digital data across the Internet, but how well we can link those data together at this moment, utilizing the current identifier schemes that have already been deployed. We gathered Darwin Core Triplets from a subset of VertNet records, along with vertebrate records from GenBank and the Barcode of Life Data System, in order to determine how Darwin Core Triplets are deployed “in the wild”. We asked if those triplets follow the recommended structure and whether they provide an easy and unambiguous means to track from specimen records to genetic sequence records. We show that Darwin Core Triplets are often riddled with semantic and syntactic errors when deployed and curated in practice, despite specifications about how to construct them. Our results strongly suggest that Darwin Core Triplets that have not been carefully curated are not currently serving a useful role for relinking data. We briefly consider needed next steps to overcome current limitations. PMID:25470125

  14. ENHANCING RESERVOIR MANAGEMENT IN THE APPALACHIAN BASIN BY IDENTIFYING TECHNICAL BARRIER AND PREFERRED PRACTICES

    SciTech Connect

    Ronald R. McDowell; Khashayar Aminian; Katharine L. Avary; John M. Bocan; Michael Ed. Hohn; Douglas G. Patchen

    2003-09-01

    The Preferred Upstream Management Practices (PUMP) project, a two-year study sponsored by the United States Department of Energy (USDOE), had three primary objectives: (1) the identification of problems, problematic issues, potential solutions and preferred practices related to oil production; (2) the creation of an Appalachian Regional Council to oversee and continue this investigation beyond the end of the project; and (3) the dissemination of investigative results to the widest possible audience, primarily by means of an interactive website. Investigation and identification of oil production problems and preferred management practices began with a Problem Identification Workshop in January of 2002. Three general issues were selected by participants for discussion: Data Management; Reservoir Engineering; and Drilling Practices. At the same meeting, the concept of the creation of an oversight organization to evaluate and disseminated preferred management practices (PMP's) after the end of the project was put forth and volunteers were solicited. In-depth interviews were arranged with oil producers to gain more insight into problems and potential solutions. Project members encountered considerable reticence on the part of interviewees when it came to revealing company-specific production problems or company-specific solutions. This was the case even though interviewees were assured that all responses would be held in confidence. Nevertheless, the following production issues were identified and ranked in order of decreasing importance: Water production including brine disposal; Management of production and business data; Oil field power costs; Paraffin accumulation; Production practices including cementing. An number of secondary issues were also noted: Problems associated with Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) and Waterflooding; Reservoir characterization; Employee availability, training, and safety; and Sale and Purchase problems. One item was mentioned both in interviews and in the Workshop, as, perhaps, the key issue related to oil production in the Appalachian region - the price of a barrel of oil. Project members sought solutions to production problems from a number of sources. In general, the Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) website, both regional and national, proved to be a fertile source of information. Technical issues included water production, paraffin accumulation, production practices, EOR and waterflooding were addressed in a number of SPE papers. Articles on reservoir characterization were found in both the AAPG Bulletin and in SPE papers. Project members extracted topical and keyword information from pertinent articles and websites and combined them in a database that was placed on the PUMP website. Because of difficulties finding potential members with the qualifications, interests, and flexibility of schedule to allow a long-term commitment, it was decided to implement the PMP Regional Council as a subcommittee of the Producer Advisory Group (PAG) sponsored by Appalachian Region PTTC. The advantages of this decision are that the PAG is in already in existence as a volunteer group interested in problem identification and implementation of solutions and that PAG members are unpaid, so no outside funds will be required to sustain the group. The PUMP website became active in October of 2002. The site is designed to evolve; as new information becomes available, it can be readily added to the site or the site can be modified to accommodate it. The site is interactive allowing users to search within the PUMP site, within the Appalachian Region PTTC site, or within the whole internet through the input of user-supplied key words for information on oil production problems and solutions. Since its inception in the Fall of 2002, the PUMP site has experienced a growing number of users of increasingly diverse nature and from an increasing geographic area. This indicates that the site is reaching its target audience in the Appalachian region and beyond. Following up on a commitment to technology transfer, a tota

  15. A High-Throughput In Vitro Drug Screen in a Genetically Engineered Mouse Model of Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma Identifies BMS-754807 as a Promising Therapeutic Agent

    PubMed Central

    Halvorson, Kyle G.; Barton, Kelly L.; Schroeder, Kristin; Misuraca, Katherine L.; Hoeman, Christine; Chung, Alex; Crabtree, Donna M.; Cordero, Francisco J.; Singh, Raj; Spasojevic, Ivan; Berlow, Noah; Pal, Ranadip; Becher, Oren J.

    2015-01-01

    Diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas (DIPGs) represent a particularly lethal type of pediatric brain cancer with no effective therapeutic options. Our laboratory has previously reported the development of genetically engineered DIPG mouse models using the RCAS/tv-a system, including a model driven by PDGF-B, H3.3K27M, and p53 loss. These models can serve as a platform in which to test novel therapeutics prior to the initiation of human clinical trials. In this study, an in vitro high-throughput drug screen as part of the DIPG preclinical consortium using cell-lines derived from our DIPG models identified BMS-754807 as a drug of interest in DIPG. BMS-754807 is a potent and reversible small molecule multi-kinase inhibitor with many targets including IGF-1R, IR, MET, TRKA, TRKB, AURKA, AURKB. In vitro evaluation showed significant cytotoxic effects with an IC50 of 0.13 ?M, significant inhibition of proliferation at a concentration of 1.5 ?M, as well as inhibition of AKT activation. Interestingly, IGF-1R signaling was absent in serum-free cultures from the PDGF-B; H3.3K27M; p53 deficient model suggesting that the antitumor activity of BMS-754807 in this model is independent of IGF-1R. In vivo, systemic administration of BMS-754807 to DIPG-bearing mice did not prolong survival. Pharmacokinetic analysis demonstrated that tumor tissue drug concentrations of BMS-754807 were well below the identified IC50, suggesting that inadequate drug delivery may limit in vivo efficacy. In summary, an unbiased in vitro drug screen identified BMS-754807 as a potential therapeutic agent in DIPG, but BMS-754807 treatment in vivo by systemic delivery did not significantly prolong survival of DIPG-bearing mice. PMID:25748921

  16. A high-throughput in vitro drug screen in a genetically engineered mouse model of diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma identifies BMS-754807 as a promising therapeutic agent.

    PubMed

    Halvorson, Kyle G; Barton, Kelly L; Schroeder, Kristin; Misuraca, Katherine L; Hoeman, Christine; Chung, Alex; Crabtree, Donna M; Cordero, Francisco J; Singh, Raj; Spasojevic, Ivan; Berlow, Noah; Pal, Ranadip; Becher, Oren J

    2015-01-01

    Diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas (DIPGs) represent a particularly lethal type of pediatric brain cancer with no effective therapeutic options. Our laboratory has previously reported the development of genetically engineered DIPG mouse models using the RCAS/tv-a system, including a model driven by PDGF-B, H3.3K27M, and p53 loss. These models can serve as a platform in which to test novel therapeutics prior to the initiation of human clinical trials. In this study, an in vitro high-throughput drug screen as part of the DIPG preclinical consortium using cell-lines derived from our DIPG models identified BMS-754807 as a drug of interest in DIPG. BMS-754807 is a potent and reversible small molecule multi-kinase inhibitor with many targets including IGF-1R, IR, MET, TRKA, TRKB, AURKA, AURKB. In vitro evaluation showed significant cytotoxic effects with an IC50 of 0.13 ?M, significant inhibition of proliferation at a concentration of 1.5 ?M, as well as inhibition of AKT activation. Interestingly, IGF-1R signaling was absent in serum-free cultures from the PDGF-B; H3.3K27M; p53 deficient model suggesting that the antitumor activity of BMS-754807 in this model is independent of IGF-1R. In vivo, systemic administration of BMS-754807 to DIPG-bearing mice did not prolong survival. Pharmacokinetic analysis demonstrated that tumor tissue drug concentrations of BMS-754807 were well below the identified IC50, suggesting that inadequate drug delivery may limit in vivo efficacy. In summary, an unbiased in vitro drug screen identified BMS-754807 as a potential therapeutic agent in DIPG, but BMS-754807 treatment in vivo by systemic delivery did not significantly prolong survival of DIPG-bearing mice. PMID:25748921

  17. The promise and challenge of practice-research collaborations: Guiding principles and strategies for initiating, designing, and implementing program evaluation research.

    PubMed

    Secret, Mary; Abell, Melissa L; Berlin, Trey

    2011-01-01

    The authors present a set of guiding principles and strategies to facilitate the collaborative efforts of social work researchers and practitioners as they initiate, design, and implement outcome evaluations of human service interventions and programs. Beginning with an exploration of the interpersonal barriers to practice-research collaborations, and building on their experiences in successfully completing a community-based research evaluation, the authors identify specific relationship-focused principles and strategies and illustrate how these approaches can guide practice-research teams through the various sequential activities of the evaluation research process. In particular, it is suggested that practice-research collaborations can be formed, strengthened, and sustained by emphasis on a spirit of discovery and shared leadership at the start of the relationship, use of a comprehensive evaluation model to clarify and frame the evaluation and program goals, beginning where the client is when selecting research methodology and measurement tools, commitment to keeping the program first and recording everything during the implementation and data-collection stages, discussion of emerging findings and presentation of findings in graphic format at the data-analysis stage, and a total team approach at the dissemination stage. PMID:21314067

  18. A system-wide analysis using a senior-friendly hospital framework identifies current practices and opportunities for improvement in the care of hospitalized older adults.

    PubMed

    Wong, Ken S; Ryan, David P; Liu, Barbara A

    2014-11-01

    Older adults are vulnerable to hospital-associated complications such as falls, pressure ulcers, functional decline, and delirium, which can contribute to prolonged hospital stay, readmission, and nursing home placement. These vulnerabilities are exacerbated when the hospital's practices, services, and physical environment are not sufficiently mindful of the complex, multidimensional needs of frail individuals. Several frameworks have emerged to help hospitals examine how organization-wide processes can be customized to avoid these complications. This article describes the application of one such framework-the Senior-Friendly Hospital (SFH) framework adopted in Ontario, Canada-which comprises five interrelated domains: organizational support, processes of care, emotional and behavioral environment, ethics in clinical care and research, and physical environment. This framework provided the blueprint for a self-assessment of all 155 adult hospitals across the province of Ontario. The system-wide analysis identified practice gaps and promising practices within each domain of the SFH framework. Taken together, these results informed 12 recommendations to support hospitals at all stages of development in becoming friendly to older adults. Priorities for system-wide action were identified, encouraging hospitals to implement or further develop their processes to better address hospital-acquired delirium and functional decline. These recommendations led to collaborative action across the province, including the development of an online toolkit and the identification of accountability indicators to support hospitals in quality improvement focusing on senior-friendly care. PMID:25355067

  19. Work–life balance: promises made and promises kept

    Microsoft Academic Search

    John S. Heywood; W. S. Siebert; Xiangdong Wei

    2010-01-01

    We present evidence on the association between the management practices conventionally identified with high performance workplaces (HPWs) and measures of work–life balance. Our framework identifies those practices associated with workers reporting that their employer makes work–life balance commitments, and separately identifies those practices associated with workers reporting that their employer keeps the commitments they make. Our results do not support

  20. Identifying effective pedagogical practices for commenting computer source code (abstract only)

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Peter J. DePasquale; Michael E. Locasto; Lisa C. Kaczmarczyk

    2012-01-01

    Few, if any, pedagogical practices exist for helping students embrace best practices in writing software documentation, particularly source code comments. Although instructors often stress the importance of good commenting, two problems exist. First, it can be difficult to actually define these best practices, and second, it can be difficult to grade or assess students' application of such methods\\/practices. This Birds-of-a-Feather

  1. Identifying practical solutions to meet America's fiber needs: proceedings from the Food & Fiber Summit.

    PubMed

    Mobley, Amy R; Jones, Julie Miller; Rodriguez, Judith; Slavin, Joanne; Zelman, Kathleen M

    2014-07-01

    Fiber continues to be singled out as a nutrient of public health concern. Adequate intakes of fiber are associated with reduced risk for cardiovascular disease, cancer, diabetes, certain gastrointestinal disorders and obesity. Despite ongoing efforts to promote adequate fiber through increased vegetable, fruit and whole-grain intakes, average fiber consumption has remained flat at approximately half of the recommended daily amounts. Research indicates that consumers report increasingly attempting to add fiber-containing foods, but there is confusion around fiber in whole grains. The persistent and alarmingly low intakes of fiber prompted the "Food & Fiber Summit," which assembled nutrition researchers, educators and communicators to explore fiber's role in public health, current fiber consumption trends and consumer awareness data with the objective of generating opportunities and solutions to help close the fiber gap. The summit outcomes highlight the need to address consumer confusion and improve the understanding of sources of fiber, to recognize the benefits of various types of fibers and to influence future dietary guidance to provide prominence and clarity around meeting daily fiber recommendations through a variety of foods and fiber types. Potential opportunities to increase fiber intake were identified, with emphasis on meal occasions and food categories that offer practical solutions for closing the fiber gap. PMID:25006857

  2. A general model-based design of experiments approach to achieve practical identifiability of pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic models.

    PubMed

    Galvanin, Federico; Ballan, Carlo C; Barolo, Massimiliano; Bezzo, Fabrizio

    2013-08-01

    The use of pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) models is a common and widespread practice in the preliminary stages of drug development. However, PK-PD models may be affected by structural identifiability issues intrinsically related to their mathematical formulation. A preliminary structural identifiability analysis is usually carried out to check if the set of model parameters can be uniquely determined from experimental observations under the ideal assumptions of noise-free data and no model uncertainty. However, even for structurally identifiable models, real-life experimental conditions and model uncertainty may strongly affect the practical possibility to estimate the model parameters in a statistically sound way. A systematic procedure coupling the numerical assessment of structural identifiability with advanced model-based design of experiments formulations is presented in this paper. The objective is to propose a general approach to design experiments in an optimal way, detecting a proper set of experimental settings that ensure the practical identifiability of PK-PD models. Two simulated case studies based on in vitro bacterial growth and killing models are presented to demonstrate the applicability and generality of the methodology to tackle model identifiability issues effectively, through the design of feasible and highly informative experiments. PMID:23733369

  3. A Universal Checklist for Identifying Infants and Toddlers Eligible for Early Intervention. TRACE Practice Guide, Volume 2, Number 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunst, Carl J.; Trivette, Carol M.; Hill, Glinda

    2007-01-01

    This practice guide includes a description of the development and use of a universal checklist for identifying infants and toddlers that may be eligible for early intervention. The checklist was specifically developed to facilitate and streamline the identification of potentially eligible children without the need to administer screening or…

  4. Identifying effective leadership practices for implementing a new mathematics curriculum in Taipei

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Brandon Kao; Peter Hudson

    2009-01-01

    This study explores successful junior high school principals' leadership practices for implementing the reformed mathematics curriculum in Taipei. Avolio and Bass's (2002) full range leadership theory was used to record data through interviews and observations of five Taipei \\

  5. Identifying the Benefits of Observational Practice in the Acquisition of a Novel Coordination Skill 

    E-print Network

    Park, Inchon

    2014-08-14

    , participants performed the task with pendula animation. After each trial, they performed a perceptual test. In the pre- and post-baseline trials, participants watched the pendula animation and then, re-produce the pattern. During the practice session, models...

  6. The Use of Single Subject Research to Identify Evidence-based Practice in Special Education

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert H. Horner; EDWARD G. CARR; JAMES HALLE

    2005-01-01

    Single-subject research plays an important role in the development of evidence-based practice in special education. The defining features of single-subject research are presented, the con- tributions of single-subject research for special education are reviewed, and a specific proposal is of- fered for using single-subject research to document evidence-based practice. This article allows readers to determine if a specific study is

  7. Statistical learning algorithms for identifying contrasting tillage practices with landsat thematic mapper data

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tillage management practices have direct impact on water holding capacity, evaporation, carbon sequestration, and water quality. This study examines the feasibility of two statistical learning algorithms, such as Least Square Support Vector Machine (LSSVM) and Relevance Vector Machine (RVM), for cla...

  8. Identifying Best Practices for Multicultural Education in a Psychology Graduate Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunnicutt, Adrienne D.

    2010-01-01

    This study was designed to examine teaching practices at Fuller Theological Seminary's graduate psychology program, using secondary analysis of existing data. Lee, Shields, and Oh (2008) collected data from approximately 300 students who evaluated the helpfulness of 18 different instructional methodologies used at Fuller, and answered questions…

  9. Within a Family-Centered Practice, How Can Family Outcomes Be Identified?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeffries, Lynn

    2009-01-01

    Family-centered practice (care, intervention, services, or help giving) and family-focused, and family-based care are terms used interchangeably over the past 60 years to describe an approach to working with children with disabilities and their families. Common beliefs fundamental to the implementation of a program that incorporates…

  10. Identifying Changes in Teaching Practice: Innovative Curricular Objectives in Classical Languages and the Taught Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verhoeven, Pim; Verloop, Nico

    2002-01-01

    To what degree is a Dutch curriculum reform in classics incorporated into teaching practice? This study included two data sources: questionnaires that asked teachers about their beliefs concerning curricular innovations and an analysis of authentic assessment material, i.e. school examinations constructed by teachers. The findings suggest that the…

  11. Best Practices in Identifying Students for Gifted and Talented Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worrell, Frank C.; Erwin, Jesse O.

    2011-01-01

    As school psychologists move from dichotomous categorizations of students as "gifted" or "nongifted" toward a more comprehensive approach to identification, their task becomes increasingly complex. In the present article, the authors outline practices at the planning, programming, and data collection stages of the identification process in hopes…

  12. Fostering Self-Determination in Higher Education: Identifying Evidence-Based Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Getzel, Elizabeth Evans

    2014-01-01

    Research on the transition of students with disabilities and their post-school outcomes continues to move the field of special education in the direction of evidence-based practices. As special education professionals work to better recognize the impact of instructional and environmental characteristics to prepare youth for their transition, so…

  13. Identifying and Clarifying Values and Reason Statements that Promote Effective Food Parenting Practices, Using Intensive Interviews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beltran, Alicia; Hingle, Melanie D.; Knesek, Jessica; O'Connor, Teresia; Baranowski, Janice; Thompson, Debbe; Baranowski, Tom

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Generate and test parents' understanding of values and associated reason statements to encourage effective food parenting practices. Methods: This study was cross-sectional. Sixteen parents from different ethnic groups (African American, white, and Hispanic) living with their 3- to 5-year-old child were recruited. Interested parents…

  14. Identifiers Identifiers

    E-print Network

    Brass, Stefan

    , July 1998. . Tim Berners­Lee: Cool URIs don't change. [http://www.w3.org/Provider/Style/URI] . Uniform://archive.ncsa.uiuc.edu/demoweb/url­primer.html] . T. Berners­Lee, R. Fielding, L. Masinter: Uniform Resource Identifiers (URI): Generic Syntax. RFC Names. RFC 1737, December 1994, 7 pages. . T. Berners­Lee, L. Masinter, M. McCahill: Uniform Resource

  15. Identifiers Identifiers

    E-print Network

    Brass, Stefan

    , July 1998. . Tim Berners­Lee: Cool URIs don't change. [http://www.w3.org/Provider/Style/URI] Stefan://archive.ncsa.uiuc.edu/demoweb/url­primer.html] . T. Berners­Lee, R. Fielding, L. Masinter: Uniform Resource Identifiers (URI): Generic Syntax. RFC Names. RFC 1737, December 1994, 7 pages. . T. Berners­Lee, L. Masinter, M. McCahill: Uniform Resource

  16. Identifying suicidal ideation among older adults in a general practice setting

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jon J. Pfaff; Osvaldo P. Almeida

    2004-01-01

    Background: Up to 70% of older people who commit suicide consult a general practitioner (GP) in the month prior to their death. The purpose of this study was to identify the clinical and demographic characteristics of older adults who are contemplating suicide and are in contact with a GP. Methods: We utilised a cross-sectional study to investigate the association between

  17. Identifying men at high risk of heart attacks: strategy for use in general practice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A G Shaper; S J Pocock; A N Phillips; M Walker

    1986-01-01

    A strategy was devised for identifying men at high risk of acute myocardial infarction or sudden ischaemic death. A risk score was devised using cigarette smoking, mean blood pressure, recall of ischaemic heart disease or diabetes mellitus diagnosed by a doctor, history of parental death from \\

  18. Biomarkers identified with time-lapse imaging: discovery, validation, and practical application

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Alice A.; Tan, Lei; Suraj, Vaishali; Pera, Renee Reijo; Shen, Shehua

    2014-01-01

    “Time-lapse markers,” which are defined by time-lapse imaging and correlated with clinical outcomes, may provide embryologists with new opportunities for improving embryo selection. This article provides an overview of noninvasive biomarkers defined by time-lapse imaging studies. In addition to comprehensively reviewing the discovery of each time-lapse marker, it focuses on the criteria necessary for their successful integration into clinical practice, including [1] statistical and biological significance, [2] validation through prospective clinical studies, and [3] development of reliable technology to measure and quantify the time-lapse marker. Because manual analysis of time-lapse images is labor intensive and limits the practical use of the image data in the clinic, automated image analysis software platforms may contribute substantially to improvements in embryo selection accuracy. Ultimately, time-lapse markers that are based on a foundation of basic research, validated through prospective clinical studies, and enabled by a reliable quantification technology may improve IVF success rates, encourage broader adoption of single-embryo transfer, and reduce the risks associated with multiple gestation pregnancies. PMID:23499001

  19. The Promises and Pitfalls of Modernity: An Ethnography of Young Catholic Women’s Media Practices for Claiming Cultural Citizenship in Urban India 

    E-print Network

    Doshi, Marissa J

    2014-12-15

    phones and the consumption of television programs and movies. Through these practices, participants attempted to displace the link between Indianness and Hindu culture and show that Catholic culture can also reflect Indianness, when Indianness is defined...

  20. Practical method to identify orbital anomaly as spacecraft breakup in the geostationary region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uetsuhara, Masahiko; Hanada, Toshiya

    2013-09-01

    Identifying spacecraft breakup events is an essential issue for better understanding of the current orbital debris environment. This paper proposes an observation planning approach to identify an orbital anomaly, which appears as a significant discontinuity in archived orbital history, as a spacecraft breakup. The proposed approach is applicable to orbital anomalies in the geostationary region. The proposed approach selects a spacecraft that experienced an orbital anomaly, and then predicts trajectories of possible fragments of the spacecraft at an observation epoch. This paper theoretically demonstrates that observation planning for the possible fragments can be conducted. To do this, long-term behaviors of the possible fragments are evaluated. It is concluded that intersections of their trajectories will converge into several corresponding regions in the celestial sphere even if the breakup epoch is not specified and it has uncertainty of the order of several weeks.

  1. Using simulation technology to identify gaps between education and practice among new graduate nurses.

    PubMed

    Everett-Thomas, Ruth; Valdes, Beatriz; Valdes, Guillermo R; Shekhter, Ilya; Fitzpatrick, Maureen; Rosen, Lisa F; Arheart, Kristopher L; Birnbach, David J

    2015-01-01

    Applied knowledge was observed among nurse groups from a medical-surgical residency program to measure clinical performance during simulation training. Twenty groups of new graduate nurses were observed during five simulated clinical scenarios, and their performances were scored on a 24-item checklist. Nurse groups showed significant improvement (p < 0.001) in applied knowledge in four clinical domains from week 1 to week 5, and the results provided valuable information of the groups' overall performances. In two of the five scenarios, poor decisions and prioritization of competing tasks were factors associated with lower performance group scores. Complex patient conditions may pose a challenge for new graduate nurses, and standardized training during the residency program may help instructors recognize specific factors to address during the transition from education to practice. PMID:25406636

  2. Defense Programs benchmarking in Chicago, April 1994: Identifying best practices in the pollution prevention programs of selected private industries

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1995-12-01

    The Office of Defense Programs (DP) was the first US Department of Energy (DOE) Cognizant Secretarial Office (CSO) to attempt to benchmark private industries for best-in-class practices in the field of pollution prevention. Defense Programs` intent in this effort is to identify and bring to DOE field offices strategic and technological tools that have helped private companies minimize waste and prevent pollution. Defense Programs` premier benchmarking study focused on business practices and process improvements used to implement exceptional pollution prevention programs in four privately owned companies. The current interest in implementing partnerships information exchange, and technology transfer with the private sector prompted DP to continue to seek best practices in the area of pollution prevention through a second benchmarking endeavor in May 1994. This report presents the results of that effort. The decision was made to select host facilities that own processes similar to those at DOE plants and laboratories, that have programs that have been recognized on a local or national level, that have an interest in partnering with the Department on an information-sharing basis, and that are located in proximity to each other. The DP benchmarking team assessed the pollution prevention programs of five companies in the Chicago area--GE Plastics, Navistar, Northrop Corporation, Sundstrand and Caterpillar. At all facilities visited, Ozone Depleting Compounds (ODCs), hazardous wastes, releases under the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act (SARA), waste water and non-hazardous wastes are being eliminated, replaced, reduced, recycled and reused whenever practicable.

  3. Promising Practices: A Case Study of One Fifth Grade Class as They Grew as Writers, Prepared, and Performed on the State Essay Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewinski, Kimberly E.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this case study is to document the ways in which fifth-grade students in a historically, low-performing school learned to write from a teacher who did not emphasize test-taking processes. The study demonstrates how these instructional practices in a writing workshop context positively affected the student performance on a statewide…

  4. Persistent Identifiers in the Publication and Citation of Scientific Data - Theory and Practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klump, J.; Brase, J.; Diepenbroek, M.; Grobe, H.; Hildenbrand, B.; Hoeck, H.; Lautenschlager, M.; Sens, I.

    2008-12-01

    In the last decade data driven research has become a third pillar of scientific work alongside with theoretical reasoning and experiment. Greatly increased computing power and storage, together with web services and other electronic resources have facilitated a quantum leap in new research based on the analysis of great amounts of data. However, traditional scientific communication only slowly changes to new media other than an emulation of paper. This leaves many data inaccessible and, in the long run exposes valuable data to the risk of loss. To improve access to data and to create incentives for scientists to make their data accessible, a group of German data centres initiated the project "Publication and Citation of Scientific Data" (STD-DOI) which was funded by the German Science Foundation DFG for the periods 2003-2005 and 2006-2008. In this project the German National Library for Science and Technology (TIB Hannover), together with the German Research Centre for Geoscience (GFZ Potsdam), Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research (AWI) Bremerhaven, University of Bremen, the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology in Hamburg, and the DLR German Remote Sensing Data Center set up the first system to assign DOIs to data sets and for their publication. A prerequisite for data to be made available is a proper citation. This means that all fields mandatory for a bibliographic citation are included. In addition, a mechanism is needed that ensures that the location of the referenced data on the internet can be resolved at any time. In the past, this was a problematic issue because URLs are short-lived, many becoming invalid after only a few months. Data publication on the internet therefore needs a system of reliable pointers to a web publication to make these publications citeable. To achieve this persistence of identifiers for their conventional publications many scientific publishers use Digital Object Identifiers (DOI). The identifier is resolved through the handle system to the valid location (URL) where the dataset can be found. This approach meets one of the prerequisites for citeability of scientific data published online. In addition, the valid bibliographic citation can be included in the catalogues of German National Library of Science and Technology (TIB). The data publications themselves are held at discipline specific data centres, for instance ICSU World Data Centers. The data providers take on the role of publication agents and are responsible for the long-term availability of the data. The discipline specific publication agents are also responsible for the quality of the published data. Syntactic and semantic quality checks are used to secure data quality. Data may come as data supplements to scientific papers, or as time series from environmental monitoring systems, or as novel form of publication in a data journal. The latter requires a peer-review process, analogous to conventional science publications.

  5. Role of scanning electron microscopy in identifying drugs used in medical practice.

    PubMed

    Fazil Marickar, Y M; Sylaja, N; Koshy, Peter

    2009-10-01

    Several plant preparations are administered for treatment of stone disease without scientific basis. This paper presents the results of in vitro and animal experimental studies using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in the identification of the therapeutic properties of trial drugs in medicine. In the first set of the study, urinary crystals namely calcium oxalate monohydrate and calcium oxalate dehydrate were grown in six sets of Hane's tubes in silica gel medium. Trial drugs namely scoparia dulcis Lynn, musa sapiens and dolicos biflorus were incorporated in the gel medium to identify the dopant effect of the trial drugs on the size and extent of crystal column growth. The changes in morphology of crystals were studied using SEM. In the second set, six male Wistar rats each were calculogenised by administering sodium oxalate and ethylene glycol and diabetised using streptozotocin. The SEM changes of calculogenisation were studied. The rats were administered trial drugs before calculogenisation or after. The kidneys of the rats studied under the scanning electron microscope showed changes in tissue morphology and crystal deposition produced by calculogenisation and alterations produced by addition of trial drugs. The trial drugs produced changes in the pattern of crystal growth and in the crystal morphology of both calcium oxalate monohydrate and calcium oxalate dihydrate grown in vitro. Elemental distribution analysis showed that the crystal purity was not altered by the trial drugs. Scoparia dulcis Lynn was found to be the most effective anticalculogenic agent. Musa sapiens and dolicos biflorus were found to have no significant effect in inhibiting crystal growth. The kidneys of rats on calculogenisation showed different grades of crystals in the glomerulus and interstitial tissues, extrusion of the crystals into the tubular lumen, collodisation and tissue inflammatory cell infiltration. Scoparia dulcis Lynn exhibited maximum protector effect against the changes of calculogenisation. Musa sapiens and dolicos biflorus had only minimal effect in preventing crystal deposition, inflammatory cell infiltration and other changes of calculogenisation. SEM was found to be effective in assessing the effect of drugs on crystal growth morphology and tissue histology. PMID:19711065

  6. Reconsidering Faculty Roles and Rewards: Promising Practices for Institutional Transformation and Enhanced Learning. A Report on CAPHE's Faculty Roles, Faculty Rewards, and Institutional Priorities Grant Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zahorski, Kennth J.; Cognard, Roger; Gilliard, Michelle D., Ed.

    This report presents conclusions of a grant program of the Consortium for the Advancement of Private Higher Education (CAPHE) which provided grants to help the 22 participating institutions bring congruence between institutional mission and existing faculty roles and reward structures. Following an introductory section, Section 1 identifies and…

  7. Skutterudites: promising power conversion thermoelectrics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ctirad Uher

    2003-01-01

    The past dozen years or so have witnessed a major resurgence of interest in thermoelectrics and specifically in identifying novel, potentially promising materials that might deliver better performance than the existing thermoelectric structures. Among the materials that have generated considerable interest are skutterudites. The open crystal environment of skutterudite compounds typified by the presence of structural voids offers a terrific

  8. The health promise of Promise Neighborhoods.

    PubMed

    Masi, Christopher

    2012-08-01

    The Promise Neighborhoods initiative from the U.S. Department of Education offers grant funding to develop innovative educational and community support programs in distressed communities. Inspired by the success of the Harlem Children's Zone (HCZ), this initiative encourages similarly pioneering approaches to assist low-income children attain academic and social success. An increasing body of evidence suggests that health benefits accrue when youth are immersed in nurturing educational environments. This article summarizes key evidence for this phenomenon, as well as theories that suggest that Promise Neighborhoods can have as great an effect on health as they do on educational achievement. PMID:24212148

  9. Version soumise Agricultural System le 8/09/08 Identifying indicators of the spatial variation of agricultural practices by a tree

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    requirements for sustainable development, such as preservation of water resources, soil conservation, and geneVersion soumise à Agricultural System le 8/09/08 Identifying indicators of the spatial variation of agricultural practices by a tree partitioning method: the case of weed control practices in a vine growing

  10. Use of Rasch Rating Scale Modeling to Develop and Validate a Measure of District-Level Characteristics and Practices Identified to Improve Instruction and Increase Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soska, Paul J., III

    2012-01-01

    Increasing qualitative evidence in the literature supports specific characteristics and practices, presented from a distributed leadership perspective, to be prevalent in school districts that demonstrate significant increases in student achievement. Quantitative evidence linking these identified district-level characteristics and practices to…

  11. Organic Chemistry Jasperse Acid-Base Practice Problems A. Identify each chemical as either an "acid" or a "base" in the following reactions, and

    E-print Network

    Jasperse, Craig P.

    Organic Chemistry Jasperse Acid-Base Practice Problems A. Identify each chemical as either an "acid" or a "base" in the following reactions, and identify "conjugate" relationships. -You should have one acid the More Acidic for Each of the Following Pairs: Single Variable Problems 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. O O O OH

  12. Organic Chemistry Jasperse Acid-Base Practice Problems A. Identify each chemical as either an "acid" or a "base" in the following reactions, and

    E-print Network

    Jasperse, Craig P.

    Organic Chemistry Jasperse Acid-Base Practice Problems A. Identify each chemical as either an "acid" or a "base" in the following reactions, and identify "conjugate" relationships. -You should have one acid?) 27. 28. G. For the following acid-base reaction, a. put a box around the weakest base in the reaction

  13. Developing a questionnaire to identify perceived barriers for implementing the Dutch physical therapy COPD clinical practice guideline

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Clinical practice guidelines have been developed to assist healthcare practitioners in clinical decision making. Publication of clinical practice guidelines does not automatically lead to their uptake and barrier identification has been recognized as an important step in implementation planning. This study aimed at developing a questionnaire to identify perceived barriers for implementing the Dutch COPD guideline for physical therapists and its recommended measurement instruments. Methods An overall questionnaire, based on two existing questionnaires, was constructed to identify barriers and facilitators for implementing the COPD guideline. The construct of the questionnaire was assessed in a cross-sectional study among 246 chest physical therapists. Factor analysis was conducted to explore underlying dimensions. Psychometric properties were analyzed using Cronbach’s alpha. Barriers and facilitators were assessed using descriptive statistics. Results Some 139 physical therapists (57%) responded. Factor analysis revealed 4-factor and 5-factor solutions with an explained variance of 36% and 39% respectively. Cronbach’s alpha of the overall questionnaire was 0.90, and varied from 0.66 to 0.92 for the different factors. Underlying domains of the 5-factor solution were characterized as: attitude towards using measurement instruments, knowledge and skills of the physical therapist, applicability of the COPD guideline, required investment of time & money, and patient characteristics. Physical therapists showed a positive attitude toward using the COPD guideline. Main barriers for implementation were required time investment and financial constraints. Conclusions The construct of the questionnaire revealed relevant underlying domains for the identification of barriers and facilitators for implementing the COPD guideline. The questionnaire allowed for tailoring to the target group and may be used across health care professionals as basis for in-depth analysis of barriers to specific recommendations in guidelines. The results of the questionnaire alone do not provide sufficient information to inform the development of an implementation strategy. The infrastructure for developing the guideline can be used for addressing key barriers by the guideline development group, using the questionnaire as well as in-depth analysis such as focus group interviews. Further development of methods for prospective identification of barriers and consequent tailoring of implementation interventions is required. PMID:23631555

  14. The Kalamazoo Promise Scholarship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartik, Timothy J.; Lachowska, Marta

    2014-01-01

    This study takes advantage of the unexpected announcement of the Kalamazoo Promise to study its effects on student achievement and behavior in high school. The Kalamazoo Promise provides college scholarships to graduates of Kalamazoo Public Schools (KPS), a midsized urban school district in Michigan that is racially and economically diverse.…

  15. Of birds, carbon and water: integrating multiple ecosystem service impacts to identify locations for agricultural conservation practice adoption

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human use of the landscape for crop production can degrade ecosystem services. A number of agricultural conservation practices are touted as mitigating these impacts. Many of these practices are encouraged by incentive programs such as the Conservation Reserve Program administere...

  16. Service-Learning: Promise and Possibility in Post-Secondary Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalles, Susan; Ryan, Thomas G.

    2015-01-01

    Herein we identify and address promising practices, essential theories, and related cautions within service-learning. The argument that service-learning is an organized community service which is connected to curriculum in an effort to deepen learning around content was scrutinized and endorsed. We envisioned service-learning as more than a joint…

  17. Best and Promising Practices in Developmental Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilton, Alan, Ed.; Ringlaben, Ravic, Ed.

    Twenty-six papers on the education of students with developmental disabilities are divided into 7 sections on: (1) definition and placement; (2) assessment and curriculum; (3) instructional strategies; (4) individual needs; (5) systematic and data-based instruction and management; (6) family involvement and community attitudes; and (7) appropriate…

  18. Adolescent Literacy Instruction: Policies and Promising Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Jill, Ed.; Moorman, Gary, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    This comprehensive resource explores how adolescence and academic achievement are defined within today's political context, examines the in-school potential of teens' out-of-school immersion in digital technologies and popular culture, and shows teachers how to embed comprehension strategies into classroom instruction. The book contains innovative…

  19. Multiethnic Education: Practices and Promises. Fastback 87.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banks, James A.

    An overview of the goals, common problems, and ideal characteristics of multiethnic education is presented. Section one discusses multiethnic education as being important for all children of all backgrounds. Students should have cultural and ethnic alternatives. They need skills, attitudes, and knowledge to function within their own ethnic…

  20. Promising Practices for Urban Reading Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, Pamela A., Ed.; Schumm, Jeanne Shay, Ed.

    This collection of research-based articles is framed around the International Reading Association's 10 "literacy rights" of every child, outlining what children need to become competent readers and writers. Under Right 1--Children have a right to appropriate early reading instruction based on their individual needs--are the following articles:…

  1. Entry Year Assistance: A Promising Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Peter; Schmidt, William

    1984-01-01

    The Entry Year Assistance Program was developed by the University of Wisconsin-LaCrosse to aid the beginning teacher in adjusting to the role of new teacher. Components of this program and recommendations for school systems and universities are offered to help other education institutions. (DF)

  2. Multicultural Science Education: Theory, Practice, and Promise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hines, S. Maxwell, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    As a relatively new area of investigation, the study of multicultural education as it relates to science teaching and learning has spawned numerous interpretations by researchers and authors worldwide. The contributors of this international volume--among them are science teacher educators, science teachers, scientists, researchers, program…

  3. FOCUS on Promising Practices. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Royce, Sherry

    A newsletter titled "Focus" was published to disseminate significant current or previous Section 353 special demonstration projects in Pennsylvania. The project involved a review of previous exemplary projects, validation of 49 significant projects, and dissemination of them. Twenty special projects from Pennsylvania and the nation were selected…

  4. Restructuring Schools: Promising Practices and Policies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hallinan, Maureen T., Ed.

    Chapters in this book focus on a wide array of educational issues that command attention at the end of the 20th century. Various aspects of contemporary schooling are explored, and models of school organization and functioning are proposed in the following chapters: (1) "Achievement-Oriented School Design" (James S. Coleman); (2) "Lost in…

  5. Examining the Culture of Poverty: Promising Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuthrell, Kristen; Stapleton, Joy; Ledford, Carolyn

    2009-01-01

    Spurred by preservice teachers' perceptions that diversity issues such as poverty would not affect their teaching, professors in 1 southeastern U.S. elementary teacher-preparation program took action, which resulted in this examination of the culture of poverty and the identification of strategies to best serve children living in poverty. The…

  6. Promise and Practice of Professional Portfolios

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Elizabeth M. Willis; Mary Ann Davies

    2002-01-01

    Professional portfolios provide a tool for improving teacher education on several levels. First, they enable programs to assess preservice students' progress in developing the myriad of complex skills necessary for effective teaching. Secondly, portfolios serve to clarify, reinforce, and evaluate attainment of a program's goals. Finally, professional portfolios reflect the national trend towards performance assessment in career placement and as

  7. Using the 6S Pyramid to Identify Research-Based Instructional Practices for Students with Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santangelo, Tanya; Novosel, Leslie C.; Cook, Bryan G.; Gapsis, Meredith

    2015-01-01

    To optimize students' learning outcomes, educators are increasingly expected to use instructional practices shown to be effective by credible research. To help make this possible, organizations and scholars are producing resources that summarize research related to various instructional practices. However, as the collection of resources grows in…

  8. Identifying Instructional Targets for Early Childhood via Authentic Assessment: Alignment of Professional Standards and Practice-Based Evidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bagnato, Stephen J.; McLean, Mary; Macy, Marisa; Neisworth, John T.

    2011-01-01

    Now at middle age, the field of Early Childhood Intervention (ECI) and its professionals have demonstrated a unique capacity to develop their own practice-based evidence (PBE) and professional standards to forge solutions to challenging professional practice dilemmas. This innovative capacity is no more evident than in designing and implementing…

  9. 14.6 CLOSE-OUT OF FIXED PRICE CONTRACTS Auditors recently have identified three problems with our practices regarding close-out of fixed-price

    E-print Network

    14.6 CLOSE-OUT OF FIXED PRICE CONTRACTS Auditors recently have identified three problems with our practices regarding close-out of fixed-price contracts when 10% or more of the budget remains in the account: 1. In some cases, government auditors are requiring the institution to prove that the original

  10. Identifying and Promoting Transition Evidence-Based Practices and Predictors of Success: A Position Paper of the Division on Career Development and Transition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazzotti, Valerie L.; Rowe, Dawn A.; Cameto, Renee; Test, David W.; Morningstar, Mary E.

    2013-01-01

    This position paper describes the Division of Career Development and Transition's stance and recommendations for identifying and promoting secondary transition evidence-based practices and predictors of postschool success for students with disabilities. Recommendations for experimental research, correlational research, and secondary analysis…

  11. Do Workshops in Evidence-Based Practice Equip Participants to Identify and Answer Questions Requiring Consideration of Clinical Research? A Diagnostic Skill Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyer, Peter C,; Naqvi, Zoon; Dayan, Peter S.; Celentano, James J.; Eskin, Barnet; Graham, Mark J.

    2009-01-01

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) requires practitioners to identify and formulate questions in response to patient encounters, and to seek, select, and appraise applicable clinical research. A standardized workshop format serves as the model for training of medical educators in these skills. We developed an evaluation exercise to assess the ability…

  12. Shifting the Focus to Student Learning: Characteristics of Effective Teaching Practice as Identified by Experienced Pre-Service Faculty Advisors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maynes, Nancy; Hatt, Blaine E.

    2012-01-01

    Cochrane-Smith and Power identify trends in teacher education programs with some relating to heightened teacher accountability for students' learning. In this paper we provide a model that identifies characteristics believed to be critical elements related to a teacher's conceptual focus shifting from an emphasis on their teaching to their…

  13. The promises of qualitative inquiry.

    PubMed

    Gergen, Kenneth J; Josselson, Ruthellen; Freeman, Mark

    2015-01-01

    We address the significance and implications of the formal entry of qualitative inquiry into the American Psychological Association. In our view, the discipline is enriched in new and important ways. Most prominently, the qualitative movement brings with it a pluralist orientation to knowledge and to practices of inquiry. Adding to the traditional view of knowledge as empirically supported theory are research practices congenial with varying accounts of knowledge, including, for example, knowledge as hermeneutic understanding, social construction, and practice-based experience. Added to the goal of prediction are investments in increasing cultural understanding, challenging cultural conventions, and directly fostering social change. The qualitative movement also enriches the discipline as a whole through the special ways in which it inspires new ranges of theory, fosters minority inclusion, and invites interdisciplinary collaboration. Finally, the movement holds promise in terms of the discipline's contribution to society at large. Here we focus on the advantages of knowing with others in addition to about them, and on ways in which qualitative work enhances communication with the society and the world. Realizing these potentials will depend on developments in responsible research and reporting, academic and journal policies, along with the discipline's capacities for appreciating a more comprehensive orientation to inquiry. PMID:25581004

  14. Using Conversion and Design Social R & D Principles to Identify Some Practice Implications for the Training of Trainers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lapides, Jerry

    This literature review examines 12 current works dealing with converting basic research on adult learning, adult development, adult education, instructional methods, and learning theory to practical application in the training of trainers. Focus of the review is on translating principles from scientific language to language more suitable to…

  15. A checklist for identifying determinants of practice: A systematic review and synthesis of frameworks and taxonomies of factors that prevent or enable improvements in healthcare professional practice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Determinants of practice are factors that might prevent or enable improvements. Several checklists, frameworks, taxonomies, and classifications of determinants of healthcare professional practice have been published. In this paper, we describe the development of a comprehensive, integrated checklist of determinants of practice (the TICD checklist). Methods We performed a systematic review of frameworks of determinants of practice followed by a consensus process. We searched electronic databases and screened the reference lists of key background documents. Two authors independently assessed titles and abstracts, and potentially relevant full text articles. We compiled a list of attributes that a checklist should have: comprehensiveness, relevance, applicability, simplicity, logic, clarity, usability, suitability, and usefulness. We assessed included articles using these criteria and collected information about the theory, model, or logic underlying how the factors (determinants) were selected, described, and grouped, the strengths and weaknesses of the checklist, and the determinants and the domains in each checklist. We drafted a preliminary checklist based on an aggregated list of determinants from the included checklists, and finalized the checklist by a consensus process among implementation researchers. Results We screened 5,778 titles and abstracts and retrieved 87 potentially relevant papers in full text. Several of these papers had references to papers that we also retrieved in full text. We also checked potentially relevant papers we had on file that were not retrieved by the searches. We included 12 checklists. None of these were completely comprehensive when compared to the aggregated list of determinants and domains. We developed a checklist with 57 potential determinants of practice grouped in seven domains: guideline factors, individual health professional factors, patient factors, professional interactions, incentives and resources, capacity for organisational change, and social, political, and legal factors. We also developed five worksheets to facilitate the use of the checklist. Conclusions Based on a systematic review and a consensus process we developed a checklist that aims to be comprehensive and to build on the strengths of each of the 12 included checklists. The checklist is accompanied with five worksheets to facilitate its use in implementation research and quality improvement projects. PMID:23522377

  16. Objectification Theory: Areas of Promise and Refinement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moradi, Bonnie

    2011-01-01

    This article elaborates on three themes related to Szymanski, Moffitt, and Carr's major contribution aims. First, the article describes the promise of objectification theory as a grounding framework in research and practice, outlining how this theory integrates key aspects of several other important theoretical models. Second, this article…

  17. The Leadership Promise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallin, Desna

    2004-01-01

    Leadership development programs come in many forms, sizes, designs, perspectives, and purposes, ranging from full-time doctoral programs to lunch-time brown-bag sessions. While the ideal leadership development experience would undoubtedly be the in-depth education in theory, philosophy, and practice that comes from experiencing a full-time…

  18. Building resilience into practical conservation: identifying local management responses to global climate change in the southern Great Barrier Reef

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. A. Maynard; P. A. Marshall; J. E. Johnson; S. Harman

    2010-01-01

    Climate change is now considered the greatest long-term threat to coral reefs, with some future change inevitable despite mitigation efforts. Managers must therefore focus on supporting the natural resilience of reefs, requiring that resilient reefs and reef regions be identified. We develop a framework for assessing resilience and trial it by applying the framework to target management responses to climate

  19. Effective Teaching Practices in Reading that Enhance the Success of Students Identified as At-Risk for Reading Failure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sambucci, Joan N.

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this descriptive study was to investigate the use of decoding strategies, specifically phonemic awareness, alphabetic principle, accuracy and fluency, and vocabulary, to determine if applying the identified decoding strategies would have an effect on the students at-risk for reading failure. The purpose was to determine if these…

  20. Promising drugs against tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Marcus Vinícius Nora

    2006-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is an important public health problem worldwide due to AIDS epidemic, the advent of multidrug resistant strains (MDR) and the lack of new drugs in the market. TB is responsible for almost 3 millions deaths each year. According to WHO (World Health Organization), which declared tuberculosis a global health emergency in 1993, tuberculosis, without a coordinated control effort, will infect an estimated 1 billion people by 2020, killing 70 million. In spite of this problem, there is a lack of development of new TB drugs. For example, it has been nearly 35 years since the introduction of a new class of compounds for the treatment of TB. Thus, there is an urgent need for new drugs to fight against this disease. Considering that, this review aims promising drug candidates that are in development against TB. PMID:18221132

  1. A promising method for identifying cross-cultural differences in patient perspective: the use of Internet-based focus groups for content validation of new Patient Reported Outcome assessments

    PubMed Central

    Atkinson, Mark J; Lohs, Jan; Kuhagen, Ilka; Kaufman, Julie; Bhaidani, Shamsu

    2006-01-01

    Objectives This proof of concept (POC) study was designed to evaluate the use of an Internet-based bulletin board technology to aid parallel cross-cultural development of thematic content for a new set of patient-reported outcome measures (PROs). Methods The POC study, conducted in Germany and the United States, utilized Internet Focus Groups (IFGs) to assure the validity of new PRO items across the two cultures – all items were designed to assess the impact of excess facial oil on individuals' lives. The on-line IFG activities were modeled after traditional face-to-face focus groups and organized by a common 'Topic' Guide designed with input from thought leaders in dermatology and health outcomes research. The two sets of IFGs were professionally moderated in the native language of each country. IFG moderators coded the thematic content of transcripts, and a frequency analysis of code endorsement was used to identify areas of content similarity and difference between the two countries. Based on this information, draft PRO items were designed and a majority (80%) of the original participants returned to rate the relative importance of the newly designed questions. Findings The use of parallel cross-cultural content analysis of IFG transcripts permitted identification of the major content themes in each country as well as exploration of the possible reasons for any observed differences between the countries. Results from coded frequency counts and transcript reviews informed the design and wording of the test questions for the future PRO instrument(s). Subsequent ratings of item importance also deepened our understanding of potential areas of cross-cultural difference, differences that would be explored over the course of future validation studies involving these PROs. Conclusion The use of IFGs for cross-cultural content development received positive reviews from participants and was found to be both cost and time effective. The novel thematic coding methodology provided an empirical platform on which to develop culturally sensitive questionnaire content using the natural language of participants. Overall, the IFG responses and thematic analyses provided a thorough evaluation of similarities and differences in cross-cultural themes, which in turn acted as a sound base for the development of new PRO questionnaires. PMID:16995935

  2. Use of technology assessment databases to identify the issues associated with adoption of structural health monitoring practices.

    SciTech Connect

    Roach, Dennis Patrick; Smith, Bryce; Neidigk, Stephen

    2010-09-01

    The goal is to create a systematic method and structure to compile, organize, and summarize SHM related data to identify the level of maturity and rate of evolution and have a quick and ongoing evaluation of the current state of SHM among research institutions and industry. Hundreds of technical publication and conference proceedings were read and analyzed to compile the database. Microsoft Excel was used to create a useable interface that could be filtered to compare any of the entered data fields.

  3. Building resilience into practical conservation: identifying local management responses to global climate change in the southern Great Barrier Reef

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. A. Maynard; P. A. Marshall; J. E. Johnson; S. Harman

    2010-01-01

    Climate change is now considered the greatest long-term threat to coral reefs, with some future change inevitable despite\\u000a mitigation efforts. Managers must therefore focus on supporting the natural resilience of reefs, requiring that resilient\\u000a reefs and reef regions be identified. We develop a framework for assessing resilience and trial it by applying the framework\\u000a to target management responses to climate

  4. Good Practice Chaplaincy: An Exploratory Study Identifying the Appropriate Skills, Attitudes and Practices for the Selection, Training and Utilisation of Chaplains.

    PubMed

    Carey, Lindsay B; Rumbold, Bruce

    2015-08-01

    This article presents an overview of exploratory research regarding the skills, knowledge, attitudes and practices considered necessary for chaplains to be highly competent in providing holistic care to clients and staff. Utilising a qualitative methodology, two focus groups comprising Salvation Army chaplains and their managers provided data about their expectations of chaplaincy personnel and about the pastoral care interventions undertaken by chaplains. The results indicated that while there were some differences in opinion, nevertheless, in overall terms, there was general agreement between chaplains and their managers about particular personal and professional qualities necessary for chaplains to be considered appropriate and proficient. Evidence was also obtained indicating a need for change with regard to the organisational attitude and culture of The Salvation Army towards chaplaincy. Recommendations are presented concerning (1) the selection criteria for chaplaincy, (2) training and utilisation of chaplains plus (3) issues relating to organizational cultural change necessary to develop a future-ready chaplaincy more suitable for the twenty-first century. PMID:25371346

  5. Practice

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Paul Goldenberg

    2011-10-25

    This article focuses on the role and techniques of effective ("distributed") practice that leads to full and fluent mastery of mental mathematics as well as conceptual growth around properties of arithmetic. It lists the essential mental math skills needed for fluent computation at grades 1, 2, and 3. The article describes a number of strategies for developing mental skills and links to pages with more details on others (some not yet complete). While this article refers to the Think Math! curriculum published by EDC, the methods generalize to any program. The Fact of the Day technique and a related video are cataloged separately.

  6. Managing the Risk of Triggered Seismicity: Can We Identify (and Avoid) Potentially Active Faults? - A Practical Case Study in Oklahoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoback, M. D.; Alt, R. C., II; Walsh, F. R.; Walters, R. J.

    2014-12-01

    It is well known that throughout the central and eastern U.S. there has been a marked increase in seismicity since 2009, at least some of which appears to increased wastewater injection. No area has seen a greater increase in seismicity than Oklahoma. In this paper, we utilize newly available information on in situ stress orientation and relative magnitudes, the distribution of high volume injection wells and knowledge of the intervals used for waste water disposal to identify the factors potentially contributing to the occurrence of triggered seismicity. While there are a number of sites where in situ stress data has been successfully used to identify potentially active faults, we are investigating whether this methodology can be implemented throughout a state utilizing the types of information frequently available in areas of oil and gas development. As an initial test of this concept, we have been compiling stress orientation data from wells throughout Oklahoma provided by private industry. Over fifty new high quality data points, principally drilling-induced tensile fractures observed in image logs, result in a greatly improved understanding of the stress field in much of the state. A relatively uniform ENE direction of maximum compressive stress is observed, although stress orientations (and possibly relative stress magnitudes) differ in the southern and southwestern parts of the state. The proposed methodology can be tested in the area of the NE-trending fault that produced the M 5+ earthquakes in the Prague, OK sequence in 2011, and the Meers fault in southwestern OK, that produced a M~7 reverse faulting earthquake about 1100 years ago. This methodology can also be used to essentially rule out slip on other major faults in the area, such as the ~N-S trending Nemaha fault system. Additional factors leading to the occurrence of relatively large triggered earthquakes in Oklahoma are 1) the overall increase in injection volumes throughout the state in recent years (especially in some particular areas) 2) the injection of waste water in a geologic formation laying directly above crystalline basement rocks and 3) the widespread distribution of injection wells.

  7. The promise of proteomics in animal science

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Proteomics hold significant promise as a method for advancing animal science research. The use of this technology in animal science is still in its infancy. The ability of proteomics to simultaneously identify and quantify potentially thousands of proteins is unparalleled. In this review, we will...

  8. Importance sampling : promises and limitations.

    SciTech Connect

    West, Nicholas J. (Stanford University, Stanford, CA); Swiler, Laura Painton

    2010-04-01

    Importance sampling is an unbiased sampling method used to sample random variables from different densities than originally defined. These importance sampling densities are constructed to pick 'important' values of input random variables to improve the estimation of a statistical response of interest, such as a mean or probability of failure. Conceptually, importance sampling is very attractive: for example one wants to generate more samples in a failure region when estimating failure probabilities. In practice, however, importance sampling can be challenging to implement efficiently, especially in a general framework that will allow solutions for many classes of problems. We are interested in the promises and limitations of importance sampling as applied to computationally expensive finite element simulations which are treated as 'black-box' codes. In this paper, we present a customized importance sampler that is meant to be used after an initial set of Latin Hypercube samples has been taken, to help refine a failure probability estimate. The importance sampling densities are constructed based on kernel density estimators. We examine importance sampling with respect to two main questions: is importance sampling efficient and accurate for situations where we can only afford small numbers of samples? And does importance sampling require the use of surrogate methods to generate a sufficient number of samples so that the importance sampling process does increase the accuracy of the failure probability estimate? We present various case studies to address these questions.

  9. PATONGO: Patterns and Tools for Non-Profit Organizations - a pattern-based approach for helping volunteers to identify and share good practice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Till Schümmer; Jörg M. Haake

    2010-01-01

    Identification and sharing of good practice is an essential ingredient for collaborative voluntary action in non-profit organizations. While current approaches for sharing good practice focus on adopting and describing good practice individually, they fail to address collaborative detection, description, and appropriation of good practice in organizations. We propose a pattern-based approach, which facilitates collaborative creation, improvement, and sharing of good

  10. Current social work perspectives on clinical practice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Max Siporin

    1985-01-01

    Several forms of progress in the development of clinical practice theory and method are identified. There is a renewed positive valuation of psychodynamic approaches, a general acceptance of a systems framework, and a greater operationalization of procedures. The current controversy between the social work scientists and artists concerning research strategies is discussed. Three promising new perspectives—of morality, spirituality, and hermeneutics-are

  11. Nanotechnology: Its Promise and Challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Vicki Colvin

    2009-05-14

    Vicki Colvin of Rice University talks about how nanotechnology-enabled systems, with dimensions on the scale of a billionth of a meter, offer great promise for solving difficult social problems and creating enormous possibilities.

  12. Temporal growth and geographic variation in the use of laboratory tests by NHS general practices: using routine data to identify research priorities

    PubMed Central

    Busby, John; Schroeder, Knut; Woltersdorf, Wolfram; Sterne, Jonathan AC; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Hay, Alastair; Hollingworth, William

    2013-01-01

    Background Laboratory tests are extensively used for diagnosis and monitoring in UK primary care. Test usage by GPs, and associated costs, have grown substantially in recent years. Aim This study aimed to quantify temporal growth and geographic variation in utilisation of laboratory tests. Design and setting Retrospective cohort study using data from general practices in the UK. Method Data from the General Practice Research Database, including patient demographics, clinical details, and laboratory test results, were used to estimate rates of change in utilisation between 2005 and 2009, and identify tests with greatest inter-regional variation, by fitting random-effects Poisson regression models. The study also investigated indications for test requests, using diagnoses and symptoms recorded in the 2 weeks before each test. Results Around 660 000 tests were recorded in 230 000 person-years of follow-up. Test use increased by 24.2%, from 23 872 to 29 644 tests per 10 000 person-years, between 2005 and 2009. Tests with the largest increases were faecal occult blood (121%) and C-reactive protein (86%). There was substantial geographic variation in test utilisation; GPs in some regions requested tests such as plasma viscosity and cardiac enzymes at a rate more than three times the national average. Conclusion Increases in the use of laboratory tests have substantial resource implications. Rapid increases in particular tests may be supported by evidence-based guidelines, but these are often vague about who should be tested, how often, and for how long. Substantial regional variation in test use may reflect uncertainty about diagnostic accuracy and appropriate indications for the laboratory test. There is a need for further research on the diagnostic accuracy, therapeutic impact, and effect on patient health outcomes of the most rapidly increasing and geographically variable tests. PMID:23540482

  13. Solutions for Failing High Schools: Converging Visions and Promising Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Legters, Nettie; Balfanz, Robert; McPartland, James

    Promising solutions to the failings of traditional comprehensive high schools were reviewed to identify basic principles and strategies for improving high schools nationwide. Selected research studies, policy documents, and promising high school programs were reviewed. The review revealed the following principles for helping high schools better…

  14. Transition Educators: Instrumental Personnel in Fulfilling the Promise of ADA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casper, Marta W.

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA) and its implementation at the local level. Identifies barriers to implementation and outlines suggestions for transition educators who are instrumental in fulfilling the promise of ADA. (Author/JOW)

  15. AMLCD cockpit: promise and payoffs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snow, Michael P.; Jackson, Timothy W.; Meyer, Frederick M.; Reising, John M.; Hopper, Darrel G.

    1999-08-01

    The active matrix liquid crystal display (AMLCD) has become the preferred flight instrument technology in avionics multifunction display applications. Current bubble canopy fighter cockpit applications involve sizes up to 7.8 X 7.8 in. active display. Dual use avionics versions of AMLCD technology are now as large as 6.7 X 6.7 in. active display area in the ARINC D sized color multifunction display (MFD). This is the standard instrument in all new Boeing transport aircraft and is being retrofitted into the C-17A. A special design of the ARINC D instrument is used in the Space Shuttle cockpit upgrade. Larger sizes of AMLCD were desired when decisions were made in the early 1990s for the F-22. Commercial AMLCD technology has now produced monitors at 1280 X 1024 resolution (1.3 megapixels) in sizes of 16 to 21 in. diagonal. Each of these larger AMLCDs has more information carrying capacity than the entire F-22A cockpit instrument panel shipset, comprising six separate smaller AMLCDs (1.2 megapixels total). The larger AMLCDs are being integrated into airborne mission crewstations for use in dim ambient lighting conditions. It is now time to identify and address the technology challenges of upgrading these larger AMLCDs for sunlight readable application and of developing concepts for their integration into advanced bubble canopy fighter cockpits. The overall goals are to significantly increase the informational carrying capacity to bring both sensor and information fusion into the cockpit and, thereby, to enable a significant increase in warfighter situational awareness and effectiveness. A research cockpit was built using specialized versions of the IBM 16.1 in and two smaller 10 in. AMLCDs to examine human factors and display design issues associated with these next-generation AMLCD cockpit displays. This cockpit was later upgraded to allow greater reconfigurability and flexibility in the display hardware used to conduct part- task mission simulations. The objective optical characterization of the AMLCDs used in this simulator and the cockpit design are described. Display formats under consideration for test in this cockpit are described together with some of the basic human factors engineering issues involved. Studies conducted in this cockpit will be part of an ongoing joint effort of the hardware-focused aerospace displays team and the pilot-focused human factors team in the Air Force Research Laboratory's Crew System Interface Division. The objective of these studies is to ascertain the payoffs of the large AMLCD promise in combat cockpits.

  16. Washington Promise Scholarship Program Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington State Higher Education Coordinating Board, Olympia.

    The Washington Promise Scholarship program was established to encourage excellent academic performance and to reward low- and middle-income students who demonstrate meritorious achievement in high school by providing them a 2-year scholarship. An evaluation was conducted to study the program and its impact on college attendance and student…

  17. Cost Estimate for Lansing Promise

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Erickcek George A

    2012-01-01

    The Upjohn Institute prepared a cost estimate of a first-dollar and middle-dollar Lansing Promise Scholarship Program. In the first dollar scenario, being eligible for the scholarship would not require the completion of the FAFSA for possible federal scholarship assistance. In the second scenario, it would be a requirement. For both scenarios, researchers prepared a 10-year forecast of the program costs.

  18. The Promise of Quantum Simulation

    E-print Network

    Muller, Richard P

    2015-01-01

    Quantum simulation promises to be one of the primary application of quantum computers, should one be constructed. This article briefly summarizes the history quantum simulation in light of the recent result of Wang and coworkers demonstrating calculation of the ground and excited states for a HeH+ molecule, and concludes with a discussion of why this and other recent progress in the field suggests that quantum simulation of quantum chemistry has a bright future.

  19. The validity of searching routinely collected general practice computer data to identify patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD): a manual review of 500 medical records

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sobana Anandarajah; Tracy Tai; Simon de Lusignan; Paul Stevens; Donal O'Donoghue; Mel Walker; Sean Hilton

    Background. We conducted a search of 12 practices' routinely collected computer data in three localities across the UK and found that 4.9% of the registered population had an estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR) of <60 ml\\/min\\/1.73 m2 (equivalent to stages 3-5 CKD). Only 3.6% of these were known to have renal disease. Although UK general practice is com- puterized, important

  20. Nano-Manufacturing While nanotechnology promises to revolutionize everything from

    E-print Network

    Hill, Wendell T.

    Nano-Manufacturing While nanotechnology promises to revolutionize everything from energy production futuristic systems will remain science fiction without practical and scalable nano-manufacturing capabilities. Researchers at the University of Maryland's NanoCenter have the manufacturing capabilities needed for turning

  1. The neural circuitry of a broken promise.

    PubMed

    Baumgartner, Thomas; Fischbacher, Urs; Feierabend, Anja; Lutz, Kai; Fehr, Ernst

    2009-12-10

    Promises are one of the oldest human-specific psychological mechanisms fostering cooperation and trust. Here, we study the neural underpinnings of promise keeping and promise breaking. Subjects first make a promise decision (promise stage), then they anticipate whether the promise affects the interaction partner's decision (anticipation stage) and are subsequently free to keep or break the promise (decision stage). Findings revealed that the breaking of the promise is associated with increased activation in the DLPFC, ACC, and amygdala, suggesting that the dishonest act involves an emotional conflict due to the suppression of the honest response. Moreover, the breach of the promise can be predicted by a perfidious brain activity pattern (anterior insula, ACC, inferior frontal gyrus) during the promise and anticipation stage, indicating that brain measurements may reveal malevolent intentions before dishonest or deceitful acts are actually committed. PMID:20005830

  2. Promising Practices in Florida: Integrating Academic and Vocational Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Betty, Comp.

    This document is a compilation of 90 successful interdisciplinary projects and activities and integrated academic and vocational curriculum ideas implemented in Florida during the past 3 years. The activities and projects have been submitted by teachers and have not been officially evaluated or reviewed. Each description provides this information:…

  3. Ultrasequencing of the meiofaunal biosphere: practice, pitfalls and promises

    E-print Network

    Pfrender, Michael

    . FONSECA,* D. L. PORAZINSKA, R. M. GIBLIN-DAVIS, W. SUNG, D. M. POWER,§ M. PACKER,­ G. R. CARVALHO,* M. L 5BD, UK, **Institute of Evolutionary Biology, Ashworth Laboratories, University of Edinburgh, King

  4. Natural capital informing decisions: from promise to practice

    E-print Network

    Guerry, Anne D.; Polasky, Stephen; Lubchenco, Jane; Rebecca Chaplin-,Kramer; Daily, Gretchen C.; Griffin, Robert; Ruckelshaus, Mary H.; Bateman, Ian J.; Duraiappah, Anantha; Elmqvist, Thomas; Feldman, Marcus W.; Folke, Carl; Hoekstra, Jon; Kareiva, Peter; Keeler, Bonnie; Li, Shuzhuo; McKenzie, Emily; Ouyang, Zhiyun; Reyers, Belinda; Ricketts, Taylor; Rockström, Johan; Tallis, Heather; Vira, Bhaskar

    2015-06-15

    to conserve or regenerate forest for the provision of watershed services, biodiversity, and carbon sequestration (85). Since implementation, Costa Rica has transitioned from being the country with the highest tropical deforestation rate in the world to one... and improve water quality for people downstream; aquatic habitats support populations of fish caught for food; mangroves stabilize shorelines and decrease damage to people and property from storms; forests and oceans store carbon that helps regulate climate...

  5. Implementing Promising Practices to Prepare Quality Teacher Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gentry, Ruben

    2012-01-01

    The United States does more than just talk; it invests a lot of money in public education. While students are the major focus of concern, teachers are a mainstay in the enterprise. In 2002, the U.S. invested $192 billion in teacher pay and benefits. More than 50% of all dollars allocated by the government for education is paid in salaries for…

  6. Annual Outcomes and Assessment Conference Designing and Assessing Promising Practices

    E-print Network

    Mohanty, Saraju P.

    the successful transfer of students between institutions. Reinold also reviews academic degree proposals from and Research, where he works on undergraduate academic affairs. Reinold Cornelius has been at the Coordinating, the Engineering Recruitment Program and the Texas-STEM Challenge Scholarship program. Reinold facilitates faculty

  7. Illinois Adult Education Bridges: Promising Practices. Transition Highlights. Issue 4

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bragg, Debra; Oertle, Kathleen Marie; Kim, Sujung; Kirby, Catherine; Taylor, Jason; Harmon, Tim; Liss, Loralea

    2011-01-01

    To enhance state-level adult education and employment policy, in 2007 the Joyce Foundation began the Shifting Gears (SG) initiative to assist six states (Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio and Wisconsin) to integrate adult education, workforce development and postsecondary education policies and improve job opportunities for low-skilled…

  8. Promising Practices in Serving Academically Talented Youth in Urban Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worrell, Frank C.

    2011-01-01

    In 1982, the UC Berkeley Gifted Program took in its first cohort. The initial group consisted of 282 middle and high school students. As was the case with many programs for gifted youths, admission to the program was based on students' SAT scores, and urban students were underrepresented. In this article, the author discusses how the program has…

  9. Promising Practices that Keep Rural Schools Open and Community Based.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubel, Keith; Johnson, Robert

    1980-01-01

    Minnesota has enacted legislation and implemented cooperative services to meet student needs. Legislation allows two or more districts to cooperate on programs and services while maintaining local boards and independent school district status. Communicasting, combining elements of communication and broadcasting, enables school districts to share…

  10. Promising Practices in Career and Technology Studies (CTS).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alberta Learning, Edmonton. Learning and Teaching Resources Branch.

    This document contains profiles of 130 successful programs and partnerships in Career and Technology Studies (CTS) in Alberta, Canada. Following an introduction to the CTS program and its implementation, the profiles are organized into 23 sections that follow the strands of the program. The sections cover the following topics: CTS general;…

  11. MEASURING RISKS IN HUMANS: THE PROMISE AND PRACTICE OF EPIDEMIOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Epidemiology has been considered the fundamental science of public health policy. The use of epidemiologic data in environmental health policy has been limited particularly in the environmental regulatory arena. Epidemiologic risk assessment (ERA) is different from risk ass...

  12. Posaconazole: promising but problematic in practice in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Gwee, Amanda; Cranswick, Noel; Curtis, Nigel

    2015-06-01

    Posaconazole is a broad-spectrum antifungal agent used for the prevention and treatment of invasive fungal infections. It is currently only licensed for use in children greater than 12 years of age. Absorption of the oral formulation is unpredictable and affected by mucositis and concomitant medications. We reviewed studies of posaconazole use in children younger than 12 years in relation to attainment of target serum concentrations. PMID:25973938

  13. Managing Educator Talent: Promising Practices and Lessons from Midwestern States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bhatt, Monica P.; Behrstock, Ellen

    2010-01-01

    This policy analysis explains the need for a system approach to educator talent management. The report analyzes how state policies in the Midwest support the development of effective teachers and leaders throughout their career. The report focuses on state policies in teacher preparation including certification and licensure, recruitment and…

  14. Special Education Inclusion. Center for School Success Promising Practices Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Imbimbo, Josephine; Knopf, Naomi

    2009-01-01

    This publication focuses on special education inclusion. Inclusion is a term that expresses commitment to providing specially designed instruction and support for students with special needs in the context of a general education classroom. All students in the school are full members of the community, participating equitably in the opportunities…

  15. Best Practices and Model Truancy Programs. Truancy Prevention in Action

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reimer, Mary S.; Dimock, Kaki

    2005-01-01

    In this publication, six critical components of successful truancy intervention programs have been identified. Each component is discussed based on the research as well as practical considerations. Several program examples are provided at the end of each discussion. Approaches employed by these examples are designated model programs, promising

  16. Identifying strategies to maximise recruitment and retention of practices and patients in a multicentre randomised controlled trial of an intervention to optimise secondary prevention for coronary heart disease in primary care

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Recruitment and retention of patients and healthcare providers in randomised controlled trials (RCTs) is important in order to determine the effectiveness of interventions. However, failure to achieve recruitment targets is common and reasons why a particular recruitment strategy works for one study and not another remain unclear. We sought to describe a strategy used in a multicentre RCT in primary care, to report researchers' and participants' experiences of its implementation and to inform future strategies to maximise recruitment and retention. Methods In total 48 general practices and 903 patients were recruited from three different areas of Ireland to a RCT of an intervention designed to optimise secondary prevention of coronary heart disease. The recruitment process involved telephoning practices, posting information, visiting practices, identifying potential participants, posting invitations and obtaining consent. Retention involved patients attending reviews and responding to questionnaires and practices facilitating data collection. Results We achieved high retention rates for practices (100%) and for patients (85%) over an 18-month intervention period. Pilot work, knowledge of the setting, awareness of change in staff and organisation amongst participant sites, rapid responses to queries and acknowledgement of practitioners' contributions were identified as being important. Minor variations in protocol and research support helped to meet varied, complex and changing individual needs of practitioners and patients and encouraged retention in the trial. A collaborative relationship between researcher and practice staff which required time to develop was perceived as vital for both recruitment and retention. Conclusion Recruiting and retaining the numbers of practices and patients estimated as required to provide findings with adequate power contributes to increased confidence in the validity and generalisability of RCT results. A continuous dynamic process of monitoring progress within trials and tailoring strategies to particular circumstances, whilst not compromising trial protocols, should allow maximal recruitment and retention. Trial registration ISRCTN24081411 PMID:19545366

  17. Drawing a Line in the Sand: Identifying the Borderzone between Self and Other in EL1 and EL2 Citation Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyland, Theresa Ann

    2009-01-01

    Current concerns about academic plagiarism in student writing assume qualitative and quantitative differences in the writing of students for whom English is a first language (EL1) and English is a second language (EL2), but lack precision in measuring those differences. I examined the citation practices of EL1 and EL2 students in a timed writing…

  18. Cultural Neuroscience: Progress and Promise

    PubMed Central

    Chiao, Joan Y.; Cheon, Bobby K.; Pornpattanangkul, Narun; Mrazek, Alissa J.; Blizinsky, Katherine D.

    2013-01-01

    The nature and origin of human diversity has been a source of intellectual curiosity since the beginning of human history. Contemporary advances in cultural and biological sciences provide unique opportunities for the emerging field of cultural neuroscience. Research in cultural neuroscience examines how cultural and genetic diversity shape the human mind, brain and behavior across multiple time scales: situation, ontogeny and phylogeny. Recent progress in cultural neuroscience provides novel theoretical frameworks for understanding the complex interaction of environmental, cultural and genetic factors in the production of adaptive human behavior. Here, we provide a brief history of cultural neuroscience, theoretical and methodological advances, as well as empirical evidence of the promise of and progress in the field. Implications of this research for population health disparities and public policy are discussed. PMID:23914126

  19. International Collaboration: Promises and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Widmer, R. Jay; Widmer, Jocelyn M.; Lerman, Amir

    2015-01-01

    We currently face a myriad of grand global challenges in fields such as poverty, the environment, education, science, and medicine. However, our current means of dealing with such challenges has fallen short, and ingenious solutions are required to overcome the inherent resistance to progress toward ameliorating such difficulties. Here, we highlight the promises and challenges of international collaboration in achieving success toward these trials. We note prior successes in fields such as education, medicine, science, and environmental issues made to date, yet at the same time we do note deficiencies and shortcomings in these efforts. Hence, the notion of international collaboration should be strengthened and encouraged by governments, non-profit organizations, and others moving forward using creative means to bring talented teams together to tackle these challenges across the globe. PMID:25973264

  20. The promise of psychiatric pharmacogenomics.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Steven P

    2015-01-01

    Clinicians already face "personalized" medicine every day while experiencing the great variation in toxicities and drug efficacy among individual patients. Pharmacogenetics studies are the platform for discovering the DNA determinants of variability in drug response and tolerability. Research now focuses on the genome after its beginning with analyses of single genes. Therapeutic outcomes from several psychotropic drugs have been weakly linked to specific genetic variants without independent replication. Drug side effects show stronger associations to genetic variants, including human leukocyte antigen loci with carbamazepine-induced dermatologic outcome and MC4R with atypical antipsychotic weight gain. Clinical implementation has proven challenging, with barriers including a lack of replicable prospective evidence for clinical utility required for altering medical care. More recent studies show promising approaches for reducing these barriers to routine incorporation of pharmacogenetics data into clinical care. PMID:25483343

  1. International collaboration: promises and challenges.

    PubMed

    Widmer, R Jay; Widmer, Jocelyn M; Lerman, Amir

    2015-04-01

    We currently face a myriad of grand global challenges in fields such as poverty, the environment, education, science, and medicine. However, our current means of dealing with such challenges has fallen short, and ingenious solutions are required to overcome the inherent resistance to progress toward ameliorating such difficulties. Here, we highlight the promises and challenges of international collaboration in achieving success toward these trials. We note prior successes in fields such as education, medicine, science, and environmental issues made to date, yet at the same time we do note deficiencies and shortcomings in these efforts. Hence, the notion of international collaboration should be strengthened and encouraged by governments, non-profit organizations, and others moving forward using creative means to bring talented teams together to tackle these challenges across the globe. PMID:25973264

  2. Promising candidates for allergy prevention.

    PubMed

    Gern, James E

    2015-07-01

    Recent advances in understanding environmental risk factors for allergic diseases in children have led to renewed efforts aimed at prevention. Factors that modify the probability of developing allergies include prenatal exposures, mode of delivery, diet, patterns of medication use, and exposure to pets and farm animals. Recent advances in microbial detection techniques demonstrate that exposure to diverse microbial communities in early life is associated with a reduction in allergic disease. In fact, microbes and their metabolic products might be essential for normal immune development. Identification of these risk factors has provided new targets for prevention of allergic diseases, and possibilities of altering microbial exposure and colonization to reduce the incidence of allergies is a promising approach. This review examines the rationale, feasibility, and potential effect for the prevention of childhood allergic diseases and explores possible strategies for enhancing exposure to beneficial microbes. PMID:26145984

  3. Promising therapeutic targets in neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Matthay, Katherine K.; George, Rani E.; Yu, Alice L.

    2012-01-01

    Neuroblastoma, the most common extra- cranial solid tumor in children, is derived from neural crest cells. Nearly half of patients present with metastatic disease, and have 5-year EFS of less than 50%. New approaches with targeted therapy may improve efficacy without increased toxicity. The current review will evaluate three promising targeted therapies, including 131I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG), a radiopharmaceutical taken up by the human norepinephrine transporter expressed in 90% of neuroblastomas, immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies targeting the GD2 ganglioside, expressed on 98% of neuroblastoma cells, and inhibitors of ALK, a tyrosine kinase which is mutated or amplified in approximately 10% of neuroblastoma and expressed on the surface of most neuroblastoma cells. Early phase trials have confirmed the activity of 131I-MIBG in relapsed neuroblastoma, with response rates of about 30%, but the technical aspects of administration of large amounts of radioactivity in young children and the limited access have hindered incorporation into treatment of newly diagnosed patients. Anti-GD2 antibodies have also demonstrated activity in relapsed disease, and a recent phase III randomized trial showed a significant improvement in event-free survival for patients receiving chimeric anti-GD2 (ch14.18) combined with cytokines and isotretinoin after myeloablative consolidation therapy. A recently approved small molecule inhibitor of ALK has promising pre-clinical activity for neuroblastoma, and is currently in phase I and II trials. This is the first agent directed to a specific mutation in neuroblastoma, and marks a new step toward personalized therapy for neuroblastoma. Further clinical development of targeted treatments offers new hope for children with neuroblastoma. PMID:22589483

  4. The promise of reverse vaccinology.

    PubMed

    Heinson, Ashley I; Woelk, Christopher H; Newell, Marie-Louise

    2015-03-01

    Reverse vaccinology (RV) is a computational approach that aims to identify putative vaccine candidates in the protein coding genome (proteome) of pathogens. RV has primarily been applied to bacterial pathogens to identify proteins that can be formulated into subunit vaccines, which consist of one or more protein antigens. An RV approach based on a filtering method has already been used to construct a subunit vaccine against Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B that is now registered in several countries (Bexsero). Recently, machine learning methods have been used to improve the ability of RV approaches to identify vaccine candidates. Further improvements related to the incorporation of epitope-binding annotation and gene expression data are discussed. In the future, it is envisaged that RV approaches will facilitate rapid vaccine design with less reliance on conventional animal testing and clinical trials in order to curb the threat of antibiotic resistance or newly emerged outbreaks of bacterial origin. PMID:25733557

  5. The validity of searching routinely collected general practice computerdata to identify patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD): a manualreview of 500 medical records

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sobana Anandarajah; Tracy Tai; Simon de Lusignan; Paul Stevens; Donal O'Donoghue; Mel Walker; Sean Hilton

    2005-01-01

    We conducted a search of 12 practices' routinely collected computer\\u000d\\u000a\\u0009data in three localities across the UK and found that 4.9\\\\% of the\\u000d\\u000a\\u0009registered population had an estimated glomerular filtration rate\\u000d\\u000a\\u0009(GFR) of 60 ml\\/min\\/1.73 m(2) (equivalent to stages 3-5 CKD). Only\\u000d\\u000a\\u00093.6\\\\% of these were known to have renal disease. Although UK general\\u000d\\u000a\\u0009practice is computerized, important clinical data

  6. Promising Practice for K-16 Project Connect: School-University Collaboration for Service-Learning. Promising Practices Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harwood, Angela; Underhill, Callie

    This issue paper describes a professor's and a teacher's experiences with Project Connect, an ongoing collaborative service-learning project between preservice teachers at Western Washington University (WWU) and eighth-grade students at Fairhaven Middle School in the Bellingham (Washington) Public School District. The paper explains that for both…

  7. Organ printing: promises and challenges.

    PubMed

    Mironov, Vladimir; Kasyanov, Vladimir; Drake, Christopher; Markwald, Roger R

    2008-01-01

    Organ printing or biomedical application of rapid prototyping, also defined as additive layer-by-layer biomanufacturing, is an emerging transforming technology that has potential for surpassing traditional solid scaffold-based tissue engineering. Organ printing has certain advantages: it is an automated approach that offers a pathway for scalable reproducible mass production of tissue engineered products; it allows a precised simultaneous 3D positioning of several cell types; it enables creation tissue with a high level of cell density; it can solve the problem of vascularization in thick tissue constructs; finally, organ printing can be done in situ. The ultimate goal of organ-printing technology is to fabricate 3D vascularized functional living human organs suitable for clinical implantation. The main practical outcomes of organ-printing technology are industrial scalable robotic biofabrication of complex human tissues and organs, automated tissue-based in vitro assays for clinical diagnostics, drug discovery and drug toxicity, and complex in vitro models of human diseases. This article describes conceptual framework and recent developments in organ-printing technology, outlines main technological barriers and challenges, and presents potential future practical applications. PMID:18154465

  8. A Practice/Research Collaborative: An Innovative Approach to Identifying and Responding to Psychosocial Functioning Problems and Recidivism Risk among Juvenile Arrestees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dembo, Richard; Walters, Wansley; Meyers, Kathleen

    2005-01-01

    Effectively identifying and responding to the psychosocial problems and recidivism risk of arrested youths remain critical needs in the field. Centralized intake facilities, such as juvenile assessment centers (JACs), can play a key role in this process. As part of a U.S. National Demonstration Project, the Miami-Dade JAC, serving a…

  9. Telepsychiatry: Promise, potential, and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Malhotra, Savita; Chakrabarti, Subho; Shah, Ruchita

    2013-01-01

    Despite the high prevalence and potentially disabling consequences of mental disorders, specialized mental health services are extremely deficient, leading to the so-called ‘Mental Health Gap’. Moreover, the services are concentrated in the urban areas, further worsening the rural-urban and tertiary primary care divide. Strengthening of and expanding the existing human resources and infrastructure, and integrating mental health into primary care appear to be the two major solutions. However, both the strategies are riddled with logistic difficulties and have a long gestation period. In such a scenario, telepsychiatry or e-mental health, defined as the use of information and communication technology to provide or support psychiatric services across distances, appears to be a promising answer. Due to its enormous potential, a review of the existing literature becomes imperative. An extensive search of literature was carried out and has been presented to delineate the modes of communication, acceptability and satisfaction, reliability, outcomes, cost-effectiveness, and legal and ethical challenges related to telepsychiatry. Telepsychiatry has been applied for direct patient care (diagnosis and management), consultation, and training, education, and research purposes. Both real-time, live interaction (synchronous) and store–forward (asynchronous) types of technologies have been used for these purposes. A growing amount of literature shows that training, supervision, and consultation by specialists to primary care physicians through telepsychiatry has several advantages. In this background, we have further focused on the models of telepsychiatry best suited for India, considering that mental health care can be integrated into primary care and taken to the doorstep of patients in the community. PMID:23441027

  10. The Utility, Limitations, and Promise of Proteomics in Animal Science

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Proteomics experiments have the ability to simultaneously identify and quantify potentially thousands of proteins in one experiment. The use of this technology in animal science is still in its infancy, yet it holds significant promise as a method for advancing animal science research. Examples of...

  11. Problems and Promises: Vocational Development for Disabled Youth in Honduras.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kucij, Daniel N.

    Issues in vocational development for disabled youth in Honduras, Central America, were the focus of an intensive short-term qualitative research effort. Among the research objectives were identifying promising employment opportunities and determining areas where modest investments of technical assistance or other resources would have maximum…

  12. The promise of riboswitches as potential antibacterial drug targets.

    PubMed

    Lünse, Christina E; Schüller, Anna; Mayer, Günter

    2014-01-01

    Riboswitches represent promising novel RNA structures for developing compounds that artificially regulate gene expression and, thus, bacterial growth. The past years have seen increasing efforts to identify metabolite-analogues which act on riboswitches and which reveal antibacterial activity. Here, we summarize the current inventory of riboswitch-targeting compounds, their characteristics and antibacterial potential. PMID:24140145

  13. The promise of automated wellness systems.

    PubMed

    Tashiro, R R; Badger, K

    1996-01-01

    Do automated wellness programs hold out the promise of improving the health of individuals and populations through the establishment of baseline wellness checkpoints? Nurse case managers have a strong interest in this question. The automation of wellness programs and the integration of this information into the continuum of a care information system model offers ongoing, interactive accountability of individual health status. The crowning glory will be the ultimate integration of the individual's personal health game plan with the provider's continuum of care offering. The strength of the nursing profession lies in its traditional role of promoting health through preventive measures (public health nursing) and managing the ill patient's progress toward his/her optimal health status. Therefore, nurses and nurse case managers should embrace wellness programs and wellness data availability. Because of their experience in using and understanding wellness data, nurses are in a unique position. Not only will they be able to assimilate rapidly the use of wellness data into their own practice, they also will be able to guide other professionals in its use. The table in this articles provides examples of the impact that automated wellness program data could have at various stages of the clinical decision-making process. PMID:9205308

  14. Propagation of Six Promising Jojoba Strains through Veneer Grafting

    Microsoft Academic Search

    MUHAMMAD AZHAR BASHIR; MUSHTAQ AHMAD; MUHAMMAD AKBAR ANJUM

    The female plants of six promising jojoba strains i.e. PKJ-1, PKJ-2, PKJ-3, PKJ-4, PKJ-5 and PKJ-6, were propagated after veneer grafting, in the months of August and February during 2002 - 2004. The pooled analysis of the data showed that the grafting practiced in August performed better than that of February. The August grafting resulted in longer sprouts (16.21 cm)

  15. Paratransgenesis: a promising new strategy for mosquito vector control.

    PubMed

    Wilke, André Barretto Bruno; Marrelli, Mauro Toledo

    2015-01-01

    The three main mosquito genera, Anopheles, Aedes and Culex, transmit respectively malaria, dengue and lymphatic filariasis. Current mosquito control strategies have proved unsuccessful, and there still is a substantial number of morbidity and mortality from these diseases. Genetic control methods have now arisen as promising alternative strategies, based on two approaches: the replacement of a vector population by disease-refractory mosquitoes and the release of mosquitoes carrying a lethal gene to suppress target populations. However, substantial hurdles and limitations need to be overcome if these methods are to be used successfully, the most significant being that a transgenic mosquito strain is required for every target species, making genetically modified mosquito strategies inviable when there are multiple vector mosquitoes in the same area. Genetically modified bacteria capable of colonizing a wide range of mosquito species may be a solution to this problem and another option for the control of these diseases. In the paratransgenic approach, symbiotic bacteria are genetically modified and reintroduced in mosquitoes, where they express effector molecules. For this approach to be used in practice, however, requires a better understanding of mosquito microbiota and that symbiotic bacteria and effector molecules be identified. Paratransgenesis could prove very useful in mosquito species that are inherently difficult to transform or in sibling species complexes. In this approach, a genetic modified bacteria can act by: (a) causing pathogenic effects in the host; (b) interfering with the host's reproduction; (c) reducing the vector's competence; and (d) interfering with oogenesis and embryogenesis. It is a much more flexible and adaptable approach than the use of genetically modified mosquitoes because effector molecules and symbiotic bacteria can be replaced if they do not achieve the desired result. Paratransgenesis may therefore become an important integrated pest management tool for mosquito control. PMID:26104575

  16. Station Identifier

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J. Stepan

    1968-01-01

    This paper describes an end office tributary identifier which sends to a toll center the calling subscriber's directory number. It is arranged to interface with the Bell System's centralized automatic message accounting (CAMA) centers. The electronic identifier operates on either a terminal per line, a terminal per station, or mixed basis. In operating, it feeds an ac signal on the

  17. The Promising Syllabus Enacted: One Teacher's Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirsch, Christine Courtade

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe a rationale and strategies for use of the Promising Syllabus (in Bain, 2004, What the best college teachers do). This syllabus reflects the learner-centered paradigm where students take charge of their own learning. The syllabus creates a series of promises between teacher and student, focusing on a…

  18. Identify fractions in multiple ways

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Mrs. Marsh

    2006-10-27

    Practice identifying fractions 1. Compare fractions and find different fractions using the same denominators. 2. Identify fractions on a number line and see if you can do it. 3. Help find grampy and identify the fraction to find him. 4. Comparing fractions with pie charts ...

  19. Promising alternative settings for HPV vaccination of US adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Parth D.; Gilkey, Melissa B.; Pepper, Jessica K.; Gottlieb, Sami L.; Brewer, Noel T.

    2014-01-01

    Vaccination in alternative settings, defined here as being outside of traditional primary care, can help address the pressing public health problem of low human papillomavirus vaccine coverage among adolescents in the United States. Pharmacies are promising because they are highly accessible and have well established immunization practices. However, pharmacies currently face policy and reimbursement challenges. School-located mass vaccination programs are also promising because of their high reach and demonstrated success in providing other vaccines, but control by local policymakers and challenges in establishing community partnerships complicate widespread implementation. Health centers in schools are currently too few to greatly increase access to human papillomavirus vaccine. Specialty clinics have experience with vaccination, but the older age of their patient populations limits their reach. Future steps to making alternative settings a success include expanding their use of statewide vaccine registries and improving their coordination with primary care providers. PMID:24405401

  20. Identifying Erosion

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    COSI

    2009-01-01

    In this environmental science activity (page 3 of the PDF), leaners will identify and explain the causes of erosion. They will observe the effects of erosion on the surrounding area and further explore examples of erosion online. An extension activity allows learners to make a hands-on model of soil erosion. Though this was created as a pre-visit activity for a workshop about water flow and erosion, it makes a great stand-alone activity as well!

  1. Identify Symmetry

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Mrs. Neubert

    2011-03-03

    This unit will teach you how to identify symmetry in everyday objects and mathematical shapes in lines and rotational symmetry. What is line symmetry? Click on the link to find out: Line Symmetry Here is a line activity to see if you understand it: Line Symmetry Class Zone See if you understand the concepts by doing the following quiz: Line Symmetry Work Now for rotational symmetry: Rotational Symmetry See if you understand rotational symmetry by taking this quiz: Rotational Symmetry Work ...

  2. New study on acupuncture contains promising findings

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Grinnell, Max

    2010-06-04

    The Great Beyond: Acupuncture 'works in mice'http://blogs.nature.com/news/thegreatbeyond/2010/05/acupuncture_works_in_mice.htmlYankees starter A.J. Burnett credits acupuncture with helping him stay healthyhttp://www.nj.com/yankees/index.ssf/2010/05/yankees_starter_aj_burnett_cre.htmlNational Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine: Acupuncturehttp://nccam.nih.gov/health/acupuncture/Acupuncture: MedlinePlushttp://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/acupuncture.htmlAmerican Academy of Medical Acupuncture [pdf]http://www.medicalacupuncture.org/Acupuncture has been practiced for thousands of year, but some medical scholars and health care experts remain skeptical of its benefits. Some have claimed that establishing a control group in clinical trails to prove the treatment's efficacy is difficult, if not impossible. This week, a team of researchers at the Center for Translational Neuromedicine at the University of Rochester Medical Center announced that the needle pricks involved in acupuncture might help relieve pain by triggering a natural painkilling chemical. Medical researcher and lead author Dr. Maiken Nedergaard and her colleagues reported their findings in the journal Nature Neuroscience. The findings were based on studies that administered half-hour acupuncture treatments to a group of mice with paw discomfort. Dr. Nedergaard and her colleagues found that adenosine (the natural painkiller in question) levels in the affected areas near the needle insertion points were 24 times greater after treatment. This particular chemical is best known for regulating sleep by inhibiting nerve signals and inflammation. While these are certainly early days for this work, the initial results are promising and it will be interesting to track follow-up studies.The first link will take visitors to a piece from this Monday's Bloomburg Businessweek which reports on this recent study. The second link will take interested parties to an entry from the Nature blog, "The Great Beyond". The entry talks a bit about the new study and also has several additional links. The third link will lead visitors to a recent article from the Newark Star-Ledger about New York Yankee A.J. Burnett's use of acupuncture. Moving on the fourth link leads to the acupuncture information page, provided by the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine. The fifth link will whisk users away to more information on acupuncture from MedlinePlus and the National Institutes of Health. The last link leads to the homepage of the American Academy of Medical Acupuncture, which has information on their professional work and the world of acupuncture.

  3. New Drug Shows Promise Against Psoriasis

    MedlinePLUS

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_153105.html New Drug Shows Promise Against Psoriasis Ixekizumab appeared to ... the disease clearing up, but people on the new drug also reporting a marked improvement in their ...

  4. Early Intervention Shows Promise in Treating Schizophrenia

    MedlinePLUS

    ... 153483.html Early Intervention Shows Promise in Treating Schizophrenia Programs that emphasize resiliency, education and job support ... health of patients in the early stages of schizophrenia, new research reveals. The finding, reported in the ...

  5. Ebola Treatment Shows Promise in Monkey Study

    MedlinePLUS

    Ebola Treatment Shows Promise in Monkey Study Antiviral drug cured animals with advanced infections, researchers say To ... HealthDay News) -- An experimental drug being tested on Ebola victims in Sierra Leone has proven effective in ...

  6. Are Some Cosmetics Promising Too Much?

    MedlinePLUS

    ... A to Z Index Follow FDA En Español Search FDA Submit search Popular Content Home Food Drugs Medical Devices Radiation- ... Consumer Updates Are Some Cosmetics Promising Too Much? Search the Consumer Updates Section Get this high-resolution ...

  7. Cost Estimate for a Beloit Promise

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Erickcek George A

    2011-01-01

    Upjohn Institute staff addressed the feasibility of a Promise-type college scholarship program for Beloit, Wisconsin. The Upjohn Institute estimated the first-dollar, middle-dollar, and last-dollar costs for a Beloit Promise over a 10-year time frame. The cost estimate was based on details that were provided by the planning committee regarding student eligibility, eligible post-secondary institutions, and time frame for the program.

  8. Advanced available-to-promise: Classification, selected methods and requirements for operations and inventory management

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richard Pibernik

    2005-01-01

    Advanced available-to-promise (AATP) comprises of an assortment of methods and tools to enhance order promising responsiveness and order fulfillment reliability. This paper contributes to a theoretical framework for the development of models and algorithms supporting order quantity and due date quoting. At first, alternative generic AATP systems will be identified on the basis of relevant classification criteria. Based upon this

  9. New promise for the electric car: plastic-metal batteries

    SciTech Connect

    Ruby, D.

    1982-02-01

    Plastic metals are much more than a laboratory curiosity. They might find practical application in many products in which metal or semiconductor materials are now used--electromagnetic shielding, photovoltaic cells, diodes and transistors, even wiring. But the most promising potential use is in batteries. Two different organic polymers (long-chain hydrocarbon molecules) are being investigated for possible use in batteries; polyacetylene (the material Pennsylvania University researchers use) and polyparaphenylene (developed at Allied Corp.'s research center in Morristown, N.J.).

  10. Identifying Elements of a Biography

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    ReadWorks

    2012-03-23

    In this resource, students will identify and describe evidence in a text showing that it is a biography. In guided and independent practice students will use A Picture Book of Anne Frank by David A. Adler.

  11. Identifying Species

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Michael DiSpezio

    This two part activity will allow students to investigate biological diversity in the area of their school. They will first prepare a taxonomic key to distinguish between the four insects or spiders that they have selected. All of the keys are combined and students then perform a transect study of a neighborhood field or school playing ground. Finally as a class students will compile a list of the animals and plants that are found within a mile of their school. They may need to use field guides, local resources, taxonomic keys, and species lists to help identify these organisms. Once they have compiled their list they will organize the species into the taxonomic groups they have studied.

  12. Order promising/fulfillment and customer/channel collaboration in supply chain management

    E-print Network

    An, Yimin, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2006-01-01

    This research investigates the order promising and fulfillment and customer and channel collaboration functions of a company. In addition to presenting more precise definitions, we identify and analyze current and emerging ...

  13. Epigenetic Epidemiology: Promises for Public Health Research

    PubMed Central

    Bakulski, Kelly M.; Fallin, M. Daniele

    2014-01-01

    Epigenetic changes underlie developmental and age related biology. Promising epidemiologic research implicates epigenetics in disease risk and progression, and suggests epigenetic status depends on environmental risks as well as genetic predisposition. Epigenetics may represent a mechanistic link between environmental exposures, or genetics, and many common diseases, or may simply provide a quantitative biomarker for exposure or disease for areas of epidemiology currently lacking such measures. This great promise is balanced by issues related to study design, measurement tools, statistical methods, and biological interpretation that must be given careful consideration in an epidemiologic setting. This article describes the promises and challenges for epigenetic epidemiology, and suggests directions to advance this emerging area of molecular epidemiology. PMID:24449392

  14. Implementing Evidence-Based Social Work Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullen, Edward J.; Bledsoe, Sarah E.; Bellamy, Jennifer L.

    2008-01-01

    Recently, social work has been influenced by new forms of practice that hold promise for bringing practice and research together to strengthen the scientific knowledge base supporting social work intervention. The most recent new practice framework is evidence-based practice. However, although evidence-based practice has many qualities that might…

  15. Evaluating Your Program. Supported Education: A Promising Practice. Evidence-Based Practices KIT (Knowledge Informing Transformation)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Unger, Karen V.

    2011-01-01

    Key stakeholders who implement Supported Education may find themselves asking two questions: (1) Has Supported Education been implemented as planned?; and (2) Has Supported Education resulted in the expected outcomes? Asking these two questions and using the answers to help improve Supported Education are critical for ensuring the success of one's…

  16. Building Your Program. Supported Education: A Promising Practice. Evidence-Based Practices KIT (Knowledge Informing Transformation)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Unger, Karen V.

    2011-01-01

    "Building Your Program" is intended to help mental health authorities, agency administrators, and program leaders think through and develop Supported Education. The first part of this booklet gives you background information about the Supported Education model. Specific information about your role in implementing and sustaining Supported Education…

  17. The Promises of Moral Foundations Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Musschenga, Bert

    2013-01-01

    In this article I examine whether Moral Foundations Theory can fulfil the promises that Haidt claims for the theory: that it will help in developing new approaches to moral education and to the moral conflicts that divide our diverse society. I argue that, first, the model that Haidt suggests for understanding the plurality of moralities--a shared…

  18. Promise or political risk for Mexican tourism

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dan A. Cothran; Cheryl Cole Cothran

    1998-01-01

    Mexico today is a major tourism power and its potential in resorts, ecotourism, touring, cruises, and other growing sectors of the industry is bright. But the country is threatened by mounting political, economic, and social problems which could undermine that promise. Mexico has become an increasingly unsafe place to visit. Street crime, drug trafficking, rebel activity, and government corruption have

  19. The Promise of Zoomable User Interfaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bederson, Benjamin B.

    2011-01-01

    Zoomable user interfaces (ZUIs) have received a significant amount of attention in the 18 years since they were introduced. They have enjoyed some success, and elements of ZUIs are widely used in computers today, although the grand vision of a zoomable desktop has not materialised. This paper describes the premise and promise of ZUIs along with…

  20. Ideological Repositioning: Race, Social Justice, and Promise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodge, Samuel R.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, I engage in discourse centrally located in the ideology of race in the United States of America juxtaposed to social justice with promise for tomorrow in higher education and beyond. I assert that social justice in kinesiology requires that once hired, retaining, securing tenured status, and promoting faculty of color means having…

  1. TANOAK ... a bibliography for a promising species

    E-print Network

    Standiford, Richard B.

    of the stands and the high amount of cull material in the. Tanoak ... a bibliography for a promising species. USDA Forest Serv. Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-22, 8 p, raw material for them traditionally is imported from other sources. Recently, however, increased

  2. Selection of promising sites for magma energy experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Carson, C.C.

    1985-01-01

    The Long Valley and Coso Hot Springs areas of California have been identified as the most promising sites for conducting a magma energy extraction experiment. These two locations were selected from among the potential sites on the basis of several factors that are critical to the success of the proposed long-term energy extraction experiment. These factors include the likelihood of the existence of shallow magma targets as well as several other drilling, energy extraction and programmatic considerations. As the magma energy extraction program continues, these sites will be analyzed in detail so that one can be selected as the site for the planned magma experiment.

  3. Cost Estimate for a Newark Promise

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Erickcek George A

    2012-01-01

    The Upjohn Institute will prepare both first-dollar and middle-dollar cost estimates of a proposed Newark, New Jersey Promise over a 10-year time frame. A middle-dollar program requires students to complete their FAFSA and then fills the gap between federal\\/state financial aid and college cost. The estimates will be for a universal college scholarship for all students who have attended Newark

  4. Retinoids in nephrology: Promises and pitfalls

    Microsoft Academic Search

    QIHE XU; JAVIER LUCIO-CAZANA; MASANORI KITAMURA; XIONGZHONG RUAN; Leon G. Fine; Jill T. Norman

    2004-01-01

    Retinoids in nephrology: Promises and pitfalls.BackgroundRetinoids, a family of vitamin A metabolites or analogs, play an important role in regulating cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis.MethodsThe biological importance of retinoids in the kidney and the potential of retinoids in the treatment of renal diseases are reviewed.ResultsVitamin A deficiency and mutations of retinoid nuclear receptors cause abnormalities in fetal kidneys, which might

  5. Identifying Equivalent Fractions

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    J.C. Banfill

    2007-12-12

    This site helps students understand how to identify equivalent fractions by explaining what equivalent fractions are and how to compare two fractions to see if they are equivalent. There is also a list of fractions equivalent to 1/2, 1/3, 1/4, 1/5, and 2/5 so students can begin to see the pattern that emerges. Finally, the site presents an interactive game in which students can practice by naming the equivalent fraction to a given fraction.

  6. The Promise of Standardized Data Collection: School Health Variables Identified by States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Kathleen H.; Bergren, Martha Dewey; Westbrook, Linda Oakes

    2012-01-01

    A gap in data prevents measurement of the needs of school-age children and the influence of school nursing interventions on student health and education outcomes. Its remedy is in the data collected in school health rooms. A national clinical database describing school health will allow education and health leaders to build evidence-based programs…

  7. Water-Well Siting in HardRock Areas: Identifying Promising Targets Using a Probabilistic Approach

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Per Sander

    1997-01-01

    A probabilistic approach to groundwater exploration, using Bayesian statistics, was evaluated in three different settings in hard rock in Botswana and Ghana. Various existing data sources were evaluated for groundwater availability and integrated into a GIS to produce posterior probability maps for subsequent selection of target areas for detailed investigations. The groundwater indicators integrated were 1) lineaments interpreted from remote-sensing

  8. Promising Aedes aegypti repellent chemotypes identified through integrated QSAE, virtual screening, synthesis, and bioassay

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Molecular field topology analysis, scaffold hopping, and molecular docking were used as complementary computational tools for the design of repellents for Aedes aegypti, the insect vector for yellow fever, West Nile fever, and dengue fever. A large number of analogues were evaluated by virtual scree...

  9. Childhood Executive Function Inventory (CHEXI): A promising measure for identifying young children with ADHD?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lisa B. Thorell; Lilianne Eninger; Karin C. Brocki; Gunilla Bohlin

    2010-01-01

    The present study investigated whether the Childhood Executive Function Inventory (CHEXI) can discriminate between young children fulfilling the diagnostic criteria for attention-deficit\\/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and normally developing children. Unlike other executive function rating instruments, the CHEXI focuses specifically on inhibitory control and working memory, without including items that overlap with the diagnostic criteria of ADHD. The CHEXI was found to

  10. When is a Promise a Strategic Liability? 

    E-print Network

    White, Phil; Terry, N

    1997-01-01

    Employers offer pension plans for two main reasons; paternalism and skills market competiveness. Recent changes in legislation and business practice have promoted the scrutiny of the underpinnings for such a management ...

  11. Large noncoding RNAs are promising regulators in embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Ya-Pu; Wang, Yangming

    2015-03-20

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) hold great promises for treating and studying numerous devastating diseases. The molecular basis of their potential is not completely understood. Large noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are an important class of gene regulators that play essential roles in a variety of physiologic and pathologic processes. Dozens of lncRNAs are now identified to control ESC self-renewal and differentiation. Research on lncRNAs may provide novel insights into manipulating the cell fate or reprogramming somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). In this review, we summarize the recent research efforts in identifying functional lncRNAs and understanding how they act in ESCs, and discuss various future directions of this field. PMID:25819086

  12. Practice guidelines

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert S. A. Hayward; Mark C. Wilson; Sean R. Tunis; Gordon H. Guyatt; Karen-Ann Moore; Eric B. Bass

    1996-01-01

    To determine features of the presentation of clinical practice guidelines that may enhance their use by internists, we conducted\\u000a a cross-sectional survey to which 1,513 (60%) of 2,513 eligible internists responded. Endorsements by respected colleagues\\u000a and by major organizations were identified as very important by 72% and 69% of respondents, respectively. Respondents preferred\\u000a short pamphlets and manuals summarizing a number

  13. Truncated norzoanthamine exhibiting similar collagen protection activity, toward a promising anti-osteoporotic drug.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Hironori; Hidaka, Daisuke; Fukuzawa, Seketsu; Tachibana, Kazuo

    2014-01-15

    The marine alkaloid, norzoanthamine, is considered to be a promising drug for osteoporosis treatment. Due to its rarity and complicated structure, a practical supply method must be developed. Here, we designed a truncated norzoanthamine, which has two-thirds of the original structure, and found that it exhibited similar collagen protection activity. PMID:24374275

  14. Exploring the Promise of Population Health Management Programs to Improve Health. Washington, DC: Mathematica Policy Research

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Suzanne Felt-Lisk; Tricia Higgins

    2011-01-01

    Population health management programs—programs targeted to a defined population that use a variety of individual, organizational, and societal interventions to improve health outcomes—are increasingly being looked on by large employers as a promising practice for improving health and outcomes and \\

  15. Strategies for Success: Promising Ideas in Adult College Completion. Policy Exchanges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lane, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    This publication is the first of a series focusing on promising new ideas and innovative practices developed through the Adult College Completion Network. The brief addresses five topics of importance to those working to improve adult college completion: (1) Data availability particular to the returning adult population; (2) Partnerships between…

  16. Turning Ideas into Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Caralee

    2011-01-01

    This article features five schools (John P. Oldham Elementary, Norwood, Massachusetts; R. J. Richey Elementary, Burnet, Texas; Pittsburgh Carmalt Science and Technology Academy, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; John D. Shaw Elementary, Wasilla, Alaska; and Springville K-8, Portland Oregon) that offer five promising practices. From fourth graders learning…

  17. Vaccination against infectious diseases: what is promising?

    PubMed

    Doerr, Hans Wilhelm; Berger, Annemarie

    2014-12-01

    Vaccination has proven to be one of the best weapons protecting the mankind against infectious diseases. Along with the huge progress in microbiology, numerous highly efficacious and safe vaccines have been produced by conventional technology (cultivation), by the use of molecular biology (genetic modification), or by synthetic chemistry. Sterilising prevention is achieved by the stimulation of antibody production, while the stimulation of cell-mediated immune responses may prevent the outbreak of disease in consequence of an acute or reactivated infection. From several examples, two rules are deduced to evaluate the perspectives of future vaccine developments: They are promising, if (1) the natural infectious disease induces immunity or (2) passive immunisation (transfer of antibodies, adoptive transfer of lymphocytes) is successful in preventing infection. PMID:25064610

  18. Comparative neuroscience holds promise for quiet revolutions.

    PubMed

    Bullock, T H

    1984-08-01

    The brain has diversified and advanced in evolution more than any other organ; the variety of nervous systems and behaviors among animal species is thus available for our exploitation. Comparative neuroscience is likely to reach insights so novel as to constitute revolutions in understanding the structure, functions, ontogeny, and evolution of nervous systems. This promise requires pursuit on a wide front, in respect to disciplines and in respect to the species, stages, and states compared. It also requires deliberate concentration on the differences among animals, in addition to the prevailing concern for the basic and common. Neglect of these challenges would be costly. Without due consideration of the neural and behavioral correlates of differences between higher taxa and between closely related families, species, sexes, and stages, we cannot expect to understand our nervous systems or ourselves. PMID:6740319

  19. Review of Some Promising Fractional Physical Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasov, Vasily E.

    2013-04-01

    Fractional dynamics is a field of study in physics and mechanics investigating the behavior of objects and systems that are characterized by power-law nonlocality, power-law long-term memory or fractal properties by using integrations and differentiation of non-integer orders, i.e., by methods in the fractional calculus. This paper is a review of physical models that look very promising for future development of fractional dynamics. We suggest a short introduction to fractional calculus as a theory of integration and differentiation of noninteger order. Some applications of integro-differentiations of fractional orders in physics are discussed. Models of discrete systems with memory, lattice with long-range inter-particle interaction, dynamics of fractal media are presented. Quantum analogs of fractional derivatives and model of open nano-system systems with memory are also discussed.

  20. The promise of Lean in health care.

    PubMed

    Toussaint, John S; Berry, Leonard L

    2013-01-01

    An urgent need in American health care is improving quality and efficiency while controlling costs. One promising management approach implemented by some leading health care institutions is Lean, a quality improvement philosophy and set of principles originated by the Toyota Motor Company. Health care cases reveal that Lean is as applicable in complex knowledge work as it is in assembly-line manufacturing. When well executed, Lean transforms how an organization works and creates an insatiable quest for improvement. In this article, we define Lean and present 6 principles that constitute the essential dynamic of Lean management: attitude of continuous improvement, value creation, unity of purpose, respect for front-line workers, visual tracking, and flexible regimentation. Health care case studies illustrate each principle. The goal of this article is to provide a template for health care leaders to use in considering the implementation of the Lean management system or in assessing the current state of implementation in their organizations. PMID:23274021

  1. Nanomedicine delivers promising treatments for rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Leena Kumari; O'Mary, Hannah; Cui, Zhengrong

    2015-07-01

    An increased understanding in the pathophysiology of chronic inflammatory diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, reveals that the diseased tissue and the increased presence of macrophages and other overexpressed molecules within the tissue can be exploited to enhance the delivery of nanomedicine. Nanomedicine can passively accumulate into chronic inflammatory tissues via the enhanced permeability and retention phenomenon, or be surface conjugated with a ligand to actively bind to receptors overexpressed by cells within chronic inflammatory tissues, leading to increased efficacy and reduced systemic side-effects. This review highlights the research conducted over the past decade on using nanomedicine for potential treatment of rheumatoid arthritis and summarizes some of the major findings and promising opportunities on using nanomedicine to treat this prevalent and chronic disease. PMID:26084368

  2. Promise and challenges of anticoagulation with dabigatran.

    PubMed

    Verma, Ashish; Chhibber, Vishesh; Emhoff, Timothy; Klinger, Dagmar

    2012-08-01

    Dabigatran, marketed as Pradaxa (Boehringer Ingelheim) in the USA, is a direct thrombin inhibitor that holds great promise. It has been shown to reduce the risk of stroke and venous thromboembolism with similar if not greater efficacy than warfarin and with far fewer side effects. However, like other anticoagulants, it can cause severe bleeding complications and lacks a specific antidote with proven efficacy. The patient presented here was on dabigatran and sustained a traumatic intracranial hemorrhage (ICH). The ICH continued to progress despite prompt initiation of 3h of hemodialysis in an effort to remove the offending drug from the circulation. Through this case report, we highlight the challenges of anticoagulation with dabigatran including the lack of routine testing for monitoring its effect and of a specific antidote. We also discuss the potential role of dialysis in treating patients with life-threatening bleeding on dabigatran. PMID:25874093

  3. Triterpenoids as new promising anticancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Petronelli, Alessia; Pannitteri, Gaetano; Testa, Ugo

    2009-11-01

    Triterpenoids are structurally diverse organic compounds, characterized by a basic backbone modified in multiple ways, allowing the formation of more than 20 000 naturally occurring triterpenoid varieties. Several triterpenoids, including ursolic and oleanolic acid, betulinic acid, celastrol, pristimerin, lupeol, and avicins possess antitumor and anti-inflammatory properties. To improve antitumor activity, some synthetic triterpenoid derivatives have been synthesized, including cyano-3,12-dioxooleana-1,9 (11)-dien-28-oic (CDDO), its methyl ester (CDDO-Me), and imidazolide (CDDO-Im) derivatives. Of these, CDDO, CDDO-Me, and betulinic acid have shown promising antitumor activities and are presently under evaluation in phase I studies. Triterpenoids are highly multifunctional and the antitumor activity of these compounds is measured by their ability to block nuclear factor-kappaB activation, induce apoptosis, inhibit signal transducer, and activate transcription and angiogenesis. PMID:19745720

  4. Review of Some Promising Fractional Physical Models

    E-print Network

    Vasily E. Tarasov

    2015-02-14

    Fractional dynamics is a field of study in physics and mechanics investigating the behavior of objects and systems that are characterized by power-law non-locality, power-law long-term memory or fractal properties by using integrations and differentiation of non-integer orders, i.e., by methods of the fractional calculus. This paper is a review of physical models that look very promising for future development of fractional dynamics. We suggest a short introduction to fractional calculus as a theory of integration and differentiation of non-integer order. Some applications of integro-differentiations of fractional orders in physics are discussed. Models of discrete systems with memory, lattice with long-range inter-particle interaction, dynamics of fractal media are presented. Quantum analogs of fractional derivatives and model of open nano-system systems with memory are also discussed.

  5. Power & Promise for student aid represents the George Washington University's commitment to the power of education and the promise of

    E-print Network

    Vertes, Akos

    POWER & PROMISE OVERVIEW Power & Promise for student aid represents the George Washington University's commitment to the power of education and the promise of tomorrow's leaders. Launched in 2009, Power & Promise ensures that qualified students, regardless of financial resources, can take full

  6. Systematic evaluation of satellite remote sensing for identifying uranium mines and mills.

    SciTech Connect

    Blair, Dianna Sue; Stork, Christopher Lyle; Smartt, Heidi Anne; Smith, Jody Lynn

    2006-01-01

    In this report, we systematically evaluate the ability of current-generation, satellite-based spectroscopic sensors to distinguish uranium mines and mills from other mineral mining and milling operations. We perform this systematic evaluation by (1) outlining the remote, spectroscopic signal generation process, (2) documenting the capabilities of current commercial satellite systems, (3) systematically comparing the uranium mining and milling process to other mineral mining and milling operations, and (4) identifying the most promising observables associated with uranium mining and milling that can be identified using satellite remote sensing. The Ranger uranium mine and mill in Australia serves as a case study where we apply and test the techniques developed in this systematic analysis. Based on literature research of mineral mining and milling practices, we develop a decision tree which utilizes the information contained in one or more observables to determine whether uranium is possibly being mined and/or milled at a given site. Promising observables associated with uranium mining and milling at the Ranger site included in the decision tree are uranium ore, sulfur, the uranium pregnant leach liquor, ammonia, and uranyl compounds and sulfate ion disposed of in the tailings pond. Based on the size, concentration, and spectral characteristics of these promising observables, we then determine whether these observables can be identified using current commercial satellite systems, namely Hyperion, ASTER, and Quickbird. We conclude that the only promising observables at Ranger that can be uniquely identified using a current commercial satellite system (notably Hyperion) are magnesium chlorite in the open pit mine and the sulfur stockpile. Based on the identified magnesium chlorite and sulfur observables, the decision tree narrows the possible mineral candidates at Ranger to uranium, copper, zinc, manganese, vanadium, the rare earths, and phosphorus, all of which are milled using sulfuric acid leaching.

  7. Who will deliver on the promise?

    PubMed

    Northridge, Mary E; Healton, Cheryl G

    2012-01-01

    The Doctor of Public Health (DrPH) Core Competency Model aspires to rigorously train future leaders of public health practice to direct and advance societal efforts that address socially rooted causes of health and illness. Although there is no proven formula for success, 3 principles derived from practice may guide the way forward: (1) institutionalize mutual learning and reciprocity between schools of public health and public health agencies and organizations, (2) capitalize on the full resources of the larger university to enrich the educational experiences of DrPH candidates and public health leaders, and (3) globalize the search for model DrPH programs that may be adapted for US schools. Schools of public health must ensure that DrPH programs gain the status and resources needed to fulfill their societal mandate. PMID:22095349

  8. Fulfilling The Pittsburgh Promise[R]: Early Progress of Pittsburgh's Postsecondary Scholarship Program. Monograph

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez, Gabriella C.; Bozick, Robert; Tharp-Taylor, Shannah; Phillips, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    This report presents a detailed assessment of the extent to which "The Pittsburgh Promise"--a postsecondary education scholarship intended to remedy the area's population decline, foster high school completion and college readiness among Pittsburgh district students, and prepare a capable and energetic workforce for the city--has met its goals to…

  9. Promise Neighborhoods: The Promise and Politics of Community Capacity Building as Urban School Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horsford, Sonya Douglass; Sampson, Carrie

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this inquiry is to consider how the U.S. Department of Education's Promise Neighborhoods (PNs) program can improve persistently low-achieving urban schools by making their "neighborhoods whole again" through community capacity building for education reform. As the "first federal initiative to put education at the…

  10. Promising New Developments in Cancer Research

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    Sanders, Hilary C.

    2001-01-01

    The 2001 Joint Meetings of the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR), National Cancer Institute (NCI), and the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) were held this week in Miami, Florida and included numerous presentations on promising cancer therapies. Two of the most prominent developments announced were a possible vaccine against melanoma and a "smart" drug that targets specific cancer cells.To learn more about the vaccine, first read the article from Reuters, which discusses the compound, called HSPPC-96 or Oncophage, developed by Dr. Giorgio Parmiani and colleagues in Milan, Italy. The Oncophage vaccine is comprised of a specific class of proteins, known as heat shock proteins, that for each individual patient contain a unique profile of signals that are the cancer's "DNA fingerprint." This "DNA fingerprint" can then be used to re-program the patient's immune system to recognize, react against, and eliminate cancer while normal cells remain unaffected. This kind of precision was unheard of previously, and positive results have been reported from clinical trials dealing with kidney cancer, melanoma, and colorectal cancer. A press release from the American Association of Cancer Research's Website gives a slightly more technical overview that the one from Reuters. Antigenics, Inc., the drug company developing the vaccine, also has an informational page about Oncophage. For a much more technical summary, hit the abstract by Parmani et al. from the American Society of Clinical Oncology.The other big development announced at the meetings by Dr. Jose Baselga of Barcelona, Spain, is the so-called "smart" cancer drug that specifically targets and blocks the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), a protein that promotes tumor cell growth. This drug has shown promise in clinical trials for patients with non-small-cell lung, colorectal, pancreatic, and head and neck cancer. The Reuters article provides a good overview. Two competing drug companies are developing this "smart" drug -- ImClone, Inc. offers it as an injection called IMC-C225, while AstraZeneca has made a pill form called Iressa. AstraZeneca has an online press release. Visitors to the IMC-C225 informational page from ImClone can view a cool Shockwave animation of the drug intercepting the EGFR. More information on Iressa and IMC-C225 is found in the press release from the AACR and in a factsheet from Cancerbacup.org, a UK-based cancer information service. To get caught up on all of the other research highlights of the 2001 joint meetings, visit the AACR Conference Abstracts page, searchable by author, keyword, or title.

  11. E-cigarettes: promise or peril?

    PubMed

    Riker, Carol A; Lee, Kiyoung; Darville, Audrey; Hahn, Ellen J

    2012-03-01

    Electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) use a heating element to vaporize nicotine and other ingredients, simulating the visual, sensory, and behavioral aspects of smoking without the combustion of tobacco. An ever-growing number of companies around the world manufacture a wide variety of e-cigarette brands, despite scant information on the safety of the ingredients for human inhalation. This article provides an overview of the history, production, and marketing of e-cigarettes, the contents of e-cigarettes and vapor, how they are used, public health concerns, and implications for nursing practice, research, and policy development. PMID:22289406

  12. Correctional Education: Why It Is Only "Promising"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, John

    2006-01-01

    Although many correctional education studies have identified various treatment programs as being effective for reducing recidivism, few, if any, of these studies appear to be above reproach when assessing their methodological vigor. This paper highlights the shortcomings in the current post-treatment quasi-experimental design primarily used to…

  13. Five promising methods for health foresight

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hassan Masum; Jody Ranck; Peter A. Singer

    2010-01-01

    Purpose – This paper aims to show through empirical examples how five foresight methods have provided value in medicine and global health, and to argue for greater use of health foresight. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – Through evaluation, literature search, and personal experiences, five approaches were identified where health foresight has shown strong value: forecasting, scenario planning, Delphi, technology roadmapping, and mass collaboration.

  14. New Ebola Vaccine Shows Promise in Human Trials

    MedlinePLUS

    ... nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_151665.html New Ebola Vaccine Shows Promise in Human Trials It appeared ... WEDNESDAY, March 25, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- An experimental Ebola vaccine shows promise in an early clinical trial, ...

  15. Resveratrol as promising natural radioprotector. A review.

    PubMed

    Dobrzy?ska, Ma?gorzata M

    2013-01-01

    Public feelings concerning radiation are still controversy. The main sources of trouble seems to be the failure nuclear power plant and danger of terroristic attack, which may cause temporally enhanced level of radiation leading to harmful health effects. Since radiation induced cellular damage is attributed primarily to harmful effect of free radicals, molecules with direct free radical scavenging properties are particularly promising as radiation modifiers/protectors, i.e. agents which present prior to or shortly after radiation exposure alter to response of tissues to radiation. Unfortunately, some of known radioprotectors are toxic at doses required for radioprotection. Resveratrol (RSV), an natural polyphenol is produced in several plants in response to injury, stress, bacteria or fungi infection, UV-irradiation and exposure to ozone. It is present in human diet i.e. in fruits and in wine. RSV is known for its antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, analgesic, antiviral, cardioprotective, neuroprotective and antiageing action and it has been shown to have chemopreventive effects with respect to several human disease such as cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis and gastric ulcers. Depending on the dose, RSV may act as antioxidant or as pro-oxidant. RSV improves sperm count and motility in rodents and prevent DNA damage caused by cryptopreservation of human sperm. Moreover, RSV acting with other agents, inhibits the toxic action of them. There are evidences that RSV is able to modulate the behavior of cells in response to radiation induced damage. Minimalization of radiation induced damage to somatic and germ cells by RSV might be useful in cancer therapy to prevent the damage to normal cells as well as in case of radiological accidents. PMID:24693709

  16. Predictors of student success in the Army Medical Department (AMEDD) Licensed Practical Nurse training program (91WM6) as identified by expert nurse educators, instructors, and administrators at Fort Sam Houston Post, San Antonio, Texas 

    E-print Network

    Scialdo, Antonia

    2006-04-12

    The U.S. Army Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN) dates back to the fall of 1947 and evolved from severe professional nursing shortages of World War II. Today, as in the past, to sustain U.S. Army readiness the highly medically ...

  17. Reflections on the Promise of Brown and Multicultural Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grant, Carl A.

    1995-01-01

    Examines the dual meaning of promise (hope and vow) in relation to "Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka, Kansas," discussing how the two conceptions are implemented in a desegregated school and explaining how multicultural education can help meet the dual expectations of "Brown" as promise/vow and promise/hope. (Author/SM)

  18. Vernonia condensata Baker (Asteraceae): a promising source of antioxidants.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Jucélia Barbosa; Temponi, Vanessa dos Santos; Gasparetto, Carolina Miranda; Fabri, Rodrigo Luiz; Aragão, Danielle Maria de Oliveira; Pinto, Nícolas de Castro Campos; Ribeiro, Antônia; Scio, Elita; Del-Vechio-Vieira, Glauciemar; de Sousa, Orlando Vieira; Alves, Maria Silvana

    2013-01-01

    The present study evaluated the antioxidant potential of Vernonia condensata Baker (Asteraceae). Dried and powdered leaves were exhaustively extracted with ethanol by static maceration followed by partition to obtain the hexane, dichloromethane, ethyl acetate, and butanol fractions. Total phenols and flavonoids contents were determined through spectrophotometry and flavonoids were identified by HPLC-DAD system. The antioxidant activity was assessed by DPPH radical scavenging activity, TLC-bioautography, reducing power of Fe(+3), phosphomolybdenum, and TBA assays. The total phenolic content and total flavonoids ranged from 0.19 to 23.11?g/100?g and from 0.13 to 4.10 g/100?g, respectively. The flavonoids apigenin and luteolin were identified in the ethyl acetate fraction. The IC50 of DPPH assay varied from 4.28 to 75.10?µg/mL and TLC-bioautography detected the antioxidant compounds. The reducing power of Fe(+3) was 19.98 to 336.48? ?g/mL, while the reaction with phosphomolybdenum ranged from 13.54% to 32.63% and 56.02% to 135.00% considering ascorbic acid and rutin as reference, respectively. At 30?mg/mL, the ethanolic extract and fractions revealed significant effect against lipid peroxidation. All these data sustain that V. condensata is an important and promising source of bioactive substances with antioxidant activity. PMID:24489987

  19. Vernonia condensata Baker (Asteraceae): A Promising Source of Antioxidants

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Jucélia Barbosa; Temponi, Vanessa dos Santos; Gasparetto, Carolina Miranda; Fabri, Rodrigo Luiz; Aragão, Danielle Maria de Oliveira; Pinto, Nícolas de Castro Campos; Ribeiro, Antônia; Scio, Elita; Del-Vechio-Vieira, Glauciemar; de Sousa, Orlando Vieira

    2013-01-01

    The present study evaluated the antioxidant potential of Vernonia condensata Baker (Asteraceae). Dried and powdered leaves were exhaustively extracted with ethanol by static maceration followed by partition to obtain the hexane, dichloromethane, ethyl acetate, and butanol fractions. Total phenols and flavonoids contents were determined through spectrophotometry and flavonoids were identified by HPLC-DAD system. The antioxidant activity was assessed by DPPH radical scavenging activity, TLC-bioautography, reducing power of Fe+3, phosphomolybdenum, and TBA assays. The total phenolic content and total flavonoids ranged from 0.19 to 23.11?g/100?g and from 0.13 to 4.10 g/100?g, respectively. The flavonoids apigenin and luteolin were identified in the ethyl acetate fraction. The IC50 of DPPH assay varied from 4.28 to 75.10?µg/mL and TLC-bioautography detected the antioxidant compounds. The reducing power of Fe+3 was 19.98 to 336.48??g/mL, while the reaction with phosphomolybdenum ranged from 13.54% to 32.63% and 56.02% to 135.00% considering ascorbic acid and rutin as reference, respectively. At 30?mg/mL, the ethanolic extract and fractions revealed significant effect against lipid peroxidation. All these data sustain that V. condensata is an important and promising source of bioactive substances with antioxidant activity. PMID:24489987

  20. Exploring determinants of vegetable parenting practices

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of this study was to find out if food parenting practices show promise for positively influencing child dietary intake. However, it is unclear what factors motivate parents to engage in vegetable parenting practices. We developed a Model of Goal Directed Vegetable Parenting Practices (MG...

  1. Heating the patient: a promising approach?

    PubMed

    van der Zee, J

    2002-08-01

    There is a clear rationale for using hyperthermia in cancer treatment. Treatment at temperatures between 40 and 44 degrees C is cytotoxic for cells in an environment with a low pO(2) and low pH, conditions that are found specifically within tumour tissue, due to insufficient blood perfusion. Under such conditions radiotherapy is less effective, and systemically applied cytotoxic agents will reach such areas in lower concentrations than in well perfused areas. Therefore, the addition of hyperthermia to radiotherapy or chemotherapy will result in at least an additive effect. Furthermore, the effects of both radiotherapy and many drugs are enhanced at an increased temperature. Hyperthermia can be applied by several methods: local hyperthermia by external or internal energy sources, regional hyperthermia by perfusion of organs or limbs, or by irrigation of body cavities, and whole body hyperthermia. The use of hyperthermia alone has resulted in complete overall response rates of 13%. The clinical value of hyperthermia in addition to other treatment modalities has been shown in randomised trials. Significant improvement in clinical outcome has been demonstrated for tumours of the head and neck, breast, brain, bladder, cervix, rectum, lung, oesophagus, vulva and vagina, and also for melanoma. Additional hyperthermia resulted in remarkably higher (complete) response rates, accompanied by improved local tumour control rates, better palliative effects and/or better overall survival rates. Generally, when combined with radiotherapy, no increase in radiation toxicity could be demonstrated. Whether toxicity from chemotherapy is enhanced depends on sequence of the two modalities, and on which tissues are heated. Toxicity from hyperthermia cannot always be avoided, but is usually of limited clinical relevance. Recent developments include improvements in heating techniques and thermometry, development of hyperthermia treatment planning models, studies on heat shock proteins and an effect on anti-cancer immune responses, drug targeting to tumours, bone marrow purging, combination with drugs targeting tumour vasculature, and the role of hyperthermia in gene therapy. The clinical results achieved to date have confirmed the expectations raised by results from experimental studies. These findings justify using hyperthermia as part of standard treatment in tumour sites for which its efficacy has been proven and, furthermore, to initiate new studies with other tumours. Hyperthermia is certainly a promising approach and deserves more attention than it has received until now. PMID:12181239

  2. Neuroimaging in Psychiatric Pharmacogenetics Research: The Promise and Pitfalls

    PubMed Central

    Falcone, Mary; Smith, Ryan M; Chenoweth, Meghan J; Kumar Bhattacharjee, Abesh; Kelsoe, John R; Tyndale, Rachel F; Lerman, Caryn

    2013-01-01

    The integration of research on neuroimaging and pharmacogenetics holds promise for improving treatment for neuropsychiatric conditions. Neuroimaging may provide a more sensitive early measure of treatment response in genetically defined patient groups, and could facilitate development of novel therapies based on an improved understanding of pathogenic mechanisms underlying pharmacogenetic associations. This review summarizes progress in efforts to incorporate neuroimaging into genetics and treatment research on major psychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia, major depressive disorder, bipolar disorder, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, and addiction. Methodological challenges include: performing genetic analyses in small study populations used in imaging studies; inclusion of patients with psychiatric comorbidities; and the extensive variability across studies in neuroimaging protocols, neurobehavioral task probes, and analytic strategies. Moreover, few studies use pharmacogenetic designs that permit testing of genotype × drug effects. As a result of these limitations, few findings have been fully replicated. Future studies that pre-screen participants for genetic variants selected a priori based on drug metabolism and targets have the greatest potential to advance the science and practice of psychiatric treatment. PMID:23793356

  3. Ginseng: a promising neuroprotective strategy in stroke

    PubMed Central

    Rastogi, Vaibhav; Santiago-Moreno, Juan; Doré, Sylvain

    2015-01-01

    Ginseng is one of the most widely used herbal medicines in the world. It has been used in the treatment of various ailments and to boost immunity for centuries; especially in Asian countries. The most common ginseng variant in traditional herbal medicine is ginseng, which is made from the peeled and dried root of Panax Ginseng. Ginseng has been suggested as an effective treatment for a vast array of neurological disorders, including stroke and other acute and chronic neurodegenerative disorders. Ginseng’s neuroprotective effects are focused on the maintenance of homeostasis. This review involves a comprehensive literature search that highlights aspects of ginseng’s putative neuroprotective effectiveness, focusing on stroke. Attenuation of inflammation through inhibition of various proinflammatory mediators, along with suppression of oxidative stress by various mechanisms, including activation of the cytoprotective transcriptional factor Nrf2, which results in decrease in reactive oxygen species, could account for its neuroprotective efficacy. It can also prevent neuronal death as a result of stroke, thus decreasing anatomical and functional stroke damage. Although there are diverse studies that have investigated the mechanisms involved in the efficacy of ginseng in treating disorders, there is still much that needs to be clarified. Both in vitro and in vivo studies including randomized controlled clinical trials are necessary to develop in-depth knowledge of ginseng and its practical applications. PMID:25653588

  4. Homogeneous Immunoassays: Historical Perspective and Future Promise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullman, Edwin F.

    1999-06-01

    The founding and growth of Syva Company is examined in the context of its leadership role in the development of homogeneous immunoassays. The simple mix and read protocols of these methods offer advantages in routine analytical and clinical applications. Early homogeneous methods were based on insensitive detection of immunoprecipitation during antigen/antibody binding. The advent of reporter groups in biology provided a means of quantitating immunochemical binding by labeling antibody or antigen and physically separating label incorporated into immune complexes from free label. Although high sensitivity was achieved, quantitative separations were experimentally demanding. Only when it became apparent that reporter groups could provide information, not only about the location of a molecule but also about its microscopic environment, was it possible to design practical non-separation methods. The evolution of early homogenous immunoassays was driven largely by the development of improved detection strategies. The first commercial spin immunoassays, developed by Syva for drug abuse testing during the Vietnam war, were followed by increasingly powerful methods such as immunochemical modulation of enzyme activity, fluorescence, and photo-induced chemiluminescence. Homogeneous methods that quantify analytes at femtomolar concentrations within a few minutes now offer important new opportunities in clinical diagnostics, nucleic acid detection and drug discovery.

  5. The Promise of Antiretrovirals for HIV Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Flash, Charlene; Krakower, Douglas; Mayer, Kenneth H.

    2013-01-01

    With an estimated 2.6 million new HIV infections diagnosed annually, the world needs new prevention strategies to partner with condom use, harm reduction approaches for injection drug users, and male circumcision. Antiretrovirals can reduce the risk of mother-to-child HIV transmission and limit HIV acquisition after occupational exposure. Macaque models and clinical trials demonstrate efficacy of oral or topical antiretrovirals used prior to HIV exposure to prevent HIV transmission, ie pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP). Early initiation of effective HIV treatment in serodiscordant couples results in a 96% decrease in HIV transmission. HIV testing to determine serostatus and identify undiagnosed persons is foundational to these approaches. The relative efficacy of different approaches, adherence, cost and long-term safety will affect uptake and impact of these strategies. Ongoing research will help characterize the role for oral and topical formulations and help quantify potential benefits in sub-populations at risk for HIV acquisition. PMID:22351302

  6. Regional HTA in Italy: promising or confusing?

    PubMed

    Garattini, Livio; van de Vooren, Katelijne; Curto, Alessandro

    2012-12-01

    We assessed the actual implementation and achievements of regional HTA in Italy. We conducted a web-based analysis (updated until July 2012). Six key elements were identified: availability of official documents, existence of a specific workgroup, involvement of external organizations, formal funds for HTA, publication of HTA reports, and membership of HTA networks. Then, we searched all HTA reports retrieved by key words to analyze whether their contents included clinical efficacy, economic evaluation, legal issues, ethics and organization. Two researchers analyzed the information separately, as a double check. Sixteen regions have formally established a structured workgroup inside their organizations. Specific funding for HTA activities could be traced in six regions, web-available reports only in four. Around 91% of the total reports concerned drugs. Contents mostly focused on epidemiological and clinical issues, economic evaluation was often restricted to a brief analysis of costs. Only a few reports mentioned organizational implications; ethical, legal and social issues were lacking. This survey showed a very uneven picture of HTA in the Italian regions. As expected, not all the regions were able to perform HTA, probably on account of their wide differences in size, tradition and skills in the health care field. PMID:23141760

  7. Ethnography in community psychology: promises and tensions.

    PubMed

    Case, Andrew D; Todd, Nathan R; Kral, Michael J

    2014-09-01

    Community psychology recognizes the need for research methods that illuminate context, culture, diversity, and process. One such method, ethnography, has crossed into multiple disciplines from anthropology, and indeed, community psychologists are becoming community ethnographers. Ethnographic work stands at the intersection of bridging universal questions with the particularities of people and groups bounded in time, geographic location, and social location. Ethnography is thus historical and deeply contextual, enabling a rich, in-depth understanding of communities that is aligned with the values and goals of community psychology. The purpose of this paper is to elucidate the potential of ethnography for community psychology and to encourage its use within the field as a method to capture culture and context, to document process, and to reveal how social change and action occur within and through communities. We discuss the method of ethnography, draw connections to community psychology values and goals, and identify tensions from our experiences doing ethnography. Overall, we assert that ethnography is a method that resonates with community psychology and present this paper as a resource for those interested in using this method in their research or community activism. PMID:24733402

  8. Lean in healthcare: the unfilled promise?

    PubMed

    Radnor, Zoe J; Holweg, Matthias; Waring, Justin

    2012-02-01

    In an effort to improve operational efficiency, healthcare services around the world have adopted process improvement methodologies from the manufacturing sector, such as Lean Production. In this paper we report on four multi-level case studies of the implementation of Lean in the English NHS. Our results show that this generally involves the application of specific Lean 'tools', such as 'kaizen blitz' and 'rapid improvement events', which tend to produce small-scale and localised productivity gains. Although this suggests that Lean might not currently deliver the efficiency improvements desired in policy, the evolution of Lean in the manufacturing sector also reveals this initial focus on the 'tool level'. In moving to a more system-wide approach, however, we identify significant contextual differences between healthcare and manufacturing that result in two critical breaches of the assumptions behind Lean. First, the customer and commissioner in the private sector are the one and the same, which is essential in determining 'customer value' that drives process improvement activities. Second, healthcare is predominantly designed to be capacity-led, and hence there is limited ability to influence demand or make full use of freed-up resources. What is different about this research is that these breaches can be regarded as not being primarily 'professional' in origin but actually more 'organisational' and 'managerial' and, if not addressed could severely constrain Lean's impact on healthcare productivity at the systems level. PMID:21414703

  9. Multipotent stem cells of the heart—do they have therapeutic promise?

    PubMed Central

    Leite, Camila F.; Almeida, Thalles R.; Lopes, Carolina S.; Dias da Silva, Valdo J.

    2015-01-01

    The last decade has brought a comprehensive change in our view of cardiac remodeling processes under both physiological and pathological conditions, and cardiac stem cells have become important new players in the general mainframe of cardiac homeostasis. Different types of cardiac stem cells show different capacities for differentiation into the three major cardiac lineages: myocytes, endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells. Physiologically, cardiac stem cells contribute to cardiac homeostasis through continual cellular turnover. Pathologically, these cells exhibit a high level of proliferative activity in an apparent attempt to repair acute cardiac injury, indicating that these cells possess (albeit limited) regenerative potential. In addition to cardiac stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells represent another multipotent cell population in the heart; these cells are located in regions near pericytes and exhibit regenerative, angiogenic, antiapoptotic, and immunosuppressive properties. The discovery of these resident cardiac stem cells was followed by a number of experimental studies in animal models of cardiomyopathies, in which cardiac stem cells were tested as a therapeutic option to overcome the limited transdifferentiating potential of hematopoietic or mesenchymal stem cells derived from bone marrow. The promising results of these studies prompted clinical studies of the role of these cells, which have demonstrated the safety and practicability of cellular therapies for the treatment of heart disease. However, questions remain regarding this new therapeutic approach. Thus, the aim of the present review was to discuss the multitude of different cardiac stem cells that have been identified, their possible functional roles in the cardiac regenerative process, and their potential therapeutic uses in treating cardiac diseases. PMID:26005421

  10. MATERIAL FLOW ANALYSIS FOR IDENTIFYING RARE EARTH ELEMENT

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    and yttrium. REEs are identified as "critical" in the sense that they combine high levels of industry to be the most promising in terms of recycling potential; namely permanent magnets, NiMH batteries and phosphors

  11. Serological markers in psoriatic arthritis: promising tools.

    PubMed

    Ramonda, Roberta; Modesti, Valentina; Ortolan, Augusta; Scanu, Anna; Bassi, Nicola; Oliviero, Francesca; Punzi, Leonardo

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to identify specific biomarkers that could be used to screen for psoriatic arthritis (PsA), as well as to assess disease activity and treatment outcome in affected patients. Forty-three outpatients considered eligible for anti-TNF-? treatment (etanercept 50?mg/week) were enrolled. Serum samples of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), metalloproteinase-3 (MMP3), pentraxin 3 (PTX3), and high-sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) were collected at baseline (t0) and after 6 (t6), 12 (t12), and 24 months (t24) of treatment. Baseline values were compared with those of a group of healthy controls matched for age and sex. Disease activity scores and functional tests (DAS28, BASDAI, PASI, BASFI, HAQ, VAS pain, and VAS patient global disease activity) after treatment were found to be significantly different from baseline values. At baseline, MMP3, hs-CRP and VEGF values in the PsA-patients were found to be significantly higher with respect to levels in the controls. There were no differences in the PTX3 values. MMP3 was significantly lower at t6 (P?

  12. Utility of remotely sensed data for identification of soil conservation practices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pelletier, R. E.; Griffin, R. H.

    1986-01-01

    Discussed are a variety of remotely sensed data sources that may have utility in the identification of conservation practices and related linear features. Test sites were evaluated in Alabama, Kansas, Mississippi, and Oklahoma using one or more of a variety of remotely sensed data sources, including color infrared photography (CIR), LANDSAT Thematic Mapper (TM) data, and aircraft-acquired Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner (TIMS) data. Both visual examination and computer-implemented enhancement procedures were used to identify conservation practices and other linear features. For the Kansas, Mississippi, and Oklahoma test sites, photo interpretations of CIR identified up to 24 of the 109 conservation practices from a matrix derived from the SCS National Handbook of Conservation Practices. The conservation practice matrix was modified to predict the possibility of identifying the 109 practices at various photographic scales based on the observed results as well as photo interpreter experience. Some practices were successfully identified in TM data through visual identification, but a number of existing practices were of such size and shape that the resolution of the TM could not detect them accurately. A series of computer-automated decorrelation and filtering procedures served to enhance the conservation practices in TM data with only fair success. However, features such as field boundaries, roads, water bodies, and the Urban/Ag interface were easily differentiated. Similar enhancement techniques applied to 5 and 10 meter TIMS data proved much more useful in delineating terraces, grass waterways, and drainage ditches as well as the features mentioned above, due partly to improved resolution and partly to thermally influenced moisture conditions. Spatially oriented data such as those derived from remotely sensed data offer some promise in the inventory and monitoring of conservation practices as well as in supplying parameter data for a variety of computer-implemented agricultural models.

  13. Evidence-Based Practices in Secondary Transition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Test, David W.; Fowler, Catherine H.; Richter, Sharon M.; White, James; Mazzotti, Valerie; Walker, Allison R.; Kohler, Paula; Kortering, Larry

    2009-01-01

    A literature review was conducted to identify evidence-based practices in secondary transition using quality indicator checklists for experimental research. Practices were categorized by the Taxonomy for Transition Programming. Overall, 32 secondary transition evidence-based practices were identified. Two practices had a strong level of evidence,…

  14. Exploring the promises of intersectionality for advancing women's health research.

    PubMed

    Hankivsky, Olena; Reid, Colleen; Cormier, Renee; Varcoe, Colleen; Clark, Natalie; Benoit, Cecilia; Brotman, Shari

    2010-01-01

    Women's health research strives to make change. It seeks to produce knowledge that promotes action on the variety of factors that affect women's lives and their health. As part of this general movement, important strides have been made to raise awareness of the health effects of sex and gender. The resultant base of knowledge has been used to inform health research, policy, and practice. Increasingly, however, the need to pay better attention to the inequities among women that are caused by racism, colonialism, ethnocentrism, heterosexism, and able-bodism, is confronting feminist health researchers and activists. Researchers are seeking new conceptual frameworks that can transform the design of research to produce knowledge that captures how systems of discrimination or subordination overlap and "articulate" with one another. An emerging paradigm for women's health research is intersectionality. Intersectionality places an explicit focus on differences among groups and seeks to illuminate various interacting social factors that affect human lives, including social locations, health status, and quality of life. This paper will draw on recently emerging intersectionality research in the Canadian women's health context in order to explore the promises and practical challenges of the processes involved in applying an intersectionality paradigm. We begin with a brief overview of why the need for an intersectionality approach has emerged within the context of women's health research and introduce current thinking about how intersectionality can inform and transform health research more broadly. We then highlight novel Canadian research that is grappling with the challenges in addressing issues of difference and diversity. In the analysis of these examples, we focus on a largely uninvestigated aspect of intersectionality research - the challenges involved in the process of initiating and developing such projects and, in particular, the meaning and significance of social locations for researchers and participants who utilize an intersectionality approach. The examples highlighted in the paper represent important shifts in the health field, demonstrating the potential of intersectionality for examining the social context of women's lives, as well as developing methods which elucidate power, create new knowledge, and have the potential to inform appropriate action to bring about positive social change. PMID:20181225

  15. Exploring the promises of intersectionality for advancing women's health research

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Women's health research strives to make change. It seeks to produce knowledge that promotes action on the variety of factors that affect women's lives and their health. As part of this general movement, important strides have been made to raise awareness of the health effects of sex and gender. The resultant base of knowledge has been used to inform health research, policy, and practice. Increasingly, however, the need to pay better attention to the inequities among women that are caused by racism, colonialism, ethnocentrism, heterosexism, and able-bodism, is confronting feminist health researchers and activists. Researchers are seeking new conceptual frameworks that can transform the design of research to produce knowledge that captures how systems of discrimination or subordination overlap and "articulate" with one another. An emerging paradigm for women's health research is intersectionality. Intersectionality places an explicit focus on differences among groups and seeks to illuminate various interacting social factors that affect human lives, including social locations, health status, and quality of life. This paper will draw on recently emerging intersectionality research in the Canadian women's health context in order to explore the promises and practical challenges of the processes involved in applying an intersectionality paradigm. We begin with a brief overview of why the need for an intersectionality approach has emerged within the context of women's health research and introduce current thinking about how intersectionality can inform and transform health research more broadly. We then highlight novel Canadian research that is grappling with the challenges in addressing issues of difference and diversity. In the analysis of these examples, we focus on a largely uninvestigated aspect of intersectionality research - the challenges involved in the process of initiating and developing such projects and, in particular, the meaning and significance of social locations for researchers and participants who utilize an intersectionality approach. The examples highlighted in the paper represent important shifts in the health field, demonstrating the potential of intersectionality for examining the social context of women's lives, as well as developing methods which elucidate power, create new knowledge, and have the potential to inform appropriate action to bring about positive social change. PMID:20181225

  16. The Struggle between Conflicting Beliefs: On the Promise of Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boman, Ylva

    2006-01-01

    Education is thought to provide a certain outcome--a "promise". I argue that a promise that education will counteract cultural and social disintegration involves a risk of engendering narrow social and cultural incorporation. On what reasonable basis could education contribute to civic life, when contemporary Western society is represented by a…

  17. The Premise and Promise of Inquiry Based Mathematics in Pre-Service Teacher Education: A Poststructuralist Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Mary

    2004-01-01

    Many teacher educators have recently implemented inquiry based instructional practices into their programs (Crawford & Deer, 1993 ; Foss & Kleinsasser, 1996 ; Klein, 1996 , 1997 , 1998 , 2001 ; Schuck, 1996 ; Tillema & Knol, 1997). In mathematics education the promise has been that pre-service teachers' socialization into new interactive…

  18. Arctic Observing Network Data Management: Current Capabilities and Their Promise for the Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, J.; Fetterer, F.; Moore, J. A.

    2008-12-01

    CADIS (the Cooperative Arctic Data and Information Service) serves as the data management, discovery and delivery component of the Arctic Observing Network (AON). As an International Polar Year (IPY) initiative, AON comprises 34 land, atmosphere and ocean observation sites, and will acquire much of the data coming from the interagency Study of Environmental Arctic Change (SEARCH). CADIS is tasked with ensuring that these observational data are managed for long term use by members of the entire Earth System Science community. Portions of CADIS are either in use by the community or available for testing. We now have an opportunity to evaluate the feedback received from our users, to identify any design shortcomings, and to identify those elements which serve their purpose well and will support future development. This presentation will focus on the nuts-and-bolts of the CADIS development to date, with an eye towards presenting lessons learned and best practices based on our experiences so far. The topics include: - How did we assess our users' needs, and how are those contributions reflected in the end product and its capabilities? - Why did we develop a CADIS metadata profile, and how does it allow CADIS to support preservation and scientific interoperability? - How can we shield the user from metadata complexities (especially those associated with various standards) while still obtaining the metadata needed to support an effective data management system? - How can we bridge the gap between the data storage formats considered convenient by researchers in the field, and those which are necessary to provide data interoperability? - What challenges have been encountered in our efforts to provide access to federated data (data stored outside of the CADIS system)? - What are the data browsing and visualization needs of the AON community, and which tools and technologies are most promising in terms of supporting those needs? A live demonstration of the current capabilities of the CADIS system will be included as time and logistics allow. CADIS is a joint effort of the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research (UCAR), the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC), and the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR).

  19. Health Practices of School Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petch-Levine, Deborah; Cureton, Virginia Young; Canham, Daryl; Murray, Meg

    2003-01-01

    The health practices of school nurses affect our role as advocates and educators to promote the health of youth. This study describes the health practices of a convenience sample of 388 school nurses who attended the business meeting at an annual school nurse conference. A self-administered, 40-item questionnaire identified health practices of…

  20. Practice-based small group learning programs

    PubMed Central

    Zaher, Eman; Ratnapalan, Savithiri

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective To identify the format, content, and effects of practice-based small group learning (PBSGL) programs involving FPs. Data sources The Ovid MEDLINE, EMBASE, and ERIC databases were searched from inception to the second week of November 2011, yielding 99 articles. Study selection Articles were included in the analysis if they described the format or content of or evaluated PBSGL programs among FPs. Thirteen articles were included in the analysis. Synthesis Two main PBSGL formats exist. The first is self-directed learning, which includes review and discussion of troubling or challenging patient cases. The contents of such programs vary with different teaching styles. The second format targets specific problems from practice to improve certain knowledge or skills or implement new guidelines by using patient cases to stimulate discussion of the selected topic. Both formats are similar in their ultimate goal, equally important, and well accepted by learners and facilitators. Evaluations of learners’ perceptions and learning outcomes indicate that PBSGL constitutes a feasible and effective method of professional development. Conclusion Current evidence suggests that PBSGL is a promising method of continuing professional development for FPs. Such programs can be adapted according to learning needs. Future studies that focus on the changes in practice effected by PBSGL will strengthen the evidence for this form of learning and motivate physicians and institutions to adopt it. PMID:22859626

  1. Practical Quantum Metrology

    E-print Network

    Jonathan C. F. Matthews; Xiao-Qi Zhou; Hugo Cable; Peter J. Shadbolt; Dylan J. Saunders; Gabriel A. Durkin; Geoff J. Pryde; Jeremy L. O'Brien

    2013-07-18

    Quantum metrology research promises approaches to build new sensors that achieve the ultimate level of precision measurement and perform fundamentally better than modern sensors. Practical schemes that tolerate realistic fabrication imperfections and environmental noise are required in order to realise quantum-enhanced sensors and to enable their real-world application. We have demonstrated the key enabling principles of a practical, loss-tolerant approach to photonic quantum metrology designed to harness all multi-photon components in spontaneous parametric downconversion---a method for generating multiple photons that we show requires no further fundamental state engineering for use in practical quantum metrology. We observe a quantum advantage of 28% in precision measurement of optical phase using the four-photon detection component of this scheme, despite 83% system loss. This opens the way to new quantum sensors based on current quantum-optical capabilities.

  2. Exemplary Practices in Adolescent Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birtwhistle, Amy; Lefkovitz, Bina; Meehan, Dorothy; Needham, Heather; Paul, Andy

    2004-01-01

    In 2003, Sierra Health Foundation's Board of Directors selected school-aged youth as the target for its next focused grantmaking effort. As part of the program research and development phase, staff and consultants examined evidenced-based practices that appear promising in positively affecting adolescent health and development for young people…

  3. Identification of Monoraphidium contortum as a promising species for liquid biofuel production.

    PubMed

    Bogen, Christian; Klassen, Viktor; Wichmann, Julian; La Russa, Marco; Doebbe, Anja; Grundmann, Michael; Uronen, Pauliina; Kruse, Olaf; Mussgnug, Jan H

    2013-04-01

    In this work, 30 microalgae strains from 17 genera were investigated in regard to biomass productivity in photoautotrophic growth conditions, lipid amount, lipid quality and biomass degradability. Six strains could be identified with robust phototrophic growth properties and high biomass productivities equal or above 300 mg l(-1) day(-1). Anaerobic fermentation of the algal biomass was most efficient for the marine members of the genera Dunaliella and Navicula, while biogas production with the freshwater strains generally resulted in lower methane yields. Monoraphidium contortum was identified as promising candidate for liquid biofuel production, characterized by high biomass productivity during maximum growth (maximum increase of 896 mg dry biomass weight (DW) l(-1) day(-1)) and a promising lipid profile. Neutral lipid production was strongly induced in M. contortum by nitrogen deficient conditions and accumulated to up to 20.4±2.2% of DW. PMID:23453981

  4. Promoting equal developmental opportunity and outcomes among America's children and youth: results from the National Promises Study.

    PubMed

    Scales, Peter C; Benson, Peter L; Moore, Kristin A; Lippman, Laura; Brown, Brett; Zaff, Jonathan F

    2008-03-01

    Building on a developmental framework positing five types of assets or inputs needed for children's development, referred to as promises, we investigated the extent to which American children and youth experience the five Promises articulated by the America's Promise Alliance. These are: (1) Caring Adults, (2) Safe Places and Constructive Use of Time, (3) A Healthy Start, (4) Effective Education, and (5) Opportunities to Make a Difference. Data came from a nationally representative poll designed to assess these five resources and involved more than 4,000 teenagers and their parents. Results showed that only a minority of young people experienced rich developmental nourishment (having 4-5 of the Promises). Males, older adolescents, adolescents of color, and adolescents from families with less education and lower parental annual incomes were significantly less likely to experience sufficient developmental opportunities and were also less likely to experience desirable developmental outcomes. However, among those young people who reported experiencing 4-5 Promises, the great majority of demographic differences in developmental outcomes were either eliminated or significantly reduced. The results suggest that increasing children's experience of these Promises would reduce developmental inequalities among America's young people. EDITORS' STRATEGIC IMPLICATIONS: Longitudinal studies with representative samples will be necessary to further validate this approach and study causal contributions of assets, but this integration of Positive Youth Development frameworks holds great promise for theory, practice, and policy. PMID:18373201

  5. Facilitating the Adoption of Tor by Focusing on a Promising Target Group

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Heiko Roßnagel; Jan Zibuschka; Lexi Pimenidis; Thomas Deselaers

    2009-01-01

    The technology for anonymous communication has been thoroughly researched. But despite the existence of several protection\\u000a services, a business model for anonymous web surfing has not emerged as of today. One possibility to stimulate adoption is\\u000a to facilitate it in a specific subnet. The idea is to identify a promising target group which has a substantial benefit from\\u000a adopting the

  6. Pthlh, a promising cancer modifier gene in rat tongue carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    SUWA, HIROHIKO; HIRANO, MASATO; KAWARADA, KOUJI; NAGAYAMA, MOTOHIKO; EHARA, MICHIKO; MURAKI, TOMONARI; SHISA, HAYASE; SUGIYAMA, AIKO; SUGIMOTO, MASAHIRO; HIAI, HIROSHI; KITANO, MOTOO; TANUMA, JUN-ICHI

    2014-01-01

    Susceptibly to the induction of rat tongue cancer (TC) by oral 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide (4NQO) exposure is a polygenic trait. Among several quantitative trait loci identified by crosses between TC-susceptible Dark Agouti (DA) rats and TC-resistant Wistar-Furth (WF) rats, we focused on tongue cancer susceptibility locus (Tcas3) of chromosome 4. We examined tongue carcinogenesis in the reciprocal congenic strains DA.WF-Tcas3 and WF.DA-Tcas3 and in their parental strains. The Tcas3DA allele, and not the Tcas3WF allele, significantly favored tumor latency, incidence and TC number/size. In genomic DNA of TCs induced in (DA × WF) F1 rats, the resistant Tcas3WF allele was frequently and selectively lost, particularly in larger tumors. Thus, we searched the possible candidate genes in the Tcas3 region using microarray analysis of TCs in F1 rats and revealed significant upregulation of 2 cancer-related genes, parathyroid hormone-like hormone (Pthlh) and Kras2. The relevance of the WF allele of Pthlh as a cancer modifier was indicated by 3 single nucleotide polymorphisms specific to this strain. In contrast, no consistent strain-specific variations were found in Kras2. Moreover, the plasma Ca2+ level was consistently higher in DA rats when compared to the level in WF rats bearing TCs; moreover, the Pthlh-mRNA expression level was >30-fold higher in TCs when compared to this level in the normal tongue mucosa. Immunostaining experiments showed strong PTHrP protein expression in TCs of DA rats, and the signal was intensified in larger TCs. Kras2 was also upregulated in TCs, but to a lesser degree than PTHrP. Thus, Pthlh is a promising candidate modifier gene in the development and progression of rat TCs. PMID:24253735

  7. Assessment and management of methotrexate hepatotoxicity in psoriasis patients: report from a consensus conference to evaluate current practice and identify key questions toward optimizing methotrexate use in the clinic.

    PubMed

    Barker, J; Horn, E J; Lebwohl, M; Warren, R B; Nast, A; Rosenberg, W; Smith, C

    2011-07-01

    Experts in psoriasis, hepatology, pharmacokinetics and pharmacogenetics convened to discuss the safety and monitoring of methotrexate with respect to hepatotoxicity when used in the treatment of psoriasis. Methotrexate is an efficacious and cost-effective treatment for psoriasis, but is associated with significant safety issues, particularly relating to hepatotoxicity. Current British, Dutch, German, EU and US guidelines for baseline evaluations, monitoring and prevention of hepatotoxicity in patients with psoriasis receiving methotrexate were evaluated. Liver safety monitoring is currently reliant upon multiple methods, including biopsy, serological tests for biomarkers such as type III procollagen amino terminal propeptide (PIIINP), and liver function tests based on liver enzymes. Monitoring of patients receiving long-term therapy is expected to be improved by the utilization of serum biomarkers currently in development such as the Enhanced Liver Fibrosis (ELF) panel and other non-invasive tests of hepatic architecture, such as fibroelastography, microbubbles and magnetic resonance imaging. Appropriate studies to determine optimal dosing to maximize efficacy and minimize toxicity, potentially utilizing pharmacogenetic principles, are clearly needed. Key questions for future research are identified including needs for optimal screening and monitoring, identification of appropriate biomarkers, assessment of relationships between dosing and safety, utility of liver biopsy, optimal dosing regimens (including route of administration), methods to measure methotrexate levels in blood, and use of methotrexate as a standardized active comparator in trials of experimental drugs used to treat psoriasis. PMID:21198946

  8. Making Education Work for Mexican-Americans: Promising Community Practices. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sosa, Alicia

    Hispanic students have higher dropout rates and lower academic achievement than Anglo students. While schools have begun to address the issue of underachievement, some community groups have implemented enrichment programs that focus on the affective domain--self-esteem, family values, and cultural pride. This digest describes and synthesizes the…

  9. Promising Practices in Afterschool Program and School Partnerships. After School Issues. Volume 3, Issue 1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Institute on Out-of-School Time, Wellesley College, 2007

    2007-01-01

    The National Institute on Out-of-School-Time (NIOST) investigated partnership strategies between community-based organizations conducting afterschool programs and the schools they serve. NIOST used in-depth phone interviews and site visits to collect information on several community-based organization afterschool programs and their affiliated…

  10. From Promises to Practices: The Fate of Educational Software in the Home

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerawalla, Lucinda; Crook, Charles

    2005-01-01

    Thirty-two families were given six market-leading, educational CD-ROMs each, and usage of them was logged over 11 weeks. These children and their parents were also interviewed on three occasions. Although parents and children were enthusiastic upon receipt of the software and envisaged that it would be a useful learning tool, children's use of…

  11. Teaching to Expand Opportunities for Nontraditional Students: Promising Strategies and Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connecticut Women's Education and Legal Fund, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The Vocational Equity Research, Training and Evaluation Center (VERTEC) was established in 1988 to increase females' access to, and opportunities in, vocational education programs that are nontraditional for their gender. The research, technical assistance and advocacy that has been provided by VERTEC staff over the last 21 years has established a…

  12. Promising Practices in Undergraduate Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics Education: Summary of Two Workshops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nielsen, Natalie

    2011-01-01

    Numerous teaching, learning, assessment, and institutional innovations in undergraduate science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education have emerged in the past decade. Because virtually all of these innovations have been developed independently of one another, their goals and purposes vary widely. Some focus on making science…

  13. Schools and the Culturally Diverse Exceptional Student: Promising Practices and Future Directions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ortiz, Alba A., Ed.; Ramirez, Bruce A., Ed.

    The 14 papers were given at a 1986 Ethnic and Multicultural Symposia and are intended to provide state-of-the-art information on the education of culturally and linguistically diverse exceptional students. Papers have the following titles and authors: "Demography As It Affects Special Education" (James Yates); "A Prereferral Process for Preventing…

  14. Using Assessment Results: Promising Practices of Institutions That Do It Well

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Gianina R.; Jankowski, Natasha A.; Provezis, Staci; Kinzie, Jillian

    2012-01-01

    Most institutions are collecting evidence of student learning, but it is not clear how these results are being used to improve student outcomes. To learn more about what colleges and universities are doing to use assessment data productively to inform and strengthen undergraduate education, the National Institute for Learning Outcomes Assessment…

  15. Lean Premixed Combustion Stabilized by Low Swirl a Promising Concept for Practical Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, R. K.

    1999-01-01

    Since its inception, the low-swirl burner (LSB) has shown to be a useful laboratory apparatus for fundamental studies of premixed turbulent flames. The LSB operates under wide ranges of equivalence ratios, flow rates, and turbulence intensities. Its flame is lifted and detached from the burner and allows easy access for laser diagnostics. The flame brush is axisymmetric and propagates normal to the incident reactants. Therefore, the LSB is well suited for investigating detailed flame structures and empirical coefficients such as flame speed, turbulence transport, and flame generated turbulence. Due to its capability to stabilize ultra-lean premixed turbulent flames (phi approx. = 0.55), the LSB has generated interest from the gas appliance industry for use as an economical low-NO(x) burner. Lean premixed combustion emits low levels of NO(x), due primarily to the low flame temperature. Therefore, it is a very effective NO(x) prevention method without involving selective catalytic reduction (SCR), fuel-air staging, or flue gas recirculation (FGR). En the gas turbine industry, substantial research efforts have already been undertaken and engines with lean premixed combustors are already in use. For commercial and residential applications, premixed pulsed combustors and premixed ceramic matrix burners are commercially available. These lean premixed combustion technologies, however, tend to be elaborate but have relatively limited operational flexibility, and higher capital, operating and maintenance costs. Consequently, these industries are continuing the development of lean premixed combustion technologies as well as exploring new concepts. This paper summarizes the research effects we have undertaken in the past few years to demonstrate the feasibility of applying the low-swirl flame stabilization method for a wide range of heating and power generation systems. The principle of flame stabilization by low-swirl is counter to the conventional high-swirl methods that rely on a recirculation zone to anchor the flame. In LSBS, flow recirculation is not promoted to allow the premixed turbulent flames to propagate freely. A LSB with an air-jet swirler is essentially an open tube with the swirler at its mid section. The small air-jets generate swirling motion only in the annular region and leaving the central core of the flow undisturbed, When this flow exits the burner tube, the angular momentum generates radial mean pressure gradient to diverge the non-swirling reactants stream. Consequently, the mean flow velocity decreases linearly. Propagating against this decelerating flow, the flame self-sustains at the position where the local flow velocity equals the flame speed, S(sub f). The LSB operates with a swirl number, S, between 0.02 to 0.1. This is much lower than the minimum S of 0.6 required for the high-swirl burners. We found that the swirl number needed for flame stabilization varies only slightly with fuel type, flow velocity, turbulent conditions and burner dimensions (i.e. throat diameter and swirl injection angle).

  16. Policies, Practices, and Promises: Challenges to Early Childhood Music Education in the United States

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Diane Cummings Persellin

    2007-01-01

    The United States has achieved nearly universal access to education and has witnessed a phenomenal growth in the number of children who attend child care programs. In addition, researchers and practitioners are making notable advances in the field of early childhood music. Many preschools, however, feel pressure to accelerate learning for young children to prepare them for high-stakes testing in

  17. Establishing Conceptual Boundaries: What Is an Adult Education Project, Promise and Practice?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stein, David S.

    2014-01-01

    In a movement toward workforce development as an academic entity, the identity of adult education as projects for inquiry is troubled. In some academic programs, adult education has been termed adult learning in the service of promoting teaching and learning for the workplace. However, adult education's inquiry, its projects, might be more…

  18. Management and Operations of Online Programs: Ensuring Quality and Accountability. Promising Practices in Online Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, John; Gemin, Butch

    2009-01-01

    Online learning is growing rapidly as states and districts are creating new online schools, and existing programs are adding new courses and students. The growth reflects the spreading understanding that online courses and programs can serve a wide variety of students and needs. These include: (1) Creating opportunities for small and rural school…

  19. 77 FR 4550 - Promising and Practical Strategies to Increase Postsecondary Success

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-30

    ...credentials that lead to improved learning and employment outcomes. When...for commercial, proprietary learning materials), distance and...intervention. [cir] The theory of action that provides the...Keywords and Tags Accelerated Learning Achievement Gap Closure...

  20. 77 FR 56194 - Promising and Practical Strategies to Increase Postsecondary Success; Request for Information

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-12

    ...credentials that lead to improved learning and employment outcomes. We...for commercial, proprietary learning materials), distance and...intervention. [cir] The theory of action that provides the...Keywords and Tags Accelerated Learning Accessible Materials...

  1. Integrating State-of-the-Art Computational Modeling with Clinical Practice: The Promise of Numerical Methods

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David E. Krummen; Gainyu Oshodi; Sanjiv M. Narayan

    \\u000a The use of numerical methods in clinical medicine has grown exponentially over the past decade. This is particularly true\\u000a in clinical cardiac electrophysiology (EP), which is focused on the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of heart rhythm abnormalities.\\u000a Part of the reason for this is the suitability of cardiac rhythm pathology to numerical modeling. At the tissue level, the\\u000a mechanisms of

  2. A Matter of Degrees: Promising Practices for Community College Student Success--A First Look

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Community College Student Engagement, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Community colleges across the country have created innovative, data-informed programs that are models for educating underprepared students, engaging traditionally underserved students, and helping students from all backgrounds succeed. However, because most of these programs have limited scope, the field now has pockets of success rather than…

  3. [Evidence-based and promising interventions to prevent infectious diseases among youth as a result of poor hand hygiene in schools: a literature review].

    PubMed

    Malherbe, Hélène; Nugier, Angélique; Clément, Juliette; Lamboy, Béatrice

    2013-01-01

    Infectious diseases remain a major cause of death among young people throughout the world. This paper reviews the current knowledge of empirically validated and promising interventions aimed at preventing infectious diseases among children caused by poor hand hygiene in schools. The study used a standard protocol to identify and review the literature and to classify the selected interventions. Approximately ten interventions were found to have a beneficial effect by promoting hand washing and hand hygiene in schools. The study also found that most of the interventions were implemented at elementary school. However, some interventions were also implemented at kindergarten or in child care centers, while others were aimed at university students. Most of the interventions were implemented by teachers, peers and/or external professionals. The study found that hand hygiene is effective regardless of the type of cleaning product used (i.e. antibacterial or plain soap, alcohol-based or alcohol-free hand sanitizer). This study aims to contribute to the understanding of empirically validated and promising interventions and to promote reflection on professional practice in France. PMID:23782636

  4. Photo -Graphic: Christine Daniloff MIT faculty see promise in American

    E-print Network

    de Weck, Olivier L.

    of AMP, but arises from similar concerns about applying technology in the national interest. MIT faculty is that the United States still produces a great deal of promising basic research and technological innovation; what

  5. New Rapid Ebola Test Shows Promise in African Clinics

    MedlinePLUS

    ... gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_153301.html New Rapid Ebola Test Shows Promise in African Clinics Researchers say ... News) -- A new rapid-detection test that diagnoses Ebola within minutes could improve treatment of the deadly ...

  6. Drugs Show Promise for Some Advanced Lung Cancers

    MedlinePLUS

    Drugs Show Promise for Some Advanced Lung Cancers Two experimental medications target mutation that fuels treatment resistance To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. (*this news ...

  7. Multiyear Predictions of North Atlantic Hurricane Frequency: Promise and Limitations

    E-print Network

    Wittenberg, Andrew

    Multiyear Predictions of North Atlantic Hurricane Frequency: Promise and Limitations GABRIEL A VILLARINI IIHR­Hydroscience & Engineering, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa ANDREW WITTENBERG Retrospective predictions of multiyear North Atlantic Ocean hurricane frequency are explored by applying

  8. Liquid Medical Marijuana Shows Promise Against Severe Epilepsy

    MedlinePLUS

    ... gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_151982.html Liquid Medical Marijuana Shows Promise Against Severe Epilepsy Child and adult ... 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A liquid form of medical marijuana may help people with severe epilepsy that does ...

  9. heritability. The overdue promise of short tandem repeat variation for

    E-print Network

    Queitsch, Christine

    heritability. The overdue promise of short tandem repeat variation for Maximilian Press, Keisha D variation for heritability.1 2 Maximilian O. Press, Keisha D. Carlson, Christine Queitsch3 Keywords: short tandem repeats, microsatellites, heritability, epistasis,9 sequencing technologies.10

  10. Features of promising technologies for pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass

    E-print Network

    California at Riverside, University of

    Features of promising technologies for pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass Nathan Mosier digestibility of cellulose present in lignocellulosic biomass. The goal of any pretreatment technology. Experimental investigation of physical changes and chemical reactions that occur during pretreatment

  11. MEK: A Single Drug Target Shows Promise in Multiple Cancers

    Cancer.gov

    Drugs that block the MEK protein have shown promise in several cancers. Trametinib has had encouraging results in patients with advanced melanoma, and selumetinib has been tested in patients with advanced thyroid and ovarian cancers.

  12. Promising Areas for Energy Efficiency in Industrial Process

    E-print Network

    Joseph, B.

    Promising Areas for Energy Efficiency in Industrial Process Babu Joseph Ph.D Southern California Edison Company Almost all of the electric utilities in the US have some sort of energy efficiency improvement program for their customers. In all...

  13. Children's understanding of promising, lying, and false belief.

    PubMed

    Maas, Fay K

    2008-07-01

    Understanding promising and lying requires an understanding of intention and the ability to interpret mental states. The author examined (a) the extent to which 4- to 6-year-olds focus on the sincerity of the speaker's intention when the 4-to 6-year-olds make judgments about promises and lies and (b) whether false-belief reasoning skills are related to understanding promising and lying. Participants watched videotaped stories and made promise and lie judgments from their own perspective and from the listener-character's perspective. Children also completed false-belief reasoning tasks. Older children made more correct promise judgments from both perspectives. All children made correct lie judgments from the listener's perspective. The author found that Ist-order false-belief reasoning was related to making judgments from the participant's perspective; 2nd-order false-belief reasoning was related to making judgments from the listener-character's perspective. Results suggest that children's understanding of promising and lying moves from a focus on outcome toward a focus on the belief that each utterance is designed to create. PMID:18649495

  14. Preventing substance abuse in American Indian and Alaska native youth: promising strategies for healthier communities.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Elizabeth H; Cummins, Lillian H; Marlatt, G Alan

    2004-03-01

    Substance abuse has had profoundly devastating effects on the health and well-being of American Indians and Alaska Natives. A wide variety of intervention methods has been used to prevent or stem the development of alcohol and drug problems in Indian youth, but there is little empirical research evaluating these efforts. This article is an overview of the published literature on substance use prevention among Indian adolescents, providing background epidemiological information, a review of programs developed specifically for Indian adolescents, and recommendations for the most promising prevention strategies currently in practice. PMID:14979774

  15. VAN method of short-term earthquake prediction shows promise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uyeda, Seiya

    Although optimism prevailed in the 1970s, the present consensus on earthquake prediction appears to be quite pessimistic. However, short-term prediction based on geoelectric potential monitoring has stood the test of time in Greece for more than a decade [VarotsosandKulhanek, 1993] Lighthill, 1996]. The method used is called the VAN method.The geoelectric potential changes constantly due to causes such as magnetotelluric effects, lightning, rainfall, leakage from manmade sources, and electrochemical instabilities of electrodes. All of this noise must be eliminated before preseismic signals are identified, if they exist at all. The VAN group apparently accomplished this task for the first time. They installed multiple short (100-200m) dipoles with different lengths in both north-south and east-west directions and long (1-10 km) dipoles in appropriate orientations at their stations (one of their mega-stations, Ioannina, for example, now has 137 dipoles in operation) and found that practically all of the noise could be eliminated by applying a set of criteria to the data.

  16. The Promise of Novel Molecular Markers in Bladder Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Miremami, Jahan; Kyprianou, Natasha

    2014-01-01

    Bladder cancer is the fourth most common malignancy in the US and is associated with the highest cost per patient. A high likelihood of recurrence, mandating stringent surveillance protocols, has made the development of urinary markers a focus of intense pursuit with the hope of decreasing the burden this disease places on patients and the healthcare system. To date, routine use of markers is not recommended for screening or diagnosis. Interests include the development of a single urinary marker that can be used in place of or as an adjunct to current screening and surveillance techniques, as well identifying a molecular signature for an individual’s disease that can help predict progression, prognosis, and potential therapeutic response. Markers have shown potential value in improving diagnostic accuracy when used as an adjunct to current modalities, risk-stratification of patients that could aid the clinician in determining aggressiveness of surveillance, and allowing for a decrease in invasive surveillance procedures. This review discusses the current understanding of emerging biomarkers, including miRNAs, gene signatures and detection of circulating tumor cells in the blood, and their potential clinical value in bladder cancer diagnosis, as prognostic indicators, and surveillance tools, as well as limitations to their incorporation into medical practice. PMID:25535079

  17. Transcranial magnetic stimulation for geriatric depression: Promises and pitfalls

    PubMed Central

    Sabesan, Priyadharshini; Lankappa, Sudheer; Khalifa, Najat; Krishnan, Vasudevan; Gandhi, Rahul; Palaniyappan, Lena

    2015-01-01

    As the global population gets older, depression in the elderly is emerging as an important health issue. A major challenge in treating geriatric depression is the lack of robust efficacy for many treatments that are of significant benefit to depressed working age adults. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a novel physical treatment approach used mostly in working age adults with depression. Many TMS trials and clinics continue to exclude the elderly from treatment citing lack of evidence in this age group. In this review, we appraise the evidence regarding the safety and efficacy of rTMS in the elderly. A consistent observation supporting a high degree of tolerability and safety among the elderly patients emerged across the Randomised Controlled Trials and the uncontrolled trials. Further, there is no reliable evidence negating the utility of rTMS in the elderly with depression. We also identified several factors other than age that moderate the observed variations in the efficacy of rTMS in the elderly. These factors include but not limited to: (1) brain atrophy; (2) intensity and number of pulses (dose-response relationship); and (3) clinical profile of patients. On the basis of the current evidence, the practice of excluding elderly patients from TMS clinics and trials cannot be supported. PMID:26110119

  18. Gang Identifiers and Terminology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cantrell, Mary Lynn

    1992-01-01

    Provides lists of gang identifiers and terminology. Suggests that, to find out names and associated identifiers of local gangs, readers should talk to their local police. Included in listing are descriptions of gang-related symbols, physical signals, graffiti, slogans, right-left rules, colors, clothing, jewelry, hair styles, and fingernails. Also…

  19. Paying for Enhanced Service: Comparing Patients' Experiences in a Concierge and General Medicine Practice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Justin M. Ko; David G. Fairchild; Dana G. Safran

    2009-01-01

    Background: Concierge medical practice is a relatively new and somewhat controversial development in primary-care practice. These practices promise patients more personalized care and dedicated service, in exchange for an annual membership fee paid by patients. The experiences of patients using these practices remain largely undocumented. Abstract: Objective: To assess the experiences of patients in a concierge medicine practice compared with

  20. Promoting Evidence-Based Practice Through a Research Training Program for Point-of-Care Clinicians

    PubMed Central

    Black, Agnes T.; Balneaves, Lynda G.; Garossino, Candy; Puyat, Joseph H.; Qian, Hong

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of a research training program on clinicians’ knowledge, attitudes, and practices related to research and evidence-based practice (EBP). BACKGROUND: EBP has been shown to improve patient care and outcomes. Innovative approaches are needed to overcome individual and organizational barriers to EBP. METHODS: Mixed-methods design was used to evaluate a research training intervention with point-of-care clinicians in a Canadian urban health organization. Participants completed the Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practice Survey over 3 timepoints. Focus groups and interviews were also conducted. RESULTS: Statistically significant improvement in research knowledge and ability was demonstrated. Participants and administrators identified benefits of the training program, including the impact on EBP. CONCLUSIONS: Providing research training opportunities to point-of-care clinicians is a promising strategy for healthcare organizations seeking to promote EBP, empower clinicians, and showcase excellence in clinical research. PMID:25390076

  1. Gene-alcohol interactions identify several novel blood pressure loci including a promising locus near SLC16A9

    PubMed Central

    Simino, Jeannette; Sung, Yun Ju; Kume, Rezart; Schwander, Karen; Rao, D. C.

    2013-01-01

    Alcohol consumption is a known risk factor for hypertension, with recent candidate studies implicating gene-alcohol interactions in blood pressure (BP) regulation. We used 6882 (predominantly) Caucasian participants aged 20–80 years from the Framingham SNP Health Association Resource (SHARe) to perform a genome-wide analysis of SNP-alcohol interactions on BP traits. We used a two-step approach in the ABEL suite to examine genetic interactions with three alcohol measures (ounces of alcohol consumed per week, drinks consumed per week, and the number of days drinking alcohol per week) on four BP traits [systolic (SBP), diastolic (DBP), mean arterial (MAP), and pulse (PP) pressure]. In the first step, we fit a linear mixed model of each BP trait onto age, sex, BMI, and antihypertensive medication while accounting for the phenotypic correlation among relatives. In the second step, we conducted 1 degree-of-freedom (df) score tests of the SNP main effect, alcohol main effect, and SNP-alcohol interaction using the maximum likelihood estimates (MLE) of the parameters from the first step. We then calculated the joint 2 df score test of the SNP main effect and SNP-alcohol interaction using MixABEL. The effect of SNP rs10826334 (near SLC16A9) on SBP was significantly modulated by both the number of alcoholic drinks and the ounces of alcohol consumed per week (p-values of 1.27E-08 and 3.92E-08, respectively). Each copy of the G-allele decreased SBP by 3.79 mmHg in those consuming 14 drinks per week vs. a 0.461 mmHg decrease in non-drinkers. Index SNPs in 20 other loci exhibited suggestive (p-value ? 1E-06) associations with BP traits by the 1 df interaction test or joint 2 df test, including 3 rare variants, one low-frequency variant, and SNPs near/in genes ESRRG, FAM179A, CRIPT-SOCS5, KAT2B, ADCY2, GLI3, ZNF716, SLIT1, PDE3A, KERA-LUM, RNF219-AS1, CLEC3A, FBXO15, and IGSF5. SNP-alcohol interactions may enhance discovery of novel variants with large effects that can be targeted with lifestyle modifications. PMID:24376456

  2. Breast Cancer Startup Challenge announces ten winning teams of entrepreneurs; Promising technologies identified to speed cancer research

    Cancer.gov

    Ten winners of a world-wide competition to bring emerging breast cancer research technologies to market faster were announced today by the Avon Foundation for Women, in partnership with NCI and the Center for Advancing Innovation (CAI). Avon is providing $250,000 in funding for this Challenge.

  3. Linguistic Diversity and Reform: Can Practices Be Identified?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nadeau, Adel

    1996-01-01

    The individual responsible for spearheading reform for the education of limited-English-proficient (LEP) students in Linda Vista Elementary School (San Diego, California) describes the process, issues, and outcomes of the initiative in this theme issue. Linda Vista Elementary School has a student population that is 77 percent LEP. The personalized…

  4. Mentoring international research ethics trainees: identifying best practices.

    PubMed

    Loue, Sana; Loff, Bebe

    2013-12-01

    Mentoring is an important component of training in the basic and clinical sciences due to the increasing complexities associated with establishing a career. Data relating to 466 long-term trainees in research ethics training programs were obtained from the Fogarty International Center's database. Data were supplemented with survey data (n = 17) and telephone interviews (n = 10) of the 21 principal investigators whose programs offered long-term training. The programs most successful with mentoring involved (1) the provision of an orientation for the trainees at the commencement of training; (2) a highly structured process of mentoring that required regular meetings and task achievement timelines; (3) intensive, frequent contact with the PI; and (4) support with personal issues that were troublesome to trainees. This paper is part of a collection of papers analyzing the Fogarty International Center's International Research Ethics Education and Curriculum Development program. PMID:24384516

  5. Encouraging SME Participation in Training: Identifying Practical Approaches.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Karen; Loader, Kim

    2003-01-01

    A case study of training for small- to medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) at a university found that the following factors influenced SME participation: preliminary consultation with SMEs on design and delivery, free half-day workshops in repeated cycles, individual pacing of learning, and business focus. (Contains 14 references.) (JOW)

  6. High-Quality Traineeships: Identifying What Works. Good Practice Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Centre for Vocational Education Research (NCVER), 2009

    2009-01-01

    Traineeships were introduced alongside apprenticeships to increase the reach of contracted training to a wider range of occupations and industries and to a broader range of learners (particularly women) and to improve the labour market prospects of young people. Traineeships have given hundreds of thousands of Australians access to nationally…

  7. Preventing Crime: What Works, What Doesn't, What's Promising. Research in Brief. National Institute of Justice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherman, Lawrence W.; Gottfredson, Denise C.; MacKenzie, Doris L.; Eck, John; Reuter, Peter; Bushway, Shawn D.

    This Research in Brief describes the scientific methodologies used to perform a review of crime prevention programs and then discusses what research has shown to work, what it has shown not to work, and what approaches seem promising for crime prevention. The first step was to identify and review reports evaluating the effectiveness of crime…

  8. Educational Researchers and Practicality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Velzen, Joke H.

    2013-01-01

    In this article, an attempt to identify further directions in research designs that researchers can use to contribute to the relevance of educational research findings, by including teachers' practicality issues, is presented. Sixty experienced teachers in secondary education read the reporting of modified experimental research findings about…

  9. Identifying the Acoustic Neuroma

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Search ANAUSA.org Connect with us! Identifying the Acoustic Neuroma Advances in medicine have made possible the identification of small acoustic neuromas (those still confined to the internal auditory ...

  10. Fulfilling the Promise of School Choice. Education Outlook. No. 5

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hess, Frederick M.

    2008-01-01

    Nearly two decades have passed since the Wisconsin legislature enacted the landmark Milwaukee Parental Choice Program. Advocates had hoped and promised that this experiment in school choice would lead the way in transforming American schools. But it is clear by now that voucher programs and charter school laws have failed to live up to their…

  11. Capitol Capsule. The Voc-Ed Regulations: A Broken Promise?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kochhar, Carol A.

    1993-01-01

    Many vocational educators, special populations advocates, and legal experts are convinced that, without some very specific changes, the Perkins Act vocational education regulations threaten to destroy the promise of the act for special population students. Practitioners should monitor the situation to ensure services for this population.…

  12. Every Child Every Promise Workforce Readiness. Issue Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    America's Promise Alliance (NJ1), 2007

    2007-01-01

    The third "Every Child, Every Promise" research brief focuses on the large percentage of the children and youth who will enter the workforce over the next two decades are lacking enough of the "soft" or applied skills--such as teamwork, decision-making, and communication--that will help them become effective employees and managers. The report…

  13. Transcendent professionalism: keeping promises and living the questions.

    PubMed

    Leach, David C

    2014-05-01

    Wynia and colleagues propose a definition of professionalism as a belief system by which to shape health care rather than a list of values and behaviors. The belief that professionalism is the best way to organize and deliver health care constitutes a promise to society. The notion that the medical profession as a whole as well as its individual members should be held accountable to standards of competence, ethical values, and interpersonal attributes developed, declared, and enforced by the profession itself is also a promise to society. The author argues that good promises offer a stabilizing influence over the inherent uncertainty in human relationships and may provide the ground for a lasting trustworthy relationship between the medical profession and society; however, the professionalism belief system itself is vulnerable if the promise is breached. The modern world has challenged the professionalism model of organizing health care, and individual practitioners as well as their professional organizations are seeking clarity about what professionalism means given current realities. This commentary reflects on these circumstances and provides some recommendations for developing a construct of professionalism. PMID:24667519

  14. Genetic monitoring as a promising tool for conservation and management

    E-print Network

    Genetic monitoring as a promising tool for conservation and management Michael K. Schwartz1. Beckwith Avenue, Missoula, MT 59801, USA 2 Center for Investigation of Biodiversity and Genetic Resources of the potential afforded by molecular genetic markers, which can provide information relevant to both ecological

  15. Emerging Neurotechnologies for Lie-Detection: Promises and Perils

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Henry T. Greely

    Detection of deception and confirmation of truth telling with conventional polygraphy raised a host of technical and ethical issues. Recently, newer methods of recording electromagnetic signals from the brain show promise in permitting the detection of deception or truth telling. Some are even being promoted as more accurate than conventional polygraphy. While the new technologies raise issues of personal privacy,

  16. Emerging Neurotechnologies for Lie-Detection: Promises and Perils

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paul Root Wolpe; Kenneth R. Foster; Daniel D. Langleben

    2010-01-01

    Detection of deception and confirmation of truth telling with conventional polygraphy raised a host of technical and ethical issues. Recently, newer methods of recording electromagnetic signals from the brain show promise in permitting the detection of deception or truth telling. Some are even being promoted as more accurate than conventional polygraphy. While the new technologies raise issues of personal privacy,

  17. Emerging Neurotechnologies for Lie-Detection: Promises and Perils

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Paul Root Wolpe; Kenneth R. Foster; Daniel D. Langleben

    2005-01-01

    Detection of deception and confirmation of truth telling with conventional polygraphy raised a host of technical and ethical issues. Recently, newer methods of recording electromagnetic signals from the brain show promise in permitting the detection of deception or truth telling. Some are even being promoted as more accurate than conventional polygraphy. While the new technologies raise issues of personal privacy,

  18. Keeping the Promise? The Debate over Charter Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walters, Stephanie

    2008-01-01

    "Keeping the Promise?" examines one of the most complex reforms in education: charter schools. This wide-ranging and thought-provoking collection of essays examines the charter school movement's founding visions, on-the-ground realities, and untapped potential-within the context of an unswerving commitment to democratic, equitable public schools.…

  19. Promise from A New Weight-Loss Drug

    MedlinePLUS

    Promise From a New Weight-Loss Drug Two-thirds who took Saxenda lost 5 percent of body weight, study shows To use the ... the battle against excess weight and obesity, a new study suggests. People who injected Saxenda (liraglutide) every ...

  20. Diversity's Promise for Higher Education: Making It Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Daryl G.

    2009-01-01

    Daryl G. Smith's career has been devoted to studying and fostering diversity in higher education. She has witnessed and encouraged the evolution of diversity from an issue addressed sporadically on college campuses to an imperative if institutions want to succeed. In "Diversity's Promise for Higher Education", she analyzes how diversity is…

  1. Hepatocyte growth factor in renal failure: Promise and reality

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gustavo A Vargas; Andreas Hoeflich; Peter M Jehle

    2000-01-01

    Hepatocyte growth factor in renal failure: Promise and reality. Can science discover some secrets of Greek mythology? In the case of Prometheus, we can now suppose that his amazing hepatic regeneration was caused by a peptide growth factor called hepatocyte growth factor (HGF). Increasing evidence indicates that HGF acts as a multifunctional cytokine on different cell types. This review addresses

  2. The Kalamazoo Promise: A New Twist on Tuition Guarantees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daun-Barnett, Nathan J.

    2011-01-01

    In 2005, Kalamazoo, Michigan launched a bold and innovative economic development strategy, The Kalamazoo Promise (KP), which guarantees tuition to every high school graduate in the district. Since KP inception, high school enrollments are up and college attendance has increased, creating national attention. This paper analyzes the benefits and…

  3. The Kalamazoo Promise and Perceived Changes in School Climate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miron, Gary; Jones, Jeffrey N.; Kelaher-Young, Allison J.

    2011-01-01

    The Kalamazoo Promise was announced in the fall of 2005, offering free college tuition at any public state college or university for graduates of the district who have gained acceptance to a postsecondary institution. This program was funded through the generous support of anonymous donors, and a federally-funded evaluation is underway to examine…

  4. Generalizations of the distributed Deutsch-Jozsa promise problem

    E-print Network

    Jozef Gruska; Daowen Qiu; Shenggen Zheng

    2015-03-18

    In the {\\em distributed Deutsch-Jozsa promise problem}, two parties are to determine whether their respective strings $x,y\\in\\{0,1\\}^n$ are at the {\\em Hamming distance} $H(x,y)=0$ or $H(x,y)=\\frac{n}{2}$. Buhrman et al. (STOC' 98) proved that the exact {\\em quantum communication complexity} of this problem is ${\\bf O}(\\log {n})$ while the {\\em deterministic communication complexity} is ${\\bf \\Omega}(n)$. This was the first impressive (exponential) gap between quantum and classical communication complexity. In this paper, we generalize the above distributed Deutsch-Jozsa promise problem to determine, for any fixed $\\frac{n}{2}\\leq k\\leq n$, whether $H(x,y)=0$ or $H(x,y)= k$, and show that an exponential gap between exact quantum and deterministic communication complexity still holds if $k$ is an even such that $\\frac{1}{2}n\\leq kwell-known {\\em disjointness} problem and show also that for this promise problem there exists an exponential gap between quantum (and also probabilistic) communication complexity and deterministic communication complexity of the promise version of such a disjointness problem. Finally, some applications to quantum, probabilistic and deterministic finite automata of the results obtained are demonstrated.

  5. Promise and Challenges of Microalgal-Derived Biofuels

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Philip T. Pienkos; Al Darzins

    2009-01-01

    Microalgae offer great promise to contribute a significant portion of the renewable fuels that will be required by the Renewable Fuels Standard described in the 2007 Energy Independence and Security Act of the United States. Algal biofuels would be based mainly on the high lipid content of the algal cell and thus would be an ideal feedstock for high energy

  6. Solar Eclipse: The Failure of a Promising Technology

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Amit Goyal; Rania Khalaf; Amar Mehta; Ashutosh Somani; Paritosh Somani

    This study analyzes the reasons a promising technology fails and brings forth the ramifications of such a failure. The analysis is done on solar car technology; specifically, the path of the MIT Solar Electric Vehicle Team, the conversion of its founder to electric v ehicle manufacturing, and the absence of solar cars from the market today. The results show that

  7. The Challenge and Promise of a Catholic University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hesburgh, Theodore M., Ed.

    This book offers 30 papers on the continuing discussion of the nature of a Catholic university. The papers are: "Introduction: The Challenge and Promise of a Catholic University" (Theodore M. Hesburgh); "Reflections on the Mission of a Catholic University" (Harold W. Attridge); "The Difference of a Catholic University" (Otto Bird); "A Catholic…

  8. IVIg for relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis: promises and uncertainties.

    PubMed

    Bayry, Jagadeesh; Hartung, Hans-Peter; Kaveri, Srini V

    2015-07-01

    Despite promising clinical trials, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) therapy in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS) has met with uncertainties that might be attributed to small patient cohorts, heterogeneity in the patients, dose of IVIg, or the duration and window of treatment. PMID:26003802

  9. Learning and Instruction in Social, Cultural Environments: Promising Research Agendas

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Inez Rovegno

    2008-01-01

    My charge is to discuss the challenges and significant research questions for pedagogy. I believe the top challenges we face are to address inequitable opportunities to learn and participate in physical activities and to improve the quality of teachers and physical education, especially for those children and adolescents who feel alienated and disengaged. The most promising research agendas are (a)

  10. Promises of Money Meant to Heighten Student Motivation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ash, Katie

    2008-01-01

    Does motivating students to study harder with the promise of cash sound like innovation--or bribery? That's a question educators and researchers have been debating, amid concerns that money-for-achievement programs actually decrease students' intrinsic motivation to learn and send mixed messages about studying. But the idea is catching on, with…

  11. Ion Channels as Promising Therapeutic Targets for Melanoma

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    20 Ion Channels as Promising Therapeutic Targets for Melanoma Aurélie Chantôme1, Marie Potier. During the last decade, the number of ion- channel types expressed in various cancers, including melanoma;Breakthroughs in Melanoma Research430 class of channels, water channels or aquaporins (AQP), allow water

  12. Race to Top Promises Come Home to Roost

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNeil, Michele

    2012-01-01

    Grant recipients risk losing millions of dollars in Race to the Top money if they fail to live up to their promises, federal education officials make clear. By threatening to revoke Hawaii's $75 million Race to the Top award for failing to make "adequate progress" on key milestones of its education reform plan, U.S. Secretary of Education Arne…

  13. Understanding bovine trypanosomiasis and trypanotolerance: the promise of functional genomics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Emmeline W. Hill; Grace M. O’Gorman; Morris Agaba; John P. Gibson; Olivier Hanotte; Stephen J. Kemp; Jan Naessens; Paul M. Coussens; David E. MacHugh

    2005-01-01

    African bovine trypanosomiasis, caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma congolense, is endemic throughout sub-Saharan Africa and is a major constraint on livestock production. A promising approach to disease control is to understand and exploit naturally evolved trypanotolerance. We describe the first attempt to investigate the transcriptional response of susceptible Boran (Bos indicus) cattle to trypanosome infection via a functional genomics

  14. MSU News Service Fall seeded peas and lentils show promise

    E-print Network

    Maxwell, Bruce D.

    MSU News Service Fall seeded peas and lentils show promise as economical nitrogen source; tour-seeded peas and lentils for spring grazing and as a nitrogen source for a subsequent wheat crop, say. Legumes, like peas and lentils, take nitrogen from the air and accumulate it in both the above

  15. Practice Makes Perfect?: Effective Practice Instruction in Large Ensembles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prichard, Stephanie

    2012-01-01

    Helping young musicians learn how to practice effectively is a challenge faced by all music educators. This article presents a system of individual music practice instruction that can be seamlessly integrated within large-ensemble rehearsals. Using a step-by-step approach, large-ensemble conductors can teach students to identify and isolate…

  16. Numeracy Practices of Young Workers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zevenbergen, Robyn; Zevenbergen, Kelly

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a summary of the first two years of a large research project investigating the numeracy practices of young people across a range of industries. Drawing on both quantitative and qualitative data, the project aims to identify the ways in which numeracy practices are perceived and enacted by young people (students in part-time…

  17. Project Juno Code of Practice

    E-print Network

    Davies, Christopher

    Project Juno Code of Practice Institute of Physics Advancing women's careers in physics higher and retain women is needed. ·Based on best practice identified from the Institute's Women in University for actions that departments can take to address the under-representation of women in university physics

  18. Managing quality in hospital practice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    NORMAN S. WEINBERG; WILLIAM B. STASON

    1998-01-01

    Background. While routine clinical decision-making has a substantial effect on quality, most practising physicians do not routinely examine their outcomes. Objectives. To set up a practical process for identifying problems in hospital practices of primary care physicians, examine their causes, and develop a quality improvement process that intimately involves practising physicians in problem-solving. Design. All hospital admissions to the Primary

  19. Metal alloy identifier

    DOEpatents

    Riley, William D. (Avondale, MD); Brown, Jr., Robert D. (Avondale, MD)

    1987-01-01

    To identify the composition of a metal alloy, sparks generated from the alloy are optically observed and spectrographically analyzed. The spectrographic data, in the form of a full-spectrum plot of intensity versus wavelength, provide the "signature" of the metal alloy. This signature can be compared with similar plots for alloys of known composition to establish the unknown composition by a positive match with a known alloy. An alternative method is to form intensity ratios for pairs of predetermined wavelengths within the observed spectrum and to then compare the values of such ratios with similar values for known alloy compositions, thereby to positively identify the unknown alloy composition.

  20. A Broken Promise: Examining the Merit-Aid Policy and Implementation Gap in the Michigan Promise Scholarship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daun-Barnet, Nathan; Hermsen, Albert; Vedder, Lori; Mabry, Beth

    2013-01-01

    In 2006, Michigan changed their traditional merit award to a credit contingent program based upon successful completion of 60 college credits. The Michigan Promise Scholarship was crafted by state policymakers without input from the financial aid community. This case study suggests that the change in policy resulted in two unintended consequences:…

  1. Strengthening chronic disease prevention programming: the Toward Evidence-Informed Practice (TEIP) Program Evidence Tool.

    PubMed

    Albert, Dayna; Fortin, Rebecca; Herrera, Christine; Riley, Barbara; Hanning, Rhona; Lessio, Anne; Rush, Brian

    2013-01-01

    In public health and chronic disease prevention there is increasing priority for effective use of evidence in practice. In Ontario, Canada, despite various models being advanced, public health practitioners are seeking ways to identify and apply evidence in their work in practical and meaningful ways. In a companion article, "Strengthening Chronic Disease Prevention Programming: The Toward Evidence-Informed Practice (TEIP) Program Assessment Tool," we describe use of a tool to assess and strengthen program planning and implementation processes using 19 criteria derived from best and promising practices literature. In this article, we describe use of a complementary Program Evidence Tool to identify, synthesize, and apply a range of evidence sources to strengthen the content of chronic disease prevention programming.The Program Evidence Tool adapts tools of evidence-based medicine to the unique contexts of community-based health promotion and chronic disease prevention. Knowledge management tools and a guided dialogue process known as an Evidence Forum enable community stakeholders to make appropriate use of evidence in diverse social, political, and structural contexts. Practical guidelines and worksheets direct users through 5 steps: 1) define an evidence question, 2) develop a search strategy, 3) collect and synthesize evidence, 4) interpret and adapt evidence, and 5) implement and evaluate. We describe the Program Evidence Tool's benefits, strengths, challenges, and what was learned from its application in 4 Ontario public health departments. The Program Evidence Tool contributes to the development and understanding of the complex use of evidence in community-based chronic disease prevention. PMID:23721788

  2. Identifying Technical Vocabulary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chung, Teresa Mihwa; Nation, Paul

    2004-01-01

    This study compared four different approaches to identifying technical words in an anatomy text. The first approach used a four step rating scale, and was used as the comparison for evaluating the other three approaches. It had a high degree of reliability. The least successful approach was that using clues provided by the writer such as labels in…

  3. METHODS TO IDENTIFY YEAST

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Yeasts are commonly identified from either phenotype or, more recently, from diagnostic gene sequences. Methods based on phenotype include fermentation reactions on a select set of sugars and growth responses on various carbon and nitrogen sources or on other diagnostic compounds. Isolates are fur...

  4. Identifying Critical Job Tasks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burkhart, Jennifer

    This guide, which is intended for project directors, coordinators, and other professional staff involved in developing and delivering workplace education programs, explains the implications of identifying critical job tasks and details a process by which educational partners can facilitate identification of critical job tasks. First, critical job…

  5. IDENTIFYING COLLISIONAL FAMILIES IN THE KUIPER BELT

    SciTech Connect

    Marcus, Robert A.; Ragozzine, Darin; Murray-Clay, Ruth A.; Holman, Matthew J., E-mail: rmarcus@cfa.harvard.edu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2011-05-20

    The identification and characterization of numerous collisional families-clusters of bodies with a common collisional origin-in the asteroid belt has added greatly to the understanding of asteroid belt formation and evolution. More recent study has also led to an appreciation of physical processes that had previously been neglected (e.g., the Yarkovsky effect). Collisions have certainly played an important role in the evolution of the Kuiper Belt as well, though only one collisional family has been identified in that region to date, around the dwarf planet Haumea. In this paper, we combine insights into collisional families from numerical simulations with the current observational constraints on the dynamical structure of the Kuiper Belt to investigate the ideal sizes and locations for identifying collisional families. We find that larger progenitors (r {approx} 500 km) result in more easily identifiable families, given the difficulty in identifying fragments of smaller progenitors in magnitude-limited surveys, despite their larger spread and less frequent occurrence. However, even these families do not stand out well from the background. Identifying families as statistical overdensities is much easier than characterizing families by distinguishing individual members from interlopers. Such identification seems promising, provided the background population is well known. In either case, families will also be much easier to study where the background population is small, i.e., at high inclinations. Overall, our results indicate that entirely different techniques for identifying families will be needed for the Kuiper Belt, and we provide some suggestions.

  6. Retinoids in cancer therapy and chemoprevention: promise meets resistance

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sarah J Freemantle; Michael J Spinella; Ethan Dmitrovsky

    2003-01-01

    Retinoids (natural and synthetic derivatives of vitamin A) signal potent differentiation and growth-suppressive effects in diverse normal, premalignant, and malignant cells. A strong rationale exists for the use of retinoids in cancer treatment and chemoprevention based on preclinical, epidemiological, and early clinical findings. Despite the success of all-trans-retinoic acid (RA)-based differentiation therapy in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), the broad promise

  7. Review of Selected Literature: The Agony and Promise of America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meeth, L. Richard

    In the more than 300 books and 600 essays on or related to U.S. higher education that were written in 1968, 2 themes appear frequently: (1) the presence and power of college students (which may be thought of as the agony and the promise of America), and (2) the future of U.S. institutions of higher education. The paper reviews 6 documents on each…

  8. Promises of stem cell therapy for retinal degenerative diseases

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ian Yat-Hin Wong; Ming-Wai Poon; Rosita Tsz-Wai Pang; Qizhou Lian; David Wong

    With the development of stem cell technology, stem cell-based therapy for retinal degeneration has been proposed to restore\\u000a the visual function. Many animal studies and some clinical trials have shown encouraging results of stem cell-based therapy\\u000a in retinal degenerative diseases. While stem cell-based therapy is a promising strategy to replace damaged retinal cells and\\u000a ultimately cure retinal degeneration, there are

  9. Siltuximab (CNTO 328): a promising option for human malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Runzhe; Chen, Baoan

    2015-01-01

    Siltuximab (CNTO 328) is a promising antibody-drug conjugate targeting cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6). It is highly binding to IL-6 and thus neutralizing IL-6 bioactivity and promoting death of tumor cell. In this review, we mainly focus on the mechanisms, clinical studies, and adverse effect of siltuximab in the treatment of human malignancies. We also provide our recommendations for siltuximab treatment in the future. PMID:26170629

  10. Medical Geography: A Promising Field of Application for Geostatistics

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. Goovaerts

    2009-01-01

    The analysis of health data and putative covariates, such as environmental, socio-economic, behavioral or demographic factors,\\u000a is a promising application for geostatistics. However, it presents several methodological challenges that arise from the fact\\u000a that data is typically aggregated over irregular spatial supports and consists of a numerator and a denominator (e.g., population\\u000a size). This paper presents an overview of recent

  11. HARVESTING OF ATMOSPHERIC WATER: A PROMISING LOW-COST TECHNOLOGY

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mohan Bahadur Karkee

    A research study conducted in eastern part of Nepal to assess the possibility of harvesting two atmospheric water sources, namely fog and rain, has indicated that it is a promising new technology. It is an integrated, community manageable and sustainable water collection system. The system collected 2.5 m3\\/m2 of mesh area per year of fog water and 1.2 m3\\/m2 of

  12. Therapeutic potential of oncolytic measles virus: promises and challenges.

    PubMed

    Galanis, E

    2010-11-01

    Measles virus (MV) is a negative-strand RNA virus (paramyxovirus) with oncolytic properties. The significant preclinical activity of MV vaccine strains against a variety of tumor models, their potent bystander effect, their selectivity against tumor cells, and their ability to retain their oncolytic properties when engineered and retargeted makes them a promising oncolytic platform. In this article, we review potential applications and challenges associated with use of MV strains as cancer therapeutics. PMID:20881957

  13. Amaryllidaceae Isocarbostyril Alkaloids and Their Derivatives as Promising Antitumor Agents

    PubMed Central

    Ingrassia, Laurent; Lefranc, Florence; Mathieu, Véronique; Darro, Francis; Kiss, Robert

    2008-01-01

    This review covers the isolation, total synthesis, biologic activity, and more particularly the in vitro and in vivo antitumor activities of naturally occurring isocarbostyril alkaloids from the Amaryllidaceae family. Starting from these natural products, new derivatives have been synthesized to explore structure-activity relationships within the chemical class and to obtain potential candidates for preclinical development. This approach appears to be capable of providing novel promising anticancer agents. PMID:18607503

  14. Interactive Video: A Promising Technology for Counseling Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baron, Augustine, Jr.; Hutchinson, Joel

    1984-01-01

    Describes the mechanical components of interactive video and details the steps toward constructing self-paced counseling modules based on this technology. Includes a discussion of ethical and practical consideratons. (LLL)

  15. Change What? Identifying Quality Improvement Targets by Investigating Usual Mental Health Care

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ann F. Garland; Leonard Bickman; Bruce F. Chorpita

    2010-01-01

    Efforts to improve community-based children’s mental health care should be based on valid information about effective practices\\u000a and current routine practices. Emerging research on routine care practices and outcomes has identified discrepancies between\\u000a evidence-based practices and “usual care.” These discrepancies highlight potentially potent quality improvement interventions.\\u000a This article reviews existing research on routine or “usual care” practice, identifies strengths and

  16. Identifying Effective School Principals 

    E-print Network

    Fernandez, Kandyce; Flores, Santa; Huang, Emily; Igwe, Carolyn; McDonald, Leslie; Stroud, Ryan; Willis, Rebecca; Dugat, Amber

    2007-01-01

    METHODOLOGY Evaluating geostatistical m p ir e p cases that occurs within a group of people in a geographic area over a defined period of time. The Centers for Disease first step because of a failure to identify a critically small p-value [2..., is usually a statistical evaluation of the likelihood of the disease distribution. Commonly the state health agency examines its health registry data and performs statistical testing comparing in- cidence rates among arbitrary geographic areas [1]. Once a...

  17. Hunting Icebergs: Identifying Icebergs

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    2012-08-03

    This self-paced, interactive tutorial guides learners through the decision-making process in locating data that will enable the identification of tabular icebergs, including: selecting the appropriate satellite orbit, and identifying the optimal solar and infrared wavelength values to discriminate between water and ice in remotely-sensed images. This resource is part of the tutorial series, Satellite Observations in Science Education, and is the first of three modules in the tutorial, Hunting Icebergs. (Note: requires Java plug-in)

  18. Tissue-engineered blood vessels as promising tools for testing drug toxicity.

    PubMed

    Truskey, George A; Fernandez, Cristina E

    2015-07-01

    Drug-induced vascular injury (DIVI) is a serious problem in preclinical studies of vasoactive molecules and for survivors of pediatric cancers. DIVI is often observed in rodents and some larger animals, primarily with drugs affecting vascular tone, but not in humans; however, DIVI observed in animal studies often precludes a drug candidate from continuing along the development pipeline. Thus, there is great interest by the pharmaceutical industry to identify quantifiable human biomarkers of DIVI. Small-scale endothelialized tissue-engineered blood vessels using human cells represent a promising approach to screen drug candidates and develop alternatives to cancer therapeutics in vitro. We identify several technical challenges that remain to be addressed, including high-throughput systems to screen large numbers of candidates, identification of suitable cell sources and establishing and maintaining a differentiated state of the vessel wall cells. Adequately addressing these challenges should yield novel platforms to screen drugs and develop new therapeutics to treat cardiovascular disease. PMID:26028128

  19. Circulating Micro-RNAs as Diagnostic Biomarkers for Endometriosis: Privation and Promise.

    PubMed

    Nothnick, Warren B; Al-Hendy, Ayman; Lue, John R

    2015-01-01

    Endometriosis represents a major medical concern in women of reproductive age. One of the remaining major hurdles for successful treatment of endometriosis is the limitation of the process of timely disease diagnosis. A simple blood test for endometriosis-specific biomarkers would offer a more timely accurate diagnosis for the disease, thus allowing for earlier treatment intervention. Although there have been considerable efforts to identify such biomarkers, no clear choice for such noninvasive diagnostic tools has been identified. Micro-RNAs are small noncoding RNAs that have been evaluated intensively as biomarkers for several diseases, and they may hold promise for a diagnosis of endometriosis. In this review, we highlight the need for noninvasive testing for endometriosis, discuss the potential use of micro-RNAs as diagnostic tools for this disease, and consider potential limitations in the use of these small RNA molecules as diagnostic markers for endometriosis. PMID:25757811

  20. Predicting sudden cardiac death from T wave alternans of the surface electrocardiogram: promise and pitfalls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenbaum, D. S.; Albrecht, P.; Cohen, R. J.

    1996-01-01

    Sudden cardiac death remains a preeminent public health problem. Despite advances in preventative treatment for patients known to be at risk, to date we have been able to identify, and thus treat, only a small minority of these patients. Therefore, there is a major need to develop noninvasive diagnostic technologies to identify patients at risk. Recent studies have demonstrated that measurement of microvolt-level T wave alternans is a promising technique for the accurate identification of patients at risk for ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. In this article, we review the clinical data establishing the relationship between microvolt T wave alternans and susceptibility to ventricular arrhythmias. We also review the methods and technology that have been developed to measure microvolt levels of T wave alternans noninvasively in broad populations of ambulatory patients. In particular, we examine techniques that permit the accurate measurement of T wave alternans during exercise stress testing.

  1. Exciting Maser Science with New Instruments - the Promise of the EVLA

    E-print Network

    Karl M. Menten

    2007-08-28

    In the near future, the Expanded Very Large Array (EVLA) will allow surveys for maser sources with unprecedented sensitivity, spectral coverage and spectroscopic capabilities. In particular, comprehensive surveys for many maser species with simultaneous sensitive continuum imaging and absorption studies will give a comprehensive radio picture of star formation in the Galactic plane and elsewhere. Very efficient EVLA surveys for H2O megamasers in Active Galacic Nuclei will be possible to practically arbitrary redshifts. EVLA and Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) studies of H2O and SiO masers will serve as high resolution probes of the innermost envelopes of oxygen-rich evolved stars and HCN masers of carbon-rich stars. Farther in the future, the Square Kilometer Array (SKA) promises the detection of OH gigamasers at all conceivable redshifts and maser astrometry with unprecedented accuracy.

  2. [The therapeutic promises of a building. Vijverdal Community Mental Hospital 1969-2004].

    PubMed

    Klijn, Annemieke

    2005-01-01

    In 1972 the psychiatric hospital 'Vijverdal' opened its doors in Maastricht. The building of this Community Mental Hospital was reported to be 'revolutionary'. Inspired by American architectural concepts about the construction of hospitals, Vijverdal arose as a huge complex with a nine storey radial block of flats: a unique building in Dutch psychiatry. The first reactions were very positive. The imposing flat expressed psychiatric optimism and therapeutic promises. However, confronted by the dynamic developments in psychiatry at the end of the seventies, the hospital more and more appeared to be a therapeutic monstrum: the flat became a symbol of alienation and medical detachment. Adapting it to the new ideas about differentiation and de-concentration appeared difficult, however. Only in 2000 Vijverdal started a fundamental renovation. The flat will be torn down in 2006. This changing evaluation of Vijverdal makes us wonder about the biography of this psychiatric hospital. Which intentions and which psychiatric concepts inspired Vijverdal to be built? How functioned the building environment of Vijverdal in practice? Could the hospital be accommodated to the new notions and wishes about psychiatric care? Moreover, in what way did the architecture determine the history of Vijverdal? And eventually, how are new conceptions about psychiatric care translated in the present renovation and reconstruction of Vijverdal? Do therapeutic promises play a role again? The adventures of Vijverdal tell us about the risks of visionary architecture, but also that a building matters: the psychiatric patients appreciate the new houses and the privacy of a room for their own. PMID:17154119

  3. Identifying a Theft Suspect

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This page was authored by the CATALST Group at the University of Minnesota, based on an activity developed by Roxy Peck at California Polytechnic State University that is based on an original idea by Tom Short, John Carroll University, and Iddo Gal, University of Haifa, Israel.

    This model-eliciting activity (MEA) challenges students to develop a model for predicting the characteristics of a person who has committed a crime. Students work with real data on shoe length, height, and gender to develop the model. Students write a report to the crime victim that identifies a suspect and justifies their decision. The activity sets the stage for students to learn about regression models, and reinforces their understanding of central tendency and variability. It is suggested that this activity be used prior to a formal introduction to linear relationships.

  4. Improving the Nurse–Family Partnership in Community Practice

    PubMed Central

    Donelan-McCall, Nancy; O’Brien, Ruth; MacMillan, Harriet; Jack, Susan; Jenkins, Thomas; Dunlap, Wallace P.; O’Fallon, Molly; Yost, Elly; Thorland, Bill; Pinto, Francesca; Gasbarro, Mariarosa; Baca, Pilar; Melnick, Alan; Beeber, Linda

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Evidence-based preventive interventions are rarely final products. They have reached a stage of development that warrant public investment but require additional research and development to strengthen their effects. The Nurse-Family Partnership (NFP), a program of nurse home visiting, is grounded in findings from replicated randomized controlled trials. OBJECTIVE: Evidence-based programs require replication in accordance with the models tested in the original randomized controlled trials in order to achieve impacts comparable to those found in those trials, and yet they must be changed in order to improve their impacts, given that interventions require continuous improvement. This article provides a framework and illustrations of work our team members have developed to address this tension. METHODS: Because the NFP is delivered in communities outside of research contexts, we used quantitative and qualitative research to identify challenges with the NFP program model and its implementation, as well as promising approaches for addressing them. RESULTS: We describe a framework used to address these issues and illustrate its use in improving nurses’ skills in retaining participants, reducing closely spaced subsequent pregnancies, responding to intimate partner violence, observing and promoting caregivers’ care of their children, addressing parents’ mental health problems, classifying families’ risks and strengths as a guide for program implementation, and collaborating with indigenous health organizations to adapt and evaluate the program for their populations. We identify common challenges encountered in conducting research in practice settings and translating findings from these studies into ongoing program implementation. CONCLUSIONS: The conduct of research focused on quality improvement, model improvement, and implementation in NFP practice settings is challenging, but feasible, and holds promise for improving the impact of the NFP. PMID:24187112

  5. Porous liquids: a promising class of media for gas separation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinshui; Chai, Song-Hai; Qiao, Zhen-An; Mahurin, Shannon M; Chen, Jihua; Fang, Youxing; Wan, Shun; Nelson, Kimberly; Zhang, Pengfei; Dai, Sheng

    2015-01-12

    A porous liquid containing empty cavities has been successfully fabricated by surface engineering of hollow structures with suitable corona and canopy species. By taking advantage of the liquid-like polymeric matrices as a separation medium and the empty cavities as gas transport pathway, this unique porous liquid can function as a promising candidate for gas separation. Moreover, such a facile synthetic strategy can be further extended to the fabrication of other types of nanostructure-based porous liquid, opening up new opportunities for preparation of porous liquids with attractive properties for specific tasks. PMID:25404583

  6. N-Cinnamoylated Aminoquinolines as Promising Antileishmanial Agents

    PubMed Central

    Vale-Costa, S.; Costa-Gouveia, J.; Pérez, B.; Silva, T.; Teixeira, C.; Gomes, P.

    2013-01-01

    A series of cinnamic acid conjugates of primaquine and chloroquine were evaluated for their in vitro antileishmanial activities. Although primaquine derivatives had modest activity, chloroquine conjugates exhibited potent activity against both promastigotes (50% inhibitory concentration [IC50] = 2.6 to 21.8 ?M) and intramacrophagic amastigotes (IC50 = 1.2 to 9.3 ?M) of Leishmania infantum. Both the high activity of these chloroquine analogues and their mild-to-low toxicity toward host cells make them promising leads for the discovery of new antileishmanial agents. PMID:23917315

  7. New cancer drug shows promise for treating advanced melanoma

    Cancer.gov

    Researchers from UCLA's Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center report that a new drug in preliminary tests has shown promising results with very manageable side effects for treating patients with melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer. The results were presented at the 2013 meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology today in Chicago by Dr. Antoni Ribas, professor of medicine in the UCLA division of hematology-oncology, who led the research. Following Ribas’ presentation, the study was published online ahead of press in the New England Journal of Medicine.

  8. Research Making Its Way into Classroom Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, Peter; Goatley, Virginia

    2015-01-01

    Identifying researchers whose work has influenced classroom practice, raises questions about the nature of research and its relationship with practice, and the means through which knowledge is distributed. We argue that normally, influence arises through lines of research more than individuals, that knowing-in-practice distribution systems should…

  9. Representation of agricultural conservation practices with SWAT

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mazdak Arabi; Jane R. Frankenberger; Bernie A. Engel; Jeff G. Arnold

    2008-01-01

    Results of modelling studies for the evaluation of water quality impacts of agricultural conservation practices depend heavily on the numerical procedure used to represent the practices. Herein, a method for the representation of several agricultural conservation practices with the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) is developed and evaluated. The representation procedure entails identifying hydrologic and water quality processes that

  10. The Ohio Scales: Practical Outcome Assessment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Benjamin M. Ogles; Gregorio Melendez; Diane C. Davis; Kirk M. Lunnen

    2001-01-01

    The development and initial psychometric studies for the Ohio Youth Problems, Functioning, and Satisfaction Scales (Ohio Scales) are described. The Ohio Scales were developed to be practical yet rigorous, multi-content, multi-source measures of outcome for children and adolescents receiving mental health services. Initial studies suggest that the Ohio Scales are promising (reliable, valid, and sensitive to change) measures that can

  11. Legal & Practical Issues When Outsourcing Software Testing

    E-print Network

    1 Legal & Practical Issues When Outsourcing Software Testing Cem Kaner, J.D. Ph.D. STAR 1997 #12;Kaner -- Slide 2 Why is Outsourcing so Complicated? All sides often lack contracting experience (except, capability & cost. Outsourcer promises too much. Outsourcing carries communication costs, forces (extra

  12. Brain Matters: Practicing Religion, Forming the Faithful

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hogue, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Religious practices have long drawn on the social sciences to broaden our understanding of how human beings develop, learn, relate, and are formed. While the religion and science conversations have not always been friendly, a growing number of theologians and scientists are engaged in promising dialogues where the interests of both parties…

  13. Security Aspects of Practical Quantum Cryptography

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Gilles Brassard; Norbert Lütkenhaus; Tal Mor; Barry C. Sanders

    2000-01-01

    The use of quantum bits (qubits) in cryptography holds the promise of secure cryptographic quantum key distribution schemes. Unfortunately, the implemented schemes are often operated in a regime which excludes unconditional security. We provide a thorough investiga- tion of security issues for practical quantum key distribution, taking into account channel losses, a realistic detection process, and modiflcations of the \\\\qubits\\

  14. Towards practical implementation of bioelectrochemical wastewater treatment

    Microsoft Academic Search

    René A. Rozendal; Hubertus V. M. Hamelers; Korneel Rabaey; Jurg Keller; Cees J. N. Buisman

    2008-01-01

    Bioelectrochemical systems (BESs), such as microbial fuel cells (MFCs) and microbial electrolysis cells (MECs), are generally regarded as a promising future technology for the production of energy from organic material present in wastewaters. The current densities that can be generated with laboratory BESs now approach levels that come close to the requirements for practical applications. However, full-scale implementation of bioelectrochemical

  15. Policy promise: community policing and domestic violence victim satisfaction

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Margaret E. Martin

    1997-01-01

    Police policy regarding domestic violence has been severely altered over the last decade. The social control approach of pro-arrest policies has coincided with a service approach promoted by community policing philosophy. But community policing practice has largely ignored the role of victim satisfaction. The evaluation of domestic violence victims must be considered in determining police accountability, because of both the

  16. The Rise of the Teleworker: False Promises and Responsive Solutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kanuka, Heather; Jugdev, Kam; Heller, Robert; West, Dan

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this exploratory study was to gain a better understanding of how to provide learning opportunities to improve teaching practices for the increasing numbers of academics who are choosing to work online from remote offices, sometimes called e-academics, remote workers, or teleworkers. The objectives of the study were twofold: (1) to…

  17. Games for Learning: Vast Wasteland or a Digital Promise?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Michael H.; Vaala, Sarah E.

    2013-01-01

    Research about emerging best practices in the learning sciences points to the potential of deploying digital games as one possible solution to the twin challenges of weak student engagement and the need for more robust achievement in literacy, science, technology, and math. This chapter reviews key cross-cutting themes in this special volume,…

  18. Promises and problems: using GIS to analyse shopping travel

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Sally Cairns

    1998-01-01

    Geographical Information Systems enable spatial analysis of a scale and nature that has never been possible before. However, their practical utilisation in transport research remains limited. This paper describes the specific experience of using the TransCAD GIS to assess different ways of organising food shopping. It concentrates on the role played by the GIS. In doing so, it aims to

  19. Multiferroics: Promising materials for microelectronics, spintronics, and sensor technique

    Microsoft Academic Search

    A. K. Zvezdin; A. S. Logginov; G. A. Meshkov; A. P. Pyatakov

    2007-01-01

    Possible areas of application of magnetoelectric materials and multiferroics in microelectronics, spintronics, and sensor\\u000a technique are considered. Criteria of practical applicability of such materials are formulated and examples of magnetoelectric\\u000a materials satisfying these criteria are given.

  20. Clinical knowledge management at scale: fulfilling the promise of pervasive

    E-print Network

    Gabrieli, John

    , calculations, evidence-based templates for­ e.g., forcing functions, calculations, evidence-based templates Geriatric adjustments Dosing calculations #12;Evidence for CDS (knowledge-based)Evidence for CDS (knowledge-based ­ e.g., protocols, care pathways, practice guidelines 6. Descriptive or predictive modeling ­ e

  1. Reducing the Risk, Increasing the Promise: Strategies for Student Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergmann, Sherrel; Brough, Judith Allen

    2012-01-01

    In their new book, Bergmann and Brough provide a clear path to follow for helping your at-risk students achieve success in and out of the classroom. Packed with classroom-tested, practical strategies and lesson plans for teaching respect, responsibility, resilience, reading, and other essential skills to at-risk students, this is a must-have book…

  2. Internet-Based Data Collection: Promises and Realities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benfield, Jacob A.; Szlemko, William J.

    2006-01-01

    The use of Internet to aid research practice has become more popular in the recent years. In fact, some believe that Internet surveying and electronic data collection may revolutionize many disciplines by allowing for easier data collection, larger samples, and therefore more representative data. However, others are skeptical of its usability as…

  3. Metal Oxide Nanowires As Promising Materials For Miniaturised Electronic Noses

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. Comini; G. Faglia; M. Ferroni; A. Ponzoni; G. Sberveglieri

    2009-01-01

    Nanotechnology is in continuous evolution leading to production of quasi-one dimensional (Q1D) structures in a variety of morphologies: nanowires, nanotubes, nanobelts, nanorods, nanorings, hierarchical structures. In particular, metal oxides represent an appealing category of materials with properties from metals to semiconductors and covering practically all aspects of material science and physics in areas including superconductivity and magnetism. MOX nanowires are

  4. Cultural Capital: The Promises and Pitfalls in Education Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winkle-Wagner, Rachelle

    2010-01-01

    The past three decades have seen the increased use of the term "cultural capital" in classrooms, research articles, and discussions in education. This monograph is an attempt to buttress a theoretical understanding of the cultural capital construct and its applicability to educational research and practice. In educational research, cultural…

  5. The Geier Consent Decree years: Fulfilled or unfulfilled promises?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jewell Winn

    2008-01-01

    The Geier Consent Decree, an agreement stemming from the landmark case Geier v. State of Tennessee was approved by the United States district Court for the Middle District of Tennessee, Nashville Division in 2001, with the intent of eliminating vestiges of past discrimination in higher education in Tennessee. Professional development and recruitment programs as well as affirmative action practices were

  6. EZID: Long term identifiers made easy (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starr, J.

    2013-12-01

    Scholarly research is producing ever increasing amounts of digital research data, and this data should be managed throughout the research life cycle both as part of good scientific practice, but also to comply with funder mandates, such as the 2013 OSTP Public Access Memo (http://www.whitehouse.gov/sites/default/files/microsites/ostp/ostp_public_access_memo_2013.pdf). By assigning unique and persistent identifiers to data objects, data managers can gain control and flexibility over what can be a daunting task. This is due to the fact that the objects can be moved to new locations without disruption to links, as long as the identifier target is maintained. EZID is a tool that makes assigning and maintaining unique, persistent identifiers easy. It was designed and built by California Digital Library (CDL) and has both a user interface and a RESTful API. EZID currently offers services for two globally unique, persistent identifier schemes: Digital Object Identifiers (DOIs) and Archival Resource Keys (ARKs). DOIs are identifiers originating from the publishing world and are in widespread use for journal articles. CDL is able to offer DOIs because of being a founding member of DataCite (http://www.datacite.org/), an international consortium established to provide easier access to scientific research data on the Internet. ARKs are identifiers originating from the library, archive and museum community. Like DOIs, they become persistent when the objects and identifier forwarding information is maintained. DOIs and ARKs have a key role in data management and, therefore, in data management plans. DOIs are the recommended identifier for use in data citation, and ARKs provide the maximum flexibility needed for data documentation and management throughout the early phases of a project. The two identifier schemes are able to be used together, and EZID is made to work with both. EZID clients, coming from education, research, government, and the private sector, are utilizing the tool for these use cases and more.

  7. Identifying Microlensing by Binaries

    E-print Network

    Rosanne Di Stefano; Rosalba Perna

    1997-02-11

    The microlensing monitoring programs have studied large numbers of standard light curves which seem to be due to lensing by a dark point mass. Theory predicts that many microlensing events should display significant deviations from the standard form. Lens binarity in particular is expected to be common. So far, however, only a handful of light curves exhibit evidence that the lens is a binary; all of these display dramatic deviations from the standard light curve, exhibiting pronounced multiple peaks and/or caustic crossings. Binary-lens events in which the light curve is less dramatically perturbed should also exist in the data set. Why, then, have we not detected them? The answer may lie in the fact that the perturbations, though often significant, tend to be less distinctive than those associated with caustic crossings. We present a method to determine whether a light curve is due to lensing by a binary. The method works for both gently and dramatically perturbed binary-lens light curves. Our method identifies all degenerate solutions-- i.e., all possible lensing events that might have given rise to the observed light curve. It also enables us to eliminate from consideration large ranges of possible false positive identifications associated with light curves that might mimic microlensing by a binary. This method, or a generalization of it, can also be applied to the analysis of light curves that deviate from the standard point-mass lens form because of astronomical effects other than lens binarity.

  8. COUNSELING PRACTICES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    WATERLOO, GLENN E.

    THE NEED FOR COUNSELING IS EMPHASIZED BY THE FACT THAT 875,000 CHILDREN IN THE UNITED STATES HAVE MENTAL AND PHYSICAL IMPEDIMENTS TO LEARNING. TYPICAL COUNSELING PRACTICES ARE PROBLEM-CENTERED COUNSELING, EXCLUSIVELY "VOCATIONAL" OR "EDUCATIONAL" COUNSELING WITH LITTLE CONCERN FOR THE WHOLE INDIVIDUAL, EXTREME DIRECTIVE OR NONDIRECTIVE COUNSELING,…

  9. Good practice guidelines for biomarker discovery from array data: a case study for breast cancer prognosis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Biomarker discovery holds the promise for advancing personalized medicine as the biomarkers can help match patients to optimal treatment to improve patient outcomes. However, serious concerns have been raised because very few molecular biomarkers or signatures discovered from high dimensional array data can be successfully validated and applied to clinical use. We propose good practice guidelines as well as a novel tool for biomarker discovery and use breast cancer prognosis as a case study to illustrate the proposed approach. Results We applied the proposed approach to a publicly available breast cancer prognosis dataset and identified small numbers of predictive markers for patient subpopulations stratified by clinical variables. Results from an independent cross-platform validation set show that our model compares favorably to other gene signature and clinical variable based prognostic tools. About half of the discovered candidate markers can individually achieve very good performance, which further demonstrate the high quality of feature selection. These candidate markers perform extremely well for young patient with estrogen receptor-positive, lymph node-negative early stage breast cancers, suggesting a distinct subset of these patients identified by these markers is actually at high risk of recurrence and may benefit from more aggressive treatment than cur-rent practice. Conclusion The results show that by following good practice guidelines, we can identify highly predictive genes in high dimensional breast cancer array data. These predictive genes have been successfully validated using an independent cross-platform dataset. PMID:24565120

  10. Targeting Cyclooxygenase-2 in Hematological Malignancies: Rationale and Promise

    PubMed Central

    Bernard, M. P.; Bancos, S.; Sime, P. J.; Phipps, R. P.

    2009-01-01

    There is much interest in the potential use of Cox-2 selective inhibitors in combination with other cancer therapeutics. Malignancies of hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic origin often have increased expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2), a key modulator of inflammation. For example, hematological malignancies such as chronic lymphocytic leukemia, chronic myeloid leukemia, Hodgkin’s lymphoma, non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma and multiple myeloma often highly express Cox-2, which correlates with poor patient prognosis. Expression of Cox-2 enhances survival and proliferation of malignant cells, while negatively influencing anti-tumor immunity. Hematological malignancies expressing elevated levels of Cox-2 potentially avoid immune responses by producing factors that enhance angiogenesis and metastases. Cellular immune responses regulated by natural killer cells, cytotoxic T lymphocytes, and T regulatory cells are also influenced by Cox-2 expression. Therefore, Cox-2 selective inhibitors have promising therapeutic potential in patients suffering from certain hematological malignancies. PMID:18691115

  11. Emerging neurotechnologies for lie-detection: promises and perils.

    PubMed

    Wolpe, Paul Root; Foster, Kenneth R; Langleben, Daniel D

    2010-10-01

    Detection of deception and confirmation of truth telling with conventional polygraphy raised a host of technical and ethical issues. Recently, newer methods of recording electromagnetic signals from the brain show promise in permitting the detection of deception or truth telling. Some are even being promoted as more accurate than conventional polygraphy. While the new technologies raise issues of personal privacy, acceptable forensic application, and other social issues, the focus of this paper is the technical limitations of the developing technology. Those limitations include the measurement validity of the new technologies, which remains largely unknown. Another set of questions pertains to the psychological paradigms used to model or constrain the target behavior. Finally, there is little standardization in the field, and the vulnerability of the techniques to countermeasures is unknown. Premature application of these technologies outside of research settings should be resisted, and the social conversation about the appropriate parameters of its civil, forensic, and security use should begin. PMID:20945266

  12. Emerging neurotechnologies for lie-detection: promises and perils.

    PubMed

    Wolpe, Paul Root; Foster, Kenneth R; Langleben, Daniel D

    2005-01-01

    Detection of deception and confirmation of truth telling with conventional polygraphy raised a host of technical and ethical issues. Recently, newer methods of recording electromagnetic signals from the brain show promise in permitting the detection of deception or truth telling. Some are even being promoted as more accurate than conventional polygraphy. While the new technologies raise issues of personal privacy, acceptable forensic application, and other social issues, the focus of this paper is the technical limitations of the developing technology. Those limitations include the measurement validity of the new technologies, which remains largely unknown. Another set of questions pertains to the psychological paradigms used to model or constrain the target behavior. Finally, there is little standardization in the field, and the vulnerability of the techniques to countermeasures is unknown. Premature application of these technologies outside of research settings should be resisted, and the social conversation about the appropriate parameters of its civil, forensic, and security use should begin. PMID:16036700

  13. Metallacarboranes: Towards promising hydrogen storage metal organic framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Abhishek; Sadrzadeh, Arta; Yakobson, Boris

    2011-03-01

    Using first principles calculations we show the high hydrogen storage capacity of metallacarboranes, where the transition metal (TM) atoms bind hydrogen via Kubas interaction. The average binding energy of ~ 0.3 eV/H favorably lies within the reversible adsorption range The Sc and Ti are found to be the optimum metal atoms maximizing the number of stored H2 molecules. Depending upon the structure, metallacarboranes can adsorb up to 8 wt% of hydrogen, which exceeds DOE goal for 2015. Being integral part of the cage, TMs do not suffer from the aggregation problem. Furthermore, the presence of carbon atom in the cages permits linking the metallacarboranes to form metal organic frameworks (MOF), thus able to adsorb hydrogen via Kubas interaction, in addition to van der Waals physisorption. A. K. Singh, A. Sadrzadeh, and B. I. Yakobson, Metallacarboranes: Toward Promising Hydrogen Storage Metal Organic Frameworks, JACS 132,14126 (2010).

  14. Reliability assessment of germanium gate stacks with promising initial characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Cimang; Lee, Choong Hyun; Nishimura, Tomonori; Nagashio, Kosuke; Toriumi, Akira

    2015-02-01

    This work reports on the reliability assessment of germanium (Ge) gate stacks with promising initial electrical properties, with focus on trap generation under a constant electric stress field (Estress). Initial Ge gate stack properties do not necessarily mean highly robust reliability when it is considered that traps are newly generated under high Estress. A small amount of yttrium- or scandium oxide-doped GeO2 (Y-GeO2 or Sc-GeO2, respectively) significantly reduces trap generation in Ge gate stacks without deterioration of the interface. This is explained by the increase in the average coordination number (Nav) of the modified GeO2 network that results from the doping.

  15. ?-Ketoamino acid ester derivatives as promising MAO inhibitors.

    PubMed

    El-Faham, Ayman; Zainab Al Marhoon; Abdel-Megeed, Ahmed; Khattab, Sherine N; Bekhit, Adnan A; Albericio, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    ?-Ketoamino acid ester 2-[2-(2-acetamidophenyl)-2-oxoacetamido] and 2-[4-(2-(2-acetamidophenyl)-2-oxoacetamido)benzamido] derivatives were synthesized via the ring opening of N-acetylisatin under mild conditions. These compounds were then examined for their capacity to inhibit monoamine oxidase (MAO). The inhibition profile was found to be competitive for compounds 4d, 6a, 6b and 6f, which showed MAO-A selectivity. Observation of the docked positions of these compounds revealed interactions with many residues previously reported to have an effect on the inhibition of the enzyme. Our findings indicate that the members of this family of ?-ketoamino acid esters are promising MAO inhibitors. PMID:25466194

  16. Promising Pharmacological Directions in the World of Lysophosphatidic Acid Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Stoddard, Nicole C.; Chun, Jerold

    2015-01-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a signaling lipid that binds to six known lysophosphatidic acid receptors (LPARs), named LPA1-LPA6. These receptors initiate signaling cascades relevant to development, maintenance, and healing processes throughout the body. The diversity and specificity of LPA signaling, especially in relation to cancer and autoimmune disorders, makes LPA receptor modulation an attractive target for drug development. Several LPAR-specific analogues and small molecules have been synthesized and are efficacious in attenuating pathology in disease models. To date, at least three compounds have passed phase I and phase II clinical trials for idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and systemic sclerosis. This review focuses on the promising therapeutic directions emerging in LPA signaling toward ameliorating several diseases, including cancer, fibrosis, arthritis, hydrocephalus, and traumatic injury. PMID:25593637

  17. The overdue promise of short tandem repeat variation for heritability.

    PubMed

    Press, Maximilian O; Carlson, Keisha D; Queitsch, Christine

    2014-11-01

    Short tandem repeat (STR) variation has been proposed as a major explanatory factor in the heritability of complex traits in humans and model organisms. However, we still struggle to incorporate STR variation into genotype-phenotype maps. We review here the promise of STRs in contributing to complex trait heritability and highlight the challenges that STRs pose due to their repetitive nature. We argue that STR variants are more likely than single-nucleotide variants to have epistatic interactions, reiterate the need for targeted assays to genotype STRs accurately, and call for more appropriate statistical methods in detecting STR-phenotype associations. Lastly, we suggest that somatic STR variation within individuals may serve as a read-out of disease susceptibility, and is thus potentially a valuable covariate for future association studies. PMID:25182195

  18. Salivaomics - A promising future in early diagnosis of dental diseases

    PubMed Central

    Koneru, Suneetha; Tanikonda, Rambabu

    2014-01-01

    Human saliva plays an important role in the health of the oral cavity and of the body as a whole. Salivary diagnostics is a dynamic and emerging field in the diagnosis of oral and systemic diseases. Saliva reflects the physiologic state of the body, including emotional, endocrinal, nutritional, and metabolic variations. The collection of saliva samples is noninvasive, safe, and inexpensive. Traditional clinical criteria are insufficient for determining sites of active disease, for monitoring the response to therapy, or for measuring the degree of susceptibility to future disease progression. Salivaomics includes five diagnostic alphabets proteins, mRNAs, miRNAs, metabolic compounds, and microbes offering substantial advantages because disease states may be accompanied by detectable changes. Salivaomics, the future of saliva-based techniques for early diagnosis of dental diseases, is promising and may offer a robust alternative for clinicians to use in the near future to make clinical decisions. PMID:24688554

  19. Salivaomics - A promising future in early diagnosis of dental diseases.

    PubMed

    Koneru, Suneetha; Tanikonda, Rambabu

    2014-01-01

    Human saliva plays an important role in the health of the oral cavity and of the body as a whole. Salivary diagnostics is a dynamic and emerging field in the diagnosis of oral and systemic diseases. Saliva reflects the physiologic state of the body, including emotional, endocrinal, nutritional, and metabolic variations. The collection of saliva samples is noninvasive, safe, and inexpensive. Traditional clinical criteria are insufficient for determining sites of active disease, for monitoring the response to therapy, or for measuring the degree of susceptibility to future disease progression. Salivaomics includes five diagnostic alphabets proteins, mRNAs, miRNAs, metabolic compounds, and microbes offering substantial advantages because disease states may be accompanied by detectable changes. Salivaomics, the future of saliva-based techniques for early diagnosis of dental diseases, is promising and may offer a robust alternative for clinicians to use in the near future to make clinical decisions. PMID:24688554

  20. Scrap tire recycling: Promising high value applications. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Bauman, B.D.; Leskovyansky, P.J.; Drela, H.

    1993-11-01

    Surface modification of scrap tire rubber (rubber particles treated with chlorine gas) show promise for ameliorating the scrap tire problem (the treated rubber can be used as a component in high- performance, expensive polymer systems). The process has been proven in Phase I. Phase II covers market/applications, process development (Forberg-design mixer reactor was chosen), plant design, capital cost estimate, economics environmental/safety/health, and energy impact. Almost of the small amount of chlorine is consumed. The capital costs for a rubber particle treatment facility are attractive, being at least two orders of magnitude less than that of facilities for making new polymer materials. Large volume markets using treated rubber are needed. The amount of scrap rubber available is small compared to the polymers available for replacement. 7 tabs, 16 figs.

  1. Miltefosine, a promising novel agent for schistosomiasis mansoni.

    PubMed

    Eissa, Maha M; El-Azzouni, Mervat Z; Amer, Eglal I; Baddour, Nahed M

    2011-02-01

    This research aims towards developing an alternative antischistosomal drug using miltefosine, which is primarily used in the treatment of leishmaniasis. The treatment and control of schistosomiasis, a notable neglected tropical disease (NTD), rely on a single drug, praziquantel (PZQ). The dependency on PZQ exclusively is quite alarming, given the spread of the disease (over 200 million people infected and close to 800 million people at risk in three continents) and the threat of drug resistance. This study shows that the oral administration of miltefosine in a daily dose of 20mg/kg for five successive days to mice infected with either invasive, juvenile or adult stages of Schistosoma mansoni resulted in significant reduction of worm burden, hepatic granulomata size and amelioration of hepatic pathology. Scanning Electron Microscopy revealed that miltefosine induced severe tegumental damage in adult schistosomes. In conclusion, we believe this is the first study highlighting miltefosine as a promising novel agent for schistosomiasis mansoni. PMID:21055404

  2. Assistive technology and learning disabilities: today's realities and tomorrow's promises.

    PubMed

    Lewis, R B

    1998-01-01

    Many forms of technology, both "high" and "low," can help individuals with learning disabilities capitalize on their strengths and bypass, or compensate for, their disabilities. This article surveys the current status of assistive technology for this population and reflects on future promises and potential problems. In addition, a model is presented for conceptualizing assistive technology in terms of the types of barriers it helps persons with disabilities to surmount. Several current technologies are described and the research supporting their effectiveness reviewed: word processing, computer-based instruction in reading and other academic areas, interactive videodisc interventions for math, and technologies for daily life. In conclusion, three themes related to the future success of assistive technology applications are discussed: equity of access to technology; ease of technology, use; and emergent technologies, such as virtual reality. PMID:9455174

  3. Cationic facial amphiphiles: a promising class of transfection agents.

    PubMed Central

    Walker, S; Sofia, M J; Kakarla, R; Kogan, N A; Wierichs, L; Longley, C B; Bruker, K; Axelrod, H R; Midha, S; Babu, S; Kahne, D

    1996-01-01

    A promising class of compounds for DNA transfection have been designed by conjugating various polyamines to bile-acid-based amphiphiles. Formulations containing these compounds were tested for their ability to facilitate the uptake of a beta-galactosidase reporter plasmid into COS-7 cells. Dioleoyl phosphatidyl ethanolamine (DOPE) formulations of some of the compounds were several times better than Lipofectin at promoting DNA uptake. The most active compounds contained the most hydrophilic bile acid components. The activity is clearly not related to affinity for DNA: the hydrophobic bile acid conjugates were found to form stable complexes with DNA at lower charge ratios than the hydrophilic conjugates. We suggest that the high activity of the best compounds is related to their facial amphiphilicity, which may confer an ability to destabilize membranes. The success of these unusual cationic transfection agents may inspire the design of even more effective gene delivery agents. Images Fig. 4 PMID:8643675

  4. The promise of the anti-idiotype concept

    PubMed Central

    Kieber-Emmons, Thomas; Monzavi-Karbassi, Bejatohlah; Pashov, Anastas; Saha, Somdutta; Murali, Ramachandran; Kohler, Heinz

    2012-01-01

    A basic tenet of antibody-based immunity is their specificity to antigenic determinates from foreign pathogen products to abnormal cellular components such as in cancer. However, an antibody has the potential to bind to more than one determinate, be it an antigen or another antibody. These observations led to the idiotype network theory (INT) to explain immune regulation, which has wax and waned in enthusiasm over the years. A truer measure of the impact of the INT is in terms of the ideas that now form the mainstay of immunological research and whose roots are spawned from the promise of the anti-idiotype concept. Among the applications of the INT is understanding the structural implications of the antibody-mediated network that has the potential for innovation in terms of rational design of reagents with biological, chemical, and pharmaceutical applications that underlies concepts of reverse immunology which is highlighted herein. PMID:23267437

  5. Immersion Education: Practices, Policies, Possibilities. Bilingual Education & Bilingualism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tedick, Diane J.; Christian, Donna; Fortune, Tara Williams

    2011-01-01

    This volume builds on Fortune and Tedick's 2008 Pathways to Multilingualism: Evolving Perspectives on Immersion Education and showcases the practice and promise of immersion education through in-depth investigations of program design, implementation practices, and policies in one-way, two-way and indigenous programs. Contributors present new…

  6. Coaching Literacy Teachers as They Design Critical Literacy Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    Literacy specialists and coaches are called upon for literacy leadership in schools and often wrestle with the tensions of implementing top-down reforms and making room for teacher- and student-led practices, such as critical literacy. Critical literacy education holds the promise of engaging learners to use literacy practices in ways that matter…

  7. Vegetated buffer management practice to improve surface water quality

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Zhang; X. Zhang; X. Liu

    2007-01-01

    Vegetated buffer best management practices (BMPs) installed in agricultural landscapes have been suggested as promising candidate tactics to reduce erosion and offsite transportation of agrochemicals. A wide range of vegetated buffer management practices have been installed in many areas to reduce agrochemical loss from applied fields, to filter sediments from tailwaters, and to deter their transportation to water bodies. This

  8. Gene therapy: a promising approach to treating spinal muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Mulcahy, Pádraig J; Iremonger, Kayleigh; Karyka, Evangelia; Herranz-Martín, Saúl; Shum, Ka-To; Tam, Janice Kal Van; Azzouz, Mimoun

    2014-07-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a severe autosomal recessive disease caused by a genetic defect in the survival motor neuron 1 (SMN1) gene, which encodes SMN, a protein widely expressed in all eukaryotic cells. Depletion of the SMN protein causes muscle weakness and progressive loss of movement in SMA patients. The field of gene therapy has made major advances over the past decade, and gene delivery to the central nervous system (CNS) by in vivo or ex vivo techniques is a rapidly emerging field in neuroscience. Despite Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis being among the most common neurodegenerative diseases in humans and attractive targets for treatment development, their multifactorial origin and complicated genetics make them less amenable to gene therapy. Monogenic disorders resulting from modifications in a single gene, such as SMA, prove more favorable and have been at the fore of this evolution of potential gene therapies, and results to date have been promising at least. With the estimated number of monogenic diseases standing in the thousands, elucidating a therapeutic target for one could have major implications for many more. Recent progress has brought about the commercialization of the first gene therapies for diseases, such as pancreatitis in the form of Glybera, with the potential for other monogenic disease therapies to follow suit. While much research has been carried out, there are many limiting factors that can halt or impede translation of therapies from the bench to the clinic. This review will look at both recent advances and encountered impediments in terms of SMA and endeavor to highlight the promising results that may be applicable to various associated diseases and also discuss the potential to overcome present limitations. PMID:24845847

  9. Promising school-based strategies and intervention guidelines to increase physical activity of adolescents.

    PubMed

    Murillo Pardo, Berta; García Bengoechea, Enrique; Generelo Lanaspa, Eduardo; Bush, Paula L; Zaragoza Casterad, Javier; Julián Clemente, José A; García González, Luis

    2013-06-01

    This narrative review describes the available scientific evidence regarding promising school-based strategies to increase physical activity of adolescents. We conducted a literature search for studies published up to 2011, regarding adolescent physical activity intervention studies that resulted in increased physical activity (regardless of measurement) and reviewed 52 intervention articles and 21 review articles. We identified several promising strategies and grouped into five broad intervention guidelines. These guidelines are as follows: (i) design multi-component interventions that foster the empowerment of members of the school community; (ii) develop improvements to Physical Education curricula as a strategy to promote physical activity to adolescents; (iii) design and implement non-curricular programmes and activities to promote physical activity; (iv) include computer-tailored interventions during the implementation and monitoring of physical activity promotion programmes and (v) design and implement specific strategies that respond to the interests and needs of girls. On the basis of our review of the adolescent physical activity promotion literature, we suggest that these five guidelines should be taken into account in school-based interventions geared towards achieving an increase in adolescent physical activity. PMID:23515117

  10. Patient-specific pluripotent stem cells: promises and challenges

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Rouven Müller; Claudia Lengerke

    2009-01-01

    Tissue transplantation is a well-established tool for the treatment of degenerative and malignant disorders, yet its use in clinical practice is hampered by the need for human-leukocyte-antigen-compatible donors and a shortage of suitable graft tissue. The discovery of human embryonic stem cells a decade ago raised hopes that a universal resource for the cell-based treatment of various conditions would soon

  11. Moral competence in nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Jormsri, Pantip; Kunaviktikul, Wipada; Ketefian, Shaké; Chaowalit, Aranya

    2005-11-01

    This article presents the derivation of moral competence in nursing practice by identifying its attributes founded on Thai culture. In this process moral competence is formed and based on the Thai nursing value system, including personal, social and professional values. It is then defined and its three dimensions (moral perception, judgment and behavior) are also identified. Additionally, eight attributes as indicators of moral competence are identified and selected from three basic values. The eight attributes are loving kindness, compassion, sympathetic joy, equanimity, responsibility, discipline, honesty, and respect for human values, dignity and rights. All attributes are discussed by addressing the three moral dimensions in order to present how to deal with ethical issues in nursing practice. As a summary, a model of moral competence is presented to demonstrate moral competence in nursing practice in Thailand. PMID:16312087

  12. Novel pharmaceutical cocrystal consisting of paracetamol and trimethylglycine, a new promising cocrystal former.

    PubMed

    Maeno, Yusuke; Fukami, Toshiro; Kawahata, Masatoshi; Yamaguchi, Kentaro; Tagami, Tatsuaki; Ozeki, Tetsuya; Suzuki, Toyofumi; Tomono, Kazuo

    2014-10-01

    Paracetamol (APAP), a frequently used antipyretic drug, has poor compression moldability. In this study, we identified a novel cocrystal consisting of APAP and trimethylglycine (TMG) that exhibits improved tabletability. TMG was used instead of oxalic acid (OXA), which is a coformer reported previously. The cocrystal (APAP-TMG at a molar ratio of 1:1) was characterized by X-ray analysis, infrared spectroscopy, and thermal analysis. The crystal structure of APAP-TMG revealed that it was a cocrystal, since no proton was transferred between the APAP and TMG molecules. The compression and dissolution properties of APAP-TMG were similar to that of the APAP-OXA cocrystal. In addition, taste sensing measurements suggested that TMG has a sweet and umami taste, indicating that TMG should suppress the bitterness of APAP. From these results, TMG could be a safe and promising cocrystal former that could replace OXA, which can irritate tissues. PMID:25010838

  13. Cholesterol uptake disruption, in association with chemotherapy, is a promising combined metabolic therapy for pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Guillaumond, Fabienne; Bidaut, Ghislain; Ouaissi, Mehdi; Servais, Stéphane; Gouirand, Victoire; Olivares, Orianne; Lac, Sophie; Borge, Laurence; Roques, Julie; Gayet, Odile; Pinault, Michelle; Guimaraes, Cyrille; Nigri, Jérémy; Loncle, Céline; Lavaut, Marie-Noëlle; Garcia, Stéphane; Tailleux, Anne; Staels, Bart; Calvo, Ezequiel; Tomasini, Richard; Iovanna, Juan Lucio; Vasseur, Sophie

    2015-02-24

    The malignant progression of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is accompanied by a profound desmoplasia, which forces proliferating tumor cells to metabolically adapt to this new microenvironment. We established the PDAC metabolic signature to highlight the main activated tumor metabolic pathways. Comparative transcriptomic analysis identified lipid-related metabolic pathways as being the most highly enriched in PDAC, compared with a normal pancreas. Our study revealed that lipoprotein metabolic processes, in particular cholesterol uptake, are drastically activated in the tumor. This process results in an increase in the amount of cholesterol and an overexpression of the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) in pancreatic tumor cells. These findings identify LDLR as a novel metabolic target to limit PDAC progression. Here, we demonstrate that shRNA silencing of LDLR, in pancreatic tumor cells, profoundly reduces uptake of cholesterol and alters its distribution, decreases tumor cell proliferation, and limits activation of ERK1/2 survival pathway. Moreover, blocking cholesterol uptake sensitizes cells to chemotherapeutic drugs and potentiates the effect of chemotherapy on PDAC regression. Clinically, high PDAC Ldlr expression is not restricted to a specific tumor stage but is correlated to a higher risk of disease recurrence. This study provides a precise overview of lipid metabolic pathways that are disturbed in PDAC. We also highlight the high dependence of pancreatic cancer cells upon cholesterol uptake, and identify LDLR as a promising metabolic target for combined therapy, to limit PDAC progression and disease patient relapse. PMID:25675507

  14. Hospital Medicine's Evolution: Literature Search and Interview Study with Practices

    PubMed Central

    Greenwald, Ruth; Novelli, Marianne; Lorence, Tom

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Hospital medicine is a young specialty that is still evolving. In its early years, research focused on clinical outcomes, efficiency, and cost effectiveness. As the specialty matures, increasing attention is being given to the patient and hospitalist experience with the hospitalist model of care. Methods: In 2008, we conducted a literature search to identify patients' and hospitalists' satisfaction concerns and potential strategies for their resolution. We used our findings to develop a semistructured interview guide as a basis for a wide-ranging discussion with Kaiser Permanente (KP) hospitalists and physician leaders and KP and non-KP subject-matter experts on their priorities, concerns, and successful practices. Results: Respondents identified sustainability and communications in coordinating care as their high-priority concerns with sustainability as the top priority. Within these broad concerns, they identified contributing factors and their interrelationships. Factors influencing sustainability of the hospitalist model include hospitalist scheduling, workload, comanagement responsibilities, and recruitment and retention. Regarding communications in coordinating care, respondents viewed themselves as being in the center of a web involving communication with patients, physicians in other services, nurses, and other hospitalists. Conclusion: Promising approaches have been developed to address sustainability concerns and for communicating with patients, physicians in other services, nurses, and other hospitalists. However, getting reliable feedback on patient satisfaction surveys for individual hospitalists is a continuing challenge. Despite the use of brochures and business cards to introduce themselves to patients and explain their role, there are difficulties in establishing a hospitalist-patient bond. PMID:22058670

  15. Identifying multiquark hadrons from heavy ion collisions.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sungtae; Furumoto, Takenori; Hyodo, Tetsuo; Jido, Daisuke; Ko, Che Ming; Lee, Su Houng; Nielsen, Marina; Ohnishi, Akira; Sekihara, Takayasu; Yasui, Shigehiro; Yazaki, Koichi

    2011-05-27

    Identifying hadronic molecular states and/or hadrons with multiquark components either with or without exotic quantum numbers is a long-standing challenge in hadronic physics. We suggest that studying the production of these hadrons in relativistic heavy ion collisions offers a promising resolution to this problem as yields of exotic hadrons are expected to be strongly affected by their structures. Using the coalescence model for hadron production, we find that, compared to the case of a nonexotic hadron with normal quark numbers, the yield of an exotic hadron is typically an order of magnitude smaller when it is a compact multiquark state and a factor of 2 or more larger when it is a loosely bound hadronic molecule. We further find that some of the newly proposed heavy exotic states could be produced and realistically measured in these experiments. PMID:21699290

  16. Global Studies: Problems and Promises for Elementary Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Overly, Norman V., Ed.; Kimpston, Richard D., Ed.

    This publication identifies rationale, content, and materials for teaching about world problems in the elementary school. Intended predominantly for use by classroom teachers and supervisors, the publication is also a useful resource for teacher training. It contains four chapters. Chapter I, A Perspective on Global Studies, reviews the historical…

  17. Objectivity in Grading: The Promise of Bar Codes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jae, Haeran; Cowling, John

    2009-01-01

    This article proposes the use of a new technology to assure student anonymity and reduce bias hazards: identifying students by using bar codes. The limited finding suggests that the use of bar codes for assuring student anonymity could potentially cause students to perceive that grades are assigned more fairly and reassure teachers that they are…

  18. Intermediate Educational Units and Their Promise for Rural Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benson, Charles W.; Barber, R. Jerry

    The document discussed the functions of intermediate educational units their relation to rural schools, and the unique needs of rural schools. Chapter I traced the development of the American school system from its inception in colonial America to contemporary times. Characteristics of America's rural population were identified and briefly…

  19. Skin: a promising reservoir for adult stem cell populations

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Shi Chunmeng; Cheng Tianmin

    2004-01-01

    Plasticity of adult cells has been identified in several post-natal tissues in the past few years and has attracted special attention in regenerative medicine. Skin is the biggest organ in the body. Adult skin consists of epidermis, dermis and appendages such as hairs and glands which are linked to the epidermis but project deep into the dermal layer. Skin stem

  20. Voices for America's Children: The Progress and the Promise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Catherine Crystal

    On the occasion of the fifteenth anniversary of the National Association of Child Advocates (NACA), this report discusses the current status of children, demonstrates the progress in the well-being of children due to the organization's efforts, identifies current challenges for child advocates, and describes the history of the organization.…

  1. Developing an evidence-based practice protocol: implications for midwifery practice

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Katherine Camacho Carr

    2000-01-01

    Evidence-based practice is defined and its importance to midwifery practice is presented. Guidelines are provided for the development of an evidence-based practice protocol. These include: identifying the clinical question, obtaining the evidence, evaluating the validity and importance of the evidence, synthesizing the evidence and applying it to the development of a protocol or clinical algorithm, and, finally, developing an evaluation

  2. The promise of metamaterials for new applications in optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweizer, H.; Fu, L.; Liu, N.; Weiss, T.; Schau, P.; Frenner, K.; Osten, W.; Giessen, H.

    2011-05-01

    Metallo-dielectric structured materials, or in other words metamaterials (MTM), are in principle a well established composite to improve efficiency, functionality, and weight of micro-wave components. In recent times, it has been demonstrated that the functionalities of metamaterials can be scaled down to optical frequencies by nano structuring techniques. Examples include negative index materials in the near infrared and visible frequency range, cloaking structures, filters, and structures for improved sensing of environmental gases. The physical processes in plasmonic metamaterials depend strongly on the excitation of surface plasmons and the interaction between them. We have learned how to control the plasmon-photon and the plasmon-plasmon interaction for manipulating the electromagnetic response in a metamaterial at wavelengths well below the vacuum wavelength. Many interesting and novel optical applications and devices are expected. For instance sub-wavelength imaging, compact communication devices as polarisation splitters, slow light media structures, compact colour filters, and resonators. All-plasmonic circuits are also the basis for ultra-dense photonic integration not achievable through the conventional optical integration. With examples of several metamaterial structures we try to illustrate the application potential of MTMs and comment on their fabrication feasibility to show whether metamaterials can hold their promise. Their investigation is in any case a rewarding adventure.

  3. miRNA therapeutics in cardiovascular diseases: promises and problems

    PubMed Central

    Nouraee, Nazila; Mowla, Seyed J.

    2015-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are a novel class of non-coding RNAs which found their way into the clinic due to their fundamental roles in cellular processes such as differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis. Recently, miRNAs have been known as micromodulators in cellular communications being involved in cell signaling and microenvironment remodeling. In this review, we will focus on the role of miRNAs in cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) and their reliability as diagnostic and therapeutic biomarkers in these conditions. CVDs comprise a variety of blood vessels and heart disorders with a high rate of morbidity and mortality worldwide. This necessitates introduction of novel molecular biomarkers for early detection, prevention, or treatment of these diseases. miRNAs, due to their stability, tissue-specific expression pattern and secretion to the corresponding body fluids, are attractive targets for cardiovascular-associated therapeutics. Explaining the challenges ahead of miRNA-based therapies, we will discuss the exosomes as delivery packages for miRNA drugs and promising novel strategies for the future of miRNA-based therapeutics. These approaches provide insights to the future of personalized medicine for the treatment of CVDs.

  4. Case Series in Cognitive Neuropsychology: Promise, Perils and Proper Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Rapp, Brenda

    2012-01-01

    Schwartz & Dell (2010) advocated for a major role for case series investigations in cognitive neuropsychology. They defined the key features of this approach and presented a number of arguments and examples illustrating the benefits of case series studies and their contribution to computational cognitive neuropsychology. In the Special Issue on “Case Series in Cognitive Neuropsychology” there are six commentaries on Schwartz and Dell (2010) as well as a response to the six commentaries by Dell and Schwartz. In this paper, I provide a brief summary of the key points made in Schwartz and Dell (2010) and I review the promise and perils of case series design as revealed by the six commentaries. I conclude by placing the set of papers within a broader perspective, providing some clarification of the historical record on case series and single case approaches, raising some cautionary notes for case series studies and situating both case series and single case approaches within the larger context of theory development in the cognitive sciences. PMID:22746685

  5. CARMENES ultra-stable cooling system: very promising results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirabet, E.; Carvas, P.; Lizon, J.-L.; Becerril, S.; Rodríguez, E.; Abril, M.; Cárdenas, M. C.; Morales, R.; Pérez, D.; Sánchez Carrasco, M. A.; Amado, P. J.; Seifert, W.; Quirrenbach, A.; Caballero, J. A.; Ribas, I.; Reiners, A.; Dreizler, S.

    2014-07-01

    CARMENES is a high resolution spectrograph to detect planets through the variation of radial velocity, destined for the Calar Alto Observatory in Almeria, Spain. The optical bench has a working temperature of 140K with a 24 hours stability of ±0,1K; goal ±0,01K. It is enclosed with a radiation shield actively cooled with thermalized nitrogen gas that flows through strategically positioned heat exchangers to remove its radiative load. The cooling system has an external preparation unit (N2GPU), which provides the nitrogen gas through actively vaporizing liquid nitrogen with heating resistances and a three stage circuit flow, each one controlled by an independent PID. Since CARMENES is still in the construction phase, a dedicated test facility has been built in order to simulate the instrument and correctly establish the N2GPU parameters. Furthermore, the test facility allows a wide range of configurations set-ups, which enables a full characterization of the N2GPU and the cooling system. The N2GPU has been designed to offer a wide temperature range of thermally stabilized nitrogen gas flow, which apart from CARMENES could also be used to provide ultra-high thermal stability in other cryogenic instruments. The present paper shows the testing of the cooling performance, the hardware used and the very promising results obtained.

  6. Nucleic acid aptamers: clinical applications and promising new horizons

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Xiaohua; Castanares, Mark; Mukherjee, Amarnath; Lupold, Shawn E.

    2011-01-01

    Aptamers are a special class of nucleic acid molecules that are beginning to be investigated for clinical use. These small RNA/DNA molecules can form secondary and tertiary structures capable of specifically binding proteins or other cellular targets; they are essentially a chemical equivalent of antibodies. Aptamers have the advantage of being highly specific, relatively small in size, and non-immunogenic. Since the discovery of aptamers in the early 1990s, great efforts have been made to make them clinically relevant for diseases like cancer, HIV, and macular degeneration. In the last two decades, many aptamers have been clinically developed as inhibitors for targets such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and thrombin. The first aptamer based therapeutic was FDA approved in 2004 for the treatment of age-related macular degeneration and several other aptamers are currently being evaluated in clinical trials. With advances in targeted-therapy, imaging, and nanotechnology, aptamers are readily considered as potential targeting ligands because of their chemical synthesis and ease of modification for conjugation. Preclinical studies using aptamer-siRNA chimeras and aptamer targeted nanoparticle therapeutics have been very successful in mouse models of cancer and HIV. In summary aptamers are in several stages of development, from pre-clinical studies to clinical trials and even as FDA approved therapeutics. In this review, we will discuss the current state of aptamers in clinical trials as well as some promising aptamers in pre-clinical development. PMID:21838685

  7. Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Derived Microparticles: A Promising Therapeutic Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Xi; Gong, Yong-Zhen; Wu, Ping; Liao, Duan-Fang; Zheng, Xi-Long

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent stem cells that give rise to various cell types of the mesodermal germ layer. Because of their unique ability to home in on injured and cancerous tissues, MSCs are of great potential in regenerative medicine. MSCs also contribute to reparative processes in different pathological conditions, including cardiovascular diseases and cancer. However, many studies have shown that only a small proportion of transplanted MSCs can actually survive and be incorporated into host tissues. The effects of MSCs cannot be fully explained by their number. Recent discoveries suggest that microparticles (MPs) derived from MSCs may be important for the physiological functions of their parent. Though the physiological role of MSC-MPs is currently not well understood, inspiring results indicate that, in tissue repair and anti-cancer therapy, MSC-MPs have similar pro-regenerative and protective properties as their cellular counterparts. Thus, MSC-MPs represent a promising approach that may overcome the obstacles and risks associated with the use of native or engineered MSCs. PMID:25196436

  8. NANOG: A promising target for digestive malignant tumors

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ai-Xi; Liu, Chang-Jiang; Sun, Zi-Qin; Wei, Zhi

    2014-01-01

    NANOG has been extensively researched since its discovery by Chambers et al. NANOG is a homeodomain transcription factor and an essential regulator of embryonic stem cell (ESC) self-renewal, which inhibits differentiation. Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are a small subset of cells that are thought to drive uncontrolled tumor growth; CSCs retain the tumor capabilities of self-renewal and propagation. The existence of CSCs was recently shown by direct experimental evidence. NANOG is expressed in CSCs and ESCs, although it remains unclear whether ESCs and CSCs share similar mechanisms in the regulation of physical and biological processes. Several studies suggest that the expression level of NANOG is high in cancer tissues and low or absent in normal tissues. High levels of NANOG expression are associated with advanced stages of cancer and a poor prognosis, indicating that it plays a vital role in tumor transformation, tumorigenesis, and tumor metastasis. NANOG is part of a complex regulatory network that controls cell fate determination, proliferation, and apoptosis. NANOG cooperates with other regulators, such as microflora, transcription factors, and kinases, in cancer cells. NANOG might have a promising future in anti-cancer and other therapeutic treatments, which could improve human health. PMID:25278701

  9. Germline oncopharmacogenetics, a promising field in cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Pesenti, Chiara; Gusella, Milena; Sirchia, Silvia M; Miozzo, Monica

    2015-02-01

    Pharmacogenetics (PGx) is the study of the relationship between inter-individual genetic variation and drug responses. Germline variants of genes involved in drug metabolism, drug transport, and drug targets can affect individual response to medications. Cancer therapies are characterized by an intrinsically high toxicity; therefore, the application of pharmacogenetics to cancer patients is a particularly promising method for avoiding the use of inefficacious drugs and preventing the associated adverse effects. However, despite continuing efforts in this field, very few labels include information about germline genetic variants associated with drug responses. DPYD, TPMT, UGT1A1, G6PD, CYP2D6, and HLA are the sole loci for which the European Medicines Agency (EMA) and the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) report specific information. This review highlights the germline PGx variants that have been approved to date for anticancer treatments, and also provides some insights about other germline variants with potential clinical applications. The continuous and rapid evolution of next-generation sequencing applications, together with the development of computational methods, should help to refine the implementation of personalized medicine. One day, clinicians may be able to prescribe the best treatment and the correct drug dosage based on each patient's genotype. This approach would improve treatment efficacy, reduce toxicity, and predict non-responders, thereby decreasing chemotherapy-associated morbidity and improving health benefits. PMID:25573079

  10. EPO906 (epothilone B): a promising novel microtubule stabilizer.

    PubMed

    Rothermel, John; Wartmann, Markus; Chen, Tianling; Hohneker, John

    2003-06-01

    EPO906 (epothilone B) is a potent member of a new class of microtubule-stabilizing cytotoxic agents known as epothilones. Although structurally unrelated to the clinically validated taxanes, EPO906 acts similarly to promote the formation and stabilization of microtubules, arresting proliferating cells in mitosis, and eventually causing cell demise by apoptosis. In preclinical studies, EPO906 has shown anticancer activity both in vitro and in vivo against several cancer types, including models that are paclitaxel-resistant. Importantly, in contrast to the taxanes, EPO906 retained activity against cancer cells either overexpressing the P-glycoprotein efflux pump or bearing tubulin mutations. Two phase I studies with EPO906 were conducted to determine the safety and maximal tolerated dose on two different dosing schedules: weekly and every 3 weeks. Diarrhea was the dose-limiting toxicity on both schedules. Tumor responses were seen in colorectal cancer as well as a variety of other tumor types, such as breast, ovarian, lung, and carcinoid in these two phase I trials. Based on the promising results from phase I studies, phase II studies in numerous indications are ongoing. PMID:12802795

  11. Targeting high-density lipoproteins: update on a promising therapy.

    PubMed

    Verdier, Céline; Martinez, Laurent O; Ferrières, Jean; Elbaz, Meyer; Genoux, Annelise; Perret, Bertrand

    2013-11-01

    Numerous epidemiological studies have demonstrated the atheroprotective roles of high density lipoproteins (HDL), so that HDL is established as an independent negative risk factor. The protective effect of HDL against atherosclerosis is mainly attributed to their capacity to bring peripheral excess cholesterol back to the liver for further elimination into the bile. In addition, HDL can exert other protective functions on the vascular wall, through their anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, antithrombotic and cytoprotective properties. HDL-targeted therapy is thus an innovative approach against cardiovascular risk and atherosclerosis. These pleiotropic atheroprotective properties of HDL have led experts to believe that "HDL-related therapies" represent the most promising next step in fighting against atherosclerosis. However, because of the heterogeneity of HDL functions, targeting HDL is not a simple task and HDL therapies that lower cardiovascular risk are NOT yet available. In this paper, an overview is presented about the therapeutic strategies currently under consideration to raise HDL levels and/or functions. Recently, clinical trials of drugs targeting HDL-C levels have disappointingly failed, suggesting that HDL functions through specific mechanisms should be targeted rather than increasing per se HDL levels. PMID:24074699

  12. Cancer Chemoprevention by Dietary Polyphenols: Promising Role for Epigenetics

    PubMed Central

    Link, Alexander; Balaguer, Francesc; Goel, Ajay

    2010-01-01

    Epigenetics refers to heritable changes that are not encoded in the DNA sequence itself, but play an important role in the control of gene expression. In mammals, epigenetic mechanisms include changes in DNA methylation, histone modifications and non-coding RNAs. Although epigenetic changes are heritable in somatic cells, these modifications are also potentially reversible, which makes them attractive and promising avenues for tailoring cancer preventive and therapeutic strategies. Burgeoning evidence in the last decade has provided unprecedented clues that diet and environmental factors directly influence epigenetic mechanisms in humans. Dietary polyphenols from green tea, turmeric, soybeans, broccoli and others have shown to possess multiple cell-regulatory activities within cancer cells. More recently, we have begun to understand that some of the dietary polyphenols may exert their chemopreventive effects in part by modulating various components of the epigenetic machinery in humans. In this article, we first discuss the contribution of diet and environmental factors on epigenetic alterations; subsequently, we provide a comprehensive review of literature on the role of various dietary polyphenols. In particular, we summarize the current knowledge on a large number of dietary agents and their effects on DNA methylation, histone modifications and regulation of expression of non-coding miRNAs in various in vitro and in vivo models. We emphasize how increased understanding of the chemopreventive effects of dietary polyphenols on specific epigenetic alterations may provide unique and yet unexplored novel and highly effective chemopreventive strategies for reducing the health burden of cancer and other diseases in humans. PMID:20599773

  13. Lanthanide titanates as promising matrices for immobilization of actinide wastes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yudintsev, S. V.

    2015-02-01

    The samples on the basis of Ln2Ti2O7 and Ln4Ti9O24 lanthanide titanates were obtained by compacting-sintering and melting-crystallization processes. The substances as such are promising as immobilizing matrices for the rare earth-actinide fraction of wastes of the treatment of used nuclear fuel. The content of simulators of the rare earth-actinide fraction in the obtained phases was as high as 50 mass % or more. The phases were characterized by a narrow range of variations of their composition. The admixtures of zirconium and aluminum caused the formation of zirconolite; the excess of titanium resulted in the formation of rutile or rhombic titanate (in the cases of Ln4Ti9O24 and Ln2Ti2O7, respectively). The use of these crystalline matrices for immobilization of long-lived radionuclides should provide a considerable decrease in the volume of solidified radioactive wastes to be disposed in deep-seated storage.

  14. Novel peptides of therapeutic promise from Indian Conidae.

    PubMed

    Gowd, K Hanumae; Sabareesh, V; Sudarslal, S; Iengar, Prathima; Franklin, Benjamin; Fernando, Antony; Dewan, Kalyan; Ramaswami, Mani; Sarma, Siddhartha P; Sikdar, Sujit; Balaram, P; Krishnan, K S

    2005-11-01

    Highly structured small peptides are the major toxic constituents of the venom of cone snails, a family of widely distributed predatory marine molluscs. These animals use the venom for rapid prey immobilization. The peptide components in the venom target a wide variety of membrane-bound ion channels and receptors. Many have been found to be highly selective for a diverse range of mammalian ion channels and receptors associated with pain-signaling pathways. Their small size, structural stability, and target specificity make them attractive pharmacologic agents. A select number of laboratories mainly from the United States, Europe, Australia, Israel, and China have been engaged in intense drug discovery programs based on peptides from a few snail species. Coastal India has an estimated 20-30% of the known cone species; however, few serious studies have been reported so far. We have begun a comprehensive program for the identification and characterization of peptides from cone snails found in Indian Coastal waters. This presentation reviews our progress over the last 2 years. As expected from the evolutionary history of these venom components, our search has yielded novel peptides of therapeutic promise from the new species that we have studied. PMID:16387709

  15. Will FLT3 Inhibitors Fulfill Their Promise in AML?

    PubMed Central

    Pratz, Keith W.; Luger, Selina M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of Review FLT-3 mutations in Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) have been brought from discovery in the early 1990's to clinical targeting in the last ten years. Despite several promising leads in pre-clinical models, no agent has yet been approved for clinical use. Here we will review the development of novel therapies for AML with FLT3 mutations. Recent findings Initial clinical development focused on broad kinase inhibitors which were found to have limited clinical activity due to insufficient kinase inhibitory activity and high toxicity. Subsequent development has brought forth narrow spectrum inhibitors with potent in-vivo activity and reasonable clinical tolerance but many patients still progress with prolonged use. Summary The optimal role for targeting FLT3 may depend on multi-modality therapy and will likely require hematopoietic transplant. The incorporation of ABL kinase inhibitors into acute lymphoblastic leukemia management should serve as a model for incorporation of FLT3 targeted agents into clinical care. Strategies incorporating FLT3 targeted agents into AML therapy are ongoing, but challenges in trial design, clinical heterogeneity and need for long term follow up make these investigations complicated in design and implementation. PMID:24468836

  16. Systems vaccinology: a promise for the young and the poor.

    PubMed

    Amenyogbe, Nelly; Levy, Ofer; Kollmann, Tobias R

    2015-06-19

    As a child, the risk of suffering and dying from infection is higher the younger you are; and higher, the less developed a region you are born in. Childhood vaccination programmes have greatly reduced mortality around the world, but least so for the very young among the very poor of the world. This appears partly owing to suboptimal vaccine effectiveness. Unfortunately, although most vaccines are administered to the newborn and very young infant (less than or equal to two months), we know the least about their host response to vaccination. We thus currently lack the knowledge to guide efforts aimed at improving vaccine effectiveness in this vulnerable population. Systems vaccinology, the study of molecular networks activated by immunization, has begun to provide unprecedented insights into mechanisms leading to vaccine-induced protection from infection or disease. However, all published reports of systems vaccinology have focused on either adults or at most children and older infants, not those most in need, i.e. newborns and very young infants. Given that the tools of systems vaccinology work perfectly well with very small sample volumes, it is time we deliver the promise that systems vaccinology holds for those most in need of vaccine-mediated protection from infection. PMID:25964462

  17. Medaka: a promising model animal for comparative population genomics

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Yoshifumi; Oota, Hiroki; Asaoka, Yoichi; Nishina, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Koji; Bujnicki, Janusz M; Oda, Shoji; Kawamura, Shoji; Mitani, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    Background Within-species genome diversity has been best studied in humans. The international HapMap project has revealed a tremendous amount of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) among humans, many of which show signals of positive selection during human evolution. In most of the cases, however, functional differences between the alleles remain experimentally unverified due to the inherent difficulty of human genetic studies. It would therefore be highly useful to have a vertebrate model with the following characteristics: (1) high within-species genetic diversity, (2) a variety of gene-manipulation protocols already developed, and (3) a completely sequenced genome. Medaka (Oryzias latipes) and its congeneric species, tiny fresh-water teleosts distributed broadly in East and Southeast Asia, meet these criteria. Findings Using Oryzias species from 27 local populations, we conducted a simple screening of nonsynonymous SNPs for 11 genes with apparent orthology between medaka and humans. We found medaka SNPs for which the same sites in human orthologs are known to be highly differentiated among the HapMap populations. Importantly, some of these SNPs show signals of positive selection. Conclusion These results indicate that medaka is a promising model system for comparative population genomics exploring the functional and adaptive significance of allelic differentiations. PMID:19426554

  18. Neprilysin gene transfer: A promising therapeutic approach for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuanli; Wang, Junqing; Zhang, Shenghao; Liu, Zhaohui

    2015-09-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by widespread neurodegeneration throughout the association cortex and limbic system, deposition of amyloid-? (A?) in the neuropil and around blood vessels, and formation of neurofibrillary tangles. A? accumulation is considered the major pathological change in AD progression. In recent years, several therapeutic strategies for treating AD have focused on reducing the A? burden in the brain. Among these approaches, the expression of A?-degrading enzymes in the brain has been effective but, so far, impractical for treating patients. Neprilysin (NEP), the most prominent of the A?-degrading enzymes in vivo, has been successfully delivered intracranially by viral vectors and is a promising therapeutic approach for reducing A? accumulation and treating AD. However, some challenges are associated with the use of viral and nonviral vectors, including secondary toxicity, activation of the immune response, and low efficiency. Therefore, safe and efficient NEP delivery systems that could avoid the viral problems with minor injury and high transfection efficiency are required to deliver AD medical applications. This Mini-Review summarizes NEP gene transfer technologies that use viral and nonviral vectors and discusses the rationale and benefits of these delivery systems for AD treatment trials, providing a reference for basic and clinical studies on AD. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26096375

  19. Heavy equipment management practices and problems in Thai highway contractors

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thanapun Prasertrungruang; B. H. W. Hadikusumo

    2007-01-01

    Purpose – This study is intended to investigate the current practices and problems in heavy equipment management as well as to identify practices capable of alleviating equipment management problems for highway contractors in Thailand. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – Equipment management practices were identified and analysed by SPSS using a questionnaire survey. ANOVA test was used to reveal significant differences in equipment management

  20. Engaging Students in the Scientific Practices of Explanation and Argumentation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reiser, Brian J.; Berland, Leema K.; Kenyon, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    "A Framework for K-12 Science Education" identifies eight science and engineering practices for K-12 classrooms. These practices, along with core ideas and crosscutting concepts, define the nation's learning goals for science. An important advance from earlier standards (AAAS 1993, NRC 1996), these practices are clearly identified "not" as…

  1. Innovative Practices in the Identification of LEP Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canales, JoAnn

    The purpose of this paper is to describe current practices in various states used to identify linguistically different students, provide a review of literature regarding recommended practices, and offer alternative practices for identifying linguistically different students. The paper provides an information base regarding current identification…

  2. Beyond locality: the creation of public practice?based knowledge through practitioner research in professional learning communities and communities of practice. A review of three books on practitioner research and professional communities

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M. Enthoven; E. de Bruijn

    2010-01-01

    In both the fields of educational practice and educational research the professional development of teachers was, is and is promising to remain an urgent and relevant topic. Practitioner research performed by teachers in professional learning communities and communities of practice is promising to serve their professional development. In addition, practitioner research and participation in these learning and working communities aim

  3. Low-osmolality contrast media: premises and promises.

    PubMed

    McClennan, B L

    1987-01-01

    After more than 30 years of experience in the United States with high-osmolality, ionic, radiopaque contrast media (HOCM), low-osmolality contrast media (LOCM), both ionic and nonionic, have recently been introduced into the marketplace. Under the current atmosphere of cost controls (prospective payment system) and consumerism in medicine, the higher cost of these newer agents has sparked heated debate, with the lingering question, "Can we afford to use them?" The new LOCM are not the only "expensive" drugs undergoing an economically constrained introduction into clinical practice, but they represent a significant challenge for radiologists in terms of our doctor-patient relationships and the monetarization of medical care. Review of the extensive literature documenting improvement in patient acceptance, tolerance, and safety, with equal or improved diagnostic efficacy, suggests that the question now at hand is, "Can we afford not to use them?" This premise is discussed with text and references designed to aid the practicing radiologist and referring physician in developing guidelines for utilization of the new LOCM. PMID:3786748

  4. Microalgae - A promising tool for heavy metal remediation.

    PubMed

    Suresh Kumar, K; Dahms, Hans-Uwe; Won, Eun-Ji; Lee, Jae-Seong; Shin, Kyung-Hoon

    2015-03-01

    Biotechnology of microalgae has gained popularity due to the growing need for novel environmental technologies and the development of innovative mass-production. Inexpensive growth requirements (solar light and CO2), and, the advantage of being utilized simultaneously for multiple technologies (e.g. carbon mitigation, biofuel production, and bioremediation) make microalgae suitable candidates for several ecofriendly technologies. Microalgae have developed an extensive spectrum of mechanisms (extracellular and intracellular) to cope with heavy metal toxicity. Their wide-spread occurrence along with their ability to grow and concentrate heavy metals, ascertains their suitability in practical applications of waste-water bioremediation. Heavy metal uptake by microalgae is affirmed to be superior to the prevalent physicochemical processes employed in the removal of toxic heavy metals. In order to evaluate their potential and to fill in the loopholes, it is essential to carry out a critical assessment of the existing microalgal technologies, and realize the need for development of commercially viable technologies involving strategic multidisciplinary approaches. This review summarizes several areas of heavy metal remediation from a microalgal perspective and provides an overview of various practical avenues of this technology. It particularly details heavy metals and microalgae which have been extensively studied, and provides a schematic representation of the mechanisms of heavy metal remediation in microalgae. PMID:25528489

  5. Demand Analysis Concerning the Promised Land White and Chocolate Milk Brands in Texas

    E-print Network

    Bingham, David Eldon

    2013-05-03

    analysis of the Promised Land brand. Previous work conducted by Capps and Salin (2010) provided the foundation for this thesis. The purpose of this thesis was threefold: 1. Estimate household demand functions for Promised Land white and chocolate milk using...

  6. Practice nurse use of evidence in clinical practice: a descriptive survey.

    PubMed

    Prior, Patsy; Wilkinson, Jill; Neville, Stephen

    2010-08-01

    The role of practice nurses is a specific feature of the modernisation agenda of the New Zealand health service. Increasing importance is being placed on service improvement through effective decision making and enhanced clinical performance. To contribute to the development of primary health care it is crucial that nurses have the skills to appropriately implement research based and other evidence in practice. This study involved 55 West Auckland practice nurses working in the general practice setting. The aim of the study was to describe nurses' perceptions of their use of evidence-based practice, attitudes toward evidence-based practice and perceptions of their knowledge/skills associated with evidence-based practice. An additional aim was to determine the effect of educational preparation on practice, attitudes and knowledge/skills toward evidence-based practice. A descriptive survey design was selected for this study. The results demonstrated that nurses' attitudes toward evidence-based practice, knowledge and skills relevant to the implementation of evidence-based practice and the educational preparation of the nurses were important factors influencing the effective utilisation and application of research results in practice. Educational interventions are identified as an integral aspect of implementing evidence-based practice and enhancing practice nurses' knowledge and skill relevant to the use of evidence in practice. Further research is needed to assess the contextual factors which can inhibit or promote achievement of evidence-based practice by practice nurses. PMID:21032971

  7. Parental Feeding Practices Predict Authoritative, Authoritarian, and Permissive Parenting Styles

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Laura Hubbs-Tait; Tay Seacord Kennedy; Melanie C. Page; Glade L. Topham; Amanda W. Harrist

    2008-01-01

    BackgroundOur goal was to identify how parental feeding practices from the nutrition literature link to general parenting styles from the child development literature to understand how to target parenting practices to increase effectiveness of interventions. Stand-alone parental feeding practices could be targeted independently. However, parental feeding practices linked to parenting styles require interventions treating underlying family dynamics as a whole.

  8. Quality management practices and their impact on performance

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lassâad Lakhal; Federico Pasin; Mohamed Limam

    2006-01-01

    Purpose – This paper aims to explore the relationship between quality management practices and their impact on performance. Design\\/methodology\\/approach – First, critical quality management practices are identified and classified in three main categories: management, infrastructure, and core practices. Then, a model linking these practices and performance is proposed and empirically tested. The empirical data were obtained from a survey of

  9. Phytoremediation of Polychlorinated Biphenyls: New Trends and Promises

    PubMed Central

    Van Aken, Benoit; Correa, Paola A.; Schnoor, Jerald L.

    2011-01-01

    Transgenic plants and associated bacteria constitute a new generation of genetically modified organisms for efficient and environmental-friendly treatment of soil and water contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). This review focuses on recent advances in phytoremediation for the treatment of PCBs, including the development of transgenic plants and associated bacteria. Phytoremediation, or the use of higher plants for rehabilitation of soil and groundwater, is a promising strategy for cost-effective treatment of sites contaminated by toxic compounds, including toxic PCBs. Plants can help mitigate environmental pollution by PCBs through a range of mechanisms: besides uptake from soil (phytoextraction), plants are capable of enzymatic transformation of PCBs (phytotransformation); by releasing a variety of secondary metabolites, plants also enhance the microbial activity in the root zone, improving biodegradation of PCBs (rhizoremediation). However, because of their hydrophobicity and chemical stability, PCBs are only slowly taken up and degraded by plants and associated bacteria, resulting in incomplete treatment and potential release of toxic metabolites into the environment. Moreover, naturally occurring plant-associated bacteria may not possess the enzymatic machinery necessary for PCB degradation. In order to overcome these limitations, bacterial genes involved in the metabolism of PCBs, such as biphenyl dioxygenases, have been introduced into higher plants, following a strategy similar to the development of transgenic crops. Similarly, bacteria have then been genetically modified that exhibit improved biodegradation capabilities and are able to maintain stable relationships with plants. Transgenic plants and associated bacteria bring hope for a broader and more efficient application of phytoremediation for the treatment of PCBs. PMID:20384372

  10. Promise and Challenges of Microalgal-Derived Biofuels

    SciTech Connect

    Pienkos, P. T.; Darzins, A.

    2009-01-01

    Microalgae offer great promise to contribute a significant portion of the renewable fuels that will be required by the Renewable Fuels Standard described in the 2007 Energy Independence and Security Act of the United States. Algal biofuels would be based mainly on the high lipid content of the algal cell and thus would be an ideal feedstock for high energy density transportation fuels, such as biodiesel as well as green diesel, green jet fuel and green gasoline. A comprehensive research and development program for the development of algal biofuels was initiated by the US Department of Energy (DoE) more than 30 years ago, and although great progress was made, the program was discontinued in 1996, because of decreasing federal budgets and low petroleum costs. Interest in algal biofuels has been growing recently due to increased concern over peak oil, energy security, greenhouse gas emissions, and the potential for other biofuel feedstocks to compete for limited agricultural resources. The high productivity of algae suggests that much of the US transportation fuel needs can be met by algal biofuels at a production cost competitive with the cost of petroleum seen during the early part of 2008. Development of algal biomass production technology, however, remains in its infancy. This perspective provides a brief overview of past algal research sponsored by the DoE, the potential of microalgal biofuels and a discussion of the technical and economic barriers that need to be overcome before production of microalgal-derived diesel-fuel substitutes can become a large-scale commercial reality.

  11. Sugammadex, a promising reversal drug. A review of clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Makri, Ira; Papadima, Artemisia; Lafioniati, Aimilia; Pappas, Apostolos B; George, Karanikas; Nikolaos, Koronakis E; Ioannis, Chrysikos D; Charalambos, Seretis; Emmanuel, Lagoudianakis E; Xanthos, Theodoros; Papadimitriou, Lila

    2011-09-01

    According to published data, sugammadex, rapidly reverses (2-5 min) shallow and profound NM block induced by rocuronium and vecuronium, without being connected with serious adverse events. It is accepted that in order to reverse shallow block, the suggested dose of sugammadex comes up to 2 mg/kg. Profound level of NM block demands 4 mg/kg in order to defy few responses at the post titanic count. Doses of sugammadex lower than 1 mg/kg may lead to rebound of rocuronium's effect. Higher doses of sugammadex (12 16 mg/g) are used in rescue reversal. In children and adolescents the 2 mg/kg dose is both effective and well tolerated, while, to date, data regarding infants are scarce. In patients with renal failure, 2 mg/kg of sugammadex resulted in a mean time to recovery of TOF ratio to 0.9 in 2 min, which was quicker than the time of reversal by acetylcholinesterase inhibitors. Investigations in cardiac patients undergoing noncardiac surgery suggest that 2 and 4 mg/kg of sugammadex are both safe and effective. Compared with neostigmine, sugammadex has no need to use muscarinic antagonists and therefore is not associated with variations in heart rate. Trials indicate that sugammadex acts faster than edrophonium and neostigmine. Sugammadex is a promising, well tolerated agent that enables fast reversal in different depths of NM block -shallow and profound- and in different patients populations. After completion of trial probation and settlement of issues concerning estimated cost and cost impact, it is believed to play a leading part in future anesthesiology. PMID:21682689

  12. Promise and status of international applications of photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect

    Altseimer, J.H.; Krupka, M.C.

    1981-01-01

    A global overview of the status of the photovoltaics (PV) technology and its commercialization is presented. There are substantial marketing opportunities for selected PV applications, despite high-PV costs. These are mostly in the developing nations. Also, the adoption of solar technologies like PV might be quite beneficial to the developing nations. The Ivory Coast and Mexico were reviewed for their potential as PV consumers. The near-term potentials are promising. The long-term outlooks are clouded by possible competition from other indigenous energy resources or adverse political decisions. The Republic of South Africa, a highly industrialized nation, was also evaluated as a PV consumer. Its near-term potential appears to be minimal because of cheap coal power and an existing power grid. The same factors, plus nuclear power that will soon come on line, could inhibit long-term PV development. The US, France, West Germany, and Japan are the major industrial nations conducting research, development and commercialization programs on PV. At least twelve other countries are involved to a lesser degree. In technology, the US is ahead but the programs and the progress in the other three major countries are nevertheless significant. They are well aware of the exporting potential of PV and are taking steps to exploit it. France and West Germany are developing complete saleable systems, whereas the US has been concentrating on components. Japan has been developing its own technology base and systems and may soon decide to become more active in the market place. Federal funding in the US for PV is being drastically reduced. In contrast, the governmental funding in the other three major nations is relatively strong and appears to be growing.

  13. Recent advances in rilpivirine: new data and promising treatment option.

    PubMed

    Casado, José Luis; Bañón, Sara

    2014-01-01

    The usefulness of every antiretroviral drug in the clinical setting should be continuously evaluated, since registration studies may not adequately reflect real-world patient populations. Rilpivirine was developed in an effort to generate patient-tailored drugs with high convenience and minimal side effects. By now, rilpivirine is currently licensed for use with other antiretroviral agents, and as a single agent or a single-tablet regimen with tenofovir and emtricitabine , in antiretroviral-naive, HIV-1-infected adults with < 100,000 HIV-1 RNA copies/ml because of a higher rate of virological failure above this level. However, after its introduction several questions remained to be elucidated, such as the efficacy of rilpivirine with abacavir/lamivudine, or its use in switching strategies, a useful alternative for patients with toxicity or intolerance. Cumulative data suggest the efficacy and safety of the combination of abacavir/lamivudine plus rilpivirine in the clinical setting, and an increasing number of patients received rilpivirine after protease inhibitor, efavirenz, or nevirapine-based therapy without compromising rilpivirine exposure after the change. Moreover, rilpivirine is a substrate and weak inducer of the CYP3A4, but there are no significant pharmacokinetic interactions with new anti-hepatitis C compounds such as telaprevir, simeprevir, daclatasvir, ledipasvir, and sofosbuvir, an important issue for a drug with low risk of hepatoxicity. As a new and promising strategy, rilpivirine has been evaluated with darunavir and dolutegravir in dual therapies, without need of dose adjustment and with adequate preliminary data. Therefore, to date, new data on rilpivirine confirm the good results observed in the clinical trials. PMID:25221991

  14. Promising X-ray fluorescence tests for superconducting tunneljunction detector

    SciTech Connect

    Friedrich, Stephan; Robinson, Arthur L.

    2001-05-15

    Scientists in the Physical Biosciences Division of the Ernest Orlando Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) studying transition metals in proteins with fluorescence-detected L-edge absorption spectroscopy have found the measurements to be extremely challenging. The difficulty is that the metal centers are present in very dilute concentrations so that their weak fluorescence is often obscured by strong background signals carbon and oxygen. To solve this problem, the Berkeley group has been working with researchers from the Advanced Detector Group at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory on an energy-dispersive superconducting tunnel junction x-ray detector. These devices in principle have the energy resolution needed to reveal the metal signal. The most recent results with the latest version of the detector on Beamline 4.0.1-2 at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) illustrate the promise of the cryogenic detector strategy not only for this application but also for spectroscopy of other types of dilute samples. Transition-metal complexes are key elements in many biologically important processes that are catalyzed by proteins (enzymes), photosynthesis being a prime example. The changes in that occur in electronic structure throughout a catalytic cycle are the subject of much research aimed at understanding the mechanisms of these processes. L-edge x-ray spectroscopy offers several advantages relative to the more common K-edge techniques, since it involves allowed transitions to the d-orbitals associated with metal-ligand bonding. It also has a rich multiplet structure interpretable by theory and higher spectral resolution.

  15. Noncommunicable Diseases and Human Rights: A Promising Synergy

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Laura; Tarantola, Daniel; Beaglehole, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) have finally emerged onto the global health and development agenda. Despite the increasingly important role human rights play in other areas of global health, their contribution to NCD prevention and control remains nascent. The recently adopted Global Action Plan for the Prevention and Control of NCDs 2013–2020 is an important step forward, but the lack of concrete attention to human rights is a missed opportunity. With practical implications for policy development, priority setting, and strategic design, human rights offer a logical, robust set of norms and standards; define the legal obligations of governments; and provide accountability mechanisms that can be used to enhance current approaches to NCD prevention and control. Harnessing the power of human rights can strengthen action for NCDs at the local, national, and global levels. PMID:24625165

  16. Noncommunicable diseases and human rights: a promising synergy.

    PubMed

    Gruskin, Sofia; Ferguson, Laura; Tarantola, Daniel; Beaglehole, Robert

    2014-05-01

    Noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) have finally emerged onto the global health and development agenda. Despite the increasingly important role human rights play in other areas of global health, their contribution to NCD prevention and control remains nascent. The recently adopted Global Action Plan for the Prevention and Control of NCDs 2013-2020 is an important step forward, but the lack of concrete attention to human rights is a missed opportunity. With practical implications for policy development, priority setting, and strategic design, human rights offer a logical, robust set of norms and standards; define the legal obligations of governments; and provide accountability mechanisms that can be used to enhance current approaches to NCD prevention and control. Harnessing the power of human rights can strengthen action for NCDs at the local, national, and global levels. PMID:24625165

  17. An Investigation of Mathematically Promising Students' Cognitive Abilities and Their Contributions to Learning Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Budak, Ibrahim; Kaygin, Bulent

    2015-01-01

    In this study, through the observation of mathematically promising students in regular classrooms, relevant learning environments and the learning needs of promising students, teacher approaches and teaching methods, and the differences between the promising students and their normal ability peers in the same classroom were investigated.…

  18. Carnosol: A promising anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory agent

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Jeremy J.

    2011-01-01

    The Mediterranean diet and more specifically certain meats, fruits, vegetables, and olive oil found in certain parts of the Mediterranean region have been associated with a decreased cardiovascular and diabetes risk. More recently, several population based studies have observed with these lifestyle choices have reported an overall reduced risk for several cancers. One study in particular observed an inverse relationship between consumption of Mediterranean herbs such as rosemary, sage, parsley, and oregano with lung cancer. In light of these findings there is a need to explore and identify the anti-cancer properties of these medicincal herbs and to identify the phytochemicals therein. One agent in particular, carnosol, has been evaluated for anti-cancer property in prostate, breast, skin, leukemia, and colon cancer with promising results. These studies have provided evidence that carnosol targets multiple deregulated pathways associated with inflammation and cancer that include nuclear factor kappa B (NF?B), apoptotic related proteins, phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3 K)/Akt, androgen and estrogen receptors, as well as molecular targets. In addition, carnosol appears to be well tolerated in that it has a selective toxicity towards cancer cells versus non-tumorigenic cells and is well tolerated when administered to animals. This mini-review reports on the pre-clinical studies that have been performed to date with carnosol describing mechanistic, efficacy, and safety/tolerability studies as a cancer chemoprevention and anti-cancer agent. PMID:21382660

  19. The Promise of New Ideas and New Technology for Improving Teaching and Learning

    PubMed Central

    Novak, Joseph D.

    2003-01-01

    There have been enormous advances in our understanding of human learning in the past three decades. There have also been important advances in our understanding of the nature of knowledge and new knowledge creation. These advances, when combined with the explosive development of the Internet and other technologies, permit advances in educational practices at least as important as the invention of the printing press in 1460. We have built on the cognitive learning theory of David Ausubel and various sources of new ideas on epistemology. Our research program has focused on understanding meaningful learning and on developing better methods to achieve such learning and to assess progress in meaningful learning. The concept map tool developed in our program has proved to be highly effective both in promoting meaningful learning and in assessing learning outcomes. Concept mapping strategies are also proving powerful for eliciting, capturing, and archiving knowledge of experts and organizations. New technology for creating concept maps developed at the University of West Florida permits easier and better concept map construction, thus facilitating learning, knowledge capture, and local or distance creation and sharing of structured knowledge, especially when utilized with the Internet. A huge gap exists between what we now know to improve learning and use of knowledge and the practices currently in place in most schools and corporations. There are promising projects in progress that may help to achieve accelerated advances. These include projects in schools at all educational levels, including projects in Colombia, Costa Rica, Italy, Spain, and the United States, and collaborative projects with corporate organizations and distance learning projects. Results to date have been encouraging and suggest that we may be moving from the lag phase of educational innovation to a phase of exponential growth. PMID:12888848

  20. Public Health Campaigns to Change Industry Practices that Damage Health: An Analysis of 12 Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freudenberg, Nicholas; Picard Bradley, Sarah; Serrano, Monica

    2009-01-01

    Industry practices such as advertising, production of unsafe products, and efforts to defeat health legislation play a major role in current patterns of U.S. ill health. Changing these practices may be a promising strategy to promote health. The authors analyze 12 campaigns designed to modify the health-related practices of U.S. corporations in…