Sample records for identifying disease genes

  1. Identifying Druggable Disease-Modifying Gene Products

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Scott J.; Stockwell, Brent R.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Many disease genes encode proteins that are difficult to target directly using small molecule drugs. Improvements in libraries based on synthetic compounds, natural product and other types of molecules may ultimately allow some challenging proteins to be successfully targeted; however, these developments alone are unlikely to be sufficient. A complementary strategy exploits the functional interconnectivity of intracellular networks to find druggable targets, lying upstream, downstream or in parallel to a disease-causing gene, where modulation can influence the disease process indirectly. These targets can be selected using prior knowledge of disease-associated pathways or identified using phenotypic chemical and genetic screens in model organisms and cells. These approaches should facilitate the development of effective drugs for many genetic disorders. PMID:19740696

  2. Identifying disease candidate genes via large-scale gene network analysis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Haseong; Park, Taesung; Gelenbe, Erol

    2014-01-01

    Gene Regulatory Networks (GRN) provide systematic views of complex living systems, offering reliable and large-scale GRNs to identify disease candidate genes. A reverse engineering technique, Bayesian Model Averaging-based Networks (BMAnet), which ensembles all appropriate linear models to tackle uncertainty in model selection that integrates heterogeneous biological data sets is introduced. Using network evaluation metrics, we compare the networks that are thus identified. The metric 'Random walk with restart (Rwr)' is utilised to search for disease genes. In a simulation our method shows better performance than elastic-net and Gaussian graphical models, but topological quantities vary among the three methods. Using real-data, brain tumour gene expression samples consisting of non-tumour, grade III and grade IV are analysed to estimate networks with a total of 4422 genes. Based on these networks, 169 brain tumour-related candidate genes were identified and some were found to relate to 'wound', 'apoptosis', and 'cell death' processes. PMID:25796737

  3. Identifying Relationships among Genomic Disease Regions: Predicting Genes at Pathogenic SNP Associations and Rare Deletions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Soumya Raychaudhuri; Robert M. Plenge; Elizabeth J. Rossin; Aylwin C. Y. Ng; Shaun M. Purcell; Pamela Sklar; Edward M. Scolnick; Ramnik J. Xavier; David Altshuler; Mark J. Daly

    2009-01-01

    Translating a set of disease regions into insight about pathogenic mechanisms requires not only the ability to identify the key disease genes within them, but also the biological relationships among those key genes. Here we describe a statistical method, Gene Relationships Among Implicated Loci (GRAIL), that takes a list of disease regions and automatically assesses the degree of relatedness of

  4. Contemporary Approaches for Identifying Rare Bone Disease Causing Genes

    PubMed Central

    Farber, Charles R.; Clemens, Thomas L.

    2015-01-01

    Recent improvements in the speed and accuracy of DNA sequencing, together with increasingly sophisticated mathematical approaches for annotating gene networks, have revolutionized the field of human genetics and made these once time consuming approaches assessable to most investigators. In the field of bone research, a particularly active area of gene discovery has occurred in patients with rare bone disorders such as osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) that are caused by mutations in single genes. In this perspective, we highlight some of these technological advances and describe how they have been used to identify the genetic determinants underlying two previously unexplained cases of OI. The widespread availability of advanced methods for DNA sequencing and bioinformatics analysis can be expected to greatly facilitate identification of novel gene networks that normally function to control bone formation and maintenance. PMID:25866697

  5. Identifying Relationships among Genomic Disease Regions: Predicting Genes at Pathogenic SNP

    E-print Network

    Raychaudhuri, Soumya

    separate practical applications in human genetics. First, we took 74 nominally associated Crohn's diseaseIdentifying Relationships among Genomic Disease Regions: Predicting Genes at Pathogenic SNP of disease regions into insight about pathogenic mechanisms requires not only the ability to identify the key

  6. Genes to Diseases (G2D) Computational Method to Identify Asthma Candidate Genes

    PubMed Central

    Tremblay, Karine; Lemire, Mathieu; Potvin, Camille; Tremblay, Alexandre; Hunninghake, Gary M.; Raby, Benjamin A.; Hudson, Thomas J.; Perez-Iratxeta, Carolina; Andrade-Navarro, Miguel A.; Laprise, Catherine

    2008-01-01

    Asthma is a complex trait for which different strategies have been used to identify its environmental and genetic predisposing factors. Here, we describe a novel methodological approach to select candidate genes for asthma genetic association studies. In this regard, the Genes to Diseases (G2D) computational tool has been used in combination with a genome-wide scan performed in a sub-sample of the Saguenay?Lac-St-Jean (SLSJ) asthmatic familial collection (n?=?609) to identify candidate genes located in two suggestive loci shown to be linked with asthma (6q26) and atopy (10q26.3), and presenting differential parent-of-origin effects. This approach combined gene selection based on the G2D data mining analysis of the bibliographic and protein public databases, or according to the genes already known to be associated with the same or a similar phenotype. Ten genes (LPA, NOX3, SNX9, VIL2, VIP, ADAM8, DOCK1, FANK1, GPR123 and PTPRE) were selected for a subsequent association study performed in a large SLSJ sample (n?=?1167) of individuals tested for asthma and atopy related phenotypes. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (n?=?91) within the candidate genes were genotyped and analysed using a family-based association test. The results suggest a protective association to allergic asthma for PTPRE rs7081735 in the SLSJ sample (p?=?0.000463; corrected p?=?0.0478). This association has not been replicated in the Childhood Asthma Management Program (CAMP) cohort. Sequencing of the regions around rs7081735 revealed additional polymorphisms, but additional genotyping did not yield new associations. These results demonstrate that the G2D tool can be useful in the selection of candidate genes located in chromosomal regions linked to a complex trait. PMID:18682798

  7. Identification of rod- and cone-specific expression signatures to identify candidate genes for retinal disease.

    PubMed

    Holt, Richard; Brown, Laurence; Broadgate, Suzanne; Butler, Rachel; Jagannath, Aarti; Downes, Susan; Peirson, Stuart; Halford, Stephanie

    2015-03-01

    Recent advances in technology have greatly increased our ability to identify genetic variants in individuals with retinal disease. However, determining which are likely to be pathogenic remains a challenging task. Using a transgenic coneless (cl) mouse model, together with rodless (rd/rd) and rodless/coneless (rd/rd cl) mice, we have characterised patterns of gene expression in the rod and cone photoreceptors at a genome-wide level. We examined the expression of >27,000 genes in the mice lacking rods, cones or both and compared them with wild type animals. We identified a list of 418 genes with highly significant changes in expression in one or more of the transgenic strains. Pathway analysis confirmed that expected Gene Ontology terms such as phototransduction were over-represented amongst these genes. However, many of these genes have no previously known function in the retina. Gene set enrichment analysis further demonstrated that the mouse orthologues of known human retinal disease genes were significantly enriched amongst those genes with decreased expression. Comparison of our data to human disease loci with no known causal genetic changes has highlighted genes with significant changes in expression making these strong candidates for further screening. These data add to the current literature through the utilisation of the specific cl and rd/rd cl models. Moreover, this study identifies genes that appear to be implicated in photoreceptor function thereby providing a valuable filter for variants identified by high-throughput sequencing in individuals with retinal disease. PMID:25579607

  8. Identifying Human Disease Genes through Cross-Species Gene Mapping of Evolutionary Conserved Processes

    PubMed Central

    Poot, Martin; Badea, Alexandra; Williams, Robert W.; Kas, Martien J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Understanding complex networks that modulate development in humans is hampered by genetic and phenotypic heterogeneity within and between populations. Here we present a method that exploits natural variation in highly diverse mouse genetic reference panels in which genetic and environmental factors can be tightly controlled. The aim of our study is to test a cross-species genetic mapping strategy, which compares data of gene mapping in human patients with functional data obtained by QTL mapping in recombinant inbred mouse strains in order to prioritize human disease candidate genes. Methodology We exploit evolutionary conservation of developmental phenotypes to discover gene variants that influence brain development in humans. We studied corpus callosum volume in a recombinant inbred mouse panel (C57BL/6J×DBA/2J, BXD strains) using high-field strength MRI technology. We aligned mouse mapping results for this neuro-anatomical phenotype with genetic data from patients with abnormal corpus callosum (ACC) development. Principal Findings From the 61 syndromes which involve an ACC, 51 human candidate genes have been identified. Through interval mapping, we identified a single significant QTL on mouse chromosome 7 for corpus callosum volume with a QTL peak located between 25.5 and 26.7 Mb. Comparing the genes in this mouse QTL region with those associated with human syndromes (involving ACC) and those covered by copy number variations (CNV) yielded a single overlap, namely HNRPU in humans and Hnrpul1 in mice. Further analysis of corpus callosum volume in BXD strains revealed that the corpus callosum was significantly larger in BXD mice with a B genotype at the Hnrpul1 locus than in BXD mice with a D genotype at Hnrpul1 (F?=?22.48, p<9.87*10?5). Conclusion This approach that exploits highly diverse mouse strains provides an efficient and effective translational bridge to study the etiology of human developmental disorders, such as autism and schizophrenia. PMID:21572526

  9. IDENTIFYING DISEASE RESISTANCE GENES AND PATHWAYS THROUGH HOST-PATHOGEN PROTEIN INTERACTIONS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A major objective of both animal and plant genomics research is to identify disease resistance genes and pathways. Popular approaches to achieve this goal include candidate gene testing, genome-wide QTL screens, and DNA microarrays. We argue that the two-hybrid assay, which detects protein-protein...

  10. A Genome-Wide Association Study Identifies IL23R as an Inflammatory Bowel Disease Gene

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Richard H. Duerr; Kent D. Taylor; Steven R. Brant; John D. Rioux; Mark S. Silverberg; Mark J. Daly; A. Hillary Steinhart; Clara Abraham; Miguel Regueiro; Anne Griffiths; Themistocles Dassopoulos; Alain Bitton; Huiying Yang; Stephan Targan; Lisa Wu Datta; Emily O. Kistner; L. Philip Schumm; Annette T. Lee; Peter K. Gregersen; M. Michael Barmada; Jerome I. Rotter; Dan L. Nicolae; Judy H. Cho

    2006-01-01

    The inflammatory bowel diseases Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis are common, chronic disorders that cause abdominal pain, diarrhea, and gastrointestinal bleeding. To identify genetic factors that might contribute to these disorders, we performed a genome-wide association study. We found a highly significant association between Crohn's disease and the IL23R gene on chromosome 1p31, which encodes a subunit of the receptor

  11. ABSTRACT Genomics and bioinformatics have the vast potential to identify genes that cause disease by investigating

    E-print Network

    Hammock, Bruce D.

    ABSTRACT Genomics and bioinformatics have the vast potential to identify genes that cause disease by investigating whole-genome databases. Comparison of an individual's geno- type with a genomic database these metabolic profiles with genomic, expression, and proteomic databases. Application of the knowledge of indi

  12. A Genome-Wide Association Study Identifies IL23R as an Inflammatory Bowel Disease Gene

    PubMed Central

    Duerr, Richard H.; Taylor, Kent D.; Brant, Steven R.; Rioux, John D.; Silverberg, Mark S.; Daly, Mark J.; Steinhart, A. Hillary; Abraham, Clara; Regueiro, Miguel; Griffiths, Anne; Dassopoulos, Themistocles; Bitton, Alain; Yang, Huiying; Targan, Stephan; Datta, Lisa Wu; Kistner, Emily O.; Schumm, L. Philip; Lee, Annette T.; Gregersen, Peter K.; Barmada, M. Michael; Rotter, Jerome I.; Nicolae, Dan L.; Cho, Judy H.

    2015-01-01

    The inflammatory bowel diseases Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis are common, chronic disorders that cause abdominal pain, diarrhea, and gastrointestinal bleeding. To identify genetic factors that might contribute to these disorders, we performed a genome-wide association study. We found a highly significant association between Crohn's disease and the IL23R gene on chromosome 1p31, which encodes a subunit of the receptor for the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-23. An uncommon coding variant (rs11209026, c.1142G>A, p.Arg381Gln) confers strong protection against Crohn's disease, and additional noncoding IL23R variants are independently associated. Replication studies confirmed IL23R associations in independent cohorts of patients with Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis. These results and previous studies on the proinflammatory role of IL-23 prioritize this signaling pathway as a therapeutic target in inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:17068223

  13. A special local clustering algorithm for identifying the genes associated with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Pang, Chao-Yang; Hu, Wei; Hu, Ben-Qiong; Shi, Ying; Vanderburg, Charles R; Rogers, Jack T; Huang, Xudong

    2010-03-01

    Clustering is the grouping of similar objects into a class. Local clustering feature refers to the phenomenon whereby one group of data is separated from another, and the data from these different groups are clustered locally. A compact class is defined as one cluster in which all similar elements cluster tightly within the cluster. Herein, the essence of the local clustering feature, revealed by mathematical manipulation, results in a novel clustering algorithm termed as the special local clustering (SLC) algorithm that was used to process gene microarray data related to Alzheimer's disease (AD). SLC algorithm was able to group together genes with similar expression patterns and identify significantly varied gene expression values as isolated points. If a gene belongs to a compact class in control data and appears as an isolated point in incipient, moderate and/or severe AD gene microarray data, this gene is possibly associated with AD. Application of a clustering algorithm in disease-associated gene identification such as in AD is rarely reported. PMID:20089478

  14. DNA methylation map of mouse and human brain identifies target genes in Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Mut, Jose V.; Aso, Ester; Panayotis, Nicolas; Lott, Ira; Dierssen, Mara; Rabano, Alberto; Urdinguio, Rocio G.; Fernandez, Agustin F.; Astudillo, Aurora; Martin-Subero, Jose I.; Balint, Balazs; Fraga, Mario F.; Gomez, Antonio; Gurnot, Cecile; Roux, Jean-Christophe; Avila, Jesus; Hensch, Takao K.; Ferrer, Isidre

    2013-01-01

    The central nervous system has a pattern of gene expression that is closely regulated with respect to functional and anatomical regions. DNA methylation is a major regulator of transcriptional activity, and aberrations in the distribution of this epigenetic mark may be involved in many neurological disorders, such as Alzheimer’s disease. Herein, we have analysed 12 distinct mouse brain regions according to their CpG 5’-end gene methylation patterns and observed their unique epigenetic landscapes. The DNA methylomes obtained from the cerebral cortex were used to identify aberrant DNA methylation changes that occurred in two mouse models of Alzheimer’s disease. We were able to translate these findings to patients with Alzheimer’s disease, identifying DNA methylation-associated silencing of three targets genes: thromboxane A2 receptor (TBXA2R), sorbin and SH3 domain containing 3 (SORBS3) and spectrin beta 4 (SPTBN4). These hypermethylation targets indicate that the cyclic AMP response element-binding protein (CREB) activation pathway and the axon initial segment could contribute to the disease. PMID:24030951

  15. Molecular profiling of experimental endometriosis identified gene expression patterns in common with human disease

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Idhaliz; Rivera, Elizabeth; Ruiz, Lynnette A.; Santiago, Olga I.; Vernon, Michael W.; Appleyard, Caroline B.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To validate a rat model of endometriosis using cDNA microarrays by identifying common gene expression patterns beween experimental and natural disease. DESIGN Autotransplantation rat model. SETTING Medical school department. ANIMALS Female Sprague-Dawley rats. INTERVENTIONS Endometriosis was surgically-induced by suturing uterine horn implants next to the small intestine’s mesentery. Control rats received sutures with no implants. After 60 days, endometriotic implants and uterine horn were obtained. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Gene expression levels determined by cDNA microarrays and QRT-PCR. METHODS Cy5-labeled cDNA was synthesized from total RNA obtained from endometriotic implants. Cy3-labeled cDNA was synthesized using uterine RNA from a control rat. Gene expression levels were analyzed after hybridizing experimental and control labeled cDNA to PIQOR™ Toxicology Rat Microarrays (Miltenyi Biotec) containing 1,252 known genes. Cy5/Cy3 ratios were determined and genes with >2-fold higher or <0.5-fold lower expression levels were selected. Microarray results were validated by QRT-PCR. RESULTS We observed differential expression of genes previously shown to be upregulated in patients, including growth factors, inflammatory cytokines/receptors, tumor invasion/metastasis factors, adhesion molecules, and anti-apoptotic factors. CONCLUSIONS This study presents evidence in support of using this rat model to study the natural history of endometriosis and test novel therapeutics for this incurable disease. PMID:17478174

  16. Identifying genes for coronary artery disease: An idea whose time has come

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Robert; Stewart, Alexandre FR; Wells, George A; Williams, Kathryn A; Kavaslar, Nihan; McPherson, Ruth

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Coronary artery disease (CAD) remains the number one killer in the western world. Genetics accounts for greater than 50% of the risk for CAD. Genetic screening and early prevention in individuals identified as being at increased risk could dramatically reduce the prevalence of CAD, thus necessitating the identification of genes predisposing to CAD. Studies of genes identified by the candidate gene approach have not been replicated due, in part, to inadequate sample size. Genome-wide scan association studies have been limited by the use of thousands of markers rather than the hundreds of thousands required, and by the use of hundreds of individuals rather than the thousands required. Replication of positive findings in an independent population is essential. To detect a minor allele frequency of 5% or greater with an odds ratio for risk of 1.3 or greater and 90% power, an estimated 14,000 (9000 affected and 5000 control) subjects are required. METHODS: The Affymetrix GeneChip Human Mapping 500K Array Set (Affymetrix Inc, USA) provides a marker every 6000 base pairs as required, and is being used to genotype 1000 cases of premature CAD and 1000 normal subjects, followed by replication in 8000 affected individuals and 4000 control subjects. The phenotype is confirmed or excluded by coronary arteriograms by catheterization or multislice computed tomography. RESULTS: Since 2005, more than 800 million genotypes have been performed and analyses performed on 500 control subjects and 500 affected individuals. Several thousand significant single nucleotide polymorphisms and 130 clusters associated with CAD have been identified. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first genome-wide scan using the 500,000 marker set in a case-control association study for CAD genes. Several genes associated with CAD appear promising. PMID:17668082

  17. Large-Scale Gene-Centric Analysis Identifies Novel Variants for Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) has a significant genetic contribution that is incompletely characterized. To complement genome-wide association (GWA) studies, we conducted a large and systematic candidate gene study of CAD susceptibility, including analysis of many uncommon and functional variants. We examined 49,094 genetic variants in ?2,100 genes of cardiovascular relevance, using a customised gene array in 15,596 CAD cases and 34,992 controls (11,202 cases and 30,733 controls of European descent; 4,394 cases and 4,259 controls of South Asian origin). We attempted to replicate putative novel associations in an additional 17,121 CAD cases and 40,473 controls. Potential mechanisms through which the novel variants could affect CAD risk were explored through association tests with vascular risk factors and gene expression. We confirmed associations of several previously known CAD susceptibility loci (eg, 9p21.3:p<10?33; LPA:p<10?19; 1p13.3:p<10?17) as well as three recently discovered loci (COL4A1/COL4A2, ZC3HC1, CYP17A1:p<5×10?7). However, we found essentially null results for most previously suggested CAD candidate genes. In our replication study of 24 promising common variants, we identified novel associations of variants in or near LIPA, IL5, TRIB1, and ABCG5/ABCG8, with per-allele odds ratios for CAD risk with each of the novel variants ranging from 1.06–1.09. Associations with variants at LIPA, TRIB1, and ABCG5/ABCG8 were supported by gene expression data or effects on lipid levels. Apart from the previously reported variants in LPA, none of the other ?4,500 low frequency and functional variants showed a strong effect. Associations in South Asians did not differ appreciably from those in Europeans, except for 9p21.3 (per-allele odds ratio: 1.14 versus 1.27 respectively; P for heterogeneity?=?0.003). This large-scale gene-centric analysis has identified several novel genes for CAD that relate to diverse biochemical and cellular functions and clarified the literature with regard to many previously suggested genes. PMID:21966275

  18. Align human interactome with phenome to identify causative genes and networks underlying disease families

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Xuebing Wu; Qifang Liu; Rui Jiang

    2009-01-01

    Motivation: Understanding the complexity in gene-phenotype relationship is vital for revealing the genetic basis of common diseases. Recent studies on the basis of human interactome and phenome not only uncovers prevalent phenotypic overlap and genetic overlap between diseases, but also reveals a modular organization of the genetic landscape of human diseases, providing new opportunities to reduce the complexity in dissecting

  19. ToP: A Trend-of-Disease-Progression Procedure Works Well for Identifying Cancer Genes from Multi-State Cohort Gene Expression Data for Human Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Feng-Hsiang; Lee, Henry Hsin-Chung; Lee, Hoong-Chien

    2013-01-01

    Significantly expressed genes extracted from microarray gene expression data have proved very useful for identifying genetic biomarkers of diseases, including cancer. However, deriving a disease related inference from a list of differentially expressed genes has proven less than straightforward. In a systems disease such as cancer, how genes interact with each other should matter just as much as the level of gene expression. Here, in a novel approach, we used the network and disease progression properties of individual genes in state-specific gene-gene interaction networks (GGINs) to select cancer genes for human colorectal cancer (CRC) and obtain a much higher hit rate of known cancer genes when compared with methods not based on network theory. We constructed GGINs by integrating gene expression microarray data from multiple states – healthy control (Nor), adenoma (Ade), inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and CRC – with protein-protein interaction database and Gene Ontology. We tracked changes in the network degrees and clustering coefficients of individual genes in the GGINs as the disease state changed from one to another. From these we inferred the state sequences Nor-Ade-CRC and Nor-IBD-CRC both exhibited a trend of (disease) progression (ToP) toward CRC, and devised a ToP procedure for selecting cancer genes for CRC. Of the 141 candidates selected using ToP, ?50% had literature support as cancer genes, compared to hit rates of 20% to 30% for standard methods using only gene expression data. Among the 16 candidate cancer genes that encoded transcription factors, 13 were known to be tumorigenic and three were novel: CDK1, SNRPF, and ILF2. We identified 13 of the 141 predicted cancer genes as candidate markers for early detection of CRC, 11 and 2 at the Ade and IBD states, respectively. PMID:23799036

  20. Genome-Wide Gene-Environment Study Identifies Glutamate Receptor Gene GRIN2A as a Parkinson's Disease Modifier Gene via Interaction with Coffee

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Taye H. Hamza; Honglei Chen; Erin M. Hill-Burns; Shannon L. Rhodes; Jennifer Montimurro; Denise M. Kay; Albert Tenesa; Victoria I. Kusel; Patricia Sheehan; Muthukrishnan Eaaswarkhanth; Dora Yearout; Ali Samii; John W. Roberts; Pinky Agarwal; Yvette Bordelon; Liyong Wang; Jianjun Gao; Jeffery M. Vance; Kenneth S. Kendler; Silviu-Alin Bacanu; William K. Scott; Beate Ritz; John Nutt; Stewart A. Factor; Haydeh Payami

    2011-01-01

    Our aim was to identify genes that influence the inverse association of coffee with the risk of developing Parkinson's disease (PD). We used genome-wide genotype data and lifetime caffeinated-coffee-consumption data on 1,458 persons with PD and 931 without PD from the NeuroGenetics Research Consortium (NGRC), and we performed a genome-wide association and interaction study (GWAIS), testing each SNP's main-effect plus

  1. Disease-targeted sequencing of ion channel genes identifies de novo mutations in patients with non-familial Brugada syndrome.

    PubMed

    Juang, Jyh-Ming Jimmy; Lu, Tzu-Pin; Lai, Liang-Chuan; Ho, Chia-Chuan; Liu, Yen-Bin; Tsai, Chia-Ti; Lin, Lian-Yu; Yu, Chih-Chieh; Chen, Wen-Jone; Chiang, Fu-Tien; Yeh, Shih-Fan Sherri; Lai, Ling-Ping; Chuang, Eric Y; Lin, Jiunn-Lee

    2014-01-01

    Brugada syndrome (BrS) is one of the ion channelopathies associated with sudden cardiac death (SCD). The most common BrS-associated gene (SCN5A) only accounts for approximately 20-25% of BrS patients. This study aims to identify novel mutations across human ion channels in non-familial BrS patients without SCN5A variants through disease-targeted sequencing. We performed disease-targeted multi-gene sequencing across 133 human ion channel genes and 12 reported BrS-associated genes in 15 unrelated, non-familial BrS patients without SCN5A variants. Candidate variants were validated by mass spectrometry and Sanger sequencing. Five de novo mutations were identified in four genes (SCNN1A, KCNJ16, KCNB2, and KCNT1) in three BrS patients (20%). Two of the three patients presented SCD and one had syncope. Interestingly, the two patients presented with SCD had compound mutations (SCNN1A:Arg350Gln and KCNB2:Glu522Lys; SCNN1A:Arg597* and KCNJ16:Ser261Gly). Importantly, two SCNN1A mutations were identified from different families. The KCNT1:Arg1106Gln mutation was identified in a patient with syncope. Bioinformatics algorithms predicted severe functional interruptions in these four mutation loci, suggesting their pivotal roles in BrS. This study identified four novel BrS-associated genes and indicated the effectiveness of this disease-targeted sequencing across ion channel genes for non-familial BrS patients without SCN5A variants. PMID:25339316

  2. Disease-Targeted Sequencing of Ion Channel Genes identifies de novo mutations in Patients with Non-Familial Brugada Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Juang, Jyh-Ming Jimmy; Lu, Tzu-Pin; Lai, Liang-Chuan; Ho, Chia-Chuan; Liu, Yen-Bin; Tsai, Chia-Ti; Lin, Lian-Yu; Yu, Chih-Chieh; Chen, Wen-Jone; Chiang, Fu-Tien; Yeh, Shih-Fan Sherri; Lai, Ling-Ping; Chuang, Eric Y.; Lin, Jiunn-Lee

    2014-01-01

    Brugada syndrome (BrS) is one of the ion channelopathies associated with sudden cardiac death (SCD). The most common BrS-associated gene (SCN5A) only accounts for approximately 20–25% of BrS patients. This study aims to identify novel mutations across human ion channels in non-familial BrS patients without SCN5A variants through disease-targeted sequencing. We performed disease-targeted multi-gene sequencing across 133 human ion channel genes and 12 reported BrS-associated genes in 15 unrelated, non-familial BrS patients without SCN5A variants. Candidate variants were validated by mass spectrometry and Sanger sequencing. Five de novo mutations were identified in four genes (SCNN1A, KCNJ16, KCNB2, and KCNT1) in three BrS patients (20%). Two of the three patients presented SCD and one had syncope. Interestingly, the two patients presented with SCD had compound mutations (SCNN1A:Arg350Gln and KCNB2:Glu522Lys; SCNN1A:Arg597* and KCNJ16:Ser261Gly). Importantly, two SCNN1A mutations were identified from different families. The KCNT1:Arg1106Gln mutation was identified in a patient with syncope. Bioinformatics algorithms predicted severe functional interruptions in these four mutation loci, suggesting their pivotal roles in BrS. This study identified four novel BrS-associated genes and indicated the effectiveness of this disease-targeted sequencing across ion channel genes for non-familial BrS patients without SCN5A variants. PMID:25339316

  3. Expression profiling of cervical cancers in Indian women at different stages to identify gene signatures during progression of the disease

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Asha; Mahantshetty, Umesh; Kannan, Sadhana; Deodhar, Kedar; Shrivastava, Shyam K; Kumar-Sinha, Chandan; Mulherkar, Rita

    2013-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer among women worldwide, with developing countries accounting for >80% of the disease burden. Although in the West, active screening has been instrumental in reducing the incidence of cervical cancer, disease management is hampered due to lack of biomarkers for disease progression and defined therapeutic targets. Here we carried out gene expression profiling of 29 cervical cancer tissues from Indian women, spanning International Federation of Gynaecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stages of the disease from early lesion (IA and IIA) to progressive stages (IIB and IIIA–B), and identified distinct gene expression signatures. Overall, metabolic pathways, pathways in cancer and signaling pathways were found to be significantly upregulated, while focal adhesion, cytokine–cytokine receptor interaction and WNT signaling were downregulated. Additionally, we identified candidate biomarkers of disease progression such as SPP1, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), STK17A, and DUSP1 among others that were validated by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) in the samples used for microarray studies as well in an independent set of 34 additional samples. Integrative analysis of our results with other cervical cancer profiling studies could facilitate the development of multiplex diagnostic markers of cervical cancer progression. PMID:24403257

  4. Genome-wide linkage scan identifies two novel genetic loci for coronary artery disease: in GeneQuest families.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hanxiang; Li, Lin; Rao, Shaoqi; Shen, Gongqing; Xi, Quansheng; Chen, Shenghan; Zhang, Zheng; Wang, Kai; Ellis, Stephen G; Chen, Qiuyun; Topol, Eric J; Wang, Qing K

    2014-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the leading cause of death worldwide. Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) identified >50 common variants associated with CAD or its complication myocardial infarction (MI), but collectively they account for <20% of heritability, generating a phenomena of "missing heritability". Rare variants with large effects may account for a large portion of missing heritability. Genome-wide linkage studies of large families and follow-up fine mapping and deep sequencing are particularly effective in identifying rare variants with large effects. Here we show results from a genome-wide linkage scan for CAD in multiplex GeneQuest families with early onset CAD and MI. Whole genome genotyping was carried out with 408 markers that span the human genome by every 10 cM and linkage analyses were performed using the affected relative pair analysis implemented in GENEHUNTER. Affected only nonparametric linkage (NPL) analysis identified two novel CAD loci with highly significant evidence of linkage on chromosome 3p25.1 (peak NPL ?=?5.49) and 3q29 (NPL ?=?6.84). We also identified four loci with suggestive linkage on 9q22.33, 9q34.11, 17p12, and 21q22.3 (NPL ?=?3.18-4.07). These results identify novel loci for CAD and provide a framework for fine mapping and deep sequencing to identify new susceptibility genes and novel variants associated with risk of CAD. PMID:25485937

  5. Genome-Wide Linkage Scan Identifies Two Novel Genetic Loci for Coronary Artery Disease: In GeneQuest Families

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Gongqing; Xi, Quansheng; Chen, Shenghan; Zhang, Zheng; Wang, Kai; Ellis, Stephen G.; Chen, Qiuyun; Topol, Eric J.; Wang, Qing K.

    2014-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the leading cause of death worldwide. Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) identified >50 common variants associated with CAD or its complication myocardial infarction (MI), but collectively they account for <20% of heritability, generating a phenomena of “missing heritability”. Rare variants with large effects may account for a large portion of missing heritability. Genome-wide linkage studies of large families and follow-up fine mapping and deep sequencing are particularly effective in identifying rare variants with large effects. Here we show results from a genome-wide linkage scan for CAD in multiplex GeneQuest families with early onset CAD and MI. Whole genome genotyping was carried out with 408 markers that span the human genome by every 10 cM and linkage analyses were performed using the affected relative pair analysis implemented in GENEHUNTER. Affected only nonparametric linkage (NPL) analysis identified two novel CAD loci with highly significant evidence of linkage on chromosome 3p25.1 (peak NPL ?=?5.49) and 3q29 (NPL ?=?6.84). We also identified four loci with suggestive linkage on 9q22.33, 9q34.11, 17p12, and 21q22.3 (NPL ?=?3.18–4.07). These results identify novel loci for CAD and provide a framework for fine mapping and deep sequencing to identify new susceptibility genes and novel variants associated with risk of CAD. PMID:25485937

  6. Chicks and single-nucleotide polymorphisms: an entree into identifying genes conferring disease resistance in chicken

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Marek's disease (MD) is one of the most serious chronic infectious disease threats to the U.S. poultry industry. Selecting for increased genetic resistance to MD is a control strategy that can augment current vaccinal control measures. Although our previous efforts integrating various genomic scre...

  7. Resistance gene analogues identified through the NBS-profiling method map close to major genes and QTL for disease resistance in apple.

    PubMed

    Calenge, F; Van der Linden, C G; Van de Weg, E; Schouten, H J; Van Arkel, G; Denancé, C; Durel, C-E

    2005-02-01

    We used a new method called nucleotide-binding site (NBS) profiling to identify and map resistance gene analogues (RGAs) in apple. This method simultaneously allows the amplification and the mapping of genetic markers anchored in the conserved NBS-encoding domain of plant disease resistance genes. Ninety-four individuals belonging to an F1 progeny derived from a cross between the apple cultivars 'Discovery' and 'TN10-8' were studied. Two degenerate primers designed from the highly conserved P-loop motif within the NBS domain were used together with adapter primers. Forty-three markers generated with NBS profiling could be mapped in this progeny. After sequencing, 23 markers were identified as RGAs, based on their homologies with known resistance genes or NBS/leucine-rich-repeat-like genes. Markers were mapped on 10 of the 17 linkage groups of the apple genetic map used. Most of these markers were organized in clusters. Twenty-five markers mapped close to major genes or quantitative trait loci for resistance to scab and mildew previously identified in different apple progenies. Several markers could become efficient tools for marker-assisted selection once converted into breeder-friendly markers. This study demonstrates the efficiency of the NBS-profiling method for generating RGA markers for resistance loci in apple. PMID:15647920

  8. Saccharomyces Fungemia Associated with Esophageal Disease Identified by D1/D2 Ribosomal RNA Gene Sequence

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Disseminated Saccharomyces infection has been reported in immunosuppressed patients treated with probiotics, but disseminated Saccharomyces cerevisiae infection associated with underlying esophageal disease is not previously described. Saccharomyces cerevisiae (which occasionally colonizes the gast...

  9. Multistudy Fine Mapping of Chromosome 2q Identifies XRCC5 as a Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Susceptibility Gene

    PubMed Central

    Hersh, Craig P.; Pillai, Sreekumar G.; Zhu, Guohua; Lomas, David A.; Bakke, Per; Gulsvik, Amund; DeMeo, Dawn L.; Klanderman, Barbara J.; Lazarus, Ross; Litonjua, Augusto A.; Sparrow, David; Reilly, John J.; Agusti, Alvar; Calverley, Peter M. A.; Donner, Claudio F.; Levy, Robert D.; Make, Barry J.; Paré, Peter D.; Rennard, Stephen I.; Vestbo, Jørgen; Wouters, Emiel F. M.; Scholand, Mary Beth; Coon, Hilary; Hoidal, John; Silverman, Edwin K.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale: Several family-based studies have identified genetic linkage for lung function and airflow obstruction to chromosome 2q. Objectives: We hypothesized that merging results of high-resolution single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) mapping in four separate populations would lead to the identification of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) susceptibility genes on chromosome 2q. Methods: Within the chromosome 2q linkage region, 2,843 SNPs were genotyped in 806 COPD cases and 779 control subjects from Norway, and 2,484 SNPs were genotyped in 309 patients with severe COPD from the National Emphysema Treatment Trial and 330 community control subjects. Significant associations from the combined results across the two case-control studies were followed up in 1,839 individuals from 603 families from the International COPD Genetics Network (ICGN) and in 949 individuals from 127 families in the Boston Early-Onset COPD Study. Measurements and Main Results: Merging the results of the two case-control analyses, 14 of the 790 overlapping SNPs had a combined P < 0.01. Two of these 14 SNPs were consistently associated with COPD in the ICGN families. The association with one SNP, located in the gene XRCC5, was replicated in the Boston Early-Onset COPD Study, with a combined P = 2.51 × 10?5 across the four studies, which remains significant when adjusted for multiple testing (P = 0.02). Genotype imputation confirmed the association with SNPs in XRCC5. Conclusions: By combining data from COPD genetic association studies conducted in four independent patient samples, we have identified XRCC5, an ATP-dependent DNA helicase, as a potential COPD susceptibility gene. PMID:20463177

  10. Genetic Analysis of Fin Development in Zebrafish Identifies Furin and Hemicentin1 as Potential Novel Fraser Syndrome Disease Genes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thomas J. Carney; Natália Martins Feitosa; Carmen Sonntag; Krasimir Slanchev; Johannes Kluger; Daiji Kiyozumi; Jan M. Gebauer; Jared Coffin Talbot; Charles B. Kimmel; Kiyotoshi Sekiguchi; Raimund Wagener; Heinz Schwarz; Phillip W. Ingham; Matthias Hammerschmidt

    2010-01-01

    Using forward genetics, we have identified the genes mutated in two classes of zebrafish fin mutants. The mutants of the first class are characterized by defects in embryonic fin morphogenesis, which are due to mutations in a Laminin subunit or an Integrin alpha receptor, respectively. The mutants of the second class display characteristic blistering underneath the basement membrane of the

  11. Positively Selected Disease Response Orthologous Gene Sets in the Cereals Identified Using Sorghum bicolor L. Moench Expression Profiles and Comparative Genomics

    PubMed Central

    Zamora, Alejandro; Sun, Qi; Hamblin, Martha T.; Aquadro, Charles F.; Kresovich, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    Disease response genes (DRGs) diverge under recurrent positive selection as a result of a molecular arms race between hosts and pathogens. Most of these studies were conducted in animals, and few defense genes have been shown to evolve adaptively in plants. To test for adaptation in the molecules mediating disease resistance in the cereals, we first combined information from the expression pattern of Sorghum bicolor genes and from divergence to the full genome of rice to identify candidate DRGs. We then used evolutionary analyses of orthologous gene sets from several grass species, to determine whether the DRGs show signals of positive selection and the residues targeted. We found 140 divergent genes upregulated under biotic stress in S. bicolor by evaluating the relative abundance of expressed sequence tags in different libraries and comparing them with rice genes. For 10 of these genes, we found sets of orthologs including sequences from rice and three other cereals; six genes showed a pattern of substitution that was consistent with positive selection. Three of these genes, a thaumatin, a peroxidase, and a barley mlo homolog, are known antifungal proteins. The other three genes with evidence of positive selection were a MCM-1 agamous deficiens SRF- (MADS) box transcription factor, an eIF5 translation initiation factor, and a gene of unknown function but with evidence of expression during stress. Permutation analyses, using different ortholog and paralog sequences, consistently identified five positively selected codons in the peroxidase, a member of a cluster of genes and a large gene family. We mapped the positively selected residues onto the structure of the peroxidase and thaumatin and found that all sites are on the surface of these proteins and several are close to biochemically determined active sites. Identifying new positively selected plant disease resistance genes and the critical amino acid sites provides a basis for functional studies that may increase our understanding of their underlying molecular mechanisms of action. Additionally, it may lead to the identification of individuals having variation at functionally important sites, as well as eventually using this information in the rational design and engineering of proteins involved in plant disease resistance. PMID:19506000

  12. Suppressors of the arabidopsis lsd5 cell death mutation identify genes involved in regulating disease resistance responses.

    PubMed Central

    Morel, J B; Dangl, J L

    1999-01-01

    Cell death is associated with the development of the plant disease resistance hypersensitive reaction (HR). Arabidopsis lsd mutants that spontaneously exhibit cell death reminiscent of the HR were identified previously. To study further the regulatory context in which cell death acts during disease resistance, one of these mutants, lsd5, was used to isolate new mutations that suppress its cell death phenotype. Using a simple lethal screen, nine lsd5 cell death suppressors, designated phx (for the mythological bird Phoenix that rises from its ashes), were isolated. These mutants were characterized with respect to their response to a bacterial pathogen and oomycete parasite. The strongest suppressors-phx2, 3, 6, and 11-1-showed complex, differential patterns of disease resistance modifications. These suppressors attenuated disease resistance to avirulent isolates of the biotrophic Peronospora parasitica pathogen, but only phx2 and phx3 altered disease resistance to avirulent strains of Pseudomonas syringae pv tomato. Therefore, some of these phx mutants define common regulators of cell death and disease resistance. In addition, phx2 and phx3 exhibited enhanced disease susceptibility to different virulent pathogens, confirming probable links between the disease resistance and susceptibility pathways. PMID:9872969

  13. Gene expression profiling to identify potentially relevant disease outcomes and support human health risk assessment for carbon black nanoparticle exposure.

    PubMed

    Bourdon, Julie A; Williams, Andrew; Kuo, Byron; Moffat, Ivy; White, Paul A; Halappanavar, Sabina; Vogel, Ulla; Wallin, Håkan; Yauk, Carole L

    2013-01-01

    New approaches are urgently needed to evaluate potential hazards posed by exposure to nanomaterials. Gene expression profiling provides information on potential modes of action and human relevance, and tools have recently become available for pathway-based quantitative risk assessment. The objective of this study was to use toxicogenomics in the context of human health risk assessment. We explore the utility of toxicogenomics in risk assessment, using published gene expression data from C57BL/6 mice exposed to 18, 54 and 162 ?g Printex 90 carbon black nanoparticles (CBNP). Analysis of CBNP-perturbed pathways, networks and transcription factors revealed concomitant changes in predicted phenotypes (e.g., pulmonary inflammation and genotoxicity), that correlated with dose and time. Benchmark doses (BMDs) for apical endpoints were comparable to minimum BMDs for relevant pathway-specific expression changes. Comparison to inflammatory lung disease models (i.e., allergic airway inflammation, bacterial infection and tissue injury and fibrosis) and human disease profiles revealed that induced gene expression changes in Printex 90 exposed mice were similar to those typical for pulmonary injury and fibrosis. Very similar fibrotic pathways were perturbed in CBNP-exposed mice and human fibrosis disease models. Our synthesis demonstrates how toxicogenomic profiles may be used in human health risk assessment of nanoparticles and constitutes an important step forward in the ultimate recognition of toxicogenomic endpoints in human health risk. As our knowledge of molecular pathways, dose-response characteristics and relevance to human disease continues to grow, we anticipate that toxicogenomics will become increasingly useful in assessing chemical toxicities and in human health risk assessment. PMID:23146762

  14. A gene signature identified using a mouse model of androgen receptor-dependent prostate cancer predicts biochemical relapse in human disease.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Vanessa C; Day, Tanya K; Bianco-Miotto, Tina; Selth, Luke A; Han, Guangzhou; Thomas, Mervyn; Buchanan, Grant; Scher, Howard I; Nelson, Colleen C; Greenberg, Norman M; Butler, Lisa M; Tilley, Wayne D

    2012-08-01

    Mutations in the androgen receptor (AR) have been detected in experimental and clinical prostate tumors. Mice with enforced prostate-specific expression of one such receptor variant, AR-E231G, invariably develop prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia by 12 weeks and metastatic prostate cancer by 52 weeks. The aim of this study was to identify genes with altered expression in the prostates of AR-E231G mice at an early stage of disease that may act as drivers of AR-mediated tumorigenesis. The gene expression profile of AR-E231G prostate tissue from 12-week-old mice was compared to an equivalent profile from mice expressing the AR-T857A receptor variant (analogous to the AR-T877A variant in LNCaP cells), which do not develop prostate tumors. One hundred and thirty-two genes were differentially expressed in AR-E231G prostates. Classification of these genes revealed enrichment for cellular pathways known to be involved in prostate cancer, including cell cycle and lipid metabolism. Suppression of two genes upregulated in the AR-E231G model, ADM and CITED1, increased cell death and reduced proliferation of human prostate cancer cells. Many genes differentially expressed in AR-E231G prostates are also deregulated in human tumors. Three of these genes, ID4, NR2F1 and PTGDS, which were expressed at consistently lower levels in clinical prostate cancer compared to nonmalignant tissues, formed a signature that predicted biochemical relapse (hazard ratio 2.2, p = 0.038). We believe that our findings support the value of this novel mouse model of prostate cancer to identify candidate therapeutic targets and/or biomarkers of human disease. PMID:22275114

  15. Repressor- and activator-type ethylene response factors functioning in jasmonate signaling and disease resistance identified via a genome-wide screen of Arabidopsis transcription factor gene expression.

    PubMed

    McGrath, Ken C; Dombrecht, Bruno; Manners, John M; Schenk, Peer M; Edgar, Cameron I; Maclean, Donald J; Scheible, Wolf-Rüdiger; Udvardi, Michael K; Kazan, Kemal

    2005-10-01

    To identify transcription factors (TFs) involved in jasmonate (JA) signaling and plant defense, we screened 1,534 Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) TFs by real-time quantitative reverse transcription-PCR for their altered transcript at 6 h following either methyl JA treatment or inoculation with the incompatible pathogen Alternaria brassicicola. We identified 134 TFs that showed a significant change in expression, including many APETALA2/ethylene response factor (AP2/ERF), MYB, WRKY, and NAC TF genes with unknown functions. Twenty TF genes were induced by both the pathogen and methyl JA and these included 10 members of the AP2/ERF TF family, primarily from the B1a and B3 subclusters. Functional analysis of the B1a TF AtERF4 revealed that AtERF4 acts as a novel negative regulator of JA-responsive defense gene expression and resistance to the necrotrophic fungal pathogen Fusarium oxysporum and antagonizes JA inhibition of root elongation. In contrast, functional analysis of the B3 TF AtERF2 showed that AtERF2 is a positive regulator of JA-responsive defense genes and resistance to F. oxysporum and enhances JA inhibition of root elongation. Our results suggest that plants coordinately express multiple repressor- and activator-type AP2/ERFs during pathogen challenge to modulate defense gene expression and disease resistance. PMID:16183832

  16. Genes and Disease

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    1998-01-01

    The National Center for Biotechnology Information of the National Library of Medicine (part of the National Institutes of Health) has posted this webpage, Genes and Disease, which provides information "for some 60 diseases associated with specific genes, and has links to the 1998 Gene Map as well as to PubMed, protein sequences, Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man, and associations related to each disease."

  17. A severe recessive and a mild dominant form of Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease associated with a newly identified Glu222Lys GDAP1 gene mutation.

    PubMed

    Kabzi?ska, Dagmara; Kotruchow, Katarzyna; Cegielska, Joanna; Hausmanowa-Petrusewicz, Irena; Kocha?ski, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease caused by mutations in the GDAP1 gene has been shown to be inherited via traits that may be either autosomal recessive (in the majority of cases) [CMT4A] or autosomal dominant [CMT2K]. CMT4A disease is characterized by an early onset, and a severe clinical course often leading to a loss of ambulation, whereas CMT2K is characterized by a mild clinical course of benign axonal neuropathy beginning even in the 6th decade of life. Clinical data from a GDAP1 mutated patient suggests that the presence of a particular mutation is associated with a certain trait of inheritance. The association of a particular GDAP1 gene mutation and a dominant or recessive trait of inheritance is of special importance for genetic counseling and the prenatal diagnostics as regards severe forms of CMT. In the present study we report on two CMT families in which a newly identified Glu222Lys mutation within the GDAP1 gene segregates both in autosomal dominant and recessive traits. Our study shows that at least some GDAP1 gene mutations may segregate with the CMT phenotype as both dominant and recessive traits. Thus, genetic counseling for CMT4A/CMT2K families requires more extensive data on GDAP1 phenotype-genotype correlations. PMID:25337607

  18. Genome-wide haplotype association study identifies the FRMD4A gene as a risk locus for Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, J-C; Grenier-Boley, B; Harold, D; Zelenika, D; Chouraki, V; Kamatani, Y; Sleegers, K; Ikram, M A; Hiltunen, M; Reitz, C; Mateo, I; Feulner, T; Bullido, M; Galimberti, D; Concari, L; Alvarez, V; Sims, R; Gerrish, A; Chapman, J; Deniz-Naranjo, C; Solfrizzi, V; Sorbi, S; Arosio, B; Spalletta, G; Siciliano, G; Epelbaum, J; Hannequin, D; Dartigues, J-F; Tzourio, C; Berr, C; Schrijvers, E M C; Rogers, R; Tosto, G; Pasquier, F; Bettens, K; Van Cauwenberghe, C; Fratiglioni, L; Graff, C; Delepine, M; Ferri, R; Reynolds, C A; Lannfelt, L; Ingelsson, M; Prince, J A; Chillotti, C; Pilotto, A; Seripa, D; Boland, A; Mancuso, M; Bossù, P; Annoni, G; Nacmias, B; Bosco, P; Panza, F; Sanchez-Garcia, F; Del Zompo, M; Coto, E; Owen, M; O'Donovan, M; Valdivieso, F; Caffara, P; Scarpini, E; Combarros, O; Buée, L; Campion, D; Soininen, H; Breteler, M; Riemenschneider, M; Van Broeckhoven, C; Alpérovitch, A; Lathrop, M; Trégouët, D-A; Williams, J; Amouyel, P

    2013-01-01

    Recently, several genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have led to the discovery of nine new loci of genetic susceptibility in Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the landscape of the AD genetic susceptibility is far away to be complete and in addition to single-SNP (single-nucleotide polymorphism) analyses as performed in conventional GWAS, complementary strategies need to be applied to overcome limitations inherent to this type of approaches. We performed a genome-wide haplotype association (GWHA) study in the EADI1 study (n=2025 AD cases and 5328 controls) by applying a sliding-windows approach. After exclusion of loci already known to be involved in AD (APOE, BIN1 and CR1), 91 regions with suggestive haplotype effects were identified. In a second step, we attempted to replicate the best suggestive haplotype associations in the GERAD1 consortium (2820 AD cases and 6356 controls) and observed that 9 of them showed nominal association. In a third step, we tested relevant haplotype associations in a combined analysis of five additional case–control studies (5093 AD cases and 4061 controls). We consistently replicated the association of a haplotype within FRMD4A on Chr.10p13 in all the data set analyzed (OR: 1.68; 95% CI: (1.43–1.96); P=1.1 × 10?10). We finally searched for association between SNPs within the FRMD4A locus and A? plasma concentrations in three independent non-demented populations (n=2579). We reported that polymorphisms were associated with plasma A?42/A?40 ratio (best signal, P=5.4 × 10?7). In conclusion, combining both GWHA study and a conservative three-stage replication approach, we characterised FRMD4A as a new genetic risk factor of AD. PMID:22430674

  19. Mapping Human Genes Why would one want to identify a gene

    E-print Network

    Dellaire, Graham

    was generated to get over- lapping clones #12;· First large gene identified #12;· The basis for oneMapping Human Genes #12;· Why would one want to identify a gene associated with a specific disease into human biology and mechanism of disease · that leads to the development of therapeutic approaches #12

  20. A Network Analysis of the Human T-Cell Activation Gene Network Identifies Jagged1 as a Therapeutic Target for Autoimmune Diseases

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ricardo Palacios; Joaquin Goni; Ivan Martinez-Forero; Jaime Iranzo; Jorge Sepulcre; Ignacio Melero; Pablo Villoslada; Jacques Zimmer

    2007-01-01

    Understanding complex diseases will benefit the recognition of the properties of the gene networks that control biological functions. Here, we set out to model the gene network that controls T-cell activation in humans, which is critical for the development of autoimmune diseases such as Multiple Sclerosis (MS). The network was established on the basis of the quantitative expression from 104

  1. Genome-Wide Analysis of Copy Number Variation Identifies Candidate Gene Loci Associated with the Progression of Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zain, Shamsul Mohd; Mohamed, Rosmawati; Cooper, David N.; Razali, Rozaimi; Rampal, Sanjay; Mahadeva, Sanjiv; Chan, Wah-Kheong; Anwar, Arif; Rosli, Nurul Shielawati Mohamed; Mahfudz, Anis Shafina; Cheah, Phaik-Leng; Basu, Roma Choudhury; Mohamed, Zahurin

    2014-01-01

    Between 10 and 25% of individuals with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) develop hepatic fibrosis leading to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). To investigate the molecular basis of disease progression, we performed a genome-wide analysis of copy number variation (CNV) in a total of 49 patients with NAFLD [10 simple steatosis and 39 non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH)] and 49 matched controls using high-density comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) microarrays. A total of 11 CNVs were found to be unique to individuals with simple steatosis, whilst 22 were common between simple steatosis and NASH, and 224 were unique to NASH. We postulated that these CNVs could be involved in the pathogenesis of NAFLD progression. After stringent filtering, we identified four rare and/or novel CNVs that may influence the pathogenesis of NASH. Two of these CNVs, located at 13q12.11 and 12q13.2 respectively, harbour the exportin 4 (XPO4) and phosphodiesterase 1B (PDE1B) genes which are already known to be involved in the etiology of liver cirrhosis and HCC. Cross-comparison of the genes located at these four CNV loci with genes already known to be associated with NAFLD yielded a set of genes associated with shared biological processes including cell death, the key process involved in ‘second hit’ hepatic injury. To our knowledge, this pilot study is the first to provide CNV information of potential relevance to the NAFLD spectrum. These data could prove invaluable in predicting patients at risk of developing NAFLD and more importantly, those who will subsequently progress to NASH. PMID:24743702

  2. Genome-wide analysis of copy number variation identifies candidate gene loci associated with the progression of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Zain, Shamsul Mohd; Mohamed, Rosmawati; Cooper, David N; Razali, Rozaimi; Rampal, Sanjay; Mahadeva, Sanjiv; Chan, Wah-Kheong; Anwar, Arif; Rosli, Nurul Shielawati Mohamed; Mahfudz, Anis Shafina; Cheah, Phaik-Leng; Basu, Roma Choudhury; Mohamed, Zahurin

    2014-01-01

    Between 10 and 25% of individuals with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) develop hepatic fibrosis leading to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). To investigate the molecular basis of disease progression, we performed a genome-wide analysis of copy number variation (CNV) in a total of 49 patients with NAFLD [10 simple steatosis and 39 non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH)] and 49 matched controls using high-density comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) microarrays. A total of 11 CNVs were found to be unique to individuals with simple steatosis, whilst 22 were common between simple steatosis and NASH, and 224 were unique to NASH. We postulated that these CNVs could be involved in the pathogenesis of NAFLD progression. After stringent filtering, we identified four rare and/or novel CNVs that may influence the pathogenesis of NASH. Two of these CNVs, located at 13q12.11 and 12q13.2 respectively, harbour the exportin 4 (XPO4) and phosphodiesterase 1B (PDE1B) genes which are already known to be involved in the etiology of liver cirrhosis and HCC. Cross-comparison of the genes located at these four CNV loci with genes already known to be associated with NAFLD yielded a set of genes associated with shared biological processes including cell death, the key process involved in 'second hit' hepatic injury. To our knowledge, this pilot study is the first to provide CNV information of potential relevance to the NAFLD spectrum. These data could prove invaluable in predicting patients at risk of developing NAFLD and more importantly, those who will subsequently progress to NASH. PMID:24743702

  3. NIH Researchers Identify OCD Risk Gene

    MedlinePLUS

    ... News From NIH NIH Researchers Identify OCD Risk Gene Past Issues / Summer 2006 Table of Contents For ... and Alcoholism (NIAAA) have identified a previously unknown gene variant that doubles an individual's risk for obsessive- ...

  4. Comparative Genomics Identifies a Flagellar and Basal Body Proteome that Includes the BBS5 Human Disease Gene

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jin Billy Li; Jantje M. Gerdes; Courtney J. Haycraft; Yanli Fan; Tanya M. Teslovich; Helen May-Simera; Haitao Li; Oliver E. Blacque; Linya Li; Carmen C. Leitch; Richard Allan Lewis; Jane S Green; Patrick S Parfrey; Michel R Leroux; William S Davidson; Philip L Beales; Lisa M Guay-Woodford; Bradley K Yoder; Gary D Stormo; Nicholas Katsanis; Susan K Dutcher

    2004-01-01

    Cilia and flagella are microtubule-based structures nucleated by modified centrioles termed basal bodies. These biochemically complex organelles have more than 250 and 150 polypeptides, respectively. To identify the proteins involved in ciliary and basal body biogenesis and function, we undertook a comparative genomics approach that subtracted the nonflagellated proteome of Arabidopsis from the shared proteome of the ciliated\\/flagellated organisms Chlamydomonas

  5. Caenorhabditis elegans expressing the Saccharomyces cerevisiae NADH alternative dehydrogenase Ndi1p, as a tool to identify new genes involved in complex I related diseases.

    PubMed

    Cossard, Raynald; Esposito, Michela; Sellem, Carole H; Pitayu, Laras; Vasnier, Christelle; Delahodde, Agnès; Dassa, Emmanuel P

    2015-01-01

    Isolated complex I deficiencies are one of the most commonly observed biochemical features in patients suffering from mitochondrial disorders. In the majority of these clinical cases the molecular bases of the diseases remain unknown suggesting the involvement of unidentified factors that are critical for complex I function. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae NDI1 gene, encoding the mitochondrial internal NADH dehydrogenase was previously shown to complement a complex I deficient strain in Caenorhabditis elegans with notable improvements in reproduction and whole organism respiration. These features indicate that Ndi1p can functionally integrate the respiratory chain, allowing complex I deficiency complementation. Taking into account the Ndi1p ability to bypass complex I, we evaluate the possibility to extend the range of defects/mutations causing complex I deficiencies that can be alleviated by NDI1 expression. We report here that NDI1 expressing animals unexpectedly exhibit a slightly shortened lifespan, a reduction in the progeny, and a depletion of the mitochondrial genome. However, Ndi1p is expressed and targeted to the mitochondria as a functional protein that confers rotenone resistance to those animals without affecting their respiration rate and ATP content. We show that the severe embryonic lethality level caused by the RNAi knockdowns of complex I structural subunit encoding genes (e.g., NDUFV1, NDUFS1, NDUFS6, NDUFS8, or GRIM-19 human orthologs) in wild type animals is significantly reduced in the Ndi1p expressing worm. All together these results open up the perspective to identify new genes involved in complex I function, assembly, or regulation by screening an RNAi library of genes leading to embryonic lethality that should be rescued by NDI1 expression. PMID:26124772

  6. Caenorhabditis elegans expressing the Saccharomyces cerevisiae NADH alternative dehydrogenase Ndi1p, as a tool to identify new genes involved in complex I related diseases

    PubMed Central

    Cossard, Raynald; Esposito, Michela; Sellem, Carole H.; Pitayu, Laras; Vasnier, Christelle; Delahodde, Agnès; Dassa, Emmanuel P.

    2015-01-01

    Isolated complex I deficiencies are one of the most commonly observed biochemical features in patients suffering from mitochondrial disorders. In the majority of these clinical cases the molecular bases of the diseases remain unknown suggesting the involvement of unidentified factors that are critical for complex I function. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae NDI1 gene, encoding the mitochondrial internal NADH dehydrogenase was previously shown to complement a complex I deficient strain in Caenorhabditis elegans with notable improvements in reproduction and whole organism respiration. These features indicate that Ndi1p can functionally integrate the respiratory chain, allowing complex I deficiency complementation. Taking into account the Ndi1p ability to bypass complex I, we evaluate the possibility to extend the range of defects/mutations causing complex I deficiencies that can be alleviated by NDI1 expression. We report here that NDI1 expressing animals unexpectedly exhibit a slightly shortened lifespan, a reduction in the progeny, and a depletion of the mitochondrial genome. However, Ndi1p is expressed and targeted to the mitochondria as a functional protein that confers rotenone resistance to those animals without affecting their respiration rate and ATP content. We show that the severe embryonic lethality level caused by the RNAi knockdowns of complex I structural subunit encoding genes (e.g., NDUFV1, NDUFS1, NDUFS6, NDUFS8, or GRIM-19 human orthologs) in wild type animals is significantly reduced in the Ndi1p expressing worm. All together these results open up the perspective to identify new genes involved in complex I function, assembly, or regulation by screening an RNAi library of genes leading to embryonic lethality that should be rescued by NDI1 expression. PMID:26124772

  7. Experimental approaches for identifying schizophrenia risk genes.

    PubMed

    Mantripragada, Kiran K; Carroll, Liam S; Williams, Nigel M

    2010-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a severe, debilitating and common psychiatric disorder, which directly affects approximately 1% of the population worldwide. Although previous studies have unequivocally shown that schizophrenia has a strong genetic component, our understanding of its pathophysiology remains limited. The precise genetic architecture of schizophrenia remains elusive and is likely to be complex. It is believed that multiple genetic variants, with each contributing a modest effect on disease risk, interact with environmental factors resulting in the phenotype. In this chapter, we summarise the main molecular genetic approaches that have been utilised in identifying susceptibility genes for schizophrenia and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each approach. First, we detail the findings of linkage mapping in pedigrees (affected families), which analyse the co-segregation of polymorphic genetic markers with disease phenotype. Second, the contribution of targeted and genome-wide association studies, which compare differential allelic frequencies in schizophrenia cases and matched controls, is presented. Third, we discuss about the identification of susceptibility genes through analysis of chromosomal structural variation (gains and losses of genetic material). Lastly, we introduce the concept of re-sequencing, where the entire genome/exome is sequenced both in affected and unaffected individuals. This approach has the potential to provide a clarified picture of the majority of the genetic variation underlying disease pathogenesis. PMID:21312414

  8. Identifying potential cancer driver genes by genomic data integration.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yong; Hao, Jingjing; Jiang, Wei; He, Tong; Zhang, Xuegong; Jiang, Tao; Jiang, Rui

    2013-01-01

    Cancer is a genomic disease associated with a plethora of gene mutations resulting in a loss of control over vital cellular functions. Among these mutated genes, driver genes are defined as being causally linked to oncogenesis, while passenger genes are thought to be irrelevant for cancer development. With increasing numbers of large-scale genomic datasets available, integrating these genomic data to identify driver genes from aberration regions of cancer genomes becomes an important goal of cancer genome analysis and investigations into mechanisms responsible for cancer development. A computational method, MAXDRIVER, is proposed here to identify potential driver genes on the basis of copy number aberration (CNA) regions of cancer genomes, by integrating publicly available human genomic data. MAXDRIVER employs several optimization strategies to construct a heterogeneous network, by means of combining a fused gene functional similarity network, gene-disease associations and a disease phenotypic similarity network. MAXDRIVER was validated to effectively recall known associations among genes and cancers. Previously identified as well as novel driver genes were detected by scanning CNAs of breast cancer, melanoma and liver carcinoma. Three predicted driver genes (CDKN2A, AKT1, RNF139) were found common in these three cancers by comparative analysis. PMID:24346768

  9. A forest-based approach to identifying gene and gene–gene interactions

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiang; Liu, Ching-Ti; Zhang, Meizhuo; Zhang, Heping

    2007-01-01

    Multiple genes, gene-by-gene interactions, and gene-by-environment interactions are believed to underlie most complex diseases. However, such interactions are difficult to identify. Although there have been recent successes in identifying genetic variants for complex diseases, it still remains difficult to identify gene–gene and gene–environment interactions. To overcome this difficulty, we propose a forest-based approach and a concept of variable importance. The proposed approach is demonstrated by simulation study for its validity and illustrated by a real data analysis for its use. Analyses of both real data and simulated data based on published genetic models show the effectiveness of our approach. For example, our analysis of a published data set on age-related macular degeneration (AMD) not only confirmed a known genetic variant (P value = 2E-6) for AMD, but also revealed an unreported haplotype surrounding single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs10272438 on chromosome 7 that was significantly associated with AMD (P value = 0.0024). These significance levels are obtained after the consideration for a large number of SNPs. Thus, the importance of this work is twofold: it proposes a powerful and flexible method to identify high-risk haplotypes and their interactions and reveals a potentially protective variant for AMD. PMID:18048322

  10. Novel point mutation of the ?2-globin gene (HBA2) and a rare 2.4?kb deletion of the ?1-globin gene (HBA1), identified in two chinese patients with Hb H disease.

    PubMed

    So, Chi-Chiu; Chan, Amy Y Y; Ma, Edmond S K

    2014-01-01

    Two Chinese patients with mild and moderate Hb H disease were investigated for rare mutations on the ?-globin genes (HBA1, HBA2) in addition to the - -(SEA) deletion. One patient was a 41-year old man with mild anemia (Hb 11.3?g/dL). Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) revealed a rare 2392?bp deletion involving the entire HBA1 gene. Mapping by gap-polymerase chain reaction (gap-PCR) defined the exact breakpoints of this deletion (HBA1: g36859_39252del2392) and confirmed its identity with a recently reported HBA1 deletion found in a Southern Chinese. The other patient was a 53-year old man with moderate anemia (Hb 9.5?g/dL). Automated direct nucleotide (nt) sequencing identified a novel single nt deletion at codon 40 (HBA2: c.123delG). This leads to a frameshift that modifies the C-terminal sequence to (40)Lys-Pro-Thr-Ser-Arg-Thr-Ser-Thr(47)COOH and the introduction of a stop codon TGA 23 nts downstream. These two cases demonstrate the power of MLPA and direct nt sequencing to detect and characterize rare and novel mutations. They also highlight the differential effect of HBA1 and HBA2 gene mutations on an ?-thalassemia (?-thal) phenotype due to their different transcriptional activity. PMID:24826793

  11. Disease gene identification strategies for exome sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Gilissen, Christian; Hoischen, Alexander; Brunner, Han G; Veltman, Joris A

    2012-01-01

    Next generation sequencing can be used to search for Mendelian disease genes in an unbiased manner by sequencing the entire protein-coding sequence, known as the exome, or even the entire human genome. Identifying the pathogenic mutation amongst thousands to millions of genomic variants is a major challenge, and novel variant prioritization strategies are required. The choice of these strategies depends on the availability of well-phenotyped patients and family members, the mode of inheritance, the severity of the disease and its population frequency. In this review, we discuss the current strategies for Mendelian disease gene identification by exome resequencing. We conclude that exome strategies are successful and identify new Mendelian disease genes in approximately 60% of the projects. Improvements in bioinformatics as well as in sequencing technology will likely increase the success rate even further. Exome sequencing is likely to become the most commonly used tool for Mendelian disease gene identification for the coming years. PMID:22258526

  12. Identifying time-lagged gene clusters using gene expression data

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Liping Ji; Kian-lee Tan

    2005-01-01

    Motivation: Analysis of gene expression data can provide insights into the time-lagged co-regulations of genes\\/gene clusters. However, existing methods such as Event Method and Edge Detection Method are inefficient as they only compare two genes each time. More importantly, they lose some important information due to their scoring criterion. In this paper, we propose an efficient algorithm to identify time-lagged

  13. Druggability of human disease genes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Meena Kishore Sakharkar; Kishore Ramaji Sakharkar; Shazib Pervaiz

    2007-01-01

    The availability of complete genome sequences and the wealth of large-scale biological datasets provide an unprecedented opportunity to elucidate the genetic basis of human diseases. Here we use integrative in silico approaches to provide an accurate description of gene functions to a set of 1737 highly curated disease genes in the human genome. This analysis is the first attempt on

  14. Human disease genes: patterns and predictions

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nick G. C. Smith; Adam Eyre-Walker

    2003-01-01

    We compared genes at which mutations are known to cause human disease (disease genes) with other human genes (nondisease genes) using a large set of human–rodent alignments to infer evolutionary patterns. Such comparisons may be of use both in predicting disease genes and in understanding the general evolution of human genes. Four features were found to differ significantly between disease

  15. Genome-wide association study identifies variants at CLU and PICALM associated with Alzheimer's disease, and shows evidence for additional susceptibility genes

    PubMed Central

    Harold, Denise; Abraham, Richard; Hollingworth, Paul; Sims, Rebecca; Gerrish, Amy; Hamshere, Marian; Singh Pahwa, Jaspreet; Moskvina, Valentina; Dowzell, Kimberley; Williams, Amy; Jones, Nicola; Thomas, Charlene; Stretton, Alexandra; Morgan, Angharad; Lovestone, Simon; Powell, John; Proitsi, Petroula; Lupton, Michelle K; Brayne, Carol; Rubinsztein, David C.; Gill, Michael; Lawlor, Brian; Lynch, Aoibhinn; Morgan, Kevin; Brown, Kristelle; Passmore, Peter; Craig, David; McGuinness, Bernadette; Todd, Stephen; Holmes, Clive; Mann, David; Smith, A. David; Love, Seth; Kehoe, Patrick G.; Hardy, John; Mead, Simon; Fox, Nick; Rossor, Martin; Collinge, John; Maier, Wolfgang; Jessen, Frank; Schürmann, Britta; van den Bussche, Hendrik; Heuser, Isabella; Kornhuber, Johannes; Wiltfang, Jens; Dichgans, Martin; Frölich, Lutz; Hampel, Harald; Hüll, Michael; Rujescu, Dan; Goate, Alison; Kauwe, John S.K.; Cruchaga, Carlos; Nowotny, Petra; Morris, John C.; Mayo, Kevin; Sleegers, Kristel; Bettens, Karolien; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; De Deyn, Peter; van Broeckhoven, Christine; Livingston, Gill; Bass, Nicholas J.; Gurling, Hugh; McQuillin, Andrew; Gwilliam, Rhian; Deloukas, Panagiotis; Al-Chalabi, Ammar; Shaw, Christopher E.; Tsolaki, Magda; Singleton, Andrew; Guerreiro, Rita; Mühleisen, Thomas W.; Nöthen, Markus M.; Moebus, Susanne; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Klopp, Norman; Wichmann, H-Erich; Carrasquillo, Minerva M.; Pankratz, V. Shane; Younkin, Steven G.; Holmans, Peter; O'Donovan, Michael; Owen, Michael J.; Williams, Julie

    2010-01-01

    We undertook a two-stage genome-wide association study of Alzheimer's disease involving over 16,000 individuals. In stage 1 (3,941 cases and 7,848 controls), we replicated the established association with the APOE locus (most significant SNP: rs2075650, p= 1.8×10?157) and observed genome-wide significant association with SNPs at two novel loci: rs11136000 in the CLU or APOJ gene (p= 1.4×10?9) and rs3851179, a SNP 5? to the PICALM gene (p= 1.9×10?8). Both novel associations were supported in stage 2 (2,023 cases and 2,340 controls), producing compelling evidence for association with AD in the combined dataset (rs11136000: p= 8.5×10?10, odds ratio= 0.86; rs3851179: p= 1.3×10?9, odds ratio= 0.86). We also observed more variants associated at p< 1×10?5 than expected by chance (p=7.5×10?6), including polymorphisms at the BIN1, DAB1 and CR1 loci. PMID:19734902

  16. Characterizing the Molecular Basis of Attenuation of Marek's Disease Virus via In Vitro Serial Passage Identifies De Novo Mutations in the Helicase-Primase Subunit Gene UL5 and Other Candidates Associated with Reduced Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Hildebrandt, Evin; Dunn, John R.; Perumbakkam, Sudeep; Niikura, Masahiro

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Marek's disease (MD) is a lymphoproliferative disease of chickens caused by the oncogenic Gallid herpesvirus 2, commonly known as Marek's disease virus (MDV). MD vaccines, the primary control method, are often generated by repeated in vitro serial passage of this highly cell-associated virus to attenuate virulent MDV strains. To understand the genetic basis of attenuation, we used experimental evolution by serially passing three virulent MDV replicates generated from an infectious bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clone. All replicates became completely or highly attenuated, indicating that de novo mutation, and not selection among quasispecies existing in a strain, is the primary driving force for the reduction in virulence. Sequence analysis of the attenuated replicates revealed 41 to 95 single-nucleotide variants (SNVs) at 2% or higher frequency in each population and several candidate genes containing high-frequency, nonsynonymous mutations. Five candidate mutations were incorporated into recombinant viruses to determine their in vivo effect. SNVs within UL42 (DNA polymerase auxiliary subunit) and UL46 (tegument) had no measurable influence, while two independent mutations in LORF2 (a gene of unknown function) improved survival time of birds but did not alter disease incidence. A fifth SNV located within UL5 (helicase-primase subunit) greatly reduced in vivo viral replication, increased survival time of birds, and resulted in only 0 to 11% disease incidence. This study shows that multiple genes, often within pathways involving DNA replication and transcriptional regulation, are involved in de novo attenuation of MDV and provides targets for the rational design of future MD vaccines. IMPORTANCE Marek's disease virus (MDV) is a very important pathogen in chickens that costs the worldwide poultry industry $1 billion to $2 billion annually. Marek's disease (MD) vaccines, the primary control method, are often produced by passing virulent strains in cell culture until attenuated. To understand this process, we identified all the changes in the viral genome that occurred during repeated cell passage. We find that a single mutation in the UL5 gene, which encodes a viral protein necessary for DNA replication, reduces disease incidence by 90% or more. In addition, other candidate genes were identified. This information should lead to the development of more effective and rationally designed MD vaccines leading to improved animal health and welfare and lower costs to consumers. PMID:24648463

  17. Mining biological databases for candidate disease genes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Terry A.; Scheetz, Todd; Webster, Gregg L.; Casavant, Thomas L.

    2001-07-01

    The publicly-funded effort to sequence the complete nucleotide sequence of the human genome, the Human Genome Project (HGP), has currently produced more than 93% of the 3 billion nucleotides of the human genome into a preliminary `draft' format. In addition, several valuable sources of information have been developed as direct and indirect results of the HGP. These include the sequencing of model organisms (rat, mouse, fly, and others), gene discovery projects (ESTs and full-length), and new technologies such as expression analysis and resources (micro-arrays or gene chips). These resources are invaluable for the researchers identifying the functional genes of the genome that transcribe and translate into the transcriptome and proteome, both of which potentially contain orders of magnitude more complexity than the genome itself. Preliminary analyses of this data identified approximately 30,000 - 40,000 human `genes.' However, the bulk of the effort still remains -- to identify the functional and structural elements contained within the transcriptome and proteome, and to associate function in the transcriptome and proteome to genes. A fortuitous consequence of the HGP is the existence of hundreds of databases containing biological information that may contain relevant data pertaining to the identification of disease-causing genes. The task of mining these databases for information on candidate genes is a commercial application of enormous potential. We are developing a system to acquire and mine data from specific databases to aid our efforts to identify disease genes. A high speed cluster of Linux of workstations is used to analyze sequence and perform distributed sequence alignments as part of our data mining and processing. This system has been used to mine GeneMap99 sequences within specific genomic intervals to identify potential candidate disease genes associated with Bardet-Biedle Syndrome (BBS).

  18. Targetability of Human Disease Genes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Meena K. Sakharkar; Kishore R. Sakharkar

    The availability of complete genome sequences and the wealth of large-scale biological datasets provide an un- precedented opportunity to elucidate the genetic basis of human diseases. Therapeutically relevant targets should be both 'druggable' and 'disease modifying'. In this review we examine the application of computational biology towards the ex- ploration of druggability, targetability and evolutionary conservation of human disease genes.

  19. Druggability of human disease genes.

    PubMed

    Sakharkar, Meena Kishore; Sakharkar, Kishore Ramaji; Pervaiz, Shazib

    2007-01-01

    The availability of complete genome sequences and the wealth of large-scale biological datasets provide an unprecedented opportunity to elucidate the genetic basis of human diseases. Here we use integrative in silico approaches to provide an accurate description of gene functions to a set of 1737 highly curated disease genes in the human genome. This analysis is the first attempt on in silico identification of druggable domains within disease genes. We provide information on gene architecture and function, druggability in the context of available drugs, and evolutionary conservation across 38 model eukaryotic genomes. These data could serve as a useful compendium for integrated information on disease genes with the potential for exploring pharmaceutically exploitable targets. Our analyses underscore the utility of large genomic databases for in silico systematic drug target identification in the post-genomic era. PMID:17446117

  20. Functional Analysis of Avr9/Cf-9 Rapidly Elicited Genes Identifies a Protein Kinase, ACIK1, That Is Essential for Full Cf-9–Dependent Disease Resistance in TomatoW?

    PubMed Central

    Rowland, Owen; Ludwig, Andrea A.; Merrick, Catherine J.; Baillieul, Fabienne; Tracy, Frances E.; Durrant, Wendy E.; Fritz-Laylin, Lillian; Nekrasov, Vladimir; Sjölander, Kimmen; Yoshioka, Hirofumi; Jones, Jonathan D.G.

    2005-01-01

    Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) Cf genes confer resistance to the fungal pathogen Cladosporium fulvum through recognition of secreted avirulence (Avr) peptides. Plant defense responses, including rapid alterations in gene expression, are immediately activated upon perception of the pathogen. Previously, we identified a collection of Avr9/Cf-9 rapidly (15 to 30 min) elicited (ACRE) genes from tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum). Many of the ACRE genes encode putative signaling components and thus may play pivotal roles in the initial development of the defense response. To assess the requirement of 42 of these genes in the hypersensitive response (HR) induced by Cf-9/Avr9 or by Cf-4/Avr4, we used virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) in N. benthamiana. Three genes were identified that when silenced compromised the Cf-mediated HR. We further characterized one of these genes, which encodes a Ser/Thr protein kinase called Avr9/Cf-9 induced kinase 1 (ACIK1). ACIK1 mRNA was rapidly upregulated in tobacco and tomato upon elicitation by Avr9 and by wounding. Silencing of ACIK1 in tobacco resulted in a reduced HR that correlated with loss of ACIK1 transcript. Importantly, ACIK1 was found to be required for Cf-9/Avr9- and Cf-4/Avr4-mediated HRs but not for the HR or resistance mediated by other resistance/Avr systems, such as Pto/AvrPto, Rx/Potato virus X, or N/Tobacco mosaic virus. Moreover, VIGS of LeACIK1 in tomato decreased Cf-9–mediated resistance to C. fulvum, showing the importance of ACIK1 in disease resistance. PMID:15598806

  1. Computational disease gene identification: a concert of methods prioritizes type 2 diabetes and obesity candidate genes

    PubMed Central

    Tiffin, Nicki; Adie, Euan; Turner, Frances; Brunner, Han G.; van Driel, Marc A.; Oti, Martin; Lopez-Bigas, Nuria; Ouzounis, Christos; Perez-Iratxeta, Carolina; Andrade-Navarro, Miguel A.; Adeyemo, Adebowale; Patti, Mary Elizabeth; Semple, Colin A. M.; Hide, Winston

    2006-01-01

    Genome-wide experimental methods to identify disease genes, such as linkage analysis and association studies, generate increasingly large candidate gene sets for which comprehensive empirical analysis is impractical. Computational methods employ data from a variety of sources to identify the most likely candidate disease genes from these gene sets. Here, we review seven independent computational disease gene prioritization methods, and then apply them in concert to the analysis of 9556 positional candidate genes for type 2 diabetes (T2D) and the related trait obesity. We generate and analyse a list of nine primary candidate genes for T2D genes and five for obesity. Two genes, LPL and BCKDHA, are common to these two sets. We also present a set of secondary candidates for T2D (94 genes) and for obesity (116 genes) with 58 genes in common to both diseases. PMID:16757574

  2. D'oh! Genes and Environment Cause Crohn's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Todd, John A.

    2010-01-01

    Information obtained from genome-wide association studies has cracked open the biology of common chronic diseases by identifying genes that predispose individuals to these disorders. Cadwell et al. (2010) now demonstrate that a viral infection, a toxic insult to the gut, commensal bacteria, and a Crohn's disease susceptibility gene collude to cause inflammatory disease in the mouse gut. PMID:20602995

  3. Gene-Network Analysis Identifies Susceptibility Genes Related to Glycobiology in Autism

    PubMed Central

    Poot, Martin; Hochstenbach, Ron; Spierenburg, Henk A.; Vorstman, Jacob A. S.; van Daalen, Emma; de Jonge, Maretha V.; Verbeek, Nienke E.; Brilstra, Eva H.; van 't Slot, Ruben; Ophoff, Roel A.; van Es, Michael A.; Blauw, Hylke M.; Veldink, Jan H.; Buizer-Voskamp, Jacobine E.; Beemer, Frits A.; van den Berg, Leonard H.; Wijmenga, Cisca; van Amstel, Hans Kristian Ploos; van Engeland, Herman; Burbach, J. Peter H.; Staal, Wouter G.

    2009-01-01

    The recent identification of copy-number variation in the human genome has opened up new avenues for the discovery of positional candidate genes underlying complex genetic disorders, especially in the field of psychiatric disease. One major challenge that remains is pinpointing the susceptibility genes in the multitude of disease-associated loci. This challenge may be tackled by reconstruction of functional gene-networks from the genes residing in these loci. We applied this approach to autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and identified the copy-number changes in the DNA of 105 ASD patients and 267 healthy individuals with Illumina Humanhap300 Beadchips. Subsequently, we used a human reconstructed gene-network, Prioritizer, to rank candidate genes in the segmental gains and losses in our autism cohort. This analysis highlighted several candidate genes already known to be mutated in cognitive and neuropsychiatric disorders, including RAI1, BRD1, and LARGE. In addition, the LARGE gene was part of a sub-network of seven genes functioning in glycobiology, present in seven copy-number changes specifically identified in autism patients with limited co-morbidity. Three of these seven copy-number changes were de novo in the patients. In autism patients with a complex phenotype and healthy controls no such sub-network was identified. An independent systematic analysis of 13 published autism susceptibility loci supports the involvement of genes related to glycobiology as we also identified the same or similar genes from those loci. Our findings suggest that the occurrence of genomic gains and losses of genes associated with glycobiology are important contributors to the development of ASD. PMID:19492091

  4. Gene therapy for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Yasuhara, Takao; Date, Isao

    2009-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is characterized by the degeneration of the nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons with the manifestation of tremor, rigidity, akinesia, and disturbances of postural reflexes. Medication using L-DOPA and surgeries including deep brain stimulation are the established therapies for Parkinson's disease. Cell therapies are also effective and have rapidly developed with the recent advancement in molecular biological technology including gene transfer. In this review, ex vivo gene therapy using genetically engineered cell transplantation for Parkinson's disease model of animals is described, including catecholamine/neurotrophic factor-secreting cell transplantation with or without encapsulation, as well as in vivo gene therapy using direct injection of viral vector to increase dopamine-production, ameliorate the survival of dopaminergic neurons, correct the deteriorated microenvironment, or normalize genetic abnormality. Furthermore, the future directions for clinical application are described together with recent clinical trials of gene therapy. PMID:20411788

  5. Targetability of human disease genes.

    PubMed

    Sakharkar, Meena K; Sakharkar, Kishore R

    2007-06-01

    The availability of complete genome sequences and the wealth of large-scale biological datasets provide an unprecedented opportunity to elucidate the genetic basis of human diseases. Therapeutically relevant targets should be both 'druggable' and 'disease modifying'. In this review we examine the application of computational biology towards the exploration of druggability, targetability and evolutionary conservation of human disease genes. These analyses could have a tremendous potential for systematic in silico drug target identification in the post-genomic era. PMID:17630928

  6. Ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease: distinctive gene expression profiles and novel susceptibility candidate genes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ian C. Lawrance; Claudio Fiocchi; Shukti Chakravarti

    2001-01-01

    To elucidate the biological dysregulation underlying two forms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), ulcera- tive colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD), we examined global gene expression profiles of inflamed colonic tissue using DNA microarrays. Our results identified several genes with altered expression not previously linked to IBD. In addition to the expected upregulation of various cytokine and chemokine genes, novel

  7. A Penalized Robust Method for Identifying Gene-Environment Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Xingjie; Liu, Jin; Huang, Jian; Zhou, Yong; Xie, Yang; Ma, Shuangge

    2015-01-01

    In high-throughput studies, an important objective is to identify gene-environment interactions associated with disease outcomes and phenotypes. Many commonly adopted methods assume specific parametric or semiparametric models, which may be subject to model mis-specification. In addition, they usually use significance level as the criterion for selecting important interactions. In this study, we adopt the rank-based estimation, which is much less sensitive to model specification than some of the existing methods and includes several commonly encountered data and models as special cases. Penalization is adopted for the identification of gene-environment interactions. It achieves simultaneous estimation and identification and does not rely on significance level. For computation feasibility, a smoothed rank estimation is further proposed. Simulation shows that under certain scenarios, for example with contaminated or heavy-tailed data, the proposed method can significantly outperform the existing alternatives with more accurate identification. We analyze a lung cancer prognosis study with gene expression measurements under the AFT (accelerated failure time) model. The proposed method identifies interactions different from those using the alternatives. Some of the identified genes have important implications. PMID:24616063

  8. Extended haplotype association study in Crohn’s disease identifies a novel, Ashkenazi Jewish-specific missense mutation in the NF-?B pathway gene, HEATR3

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Hui, Ken Y.; Gusev, Alexander; Warner, Neil; Evelyn Ng, Sok Meng; Ferguson, John; Choi, Murim; Burberry, Aaron; Abraham, Clara; Mayer, Lloyd; Desnick, Robert J.; Cardinale, Christopher J.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Waterman, Matti; Chowers, Yehuda; Karban, Amir; Brant, Steven R.; Silverberg, Mark S.; Gregersen, Peter K.; Katz, Seymour; Lifton, Richard P.; Zhao, Hongyu; Nuñez, Gabriel; Pe’er, Itsik; Peter, Inga; Cho, Judy H.

    2013-01-01

    The Ashkenazi Jewish population has a several-fold higher prevalence of Crohn’s disease compared to non-Jewish European ancestry populations and has a unique genetic history. Haplotype association is critical to Crohn’s disease etiology in this population, most notably at NOD2, in which three causal, uncommon, and conditionally independent NOD2 variants reside on a shared background haplotype. We present an analysis of extended haplotypes which showed significantly greater association to Crohn’s disease in the Ashkenazi Jewish population compared to a non-Jewish population (145 haplotypes and no haplotypes with P-value < 10?3, respectively). Two haplotype regions, one each on chromosomes 16 and 21, conferred increased disease risk within established Crohn’s disease loci. We performed exome sequencing of 55 Ashkenazi Jewish individuals and follow-up genotyping focused on variants in these two regions. We observed Ashkenazi Jewish-specific nominal association at R755C in TRPM2 on chromosome 21. Within the chromosome 16 region, R642S of HEATR3 and rs9922362 of BRD7 showed genome-wide significance. Expression studies of HEATR3 demonstrated a positive role in NOD2-mediated NF-?B signaling. The BRD7 signal showed conditional dependence with only the downstream rare Crohn’s disease-causal variants in NOD2, but not with the background haplotype; this elaborates NOD2 as a key illustration of synthetic association. PMID:23615072

  9. Virus induced gene silencing of Arabidopsis gene homologues in wheat identify genes conferring improved drought tolerance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In a non-model staple crop like wheat, functional validation of potential drought stress responsive genes identified in Arabidopsis could provide gene targets for wheat breeding. Virus induced gene silencing (VIGS) of genes of interest can overcome the inherent problems of polyploidy and limited tra...

  10. Disease gene prioritization using network and feature.

    PubMed

    Xie, Bingqing; Agam, Gady; Balasubramanian, Sandhya; Xu, Jinbo; Gilliam, T Conrad; Maltsev, Natalia; Börnigen, Daniela

    2015-04-01

    Identifying high-confidence candidate genes that are causative for disease phenotypes, from the large lists of variations produced by high-throughput genomics, can be both time-consuming and costly. The development of novel computational approaches, utilizing existing biological knowledge for the prioritization of such candidate genes, can improve the efficiency and accuracy of the biomedical data analysis. It can also reduce the cost of such studies by avoiding experimental validations of irrelevant candidates. In this study, we address this challenge by proposing a novel gene prioritization approach that ranks promising candidate genes that are likely to be involved in a disease or phenotype under study. This algorithm is based on the modified conditional random field (CRF) model that simultaneously makes use of both gene annotations and gene interactions, while preserving their original representation. We validated our approach on two independent disease benchmark studies by ranking candidate genes using network and feature information. Our results showed both high area under the curve (AUC) value (0.86), and more importantly high partial AUC (pAUC) value (0.1296), and revealed higher accuracy and precision at the top predictions as compared with other well-performed gene prioritization tools, such as Endeavour (AUC-0.82, pAUC-0.083) and PINTA (AUC-0.76, pAUC-0.066). We were able to detect more target genes (9/18/19/27) on top positions (1/5/10/20) compared to Endeavour (3/11/14/23) and PINTA (6/10/13/18). To demonstrate its usability, we applied our method to a case study for the prediction of molecular mechanisms contributing to intellectual disability and autism. Our approach was able to correctly recover genes related to both disorders and provide suggestions for possible additional candidates based on their rankings and functional annotations. PMID:25844670

  11. Network-Based Inference Framework for Identifying Cancer Genes from Gene Expression Data

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Bo; Zhang, Junying; Yin, Yaling; Zhang, Yuanyuan

    2013-01-01

    Great efforts have been devoted to alleviate uncertainty of detected cancer genes as accurate identification of oncogenes is of tremendous significance and helps unravel the biological behavior of tumors. In this paper, we present a differential network-based framework to detect biologically meaningful cancer-related genes. Firstly, a gene regulatory network construction algorithm is proposed, in which a boosting regression based on likelihood score and informative prior is employed for improving accuracy of identification. Secondly, with the algorithm, two gene regulatory networks are constructed from case and control samples independently. Thirdly, by subtracting the two networks, a differential-network model is obtained and then used to rank differentially expressed hub genes for identification of cancer biomarkers. Compared with two existing gene-based methods (t-test and lasso), the method has a significant improvement in accuracy both on synthetic datasets and two real breast cancer datasets. Furthermore, identified six genes (TSPYL5, CD55, CCNE2, DCK, BBC3, and MUC1) susceptible to breast cancer were verified through the literature mining, GO analysis, and pathway functional enrichment analysis. Among these oncogenes, TSPYL5 and CCNE2 have been already known as prognostic biomarkers in breast cancer, CD55 has been suspected of playing an important role in breast cancer prognosis from literature evidence, and other three genes are newly discovered breast cancer biomarkers. More generally, the differential-network schema can be extended to other complex diseases for detection of disease associated-genes. PMID:24073403

  12. Phenol sulfotransferases: Candidate genes for Batten disease

    SciTech Connect

    Dooley, T.P.; Probst, P.; Obermoeller, R.D. [M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)] [and others

    1995-06-05

    Batten disease (juvenile-onset neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis; JNCL) is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder, characterized by the cytosomal accumulation of autofluorescent protolipopigments in neurons and other cell types. The Batten disease gene (CLN3) has not yet been identified, but has been mapped to a small region of human chromosome area 16p12.1-p11.2. We recently reported the fortuitous discovery that the cytosolic phenol sulfotransferase gene (STP) is located within this same interval of chromosome 16p. Since phenol sulfotransferase is expressed in neurons, can sulfate lipophilic phenolic compounds, and is mapped near CLN3, STP is considered as a candidate gene for Batten disease. YAC and cosmid cloning results have further substantiated the close proximity of STP and a highly related sulfotransferase (STM), encoding the catecholamine-preferring enzyme, to the CLN3 region of chromosome 16p. In this report, we summarize some of the recent progress in the identification of two phenol sulfotransferase genes (STP and STM) as positional candidate genes for Batten disease. 42 refs., 1 tab.

  13. Population choice in mapping genes for complex diseases

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Andrew D Carothers; Mario Pirastu; Alan F Wright

    1999-01-01

    The difficulty of identifying susceptibility genes for common diseases has polarized geneticists' views on what disease models are appropriate and how best to proceed once high-density genome maps become available. Different disease models have different implications for using linkage or linkage-disequilibrium-based approaches for mapping complex disease genes. We argue that the choice of study population is a critical factor when

  14. Patching genes to fight disease

    SciTech Connect

    Holzman, D.

    1990-09-03

    The National Institutes of Health has approved the first gene therapy experiments, one of which will try to cure cancer by bolstering the immune system. The applications of such therapy are limited, but the potential aid to people with genetic diseases is great.

  15. Identifying Complex Biological Interactions based on Categorical Gene Expression Data

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ben Goertzel; Cassio Pennachin; L. de Souza Coelho; M. Mudado

    2006-01-01

    A novel method, MUTIC (model utilization-based clustering), is described for identifying complex interactions between genes or gene-categories based on gene expression data. The method deals with binary categorical data, which consists of a set of gene expression profiles divided into two biologically meaningful categories. It does not require data from multiple time points. Gene expression profiles are represented by feature

  16. Repressor and Activator-Type Ethylene Response Factors Functioning in Jasmonate Signaling and Disease Resistance Identified via a Genome-Wide Screen of Arabidopsis Transcription Factor Gene Expression

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ken C. McGrath; Bruno Dombrecht; John M. Manners; Peer M. Schenk; Cameron I. Edgar; Donald J. Maclean; Wolf-Rudiger Scheible; Michael K. Udvardi; Kemal Kazan

    2005-01-01

    To identify transcription factors (TFs) involved in jasmonate (JA) signaling and plant defense, we screened 1,534 Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) TFs by real-time quantitative reverse transcription-PCR for their altered transcript at 6 h following either methyl JA treatment or inoculation with the incompatible pathogen Alternaria brassicicola. We identified 134 TFs that showed a significant change in expression,including many APETALA2\\/ethylene response factor

  17. Methods for detecting additional genes underlying Alzheimer disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    P. A. Locke; J. L. Haines; M. Ter-Minassian

    1994-01-01

    Alzheimer`s disease (AD) is a complex inherited disorder with proven genetic heterogeneity. To date, genes on chromosome 21 (APP) and 14 (not yet identified) are associated with early-onset familial AD, while the APOE gene on chromosome 19 is associated with both late onset familial and sporadic AD and early onset sporadic AD. Although these genes likely account for the majority

  18. Epigenome-wide scan identifies a treatment-responsive pattern of altered DNA methylation among cytoskeletal remodeling genes in monocytes and CD4+ T cells in Behçet’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Travis; Ture-Ozdemir, Filiz; Alibaz-Oner, Fatma; Coit, Patrick; Direskeneli, Haner; Sawalha, Amr H

    2014-01-01

    Objective Behçet’s disease (BD) is an inflammatory disease characterized by multi-system involvement including recurrent oral and genital ulcers, cutaneous lesions, and uveitis. The pathogenesis of BD remains poorly understood. We performed a genome-wide DNA methylation study in BD before and after disease remission, and in healthy matched controls. Methods We examined genome-wide DNA methylation in monocytes and CD4+ T cells from a set of 16 untreated male BD patients and age, sex, and ethnicity-matched controls. Additional samples were collected from 12 of the same BD patients after treatment and disease remission. Genome-wide DNA methylation patterns were assessed using the HumanMethylation450 DNA Analysis BeadChip array which includes over 485,000 individual methylation sites across the genome. Results We identified 383 differentially methylated CpG sites between BD patients and controls in monocytes and 125 differentially methylated CpG sites in CD4+ T cells. Bioinformatic analysis revealed a pattern of aberrant DNA methylation among genes that regulate cytoskeletal dynamics suggesting that aberrant DNA methylation of multiple classes of structural and regulatory proteins of the cytoskeleton might contribute to the pathogenesis of BD. Further, DNA methylation changes associated with treatment act to restore methylation differences observed between patients and controls. Indeed, among CpG sites differentially methylated before and after disease remission, there was almost exclusive reversal of the direction of aberrant DNA methylation observed between patients and healthy controls. Conclusions We performed the first epigenome-wide study in BD and provide strong evidence that epigenetic modification of cytoskeletal dynamics underlies the pathogenesis and therapeutic response in BD. PMID:24574333

  19. Genes and Disease: Prader-Willi Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Medicine, National Institutes of Health. National Center for Biotechnology Information (US). Genes and Disease [Internet]. Bethesda (MD): National Center for Biotechnology Information (US); 1998-. Genes and Disease [Internet]. Show ...

  20. Evolutionary Signatures amongst Disease Genes Permit Novel Methods for Gene Prioritization and Construction of Informative Gene-Based Networks

    PubMed Central

    Priedigkeit, Nolan; Wolfe, Nicholas; Clark, Nathan L.

    2015-01-01

    Genes involved in the same function tend to have similar evolutionary histories, in that their rates of evolution covary over time. This coevolutionary signature, termed Evolutionary Rate Covariation (ERC), is calculated using only gene sequences from a set of closely related species and has demonstrated potential as a computational tool for inferring functional relationships between genes. To further define applications of ERC, we first established that roughly 55% of genetic diseases posses an ERC signature between their contributing genes. At a false discovery rate of 5% we report 40 such diseases including cancers, developmental disorders and mitochondrial diseases. Given these coevolutionary signatures between disease genes, we then assessed ERC's ability to prioritize known disease genes out of a list of unrelated candidates. We found that in the presence of an ERC signature, the true disease gene is effectively prioritized to the top 6% of candidates on average. We then apply this strategy to a melanoma-associated region on chromosome 1 and identify MCL1 as a potential causative gene. Furthermore, to gain global insight into disease mechanisms, we used ERC to predict molecular connections between 310 nominally distinct diseases. The resulting “disease map” network associates several diseases with related pathogenic mechanisms and unveils many novel relationships between clinically distinct diseases, such as between Hirschsprung's disease and melanoma. Taken together, these results demonstrate the utility of molecular evolution as a gene discovery platform and show that evolutionary signatures can be used to build informative gene-based networks. PMID:25679399

  1. Gene Expression Signatures of Coronary Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Joehanes, Roby; Ying, Saixia; Huan, Tianxiao; Johnson, Andrew D.; Raghavachari, Nalini; Wang, Richard; Liu, Poching; Woodhouse, Kimberly A.; Sen, Shurjo K.; Tanriverdi, Kahraman; Courchesne, Paul; Freedman, Jane E.; O'Donnell, Christopher J.; Levy, Daniel; Munson, Peter J.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To identify transcriptomic biomarkers of coronary heart disease (CHD) in 188 CHD cases and 188 age- and sex-matched controls who were participants in the Framingham Heart Study. Approach and results A total of 35 genes were differentially expressed in CHD cases vs. controls at FDR<0.5 including GZMB, TMEM56 and GUK1. Cluster analysis revealed three gene clusters associated with CHD, two linked to increased erythrocyte production and a third to reduced natural killer (NK) and T cell activity in CHD cases. Exon-level results corroborated and extended the gene-level results. Alternative splicing analysis suggested that GUK1 and 38 other genes were differentially spliced in CHD cases vs. controls. Gene ontology analysis linked ubiquitination and T-cell-related pathways with CHD. Conclusion Two bioinformatically defined groups of genes show consistent associations with CHD. Our findings are consistent with the hypotheses that hematopoesis is up-regulated in CHD, possibly reflecting a compensatory mechanism, and that innate immune activity is disrupted in CHD or altered by its treatment. Transcriptomic signatures may be useful in identifying pathways associated with CHD and point toward novel therapeutic targets for its treatment and prevention. PMID:23539218

  2. RNA interference based gene therapy for neurological disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Aarti Jagannath; Matthew Wood

    2007-01-01

    Neurodegenerative disorders represent a major class of disorders for which thus far any effective small molecule drug therapy has failed to emerge. RNA interference (RNAi), by which disease genes such as those identified for spino-cerebellar ataxia and Huntington's disease can be specifically silenced, has great potential in becoming a successful therapeutic strategy for these diseases. RNAi has shown therapeutic value

  3. mdv1-miR-M7-5p, located in the newly identified first intron of the latency-associated transcript of Marek's disease virus, targets the immediate-early genes ICP4 and ICP27.

    PubMed

    Strassheim, S; Stik, G; Rasschaert, D; Laurent, S

    2012-08-01

    Marek's disease virus serotype 1 (MDV-1) is an oncogenic alphaherpesvirus causing fatal T-cell lymphoma in chickens. MDV latency is characterized by the production of latency-associated transcripts (LATs), a family of non-protein-coding spliced RNAs. A cluster of four microRNAs (cluster mdv1-miR-M8-M10) was identified, but not formally mapped, at the predicted LAT 5' end. We established a LAT cDNA library from latently MDV-infected cell line MSB-1. We identified 22 highly variable LATs, which were due to the extensive alternative splicing of a total of 14 introns. RACE PCR confirmed the predicted 3' end and allowed identification of the 5' end, 400 nt upstream of the previously predicted LAT end. The LATs share their transcription start site with the microRNA-expressing transcript described previously, localizing the microRNAs to the first LAT intron and identifying the LATs as the primary transcripts of the microRNAs. We identified MDV immediate-early (IE) genes ICP4 and ICP27 as putative targets of mdv1-miR-M7-5p, the third microRNA of the cluster mdv1-miR-M8-M10. Endogenously expressed mdv1-miR-M7-5p in MSB-1 cells reduced luciferase activity significantly when microRNA-responsive elements from ICP4 or ICP27 were cloned in the 3' UTR of the firefly luciferase gene. ICP27 protein levels were decreased by 70?% when the mdv1-miR-M7-5p precursor was co-expressed with an ICP27 expression plasmid. Additionally, we showed a negative correlation between the decreased expression of mdv1-miR-M7-5p and an increase in ICP27 expression during virus reactivation. Our results suggest that, by targeting two IE genes, MDV microRNAs produced from LAT transcripts may contribute to establish and/or maintain latency. PMID:22513387

  4. The study of psychiatric disease genes and drugs in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Haesemeyer, Martin; Schier, Alexander F

    2015-02-01

    Mutations associated with psychiatric disease are being identified, but it remains unclear how the affected genes contribute to disease. Zebrafish is an emerging model to study psychiatric disease genes with a rich repertoire of phenotyping tools. Recent zebrafish research has uncovered potential developmental phenotypes for genes associated with psychiatric disorders, while drug screens have behaviorally characterized small molecules and identified new classes of drugs. Behavioral studies have led to promising models for endophenotypes of psychiatric diseases. While further research is needed to firmly link these models to psychiatric disorders, they are valuable tools for phenotyping genetic mutations and drugs. Recently developed tools in genome editing and in vivo imaging promise additional insights into the processes disrupted by mutations in psychiatric disease genes. PMID:25523356

  5. Deletions of recessive disease genes: CNV contribution to carrier states and disease-causing alleles

    PubMed Central

    Boone, Philip M.; Campbell, Ian M.; Baggett, Brett C.; Soens, Zachry T.; Rao, Mitchell M.; Hixson, Patricia M.; Patel, Ankita; Bi, Weimin; Cheung, Sau Wai; Lalani, Seema R.; Beaudet, Arthur L.; Stankiewicz, Pawel; Shaw, Chad A.; Lupski, James R.

    2013-01-01

    Over 1200 recessive disease genes have been described in humans. The prevalence, allelic architecture, and per-genome load of pathogenic alleles in these genes remain to be fully elucidated, as does the contribution of DNA copy-number variants (CNVs) to carrier status and recessive disease. We mined CNV data from 21,470 individuals obtained by array-comparative genomic hybridization in a clinical diagnostic setting to identify deletions encompassing or disrupting recessive disease genes. We identified 3212 heterozygous potential carrier deletions affecting 419 unique recessive disease genes. Deletion frequency of these genes ranged from one occurrence to 1.5%. When compared with recessive disease genes never deleted in our cohort, the 419 recessive disease genes affected by at least one carrier deletion were longer and located farther from known dominant disease genes, suggesting that the formation and/or prevalence of carrier CNVs may be affected by both local and adjacent genomic features and by selection. Some subjects had multiple carrier CNVs (307 subjects) and/or carrier deletions encompassing more than one recessive disease gene (206 deletions). Heterozygous deletions spanning multiple recessive disease genes may confer carrier status for multiple single-gene disorders, for complex syndromes resulting from the combination of two or more recessive conditions, or may potentially cause clinical phenotypes due to a multiply heterozygous state. In addition to carrier mutations, we identified homozygous and hemizygous deletions potentially causative for recessive disease. We provide further evidence that CNVs contribute to the allelic architecture of both carrier and recessive disease-causing mutations. Thus, a complete recessive carrier screening method or diagnostic test should detect CNV alleles. PMID:23685542

  6. TAGGING OF DISEASE RESISTANCE GENES IN SUGARBEET

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The characterization of genes that confer resistance to diseases important to sugarbeet production has been hampered by a lack of markers associated with these genes. In ongoing collaborative research, we have begun generating molecular genetic markers linked to various disease resistance genes for...

  7. Differential Network Analyses of Alzheimer’s Disease Identify Early Events in Alzheimer’s Disease Pathology

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Xia, Jing; Rocke, David M.; Perry, George; Ray, Monika

    2014-01-01

    In late-onset Alzheimer’s disease (AD), multiple brain regions are not affected simultaneously. Comparing the gene expression of the affected regions to identify the differences in the biological processes perturbed can lead to greater insight into AD pathogenesis and early characteristics. We identified differentially expressed (DE) genes from single cell microarray data of four AD affected brain regions: entorhinal cortex (EC), hippocampus (HIP), posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), and middle temporal gyrus (MTG). We organized the DE genes in the four brain regions into region-specific gene coexpression networks. Differential neighborhood analyses in the coexpression networks were performed to identify genes with lowmore »topological overlap (TO) of their direct neighbors. The low TO genes were used to characterize the biological differences between two regions. Our analyses show that increased oxidative stress, along with alterations in lipid metabolism in neurons, may be some of the very early events occurring in AD pathology. Cellular defense mechanisms try to intervene but fail, finally resulting in AD pathology as the disease progresses. Furthermore, disease annotation of the low TO genes in two independent protein interaction networks has resulted in association between cancer, diabetes, renal diseases, and cardiovascular diseases.« less

  8. Identifying Conserved Gene Clusters in the Presence of Orthologous Groups

    E-print Network

    Goldwasser, Michael

    used this approach to study two bacterial genomes, E. coli and B. subtilis and successfully identified in prokaryotic genomes and similar expression patterns of neighboring genes in some eu- karyotic genomes genome comparison. This generalizes a recent model called "gene teams." A gene team is a set

  9. Identifying Conserved Gene Clusters in the Presence of Homology Families

    E-print Network

    Goldwasser, Michael

    demonstrate the utility of our methods by studying two bacterial genomes, E. coli K­12 and B. subtilis. Many of the teams identified by our algorithm correlate with documented E. coli operons, while several others match Keywords: cluster of orthologous genes, comparative genomics, conserved gene cluster, gene team, homology

  10. Identifying Conserved Gene Clusters in the Presence of Homology Families

    E-print Network

    Goldwasser, Michael

    demonstrate the utility of our methods by studying two bacterial genomes, E. coli K-12 and B. subtilis. Many of the teams identified by our algorithm correlate with documented E. coli operons, while several others match Keywords: cluster of orthologous genes, comparative genomics, conserved gene cluster, gene team, homology

  11. Identifying Complex Biological Interactions based on Categorical Gene Expression Data

    E-print Network

    Fernandez, Thomas

    Identifying Complex Biological Interactions based on Categorical Gene Expression Data Ben Goertzel-categories based on gene expression data. The method deals with binary categorical data, which consists of a set of gene expression profiles divided into two biologically meaningful categories. It does not require data

  12. Gene therapy of benign gynecological diseases?

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Memy H.; Othman, Essam E.; Hornung, Daniela; Al-Hendy, Ayman

    2015-01-01

    Gene therapy is the introduction of genetic material into patient’s cells to achieve therapeutic benefit. Advances in molecular biology techniques and better understanding of disease pathogenesis have validated the use of a variety of genes as potential molecular targets for gene therapy based approaches. Gene therapy strategies include: mutation compensation of dysregulated genes; replacement of defective tumor-suppressor genes; inactivation of oncogenes; introduction of suicide genes; immunogenic therapy and antiangiogenesis based approaches. Preclinical studies of gene therapy for various gynecological disorders have not only shown to be feasible, but also showed promising results in diseases such as uterine leiomyomas and endometriosis. In recent years, significant improvement in gene transfer technology has led to the development of targetable vectors, which have fewer side-effects without compromising their efficacy. This review provides an update on developing gene therapy approaches to treat common gynecological diseases such as uterine leiomyoma and endometriosis. PMID:19446586

  13. Cellular senescence bypass screen identifies new putative tumor suppressor genes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    J F M Leal; J Fominaya; A Cascón; M V Guijarro; C Blanco-Aparicio; M Lleonart; M E Castro; S Ramon y Cajal; M Robledo; D H Beach; A Carnero

    2008-01-01

    Senescence is a mechanism that limits cellular lifespan and constitutes a barrier against cellular immortalization. To identify new senescence regulatory genes that might play a role in tumorigenesis, we have designed and performed a large-scale antisense-based genetic screen in primary mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs). Out of this screen, we have identified five different genes through which loss of function partially

  14. Tissue-Specific Gene Expression Identifies a Gene in the Lysogenic Phage Gifsy-1 That Affects Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium Survival in Peyer's Patches

    Microsoft Academic Search

    THERESA L. STANLEY; CRAIG D. ELLERMEIER; JAMES M. SLAUCH

    2000-01-01

    In vivo expression technology was used to identify Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium genes that are transcriptionally induced when the bacteria colonize the small intestines of mice. These genes were subse- quently screened for those that are transcriptionally inactive during the systemic stages of disease. This procedure identified gipA, a gene that is specifically induced in the small intestine of the

  15. A novel approach for identifying causal models of complex diseases from family data.

    PubMed

    Park, Leeyoung; Kim, Ju H

    2015-04-01

    Causal models including genetic factors are important for understanding the presentation mechanisms of complex diseases. Familial aggregation and segregation analyses based on polygenic threshold models have been the primary approach to fitting genetic models to the family data of complex diseases. In the current study, an advanced approach to obtaining appropriate causal models for complex diseases based on the sufficient component cause (SCC) model involving combinations of traditional genetics principles was proposed. The probabilities for the entire population, i.e., normal-normal, normal-disease, and disease-disease, were considered for each model for the appropriate handling of common complex diseases. The causal model in the current study included the genetic effects from single genes involving epistasis, complementary gene interactions, gene-environment interactions, and environmental effects. Bayesian inference using a Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm (MCMC) was used to assess of the proportions of each component for a given population lifetime incidence. This approach is flexible, allowing both common and rare variants within a gene and across multiple genes. An application to schizophrenia data confirmed the complexity of the causal factors. An analysis of diabetes data demonstrated that environmental factors and gene-environment interactions are the main causal factors for type II diabetes. The proposed method is effective and useful for identifying causal models, which can accelerate the development of efficient strategies for identifying causal factors of complex diseases. PMID:25701286

  16. Identifying gene-environment and gene-gene interactions using a progressive penalization approach

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Ruoqing; Zhao, Hongyu; Ma, Shuangge

    2015-01-01

    In genomic studies, identifying important gene-environment and gene-gene interactions is a challenging problem. In this study, we adopt the statistical modeling approach, where interactions are represented by product terms in regression models. For the identification of important interactions, we adopt penalization, which has been used in many genomic studies. Straightforward application of penalization does not respect the “main effect, interaction” hierarchical structure. A few recently proposed methods respect this structure by applying constrained penalization. However, they demand very complicated computational algorithms and can only accommodate a small number of genomic measurements. We propose a computationally fast penalization method that can identify important gene-environment and gene-gene interactions and respect a strong hierarchical structure. The method takes a stagewise approach and progressively expands its optimization domain to account for possible hierarchical interactions. It is applicable to multiple data types and models. A coordinate descent method is utilized to produce the entire regularized solution path. Simulation study demonstrates the superior performance of the proposed method. We analyze a lung cancer prognosis study with gene expression measurements and identify important gene-environment interactions. PMID:24723356

  17. CNL Disease Resistance Genes in Soybean and Their Evolutionary Divergence

    PubMed Central

    Nepal, Madhav P; Benson, Benjamin V

    2015-01-01

    Disease resistance genes (R-genes) encode proteins involved in detecting pathogen attack and activating downstream defense molecules. Recent availability of soybean genome sequences makes it possible to examine the diversity of gene families including disease-resistant genes. The objectives of this study were to identify coiled-coil NBS-LRR (= CNL) R-genes in soybean, infer their evolutionary relationships, and assess structural as well as functional divergence of the R-genes. Profile hidden Markov models were used for sequence identification and model-based maximum likelihood was used for phylogenetic analysis, and variation in chromosomal positioning, gene clustering, and functional divergence were assessed. We identified 188 soybean CNL genes nested into four clades consistent to their orthologs in Arabidopsis. Gene clustering analysis revealed the presence of 41 gene clusters located on 13 different chromosomes. Analyses of the Ks-values and chromosomal positioning suggest duplication events occurring at varying timescales, and an extrapericentromeric positioning may have facilitated their rapid evolution. Each of the four CNL clades exhibited distinct patterns of gene expression. Phylogenetic analysis further supported the extrapericentromeric positioning effect on the divergence and retention of the CNL genes. The results are important for understanding the diversity and divergence of CNL genes in soybean, which would have implication in soybean crop improvement in future. PMID:25922568

  18. Finding genetic overlaps among diseases based on ranked gene lists.

    PubMed

    Chen, Quan; Zhou, Xianghong J; Sun, Fengzhu

    2015-02-01

    To understand disease relationships in terms of their genetic mechanisms, it is important to study the common genetic basis among different diseases. Although discoveries on pleiotropic genes related to multiple diseases abound, methods flexibly applicable to various types of datasets generated from different studies or experiments are needed to gain big pictures on the genetic relationships among a large number of diseases. We develop a set of genetic similarity measures to gauge the genetic overlap between diseases, as well as several estimators of the number of overlapping disease genes between diseases. These methods are based on ranked gene lists so that they could be flexibly applied to different types of data. We first investigate the performance of the genetic similarity measure for evaluating the similarity between human diseases in simulation studies. Then we apply the method to diseases in the OMIM database. We show that our proposed genetic measure achieves superior performance in explaining phenotype similarities between diseases compared to simpler methods. Furthermore, we identified common genes underlying the genetic overlap between disease pairs. With an example of five vision-related diseases, we demonstrate how our methods can provide insights into the relationships among diseases based on their shared genetic mechanisms. PMID:25684200

  19. Gene expression profiling identifies clinically relevant subtypes of prostate cancer

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jacques Lapointe; Chunde Li; John P. Higgins; Matt van de Rijn; Eric Bair; Kelli Montgomery; Michelle Ferrari; Lars Egevad; Walter Rayford; Ulf Bergerheim; Peter Ekman; Angelo M. Demarzo; Robert Tibshirani; David Botstein; Patrick O. Brown; James D. Brooks; Jonathan R. Pollack

    2004-01-01

    Prostate cancer, a leading cause of cancer death, displays a broad range of clinical behavior from relatively indolent to aggressive metastatic disease. To explore potential molecular variation underlying this clinical heterogeneity, we profiled gene expression in 62 primary prostate tumors, as well as 41 normal prostate specimens and nine lymph node metastases, using cDNA microarrays containing 26,000 genes. Unsupervised hierarchical

  20. Gene Regulatory Networks Elucidating Huanglongbing Disease Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Martinelli, Federico; Reagan, Russell L.; Uratsu, Sandra L.; Phu, My L.; Albrecht, Ute; Zhao, Weixiang; Davis, Cristina E.; Bowman, Kim D.; Dandekar, Abhaya M.

    2013-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing was exploited to gain deeper insight into the response to infection by Candidatus liberibacter asiaticus (CaLas), especially the immune disregulation and metabolic dysfunction caused by source-sink disruption. Previous fruit transcriptome data were compared with additional RNA-Seq data in three tissues: immature fruit, and young and mature leaves. Four categories of orchard trees were studied: symptomatic, asymptomatic, apparently healthy, and healthy. Principal component analysis found distinct expression patterns between immature and mature fruits and leaf samples for all four categories of trees. A predicted protein – protein interaction network identified HLB-regulated genes for sugar transporters playing key roles in the overall plant responses. Gene set and pathway enrichment analyses highlight the role of sucrose and starch metabolism in disease symptom development in all tissues. HLB-regulated genes (glucose-phosphate-transporter, invertase, starch-related genes) would likely determine the source-sink relationship disruption. In infected leaves, transcriptomic changes were observed for light reactions genes (downregulation), sucrose metabolism (upregulation), and starch biosynthesis (upregulation). In parallel, symptomatic fruits over-expressed genes involved in photosynthesis, sucrose and raffinose metabolism, and downregulated starch biosynthesis. We visualized gene networks between tissues inducing a source-sink shift. CaLas alters the hormone crosstalk, resulting in weak and ineffective tissue-specific plant immune responses necessary for bacterial clearance. Accordingly, expression of WRKYs (including WRKY70) was higher in fruits than in leaves. Systemic acquired responses were inadequately activated in young leaves, generally considered the sites where most new infections occur. PMID:24086326

  1. Identifying Drug Active Pathways from Gene Networks Estimated by Gene Expression Data

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yoshinori Tamada; Seiya Imoto; Kousuke Tashiro; Satoru Kuhara; Satoru Miyano

    2005-01-01

    We present a computational method for identifying genes and their regulatory pathways in?u- enced by a drug, using microarray gene expression data collected by single gene disruptions and drug responses. The automatic identiflcation of such genes and pathways in organisms' cells is an important problem for pharmacogenomics and the tailor-made medication. Our method estimates regulatory relationships between genes as a

  2. Identifying pair-wise gene functional similarity by multiplex gene expression maps and supervised learning

    E-print Network

    Obradovic, Zoran

    Identifying pair-wise gene functional similarity by multiplex gene expression maps and supervised and gene expression profiles in the mammalian brain. However, little attention has been paid to the location information of a gene's expressions. Gene expression maps, which contain spatial information

  3. Integration of text- and data-mining using ontologies successfully selects disease gene candidates

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nicki Tiffin; Janet F. Kelso; Alan R. Powell; Hong Pan; Vladimir B. Bajic; Winston A. Hide

    2005-01-01

    Genome-wide techniques such as microarray analysis, Serial Analysis of Gene Expression (SAGE), Massively Parallel Signature Sequencing (MPSS), linkage analysis and association studies are used extensively in the search for genes that cause dis- eases, and often identify many hundreds of candidate disease genes. Selection of the most probable of these candidate disease genes for further empirical analysis is a significant

  4. MethylMix: an R package for identifying DNA methylation-driven genes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Summary: DNA methylation is an important mechanism regulating gene transcription, and its role in carcinogenesis has been extensively studied. Hyper and hypomethylation of genes is an alternative mechanism to deregulate gene expression in a wide range of diseases. At the same time, high-throughput DNA methylation assays have been developed generating vast amounts of genome wide DNA methylation measurements. Yet, few tools exist that can formally identify hypo and hypermethylated genes that are predictive of transcription and thus functionally relevant for a particular disease. To accommodate this lack of tools, we developed MethylMix, an algorithm implemented in R to identify disease specific hyper and hypomethylated genes. MethylMix is based on a beta mixture model to identify methylation states and compares them with the normal DNA methylation state. MethylMix introduces a novel metric, the ‘Differential Methylation value’ or DM-value defined as the difference of a methylation state with the normal methylation state. Finally, matched gene expression data are used to identify, besides differential, transcriptionally predictive methylation states by focusing on methylation changes that effect gene expression. Availability and implementation: MethylMix was implemented as an R package and is available in bioconductor. Contact: olivier.gevaert@stanford.edu PMID:25609794

  5. Identifying functional modules for coronary artery disease by a prior knowledge-based approach.

    PubMed

    Li, Haoli; Zuo, Xiaoyu; Ouyang, Ping; Lin, Meihua; Zhao, Zhong; Liang, Yan; Zhong, Shouqiang; Rao, Shaoqi

    2014-03-10

    Until recently, the underlying genetic mechanisms for coronary artery disease (CAD) have been largely unknown, with just a list of genes identified accounting for very little of the disease in the population. Hence, a systematic dissection of the sophisticated interplays between these individual disease genes and their functional involvements becomes essential. Here, we presented a novel knowledge-based approach to identify the functional modules for CAD. First, we selected 266 disease genes in CADgene database as the initial seed genes, and used PPI knowledge as a guide to expand these genes into a CAD-specific gene network. Then, we used Newman's algorithm to decompose the primary network into 14 compact modules with high modularity. By analysis of these modules, we further identified 114 hub genes, all either directly or indirectly associated with CAD. Finally, by functional analysis of these modules, we revealed several novel pathogenic mechanisms for CAD (for examples, some yet rarely concerned like peptide YY receptor activity, Fc gamma R-mediated phagocytosis and actin cytoskeleton regulation etc.). PMID:24389497

  6. Brucella abortus Genes Identified following Constitutive Growth and Macrophage Infection

    PubMed Central

    Eskra, Linda; Canavessi, Aurea; Carey, Merriann; Splitter, Gary

    2001-01-01

    The chronicity of Brucella abortus infection in humans and animals depends on the organism's ability to escape host defenses by gaining entry and surviving inside the macrophage. Although no human vaccine exists for Brucella, vaccine development in other bacteria has been based on deletions of selective nutritional as well as regulatory systems. Our goal is to develop a vaccine for Brucella. To further this aim, we have used a green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter system to identify constitutively and intracellularly induced B. abortus genes. Constitutively producing gfp clones exhibited sequence homology with genes associated with protein synthesis and metabolism (initiation factor-1 and tRNA ribotransferase) and detoxification (organic hydroperoxidase resistance). Of greater interest, clones negative for constitutively produced gfp in agar were examined by fluorescence microscopy to detect promoter activity induced within macrophages 4 and 24 h following infection. Bacterial genes activated in macrophages 4 h postinfection appear to be involved in adapting to intracellular environmental conditions. Included in this group were genes for detoxification (lactoglyglutathione lyase gene), repair (formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase gene), osmotic protection (K+ transport gene), and site-specific recombination (xerD gene). A gene involved in metabolism and biosynthesis (deoxyxylulose 5? phosphate synthase gene) was also identified. Genes activated 24 h following infection were biosynthesis- and metabolism-associated genes (iron binding protein and rhizopine catabolism). Identification of B. abortus genes that are activated following macrophage invasion provides insight into Brucella pathogenesis and thus is valuable in vaccine design utilizing selective targeted deletions of newly identified Brucella genes. PMID:11705955

  7. Psoriasis is associated with pleiotropic susceptibility loci identified in type II diabetes and Crohn disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    N Wolf; M Quaranta; N J Prescott; M Allen; R Smith; A D Burden; J Worthington; C E M Griffiths; C G Mathew; J N Barker; F Capon; R C Trembath

    2008-01-01

    Background:Psoriasis is an immune-mediated skin disorder that is inherited as a multifactorial trait. Linkage analyses have clearly mapped a primary disease susceptibility locus to the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region on chromosome 6p21. More recently, whole-genome association studies have identified two non-MHC disease genes (IL12B and IL23R), both of which also confer susceptibility to Crohn disease (CD).Objective and methods:To ascertain

  8. ORIGINAL PAPER Identifying differentially expressed genes in human acute leukemia

    E-print Network

    Gu, Xun

    ORIGINAL PAPER Identifying differentially expressed genes in human acute leukemia and mouse brain the experimental-wise false discovery rate. A human acute leukemia dataset corrected from 38 leukemia patients

  9. GENE EXPRESSION PROFILING TO IDENTIFY BIOMARKERS OF REPRODUCTIVE TOXICITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    SOT 2005 SESSION ABSTRACT GENE EXPRESSION PROFILING TO IDENTIFY BIOMARKERS OF REPRODUCTIVE TOXICITY David J. Dix. National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, US Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle...

  10. GENE EXPRESSION PROFILING TO IDENTIFY MECHANISMS OF MALE REPRODUCTIVE TOXICITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gene Expression Profiling to Identify Mechanisms of Male Reproductive Toxicity David J. Dix National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC, 27711, USA. Ab...

  11. Zebrafish promoter microarrays identify actively transcribed embryonic genes

    E-print Network

    Wardle, Fiona C

    We have designed a zebrafish genomic microarray to identify DNA-protein interactions in the proximal promoter regions of over 11,000 zebrafish genes. Using these microarrays, together with chromatin immunoprecipitation ...

  12. Microarray Analysis of Pneumococcal Gene Expression during Invasive Disease

    PubMed Central

    Orihuela, Carlos J.; Radin, Jana N.; Sublett, Jack E.; Gao, Geli; Kaushal, Deepak; Tuomanen, Elaine I.

    2004-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a leading cause of invasive bacterial disease. This is the first study to examine the expression of S. pneumoniae genes in vivo by using whole-genome microarrays available from The Institute for Genomic Research. Total RNA was collected from pneumococci isolated from infected blood, infected cerebrospinal fluid, and bacteria attached to a pharyngeal epithelial cell line in vitro. Microarray analysis of pneumococcal genes expressed in these models identified body site-specific patterns of expression for virulence factors, transporters, transcription factors, translation-associated proteins, metabolism, and genes with unknown function. Contributions to virulence predicted for several unknown genes with enhanced expression in vivo were confirmed by insertion duplication mutagenesis and challenge of mice with the mutants. Finally, we cross-referenced our results with previous studies that used signature-tagged mutagenesis and differential fluorescence induction to identify genes that are potentially required by a broad range of pneumococcal strains for invasive disease. PMID:15385455

  13. Using biologically interrelated experiments to identify pathway genes in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyungpil; Jiang, Keni; Teng, Siew Leng; Feldman, Lewis J.; Huang, Haiyan

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: Pathway genes are considered as a group of genes that work cooperatively in the same pathway constituting a fundamental functional grouping in a biological process. Identifying pathway genes has been one of the major tasks in understanding biological processes. However, due to the difficulty in characterizing/inferring different types of biological gene relationships, as well as several computational issues arising from dealing with high-dimensional biological data, deducing genes in pathways remain challenging. Results: In this work, we elucidate higher level gene–gene interactions by evaluating the conditional dependencies between genes, i.e. the relationships between genes after removing the influences of a set of previously known pathway genes. These previously known pathway genes serve as seed genes in our model and will guide the detection of other genes involved in the same pathway. The detailed statistical techniques involve the estimation of a precision matrix whose elements are known to be proportional to partial correlations (i.e. conditional dependencies) between genes under appropriate normality assumptions. Likelihood ratio tests on two forms of precision matrices are further performed to see if a candidate pathway gene is conditionally independent of all the previously known pathway genes. When used effectively, this is a promising approach to recover gene relationships that would have otherwise been missed by standard methods. The advantage of the proposed method is demonstrated using both simulation studies and real datasets. We also demonstrated the importance of taking into account experimental dependencies in the simulation and real data studies. Contact: hhuang@stat.berkeley.edu; ljfeldman@berkeley.edu Supplementary information:Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:22271267

  14. Improved integrative framework combining association data with gene expression features to prioritize Crohn's disease genes.

    PubMed

    Ning, Kaida; Gettler, Kyle; Zhang, Wei; Ng, Sok Meng; Bowen, B Monica; Hyams, Jeffrey; Stephens, Michael C; Kugathasan, Subra; Denson, Lee A; Schadt, Eric E; Hoffman, Gabriel E; Cho, Judy H

    2015-07-15

    Genome-wide association studies in Crohn's disease (CD) have identified 140 genome-wide significant loci. However, identification of genes driving association signals remains challenging. Furthermore, genome-wide significant thresholds limit false positives at the expense of decreased sensitivity. In this study, we explored gene features contributing to CD pathogenicity, including gene-based association data from CD and autoimmune (AI) diseases, as well as gene expression features (eQTLs, epigenetic markers of expression and intestinal gene expression data). We developed an integrative model based on a CD reference gene set. This integrative approach outperformed gene-based association signals alone in identifying CD-related genes based on statistical validation, gene ontology enrichment, differential expression between M1 and M2 macrophages and a validation using genes causing monogenic forms of inflammatory bowel disease as a reference. Besides gene-level CD association P-values, association with AI diseases was the strongest predictor, highlighting generalized mechanisms of inflammation, and the interferon-? pathway particularly. Within the 140 high-confidence CD regions, 598 of 1328 genes had low prioritization scores, highlighting genes unlikely to contribute to CD pathogenesis. For select regions, comparably high integrative model scores were observed for multiple genes. This is particularly evident for regions having extensive linkage disequilibrium such as the IBD5 locus. Our analyses provide a standardized reference for prioritizing potential CD-related genes, in regions with both highly significant and nominally significant gene-level association P-values. Our integrative model may be particularly valuable in prioritizing rare, potentially private, missense variants for which genome-wide evidence for association may be unattainable. PMID:25935003

  15. Finding Cardiovascular Disease Genes in the Dog

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Heidi G.; Meurs, Kathryn M.; Ostrander, Elaine A.

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in canine genomics are changing the landscape of veterinary biology, and by default, veterinary medicine. No longer are clinicians locked into traditional methods of diagnoses and therapy. Rather major advances in canine genetics and genomics from the past five years are now changing the way the veterinarian of the 21st century practices medicine. First, the availability of a dense genome map gives canine genetics a much needed foothold in comparative medicine, allowing advances made in human and mouse genetics to be applied to companion animals. Second, the recently released 7.5x whole genome sequence of the dog is facilitating the identification of hereditary disease genes. Finally, development of genetic tools for rapid screening of families and populations at risk for inherited disease means that the cost of identifying and testing for disease loci will significantly decrease in coming years. Out of these advances will come major changes in companion animal diagnostics and therapy. Clinicians will be able to offer their clients genetic testing and counseling for a myriad of disorders. Such advances are certain to generate healthier and more long lived dogs, improving quality of life for owner and pet alike. The clinician of the 21st century, therefore, faces incredible opportunities as well as challenges in the management of genetic disease. In this review we summarize recent findings in canine genomics and discuss their application to the study of canine cardiac health. PMID:19083345

  16. Vectors for gene therapy of cardiovascular disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jean-François Dedieu; Abderrahim Mahfoudi; Aude Le Roux; Didier Branellec

    2000-01-01

    Several phase I\\/II clinical trials are currently ongoing in gene therapy of cardiovascular disease. Whereas the indications\\u000a vary, including peripheral artery disease, ischemic heart disease, post-angioplasty restenosis, and vein graft failure, these\\u000a trials are mostly based on the use of adenoviral vectors and nonviral vectors. Novel vectors aimed at improving the efficacy\\u000a and safety of gene delivery in target organs,

  17. Computational analysis identifies invasion-associated genes in pituitary adenomas.

    PubMed

    Cao, Changjun; Wang, Wei; Ma, Chao; Jiang, Pucha

    2015-08-01

    Pituitary adenomas are considered to be benign tumours. However, they can infiltrate surrounding tissues, which may cause a failure of complete removal during surgical resection. Thus far, no molecular biomarkers have been identified, which are able to reliably predict the behaviour of this type of tumour. In the present study, a list of differentially expressed genes in invasive pituitary adenomas was obtained using a computational bioinformatics analysis on the DNA microarray expression profiles. The gene expression datasets of a total of 16 samples were retrieved from the National Center for Biotechnology Information Gene Expression Omnibus database. The gene set enrichment analysis was later conducted on the significantly (FDR<0.05) differentially expressed genes. A total of 194 genes were identified as differentially expressed. The pathway impact analysis revealed that cell adhesion molecules may be vital in the progression of pituitary adenoma invasion. A total of six genes, claudin 7, contactin associated protein?like 2, integrin ?6, junctional adhesion molecule 3, protein tyrosine phosphatase, receptor type C and cadherin?associated protein ?1 were identified as molecular biomarkers for pituitary adenoma invasion. The present study identified six novel molecular biomarkers, which may be used for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes. However, further experimental investigations are required to validate the present findings. PMID:25824863

  18. Inferring Gene Family Histories in Yeast Identifies Lineage Specific Expansions

    PubMed Central

    Ames, Ryan M.; Money, Daniel; Lovell, Simon C.

    2014-01-01

    The complement of genes found in the genome is a balance between gene gain and gene loss. Knowledge of the specific genes that are gained and lost over evolutionary time allows an understanding of the evolution of biological functions. Here we use new evolutionary models to infer gene family histories across complete yeast genomes; these models allow us to estimate the relative genome-wide rates of gene birth, death, innovation and extinction (loss of an entire family) for the first time. We show that the rates of gene family evolution vary both between gene families and between species. We are also able to identify those families that have experienced rapid lineage specific expansion/contraction and show that these families are enriched for specific functions. Moreover, we find that families with specific functions are repeatedly expanded in multiple species, suggesting the presence of common adaptations and that these family expansions/contractions are not random. Additionally, we identify potential specialisations, unique to specific species, in the functions of lineage specific expanded families. These results suggest that an important mechanism in the evolution of genome content is the presence of lineage-specific gene family changes. PMID:24921666

  19. Discovering transnosological molecular basis of human brain diseases using biclustering analysis of integrated gene expression data

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background It has been reported that several brain diseases can be treated as transnosological manner implicating possible common molecular basis under those diseases. However, molecular level commonality among those brain diseases has been largely unexplored. Gene expression analyses of human brain have been used to find genes associated with brain diseases but most of those studies were restricted either to an individual disease or to a couple of diseases. In addition, identifying significant genes in such brain diseases mostly failed when it used typical methods depending on differentially expressed genes. Results In this study, we used a correlation-based biclustering approach to find coexpressed gene sets in five neurodegenerative diseases and three psychiatric disorders. By using biclustering analysis, we could efficiently and fairly identified various gene sets expressed specifically in both single and multiple brain diseases. We could find 4,307 gene sets correlatively expressed in multiple brain diseases and 3,409 gene sets exclusively specified in individual brain diseases. The function enrichment analysis of those gene sets showed many new possible functional bases as well as neurological processes that are common or specific for those eight diseases. Conclusions This study introduces possible common molecular bases for several brain diseases, which open the opportunity to clarify the transnosological perspective assumed in brain diseases. It also showed the advantages of correlation-based biclustering analysis and accompanying function enrichment analysis for gene expression data in this type of investigation. PMID:26043779

  20. Adipose Co-expression networks across Finns and Mexicans identify novel triglyceride-associated genes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background High serum triglyceride (TG) levels is an established risk factor for coronary heart disease (CHD). Fat is stored in the form of TGs in human adipose tissue. We hypothesized that gene co-expression networks in human adipose tissue may be correlated with serum TG levels and help reveal novel genes involved in TG regulation. Methods Gene co-expression networks were constructed from two Finnish and one Mexican study sample using the blockwiseModules R function in Weighted Gene Co-expression Network Analysis (WGCNA). Overlap between TG-associated networks from each of the three study samples were calculated using a Fisher’s Exact test. Gene ontology was used to determine known pathways enriched in each TG-associated network. Results We measured gene expression in adipose samples from two Finnish and one Mexican study sample. In each study sample, we observed a gene co-expression network that was significantly associated with serum TG levels. The TG modules observed in Finns and Mexicans significantly overlapped and shared 34 genes. Seven of the 34 genes (ARHGAP30, CCR1, CXCL16, FERMT3, HCST, RNASET2, SELPG) were identified as the key hub genes of all three TG modules. Furthermore, two of the 34 genes (ARHGAP9, LST1) reside in previous TG GWAS regions, suggesting them as the regional candidates underlying the GWAS signals. Conclusions This study presents a novel adipose gene co-expression network with 34 genes significantly correlated with serum TG across populations. PMID:23217153

  1. Gene Therapy for Allergic Airway Diseases

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tania Maes; Kurt G. Tournoy; Guy F. Joos

    2011-01-01

    Airway diseases such as allergic asthma and rhinitis are characterized by a T-helper type 2 (Th2) response. Treatment of allergic\\u000a airway diseases is currently limited to drugs that relieve disease symptoms and inflammation. In the search for new therapeutics,\\u000a efforts have been made to treat allergic airway disease with gene therapy, and many preclinical studies have demonstrated\\u000a its impressive potential.

  2. Axon Regeneration Genes Identified by RNAi Screening in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Nix, Paola; Hammarlund, Marc; Hauth, Linda; Lachnit, Martina; Jorgensen, Erik M.

    2014-01-01

    Axons of the mammalian CNS lose the ability to regenerate soon after development due to both an inhibitory CNS environment and the loss of cell-intrinsic factors necessary for regeneration. The complex molecular events required for robust regeneration of mature neurons are not fully understood, particularly in vivo. To identify genes affecting axon regeneration in Caenorhabditis elegans, we performed both an RNAi-based screen for defective motor axon regeneration in unc-70/?-spectrin mutants and a candidate gene screen. From these screens, we identified at least 50 conserved genes with growth-promoting or growth-inhibiting functions. Through our analysis of mutants, we shed new light on certain aspects of regeneration, including the role of ?-spectrin and membrane dynamics, the antagonistic activity of MAP kinase signaling pathways, and the role of stress in promoting axon regeneration. Many gene candidates had not previously been associated with axon regeneration and implicate new pathways of interest for therapeutic intervention. PMID:24403161

  3. Axon regeneration genes identified by RNAi screening in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Nix, Paola; Hammarlund, Marc; Hauth, Linda; Lachnit, Martina; Jorgensen, Erik M; Bastiani, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Axons of the mammalian CNS lose the ability to regenerate soon after development due to both an inhibitory CNS environment and the loss of cell-intrinsic factors necessary for regeneration. The complex molecular events required for robust regeneration of mature neurons are not fully understood, particularly in vivo. To identify genes affecting axon regeneration in Caenorhabditis elegans, we performed both an RNAi-based screen for defective motor axon regeneration in unc-70/?-spectrin mutants and a candidate gene screen. From these screens, we identified at least 50 conserved genes with growth-promoting or growth-inhibiting functions. Through our analysis of mutants, we shed new light on certain aspects of regeneration, including the role of ?-spectrin and membrane dynamics, the antagonistic activity of MAP kinase signaling pathways, and the role of stress in promoting axon regeneration. Many gene candidates had not previously been associated with axon regeneration and implicate new pathways of interest for therapeutic intervention. PMID:24403161

  4. A cross-study gene set enrichment analysis identifies critical pathways in endometriosis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hongbo Zhao; Qishan Wang; Chunyan Bai; Kan He; Yuchun Pan

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Endometriosis is an enigmatic disease. Gene expression profiling of endometriosis has been used in several studies, but few studies went further to classify subtypes of endometriosis based on expression patterns and to identify possible pathways involved in endometriosis. Some of the observed pathways are more inconsistent between the studies, and these candidate pathways presumably only represent a fraction of

  5. Next-generation sequencing identifies transportin 3 as the causative gene for LGMD1F.

    PubMed

    Torella, Annalaura; Fanin, Marina; Mutarelli, Margherita; Peterle, Enrico; Del Vecchio Blanco, Francesca; Rispoli, Rossella; Savarese, Marco; Garofalo, Arcomaria; Piluso, Giulio; Morandi, Lucia; Ricci, Giulia; Siciliano, Gabriele; Angelini, Corrado; Nigro, Vincenzo

    2013-01-01

    Limb-girdle muscular dystrophies (LGMD) are genetically and clinically heterogeneous conditions. We investigated a large family with autosomal dominant transmission pattern, previously classified as LGMD1F and mapped to chromosome 7q32. Affected members are characterized by muscle weakness affecting earlier the pelvic girdle and the ileopsoas muscles. We sequenced the whole exome of four family members and identified a shared heterozygous frame-shift variant in the Transportin 3 (TNPO3) gene, encoding a member of the importin-? super-family. The TNPO3 gene is mapped within the LGMD1F critical interval and its 923-amino acid human gene product is also expressed in skeletal muscle. In addition, we identified an isolated case of LGMD with a new missense mutation in the same gene. We localized the mutant TNPO3 around the nucleus, but not inside. The involvement of gene related to the nuclear transport suggests a novel disease mechanism leading to muscular dystrophy. PMID:23667635

  6. Next-Generation Sequencing Identifies Transportin 3 as the Causative Gene for LGMD1F

    PubMed Central

    Mutarelli, Margherita; Peterle, Enrico; Del Vecchio Blanco, Francesca; Rispoli, Rossella; Savarese, Marco; Garofalo, Arcomaria; Piluso, Giulio; Morandi, Lucia; Ricci, Giulia; Siciliano, Gabriele; Angelini, Corrado; Nigro, Vincenzo

    2013-01-01

    Limb-girdle muscular dystrophies (LGMD) are genetically and clinically heterogeneous conditions. We investigated a large family with autosomal dominant transmission pattern, previously classified as LGMD1F and mapped to chromosome 7q32. Affected members are characterized by muscle weakness affecting earlier the pelvic girdle and the ileopsoas muscles. We sequenced the whole exome of four family members and identified a shared heterozygous frame-shift variant in the Transportin 3 (TNPO3) gene, encoding a member of the importin-? super-family. The TNPO3 gene is mapped within the LGMD1F critical interval and its 923-amino acid human gene product is also expressed in skeletal muscle. In addition, we identified an isolated case of LGMD with a new missense mutation in the same gene. We localized the mutant TNPO3 around the nucleus, but not inside. The involvement of gene related to the nuclear transport suggests a novel disease mechanism leading to muscular dystrophy. PMID:23667635

  7. Widespread expression of Huntington's disease gene (IT15) protein product

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Alan H Sharp; Scott J Loev; Gabriele Schilling; Shi-Hua Li; Xiao-Jiang Li; Jun Bao; Molly V Wagster; Joyce A Kotzuk; Joseph P Steiner; Amy Lo; John Hedreen; Sangram Sisodia; Solomon H Snyder; Ted M Dawson; David K Ryugo; Christopher A Ross

    1995-01-01

    Huntington's Disease (HD) is caused by expansion of a CAG repeat within a putative open reading frame of a recently identified gene, IT15. We have examined the expression of the gene's protein product using antibodies developed against the N-terminus and an internal epitope. Both antisera recognize a 350 kDa protein, the predicted size, indicating that the CAG repeat is translated

  8. Limitations of Compositional Approach to Identifying Horizontally Transferred Genes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bin Wang

    2001-01-01

    .   Genes with atypical G+C content and pattern of codon usage in a certain genome are possibly of exotic origin, and this idea\\u000a has been applied to identify horizontal events. In this way, it was postulated that a total of 755 genes in the E. coli genome are relics of horizontal events after the divergence of E. coli from the

  9. DCEG Scientists Identify New Gene Mutation Related to Familial Melanoma

    Cancer.gov

    Scientists have identified a rare inherited mutation in a gene that can increase the risk of familial melanoma, according to a study that appeared online in Nature Genetics on March 30, 2014. Although the finding does not offer immediate benefit to patients, variation in the Protection of Telomeres-1 (POT1) gene provides additional clues as to the origins of melanoma and may open new avenues in prevention and treatment research.

  10. Genetics of Sputum Gene Expression in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Weiliang; Cho, Michael H.; Riley, John H.; Anderson, Wayne H.; Singh, Dave; Bakke, Per; Gulsvik, Amund; Litonjua, Augusto A.; Lomas, David A.; Crapo, James D.; Beaty, Terri H.; Celli, Bartolome R.; Rennard, Stephen; Tal-Singer, Ruth; Fox, Steven M.; Silverman, Edwin K.; Hersh, Craig P.

    2011-01-01

    Previous expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) studies have performed genetic association studies for gene expression, but most of these studies examined lymphoblastoid cell lines from non-diseased individuals. We examined the genetics of gene expression in a relevant disease tissue from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients to identify functional effects of known susceptibility genes and to find novel disease genes. By combining gene expression profiling on induced sputum samples from 131 COPD cases from the ECLIPSE Study with genomewide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data, we found 4315 significant cis-eQTL SNP-probe set associations (3309 unique SNPs). The 3309 SNPs were tested for association with COPD in a genomewide association study (GWAS) dataset, which included 2940 COPD cases and 1380 controls. Adjusting for 3309 tests (p<1.5e-5), the two SNPs which were significantly associated with COPD were located in two separate genes in a known COPD locus on chromosome 15: CHRNA5 and IREB2. Detailed analysis of chromosome 15 demonstrated additional eQTLs for IREB2 mapping to that gene. eQTL SNPs for CHRNA5 mapped to multiple linkage disequilibrium (LD) bins. The eQTLs for IREB2 and CHRNA5 were not in LD. Seventy-four additional eQTL SNPs were associated with COPD at p<0.01. These were genotyped in two COPD populations, finding replicated associations with a SNP in PSORS1C1, in the HLA-C region on chromosome 6. Integrative analysis of GWAS and gene expression data from relevant tissue from diseased subjects has located potential functional variants in two known COPD genes and has identified a novel COPD susceptibility locus. PMID:21949713

  11. Co-clustering phenome–genome for phenotype classification and disease gene discovery

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, TaeHyun; Atluri, Gowtham; Xie, MaoQiang; Dey, Sanjoy; Hong, Changjin; Kumar, Vipin; Kuang, Rui

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the categorization of human diseases is critical for reliably identifying disease causal genes. Recently, genome-wide studies of abnormal chromosomal locations related to diseases have mapped >2000 phenotype–gene relations, which provide valuable information for classifying diseases and identifying candidate genes as drug targets. In this article, a regularized non-negative matrix tri-factorization (R-NMTF) algorithm is introduced to co-cluster phenotypes and genes, and simultaneously detect associations between the detected phenotype clusters and gene clusters. The R-NMTF algorithm factorizes the phenotype–gene association matrix under the prior knowledge from phenotype similarity network and protein–protein interaction network, supervised by the label information from known disease classes and biological pathways. In the experiments on disease phenotype–gene associations in OMIM and KEGG disease pathways, R-NMTF significantly improved the classification of disease phenotypes and disease pathway genes compared with support vector machines and Label Propagation in cross-validation on the annotated phenotypes and genes. The newly predicted phenotypes in each disease class are highly consistent with human phenotype ontology annotations. The roles of the new member genes in the disease pathways are examined and validated in the protein–protein interaction subnetworks. Extensive literature review also confirmed many new members of the disease classes and pathways as well as the predicted associations between disease phenotype classes and pathways. PMID:22735708

  12. Scientists Identify Four Candidate Obesity Genes in Mice

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    APS Communications Office (American Physiological Society Communications Office)

    2011-09-06

    Press release on a recent study where researchers developed a strain of mice more likely to be obese and then, using this strain, identified four genes in mouse chromosome 7 that may relate to obesity. This study, Â?Four Out of Eight Genes in a Mouse Chromosome 7 Congenic Donor Region are Candidate Obesity Genes,Â? was conducted by Craig H. Warden, Kari A. Sarahan, and Janis S. Fisler of the University of California, Davis. The study is published in Physiologic Genomics.

  13. Simulated Search For A Disease Gene

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    BEGIN:VCARD VERSION:2.1 FN:Katharine Noonan N:Noonan; Katharine ORG:Oakland High School REV:2005-04-12 END:VCARD

    1995-06-30

    This simulation is based on the research of Nancy Wexler and James Gusella on Huntington's disease (see Micklos and Freyer, 1991, DNA Science, pp. 148-155). Plasmid DNA is used to represent human DNA samples from a family affected by a genetic disease. RFLP analysis of the samples reveals a potential marker for the disease gene. A mutation within or near the disease gene has created a new restriction site for the restriction endonuclease Nru1, yielding 2 smaller restriction fragments on electrophoresis instead of a single larger one. The students discover that the disease phenotype is linked to the double-banded allele. They are able to use the information to describe the inheritance of the disease (autosomal, recessive) and to predict that a fetus (#52) will be unaffected by the disease. Through creative writing assignments, students explore personal and societal issues surrounding genetic testing.

  14. Genome-wide association study identifies variants at CLU and PICALM associated with Alzheimer's disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Denise Harold; Richard Abraham; Paul Hollingworth; Rebecca Sims; Amy Gerrish; Marian L Hamshere; Jaspreet Singh Pahwa; Valentina Moskvina; Kimberley Dowzell; Amy Williams; Nicola Jones; Charlene Thomas; Alexandra Stretton; Angharad R Morgan; Simon Lovestone; John Powell; Petroula Proitsi; Michelle K Lupton; Carol Brayne; David C Rubinsztein; Michael Gill; Brian Lawlor; Aoibhinn Lynch; Kevin Morgan; Kristelle S Brown; Peter A Passmore; David Craig; Bernadette McGuinness; Stephen Todd; Clive Holmes; David Mann; A David Smith; Seth Love; Patrick G Kehoe; John Hardy; Simon Mead; Nick Fox; Martin Rossor; John Collinge; Wolfgang Maier; Frank Jessen; Britta Schürmann; Hendrik van den Bussche; Isabella Heuser; Johannes Kornhuber; Jens Wiltfang; Martin Dichgans; Lutz Frölich; Harald Hampel; Michael Hüll; Dan Rujescu; Alison M Goate; John S K Kauwe; Carlos Cruchaga; Petra Nowotny; John C Morris; Kevin Mayo; Kristel Sleegers; Karolien Bettens; Sebastiaan Engelborghs; Peter P De Deyn; Christine Van Broeckhoven; Gill Livingston; Nicholas J Bass; Hugh Gurling; Andrew McQuillin; Rhian Gwilliam; Panagiotis Deloukas; Ammar Al-Chalabi; Christopher E Shaw; Magda Tsolaki; Andrew B Singleton; Rita Guerreiro; Thomas W Mühleisen; Markus M Nöthen; Susanne Moebus; Karl-Heinz Jöckel; Norman Klopp; H-Erich Wichmann; Minerva M Carrasquillo; V Shane Pankratz; Steven G Younkin; Peter A Holmans; Michael O'Donovan; Michael J Owen; Julie Williams

    2009-01-01

    the gene encoding apolipoprotein e (APOE) on chromosome 19 is the only confirmed susceptibility locus for late-onset Alzheimer's disease. to identify other risk loci, we conducted a large genome-wide association study of 2,032 individuals from France with Alzheimer's disease (cases) and 5,328 controls. Markers outside APO e with suggestive evidence of association (P < 10 ?5 ) were examined in

  15. Gene conversion: mechanisms, evolution and human disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David N. Cooper; Nadia Chuzhanova; Claude Férec; Jian-Min Chen; George P. Patrinos

    2007-01-01

    Gene conversion, one of the two mechanisms of homologous recombination, involves the unidirectional transfer of genetic material from a 'donor' sequence to a highly homologous 'acceptor'. Considerable progress has been made in understanding the molecular mechanisms that underlie gene conversion, its formative role in human genome evolution and its implications for human inherited disease. Here we assess current thinking about

  16. Gene therapy for chronic granulomatous disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Akihiro Kume; Mary C Dinauer

    2000-01-01

    Recent progress in the development of gene therapy for chronic granulomatous disease (CGD), an inherited immunodeficiency syndrome, is reviewed. This disorder results from defects in any of the four genes encoding essential subunits of respiratory burst oxidase, the superoxide-generating enzyme complex in phagocytic leukocytes. The absence of respiratory burst oxidants results in recurrent bacterial and fungal infections and can also

  17. Genes, diet and inflammatory bowel disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Lynnette R. Ferguson; Andrew N. Shelling; Brian L. Browning; Claudia Huebner; Ivonne Petermann

    2007-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) arises in part from a genetic predisposition, through the inheritance of a number of contributory genetic polymorphisms. These variant forms of genes may be associated with an abnormal response to normal luminal bacteria. A consistent observation across most populations is that any of three polymorphisms of the Caspase-activated recruitment domain (CARD15) gene are more prevalent in

  18. Celiac Disease: a model autoimmune disease with gene therapy applications

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M Londei; S Quaratino; L Maiuri

    2003-01-01

    Gene therapy (GT) is still at the ‘experimental’ stage and some recent setbacks have cooled the potential use of this therapeutic tool even in life-threatening conditions. However, this therapeutic approach has a potential, which is not limited to disease for which we have not other option. There are increasing evidence that GT will be soon used in diseases that are

  19. Identifying gene regulatory modules of heat shock response in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wei-Sheng; Li, Wen-Hsiung

    2008-01-01

    Background A gene regulatory module (GRM) is a set of genes that is regulated by the same set of transcription factors (TFs). By organizing the genome into GRMs, a living cell can coordinate the activities of many genes in response to various internal and external stimuli. Therefore, identifying GRMs is helpful for understanding gene regulation. Results Integrating transcription factor binding site (TFBS), mutant, ChIP-chip, and heat shock time series gene expression data, we develop a method, called Heat-Inducible Module Identification Algorithm (HIMIA), for reconstructing GRMs of yeast heat shock response. Unlike previous module inference tools which are static statistics-based methods, HIMIA is a dynamic system model-based method that utilizes the dynamic nature of time series gene expression data. HIMIA identifies 29 GRMs, which in total contain 182 heat-inducible genes regulated by 12 heat-responsive TFs. Using various types of published data, we validate the biological relevance of the identified GRMs. Our analysis suggests that different combinations of a fairly small number of heat-responsive TFs regulate a large number of genes involved in heat shock response and that there may exist crosstalk between heat shock response and other cellular processes. Using HIMIA, we identify 68 uncharacterized genes that may be involved in heat shock response and we also identify their plausible heat-responsive regulators. Furthermore, HIMIA is capable of assigning the regulatory roles of the TFs that regulate GRMs and Cst6, Hsf1, Msn2, Msn4, and Yap1 are found to be activators of several GRMs. In addition, HIMIA refines two clusters of genes involved in heat shock response and provides a better understanding of how the complex expression program of heat shock response is regulated. Finally, we show that HIMIA outperforms four current module inference tools (GRAM, MOFA, ReMoDisvovery, and SAMBA), and we conduct two randomization tests to show that the output of HIMIA is statistically meaningful. Conclusion HIMIA is effective for reconstructing GRMs of yeast heat shock response. Indeed, many of the reconstructed GRMs are in agreement with previous studies. Further, HIMIA predicts several interesting new modules and novel TF combinations. Our study shows that integrating multiple types of data is a powerful approach to studying complex biological systems. PMID:18811975

  20. Neuronal gene expression profiling: uncovering the molecular biology of neurodegenerative disease.

    PubMed

    Mufson, Elliott J; Counts, Scott E; Che, Shaoli; Ginsberg, Stephen D

    2006-01-01

    The development of gene array techniques to quantify expression levels of dozens to thousands of genes simultaneously within selected tissue samples from control and diseased brain has enabled researchers to generate expression profiles of vulnerable neuronal populations in several neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, schizophrenia, multiple sclerosis, and Creutzfeld-Jakob disease. Intriguingly, gene expression analysis reveals that vulnerable brain regions in many of these diseases share putative pathogenetic alterations in common classes of genes, including decrements in synaptic transcript levels and increments in immune response transcripts. Thus, gene expression profiles of diseased neuronal populations may reveal mechanistic clues to the molecular pathogenesis underlying various neurological diseases and aid in identifying potential therapeutic targets. This chapter will review how regional and single cell gene array technologies have advanced our understanding of the genetics of human neurological disease. PMID:17027698

  1. Gene Transfer Approaches for Gynecological Diseases

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mari Raki; Daniel T. Rein; Anna Kanerva; Akseli Hemminki

    2006-01-01

    Gene transfer presents a potentially useful approach for the treatment of diseases refractory to conventional therapies. Various preclinical and clinical strategies have been explored for treatment of gynecological diseases. Given the direst need for novel treatments, much of the work has been performed with gynecological cancers and ovarian cancer in particular. Although the safety of many approaches has been demonstrated

  2. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Gene Disease Interaction on Orbitofrontal

    E-print Network

    Homes, Christopher C.

    ADDICTION IS A chronic disease associ- ated with deficits in brain dopamine1 (DAORIGINAL ARTICLE Gene Disease Interaction on Orbitofrontal Gray Matter in Cocaine Addiction Nelly-term cocaine use has been associated with structural deficits in brain regions having dopamine- receptive

  3. Gene-expression profiling in rheumatic disease: tools and therapeutic potential

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jason W. Bauer; Hatice Bilgic; Emily C. Baechler

    2009-01-01

    Gene-expression profiling is a powerful tool for the discovery of molecular fingerprints that underlie human disease. Microarray technologies allow the analysis of messenger RNA transcript levels for every gene in the genome. However, gene-expression profiling is best viewed as part of a pipeline that extends from sample collection through clinical application. Key genes and pathways identified by microarray profiling should

  4. Identification of the von Hippel-Lindau Disease Tumor Suppressor Gene

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Farida Latif; Kalman Tory; James Gnarra; Masahiro Yao; Fuh-Mei Duh; Mary Lou Orcutt; Thomas Stackhouse; Igor Kuzmin; William Modi; Laura Geil; Laura Schmidt; Fangwei Zhou; Hua Li; Ming Hui Wei; Fan Chen; Gladys Glenn; Peter Choyke; Mcclellan M. Walther; Yongkai Weng; Dah-Shuhn R. Duan; Michael Dean; Damjan Glavac; Frances M. Richards; Paul A. Crossey; Malcolm A. Ferguson-Smith; Denis Le Paslier; Iiya Chumakov; Daniel Cohen; A. Craig Chinault; Eamonn R. Maher; W. Marston Linehan; Berton Zbar; Michael I. Lerman

    1993-01-01

    A gene discovered by positional cloning has been identified as the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease tumor suppressor gene. A restriction fragment encompassing the gene showed rearrangements in 28 of 221 VHL kindreds. Eighteen of these rearrangements were due to deletions in the candidate gene, including three large nonoverlapping deletions. Intragenic mutations were detected in cell lines derived from VHL patients

  5. Using RNA interference to identify genes required for RNA interference

    PubMed Central

    Dudley, Nathaniel R.; Labbé, Jean-Claude; Goldstein, Bob

    2002-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a phenomenon in which double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) silences endogenous gene expression. By injecting pools of dsRNAs into Caenorhabditis elegans, we identified a dsRNA that acts as a potent suppressor of the RNAi mechanism. We have used coinjection of dsRNAs to identify four additional candidates for genes involved in the RNAi mechanism in C. elegans. Three of the genes are C. elegans mes genes, some of which encode homologs of the Drosophila chromatin-binding Polycomb-group proteins. We have used loss-of-function mutants to confirm a role for mes-3, -4, and -6 in RNAi. Interestingly, introducing very low levels of dsRNA can bypass a requirement for these genes in RNAi. The finding that genes predicted to encode proteins that associate with chromatin are involved in RNAi in C. elegans raises the possibility that chromatin may play a role in RNAi in animals, as it does in plants. PMID:11904378

  6. Application of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics Tools to Identify Putative Transcription Factor-Gene Regulatory Network of Ankylosing Spondylitis and Sarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Dongseok; Sharma, Srilakshmi M; Pasadhika, Sirichai; Kang, Zhixin; Harrington, Christina A.; Smith, Justine R.; Planck, Stephen R.; Rosenbaum, James T.

    2009-01-01

    Transcription factors and corresponding cis-regulatory elements are considered key components in gene regulation. We combined biostatistics and bioinformatics tools to streamline identification of putative transcription factor-gene regulatory networks unique for two immune-mediated diseases, ankylosing spondylitis and sarcoidosis. After identifying differentially expressed genes from microarrays, we employed tightCluster to find tight clusters of potentially co-regulated genes. By subsequently applying bioinformatics tools to search for common cis-regulatory elements, putative transcription factor-gene regulatory networks were found. Recognition of these networks by applying this methodology could pave the way for new insights into disease pathogenesis. PMID:20037664

  7. Heterozygous Screen in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Identifies Dosage-Sensitive Genes That Affect Chromosome Stability

    PubMed Central

    Strome, Erin D.; Wu, Xiaowei; Kimmel, Marek; Plon, Sharon E.

    2008-01-01

    Current techniques for identifying mutations that convey a small increased cancer risk or those that modify cancer risk in carriers of highly penetrant mutations are limited by the statistical power of epidemiologic studies, which require screening of large populations and candidate genes. To identify dosage-sensitive genes that mediate genomic stability, we performed a genomewide screen in Saccharomyces cerevisiae for heterozygous mutations that increase chromosome instability in a checkpoint-deficient diploid strain. We used two genome stability assays sensitive enough to detect the impact of heterozygous mutations and identified 172 heterozygous gene disruptions that affected chromosome fragment (CF) loss, 45% of which also conferred modest but statistically significant instability of endogenous chromosomes. Analysis of heterozygous deletion of 65 of these genes demonstrated that the majority increased genomic instability in both checkpoint-deficient and wild-type backgrounds. Strains heterozygous for COMA kinetochore complex genes were particularly unstable. Over 50% of the genes identified in this screen have putative human homologs, including CHEK2, ERCC4, and TOPBP1, which are already associated with inherited cancer susceptibility. These findings encourage the incorporation of this orthologous gene list into cancer epidemiology studies and suggest further analysis of heterozygous phenotypes in yeast as models of human disease resulting from haplo-insufficiency. PMID:18245329

  8. Global methylation analysis identifies prognostically important epigenetically inactivated tumor suppressor genes in multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Kaiser, Martin F.; Johnson, David C.; Wu, Ping; Walker, Brian A.; Brioli, Annamaria; Mirabella, Fabio; Wardell, Christopher P.; Melchor, Lorenzo; Davies, Faith E.

    2013-01-01

    Outcome in multiple myeloma is highly variable and a better understanding of the factors that influence disease biology is essential to understand and predict behavior in individual patients. In the present study, we analyzed combined genomewide DNA methylation and gene expression data of patients treated in the Medical Research Council Myeloma IX trial. We used these data to identify epigenetically repressed tumor suppressor genes with prognostic relevance in myeloma. We identified 195 genes with changes in methylation status that were significantly associated with prognosis. Combining DNA methylation and gene expression data led to the identification of the epigenetically regulated tumor modulating genes GPX3, RBP1, SPARC, and TGFBI. Hypermethylation of these genes was associated with significantly shorter overall survival, independent of age, International Staging System score, and adverse cytogenetics. The 4 differentially methylated and expressed genes are known to mediate important tumor suppressive functions including response to chemotherapy (TGFBI), interaction with the microenvironment (SPARC), retinoic acid signaling (RBP1), and the response to oxidative stress (GPX3), which could explain the prognostic impact of their differential methylation. Assessment of the DNA methylation status of the identified genes could contribute to the molecular characterization of myeloma, which is prerequisite for an individualized treatment approach. PMID:23699600

  9. Candidate Olfaction Genes Identified within the Helicoverpa armigera Antennal Transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Gu, Shaohua; Zhang, Yongjun; Guo, Yuyuan; Wang, Guirong

    2012-01-01

    Antennal olfaction is extremely important for insect survival, mediating key behaviors such as host preference, mate choice, and oviposition site selection. Multiple antennal proteins are involved in olfactory signal transduction pathways. Of these, odorant receptors (ORs) and ionotropic receptors (IRs) confer specificity on olfactory sensory neuron responses. In this study, we identified the olfactory gene repertoire of the economically important agricultural pest moth, Helicoverpa armigera, by assembling the adult male and female antennal transcriptomes. Within the male and female antennal transcriptomes we identified a total of 47 OR candidate genes containing 6 pheromone receptor candidates. Additionally, 12 IR genes as well as 26 odorant-binding proteins and 12 chemosensory proteins were annotated. Our results allow a systematic functional analysis across much of conventional ORs repertoire and newly reported IRs mediating the key olfaction-mediated behaviors of H. armigera. PMID:23110222

  10. Gene expression profiling identifies clinically relevant subtypes of prostate cancer

    E-print Network

    Botstein, David

    Gene expression profiling identifies clinically relevant subtypes of prostate cancer Jacques­Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, and approved November 17, 2003 (received for review July 9, 2003) Prostate and treatment stratification. Worldwide, prostate cancer is the third most common cancer and the cause of 6

  11. Imaging, Diagnosis, Prognosis Gene Expression Analysis Identifies Potential Biomarkers of

    E-print Network

    Hammerton, James

    Imaging, Diagnosis, Prognosis Gene Expression Analysis Identifies Potential Biomarkers to verify NF1 diagnosis, monitor tumor burden, and/or detect transformation. Experimental Design: We used of transformation to MPNST. Clin Cancer Res; 16(20); 5048­57. ©2010 AACR. Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1

  12. DAWN: a framework to identify autism genes and subnetworks using gene expression and genetics

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background De novo loss-of-function (dnLoF) mutations are found twofold more often in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) probands than their unaffected siblings. Multiple independent dnLoF mutations in the same gene implicate the gene in risk and hence provide a systematic, albeit arduous, path forward for ASD genetics. It is likely that using additional non-genetic data will enhance the ability to identify ASD genes. Methods To accelerate the search for ASD genes, we developed a novel algorithm, DAWN, to model two kinds of data: rare variations from exome sequencing and gene co-expression in the mid-fetal prefrontal and motor-somatosensory neocortex, a critical nexus for risk. The algorithm casts the ensemble data as a hidden Markov random field in which the graph structure is determined by gene co-expression and it combines these interrelationships with node-specific observations, namely gene identity, expression, genetic data and the estimated effect on risk. Results Using currently available genetic data and a specific developmental time period for gene co-expression, DAWN identified 127 genes that plausibly affect risk, and a set of likely ASD subnetworks. Validation experiments making use of published targeted resequencing results demonstrate its efficacy in reliably predicting ASD genes. DAWN also successfully predicts known ASD genes, not included in the genetic data used to create the model. Conclusions Validation studies demonstrate that DAWN is effective in predicting ASD genes and subnetworks by leveraging genetic and gene expression data. The findings reported here implicate neurite extension and neuronal arborization as risks for ASD. Using DAWN on emerging ASD sequence data and gene expression data from other brain regions and tissues would likely identify novel ASD genes. DAWN can also be used for other complex disorders to identify genes and subnetworks in those disorders. PMID:24602502

  13. Gene Expression Profiles in Cells of Peripheral Blood Identify New Molecular Markers of Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Bluth, Martin; Lin, Yin-yao; Zhang, Hong; Viterbo, Dominick; Zenilman, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Blood leukocytes play a major role in mediating local and systemic inflammation during acute pancreatitis. We hypothesize that peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in circulation exhibit unique changes in gene expression, and could provide a “reporter” function that reflects the inflammatory response in pancreas of acute pancreatitis. Methods To determine specific changes in blood leukocytes during acute pancreatitis, we studied gene transcription profile of in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in a rat model of experimental pancreatitis (sodium taurocholate). Normal rats, saline controls and a model of septic shock were used as a controls. cRNA obtained from PBMC of each group (n = 3) were applied to Affymetrix rat genome DNA Gene Chip Arrays. Results From the 8,799 rat genes analyzed, 140 genes showed unique significant changes in their expression in PBMC during the acute phase of pancreatitis, but not in sepsis. Among the 140 genes, 57 were upregulated, while 69 were downregulated. Platelet-derived growth factor receptor, prostaglandin E2 receptor and phospholipase D1 are among the top upregulated genes. Others include genes involved in G protein-coupled receptor and TGF-?-mediated signaling pathways, while genes associated with apoptosis, glucocorticoid receptors and even the cholecystokinin receptor are downregulated. Conclusions Microarray analysis in transcriptional profiling of PBMC showed that genes that are uniquely related to molecular and pancreatic function display differential expression in acute pancreatitis. Profiling genes obtained from an easily accessible source during severe pancreatitis may identify surrogate markers for disease severity. PMID:18347268

  14. Identifying critical transitions and their leading biomolecular networks in complex diseases.

    PubMed

    Liu, Rui; Li, Meiyi; Liu, Zhi-Ping; Wu, Jiarui; Chen, Luonan; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2012-01-01

    Identifying a critical transition and its leading biomolecular network during the initiation and progression of a complex disease is a challenging task, but holds the key to early diagnosis and further elucidation of the essential mechanisms of disease deterioration at the network level. In this study, we developed a novel computational method for identifying early-warning signals of the critical transition and its leading network during a disease progression, based on high-throughput data using a small number of samples. The leading network makes the first move from the normal state toward the disease state during a transition, and thus is causally related with disease-driving genes or networks. Specifically, we first define a state-transition-based local network entropy (SNE), and prove that SNE can serve as a general early-warning indicator of any imminent transitions, regardless of specific differences among systems. The effectiveness of this method was validated by functional analysis and experimental data. PMID:23230504

  15. Prioritization of candidate disease genes by enlarging the seed set and fusing information of the network topology and gene expression.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shao-Wu; Shao, Dong-Dong; Zhang, Song-Yao; Wang, Yi-Bin

    2014-06-01

    The identification of disease genes is very important not only to provide greater understanding of gene function and cellular mechanisms which drive human disease, but also to enhance human disease diagnosis and treatment. Recently, high-throughput techniques have been applied to detect dozens or even hundreds of candidate genes. However, experimental approaches to validate the many candidates are usually time-consuming, tedious and expensive, and sometimes lack reproducibility. Therefore, numerous theoretical and computational methods (e.g. network-based approaches) have been developed to prioritize candidate disease genes. Many network-based approaches implicitly utilize the observation that genes causing the same or similar diseases tend to correlate with each other in gene-protein relationship networks. Of these network approaches, the random walk with restart algorithm (RWR) is considered to be a state-of-the-art approach. To further improve the performance of RWR, we propose a novel method named ESFSC to identify disease-related genes, by enlarging the seed set according to the centrality of disease genes in a network and fusing information of the protein-protein interaction (PPI) network topological similarity and the gene expression correlation. The ESFSC algorithm restarts at all of the nodes in the seed set consisting of the known disease genes and their k-nearest neighbor nodes, then walks in the global network separately guided by the similarity transition matrix constructed with PPI network topological similarity properties and the correlational transition matrix constructed with the gene expression profiles. As a result, all the genes in the network are ranked by weighted fusing the above results of the RWR guided by two types of transition matrices. Comprehensive simulation results of the 10 diseases with 97 known disease genes collected from the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database show that ESFSC outperforms existing methods for prioritizing candidate disease genes. The top prediction results of Alzheimer's disease are consistent with previous literature reports. PMID:24695957

  16. Multiplexed Component Analysis to Identify Genes Contributing to the Immune Response during Acute SIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini, Iraj; Gama, Lucio; Mac Gabhann, Feilim

    2015-01-01

    Immune response genes play an important role during acute HIV and SIV infection. Using an SIV macaque model of AIDS and CNS disease, our overall goal was to assess how the expression of genes associated with immune and inflammatory responses are longitudinally changed in different organs or cells during SIV infection. To compare RNA expression of a panel of 88 immune-related genes across time points and among three tissues – spleen, mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) – we designed a set of Nanostring probes. To identify significant genes during acute SIV infection and to investigate whether these genes are tissue-specific or have global roles, we introduce a novel multiplexed component analysis (MCA) method. This combines multivariate analysis methods with multiple preprocessing methods to create a set of 12 “judges”; each judge emphasizes particular types of change in gene expression to which cells could respond, for example, the absolute or relative size of expression change from baseline. Compared to bivariate analysis methods, our MCA method improved classification rates. This analysis allows us to identify three categories of genes: (a) consensus genes likely to contribute highly to the immune response; (b) genes that would contribute highly to the immune response only if certain assumptions are met – e.g. that the cell responds to relative expression change rather than absolute expression change; and (c) genes whose contribution to immune response appears to be modest. We then compared the results across the three tissues of interest; some genes are consistently highly-contributing in all tissues, while others are specific for certain tissues. Our analysis identified CCL8, CXCL10, CXCL11, MxA, OAS2, and OAS1 as top contributing genes, all of which are stimulated by type I interferon. This suggests that the cytokine storm during acute SIV infection is a systemic innate immune response against viral replication. Furthermore, these genes have approximately equal contributions to all tissues, making them possible candidates to be used as non-invasive biomarkers in studying PBMCs instead of MLN and spleen during acute SIV infection experiments. We identified clusters of genes that co-vary together and studied their correlation with regard to other gene clusters. We also developed novel methods to faithfully visualize multi-gene correlations on two-dimensional polar plots, and to visualize tissue specificity of gene expression responses. PMID:25984721

  17. Analyse multiple disease subtypes and build associated gene networks using genome-wide expression profiles

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite the large increase of transcriptomic studies that look for gene signatures on diseases, there is still a need for integrative approaches that obtain separation of multiple pathological states providing robust selection of gene markers for each disease subtype and information about the possible links or relations between those genes. Results We present a network-oriented and data-driven bioinformatic approach that searches for association of genes and diseases based on the analysis of genome-wide expression data derived from microarrays or RNA-Seq studies. The approach aims to (i) identify gene sets associated to different pathological states analysed together; (ii) identify a minimum subset within these genes that unequivocally differentiates and classifies the compared disease subtypes; (iii) provide a measurement of the discriminant power of these genes and (iv) identify links between the genes that characterise each of the disease subtypes. This bioinformatic approach is implemented in an R package, named geNetClassifier, available as an open access tool in Bioconductor. To illustrate the performance of the tool, we applied it to two independent datasets: 250 samples from patients with four major leukemia subtypes analysed using expression arrays; another leukemia dataset analysed with RNA-Seq that includes a subtype also present in the previous set. The results show the selection of key deregulated genes recently reported in the literature and assigned to the leukemia subtypes studied. We also show, using these independent datasets, the selection of similar genes in a network built for the same disease subtype. Conclusions The construction of gene networks related to specific disease subtypes that include parameters such as gene-to-gene association, gene disease specificity and gene discriminant power can be very useful to draw gene-disease maps and to unravel the molecular features that characterize specific pathological states. The application of the bioinformatic tool here presented shows a neat way to achieve such molecular characterization of the diseases using genome-wide expression data. PMID:26040557

  18. Identifying tissue-enriched gene expression in mouse tissues using the NIH UniGene database.

    PubMed

    Stanton, Jo-Ann L; Macgregor, Andrew B; Green, David P L

    2003-01-01

    There is considerable interest in the gene expression profiles that underpin the phenotypes of cells and tissues. We have developed Bioperl scripts for mining the National Institutes of Health (NIH) UniGene databases to identify this tissue-enriched gene expression. UniGene imports expressed sequence tags (ESTs) from the NIH dbEST database and clusters them by searching for sequence matches. In principle, each UniGene cluster represents the product(s) of a single transcriptional unit in the genome. This transcriptional unit can be expressed in a range of cell types, and UniGene clusters reflect these heterogeneous origins. UniGene clusters containing ESTs expressed predominantly or uniquely by one tissue will show a high proportion of ESTs from that tissue. Our Bioperl scripts parse the NIH UniGene data files as a starting point for an in-house UniGene database. Each UniGene cluster is then assessed for the total number of ESTs from a specified set of dbEST libraries and the total number of ESTs in the cluster. The ratio of the two gives a measure of enrichment. In this paper, we identify tissue-enriched gene expression in mouse pancreas, mammary gland and heart. Each tissue-enriched expression profile identifies genes that are recognisably characteristic of the respective tissue. It also identifies significant numbers of tissue-enhanced UniGenes that are derived from transcriptional units with no known function. These genes may play important and specialised functions in the tissue in question and offer targets for drug action. PMID:15130819

  19. Proteomic analysis of age-dependent changes in protein solubility identifies genes that modulate lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Reis-Rodrigues, Pedro; Czerwieniec, Gregg; Peters, Theodore W; Evani, Uday S; Alavez, Silvestre; Gaman, Emily A; Vantipalli, Maithili; Mooney, Sean D; Gibson, Bradford W; Lithgow, Gordon J; Hughes, Robert E

    2012-01-01

    While it is generally recognized that misfolding of specific proteins can cause late-onset disease, the contribution of protein aggregation to the normal aging process is less well understood. To address this issue, a mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis was performed to identify proteins that adopt sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-insoluble conformations during aging in Caenorhabditis elegans. SDS-insoluble proteins extracted from young and aged C. elegans were chemically labeled by isobaric tagging for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) and identified by liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. Two hundred and three proteins were identified as being significantly enriched in an SDS-insoluble fraction in aged nematodes and were largely absent from a similar protein fraction in young nematodes. The SDS-insoluble fraction in aged animals contains a diverse range of proteins including a large number of ribosomal proteins. Gene ontology analysis revealed highly significant enrichments for energy production and translation functions. Expression of genes encoding insoluble proteins observed in aged nematodes was knocked down using RNAi, and effects on lifespan were measured. 41% of genes tested were shown to extend lifespan after RNAi treatment, compared with 18% in a control group of genes. These data indicate that genes encoding proteins that become insoluble with age are enriched for modifiers of lifespan. This demonstrates that proteomic approaches can be used to identify genes that modify lifespan. Finally, these observations indicate that the accumulation of insoluble proteins with diverse functions may be a general feature of aging. PMID:22103665

  20. Curing Genetic Disease with Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Williams, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Development of viral vectors that allow high efficiency gene transfer into mammalian cells in the early 1980s foresaw the treatment of severe monogenic diseases in humans. The application of gene transfer using viral vectors has been successful in diseases of the blood and immune systems, albeit with several curative studies also showing serious adverse events (SAEs). In children with X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID-X1), chronic granulomatous disease, and Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome, these SAEs were caused by inappropriate activation of oncogenes. Subsequent studies have defined the vector sequences responsible for these transforming events. Members of the Transatlantic Gene Therapy Consortium [TAGTC] have collaboratively developed new vectors that have proven safer in preclinical studies and used these vectors in new clinical trials in SCID-X1. These trials have shown evidence of early efficacy and preliminary integration analysis data from the SCID-X1 trial suggest an improved safety profile. PMID:25125725

  1. Gene and splicing therapies for neuromuscular diseases.

    PubMed

    Benchaouir, Rachid; Robin, Valerie; Goyenvalle, Aurelie

    2015-01-01

    Neuromuscular disorders (NMD) are heterogeneous group of genetic diseases characterized by muscle weakness and wasting. Duchenne Muscular dystrophy (DMD) and Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) are two of the most common and severe forms in humans and although the molecular mechanisms of these diseases have been extensively investigated, there is currently no effective treatment. However, new gene-based therapies have recently emerged with particular noted advances in using conventional gene replacement strategies and RNA-based technology. Whilst proof of principle have been demonstrated in animal models, several clinical trials have recently been undertaken to investigate the feasibility of these strategies in patients. In particular, antisense mediated exon skipping has shown encouraging results and hold promise for the treatment of dystrophic muscle. In this review, we summarize the recent progress of therapeutic approaches to neuromuscular diseases, with an emphasis on gene therapy and splicing modulation for DMD and SMA, focusing on the advantages offered by these technologies but also their challenges. PMID:25961553

  2. Gene expression profiling as a window into idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis pathogenesis: can we identify the right target genes?

    PubMed

    Kaminski, Naftali; Rosas, Ivan O

    2006-06-01

    Expression microarrays that provide genome-level, transcriptional, high-resolution profiles have been applied successfully to multiple diseases. Although microarrays provide information regarding thousands of genes, many investigators prefer to focus on a single gene and validate its role, an approach often supported by grant and journal reviewers. Only a minority of investigators focus on global changes in gene expression. Here, we describe and contrast two general approaches to the use of microarray data: the reductionist "cherry picking" approach and the more global, quantitative "systems" approach. We describe microarray analysis experiments relevant to idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) in the context of these two approaches. Although it seems that the cherry-picking approaches have been successful in identifying new relevant genes in IPF, we suggest that to fulfill the discovery potential of microarrays in IPF and to create a working model of IPF, unbiased integrative systems approaches are required. PMID:16738198

  3. Integrated Genomics Identifies Convergence of Ankylosing Spondylitis with Global Immune Mediated Disease Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Uddin, Mohammed; Codner, Dianne; Mahmud Hasan, S M; Scherer, Stephen W; O’Rielly, Darren D; Rahman, Proton

    2015-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis(AS), a highly heritable complex inflammatory arthritis. Although, a handful of non-HLA risk loci have been identified, capturing the unexplained genetic contribution to AS pathogenesis remains a challenge attributed to additive, pleiotropic and epistatic-interactions at the molecular level. Here, we developed multiple integrated genomic approaches to quantify molecular convergence of non-HLA loci with global immune mediated diseases. We show that non-HLA genes are significantly sensitive to deleterious mutation accumulation in the general population compared with tolerant genes. Human developmental proteomics (prenatal to adult) analysis revealed that proteins encoded by non-HLA AS risk loci are 2-fold more expressed in adult hematopoietic cells.Enrichment analysis revealed AS risk genes overlap with a significant number of immune related pathways (p?genes are highly clustered seeds that significantly converge (empirical; p?disease risk loci. We have also provided initial evidence for the involvement of STAT2/3 in AS pathogenesis. Collectively, these findings highlight molecular insight on non-HLA AS risk loci that are not exclusively connected with overlapping immune mediated diseases; rather a component of common pathophysiological pathways with other immune mediated diseases. This information will be pivotal to fully explain AS pathogenesis and identify new therapeutic targets. PMID:25980808

  4. Integrated genomics identifies convergence of ankylosing spondylitis with global immune mediated disease pathways.

    PubMed

    Uddin, Mohammed; Codner, Dianne; Mahmud Hasan, S M; Scherer, Stephen W; O'Rielly, Darren D; Rahman, Proton

    2015-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis(AS), a highly heritable complex inflammatory arthritis. Although, a handful of non-HLA risk loci have been identified, capturing the unexplained genetic contribution to AS pathogenesis remains a challenge attributed to additive, pleiotropic and epistatic-interactions at the molecular level. Here, we developed multiple integrated genomic approaches to quantify molecular convergence of non-HLA loci with global immune mediated diseases. We show that non-HLA genes are significantly sensitive to deleterious mutation accumulation in the general population compared with tolerant genes. Human developmental proteomics (prenatal to adult) analysis revealed that proteins encoded by non-HLA AS risk loci are 2-fold more expressed in adult hematopoietic cells.Enrichment analysis revealed AS risk genes overlap with a significant number of immune related pathways (p?genes are highly clustered seeds that significantly converge (empirical; p?disease risk loci. We have also provided initial evidence for the involvement of STAT2/3 in AS pathogenesis. Collectively, these findings highlight molecular insight on non-HLA AS risk loci that are not exclusively connected with overlapping immune mediated diseases; rather a component of common pathophysiological pathways with other immune mediated diseases. This information will be pivotal to fully explain AS pathogenesis and identify new therapeutic targets. PMID:25980808

  5. Gene Therapy for Parkinson's Disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Kari Andersen

    2012-01-01

    Background: Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder of unknown cause. The characteristic motor impairments of PD including resting tremor, rigidity, slowed movement, decreased dexterity, small handwriting, flexed posture, gait disorder, and imbalance predominantly arise from the loss of neurons in the substantia nigra region of the midbrain that produce the neurotransmitter dopamine. Dopamine replacement therapy provides temporary relief of

  6. Genes Necessary for Bacterial Magnetite Biomineralization Identified by Transposon Mutagenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nash, C. Z.; Komeili, A.; Newman, D. K.; Kirschvink, J. L.

    2004-12-01

    Magnetic bacteria synthesize nanoscale crystals of magnetite in intracellular, membrane-bounded organelles (magnetosomes). These crystals are preserved in the fossil record at least as far back as the late Neoproterozoic and have been tentatively identified in much older rocks (1). This fossil record may provide deep time calibration points for molecular evolution studies once the genes involved in biologically controlled magnetic mineralization (BCMM) are known. Further, a genetic and biochemical understanding of BCMM will give insight into the depositional environment and biogeochemical cycles in which magnetic bacteria play a role. The BCMM process is not well understood, though proteins have been identified from the magnetosome membrane and genetic manipulation and biochemical characterization of these proteins are underway. Most of the proteins currently thought to be involved are encoded within the mam cluster, a large cluster of genes whose products localize to the magnetosome membrane and are conserved among magnetic bacteria (2). In an effort to identify all of the genes necessary for bacterial BCMM, we undertook a transposon mutagenesis of Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1. Non-magnetic mutants (MNMs) were identified by growth in liquid culture followed by a magnetic assay. The insertion site of the transposon was identified two ways. First MNMs were screened with a PCR assay to determine if the transposon had inserted into the mam cluster. Second, the transposon was rescued from the mutant DNA and cloned for sequencing. The majority insertion sites are located within the mam cluster. Insertion sites also occur in operons which have not previously been suspected to be involved in magnetite biomineralization. None of the insertion sites have occurred within genes reported from previous transposon mutagenesis studies of AMB-1 (3, 4). Two of the non-mam cluster insertion sites occur in operons containing genes conserved particularly between MS-1 and MC-1. We are undertaking a complementation strategy to demonstrate the necessity of these novel genes in BCMM as well as characterizing the phenotypes of the mutants. 1. S. B. R. Chang, J. F. Stolz, J. L. Kirschvink, S. M. Awramik, Precambrian Res. 43, 305-315 (1989). 2. K. Grünberg, C. Wawer, B. M. Tebo, D. Schüler, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 67, 4573-4582 (2001). 3. A. T. Wahyudi, H. Takeyama, T. Matsunaga, Appl. Biochem. Biotechnol. 91-3, 147-154 (2001). 4. T. Matsunaga, C. Nakamura, J. G. Burgess, K. Sode, J. Bacteriol. 174, 2748-2753 (1992).

  7. Identifying disease-centric subdomains in very large medical ontologies,

    E-print Network

    ten Teije, Annette

    Identifying disease-centric subdomains in very large medical ontologies, a case-study on breast and ontology concepts. Both methods include term-expansion over sub- sumption and equality relations. We use both methods to determine a breast-cancer-centric subdomain of the SNOMED ontology. Our exper- iments

  8. Identifying Disease-Centric Subdomains in Very Large Medical Ontologies

    E-print Network

    van Harmelen, Frank

    Identifying Disease-Centric Subdomains in Very Large Medical Ontologies: A Case-Study on Breast and ontology concepts. Both methods include concept-expansion over subsumption and equality relations. We use both methods to determine a breast-cancer-centric subdomain of the SNOMED CT ontology. Our experiments

  9. Identifying polymorphism in enamelin gene in amelogenesis imperfecta (AI).

    PubMed

    Gopinath, V K; Yoong, Tan Pang; Yean, Chan Yean; Ravichandran, M

    2008-10-01

    Amelogenesis imperfecta (AI) is a developmental defect of dental enamel formation. This enamel defect can be caused by mutation in ENAM gene. Hence this study investigated the molecular defect in the enamelin gene in a patient with the clinical features of AI. The genomic DNA was extracted from patient's whole blood samples and the DNA was subjected to the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in the presence of 16 pairs of oligonucleotide primers specifically designed to amplify all the 10 exons, g2382, g6395 and g8344 of the enamelin (ENAM) gene in the long arm of the chromosome 4. The PCR products were gel purified and sequenced to identify any mutation. The ENAM gene sequences from the patient were aligned with the reference sequence (GenBank accession no. AY167999) using VectorNTI software. We identified a single base difference at location g359 A-->G on exon 1 between the reference sequence and patient's sequence. We successfully ruled out any possible mutation on exon 2, exon 3, exon 4, exon 5, exon 6, exon 7, exon 8, exon 9, exon 10, g2382, g6395 and g8344. PMID:18466877

  10. Sleeping Beauty mouse models identify candidate genes involved in gliomagenesis.

    PubMed

    Vyazunova, Irina; Maklakova, Vilena I; Berman, Samuel; De, Ishani; Steffen, Megan D; Hong, Won; Lincoln, Hayley; Morrissy, A Sorana; Taylor, Michael D; Akagi, Keiko; Brennan, Cameron W; Rodriguez, Fausto J; Collier, Lara S

    2014-01-01

    Genomic studies of human high-grade gliomas have discovered known and candidate tumor drivers. Studies in both cell culture and mouse models have complemented these approaches and have identified additional genes and processes important for gliomagenesis. Previously, we found that mobilization of Sleeping Beauty transposons in mice ubiquitously throughout the body from the Rosa26 locus led to gliomagenesis with low penetrance. Here we report the characterization of mice in which transposons are mobilized in the Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein (GFAP) compartment. Glioma formation in these mice did not occur on an otherwise wild-type genetic background, but rare gliomas were observed when mobilization occurred in a p19Arf heterozygous background. Through cloning insertions from additional gliomas generated by transposon mobilization in the Rosa26 compartment, several candidate glioma genes were identified. Comparisons to genetic, epigenetic and mRNA expression data from human gliomas implicates several of these genes as tumor suppressor genes and oncogenes in human glioblastoma. PMID:25423036

  11. Sleeping Beauty Mouse Models Identify Candidate Genes Involved in Gliomagenesis

    PubMed Central

    Vyazunova, Irina; Maklakova, Vilena I.; Berman, Samuel; De, Ishani; Steffen, Megan D.; Hong, Won; Lincoln, Hayley; Morrissy, A. Sorana; Taylor, Michael D.; Akagi, Keiko; Brennan, Cameron W.; Rodriguez, Fausto J.; Collier, Lara S.

    2014-01-01

    Genomic studies of human high-grade gliomas have discovered known and candidate tumor drivers. Studies in both cell culture and mouse models have complemented these approaches and have identified additional genes and processes important for gliomagenesis. Previously, we found that mobilization of Sleeping Beauty transposons in mice ubiquitously throughout the body from the Rosa26 locus led to gliomagenesis with low penetrance. Here we report the characterization of mice in which transposons are mobilized in the Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein (GFAP) compartment. Glioma formation in these mice did not occur on an otherwise wild-type genetic background, but rare gliomas were observed when mobilization occurred in a p19Arf heterozygous background. Through cloning insertions from additional gliomas generated by transposon mobilization in the Rosa26 compartment, several candidate glioma genes were identified. Comparisons to genetic, epigenetic and mRNA expression data from human gliomas implicates several of these genes as tumor suppressor genes and oncogenes in human glioblastoma. PMID:25423036

  12. Methods for identifying an essential gene in a prokaryotic microorganism

    DOEpatents

    Shizuya, Hiroaki

    2006-01-31

    Methods are provided for the rapid identification of essential or conditionally essential DNA segments in any species of haploid cell (one copy chromosome per cell) that is capable of being transformed by artificial means and is capable of undergoing DNA recombination. This system offers an enhanced means of identifying essential function genes in diploid pathogens, such as gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria.

  13. Gene-Environment Interactions and Epigenetic Basis of Human Diseases

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Liang Liu; Yuanyuan Li; Trygve O. Tollefsbol

    Most human diseases are related in some way to the loss or gain in gene functions. Regulation of gene expression is a complex process. In addition to genetic mechanisms, epigenetic causes are gaining new perspectives in human diseases related to gene deregulation. Most eukaryotic genes are packed into chromatin structures, which lead to high condensations of the genes that require

  14. Gene-Wide Analysis Detects Two New Susceptibility Genes for Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Harold, Denise; Jones, Lesley; Holmans, Peter; Gerrish, Amy; Vedernikov, Alexey; Richards, Alexander; DeStefano, Anita L.; Lambert, Jean-Charles; Ibrahim-Verbaas, Carla A.; Naj, Adam C.; Sims, Rebecca; Jun, Gyungah; Bis, Joshua C.; Beecham, Gary W.; Grenier-Boley, Benjamin; Russo, Giancarlo; Thornton-Wells, Tricia A.; Denning, Nicola; Smith, Albert V.; Chouraki, Vincent; Thomas, Charlene; Ikram, M. Arfan; Zelenika, Diana; Vardarajan, Badri N.; Kamatani, Yoichiro; Lin, Chiao-Feng; Schmidt, Helena; Kunkle, Brian; Dunstan, Melanie L.; Vronskaya, Maria; Johnson, Andrew D.; Ruiz, Agustin; Bihoreau, Marie-Thérèse; Reitz, Christiane; Pasquier, Florence; Hollingworth, Paul; Hanon, Olivier; Fitzpatrick, Annette L.; Buxbaum, Joseph D.; Campion, Dominique; Crane, Paul K.; Baldwin, Clinton; Becker, Tim; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Cruchaga, Carlos; Craig, David; Amin, Najaf; Berr, Claudine; Lopez, Oscar L.; De Jager, Philip L.; Deramecourt, Vincent; Johnston, Janet A.; Evans, Denis; Lovestone, Simon; Letenneur, Luc; Hernández, Isabel; Rubinsztein, David C.; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Sleegers, Kristel; Goate, Alison M.; Fiévet, Nathalie; Huentelman, Matthew J.; Gill, Michael; Brown, Kristelle; Kamboh, M. Ilyas; Keller, Lina; Barberger-Gateau, Pascale; McGuinness, Bernadette; Larson, Eric B.; Myers, Amanda J.; Dufouil, Carole; Todd, Stephen; Wallon, David; Love, Seth; Rogaeva, Ekaterina; Gallacher, John; George-Hyslop, Peter St; Clarimon, Jordi; Lleo, Alberto; Bayer, Anthony; Tsuang, Debby W.; Yu, Lei; Tsolaki, Magda; Bossù, Paola; Spalletta, Gianfranco; Proitsi, Petra; Collinge, John; Sorbi, Sandro; Garcia, Florentino Sanchez; Fox, Nick C.; Hardy, John; Naranjo, Maria Candida Deniz; Bosco, Paolo; Clarke, Robert; Brayne, Carol; Galimberti, Daniela; Scarpini, Elio; Bonuccelli, Ubaldo; Mancuso, Michelangelo; Siciliano, Gabriele; Moebus, Susanne; Mecocci, Patrizia; Zompo, Maria Del; Maier, Wolfgang; Hampel, Harald; Pilotto, Alberto; Frank-García, Ana; Panza, Francesco; Solfrizzi, Vincenzo; Caffarra, Paolo; Nacmias, Benedetta; Perry, William; Mayhaus, Manuel; Lannfelt, Lars; Hakonarson, Hakon; Pichler, Sabrina; Carrasquillo, Minerva M.; Ingelsson, Martin; Beekly, Duane; Alvarez, Victoria; Zou, Fanggeng; Valladares, Otto; Younkin, Steven G.; Coto, Eliecer; Hamilton-Nelson, Kara L.; Gu, Wei; Razquin, Cristina; Pastor, Pau; Mateo, Ignacio; Owen, Michael J.; Faber, Kelley M.; Jonsson, Palmi V.; Combarros, Onofre; O'Donovan, Michael C.; Cantwell, Laura B.; Soininen, Hilkka; Blacker, Deborah; Mead, Simon; Mosley, Thomas H.; Bennett, David A.; Harris, Tamara B.; Fratiglioni, Laura; Holmes, Clive; de Bruijn, Renee F. A. G.; Passmore, Peter; Montine, Thomas J.; Bettens, Karolien; Rotter, Jerome I.; Brice, Alexis; Morgan, Kevin; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Kukull, Walter A.; Hannequin, Didier; Powell, John F.; Nalls, Michael A.; Ritchie, Karen; Lunetta, Kathryn L.; Kauwe, John S. K.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Riemenschneider, Matthias; Boada, Mercè; Hiltunen, Mikko; Martin, Eden R.; Schmidt, Reinhold; Rujescu, Dan; Dartigues, Jean-François; Mayeux, Richard; Tzourio, Christophe; Hofman, Albert; Nöthen, Markus M.; Graff, Caroline; Psaty, Bruce M.; Haines, Jonathan L.; Lathrop, Mark; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; Launer, Lenore J.; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; Farrer, Lindsay A.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Ramirez, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    Background Alzheimer's disease is a common debilitating dementia with known heritability, for which 20 late onset susceptibility loci have been identified, but more remain to be discovered. This study sought to identify new susceptibility genes, using an alternative gene-wide analytical approach which tests for patterns of association within genes, in the powerful genome-wide association dataset of the International Genomics of Alzheimer's Project Consortium, comprising over 7 m genotypes from 25,580 Alzheimer's cases and 48,466 controls. Principal Findings In addition to earlier reported genes, we detected genome-wide significant loci on chromosomes 8 (TP53INP1, p?=?1.4×10?6) and 14 (IGHV1-67 p?=?7.9×10?8) which indexed novel susceptibility loci. Significance The additional genes identified in this study, have an array of functions previously implicated in Alzheimer's disease, including aspects of energy metabolism, protein degradation and the immune system and add further weight to these pathways as potential therapeutic targets in Alzheimer's disease. PMID:24922517

  15. Association of the T-cell regulatory gene CTLA4 with susceptibility to autoimmune disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hironori Ueda; Joanna M. M. Howson; Laura Esposito; Joanne Heward; Hywel Snook; Giselle Chamberlain; Daniel B. Rainbow; Kara M. D. Hunter; Annabel N. Smith; Gianfranco Di Genova; Mathias H. Herr; Ingrid Dahlman; Felicity Payne; Deborah Smyth; Christopher Lowe; Rebecca C. J. Twells; Sarah Howlett; Barry Healy; Sarah Nutland; Helen E. Rance; Vin Everett; Luc J. Smink; Alex C. Lam; Heather J. Cordell; Neil M. Walker; Cristina Bordin; John Hulme; Costantino Motzo; Francesco Cucca; J. Fred Hess; Michael L. Metzker; Jane Rogers; Simon Gregory; Amit Allahabadia; Ratnasingam Nithiyananthan; Eva Tuomilehto-Wolf; Jaakko Tuomilehto; Polly Bingley; Kathleen M. Gillespie; Dag E. Undlien; Kjersti S. Rønningen; Cristian Guja; Constantin Ionescu-Tîrgoviste; David A. Savage; A. Peter Maxwell; Dennis J. Carson; Chris C. Patterson; Jayne A. Franklyn; David G. Clayton; Laurence B. Peterson; Linda S. Wicker; John A. Todd; Stephen C. L. Gough

    2003-01-01

    Genes and mechanisms involved in common complex diseases, such as the autoimmune disorders that affect approximately 5% of the population, remain obscure. Here we identify polymorphisms of the cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen 4 gene (CTLA4)-which encodes a vital negative regulatory molecule of the immune system-as candidates for primary determinants of risk of the common autoimmune disorders Graves' disease, autoimmune hypothyroidism

  16. Connexin gene mutations in human genetic diseases

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Vladimir Krutovskikh; Hiroshi Yamasaki

    2000-01-01

    Rapid advances in understanding the molecular biology of the gap junctional proteins — connexins (Cx) — have revealed that these proteins are indispensable for various cellular functions. Recent findings that mutational alterations of Cx genes leads to several quite different human diseases provide additional evidence that these proteins possess several not yet fully understood functions. Many different mutations of Cx32

  17. Gene therapy for autoimmune diseases: quo vadis?

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David J. Gould; Osvaldo L. Podhajcer; Yuti Chernajovsky

    2004-01-01

    Biological therapies using antibodies and cytokines are becoming widespread for the treatment of chronic inflammatory autoimmune diseases. However, these treatments have several limitations — such as expense, the need for repeated injections and unwanted side-effects — that can be overcome by genetic delivery. This review summarizes the ingenuity, sophistication and variety of gene-therapy approaches that have been taken in the

  18. Screening for Single Gene Genetic Disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Thomas J. Musci

    2005-01-01

    The screening and directed testing for genetic disease caused by single gene mutations is an expanding part of the overall scheme of prenatal care. In addition to reproductive choice, carrier screening and fetal diagnostic testing afford the important opportunity for preparation of the family and the delivery site for the birth of a fetus with a known genetic disorder. Increasingly

  19. Pseudoachondroplasia and Multiple Epiphyseal Dysplasia: A 7-Year Comprehensive Analysis of the Known Disease Genes Identify Novel and Recurrent Mutations and Provides an Accurate Assessment of Their Relative Contribution

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Gail C; Mittaz-Crettol, Laureane; Taylor, Jacqueline A; Mortier, Geert R; Spranger, Juergen; Zabel, Bernhard; Le Merrer, Martine; Cormier-Daire, Valerie; Hall, Christine M; Offiah, Amaka; Wright, Michael J; Savarirayan, Ravi; Nishimura, Gen; Ramsden, Simon C; Elles, Rob; Bonafe, Luisa; Superti-Furga, Andrea; Unger, Sheila; Zankl, Andreas; Briggs, Michael D

    2012-01-01

    Pseudoachondroplasia (PSACH) and multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (MED) are relatively common skeletal dysplasias resulting in short-limbed dwarfism, joint pain, and stiffness. PSACH and the largest proportion of autosomal dominant MED (AD-MED) results from mutations in cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP); however, AD-MED is genetically heterogenous and can also result from mutations in matrilin-3 (MATN3) and type IX collagen (COL9A1, COL9A2, and COL9A3). In contrast, autosomal recessive MED (rMED) appears to result exclusively from mutations in sulphate transporter solute carrier family 26 (SLC26A2). The diagnosis of PSACH and MED can be difficult for the nonexpert due to various complications and similarities with other related diseases and often mutation analysis is requested to either confirm or exclude the diagnosis. Since 2003, the European Skeletal Dysplasia Network (ESDN) has used an on-line review system to efficiently diagnose cases referred to the network prior to mutation analysis. In this study, we present the molecular findings in 130 patients referred to ESDN, which includes the identification of novel and recurrent mutations in over 100 patients. Furthermore, this study provides the first indication of the relative contribution of each gene and confirms that they account for the majority of PSACH and MED. Hum Mutat 33:144–157, 2012. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:21922596

  20. Identifying sleep regulatory genes using a Drosophila model of insomnia

    PubMed Central

    Seugnet, Laurent; Suzuki, Yasuko; Thimgan, Matthew; Donlea, Jeff; Gimbel, Sarah I.; Gottschalk, Laura; Duntley, Steve P.; Shaw, Paul J.

    2009-01-01

    Although it is widely accepted that sleep must serve an essential biological function, little is known about molecules that underlie sleep regulation. Given that insomnia is a common sleep disorder that disrupts the ability to initiate and maintain restorative sleep, a better understanding of its molecular underpinning may provide crucial insights into sleep regulatory processes. Thus, we created a line of flies using laboratory selection that share traits with human insomnia. After 60 generations insomnia-like (ins-l) flies sleep 60 min a day, exhibit difficulty initiating sleep, difficulty maintaining sleep, and show evidence of daytime cognitive impairment. ins-l flies are also hyperactive and hyper responsive to environmental perturbations. In addition they have difficulty maintaining their balance, have elevated levels of dopamine, are short-lived and show increased levels of triglycerides, cholesterol, and free fatty acids. While their core molecular clock remains intact, ins-l flies lose their ability to sleep when placed into constant darkness. Whole genome profiling identified genes that are modified in ins-l flies. Among those differentially expressed transcripts genes involved in metabolism, neuronal activity, and sensory perception constituted over-represented categories. We demonstrate that two of these genes are upregulated in human subjects following acute sleep deprivation. Together these data indicate that the ins-l flies are a useful tool that can be used to identify molecules important for sleep regulation and may provide insights into both the causes and long-term consequences of insomnia. PMID:19494137

  1. Identifying Francisella tularensis Genes Required for Growth in Host Cells.

    PubMed

    Brunton, J; Steele, S; Miller, C; Lovullo, E; Taft-Benz, S; Kawula, T

    2015-08-01

    Francisella tularensis is a highly virulent Gram-negative intracellular pathogen capable of infecting a vast diversity of hosts, ranging from amoebae to humans. A hallmark of F. tularensis virulence is its ability to quickly grow to high densities within a diverse set of host cells, including, but not limited to, macrophages and epithelial cells. We developed a luminescence reporter system to facilitate a large-scale transposon mutagenesis screen to identify genes required for growth in macrophage and epithelial cell lines. We screened 7,454 individual mutants, 269 of which exhibited reduced intracellular growth. Transposon insertions in the 269 growth-defective strains mapped to 68 different genes. FTT_0924, a gene of unknown function but highly conserved among Francisella species, was identified in this screen to be defective for intracellular growth within both macrophage and epithelial cell lines. FTT_0924 was required for full Schu S4 virulence in a murine pulmonary infection model. The ?FTT_0924 mutant bacterial membrane is permeable when replicating in hypotonic solution and within macrophages, resulting in strongly reduced viability. The permeability and reduced viability were rescued when the mutant was grown in a hypertonic solution, indicating that FTT_0924 is required for resisting osmotic stress. The ?FTT_0924 mutant was also significantly more sensitive to ?-lactam antibiotics than Schu S4. Taken together, the data strongly suggest that FTT_0924 is required for maintaining peptidoglycan integrity and virulence. PMID:25987704

  2. Exome Sequencing Identifies Three Novel Candidate Genes Implicated in Intellectual Disability

    PubMed Central

    Azam, Maleeha; Ayub, Humaira; Vissers, Lisenka E. L. M.; Gilissen, Christian; Ali, Syeda Hafiza Benish; Riaz, Moeen; Veltman, Joris A.; Pfundt, Rolph; van Bokhoven, Hans; Qamar, Raheel

    2014-01-01

    Intellectual disability (ID) is a major health problem mostly with an unknown etiology. Recently exome sequencing of individuals with ID identified novel genes implicated in the disease. Therefore the purpose of the present study was to identify the genetic cause of ID in one syndromic and two non-syndromic Pakistani families. Whole exome of three ID probands was sequenced. Missense variations in two plausible novel genes implicated in autosomal recessive ID were identified: lysine (K)-specific methyltransferase 2B (KMT2B), zinc finger protein 589 (ZNF589), as well as hedgehog acyltransferase (HHAT) with a de novo mutation with autosomal dominant mode of inheritance. The KMT2B recessive variant is the first report of recessive Kleefstra syndrome-like phenotype. Identification of plausible causative mutations for two recessive and a dominant type of ID, in genes not previously implicated in disease, underscores the large genetic heterogeneity of ID. These results also support the viewpoint that large number of ID genes converge on limited number of common networks i.e. ZNF589 belongs to KRAB-domain zinc-finger proteins previously implicated in ID, HHAT is predicted to affect sonic hedgehog, which is involved in several disorders with ID, KMT2B associated with syndromic ID fits the epigenetic module underlying the Kleefstra syndromic spectrum. The association of these novel genes in three different Pakistani ID families highlights the importance of screening these genes in more families with similar phenotypes from different populations to confirm the involvement of these genes in pathogenesis of ID. PMID:25405613

  3. Anticytokine gene therapy of autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Prud'homme, G J; Lawson, B R; Theofilopoulos, A N

    2001-05-01

    Viral and nonviral gene therapy vectors have been successfully employed to deliver inflammatory cytokine inhibitors (anticytokines), or anti-inflammatory cytokines, such as transforming growth factor beta-1 (TGF-beta 1), which protect against experimental autoimmune diseases. These vectors carry the relevant genes into a variety of tissues, for either localised or systemic release of the encoded protein. Administration of cDNA encoding soluble IFN-gamma receptor (IFN-gamma R)/IgG-Fc fusion proteins, soluble TNF-alpha receptors, or IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra), protects against either lupus, various forms of arthritis, autoimmune diabetes, or other autoimmune diseases. These inhibitors, unlike many cytokines, have little or no toxic potential. Similarly, TGF-beta 1 gene therapy protects against numerous forms of autoimmunity, though its administration entails more risk than anticytokine therapy. We have relied on the injection of naked plasmid DNA into skeletal muscle, with or without enhancement of gene transfer by in vivo electroporation. Expression plasmids offer interesting advantages over viral vectors, since they are simple to produce, non-immunogenic and nonpathogenic. They can be repeatedly administered and after each treatment the encoded proteins are produced for relatively long periods, ranging from weeks to months. Moreover, soluble receptors which block cytokine action, encoded by gene therapy vectors, can be constructed from non-immunogenic self elements that are unlikely to be neutralised by the host immune response (unlike monoclonal antibodies [mAbs]), allowing long-term gene therapy of chronic inflammatory disorders. PMID:11727511

  4. Identifying bacterial genes and endosymbiont DNA with Glimmer

    PubMed Central

    Delcher, Arthur L.; Bratke, Kirsten A.; Powers, Edwin C.; Salzberg, Steven L.

    2008-01-01

    Motivation: The Glimmer gene-finding software has been successfully used for finding genes in bacteria, archæa and viruses representing hundreds of species. We describe several major changes to the Glimmer system, including improved methods for identifying both coding regions and start codons. We also describe a new module of Glimmer that can distinguish host and endosymbiont DNA. This module was developed in response to the discovery that eukaryotic genome sequencing projects sometimes inadvertently capture the DNA of intracellular bacteria living in the host. Results: The new methods dramatically reduce the rate of false-positive predictions, while maintaining Glimmer's 99% sensitivity rate at detecting genes in most species, and they find substantially more correct start sites, as measured by comparisons to known and well-curated genes. We show that our interpolated Markov model (IMM) DNA discriminator correctly separated 99% of the sequences in a recent genome project that produced a mixture of sequences from the bacterium Prochloron didemni and its sea squirt host, Lissoclinum patella. PMID:17237039

  5. Network-based prediction and knowledge mining of disease genes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background In recent years, high-throughput protein interaction identification methods have generated a large amount of data. When combined with the results from other in vivo and in vitro experiments, a complex set of relationships between biological molecules emerges. The growing popularity of network analysis and data mining has allowed researchers to recognize indirect connections between these molecules. Due to the interdependent nature of network entities, evaluating proteins in this context can reveal relationships that may not otherwise be evident. Methods We examined the human protein interaction network as it relates to human illness using the Disease Ontology. After calculating several topological metrics, we trained an alternating decision tree (ADTree) classifier to identify disease-associated proteins. Using a bootstrapping method, we created a tree to highlight conserved characteristics shared by many of these proteins. Subsequently, we reviewed a set of non-disease-associated proteins that were misclassified by the algorithm with high confidence and searched for evidence of a disease relationship. Results Our classifier was able to predict disease-related genes with 79% area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC), which indicates the tradeoff between sensitivity and specificity and is a good predictor of how a classifier will perform on future data sets. We found that a combination of several network characteristics including degree centrality, disease neighbor ratio, eccentricity, and neighborhood connectivity help to distinguish between disease- and non-disease-related proteins. Furthermore, the ADTree allowed us to understand which combinations of strongly predictive attributes contributed most to protein-disease classification. In our post-processing evaluation, we found several examples of potential novel disease-related proteins and corresponding literature evidence. In addition, we showed that first- and second-order neighbors in the PPI network could be used to identify likely disease associations. Conclusions We analyzed the human protein interaction network and its relationship to disease and found that both the number of interactions with other proteins and the disease relationship of neighboring proteins helped to determine whether a protein had a relationship to disease. Our classifier predicted many proteins with no annotated disease association to be disease-related, which indicated that these proteins have network characteristics that are similar to disease-related proteins and may therefore have disease associations not previously identified. By performing a post-processing step after the prediction, we were able to identify evidence in literature supporting this possibility. This method could provide a useful filter for experimentalists searching for new candidate protein targets for drug repositioning and could also be extended to include other network and data types in order to refine these predictions. PMID:26043920

  6. MICA(?)078: A novel allele identified in a Moroccan individual affected by celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Piancatelli, Daniela; Oumhani, Khadija; Benelbarhdadi, Imane; Del Beato, Tiziana; Colanardi, Alessia; Sebastiani, Pierluigi; Tessitore, Alessandra; El Aouad, Rajae; Essaid, Abdellah

    2015-06-01

    A novel MICA allele, MICA(?)078, has been identified during HLA/MICA high resolution typing of Moroccan patients with celiac disease. MICA(?)078 shows an uncommon variation at a highly conserved nucleotide position (nt 493, G?A), resulting in one amino acid change at codon 142 (V?I) of MICA gene (compared to MICA(?)002:01), located in the ?2-domain, in which V142 is the common residue. PMID:25797203

  7. Disease gene identification by random walk on multigraphs merging heterogeneous genomic and phenotype data

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background High throughput experiments resulted in many genomic datasets and hundreds of candidate disease genes. To discover the real disease genes from a set of candidate genes, computational methods have been proposed and worked on various types of genomic data sources. As a single source of genomic data is prone of bias, incompleteness and noise, integration of different genomic data sources is highly demanded to accomplish reliable disease gene identification. Results In contrast to the commonly adapted data integration approach which integrates separate lists of candidate genes derived from the each single data sources, we merge various genomic networks into a multigraph which is capable of connecting multiple edges between a pair of nodes. This novel approach provides a data platform with strong noise tolerance to prioritize the disease genes. A new idea of random walk is then developed to work on multigraphs using a modified step to calculate the transition matrix. Our method is further enhanced to deal with heterogeneous data types by allowing cross-walk between phenotype and gene networks. Compared on benchmark datasets, our method is shown to be more accurate than the state-of-the-art methods in disease gene identification. We also conducted a case study to identify disease genes for Insulin-Dependent Diabetes Mellitus. Some of the newly identified disease genes are supported by recently published literature. Conclusions The proposed RWRM (Random Walk with Restart on Multigraphs) model and CHN (Complex Heterogeneous Network) model are effective in data integration for candidate gene prioritization. PMID:23282070

  8. Identifying genes that mediate anthracyline toxicity in immune cells.

    PubMed

    Frick, Amber; Suzuki, Oscar T; Benton, Cristina; Parks, Bethany; Fedoriw, Yuri; Richards, Kristy L; Thomas, Russell S; Wiltshire, Tim

    2015-01-01

    The role of the immune system in response to chemotherapeutic agents remains elusive. The interpatient variability observed in immune and chemotherapeutic cytotoxic responses is likely, at least in part, due to complex genetic differences. Through the use of a panel of genetically diverse mouse inbred strains, we developed a drug screening platform aimed at identifying genes underlying these chemotherapeutic cytotoxic effects on immune cells. Using genome-wide association studies (GWAS), we identified four genome-wide significant quantitative trait loci (QTL) that contributed to the sensitivity of doxorubicin and idarubicin in immune cells. Of particular interest, a locus on chromosome 16 was significantly associated with cell viability following idarubicin administration (p = 5.01 × 10(-8)). Within this QTL lies App, which encodes amyloid beta precursor protein. Comparison of dose-response curves verified that T-cells in App knockout mice were more sensitive to idarubicin than those of C57BL/6J control mice (p < 0.05). In conclusion, the cellular screening approach coupled with GWAS led to the identification and subsequent validation of a gene involved in T-cell viability after idarubicin treatment. Previous studies have suggested a role for App in in vitro and in vivo cytotoxicity to anticancer agents; the overexpression of App enhances resistance, while the knockdown of this gene is deleterious to cell viability. Further investigations should include performing mechanistic studies, validating additional genes from the GWAS, including Ppfia1 and Ppfibp1, and ultimately translating the findings to in vivo and human studies. PMID:25926793

  9. Gene polymorphisms and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xiaodan; Yuan, Bowei; López, Elena; Bai, Chunxue; Wang, Xiangdong

    2014-01-01

    The genetic component was suggested to contribute to the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), a major and growing public health burden. The present review aims to characterize the evidence that gene polymorphisms contribute to the aetiology of COPD and related traits, and explore the potential relationship between certain gene polymorphisms and COPD susceptibility, severity, lung function, phenotypes, or drug effects, even though limited results from related studies lacked consistency. Most of these studies were association studies, rather than confirmatory studies. More large-sized and strictly controlled studies are needed to prove the relationship between gene polymorphisms and the reviewed traits. More importantly, prospective confirmatory studies beyond initial association studies will be necessary to evaluate true relationships between gene polymorphisms and COPD and help individualized treatment for patients with COPD. PMID:24256364

  10. Analysis of human genes with protein-protein interaction network for detecting disease genes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shun-yao; Shao, Feng-jing; Sun, Ren-cheng; Sui, Yi; Wang, Ying; Wang, Jin-long

    2014-03-01

    The topological features of disease genes and non-disease genes were widely utilized in disease genes prediction. However, previous studies neglected to exploit essential genes to distinguish disease genes and non-disease genes. Therefore, this paper firstly takes essential genes as reference to analyze the topological properties of human genes with protein-protein interaction network. Empirical results demonstrate that nonessential disease genes are topologically more important and closer to the center of the network than other genes (unknown genes, which are deemed as non-disease genes in disease genes prediction). Although disease genes are closer to essential genes, we find that the influence of disease genes on essential genes is similar with other genes, or even weaker. Further, we generate new topological features according to our findings and validate the effectiveness of combining the additional features for detecting disease genes. In addition, we find that the k-shell index (ks) of protein-protein network follows a power law distribution, and the function of the proteins with the largest ks may deserve further research.

  11. Identification of susceptibility genes and genetic modifiers of human diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abel, Kenneth; Kammerer, Stefan; Hoyal, Carolyn; Reneland, Rikard; Marnellos, George; Nelson, Matthew R.; Braun, Andreas

    2005-03-01

    The completion of the human genome sequence enables the discovery of genes involved in common human disorders. The successful identification of these genes is dependent on the availability of informative sample sets, validated marker panels, a high-throughput scoring technology, and a strategy for combining these resources. We have developed a universal platform technology based on mass spectrometry (MassARRAY) for analyzing nucleic acids with high precision and accuracy. To fuel this technology, we generated more than 100,000 validated assays for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) covering virtually all known and predicted human genes. We also established a large DNA sample bank comprised of more than 50,000 consented healthy and diseased individuals. This combination of reagents and technology allows the execution of large-scale genome-wide association studies. Taking advantage of MassARRAY"s capability for quantitative analysis of nucleic acids, allele frequencies are estimated in sample pools containing large numbers of individual DNAs. To compare pools as a first-pass "filtering" step is a tremendous advantage in throughput and cost over individual genotyping. We employed this approach in numerous genome-wide, hypothesis-free searches to identify genes associated with common complex diseases, such as breast cancer, osteoporosis, and osteoarthritis, and genes involved in quantitative traits like high density lipoproteins cholesterol (HDL-c) levels and central fat. Access to additional well-characterized patient samples through collaborations allows us to conduct replication studies that validate true disease genes. These discoveries will expand our understanding of genetic disease predisposition, and our ability for early diagnosis and determination of specific disease subtype or progression stage.

  12. Gene Network Analysis of Small Molecules with Autoimmune Disease Associated Genes Predicts a Novel Strategy for Drug Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Maiti, Amit K.; Nath, Swapan K.

    2012-01-01

    Numerous genes/SNPs in autoimmune diseases (ADs) are identified through genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and likely to contribute in developing autoimmune phenotypes. Constructions of biologically meaningful pathways are necessary to determine how these genes interact each other and with other small molecules to develop various complex ADs phenotypes prior to beginning time-consuming rigorous experimentation. We have constructed biological pathways with genetically identified genes leading to shared ADs phenotypes. Various environmental and endogenous factors interact with these ADs associated genes suggesting their critical role in developing diseases and further association studies could be designed for assessing the role of these factors with risk allele in a specific gene. Additionally, existing drugs that have been used long before the identification of these genetically associated genes also interact with these newly associated genes. Thus advanced therapeutic strategies could be designed by grouping patients with risk allele(s) in particular genes that directly or closely interact with the specified drugs. This drug-susceptible gene network will not only increase our understanding about the additional molecular basis for effectiveness against these diseases but also which drug could be more effective for those patients carrying risk allele(s) in that gene. Additionally, we have also identified several interlinking genes in the pathways that could be used for designing future association studies. PMID:23000205

  13. Characterization of TCF21 Downstream Target Regions Identifies a Transcriptional Network Linking Multiple Independent Coronary Artery Disease Loci.

    PubMed

    Sazonova, Olga; Zhao, Yuqi; Nürnberg, Sylvia; Miller, Clint; Pjanic, Milos; Castano, Victor G; Kim, Juyong B; Salfati, Elias L; Kundaje, Anshul B; Bejerano, Gill; Assimes, Themistocles; Yang, Xia; Quertermous, Thomas

    2015-05-01

    To functionally link coronary artery disease (CAD) causal genes identified by genome wide association studies (GWAS), and to investigate the cellular and molecular mechanisms of atherosclerosis, we have used chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-Seq) with the CAD associated transcription factor TCF21 in human coronary artery smooth muscle cells (HCASMC). Analysis of identified TCF21 target genes for enrichment of molecular and cellular annotation terms identified processes relevant to CAD pathophysiology, including "growth factor binding," "matrix interaction," and "smooth muscle contraction." We characterized the canonical binding sequence for TCF21 as CAGCTG, identified AP-1 binding sites in TCF21 peaks, and by conducting ChIP-Seq for JUN and JUND in HCASMC confirmed that there is significant overlap between TCF21 and AP-1 binding loci in this cell type. Expression quantitative trait variation mapped to target genes of TCF21 was significantly enriched among variants with low P-values in the GWAS analyses, suggesting a possible functional interaction between TCF21 binding and causal variants in other CAD disease loci. Separate enrichment analyses found over-representation of TCF21 target genes among CAD associated genes, and linkage disequilibrium between TCF21 peak variation and that found in GWAS loci, consistent with the hypothesis that TCF21 may affect disease risk through interaction with other disease associated loci. Interestingly, enrichment for TCF21 target genes was also found among other genome wide association phenotypes, including height and inflammatory bowel disease, suggesting a functional profile important for basic cellular processes in non-vascular tissues. Thus, data and analyses presented here suggest that study of GWAS transcription factors may be a highly useful approach to identifying disease gene interactions and thus pathways that may be relevant to complex disease etiology. PMID:26020271

  14. Characterization of TCF21 Downstream Target Regions Identifies a Transcriptional Network Linking Multiple Independent Coronary Artery Disease Loci

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Clint; Pjanic, Milos; Castano, Victor G.; Kim, Juyong B.; Salfati, Elias L.; Kundaje, Anshul B.; Bejerano, Gill; Assimes, Themistocles; Yang, Xia; Quertermous, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    To functionally link coronary artery disease (CAD) causal genes identified by genome wide association studies (GWAS), and to investigate the cellular and molecular mechanisms of atherosclerosis, we have used chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-Seq) with the CAD associated transcription factor TCF21 in human coronary artery smooth muscle cells (HCASMC). Analysis of identified TCF21 target genes for enrichment of molecular and cellular annotation terms identified processes relevant to CAD pathophysiology, including “growth factor binding,” “matrix interaction,” and “smooth muscle contraction.” We characterized the canonical binding sequence for TCF21 as CAGCTG, identified AP-1 binding sites in TCF21 peaks, and by conducting ChIP-Seq for JUN and JUND in HCASMC confirmed that there is significant overlap between TCF21 and AP-1 binding loci in this cell type. Expression quantitative trait variation mapped to target genes of TCF21 was significantly enriched among variants with low P-values in the GWAS analyses, suggesting a possible functional interaction between TCF21 binding and causal variants in other CAD disease loci. Separate enrichment analyses found over-representation of TCF21 target genes among CAD associated genes, and linkage disequilibrium between TCF21 peak variation and that found in GWAS loci, consistent with the hypothesis that TCF21 may affect disease risk through interaction with other disease associated loci. Interestingly, enrichment for TCF21 target genes was also found among other genome wide association phenotypes, including height and inflammatory bowel disease, suggesting a functional profile important for basic cellular processes in non-vascular tissues. Thus, data and analyses presented here suggest that study of GWAS transcription factors may be a highly useful approach to identifying disease gene interactions and thus pathways that may be relevant to complex disease etiology. PMID:26020271

  15. Inferring Gene Family Histories in Yeast Identifies Lineage Specific Expansions

    E-print Network

    Ames, Ryan M.; Money, Daniel; Lovell, Simon C.

    2014-06-12

    The complement of genes found in the genome is a balance between gene gain and gene loss. Knowledge of the specific genes that are gained and lost over evolutionary time allows an understanding of the evolution of biological ...

  16. Gene expression analyses identify Narp contribution in the development of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia.

    PubMed

    Charbonnier-Beaupel, Fanny; Malerbi, Marion; Alcacer, Cristina; Tahiri, Khadija; Carpentier, Wassila; Wang, Chuansong; During, Matthew; Xu, Desheng; Worley, Paul F; Girault, Jean-Antoine; Hervé, Denis; Corvol, Jean-Christophe

    2015-01-01

    In Parkinson's disease, long-term dopamine replacement therapy is complicated by the appearance of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia (LID). One major hypothesis is that LID results from an aberrant transcriptional program in striatal neurons induced by L-DOPA and triggered by the activation of ERK. To identify these genes, we performed transcriptome analyses in the striatum in 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned mice. A time course analysis (0-6 h after treatment with L-DOPA) identified an acute signature of 709 genes, among which genes involved in protein phosphatase activity were overrepresented, suggesting a negative feedback on ERK activation by l-DOPA. l-DOPA-dependent deregulation of 28 genes was blocked by pretreatment with SL327, an inhibitor of ERK activation, and 26 genes were found differentially expressed between highly and weakly dyskinetic animals after treatment with L-DOPA. The intersection list identified five genes: FosB, Th, Nptx2, Nedd4l, and Ccrn4l. Nptx2 encodes neuronal pentraxin II (or neuronal activity-regulated pentraxin, Narp), which is involved in the clustering of glutamate receptors. We confirmed increased Nptx2 expression after L-DOPA and its blockade by SL327 using quantitative RT-PCR in independent experiments. Using an escalating L-DOPA dose protocol, LID severity was decreased in Narp knock-out mice compared with their wild-type littermates or after overexpression of a dominant-negative form of Narp in the striatum. In conclusion, we have identified a molecular signature induced by L-DOPA in the dopamine-denervated striatum that is dependent on ERK and associated with LID. Here, we demonstrate the implication of one of these genes, Nptx2, in the development of LID. PMID:25568106

  17. Fabry disease: six gene rearrangements and an exonic point mutation in the alpha-galactosidase gene.

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, H S; Bishop, D F; Astrin, K H; Kornreich, R; Eng, C M; Sakuraba, H; Desnick, R J

    1989-01-01

    Fabry disease, an X-linked recessive disorder of glycosphingolipid catabolism, results from the deficient activity of the lysosomal hydrolase, alpha-galactosidase. Southern hybridization analysis of the alpha-galactosidase gene in affected hemizygous males from 130 unrelated families with Fabry disease revealed six with different gene rearrangements and one with an exonic point mutation resulting in the obliteration of an Msp I restriction site. Five partial gene deletions were detected ranging in size from 0.4 to greater than 5.5 kb. Four of these deletions had breakpoints in intron 2, a region in the gene containing multiple Alu repeat sequences. A sixth genomic rearrangement was identified in which a region of about 8 kb, containing exons 2 through 6, was duplicated by a homologous, but unequal crossover event. The Msp I site obliteration, which mapped to exon 7, was detected in an affected hemizygote who had residual enzyme activity. Genomic amplification by the polymerase chain reaction and sequencing revealed that the obliteration resulted from a C to T transition at nucleotide 1066 in the coding sequence. This point mutation, the first identified in Fabry disease, resulted in an arginine356 to tryptophan356 substitution which altered the enzyme's kinetic and stability properties. The detection of these abnormalities provided for the precise identification of Fabry heterozygotes, thereby permitting molecular pedigree analysis in these families which revealed paternity exclusions and the first documented new mutations in this disease. Images PMID:2539398

  18. Global transcriptome analysis of formalin-fixed prostate cancer specimens identifies biomarkers of disease recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Long, Qi; Xu, Jianpeng; Osunkoya, Adeboye O.; Sannigrahi, Soma; Johnson, Brent A.; Zhou, Wei; Gillespie, Theresa; Park, Jong Y.; Nam, Robert K.; Sugar, Linda; Stanimirovic, Aleksandra; Seth, Arun K.; Petros, John A.; Moreno, Carlos S.

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer remains the second leading cause of cancer death in American men and there is an unmet need for biomarkers to identify patients with aggressive disease. In an effort to identify biomarkers of recurrence, we performed global RNA sequencing on 106 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) prostatectomy samples from 100 patients at three independent sites, defining a 24-gene signature panel. The 24 genes in this panel function in cell cycle progression, angiogenesis, hypoxia, apoptosis, PI3K signaling, steroid metabolism, translation, chromatin modification and transcription. Sixteen genes have been associated with cancer with five specifically associated with prostate cancer (BTG2, IGFBP3, SIRT1, MXI1 and FDPS). Validation was performed on an independent publicly available dataset of 140 patients, where the new signature panel outperformed markers published previously in terms of predicting biochemical recurrence (BCR). Our work also identified differences in gene expression between Gleason Pattern 4+3 and 3+4 tumors, including several genes involved in the epithelial to mesenchymal transition and developmental pathways. Overall, this study defines a novel biomarker panel that has the potential to improve the clinical management of prostate cancer. PMID:24713434

  19. Prion disease induced alterations in gene expression in spleen and brain prior to clinical symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyeon O; Snyder, Greg P; Blazey, Tyler M; Race, Richard E; Chesebro, Bruce; Skinner, Pamela J

    2008-01-01

    Prion diseases are fatal neurodegenerative disorders that affect animals and humans. There is a need to gain understanding of prion disease pathogenesis and to develop diagnostic assays to detect prion diseases prior to the onset of clinical symptoms. The goal of this study was to identify genes that show altered expression early in the disease process in the spleen and brain of prion disease-infected mice. Using Affymetrix microarrays, we identified 67 genes that showed increased expression in the brains of prion disease-infected mice prior to the onset of clinical symptoms. These genes function in many cellular processes including immunity, the endosome/lysosome system, hormone activity, and the cytoskeleton. We confirmed a subset of these gene expression alterations using other methods and determined the time course in which these changes occur. We also identified 14 genes showing altered expression prior to the onset of clinical symptoms in spleens of prion disease infected mice. Interestingly, four genes, Atp1b1, Gh, Anp32a, and Grn, were altered at the very early time of 46 days post-infection. These gene expression alterations provide insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying prion disease pathogenesis and may serve as surrogate markers for the early detection and diagnosis of prion disease. PMID:21918605

  20. Integrated Model of De Novo and Inherited Genetic Variants Yields Greater Power to Identify Risk Genes

    PubMed Central

    He, Xin; Sanders, Stephan J.; Liu, Li; De Rubeis, Silvia; Lim, Elaine T.; Sutcliffe, James S.; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Daly, Mark J.; Buxbaum, Joseph D.; State, Matthew W.; Devlin, Bernie; Roeder, Kathryn

    2013-01-01

    De novo mutations affect risk for many diseases and disorders, especially those with early-onset. An example is autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Four recent whole-exome sequencing (WES) studies of ASD families revealed a handful of novel risk genes, based on independent de novo loss-of-function (LoF) mutations falling in the same gene, and found that de novo LoF mutations occurred at a twofold higher rate than expected by chance. However successful these studies were, they used only a small fraction of the data, excluding other types of de novo mutations and inherited rare variants. Moreover, such analyses cannot readily incorporate data from case-control studies. An important research challenge in gene discovery, therefore, is to develop statistical methods that accommodate a broader class of rare variation. We develop methods that can incorporate WES data regarding de novo mutations, inherited variants present, and variants identified within cases and controls. TADA, for Transmission And De novo Association, integrates these data by a gene-based likelihood model involving parameters for allele frequencies and gene-specific penetrances. Inference is based on a Hierarchical Bayes strategy that borrows information across all genes to infer parameters that would be difficult to estimate for individual genes. In addition to theoretical development we validated TADA using realistic simulations mimicking rare, large-effect mutations affecting risk for ASD and show it has dramatically better power than other common methods of analysis. Thus TADA's integration of various kinds of WES data can be a highly effective means of identifying novel risk genes. Indeed, application of TADA to WES data from subjects with ASD and their families, as well as from a study of ASD subjects and controls, revealed several novel and promising ASD candidate genes with strong statistical support. PMID:23966865

  1. Brain Expression Genome-Wide Association Study (eGWAS) Identifies Human Disease-Associated Variants

    PubMed Central

    Crook, Julia; Pankratz, V. Shane; Carrasquillo, Minerva M.; Rowley, Christopher N.; Nair, Asha A.; Middha, Sumit; Maharjan, Sooraj; Nguyen, Thuy; Ma, Li; Malphrus, Kimberly G.; Palusak, Ryan; Lincoln, Sarah; Bisceglio, Gina; Georgescu, Constantin; Kouri, Naomi; Kolbert, Christopher P.; Jen, Jin; Haines, Jonathan L.; Mayeux, Richard; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; Farrer, Lindsay A.; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Petersen, Ronald C.; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Dickson, Dennis W.; Younkin, Steven G.; Ertekin-Taner, Nilüfer

    2012-01-01

    Genetic variants that modify brain gene expression may also influence risk for human diseases. We measured expression levels of 24,526 transcripts in brain samples from the cerebellum and temporal cortex of autopsied subjects with Alzheimer's disease (AD, cerebellar n?=?197, temporal cortex n?=?202) and with other brain pathologies (non–AD, cerebellar n?=?177, temporal cortex n?=?197). We conducted an expression genome-wide association study (eGWAS) using 213,528 cisSNPs within ±100 kb of the tested transcripts. We identified 2,980 cerebellar cisSNP/transcript level associations (2,596 unique cisSNPs) significant in both ADs and non–ADs (q<0.05, p?=?7.70×10?5–1.67×10?82). Of these, 2,089 were also significant in the temporal cortex (p?=?1.85×10?5–1.70×10?141). The top cerebellar cisSNPs had 2.4-fold enrichment for human disease-associated variants (p<10?6). We identified novel cisSNP/transcript associations for human disease-associated variants, including progressive supranuclear palsy SLCO1A2/rs11568563, Parkinson's disease (PD) MMRN1/rs6532197, Paget's disease OPTN/rs1561570; and we confirmed others, including PD MAPT/rs242557, systemic lupus erythematosus and ulcerative colitis IRF5/rs4728142, and type 1 diabetes mellitus RPS26/rs1701704. In our eGWAS, there was 2.9–3.3 fold enrichment (p<10?6) of significant cisSNPs with suggestive AD–risk association (p<10?3) in the Alzheimer's Disease Genetics Consortium GWAS. These results demonstrate the significant contributions of genetic factors to human brain gene expression, which are reliably detected across different brain regions and pathologies. The significant enrichment of brain cisSNPs among disease-associated variants advocates gene expression changes as a mechanism for many central nervous system (CNS) and non–CNS diseases. Combined assessment of expression and disease GWAS may provide complementary information in discovery of human disease variants with functional implications. Our findings have implications for the design and interpretation of eGWAS in general and the use of brain expression quantitative trait loci in the study of human disease genetics. PMID:22685416

  2. Brain expression genome-wide association study (eGWAS) identifies human disease-associated variants.

    PubMed

    Zou, Fanggeng; Chai, High Seng; Younkin, Curtis S; Allen, Mariet; Crook, Julia; Pankratz, V Shane; Carrasquillo, Minerva M; Rowley, Christopher N; Nair, Asha A; Middha, Sumit; Maharjan, Sooraj; Nguyen, Thuy; Ma, Li; Malphrus, Kimberly G; Palusak, Ryan; Lincoln, Sarah; Bisceglio, Gina; Georgescu, Constantin; Kouri, Naomi; Kolbert, Christopher P; Jen, Jin; Haines, Jonathan L; Mayeux, Richard; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A; Farrer, Lindsay A; Schellenberg, Gerard D; Petersen, Ronald C; Graff-Radford, Neill R; Dickson, Dennis W; Younkin, Steven G; Ertekin-Taner, Nilüfer

    2012-01-01

    Genetic variants that modify brain gene expression may also influence risk for human diseases. We measured expression levels of 24,526 transcripts in brain samples from the cerebellum and temporal cortex of autopsied subjects with Alzheimer's disease (AD, cerebellar n=197, temporal cortex n=202) and with other brain pathologies (non-AD, cerebellar n=177, temporal cortex n=197). We conducted an expression genome-wide association study (eGWAS) using 213,528 cisSNPs within ± 100 kb of the tested transcripts. We identified 2,980 cerebellar cisSNP/transcript level associations (2,596 unique cisSNPs) significant in both ADs and non-ADs (q<0.05, p=7.70 × 10(-5)-1.67 × 10(-82)). Of these, 2,089 were also significant in the temporal cortex (p=1.85 × 10(-5)-1.70 × 10(-141)). The top cerebellar cisSNPs had 2.4-fold enrichment for human disease-associated variants (p<10(-6)). We identified novel cisSNP/transcript associations for human disease-associated variants, including progressive supranuclear palsy SLCO1A2/rs11568563, Parkinson's disease (PD) MMRN1/rs6532197, Paget's disease OPTN/rs1561570; and we confirmed others, including PD MAPT/rs242557, systemic lupus erythematosus and ulcerative colitis IRF5/rs4728142, and type 1 diabetes mellitus RPS26/rs1701704. In our eGWAS, there was 2.9-3.3 fold enrichment (p<10(-6)) of significant cisSNPs with suggestive AD-risk association (p<10(-3)) in the Alzheimer's Disease Genetics Consortium GWAS. These results demonstrate the significant contributions of genetic factors to human brain gene expression, which are reliably detected across different brain regions and pathologies. The significant enrichment of brain cisSNPs among disease-associated variants advocates gene expression changes as a mechanism for many central nervous system (CNS) and non-CNS diseases. Combined assessment of expression and disease GWAS may provide complementary information in discovery of human disease variants with functional implications. Our findings have implications for the design and interpretation of eGWAS in general and the use of brain expression quantitative trait loci in the study of human disease genetics. PMID:22685416

  3. Missense Mutations in Disease Genes: A Bayesian Approach to Evaluate Causality

    E-print Network

    West, Mike

    community to map the human genome and identify disease causing genes has been successful in advancing our knowledge in a number of areas, such as molecular technology leading to more rapid cloning and sequencing

  4. Inflammatory bowel disease gene discovery. CRADA final report

    SciTech Connect

    NONE

    1997-09-09

    The ultimate goal of this project is to identify the human gene(s) responsible for the disorder known as IBD. The work was planned in two phases. The desired products resulting from Phase 1 were BAC clone(s) containing the genetic marker(s) identified by gene/Networks, Inc. as potentially linked to IBD, plasmid subclones of those BAC(s), and new genetic markers developed from these plasmid subclones. The newly developed markers would be genotyped by gene/Networks, Inc. to ascertain evidence for linkage or non-linkage of IBD to this region. If non-linkage was indicated, the project would move to investigation of other candidate chromosomal regions. Where linkage was indicated, the project would move to Phase 2, in which a physical map of the candidate region(s) would be developed. The products of this phase would be contig(s) of BAC clones in the region exhibiting linkage to IBD, as well as plasmic subclones of the BACs and further genetic marker development. There would also be continued genotyping with new polymorphic markers during this phase. It was anticipated that clones identified and developed during these two phases would provide the physical resources for eventual disease gene discovery.

  5. Gene therapy of chronic granulomatous disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M Grez; S Becker; S Saulnier; H Knö?; MG Ott; A Maurer; MC Dinauer; D Hoelzer; R Seger; JP Hossle

    2000-01-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) is a primary immunodeficiency disorder which results from absence or malfunction of the respiratory burst oxidase normally expressed in neutrophils and other phagocytic leukocytes. Two-thirds of the patients are males hemizygous for mutations in the X-linked gene coding for gp91-phox. As a therapeutic approach towards the X-linked form of CGD bicistronic retroviral vectors containing the gp91-phox

  6. A systems approach identifies networks and genes linking sleep and stress: implications for neuropsychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Peng; Scarpa, Joseph R; Fitzpatrick, Karrie; Losic, Bojan; Gao, Vance D; Hao, Ke; Summa, Keith C; Yang, He S; Zhang, Bin; Allada, Ravi; Vitaterna, Martha H; Turek, Fred W; Kasarskis, Andrew

    2015-05-01

    Sleep dysfunction and stress susceptibility are comorbid complex traits that often precede and predispose patients to a variety of neuropsychiatric diseases. Here, we demonstrate multilevel organizations of genetic landscape, candidate genes, and molecular networks associated with 328 stress and sleep traits in a chronically stressed population of 338 (C57BL/6J × A/J) F2 mice. We constructed striatal gene co-expression networks, revealing functionally and cell-type-specific gene co-regulations important for stress and sleep. Using a composite ranking system, we identified network modules most relevant for 15 independent phenotypic categories, highlighting a mitochondria/synaptic module that links sleep and stress. The key network regulators of this module are overrepresented with genes implicated in neuropsychiatric diseases. Our work suggests that the interplay among sleep, stress, and neuropathology emerges from genetic influences on gene expression and their collective organization through complex molecular networks, providing a framework for interrogating the mechanisms underlying sleep, stress susceptibility, and related neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:25921536

  7. Integrative Analysis of GWASs, Human Protein Interaction, and Gene Expression Identified Gene Modules Associated With BMDs

    PubMed Central

    He, Hao; Zhang, Lei; Li, Jian; Wang, Yu-Ping; Zhang, Ji-Gang; Shen, Jie; Guo, Yan-Fang

    2014-01-01

    Context: To date, few systems genetics studies in the bone field have been performed. We designed our study from a systems-level perspective by integrating genome-wide association studies (GWASs), human protein-protein interaction (PPI) network, and gene expression to identify gene modules contributing to osteoporosis risk. Methods: First we searched for modules significantly enriched with bone mineral density (BMD)-associated genes in human PPI network by using 2 large meta-analysis GWAS datasets through a dense module search algorithm. One included 7 individual GWAS samples (Meta7). The other was from the Genetic Factors for Osteoporosis Consortium (GEFOS2). One was assigned as a discovery dataset and the other as an evaluation dataset, and vice versa. Results: In total, 42 modules and 129 modules were identified significantly in both Meta7 and GEFOS2 datasets for femoral neck and spine BMD, respectively. There were 3340 modules identified for hip BMD only in Meta7. As candidate modules, they were assessed for the biological relevance to BMD by gene set enrichment analysis in 2 expression profiles generated from circulating monocytes in subjects with low versus high BMD values. Interestingly, there were 2 modules significantly enriched in monocytes from the low BMD group in both gene expression datasets (nominal P value <.05). Two modules had 16 nonredundant genes. Functional enrichment analysis revealed that both modules were enriched for genes involved in Wnt receptor signaling and osteoblast differentiation. Conclusion: We highlighted 2 modules and novel genes playing important roles in the regulation of bone mass, providing important clues for therapeutic approaches for osteoporosis. PMID:25119315

  8. Predicting environmental chemical factors associated with disease-related gene expression data

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Many common diseases arise from an interaction between environmental and genetic factors. Our knowledge regarding environment and gene interactions is growing, but frameworks to build an association between gene-environment interactions and disease using preexisting, publicly available data has been lacking. Integrating freely-available environment-gene interaction and disease phenotype data would allow hypothesis generation for potential environmental associations to disease. Methods We integrated publicly available disease-specific gene expression microarray data and curated chemical-gene interaction data to systematically predict environmental chemicals associated with disease. We derived chemical-gene signatures for 1,338 chemical/environmental chemicals from the Comparative Toxicogenomics Database (CTD). We associated these chemical-gene signatures with differentially expressed genes from datasets found in the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) through an enrichment test. Results We were able to verify our analytic method by accurately identifying chemicals applied to samples and cell lines. Furthermore, we were able to predict known and novel environmental associations with prostate, lung, and breast cancers, such as estradiol and bisphenol A. Conclusions We have developed a scalable and statistical method to identify possible environmental associations with disease using publicly available data and have validated some of the associations in the literature. PMID:20459635

  9. Exome sequencing identifies MPL as a causative gene in familial aplastic anemia

    PubMed Central

    Walne, Amanda J.; Dokal, Arran; Plagnol, Vincent; Beswick, Richard; Kirwan, Michael; de la Fuente, Josu; Vulliamy, Tom; Dokal, Inderjeet

    2012-01-01

    The primary cause of aplastic anemia remains unknown in many patients. The aim of this study was to clarify the genetic cause of familial aplastic anemia. Genomic DNA of an affected individual from a multiplex consanguineous family was hybridized to a Nimblegen exome library before being sequenced on a GAIIx genome analyzer. Once the disease causing homozygous mutation had been confirmed in the consanguineous family, this gene was then analyzed for mutation in 33 uncharacterized index cases of aplastic anemia (<13 years) using denaturing HPLC. Abnormal traces were confirmed by direct sequencing. Exome sequencing identified a novel homozygous nonsense mutation in the thrombopoietin receptor gene MPL. An additional novel homozygous MPL mutation was identified in the screen of 33 aplastic anemia patients. This study shows for the first time a link between homozygous MPL mutations and familial aplastic anemia. It also highlights the important role of MPL in trilineage hematopoiesis. PMID:22180433

  10. Subnetwork-based analysis of chronic lymphocytic leukemia identifies pathways that associate with disease progression

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Han-Yu; Rassenti, Laura; Salcedo, Michelle; Licon, Kate; Kohlmann, Alexander; Haferlach, Torsten; Foà, Robin

    2012-01-01

    The clinical course of patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is heterogeneous. Several prognostic factors have been identified that can stratify patients into groups that differ in their relative tendency for disease progression and/or survival. Here, we pursued a subnetwork-based analysis of gene expression profiles to discriminate between groups of patients with disparate risks for CLL progression. From an initial cohort of 130 patients, we identified 38 prognostic subnetworks that could predict the relative risk for disease progression requiring therapy from the time of sample collection, more accurately than established markers. The prognostic power of these subnetworks then was validated on 2 other cohorts of patients. We noted reduced divergence in gene expression between leukemia cells of CLL patients classified at diagnosis with aggressive versus indolent disease over time. The predictive subnetworks vary in levels of expression over time but exhibit increased similarity at later time points before therapy, suggesting that degenerate pathways apparently converge into common pathways that are associated with disease progression. As such, these results have implications for understanding cancer evolution and for the development of novel treatment strategies for patients with CLL. PMID:22837534

  11. Subnetwork-based analysis of chronic lymphocytic leukemia identifies pathways that associate with disease progression.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Han-Yu; Rassenti, Laura; Salcedo, Michelle; Licon, Kate; Kohlmann, Alexander; Haferlach, Torsten; Foà, Robin; Ideker, Trey; Kipps, Thomas J

    2012-09-27

    The clinical course of patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) is heterogeneous. Several prognostic factors have been identified that can stratify patients into groups that differ in their relative tendency for disease progression and/or survival. Here, we pursued a subnetwork-based analysis of gene expression profiles to discriminate between groups of patients with disparate risks for CLL progression. From an initial cohort of 130 patients, we identified 38 prognostic subnetworks that could predict the relative risk for disease progression requiring therapy from the time of sample collection, more accurately than established markers. The prognostic power of these subnetworks then was validated on 2 other cohorts of patients. We noted reduced divergence in gene expression between leukemia cells of CLL patients classified at diagnosis with aggressive versus indolent disease over time. The predictive subnetworks vary in levels of expression over time but exhibit increased similarity at later time points before therapy, suggesting that degenerate pathways apparently converge into common pathways that are associated with disease progression. As such, these results have implications for understanding cancer evolution and for the development of novel treatment strategies for patients with CLL. PMID:22837534

  12. Uncover disease genes by maximizing information flow in the phenome–interactome network

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yong; Jiang, Tao; Jiang, Rui

    2011-01-01

    Motivation: Pinpointing genes that underlie human inherited diseases among candidate genes in susceptibility genetic regions is the primary step towards the understanding of pathogenesis of diseases. Although several probabilistic models have been proposed to prioritize candidate genes using phenotype similarities and protein–protein interactions, no combinatorial approaches have been proposed in the literature. Results: We propose the first combinatorial approach for prioritizing candidate genes. We first construct a phenome–interactome network by integrating the given phenotype similarity profile, protein–protein interaction network and associations between diseases and genes. Then, we introduce a computational method called MAXIF to maximize the information flow in this network for uncovering genes that underlie diseases. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this method in prioritizing candidate genes through a series of cross-validation experiments, and we show the possibility of using this method to identify diseases with which a query gene may be associated. We demonstrate the competitive performance of our method through a comparison with two existing state-of-the-art methods, and we analyze the robustness of our method with respect to the parameters involved. As an example application, we apply our method to predict driver genes in 50 copy number aberration regions of melanoma. Our method is not only able to identify several driver genes that have been reported in the literature, it also shed some new biological insights on the understanding of the modular property and transcriptional regulation scheme of these driver genes. Contact: ruijiang@tsinghua.edu.cn PMID:21685067

  13. Contig maps and genomic sequencing identify candidate genes in the usher 1C locus.

    PubMed

    Higgins, M J; Day, C D; Smilinich, N J; Ni, L; Cooper, P R; Nowak, N J; Davies, C; de Jong, P J; Hejtmancik, F; Evans, G A; Smith, R J; Shows, T B

    1998-01-01

    Usher syndrome 1C (USH1C) is a congenital condition manifesting profound hearing loss, the absence of vestibular function, and eventual retinal degeneration. The USH1C locus has been mapped genetically to a 2- to 3-cM interval in 11p14-15.1 between D11S899 and D11S861. In an effort to identify the USH1C disease gene we have isolated the region between these markers in yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) using a combination of STS content mapping and Alu-PCR hybridization. The YAC contig is approximately 3.5 Mb and has located several other loci within this interval, resulting in the order CEN-LDHA-SAA1-TPH-D11S1310-(D11S1888/KCNC1 )-MYOD1-D11S902D11S921-D11S 1890-TEL. Subsequent haplotyping and homozygosity analysis refined the location of the disease gene to a 400-kb interval between D11S902 and D11S1890 with all affected individuals being homozygous for the internal marker D11S921. To facilitate gene identification, the critical region has been converted into P1 artificial chromosome (PAC) clones using sequence-tagged sites (STSs) mapped to the YAC contig, Alu-PCR products generated from the YACs, and PAC end probes. A contig of >50 PAC clones has been assembled between D11S1310 and D11S1890, confirming the order of markers used in haplotyping. Three PAC clones representing nearly two-thirds of the USH1C critical region have been sequenced. PowerBLAST analysis identified six clusters of expressed sequence tags (ESTs), two known genes (BIR, SUR1) mapped previously to this region, and a previously characterized but unmapped gene NEFA (DNA binding/EF hand/acidic amino-acid-rich). GRAIL analysis identified 11 CpG islands and 73 exons of excellent quality. These data allowed the construction of a transcription map for the USH1C critical region, consisting of three known genes and six or more novel transcripts. Based on their map location, these loci represent candidate disease loci for USH1C. The NEFA gene was assessed as the USH1C locus by the sequencing of an amplified NEFA cDNA from an USH1C patient; however, no mutations were detected. PMID:9445488

  14. EvoTol: a protein-sequence based evolutionary intolerance framework for disease-gene prioritization

    PubMed Central

    Rackham, Owen J. L.; Shihab, Hashem A.; Johnson, Michael R.; Petretto, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    Methods to interpret personal genome sequences are increasingly required. Here, we report a novel framework (EvoTol) to identify disease-causing genes using patient sequence data from within protein coding-regions. EvoTol quantifies a gene's intolerance to mutation using evolutionary conservation of protein sequences and can incorporate tissue-specific gene expression data. We apply this framework to the analysis of whole-exome sequence data in epilepsy and congenital heart disease, and demonstrate EvoTol's ability to identify known disease-causing genes is unmatched by competing methods. Application of EvoTol to the human interactome revealed networks enriched for genes intolerant to protein sequence variation, informing novel polygenic contributions to human disease. PMID:25550428

  15. Hyperoxia-induced neurodegeneration as a tool to identify neuroprotective genes in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Gruenewald, Christoph; Botella, Jose A; Bayersdorfer, Florian; Navarro, Juan A; Schneuwly, Stephan

    2009-06-15

    Oxidative stress has been reported to be a common underlying mechanism in the pathogenesis of many neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer, Huntington, Creutzfeld-Jakob, and Parkinson disease. Despite the increasing number of articles showing a correlation between oxidative damage and neurodegeneration little is known about the genetic elements that confer protection against the deleterious effects of an oxidative imbalance in neurons. We show that oxygen-induced damage is a direct cause of brain degeneration in Drosophila and establish an experimental setup measuring dopaminergic neuron survival to model oxidative stress-induced neurodegeneration in flies. The overexpression of superoxide dismutase but not catalase was able to protect dopaminergic neurons against oxidative imbalance under hyperoxia treatment. In an effort to identify new genes involved in the process of oxidative stress-induced neurodegeneration, we have carried out a genome-wide expression analysis to identify genes whose expression is upregulated in fly heads under hyperoxia. Among them, a number of mitochondrial and cytoplasmic chaperones could be identified and were shown to protect dopaminergic neurons when overexpressed, thus validating our approach to identifying new genes involved in the neuronal defense mechanism against oxidative stress. PMID:19345730

  16. Integrated sequence analysis pipeline provides one-stop solution for identifying disease-causing mutations.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hao; Wienker, Thomas F; Musante, Luciana; Kalscheuer, Vera M; Kahrizi, Kimia; Najmabadi, Hossein; Ropers, H Hilger

    2014-12-01

    Next-generation sequencing has greatly accelerated the search for disease-causing defects, but even for experts the data analysis can be a major challenge. To facilitate the data processing in a clinical setting, we have developed a novel medical resequencing analysis pipeline (MERAP). MERAP assesses the quality of sequencing, and has optimized capacity for calling variants, including single-nucleotide variants, insertions and deletions, copy-number variation, and other structural variants. MERAP identifies polymorphic and known causal variants by filtering against public domain databases, and flags nonsynonymous and splice-site changes. MERAP uses a logistic model to estimate the causal likelihood of a given missense variant. MERAP considers the relevant information such as phenotype and interaction with known disease-causing genes. MERAP compares favorably with GATK, one of the widely used tools, because of its higher sensitivity for detecting indels, its easy installation, and its economical use of computational resources. Upon testing more than 1,200 individuals with mutations in known and novel disease genes, MERAP proved highly reliable, as illustrated here for five families with disease-causing variants. We believe that the clinical implementation of MERAP will expedite the diagnostic process of many disease-causing defects. PMID:25219469

  17. Combining gene expression and genetic analyses to identify candidate genes involved in cold responses in pea.

    PubMed

    Legrand, Sylvain; Marque, Gilles; Blassiau, Christelle; Bluteau, Aurélie; Canoy, Anne-Sophie; Fontaine, Véronique; Jaminon, Odile; Bahrman, Nasser; Mautord, Julie; Morin, Julie; Petit, Aurélie; Baranger, Alain; Rivière, Nathalie; Wilmer, Jeroen; Delbreil, Bruno; Lejeune-Hénaut, Isabelle

    2013-09-01

    Cold stress affects plant growth and development. In order to better understand the responses to cold (chilling or freezing tolerance), we used two contrasted pea lines. Following a chilling period, the Champagne line becomes tolerant to frost whereas the Terese line remains sensitive. Four suppression subtractive hybridisation libraries were obtained using mRNAs isolated from pea genotypes Champagne and Terese. Using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) performed on 159 genes, 43 and 54 genes were identified as differentially expressed at the initial time point and during the time course study, respectively. Molecular markers were developed from the differentially expressed genes and were genotyped on a population of 164 RILs derived from a cross between Champagne and Terese. We identified 5 candidate genes colocalizing with 3 different frost damage quantitative trait loci (QTL) intervals and a protein quantity locus (PQL) rich region previously reported. This investigation revealed the role of constitutive differences between both genotypes in the cold responses, in particular with genes related to glycine degradation pathway that could confer to Champagne a better frost tolerance. We showed that freezing tolerance involves a decrease of expression of genes related to photosynthesis and the expression of a gene involved in the production of cysteine and methionine that could act as cryoprotectant molecules. Although it remains to be confirmed, this study could also reveal the involvement of the jasmonate pathway in the cold responses, since we observed that two genes related to this pathway were mapped in a frost damage QTL interval and in a PQL rich region interval, respectively. PMID:23632303

  18. Genome Wide Transcriptome Analysis of Dendritic Cells Identifies Genes with Altered Expression in Psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    Szász, András; Tubak, Vilmos; Kemény, Lajos; Kondorosi, Éva; Nagy, István

    2013-01-01

    Activation of dendritic cells by different pathogens induces the secretion of proinflammatory mediators resulting in local inflammation. Importantly, innate immunity must be properly controlled, as its continuous activation leads to the development of chronic inflammatory diseases such as psoriasis. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or peptidoglycan (PGN) induced tolerance, a phenomenon of transient unresponsiveness of cells to repeated or prolonged stimulation, proved valuable model for the study of chronic inflammation. Thus, the aim of this study was the identification of the transcriptional diversity of primary human immature dendritic cells (iDCs) upon PGN induced tolerance. Using SAGE-Seq approach, a tag-based transcriptome sequencing method, we investigated gene expression changes of primary human iDCs upon stimulation or restimulation with Staphylococcus aureus derived PGN, a widely used TLR2 ligand. Based on the expression pattern of the altered genes, we identified non-tolerizeable and tolerizeable genes. Gene Ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (Kegg) analysis showed marked enrichment of immune-, cell cycle- and apoptosis related genes. In parallel to the marked induction of proinflammatory mediators, negative feedback regulators of innate immunity, such as TNFAIP3, TNFAIP8, Tyro3 and Mer are markedly downregulated in tolerant cells. We also demonstrate, that the expression pattern of TNFAIP3 and TNFAIP8 is altered in both lesional, and non-lesional skin of psoriatic patients. Finally, we show that pretreatment of immature dendritic cells with anti-TNF-? inhibits the expression of IL-6 and CCL1 in tolerant iDCs and partially releases the suppression of TNFAIP8. Our findings suggest that after PGN stimulation/restimulation the host cell utilizes different mechanisms in order to maintain critical balance between inflammation and tolerance. Importantly, the transcriptome sequencing of stimulated/restimulated iDCs identified numerous genes with altered expression to date not associated with role in chronic inflammation, underlying the relevance of our in vitro model for further characterization of IFN-primed iDCs. PMID:24039940

  19. A functional screen for copper homeostasis genes identifies a pharmacologically tractable cellular system

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Copper is essential for the survival of aerobic organisms. If copper is not properly regulated in the body however, it can be extremely cytotoxic and genetic mutations that compromise copper homeostasis result in severe clinical phenotypes. Understanding how cells maintain optimal copper levels is therefore highly relevant to human health. Results We found that addition of copper (Cu) to culture medium leads to increased respiratory growth of yeast, a phenotype which we then systematically and quantitatively measured in 5050 homozygous diploid deletion strains. Cu’s positive effect on respiratory growth was quantitatively reduced in deletion strains representing 73 different genes, the function of which identify increased iron uptake as a cause of the increase in growth rate. Conversely, these effects were enhanced in strains representing 93 genes. Many of these strains exhibited respiratory defects that were specifically rescued by supplementing the growth medium with Cu. Among the genes identified are known and direct regulators of copper homeostasis, genes required to maintain low vacuolar pH, and genes where evidence supporting a functional link with Cu has been heretofore lacking. Roughly half of the genes are conserved in man, and several of these are associated with Mendelian disorders, including the Cu-imbalance syndromes Menkes and Wilson’s disease. We additionally demonstrate that pharmacological agents, including the approved drug disulfiram, can rescue Cu-deficiencies of both environmental and genetic origin. Conclusions A functional screen in yeast has expanded the list of genes required for Cu-dependent fitness, revealing a complex cellular system with implications for human health. Respiratory fitness defects arising from perturbations in this system can be corrected with pharmacological agents that increase intracellular copper concentrations. PMID:24708151

  20. A Systematic Approach for Identifying Regulatory Interactions in Large Temporal Gene Expression Datasets from Peripheral Blood

    Microsoft Academic Search

    S. Knott; P. Mousavi; S. Baranzini

    2006-01-01

    High throughput genomic techniques produce datasets involving thousands of gene expression profiles. In order to infer biologically meaningful regulatory interactions, a dimensionality reduction must take place to identify genes or groups of genes that are important to the biological system being analyzed. Here we provide a systematic approach to remove dispersible genes from consideration based on their gene expression profiles,

  1. Gene transcription abnormalities in canine atopic dermatitis and related human eosinophilic allergic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Plager, Douglas A.; Torres, Sheila M.F.; Koch, Sandra N.; Kita, Hirohito

    2015-01-01

    Canine atopic dermatitis (AD) is clinically similar to human AD, implicating it as a useful model of human eosinophilic allergic disease. To identify cutaneous gene transcription changes in relatively early inflammation of canine AD, microarrays were used to monitor transcription in normal skin (n = 13) and in acute lesional AD (ALAD) and nearby visibly nonlesional AD (NLAD) skin (n = 13) from dogs. Scanning the putative abnormally transcribed genes, several potentially relevant genes, some abnormally transcribed in both NLAD and ALAD (e.g. IL6, NFAM1, MSRA, and SYK), were observed. Comparison for abnormally transcribed genes common to two related human diseases, human AD and asthmatic chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps (aCRSwNP), further identified genes or gene sets likely relevant to eosinophilic allergic inflammation. These included: (1) genes associated with alternatively activated monocyte-derived cells, including members of the monocyte chemotactic protein (MCP) gene cluster, (2) members of the IL1 family gene cluster, (3) eosinophil-associated seven transmembrane receptor EMR1 and EMR3 genes, (4) interferon-inducible genes, and (5) keratin genes associated with hair and nail formation. Overall, numerous abnormally transcribed genes were observed only in canine AD; however, many others are common to related human eosinophilic allergic diseases and represent therapeutic targets testable in dogs with AD. PMID:22749291

  2. Gene Profiling of Mta1 Identifies Novel Gene Targets and Functions

    PubMed Central

    Eswaran, Jeyanthy; Kumar, Rakesh

    2011-01-01

    Background Metastasis-associated protein 1 (MTA1), a master dual co-regulatory protein is found to be an integral part of NuRD (Nucleosome Remodeling and Histone Deacetylation) complex, which has indispensable transcriptional regulatory functions via histone deacetylation and chromatin remodeling. Emerging literature establishes MTA1 to be a valid DNA-damage responsive protein with a significant role in maintaining the optimum DNA-repair activity in mammalian cells exposed to genotoxic stress. This DNA-damage responsive function of MTA1 was reported to be a P53-dependent and independent function. Here, we investigate the influence of P53 on gene regulation function of Mta1 to identify novel gene targets and functions of Mta1. Methods Gene expression analysis was performed on five different mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) samples (i) the Mta1 wild type, (ii) Mta1 knock out (iii) Mta1 knock out in which Mta1 was reintroduced (iv) P53 knock out (v) P53 knock out in which Mta1 was over expressed using Affymetrix Mouse Exon 1.0 ST arrays. Further Hierarchical Clustering, Gene Ontology analysis with GO terms satisfying corrected p-value<0.1, and the Ingenuity Pathway Analysis were performed. Finally, RT-qPCR was carried out on selective candidate genes. Significance/Conclusion This study represents a complete genome wide screen for possible target genes of a coregulator, Mta1. The comparative gene profiling of Mta1 wild type, Mta1 knockout and Mta1 re-expression in the Mta1 knockout conditions define “bona fide” Mta1 target genes. Further extensive analyses of the data highlights the influence of P53 on Mta1 gene regulation. In the presence of P53 majority of the genes regulated by Mta1 are related to inflammatory and anti-microbial responses whereas in the absence of P53 the predominant target genes are involved in cancer signaling. Thus, the presented data emphasizes the known functions of Mta1 and serves as a rich resource which could help us identify novel Mta1 functions. PMID:21364872

  3. Detecting gene-gene interactions that underlie human diseases

    PubMed Central

    Cordell, Heather J.

    2010-01-01

    Following the identification of several disease-associated polymorphisms by whole genome association analysis, interest is now focussing on the detection of effects that, due to their interaction with other genetic (or environmental) factors, may not be identified by using standard single-locus tests. In addition to increasing power to detect association, there is also a hope detecting interactions between loci will allow us to elucidate the biological and biochemical pathways underpinning disease. Here I provide a critical survey of the current methodological approaches (and related software packages) used to detect interactions between genetic loci that contribute to human genetic disease. I also discuss the difficulties in determining the biologcal relevance of statistical interactions. PMID:19434077

  4. Expression of coordinately regulated defense response genes and analysis of their role in disease resistance in Medicago truncatula

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microarray technology was used to identify genes associated with disease defense responses in the model legume Medicago truncatula. Transcript profiles from leaves inoculated with Colletotrichum trifolii and Erysiphe pisi and roots infected with Phytophthora medicaginis were compared to identify gen...

  5. Analysis of the retinal gene expression profile after hypoxic preconditioning identifies candidate genes for neuroprotection

    PubMed Central

    Thiersch, Markus; Raffelsberger, Wolfgang; Frigg, Rico; Samardzija, Marijana; Wenzel, Andreas; Poch, Olivier; Grimm, Christian

    2008-01-01

    Background Retinal degeneration is a main cause of blindness in humans. Neuroprotective therapies may be used to rescue retinal cells and preserve vision. Hypoxic preconditioning stabilizes the transcription factor HIF-1? in the retina and strongly protects photoreceptors in an animal model of light-induced retinal degeneration. To address the molecular mechanisms of the protection, we analyzed the transcriptome of the hypoxic retina using microarrays and real-time PCR. Results Hypoxic exposure induced a marked alteration in the retinal transcriptome with significantly different expression levels of 431 genes immediately after hypoxic exposure. The normal expression profile was restored within 16 hours of reoxygenation. Among the differentially regulated genes, several candidates for neuroprotection were identified like metallothionein-1 and -2, the HIF-1 target gene adrenomedullin and the gene encoding the antioxidative and cytoprotective enzyme paraoxonase 1 which was previously not known to be a hypoxia responsive gene in the retina. The strongly upregulated cyclin dependent kinase inhibitor p21 was excluded from being essential for neuroprotection. Conclusion Our data suggest that neuroprotection after hypoxic preconditioning is the result of the differential expression of a multitude of genes which may act in concert to protect visual cells against a toxic insult. PMID:18261226

  6. Identification of Sequence Variants in Genetic Disease-Causing Genes Using Targeted Next-Generation Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Qian; Qu, Ning; Liu, Tengfei; Chen, Yang; Jiang, Hui; Yang, Guanghui; Zhen, Ruan; Lan, Zhangzhang; Qi, Ming; Wang, Jinming; Yang, Yi; Chu, Yuxing; Li, Xiaoyan; Guang, Yanfang; Huang, Jian

    2011-01-01

    Background Identification of gene variants plays an important role in research on and diagnosis of genetic diseases. A combination of enrichment of targeted genes and next-generation sequencing (targeted DNA-HiSeq) results in both high efficiency and low cost for targeted sequencing of genes of interest. Methodology/Principal Findings To identify mutations associated with genetic diseases, we designed an array-based gene chip to capture all of the exons of 193 genes involved in 103 genetic diseases. To evaluate this technology, we selected 7 samples from seven patients with six different genetic diseases resulting from six disease-causing genes and 100 samples from normal human adults as controls. The data obtained showed that on average, 99.14% of 3,382 exons with more than 30-fold coverage were successfully detected using Targeted DNA-HiSeq technology, and we found six known variants in four disease-causing genes and two novel mutations in two other disease-causing genes (the STS gene for XLI and the FBN1 gene for MFS) as well as one exon deletion mutation in the DMD gene. These results were confirmed in their entirety using either the Sanger sequencing method or real-time PCR. Conclusions/Significance Targeted DNA-HiSeq combines next-generation sequencing with the capture of sequences from a relevant subset of high-interest genes. This method was tested by capturing sequences from a DNA library through hybridization to oligonucleotide probes specific for genetic disorder-related genes and was found to show high selectivity, improve the detection of mutations, enabling the discovery of novel variants, and provide additional indel data. Thus, targeted DNA-HiSeq can be used to analyze the gene variant profiles of monogenic diseases with high sensitivity, fidelity, throughput and speed. PMID:22216297

  7. With current gene markers, presymptomatic diagnosis of heritable disease is still a family affair

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-09-04

    In the last four years, genes or genetic markers have been identified for a host of disorders including Huntington's disease, cystic fibrosis, Duchenne muscular dystrophy, polycystic kidney disease, bipolar depressive disorder, retinoblastoma, Alzheimer's disease, and schizophrenia. Such discoveries have made it possible to diagnose in utero some 30 genetic diseases during the first trimester of pregnancy. Yet, while these newly discovered gene markers may be revolutionizing prenatal and presymptomatic diagnosis, they are in many respects halfway technology. Such was the opinion of several speakers at a conference sponsored by the American Medical Association in Washington, DC. At the conference, entitled DNA Probes in the Practice of Medicine, geneticists emphasized that gene markers - stretches of DNA that are usually inherited in tandem with a disease gene - are usually not sufficient for presymptomatic diagnosis of genetic disease in an individual.

  8. Gene prioritization aims to identify the most promising genes (or proteins) among a larger pool of candidates

    E-print Network

    Gene prioritization aims to identify the most promising genes (or proteins) among a larger pool for prioritization are useful at several stages of any gene-hunting process. These bioinformatics tools were on a few of the most likely candidate genes1­3 . For instance, a linkage analysis on patients

  9. Beyond comparing means: the usefulness of analyzing interindividual variation in gene expression for identifying genes associated with cancer development.

    PubMed

    Gorlov, Ivan P; Byun, Jinyoung; Zhao, Hongya; Logothetis, Christopher J; Gorlova, Olga Y

    2012-04-01

    Identifying genes associated with cancer development is typically accomplished by comparing mean expression values in normal and tumor tissues, which identifies differentially expressed (DE) genes. Interindividual variation (IV) in gene expression is indirectly included in DE gene identification because given the same absolute differences in means, genes with lower variance tend to have lower p-values. We explored the direct use of IV in gene expression to identify candidate genes associated with cancer development. We focused on prostate (PCa) and lung (LC) cancers and compared IV in the expression level of genes shown to be cancer related with that in all other genes in the human genome. Compared with all those other genes, cancer-related genes tended to have greater IV in normal tissues and a greater increase in IV during the transition from normal to tumorous tissue. Genes without significantly different mean expression values between tumor and normal tissues but with greater IV in tumor than in normal tissue (note: the DE-based approach completely ignores those genes) had stronger associations with clinically important features like Gleason score in PCa or tumor histology in LC than all other genes were. Our results suggest that analyzing IV in gene expression level is useful in identifying novel candidate genes associated with cancer development. PMID:22809348

  10. Supervised Model for Identifying Differentially Expressed Genes in DNA Microarray Gene Expression Dataset Using Biological Pathway Information

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Tae Su Chung; Keewon Kim; Ju Han Kim

    2005-01-01

    Microarray technology makes it possible to measure the expressions of tens of thousands of genes simultaneously under various experimental conditions. Identifying differentially expressed genes in each single experimental condition is one of the most common first steps in microarray gene expression data analysis. Reasonable choices of thresholds for determining differentially expressed genes are used for the next-step-analysis with suitable statistical

  11. Synthetic lethal screening in the mammalian central nervous system identifies Gpx6 as a modulator of Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Shema, Reut; Kulicke, Ruth; Cowley, Glenn S; Stein, Rachael; Root, David E; Heiman, Myriam

    2015-01-01

    Huntington's disease, the most common inherited neurodegenerative disease, is characterized by a dramatic loss of deep-layer cortical and striatal neurons, as well as morbidity in midlife. Human genetic studies led to the identification of the causative gene, huntingtin. Recent genomic advances have also led to the identification of hundreds of potential interacting partners for huntingtin protein and many hypotheses as to the molecular mechanisms whereby mutant huntingtin leads to cellular dysfunction and death. However, the multitude of possible interacting partners and cellular pathways affected by mutant huntingtin has complicated efforts to understand the etiology of this disease, and to date no curative therapeutic exists. To address the general problem of identifying the disease-phenotype contributing genes from a large number of correlative studies, here we develop a synthetic lethal screening methodology for the mammalian central nervous system, called SLIC, for synthetic lethal in the central nervous system. Applying SLIC to the study of Huntington's disease, we identify the age-regulated glutathione peroxidase 6 (Gpx6) gene as a modulator of mutant huntingtin toxicity and show that overexpression of Gpx6 can dramatically alleviate both behavioral and molecular phenotypes associated with a mouse model of Huntington's disease. SLIC can, in principle, be used in the study of any neurodegenerative disease for which a mouse model exists, promising to reveal modulators of neurodegenerative disease in an unbiased fashion, akin to screens in simpler model organisms. PMID:25535386

  12. Using ChIP-based technologies to identify epigenetic modifications in disease-relevant cells.

    PubMed

    Falk, Jeffrey

    2010-03-01

    The effect of epigenetic modifications on the regulation of gene expression and the concomitant relationship to human diseases has become a key area of biological research in recent years. Studies have suggested that there is direct correlation between epigenetic modifications, such as histone methylation, histone acetylation and DNA methylation, and gene expression in disease-relevant cells, including cancer cells. The development of chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP)-based technologies, such as ChIP-chip and ChIP-Seq, has facilitated the high-throughput genome-wide mapping of epigenetic modifications that enable researchers to define the epigenome in disease-relevant cells and use comparative ChIP-based epigenetic mapping to correlate changes in epigenetic modifications with key physiological changes in disease-relevant tissues, including cancer cells, stem cells and T-cells. This feature review article provides insight into the nature of epigenetic modifications, the ChIP-based technologies that are available, and how such methods are being used to identify key epigenetic regulatory activities in medically relevant areas such as cancer and immunology. PMID:20191433

  13. Dorothy Hodgkin Lecture 2014. Understanding genes identified by genome-wide association studies for type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Rutter, G A

    2014-12-01

    Whilst the heritable nature of Type 2 diabetes has been recognized for many years, only in the past two decades have linkage analyses in families and genome-wide association studies in large populations begun to reveal the genetic landscape of the disease in detail. Whilst the former have provided a powerful means of identifying the genes responsible for monogenic forms of the disease, the latter highlight relatively large genomic regions. These often harbour multiple genes, whose relative contribution to exaggerated disease risk is uncertain. In the present study, the approaches that have been used to dissect the role of just a few (TCF7L2, SLC30A8, ADCY5, MTNR1B and CDKAL1) of the ~ 500 genes identified at dozens of implicated loci are described. These are usually selected based on the strength of their effect on disease risk, and predictions as to their likely biological role. Direct determination of the effects of identified polymorphisms on gene expression in disease-relevant tissues, notably the pancreatic islet, are then performed to identify genes whose expression is affected by a particular polymorphism. Subsequent functional analyses then involve perturbing gene expression in vitro in ?-cell lines or isolated islets and in vivo in animal models. Although the majority of polymorphisms affect insulin production rather than action, and mainly affect the ? cell, effects via other tissues may also contribute, requiring careful consideration in the design and interpretation of experiments in model systems. These considerations illustrate the scale of the task needed to exploit genome-wide association study data for the development of new therapeutic strategies. PMID:25186316

  14. Virus-induced gene silencing of Arabidopsis thaliana gene homologues in wheat identifies genes conferring improved drought tolerance.

    PubMed

    Manmathan, Harish; Shaner, Dale; Snelling, Jacob; Tisserat, Ned; Lapitan, Nora

    2013-03-01

    In a non-model staple crop like wheat (Triticum aestivumI L.), functional validation of potential drought stress responsive genes identified in Arabidopsis could provide gene targets for breeding. Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) of genes of interest can overcome the inherent problems of polyploidy and limited transformation potential that hamper functional validation studies in wheat. In this study, three potential candidate genes shown to be involved in abiotic stress response pathways in Arabidopsis thaliana were selected for VIGS experiments in wheat. These include Era1 (enhanced response to abscisic acid), Cyp707a (ABA 8'-hydroxylase), and Sal1 (inositol polyphosphate 1-phosphatase). Gene homologues for these three genes were identified in wheat and cloned in the viral vector barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV) in the antisense direction, followed by rub inoculation of BSMV viral RNA transcripts onto wheat plants. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that VIGS-treated wheat plants had significant reductions in target gene transcripts. When VIGS-treated plants generated for Era1 and Sal1 were subjected to limiting water conditions, they showed increased relative water content, improved water use efficiency, reduced gas exchange, and better vigour compared to water-stressed control plants inoculated with RNA from the empty viral vector (BSMV0). In comparison, the Cyp707a-silenced plants showed no improvement over BSMV0-inoculated plants under limited water condition. These results indicate that Era1 and Sal1 play important roles in conferring drought tolerance in wheat. Other traits affected by Era1 silencing were also studied. Delayed seed germination in Era1-silenced plants suggests this gene may be a useful target for developing resistance to pre-harvest sprouting. PMID:23364940

  15. Gene Expression Profiling Identifies Molecular Pathways Associated with Collagen VI Deficiency and Provides Novel Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Paco, Sonia; Kalko, Susana G.; Jou, Cristina; Rodríguez, María A.; Corbera, Joan; Muntoni, Francesco; Feng, Lucy; Rivas, Eloy; Torner, Ferran; Gualandi, Francesca; Gomez-Foix, Anna M.; Ferrer, Anna; Ortez, Carlos; Nascimento, Andrés; Colomer, Jaume; Jimenez-Mallebrera, Cecilia

    2013-01-01

    Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD), caused by collagen VI deficiency, is a common congenital muscular dystrophy. At present, the role of collagen VI in muscle and the mechanism of disease are not fully understood. To address this we have applied microarrays to analyse the transcriptome of UCMD muscle and compare it to healthy muscle and other muscular dystrophies. We identified 389 genes which are differentially regulated in UCMD relative to controls. In addition, there were 718 genes differentially expressed between UCMD and dystrophin deficient muscle. In contrast, only 29 genes were altered relative to other congenital muscular dystrophies. Changes in gene expression were confirmed by real-time PCR. The set of regulated genes was analysed by Gene Ontology, KEGG pathways and Ingenuity Pathway analysis to reveal the molecular functions and gene networks associated with collagen VI defects. The most significantly regulated pathways were those involved in muscle regeneration, extracellular matrix remodelling and inflammation. We characterised the immune response in UCMD biopsies as being mainly mediated via M2 macrophages and the complement pathway indicating that anti-inflammatory treatment may be beneficial to UCMD as for other dystrophies. We studied the immunolocalisation of ECM components and found that biglycan, a collagen VI interacting proteoglycan, was reduced in the basal lamina of UCMD patients. We propose that biglycan reduction is secondary to collagen VI loss and that it may be contributing towards UCMD pathophysiology. Consequently, strategies aimed at over-expressing biglycan and restore the link between the muscle cell surface and the extracellular matrix should be considered. PMID:24223098

  16. Using context-specific effect of miRNAs to identify functional associations between miRNAs and gene signatures

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs are a class of short regulatory RNAs that act as post-transcriptional fine-tune regulators of a large host of genes that play key roles in many cellular processes and signaling pathways. A useful step for understanding their functional role is characterizing their influence on the protein context of the targets. Using miRNA context-specific influence as a functional signature is promising to identify functional associations between miRNAs and other gene signatures, and thus advance our understanding of miRNA mode of action. Results In the current study we utilized the power of regularized regression models to construct functional associations between gene signatures. Genes that are influenced by miRNAs directly(computational miRNA target prediction) or indirectly (protein partners of direct targets) are defined as functional miRNA gene signature. The combined direct and indirect miRNA influence is defined as context-specific effects of miRNAs, and is used to identify regulatory effects of miRNAs on curated gene signatures. Elastic-net regression was used to build functional associations between context-specific effect of miRNAs and other gene signatures (disease, pathway signatures) by identifying miRNAs whose targets are enriched in gene lists. As a proof of concept, elastic-net regression was applied on lists of genes downregulated upon pre-miRNA transfection, and successfully identified the treated miRNA. This model was then extended to construct functional relationships between miRNAs and disease and pathway gene lists. Integrating context-specific effects of miRNAs on a protein network reveals more significant miRNA enrichment in prostate gene signatures compared to miRNA direct targets. The model identified novel list of miRNAs that are associated with prostate clinical variables. Conclusions Elastic-net regression is used as a model to construct functional associations between miRNA signatures and other gene signatures. Defining miRNA context-specific functional gene signature by integrating the downstream effect of miRNAs demonstrates better performance compared to the miRNA signature alone (direct targets). miRNA functional signatures can greatly facilitate miRNA research to uncover new functional associations between miRNAs and diseases, drugs or pathways. PMID:24267745

  17. Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 4F disease caused by S399fsx410 mutation in the PRX gene.

    PubMed

    Kabzinska, D; Drac, H; Sherman, D L; Kostera-Pruszczyk, A; Brophy, P J; Kochanski, A; Hausmanowa-Petrusewicz, I

    2006-03-14

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 4F disease (CMT4F) is an autosomal recessive neuropathy caused by mutations in the PRX gene. To date, only seven mutations have been identified in the PRX gene. In this study, the authors report a novel S399fsX410 mutation in the PRX gene and its effects at the protein level, which was identified in an 8-year-old patient with early-onset CMT disease. PMID:16534116

  18. Genomewide association study for susceptibility genes contributing to familial Parkinson disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nathan Pankratz; Jemma B. Wilk; Jeanne C. Latourelle; Anita L. DeStefano; Cheryl Halter; Elizabeth W. Pugh; Kimberly F. Doheny; James F. Gusella; William C. Nichols; Tatiana Foroud; Richard H. Myers

    2009-01-01

    Five genes have been identified that contribute to Mendelian forms of Parkinson disease (PD); however, mutations have been\\u000a found in fewer than 5% of patients, suggesting that additional genes contribute to disease risk. Unlike previous studies that\\u000a focused primarily on sporadic PD, we have performed the first genomewide association study (GWAS) in familial PD. Genotyping\\u000a was performed with the Illumina

  19. Differential Expression of Vitamin E and Selenium-Responsive Genes by Disease Severity in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Agler, AH; Crystal, RG; Mezey, JG; Fuller, J; Gao, C; Hansen, JG; Cassano, PA

    2014-01-01

    Antioxidant nutritional status is hypothesized to influence chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) susceptibility and progression. Although past studies relate antioxidants to gene expression, there are no data in patients with COPD. This study investigated the hypothesis that antioxidant status is compromised in patients with COPD, and antioxidant-responsive genes differentially express in a similar pattern. Lung tissue samples from patients with COPD were assayed for vitamin E and gene expression. Selenium and vitamin E were assayed in corresponding plasma samples. Discovery based genome-wide expression analysis compared moderate, severe, and very severe COPD (GOLD II-IV) patients to mild and at-risk/normal (GOLD 0-I). Hypotheses-driven analyses assessed differential gene expression by disease severity for vitamin E-responsive and selenium-responsive genes. GOLD II-IV COPD patients had 30% lower lung tissue vitamin E levels compared to GOLD 0-I participants (p = 0.0082). No statistically significant genome-wide differences in expression by disease severity were identified. Hypothesis-driven analyses of 109 genes found 16 genes differentially expressed (padjusted<0.05) by disease severity including 6 selenium-responsive genes (range in fold-change -1.39 to 2.25), 6 vitamin E-responsive genes (fold-change -2.30 to 1.51), and 4 COPD-associated genes. Lung tissue vitamin E in patients with COPD was associated with disease severity and vitamin E-responsive genes were differentially expressed by disease severity. While nutritional status is hypothesized to contribute to COPD risk, and is of therapeutic interest, evidence to date is mainly observational. The findings reported herein are novel, and support a role of vitamin E in COPD progression. PMID:23875740

  20. Module networks: identifying regulatory modules and their condition-specific regulators from gene expression data

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Michael Shapira; Aviv Regev; Dana Pe'er; David Botstein; Nir Friedman; Eran Segal; Daphne Koller

    2003-01-01

    Much of a cell's activity is organized as a network of interacting modules: sets of genes coregulated to respond to different conditions. We present a probabilistic method for identifying regulatory modules from gene expression data. Our procedure identifies modules of coregulated genes, their regulators and the conditions under which regulation occurs, generating testable hypotheses in the form 'regulator X regulates

  1. The influence of disease categories on gene candidate predictions from model organism phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The molecular etiology is still to be identified for about half of the currently described Mendelian diseases in humans, thereby hindering efforts to find treatments or preventive measures. Advances, such as new sequencing technologies, have led to increasing amounts of data becoming available with which to address the problem of identifying disease genes. Therefore, automated methods are needed that reliably predict disease gene candidates based on available data. We have recently developed Exomiser as a tool for identifying causative variants from exome analysis results by filtering and prioritising using a number of criteria including the phenotype similarity between the disease and mouse mutants involving the gene candidates. Initial investigations revealed a variation in performance for different medical categories of disease, due in part to a varying contribution of the phenotype scoring component. Results In this study, we further analyse the performance of our cross-species phenotype matching algorithm, and examine in more detail the reasons why disease gene filtering based on phenotype data works better for certain disease categories than others. We found that in addition to misleading phenotype alignments between species, some disease categories are still more amenable to automated predictions than others, and that this often ties in with community perceptions on how well the organism works as model. Conclusions In conclusion, our automated disease gene candidate predictions are highly dependent on the organism used for the predictions and the disease category being studied. Future work on computational disease gene prediction using phenotype data would benefit from methods that take into account the disease category and the source of model organism data. PMID:25093073

  2. Identification of Candidate Disease Genes by EST Alignments, Synteny, and Expression and Verification of Ensembl Genes on Rat Chromosome 1q43-54

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ursula Vitt; Darryl Gietzen; Kristian Stevens; Jim Wingrove; Shanya Becha; Sean Bulloch; John Burrill; Narinder Chawla; Jennifer Chien; Matthew Crawford; Craig Ison; Liam Kearney; Mary Kwong; Joe Park; Jennifer Policky; Mark Weiler; Renee White; Yuming Xu; Sue Daniels; Howard Jacob; Michael I. Jensen-Seaman; Jozef Lazar; Laura Stuve; Jeanette Schmidt

    2004-01-01

    We aligned Incyte ESTs and publicly available sequences to the rat genome and analyzed rat chromosome 1q43-54, a region in which several quantitative trait loci (QTLs) have been identified, including renal disease, diabetes, hypertension, body weight, and encephalomyelitis. Within this region, which contains 255 Ensembl gene predictions, the aligned sequences clustered into 568 Incyte genes and gene fragments. Of the

  3. Identifying rarer genetic variants for common complex diseases: diseased versus neutral discovery panels

    PubMed Central

    CURTIN, K.; ILES, M. M.; CAMP, N. J.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY The power of genetic association studies to identify disease susceptibility alleles fundamentally relies on the variants studied. The standard approach is to determine a set of tagging-SNPs (tSNPs) that capture the majority of genomic variation in regions of interest by exploiting local correlation structures. Typically, tSNPs are selected from neutral discovery panels, collections of individuals comprehensively genotyped across a region. We investigated the implications of discovery panel design on tSNP performance in association studies using realistically-simulated sequence data. We found that discovery panels of 24 sequenced ‘neutral’ individuals (similar to NIEHS or HapMap ENCODE data) were sufficient to select well-powered tSNPs to identify common susceptibility alleles. For less common alleles (0.01–0.05 frequency) we found neutral panels of this size inadequate, particularly if low-frequency variants were removed prior to tSNP selection; superior tSNPs were found using panels of diseased individuals. Only large neutral panels (200 individuals) matched diseased panel performance in selecting well-powered tSNPs to detect both common and rarer alleles. The 1000 Genomes Project initiative may provide larger neutral panels necessary to identify rarer susceptibility alleles in association studies. In the interim, our results suggest investigators can boost power to detect such alleles by sequencing diseased individuals for tSNP selection. PMID:19132978

  4. Identifying genetic diversity of avirulence genes in Leptosphaeria maculans using whole genome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Zander, Manuel; Patel, Dhwani A; Van de Wouw, Angela; Lai, Kaitao; Lorenc, Michal T; Campbell, Emma; Hayward, Alice; Edwards, David; Raman, Harsh; Batley, Jacqueline

    2013-08-01

    Next generation sequencing technology allows rapid re-sequencing of individuals, as well as the discovery of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), for genomic diversity and evolutionary analyses. By sequencing two isolates of the fungal plant pathogen Leptosphaeria maculans, the causal agent of blackleg disease in Brassica crops, we have generated a resource of over 76 million sequence reads aligned to the reference genome. We identified over 21,000 SNPs with an overall SNP frequency of one SNP every 2,065 bp. Sequence validation of a selection of these SNPs in additional isolates collected throughout Australia indicates a high degree of polymorphism in the Australian population. In preliminary phylogenetic analysis, isolates from Western Australia clustered together and those collected from Brassica juncea stubble were identical. These SNPs provide a novel marker resource to study the genetic diversity of this pathogen. We demonstrate that re-sequencing provides a method of validating previously characterised SNPs and analysing differences in important genes, such as the disease related avirulence genes of L. maculans. Understanding the genetic characteristics of this devastating pathogen is vital in developing long-term solutions to managing blackleg disease in Brassica crops. PMID:23793572

  5. Associating Genes and Protein Complexes with Disease via Network Propagation

    E-print Network

    Ruppin, Eytan

    -factorial diseases for which some causal genes have been found already: prostate cancer, alzheimer and type 2 challenge in human health with applications to understanding disease mech- anisms, diagnosis and therapy

  6. Clustering Gene Expression Regulators: New Approach to Disease Subtyping

    PubMed Central

    Pyatnitskiy, Mikhail; Mazo, Ilya; Shkrob, Maria; Schwartz, Elena; Kotelnikova, Ekaterina

    2014-01-01

    One of the main challenges in modern medicine is to stratify different patient groups in terms of underlying disease molecular mechanisms as to develop more personalized approach to therapy. Here we propose novel method for disease subtyping based on analysis of activated expression regulators on a sample-by-sample basis. Our approach relies on Sub-Network Enrichment Analysis algorithm (SNEA) which identifies gene subnetworks with significant concordant changes in expression between two conditions. Subnetwork consists of central regulator and downstream genes connected by relations extracted from global literature-extracted regulation database. Regulators found in each patient separately are clustered together and assigned activity scores which are used for final patients grouping. We show that our approach performs well compared to other related methods and at the same time provides researchers with complementary level of understanding of pathway-level biology behind a disease by identification of significant expression regulators. We have observed the reasonable grouping of neuromuscular disorders (triggered by structural damage vs triggered by unknown mechanisms), that was not revealed using standard expression profile clustering. For another experiment we were able to suggest the clusters of regulators, responsible for colorectal carcinoma vs adenoma discrimination and identify frequently genetically changed regulators that could be of specific importance for the individual characteristics of cancer development. Proposed approach can be regarded as biologically meaningful feature selection, reducing tens of thousands of genes down to dozens of clusters of regulators. Obtained clusters of regulators make possible to generate valuable biological hypotheses about molecular mechanisms related to a clinical outcome for individual patient. PMID:24416320

  7. Comparative and Functional Genomics in Identifying Aflatoxin Biosynthetic Genes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Identification of genes involved in aflatoxin biosynthesis through Aspergillus flavus genomics has been actively pursued. A. flavus Expressed Sequence Tags (EST’s) and whole genome sequencing have been completed. Groups of genes that are potentially involved in aflatoxin production have been profi...

  8. Candidate genes and functional noncoding variants identified in a canine model of obsessive-compulsive disorder

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), a severe mental disease manifested in time-consuming repetition of behaviors, affects 1 to 3% of the human population. While highly heritable, complex genetics has hampered attempts to elucidate OCD etiology. Dogs suffer from naturally occurring compulsive disorders that closely model human OCD, manifested as an excessive repetition of normal canine behaviors that only partially responds to drug therapy. The limited diversity within dog breeds makes identifying underlying genetic factors easier. Results We use genome-wide association of 87 Doberman Pinscher cases and 63 controls to identify genomic loci associated with OCD and sequence these regions in 8 affected dogs from high-risk breeds and 8 breed-matched controls. We find 119 variants in evolutionarily conserved sites that are specific to dogs with OCD. These case-only variants are significantly more common in high OCD risk breeds compared to breeds with no known psychiatric problems. Four genes, all with synaptic function, have the most case-only variation: neuronal cadherin (CDH2), catenin alpha2 (CTNNA2), ataxin-1 (ATXN1), and plasma glutamate carboxypeptidase (PGCP). In the 2 Mb gene desert between the cadherin genes CDH2 and DSC3, we find two different variants found only in dogs with OCD that disrupt the same highly conserved regulatory element. These variants cause significant changes in gene expression in a human neuroblastoma cell line, likely due to disrupted transcription factor binding. Conclusions The limited genetic diversity of dog breeds facilitates identification of genes, functional variants and regulatory pathways underlying complex psychiatric disorders that are mechanistically similar in dogs and humans. PMID:24995881

  9. Deep resequencing of GWAS loci identifies independent rare variants associated with inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Rivas, Manuel A.; Beaudoin, Melissa; Gardet, Agnes; Stevens, Christine; Sharma, Yashoda; Zhang, Clarence K.; Boucher, Gabrielle; Ripke, Stephan; Ellinghaus, David; Burtt, Noel; Fennell, Tim; Kirby, Andrew; Latiano, Anna; Goyette, Philippe; Green, Todd; Halfvarson, Jonas; Haritunians, Talin; Korn, Joshua M.; Kuruvilla, Finny; Lagacé, Caroline; Neale, Benjamin; Lo, Ken Sin; Schumm, Phil; Törkvist, Leif; Dubinsky, Marla; Brant, Steven R.; Silverberg, Mark; Duerr, Richard H.; Altshuler, David; Gabriel, Stacey; Lettre, Guillaume; Franke, Andre; D’Amato, Mauro; McGovern, Dermot P.B.; Cho, Judy H.; Rioux, John D.; Xavier, Ramnik J.; Daly, Mark J.

    2012-01-01

    More than a thousand disease susceptibility loci have been identified via genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of common variants; however, the specific genes and full allelic spectrum of causal variants underlying these findings generally remain to be defined. We utilize pooled next-generation sequencing to study 56 genes in regions associated to Crohn’s Disease in 350 cases and 350 controls. Follow up genotyping of 70 rare and low-frequency protein-altering variants (MAF ~ .001-.05) in nine independent case-control series (16054 CD patients, 12153 UC patients, 17575 healthy controls) identifies four additional independent risk factors in NOD2, two additional protective variants in IL23R, a highly significant association to a novel, protective splice variant in CARD9 (p < 1e-16, OR ~ 0.29), as well as additional associations to coding variants in IL18RAP, CUL2, C1orf106, PTPN22 and MUC19. We extend the results of successful GWAS by providing novel, rare, and likely functional variants that will empower functional experiments and predictive models. PMID:21983784

  10. A P-Norm Robust Feature Extraction Method for Identifying Differentially Expressed Genes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jian; Liu, Jin-Xing; Gao, Ying-Lian; Kong, Xiang-Zhen; Wang, Xue-Song; Wang, Dong

    2015-01-01

    In current molecular biology, it becomes more and more important to identify differentially expressed genes closely correlated with a key biological process from gene expression data. In this paper, based on the Schatten p-norm and Lp-norm, a novel p-norm robust feature extraction method is proposed to identify the differentially expressed genes. In our method, the Schatten p-norm is used as the regularization function to obtain a low-rank matrix and the Lp-norm is taken as the error function to improve the robustness to outliers in the gene expression data. The results on simulation data show that our method can obtain higher identification accuracies than the competitive methods. Numerous experiments on real gene expression data sets demonstrate that our method can identify more differentially expressed genes than the others. Moreover, we confirmed that the identified genes are closely correlated with the corresponding gene expression data. PMID:26201006

  11. [Expression of bioinformatically identified genes in skin of psoriasis patients].

    PubMed

    2013-10-01

    Gene expression analysis for EPHA2 (EPH receptor A2), EPHB2 (EPH receptor B2), S100A9 (S100 calcium binding protein A9), PBEF(nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase), LILRB2 (leukocyte immunoglobulin-like receptor, subfamily B (with TM and ITIM domains), member 2), PLAUR (plasminogen activator, urokinase receptor), LTB (lymphotoxin beta (TNF superfamily, member 3)), WNT5A (wingless-type MMTV integration site family, member 5A) has been conducted using real-time polymerase chain reaction in specimens affected by psoriasis versus visually intact skin in 18 patients. It was revealed that the expression of the nine examined genes was upregulated in the affected by psoriasis compared to visually intact skin specimens. The highest expression was observed for S100A9, S100AS, PBEF, WNT5A2, and EPHB2 genes. S100A9 and S100A8 gene expression in the affected by psoriasis skin was 100-fold higher versus visually intact skin while PBEF, WNT5A, and EPHB2 gene expression was upregulated more than five-fold. We suggested that the high expression of these genes might be associated with the state of the pathological process in psoriasis. Moreover, the transcriptional activity of these genes might serve a molecular indicator of the efficacy of treatment in psoriasis. PMID:25508677

  12. [Expression of bioinformatically identified genes in skin of psoriasis patients].

    PubMed

    Sobolev, V V; Nikol'skaia, T A; Zolotarenko, A D; Piruzian, E S; Bruskin, S A

    2013-10-01

    Gene expression analysis for EPHA2 (EPH receptor A2), EPHB2 (EPH receptor B2), S100A9 (S100 calcium binding protein A9), PBEF(nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase), LILRB2 (leukocyte immunoglobulin-like receptor, subfamily B (with TM and ITIM domains), member 2), PLAUR (plasminogen activator, urokinase receptor), LTB (lymphotoxin beta (TNF superfamily, member 3)), WNT5A (wingless-type MMTV integration site family, member 5A) has been conducted using real-time polymerase chain reaction in specimens affected by psoriasis versus visually intact skin in 18 patients. It was revealed that the expression of the nine examined genes was upregulated in the affected by psoriasis compared to visually intact skin specimens. The highest expression was observed for S100A9, S100AS, PBEF, WNT5A2, and EPHB2 genes. S100A9 and S100A8 gene expression in the affected by psoriasis skin was 100-fold higher versus visually intact skin while PBEF, WNT5A, and EPHB2 gene expression was upregulated more than five-fold. We suggested that the high expression of these genes might be associated with the state of the pathological process in psoriasis. Moreover, the transcriptional activity of these genes might serve a molecular indicator of the efficacy of treatment in psoriasis. PMID:25474898

  13. Gene therapy for cardiovascular disease mediated by ultrasound and microbubbles

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Gene therapy provides an efficient approach for treatment of cardiovascular disease. To realize the therapeutic effect, both efficient delivery to the target cells and sustained expression of transgenes are required. Ultrasound targeted microbubble destruction (UTMD) technique has become a potential strategy for target-specific gene and drug delivery. When gene-loaded microbubble is injected, the ultrasound-mediated microbubble destruction may spew the transported gene to the targeted cells or organ. Meanwhile, high amplitude oscillations of microbubbles increase the permeability of capillary and cell membrane, facilitating uptake of the released gene into tissue and cell. Therefore, efficiency of gene therapy can be significantly improved. To date, UTMD has been successfully investigated in many diseases, and it has achieved outstanding progress in the last two decades. Herein, we discuss the current status of gene therapy of cardiovascular diseases, and reviewed the progress of the delivery of genes to cardiovascular system by UTMD. PMID:23594865

  14. Improving disease gene prioritization by comparing the semantic similarity of phenotypes in mice with those of human diseases.

    PubMed

    Oellrich, Anika; Hoehndorf, Robert; Gkoutos, Georgios V; Rebholz-Schuhmann, Dietrich

    2012-01-01

    Despite considerable progress in understanding the molecular origins of hereditary human diseases, the molecular basis of several thousand genetic diseases still remains unknown. High-throughput phenotype studies are underway to systematically assess the phenotype outcome of targeted mutations in model organisms. Thus, comparing the similarity between experimentally identified phenotypes and the phenotypes associated with human diseases can be used to suggest causal genes underlying a disease. In this manuscript, we present a method for disease gene prioritization based on comparing phenotypes of mouse models with those of human diseases. For this purpose, either human disease phenotypes are "translated" into a mouse-based representation (using the Mammalian Phenotype Ontology), or mouse phenotypes are "translated" into a human-based representation (using the Human Phenotype Ontology). We apply a measure of semantic similarity and rank experimentally identified phenotypes in mice with respect to their phenotypic similarity to human diseases. Our method is evaluated on manually curated and experimentally verified gene-disease associations for human and for mouse. We evaluate our approach using a Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) analysis and obtain an area under the ROC curve of up to . Furthermore, we are able to confirm previous results that the Vax1 gene is involved in Septo-Optic Dysplasia and suggest Gdf6 and Marcks as further potential candidates. Our method significantly outperforms previous phenotype-based approaches of prioritizing gene-disease associations. To enable the adaption of our method to the analysis of other phenotype data, our software and prioritization results are freely available under a BSD licence at http://code.google.com/p/phenomeblast/wiki/CAMP. Furthermore, our method has been integrated in PhenomeNET and the results can be explored using the PhenomeBrowser at http://phenomebrowser.net. PMID:22719993

  15. FORGE Canada Consortium: outcomes of a 2-year national rare-disease gene-discovery project.

    PubMed

    Beaulieu, Chandree L; Majewski, Jacek; Schwartzentruber, Jeremy; Samuels, Mark E; Fernandez, Bridget A; Bernier, Francois P; Brudno, Michael; Knoppers, Bartha; Marcadier, Janet; Dyment, David; Adam, Shelin; Bulman, Dennis E; Jones, Steve J M; Avard, Denise; Nguyen, Minh Thu; Rousseau, Francois; Marshall, Christian; Wintle, Richard F; Shen, Yaoqing; Scherer, Stephen W; Friedman, Jan M; Michaud, Jacques L; Boycott, Kym M

    2014-06-01

    Inherited monogenic disease has an enormous impact on the well-being of children and their families. Over half of the children living with one of these conditions are without a molecular diagnosis because of the rarity of the disease, the marked clinical heterogeneity, and the reality that there are thousands of rare diseases for which causative mutations have yet to be identified. It is in this context that in 2010 a Canadian consortium was formed to rapidly identify mutations causing a wide spectrum of pediatric-onset rare diseases by using whole-exome sequencing. The FORGE (Finding of Rare Disease Genes) Canada Consortium brought together clinicians and scientists from 21 genetics centers and three science and technology innovation centers from across Canada. From nation-wide requests for proposals, 264 disorders were selected for study from the 371 submitted; disease-causing variants (including in 67 genes not previously associated with human disease; 41 of these have been genetically or functionally validated, and 26 are currently under study) were identified for 146 disorders over a 2-year period. Here, we present our experience with four strategies employed for gene discovery and discuss FORGE's impact in a number of realms, from clinical diagnostics to the broadening of the phenotypic spectrum of many diseases to the biological insight gained into both disease states and normal human development. Lastly, on the basis of this experience, we discuss the way forward for rare-disease genetic discovery both in Canada and internationally. PMID:24906018

  16. A Systems Genetics Approach Identifies CXCL14, ITGAX, and LPCAT2 as Novel Aggressive Prostate Cancer Susceptibility Genes

    PubMed Central

    Andreas, Jonathan; Patel, Shashank J.; Zhang, Suiyuan; Chines, Peter; Elkahloun, Abdel; Chandrasekharappa, Settara; Gutkind, J. Silvio; Molinolo, Alfredo A.; Crawford, Nigel P. S.

    2014-01-01

    Although prostate cancer typically runs an indolent course, a subset of men develop aggressive, fatal forms of this disease. We hypothesize that germline variation modulates susceptibility to aggressive prostate cancer. The goal of this work is to identify susceptibility genes using the C57BL/6-Tg(TRAMP)8247Ng/J (TRAMP) mouse model of neuroendocrine prostate cancer. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping was performed in transgene-positive (TRAMPxNOD/ShiLtJ) F2 intercross males (n?=?228), which facilitated identification of 11 loci associated with aggressive disease development. Microarray data derived from 126 (TRAMPxNOD/ShiLtJ) F2 primary tumors were used to prioritize candidate genes within QTLs, with candidate genes deemed as being high priority when possessing both high levels of expression-trait correlation and a proximal expression QTL. This process enabled the identification of 35 aggressive prostate tumorigenesis candidate genes. The role of these genes in aggressive forms of human prostate cancer was investigated using two concurrent approaches. First, logistic regression analysis in two human prostate gene expression datasets revealed that expression levels of five genes (CXCL14, ITGAX, LPCAT2, RNASEH2A, and ZNF322) were positively correlated with aggressive prostate cancer and two genes (CCL19 and HIST1H1A) were protective for aggressive prostate cancer. Higher than average levels of expression of the five genes that were positively correlated with aggressive disease were consistently associated with patient outcome in both human prostate cancer tumor gene expression datasets. Second, three of these five genes (CXCL14, ITGAX, and LPCAT2) harbored polymorphisms associated with aggressive disease development in a human GWAS cohort consisting of 1,172 prostate cancer patients. This study is the first example of using a systems genetics approach to successfully identify novel susceptibility genes for aggressive prostate cancer. Such approaches will facilitate the identification of novel germline factors driving aggressive disease susceptibility and allow for new insights into these deadly forms of prostate cancer. PMID:25411967

  17. A common protein interaction domain links two recently identified epilepsy genes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hartmut Scheel; Stefan Tomiuk; Kay Hofmann

    2002-01-01

    Until recently, all genes found to be mutated in hereditary idiopathic epilepsies encoded subunits of ion channels, leading to the view of this class of diseases as channelopathies. Two apparent exceptions to this rule are the MASS1 gene, which is mutated in the Frings mouse model of audiogenic epilepsy, and the LGI1 gene, which is mutated in autosomal dominant partial

  18. MethylMix: an R package for identifying DNA methylation driven genes | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    DNA methylation is an important mechanism regulating gene transcription, and its role in carcinogenesis has been extensively studied. Hyper and hypomethylation of genes is an alternative mechanism to deregulate gene expression in a wide range of diseases. At the same time high throughput DNA methylation assays have been developed generating vast amounts of genome wide DNA methylation measurements.

  19. MethylMix: an R package for identifying DNA methylation driven genes

    Cancer.gov

    DNA methylation is an important mechanism regulating gene transcription, and its role in carcinogenesis has been extensively studied. Hyper and hypomethylation of genes is an alternative mechanism to deregulate gene expression in a wide range of diseases. At the same time high throughput DNA methylation assays have been developed generating vast amounts of genome wide DNA methylation measurements.

  20. PPAR? disease gene network and identification of therapeutic targets for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Venkatachalam, Gireedhar; Kumar, Alan Prem; Sakharkar, Kishore R; Thangavel, Sindhu; Clement, Marie-Véronique; Sakharkar, Meena Kishore

    2011-11-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) belongs to the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily. Recently published reports demonstrate the importance of a direct repeat 2 (DR2) as a PPAR?-responsive element in addition to the canonical direct repeat 1 (DR1) Peroxisome proliferator response elements (PPREs). However, a comprehensive and systematic approach to constructing de novo disease-specific gene networks for PPAR? is lacking, especially one that includes PPAR? target genes containing either DR1 or DR2 site within their promoter region. Here, we computationally identified 1154 PPAR? direct target genes and constructed the PPAR? disease gene network, which revealed 138 PPAR? target genes that are associated with 65 unique diseases. The network shows that PPAR? target genes are highly associated with cancer and neurological diseases. Thirty-eight PPAR? direct target genes were found to be involved in prostate cancer and two key (hub) PPAR? direct target genes, PRKCZ and PGK1, were experimentally validated to be repressed upon PPAR? activation by its natural ligand, 15d-PGJ(2) in three prostrate cancer cell lines. We proposed that PRKCZ and PGK1 could be novel therapeutic targets for prostate cancer. These investigations would not only aid in understanding the molecular mechanisms by which PPAR? regulates disease targets but would also lead to the identification of novel PPAR? gene targets. PMID:21780947

  1. Identifying novel resistance genes in rice wild relatives

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice blast and sheath blight are major fungal diseases of cultivated rice (Oryza sativa L. ) that limit Arkansas rough rice yields and market potential. Resistance to these diseases has been found in rice wild relatives (Oryza spp.) A collection of these wild relatives originating from outside the U...

  2. Limits of resolution of genetic linkage studies: Implications for the positional cloning of human disease genes

    SciTech Connect

    Boehnke, M. (Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States))

    1994-08-01

    Positional cloning studies to identify disease genes are being carried out for many human genetic diseases. Such studies often include a genome-scan linkage analysis to identify the rough chromosomal location of a disease gene, fine structure genetic mapping to define and narrow the chromosomal interval in which the disease gene may be located, and physical mapping and gene identification in the genetically defined interval to clone the disease gene. During the planning of a positional cloning study, it is important to know that, if linkage is found, the genetic interval identified is likely to be sufficiently narrow to be dissected efficiently by methods of physical mapping and gene identification. Thus, one wishes to know the limits of resolution of a genetic linkage study. In this paper, the author determines for Mendelian diseases the distributions and moments of three measures of linkage resolution: (1) in a set of N chromosomes, the distance between the nearest crossovers that flank a disease locus, (2) the distance between the nearest genetic markers that flank the pair of flanking crossovers after a genome scan, and (3) the distance between the nearest flanking markers after additional randomly placed markers are generated and typed in an identified interval. These results provide explicit sample-size guidelines for future positional cloning studies of Mendelian diseases and make possible a more objective evaluation of whether a proposed positional cloning study is likely to be successful. The author also briefly discusses the more difficult problem of linkage resolution for complex genetic diseases. 14 refs., 1 fig., 6 tabs.

  3. Research of Maize Leaf Disease Identifying Models Based Image Recognition

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Yu-Xia Zhao; Ke-Ru Wang; Zhong-Ying Bai; Shao-Kun Li; Rui-Zhi Xie; Shi-Ju Gao

    \\u000a The methods of recognition and diagnosis of main maize leaf diseases using machine vision were studied in the paper. Threshold\\u000a method was adopted to do image segmentation, and area-marking method was used calculating the num of disease as well as wiping\\u000a off redundancy dots. And then Freeman link code was used to calculate form feature. Finally diseases were deduced according

  4. Pinpointing disease genes through phenomic and genomic data fusion

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Pinpointing genes involved in inherited human diseases remains a great challenge in the post-genomics era. Although approaches have been proposed either based on the guilt-by-association principle or making use of disease phenotype similarities, the low coverage of both diseases and genes in existing methods has been preventing the scan of causative genes for a significant proportion of diseases at the whole-genome level. Results To overcome this limitation, we proposed a rigorous statistical method called pgFusion to prioritize candidate genes by integrating one type of disease phenotype similarity derived from the Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) and seven types of gene functional similarities calculated from gene expression, gene ontology, pathway membership, protein sequence, protein domain, protein-protein interaction and regulation pattern, respectively. Our method covered a total of 7,719 diseases and 20,327 genes, achieving the highest coverage thus far for both diseases and genes. We performed leave-one-out cross-validation experiments to demonstrate the superior performance of our method and applied it to a real exome sequencing dataset of epileptic encephalopathies, showing the capability of this approach in finding causative genes for complex diseases. We further provided the standalone software and online services of pgFusion at http://bioinfo.au.tsinghua.edu.cn/jianglab/pgfusion. Conclusions pgFusion not only provided an effective way for prioritizing candidate genes, but also demonstrated feasible solutions to two fundamental questions in the analysis of big genomic data: the comparability of heterogeneous data and the integration of multiple types of data. Applications of this method in exome or whole genome sequencing studies would accelerate the finding of causative genes for human diseases. Other research fields in genomics could also benefit from the incorporation of our data fusion methodology. PMID:25708473

  5. An evidence-based knowledgebase of pulmonary arterial hypertension to identify genes and pathways relevant to pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Min; Austin, Eric D; Hemnes, Anna R; Loyd, James E; Zhao, Zhongming

    2014-04-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a major progressive form of pulmonary hypertension (PH) with more than 4800 patients in the United States. In the last two decades, many studies have identified numerous genes associated with this disease. However, there is no comprehensive research resource for PAH or other PH types that integrates various genetic studies and their related biological information. Thus, the number of associated genes, and their strength of evidence, is unclear. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that a web-based knowledgebase could be used to develop a biological map of highly interrelated, functionally important genes in PAH. We developed the pulmonary arterial hypertension knowledgebase (PAHKB, ), a comprehensive database with a user-friendly web interface. PAHKB extracts genetic data from all available sources, including those from association studies, genetic mutation, gene expression, animal model, supporting literature, various genomic annotations, gene networks, cellular and regulatory pathways, as well as microRNAs. Moreover, PAHKB provides online tools for data browsing and searching, data integration, pathway graphical presentation, and gene ranking. In the current release, PAHKB contains 341 human PH-related genes (293 protein coding and 48 non-coding genes) curated from over 1000 PubMed abstracts. Based on the top 39 ranked PAH-related genes in PAHKB, we constructed a core biological map. This core map was enriched with the TGF-beta signaling pathway, focal adhesion, cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction, and MAPK signaling. In addition, the reconstructed map elucidates several novel cancer signaling pathways, which may provide clues to support the application of anti-cancer therapeutics to PAH. In summary, we have developed a system for the identification of core PH-related genes and identified critical signaling pathways that may be relevant to PAH pathogenesis. This system can be easily applied to other pulmonary diseases. PMID:24448676

  6. A gene sets approach for identifying prognostic gene signatures for outcome prediction

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Seon-Young Kim; Yong Sung Kim

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Gene expression profiling is a promising approach to better estimate patient prognosis; however, there are still unresolved problems, including little overlap among similarly developed gene sets and poor performance of a developed gene set in other datasets. RESULTS: We applied a gene sets approach to develop a prognostic gene set from multiple gene expression datasets. By analyzing 12 independent

  7. Standardized Plant Disease Evaluations will Enhance Resistance Gene Discovery

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gene discovery and marker development using DNA based tools require plant populations with well-documented phenotypes. Related crops such as apples and pears may share a number of genes, for example resistance to common diseases, and data mining in one crop may reveal genes for the other. However, u...

  8. Disease candidate gene identification and prioritization using protein interaction networks

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jing Chen; Bruce J. Aronow; Anil G. Jegga

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Although most of the current disease candidate gene identification and prioritization methods depend on functional annotations, the coverage of the gene functional annotations is a limiting factor. In the current study, we describe a candidate gene prioritization method that is entirely based on protein-protein interaction network (PPIN) analyses. RESULTS: For the first time, extended versions of the PageRank and

  9. Analysis of POFUT1 Gene Mutation in a Chinese Family with Dowling-Degos Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Mingfei; Li, Yi; Liu, Hong; Fu, Xi'an; Yu, Yiongxiang; Yu, Gongqi; Wang, Chuan; Bao, Fangfang; Liany, Herty; Wang, Zhenzhen; Shi, Zhongxiang; Zhang, Dizhan; Zhou, Guizhi; Liu, Jianjun; Zhang, Furen

    2014-01-01

    Dowling-Degos disease (DDD) is an autosomal dominant genodermatosis characterized by reticular pigmented anomaly mainly affecting flexures. Though KRT5 has been identified to be the causal gene of DDD, the heterogeneity of this disease was displayed: for example, POFUT1 and POGLUT1 were recently identified and confirmed to be additional pathogenic genes of DDD. To identify other DDD causative genes, we performed genome-wide linkage and exome sequencing analyses in a multiplex Chinese DDD family, in which the KRT5 mutation was absent. Only a novel 1-bp deletion (c.246+5delG) in POFUT1 was found. No other novel mutation or this deletion was detected in POFUT1 in a second DDD family and a sporadic DDD case by Sanger Sequencing. The result shows the genetic-heterogeneity and complexity of DDD and will contribute to the further understanding of DDD genotype/phenotype correlations and to the pathogenesis of this disease. PMID:25157627

  10. Family-based analysis identified CD2 as a susceptibility gene for primary open angle glaucoma in Chinese Han population

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ting; Xie, Lin; Ye, Jian; He, Xiangge

    2014-01-01

    Primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) is characterized by optic disc cupping and irreversible loss of retinal ganglion cells. Few genes have been detected that influence POAG susceptibility and little is known about its genetic architecture. In this study, we employed exome sequencing on three members from a high frequency POAG family to identify the risk factors of POAG in Chinese population. Text-mining method was applied to identify genes associated with glaucoma in literature, and protein–protein interaction networks were constructed. Furthermore, reverse transcription PCR and Western blot were performed to confirm the differential gene expression. Six genes, baculoviral inhibitors of apoptosis protein repeat containing 6 (BIRC6), CD2, luteinizing hormone/choriogonadotropin receptor (LHCGR), polycystic kidney and hepatic disease gene 1 (PKHD1), phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) and fucosyltransferase 7 (FUT7), which might be associated with POAG, were identified. Both the mRNA expression levels and protein expression levels of HSP27 were increased in astrocytes from POAG patients compared with those from normal control, suggesting that mutation in CD2 might pose a risk for POAG in Chinese population. In conclusion, novel rare variants detected by exome sequencing may hold the key to unravelling the remaining contribution of genetics to complex diseases such as POAG. PMID:24597656

  11. A multistep screening method to identify genes using evolutionary transcriptome of plants.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chang-Kug; Lim, Hye-Min; Na, Jong-Kuk; Choi, Ji-Weon; Sohn, Seong-Han; Park, Soo-Chul; Kim, Young-Hwan; Kim, Yong-Kab; Kim, Dool-Yi

    2014-01-01

    We introduced a multistep screening method to identify the genes in plants using microarrays and ribonucleic acid (RNA)-seq transcriptome data. Our method describes the process for identifying genes using the salt-tolerance response pathways of the potato (Solanum tuberosum) plant. Gene expression was analyzed using microarrays and RNA-seq experiments that examined three potato lines (high, intermediate, and low salt tolerance) under conditions of salt stress. We screened the orthologous genes and pathway genes involved in salinity-related biosynthetic pathways, and identified nine potato genes that were candidates for salinity-tolerance pathways. The nine genes were selected to characterize their phylogenetic reconstruction with homologous genes of Arabidopsis thaliana, and a Circos diagram was generated to understand the relationships among the selected genes. The involvement of the selected genes in salt-tolerance pathways was verified by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis. One candidate potato gene was selected for physiological validation by generating dehydration-responsive element-binding 1 (DREB1)-overexpressing transgenic potato plants. The DREB1 overexpression lines exhibited increased salt tolerance and plant growth when compared to that of the control. Although the nine genes identified by our multistep screening method require further characterization and validation, this study demonstrates the power of our screening strategy after the initial identification of genes using microarrays and RNA-seq experiments. PMID:24812480

  12. A Multistep Screening Method to Identify Genes Using Evolutionary Transcriptome of Plants

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chang-Kug; Lim, Hye-Min; Na, Jong-Kuk; Choi, Ji-Weon; Sohn, Seong-Han; Park, Soo-Chul; Kim, Young-Hwan; Kim, Yong-Kab; Kim, Dool-Yi

    2014-01-01

    We introduced a multistep screening method to identify the genes in plants using microarrays and ribonucleic acid (RNA)-seq transcriptome data. Our method describes the process for identifying genes using the salt-tolerance response pathways of the potato (Solanum tuberosum) plant. Gene expression was analyzed using microarrays and RNA-seq experiments that examined three potato lines (high, intermediate, and low salt tolerance) under conditions of salt stress. We screened the orthologous genes and pathway genes involved in salinity-related biosynthetic pathways, and identified nine potato genes that were candidates for salinity-tolerance pathways. The nine genes were selected to characterize their phylogenetic reconstruction with homologous genes of Arabidopsis thaliana, and a Circos diagram was generated to understand the relationships among the selected genes. The involvement of the selected genes in salt-tolerance pathways was verified by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis. One candidate potato gene was selected for physiological validation by generating dehydration-responsive element-binding 1 (DREB1)-overexpressing transgenic potato plants. The DREB1 overexpression lines exhibited increased salt tolerance and plant growth when compared to that of the control. Although the nine genes identified by our multistep screening method require further characterization and validation, this study demonstrates the power of our screening strategy after the initial identification of genes using microarrays and RNA-seq experiments. PMID:24812480

  13. A common protein interaction domain links two recently identified epilepsy genes.

    PubMed

    Scheel, Hartmut; Tomiuk, Stefan; Hofmann, Kay

    2002-07-15

    Until recently, all genes found to be mutated in hereditary idiopathic epilepsies encoded subunits of ion channels, leading to the view of this class of diseases as channelopathies. Two apparent exceptions to this rule are the MASS1 gene, which is mutated in the Frings mouse model of audiogenic epilepsy, and the LGI1 gene, which is mutated in autosomal dominant partial epilepsy with auditory features (ADPEAF). Careful sequence analysis of the two protein products encoded by those genes shows a common feature: both sequences harbour a novel homology domain consisting of a 7-fold repeated 44-residue motif. The architecture and structural features of this new domain make it a likely member of the growing class of protein interaction domains with a seven-bladed beta-propeller fold. In the MASS1 gene product, which has recently been shown to be a fragment of the very large G-protein-coupled receptor VLGR1, this EAR domain (for epilepsy-associated repeat) is part of the ligand-binding ectodomain. LGI1, as well as a number of newly identified LGI1 relatives, is predicted to be a secreted protein, and consists of an N-terminal leucine-rich repeat region and a C-terminal EAR region. The known portion of the human genome encodes six EAR proteins, some of which map to chromosome regions associated with seizure disorders. The EAR domain is likely to play an important role in the pathogenesis of epilepsy, either by binding to an unknown anti-epileptic ligand, or more likely by interfering with axon guidance or synaptogenesis. PMID:12095917

  14. Meta-Analysis Approach identifies Candidate Genes and associated Molecular Networks for Type2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Axel Rasche; Hadi Al-Hasani; Ralf Herwig

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Multiple functional genomics data for complex human diseases have been published and made available by researchers worldwide. The main goal of these studies is the detailed analysis of a particular aspect of the disease. Complementary, meta-analysis approaches try to extract supersets of disease genes and interaction networks by integrating and combining these individual studies using statistical approaches. RESULTS: Here

  15. Candidate genes for limiting cholestatic intestinal injury identified by gene expression profiling

    PubMed Central

    Alaish, Samuel M; Timmons, Jennifer; Smith, Alexis; Buzza, Marguerite S; Murphy, Ebony; Zhao, Aiping; Sun, Yezhou; Turner, Douglas J; Shea-Donahue, Terez; Antalis, Toni M; Cross, Alan; Dorsey, Susan G

    2013-01-01

    The lack of bile flow from the liver into the intestine can have devastating complications including hepatic failure, sepsis, and even death. This pathologic condition known as cholestasis can result from etiologies as diverse as total parenteral nutrition (TPN), hepatitis, and pancreatic cancer. The intestinal injury associated with cholestasis has been shown to result in decreased intestinal resistance, increased bacterial translocation, and increased endotoxemia. Anecdotal clinical evidence suggests a genetic predisposition to exaggerated injury. Recent animal research on two different strains of inbred mice demonstrating different rates of bacterial translocation with different mortality rates supports this premise. In this study, a microarray analysis of intestinal tissue following common bile duct ligation (CBDL) performed under general anesthesia on these same two strains of inbred mice was done with the goal of identifying the potential molecular mechanistic pathways responsible. Over 500 genes were increased more than 2.0-fold following CBDL. The most promising candidate genes included major urinary proteins (MUPs), serine protease-1-inhibitor (Serpina1a), and lipocalin-2 (LCN-2). Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) validated the microarray results for these candidate genes. In an in vitro experiment using differentiated intestinal epithelial cells, inhibition of MUP-1 by siRNA resulted in increased intestinal epithelial cell permeability. Diverse novel mechanisms involving the growth hormone pathway, the acute phase response, and the innate immune response are thus potential avenues for limiting cholestatic intestinal injury. Changes in gene expression were at times found to be not only due to the CBDL but also due to the murine strain. Should further studies in cholestatic patients demonstrate interindividual variability similar to what we have shown in mice, then a “personalized medicine” approach to cholestatic patients may become possible. PMID:24179676

  16. A Novel Apoptosis Gene Identified in the Pituitary Gland

    Microsoft Academic Search

    W. E. Farrell

    2006-01-01

    Although multiple different cancers have been described, it is likely that these tumour types share a small, and common, number of newly acquired functional capabilities. Tumours that arise within the pituitary gland are no exception with respect to these new functional capabilities. Although compelling evidence for self-sufficiency in growth signals is presented, loss of functional tumour suppressor genes by classic

  17. Detecting disease associated modules and prioritizing active genes based on high throughput data

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The accumulation of high-throughput data greatly promotes computational investigation of gene function in the context of complex biological systems. However, a biological function is not simply controlled by an individual gene since genes function in a cooperative manner to achieve biological processes. In the study of human diseases, rather than to discover disease related genes, identifying disease associated pathways and modules becomes an essential problem in the field of systems biology. Results In this paper, we propose a novel method to detect disease related gene modules or dysfunctional pathways based on global characteristics of interactome coupled with gene expression data. Specifically, we exploit interacting relationships between genes to define a gene's active score function based on the kernel trick, which can represent nonlinear effects of gene cooperativity. Then, modules or pathways are inferred based on the active scores evaluated by the support vector regression in a global and integrative manner. The efficiency and robustness of the proposed method are comprehensively validated by using both simulated and real data with the comparison to existing methods. Conclusions By applying the proposed method to two cancer related problems, i.e. breast cancer and prostate cancer, we successfully identified active modules or dysfunctional pathways related to these two types of cancers with literature confirmed evidences. We show that this network-based method is highly efficient and can be applied to a large-scale problem especially for human disease related modules or pathway extraction. Moreover, this method can also be used for prioritizing genes associated with a specific phenotype or disease. PMID:20070902

  18. Ranking Analysis of Microarray Data: A Powerful Method for Identifying Differentially Expressed Genes

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Yuan-De; Fornage, Myriam; Fu, Yun-Xin

    2007-01-01

    Microarray technology provides a powerful tool for the expression profile of thousands of genes simultaneously, which makes it possible to explore the molecular and metabolic etiology of the development of a complex disease under study. However, classical statistical methods and technologies fail to be applied to microarray data. Therefore, it is necessary and motivated to develop the powerful methods for large-scale statistical analyses. In this paper, we described a novel method, called Ranking Analysis of Microarray data (RAM). RAM, which is a large-scale two-sample t-test method, is based on comparisons between a set of ranked T-statistics and a set of ranked Z-values (a set of ranked estimated null scores) yielded by a “randomly splitting” approach instead of a “permutation” approach and two-simulation strategy for estimating the proportion of genes identified by chance, i.e., the false discovery rate (FDR). The results obtained from the simulated and observed microarray data shows that RAM is more efficient in identification of genes differentially expressed and estimation of FDR under the undesirable conditions such as a large fudge factor, small sample size, or mixture distribution of noises than Significance Analysis of Microarrays (SAM). PMID:16979869

  19. Novel variants identified in methyl-CpG-binding domain genes in autistic individuals

    PubMed Central

    Cukier, Holly N.; Rabionet, Raquel; Konidari, Ioanna; Rayner-Evans, Melissa Y.; Baltos, Mary L.; Wright, Harry H.; Abramson, Ruth K.; Martin, Eden R.; Cuccaro, Michael L.; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.

    2010-01-01

    Misregulation of the methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2) gene has been found to cause a myriad of neurological disorders including autism, mental retardation, seizures, learning disabilities, and Rett syndrome. We hypothesized that mutations in other members of the methyl-CpG-binding domain (MBD) family may also cause autistic features in individuals. We evaluated 226 autistic individuals for alterations in the four genes most homologous to MECP2: MBD1, MBD2, MBD3, and MBD4. A total of 46 alterations were identified in the four genes, including ten missense changes and two deletions that alter coding sequence. Several are either unique to our autistic population or cosegregate with affected individuals within a family, suggesting a possible relation of these variations to disease etiology. Variants include a R23M alteration in two affected half brothers which falls within the MBD domain of the MBD3 protein, as well as a frameshift in MBD4 that is predicted to truncate almost half of the protein. These results suggest that rare cases of autism may be influenced by mutations in members of the dynamic MBD protein family. PMID:19921286

  20. Autoantibodies against aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase identifies a subgroup of patients with Addison's disease.

    PubMed

    Söderbergh, A; Rorsman, F; Halonen, M; Ekwall, O; Björses, P; Kämpe, O; Husebye, E S

    2000-01-01

    Autoantibodies against aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC) are present in about 50 percent of sera from patients with autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type I (APS I) but absent in sera from patients with different organ-specific autoimmune diseases, such as insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, Hashimoto's thyroiditis, and Graves' disease. AADC is expressed in the pancreatic beta-cells, the liver, and the nervous system; and the presence of AADC antibodies has been shown to correlate to hepatitis and vitiligo in APS I patients. Among 101 investigated patients with autoimmune Addison's disease, 15 had high titers of AADC antibodies. According to the clinical characteristics of these patients, only 3 had APS I. The remaining 12 had either isolated Addison's disease or associated diabetes mellitus, hypothyroidism, vitiligo, alopecia, gonadal failure, and pernicious anemia. Autoantibodies against 21-hydroxylase were present in 9 of 12, whereas autoantibodies against side-chain cleavage enzyme and 17alpha-hydroxylase were present in 3 of 12. Two patients had only autoantibodies against AADC. DNA was available from 3 of these 12 patients. One of the patients, a woman with Addison's disease, autoimmune thyroiditis, and premature menopause was heterozygous for a point mutation (G1021A, Val301Met) in the first plant homeodomain zinc finger domain of the autoimmune regulator (AIRE) gene. The presence of AADC autoantibodies identifies patients with APS I and a subgroup of Addison patients who may have a milder atypical form of APS I or represent a distinct entity. Measurement of autoantibodies against AADC should be included in the evaluation of Addison's disease. PMID:10634424

  1. Ensemble Positive Unlabeled Learning for Disease Gene Identification

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Peng; Li, Xiaoli; Chua, Hon-Nian; Kwoh, Chee-Keong; Ng, See-Kiong

    2014-01-01

    An increasing number of genes have been experimentally confirmed in recent years as causative genes to various human diseases. The newly available knowledge can be exploited by machine learning methods to discover additional unknown genes that are likely to be associated with diseases. In particular, positive unlabeled learning (PU learning) methods, which require only a positive training set P (confirmed disease genes) and an unlabeled set U (the unknown candidate genes) instead of a negative training set N, have been shown to be effective in uncovering new disease genes in the current scenario. Using only a single source of data for prediction can be susceptible to bias due to incompleteness and noise in the genomic data and a single machine learning predictor prone to bias caused by inherent limitations of individual methods. In this paper, we propose an effective PU learning framework that integrates multiple biological data sources and an ensemble of powerful machine learning classifiers for disease gene identification. Our proposed method integrates data from multiple biological sources for training PU learning classifiers. A novel ensemble-based PU learning method EPU is then used to integrate multiple PU learning classifiers to achieve accurate and robust disease gene predictions. Our evaluation experiments across six disease groups showed that EPU achieved significantly better results compared with various state-of-the-art prediction methods as well as ensemble learning classifiers. Through integrating multiple biological data sources for training and the outputs of an ensemble of PU learning classifiers for prediction, we are able to minimize the potential bias and errors in individual data sources and machine learning algorithms to achieve more accurate and robust disease gene predictions. In the future, our EPU method provides an effective framework to integrate the additional biological and computational resources for better disease gene predictions. PMID:24816822

  2. Inductive matrix completion for predicting gene–disease associations

    PubMed Central

    Natarajan, Nagarajan; Dhillon, Inderjit S.

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: Most existing methods for predicting causal disease genes rely on specific type of evidence, and are therefore limited in terms of applicability. More often than not, the type of evidence available for diseases varies—for example, we may know linked genes, keywords associated with the disease obtained by mining text, or co-occurrence of disease symptoms in patients. Similarly, the type of evidence available for genes varies—for example, specific microarray probes convey information only for certain sets of genes. In this article, we apply a novel matrix-completion method called Inductive Matrix Completion to the problem of predicting gene-disease associations; it combines multiple types of evidence (features) for diseases and genes to learn latent factors that explain the observed gene–disease associations. We construct features from different biological sources such as microarray expression data and disease-related textual data. A crucial advantage of the method is that it is inductive; it can be applied to diseases not seen at training time, unlike traditional matrix-completion approaches and network-based inference methods that are transductive. Results: Comparison with state-of-the-art methods on diseases from the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database shows that the proposed approach is substantially better—it has close to one-in-four chance of recovering a true association in the top 100 predictions, compared to the recently proposed Catapult method (second best) that has <15% chance. We demonstrate that the inductive method is particularly effective for a query disease with no previously known gene associations, and for predicting novel genes, i.e. genes that are previously not linked to diseases. Thus the method is capable of predicting novel genes even for well-characterized diseases. We also validate the novelty of predictions by evaluating the method on recently reported OMIM associations and on associations recently reported in the literature. Availability: Source code and datasets can be downloaded from http://bigdata.ices.utexas.edu/project/gene-disease. Contact: naga86@cs.utexas.edu PMID:24932006

  3. Identifying Gene Clusters and Regulatory Themes using Time Course Expression Data,

    E-print Network

    Goldschmidt, Christina

    Pages 1­13 Identifying Gene Clusters and Regulatory Themes using Time Course Expression Data, 2 Department of Statistics, Oxford Centre for Gene Function, University of Oxford, 1 South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3TG ABSTRACT Motivation: The development of microarrays has allowed the gene

  4. A STRATEGY FOR IDENTIFYING PUTATIVE CAUSES OF GENE EXPRESSION VARIATION IN HUMAN CANCER

    E-print Network

    Ringnér, Markus

    A STRATEGY FOR IDENTIFYING PUTATIVE CAUSES OF GENE EXPRESSION VARIATION IN HUMAN CANCER Sampsa expression screening by microarray techniques. However, the causes of this variability from one cancer in 14 breast cancer samples. The expression of 270 genes could be explained by the variability of gene

  5. Amygdala-enriched genes identified by microarray technology are restricted to specific

    E-print Network

    Kreiman, Gabriel

    Amygdala-enriched genes identified by microarray technology are restricted to specific amygdaloid of differential gene expression among five selected brain regions, including the amygdala, cerebellum, hippocampus performed on a subset of amygdala-enriched genes confirmed in most cases the overall region

  6. Identification of Genes Expressed in Premalignant Breast Disease by Microscopy-Directed Cloning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Roy A.; Page, David L.; Holt, Jeffrey T.

    1994-09-01

    Histopathologic study of human breast biopsy samples has identified specific lesions which are associated with a high risk of development of invasive breast cancer. Presumably, these lesions (collectively termed premalignant breast disease) represent the earliest recognizable morphologic expression of fundamental molecular events that lead to the development of invasive breast cancer. To study molecular events underlying premalignant breast disease, we have developed a method for isolating RNA from histologically identified lesions from frozen human breast tissue. This method specifically obtains mRNA from breast epithelial cells and has identified three genes which are differentially expressed in premalignant breast epithelial lesions. One gene identified by this method is overexpressed in four of five noncomedo ductal carcinoma in situ lesions and appears to be the human homologue of the gene encoding the M2 subunit of ribonucleotide reductase, an enzyme involved in DNA synthesis.

  7. Mapping eQTLs in the Norfolk Island Genetic Isolate Identifies Candidate Genes for CVD Risk Traits

    PubMed Central

    Benton, Miles C.; Lea, Rod A.; Macartney-Coxson, Donia; Carless, Melanie A.; Göring, Harald H.; Bellis, Claire; Hanna, Michelle; Eccles, David; Chambers, Geoffrey K.; Curran, Joanne E.; Harper, Jacquie L.; Blangero, John; Griffiths, Lyn R.

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) affects millions of people worldwide and is influenced by numerous factors, including lifestyle and genetics. Expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) influence gene expression and are good candidates for CVD risk. Founder-effect pedigrees can provide additional power to map genes associated with disease risk. Therefore, we identified eQTLs in the genetic isolate of Norfolk Island (NI) and tested for associations between these and CVD risk factors. We measured genome-wide transcript levels of blood lymphocytes in 330 individuals and used pedigree-based heritability analysis to identify heritable transcripts. eQTLs were identified by genome-wide association testing of these transcripts. Testing for association between CVD risk factors (i.e., blood lipids, blood pressure, and body fat indices) and eQTLs revealed 1,712 heritable transcripts (p < 0.05) with heritability values ranging from 0.18 to 0.84. From these, we identified 200 cis-acting and 70 trans-acting eQTLs (p < 1.84 × 10?7) An eQTL-centric analysis of CVD risk traits revealed multiple associations, including 12 previously associated with CVD-related traits. Trait versus eQTL regression modeling identified four CVD risk candidates (NAAA, PAPSS1, NME1, and PRDX1), all of which have known biological roles in disease. In addition, we implicated several genes previously associated with CVD risk traits, including MTHFR and FN3KRP. We have successfully identified a panel of eQTLs in the NI pedigree and used this to implicate several genes in CVD risk. Future studies are required for further assessing the functional importance of these eQTLs and whether the findings here also relate to outbred populations. PMID:24314549

  8. Quantitative cell array screening to identify regulators of gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Kainth, Pinay

    2010-01-01

    In the last decade or so, advances in genome-scale technologies have allowed systematic and detailed analysis of gene function. The experimental accessibility of budding yeast makes it a test-bed for technology development and application of new functional genomic tools and resources that pave the way for comparable efforts in higher eukaryotes. In this article, we review advances in reporter screening technology to discover trans-acting regulators of promoters (or cis-elements) of interest in the context of a novel functional genomics approach called Reporter Synthetic Genetic Array (R-SGA) analysis. We anticipate that this methodology will enable researchers to collect quantitative data on hundreds of gene expression pathways in an effort to better understand transcriptional regulatory networks. PMID:19952074

  9. Quantitative cell array screening to identify regulators of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Kainth, Pinay; Andrews, Brenda

    2010-01-01

    In the last decade or so, advances in genome-scale technologies have allowed systematic and detailed analysis of gene function. The experimental accessibility of budding yeast makes it a test-bed for technology development and application of new functional genomic tools and resources that pave the way for comparable efforts in higher eukaryotes. In this article, we review advances in reporter screening technology to discover trans-acting regulators of promoters (or cis-elements) of interest in the context of a novel functional genomics approach called Reporter Synthetic Genetic Array (R-SGA) analysis. We anticipate that this methodology will enable researchers to collect quantitative data on hundreds of gene expression pathways in an effort to better understand transcriptional regulatory networks. PMID:19952074

  10. Case-only exome sequencing and complex disease susceptibility gene discovery: study design considerations.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lang; Schaid, Daniel J; Sicotte, Hugues; Wieben, Eric D; Li, Hu; Petersen, Gloria M

    2015-01-01

    Whole exome sequencing (WES) provides an unprecedented opportunity to identify the potential aetiological role of rare functional variants in human complex diseases. Large-scale collaborations have generated germline WES data on patients with a number of diseases, especially cancer, but less often on healthy controls under the same sequencing procedures. These data can be a valuable resource for identifying new disease susceptibility loci if study designs are appropriately applied. This review describes suggested strategies and technical considerations when focusing on case-only study designs that use WES data in complex disease scenarios. These include variant filtering based on frequency and functionality, gene prioritisation, interrogation of different data types and targeted sequencing validation. We propose that if case-only WES designs were applied in an appropriate manner, new susceptibility genes containing rare variants for human complex diseases can be detected. PMID:25371537

  11. Identifying Escherichia coli genes involved in intrinsic multidrug resistance

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Miao Duo; Shuyu Hou; Dacheng Ren

    2008-01-01

    Multidrug resistance is a major cause of clinical failure in treating bacterial infections. Increasing evidence suggests that\\u000a bacteria can resist multiple antibiotics through intrinsic mechanisms that rely on gene products such as efflux pumps that\\u000a expel antibiotics and special membrane proteins that block the penetration of drug molecules. In this study, Escherichia coli was used as a model system to

  12. Identifying mechanistic indicators of childhood asthma from blood gene expression

    EPA Science Inventory

    Asthmatic individuals have been identified as a susceptible subpopulation for air pollutants. However, asthma represents a syndrome with multiple probable etiologies, and the identification of these asthma endotypes is critical to accurately define the most susceptible subpopula...

  13. Large-scale association analysis identifies new risk loci for coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the commonest cause of death. Here, we report an association analysis in 63,746 CAD cases and 130,681 controls identifying 15 loci reaching genome-wide significance, taking the number of susceptibility loci for CAD to 46, and a further 104 independent variants (r2 < 0.2) strongly associated with CAD at a 5% false discovery rate (FDR). Together, these variants explain approximately 10.6% of CAD heritability. Of the 46 genome-wide significant lead SNPs, 12 show a significant association with a lipid trait, and 5 show a significant association with blood pressure, but none is significantly associated with diabetes. Network analysis with 233 candidate genes (loci at 10% FDR) generated 5 interaction networks comprising 85% of these putative genes involved in CAD. The four most significant pathways mapping to these networks are linked to lipid metabolism and inflammation, underscoring the causal role of these activities in the genetic etiology of CAD. Our study provides insights into the genetic basis of CAD and identifies key biological pathways. PMID:23202125

  14. Large-scale association analysis identifies new risk loci for coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Deloukas, Panos; Kanoni, Stavroula; Willenborg, Christina; Farrall, Martin; Assimes, Themistocles L; Thompson, John R; Ingelsson, Erik; Saleheen, Danish; Erdmann, Jeanette; Goldstein, Benjamin A; Stirrups, Kathleen; König, Inke R; Cazier, Jean-Baptiste; Johansson, Asa; Hall, Alistair S; Lee, Jong-Young; Willer, Cristen J; Chambers, John C; Esko, Tõnu; Folkersen, Lasse; Goel, Anuj; Grundberg, Elin; Havulinna, Aki S; Ho, Weang K; Hopewell, Jemma C; Eriksson, Niclas; Kleber, Marcus E; Kristiansson, Kati; Lundmark, Per; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Rafelt, Suzanne; Shungin, Dmitry; Strawbridge, Rona J; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Tikkanen, Emmi; Van Zuydam, Natalie; Voight, Benjamin F; Waite, Lindsay L; Zhang, Weihua; Ziegler, Andreas; Absher, Devin; Altshuler, David; Balmforth, Anthony J; Barroso, Inês; Braund, Peter S; Burgdorf, Christof; Claudi-Boehm, Simone; Cox, David; Dimitriou, Maria; Do, Ron; Doney, Alex S F; El Mokhtari, NourEddine; Eriksson, Per; Fischer, Krista; Fontanillas, Pierre; Franco-Cereceda, Anders; Gigante, Bruna; Groop, Leif; Gustafsson, Stefan; Hager, Jörg; Hallmans, Göran; Han, Bok-Ghee; Hunt, Sarah E; Kang, Hyun M; Illig, Thomas; Kessler, Thorsten; Knowles, Joshua W; Kolovou, Genovefa; Kuusisto, Johanna; Langenberg, Claudia; Langford, Cordelia; Leander, Karin; Lokki, Marja-Liisa; Lundmark, Anders; McCarthy, Mark I; Meisinger, Christa; Melander, Olle; Mihailov, Evelin; Maouche, Seraya; Morris, Andrew D; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Nikus, Kjell; Peden, John F; Rayner, N William; Rasheed, Asif; Rosinger, Silke; Rubin, Diana; Rumpf, Moritz P; Schäfer, Arne; Sivananthan, Mohan; Song, Ci; Stewart, Alexandre F R; Tan, Sian-Tsung; Thorgeirsson, Gudmundur; van der Schoot, C Ellen; Wagner, Peter J; Wells, George A; Wild, Philipp S; Yang, Tsun-Po; Amouyel, Philippe; Arveiler, Dominique; Basart, Hanneke; Boehnke, Michael; Boerwinkle, Eric; Brambilla, Paolo; Cambien, Francois; Cupples, Adrienne L; de Faire, Ulf; Dehghan, Abbas; Diemert, Patrick; Epstein, Stephen E; Evans, Alun; Ferrario, Marco M; Ferrières, Jean; Gauguier, Dominique; Go, Alan S; Goodall, Alison H; Gudnason, Villi; Hazen, Stanley L; Holm, Hilma; Iribarren, Carlos; Jang, Yangsoo; Kähönen, Mika; Kee, Frank; Kim, Hyo-Soo; Klopp, Norman; Koenig, Wolfgang; Kratzer, Wolfgang; Kuulasmaa, Kari; Laakso, Markku; Laaksonen, Reijo; Lee, Ji-Young; Lind, Lars; Ouwehand, Willem H; Parish, Sarah; Park, Jeong E; Pedersen, Nancy L; Peters, Annette; Quertermous, Thomas; Rader, Daniel J; Salomaa, Veikko; Schadt, Eric; Shah, Svati H; Sinisalo, Juha; Stark, Klaus; Stefansson, Kari; Trégouët, David-Alexandre; Virtamo, Jarmo; Wallentin, Lars; Wareham, Nicholas; Zimmermann, Martina E; Nieminen, Markku S; Hengstenberg, Christian; Sandhu, Manjinder S; Pastinen, Tomi; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Hovingh, G Kees; Dedoussis, George; Franks, Paul W; Lehtimäki, Terho; Metspalu, Andres; Zalloua, Pierre A; Siegbahn, Agneta; Schreiber, Stefan; Ripatti, Samuli; Blankenberg, Stefan S; Perola, Markus; Clarke, Robert; Boehm, Bernhard O; O'Donnell, Christopher; Reilly, Muredach P; März, Winfried; Collins, Rory; Kathiresan, Sekar; Hamsten, Anders; Kooner, Jaspal S; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Danesh, John; Palmer, Colin N A; Roberts, Robert; Watkins, Hugh; Schunkert, Heribert; Samani, Nilesh J

    2013-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the commonest cause of death. Here, we report an association analysis in 63,746 CAD cases and 130,681 controls identifying 15 loci reaching genome-wide significance, taking the number of susceptibility loci for CAD to 46, and a further 104 independent variants (r(2) < 0.2) strongly associated with CAD at a 5% false discovery rate (FDR). Together, these variants explain approximately 10.6% of CAD heritability. Of the 46 genome-wide significant lead SNPs, 12 show a significant association with a lipid trait, and 5 show a significant association with blood pressure, but none is significantly associated with diabetes. Network analysis with 233 candidate genes (loci at 10% FDR) generated 5 interaction networks comprising 85% of these putative genes involved in CAD. The four most significant pathways mapping to these networks are linked to lipid metabolism and inflammation, underscoring the causal role of these activities in the genetic etiology of CAD. Our study provides insights into the genetic basis of CAD and identifies key biological pathways. PMID:23202125

  15. Signature-Tagged Mutagenesis to Identify Virulence Genes in Salmonella choleraesuis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Carol A. Lichtensteiger; Eric R. Vimr

    Signature-tagged mutagenesis is a functional genomics approach to identify bacterial virulence genes by simultaneously screening multiple mutants in a single host animal. Avirulent (attenuated) mutants are identified by negative selection (failure to colonize the host). The method was recently developed to investigate Salmonella typhimurium in a mouse model of human typhoid fever. We modified the protocol to investigate virulence genes

  16. Reproduced with permission from Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Identifying new human oocyte marker genes: a

    E-print Network

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Reproduced with permission from Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Identifying new human oocyte marker of these genes as well as other related genes in human oocytes and cumulus cells. In this study, we identified) demonstrated that, in vitro, the culture of human oocytes with attached cumulus cells may improve

  17. Respiratory Epithelial Gene Expression in Patients with Mild and Severe Cystic Fibrosis Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Jerry M.; Merlo, Christian A.; Reynolds, Jeffrey B.; Zeitlin, Pamela L.; Garcia, Joe G. N.; Guggino, William B.; Boyle, Michael P.

    2006-01-01

    Despite having identical cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator genotypes, individuals with ?F508 homozygous cystic fibrosis (CF) demonstrate significant variability in severity of pulmonary disease. This investigation used high-density oligonucleotide microarray analysis of nasal respiratory epithelium to investigate the molecular basis of phenotypic differences in CF by (1) identifying differences in gene expression between ?F508 homozygotes in the most severe 20th percentile of lung disease by forced expiratory volume in 1 s and those in the most mild 20th percentile of lung disease and (2) identifying differences in gene expression between ?F508 homozygotes and age-matched non-CF control subjects. Microarray results from 23 participants (12 CF, 11 non-CF) met the strict quality control guidelines and were used for final data analysis. A total of 652 of the 11,867 genes identified as present in 75% of the samples were significantly differentially expressed in one of the three disease phenotypes: 30 in non-CF, 53 in mild CF, and 569 in severe CF. An analysis of genes differentially expressed by severity of CF lung disease demonstrated significant upregulation in severe CF of genes involved in protein ubiquination (P < 0.04), mitochondrial oxidoreductase activity (P < 0.01), and lipid metabolism (P < 0.03). Analysis of genes with decreased expression in patients with CF compared with control subjects demonstrated significant downregulation of genes involved in airway defense (P < 0.047) and protein metabolism (P < 0.048). This study suggests that differences in CF lung phenotype are associated with differences in expression of genes involving airway defense, protein ubiquination, and mitochondrial oxidoreductase activity and identifies specific new candidate modifiers of the CF phenotype. PMID:16614352

  18. HGCS: an online tool for prioritizing disease-causing gene variants by biological distance

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Identifying the genotypes underlying human disease phenotypes is a fundamental step in human genetics and medicine. High-throughput genomic technologies provide thousands of genetic variants per individual. The causal genes of a specific phenotype are usually expected to be functionally close to each other. According to this hypothesis, candidate genes are picked from high-throughput data on the basis of their biological proximity to core genesgenes already known to be responsible for the phenotype. There is currently no effective gene-centric online interface for this purpose. Results We describe here the human gene connectome server (HGCS), a powerful, easy-to-use interactive online tool enabling researchers to prioritize any list of genes according to their biological proximity to core genes associated with the phenotype of interest. We also make available an updated and extended version for all human gene-specific connectomes. The HGCS is freely available to noncommercial users from: http://hgc.rockefeller.edu/. Conclusions The HGCS should help investigators from diverse fields to identify new disease-causing candidate genes more effectively, via a user-friendly online interface. PMID:24694260

  19. Walking on multiple disease-gene networks to prioritize candidate genes.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Rui

    2015-06-01

    Uncovering causal genes for human inherited diseases, as the primary step toward understanding the pathogenesis of these diseases, requires a combined analysis of genetic and genomic data. Although bioinformatics methods have been designed to prioritize candidate genes resulting from genetic linkage analysis or association studies, the coverage of both diseases and genes in existing methods is quite limited, thereby preventing the scan of causal genes for a significant proportion of diseases at the whole-genome level. To overcome this limitation, we propose a method named pgWalk to prioritize candidate genes by integrating multiple phenomic and genomic data. We derive three types of phenotype similarities among 7719 diseases and nine types of functional similarities among 20327 genes. Based on a pair of phenotype and gene similarities, we construct a disease-gene network and then simulate the process that a random walker wanders on such a heterogeneous network to quantify the strength of association between a candidate gene and a query disease. A weighted version of the Fisher's method with dependent correction is adopted to integrate 27 scores obtained in this way, and a final q-value is calibrated for prioritizing candidate genes. A series of validation experiments are conducted to demonstrate the superior performance of this approach. We further show the effectiveness of this method in exome sequencing studies of autism and epileptic encephalopathies. An online service and the standalone software of pgWalk can be found at http://bioinfo.au.tsinghua.edu.cn/jianglab/pgwalk. PMID:25681405

  20. Unravelling personalized dysfunctional gene network of complex diseases based on differential network model.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiangtian; Zeng, Tao; Wang, Xiangdong; Li, Guojun; Chen, Luonan

    2015-01-01

    In the conventional analysis of complex diseases, the control and case samples are assumed to be of great purity. However, due to the heterogeneity of disease samples, many disease genes are even not always consistently up-/down-regulated, leading to be under-estimated. This problem will seriously influence effective personalized diagnosis or treatment. The expression variance and expression covariance can address such a problem in a network manner. But, these analyses always require multiple samples rather than one sample, which is generally not available in clinical practice for each individual. To extract the common and specific network characteristics for individual patients in this paper, a novel differential network model, e.g. personalized dysfunctional gene network, is proposed to integrate those genes with different features, such as genes with the differential gene expression (DEG), genes with the differential expression variance (DEVG) and gene-pairs with the differential expression covariance (DECG) simultaneously, to construct personalized dysfunctional networks. This model uses a new statistic-like measurement on differential information, i.e., a differential score (DEVC), to reconstruct the differential expression network between groups of normal and diseased samples; and further quantitatively evaluate different feature genes in the patient-specific network for each individual. This DEVC-based differential expression network (DEVC-net) has been applied to the study of complex diseases for prostate cancer and diabetes. (1) Characterizing the global expression change between normal and diseased samples, the differential gene networks of those diseases were found to have a new bi-coloured topological structure, where their non hub-centred sub-networks are mainly composed of genes/proteins controlling various biological processes. (2) The differential expression variance/covariance rather than differential expression is new informative sources, and can be used to identify genes or gene-pairs with discriminative power, which are ignored by traditional methods. (3) More importantly, DEVC-net is effective to measure the expression state or activity of different feature genes and their network or modules in one sample for an individual. All of these results support that DEVC-net indeed has a clear advantage to effectively extract discriminatively interpretable features of gene/protein network of one sample (i.e. personalized dysfunctional network) even when disease samples are heterogeneous, and thus can provide new features like gene-pairs, in addition to the conventional individual genes, to the analysis of the personalized diagnosis and prognosis, and a better understanding on the underlying biological mechanisms. PMID:26070628

  1. A Comparative Transcriptome Analysis Identifying FGF23 Regulated Genes in the Kidney of a Mouse CKD Model

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Aline; Huang, Jinsong; Li, Hua; Jiao, Yan; Gu, Weikuan; Quarles, L. Darryl

    2012-01-01

    Elevations of circulating Fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) are associated with adverse cardiovascular outcomes and progression of renal failure in chronic kidney disease (CKD). Efforts to identify gene products whose transcription is directly regulated by FGF23 stimulation of fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFR)/?-Klotho complexes in the kidney is confounded by both systemic alterations in calcium, phosphorus and vitamin D metabolism and intrinsic alterations caused by the underlying renal pathology in CKD. To identify FGF23 responsive genes in the kidney that might explain the association between FGF23 and adverse outcomes in CKD, we performed comparative genome wide analysis of gene expression profiles in the kidney of the Collagen 4 alpha 3 null mice (Col4a3?/?) model of progressive kidney disease with kidney expression profiles of Hypophosphatemic (Hyp) and FGF23 transgenic mouse models of elevated FGF23. The different complement of potentially confounding factors in these models allowed us to identify genes that are directly targeted by FGF23. This analysis found that ?-Klotho, an anti-aging hormone and FGF23 co-receptor, was decreased by FGF23. We also identified additional FGF23-responsive transcripts and activation of networks associated with renal damage and chronic inflammation, including lipocalin 2 (Lcn2), transforming growth factor beta (TGF-?) and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-?) signaling pathways. Finally, we found that FGF23 suppresses angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) expression in the kidney, thereby providing a pathway for FGF23 regulation of the renin-angiotensin system. These gene products provide a possible mechanistic links between elevated FGF23 and pathways responsible for renal failure progression and cardiovascular diseases. PMID:22970174

  2. Identifying Alzheimers Disease-Related Brain Regions from Multi-Modality Neuroimaging Data

    E-print Network

    Li, Jing

    1 Identifying Alzheimers Disease-Related Brain Regions from Multi-Modality Neuroimaging Data using Abstract5 Diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) at the early stage of the disease development is of great628 Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a fatal, neurodegenerative disorder that currently affects over five29

  3. Genes and pathways underlying regional and cell type changes in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Transcriptional studies suggest Alzheimer's disease (AD) involves dysfunction of many cellular pathways, including synaptic transmission, cytoskeletal dynamics, energetics, and apoptosis. Despite known progression of AD pathologies, it is unclear how such striking regional vulnerability occurs, or which genes play causative roles in disease progression. Methods To address these issues, we performed a large-scale transcriptional analysis in the CA1 and relatively less vulnerable CA3 brain regions of individuals with advanced AD and nondemented controls. In our study, we assessed differential gene expression across region and disease status, compared our results to previous studies of similar design, and performed an unbiased co-expression analysis using weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA). Several disease genes were identified and validated using qRT-PCR. Results We find disease signatures consistent with several previous microarray studies, then extend these results to show a relationship between disease status and brain region. Specifically, genes showing decreased expression with AD progression tend to show enrichment in CA3 (and vice versa), suggesting transcription levels may reflect a region's vulnerability to disease. Additionally, we find several candidate vulnerability (ABCA1, MT1H, PDK4, RHOBTB3) and protection (FAM13A1, LINGO2, UNC13C) genes based on expression patterns. Finally, we use a systems-biology approach based on WGCNA to uncover disease-relevant expression patterns for major cell types, including pathways consistent with a key role for early microglial activation in AD. Conclusions These results paint a picture of AD as a multifaceted disease involving slight transcriptional changes in many genes between regions, coupled with a systemic immune response, gliosis, and neurodegeneration. Despite this complexity, we find that a consistent picture of gene expression in AD is emerging. PMID:23705665

  4. Integration of disease association and eQTL data using a Bayesian colocalisation approach highlights six candidate causal genes in immune-mediated diseases.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hui; Fortune, Mary D; Burren, Oliver S; Schofield, Ellen; Todd, John A; Wallace, Chris

    2015-06-15

    The genes and cells that mediate genetic associations identified through genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are only partially understood. Several studies that have investigated the genetic regulation of gene expression have shown that disease-associated variants are over-represented amongst expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) variants. Evidence for colocalisation of eQTL and disease causal variants can suggest causal genes and cells for these genetic associations. Here, we used colocalisation analysis to investigate whether 595 genetic associations to ten immune-mediated diseases are consistent with a causal variant that regulates, in cis, gene expression in resting B cells, and in resting and stimulated monocytes. Previously published candidate causal genes were over-represented amongst genes exhibiting colocalisation (odds ratio > 1.5), and we identified evidence for colocalisation (posterior odds > 5) between cis eQTLs in at least one cell type and at least one disease for six genes: ADAM15, RGS1, CARD9, LTBR, CTSH and SYNGR1. We identified cell-specific effects, such as for CTSH, the expression of which in monocytes, but not in B cells, may mediate type 1 diabetes and narcolepsy associations in the chromosome 15q25.1 region. Our results demonstrate the utility of integrating genetic studies of disease and gene expression for highlighting causal genes and cell types. PMID:25743184

  5. Prioritizing candidate disease genes by network-based boosting of genome-wide association data

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Insuk; Blom, U. Martin; Wang, Peggy I.; Shim, Jung Eun; Marcotte, Edward M.

    2011-01-01

    Network “guilt by association” (GBA) is a proven approach for identifying novel disease genes based on the observation that similar mutational phenotypes arise from functionally related genes. In principle, this approach could account even for nonadditive genetic interactions, which underlie the synergistic combinations of mutations often linked to complex diseases. Here, we analyze a large-scale, human gene functional interaction network (dubbed HumanNet). We show that candidate disease genes can be effectively identified by GBA in cross-validated tests using label propagation algorithms related to Google's PageRank. However, GBA has been shown to work poorly in genome-wide association studies (GWAS), where many genes are somewhat implicated, but few are known with very high certainty. Here, we resolve this by explicitly modeling the uncertainty of the associations and incorporating the uncertainty for the seed set into the GBA framework. We observe a significant boost in the power to detect validated candidate genes for Crohn's disease and type 2 diabetes by comparing our predictions to results from follow-up meta-analyses, with incorporation of the network serving to highlight the JAK–STAT pathway and associated adaptors GRB2/SHC1 in Crohn's disease and BACH2 in type 2 diabetes. Consideration of the network during GWAS thus conveys some of the benefits of enrolling more participants in the GWAS study. More generally, we demonstrate that a functional network of human genes provides a valuable statistical framework for prioritizing candidate disease genes, both for candidate gene-based and GWAS-based studies. PMID:21536720

  6. Harnessing genomics to identify environmental determinants of heritable disease

    EPA Science Inventory

    De novo mutation is increasingly being recognized as the cause for a range of human genetic diseases and disorders. Important examples of this include inherited genetic disorders such as autism, schizophrenia, mental retardation, epilepsy, and a broad range of adverse reproductiv...

  7. A Drosophila Model Identifies a Critical Role for Zinc in Mineralization for Kidney Stone Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Sven; Bose, Neelanjan; Kahn, Arnold; Flechner, Lawrence; Blaschko, Sarah D.; Zee, Tiffany; Muteliefu, Gulinuer; Bond, Nichole; Kolipinski, Marysia; Fakra, Sirine C.; Mandel, Neil; Miller, Joe; Ramanathan, Arvind; Killilea, David W.; Brückner, Katja; Kapahi, Pankaj; Stoller, Marshall L.

    2015-01-01

    Ectopic calcification is a driving force for a variety of diseases, including kidney stones and atherosclerosis, but initiating factors remain largely unknown. Given its importance in seemingly divergent disease processes, identifying fundamental principal actors for ectopic calcification may have broad translational significance. Here we establish a Drosophila melanogaster model for ectopic calcification by inhibiting xanthine dehydrogenase whose deficiency leads to kidney stones in humans and dogs. Micro X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (?XANES) synchrotron analyses revealed high enrichment of zinc in the Drosophila equivalent of kidney stones, which was also observed in human kidney stones and Randall’s plaques (early calcifications seen in human kidneys thought to be the precursor for renal stones). To further test the role of zinc in driving mineralization, we inhibited zinc transporter genes in the ZnT family and observed suppression of Drosophila stone formation. Taken together, genetic, dietary, and pharmacologic interventions to lower zinc confirm a critical role for zinc in driving the process of heterogeneous nucleation that eventually leads to stone formation. Our findings open a novel perspective on the etiology of urinary stones and related diseases, which may lead to the identification of new preventive and therapeutic approaches. PMID:25970330

  8. A Drosophila model identifies a critical role for zinc in mineralization for kidney stone disease.

    PubMed

    Chi, Thomas; Kim, Man Su; Lang, Sven; Bose, Neelanjan; Kahn, Arnold; Flechner, Lawrence; Blaschko, Sarah D; Zee, Tiffany; Muteliefu, Gulinuer; Bond, Nichole; Kolipinski, Marysia; Fakra, Sirine C; Mandel, Neil; Miller, Joe; Ramanathan, Arvind; Killilea, David W; Brückner, Katja; Kapahi, Pankaj; Stoller, Marshall L

    2015-01-01

    Ectopic calcification is a driving force for a variety of diseases, including kidney stones and atherosclerosis, but initiating factors remain largely unknown. Given its importance in seemingly divergent disease processes, identifying fundamental principal actors for ectopic calcification may have broad translational significance. Here we establish a Drosophila melanogaster model for ectopic calcification by inhibiting xanthine dehydrogenase whose deficiency leads to kidney stones in humans and dogs. Micro X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (?XANES) synchrotron analyses revealed high enrichment of zinc in the Drosophila equivalent of kidney stones, which was also observed in human kidney stones and Randall's plaques (early calcifications seen in human kidneys thought to be the precursor for renal stones). To further test the role of zinc in driving mineralization, we inhibited zinc transporter genes in the ZnT family and observed suppression of Drosophila stone formation. Taken together, genetic, dietary, and pharmacologic interventions to lower zinc confirm a critical role for zinc in driving the process of heterogeneous nucleation that eventually leads to stone formation. Our findings open a novel perspective on the etiology of urinary stones and related diseases, which may lead to the identification of new preventive and therapeutic approaches. PMID:25970330

  9. Identifying essential genes in Mycobacterium tuberculosis by global phenotypic profiling.

    PubMed

    Long, Jarukit E; DeJesus, Michael; Ward, Doyle; Baker, Richard E; Ioerger, Thomas; Sassetti, Christopher M

    2015-01-01

    Transposon sequencing (TnSeq) is a next-generation deep sequencing-based method to quantitatively assess the composition of complex mutant transposon libraries after pressure from selection. Although this method can be used for any organism in which transposon mutagenesis is possible, this chapter describes its use in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. More specifically, the methods for generating complex libraries through transposon mutagenesis, design of selective pressure, extraction of genomic DNA, amplification and quantification of transposon insertions through next-generation deep sequencing are covered. Determining gene essentiality and statistical analysis on data collected are also discussed. PMID:25636614

  10. Genes Involved in the Osteoarthritis Process Identified through Genome Wide Expression Analysis in Articular Cartilage; the RAAK Study

    PubMed Central

    Bovée, Judith V. M. G.; Bomer, Nils; van der Breggen, Ruud; Lakenberg, Nico; Keurentjes, J. Christiaan; Goeman, Jelle J.; Slagboom, P. Eline; Nelissen, Rob G. H. H.; Bos, Steffan D.; Meulenbelt, Ingrid

    2014-01-01

    Objective Identify gene expression profiles associated with OA processes in articular cartilage and determine pathways changing during the disease process. Methods Genome wide gene expression was determined in paired samples of OA affected and preserved cartilage of the same joint using microarray analysis for 33 patients of the RAAK study. Results were replicated in independent samples by RT-qPCR and immunohistochemistry. Profiles were analyzed with the online analysis tools DAVID and STRING to identify enrichment for specific pathways and protein-protein interactions. Results Among the 1717 genes that were significantly differently expressed between OA affected and preserved cartilage we found significant enrichment for genes involved in skeletal development (e.g. TNFRSF11B and FRZB). Also several inflammatory genes such as CD55, PTGES and TNFAIP6, previously identified in within-joint analyses as well as in analyses comparing preserved cartilage from OA affected joints versus healthy cartilage were among the top genes. Of note was the high up-regulation of NGF in OA cartilage. RT-qPCR confirmed differential expression for 18 out of 19 genes with expression changes of 2-fold or higher, and immunohistochemistry of selected genes showed a concordant change in protein expression. Most of these changes associated with OA severity (Mankin score) but were independent of joint-site or sex. Conclusion We provide further insights into the ongoing OA pathophysiological processes in cartilage, in particular into differences in macroscopically intact cartilage compared to OA affected cartilage, which seem relatively consistent and independent of sex or joint. We advocate that development of treatment could benefit by focusing on these similarities in gene expression changes and/or pathways. PMID:25054223

  11. Whole-Genome Sequencing of Individuals from a Founder Population Identifies Candidate Genes for Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Catarina D.; Mohajeri, Kiana; Malig, Maika; Hormozdiari, Fereydoun; Nelson, Benjamin; Du, Gaixin; Patterson, Kristen M.; Eng, Celeste; Torgerson, Dara G.; Hu, Donglei; Herman, Catherine; Chong, Jessica X.; Ko, Arthur; O'Roak, Brian J.; Krumm, Niklas; Vives, Laura; Lee, Choli; Roth, Lindsey A.; Rodriguez-Cintron, William; Rodriguez-Santana, Jose; Brigino-Buenaventura, Emerita; Davis, Adam; Meade, Kelley; LeNoir, Michael A.; Thyne, Shannon; Jackson, Daniel J.; Gern, James E.; Lemanske, Robert F.; Shendure, Jay; Abney, Mark; Burchard, Esteban G.; Ober, Carole; Eichler, Evan E.

    2014-01-01

    Asthma is a complex genetic disease caused by a combination of genetic and environmental risk factors. We sought to test classes of genetic variants largely missed by genome-wide association studies (GWAS), including copy number variants (CNVs) and low-frequency variants, by performing whole-genome sequencing (WGS) on 16 individuals from asthma-enriched and asthma-depleted families. The samples were obtained from an extended 13-generation Hutterite pedigree with reduced genetic heterogeneity due to a small founding gene pool and reduced environmental heterogeneity as a result of a communal lifestyle. We sequenced each individual to an average depth of 13-fold, generated a comprehensive catalog of genetic variants, and tested the most severe mutations for association with asthma. We identified and validated 1960 CNVs, 19 nonsense or splice-site single nucleotide variants (SNVs), and 18 insertions or deletions that were out of frame. As follow-up, we performed targeted sequencing of 16 genes in 837 cases and 540 controls of Puerto Rican ancestry and found that controls carry a significantly higher burden of mutations in IL27RA (2.0% of controls; 0.23% of cases; nominal p?=?0.004; Bonferroni p?=?0.21). We also genotyped 593 CNVs in 1199 Hutterite individuals. We identified a nominally significant association (p?=?0.03; Odds ratio (OR)?=?3.13) between a 6 kbp deletion in an intron of NEDD4L and increased risk of asthma. We genotyped this deletion in an additional 4787 non-Hutterite individuals (nominal p?=?0.056; OR?=?1.69). NEDD4L is expressed in bronchial epithelial cells, and conditional knockout of this gene in the lung in mice leads to severe inflammation and mucus accumulation. Our study represents one of the early instances of applying WGS to complex disease with a large environmental component and demonstrates how WGS can identify risk variants, including CNVs and low-frequency variants, largely untested in GWAS. PMID:25116239

  12. Meta-analysis of the global gene expression profile of triple-negative breast cancer identifies genes for the prognostication and treatment of aggressive breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Al-Ejeh, F; Simpson, P T; Sanus, J M; Klein, K; Kalimutho, M; Shi, W; Miranda, M; Kutasovic, J; Raghavendra, A; Madore, J; Reid, L; Krause, L; Chenevix-Trench, G; Lakhani, S R; Khanna, K K

    2014-01-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is an aggressive breast cancer subtype lacking expression of estrogen and progesterone receptors (ER/PR) and HER2, thus limiting therapy options. We hypothesized that meta-analysis of TNBC gene expression profiles would illuminate mechanisms underlying the aggressive nature of this disease and identify therapeutic targets. Meta-analysis in the Oncomine database identified 206 genes that were recurrently deregulated in TNBC compared with non-TNBC and in tumors that metastasized or led to death within 5 years. This ‘aggressiveness gene list' was enriched for two core functions/metagenes: chromosomal instability (CIN) and ER signaling metagenes. We calculated an ‘aggressiveness score' as the ratio of the CIN metagene to the ER metagene, which identified aggressive tumors in breast cancer data sets regardless of subtype or other clinico-pathological indicators. A score calculated from six genes from the CIN metagene and two genes from the ER metagene recapitulated the aggressiveness score. By multivariate survival analysis, we show that our aggressiveness scores (from 206 genes or the 8 representative genes) outperformed several published prognostic signatures. Small interfering RNA screen revealed that the CIN metagene holds therapeutic targets against TNBC. Particularly, the inhibition of TTK significantly reduced the survival of TNBC cells and synergized with docetaxel in vitro. Importantly, mitosis-independent expression of TTK protein was associated with aggressive subgroups, poor survival and further stratified outcome within grade 3, lymph node-positive, HER2-positive and TNBC patients. In conclusion, we identified the core components of CIN and ER metagenes that identify aggressive breast tumors and have therapeutic potential in TNBC and aggressive breast tumors. Prognostication from these metagenes at the mRNA level was limited to ER-positive tumors. However, we provide evidence that mitosis-independent expression of TTK protein was prognostic in TNBC and other aggressive breast cancer subgroups, suggesting that protection of CIN/aneuploidy drives aggressiveness and treatment resistance. PMID:24752235

  13. Identifying genes affectng stress response in rainbow trout

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genomic analyses have the potential to impact aquaculture production traits by identifying markers as proxies for traits which are expensive or difficult to measure and characterizing genetic variation and biochemical mechanisms underlying phenotypic variation. One such set of traits are the respon...

  14. Towards identifying genes underlying ecologically relevant traits in Arabidopsis thaliana

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Fabrice Roux; Joy Bergelson

    2010-01-01

    A major challenge in evolutionary biology and plant breeding is to identify the genetic basis of complex quantitative traits, including those that contribute to adaptive variation. Here we review the development of new methods and resources to fine-map intraspecific genetic variation that underlies natural phenotypic variation in plants. In particular, the analysis of 107 quantitative traits reported in the first

  15. Dragon Gene Start Finder identifies approximate locations of the 5' ends of genes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Vladimir B. Bajic; Seng Hong Seah

    2003-01-01

    Recognition of gene starts is a difficult and yet unsolved problem. We present a program, Dragon Gene Start Finder (DGSF), which assesses the gene start in mammalian genomes and predicts a region which should overlap with the first exon of the gene or be in its proximity. The program has been rigorously tested on human chromosomes 4, 21 and 22,

  16. Understanding Epistatic Interactions between Genes Targeted by Non-coding Regulatory Elements in Complex Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Min Kyung; Bang, Hyoeun

    2014-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have proven the highly polygenic architecture of complex diseases or traits; therefore, single-locus-based methods are usually unable to detect all involved loci, especially when individual loci exert small effects. Moreover, the majority of associated single-nucleotide polymorphisms resides in non-coding regions, making it difficult to understand their phenotypic contribution. In this work, we studied epistatic interactions associated with three common diseases using Korea Association Resource (KARE) data: type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM), hypertension (HT), and coronary artery disease (CAD). We showed that epistatic single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were enriched in enhancers, as well as in DNase I footprints (the Encyclopedia of DNA Elements [ENCODE] Project Consortium 2012), which suggested that the disruption of the regulatory regions where transcription factors bind may be involved in the disease mechanism. Accordingly, to identify the genes affected by the SNPs, we employed whole-genome multiple-cell-type enhancer data which discovered using DNase I profiles and Cap Analysis Gene Expression (CAGE). Assigned genes were significantly enriched in known disease associated gene sets, which were explored based on the literature, suggesting that this approach is useful for detecting relevant affected genes. In our knowledge-based epistatic network, the three diseases share many associated genes and are also closely related with each other through many epistatic interactions. These findings elucidate the genetic basis of the close relationship between DM, HT, and CAD. PMID:25705156

  17. De novo copy number variants identify new genes and loci in isolated sporadic tetralogy of Fallot.

    PubMed

    Greenway, Steven C; Pereira, Alexandre C; Lin, Jennifer C; DePalma, Steven R; Israel, Samuel J; Mesquita, Sonia M; Ergul, Emel; Conta, Jessie H; Korn, Joshua M; McCarroll, Steven A; Gorham, Joshua M; Gabriel, Stacey; Altshuler, David M; Quintanilla-Dieck, Maria de Lourdes; Artunduaga, Maria Alexandra; Eavey, Roland D; Plenge, Robert M; Shadick, Nancy A; Weinblatt, Michael E; De Jager, Philip L; Hafler, David A; Breitbart, Roger E; Seidman, Jonathan G; Seidman, Christine E

    2009-08-01

    Tetralogy of Fallot (TOF), the most common severe congenital heart malformation, occurs sporadically, without other anomaly, and from unknown cause in 70% of cases. Through a genome-wide survey of 114 subjects with TOF and their unaffected parents, we identified 11 de novo copy number variants (CNVs) that were absent or extremely rare (<0.1%) in 2,265 controls. We then examined a second, independent TOF cohort (n = 398) for additional CNVs at these loci. We identified CNVs at chromosome 1q21.1 in 1% (5/512, P = 0.0002, OR = 22.3) of nonsyndromic sporadic TOF cases. We also identified recurrent CNVs at 3p25.1, 7p21.3 and 22q11.2. CNVs in a single subject with TOF occurred at six loci, two that encode known (NOTCH1, JAG1) disease-associated genes. Our findings predict that at least 10% (4.5-15.5%, 95% confidence interval) of sporadic nonsyndromic TOF cases result from de novo CNVs and suggest that mutations within these loci might be etiologic in other cases of TOF. PMID:19597493

  18. Semi-automated literature mining to identify putative biomarkers of disease from multiple biofluids

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Computational methods for mining of biomedical literature can be useful in augmenting manual searches of the literature using keywords for disease-specific biomarker discovery from biofluids. In this work, we develop and apply a semi-automated literature mining method to mine abstracts obtained from PubMed to discover putative biomarkers of breast and lung cancers in specific biofluids. Methodology A positive set of abstracts was defined by the terms ‘breast cancer’ and ‘lung cancer’ in conjunction with 14 separate ‘biofluids’ (bile, blood, breastmilk, cerebrospinal fluid, mucus, plasma, saliva, semen, serum, synovial fluid, stool, sweat, tears, and urine), while a negative set of abstracts was defined by the terms ‘(biofluid) NOT breast cancer’ or ‘(biofluid) NOT lung cancer.’ More than 5.3 million total abstracts were obtained from PubMed and examined for biomarker-disease-biofluid associations (34,296 positive and 2,653,396 negative for breast cancer; 28,355 positive and 2,595,034 negative for lung cancer). Biological entities such as genes and proteins were tagged using ABNER, and processed using Python scripts to produce a list of putative biomarkers. Z-scores were calculated, ranked, and used to determine significance of putative biomarkers found. Manual verification of relevant abstracts was performed to assess our method’s performance. Results Biofluid-specific markers were identified from the literature, assigned relevance scores based on frequency of occurrence, and validated using known biomarker lists and/or databases for lung and breast cancer [NCBI’s On-line Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM), Cancer Gene annotation server for cancer genomics (CAGE), NCBI’s Genes & Disease, NCI’s Early Detection Research Network (EDRN), and others]. The specificity of each marker for a given biofluid was calculated, and the performance of our semi-automated literature mining method assessed for breast and lung cancer. Conclusions We developed a semi-automated process for determining a list of putative biomarkers for breast and lung cancer. New knowledge is presented in the form of biomarker lists; ranked, newly discovered biomarker-disease-biofluid relationships; and biomarker specificity across biofluids. PMID:25379168

  19. Positional cloning of disease genes on chromosome 16

    SciTech Connect

    Doggett, N. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Bruening, M. [Leiden Univ. (Netherlands); Callen, D. [Adelaide Women`s and Children`s Hospital, North Adelaide, South Australia (Australia); Gardiner, M. [University Coll., London (United Kingdom); Lerner, T. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    1996-04-01

    The project seeks to elucidate the molecular basis of an important genetic disease (Batten`s disease) by molecular cloning of the affected gene by utilizing an overlapping clone map of chromosome 16. Batten disease (also known as juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis) is a recessively inherited neurodegenerative disorder of childhood characterized by progressive loss of vision, seizures, and psychomoter disturbances. The Batten disease gene was genetically mapped to the chromosome region 16p 12.1 in close linkage with the genetic markers D16S299 and D16S298. Exon amplification of a cosmid containing D16S298 yielded a candidate gene that was disrupted by a 1 kb genomic deletion in all patients containing the most common haplotype for the disease. Two separate deletions and a point mutation altering a splice site in three unrelated families have confirmed the gene as the Batten disease gene. The disease gene encodes a novel 438 amino acid membrane binding protein of unknown function.

  20. Genetic analyses of bovine CARD15, a putative disease resistance gene

    E-print Network

    Taylor, Kristen Hawkins

    2004-09-30

    as a disease resistance gene in Crohn's disease and Blau Syndrome in human. The gene's relationship to disease and its conservation between species suggests that it may also have a conserved role in bovine disease resistance. To elucidate...

  1. Integrative analysis reveals disease-associated genes and biomarkers for prostate cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Prostate cancer is one of the most common complex diseases with high leading cause of death in men. Identifications of prostate cancer associated genes and biomarkers are thus essential as they can gain insights into the mechanisms underlying disease progression and advancing for early diagnosis and developing effective therapies. Methods In this study, we presented an integrative analysis of gene expression profiling and protein interaction network at a systematic level to reveal candidate disease-associated genes and biomarkers for prostate cancer progression. At first, we reconstructed the human prostate cancer protein-protein interaction network (HPC-PPIN) and the network was then integrated with the prostate cancer gene expression data to identify modules related to different phases in prostate cancer. At last, the candidate module biomarkers were validated by its predictive ability of prostate cancer progression. Results Different phases-specific modules were identified for prostate cancer. Among these modules, transcription Androgen Receptor (AR) nuclear signaling and Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) signalling pathway were shown to be the pathway targets for prostate cancer progression. The identified candidate disease-associated genes showed better predictive ability of prostate cancer progression than those of published biomarkers. In context of functional enrichment analysis, interestingly candidate disease-associated genes were enriched in the nucleus and different functions were encoded for potential transcription factors, for examples key players as AR, Myc, ESR1 and hidden player as Sp1 which was considered as a potential novel biomarker for prostate cancer. Conclusions The successful results on prostate cancer samples demonstrated that the integrative analysis is powerful and useful approach to detect candidate disease-associate genes and modules which can be used as the potential biomarkers for prostate cancer progression. The data, tools and supplementary files for this integrative analysis are deposited at http://www.ibio-cn.org/HPC-PPIN/. PMID:25080090

  2. Sequential Waves of Gene Expression in Patients with Clinically Defined Dengue Illnesses Reveal Subtle Disease Phases and Predict Disease Severity

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Peifang; García, Josefina; Comach, Guillermo; Vahey, Maryanne T.; Wang, Zhining; Forshey, Brett M.; Morrison, Amy C.; Sierra, Gloria; Bazan, Isabel; Rocha, Claudio; Vilcarromero, Stalin; Blair, Patrick J.; Scott, Thomas W.; Camacho, Daria E.; Ockenhouse, Christian F.; Halsey, Eric S.; Kochel, Tadeusz J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Dengue virus (DENV) infection can range in severity from mild dengue fever (DF) to severe dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) or dengue shock syndrome (DSS). Changes in host gene expression, temporally through the progression of DENV infection, especially during the early days, remains poorly characterized. Early diagnostic markers for DHF are also lacking. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we investigated host gene expression in a cohort of DENV-infected subjects clinically diagnosed as DF (n?=?51) and DHF (n?=?13) from Maracay, Venezuela. Blood specimens were collected daily from these subjects from enrollment to early defervescence and at one convalescent time-point. Using convalescent expression levels as baseline, two distinct groups of genes were identified: the “early” group, which included genes associated with innate immunity, type I interferon, cytokine-mediated signaling, chemotaxis, and complement activity peaked at day 0–1 and declined on day 3–4; the second “late” group, comprised of genes associated with cell cycle, emerged from day 4 and peaked at day 5–6. The up-regulation of innate immune response genes coincided with the down-regulation of genes associated with viral replication during day 0–3. Furthermore, DHF patients had lower expression of genes associated with antigen processing and presentation, MHC class II receptor, NK and T cell activities, compared to that of DF patients. These results suggested that the innate and adaptive immunity during the early days of the disease are vital in suppressing DENV replication and in affecting outcome of disease severity. Gene signatures of DHF were identified as early as day 1. Conclusions/Significance Our study reveals a broad and dynamic picture of host responses in DENV infected subjects. Host response to DENV infection can now be understood as two distinct phases with unique transcriptional markers. The DHF signatures identified during day 1–3 may have applications in developing early molecular diagnostics for DHF. PMID:23875036

  3. Potential hippocampal genes and pathways involved in Alzheimer's disease: a bioinformatic analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L; Guo, X Q; Chu, J F; Zhang, X; Yan, Z R; Li, Y Z

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disor-der and the most common cause of dementia in elderly people. Nu-merous studies have focused on the dysregulated genes in AD, but the pathogenesis is still unknown. In this study, we explored critical hippocampal genes and pathways that might potentially be involved in the pathogenesis of AD. Four transcriptome datasets for the hip-pocampus of patients with AD were downloaded from ArrayExpress, and the gene signature was identified by integrated analysis of mul-tiple transcriptomes using novel genome-wide relative significance and genome-wide global significance models. A protein-protein interaction network was constructed, and five clusters were selected. The biologi-cal functions and pathways were identified by Gene Ontology and Kyo-to Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway enrichment analysis. A total of 6994 genes were screened, and the top 300 genes were subjected to further analysis. Four significant KEGG pathways were identified, including oxidative phosphorylation and Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, and Alzheimer's disease pathways. The hub network of cluster 1 with the highest average rank value was de-fined. The genes (NDUFB3, NDUFA9, NDUFV1, NDUFV2, NDUFS3, NDUFA10, COX7B, and UQCR1) were considered critical with high degree in cluster 1 as well as being shared by the four significant path-ways. The oxidative phosphorylation process was also involved in the other three pathways and is considered to be relevant to energy-related AD pathology in the hippocampus. This research provides a perspec-tive from which to explore critical genes and pathways for potential AD therapies. PMID:26125932

  4. Locus heterogeneity of Dent's disease: OCRL1 and TMEM27 genes in patients with no CLCN5 mutations.

    PubMed

    Tosetto, Enrica; Addis, Maria; Caridi, Gianluca; Meloni, Cristiana; Emma, Francesco; Vergine, Gianluca; Stringini, Gilda; Papalia, Teresa; Barbano, Giancarlo; Ghiggeri, Gian Marco; Ruggeri, Laura; Miglietti, Nunzia; D Angelo, Angela; Melis, Maria Antonietta; Anglani, Franca

    2009-10-01

    Dent's disease is an X-linked renal tubulopathy caused by mutations mainly affecting the CLCN5 gene. Defects in the OCRL1 gene, which is usually mutated in patients with Lowe syndrome, have recently been shown to lead to a Dent-like phenotype, called Dent's disease 2. About 25% of Dent's disease patients do not carry CLCN5/OCRL1 mutations. The CLCN4 and SLC9A6 genes have been investigated, but no mutations have been identified. The recent discovery of a novel mediator of renal amino acid transport, collectrin (the TMEM27 gene), may provide new insight on the pathogenesis of Dent's disease. We studied 31 patients showing a phenotype resembling Dent's disease but lacking any CLCN5 mutations by direct sequencing of the OCRL1 and TMEM27 genes. Five novel mutations, L88X, P161HfsX167, F270S, D506N and E720D, in the OCRL1 gene, which have not previously been reported in patients with Dent's or Lowe disease, were identified among 11 patients with the classical Dent's disease phenotype. No TMEM27 gene mutations were discovered among 26 patients, 20 of whom had an incomplete Dent's disease phenotype. Our findings confirm that OCRL1 is involved in the functional defects characteristic of Dent's disease and suggest that patients carrying missense mutations in exons where many Lowe mutations are mapped may represent a phenotypic variant of Lowe syndrome. PMID:19582483

  5. Mechanistic Phenotypes: An Aggregative Phenotyping Strategy to Identify Disease Mechanisms Using GWAS Data

    PubMed Central

    Mosley, Jonathan D.; Van Driest, Sara L.; Larkin, Emma K.; Weeke, Peter E.; Witte, John S.; Wells, Quinn S.; Karnes, Jason H.; Guo, Yan; Bastarache, Lisa; Olson, Lana M.; McCarty, Catherine A.; Pacheco, Jennifer A.; Jarvik, Gail P.; Carrell, David S.; Larson, Eric B.; Crosslin, David R.; Kullo, Iftikhar J.; Tromp, Gerard; Kuivaniemi, Helena; Carey, David J.; Ritchie, Marylyn D.; Denny, Josh C.; Roden, Dan M.

    2013-01-01

    A single mutation can alter cellular and global homeostatic mechanisms and give rise to multiple clinical diseases. We hypothesized that these disease mechanisms could be identified using low minor allele frequency (MAF<0.1) non-synonymous SNPs (nsSNPs) associated with “mechanistic phenotypes”, comprised of collections of related diagnoses. We studied two mechanistic phenotypes: (1) thrombosis, evaluated in a population of 1,655 African Americans; and (2) four groupings of cancer diagnoses, evaluated in 3,009 white European Americans. We tested associations between nsSNPs represented on GWAS platforms and mechanistic phenotypes ascertained from electronic medical records (EMRs), and sought enrichment in functional ontologies across the top-ranked associations. We used a two-step analytic approach whereby nsSNPs were first sorted by the strength of their association with a phenotype. We tested associations using two reverse genetic models and standard additive and recessive models. In the second step, we employed a hypothesis-free ontological enrichment analysis using the sorted nsSNPs to identify functional mechanisms underlying the diagnoses comprising the mechanistic phenotypes. The thrombosis phenotype was solely associated with ontologies related to blood coagulation (Fisher's p?=?0.0001, FDR p?=?0.03), driven by the F5, P2RY12 and F2RL2 genes. For the cancer phenotypes, the reverse genetics models were enriched in DNA repair functions (p?=?2×10?5, FDR p?=?0.03) (POLG/FANCI, SLX4/FANCP, XRCC1, BRCA1, FANCA, CHD1L) while the additive model showed enrichment related to chromatid segregation (p?=?4×10?6, FDR p?=?0.005) (KIF25, PINX1). We were able to replicate nsSNP associations for POLG/FANCI, BRCA1, FANCA and CHD1L in independent data sets. Mechanism-oriented phenotyping using collections of EMR-derived diagnoses can elucidate fundamental disease mechanisms. PMID:24349080

  6. GeneChaser: Identifying all biological and clinical conditions in which genes of interest are differentially expressed

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Rong; Mallelwar, Rohan; Thosar, Ajit; Venkatasubrahmanyam, Shivkumar; Butte, Atul J

    2008-01-01

    Background The amount of gene expression data in the public repositories, such as NCBI Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) has grown exponentially, and provides a gold mine for bioinformaticians, but has not been easily accessible by biologists and clinicians. Results We developed an automated approach to annotate and analyze all GEO data sets, including 1,515 GEO data sets from 231 microarray types across 42 species, and performed 12,658 group versus group comparisons of 24 GEO-specified types. We then built GeneChaser, a web server that enables biologists and clinicians without bioinformatics skills to easily identify biological and clinical conditions in which a gene or set of genes was differentially expressed. GeneChaser displays these conditions in graphs, gives statistical comparisons, allows sort/filter functions and provides access to the original studies. We performed a single gene search for Nanog and a multiple gene search for Nanog, Oct4, Sox2 and LIN28, confirmed their roles in embryonic stem cell development, identified several drugs that regulate their expression, and suggested their potential roles in sex determination, abnormal sperm morphology, malaria infection, and cancer. Conclusion We demonstrated that GeneChaser is a powerful tool to elucidate information on function, transcriptional regulation, drug-response and clinical implications for genes of interest. PMID:19094235

  7. Inherited retinal diseases in dogs: advances in gene/mutation discovery

    PubMed Central

    Miyadera, Keiko

    2015-01-01

    1. Inherited retinal diseases (RDs) are vision-threatening conditions affecting humans as well as many domestic animals. Through many years of clinical studies of the domestic dog population, a wide array of RDs has been phenotypically characterized. Extensive effort to map the causative gene and to identify the underlying mutation followed. Through candidate gene, linkage analysis, genome-wide association studies, and more recently, by means of next-generation sequencing, as many as 31 mutations in 24 genes have been identified as the underlying cause for canine RDs. Most of these genes have been associated with human RDs providing opportunities to study their roles in the disease pathogenesis and in normal visual function. The canine model has also contributed in developing new treatments such as gene therapy which has been clinically applied to human patients. Meanwhile, with increasing knowledge of the molecular architecture of RDs in different subpopulations of dogs, the conventional understanding of RDs as a simple monogenic disease is beginning to change. Emerging evidence of modifiers that alters the disease outcome is complicating the interpretation of DNA tests. In this review, advances in the gene/mutation discovery approaches and the emerging genetic complexity of canine RDs are discussed.

  8. [From gene to disease; Dent's disease caused by abnormalities in the CLCN5 and OCRL1 genes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    E. N. Levtchenko; L. A. H. Monnens; A. Bokenkamp; N. V. A. M. Knoers

    2007-01-01

    Dent's disease is an X-linked disorder, characterized by generalized proximal tubular dysfunction, nephrolithiasis, nephrocalcinosis and the development ofend-stage renal disease, generally occurring after the age of thirty. In the majority of cases, the disease is caused by mutations in the CLCN5-gene. The pathogenesis of the disease has not yet been clarified. Defective recycling of multi-ligand proximal tubular receptors megalin and

  9. Novel mutations in ABCA1 gene in Japanese patients with Tangier disease and familial high density lipoprotein deficiency with coronary heart disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wei Huang; Kengo Moriyama; Takafumi Koga; Han Hua; Masato Ageta; Seiro Kawabata; Koji Mawatari; Takuro Imamura; Tanenao Eto; Mitsunobu Kawamura; Tamio Teramoto; Jun Sasaki

    2001-01-01

    Mutations in the ATP-binding cassette transporter 1 (ABCA1) gene have been recently identified as the molecular defect in Tangier disease (TD) and familial high density lipoprotein deficiency (FHA). We here report novel mutations in the ABCA1 gene in two sisters from a Japanese family with TD who have been described previously (S. Ohtaki, H. Nakagawa, N. Kida, H. Nakamura, K.

  10. Prioritization of neurodevelopmental disease genes by discovery of new mutations.

    PubMed

    Hoischen, Alexander; Krumm, Niklas; Eichler, Evan E

    2014-06-01

    Advances in genome sequencing technologies have begun to revolutionize neurogenetics, allowing the full spectrum of genetic variation to be better understood in relation to disease. Exome sequencing of hundreds to thousands of samples from patients with autism spectrum disorder, intellectual disability, epilepsy and schizophrenia provides strong evidence of the importance of de novo and gene-disruptive events. There are now several hundred new candidate genes and targeted resequencing technologies that allow screening of dozens of genes in tens of thousands of individuals with high specificity and sensitivity. The decision of which genes to pursue depends on many factors, including recurrence, previous evidence of overlap with pathogenic copy number variants, the position of the mutation in the protein, the mutational burden among healthy individuals and membership of the candidate gene in disease-implicated protein networks. We discuss these emerging criteria for gene prioritization and the potential impact on the field of neuroscience. PMID:24866042

  11. Common variants in Mendelian kidney disease genes and their association with renal function.

    PubMed

    Parsa, Afshin; Fuchsberger, Christian; Köttgen, Anna; O'Seaghdha, Conall M; Pattaro, Cristian; de Andrade, Mariza; Chasman, Daniel I; Teumer, Alexander; Endlich, Karlhans; Olden, Matthias; Chen, Ming-Huei; Tin, Adrienne; Kim, Young J; Taliun, Daniel; Li, Man; Feitosa, Mary; Gorski, Mathias; Yang, Qiong; Hundertmark, Claudia; Foster, Meredith C; Glazer, Nicole; Isaacs, Aaron; Rao, Madhumathi; Smith, Albert V; O'Connell, Jeffrey R; Struchalin, Maksim; Tanaka, Toshiko; Li, Guo; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Atkinson, Elizabeth J; Lohman, Kurt; Cornelis, Marilyn C; Johansson, Asa; Tönjes, Anke; Dehghan, Abbas; Couraki, Vincent; Holliday, Elizabeth G; Sorice, Rossella; Kutalik, Zoltan; Lehtimäki, Terho; Esko, Tõnu; Deshmukh, Harshal; Ulivi, Sheila; Chu, Audrey Y; Murgia, Federico; Trompet, Stella; Imboden, Medea; Kollerits, Barbara; Pistis, Giorgio; Harris, Tamara B; Launer, Lenore J; Aspelund, Thor; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Mitchell, Braxton D; Boerwinkle, Eric; Schmidt, Helena; Hofer, Edith; Hu, Frank; Demirkan, Ayse; Oostra, Ben A; Turner, Stephen T; Ding, Jingzhong; Andrews, Jeanette S; Freedman, Barry I; Giulianini, Franco; Koenig, Wolfgang; Illig, Thomas; Döring, Angela; Wichmann, H-Erich; Zgaga, Lina; Zemunik, Tatijana; Boban, Mladen; Minelli, Cosetta; Wheeler, Heather E; Igl, Wilmar; Zaboli, Ghazal; Wild, Sarah H; Wright, Alan F; Campbell, Harry; Ellinghaus, David; Nöthlings, Ute; Jacobs, Gunnar; Biffar, Reiner; Ernst, Florian; Homuth, Georg; Kroemer, Heyo K; Nauck, Matthias; Stracke, Sylvia; Völker, Uwe; Völzke, Henry; Kovacs, Peter; Stumvoll, Michael; Mägi, Reedik; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Aulchenko, Yurii S; Polasek, Ozren; Hastie, Nick; Vitart, Veronique; Helmer, Catherine; Wang, Jie Jin; Stengel, Bénédicte; Ruggiero, Daniela; Bergmann, Sven; Kähönen, Mika; Viikari, Jorma; Nikopensius, Tiit; Province, Michael; Colhoun, Helen; Doney, Alex; Robino, Antonietta; Krämer, Bernhard K; Portas, Laura; Ford, Ian; Buckley, Brendan M; Adam, Martin; Thun, Gian-Andri; Paulweber, Bernhard; Haun, Margot; Sala, Cinzia; Mitchell, Paul; Ciullo, Marina; Vollenweider, Peter; Raitakari, Olli; Metspalu, Andres; Palmer, Colin; Gasparini, Paolo; Pirastu, Mario; Jukema, J Wouter; Probst-Hensch, Nicole M; Kronenberg, Florian; Toniolo, Daniela; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Shuldiner, Alan R; Coresh, Josef; Schmidt, Reinhold; Ferrucci, Luigi; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Borecki, Ingrid; Kardia, Sharon L R; Liu, Yongmei; Curhan, Gary C; Rudan, Igor; Gyllensten, Ulf; Wilson, James F; Franke, Andre; Pramstaller, Peter P; Rettig, Rainer; Prokopenko, Inga; Witteman, Jacqueline; Hayward, Caroline; Ridker, Paul M; Bochud, Murielle; Heid, Iris M; Siscovick, David S; Fox, Caroline S; Kao, W Linda; Böger, Carsten A

    2013-12-01

    Many common genetic variants identified by genome-wide association studies for complex traits map to genes previously linked to rare inherited Mendelian disorders. A systematic analysis of common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes responsible for Mendelian diseases with kidney phenotypes has not been performed. We thus developed a comprehensive database of genes for Mendelian kidney conditions and evaluated the association between common genetic variants within these genes and kidney function in the general population. Using the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man database, we identified 731 unique disease entries related to specific renal search terms and confirmed a kidney phenotype in 218 of these entries, corresponding to mutations in 258 genes. We interrogated common SNPs (minor allele frequency >5%) within these genes for association with the estimated GFR in 74,354 European-ancestry participants from the CKDGen Consortium. However, the top four candidate SNPs (rs6433115 at LRP2, rs1050700 at TSC1, rs249942 at PALB2, and rs9827843 at ROBO2) did not achieve significance in a stage 2 meta-analysis performed in 56,246 additional independent individuals, indicating that these common SNPs are not associated with estimated GFR. The effect of less common or rare variants in these genes on kidney function in the general population and disease-specific cohorts requires further research. PMID:24029420

  12. Common Variants in Mendelian Kidney Disease Genes and Their Association with Renal Function

    PubMed Central

    Fuchsberger, Christian; Köttgen, Anna; O’Seaghdha, Conall M.; Pattaro, Cristian; de Andrade, Mariza; Chasman, Daniel I.; Teumer, Alexander; Endlich, Karlhans; Olden, Matthias; Chen, Ming-Huei; Tin, Adrienne; Kim, Young J.; Taliun, Daniel; Li, Man; Feitosa, Mary; Gorski, Mathias; Yang, Qiong; Hundertmark, Claudia; Foster, Meredith C.; Glazer, Nicole; Isaacs, Aaron; Rao, Madhumathi; Smith, Albert V.; O’Connell, Jeffrey R.; Struchalin, Maksim; Tanaka, Toshiko; Li, Guo; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Atkinson, Elizabeth J.; Lohman, Kurt; Cornelis, Marilyn C.; Johansson, Åsa; Tönjes, Anke; Dehghan, Abbas; Couraki, Vincent; Holliday, Elizabeth G.; Sorice, Rossella; Kutalik, Zoltan; Lehtimäki, Terho; Esko, Tõnu; Deshmukh, Harshal; Ulivi, Sheila; Chu, Audrey Y.; Murgia, Federico; Trompet, Stella; Imboden, Medea; Kollerits, Barbara; Pistis, Giorgio; Harris, Tamara B.; Launer, Lenore J.; Aspelund, Thor; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Schmidt, Helena; Hofer, Edith; Hu, Frank; Demirkan, Ayse; Oostra, Ben A.; Turner, Stephen T.; Ding, Jingzhong; Andrews, Jeanette S.; Freedman, Barry I.; Giulianini, Franco; Koenig, Wolfgang; Illig, Thomas; Döring, Angela; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Zgaga, Lina; Zemunik, Tatijana; Boban, Mladen; Minelli, Cosetta; Wheeler, Heather E.; Igl, Wilmar; Zaboli, Ghazal; Wild, Sarah H.; Wright, Alan F.; Campbell, Harry; Ellinghaus, David; Nöthlings, Ute; Jacobs, Gunnar; Biffar, Reiner; Ernst, Florian; Homuth, Georg; Kroemer, Heyo K.; Nauck, Matthias; Stracke, Sylvia; Völker, Uwe; Völzke, Henry; Kovacs, Peter; Stumvoll, Michael; Mägi, Reedik; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Aulchenko, Yurii S.; Polasek, Ozren; Hastie, Nick; Vitart, Veronique; Helmer, Catherine; Wang, Jie Jin; Stengel, Bénédicte; Ruggiero, Daniela; Bergmann, Sven; Kähönen, Mika; Viikari, Jorma; Nikopensius, Tiit; Province, Michael; Colhoun, Helen; Doney, Alex; Robino, Antonietta; Krämer, Bernhard K.; Portas, Laura; Ford, Ian; Buckley, Brendan M.; Adam, Martin; Thun, Gian-Andri; Paulweber, Bernhard; Haun, Margot; Sala, Cinzia; Mitchell, Paul; Ciullo, Marina; Vollenweider, Peter; Raitakari, Olli; Metspalu, Andres; Palmer, Colin; Gasparini, Paolo; Pirastu, Mario; Jukema, J. Wouter; Probst-Hensch, Nicole M.; Kronenberg, Florian; Toniolo, Daniela; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Coresh, Josef; Schmidt, Reinhold; Ferrucci, Luigi; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Borecki, Ingrid; Kardia, Sharon L.R.; Liu, Yongmei; Curhan, Gary C.; Rudan, Igor; Gyllensten, Ulf; Wilson, James F.; Franke, Andre; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Rettig, Rainer; Prokopenko, Inga; Witteman, Jacqueline; Hayward, Caroline; Ridker, Paul M.; Bochud, Murielle; Heid, Iris M.; Siscovick, David S.; Fox, Caroline S.; Kao, W. Linda; Böger, Carsten A.

    2013-01-01

    Many common genetic variants identified by genome-wide association studies for complex traits map to genes previously linked to rare inherited Mendelian disorders. A systematic analysis of common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes responsible for Mendelian diseases with kidney phenotypes has not been performed. We thus developed a comprehensive database of genes for Mendelian kidney conditions and evaluated the association between common genetic variants within these genes and kidney function in the general population. Using the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man database, we identified 731 unique disease entries related to specific renal search terms and confirmed a kidney phenotype in 218 of these entries, corresponding to mutations in 258 genes. We interrogated common SNPs (minor allele frequency >5%) within these genes for association with the estimated GFR in 74,354 European-ancestry participants from the CKDGen Consortium. However, the top four candidate SNPs (rs6433115 at LRP2, rs1050700 at TSC1, rs249942 at PALB2, and rs9827843 at ROBO2) did not achieve significance in a stage 2 meta-analysis performed in 56,246 additional independent individuals, indicating that these common SNPs are not associated with estimated GFR. The effect of less common or rare variants in these genes on kidney function in the general population and disease-specific cohorts requires further research. PMID:24029420

  13. Genes and Environment in Common Neonatal Lung Disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Mikko Hallman; Riitta Marttila; Riccardo Pertile; Marja Ojaniemi; Ritva Haataja

    2007-01-01

    Respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) and bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) are common, serious lung diseases in preterm infants. Polymorphism of the genes involved in basic lung function and alveolar stability, lung differentiation and pulmonary host defense may influence the risk. Natural selection has refined the genes responsible for cardiopulmonary adaptation and resistance against pneumonia in term and near-term infants. Before the era

  14. Evidence for somatic gene conversion and deletion in bipolar disorder, Crohn's disease, coronary artery disease, hypertension, rheumatoid arthritis, type-1 diabetes, and type-2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background During gene conversion, genetic information is transferred unidirectionally between highly homologous but non-allelic regions of DNA. While germ-line gene conversion has been implicated in the pathogenesis of some diseases, somatic gene conversion has remained technically difficult to investigate on a large scale. Methods A novel analysis technique is proposed for detecting the signature of somatic gene conversion from SNP microarray data. The Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium has gathered SNP microarray data for two control populations and cohorts for bipolar disorder (BD), cardiovascular disease (CAD), Crohn's disease (CD), hypertension (HT), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), type-1 diabetes (T1D) and type-2 diabetes (T2D). Using the new analysis technique, the seven disease cohorts are analyzed to identify cohort-specific SNPs at which conversion is predicted. The quality of the predictions is assessed by identifying known disease associations for genes in the homologous duplicons, and comparing the frequency of such associations with background rates. Results Of 28 disease/locus pairs meeting stringent conditions, 22 show various degrees of disease association, compared with only 8 of 70 in a mock study designed to measure the background association rate (P < 10-9). Additional candidate genes are identified using less stringent filtering conditions. In some cases, somatic deletions appear likely. RA has a distinctive pattern of events relative to other diseases. Similarities in patterns are apparent between BD and HT. Conclusions The associations derived represent the first evidence that somatic gene conversion could be a significant causative factor in each of the seven diseases. The specific genes provide potential insights about disease mechanisms, and are strong candidates for further study. Please see Commentary: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7015/9/13/abstract. PMID:21291537

  15. Association of SORL1 gene variants with Alzheimer's disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Heike Kölsch; Frank Jessen; Jens Wiltfang; Piotr Lewczuk; Martin Dichgans; Stefan J. Teipel; Johannes Kornhuber; Lutz Frölich; Isabella Heuser; Oliver Peters; Birgitt Wiese; Hanna Kaduszkiewicz; Hendrik van den Bussche; Michael Hüll; Alexander Kurz; Eckhart Rüther; Fritz A. Henn; Wolfgang Maier

    2009-01-01

    SORL1 gene variants were described as risk factor of Alzheimer's disease (AD) additionally SORL1 gene variants were associated with altered A?42 CSF levels in AD patients. In the present study we investigated the association of SORL1 gene variants (rs2070045 (SNP19), SORL1-18ex26 (SNP21), rs3824968 (SNP23), rs1010159 (SNP25)) with AD risk by using Cox proportional hazard model and Kaplan–Meier survival analysis in

  16. A New SNP Haplotype associated with blue disease resistance gene in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Resistance to cotton blue disease (CBD) was evaluated in 364 F2.3 families of 3 populations derived from resistant variety ‘Delta Opal’. The CBD resistance in ‘Delta Opal’ was controlled by one single dominant gene designated Cbd. Two simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers were identified as linked t...

  17. A critical analysis of disease-associated DNA polymorphisms in the genes of cattle, goat, sheep, and pig

    PubMed Central

    Ibeagha-Awemu, Eveline M.; Kgwatalala, Patrick; Ibeagha, Aloysius E.

    2008-01-01

    Genetic variations through their effects on gene expression and protein function underlie disease susceptibility in farm animal species. The variations are in the form of single nucleotide polymorphisms, deletions/insertions of nucleotides or whole genes, gene or whole chromosomal rearrangements, gene duplications, and copy number polymorphisms or variants. They exert varying degrees of effects on gene action, such as substitution of an amino acid for another, shift in reading frame and premature termination of translation, and complete deletion of entire exon(s) or gene(s) in diseased individuals. These factors influence gene function by affecting mRNA splicing pattern or by altering/eliminating protein function. Elucidating the genetic bases of diseases under the control of many genes is very challenging, and it is compounded by several factors, including host × pathogen × environment interactions. In this review, the genetic variations that underlie several diseases of livestock (under monogenic and polygenic control) are analyzed. Also, factors hampering research efforts toward identification of genetic influences on animal disease identification and control are highlighted. A better understanding of the factors analyzed could be better harnessed to effectively identify and control, genetically, livestock diseases. Finally, genetic control of animal diseases can reduce the costs associated with diseases, improve animal welfare, and provide healthy animal products to consumers, and should be given more attention. PMID:18350334

  18. Paradata for 'ALK1 signalling analysis identifies angiogenesis related genes and reveals disparity between TGF-? and constitutively active receptor induced gene expression'

    NSDL National Science Digital Library

    This record contains paradata for the resource 'ALK1 signalling analysis identifies angiogenesis related genes and reveals disparity between TGF-? and constitutively active receptor induced gene expression'

  19. Thiamine responsive megaloblastic anemia syndrome: A novel homozygous SLC19A2 gene mutation identified.

    PubMed

    Mikstiene, Violeta; Songailiene, Jurgita; Byckova, Jekaterina; Rutkauskiene, Giedre; Jasinskiene, Edita; Verkauskiene, Rasa; Lesinskas, Eugenijus; Utkus, Algirdas

    2015-07-01

    Thiamine responsive megaloblastic anemia syndrome (TRMAS) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder especially in countries where consanguinity is uncommon. Three main features are characteristic of the disease - megaloblastic anemia, early onset deafness, and non-type I diabetes. TRMAS is a Mendelian disorder; a gene SLC19A2 coding high affinity thiamine transporter mediating vitamin B1 uptake through cell membrane has been identified. We present the first patient with TRMAS in Lithuania - a 3-year-old boy born to a non-consanguineous family with a novel homozygous SLC19A2 gene mutation. The patient had insulin dependent diabetes (onset 11 months), respiratory illness (onset 11 months), bilateral profound hearing loss (onset at 7 months, verified at 20 months), refractory anemia (onset 2 years), and decreased vision acuity and photophobia (onset 2.5 years). The psychomotor abilities developed according to age. Phenotypic evaluation did not reveal any dysmorphic features. The clinical diagnosis of TRMAS was suspected and daily supplementation with thiamine 100?mg was started. The condition of the patient markedly improved several days after the initiation of treatment. The results of SLC19A2 gene molecular testing confirmed the clinical diagnosis - novel homozygous c.[205G>T], p.[(Val69Phe)] mutation changing conserved amino acid residue or even interfering the mRNA splicing. Clinical heterogeneity, diverse dynamics, and wide spectrum of symptoms are aggravating factors in the diagnosis. The possibility of treatment demands early recognition of disorder to facilitate the improvement of the patient's condition. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25707023

  20. Mucin gene expression in intestinal epithelial cells in Crohn's disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M-P Buisine; P Desreumaux; E Leteurtre; M-C Copin; J-F Colombel; N Porchet; J-P Aubert

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUNDCrohn's disease (CD) is a chronic relapsing inflammatory bowel disease of unknown origin. It is characterised by chronic mucosal ulcerations which affect any part of the intestine but most commonly are found in the ileum and proximal colon.AIMSStudies were undertaken to provide information regarding cell specific expression of mucin genes in the ileum of patients with CD.PATIENTS AND METHODSExpression of

  1. Exploring the potential relevance of human-specific genes to complex disease

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Although human disease genes generally tend to be evolutionarily more ancient than non-disease genes, complex disease genes appear to be represented more frequently than Mendelian disease genes among genes of more recent evolutionary origin. It is therefore proposed that the analysis of human-specific genes might provide new insights into the genetics of complex disease. Cross-comparison with the Human Gene Mutation Database (http://www.hgmd.org) revealed a number of examples of disease-causing and disease-associated mutations in putatively human-specific genes. A sizeable proportion of these were missense polymorphisms associated with complex disease. Since both human-specific genes and genes associated with complex disease have often experienced particularly rapid rates of evolutionary change, either due to weaker purifying selection or positive selection, it is proposed that a significant number of human-specific genes may play a role in complex disease. PMID:21296743

  2. Analysis of Batten disease candidate genes STP and STM

    SciTech Connect

    Munroe, P.B.; Mitchison, H.M.; Gardiner, R.M. [Rayne Institute, London (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1995-06-05

    We have sequenced a large proportion of the open reading frames (ORFs) of two phenol sulphotransferase gene transcripts (STP and STM) from three patients with Batten disease. This was done using reverse transcription and PCR amplification of total RNA followed by direct sequencing of the PCR products. No mutations or changes have been observed in either gene after sequencing 93% of the STP ORF and 72% of the STM ORF. Work is in the progress to finish sequencing both genes which will allow the confirmation or exclusion of these phenol sulphotransferases having a role in the development of Batten disease. 11 refs., 1 fig.

  3. Genome-wide association identifies ATOH7 as a major gene determining human optic disc size.

    PubMed

    Macgregor, Stuart; Hewitt, Alex W; Hysi, Pirro G; Ruddle, Jonathan B; Medland, Sarah E; Henders, Anjali K; Gordon, Scott D; Andrew, Toby; McEvoy, Brian; Sanfilippo, Paul G; Carbonaro, Francis; Tah, Vikas; Li, Yi Ju; Bennett, Sonya L; Craig, Jamie E; Montgomery, Grant W; Tran-Viet, Khanh-Nhat; Brown, Nadean L; Spector, Timothy D; Martin, Nicholas G; Young, Terri L; Hammond, Christopher J; Mackey, David A

    2010-07-01

    Optic nerve assessment is important for many blinding diseases, with cup-to-disc ratio (CDR) assessments commonly used in both diagnosis and progression monitoring of glaucoma patients. Optic disc, cup, rim area and CDR measurements all show substantial variation between human populations and high heritability estimates within populations. To identify loci underlying these quantitative traits, we performed a genome-wide association study in two Australian twin cohorts and identified rs3858145, P=6.2x10(-10), near the ATOH7 gene as associated with the mean disc area. ATOH7 is known from studies in model organisms to play a key role in retinal ganglion cell formation. The association with rs3858145 was replicated in a cohort of UK twins, with a meta-analysis of the combined data yielding P=3.4x10(-10). Imputation further increased the evidence for association for several SNPs in and around ATOH7 (P=1.3x10(-10) to 4.3x10(-11), top SNP rs1900004). The meta-analysis also provided suggestive evidence for association for the cup area at rs690037, P=1.5x10(-7), in the gene RFTN1. Direct sequencing of ATOH7 in 12 patients with optic nerve hypoplasia, one of the leading causes of blindness in children, revealed two novel non-synonymous mutations (Arg65Gly, Ala47Thr) which were not found in 90 unrelated controls (combined Fisher's exact P=0.0136). Furthermore, the Arg65Gly variant was found to have very low frequency (0.00066) in an additional set of 672 controls. PMID:20395239

  4. The compact Selaginella genome identifies changes in gene content associated with the evolution of vascular plants

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Igor V. Grigoriev; Jo Ann Banks; Tomoaki Nishiyama; Mitsuyasu Hasebe; John L. Bowman; Michael Gribskov; Claude dePamphilis; Victor A. Albert; Naoki Aono; Tsuyoshi Aoyama; Barbara A. Ambrose; Neil W. Ashton; Michael J. Axtell; Elizabeth Barker; Michael S. Barker; Jeffrey L. Bennetzen; Nicholas D. Bonawitz; Clint Chapple; Chaoyang Cheng; Luiz Gustavo Guedes Correa; Michael Dacre; Jeremy DeBarry; Ingo Dreyer; Marek Elias; Eric M. Engstrom; Mark Estelle; Liang Feng; Cedric Finet; Sandra K. Floyd; Wolf B. Frommer; Tomomichi Fujita; Lydia Gramzow; Michael Gutensohn; Jesper Harholt; Mitsuru Hattori; Alexander Heyl; Tadayoshi Hirai; Yuji Hiwatashi; Masaki Ishikawa; Mineko Iwata; Kenneth G. Karol; Barbara Koehler; Uener Kolukisaoglu; Minoru Kubo; Tetsuya Kurata; Sylvie Lalonde; Kejie Li; Ying Li; Amy Litt; Eric Lyons; Gerard Manning; Takeshi Maruyama; Todd P. Michael; Koji Mikami; Saori Miyazaki; Shin-ichi Morinaga; Takashi Murata; Bernd Mueller-Roeber; David R. Nelson; Mari Obara; Yasuko Oguri; Richard G. Olmstead; Naoko Onodera; Bent Larsen Petersen; Birgit Pils; Michael Prigge; Stefan A. Rensing; Diego Mauricio Riano-Pachon; Alison W. Roberts; Yoshikatsu Sato; Henrik Vibe Scheller; Burkhard Schulz; Christian Schulz; Eugene V. Shakirov; Nakako Shibagaki; Naoki Shinohara; Dorothy E. Shippen; Iben Sorensen; Ryo Sotooka; Nagisa Sugimoto; Mamoru Sugita; Naomi Sumikawa; Milos Tanurdzic; Gunter Theilsen; Peter Ulvskov; Sachiko Wakazuki; Jing-Ke Weng; William W. G. T. Willats; Daniel Wipf; Paul G. Wolf; Lixing Yang; Andreas D. Zimmer; Qihui Zhu; Therese Mitros; Uffe Hellsten; Dominique Loque; Robert Otillar; Asaf Salamov; Jeremy Schmutz; Harris Shapiro; Erika Lindquist; Susan Lucas; Daniel Rokhsar

    2011-01-01

    We report the genome sequence of the nonseed vascular plant, Selaginella moellendorffii, and by comparative genomics identify genes that likely played important roles in the early evolution of vascular plants and their subsequent evolution

  5. Harnessing gene expression to identify the genetic basis of drug resistance Supplementary Information

    E-print Network

    Pe'er, Dana

    . There are two parts, development and testing of the predictive model and post-linkage analysis. The predictive1 Harnessing gene expression to identify the genetic basis of drug resistance Supplementary .......................................................................................................................... 2 Triangle test

  6. Sequential prediction bounds for identifying differentially expressed genes in replicated microarray experiments

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Robert D. Gibbons; Dulal K. Bhaumik; David R. Cox; Dennis R. Grayson; John M. Davis; Rajiv P. Sharma

    2005-01-01

    Microarrays are new biotechnological devices that permit the simultaneous evaluation of expression levels of thousands of genes in one or more tissue samples. We develop a new method for identifying differentially expressed genes in replicated cDNA and oligonucleotide microarray experiments. The method is based on a nonparametric prediction interval which is computed as an order statistic of n control measurements

  7. Identifying gene targets for the metabolic engineering of lycopene biosynthesis in Escherichia coli

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Hal Alper; Yong-Su Jin; J. F. Moxley; G. Stephanopoulos

    2005-01-01

    The identification of genetic targets that are effective in bringing about a desired phenotype change is still an open problem. While random gene knockouts have yielded improved strains in certain cases, it is also important to seek the guidance of cell-wide stoichiometric constraints in identifying promising gene knockout targets. To investigate these issues, we undertook a genome-wide stoichiometric flux balance

  8. Androgen receptor gene and gender specific Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Raffaele; Dawoodi, Saad; Raju, Merrill; Thumma, Avinash; Hynan, Linda S.; Maasumi, Shirin Hejazi; Reisch, Joan S.; O’Bryant, Sid; Jenkins, Marjorie; Barber, Robert; Momeni, Parastoo

    2013-01-01

    Women are at a twofold risk of developing late onset Alzheimer’s disease (LOAD) (onset ?65 years of age) compared to men. During perimenopausal years, women undergo hormonal changes that are accompanied by metabolic, cardiovascular and inflammatory changes. These all together have been suggested as risk factors for LOAD. However, not all perimenopausal women develop AD; we hypothesize that certain genetic factors might underlie the increased susceptibility for developing AD in postmenopausal women. We investigated the androgen receptor (AR) gene in a clinical cohort of male and female AD patients and normal controls by sequencing all coding exons and evaluating the length and distribution of the CAG repeat in exon 1. We could not establish a correlation between the repeat length, gender and the disease status, nor did we identify possible pathogenic variants. AR is located on the X chromosome; in order to assess its role in AD, X-inactivation patterns will need to be studied to directly correlate the actual expressed repeat length to a possible sex specific phenotypic effect. PMID:23545426

  9. Gene expression signatures identify novel regulatory pathways during murine lung development: implications for lung tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bonner, A; Lemon, W; You, M

    2003-01-01

    Oligonucleotide array based analysis was conducted to examine the temporal pattern of gene expression across the various stages of lung development to identify regulatory pathways at key developmental time points. Whole embryo total RNA or embryonic lung total RNA was harvested from A/J mice at seven developmental stages. To investigate changes in gene expression during lung development, four samples from each stage were examined using Affymetrix U74Av2 murine oligonucleotide microarrays. From the over 12 000 genes and ESTs represented on the array, 1346 genes and ESTs were identified as having a significant change in expression between at least one time point and the others (p<0.001, Kruskal-Wallis test). Within this group of ?1300 genes, four patterns of expression were seen: (1) upregulation during the embryonic period of development (up-down); (2) upregulation during the postnatal period of lung development (down-up) and (3) fluctuating expression, up initially, down for one or more time points, and then up again (up-down-up); and (4) vice versa (down-up-down). Expression patterns of genes previously reported to be involved in pulmonary development were also examined. Using the pathway visualisation tool, GenMapp, at least three regulatory pathways were found to contain clusters of differentially expressed genes: Wnt signalling, cell cycle, and apoptosis. Furthermore, we have shown that many of the genes involved in lung development are either known oncogenes or tumour suppressor genes altered in lung cancer, such as Cyr61, Rassf1a, and Dutt1/Robo1, or putative lung cancer genes. In addition, the genes identified pertinent to early development may also serve as candidate susceptibility genes for various inherited lung cancer disorders as well as for various heritable disorders of lung development. These results will contribute to our understanding of novel aspects of the regulatory machinery for embryonic lung development and of the genes involved in lung tumorigenesis. PMID:12807961

  10. A Genome-Wide Association Study of the Maize Hypersensitive Defense Response Identifies Genes That Cluster in Related Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Venkata, Bala P.; Marla, Sandeep; Ji, Jiabing; Gachomo, Emma; Chu, Kevin; Negeri, Adisu; Benson, Jacqueline; Nelson, Rebecca; Bradbury, Peter; Nielsen, Dahlia; Holland, James B.; Balint-Kurti, Peter J.; Johal, Gurmukh

    2014-01-01

    Much remains unknown of molecular events controlling the plant hypersensitive defense response (HR), a rapid localized cell death that limits pathogen spread and is mediated by resistance (R-) genes. Genetic control of the HR is hard to quantify due to its microscopic and rapid nature. Natural modifiers of the ectopic HR phenotype induced by an aberrant auto-active R-gene (Rp1-D21), were mapped in a population of 3,381 recombinant inbred lines from the maize nested association mapping population. Joint linkage analysis was conducted to identify 32 additive but no epistatic quantitative trait loci (QTL) using a linkage map based on more than 7000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Genome-wide association (GWA) analysis of 26.5 million SNPs was conducted after adjusting for background QTL. GWA identified associated SNPs that colocalized with 44 candidate genes. Thirty-six of these genes colocalized within 23 of the 32 QTL identified by joint linkage analysis. The candidate genes included genes predicted to be in involved programmed cell death, defense response, ubiquitination, redox homeostasis, autophagy, calcium signalling, lignin biosynthesis and cell wall modification. Twelve of the candidate genes showed significant differential expression between isogenic lines differing for the presence of Rp1-D21. Low but significant correlations between HR-related traits and several previously-measured disease resistance traits suggested that the genetic control of these traits was substantially, though not entirely, independent. This study provides the first system-wide analysis of natural variation that modulates the HR response in plants. PMID:25166276

  11. Gene expression associated with compatible viral diseases in grapevine cultivars

    Microsoft Academic Search

    C. Espinoza; A. Vega; C. Medina; K. Schlauch; G. Cramer; P. Arce-Johnson

    2007-01-01

    Viral diseases affect grapevine cultures without inducing any resistance response. Thus, these plants develop systemic diseases\\u000a and are chronically infected. Molecular events associated with viral compatible infections responsible for disease establishment\\u000a and symptoms development are poorly understood. In this study, we surveyed viral infection in grapevines at a transcriptional\\u000a level. Gene expression in the Vitis vinifera red wine cultivars Carmnre

  12. Gene Dosage, Expression, and Ontology Analysis Identifies Driver Genes in the Carcinogenesis and Chemoradioresistance of Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lando, Malin; Holden, Marit; Bergersen, Linn C.; Svendsrud, Debbie H.; Stokke, Trond; Sundfør, Kolbein; Glad, Ingrid K.; Kristensen, Gunnar B.; Lyng, Heidi

    2009-01-01

    Integrative analysis of gene dosage, expression, and ontology (GO) data was performed to discover driver genes in the carcinogenesis and chemoradioresistance of cervical cancers. Gene dosage and expression profiles of 102 locally advanced cervical cancers were generated by microarray techniques. Fifty-two of these patients were also analyzed with the Illumina expression method to confirm the gene expression results. An independent cohort of 41 patients was used for validation of gene expressions associated with clinical outcome. Statistical analysis identified 29 recurrent gains and losses and 3 losses (on 3p, 13q, 21q) associated with poor outcome after chemoradiotherapy. The intratumor heterogeneity, assessed from the gene dosage profiles, was low for these alterations, showing that they had emerged prior to many other alterations and probably were early events in carcinogenesis. Integration of the alterations with gene expression and GO data identified genes that were regulated by the alterations and revealed five biological processes that were significantly overrepresented among the affected genes: apoptosis, metabolism, macromolecule localization, translation, and transcription. Four genes on 3p (RYBP, GBE1) and 13q (FAM48A, MED4) correlated with outcome at both the gene dosage and expression level and were satisfactorily validated in the independent cohort. These integrated analyses yielded 57 candidate drivers of 24 genetic events, including novel loci responsible for chemoradioresistance. Further mapping of the connections among genetic events, drivers, and biological processes suggested that each individual event stimulates specific processes in carcinogenesis through the coordinated control of multiple genes. The present results may provide novel therapeutic opportunities of both early and advanced stage cervical cancers. PMID:19911042

  13. Prioritization of candidate disease genes by topological similarity between disease and protein diffusion profiles

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Identification of gene-phenotype relationships is a fundamental challenge in human health clinic. Based on the observation that genes causing the same or similar phenotypes tend to correlate with each other in the protein-protein interaction network, a lot of network-based approaches were proposed based on different underlying models. A recent comparative study showed that diffusion-based methods achieve the state-of-the-art predictive performance. Results In this paper, a new diffusion-based method was proposed to prioritize candidate disease genes. Diffusion profile of a disease was defined as the stationary distribution of candidate genes given a random walk with restart where similarities between phenotypes are incorporated. Then, candidate disease genes are prioritized by comparing their diffusion profiles with that of the disease. Finally, the effectiveness of our method was demonstrated through the leave-one-out cross-validation against control genes from artificial linkage intervals and randomly chosen genes. Comparative study showed that our method achieves improved performance compared to some classical diffusion-based methods. To further illustrate our method, we used our algorithm to predict new causing genes of 16 multifactorial diseases including Prostate cancer and Alzheimer's disease, and the top predictions were in good consistent with literature reports. Conclusions Our study indicates that integration of multiple information sources, especially the phenotype similarity profile data, and introduction of global similarity measure between disease and gene diffusion profiles are helpful for prioritizing candidate disease genes. Availability Programs and data are available upon request. PMID:23734762

  14. Application of Genomic and Quantitative Genetic Tools to Identify Candidate Resistance Genes for Brown Rot Resistance in Peach

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-García, Pedro J.; Parfitt, Dan E.; Bostock, Richard M.; Fresnedo-Ramírez, Jonathan; Vazquez-Lobo, Alejandra; Ogundiwin, Ebenezer A.; Gradziel, Thomas M.; Crisosto, Carlos H.

    2013-01-01

    The availability of a complete peach genome assembly and three different peach genome sequences created by our group provide new opportunities for application of genomic data and can improve the power of the classical Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) approaches to identify candidate genes for peach disease resistance. Brown rot caused by Monilinia spp., is the most important fungal disease of stone fruits worldwide. Improved levels of peach fruit rot resistance have been identified in some cultivars and advanced selections developed in the UC Davis and USDA breeding programs. Whole genome sequencing of the Pop-DF parents lead to discovery of high-quality SNP markers for QTL genome scanning in this experimental population. Pop-DF created by crossing a brown rot moderately resistant cultivar ‘Dr. Davis’ and a brown rot resistant introgression line, ‘F8,1–42’, derived from an initial almond × peach interspecific hybrid, was evaluated for brown rot resistance in fruit of harvest maturity over three seasons. Using the SNP linkage map of Pop-DF and phenotypic data collected with inoculated fruit, a genome scan for QTL identified several SNP markers associated with brown rot resistance. Two of these QTLs were placed on linkage group 1, covering a large (physical) region on chromosome 1. The genome scan for QTL and SNP effects predicted several candidate genes associated with disease resistance responses in other host-pathogen systems. Two potential candidate genes, ppa011763m and ppa026453m, may be the genes primarily responsible for M. fructicola recognition in peach, activating both PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI) and effector-triggered immunity (ETI) responses. Our results provide a foundation for further genetic dissection, marker assisted breeding for brown rot resistance, and development of peach cultivars resistant to brown rot. PMID:24244329

  15. Human disease genes: patterns and predictions Nick G.C. Smitha,*, Adam Eyre-Walkerb

    E-print Network

    Eyre-Walker, Adam

    Human disease genes: patterns and predictions Nick G.C. Smitha,*, Adam Eyre-Walkerb a Department Received by W. Makalowski Abstract We compared genes at which mutations are known to cause human disease (disease genes) with other human genes (nondisease genes) using a large set of human­rodent alignments

  16. Bioinformatic Analysis of Nematode Migration-Associated Genes Identifies Novel Vertebrate Neural Crest Markers

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Shuyi; Kwak, Jina; Hwang, Byung Joon; Bronner, Marianne E.; Kee, Yun

    2014-01-01

    Neural crest cells are highly motile, yet a limited number of genes governing neural crest migration have been identified by conventional studies. To test the hypothesis that cell migration genes are likely to be conserved over large evolutionary distances and from diverse tissues, we searched for vertebrate homologs of genes important for migration of various cell types in the invertebrate nematode and examined their expression during vertebrate neural crest cell migration. Our systematic analysis utilized a combination of comparative genomic scanning, functional pathway analysis and gene expression profiling to uncover previously unidentified genes expressed by premigratory, emigrating and/or migrating neural crest cells. The results demonstrate that similar gene sets are expressed in migratory cell types across distant animals and different germ layers. Bioinformatics analysis of these factors revealed relationships between these genes within signaling pathways that may be important during neural crest cell migration. PMID:25051358

  17. Gene expression associated with compatible viral diseases in grapevine cultivars.

    PubMed

    Espinoza, C; Vega, A; Medina, C; Schlauch, K; Cramer, G; Arce-Johnson, P

    2007-04-01

    Viral diseases affect grapevine cultures without inducing any resistance response. Thus, these plants develop systemic diseases and are chronically infected. Molecular events associated with viral compatible infections responsible for disease establishment and symptoms development are poorly understood. In this study, we surveyed viral infection in grapevines at a transcriptional level. Gene expression in the Vitis vinifera red wine cultivars Carménère and Cabernet-Sauvignon naturally infected with GLRaV-3 were evaluated using a genome-wide expression profiling with the Vitis vinifera GeneChip from Affymetrix. We describe numerous genes that are induced or repressed in viral infected grapevines leaves. Changes in gene expression involved a wide spectrum of biological functions, including processes of translation and protein targeting, metabolism, transport, and cell defense. Considering cellular localization, the membrane and endomembrane systems appeared with the highest number of induced genes, while chloroplastic genes were mostly repressed. As most induced genes associated with the membranous system are involved in transport, the possible effect of virus in this process is discussed. Responses of both cultivars are analyzed and the results are compared with published data from other species. This is the first study of global gene profiling in grapevine in response to viral infections using DNA microarray. PMID:16775684

  18. Gene expression alterations in Rocky Mountain elk infected with chronic wasting disease.

    PubMed

    Basu, Urmila; Almeida, Luciane M; Dudas, Sandor; Graham, Catherine E; Czub, Stefanie; Moore, Stephen S; Guan, Le Luo

    2012-07-01

    Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is an invariably fatal neurologic disease that naturally infects mule deer, white tailed deer and elk. The understanding of CWD neurodegeneration at a molecular level is very limited. In this study, microarray analysis was performed to determine changes in the gene expression profiles in six different tissues including brain, midbrain, thalamus, spleen, RPLN and tonsil of CWD-infected elk in comparison to non-infected healthy elk, using 24,000 bovine specific oligo probes. In total, 329 genes were found to be differentially expressed (> 2.0-fold) between CWD negative and positive brain tissues, with 132 genes upregulated and 197 genes downregulated. There were 249 DE genes in the spleen (168 up- and 81 downregulated), 30 DE genes in the retropharyngeal lymph node (RPLN) (18 up- and 12 downregulated), and 55 DE genes in the tonsil (21 up- and 34 downregulated). Using Gene Ontology (GO), the DE genes were assigned to functional groups associated with cellular process, biological regulation, metabolic process, and regulation of biological process. For all brain tissues, the highest ranking networks for DE genes identified by Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) were associated with neurological disease, cell morphology, cellular assembly and organization. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) validated the expression of DE genes primarily involved in different regulatory pathways, including neuronal signaling and synapse function, calcium signaling, apoptosis and cell death and immune cell trafficking and inflammatory response. This is the first study to evaluate altered gene expression in multiple organs including brain from orally infected elk and the results will improve our understanding of CWD neurodegeneration at the molecular level. PMID:22561165

  19. De Novo Assembly of the Japanese Flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) Spleen Transcriptome to Identify Putative Genes Involved in Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lin; Li, Guiyang; Mo, Zhaolan; Xiao, Peng; Li, Jie; Huang, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Background Japanese flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) is an economically important marine fish in Asia and has suffered from disease outbreaks caused by various pathogens, which requires more information for immune relevant genes on genome background. However, genomic and transcriptomic data for Japanese flounder remain scarce, which limits studies on the immune system of this species. In this study, we characterized the Japanese flounder spleen transcriptome using an Illumina paired-end sequencing platform to identify putative genes involved in immunity. Methodology/Principal Findings A cDNA library from the spleen of P. olivaceus was constructed and randomly sequenced using an Illumina technique. The removal of low quality reads generated 12,196,968 trimmed reads, which assembled into 96,627 unigenes. A total of 21,391 unigenes (22.14%) were annotated in the NCBI Nr database, and only 1.1% of the BLASTx top-hits matched P. olivaceus protein sequences. Approximately 12,503 (58.45%) unigenes were categorized into three Gene Ontology groups, 19,547 (91.38%) were classified into 26 Cluster of Orthologous Groups, and 10,649 (49.78%) were assigned to six Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathways. Furthermore, 40,928 putative simple sequence repeats and 47, 362 putative single nucleotide polymorphisms were identified. Importantly, we identified 1,563 putative immune-associated unigenes that mapped to 15 immune signaling pathways. Conclusions/Significance The P. olivaceus transciptome data provides a rich source to discover and identify new genes, and the immune-relevant sequences identified here will facilitate our understanding of the mechanisms involved in the immune response. Furthermore, the plentiful potential SSRs and SNPs found in this study are important resources with respect to future development of a linkage map or marker assisted breeding programs for the flounder. PMID:25723398

  20. A Thirteen-Gene Expression Signature Predicts Survival of Patients with Pancreatic Cancer and Identifies New Genes of Interest

    PubMed Central

    Newhook, Timothy E.; Blais, Edik M.; Lindberg, James M.; Adair, Sara J.; Xin, Wenjun; Lee, Jae K.; Papin, Jason A.; Parsons, J. Thomas; Bauer, Todd W.

    2014-01-01

    Background Currently, prognostication for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is based upon a coarse clinical staging system. Thus, more accurate prognostic tests are needed for PDAC patients to aid treatment decisions. Methods and Findings Affymetrix gene expression profiling was carried out on 15 human PDAC tumors and from the data we identified a 13-gene expression signature (risk score) that correlated with patient survival. The gene expression risk score was then independently validated using published gene expression data and survival data for an additional 101 patients with pancreatic cancer. Patients with high-risk scores had significantly higher risk of death compared to patients with low-risk scores (HR 2.27, p?=?0.002). When the 13-gene score was combined with lymph node status the risk-score further discriminated the length of patient survival time (p<0.001). Patients with a high-risk score had poor survival independent of nodal status; however, nodal status increased predictability for survival in patients with a low-risk gene signature score (low-risk N1 vs. low-risk N0: HR?=?2.0, p?=?0.002). While AJCC stage correlated with patient survival (p?=?0.03), the 13-gene score was superior at predicting survival. Of the 13 genes comprising the predictive model, four have been shown to be important in PDAC, six are unreported in PDAC but important in other cancers, and three are unreported in any cancer. Conclusions We identified a 13-gene expression signature that predicts survival of PDAC patients and could prove useful for making treatment decisions. This risk score should be evaluated prospectively in clinical trials for prognostication and for predicting response to chemotherapy. Investigation of new genes identified in our model may lead to novel therapeutic targets. PMID:25180633

  1. Comparative Genomic Analysis of Asian Haemorrhagic Septicaemia-Associated Strains of Pasteurella multocida Identifies More than 90 Haemorrhagic Septicaemia-Specific Genes

    PubMed Central

    Moustafa, Ahmed M.; Seemann, Torsten; Gladman, Simon; Adler, Ben; Harper, Marina; Boyce, John D.; Bennett, Mark D.

    2015-01-01

    Pasteurella multocida is the primary causative agent of a range of economically important diseases in animals, including haemorrhagic septicaemia (HS), a rapidly fatal disease of ungulates. There is limited information available on the diversity of P. multocida strains that cause HS. Therefore, we determined draft genome sequences of ten disease-causing isolates and two vaccine strains and compared these genomes using a range of bioinformatic analyses. The draft genomes of the 12 HS strains were between 2,298,035 and 2,410,300 bp in length. Comparison of these genomes with the North American HS strain, M1404, and other available P. multocida genomes (Pm70, 3480, 36950 and HN06) identified a core set of 1,824 genes. A set of 96 genes was present in all HS isolates and vaccine strains examined in this study, but absent from Pm70, 3480, 36950 and HN06. Moreover, 59 genes were shared only by the Asian B:2 strains. In two Pakistani isolates, genes with high similarity to genes in the integrative and conjugative element, ICEPmu1 from strain 36950 were identified along with a range of other antimicrobial resistance genes. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the HS strains formed clades based on their country of isolation. Future analysis of the 96 genes unique to the HS isolates will aid the identification of HS-specific virulence attributes and facilitate the development of disease-specific diagnostic tests. PMID:26151935

  2. Integrated analysis of recurrent properties of cancer genes to identify novel drivers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The heterogeneity of cancer genomes in terms of acquired mutations complicates the identification of genes whose modification may exert a driver role in tumorigenesis. In this study, we present a novel method that integrates expression profiles, mutation effects, and systemic properties of mutated genes to identify novel cancer drivers. We applied our method to ovarian cancer samples and were able to identify putative drivers in the majority of carcinomas without mutations in known cancer genes, thus suggesting that it can be used as a complementary approach to find rare driver mutations that cannot be detected using frequency-based approaches. PMID:23718799

  3. Novel PNPLA2 gene mutations in Chinese Han patients causing neutral lipid storage disease with myopathy.

    PubMed

    Lin, Pengfei; Li, Wei; Wen, Bing; Zhao, Yuying; Fenster, Danielle S; Wang, Yongxiang; Gong, Yaoqin; Yan, Chuanzhu

    2012-10-01

    Neutral lipid storage disease with myopathy (NLSDM) referred to those neutral lipid storage disease (NLSD) patients with myopathy but without ichthyosis. Recently, NLSDM has been attributed to mutations in the PNPLA2 gene. Until now, 19 patients with PNPLA2 mutations have been reported. In the present study, we describe the clinical and genetic findings in three Chinese patients with NLSDM. Sequence analysis of PNPLA2 gene was performed. In our patients we identified four novel mutations in the PNPLA2 gene including two splicing mutations. The identification and study of mutations found in PNPLA2 is also particularly important to define the clinical spectrum and genotype-phenotype correlations of the PNPLA2 gene. PMID:22832386

  4. VeryGene: linking tissue-specific genes to diseases, drugs, and beyond for knowledge discovery.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiaoqin; Ye, Yun; Wang, Guiping; Huang, Hong; Yu, Dekuang; Liang, Shuang

    2011-04-27

    In addition to many other genes, tissue-specific genes (TSGs) represent a set of genes of great importance for human physiology. However, the links among TSGs, diseases, and potential therapeutic agents are often missing, hidden, or too scattered to find. There is a need to establish a knowledgebase for researchers to share this and additional information in order to speed up discovery and clinical practice. As an initiative toward systems biology, the VeryGene web server was developed to fill this gap. A significant effort has been made to integrate TSGs from two large-scale data analyses with respective information on subcellular localization, Gene Ontology, Reactome, KEGG pathway, Mouse Genome Informatics (MGI) Mammalian Phenotype, disease association, and targeting drugs. The current release carefully selected 3,960 annotated TSGs derived from 127 normal human tissues and cell types, including 5,672 gene-disease and 2,171 drug-target relationships. In addition to being a specialized source for TSGs, VeryGene can be used as a discovery tool by generating novel inferences. Some inherently useful but hidden relations among genes, diseases, drugs, and other important aspects can be inferred to form testable hypotheses. VeryGene is available online at http://www.verygene.com. PMID:21245417

  5. Transcriptomics-based screen for genes induced by flagellin and repressed by pathogen effectors identifies a cell wall-associated kinase involved in plant immunity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Microbe-associated molecular patterns, such as those present in bacterial flagellin, are powerful inducers of the innate immune response in plants. Successful pathogens deliver virulence proteins, termed effectors, into the plant cell where they can interfere with the immune response and promote disease. Engineering the plant immune system to enhance disease resistance requires a thorough understanding of its components. Results We describe a high-throughput screen, using RNA sequencing and virus-induced gene silencing, to identify tomato genes whose expression is enhanced by the flagellin microbe-associated molecular pattern flgII-28, but reduced by activities of the Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) type III effectors AvrPto and AvrPtoB. Gene ontology terms for this category of Flagellin-induced repressed by effectors (FIRE) genes showed enrichment for genes encoding certain subfamilies of protein kinases and transcription factors. At least 25 of the FIRE genes have been implicated previously in plant immunity. Of the 92 protein kinase-encoding FIRE genes, 33 were subjected to virus-induced gene silencing and their involvement in pattern-triggered immunity was tested with a leaf-based assay. Silencing of one FIRE gene, which encodes the cell wall-associated kinase SlWAK1, compromised the plant immune response resulting in increased growth of Pst and enhanced disease symptoms. Conclusions Our transcriptomic approach identifies FIRE genes that represent a pathogen-defined core set of immune-related genes. The analysis of this set of candidate genes led to the discovery of a cell wall-associated kinase that participates in plant defense. The FIRE genes will be useful for further elucidation of the plant immune system. PMID:24359686

  6. A cross-species genetic analysis identifies candidate genes for mouse anxiety and human bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Ashbrook, David G.; Williams, Robert W.; Lu, Lu; Hager, Reinmar

    2015-01-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a significant neuropsychiatric disorder with a lifetime prevalence of ~1%. To identify genetic variants underlying BD genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been carried out. While many variants of small effect associated with BD have been identified few have yet been confirmed, partly because of the low power of GWAS due to multiple comparisons being made. Complementary mapping studies using murine models have identified genetic variants for behavioral traits linked to BD, often with high power, but these identified regions often contain too many genes for clear identification of candidate genes. In the current study we have aligned human BD GWAS results and mouse linkage studies to help define and evaluate candidate genes linked to BD, seeking to use the power of the mouse mapping with the precision of GWAS. We use quantitative trait mapping for open field test and elevated zero maze data in the largest mammalian model system, the BXD recombinant inbred mouse population, to identify genomic regions associated with these BD-like phenotypes. We then investigate these regions in whole genome data from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium's bipolar disorder GWAS to identify candidate genes associated with BD. Finally we establish the biological relevance and pathways of these genes in a comprehensive systems genetics analysis. We identify four genes associated with both mouse anxiety and human BD. While TNR is a novel candidate for BD, we can confirm previously suggested associations with CMYA5, MCTP1, and RXRG. A cross-species, systems genetics analysis shows that MCTP1, RXRG, and TNR coexpress with genes linked to psychiatric disorders and identify the striatum as a potential site of action. CMYA5, MCTP1, RXRG, and TNR are associated with mouse anxiety and human BD. We hypothesize that MCTP1, RXRG, and TNR influence intercellular signaling in the striatum. PMID:26190982

  7. Genes associated with agronomic traits in non-heading Chinese cabbage identified by expression profiling

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The genomes of non-heading Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa ssp. chinensis), heading Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa ssp. pekinensis) and their close relative Arabidopsis thaliana have provided important resources for studying the evolution and genetic improvement of cruciferous plants. Natural growing conditions present these plants with a variety of physiological challenges for which they have a repertoire of genes that ensure adaptability and normal growth. We investigated the differential expressions of genes that control adaptability and development in plants growing in the natural environment to study underlying mechanisms of their expression. Results Using digital gene expression tag profiling, we constructed an expression profile to identify genes related to important agronomic traits under natural growing conditions. Among three non-heading Chinese cabbage cultivars, we found thousands of genes that exhibited significant differences in expression levels at five developmental stages. Through comparative analysis and previous reports, we identified several candidate genes associated with late flowering, cold tolerance, self-incompatibility, and leaf color. Two genes related to cold tolerance were verified using quantitative real-time PCR. Conclusions We identified a large number of genes associated with important agronomic traits of non-heading Chinese cabbage. This analysis will provide a wealth of resources for molecular-assisted breeding of cabbage. The raw data and detailed results of this analysis are available at the website http://nhccdata.njau.edu.cn. PMID:24655567

  8. Transcriptional Analysis of Gli3 Mutants Identifies Wnt Target Genes in the Developing Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Hasenpusch-Theil, Kerstin; Magnani, Dario; Amaniti, Eleni-Maria; Han, Lin; Armstrong, Douglas

    2012-01-01

    Early development of the hippocampus, which is essential for spatial memory and learning, is controlled by secreted signaling molecules of the Wnt gene family and by Wnt/?-catenin signaling. Despite its importance, little is known, however, about Wnt-regulated genes during hippocampal development. Here, we used the Gli3 mutant mouse extra-toes (XtJ), in which Wnt gene expression in the forebrain is severely affected, as a tool in a microarray analyses to identify potential Wnt target genes. This approach revealed 53 candidate genes with restricted or graded expression patterns in the dorsomedial telencephalon. We identified conserved Tcf/Lef-binding sites in telencephalon-specific enhancers of several of these genes, including Dmrt3, Gli3, Nfia, and Wnt8b. Binding of Lef1 to these sites was confirmed using electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Mutations in these Tcf/Lef-binding sites disrupted or reduced enhancer activity in vivo. Moreover, ectopic activation of Wnt/?-catenin signaling in an ex vivo explant system led to increased telencephalic expression of these genes. Finally, conditional inactivation of Gli3 results in defective hippocampal growth. Collectively, these data strongly suggest that we have identified a set of direct Wnt target genes in the developing hippocampus and provide inside into the genetic hierarchy underlying Wnt-regulated hippocampal development. PMID:22235033

  9. PhenomeNET: a whole-phenome approach to disease gene discovery

    PubMed Central

    Hoehndorf, Robert; Schofield, Paul N.; Gkoutos, Georgios V.

    2011-01-01

    Phenotypes are investigated in model organisms to understand and reveal the molecular mechanisms underlying disease. Phenotype ontologies were developed to capture and compare phenotypes within the context of a single species. Recently, these ontologies were augmented with formal class definitions that may be utilized to integrate phenotypic data and enable the direct comparison of phenotypes between different species. We have developed a method to transform phenotype ontologies into a formal representation, combine phenotype ontologies with anatomy ontologies, and apply a measure of semantic similarity to construct the PhenomeNET cross-species phenotype network. We demonstrate that PhenomeNET can identify orthologous genes, genes involved in the same pathway and gene–disease associations through the comparison of mutant phenotypes. We provide evidence that the Adam19 and Fgf15 genes in mice are involved in the tetralogy of Fallot, and, using zebrafish phenotypes, propose the hypothesis that the mammalian homologs of Cx36.7 and Nkx2.5 lie in a pathway controlling cardiac morphogenesis and electrical conductivity which, when defective, cause the tetralogy of Fallot phenotype. Our method implements a whole-phenome approach toward disease gene discovery and can be applied to prioritize genes for rare and orphan diseases for which the molecular basis is unknown. PMID:21737429

  10. Application of disease-associated differentially expressed genes – Mining for functional candidate genes for mastitis resistance in cattle

    PubMed Central

    2003-01-01

    In this study the mRNA differential display method was applied to identify mastitis-associated expressed DNA sequences based on different expression patterns in mammary gland samples of non-infected and infected udder quarters of a cow. In total, 704 different cDNA bands were displayed in both udder samples. Five hundred-and-thirty two bands, (75.6%) were differentially displayed. Ninety prominent cDNA bands were isolated, re-amplified, cloned and sequenced resulting in 87 different sequences. Amongst the 19 expressed sequence tags showing a similarity with previously described genes, the majority of these sequences exhibited homology to protein kinase encoding genes (26.3%), to genes involved in the regulation of gene expression (26.3%), to growth and differentiation factor encoding genes (21.0%) and to immune response or inflammation marker encoding genes (21.0%). These sequences were shown to have mastitis-associated expression in the udder samples of animals with and without clinical mastitis by quantitative RT-PCR. They were mapped physically using a bovine-hamster somatic cell hybrid panel and a 5000 rad bovine whole genome radiation hybrid panel. According to their localization in QTL regions based on an established integrated marker/gene-map and their disease-associated expression, four genes (AHCY, PRKDC, HNRPU, OSTF1) were suggested as potentially involved in mastitis defense. PMID:12927078

  11. Expected size of shared haplotypes surrounding a common disease gene

    SciTech Connect

    Meerman, G.J. te; Meulen, M.A. van der; Sandkuijl, L.A. [Univ. of Groningen (Netherlands)

    1994-09-01

    If two persons in a founder population share a rare disease, they may share genes involved in that disease Identical By Descent. We have calculated the probability of the size of the region IBD on either side of a shared common gene. Probabilities are plotted for various values of the meiotic count: the number of independent meioses connecting the persons. Even if this number is quite large, the shared area will, given the present density of markers, contain several markers. To be 95% certain that the area surrounding a gene can be delimited to less than 1 cM, approximately 500 meioses need to be observed. The many generations that are required before a gene is separated from its surrounding polymorphisms indicate that association between disease and marker alleles can be explained as IBD around a common gene. In founder populations apparantly unrelated affected persons will likely share disease genes introduced or mutated between 10 and 40 generations ago. Analyzing the overlap of haplotypes gives excellent opportunities to observe implicitly the many meioses required for genetic fine mapping.

  12. Gene-environment interactions and epigenetic basis of human diseases.

    PubMed

    Liu, Liang; Li, Yuanyuan; Tollefsbol, Trygve O

    2008-01-01

    Most human diseases are related in some way to the loss or gain in gene functions. Regulation of gene expression is a complex process. In addition to genetic mechanisms, epigenetic causes are gaining new perspectives in human diseases related to gene deregulation. Most eukaryotic genes are packed into chromatin structures, which lead to high condensations of the genes that require dynamic chromatin remodeling processes to facilitate their transcription. DNA methylation and histone modifications represent two of the major chromatin remodeling processes. They also serve to integrate environmental signals for the cells to modulate the functional output of their genome. Complex human diseases such as cancer and type 2 diabetes are believed to have a strong environmental component in addition to genetic causes. Aberrancies in chromatin remodeling are associated with both genetically and environmentally-related diseases. We will focus on recent findings of the epigenetic basis of human metabolic disorders to facilitate further exploration of epigenetic mechanisms and better understandings of the molecular cues underlying such complex diseases. PMID:18525104

  13. Screening of 38 genes identifies mutations in 62% of families with nonsyndromic deafness in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Duman, Duygu; Sirmaci, Asli; Cengiz, F Basak; Ozdag, Hilal; Tekin, Mustafa

    2011-01-01

    More than 60% of prelingual deafness is genetic in origin, and of these up to 95% are monogenic autosomal recessive traits. Causal mutations have been identified in 1 of 38 different genes in a subset of patients with nonsyndromic autosomal recessive deafness. In this study, we screened 49 unrelated Turkish families with at least three affected children born to consanguineous parents. Probands from all families were negative for mutations in the GJB2 gene, two large deletions in the GJB6 gene, and the 1555A>G substitution in the mitochondrial DNA MTRNR1 gene. Each family was subsequently screened via autozygosity mapping with genomewide single-nucleotide polymorphism arrays. If the phenotype cosegregated with a haplotype flanking one of the 38 genes, mutation analysis of the gene was performed. We identified 22 different autozygous mutations in 11 genes, other than GJB2, in 26 of 49 families, which overall explains deafness in 62% of families. Relative frequencies of genes following GJB2 were MYO15A (9.9%), TMIE (6.6%), TMC1 (6.6%), OTOF (5.0%), CDH23 (3.3%), MYO7A (3.3%), SLC26A4 (1.7%), PCDH15 (1.7%), LRTOMT (1.7%), SERPINB6 (1.7%), and TMPRSS3 (1.7%). Nineteen of 22 mutations are reported for the first time in this study. Unknown rare genes for deafness appear to be present in the remaining 23 families. PMID:21117948

  14. Exploiting Gene Expression Variation to Capture Gene-Environment Interactions for Disease

    PubMed Central

    Idaghdour, Youssef; Awadalla, Philip

    2013-01-01

    Gene-environment interactions have long been recognized as a fundamental concept in evolutionary, quantitative, and medical genetics. In the genomics era, study of how environment and genome interact to shape gene expression variation is relevant to understanding the genetic architecture of complex phenotypes. While genetic analysis of gene expression variation focused on main effects, little is known about the extent of interaction effects implicating regulatory variants and their consequences on transcriptional variation. Here we survey the current state of the concept of transcriptional gene-environment interactions and discuss its utility for mapping disease phenotypes in light of the insights gained from genome-wide association studies of gene expression. PMID:23755064

  15. Analysis of Temporal High-Dimensional Gene Expression Data for Identifying Informative Biomarker Candidates

    E-print Network

    Obradovic, Zoran

    Analysis of Temporal High-Dimensional Gene Expression Data for Identifying Informative Biomarker zoran.obradovic@temple.edu Abstract--Identifying informative biomarkers from a large pool of candidates-sample high-dimensional data where the number of biomarkers used as features is typically much larger than

  16. ICan: An Integrated Co-Alteration Network to Identify Ovarian Cancer-Related Genes

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yuanshuai; Liu, Yongjing; Li, Kening; Zhang, Rui; Qiu, Fujun; Zhao, Ning; Xu, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Background Over the last decade, an increasing number of integrative studies on cancer-related genes have been published. Integrative analyses aim to overcome the limitation of a single data type, and provide a more complete view of carcinogenesis. The vast majority of these studies used sample-matched data of gene expression and copy number to investigate the impact of copy number alteration on gene expression, and to predict and prioritize candidate oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. However, correlations between genes were neglected in these studies. Our work aimed to evaluate the co-alteration of copy number, methylation and expression, allowing us to identify cancer-related genes and essential functional modules in cancer. Results We built the Integrated Co-alteration network (ICan) based on multi-omics data, and analyzed the network to uncover cancer-related genes. After comparison with random networks, we identified 155 ovarian cancer-related genes, including well-known (TP53, BRCA1, RB1 and PTEN) and also novel cancer-related genes, such as PDPN and EphA2. We compared the results with a conventional method: CNAmet, and obtained a significantly better area under the curve value (ICan: 0.8179, CNAmet: 0.5183). Conclusion In this paper, we describe a framework to find cancer-related genes based on an Integrated Co-alteration network. Our results proved that ICan could precisely identify candidate cancer genes and provide increased mechanistic understanding of carcinogenesis. This work suggested a new research direction for biological network analyses involving multi-omics data. PMID:25803614

  17. Epigenetic mechanisms of gene expression regulation in neurological diseases.

    PubMed

    Gos, Monika

    2013-01-01

    Neurological diseases are a heterogenous group of disorders that are related to alterations in nervous system function. The genetic background of neurological diseases is heterogenous and may include chromosomal aberrations, specific gene mutations and epigenetic defects. This review is aimed at presenting of selected diseases that are associated with different epigenetic alterations. The imprinting defects on chromosome 15 are the cause of Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes that both are characterized by intellectual disability, developmental delay and specific behavioral phenotype. Besides the imprinting defect, these diseases can also be caused by deletion of chromosome 15 or uniparental disomy. Aberrant epigenetic regulation is also specific for Fragile X syndrome that is caused by expansion of CGG repeats in the FMR1 gene that leads to global methylation of the promoter region and repression of FMR1 transcription. A number of neurological diseases, mainly associated with intellectual impairment, may be caused by mutations in genes encoding proteins involved in epigenetic regulation. The number of such diseases is rapidly growing thanks to the implementation of genomic sequencing for the identification of their molecular causes. One of the best known diseases linked to defects in epigenetic modifiers is Rett syndrome caused by a mutation in the MECP2 gene or its variant - Rett-like syndrome caused by a mutation in CDKL5 or FOXG1 genes. As the epigenetic signature is potentially reversible, much attention is focused on possible therapies with drugs that influence DNA or histone modifications. This is especially important in the case of neurological disorders in which epigenetic changes are observed as the effect of the disease. PMID:23595281

  18. An MHC class I immune evasion gene of Marek?s disease virus.

    PubMed

    Hearn, Cari; Preeyanon, Likit; Hunt, Henry D; York, Ian A

    2015-01-15

    Marek?s disease virus (MDV) is a widespread ?-herpesvirus of chickens that causes T cell tumors. Acute, but not latent, MDV infection has previously been shown to lead to downregulation of cell-surface MHC class I (Virology 282:198-205 (2001)), but the gene(s) involved have not been identified. Here we demonstrate that an MDV gene, MDV012, is capable of reducing surface expression of MHC class I on chicken cells. Co-expression of an MHC class I-binding peptide targeted to the endoplasmic reticulum (bypassing the requirement for the TAP peptide transporter) partially rescued MHC class I expression in the presence of MDV012, suggesting that MDV012 is a TAP-blocking MHC class I immune evasion protein. This is the first unique non-mammalian MHC class I immune evasion gene identified, and suggests that ?-herpesviruses have conserved this function for at least 100 million years. PMID:25462349

  19. Association between insertion mutation in NOD2 gene and Crohn's disease in German and British populations.

    PubMed

    Hampe, J; Cuthbert, A; Croucher, P J; Mirza, M M; Mascheretti, S; Fisher, S; Frenzel, H; King, K; Hasselmeyer, A; MacPherson, A J; Bridger, S; van Deventer, S; Forbes, A; Nikolaus, S; Lennard-Jones, J E; Foelsch, U R; Krawczak, M; Lewis, C; Schreiber, S; Mathew, C G

    2001-06-16

    Background Genetic predisposition to inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) has been shown by epidemiological and linkage studies. Genetic linkage of IBD to chromosome 16 has been previously observed and replicated in independent populations. The recently identified NOD2 gene is a good positional and functional candidate gene since it is located in the region of linkage on chromosome 16q12, and activates nuclear factor (NF) kappaB in response to bacterial lipopolysaccharides. Methods We sequenced the coding region of the NOD2 gene and genotyped an insertion polymorphism affecting the leucine-rich region of the protein product in 512 individuals with IBD from 309 German or British families, 369 German trios (ie, German patients with sporadic IBD and their unaffected parents), and 272 normal controls. We then tested for association with Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis. Findings Family-based association analyses were consistently positive in 95 British and 99 German affected sibling pairs with Crohn's disease (combined p<0.0001); the association was confirmed in the 304 German trios with Crohn's disease. No association was seen in the 115 sibling pairs and 65 trios with ulcerative colitis. The genotype-specific disease risks conferred by heterozygous and homozygous mutant genotypes were 2.6 (95% CI 1.5-4.5) and 42.1 (4.3-infinity), respectively. Interpretation The insertion mutation in the NOD2 gene confers a substantially increased susceptibility to Crohn's disease but not to ulcerative colitis. PMID:11425413

  20. Towards identification, isolation and characterization of disease resistance genes from native North American grape (Vitis L.) species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vitis shuttleworthii is a grape species native to the southeastern United States that is known for its resistance to major grape diseases and pests. To identify and isolate the genes linked to disease resistance in V. shuttleworthii, a clone was used to produce a cDNA library derived from leaves an...

  1. Gene Expression Profiling of Lichen Planus Reflects CXCL9+-Mediated Inflammation and Distinguishes this Disease from Atopic Dermatitis and Psoriasis

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Joerg Wenzel; Bettina Peters; Sabine Zahn; Michael Birth; Kay Hofmann; Daniel Küsters; Stefan Tomiuk; Jens M Baron; Hans F Merk; Cornelia Mauch; Thomas Krieg; Thomas Bieber; Thomas Tüting; Andreas Bosio

    2008-01-01

    Here, we present data of a gene expression profiling approach to apply the diagnostic value and pathological significance of this method in different inflammatory skin diseases, using whole skin biopsies. Initially, SAGE™ was performed to identify frequent tags differentially expressed in various skin diseases. On the basis of these results, a new skin pathology-oriented PIQOR™ microarray was designed. Lichen planus

  2. NATURE BIOTECHNOLOGY VOLUME 25 NUMBER 10 OCTOBER 2007 1111 and drugs that act directly on disease genes.

    E-print Network

    Ford, James

    NATURE BIOTECHNOLOGY VOLUME 25 NUMBER 10 OCTOBER 2007 1111 and drugs that act directly on disease an increase in drugs that target the genes asso- ciated with disease. Networkbiologymayalsoplayaroleindrug- target identification. Is it possible to identify drug targets from their position in a biological

  3. Transient expression of anthocyanin genes in barley epidermal cells: potential for use in evaluation of disease response genes

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Amy J. Nelson; William R. Bushnell

    1997-01-01

    A transient assay is described that should allow evaluation of the role of host genes in disease response by enhancing or disrupting expression of those genes in specific cells and looking for effects on disease development. The assay also has the potential for assessing utility of host and non-host genes in enhancing resistance to disease in transgenic plants. Particle bombardment

  4. Integrating Autoimmune Risk Loci with Gene-Expression Data Identifies Specific Pathogenic Immune Cell Subsets

    E-print Network

    Hu, Xinli

    Although genome-wide association studies have implicated many individual loci in complex diseases, identifying the exact causal alleles and the cell types within which they act remains greatly challenging. To ultimately ...

  5. Infection of Apple by Apple Stem Grooving Virus Leads to Extensive Alterations in Gene Expression Patterns but No Disease Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Lu; Chen, Hui; Wang, Shaojie; Fan, Zaifeng; Guo, Liyun; Zhou, Tao

    2014-01-01

    To understand the molecular basis of viral diseases, transcriptome profiling has been widely used to correlate host gene expression change patterns with disease symptoms during viral infection in many plant hosts. We used infection of apple by Apple stem grooving virus (ASGV), which produces no disease symptoms, to assess the significance of host gene expression changes in disease development. We specifically asked the question of whether such asymptomatic infection is attributed to limited changes in host gene expression. Using RNA-seq, we identified a total of 184 up-regulated and 136 down-regulated genes in apple shoot cultures permanently infected by ASGV in comparison with virus-free shoot cultures. As in most plant hosts showing disease symptoms during viral infection, these differentially expressed genes encode known or putative proteins involved in cell cycle, cell wall biogenesis, response to biotic and abiotic stress, development and fruit ripening, phytohormone function, metabolism, signal transduction, transcription regulation, translation, transport, and photosynthesis. Thus, global host gene expression changes do not necessarily lead to virus disease symptoms. Our data suggest that the general approaches to correlate host gene expression changes under viral infection conditions to specific disease symptom, based on the interpretation of transcription profiling data and altered individual gene functions, may have limitations depending on particular experimental systems. PMID:24736405

  6. [From gene to disease; Dent's disease caused by abnormalities in the CLCN5 and OCRL1 genes].

    PubMed

    Levtchenko, E N; Monnens, L A H; Bökenkamp, A; Knoers, N V

    2007-10-27

    Dent's disease is an X-linked disorder, characterized by generalized proximal tubular dysfunction, nephrolithiasis, nephrocalcinosis and the development ofend-stage renal disease, generally occurring after the age of thirty. In the majority of cases, the disease is caused by mutations in the CLCN5-gene. The pathogenesis of the disease has not yet been clarified. Defective recycling of multi-ligand proximal tubular receptors megalin and cubilin is considered responsible for the defective reabsorption of low molecular weight proteins, albumin, hormones and vitamins. Treatment with thiazide diuretics to diminish the hypercalciuria in combination with citrate supplements might prevent renal stone formation and deterioration of renal function. In the laboratory ofDNA diagnostics in the Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, the molecular analysis of the CLCN5-gene in patients suspected with this disease is performed. PMID:18019214

  7. Analysis of anther transcriptomes to identify genes contributing to meiosis and male gametophyte development in rice

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In flowering plants, the anther is the site of male gametophyte development. Two major events in the development of the male germline are meiosis and the asymmetric division in the male gametophyte that gives rise to the vegetative and generative cells, and the following mitotic division in the generative cell that produces two sperm cells. Anther transcriptomes have been analyzed in many plant species at progressive stages of development by using microarray and sequence-by synthesis-technologies to identify genes that regulate anther development. Here we report a comprehensive analysis of rice anther transcriptomes at four distinct stages, focusing on identifying regulatory components that contribute to male meiosis and germline development. Further, these transcriptomes have been compared with the transcriptomes of 10 stages of rice vegetative and seed development to identify genes that express specifically during anther development. Results Transcriptome profiling of four stages of anther development in rice including pre-meiotic (PMA), meiotic (MA), anthers at single-celled (SCP) and tri-nucleate pollen (TPA) revealed about 22,000 genes expressing in at least one of the anther developmental stages, with the highest number in MA (18,090) and the lowest (15,465) in TPA. Comparison of these transcriptome profiles to an in-house generated microarray-based transcriptomics database comprising of 10 stages/tissues of vegetative as well as reproductive development in rice resulted in the identification of 1,000 genes specifically expressed in anther stages. From this sub-set, 453 genes were specific to TPA, while 78 and 184 genes were expressed specifically in MA and SCP, respectively. The expression pattern of selected genes has been validated using real time PCR and in situ hybridizations. Gene ontology and pathway analysis of stage-specific genes revealed that those encoding transcription factors and components of protein folding, sorting and degradation pathway genes dominated in MA, whereas in TPA, those coding for cell structure and signal transduction components were in abundance. Interestingly, about 50% of the genes with anther-specific expression have not been annotated so far. Conclusions Not only have we provided the transcriptome constituents of four landmark stages of anther development in rice but we have also identified genes that express exclusively in these stages. It is likely that many of these candidates may therefore contribute to specific aspects of anther and/or male gametophyte development in rice. In addition, the gene sets that have been produced will assist the plant reproductive community in building a deeper understanding of underlying regulatory networks and in selecting gene candidates for functional validation. PMID:21554676

  8. Prediction of disease-related genes based on weighted tissue-specific networks by using DNA methylation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Predicting disease-related genes is one of the most important tasks in bioinformatics and systems biology. With the advances in high-throughput techniques, a large number of protein-protein interactions are available, which make it possible to identify disease-related genes at the network level. However, network-based identification of disease-related genes is still a challenge as the considerable false-positives are still existed in the current available protein interaction networks (PIN). Results Considering the fact that the majority of genetic disorders tend to manifest only in a single or a few tissues, we constructed tissue-specific networks (TSN) by integrating PIN and tissue-specific data. We further weighed the constructed tissue-specific network (WTSN) by using DNA methylation as it plays an irreplaceable role in the development of complex diseases. A PageRank-based method was developed to identify disease-related genes from the constructed networks. To validate the effectiveness of the proposed method, we constructed PIN, weighted PIN (WPIN), TSN, WTSN for colon cancer and leukemia, respectively. The experimental results on colon cancer and leukemia show that the combination of tissue-specific data and DNA methylation can help to identify disease-related genes more accurately. Moreover, the PageRank-based method was effective to predict disease-related genes on the case studies of colon cancer and leukemia. Conclusions Tissue-specific data and DNA methylation are two important factors to the study of human diseases. The same method implemented on the WTSN can achieve better results compared to those being implemented on original PIN, WPIN, or TSN. The PageRank-based method outperforms degree centrality-based method for identifying disease-related genes from WTSN. PMID:25350763

  9. Neurofilament L gene is not a genetic factor of sporadic and familial Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Rahner, Nils; Holzmann, Carsten; Krüger, Rejko; Schöls, Ludger; Berger, Klaus; Riess, Olaf

    2002-09-27

    Mutations in two genes, alpha-synuclein and parkin, have been identified as some rare causes for familial Parkinson's disease (PD). alpha-Synuclein and parkin protein have subsequently been identified in Lewy bodies (LB). To gain further insight into the pathogenesis of PD we investigated the role of neurofilament light (NF-L), another component of LB aggregation. A detailed mutation search of the NF-L gene in 328 sporadic and familial PD patients of German ancestry revealed three silent DNA changes (G163A, C224T, C487T) in three unrelated patients. Analysis of the promoter region of the NF-L gene identified a total of three base pair substitutions defining five haplotypes. Association studies based on these haplotypes revealed no significant differences between PD patients and 344 control individuals. Therefore, NF-L is unlikely to play a major role in the pathogenesis of PD. PMID:12231460

  10. Successes and Challenges of Using Whole Exome Sequencing to Identify Novel Genes Underlying an Inherited Predisposition for Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms and Acute Aortic Dissections

    PubMed Central

    Milewicz, Dianna M.; Regalado, Ellen; Shendure, Jay; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Guo, Dongchuan

    2013-01-01

    Thoracic aortic aneurysms involving the aortic root and/or ascending aorta can lead to acute aortic dissections. Approximately 20% of patients with thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections (TAAD) have a family history of the disease, referred to as familial TAAD (FTAAD), which can be inherited in an autosomal dominant manner with variable expression with respect to disease presentation, age of onset and associated features. Whole exome sequencing (WES) has been used to identify causative mutations in novel genes for TAAD. The strategy used to reduce the large number of rare variants identified using WES is to sequence distant relatives with TAAD and filter for heterozygous rare variants that are shared between the relatives, predicted to disrupt protein function and segregate with the TAAD phenotype in other family members. Further validation of putative genes by sequencing of additional families with TAAD has successfully identified novel genes for FTAAD. PMID:23953976

  11. An Update on Gene Therapy in Parkinson’s Disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Jennifer Witt; William J. Marks Jr

    2011-01-01

    Gene therapy for Parkinson’s disease (PD) may offer an alternative to current pharmacologic and surgical treatments; the former\\u000a are limited by motor complications and non-motor adverse effects, and both by lack of neuroprotection. Three main strategies\\u000a under investigation using gene transfer for targeted protein expression include improving availability of dopamine to the\\u000a striatum with more continuous delivery, reducing activity in

  12. Evolution of the Rice Xa21 Disease Resistance Gene Family

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Wen-Yuan Song; Guo-Liang Wang; Pamela C. R

    1997-01-01

    The rice disease resistance gene Xa21, encoding a receptor-like kinase, is a member of a multigene family. Sequence analysis of seven family members revealed two distinkt classes of genes. One member from each class encodes a receptor kinase-like open reading frame. The other five members encode truncated open reading frames of the pre- dicted receptor kinase. A highly conserved 233-bp

  13. Identifying Genes for Establishing a Multigenic Test for HCC Surveillance in HCV+ Cirrhotic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Archer, Kellie J.; Mas, Valeria R.; David, Krystle; Maluf, Daniel G.; Bornstein, Karen; Fisher, Robert A.

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we used the Affymetrix HG-U133A version 2.0 GeneChips for identifying genes capabable of distinguishing cirrhotic liver tissues with and without hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) by modeling the high-dimensional dataset using an L1 penalized logistic regression model, with error estimated using N-fold cross-validation. Genes identified by gene expression microarray included those that have important links to cancer development and progression, including VAMP2, DPP4, CALR, CACNA1C, and EGR1. In addition, the selected molecular markers in the multigenic gene expression classifier were subsequently validated using real-time PCR and an independently acquired gene expression microarray dataset downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus. The multigenetic classifier derived herein performed similarly or better that standard abdominal ultrasonography and serum alpha-fetoprotein, which are currently used for HCC surveillance. Since early HCC diagnosis increases survival by increasing access to therapeutic options, these molecular markers may prove useful for early diagnosis of HCC, especially if prospectively validated and translated into gene products that can be reproducibly and reliably tested non-invasively. PMID:19861515

  14. The clustering of functionally related genes contributes to CNV-mediated disease.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Tallulah; Honti, Frantisek; Pfundt, Rolph; de Leeuw, Nicole; Hehir-Kwa, Jayne; Vulto-van Silfhout, Anneke; de Vries, Bert; Webber, Caleb

    2015-06-01

    Clusters of functionally related genes can be disrupted by a single copy number variant (CNV). We demonstrate that the simultaneous disruption of multiple functionally related genes is a frequent and significant characteristic of de novo CNVs in patients with developmental disorders (P = 1 × 10(-3)). Using three different functional networks, we identified unexpectedly large numbers of functionally related genes within de novo CNVs from two large independent cohorts of individuals with developmental disorders. The presence of multiple functionally related genes was a significant predictor of a CNV's pathogenicity when compared to CNVs from apparently healthy individuals and a better predictor than the presence of known disease or haploinsufficient genes for larger CNVs. The functionally related genes found in the de novo CNVs belonged to 70% of all clusters of functionally related genes found across the genome. De novo CNVs were more likely to affect functional clusters and affect them to a greater extent than benign CNVs (P = 6 × 10(-4)). Furthermore, such clusters of functionally related genes are phenotypically informative: Different patients possessing CNVs that affect the same cluster of functionally related genes exhibit more similar phenotypes than expected (P < 0.05). The spanning of multiple functionally similar genes by single CNVs contributes substantially to how these variants exert their pathogenic effects. PMID:25887030

  15. Identifying the Right Disease Targets to Develop Better Drugs, Faster | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Identifying the Right Disease Targets to Develop Better Drugs, Faster Past Issues / Spring 2014 Table of Contents ... ones can't wait. Aren't there enough drugs already? No. Drug development is a terribly difficult, ...

  16. Tau Overexpression Impacts a Neuroinflammation Gene Expression Network Perturbed in Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wes, Paul D.; Easton, Amy; Corradi, John; Barten, Donna M.; Devidze, Nino; DeCarr, Lynn B.; Truong, Amy; He, Aiqing; Barrezueta, Nestor X.; Polson, Craig; Bourin, Clotilde; Flynn, Marianne E.; Keenan, Stefanie; Lidge, Regina; Meredith, Jere; Natale, Joanne; Sankaranarayanan, Sethu; Cadelina, Greg W.; Albright, Charlie F.; Cacace, Angela M.

    2014-01-01

    Filamentous inclusions of the microtubule-associated protein, tau, define a variety of neurodegenerative diseases known as tauopathies, including Alzheimer’s disease (AD). To better understand the role of tau-mediated effects on pathophysiology and global central nervous system function, we extensively characterized gene expression, pathology and behavior of the rTg4510 mouse model, which overexpresses a mutant form of human tau that causes Frontotemporal dementia and parkinsonism linked to chromosome 17 (FTDP-17). We found that the most predominantly altered gene expression pathways in rTg4510 mice were in inflammatory processes. These results closely matched the causal immune function and microglial gene-regulatory network recently identified in AD. We identified additional gene expression changes by laser microdissecting specific regions of the hippocampus, which highlighted alterations in neuronal network activity. Expression of inflammatory genes and markers of neuronal activity changed as a function of age in rTg4510 mice and coincided with behavioral deficits. Inflammatory changes were tau-dependent, as they were reversed by suppression of the tau transgene. Our results suggest that the alterations in microglial phenotypes that appear to contribute to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease may be driven by tau dysfunction, in addition to the direct effects of beta-amyloid. PMID:25153994

  17. Identifying Gene Set Association Enrichment Using the Coefficient of Intrinsic Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Chen-An; Liu, Li-Yu Daisy

    2013-01-01

    Gene set testing problem has become the focus of microarray data analysis. A gene set is a group of genes that are defined by a priori biological knowledge. Several statistical methods have been proposed to determine whether functional gene sets express differentially (enrichment and/or deletion) in variations of phenotypes. However, little attention has been given to analyzing the dependence structure among gene sets. In this study, we have proposed a novel statistical method of gene set association analysis to identify significantly associated gene sets using the coefficient of intrinsic dependence. The simulation studies show that the proposed method outperforms the conventional methods to detect general forms of association in terms of control of type I error and power. The correlation of intrinsic dependence has been applied to a breast cancer microarray dataset to quantify the un-supervised relationship between two sets of genes in the tumor and non-tumor samples. It was observed that the existence of gene-set association differed across various clinical cohorts. In addition, a supervised learning was employed to illustrate how gene sets, in signaling transduction pathways or subnetworks regulated by a set of transcription factors, can be discovered using microarray data. In conclusion, the coefficient of intrinsic dependence provides a powerful tool for detecting general types of association. Hence, it can be useful to associate gene sets using microarray expression data. Through connecting relevant gene sets, our approach has the potential to reveal underlying associations by drawing a statistically relevant network in a given population, and it can also be used to complement the conventional gene set analysis. PMID:23516564

  18. Drug repositioning for orphan genetic diseases through Conserved Anticoexpressed Gene Clusters (CAGCs)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The development of new therapies for orphan genetic diseases represents an extremely important medical and social challenge. Drug repositioning, i.e. finding new indications for approved drugs, could be one of the most cost- and time-effective strategies to cope with this problem, at least in a subset of cases. Therefore, many computational approaches based on the analysis of high throughput gene expression data have so far been proposed to reposition available drugs. However, most of these methods require gene expression profiles directly relevant to the pathologic conditions under study, such as those obtained from patient cells and/or from suitable experimental models. In this work we have developed a new approach for drug repositioning, based on identifying known drug targets showing conserved anti-correlated expression profiles with human disease genes, which is completely independent from the availability of ‘ad hoc’ gene expression data-sets. Results By analyzing available data, we provide evidence that the genes displaying conserved anti-correlation with drug targets are antagonistically modulated in their expression by treatment with the relevant drugs. We then identified clusters of genes associated to similar phenotypes and showing conserved anticorrelation with drug targets. On this basis, we generated a list of potential candidate drug-disease associations. Importantly, we show that some of the proposed associations are already supported by independent experimental evidence. Conclusions Our results support the hypothesis that the identification of gene clusters showing conserved anticorrelation with drug targets can be an effective method for drug repositioning and provide a wide list of new potential drug-disease associations for experimental validation. PMID:24088245

  19. A duplicated PLP gene causing Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease detected by comparative multiplex PCR

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, K.; Sugiyama, N.; Kawanishi, C. [Yokohama City Univ., Yokohama (Japan)] [and others

    1996-07-01

    Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PMD) is an X-linked dysmyelinating disorder caused by abnormalities in the proteolipid protein (PLP) gene, which is essential for oligodendrocyte differentiation and CNS myelin formation. Although linkage analysis has shown the homogeneity at the PLP locus in patients with PMD, exonic mutations in the PLP gene have been identified in only 10% - 25% of all cases, which suggests the presence of other genetic aberrations, including gene duplication. In this study, we examined five families with PMD not carrying exonic mutations in PLP gene, using comparative multiplex PCR (CM-PCR) as a semiquantitative assay of gene dosage. PLP gene duplications were identified in four families by CM-PCR and confirmed in three families by densitometric RFLP analysis. Because a homologous myelin protein gene, PMP22, is duplicated in the majority of patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth 1A, PLP gene overdosage may be an important genetic abnormality in PMD and affect myelin formation. 38 ref., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. A loss of function screen identifies nine new radiation susceptibility genes

    SciTech Connect

    Sudo, Hitomi [Diagnostic Imaging Group, Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Department of Pathology and Oncology, Juntendo University School of Medicine, 2-1-1 Hongo, Bunkyou-ku, Tokyo 113-8421 (Japan); Tsuji, Atsushi B. [Diagnostic Imaging Group, Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)], E-mail: a_tsuji@nirs.go.jp; Sugyo, Aya [Diagnostic Imaging Group, Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Imai, Takashi [Radgenomics Research Group, Research Center for Charged Particle Therapy, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Saga, Tsuneo; Harada, Yoshi-nobu [Diagnostic Imaging Group, Molecular Imaging Center, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan)

    2007-12-21

    Genomic instability is considered a hallmark of carcinogenesis, and dysfunction of DNA repair and cell cycle regulation in response to DNA damage caused by ionizing radiation are thought to be important factors in the early stages of genomic instability. We performed cell-based functional screening using an RNA interference library targeting 200 genes in human cells. We identified three known and nine new radiation susceptibility genes, eight of which are linked directly or potentially with cell cycle progression. Cell cycle analysis on four of the genes not previously linked to cell cycle progression demonstrated that one, ZDHHC8, was associated with the G{sub 2}/M checkpoint in response to DNA damage. Further study of the 12 radiation susceptibility genes identified in this screen may help to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of cell cycle progression, DNA repair, cell death, cell growth and genomic instability, and to develop new radiation sensitizing agents for radiotherapy.

  1. A zebrafish screen for craniofacial mutants identifies wdr68 as a highly conserved gene required for endothelin-1 expression

    PubMed Central

    Nissen, Robert M; Amsterdam, Adam; Hopkins, Nancy

    2006-01-01

    Background Craniofacial birth defects result from defects in cranial neural crest (NC) patterning and morphogenesis. The vertebrate craniofacial skeleton is derived from cranial NC cells and the patterning of these cells occurs within the pharyngeal arches. Substantial efforts have led to the identification of several genes required for craniofacial skeletal development such as the endothelin-1 (edn1) signaling pathway that is required for lower jaw formation. However, many essential genes required for craniofacial development remain to be identified. Results Through screening a collection of insertional zebrafish mutants containing approximately 25% of the genes essential for embryonic development, we present the identification of 15 essential genes that are required for craniofacial development. We identified 3 genes required for hyomandibular development. We also identified zebrafish models for Campomelic Dysplasia and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. To further demonstrate the utility of this method, we include a characterization of the wdr68 gene. We show that wdr68 acts upstream of the edn1 pathway and is also required for formation of the upper jaw equivalent, the palatoquadrate. We also present evidence that the level of wdr68 activity required for edn1 pathway function differs between the 1st and 2nd arches. Wdr68 interacts with two minibrain-related kinases, Dyrk1a and Dyrk1b, required for embryonic growth and myotube differentiation, respectively. We show that a GFP-Wdr68 fusion protein localizes to the nucleus with Dyrk1a in contrast to an engineered loss of function mutation Wdr68-T284F that no longer accumulated in the cell nucleus and failed to rescue wdr68 mutant animals. Wdr68 homologs appear to exist in all eukaryotic genomes. Notably, we found that the Drosophila wdr68 homolog CG14614 could substitute for the vertebrate wdr68 gene even though insects lack the NC cell lineage. Conclusion This work represents a systematic identification of approximately 25% of the essential genes required for craniofacial development. The identification of zebrafish models for two human disease syndromes indicates that homologs to the other genes are likely to also be relevant for human craniofacial development. The initial characterization of wdr68 suggests an important role in craniofacial development for the highly conserved Wdr68-Dyrk1 protein complexes. PMID:16759393

  2. IDENTIFYING NOVEL R-GENES IN RICE WILD RELATIVES WITH MICROSATELLITE MARKERS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice wild relatives (Oryza spp.) are an important source of novel R(resistance)-genes for rice improvement. Rice sheath blight, caused by Rhizoctonia solani, and leaf blast, caused by Magnaporthe grisea, are major fungal diseases of cultivated rice (O. sativa) in the USA and of irrigated rice world...

  3. Rmg7, a New Gene for Resistance to Triticum Isolates of Pyricularia oryzae Identified in Tetraploid Wheat.

    PubMed

    Tagle, Analiza Grubanzo; Chuma, Izumi; Tosa, Yukio

    2015-04-01

    A single gene for resistance, designated Rmg7 (Resistance to Magnaporthe grisea 7), was identified in a tetraploid wheat accession, St24 (Triticum dicoccum, KU120), against Br48, a Triticum isolate of Pyricularia oryzae. Two other wheat accessions, St17 (T. dicoccum, KU112) and St25 (T. dicoccum, KU122), were also resistant against Br48 and showed a similar disease reaction pattern to St24. Crosses between these resistant accessions yielded no susceptible F2 seedlings, suggesting that St24, St17, and St25 carry the same resistance gene. Furthermore, a single avirulence gene corresponding to Rmg7 was detected in a segregation analysis of random F1 progenies between Br48 and MZ5-1-6, an Eleusine isolate virulent to St24 at a higher temperature. This avirulence gene was recognized not only by St24, but also by St17 and St25, thus supporting the preceding results indicating that all three accessions carry Rmg7. This resistance gene may have potential in future wheat breeding programs. PMID:25870924

  4. Renal Gene and Protein Expression Signatures for Prediction of Kidney Disease Progression

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Wenjun; Eichinger, Felix; Bitzer, Markus; Oh, Jun; McWeeney, Shannon; Berthier, Celine C.; Shedden, Kerby; Cohen, Clemens D.; Henger, Anna; Krick, Stefanie; Kopp, Jeffrey B.; Stoeckert, Christian J.; Dikman, Steven; Schröppel, Bernd; Thomas, David B.; Schlondorff, Detlef; Kretzler, Matthias; Böttinger, Erwin P.

    2009-01-01

    Although chronic kidney disease (CKD) is common, only a fraction of CKD patients progress to end-stage renal disease. Molecular predictors to stratify CKD populations according to their risk of progression remain undiscovered. Here we applied transcriptional profiling of kidneys from transforming growth factor-?1 transgenic (Tg) mice, characterized by heterogeneity of kidney disease progression, to identify 43 genes that discriminate kidneys by severity of glomerular apoptosis before the onset of tubulointerstitial fibrosis in 2-week-old animals. Among the genes examined, 19 showed significant correlation between mRNA expression in uninephrectomized left kidneys at 2 weeks of age and renal disease severity in right kidneys of Tg mice at 4 weeks of age. Gene expression profiles of human orthologs of the 43 genes in kidney biopsies were highly significantly related (R2 = 0.53; P < 0.001) to the estimated glomerular filtration rates in patients with CKD stages I to V, and discriminated groups of CKD stages I/II and III/IV/V with positive and negative predictive values of 0.8 and 0.83, respectively. Protein expression patterns for selected genes were successfully validated by immunohistochemistry in kidneys of Tg mice and kidney biopsies of patients with IgA nephropathy and CKD stages I to V, respectively. In conclusion, we developed novel mRNA and protein expression signatures that predict progressive renal fibrosis in mice and may be useful molecular predictors of CKD progression in humans. PMID:19465643

  5. An empiric comparison of linkage disequilibrium parameters in disease gene localizations; the myotonic dystrophy experience

    SciTech Connect

    Podolsky, L.; Baird, S.; Korneluk, R.G. [Children`s Hospital of Eastern Ontario, Ottawa (Canada)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Analyses of linkage disequilibrium (LD) between markers of known location and disease phenotypes often provide valuable information in efforts to clone the causative genes. However, there exist a number of factors which may attenuate a consistent inverse relationship between physical distance and LD for a given pairing of a genetic marker and a human disease gene. Chief among these is the effect of the general population frequency of an allele which demonstrates LD with a disease gene. Possibly as a result of this, a number of methods of calculating LD has been proposed. We have calculated seven such LD parameters for twelve physically mapped RFLP`s from a 1.3 Mb DM gene containing region of 19q13.3 using 107 DM and 213 non-DM chromosomes. Correlation of the DM-marker physical distance with LD for the 12 loci reveals the Yule coefficient and Dij{prime} parameter to give the most consistent relationship. The D{prime} parameter shown to have a relative allele frequency independence gave only a weak correlation. A similar analysis is being carried out on published cystic fibrosis genetic and physical mapping data. The parameters identified in this study may be the most appropriate for future LD based localizations of disease genes.

  6. Comparative study of synthetic oligonucleotide and cloned polynucleotide enterotoxin gene probes to identify enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Echeverria, P; Taylor, D N; Seriwatana, J; Moe, C

    1987-01-01

    Escherichia coli isolated from 2,126 children in Thailand and the Philippines was examined for enterotoxin production and for DNA hybridization with synthetic oligonucleotide and cloned polynucleotide enterotoxin gene probes. A total of 233 infections with E. coli that were detected by one or more of these assays were identified. Of the infections, 75% (164/233) were identified by all three methods. An additional 18% (43/233) were identified by two of three methods. Isolates from 10% (19/183) of infections with E. coli that hybridized with both the oligonucleotide and cloned enterotoxin gene probes were nontoxigenic, as determined by the Y1 adrenal cell and suckling mouse assays. Although synthetic oligonucleotide probes to detect enterotoxigenic E. coli are more uniform and easier to use than cloned enterotoxin gene probes, the heat-labile toxin oligo probe used in this study did not identify 13% (11/87) of infections with E. coli that produced heat-labile toxin, as identified with the Y1 adrenal cell assay and the cloned enterotoxin gene probe. Synthetic oligonucleotide probes enable laboratories with only minimal equipment to use DNA hybridization assays to identify enterotoxigenic E. coli. PMID:3539983

  7. Genome-wide methylation analysis identifies epigenetically inactivated candidate tumour suppressor genes in renal cell carcinoma

    Microsoft Academic Search

    M R Morris; C J Ricketts; D Gentle; F McRonald; N Carli; H Khalili; M Brown; T Kishida; M Yao; R E Banks; N Clarke; F Latif; E R Maher

    2011-01-01

    The detection of promoter region hypermethylation and transcriptional silencing has facilitated the identification of candidate renal cell carcinoma (RCC) tumour suppressor genes (TSGs). We have used a genome-wide strategy (methylated DNA immunoprecipitation (MeDIP) and whole-genome array analysis in combination with high-density expression array analysis) to identify genes that are frequently methylated and silenced in RCC. MeDIP analysis on 9 RCC

  8. Gene expression endophenotypes: a novel approach for gene discovery in Alzheimer's disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Nilüfer Ertekin-Taner

    2011-01-01

    Uncovering the underlying genetic component of any disease is key to the understanding of its pathophysiology and may open\\u000a new avenues for development of therapeutic strategies and biomarkers. In the past several years, there has been an explosion\\u000a of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) resulting in the discovery of novel candidate genes conferring risk for complex\\u000a diseases, including neurodegenerative diseases. Despite

  9. Identifying functional gene regulatory network phenotypes underlying single cell transcriptional variability.

    PubMed

    Park, James; Ogunnaike, Babatunde; Schwaber, James; Vadigepalli, Rajanikanth

    2015-01-01

    Recent analysis of single-cell transcriptomic data has revealed a surprising organization of the transcriptional variability pervasive across individual neurons. In response to distinct combinations of synaptic input-type, a new organization of neuronal subtypes emerged based on transcriptional states that were aligned along a gradient of correlated gene expression. Individual neurons traverse across these transcriptional states in response to cellular inputs. However, the regulatory network interactions driving these changes remain unclear. Here we present a novel fuzzy logic-based approach to infer quantitative gene regulatory network models from highly variable single-cell gene expression data. Our approach involves developing an a priori regulatory network that is then trained against in vivo single-cell gene expression data in order to identify causal gene interactions and corresponding quantitative model parameters. Simulations of the inferred gene regulatory network response to experimentally observed stimuli levels mirrored the pattern and quantitative range of gene expression across individual neurons remarkably well. In addition, the network identification results revealed that distinct regulatory interactions, coupled with differences in the regulatory network stimuli, drive the variable gene expression patterns observed across the neuronal subtypes. We also identified a key difference between the neuronal subtype-specific networks with respect to negative feedback regulation, with the catecholaminergic subtype network lacking such interactions. Furthermore, by varying regulatory network stimuli over a wide range, we identified several cases in which divergent neuronal subtypes could be driven towards similar transcriptional states by distinct stimuli operating on subtype-specific regulatory networks. Based on these results, we conclude that heterogenous single-cell gene expression profiles should be interpreted through a regulatory network modeling perspective in order to separate the contributions of network interactions from those of cellular inputs. PMID:25433230

  10. Comparative Genomic Analysis of East Asian and Non-Asian Helicobacter pylori Strains Identifies Rapidly Evolving Genes

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Stacy S.; Valk, Pieter L.; McClain, Mark S.; Shaffer, Carrie L.; Metcalf, Jason A.; Bordenstein, Seth R.; Cover, Timothy L.

    2013-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is a risk factor for the development of gastric adenocarcinoma, a disease that has a high incidence in East Asia. Genes that are highly divergent in East Asian H. pylori strains compared to non-Asian strains are predicted to encode proteins that differ in functional activity and could represent novel determinants of virulence. To identify such proteins, we undertook a comparative analysis of sixteen H. pylori genomes, selected equally from strains classified as East Asian or non-Asian. As expected, the deduced sequences of two known virulence determinants (CagA and VacA) are highly divergent, with 77% and 87% mean amino acid sequence identities between East Asian and non-Asian groups, respectively. In total, we identified 57 protein sequences that are highly divergent between East Asian and non-Asian strains, but relatively conserved within East Asian strains. The most highly represented functional groups are hypothetical proteins, cell envelope proteins and proteins involved in DNA metabolism. Among the divergent genes with known or predicted functions, population genetic analyses indicate that 86% exhibit evidence of positive selection. McDonald-Kreitman tests further indicate that about one third of these highly divergent genes, including cagA and vacA, are under diversifying selection. We conclude that, similar to cagA and vacA, most of the divergent genes identified in this study evolved under positive selection, and represent candidate factors that may account for the disproportionately high incidence of gastric cancer associated with East Asian H. pylori strains. Moreover, these divergent genes represent robust biomarkers that can be used to differentiate East Asian and non-Asian H. pylori strains. PMID:23383074

  11. Genome-Wide DNA Methylation Analysis Identifies Novel Hypomethylated Non-Pericentromeric Genes with Potential Clinical Implications in ICF Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gatto, S.; Gagliardi, M.; Crujeiras, A. B.; Matarazzo, M. R.; Esteller, M.; Sandoval, J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction and Results Immunodeficiency, centromeric instability and facial anomalies syndrome (ICF) is a rare autosomal recessive disease, characterized by severe hypomethylation in pericentromeric regions of chromosomes (1, 16 and 9), marked immunodeficiency and facial anomalies. The majority of ICF patients present mutations in the DNMT3B gene, affecting the DNA methyltransferase activity of the protein. In the present study, we have used the Infinium 450K DNA methylation array to evaluate the methylation level of 450,000 CpGs in lymphoblastoid cell lines and untrasformed fibroblasts derived from ICF patients and healthy donors. Our results demonstrate that ICF-specific DNMT3B variants A603T/STP807ins and V699G/R54X cause global DNA hypomethylation compared to wild-type protein. We identified 181 novel differentially methylated positions (DMPs) including subtelomeric and intrachromosomic regions, outside the classical ICF-related pericentromeric hypomethylated positions. Interestingly, these sites were mainly located in intergenic regions and inside the CpG islands. Among the identified hypomethylated CpG-island associated genes, we confirmed the overexpression of three selected genes, BOLL, SYCP2 and NCRNA00221, in ICF compared to healthy controls, which are supposed to be expressed in germ line and silenced in somatic tissues. Conclusions In conclusion, this study contributes in clarifying the direct relationship between DNA methylation defect and gene expression impairment in ICF syndrome, identifying novel direct target genes of DNMT3B. A high percentage of the DMPs are located in the subtelomeric regions, indicating a specific role of DNMT3B in methylating these chromosomal sites. Therefore, we provide further evidence that hypomethylation in specific non-pericentromeric regions of chromosomes might be involved in the molecular pathogenesis of ICF syndrome. The detection of DNA hypomethylation at BOLL, SYCP2 and NCRNA00221 may pave the way for the development of specific clinical biomarkers with the aim to facilitate the identification of ICF patients. PMID:26161907

  12. Functional genomics identifies neural stem cell sub-type expression profiles and genes regulating neuroblast homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Carney, Travis D.; Miller, Michael R.; Robinson, Kristin J.; Bayraktar, Omer A.; Osterhout, Jessica A.; Doe, Chris Q.

    2014-01-01

    The Drosophila larval central brain contains about 10,000 differentiated neurons and 200 scattered neural progenitors (neuroblasts), which can be further subdivided into ~95 type I neuroblasts and eight type II neuroblasts per brain lobe. Only type II neuroblasts generate self-renewing intermediate neural progenitors (INPs), and consequently each contributes more neurons to the brain, including much of the central complex. We characterized six different mutant genotypes that lead to expansion of neuroblast numbers; some preferentially expand type II or type I neuroblasts. Transcriptional profiling of larval brains from these mutant genotypes versus wild-type allowed us to identify small clusters of transcripts enriched in type II or type I neuroblasts, and we validated these clusters by gene expression analysis. Unexpectedly, only a few genes were found to be differentially expressed between type I/II neuroblasts, suggesting that these genes play a large role in establishing the different cell types. We also identified a large group of genes predicted to be expressed in all neuroblasts but not neurons. We performed a neuroblast-specific, RNAi-based functional screen and identified 84 genes that are required to maintain proper neuroblast numbers; all have conserved mammalian orthologs. These genes are excellent candidates for regulating neural progenitor self-renewal in Drosophila and mammals. PMID:22061480

  13. A Three Stage Integrative Pathway Search (TIPS©) framework to identify toxicity relevant genes and pathways

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zheng; Srivastava, Shireesh; Mittal, Sheenu; Yang, Xuerui; Sheng, Lufang; Chan, Christina

    2007-01-01

    Background The ability to obtain profiles of gene expressions, proteins and metabolites with the advent of high throughput technologies has advanced the study of pathway and network reconstruction. Genome-wide network reconstruction requires either interaction measurements or large amount of perturbation data, often not available for mammalian cell systems. To overcome these shortcomings, we developed a Three Stage Integrative Pathway Search (TIPS©) approach to reconstruct context-specific active pathways involved in conferring a specific phenotype, from limited amount of perturbation data. The approach was tested on human liver cells to identify pathways that confer cytotoxicity. Results This paper presents a systems approach that integrates gene expression and cytotoxicity profiles to identify a network of pathways involved in free fatty acid (FFA) and tumor necrosis factor-? (TNF-?) induced cytotoxicity in human hepatoblastoma cells (HepG2/C3A). Cytotoxicity relevant genes were first identified and then used to reconstruct a network using Bayesian network (BN) analysis. BN inference was used subsequently to predict the effects of perturbing a gene on the other genes in the network and on the cytotoxicity. These predictions were subsequently confirmed through the published literature and further experiments. Conclusion The TIPS© approach is able to reconstruct active pathways that confer a particular phenotype by integrating gene expression and phenotypic profiles. A web-based version of TIPS© that performs the analysis described herein can be accessed at . PMID:17570844

  14. Genome-wide RNAi screen identifies the Parkinson disease GWAS risk locus SREBF1 as a regulator of mitophagy.

    PubMed

    Ivatt, Rachael M; Sanchez-Martinez, Alvaro; Godena, Vinay K; Brown, Stephen; Ziviani, Elena; Whitworth, Alexander J

    2014-06-10

    Genetic analysis of Parkinson disease (PD) has identified several genes whose mutation causes inherited parkinsonism, as well as risk loci for sporadic PD. PTEN-induced kinase 1 (PINK1) and parkin, linked to autosomal recessive PD, act in a common genetic pathway regulating the autophagic degradation of mitochondria, termed mitophagy. We undertook a genome-wide RNAi screen as an unbiased approach to identify genes regulating the PINK1/Parkin pathway. We identified several genes that have a conserved function in promoting mitochondrial translocation of Parkin and subsequent mitophagy, most notably sterol regulatory element binding transcription factor 1 (SREBF1), F-box and WD40 domain protein 7 (FBXW7), and other components of the lipogenesis pathway. The relevance of mechanisms of autosomal recessive parkinsonism to sporadic PD has long been debated. However, with the recent identification of SREBF1 as a risk locus for sporadic PD, our findings suggest a common mechanistic link between autosomal recessive and sporadic PD, and underscore the importance of mitochondrial homeostasis. PMID:24912190

  15. Lateral organ boundaries 1 is a disease susceptibility gene for citrus bacterial canker disease

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yang; Zhang, Junli; Jia, Hongge; Sosso, Davide; Li, Ting; Frommer, Wolf B.; Yang, Bing; White, Frank F.; Wang, Nian; Jones, Jeffrey B.

    2014-01-01

    Citrus bacterial canker (CBC) disease occurs worldwide and incurs considerable costs both from control measures and yield losses. Bacteria that cause CBC require one of six known type III transcription activator-like (TAL) effector genes for the characteristic pustule formation at the site of infection. Here, we show that Xanthomonas citri subspecies citri strain Xcc306, with the type III TAL effector gene pthA4 or with the distinct yet biologically equivalent gene pthAw from strain XccAw, induces two host genes, CsLOB1 and CsSWEET1, in a TAL effector-dependent manner. CsLOB1 is a member of the Lateral Organ Boundaries (LOB) gene family of transcription factors, and CsSWEET1 is a homolog of the SWEET sugar transporter and rice disease susceptibility gene. Both TAL effectors drive expression of CsLOB1 and CsSWEET1 promoter reporter gene fusions when coexpressed in citrus or Nicotiana benthamiana. Artificially designed TAL effectors directed to sequences in the CsLOB1 promoter region, but not the CsSWEET1 promoter, promoted pustule formation and higher bacterial leaf populations. Three additional distinct TAL effector genes, pthA*, pthB, and pthC, also direct pustule formation and expression of CsLOB1. Unlike pthA4 and pthAw, pthB and pthC do not promote the expression of CsSWEET1. CsLOB1 expression was associated with the expression of genes associated with cell expansion. The results indicate that CBC-inciting species of Xanthomonas exploit a single host disease susceptibility gene by altering the expression of an otherwise developmentally regulated gene using any one of a diverse set of TAL effector genes in the pathogen populations. PMID:24474801

  16. Genomic structure and expression of STM2, the chromosome 1 familial Alzheimer disease gene

    SciTech Connect

    Levy-Lahad, E. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)] [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Wang, Kai; Fu, Ying Hui [Darwin Molecular, Bothell, WA (United States)] [and others] [Darwin Molecular, Bothell, WA (United States); and others

    1996-06-01

    Mutations in the gene STM2 result in autosomal dominant familial Alzheimer disease. To screen for mutations and to identify regulatory elements for this gene, the genomic DNA sequence and intron-exon structure were determined. Twelve exons including 10 coding exons were identified in a genomic region spanning 23, 737 bp. The first 2 exons encode the 5{prime}-untranslated region. Expression analysis of STM2 indicates that two transcripts of 2.4 and 2.8 kb are found in skeletal muscle, pancreas, and heart. In addition, a splice variant of the 2.4-kb transcript was identified that is the result of the use of an alternative splice acceptor site located in exon 10. The use of this site results in a transcript lacking a single glutamate. The promotor for this gene and the alternatively spliced exons leading to the 2.8-kb form of the gene remain to be identified. Expression of STM2 was high in skeletal muscle and pancreas, with comparatively low levels observed in brain. This expression pattern is intriguing since in Alzheimer disease, pathology and degeneration are observed only in the central nervous system. 19 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. A Genome-Wide Regulatory Framework Identifies Maize Pericarp Color1 Controlled Genes[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Morohashi, Kengo; Casas, María Isabel; Ferreyra, Lorena Falcone; Mejía-Guerra, María Katherine; Pourcel, Lucille; Yilmaz, Alper; Feller, Antje; Carvalho, Bruna; Emiliani, Julia; Rodriguez, Eduardo; Pellegrinet, Silvina; McMullen, Michael; Casati, Paula; Grotewold, Erich

    2012-01-01

    Pericarp Color1 (P1) encodes an R2R3-MYB transcription factor responsible for the accumulation of insecticidal flavones in maize (Zea mays) silks and red phlobaphene pigments in pericarps and other floral tissues, which makes P1 an important visual marker. Using genome-wide expression analyses (RNA sequencing) in pericarps and silks of plants with contrasting P1 alleles combined with chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled with high-throughput sequencing, we show here that the regulatory functions of P1 are much broader than the activation of genes corresponding to enzymes in a branch of flavonoid biosynthesis. P1 modulates the expression of several thousand genes, and ?1500 of them were identified as putative direct targets of P1. Among them, we identified F2H1, corresponding to a P450 enzyme that converts naringenin into 2-hydroxynaringenin, a key branch point in the P1-controlled pathway and the first step in the formation of insecticidal C-glycosyl flavones. Unexpectedly, the binding of P1 to gene regulatory regions can result in both gene activation and repression. Our results indicate that P1 is the major regulator for a set of genes involved in flavonoid biosynthesis and a minor modulator of the expression of a much larger gene set that includes genes involved in primary metabolism and production of other specialized compounds. PMID:22822204

  18. Insect Innate Immunity Database (IIID): An Annotation Tool for Identifying Immune Genes in Insect Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Brucker, Robert M.; Funkhouser, Lisa J.; Setia, Shefali; Pauly, Rini; Bordenstein, Seth R.

    2012-01-01

    The innate immune system is an ancient component of host defense. Since innate immunity pathways are well conserved throughout many eukaryotes, immune genes in model animals can be used to putatively identify homologous genes in newly sequenced genomes of non-model organisms. With the initiation of the “i5k” project, which aims to sequence 5,000 insect genomes by 2016, many novel insect genomes will soon become publicly available, yet few annotation resources are currently available for insects. Thus, we developed an online tool called the Insect Innate Immunity Database (IIID) to provide an open access resource for insect immunity and comparative biology research (http://www.vanderbilt.edu/IIID). The database provides users with simple exploratory tools to search the immune repertoires of five insect models (including Nasonia), spanning three orders, for specific immunity genes or genes within a particular immunity pathway. As a proof of principle, we used an initial database with only four insect models to annotate potential immune genes in the parasitoid wasp genus Nasonia. Results specify 306 putative immune genes in the genomes of N. vitripennis and its two sister species N. giraulti and N. longicornis. Of these genes, 146 were not found in previous annotations of Nasonia immunity genes. Combining these newly identified immune genes with those in previous annotations, Nasonia possess 489 putative immunity genes, the largest immune repertoire found in insects to date. While these computational predictions need to be complemented with functional studies, the IIID database can help initiate and augment annotations of the immune system in the plethora of insect genomes that will soon become available. PMID:22984621

  19. Transcriptome analysis identifies genes involved in ethanol response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in Agave tequilana juice.

    PubMed

    Ramirez-Córdova, Jesús; Drnevich, Jenny; Madrigal-Pulido, Jaime Alberto; Arrizon, Javier; Allen, Kirk; Martínez-Velázquez, Moisés; Alvarez-Maya, Ikuri

    2012-08-01

    During ethanol fermentation, yeast cells are exposed to stress due to the accumulation of ethanol, cell growth is altered and the output of the target product is reduced. For Agave beverages, like tequila, no reports have been published on the global gene expression under ethanol stress. In this work, we used microarray analysis to identify Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes involved in the ethanol response. Gene expression of a tequila yeast strain of S. cerevisiae (AR5) was explored by comparing global gene expression with that of laboratory strain S288C, both after ethanol exposure. Additionally, we used two different culture conditions, cells grown in Agave tequilana juice as a natural fermentation media or grown in yeast-extract peptone dextrose as artificial media. Of the 6368 S. cerevisiae genes in the microarray, 657 genes were identified that had different expression responses to ethanol stress due to strain and/or media. A cluster of 28 genes was found over-expressed specifically in the AR5 tequila strain that could be involved in the adaptation to tequila yeast fermentation, 14 of which are unknown such as yor343c, ylr162w, ygr182c, ymr265c, yer053c-a or ydr415c. These could be the most suitable genes for transforming tequila yeast to increase ethanol tolerance in the tequila fermentation process. Other genes involved in response to stress (RFC4, TSA1, MLH1, PAU3, RAD53) or transport (CYB2, TIP20, QCR9) were expressed in the same cluster. Unknown genes could be good candidates for the development of recombinant yeasts with ethanol tolerance for use in industrial tequila fermentation. PMID:22535436

  20. Expression study of the Norrie disease (NDP) gene

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Z.Y.; Battinelli, E.M.; Breakefield, X.O. [Massachusetts General Hospital-East, Charlestown, MA (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Norrie disease is a severe X-linked recessive neurological disorder of unknown pathogenesis. Typically, Norrie disease is characterized by congenital blindness with progressive loss of hearing; over half of Norrie patients also manifest different degrees of mental retardation. The gene for Norrie disease (NDP) comprises three exons, with the first exon being untranslated. The open reading frame is confined within exons 2 and 3. The mouse NDP gene has essentially the same structure as the human. In order to determine the expression pattern of the NDP gene, RT-PCR was performed on mRNAs isolated from brain, retina, cochlea, and liver tissues of mice at different developmental stages. Transcripts were detected in all tissues at all times. This result, however, is different from the results we obtained from human tissue in which all tissues examined showed expression of the NDP gene with the exception of liver. We further analyzed the transcription initiation sites of the mouse NDP gene by random amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) method. The results showed that there are multiple transcription initiation sites associated with the expression of the NDP gene. The transcription start sites are utilized differentially in the tissues at different developmental stages. By using different intronic genomic fragments, we detected a possible second transcript which does not include the untranslated first exon. Northern analysis also revealed that there are at least two abundant transcripts associated with the NDP gene in brain. The results suggest that both multiple transcription initiation sites and different promoters may contribute to the expression of the NDP gene in different tissues during development.

  1. Adapting simultaneous analysis phylogenomic techniques to study complex disease gene relationships.

    PubMed

    Romano, Joseph D; Tharp, William G; Sarkar, Indra Neil

    2015-04-01

    The characterization of complex diseases remains a great challenge for biomedical researchers due to the myriad interactions of genetic and environmental factors. Network medicine approaches strive to accommodate these factors holistically. Phylogenomic techniques that can leverage available genomic data may provide an evolutionary perspective that may elucidate knowledge for gene networks of complex diseases and provide another source of information for network medicine approaches. Here, an automated method is presented that leverages publicly available genomic data and phylogenomic techniques, resulting in a gene network. The potential of approach is demonstrated based on a case study of nine genes associated with Alzheimer Disease, a complex neurodegenerative syndrome. The developed technique, which is incorporated into an update to a previously described Perl script called "ASAP," was implemented through a suite of Ruby scripts entitled "ASAP2," first compiles a list of sequence-similarity based orthologues using PSI-BLAST and a recursive NCBI BLAST+ search strategy, then constructs maximum parsimony phylogenetic trees for each set of nucleotide and protein sequences, and calculates phylogenetic metrics (Incongruence Length Difference between orthologue sets, partitioned Bremer support values, combined branch scores, and Robinson-Foulds distance) to provide an empirical assessment of evolutionary conservation within a given genetic network. In addition to the individual phylogenetic metrics, ASAP2 provides results in a way that can be used to generate a gene network that represents evolutionary similarity based on topological similarity (the Robinson-Foulds distance). The results of this study demonstrate the potential for using phylogenomic approaches that enable the study of multiple genes simultaneously to provide insights about potential gene relationships that can be studied within a network medicine framework that may not have been apparent using traditional, single-gene methods. Furthermore, the results provide an initial integrated evolutionary history of an Alzheimer Disease gene network and identify potentially important co-evolutionary clustering that may warrant further investigation. PMID:25592479

  2. Identify lymphatic metastasis-associated genes in mouse hepatocarcinoma cell lines using gene chip

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Bo Song; Jian-Wu Tang; Bo Wang; Xiao-Nan Cui; Lu Sun; Li-Min Mao; Chun-Hui Zhou; Yue Du; Li-Hui Wang; Hua-Xin Wang; Ren-Shu Zheng; Lei Sun

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Abstract Abstract Abstract Abstract AIM: In order to obtain ,lymphogenous ,metastasis- associated genes, we compared the transcriptional profiles of mouse hepatocarcinoma,cell lines Hca-F with highly lymphatic,metastasis ,potential ,and ,Hca-P with low lymphatic metastasis potential. METHODS:T otal RNA was isolated from Hca-F and Hca-P

  3. Defining essential genes and identifying virulence factors of Porphyromonas gingivalis by massively parallel sequencing of transposon libraries (Tn-seq).

    PubMed

    Klein, Brian A; Duncan, Margaret J; Hu, Linden T

    2015-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is a keystone pathogen in the development and progression of periodontal disease. Obstacles to the development of saturated transposon libraries have previously limited transposon mutant-based screens as well as essential gene studies. We have developed a system for efficient transposon mutagenesis of P. gingivalis using a modified mariner transposon. Tn-seq is a technique that allows for quantitative assessment of individual mutants within a transposon mutant library by sequencing the transposon-genome junctions and then compiling mutant presence by mapping to a base genome. Using Tn-seq, it is possible to quickly define all the insertional mutants in a library and thus identify nonessential genes under the conditions in which the library was produced. Identification of fitness of individual mutants under specific conditions can be performed by exposing the library to selective pressures. PMID:25636611

  4. Identification of Risk and Age-at-Onset Genes on Chromosome 1p in Parkinson Disease

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Sofia A.; Li, Yi-Ju; Noureddine, Maher A.; Züchner, Stephan; Qin, Xuejun; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; Vance, Jeffery M.

    2005-01-01

    We previously reported a linkage region on chromosome 1p (LOD = 3.41) for genes controlling age at onset (AAO) in Parkinson disease (PD). This region overlaps with the previously reported PARK10 locus. To identify the gene(s) associated with AAO and risk of PD in this region, we first applied a genomic convergence approach that combined gene expression and linkage data. No significant results were found. Second, we performed association mapping across a 19.2-Mb region centered under the AAO linkage peak. An iterative association mapping approach was done by initially genotyping single-nucleotide polymorphisms at an average distance of 100 kb apart and then by increasing the density of markers as needed. Using the overall data set of 267 multiplex families, we identified six associated genes in the region, but further screening of a subset of 83 families linked to the chromosome 1 locus identified only two genes significantly associated with AAO in PD: the ? subunit of the translation initiation factor EIF2B gene (EIF2B3), which was more significant in the linked subset and the ubiquitin-specific protease 24 gene (USP24). Unexpectedly, the human immunodeficiency virus enhancer-binding protein 3 gene (HIVEP3) was found to be associated with risk for susceptibility to PD. We used several criteria to define significant results in the presence of multiple testing, including criteria derived from a novel cluster approach. The known or putative functions of these genes fit well with the current suspected pathogenic mechanisms of PD and thus show great potential as candidates for the PARK10 locus. PMID:15986317

  5. Epigenetic gene regulation: Linking early developmental environment to adult disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Dana C. Dolinoy; Jennifer R. Weidman; Randy L. Jirtle

    2007-01-01

    Traditional studies on the combined effects of genetics and the environment on individual variation in disease susceptibility primarily focus on single nucleotide polymorphisms that influence toxicant uptake and metabolism. A growing body of evidence, however, suggests that epigenetic mechanisms of gene regulation, such as DNA methylation and chromatin modification, are also influenced by the environment, and play an important role

  6. Les Liaisons Dangereuses: Cancer-Related Genes and Neurodegenerative Diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghetti, Bernardino; Buonaguro, Franco M.

    2014-07-01

    The following sections are included: * INTRODUCTION * MUTATIONS IN THE CSF1R GENE ASSOCIATED WITH DIFFUSE LEUKOENCEPHALOPATHY WITH SPHEROIDS AND HUMAN CANCERS. * A SPECIAL LINK HAS BEEN SHOWN BETWEEN PTEN AND AD. * ACETYLCHOLINE DEFICIENCY AND PATHOGENESIS OF AD. * MIRNAS AND COMMON PATHWAYS IN CANCER AND NEURODEGENERATIVE DISEASE. * SUMMARY * REFERENCES

  7. Mechanisms of insertional mutagenesis in human genes causing genetic disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    David N. Cooper; Michael Krawczak

    1991-01-01

    Examples of the insertion of < 10 bp of DNA sequence into human gene-coding regions causing genetic disease were collated in order to study the underlying causative mechanisms. The nature of these insertions was found to be consistent with several mechanisms of mutagenesis including: (1) slipped mispairing mediated by direct repeats or runs of identical bases and (2) the templated

  8. Identification of blast resistance genes for managing rice blast disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice blast, caused by the fungal pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae, is one of the most devastating diseases worldwide. In the present study, an international set of monogenic differentials carrying 24 major blast resistance (R) genes (Pia, Pib, Pii, Pik, Pik-h, Pik-m, Pik-p, Pik-s, Pish, Pit, Pita, Pita2,...

  9. Identifying essential proteins from active PPI networks constructed with dynamic gene expression

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Essential proteins are vitally important for cellular survival and development, and identifying essential proteins is very meaningful research work in the post-genome era. Rapid increase of available protein-protein interaction (PPI) data has made it possible to detect protein essentiality at the network level. A series of centrality measures have been proposed to discover essential proteins based on the PPI networks. However, the PPI data obtained from large scale, high-throughput experiments generally contain false positives. It is insufficient to use original PPI data to identify essential proteins. How to improve the accuracy, has become the focus of identifying essential proteins. In this paper, we proposed a framework for identifying essential proteins from active PPI networks constructed with dynamic gene expression. Firstly, we process the dynamic gene expression profiles by using time-dependent model and time-independent model. Secondly, we construct an active PPI network based on co-expressed genes. Lastly, we apply six classical centrality measures in the active PPI network. For the purpose of comparison, other prediction methods are also performed to identify essential proteins based on the active PPI network. The experimental results on yeast network show that identifying essential proteins based on the active PPI network can improve the performance of centrality measures considerably in terms of the number of identified essential proteins and identification accuracy. At the same time, the results also indicate that most of essential proteins are active. PMID:25707432

  10. Integration of partial least squares and Monte Carlo gene expression analysis in coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, HUAN; LI, TAO; WU, GUANJI; MA, FENG

    2014-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the most common type of cardiovascular disease and leading cause of mortality worldwide. Microarray technology for gene expression analysis has facilitated the identification of the molecular mechanism that underlies the pathogenesis of CAD. Previous studies have primarily used variance or regression analysis, without considering array specific factors. Thus, the aim of the present study was to investigate the mechanism of CAD using partial least squares (PLS)-based analysis, which was integrated with the Monte Carlo technique. Microarray analysis was performed with a data set of 110 CAD patients and 111 controls obtained from the Gene Expression Omnibus database. A total of 390 dysregulated genes were acquired. Significantly increased representations of dysregulated genes in Gene Ontology items, including transforming growth factor ?-activated receptor activity and acyl-CoA oxidase activity, were identified. Network analysis revealed three hub genes with a degree of >10, including ESR1, ITGA4 and ARRB2. The results of the present study provide novel information on the gene expression signatures of CAD patients and offer further theoretical support for future therapeutic study. PMID:24940402

  11. Whole-exome sequencing defines the mutational landscape of pheochromocytoma and identifies KMT2D as a recurrently mutated gene.

    PubMed

    Juhlin, C Christofer; Stenman, Adam; Haglund, Felix; Clark, Victoria E; Brown, Taylor C; Baranoski, Jacob; Bilguvar, Kaya; Goh, Gerald; Welander, Jenny; Svahn, Fredrika; Rubinstein, Jill C; Caramuta, Stefano; Yasuno, Katsuhito; Günel, Murat; Bäckdahl, Martin; Gimm, Oliver; Söderkvist, Peter; Prasad, Manju L; Korah, Reju; Lifton, Richard P; Carling, Tobias

    2015-09-01

    As subsets of pheochromocytomas (PCCs) lack a defined molecular etiology, we sought to characterize the mutational landscape of PCCs to identify novel gene candidates involved in disease development. A discovery cohort of 15 PCCs wild type for mutations in PCC susceptibility genes underwent whole-exome sequencing, and an additional 83 PCCs served as a verification cohort for targeted sequencing of candidate mutations. A low rate of nonsilent single nucleotide variants (SNVs) was detected (6.1/sample). Somatic HRAS and EPAS1 mutations were observed in one case each, whereas the remaining 13 cases did not exhibit variants in established PCC genes. SNVs aggregated in apoptosis-related pathways, and mutations in COSMIC genes not previously reported in PCCs included ZAN, MITF, WDTC1, and CAMTA1. Two somatic mutations and one constitutional variant in the well-established cancer gene lysine (K)-specific methyltransferase 2D (KMT2D, MLL2) were discovered in one sample each, prompting KMT2D screening using focused exome-sequencing in the verification cohort. An additional 11 PCCs displayed KMT2D variants, of which two were recurrent. In total, missense KMT2D variants were found in 14 (11 somatic, two constitutional, one undetermined) of 99 PCCs (14%). Five cases displayed somatic mutations in the functional FYR/SET domains of KMT2D, constituting 36% of all KMT2D-mutated PCCs. KMT2D expression was upregulated in PCCs compared to normal adrenals, and KMT2D overexpression positively affected cell migration in a PCC cell line. We conclude that KMT2D represents a recurrently mutated gene with potential implication for PCC development. © 2015 The Authors. Genes, Chromosomes & Cancer Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26032282

  12. Norrie disease gene: Characterization of deletions and possible function

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Z.Y.; Battinelli, E.M.; Hendriks, R.W.; Craig, I.W. [Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom)] [Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom); Powell, J.F. [Institute of Psychiatry, London (United Kingdom)] [Institute of Psychiatry, London (United Kingdom); Middleton-Price, H. [Univ. of London (United Kingdom)] [Univ. of London (United Kingdom); Sims, K.B.; Breakefield, X.O. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, MA (United States)] [Massachusetts General Hospital, Charlestown, MA (United States)

    1993-05-01

    Positional cloning experiments have resulted recently in the isolation of a candidate gene for Norrie disease (pseudoglioma; NDP), a severe X-linked neuro-developmental disorder. Here the authors report the isolation and analysis of human genomic DNA clones encompassing the NDP gene. The gene spans 28 kb and consists of 3 exons, the first of which is entirely contained within the 5{prime} untranslated region. Detailed analysis of genomic deletions in Norrie patients shows that they are heterogeneous, both in size and in position. By PCR analysis, they found that expression of the NDP gene was not confined to the eye or to the brain. An extensive DNA and protein sequence comparison between the human NDP gene and related genes from the database revealed homology with cysteine-rich protein-binding domains of immediate--early genes implicated in the regulation of cell proliferation. They propose that NDP is a molecule related in function to these genes and may be involved in a pathway that regulates neural cell differentiation and proliferation. 19 refs., 2 figs.

  13. Integrative Genomic and Transcriptomic Analysis Identified Candidate Genes Implicated in the Pathogenesis of Hepatosplenic T-Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Finalet Ferreiro, Julio; Rouhigharabaei, Leila; Urbankova, Helena; van der Krogt, Jo-Anne; Michaux, Lucienne; Shetty, Shashirekha; Krenacs, Laszlo; Tousseyn, Thomas; De Paepe, Pascale; Uyttebroeck, Anne; Verhoef, Gregor; Taghon, Tom; Vandenberghe, Peter; Cools, Jan; Wlodarska, Iwona

    2014-01-01

    Hepatosplenic T-cell lymphoma (HSTL) is an aggressive lymphoma cytogenetically characterized by isochromosome 7q [i(7)(q10)], of which the molecular consequences remain unknown. We report here results of an integrative genomic and transcriptomic (expression microarray and RNA-sequencing) study of six i(7)(q10)-positive HSTL cases, including HSTL-derived cell line (DERL-2), and three cases with ring 7 [r(7)], the recently identified rare variant aberration. Using high resolution array CGH, we profiled all cases and mapped the common deleted region (CDR) at 7p22.1p14.1 (34.88 Mb; 3506316-38406226 bp) and the common gained region (CGR) at 7q22.11q31.1 (38.77 Mb; 86259620–124892276 bp). Interestingly, CDR spans a smaller region of 13 Mb (86259620–99271246 bp) constantly amplified in cases with r(7). In addition, we found that TCRG (7p14.1) and TCRB (7q32) are involved in formation of r(7), which seems to be a byproduct of illegitimate somatic rearrangement of both loci. Further transcriptomic analysis has not identified any CDR-related candidate tumor suppressor gene. Instead, loss of 7p22.1p14.1 correlated with an enhanced expression of CHN2 (7p14.1) and the encoded ?2-chimerin. Gain and amplification of 7q22.11q31.1 are associated with an increased expression of several genes postulated to be implicated in cancer, including RUNDC3B, PPP1R9A and ABCB1, a known multidrug resistance gene. RNA-sequencing did not identify any disease-defining mutation or gene fusion. Thus, chromosome 7 imbalances remain the only driver events detected in this tumor. We hypothesize that the ?7p22.1p14.1-associated enhanced expression of CHN2/?2-chimerin leads to downmodulation of the NFAT pathway and a proliferative response, while upregulation of the CGR-related genes provides growth advantage for neoplastic ??T-cells and underlies their intrinsic chemoresistance. Finally, our study confirms the previously described gene expression profile of HSTL and identifies a set of 24 genes, including three located on chromosome 7 (CHN2, ABCB1 and PPP1R9A), distinguishing HSTL from other malignancies. PMID:25057852

  14. Transcriptome Analysis to Identify Cold-Responsive Genes in Amur Carp (Cyprinus carpio haematopterus)

    PubMed Central

    He, XuLing

    2015-01-01

    The adaptation of fish to low temperatures is the result of long-term evolution. Amur carp (Cyprinus carpio haematopterus) survives low temperatures (0-4°C) for six months per year. Therefore, we chose this fish as a model organism to study the mechanisms of cold-adaptive responses using high-throughput sequencing technology. This system provided an excellent model for exploring the relationship between evolutionary genomic changes and environmental adaptations. The Amur carp transcriptome was sequenced using the Illumina platform and was assembled into 163,121 cDNA contigs, with an average read length of 594 bp and an N50 length of 913 bp. A total of 162,339 coding sequences (CDSs) were identified and of 32,730 unique CDSs were annotated. Gene Ontology (GO), EuKaryotic Orthologous Groups (KOG) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) analyses were performed to classify all CDSs into different functional categories. A large number of cold-responsive genes were detected in different tissues at different temperatures. A total of 9,427 microsatellites were identified and classified, with 1952 identifying in cold-responsive genes. Based on GO enrichment analysis of the cold-induced genes, “protein localization” and “protein transport” were the most highly represented biological processes. “Circadian rhythm,” “protein processing in endoplasmic reticulum,” “endocytosis,” “insulin signaling pathway,” and “lysosome” were the most highly enriched pathways for the genes induced by cold stress. Our data greatly contribute to the common carp (C. carpio) transcriptome resource, and the identification of cold-responsive genes in different tissues at different temperatures will aid in deciphering the genetic basis of ecological and environmental adaptations in this species. Based on our results, the Amur carp has evolved special strategies to survive low temperatures, and these strategies include the system-wide or tissue-specific induction of gene expression during their six-month overwintering period. PMID:26098567

  15. Newly identified genetic risk variants for celiac disease related to the immune response

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Karen A Hunt; Alexandra Zhernakova; Graham Turner; Graham A R Heap; Lude Franke; Marcel Bruinenberg; Jihane Romanos; Lotte C Dinesen; Anthony W Ryan; Davinder Panesar; Rhian Gwilliam; Fumihiko Takeuchi; William M McLaren; Geoffrey K T Holmes; Peter D Howdle; Julian R F Walters; David S Sanders; Raymond J Playford; Gosia Trynka; Chris J J Mulder; M Luisa Mearin; Wieke H M Verbeek; Valerie Trimble; Fiona M Stevens; Colm O'Morain; Nicholas P Kennedy; Dermot Kelleher; Daniel J Pennington; David P Strachan; Wendy L McArdle; Charles A Mein; Martin C Wapenaar; Panos Deloukas; Ralph McGinnis; Ross McManus; Cisca Wijmenga; David A van Heel

    2008-01-01

    Our genome-wide association study of celiac disease previously identified risk variants in the IL2–IL21 region. To identify additional risk variants, we genotyped 1,020 of the most strongly associated non-HLA markers in an additional 1,643 cases and 3,406 controls. Through joint analysis including the genome-wide association study data (767 cases, 1,422 controls), we identified seven previously unknown risk regions (P <

  16. De novo insertion of an Alu sequence in the coding region of the CLCN5 gene results in Dent's disease

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Felix Claverie-Martin; Hilaria González-Acosta; Carlos Flores; Montserrat Antón-Gamero; Víctor García-Nieto

    2003-01-01

    Dent's disease is an X-linked renal tubular disorder characterized by low-molecular-weight proteinuria, hypercalciuria, nephrocalcinosis, nephrolithiasis, and eventual renal failure. Various types of mutations in the renal chloride channel gene, CLCN5, have been identified in patients with this disease. We studied a Spanish patient with Dent's disease and found, by polymerase chain reaction amplification of the CLCN5 exons, an abnormally large

  17. Gene expression in bovine rumen epithelium during weaning identifies molecular regulators of rumen development and growth.

    PubMed

    Connor, Erin E; Baldwin, Ransom L; Li, Cong-jun; Li, Robert W; Chung, Hoyoung

    2013-03-01

    During weaning, epithelial cell function in the rumen transitions in response to conversion from a pre-ruminant to a true ruminant environment to ensure efficient nutrient absorption and metabolism. To identify gene networks affected by weaning in bovine rumen, Holstein bull calves were fed commercial milk replacer only (MRO) until 42 days of age, then were provided diets of either milk + orchardgrass hay (MH) or milk + grain-based calf starter (MG). Rumen epithelial RNA was extracted from calves sacrificed at four time points: day 14 (n?=?3) and day 42 (n?=?3) of age while fed the MRO diet and day 56 (n?=?3/diet) and day 70 (n?=?3/diet) while fed the MH and MG diets for transcript profiling by microarray hybridization. Five two-group comparisons were made using Permutation Analysis of Differential Expression® to identify differentially expressed genes over time and developmental stage between days 14 and 42 within the MRO diet, between day 42 on the MRO diet and day 56 on the MG or MH diets, and between the MG and MH diets at days 56 and 70. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) of differentially expressed genes during weaning indicated the top 5 gene networks involving molecules participating in lipid metabolism, cell morphology and death, cellular growth and proliferation, molecular transport, and the cell cycle. Putative genes functioning in the establishment of the rumen microbial population and associated rumen epithelial inflammation during weaning were identified. Activation of transcription factor PPAR-? was identified by IPA software as an important regulator of molecular changes in rumen epithelium that function in papillary development and fatty acid oxidation during the transition from pre-rumination to rumination. Thus, molecular markers of rumen development and gene networks regulating differentiation and growth of rumen epithelium were identified for selecting targets and methods for improving and assessing rumen development and function, particularly in the growing calf. PMID:23314861

  18. Transcriptional control of the calreticulin gene in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yuanyuan; Michalak, Marek

    2009-03-01

    Calreticulin is a multifunctional Ca(2+) binding chaperone in the endoplasmic reticulum and expression of the protein is tightly regulated at the transcriptional level. There are two calreticulin genes, named calreticulin-1 and calreticulin-2 gene. The calreticulin-1 promoter contains a number of putative binding sites for transcription factors including tissue specific factors. Direct regulation of the calreticulin-1 promoter by several of these factors has been confirmed experimentally including Nkx2.5, MEF2C, GATA6, PPAR, COUP-TF1 and Evi-1 factors. Studies on calreticulin-deficient mice and transgenic animal models indicate that calreticulin is critical for cardiac development and that expression of the protein must be tightly regulated during cardiogenesis. Moreover, differential expression of calreticulin has been associated with several diseases, including neurodegenerative problems, cancers, autoimmune diseases and wound healing. Understanding the mechanisms responsible for the regulation of expression of calreticulin may contribute to the treatment of many diverse diseases. PMID:18765291

  19. Folate: metabolism, genes, polymorphisms and the associated diseases.

    PubMed

    Nazki, Fakhira Hassan; Sameer, Aga Syed; Ganaie, Bashir Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    Folate being an important vitamin of B Complex group in our diet plays an important role not only in the synthesis of DNA but also in the maintenance of methylation reactions in the cells. Folate metabolism is influenced by several processes especially its dietary intake and the polymorphisms of the associated genes involved. Aberrant folate metabolism, therefore, affects both methylation as well as the DNA synthesis processes, both of which have been implicated in the development of various diseases. This paper reviews the current knowledge of the processes involved in folate metabolism and consequences of deviant folate metabolism, particular emphasis is given to the polymorphic genes which have been implicated in the development of various diseases in humans, like vascular diseases, Down's syndrome, neural tube defects, psychiatric disorders and cancers. PMID:24091066

  20. Genetic variation of oxidative phosphorylation genes in stroke and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Biffi, Alessandro; Sabuncu, Mert R; Desikan, Rahul S; Schmansky, Nick; Salat, David H; Rosand, Jonathan; Anderson, Christopher D

    2014-08-01

    Previous research implicates alterations in oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) in the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We sought to test whether genetic variants within OXPHOS genes increase the risk of AD. We first used gene-set enrichment analysis to identify associations, and then applied a previously replicated stroke genetic risk score to determine if OXPHOS genetic overlap exists between stroke and AD. Gene-set enrichment analysis identified associations between variation in OXPHOS genes and AD versus control status (p = 0.012). Conversion from cognitively normal controls to mild cognitive impairment was also associated with the OXPHOS gene-set (p = 0.045). Subset analyses demonstrated association for complex I genes (p < 0.05), but not for complexes II-V. Among neuroimaging measures, hippocampal volume and entorhinal cortex thickness were associated with OXPHOS genes (all p < 0.025). The stroke genetic risk score demonstrated association with clinical status, baseline and longitudinal imaging measures (p < 0.05). OXPHOS genetic variation influences clinical status and neuroimaging intermediates of AD. OXPHOS genetic variants associated with stroke are also linked to AD progression. Further studies are needed to explore functional consequences of these OXPHOS variants. PMID:24650791

  1. A meta-analysis of lung cancer gene expression identifies PTK7 as a survival gene in lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ron; Khatri, Purvesh; Mazur, Pawel K.; Polin, Melanie; Zheng, Yanyan; Vaka, Dedeepya; Hoang, Chuong D.; Shrager, Joseph; Xu, Yue; Vicent, Silvestre; Butte, Atul; Sweet-Cordero, E. Alejandro

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer remains the most common cause of cancer-related death worldwide and it continues to lack effective treatment. The increasingly large and diverse public databases of lung cancer gene expression constitute a rich source of candidate oncogenic drivers and therapeutic targets. To define novel targets for lung adenocarcinoma (ADC), we conducted a large scale meta-analysis of genes specifically overexpressed in ADC. We identified an eleven-gene signature that was overexpressed consistently in ADC specimens relative to normal lung tissue. Six genes in this signature were specifically overexpressed in ADC relative to other subtypes of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Among these genes was the little studied protein tyrosine kinase PTK7. Immunohistochemical analysis confirmed that PTK7 is highly expressed in primary ADC patient samples. RNAi-mediated attenuation of PTK7 decreased cell viability and increased apoptosis in a subset of ADC cell lines. Further, loss of PTK7 activated the MKK7-JNK stress response pathway and impaired tumor growth in xenotransplantation assays. Our work defines PTK7 as a highly and specifically expressed gene in ADC and a potential therapeutic target in this subset of NSCLC. PMID:24654231

  2. A meta-analysis of lung cancer gene expression identifies PTK7 as a survival gene in lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ron; Khatri, Purvesh; Mazur, Pawel K; Polin, Melanie; Zheng, Yanyan; Vaka, Dedeepya; Hoang, Chuong D; Shrager, Joseph; Xu, Yue; Vicent, Silvestre; Butte, Atul J; Sweet-Cordero, E Alejandro

    2014-05-15

    Lung cancer remains the most common cause of cancer-related death worldwide and it continues to lack effective treatment. The increasingly large and diverse public databases of lung cancer gene expression constitute a rich source of candidate oncogenic drivers and therapeutic targets. To define novel targets for lung adenocarcinoma, we conducted a large-scale meta-analysis of genes specifically overexpressed in adenocarcinoma. We identified an 11-gene signature that was overexpressed consistently in adenocarcinoma specimens relative to normal lung tissue. Six genes in this signature were specifically overexpressed in adenocarcinoma relative to other subtypes of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Among these genes was the little studied protein tyrosine kinase PTK7. Immunohistochemical analysis confirmed that PTK7 is highly expressed in primary adenocarcinoma patient samples. RNA interference-mediated attenuation of PTK7 decreased cell viability and increased apoptosis in a subset of adenocarcinoma cell lines. Further, loss of PTK7 activated the MKK7-JNK stress response pathway and impaired tumor growth in xenotransplantation assays. Our work defines PTK7 as a highly and specifically expressed gene in adenocarcinoma and a potential therapeutic target in this subset of NSCLC. PMID:24654231

  3. Genetic?Genomic Replication to Identify Candidate Mouse Atherosclerosis Modifier Genes

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Jeffrey; Smith, Jonathan D.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Genetics plays a large role in atherosclerosis susceptibility in humans and mice. We attempted to confirm previously determined mouse atherosclerosis?associated loci and use bioinformatics and transcriptomics to create a catalog of candidate atherosclerosis modifier genes at these loci. Methods and Results A strain intercross was performed between AKR and DBA/2 mice on the apoE?/? background generating 166 F2 progeny. Using the phenotype log10 of the aortic root lesion area, we identified 3 suggestive atherosclerosis quantitative trait loci (Ath QTLs). When combined with our prior strain intercross, we confirmed 3 significant Ath QTLs on chromosomes 2, 15, and 17, with combined logarithm of odds scores of 5.9, 5.3, and 5.6, respectively, which each met the genome?wide 5% false discovery rate threshold. We identified all of the protein coding differences between these 2 mouse strains within the Ath QTL intervals. Microarray gene expression profiling was performed on macrophages and endothelial cells from this intercross to identify expression QTLs (eQTLs), the loci that are associated with variation in the expression levels of specific transcripts. Cross tissue eQTLs and macrophage eQTLs that replicated from a prior strain intercross were identified. These bioinformatic and eQTL analyses produced a comprehensive list of candidate genes that may be responsible for the Ath QTLs. Conclusions Replication studies for clinical traits as well as gene expression traits are worthwhile in identifying true versus false genetic associations. We have replicated 3 loci on mouse chromosomes 2, 15, and 17 that are associated with atherosclerosis. We have also identified protein coding differences and multiple replicated eQTLs, which may be useful in the identification of atherosclerosis modifier genes. PMID:23525445

  4. Translating Mendelian and complex inheritance of Alzheimer's disease genes for predicting unique personal genome variants

    PubMed Central

    Regan, Kelly; Wang, Kanix; Doughty, Emily; Li, Haiquan; Li, Jianrong; Lee, Younghee; Kann, Maricel G

    2012-01-01

    Objective Although trait-associated genes identified as complex versus single-gene inheritance differ substantially in odds ratio, the authors nonetheless posit that their mechanistic concordance can reveal fundamental properties of the genetic architecture, allowing the automated interpretation of unique polymorphisms within a personal genome. Materials and methods An analytical method, SPADE-gen, spanning three biological scales was developed to demonstrate the mechanistic concordance between Mendelian and complex inheritance of Alzheimer's disease (AD) genes: biological functions (BP), protein interaction modeling, and protein domain implicated in the disease-associated polymorphism. Results Among Gene Ontology (GO) biological processes (BP) enriched at a false detection rate <5% in 15 AD genes of Mendelian inheritance (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man) and independently in those of complex inheritance (25 host genes of intragenic AD single-nucleotide polymorphisms confirmed in genome-wide association studies), 16 overlapped (empirical p=0.007) and 45 were similar (empirical p<0.009; information theory). SPAN network modeling extended the canonical pathway of AD (KEGG) with 26 new protein interactions (empirical p<0.0001). Discussion The study prioritized new AD-associated biological mechanisms and focused the analysis on previously unreported interactions associated with the biological processes of polymorphisms that affect specific protein domains within characterized AD genes and their direct interactors using (1) concordant GO-BP and (2) domain interactions within STRING protein–protein interactions corresponding to the genomic location of the AD polymorphism (eg, EPHA1, APOE, and CD2AP). Conclusion These results are in line with unique-event polymorphism theory, indicating how disease-associated polymorphisms of Mendelian or complex inheritance relate genetically to those observed as ‘unique personal variants’. They also provide insight for identifying novel targets, for repositioning drugs, and for personal therapeutics. PMID:22319180

  5. Comparative Transcriptional Profiling of the Axolotl Limb Identifies a Tripartite Regeneration-Specific Gene Program

    PubMed Central

    Knapp, Dunja; Schulz, Herbert; Rascon, Cynthia Alexander; Volkmer, Michael; Scholz, Juliane; Nacu, Eugen; Le, Mu; Novozhilov, Sergey; Tazaki, Akira; Protze, Stephanie; Jacob, Tina; Hubner, Norbert; Habermann, Bianca; Tanaka, Elly M.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding how the limb blastema is established after the initial wound healing response is an important aspect of regeneration research. Here we performed parallel expression profile time courses of healing lateral wounds versus amputated limbs in axolotl. This comparison between wound healing and regeneration allowed us to identify amputation-specific genes. By clustering the expression profiles of these samples, we could detect three distinguishable phases of gene expression – early wound healing followed by a transition-phase leading to establishment of the limb development program, which correspond to the three phases of limb regeneration that had been defined by morphological criteria. By focusing on the transition-phase, we identified 93 strictly amputation-associated genes many of which are implicated in oxidative-stress response, chromatin modification, epithelial development or limb development. We further classified the genes based on whether they were or were not significantly expressed in the developing limb bud. The specific localization of 53 selected candidates within the blastema was investigated by in situ hybridization. In summary, we identified a set of genes that are expressed specifically during regeneration and are therefore, likely candidates for the regulation of blastema formation. PMID:23658691

  6. Integrated genomic analyses identify ERRFI1 and TACC3 as glioblastoma-targeted genes

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Cathy A.; Lampson, Benjamin; Chen, William C.; Liu, Jeff; Solomon, David; Waldman, Todd; Towers, Aaron J.; Gregory, Simon G.; McDonald, Kerrie L.; McLendon, Roger E.; Bigner, Darell D.; Yan, Hai

    2010-01-01

    The glioblastoma genome displays remarkable chromosomal aberrations, which harbor critical glioblastoma-specific genes contributing to several oncogenetic pathways. To identify glioblastoma-targeted genes, we completed a multifaceted genome-wide analysis to characterize the most significant aberrations of DNA content occurring in glioblastomas. We performed copy number analysis of 111 glioblastomas by Digital Karyotyping and Illumina BeadChip assays and validated our findings using data from the TCGA (The Cancer Genome Atlas) glioblastoma project. From this study, we identified recurrent focal copy number alterations in 1p36.23 and 4p16.3. Expression analyses of genes located in the two regions revealed genes which are dysregulated in glioblastomas. Specifically, we identify EGFR negative regulator, ERRFI1, within the minimal region of deletion in 1p36.23. In glioblastoma cells with a focal deletion of the ERRFI1 locus, restoration of ERRFI1 expression slowed cell migration. Furthermore, we demonstrate that TACC3, an Aurora-A kinase substrate, on 4p16.3, displays gain of copy number, is overexpressed in a glioma-grade-specific pattern, and correlates with Aurora kinase overexpression in glioblastomas. Our multifaceted genomic evaluation of glioblastoma establishes ERRFI1 as a potential candidate tumor suppressor gene and TACC3 as a potential oncogene, and provides insight on targets for oncogenic pathway-based therapy. PMID:21113414

  7. Identifying Context-Specific Transcription Factor Targets from Prior Knowledge and Gene Expression Data

    PubMed Central

    Fertig, Elana J; Favorov, Alexander V; Ochs, Michael F

    2013-01-01

    Numerous methodologies, assays, and databases presently provide candidate targets of transcription factors (TFs). However, TFs rarely regulate their targets universally. The context of activation of a TF can change the transcriptional response of targets. Direct multiple regulation typical to mammalian genes complicates direct inference of TF targets from gene expression data. We present a novel statistic that infers context-specific TF regulation based upon the CoGAPS algorithm, which infers overlapping gene expression patterns resulting from coregulation. Numerical experiments with simulated data showed that this statistic correctly inferred targets that are common to multiple TFs, except in cases where the signal from a TF is negligible relative to noise level and signal from other TFs. The statistic is robust to moderate levels of error in the simulated gene sets, identifying fewer false positives than false negatives. Significantly, the regulatory statistic refines the number of TF targets relevant to cell signaling in gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) to genes consistent with the phosphorylation patterns of TFs identified in previous studies. As formulated, the proposed regulatory statistic has wide applicability to inferring set membership in integrated datasets. This statistic could be naturally extended to account for prior probabilities of set membership or to add candidate gene targets. PMID:23694699

  8. Systems biology approach to identify transcriptome reprogramming and candidate microRNA targets during the progression of polycystic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is characterized by cyst formation throughout the kidney parenchyma. It is caused by mutations in either of two genes, PKD1 and PKD2. Mice that lack functional Pkd1 (Pkd1-/-), develop rapidly progressive cystic disease during embryogenesis, and serve as a model to study human ADPKD. Genome wide transcriptome reprogramming and the possible roles of micro-RNAs (miRNAs) that affect the initiation and progression of cyst formation in the Pkd1-/- have yet to be studied. miRNAs are small, regulatory non-coding RNAs, implicated in a wide spectrum of biological processes. Their expression levels are altered in several diseases including kidney cancer, diabetic nephropathy and PKD. Results We examined the molecular pathways that modulate renal cyst formation and growth in the Pkd1-/- model by performing global gene-expression profiling in embryonic kidneys at days 14.5 and 17.5. Gene Ontology and gene set enrichment analysis were used to identify overrepresented signaling pathways in Pkd1-/- kidneys. We found dysregulation of developmental, metabolic, and signaling pathways (e.g. Wnt, calcium, TGF-? and MAPK) in Pkd1-/- kidneys. Using a comparative transcriptomics approach, we determined similarities and differences with human ADPKD: ~50% overlap at the pathway level among the mis-regulated pathways was observed. By using computational approaches (TargetScan, miRanda, microT and miRDB), we then predicted miRNAs that were suggested to target the differentially expressed mRNAs. Differential expressions of 9 candidate miRNAs, miRs-10a, -30a-5p, -96, -126-5p, -182, -200a, -204, -429 and -488, and 16 genes were confirmed by qPCR. In addition, 14 candidate miRNA:mRNA reciprocal interactions were predicted. Several of the highly regulated genes and pathways were predicted as targets of miRNAs. Conclusions We have described global transcriptional reprogramming during the progression of PKD in the Pkd1-/- model. We propose a model for the cascade of signaling events involved in cyst formation and growth. Our results suggest that several miRNAs may be involved in regulating signaling pathways in ADPKD. We further describe novel putative miRNA:mRNA signatures in ADPKD, which will provide additional insights into the pathogenesis of this common genetic disease in humans. PMID:21518438

  9. Global Gene-Expression Analysis to Identify Differentially Expressed Genes Critical for the Heat Stress Response in Brassica rapa

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Xiangshu; Yi, Hankuil; Lee, Jeongyeo; Nou, Ill-Sup; Han, Ching-Tack; Hur, Yoonkang

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide dissection of the heat stress response (HSR) is necessary to overcome problems in crop production caused by global warming. To identify HSR genes, we profiled gene expression in two Chinese cabbage inbred lines with different thermotolerances, Chiifu and Kenshin. Many genes exhibited >2-fold changes in expression upon exposure to 0.5– 4 h at 45°C (high temperature, HT): 5.2% (2,142 genes) in Chiifu and 3.7% (1,535 genes) in Kenshin. The most enriched GO (Gene Ontology) items included ‘response to heat’, ‘response to reactive oxygen species (ROS)’, ‘response to temperature stimulus’, ‘response to abiotic stimulus’, and ‘MAPKKK cascade’. In both lines, the genes most highly induced by HT encoded small heat shock proteins (Hsps) and heat shock factor (Hsf)-like proteins such as HsfB2A (Bra029292), whereas high-molecular weight Hsps were constitutively expressed. Other upstream HSR components were also up-regulated: ROS-scavenging genes like glutathione peroxidase 2 (BrGPX2, Bra022853), protein kinases, and phosphatases. Among heat stress (HS) marker genes in Arabidopsis, only exportin 1A (XPO1A) (Bra008580, Bra006382) can be applied to B. rapa for basal thermotolerance (BT) and short-term acquired thermotolerance (SAT) gene. CYP707A3 (Bra025083, Bra021965), which is involved in the dehydration response in Arabidopsis, was associated with membrane leakage in both lines following HS. Although many transcription factors (TF) genes, including DREB2A (Bra005852), were involved in HS tolerance in both lines, Bra024224 (MYB41) and Bra021735 (a bZIP/AIR1 [Anthocyanin-Impaired-Response-1]) were specific to Kenshin. Several candidate TFs involved in thermotolerance were confirmed as HSR genes by real-time PCR, and these assignments were further supported by promoter analysis. Although some of our findings are similar to those obtained using other plant species, clear differences in Brassica rapa reveal a distinct HSR in this species. Our data could also provide a springboard for developing molecular markers of HS and for engineering HS tolerant B. rapa. PMID:26102990

  10. Global Gene-Expression Analysis to Identify Differentially Expressed Genes Critical for the Heat Stress Response in Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xiangshu; Yi, Hankuil; Lee, Jeongyeo; Nou, Ill-Sup; Han, Ching-Tack; Hur, Yoonkang

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide dissection of the heat stress response (HSR) is necessary to overcome problems in crop production caused by global warming. To identify HSR genes, we profiled gene expression in two Chinese cabbage inbred lines with different thermotolerances, Chiifu and Kenshin. Many genes exhibited >2-fold changes in expression upon exposure to 0.5- 4 h at 45°C (high temperature, HT): 5.2% (2,142 genes) in Chiifu and 3.7% (1,535 genes) in Kenshin. The most enriched GO (Gene Ontology) items included 'response to heat', 'response to reactive oxygen species (ROS)', 'response to temperature stimulus', 'response to abiotic stimulus', and 'MAPKKK cascade'. In both lines, the genes most highly induced by HT encoded small heat shock proteins (Hsps) and heat shock factor (Hsf)-like proteins such as HsfB2A (Bra029292), whereas high-molecular weight Hsps were constitutively expressed. Other upstream HSR components were also up-regulated: ROS-scavenging genes like glutathione peroxidase 2 (BrGPX2, Bra022853), protein kinases, and phosphatases. Among heat stress (HS) marker genes in Arabidopsis, only exportin 1A (XPO1A) (Bra008580, Bra006382) can be applied to B. rapa for basal thermotolerance (BT) and short-term acquired thermotolerance (SAT) gene. CYP707A3 (Bra025083, Bra021965), which is involved in the dehydration response in Arabidopsis, was associated with membrane leakage in both lines following HS. Although many transcription factors (TF) genes, including DREB2A (Bra005852), were involved in HS tolerance in both lines, Bra024224 (MYB41) and Bra021735 (a bZIP/AIR1 [Anthocyanin-Impaired-Response-1]) were specific to Kenshin. Several candidate TFs involved in thermotolerance were confirmed as HSR genes by real-time PCR, and these assignments were further supported by promoter analysis. Although some of our findings are similar to those obtained using other plant species, clear differences in Brassica rapa reveal a distinct HSR in this species. Our data could also provide a springboard for developing molecular markers of HS and for engineering HS tolerant B. rapa. PMID:26102990

  11. The ABCA subfamily—gene and protein structures, functions and associated hereditary diseases

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Christiane Albrecht; Enrique Viturro

    2007-01-01

    To date, 12 members of the human ABCA subfamily are identified. They share a high degree of sequence conservation and have\\u000a been mostly related with lipid trafficking in a wide range of body locations. Mutations in some of these genes have been described\\u000a to cause severe hereditary diseases related with lipid transport, such as fatal surfactant deficiency or harlequin ichthyosis.

  12. Gene transfer for neurologic disease: agencies, policies, and process.

    PubMed

    Mendell, Jerry R; Miller, Andra

    2004-12-28

    Advances in molecular biology have contributed to a growing interest in gene therapy as a form of management for neurologic diseases. However, implementation requires knowledge of the regulatory policies governing this field of research, especially in view of the greater stringency imposed by the serious adverse events affecting some patients participating in gene therapy protocols. Educational resources for neurologists, or any clinicians, who hope to serve as potential principal investigators for a gene therapy protocol are not available through any single source, requiring considerable effort to discover appropriate guidance. Summarized here are the regulatory agencies and their requirements, the phases of clinical development with emphasis on a Phase I study, and specific steps leading to an Investigational New Drug application for a biologic product to be used in a gene therapy clinical trial. The links provided to all appropriate Web sites will facilitate the process for the clinician investigator. PMID:15623678

  13. Likelihood methods for locating disease genes in nonequilibrium populations.

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, N L; Hill, W G; Weir, B S

    1995-01-01

    Until recently, attempts to map disease genes on the basis of population associations with linked markers have been based on expected values of linkage disequilibrium. These methods suffer from the large variances imposed on disequilibrium measures by the evolutionary process, but a more serious problem for many diseases is that they assume an equilibrium population. For diseases that arose only a few hundred generations ago, it is more appropriate to concentrate on the initial growth phase of the disease. We invoke a Poisson branching process for this early growth, and estimate the likelihood for the recombination fraction between marker and disease loci, on the basis of simulated disease populations. The limits of the resulting support intervals for the recombination fraction vary inversely with the age of the disease in generations. We illustrate the procedure with data on cystic fibrosis and diastrophic dysplasia, for which the method appears appropriate, and for Friedreich ataxia and Huntington disease, for which it does not. A valuable aspect of the method is the ability in some cases to compare likelihoods of the three orders for a disease locus and two linked marker loci. PMID:7825575

  14. Targeted sequencing of the Paget's disease associated 14q32 locus identifies several missense coding variants in RIN3 that predispose to Paget's disease of bone

    PubMed Central

    Vallet, Mahéva; Soares, Dinesh C.; Wani, Sachin; Sophocleous, Antonia; Warner, Jon; Salter, Donald M.; Ralston, Stuart H.; Albagha, Omar M.E.

    2015-01-01

    Paget's disease of bone (PDB) is a common disorder with a strong genetic component characterized by increased but disorganized bone remodelling. Previous genome-wide association studies identified a locus on chromosome 14q32 tagged by rs10498635 which was significantly associated with susceptibility to PDB in several European populations. Here we conducted fine-mapping and targeted sequencing of the candidate locus to identify possible functional variants. Imputation in 741 PDB patients and 2699 controls confirmed that the association was confined to a 60 kb region in the RIN3 gene and conditional analysis adjusting for rs10498635 identified no new independent signals. Sequencing of the RIN3 gene identified a common missense variant (p.R279C) that was strongly associated with the disease (OR = 0.64; P = 1.4 × 10?9), and was in strong linkage disequilibrium with rs10498635. A further 13 rare missense variants were identified, seven of which were novel and detected only in PDB cases. When combined, these rare variants were over-represented in cases compared with controls (OR = 3.72; P = 8.9 × 10?10). Most rare variants were located in a region that encodes a proline-rich, intrinsically disordered domain of the protein and many were predicted to be pathogenic. RIN3 was expressed in bone tissue and its expression level was ?10-fold higher in osteoclasts compared with osteoblasts. We conclude that susceptibility to PDB at the 14q32 locus is mediated by a combination of common and rare coding variants in RIN3 and suggest that RIN3 may contribute to PDB susceptibility by affecting osteoclast function. PMID:25701875

  15. Subtractive hybridization analysis of gastric diseases-associated Helicobacter pylori identifies peptidyl-prolyl isomerase as a potential marker for gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yue-Hua; Chen, Moye; Xu, Ying; Dong, Nannan; Sang, Zhikun; Liu, Jun; Yuan, Yuan

    2011-07-01

    Helicobacter pylori, a microaerophilic Gram-negative bacterium, is known to cause chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer and gastric cancer. Genes that are present in certain isolates may determine strain-specific traits such as disease association and drug resistance. In order to understand the pathogenic mechanisms of gastric diseases, identify molecular markers of the diseases associated with H. pylori strains and provide clues for target treatment of H. pylori-related diseases, a subtracted DNA library was constructed from a gastric cancer-associated H. pylori strain and a superficial gastritis-associated H. pylori strain by suppression subtractive hybridization. The presence of gastric cancer-specific genes was identified by dot blot hybridization, DNA sequencing and PCR-based screening. Twelve gastric cancer-specific high-copy genes and nine low-copy genes were found in gastric cancer compared with the superficial gastritis strain. These genes were confirmed by PCR analysis of H. pylori isolates. Notably, peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase (PPIase) was detected positively in 11 out of 22 (50%) gastric cancer-associated H. pylori strains. In contrast, <24% of the H. pylori strains from superficial gastritis showed positive results. Given the potential role of PPIases in cell growth, apoptosis and oncogenic transformation, our results suggest that PPIase may represent a novel marker and potential therapeutic target for gastric cancer. PMID:21535099

  16. Use of recombinant congenic and congenic strains of NOD mice to identify a new insulin-dependent diabetes resistance gene

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) in NOD/Lt mice represents a complex polygenic disease. NOR/Lt is a recombinant congenic strain (RCS) in which limited regions of the NOD/Lt genome have been replaced by genome from the C57BL/KsJ strain. NOR mice are insulitis resistant and diabetes free despite genetic identity with NOD at numerous chromosomal regions containing previously described insulin-dependent diabetes (Idd) genes, including the strongly diabetogenic H2g7 major histocompatibility complex (MHC) haplotype. The present study revealed BKs-derived genome on segments of chromosomes (Chr) 1, 2, 4, 5, 7, 11, 12, and 18, approximating 11.6% of the total NOR genome analyzed. (NOD x NOR)F2 segregation analysis was employed to identify chromosomal regions in NOR containing Idd resistance alleles. IDDM developed in 33% (10/30) of F1 females, and 29.3% (36/123) of F2 females aged to 1 yr. A previously unrecognized diabetes resistance locus (designated Idd13r) strongly protective in homozygous state was identified on NOR Chr 2 in linkage with the Il1 alpha structural gene. The existence of this locus was confirmed by construction of a NOD stock congenic for NOR-derived markers on Chr 2. Our analysis shows the utility of RCS and congenic stocks for the identification and isolation of non-MHC genes with strong antidiabetogenic functions. PMID:7931087

  17. ellipsoidFN: a tool for identifying a heterogeneous set of cancer biomarkers based on gene expressions.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xianwen; Wang, Yong; Chen, Luonan; Zhang, Xiang-Sun; Jin, Qi

    2013-02-01

    Computationally identifying effective biomarkers for cancers from gene expression profiles is an important and challenging task. The challenge lies in the complicated pathogenesis of cancers that often involve the dysfunction of many genes and regulatory interactions. Thus, sophisticated classification model is in pressing need. In this study, we proposed an efficient approach, called ellipsoidFN (ellipsoid Feature Net), to model the disease complexity by ellipsoids and seek a set of heterogeneous biomarkers. Our approach achieves a non-linear classification scheme for the mixed samples by the ellipsoid concept, and at the same time uses a linear programming framework to efficiently select biomarkers from high-dimensional space. ellipsoidFN reduces the redundancy and improves the complementariness between the identified biomarkers, thus significantly enhancing the distinctiveness between cancers and normal samples, and even between cancer types. Numerical evaluation on real prostate cancer, breast cancer and leukemia gene expression datasets suggested that ellipsoidFN outperforms the state-of-the-art biomarker identification methods, and it can serve as a useful tool for cancer biomarker identification in the future. The Matlab code of ellipsoidFN is freely available from http://doc.aporc.org/wiki/EllipsoidFN. PMID:23262226

  18. Gene from a novel plant virus satellite from grapevine identifies a viral satellite lineage

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have identified the genome of a novel viral satellite in deep sequence analysis of double-stranded RNA from grapevine. The genome was 1,060 bases in length, and encoded two open reading frames. Neither frame was related to any known plant virus gene. But translation of the longer frame showed ...

  19. Combining phylogenetic data with co-regulated genes to identify regulatory motifs

    Microsoft Academic Search

    Ting Wang; Gary D. Stormo

    2003-01-01

    Motivation: Discovery of regulatory motifs in unaligned DNA sequences remains a fundamenta