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1

Identifying disease genes by integrating multiple data sources  

PubMed Central

Background Now multiple types of data are available for identifying disease genes. Those data include gene-disease associations, disease phenotype similarities, protein-protein interactions, pathways, gene expression profiles, etc.. It is believed that integrating different kinds of biological data is an effective method to identify disease genes. Results In this paper, we propose a multiple data integration method based on the theory of Markov random field (MRF) and the method of Bayesian analysis for identifying human disease genes. The proposed method is not only flexible in easily incorporating different kinds of data, but also reliable in predicting candidate disease genes. Conclusions Numerical experiments are carried out by integrating known gene-disease associations, protein complexes, protein-protein interactions, pathways and gene expression profiles. Predictions are evaluated by the leave-one-out method. The proposed method achieves an AUC score of 0.743 when integrating all those biological data in our experiments. PMID:25350511

2014-01-01

2

Identifying Relationships among Genomic Disease Regions: Predicting Genes at Pathogenic SNP Associations and Rare Deletions  

E-print Network

Translating a set of disease regions into insight about pathogenic mechanisms requires not only the ability to identify the key disease genes within them, but also the biological relationships among those key genes. Here ...

Daly, Mark J.

3

Functional screening in Drosophila identifies Alzheimer's disease susceptibility genes  

E-print Network

Department of Pathology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA 10 Program in Medical and Population-wide association studies (GWAS). Genetic manipulation of 87 homologous fly genes was tested for modulation suggest that a large collection of genetic variants impact disease risk, and the critical next step

Perrimon, Norbert

4

Gene-Based Rare Allele Analysis Identified a Risk Gene of Alzheimer’s Disease  

PubMed Central

Alzheimer’s disease (AD) has a strong propensity to run in families. However, the known risk genes excluding APOE are not clinically useful. In various complex diseases, gene studies have targeted rare alleles for unsolved heritability. Our study aims to elucidate previously unknown risk genes for AD by targeting rare alleles. We used data from five publicly available genetic studies from the Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) and the database of Genotypes and Phenotypes (dbGaP). A total of 4,171 cases and 9,358 controls were included. The genotype information of rare alleles was imputed using 1,000 genomes. We performed gene-based analysis of rare alleles (minor allele frequency?3%). The genome-wide significance level was defined as meta P<1.8×10–6 (0.05/number of genes in human genome?=?0.05/28,517). ZNF628, which is located at chromosome 19q13.42, showed a genome-wide significant association with AD. The association of ZNF628 with AD was not dependent on APOE ?4. APOE and TREM2 were also significantly associated with AD, although not at genome-wide significance levels. Other genes identified by targeting common alleles could not be replicated in our gene-based rare allele analysis. We identified that rare variants in ZNF628 are associated with AD. The protein encoded by ZNF628 is known as a transcription factor. Furthermore, the associations of APOE and TREM2 with AD were highly significant, even in gene-based rare allele analysis, which implies that further deep sequencing of these genes is required in AD heritability studies. PMID:25329708

Kim, Jong Hun; Song, Pamela; Lim, Hyunsun; Lee, Jae-Hyung; Lee, Jun Hong; Park, Sun Ah

2014-01-01

5

GeneFriends: An online co-expression analysis tool to identify novel gene targets for aging and complex diseases  

PubMed Central

Background Although many diseases have been well characterized at the molecular level, the underlying mechanisms are often unknown. Nearly half of all human genes remain poorly studied, yet these genes may contribute to a number of disease processes. Genes involved in common biological processes and diseases are often co-expressed. Using known disease-associated genes in a co-expression analysis may help identify and prioritize novel candidate genes for further study. Results We have created an online tool, called GeneFriends, which identifies co-expressed genes in over 1,000 mouse microarray datasets. GeneFriends can be used to assign putative functions to poorly studied genes. Using a seed list of disease-associated genes and a guilt-by-association method, GeneFriends allows users to quickly identify novel genes and transcription factors associated with a disease or process. We tested GeneFriends using seed lists for aging, cancer, and mitochondrial complex I disease. We identified several candidate genes that have previously been predicted as relevant targets. Some of the genes identified are already being tested in clinical trials, indicating the effectiveness of this approach. Co-expressed transcription factors were investigated, identifying C/ebp genes as candidate regulators of aging. Furthermore, several novel candidate genes, that may be suitable for experimental or clinical follow-up, were identified. Two of the novel candidates of unknown function that were co-expressed with cancer-associated genes were selected for experimental validation. Knock-down of their human homologs (C1ORF112 and C12ORF48) in HeLa cells slowed growth, indicating that these genes of unknown function, identified by GeneFriends, may be involved in cancer. Conclusions GeneFriends is a resource for biologists to identify and prioritize novel candidate genes involved in biological processes and complex diseases. It is an intuitive online resource that will help drive experimentation. GeneFriends is available online at: http://genefriends.org/. PMID:23039964

2012-01-01

6

Identifying and prioritizing disease-related genes based on the network topological features.  

PubMed

Identifying and prioritizing disease-related genes are the most important steps for understanding the pathogenesis and discovering the therapeutic targets. The experimental examination of these genes is very expensive and laborious, and usually has a higher false positive rate. Therefore, it is highly desirable to develop computational methods for the identification and prioritization of disease-related genes. In this study, we develop a powerful method to identify and prioritize candidate disease genes. The novel network topological features with local and global information are proposed and adopted to characterize genes. The performance of these novel features is verified based on the 10-fold cross-validation test and leave-one-out cross-validation test. The proposed features are compared with the published features, and fused strategy is investigated by combining the current features with the published features. And, these combination features are also utilized to identify and prioritize Parkinson's disease-related genes. The results indicate that identified genes are highly related to some molecular process and biological function, which provides new clues for researching pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease. The source code of Matlab is freely available on request from the authors. PMID:25183318

Li, Zhan-Chao; Lai, Yan-Hua; Chen, Li-Li; Xie, Yun; Dai, Zong; Zou, Xiao-Yong

2014-08-23

7

IDENTIFYING DISEASE RESISTANCE GENES AND PATHWAYS THROUGH HOST-PATHOGEN PROTEIN INTERACTIONS  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

A major objective of both animal and plant genomics research is to identify disease resistance genes and pathways. Popular approaches to achieve this goal include candidate gene testing, genome-wide QTL screens, and DNA microarrays. We argue that the two-hybrid assay, which detects protein-protein...

8

ABSTRACT Genomics and bioinformatics have the vast potential to identify genes that cause disease by investigating  

E-print Network

ABSTRACT Genomics and bioinformatics have the vast potential to identify genes that cause disease by investigating whole-genome databases. Comparison of an individual's geno- type with a genomic database these metabolic profiles with genomic, expression, and proteomic databases. Application of the knowledge of indi

Hammock, Bruce D.

9

Genome-wide transcriptome analysis identifies novel gene signatures implicated in human chronic liver disease  

PubMed Central

The molecular mechanisms behind human liver disease progression to cirrhosis remain elusive. Nuclear receptor small heterodimer partner (SHP/Nr0b2) is a hepatic tumor suppressor and a critical regulator of liver function. SHP expression is diminished in human cirrhotic livers, suggesting a regulatory role in human liver diseases. The goal of this study was to identify novel SHP-regulated genes that are involved in the development and progression of chronic liver disease. To achieve this, we conducted the first comprehensive RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) analysis of Shp?/? mice, compared the results with human hepatitis C cirrhosis RNA-seq and nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) microarray datasets, and verified novel results in human liver biospecimens. This approach revealed new gene signatures associated with chronic liver disease and regulated by SHP. Several genes were selected for validation of physiological relevance based on their marked upregulation, novelty with regard to liver function, and involvement in gene pathways related to liver disease. These genes include peptidoglycan recognition protein 2, dual specific phosphatase-4, tetraspanin 4, thrombospondin 1, and SPARC-related modular calcium binding protein-2, which were validated by qPCR analysis of 126 human liver specimens, including steatosis, fibrosis, and NASH, alcohol and hepatitis C cirrhosis, and in mouse models of liver inflammation and injury. This RNA-seq analysis identifies new genes that are regulated by the nuclear receptor SHP and implicated in the molecular pathogenesis of human chronic liver diseases. The results provide valuable transcriptome information for characterizing mechanisms of these diseases. PMID:23812039

Smalling, Rana L.; Delker, Don A.; Zhang, Yuxia; Nieto, Natalia; Mcguiness, Michael S.; Liu, Shuanghu; Friedman, Scott L.; Hagedorn, Curt H.

2013-01-01

10

Molecular profiling of experimental endometriosis identified gene expression patterns in common with human disease  

PubMed Central

OBJECTIVE To validate a rat model of endometriosis using cDNA microarrays by identifying common gene expression patterns beween experimental and natural disease. DESIGN Autotransplantation rat model. SETTING Medical school department. ANIMALS Female Sprague-Dawley rats. INTERVENTIONS Endometriosis was surgically-induced by suturing uterine horn implants next to the small intestine’s mesentery. Control rats received sutures with no implants. After 60 days, endometriotic implants and uterine horn were obtained. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Gene expression levels determined by cDNA microarrays and QRT-PCR. METHODS Cy5-labeled cDNA was synthesized from total RNA obtained from endometriotic implants. Cy3-labeled cDNA was synthesized using uterine RNA from a control rat. Gene expression levels were analyzed after hybridizing experimental and control labeled cDNA to PIQOR™ Toxicology Rat Microarrays (Miltenyi Biotec) containing 1,252 known genes. Cy5/Cy3 ratios were determined and genes with >2-fold higher or <0.5-fold lower expression levels were selected. Microarray results were validated by QRT-PCR. RESULTS We observed differential expression of genes previously shown to be upregulated in patients, including growth factors, inflammatory cytokines/receptors, tumor invasion/metastasis factors, adhesion molecules, and anti-apoptotic factors. CONCLUSIONS This study presents evidence in support of using this rat model to study the natural history of endometriosis and test novel therapeutics for this incurable disease. PMID:17478174

Flores, Idhaliz; Rivera, Elizabeth; Ruiz, Lynnette A.; Santiago, Olga I.; Vernon, Michael W.; Appleyard, Caroline B.

2007-01-01

11

Genomic convergence to identify candidate genes for Alzheimer disease on chromosome 10  

PubMed Central

A broad region of chromosome 10 (chr10) has engendered continued interest in the etiology of late-onset Alzheimer Disease (LOAD) from both linkage and candidate gene studies. However, there is a very extensive heterogeneity on chr10. We converged linkage analysis and gene expression data using the concept of genomic convergence that suggests that genes showing positive results across multiple different data types are more likely to be involved in AD. We identified and examined 28 genes on chr10 for association with AD in a Caucasian case-control dataset of 506 cases and 558 controls with substantial clinical information. The cases were all LOAD (minimum age at onset ? 60 years). Both single marker and haplotypic associations were tested in the overall dataset and 8 subsets defined by age, gender, ApoE and clinical status. PTPLA showed allelic, genotypic and haplotypic association in the overall dataset. SORCS1 was significant in the overall data sets (p=0.0025) and most significant in the female subset (allelic association p=0.00002, a 3-locus haplotype had p=0.0005). Odds Ratio of SORCS1 in the female subset was 1.7 (p<0.0001). SORCS1 is an interesting candidate gene involved in the A? pathway. Therefore, genetic variations in PTPLA and SORCS1 may be associated and have modest effect to the risk of AD by affecting A? pathway. The replication of the effect of these genes in different study populations and search for susceptible variants and functional studies of these genes are necessary to get a better understanding of the roles of the genes in Alzheimer disease. PMID:19241460

Liang, Xueying; Slifer, Michael; Martin, Eden R.; Schnetz-Boutaud, Nathalie; Bartlett, Jackie; Anderson, Brent; Züchner, Stephan; Gwirtsman, Harry; Gilbert, John R.; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; Haines, Jonathan L.

2009-01-01

12

Long-range DNA looping and gene expression analyses identify DEXI as an autoimmune disease candidate gene  

PubMed Central

The chromosome 16p13 region has been associated with several autoimmune diseases, including type 1 diabetes (T1D) and multiple sclerosis (MS). CLEC16A has been reported as the most likely candidate gene in the region, since it contains the most disease-associated single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), as well as an imunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif. However, here we report that intron 19 of CLEC16A, containing the most autoimmune disease-associated SNPs, appears to behave as a regulatory sequence, affecting the expression of a neighbouring gene, DEXI. The CLEC16A alleles that are protective from T1D and MS are associated with increased expression of DEXI, and no other genes in the region, in two independent monocyte gene expression data sets. Critically, using chromosome conformation capture (3C), we identified physical proximity between the DEXI promoter region and intron 19 of CLEC16A, separated by a loop of >150 kb. In reciprocal experiments, a 20 kb fragment of intron 19 of CLEC16A, containing SNPs associated with T1D and MS, as well as with DEXI expression, interacted with the promotor region of DEXI but not with candidate DNA fragments containing other potential causal genes in the region, including CLEC16A. Intron 19 of CLEC16A is highly enriched for transcription-factor-binding events and markers associated with enhancer activity. Taken together, these data indicate that although the causal variants in the 16p13 region lie within CLEC16A, DEXI is an unappreciated autoimmune disease candidate gene, and illustrate the power of the 3C approach in progressing from genome-wide association studies results to candidate causal genes. PMID:21989056

Davison, Lucy J.; Wallace, Chris; Cooper, Jason D.; Cope, Nathan F.; Wilson, Nicola K.; Smyth, Deborah J.; Howson, Joanna M.M.; Saleh, Nada; Al-Jeffery, Abdullah; Angus, Karen L.; Stevens, Helen E.; Nutland, Sarah; Duley, Simon; Coulson, Richard M.R.; Walker, Neil M.; Burren, Oliver S.; Rice, Catherine M.; Cambien, Francois; Zeller, Tanja; Munzel, Thomas; Lackner, Karl; Blankenberg, Stefan; Fraser, Peter; Gottgens, Berthold; Todd, John A.

2012-01-01

13

Integrated immunogenomics in the chicken: Deciphering the immune response to identify disease resistance genes  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Resistance to infection takes place at many levels, and involves both non-specific and specific immune mechanisms. The chicken has a different repertoire of immune genes, molecules, cells and organs compared to mammals. To understand the role of any disease resistance gene(s), it is therefore impo...

14

Identifying Disease-Related Biomarkers by Studying Social Networks of Genes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Identifying cancer biomarkers is an essential research problem that has attracted the attention of several research groups\\u000a over the past decades. The main target is to find the most informative genes for predicting cancer cases, such genes are called\\u000a cancer biomarkers. In this chapter, we contribute to the literature a new methodology that analysis the communities of genes\\u000a to identify

Mohammed Al-Shalalfa; Ala Qabaja; Reda Alhajj; Jon G. Rokne

2009-01-01

15

Large-scale gene-centric analysis identifies novel variants for coronary artery disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Coronary artery disease (CAD) has a significant genetic contribution that is incompletely characterized. To complement genome-wide association (GWA) studies, we conducted a large and systematic candidate gene study of CAD susceptibility, including analysis of many uncommon and functional variants. We examined 49,094 genetic variants in approximately 2,100 genes of cardiovascular relevance, using a customised gene array in 15,596 CAD cases

A. S. Butterworth; P. S. Braund; R. J. Hardwick; D. Saleheen; J. F. Peden; N. Soranzo; J. C. Chambers; M. E. Kleber; B. Keating; A. Qasim; N. Klopp; J. Erdmann; H. Basart; J. H. Baumert; C. R. Bezzina; B. O. Boehm; J. Brocheton; P. Bugert; F. Cambien; R. Collins; D. Couper; J. S. de Jong; P. Diemert; K. Ejebe; C. C. Elbers; P. Elliott; M. Fornage; P. Frossard; S. Garner; S. E. Hunt; J. J. Kastelein; O. H. Klungel; H. Kluter; K. Koch; I. R. Konig; A. S. Kooner; K. Liu; R. McPherson; M. D. Musameh; S. Musani; G. Papanicolaou; A. Peters; B. J. Peters; S. Potter; B. M. Psaty; A. Rasheed; J. Scott; U. Seedorf; J. S. Sehmi; N. Sotoodehnia; K. Stark; J. Stephens; C. E. van der Schoot; Y. T. van der Schouw; P. van der Harst; R. S. Vasan; A. A. Wilde; C. Willenborg; B. R. Winkelmann; M. Zaidi; W. Zhang; A. Ziegler; W. Koenig; W. Matz; M. D. Trip; M. P. Reilly; S. Kathiresan; H. Schunkert; A. Hamsten; A. S. Hall; J. S. Kooner; S. G. Thompson; J. R. Thompson; H. Watkins; J. Danesh; T. Barnes; S. Rafelt; V. Codd; N. Bruinsma; L. R. Dekker; J. P. Henriques; R. J. de Winter; M. Alings; C. F. Allaart; A. P. Gorgels; F. W. A. Verheugt; M. Mueller; C. Meisinger; S. DerOhannessian; N. N. Mehta; J. Ferguson; H. Hakonarson; W. Matthai; R. Wilensky; J. C. Hopewell; S. Parish; P. Linksted; J. Notman; H. Gonzalez; A. Young; T. Ostley; A. Munday; N. Goodwin; V. Verdon; S. Shah; C. Edwards; C. Mathews; R. Gunter; J. Benham; C. Davies; M. Cobb; L. Cobb; J. Crowther; A. Richards; M. Silver; S. Tochlin; S. Mozley; S. Clark; M. Radley; K. Kourellias; P. Olsson; S. Barlera; G. Tognoni; S. Rust; G. Assmann; S. Heath; D. Zelenika; I. Gut; F. Green; M. Farrall; A. Goel; H. Ongen; M. G. Franzosi; M. Lathrop; R. Clarke; A. Aly; K. Anner; K. Bjorklund; G. Blomgren; B. Cederschiold; K. Danell-Toverud; P. Eriksson; U. Grundstedt; M. Heinonen; M. L. Hellenius; F. van't Hooft; K. Husman; J. Lagercrantz; A. Larsson; M. Larsson; M. Mossfeldt; A. Malarstig; G. Olsson; M. Sabater-Lleal; B. Sennblad; A. Silveira; R. Strawbridge; B. Soderholm; J. Ohrvik; K. S. Zaman; N. H. Mallick; M. Azhar; A. Samad; M. Ishaq; N. Shah; M. Samuel; T. L. Assimes; H. Holm; M. Preuss; A. F. Stewart; M. Barbalic; C. Gieger; D. Absher; Z. Aherrahrou; H. Allayee; D. Altshuler; S. Anand; K. Andersen; J. L. Anderson; D. Ardissino; S. G. Ball; A. J. Balmforth; L. C. Becker; D. M. Becker; K. Berger; J. C. Bis; S. M. Boekholdt; E. Boerwinkle; M. J. Brown; M. S. Burnett; I. Buysschaert; J. F. Carlquist; L. Chen; R. W. Davies; G. Dedoussis; A. Dehghan; S. Demissie; J. Devaney; A. Doering; N. E. El Mokhtari; S. G. Ellis; R. Elosua; J. C. Engert; S. Epstein; U. de Faire; M. Fischer; A. R. Folsom; J. Freyer; B. Gigante; D. Girelli; S. Gretarsdottir; V. Gudnason; J. R. Gulcher; S. Tennstedt; E. Halperin; N. Hammond; S. L. Hazen; A. Hofman; B. D. Horne; T. Illig; C. Iribarren; G. T. Jones; J. W. Jukema; M. A. Kaiser; L. M. Kaplan; K. T. Khaw; J. W. Knowles; G. Kolovou; A. Kong; R. Laaksonen; D. Lambrechts; K. Leander; M. Li; W. Lieb; G. Lettre; C. Loley; A. J. Lotery; P. M. Mannucci; N. Martinelli; P. P. McKeown; T. Meitinger; O. Melander; P. A. Merlini; V. Mooser; T. Morgan; Muhleisen T. W; J. B. Muhlestein; K. Musunuru; J. Nahrstaedt; M. M. Nothen; O. Olivieri; F. Peyvandi; R. S. Patel; C. C. Patterson; L. Qu; A. A. Quyyumi; D. J. Rader; L. S. Rallidis; C. Rice; F. R. Roosendaal; D. Rubin; V. Salomaa; M. L. Sampietro; M. S. Sandhu; E. Schadt; A. Schafer; A. Schillert; S. Schreiber; J. Schrezenmeir; S. M. Schwartz; D. S. Siscovick; M. Sivananthan; S. Sivapalaratnam; A. V. Smith; T. B. Smith; J. D. Snoep; J. A. Spertus; K. Stefansson; K. Stirrups; M. Stoll; W. H. Tang; G. Thorgeirsson; G. Thorleifsson; M. Tomaszewski; A. G. Uitterlinden; A. M. van Rij; B. F. Voight; N. J. Wareham; G. AWells; H. E. Wichmann; J. C. Witteman; B. J. Wright; S. Ye; L. A. Cupples; T. Quertermous; W. Marz; S. Blankenberg; U. Thorsteinsdottir; R. Roberts; C. J. O'Donnell; N. C. Onland-Moret; J. van Setten; P. I. de Bakker; W. M. Verschuren; J. M. Boer; C. Wijmenga; M. H. Hofker; A. H. Maitland-van der Zee; A. de Boer; D. E. Grobbee; T. Attwood; S. Belz; J. Cooper; A. Crisp-Hihn; P. Deloukas; N. Foad; A. H. Goodall; J. Gracey; E. Gray; R. Gwilliams; S. Heimerl; C. Hengstenberg; J. Jolley; U. Krishnan; H. Lloyd-Jones; I. Lugauer; P. Lundmark; S. Maouche; J. S. Moore; D. Muir; E. Murray; C. P. Nelson; J. Neudert; D. Niblett; K. O'Leary; W. H. Ouwehand; H. Pollard; A. Rankin; H. Sager; N. J. Samani; J. Sambrook; G. Schmitz; M. Scholz; L. Schroeder; A. C. Syvannen; C. Wallace

2011-01-01

16

Disease-Targeted Sequencing of Ion Channel Genes identifies de novo mutations in Patients with Non-Familial Brugada Syndrome  

PubMed Central

Brugada syndrome (BrS) is one of the ion channelopathies associated with sudden cardiac death (SCD). The most common BrS-associated gene (SCN5A) only accounts for approximately 20–25% of BrS patients. This study aims to identify novel mutations across human ion channels in non-familial BrS patients without SCN5A variants through disease-targeted sequencing. We performed disease-targeted multi-gene sequencing across 133 human ion channel genes and 12 reported BrS-associated genes in 15 unrelated, non-familial BrS patients without SCN5A variants. Candidate variants were validated by mass spectrometry and Sanger sequencing. Five de novo mutations were identified in four genes (SCNN1A, KCNJ16, KCNB2, and KCNT1) in three BrS patients (20%). Two of the three patients presented SCD and one had syncope. Interestingly, the two patients presented with SCD had compound mutations (SCNN1A:Arg350Gln and KCNB2:Glu522Lys; SCNN1A:Arg597* and KCNJ16:Ser261Gly). Importantly, two SCNN1A mutations were identified from different families. The KCNT1:Arg1106Gln mutation was identified in a patient with syncope. Bioinformatics algorithms predicted severe functional interruptions in these four mutation loci, suggesting their pivotal roles in BrS. This study identified four novel BrS-associated genes and indicated the effectiveness of this disease-targeted sequencing across ion channel genes for non-familial BrS patients without SCN5A variants. PMID:25339316

Juang, Jyh-Ming Jimmy; Lu, Tzu-Pin; Lai, Liang-Chuan; Ho, Chia-Chuan; Liu, Yen-Bin; Tsai, Chia-Ti; Lin, Lian-Yu; Yu, Chih-Chieh; Chen, Wen-Jone; Chiang, Fu-Tien; Yeh, Shih-Fan Sherri; Lai, Ling-Ping; Chuang, Eric Y.; Lin, Jiunn-Lee

2014-01-01

17

Real-Time qPCR Identifies Suitable Reference Genes for Borna Disease Virus-Infected Rat Cortical Neurons  

PubMed Central

Quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) is the most commonly-used technique to identify gene expression profiles. The selection of stably expressed reference genes is a prerequisite to properly evaluating gene expression. Here, the suitability of commonly-used reference genes in normalizing RT-qPCR assays of mRNA expression in cultured rat cortical neurons infected with Borna disease virus (BDV) was assessed. The expressions of eight commonly-used reference genes were comparatively analyzed in BDV-infected rat cortical neurons and non-infected control neurons mainly across 9 and 12 days post-infection. These reference genes were validated by RT-qPCR and separately ranked by four statistical algorithms: geNorm, NormFinder, BestKeeper and the comparative delta-Ct method. Then, the RankAggreg package was used to construct consensus rankings. ARBP was found to be the most stable internal control gene at Day 9, and ACTB at Day 12. As the assessment of the validity of the selected reference genes confirms the suitability of applying a combination of the two most stable references genes, combining the two most stable genes for normalization of RT-qPCR studies in BDV-infected rat cortical neurons is recommended at each time point. This study can contribute to improving BDV research by providing the means by which to obtain more reliable and accurate gene expression measurements. PMID:25431926

Zhang, Lujun; Liu, Siwen; Zhang, Liang; You, Hongmin; Huang, Rongzhong; Sun, Lin; He, Peng; Chen, Shigang; Zhang, Hong; Xie, Peng

2014-01-01

18

Transcriptional Profiling of Human Liver Identifies Sex-Biased Genes Associated with Polygenic Dyslipidemia and Coronary Artery Disease  

PubMed Central

Sex-differences in human liver gene expression were characterized on a genome-wide scale using a large liver sample collection, allowing for detection of small expression differences with high statistical power. 1,249 sex-biased genes were identified, 70% showing higher expression in females. Chromosomal bias was apparent, with female-biased genes enriched on chrX and male-biased genes enriched on chrY and chr19, where 11 male-biased zinc-finger KRAB-repressor domain genes are distributed in six clusters. Top biological functions and diseases significantly enriched in sex-biased genes include transcription, chromatin organization and modification, sexual reproduction, lipid metabolism and cardiovascular disease. Notably, sex-biased genes are enriched at loci associated with polygenic dyslipidemia and coronary artery disease in genome-wide association studies. Moreover, of the 8 sex-biased genes at these loci, 4 have been directly linked to monogenic disorders of lipid metabolism and show an expression profile in females (elevated expression of ABCA1, APOA5 and LDLR; reduced expression of LIPC) that is consistent with the lower female risk of coronary artery disease. Female-biased expression was also observed for CYP7A1, which is activated by drugs used to treat hypercholesterolemia. Several sex-biased drug-metabolizing enzyme genes were identified, including members of the CYP, UGT, GPX and ALDH families. Half of 879 mouse orthologs, including many genes of lipid metabolism and homeostasis, show growth hormone-regulated sex-biased expression in mouse liver, suggesting growth hormone might play a similar regulatory role in human liver. Finally, the evolutionary rate of protein coding regions for human-mouse orthologs, revealed by dN/dS ratio, is significantly higher for genes showing the same sex-bias in both species than for non-sex-biased genes. These findings establish that human hepatic sex differences are widespread and affect diverse cell metabolic processes, and may help explain sex differences in lipid profiles associated with sex differential risk of coronary artery disease. PMID:21858147

Zhang, Yijing; Klein, Kathrin; Sugathan, Aarathi; Nassery, Najlla; Dombkowski, Alan; Zanger, Ulrich M.; Waxman, David J.

2011-01-01

19

Genome-wide transcriptional analysis of flagellar regeneration in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii identifies orthologs of ciliary disease genes  

PubMed Central

The important role that cilia and flagella play in human disease creates an urgent need to identify genes involved in ciliary assembly and function. The strong and specific induction of flagellar-coding genes during flagellar regeneration in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii suggests that transcriptional profiling of such cells would reveal new flagella-related genes. We have conducted a genome-wide analysis of RNA transcript levels during flagellar regeneration in Chlamydomonas by using maskless photolithography method-produced DNA oligonucleotide microarrays with unique probe sequences for all exons of the 19,803 predicted genes. This analysis represents previously uncharacterized whole-genome transcriptional activity profiling study in this important model organism. Analysis of strongly induced genes reveals a large set of known flagellar components and also identifies a number of important disease-related proteins as being involved with cilia and flagella, including the zebrafish polycystic kidney genes Qilin, Reptin, and Pontin, as well as the testis-expressed tubby-like protein TULP2. PMID:15738400

Stolc, Viktor; Samanta, Manoj Pratim; Tongprasit, Waraporn; Marshall, Wallace F.

2005-01-01

20

Integrated Whole Transcriptome and DNA Methylation Analysis Identifies Gene Networks Specific to Late-Onset Alzheimer's Disease.  

PubMed

Previous transcriptome studies observed disrupted cellular processes in late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD), yet it is unclear whether these changes are specific to LOAD, or are common to general neurodegeneration. In this study, we address this question by examining transcription in LOAD and comparing it to cognitively normal controls and a cohort of "disease controls." Differential transcription was examined using RNA-seq, which allows for the examination of protein coding genes, non-coding RNAs, and splicing. Significant transcription differences specific to LOAD were observed in five genes: C10orf105, DIO2, a lincRNA, RARRES3, and WIF1. These findings were replicated in two independent publicly available microarray data sets. Network analyses, performed on 2,504 genes with moderate transcription differences in LOAD, reveal that these genes aggregate into seven networks. Two networks involved in myelination and innate immune response specifically correlated to LOAD. FRMD4B and ST18, hub genes within the myelination network, were previously implicated in LOAD. Of the five significant genes, WIF1 and RARRES3 are directly implicated in the myelination process; the other three genes are located within the network. LOAD specific changes in DNA methylation were located throughout the genome and substantial changes in methylation were identified within the myelination network. Splicing differences specific to LOAD were observed across the genome and were decreased in all seven networks. DNA methylation had reduced influence on transcription within LOAD in the myelination network when compared to both controls. These results hint at the molecular underpinnings of LOAD and indicate several key processes, genes, and networks specific to the disease. PMID:25380588

Humphries, Crystal E; Kohli, Martin A; Nathanson, Lubov; Whitehead, Patrice; Beecham, Gary; Martin, Eden; Mash, Deborah C; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A; Gilbert, John

2014-11-01

21

Exome Sequencing Identifies DLG1 as a Novel Gene for Potential Susceptibility to Crohn's Disease in a Chinese Family Study  

PubMed Central

Background Genetic variants make some contributions to inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), including Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). More than 100 susceptibility loci were identified in Western IBD studies, but susceptibility gene has not been found in Chinese IBD patients till now. Sequencing of individuals with an IBD family history is a powerful approach toward our understanding of the genetics and pathogenesis of IBD. The aim of this study, which focuses on a Han Chinese CD family, is to identify high-risk variants and potentially novel loci using whole exome sequencing technique. Methods Exome sequence data from 4 individuals belonging to a same family were analyzed using bioinformatics methods to narrow down the variants associated with CD. The potential risk genes were further analyzed by genotyping and Sanger sequencing in family members, additional 401 healthy controls (HC), 278 sporadic CD patients, 123 UC cases, a pair of monozygotic CD twins and another Chinese CD family. Results From the CD family in which the father and daughter were affected, we identified a novel single nucleotide variant (SNV) c.374T>C (p.I125T) in exon 4 of discs large homolog 1 (DLG1), a gene has been reported to play mutiple roles in cell proliferation, T cell polarity and T cell receptor signaling. After genotyping among case and controls, a PLINK analysis showed the variant was of significance (P<0.05). 4 CD patients of the other Chinese family bore another non-synonymous variant c.833G>A (p.R278Q) in exon 9 of DLG1. Conclusions We have discovered novel genetic variants in the coding regions of DLG1 gene, the results support that DLG1 is a novel potential susceptibility gene for CD in Chinese patients. PMID:24937328

Song, Lu; NG, Siew Chien; Wang, Xiaobing; Chen, Liping; Yi, Fengming; Ran, Zhihua; Zhou, Rui; Xia, Bing

2014-01-01

22

Genome-Wide Linkage Scan Identifies Two Novel Genetic Loci for Coronary Artery Disease: In GeneQuest Families  

PubMed Central

Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the leading cause of death worldwide. Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) identified >50 common variants associated with CAD or its complication myocardial infarction (MI), but collectively they account for <20% of heritability, generating a phenomena of “missing heritability”. Rare variants with large effects may account for a large portion of missing heritability. Genome-wide linkage studies of large families and follow-up fine mapping and deep sequencing are particularly effective in identifying rare variants with large effects. Here we show results from a genome-wide linkage scan for CAD in multiplex GeneQuest families with early onset CAD and MI. Whole genome genotyping was carried out with 408 markers that span the human genome by every 10 cM and linkage analyses were performed using the affected relative pair analysis implemented in GENEHUNTER. Affected only nonparametric linkage (NPL) analysis identified two novel CAD loci with highly significant evidence of linkage on chromosome 3p25.1 (peak NPL ?=?5.49) and 3q29 (NPL ?=?6.84). We also identified four loci with suggestive linkage on 9q22.33, 9q34.11, 17p12, and 21q22.3 (NPL ?=?3.18–4.07). These results identify novel loci for CAD and provide a framework for fine mapping and deep sequencing to identify new susceptibility genes and novel variants associated with risk of CAD. PMID:25485937

Shen, Gongqing; Xi, Quansheng; Chen, Shenghan; Zhang, Zheng; Wang, Kai; Ellis, Stephen G.; Chen, Qiuyun; Topol, Eric J.; Wang, Qing K.

2014-01-01

23

Combined NGS Approaches Identify Mutations in the Intraflagellar Transport Gene IFT140 in Skeletal Ciliopathies with Early Progressive Kidney Disease  

PubMed Central

Ciliopathies are genetically heterogeneous disorders characterized by variable expressivity and overlaps between different disease entities. This is exemplified by the short rib-polydactyly syndromes, Jeune, Sensenbrenner, and Mainzer-Saldino chondrodysplasia syndromes. These three syndromes are frequently caused by mutations in intraflagellar transport (IFT) genes affecting the primary cilia, which play a crucial role in skeletal and chondral development. Here, we identified mutations in IFT140, an IFT complex A gene, in five Jeune asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy (JATD) and two Mainzer-Saldino syndrome (MSS) families, by screening a cohort of 66 JATD/MSS patients using whole exome sequencing and targeted resequencing of a customized ciliopathy gene panel. We also found an enrichment of rare IFT140 alleles in JATD compared with nonciliopathy diseases, implying putative modifier effects for certain alleles. IFT140 patients presented with mild chest narrowing, but all had end-stage renal failure under 13 years of age and retinal dystrophy when examined for ocular dysfunction. This is consistent with the severe cystic phenotype of Ift140 conditional knockout mice, and the higher level of Ift140 expression in kidney and retina compared with the skeleton at E15.5 in the mouse. IFT140 is therefore a major cause of cono-renal syndromes (JATD and MSS). The present study strengthens the rationale for IFT140 screening in skeletal ciliopathy spectrum patients that have kidney disease and/or retinal dystrophy. PMID:23418020

Schmidts, Miriam; Frank, Valeska; Eisenberger, Tobias; al Turki, Saeed; Bizet, Albane A.; Antony, Dinu; Rix, Suzanne; Decker, Christian; Bachmann, Nadine; Bald, Martin; Vinke, Tobias; Toenshoff, Burkhard; Donato, Natalia Di; Neuhann, Theresa; Hartley, Jane L.; Maher, Eamonn R.; Bogdanovi?, Radovan; Peco-Anti?, Amira; Mache, Christoph; Hurles, Matthew E.; Joksi?, Ivana; Gu?-Š?eki?, Marija; Dobricic, Jelena; Brankovic-Magic, Mirjana; Bolz, Hanno J.; Pazour, Gregory J.; Beales, Philip L.; Scambler, Peter J.; Saunier, Sophie; Mitchison, Hannah M.; Bergmann, Carsten

2014-01-01

24

Genetic Analysis of Fin Development in Zebrafish Identifies Furin and Hemicentin1 as Potential Novel Fraser Syndrome Disease Genes  

PubMed Central

Using forward genetics, we have identified the genes mutated in two classes of zebrafish fin mutants. The mutants of the first class are characterized by defects in embryonic fin morphogenesis, which are due to mutations in a Laminin subunit or an Integrin alpha receptor, respectively. The mutants of the second class display characteristic blistering underneath the basement membrane of the fin epidermis. Three of them are due to mutations in zebrafish orthologues of FRAS1, FREM1, or FREM2, large basement membrane protein encoding genes that are mutated in mouse bleb mutants and in human patients suffering from Fraser Syndrome, a rare congenital condition characterized by syndactyly and cryptophthalmos. Fin blistering in a fourth group of zebrafish mutants is caused by mutations in Hemicentin1 (Hmcn1), another large extracellular matrix protein the function of which in vertebrates was hitherto unknown. Our mutant and dose-dependent interaction data suggest a potential involvement of Hmcn1 in Fraser complex-dependent basement membrane anchorage. Furthermore, we present biochemical and genetic data suggesting a role for the proprotein convertase FurinA in zebrafish fin development and cell surface shedding of Fras1 and Frem2, thereby allowing proper localization of the proteins within the basement membrane of forming fins. Finally, we identify the extracellular matrix protein Fibrillin2 as an indispensable interaction partner of Hmcn1. Thus we have defined a series of zebrafish mutants modelling Fraser Syndrome and have identified several implicated novel genes that might help to further elucidate the mechanisms of basement membrane anchorage and of the disease's aetiology. In addition, the novel genes might prove helpful to unravel the molecular nature of thus far unresolved cases of the human disease. PMID:20419147

Carney, Thomas J.; Feitosa, Natália Martins; Sonntag, Carmen; Slanchev, Krasimir; Kluger, Johannes; Kiyozumi, Daiji; Gebauer, Jan M.; Coffin Talbot, Jared; Kimmel, Charles B.; Sekiguchi, Kiyotoshi; Wagener, Raimund; Schwarz, Heinz; Ingham, Phillip W.; Hammerschmidt, Matthias

2010-01-01

25

Saccharomyces Fungemia Associated with Esophageal Disease Identified by D1/D2 Ribosomal RNA Gene Sequence  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Disseminated Saccharomyces infection has been reported in immunosuppressed patients treated with probiotics, but disseminated Saccharomyces cerevisiae infection associated with underlying esophageal disease is not previously described. Saccharomyces cerevisiae (which occasionally colonizes the gast...

26

Comparison of Expression Profiles in Ovarian Epithelium In Vivo and Ovarian Cancer Identifies Novel Candidate Genes Involved in Disease Pathogenesis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Molecular events leading to epithelial ovarian cancer are poorly understood but ovulatory hormones and a high number of life-time ovulations with concomitant proliferation, apoptosis, and inflammation, increases risk. We identified genes that are regulated during the estrous cycle in murine ovarian surface epithelium and analysed these profiles to identify genes dysregulated in human ovarian cancer, using publically available datasets. We

Catherine Emmanuel; Natalie Gava; Catherine Kennedy; Rosemary L. Balleine; Raghwa Sharma; Gerard Wain; Alison Brand; Russell Hogg; Dariush Etemadmoghadam; Joshy George; Michael J. Birrer; Christine L. Clarke; Georgia Chenevix-Trench; David D. L. Bowtell; Paul R. Harnett; Anna Defazio; Thomas Preiss

2011-01-01

27

Systems Analysis of Immune Responses in Marek's Disease Virus-Infected Chickens Identifies a Gene Involved in Susceptibility and Highlights a Possible Novel Pathogenicity Mechanism?†  

PubMed Central

Marek's disease virus (MDV) is a highly contagious oncogenic alphaherpesvirus that causes disease that is both a cancer model and a continuing threat to the world's poultry industry. This comprehensive gene expression study analyzes the host response to infection in both resistant and susceptible lines of chickens and inherent expression differences between the two lines following the infection of the host. A novel pathogenicity mechanism, involving the downregulation of genes containing HIC1 transcription factor binding sites as early as 4 days postinfection, was suggested from this analysis. HIC1 drives antitumor mechanisms, suggesting that MDV infection switches off genes involved in antitumor regulation several days before the expression of the MDV oncogene meq. The comparison of the gene expression data to previous QTL data identified several genes as candidates for involvement in resistance to MD. One of these genes, IRG1, was confirmed by single nucleotide polymorphism analysis to be involved in susceptibility. Its precise mechanism remains to be elucidated, although the analysis of gene expression data suggests it has a role in apoptosis. Understanding which genes are involved in susceptibility/resistance to MD and defining the pathological mechanisms of the disease gives us a much greater ability to try to reduce the incidence of this virus, which is costly to the poultry industry in terms of both animal welfare and economics. PMID:21865384

Smith, Jacqueline; Sadeyen, Jean-Remy; Paton, Ian R.; Hocking, Paul M.; Salmon, Nigel; Fife, Mark; Nair, Venugopal; Burt, David W.; Kaiser, Pete

2011-01-01

28

Positively Selected Disease Response Orthologous Gene Sets in the Cereals Identified Using Sorghum bicolor L. Moench Expression Profiles and Comparative Genomics  

PubMed Central

Disease response genes (DRGs) diverge under recurrent positive selection as a result of a molecular arms race between hosts and pathogens. Most of these studies were conducted in animals, and few defense genes have been shown to evolve adaptively in plants. To test for adaptation in the molecules mediating disease resistance in the cereals, we first combined information from the expression pattern of Sorghum bicolor genes and from divergence to the full genome of rice to identify candidate DRGs. We then used evolutionary analyses of orthologous gene sets from several grass species, to determine whether the DRGs show signals of positive selection and the residues targeted. We found 140 divergent genes upregulated under biotic stress in S. bicolor by evaluating the relative abundance of expressed sequence tags in different libraries and comparing them with rice genes. For 10 of these genes, we found sets of orthologs including sequences from rice and three other cereals; six genes showed a pattern of substitution that was consistent with positive selection. Three of these genes, a thaumatin, a peroxidase, and a barley mlo homolog, are known antifungal proteins. The other three genes with evidence of positive selection were a MCM-1 agamous deficiens SRF- (MADS) box transcription factor, an eIF5 translation initiation factor, and a gene of unknown function but with evidence of expression during stress. Permutation analyses, using different ortholog and paralog sequences, consistently identified five positively selected codons in the peroxidase, a member of a cluster of genes and a large gene family. We mapped the positively selected residues onto the structure of the peroxidase and thaumatin and found that all sites are on the surface of these proteins and several are close to biochemically determined active sites. Identifying new positively selected plant disease resistance genes and the critical amino acid sites provides a basis for functional studies that may increase our understanding of their underlying molecular mechanisms of action. Additionally, it may lead to the identification of individuals having variation at functionally important sites, as well as eventually using this information in the rational design and engineering of proteins involved in plant disease resistance. PMID:19506000

Zamora, Alejandro; Sun, Qi; Hamblin, Martha T.; Aquadro, Charles F.; Kresovich, Stephen

2009-01-01

29

A diVIsive Shuffling Approach (VIStA) for gene expression analysis to identify subtypes in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease  

PubMed Central

Background An important step toward understanding the biological mechanisms underlying a complex disease is a refined understanding of its clinical heterogeneity. Relating clinical and molecular differences may allow us to define more specific subtypes of patients that respond differently to therapeutic interventions. Results We developed a novel unbiased method called diVIsive Shuffling Approach (VIStA) that identifies subgroups of patients by maximizing the difference in their gene expression patterns. We tested our algorithm on 140 subjects with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) and found four distinct, biologically and clinically meaningful combinations of clinical characteristics that are associated with large gene expression differences. The dominant characteristic in these combinations was the severity of airflow limitation. Other frequently identified measures included emphysema, fibrinogen levels, phlegm, BMI and age. A pathway analysis of the differentially expressed genes in the identified subtypes suggests that VIStA is capable of capturing specific molecular signatures within in each group. Conclusions The introduced methodology allowed us to identify combinations of clinical characteristics that correspond to clear gene expression differences. The resulting subtypes for COPD contribute to a better understanding of its heterogeneity. PMID:25032995

2014-01-01

30

Genome-wide haplotype association study identifies the FRMD4A gene as a risk locus for Alzheimer's disease  

PubMed Central

Recently, several genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have led to the discovery of nine new loci of genetic susceptibility in Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the landscape of the AD genetic susceptibility is far away to be complete and in addition to single-SNP (single-nucleotide polymorphism) analyses as performed in conventional GWAS, complementary strategies need to be applied to overcome limitations inherent to this type of approaches. We performed a genome-wide haplotype association (GWHA) study in the EADI1 study (n=2025 AD cases and 5328 controls) by applying a sliding-windows approach. After exclusion of loci already known to be involved in AD (APOE, BIN1 and CR1), 91 regions with suggestive haplotype effects were identified. In a second step, we attempted to replicate the best suggestive haplotype associations in the GERAD1 consortium (2820 AD cases and 6356 controls) and observed that 9 of them showed nominal association. In a third step, we tested relevant haplotype associations in a combined analysis of five additional case–control studies (5093 AD cases and 4061 controls). We consistently replicated the association of a haplotype within FRMD4A on Chr.10p13 in all the data set analyzed (OR: 1.68; 95% CI: (1.43–1.96); P=1.1 × 10?10). We finally searched for association between SNPs within the FRMD4A locus and A? plasma concentrations in three independent non-demented populations (n=2579). We reported that polymorphisms were associated with plasma A?42/A?40 ratio (best signal, P=5.4 × 10?7). In conclusion, combining both GWHA study and a conservative three-stage replication approach, we characterised FRMD4A as a new genetic risk factor of AD. PMID:22430674

Lambert, J-C; Grenier-Boley, B; Harold, D; Zelenika, D; Chouraki, V; Kamatani, Y; Sleegers, K; Ikram, M A; Hiltunen, M; Reitz, C; Mateo, I; Feulner, T; Bullido, M; Galimberti, D; Concari, L; Alvarez, V; Sims, R; Gerrish, A; Chapman, J; Deniz-Naranjo, C; Solfrizzi, V; Sorbi, S; Arosio, B; Spalletta, G; Siciliano, G; Epelbaum, J; Hannequin, D; Dartigues, J-F; Tzourio, C; Berr, C; Schrijvers, E M C; Rogers, R; Tosto, G; Pasquier, F; Bettens, K; Van Cauwenberghe, C; Fratiglioni, L; Graff, C; Delepine, M; Ferri, R; Reynolds, C A; Lannfelt, L; Ingelsson, M; Prince, J A; Chillotti, C; Pilotto, A; Seripa, D; Boland, A; Mancuso, M; Bossù, P; Annoni, G; Nacmias, B; Bosco, P; Panza, F; Sanchez-Garcia, F; Del Zompo, M; Coto, E; Owen, M; O'Donovan, M; Valdivieso, F; Caffara, P; Scarpini, E; Combarros, O; Buée, L; Campion, D; Soininen, H; Breteler, M; Riemenschneider, M; Van Broeckhoven, C; Alpérovitch, A; Lathrop, M; Trégouët, D-A; Williams, J; Amouyel, P

2013-01-01

31

Follow-up of loci from the International Genomics of Alzheimer's Disease Project identifies TRIP4 as a novel susceptibility gene  

PubMed Central

To follow-up loci discovered by the International Genomics of Alzheimer's Disease Project, we attempted independent replication of 19 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a large Spanish sample (Fundació ACE data set; 1808 patients and 2564 controls). Our results corroborate association with four SNPs located in the genes INPP5D, MEF2C, ZCWPW1 and FERMT2, respectively. Of these, ZCWPW1 was the only SNP to withstand correction for multiple testing (P=0.000655). Furthermore, we identify TRIP4 (rs74615166) as a novel genome-wide significant locus for Alzheimer's disease risk (odds ratio=1.31; confidence interval 95% (1.19–1.44); P=9.74 × 10?9). PMID:24495969

Ruiz, A; Heilmann, S; Becker, T; Hernández, I; Wagner, H; Thelen, M; Mauleón, A; Rosende-Roca, M; Bellenguez, C; Bis, J C; Harold, D; Gerrish, A; Sims, R; Sotolongo-Grau, O; Espinosa, A; Alegret, M; Arrieta, J L; Lacour, A; Leber, M; Becker, J; Lafuente, A; Ruiz, S; Vargas, L; Rodríguez, O; Ortega, G; Dominguez, M-A; Mayeux, R; Haines, J L; Pericak-Vance, M A; Farrer, L A; Schellenberg, G D; Chouraki, V; Launer, L J; van Duijn, C; Seshadri, S; Antúnez, C; Breteler, M M; Serrano-Ríos, M; Jessen, F; Tárraga, L; Nöthen, M M; Maier, W; Boada, M; Ramírez, A

2014-01-01

32

A Parkinson's disease gene regulatory network identifies the signaling protein RGS2 as a modulator of LRRK2 activity and neuronal toxicity.  

PubMed

Mutations in LRRK2 are one of the primary genetic causes of Parkinson's disease (PD). LRRK2 contains a kinase and a GTPase domain, and familial PD mutations affect both enzymatic activities. However, the signaling mechanisms regulating LRRK2 and the pathogenic effects of familial mutations remain unknown. Identifying the signaling proteins that regulate LRRK2 function and toxicity remains a critical goal for the development of effective therapeutic strategies. In this study, we apply systems biology tools to human PD brain and blood transcriptomes to reverse-engineer a LRRK2-centered gene regulatory network. This network identifies several putative master regulators of LRRK2 function. In particular, the signaling gene RGS2, which encodes for a GTPase-activating protein (GAP), is a key regulatory hub connecting the familial PD-associated genes DJ-1 and PINK1 with LRRK2 in the network. RGS2 expression levels are reduced in the striata of LRRK2 and sporadic PD patients. We identify RGS2 as a novel interacting partner of LRRK2 in vivo. RGS2 regulates both the GTPase and kinase activities of LRRK2. We show in mammalian neurons that RGS2 regulates LRRK2 function in the control of neuronal process length. RGS2 is also protective against neuronal toxicity of the most prevalent mutation in LRRK2, G2019S. We find that RGS2 regulates LRRK2 function and neuronal toxicity through its effects on kinase activity and independently of GTPase activity, which reveals a novel mode of action for GAP proteins. This work identifies RGS2 as a promising target for interfering with neurodegeneration due to LRRK2 mutations in PD patients. PMID:24794857

Dusonchet, Julien; Li, Hu; Guillily, Maria; Liu, Min; Stafa, Klodjan; Derada Troletti, Claudio; Boon, Joon Y; Saha, Shamol; Glauser, Liliane; Mamais, Adamantios; Citro, Allison; Youmans, Katherine L; Liu, LiQun; Schneider, Bernard L; Aebischer, Patrick; Yue, Zhenyu; Bandopadhyay, Rina; Glicksman, Marcie A; Moore, Darren J; Collins, James J; Wolozin, Benjamin

2014-09-15

33

Genome-Wide Analysis of Copy Number Variation Identifies Candidate Gene Loci Associated with the Progression of Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease  

PubMed Central

Between 10 and 25% of individuals with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) develop hepatic fibrosis leading to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). To investigate the molecular basis of disease progression, we performed a genome-wide analysis of copy number variation (CNV) in a total of 49 patients with NAFLD [10 simple steatosis and 39 non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH)] and 49 matched controls using high-density comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) microarrays. A total of 11 CNVs were found to be unique to individuals with simple steatosis, whilst 22 were common between simple steatosis and NASH, and 224 were unique to NASH. We postulated that these CNVs could be involved in the pathogenesis of NAFLD progression. After stringent filtering, we identified four rare and/or novel CNVs that may influence the pathogenesis of NASH. Two of these CNVs, located at 13q12.11 and 12q13.2 respectively, harbour the exportin 4 (XPO4) and phosphodiesterase 1B (PDE1B) genes which are already known to be involved in the etiology of liver cirrhosis and HCC. Cross-comparison of the genes located at these four CNV loci with genes already known to be associated with NAFLD yielded a set of genes associated with shared biological processes including cell death, the key process involved in ‘second hit’ hepatic injury. To our knowledge, this pilot study is the first to provide CNV information of potential relevance to the NAFLD spectrum. These data could prove invaluable in predicting patients at risk of developing NAFLD and more importantly, those who will subsequently progress to NASH. PMID:24743702

Zain, Shamsul Mohd; Mohamed, Rosmawati; Cooper, David N.; Razali, Rozaimi; Rampal, Sanjay; Mahadeva, Sanjiv; Chan, Wah-Kheong; Anwar, Arif; Rosli, Nurul Shielawati Mohamed; Mahfudz, Anis Shafina; Cheah, Phaik-Leng; Basu, Roma Choudhury; Mohamed, Zahurin

2014-01-01

34

NIH Researchers Identify OCD Risk Gene  

MedlinePLUS

... News From NIH NIH Researchers Identify OCD Risk Gene Past Issues / Summer 2006 Table of Contents For ... and Alcoholism (NIAAA) have identified a previously unknown gene variant that doubles an individual's risk for obsessive- ...

35

Comparative Genomics Identifies a Flagellar and Basal Body Proteome that Includes the BBS5 Human Disease Gene  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cilia and flagella are microtubule-based structures nucleated by modified centrioles termed basal bodies. These biochemically complex organelles have more than 250 and 150 polypeptides, respectively. To identify the proteins involved in ciliary and basal body biogenesis and function, we undertook a comparative genomics approach that subtracted the nonflagellated proteome of Arabidopsis from the shared proteome of the ciliated\\/flagellated organisms Chlamydomonas

Jin Billy Li; Jantje M. Gerdes; Courtney J. Haycraft; Yanli Fan; Tanya M. Teslovich; Helen May-Simera; Haitao Li; Oliver E. Blacque; Linya Li; Carmen C. Leitch; Richard Allan Lewis; Jane S Green; Patrick S Parfrey; Michel R Leroux; William S Davidson; Philip L Beales; Lisa M Guay-Woodford; Bradley K Yoder; Gary D Stormo; Nicholas Katsanis; Susan K Dutcher

2004-01-01

36

Gene Genealogies and AFLP Analyses in the Fusarium oxysporum Complex Identify Monophyletic and Nonmonophyletic Formae Speciales Causing Wilt and Rot Disease.  

PubMed

ABSTRACT The monophyletic origin of host-specific taxa in the plant-pathogenic Fusarium oxysporum complex was tested by constructing nuclear and mitochondrial gene genealogies and amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP)-based phylogenies for 89 strains representing the known genetic and pathogenic diversity in 8 formae speciales associated with wilt diseases and root and bulb rot. We included strains from clonal lineages of F. oxysporum f. spp. asparagi, dianthi, gladioli, lilii, lini, opuntiarum, spinaciae, and tulipae. Putatively nonpathogenic strains from carnation and lily were included and a reference strain from each of the three main clades identified previously in the F. oxysporum complex; sequences from related species were used as outgroups. DNA sequences from the nuclear translation elongation factor 1alpha and the mitochondrial small subunit (mtSSU) ribosomal RNA genes were combined for phylogenetic analysis. Strains in vegetative compatibility groups (VCGs) shared identical sequences and AFLP profiles, supporting the monophyly of the two single-VCG formae speciales, lilii and tulipae. Identical genotypes were also found for the three VCGs in F. oxysporum f. sp. spinaciae. In contrast, multiple evolutionary origins were apparent for F. oxysporum f. spp. asparagi, dianthi, gladioli, lini, and opuntiarum, although different VCGs within each of these formae speciales often clustered close together or shared identical EF-1alpha and mtSSU rDNA haplotypes. Kishino-Hasegawa analyses of constraints forcing the monophyly of these formae speciales supported the exclusive origin of F. oxysporum f. sp. opuntiarum but not the monophyly of F. oxysporum f. spp. asparagi, dianthi, gladioli, and lini. Most of the putatively nonpathogenic strains from carnation and lily, representing unique VCGs, were unrelated to F. oxysporum f. spp. dianthi and lilii, respectively. Putatively nonpathogenic or rot-inducing strains did not form exclusive groups within the molecular phylogeny. Parsimony analyses of AFLP fingerprint data supported the gene genealogy-based phylogram; however, AFLP-based phylogenies were considerably more homoplasious than the gene genealogies. The predictive value of the forma specialis naming system within the F. oxysporum complex is questioned. PMID:18944511

Baayen, R P; O'Donnell, K; Bonants, P J; Cigelnik, E; Kroon, L P; Roebroeck, E J; Waalwijk, C

2000-08-01

37

Identifying potential cancer driver genes by genomic data integration  

PubMed Central

Cancer is a genomic disease associated with a plethora of gene mutations resulting in a loss of control over vital cellular functions. Among these mutated genes, driver genes are defined as being causally linked to oncogenesis, while passenger genes are thought to be irrelevant for cancer development. With increasing numbers of large-scale genomic datasets available, integrating these genomic data to identify driver genes from aberration regions of cancer genomes becomes an important goal of cancer genome analysis and investigations into mechanisms responsible for cancer development. A computational method, MAXDRIVER, is proposed here to identify potential driver genes on the basis of copy number aberration (CNA) regions of cancer genomes, by integrating publicly available human genomic data. MAXDRIVER employs several optimization strategies to construct a heterogeneous network, by means of combining a fused gene functional similarity network, gene-disease associations and a disease phenotypic similarity network. MAXDRIVER was validated to effectively recall known associations among genes and cancers. Previously identified as well as novel driver genes were detected by scanning CNAs of breast cancer, melanoma and liver carcinoma. Three predicted driver genes (CDKN2A, AKT1, RNF139) were found common in these three cancers by comparative analysis. PMID:24346768

Chen, Yong; Hao, Jingjing; Jiang, Wei; He, Tong; Zhang, Xuegong; Jiang, Tao; Jiang, Rui

2013-01-01

38

Identifying potential cancer driver genes by genomic data integration.  

PubMed

Cancer is a genomic disease associated with a plethora of gene mutations resulting in a loss of control over vital cellular functions. Among these mutated genes, driver genes are defined as being causally linked to oncogenesis, while passenger genes are thought to be irrelevant for cancer development. With increasing numbers of large-scale genomic datasets available, integrating these genomic data to identify driver genes from aberration regions of cancer genomes becomes an important goal of cancer genome analysis and investigations into mechanisms responsible for cancer development. A computational method, MAXDRIVER, is proposed here to identify potential driver genes on the basis of copy number aberration (CNA) regions of cancer genomes, by integrating publicly available human genomic data. MAXDRIVER employs several optimization strategies to construct a heterogeneous network, by means of combining a fused gene functional similarity network, gene-disease associations and a disease phenotypic similarity network. MAXDRIVER was validated to effectively recall known associations among genes and cancers. Previously identified as well as novel driver genes were detected by scanning CNAs of breast cancer, melanoma and liver carcinoma. Three predicted driver genes (CDKN2A, AKT1, RNF139) were found common in these three cancers by comparative analysis. PMID:24346768

Chen, Yong; Hao, Jingjing; Jiang, Wei; He, Tong; Zhang, Xuegong; Jiang, Tao; Jiang, Rui

2013-01-01

39

Identifying Choke Cherry Source of X Disease  

E-print Network

Identifying Choke Cherry ­ Source of X Disease Choke cherry identification is important for peach and sweet cherry growers. This is because choke cherry (Prunus virginiana L.) is important in spreading a fatal disease of peach and sweet cherry trees, called X-disease. The disease is caused by Phytoplasma

New Hampshire, University of

40

Identifying Gene Networks Underlying the Neurobiology of Ethanol and Alcoholism  

PubMed Central

For complex disorders such as alcoholism, identifying the genes linked to these diseases and their specific roles is difficult. Traditional genetic approaches, such as genetic association studies (including genome-wide association studies) and analyses of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) in both humans and laboratory animals already have helped identify some candidate genes. However, because of technical obstacles, such as the small impact of any individual gene, these approaches only have limited effectiveness in identifying specific genes that contribute to complex diseases. The emerging field of systems biology, which allows for analyses of entire gene networks, may help researchers better elucidate the genetic basis of alcoholism, both in humans and in animal models. Such networks can be identified using approaches such as high-throughput molecular profiling (e.g., through microarray-based gene expression analyses) or strategies referred to as genetical genomics, such as the mapping of expression QTLs (eQTLs). Characterization of gene networks can shed light on the biological pathways underlying complex traits and provide the functional context for identifying those genes that contribute to disease development. PMID:23134046

Wolen, Aaron R.; Miles, Michael F.

2012-01-01

41

Identifying relationships among genomic disease regions: predicting= pathogenic SNP associations and rare deletions  

E-print Network

Translating a set of disease regions into insight about pathogenic mechanisms requires not only the ability to identify the key disease genes within them, but also the biological relationships among those key genes. Here ...

Raychaudhuri, Soumya

42

Integrated analyses of genome-wide DNA occupancy and expression profiling identify key genes and pathways involved in cellular transformation by a Marek's disease virus oncoprotein, Meq.  

PubMed

Marek's disease (MD) is an economically significant disease in chickens that is caused by the highly oncogenic Marek's disease virus (MDV). A major unanswered question is the mechanism of MDV-induced tumor formation. Meq, a bZIP transcription factor discovered in the 1990s, is critically involved in viral oncogenicity, but only a few of its host target genes have been described, impeding our understanding of MDV-induced tumorigenesis. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing (ChIP-seq) and microarray analysis, a high-confidence list of Meq binding sites in the chicken genome and a global transcriptome of Meq-responsive genes were generated. Meq binding sites were found to be enriched in the promoter regions of upregulated genes but not in those of downregulated genes. ChIP-seq was also performed for c-Jun, a known heterodimeric partner of Meq. The close location of binding sites of Meq and c-Jun was noted, suggesting cooperativity between these two factors in modulating transcription. Pathway analysis indicated that Meq transcriptionally regulates many genes that are part of several signaling pathways including the extracellular signal-regulated kinase /mitogen-activated protein kinase (ERK/MAPK), Jak-STAT, and ErbB pathways, which are critical for oncogenesis and/or include signaling mediators involved in apoptosis. Meq activates oncogenic signaling cascades by transcriptionally activating major kinases in the ERK/MAPK pathway and simultaneously repressing phosphatases, as verified using inhibitors of MEK and ERK1/2 in a cell proliferation assay. This study provides significant insights into the mechanistic basis of Meq-dependent cell transformation. PMID:23740999

Subramaniam, Sugalesini; Johnston, John; Preeyanon, Likit; Brown, C Titus; Kung, Hsing-Jien; Cheng, Hans H

2013-08-01

43

Systems biology approaches to identify developmental bases for lung diseases  

PubMed Central

A greater understanding of the regulatory processes contributing to lung development could be helpful to identify strategies to ameliorate morbidity and mortality in premature infants and to identify individuals at risk for congenital and/or chronic lung diseases. Over the past decade, genomics technologies have enabled the production of rich gene expression databases providing information for all genes across developmental time or in diseased tissue. These data sets facilitate systems biology approaches for identifying underlying biological modules and programs contributing to the complex processes of normal development, and those that may be associated with disease states. The next decade will undoubtedly see rapid and significant advances in redefining both lung development and disease at the systems level. PMID:23314295

Bhattacharya, Soumyaroop; Mariani, Thomas J.

2013-01-01

44

PCR and restriction fragment length polymorphism of a pel gene as a tool to identify Erwinia carotovora in relation to potato diseases.  

PubMed Central

Using a sequenced pectate lyase-encoding gene (pel gene), we developed a PCR test for Erwinia carotovora. A set of primers allowed the amplification of a 434-bp fragment in E. carotovora strains. Among the 89 E. carotovora strains tested, only the Erwinia carotovora subsp. betavasculorum strains were not detected. A restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) study was undertaken on the amplified fragment with seven endonucleases. The Sau3AI digestion pattern specifically identified the Erwinia carotovora subsp. atroseptica strains, and the whole set of data identified the Erwinia carotovora subsp. wasabiae strains. However, Erwinia carotovora subsp. carotovora and Erwinia carotovora subsp. odorifera could not be separated. Phenetic and phylogenic analyses of RFLP results showed E. carotovora subsp. atroseptica as a homogeneous group while E. carotovora subsp. carotovora and E. carotovora subsp. odorifera strains exhibited a genetic diversity that may result from a nonmonophyletic origin. The use of RFLP on amplified fragments in epidemiology and for diagnosis is discussed. Images PMID:7912502

Darrasse, A; Priou, S; Kotoujansky, A; Bertheau, Y

1994-01-01

45

Network Topology Reveals Key Cardiovascular Disease Genes  

PubMed Central

The structure of protein-protein interaction (PPI) networks has already been successfully used as a source of new biological information. Even though cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are a major global cause of death, many CVD genes still await discovery. We explore ways to utilize the structure of the human PPI network to find important genes for CVDs that should be targeted by drugs. The hope is to use the properties of such important genes to predict new ones, which would in turn improve a choice of therapy. We propose a methodology that examines the PPI network wiring around genes involved in CVDs. We use the methodology to identify a subset of CVD-related genes that are statistically significantly enriched in drug targets and “driver genes.” We seek such genes, since driver genes have been proposed to drive onset and progression of a disease. Our identified subset of CVD genes has a large overlap with the Core Diseasome, which has been postulated to be the key to disease formation and hence should be the primary object of therapeutic intervention. This indicates that our methodology identifies “key” genes responsible for CVDs. Thus, we use it to predict new CVD genes and we validate over 70% of our predictions in the literature. Finally, we show that our predicted genes are functionally similar to currently known CVD drug targets, which confirms a potential utility of our methodology towards improving therapy for CVDs. PMID:23977067

Stojkovi?, Neda; Radak, Djordje; Pržulj, Nataša

2013-01-01

46

Chapter 15: Disease Gene Prioritization  

PubMed Central

Disease-causing aberrations in the normal function of a gene define that gene as a disease gene. Proving a causal link between a gene and a disease experimentally is expensive and time-consuming. Comprehensive prioritization of candidate genes prior to experimental testing drastically reduces the associated costs. Computational gene prioritization is based on various pieces of correlative evidence that associate each gene with the given disease and suggest possible causal links. A fair amount of this evidence comes from high-throughput experimentation. Thus, well-developed methods are necessary to reliably deal with the quantity of information at hand. Existing gene prioritization techniques already significantly improve the outcomes of targeted experimental studies. Faster and more reliable techniques that account for novel data types are necessary for the development of new diagnostics, treatments, and cure for many diseases. PMID:23633938

Bromberg, Yana

2013-01-01

47

Chapter 15: disease gene prioritization.  

PubMed

Disease-causing aberrations in the normal function of a gene define that gene as a disease gene. Proving a causal link between a gene and a disease experimentally is expensive and time-consuming. Comprehensive prioritization of candidate genes prior to experimental testing drastically reduces the associated costs. Computational gene prioritization is based on various pieces of correlative evidence that associate each gene with the given disease and suggest possible causal links. A fair amount of this evidence comes from high-throughput experimentation. Thus, well-developed methods are necessary to reliably deal with the quantity of information at hand. Existing gene prioritization techniques already significantly improve the outcomes of targeted experimental studies. Faster and more reliable techniques that account for novel data types are necessary for the development of new diagnostics, treatments, and cure for many diseases. PMID:23633938

Bromberg, Yana

2013-04-01

48

Global gene expression profiling in early-stage polycystic kidney disease in the Han:SPRD Cy rat identifies a role for RXR signaling.  

PubMed

Han:SPRD Cy is a spontaneous rat model of polycystic kidney disease (PKD) caused by a missense mutation in Pkdr1. Cystogenesis in this model is not clearly understood. In the current study, we performed global gene expression profiling in early-stage PKD cyst development in Cy/Cy kidneys and normal (+/+) kidneys at 3 and 7 days of postnatal age. Expression profiles were determined by microarray analysis, followed by validation with real-time RT-PCR. Genes were selected with over 1.5-fold expression changes compared with age-matched +/+ kidneys for canonical pathway analysis. We found nine pathways in common between 3- and 7-day Cy/Cy kidneys. Three significantly changed pathways were designated "Vitamin D Receptor (VDR)/Retinoid X Receptor (RXR) Activation," "LPS/IL-1-Mediated Inhibition of RXR Function," and "Liver X Receptor (LXR)/RXR Activation." These results suggest that RXR-mediated signaling is significantly altered in developing kidneys with mutated Pkdr1. In gene ontology analysis, the functions of these RXR-related genes were found to be involved in regulating cell proliferation and organ morphogenesis. With real-time RT-PCR analysis, the upregulation of Ptx2, Alox15b, OSP, and PCNA, major markers of cell proliferation associated with the RXR pathway, were confirmed in 3- and 7-day Cy/Cy kidneys compared with 3-day +/+ kidneys. The increased RXR protein was observed in both the nucleus and cytoplasm of cystic epithelial cells in early-stage Cy/Cy kidneys, and the RXR-positive cells were strongly positive for PCNA staining. Taken together, cell proliferation and organ morphogenesis signals transduced by RXR-mediated pathways may have important roles for cystogenesis in early-stage PKD in this Pkdr1-mutated Cy rat. PMID:20926632

Kugita, Masanori; Nishii, Kazuhiro; Morita, Miwa; Yoshihara, Daisuke; Kowa-Sugiyama, Hiroe; Yamada, Kouji; Yamaguchi, Tamio; Wallace, Darren P; Calvet, James P; Kurahashi, Hiroki; Nagao, Shizuko

2011-01-01

49

Identification of Disease Genes This exercise focuses on the identification of a disease gene using  

E-print Network

disease genes. Problem: A laboratory has generated an EST library from a hemochromatosis patient and wants an EST library from a hemochromatosis patient and wants to identify the gene(s) causing the phenotype. Outline: We will follow these steps to solve the problem: 1. Compare the EST from a hemochromatosis

Levin, Judith G.

50

Genome-wide association study identifies variants at CLU and PICALM associated with Alzheimer's disease, and shows evidence for additional susceptibility genes  

PubMed Central

We undertook a two-stage genome-wide association study of Alzheimer's disease involving over 16,000 individuals. In stage 1 (3,941 cases and 7,848 controls), we replicated the established association with the APOE locus (most significant SNP: rs2075650, p= 1.8×10?157) and observed genome-wide significant association with SNPs at two novel loci: rs11136000 in the CLU or APOJ gene (p= 1.4×10?9) and rs3851179, a SNP 5? to the PICALM gene (p= 1.9×10?8). Both novel associations were supported in stage 2 (2,023 cases and 2,340 controls), producing compelling evidence for association with AD in the combined dataset (rs11136000: p= 8.5×10?10, odds ratio= 0.86; rs3851179: p= 1.3×10?9, odds ratio= 0.86). We also observed more variants associated at p< 1×10?5 than expected by chance (p=7.5×10?6), including polymorphisms at the BIN1, DAB1 and CR1 loci. PMID:19734902

Harold, Denise; Abraham, Richard; Hollingworth, Paul; Sims, Rebecca; Gerrish, Amy; Hamshere, Marian; Singh Pahwa, Jaspreet; Moskvina, Valentina; Dowzell, Kimberley; Williams, Amy; Jones, Nicola; Thomas, Charlene; Stretton, Alexandra; Morgan, Angharad; Lovestone, Simon; Powell, John; Proitsi, Petroula; Lupton, Michelle K; Brayne, Carol; Rubinsztein, David C.; Gill, Michael; Lawlor, Brian; Lynch, Aoibhinn; Morgan, Kevin; Brown, Kristelle; Passmore, Peter; Craig, David; McGuinness, Bernadette; Todd, Stephen; Holmes, Clive; Mann, David; Smith, A. David; Love, Seth; Kehoe, Patrick G.; Hardy, John; Mead, Simon; Fox, Nick; Rossor, Martin; Collinge, John; Maier, Wolfgang; Jessen, Frank; Schürmann, Britta; van den Bussche, Hendrik; Heuser, Isabella; Kornhuber, Johannes; Wiltfang, Jens; Dichgans, Martin; Frölich, Lutz; Hampel, Harald; Hüll, Michael; Rujescu, Dan; Goate, Alison; Kauwe, John S.K.; Cruchaga, Carlos; Nowotny, Petra; Morris, John C.; Mayo, Kevin; Sleegers, Kristel; Bettens, Karolien; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; De Deyn, Peter; van Broeckhoven, Christine; Livingston, Gill; Bass, Nicholas J.; Gurling, Hugh; McQuillin, Andrew; Gwilliam, Rhian; Deloukas, Panagiotis; Al-Chalabi, Ammar; Shaw, Christopher E.; Tsolaki, Magda; Singleton, Andrew; Guerreiro, Rita; Mühleisen, Thomas W.; Nöthen, Markus M.; Moebus, Susanne; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Klopp, Norman; Wichmann, H-Erich; Carrasquillo, Minerva M.; Pankratz, V. Shane; Younkin, Steven G.; Holmans, Peter; O'Donovan, Michael; Owen, Michael J.; Williams, Julie

2010-01-01

51

Gene expression analysis identifies global gene dosage sensitivity in cancer.  

PubMed

Many cancer-associated somatic copy number alterations (SCNAs) are known. Currently, one of the challenges is to identify the molecular downstream effects of these variants. Although several SCNAs are known to change gene expression levels, it is not clear whether each individual SCNA affects gene expression. We reanalyzed 77,840 expression profiles and observed a limited set of 'transcriptional components' that describe well-known biology, explain the vast majority of variation in gene expression and enable us to predict the biological function of genes. On correcting expression profiles for these components, we observed that the residual expression levels (in 'functional genomic mRNA' profiling) correlated strongly with copy number. DNA copy number correlated positively with expression levels for 99% of all abundantly expressed human genes, indicating global gene dosage sensitivity. By applying this method to 16,172 patient-derived tumor samples, we replicated many loci with aberrant copy numbers and identified recurrently disrupted genes in genomically unstable cancers. PMID:25581432

Fehrmann, Rudolf S N; Karjalainen, Juha M; Krajewska, Ma?gorzata; Westra, Harm-Jan; Maloney, David; Simeonov, Anton; Pers, Tune H; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Jansen, Ritsert C; Schultes, Erik A; van Haagen, Herman H H B M; de Vries, Elisabeth G E; Te Meerman, Gerard J; Wijmenga, Cisca; van Vugt, Marcel A T M; Franke, Lude

2015-02-01

52

Human disease genes: patterns and predictions  

Microsoft Academic Search

We compared genes at which mutations are known to cause human disease (disease genes) with other human genes (nondisease genes) using a large set of human–rodent alignments to infer evolutionary patterns. Such comparisons may be of use both in predicting disease genes and in understanding the general evolution of human genes. Four features were found to differ significantly between disease

Nick G. C. Smith; Adam Eyre-Walker

2003-01-01

53

Prediction of disease genes using tissue-specified gene-gene network  

PubMed Central

Background Tissue specificity is an important aspect of many genetic diseases in the context of genetic disorders as the disorder affects only few tissues. Therefore tissue specificity is important in identifying disease-gene associations. Hence this paper seeks to discuss the impact of using tissue specificity in predicting new disease-gene associations and how to use tissue specificity along with phenotype information for a particular disease. Methods In order to find out the impact of using tissue specificity for predicting new disease-gene associations, this study proposes a novel method called tissue-specified genes to construct tissues-specific gene-gene networks for different tissue samples. Subsequently, these networks are used with phenotype details to predict disease genes by using Katz method. The proposed method was compared with three other tissue-specific network construction methods in order to check its effectiveness. Furthermore, to check the possibility of using tissue-specific gene-gene network instead of generic protein-protein network at all time, the results are compared with three other methods. Results In terms of leave-one-out cross validation, calculation of the mean enrichment and ROC curves indicate that the proposed approach outperforms existing network construction methods. Furthermore tissues-specific gene-gene networks make a more positive impact on predicting disease-gene associations than generic protein-protein interaction networks. Conclusions In conclusion by integrating tissue-specific data it enabled prediction of known and unknown disease-gene associations for a particular disease more effectively. Hence it is better to use tissue-specific gene-gene network whenever possible. In addition the proposed method is a better way of constructing tissue-specific gene-gene networks. PMID:25350876

2014-01-01

54

Mapping genes and pathways in autoimmune disease.  

PubMed

Identifying novel genes and pathways controlling T-cell activation holds the promise of developing novel therapies for autoimmune disease and cancer. Recent advances in the human genome project have shown that it is timely for small groups searching for this Holy Grail to rethink their options. In this review, some alternative strategies employed in pursuing novel disease pathways in rodents and humans, including recent results, are presented. Examples include the murine Roquin and Ncf1 genes, and the PTPN22 gene identified in humans. The potential benefit of reducing the heterogeneity of clinically defined diseases by the careful phenotyping of patients, cells and lesions using advanced molecular biology and imaging techniques is highlighted. PMID:16753344

Spurkland, Anne; Sollid, Ludvig M

2006-07-01

55

Differences in Pathogenesis for Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in the Mouse Versus the Swine Model Identify Bacterial Gene Products Required for Systemic but not Gastrointestinal Disease  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Over the last several decades, the mouse model of Typhoid fever has been an extremely productive model to investigate Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium pathogenesis. The mouse is the paradigm for investigating systemic disease due to infection by Salmonella; however, the swine model of gastro...

56

Network-Based Inference Framework for Identifying Cancer Genes from Gene Expression Data  

PubMed Central

Great efforts have been devoted to alleviate uncertainty of detected cancer genes as accurate identification of oncogenes is of tremendous significance and helps unravel the biological behavior of tumors. In this paper, we present a differential network-based framework to detect biologically meaningful cancer-related genes. Firstly, a gene regulatory network construction algorithm is proposed, in which a boosting regression based on likelihood score and informative prior is employed for improving accuracy of identification. Secondly, with the algorithm, two gene regulatory networks are constructed from case and control samples independently. Thirdly, by subtracting the two networks, a differential-network model is obtained and then used to rank differentially expressed hub genes for identification of cancer biomarkers. Compared with two existing gene-based methods (t-test and lasso), the method has a significant improvement in accuracy both on synthetic datasets and two real breast cancer datasets. Furthermore, identified six genes (TSPYL5, CD55, CCNE2, DCK, BBC3, and MUC1) susceptible to breast cancer were verified through the literature mining, GO analysis, and pathway functional enrichment analysis. Among these oncogenes, TSPYL5 and CCNE2 have been already known as prognostic biomarkers in breast cancer, CD55 has been suspected of playing an important role in breast cancer prognosis from literature evidence, and other three genes are newly discovered breast cancer biomarkers. More generally, the differential-network schema can be extended to other complex diseases for detection of disease associated-genes. PMID:24073403

Yang, Bo; Zhang, Junying; Yin, Yaling; Zhang, Yuanyuan

2013-01-01

57

Identifying Significant Genes from Microarray Data  

Microsoft Academic Search

Microarray technology is a recent development in experimental molecular biology which can produce quantitative expression measurements for thousands of genes in a single, cellular mRNA sample. These many gene expression measurements form a composite profile of the sample, which can be used to differentiate samples from different classes such as tissue types or treatments. However, for the gene expression profile

Han-yu Chuang; Hongfang Liu; Stuart Brown; Cameron Mcmunn-coffran; Cheng-yan Kao; D. Frank Hsu

2004-01-01

58

Genes and Disease: Prader-Willi Syndrome  

MedlinePLUS

... MD): National Center for Biotechnology Information (US); 1998-. Genes and Disease [Internet]. Show details National Center for ... Willi syndrome. PDF version of this page (250K) Gene sequence Genome view see gene locations Entrez Gene ...

59

Susceptible mice: identifying a diabetic nephropathy disease locus using a murine model  

Microsoft Academic Search

Diabetic nephropathy is a common, complex disease with a clear genetic predisposition. Human gene association studies are beginning to bear fruit by identifying gene loci that increase diabetic nephropathy risk. Chua et al. report a similar study in diabetic mice that reveals a major nephropathy locus on chromosome 8. Could this be a human nephropathy gene? Time will tell, but

Frank C Brosius

2010-01-01

60

Identifying targets for COPD treatment through gene expression analyses  

PubMed Central

Despite the status of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) as a major global health problem, no currently available therapies can limit COPD progression. Therefore, an urgent need exists for the development of new and effective treatments for COPD. An improved understanding in the molecular pathogenesis of COPD can potentially identify molecular targets to facilitate the development of new therapeutic modalities. Among the best approaches for understanding the molecular basis of COPD include gene expression profiling techniques, such as serial analysis of gene expression or microarrays. Using these methods, recent studies have mapped comparative gene expression profiles of lung tissues from patients with different stages of COPD relative to healthy smokers or non-smokers. Such studies have revealed a number of differentially-regulated genes associated with COPD progression, which include genes involved in the regulation of inflammation, extracellular matrix, cytokines, chemokines, apoptosis, and stress responses. These studies have shed new light on the molecular mechanisms of COPD, and suggest novel targets for clinical treatments. PMID:18990963

Chen, Zhi-Hua; Kim, Hong Pyo; Ryter, Stefan W; Choi, Augustine MK

2008-01-01

61

Susceptibility genes in common complex kidney disease  

PubMed Central

Purpose of review This manuscript reviews recent efforts to identify genetic variants conferring risk for chronic kidney disease (CKD). A brief overview of methods for identifying gene variants is provided, along with genetic associations and new avenues under exploration. Recent findings The role of renal failure susceptibility genes including MYH9, ELMO1, UMOD and ACTN4 has become clearer over the last 18 months. The spectrum of MYH9-associated kidney disease including focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS), global glomerulosclerosis and collapsing glomerulopathy, related entities contributing to approximately 43% of end-stage renal disease in African Americans, has come to light. Summary MYH9 will re-categorize FSGS and related disorders, and has clarified the relationship between hypertension and kidney disease. MYH9 polymorphisms account for much of the excess risk of HIV-associated nephropathy and non-diabetic kidney disease in African Americans. Kidney disease associations with ELMO1 and UMOD have been replicated and applications of genome-wide association studies based on expression data are providing novel insights on renal protein expression. These breakthroughs will alter our approach to kidney disease surveillance and lead to new therapeutic options. PMID:19838113

Divers, Jasmin; Freedman, Barry I.

2010-01-01

62

Identification of disease-causing genes using microarray data mining and Gene Ontology  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: One of the best and most accurate methods for identifying disease-causing genes is monitoring gene expression values in different samples using microarray technology. One of the shortcomings of microarray data is that they provide a small quantity of samples with respect to the number of genes. This problem reduces the classification accuracy of the methods, so gene selection is

Azadeh Mohammadi; Mohammad H Saraee; Mansoor Salehi

2011-01-01

63

RNA-Seq identifies novel myocardial gene expression signatures of heart failure.  

PubMed

Heart failure is a complex clinical syndrome and has become the most common reason for adult hospitalization in developed countries. Two subtypes of heart failure, ischemic heart disease (ISCH) and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM), have been studied using microarray platforms. However, microarray has limited resolution. Here we applied RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) to identify gene signatures for heart failure from six individuals, including three controls, one ISCH and two DCM patients. Using genes identified from this small RNA-Seq dataset, we were able to accurately classify heart failure status in a much larger set of 313 individuals. The identified genes significantly overlapped with genes identified via genome-wide association studies for cardiometabolic traits and the promoters of those genes were enriched for binding sites for transcriptions factors. Our results indicate that it is possible to use RNA-Seq to classify disease status for complex diseases such as heart failure using an extremely small training dataset. PMID:25528681

Liu, Yichuan; Morley, Michael; Brandimarto, Jeffrey; Hannenhalli, Sridhar; Hu, Yu; Ashley, Euan A; Tang, W H Wilson; Moravec, Christine S; Margulies, Kenneth B; Cappola, Thomas P; Li, Mingyao

2015-02-01

64

Patching genes to fight disease  

SciTech Connect

The National Institutes of Health has approved the first gene therapy experiments, one of which will try to cure cancer by bolstering the immune system. The applications of such therapy are limited, but the potential aid to people with genetic diseases is great.

Holzman, D.

1990-09-03

65

Disease-specific gene repositioning in breast cancer  

PubMed Central

Genomes are nonrandomly organized within the three-dimensional space of the cell nucleus. Here, we have identified several genes whose nuclear positions are altered in human invasive breast cancer compared with normal breast tissue. The changes in positioning are gene specific and are not a reflection of genomic instability within the cancer tissue. Repositioning events are specific to cancer and do not generally occur in noncancerous breast disease. Moreover, we show that the spatial positions of genes are highly consistent between individuals. Our data indicate that cancer cells have disease-specific gene distributions. These interphase gene positioning patterns may be used to identify cancer tissues. PMID:19995938

Meaburn, Karen J.; Gudla, Prabhakar R.; Khan, Sameena; Lockett, Stephen J.

2009-01-01

66

Differential Gene Repertoire in Mycobacterium ulcerans Identifies Candidate Genes for Patho-Adaptation  

PubMed Central

Background Based on large genomic sequence polymorphisms, several haplotypes belonging to two major lineages of the human pathogen Mycobacterium ulcerans could be distinguished among patient isolates from various geographic origins. However, the biological relevance of insertional/deletional diversity is not understood. Methodology Using comparative genomics, we have investigated the genes located in regions of difference recently identified by DNA microarray based hybridisation analysis. The analysed regions of difference comprise ?7% of the entire M. ulcerans genome. Principal Findings Several different mechanisms leading to loss of functional genes were identified, ranging from pseudogenization, caused by frame shift mutations or mobile genetic element interspersing, to large sequence polymorphisms. Four hot spot regions for genetic instability were unveiled. Altogether, 229 coding sequences were found to be differentially inactivated, constituting a repertoire of coding sequence variation in the rather monomorphic M. ulcerans. Conclusions/Significance The differential gene inactivation patterns associated with the M. ulcerans haplotypes identified candidate genes that may confer enhanced adaptation upon ablation of expression. A number of gene conversions confined to the classical lineage may contribute to particular virulence of this group comprising isolates from Africa and Australia. Identification of this spectrum of anti-virulence gene candidates expands our understanding of the pathogenicity and ecology of the emerging infectious disease Buruli ulcer. PMID:19104652

Käser, Michael; Pluschke, Gerd

2008-01-01

67

Cancer genomics identifies disrupted epigenetic genes.  

PubMed

Latest advances in genome technologies have greatly advanced the discovery of epigenetic genes altered in cancer. The initial single candidate gene approaches have been coupled with newly developed epigenomic platforms to hasten the convergence of scientific discoveries and translational applications. Here, we present an overview of the evolution of cancer epigenomics and an updated catalog of disruptions in epigenetic pathways, whose misregulation can culminate in cancer. The creation of these basic mutational catalogs in cell lines and primary tumors will provide us with enough knowledge to move diagnostics and therapy from the laboratory bench to the bedside. PMID:24104525

Simó-Riudalbas, Laia; Esteller, Manel

2014-06-01

68

Gene Therapy for Diseases and Genetic Disorders  

MedlinePLUS

Gene Therapy for Diseases Gene Therapy has made important medical advances in less than two decades. Within ... Among the most notable advancements are the following: Gene Therapy for Genetic Disorders Severe Combined Immune Deficiency ( ...

69

Gene Expression Signatures of Coronary Heart Disease  

PubMed Central

Objective To identify transcriptomic biomarkers of coronary heart disease (CHD) in 188 CHD cases and 188 age- and sex-matched controls who were participants in the Framingham Heart Study. Approach and results A total of 35 genes were differentially expressed in CHD cases vs. controls at FDR<0.5 including GZMB, TMEM56 and GUK1. Cluster analysis revealed three gene clusters associated with CHD, two linked to increased erythrocyte production and a third to reduced natural killer (NK) and T cell activity in CHD cases. Exon-level results corroborated and extended the gene-level results. Alternative splicing analysis suggested that GUK1 and 38 other genes were differentially spliced in CHD cases vs. controls. Gene ontology analysis linked ubiquitination and T-cell-related pathways with CHD. Conclusion Two bioinformatically defined groups of genes show consistent associations with CHD. Our findings are consistent with the hypotheses that hematopoesis is up-regulated in CHD, possibly reflecting a compensatory mechanism, and that innate immune activity is disrupted in CHD or altered by its treatment. Transcriptomic signatures may be useful in identifying pathways associated with CHD and point toward novel therapeutic targets for its treatment and prevention. PMID:23539218

Joehanes, Roby; Ying, Saixia; Huan, Tianxiao; Johnson, Andrew D.; Raghavachari, Nalini; Wang, Richard; Liu, Poching; Woodhouse, Kimberly A.; Sen, Shurjo K.; Tanriverdi, Kahraman; Courchesne, Paul; Freedman, Jane E.; O'Donnell, Christopher J.; Levy, Daniel; Munson, Peter J.

2013-01-01

70

Microarray analysis identified Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici genes involved in infection and sporulation.  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst) causes stripe rust, one of the most important diseases of wheat worldwide. To identify Pst genes involved in infection and sporulation, a custom oligonucleotide Genechip was made using sequences of 442 genes selected from Pst cDNA libraries. Microarray analy...

71

A Gene Recommender Algorithm to Identify Coexpressed Genes in C. elegans  

E-print Network

A Gene Recommender Algorithm to Identify Coexpressed Genes in C. elegans Art B. Owen,1,4 Josh is for the discovery of new genes with similar function to a given list of genes (the query) already known to have closely related function. We have developed an algorithm, called the gene recommender, that ranks genes

Stuart, Josh

72

Detecting disease associated modules and prioritizing active genes based on high throughput data  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background: The accumulation of high-throughput data greatly promotes computational investigation of gene function in the context of complex biological systems. However, a biological function is not simply controlled by an individual gene since genes function in a cooperative manner to achieve biological processes. In the study of human diseases, rather than to discover disease related genes, identifying disease associated pathways

Yu-Qing Qiu; Shi-Hua Zhang; Xiang-Sun Zhang; Luonan Chen

2010-01-01

73

Potential New Genes for Resistance to Mycosphaerella Graminicola Identified in Triticum Aestivum x Lophopyrum Elongatum Disomic Substitution Lines  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Lophopyrum species carry many desirable agronomic traits, including disease resistance, which can be transferred to wheat by interspecific hybridizations. To identify potentially new genes for disease and insect resistance carried by individual Lophopyrum chromosomes, 19 of 21 possible wheat cultiv...

74

Activation tag screening to identify novel genes for trichothecene resistance  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The goal of our research is to identify plant genes which enhance trichothecene resistance and, ultimately, Fusarium Head Blight resistance in wheat and barley. We are taking a two pronged approach using Arabidopsis to identify plant genes which confer resistance to trichothecenes. The first approac...

75

Genetic risk factors for the development of allergic disease identified by genome-wide association.  

PubMed

An increasing proportion of the worldwide population is affected by allergic diseases such as allergic rhinitis (AR), atopic dermatitis (AD) and allergic asthma and improved treatment options are needed particularly for severe, refractory disease. Allergic diseases are complex and development involves both environmental and genetic factors. Although the existence of a genetic component for allergy was first described almost 100 years ago, progress in gene identification has been hindered by lack of high throughput technologies to investigate genetic variation in large numbers of subjects. The development of Genome-Wide Association Studies (GWAS), a hypothesis-free method of interrogating large numbers of common variants spanning the entire genome in disease and non-disease subjects has revolutionised our understanding of the genetics of allergic disease. Susceptibility genes for asthma, AR and AD have now been identified with confidence, suggesting there are common and distinct genetic loci associated with these diseases, providing novel insights into potential disease pathways and mechanisms. Genes involved in both adaptive and innate immune mechanisms have been identified, notably including multiple genes involved in epithelial function/secretion, suggesting that the airway epithelium may be particularly important in asthma. Interestingly, concordance/discordance between the genetic factors driving allergic traits such as IgE levels and disease states such as asthma have further supported the accumulating evidence for heterogeneity in these diseases. While GWAS have been useful and continue to identify novel genes for allergic diseases through increased sample sizes and phenotype refinement, future approaches will integrate analyses of rare variants, epigenetic mechanisms and eQTL approaches, leading to greater insight into the genetic basis of these diseases. Gene identification will improve our understanding of disease mechanisms and generate potential therapeutic opportunities. PMID:24766371

Portelli, M A; Hodge, E; Sayers, I

2015-01-01

76

Genetic risk factors for the development of allergic disease identified by genome-wide association  

PubMed Central

An increasing proportion of the worldwide population is affected by allergic diseases such as allergic rhinitis (AR), atopic dermatitis (AD) and allergic asthma and improved treatment options are needed particularly for severe, refractory disease. Allergic diseases are complex and development involves both environmental and genetic factors. Although the existence of a genetic component for allergy was first described almost 100 years ago, progress in gene identification has been hindered by lack of high throughput technologies to investigate genetic variation in large numbers of subjects. The development of Genome-Wide Association Studies (GWAS), a hypothesis-free method of interrogating large numbers of common variants spanning the entire genome in disease and non-disease subjects has revolutionised our understanding of the genetics of allergic disease. Susceptibility genes for asthma, AR and AD have now been identified with confidence, suggesting there are common and distinct genetic loci associated with these diseases, providing novel insights into potential disease pathways and mechanisms. Genes involved in both adaptive and innate immune mechanisms have been identified, notably including multiple genes involved in epithelial function/secretion, suggesting that the airway epithelium may be particularly important in asthma. Interestingly, concordance/discordance between the genetic factors driving allergic traits such as IgE levels and disease states such as asthma have further supported the accumulating evidence for heterogeneity in these diseases. While GWAS have been useful and continue to identify novel genes for allergic diseases through increased sample sizes and phenotype refinement, future approaches will integrate analyses of rare variants, epigenetic mechanisms and eQTL approaches, leading to greater insight into the genetic basis of these diseases. Gene identification will improve our understanding of disease mechanisms and generate potential therapeutic opportunities. PMID:24766371

Portelli, M A; Hodge, E; Sayers, I

2015-01-01

77

Blood Pressure Loci Identified with a Gene-Centric Array  

PubMed Central

Raised blood pressure (BP) is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Previous studies have identified 47 distinct genetic variants robustly associated with BP, but collectively these explain only a few percent of the heritability for BP phenotypes. To find additional BP loci, we used a bespoke gene-centric array to genotype an independent discovery sample of 25,118 individuals that combined hypertensive case-control and general population samples. We followed up four SNPs associated with BP at our p < 8.56 × 10?7 study-specific significance threshold and six suggestively associated SNPs in a further 59,349 individuals. We identified and replicated a SNP at LSP1/TNNT3, a SNP at MTHFR-NPPB independent (r2 = 0.33) of previous reports, and replicated SNPs at AGT and ATP2B1 reported previously. An analysis of combined discovery and follow-up data identified SNPs significantly associated with BP at p < 8.56 × 10?7 at four further loci (NPR3, HFE, NOS3, and SOX6). The high number of discoveries made with modest genotyping effort can be attributed to using a large-scale yet targeted genotyping array and to the development of a weighting scheme that maximized power when meta-analyzing results from samples ascertained with extreme phenotypes, in combination with results from nonascertained or population samples. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and transcript expression data highlight potential gene regulatory mechanisms at the MTHFR and NOS3 loci. These results provide candidates for further study to help dissect mechanisms affecting BP and highlight the utility of studying SNPs and samples that are independent of those studied previously even when the sample size is smaller than that in previous studies. PMID:22100073

Johnson, Toby; Gaunt, Tom R.; Newhouse, Stephen J.; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Tomaszewski, Maciej; Kumari, Meena; Morris, Richard W.; Tzoulaki, Ioanna; O'Brien, Eoin T.; Poulter, Neil R.; Sever, Peter; Shields, Denis C.; Thom, Simon; Wannamethee, Sasiwarang G.; Whincup, Peter H.; Brown, Morris J.; Connell, John M.; Dobson, Richard J.; Howard, Philip J.; Mein, Charles A.; Onipinla, Abiodun; Shaw-Hawkins, Sue; Zhang, Yun; Smith, George Davey; Day, Ian N.M.; Lawlor, Debbie A.; Goodall, Alison H.; Fowkes, F. Gerald; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.; Elliott, Paul; Gateva, Vesela; Braund, Peter S.; Burton, Paul R.; Nelson, Christopher P.; Tobin, Martin D.; van der Harst, Pim; Glorioso, Nicola; Neuvrith, Hani; Salvi, Erika; Staessen, Jan A.; Stucchi, Andrea; Devos, Nabila; Jeunemaitre, Xavier; Plouin, Pierre-François; Tichet, Jean; Juhanson, Peeter; Org, Elin; Putku, Margus; Sõber, Siim; Veldre, Gudrun; Viigimaa, Margus; Levinsson, Anna; Rosengren, Annika; Thelle, Dag S.; Hastie, Claire E.; Hedner, Thomas; Lee, Wai K.; Melander, Olle; Wahlstrand, Björn; Hardy, Rebecca; Wong, Andrew; Cooper, Jackie A.; Palmen, Jutta; Chen, Li; Stewart, Alexandre F.R.; Wells, George A.; Westra, Harm-Jan; Wolfs, Marcel G.M.; Clarke, Robert; Franzosi, Maria Grazia; Goel, Anuj; Hamsten, Anders; Lathrop, Mark; Peden, John F.; Seedorf, Udo; Watkins, Hugh; Ouwehand, Willem H.; Sambrook, Jennifer; Stephens, Jonathan; Casas, Juan-Pablo; Drenos, Fotios; Holmes, Michael V.; Kivimaki, Mika; Shah, Sonia; Shah, Tina; Talmud, Philippa J.; Whittaker, John; Wallace, Chris; Delles, Christian; Laan, Maris; Kuh, Diana; Humphries, Steve E.; Nyberg, Fredrik; Cusi, Daniele; Roberts, Robert; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Franke, Lude; Stanton, Alice V.; Dominiczak, Anna F.; Farrall, Martin; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Samani, Nilesh J.; Caulfield, Mark J.; Munroe, Patricia B.

2011-01-01

78

Deletions of recessive disease genes: CNV contribution to carrier states and disease-causing alleles  

PubMed Central

Over 1200 recessive disease genes have been described in humans. The prevalence, allelic architecture, and per-genome load of pathogenic alleles in these genes remain to be fully elucidated, as does the contribution of DNA copy-number variants (CNVs) to carrier status and recessive disease. We mined CNV data from 21,470 individuals obtained by array-comparative genomic hybridization in a clinical diagnostic setting to identify deletions encompassing or disrupting recessive disease genes. We identified 3212 heterozygous potential carrier deletions affecting 419 unique recessive disease genes. Deletion frequency of these genes ranged from one occurrence to 1.5%. When compared with recessive disease genes never deleted in our cohort, the 419 recessive disease genes affected by at least one carrier deletion were longer and located farther from known dominant disease genes, suggesting that the formation and/or prevalence of carrier CNVs may be affected by both local and adjacent genomic features and by selection. Some subjects had multiple carrier CNVs (307 subjects) and/or carrier deletions encompassing more than one recessive disease gene (206 deletions). Heterozygous deletions spanning multiple recessive disease genes may confer carrier status for multiple single-gene disorders, for complex syndromes resulting from the combination of two or more recessive conditions, or may potentially cause clinical phenotypes due to a multiply heterozygous state. In addition to carrier mutations, we identified homozygous and hemizygous deletions potentially causative for recessive disease. We provide further evidence that CNVs contribute to the allelic architecture of both carrier and recessive disease-causing mutations. Thus, a complete recessive carrier screening method or diagnostic test should detect CNV alleles. PMID:23685542

Boone, Philip M.; Campbell, Ian M.; Baggett, Brett C.; Soens, Zachry T.; Rao, Mitchell M.; Hixson, Patricia M.; Patel, Ankita; Bi, Weimin; Cheung, Sau Wai; Lalani, Seema R.; Beaudet, Arthur L.; Stankiewicz, Pawel; Shaw, Chad A.; Lupski, James R.

2013-01-01

79

Gene expression profiling identifies clinically relevant subtypes of prostate cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

Prostate cancer, a leading cause of cancer death, displays a broad range of clinical behavior from relatively indolent to aggressive metastatic disease. To explore potential molecular variation underlying this clinical heterogeneity, we profiled gene expression in 62 primary prostate tumors, as well as 41 normal prostate specimens and nine lymph node metastases, using cDNA microarrays containing 26,000 genes. Unsupervised hierarchical

Jacques Lapointe; Chunde Li; John P. Higgins; Matt van de Rijn; Eric Bair; Kelli Montgomery; Michelle Ferrari; Lars Egevad; Walter Rayford; Ulf Bergerheim; Peter Ekman; Angelo M. Demarzo; Robert Tibshirani; David Botstein; Patrick O. Brown; James D. Brooks; Jonathan R. Pollack

2004-01-01

80

Novel methods to identify biologically relevant genes for leukemia and prostate cancer from gene expression profiles  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: High-throughput microarray experiments now permit researchers to screen thousands of genes simultaneously and determine the different expression levels of genes in normal or cancerous tissues. In this paper, we address the challenge of selecting a relevant and manageable subset of genes from a large microarray dataset. Currently, most gene selection methods focus on identifying a set of genes that

Austin H Chen; Yin-Wu Tsau; Ching-Heng Lin

2010-01-01

81

Degree-adjusted algorithm for prioritisation of candidate disease genes from gene expression and protein interactome.  

PubMed

Computational methods play an important role in the disease genes prioritisation by integrating many kinds of data sources such as gene expression, functional annotations and protein-protein interactions. However, the existing methods usually perform well in predicting highly linked genes, whereas they work quite poorly for loosely linked genes. Motivated by this observation, a degree-adjusted strategy is applied to improve the algorithm that was proposed earlier for the prediction of disease genes from gene expression and protein interactions. The authors also showed that the modified method is good at identifying loosely linked disease genes and the overall performance gets enhanced accordingly. This study suggests the importance of statistically adjusting the degree distribution bias in the background network for network-based modelling of complex diseases. PMID:25014224

Wang, Yichuan; Fang, Haiyang; Yang, Tinghong; Wu, Duzhi; Zhao, Jing

2014-04-01

82

Disease Risk Factors Identified through Shared Genetic Architecture and Electronic Medical Records  

PubMed Central

Genome-Wide Association Studies (GWAS) have identified genetic variants for thousands of diseases and traits. In this study, we evaluated the relationships between specific risk factors (for example, blood cholesterol level) and diseases on the basis of their shared genetic architecture in a comprehensive human disease-SNP association database (VARIMED), analyzing the findings from 8,962 published association studies. Similarity between traits and diseases was statistically evaluated based on their association with shared gene variants. We identified 120 disease-trait pairs that were statistically similar, and of these we tested and validated five previously unknown disease-trait associations by searching electronic medical records (EMR) from 3 independent medical centers for evidence of the trait appearing in patients within one year of first diagnosis of the disease. We validated that mean corpuscular volume is elevated before diagnosis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia; both have associated variants in the gene IKZF1. Platelet count is decreased before diagnosis of alcohol dependence; both are associated with variants in the gene C12orf51. Alkaline phosphatase level is elevated in patients with venous thromboembolism; both share variants in ABO. Similarly, we found prostate specific antigen and serum magnesium levels were altered before the diagnosis of lung cancer and gastric cancer, respectively. Disease-trait associations identifies traits that can potentially serve a prognostic function clinically; validating disease-trait associations through EMR can whether these candidates are risk factors for complex diseases. PMID:24786325

Li, Li; Ruau, David J.; Patel, Chirag J.; Weber, Susan C.; Chen, Rong; Tatonetti, Nicholas P.; Dudley, Joel T.; Butte, Atul J.

2015-01-01

83

In vivo negative selection screen identifies genes required for Francisella virulence  

PubMed Central

Francisella tularensis subverts the immune system to rapidly grow within mammalian hosts, often causing tularemia, a fatal disease. This pathogen targets the cytosol of macrophages where it replicates by using the genes encoded in the Francisella pathogenicity island. However, the bacteria are recognized in the cytosol by the host's ASC/caspase-1 pathway, which is essential for host defense, and leads to macrophage cell death and proinflammatory cytokine production. We used a microarray-based negative selection screen to identify Francisella genes that contribute to growth and/or survival in mice. The screen identified many known virulence factors including all of the Francisella pathogenicity island genes, LPS O-antigen synthetic genes, and capsule synthetic genes. We also identified 44 previously unidentified genes that were required for Francisella virulence in vivo, indicating that this pathogen may use uncharacterized mechanisms to cause disease. Among these, we discovered a class of Francisella virulence genes that are essential for growth and survival in vivo but do not play a role in intracellular replication within macrophages. Instead, these genes modulate the host ASC/caspase-1 pathway, a previously unidentified mechanism of Francisella pathogenesis. This finding indicates that the elucidation of the molecular mechanisms used by other uncharacterized genes identified in our screen will increase our understanding of the ways in which bacterial pathogens subvert the immune system. PMID:17389372

Weiss, David S.; Brotcke, Anna; Henry, Thomas; Margolis, Jeffrey J.; Chan, Kaman; Monack, Denise M.

2007-01-01

84

ORIGINAL PAPER Identifying differentially expressed genes in human acute leukemia  

E-print Network

ORIGINAL PAPER Identifying differentially expressed genes in human acute leukemia and mouse brain the experimental-wise false discovery rate. A human acute leukemia dataset corrected from 38 leukemia patients

Gu, Xun

85

Zebrafish promoter microarrays identify actively transcribed embryonic genes  

E-print Network

We have designed a zebrafish genomic microarray to identify DNA-protein interactions in the proximal promoter regions of over 11,000 zebrafish genes. Using these microarrays, together with chromatin immunoprecipitation ...

Wardle, Fiona C

86

Scientists Identify Four Candidate Obesity Genes in Mice  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Press release on a recent study where researchers developed a strain of mice more likely to be obese and then, using this strain, identified four genes in mouse chromosome 7 that may relate to obesity. This study, ÃÂFour Out of Eight Genes in a Mouse Chromosome 7 Congenic Donor Region are Candidate Obesity Genes,ÃÂ was conducted by Craig H. Warden, Kari A. Sarahan, and Janis S. Fisler of the University of California, Davis. The study is published in Physiologic Genomics.

APS Communications Office (American Physiological Society Communications Office)

2011-09-06

87

Identifying functional modules for coronary artery disease by a prior knowledge-based approach.  

PubMed

Until recently, the underlying genetic mechanisms for coronary artery disease (CAD) have been largely unknown, with just a list of genes identified accounting for very little of the disease in the population. Hence, a systematic dissection of the sophisticated interplays between these individual disease genes and their functional involvements becomes essential. Here, we presented a novel knowledge-based approach to identify the functional modules for CAD. First, we selected 266 disease genes in CADgene database as the initial seed genes, and used PPI knowledge as a guide to expand these genes into a CAD-specific gene network. Then, we used Newman's algorithm to decompose the primary network into 14 compact modules with high modularity. By analysis of these modules, we further identified 114 hub genes, all either directly or indirectly associated with CAD. Finally, by functional analysis of these modules, we revealed several novel pathogenic mechanisms for CAD (for examples, some yet rarely concerned like peptide YY receptor activity, Fc gamma R-mediated phagocytosis and actin cytoskeleton regulation etc.). PMID:24389497

Li, Haoli; Zuo, Xiaoyu; Ouyang, Ping; Lin, Meihua; Zhao, Zhong; Liang, Yan; Zhong, Shouqiang; Rao, Shaoqi

2014-03-10

88

Gene expression profiling identifies clinically relevant subtypes of prostate cancer  

E-print Network

Gene expression profiling identifies clinically relevant subtypes of prostate cancer Jacques­Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, and approved November 17, 2003 (received for review July 9, 2003) Prostate this clinical heterogeneity, we profiled gene expression in 62 primary prostate tumors, as well as 41 normal

Botstein, David

89

Mining susceptibility gene modules and disease risk genes from SNP data by combining network topological properties with support vector regression  

Microsoft Academic Search

Genome-wide association study is a powerful approach to identify disease risk loci. However, the molecular regulatory mechanisms for most complex diseases are still not well understood. Therefore, further investigating the interplay between genetic factors and biological networks is important for elucidating the molecular mechanisms of complex diseases. Here, we proposed a novel framework to identify susceptibility gene modules and disease

Lin Hua; Ping Zhou; Hong Liu; Lin Li; Zheng Yang; Zhi-cheng Liu

2011-01-01

90

Finding genetic overlaps among diseases based on ranked gene lists.  

PubMed

To understand disease relationships in terms of their genetic mechanisms, it is important to study the common genetic basis among different diseases. Although discoveries on pleiotropic genes related to multiple diseases abound, methods flexibly applicable to various types of datasets generated from different studies or experiments are needed to gain big pictures on the genetic relationships among a large number of diseases. We develop a set of genetic similarity measures to gauge the genetic overlap between diseases, as well as several estimators of the number of overlapping disease genes between diseases. These methods are based on ranked gene lists so that they could be flexibly applied to different types of data. We first investigate the performance of the genetic similarity measure for evaluating the similarity between human diseases in simulation studies. Then we apply the method to diseases in the OMIM database. We show that our proposed genetic measure achieves superior performance in explaining phenotype similarities between diseases compared to simpler methods. Furthermore, we identified common genes underlying the genetic overlap between disease pairs. With an example of five vision-related diseases, we demonstrate how our methods can provide insights into the relationships among diseases based on their shared genetic mechanisms. PMID:25684200

Chen, Quan; Zhou, Xianghong J; Sun, Fengzhu

2015-02-01

91

Gene Regulatory Networks Elucidating Huanglongbing Disease Mechanisms  

PubMed Central

Next-generation sequencing was exploited to gain deeper insight into the response to infection by Candidatus liberibacter asiaticus (CaLas), especially the immune disregulation and metabolic dysfunction caused by source-sink disruption. Previous fruit transcriptome data were compared with additional RNA-Seq data in three tissues: immature fruit, and young and mature leaves. Four categories of orchard trees were studied: symptomatic, asymptomatic, apparently healthy, and healthy. Principal component analysis found distinct expression patterns between immature and mature fruits and leaf samples for all four categories of trees. A predicted protein – protein interaction network identified HLB-regulated genes for sugar transporters playing key roles in the overall plant responses. Gene set and pathway enrichment analyses highlight the role of sucrose and starch metabolism in disease symptom development in all tissues. HLB-regulated genes (glucose-phosphate-transporter, invertase, starch-related genes) would likely determine the source-sink relationship disruption. In infected leaves, transcriptomic changes were observed for light reactions genes (downregulation), sucrose metabolism (upregulation), and starch biosynthesis (upregulation). In parallel, symptomatic fruits over-expressed genes involved in photosynthesis, sucrose and raffinose metabolism, and downregulated starch biosynthesis. We visualized gene networks between tissues inducing a source-sink shift. CaLas alters the hormone crosstalk, resulting in weak and ineffective tissue-specific plant immune responses necessary for bacterial clearance. Accordingly, expression of WRKYs (including WRKY70) was higher in fruits than in leaves. Systemic acquired responses were inadequately activated in young leaves, generally considered the sites where most new infections occur. PMID:24086326

Martinelli, Federico; Reagan, Russell L.; Uratsu, Sandra L.; Phu, My L.; Albrecht, Ute; Zhao, Weixiang; Davis, Cristina E.; Bowman, Kim D.; Dandekar, Abhaya M.

2013-01-01

92

Gene linked to Lou Gehrig's disease  

SciTech Connect

Scientists have just taken a big step toward understanding the cause of Lou Gehrig's disease, one of the most devastating nerve degenerative diseases. A large team of researchers, led by Robert Brown Jr. of Harvards's Massachusetts General Hospital and Robert Horvitz, a Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, report in the 4 March Nature that they've identified the gene that causes a hereditary form of the condition, which also goes by the name amyothophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). While most ALS cases - approximately 90% - are apparently sporadic' and not caused by an inherited gene defect, all the patients have such similar symptons that researchers are hopeful that what they learn about hereditary ALS will also apply to the sporadic form, possibly leading to new therapeutic strategies that will help both. It's a very important finding,' says neurobiologist Donald Harter of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. It's one of the first handles we've had on the genetic basis of ALS.' The gene encodes Cu/Zn-binding superoxide dismutase and maps to the long arm of human chromosome 21.

Marx, J.

1993-03-05

93

Identification of PAHX, a Refsum disease gene.  

PubMed

Refsum disease is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by retinitis pigmentosa, peripheral polyneuropathy, cerebellar ataxia and increased cerebrospinal fluid protein. Biochemically, the disorder is defined by two related properties: pronounced accumulation of phytanic acid and selective loss of the peroxisomal dioxygenase required for alpha-hydroxylation of phytanoyl-CoA2. Decreased phytanic-acid oxidation is also observed in human cells lacking PEX7, the receptor for the type-2 peroxisomal targetting signal (PTS2; refs 3,4), suggesting that the enzyme defective in Refsum disease is targetted to peroxisomes by a PTS2. We initially identified the human PAHX and mouse Pahx genes as expressed sequence tags (ESTs) capable of encoding PTS2 proteins. Human PAHX is targetted to peroxisomes, requires the PTS2 receptor for peroxisomal localization, interacts with the PTS2 receptor in the yeast two-hybrid assay and has intrinsic phytanoyl-CoA alpha-hydroxylase activity that requires the dioxygenase cofactor iron and cosubstrate 2-oxoglutarate. Radiation hybrid data place PAHX on chromosome 10 between the markers D10S249 and D10S466, a region previously implicated in Refsum disease by homozygosity mapping. We find that both Refsum disease patients examined are homozygous for inactivating mutations in PAHX, demonstrating that mutations in PAHX can cause Refsum disease. PMID:9326939

Mihalik, S J; Morrell, J C; Kim, D; Sacksteder, K A; Watkins, P A; Gould, S J

1997-10-01

94

Candidate Gene for the Chromosome 1 Familial Alzheimer's Disease Locus  

Microsoft Academic Search

A candidate gene for the chromosome 1 Alzheimer's disease (AD) locus was identified (STM2). The predicted amino acid sequence for STM2 is homologous to that of the recently cloned chromosome 14 AD gene (S182). A point mutation in STM2, resulting in the substitution of an isoleucine for an asparagine (N141l), was identified in affected people from Volga German AD kindreds.

Ephrat Levy-Lahad; Wilma Wasco; Parvoneh Poorkaj; Donna M. Romano; Junko Oshima; Warren H. Pettingell; Chang-En Yu; Paul D. Jondro; Stephen D. Schmidt; Kai Wang; Annette C. Crowley; Ying-Hui Fu; Suzanne Y. Guenette; David Galas; Ellen Nemens; Ellen M. Wijsman; Thomas D. Bird; Gerard D. Schellenberg; Rudolph E. Tanzi

1995-01-01

95

Mapping and identifying genes for asthma and psoriasis  

PubMed Central

Susceptibility genes for complex diseases are characterized by reduced penetrance, caused by the influence of other genes, the environment or stochastic events. Recently, positional cloning efforts have yielded several candidate susceptibility genes in different complex disorders such as Crohn's disease and asthma. Within a genetic locus, however, the identification of the effector gene may pose further challenges and require functional studies. I review two examples of such challenges: the cloning of GPR154 (GPRA) and AAA1 on chromosome 7p14 at a susceptibility locus for atopy and asthma, and the study of HLA-Cw6, CCHCR1 (HCR) and CDSN on chromosome 6p21 at PSORS1, the major susceptibility locus for psoriasis. The susceptibility locus for atopy and asthma contains two genes and only one of them is protein coding. We studied its isoform-specific expression in bronchial biopsies and in a mouse model of ovalbumin-induced inflammation of bronchial epithelia. In the PSORS1 locus, strong linkage disequilibrium between genes has made it difficult to distinguish the effects of the three nearby genes. We engineered transgenic mice with either a HCR non-risk allele or the HCR*WWCC risk allele controlled by the cytokeratin-14 promoter. The results suggested that the overexpression of HCR in mouse skin was insufficient to induce a psoriasiform phenotype, but it appeared to induce allele-specific gene expression changes that were similar to those observed in psoriatic skin. PMID:16096103

Kere, Juha

2005-01-01

96

Identifying Glioblastoma Gene Networks Based on Hypergeometric Test Analysis  

PubMed Central

Patient specific therapy is emerging as an important possibility for many cancer patients. However, to identify such therapies it is essential to determine the genomic and transcriptional alterations present in one tumor relative to control samples. This presents a challenge since use of a single sample precludes many standard statistical analysis techniques. We reasoned that one means of addressing this issue is by comparing transcriptional changes in one tumor with those observed in a large cohort of patients analyzed by The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). To test this directly, we devised a bioinformatics pipeline to identify differentially expressed genes in tumors resected from patients suffering from the most common malignant adult brain tumor, glioblastoma (GBM). We performed RNA sequencing on tumors from individual GBM patients and filtered the results through the TCGA database in order to identify possible gene networks that are overrepresented in GBM samples relative to controls. Importantly, we demonstrate that hypergeometric-based analysis of gene pairs identifies gene networks that validate experimentally. These studies identify a putative workflow for uncovering differentially expressed patient specific genes and gene networks for GBM and other cancers. PMID:25551752

Stathias, Vasileios; Pastori, Chiara; Griffin, Tess Z.; Komotar, Ricardo; Clarke, Jennifer; Zhang, Ming; Ayad, Nagi G.

2014-01-01

97

ENU Mutagenesis in Mice Identifies Candidate Genes For Hypogonadism  

PubMed Central

Genome-wide mutagenesis was performed in mice to identify candidate genes for male infertility, for which the predominant causes remain idiopathic. Mice were mutagenized using N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU), bred, and screened for phenotypes associated with the male urogenital system. Fifteen heritable lines were isolated and chromosomal loci were assigned using low density genome-wide SNP arrays. Ten of the fifteen lines were pursued further using higher resolution SNP analysis to narrow the candidate gene regions. Exon sequencing of candidate genes identified mutations in mice with cystic kidneys (Bicc1), cryptorchidism (Rxfp2), restricted germ cell deficiency (Plk4), and severe germ cell deficiency (Prdm9). In two other lines with severe hypogonadism candidate sequencing failed to identify mutations, suggesting defects in genes with previously undocumented roles in gonadal function. These genomic intervals were sequenced in their entirety and a candidate mutation was identified in SnrpE in one of the two lines. The line harboring the SnrpE variant retains substantial spermatogenesis despite small testis size, an unusual phenotype. In addition to the reproductive defects, heritable phenotypes were observed in mice with ataxia (Myo5a), tremors (Pmp22), growth retardation (unknown gene), and hydrocephalus (unknown gene). These results demonstrate that the ENU screen is an effective tool for identifying potential causes of male infertility. PMID:22258617

Weiss, Jeffrey; Hurley, Lisa A.; Harris, Rebecca M.; Finlayson, Courtney; Tong, Minghan; Fisher, Lisa A.; Moran, Jennifer L.; Beier, David R.; Mason, Christopher; Jameson, J. Larry

2012-01-01

98

Inferring Gene Family Histories in Yeast Identifies Lineage Specific Expansions  

PubMed Central

The complement of genes found in the genome is a balance between gene gain and gene loss. Knowledge of the specific genes that are gained and lost over evolutionary time allows an understanding of the evolution of biological functions. Here we use new evolutionary models to infer gene family histories across complete yeast genomes; these models allow us to estimate the relative genome-wide rates of gene birth, death, innovation and extinction (loss of an entire family) for the first time. We show that the rates of gene family evolution vary both between gene families and between species. We are also able to identify those families that have experienced rapid lineage specific expansion/contraction and show that these families are enriched for specific functions. Moreover, we find that families with specific functions are repeatedly expanded in multiple species, suggesting the presence of common adaptations and that these family expansions/contractions are not random. Additionally, we identify potential specialisations, unique to specific species, in the functions of lineage specific expanded families. These results suggest that an important mechanism in the evolution of genome content is the presence of lineage-specific gene family changes. PMID:24921666

Ames, Ryan M.; Money, Daniel; Lovell, Simon C.

2014-01-01

99

Gene Duplication Identified in an Uncommon Form of Bone Cancer  

Cancer.gov

Scientists have discovered that a familial form of a rare bone cancer called chordoma is explained not by typical types of changes or mutations in the sequence of DNA in a gene, but rather by the presence of a second copy of an entire gene. Inherited large structural changes, known as copy number variations (CNVs), have been implicated in some hereditary diseases but have seldom been reported as the underlying basis for a familial cancer.

100

Conceptual importance of identifying alcoholic liver disease as a lifestyle disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

The concept that alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is as a toxic disease does not mirror the exact nature of the disease. ALD\\u000a should be defined as an alcohol-associated lifestyle disease, the predisposition to which is largely governed by gene–environment\\u000a interactions, much like other chronic diseases such as diabetes, atherosclerosis, and neurodegenerative diseases. The epidemiology\\u000a and pathogenesis of ALD need to

Hidekazu Tsukamoto

2007-01-01

101

Microarray Analysis of Pneumococcal Gene Expression during Invasive Disease  

PubMed Central

Streptococcus pneumoniae is a leading cause of invasive bacterial disease. This is the first study to examine the expression of S. pneumoniae genes in vivo by using whole-genome microarrays available from The Institute for Genomic Research. Total RNA was collected from pneumococci isolated from infected blood, infected cerebrospinal fluid, and bacteria attached to a pharyngeal epithelial cell line in vitro. Microarray analysis of pneumococcal genes expressed in these models identified body site-specific patterns of expression for virulence factors, transporters, transcription factors, translation-associated proteins, metabolism, and genes with unknown function. Contributions to virulence predicted for several unknown genes with enhanced expression in vivo were confirmed by insertion duplication mutagenesis and challenge of mice with the mutants. Finally, we cross-referenced our results with previous studies that used signature-tagged mutagenesis and differential fluorescence induction to identify genes that are potentially required by a broad range of pneumococcal strains for invasive disease. PMID:15385455

Orihuela, Carlos J.; Radin, Jana N.; Sublett, Jack E.; Gao, Geli; Kaushal, Deepak; Tuomanen, Elaine I.

2004-01-01

102

Axon Regeneration Genes Identified by RNAi Screening in C. elegans  

PubMed Central

Axons of the mammalian CNS lose the ability to regenerate soon after development due to both an inhibitory CNS environment and the loss of cell-intrinsic factors necessary for regeneration. The complex molecular events required for robust regeneration of mature neurons are not fully understood, particularly in vivo. To identify genes affecting axon regeneration in Caenorhabditis elegans, we performed both an RNAi-based screen for defective motor axon regeneration in unc-70/?-spectrin mutants and a candidate gene screen. From these screens, we identified at least 50 conserved genes with growth-promoting or growth-inhibiting functions. Through our analysis of mutants, we shed new light on certain aspects of regeneration, including the role of ?-spectrin and membrane dynamics, the antagonistic activity of MAP kinase signaling pathways, and the role of stress in promoting axon regeneration. Many gene candidates had not previously been associated with axon regeneration and implicate new pathways of interest for therapeutic intervention. PMID:24403161

Nix, Paola; Hammarlund, Marc; Hauth, Linda; Lachnit, Martina; Jorgensen, Erik M.

2014-01-01

103

Exomic Sequencing Identifies PALB2 as a Pancreatic Cancer Susceptibility Gene  

Microsoft Academic Search

Through complete sequencing of the protein-coding genes in a patient with familial pancreatic cancer, we identified a germline, truncating mutation in PALB2 that appeared responsible for this patient's predisposition to the disease. Analysis of 96 additional patients with familial pancreatic cancer revealed three distinct protein-truncating mutations, thereby validating the role of PALB2 as a susceptibility gene for pancreatic cancer. PALB2

Siân Jones; Ralph H. Hruban; Mihoko Kamiyama; Michael Borges; Xiaosong Zhang; D. Williams Parsons; Jimmy Cheng-Ho Lin; Emily Palmisano; Kieran Brune; Elizabeth M. Jaffee; Christine A. Iacobuzio-Donahue; Anirban Maitra; Giovanni Parmigiani; Scott E. Kern; Victor E. Velculescu; Kenneth W. Kinzler; Bert Vogelstein; James R. Eshleman; Michael Goggins; Alison P. Klein

2009-01-01

104

Cellular senescence bypass screen identifies new putative tumor suppressor genes.  

PubMed

Senescence is a mechanism that limits cellular lifespan and constitutes a barrier against cellular immortalization. To identify new senescence regulatory genes that might play a role in tumorigenesis, we have designed and performed a large-scale antisense-based genetic screen in primary mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs). Out of this screen, we have identified five different genes through which loss of function partially bypasses senescence. These genes belong to very different biochemical families: csn2 (component of the Cop9 signalosome), aldose reductase (a metabolic enzyme) and brf1 (subunit of the RNA polymerase II complex), S-adenosyl homocysteine hydrolase and Bub1. Inactivation, at least partial, of these genes confers resistance to both p53- and p16INK4a-induced proliferation arrest. Furthermore, such inactivation inhibits p53 but not E2F1 transcriptional activity and impairs DNA-damage-induced transcription of p21. Since the aim of the screen was to identify new regulators of tumorigenesis, we have tested their inactivation in human tumors. We have found, either by northern blot or quantitative reverse transcriptase-PCR analysis, that the expression of three genes, Csn2, Aldose reductase and Brf1, is lost at different ratios in tumors of different origins. These genes are located at common positions of loss of heterogeneity (15q21.2, 7q35 and 14q32.33); therefore,we have measured genomic losses of these specific genes in different tumors. We have found that Csn2 and Brf1 also show genomic losses of one allele in different tumors. Our data suggest that the three genes identified in the genome-wide loss-of-function genetic screen are putative tumor suppressors located at 15q21.2; 7q35 and 14q32.33. PMID:17968325

Leal, J F M; Fominaya, J; Cascón, A; Guijarro, M V; Blanco-Aparicio, C; Lleonart, M; Castro, M E; Ramon Y Cajal, S; Robledo, M; Beach, D H; Carnero, A

2008-03-27

105

Functional Epigenomics Identifies Genes Frequently Silenced in Prostate Cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

In many cases, silencing of gene expression by CpG methylation is causally involved in carcinogenesis. Further- more, cancer-specific CpG methylation may serve as a tumor marker. In order to identify candidate genes for inactivation by CpG methylation in prostate cancer, the prostate cancer cell lines LNCaP, PC3, and Du-145 were treated with 5-aza-2V deoxycytidine and trichostatin A, which leads to

Dimitri Lodygin; Alexey Epanchintsev; Antje Menssen; Joachim Diebold; Heiko Hermeking

106

VCP gene analyses in Japanese patients with sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis identify a new mutation.  

PubMed

Accumulating evidence has proven that mutations in the VCP gene encoding valosin-containing protein (VCP) cause inclusion body myopathy with Paget disease of the bone and frontotemporal dementia. This gene was later found to be causative for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), a fatal neurodegenerative disease, occurring typically in elderly persons. We thus sequenced the VCP gene in 75 Japanese patients with sporadic ALS negative for mutations in other genes causative for ALS and found a novel mutation, p.Arg487His, in 1 patient. The newly identified mutant as well as known mutants rendered neuronal cells susceptible to oxidative stress. The presence of the mutation in the Japanese population extends the geographic region for involvement of the VCP gene in sporadic ALS to East Asia. PMID:25457024

Hirano, Makito; Nakamura, Yusaku; Saigoh, Kazumasa; Sakamoto, Hikaru; Ueno, Shuichi; Isono, Chiharu; Mitsui, Yoshiyuki; Kusunoki, Susumu

2014-10-16

107

Integrative Approach to Pain Genetics Identifies Pain Sensitivity Loci across Diseases  

PubMed Central

Identifying human genes relevant for the processing of pain requires difficult-to-conduct and expensive large-scale clinical trials. Here, we examine a novel integrative paradigm for data-driven discovery of pain gene candidates, taking advantage of the vast amount of existing disease-related clinical literature and gene expression microarray data stored in large international repositories. First, thousands of diseases were ranked according to a disease-specific pain index (DSPI), derived from Medical Subject Heading (MESH) annotations in MEDLINE. Second, gene expression profiles of 121 of these human diseases were obtained from public sources. Third, genes with expression variation significantly correlated with DSPI across diseases were selected as candidate pain genes. Finally, selected candidate pain genes were genotyped in an independent human cohort and prospectively evaluated for significant association between variants and measures of pain sensitivity. The strongest signal was with rs4512126 (5q32, ABLIM3, P?=?1.3×10?10) for the sensitivity to cold pressor pain in males, but not in females. Significant associations were also observed with rs12548828, rs7826700 and rs1075791 on 8q22.2 within NCALD (P?=?1.7×10?4, 1.8×10?4, and 2.2×10?4 respectively). Our results demonstrate the utility of a novel paradigm that integrates publicly available disease-specific gene expression data with clinical data curated from MEDLINE to facilitate the discovery of pain-relevant genes. This data-derived list of pain gene candidates enables additional focused and efficient biological studies validating additional candidates. PMID:22685391

Ruau, David; Dudley, Joel T.; Chen, Rong; Phillips, Nicholas G.; Swan, Gary E.; Lazzeroni, Laura C.; Clark, J. David

2012-01-01

108

A cross-study gene set enrichment analysis identifies critical pathways in endometriosis  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Endometriosis is an enigmatic disease. Gene expression profiling of endometriosis has been used in several studies, but few studies went further to classify subtypes of endometriosis based on expression patterns and to identify possible pathways involved in endometriosis. Some of the observed pathways are more inconsistent between the studies, and these candidate pathways presumably only represent a fraction of

Hongbo Zhao; Qishan Wang; Chunyan Bai; Kan He; Yuchun Pan

2009-01-01

109

Renal Gene Expression Database (RGED): a relational database of gene expression profiles in kidney disease  

PubMed Central

We present a bioinformatics database named Renal Gene Expression Database (RGED), which contains comprehensive gene expression data sets from renal disease research. The web-based interface of RGED allows users to query the gene expression profiles in various kidney-related samples, including renal cell lines, human kidney tissues and murine model kidneys. Researchers can explore certain gene profiles, the relationships between genes of interests and identify biomarkers or even drug targets in kidney diseases. The aim of this work is to provide a user-friendly utility for the renal disease research community to query expression profiles of genes of their own interest without the requirement of advanced computational skills. Availability and implementation: Website is implemented in PHP, R, MySQL and Nginx and freely available from http://rged.wall-eva.net. Database URL: http://rged.wall-eva.net PMID:25252782

Zhang, Qingzhou; Yang, Bo; Chen, Xujiao; Xu, Jing; Mei, Changlin; Mao, Zhiguo

2014-01-01

110

Associations between human disease genes and overlapping gene groups and multiple amino acid runs  

PubMed Central

Overlapping gene groups (OGGs) arise when exons of one gene are contained within the introns of another. Typically, the two overlapping genes are encoded on opposite DNA strands. OGGs are often associated with specific disease phenotypes. In this report, we identify genes with OGG architecture and genes encoding multiple long amino acid runs and examine their relations to diseases. OGGs appear to be susceptible to genomic rearrangements as happens commonly with the loci of the DiGeorge syndrome on human chromosome 22. We also examine the degree of conservation of OGGs between human and mouse. Our analyses suggest that (i) a high proportion of genes in OGG regions are disease-associated, (ii) genomic rearrangements are likely to occur within OGGs, possibly as a consequence of anomalous sequence features prevalent in these regions, and (iii) multiple amino acid runs are also frequently associated with pathologies. PMID:12473749

Karlin, Samuel; Chen, Chingfer; Gentles, Andrew J.; Cleary, Michael

2002-01-01

111

Next-Generation Sequencing Identifies Transportin 3 as the Causative Gene for LGMD1F  

PubMed Central

Limb-girdle muscular dystrophies (LGMD) are genetically and clinically heterogeneous conditions. We investigated a large family with autosomal dominant transmission pattern, previously classified as LGMD1F and mapped to chromosome 7q32. Affected members are characterized by muscle weakness affecting earlier the pelvic girdle and the ileopsoas muscles. We sequenced the whole exome of four family members and identified a shared heterozygous frame-shift variant in the Transportin 3 (TNPO3) gene, encoding a member of the importin-? super-family. The TNPO3 gene is mapped within the LGMD1F critical interval and its 923-amino acid human gene product is also expressed in skeletal muscle. In addition, we identified an isolated case of LGMD with a new missense mutation in the same gene. We localized the mutant TNPO3 around the nucleus, but not inside. The involvement of gene related to the nuclear transport suggests a novel disease mechanism leading to muscular dystrophy. PMID:23667635

Mutarelli, Margherita; Peterle, Enrico; Del Vecchio Blanco, Francesca; Rispoli, Rossella; Savarese, Marco; Garofalo, Arcomaria; Piluso, Giulio; Morandi, Lucia; Ricci, Giulia; Siciliano, Gabriele; Angelini, Corrado; Nigro, Vincenzo

2013-01-01

112

Genome-wide association study identifies variants at CLU and PICALM associated with Alzheimer's disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

the gene encoding apolipoprotein e (APOE) on chromosome 19 is the only confirmed susceptibility locus for late-onset Alzheimer's disease. to identify other risk loci, we conducted a large genome-wide association study of 2,032 individuals from France with Alzheimer's disease (cases) and 5,328 controls. Markers outside APO e with suggestive evidence of association (P < 10 ?5 ) were examined in

Denise Harold; Richard Abraham; Paul Hollingworth; Rebecca Sims; Amy Gerrish; Marian L Hamshere; Jaspreet Singh Pahwa; Valentina Moskvina; Kimberley Dowzell; Amy Williams; Nicola Jones; Charlene Thomas; Alexandra Stretton; Angharad R Morgan; Simon Lovestone; John Powell; Petroula Proitsi; Michelle K Lupton; Carol Brayne; David C Rubinsztein; Michael Gill; Brian Lawlor; Aoibhinn Lynch; Kevin Morgan; Kristelle S Brown; Peter A Passmore; David Craig; Bernadette McGuinness; Stephen Todd; Clive Holmes; David Mann; A David Smith; Seth Love; Patrick G Kehoe; John Hardy; Simon Mead; Nick Fox; Martin Rossor; John Collinge; Wolfgang Maier; Frank Jessen; Britta Schürmann; Hendrik van den Bussche; Isabella Heuser; Johannes Kornhuber; Jens Wiltfang; Martin Dichgans; Lutz Frölich; Harald Hampel; Michael Hüll; Dan Rujescu; Alison M Goate; John S K Kauwe; Carlos Cruchaga; Petra Nowotny; John C Morris; Kevin Mayo; Kristel Sleegers; Karolien Bettens; Sebastiaan Engelborghs; Peter P De Deyn; Christine Van Broeckhoven; Gill Livingston; Nicholas J Bass; Hugh Gurling; Andrew McQuillin; Rhian Gwilliam; Panagiotis Deloukas; Ammar Al-Chalabi; Christopher E Shaw; Magda Tsolaki; Andrew B Singleton; Rita Guerreiro; Thomas W Mühleisen; Markus M Nöthen; Susanne Moebus; Karl-Heinz Jöckel; Norman Klopp; H-Erich Wichmann; Minerva M Carrasquillo; V Shane Pankratz; Steven G Younkin; Peter A Holmans; Michael O'Donovan; Michael J Owen; Julie Williams

2009-01-01

113

International team identifies critical genes mutated in stomach cancer  

Cancer.gov

An international team of scientists, led by researchers from the Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School in Singapore and National Cancer Centre of Singapore, has identified hundreds of novel genes that are mutated in stomach cancer, the second-most lethal cancer worldwide.

114

Identifying Aphid Resistance Genes in a Maize NAM Population  

E-print Network

Identifying Aphid Resistance Genes in a Maize NAM Population Georg Jander Boyce Thompson Institute of Nymphs Experiment 1 CML322 B73 R2 = 0.7 Aphid reproduction varies 100-fold on maize inbred lines Lisa Meihls and Harleen Kaur Rhopalosiphum maidis #12;Aphid resistance is recessive in B73 x CML322 0 10 20 30

Pawlowski, Wojtek

115

Gene identified that sensitizes cancer cells to chemotherapy drugs  

Cancer.gov

NCI scientists have found that a gene, Schlafen-11 (SLFN11), sensitizes cells to substances known to cause irreparable damage to DNA.  As part of their study, the researchers used a repository of 60 cell types to identify predictors of cancer cell response to classes of DNA damaging agents, widely used as chemotherapy treatments for many cancers.

116

Candidate Olfaction Genes Identified within the Helicoverpa armigera Antennal Transcriptome  

PubMed Central

Antennal olfaction is extremely important for insect survival, mediating key behaviors such as host preference, mate choice, and oviposition site selection. Multiple antennal proteins are involved in olfactory signal transduction pathways. Of these, odorant receptors (ORs) and ionotropic receptors (IRs) confer specificity on olfactory sensory neuron responses. In this study, we identified the olfactory gene repertoire of the economically important agricultural pest moth, Helicoverpa armigera, by assembling the adult male and female antennal transcriptomes. Within the male and female antennal transcriptomes we identified a total of 47 OR candidate genes containing 6 pheromone receptor candidates. Additionally, 12 IR genes as well as 26 odorant-binding proteins and 12 chemosensory proteins were annotated. Our results allow a systematic functional analysis across much of conventional ORs repertoire and newly reported IRs mediating the key olfaction-mediated behaviors of H. armigera. PMID:23110222

Liu, Yang; Gu, Shaohua; Zhang, Yongjun; Guo, Yuyuan; Wang, Guirong

2012-01-01

117

Does simultaneous consideration of multiple regions improve disease gene localization?  

PubMed

Improvement in localization of disease susceptibility genes by simultaneous consideration of multiple interacting loci was assessed using the Genetic Analysis Workshop 12 simulated data. Evidence of linkage at primary loci was used to weight families for analyses at secondary loci. To identify regions linked to disease susceptibility genes, parametric and allele-sharing genome scans were performed in the extended pedigrees and nuclear families, respectively. The position of the peak allele-sharing lod was used as the estimate of a disease gene location. In weighted analyses, the positions where the greatest lod increases occurred were taken as alternative estimates of the gene locations. Variability of the location estimates of disease genes given by the unweighted and weighted analyses was compared. Similar analyses were carried out using true disease loci to determine weights. Weighted analyses did not in general improve the localization of disease genes in this data set, even with a large sample of 1,928 nuclear families, due to the features of the underlying additive liability threshold model. PMID:11793727

Biernacka, J; Lewinger, J P; Chan, V; Bull, S B

2001-01-01

118

Gene expression in Peyronie's disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Currently, surgical intervention is the only efficacious treatment for Peyronie's disease (PD), a fibromatosis of the tunica albuginea of the penis. Therapies based on the molecular pathways for this disease could provide alternatives to surgical treatment but only recently has the pathophysiology of the Peyronie's disease plaque been investigated at the molecular level. In this review, we examine the current

N F Gonzalez-Cadavid; T R Magee; M Ferrini; A Qian; D Vernet; J Rajfer

2002-01-01

119

Comparative genomics on Norrie disease gene.  

PubMed

DAND1 (NBL1), DAND2 (CKTSF1B1 or GREM1 or GREMLIN), DAND3 (CKTSF1B2 or GREM2 or PRDC), DAND4 (CER1), DAND5 (CKTSF1B3 or GREM3 or DANTE), MUC2, MUC5AC, MUC5B, MUC6, MUC19, WISP1, WISP2, WISP3, VWF, NOV and Norrie disease (NDP or NORRIN) genes encode proteins with cysteine knot domain. Cysteine-knot superfamily proteins regulate ligand-receptor interactions for a variety of signaling pathways implicated in embryogenesis, homeostasis, and carcinogenesis. Although Ndp is unrelated to Wnt family members, Ndp is claimed to function as a ligand for Fzd4. Here, we identified and characterized rat Ndp, cow Ndp, chicken ndp and zebrafish ndp genes by using bioinformatics. Rat Ndp gene, consisting of three exons, was located within AC105563.4 genome sequence. Cow Ndp and chicken ndp complete CDS were derived from CB467544.1 EST and BX932859.2 cDNA, respectively. Zebrafish ndp gene was located within BX572627.5 genome sequence. Rat Ndp (131 aa) was a secreted protein with C-terminal cysteine knot-like (CTCK) domain. Rat Ndp showed 100, 96.9, 95.4, 87.8 and 66.4 total-amino-acid identity with mouse Ndp, cow Ndp, human NDP, chicken ndp and zebrafish ndp, respectively. Exon-intron structure of mammalian Ndp orthologs was well conserved. FOXA2, CUTL1 (CCAAT displacement protein), LMO2, CEBPA (C/EBPalpha)-binding sites and triple POU2F1 (OCT1)-binding sites were conserved among promoters of mammalian Ndp orthologs. PMID:15806314

Katoh, Masuko; Katoh, Masaru

2005-05-01

120

DAWN: a framework to identify autism genes and subnetworks using gene expression and genetics  

PubMed Central

Background De novo loss-of-function (dnLoF) mutations are found twofold more often in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) probands than their unaffected siblings. Multiple independent dnLoF mutations in the same gene implicate the gene in risk and hence provide a systematic, albeit arduous, path forward for ASD genetics. It is likely that using additional non-genetic data will enhance the ability to identify ASD genes. Methods To accelerate the search for ASD genes, we developed a novel algorithm, DAWN, to model two kinds of data: rare variations from exome sequencing and gene co-expression in the mid-fetal prefrontal and motor-somatosensory neocortex, a critical nexus for risk. The algorithm casts the ensemble data as a hidden Markov random field in which the graph structure is determined by gene co-expression and it combines these interrelationships with node-specific observations, namely gene identity, expression, genetic data and the estimated effect on risk. Results Using currently available genetic data and a specific developmental time period for gene co-expression, DAWN identified 127 genes that plausibly affect risk, and a set of likely ASD subnetworks. Validation experiments making use of published targeted resequencing results demonstrate its efficacy in reliably predicting ASD genes. DAWN also successfully predicts known ASD genes, not included in the genetic data used to create the model. Conclusions Validation studies demonstrate that DAWN is effective in predicting ASD genes and subnetworks by leveraging genetic and gene expression data. The findings reported here implicate neurite extension and neuronal arborization as risks for ASD. Using DAWN on emerging ASD sequence data and gene expression data from other brain regions and tissues would likely identify novel ASD genes. DAWN can also be used for other complex disorders to identify genes and subnetworks in those disorders. PMID:24602502

2014-01-01

121

Global methylation analysis identifies prognostically important epigenetically inactivated tumor suppressor genes in multiple myeloma  

PubMed Central

Outcome in multiple myeloma is highly variable and a better understanding of the factors that influence disease biology is essential to understand and predict behavior in individual patients. In the present study, we analyzed combined genomewide DNA methylation and gene expression data of patients treated in the Medical Research Council Myeloma IX trial. We used these data to identify epigenetically repressed tumor suppressor genes with prognostic relevance in myeloma. We identified 195 genes with changes in methylation status that were significantly associated with prognosis. Combining DNA methylation and gene expression data led to the identification of the epigenetically regulated tumor modulating genes GPX3, RBP1, SPARC, and TGFBI. Hypermethylation of these genes was associated with significantly shorter overall survival, independent of age, International Staging System score, and adverse cytogenetics. The 4 differentially methylated and expressed genes are known to mediate important tumor suppressive functions including response to chemotherapy (TGFBI), interaction with the microenvironment (SPARC), retinoic acid signaling (RBP1), and the response to oxidative stress (GPX3), which could explain the prognostic impact of their differential methylation. Assessment of the DNA methylation status of the identified genes could contribute to the molecular characterization of myeloma, which is prerequisite for an individualized treatment approach. PMID:23699600

Kaiser, Martin F.; Johnson, David C.; Wu, Ping; Walker, Brian A.; Brioli, Annamaria; Mirabella, Fabio; Wardell, Christopher P.; Melchor, Lorenzo; Davies, Faith E.

2013-01-01

122

Globicatella bacteraemia identified by 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequencing  

PubMed Central

Background Globicatella are streptococcus?like organisms that have been rarely isolated from clinical specimens. Their epidemiology and clinical significance remain largely unknown. Aims To describe two cases of Globicatella bacteraemia identified by 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene sequencing. Methods Two unidentified streptococcus?like bacteria isolated from blood cultures of patients were subject to 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Results Two cases of Globicatella bacteraemia were identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. In the first case, a gram positive coccus was isolated from the blood culture of an 80?year old woman with diabetes mellitus and nosocomial sepsis, who died the day after developing the bacteraemia. The bacterium was unidentified by conventional phenotypic tests, the Vitek (gram positive identification) and the ATB expression (ID32 Strep) systems. In the second case, a similar bacterium was isolated from the blood culture of a 92?year old woman with polymicrobial acute pyelonephritis complicated by septic shock, who subsequently recovered after antibiotic treatment. 16S rRNA gene sequencing of the two isolates showed 0.5% nucleotide difference from that of G. sulfidifaciens and 0.7% nucleotide difference from that of G. sanguinis, indicating that they were Globicatella species. Conclusions Because Globicatella is rarely encountered in clinical microbiology laboratories, it may have been overlooked or misidentified in these cases. 16S rRNA gene sequencing is a useful tool to better characterise the epidemiology and clinical significance of Globicatella. PMID:16505283

Lau, S K P; Woo, P C Y; Li, N K H; Teng, J L L; Leung, K?W; Ng, K H L; Que, T?L; Yuen, K?Y

2006-01-01

123

Identifying critical transitions and their leading biomolecular networks in complex diseases  

PubMed Central

Identifying a critical transition and its leading biomolecular network during the initiation and progression of a complex disease is a challenging task, but holds the key to early diagnosis and further elucidation of the essential mechanisms of disease deterioration at the network level. In this study, we developed a novel computational method for identifying early-warning signals of the critical transition and its leading network during a disease progression, based on high-throughput data using a small number of samples. The leading network makes the first move from the normal state toward the disease state during a transition, and thus is causally related with disease-driving genes or networks. Specifically, we first define a state-transition-based local network entropy (SNE), and prove that SNE can serve as a general early-warning indicator of any imminent transitions, regardless of specific differences among systems. The effectiveness of this method was validated by functional analysis and experimental data. PMID:23230504

Liu, Rui; Li, Meiyi; Liu, Zhi-Ping; Wu, Jiarui; Chen, Luonan; Aihara, Kazuyuki

2012-01-01

124

Identifying critical transitions and their leading biomolecular networks in complex diseases  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Identifying a critical transition and its leading biomolecular network during the initiation and progression of a complex disease is a challenging task, but holds the key to early diagnosis and further elucidation of the essential mechanisms of disease deterioration at the network level. In this study, we developed a novel computational method for identifying early-warning signals of the critical transition and its leading network during a disease progression, based on high-throughput data using a small number of samples. The leading network makes the first move from the normal state toward the disease state during a transition, and thus is causally related with disease-driving genes or networks. Specifically, we first define a state-transition-based local network entropy (SNE), and prove that SNE can serve as a general early-warning indicator of any imminent transitions, regardless of specific differences among systems. The effectiveness of this method was validated by functional analysis and experimental data.

Liu, Rui; Li, Meiyi; Liu, Zhi-Ping; Wu, Jiarui; Chen, Luonan; Aihara, Kazuyuki

2012-12-01

125

Gene Conversion in Human Genetic Disease  

PubMed Central

Gene conversion is a specific type of homologous recombination that involves the unidirectional transfer of genetic material from a ‘donor’ sequence to a highly homologous ‘acceptor’. We have recently reviewed the molecular mechanisms underlying gene conversion, explored the key part that this process has played in fashioning extant human genes, and performed a meta-analysis of gene-conversion events known to have caused human genetic disease. Here we shall briefly summarize some of the latest developments in the study of pathogenic gene conversion events, including (i) the emerging idea of minimal efficient sequence homology (MESH) for homologous recombination, (ii) the local DNA sequence features that appear to predispose to gene conversion, (iii) a mechanistic comparison of gene conversion and transient hypermutability, and (iv) recently reported examples of pathogenic gene conversion events. PMID:24710102

Chen, Jian-Min; Férec, Claude; Cooper, David N.

2010-01-01

126

Genetics of Sputum Gene Expression in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease  

PubMed Central

Previous expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) studies have performed genetic association studies for gene expression, but most of these studies examined lymphoblastoid cell lines from non-diseased individuals. We examined the genetics of gene expression in a relevant disease tissue from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients to identify functional effects of known susceptibility genes and to find novel disease genes. By combining gene expression profiling on induced sputum samples from 131 COPD cases from the ECLIPSE Study with genomewide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data, we found 4315 significant cis-eQTL SNP-probe set associations (3309 unique SNPs). The 3309 SNPs were tested for association with COPD in a genomewide association study (GWAS) dataset, which included 2940 COPD cases and 1380 controls. Adjusting for 3309 tests (p<1.5e-5), the two SNPs which were significantly associated with COPD were located in two separate genes in a known COPD locus on chromosome 15: CHRNA5 and IREB2. Detailed analysis of chromosome 15 demonstrated additional eQTLs for IREB2 mapping to that gene. eQTL SNPs for CHRNA5 mapped to multiple linkage disequilibrium (LD) bins. The eQTLs for IREB2 and CHRNA5 were not in LD. Seventy-four additional eQTL SNPs were associated with COPD at p<0.01. These were genotyped in two COPD populations, finding replicated associations with a SNP in PSORS1C1, in the HLA-C region on chromosome 6. Integrative analysis of GWAS and gene expression data from relevant tissue from diseased subjects has located potential functional variants in two known COPD genes and has identified a novel COPD susceptibility locus. PMID:21949713

Qiu, Weiliang; Cho, Michael H.; Riley, John H.; Anderson, Wayne H.; Singh, Dave; Bakke, Per; Gulsvik, Amund; Litonjua, Augusto A.; Lomas, David A.; Crapo, James D.; Beaty, Terri H.; Celli, Bartolome R.; Rennard, Stephen; Tal-Singer, Ruth; Fox, Steven M.; Silverman, Edwin K.; Hersh, Craig P.

2011-01-01

127

Gene Expression Profiles in Cells of Peripheral Blood Identify New Molecular Markers of Acute Pancreatitis  

PubMed Central

Introduction Blood leukocytes play a major role in mediating local and systemic inflammation during acute pancreatitis. We hypothesize that peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in circulation exhibit unique changes in gene expression, and could provide a “reporter” function that reflects the inflammatory response in pancreas of acute pancreatitis. Methods To determine specific changes in blood leukocytes during acute pancreatitis, we studied gene transcription profile of in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in a rat model of experimental pancreatitis (sodium taurocholate). Normal rats, saline controls and a model of septic shock were used as a controls. cRNA obtained from PBMC of each group (n = 3) were applied to Affymetrix rat genome DNA Gene Chip Arrays. Results From the 8,799 rat genes analyzed, 140 genes showed unique significant changes in their expression in PBMC during the acute phase of pancreatitis, but not in sepsis. Among the 140 genes, 57 were upregulated, while 69 were downregulated. Platelet-derived growth factor receptor, prostaglandin E2 receptor and phospholipase D1 are among the top upregulated genes. Others include genes involved in G protein-coupled receptor and TGF-?-mediated signaling pathways, while genes associated with apoptosis, glucocorticoid receptors and even the cholecystokinin receptor are downregulated. Conclusions Microarray analysis in transcriptional profiling of PBMC showed that genes that are uniquely related to molecular and pancreatic function display differential expression in acute pancreatitis. Profiling genes obtained from an easily accessible source during severe pancreatitis may identify surrogate markers for disease severity. PMID:18347268

Bluth, Martin; Lin, Yin-yao; Zhang, Hong; Viterbo, Dominick; Zenilman, Michael

2009-01-01

128

Application of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics Tools to Identify Putative Transcription Factor-Gene Regulatory Network of Ankylosing Spondylitis and Sarcoidosis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Transcription factors and corresponding cis-regulatory elements are considered key components in gene regulation. We combined biostatistics and bioinformatics tools to streamline identification of putative transcription factor-gene regulatory networks unique for two immune-mediated diseases, ankylosing spondylitis and sarcoidosis. After identifying differentially expressed genes from microarrays, we employed tightCluster to find tight clusters of potentially co-regulated genes. By subsequently applying bioinformatics tools

Dongseok Choi; Srilakshmi M. Sharma; Sirichai Pasadhika; Zhixin Kang; Christina A. Harrington; Justine R. Smith; Stephen R. Planck; James T. Rosenbaum

2009-01-01

129

Application of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics Tools to Identify Putative Transcription Factor-Gene Regulatory Network of Ankylosing Spondylitis and Sarcoidosis  

PubMed Central

Transcription factors and corresponding cis-regulatory elements are considered key components in gene regulation. We combined biostatistics and bioinformatics tools to streamline identification of putative transcription factor-gene regulatory networks unique for two immune-mediated diseases, ankylosing spondylitis and sarcoidosis. After identifying differentially expressed genes from microarrays, we employed tightCluster to find tight clusters of potentially co-regulated genes. By subsequently applying bioinformatics tools to search for common cis-regulatory elements, putative transcription factor-gene regulatory networks were found. Recognition of these networks by applying this methodology could pave the way for new insights into disease pathogenesis. PMID:20037664

Choi, Dongseok; Sharma, Srilakshmi M; Pasadhika, Sirichai; Kang, Zhixin; Harrington, Christina A.; Smith, Justine R.; Planck, Stephen R.; Rosenbaum, James T.

2009-01-01

130

Using SCOPE to identify potential regulatory motifs in coregulated genes.  

PubMed

SCOPE is an ensemble motif finder that uses three component algorithms in parallel to identify potential regulatory motifs by over-representation and motif position preference. Each component algorithm is optimized to find a different kind of motif. By taking the best of these three approaches, SCOPE performs better than any single algorithm, even in the presence of noisy data. In this article, we utilize a web version of SCOPE to examine genes that are involved in telomere maintenance. SCOPE has been incorporated into at least two other motif finding programs and has been used in other studies. The three algorithms that comprise SCOPE are BEAM, which finds non-degenerate motifs (ACCGGT), PRISM, which finds degenerate motifs (ASCGWT), and SPACER, which finds longer bipartite motifs (ACCnnnnnnnnGGT). These three algorithms have been optimized to find their corresponding type of motif. Together, they allow SCOPE to perform extremely well. Once a gene set has been analyzed and candidate motifs identified, SCOPE can look for other genes that contain the motif which, when added to the original set, will improve the motif score. This can occur through over-representation or motif position preference. Working with partial gene sets that have biologically verified transcription factor binding sites, SCOPE was able to identify most of the rest of the genes also regulated by the given transcription factor. Output from SCOPE shows candidate motifs, their significance, and other information both as a table and as a graphical motif map. FAQs and video tutorials are available at the SCOPE web site which also includes a "Sample Search" button that allows the user to perform a trial run. Scope has a very friendly user interface that enables novice users to access the algorithm's full power without having to become an expert in the bioinformatics of motif finding. As input, SCOPE can take a list of genes, or FASTA sequences. These can be entered in browser text fields, or read from a file. The output from SCOPE contains a list of all identified motifs with their scores, number of occurrences, fraction of genes containing the motif, and the algorithm used to identify the motif. For each motif, result details include a consensus representation of the motif, a sequence logo, a position weight matrix, and a list of instances for every motif occurrence (with exact positions and "strand" indicated). Results are returned in a browser window and also optionally by email. Previous papers describe the SCOPE algorithms in detail. PMID:21673638

Martyanov, Viktor; Gross, Robert H

2011-01-01

131

Gene–environment interactions in human diseases  

Microsoft Academic Search

Studies of gene–environment interactions aim to describe how genetic and environmental factors jointly influence the risk of developing a human disease. Gene–environment interactions can be described by using several models, which take into account the various ways in which genetic effects can be modified by environmental exposures, the number of levels of these exposures and the model on which the

David J. Hunter

2005-01-01

132

Co-clustering phenome–genome for phenotype classification and disease gene discovery  

PubMed Central

Understanding the categorization of human diseases is critical for reliably identifying disease causal genes. Recently, genome-wide studies of abnormal chromosomal locations related to diseases have mapped >2000 phenotype–gene relations, which provide valuable information for classifying diseases and identifying candidate genes as drug targets. In this article, a regularized non-negative matrix tri-factorization (R-NMTF) algorithm is introduced to co-cluster phenotypes and genes, and simultaneously detect associations between the detected phenotype clusters and gene clusters. The R-NMTF algorithm factorizes the phenotype–gene association matrix under the prior knowledge from phenotype similarity network and protein–protein interaction network, supervised by the label information from known disease classes and biological pathways. In the experiments on disease phenotype–gene associations in OMIM and KEGG disease pathways, R-NMTF significantly improved the classification of disease phenotypes and disease pathway genes compared with support vector machines and Label Propagation in cross-validation on the annotated phenotypes and genes. The newly predicted phenotypes in each disease class are highly consistent with human phenotype ontology annotations. The roles of the new member genes in the disease pathways are examined and validated in the protein–protein interaction subnetworks. Extensive literature review also confirmed many new members of the disease classes and pathways as well as the predicted associations between disease phenotype classes and pathways. PMID:22735708

Hwang, TaeHyun; Atluri, Gowtham; Xie, MaoQiang; Dey, Sanjoy; Hong, Changjin; Kumar, Vipin; Kuang, Rui

2012-01-01

133

Discovering disease-genes by topological features in human protein-protein interaction network  

Microsoft Academic Search

Motivation: Mining the hereditary disease-genes from human genome is one of the most important tasks in bioinformatics research. A variety of sequence features and functional similarities between known human hereditary disease-genes and those not known to be involved in disease have been systematically examined and efficient classifiers have been constructed based on the identified common patterns. The availability of human

Jianzhen Xu; Yongjin Li

2006-01-01

134

Phage cluster relationships identified through single gene analysis  

PubMed Central

Background Phylogenetic comparison of bacteriophages requires whole genome approaches such as dotplot analysis, genome pairwise maps, and gene content analysis. Currently mycobacteriophages, a highly studied phage group, are categorized into related clusters based on the comparative analysis of whole genome sequences. With the recent explosion of phage isolation, a simple method for phage cluster prediction would facilitate analysis of crude or complex samples without whole genome isolation and sequencing. The hypothesis of this study was that mycobacteriophage-cluster prediction is possible using comparison of a single, ubiquitous, semi-conserved gene. Tape Measure Protein (TMP) was selected to test the hypothesis because it is typically the longest gene in mycobacteriophage genomes and because regions within the TMP gene are conserved. Results A single gene, TMP, identified the known Mycobacteriophage clusters and subclusters using a Gepard dotplot comparison or a phylogenetic tree constructed from global alignment and maximum likelihood comparisons. Gepard analysis of 247 mycobacteriophage TMP sequences appropriately recovered 98.8% of the subcluster assignments that were made by whole-genome comparison. Subcluster-specific primers within TMP allow for PCR determination of the mycobacteriophage subcluster from DNA samples. Using the single-gene comparison approach for siphovirus coliphages, phage groupings by TMP comparison reflected relationships observed in a whole genome dotplot comparison and confirm the potential utility of this approach to another widely studied group of phages. Conclusions TMP sequence comparison and PCR results support the hypothesis that a single gene can be used for distinguishing phage cluster and subcluster assignments. TMP single-gene analysis can quickly and accurately aid in mycobacteriophage classification. PMID:23777341

2013-01-01

135

ORIGINAL ARTICLE Gene Disease Interaction on Orbitofrontal  

E-print Network

ORIGINAL ARTICLE Gene Disease Interaction on Orbitofrontal Gray Matter in Cocaine Addiction Nelly MAOA interac- tions, and (3) correlating GMV with lifetime cocaine, al- cohol, and cigarette smoking ADDICTION IS A chronic disease associ- ated with deficits in brain dopamine1 (DA

Homes, Christopher C.

136

Evolutionary conservation and selection of human disease gene orthologs in the rat and mouse genomes  

PubMed Central

Background Model organisms have contributed substantially to our understanding of the etiology of human disease as well as having assisted with the development of new treatment modalities. The availability of the human, mouse and, most recently, the rat genome sequences now permit the comprehensive investigation of the rodent orthologs of genes associated with human disease. Here, we investigate whether human disease genes differ significantly from their rodent orthologs with respect to their overall levels of conservation and their rates of evolutionary change. Results Human disease genes are unevenly distributed among human chromosomes and are highly represented (99.5%) among human-rodent ortholog sets. Differences are revealed in evolutionary conservation and selection between different categories of human disease genes. Although selection appears not to have greatly discriminated between disease and non-disease genes, synonymous substitution rates are significantly higher for disease genes. In neurological and malformation syndrome disease systems, associated genes have evolved slowly whereas genes of the immune, hematological and pulmonary disease systems have changed more rapidly. Amino-acid substitutions associated with human inherited disease occur at sites that are more highly conserved than the average; nevertheless, 15 substituting amino acids associated with human disease were identified as wild-type amino acids in the rat. Rodent orthologs of human trinucleotide repeat-expansion disease genes were found to contain substantially fewer of such repeats. Six human genes that share the same characteristics as triplet repeat-expansion disease-associated genes were identified; although four of these genes are expressed in the brain, none is currently known to be associated with disease. Conclusions Most human disease genes have been retained in rodent genomes. Synonymous nucleotide substitutions occur at a higher rate in disease genes, a finding that may reflect increased mutation rates in the chromosomal regions in which disease genes are found. Rodent orthologs associated with neurological function exhibit the greatest evolutionary conservation; this suggests that rodent models of human neurological disease are likely to most faithfully represent human disease processes. However, with regard to neurological triplet repeat expansion-associated human disease genes, the contraction, relative to human, of rodent trinucleotide repeats suggests that rodent loci may not achieve a 'critical repeat threshold' necessary to undergo spontaneous pathological repeat expansions. The identification of six genes in this study that have multiple characteristics associated with repeat expansion-disease genes raises the possibility that not all human loci capable of facilitating neurological disease by repeat expansion have as yet been identified. PMID:15239832

Huang, Hui; Winter, Eitan E; Wang, Huajun; Weinstock, Keith G; Xing, Heming; Goodstadt, Leo; Stenson, Peter D; Cooper, David N; Smith, Douglas; Albà, M Mar; Ponting, Chris P; Fechtel, Kim

2004-01-01

137

Lung disease modifier genes in cystic fibrosis.  

PubMed

Cystic fibrosis (CF) is recognized as a single gene disorder. However, a considerable diversity in its clinical phenotype has been documented since the description of the disease. Identification of additional gene alleles, so called "modifier genes" that directly influence the phenotype of CF disease became a challenge in the late '90ies, not only for the insight it provides into the CF pathophysiology, but also for the development of new potential therapeutic targets. One of the most studied phenotype has been the lung disease severity as lung dysfunction is the major cause of morbidity and mortality in CF. This review details the results of two main genetic approaches that have mainly been explored so far: (1) an "a priori" approach, i.e. the candidate gene approach; (2) a "without a priori" approach, analyzing the whole genome by linkage and genome-wide association studies (GWAS), or the whole exome by exome sequencing. PMID:24569122

Guillot, Loic; Beucher, Julie; Tabary, Olivier; Le Rouzic, Philippe; Clement, Annick; Corvol, Harriet

2014-07-01

138

Integrative Analysis of DNA Methylation and Gene Expression Data Identifies EPAS1 as a Key Regulator of COPD  

PubMed Central

Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) is a complex disease. Genetic, epigenetic, and environmental factors are known to contribute to COPD risk and disease progression. Therefore we developed a systematic approach to identify key regulators of COPD that integrates genome-wide DNA methylation, gene expression, and phenotype data in lung tissue from COPD and control samples. Our integrative analysis identified 126 key regulators of COPD. We identified EPAS1 as the only key regulator whose downstream genes significantly overlapped with multiple genes sets associated with COPD disease severity. EPAS1 is distinct in comparison with other key regulators in terms of methylation profile and downstream target genes. Genes predicted to be regulated by EPAS1 were enriched for biological processes including signaling, cell communications, and system development. We confirmed that EPAS1 protein levels are lower in human COPD lung tissue compared to non-disease controls and that Epas1 gene expression is reduced in mice chronically exposed to cigarette smoke. As EPAS1 downstream genes were significantly enriched for hypoxia responsive genes in endothelial cells, we tested EPAS1 function in human endothelial cells. EPAS1 knockdown by siRNA in endothelial cells impacted genes that significantly overlapped with EPAS1 downstream genes in lung tissue including hypoxia responsive genes, and genes associated with emphysema severity. Our first integrative analysis of genome-wide DNA methylation and gene expression profiles illustrates that not only does DNA methylation play a ‘causal’ role in the molecular pathophysiology of COPD, but it can be leveraged to directly identify novel key mediators of this pathophysiology. PMID:25569234

Yoo, Seungyeul; Takikawa, Sachiko; Geraghty, Patrick; Argmann, Carmen; Campbell, Joshua; Lin, Luan; Huang, Tao; Tu, Zhidong; Feronjy, Robert; Spira, Avrum; Schadt, Eric E.; Powell, Charles A.; Zhu, Jun

2015-01-01

139

Network Analysis Identifies SOD2 mRNA as a Potential Biomarker for Parkinson's Disease  

PubMed Central

Increasing evidence indicates that Parkinson's disease (PD) and type 2 diabetes (T2DM) share dysregulated molecular networks. We identified 84 genes shared between PD and T2DM from curated disease-gene databases. Nitric oxide biosynthesis, lipid and carbohydrate metabolism, insulin secretion and inflammation were identified as common dysregulated pathways. A network prioritization approach was implemented to rank genes according to their distance to seed genes and their involvement in common biological pathways. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction assays revealed that a highly ranked gene, superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2), is upregulated in PD patients compared to healthy controls in 192 whole blood samples from two independent clinical trials, the Harvard Biomarker Study (HBS) and the Diagnostic and Prognostic Biomarkers in Parkinson's disease (PROBE). The results from this study reinforce the idea that shared molecular networks between PD and T2DM provides an additional source of biologically meaningful biomarkers. Evaluation of this biomarker in de novo PD patients and in a larger prospective longitudinal study is warranted. PMID:25279756

Santiago, Jose A.; Scherzer, Clemens R.; Potashkin, Judith A.

2014-01-01

140

Gene-expression profiling in rheumatic disease: tools and therapeutic potential  

Microsoft Academic Search

Gene-expression profiling is a powerful tool for the discovery of molecular fingerprints that underlie human disease. Microarray technologies allow the analysis of messenger RNA transcript levels for every gene in the genome. However, gene-expression profiling is best viewed as part of a pipeline that extends from sample collection through clinical application. Key genes and pathways identified by microarray profiling should

Jason W. Bauer; Hatice Bilgic; Emily C. Baechler

2009-01-01

141

Identifying progression related disease risk modules based on the human subcellular signaling networks.  

PubMed

Many studies have shown that the structure and dynamics of the human signaling network are disturbed in complex diseases such as coronary artery disease, and gene expression profiles can distinguish variations in diseases since they can accurately reflect the status of cells. Integration of subcellular localization and the human signaling network holds promise for providing insight into human diseases. In this study, we performed a novel algorithm to identify progression-related-disease-risk modules (PRDRMs) among patients of different disease states within eleven subcellular sub-networks from a human signaling network. The functional annotation and literature retrieval showed that the PRDRMs were strongly associated with disease pathogenesis. The results indicated that the PRDRM expression values as classification features had a good classification performance to distinguish patients of different disease states. Our approach compared with the method PageRank had a better classification performance. The identification of the PRDRMs in response to the dynamic gene expression change could facilitate our understanding of the pathological basis of complex diseases. Our strategy could provide new insights into the potential use of prognostic biomarkers and the effective guidance of clinical therapy from the human subcellular signaling network perspective. PMID:25315201

Xie, Ruiqiang; Huang, Hao; Li, Wan; Chen, Binbin; Jiang, Jing; He, Yuehan; Lv, Junjie; ma, Bo; Zhou, Yanyan; Feng, Chenchen; Chen, Lina; He, Weiming

2014-12-01

142

Identifying photoreceptors in blind eyes caused by RPE65 mutations: Prerequisite for human gene therapy success  

PubMed Central

Mutations in RPE65, a gene essential to normal operation of the visual (retinoid) cycle, cause the childhood blindness known as Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA). Retinal gene therapy restores vision to blind canine and murine models of LCA. Gene therapy in blind humans with LCA from RPE65 mutations may also have potential for success but only if the retinal photoreceptor layer is intact, as in the early-disease stage-treated animals. Here, we use high-resolution in vivo microscopy to quantify photoreceptor layer thickness in the human disease to define the relationship of retinal structure to vision and determine the potential for gene therapy success. The normally cone photoreceptor-rich central retina and rod-rich regions were studied. Despite severely reduced cone vision, many RPE65-mutant retinas had near-normal central microstructure. Absent rod vision was associated with a detectable but thinned photoreceptor layer. We asked whether abnormally thinned RPE65-mutant retina with photoreceptor loss would respond to treatment. Gene therapy in Rpe65-/- mice at advanced-disease stages, a more faithful mimic of the humans we studied, showed success but only in animals with better-preserved photoreceptor structure. The results indicate that identifying and then targeting retinal locations with retained photoreceptors will be a prerequisite for successful gene therapy in humans with RPE65 mutations and in other retinal degenerative disorders now moving from proof-of-concept studies toward clinical trials. PMID:15837919

Jacobson, Samuel G.; Aleman, Tomas S.; Cideciyan, Artur V.; Sumaroka, Alexander; Schwartz, Sharon B.; Windsor, Elizabeth A. M.; Traboulsi, Elias I.; Heon, Elise; Pittler, Steven J.; Milam, Ann H.; Maguire, Albert M.; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Stone, Edwin M.; Bennett, Jean

2005-01-01

143

A novel approach to identify driver genes involved in androgen-independent prostate cancer  

PubMed Central

Background Insertional mutagenesis screens have been used with great success to identify oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. Typically, these screens use gammaretroviruses (?RV) or transposons as insertional mutagens. However, insertional mutations from replication-competent ?RVs or transposons that occur later during oncogenesis can produce passenger mutations that do not drive cancer progression. Here, we utilized a replication-incompetent lentiviral vector (LV) to perform an insertional mutagenesis screen to identify genes in the progression to androgen-independent prostate cancer (AIPC). Methods Prostate cancer cells were mutagenized with a LV to enrich for clones with a selective advantage in an androgen-deficient environment provided by a dysregulated gene(s) near the vector integration site. We performed our screen using an in vitro AIPC model and also an in vivo xenotransplant model for AIPC. Our approach identified proviral integration sites utilizing a shuttle vector that allows for rapid rescue of plasmids in E. coli that contain LV long terminal repeat (LTR)-chromosome junctions. This shuttle vector approach does not require PCR amplification and has several advantages over PCR-based techniques. Results Proviral integrations were enriched near prostate cancer susceptibility loci in cells grown in androgen-deficient medium (p?genes that influence AIPC were identified; ATPAF1, GCOM1, MEX3D, PTRF, and TRPM4. Additionally, we showed that RNAi knockdown of ATPAF1 significantly reduces growth (p?identifying a known prostate cancer gene, PTRF, and also several genes not previously associated with prostate cancer. The replication-incompetent shuttle vector approach has broad potential applications for cancer gene discovery, and for interrogating diverse biological and disease processes. PMID:24885513

2014-01-01

144

Researchers Find Gene Mutation That May Protect Against Heart Disease  

MedlinePLUS

... on this page, please enable JavaScript. Researchers Find Gene Mutation That May Protect Against Heart Disease Rare ... Preidt Wednesday, November 12, 2014 Related MedlinePlus Pages Genes and Gene Therapy Heart Diseases WEDNESDAY, Nov. 12, ...

145

Gene Therapy Techniques for Peripheral Arterial Disease  

SciTech Connect

Somatic gene therapy is the introduction of new genetic material into selective somatic cells with resulting therapeutic benefits. Vascular wall and, subsequently, cardiovascular diseases have become an interesting target for gene therapy studies.Arteries are an attractive target for gene therapy since vascular interventions, both open surgical and endovascular, are well suited for minimally invasive, easily monitored gene delivery. Promising therapeutic effects have been obtained in animal models in preventing post-angioplasty restenosis and vein graft thickening, as well as increasing blood flow and collateral development in ischemic limbs.First clinical trials suggest a beneficial effect of vascular endothelial growth factor in achieving therapeutic angiogenesis in chronic limb ischemia and the efficacy of decoy oligonucleotides to prevent infrainguinal vein graft stenosis. However, further studies are mandatory to clarify the safety issues, to develop better gene delivery vectors and delivery catheters, to improve transgene expression, as well as to find the most effective and safe treatment genes.

Manninen, Hannu I. [Department of Clinical Radiology, Kuopio University Hospital, Puijonlaaksontie 2, FIN-70210 Kuopio (Finland); Maekinen, Kimmo [Departmentof Surgery, and Gene Therapy Unit, Kuopio University Hospital, Puijonlaaksontie 2, FIN-70210 Kuopio (Finland)

2002-03-15

146

Modulation of polyglutamine-induced cell death by genes identified by expression profiling.  

PubMed

The majority of triplet-repeat diseases are caused by mutated genes with an extended polyglutamine tract, exemplified by Huntington's disease (HD). In order to model HD pathogenesis in a controlled system, we developed stable PC12 cell lines that express exon 1 fragments of the huntingtin gene with 23 or 74 polyglutamines driven by an inducible doxycycline (dox)-sensitive promoter (HD-23Q or HD-74Q). We aimed to identify early perturbations induced by the mutation by studying expression levels of 1824 genes at 0, 5, 10 and 18 hours after induction, using adaptor-tagged competitive PCR (ATAC-PCR). At these time points, the cells show no appreciable death or mitochondrial impairment and very low inclusion levels. A total of 126 genes, including 69 known genes, exhibited statistically significant alterations in the HD-74Q cell lines but no changes in the HD-23Q lines. We tested 11 of these genes for their abilities to modulate polyglutamine-induced cell death in transiently transfected cell models. Five genes [glucose transporter 1 (Glut1), phosphofructokinase muscle isozyme (Pfkm), prostate glutathione-S -transferase 2 (Gstm2), RNA-binding motif protein 3 (Rbm3) and KRAB-A interacting protein 1 (Krip-1)] significantly suppressed cell death in both neuronal precursor and non-neuronal cell lines, suggesting that these transcriptional changes were relevant to polyglutamine pathology. The efficient recovery of functionally relevant genes supports the utility of gene expression profiling for discovering pathways related to pathogenesis, and the importance of analyzing molecular events in the early stages of disease. PMID:12217956

Kita, Hiroko; Carmichael, Jenny; Swartz, Jina; Muro, Shizuko; Wyttenbach, Andreas; Matsubara, Kenichi; Rubinsztein, David C; Kato, Kikuya

2002-09-15

147

Identifying patients with chronic kidney disease from general practicecomputer records  

Microsoft Academic Search

Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is an important predictor of end-stage\\u000d\\u000a\\u0009renal disease, as well as a marker of increased mortality. The New\\u000d\\u000a\\u0009Opportunities for Early Renal Intervention by Computerised Assessment\\u000d\\u000a\\u0009(NEOERICA) project aimed to assess whether people with undiagnosed\\u000d\\u000a\\u0009CKD who might benefit from early intervention could be identified\\u000d\\u000a\\u0009from GP computer records.The simplified Modification of Diet in Renal\\u000d\\u000a\\u0009Disease

Simon de Lusignan; Tom Chan; Paul Stevens; Donal O'Donoghue; Nigel Hague; Billy Dzregah; Jeremy Van Vlymen; Mel Walker; Sean Hilton

2005-01-01

148

A large-scale analysis of tissue-specific pathology and gene expression of human disease genes and complexes  

PubMed Central

Heritable diseases are caused by germ-line mutations that, despite tissuewide presence, often lead to tissue-specific pathology. Here, we make a systematic analysis of the link between tissue-specific gene expression and pathological manifestations in many human diseases and cancers. Diseases were systematically mapped to tissues they affect from disease-relevant literature in PubMed to create a disease–tissue covariation matrix of high-confidence associations of >1,000 diseases to 73 tissues. By retrieving >2,000 known disease genes, and generating 1,500 disease-associated protein complexes, we analyzed the differential expression of a gene or complex involved in a particular disease in the tissues affected by the disease, compared with nonaffected tissues. When this analysis is scaled to all diseases in our dataset, there is a significant tendency for disease genes and complexes to be overexpressed in the normal tissues where defects cause pathology. In contrast, cancer genes and complexes were not overexpressed in the tissues from which the tumors emanate. We specifically identified a complex involved in XY sex reversal that is testis-specific and down-regulated in ovaries. We also identified complexes in Parkinson disease, cardiomyopathies, and muscular dystrophy syndromes that are similarly tissue specific. Our method represents a conceptual scaffold for organism-spanning analyses and reveals an extensive list of tissue-specific draft molecular pathways, both known and unexpected, that might be disrupted in disease. PMID:19104045

Lage, Kasper; Hansen, Niclas Tue; Karlberg, E. Olof; Eklund, Aron C.; Roque, Francisco S.; Donahoe, Patricia K.; Szallasi, Zoltan; Jensen, Thomas Skøt; Brunak, Søren

2008-01-01

149

Screening for Noise in Gene Expression Identifies Drug Synergies  

PubMed Central

Stochastic fluctuations are inherent to gene expression and can drive cell-fate specification. We used such fluctuations to modulate reactivation of HIV from latency—a quiescent state that is a major barrier to an HIV cure. By screening a diverse library of bioactive small molecules, we identified over 80 compounds that modulated HIV gene-expression fluctuations (i.e. ‘noise’), without changing mean expression. These noise-modulating compounds would be neglected in conventional screens and strikingly they synergized with conventional transcriptional activators. Noise enhancers reactivated latent cells significantly better than existing best-in-class reactivation cocktails (and with reduced off-target cytotoxicity), while noise suppressors stabilized latency. Noise-modulating chemicals may provide novel probes for the physiological consequences of noise and an unexplored axis for drug discovery, allowing enhanced control over diverse cell-fate decisions. PMID:24903562

Dar, Roy D.; Hosmane, Nina N.; Arkin, Michelle R.; Siliciano, Robert F.; Weinberger, Leor S.

2014-01-01

150

Restorative gene therapy approaches to Parkinson's disease.  

PubMed

Perhaps one of the most exciting developments in brain research of the past decade is the advent of genetic intervention in human neurologic disease. Although there are a variety of gene transfer approaches, none of which has been perfected, gene therapy is now science fact and no longer science fiction. As technology progresses, some vectors will prove more effective for certain disease categories than others; it is too early to predict definitively which vector would be most effective for therapy in Parkinson's disease and other movement disorders. Nonetheless, it is likely that within the next year or two a gene therapy trial will be instituted in human patients with Parkinson's disease. The potential for an impact on the symptoms and progression of this disease is significant. Clinicians may be on the threshold of a new era of intervention for Parkinson's disease and other neurologic diseases, based on bypassing traditional but less selective drug-extracellular receptor interactions and instead focusing on genetic modulation of specific intracellular processes. The continuing development of small incremental changes of new dopamine agonists and pharmacologic agents will likely pale in comparison to the specificity of intracellular genetic manipulation. PMID:10093593

Freese, A

1999-03-01

151

[Toward identification of susceptible genes for sporadic neurodegenerative disease].  

PubMed

Over the past decade, genome-wide association studies (GWASs) using common polymorphisms have been conducted to identify genetic risks associated with sporadic diseases. Although GWASs have successfully revealed numerous susceptibility genes for neurodegenerative diseases, the odds ratios associated with these risk alleles are generally low and account for only a small proportion of estimated familial clustering. Emerging new technologies for nucleotide sequencing such as exome sequencing has provided an exhaustive list of variants, which will eventually enable us to explore the role of low-frequency variants of large effect sizes in sporadic neurodegenerative diseases. However, it is still a statistical challenge to determine which variants are relevant to diseases among the numerous candidates, and large sample sizes will be required. Using the clues provided by rare familial cases, we have recently identified strong genetic factors in Parkinson diseases and in multiple system atrophy based on the candidate gene approach. Focusing on the familial aggregation may be an efficient approach to identifying risk alleles of large effect sizes in apparently sporadic neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:24291979

Mitsui, Jun

2013-01-01

152

Gene that controls aggressiveness in breast cancer cells identified  

Cancer.gov

In a discovery that sheds new light on the aggressiveness of certain breast cancers, Whitehead Institute and MIT researchers have identified a transcription factor, known as ZEB1, that is capable of converting non-aggressive basal-type cancer cells into highly malignant, tumor-forming cancer stem cells (CSCs). Intriguingly, luminal breast cancer cells, which are associated with a much better clinical prognosis, carry this gene in a state in which it seems to be permanently shut down. MIT is home to the David H. Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research.

153

Identification of Sequence Variants in Genetic Disease-Causing Genes Using Targeted Next-Generation Sequencing  

Microsoft Academic Search

BackgroundIdentification of gene variants plays an important role in research on and diagnosis of genetic diseases. A combination of enrichment of targeted genes and next-generation sequencing (targeted DNA-HiSeq) results in both high efficiency and low cost for targeted sequencing of genes of interest.Methodology\\/Principal FindingsTo identify mutations associated with genetic diseases, we designed an array-based gene chip to capture all of

Xiaoming Wei; Xiangchun Ju; Xin Yi; Qian Zhu; Ning Qu; Tengfei Liu; Yang Chen; Hui Jiang; Guanghui Yang; Ruan Zhen; Zhangzhang Lan; Ming Qi; Jinming Wang; Yi Yang; Yuxing Chu; Xiaoyan Li; Yanfang Guang; Jian Huang

2011-01-01

154

Identifying Genes Involved in Cyclic Processes by Combining Gene Expression Analysis and Prior Knowledge  

PubMed Central

Based on time series gene expressions, cyclic genes can be recognized via spectral analysis and statistical periodicity detection tests. These cyclic genes are usually associated with cyclic biological processes, for example, cell cycle and circadian rhythm. The power of a scheme is practically measured by comparing the detected periodically expressed genes with experimentally verified genes participating in a cyclic process. However, in the above mentioned procedure the valuable prior knowledge only serves as an evaluation benchmark, and it is not fully exploited in the implementation of the algorithm. In addition, partial data sets are also disregarded due to their nonstationarity. This paper proposes a novel algorithm to identify cyclic-process-involved genes by integrating the prior knowledge with the gene expression analysis. The proposed algorithm is applied on data sets corresponding to Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Drosophila melanogaster, respectively. Biological evidences are found to validate the roles of the discovered genes in cell cycle and circadian rhythm. Dendrograms are presented to cluster the identified genes and to reveal expression patterns. It is corroborated that the proposed novel identification scheme provides a valuable technique for unveiling pathways related to cyclic processes. PMID:19390635

2009-01-01

155

Genomic analysis of primordial dwarfism reveals novel disease genes  

PubMed Central

Primordial dwarfism (PD) is a disease in which severely impaired fetal growth persists throughout postnatal development and results in stunted adult size. The condition is highly heterogeneous clinically, but the use of certain phenotypic aspects such as head circumference and facial appearance has proven helpful in defining clinical subgroups. In this study, we present the results of clinical and genomic characterization of 16 new patients in whom a broad definition of PD was used (e.g., 3M syndrome was included). We report a novel PD syndrome with distinct facies in two unrelated patients, each with a different homozygous truncating mutation in CRIPT. Our analysis also reveals, in addition to mutations in known PD disease genes, the first instance of biallelic truncating BRCA2 mutation causing PD with normal bone marrow analysis. In addition, we have identified a novel locus for Seckel syndrome based on a consanguineous multiplex family and identified a homozygous truncating mutation in DNA2 as the likely cause. An additional novel PD disease candidate gene XRCC4 was identified by autozygome/exome analysis, and the knockout mouse phenotype is highly compatible with PD. Thus, we add a number of novel genes to the growing list of PD-linked genes, including one which we show to be linked to a novel PD syndrome with a distinct facial appearance. PD is extremely heterogeneous genetically and clinically, and genomic tools are often required to reach a molecular diagnosis. PMID:24389050

Shaheen, Ranad; Faqeih, Eissa; Ansari, Shinu; Abdel-Salam, Ghada; Al-Hassnan, Zuhair N.; Al-Shidi, Tarfa; Alomar, Rana; Sogaty, Sameera; Alkuraya, Fowzan S.

2014-01-01

156

Genomic analysis of primordial dwarfism reveals novel disease genes.  

PubMed

Primordial dwarfism (PD) is a disease in which severely impaired fetal growth persists throughout postnatal development and results in stunted adult size. The condition is highly heterogeneous clinically, but the use of certain phenotypic aspects such as head circumference and facial appearance has proven helpful in defining clinical subgroups. In this study, we present the results of clinical and genomic characterization of 16 new patients in whom a broad definition of PD was used (e.g., 3M syndrome was included). We report a novel PD syndrome with distinct facies in two unrelated patients, each with a different homozygous truncating mutation in CRIPT. Our analysis also reveals, in addition to mutations in known PD disease genes, the first instance of biallelic truncating BRCA2 mutation causing PD with normal bone marrow analysis. In addition, we have identified a novel locus for Seckel syndrome based on a consanguineous multiplex family and identified a homozygous truncating mutation in DNA2 as the likely cause. An additional novel PD disease candidate gene XRCC4 was identified by autozygome/exome analysis, and the knockout mouse phenotype is highly compatible with PD. Thus, we add a number of novel genes to the growing list of PD-linked genes, including one which we show to be linked to a novel PD syndrome with a distinct facial appearance. PD is extremely heterogeneous genetically and clinically, and genomic tools are often required to reach a molecular diagnosis. PMID:24389050

Shaheen, Ranad; Faqeih, Eissa; Ansari, Shinu; Abdel-Salam, Ghada; Al-Hassnan, Zuhair N; Al-Shidi, Tarfa; Alomar, Rana; Sogaty, Sameera; Alkuraya, Fowzan S

2014-02-01

157

Fox Chase researchers identify a gene that predicts recurrence in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck  

Cancer.gov

Fox Chase Cancer Center researchers have identified a gene that predicts disease recurrence in individuals with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. The new findings, presented at the American Association for Cancer Research Annual Meeting 2012 on Monday, April 2, show that patients with one common variant of a gene which encodes the cytochrome P450 (CYP1B1) protein are likely to have a longer time-to-recurrence than those with the more typical form of the gene.

158

Progression-associated genes in astrocytoma identified by novel microarray gene expression data reanalysis.  

PubMed

Astrocytoma is graded as pilocytic (WHO grade I), diffuse (WHO grade II), anaplastic (WHO grade III), and glioblastoma multiforme (WHO grade IV). The progression from low- to high-grade astrocytoma is associated with distinct molecular changes that vary with patient age, yet the prognosis of high-grade tumors in children and adults is equally dismal. Whether specific gene expression changes are consistently associated with all high-grade astrocytomas, independent of patient age, is not known. To address this question, we reanalyzed the microarray datasets comprising astrocytomas from children and adults, respectively. We identified nine genes consistently dysregulated in high-grade tumors, using four novel tests for identifying differentially expressed genes. Four genes encoding ribosomal proteins (RPS2, RPS8, RPS18, RPL37A) were upregulated, and five genes (APOD, SORL1, SPOCK2, PRSS11, ID3) were downregulated in high-grade by all tests. Expression results were validated using a third astrocytoma dataset. APOD, the most differentially expressed gene, has been shown to inhibit tumor cell and vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation. This suggests that dysregulation of APOD may be critical for malignant astrocytoma formation, and thus a possible novel universal target for therapeutic intervention. Further investigation is needed to evaluate the role of APOD, as well as the other genes identified, in malignant astrocytoma development. PMID:17634619

MacDonald, Tobey J; Pollack, Ian F; Okada, Hideho; Bhattacharya, Soumyaroop; Lyons-Weiler, James

2007-01-01

159

Gene Expression Analyses Identify Narp Contribution in the Development of l-DOPA-Induced Dyskinesia.  

PubMed

In Parkinson's disease, long-term dopamine replacement therapy is complicated by the appearance of l-DOPA-induced dyskinesia (LID). One major hypothesis is that LID results from an aberrant transcriptional program in striatal neurons induced by l-DOPA and triggered by the activation of ERK. To identify these genes, we performed transcriptome analyses in the striatum in 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned mice. A time course analysis (0-6 h after treatment with l-DOPA) identified an acute signature of 709 genes, among which genes involved in protein phosphatase activity were overrepresented, suggesting a negative feedback on ERK activation by l-DOPA. l-DOPA-dependent deregulation of 28 genes was blocked by pretreatment with SL327, an inhibitor of ERK activation, and 26 genes were found differentially expressed between highly and weakly dyskinetic animals after treatment with l-DOPA. The intersection list identified five genes: FosB, Th, Nptx2, Nedd4l, and Ccrn4l. Nptx2 encodes neuronal pentraxin II (or neuronal activity-regulated pentraxin, Narp), which is involved in the clustering of glutamate receptors. We confirmed increased Nptx2 expression after l-DOPA and its blockade by SL327 using quantitative RT-PCR in independent experiments. Using an escalating l-DOPA dose protocol, LID severity was decreased in Narp knock-out mice compared with their wild-type littermates or after overexpression of a dominant-negative form of Narp in the striatum. In conclusion, we have identified a molecular signature induced by l-DOPA in the dopamine-denervated striatum that is dependent on ERK and associated with LID. Here, we demonstrate the implication of one of these genes, Nptx2, in the development of LID. PMID:25568106

Charbonnier-Beaupel, Fanny; Malerbi, Marion; Alcacer, Cristina; Tahiri, Khadija; Carpentier, Wassila; Wang, Chuansong; During, Matthew; Xu, Desheng; Worley, Paul F; Girault, Jean-Antoine; Hervé, Denis; Corvol, Jean-Christophe

2015-01-01

160

Gene Therapy for Lysosomal Storage Diseases  

Microsoft Academic Search

Lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) comprise a diverse group of monogenetic disorders with complex clinical phenotypes that include both systemic and central nervous system pathologies. In recent years, the identification or development of mouse models recapitulating the clinical course of the LSDs has been instrumental in evaluating therapeutic strategies. Here, we review the various gene replacement strategies for target organs affected

Mark S. Sands; Beverly L. Davidson

2006-01-01

161

Hippocampal Gene Expression Meta-Analysis Identifies Aging and Age-Associated Spatial Learning Impairment (ASLI) Genes and Pathways  

PubMed Central

A number of gene expression microarray studies have been carried out in the past, which studied aging and age-associated spatial learning impairment (ASLI) in the hippocampus in animal models, with varying results. Data from such studies were never integrated to identify the most significant ASLI genes and to understand their effect. In this study we integrated these data involving rats using meta-analysis. Our results show that proper removal of batch effects from microarray data generated from different laboratories is necessary before integrating them for meta-analysis. Our meta-analysis has identified a number of significant differentially expressed genes across age or across ASLI. These genes affect many key functions in the aged compared to the young rats, which include viability of neurons, cell-to-cell signalling and interaction, migration of cells, neuronal growth, and synaptic plasticity. These functional changes due to the altered gene expression may manifest into various neurodegenerative diseases and disorders, some of which leading into syndromic memory impairments. While other aging related molecular changes can result into altered synaptic plasticity simply causing normal aging related non-syndromic learning or spatial learning impairments such as ASLI. PMID:23874995

Uddin, Raihan K.; Singh, Shiva M.

2013-01-01

162

[Genes: movers of life and disease].  

PubMed

Genes are elements of the genetic material (deoxyribonucleic acid, dna). They code for a protein product. The human genome contains 35,000 genes. Half of our genetic information is inherited from our father, the other half from our mother. Mitrochondria and their DNA are entirely of maternal origin, which allowed Bryan Sykes to establish that modern human subjects can be classified into seven different lineages. The seven daughters of Eve, Bryan Sykes, 2001). Some genes code for structural proteins, some others code for regulatory ones. The efficient control of the cell cycle is carried out by numerous "normal" proteins. Some proteins, mutated on "abnormally" regulated are inducers of diseases, such as cancers or degenerative diseases. PMID:12371272

Burny, A; Demonté, D; Van Lint, C

2001-01-01

163

The VPS35 gene and Parkinson's disease.  

PubMed

Parkinson's disease (PD), the second most common age-related neurodegenerative disease, is characterized by loss of dopaminergic and nondopaminergic neurons, leading to a variety of motor and nonmotor symptoms. In addition to environmental factors, genetic predisposition and specific gene mutations have been shown to play an important role in the pathogenesis of this disorder. Recently, the identification of the vacuolar protein sorting 35 homolog gene (VPS35), linked to autosomal dominant late-onset PD, has provided new clues to the pathogenesis of PD. Here we discuss the VPS35 gene, its protein function, and various pathways involved in Wnt/?-catenin signaling and in the role of DMT1 mediating the uptake of iron and iron translocation from endosomes to the cytoplasm. Further understanding of these mechanisms will undoubtedly provide new insights into the pathogenic mechanisms of PD and may lead to prevention and better treatment of the disorder. PMID:23536430

Deng, Hao; Gao, Kai; Jankovic, Joseph

2013-05-01

164

Brain Expression Genome-Wide Association Study (eGWAS) Identifies Human Disease-Associated Variants  

PubMed Central

Genetic variants that modify brain gene expression may also influence risk for human diseases. We measured expression levels of 24,526 transcripts in brain samples from the cerebellum and temporal cortex of autopsied subjects with Alzheimer's disease (AD, cerebellar n?=?197, temporal cortex n?=?202) and with other brain pathologies (non–AD, cerebellar n?=?177, temporal cortex n?=?197). We conducted an expression genome-wide association study (eGWAS) using 213,528 cisSNPs within ±100 kb of the tested transcripts. We identified 2,980 cerebellar cisSNP/transcript level associations (2,596 unique cisSNPs) significant in both ADs and non–ADs (q<0.05, p?=?7.70×10?5–1.67×10?82). Of these, 2,089 were also significant in the temporal cortex (p?=?1.85×10?5–1.70×10?141). The top cerebellar cisSNPs had 2.4-fold enrichment for human disease-associated variants (p<10?6). We identified novel cisSNP/transcript associations for human disease-associated variants, including progressive supranuclear palsy SLCO1A2/rs11568563, Parkinson's disease (PD) MMRN1/rs6532197, Paget's disease OPTN/rs1561570; and we confirmed others, including PD MAPT/rs242557, systemic lupus erythematosus and ulcerative colitis IRF5/rs4728142, and type 1 diabetes mellitus RPS26/rs1701704. In our eGWAS, there was 2.9–3.3 fold enrichment (p<10?6) of significant cisSNPs with suggestive AD–risk association (p<10?3) in the Alzheimer's Disease Genetics Consortium GWAS. These results demonstrate the significant contributions of genetic factors to human brain gene expression, which are reliably detected across different brain regions and pathologies. The significant enrichment of brain cisSNPs among disease-associated variants advocates gene expression changes as a mechanism for many central nervous system (CNS) and non–CNS diseases. Combined assessment of expression and disease GWAS may provide complementary information in discovery of human disease variants with functional implications. Our findings have implications for the design and interpretation of eGWAS in general and the use of brain expression quantitative trait loci in the study of human disease genetics. PMID:22685416

Crook, Julia; Pankratz, V. Shane; Carrasquillo, Minerva M.; Rowley, Christopher N.; Nair, Asha A.; Middha, Sumit; Maharjan, Sooraj; Nguyen, Thuy; Ma, Li; Malphrus, Kimberly G.; Palusak, Ryan; Lincoln, Sarah; Bisceglio, Gina; Georgescu, Constantin; Kouri, Naomi; Kolbert, Christopher P.; Jen, Jin; Haines, Jonathan L.; Mayeux, Richard; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; Farrer, Lindsay A.; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Petersen, Ronald C.; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Dickson, Dennis W.; Younkin, Steven G.; Ertekin-Taner, Nilüfer

2012-01-01

165

Identifying gene clusters by discovering common intervals in indeterminate strings  

PubMed Central

Background Comparative analyses of chromosomal gene orders are successfully used to predict gene clusters in bacterial and fungal genomes. Present models for detecting sets of co-localized genes in chromosomal sequences require prior knowledge of gene family assignments of genes in the dataset of interest. These families are often computationally predicted on the basis of sequence similarity or higher order features of gene products. Errors introduced in this process amplify in subsequent gene order analyses and thus may deteriorate gene cluster prediction. Results In this work, we present a new dynamic model and efficient computational approaches for gene cluster prediction suitable in scenarios ranging from traditional gene family-based gene cluster prediction, via multiple conflicting gene family annotations, to gene family-free analysis, in which gene clusters are predicted solely on the basis of a pairwise similarity measure of the genes of different genomes. We evaluate our gene family-free model against a gene family-based model on a dataset of 93 bacterial genomes. Conclusions Our model is able to detect gene clusters that would be also detected with well-established gene family-based approaches. Moreover, we show that it is able to detect conserved regions which are missed by gene family-based methods due to wrong or deficient gene family assignments.

2014-01-01

166

Association of the T-cell regulatory gene CTLA4 with susceptibility to autoimmune disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Genes and mechanisms involved in common complex diseases, such as the autoimmune disorders that affect approximately 5% of the population, remain obscure. Here we identify polymorphisms of the cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen 4 gene (CTLA4)-which encodes a vital negative regulatory molecule of the immune system-as candidates for primary determinants of risk of the common autoimmune disorders Graves' disease, autoimmune hypothyroidism

Hironori Ueda; Joanna M. M. Howson; Laura Esposito; Joanne Heward; Hywel Snook; Giselle Chamberlain; Daniel B. Rainbow; Kara M. D. Hunter; Annabel N. Smith; Gianfranco Di Genova; Mathias H. Herr; Ingrid Dahlman; Felicity Payne; Deborah Smyth; Christopher Lowe; Rebecca C. J. Twells; Sarah Howlett; Barry Healy; Sarah Nutland; Helen E. Rance; Vin Everett; Luc J. Smink; Alex C. Lam; Heather J. Cordell; Neil M. Walker; Cristina Bordin; John Hulme; Costantino Motzo; Francesco Cucca; J. Fred Hess; Michael L. Metzker; Jane Rogers; Simon Gregory; Amit Allahabadia; Ratnasingam Nithiyananthan; Eva Tuomilehto-Wolf; Jaakko Tuomilehto; Polly Bingley; Kathleen M. Gillespie; Dag E. Undlien; Kjersti S. Rønningen; Cristian Guja; Constantin Ionescu-Tîrgoviste; David A. Savage; A. Peter Maxwell; Dennis J. Carson; Chris C. Patterson; Jayne A. Franklyn; David G. Clayton; Laurence B. Peterson; Linda S. Wicker; John A. Todd; Stephen C. L. Gough

2003-01-01

167

Integrated Model of De Novo and Inherited Genetic Variants Yields Greater Power to Identify Risk Genes  

PubMed Central

De novo mutations affect risk for many diseases and disorders, especially those with early-onset. An example is autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Four recent whole-exome sequencing (WES) studies of ASD families revealed a handful of novel risk genes, based on independent de novo loss-of-function (LoF) mutations falling in the same gene, and found that de novo LoF mutations occurred at a twofold higher rate than expected by chance. However successful these studies were, they used only a small fraction of the data, excluding other types of de novo mutations and inherited rare variants. Moreover, such analyses cannot readily incorporate data from case-control studies. An important research challenge in gene discovery, therefore, is to develop statistical methods that accommodate a broader class of rare variation. We develop methods that can incorporate WES data regarding de novo mutations, inherited variants present, and variants identified within cases and controls. TADA, for Transmission And De novo Association, integrates these data by a gene-based likelihood model involving parameters for allele frequencies and gene-specific penetrances. Inference is based on a Hierarchical Bayes strategy that borrows information across all genes to infer parameters that would be difficult to estimate for individual genes. In addition to theoretical development we validated TADA using realistic simulations mimicking rare, large-effect mutations affecting risk for ASD and show it has dramatically better power than other common methods of analysis. Thus TADA's integration of various kinds of WES data can be a highly effective means of identifying novel risk genes. Indeed, application of TADA to WES data from subjects with ASD and their families, as well as from a study of ASD subjects and controls, revealed several novel and promising ASD candidate genes with strong statistical support. PMID:23966865

He, Xin; Sanders, Stephan J.; Liu, Li; De Rubeis, Silvia; Lim, Elaine T.; Sutcliffe, James S.; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Daly, Mark J.; Buxbaum, Joseph D.; State, Matthew W.; Devlin, Bernie; Roeder, Kathryn

2013-01-01

168

Prioritizing genes of potential relevance to diseases affected by sex hormones: an example of Myasthenia Gravis  

PubMed Central

Background About 5% of western populations are afflicted by autoimmune diseases many of which are affected by sex hormones. Autoimmune diseases are complex and involve many genes. Identifying these disease-associated genes contributes to development of more effective therapies. Also, association studies frequently imply genomic regions that contain disease-associated genes but fall short of pinpointing these genes. The identification of disease-associated genes has always been challenging and to date there is no universal and effective method developed. Results We have developed a method to prioritize disease-associated genes for diseases affected strongly by sex hormones. Our method uses various types of information available for the genes, but no information that directly links genes with the disease. It generates a score for each of the considered genes and ranks genes based on that score. We illustrate our method on early-onset myasthenia gravis (MG) using genes potentially controlled by estrogen and localized in a genomic segment (which contains the MHC and surrounding region) strongly associated with MG. Based on the considered genomic segment 283 genes are ranked for their relevance to MG and responsiveness to estrogen. The top three ranked genes, HLA-G, TAP2 and HLA-DRB1, are implicated in autoimmune diseases, while TAP2 is associated with SNPs characteristic for MG. Within the top 35 prioritized genes our method identifies 90% of the 10 already known MG-associated genes from the considered region without using any information that directly links genes to MG. Among the top eight genes we identified HLA-G and TUBB as new candidates. We show that our ab-initio approach outperforms the other methods for prioritizing disease-associated genes. Conclusion We have developed a method to prioritize disease-associated genes under the potential control of sex hormones. We demonstrate the success of this method by prioritizing the genes localized in the MHC and surrounding region and evaluating the role of these genes as potential candidates for estrogen control as well as MG. We show that our method outperforms the other methods. The method has a potential to be adapted to prioritize genes relevant to other diseases. PMID:18851734

Kaur, Mandeep; Schmeier, Sebastian; MacPherson, Cameron R; Hofmann, Oliver; Hide, Winston A; Taylor, Stephen; Willcox, Nick; Bajic, Vladimir B

2008-01-01

169

TimeXNet: Identifying active gene sub-networks using time-course gene expression profiles  

PubMed Central

Background Time-course gene expression profiles are frequently used to provide insight into the changes in cellular state over time and to infer the molecular pathways involved. When combined with large-scale molecular interaction networks, such data can provide information about the dynamics of cellular response to stimulus. However, few tools are currently available to predict a single active gene sub-network from time-course gene expression profiles. Results We introduce a tool, TimeXNet, which identifies active gene sub-networks with temporal paths using time-course gene expression profiles in the context of a weighted gene regulatory and protein-protein interaction network. TimeXNet uses a specialized form of the network flow optimization approach to identify the most probable paths connecting the genes with significant changes in expression at consecutive time intervals. TimeXNet has been extensively evaluated for its ability to predict novel regulators and their associated pathways within active gene sub-networks in the mouse innate immune response and the yeast osmotic stress response. Compared to other similar methods, TimeXNet identified up to 50% more novel regulators from independent experimental datasets. It predicted paths within a greater number of known pathways with longer overlaps (up to 7 consecutive edges) within these pathways. TimeXNet was also shown to be robust in the presence of varying amounts of noise in the molecular interaction network. Conclusions TimeXNet is a reliable tool that can be used to study cellular response to stimuli through the identification of time-dependent active gene sub-networks in diverse biological systems. It is significantly better than other similar tools. TimeXNet is implemented in Java as a stand-alone application and supported on Linux, MS Windows and Macintosh. The output of TimeXNet can be directly viewed in Cytoscape. TimeXNet is freely available for non-commercial users. PMID:25522063

2014-01-01

170

Diametrical clustering for identifying anti-correlated gene clusters  

Microsoft Academic Search

Motivation: Clustering genes based upon their expres- sion patterns allows us to predict gene function. Most existing clus- tering algorithms cluster genes together when their expression pat- terns show high positive correlation. However, it has been observed that genes whose expression patterns are strongly anti-correlated can also be functionally similar. Biologically, this is not unintuitive ó genes responding to the

Inderjit S. Dhillon; Edward M. Marcotte; Usman Roshan

2003-01-01

171

Gene expression profile analysis identifies metastasis and chemoresistance-associated genes in epithelial ovarian carcinoma cells.  

PubMed

The purpose of this study was to identify genes that associated with higher ability of metastasis and chemotherapic resistance in epithelial ovarian carcinoma (EOC) cells. An oligonucleotide microarray with probe sets complementary to 41,000(+) unique human genes and transcripts was used to determine whether gene expression profile may differentiate three epithelial ovarian cell lines (RMG-I-C, COC1 and HO8910) from their sub-lines (RMG-I-H, COCI/DDP and HO8910/PM) with higher ability of metastasis and chemotherapic resistance. Quantitative real-time PCR and immunohistochemical staining validated the microarray results. Hierarchic cluster analysis of gene expression identified 49 genes that exhibited ?2.0-fold change and P value ?0.05. Highly differential expression of GCET2, NLRP4, FOXP1 and SNX29 genes was validated by quantitative PCR in all cell line samples. Finally, FOXP1 was validated at the protein level by immunohistochemistry in paraffin embedded ovarian tissues (i.e., for metastasis, 15 primary EOC and 10 omental metastasis [OM]; for chemoresistance, 13 sensitive and 13 resistant EOC). The identification of higher ability of metastasis and chemotherapic resistance-associated genes may provide a foundation for the development of new type-specific diagnostic strategies and treatment for metastasis and chemotherapic resistance in epithelial ovarian cancer. PMID:25502083

Zhu, Liancheng; Hu, Zhenhua; Liu, Juanjuan; Gao, Jian; Lin, Bei

2015-01-01

172

Previously unidentified changes in renal cell carcinoma gene expression identified by parametric analysis of microarray data  

PubMed Central

Background Renal cell carcinoma is a common malignancy that often presents as a metastatic-disease for which there are no effective treatments. To gain insights into the mechanism of renal cell carcinogenesis, a number of genome-wide expression profiling studies have been performed. Surprisingly, there is very poor agreement among these studies as to which genes are differentially regulated. To better understand this lack of agreement we profiled renal cell tumor gene expression using genome-wide microarrays (45,000 probe sets) and compare our analysis to previous microarray studies. Methods We hybridized total RNA isolated from renal cell tumors and adjacent normal tissue to Affymetrix U133A and U133B arrays. We removed samples with technical defects and removed probesets that failed to exhibit sequence-specific hybridization in any of the samples. We detected differential gene expression in the resulting dataset with parametric methods and identified keywords that are overrepresented in the differentially expressed genes with the Fisher-exact test. Results We identify 1,234 genes that are more than three-fold changed in renal tumors by t-test, 800 of which have not been previously reported to be altered in renal cell tumors. Of the only 37 genes that have been identified as being differentially expressed in three or more of five previous microarray studies of renal tumor gene expression, our analysis finds 33 of these genes (89%). A key to the sensitivity and power of our analysis is filtering out defective samples and genes that are not reliably detected. Conclusions The widespread use of sample-wise voting schemes for detecting differential expression that do not control for false positives likely account for the poor overlap among previous studies. Among the many genes we identified using parametric methods that were not previously reported as being differentially expressed in renal cell tumors are several oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes that likely play important roles in renal cell carcinogenesis. This highlights the need for rigorous statistical approaches in microarray studies. PMID:14641932

Lenburg, Marc E; Liou, Louis S; Gerry, Norman P; Frampton, Garrett M; Cohen, Herbert T; Christman, Michael F

2003-01-01

173

Identifying Unstable Regions of Proteins Involved in Misfolding Diseases  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Protein misfolding is a necessary step in the pathogenesis of many diseases, including Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) and familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (fALS). Identifying unstable structural elements in their causative proteins elucidates the early events of misfolding and presents targets for inhibition of the disease process. An algorithm was developed to calculate the Gibbs free energy of unfolding for all sequence-contiguous regions of a protein using three methods to parameterize energy changes: a modified G=o model, changes in solvent-accessible surface area, and all-atoms molecular dynamics. The entropic effects of disulfide bonds and post-translational modifications are treated analytically. It incorporates a novel method for finding local dielectric constants inside a protein to accurately handle charge effects. We have predicted the unstable parts of prion protein and superoxide dismutase 1, the proteins involved in CJD and fALS respectively, and have used these regions as epitopes to prepare antibodies that are specific to the misfolded conformation and show promise as therapeutic agents.

Guest, Will; Cashman, Neil; Plotkin, Steven

2009-05-01

174

A modified entropy-based approach for identifying gene-gene interactions in case-control study.  

PubMed

Gene-gene interactions may play an important role in the genetics of a complex disease. Detection and characterization of gene-gene interactions is a challenging issue that has stimulated the development of various statistical methods to address it. In this study, we introduce a method to measure gene interactions using entropy-based statistics from a contingency table of trait and genotype combinations. We also developed an exploration procedure by using graphs. We propose a standardized relative information gain (RIG) measure to evaluate the interactions between single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) combinations. To identify the k (th) order interactions, contingency tables of trait and genotype combinations of k SNPs are constructed, with which RIGs are calculated. The RIGs are standardized using the mean and standard deviation from the permuted datasets. SNP combinations yielding high standardized RIG are chosen for gene-gene interactions. Detection of high-order interactions and comparison of interaction strengths between different orders are made possible by using standardized RIG. We have applied the proposed standardized entropy-based method to two types of data sets from a simulation study and a real genetic association study. We have compared our method and the multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR) method through power analysis of eight different genetic models with varying penetrance rates, number of SNPs, and sample sizes. Our method shows successful identification of genetic associations and gene-gene interactions both in simulation and real genetic data. Simulation results suggest that the proposed entropy-based method is better able to detect high-order interactions and is superior to the MDR method in most cases. The proposed method is well suited for detecting interactions without main effects as well as for models including main effects. PMID:23874943

Yee, Jaeyong; Kwon, Min-Seok; Park, Taesung; Park, Mira

2013-01-01

175

A New Strategy to Identify and Annotate Human RPE-Specific Gene Expression  

PubMed Central

Background To identify and functionally annotate cell type-specific gene expression in the human retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), a key tissue involved in age-related macular degeneration and retinitis pigmentosa. Methodology RPE, photoreceptor and choroidal cells were isolated from selected freshly frozen healthy human donor eyes using laser microdissection. RNA isolation, amplification and hybridization to 44 k microarrays was carried out according to Agilent specifications. Bioinformatics was carried out using Rosetta Resolver, David and Ingenuity software. Principal Findings Our previous 22 k analysis of the RPE transcriptome showed that the RPE has high levels of protein synthesis, strong energy demands, is exposed to high levels of oxidative stress and a variable degree of inflammation. We currently use a complementary new strategy aimed at the identification and functional annotation of RPE-specific expressed transcripts. This strategy takes advantage of the multilayered cellular structure of the retina and overcomes a number of limitations of previous studies. In triplicate, we compared the transcriptomes of RPE, photoreceptor and choroidal cells and we deduced RPE specific expression. We identified at least 114 entries with RPE-specific gene expression. Thirty-nine of these 114 genes also show high expression in the RPE, comparison with the literature showed that 85% of these 39 were previously identified to be expressed in the RPE. In the group of 114 RPE specific genes there was an overrepresentation of genes involved in (membrane) transport, vision and ophthalmic disease. More fundamentally, we found RPE-specific involvement in the RAR-activation, retinol metabolism and GABA receptor signaling pathways. Conclusions In this study we provide a further specification and understanding of the RPE transcriptome by identifying and analyzing genes that are specifically expressed in the RPE. PMID:20479888

Booij, Judith C.; ten Brink, Jacoline B.; Swagemakers, Sigrid M. A.; Verkerk, Annemieke J. M. H.; Essing, Anke H. W.; van der Spek, Peter J.; Bergen, Arthur A. B.

2010-01-01

176

Analysis of human genes with protein-protein interaction network for detecting disease genes  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

The topological features of disease genes and non-disease genes were widely utilized in disease genes prediction. However, previous studies neglected to exploit essential genes to distinguish disease genes and non-disease genes. Therefore, this paper firstly takes essential genes as reference to analyze the topological properties of human genes with protein-protein interaction network. Empirical results demonstrate that nonessential disease genes are topologically more important and closer to the center of the network than other genes (unknown genes, which are deemed as non-disease genes in disease genes prediction). Although disease genes are closer to essential genes, we find that the influence of disease genes on essential genes is similar with other genes, or even weaker. Further, we generate new topological features according to our findings and validate the effectiveness of combining the additional features for detecting disease genes. In addition, we find that the k-shell index (ks) of protein-protein network follows a power law distribution, and the function of the proteins with the largest ks may deserve further research.

Wu, Shun-yao; Shao, Feng-jing; Sun, Ren-cheng; Sui, Yi; Wang, Ying; Wang, Jin-long

2014-03-01

177

A molecular signature in blood identifies early Parkinson’s disease  

PubMed Central

Background The search for biomarkers in Parkinson’s disease (PD) is crucial to identify the disease early and monitor the effectiveness of neuroprotective therapies. We aim to assess whether a gene signature could be detected in blood from early/mild PD patients that could support the diagnosis of early PD, focusing on genes found particularly altered in the substantia nigra of sporadic PD. Results The transcriptional expression of seven selected genes was examined in blood samples from 62 early stage PD patients and 64 healthy age-matched controls. Stepwise multivariate logistic regression analysis identified five genes as optimal predictors of PD: p19 S-phase kinase-associated protein 1A (odds ratio [OR] 0.73; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.60–0.90), huntingtin interacting protein-2 (OR 1.32; CI 1.08–1.61), aldehyde dehydrogenase family 1 subfamily A1 (OR 0.86; 95% CI 0.75–0.99), 19?S proteasomal protein PSMC4 (OR 0.73; 95% CI 0.60–0.89) and heat shock 70-kDa protein 8 (OR 1.39; 95% CI 1.14–1.70). At a 0.5 cut-off the gene panel yielded a sensitivity and specificity in detecting PD of 90.3 and 89.1 respectively and the area under the receiving operating curve (ROC AUC) was 0.96. The performance of the five-gene classifier on the de novo PD individuals alone composing the early PD cohort (n?=?38), resulted in a similar ROC with an AUC of 0.95, indicating the stability of the model and also, that patient medication had no significant effect on the predictive probability (PP) of the classifier for PD risk. The predictive ability of the model was validated in an independent cohort of 30 patients at advanced stage of PD, classifying correctly all cases as PD (100% sensitivity). Notably, the nominal average value of the PP for PD (0.95 (SD?=?0.09)) in this cohort was higher than that of the early PD group (0.83 (SD?=?0.22)), suggesting a potential for the model to assess disease severity. Lastly, the gene panel fully discriminated between PD and Alzheimer’s disease (n?=?29). Conclusions The findings provide evidence on the ability of a five-gene panel to diagnose early/mild PD, with a possible diagnostic value for detection of asymptomatic PD before overt expression of the disorder. PMID:22651796

2012-01-01

178

Integrative literature and data mining to rank disease candidate genes.  

PubMed

While the genomics-derived discoveries promise benefits to basic research and health care, the speed and affordability of sequencing following recent technological advances has further aggravated the data deluge. Seamless integration of the ever-increasing clinical, genomic, and experimental data and efficient mining for knowledge extraction, delivering actionable insight and generating testable hypotheses are therefore critical for the needs of biomedical research. For instance, high-throughput techniques are frequently applied to detect disease candidate genes. Experimental validation of these candidates however is both time-consuming and expensive. Hence, several computational approaches based on literature and data mining have been developed to identify the most promising candidates for follow-up studies. Based on "guilt by association" principle, most of these methods use prior knowledge about a disease of interest to discover and rank novel candidate genes. In this chapter, we provide a brief overview of recent advances made in literature- and data-mining-based approaches for candidate gene prioritization. As a case study, we focus on a Web-based computational approach that uses integrated heterogeneous data sources including gene-literature associations for ranking disease candidate genes and explain how to run typical queries using this system. PMID:24788269

Wu, Chao; Zhu, Cheng; Jegga, Anil G

2014-01-01

179

Expressed sequences tags of the anther smut fungus, Microbotryum violaceum, identify mating and pathogenicity genes  

PubMed Central

Background The basidiomycete fungus Microbotryum violaceum is responsible for the anther-smut disease in many plants of the Caryophyllaceae family and is a model in genetics and evolutionary biology. Infection is initiated by dikaryotic hyphae produced after the conjugation of two haploid sporidia of opposite mating type. This study describes M. violaceum ESTs corresponding to nuclear genes expressed during conjugation and early hyphal production. Results A normalized cDNA library generated 24,128 sequences, which were assembled into 7,765 unique genes; 25.2% of them displayed significant similarity to annotated proteins from other organisms, 74.3% a weak similarity to the same set of known proteins, and 0.5% were orphans. We identified putative pheromone receptors and genes that in other fungi are involved in the mating process. We also identified many sequences similar to genes known to be involved in pathogenicity in other fungi. The M. violaceum EST database, MICROBASE, is available on the Web and provides access to the sequences, assembled contigs, annotations and programs to compare similarities against MICROBASE. Conclusion This study provides a basis for cloning the mating type locus, for further investigation of pathogenicity genes in the anther smut fungi, and for comparative genomics. PMID:17692127

Yockteng, Roxana; Marthey, Sylvain; Chiapello, Hélène; Gendrault, Annie; Hood, Michael E; Rodolphe, François; Devier, Benjamin; Wincker, Patrick; Dossat, Carole; Giraud, Tatiana

2007-01-01

180

Inferring Gene Family Histories in Yeast Identifies Lineage Specific Expansions  

E-print Network

The complement of genes found in the genome is a balance between gene gain and gene loss. Knowledge of the specific genes that are gained and lost over evolutionary time allows an understanding of the evolution of biological functions. Here we use...

Ames, Ryan M.; Money, Daniel; Lovell, Simon C.

2014-06-12

181

MMTV insertional mutagenesis identifies genes, gene families and pathways involved in mammary cancer  

Microsoft Academic Search

We performed a high-throughput retroviral insertional mutagenesis screen in mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV)-induced mammary tumors and identified 33 common insertion sites, of which 17 genes were previously not known to be associated with mammary cancer and 13 had not previously been linked to cancer in general. Although members of the Wnt and fibroblast growth factors (Fgf) families were frequently

Vassiliki Theodorou; Melanie A Kimm; Mandy Boer; Lodewyk Wessels; Wendy Theelen; Jos Jonkers; John Hilkens

2007-01-01

182

Whole-exome sequencing identifies rare pathogenic variants in new predisposition genes for familial colorectal cancer  

PubMed Central

Purpose: Colorectal cancer is an important cause of mortality in the developed world. Hereditary forms are due to germ-line mutations in APC, MUTYH, and the mismatch repair genes, but many cases present familial aggregation but an unknown inherited cause. The hypothesis of rare high-penetrance mutations in new genes is a likely explanation for the underlying predisposition in some of these familial cases. Methods: Exome sequencing was performed in 43 patients with colorectal cancer from 29 families with strong disease aggregation without mutations in known hereditary colorectal cancer genes. Data analysis selected only very rare variants (0–0.1%), producing a putative loss of function and located in genes with a role compatible with cancer. Variants in genes previously involved in hereditary colorectal cancer or nearby previous colorectal cancer genome-wide association study hits were also chosen. Results: Twenty-eight final candidate variants were selected and validated by Sanger sequencing. Correct family segregation and somatic studies were used to categorize the most interesting variants in CDKN1B, XRCC4, EPHX1, NFKBIZ, SMARCA4, and BARD1. Conclusion: We identified new potential colorectal cancer predisposition variants in genes that have a role in cancer predisposition and are involved in DNA repair and the cell cycle, which supports their putative involvement in germ-line predisposition to this neoplasm. PMID:25058500

Esteban-Jurado, Clara; Vila-Casadesús, Maria; Garre, Pilar; Lozano, Juan José; Pristoupilova, Anna; Beltran, Sergi; Muñoz, Jenifer; Ocaña, Teresa; Balaguer, Francesc; López-Cerón, Maria; Cuatrecasas, Miriam; Franch-Expósito, Sebastià; Piqué, Josep M.; Castells, Antoni; Carracedo, Angel; Ruiz-Ponte, Clara; Abulí, Anna; Bessa, Xavier; Andreu, Montserrat; Bujanda, Luis; Caldés, Trinidad; Castellví-Bel, Sergi

2015-01-01

183

First 'Epigenomes' Map Highlights How Genes Spur Health, Disease  

MedlinePLUS

... please enable JavaScript. First 'Epigenomes' Map Highlights How Genes Spur Health, Disease Epigenomes involve processes that switch ... Mozes Wednesday, February 18, 2015 Related MedlinePlus Pages Genes and Gene Therapy Genetic Testing WEDNESDAY, Feb. 18, ...

184

Identification of disease-causing genes using microarray data mining and Gene Ontology  

PubMed Central

Background One of the best and most accurate methods for identifying disease-causing genes is monitoring gene expression values in different samples using microarray technology. One of the shortcomings of microarray data is that they provide a small quantity of samples with respect to the number of genes. This problem reduces the classification accuracy of the methods, so gene selection is essential to improve the predictive accuracy and to identify potential marker genes for a disease. Among numerous existing methods for gene selection, support vector machine-based recursive feature elimination (SVMRFE) has become one of the leading methods, but its performance can be reduced because of the small sample size, noisy data and the fact that the method does not remove redundant genes. Methods We propose a novel framework for gene selection which uses the advantageous features of conventional methods and addresses their weaknesses. In fact, we have combined the Fisher method and SVMRFE to utilize the advantages of a filtering method as well as an embedded method. Furthermore, we have added a redundancy reduction stage to address the weakness of the Fisher method and SVMRFE. In addition to gene expression values, the proposed method uses Gene Ontology which is a reliable source of information on genes. The use of Gene Ontology can compensate, in part, for the limitations of microarrays, such as having a small number of samples and erroneous measurement results. Results The proposed method has been applied to colon, Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma (DLBCL) and prostate cancer datasets. The empirical results show that our method has improved classification performance in terms of accuracy, sensitivity and specificity. In addition, the study of the molecular function of selected genes strengthened the hypothesis that these genes are involved in the process of cancer growth. Conclusions The proposed method addresses the weakness of conventional methods by adding a redundancy reduction stage and utilizing Gene Ontology information. It predicts marker genes for colon, DLBCL and prostate cancer with a high accuracy. The predictions made in this study can serve as a list of candidates for subsequent wet-lab verification and might help in the search for a cure for cancers. PMID:21269461

2011-01-01

185

Associating Genes and Protein Complexes with Disease via Network Propagation  

E-print Network

-factorial diseases for which some causal genes have been found already: prostate cancer, alzheimer and type 2Associating Genes and Protein Complexes with Disease via Network Propagation Oron Vanunu1. , Oded A fundamental challenge in human health is the identification of disease-causing genes. Recently, several

Ruppin, Eytan

186

Identifying A?-specific pathogenic mechanisms using a nematode model of Alzheimer's disease.  

PubMed

Multiple gene expression alterations have been linked to Alzheimer's disease (AD), implicating multiple metabolic pathways in its pathogenesis. However, a clear distinction between AD-specific gene expression changes and those resulting from nonspecific responses to toxic aggregating proteins has not been made. We investigated alterations in gene expression induced by human beta-amyloid peptide (A?) in a Caenorhabditis elegans AD model. A?-induced gene expression alterations were compared with those caused by a synthetic aggregating protein to identify A?-specific effects. Both A?-specific and nonspecific alterations were observed. Among A?-specific genes were those involved in aging, proteasome function, and mitochondrial function. An intriguing observation was the significant overlap between gene expression changes induced by A? and those induced by Cry5B, a bacterial pore-forming toxin. This led us to hypothesize that A? exerts its toxic effect, at least in part, by causing damage to biological membranes. We provide in vivo evidence consistent with this hypothesis. This study distinguishes between A?-specific and nonspecific mechanisms and provides potential targets for therapeutics discovery. PMID:25457027

Hassan, Wail M; Dostal, Vishantie; Huemann, Brady N; Yerg, John E; Link, Christopher D

2015-02-01

187

Linkage and mutational analysis of familial Alzheimer disease kindreds for the APP gene region  

Microsoft Academic Search

A large number of familial Alzheimer disease (FAD) kindreds were examined to determine whether mutations in the amyloid precursor protein (APP) gene could be responsible for the disease. Previous studies have identified three mutations at APP codon 717 which are pathogenic for Alzheimer disease (AD). Samples from affected subjects were examined for mutations in exons 16 and 17 of the

K. Kamino; L. Anderson; S. Odahl; E. Nemens; T. D. Bird; G. D. Schellenberg; E. M. Wijsman; W. Kukall; E. Larson; L. L. Heston

1992-01-01

188

Fluid Mechanics, Arterial Disease, and Gene Expression  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This review places modern research developments in vascular mechanobiology in the context of hemodynamic phenomena in the cardiovascular system and the discrete localization of vascular disease. The modern origins of this field are traced, beginning in the 1960s when associations between flow characteristics, particularly blood flow-induced wall shear stress, and the localization of atherosclerotic plaques were uncovered, and continuing to fluid shear stress effects on the vascular lining endothelial cells (ECs), including their effects on EC morphology, biochemical production, and gene expression. The earliest single-gene studies and genome-wide analyses are considered. The final section moves from the ECs lining the vessel wall to the smooth muscle cells and fibroblasts within the wall that are fluid mechanically activated by interstitial flow that imposes shear stresses on their surfaces comparable with those of flowing blood on EC surfaces. Interstitial flow stimulates biochemical production and gene expression, much like blood flow on ECs.

Tarbell, John M.; Shi, Zhong-Dong; Dunn, Jessilyn; Jo, Hanjoong

2014-01-01

189

Fluid Mechanics, Arterial Disease, and Gene Expression  

PubMed Central

This review places modern research developments in vascular mechanobiology in the context of hemodynamic phenomena in the cardiovascular system and the discrete localization of vascular disease. The modern origins of this field are traced, beginning in the 1960s when associations between flow characteristics, particularly blood flow–induced wall shear stress, and the localization of atherosclerotic plaques were uncovered, and continuing to fluid shear stress effects on the vascular lining endothelial) cells (ECs), including their effects on EC morphology, biochemical production, and gene expression. The earliest single-gene studies and genome-wide analyses are considered. The final section moves from the ECs lining the vessel wall to the smooth muscle cells and fibroblasts within the wall that are fluid me chanically activated by interstitial flow that imposes shear stresses on their surfaces comparable with those of flowing blood on EC surfaces. Interstitial flow stimulates biochemical production and gene expression, much like blood flow on ECs. PMID:25360054

Tarbell, John M.; Shi, Zhong-Dong; Dunn, Jessilyn; Jo, Hanjoong

2014-01-01

190

PKD2, a Gene for Polycystic Kidney Disease That Encodes an Integral Membrane Protein  

Microsoft Academic Search

A second gene for autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease was identified by positional cloning. Nonsense mutations in this gene (PKD2) segregated with the disease in three PKD2 families. The predicted 968-amino acid sequence of the PKD2 gene product has six transmembrane spans with intracellular amino- and carboxyl-termini. The PKD2 protein has amino acid similarity with PKD1, the Caenorhabditis elegans homolog

Toshio Mochizuki; Guanqing Wu; Tomohito Hayashi; Stavroulla L. Xenophontos; Barbera Veldhuisen; Jasper J. Saris; David M. Reynolds; Yiqiang Cai; Patricia A. Gabow; Alkis Pierides; William J. Kimberling; Martijn H. Breuning; C. Constantinou Deltas; Dorien J. M. Peters; Stefan Somlo

1996-01-01

191

Identifying Physical Activity-Associated Neuroprotective Gene Transcripts.  

E-print Network

??Mild, moderate, and vigorous physical activity are associated with decreased risks of Alzheimers disease, Parkinsons disease, and a decreased infarct from stroke. Physical activity increases… (more)

Mitchell, Amanda Christine

2011-01-01

192

Bioinformatic Screening of Autoimmune Disease Genes and Protein Structure Prediction with FAMS for Drug Discovery  

PubMed Central

Autoimmune diseases are often intractable because their causes are unknown. Identifying which genes contribute to these diseases may allow us to understand the pathogenesis, but it is difficult to determine which genes contribute to disease. Recently, epigenetic information has been considered to activate/deactivate disease-related genes. Thus, it may also be useful to study epigenetic information that differs between healthy controls and patients with autoimmune disease. Among several types of epigenetic information, promoter methylation is believed to be one of the most important factors. Here, we propose that principal component analysis is useful to identify specific gene promoters that are differently methylated between the normal healthy controls and patients with autoimmune disease. Full Automatic Modeling System (FAMS) was used to predict the three-dimensional structures of selected proteins and successfully inferred relatively confident structures. Several possibilities of the application to the drug discovery based on obtained structures are discussed. PMID:23855671

Ishida, Shigeharu; Umeyama, Hideaki; Iwadate, Mitsuo; Y-h, Taguchi

2014-01-01

193

Knowledge-based compact disease models identify new molecular players contributing to early-stage Alzheimer’s disease  

PubMed Central

Background High-throughput profiling of human tissues typically yield as results the gene lists comprised of a mix of relevant molecular entities with multiple false positives that obstruct the translation of such results into mechanistic hypotheses. From general probabilistic considerations, gene lists distilled for the mechanistically relevant components can be far more useful for subsequent experimental design or data interpretation. Results The input candidate gene lists were processed into different tiers of evidence consistency established by enrichment analysis across subsets of the same experiments and across different experiments and platforms. The cut-offs were established empirically through ontological and semantic enrichment; resultant shortened gene list was re-expanded by Ingenuity Pathway Assistant tool. The resulting sub-networks provided the basis for generating mechanistic hypotheses that were partially validated by literature search. This approach differs from previous consistency-based studies in that the cut-off on the Receiver Operating Characteristic of the true-false separation process is optimized by flexible selection of the consistency building procedure. The gene list distilled by this analytic technique and its network representation were termed Compact Disease Model (CDM). Here we present the CDM signature for the study of early-stage Alzheimer’s disease. The integrated analysis of this gene signature allowed us to identify the protein traffic vesicles as prominent players in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s. Considering the distances and complexity of protein trafficking in neurons, it is plausible that spontaneous protein misfolding along with a shortage of growth stimulation result in neurodegeneration. Several potentially overlapping scenarios of early-stage Alzheimer pathogenesis have been discussed, with an emphasis on the protective effects of AT-1 mediated antihypertensive response on cytoskeleton remodeling, along with neuronal activation of oncogenes, luteinizing hormone signaling and insulin-related growth regulation, forming a pleiotropic model of its early stages. Alignment with emerging literature confirmed many predictions derived from early-stage Alzheimer’s disease’ CDM. Conclusions A flexible approach for high-throughput data analysis, the Compact Disease Model generation, allows extraction of meaningful, mechanism-centered gene sets compatible with instant translation of the results into testable hypotheses. PMID:24196233

2013-01-01

194

A functional screen for copper homeostasis genes identifies a pharmacologically tractable cellular system  

PubMed Central

Background Copper is essential for the survival of aerobic organisms. If copper is not properly regulated in the body however, it can be extremely cytotoxic and genetic mutations that compromise copper homeostasis result in severe clinical phenotypes. Understanding how cells maintain optimal copper levels is therefore highly relevant to human health. Results We found that addition of copper (Cu) to culture medium leads to increased respiratory growth of yeast, a phenotype which we then systematically and quantitatively measured in 5050 homozygous diploid deletion strains. Cu’s positive effect on respiratory growth was quantitatively reduced in deletion strains representing 73 different genes, the function of which identify increased iron uptake as a cause of the increase in growth rate. Conversely, these effects were enhanced in strains representing 93 genes. Many of these strains exhibited respiratory defects that were specifically rescued by supplementing the growth medium with Cu. Among the genes identified are known and direct regulators of copper homeostasis, genes required to maintain low vacuolar pH, and genes where evidence supporting a functional link with Cu has been heretofore lacking. Roughly half of the genes are conserved in man, and several of these are associated with Mendelian disorders, including the Cu-imbalance syndromes Menkes and Wilson’s disease. We additionally demonstrate that pharmacological agents, including the approved drug disulfiram, can rescue Cu-deficiencies of both environmental and genetic origin. Conclusions A functional screen in yeast has expanded the list of genes required for Cu-dependent fitness, revealing a complex cellular system with implications for human health. Respiratory fitness defects arising from perturbations in this system can be corrected with pharmacological agents that increase intracellular copper concentrations. PMID:24708151

2014-01-01

195

A novel method to identify gene-gene effects in nuclear families: the MDR-PDT.  

PubMed

It is now well recognized that gene-gene and gene-environment interactions are important in complex diseases, and statistical methods to detect interactions are becoming widespread. Traditional parametric approaches are limited in their ability to detect high-order interactions and handle sparse data, and standard stepwise procedures may miss interactions that occur in the absence of detectable main effects. To address these limitations, the multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR) method [Ritchie et al., 2001: Am J Hum Genet 69:138-147] was developed. The MDR is well-suited for examining high-order interactions and detecting interactions without main effects. The MDR was originally designed to analyze balanced case-control data. The analysis can use family data, but requires a single matched pair be selected from each family. This may be a discordant sib pair, or may be constructed from triad data when parents are available. To take advantage of additional affected and unaffected siblings requires a test statistic that measures the association of genotype with disease in general nuclear families. We have developed a novel test, the MDR-PDT, by merging the MDR method with the genotype-Pedigree Disequilibrium Test (geno-PDT)[Martin et al., 2003: Genet Epidemiol 25:203-213]. MDR-PDT allows identification of single-locus effects or joint effects of multiple loci in families of diverse structure. We present simulations to demonstrate the validity of the test and evaluate its power. To examine its applicability to real data, we applied the MDR-PDT to data from candidate genes for Alzheimer disease (AD) in a large family dataset. These results show the utility of the MDR-PDT for understanding the genetics of complex diseases. PMID:16374833

Martin, E R; Ritchie, M D; Hahn, L; Kang, S; Moore, J H

2006-02-01

196

Gene Network Analysis in a Pediatric Cohort Identifies Novel Lung Function Genes  

PubMed Central

Lung function is a heritable trait and serves as an important clinical predictor of morbidity and mortality for pulmonary conditions in adults, however, despite its importance, no studies have focused on uncovering pediatric-specific loci influencing lung function. To identify novel genetic determinants of pediatric lung function, we conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of four pulmonary function traits, including FVC, FEV1, FEV1/FVC and FEF25–75% in 1556 children. Further, we carried out gene network analyses for each trait including all SNPs with a P-value of <1.0×10?3 from the individual GWAS. The GWAS identified SNPs with notable trends towards association with the pulmonary function measures, including the previously described INTS12 locus association with FEV1 (pmeta?=?1.41×10?7). The gene network analyses identified 34 networks of genes associated with pulmonary function variables in Caucasians. Of those, the glycoprotein gene network reached genome-wide significance for all four variables. P-value range pmeta?=?6.29×10?4 - 2.80×10?8 on meta-analysis. In this study, we report on specific pathways that are significantly associated with pediatric lung function at genome-wide significance. In addition, we report the first loci associated with lung function in both pediatric Caucasian and African American populations. PMID:24023788

McDonough, Joseph M.; Wei, Zhi; Kim, Cecilia; Chiavacci, Rosetta; Mentch, Frank; Caboot, Jason B.; Spergel, Jonathan; Allen, Julian L.; Sleiman, Patrick M. A.; Hakonarson, Hakon

2013-01-01

197

Distinct epitopes of Ik gene products identified by monoclonal antibodies.  

PubMed

Analysis of reactivity of monoclonal anti-Iak alloantibodies, obtained by fusion between NS 1 myeloma and spleen cells from alloimmune A. TH mice, permitted the identification of 9 distinct determinants of the Ik gene products. Competitive binding experiments indicated that 2 private epitopes (defined by H8-109.13 and H8-138.4 antibodies) of the I-Ak product could be separated, thereby apparently splitting the Ia.2 specificity. A public determinant of the I-Ak molecule (identified by H8-15.9 antibody) was found expressed not only on the I-A products of the H-2b, H-2d, H-2ja, H-2p and H-2q murine haplotypes, but also on human HLA-DR antigens. Four determinants of the I-E/Ck antigen (defined by H7-8.26, H10-81.10, H10-93.2 and H8-86.2 antibodies) had a strain distribution analogues to the Ia.7 specificity. However, competitive binding experiments, and the cross-reactivity pattern with Ia-like antigens from other species (e.g. human HLA-DR antigens) indicated that these antibodies detected distinct determinants on the I-E/Ck molecule, thereby subdividing the broad Ia. 7 specificity. Two other determinants (defined by H9-14.8 and H9-15.4 antibodies) had a strain distribution that did not permit a precise assignment to a given Ia antigen, even though preliminary data suggested that they could detect separate determinants on the I-E/Ck product. All these monoclonal antibodies identified membrane antigens with the expected Ia tissue distribution pattern, and most of them could precipitate a molecule containing two chains of 28kD and 35kD, from mouse spleen cell lysates. PMID:6162651

Pierres, M; Kourilsky, F M; Rebouah, J P; Dosseto, M; Caillol, D

1980-12-01

198

Elevating crop disease resistance with cloned genes.  

PubMed

Essentially all plant species exhibit heritable genetic variation for resistance to a variety of plant diseases caused by fungi, bacteria, oomycetes or viruses. Disease losses in crop monocultures are already significant, and would be greater but for applications of disease-controlling agrichemicals. For sustainable intensification of crop production, we argue that disease control should as far as possible be achieved using genetics rather than using costly recurrent chemical sprays. The latter imply CO? emissions from diesel fuel and potential soil compaction from tractor journeys. Great progress has been made in the past 25 years in our understanding of the molecular basis of plant disease resistance mechanisms, and of how pathogens circumvent them. These insights can inform more sophisticated approaches to elevating disease resistance in crops that help us tip the evolutionary balance in favour of the crop and away from the pathogen. We illustrate this theme with an account of a genetically modified (GM) blight-resistant potato trial in Norwich, using the Rpi-vnt1.1 gene isolated from a wild relative of potato, Solanum venturii, and introduced by GM methods into the potato variety Desiree. PMID:24535396

Jones, Jonathan D G; Witek, Kamil; Verweij, Walter; Jupe, Florian; Cooke, David; Dorling, Stephen; Tomlinson, Laurence; Smoker, Matthew; Perkins, Sara; Foster, Simon

2014-04-01

199

CFTR gene mutations in isolated chronic obstructive pulmonary disease  

SciTech Connect

In order to identify a possible hereditary predisposition to the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), we have looked for the presence of cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) gene DNA sequence modifications in 28 unrelated patients with no signs of cystic fibrosis. The known mutations in Italian CF patients, as well as the most frequent worldwide CF mutations, were investigated. In addition, a denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis of about half of the coding sequence of the gene in 56 chromosomes from the patients and in 102 chromosomes from control individuals affected by other pulmonary diseases and from normal controls was performed. Nine different CFTR gene mutations and polymorphisms were found in seven patients, a highly significant increase over controls. Two of the patients were compound heterozygotes. Two frequent CF mutations were detected: deletion F508 and R117H; two rare CF mutations: R1066C and 3667ins4; and five CF sequence variants: R75Q (which was also described as a disease-causing mutation in male sterility cases due to the absence of the vasa deferentia), G576A, 2736 A{r_arrow}G, L997F, and 3271+18C{r_arrow}T. Seven (78%) of the mutations are localized in transmembrane domains. Six (86%) of the patients with defined mutations and polymorphisms had bronchiectasis. These results indicate that CFTR gene mutations and sequence alterations may be involved in the etiopathogenesis of some cases of COPD.

Pignatti, P.F.; Bombien, C.; Marigo, C. [and others

1994-09-01

200

Functional gene group analysis identifies synaptic gene groups as risk factor for schizophrenia  

PubMed Central

Schizophrenia is a highly heritable disorder with a polygenic pattern of inheritance and a population prevalence of ?1%. Previous studies have implicated synaptic dysfunction in schizophrenia. We tested the accumulated association of genetic variants in expert-curated synaptic gene groups with schizophrenia in 4673 cases and 4965 healthy controls, using functional gene group analysis. Identifying groups of genes with similar cellular function rather than genes in isolation may have clinical implications for finding additional drug targets. We found that a group of 1026 synaptic genes was significantly associated with the risk of schizophrenia (P=7.6 × 10?11) and more strongly associated than 100 randomly drawn, matched control groups of genetic variants (P<0.01). Subsequent analysis of synaptic subgroups suggested that the strongest association signals are derived from three synaptic gene groups: intracellular signal transduction (P=2.0 × 10?4), excitability (P=9.0 × 10?4) and cell adhesion and trans-synaptic signaling (P=2.4 × 10?3). These results are consistent with a role of synaptic dysfunction in schizophrenia and imply that impaired intracellular signal transduction in synapses, synaptic excitability and cell adhesion and trans-synaptic signaling play a role in the pathology of schizophrenia. PMID:21931320

Lips, E S; Cornelisse, L N; Toonen, R F; Min, J L; Hultman, C M; Holmans, P A; O'Donovan, M C; Purcell, S M; Smit, A B; Verhage, M; Sullivan, P F; Visscher, P M; Posthuma, D

2012-01-01

201

Alzheimer's Disease Risk Genes and Mechanisms of Disease Pathogenesis.  

PubMed

We review the genetic risk factors for late-onset Alzheimer's disease (AD) and their role in AD pathogenesis. More recent advances in understanding of the human genome-technologic advances in methods to analyze millions of polymorphisms in thousands of subjects-have revealed new genes associated with AD risk, including ABCA7, BIN1, CASS4, CD33, CD2AP, CELF1, CLU, CR1, DSG2, EPHA1, FERMT2, HLA-DRB5-DBR1, INPP5D, MS4A, MEF2C, NME8, PICALM, PTK2B, SLC24H4-RIN3, SORL1, and ZCWPW1. Emerging technologies to analyze the entire genome in large data sets have also revealed coding variants that increase AD risk: PLD3 and TREM2. We review the relationship between these AD risk genes and the cellular and neuropathologic features of AD. Understanding the mechanisms underlying the association of these genes with risk for disease will provide the most meaningful targets for therapeutic development to date. PMID:24951455

Karch, Celeste M; Goate, Alison M

2015-01-01

202

DGEM--a microarray gene expression database for primary human disease tissues.  

PubMed

Gene expression patterns can reflect gene regulations in human tissues under normal or pathologic conditions. Gene expression profiling data from studies of primary human disease samples are particularly valuable since these studies often span many years in order to collect patient clinical information and achieve a large sample size. Disease-to-Gene Expression Mapper (DGEM) provides a beneficial community resource to access and analyze these data; it currently includes Affymetrix oligonucleotide array datasets for more than 40 human diseases and 1400 samples. The data are normalized to the same scale and stored in a relational database. A statistical-analysis pipeline was implemented to identify genes abnormally expressed in disease tissues or genes whose expressions are associated with clinical parameters such as cancer patient survival. Data-mining results can be queried through a web-based interface at http://dgem.dhcp.iupui.edu/. The query tool enables dynamic generation of graphs and tables that are further linked to major gene and pathway resources that connect the data to relevant biology, including Entrez Gene and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG). In summary, DGEM provides scientists and physicians a valuable tool to study disease mechanisms, to discover potential disease biomarkers for diagnosis and prognosis, and to identify novel gene targets for drug discovery. The source code is freely available for non-profit use, on request to the authors. PMID:17570735

Xia, Yuni; Campen, Andrew; Rigsby, Dan; Guo, Ying; Feng, Xingdong; Su, Eric W; Palakal, Mathew; Li, Shuyu

2007-01-01

203

A vertex similarity-based framework to discover and rank orphan disease-related genes  

PubMed Central

Background A rare or orphan disease (OD) is any disease that affects a small percentage of the population. While opportunities now exist to accelerate progress toward understanding the basis for many more ODs, the prioritization of candidate genes is still a critical step for disease-gene identification. Several network-based frameworks have been developed to address this problem with varied results. Result We have developed a novel vertex similarity (VS) based parameter-free prioritizing framework to identify and rank orphan disease candidate genes. We validate our approach by using 1598 known orphan disease-causing genes (ODGs) representing 172 orphan diseases (ODs). We compare our approach with a state-of-art parameter-based approach (PageRank with Priors or PRP) and with another parameter-free method (Interconnectedness or ICN). Our results show that VS-based approach outperforms ICN and is comparable to PRP. We further apply VS-based ranking to identify and rank potential novel candidate genes for several ODs. Conclusion We demonstrate that VS-based parameter-free ranking approach can be successfully used for disease candidate gene prioritization and can complement other network-based methods for candidate disease gene ranking. Importantly, our VS-ranked top candidate genes for the ODs match the known literature, suggesting several novel causal relationships for further investigation. PMID:23281592

2012-01-01

204

FROM GENES TO PHENOTYPE IN A FLY: A DEFICIENCY SCREEN TO IDENTIFY GENE REGIONS AFFECTING FEMALE FERTILITY IN DROSOPHILA MELANOGASTER  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This series of laboratory exercises engages students in the scholarship of discovery by having them conduct a deficiency screen to identify genes affecting Drosophila female fertility. Students are also introduced to bioinformatics as they use FlyBase to identify genes within a deficiency region and develop hypotheses regarding specific gene effects on female sperm storage.

PhD Margaret C Bloch-Qazi (Gustavus Adolphus College Biology)

2009-01-28

205

Dense genotyping identifies and localizes multiple common and rare variant association signals in celiac disease  

PubMed Central

We densely genotyped, using 1000 Genomes Project pilot CEU and additional re-sequencing study variants, 183 reported immune-mediated disease non-HLA risk loci in 12,041 celiac disease cases and 12,228 controls. We identified 13 new celiac disease risk loci at genome wide significance, bringing the total number of known loci (including HLA) to 40. Multiple independent association signals are found at over a third of these loci, attributable to a combination of common, low frequency, and rare genetic variants. In comparison with previously available data such as HapMap3, our dense genotyping in a large sample size provided increased resolution of the pattern of linkage disequilibrium, and suggested localization of many signals to finer scale regions. In particular, 29 of 54 fine-mapped signals appeared localized to specific single genes - and in some instances to gene regulatory elements. We define a complex genetic architecture of risk regions, and refine risk signals, providing a next step towards elucidating causal disease mechanisms. PMID:22057235

Trynka, Gosia; Hunt, Karen A; Bockett, Nicholas A; Romanos, Jihane; Mistry, Vanisha; Szperl, Agata; Bakker, Sjoerd F; Bardella, Maria Teresa; Bhaw-Rosun, Leena; Castillejo, Gemma; de la Concha, Emilio G.; de Almeida, Rodrigo Coutinho; Dias, Kerith-Rae M; van Diemen, Cleo C.; Dubois, Patrick CA; Duerr, Richard H.; Edkins, Sarah; Franke, Lude; Fransen, Karin; Gutierrez, Javier; Heap, Graham AR; Hrdlickova, Barbara; Hunt, Sarah; Izurieta, Leticia Plaza; Izzo, Valentina; Joosten, Leo AB; Langford, Cordelia; Mazzilli, Maria Cristina; Mein, Charles A; Midah, Vandana; Mitrovic, Mitja; Mora, Barbara; Morelli, Marinita; Nutland, Sarah; Núñez, Concepción; Onengut-Gumuscu, Suna; Pearce, Kerra; Platteel, Mathieu; Polanco, Isabel; Potter, Simon; Ribes-Koninckx, Carmen; Ricaño-Ponce, Isis; Rich, Stephen S.; Rybak, Anna; Santiago, José Luis; Senapati, Sabyasachi; Sood, Ajit; Szajewska, Hania; Troncone, Riccardo; Varadé, Jezabel; Wallace, Chris; Wolters, Victorien M; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Thelma, B.K.; Cukrowska, Bozena; Urcelay, Elena; Bilbao, Jose Ramon; Mearin, M Luisa; Barisani, Donatella; Barrett, Jeffrey C; Plagnol, Vincent; Deloukas, Panos; Wijmenga, Cisca; van Heel, David A

2011-01-01

206

Gene prioritization aims to identify the most promising genes (or proteins) among a larger pool of candidates  

E-print Network

Gene prioritization aims to identify the most promising genes (or proteins) among a larger pool for prioritization are useful at several stages of any gene-hunting process. These bioinformatics tools were on a few of the most likely candidate genes1­3 . For instance, a linkage analysis on patients

207

Rapid-Throughput Skeletal Phenotyping of 100 Knockout Mice Identifies 9 New Genes That Determine Bone Strength  

Microsoft Academic Search

Osteoporosis is a common polygenic disease and global healthcare priority but its genetic basis remains largely unknown. We report a high-throughput multi-parameter phenotype screen to identify functionally significant skeletal phenotypes in mice generated by the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute Mouse Genetics Project and discover novel genes that may be involved in the pathogenesis of osteoporosis. The integrated use of primary

J. H. Duncan Bassett; Apostolos Gogakos; Jacqueline K. White; Holly Evans; Richard M. Jacques; Anne H. van der Spek; Edward Ryder; David Sunter; Alan Boyde; Michael J. Campbell; Peter I. Croucher; Graham R. Williams

2012-01-01

208

Dissecting the Gene Network of Dietary Restriction to Identify Evolutionarily Conserved Pathways and New Functional Genes  

PubMed Central

Dietary restriction (DR), limiting nutrient intake from diet without causing malnutrition, delays the aging process and extends lifespan in multiple organisms. The conserved life-extending effect of DR suggests the involvement of fundamental mechanisms, although these remain a subject of debate. To help decipher the life-extending mechanisms of DR, we first compiled a list of genes that if genetically altered disrupt or prevent the life-extending effects of DR. We called these DR–essential genes and identified more than 100 in model organisms such as yeast, worms, flies, and mice. In order for other researchers to benefit from this first curated list of genes essential for DR, we established an online database called GenDR (http://genomics.senescence.info/diet/). To dissect the interactions of DR–essential genes and discover the underlying lifespan-extending mechanisms, we then used a variety of network and systems biology approaches to analyze the gene network of DR. We show that DR–essential genes are more conserved at the molecular level and have more molecular interactions than expected by chance. Furthermore, we employed a guilt-by-association method to predict novel DR–essential genes. In budding yeast, we predicted nine genes related to vacuolar functions; we show experimentally that mutations deleting eight of those genes prevent the life-extending effects of DR. Three of these mutants (OPT2, FRE6, and RCR2) had extended lifespan under ad libitum, indicating that the lack of further longevity under DR is not caused by a general compromise of fitness. These results demonstrate how network analyses of DR using GenDR can be used to make phenotypically relevant predictions. Moreover, gene-regulatory circuits reveal that the DR–induced transcriptional signature in yeast involves nutrient-sensing, stress responses and meiotic transcription factors. Finally, comparing the influence of gene expression changes during DR on the interactomes of multiple organisms led us to suggest that DR commonly suppresses translation, while stimulating an ancient reproduction-related process. PMID:22912585

Wuttke, Daniel; Connor, Richard; Vora, Chintan; Craig, Thomas; Li, Yang; Wood, Shona; Vasieva, Olga; Shmookler Reis, Robert; Tang, Fusheng; de Magalhães, João Pedro

2012-01-01

209

Identification of candidates for human disease genes using large-scale PCR mapping of gene-based STSs  

SciTech Connect

We have developed a strategy for the rapid identification of possible human disease/syndrome genes. Using this procedure we found candidates for 45 human disease/syndrome genes from the first 200 genes mapped. New human genes are identified through automated single-pass sequencing into the 3{prime} untranslated (3{prime}UT) regions of human cDNAs. Primers derived from the 3{prime}UT region sequences, representing gene-based STSs, are used for PCR analyses of the CEPH megabase YAC DNA pools. With this approach {approximately}18,000 megabase YACs can be screened and a single YAC identified using only 52 PCR reactions. The YAC localization in conjunction with other mapping approaches, such as PCR mapping to chromosomes by means of somatic hybrids, allows mapping to chromosomal band locations. In this manner, each gene can be associated with its own STS which in turn specifies both a corresponding genomic clone and a specific location in the genome. These locations can be compared to purported locations of disease genes listed in Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man. Using our current collection of >3,000 human brain cDNA sequences as a resource, we have carried out a proof of principle study in which {approximately}200 cDNAs were mapped to YACs within a few months. Appropriate scale up of this strategy could permit mapping of most human genes and identification of many candidate disease genes over the next few years.

Berry, R.; Stevens, T.J.; Wilcox, A.S. [Univ. of Colorado Health Sciences Center, Denver, CO (United States)] [and others

1994-09-01

210

Detecting gene-gene interactions that underlie human diseases  

PubMed Central

Following the identification of several disease-associated polymorphisms by whole genome association analysis, interest is now focussing on the detection of effects that, due to their interaction with other genetic (or environmental) factors, may not be identified by using standard single-locus tests. In addition to increasing power to detect association, there is also a hope detecting interactions between loci will allow us to elucidate the biological and biochemical pathways underpinning disease. Here I provide a critical survey of the current methodological approaches (and related software packages) used to detect interactions between genetic loci that contribute to human genetic disease. I also discuss the difficulties in determining the biologcal relevance of statistical interactions. PMID:19434077

Cordell, Heather J.

2010-01-01

211

Gene expression reveals overlap between normal aging and Alzheimer’s disease genes  

PubMed Central

Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a common cause of dementia with a strong genetic component and risk sharply increasing with age. We performed two parallel microarray experiments to independently identify genes involved in normal aging and genes involved in AD using RNA extracted from the temporal lobe of 22 late onset AD and 23 control brain donors. We found that AD is accompanied by significant changes in the expression of many genes with up-regulation of genes involved in inflammation and in transcription regulation and down-regulation of genes involved in neuronal functions. The changes with healthy aging involved multiple genes but were not as strong. Replicating and strengthening previous reports we find a highly significant overlap between genes changing expression with age and those changing in AD and we observe that those changes are most often in the same direction. This result supports an overlap between the biological processes of normal aging and susceptibility to AD and suggests that age related genes expression changes might increase the risk to develop AD. PMID:20570407

Avramopoulos, Dimitrios; Szymanski, Megan; Wang, Ruihua; Bassett, Susan

2010-01-01

212

Inferring novel gene-disease associations using Medical Subject Heading Over-representation Profiles  

PubMed Central

Background MEDLINE®/PubMed® currently indexes over 18 million biomedical articles, providing unprecedented opportunities and challenges for text analysis. Using Medical Subject Heading Over-representation Profiles (MeSHOPs), an entity of interest can be robustly summarized, quantitatively identifying associated biomedical terms and predicting novel indirect associations. Methods A procedure is introduced for quantitative comparison of MeSHOPs derived from a group of MEDLINE® articles for a biomedical topic (for example, articles for a specific gene or disease). Similarity scores are computed to compare MeSHOPs of genes and diseases. Results Similarity scores successfully infer novel associations between diseases and genes. The number of papers addressing a gene or disease has a strong influence on predicted associations, revealing an important bias for gene-disease relationship prediction. Predictions derived from comparisons of MeSHOPs achieves a mean 8% AUC improvement in the identification of gene-disease relationships compared to gene-independent baseline properties. Conclusions MeSHOP comparisons are demonstrated to provide predictive capacity for novel relationships between genes and human diseases. We demonstrate the impact of literature bias on the performance of gene-disease prediction methods. MeSHOPs provide a rich source of annotation to facilitate relationship discovery in biomedical informatics. PMID:23021552

2012-01-01

213

Virus-induced gene silencing of Arabidopsis thaliana gene homologues in wheat identifies genes conferring improved drought tolerance  

PubMed Central

In a non-model staple crop like wheat (Triticum aestivumI L.), functional validation of potential drought stress responsive genes identified in Arabidopsis could provide gene targets for breeding. Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) of genes of interest can overcome the inherent problems of polyploidy and limited transformation potential that hamper functional validation studies in wheat. In this study, three potential candidate genes shown to be involved in abiotic stress response pathways in Arabidopsis thaliana were selected for VIGS experiments in wheat. These include Era1 (enhanced response to abscisic acid), Cyp707a (ABA 8’-hydroxylase), and Sal1 (inositol polyphosphate 1-phosphatase). Gene homologues for these three genes were identified in wheat and cloned in the viral vector barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV) in the antisense direction, followed by rub inoculation of BSMV viral RNA transcripts onto wheat plants. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that VIGS-treated wheat plants had significant reductions in target gene transcripts. When VIGS-treated plants generated for Era1 and Sal1 were subjected to limiting water conditions, they showed increased relative water content, improved water use efficiency, reduced gas exchange, and better vigour compared to water-stressed control plants inoculated with RNA from the empty viral vector (BSMV0). In comparison, the Cyp707a-silenced plants showed no improvement over BSMV0-inoculated plants under limited water condition. These results indicate that Era1 and Sal1 play important roles in conferring drought tolerance in wheat. Other traits affected by Era1 silencing were also studied. Delayed seed germination in Era1-silenced plants suggests this gene may be a useful target for developing resistance to pre-harvest sprouting. PMID:23364940

Lapitan, Nora

2013-01-01

214

An Integrative Framework for Bayesian Variable Selection with Informative Priors for Identifying Genes and Pathways  

PubMed Central

The discovery of genetic or genomic markers plays a central role in the development of personalized medicine. A notable challenge exists when dealing with the high dimensionality of the data sets, as thousands of genes or millions of genetic variants are collected on a relatively small number of subjects. Traditional gene-wise selection methods using univariate analyses face difficulty to incorporate correlational, structural, or functional structures amongst the molecular measures. For microarray gene expression data, we first summarize solutions in dealing with ‘large p, small n’ problems, and then propose an integrative Bayesian variable selection (iBVS) framework for simultaneously identifying causal or marker genes and regulatory pathways. A novel partial least squares (PLS) g-prior for iBVS is developed to allow the incorporation of prior knowledge on gene-gene interactions or functional relationships. From the point view of systems biology, iBVS enables user to directly target the joint effects of multiple genes and pathways in a hierarchical modeling diagram to predict disease status or phenotype. The estimated posterior selection probabilities offer probabilitic and biological interpretations. Both simulated data and a set of microarray data in predicting stroke status are used in validating the performance of iBVS in a Probit model with binary outcomes. iBVS offers a general framework for effective discovery of various molecular biomarkers by combining data-based statistics and knowledge-based priors. Guidelines on making posterior inferences, determining Bayesian significance levels, and improving computational efficiencies are also discussed. PMID:23844055

Ander, Bradley P.; Zhang, Xiaoshuai; Xue, Fuzhong; Sharp, Frank R.; Yang, Xiaowei

2013-01-01

215

Genome-wide RNAi screening identifies protein damage as a regulator of osmoprotective gene expression  

PubMed Central

The detection, stabilization, and repair of stress-induced damage are essential requirements for cellular life. All cells respond to osmotic stress-induced water loss with increased expression of genes that mediate accumulation of organic osmolytes, solutes that function as chemical chaperones and restore osmotic homeostasis. The signals and signaling mechanisms that regulate osmoprotective gene expression in animal cells are poorly understood. Here, we show that gpdh-1 and gpdh-2, genes that mediate the accumulation of the organic osmolyte glycerol, are essential for survival of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans during osmotic stress. Expression of GFP driven by the gpdh-1 promoter (Pgpdh-1::GFP) is detected only during hypertonic stress but is not induced by other stressors. Using Pgpdh-1::GFP expression as a phenotype, we screened ?16,000 genes by RNAi feeding and identified 122 that cause constitutive activation of gpdh-1 expression and glycerol accumulation. Many of these genes function to regulate protein translation and cotranslational protein folding and to target and degrade denatured proteins, suggesting that the accumulation of misfolded proteins functions as a signal to activate osmoprotective gene expression and organic osmolyte accumulation in animal cells. Consistent with this hypothesis, 73% of these protein-homeostasis genes have been shown to slow age-dependent protein aggregation in C. elegans. Because diverse environmental stressors and numerous disease states result in protein misfolding, mechanisms must exist that discriminate between osmotically induced and other forms of stress-induced protein damage. Our findings provide a foundation for understanding how these damage-selectivity mechanisms function. PMID:16880390

Lamitina, Todd; Huang, Chunyi George; Strange, Kevin

2006-01-01

216

Sleeping Beauty Plays a Significant Role in Identifying Cancer Genes  

Cancer.gov

Researchers at the University of Minnesota Cancer Center and the National Cancer Institute (NCI), part of the National Institutes of Health, have discovered a new method that could accelerate the way cancer-causing genes are found and could lead to a more accurate identification of the genes

217

Expression of coordinately regulated defense response genes and analysis of their role in disease resistance in Medicago truncatula  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Microarray technology was used to identify genes associated with disease defense responses in the model legume Medicago truncatula. Transcript profiles from leaves inoculated with Colletotrichum trifolii and Erysiphe pisi and roots infected with Phytophthora medicaginis were compared to identify gen...

218

Hashimoto's Thyroiditis: From Genes to the Disease  

PubMed Central

Hashimoto’s thyroiditis (HT) is the most prevalent autoimmune thyroid disorder. Intrathyroidal lymphocytic infiltration is followed by a gradual destruction of the thyroid gland which may lead to subclinical or overt hypothyroidism. Biochemical markers of the disease are thyroid peroxidase and/or thyroglobulin autoantibodies in the serum which are present with a higher prevalence in females than in males and increase with age. Although exact mechanisms of aetiology and pathogenesis of the disorder are not completely understood, a strong genetic susceptibility to the disease has been confirmed predominantly by family and twin studies. Several genes were shown to be associated with the disease occurrence, progression, and severity. Genes for human leukocyte antigen, cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4, protein tyrosine phosphatase nonreceptor-type 22, thyroglobulin, vitamin D receptor, and cytokines are considered to be of utmost importance. Amongst endogenous factors for the disease development, the attention is focused predominantly on female sex, pregnancy with postpartum period and fetal microchimerism. Environmental factors influencing HT development are iodine intake, drugs, infections and different chemicals. Disturbed self-tolerance accompanied by the increased antigen presentation is a prerequisite for the HT occurrence, whereas proper interaction of thyroid cells, antigen presenting cells, and T cells are necessary for the initiation of thyroid autoimmunity. Secreted cytokines lead predominantly to T-helper type 1 (Th1) response as well as to Th 17 response which has only recently been implicated. Final outcome of HT is thyroid destruction which is mostly a consequence of the apoptotic processes combined with T-cell mediated cytotoxicity. PMID:22654557

Zaletel, Katja; Gaberš?ek, Simona

2011-01-01

219

A Computational Study Identifies HIV Progression-Related Genes Using mRMR and Shortest Path Tracing  

PubMed Central

Since statistical relationships between HIV load and CD4+ T cell loss have been demonstrated to be weak, searching for host factors contributing to the pathogenesis of HIV infection becomes a key point for both understanding the disease pathology and developing treatments. We applied Maximum Relevance Minimum Redundancy (mRMR) algorithm to a set of microarray data generated from the CD4+ T cells of viremic non-progressors (VNPs) and rapid progressors (RPs) to identify host factors associated with the different responses to HIV infection. Using mRMR algorithm, 147 gene had been identified. Furthermore, we constructed a weighted molecular interaction network with the existing protein-protein interaction data from STRING database and identified 1331 genes on the shortest-paths among the genes identified with mRMR. Functional analysis shows that the functions relating to apoptosis play important roles during the pathogenesis of HIV infection. These results bring new insights of understanding HIV progression. PMID:24244287

Liu, Lei

2013-01-01

220

Chemical probes identify a role for histone deacetylase 3 in Friedreich’s ataxia gene silencing  

PubMed Central

SUMMARY We recently identified a novel class of pimelic diphenylamide histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors that show promise as therapeutics in the neurodegenerative diseases Friedreich’s ataxia (FRDA) and Huntington’s disease. Here we describe chemical approaches to identify the HDAC enzyme target of these inhibitors. Incubation of a trifunctional activity-based probe with a panel of class I and class II recombinant HDAC enzymes, followed by click chemistry addition of a fluorescent dye and gel electrophoresis, identifies HDAC3 as a unique high-affinity target of the probe. Photoaffinity labeling in a nuclear extract prepared from human lymphoblasts with the trifunctional probe, followed by biotin addition through click chemistry, streptavidin enrichment and western blotting also identifies HDAC3 as the preferred cellular target of the inhibitor. Additional inhibitors with different HDAC specificity profiles were synthesized and results from transcription experiments in FRDA cells point to a unique role for HDAC3 in gene silencing in Friedreich’s ataxia. PMID:19778726

Xu, Chunping; Soragni, Elisabetta; Chou, C. James; Herman, David; Plasterer, Heather L.; Rusche, James R.; Gottesfeld, Joel M.

2010-01-01

221

Diagnosis by Numbers: Defining Skin Disease Pathogenesis through Collated Gene Signatures.  

PubMed

Disease gene expression profiles can be utilized as biomarkers for diagnostic, prognostic, and targeted therapeutic purposes, although individual data sets may be of limited generic value. To develop broader clinical relevance from disease gene signatures, Inkeles et al. demonstrate how mining publically available microarray data from a range of skin disorders can elucidate disease pathways, generate a multi-disease classifier, and identify potential therapeutic targets. This integrative molecular classification and functional analysis offers a new approach to understanding disease pathogenesis, with significant implications for diagnostics and the development of personalized medicine. PMID:25501379

Salam, Amr; McGrath, John A

2015-01-01

222

A Two-Stage Meta-Analysis Identifies Several New Loci for Parkinson's Disease  

PubMed Central

A previous genome-wide association (GWA) meta-analysis of 12,386 PD cases and 21,026 controls conducted by the International Parkinson's Disease Genomics Consortium (IPDGC) discovered or confirmed 11 Parkinson's disease (PD) loci. This first analysis of the two-stage IPDGC study focused on the set of loci that passed genome-wide significance in the first stage GWA scan. However, the second stage genotyping array, the ImmunoChip, included a larger set of 1,920 SNPs selected on the basis of the GWA analysis. Here, we analyzed this set of 1,920 SNPs, and we identified five additional PD risk loci (combined p<5×10?10, PARK16/1q32, STX1B/16p11, FGF20/8p22, STBD1/4q21, and GPNMB/7p15). Two of these five loci have been suggested by previous association studies (PARK16/1q32, FGF20/8p22), and this study provides further support for these findings. Using a dataset of post-mortem brain samples assayed for gene expression (n?=?399) and methylation (n?=?292), we identified methylation and expression changes associated with PD risk variants in PARK16/1q32, GPNMB/7p15, and STX1B/16p11 loci, hence suggesting potential molecular mechanisms and candidate genes at these risk loci. PMID:21738488

2011-01-01

223

Stratified Pathway Analysis to Identify Gene Sets Associated with Oral Contraceptive Use and Breast Cancer  

PubMed Central

Cancer biomarker discovery can facilitate drug development, improve staging of patients, and predict patient prognosis. Because cancer is the result of many interacting genes, analysis based on a set of genes with related biological functions or pathways may be more informative than single gene-based analysis for cancer biomarker discovery. The relevant pathways thus identified may help characterize different aspects of molecular phenotypes related to the tumor. Although it is well known that cancer patients may respond to the same treatment differently because of clinical variables and variation of molecular phenotypes, this patient heterogeneity has not been explicitly considered in pathway analysis in the literature. We hypothesize that combining pathway and patient clinical information can more effectively identify relevant pathways pertinent to specific patient subgroups, leading to better diagnosis and treatment. In this article, we propose to perform stratified pathway analysis based on clinical information from patients. In contrast to analysis using all the patients, this more focused analysis has the potential to reveal subgroup-specific pathways that may lead to more biological insights into disease etiology and treatment response. As an illustration, the power of our approach is demonstrated through its application to a breast cancer dataset in which the patients are stratified according to their oral contraceptive use. PMID:25574128

Pang, Herbert; Zhao, Hongyu

2014-01-01

224

Gene Therapy Ameliorates Cardiovascular Disease in Dogs With Mucopolysaccharidosis VII  

E-print Network

Gene Therapy Ameliorates Cardiovascular Disease in Dogs With Mucopolysaccharidosis VII M.M. Sleeper;110:815-820.) Key Words: cardiovascular diseases gene therapy lysosomes mucopolysaccharidosis--Mucopolysaccharidosis VII (MPS VII) is a lysosomal storage disease caused by deficient -glucuronidase (GUSB) activity

Ponder, Katherine P.

225

New Genes and New Insights from Old Genes: Update on Alzheimer Disease  

PubMed Central

Purpose of Review: This article discusses the current status of knowledge regarding the genetic basis of Alzheimer disease (AD) with a focus on clinically relevant aspects. Recent Findings: The genetic architecture of AD is complex, as it includes multiple susceptibility genes and likely nongenetic factors. Rare but highly penetrant autosomal dominant mutations explain a small minority of the cases but have allowed tremendous advances in understanding disease pathogenesis. The identification of a strong genetic risk factor, APOE, reshaped the field and introduced the notion of genetic risk for AD. More recently, large-scale genome-wide association studies are adding to the picture a number of common variants with very small effect sizes. Large-scale resequencing studies are expected to identify additional risk factors, including rare susceptibility variants and structural variation. Summary: Genetic assessment is currently of limited utility in clinical practice because of the low frequency (Mendelian mutations) or small effect size (common risk factors) of the currently known susceptibility genes. However, genetic studies are identifying with confidence a number of novel risk genes, and this will further our understanding of disease biology and possibly the identification of therapeutic targets. PMID:23558482

Ringman, John M.; Coppola, Giovanni

2013-01-01

226

Identification of Candidate Genes in Rice for Resistance to Sheath Blight Disease by Whole Genome Sequencing  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Recent advances in whole genome sequencing have allowed identification of genes for disease susceptibility in humans. The objective of our research was to exploit whole genome sequences of 13 rice (Oryza sativa L.) inbred lines to identify non-synonymous SNPs (nsSNPs) and candidate genes for resista...

227

Transcriptome profiling to identify genes involved in peroxisome assembly and function  

PubMed Central

Yeast cells were induced to proliferate peroxisomes, and microarray transcriptional profiling was used to identify PEX genes encoding peroxins involved in peroxisome assembly and genes involved in peroxisome function. Clustering algorithms identified 224 genes with expression profiles similar to those of genes encoding peroxisomal proteins and genes involved in peroxisome biogenesis. Several previously uncharacterized genes were identified, two of which, YPL112c and YOR084w, encode proteins of the peroxisomal membrane and matrix, respectively. Ypl112p, renamed Pex25p, is a novel peroxin required for the regulation of peroxisome size and maintenance. These studies demonstrate the utility of comparative gene profiling as an alternative to functional assays to identify genes with roles in peroxisome biogenesis. PMID:12135984

Smith, Jennifer J.; Marelli, Marcello; Christmas, Rowan H.; Vizeacoumar, Franco J.; Dilworth, David J.; Ideker, Trey; Galitski, Timothy; Dimitrov, Krassen; Rachubinski, Richard A.; Aitchison, John D.

2002-01-01

228

Identifying Foodborne Disease Hazards in Food Service Establishments  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Describes procedures used to evaluate foodborne disease hazards that exist in food service establishments, lists the factors that have contributed to foodborne disease outbreaks in the United States, and presents a form that has been devised to facilitate the evaluation of these factors. (JR)

Bryan, Frank L.

1974-01-01

229

Identifying Families with Likely Genetic Protective Factors against Alzheimer Disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary Elderly individuals who lived beyond the age of 90 years without dementia were hypothesized to have increased concentrations of genetic protective factors against Alz- heimer disease (AD), conferring a reduced liability for this disease relative to less-aged nondemented elderly. However, testing this hypothesis is complicated by hav- ing to distinguish such a group from those who may lack genetic

Jeremy M. Silverman; Christopher J. Smith; Deborah B. Marin; Sandra Birstein; Marlene Mare; Richard C. Mohs; Kenneth L. Davis

1999-01-01

230

Seven newly identified loci for autoimmune thyroid disease.  

PubMed

Autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD), including Graves' disease (GD) and Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT), is one of the most common of the immune-mediated diseases. To further investigate the genetic determinants of AITD, we conducted an association study using a custom-made single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array, the ImmunoChip. The SNP array contains all known and genotype-able SNPs across 186 distinct susceptibility loci associated with one or more immune-mediated diseases. After stringent quality control, we analysed 103 875 common SNPs (minor allele frequency >0.05) in 2285 GD and 462 HT patients and 9364 controls. We found evidence for seven new AITD risk loci (P < 1.12 × 10(-6); a permutation test derived significance threshold), five at locations previously associated and two at locations awaiting confirmation, with other immune-mediated diseases. PMID:22922229

Cooper, Jason D; Simmonds, Matthew J; Walker, Neil M; Burren, Oliver; Brand, Oliver J; Guo, Hui; Wallace, Chris; Stevens, Helen; Coleman, Gillian; Franklyn, Jayne A; Todd, John A; Gough, Stephen C L

2012-12-01

231

Gene sequencing project identifies abnormal gene that launches rare childhood leukemia  

Cancer.gov

Research led by the St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital – Washington University Pediatric Cancer Genome Project has identified a fusion gene responsible for almost 30 percent of a rare subtype of childhood leukemia with an extremely poor prognosis. The finding offers the first evidence of a mistake that gives rise to a significant percentage of acute megakaryoblastic leukemia (AMKL) cases in children. AMKL accounts for about 10 percent of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The discovery paves the way for desperately needed treatment advances.

232

A genomewide screen for chronic rhinosinusitis genes identifies a locus on chromosome 7q  

PubMed Central

Background Chronic rhinosinusitis is an important public health problem with substantial impact on patient quality of life and health care costs. We hypothesized that genetic variation may be one factor that affects this disease. Objective To identify genetic variation underlying susceptibility to chronic rhinosinusitis using a genome-wide approach. Methods We studied a religious isolate that practices a communal lifestyle and shares common environmental exposures. Using physical examination, medical interviews, and a review of medical records, we identified 8 individuals with chronic rhinosinusitis out of 291 screened. These 8 individuals were related to each other in a single 60 member, 9 generation pedigree. A genome-wide screen for loci influencing susceptibility to chronic rhinosinusitis using 1123 genome-wide markers was conducted. Results The largest linkage peak (P = 0.0023; 127.15 cM, equivalent to LOD=2.01) was on chromosome 7q31.1-7q32.1, 7q31 (127.15 cM; 1-LOD support region: 115cM to 135cM) and included the CFTR locus. Genotyping of 38 mutations in the CFTR gene did not reveal variation accounting for this linkage signal. Conclusion Understanding the genes involved in chronic rhinosinusitis may lead to improvements in its diagnosis and treatment. Our results represent the first genome-wide screen for chronic rhinosinusitis and suggest that a locus on 7q31.1-7q32.1 influences disease susceptibility. This may be the CFTR gene or another nearby locus. PMID:18622306

Pinto, Jayant M.; Hayes, M. Geoffrey; Schneider, Daniel; Naclerio, Robert M.; Ober, Carole

2014-01-01

233

Gene expression profiling in whole blood identifies distinct biological pathways associated with obesity  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Obesity is reaching epidemic proportions and represents a significant risk factor for cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and cancer. METHODS: To explore the relationship between increased body mass and gene expression in blood, we conducted whole-genome expression profiling of whole blood from seventeen obese and seventeen well matched lean subjects. Gene expression data was analyzed at the individual gene and pathway

Sujoy Ghosh; Robert Dent; Mary-Ellen Harper; Shelby A Gorman; Joan S Stuart; Ruth McPherson

2010-01-01

234

A Classifier-based approach to identify genetic similarities between diseases  

PubMed Central

Motivation: Genome-wide association studies are commonly used to identify possible associations between genetic variations and diseases. These studies mainly focus on identifying individual single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) potentially linked with one disease of interest. In this work, we introduce a novel methodology that identifies similarities between diseases using information from a large number of SNPs. We separate the diseases for which we have individual genotype data into one reference disease and several query diseases. We train a classifier that distinguishes between individuals that have the reference disease and a set of control individuals. This classifier is then used to classify the individuals that have the query diseases. We can then rank query diseases according to the average classification of the individuals in each disease set, and identify which of the query diseases are more similar to the reference disease. We repeat these classification and comparison steps so that each disease is used once as reference disease. Results: We apply this approach using a decision tree classifier to the genotype data of seven common diseases and two shared control sets provided by the Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium. We show that this approach identifies the known genetic similarity between type 1 diabetes and rheumatoid arthritis, and identifies a new putative similarity between bipolar disease and hypertension. Contact: serafim@cs.stanford.edu PMID:19477990

Schaub, Marc A.; Kaplow, Irene M.; Sirota, Marina; Do, Chuong B.; Butte, Atul J.; Batzoglou, Serafim

2009-01-01

235

From Library Screening to Microarray Technology: Strategies to Determine Gene Expression Proles and to Identify Dierentially Regulated Genes in Plants  

E-print Network

Hybridization to DNA microarrays and high density membrane ®lters, serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE®les and to Identify Dierentially Regulated Genes in Plants EKKEHARD KUHN* Institute of Plant Physiology dierentially regulated genes in plants and other organisms. In this review, commonly used display systems

Hahn, Mark E.

236

A Systems Genetics Approach Identifies CXCL14, ITGAX, and LPCAT2 as Novel Aggressive Prostate Cancer Susceptibility Genes  

PubMed Central

Although prostate cancer typically runs an indolent course, a subset of men develop aggressive, fatal forms of this disease. We hypothesize that germline variation modulates susceptibility to aggressive prostate cancer. The goal of this work is to identify susceptibility genes using the C57BL/6-Tg(TRAMP)8247Ng/J (TRAMP) mouse model of neuroendocrine prostate cancer. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping was performed in transgene-positive (TRAMPxNOD/ShiLtJ) F2 intercross males (n?=?228), which facilitated identification of 11 loci associated with aggressive disease development. Microarray data derived from 126 (TRAMPxNOD/ShiLtJ) F2 primary tumors were used to prioritize candidate genes within QTLs, with candidate genes deemed as being high priority when possessing both high levels of expression-trait correlation and a proximal expression QTL. This process enabled the identification of 35 aggressive prostate tumorigenesis candidate genes. The role of these genes in aggressive forms of human prostate cancer was investigated using two concurrent approaches. First, logistic regression analysis in two human prostate gene expression datasets revealed that expression levels of five genes (CXCL14, ITGAX, LPCAT2, RNASEH2A, and ZNF322) were positively correlated with aggressive prostate cancer and two genes (CCL19 and HIST1H1A) were protective for aggressive prostate cancer. Higher than average levels of expression of the five genes that were positively correlated with aggressive disease were consistently associated with patient outcome in both human prostate cancer tumor gene expression datasets. Second, three of these five genes (CXCL14, ITGAX, and LPCAT2) harbored polymorphisms associated with aggressive disease development in a human GWAS cohort consisting of 1,172 prostate cancer patients. This study is the first example of using a systems genetics approach to successfully identify novel susceptibility genes for aggressive prostate cancer. Such approaches will facilitate the identification of novel germline factors driving aggressive disease susceptibility and allow for new insights into these deadly forms of prostate cancer. PMID:25411967

Andreas, Jonathan; Patel, Shashank J.; Zhang, Suiyuan; Chines, Peter; Elkahloun, Abdel; Chandrasekharappa, Settara; Gutkind, J. Silvio; Molinolo, Alfredo A.; Crawford, Nigel P. S.

2014-01-01

237

Moffitt Cancer Center researchers identify unique immune gene signature  

Cancer.gov

Researchers at Moffitt Cancer Center have discovered a unique immune gene signature that can predict the presence of microscopic lymph node-like structures in metastatic melanoma. The presence of these immune structures, the researchers said, appears to be associated with better survival and may indicate the possibility of selecting patients for immunotherapy based solely on the immune-related makeup of their tumors.

238

Clustering Gene Expression Regulators: New Approach to Disease Subtyping  

PubMed Central

One of the main challenges in modern medicine is to stratify different patient groups in terms of underlying disease molecular mechanisms as to develop more personalized approach to therapy. Here we propose novel method for disease subtyping based on analysis of activated expression regulators on a sample-by-sample basis. Our approach relies on Sub-Network Enrichment Analysis algorithm (SNEA) which identifies gene subnetworks with significant concordant changes in expression between two conditions. Subnetwork consists of central regulator and downstream genes connected by relations extracted from global literature-extracted regulation database. Regulators found in each patient separately are clustered together and assigned activity scores which are used for final patients grouping. We show that our approach performs well compared to other related methods and at the same time provides researchers with complementary level of understanding of pathway-level biology behind a disease by identification of significant expression regulators. We have observed the reasonable grouping of neuromuscular disorders (triggered by structural damage vs triggered by unknown mechanisms), that was not revealed using standard expression profile clustering. For another experiment we were able to suggest the clusters of regulators, responsible for colorectal carcinoma vs adenoma discrimination and identify frequently genetically changed regulators that could be of specific importance for the individual characteristics of cancer development. Proposed approach can be regarded as biologically meaningful feature selection, reducing tens of thousands of genes down to dozens of clusters of regulators. Obtained clusters of regulators make possible to generate valuable biological hypotheses about molecular mechanisms related to a clinical outcome for individual patient. PMID:24416320

Pyatnitskiy, Mikhail; Mazo, Ilya; Shkrob, Maria; Schwartz, Elena; Kotelnikova, Ekaterina

2014-01-01

239

Gene expression in normal and disease states--identification of therapeutic targets.  

PubMed

Analysis of gene-expression patterns derived from large expressed sequence tag (EST) databases has become a valuable tool in the discovery of therapeutic targets and diagnostic markers. Sequence data derived from a wide variety of cDNA libraries offer a wealth of information for identifying genes for pharmaceutical product development. Collecting, storing, organizing, analyzing and presenting cDNA expression data requires advanced bioinformatics methods and high-performance computational equipment. Comparison of expression patterns from normal and disease tissues enables inferences about gene function to be made, and medically relevant genes as candidates for therapeutics research and development programs to be identified. PMID:8987461

Fannon, M R

1996-08-01

240

Candidate genes for limiting cholestatic intestinal injury identified by gene expression profiling  

PubMed Central

The lack of bile flow from the liver into the intestine can have devastating complications including hepatic failure, sepsis, and even death. This pathologic condition known as cholestasis can result from etiologies as diverse as total parenteral nutrition (TPN), hepatitis, and pancreatic cancer. The intestinal injury associated with cholestasis has been shown to result in decreased intestinal resistance, increased bacterial translocation, and increased endotoxemia. Anecdotal clinical evidence suggests a genetic predisposition to exaggerated injury. Recent animal research on two different strains of inbred mice demonstrating different rates of bacterial translocation with different mortality rates supports this premise. In this study, a microarray analysis of intestinal tissue following common bile duct ligation (CBDL) performed under general anesthesia on these same two strains of inbred mice was done with the goal of identifying the potential molecular mechanistic pathways responsible. Over 500 genes were increased more than 2.0-fold following CBDL. The most promising candidate genes included major urinary proteins (MUPs), serine protease-1-inhibitor (Serpina1a), and lipocalin-2 (LCN-2). Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) validated the microarray results for these candidate genes. In an in vitro experiment using differentiated intestinal epithelial cells, inhibition of MUP-1 by siRNA resulted in increased intestinal epithelial cell permeability. Diverse novel mechanisms involving the growth hormone pathway, the acute phase response, and the innate immune response are thus potential avenues for limiting cholestatic intestinal injury. Changes in gene expression were at times found to be not only due to the CBDL but also due to the murine strain. Should further studies in cholestatic patients demonstrate interindividual variability similar to what we have shown in mice, then a “personalized medicine” approach to cholestatic patients may become possible. PMID:24179676

Alaish, Samuel M; Timmons, Jennifer; Smith, Alexis; Buzza, Marguerite S; Murphy, Ebony; Zhao, Aiping; Sun, Yezhou; Turner, Douglas J; Shea-Donahue, Terez; Antalis, Toni M; Cross, Alan; Dorsey, Susan G

2013-01-01

241

Prioritizing genes for X-linked diseases using population exome data.  

PubMed

Many new disease genes can be identified through high-throughput sequencing. Yet, variant interpretation for the large amounts of genomic data remains a challenge given variation of uncertain significance and genes that lack disease annotation. As clinically significant disease genes may be subject to negative selection, we developed a prediction method that measures paucity of non-synonymous variation in the human population to infer gene-based pathogenicity. Integrating human exome data of over 6000 individuals from the NHLBI Exome Sequencing Project, we tested the utility of the prediction method based on the ratio of non-synonymous to synonymous substitution rates (dN/dS) on X-chromosome genes. A low dN/dS ratio characterized genes associated with childhood disease and outcome. Furthermore, we identify new candidates for diseases with early mortality and demonstrate intragenic localized patterns of variants that suggest pathogenic hotspots. Our results suggest that intrahuman substitution analysis is a valuable tool to help prioritize novel disease genes in sequence interpretation. PMID:25217573

Ge, Xiaoyan; Kwok, Pui-Yan; Shieh, Joseph T C

2015-02-01

242

Prediction of Human Disease Genes by Human-Mouse Conserved Coexpression Analysis  

PubMed Central

Background Even in the post-genomic era, the identification of candidate genes within loci associated with human genetic diseases is a very demanding task, because the critical region may typically contain hundreds of positional candidates. Since genes implicated in similar phenotypes tend to share very similar expression profiles, high throughput gene expression data may represent a very important resource to identify the best candidates for sequencing. However, so far, gene coexpression has not been used very successfully to prioritize positional candidates. Methodology/Principal Findings We show that it is possible to reliably identify disease-relevant relationships among genes from massive microarray datasets by concentrating only on genes sharing similar expression profiles in both human and mouse. Moreover, we show systematically that the integration of human-mouse conserved coexpression with a phenotype similarity map allows the efficient identification of disease genes in large genomic regions. Finally, using this approach on 850 OMIM loci characterized by an unknown molecular basis, we propose high-probability candidates for 81 genetic diseases. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that conserved coexpression, even at the human-mouse phylogenetic distance, represents a very strong criterion to predict disease-relevant relationships among human genes. PMID:18369433

Grassi, Elena; Damasco, Christian; Silengo, Lorenzo; Oti, Martin; Provero, Paolo; Di Cunto, Ferdinando

2008-01-01

243

Renal cystic disease in tuberous sclerosis: role of the polycystic kidney disease 1 gene.  

PubMed Central

Tuberous sclerosis is an autosomal dominant trait characterized by the development of hamartomatous growths in many organs. Renal cysts are also a frequent manifestation. Major genes for tuberous sclerosis and autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease, TSC2 and PKD1, respectively, lie adjacent to each other at chromosome 16p13.3, suggesting a role for PKD1 in the etiology of renal cystic disease in tuberous sclerosis. We studied 27 unrelated patients with tuberous sclerosis and renal cystic disease. Clinical histories and radiographic features were reviewed, and renal function was assessed. We sought mutations at the TSC2 and PKD1 loci, using pulsed field- and conventional-gel electrophoresis and FISH. Twenty-two patients had contiguous deletions of TSC2 and PKD1. In 17 patients with constitutional deletions, cystic disease was severe, with early renal insufficiency. One patient with deletion of TSC2 and of only the 3' UTR of PKD1 had few cysts. Four patients were somatic mosaics; the severity of their cystic disease varied considerably. Mosaicism and mild cystic disease also were demonstrated in parents of 3 of the constitutionally deleted patients. Five patients without contiguous deletions had relatively mild cystic disease, 3 of whom had gross rearrangements of TSC2 and 2 in whom no mutation was identified. Significant renal cystic disease in tuberous sclerosis usually reflects mutational involvement of the PKD1 gene, and mosaicism for large deletions of TSC2 and PKD1 is a frequent phenomenon. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 PMID:9382094

Sampson, J R; Maheshwar, M M; Aspinwall, R; Thompson, P; Cheadle, J P; Ravine, D; Roy, S; Haan, E; Bernstein, J; Harris, P C

1997-01-01

244

Identifying and characterizing barley genes that protect against trichothecene mycotoxins  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Fusarium head blight of wheat and barley, caused by the fungal pathogen Fusarium graminearum, is a major disease problem around the world. During infection, trichothecene mycotoxins are produced and act as virulence factors, resulting in reduced grain yield and quality. There are two types of tricho...

245

Family-based analysis identified CD2 as a susceptibility gene for primary open angle glaucoma in Chinese Han population  

PubMed Central

Primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) is characterized by optic disc cupping and irreversible loss of retinal ganglion cells. Few genes have been detected that influence POAG susceptibility and little is known about its genetic architecture. In this study, we employed exome sequencing on three members from a high frequency POAG family to identify the risk factors of POAG in Chinese population. Text-mining method was applied to identify genes associated with glaucoma in literature, and protein–protein interaction networks were constructed. Furthermore, reverse transcription PCR and Western blot were performed to confirm the differential gene expression. Six genes, baculoviral inhibitors of apoptosis protein repeat containing 6 (BIRC6), CD2, luteinizing hormone/choriogonadotropin receptor (LHCGR), polycystic kidney and hepatic disease gene 1 (PKHD1), phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) and fucosyltransferase 7 (FUT7), which might be associated with POAG, were identified. Both the mRNA expression levels and protein expression levels of HSP27 were increased in astrocytes from POAG patients compared with those from normal control, suggesting that mutation in CD2 might pose a risk for POAG in Chinese population. In conclusion, novel rare variants detected by exome sequencing may hold the key to unravelling the remaining contribution of genetics to complex diseases such as POAG. PMID:24597656

Liu, Ting; Xie, Lin; Ye, Jian; He, Xiangge

2014-01-01

246

Genomic Structure and Expression of STM2, the Chromosome 1 Familial Alzheimer Disease Gene  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mutations in the gene STM2 result in autosomal dominant familial Alzheimer disease. To screen for mutations and to identify regulatory elements for this gene, the genomic DNA sequence and intron–exon structure were determined. Twelve exons including 10 coding exons were identified in a genomic region spanning 23,737 bp. The first 2 exons encode the 5?-untranslated region. Expression analysis of STM2

Ephrat Levy-Lahad; Parvoneh Poorkaj; Kai Wang; Ying Hui Fu; Junko Oshima; John Mulligan; Gerard D. Schellenberg

1996-01-01

247

Ranking analysis of microarray data: a powerful method for identifying differentially expressed genes.  

PubMed

Microarray technology provides a powerful tool for the expression profile of thousands of genes simultaneously, which makes it possible to explore the molecular and metabolic etiology of the development of a complex disease under study. However, classical statistical methods and technologies fail to be applicable to microarray data. Therefore, it is necessary and motivating to develop powerful methods for large-scale statistical analyses. In this paper, we described a novel method, called Ranking Analysis of Microarray Data (RAM). RAM, which is a large-scale two-sample t-test method, is based on comparisons between a set of ranked T statistics and a set of ranked Z values (a set of ranked estimated null scores) yielded by a "randomly splitting" approach instead of a "permutation" approach and a two-simulation strategy for estimating the proportion of genes identified by chance, i.e., the false discovery rate (FDR). The results obtained from the simulated and observed microarray data show that RAM is more efficient in identification of genes differentially expressed and estimation of FDR under undesirable conditions such as a large fudge factor, small sample size, or mixture distribution of noises than Significance Analysis of Microarrays. PMID:16979869

Tan, Yuan-De; Fornage, Myriam; Fu, Yun-Xin

2006-12-01

248

Implications of Comorbidity and Ascertainment Bias for Identifying Disease Genes  

E-print Network

may increase the probability that a person will seek treat- ment for either individual disorder, Massachusetts 2 Psychiatric Genetics Program in Mood and Anxiety Disorders, Massachusetts General Hospital in population-based samples. An explanation for this finding is that sub- jects suffering from multiple

249

PEN-2 gene mutation in a familial Alzheimer's disease case.  

PubMed

Genetic evidence indicates a central role of cerebral accumulation of beta-amyloid (Abeta) in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Beside presenilin 1 and 2, three other recently discovered proteins (Aph 1, PEN 2 and nicastrin) are associated with gamma-secretase activity, the enzymatic complex generating Abeta. Alterations in genes encoding these proteins were candidates for a role in AD. The PEN 2 gene was examined for unknown mutations and polymorphisms in sporadic and familial Alzheimer patients. Samples from age-matched controls (n=253), sporadic AD (SAD, n=256) and familial AD (FAD, n=140) were screened with DHPLC methodology followed by sequencing. Scanning the gene identified for the first time a missense mutation (D90N) in a patient with FAD. Three intronic polymorphisms were also identified, one of which had a higher presence of the mutated allele in AD subjects carrying the allele epsilon4 of apolipoprotein E than controls. The pathogenic role of the PEN-2 D90N mutation in AD is not clear, but the findings might lead to new studies on its functional and genetic role. PMID:16170650

Sala Frigerio, C; Piscopo, P; Calabrese, E; Crestini, A; Malvezzi Campeggi, L; Civita di Fava, R; Fogliarino, S; Albani, D; Marcon, G; Cherchi, R; Piras, R; Forloni, G; Confaloni, A

2005-09-01

250

Gene therapy for cardiovascular disease mediated by ultrasound and microbubbles  

PubMed Central

Gene therapy provides an efficient approach for treatment of cardiovascular disease. To realize the therapeutic effect, both efficient delivery to the target cells and sustained expression of transgenes are required. Ultrasound targeted microbubble destruction (UTMD) technique has become a potential strategy for target-specific gene and drug delivery. When gene-loaded microbubble is injected, the ultrasound-mediated microbubble destruction may spew the transported gene to the targeted cells or organ. Meanwhile, high amplitude oscillations of microbubbles increase the permeability of capillary and cell membrane, facilitating uptake of the released gene into tissue and cell. Therefore, efficiency of gene therapy can be significantly improved. To date, UTMD has been successfully investigated in many diseases, and it has achieved outstanding progress in the last two decades. Herein, we discuss the current status of gene therapy of cardiovascular diseases, and reviewed the progress of the delivery of genes to cardiovascular system by UTMD. PMID:23594865

2013-01-01

251

Harnessing genomics to identify environmental determinants of heritable disease  

EPA Science Inventory

De novo mutation is increasingly being recognized as the cause for a range of human genetic diseases and disorders. Important examples of this include inherited genetic disorders such as autism, schizophrenia, mental retardation, epilepsy, and a broad range of adverse reproductiv...

252

Identifying Gastric Cancer Related Genes Using the Shortest Path Algorithm and Protein-Protein Interaction Network  

PubMed Central

Gastric cancer, as one of the leading causes of cancer related deaths worldwide, causes about 800,000 deaths per year. Up to now, the mechanism underlying this disease is still not totally uncovered. Identification of related genes of this disease is an important step which can help to understand the mechanism underlying this disease, thereby designing effective treatments. In this study, some novel gastric cancer related genes were discovered based on the knowledge of known gastric cancer related ones. These genes were searched by applying the shortest path algorithm in protein-protein interaction network. The analysis results suggest that some of them are indeed involved in the biological process of gastric cancer, which indicates that they are the actual gastric cancer related genes with high probability. It is hopeful that the findings in this study may help promote the study of this disease and the methods can provide new insights to study various diseases. PMID:24729971

Shi, Ying; Li, Li-Peng; Ren, Hui

2014-01-01

253

FORGE Canada Consortium: outcomes of a 2-year national rare-disease gene-discovery project.  

PubMed

Inherited monogenic disease has an enormous impact on the well-being of children and their families. Over half of the children living with one of these conditions are without a molecular diagnosis because of the rarity of the disease, the marked clinical heterogeneity, and the reality that there are thousands of rare diseases for which causative mutations have yet to be identified. It is in this context that in 2010 a Canadian consortium was formed to rapidly identify mutations causing a wide spectrum of pediatric-onset rare diseases by using whole-exome sequencing. The FORGE (Finding of Rare Disease Genes) Canada Consortium brought together clinicians and scientists from 21 genetics centers and three science and technology innovation centers from across Canada. From nation-wide requests for proposals, 264 disorders were selected for study from the 371 submitted; disease-causing variants (including in 67 genes not previously associated with human disease; 41 of these have been genetically or functionally validated, and 26 are currently under study) were identified for 146 disorders over a 2-year period. Here, we present our experience with four strategies employed for gene discovery and discuss FORGE's impact in a number of realms, from clinical diagnostics to the broadening of the phenotypic spectrum of many diseases to the biological insight gained into both disease states and normal human development. Lastly, on the basis of this experience, we discuss the way forward for rare-disease genetic discovery both in Canada and internationally. PMID:24906018

Beaulieu, Chandree L; Majewski, Jacek; Schwartzentruber, Jeremy; Samuels, Mark E; Fernandez, Bridget A; Bernier, Francois P; Brudno, Michael; Knoppers, Bartha; Marcadier, Janet; Dyment, David; Adam, Shelin; Bulman, Dennis E; Jones, Steve J M; Avard, Denise; Nguyen, Minh Thu; Rousseau, Francois; Marshall, Christian; Wintle, Richard F; Shen, Yaoqing; Scherer, Stephen W; Friedman, Jan M; Michaud, Jacques L; Boycott, Kym M

2014-06-01

254

Large-scale association analysis identifies new risk loci for coronary artery disease  

PubMed Central

Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the commonest cause of death. Here, we report an association analysis in 63,746 CAD cases and 130,681 controls identifying 15 loci reaching genome-wide significance, taking the number of susceptibility loci for CAD to 46, and a further 104 independent variants (r2 < 0.2) strongly associated with CAD at a 5% false discovery rate (FDR). Together, these variants explain approximately 10.6% of CAD heritability. Of the 46 genome-wide significant lead SNPs, 12 show a significant association with a lipid trait, and 5 show a significant association with blood pressure, but none is significantly associated with diabetes. Network analysis with 233 candidate genes (loci at 10% FDR) generated 5 interaction networks comprising 85% of these putative genes involved in CAD. The four most significant pathways mapping to these networks are linked to lipid metabolism and inflammation, underscoring the causal role of these activities in the genetic etiology of CAD. Our study provides insights into the genetic basis of CAD and identifies key biological pathways. PMID:23202125

2013-01-01

255

Large-scale association analysis identifies new risk loci for coronary artery disease.  

PubMed

Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the commonest cause of death. Here, we report an association analysis in 63,746 CAD cases and 130,681 controls identifying 15 loci reaching genome-wide significance, taking the number of susceptibility loci for CAD to 46, and a further 104 independent variants (r(2) < 0.2) strongly associated with CAD at a 5% false discovery rate (FDR). Together, these variants explain approximately 10.6% of CAD heritability. Of the 46 genome-wide significant lead SNPs, 12 show a significant association with a lipid trait, and 5 show a significant association with blood pressure, but none is significantly associated with diabetes. Network analysis with 233 candidate genes (loci at 10% FDR) generated 5 interaction networks comprising 85% of these putative genes involved in CAD. The four most significant pathways mapping to these networks are linked to lipid metabolism and inflammation, underscoring the causal role of these activities in the genetic etiology of CAD. Our study provides insights into the genetic basis of CAD and identifies key biological pathways. PMID:23202125

Deloukas, Panos; Kanoni, Stavroula; Willenborg, Christina; Farrall, Martin; Assimes, Themistocles L; Thompson, John R; Ingelsson, Erik; Saleheen, Danish; Erdmann, Jeanette; Goldstein, Benjamin A; Stirrups, Kathleen; König, Inke R; Cazier, Jean-Baptiste; Johansson, Asa; Hall, Alistair S; Lee, Jong-Young; Willer, Cristen J; Chambers, John C; Esko, Tõnu; Folkersen, Lasse; Goel, Anuj; Grundberg, Elin; Havulinna, Aki S; Ho, Weang K; Hopewell, Jemma C; Eriksson, Niclas; Kleber, Marcus E; Kristiansson, Kati; Lundmark, Per; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Rafelt, Suzanne; Shungin, Dmitry; Strawbridge, Rona J; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Tikkanen, Emmi; Van Zuydam, Natalie; Voight, Benjamin F; Waite, Lindsay L; Zhang, Weihua; Ziegler, Andreas; Absher, Devin; Altshuler, David; Balmforth, Anthony J; Barroso, Inês; Braund, Peter S; Burgdorf, Christof; Claudi-Boehm, Simone; Cox, David; Dimitriou, Maria; Do, Ron; Doney, Alex S F; El Mokhtari, NourEddine; Eriksson, Per; Fischer, Krista; Fontanillas, Pierre; Franco-Cereceda, Anders; Gigante, Bruna; Groop, Leif; Gustafsson, Stefan; Hager, Jörg; Hallmans, Göran; Han, Bok-Ghee; Hunt, Sarah E; Kang, Hyun M; Illig, Thomas; Kessler, Thorsten; Knowles, Joshua W; Kolovou, Genovefa; Kuusisto, Johanna; Langenberg, Claudia; Langford, Cordelia; Leander, Karin; Lokki, Marja-Liisa; Lundmark, Anders; McCarthy, Mark I; Meisinger, Christa; Melander, Olle; Mihailov, Evelin; Maouche, Seraya; Morris, Andrew D; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Nikus, Kjell; Peden, John F; Rayner, N William; Rasheed, Asif; Rosinger, Silke; Rubin, Diana; Rumpf, Moritz P; Schäfer, Arne; Sivananthan, Mohan; Song, Ci; Stewart, Alexandre F R; Tan, Sian-Tsung; Thorgeirsson, Gudmundur; van der Schoot, C Ellen; Wagner, Peter J; Wells, George A; Wild, Philipp S; Yang, Tsun-Po; Amouyel, Philippe; Arveiler, Dominique; Basart, Hanneke; Boehnke, Michael; Boerwinkle, Eric; Brambilla, Paolo; Cambien, Francois; Cupples, Adrienne L; de Faire, Ulf; Dehghan, Abbas; Diemert, Patrick; Epstein, Stephen E; Evans, Alun; Ferrario, Marco M; Ferrières, Jean; Gauguier, Dominique; Go, Alan S; Goodall, Alison H; Gudnason, Villi; Hazen, Stanley L; Holm, Hilma; Iribarren, Carlos; Jang, Yangsoo; Kähönen, Mika; Kee, Frank; Kim, Hyo-Soo; Klopp, Norman; Koenig, Wolfgang; Kratzer, Wolfgang; Kuulasmaa, Kari; Laakso, Markku; Laaksonen, Reijo; Lee, Ji-Young; Lind, Lars; Ouwehand, Willem H; Parish, Sarah; Park, Jeong E; Pedersen, Nancy L; Peters, Annette; Quertermous, Thomas; Rader, Daniel J; Salomaa, Veikko; Schadt, Eric; Shah, Svati H; Sinisalo, Juha; Stark, Klaus; Stefansson, Kari; Trégouët, David-Alexandre; Virtamo, Jarmo; Wallentin, Lars; Wareham, Nicholas; Zimmermann, Martina E; Nieminen, Markku S; Hengstenberg, Christian; Sandhu, Manjinder S; Pastinen, Tomi; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Hovingh, G Kees; Dedoussis, George; Franks, Paul W; Lehtimäki, Terho; Metspalu, Andres; Zalloua, Pierre A; Siegbahn, Agneta; Schreiber, Stefan; Ripatti, Samuli; Blankenberg, Stefan S; Perola, Markus; Clarke, Robert; Boehm, Bernhard O; O'Donnell, Christopher; Reilly, Muredach P; März, Winfried; Collins, Rory; Kathiresan, Sekar; Hamsten, Anders; Kooner, Jaspal S; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Danesh, John; Palmer, Colin N A; Roberts, Robert; Watkins, Hugh; Schunkert, Heribert; Samani, Nilesh J

2013-01-01

256

Identifying Gene Clusters and Regulatory Themes using Time Course Expression Data,  

E-print Network

Pages 1­13 Identifying Gene Clusters and Regulatory Themes using Time Course Expression Data, 2 Department of Statistics, Oxford Centre for Gene Function, University of Oxford, 1 South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3TG ABSTRACT Motivation: The development of microarrays has allowed the gene

Goldschmidt, Christina

257

Identifying Alzheimers Disease-Related Brain Regions from Multi-Modality Neuroimaging Data  

E-print Network

1 Identifying Alzheimers Disease-Related Brain Regions from Multi-Modality Neuroimaging Data using Abstract5 Diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) at the early stage of the disease development is of great628 Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a fatal, neurodegenerative disorder that currently affects over five29

Li, Jing

258

Identifying Alzheimer's Disease-Related Brain Regions from Multi-Modality Neuroimaging Data using Sparse  

E-print Network

1 Identifying Alzheimer's Disease-Related Brain Regions from Multi-Modality Neuroimaging Data using.reiman}@bannerhealth.com Abstract Diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) at the early stage of the disease development is of great consistent with findings in the AD literature. 1 Introduction Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a fatal

Ye, Jieping

259

A robust hybrid approach based on estimation of distribution algorithm and support vector machine for hunting candidate disease genes.  

PubMed

Microarray data are high dimension with high noise ratio and relatively small sample size, which makes it a challenge to use microarray data to identify candidate disease genes. Here, we have presented a hybrid method that combines estimation of distribution algorithm with support vector machine for selection of key feature genes. We have benchmarked the method using the microarray data of both diffuse B cell lymphoma and colon cancer to demonstrate its performance for identifying key features from the profile data of high-dimension gene expression. The method was compared with a probabilistic model based on genetic algorithm and another hybrid method based on both genetics algorithm and support vector machine. The results showed that the proposed method provides new computational strategy for hunting candidate disease genes from the profile data of disease gene expression. The selected candidate disease genes may help to improve the diagnosis and treatment for diseases. PMID:23476131

Li, Li; Chen, Hongmei; Liu, Chang; Wang, Fang; Zhang, Fangfang; Bai, Lihua; Chen, Yihan; Peng, Luying

2013-01-01

260

Identifying Neisseria Species by Use of the 50S Ribosomal Protein L6 (rplF) Gene  

PubMed Central

The comparison of 16S rRNA gene sequences is widely used to differentiate bacteria; however, this gene can lack resolution among closely related but distinct members of the same genus. This is a problem in clinical situations in those genera, such as Neisseria, where some species are associated with disease while others are not. Here, we identified and validated an alternative genetic target common to all Neisseria species which can be readily sequenced to provide an assay that rapidly and accurately discriminates among members of the genus. Ribosomal multilocus sequence typing (rMLST) using ribosomal protein genes has been shown to unambiguously identify these bacteria. The PubMLST Neisseria database (http://pubmlst.org/neisseria/) was queried to extract the 53 ribosomal protein gene sequences from 44 genomes from diverse species. Phylogenies reconstructed from these genes were examined, and a single 413-bp fragment of the 50S ribosomal protein L6 (rplF) gene was identified which produced a phylogeny that was congruent with the phylogeny reconstructed from concatenated ribosomal protein genes. Primers that enabled the amplification and direct sequencing of the rplF gene fragment were designed to validate the assay in vitro and in silico. Allele sequences were defined for the gene fragment, associated with particular species names, and stored on the PubMLST Neisseria database, providing a curated electronic resource. This approach provides an alternative to 16S rRNA gene sequencing, which can be readily replicated for other organisms for which more resolution is required, and it has potential applications in high-resolution metagenomic studies. PMID:24523465

Bennett, Julia S.; Watkins, Eleanor R.; Jolley, Keith A.; Harrison, Odile B.

2014-01-01

261

Functional epigenomics approach to identify methylated candidate tumour suppressor genes in renal cell carcinoma  

Microsoft Academic Search

Promoter region hypermethylation and transcriptional silencing is a frequent cause of tumour suppressor gene (TSG) inactivation in many human cancers. Previously, to identify candidate epigenetically inactivated TSGs in renal cell carcinoma (RCC), we monitored changes in gene expression in four RCC cell lines after treatment with the demethylating agent 5-azacytidine. This enabled us to identify HAI-2\\/SPINT2 as a novel epigenetically

M R Morris; D Gentle; M Abdulrahman; N Clarke; M Brown; T Kishida; M Yao; B T Teh; F Latif; E R Maher

2008-01-01

262

Identifying genes affectng stress response in rainbow trout  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Genomic analyses have the potential to impact aquaculture production traits by identifying markers as proxies for traits which are expensive or difficult to measure and characterizing genetic variation and biochemical mechanisms underlying phenotypic variation. One such set of traits are the respon...

263

Limits of resolution of genetic linkage studies: Implications for the positional cloning of human disease genes  

SciTech Connect

Positional cloning studies to identify disease genes are being carried out for many human genetic diseases. Such studies often include a genome-scan linkage analysis to identify the rough chromosomal location of a disease gene, fine structure genetic mapping to define and narrow the chromosomal interval in which the disease gene may be located, and physical mapping and gene identification in the genetically defined interval to clone the disease gene. During the planning of a positional cloning study, it is important to know that, if linkage is found, the genetic interval identified is likely to be sufficiently narrow to be dissected efficiently by methods of physical mapping and gene identification. Thus, one wishes to know the limits of resolution of a genetic linkage study. In this paper, the author determines for Mendelian diseases the distributions and moments of three measures of linkage resolution: (1) in a set of N chromosomes, the distance between the nearest crossovers that flank a disease locus, (2) the distance between the nearest genetic markers that flank the pair of flanking crossovers after a genome scan, and (3) the distance between the nearest flanking markers after additional randomly placed markers are generated and typed in an identified interval. These results provide explicit sample-size guidelines for future positional cloning studies of Mendelian diseases and make possible a more objective evaluation of whether a proposed positional cloning study is likely to be successful. The author also briefly discusses the more difficult problem of linkage resolution for complex genetic diseases. 14 refs., 1 fig., 6 tabs.

Boehnke, M. (Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States))

1994-08-01

264

Using Registries to Identify Adverse Events in Rheumatic Diseases  

PubMed Central

The proven effectiveness of biologics and other immunomodulatory products in inflammatory rheumatic diseases has resulted in their widespread use as well as reports of potential short- and long-term complications such as infection and malignancy. These complications are especially worrisome in children who often have serial exposures to multiple immunomodulatory products. Post-marketing surveillance of immunomodulatory products in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and pediatric systemic lupus erythematosus is currently based on product-specific registries and passive surveillance, which may not accurately reflect the safety risks for children owing to low numbers, poor long-term retention, and inadequate comparators. In collaboration with the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), patient and family advocacy groups, biopharmaceutical industry representatives and other stakeholders, the Childhood Arthritis and Rheumatology Research Alliance (CARRA) and the Duke Clinical Research Institute (DCRI) have developed a novel pharmacosurveillance model (CARRA Consolidated Safety Registry [CoRe]) based on a multicenter longitudinal pediatric rheumatic diseases registry with over 8000 participants. The existing CARRA infrastructure provides access to much larger numbers of subjects than is feasible in single-product registries. Enrollment regardless of medication exposure allows more accurate detection and evaluation of safety signals. Flexibility built into the model allows the addition of specific data elements and safety outcomes, and designation of appropriate disease comparator groups relevant to each product, fulfilling post-marketing requirements and commitments. The proposed model can be applied to other pediatric and adult diseases, potentially transforming the paradigm of pharmacosurveillance in response to the growing public mandate for rigorous post-marketing safety monitoring. PMID:24144710

Lionetti, Geraldina; Kimura, Yukiko; Schanberg, Laura E.; Beukelman, Timothy; Wallace, Carol A.; Ilowite, Norman T.; Winsor, Jane; Fox, Kathleen; Natter, Marc; Sundy, John S.; Brodsky, Eric; Curtis, Jeffrey R.; Del Gaizo, Vincent; Iyasu, Solomon; Jahreis, Angelika; Meeker-O’Connell, Ann; Mittleman, Barbara B.; Murphy, Bernard M.; Peterson, Eric D.; Raymond, Sandra C.; Setoguchi, Soko; Siegel, Jeffrey N.; Sobel, Rachel E.; Solomon, Daniel; Southwood, Taunton R.; Vesely, Richard; White, Patience H.; Wulffraat, Nico M.; Sandborg, Christy I.

2013-01-01

265

Mutational Analysis of Angiogenin Gene in Parkinson's Disease  

PubMed Central

Mutations in the angiogenic factor, angiogenin (ANG), have been identified in patients with both familial and sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and are thought to have a neuroprotective function. Parkinsonism has been noted in kindreds with ANG mutations and variants in the ANG gene have been found to associate with PD in two Caucasian populations. We therefore hypothesized that mutations in ANG may also contribute to idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD). We sequenced ANG gene in a total of 1498 participants comprising 750 PD patients and 748 age/gender matched controls from Taiwan. We identified one novel synonymous substitution, c.C100T (p.L10L), in a single heterozygous state in one PD patient, which was not observed in controls. The clinical phenotypes and [99mTc]-TORDAT-SPECT images of the p.L10L carrier were similar to that seen in idiopathic PD. In addition, we also identified one common variant, c.T330G (p.G110G, rs11701), which was previously reported to associate with PD risk in Caucasians. However, the frequency of TG/GG genotype was comparable between PD cases and controls (odds ratio: 0.85, 95% confidence interval: 0.29–2.55, P?=?0.78). Our results did not support that ANG rs11701 variant is a genetic risk factor for PD in our population. We conclude that mutations in ANG are not a common cause for idiopathic PD. PMID:25386690

Chen, Meng-Ling; Wu, Ruey-Meei; Tai, Chun-Hwei; Lin, Chin-Hsien

2014-01-01

266

Loci influencing blood pressure identified using a cardiovascular gene-centric array  

PubMed Central

Blood pressure (BP) is a heritable determinant of risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). To investigate genetic associations with systolic BP (SBP), diastolic BP (DBP), mean arterial pressure (MAP) and pulse pressure (PP), we genotyped ?50 000 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that capture variation in ?2100 candidate genes for cardiovascular phenotypes in 61 619 individuals of European ancestry from cohort studies in the USA and Europe. We identified novel associations between rs347591 and SBP (chromosome 3p25.3, in an intron of HRH1) and between rs2169137 and DBP (chromosome1q32.1 in an intron of MDM4) and between rs2014408 and SBP (chromosome 11p15 in an intron of SOX6), previously reported to be associated with MAP. We also confirmed 10 previously known loci associated with SBP, DBP, MAP or PP (ADRB1, ATP2B1, SH2B3/ATXN2, CSK, CYP17A1, FURIN, HFE, LSP1, MTHFR, SOX6) at array-wide significance (P < 2.4 × 10?6). We then replicated these associations in an independent set of 65 886 individuals of European ancestry. The findings from expression QTL (eQTL) analysis showed associations of SNPs in the MDM4 region with MDM4 expression. We did not find any evidence of association of the two novel SNPs in MDM4 and HRH1 with sequelae of high BP including coronary artery disease (CAD), left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) or stroke. In summary, we identified two novel loci associated with BP and confirmed multiple previously reported associations. Our findings extend our understanding of genes involved in BP regulation, some of which may eventually provide new targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:23303523

Ganesh, Santhi K.; Tragante, Vinicius; Guo, Wei; Guo, Yiran; Lanktree, Matthew B.; Smith, Erin N.; Johnson, Toby; Castillo, Berta Almoguera; Barnard, John; Baumert, Jens; Chang, Yen-Pei Christy; Elbers, Clara C.; Farrall, Martin; Fischer, Mary E.; Franceschini, Nora; Gaunt, Tom R.; Gho, Johannes M.I.H.; Gieger, Christian; Gong, Yan; Isaacs, Aaron; Kleber, Marcus E.; Leach, Irene Mateo; McDonough, Caitrin W.; Meijs, Matthijs F.L.; Mellander, Olle; Molony, Cliona M.; Nolte, Ilja M.; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Price, Tom S.; Rajagopalan, Ramakrishnan; Shaffer, Jonathan; Shah, Sonia; Shen, Haiqing; Soranzo, Nicole; van der Most, Peter J.; Van Iperen, Erik P.A.; Van Setten, Jessic A.; Vonk, Judith M.; Zhang, Li; Beitelshees, Amber L.; Berenson, Gerald S.; Bhatt, Deepak L.; Boer, Jolanda M.A.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Burkley, Ben; Burt, Amber; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Chen, Wei; Cooper-DeHoff, Rhonda M.; Curtis, Sean P.; Dreisbach, Albert; Duggan, David; Ehret, Georg B.; Fabsitz, Richard R.; Fornage, Myriam; Fox, Ervin; Furlong, Clement E.; Gansevoort, Ron T.; Hofker, Marten H.; Hovingh, G. Kees; Kirkland, Susan A.; Kottke-Marchant, Kandice; Kutlar, Abdullah; LaCroix, Andrea Z.; Langaee, Taimour Y.; Li, Yun R.; Lin, Honghuang; Liu, Kiang; Maiwald, Steffi; Malik, Rainer; Murugesan, Gurunathan; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; O'Connell, Jeffery R.; Onland-Moret, N. Charlotte; Ouwehand, Willem H.; Palmas, Walter; Penninx, Brenda W.; Pepine, Carl J.; Pettinger, Mary; Polak, Joseph F.; Ramachandran, Vasan S.; Ranchalis, Jane; Redline, Susan; Ridker, Paul M.; Rose, Lynda M.; Scharnag, Hubert; Schork, Nicholas J.; Shimbo, Daichi; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Srinivasan, Sathanur R.; Stolk, Ronald P.; Taylor, Herman A.; Thorand, Barbara; Trip, Mieke D.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Verschuren, W. Monique; Wijmenga, Cisca; Winkelmann, Bernhard R.; Wyatt, Sharon; Young, J. Hunter; Boehm, Bernhard O.; Caulfield, Mark J.; Chasman, Daniel I.; Davidson, Karina W.; Doevendans, Pieter A.; FitzGerald, Garret A.; Gums, John G.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Hillege, Hans L.; Illig, Thomas; Jarvik, Gail P.; Johnson, Julie A.; Kastelein, John J.P.; Koenig, Wolfgang; März, Winfried; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Murray, Sarah S.; Oldehinkel, Albertine J.; Rader, Daniel J.; Reilly, Muredach P.; Reiner, Alex P.; Schadt, Eric E.; Silverstein, Roy L.; Snieder, Harold; Stanton, Alice V.; Uitterlinden, André G.; van der Harst, Pim; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; Samani, Nilesh J.; Johnson, Andrew D.; Munroe, Patricia B.; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Levy, Daniel; Keating, Brendan J.; Asselbergs, Folkert W.

2013-01-01

267

Loci influencing blood pressure identified using a cardiovascular gene-centric array.  

PubMed

Blood pressure (BP) is a heritable determinant of risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). To investigate genetic associations with systolic BP (SBP), diastolic BP (DBP), mean arterial pressure (MAP) and pulse pressure (PP), we genotyped ?50 000 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that capture variation in ?2100 candidate genes for cardiovascular phenotypes in 61 619 individuals of European ancestry from cohort studies in the USA and Europe. We identified novel associations between rs347591 and SBP (chromosome 3p25.3, in an intron of HRH1) and between rs2169137 and DBP (chromosome1q32.1 in an intron of MDM4) and between rs2014408 and SBP (chromosome 11p15 in an intron of SOX6), previously reported to be associated with MAP. We also confirmed 10 previously known loci associated with SBP, DBP, MAP or PP (ADRB1, ATP2B1, SH2B3/ATXN2, CSK, CYP17A1, FURIN, HFE, LSP1, MTHFR, SOX6) at array-wide significance (P < 2.4 × 10(-6)). We then replicated these associations in an independent set of 65 886 individuals of European ancestry. The findings from expression QTL (eQTL) analysis showed associations of SNPs in the MDM4 region with MDM4 expression. We did not find any evidence of association of the two novel SNPs in MDM4 and HRH1 with sequelae of high BP including coronary artery disease (CAD), left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) or stroke. In summary, we identified two novel loci associated with BP and confirmed multiple previously reported associations. Our findings extend our understanding of genes involved in BP regulation, some of which may eventually provide new targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:23303523

Ganesh, Santhi K; Tragante, Vinicius; Guo, Wei; Guo, Yiran; Lanktree, Matthew B; Smith, Erin N; Johnson, Toby; Castillo, Berta Almoguera; Barnard, John; Baumert, Jens; Chang, Yen-Pei Christy; Elbers, Clara C; Farrall, Martin; Fischer, Mary E; Franceschini, Nora; Gaunt, Tom R; Gho, Johannes M I H; Gieger, Christian; Gong, Yan; Isaacs, Aaron; Kleber, Marcus E; Mateo Leach, Irene; McDonough, Caitrin W; Meijs, Matthijs F L; Mellander, Olle; Molony, Cliona M; Nolte, Ilja M; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Price, Tom S; Rajagopalan, Ramakrishnan; Shaffer, Jonathan; Shah, Sonia; Shen, Haiqing; Soranzo, Nicole; van der Most, Peter J; Van Iperen, Erik P A; Van Setten, Jessica; Van Setten, Jessic A; Vonk, Judith M; Zhang, Li; Beitelshees, Amber L; Berenson, Gerald S; Bhatt, Deepak L; Boer, Jolanda M A; Boerwinkle, Eric; Burkley, Ben; Burt, Amber; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Chen, Wei; Cooper-Dehoff, Rhonda M; Curtis, Sean P; Dreisbach, Albert; Duggan, David; Ehret, Georg B; Fabsitz, Richard R; Fornage, Myriam; Fox, Ervin; Furlong, Clement E; Gansevoort, Ron T; Hofker, Marten H; Hovingh, G Kees; Kirkland, Susan A; Kottke-Marchant, Kandice; Kutlar, Abdullah; Lacroix, Andrea Z; Langaee, Taimour Y; Li, Yun R; Lin, Honghuang; Liu, Kiang; Maiwald, Steffi; Malik, Rainer; Murugesan, Gurunathan; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; O'Connell, Jeffery R; Onland-Moret, N Charlotte; Ouwehand, Willem H; Palmas, Walter; Penninx, Brenda W; Pepine, Carl J; Pettinger, Mary; Polak, Joseph F; Ramachandran, Vasan S; Ranchalis, Jane; Redline, Susan; Ridker, Paul M; Rose, Lynda M; Scharnag, Hubert; Schork, Nicholas J; Shimbo, Daichi; Shuldiner, Alan R; Srinivasan, Sathanur R; Stolk, Ronald P; Taylor, Herman A; Thorand, Barbara; Trip, Mieke D; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Verschuren, W Monique; Wijmenga, Cisca; Winkelmann, Bernhard R; Wyatt, Sharon; Young, J Hunter; Boehm, Bernhard O; Caulfield, Mark J; Chasman, Daniel I; Davidson, Karina W; Doevendans, Pieter A; Fitzgerald, Garret A; Gums, John G; Hakonarson, Hakon; Hillege, Hans L; Illig, Thomas; Jarvik, Gail P; Johnson, Julie A; Kastelein, John J P; Koenig, Wolfgang; März, Winfried; Mitchell, Braxton D; Murray, Sarah S; Oldehinkel, Albertine J; Rader, Daniel J; Reilly, Muredach P; Reiner, Alex P; Schadt, Eric E; Silverstein, Roy L; Snieder, Harold; Stanton, Alice V; Uitterlinden, André G; van der Harst, Pim; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; Samani, Nilesh J; Johnson, Andrew D; Munroe, Patricia B; de Bakker, Paul I W; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Levy, Daniel; Keating, Brendan J; Asselbergs, Folkert W

2013-04-15

268

Identifying Disease-centric Subdomains in Very Large Medical Ontologies,  

E-print Network

different methods: (i) the seed query method from [1] was used for extraction of concepts that are unique is of course a relevant term, but not vice versa. Hypothesis: Our hypothesis is that the seed query method, when seeded properly, will identify only key concepts, while the manual guideline-based method

ten Teije, Annette

269

A methodology based on molecular interactions and pathways to find candidate genes associated to diseases: its application to schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease.  

PubMed

Experimental techniques for the identification of genes associated with diseases are expensive and have certain limitations. In this scenario, computational methods are useful tools to identify lists of promising genes for further experimental verification. This paper describes a flexible methodology for the in silico prediction of genes associated with diseases combining the use of available tools for gene enrichment analysis, gene network generation and gene prioritization. A set of reference genes, with a known association to a disease, is used as bait to extract candidate genes from molecular interaction networks and enriched pathways. In a second step, prioritization methods are applied to evaluate the similarities between previously selected candidates and the set of reference genes. The top genes obtained by these programs are grouped into a single list sorted by the number of methods that have selected each gene. As a proof of concept, top genes reported a few years ago in SzGene and AlzGene databases were used as references to predict genes associated to schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease, respectively. In both cases, we were able to predict a statistically significant amount of genes belonging to the updated lists. PMID:21776608

Ochagavía, María Elena; Miranda, Jamilet; Nazábal, Marcelo; Martin, Alexander; Novoa, Lidia Inés; Bringas, Ricardo; Fernández-DE-Cossío, Jorge; Camacho, Hanlet

2011-08-01

270

The systematic functional characterisation of Xq28 genes prioritises candidate disease genes  

PubMed Central

Background Well known for its gene density and the large number of mapped diseases, the human sub-chromosomal region Xq28 has long been a focus of genome research. Over 40 of approximately 300 X-linked diseases map to this region, and systematic mapping, transcript identification, and mutation analysis has led to the identification of causative genes for 26 of these diseases, leaving another 17 diseases mapped to Xq28, where the causative gene is still unknown. To expedite disease gene identification, we have initiated the functional characterisation of all known Xq28 genes. Results By using a systematic approach, we describe the Xq28 genes by RNA in situ hybridisation and Northern blotting of the mouse orthologs, as well as subcellular localisation and data mining of the human genes. We have developed a relational web-accessible database with comprehensive query options integrating all experimental data. Using this database, we matched gene expression patterns with affected tissues for 16 of the 17 remaining Xq28 linked diseases, where the causative gene is unknown. Conclusion By using this systematic approach, we have prioritised genes in linkage regions of Xq28-mapped diseases to an amenable number for mutational screens. Our database can be queried by any researcher performing highly specified searches including diseases not listed in OMIM or diseases that might be linked to Xq28 in the future. PMID:16503986

Kolb-Kokocinski, Anja; Mehrle, Alexander; Bechtel, Stephanie; Simpson, Jeremy C; Kioschis, Petra; Wiemann, Stefan; Wellenreuther, Ruth; Poustka, Annemarie

2006-01-01

271

Identifying Subspace Gene Clusters from Microarray Data Using Low-Rank Representation  

PubMed Central

Identifying subspace gene clusters from the gene expression data is useful for discovering novel functional gene interactions. In this paper, we propose to use low-rank representation (LRR) to identify the subspace gene clusters from microarray data. LRR seeks the lowest-rank representation among all the candidates that can represent the genes as linear combinations of the bases in the dataset. The clusters can be extracted based on the block diagonal representation matrix obtained using LRR, and they can well capture the intrinsic patterns of genes with similar functions. Meanwhile, the parameter of LRR can balance the effect of noise so that the method is capable of extracting useful information from the data with high level of background noise. Compared with traditional methods, our approach can identify genes with similar functions yet without similar expression profiles. Also, it could assign one gene into different clusters. Moreover, our method is robust to the noise and can identify more biologically relevant gene clusters. When applied to three public datasets, the results show that the LRR based method is superior to existing methods for identifying subspace gene clusters. PMID:23527177

Cui, Yan; Zheng, Chun-Hou; Yang, Jian

2013-01-01

272

Gene therapy\\/cell therapy for lysosomal storage disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Lysosomal storage diseases (LSD) are considered to be appropriate disorders for gene therapy\\/cell therapy. We are attempting to treat one of these disorders using a mouse model, the Sly mouse. This is an authentic model for human ß-glucuronidase deficiency, MPS VII. We have carried out two types of experimental protocols; in vivo gene therapy and ex vivo gene therapy using

Y. Eto; T. Ohashi

2000-01-01

273

Standardized Plant Disease Evaluations will Enhance Resistance Gene Discovery  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Gene discovery and marker development using DNA based tools require plant populations with well-documented phenotypes. Related crops such as apples and pears may share a number of genes, for example resistance to common diseases, and data mining in one crop may reveal genes for the other. However, u...

274

Whole-Genome Sequencing of Individuals from a Founder Population Identifies Candidate Genes for Asthma  

PubMed Central

Asthma is a complex genetic disease caused by a combination of genetic and environmental risk factors. We sought to test classes of genetic variants largely missed by genome-wide association studies (GWAS), including copy number variants (CNVs) and low-frequency variants, by performing whole-genome sequencing (WGS) on 16 individuals from asthma-enriched and asthma-depleted families. The samples were obtained from an extended 13-generation Hutterite pedigree with reduced genetic heterogeneity due to a small founding gene pool and reduced environmental heterogeneity as a result of a communal lifestyle. We sequenced each individual to an average depth of 13-fold, generated a comprehensive catalog of genetic variants, and tested the most severe mutations for association with asthma. We identified and validated 1960 CNVs, 19 nonsense or splice-site single nucleotide variants (SNVs), and 18 insertions or deletions that were out of frame. As follow-up, we performed targeted sequencing of 16 genes in 837 cases and 540 controls of Puerto Rican ancestry and found that controls carry a significantly higher burden of mutations in IL27RA (2.0% of controls; 0.23% of cases; nominal p?=?0.004; Bonferroni p?=?0.21). We also genotyped 593 CNVs in 1199 Hutterite individuals. We identified a nominally significant association (p?=?0.03; Odds ratio (OR)?=?3.13) between a 6 kbp deletion in an intron of NEDD4L and increased risk of asthma. We genotyped this deletion in an additional 4787 non-Hutterite individuals (nominal p?=?0.056; OR?=?1.69). NEDD4L is expressed in bronchial epithelial cells, and conditional knockout of this gene in the lung in mice leads to severe inflammation and mucus accumulation. Our study represents one of the early instances of applying WGS to complex disease with a large environmental component and demonstrates how WGS can identify risk variants, including CNVs and low-frequency variants, largely untested in GWAS. PMID:25116239

Campbell, Catarina D.; Mohajeri, Kiana; Malig, Maika; Hormozdiari, Fereydoun; Nelson, Benjamin; Du, Gaixin; Patterson, Kristen M.; Eng, Celeste; Torgerson, Dara G.; Hu, Donglei; Herman, Catherine; Chong, Jessica X.; Ko, Arthur; O'Roak, Brian J.; Krumm, Niklas; Vives, Laura; Lee, Choli; Roth, Lindsey A.; Rodriguez-Cintron, William; Rodriguez-Santana, Jose; Brigino-Buenaventura, Emerita; Davis, Adam; Meade, Kelley; LeNoir, Michael A.; Thyne, Shannon; Jackson, Daniel J.; Gern, James E.; Lemanske, Robert F.; Shendure, Jay; Abney, Mark; Burchard, Esteban G.; Ober, Carole; Eichler, Evan E.

2014-01-01

275

A gene expression signature identifies two prognostic subgroups of basal breast cancer.  

PubMed

Prognosis of basal breast cancers is poor but heterogeneous. Medullary breast cancers (MBC) display a basal profile, but a favorable prognosis. We hypothesized that a previously published 368-gene expression signature associated with MBC might serve to define a prognostic classifier in basal cancers. We collected public gene expression and histoclinical data of 2145 invasive early breast adenocarcinomas. We developed a Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifier based on this 368-gene list in a learning set, and tested its predictive performances in an independent validation set. Then, we assessed its prognostic value and that of six prognostic signatures for disease-free survival (DFS) in the remaining 2034 samples. The SVM model accurately classified all MBC samples in the learning and validation sets. A total of 466 cases were basal across other sets. The SVM classifier separated them into two subgroups, subgroup 1 (resembling MBC) and subgroup 2 (not resembling MBC). Subgroup 1 exhibited 71% 5-year DFS, whereas subgroup 2 exhibited 50% (P = 9.93E-05). The classifier outperformed the classical prognostic variables in multivariate analysis, conferring lesser risk for relapse in subgroup 1 (HR = 0.52, P = 3.9E-04). This prognostic value was specific to the basal subtype, in which none of the other prognostic signatures was informative. Ontology analysis revealed effective immune response (IR), enhanced tumor cell apoptosis, elevated levels of metastasis-inhibiting factors and low levels of metastasis-promoting factors in the good-prognosis subgroup, and a more developed cell migration system in the poor-prognosis subgroup. In conclusion, based on this 368-gene SVM model derived from an MBC signature, basal breast cancers were classified in two prognostic subgroups, suggesting that MBC and basal breast cancers share similar molecular alterations associated with aggressiveness. This signature could help define the prognosis, adapt the systemic treatment, and identify new therapeutic targets. PMID:20490655

Sabatier, Renaud; Finetti, Pascal; Cervera, Nathalie; Lambaudie, Eric; Esterni, Benjamin; Mamessier, Emilie; Tallet, Agnès; Chabannon, Christian; Extra, Jean-Marc; Jacquemier, Jocelyne; Viens, Patrice; Birnbaum, Daniel; Bertucci, François

2011-04-01

276

The NACP/synuclein gene: Chromosomal assignment and screening for alterations in Alzheimer disease  

SciTech Connect

The major component of the vascular and plaque amyloid deposits in Alzheimer disease is the amyloid {beta} peptide (A{beta}). A second intrinsic component of amyloid, the NAC (non-A{beta} component of amyloid) peptide, has recently been identified, and its precursor protein was named NACP. A computer homology search allowed us to establish that the human NACP gene was homologous to the rat synuclein gene. We mapped the NACP/synuclein gene to chromosome 4 and cloned three alternatively spliced transcripts in lymphocytes derived from a normal subject. We analyzed by RT-PCR and direct sequencing the entire coding region of the NACP/synuclein gene in a group of patients with familial early onset Alzheimer disease. No mutation was found in 26 unrelated patients. Further studies are required to investigate the implication of the NACP/synuclein gene in Alzheimer disease. 21 refs., 3 tabs.

Campion, D. [CHR, Rouen (France)] [CHR, Rouen (France); Martin, C.; Charbonnier, F. [Unite de Genetique, Rouen (France)] [and others] [Unite de Genetique, Rouen (France); and others

1995-03-20

277

Semi-automated literature mining to identify putative biomarkers of disease from multiple biofluids  

PubMed Central

Background Computational methods for mining of biomedical literature can be useful in augmenting manual searches of the literature using keywords for disease-specific biomarker discovery from biofluids. In this work, we develop and apply a semi-automated literature mining method to mine abstracts obtained from PubMed to discover putative biomarkers of breast and lung cancers in specific biofluids. Methodology A positive set of abstracts was defined by the terms ‘breast cancer’ and ‘lung cancer’ in conjunction with 14 separate ‘biofluids’ (bile, blood, breastmilk, cerebrospinal fluid, mucus, plasma, saliva, semen, serum, synovial fluid, stool, sweat, tears, and urine), while a negative set of abstracts was defined by the terms ‘(biofluid) NOT breast cancer’ or ‘(biofluid) NOT lung cancer.’ More than 5.3 million total abstracts were obtained from PubMed and examined for biomarker-disease-biofluid associations (34,296 positive and 2,653,396 negative for breast cancer; 28,355 positive and 2,595,034 negative for lung cancer). Biological entities such as genes and proteins were tagged using ABNER, and processed using Python scripts to produce a list of putative biomarkers. Z-scores were calculated, ranked, and used to determine significance of putative biomarkers found. Manual verification of relevant abstracts was performed to assess our method’s performance. Results Biofluid-specific markers were identified from the literature, assigned relevance scores based on frequency of occurrence, and validated using known biomarker lists and/or databases for lung and breast cancer [NCBI’s On-line Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM), Cancer Gene annotation server for cancer genomics (CAGE), NCBI’s Genes & Disease, NCI’s Early Detection Research Network (EDRN), and others]. The specificity of each marker for a given biofluid was calculated, and the performance of our semi-automated literature mining method assessed for breast and lung cancer. Conclusions We developed a semi-automated process for determining a list of putative biomarkers for breast and lung cancer. New knowledge is presented in the form of biomarker lists; ranked, newly discovered biomarker-disease-biofluid relationships; and biomarker specificity across biofluids. PMID:25379168

2014-01-01

278

Sherlock: detecting gene-disease associations by matching patterns of expression QTL and GWAS.  

PubMed

Genetic mapping of complex diseases to date depends on variations inside or close to the genes that perturb their activities. A strong body of evidence suggests that changes in gene expression play a key role in complex diseases and that numerous loci perturb gene expression in trans. The information in trans variants, however, has largely been ignored in the current analysis paradigm. Here we present a statistical framework for genetic mapping by utilizing collective information in both cis and trans variants. We reason that for a disease-associated gene, any genetic variation that perturbs its expression is also likely to influence the disease risk. Thus, the expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) of the gene, which constitute a unique "genetic signature," should overlap significantly with the set of loci associated with the disease. We translate this idea into a computational algorithm (named Sherlock) to search for gene-disease associations from GWASs, taking advantage of independent eQTL data. Application of this strategy to Crohn disease and type 2 diabetes predicts a number of genes with possible disease roles, including several predictions supported by solid experimental evidence. Importantly, predicted genes are often implicated by multiple trans eQTL with moderate associations. These genes are far from any GWAS association signals and thus cannot be identified from the GWAS alone. Our approach allows analysis of association data from a new perspective and is applicable to any complex phenotype. It is readily generalizable to molecular traits other than gene expression, such as metabolites, noncoding RNAs, and epigenetic modifications. PMID:23643380

He, Xin; Fuller, Chris K; Song, Yi; Meng, Qingying; Zhang, Bin; Yang, Xia; Li, Hao

2013-05-01

279

Sherlock: Detecting Gene-Disease Associations by Matching Patterns of Expression QTL and GWAS  

PubMed Central

Genetic mapping of complex diseases to date depends on variations inside or close to the genes that perturb their activities. A strong body of evidence suggests that changes in gene expression play a key role in complex diseases and that numerous loci perturb gene expression in trans. The information in trans variants, however, has largely been ignored in the current analysis paradigm. Here we present a statistical framework for genetic mapping by utilizing collective information in both cis and trans variants. We reason that for a disease-associated gene, any genetic variation that perturbs its expression is also likely to influence the disease risk. Thus, the expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) of the gene, which constitute a unique “genetic signature,” should overlap significantly with the set of loci associated with the disease. We translate this idea into a computational algorithm (named Sherlock) to search for gene-disease associations from GWASs, taking advantage of independent eQTL data. Application of this strategy to Crohn disease and type 2 diabetes predicts a number of genes with possible disease roles, including several predictions supported by solid experimental evidence. Importantly, predicted genes are often implicated by multiple trans eQTL with moderate associations. These genes are far from any GWAS association signals and thus cannot be identified from the GWAS alone. Our approach allows analysis of association data from a new perspective and is applicable to any complex phenotype. It is readily generalizable to molecular traits other than gene expression, such as metabolites, noncoding RNAs, and epigenetic modifications. PMID:23643380

He, Xin; Fuller, Chris K.; Song, Yi; Meng, Qingying; Zhang, Bin; Yang, Xia; Li, Hao

2013-01-01

280

Large-scale functional RNAi screen in C. elegans identifies genes that regulate the dysfunction of mutant polyglutamine neurons  

PubMed Central

Background A central goal in Huntington's disease (HD) research is to identify and prioritize candidate targets for neuroprotective intervention, which requires genome-scale information on the modifiers of early-stage neuron injury in HD. Results Here, we performed a large-scale RNA interference screen in C. elegans strains that express N-terminal huntingtin (htt) in touch receptor neurons. These neurons control the response to light touch. Their function is strongly impaired by expanded polyglutamines (128Q) as shown by the nearly complete loss of touch response in adult animals, providing an in vivo model in which to manipulate the early phases of expanded-polyQ neurotoxicity. In total, 6034 genes were examined, revealing 662 gene inactivations that either reduce or aggravate defective touch response in 128Q animals. Several genes were previously implicated in HD or neurodegenerative disease, suggesting that this screen has effectively identified candidate targets for HD. Network-based analysis emphasized a subset of high-confidence modifier genes in pathways of interest in HD including metabolic, neurodevelopmental and pro-survival pathways. Finally, 49 modifiers of 128Q-neuron dysfunction that are dysregulated in the striatum of either R/2 or CHL2 HD mice, or both, were identified. Conclusions Collectively, these results highlight the relevance to HD pathogenesis, providing novel information on the potential therapeutic targets for neuroprotection in HD. PMID:22413862

2012-01-01

281

The KM-Algorithm Identifies Regulated Genes in Time Series Expression Data  

PubMed Central

We present a statistical method to rank observed genes in gene expression time series experiments according to their degree of regulation in a biological process. The ranking may be used to focus on specific genes or to select meaningful subsets of genes from which gene regulatory networks can be built. Our approach is based on a state space model that incorporates hidden regulators of gene expression. Kalman (K) smoothing and maximum (M) likelihood estimation techniques are used to derive optimal estimates of the model parameters upon which a proposed regulation criterion is based. The statistical power of the proposed algorithm is investigated, and a real data set is analyzed for the purpose of identifying regulated genes in time dependent gene expression data. This statistical approach supports the concept that meaningful biological conclusions can be drawn from gene expression time series experiments by focusing on strong regulation rather than large expression values. PMID:19956417

Bremer, Martina; Doerge, R. W.

2009-01-01

282

Genes Involved in the Osteoarthritis Process Identified through Genome Wide Expression Analysis in Articular Cartilage; the RAAK Study  

PubMed Central

Objective Identify gene expression profiles associated with OA processes in articular cartilage and determine pathways changing during the disease process. Methods Genome wide gene expression was determined in paired samples of OA affected and preserved cartilage of the same joint using microarray analysis for 33 patients of the RAAK study. Results were replicated in independent samples by RT-qPCR and immunohistochemistry. Profiles were analyzed with the online analysis tools DAVID and STRING to identify enrichment for specific pathways and protein-protein interactions. Results Among the 1717 genes that were significantly differently expressed between OA affected and preserved cartilage we found significant enrichment for genes involved in skeletal development (e.g. TNFRSF11B and FRZB). Also several inflammatory genes such as CD55, PTGES and TNFAIP6, previously identified in within-joint analyses as well as in analyses comparing preserved cartilage from OA affected joints versus healthy cartilage were among the top genes. Of note was the high up-regulation of NGF in OA cartilage. RT-qPCR confirmed differential expression for 18 out of 19 genes with expression changes of 2-fold or higher, and immunohistochemistry of selected genes showed a concordant change in protein expression. Most of these changes associated with OA severity (Mankin score) but were independent of joint-site or sex. Conclusion We provide further insights into the ongoing OA pathophysiological processes in cartilage, in particular into differences in macroscopically intact cartilage compared to OA affected cartilage, which seem relatively consistent and independent of sex or joint. We advocate that development of treatment could benefit by focusing on these similarities in gene expression changes and/or pathways. PMID:25054223

Bovée, Judith V. M. G.; Bomer, Nils; van der Breggen, Ruud; Lakenberg, Nico; Keurentjes, J. Christiaan; Goeman, Jelle J.; Slagboom, P. Eline; Nelissen, Rob G. H. H.; Bos, Steffan D.; Meulenbelt, Ingrid

2014-01-01

283

Identifying predictors of hospice eligibility in patients with Parkinson disease.  

PubMed

This study aims to improve recognition of hospice eligibility for patients with Parkinson disease (PD) by ascertaining which variables have a higher probability of occurring uniquely in 6 to 12 months before death when compared to 18 to 24 months before death. Participants were 339 patients who died who were diagnosed with PD or Parkinsonism and treated with dopaminergic prescriptions for at least 3 years in northwestern US Veterans Affairs medical centers. A range of indicators were compared across 3 time periods (30-36 months, 24-18 months, and 12-6 months before death) using within-subjects repeated measures design. Results indicate that body mass index less than 18, alone or combined with a shift in prescribing (when benefits of dopaminergic medications no longer outweigh their risk of side effects), may signal appropriate timing for hospice referral. PMID:23975684

Goy, Elizabeth R; Bohlig, Amanda; Carter, Julie; Ganzini, Linda

2015-02-01

284

A candidate plasma protein classifier to identify Alzheimer's disease.  

PubMed

Biomarkers currently used in the aid for the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) protein markers and brain neuroimaging markers. These biomarkers, however, either involve semi-invasive procedures or are costly to measure. Thus, AD biomarkers from more easily accessible body fluids, such as plasma, are very enticing. Using an aptamer-based proteomic technology, we profiled 1,129 plasma proteins of AD patients and non-demented control individuals. A 5-protein classifier for AD identification was constructed in the discovery study with excellent 10-fold cross-validation performance (90.1% sensitivity, 84.2% specificity, 87.9% accuracy, and AUC as 0.94). In an independent validation study, the classifier was applied and correctly predicted AD with 100.0% sensitivity, 80.0% specificity, and 90.0% accuracy, matching or outperforming the CSF A?42 and tau biomarkers whose performance were assessed in individual-matched CSF samples obtained at the same visit as plasma sample collection. Moreover, the classifier also correctly predicted mild cognitive impairment, an early pre-dementia state of the disease, with 96.7% sensitivity, 80.0% specificity, and 92.5% accuracy. These studies demonstrate that plasma proteins could be used effectively and accurately to contribute to the clinical diagnosis of AD. Although additional and more diverse cohorts are needed for further validation of the robustness, including the support of postmortem diagnosis, the 5-protein classifier appears to be a promising blood test to contribute diagnosis of AD. PMID:25114072

Zhao, Xuemei; Lejnine, Serguei; Spond, Jeffrey; Zhang, Chunsheng; Ramaraj, T C; Holder, Daniel J; Dai, Hongyue; Weiner, Russell; Laterza, Omar F

2015-01-01

285

Ensemble Positive Unlabeled Learning for Disease Gene Identification  

PubMed Central

An increasing number of genes have been experimentally confirmed in recent years as causative genes to various human diseases. The newly available knowledge can be exploited by machine learning methods to discover additional unknown genes that are likely to be associated with diseases. In particular, positive unlabeled learning (PU learning) methods, which require only a positive training set P (confirmed disease genes) and an unlabeled set U (the unknown candidate genes) instead of a negative training set N, have been shown to be effective in uncovering new disease genes in the current scenario. Using only a single source of data for prediction can be susceptible to bias due to incompleteness and noise in the genomic data and a single machine learning predictor prone to bias caused by inherent limitations of individual methods. In this paper, we propose an effective PU learning framework that integrates multiple biological data sources and an ensemble of powerful machine learning classifiers for disease gene identification. Our proposed method integrates data from multiple biological sources for training PU learning classifiers. A novel ensemble-based PU learning method EPU is then used to integrate multiple PU learning classifiers to achieve accurate and robust disease gene predictions. Our evaluation experiments across six disease groups showed that EPU achieved significantly better results compared with various state-of-the-art prediction methods as well as ensemble learning classifiers. Through integrating multiple biological data sources for training and the outputs of an ensemble of PU learning classifiers for prediction, we are able to minimize the potential bias and errors in individual data sources and machine learning algorithms to achieve more accurate and robust disease gene predictions. In the future, our EPU method provides an effective framework to integrate the additional biological and computational resources for better disease gene predictions. PMID:24816822

Yang, Peng; Li, Xiaoli; Chua, Hon-Nian; Kwoh, Chee-Keong; Ng, See-Kiong

2014-01-01

286

Ensemble positive unlabeled learning for disease gene identification.  

PubMed

An increasing number of genes have been experimentally confirmed in recent years as causative genes to various human diseases. The newly available knowledge can be exploited by machine learning methods to discover additional unknown genes that are likely to be associated with diseases. In particular, positive unlabeled learning (PU learning) methods, which require only a positive training set P (confirmed disease genes) and an unlabeled set U (the unknown candidate genes) instead of a negative training set N, have been shown to be effective in uncovering new disease genes in the current scenario. Using only a single source of data for prediction can be susceptible to bias due to incompleteness and noise in the genomic data and a single machine learning predictor prone to bias caused by inherent limitations of individual methods. In this paper, we propose an effective PU learning framework that integrates multiple biological data sources and an ensemble of powerful machine learning classifiers for disease gene identification. Our proposed method integrates data from multiple biological sources for training PU learning classifiers. A novel ensemble-based PU learning method EPU is then used to integrate multiple PU learning classifiers to achieve accurate and robust disease gene predictions. Our evaluation experiments across six disease groups showed that EPU achieved significantly better results compared with various state-of-the-art prediction methods as well as ensemble learning classifiers. Through integrating multiple biological data sources for training and the outputs of an ensemble of PU learning classifiers for prediction, we are able to minimize the potential bias and errors in individual data sources and machine learning algorithms to achieve more accurate and robust disease gene predictions. In the future, our EPU method provides an effective framework to integrate the additional biological and computational resources for better disease gene predictions. PMID:24816822

Yang, Peng; Li, Xiaoli; Chua, Hon-Nian; Kwoh, Chee-Keong; Ng, See-Kiong

2014-01-01

287

Endometriosis-Specific Genes Identified by Real-Time Reverse Transcription-Polymerase Chain Reaction Expression Profiling of Endometriosis Versus Autologous Uterine Endometrium  

Microsoft Academic Search

Context: The etiology and molecular pathogenesis of endometriosis, a prevalent estrogen-dependent gynecologic disease, are poorly understood. Objective: The objective of the study was to identify the differentially expressed genes between autologous ectopic and eutopic endometrium. Design: Subtractive hybridization was used for a genome-wide search for differentially expressed genes between autologous ectopic and eutopic endometrium. Real-time RT-PCR was used for gene

Wei-Ping Hu; Sun Kuie Tay; Yi Zhao

288

Identification of Genes Expressed in Premalignant Breast Disease by Microscopy-Directed Cloning  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Histopathologic study of human breast biopsy samples has identified specific lesions which are associated with a high risk of development of invasive breast cancer. Presumably, these lesions (collectively termed premalignant breast disease) represent the earliest recognizable morphologic expression of fundamental molecular events that lead to the development of invasive breast cancer. To study molecular events underlying premalignant breast disease, we have developed a method for isolating RNA from histologically identified lesions from frozen human breast tissue. This method specifically obtains mRNA from breast epithelial cells and has identified three genes which are differentially expressed in premalignant breast epithelial lesions. One gene identified by this method is overexpressed in four of five noncomedo ductal carcinoma in situ lesions and appears to be the human homologue of the gene encoding the M2 subunit of ribonucleotide reductase, an enzyme involved in DNA synthesis.

Jensen, Roy A.; Page, David L.; Holt, Jeffrey T.

1994-09-01

289

The impact of self-identified race on epidemiologic studies of gene expression.  

PubMed

Although population differences in gene expression have been established, the impact on differential gene expression studies in large populations is not well understood. We describe the effect of self-reported race on a gene expression study of lung function in asthma. We generated gene expression profiles for 254 young adults (205 non-Hispanic whites and 49 African Americans) with asthma on whom concurrent total RNA derived from peripheral blood CD4(+) lymphocytes and lung function measurements were obtained. We identified four principal components that explained 62% of the variance in gene expression. The dominant principal component, which explained 29% of the total variance in gene expression, was strongly associated with self-identified race (P<10(-16)). The impact of these racial differences was observed when we performed differential gene expression analysis of lung function. Using multivariate linear models, we tested whether gene expression was associated with a quantitative measure of lung function: pre-bronchodilator forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV(1)). Though unadjusted linear models of FEV(1) identified several genes strongly correlated with lung function, these correlations were due to racial differences in the distribution of both FEV(1) and gene expression, and were no longer statistically significant following adjustment for self-identified race. These results suggest that self-identified race is a critical confounding covariate in epidemiologic studies of gene expression and that, similar to genetic studies, careful consideration of self-identified race in gene expression profiling studies is needed to avoid spurious association. PMID:21254216

Sharma, Sunita; Murphy, Amy; Howrylak, Judie; Himes, Blanca; Cho, Michael H; Chu, Jen-Hwa; Hunninghake, Gary M; Fuhlbrigge, Anne; Klanderman, Barbara; Ziniti, John; Senter-Sylvia, Jody; Liu, Andy; Szefler, Stanley J; Strunk, Robert; Castro, Mario; Hansel, Nadia N; Diette, Gregory B; Vonakis, Becky M; Adkinson, N Franklin; Carey, Vincent J; Raby, Benjamin A

2011-02-01

290

Integrating Murine Gene Expression Studies to Understand Obstructive Lung Disease Due to Chronic Inhaled Endotoxin  

PubMed Central

Rationale Endotoxin is a near ubiquitous environmental exposure that that has been associated with both asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). These obstructive lung diseases have a complex pathophysiology, making them difficult to study comprehensively in the context of endotoxin. Genome-wide gene expression studies have been used to identify a molecular snapshot of the response to environmental exposures. Identification of differentially expressed genes shared across all published murine models of chronic inhaled endotoxin will provide insight into the biology underlying endotoxin-associated lung disease. Methods We identified three published murine models with gene expression profiling after repeated low-dose inhaled endotoxin. All array data from these experiments were re-analyzed, annotated consistently, and tested for shared genes found to be differentially expressed. Additional functional comparison was conducted by testing for significant enrichment of differentially expressed genes in known pathways. The importance of this gene signature in smoking-related lung disease was assessed using hierarchical clustering in an independent experiment where mice were exposed to endotoxin, smoke, and endotoxin plus smoke. Results A 101-gene signature was detected in three murine models, more than expected by chance. The three model systems exhibit additional similarity beyond shared genes when compared at the pathway level, with increasing enrichment of inflammatory pathways associated with longer duration of endotoxin exposure. Genes and pathways important in both asthma and COPD were shared across all endotoxin models. Mice exposed to endotoxin, smoke, and smoke plus endotoxin were accurately classified with the endotoxin gene signature. Conclusions Despite the differences in laboratory, duration of exposure, and strain of mouse used in three experimental models of chronic inhaled endotoxin, surprising similarities in gene expression were observed. The endotoxin component of tobacco smoke may play an important role in disease development. PMID:23675439

Lai, Peggy S.; Hofmann, Oliver; Baron, Rebecca M.; Cernadas, Manuela; Meng, Quanxin Ryan; Bresler, Herbert S.; Brass, David M.; Yang, Ivana V.; Schwartz, David A.; Christiani, David C.; Hide, Winston

2013-01-01

291

Network Topology Reveals Key Cardiovascular Disease Genes Anida Sarajlic1,  

E-print Network

1 Network Topology Reveals Key Cardiovascular Disease Genes Anida Sarajli´c1, , Vuk Janji´c1, SW72AZ, UK 2 Institute for Cardiovascular Disease "Dedinje," University of Belgrade, Serbia E biological information. Even though cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are a major global cause of death, many

Przulj, Natasa

292

Genetics of gene expression and its effect on disease  

Microsoft Academic Search

Common human diseases result from the interplay of many genes and environmental factors. Therefore, a more integrative biology approach is needed to unravel the complexity and causes of such diseases. To elucidate the complexity of common human diseases such as obesity, we have analysed the expression of 23,720 transcripts in large population-based blood and adipose tissue cohorts comprehensively assessed for

Valur Emilsson; Gudmar Thorleifsson; Bin Zhang; Amy S. Leonardson; Florian Zink; Jun Zhu; Sonia Carlson; Agnar Helgason; G. Bragi Walters; Steinunn Gunnarsdottir; Magali Mouy; Valgerdur Steinthorsdottir; Gudrun H. Eiriksdottir; Gyda Bjornsdottir; Inga Reynisdottir; Daniel Gudbjartsson; Anna Helgadottir; Aslaug Jonasdottir; Adalbjorg Jonasdottir; Unnur Styrkarsdottir; Solveig Gretarsdottir; Kristinn P. Magnusson; Hreinn Stefansson; Ragnheidur Fossdal; Kristleifur Kristjansson; Hjortur G. Gislason; Tryggvi Stefansson; Bjorn G. Leifsson; Unnur Thorsteinsdottir; John R. Lamb; Jeffrey R. Gulcher; Marc L. Reitman; Augustine Kong; Eric E. Schadt; Kari Stefansson

2008-01-01

293

Analysis of Gene-Gene Interactions among Common Variants in Candidate Cardiovascular Genes in Coronary Artery Disease  

PubMed Central

Objective Only a small fraction of coronary artery disease (CAD) heritability has been explained by common variants identified to date. Interactions between genes of importance to cardiovascular regulation may account for some of the missing heritability of CAD. This study aimed to investigate the role of gene-gene interactions in common variants in candidate cardiovascular genes in CAD. Approach and Results 2,101 patients with CAD from the British Heart Foundation Family Heart Study and 2,426 CAD-free controls were included in the discovery cohort. All subjects were genotyped with the Illumina HumanCVD BeadChip enriched for genes and pathways relevant to the cardiovascular system and disease. The primary analysis in the discovery cohort examined pairwise interactions among 913 common (minor allele frequency >0.1) independent single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with at least nominal association with CAD in single locus analysis. A secondary exploratory interaction analysis was performed among all 11,332 independent common SNPs surviving quality control criteria. Replication analyses were conducted in 2,967 patients and 3,075 controls from the Myocardial Infarction Genetics Consortium. None of the interactions amongst 913 SNPs analysed in the primary analysis was statistically significant after correction for multiple testing (required P<1.2x10-7). Similarly, none of the pairwise gene-gene interactions in the secondary analysis reached statistical significance after correction for multiple testing (required P = 7.8x10-10). None of 36 suggestive interactions from the primary analysis or 31 interactions from the secondary analysis was significant in the replication cohort. Our study had 80% power to detect odds ratios > 1.7 for common variants in the primary analysis. Conclusions Moderately large additive interactions between common SNPs in genes relevant to cardiovascular disease do not appear to play a major role in genetic predisposition to CAD. The role of genetic interactions amongst less common SNPs and with medium and small magnitude effects remain to be investigated. PMID:25658981

Musameh, Muntaser D.; Wang, William Y. S.; Nelson, Christopher P.; Lluís-Ganella, Carla; Debiec, Radoslaw; Subirana, Isaac; Elosua, Roberto; Balmforth, Anthony J.; Ball, Stephen G.; Hall, Alistair S.; Kathiresan, Sekar; Thompson, John R.; Lucas, Gavin; Samani, Nilesh J.; Tomaszewski, Maciej

2015-01-01

294

Rapid in vivo forward genetic approach for identifying axon death genes in Drosophila  

PubMed Central

Axons damaged by acute injury, toxic insults, or neurodegenerative diseases execute a poorly defined autodestruction signaling pathway leading to widespread fragmentation and functional loss. Here, we describe an approach to study Wallerian degeneration in the Drosophila L1 wing vein that allows for analysis of axon degenerative phenotypes with single-axon resolution in vivo. This method allows for the axotomy of specific subsets of axons followed by examination of progressive axonal degeneration and debris clearance alongside uninjured control axons. We developed new Flippase (FLP) reagents using proneural gene promoters to drive FLP expression very early in neural lineages. These tools allow for the production of mosaic clone populations with high efficiency in sensory neurons in the wing. We describe a collection of lines optimized for forward genetic mosaic screens using MARCM (mosaic analysis with a repressible cell marker; i.e., GFP-labeled, homozygous mutant) on all major autosomal arms (?95% of the fly genome). Finally, as a proof of principle we screened the X chromosome and identified a collection eight recessive and two dominant alleles of highwire, a ubiquitin E3 ligase required for axon degeneration. Similar unbiased forward genetic screens should help rapidly delineate axon death genes, thereby providing novel potential drug targets for therapeutic intervention to prevent axonal and synaptic loss. PMID:24958874

Neukomm, Lukas J.; Burdett, Thomas C.; Gonzalez, Michael A.; Züchner, Stephan; Freeman, Marc R.

2014-01-01

295

Rapid in vivo forward genetic approach for identifying axon death genes in Drosophila.  

PubMed

Axons damaged by acute injury, toxic insults, or neurodegenerative diseases execute a poorly defined autodestruction signaling pathway leading to widespread fragmentation and functional loss. Here, we describe an approach to study Wallerian degeneration in the Drosophila L1 wing vein that allows for analysis of axon degenerative phenotypes with single-axon resolution in vivo. This method allows for the axotomy of specific subsets of axons followed by examination of progressive axonal degeneration and debris clearance alongside uninjured control axons. We developed new Flippase (FLP) reagents using proneural gene promoters to drive FLP expression very early in neural lineages. These tools allow for the production of mosaic clone populations with high efficiency in sensory neurons in the wing. We describe a collection of lines optimized for forward genetic mosaic screens using MARCM (mosaic analysis with a repressible cell marker; i.e., GFP-labeled, homozygous mutant) on all major autosomal arms (?95% of the fly genome). Finally, as a proof of principle we screened the X chromosome and identified a collection eight recessive and two dominant alleles of highwire, a ubiquitin E3 ligase required for axon degeneration. Similar unbiased forward genetic screens should help rapidly delineate axon death genes, thereby providing novel potential drug targets for therapeutic intervention to prevent axonal and synaptic loss. PMID:24958874

Neukomm, Lukas J; Burdett, Thomas C; Gonzalez, Michael A; Züchner, Stephan; Freeman, Marc R

2014-07-01

296

Site-specific gene therapy for cardiovascular disease  

PubMed Central

Gene therapy holds considerable promise for the treatment of cardiovascular disease and may provide novel therapeutic solutions for both genetic disorders and acquired pathophysiologies such as arteriosclerosis, heart failure and arrhythmias. Recombinant DNA technology and the sequencing of the human genome have made a plethora of candidate therapeutic genes available for cardiovascular diseases. However, progress in the field of gene therapy for cardiovascular disease has been modest; one of the key reasons for this limited progress is the lack of gene delivery systems for localizing gene therapy to specific sites to optimize transgene expression and efficacy. This review summarizes progress made toward the site-specific delivery of cardiovascular gene therapy and highlights selected promising novel approaches. PMID:20205054

Fishbein, Ilia; Chorny, Michael; Levy, Robert J

2010-01-01

297

Genetic interactions and modifier genes in Hirschsprung's disease  

PubMed Central

Hirschsprung’s disease is a congenital disorder that occurs in 1:5000 live births. It is characterised by an absence of enteric neurons along a variable region of the gastrointestinal tract. Hirschsprung’s disease is classified as a multigenic disorder, because the same phenotype is associated with mutations in multiple distinct genes. Furthermore, the genetics of Hirschsprung’s disease are highly complex and not strictly Mendelian. The phenotypic variability and incomplete penetrance observed in Hirschsprung’s disease also suggests the involvement of modifier genes. Here, we summarise the current knowledge of the genetics underlying Hirschsprung’s disease based on human and animal studies, focusing on the principal causative genes, their interactions, and the role of modifier genes. PMID:22174542

Wallace, Adam S; Anderson, Richard B

2011-01-01

298

Genome-Wide Homozygosity Mapping in Families with Leber Congenital Amaurosis Identifies Mutations in AIPL1 and RDH12 Genes.  

PubMed

Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA) causes severe visual impairment and blindness very early in life. Mutant alleles of several genes acting in different pathways, of which all have critical roles for normal retinal function, were involved in LCA development. The purpose of this study was to use genome-wide genotyping to identify LCA-causing loci in two Turkish families. Genome-wide genotyping and haplotype analysis were performed for prioritization of candidate genes for mutation screening in families with LCA. Identified informative critical choromosomal regions obtained by homozygosity mapping from the families were searched for overlapping of any LCA causative genes. Corresponding clinical phenotypes of the patients with identified mutations were evaluated. In this study, two families were shown to be linked to two different LCA loci covering retinol dehydrogenase 12 (RDH12) and aryl-hydrocarbon-interacting protein-like1 (AIPL1) genes. Mutation screening revealed a novel p.Gln141* mutation in the AIPL1 gene and a previously described p.Thr49Met mutation in the RDH12 gene in a homozygous state. Our patients with the RDH12 mutation had the distinct macular coloboma sign, and the patient with the AIPL1 mutation developed microphthalmia and severe widespread retinal pigment epithelial atrophy, in contrast to previously reported cases. It is currently evident that mutation screening needs to be done in at least 18 genes known to be associated with LCA. Thus, homozygosity mapping is an alternative technique to improve the molecular diagnosis in LCA, which is a group of genetically and clinically heterogeneous diseases causing retinal degeneration. The patients without mutation in known genes may further be analyzed by using next-generation sequencing. PMID:25148430

Yücel-Y?lmaz, Didem; Tarlan, Berçin; K?ratl?, Hayyam; Ozgül, R?za Köksal

2014-12-01

299

Screening Leishmania donovani complex-specific genes required for visceral disease.  

PubMed

Leishmania protozoan parasites are the causing agent of leishmaniasis. Depending on the infecting species, Leishmania infection can causes a wide variety of diseases such as self-healing cutaneous lesions by L. major and fatal visceral leishmaniasis by L. donovani and L. infantum. Comparison of the visceral disease causing L. infantum genome with cutaneous disease causing L. major and L. braziliensis genomes has identified 25 L. infantum (L. donovani complex) species-specific genes that are absent or pseudogenes in L. major and L. braziliensis. To investigate whether these L. donovani complex species-specific genes are involved in visceral infection, we cloned these genes from L. donovani and introduced them into L. major and then determined whether the transgenic L. major had an increased ability to survive in liver and spleen of BALB/c mice. Several of these L. donovani complex specific genes were found to significantly increase L. major survival in visceral organs in BALB/c mice including the A2 and Ld2834 genes, while down regulation of these genes in L. donovani by either antisense RNA or gene knockout dramatically reduced L. donovani virulence in BALB/c mice. This demonstrated that L. donovani complex species-specific genes play important roles in visceral infection. In this chapter, we describe procedures to screen L. donovani complex specific genes required for visceral infection by cross species transgenic expression, gene deletion targeting and measuring infection levels in mice. PMID:25388124

Zhang, Wen-Wei; Matlashewski, Greg

2015-01-01

300

Late-Onset Alzheimer's Disease Genes and the Potentially Implicated Pathways.  

PubMed

Late-onset Alzheimer's disease (LOAD) is a devastating neurodegenerative disease with no effective treatment or cure. In addition to APOE, recent large genome-wide association studies have identified variation in over 20 loci that contribute to disease risk: CR1, BIN1, INPP5D, MEF2C, TREM2, CD2AP, HLA-DRB1/HLA-DRB5, EPHA1, NME8, ZCWPW1, CLU, PTK2B, PICALM, SORL1, CELF1, MS4A4/MS4A6E, SLC24A4/RIN3,FERMT2, CD33, ABCA7, CASS4. In addition, rare variants associated with LOAD have also been identified in APP, TREM2 and PLD3 genes. Previous research has identified inflammatory response, lipid metabolism and homeostasis, and endocytosis as the likely modes through which these gene products participate in Alzheimer's disease. Despite the clustering of these genes across a few common pathways, many of their roles in disease pathogenesis have yet to be determined. In this review, we examine both general and postulated disease functions of these genes and consider a comprehensive view of their potential roles in LOAD risk. PMID:24829845

Rosenthal, Samantha L; Kamboh, M Ilyas

2014-01-01

301

Large-scale association analyses identifies 13 new susceptibility loci for coronary artery disease  

PubMed Central

We performed a meta-analysis of 14 genome-wide association studies of coronary artery disease (CAD) comprising 22,233 cases and 64,762 controls of European descent, followed by genotyping of top association signals in 60,738 additional individuals. This genomic analysis identified 13 novel loci harboring one or more SNPs that were associated with CAD at P<5×10?8 and confirmed the association of 10 of 12 previously reported CAD loci. The 13 novel loci displayed risk allele frequencies ranging from 0.13 to 0.91 and were associated with a 6 to 17 percent increase in the risk of CAD per allele. Notably, only three of the novel loci displayed significant association with traditional CAD risk factors, while the majority lie in gene regions not previously implicated in the pathogenesis of CAD. Finally, five of the novel CAD risk loci appear to have pleiotropic effects, showing strong association with various other human diseases or traits. PMID:21378990

Schunkert, Heribert; König, Inke R.; Kathiresan, Sekar; Reilly, Muredach P.; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Holm, Hilma; Preuss, Michael; Stewart, Alexandre F. R.; Barbalic, Maja; Gieger, Christian; Absher, Devin; Aherrahrou, Zouhair; Allayee, Hooman; Altshuler, David; Anand, Sonia S.; Andersen, Karl; Anderson, Jeffrey L.; Ardissino, Diego; Ball, Stephen G.; Balmforth, Anthony J.; Barnes, Timothy A.; Becker, Diane M.; Becker, Lewis C.; Berger, Klaus; Bis, Joshua C.; Boekholdt, S. Matthijs; Boerwinkle, Eric; Braund, Peter S.; Brown, Morris J.; Burnett, Mary Susan; Buysschaert, Ian; Carlquist, Cardiogenics, John F.; Chen, Li; Cichon, Sven; Codd, Veryan; Davies, Robert W.; Dedoussis, George; Dehghan, Abbas; Demissie, Serkalem; Devaney, Joseph M.; Do, Ron; Doering, Angela; Eifert, Sandra; El Mokhtari, Nour Eddine; Ellis, Stephen G.; Elosua, Roberto; Engert, James C.; Epstein, Stephen E.; Faire, Ulf de; Fischer, Marcus; Folsom, Aaron R.; Freyer, Jennifer; Gigante, Bruna; Girelli, Domenico; Gretarsdottir, Solveig; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Gulcher, Jeffrey R.; Halperin, Eran; Hammond, Naomi; Hazen, Stanley L.; Hofman, Albert; Horne, Benjamin D.; Illig, Thomas; Iribarren, Carlos; Jones, Gregory T.; Jukema, J.Wouter; Kaiser, Michael A.; Kaplan, Lee M.; Kastelein, John J.P.; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Knowles, Joshua W.; Kolovou, Genovefa; Kong, Augustine; Laaksonen, Reijo; Lambrechts, Diether; Leander, Karin; Lettre, Guillaume; Li, Mingyao; Lieb, Wolfgang; Linsel-Nitschke, Patrick; Loley, Christina; Lotery, Andrew J.; Mannucci, Pier M.; Maouche, Seraya; Martinelli, Nicola; McKeown, Pascal P.; Meisinger, Christa; Meitinger, Thomas; Melander, Olle; Merlini, Pier Angelica; Mooser, Vincent; Morgan, Thomas; Mühleisen, Thomas W.; Muhlestein, Joseph B.; Münzel, Thomas; Musunuru, Kiran; Nahrstaedt, Janja; Nelson, Christopher P.; Nöthen, Markus M.; Olivieri, Oliviero; Patel, Riyaz S.; Patterson, Chris C.; Peters, Annette; Peyvandi, Flora; Qu, Liming; Quyyumi, Arshed A.; Rader, Daniel J.; Rallidis, Loukianos S.; Rice, Catherine; Rosendaal, Frits R.; Rubin, Diana; Salomaa, Veikko; Sampietro, M. Lourdes; Sandhu, Manj S.; Schadt, Eric; Schäfer, Arne; Schillert, Arne; Schreiber, Stefan; Schrezenmeir, Jürgen; Schwartz, Stephen M.; Siscovick, David S.; Sivananthan, Mohan; Sivapalaratnam, Suthesh; Smith, Albert; Smith, Tamara B.; Snoep, Jaapjan D.; Soranzo, Nicole; Spertus, John A.; Stark, Klaus; Stirrups, Kathy; Stoll, Monika; Tang, W. H. Wilson; Tennstedt, Stephanie; Thorgeirsson, Gudmundur; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Tomaszewski, Maciej; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; van Rij, Andre M.; Voight, Benjamin F.; Wareham, Nick J.; Wells, George A.; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Wild, Philipp S.; Willenborg, Christina; Witteman, Jaqueline C. M.; Wright, Benjamin J.; Ye, Shu; Zeller, Tanja; Ziegler, Andreas; Cambien, Francois; Goodall, Alison H.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Quertermous, Thomas; März, Winfried; Hengstenberg, Christian; Blankenberg, Stefan; Ouwehand, Willem H.; Hall, Alistair S.; Deloukas, Panos; Thompson, John R.; Stefansson, Kari; Roberts, Robert; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; O’Donnell, Christopher J.; McPherson, Ruth; Erdmann, Jeanette; Samani, Nilesh J.

2011-01-01

302

A global approach to identify differentially expressed genes in cDNA (two-color) microarray experiments  

Microsoft Academic Search

Motivation: Currently most of the methods for identifying differen- tially expressed genes fall into the category of so called single-gene- analysis, performing hypothesis testing on a gene-by-gene basis. In a single-gene-analysis approach, estimating the variability of each gene is required to determine whether a gene is differentially expressed or not. Poor accuracy of variability estimation makes it difficult to identify

Yiyong Zhou; Corentin Cras-méneur; Mitsuru Ohsugi; Gary D. Stormo; M. Alan. Permutt

2007-01-01

303

A functional siRNA screen identifies genes modulating angiotensin II-mediated EGFR transactivation  

PubMed Central

Summary The angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT1R) transactivates the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) to mediate cellular growth, however, the molecular mechanisms involved have not yet been resolved. To address this, we performed a functional siRNA screen of the human kinome in human mammary epithelial cells that demonstrate a robust AT1R–EGFR transactivation. We identified a suite of genes encoding proteins that both positively and negatively regulate AT1R–EGFR transactivation. Many candidates are components of EGFR signalling networks, whereas others, including TRIO, BMX and CHKA, have not been previously linked to EGFR transactivation. Individual knockdown of TRIO, BMX or CHKA attenuated tyrosine phosphorylation of the EGFR by angiotensin II stimulation, but this did not occur following direct stimulation of the EGFR with EGF, indicating that these proteins function between the activated AT1R and the EGFR. Further investigation of TRIO and CHKA revealed that their activity is likely to be required for AT1R–EGFR transactivation. CHKA also mediated EGFR transactivation in response to another G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) ligand, thrombin, indicating a pervasive role for CHKA in GPCR–EGFR crosstalk. Our study reveals the power of unbiased, functional genomic screens to identify new signalling mediators important for tissue remodelling in cardiovascular disease and cancer. PMID:24046455

George, Amee J.; Purdue, Brooke W.; Gould, Cathryn M.; Thomas, Daniel W.; Handoko, Yanny; Qian, Hongwei; Quaife-Ryan, Gregory A.; Morgan, Kylie A.; Simpson, Kaylene J.; Thomas, Walter G.; Hannan, Ross D.

2013-01-01

304

Model systems for investigating mucin gene expression in airway diseases.  

PubMed

Overproduction of mucus and of mucin glycoproteins and goblet cell hyperplasia occurs in chronic obstructive airway diseases, including asthma and cystic fibrosis. Mucus overproduction results from alterations in several cellular processes, including altered regulation of airway mucin genes on exposure to environmental and infectious agents and to inflammatory mediators. Seven of the nine identified MUC genes (which encode the protein backbone of mucins) are normally expressed in human respiratory tract tissues. Several inflammatory mediators have now been shown to regulate expression of MUC2, MUC5AC, and MUC5B genes. Importantly, mucin gene expression can be regulated both transcriptionally and posttranscriptionally. Current information on airway mucin gene expression is summarized in this review along with an overview of airway epithelial model systems. In vitro model systems include airway epithelial carcinoma cell lines and primary normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells. In vivo systems include human respiratory tract tissues and rodent airways. Our laboratory has begun to investigate the role of cytokines on mucin gene expression in vitro and in vivo and on goblet cell metaplasia in vivo. Because cytokines can alter cell proliferation, we characterized the effect of interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-13 on the proliferation of NHBE cells and three human lung carcinoma cell lines--A549, NCI-H292, and Calu-3--that are frequently used for analyses of airway mucin gene expression. Both IL-4 and IL-13 had cell-specific effects. They increased proliferation moderately (1.2-3.0-fold) in NHBE and Calu-3 cells, but markedly inhibited proliferation of A549 cells in a dose-dependent manner. IL-4 increased proliferation of NCI-H292 cells moderately, although IL-13 had no significant effect. We also examined the role of IL-13 and IL-4 on MUC5AC messenger RNA (mRNA) expression in A549, Calu-3, and H292 cell lines and did not observe any significant effect. However, we recently showed an increase in Muc-5ac mRNA and protein expression in a murine model of ovalbumin-induced allergic asthma and in murine airways when IL-13 was delivered intranasally (Alimam, N.Z., et al. Am J. Respir. Cell Mol. Biol. 22:253--260). Thus, we speculate that IL-13 plays a role in the differentiation of murine airway epithelial cells into goblet cells, which then express Muc-5ac mRNA. A detailed analysis of the role of cytokines in airway cell differentiation and mucin gene expression both in vitro and in vivo is required to elucidate the roles of mucins in airway health and diseases. Identification of Muc-5ac as a major gene and gene product in goblet cell metaplasia should facilitate delineation of the molecular mechanisms underlying the induction and reversal of airway goblet cell metaplasia and goblet cell hyperplasia. PMID:11066028

Rose, M C; Piazza, F M; Chen, Y A; Alimam, M Z; Bautista, M V; Letwin, N; Rajput, B

2000-01-01

305

GeneBrowser 2: an application to explore and identify common biological traits in a set of genes  

PubMed Central

Background The development of high-throughput laboratory techniques created a demand for computer-assisted result analysis tools. Many of these techniques return lists of genes whose interpretation requires finding relevant biological roles for the problem at hand. The required information is typically available in public databases, and usually, this information must be manually retrieved to complement the analysis. This process is a very time-consuming task that should be automated as much as possible. Results GeneBrowser is a web-based tool that, for a given list of genes, combines data from several public databases with visualisation and analysis methods to help identify the most relevant and common biological characteristics. The functionalities provided include the following: a central point with the most relevant biological information for each inserted gene; a list of the most related papers in PubMed and gene expression studies in ArrayExpress; and an extended approach to functional analysis applied to Gene Ontology, homologies, gene chromosomal localisation and pathways. Conclusions GeneBrowser provides a unique entry point to several visualisation and analysis methods, providing fast and easy analysis of a set of genes. GeneBrowser fills the gap between Web portals that analyse one gene at a time and functional analysis tools that are limited in scope and usually desktop-based. PMID:20663121

2010-01-01

306

Novel Mutations in the ZEB1 Gene Identified in Czech and British Patients With Posterior Polymorphous Corneal Dystrophy  

PubMed Central

We describe the search for mutations in six unrelated Czech and four unrelated British families with posterior polymorphous corneal dystrophy (PPCD); a relatively rare eye disorder. Coding exons and intron/exon boundaries of all three genes (VSX1, COL8A2, and ZEB1/TCF8) previously reported to be implicated in the pathogenesis of this disorder were screened by DNA sequencing. Four novel pathogenic mutations were identified in four families; two deletions, one nonsense, and one duplication within exon 7 in the ZEB1 gene located at 10p11.2. We also genotyped the Czech patients to test for a founder haplotype and lack of disease segregation with the 20p11.2 locus we previously described. Although a systematic clinical examination was not performed, our investigation does not support an association between ZEB1 changes and self reported non-ocular anomalies. In the remaining six families no disease causing mutations were identified thereby indicating that as yet unidentified gene(s) are likely to be responsible for PPCD. PMID:17437275

Liskova, Petra; Tuft, Stephen J.; Gwilliam, Rhian; Ebenezer, Neil D.; Jirsova, Katerina; Prescott, Quincy; Martincova, Radka; Pretorius, Marike; Sinclair, Neil; Boase, David L.; Jeffrey, Margaret J.; Deloukas, Panos; Hardcastle, Alison J.; Filipec, Martin; Bhattacharya, Shomi S.

2009-01-01

307

Newly identified fusion genes in lung and colorectal cancer may guide treatment with 'targeted' drugs  

Cancer.gov

Novel gene abnormalities discovered in a subpopulation of lung and colorectal tumors could potentially identify patients with a good chance of responding to highly specific "targeted" drugs already in use for treating other cancers, scientists report.

308

Salk scientists identify a new gene that could stop the spread of deadly cancer  

Cancer.gov

Scientists at the Salk Institute have identified a gene responsible for stopping the movement of cancer from the lungs to other parts of the body, indicating a new way to fight one of the world's deadliest cancers.

309

The compact Selaginella genome identifies changes in gene content associated with the evolution of vascular plants  

Microsoft Academic Search

We report the genome sequence of the nonseed vascular plant, Selaginella moellendorffii, and by comparative genomics identify genes that likely played important roles in the early evolution of vascular plants and their subsequent evolution

Igor V. Grigoriev; Jo Ann Banks; Tomoaki Nishiyama; Mitsuyasu Hasebe; John L. Bowman; Michael Gribskov; Claude dePamphilis; Victor A. Albert; Naoki Aono; Tsuyoshi Aoyama; Barbara A. Ambrose; Neil W. Ashton; Michael J. Axtell; Elizabeth Barker; Michael S. Barker; Jeffrey L. Bennetzen; Nicholas D. Bonawitz; Clint Chapple; Chaoyang Cheng; Luiz Gustavo Guedes Correa; Michael Dacre; Jeremy DeBarry; Ingo Dreyer; Marek Elias; Eric M. Engstrom; Mark Estelle; Liang Feng; Cedric Finet; Sandra K. Floyd; Wolf B. Frommer; Tomomichi Fujita; Lydia Gramzow; Michael Gutensohn; Jesper Harholt; Mitsuru Hattori; Alexander Heyl; Tadayoshi Hirai; Yuji Hiwatashi; Masaki Ishikawa; Mineko Iwata; Kenneth G. Karol; Barbara Koehler; Uener Kolukisaoglu; Minoru Kubo; Tetsuya Kurata; Sylvie Lalonde; Kejie Li; Ying Li; Amy Litt; Eric Lyons; Gerard Manning; Takeshi Maruyama; Todd P. Michael; Koji Mikami; Saori Miyazaki; Shin-ichi Morinaga; Takashi Murata; Bernd Mueller-Roeber; David R. Nelson; Mari Obara; Yasuko Oguri; Richard G. Olmstead; Naoko Onodera; Bent Larsen Petersen; Birgit Pils; Michael Prigge; Stefan A. Rensing; Diego Mauricio Riano-Pachon; Alison W. Roberts; Yoshikatsu Sato; Henrik Vibe Scheller; Burkhard Schulz; Christian Schulz; Eugene V. Shakirov; Nakako Shibagaki; Naoki Shinohara; Dorothy E. Shippen; Iben Sorensen; Ryo Sotooka; Nagisa Sugimoto; Mamoru Sugita; Naomi Sumikawa; Milos Tanurdzic; Gunter Theilsen; Peter Ulvskov; Sachiko Wakazuki; Jing-Ke Weng; William W. G. T. Willats; Daniel Wipf; Paul G. Wolf; Lixing Yang; Andreas D. Zimmer; Qihui Zhu; Therese Mitros; Uffe Hellsten; Dominique Loque; Robert Otillar; Asaf Salamov; Jeremy Schmutz; Harris Shapiro; Erika Lindquist; Susan Lucas; Daniel Rokhsar

2011-01-01

310

NIH Researchers Identify New Gene Mutation Associated with ALS and Dementia  

MedlinePLUS

... identify new gene mutation associated with ALS and dementia April 7, 2014 A rare mutation in a ... several people had been diagnosed with ALS and dementia, the investigators used exome sequencing—a technique in ...

311

The compact Selaginella genome identifies changes in gene content associated with the evolution of vascular plants  

SciTech Connect

We report the genome sequence of the nonseed vascular plant, Selaginella moellendorffii, and by comparative genomics identify genes that likely played important roles in the early evolution of vascular plants and their subsequent evolution

Grigoriev, Igor V.; Banks, Jo Ann; Nishiyama, Tomoaki; Hasebe, Mitsuyasu; Bowman, John L.; Gribskov, Michael; dePamphilis, Claude; Albert, Victor A.; Aono, Naoki; Aoyama, Tsuyoshi; Ambrose, Barbara A.; Ashton, Neil W.; Axtell, Michael J.; Barker, Elizabeth; Barker, Michael S.; Bennetzen, Jeffrey L.; Bonawitz, Nicholas D.; Chapple, Clint; Cheng, Chaoyang; Correa, Luiz Gustavo Guedes; Dacre, Michael; DeBarry, Jeremy; Dreyer, Ingo; Elias, Marek; Engstrom, Eric M.; Estelle, Mark; Feng, Liang; Finet, Cedric; Floyd, Sandra K.; Frommer, Wolf B.; Fujita, Tomomichi; Gramzow, Lydia; Gutensohn, Michael; Harholt, Jesper; Hattori, Mitsuru; Heyl, Alexander; Hirai, Tadayoshi; Hiwatashi, Yuji; Ishikawa, Masaki; Iwata, Mineko; Karol, Kenneth G.; Koehler, Barbara; Kolukisaoglu, Uener; Kubo, Minoru; Kurata, Tetsuya; Lalonde, Sylvie; Li, Kejie; Li, Ying; Litt, Amy; Lyons, Eric; Manning, Gerard; Maruyama, Takeshi; Michael, Todd P.; Mikami, Koji; Miyazaki, Saori; Morinaga, Shin-ichi; Murata, Takashi; Mueller-Roeber, Bernd; Nelson, David R.; Obara, Mari; Oguri, Yasuko; Olmstead, Richard G.; Onodera, Naoko; Petersen, Bent Larsen; Pils, Birgit; Prigge, Michael; Rensing, Stefan A.; Riano-Pachon, Diego Mauricio; Roberts, Alison W.; Sato, Yoshikatsu; Scheller, Henrik Vibe; Schulz, Burkhard; Schulz, Christian; Shakirov, Eugene V.; Shibagaki, Nakako; Shinohara, Naoki; Shippen, Dorothy E.; Sorensen, Iben; Sotooka, Ryo; Sugimoto, Nagisa; Sugita, Mamoru; Sumikawa, Naomi; Tanurdzic, Milos; Theilsen, Gunter; Ulvskov, Peter; Wakazuki, Sachiko; Weng, Jing-Ke; Willats, William W.G.T.; Wipf, Daniel; Wolf, Paul G.; Yang, Lixing; Zimmer, Andreas D.; Zhu, Qihui; Mitros, Therese; Hellsten, Uffe; Loque, Dominique; Otillar, Robert; Salamov, Asaf; Schmutz, Jeremy; Shapiro, Harris; Lindquist, Erika; Lucas, Susan; Rokhsar, Daniel

2011-04-28

312

Gene expression profiling of human diseases by serial analysis of gene expression  

Microsoft Academic Search

Until recently, the approach to understanding the molecular basis of complex syndromes such as cancer, coronary artery disease, and diabetes was to study the behavior of individual genes. However, it is generally recognized that expression of a number of genes is coordinated both spatially and temporally and that this coordination changes during the development and progression of diseases. Newly developed

Shui Qing Ye; David C. Usher; Li Q. Zhang

2002-01-01

313

A de novo complete BRCA1 gene deletion identified in a Spanish woman with early bilateral breast cancer  

PubMed Central

Background Germline mutations in either of the two tumor-suppressor genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2, account for a significant proportion of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer cases. Most of these mutations consist of deletions, insertions, nonsense mutations, and splice variants, however an increasing number of large genomic rearrangements have been identified in these genes. Methods We analysed BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes by direct sequencing and MLPA. We confirmed the results by an alternative MLPA kit and characterized the BRCA1 deletion by Array CGH. Results We describe the first case of a patient with no strong family history of the disease who developed early-onset bilateral breast cancer with a de novo complete BRCA1 gene deletion in the germinal line. The detected deletion started from the region surrounding the VAT1 locus to the beginning of NBR1 gene, including the RND2, ?BRCA1, BRCA1 and NBR2 complete genes. Conclusion This finding supports the large genomic rearrangement screening of BRCA genes in young breast cancer patients without family history, as well as in hereditary breast and ovarian cancer families previously tested negative for other variations. PMID:21989022

2011-01-01

314

Investigation of manic and euthymic episodes identifies state- and trait-specific gene expression and STAB1 as a new candidate gene for bipolar disorder  

PubMed Central

Bipolar disorder (BD) is a highly heritable psychiatric disease characterized by recurrent episodes of mania and depression. To identify new BD genes and pathways, the present study employed a three-step approach. First, gene-expression profiles of BD patients were assessed during both a manic and an euthymic phase. These profiles were compared intra-individually and with the gene-expression profiles of controls. Second, those differentially expressed genes that were considered potential trait markers of BD were validated using data from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortiums' genome-wide association study (GWAS) of BD. Third, the implicated molecular mechanisms were investigated using pathway analytical methods. In the present patients, this novel approach identified: (i) sets of differentially expressed genes specific to mania and euthymia; and (ii) a set of differentially expressed genes that were common to both mood states. In the GWAS data integration analysis, one gene (STAB1) remained significant (P=1.9 × 10?4) after adjustment for multiple testing. STAB1 is located in close proximity to PBMR1 and the NEK4-ITIH1-ITIH3-ITIH4 region, which are the top findings from GWAS meta-analyses of mood disorder, and a combined BD and schizophrenia data set. Pathway analyses in the mania versus control comparison revealed three distinct clusters of pathways tagging molecular mechanisms implicated in BD, for example, energy metabolism, inflammation and the ubiquitin proteasome system. The present findings suggest that STAB1 is a new and highly promising candidate gene in this region. The combining of gene expression and GWAS data may provide valuable insights into the biological mechanisms of BD. PMID:25136889

Witt, S H; Juraeva, D; Sticht, C; Strohmaier, J; Meier, S; Treutlein, J; Dukal, H; Frank, J; Lang, M; Deuschle, M; Schulze, T G; Degenhardt, F; Mattheisen, M; Brors, B; Cichon, S; Nöthen, M M; Witt, C C; Rietschel, M

2014-01-01

315

GWAS of cerebrospinal fluid tau levels identifies risk variants for Alzheimer's disease.  

PubMed

Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) tau, tau phosphorylated at threonine 181 (ptau), and A??? are established biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease (AD) and have been used as quantitative traits for genetic analyses. We performed the largest genome-wide association study for cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) tau/ptau levels published to date (n = 1,269), identifying three genome-wide significant loci for CSF tau and ptau: rs9877502 (p = 4.89 × 10?? for tau) located at 3q28 between GEMC1 and OSTN, rs514716 (p = 1.07 × 10?? and p = 3.22 × 10?? for tau and ptau, respectively), located at 9p24.2 within GLIS3 and rs6922617 (p = 3.58 × 10?? for CSF ptau) at 6p21.1 within the TREM gene cluster, a region recently reported to harbor rare variants that increase AD risk. In independent data sets, rs9877502 showed a strong association with risk for AD, tangle pathology, and global cognitive decline (p = 2.67 × 10??, 0.039, 4.86 × 10??, respectively) illustrating how this endophenotype-based approach can be used to identify new AD risk loci. PMID:23562540

Cruchaga, Carlos; Kauwe, John S K; Harari, Oscar; Jin, Sheng Chih; Cai, Yefei; Karch, Celeste M; Benitez, Bruno A; Jeng, Amanda T; Skorupa, Tara; Carrell, David; Bertelsen, Sarah; Bailey, Matthew; McKean, David; Shulman, Joshua M; De Jager, Philip L; Chibnik, Lori; Bennett, David A; Arnold, Steve E; Harold, Denise; Sims, Rebecca; Gerrish, Amy; Williams, Julie; Van Deerlin, Vivianna M; Lee, Virginia M-Y; Shaw, Leslie M; Trojanowski, John Q; Haines, Jonathan L; Mayeux, Richard; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A; Farrer, Lindsay A; Schellenberg, Gerard D; Peskind, Elaine R; Galasko, Douglas; Fagan, Anne M; Holtzman, David M; Morris, John C; Goate, Alison M

2013-04-24

316

Transcriptome profiling identified novel genes associated with aluminum toxicity, resistance and tolerance in Medicago truncatula.  

PubMed

Oligonucleotide microarrays corresponding to over 16,000 genes were used to analyze changes in transcript accumulation in root tips of the Al-sensitive Medicago truncatula cultivar Jemalong genotype A17 in response to Al treatment. Out of 2,782 genes with significant changes in transcript accumulation, 324 genes were up-regulated and 267 genes were down-regulated at least twofold by Al. Up-regulated genes were enriched in transcripts involved in cell-wall modification and abiotic and biotic stress responses while down-regulated genes were enriched in transcripts involved in primary metabolism, secondary metabolism, protein synthesis and processing, and the cell cycle. Known markers of Al-induced gene expression including genes associated with oxidative stress and cell wall stiffening were differentially regulated in this study. Transcript profiling identified novel genes associated with processes involved in Al toxicity including cell wall modification, cell cycle arrest and ethylene production. Novel genes potentially associated with Al resistance and tolerance in M. truncatula including organic acid transporters, cell wall loosening enzymes, Ca(2+) homeostasis maintaining genes, and Al-binding were also identified. In addition, expression analysis of nine genes in the mature regions of the root revealed that Al-induced gene expression in these regions may play a role in Al tolerance. Finally, interfering RNA-induced silencing of two Al-induced genes, pectin acetylesterase and annexin, in A17 hairy roots slightly increased the sensitivity of A17 to Al suggesting that these genes may play a role in Al resistance. PMID:18351384

Chandran, Divya; Sharopova, Natasha; Ivashuta, Sergey; Gantt, J Stephen; Vandenbosch, Kathryn A; Samac, Deborah A

2008-06-01

317

Paradata for 'ALK1 signalling analysis identifies angiogenesis related genes and reveals disparity between TGF-? and constitutively active receptor induced gene expression'  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

This record contains paradata for the resource 'ALK1 signalling analysis identifies angiogenesis related genes and reveals disparity between TGF-? and constitutively active receptor induced gene expression'

318

Fugu and human sequence comparison identifies novel human genes and conserved non-coding sequences  

Microsoft Academic Search

The compact genome of the pufferfish, Fugurubripes, has been proposed as a ‘reference’ genome to aid in annotating and analysing the human genome. We have annotated and compared 85 kb of Fugu sequence containing 17 genes with its homologous loci in the human draft genome and identified three ‘novel’ human genes that were missed or incompletely predicted by the previous

Patrick Gilligan; Sydney Brenner; Byrappa Venkatesh

2002-01-01

319

INTRODUCTION Rx is a paired-like homeobox gene that has been identified in  

E-print Network

. In this study, we used a transgenic approach in Xenopus laevis to identify the regulatory sequences of the Xrx1A sequences of the Xenopus laevis Rx1A gene that can direct gene expression in the retinal progenitor cells signaling mediated by FGF receptor 4a in the development of retinal cell types in Xenopus laevis

Wensel, Theodore G.

320

Mayo Clinic identifies gene critical to development and spread of lung cancer  

Cancer.gov

A single gene that promotes initial development of the most common form of lung cancer and its lethal metastases has been identified by researchers at Mayo Clinic in Florida. Their study suggests other forms of cancer may also be driven by this gene, matrix metalloproteinase-10 (MMP-10).

321

An activation tagging screen to identify novel genes for Fusarium head blight (FHB) resistance  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The goal of this project is to identify plant genes that confer resistance against FHB and reduced DON accumulation. The identification of such genes offers the possibility to more fully understand the mechanisms of Fusarium susceptibility and to design transgenic strategies to increase FHB resistan...

322

Analysis of 81 genes from 64 plastid genomes resolves relationships in angiosperms and identifies  

E-print Network

Analysis of 81 genes from 64 plastid genomes resolves relationships in angiosperms and identifies, Missouri Botanical Garden, St. Louis, MO, September 25, 2007 (received for review July 6, 2007) Angiosperms the major angiosperm clades, and the resulting trees are used to examine the evolution of gene and intron

dePamphilis, Claude

323

Conditional Survival as a Selection Strategy To Identify Plant-Inducible Genes of Pseudomonas syringae  

Microsoft Academic Search

A novel strategy termed habitat-inducible rescue of survival (HIRS) was developed to identify genes of Pseudomonas syringae that are induced during growth on bean leaves. This strategy is based on the comple- mentation of metXW, two cotranscribed genes that are necessary for methionine biosynthesis and required for survival of P. syringae on bean leaves exposed to conditions of low humidity.

Maria L. Marco; Jennifer Legac; Steven E. Lindow

2003-01-01

324

Gene Expression Profiling in Familial Adenomatous Polyposis Adenomas and Desmoid Disease  

PubMed Central

Gene expression profiling is a powerful method by which alterations in gene expression can be interrogated in a single experiment. The disease familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) is associated with germline mutations in the APC gene, which result in aberrant ?-catenin control. The molecular mechanisms underlying colorectal cancer development in FAP are being characterised but limited information is available about other symptoms that occur in this disorder. Although extremely rare in the general population, desmoid tumours in approximately 10% of FAP patients. The aim of this study was to determine the similarities and differences in gene expression profiles in adenomas and compare them to those observed in desmoid tumours. Illumina whole genome gene expression BeadChips were used to measure gene expression in FAP adenomas and desmoid tumours. Similarities between gene expression profiles and mechanisms important in regulating formation of FAP adenomas and desmoid tumours were identified. This study furthers our understanding of the mechanisms underlying FAP and desmoid tumour formation. PMID:19725988

Bowden, Nikola A; Croft, Amanda; Scott, Rodney J

2007-01-01

325

Microarray Analysis Identifies Cerebellar Genes Sensitive to Chronic Ethanol Treatment in PKC? Mice  

PubMed Central

Neuroadaptive changes that occur in the development of ethanol tolerance may be the result of alterations in gene expression. We have shown that PKC? wild-type mice develop tolerance to the sedative-hypnotic effects of ethanol after chronic ethanol treatment; whereas, mutant mice do not, making these genotypes a suitable model for identifying changes in gene expression related to tolerance development. Using a two-stage process, several genes were initially identified using microarray analyses of cerebellar tissue from ethanol-treated PKC? mutant and wild-type mice. Subsequent confirmation of a subset of these genes using qRT-PCR was done to verify gene expression changes. A total of 109 genes from different functional classifications were identified in these groups on the microarrays. Eight genes were selected for verification: three, Twik-1, Plp, and Adk2, were chosen as genes related to tolerance; another three, Hsp70.2, Bdnf, and Th, were chosen as genes related to resistance to tolerance; and two genes, JunB and Nur77, were selected as candidate genes sensitive to chronic ethanol. The results from the verification experiments indicated that Twik-1, which codes for a potassium channel, was associated with tolerance and appeared to be dependent on the presence of PKC?. No genes were confirmed to be related to resistance to tolerance; however, expression of two of these, Hsp70.2 and Th, were found to be sensitive to chronic ethanol and were added to the transcription factors, JunB and Nur77, confirmed by qRT-PCR, as a subset of genes that respond to chronic ethanol. PMID:17157717

Bowers, Barbara J.; Radcliffe, Richard A.; Smith, Amy M.; Miyamoto-Ditmon, Jill; Wehner, Jeanne M.

2007-01-01

326

Gene expression signatures identify novel regulatory pathways during murine lung development: implications for lung tumorigenesis  

PubMed Central

Oligonucleotide array based analysis was conducted to examine the temporal pattern of gene expression across the various stages of lung development to identify regulatory pathways at key developmental time points. Whole embryo total RNA or embryonic lung total RNA was harvested from A/J mice at seven developmental stages. To investigate changes in gene expression during lung development, four samples from each stage were examined using Affymetrix U74Av2 murine oligonucleotide microarrays. From the over 12 000 genes and ESTs represented on the array, 1346 genes and ESTs were identified as having a significant change in expression between at least one time point and the others (p<0.001, Kruskal-Wallis test). Within this group of ?1300 genes, four patterns of expression were seen: (1) upregulation during the embryonic period of development (up-down); (2) upregulation during the postnatal period of lung development (down-up) and (3) fluctuating expression, up initially, down for one or more time points, and then up again (up-down-up); and (4) vice versa (down-up-down). Expression patterns of genes previously reported to be involved in pulmonary development were also examined. Using the pathway visualisation tool, GenMapp, at least three regulatory pathways were found to contain clusters of differentially expressed genes: Wnt signalling, cell cycle, and apoptosis. Furthermore, we have shown that many of the genes involved in lung development are either known oncogenes or tumour suppressor genes altered in lung cancer, such as Cyr61, Rassf1a, and Dutt1/Robo1, or putative lung cancer genes. In addition, the genes identified pertinent to early development may also serve as candidate susceptibility genes for various inherited lung cancer disorders as well as for various heritable disorders of lung development. These results will contribute to our understanding of novel aspects of the regulatory machinery for embryonic lung development and of the genes involved in lung tumorigenesis. PMID:12807961

Bonner, A; Lemon, W; You, M

2003-01-01

327

Integrative analysis reveals disease-associated genes and biomarkers for prostate cancer progression  

PubMed Central

Background Prostate cancer is one of the most common complex diseases with high leading cause of death in men. Identifications of prostate cancer associated genes and biomarkers are thus essential as they can gain insights into the mechanisms underlying disease progression and advancing for early diagnosis and developing effective therapies. Methods In this study, we presented an integrative analysis of gene expression profiling and protein interaction network at a systematic level to reveal candidate disease-associated genes and biomarkers for prostate cancer progression. At first, we reconstructed the human prostate cancer protein-protein interaction network (HPC-PPIN) and the network was then integrated with the prostate cancer gene expression data to identify modules related to different phases in prostate cancer. At last, the candidate module biomarkers were validated by its predictive ability of prostate cancer progression. Results Different phases-specific modules were identified for prostate cancer. Among these modules, transcription Androgen Receptor (AR) nuclear signaling and Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) signalling pathway were shown to be the pathway targets for prostate cancer progression. The identified candidate disease-associated genes showed better predictive ability of prostate cancer progression than those of published biomarkers. In context of functional enrichment analysis, interestingly candidate disease-associated genes were enriched in the nucleus and different functions were encoded for potential transcription factors, for examples key players as AR, Myc, ESR1 and hidden player as Sp1 which was considered as a potential novel biomarker for prostate cancer. Conclusions The successful results on prostate cancer samples demonstrated that the integrative analysis is powerful and useful approach to detect candidate disease-associate genes and modules which can be used as the potential biomarkers for prostate cancer progression. The data, tools and supplementary files for this integrative analysis are deposited at http://www.ibio-cn.org/HPC-PPIN/. PMID:25080090

2014-01-01

328

Sequential Waves of Gene Expression in Patients with Clinically Defined Dengue Illnesses Reveal Subtle Disease Phases and Predict Disease Severity  

PubMed Central

Background Dengue virus (DENV) infection can range in severity from mild dengue fever (DF) to severe dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) or dengue shock syndrome (DSS). Changes in host gene expression, temporally through the progression of DENV infection, especially during the early days, remains poorly characterized. Early diagnostic markers for DHF are also lacking. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we investigated host gene expression in a cohort of DENV-infected subjects clinically diagnosed as DF (n?=?51) and DHF (n?=?13) from Maracay, Venezuela. Blood specimens were collected daily from these subjects from enrollment to early defervescence and at one convalescent time-point. Using convalescent expression levels as baseline, two distinct groups of genes were identified: the “early” group, which included genes associated with innate immunity, type I interferon, cytokine-mediated signaling, chemotaxis, and complement activity peaked at day 0–1 and declined on day 3–4; the second “late” group, comprised of genes associated with cell cycle, emerged from day 4 and peaked at day 5–6. The up-regulation of innate immune response genes coincided with the down-regulation of genes associated with viral replication during day 0–3. Furthermore, DHF patients had lower expression of genes associated with antigen processing and presentation, MHC class II receptor, NK and T cell activities, compared to that of DF patients. These results suggested that the innate and adaptive immunity during the early days of the disease are vital in suppressing DENV replication and in affecting outcome of disease severity. Gene signatures of DHF were identified as early as day 1. Conclusions/Significance Our study reveals a broad and dynamic picture of host responses in DENV infected subjects. Host response to DENV infection can now be understood as two distinct phases with unique transcriptional markers. The DHF signatures identified during day 1–3 may have applications in developing early molecular diagnostics for DHF. PMID:23875036

Sun, Peifang; García, Josefina; Comach, Guillermo; Vahey, Maryanne T.; Wang, Zhining; Forshey, Brett M.; Morrison, Amy C.; Sierra, Gloria; Bazan, Isabel; Rocha, Claudio; Vilcarromero, Stalin; Blair, Patrick J.; Scott, Thomas W.; Camacho, Daria E.; Ockenhouse, Christian F.; Halsey, Eric S.; Kochel, Tadeusz J.

2013-01-01

329

Bioinformatic Analysis of Nematode Migration-Associated Genes Identifies Novel Vertebrate Neural Crest Markers  

PubMed Central

Neural crest cells are highly motile, yet a limited number of genes governing neural crest migration have been identified by conventional studies. To test the hypothesis that cell migration genes are likely to be conserved over large evolutionary distances and from diverse tissues, we searched for vertebrate homologs of genes important for migration of various cell types in the invertebrate nematode and examined their expression during vertebrate neural crest cell migration. Our systematic analysis utilized a combination of comparative genomic scanning, functional pathway analysis and gene expression profiling to uncover previously unidentified genes expressed by premigratory, emigrating and/or migrating neural crest cells. The results demonstrate that similar gene sets are expressed in migratory cell types across distant animals and different germ layers. Bioinformatics analysis of these factors revealed relationships between these genes within signaling pathways that may be important during neural crest cell migration. PMID:25051358

Nie, Shuyi; Kwak, Jina; Hwang, Byung Joon; Bronner, Marianne E.; Kee, Yun

2014-01-01

330

Bioinformatic analysis of nematode migration-associated genes identifies novel vertebrate neural crest markers.  

PubMed

Neural crest cells are highly motile, yet a limited number of genes governing neural crest migration have been identified by conventional studies. To test the hypothesis that cell migration genes are likely to be conserved over large evolutionary distances and from diverse tissues, we searched for vertebrate homologs of genes important for migration of various cell types in the invertebrate nematode and examined their expression during vertebrate neural crest cell migration. Our systematic analysis utilized a combination of comparative genomic scanning, functional pathway analysis and gene expression profiling to uncover previously unidentified genes expressed by premigratory, emigrating and/or migrating neural crest cells. The results demonstrate that similar gene sets are expressed in migratory cell types across distant animals and different germ layers. Bioinformatics analysis of these factors revealed relationships between these genes within signaling pathways that may be important during neural crest cell migration. PMID:25051358

Kwon, Seung-Hae; Park, Ok Kyu; Nie, Shuyi; Kwak, Jina; Hwang, Byung Joon; Bronner, Marianne E; Kee, Yun

2014-01-01

331

The Complete Spectrum of Yeast Chromosome Instability Genes Identifies Candidate CIN Cancer Genes and Functional Roles for ASTRA Complex Components  

PubMed Central

Chromosome instability (CIN) is observed in most solid tumors and is linked to somatic mutations in genome integrity maintenance genes. The spectrum of mutations that cause CIN is only partly known and it is not possible to predict a priori all pathways whose disruption might lead to CIN. To address this issue, we generated a catalogue of CIN genes and pathways by screening ?2,000 reduction-of-function alleles for 90% of essential genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Integrating this with published CIN phenotypes for other yeast genes generated a systematic CIN gene dataset comprised of 692 genes. Enriched gene ontology terms defined cellular CIN pathways that, together with sequence orthologs, created a list of human CIN candidate genes, which we cross-referenced to published somatic mutation databases revealing hundreds of mutated CIN candidate genes. Characterization of some poorly characterized CIN genes revealed short telomeres in mutants of the ASTRA/TTT components TTI1 and ASA1. High-throughput phenotypic profiling links ASA1 to TTT (Tel2-Tti1-Tti2) complex function and to TORC1 signaling via Tor1p stability, consistent with the role of TTT in PI3-kinase related kinase biogenesis. The comprehensive CIN gene list presented here in principle comprises all conserved eukaryotic genome integrity pathways. Deriving human CIN candidate genes from the list allows direct cross-referencing with tumor mutational data and thus candidate mutations potentially driving CIN in tumors. Overall, the CIN gene spectrum reveals new chromosome biology and will help us to understand CIN phenotypes in human disease. PMID:21552543

Stirling, Peter C.; Bloom, Michelle S.; Solanki-Patil, Tejomayee; Smith, Stephanie; Sipahimalani, Payal; Li, Zhijian; Kofoed, Megan; Ben-Aroya, Shay; Myung, Kyungjae; Hieter, Philip

2011-01-01

332

A Genome-Wide Association Study of the Maize Hypersensitive Defense Response Identifies Genes That Cluster in Related Pathways  

PubMed Central

Much remains unknown of molecular events controlling the plant hypersensitive defense response (HR), a rapid localized cell death that limits pathogen spread and is mediated by resistance (R-) genes. Genetic control of the HR is hard to quantify due to its microscopic and rapid nature. Natural modifiers of the ectopic HR phenotype induced by an aberrant auto-active R-gene (Rp1-D21), were mapped in a population of 3,381 recombinant inbred lines from the maize nested association mapping population. Joint linkage analysis was conducted to identify 32 additive but no epistatic quantitative trait loci (QTL) using a linkage map based on more than 7000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Genome-wide association (GWA) analysis of 26.5 million SNPs was conducted after adjusting for background QTL. GWA identified associated SNPs that colocalized with 44 candidate genes. Thirty-six of these genes colocalized within 23 of the 32 QTL identified by joint linkage analysis. The candidate genes included genes predicted to be in involved programmed cell death, defense response, ubiquitination, redox homeostasis, autophagy, calcium signalling, lignin biosynthesis and cell wall modification. Twelve of the candidate genes showed significant differential expression between isogenic lines differing for the presence of Rp1-D21. Low but significant correlations between HR-related traits and several previously-measured disease resistance traits suggested that the genetic control of these traits was substantially, though not entirely, independent. This study provides the first system-wide analysis of natural variation that modulates the HR response in plants. PMID:25166276

Venkata, Bala P.; Marla, Sandeep; Ji, Jiabing; Gachomo, Emma; Chu, Kevin; Negeri, Adisu; Benson, Jacqueline; Nelson, Rebecca; Bradbury, Peter; Nielsen, Dahlia; Holland, James B.; Balint-Kurti, Peter J.; Johal, Gurmukh

2014-01-01

333

Specifically regulated genes in malignant melanoma tissues identified by subtractive hybridization  

PubMed Central

A polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based subtractive hybridization technique was used to identify transformation-related genes in malignant melanoma. Melanoma biopsies were compared with tissues of benign melanocytic naevi and 549 gene fragments were screened using arrayed filters. Thirty-eight clones were confirmed to be differentially expressed representing 30 different genes (18 melanoma-specific and 12 naevus-specific genes). To further confirm differential gene expression, Northern blot analyses with six of the 30 genes as probes were performed. All six were differentially expressed in benign and malignant melanocytic lesions, specifically dbpB/YB-1, 67-kDa laminin receptor, CAGH-3, 71-kDa heat shock protein and two unknown genes. The expression levels of these genes were then analysed in 50 different tissues to determine their overall expression profile. In conclusion, the technique of PCR-based subtractive hybridization in combination with arrayed filters allows detection of differences in gene expression even in tissues from which high-quality RNA is hard to isolate. The genes identified in this study are of interest because of their potential role in the pathogenesis of malignant melanoma. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10735498

Hipfel, R; Schittek, B; Bodingbauer, Y; Garbe, C

2000-01-01

334

A systems biology approach to identify the combination effects of human herpesvirus 8 genes on NF-kappaB activation.  

PubMed

Human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) is the etiologic agent of Kaposi's sarcoma and primary effusion lymphoma. Activation of the cellular transcription factor nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappaB) is essential for latent persistence of HHV-8, survival of HHV-8-infected cells, and disease progression. We used reverse-transfected cell microarrays (RTCM) as an unbiased systems biology approach to systematically analyze the effects of HHV-8 genes on the NF-kappaB signaling pathway. All HHV-8 genes individually (n = 86) and, additionally, all K and latent genes in pairwise combinations (n = 231) were investigated. Statistical analyses of more than 14,000 transfections identified ORF75 as a novel and confirmed K13 as a known HHV-8 activator of NF-kappaB. K13 and ORF75 showed cooperative NF-kappaB activation. Small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of ORF75 expression demonstrated that this gene contributes significantly to NF-kappaB activation in HHV-8-infected cells. Furthermore, our approach confirmed K10.5 as an NF-kappaB inhibitor and newly identified K1 as an inhibitor of both K13- and ORF75-mediated NF-kappaB activation. All results obtained with RTCM were confirmed with classical transfection experiments. Our work describes the first successful application of RTCM for the systematic analysis of pathofunctions of genes of an infectious agent. With this approach, ORF75 and K1 were identified as novel HHV-8 regulatory molecules on the NF-kappaB signal transduction pathway. The genes identified may be involved in fine-tuning of the balance between latency and lytic replication, since this depends critically on the state of NF-kappaB activity. PMID:19129458

Konrad, Andreas; Wies, Effi; Thurau, Mathias; Marquardt, Gaby; Naschberger, Elisabeth; Hentschel, Sonja; Jochmann, Ramona; Schulz, Thomas F; Erfle, Holger; Brors, Benedikt; Lausen, Berthold; Neipel, Frank; Stürzl, Michael

2009-03-01

335

Application of Genomic and Quantitative Genetic Tools to Identify Candidate Resistance Genes for Brown Rot Resistance in Peach  

PubMed Central

The availability of a complete peach genome assembly and three different peach genome sequences created by our group provide new opportunities for application of genomic data and can improve the power of the classical Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) approaches to identify candidate genes for peach disease resistance. Brown rot caused by Monilinia spp., is the most important fungal disease of stone fruits worldwide. Improved levels of peach fruit rot resistance have been identified in some cultivars and advanced selections developed in the UC Davis and USDA breeding programs. Whole genome sequencing of the Pop-DF parents lead to discovery of high-quality SNP markers for QTL genome scanning in this experimental population. Pop-DF created by crossing a brown rot moderately resistant cultivar ‘Dr. Davis’ and a brown rot resistant introgression line, ‘F8,1–42’, derived from an initial almond × peach interspecific hybrid, was evaluated for brown rot resistance in fruit of harvest maturity over three seasons. Using the SNP linkage map of Pop-DF and phenotypic data collected with inoculated fruit, a genome scan for QTL identified several SNP markers associated with brown rot resistance. Two of these QTLs were placed on linkage group 1, covering a large (physical) region on chromosome 1. The genome scan for QTL and SNP effects predicted several candidate genes associated with disease resistance responses in other host-pathogen systems. Two potential candidate genes, ppa011763m and ppa026453m, may be the genes primarily responsible for M. fructicola recognition in peach, activating both PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI) and effector-triggered immunity (ETI) responses. Our results provide a foundation for further genetic dissection, marker assisted breeding for brown rot resistance, and development of peach cultivars resistant to brown rot. PMID:24244329

Martínez-García, Pedro J.; Parfitt, Dan E.; Bostock, Richard M.; Fresnedo-Ramírez, Jonathan; Vazquez-Lobo, Alejandra; Ogundiwin, Ebenezer A.; Gradziel, Thomas M.; Crisosto, Carlos H.

2013-01-01

336

A genomic strategy for the functional validation of colorectal cancer genes identifies potential therapeutic targets  

PubMed Central

Summary/Abstract Genes that are highly overexpressed in tumor cells can be required for tumor cell survival, and have the potential to be selective therapeutic targets. In an attempt to identify such targets, we combined a functional genomics and a systems biology approach to assess the consequences of RNAi-mediated silencing of overexpressed genes that were selected from 140 gene expression profiles from colorectal cancers (CRC) and matched normal mucosa. In order to identify credible models for in-depth functional analysis, we first confirmed the overexpression of these genes in 25 different CRC cell lines. We then identified five candidate genes that profoundly reduced the viability of CRC cell lines when silenced with either siRNAs or shRNAs, i.e., HMGA1, TACSTD2, RRM2, RPS2, and NOL5A. These genes were further studied by systematic analysis of comprehensive gene expression profiles generated following siRNA-mediated silencing. Exploration of these RNAi-specific gene expression signatures allowed the identification of the functional space in which the five genes operate, and showed enrichment for cancer specific signaling pathways, some known to be involved in CRC. By comparing the expression of the RNAi signature genes with their respective expression levels in an independent set of primary rectal carcinomas we could recapitulate these defined RNAi signatures, therefore establishing the biologically relevance of our observations. This strategy identified the signaling pathways that are affected by the prominent oncogenes HMGA1 and TACSTD2, established a yet unknown link between RRM2 and PLK1, and identified RPS2 and NOL5A as promising potential therapeutic targets in CRC. PMID:20473941

Grade, Marian; Hummon, Amanda B.; Camps, Jordi; Emons, Georg; Spitzner, Melanie; Gaedcke, Jochen; Hoermann, Patrick; Ebner, Reinhard; Becker, Heinz; Difilippantonio, Michael J.; Ghadimi, B. Michael; Beissbarth, Tim; Caplen, Natasha J.; Ried, Thomas

2010-01-01

337

WNT3A gene expression is associated with isolated Hirschsprung disease polymorphism and disease status  

PubMed Central

WNT3A has been regarded as an activator of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway. It has been found Wnt signaling pathway is closely related with embrionic development and Hirschsprung disease (HSCR). A common haplotype consisting of minor SNPs alleles located in the WNT3A gene has been described as a risk factor for various genetic disorders. However, whether WNT3A contributes to the onset of HSCR has not been identified. The present study aims to detect the interactions of genetic variations in the WNT3A gene and examine the biological expression levels with Hirschsprung disease (HSCR) in the Chinese people. We analyzed WNT3A gene (rs61743220, rs192966556 and rs145882986) variants in the whole blood samples from HSCR patients and normal children (control groups). WNT3A expression was also examined by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR), western blotting and immunostaining. Consequently, when rs192966556 and rs145882986 alleles of the WNT3A gene lack the SNPs, they are especially associated with a greater risk of HSCR (OR [95% confidence interval] = 1.791, p = 0.001; OR [95% confidence interval] = 1.556, p = 0.003, respectively). The mRNA and protein expressions of WNT3A were higher in the aganglionic colon segment tissues than in the normal ganglionic segments tissues. Immunostaining indicates that the staining of WNT3A was much stronger (brown) in the aganglionic colon segment tissues than that in the normal ganglionic colon segment tissues (colorless or light yellow) in the mucous layer and muscular layer. Although preliminary, these results suggest that WNT3A may play an important role in the pathogenesis of HSCR. PMID:24817932

Chen, Dong; Mi, Jie; Liu, Xiaomei; Zhang, Juan; Wang, Weilin; Gao, Hong

2014-01-01

338

The genomic and functional characteristics of disease genes.  

PubMed

Increasing evidence indicates that genes containing disease causal variation have distinct functional and genomic properties. The importance of understanding these properties is highlighted by efforts to filter lists of variants from next-generation sequencing studies, where the number of potentially deleterious variants, which are in fact unrelated to disease, may be large. Available evidence indicates that the majority of disease genes are 'non-essential' and their products occupy functionally peripheral positions in protein networks. They tend to be intermediate between genes that have core biological functions, particularly low mutation rates and low haplotype diversity, and genes for which high haplotype diversity and high mutation rates are advantageous (such as those involved in sensory perception and some immune system functions). Evidence presented here supports these conclusions through analysis of integrated data sets incorporating the latest mutational profiles, linkage disequilibrium structure and other genomic properties of individual genes. The analysis highlights the contrasting functions of genes predicted as least and most likely to contain disease variation and provides a basis for filtering gene variant lists to exclude the least plausible disease candidates. PMID:24425794

Collins, Andrew

2015-01-01

339

Locus heterogeneity of Dent's disease: OCRL1 and TMEM27 genes in patients with no CLCN5 mutations.  

PubMed

Dent's disease is an X-linked renal tubulopathy caused by mutations mainly affecting the CLCN5 gene. Defects in the OCRL1 gene, which is usually mutated in patients with Lowe syndrome, have recently been shown to lead to a Dent-like phenotype, called Dent's disease 2. About 25% of Dent's disease patients do not carry CLCN5/OCRL1 mutations. The CLCN4 and SLC9A6 genes have been investigated, but no mutations have been identified. The recent discovery of a novel mediator of renal amino acid transport, collectrin (the TMEM27 gene), may provide new insight on the pathogenesis of Dent's disease. We studied 31 patients showing a phenotype resembling Dent's disease but lacking any CLCN5 mutations by direct sequencing of the OCRL1 and TMEM27 genes. Five novel mutations, L88X, P161HfsX167, F270S, D506N and E720D, in the OCRL1 gene, which have not previously been reported in patients with Dent's or Lowe disease, were identified among 11 patients with the classical Dent's disease phenotype. No TMEM27 gene mutations were discovered among 26 patients, 20 of whom had an incomplete Dent's disease phenotype. Our findings confirm that OCRL1 is involved in the functional defects characteristic of Dent's disease and suggest that patients carrying missense mutations in exons where many Lowe mutations are mapped may represent a phenotypic variant of Lowe syndrome. PMID:19582483

Tosetto, Enrica; Addis, Maria; Caridi, Gianluca; Meloni, Cristiana; Emma, Francesco; Vergine, Gianluca; Stringini, Gilda; Papalia, Teresa; Barbano, Giancarlo; Ghiggeri, Gian Marco; Ruggeri, Laura; Miglietti, Nunzia; D Angelo, Angela; Melis, Maria Antonietta; Anglani, Franca

2009-10-01

340

A Thirteen-Gene Expression Signature Predicts Survival of Patients with Pancreatic Cancer and Identifies New Genes of Interest  

PubMed Central

Background Currently, prognostication for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is based upon a coarse clinical staging system. Thus, more accurate prognostic tests are needed for PDAC patients to aid treatment decisions. Methods and Findings Affymetrix gene expression profiling was carried out on 15 human PDAC tumors and from the data we identified a 13-gene expression signature (risk score) that correlated with patient survival. The gene expression risk score was then independently validated using published gene expression data and survival data for an additional 101 patients with pancreatic cancer. Patients with high-risk scores had significantly higher risk of death compared to patients with low-risk scores (HR 2.27, p?=?0.002). When the 13-gene score was combined with lymph node status the risk-score further discriminated the length of patient survival time (p<0.001). Patients with a high-risk score had poor survival independent of nodal status; however, nodal status increased predictability for survival in patients with a low-risk gene signature score (low-risk N1 vs. low-risk N0: HR?=?2.0, p?=?0.002). While AJCC stage correlated with patient survival (p?=?0.03), the 13-gene score was superior at predicting survival. Of the 13 genes comprising the predictive model, four have been shown to be important in PDAC, six are unreported in PDAC but important in other cancers, and three are unreported in any cancer. Conclusions We identified a 13-gene expression signature that predicts survival of PDAC patients and could prove useful for making treatment decisions. This risk score should be evaluated prospectively in clinical trials for prognostication and for predicting response to chemotherapy. Investigation of new genes identified in our model may lead to novel therapeutic targets. PMID:25180633

Newhook, Timothy E.; Blais, Edik M.; Lindberg, James M.; Adair, Sara J.; Xin, Wenjun; Lee, Jae K.; Papin, Jason A.; Parsons, J. Thomas; Bauer, Todd W.

2014-01-01

341

A Genome-Scale DNA Repair RNAi Screen Identifies SPG48 as a Novel Gene Associated with Hereditary Spastic Paraplegia  

PubMed Central

DNA repair is essential to maintain genome integrity, and genes with roles in DNA repair are frequently mutated in a variety of human diseases. Repair via homologous recombination typically restores the original DNA sequence without introducing mutations, and a number of genes that are required for homologous recombination DNA double-strand break repair (HR-DSBR) have been identified. However, a systematic analysis of this important DNA repair pathway in mammalian cells has not been reported. Here, we describe a genome-scale endoribonuclease-prepared short interfering RNA (esiRNA) screen for genes involved in DNA double strand break repair. We report 61 genes that influenced the frequency of HR-DSBR and characterize in detail one of the genes that decreased the frequency of HR-DSBR. We show that the gene KIAA0415 encodes a putative helicase that interacts with SPG11 and SPG15, two proteins mutated in hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP). We identify mutations in HSP patients, discovering KIAA0415/SPG48 as a novel HSP-associated gene, and show that a KIAA0415/SPG48 mutant cell line is more sensitive to DNA damaging drugs. We present the first genome-scale survey of HR-DSBR in mammalian cells providing a dataset that should accelerate the discovery of novel genes with roles in DNA repair and associated medical conditions. The discovery that proteins forming a novel protein complex are required for efficient HR-DSBR and are mutated in patients suffering from HSP suggests a link between HSP and DNA repair. PMID:20613862

S?abicki, Miko?aj; Theis, Mirko; Krastev, Dragomir B.; Samsonov, Sergey; Mundwiller, Emeline; Junqueira, Magno; Paszkowski-Rogacz, Maciej; Teyra, Joan; Heninger, Anne-Kristin; Poser, Ina; Prieur, Fabienne; Truchetto, Jérémy; Confavreux, Christian; Marelli, Cécilia; Durr, Alexandra; Camdessanche, Jean Philippe; Brice, Alexis; Shevchenko, Andrej; Pisabarro, M. Teresa; Stevanin, Giovanni; Buchholz, Frank

2010-01-01

342

Integrated analysis of recurrent properties of cancer genes to identify novel drivers  

PubMed Central

The heterogeneity of cancer genomes in terms of acquired mutations complicates the identification of genes whose modification may exert a driver role in tumorigenesis. In this study, we present a novel method that integrates expression profiles, mutation effects, and systemic properties of mutated genes to identify novel cancer drivers. We applied our method to ovarian cancer samples and were able to identify putative drivers in the majority of carcinomas without mutations in known cancer genes, thus suggesting that it can be used as a complementary approach to find rare driver mutations that cannot be detected using frequency-based approaches. PMID:23718799

2013-01-01

343

GTI: A Novel Algorithm for Identifying Outlier Gene Expression Profiles from Integrated Microarray Datasets  

PubMed Central

Background Meta-analysis of gene expression microarray datasets presents significant challenges for statistical analysis. We developed and validated a new bioinformatic method for the identification of genes upregulated in subsets of samples of a given tumour type (‘outlier genes’), a hallmark of potential oncogenes. Methodology A new statistical method (the gene tissue index, GTI) was developed by modifying and adapting algorithms originally developed for statistical problems in economics. We compared the potential of the GTI to detect outlier genes in meta-datasets with four previously defined statistical methods, COPA, the OS statistic, the t-test and ORT, using simulated data. We demonstrated that the GTI performed equally well to existing methods in a single study simulation. Next, we evaluated the performance of the GTI in the analysis of combined Affymetrix gene expression data from several published studies covering 392 normal samples of tissue from the central nervous system, 74 astrocytomas, and 353 glioblastomas. According to the results, the GTI was better able than most of the previous methods to identify known oncogenic outlier genes. In addition, the GTI identified 29 novel outlier genes in glioblastomas, including TYMS and CDKN2A. The over-expression of these genes was validated in vivo by immunohistochemical staining data from clinical glioblastoma samples. Immunohistochemical data were available for 65% (19 of 29) of these genes, and 17 of these 19 genes (90%) showed a typical outlier staining pattern. Furthermore, raltitrexed, a specific inhibitor of TYMS used in the therapy of tumour types other than glioblastoma, also effectively blocked cell proliferation in glioblastoma cell lines, thus highlighting this outlier gene candidate as a potential therapeutic target. Conclusions/Significance Taken together, these results support the GTI as a novel approach to identify potential oncogene outliers and drug targets. The algorithm is implemented in an R package (Text S1). PMID:21365010

Mpindi, John Patrick; Sara, Henri; Haapa-Paananen, Saija; Kilpinen, Sami; Pisto, Tommi; Bucher, Elmar; Ojala, Kalle; Iljin, Kristiina; Vainio, Paula; Björkman, Mari; Gupta, Santosh; Kohonen, Pekka; Nees, Matthias; Kallioniemi, Olli

2011-01-01

344

Genome wide association study of SNP-, gene-, and pathway-based approaches to identify genes influencing susceptibility to Staphylococcus aureus infections  

PubMed Central

Background: We conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) to identify specific genetic variants that underlie susceptibility to diseases caused by Staphylococcus aureus in humans. Methods: Cases (n = 309) and controls (n = 2925) were genotyped at 508,921 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Cases had at least one laboratory and clinician confirmed disease caused by S. aureus whereas controls did not. R-package (for SNP association), EIGENSOFT (to estimate and adjust for population stratification) and gene- (VEGAS) and pathway-based (DAVID, PANTHER, and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis) analyses were performed. Results: No SNP reached genome-wide significance. Four SNPs exceeded the p < 10?5 threshold including two (rs2455012 and rs7152530) reaching a p-value < 10?7. The nearby genes were PDE4B (rs2455012), TXNRD2 (rs3804047), VRK1 and BCL11B (rs7152530), and PNPLA5 (rs470093). The top two findings from the gene-based analysis were NMRK2 (pgene = 1.20E-05), which codes an integrin binding molecule (focal adhesion), and DAPK3 (pgene = 5.10E-05), a serine/threonine kinase (apoptosis and cytokinesis). The pathway analyses identified epithelial cell responses to mechanical and non-mechanical stress. Conclusion: We identified potential susceptibility genes for S. aureus diseases in this preliminary study but confirmation by other studies is needed. The observed associations could be relevant given the complexity of S. aureus as a pathogen and its ability to exploit multiple biological pathways to cause infections in humans. PMID:24847357

Ye, Zhan; Vasco, Daniel A.; Carter, Tonia C.; Brilliant, Murray H.; Schrodi, Steven J.; Shukla, Sanjay K.

2014-01-01

345

An Image-Based Genetic Assay Identifies Genes in T1D Susceptibility Loci Controlling Cellular Antiviral Immunity in Mouse  

PubMed Central

The pathogenesis of complex diseases, such as type 1 diabetes (T1D), derives from interactions between host genetics and environmental factors. Previous studies have suggested that viral infection plays a significant role in initiation of T1D in genetically predisposed individuals. T1D susceptibility loci may therefore be enriched in previously uncharacterized genes functioning in antiviral defense pathways. To identify genes involved in antiviral immunity, we performed an image-based high-throughput genetic screen using short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) against 161 genes within T1D susceptibility loci. RAW 264.7 cells transduced with shRNAs were infected with GFP-expressing herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and fluorescent microscopy was performed to assess the viral infectivity by fluorescence reporter activity. Of the 14 candidates identified with high confidence, two candidates were selected for further investigation, Il27 and Tagap. Administration of recombinant IL-27 during viral infection was found to act synergistically with interferon gamma (IFN-?) to activate expression of type I IFNs and proinflammatory cytokines, and to enhance the activities of interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3). Consistent with a role in antiviral immunity, Tagap-deficient macrophages demonstrated increased viral replication, reduced expression of proinflammatory chemokines and cytokines, and decreased production of IFN-?. Taken together, our unbiased loss-of-function genetic screen identifies genes that play a role in host antiviral immunity and delineates roles for IL-27 and Tagap in the production of antiviral cytokines. PMID:25268627

Liao, Juan; Jijon, Humberto B.; Kim, Ira R.; Goel, Gautam; Doan, Aivi; Sokol, Harry; Bauer, Hermann; Herrmann, Bernhard G.; Lassen, Kara G.; Xavier, Ramnik J.

2014-01-01

346

Systematic identification of human mitochondrial disease genes through integrative genomics  

E-print Network

, coexpression and transcriptional induction during mitochondrial biogenesis. Through an integrated analysis we in gene expression during mitochondrial biogenesis induced by PGC-1a 2,361 68 Maestro 1,451 10 EightSystematic identification of human mitochondrial disease genes through integrative genomics Sarah

347

Bioinformatic analysis of the nucleotide binding site-encoding disease-resistance genes in foxtail millet (Setaria italica (L.) Beauv.).  

PubMed

The nucleotide-binding site (NBS) disease-resistance genes are the largest category of plant disease-resistance gene analogs. The complete set of disease-resistant candidate genes, which encode the NBS sequence, was filtered in the genomes of two varieties of foxtail millet (Yugu1 and 'Zhang gu'). This study investigated a number of characteristics of the putative NBS genes, such as structural diversity and phylogenetic relationships. A total of 269 and 281 NBS-coding sequences were identified in Yugu1 and 'Zhang gu', respectively. When the two databases were compared, 72 genes were found to be identical and 164 genes showed more than 90% similarity. Physical positioning and gene family analysis of the NBS disease-resistance genes in the genome revealed that the number of genes on each chromosome was similar in both varieties. The eighth chromosome contained the largest number of genes and the ninth chromosome contained the lowest number of genes. Exactly 34 gene clusters containing the 161 genes were found in the Yugu1 genome, with each cluster containing 4.7 genes on average. In comparison, the 'Zhang gu' genome possessed 28 gene clusters, which had 151 genes, with an average of 5.4 genes in each cluster. The largest gene cluster, located on the eighth chromosome, contained 12 genes in the Yugu1 database, whereas it contained 16 genes in the 'Zhang gu' database. The classification results showed that the CC-NBS-LRR gene made up the largest part of each chromosome in the two databases. Two TIR-NBS genes were also found in the Yugu1 genome. PMID:25177941

Zhu, Y B; Xie, X Q; Li, Z Y; Bai, H; Dong, L; Dong, Z P; Dong, J G

2014-01-01

348

Bioenergetics and the Epigenome: Interface between the Environment and Genes in Common Diseases  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Extensive efforts have been directed at using genome-wide association studies (GWAS) to identify the genes responsible for common metabolic and degenerative diseases, cancer, and aging, but with limited success. While environmental factors have been evoked to explain this conundrum, the nature of these environmental factors remains unexplained.…

Wallace, Douglas C.

2010-01-01

349

BDNF gene regulation in Alzheimer's disease and Alzheimer's disease models  

Microsoft Academic Search

Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a debilitating condition affecting predominantly seniors and increasing in likelihood with age. AD symptoms are learning and memory impairment, changes in personality and behaviour, and decreased cognitive function. The disease is progressive to the point of complete incapacitation of the afflicted. The cause of AD is unknown and current drug treatments have only demonstrated brief stabilization.

Diego J Garzon

2006-01-01

350

Novel Subtype-specific Genes Identify Distinct Subpopulations of Callosal Projection Neurons  

PubMed Central

Little is known about the molecular development and heterogeneity of callosal projection neurons (CPN), cortical commissural neurons that connect homotopic regions of the two cerebral hemispheres via the corpus callosum, and that are critical for bilateral integration of cortical information. Here we report on the identification of a series of genes that individually and in combination define CPN and novel CPN subpopulations during embryonic and postnatal development. We used in situ hybridization analysis, immunocytochemistry, and retrograde labeling to define the layer- and neuron type-specific distribution of these newly identified CPN genes across different stages of maturation. We demonstrate that a subset of these genes (e.g. Hspb3 and Lpl), appear specific to all CPN (in layers II/III and V–VI), while others (e.g. Nectin-3, Plexin-D1 and Dkk3) discriminate between CPN of the deep layers and those of the upper layers. Further, the data show that several genes finely subdivide CPN within individual layers and appear to label CPN subpopulations that have not been previously described using anatomical or morphological criteria. The genes identified here likely reflect the existence of distinct programs of gene expression governing the development, maturation, and function of the newly identified subpopulations of CPN. Together, these data define the first set of genes that identify and molecularly subcategorize distinct populations of callosal projection neurons, often located in distinct subdivisions of the canonical cortical laminae. PMID:19793993

Molyneaux, Bradley J.; Arlotta, Paola; Fame, Ryann M.; MacDonald, Jessica L.; MacQuarrie, Kyle L.; Macklis, Jeffrey D.

2009-01-01

351

An atlas of tissue-specific conserved coexpression for functional annotation and disease gene prediction  

PubMed Central

Gene coexpression relationships that are phylogenetically conserved between human and mouse have been shown to provide important clues about gene function that can be efficiently used to identify promising candidate genes for human hereditary disorders. In the past, such approaches have considered mostly generic gene expression profiles that cover multiple tissues and organs. The individual genes of multicellular organisms, however, can participate in different transcriptional programs, operating at scales as different as single-cell types, tissues, organs, body regions or the entire organism. Therefore, systematic analysis of tissue-specific coexpression could be, in principle, a very powerful strategy to dissect those functional relationships among genes that emerge only in particular tissues or organs. In this report, we show that, in fact, conserved coexpression as determined from tissue-specific and condition-specific data sets can predict many functional relationships that are not detected by analyzing heterogeneous microarray data sets. More importantly, we find that, when combined with disease networks, the simultaneous use of both generic (multi-tissue) and tissue-specific conserved coexpression allows a more efficient prediction of human disease genes than the use of generic conserved coexpression alone. Using this strategy, we were able to identify high-probability candidates for 238 orphan disease loci. We provide proof of concept that this combined use of generic and tissue-specific conserved coexpression can be very useful to prioritize the mutational candidates obtained from deep-sequencing projects, even in the case of genetic disorders as heterogeneous as XLMR. PMID:21654723

Piro, Rosario Michael; Ala, Ugo; Molineris, Ivan; Grassi, Elena; Bracco, Chiara; Perego, Gian Paolo; Provero, Paolo; Di Cunto, Ferdinando

2011-01-01

352

Common variants in Mendelian kidney disease genes and their association with renal function.  

PubMed

Many common genetic variants identified by genome-wide association studies for complex traits map to genes previously linked to rare inherited Mendelian disorders. A systematic analysis of common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes responsible for Mendelian diseases with kidney phenotypes has not been performed. We thus developed a comprehensive database of genes for Mendelian kidney conditions and evaluated the association between common genetic variants within these genes and kidney function in the general population. Using the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man database, we identified 731 unique disease entries related to specific renal search terms and confirmed a kidney phenotype in 218 of these entries, corresponding to mutations in 258 genes. We interrogated common SNPs (minor allele frequency >5%) within these genes for association with the estimated GFR in 74,354 European-ancestry participants from the CKDGen Consortium. However, the top four candidate SNPs (rs6433115 at LRP2, rs1050700 at TSC1, rs249942 at PALB2, and rs9827843 at ROBO2) did not achieve significance in a stage 2 meta-analysis performed in 56,246 additional independent individuals, indicating that these common SNPs are not associated with estimated GFR. The effect of less common or rare variants in these genes on kidney function in the general population and disease-specific cohorts requires further research. PMID:24029420

Parsa, Afshin; Fuchsberger, Christian; Köttgen, Anna; O'Seaghdha, Conall M; Pattaro, Cristian; de Andrade, Mariza; Chasman, Daniel I; Teumer, Alexander; Endlich, Karlhans; Olden, Matthias; Chen, Ming-Huei; Tin, Adrienne; Kim, Young J; Taliun, Daniel; Li, Man; Feitosa, Mary; Gorski, Mathias; Yang, Qiong; Hundertmark, Claudia; Foster, Meredith C; Glazer, Nicole; Isaacs, Aaron; Rao, Madhumathi; Smith, Albert V; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; Struchalin, Maksim; Tanaka, Toshiko; Li, Guo; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Atkinson, Elizabeth J; Lohman, Kurt; Cornelis, Marilyn C; Johansson, Asa; Tönjes, Anke; Dehghan, Abbas; Couraki, Vincent; Holliday, Elizabeth G; Sorice, Rossella; Kutalik, Zoltan; Lehtimäki, Terho; Esko, Tõnu; Deshmukh, Harshal; Ulivi, Sheila; Chu, Audrey Y; Murgia, Federico; Trompet, Stella; Imboden, Medea; Kollerits, Barbara; Pistis, Giorgio; Harris, Tamara B; Launer, Lenore J; Aspelund, Thor; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Mitchell, Braxton D; Boerwinkle, Eric; Schmidt, Helena; Hofer, Edith; Hu, Frank; Demirkan, Ayse; Oostra, Ben A; Turner, Stephen T; Ding, Jingzhong; Andrews, Jeanette S; Freedman, Barry I; Giulianini, Franco; Koenig, Wolfgang; Illig, Thomas; Döring, Angela; Wichmann, H-Erich; Zgaga, Lina; Zemunik, Tatijana; Boban, Mladen; Minelli, Cosetta; Wheeler, Heather E; Igl, Wilmar; Zaboli, Ghazal; Wild, Sarah H; Wright, Alan F; Campbell, Harry; Ellinghaus, David; Nöthlings, Ute; Jacobs, Gunnar; Biffar, Reiner; Ernst, Florian; Homuth, Georg; Kroemer, Heyo K; Nauck, Matthias; Stracke, Sylvia; Völker, Uwe; Völzke, Henry; Kovacs, Peter; Stumvoll, Michael; Mägi, Reedik; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Aulchenko, Yurii S; Polasek, Ozren; Hastie, Nick; Vitart, Veronique; Helmer, Catherine; Wang, Jie Jin; Stengel, Bénédicte; Ruggiero, Daniela; Bergmann, Sven; Kähönen, Mika; Viikari, Jorma; Nikopensius, Tiit; Province, Michael; Colhoun, Helen; Doney, Alex; Robino, Antonietta; Krämer, Bernhard K; Portas, Laura; Ford, Ian; Buckley, Brendan M; Adam, Martin; Thun, Gian-Andri; Paulweber, Bernhard; Haun, Margot; Sala, Cinzia; Mitchell, Paul; Ciullo, Marina; Vollenweider, Peter; Raitakari, Olli; Metspalu, Andres; Palmer, Colin; Gasparini, Paolo; Pirastu, Mario; Jukema, J Wouter; Probst-Hensch, Nicole M; Kronenberg, Florian; Toniolo, Daniela; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Shuldiner, Alan R; Coresh, Josef; Schmidt, Reinhold; Ferrucci, Luigi; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Borecki, Ingrid; Kardia, Sharon L R; Liu, Yongmei; Curhan, Gary C; Rudan, Igor; Gyllensten, Ulf; Wilson, James F; Franke, Andre; Pramstaller, Peter P; Rettig, Rainer; Prokopenko, Inga; Witteman, Jacqueline; Hayward, Caroline; Ridker, Paul M; Bochud, Murielle; Heid, Iris M; Siscovick, David S; Fox, Caroline S; Kao, W Linda; Böger, Carsten A

2013-12-01

353

Genes associated with agronomic traits in non-heading Chinese cabbage identified by expression profiling  

PubMed Central

Background The genomes of non-heading Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa ssp. chinensis), heading Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa ssp. pekinensis) and their close relative Arabidopsis thaliana have provided important resources for studying the evolution and genetic improvement of cruciferous plants. Natural growing conditions present these plants with a variety of physiological challenges for which they have a repertoire of genes that ensure adaptability and normal growth. We investigated the differential expressions of genes that control adaptability and development in plants growing in the natural environment to study underlying mechanisms of their expression. Results Using digital gene expression tag profiling, we constructed an expression profile to identify genes related to important agronomic traits under natural growing conditions. Among three non-heading Chinese cabbage cultivars, we found thousands of genes that exhibited significant differences in expression levels at five developmental stages. Through comparative analysis and previous reports, we identified several candidate genes associated with late flowering, cold tolerance, self-incompatibility, and leaf color. Two genes related to cold tolerance were verified using quantitative real-time PCR. Conclusions We identified a large number of genes associated with important agronomic traits of non-heading Chinese cabbage. This analysis will provide a wealth of resources for molecular-assisted breeding of cabbage. The raw data and detailed results of this analysis are available at the website http://nhccdata.njau.edu.cn. PMID:24655567

2014-01-01

354

Transcriptional Analysis of Gli3 Mutants Identifies Wnt Target Genes in the Developing Hippocampus  

PubMed Central

Early development of the hippocampus, which is essential for spatial memory and learning, is controlled by secreted signaling molecules of the Wnt gene family and by Wnt/?-catenin signaling. Despite its importance, little is known, however, about Wnt-regulated genes during hippocampal development. Here, we used the Gli3 mutant mouse extra-toes (XtJ), in which Wnt gene expression in the forebrain is severely affected, as a tool in a microarray analyses to identify potential Wnt target genes. This approach revealed 53 candidate genes with restricted or graded expression patterns in the dorsomedial telencephalon. We identified conserved Tcf/Lef-binding sites in telencephalon-specific enhancers of several of these genes, including Dmrt3, Gli3, Nfia, and Wnt8b. Binding of Lef1 to these sites was confirmed using electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Mutations in these Tcf/Lef-binding sites disrupted or reduced enhancer activity in vivo. Moreover, ectopic activation of Wnt/?-catenin signaling in an ex vivo explant system led to increased telencephalic expression of these genes. Finally, conditional inactivation of Gli3 results in defective hippocampal growth. Collectively, these data strongly suggest that we have identified a set of direct Wnt target genes in the developing hippocampus and provide inside into the genetic hierarchy underlying Wnt-regulated hippocampal development. PMID:22235033

Hasenpusch-Theil, Kerstin; Magnani, Dario; Amaniti, Eleni-Maria; Han, Lin; Armstrong, Douglas

2012-01-01

355

Gene Set Enrichment in eQTL Data Identifies Novel Annotations and Pathway Regulators  

PubMed Central

Genome-wide gene expression profiling has been extensively used to generate biological hypotheses based on differential expression. Recently, many studies have used microarrays to measure gene expression levels across genetic mapping populations. These gene expression phenotypes have been used for genome-wide association analyses, an analysis referred to as expression QTL (eQTL) mapping. Here, eQTL analysis was performed in adipose tissue from 28 inbred strains of mice. We focused our analysis on “trans-eQTL bands”, defined as instances in which the expression patterns of many genes were all associated to a common genetic locus. Genes comprising trans-eQTL bands were screened for enrichments in functional gene sets representing known biological pathways, and genes located at associated trans-eQTL band loci were considered candidate transcriptional modulators. We demonstrate that these patterns were enriched for previously characterized relationships between known upstream transcriptional regulators and their downstream target genes. Moreover, we used this strategy to identify both novel regulators and novel members of known pathways. Finally, based on a putative regulatory relationship identified in our analysis, we identified and validated a previously uncharacterized role for cyclin H in the regulation of oxidative phosphorylation. We believe that the specific molecular hypotheses generated in this study will reveal many additional pathway members and regulators, and that the analysis approaches described herein will be broadly applicable to other eQTL data sets. PMID:18464898

Wu, Chunlei; Delano, David L.; Mitro, Nico; Su, Stephen V.; Janes, Jeff; McClurg, Phillip; Batalov, Serge; Welch, Genevieve L.; Zhang, Jie; Orth, Anthony P.; Walker, John R.; Glynne, Richard J.; Cooke, Michael P.; Takahashi, Joseph S.; Shimomura, Kazuhiro; Kohsaka, Akira; Bass, Joseph; Saez, Enrique; Wiltshire, Tim; Su, Andrew I.

2008-01-01

356

Analysis of the distribution and molecular heterogeneity of the ospD gene among the Lyme disease spirochetes: evidence for lateral gene exchange.  

PubMed Central

Analysis of the ospD gene has revealed that this gene is not universal among Lyme disease spirochete isolates. The gene was found to be carried by 90, 50, and 24% of the Borrelia garinii, B. afzelii, and B. burgdorferi isolates tested. Size variability in the ospD-encoding plasmid was also observed. Sequence analysis has demonstrated the presence of various numbers of a 17-bp repeated sequence in the upstream control (promoter) region of the gene. In addition, a region within the coding sequence where various insertions, deletions, and direct repeats occur was identified. ospD gene sequences from 31 different isolates were determined and utilized in pairwise sequence comparisons and construction of a gene tree. These analyses suggest that the ospD gene was the target of several recombinational events and that the gene was recently acquired by Lyme disease spirochetes and laterally transferred between species. Images PMID:7913928

Marconi, R T; Samuels, D S; Landry, R K; Garon, C F

1994-01-01

357

Characterization of foot-and-mouth disease virus gene products with antisera against bacterially synthesized fusion proteins  

SciTech Connect

Defined segments of the cloned foot-and-mouth disease virus genome corresponding to all parts of the coding region were expressed in Escherichia coli as fusions to the N-terminal part of the MS2-polymerase gene under the control of the inducible lambdaPL promoter. All constructs yielded large amounts of proteins, which were purified and used to raise sequence-specific antisera in rabbits. These antisera were used to identify the corresponding viral gene products in /sup 35/S-labeled extracts from foot-and-mouth disease virus-infected BHK cells. This allowed us to locate unequivocally all mature foot-and-mouth disease virus gene products in the nucleotide sequence, to identify precursor-product relationships, and to detect several foot-and mouth disease virus gene products not previously identified in vivo or in vitro.

Strebel, K.; Beck, E.; Strohmaier, K.; Schaller, H.

1986-03-01

358

The Disruption of Celf6, a Gene Identified by Translational Profiling of Serotonergic Neurons, Results in Autism-Related Behaviors  

PubMed Central

The immense molecular diversity of neurons challenges our ability to understand the genetic and cellular etiology of neuropsychiatric disorders. Leveraging knowledge from neurobiology may help parse the genetic complexity: identifying genes important for a circuit that mediates a particular symptom of a disease may help identify polymorphisms that contribute to risk for the disease as a whole. The serotonergic system has long been suspected in disorders that have symptoms of repetitive behaviors and resistance to change, including autism. We generated a bacTRAP mouse line to permit translational profiling of serotonergic neurons. From this, we identified several thousand serotonergic-cell expressed transcripts, of which 174 were highly enriched, including all known markers of these cells. Analysis of common variants near the corresponding genes in the AGRE collection implicated the RNA binding protein CELF6 in autism risk. Screening for rare variants in CELF6 identified an inherited premature stop codon in one of the probands. Subsequent disruption of Celf6 in mice resulted in animals exhibiting resistance to change and decreased ultrasonic vocalization as well as abnormal levels of serotonin in the brain. This work provides a reproducible and accurate method to profile serotonergic neurons under a variety of conditions and suggests a novel paradigm for gaining information on the etiology of psychiatric disorders. PMID:23407934

Dougherty, Joseph D.; Maloney, Susan E.; Wozniak, David F.; Rieger, Michael A.; Sonnenblick, Lisa; Coppola, Giovanni; Mahieu, Nathaniel G.; Zhang, Juliet; Cai, Jinlu; Patti, Gary J.; Abrahams, Brett S.; Geschwind, Daniel H.; Heintz, Nathaniel

2013-01-01

359

Finding new genes causing motor neuron diseases.  

E-print Network

??Doctor of Philosophy%%%Abstract Neurodegenerative disorders are a diverse group of disorders that affect specific subsets of neurons. Motor neuron diseases, neurodegenerative disorders of motor neurons,… (more)

Gopinath, Sumana

2007-01-01

360

Identifying genetic risk variants for coronary heart disease in familial hypercholesterolemia: an extreme genetics approach.  

PubMed

Mutations in the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) gene cause familial hypercholesterolemia (FH), a disorder characterized by coronary heart disease (CHD) at young age. We aimed to apply an extreme sampling method to enhance the statistical power to identify novel genetic risk variants for CHD in individuals with FH. We selected cases and controls with an extreme contrast in CHD risk from 17?000 FH patients from the Netherlands, whose functional LDLR mutation was unequivocally established. The genome-wide association (GWA) study was performed on 249 very young FH cases with CHD and 217 old FH controls without CHD (above 65 years for males and 70 years of age for females) using the Illumina HumanHap550K chip. In the next stage, two independent samples (one from the Netherlands and one from Italy, Norway, Spain, and the United Kingdom) of FH patients were used as replication samples. In the initial GWA analysis, we identified 29 independent single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with suggestive associations with premature CHD (P<1 × 10(-4)). We examined the association of these SNPs with CHD risk in the replication samples. After Bonferroni correction, none of the SNPs either replicated or reached genome-wide significance after combining the discovery and replication samples. Therefore, we conclude that the genetics of CHD risk in FH is complex and even applying an 'extreme genetics' approach we did not identify new genetic risk variants. Most likely, this method is not as effective in leveraging effect size as anticipated, and may, therefore, not lead to significant gains in statistical power. PMID:24916650

Versmissen, Jorie; Oosterveer, Daniëlla M; Yazdanpanah, Mojgan; Dehghan, Abbas; Hólm, Hilma; Erdman, Jeanette; Aulchenko, Yurii S; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Schunkert, Heribert; Huijgen, Roeland; Vongpromek, Ranitha; Uitterlinden, André G; Defesche, Joep C; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Mulder, Monique; Dadd, Tony; Karlsson, Hróbjartur D; Ordovas, Jose; Kindt, Iris; Jarman, Amelia; Hofman, Albert; van Vark-van der Zee, Leonie; Blommesteijn-Touw, Adriana C; Kwekkeboom, Jaap; Liem, Anho H; van der Ouderaa, Frans J; Calandra, Sebastiano; Bertolini, Stefano; Averna, Maurizio; Langslet, Gisle; Ose, Leiv; Ros, Emilio; Almagro, Fátima; de Leeuw, Peter W; Civeira, Fernando; Masana, Luis; Pintó, Xavier; Simoons, Maarten L; Schinkel, Arend Fl; Green, Martin R; Zwinderman, Aeilko H; Johnson, Keith J; Schaefer, Arne; Neil, Andrew; Witteman, Jacqueline Cm; Humphries, Steve E; Kastelein, John Jp; Sijbrands, Eric Jg

2015-03-01

361

Differentially expressed alternatively spliced genes in Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma identified using massively parallel transcriptome sequencing  

PubMed Central

Background Analyses of Expressed Sequence Tags (ESTs) databases suggest that most human genes have multiple alternative splice variants. The alternative splicing of pre-mRNA is tightly regulated during development and in different tissue types. Changes in splicing patterns have been described in disease states. Recently, we used whole-transcriptome shotgun pryrosequencing to characterize 4 malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) tumors, 1 lung adenocarcinoma and 1 normal lung. We hypothesized that alternative splicing profiles might be detected in the sequencing data for the expressed genes in these samples. Methods We developed a software pipeline to map the transcriptome read sequences of the 4 MPM samples and 1 normal lung sample onto known exon junction sequences in the comprehensive AceView database of expressed sequences and to count how many reads map to each junction. 13,274,187 transcriptome reads generated by the Roche/454 sequencing platform for 5 samples were compared with 151,486 exon junctions from the AceView database. The exon junction expression index (EJEI) was calculated for each exon junction in each sample to measure the differential expression of alternative splicing events. Top ten exon junctions with the largest EJEI difference between the 4 mesothelioma and the normal lung sample were then examined for differential expression using Quantitative Real Time PCR (qRT-PCR) in the 5 sequenced samples. Two of the differentially expressed exon junctions (ACTG2.aAug05 and CDK4.aAug05) were further examined with qRT-PCR in additional 18 MPM and 18 normal lung specimens. Results We found 70,953 exon junctions covered by at least one sequence read in at least one of the 5 samples. All 10 identified most differentially expressed exon junctions were validated as present by RT-PCR, and 8 were differentially expressed exactly as predicted by the sequence analysis. The differential expression of the AceView exon junctions for the ACTG2 and CDK4 genes were also observed to be statistically significant in an additional 18 MPM and 18 normal lung samples examined using qRT-PCR. The differential expression of these two junctions was shown to successfully classify these mesothelioma and normal lung specimens with high sensitivity (89% and 78%, respectively). Conclusion Whole-transcriptome shotgun sequencing, combined with a downstream bioinformatics pipeline, provides powerful tools for the identification of differentially expressed exon junctions resulting from alternative splice variants. The alternatively spliced genes discovered in the study could serve as useful diagnostic markers as well as potential therapeutic targets for MPM. PMID:20043850

2009-01-01

362

A Computational Approach to Identifying Gene-microRNA Modules in Cancer  

PubMed Central

MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play key roles in the initiation and progression of various cancers by regulating genes. Regulatory interactions between genes and miRNAs are complex, as multiple miRNAs can regulate multiple genes. In addtion, these interactions vary from patient to patient and even among patients with the same cancer type, as cancer development is a heterogeneous process. These relationships are more complicated because transcription factors and other regulatory molecules can also regulate miRNAs and genes. Hence, it is important to identify the complex relationships between genes and miRNAs in cancer. In this study, we propose a computational approach to constructing modules that represent these relationships by integrating the expression data of genes and miRNAs with gene-gene interaction data. First, we used a biclustering algorithm to construct modules consisting of a subset of genes and a subset of samples to incorporate the heterogeneity of cancer cells. Second, we combined gene-gene interactions to include genes that play important roles in cancer-related pathways. Then, we selected miRNAs that are closely associated with genes in the modules based on a Gaussian Bayesian network and Bayesian Information Criteria. When we applied our approach to ovarian cancer and glioblastoma (GBM) data sets, 33 and 54 modules were constructed, respectively. In these modules, 91% and 94% of ovarian cancer and GBM modules, respectively, were explained either by direct regulation between genes and miRNAs or by indirect relationships via transcription factors. In addition, 48.4% and 74.0% of modules from ovarian cancer and GBM, respectively, were enriched with cancer-related pathways, and 51.7% and 71.7% of miRNAs in modules were ovarian cancer-related miRNAs and GBM-related miRNAs, respectively. Finally, we extensively analyzed significant modules and showed that most genes in these modules were related to ovarian cancer and GBM. PMID:25611546

Jin, Daeyong; Lee, Hyunju

2015-01-01

363

Credibility Analysis of Putative Disease-Causing Genes Using Bioinformatics  

PubMed Central

Background Genetic studies are challenging in many complex diseases, particularly those with limited diagnostic certainty, low prevalence or of old age. The result is that genes may be reported as disease-causing with varying levels of evidence, and in some cases, the data may be so limited as to be indistinguishable from chance findings. When there are large numbers of such genes, an objective method for ranking the evidence is useful. Using the neurodegenerative and complex disease amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) as a model, and the disease-specific database ALSoD, the objective is to develop a method using publicly available data to generate a credibility score for putative disease-causing genes. Methods Genes with at least one publication suggesting involvement in adult onset familial ALS were collated following an exhaustive literature search. SQL was used to generate a score by extracting information from the publications and combined with a pathogenicity analysis using bioinformatics tools. The resulting score allowed us to rank genes in order of credibility. To validate the method, we compared the objective ranking with a rank generated by ALS genetics experts. Spearman's Rho was used to compare rankings generated by the different methods. Results The automated method ranked ALS genes in the following order: SOD1, TARDBP, FUS, ANG, SPG11, NEFH, OPTN, ALS2, SETX, FIG4, VAPB, DCTN1, TAF15, VCP, DAO. This compared very well to the ranking of ALS genetics experts, with Spearman's Rho of 0.69 (P?=?0.009). Conclusion We have presented an automated method for scoring the level of evidence for a gene being disease-causing. In developing the method we have used the model disease ALS, but it could equally be applied to any disease in which there is genotypic uncertainty. PMID:23755159

Abel, Olubunmi; Powell, John F.; Andersen, Peter M.; Al-Chalabi, Ammar

2013-01-01

364

High density gene expression microarrays and gene ontology analysis for identifying processes in implanted tissue engineering constructs  

Microsoft Academic Search

The in vivo performance of tissue-engineered constructs is often based on generally accepted read-out parameters, like (immuno)histology. In this study, high-density gene expression microarrays and gene ontology (GO) analysis were used as a read-out tool to identify the biological processes occurring after implantation of an acellular collagen-based skin construct using a rat full-thickness wound model. A freely-available program (DAVID) was used

Gerwen Lammers; Christian Gilissen; Suzan T. M. Nillesen; Peter J. E. Uijtdewilligen; Ronnie G. Wismans; Joris A. Veltman; Willeke F. Daamen; Toin H. van Kuppevelt

2010-01-01

365

Cytokine gene polymorphism and progression of renal and cardiovascular diseases  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cytokines are important modulators of inflammation. The balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines determines whether the intensity of inflammatory response is within physiological limits or in the pathological range. The cytokine network is highly complex, containing interactive cascades of gene activation and suppression. Both chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end-stage renal disease (ESRD) are characterized by elevated levels of proinflammatory

M Rao; C Wong; P Kanetsky; M Girndt; P Stenvinkel; M Reilly; D S C Raj; DSC Raj

2007-01-01

366

Functional genomics identifies novel genes essential for clear cell renal cell carcinoma tumor cell proliferation and migration  

PubMed Central

Currently there is a lack of targeted therapies that lead to long-term attenuation or regression of disease in patients with advanced clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC). Our group has implemented a high-throughput genetic analysis coupled with a high-throughput proliferative screen in order to investigate the genetic contributions of a large cohort of overexpressed genes at the functional level in an effort to better understand factors involved in tumor initiation and progression. Patient gene array analysis identified transcripts that are consistently elevated in patient ccRCC as compared to matched normal renal tissues. This was followed by a high-throughput lentivirus screen, independently targeting 195 overexpressed transcripts identified in the gene array in four ccRCC cell lines. This revealed 31 ‘hits’ that contribute to ccRCC cell proliferation. Many of the hits identified are not only presented in the context of ccRCC for the first time, but several have not been previously linked to cancer. We further characterize the function of a group of hits in tumor cell invasion. Taken together these findings reveal pathways that may be critical in ccRCC tumorigenicity, and identifies novel candidate factors that could serve as targets for therapeutic intervention or diagnostic/prognostic biomarkers for patients with advanced ccRCC. PMID:24979721

von Roemeling, Christina A.; Marlow, Laura A.; Radisky, Derek C.; Rohl, Austin; Larsen, Hege E.; Wei, Johnny; Sasinowska, Heather; Zhu, Heng; Drake, Richard; Sasinowski, Maciek; Tun, Han W.; Copland, John A.

2014-01-01

367

A critical analysis of disease-associated DNA polymorphisms in the genes of cattle, goat, sheep, and pig  

PubMed Central

Genetic variations through their effects on gene expression and protein function underlie disease susceptibility in farm animal species. The variations are in the form of single nucleotide polymorphisms, deletions/insertions of nucleotides or whole genes, gene or whole chromosomal rearrangements, gene duplications, and copy number polymorphisms or variants. They exert varying degrees of effects on gene action, such as substitution of an amino acid for another, shift in reading frame and premature termination of translation, and complete deletion of entire exon(s) or gene(s) in diseased individuals. These factors influence gene function by affecting mRNA splicing pattern or by altering/eliminating protein function. Elucidating the genetic bases of diseases under the control of many genes is very challenging, and it is compounded by several factors, including host × pathogen × environment interactions. In this review, the genetic variations that underlie several diseases of livestock (under monogenic and polygenic control) are analyzed. Also, factors hampering research efforts toward identification of genetic influences on animal disease identification and control are highlighted. A better understanding of the factors analyzed could be better harnessed to effectively identify and control, genetically, livestock diseases. Finally, genetic control of animal diseases can reduce the costs associated with diseases, improve animal welfare, and provide healthy animal products to consumers, and should be given more attention. PMID:18350334

Ibeagha-Awemu, Eveline M.; Kgwatalala, Patrick; Ibeagha, Aloysius E.

2008-01-01

368

Integrative MicroRNA and Proteomic Approaches Identify Novel Osteoarthritis Genes and Their Collaborative Metabolic and Inflammatory Networks  

PubMed Central

Background Osteoarthritis is a multifactorial disease characterized by destruction of the articular cartilage due to genetic, mechanical and environmental components affecting more than 100 million individuals all over the world. Despite the high prevalence of the disease, the absence of large-scale molecular studies limits our ability to understand the molecular pathobiology of osteoathritis and identify targets for drug development. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study we integrated genetic, bioinformatic and proteomic approaches in order to identify new genes and their collaborative networks involved in osteoarthritis pathogenesis. MicroRNA profiling of patient-derived osteoarthritic cartilage in comparison to normal cartilage, revealed a 16 microRNA osteoarthritis gene signature. Using reverse-phase protein arrays in the same tissues we detected 76 differentially expressed proteins between osteoarthritic and normal chondrocytes. Proteins such as SOX11, FGF23, KLF6, WWOX and GDF15 not implicated previously in the genesis of osteoarthritis were identified. Integration of microRNA and proteomic data with microRNA gene-target prediction algorithms, generated a potential “interactome” network consisting of 11 microRNAs and 58 proteins linked by 414 potential functional associations. Comparison of the molecular and clinical data, revealed specific microRNAs (miR-22, miR-103) and proteins (PPARA, BMP7, IL1B) to be highly correlated with Body Mass Index (BMI). Experimental validation revealed that miR-22 regulated PPARA and BMP7 expression and its inhibition blocked inflammatory and catabolic changes in osteoarthritic chondrocytes. Conclusions/Significance Our findings indicate that obesity and inflammation are related to osteoarthritis, a metabolic disease affected by microRNA deregulation. Gene network approaches provide new insights for elucidating the complexity of diseases such as osteoarthritis. The integration of microRNA, proteomic and clinical data provides a detailed picture of how a network state is correlated with disease and furthermore leads to the development of new treatments. This strategy will help to improve the understanding of the pathogenesis of multifactorial diseases such as osteoarthritis and provide possible novel therapeutic targets. PMID:19011694

Iliopoulos, Dimitrios; Malizos, Konstantinos N.; Oikonomou, Pagona; Tsezou, Aspasia

2008-01-01

369

Integrating Autoimmune Risk Loci with Gene-Expression Data Identifies Specific Pathogenic Immune Cell Subsets  

E-print Network

Although genome-wide association studies have implicated many individual loci in complex diseases, identifying the exact causal alleles and the cell types within which they act remains greatly challenging. To ultimately ...

Hu, Xinli

370

Homozygosity mapping with SNP arrays identifies TRIM32, an E3 ubiquitin ligase, as a Bardet–Biedl syndrome gene (BBS11)  

PubMed Central

The identification of mutations in genes that cause human diseases has largely been accomplished through the use of positional cloning, which relies on linkage mapping. In studies of rare diseases, the resolution of linkage mapping is limited by the number of available meioses and informative marker density. One recent advance is the development of high-density SNP microarrays for genotyping. The SNP arrays overcome low marker informativity by using a large number of markers to achieve greater coverage at finer resolution. We used SNP microarray genotyping for homozygosity mapping in a small consanguineous Israeli Bedouin family with autosomal recessive Bardet–Biedl syndrome (BBS; obesity, pigmentary retinopathy, polydactyly, hypogonadism, renal and cardiac abnormalities, and cognitive impairment) in which previous linkage studies using short tandem repeat polymorphisms failed to identify a disease locus. SNP genotyping revealed a homozygous candidate region. Mutation analysis in the region of homozygosity identified a conserved homozygous missense mutation in the TRIM32 gene, a gene coding for an E3 ubiquitin ligase. Functional analysis of this gene in zebrafish and expression correlation analyses among other BBS genes in an expression quantitative trait loci data set demonstrate that TRIM32 is a BBS gene. This study shows the value of high-density SNP genotyping for homozygosity mapping and the use of expression correlation data for evaluation of candidate genes and identifies the proteasome degradation pathway as a pathway involved in BBS. PMID:16606853

Chiang, Annie P.; Beck, John S.; Yen, Hsan-Jan; Tayeh, Marwan K.; Scheetz, Todd E.; Swiderski, Ruth E.; Nishimura, Darryl Y.; Braun, Terry A.; Kim, Kwang-Youn A.; Huang, Jian; Elbedour, Khalil; Carmi, Rivka; Slusarski, Diane C.; Casavant, Thomas L.; Stone, Edwin M.; Sheffield, Val C.

2006-01-01

371

Homozygosity mapping with SNP arrays identifies TRIM32, an E3 ubiquitin ligase, as a Bardet-Biedl syndrome gene (BBS11).  

PubMed

The identification of mutations in genes that cause human diseases has largely been accomplished through the use of positional cloning, which relies on linkage mapping. In studies of rare diseases, the resolution of linkage mapping is limited by the number of available meioses and informative marker density. One recent advance is the development of high-density SNP microarrays for genotyping. The SNP arrays overcome low marker informativity by using a large number of markers to achieve greater coverage at finer resolution. We used SNP microarray genotyping for homozygosity mapping in a small consanguineous Israeli Bedouin family with autosomal recessive Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS; obesity, pigmentary retinopathy, polydactyly, hypogonadism, renal and cardiac abnormalities, and cognitive impairment) in which previous linkage studies using short tandem repeat polymorphisms failed to identify a disease locus. SNP genotyping revealed a homozygous candidate region. Mutation analysis in the region of homozygosity identified a conserved homozygous missense mutation in the TRIM32 gene, a gene coding for an E3 ubiquitin ligase. Functional analysis of this gene in zebrafish and expression correlation analyses among other BBS genes in an expression quantitative trait loci data set demonstrate that TRIM32 is a BBS gene. This study shows the value of high-density SNP genotyping for homozygosity mapping and the use of expression correlation data for evaluation of candidate genes and identifies the proteasome degradation pathway as a pathway involved in BBS. PMID:16606853

Chiang, Annie P; Beck, John S; Yen, Hsan-Jan; Tayeh, Marwan K; Scheetz, Todd E; Swiderski, Ruth E; Nishimura, Darryl Y; Braun, Terry A; Kim, Kwang-Youn A; Huang, Jian; Elbedour, Khalil; Carmi, Rivka; Slusarski, Diane C; Casavant, Thomas L; Stone, Edwin M; Sheffield, Val C

2006-04-18

372

Androgen receptor gene and gender specific Alzheimer’s disease  

PubMed Central

Women are at a twofold risk of developing late onset Alzheimer’s disease (LOAD) (onset ?65 years of age) compared to men. During perimenopausal years, women undergo hormonal changes that are accompanied by metabolic, cardiovascular and inflammatory changes. These all together have been suggested as risk factors for LOAD. However, not all perimenopausal women develop AD; we hypothesize that certain genetic factors might underlie the increased susceptibility for developing AD in postmenopausal women. We investigated the androgen receptor (AR) gene in a clinical cohort of male and female AD patients and normal controls by sequencing all coding exons and evaluating the length and distribution of the CAG repeat in exon 1. We could not establish a correlation between the repeat length, gender and the disease status, nor did we identify possible pathogenic variants. AR is located on the X chromosome; in order to assess its role in AD, X-inactivation patterns will need to be studied to directly correlate the actual e