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Sample records for identifying disease genes

  1. Identifying disease genes by integrating multiple data sources

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Now multiple types of data are available for identifying disease genes. Those data include gene-disease associations, disease phenotype similarities, protein-protein interactions, pathways, gene expression profiles, etc.. It is believed that integrating different kinds of biological data is an effective method to identify disease genes. Results In this paper, we propose a multiple data integration method based on the theory of Markov random field (MRF) and the method of Bayesian analysis for identifying human disease genes. The proposed method is not only flexible in easily incorporating different kinds of data, but also reliable in predicting candidate disease genes. Conclusions Numerical experiments are carried out by integrating known gene-disease associations, protein complexes, protein-protein interactions, pathways and gene expression profiles. Predictions are evaluated by the leave-one-out method. The proposed method achieves an AUC score of 0.743 when integrating all those biological data in our experiments. PMID:25350511

  2. Identifying Relationships among Genomic Disease Regions: Predicting Genes at Pathogenic SNP Associations and Rare Deletions

    E-print Network

    Daly, Mark J.

    Translating a set of disease regions into insight about pathogenic mechanisms requires not only the ability to identify the key disease genes within them, but also the biological relationships among those key genes. Here ...

  3. Genes to Diseases (G2D) Computational Method to Identify Asthma Candidate Genes

    PubMed Central

    Tremblay, Karine; Lemire, Mathieu; Potvin, Camille; Tremblay, Alexandre; Hunninghake, Gary M.; Raby, Benjamin A.; Hudson, Thomas J.; Perez-Iratxeta, Carolina; Andrade-Navarro, Miguel A.; Laprise, Catherine

    2008-01-01

    Asthma is a complex trait for which different strategies have been used to identify its environmental and genetic predisposing factors. Here, we describe a novel methodological approach to select candidate genes for asthma genetic association studies. In this regard, the Genes to Diseases (G2D) computational tool has been used in combination with a genome-wide scan performed in a sub-sample of the Saguenay?Lac-St-Jean (SLSJ) asthmatic familial collection (n?=?609) to identify candidate genes located in two suggestive loci shown to be linked with asthma (6q26) and atopy (10q26.3), and presenting differential parent-of-origin effects. This approach combined gene selection based on the G2D data mining analysis of the bibliographic and protein public databases, or according to the genes already known to be associated with the same or a similar phenotype. Ten genes (LPA, NOX3, SNX9, VIL2, VIP, ADAM8, DOCK1, FANK1, GPR123 and PTPRE) were selected for a subsequent association study performed in a large SLSJ sample (n?=?1167) of individuals tested for asthma and atopy related phenotypes. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (n?=?91) within the candidate genes were genotyped and analysed using a family-based association test. The results suggest a protective association to allergic asthma for PTPRE rs7081735 in the SLSJ sample (p?=?0.000463; corrected p?=?0.0478). This association has not been replicated in the Childhood Asthma Management Program (CAMP) cohort. Sequencing of the regions around rs7081735 revealed additional polymorphisms, but additional genotyping did not yield new associations. These results demonstrate that the G2D tool can be useful in the selection of candidate genes located in chromosomal regions linked to a complex trait. PMID:18682798

  4. Identifying and prioritizing disease-related genes based on the network topological features.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhan-Chao; Lai, Yan-Hua; Chen, Li-Li; Xie, Yun; Dai, Zong; Zou, Xiao-Yong

    2014-08-23

    Identifying and prioritizing disease-related genes are the most important steps for understanding the pathogenesis and discovering the therapeutic targets. The experimental examination of these genes is very expensive and laborious, and usually has a higher false positive rate. Therefore, it is highly desirable to develop computational methods for the identification and prioritization of disease-related genes. In this study, we develop a powerful method to identify and prioritize candidate disease genes. The novel network topological features with local and global information are proposed and adopted to characterize genes. The performance of these novel features is verified based on the 10-fold cross-validation test and leave-one-out cross-validation test. The proposed features are compared with the published features, and fused strategy is investigated by combining the current features with the published features. And, these combination features are also utilized to identify and prioritize Parkinson's disease-related genes. The results indicate that identified genes are highly related to some molecular process and biological function, which provides new clues for researching pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease. The source code of Matlab is freely available on request from the authors. PMID:25183318

  5. IDENTIFYING DISEASE RESISTANCE GENES AND PATHWAYS THROUGH HOST-PATHOGEN PROTEIN INTERACTIONS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A major objective of both animal and plant genomics research is to identify disease resistance genes and pathways. Popular approaches to achieve this goal include candidate gene testing, genome-wide QTL screens, and DNA microarrays. We argue that the two-hybrid assay, which detects protein-protein...

  6. A fast and high performance multiple data integration algorithm for identifying human disease genes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Integrating multiple data sources is indispensable in improving disease gene identification. It is not only due to the fact that disease genes associated with similar genetic diseases tend to lie close with each other in various biological networks, but also due to the fact that gene-disease associations are complex. Although various algorithms have been proposed to identify disease genes, their prediction performances and the computational time still should be further improved. Results In this study, we propose a fast and high performance multiple data integration algorithm for identifying human disease genes. A posterior probability of each candidate gene associated with individual diseases is calculated by using a Bayesian analysis method and a binary logistic regression model. Two prior probability estimation strategies and two feature vector construction methods are developed to test the performance of the proposed algorithm. Conclusions The proposed algorithm is not only generated predictions with high AUC scores, but also runs very fast. When only a single PPI network is employed, the AUC score is 0.769 by using F2 as feature vectors. The average running time for each leave-one-out experiment is only around 1.5 seconds. When three biological networks are integrated, the AUC score using F3 as feature vectors increases to 0.830, and the average running time for each leave-one-out experiment takes only about 12.54 seconds. It is better than many existing algorithms. PMID:26399620

  7. De Novo Transcriptome Sequencing of Oryza officinalis Wall ex Watt to Identify Disease-Resistance Genes

    PubMed Central

    He, Bin; Gu, Yinghong; Tao, Xiang; Cheng, Xiaojie; Wei, Changhe; Fu, Jian; Cheng, Zaiquan; Zhang, Yizheng

    2015-01-01

    Oryza officinalis Wall ex Watt is one of the most important wild relatives of cultivated rice and exhibits high resistance to many diseases. It has been used as a source of genes for introgression into cultivated rice. However, there are limited genomic resources and little genetic information publicly reported for this species. To better understand the pathways and factors involved in disease resistance and accelerating the process of rice breeding, we carried out a de novo transcriptome sequencing of O. officinalis. In this research, 137,229 contigs were obtained ranging from 200 to 19,214 bp with an N50 of 2331 bp through de novo assembly of leaves, stems and roots in O. officinalis using an Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform. Based on sequence similarity searches against a non-redundant protein database, a total of 88,249 contigs were annotated with gene descriptions and 75,589 transcripts were further assigned to GO terms. Candidate genes for plant–pathogen interaction and plant hormones regulation pathways involved in disease-resistance were identified. Further analyses of gene expression profiles showed that the majority of genes related to disease resistance were all expressed in the three tissues. In addition, there are two kinds of rice bacterial blight-resistant genes in O. officinalis, including two Xa1 genes and three Xa26 genes. All 2 Xa1 genes showed the highest expression level in stem, whereas one of Xa26 was expressed dominantly in leaf and other 2 Xa26 genes displayed low expression level in all three tissues. This transcriptomic database provides an opportunity for identifying the genes involved in disease-resistance and will provide a basis for studying functional genomics of O. officinalis and genetic improvement of cultivated rice in the future. PMID:26690414

  8. De Novo Transcriptome Sequencing of Oryza officinalis Wall ex Watt to Identify Disease-Resistance Genes.

    PubMed

    He, Bin; Gu, Yinghong; Tao, Xiang; Cheng, Xiaojie; Wei, Changhe; Fu, Jian; Cheng, Zaiquan; Zhang, Yizheng

    2015-01-01

    Oryza officinalis Wall ex Watt is one of the most important wild relatives of cultivated rice and exhibits high resistance to many diseases. It has been used as a source of genes for introgression into cultivated rice. However, there are limited genomic resources and little genetic information publicly reported for this species. To better understand the pathways and factors involved in disease resistance and accelerating the process of rice breeding, we carried out a de novo transcriptome sequencing of O. officinalis. In this research, 137,229 contigs were obtained ranging from 200 to 19,214 bp with an N50 of 2331 bp through de novo assembly of leaves, stems and roots in O. officinalis using an Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform. Based on sequence similarity searches against a non-redundant protein database, a total of 88,249 contigs were annotated with gene descriptions and 75,589 transcripts were further assigned to GO terms. Candidate genes for plant-pathogen interaction and plant hormones regulation pathways involved in disease-resistance were identified. Further analyses of gene expression profiles showed that the majority of genes related to disease resistance were all expressed in the three tissues. In addition, there are two kinds of rice bacterial blight-resistant genes in O. officinalis, including two Xa1 genes and three Xa26 genes. All 2 Xa1 genes showed the highest expression level in stem, whereas one of Xa26 was expressed dominantly in leaf and other 2 Xa26 genes displayed low expression level in all three tissues. This transcriptomic database provides an opportunity for identifying the genes involved in disease-resistance and will provide a basis for studying functional genomics of O. officinalis and genetic improvement of cultivated rice in the future. PMID:26690414

  9. A validated gene regulatory network and GWAS identifies early regulators of T cell-associated diseases.

    PubMed

    Gustafsson, Mika; Gawel, Danuta R; Alfredsson, Lars; Baranzini, Sergio; Björkander, Janne; Blomgran, Robert; Hellberg, Sandra; Eklund, Daniel; Ernerudh, Jan; Kockum, Ingrid; Konstantinell, Aelita; Lahesmaa, Riita; Lentini, Antonio; Liljenström, H Robert I; Mattson, Lina; Matussek, Andreas; Mellergård, Johan; Mendez, Melissa; Olsson, Tomas; Pujana, Miguel A; Rasool, Omid; Serra-Musach, Jordi; Stenmarker, Margaretha; Tripathi, Subhash; Viitala, Miro; Wang, Hui; Zhang, Huan; Nestor, Colm E; Benson, Mikael

    2015-11-11

    Early regulators of disease may increase understanding of disease mechanisms and serve as markers for presymptomatic diagnosis and treatment. However, early regulators are difficult to identify because patients generally present after they are symptomatic. We hypothesized that early regulators of T cell-associated diseases could be found by identifying upstream transcription factors (TFs) in T cell differentiation and by prioritizing hub TFs that were enriched for disease-associated polymorphisms. A gene regulatory network (GRN) was constructed by time series profiling of the transcriptomes and methylomes of human CD4(+) T cells during in vitro differentiation into four helper T cell lineages, in combination with sequence-based TF binding predictions. The TFs GATA3, MAF, and MYB were identified as early regulators and validated by ChIP-seq (chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing) and small interfering RNA knockdowns. Differential mRNA expression of the TFs and their targets in T cell-associated diseases supports their clinical relevance. To directly test if the TFs were altered early in disease, T cells from patients with two T cell-mediated diseases, multiple sclerosis and seasonal allergic rhinitis, were analyzed. Strikingly, the TFs were differentially expressed during asymptomatic stages of both diseases, whereas their targets showed altered expression during symptomatic stages. This analytical strategy to identify early regulators of disease by combining GRNs with genome-wide association studies may be generally applicable for functional and clinical studies of early disease development. PMID:26560356

  10. Genes that Affect Brain Structure and Function Identified by Rare Variant Analyses of Mendelian Neurologic Disease.

    PubMed

    Karaca, Ender; Harel, Tamar; Pehlivan, Davut; Jhangiani, Shalini N; Gambin, Tomasz; Coban Akdemir, Zeynep; Gonzaga-Jauregui, Claudia; Erdin, Serkan; Bayram, Yavuz; Campbell, Ian M; Hunter, Jill V; Atik, Mehmed M; Van Esch, Hilde; Yuan, Bo; Wiszniewski, Wojciech; Isikay, Sedat; Yesil, Gozde; Yuregir, Ozge O; Tug Bozdogan, Sevcan; Aslan, Huseyin; Aydin, Hatip; Tos, Tulay; Aksoy, Ayse; De Vivo, Darryl C; Jain, Preti; Geckinli, B Bilge; Sezer, Ozlem; Gul, Davut; Durmaz, Burak; Cogulu, Ozgur; Ozkinay, Ferda; Topcu, Vehap; Candan, Sukru; Cebi, Alper Han; Ikbal, Mevlit; Yilmaz Gulec, Elif; Gezdirici, Alper; Koparir, Erkan; Ekici, Fatma; Coskun, Salih; Cicek, Salih; Karaer, Kadri; Koparir, Asuman; Duz, Mehmet Bugrahan; Kirat, Emre; Fenercioglu, Elif; Ulucan, Hakan; Seven, Mehmet; Guran, Tulay; Elcioglu, Nursel; Yildirim, Mahmut Selman; Aktas, Dilek; Alika?ifo?lu, Mehmet; Ture, Mehmet; Yakut, Tahsin; Overton, John D; Yuksel, Adnan; Ozen, Mustafa; Muzny, Donna M; Adams, David R; Boerwinkle, Eric; Chung, Wendy K; Gibbs, Richard A; Lupski, James R

    2015-11-01

    Development of the human nervous system involves complex interactions among fundamental cellular processes and requires a multitude of genes, many of which remain to be associated with human disease. We applied whole exome sequencing to 128 mostly consanguineous families with neurogenetic disorders that often included brain malformations. Rare variant analyses for both single nucleotide variant (SNV) and copy number variant (CNV) alleles allowed for identification of 45 novel variants in 43 known disease genes, 41 candidate genes, and CNVs in 10 families, with an overall potential molecular cause identified in >85% of families studied. Among the candidate genes identified, we found PRUNE, VARS, and DHX37 in multiple families and homozygous loss-of-function variants in AGBL2, SLC18A2, SMARCA1, UBQLN1, and CPLX1. Neuroimaging and in silico analysis of functional and expression proximity between candidate and known disease genes allowed for further understanding of genetic networks underlying specific types of brain malformations. VIDEO ABSTRACT. PMID:26539891

  11. Genetic similarity between cancers and comorbid Mendelian diseases identifies candidate driver genes

    PubMed Central

    Melamed, Rachel D.; Emmett, Kevin J.; Madubata, Chioma; Rzhetsky, Andrey; Rabadan, Raul

    2015-01-01

    Despite large-scale cancer genomics studies, key somatic mutations driving cancer, and their functional roles, remain elusive. Here we propose that analysis of comorbidities of Mendelian diseases with cancers provides a novel, systematic way to discover new cancer genes. If germline genetic variation in Mendelian loci predisposes bearers to common cancers, the same loci may harbor cancer-associated somatic variation. Compilations of clinical records spanning over 100 million patients provide an unprecedented opportunity to assess clinical associations between Mendelian diseases and cancers. We systematically compare these comorbidities against recurrent somatic mutations from more than five thousand patients across many cancers. Using multiple measures of genetic similarity, we show that a Mendelian disease and comorbid cancer indeed have genetic alterations of significant functional similarity. This result provides a basis to identify candidate drivers in cancers including melanoma and glioblastoma. Some Mendelian diseases demonstrate “pan-cancer” comorbidity and shared genetics across cancers. PMID:25926297

  12. Integrated analysis of differential gene expression profiles in hippocampi to identify candidate genes involved in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wanhua; Lin, Xiaodong; Chen, Kelong

    2015-11-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a complex neurodegenerative disorder with largely unknown genetic mechanisms. Identifying altered neuronal gene expression in AD may provide diagnostic or therapeutic targets for AD. The present study aimed to identify differentially expressed genes (DEGs) and their further association with other biological processes that regulate causative factors for AD. The present study performed an integrated analysis of publicly available gene expression omnibus datasets of AD hippocampi. Gene ontology (GO) enrichment analyses, Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway analysis and Protein?Protein interaction (PPI) network analysis were performed. The present study detected 295 DEGs (109 upregulated and 186 downregulated genes) in hippocampi between AD and control samples by integrating four datasets of gene expression profiles of hippocampi of patients with AD. Respiratory electron transport chain (GO: 0022904; P=1.64x10?11) was the most significantly enriched GO term among biological processes, while for molecular functions, the most significantly enriched GO term was that of protein binding (GO: 0005515; P=3.03x10?29), and for cellular components, the most significantly enriched GO term was that of the cytoplasm (GO: 0005737; P=8.67x10?33). The most signi?cant pathway in the KEGG analysis was oxidative phosphorylation (P=1.61x10?13). PPI network analysis showed that the significant hub proteins contained ?-actin (degree, 268), hepatoma-derived growth factor (degree, 218) and WD repeat?containing protein 82 (degree, 87). The integrated analysis performed in the present study serves as a basis for identifying novel drug targets to develop improved therapies and interventions for common and devastating neurological diseases such as AD. PMID:26324066

  13. Large-Scale Gene-Centric Analysis Identifies Novel Variants for Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) has a significant genetic contribution that is incompletely characterized. To complement genome-wide association (GWA) studies, we conducted a large and systematic candidate gene study of CAD susceptibility, including analysis of many uncommon and functional variants. We examined 49,094 genetic variants in ?2,100 genes of cardiovascular relevance, using a customised gene array in 15,596 CAD cases and 34,992 controls (11,202 cases and 30,733 controls of European descent; 4,394 cases and 4,259 controls of South Asian origin). We attempted to replicate putative novel associations in an additional 17,121 CAD cases and 40,473 controls. Potential mechanisms through which the novel variants could affect CAD risk were explored through association tests with vascular risk factors and gene expression. We confirmed associations of several previously known CAD susceptibility loci (eg, 9p21.3:p<10?33; LPA:p<10?19; 1p13.3:p<10?17) as well as three recently discovered loci (COL4A1/COL4A2, ZC3HC1, CYP17A1:p<5×10?7). However, we found essentially null results for most previously suggested CAD candidate genes. In our replication study of 24 promising common variants, we identified novel associations of variants in or near LIPA, IL5, TRIB1, and ABCG5/ABCG8, with per-allele odds ratios for CAD risk with each of the novel variants ranging from 1.06–1.09. Associations with variants at LIPA, TRIB1, and ABCG5/ABCG8 were supported by gene expression data or effects on lipid levels. Apart from the previously reported variants in LPA, none of the other ?4,500 low frequency and functional variants showed a strong effect. Associations in South Asians did not differ appreciably from those in Europeans, except for 9p21.3 (per-allele odds ratio: 1.14 versus 1.27 respectively; P for heterogeneity?=?0.003). This large-scale gene-centric analysis has identified several novel genes for CAD that relate to diverse biochemical and cellular functions and clarified the literature with regard to many previously suggested genes. PMID:21966275

  14. Integrated immunogenomics in the chicken: Deciphering the immune response to identify disease resistance genes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Resistance to infection takes place at many levels, and involves both non-specific and specific immune mechanisms. The chicken has a different repertoire of immune genes, molecules, cells and organs compared to mammals. To understand the role of any disease resistance gene(s), it is therefore impo...

  15. Peripheral blood gene expression patterns discriminate among chronic inflammatory diseases and healthy controls and identify novel targets

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Chronic inflammatory diseases including inflammatory bowel disease (IBD; Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis), psoriasis and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) afflict millions of people worldwide, but their pathogenesis is still not well understood. It is also not well known if distinct changes in gene expression characterize these diseases and if these patterns can discriminate between diseased and control patients and/or stratify the disease. The main focus of our work was the identification of novel markers that overlap among the 3 diseases or discriminate them from each other. Methods Diseased (n = 13, n = 15 and n = 12 in IBD, psoriasis and RA respectively) and healthy patients (n = 18) were recruited based on strict inclusion and exclusion criteria; peripheral blood samples were collected by clinicians (30 ml) in Venous Blood Vacuum Collection Tubes containing EDTA and peripheral blood mononuclear cells were separated by Ficoll gradient centrifugation. RNA was extracted using Trizol reagent. Gene expression data was obtained using TaqMan Low Density Array (TLDA) containing 96 genes that were selected by an algorithm and the statistical analyses were performed in Prism by using non-parametric Mann-Whitney U test (P-values < 0.05). Results Here we show that using a panel of 96 disease associated genes and measuring mRNA expression levels in peripheral blood derived mononuclear cells; we could identify disease-specific gene panels that separate each disease from healthy controls. In addition, a panel of five genes such as ADM, AQP9, CXCL2, IL10 and NAMPT discriminates between all samples from patients with chronic inflammation and healthy controls. We also found genes that stratify the diseases and separate different subtypes or different states of prognosis in each condition. Conclusions These findings and the identification of five universal markers of chronic inflammation suggest that these diseases have a common background in pathomechanism, but still can be separated by peripheral blood gene expression. Importantly, the identified genes can be associated with overlapping biological processes including changed inflammatory response. Gene panels based on such markers can play a major role in the development of personalized medicine, in monitoring disease progression and can lead to the identification of new potential drug targets in chronic inflammation. PMID:20444268

  16. Disease-Targeted Sequencing of Ion Channel Genes identifies de novo mutations in Patients with Non-Familial Brugada Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Juang, Jyh-Ming Jimmy; Lu, Tzu-Pin; Lai, Liang-Chuan; Ho, Chia-Chuan; Liu, Yen-Bin; Tsai, Chia-Ti; Lin, Lian-Yu; Yu, Chih-Chieh; Chen, Wen-Jone; Chiang, Fu-Tien; Yeh, Shih-Fan Sherri; Lai, Ling-Ping; Chuang, Eric Y.; Lin, Jiunn-Lee

    2014-01-01

    Brugada syndrome (BrS) is one of the ion channelopathies associated with sudden cardiac death (SCD). The most common BrS-associated gene (SCN5A) only accounts for approximately 20–25% of BrS patients. This study aims to identify novel mutations across human ion channels in non-familial BrS patients without SCN5A variants through disease-targeted sequencing. We performed disease-targeted multi-gene sequencing across 133 human ion channel genes and 12 reported BrS-associated genes in 15 unrelated, non-familial BrS patients without SCN5A variants. Candidate variants were validated by mass spectrometry and Sanger sequencing. Five de novo mutations were identified in four genes (SCNN1A, KCNJ16, KCNB2, and KCNT1) in three BrS patients (20%). Two of the three patients presented SCD and one had syncope. Interestingly, the two patients presented with SCD had compound mutations (SCNN1A:Arg350Gln and KCNB2:Glu522Lys; SCNN1A:Arg597* and KCNJ16:Ser261Gly). Importantly, two SCNN1A mutations were identified from different families. The KCNT1:Arg1106Gln mutation was identified in a patient with syncope. Bioinformatics algorithms predicted severe functional interruptions in these four mutation loci, suggesting their pivotal roles in BrS. This study identified four novel BrS-associated genes and indicated the effectiveness of this disease-targeted sequencing across ion channel genes for non-familial BrS patients without SCN5A variants. PMID:25339316

  17. Real-Time qPCR Identifies Suitable Reference Genes for Borna Disease Virus-Infected Rat Cortical Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lujun; Liu, Siwen; Zhang, Liang; You, Hongmin; Huang, Rongzhong; Sun, Lin; He, Peng; Chen, Shigang; Zhang, Hong; Xie, Peng

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) is the most commonly-used technique to identify gene expression profiles. The selection of stably expressed reference genes is a prerequisite to properly evaluating gene expression. Here, the suitability of commonly-used reference genes in normalizing RT-qPCR assays of mRNA expression in cultured rat cortical neurons infected with Borna disease virus (BDV) was assessed. The expressions of eight commonly-used reference genes were comparatively analyzed in BDV-infected rat cortical neurons and non-infected control neurons mainly across 9 and 12 days post-infection. These reference genes were validated by RT-qPCR and separately ranked by four statistical algorithms: geNorm, NormFinder, BestKeeper and the comparative delta-Ct method. Then, the RankAggreg package was used to construct consensus rankings. ARBP was found to be the most stable internal control gene at Day 9, and ACTB at Day 12. As the assessment of the validity of the selected reference genes confirms the suitability of applying a combination of the two most stable references genes, combining the two most stable genes for normalization of RT-qPCR studies in BDV-infected rat cortical neurons is recommended at each time point. This study can contribute to improving BDV research by providing the means by which to obtain more reliable and accurate gene expression measurements. PMID:25431926

  18. Genome-wide transcriptional analysis of flagellar regeneration in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii identifies orthologs of ciliary disease genes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stolc, Viktor; Samanta, Manoj Pratim; Tongprasit, Waraporn; Marshall, Wallace F.

    2005-01-01

    The important role that cilia and flagella play in human disease creates an urgent need to identify genes involved in ciliary assembly and function. The strong and specific induction of flagellar-coding genes during flagellar regeneration in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii suggests that transcriptional profiling of such cells would reveal new flagella-related genes. We have conducted a genome-wide analysis of RNA transcript levels during flagellar regeneration in Chlamydomonas by using maskless photolithography method-produced DNA oligonucleotide microarrays with unique probe sequences for all exons of the 19,803 predicted genes. This analysis represents previously uncharacterized whole-genome transcriptional activity profiling study in this important model organism. Analysis of strongly induced genes reveals a large set of known flagellar components and also identifies a number of important disease-related proteins as being involved with cilia and flagella, including the zebrafish polycystic kidney genes Qilin, Reptin, and Pontin, as well as the testis-expressed tubby-like protein TULP2.

  19. CARD15 gene polymorphisms in patients with spondyloarthropathies identify a specific phenotype previously related to Crohn's disease

    PubMed Central

    Laukens, D; Peeters, H; Marichal, D; Vander, C; Mielants, H; Elewaut, D; Demetter, P; Cuvelier, C; Van Den Berghe, M; Rottiers, P; Veys, E; Remaut, E; Steidler, L; De Keyser, F; De Vos, M

    2005-01-01

    Background: The association between spondyloarthropathy and Crohn's disease is well known. A risk for evolution to Crohn's disease has already been shown in the subgroup of patients with spondyloarthropathy associated with chronic gut inflammation. Objective: To investigate whether the reported polymorphisms in the CARD15 gene, a susceptibility gene for Crohn's disease, are associated with the presence of preclinical intestinal inflammation observed in spondyloarthropathies. Methods: 104 patients with spondyloarthropathies were studied. All underwent ileocolonoscopy with biopsies between 1983 and 2004. The prevalence of three single nucleotide polymorphisms in the CARD15 gene (R702W, G908R, and 1007fs) was assessed using restriction fragment length polymorphism–polymerase chain reaction (RFLP-PCR); the patients were compared with an ethnically matched Crohn's disease population and a control population. Results: The carrier frequency of R702W, G908R, or 1007fs variants in the spondyloarthropathy populations (20%) was similar to the control population (17%), but increased to 38% in the spondyloarthropathy subgroup with chronic gut inflammation. This frequency was significantly higher than in the other spondyloarthropathy subgroups (p = 0.001) or the control group (p = 0.006), but not different from the Crohn's disease group (49%) (NS). This indicates that CARD15 polymorphisms are associated with a higher risk for development of chronic gut inflammation. Conclusions: CARD15 gene polymorphisms clearly identify a subgroup of patients with spondyloarthropathies associated with chronic intestinal inflammation. PMID:15539413

  20. Exome Sequencing Identifies DLG1 as a Novel Gene for Potential Susceptibility to Crohn's Disease in a Chinese Family Study

    PubMed Central

    Song, Lu; NG, Siew Chien; Wang, Xiaobing; Chen, Liping; Yi, Fengming; Ran, Zhihua; Zhou, Rui; Xia, Bing

    2014-01-01

    Background Genetic variants make some contributions to inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), including Crohn’s disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). More than 100 susceptibility loci were identified in Western IBD studies, but susceptibility gene has not been found in Chinese IBD patients till now. Sequencing of individuals with an IBD family history is a powerful approach toward our understanding of the genetics and pathogenesis of IBD. The aim of this study, which focuses on a Han Chinese CD family, is to identify high-risk variants and potentially novel loci using whole exome sequencing technique. Methods Exome sequence data from 4 individuals belonging to a same family were analyzed using bioinformatics methods to narrow down the variants associated with CD. The potential risk genes were further analyzed by genotyping and Sanger sequencing in family members, additional 401 healthy controls (HC), 278 sporadic CD patients, 123 UC cases, a pair of monozygotic CD twins and another Chinese CD family. Results From the CD family in which the father and daughter were affected, we identified a novel single nucleotide variant (SNV) c.374T>C (p.I125T) in exon 4 of discs large homolog 1 (DLG1), a gene has been reported to play mutiple roles in cell proliferation, T cell polarity and T cell receptor signaling. After genotyping among case and controls, a PLINK analysis showed the variant was of significance (P<0.05). 4 CD patients of the other Chinese family bore another non-synonymous variant c.833G>A (p.R278Q) in exon 9 of DLG1. Conclusions We have discovered novel genetic variants in the coding regions of DLG1 gene, the results support that DLG1 is a novel potential susceptibility gene for CD in Chinese patients. PMID:24937328

  1. Chicks and SNPs--an entree into identifying genes conferring disease resistance in chicken

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    With high-density chicken rearing, control of infectious diseases are critical for economic viability and maintaining public confidence in poultry products. Among poultry diseases, Marek’s disease (MD), a lymphoproliferative disease caused by the highly oncogenic herpesvirus Marek's disease virus (M...

  2. Genome-wide gene-environment study identifies glutamate receptor gene GRIN2A as a Parkinson's disease modifier gene via interaction with coffee.

    PubMed

    Hamza, Taye H; Chen, Honglei; Hill-Burns, Erin M; Rhodes, Shannon L; Montimurro, Jennifer; Kay, Denise M; Tenesa, Albert; Kusel, Victoria I; Sheehan, Patricia; Eaaswarkhanth, Muthukrishnan; Yearout, Dora; Samii, Ali; Roberts, John W; Agarwal, Pinky; Bordelon, Yvette; Park, Yikyung; Wang, Liyong; Gao, Jianjun; Vance, Jeffery M; Kendler, Kenneth S; Bacanu, Silviu-Alin; Scott, William K; Ritz, Beate; Nutt, John; Factor, Stewart A; Zabetian, Cyrus P; Payami, Haydeh

    2011-08-01

    Our aim was to identify genes that influence the inverse association of coffee with the risk of developing Parkinson's disease (PD). We used genome-wide genotype data and lifetime caffeinated-coffee-consumption data on 1,458 persons with PD and 931 without PD from the NeuroGenetics Research Consortium (NGRC), and we performed a genome-wide association and interaction study (GWAIS), testing each SNP's main-effect plus its interaction with coffee, adjusting for sex, age, and two principal components. We then stratified subjects as heavy or light coffee-drinkers and performed genome-wide association study (GWAS) in each group. We replicated the most significant SNP. Finally, we imputed the NGRC dataset, increasing genomic coverage to examine the region of interest in detail. The primary analyses (GWAIS, GWAS, Replication) were performed using genotyped data. In GWAIS, the most significant signal came from rs4998386 and the neighboring SNPs in GRIN2A. GRIN2A encodes an NMDA-glutamate-receptor subunit and regulates excitatory neurotransmission in the brain. Achieving P(2df)?=?10(-6), GRIN2A surpassed all known PD susceptibility genes in significance in the GWAIS. In stratified GWAS, the GRIN2A signal was present in heavy coffee-drinkers (OR?=?0.43; P?=?6×10(-7)) but not in light coffee-drinkers. The a priori Replication hypothesis that "Among heavy coffee-drinkers, rs4998386_T carriers have lower PD risk than rs4998386_CC carriers" was confirmed: OR(Replication)?=?0.59, P(Replication)?=?10(-3); OR(Pooled)?=?0.51, P(Pooled)?=?7×10(-8). Compared to light coffee-drinkers with rs4998386_CC genotype, heavy coffee-drinkers with rs4998386_CC genotype had 18% lower risk (P?=?3×10(-3)), whereas heavy coffee-drinkers with rs4998386_TC genotype had 59% lower risk (P?=?6×10(-13)). Imputation revealed a block of SNPs that achieved P(2df)<5×10(-8) in GWAIS, and OR?=?0.41, P?=?3×10(-8) in heavy coffee-drinkers. This study is proof of concept that inclusion of environmental factors can help identify genes that are missed in GWAS. Both adenosine antagonists (caffeine-like) and glutamate antagonists (GRIN2A-related) are being tested in clinical trials for treatment of PD. GRIN2A may be a useful pharmacogenetic marker for subdividing individuals in clinical trials to determine which medications might work best for which patients. PMID:21876681

  3. Genome-Wide Gene-Environment Study Identifies Glutamate Receptor Gene GRIN2A as a Parkinson's Disease Modifier Gene via Interaction with Coffee

    PubMed Central

    Hamza, Taye H.; Chen, Honglei; Hill-Burns, Erin M.; Rhodes, Shannon L.; Montimurro, Jennifer; Kay, Denise M.; Tenesa, Albert; Kusel, Victoria I.; Sheehan, Patricia; Eaaswarkhanth, Muthukrishnan; Yearout, Dora; Samii, Ali; Roberts, John W.; Agarwal, Pinky; Bordelon, Yvette; Park, Yikyung; Wang, Liyong; Gao, Jianjun; Vance, Jeffery M.; Kendler, Kenneth S.; Bacanu, Silviu-Alin; Scott, William K.; Ritz, Beate; Nutt, John; Factor, Stewart A.; Zabetian, Cyrus P.; Payami, Haydeh

    2011-01-01

    Our aim was to identify genes that influence the inverse association of coffee with the risk of developing Parkinson's disease (PD). We used genome-wide genotype data and lifetime caffeinated-coffee-consumption data on 1,458 persons with PD and 931 without PD from the NeuroGenetics Research Consortium (NGRC), and we performed a genome-wide association and interaction study (GWAIS), testing each SNP's main-effect plus its interaction with coffee, adjusting for sex, age, and two principal components. We then stratified subjects as heavy or light coffee-drinkers and performed genome-wide association study (GWAS) in each group. We replicated the most significant SNP. Finally, we imputed the NGRC dataset, increasing genomic coverage to examine the region of interest in detail. The primary analyses (GWAIS, GWAS, Replication) were performed using genotyped data. In GWAIS, the most significant signal came from rs4998386 and the neighboring SNPs in GRIN2A. GRIN2A encodes an NMDA-glutamate-receptor subunit and regulates excitatory neurotransmission in the brain. Achieving P2df?=?10?6, GRIN2A surpassed all known PD susceptibility genes in significance in the GWAIS. In stratified GWAS, the GRIN2A signal was present in heavy coffee-drinkers (OR?=?0.43; P?=?6×10?7) but not in light coffee-drinkers. The a priori Replication hypothesis that “Among heavy coffee-drinkers, rs4998386_T carriers have lower PD risk than rs4998386_CC carriers” was confirmed: ORReplication?=?0.59, PReplication?=?10?3; ORPooled?=?0.51, PPooled?=?7×10?8. Compared to light coffee-drinkers with rs4998386_CC genotype, heavy coffee-drinkers with rs4998386_CC genotype had 18% lower risk (P?=?3×10?3), whereas heavy coffee-drinkers with rs4998386_TC genotype had 59% lower risk (P?=?6×10?13). Imputation revealed a block of SNPs that achieved P2df<5×10?8 in GWAIS, and OR?=?0.41, P?=?3×10?8 in heavy coffee-drinkers. This study is proof of concept that inclusion of environmental factors can help identify genes that are missed in GWAS. Both adenosine antagonists (caffeine-like) and glutamate antagonists (GRIN2A-related) are being tested in clinical trials for treatment of PD. GRIN2A may be a useful pharmacogenetic marker for subdividing individuals in clinical trials to determine which medications might work best for which patients. PMID:21876681

  4. Saccharomyces Fungemia Associated with Esophageal Disease Identified by D1/D2 Ribosomal RNA Gene Sequence

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Disseminated Saccharomyces infection has been reported in immunosuppressed patients treated with probiotics, but disseminated Saccharomyces cerevisiae infection associated with underlying esophageal disease is not previously described. Saccharomyces cerevisiae (which occasionally colonizes the gast...

  5. Whole blood transcriptional profiling in ankylosing spondylitis identifies novel candidate genes that might contribute to the inflammatory and tissue-destructive disease aspects

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction A number of genetic-association studies have identified genes contributing to ankylosing spondylitis (AS) susceptibility but such approaches provide little information as to the gene activity changes occurring during the disease process. Transcriptional profiling generates a 'snapshot' of the sampled cells' activity and thus can provide insights into the molecular processes driving the disease process. We undertook a whole-genome microarray approach to identify candidate genes associated with AS and validated these gene-expression changes in a larger sample cohort. Methods A total of 18 active AS patients, classified according to the New York criteria, and 18 gender- and age-matched controls were profiled using Illumina HT-12 whole-genome expression BeadChips which carry cDNAs for 48,000 genes and transcripts. Class comparison analysis identified a number of differentially expressed candidate genes. These candidate genes were then validated in a larger cohort using qPCR-based TaqMan low density arrays (TLDAs). Results A total of 239 probes corresponding to 221 genes were identified as being significantly different between patients and controls with a P-value <0.0005 (80% confidence level of false discovery rate). Forty-seven genes were then selected for validation studies, using the TLDAs. Thirteen of these genes were validated in the second patient cohort with 12 downregulated 1.3- to 2-fold and only 1 upregulated (1.6-fold). Among a number of identified genes with well-documented inflammatory roles we also validated genes that might be of great interest to the understanding of AS progression such as SPOCK2 (osteonectin) and EP300, which modulate cartilage and bone metabolism. Conclusions We have validated a gene expression signature for AS from whole blood and identified strong candidate genes that may play roles in both the inflammatory and joint destruction aspects of the disease. PMID:21470430

  6. Broker genes in human disease.

    PubMed

    Cai, James J; Borenstein, Elhanan; Petrov, Dmitri A

    2010-01-01

    Genes that underlie human disease are important subjects of systems biology research. In the present study, we demonstrate that Mendelian and complex disease genes have distinct and consistent protein-protein interaction (PPI) properties. We show that five different network properties can be reduced to two independent metrics when applied to the human PPI network. These two metrics largely coincide with the degree (number of connections) and the clustering coefficient (the number of connections among the neighbors of a particular protein). We demonstrate that disease genes have simultaneously unusually high degree and unusually low clustering coefficient. Such genes can be described as brokers in that they connect many proteins that would not be connected otherwise. We show that these results are robust to the effect of gene age and inspection bias variation. Notably, genes identified in genome-wide association study (GWAS) have network patterns that are almost indistinguishable from the network patterns of nondisease genes and significantly different from the network patterns of complex disease genes identified through non-GWAS means. This suggests either that GWAS focused on a distinct set of diseases associated with an unusual set of genes or that mapping of GWAS-identified single nucleotide polymorphisms onto the causally affected neighboring genes is error prone. PMID:20937604

  7. Broker Genes in Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cai, James J.; Borenstein, Elhanan; Petrov, Dmitri A.

    2010-01-01

    Genes that underlie human disease are important subjects of systems biology research. In the present study, we demonstrate that Mendelian and complex disease genes have distinct and consistent protein–protein interaction (PPI) properties. We show that five different network properties can be reduced to two independent metrics when applied to the human PPI network. These two metrics largely coincide with the degree (number of connections) and the clustering coefficient (the number of connections among the neighbors of a particular protein). We demonstrate that disease genes have simultaneously unusually high degree and unusually low clustering coefficient. Such genes can be described as brokers in that they connect many proteins that would not be connected otherwise. We show that these results are robust to the effect of gene age and inspection bias variation. Notably, genes identified in genome-wide association study (GWAS) have network patterns that are almost indistinguishable from the network patterns of nondisease genes and significantly different from the network patterns of complex disease genes identified through non-GWAS means. This suggests either that GWAS focused on a distinct set of diseases associated with an unusual set of genes or that mapping of GWAS-identified single nucleotide polymorphisms onto the causally affected neighboring genes is error prone. PMID:20937604

  8. Pooled Sequencing of 531 Genes in Inflammatory Bowel Disease Identifies an Associated Rare Variant in BTNL2 and Implicates Other Immune Related Genes

    PubMed Central

    Prescott, Natalie J.; Lehne, Benjamin; Stone, Kristina; Lee, James C.; Taylor, Kirstin; Knight, Jo; Papouli, Efterpi; Mirza, Muddassar M.; Simpson, Michael A.; Spain, Sarah L.; Lu, Grace; Fraternali, Franca; Bumpstead, Suzannah J.; Gray, Emma; Amar, Ariella; Bye, Hannah; Green, Peter; Chung-Faye, Guy; Hayee, Bu’Hussain; Pollok, Richard; Satsangi, Jack; Parkes, Miles; Barrett, Jeffrey C.; Mansfield, John C.; Sanderson, Jeremy; Lewis, Cathryn M.; Weale, Michael E.; Schlitt, Thomas; Mathew, Christopher G.

    2015-01-01

    The contribution of rare coding sequence variants to genetic susceptibility in complex disorders is an important but unresolved question. Most studies thus far have investigated a limited number of genes from regions which contain common disease associated variants. Here we investigate this in inflammatory bowel disease by sequencing the exons and proximal promoters of 531 genes selected from both genome-wide association studies and pathway analysis in pooled DNA panels from 474 cases of Crohn’s disease and 480 controls. 80 variants with evidence of association in the sequencing experiment or with potential functional significance were selected for follow up genotyping in 6,507 IBD cases and 3,064 population controls. The top 5 disease associated variants were genotyped in an extension panel of 3,662 IBD cases and 3,639 controls, and tested for association in a combined analysis of 10,147 IBD cases and 7,008 controls. A rare coding variant p.G454C in the BTNL2 gene within the major histocompatibility complex was significantly associated with increased risk for IBD (p = 9.65x10?10, OR = 2.3[95% CI = 1.75–3.04]), but was independent of the known common associated CD and UC variants at this locus. Rare (<1%) and low frequency (1–5%) variants in 3 additional genes showed suggestive association (p<0.005) with either an increased risk (ARIH2 c.338-6C>T) or decreased risk (IL12B p.V298F, and NICN p.H191R) of IBD. These results provide additional insights into the involvement of the inhibition of T cell activation in the development of both sub-phenotypes of inflammatory bowel disease. We suggest that although rare coding variants may make a modest overall contribution to complex disease susceptibility, they can inform our understanding of the molecular pathways that contribute to pathogenesis. PMID:25671699

  9. Integrating Autoimmune Risk Loci with Gene-Expression Data Identifies

    E-print Network

    Raychaudhuri, Soumya

    pathogenic cell types in autoimmune diseases by using a gene-expression data set of 223 murine-sorted immune and high-quality cell-type-specific gene expression is available. Introduction Autoimmune diseasesARTICLE Integrating Autoimmune Risk Loci with Gene-Expression Data Identifies Specific Pathogenic

  10. Twelve novel HGD gene variants identified in 99 alkaptonuria patients: focus on 'black bone disease' in Italy.

    PubMed

    Nemethova, Martina; Radvanszky, Jan; Kadasi, Ludevit; Ascher, David B; Pires, Douglas E V; Blundell, Tom L; Porfirio, Berardino; Mannoni, Alessandro; Santucci, Annalisa; Milucci, Lia; Sestini, Silvia; Biolcati, Gianfranco; Sorge, Fiammetta; Aurizi, Caterina; Aquaron, Robert; Alsbou, Mohammed; Marques Lourenço, Charles; Ramadevi, Kanakasabapathi; Ranganath, Lakshminarayan R; Gallagher, James A; van Kan, Christa; Hall, Anthony K; Olsson, Birgitta; Sireau, Nicolas; Ayoob, Hana; Timmis, Oliver G; Le Quan Sang, Kim-Hanh; Genovese, Federica; Imrich, Richard; Rovensky, Jozef; Srinivasaraghavan, Rangan; Bharadwaj, Shruthi K; Spiegel, Ronen; Zatkova, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Alkaptonuria (AKU) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in homogentisate-1,2-dioxygenase (HGD) gene leading to the deficiency of HGD enzyme activity. The DevelopAKUre project is underway to test nitisinone as a specific treatment to counteract this derangement of the phenylalanine-tyrosine catabolic pathway. We analysed DNA of 40 AKU patients enrolled for SONIA1, the first study in DevelopAKUre, and of 59 other AKU patients sent to our laboratory for molecular diagnostics. We identified 12 novel DNA variants: one was identified in patients from Brazil (c.557T>A), Slovakia (c.500C>T) and France (c.440T>C), three in patients from India (c.469+6T>C, c.650-85A>G, c.158G>A), and six in patients from Italy (c.742A>G, c.614G>A, c.1057A>C, c.752G>A, c.119A>C, c.926G>T). Thus, the total number of potential AKU-causing variants found in 380 patients reported in the HGD mutation database is now 129. Using mCSM and DUET, computational approaches based on the protein 3D structure, the novel missense variants are predicted to affect the activity of the enzyme by three mechanisms: decrease of stability of individual protomers, disruption of protomer-protomer interactions or modification of residues in the region of the active site. We also present an overview of AKU in Italy, where so far about 60 AKU cases are known and DNA analysis has been reported for 34 of them. In this rather small group, 26 different HGD variants affecting function were described, indicating rather high heterogeneity. Twelve of these variants seem to be specific for Italy. PMID:25804398

  11. Identifying proteins controlling key disease signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Gitter, Anthony; Bar-Joseph, Ziv

    2013-01-01

    Motivation: Several types of studies, including genome-wide association studies and RNA interference screens, strive to link genes to diseases. Although these approaches have had some success, genetic variants are often only present in a small subset of the population, and screens are noisy with low overlap between experiments in different labs. Neither provides a mechanistic model explaining how identified genes impact the disease of interest or the dynamics of the pathways those genes regulate. Such mechanistic models could be used to accurately predict downstream effects of knocking down pathway members and allow comprehensive exploration of the effects of targeting pairs or higher-order combinations of genes. Results: We developed methods to model the activation of signaling and dynamic regulatory networks involved in disease progression. Our model, SDREM, integrates static and time series data to link proteins and the pathways they regulate in these networks. SDREM uses prior information about proteins’ likelihood of involvement in a disease (e.g. from screens) to improve the quality of the predicted signaling pathways. We used our algorithms to study the human immune response to H1N1 influenza infection. The resulting networks correctly identified many of the known pathways and transcriptional regulators of this disease. Furthermore, they accurately predict RNA interference effects and can be used to infer genetic interactions, greatly improving over other methods suggested for this task. Applying our method to the more pathogenic H5N1 influenza allowed us to identify several strain-specific targets of this infection. Availability: SDREM is available from http://sb.cs.cmu.edu/sdrem Contact: zivbj@cs.cmu.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:23812988

  12. NIH Researchers Identify OCD Risk Gene

    MedlinePLUS

    ... News From NIH NIH Researchers Identify OCD Risk Gene Past Issues / Summer 2006 Table of Contents For ... and Alcoholism (NIAAA) have identified a previously unknown gene variant that doubles an individual's risk for obsessive- ...

  13. Caenorhabditis elegans expressing the Saccharomyces cerevisiae NADH alternative dehydrogenase Ndi1p, as a tool to identify new genes involved in complex I related diseases

    PubMed Central

    Cossard, Raynald; Esposito, Michela; Sellem, Carole H.; Pitayu, Laras; Vasnier, Christelle; Delahodde, Agnès; Dassa, Emmanuel P.

    2015-01-01

    Isolated complex I deficiencies are one of the most commonly observed biochemical features in patients suffering from mitochondrial disorders. In the majority of these clinical cases the molecular bases of the diseases remain unknown suggesting the involvement of unidentified factors that are critical for complex I function. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae NDI1 gene, encoding the mitochondrial internal NADH dehydrogenase was previously shown to complement a complex I deficient strain in Caenorhabditis elegans with notable improvements in reproduction and whole organism respiration. These features indicate that Ndi1p can functionally integrate the respiratory chain, allowing complex I deficiency complementation. Taking into account the Ndi1p ability to bypass complex I, we evaluate the possibility to extend the range of defects/mutations causing complex I deficiencies that can be alleviated by NDI1 expression. We report here that NDI1 expressing animals unexpectedly exhibit a slightly shortened lifespan, a reduction in the progeny, and a depletion of the mitochondrial genome. However, Ndi1p is expressed and targeted to the mitochondria as a functional protein that confers rotenone resistance to those animals without affecting their respiration rate and ATP content. We show that the severe embryonic lethality level caused by the RNAi knockdowns of complex I structural subunit encoding genes (e.g., NDUFV1, NDUFS1, NDUFS6, NDUFS8, or GRIM-19 human orthologs) in wild type animals is significantly reduced in the Ndi1p expressing worm. All together these results open up the perspective to identify new genes involved in complex I function, assembly, or regulation by screening an RNAi library of genes leading to embryonic lethality that should be rescued by NDI1 expression. PMID:26124772

  14. Caenorhabditis elegans expressing the Saccharomyces cerevisiae NADH alternative dehydrogenase Ndi1p, as a tool to identify new genes involved in complex I related diseases.

    PubMed

    Cossard, Raynald; Esposito, Michela; Sellem, Carole H; Pitayu, Laras; Vasnier, Christelle; Delahodde, Agnès; Dassa, Emmanuel P

    2015-01-01

    Isolated complex I deficiencies are one of the most commonly observed biochemical features in patients suffering from mitochondrial disorders. In the majority of these clinical cases the molecular bases of the diseases remain unknown suggesting the involvement of unidentified factors that are critical for complex I function. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae NDI1 gene, encoding the mitochondrial internal NADH dehydrogenase was previously shown to complement a complex I deficient strain in Caenorhabditis elegans with notable improvements in reproduction and whole organism respiration. These features indicate that Ndi1p can functionally integrate the respiratory chain, allowing complex I deficiency complementation. Taking into account the Ndi1p ability to bypass complex I, we evaluate the possibility to extend the range of defects/mutations causing complex I deficiencies that can be alleviated by NDI1 expression. We report here that NDI1 expressing animals unexpectedly exhibit a slightly shortened lifespan, a reduction in the progeny, and a depletion of the mitochondrial genome. However, Ndi1p is expressed and targeted to the mitochondria as a functional protein that confers rotenone resistance to those animals without affecting their respiration rate and ATP content. We show that the severe embryonic lethality level caused by the RNAi knockdowns of complex I structural subunit encoding genes (e.g., NDUFV1, NDUFS1, NDUFS6, NDUFS8, or GRIM-19 human orthologs) in wild type animals is significantly reduced in the Ndi1p expressing worm. All together these results open up the perspective to identify new genes involved in complex I function, assembly, or regulation by screening an RNAi library of genes leading to embryonic lethality that should be rescued by NDI1 expression. PMID:26124772

  15. From SNPs to Genes: Disease Association at the Gene Level

    PubMed Central

    Lehne, Benjamin; Lewis, Cathryn M.; Schlitt, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Interpreting Genome-Wide Association Studies (GWAS) at a gene level is an important step towards understanding the molecular processes that lead to disease. In order to incorporate prior biological knowledge such as pathways and protein interactions in the analysis of GWAS data it is necessary to derive one measure of association for each gene. We compare three different methods to obtain gene-wide test statistics from Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) based association data: choosing the test statistic from the most significant SNP; the mean test statistics of all SNPs; and the mean of the top quartile of all test statistics. We demonstrate that the gene-wide test statistics can be controlled for the number of SNPs within each gene and show that all three methods perform considerably better than expected by chance at identifying genes with confirmed associations. By applying each method to GWAS data for Crohn's Disease and Type 1 Diabetes we identified new potential disease genes. PMID:21738570

  16. Identifying potential cancer driver genes by genomic data integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yong; Hao, Jingjing; Jiang, Wei; He, Tong; Zhang, Xuegong; Jiang, Tao; Jiang, Rui

    2013-12-01

    Cancer is a genomic disease associated with a plethora of gene mutations resulting in a loss of control over vital cellular functions. Among these mutated genes, driver genes are defined as being causally linked to oncogenesis, while passenger genes are thought to be irrelevant for cancer development. With increasing numbers of large-scale genomic datasets available, integrating these genomic data to identify driver genes from aberration regions of cancer genomes becomes an important goal of cancer genome analysis and investigations into mechanisms responsible for cancer development. A computational method, MAXDRIVER, is proposed here to identify potential driver genes on the basis of copy number aberration (CNA) regions of cancer genomes, by integrating publicly available human genomic data. MAXDRIVER employs several optimization strategies to construct a heterogeneous network, by means of combining a fused gene functional similarity network, gene-disease associations and a disease phenotypic similarity network. MAXDRIVER was validated to effectively recall known associations among genes and cancers. Previously identified as well as novel driver genes were detected by scanning CNAs of breast cancer, melanoma and liver carcinoma. Three predicted driver genes (CDKN2A, AKT1, RNF139) were found common in these three cancers by comparative analysis.

  17. Exploring candidate genes for human brain diseases from a brain-specific gene network

    E-print Network

    Jiang,Tianzi

    Exploring candidate genes for human brain diseases from a brain-specific gene network Bing Liu identifying multiple candidate genes for genetic human brain diseases from a brain-specific gene network knowledge of a specific brain disease, we can effectively iden- tify multiple candidate genes

  18. Chapter 15: Disease Gene Prioritization

    PubMed Central

    Bromberg, Yana

    2013-01-01

    Disease-causing aberrations in the normal function of a gene define that gene as a disease gene. Proving a causal link between a gene and a disease experimentally is expensive and time-consuming. Comprehensive prioritization of candidate genes prior to experimental testing drastically reduces the associated costs. Computational gene prioritization is based on various pieces of correlative evidence that associate each gene with the given disease and suggest possible causal links. A fair amount of this evidence comes from high-throughput experimentation. Thus, well-developed methods are necessary to reliably deal with the quantity of information at hand. Existing gene prioritization techniques already significantly improve the outcomes of targeted experimental studies. Faster and more reliable techniques that account for novel data types are necessary for the development of new diagnostics, treatments, and cure for many diseases. PMID:23633938

  19. Identifying relationships among genomic disease regions: predicting= pathogenic SNP associations and rare deletions

    E-print Network

    Raychaudhuri, Soumya

    Translating a set of disease regions into insight about pathogenic mechanisms requires not only the ability to identify the key disease genes within them, but also the biological relationships among those key genes. Here ...

  20. Hypothesis-based RNAi screening identifies neuroprotective genes in a Parkinson's

    E-print Network

    Caldwell, Guy

    Hypothesis-based RNAi screening identifies neuroprotective genes in a Parkinson's disease model intracellular misfolding, results in Parkinson's disease (PD). Here we report the results from systematic- sent heritable susceptibility factors for Parkinson's disease (PD). PD involves the progressive loss

  1. Identifying genes related with rheumatoid arthritis via system biology analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tao; Lin, Xinmei; Yu, Hongjian

    2015-10-15

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic, inflammatory joint disease that mainly attacks synovial joints. However, the underlying systematic relationship among different genes and biological processes involved in the pathogenesis are still unclear. By analyzing and comparing the transcriptional profiles from RA, OA (osteoarthritis) patients as well as ND (normal donors) with bioinformatics methods, we tend to uncover the potential molecular networks and critical genes which play important roles in RA and OA development. Initially, hierarchical clustering was performed to classify the overall transcriptional profiles. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between ND and RA and OA patients were identified. Furthermore, PPI networks were constructed, functional modules were extracted, and functional annotation was also applied. Our functional analysis identifies 22 biological processes and 2 KEGG pathways enriched in the commonly-regulated gene set. However, we found that number of set of genes differentially expressed genes only between RA and ND reaches up to 244, indicating this gene set may specifically accounts for processing to disease of RA. Additionally, 142 biological processes and 19 KEGG pathways are over-represented by these 244 genes. Meanwhile, although another 21 genes were differentially expressed only in OA and ND, no biological process nor pathway is over-represented by them. PMID:26117171

  2. The Search for Autism Disease Genes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wassink, Thomas H.; Brzustowicz, Linda M.; Bartlett, Christopher W.; Szatmari, Peter

    2004-01-01

    Autism is a heritable disorder characterized by phenotypic and genetic complexity. This review begins by surveying current linkage, gene association, and cytogenetic studies performed with the goal of identifying autism disease susceptibility variants. Though numerous linkages and associations have been identified, they tend to diminish upon…

  3. Gene Therapy for Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Denyer, Rachel; Douglas, Michael R.

    2012-01-01

    Current pharmacological and surgical treatments for Parkinson's disease offer symptomatic improvements to those suffering from this incurable degenerative neurological disorder, but none of these has convincingly shown effects on disease progression. Novel approaches based on gene therapy have several potential advantages over conventional treatment modalities. These could be used to provide more consistent dopamine supplementation, potentially providing superior symptomatic relief with fewer side effects. More radically, gene therapy could be used to correct the imbalances in basal ganglia circuitry associated with the symptoms of Parkinson's disease, or to preserve or restore dopaminergic neurons lost during the disease process itself. The latter neuroprotective approach is the most exciting, as it could theoretically be disease modifying rather than simply symptom alleviating. Gene therapy agents using these approaches are currently making the transition from the laboratory to the bedside. This paper summarises the theoretical approaches to gene therapy for Parkinson's disease and the findings of clinical trials in this rapidly changing field. PMID:22619738

  4. Huntington's disease Between genes and

    E-print Network

    Levin, Yan

    Huntington's disease Between genes and environment Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 101, 3498­3503 (2004) The fatal, inherited neurodegenerative disorder called Huntington's disease is caused by a three when the disease will strike. But there's the question of why people with identical repeats nonetheless

  5. Mining biological databases for candidate disease genes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Terry A.; Scheetz, Todd; Webster, Gregg L.; Casavant, Thomas L.

    2001-07-01

    The publicly-funded effort to sequence the complete nucleotide sequence of the human genome, the Human Genome Project (HGP), has currently produced more than 93% of the 3 billion nucleotides of the human genome into a preliminary `draft' format. In addition, several valuable sources of information have been developed as direct and indirect results of the HGP. These include the sequencing of model organisms (rat, mouse, fly, and others), gene discovery projects (ESTs and full-length), and new technologies such as expression analysis and resources (micro-arrays or gene chips). These resources are invaluable for the researchers identifying the functional genes of the genome that transcribe and translate into the transcriptome and proteome, both of which potentially contain orders of magnitude more complexity than the genome itself. Preliminary analyses of this data identified approximately 30,000 - 40,000 human `genes.' However, the bulk of the effort still remains -- to identify the functional and structural elements contained within the transcriptome and proteome, and to associate function in the transcriptome and proteome to genes. A fortuitous consequence of the HGP is the existence of hundreds of databases containing biological information that may contain relevant data pertaining to the identification of disease-causing genes. The task of mining these databases for information on candidate genes is a commercial application of enormous potential. We are developing a system to acquire and mine data from specific databases to aid our efforts to identify disease genes. A high speed cluster of Linux of workstations is used to analyze sequence and perform distributed sequence alignments as part of our data mining and processing. This system has been used to mine GeneMap99 sequences within specific genomic intervals to identify potential candidate disease genes associated with Bardet-Biedle Syndrome (BBS).

  6. GeneTIER: prioritization of candidate disease genes using tissue-specific gene expression profiles

    PubMed Central

    Antanaviciute, Agne; Daly, Catherine; Crinnion, Laura A.; Markham, Alexander F.; Watson, Christopher M.; Bonthron, David T.; Carr, Ian M.

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: In attempts to determine the genetic causes of human disease, researchers are often faced with a large number of candidate genes. Linkage studies can point to a genomic region containing hundreds of genes, while the high-throughput sequencing approach will often identify a great number of non-synonymous genetic variants. Since systematic experimental verification of each such candidate gene is not feasible, a method is needed to decide which genes are worth investigating further. Computational gene prioritization presents itself as a solution to this problem, systematically analyzing and sorting each gene from the most to least likely to be the disease-causing gene, in a fraction of the time it would take a researcher to perform such queries manually. Results: Here, we present Gene TIssue Expression Ranker (GeneTIER), a new web-based application for candidate gene prioritization. GeneTIER replaces knowledge-based inference traditionally used in candidate disease gene prioritization applications with experimental data from tissue-specific gene expression datasets and thus largely overcomes the bias toward the better characterized genes/diseases that commonly afflict other methods. We show that our approach is capable of accurate candidate gene prioritization and illustrate its strengths and weaknesses using case study examples. Availability and Implementation: Freely available on the web at http://dna.leeds.ac.uk/GeneTIER/. Contact: umaan@leeds.ac.uk Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:25861967

  7. RANKING GENES BY RELEVANCE TO A DISEASE Shivani Agarwal 1

    E-print Network

    Agarwal, Shivani

    RANKING GENES BY RELEVANCE TO A DISEASE Shivani Agarwal 1 and Shiladitya Sengupta 2,3 1 Department@mit.edu The problem of identifying key genes that are involved in a particular disease is of fundamental importance in biology and medicine. Given the increasing availability of a variety of gene-related biological data

  8. Phenoscape: Identifying Candidate Genes for Evolutionary Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Edmunds, Richard C.; Su, Baofeng; Balhoff, James P.; Eames, B. Frank; Dahdul, Wasila M.; Lapp, Hilmar; Lundberg, John G.; Vision, Todd J.; Dunham, Rex A.; Mabee, Paula M.; Westerfield, Monte

    2016-01-01

    Phenotypes resulting from mutations in genetic model organisms can help reveal candidate genes for evolutionarily important phenotypic changes in related taxa. Although testing candidate gene hypotheses experimentally in nonmodel organisms is typically difficult, ontology-driven information systems can help generate testable hypotheses about developmental processes in experimentally tractable organisms. Here, we tested candidate gene hypotheses suggested by expert use of the Phenoscape Knowledgebase, specifically looking for genes that are candidates responsible for evolutionarily interesting phenotypes in the ostariophysan fishes that bear resemblance to mutant phenotypes in zebrafish. For this, we searched ZFIN for genetic perturbations that result in either loss of basihyal element or loss of scales phenotypes, because these are the ancestral phenotypes observed in catfishes (Siluriformes). We tested the identified candidate genes by examining their endogenous expression patterns in the channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus. The experimental results were consistent with the hypotheses that these features evolved through disruption in developmental pathways at, or upstream of, brpf1 and eda/edar for the ancestral losses of basihyal element and scales, respectively. These results demonstrate that ontological annotations of the phenotypic effects of genetic alterations in model organisms, when aggregated within a knowledgebase, can be used effectively to generate testable, and useful, hypotheses about evolutionary changes in morphology. PMID:26500251

  9. Susceptibility Genes for Multiple Sclerosis Identified in a Gene-Based Genome-Wide Association Study

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Xiang; Deng, Fei-Yan; Lu, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a demyelinating and inflammatory disease of the central nervous system. The aim of this study was to identify more genes associated with MS. Methods Based on the publicly available data of the single-nucleotide polymorphism-based genome-wide association study (GWAS) from the database of Genotypes and Phenotypes, we conducted a powerful gene-based GWAS in an initial sample with 931 family trios, and a replication study sample with 978 cases and 883 controls. For interesting genes, gene expression in MS-related cells between MS cases and controls was examined by using publicly available datasets. Results A total of 58 genes was identified, including 20 "novel" genes significantly associated with MS (p<1.40×10-4). In the replication study, 44 of the 58 identified genes had been genotyped and 35 replicated the association. In the gene-expression study, 21 of the 58 identified genes exhibited differential expressions in MS-related cells. Thus, 15 novel genes were supported by replicated association and/or differential expression. In particular, four of the novel genes, those encoding myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG), coiled-coil alpha-helical rod protein 1 (CCHCR1), human leukocyte antigen complex group 22 (HCG22), and major histocompatibility complex, class II, DM alpha (HLA-DMA), were supported by the evidence of both. Conclusions The results of this study emphasize the high power of gene-based GWAS in detecting the susceptibility genes of MS. The novel genes identified herein may provide new insights into the molecular genetic mechanisms underlying MS. PMID:26320842

  10. Disease Resistance Gene Analogs (RGAs) in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Sekhwal, Manoj Kumar; Li, Pingchuan; Lam, Irene; Wang, Xiue; Cloutier, Sylvie; You, Frank M.

    2015-01-01

    Plants have developed effective mechanisms to recognize and respond to infections caused by pathogens. Plant resistance gene analogs (RGAs), as resistance (R) gene candidates, have conserved domains and motifs that play specific roles in pathogens’ resistance. Well-known RGAs are nucleotide binding site leucine rich repeats, receptor like kinases, and receptor like proteins. Others include pentatricopeptide repeats and apoplastic peroxidases. RGAs can be detected using bioinformatics tools based on their conserved structural features. Thousands of RGAs have been identified from sequenced plant genomes. High-density genome-wide RGA genetic maps are useful for designing diagnostic markers and identifying quantitative trait loci (QTL) or markers associated with plant disease resistance. This review focuses on recent advances in structures and mechanisms of RGAs, and their identification from sequenced genomes using bioinformatics tools. Applications in enhancing fine mapping and cloning of plant disease resistance genes are also discussed. PMID:26287177

  11. Gene therapy for retinal disease

    PubMed Central

    McClements, Michelle E; MacLaren, Robert E

    2013-01-01

    Gene therapy strategies for the treatment of inherited retinal diseases have made major advances in recent years. This review focuses on adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector approaches to treat retinal degeneration and thus prevent or delay the onset of blindness. Data from human clinical trials of gene therapy for retinal disease show encouraging signs of safety and efficacy from AAV vectors. Recent progress in enhancing cell-specific targeting and transduction efficiency of the various retinal layers plus the use of AAV-delivered growth factors to augment the therapeutic effect and limit cell death suggest even greater success in future human trials is possible. PMID:23305707

  12. DDA: A Novel Network-Based Scoring Method to Identify Disease–Disease Associations

    PubMed Central

    Suratanee, Apichat; Plaimas, Kitiporn

    2015-01-01

    Categorizing human diseases provides higher efficiency and accuracy for disease diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment. Disease–disease association (DDA) is a precious information that indicates the large-scale structure of complex relationships of diseases. However, the number of known and reliable associations is very small. Therefore, identification of DDAs is a challenging task in systems biology and medicine. Here, we developed a novel network-based scoring algorithm called DDA to identify the relationships between diseases in a large-scale study. Our method is developed based on a random walk prioritization in a protein–protein interaction network. This approach considers not only whether two diseases directly share associated genes but also the statistical relationships between two different diseases using known disease-related genes. Predicted associations were validated by known DDAs from a database and literature supports. The method yielded a good performance with an area under the curve of 71% and outperformed other standard association indices. Furthermore, novel DDAs and relationships among diseases from the clusters analysis were reported. This method is efficient to identify disease–disease relationships on an interaction network and can also be generalized to other association studies to further enhance knowledge in medical studies. PMID:26673408

  13. Virus induced gene silencing of Arabidopsis gene homologues in wheat identify genes conferring improved drought tolerance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In a non-model staple crop like wheat, functional validation of potential drought stress responsive genes identified in Arabidopsis could provide gene targets for wheat breeding. Virus induced gene silencing (VIGS) of genes of interest can overcome the inherent problems of polyploidy and limited tra...

  14. Patching genes to fight disease

    SciTech Connect

    Holzman, D.

    1990-09-03

    The National Institutes of Health has approved the first gene therapy experiments, one of which will try to cure cancer by bolstering the immune system. The applications of such therapy are limited, but the potential aid to people with genetic diseases is great.

  15. Network-Based Inference Framework for Identifying Cancer Genes from Gene Expression Data

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Bo; Zhang, Junying; Yin, Yaling; Zhang, Yuanyuan

    2013-01-01

    Great efforts have been devoted to alleviate uncertainty of detected cancer genes as accurate identification of oncogenes is of tremendous significance and helps unravel the biological behavior of tumors. In this paper, we present a differential network-based framework to detect biologically meaningful cancer-related genes. Firstly, a gene regulatory network construction algorithm is proposed, in which a boosting regression based on likelihood score and informative prior is employed for improving accuracy of identification. Secondly, with the algorithm, two gene regulatory networks are constructed from case and control samples independently. Thirdly, by subtracting the two networks, a differential-network model is obtained and then used to rank differentially expressed hub genes for identification of cancer biomarkers. Compared with two existing gene-based methods (t-test and lasso), the method has a significant improvement in accuracy both on synthetic datasets and two real breast cancer datasets. Furthermore, identified six genes (TSPYL5, CD55, CCNE2, DCK, BBC3, and MUC1) susceptible to breast cancer were verified through the literature mining, GO analysis, and pathway functional enrichment analysis. Among these oncogenes, TSPYL5 and CCNE2 have been already known as prognostic biomarkers in breast cancer, CD55 has been suspected of playing an important role in breast cancer prognosis from literature evidence, and other three genes are newly discovered breast cancer biomarkers. More generally, the differential-network schema can be extended to other complex diseases for detection of disease associated-genes. PMID:24073403

  16. A whole genome RNAi screen identifies replication stress response genes.

    PubMed

    Kavanaugh, Gina; Ye, Fei; Mohni, Kareem N; Luzwick, Jessica W; Glick, Gloria; Cortez, David

    2015-11-01

    Proper DNA replication is critical to maintain genome stability. When the DNA replication machinery encounters obstacles to replication, replication forks stall and the replication stress response is activated. This response includes activation of cell cycle checkpoints, stabilization of the replication fork, and DNA damage repair and tolerance mechanisms. Defects in the replication stress response can result in alterations to the DNA sequence causing changes in protein function and expression, ultimately leading to disease states such as cancer. To identify additional genes that control the replication stress response, we performed a three-parameter, high content, whole genome siRNA screen measuring DNA replication before and after a challenge with replication stress as well as a marker of checkpoint kinase signalling. We identified over 200 replication stress response genes and subsequently analyzed how they influence cellular viability in response to replication stress. These data will serve as a useful resource for understanding the replication stress response. PMID:26454783

  17. Differences in Pathogenesis for Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in the Mouse Versus the Swine Model Identify Bacterial Gene Products Required for Systemic but not Gastrointestinal Disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Over the last several decades, the mouse model of Typhoid fever has been an extremely productive model to investigate Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium pathogenesis. The mouse is the paradigm for investigating systemic disease due to infection by Salmonella; however, the swine model of gastro...

  18. Genes and Disease: Prader-Willi Syndrome

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Medicine, National Institutes of Health. National Center for Biotechnology Information (US). Genes and Disease [Internet]. Bethesda (MD): National Center for Biotechnology Information (US); 1998-. Genes and Disease [Internet]. Show ...

  19. Identifying genes altered by a drug in temporal microarray data: A case study

    E-print Network

    Spirtes, Peter

    of a drug, once prescribed for diabetes, which is a genetically heterogeneous diseases. Our case study movesIdentifying genes altered by a drug in temporal microarray data: A case study Nicoleta Serban Larry is identifying genes altered by a particular drug of inter- est. This process allow biologists to target drug

  20. Gene Therapy for Diseases and Genetic Disorders

    MedlinePLUS

    Home ASGCT Gene Therapy for Diseases Gene Therapy has made important medical advances in less than two decades. Within this short time ... Among the most notable advancements are the following: Gene Therapy for Genetic Disorders Severe Combined Immune Deficiency (ADA- ...

  1. Evolutionary Signatures amongst Disease Genes Permit Novel Methods for Gene Prioritization and Construction of Informative Gene-Based Networks

    PubMed Central

    Priedigkeit, Nolan; Wolfe, Nicholas; Clark, Nathan L.

    2015-01-01

    Genes involved in the same function tend to have similar evolutionary histories, in that their rates of evolution covary over time. This coevolutionary signature, termed Evolutionary Rate Covariation (ERC), is calculated using only gene sequences from a set of closely related species and has demonstrated potential as a computational tool for inferring functional relationships between genes. To further define applications of ERC, we first established that roughly 55% of genetic diseases posses an ERC signature between their contributing genes. At a false discovery rate of 5% we report 40 such diseases including cancers, developmental disorders and mitochondrial diseases. Given these coevolutionary signatures between disease genes, we then assessed ERC's ability to prioritize known disease genes out of a list of unrelated candidates. We found that in the presence of an ERC signature, the true disease gene is effectively prioritized to the top 6% of candidates on average. We then apply this strategy to a melanoma-associated region on chromosome 1 and identify MCL1 as a potential causative gene. Furthermore, to gain global insight into disease mechanisms, we used ERC to predict molecular connections between 310 nominally distinct diseases. The resulting “disease map” network associates several diseases with related pathogenic mechanisms and unveils many novel relationships between clinically distinct diseases, such as between Hirschsprung's disease and melanoma. Taken together, these results demonstrate the utility of molecular evolution as a gene discovery platform and show that evolutionary signatures can be used to build informative gene-based networks. PMID:25679399

  2. Evolutionary signatures amongst disease genes permit novel methods for gene prioritization and construction of informative gene-based networks.

    PubMed

    Priedigkeit, Nolan; Wolfe, Nicholas; Clark, Nathan L

    2015-02-01

    Genes involved in the same function tend to have similar evolutionary histories, in that their rates of evolution covary over time. This coevolutionary signature, termed Evolutionary Rate Covariation (ERC), is calculated using only gene sequences from a set of closely related species and has demonstrated potential as a computational tool for inferring functional relationships between genes. To further define applications of ERC, we first established that roughly 55% of genetic diseases posses an ERC signature between their contributing genes. At a false discovery rate of 5% we report 40 such diseases including cancers, developmental disorders and mitochondrial diseases. Given these coevolutionary signatures between disease genes, we then assessed ERC's ability to prioritize known disease genes out of a list of unrelated candidates. We found that in the presence of an ERC signature, the true disease gene is effectively prioritized to the top 6% of candidates on average. We then apply this strategy to a melanoma-associated region on chromosome 1 and identify MCL1 as a potential causative gene. Furthermore, to gain global insight into disease mechanisms, we used ERC to predict molecular connections between 310 nominally distinct diseases. The resulting "disease map" network associates several diseases with related pathogenic mechanisms and unveils many novel relationships between clinically distinct diseases, such as between Hirschsprung's disease and melanoma. Taken together, these results demonstrate the utility of molecular evolution as a gene discovery platform and show that evolutionary signatures can be used to build informative gene-based networks. PMID:25679399

  3. Epigenome-wide scan identifies a treatment-responsive pattern of altered DNA methylation among cytoskeletal remodeling genes in monocytes and CD4+ T cells in Behçet’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Travis; Ture-Ozdemir, Filiz; Alibaz-Oner, Fatma; Coit, Patrick; Direskeneli, Haner; Sawalha, Amr H

    2014-01-01

    Objective Behçet’s disease (BD) is an inflammatory disease characterized by multi-system involvement including recurrent oral and genital ulcers, cutaneous lesions, and uveitis. The pathogenesis of BD remains poorly understood. We performed a genome-wide DNA methylation study in BD before and after disease remission, and in healthy matched controls. Methods We examined genome-wide DNA methylation in monocytes and CD4+ T cells from a set of 16 untreated male BD patients and age, sex, and ethnicity-matched controls. Additional samples were collected from 12 of the same BD patients after treatment and disease remission. Genome-wide DNA methylation patterns were assessed using the HumanMethylation450 DNA Analysis BeadChip array which includes over 485,000 individual methylation sites across the genome. Results We identified 383 differentially methylated CpG sites between BD patients and controls in monocytes and 125 differentially methylated CpG sites in CD4+ T cells. Bioinformatic analysis revealed a pattern of aberrant DNA methylation among genes that regulate cytoskeletal dynamics suggesting that aberrant DNA methylation of multiple classes of structural and regulatory proteins of the cytoskeleton might contribute to the pathogenesis of BD. Further, DNA methylation changes associated with treatment act to restore methylation differences observed between patients and controls. Indeed, among CpG sites differentially methylated before and after disease remission, there was almost exclusive reversal of the direction of aberrant DNA methylation observed between patients and healthy controls. Conclusions We performed the first epigenome-wide study in BD and provide strong evidence that epigenetic modification of cytoskeletal dynamics underlies the pathogenesis and therapeutic response in BD. PMID:24574333

  4. Identifying Driver Genes in Cancer by Triangulating Gene Expression, Gene Location, and Survival Data

    PubMed Central

    Rouam, Sigrid; Miller, Lance D; Karuturi, R Krishna Murthy

    2014-01-01

    Driver genes are directly responsible for oncogenesis and identifying them is essential in order to fully understand the mechanisms of cancer. However, it is difficult to delineate them from the larger pool of genes that are deregulated in cancer (ie, passenger genes). In order to address this problem, we developed an approach called TRIAngulating Gene Expression (TRIAGE through clinico-genomic intersects). Here, we present a refinement of this approach incorporating a new scoring methodology to identify putative driver genes that are deregulated in cancer. TRIAGE triangulates – or integrates – three levels of information: gene expression, gene location, and patient survival. First, TRIAGE identifies regions of deregulated expression (ie, expression footprints) by deriving a newly established measure called the Local Singular Value Decomposition (LSVD) score for each locus. Driver genes are then distinguished from passenger genes using dual survival analyses. Incorporating measurements of gene expression and weighting them according to the LSVD weight of each tumor, these analyses are performed using the genes located in significant expression footprints. Here, we first use simulated data to characterize the newly established LSVD score. We then present the results of our application of this refined version of TRIAGE to gene expression data from five cancer types. This refined version of TRIAGE not only allowed us to identify known prominent driver genes, such as MMP1, IL8, and COL1A2, but it also led us to identify several novel ones. These results illustrate that TRIAGE complements existing tools, allows for the identification of genes that drive cancer and could perhaps elucidate potential future targets of novel anticancer therapeutics. PMID:25949096

  5. Identifying Conserved Gene Clusters in the Presence of Orthologous Groups

    E-print Network

    Goldwasser, Michael

    and thus these genes are likely to represent a functionally significant group. Such a gene groupIdentifying Conserved Gene Clusters in the Presence of Orthologous Groups [Extended Abstract] Xin between the function and the position of genes in chromosomes. Ex- amples include operon structure

  6. The Wilson disease gene: Haplotypes and mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, G.R.; Roberts, E.A.; Cox, D.W.; Walshe, J.M.

    1994-09-01

    Wilson disease (WND) is an autosomal recessive defect of copper transport. The gene involved in WND, located on chromosome 13, has recently been shown to be a putative copper transporting P-type ATPase, designated ATP7B. The gene is highly similar to ATP7A, located on the X chromosome, which is defective in Menkes disease, another disorder of copper transport. We have available for study WND families from Canada (34 families), the United Kingdom (32 families), Japan (4 families), Iceland (3 families) and Hong Kong (2 families). We have utilized four highly polymorphic CA repeat markers (D13S296, D13S301, D13S314 and D13S316) surrounding the ATP7B locus to construct haplotypes in these families. Analysis indicates that there are many unique WND haplotypes not present on normal chromosomes and that there may be a large number of different WND mutations. We have screened the WND patients for mutations in the ATP7B gene. Fifty six patients, representing all of the identified haplotypes, have been screened using single strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP), followed by selective sequencing. To date, 19 mutations and 12 polymorphisms have been identified. All of the changes are nucleotide substitutions or small insertions/deletions and there is no evidence for larger deletions as seen in the similar gene on the X chromosome, ATP7A. Haplotypes of close markers and the ability to detect some of the mutations present in the gene allow for more reliable molecular diagnosis of presymptomatic sibs of WND patients. A reassessment of individuals previously diagnosed in the presymptomatic phase is now required, as we have have identified some heterozygotes who are biochemically indistinguishable from affected homozygotes. The identification of specific mutations will soon allow direct diagnosis of WND patients with a high level of certainty.

  7. Inferring Disease and Gene Set Associations with Rank Coherence in Networks

    E-print Network

    Hwang, TaeHyun; Xie, Maoqiang; Kuang, Rui

    2011-01-01

    A computational challenge to validate the candidate disease genes identified in a high-throughput genomic study is to elucidate the associations between the set of candidate genes and disease phenotypes. The conventional gene set enrichment analysis often fails to reveal associations between disease phenotypes and the gene sets with a short list of poorly annotated genes, because the existing annotations of disease causative genes are incomplete. We propose a network-based computational approach called rcNet to discover the associations between gene sets and disease phenotypes. Assuming coherent associations between the genes ranked by their relevance to the query gene set, and the disease phenotypes ranked by their relevance to the hidden target disease phenotypes of the query gene set, we formulate a learning framework maximizing the rank coherence with respect to the known disease phenotype-gene associations. An efficient algorithm coupling ridge regression with label propagation, and two variants are intr...

  8. Huntington's disease biomarker progression profile identified by transcriptome sequencing in peripheral blood.

    PubMed

    Mastrokolias, Anastasios; Ariyurek, Yavuz; Goeman, Jelle J; van Duijn, Erik; Roos, Raymund Ac; van der Mast, Roos C; van Ommen, GertJan B; den Dunnen, Johan T; 't Hoen, Peter Ac; van Roon-Mom, Willeke Mc

    2015-10-01

    With several therapeutic approaches in development for Huntington's disease, there is a need for easily accessible biomarkers to monitor disease progression and therapy response. We performed next-generation sequencing-based transcriptome analysis of total RNA from peripheral blood of 91 mutation carriers (27 presymptomatic and, 64 symptomatic) and 33 controls. Transcriptome analysis by DeepSAGE identified 167 genes significantly associated with clinical total motor score in Huntington's disease patients. Relative to previous studies, this yielded novel genes and confirmed previously identified genes, such as H2AFY, an overlap in results that has proven difficult in the past. Pathway analysis showed enrichment of genes of the immune system and target genes of miRNAs, which are downregulated in Huntington's disease models. Using a highly parallelized microfluidics array chip (Fluidigm), we validated 12 of the top 20 significant genes in our discovery cohort and 7 in a second independent cohort. The five genes (PROK2, ZNF238, AQP9, CYSTM1 and ANXA3) that were validated independently in both cohorts present a candidate biomarker panel for stage determination and therapeutic readout in Huntington's disease. Finally we suggest a first empiric formula predicting total motor score from the expression levels of our biomarker panel. Our data support the view that peripheral blood is a useful source to identify biomarkers for Huntington's disease and monitor disease progression in future clinical trials. PMID:25626709

  9. An Integrative Approach to Identifying Biologically Relevant Genes Jiangxin Wang

    E-print Network

    Liu, Huan

    An Integrative Approach to Identifying Biologically Relevant Genes Zheng Zhao Jiangxin Wang {zhaozheng, jiangxin.wang, sssharma, agarwal.nitin, huan.liu, yung.chang}@asu.edu Abstract Gene selection aims at detecting biologically relevant genes to assist biologists' research. The cDNA Microarray data

  10. Glomerular changes in hereditary single-gene diseases.

    PubMed

    Sessa, Adalberto; Meroni, Mietta; Battini, Graziana; Maglio, Alessia; Righetti, Marco; Fabris, Elisabetta; Nebuloni, Manuela; Pallotti, Francesco; Giordano, Ferdinando; Tosoni, Antonella

    2002-01-01

    Molecular genetics has strongly influenced clinical medicine and particularly nephrology. Several gene mutations of single-gene hereditary nephropathies have been recently identified. These data are useful to develop methods of diagnosis and treatment, but also to understand the pathogenesis of these particular disorders. In this review we focused on several monogenic hereditary renal diseases inducing nephrotic syndrome and other hereditary diseases with renal involvement and progression towards end-stage renal failure. PMID:12515374

  11. Gene Regulatory Networks Elucidating Huanglongbing Disease Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Martinelli, Federico; Reagan, Russell L.; Uratsu, Sandra L.; Phu, My L.; Albrecht, Ute; Zhao, Weixiang; Davis, Cristina E.; Bowman, Kim D.; Dandekar, Abhaya M.

    2013-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing was exploited to gain deeper insight into the response to infection by Candidatus liberibacter asiaticus (CaLas), especially the immune disregulation and metabolic dysfunction caused by source-sink disruption. Previous fruit transcriptome data were compared with additional RNA-Seq data in three tissues: immature fruit, and young and mature leaves. Four categories of orchard trees were studied: symptomatic, asymptomatic, apparently healthy, and healthy. Principal component analysis found distinct expression patterns between immature and mature fruits and leaf samples for all four categories of trees. A predicted protein – protein interaction network identified HLB-regulated genes for sugar transporters playing key roles in the overall plant responses. Gene set and pathway enrichment analyses highlight the role of sucrose and starch metabolism in disease symptom development in all tissues. HLB-regulated genes (glucose-phosphate-transporter, invertase, starch-related genes) would likely determine the source-sink relationship disruption. In infected leaves, transcriptomic changes were observed for light reactions genes (downregulation), sucrose metabolism (upregulation), and starch biosynthesis (upregulation). In parallel, symptomatic fruits over-expressed genes involved in photosynthesis, sucrose and raffinose metabolism, and downregulated starch biosynthesis. We visualized gene networks between tissues inducing a source-sink shift. CaLas alters the hormone crosstalk, resulting in weak and ineffective tissue-specific plant immune responses necessary for bacterial clearance. Accordingly, expression of WRKYs (including WRKY70) was higher in fruits than in leaves. Systemic acquired responses were inadequately activated in young leaves, generally considered the sites where most new infections occur. PMID:24086326

  12. Finding genetic overlaps among diseases based on ranked gene lists.

    PubMed

    Chen, Quan; Zhou, Xianghong J; Sun, Fengzhu

    2015-02-01

    To understand disease relationships in terms of their genetic mechanisms, it is important to study the common genetic basis among different diseases. Although discoveries on pleiotropic genes related to multiple diseases abound, methods flexibly applicable to various types of datasets generated from different studies or experiments are needed to gain big pictures on the genetic relationships among a large number of diseases. We develop a set of genetic similarity measures to gauge the genetic overlap between diseases, as well as several estimators of the number of overlapping disease genes between diseases. These methods are based on ranked gene lists so that they could be flexibly applied to different types of data. We first investigate the performance of the genetic similarity measure for evaluating the similarity between human diseases in simulation studies. Then we apply the method to diseases in the OMIM database. We show that our proposed genetic measure achieves superior performance in explaining phenotype similarities between diseases compared to simpler methods. Furthermore, we identified common genes underlying the genetic overlap between disease pairs. With an example of five vision-related diseases, we demonstrate how our methods can provide insights into the relationships among diseases based on their shared genetic mechanisms. PMID:25684200

  13. Identifying Novel Candidate Genes Related to Apoptosis from a Protein-Protein Interaction Network

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Baoman; Yuan, Fei; Kong, Xiangyin; Hu, Lan-Dian; Cai, Yu-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis is the process of programmed cell death (PCD) that occurs in multicellular organisms. This process of normal cell death is required to maintain the balance of homeostasis. In addition, some diseases, such as obesity, cancer, and neurodegenerative diseases, can be cured through apoptosis, which produces few side effects. An effective comprehension of the mechanisms underlying apoptosis will be helpful to prevent and treat some diseases. The identification of genes related to apoptosis is essential to uncover its underlying mechanisms. In this study, a computational method was proposed to identify novel candidate genes related to apoptosis. First, protein-protein interaction information was used to construct a weighted graph. Second, a shortest path algorithm was applied to the graph to search for new candidate genes. Finally, the obtained genes were filtered by a permutation test. As a result, 26 genes were obtained, and we discuss their likelihood of being novel apoptosis-related genes by collecting evidence from published literature. PMID:26543496

  14. Differential Network Analyses of Alzheimer’s Disease Identify Early Events in Alzheimer’s Disease Pathology

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Xia, Jing; Rocke, David M.; Perry, George; Ray, Monika

    2014-01-01

    In late-onset Alzheimer’s disease (AD), multiple brain regions are not affected simultaneously. Comparing the gene expression of the affected regions to identify the differences in the biological processes perturbed can lead to greater insight into AD pathogenesis and early characteristics. We identified differentially expressed (DE) genes from single cell microarray data of four AD affected brain regions: entorhinal cortex (EC), hippocampus (HIP), posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), and middle temporal gyrus (MTG). We organized the DE genes in the four brain regions into region-specific gene coexpression networks. Differential neighborhood analyses in the coexpression networks were performed to identify genes with lowmore »topological overlap (TO) of their direct neighbors. The low TO genes were used to characterize the biological differences between two regions. Our analyses show that increased oxidative stress, along with alterations in lipid metabolism in neurons, may be some of the very early events occurring in AD pathology. Cellular defense mechanisms try to intervene but fail, finally resulting in AD pathology as the disease progresses. Furthermore, disease annotation of the low TO genes in two independent protein interaction networks has resulted in association between cancer, diabetes, renal diseases, and cardiovascular diseases.« less

  15. ISSUE 55 JULY 2008 Genes and disease

    E-print Network

    Rambaut, Andrew

    influences on 25 diseases, and to study the genetics of learning in children and individuals' responses to or protect them from common diseases such as diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis and coronary heart disease. #12ISSUE 55 JULY 2008 FUNDING Genes and disease In this issue... FUNDING AND UPDATES 2­5 Project

  16. Broker Genes in Human Disease James J. Cai*,1,2

    E-print Network

    Borenstein, Elhanan

    variation. Notably, genes identified in genome-wide association study (GWAS) have network patterns the network patterns of complex disease genes identified through non-GWAS means. This suggests either that GWAS focused on a distinct set of diseases associated with an unusual set of genes or that mapping

  17. Systematic Analysis of New Drug Indications by Drug-Gene-Disease Coherent Subnetworks

    PubMed Central

    Wang, L; Wang, Y; Hu, Q; Li, S

    2014-01-01

    Drug targets and disease genes may work as driver factors at the transcriptional level, which propagate signals through gene regulatory network and cause the downstream genes' differential expression. How to analyze transcriptional response data to identify meaningful gene modules shared by both drugs and diseases is still a critical issue for drug-disease associations and molecular mechanism. In this article, we propose the drug-gene-disease coherent subnetwork concept to group the biological function related drugs, diseases, and genes. It was defined as the subnetwork with drug, gene, and disease as nodes and their interactions coherently crossing three data layers as edges. Integrating differential expression profiles of 418 drugs and 84 diseases, we develop a computational framework and identify 13 coherent subnetworks such as inflammatory bowel disease and melanoma relevant subnetwork. The results demonstrate that our coherent subnetwork approach is able to identify novel drug indications and highlight their molecular basis. PMID:25390685

  18. Bioinformatics analysis to identify the differentially expressed genes of glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    YAN, XIANG; YUAN, FEI; CHEN, XIUPING; DONG, CHUNQIONG

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to screen the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) associated with glaucoma and investigate the changing patterns of the expression of these genes. The GSE2378 gene microarray data of glaucoma was downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus database, which included seven normal samples and eight glaucoma astrocyte samples. Taking into account the corresponding associations between the probe ID and gene symbols, the DEGs were identified prior to and subsequent to the summation of probe level values using the Limma package in R language, followed by Gene Ontology (GO) and pathway enrichment analyses. Interaction networks of the DEGs were constructed using the Biomolecular Interaction Network Database, and cluster analysis of the genes in the networks was performed using ClusterONE. Subsequent to the summation of probe value, a total of 223 genes were identified as DEGs between the normal and glaucoma samples, including 74 downregulated and 149 upregulated genes. In addition, the DEGs were found to be associated with several functions, including response to wounding, extracellular region part and calcium ion binding. The most significantly enriched pathways were complement and coagulation cascades, arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy and extracellular matrix (ECM)-receptor interaction. Furthermore, interaction networks were constructed of the DEGs prior to and subsequent to the summation of probe values, and HNF4A and CEBPD were identified as hub genes. Additionally, 37 and 31 GO terms were identified to be enriched in the two DEGs of the networks prior to and subsequent to summation, respectively. The results indicated the identified genes associated with ECM as important, and the CEBPD gene was considered to be a critical gene in glaucoma. The findings of the present study offer a potential reference value in further investigations of glaucoma at the gene level. PMID:26135629

  19. Bioinformatics analysis to identify the differentially expressed genes of glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xiang; Yuan, Fei; Chen, Xiuping; Dong, Chunqiong

    2015-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to screen the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) associated with glaucoma and investigate the changing patterns of the expression of these genes. The GSE2378 gene microarray data of glaucoma was downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus database, which included seven normal samples and eight glaucoma astrocyte samples. Taking into account the corresponding associations between the probe ID and gene symbols, the DEGs were identified prior to and subsequent to the summation of probe level values using the Limma package in R language, followed by Gene Ontology (GO) and pathway enrichment analyses. Interaction networks of the DEGs were constructed using the Biomolecular Interaction Network Database, and cluster analysis of the genes in the networks was performed using ClusterONE. Subsequent to the summation of probe value, a total of 223 genes were identified as DEGs between the normal and glaucoma samples, including 74 downregulated and 149 upregulated genes. In addition, the DEGs were found to be associated with several functions, including response to wounding, extracellular region part and calcium ion binding. The most significantly enriched pathways were complement and coagulation cascades, arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy and extracellular matrix (ECM)?receptor interaction. Furthermore, interaction networks were constructed of the DEGs prior to and subsequent to the summation of probe values, and HNF4A and CEBPD were identified as hub genes. Additionally, 37 and 31 GO terms were identified to be enriched in the two DEGs of the networks prior to and subsequent to summation, respectively. The results indicated the identified genes associated with ECM as important, and the CEBPD gene was considered to be a critical gene in glaucoma. The findings of the present study offer a potential reference value in further investigations of glaucoma at the gene level. PMID:26135629

  20. Identifying Good Diagnostic Gene Groups from Gene Expression Profiles Using the Concept of Emerging Patterns

    E-print Network

    Wong, Limsoon

    that are significantly related to a disease can be detected by conducting a series of gene expression experiments the patterns from these genes. According to our studies on the ALL/AML dataset and the colon tumor dataset genes to treat a disease. Emerging patterns (Dong and Li, 1999) ---EPs for short---are an important

  1. Enhancing the Prioritization of Disease-Causing Genes through Tissue Specific Protein Interaction Networks

    E-print Network

    Ruppin, Eytan

    identify genomic intervals that are linked to a disease of interest. Second, the genes withinEnhancing the Prioritization of Disease-Causing Genes through Tissue Specific Protein Interaction Aviv, Israel Abstract The prioritization of candidate disease-causing genes is a fundamental challenge

  2. Genetic risk factors for the development of allergic disease identified by genome-wide association

    PubMed Central

    Portelli, M A; Hodge, E; Sayers, I

    2015-01-01

    An increasing proportion of the worldwide population is affected by allergic diseases such as allergic rhinitis (AR), atopic dermatitis (AD) and allergic asthma and improved treatment options are needed particularly for severe, refractory disease. Allergic diseases are complex and development involves both environmental and genetic factors. Although the existence of a genetic component for allergy was first described almost 100 years ago, progress in gene identification has been hindered by lack of high throughput technologies to investigate genetic variation in large numbers of subjects. The development of Genome-Wide Association Studies (GWAS), a hypothesis-free method of interrogating large numbers of common variants spanning the entire genome in disease and non-disease subjects has revolutionised our understanding of the genetics of allergic disease. Susceptibility genes for asthma, AR and AD have now been identified with confidence, suggesting there are common and distinct genetic loci associated with these diseases, providing novel insights into potential disease pathways and mechanisms. Genes involved in both adaptive and innate immune mechanisms have been identified, notably including multiple genes involved in epithelial function/secretion, suggesting that the airway epithelium may be particularly important in asthma. Interestingly, concordance/discordance between the genetic factors driving allergic traits such as IgE levels and disease states such as asthma have further supported the accumulating evidence for heterogeneity in these diseases. While GWAS have been useful and continue to identify novel genes for allergic diseases through increased sample sizes and phenotype refinement, future approaches will integrate analyses of rare variants, epigenetic mechanisms and eQTL approaches, leading to greater insight into the genetic basis of these diseases. Gene identification will improve our understanding of disease mechanisms and generate potential therapeutic opportunities. PMID:24766371

  3. A predictive approach to identify genes differentially expressed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saraiva, Erlandson F.; Louzada, Francisco; Milan, Luís A.; Meira, Silvana; Cobre, Juliana

    2012-10-01

    The main objective of gene expression data analysis is to identify genes that present significant changes in expression levels between a treatment and a control biological condition. In this paper, we propose a Bayesian approach to identify genes differentially expressed calculating credibility intervals from predictive densities which are constructed using sampled mean treatment effect from all genes in study excluding the treatment effect of genes previously identified with statistical evidence for difference. We compare our Bayesian approach with the standard ones based on the use of the t-test and modified t-tests via a simulation study, using small sample sizes which are common in gene expression data analysis. Results obtained indicate that the proposed approach performs better than standard ones, especially for cases with mean differences and increases in treatment variance in relation to control variance. We also apply the methodologies to a publicly available data set on Escherichia coli bacteria.

  4. Testing a computational model of categorisation and category combination: Identifying diseases and new disease combinations.

    E-print Network

    Costello, Fintan

    Testing a computational model of categorisation and category combination: Identifying diseases and new disease combinations. Fintan Costello (fintan@compapp.dcu.ie), School of Computer Applications people learned to identify (imaginary) diseases, and then classified patient descriptions into single

  5. Meta-Analysis Approach identifies Candidate Genes and associated Molecular Networks for Type-2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Rasche, Axel; Al-Hasani, Hadi; Herwig, Ralf

    2008-01-01

    Background Multiple functional genomics data for complex human diseases have been published and made available by researchers worldwide. The main goal of these studies is the detailed analysis of a particular aspect of the disease. Complementary, meta-analysis approaches try to extract supersets of disease genes and interaction networks by integrating and combining these individual studies using statistical approaches. Results Here we report on a meta-analysis approach that integrates data of heterogeneous origin in the domain of type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Different data sources such as DNA microarrays and, complementing, qualitative data covering several human and mouse tissues are integrated and analyzed with a Bootstrap scoring approach in order to extract disease relevance of the genes. The purpose of the meta-analysis is two-fold: on the one hand it identifies a group of genes with overall disease relevance indicating common, tissue-independent processes related to the disease; on the other hand it identifies genes showing specific alterations with respect to a single study. Using a random sampling approach we computed a core set of 213 T2DM genes across multiple tissues in human and mouse, including well-known genes such as Pdk4, Adipoq, Scd, Pik3r1, Socs2 that monitor important hallmarks of T2DM, for example the strong relationship between obesity and insulin resistance, as well as a large fraction (128) of yet barely characterized novel candidate genes. Furthermore, we explored functional information and identified cellular networks associated with this core set of genes such as pathway information, protein-protein interactions and gene regulatory networks. Additionally, we set up a web interface in order to allow users to screen T2DM relevance for any – yet non-associated – gene. Conclusion In our paper we have identified a core set of 213 T2DM candidate genes by a meta-analysis of existing data sources. We have explored the relation of these genes to disease relevant information and – using enrichment analysis – we have identified biological networks on different layers of cellular information such as signaling and metabolic pathways, gene regulatory networks and protein-protein interactions. The web interface is accessible via . PMID:18590522

  6. Recent gene therapy advancements for neurological diseases.

    PubMed

    Nagabhushan Kalburgi, Sahana; Khan, Nadia N; Gray, Steven J

    2013-02-01

    The past few years have seen rapid advancements in vector-mediated gene transfer to the nervous system and modest successes in human gene therapy trials. The purpose of this review is to describe commonly-used viral gene transfer vectors and recent advancements towards producing meaningful gene-based treatments for central nervous system (CNS) disorders. Gene therapy trials for Canavan disease, Batten disease, adrenoleukodystrophy, and Parkinson's disease are discussed to illustrate the current state of clinical gene transfer to the CNS. Preclinical studies are under way for a number of diseases, primarily lysosomal storage disorders, using a newer generation of vectors and delivery strategies. Relevant studies in animal models are highlighted for Mucopolysaccharidosis IIIB and Krabbe disease to provide a prelude for what can be expected in the coming years for human gene transfer trials, using recent advancements in gene transfer technology. In conclusion, recent improvements in CNS gene transfer technology are expected to significantly increase the degree of disease rescue in future CNS-directed clinical trials, exceeding the modest clinical successes that have been observed so far. PMID:23449113

  7. Rice transcriptome analysis to identify possible herbicide quinclorac detoxification genes

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wenying; Di, Chao; Zhou, Shaoxia; Liu, Jia; Li, Li; Liu, Fengxia; Yang, Xinling; Ling, Yun; Su, Zhen

    2015-01-01

    Quinclorac is a highly selective auxin-type herbicide and is widely used in the effective control of barnyard grass in paddy rice fields, improving the world's rice yield. The herbicide mode of action of quinclorac has been proposed, and hormone interactions affecting quinclorac signaling has been identified. Because of widespread use, quinclorac may be transported outside rice fields with the drainage waters, leading to soil and water pollution and other environmental health problems. In this study, we used 57K Affymetrix rice whole-genome array to identify quinclorac signaling response genes to study the molecular mechanisms of action and detoxification of quinclorac in rice plants. Overall, 637 probe sets were identified with differential expression levels under either 6 or 24 h of quinclorac treatment. Auxin-related genes such as GH3 and OsIAAs responded to quinclorac treatment. Gene Ontology analysis showed that genes of detoxification-related family genes were significantly enriched, including cytochrome P450, GST, UGT, and ABC and drug transporter genes. Moreover, real-time RT-PCR analysis showed that top candidate genes of P450 families such as CYP81, CYP709C, and CYP72A were universally induced by different herbicides. Some Arabidopsis genes of the same P450 family were up-regulated under quinclorac treatment. We conducted rice whole-genome GeneChip analysis and the first global identification of quinclorac response genes. This work may provide potential markers for detoxification of quinclorac and biomonitors of environmental chemical pollution. PMID:26483837

  8. Rice transcriptome analysis to identify possible herbicide quinclorac detoxification genes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wenying; Di, Chao; Zhou, Shaoxia; Liu, Jia; Li, Li; Liu, Fengxia; Yang, Xinling; Ling, Yun; Su, Zhen

    2015-01-01

    Quinclorac is a highly selective auxin-type herbicide and is widely used in the effective control of barnyard grass in paddy rice fields, improving the world's rice yield. The herbicide mode of action of quinclorac has been proposed, and hormone interactions affecting quinclorac signaling has been identified. Because of widespread use, quinclorac may be transported outside rice fields with the drainage waters, leading to soil and water pollution and other environmental health problems. In this study, we used 57K Affymetrix rice whole-genome array to identify quinclorac signaling response genes to study the molecular mechanisms of action and detoxification of quinclorac in rice plants. Overall, 637 probe sets were identified with differential expression levels under either 6 or 24 h of quinclorac treatment. Auxin-related genes such as GH3 and OsIAAs responded to quinclorac treatment. Gene Ontology analysis showed that genes of detoxification-related family genes were significantly enriched, including cytochrome P450, GST, UGT, and ABC and drug transporter genes. Moreover, real-time RT-PCR analysis showed that top candidate genes of P450 families such as CYP81, CYP709C, and CYP72A were universally induced by different herbicides. Some Arabidopsis genes of the same P450 family were up-regulated under quinclorac treatment. We conducted rice whole-genome GeneChip analysis and the first global identification of quinclorac response genes. This work may provide potential markers for detoxification of quinclorac and biomonitors of environmental chemical pollution. PMID:26483837

  9. Early Warning Sign for Kidney Disease Identified in Study

    MedlinePLUS

    ... news/fullstory_155546.html Early Warning Sign for Kidney Disease Identified in Study Researchers say blood test ... ve discovered an early warning sign of chronic kidney disease. They found that levels of a common ...

  10. Assessment of gene order computing methods for Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Computational genomics of Alzheimer disease (AD), the most common form of senile dementia, is a nascent field in AD research. The field includes AD gene clustering by computing gene order which generates higher quality gene clustering patterns than most other clustering methods. However, there are few available gene order computing methods such as Genetic Algorithm (GA) and Ant Colony Optimization (ACO). Further, their performance in gene order computation using AD microarray data is not known. We thus set forth to evaluate the performances of current gene order computing methods with different distance formulas, and to identify additional features associated with gene order computation. Methods Using different distance formulas- Pearson distance and Euclidean distance, the squared Euclidean distance, and other conditions, gene orders were calculated by ACO and GA (including standard GA and improved GA) methods, respectively. The qualities of the gene orders were compared, and new features from the calculated gene orders were identified. Results Compared to the GA methods tested in this study, ACO fits the AD microarray data the best when calculating gene order. In addition, the following features were revealed: different distance formulas generated a different quality of gene order, and the commonly used Pearson distance was not the best distance formula when used with both GA and ACO methods for AD microarray data. Conclusion Compared with Pearson distance and Euclidean distance, the squared Euclidean distance generated the best quality gene order computed by GA and ACO methods. PMID:23369541

  11. Transposon tagging of disease resistance genes

    SciTech Connect

    Michelmore, R.W. . Dept. of Physics)

    1989-01-01

    We are developing a transposon mutagenesis system for lettuce to clone genes for resistance to the fungal pathogen, Bremia lactucae. Activity of heterologous transposons is being studied in transgenic plants. Southern analysis of T{sub 1} and T{sub 2} plants containing Tam3 from Antirrhinum provided ambiguous results. Multiple endonuclease digests indicated that transposition had occurred; however, in no plant were all endonuclease digests consistent with a simple excision event. Southern or PCR analysis of over 50 plans containing Ac from maize have also failed to reveal clear evidence of transposition; this is contrast to experiments by others with the same constructs who have observed high rates of Ac excision in other plant species. Nearly all of 65 T{sub 2} families containing Ac interrupting a chimeric streptomycin resistance gene (Courtesy J. Jones, Sainsbury Lab., UK) clearly segregated for streptomycin resistance. Southern analyses, however, showed no evidence of transposition, indicating restoration of a functional message by other mechanisms, possibly mRNA processing. Transgenic plants have also been generated containing CaMV 35S or hsp70 promoters fused to transposase coding sequences or a Ds element interrupting a chimeric GUS gene (Courtesy M. Lassner, UC Davis). F{sub 1} plants containing both constructs were analyzed for transposition. Only two plants containing both constructs were obtained from 48 progeny, far fewer than expected, and neither showed evidence of transposition in Southerns and GUS assays. We are currently constructing further chimeric transposase fusions. To test for the stability of the targeted disease resistance genes, 50,000 F{sub 1} plants heterozygous for three resistance genes were generated; no mutants have been identified in the 5000 so far screened.

  12. UI researchers identify key gene that controls emergence of salmonella.

    E-print Network

    Bashir, Rashid

    UI researchers identify key gene that controls emergence of salmonella. New service offers parents while obtaining my de- gree," Meyer said. "I didn't have to pick up my entire life and move downstate

  13. Zebrafish promoter microarrays identify actively transcribed embryonic genes

    E-print Network

    Wardle, Fiona C.; Odom, Duncan T.; Bell, George W.; Yuan, Bingbing; Danford, Timothy W.; Wiellette, Elizabeth L.; Herbolsheimer, Elizabeth; Sive, Hazel L.; Young, Richard A.; Smith, James C.

    2006-08-04

    Abstract We have designed a zebrafish genomic microarray to identify DNA-protein interactions in the proximal promoter regions of over 11,000 zebrafish genes. Using these microarrays, together with chromatin immunoprecipitation with an antibody...

  14. Zebrafish promoter microarrays identify actively transcribed embryonic genes

    E-print Network

    Wardle, Fiona C

    We have designed a zebrafish genomic microarray to identify DNA-protein interactions in the proximal promoter regions of over 11,000 zebrafish genes. Using these microarrays, together with chromatin immunoprecipitation ...

  15. ORIGINAL PAPER Identifying differentially expressed genes in human acute leukemia

    E-print Network

    Gu, Xun

    ORIGINAL PAPER Identifying differentially expressed genes in human acute leukemia and mouse brain the experimental-wise false discovery rate. A human acute leukemia dataset corrected from 38 leukemia patients

  16. Identifying differentially expressed genes from microarray experiments via statistic synthesis

    E-print Network

    Yang, Yee Hwa

    expression information on a whole genome level. There are several types of microarray technology including to the biology and technology underlying microarrays. Microarray experiments generate large and complexIdentifying differentially expressed genes from microarray experiments via statistic synthesis Yee

  17. Researchers Pinpoint Genes Linked to Height, Heart Disease

    MedlinePLUS

    ... rights reserved. More Health News on: Genes and Gene Therapy Heart Diseases Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Genes and Gene Therapy Heart Diseases About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Contact ...

  18. Identifying The Most Significant Genes From Gene Expression Profiles For Sample Classification

    E-print Network

    Al-Mubaid, Hisham

    and manipulation of gene expression data. These data include H. Al-Mubaid and N. Ghaffari are with the ComputerIdentifying The Most Significant Genes From Gene Expression Profiles For Sample Classification Hisham Al-Mubaid and Noushin Ghaffari, Member, IEEE Abstract-- The gene expression data generated

  19. When Noisy Neighbors Are a Blessing: Analysis of Gene Expression Noise Identifies Coregulated Genes

    E-print Network

    Junker, Jan Philipp

    In this issue of Molecular Cell, Stewart-Ornstein et al. (2012) use systematic pair-wise correlation analysis of expression noise in a large number of yeast genes to identify clusters of functionally related genes and ...

  20. Immunogenetic Mechanisms Leading to Thyroid Autoimmunity: Recent Advances in Identifying Susceptibility Genes and Regions

    PubMed Central

    Brand, Oliver J; Gough, Stephen C.L

    2011-01-01

    The autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD) include Graves’ disease (GD) and Hashimoto’s thyroiditis (HT), which are characterised by a breakdown in immune tolerance to thyroid antigens. Unravelling the genetic architecture of AITD is vital to better understanding of AITD pathogenesis, required to advance therapeutic options in both disease management and prevention. The early whole-genome linkage and candidate gene association studies provided the first evidence that the HLA region and CTLA-4 represented AITD risk loci. Recent improvements in; high throughput genotyping technologies, collection of larger disease cohorts and cataloguing of genome-scale variation have facilitated genome-wide association studies and more thorough screening of candidate gene regions. This has allowed identification of many novel AITD risk genes and more detailed association mapping. The growing number of confirmed AITD susceptibility loci, implicates a number of putative disease mechanisms most of which are tightly linked with aspects of immune system function. The unprecedented advances in genetic study will allow future studies to identify further novel disease risk genes and to identify aetiological variants within specific gene regions, which will undoubtedly lead to a better understanding of AITD patho-physiology. PMID:22654554

  1. Inferring Gene Family Histories in Yeast Identifies Lineage Specific Expansions

    PubMed Central

    Ames, Ryan M.; Money, Daniel; Lovell, Simon C.

    2014-01-01

    The complement of genes found in the genome is a balance between gene gain and gene loss. Knowledge of the specific genes that are gained and lost over evolutionary time allows an understanding of the evolution of biological functions. Here we use new evolutionary models to infer gene family histories across complete yeast genomes; these models allow us to estimate the relative genome-wide rates of gene birth, death, innovation and extinction (loss of an entire family) for the first time. We show that the rates of gene family evolution vary both between gene families and between species. We are also able to identify those families that have experienced rapid lineage specific expansion/contraction and show that these families are enriched for specific functions. Moreover, we find that families with specific functions are repeatedly expanded in multiple species, suggesting the presence of common adaptations and that these family expansions/contractions are not random. Additionally, we identify potential specialisations, unique to specific species, in the functions of lineage specific expanded families. These results suggest that an important mechanism in the evolution of genome content is the presence of lineage-specific gene family changes. PMID:24921666

  2. Candidate DNA repair susceptibility genes identified by exome sequencing in high-risk pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Smith, Alyssa L; Alirezaie, Najmeh; Connor, Ashton; Chan-Seng-Yue, Michelle; Grant, Robert; Selander, Iris; Bascuñana, Claire; Borgida, Ayelet; Hall, Anita; Whelan, Thomas; Holter, Spring; McPherson, Treasa; Cleary, Sean; Petersen, Gloria M; Omeroglu, Atilla; Saloustros, Emmanouil; McPherson, John; Stein, Lincoln D; Foulkes, William D; Majewski, Jacek; Gallinger, Steven; Zogopoulos, George

    2016-01-28

    The genetic basis underlying the majority of hereditary pancreatic adenocarcinoma (PC) is unknown. Since DNA repair genes are widely implicated in gastrointestinal malignancies, including PC, we hypothesized that there are novel DNA repair PC susceptibility genes. As germline DNA repair gene mutations may lead to PC subtypes with selective therapeutic responses, we also hypothesized that there is an overall survival (OS) difference in mutation carriers versus non-carriers. We therefore interrogated the germline exomes of 109 high-risk PC cases for rare protein-truncating variants (PTVs) in 513 putative DNA repair genes. We identified PTVs in 41 novel genes among 36 kindred. Additional genetic evidence for causality was obtained for 17 genes, with FAN1, NEK1 and RHNO1 emerging as the strongest candidates. An OS difference was observed for carriers versus non-carriers of PTVs with early stage (?IIB) disease. This adverse survival trend in carriers with early stage disease was also observed in an independent series of 130 PC cases. We identified candidate DNA repair PC susceptibility genes and suggest that carriers of a germline PTV in a DNA repair gene with early stage disease have worse survival. PMID:26546047

  3. Identifying Housekeeping Gene Primers in Lodgepole Pine Dwarf Mistletoe (Arceuthobium americanum)

    E-print Network

    Gosselin, Louis A.

    Identifying Housekeeping Gene Primers in Lodgepole Pine Dwarf Mistletoe (Arceuthobium americanum quantification is accurate. High quality reference genes are stably expressed genes, commonly housekeeping genes reference gene primers are required for stability experimentation. Therefore, more housekeeping gene primers

  4. Discovering transnosological molecular basis of human brain diseases using biclustering analysis of integrated gene expression data

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background It has been reported that several brain diseases can be treated as transnosological manner implicating possible common molecular basis under those diseases. However, molecular level commonality among those brain diseases has been largely unexplored. Gene expression analyses of human brain have been used to find genes associated with brain diseases but most of those studies were restricted either to an individual disease or to a couple of diseases. In addition, identifying significant genes in such brain diseases mostly failed when it used typical methods depending on differentially expressed genes. Results In this study, we used a correlation-based biclustering approach to find coexpressed gene sets in five neurodegenerative diseases and three psychiatric disorders. By using biclustering analysis, we could efficiently and fairly identified various gene sets expressed specifically in both single and multiple brain diseases. We could find 4,307 gene sets correlatively expressed in multiple brain diseases and 3,409 gene sets exclusively specified in individual brain diseases. The function enrichment analysis of those gene sets showed many new possible functional bases as well as neurological processes that are common or specific for those eight diseases. Conclusions This study introduces possible common molecular bases for several brain diseases, which open the opportunity to clarify the transnosological perspective assumed in brain diseases. It also showed the advantages of correlation-based biclustering analysis and accompanying function enrichment analysis for gene expression data in this type of investigation. PMID:26043779

  5. Linking Genes to Cardiovascular Diseases: Gene Action and Gene-Environment Interactions.

    PubMed

    Pasipoularides, Ares

    2015-12-01

    A unique myocardial characteristic is its ability to grow/remodel in order to adapt; this is determined partly by genes and partly by the environment and the milieu intérieur. In the "post-genomic" era, a need is emerging to elucidate the physiologic functions of myocardial genes, as well as potential adaptive and maladaptive modulations induced by environmental/epigenetic factors. Genome sequencing and analysis advances have become exponential lately, with escalation of our knowledge concerning sometimes controversial genetic underpinnings of cardiovascular diseases. Current technologies can identify candidate genes variously involved in diverse normal/abnormal morphomechanical phenotypes, and offer insights into multiple genetic factors implicated in complex cardiovascular syndromes. The expression profiles of thousands of genes are regularly ascertained under diverse conditions. Global analyses of gene expression levels are useful for cataloging genes and correlated phenotypes, and for elucidating the role of genes in maladies. Comparative expression of gene networks coupled to complex disorders can contribute insights as to how "modifier genes" influence the expressed phenotypes. Increasingly, a more comprehensive and detailed systematic understanding of genetic abnormalities underlying, for example, various genetic cardiomyopathies is emerging. Implementing genomic findings in cardiology practice may well lead directly to better diagnosing and therapeutics. There is currently evolving a strong appreciation for the value of studying gene anomalies, and doing so in a non-disjointed, cohesive manner. However, it is challenging for many-practitioners and investigators-to comprehend, interpret, and utilize the clinically increasingly accessible and affordable cardiovascular genomics studies. This survey addresses the need for fundamental understanding in this vital area. PMID:26545598

  6. Integrating Diverse Types of Genomic Data to Identify Genes that Underlie Adverse Pregnancy Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Hirbo, Jibril; Eidem, Haley; Rokas, Antonis; Abbot, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Progress in understanding complex genetic diseases has been bolstered by synthetic approaches that overlay diverse data types and analyses to identify functionally important genes. Pre-term birth (PTB), a major complication of pregnancy, is a leading cause of infant mortality worldwide. A major obstacle in addressing PTB is that the mechanisms controlling parturition and birth timing remain poorly understood. Integrative approaches that overlay datasets derived from comparative genomics with function-derived ones have potential to advance our understanding of the genetics of birth timing, and thus provide insights into the genes that may contribute to PTB. We intersected data from fast evolving coding and non-coding gene regions in the human and primate lineage with data from genes expressed in the placenta, from genes that show enriched expression only in the placenta, as well as from genes that are differentially expressed in four distinct PTB clinical subtypes. A large fraction of genes that are expressed in placenta, and differentially expressed in PTB clinical subtypes (23–34%) are fast evolving, and are associated with functions that include adhesion neurodevelopmental and immune processes. Functional categories of genes that express fast evolution in coding regions differ from those linked to fast evolution in non-coding regions. Finally, there is a surprising lack of overlap between fast evolving genes that are differentially expressed in four PTB clinical subtypes. Integrative approaches, especially those that incorporate evolutionary perspectives, can be successful in identifying potential genetic contributions to complex genetic diseases, such as PTB. PMID:26641094

  7. A systematic screening to identify de novo mutations causing sporadic early-onset Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Kun-Rodrigues, Celia; Ganos, Christos; Guerreiro, Rita; Schneider, Susanne A; Schulte, Claudia; Lesage, Suzanne; Darwent, Lee; Holmans, Peter; Singleton, Andrew; Bhatia, Kailash; Bras, Jose

    2015-12-01

    Despite the many advances in our understanding of the genetic basis of Mendelian forms of Parkinson's disease (PD), a large number of early-onset cases still remain to be explained. Many of these cases, present with a form of disease that is identical to that underlined by genetic causes, but do not have mutations in any of the currently known disease-causing genes. Here, we hypothesized that de novo mutations may account for a proportion of these early-onset, sporadic cases. We performed exome sequencing in full parent-child trios where the proband presents with typical PD to unequivocally identify de novo mutations. This approach allows us to test all genes in the genome in an unbiased manner. We have identified and confirmed 20 coding de novo mutations in 21 trios. We have used publicly available population genetic data to compare variant frequencies and our independent in-house dataset of exome sequencing in PD (with over 1200 cases) to identify additional variants in the same genes. Of the genes identified to carry de novo mutations, PTEN, VAPB and ASNA1 are supported by various sources of data to be involved in PD. We show that these genes are reported to be within a protein-protein interaction network with PD genes and that they contain additional rare, case-specific, mutations in our independent cohort of PD cases. Our results support the involvement of these three genes in PD and suggest that testing for de novo mutations in sporadic disease may aid in the identification of novel disease-causing genes. PMID:26362251

  8. A systematic screening to identify de novo mutations causing sporadic early-onset Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Kun-Rodrigues, Celia; Ganos, Christos; Guerreiro, Rita; Schneider, Susanne A.; Schulte, Claudia; Lesage, Suzanne; Darwent, Lee; Holmans, Peter; Singleton, Andrew; Bhatia, Kailash; Bras, Jose

    2015-01-01

    Despite the many advances in our understanding of the genetic basis of Mendelian forms of Parkinson's disease (PD), a large number of early-onset cases still remain to be explained. Many of these cases, present with a form of disease that is identical to that underlined by genetic causes, but do not have mutations in any of the currently known disease-causing genes. Here, we hypothesized that de novo mutations may account for a proportion of these early-onset, sporadic cases. We performed exome sequencing in full parent–child trios where the proband presents with typical PD to unequivocally identify de novo mutations. This approach allows us to test all genes in the genome in an unbiased manner. We have identified and confirmed 20 coding de novo mutations in 21 trios. We have used publicly available population genetic data to compare variant frequencies and our independent in-house dataset of exome sequencing in PD (with over 1200 cases) to identify additional variants in the same genes. Of the genes identified to carry de novo mutations, PTEN, VAPB and ASNA1 are supported by various sources of data to be involved in PD. We show that these genes are reported to be within a protein–protein interaction network with PD genes and that they contain additional rare, case-specific, mutations in our independent cohort of PD cases. Our results support the involvement of these three genes in PD and suggest that testing for de novo mutations in sporadic disease may aid in the identification of novel disease-causing genes. PMID:26362251

  9. A computational framework for the prioritization of disease-gene candidates

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background The identification of genes and uncovering the role they play in diseases is an important and complex challenge. Genome-wide linkage and association studies have made advancements in identifying genetic variants that underpin human disease. An important challenge now is to identify meaningful disease-associated genes from a long list of candidate genes implicated by these analyses. The application of gene prioritization can enhance our understanding of disease mechanisms and aid in the discovery of drug targets. The integration of protein-protein interaction networks along with disease datasets and contextual information is an important tool in unraveling the molecular basis of diseases. Results In this paper we propose a computational pipeline for the prioritization of disease-gene candidates. Diverse heterogeneous data including: gene-expression, protein-protein interaction network, ontology-based similarity and topological measures and tissue-specific are integrated. The pipeline was applied to prioritize Alzheimer's Disease (AD) genes, whereby a list of 32 prioritized genes was generated. This approach correctly identified key AD susceptible genes: PSEN1 and TRAF1. Biological process enrichment analysis revealed the prioritized genes are modulated in AD pathogenesis including: regulation of neurogenesis and generation of neurons. Relatively high predictive performance (AUC: 0.70) was observed when classifying AD and normal gene expression profiles from individuals using leave-one-out cross validation. Conclusions This work provides a foundation for future investigation of diverse heterogeneous data integration for disease-gene prioritization. PMID:26330267

  10. Phenolyzer: phenotype-based prioritization of candidate genes for human diseases.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hui; Robinson, Peter N; Wang, Kai

    2015-09-01

    Prior biological knowledge and phenotype information may help to identify disease genes from human whole-genome and whole-exome sequencing studies. We developed Phenolyzer (http://phenolyzer.usc.edu), a tool that uses prior information to implicate genes involved in diseases. Phenolyzer exhibits superior performance over competing methods for prioritizing Mendelian and complex disease genes, based on disease or phenotype terms entered as free text. PMID:26192085

  11. Co-clustering phenome–genome for phenotype classification and disease gene discovery

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, TaeHyun; Atluri, Gowtham; Xie, MaoQiang; Dey, Sanjoy; Hong, Changjin; Kumar, Vipin; Kuang, Rui

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the categorization of human diseases is critical for reliably identifying disease causal genes. Recently, genome-wide studies of abnormal chromosomal locations related to diseases have mapped >2000 phenotype–gene relations, which provide valuable information for classifying diseases and identifying candidate genes as drug targets. In this article, a regularized non-negative matrix tri-factorization (R-NMTF) algorithm is introduced to co-cluster phenotypes and genes, and simultaneously detect associations between the detected phenotype clusters and gene clusters. The R-NMTF algorithm factorizes the phenotype–gene association matrix under the prior knowledge from phenotype similarity network and protein–protein interaction network, supervised by the label information from known disease classes and biological pathways. In the experiments on disease phenotype–gene associations in OMIM and KEGG disease pathways, R-NMTF significantly improved the classification of disease phenotypes and disease pathway genes compared with support vector machines and Label Propagation in cross-validation on the annotated phenotypes and genes. The newly predicted phenotypes in each disease class are highly consistent with human phenotype ontology annotations. The roles of the new member genes in the disease pathways are examined and validated in the protein–protein interaction subnetworks. Extensive literature review also confirmed many new members of the disease classes and pathways as well as the predicted associations between disease phenotype classes and pathways. PMID:22735708

  12. An in vivo screen to identify candidate neurogenic genes in the developing Xenopus visual system.

    PubMed

    Bestman, Jennifer E; Huang, Lin-Chien; Lee-Osbourne, Jane; Cheung, Phillip; Cline, Hollis T

    2015-12-15

    Neurogenesis in the brain of Xenopus laevis continues throughout larval stages of development. We developed a 2-tier screen to identify candidate genes controlling neurogenesis in Xenopus optic tectum in vivo. First, microarray and NanoString analyses were used to identify candidate genes that were differentially expressed in Sox2-expressing neural progenitor cells or their neuronal progeny. Then an in vivo, time-lapse imaging-based screen was used to test whether morpholinos against 34 candidate genes altered neural progenitor cell proliferation or neuronal differentiation over 3 days in the optic tectum of intact Xenopus tadpoles. We co-electroporated antisense morpholino oligonucleotides against each of the candidate genes with a plasmid that drives GFP expression in Sox2-expressing neural progenitor cells and quantified the effects of morpholinos on neurogenesis. Of the 34 morpholinos tested, 24 altered neural progenitor cell proliferation or neuronal differentiation. The candidates which were tagged as differentially expressed and validated by the in vivo imaging screen include: actn1, arl9, eif3a, elk4, ephb1, fmr1-a, fxr1-1, fbxw7, fgf2, gstp1, hat1, hspa5, lsm6, mecp2, mmp9, and prkaca. Several of these candidates, including fgf2 and elk4, have known or proposed neurogenic functions, thereby validating our strategy to identify candidates. Genes with no previously demonstrated neurogenic functions, gstp1, hspa5 and lsm6, were identified from the morpholino experiments, suggesting that our screen successfully revealed unknown candidates. Genes that are associated with human disease, such as such as mecp2 and fmr1-a, were identified by our screen, providing the groundwork for using Xenopus as an experimental system to probe conserved disease mechanisms. Together the data identify candidate neurogenic regulatory genes and demonstrate that Xenopus is an effective experimental animal to identify and characterize genes that regulate neural progenitor cell proliferation and differentiation in vivo. PMID:25818835

  13. Axon Regeneration Genes Identified by RNAi Screening in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Nix, Paola; Hammarlund, Marc; Hauth, Linda; Lachnit, Martina; Jorgensen, Erik M.

    2014-01-01

    Axons of the mammalian CNS lose the ability to regenerate soon after development due to both an inhibitory CNS environment and the loss of cell-intrinsic factors necessary for regeneration. The complex molecular events required for robust regeneration of mature neurons are not fully understood, particularly in vivo. To identify genes affecting axon regeneration in Caenorhabditis elegans, we performed both an RNAi-based screen for defective motor axon regeneration in unc-70/?-spectrin mutants and a candidate gene screen. From these screens, we identified at least 50 conserved genes with growth-promoting or growth-inhibiting functions. Through our analysis of mutants, we shed new light on certain aspects of regeneration, including the role of ?-spectrin and membrane dynamics, the antagonistic activity of MAP kinase signaling pathways, and the role of stress in promoting axon regeneration. Many gene candidates had not previously been associated with axon regeneration and implicate new pathways of interest for therapeutic intervention. PMID:24403161

  14. DCEG Scientists Identify New Gene Mutation Related to Familial Melanoma

    Cancer.gov

    Scientists have identified a rare inherited mutation in a gene that can increase the risk of familial melanoma, according to a study that appeared online in Nature Genetics on March 30, 2014. Although the finding does not offer immediate benefit to patients, variation in the Protection of Telomeres-1 (POT1) gene provides additional clues as to the origins of melanoma and may open new avenues in prevention and treatment research.

  15. Next-generation sequencing identifies transportin 3 as the causative gene for LGMD1F.

    PubMed

    Torella, Annalaura; Fanin, Marina; Mutarelli, Margherita; Peterle, Enrico; Del Vecchio Blanco, Francesca; Rispoli, Rossella; Savarese, Marco; Garofalo, Arcomaria; Piluso, Giulio; Morandi, Lucia; Ricci, Giulia; Siciliano, Gabriele; Angelini, Corrado; Nigro, Vincenzo

    2013-01-01

    Limb-girdle muscular dystrophies (LGMD) are genetically and clinically heterogeneous conditions. We investigated a large family with autosomal dominant transmission pattern, previously classified as LGMD1F and mapped to chromosome 7q32. Affected members are characterized by muscle weakness affecting earlier the pelvic girdle and the ileopsoas muscles. We sequenced the whole exome of four family members and identified a shared heterozygous frame-shift variant in the Transportin 3 (TNPO3) gene, encoding a member of the importin-? super-family. The TNPO3 gene is mapped within the LGMD1F critical interval and its 923-amino acid human gene product is also expressed in skeletal muscle. In addition, we identified an isolated case of LGMD with a new missense mutation in the same gene. We localized the mutant TNPO3 around the nucleus, but not inside. The involvement of gene related to the nuclear transport suggests a novel disease mechanism leading to muscular dystrophy. PMID:23667635

  16. Gene expression profile in multiple sclerosis patients and healthy controls: identifying

    E-print Network

    Ringnér, Markus

    Gene expression profile in multiple sclerosis patients and healthy controls: identifying pathways June 12, 2003; Accepted June 26, 2003 Multiple sclerosis (MS) and other T cell-mediated autoimmune cells aimed at characterizing disease phenotypes. INTRODUCTION Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic

  17. Gene Therapy For Ischemic Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lavu, Madhav; Gundewar, Susheel; Lefer, David J.

    2010-01-01

    Current pharmacologic therapy for ischemic heart disease suffers multiple limitations such as compliance issues and side effects of medications. Revascularization procedures often end with need for repeat procedures. Patients remain symptomatic despite maximal medical therapy. Gene therapy offers an attractive alternative to current pharmacologic therapies and may be beneficial in refractory disease. Gene therapy with isoforms of growth factors such as VEGF, FGF and HGF induces angiogenesis, decreases apoptosis and leads to protection in the ischemic heart. Stem cell therapy augmented with gene therapy used for myogenesis has proven to be beneficial in numerous animal models of myocardial ischemia. Gene therapy coding for antioxidants, eNOS, HSP, mitogen-activated protein kinase and numerous other anti apoptotic proteins have demonstrated significant cardioprotection in animal models. Clinical trials have demonstrated safety in humans apart from symptomatic and objective improvements in cardiac function. Current research efforts are aimed at refining various gene transfection techniques and regulation of gene expression in vivo in the heart and circulation to improve clinical outcomes in patients that suffer from ischemic heart disease. In this review article we will attempt to summarize the current state of both preclinical and clinical studies of gene therapy to combat myocardial ischemic disease. PMID:20600100

  18. An Effective Method to Identify Shared Pathways and Common Factors among Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ping; Nie, Yaling; Yu, Jingkai

    2015-01-01

    Groups of distinct but related diseases often share common symptoms, which suggest likely overlaps in underlying pathogenic mechanisms. Identifying the shared pathways and common factors among those disorders can be expected to deepen our understanding for them and help designing new treatment strategies effected on those diseases. Neurodegeneration diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD) and Huntington's disease (HD), were taken as a case study in this research. Reported susceptibility genes for AD, PD and HD were collected and human protein-protein interaction network (hPPIN) was used to identify biological pathways related to neurodegeneration. 81 KEGG pathways were found to be correlated with neurodegenerative disorders. 36 out of the 81 are human disease pathways, and the remaining ones are involved in miscellaneous human functional pathways. Cancers and infectious diseases are two major subclasses within the disease group. Apoptosis is one of the most significant functional pathways. Most of those pathways found here are actually consistent with prior knowledge of neurodegenerative diseases except two cell communication pathways: adherens and tight junctions. Gene expression analysis showed a high probability that the two pathways were related to neurodegenerative diseases. A combination of common susceptibility genes and hPPIN is an effective method to study shared pathways involved in a group of closely related disorders. Common modules, which might play a bridging role in linking neurodegenerative disorders and the enriched pathways, were identified by clustering analysis. The identified shared pathways and common modules can be expected to yield clues for effective target discovery efforts on neurodegeneration. PMID:26575483

  19. An Effective Method to Identify Shared Pathways and Common Factors among Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    PubMed

    Li, Ping; Nie, Yaling; Yu, Jingkai

    2015-01-01

    Groups of distinct but related diseases often share common symptoms, which suggest likely overlaps in underlying pathogenic mechanisms. Identifying the shared pathways and common factors among those disorders can be expected to deepen our understanding for them and help designing new treatment strategies effected on those diseases. Neurodegeneration diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD) and Huntington's disease (HD), were taken as a case study in this research. Reported susceptibility genes for AD, PD and HD were collected and human protein-protein interaction network (hPPIN) was used to identify biological pathways related to neurodegeneration. 81 KEGG pathways were found to be correlated with neurodegenerative disorders. 36 out of the 81 are human disease pathways, and the remaining ones are involved in miscellaneous human functional pathways. Cancers and infectious diseases are two major subclasses within the disease group. Apoptosis is one of the most significant functional pathways. Most of those pathways found here are actually consistent with prior knowledge of neurodegenerative diseases except two cell communication pathways: adherens and tight junctions. Gene expression analysis showed a high probability that the two pathways were related to neurodegenerative diseases. A combination of common susceptibility genes and hPPIN is an effective method to study shared pathways involved in a group of closely related disorders. Common modules, which might play a bridging role in linking neurodegenerative disorders and the enriched pathways, were identified by clustering analysis. The identified shared pathways and common modules can be expected to yield clues for effective target discovery efforts on neurodegeneration. PMID:26575483

  20. DAWN: a framework to identify autism genes and subnetworks using gene expression and genetics

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background De novo loss-of-function (dnLoF) mutations are found twofold more often in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) probands than their unaffected siblings. Multiple independent dnLoF mutations in the same gene implicate the gene in risk and hence provide a systematic, albeit arduous, path forward for ASD genetics. It is likely that using additional non-genetic data will enhance the ability to identify ASD genes. Methods To accelerate the search for ASD genes, we developed a novel algorithm, DAWN, to model two kinds of data: rare variations from exome sequencing and gene co-expression in the mid-fetal prefrontal and motor-somatosensory neocortex, a critical nexus for risk. The algorithm casts the ensemble data as a hidden Markov random field in which the graph structure is determined by gene co-expression and it combines these interrelationships with node-specific observations, namely gene identity, expression, genetic data and the estimated effect on risk. Results Using currently available genetic data and a specific developmental time period for gene co-expression, DAWN identified 127 genes that plausibly affect risk, and a set of likely ASD subnetworks. Validation experiments making use of published targeted resequencing results demonstrate its efficacy in reliably predicting ASD genes. DAWN also successfully predicts known ASD genes, not included in the genetic data used to create the model. Conclusions Validation studies demonstrate that DAWN is effective in predicting ASD genes and subnetworks by leveraging genetic and gene expression data. The findings reported here implicate neurite extension and neuronal arborization as risks for ASD. Using DAWN on emerging ASD sequence data and gene expression data from other brain regions and tissues would likely identify novel ASD genes. DAWN can also be used for other complex disorders to identify genes and subnetworks in those disorders. PMID:24602502

  1. The impact of sample imbalance on identifying differentially expressed genes

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Kun; Li, Jianzhong; Gao, Hong

    2006-01-01

    Background Recently several statistical methods have been proposed to identify genes with differential expression between two conditions. However, very few studies consider the problem of sample imbalance and there is no study to investigate the impact of sample imbalance on identifying differential expression genes. In addition, it is not clear which method is more suitable for the unbalanced data. Results Based on random sampling, two evaluation models are proposed to investigate the impact of sample imbalance on identifying differential expression genes. Using the proposed evaluation models, the performances of six famous methods are compared on the unbalanced data. The experimental results indicate that the sample imbalance has a great influence on selecting differential expression genes. Furthermore, different methods have very different performances on the unbalanced data. Among the six methods, the welch t-test appears to perform best when the size of samples in the large variance group is larger than that in the small one, while the Regularized t-test and SAM outperform others on the unbalanced data in other cases. Conclusion Two proposed evaluation models are effective and sample imbalance should be taken into account in microarray experiment design and gene expression data analysis. The results and two proposed evaluation models can provide some help in selecting suitable method to process the unbalanced data. PMID:17217526

  2. Gene Therapy Techniques for Peripheral Arterial Disease

    SciTech Connect

    Manninen, Hannu I.; Maekinen, Kimmo

    2002-03-15

    Somatic gene therapy is the introduction of new genetic material into selective somatic cells with resulting therapeutic benefits. Vascular wall and, subsequently, cardiovascular diseases have become an interesting target for gene therapy studies.Arteries are an attractive target for gene therapy since vascular interventions, both open surgical and endovascular, are well suited for minimally invasive, easily monitored gene delivery. Promising therapeutic effects have been obtained in animal models in preventing post-angioplasty restenosis and vein graft thickening, as well as increasing blood flow and collateral development in ischemic limbs.First clinical trials suggest a beneficial effect of vascular endothelial growth factor in achieving therapeutic angiogenesis in chronic limb ischemia and the efficacy of decoy oligonucleotides to prevent infrainguinal vein graft stenosis. However, further studies are mandatory to clarify the safety issues, to develop better gene delivery vectors and delivery catheters, to improve transgene expression, as well as to find the most effective and safe treatment genes.

  3. Genome-Wide Architecture of Disease Resistance Genes in Lettuce.

    PubMed

    Christopoulou, Marilena; Wo, Sebastian Reyes-Chin; Kozik, Alex; McHale, Leah K; Truco, Maria-Jose; Wroblewski, Tadeusz; Michelmore, Richard W

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide motif searches identified 1134 genes in the lettuce reference genome of cv. Salinas that are potentially involved in pathogen recognition, of which 385 were predicted to encode nucleotide binding-leucine rich repeat receptor (NLR) proteins. Using a maximum-likelihood approach, we grouped the NLRs into 25 multigene families and 17 singletons. Forty-one percent of these NLR-encoding genes belong to three families, the largest being RGC16 with 62 genes in cv. Salinas. The majority of NLR-encoding genes are located in five major resistance clusters (MRCs) on chromosomes 1, 2, 3, 4, and 8 and cosegregate with multiple disease resistance phenotypes. Most MRCs contain primarily members of a single NLR gene family but a few are more complex. MRC2 spans 73 Mb and contains 61 NLRs of six different gene families that cosegregate with nine disease resistance phenotypes. MRC3, which is 25 Mb, contains 22 RGC21 genes and colocates with Dm13. A library of 33 transgenic RNA interference tester stocks was generated for functional analysis of NLR-encoding genes that cosegregated with disease resistance phenotypes in each of the MRCs. Members of four NLR-encoding families, RGC1, RGC2, RGC21, and RGC12 were shown to be required for 16 disease resistance phenotypes in lettuce. The general composition of MRCs is conserved across different genotypes; however, the specific repertoire of NLR-encoding genes varied particularly of the rapidly evolving Type I genes. These tester stocks are valuable resources for future analyses of additional resistance phenotypes. PMID:26449254

  4. Genome-Wide Architecture of Disease Resistance Genes in Lettuce

    PubMed Central

    Christopoulou, Marilena; Wo, Sebastian Reyes-Chin; Kozik, Alex; McHale, Leah K.; Truco, Maria-Jose; Wroblewski, Tadeusz; Michelmore, Richard W.

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide motif searches identified 1134 genes in the lettuce reference genome of cv. Salinas that are potentially involved in pathogen recognition, of which 385 were predicted to encode nucleotide binding-leucine rich repeat receptor (NLR) proteins. Using a maximum-likelihood approach, we grouped the NLRs into 25 multigene families and 17 singletons. Forty-one percent of these NLR-encoding genes belong to three families, the largest being RGC16 with 62 genes in cv. Salinas. The majority of NLR-encoding genes are located in five major resistance clusters (MRCs) on chromosomes 1, 2, 3, 4, and 8 and cosegregate with multiple disease resistance phenotypes. Most MRCs contain primarily members of a single NLR gene family but a few are more complex. MRC2 spans 73 Mb and contains 61 NLRs of six different gene families that cosegregate with nine disease resistance phenotypes. MRC3, which is 25 Mb, contains 22 RGC21 genes and colocates with Dm13. A library of 33 transgenic RNA interference tester stocks was generated for functional analysis of NLR-encoding genes that cosegregated with disease resistance phenotypes in each of the MRCs. Members of four NLR-encoding families, RGC1, RGC2, RGC21, and RGC12 were shown to be required for 16 disease resistance phenotypes in lettuce. The general composition of MRCs is conserved across different genotypes; however, the specific repertoire of NLR-encoding genes varied particularly of the rapidly evolving Type I genes. These tester stocks are valuable resources for future analyses of additional resistance phenotypes. PMID:26449254

  5. Sheath blight disease screening methods to identify resistant Oryza spp. accessions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oryza species, wild relatives of cultivated rice (O. sativa), may contain novel resistance genes to sheath blight, caused by Rhizoctonia solani Kühn, that could be used to enhance resistance to this important disease in commercial rice. Suitable greenhouse screening methods are needed to identify re...

  6. Gene expression profiling identifies clinically relevant subtypes of prostate cancer

    E-print Network

    Botstein, David

    Gene expression profiling identifies clinically relevant subtypes of prostate cancer Jacques­Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY, and approved November 17, 2003 (received for review July 9, 2003) Prostate and treatment stratification. Worldwide, prostate cancer is the third most common cancer and the cause of 6

  7. GENE EXPRESSION PROFILING TO IDENTIFY MECHANISMS OF MALE REPRODUCTIVE TOXICITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gene Expression Profiling to Identify Mechanisms of Male Reproductive Toxicity
    David J. Dix
    National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC, 27711, USA.
    Ab...

  8. Identifying Aphid Resistance Genes in a Maize NAM Population

    E-print Network

    Pawlowski, Wojtek

    Identifying Aphid Resistance Genes in a Maize NAM Population Georg Jander Boyce Thompson Institute of Nymphs Experiment 1 CML322 B73 R2 = 0.7 Aphid reproduction varies 100-fold on maize inbred lines Lisa Meihls and Harleen Kaur Rhopalosiphum maidis #12;Aphid resistance is recessive in B73 x CML322 0 10 20 30

  9. Global methylation analysis identifies prognostically important epigenetically inactivated tumor suppressor genes in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Martin F; Johnson, David C; Wu, Ping; Walker, Brian A; Brioli, Annamaria; Mirabella, Fabio; Wardell, Christopher P; Melchor, Lorenzo; Davies, Faith E; Morgan, Gareth J

    2013-07-11

    Outcome in multiple myeloma is highly variable and a better understanding of the factors that influence disease biology is essential to understand and predict behavior in individual patients. In the present study, we analyzed combined genomewide DNA methylation and gene expression data of patients treated in the Medical Research Council Myeloma IX trial. We used these data to identify epigenetically repressed tumor suppressor genes with prognostic relevance in myeloma. We identified 195 genes with changes in methylation status that were significantly associated with prognosis. Combining DNA methylation and gene expression data led to the identification of the epigenetically regulated tumor modulating genes GPX3, RBP1, SPARC, and TGFBI. Hypermethylation of these genes was associated with significantly shorter overall survival, independent of age, International Staging System score, and adverse cytogenetics. The 4 differentially methylated and expressed genes are known to mediate important tumor suppressive functions including response to chemotherapy (TGFBI), interaction with the microenvironment (SPARC), retinoic acid signaling (RBP1), and the response to oxidative stress (GPX3), which could explain the prognostic impact of their differential methylation. Assessment of the DNA methylation status of the identified genes could contribute to the molecular characterization of myeloma, which is prerequisite for an individualized treatment approach. PMID:23699600

  10. A genomics approach identifies senescence-specific gene expression regulation

    PubMed Central

    Lackner, Daniel H; Hayashi, Makoto T; Cesare, Anthony J; Karlseder, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Replicative senescence is a fundamental tumor-suppressive mechanism triggered by telomere erosion that results in a permanent cell cycle arrest. To understand the impact of telomere shortening on gene expression, we analyzed the transcriptome of diploid human fibroblasts as they progressed toward and entered into senescence. We distinguished novel transcription regulation due to replicative senescence by comparing senescence-specific expression profiles to profiles from cells arrested by DNA damage or serum starvation. Only a small specific subset of genes was identified that was truly senescence-regulated and changes in gene expression were exacerbated from presenescent to senescent cells. The majority of gene expression regulation in replicative senescence was shown to occur due to telomere shortening, as exogenous telomerase activity reverted most of these changes. PMID:24863242

  11. Analyse multiple disease subtypes and build associated gene networks using genome-wide expression profiles

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite the large increase of transcriptomic studies that look for gene signatures on diseases, there is still a need for integrative approaches that obtain separation of multiple pathological states providing robust selection of gene markers for each disease subtype and information about the possible links or relations between those genes. Results We present a network-oriented and data-driven bioinformatic approach that searches for association of genes and diseases based on the analysis of genome-wide expression data derived from microarrays or RNA-Seq studies. The approach aims to (i) identify gene sets associated to different pathological states analysed together; (ii) identify a minimum subset within these genes that unequivocally differentiates and classifies the compared disease subtypes; (iii) provide a measurement of the discriminant power of these genes and (iv) identify links between the genes that characterise each of the disease subtypes. This bioinformatic approach is implemented in an R package, named geNetClassifier, available as an open access tool in Bioconductor. To illustrate the performance of the tool, we applied it to two independent datasets: 250 samples from patients with four major leukemia subtypes analysed using expression arrays; another leukemia dataset analysed with RNA-Seq that includes a subtype also present in the previous set. The results show the selection of key deregulated genes recently reported in the literature and assigned to the leukemia subtypes studied. We also show, using these independent datasets, the selection of similar genes in a network built for the same disease subtype. Conclusions The construction of gene networks related to specific disease subtypes that include parameters such as gene-to-gene association, gene disease specificity and gene discriminant power can be very useful to draw gene-disease maps and to unravel the molecular features that characterize specific pathological states. The application of the bioinformatic tool here presented shows a neat way to achieve such molecular characterization of the diseases using genome-wide expression data. PMID:26040557

  12. Knowledge-Driven Analysis Identifies a GeneGene Interaction Affecting High-Density Lipoprotein

    E-print Network

    Keinan, Alon

    -density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels are among the most important risk factors for coronary artery disease on HDL-C levels (Bonferroni corrected Pc = 0.002). Using an adaptive locus-based validation procedure, we of HDL-C. However, the effect on HDL-C of the novel gene­gene interaction reported here is twice

  13. Comparison of Molecular Signatures from Multiple Skin Diseases Identifies Mechanisms of Immunopathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Inkeles, Megan S.; Scumpia, Philip O.; Swindell, William R.; Lopez, David; Teles, Rosane M.B.; Graeber, Thomas G.; Meller, Stephan; Homey, Bernhard; Elder, James T.; Gilliet, Michel; Modlin, Robert L.; Pellegrini, Matteo

    2014-01-01

    The ability to obtain gene expression profiles from human disease specimens provides an opportunity to identify relevant gene pathways, but is limited by the absence of data sets spanning a broad range of conditions. Here, we analyzed publicly available microarray data from 16 diverse skin conditions in order to gain insight into disease pathogenesis. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering separated samples by disease and common cellular and molecular pathways. Disease specific signatures were leveraged to build a multi-disease classifier which predicted the diagnosis of publicly and prospectively collected expression profiles with 93% accuracy. In one sample, the molecular classifier differed from the initial clinical diagnosis and correctly predicted the eventual diagnosis as the clinical presentation evolved. Finally, integration of interferon (IFN) regulated gene programs with the skin database revealed a significant inverse correlation between IFN–? and IFN–? programs across all conditions. Our study provides an integrative approach to the study of gene signatures from multiple skin conditions, elucidating mechanisms of disease pathogenesis. Additionally, these studies provide a framework for developing tools for personalized medicine towards the precise prediction, prevention, and treatment of disease on an individual level. PMID:25111617

  14. Enrichment Analysis Identifies Functional MicroRNA-Disease Associations in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Dandan; Cui, Xiaomeng; Wang, Yang; Zhao, Yilei; Li, Huiying; Hu, Suangjiu; Chu, Xiaodan; Li, Yan; Li, Qiang; Liu, Qian; Zhu, Wenliang

    2015-01-01

    Substantial evidence has shown that microRNAs (miRNAs) may be causally linked to the occurrence and progression of human diseases. Herein, we conducted an enrichment analysis to identify potential functional miRNA-disease associations (MDAs) in humans by integrating currently known biological data: miRNA-target interactions (MTIs), protein-protein interactions, and gene-disease associations. Two contributing factors to functional miRNA-disease associations were quantitatively considered: the direct effects of miRNA that target disease-related genes, and indirect effects triggered by protein-protein interactions. Ninety-nine miRNAs were scanned for possible functional association with 2223 MeSH-defined human diseases. Each miRNA was experimentally validated to target ? 10 mRNA genes. Putative MDAs were identified when at least one MTI was confidently validated for a disease. Overall, 19648 putative MDAs were found, of which 10.0% was experimentally validated. Further results suggest that filtering for miRNAs that target a greater number of disease-related genes (n ? 8) can significantly enrich for true MDAs from the set of putative associations (enrichment rate = 60.7%, adjusted hypergeometric p = 2.41×10?91). Considering the indirect effects of miRNAs further elevated the enrichment rate to 72.6%. By using this method, a novel MDA between miR-24 and ovarian cancer was found. Compared with scramble miRNA overexpression of miR-24 was validated to remarkably induce ovarian cancer cells apoptosis. Our study provides novel insight into factors contributing to functional MDAs by integrating large quantities of previously generated biological data, and establishes a feasible method to identify plausible associations with high confidence. PMID:26296081

  15. Variability of Gene Expression Identifies Transcriptional Regulators of Early Human Embryonic Development.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Yu; Taylor, Deanne; Ovchinnikov, Dmitry A; Wolvetang, Ernst J; de Torrenté, Laurence; Mar, Jessica C

    2015-08-01

    An analysis of gene expression variability can provide an insightful window into how regulatory control is distributed across the transcriptome. In a single cell analysis, the inter-cellular variability of gene expression measures the consistency of transcript copy numbers observed between cells in the same population. Application of these ideas to the study of early human embryonic development may reveal important insights into the transcriptional programs controlling this process, based on which components are most tightly regulated. Using a published single cell RNA-seq data set of human embryos collected at four-cell, eight-cell, morula and blastocyst stages, we identified genes with the most stable, invariant expression across all four developmental stages. Stably-expressed genes were found to be enriched for those sharing indispensable features, including essentiality, haploinsufficiency, and ubiquitous expression. The stable genes were less likely to be associated with loss-of-function variant genes or human recessive disease genes affected by a DNA copy number variant deletion, suggesting that stable genes have a functional impact on the regulation of some of the basic cellular processes. Genes with low expression variability at early stages of development are involved in regulation of DNA methylation, responses to hypoxia and telomerase activity, whereas by the blastocyst stage, low-variability genes are enriched for metabolic processes as well as telomerase signaling. Based on changes in expression variability, we identified a putative set of gene expression markers of morulae and blastocyst stages. Experimental validation of a blastocyst-expressed variability marker demonstrated that HDDC2 plays a role in the maintenance of pluripotency in human ES and iPS cells. Collectively our analyses identified new regulators involved in human embryonic development that would have otherwise been missed using methods that focus on assessment of the average expression levels; in doing so, we highlight the value of studying expression variability for single cell RNA-seq data. PMID:26288249

  16. Variability of Gene Expression Identifies Transcriptional Regulators of Early Human Embryonic Development

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Yu; Taylor, Deanne; Ovchinnikov, Dmitry A.; Wolvetang, Ernst J.; de Torrenté, Laurence; Mar, Jessica C.

    2015-01-01

    An analysis of gene expression variability can provide an insightful window into how regulatory control is distributed across the transcriptome. In a single cell analysis, the inter-cellular variability of gene expression measures the consistency of transcript copy numbers observed between cells in the same population. Application of these ideas to the study of early human embryonic development may reveal important insights into the transcriptional programs controlling this process, based on which components are most tightly regulated. Using a published single cell RNA-seq data set of human embryos collected at four-cell, eight-cell, morula and blastocyst stages, we identified genes with the most stable, invariant expression across all four developmental stages. Stably-expressed genes were found to be enriched for those sharing indispensable features, including essentiality, haploinsufficiency, and ubiquitous expression. The stable genes were less likely to be associated with loss-of-function variant genes or human recessive disease genes affected by a DNA copy number variant deletion, suggesting that stable genes have a functional impact on the regulation of some of the basic cellular processes. Genes with low expression variability at early stages of development are involved in regulation of DNA methylation, responses to hypoxia and telomerase activity, whereas by the blastocyst stage, low-variability genes are enriched for metabolic processes as well as telomerase signaling. Based on changes in expression variability, we identified a putative set of gene expression markers of morulae and blastocyst stages. Experimental validation of a blastocyst-expressed variability marker demonstrated that HDDC2 plays a role in the maintenance of pluripotency in human ES and iPS cells. Collectively our analyses identified new regulators involved in human embryonic development that would have otherwise been missed using methods that focus on assessment of the average expression levels; in doing so, we highlight the value of studying expression variability for single cell RNA-seq data. PMID:26288249

  17. Phage cluster relationships identified through single gene analysis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Phylogenetic comparison of bacteriophages requires whole genome approaches such as dotplot analysis, genome pairwise maps, and gene content analysis. Currently mycobacteriophages, a highly studied phage group, are categorized into related clusters based on the comparative analysis of whole genome sequences. With the recent explosion of phage isolation, a simple method for phage cluster prediction would facilitate analysis of crude or complex samples without whole genome isolation and sequencing. The hypothesis of this study was that mycobacteriophage-cluster prediction is possible using comparison of a single, ubiquitous, semi-conserved gene. Tape Measure Protein (TMP) was selected to test the hypothesis because it is typically the longest gene in mycobacteriophage genomes and because regions within the TMP gene are conserved. Results A single gene, TMP, identified the known Mycobacteriophage clusters and subclusters using a Gepard dotplot comparison or a phylogenetic tree constructed from global alignment and maximum likelihood comparisons. Gepard analysis of 247 mycobacteriophage TMP sequences appropriately recovered 98.8% of the subcluster assignments that were made by whole-genome comparison. Subcluster-specific primers within TMP allow for PCR determination of the mycobacteriophage subcluster from DNA samples. Using the single-gene comparison approach for siphovirus coliphages, phage groupings by TMP comparison reflected relationships observed in a whole genome dotplot comparison and confirm the potential utility of this approach to another widely studied group of phages. Conclusions TMP sequence comparison and PCR results support the hypothesis that a single gene can be used for distinguishing phage cluster and subcluster assignments. TMP single-gene analysis can quickly and accurately aid in mycobacteriophage classification. PMID:23777341

  18. Refining analyses of copy number variation identifies specific genes associated with developmental delay.

    PubMed

    Coe, Bradley P; Witherspoon, Kali; Rosenfeld, Jill A; van Bon, Bregje W M; Vulto-van Silfhout, Anneke T; Bosco, Paolo; Friend, Kathryn L; Baker, Carl; Buono, Serafino; Vissers, Lisenka E L M; Schuurs-Hoeijmakers, Janneke H; Hoischen, Alex; Pfundt, Rolph; Krumm, Nik; Carvill, Gemma L; Li, Deana; Amaral, David; Brown, Natasha; Lockhart, Paul J; Scheffer, Ingrid E; Alberti, Antonino; Shaw, Marie; Pettinato, Rosa; Tervo, Raymond; de Leeuw, Nicole; Reijnders, Margot R F; Torchia, Beth S; Peeters, Hilde; O'Roak, Brian J; Fichera, Marco; Hehir-Kwa, Jayne Y; Shendure, Jay; Mefford, Heather C; Haan, Eric; Gécz, Jozef; de Vries, Bert B A; Romano, Corrado; Eichler, Evan E

    2014-10-01

    Copy number variants (CNVs) are associated with many neurocognitive disorders; however, these events are typically large, and the underlying causative genes are unclear. We created an expanded CNV morbidity map from 29,085 children with developmental delay in comparison to 19,584 healthy controls, identifying 70 significant CNVs. We resequenced 26 candidate genes in 4,716 additional cases with developmental delay or autism and 2,193 controls. An integrated analysis of CNV and single-nucleotide variant (SNV) data pinpointed 10 genes enriched for putative loss of function. Follow-up of a subset of affected individuals identified new clinical subtypes of pediatric disease and the genes responsible for disease-associated CNVs. These genetic changes include haploinsufficiency of SETBP1 associated with intellectual disability and loss of expressive language and truncations of ZMYND11 in individuals with autism, aggression and complex neuropsychiatric features. This combined CNV and SNV approach facilitates the rapid discovery of new syndromes and genes involved in neuropsychiatric disease despite extensive genetic heterogeneity. PMID:25217958

  19. Will admixture mapping work to find disease genes?

    E-print Network

    Reich, David

    Will admixture mapping work to find disease genes? David Reich1,2,* and Nick Patterson1,2 1 GENE MAPPING METHOD At present there are two approaches to interrogating the genome for disease genes Mendelian diseases. Whole- genome association has much more power in principle to discover the genes of weak

  20. TOWARD DISCOVERING DISEASE-SPECIFIC GENE NETWORKS FROM ONLINE LITERATURE

    E-print Network

    Wong, Limsoon

    TOWARD DISCOVERING DISEASE-SPECIFIC GENE NETWORKS FROM ONLINE LITERATURE ZHUO ZHANG , SUISHENG TANG diseases are the result of abnormal interactions between multiple genes instead of single gene mutations. Discovering the interactions between these genes and their relationships to human diseases is critical

  1. COMBINING PHENOTYPIC AND GENOTYPIC DATA TO DISCOVER MULTIPLE DISEASE GENES

    E-print Network

    Toivonen, Hannu

    , or extracted from medical records. Since different genes, all related to the same disease, are likely to haveCOMBINING PHENOTYPIC AND GENOTYPIC DATA TO DISCOVER MULTIPLE DISEASE GENES Hannu Toivonen, Saara Mapping genes for common, polygenic diseases is challenging due to the number of genes involved. Typi- cal

  2. Identifying critical transitions and their leading biomolecular networks in complex diseases

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Rui; Li, Meiyi; Liu, Zhi-Ping; Wu, Jiarui; Chen, Luonan; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2012-01-01

    Identifying a critical transition and its leading biomolecular network during the initiation and progression of a complex disease is a challenging task, but holds the key to early diagnosis and further elucidation of the essential mechanisms of disease deterioration at the network level. In this study, we developed a novel computational method for identifying early-warning signals of the critical transition and its leading network during a disease progression, based on high-throughput data using a small number of samples. The leading network makes the first move from the normal state toward the disease state during a transition, and thus is causally related with disease-driving genes or networks. Specifically, we first define a state-transition-based local network entropy (SNE), and prove that SNE can serve as a general early-warning indicator of any imminent transitions, regardless of specific differences among systems. The effectiveness of this method was validated by functional analysis and experimental data. PMID:23230504

  3. Genes Necessary for Bacterial Magnetite Biomineralization Identified by Transposon Mutagenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nash, C. Z.; Komeili, A.; Newman, D. K.; Kirschvink, J. L.

    2004-12-01

    Magnetic bacteria synthesize nanoscale crystals of magnetite in intracellular, membrane-bounded organelles (magnetosomes). These crystals are preserved in the fossil record at least as far back as the late Neoproterozoic and have been tentatively identified in much older rocks (1). This fossil record may provide deep time calibration points for molecular evolution studies once the genes involved in biologically controlled magnetic mineralization (BCMM) are known. Further, a genetic and biochemical understanding of BCMM will give insight into the depositional environment and biogeochemical cycles in which magnetic bacteria play a role. The BCMM process is not well understood, though proteins have been identified from the magnetosome membrane and genetic manipulation and biochemical characterization of these proteins are underway. Most of the proteins currently thought to be involved are encoded within the mam cluster, a large cluster of genes whose products localize to the magnetosome membrane and are conserved among magnetic bacteria (2). In an effort to identify all of the genes necessary for bacterial BCMM, we undertook a transposon mutagenesis of Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1. Non-magnetic mutants (MNMs) were identified by growth in liquid culture followed by a magnetic assay. The insertion site of the transposon was identified two ways. First MNMs were screened with a PCR assay to determine if the transposon had inserted into the mam cluster. Second, the transposon was rescued from the mutant DNA and cloned for sequencing. The majority insertion sites are located within the mam cluster. Insertion sites also occur in operons which have not previously been suspected to be involved in magnetite biomineralization. None of the insertion sites have occurred within genes reported from previous transposon mutagenesis studies of AMB-1 (3, 4). Two of the non-mam cluster insertion sites occur in operons containing genes conserved particularly between MS-1 and MC-1. We are undertaking a complementation strategy to demonstrate the necessity of these novel genes in BCMM as well as characterizing the phenotypes of the mutants. 1. S. B. R. Chang, J. F. Stolz, J. L. Kirschvink, S. M. Awramik, Precambrian Res. 43, 305-315 (1989). 2. K. Grünberg, C. Wawer, B. M. Tebo, D. Schüler, Appl. Environ. Microbiol. 67, 4573-4582 (2001). 3. A. T. Wahyudi, H. Takeyama, T. Matsunaga, Appl. Biochem. Biotechnol. 91-3, 147-154 (2001). 4. T. Matsunaga, C. Nakamura, J. G. Burgess, K. Sode, J. Bacteriol. 174, 2748-2753 (1992).

  4. Gene-Wide Analysis Detects Two New Susceptibility Genes for Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Harold, Denise; Jones, Lesley; Holmans, Peter; Gerrish, Amy; Vedernikov, Alexey; Richards, Alexander; DeStefano, Anita L.; Lambert, Jean-Charles; Ibrahim-Verbaas, Carla A.; Naj, Adam C.; Sims, Rebecca; Jun, Gyungah; Bis, Joshua C.; Beecham, Gary W.; Grenier-Boley, Benjamin; Russo, Giancarlo; Thornton-Wells, Tricia A.; Denning, Nicola; Smith, Albert V.; Chouraki, Vincent; Thomas, Charlene; Ikram, M. Arfan; Zelenika, Diana; Vardarajan, Badri N.; Kamatani, Yoichiro; Lin, Chiao-Feng; Schmidt, Helena; Kunkle, Brian; Dunstan, Melanie L.; Vronskaya, Maria; Johnson, Andrew D.; Ruiz, Agustin; Bihoreau, Marie-Thérèse; Reitz, Christiane; Pasquier, Florence; Hollingworth, Paul; Hanon, Olivier; Fitzpatrick, Annette L.; Buxbaum, Joseph D.; Campion, Dominique; Crane, Paul K.; Baldwin, Clinton; Becker, Tim; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Cruchaga, Carlos; Craig, David; Amin, Najaf; Berr, Claudine; Lopez, Oscar L.; De Jager, Philip L.; Deramecourt, Vincent; Johnston, Janet A.; Evans, Denis; Lovestone, Simon; Letenneur, Luc; Hernández, Isabel; Rubinsztein, David C.; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Sleegers, Kristel; Goate, Alison M.; Fiévet, Nathalie; Huentelman, Matthew J.; Gill, Michael; Brown, Kristelle; Kamboh, M. Ilyas; Keller, Lina; Barberger-Gateau, Pascale; McGuinness, Bernadette; Larson, Eric B.; Myers, Amanda J.; Dufouil, Carole; Todd, Stephen; Wallon, David; Love, Seth; Rogaeva, Ekaterina; Gallacher, John; George-Hyslop, Peter St; Clarimon, Jordi; Lleo, Alberto; Bayer, Anthony; Tsuang, Debby W.; Yu, Lei; Tsolaki, Magda; Bossù, Paola; Spalletta, Gianfranco; Proitsi, Petra; Collinge, John; Sorbi, Sandro; Garcia, Florentino Sanchez; Fox, Nick C.; Hardy, John; Naranjo, Maria Candida Deniz; Bosco, Paolo; Clarke, Robert; Brayne, Carol; Galimberti, Daniela; Scarpini, Elio; Bonuccelli, Ubaldo; Mancuso, Michelangelo; Siciliano, Gabriele; Moebus, Susanne; Mecocci, Patrizia; Zompo, Maria Del; Maier, Wolfgang; Hampel, Harald; Pilotto, Alberto; Frank-García, Ana; Panza, Francesco; Solfrizzi, Vincenzo; Caffarra, Paolo; Nacmias, Benedetta; Perry, William; Mayhaus, Manuel; Lannfelt, Lars; Hakonarson, Hakon; Pichler, Sabrina; Carrasquillo, Minerva M.; Ingelsson, Martin; Beekly, Duane; Alvarez, Victoria; Zou, Fanggeng; Valladares, Otto; Younkin, Steven G.; Coto, Eliecer; Hamilton-Nelson, Kara L.; Gu, Wei; Razquin, Cristina; Pastor, Pau; Mateo, Ignacio; Owen, Michael J.; Faber, Kelley M.; Jonsson, Palmi V.; Combarros, Onofre; O'Donovan, Michael C.; Cantwell, Laura B.; Soininen, Hilkka; Blacker, Deborah; Mead, Simon; Mosley, Thomas H.; Bennett, David A.; Harris, Tamara B.; Fratiglioni, Laura; Holmes, Clive; de Bruijn, Renee F. A. G.; Passmore, Peter; Montine, Thomas J.; Bettens, Karolien; Rotter, Jerome I.; Brice, Alexis; Morgan, Kevin; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Kukull, Walter A.; Hannequin, Didier; Powell, John F.; Nalls, Michael A.; Ritchie, Karen; Lunetta, Kathryn L.; Kauwe, John S. K.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Riemenschneider, Matthias; Boada, Mercè; Hiltunen, Mikko; Martin, Eden R.; Schmidt, Reinhold; Rujescu, Dan; Dartigues, Jean-François; Mayeux, Richard; Tzourio, Christophe; Hofman, Albert; Nöthen, Markus M.; Graff, Caroline; Psaty, Bruce M.; Haines, Jonathan L.; Lathrop, Mark; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; Launer, Lenore J.; Van Broeckhoven, Christine; Farrer, Lindsay A.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Ramirez, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    Background Alzheimer's disease is a common debilitating dementia with known heritability, for which 20 late onset susceptibility loci have been identified, but more remain to be discovered. This study sought to identify new susceptibility genes, using an alternative gene-wide analytical approach which tests for patterns of association within genes, in the powerful genome-wide association dataset of the International Genomics of Alzheimer's Project Consortium, comprising over 7 m genotypes from 25,580 Alzheimer's cases and 48,466 controls. Principal Findings In addition to earlier reported genes, we detected genome-wide significant loci on chromosomes 8 (TP53INP1, p?=?1.4×10?6) and 14 (IGHV1-67 p?=?7.9×10?8) which indexed novel susceptibility loci. Significance The additional genes identified in this study, have an array of functions previously implicated in Alzheimer's disease, including aspects of energy metabolism, protein degradation and the immune system and add further weight to these pathways as potential therapeutic targets in Alzheimer's disease. PMID:24922517

  5. Methods for identifying an essential gene in a prokaryotic microorganism

    DOEpatents

    Shizuya, Hiroaki

    2006-01-31

    Methods are provided for the rapid identification of essential or conditionally essential DNA segments in any species of haploid cell (one copy chromosome per cell) that is capable of being transformed by artificial means and is capable of undergoing DNA recombination. This system offers an enhanced means of identifying essential function genes in diploid pathogens, such as gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria.

  6. Transcriptome analysis reveals mucin 4 to be highly associated with periodontitis and identifies pleckstrin as a link to systemic diseases.

    PubMed

    Lundmark, Anna; Davanian, Haleh; Båge, Tove; Johannsen, Gunnar; Koro, Catalin; Lundeberg, Joakim; Yucel-Lindberg, Tülay

    2015-01-01

    The multifactorial chronic inflammatory disease periodontitis, which is characterized by destruction of tooth-supporting tissues, has also been implicated as a risk factor for various systemic diseases. Although periodontitis has been studied extensively, neither disease-specific biomarkers nor therapeutic targets have been identified, nor its link with systemic diseases. Here, we analyzed the global transcriptome of periodontitis and compared its gene expression profile with those of other inflammatory conditions, including cardiovascular disease (CVD), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and ulcerative colitis (UC). Gingival biopsies from 62 patients with periodontitis and 62 healthy subjects were subjected to RNA sequencing. The up-regulated genes in periodontitis were related to inflammation, wounding and defense response, and apoptosis, whereas down-regulated genes were related to extracellular matrix organization and structural support. The most highly up-regulated gene was mucin 4 (MUC4), and its protein product was confirmed to be over-expressed in periodontitis. When comparing the expression profile of periodontitis with other inflammatory diseases, several gene ontology categories, including inflammatory response, cell death, cell motion, and homeostatic processes, were identified as common to all diseases. Only one gene, pleckstrin (PLEK), was significantly overexpressed in periodontitis, CVD, RA, and UC, implicating this gene as an important networking link between these chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:26686060

  7. Transcriptome analysis reveals mucin 4 to be highly associated with periodontitis and identifies pleckstrin as a link to systemic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Lundmark, Anna; Davanian, Haleh; Båge, Tove; Johannsen, Gunnar; Koro, Catalin; Lundeberg, Joakim; Yucel-Lindberg, Tülay

    2015-01-01

    The multifactorial chronic inflammatory disease periodontitis, which is characterized by destruction of tooth-supporting tissues, has also been implicated as a risk factor for various systemic diseases. Although periodontitis has been studied extensively, neither disease-specific biomarkers nor therapeutic targets have been identified, nor its link with systemic diseases. Here, we analyzed the global transcriptome of periodontitis and compared its gene expression profile with those of other inflammatory conditions, including cardiovascular disease (CVD), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and ulcerative colitis (UC). Gingival biopsies from 62 patients with periodontitis and 62 healthy subjects were subjected to RNA sequencing. The up-regulated genes in periodontitis were related to inflammation, wounding and defense response, and apoptosis, whereas down-regulated genes were related to extracellular matrix organization and structural support. The most highly up-regulated gene was mucin 4 (MUC4), and its protein product was confirmed to be over-expressed in periodontitis. When comparing the expression profile of periodontitis with other inflammatory diseases, several gene ontology categories, including inflammatory response, cell death, cell motion, and homeostatic processes, were identified as common to all diseases. Only one gene, pleckstrin (PLEK), was significantly overexpressed in periodontitis, CVD, RA, and UC, implicating this gene as an important networking link between these chronic inflammatory diseases. PMID:26686060

  8. Analysis of human genes with protein-protein interaction network for detecting disease genes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shun-yao; Shao, Feng-jing; Sun, Ren-cheng; Sui, Yi; Wang, Ying; Wang, Jin-long

    2014-03-01

    The topological features of disease genes and non-disease genes were widely utilized in disease genes prediction. However, previous studies neglected to exploit essential genes to distinguish disease genes and non-disease genes. Therefore, this paper firstly takes essential genes as reference to analyze the topological properties of human genes with protein-protein interaction network. Empirical results demonstrate that nonessential disease genes are topologically more important and closer to the center of the network than other genes (unknown genes, which are deemed as non-disease genes in disease genes prediction). Although disease genes are closer to essential genes, we find that the influence of disease genes on essential genes is similar with other genes, or even weaker. Further, we generate new topological features according to our findings and validate the effectiveness of combining the additional features for detecting disease genes. In addition, we find that the k-shell index (ks) of protein-protein network follows a power law distribution, and the function of the proteins with the largest ks may deserve further research.

  9. Transcriptional Profile Analysis of RPGRORF15 Frameshift Mutation Identifies Novel Genes Associated with Retinal Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Genini, Sem; Zangerl, Barbara; Slavik, Julianna; Acland, Gregory M.; Beltran, William A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose. To identify genes and molecular mechanisms associated with photoreceptor degeneration in a canine model of XLRP caused by an RPGR exon ORF15 microdeletion. Methods. Expression profiles of mutant and normal retinas were compared by using canine retinal custom cDNA microarrays. qRT-PCR, Western blot analysis, and immunohistochemistry (IHC) were applied to selected genes, to confirm and expand the microarray results. Results. At 7 and 16 weeks, respectively, 56 and 18 transcripts were downregulated in the mutant retinas, but none were differentially expressed (DE) at both ages, suggesting the involvement of temporally distinct pathways. Downregulated genes included the known retina-relevant genes PAX6, CHML, and RDH11 at 7 weeks and CRX and SAG at 16 weeks. Genes directly or indirectly active in apoptotic processes were altered at 7 weeks (CAMK2G, NTRK2, PRKCB, RALA, RBBP6, RNF41, SMYD3, SPP1, and TUBB2C) and 16 weeks (SLC25A5 and NKAP). Furthermore, the DE genes at 7 weeks (ELOVL6, GLOD4, NDUFS4, and REEP1) and 16 weeks (SLC25A5 and TARS2) are related to mitochondrial functions. qRT-PCR of 18 genes confirmed the microarray results and showed DE of additional genes not on the array. Only GFAP was DE at 3 weeks of age. Western blot and IHC analyses also confirmed the high reliability of the transcriptomic data. Conclusions. Several DE genes were identified in mutant retinas. At 7 weeks, a combination of nonclassic anti- and proapoptosis genes appear to be involved in photoreceptor degeneration, whereas at both 7 and 16 weeks, the expression of mitochondria-related genes indicates that they may play a relevant role in the disease process. PMID:20574030

  10. Network-based prediction and knowledge mining of disease genes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background In recent years, high-throughput protein interaction identification methods have generated a large amount of data. When combined with the results from other in vivo and in vitro experiments, a complex set of relationships between biological molecules emerges. The growing popularity of network analysis and data mining has allowed researchers to recognize indirect connections between these molecules. Due to the interdependent nature of network entities, evaluating proteins in this context can reveal relationships that may not otherwise be evident. Methods We examined the human protein interaction network as it relates to human illness using the Disease Ontology. After calculating several topological metrics, we trained an alternating decision tree (ADTree) classifier to identify disease-associated proteins. Using a bootstrapping method, we created a tree to highlight conserved characteristics shared by many of these proteins. Subsequently, we reviewed a set of non-disease-associated proteins that were misclassified by the algorithm with high confidence and searched for evidence of a disease relationship. Results Our classifier was able to predict disease-related genes with 79% area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC), which indicates the tradeoff between sensitivity and specificity and is a good predictor of how a classifier will perform on future data sets. We found that a combination of several network characteristics including degree centrality, disease neighbor ratio, eccentricity, and neighborhood connectivity help to distinguish between disease- and non-disease-related proteins. Furthermore, the ADTree allowed us to understand which combinations of strongly predictive attributes contributed most to protein-disease classification. In our post-processing evaluation, we found several examples of potential novel disease-related proteins and corresponding literature evidence. In addition, we showed that first- and second-order neighbors in the PPI network could be used to identify likely disease associations. Conclusions We analyzed the human protein interaction network and its relationship to disease and found that both the number of interactions with other proteins and the disease relationship of neighboring proteins helped to determine whether a protein had a relationship to disease. Our classifier predicted many proteins with no annotated disease association to be disease-related, which indicated that these proteins have network characteristics that are similar to disease-related proteins and may therefore have disease associations not previously identified. By performing a post-processing step after the prediction, we were able to identify evidence in literature supporting this possibility. This method could provide a useful filter for experimentalists searching for new candidate protein targets for drug repositioning and could also be extended to include other network and data types in order to refine these predictions. PMID:26043920

  11. Integrated Genomics Identifies Convergence of Ankylosing Spondylitis with Global Immune Mediated Disease Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Uddin, Mohammed; Codner, Dianne; Mahmud Hasan, S M; Scherer, Stephen W; O’Rielly, Darren D; Rahman, Proton

    2015-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis(AS), a highly heritable complex inflammatory arthritis. Although, a handful of non-HLA risk loci have been identified, capturing the unexplained genetic contribution to AS pathogenesis remains a challenge attributed to additive, pleiotropic and epistatic-interactions at the molecular level. Here, we developed multiple integrated genomic approaches to quantify molecular convergence of non-HLA loci with global immune mediated diseases. We show that non-HLA genes are significantly sensitive to deleterious mutation accumulation in the general population compared with tolerant genes. Human developmental proteomics (prenatal to adult) analysis revealed that proteins encoded by non-HLA AS risk loci are 2-fold more expressed in adult hematopoietic cells.Enrichment analysis revealed AS risk genes overlap with a significant number of immune related pathways (p?genes are highly clustered seeds that significantly converge (empirical; p?disease risk loci. We have also provided initial evidence for the involvement of STAT2/3 in AS pathogenesis. Collectively, these findings highlight molecular insight on non-HLA AS risk loci that are not exclusively connected with overlapping immune mediated diseases; rather a component of common pathophysiological pathways with other immune mediated diseases. This information will be pivotal to fully explain AS pathogenesis and identify new therapeutic targets. PMID:25980808

  12. Integration of disease association and eQTL data using a Bayesian colocalisation approach highlights six candidate causal genes in immune-mediated diseases

    E-print Network

    Guo, Hui; Fortune, Mary D.; Burren, Oliver S.; Schofield, Ellen; Todd, John A.; Wallace, Chris

    2015-03-05

    The genes and cells that mediate genetic associations identified through genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are only partially understood. Several studies that have investigated the genetic regulation of gene expression have shown that disease...

  13. Disease gene identification by random walk on multigraphs merging heterogeneous genomic and phenotype data

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background High throughput experiments resulted in many genomic datasets and hundreds of candidate disease genes. To discover the real disease genes from a set of candidate genes, computational methods have been proposed and worked on various types of genomic data sources. As a single source of genomic data is prone of bias, incompleteness and noise, integration of different genomic data sources is highly demanded to accomplish reliable disease gene identification. Results In contrast to the commonly adapted data integration approach which integrates separate lists of candidate genes derived from the each single data sources, we merge various genomic networks into a multigraph which is capable of connecting multiple edges between a pair of nodes. This novel approach provides a data platform with strong noise tolerance to prioritize the disease genes. A new idea of random walk is then developed to work on multigraphs using a modified step to calculate the transition matrix. Our method is further enhanced to deal with heterogeneous data types by allowing cross-walk between phenotype and gene networks. Compared on benchmark datasets, our method is shown to be more accurate than the state-of-the-art methods in disease gene identification. We also conducted a case study to identify disease genes for Insulin-Dependent Diabetes Mellitus. Some of the newly identified disease genes are supported by recently published literature. Conclusions The proposed RWRM (Random Walk with Restart on Multigraphs) model and CHN (Complex Heterogeneous Network) model are effective in data integration for candidate gene prioritization. PMID:23282070

  14. 108 PostErs EMBnet.journal 18.B Biomedical Text Mining for Disease Gene Discovery

    E-print Network

    the user any free text query as an input and attempts to identify those genes most strongly linked work of our tool is based on text mining. Basically, each gene is linked to a profile that contains108 PostErs EMBnet.journal 18.B Biomedical Text Mining for Disease Gene Discovery Sarah ElShal1

  15. Identifying Francisella tularensis genes required for growth in host cells.

    PubMed

    Brunton, J; Steele, S; Miller, C; Lovullo, E; Taft-Benz, S; Kawula, T

    2015-08-01

    Francisella tularensis is a highly virulent Gram-negative intracellular pathogen capable of infecting a vast diversity of hosts, ranging from amoebae to humans. A hallmark of F. tularensis virulence is its ability to quickly grow to high densities within a diverse set of host cells, including, but not limited to, macrophages and epithelial cells. We developed a luminescence reporter system to facilitate a large-scale transposon mutagenesis screen to identify genes required for growth in macrophage and epithelial cell lines. We screened 7,454 individual mutants, 269 of which exhibited reduced intracellular growth. Transposon insertions in the 269 growth-defective strains mapped to 68 different genes. FTT_0924, a gene of unknown function but highly conserved among Francisella species, was identified in this screen to be defective for intracellular growth within both macrophage and epithelial cell lines. FTT_0924 was required for full Schu S4 virulence in a murine pulmonary infection model. The ?FTT_0924 mutant bacterial membrane is permeable when replicating in hypotonic solution and within macrophages, resulting in strongly reduced viability. The permeability and reduced viability were rescued when the mutant was grown in a hypertonic solution, indicating that FTT_0924 is required for resisting osmotic stress. The ?FTT_0924 mutant was also significantly more sensitive to ?-lactam antibiotics than Schu S4. Taken together, the data strongly suggest that FTT_0924 is required for maintaining peptidoglycan integrity and virulence. PMID:25987704

  16. New Viruses Identified in Fig Trees Exhibiting Fig Mosaic Disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fig mosaic disease has been known for decades, but the causal agent has been elusive. Here we present data on the incidence of at least four new viruses isolated from fig trees exhibiting mosaic symptoms. One of the viruses is closely related to the recently identified European mountain ash ringspo...

  17. Exome Sequencing Identifies Three Novel Candidate Genes Implicated in Intellectual Disability

    PubMed Central

    Azam, Maleeha; Ayub, Humaira; Vissers, Lisenka E. L. M.; Gilissen, Christian; Ali, Syeda Hafiza Benish; Riaz, Moeen; Veltman, Joris A.; Pfundt, Rolph; van Bokhoven, Hans; Qamar, Raheel

    2014-01-01

    Intellectual disability (ID) is a major health problem mostly with an unknown etiology. Recently exome sequencing of individuals with ID identified novel genes implicated in the disease. Therefore the purpose of the present study was to identify the genetic cause of ID in one syndromic and two non-syndromic Pakistani families. Whole exome of three ID probands was sequenced. Missense variations in two plausible novel genes implicated in autosomal recessive ID were identified: lysine (K)-specific methyltransferase 2B (KMT2B), zinc finger protein 589 (ZNF589), as well as hedgehog acyltransferase (HHAT) with a de novo mutation with autosomal dominant mode of inheritance. The KMT2B recessive variant is the first report of recessive Kleefstra syndrome-like phenotype. Identification of plausible causative mutations for two recessive and a dominant type of ID, in genes not previously implicated in disease, underscores the large genetic heterogeneity of ID. These results also support the viewpoint that large number of ID genes converge on limited number of common networks i.e. ZNF589 belongs to KRAB-domain zinc-finger proteins previously implicated in ID, HHAT is predicted to affect sonic hedgehog, which is involved in several disorders with ID, KMT2B associated with syndromic ID fits the epigenetic module underlying the Kleefstra syndromic spectrum. The association of these novel genes in three different Pakistani ID families highlights the importance of screening these genes in more families with similar phenotypes from different populations to confirm the involvement of these genes in pathogenesis of ID. PMID:25405613

  18. Mutational analysis of PKD1 gene in a Chinese family with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jingyan; Li, Lanrong; Liu, Qingmin

    2015-01-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is a hereditary disease and common renal disease. Mutations of PKD genes are responsible for this disease. We analyzed a large Chinese family with ADPKD using Sanger sequencing to identify the mutation responsible for this disease. The family comprised 27 individuals including 10 ADPKD patients. These ADPKD patients had severe renal disease and most of them died very young. We analyzed 6 survival patients gene and found they all had C10529T mutation in exon 35 of PKD1 gene. We did not found gene mutation in any unaffected relatives or 300 unrelated controls. These findings suggested that the C10529T mutation in PKD1 gene might be the pathogenic mutation responsible for the disease in this family. PMID:26722532

  19. Identifying genes that mediate anthracyline toxicity in immune cells

    PubMed Central

    Frick, Amber; Suzuki, Oscar T.; Benton, Cristina; Parks, Bethany; Fedoriw, Yuri; Richards, Kristy L.; Thomas, Russell S.; Wiltshire, Tim

    2015-01-01

    The role of the immune system in response to chemotherapeutic agents remains elusive. The interpatient variability observed in immune and chemotherapeutic cytotoxic responses is likely, at least in part, due to complex genetic differences. Through the use of a panel of genetically diverse mouse inbred strains, we developed a drug screening platform aimed at identifying genes underlying these chemotherapeutic cytotoxic effects on immune cells. Using genome-wide association studies (GWAS), we identified four genome-wide significant quantitative trait loci (QTL) that contributed to the sensitivity of doxorubicin and idarubicin in immune cells. Of particular interest, a locus on chromosome 16 was significantly associated with cell viability following idarubicin administration (p = 5.01 × 10?8). Within this QTL lies App, which encodes amyloid beta precursor protein. Comparison of dose-response curves verified that T-cells in App knockout mice were more sensitive to idarubicin than those of C57BL/6J control mice (p < 0.05). In conclusion, the cellular screening approach coupled with GWAS led to the identification and subsequent validation of a gene involved in T-cell viability after idarubicin treatment. Previous studies have suggested a role for App in in vitro and in vivo cytotoxicity to anticancer agents; the overexpression of App enhances resistance, while the knockdown of this gene is deleterious to cell viability. Further investigations should include performing mechanistic studies, validating additional genes from the GWAS, including Ppfia1 and Ppfibp1, and ultimately translating the findings to in vivo and human studies. PMID:25926793

  20. Identifying gene-specific variations in biomedical text.

    PubMed

    Klinger, Roman; Friedrich, Christoph M; Mevissen, Heinz Theodor; Fluck, Juliane; Hofmann-Apitius, Martin; Furlong, Laura I; Sanz, Ferran

    2007-12-01

    The influence of genetic variations on diseases or cellular processes is the main focus of many investigations, and results of biomedical studies are often only accessible through scientific publications. Automatic extraction of this information requires recognition of the gene names and the accompanying allelic variant information. In a previous work, the OSIRIS system for the detection of allelic variation in text based on a query expansion approach was communicated. Challenges associated with this system are the relatively low recall for variation mentions and gene name recognition. To tackle this challenge, we integrate the ProMiner system developed for the recognition and normalization of gene and protein names with a conditional random field (CRF)-based recognition of variation terms in biomedical text. Following the newly developed normalization of variation entities, we can link textual entities to Single Nucleotide Polymorphism database (dbSNP) entries. The performance of this novel approach is evaluated, and improved results in comparison to state-of-the-art systems are reported. PMID:18172929

  1. Ontology Guided Data Integration for Computational Prioritization of Disease Genes

    E-print Network

    Ontology Guided Data Integration for Computational Prioritization of Disease Genes Bert Coessens1 for computational prioritization of candidate disease genes, called Endeav- our. Endeavour prioritizes genes based on their similarity with a set of training genes while using a wide variety of information sources. However

  2. Associating Genes and Protein Complexes with Disease via Network Propagation

    E-print Network

    Sharan, Roded

    Associating Genes and Protein Complexes with Disease via Network Propagation Oron Vanunu1. , Oded A fundamental challenge in human health is the identification of disease-causing genes. Recently, several, network-based method for prioritizing disease genes and inferring protein complex associations, which we

  3. Fluid Mechanics, Arterial Disease, and Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Tarbell, John M.; Shi, Zhong-Dong; Dunn, Jessilyn; Jo, Hanjoong

    2014-01-01

    This review places modern research developments in vascular mechanobiology in the context of hemodynamic phenomena in the cardiovascular system and the discrete localization of vascular disease. The modern origins of this field are traced, beginning in the 1960s when associations between flow characteristics, particularly blood flow–induced wall shear stress, and the localization of atherosclerotic plaques were uncovered, and continuing to fluid shear stress effects on the vascular lining endothelial) cells (ECs), including their effects on EC morphology, biochemical production, and gene expression. The earliest single-gene studies and genome-wide analyses are considered. The final section moves from the ECs lining the vessel wall to the smooth muscle cells and fibroblasts within the wall that are fluid me chanically activated by interstitial flow that imposes shear stresses on their surfaces comparable with those of flowing blood on EC surfaces. Interstitial flow stimulates biochemical production and gene expression, much like blood flow on ECs. PMID:25360054

  4. Retinitis Pigmentosa: Genes and Disease Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, Stefano; Di Iorio, Enzo; Barbaro, Vanessa; Ponzin, Diego; Sorrentino, Francesco S; Parmeggiani, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a group of inherited disorders affecting 1 in 3000-7000 people and characterized by abnormalities of the photoreceptors (rods and cones) or the retinal pigment epithelium of the retina which lead to progressive visual loss. RP can be inherited in an autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive or X-linked manner. While usually limited to the eye, RP may also occur as part of a syndrome as in the Usher syndrome and Bardet-Biedl syndrome. Over 40 genes have been associated with RP so far, with the majority of them expressed in either the photoreceptors or the retinal pigment epithelium. The tremendous heterogeneity of the disease makes the genetics of RP complicated, thus rendering genotype-phenotype correlations not fully applicable yet. In addition to the multiplicity of mutations, in fact, different mutations in the same gene may cause different diseases. We will here review which genes are involved in the genesis of RP and how mutations can lead to retinal degeneration. In the future, a more thorough analysis of genetic and clinical data together with a better understanding of the genotype-phenotype correlation might allow to reveal important information with respect to the likelihood of disease development and choices of therapy. PMID:22131869

  5. Gene expression analyses identify Narp contribution in the development of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia.

    PubMed

    Charbonnier-Beaupel, Fanny; Malerbi, Marion; Alcacer, Cristina; Tahiri, Khadija; Carpentier, Wassila; Wang, Chuansong; During, Matthew; Xu, Desheng; Worley, Paul F; Girault, Jean-Antoine; Hervé, Denis; Corvol, Jean-Christophe

    2015-01-01

    In Parkinson's disease, long-term dopamine replacement therapy is complicated by the appearance of L-DOPA-induced dyskinesia (LID). One major hypothesis is that LID results from an aberrant transcriptional program in striatal neurons induced by L-DOPA and triggered by the activation of ERK. To identify these genes, we performed transcriptome analyses in the striatum in 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned mice. A time course analysis (0-6 h after treatment with L-DOPA) identified an acute signature of 709 genes, among which genes involved in protein phosphatase activity were overrepresented, suggesting a negative feedback on ERK activation by l-DOPA. l-DOPA-dependent deregulation of 28 genes was blocked by pretreatment with SL327, an inhibitor of ERK activation, and 26 genes were found differentially expressed between highly and weakly dyskinetic animals after treatment with L-DOPA. The intersection list identified five genes: FosB, Th, Nptx2, Nedd4l, and Ccrn4l. Nptx2 encodes neuronal pentraxin II (or neuronal activity-regulated pentraxin, Narp), which is involved in the clustering of glutamate receptors. We confirmed increased Nptx2 expression after L-DOPA and its blockade by SL327 using quantitative RT-PCR in independent experiments. Using an escalating L-DOPA dose protocol, LID severity was decreased in Narp knock-out mice compared with their wild-type littermates or after overexpression of a dominant-negative form of Narp in the striatum. In conclusion, we have identified a molecular signature induced by L-DOPA in the dopamine-denervated striatum that is dependent on ERK and associated with LID. Here, we demonstrate the implication of one of these genes, Nptx2, in the development of LID. PMID:25568106

  6. Bioinformatic Screening of Autoimmune Disease Genes and Protein Structure Prediction with FAMS for Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Ishida, Shigeharu; Umeyama, Hideaki; Iwadate, Mitsuo; Y-h, Taguchi

    2014-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases are often intractable because their causes are unknown. Identifying which genes contribute to these diseases may allow us to understand the pathogenesis, but it is difficult to determine which genes contribute to disease. Recently, epigenetic information has been considered to activate/deactivate disease-related genes. Thus, it may also be useful to study epigenetic information that differs between healthy controls and patients with autoimmune disease. Among several types of epigenetic information, promoter methylation is believed to be one of the most important factors. Here, we propose that principal component analysis is useful to identify specific gene promoters that are differently methylated between the normal healthy controls and patients with autoimmune disease. Full Automatic Modeling System (FAMS) was used to predict the three-dimensional structures of selected proteins and successfully inferred relatively confident structures. Several possibilities of the application to the drug discovery based on obtained structures are discussed. PMID:23855671

  7. Integrated Model of De Novo and Inherited Genetic Variants Yields Greater Power to Identify Risk Genes

    PubMed Central

    He, Xin; Sanders, Stephan J.; Liu, Li; De Rubeis, Silvia; Lim, Elaine T.; Sutcliffe, James S.; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Daly, Mark J.; Buxbaum, Joseph D.; State, Matthew W.; Devlin, Bernie; Roeder, Kathryn

    2013-01-01

    De novo mutations affect risk for many diseases and disorders, especially those with early-onset. An example is autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Four recent whole-exome sequencing (WES) studies of ASD families revealed a handful of novel risk genes, based on independent de novo loss-of-function (LoF) mutations falling in the same gene, and found that de novo LoF mutations occurred at a twofold higher rate than expected by chance. However successful these studies were, they used only a small fraction of the data, excluding other types of de novo mutations and inherited rare variants. Moreover, such analyses cannot readily incorporate data from case-control studies. An important research challenge in gene discovery, therefore, is to develop statistical methods that accommodate a broader class of rare variation. We develop methods that can incorporate WES data regarding de novo mutations, inherited variants present, and variants identified within cases and controls. TADA, for Transmission And De novo Association, integrates these data by a gene-based likelihood model involving parameters for allele frequencies and gene-specific penetrances. Inference is based on a Hierarchical Bayes strategy that borrows information across all genes to infer parameters that would be difficult to estimate for individual genes. In addition to theoretical development we validated TADA using realistic simulations mimicking rare, large-effect mutations affecting risk for ASD and show it has dramatically better power than other common methods of analysis. Thus TADA's integration of various kinds of WES data can be a highly effective means of identifying novel risk genes. Indeed, application of TADA to WES data from subjects with ASD and their families, as well as from a study of ASD subjects and controls, revealed several novel and promising ASD candidate genes with strong statistical support. PMID:23966865

  8. Elevating crop disease resistance with cloned genes

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Jonathan D. G.; Witek, Kamil; Verweij, Walter; Jupe, Florian; Cooke, David; Dorling, Stephen; Tomlinson, Laurence; Smoker, Matthew; Perkins, Sara; Foster, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Essentially all plant species exhibit heritable genetic variation for resistance to a variety of plant diseases caused by fungi, bacteria, oomycetes or viruses. Disease losses in crop monocultures are already significant, and would be greater but for applications of disease-controlling agrichemicals. For sustainable intensification of crop production, we argue that disease control should as far as possible be achieved using genetics rather than using costly recurrent chemical sprays. The latter imply CO2 emissions from diesel fuel and potential soil compaction from tractor journeys. Great progress has been made in the past 25 years in our understanding of the molecular basis of plant disease resistance mechanisms, and of how pathogens circumvent them. These insights can inform more sophisticated approaches to elevating disease resistance in crops that help us tip the evolutionary balance in favour of the crop and away from the pathogen. We illustrate this theme with an account of a genetically modified (GM) blight-resistant potato trial in Norwich, using the Rpi-vnt1.1 gene isolated from a wild relative of potato, Solanum venturii, and introduced by GM methods into the potato variety Desiree. PMID:24535396

  9. CFTR gene mutations in isolated chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    SciTech Connect

    Pignatti, P.F.; Bombien, C.; Marigo, C.

    1994-09-01

    In order to identify a possible hereditary predisposition to the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), we have looked for the presence of cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator (CFTR) gene DNA sequence modifications in 28 unrelated patients with no signs of cystic fibrosis. The known mutations in Italian CF patients, as well as the most frequent worldwide CF mutations, were investigated. In addition, a denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis of about half of the coding sequence of the gene in 56 chromosomes from the patients and in 102 chromosomes from control individuals affected by other pulmonary diseases and from normal controls was performed. Nine different CFTR gene mutations and polymorphisms were found in seven patients, a highly significant increase over controls. Two of the patients were compound heterozygotes. Two frequent CF mutations were detected: deletion F508 and R117H; two rare CF mutations: R1066C and 3667ins4; and five CF sequence variants: R75Q (which was also described as a disease-causing mutation in male sterility cases due to the absence of the vasa deferentia), G576A, 2736 A{r_arrow}G, L997F, and 3271+18C{r_arrow}T. Seven (78%) of the mutations are localized in transmembrane domains. Six (86%) of the patients with defined mutations and polymorphisms had bronchiectasis. These results indicate that CFTR gene mutations and sequence alterations may be involved in the etiopathogenesis of some cases of COPD.

  10. Detecting Mutual Functional Gene Clusters from Multiple Related Diseases

    E-print Network

    Buffalo, State University of New York

    Detecting Mutual Functional Gene Clusters from Multiple Related Diseases Nan Du, Xiaoyi Li, Yuan opportunity for understanding the functional genomics of a specific disease. Due to its strong power the gene clusters for various diseases. However, more and more evidence suggest that human diseases

  11. Antioxidant Enzyme Gene Transfer for Ischemic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jian; Hecker, James G.; Chiamvimonvat, Nipavan

    2009-01-01

    The balance of redox is pivotal for normal function and integrity of tissues. Ischemic insults occur as results of a variety of conditions, leading to an accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and an imbalanced redox status in the tissues. The oxidant stress may activate signaling mechanisms provoking more toxic events, and eventually cause tissue damage. Therefore, treatments with antioxidants, free radical scavengers and their mimetics, as well as gene transfer approaches to overexpress antioxidant genes represent potential therapeutic options to correct the redox imbalance. Among them, antioxidant gene transfer may enhance the production of antioxidant scavengers, and has been employed to experimentally prevent or treat ischemic injury in cardiovascular, pulmonary, hepatic, intestinal, central nervous or other systems in animal models. With improvements in vector systems and delivery approaches, innovative antioxidant gene therapy has conferred better outcomes for myocardial infarction, reduced restenosis after coronary angioplasty, improved the quality and function of liver grafts, as well as outcome of intestinal and cerebral ischemic attacks. However, it is crucial to be mindful that like other therapeutic armentarium, the efficacy of antioxidant gene transfer requires extensive preclinical investigation before it can be used in patients, and that it may have unanticipated short- or long-term adverse effects. Thus, it is critical to balance between the therapeutic benefits and potential risks, to develop disease-specific antioxidant gene transfer strategies, to deliver the therapy with an optimal time window and in a safe manner. This review attempts to provide the rationale, the most effective approaches and the potential hurdles of available antioxidant gene transfer approaches for ischemic injury in various organs, as well as the possible directions of future preclinical and clinical investigations of this highly promising therapeutic modality. PMID:19233238

  12. Connectivity mapping using a combined gene signature from multiple colorectal cancer datasets identified candidate drugs including existing chemotherapies

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background While the discovery of new drugs is a complex, lengthy and costly process, identifying new uses for existing drugs is a cost-effective approach to therapeutic discovery. Connectivity mapping integrates gene expression profiling with advanced algorithms to connect genes, diseases and small molecule compounds and has been applied in a large number of studies to identify potential drugs, particularly to facilitate drug repurposing. Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a commonly diagnosed cancer with high mortality rates, presenting a worldwide health problem. With the advancement of high throughput omics technologies, a number of large scale gene expression profiling studies have been conducted on CRCs, providing multiple datasets in gene expression data repositories. In this work, we systematically apply gene expression connectivity mapping to multiple CRC datasets to identify candidate therapeutics to this disease. Results We developed a robust method to compile a combined gene signature for colorectal cancer across multiple datasets. Connectivity mapping analysis with this signature of 148 genes identified 10 candidate compounds, including irinotecan and etoposide, which are chemotherapy drugs currently used to treat CRCs. These results indicate that we have discovered high quality connections between the CRC disease state and the candidate compounds, and that the gene signature we created may be used as a potential therapeutic target in treating the disease. The method we proposed is highly effective in generating quality gene signature through multiple datasets; the publication of the combined CRC gene signature and the list of candidate compounds from this work will benefit both cancer and systems biology research communities for further development and investigations. PMID:26356760

  13. Characterization of TCF21 Downstream Target Regions Identifies a Transcriptional Network Linking Multiple Independent Coronary Artery Disease Loci

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Clint; Pjanic, Milos; Castano, Victor G.; Kim, Juyong B.; Salfati, Elias L.; Kundaje, Anshul B.; Bejerano, Gill; Assimes, Themistocles; Yang, Xia; Quertermous, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    To functionally link coronary artery disease (CAD) causal genes identified by genome wide association studies (GWAS), and to investigate the cellular and molecular mechanisms of atherosclerosis, we have used chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-Seq) with the CAD associated transcription factor TCF21 in human coronary artery smooth muscle cells (HCASMC). Analysis of identified TCF21 target genes for enrichment of molecular and cellular annotation terms identified processes relevant to CAD pathophysiology, including “growth factor binding,” “matrix interaction,” and “smooth muscle contraction.” We characterized the canonical binding sequence for TCF21 as CAGCTG, identified AP-1 binding sites in TCF21 peaks, and by conducting ChIP-Seq for JUN and JUND in HCASMC confirmed that there is significant overlap between TCF21 and AP-1 binding loci in this cell type. Expression quantitative trait variation mapped to target genes of TCF21 was significantly enriched among variants with low P-values in the GWAS analyses, suggesting a possible functional interaction between TCF21 binding and causal variants in other CAD disease loci. Separate enrichment analyses found over-representation of TCF21 target genes among CAD associated genes, and linkage disequilibrium between TCF21 peak variation and that found in GWAS loci, consistent with the hypothesis that TCF21 may affect disease risk through interaction with other disease associated loci. Interestingly, enrichment for TCF21 target genes was also found among other genome wide association phenotypes, including height and inflammatory bowel disease, suggesting a functional profile important for basic cellular processes in non-vascular tissues. Thus, data and analyses presented here suggest that study of GWAS transcription factors may be a highly useful approach to identifying disease gene interactions and thus pathways that may be relevant to complex disease etiology. PMID:26020271

  14. A systems approach identifies networks and genes linking sleep and stress: implications for neuropsychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Peng; Scarpa, Joseph R; Fitzpatrick, Karrie; Losic, Bojan; Gao, Vance D; Hao, Ke; Summa, Keith C; Yang, He S; Zhang, Bin; Allada, Ravi; Vitaterna, Martha H; Turek, Fred W; Kasarskis, Andrew

    2015-05-01

    Sleep dysfunction and stress susceptibility are comorbid complex traits that often precede and predispose patients to a variety of neuropsychiatric diseases. Here, we demonstrate multilevel organizations of genetic landscape, candidate genes, and molecular networks associated with 328 stress and sleep traits in a chronically stressed population of 338 (C57BL/6J × A/J) F2 mice. We constructed striatal gene co-expression networks, revealing functionally and cell-type-specific gene co-regulations important for stress and sleep. Using a composite ranking system, we identified network modules most relevant for 15 independent phenotypic categories, highlighting a mitochondria/synaptic module that links sleep and stress. The key network regulators of this module are overrepresented with genes implicated in neuropsychiatric diseases. Our work suggests that the interplay among sleep, stress, and neuropathology emerges from genetic influences on gene expression and their collective organization through complex molecular networks, providing a framework for interrogating the mechanisms underlying sleep, stress susceptibility, and related neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:25921536

  15. Identifying glycoside hydrolase family 18 genes in the mycoparasitic fungal species Clonostachys rosea.

    PubMed

    Tzelepis, Georgios; Dubey, Mukesh; Jensen, Dan Funck; Karlsson, Magnus

    2015-07-01

    Clonostachysrosea is a mycoparasitic fungal species that is an efficient biocontrol agent against many plant diseases. During mycoparasitic interactions, one of the most crucial steps is the hydrolysis of the prey's fungal cell wall, which mainly consists of glucans, glycoproteins and chitin. Chitinases are hydrolytic enzymes responsible for chitin degradation and it is suggested that they play an important role in fungal-fungal interactions. Fungal chitinases belong exclusively to the glycoside hydrolase (GH) family 18.These GH18 proteins are categorized into three distinct phylogenetic groups (A, B and C), subdivided into several subgroups. In this study, we identified 14 GH18 genes in the C. rosea genome, which is remarkably low compared with the high numbers found in mycoparasitic Trichoderma species. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that C. rosea contains eight genes in group A, two genes in group B, two genes in group C, one gene encoding a putative ENGase (endo-?-N-acetylglucosaminidase) and the ech37 gene, which is of bacterial origin. Gene expression analysis showed that only two genes had higher transcription levels during fungal-fungal interactions, while eight out of 14 GH18 genes were triggered by chitin. Furthermore, deletion of the C group chiC2 gene decreased the growth inhibitory activity of C. rosea culture filtrates against Botrytis cinerea and Rhizoctonia solani, although the biocontrol ability of C. rosea against B. cinerea was not affected. In addition, a potential role of the CHIC2 chitinase in the sporulation process was revealed. These results provide new information about the role of GH18 proteins in mycoparasitic interactions. PMID:25881898

  16. Genome-Wide Scan Informed by Age-Related Disease Identifies Loci for Exceptional Human Longevity.

    PubMed

    Fortney, Kristen; Dobriban, Edgar; Garagnani, Paolo; Pirazzini, Chiara; Monti, Daniela; Mari, Daniela; Atzmon, Gil; Barzilai, Nir; Franceschi, Claudio; Owen, Art B; Kim, Stuart K

    2015-12-01

    We developed a new statistical framework to find genetic variants associated with extreme longevity. The method, informed GWAS (iGWAS), takes advantage of knowledge from large studies of age-related disease in order to narrow the search for SNPs associated with longevity. To gain support for our approach, we first show there is an overlap between loci involved in disease and loci associated with extreme longevity. These results indicate that several disease variants may be depleted in centenarians versus the general population. Next, we used iGWAS to harness information from 14 meta-analyses of disease and trait GWAS to identify longevity loci in two studies of long-lived humans. In a standard GWAS analysis, only one locus in these studies is significant (APOE/TOMM40) when controlling the false discovery rate (FDR) at 10%. With iGWAS, we identify eight genetic loci to associate significantly with exceptional human longevity at FDR < 10%. We followed up the eight lead SNPs in independent cohorts, and found replication evidence of four loci and suggestive evidence for one more with exceptional longevity. The loci that replicated (FDR < 5%) included APOE/TOMM40 (associated with Alzheimer's disease), CDKN2B/ANRIL (implicated in the regulation of cellular senescence), ABO (tags the O blood group), and SH2B3/ATXN2 (a signaling gene that extends lifespan in Drosophila and a gene involved in neurological disease). Our results implicate new loci in longevity and reveal a genetic overlap between longevity and age-related diseases and traits, including coronary artery disease and Alzheimer's disease. iGWAS provides a new analytical strategy for uncovering SNPs that influence extreme longevity, and can be applied more broadly to boost power in other studies of complex phenotypes. PMID:26677855

  17. Genome-Wide Scan Informed by Age-Related Disease Identifies Loci for Exceptional Human Longevity

    PubMed Central

    Fortney, Kristen; Dobriban, Edgar; Garagnani, Paolo; Pirazzini, Chiara; Monti, Daniela; Mari, Daniela; Atzmon, Gil; Barzilai, Nir; Franceschi, Claudio; Owen, Art B.; Kim, Stuart K.

    2015-01-01

    We developed a new statistical framework to find genetic variants associated with extreme longevity. The method, informed GWAS (iGWAS), takes advantage of knowledge from large studies of age-related disease in order to narrow the search for SNPs associated with longevity. To gain support for our approach, we first show there is an overlap between loci involved in disease and loci associated with extreme longevity. These results indicate that several disease variants may be depleted in centenarians versus the general population. Next, we used iGWAS to harness information from 14 meta-analyses of disease and trait GWAS to identify longevity loci in two studies of long-lived humans. In a standard GWAS analysis, only one locus in these studies is significant (APOE/TOMM40) when controlling the false discovery rate (FDR) at 10%. With iGWAS, we identify eight genetic loci to associate significantly with exceptional human longevity at FDR < 10%. We followed up the eight lead SNPs in independent cohorts, and found replication evidence of four loci and suggestive evidence for one more with exceptional longevity. The loci that replicated (FDR < 5%) included APOE/TOMM40 (associated with Alzheimer’s disease), CDKN2B/ANRIL (implicated in the regulation of cellular senescence), ABO (tags the O blood group), and SH2B3/ATXN2 (a signaling gene that extends lifespan in Drosophila and a gene involved in neurological disease). Our results implicate new loci in longevity and reveal a genetic overlap between longevity and age-related diseases and traits, including coronary artery disease and Alzheimer’s disease. iGWAS provides a new analytical strategy for uncovering SNPs that influence extreme longevity, and can be applied more broadly to boost power in other studies of complex phenotypes. PMID:26677855

  18. Combined linkage analysis and exome sequencing identifies novel genes for familial goiter.

    PubMed

    Yan, Junxia; Takahashi, Tsutomu; Ohura, Toshihiro; Adachi, Hiroyuki; Takahashi, Ikuko; Ogawa, Eishin; Okuda, Hiroko; Kobayashi, Hatasu; Hitomi, Toshiaki; Liu, Wanyang; Harada, Kouji H; Koizumi, Akio

    2013-06-01

    Familial goiter is a genetic disease showing heterogeneous expression. To identify causative genes, we investigated three multigenerational goiter families with an autosomal dominant inheritance pattern. We performed genome-wide linkage analysis on all the families, combined with whole-exome sequencing in two affected individuals from each family. For linkage analysis, we considered loci with logarithm of odds (LOD) scores >1.5 as candidate regions for identification of rare variants. In one of the families, we found two rare heterozygous missense variants, p.V56M in RGS12 and p.G37D in GRPEL1, which segregate with goiter and are both located within the same haplotype on 4p16. This haplotype was not observed in 150 controls. In the other two families, we identified two additional rare missense variants segregating with goiter, p.A551T in CLIC6 on 21q22.12 and p.V412A in WFS1 on 4p16. In controls, the minor allele frequency (MAF) of p.V412A in WFS1 was 0.017 while p.A551T in CLIC6 was not detected. All identified genes (RGS12, GRPEL1, CLIC6 and WFS1) show expression in the human thyroid gland, suggesting that they may play a role in thyroid gland function. Moreover, these four genes are novel with regard to their involvement in familial goiter, supporting genetic heterogeneity of this disease. PMID:23535966

  19. Strategies for Evaluating Idiopathic Inflammatory Myopathy Disease Susceptibility Genes

    PubMed Central

    Rothwell, Simon; Cooper, Robert G.; Lamb, Janine A.; Chinoy, Hector

    2015-01-01

    This review outlines the progress that has been made in understanding the genetics of the idiopathic inflammatory myopathies in the previous two years, with a particular focus on dermatomyositis and polymyositis. A recent genome wide association study in dermatomyositis has confirmed the importance of the major histocompatibility region in this disease, and suggested a shared genetic etiology with other autoimmune disorders. This has led to an ongoing study of additional immune-related loci using the Immunochip array. Candidate gene studies have identified novel risk associations in non-Europeans, such as STAT4 and HLA-DRB1 in the Japanese population. Evidence for gene-environment interactions has come from two recent studies implicating smoking status and statin use with HLA alleles. This review also touches on future approaches to genetic research in myositis, including bioinformatics tools to identify causal variants, HLA imputation from existing genetic data and statistical methods to investigate shared effects between subgroups of myositis. PMID:25182674

  20. EvoTol: a protein-sequence based evolutionary intolerance framework for disease-gene prioritization

    PubMed Central

    Rackham, Owen J. L.; Shihab, Hashem A.; Johnson, Michael R.; Petretto, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    Methods to interpret personal genome sequences are increasingly required. Here, we report a novel framework (EvoTol) to identify disease-causing genes using patient sequence data from within protein coding-regions. EvoTol quantifies a gene's intolerance to mutation using evolutionary conservation of protein sequences and can incorporate tissue-specific gene expression data. We apply this framework to the analysis of whole-exome sequence data in epilepsy and congenital heart disease, and demonstrate EvoTol's ability to identify known disease-causing genes is unmatched by competing methods. Application of EvoTol to the human interactome revealed networks enriched for genes intolerant to protein sequence variation, informing novel polygenic contributions to human disease. PMID:25550428

  1. Inferring novel gene-disease associations using Medical Subject Heading Over-representation Profiles

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background MEDLINE®/PubMed® currently indexes over 18 million biomedical articles, providing unprecedented opportunities and challenges for text analysis. Using Medical Subject Heading Over-representation Profiles (MeSHOPs), an entity of interest can be robustly summarized, quantitatively identifying associated biomedical terms and predicting novel indirect associations. Methods A procedure is introduced for quantitative comparison of MeSHOPs derived from a group of MEDLINE® articles for a biomedical topic (for example, articles for a specific gene or disease). Similarity scores are computed to compare MeSHOPs of genes and diseases. Results Similarity scores successfully infer novel associations between diseases and genes. The number of papers addressing a gene or disease has a strong influence on predicted associations, revealing an important bias for gene-disease relationship prediction. Predictions derived from comparisons of MeSHOPs achieves a mean 8% AUC improvement in the identification of gene-disease relationships compared to gene-independent baseline properties. Conclusions MeSHOP comparisons are demonstrated to provide predictive capacity for novel relationships between genes and human diseases. We demonstrate the impact of literature bias on the performance of gene-disease prediction methods. MeSHOPs provide a rich source of annotation to facilitate relationship discovery in biomedical informatics. PMID:23021552

  2. Identifying Diagnostic Peptides for Lyme Disease through Epitope Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Kouzmitcheva, Galina A.; Petrenko, Valery A.; Smith, George P.

    2001-01-01

    Serum antibodies from patients with Lyme disease (LD) were used to affinity select peptide epitopes from 12 large random peptide libraries in phage display format. The selected peptides were surveyed for reactivity with a panel of positive sera (from LD patients) and negative sera (from subjects without LD), thus identifying 17 peptides with a diagnostically useful binding pattern: reactivity with at least three positive sera and no reactivity with any of the negative sera. The peptides define eight sequence motifs, none of which can be matched convincingly with segments of proteins from Borrelia burgdorferi, the LD pathogen; evidently, then, they are “mimotopes,” mimicking natural pathogen epitopes without matching contiguous amino acids of pathogen proteins. Peptides like these could be the basis of a new diagnostic enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for LD, with sufficient specificity and sensitivity to replace expensive immunoblotting tests that are currently required for definitive serological diagnosis. Moreover, the method used to discover these peptides did not require any knowledge of the pathogen and involved generic procedures that are applicable to almost any infectious disease, including emerging diseases for which no pathogen has yet been identified. PMID:11139210

  3. Expression sensitivity analysis of human disease related genes.

    PubMed

    Ma, Liang-Xiao; Wang, Ya-Jun; Wang, Jing-Fang; Li, Xuan; Hao, Pei

    2013-01-01

    Background. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have shown its revolutionary power in seeking the influenced loci on complex diseases genetically. Thousands of replicated loci for common traits are helpful in diseases risk assessment. However it is still difficult to elucidate the variations in these loci that directly cause susceptibility to diseases by disrupting the expression or function of a protein currently. Results. We evaluate the expression features of disease related genes and find that different diseases related genes show different expression perturbation sensitivities in various conditions. It is worth noting that the expression of some robust disease-genes doesn't show significant change in their corresponding diseases, these genes might be easily ignored in the expression profile analysis. Conclusion. Gene ontology enrichment analysis indicates that robust disease-genes execute essential function in comparison with sensitive disease-genes. The diseases associated with robust genes seem to be relatively lethal like cancer and aging. On the other hand, the diseases associated with sensitive genes are apparently nonlethal like psych and chemical dependency diseases. PMID:24350280

  4. Integrated Analyses of Gene Expression Profiles Digs out Common Markers for Rheumatic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lan; Wu, Long-Fei; Lu, Xin; Mo, Xing-Bo; Tang, Zai-Xiang; Lei, Shu-Feng; Deng, Fei-Yan

    2015-01-01

    Objective Rheumatic diseases have some common symptoms. Extensive gene expression studies, accumulated thus far, have successfully identified signature molecules for each rheumatic disease, individually. However, whether there exist shared factors across rheumatic diseases has yet to be tested. Methods We collected and utilized 6 public microarray datasets covering 4 types of representative rheumatic diseases including rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, ankylosing spondylitis, and osteoarthritis. Then we detected overlaps of differentially expressed genes across datasets and performed a meta-analysis aiming at identifying common differentially expressed genes that discriminate between pathological cases and normal controls. To further gain insights into the functions of the identified common differentially expressed genes, we conducted gene ontology enrichment analysis and protein-protein interaction analysis. Results We identified a total of eight differentially expressed genes (TNFSF10, CX3CR1, LY96, TLR5, TXN, TIA1, PRKCH, PRF1), each associated with at least 3 of the 4 studied rheumatic diseases. Meta-analysis warranted the significance of the eight genes and highlighted the general significance of four genes (CX3CR1, LY96, TLR5, and PRF1). Protein-protein interaction and gene ontology enrichment analyses indicated that the eight genes interact with each other to exert functions related to immune response and immune regulation. Conclusion The findings support that there exist common factors underlying rheumatic diseases. For rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, ankylosing spondylitis and osteoarthritis diseases, those common factors include TNFSF10, CX3CR1, LY96, TLR5, TXN, TIA1, PRKCH, and PRF1. In-depth studies on these common factors may provide keys to understanding the pathogenesis and developing intervention strategies for rheumatic diseases. PMID:26352601

  5. Transcriptome profiling to identify genes involved in pathogenicity of Valsa mali on apple tree.

    PubMed

    Ke, Xiwang; Yin, Zhiyuan; Song, Na; Dai, Qingqing; Voegele, Ralf T; Liu, Yangyang; Wang, Haiying; Gao, Xiaoning; Kang, Zhensheng; Huang, Lili

    2014-07-01

    Apple Valsa canker, caused by the fungus Valsa mali (Vm), is one of the most destructive diseases of apple in China. A better understanding of this host-pathogen interaction is urgently needed to improve management strategies. In the current study we sequenced the transcriptomes of Vm during infection of apple bark and mycelium grown in axenic culture using Illumina RNA-Seq technology. We identified 437 genes that were differentially expressed during fungal infection compared to fungal mycelium grown in axenic culture. One hundred and thirty nine of these 437 genes showed more than two fold higher transcript abundance during infection. GO and KEGG enrichment analyses of the up-regulated genes suggest prevalence of genes associated with pectin catabolic, hydrolase activity and secondary metabolite biosynthesis during fungal infection. Some of the up-regulated genes associated with loss of pathogenicity and reduced virulence annotated by host-pathogen interaction databases may also be involved in cell wall hydrolysis and secondary metabolite transport, including a glycoside hydrolase family 28 protein, a peptidase and two major facilitator superfamily proteins. This highlights the importance of secondary metabolites and cell wall hydrolases during establishment of apple Valsa canker. Functional verification of the genes involved in pathogenicity of Vm will allow us to better understand how the fungus interferes with the host machinery and assists in apple canker establishment. PMID:24747070

  6. Whole-exome sequencing identifies rare pathogenic variants in new predisposition genes for familial colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Esteban-Jurado, Clara; Vila-Casadesús, Maria; Garre, Pilar; Lozano, Juan José; Pristoupilova, Anna; Beltran, Sergi; Muñoz, Jenifer; Ocaña, Teresa; Balaguer, Francesc; López-Cerón, Maria; Cuatrecasas, Miriam; Franch-Expósito, Sebastià; Piqué, Josep M.; Castells, Antoni; Carracedo, Angel; Ruiz-Ponte, Clara; Abulí, Anna; Bessa, Xavier; Andreu, Montserrat; Bujanda, Luis; Caldés, Trinidad; Castellví-Bel, Sergi

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Colorectal cancer is an important cause of mortality in the developed world. Hereditary forms are due to germ-line mutations in APC, MUTYH, and the mismatch repair genes, but many cases present familial aggregation but an unknown inherited cause. The hypothesis of rare high-penetrance mutations in new genes is a likely explanation for the underlying predisposition in some of these familial cases. Methods: Exome sequencing was performed in 43 patients with colorectal cancer from 29 families with strong disease aggregation without mutations in known hereditary colorectal cancer genes. Data analysis selected only very rare variants (0–0.1%), producing a putative loss of function and located in genes with a role compatible with cancer. Variants in genes previously involved in hereditary colorectal cancer or nearby previous colorectal cancer genome-wide association study hits were also chosen. Results: Twenty-eight final candidate variants were selected and validated by Sanger sequencing. Correct family segregation and somatic studies were used to categorize the most interesting variants in CDKN1B, XRCC4, EPHX1, NFKBIZ, SMARCA4, and BARD1. Conclusion: We identified new potential colorectal cancer predisposition variants in genes that have a role in cancer predisposition and are involved in DNA repair and the cell cycle, which supports their putative involvement in germ-line predisposition to this neoplasm. PMID:25058500

  7. Gene patents related to common diseases of the eye.

    PubMed

    Sahebjada, Srujana; Cantsileris, Stuart; Baird, Paul N

    2011-12-01

    Visual impairment and blindness impose substantial morbidity and premature mortality on the population. The direct costs for vision disorders have been shown to be more than the cost of coronary heart disease, stroke, arthritis or depression and were estimated to be $9.85 billion in 2004 in Australia. Hence it is important to identify the causes of common eye diseases and understand their aetiology which in turn would allow determination of better management strategies and treatment options. Age related Macular Degeneration, Cataract, Diabetic Retinopathy, Glaucoma and uncorrected refractive errors represent the majority of the visual impairment and blindness in Australia and various parts of the world. This article reviews the gene patents available for these eye conditions and highlights the important discoveries that have so far contributed to our understanding of these diseases and provides valuable information as to where research will be heading in the future. PMID:21867478

  8. Inferring Gene Family Histories in Yeast Identifies Lineage Specific Expansions

    E-print Network

    Ames, Ryan M.; Money, Daniel; Lovell, Simon C.

    2014-06-12

    The complement of genes found in the genome is a balance between gene gain and gene loss. Knowledge of the specific genes that are gained and lost over evolutionary time allows an understanding of the evolution of biological functions. Here we use...

  9. Identifying Differentially-Expressed Genes via Weighted Rank Aggregation Dept of Computer Science and Engineering

    E-print Network

    Ng, Wilfred Siu Hung

    Identifying Differentially-Expressed Genes via Weighted Rank Aggregation Qiong Fang Dept and Engineering HKUST Hong Kong, China wilfred@cse.ust.hk Abstract--Identifying differentially-expressed genes is an important problem in gene expression analysis, since these genes, exhibiting sufficiently different

  10. A novel method to identify gene-gene effects in nuclear families: the MDR-PDT.

    PubMed

    Martin, E R; Ritchie, M D; Hahn, L; Kang, S; Moore, J H

    2006-02-01

    It is now well recognized that gene-gene and gene-environment interactions are important in complex diseases, and statistical methods to detect interactions are becoming widespread. Traditional parametric approaches are limited in their ability to detect high-order interactions and handle sparse data, and standard stepwise procedures may miss interactions that occur in the absence of detectable main effects. To address these limitations, the multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR) method [Ritchie et al., 2001: Am J Hum Genet 69:138-147] was developed. The MDR is well-suited for examining high-order interactions and detecting interactions without main effects. The MDR was originally designed to analyze balanced case-control data. The analysis can use family data, but requires a single matched pair be selected from each family. This may be a discordant sib pair, or may be constructed from triad data when parents are available. To take advantage of additional affected and unaffected siblings requires a test statistic that measures the association of genotype with disease in general nuclear families. We have developed a novel test, the MDR-PDT, by merging the MDR method with the genotype-Pedigree Disequilibrium Test (geno-PDT)[Martin et al., 2003: Genet Epidemiol 25:203-213]. MDR-PDT allows identification of single-locus effects or joint effects of multiple loci in families of diverse structure. We present simulations to demonstrate the validity of the test and evaluate its power. To examine its applicability to real data, we applied the MDR-PDT to data from candidate genes for Alzheimer disease (AD) in a large family dataset. These results show the utility of the MDR-PDT for understanding the genetics of complex diseases. PMID:16374833

  11. Gene Network Analysis in a Pediatric Cohort Identifies Novel Lung Function Genes

    PubMed Central

    McDonough, Joseph M.; Wei, Zhi; Kim, Cecilia; Chiavacci, Rosetta; Mentch, Frank; Caboot, Jason B.; Spergel, Jonathan; Allen, Julian L.; Sleiman, Patrick M. A.; Hakonarson, Hakon

    2013-01-01

    Lung function is a heritable trait and serves as an important clinical predictor of morbidity and mortality for pulmonary conditions in adults, however, despite its importance, no studies have focused on uncovering pediatric-specific loci influencing lung function. To identify novel genetic determinants of pediatric lung function, we conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of four pulmonary function traits, including FVC, FEV1, FEV1/FVC and FEF25–75% in 1556 children. Further, we carried out gene network analyses for each trait including all SNPs with a P-value of <1.0×10?3 from the individual GWAS. The GWAS identified SNPs with notable trends towards association with the pulmonary function measures, including the previously described INTS12 locus association with FEV1 (pmeta?=?1.41×10?7). The gene network analyses identified 34 networks of genes associated with pulmonary function variables in Caucasians. Of those, the glycoprotein gene network reached genome-wide significance for all four variables. P-value range pmeta?=?6.29×10?4 - 2.80×10?8 on meta-analysis. In this study, we report on specific pathways that are significantly associated with pediatric lung function at genome-wide significance. In addition, we report the first loci associated with lung function in both pediatric Caucasian and African American populations. PMID:24023788

  12. Expression of coordinately regulated defense response genes and analysis of their role in disease resistance in Medicago truncatula

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microarray technology was used to identify genes associated with disease defense responses in the model legume Medicago truncatula. Transcript profiles from leaves inoculated with Colletotrichum trifolii and Erysiphe pisi and roots infected with Phytophthora medicaginis were compared to identify gen...

  13. Yeast Augmented Network Analysis (YANA): a new systems approach to identify therapeutic targets for human genetic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wiley, David J.; Juan, Ilona; Le, Hao; Cai, Xiaodong; Baumbach, Lisa; Beattie, Christine; D'Urso, Gennaro

    2014-01-01

    Genetic interaction networks that underlie most human diseases are highly complex and poorly defined. Better-defined networks will allow identification of a greater number of therapeutic targets. Here we introduce our Yeast Augmented Network Analysis (YANA) approach and test it with the X-linked spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) disease gene UBA1. First, we express UBA1 and a mutant variant in fission yeast and use high-throughput methods to identify fission yeast genetic modifiers of UBA1. Second, we analyze available protein-protein interaction network databases in both fission yeast and human to construct UBA1 genetic networks. Third, from these networks we identified potential therapeutic targets for SMA. Finally, we validate one of these targets in a vertebrate (zebrafish) SMA model. This study demonstrates the power of combining synthetic and chemical genetics with a simple model system to identify human disease gene networks that can be exploited for treating human diseases. PMID:25075304

  14. With current gene markers, presymptomatic diagnosis of heritable disease is still a family affair

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-09-04

    In the last four years, genes or genetic markers have been identified for a host of disorders including Huntington's disease, cystic fibrosis, Duchenne muscular dystrophy, polycystic kidney disease, bipolar depressive disorder, retinoblastoma, Alzheimer's disease, and schizophrenia. Such discoveries have made it possible to diagnose in utero some 30 genetic diseases during the first trimester of pregnancy. Yet, while these newly discovered gene markers may be revolutionizing prenatal and presymptomatic diagnosis, they are in many respects halfway technology. Such was the opinion of several speakers at a conference sponsored by the American Medical Association in Washington, DC. At the conference, entitled DNA Probes in the Practice of Medicine, geneticists emphasized that gene markers - stretches of DNA that are usually inherited in tandem with a disease gene - are usually not sufficient for presymptomatic diagnosis of genetic disease in an individual.

  15. Analysis of the retinal gene expression profile after hypoxic preconditioning identifies candidate genes for neuroprotection

    PubMed Central

    Thiersch, Markus; Raffelsberger, Wolfgang; Frigg, Rico; Samardzija, Marijana; Wenzel, Andreas; Poch, Olivier; Grimm, Christian

    2008-01-01

    Background Retinal degeneration is a main cause of blindness in humans. Neuroprotective therapies may be used to rescue retinal cells and preserve vision. Hypoxic preconditioning stabilizes the transcription factor HIF-1? in the retina and strongly protects photoreceptors in an animal model of light-induced retinal degeneration. To address the molecular mechanisms of the protection, we analyzed the transcriptome of the hypoxic retina using microarrays and real-time PCR. Results Hypoxic exposure induced a marked alteration in the retinal transcriptome with significantly different expression levels of 431 genes immediately after hypoxic exposure. The normal expression profile was restored within 16 hours of reoxygenation. Among the differentially regulated genes, several candidates for neuroprotection were identified like metallothionein-1 and -2, the HIF-1 target gene adrenomedullin and the gene encoding the antioxidative and cytoprotective enzyme paraoxonase 1 which was previously not known to be a hypoxia responsive gene in the retina. The strongly upregulated cyclin dependent kinase inhibitor p21 was excluded from being essential for neuroprotection. Conclusion Our data suggest that neuroprotection after hypoxic preconditioning is the result of the differential expression of a multitude of genes which may act in concert to protect visual cells against a toxic insult. PMID:18261226

  16. Gene prioritization aims to identify the most promising genes (or proteins) among a larger pool of candidates

    E-print Network

    Gene prioritization aims to identify the most promising genes (or proteins) among a larger pool for prioritization are useful at several stages of any gene-hunting process. These bioinformatics tools were on a few of the most likely candidate genes1­3 . For instance, a linkage analysis on patients

  17. AN MHC class I immune evasion gene of Marek's disease virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Marek's disease virus (MDV) is a widespread a-herpesvirus of chickens that causes T cell tumors. Acute, but not latent, MDV infection has previously been shown to lead to downregulation of cell-surface MHC class I (Virology 282:198–205 (2001)), but the gene(s) involved have not been identified. Here...

  18. Identification of Candidate Genes in Rice for Resistance to Sheath Blight Disease by Whole Genome Sequencing

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent advances in whole genome sequencing have allowed identification of genes for disease susceptibility in humans. The objective of our research was to exploit whole genome sequences of 13 rice (Oryza sativa L.) inbred lines to identify non-synonymous SNPs (nsSNPs) and candidate genes for resista...

  19. Comparative transcriptome analysis of atrial septal defect identifies dysregulated genes during heart septum morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenju; Niu, Zhaoyi; Wang, Yi; Li, Yaxiong; Zou, Honglin; Yang, Li; Meng, Mingyao; Wei, Chuanyu; Li, Qinrui; Duan, Le; Xie, Yanhua; Zhang, Yayong; Cao, Yu; Han, Shen; Hou, Zongliu; Jiang, Lihong

    2016-01-10

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) is one of most common birth defects, causing fetal loss and death in newborn all over the world. Atrial and ventricular septal defects were the most common CHD subtypes in most districts. During the past decades, several genes were identified to control atrial septum formation, and mutations of these genes can cause cardiac septation defects. However, the pathogenic mechanism of ASD on transcriptional levels has not been well elucidated yet. Herein, we performed comparative transcriptome analysis between normal and atrial septal defect (ASD) patients by Illumina RNA sequencing (RNA-seq). Advanced bioinformatic analyses were employed to identify dysregulated genes in ASD. The results indicated that cardiac specific transcriptional factors (GATA4 and NKX2-5), extracellular signal molecules (VEGFA and BMP10) and cardiac sarcomeric proteins (MYL2, MYL3, MYH7, TNNT1 and TNNT3) were downregulated in ASD which may affect heart atrial septum formation, cardiomyocyte proliferation and cardiac muscle development. Importantly, cell cycle was dominant pathway among downregulated genes, and decreased expression of the proteins included in cell cycle may disturb cardiomyocyte growth and differentiation during atrial septum formation. Our study provided evidences of understanding pathogenic mechanism of ASD and resource for validation of CHD genomic studies. PMID:26375510

  20. Identifying Unstable Regions of Proteins Involved in Misfolding Diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guest, Will; Cashman, Neil; Plotkin, Steven

    2009-05-01

    Protein misfolding is a necessary step in the pathogenesis of many diseases, including Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) and familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (fALS). Identifying unstable structural elements in their causative proteins elucidates the early events of misfolding and presents targets for inhibition of the disease process. An algorithm was developed to calculate the Gibbs free energy of unfolding for all sequence-contiguous regions of a protein using three methods to parameterize energy changes: a modified G=o model, changes in solvent-accessible surface area, and all-atoms molecular dynamics. The entropic effects of disulfide bonds and post-translational modifications are treated analytically. It incorporates a novel method for finding local dielectric constants inside a protein to accurately handle charge effects. We have predicted the unstable parts of prion protein and superoxide dismutase 1, the proteins involved in CJD and fALS respectively, and have used these regions as epitopes to prepare antibodies that are specific to the misfolded conformation and show promise as therapeutic agents.

  1. Prioritisation and Network Analysis of Crohn's Disease Susceptibility Genes

    E-print Network

    Muraro, Daniele

    Recent Genome-Wide Association Studies (GWAS) have revealed numerous Crohn's disease susceptibility genes and a key challenge now is in understanding how risk polymorphisms in associated genes might contribute to development ...

  2. Development and Utilization of InDel Markers to Identify Peanut (Arachis hypogaea) Disease Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lifeng; Dang, Phat M.; Chen, Charles Y.

    2015-01-01

    Peanut diseases, such as leaf spot and spotted wilt caused by Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus, can significantly reduce yield and quality. Application of marker assisted plant breeding requires the development and validation of different types of DNA molecular markers. Nearly 10,000 SSR-based molecular markers have been identified by various research groups around the world, but less than 14.5% showed polymorphism in peanut and only 6.4% have been mapped. Low levels of polymorphism limit the application of marker assisted selection (MAS) in peanut breeding programs. Insertion/deletion (InDel) markers have been reported to be more polymorphic than SSRs in some crops. The goals of this study were to identify novel InDel markers and to evaluate the potential use in peanut breeding. Forty-eight InDel markers were developed from conserved sequences of functional genes and tested in a diverse panel of 118 accessions covering six botanical types of cultivated peanut, of which 104 were from the U.S. mini-core. Results showed that 16 InDel markers were polymorphic with polymorphic information content (PIC) among InDels ranged from 0.017 to 0.660. With respect to botanical types, PICs varied from 0.176 for fastigiata var., 0.181 for hypogaea var., 0.306 for vulgaris var., 0.534 for aequatoriana var., 0.556 for peruviana var., to 0.660 for hirsuta var., implying that aequatoriana var., peruviana var., and hirsuta var. have higher genetic diversity than the other types and provide a basis for gene functional studies. Single marker analysis was conducted to associate specific marker to disease resistant traits. Five InDels from functional genes were identified to be significantly correlated to tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) infection and leaf spot, and these novel markers will be utilized to identify disease resistant genotype in breeding populations. PMID:26617627

  3. Disease Gene Characterization through Large-Scale Co-Expression Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Funari, Vincent A.; Harry, Bret; Strom, Samuel P.; Cohn, Dan H.; Nelson, Stanley F.

    2009-01-01

    Background In the post genome era, a major goal of biology is the identification of specific roles for individual genes. We report a new genomic tool for gene characterization, the UCLA Gene Expression Tool (UGET). Results Celsius, the largest co-normalized microarray dataset of Affymetrix based gene expression, was used to calculate the correlation between all possible gene pairs on all platforms, and generate stored indexes in a web searchable format. The size of Celsius makes UGET a powerful gene characterization tool. Using a small seed list of known cartilage-selective genes, UGET extended the list of known genes by identifying 32 new highly cartilage-selective genes. Of these, 7 of 10 tested were validated by qPCR including the novel cartilage-specific genes SDK2 and FLJ41170. In addition, we retrospectively tested UGET and other gene expression based prioritization tools to identify disease-causing genes within known linkage intervals. We first demonstrated this utility with UGET using genetically heterogeneous disorders such as Joubert syndrome, microcephaly, neuropsychiatric disorders and type 2 limb girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD2) and then compared UGET to other gene expression based prioritization programs which use small but discrete and well annotated datasets. Finally, we observed a significantly higher gene correlation shared between genes in disease networks associated with similar complex or Mendelian disorders. Discussion UGET is an invaluable resource for a geneticist that permits the rapid inclusion of expression criteria from one to hundreds of genes in genomic intervals linked to disease. By using thousands of arrays UGET annotates and prioritizes genes better than other tools especially with rare tissue disorders or complex multi-tissue biological processes. This information can be critical in prioritization of candidate genes for sequence analysis. PMID:20046828

  4. Gene Expression in Human Hippocampus from Cocaine Abusers Identifies Genes which Regulate Extracellular Matrix Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Mash, Deborah C.; ffrench-Mullen, Jarlath; Adi, Nikhil; Qin, Yujing; Buck, Andrew; Pablo, John

    2007-01-01

    The chronic effects of cocaine abuse on brain structure and function are blamed for the inability of most addicts to remain abstinent. Part of the difficulty in preventing relapse is the persisting memory of the intense euphoria or cocaine “rush”. Most abused drugs and alcohol induce neuroplastic changes in brain pathways subserving emotion and cognition. Such changes may account for the consolidation and structural reconfiguration of synaptic connections with exposure to cocaine. Adaptive hippocampal plasticity could be related to specific patterns of gene expression with chronic cocaine abuse. Here, we compare gene expression profiles in the human hippocampus from cocaine addicts and age-matched drug-free control subjects. Cocaine abusers had 151 gene transcripts upregulated, while 91 gene transcripts were downregulated. Topping the list of cocaine-regulated transcripts was RECK in the human hippocampus (FC?=?2.0; p<0.05). RECK is a membrane-anchored MMP inhibitor that is implicated in the coordinated regulation of extracellular matrix integrity and angiogenesis. In keeping with elevated RECK expression, active MMP9 protein levels were decreased in the hippocampus from cocaine abusers. Pathway analysis identified other genes regulated by cocaine that code for proteins involved in the remodeling of the cytomatrix and synaptic connections and the inhibition of blood vessel proliferation (PCDH8, LAMB1, ITGB6, CTGF and EphB4). The observed microarray phenotype in the human hippocampus identified RECK and other region-specific genes that may promote long-lasting structural changes with repeated cocaine abuse. Extracellular matrix remodeling in the hippocampus may be a persisting effect of chronic abuse that contributes to the compulsive and relapsing nature of cocaine addiction. PMID:18000554

  5. Candidate gene associated with a mutation causing recessive polycystic kidney disease in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Moyer, J.H.; Lee-Tischler, M.J.; Kwon, H.Y.; Schrick, J.J. ); Avner, E.D.; Sweeney, W.E. ); Godfrey, V.L.; Cacheiro, N.L.A.; Woychik, R.P. ); Wilkinson, J.E. )

    1994-05-27

    A line of transgenic mice was generated that contains an insertional mutation causing a phenotype similar to human autosomal recessive polycystic kidney disease. Homozygotes displayed a complex phenotype that included bilateral polycystic kidneys and an unusual liver lesion. The mutant locus was cloned and characterized through use of the transgene as a molecular marker. Additionally, a candidate polycystic kidney disease (PKD) gene was identified whose structure and expression are directly associated with the mutant locus. A complementary DNA derived from this gene predicted a peptide containing a motif that was originally identified in several genes involved in cell cycle control.

  6. Rhesus monkey model of liver disease reflecting clinical disease progression and hepatic gene expression analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hong; Tan, Tao; Wang, Junfeng; Niu, Yuyu; Yan, Yaping; Guo, Xiangyu; Kang, Yu; Duan, Yanchao; Chang, Shaohui; Liao, Jianpeng; Si, Chenyang; Ji, Weizhi; Si, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is a significant public health issue with heavy medical and economic burdens. The aetiology of ALD is not yet completely understood. The development of drugs and therapies for ALD is hampered by a lack of suitable animal models that replicate both the histological and metabolic features of human ALD. Here, we characterize a rhesus monkey model of alcohol-induced liver steatosis and hepatic fibrosis that is compatible with the clinical progression of the biochemistry and pathology in humans with ALD. Microarray analysis of hepatic gene expression was conducted to identify potential molecular signatures of ALD progression. The up-regulation of expression of hepatic genes related to liver steatosis (CPT1A, FASN, LEPR, RXRA, IGFBP1, PPARGC1A and SLC2A4) was detected in our rhesus model, as was the down-regulation of such genes (CYP7A1, HMGCR, GCK and PNPLA3) and the up-regulation of expression of hepatic genes related to liver cancer (E2F1, OPCML, FZD7, IGFBP1 and LEF1). Our results demonstrate that this ALD model reflects the clinical disease progression and hepatic gene expression observed in humans. These findings will be useful for increasing the understanding of ALD pathogenesis and will benefit the development of new therapeutic procedures and pharmacological reagents for treating ALD. PMID:26442469

  7. Rhesus monkey model of liver disease reflecting clinical disease progression and hepatic gene expression analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong; Tan, Tao; Wang, Junfeng; Niu, Yuyu; Yan, Yaping; Guo, Xiangyu; Kang, Yu; Duan, Yanchao; Chang, Shaohui; Liao, Jianpeng; Si, Chenyang; Ji, Weizhi; Si, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is a significant public health issue with heavy medical and economic burdens. The aetiology of ALD is not yet completely understood. The development of drugs and therapies for ALD is hampered by a lack of suitable animal models that replicate both the histological and metabolic features of human ALD. Here, we characterize a rhesus monkey model of alcohol-induced liver steatosis and hepatic fibrosis that is compatible with the clinical progression of the biochemistry and pathology in humans with ALD. Microarray analysis of hepatic gene expression was conducted to identify potential molecular signatures of ALD progression. The up-regulation of expression of hepatic genes related to liver steatosis (CPT1A, FASN, LEPR, RXRA, IGFBP1, PPARGC1A and SLC2A4) was detected in our rhesus model, as was the down-regulation of such genes (CYP7A1, HMGCR, GCK and PNPLA3) and the up-regulation of expression of hepatic genes related to liver cancer (E2F1, OPCML, FZD7, IGFBP1 and LEF1). Our results demonstrate that this ALD model reflects the clinical disease progression and hepatic gene expression observed in humans. These findings will be useful for increasing the understanding of ALD pathogenesis and will benefit the development of new therapeutic procedures and pharmacological reagents for treating ALD. PMID:26442469

  8. The etiology of autoimmune thyroid disease: a story of genes and environment.

    PubMed

    Tomer, Yaron; Huber, Amanda

    2009-01-01

    Autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITDs), including Graves' disease (GD) and Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) are prevalent autoimmune diseases, affecting up to 5% of the general population. Autoimmune thyroid diseases arise due to complex interactions between environmental and genetic factors. Significant progress has been made in our understanding of the genetic and environmental triggers contributing to AITD. However, the interactions between genes and environment are yet to be defined. Among the major AITD susceptibility genes that have been identified and characterized is the HLA-DR gene locus, as well as non-MHC genes including the CTLA-4, CD40, PTPN22, thyroglobulin, and TSH receptor genes. The major environmental triggers of AITD include iodine, medications, infection, smoking, and possibly stress. Recent data on the genetic predisposition to AITD lead to novel putative mechanisms by which the genetic-environmental interactions may lead to the development of thyroid autoimmunity. PMID:19307103

  9. Dorothy Hodgkin Lecture 2014. Understanding genes identified by genome-wide association studies for type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Rutter, G A

    2014-12-01

    Whilst the heritable nature of Type 2 diabetes has been recognized for many years, only in the past two decades have linkage analyses in families and genome-wide association studies in large populations begun to reveal the genetic landscape of the disease in detail. Whilst the former have provided a powerful means of identifying the genes responsible for monogenic forms of the disease, the latter highlight relatively large genomic regions. These often harbour multiple genes, whose relative contribution to exaggerated disease risk is uncertain. In the present study, the approaches that have been used to dissect the role of just a few (TCF7L2, SLC30A8, ADCY5, MTNR1B and CDKAL1) of the ~ 500 genes identified at dozens of implicated loci are described. These are usually selected based on the strength of their effect on disease risk, and predictions as to their likely biological role. Direct determination of the effects of identified polymorphisms on gene expression in disease-relevant tissues, notably the pancreatic islet, are then performed to identify genes whose expression is affected by a particular polymorphism. Subsequent functional analyses then involve perturbing gene expression in vitro in ?-cell lines or isolated islets and in vivo in animal models. Although the majority of polymorphisms affect insulin production rather than action, and mainly affect the ? cell, effects via other tissues may also contribute, requiring careful consideration in the design and interpretation of experiments in model systems. These considerations illustrate the scale of the task needed to exploit genome-wide association study data for the development of new therapeutic strategies. PMID:25186316

  10. Clustering gene expression regulators: new approach to disease subtyping.

    PubMed

    Pyatnitskiy, Mikhail; Mazo, Ilya; Shkrob, Maria; Schwartz, Elena; Kotelnikova, Ekaterina

    2014-01-01

    One of the main challenges in modern medicine is to stratify different patient groups in terms of underlying disease molecular mechanisms as to develop more personalized approach to therapy. Here we propose novel method for disease subtyping based on analysis of activated expression regulators on a sample-by-sample basis. Our approach relies on Sub-Network Enrichment Analysis algorithm (SNEA) which identifies gene subnetworks with significant concordant changes in expression between two conditions. Subnetwork consists of central regulator and downstream genes connected by relations extracted from global literature-extracted regulation database. Regulators found in each patient separately are clustered together and assigned activity scores which are used for final patients grouping. We show that our approach performs well compared to other related methods and at the same time provides researchers with complementary level of understanding of pathway-level biology behind a disease by identification of significant expression regulators. We have observed the reasonable grouping of neuromuscular disorders (triggered by structural damage vs triggered by unknown mechanisms), that was not revealed using standard expression profile clustering. For another experiment we were able to suggest the clusters of regulators, responsible for colorectal carcinoma vs adenoma discrimination and identify frequently genetically changed regulators that could be of specific importance for the individual characteristics of cancer development. Proposed approach can be regarded as biologically meaningful feature selection, reducing tens of thousands of genes down to dozens of clusters of regulators. Obtained clusters of regulators make possible to generate valuable biological hypotheses about molecular mechanisms related to a clinical outcome for individual patient. PMID:24416320

  11. The influence of disease categories on gene candidate predictions from model organism phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The molecular etiology is still to be identified for about half of the currently described Mendelian diseases in humans, thereby hindering efforts to find treatments or preventive measures. Advances, such as new sequencing technologies, have led to increasing amounts of data becoming available with which to address the problem of identifying disease genes. Therefore, automated methods are needed that reliably predict disease gene candidates based on available data. We have recently developed Exomiser as a tool for identifying causative variants from exome analysis results by filtering and prioritising using a number of criteria including the phenotype similarity between the disease and mouse mutants involving the gene candidates. Initial investigations revealed a variation in performance for different medical categories of disease, due in part to a varying contribution of the phenotype scoring component. Results In this study, we further analyse the performance of our cross-species phenotype matching algorithm, and examine in more detail the reasons why disease gene filtering based on phenotype data works better for certain disease categories than others. We found that in addition to misleading phenotype alignments between species, some disease categories are still more amenable to automated predictions than others, and that this often ties in with community perceptions on how well the organism works as model. Conclusions In conclusion, our automated disease gene candidate predictions are highly dependent on the organism used for the predictions and the disease category being studied. Future work on computational disease gene prediction using phenotype data would benefit from methods that take into account the disease category and the source of model organism data. PMID:25093073

  12. Gene Expression Profiling Identifies Molecular Pathways Associated with Collagen VI Deficiency and Provides Novel Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Paco, Sonia; Kalko, Susana G.; Jou, Cristina; Rodríguez, María A.; Corbera, Joan; Muntoni, Francesco; Feng, Lucy; Rivas, Eloy; Torner, Ferran; Gualandi, Francesca; Gomez-Foix, Anna M.; Ferrer, Anna; Ortez, Carlos; Nascimento, Andrés; Colomer, Jaume; Jimenez-Mallebrera, Cecilia

    2013-01-01

    Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD), caused by collagen VI deficiency, is a common congenital muscular dystrophy. At present, the role of collagen VI in muscle and the mechanism of disease are not fully understood. To address this we have applied microarrays to analyse the transcriptome of UCMD muscle and compare it to healthy muscle and other muscular dystrophies. We identified 389 genes which are differentially regulated in UCMD relative to controls. In addition, there were 718 genes differentially expressed between UCMD and dystrophin deficient muscle. In contrast, only 29 genes were altered relative to other congenital muscular dystrophies. Changes in gene expression were confirmed by real-time PCR. The set of regulated genes was analysed by Gene Ontology, KEGG pathways and Ingenuity Pathway analysis to reveal the molecular functions and gene networks associated with collagen VI defects. The most significantly regulated pathways were those involved in muscle regeneration, extracellular matrix remodelling and inflammation. We characterised the immune response in UCMD biopsies as being mainly mediated via M2 macrophages and the complement pathway indicating that anti-inflammatory treatment may be beneficial to UCMD as for other dystrophies. We studied the immunolocalisation of ECM components and found that biglycan, a collagen VI interacting proteoglycan, was reduced in the basal lamina of UCMD patients. We propose that biglycan reduction is secondary to collagen VI loss and that it may be contributing towards UCMD pathophysiology. Consequently, strategies aimed at over-expressing biglycan and restore the link between the muscle cell surface and the extracellular matrix should be considered. PMID:24223098

  13. Gene expression profiling identifies molecular pathways associated with collagen VI deficiency and provides novel therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Paco, Sonia; Kalko, Susana G; Jou, Cristina; Rodríguez, María A; Corbera, Joan; Muntoni, Francesco; Feng, Lucy; Rivas, Eloy; Torner, Ferran; Gualandi, Francesca; Gomez-Foix, Anna M; Ferrer, Anna; Ortez, Carlos; Nascimento, Andrés; Colomer, Jaume; Jimenez-Mallebrera, Cecilia

    2013-01-01

    Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD), caused by collagen VI deficiency, is a common congenital muscular dystrophy. At present, the role of collagen VI in muscle and the mechanism of disease are not fully understood. To address this we have applied microarrays to analyse the transcriptome of UCMD muscle and compare it to healthy muscle and other muscular dystrophies. We identified 389 genes which are differentially regulated in UCMD relative to controls. In addition, there were 718 genes differentially expressed between UCMD and dystrophin deficient muscle. In contrast, only 29 genes were altered relative to other congenital muscular dystrophies. Changes in gene expression were confirmed by real-time PCR. The set of regulated genes was analysed by Gene Ontology, KEGG pathways and Ingenuity Pathway analysis to reveal the molecular functions and gene networks associated with collagen VI defects. The most significantly regulated pathways were those involved in muscle regeneration, extracellular matrix remodelling and inflammation. We characterised the immune response in UCMD biopsies as being mainly mediated via M2 macrophages and the complement pathway indicating that anti-inflammatory treatment may be beneficial to UCMD as for other dystrophies. We studied the immunolocalisation of ECM components and found that biglycan, a collagen VI interacting proteoglycan, was reduced in the basal lamina of UCMD patients. We propose that biglycan reduction is secondary to collagen VI loss and that it may be contributing towards UCMD pathophysiology. Consequently, strategies aimed at over-expressing biglycan and restore the link between the muscle cell surface and the extracellular matrix should be considered. PMID:24223098

  14. Exploring matrix factorization techniques for significant genes identification of Alzheimer’s disease microarray gene expression data

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background The wide use of high-throughput DNA microarray technology provide an increasingly detailed view of human transcriptome from hundreds to thousands of genes. Although biomedical researchers typically design microarray experiments to explore specific biological contexts, the relationships between genes are hard to identified because they are complex and noisy high-dimensional data and are often hindered by low statistical power. The main challenge now is to extract valuable biological information from the colossal amount of data to gain insight into biological processes and the mechanisms of human disease. To overcome the challenge requires mathematical and computational methods that are versatile enough to capture the underlying biological features and simple enough to be applied efficiently to large datasets. Methods Unsupervised machine learning approaches provide new and efficient analysis of gene expression profiles. In our study, two unsupervised knowledge-based matrix factorization methods, independent component analysis (ICA) and nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF) are integrated to identify significant genes and related pathways in microarray gene expression dataset of Alzheimer’s disease. The advantage of these two approaches is they can be performed as a biclustering method by which genes and conditions can be clustered simultaneously. Furthermore, they can group genes into different categories for identifying related diagnostic pathways and regulatory networks. The difference between these two method lies in ICA assume statistical independence of the expression modes, while NMF need positivity constrains to generate localized gene expression profiles. Results In our work, we performed FastICA and non-smooth NMF methods on DNA microarray gene expression data of Alzheimer’s disease respectively. The simulation results shows that both of the methods can clearly classify severe AD samples from control samples, and the biological analysis of the identified significant genes and their related pathways demonstrated that these genes play a prominent role in AD and relate the activation patterns to AD phenotypes. It is validated that the combination of these two methods is efficient. Conclusions Unsupervised matrix factorization methods provide efficient tools to analyze high-throughput microarray dataset. According to the facts that different unsupervised approaches explore correlations in the high-dimensional data space and identify relevant subspace base on different hypotheses, integrating these methods to explore the underlying biological information from microarray dataset is an efficient approach. By combining the significant genes identified by both ICA and NMF, the biological analysis shows great efficient for elucidating the molecular taxonomy of Alzheimer’s disease and enable better experimental design to further identify potential pathways and therapeutic targets of AD. PMID:21989140

  15. Phenotype-driven strategies for exome prioritization of human Mendelian disease genes.

    PubMed

    Smedley, Damian; Robinson, Peter N

    2015-01-01

    Whole exome sequencing has altered the way in which rare diseases are diagnosed and disease genes identified. Hundreds of novel disease-associated genes have been characterized by whole exome sequencing in the past five years, yet the identification of disease-causing mutations is often challenging because of the large number of rare variants that are being revealed. Gene prioritization aims to rank the most probable candidate genes towards the top of a list of potentially pathogenic variants. A promising new approach involves the computational comparison of the phenotypic abnormalities of the individual being investigated with those previously associated with human diseases or genetically modified model organisms. In this review, we compare and contrast the strengths and weaknesses of current phenotype-driven computational algorithms, including Phevor, Phen-Gen, eXtasy and two algorithms developed by our groups called PhenIX and Exomiser. Computational phenotype analysis can substantially improve the performance of exome analysis pipelines. PMID:26229552

  16. Prediction of Human Disease Genes by Human-Mouse Conserved Coexpression Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Grassi, Elena; Damasco, Christian; Silengo, Lorenzo; Oti, Martin; Provero, Paolo; Di Cunto, Ferdinando

    2008-01-01

    Background Even in the post-genomic era, the identification of candidate genes within loci associated with human genetic diseases is a very demanding task, because the critical region may typically contain hundreds of positional candidates. Since genes implicated in similar phenotypes tend to share very similar expression profiles, high throughput gene expression data may represent a very important resource to identify the best candidates for sequencing. However, so far, gene coexpression has not been used very successfully to prioritize positional candidates. Methodology/Principal Findings We show that it is possible to reliably identify disease-relevant relationships among genes from massive microarray datasets by concentrating only on genes sharing similar expression profiles in both human and mouse. Moreover, we show systematically that the integration of human-mouse conserved coexpression with a phenotype similarity map allows the efficient identification of disease genes in large genomic regions. Finally, using this approach on 850 OMIM loci characterized by an unknown molecular basis, we propose high-probability candidates for 81 genetic diseases. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that conserved coexpression, even at the human-mouse phylogenetic distance, represents a very strong criterion to predict disease-relevant relationships among human genes. PMID:18369433

  17. Synthetic lethal screening in the mammalian central nervous system identifies Gpx6 as a modulator of Huntington’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Shema, Reut; Kulicke, Ruth; Cowley, Glenn S.; Stein, Rachael; Root, David E.; Heiman, Myriam

    2015-01-01

    Huntington’s disease, the most common inherited neurodegenerative disease, is characterized by a dramatic loss of deep-layer cortical and striatal neurons, as well as morbidity in midlife. Human genetic studies led to the identification of the causative gene, huntingtin. Recent genomic advances have also led to the identification of hundreds of potential interacting partners for huntingtin protein and many hypotheses as to the molecular mechanisms whereby mutant huntingtin leads to cellular dysfunction and death. However, the multitude of possible interacting partners and cellular pathways affected by mutant huntingtin has complicated efforts to understand the etiology of this disease, and to date no curative therapeutic exists. To address the general problem of identifying the disease-phenotype contributing genes from a large number of correlative studies, here we develop a synthetic lethal screening methodology for the mammalian central nervous system, called SLIC, for synthetic lethal in the central nervous system. Applying SLIC to the study of Huntington’s disease, we identify the age-regulated glutathione peroxidase 6 (Gpx6) gene as a modulator of mutant huntingtin toxicity and show that overexpression of Gpx6 can dramatically alleviate both behavioral and molecular phenotypes associated with a mouse model of Huntington’s disease. SLIC can, in principle, be used in the study of any neurodegenerative disease for which a mouse model exists, promising to reveal modulators of neurodegenerative disease in an unbiased fashion, akin to screens in simpler model organisms. PMID:25535386

  18. Dense genotyping identifies and localizes multiple common and rare variant association signals in celiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Trynka, Gosia; Hunt, Karen A; Bockett, Nicholas A; Romanos, Jihane; Mistry, Vanisha; Szperl, Agata; Bakker, Sjoerd F; Bardella, Maria Teresa; Bhaw-Rosun, Leena; Castillejo, Gemma; de la Concha, Emilio G.; de Almeida, Rodrigo Coutinho; Dias, Kerith-Rae M; van Diemen, Cleo C.; Dubois, Patrick CA; Duerr, Richard H.; Edkins, Sarah; Franke, Lude; Fransen, Karin; Gutierrez, Javier; Heap, Graham AR; Hrdlickova, Barbara; Hunt, Sarah; Izurieta, Leticia Plaza; Izzo, Valentina; Joosten, Leo AB; Langford, Cordelia; Mazzilli, Maria Cristina; Mein, Charles A; Midah, Vandana; Mitrovic, Mitja; Mora, Barbara; Morelli, Marinita; Nutland, Sarah; Núñez, Concepción; Onengut-Gumuscu, Suna; Pearce, Kerra; Platteel, Mathieu; Polanco, Isabel; Potter, Simon; Ribes-Koninckx, Carmen; Ricaño-Ponce, Isis; Rich, Stephen S.; Rybak, Anna; Santiago, José Luis; Senapati, Sabyasachi; Sood, Ajit; Szajewska, Hania; Troncone, Riccardo; Varadé, Jezabel; Wallace, Chris; Wolters, Victorien M; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Thelma, B.K.; Cukrowska, Bozena; Urcelay, Elena; Bilbao, Jose Ramon; Mearin, M Luisa; Barisani, Donatella; Barrett, Jeffrey C; Plagnol, Vincent; Deloukas, Panos; Wijmenga, Cisca; van Heel, David A

    2011-01-01

    We densely genotyped, using 1000 Genomes Project pilot CEU and additional re-sequencing study variants, 183 reported immune-mediated disease non-HLA risk loci in 12,041 celiac disease cases and 12,228 controls. We identified 13 new celiac disease risk loci at genome wide significance, bringing the total number of known loci (including HLA) to 40. Multiple independent association signals are found at over a third of these loci, attributable to a combination of common, low frequency, and rare genetic variants. In comparison with previously available data such as HapMap3, our dense genotyping in a large sample size provided increased resolution of the pattern of linkage disequilibrium, and suggested localization of many signals to finer scale regions. In particular, 29 of 54 fine-mapped signals appeared localized to specific single genes - and in some instances to gene regulatory elements. We define a complex genetic architecture of risk regions, and refine risk signals, providing a next step towards elucidating causal disease mechanisms. PMID:22057235

  19. Integrating nutrigenomics data to identify cardiometabolic gene-environment interactions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nutrition is a key factor in health and in many age-related diseases. This is particularly the case for cardiometabolic diseases such as cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes and hypertension, and is often precluded by obesity, glucose impairment and metabolic syndrome. Our research objectives are...

  20. Gene expression profiles in the rat streptococcal cell wall-induced arthritis model identified using microarray analysis

    PubMed Central

    Rioja, Inmaculada; Clayton, Chris L; Graham, Simon J; Life, Paul F; Dickson, Marion C

    2005-01-01

    Experimental arthritis models are considered valuable tools for delineating mechanisms of inflammation and autoimmune phenomena. Use of microarray-based methods represents a new and challenging approach that allows molecular dissection of complex autoimmune diseases such as arthritis. In order to characterize the temporal gene expression profile in joints from the reactivation model of streptococcal cell wall (SCW)-induced arthritis in Lewis (LEW/N) rats, total RNA was extracted from ankle joints from naïve, SCW injected, or phosphate buffered saline injected animals (time course study) and gene expression was analyzed using Affymetrix oligonucleotide microarray technology (RAE230A). After normalization and statistical analysis of data, 631 differentially expressed genes were sorted into clusters based on their levels and kinetics of expression using Spotfire® profile search and K-mean cluster analysis. Microarray-based data for a subset of genes were validated using real-time PCR TaqMan® analysis. Analysis of the microarray data identified 631 genes (441 upregulated and 190 downregulated) that were differentially expressed (Delta > 1.8, P < 0.01), showing specific levels and patterns of gene expression. The genes exhibiting the highest fold increase in expression on days -13.8, -13, or 3 were involved in chemotaxis, inflammatory response, cell adhesion and extracellular matrix remodelling. Transcriptome analysis identified 10 upregulated genes (Delta > 5), which have not previously been associated with arthritis pathology and are located in genomic regions associated with autoimmune disease. The majority of the downregulated genes were associated with metabolism, transport and regulation of muscle development. In conclusion, the present study describes the temporal expression of multiple disease-associated genes with potential pathophysiological roles in the reactivation model of SCW-induced arthritis in Lewis (LEW/N) rat. These findings improve our understanding of the molecular events that underlie the pathology in this animal model, which is potentially a valuable comparator to human rheumatoid arthritis (RA). PMID:15642130

  1. Identifying genes of agronomic importance in maize by screening microsatellites for evidence of

    E-print Network

    Doebley, John

    Identifying genes of agronomic importance in maize by screening microsatellites for evidence for review April 3, 2002) Crop species experienced strong selective pressure directed at genes controlling. Consequently, these genes are expected to exhibit the signature of selection. We screened 501 maize genes

  2. Prediction and validation of gene-disease associations using methods inspired by social network analyses.

    PubMed

    Singh-Blom, U Martin; Natarajan, Nagarajan; Tewari, Ambuj; Woods, John O; Dhillon, Inderjit S; Marcotte, Edward M

    2013-01-01

    Correctly identifying associations of genes with diseases has long been a goal in biology. With the emergence of large-scale gene-phenotype association datasets in biology, we can leverage statistical and machine learning methods to help us achieve this goal. In this paper, we present two methods for predicting gene-disease associations based on functional gene associations and gene-phenotype associations in model organisms. The first method, the Katz measure, is motivated from its success in social network link prediction, and is very closely related to some of the recent methods proposed for gene-disease association inference. The second method, called Catapult (Combining dATa Across species using Positive-Unlabeled Learning Techniques), is a supervised machine learning method that uses a biased support vector machine where the features are derived from walks in a heterogeneous gene-trait network. We study the performance of the proposed methods and related state-of-the-art methods using two different evaluation strategies, on two distinct data sets, namely OMIM phenotypes and drug-target interactions. Finally, by measuring the performance of the methods using two different evaluation strategies, we show that even though both methods perform very well, the Katz measure is better at identifying associations between traits and poorly studied genes, whereas Catapult is better suited to correctly identifying gene-trait associations overall [corrected]. PMID:23650495

  3. Disease-Aging Network Reveals Significant Roles of Aging Genes in Connecting Genetic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiguang; Zhang, Shihua; Wang, Yong; Chen, Luonan; Zhang, Xiang-Sun

    2009-01-01

    One of the challenging problems in biology and medicine is exploring the underlying mechanisms of genetic diseases. Recent studies suggest that the relationship between genetic diseases and the aging process is important in understanding the molecular mechanisms of complex diseases. Although some intricate associations have been investigated for a long time, the studies are still in their early stages. In this paper, we construct a human disease-aging network to study the relationship among aging genes and genetic disease genes. Specifically, we integrate human protein-protein interactions (PPIs), disease-gene associations, aging-gene associations, and physiological system–based genetic disease classification information in a single graph-theoretic framework and find that (1) human disease genes are much closer to aging genes than expected by chance; and (2) diseases can be categorized into two types according to their relationships with aging. Type I diseases have their genes significantly close to aging genes, while type II diseases do not. Furthermore, we examine the topological characters of the disease-aging network from a systems perspective. Theoretical results reveal that the genes of type I diseases are in a central position of a PPI network while type II are not; (3) more importantly, we define an asymmetric closeness based on the PPI network to describe relationships between diseases, and find that aging genes make a significant contribution to associations among diseases, especially among type I diseases. In conclusion, the network-based study provides not only evidence for the intricate relationship between the aging process and genetic diseases, but also biological implications for prying into the nature of human diseases. PMID:19779549

  4. Integrated genomic approaches identify major pathways and upstream regulators in late onset Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinzhong; Long, Jintao; He, Taigang; Belshaw, Robert; Scott, James

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have evaluated gene expression in Alzheimer's disease (AD) brains to identify mechanistic processes, but have been limited by the size of the datasets studied. Here we have implemented a novel meta-analysis approach to identify differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in published datasets comprising 450 late onset AD (LOAD) brains and 212 controls. We found 3124 DEGs, many of which were highly correlated with Braak stage and cerebral atrophy. Pathway Analysis revealed the most perturbed pathways to be (a) nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species in macrophages (NOROS), (b) NFkB and (c) mitochondrial dysfunction. NOROS was also up-regulated, and mitochondrial dysfunction down-regulated, in healthy ageing subjects. Upstream regulator analysis predicted the TLR4 ligands, STAT3 and NFKBIA, for activated pathways and RICTOR for mitochondrial genes. Protein-protein interaction network analysis emphasised the role of NFKB; identified a key interaction of CLU with complement; and linked TYROBP, TREM2 and DOK3 to modulation of LPS signalling through TLR4 and to phosphatidylinositol metabolism. We suggest that NEUROD6, ZCCHC17, PPEF1 and MANBAL are potentially implicated in LOAD, with predicted links to calcium signalling and protein mannosylation. Our study demonstrates a highly injurious combination of TLR4-mediated NFKB signalling, NOROS inflammatory pathway activation, and mitochondrial dysfunction in LOAD. PMID:26202100

  5. Inferring Gene Family Histories in Yeast Identifies Lineage Specific Expansions

    E-print Network

    Ames, Ryan M.; Money, Daniel; Lovell, Simon C.

    2014-06-12

    new evolutionary models to infer gene family histories across complete yeast genomes; these models allow us to estimate the relative genome-wide rates of gene birth, death, innovation and extinction (loss of an entire family) for the first time. We...

  6. Candidate genes and functional noncoding variants identified in a canine model of obsessive-compulsive disorder

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), a severe mental disease manifested in time-consuming repetition of behaviors, affects 1 to 3% of the human population. While highly heritable, complex genetics has hampered attempts to elucidate OCD etiology. Dogs suffer from naturally occurring compulsive disorders that closely model human OCD, manifested as an excessive repetition of normal canine behaviors that only partially responds to drug therapy. The limited diversity within dog breeds makes identifying underlying genetic factors easier. Results We use genome-wide association of 87 Doberman Pinscher cases and 63 controls to identify genomic loci associated with OCD and sequence these regions in 8 affected dogs from high-risk breeds and 8 breed-matched controls. We find 119 variants in evolutionarily conserved sites that are specific to dogs with OCD. These case-only variants are significantly more common in high OCD risk breeds compared to breeds with no known psychiatric problems. Four genes, all with synaptic function, have the most case-only variation: neuronal cadherin (CDH2), catenin alpha2 (CTNNA2), ataxin-1 (ATXN1), and plasma glutamate carboxypeptidase (PGCP). In the 2 Mb gene desert between the cadherin genes CDH2 and DSC3, we find two different variants found only in dogs with OCD that disrupt the same highly conserved regulatory element. These variants cause significant changes in gene expression in a human neuroblastoma cell line, likely due to disrupted transcription factor binding. Conclusions The limited genetic diversity of dog breeds facilitates identification of genes, functional variants and regulatory pathways underlying complex psychiatric disorders that are mechanistically similar in dogs and humans. PMID:24995881

  7. Identifying New Candidate Genes and Chemicals Related to Prostate Cancer Using a Hybrid Network and Shortest Path Approach

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Fei; Zhou, You; Wang, Meng; Yang, Jing; Wu, Kai; Lu, Changhong; Kong, Xiangyin; Cai, Yu-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a type of cancer that occurs in the male prostate, a gland in the male reproductive system. Because prostate cancer cells may spread to other parts of the body and can influence human reproduction, understanding the mechanisms underlying this disease is critical for designing effective treatments. The identification of as many genes and chemicals related to prostate cancer as possible will enhance our understanding of this disease. In this study, we proposed a computational method to identify new candidate genes and chemicals based on currently known genes and chemicals related to prostate cancer by applying a shortest path approach in a hybrid network. The hybrid network was constructed according to information concerning chemical-chemical interactions, chemical-protein interactions, and protein-protein interactions. Many of the obtained genes and chemicals are associated with prostate cancer. PMID:26504486

  8. Stratified Pathway Analysis to Identify Gene Sets Associated with Oral Contraceptive Use and Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Herbert; Zhao, Hongyu

    2014-01-01

    Cancer biomarker discovery can facilitate drug development, improve staging of patients, and predict patient prognosis. Because cancer is the result of many interacting genes, analysis based on a set of genes with related biological functions or pathways may be more informative than single gene-based analysis for cancer biomarker discovery. The relevant pathways thus identified may help characterize different aspects of molecular phenotypes related to the tumor. Although it is well known that cancer patients may respond to the same treatment differently because of clinical variables and variation of molecular phenotypes, this patient heterogeneity has not been explicitly considered in pathway analysis in the literature. We hypothesize that combining pathway and patient clinical information can more effectively identify relevant pathways pertinent to specific patient subgroups, leading to better diagnosis and treatment. In this article, we propose to perform stratified pathway analysis based on clinical information from patients. In contrast to analysis using all the patients, this more focused analysis has the potential to reveal subgroup-specific pathways that may lead to more biological insights into disease etiology and treatment response. As an illustration, the power of our approach is demonstrated through its application to a breast cancer dataset in which the patients are stratified according to their oral contraceptive use. PMID:25574128

  9. Analysis of genomic aberrations and gene expression profiling identifies novel lesions and pathways in myeloproliferative neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Rice, K L; Lin, X; Wolniak, K; Ebert, B L; Berkofsky-Fessler, W; Buzzai, M; Sun, Y; Xi, C; Elkin, P; Levine, R; Golub, T; Gilliland, D G; Crispino, J D; Licht, J D; Zhang, W

    2011-01-01

    Polycythemia vera (PV), essential thrombocythemia and primary myelofibrosis, are myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) with distinct clinical features and are associated with the JAK2V617F mutation. To identify genomic anomalies involved in the pathogenesis of these disorders, we profiled 87 MPN patients using Affymetrix 250K single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays. Aberrations affecting chr9 were the most frequently observed and included 9pLOH (n=16), trisomy 9 (n=6) and amplifications of 9p13.3–23.3 (n=1), 9q33.1–34.13 (n=1) and 9q34.13 (n=6). Patients with trisomy 9 were associated with elevated JAK2V617F mutant allele burden, suggesting that gain of chr9 represents an alternative mechanism for increasing JAK2V617F dosage. Gene expression profiling of patients with and without chr9 abnormalities (+9, 9pLOH), identified genes potentially involved in disease pathogenesis including JAK2, STAT5B and MAPK14. We also observed recurrent gains of 1p36.31–36.33 (n=6), 17q21.2–q21.31 (n=5) and 17q25.1–25.3 (n=5) and deletions affecting 18p11.31–11.32 (n=8). Combined SNP and gene expression analysis identified aberrations affecting components of a non-canonical PRC2 complex (EZH1, SUZ12 and JARID2) and genes comprising a ‘HSC signature' (MLLT3, SMARCA2 and PBX1). We show that NFIB, which is amplified in 7/87 MPN patients and upregulated in PV CD34+ cells, protects cells from apoptosis induced by cytokine withdrawal. PMID:22829077

  10. The systematic functional characterisation of Xq28 genes prioritises candidate disease genes

    PubMed Central

    Kolb-Kokocinski, Anja; Mehrle, Alexander; Bechtel, Stephanie; Simpson, Jeremy C; Kioschis, Petra; Wiemann, Stefan; Wellenreuther, Ruth; Poustka, Annemarie

    2006-01-01

    Background Well known for its gene density and the large number of mapped diseases, the human sub-chromosomal region Xq28 has long been a focus of genome research. Over 40 of approximately 300 X-linked diseases map to this region, and systematic mapping, transcript identification, and mutation analysis has led to the identification of causative genes for 26 of these diseases, leaving another 17 diseases mapped to Xq28, where the causative gene is still unknown. To expedite disease gene identification, we have initiated the functional characterisation of all known Xq28 genes. Results By using a systematic approach, we describe the Xq28 genes by RNA in situ hybridisation and Northern blotting of the mouse orthologs, as well as subcellular localisation and data mining of the human genes. We have developed a relational web-accessible database with comprehensive query options integrating all experimental data. Using this database, we matched gene expression patterns with affected tissues for 16 of the 17 remaining Xq28 linked diseases, where the causative gene is unknown. Conclusion By using this systematic approach, we have prioritised genes in linkage regions of Xq28-mapped diseases to an amenable number for mutational screens. Our database can be queried by any researcher performing highly specified searches including diseases not listed in OMIM or diseases that might be linked to Xq28 in the future. PMID:16503986

  11. FORGE Canada Consortium: Outcomes of a 2-Year National Rare-Disease Gene-Discovery Project

    PubMed Central

    Beaulieu, Chandree L.; Majewski, Jacek; Schwartzentruber, Jeremy; Samuels, Mark E.; Fernandez, Bridget A.; Bernier, Francois P.; Brudno, Michael; Knoppers, Bartha; Marcadier, Janet; Dyment, David; Adam, Shelin; Bulman, Dennis E.; Jones, Steve J.M.; Avard, Denise; Nguyen, Minh Thu; Rousseau, Francois; Marshall, Christian; Wintle, Richard F.; Shen, Yaoqing; Scherer, Stephen W.; Friedman, Jan M.; Michaud, Jacques L.; Boycott, Kym M.

    2014-01-01

    Inherited monogenic disease has an enormous impact on the well-being of children and their families. Over half of the children living with one of these conditions are without a molecular diagnosis because of the rarity of the disease, the marked clinical heterogeneity, and the reality that there are thousands of rare diseases for which causative mutations have yet to be identified. It is in this context that in 2010 a Canadian consortium was formed to rapidly identify mutations causing a wide spectrum of pediatric-onset rare diseases by using whole-exome sequencing. The FORGE (Finding of Rare Disease Genes) Canada Consortium brought together clinicians and scientists from 21 genetics centers and three science and technology innovation centers from across Canada. From nation-wide requests for proposals, 264 disorders were selected for study from the 371 submitted; disease-causing variants (including in 67 genes not previously associated with human disease; 41 of these have been genetically or functionally validated, and 26 are currently under study) were identified for 146 disorders over a 2-year period. Here, we present our experience with four strategies employed for gene discovery and discuss FORGE’s impact in a number of realms, from clinical diagnostics to the broadening of the phenotypic spectrum of many diseases to the biological insight gained into both disease states and normal human development. Lastly, on the basis of this experience, we discuss the way forward for rare-disease genetic discovery both in Canada and internationally. PMID:24906018

  12. Disease susceptibility genes shared by primary biliary cirrhosis and Crohn's disease in the Japanese population.

    PubMed

    Aiba, Yoshihiro; Yamazaki, Keiko; Nishida, Nao; Kawashima, Minae; Hitomi, Yuki; Nakamura, Hitomi; Komori, Atsumasa; Fuyuno, Yuta; Takahashi, Atsushi; Kawaguchi, Takaaki; Takazoe, Masakazu; Suzuki, Yasuo; Motoya, Satoshi; Matsui, Toshiyuki; Esaki, Motohiro; Matsumoto, Takayuki; Kubo, Michiaki; Tokunaga, Katsushi; Nakamura, Minoru

    2015-09-01

    We previously identified TNFSF15 as the most significant susceptibility gene at non-HLA loci for both primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) and Crohn's diseases (CD) in the Japanese population. The aim of this study is to identify further disease susceptibility genes shared by PBC and CD. We selected 15 and 33 genetic variants that were significantly associated with PBC and CD, respectively, based on previously reported genome-wide association studies of the Japanese population. Next, an association study was independently performed for these genetic variants in CD (1312 CD patients and 3331 healthy controls) and PBC (1279 PBC patients and 1015 healthy controls) cohorts. Two CD susceptibility genes, ICOSLG rs2838519 and IL12B rs6556412, were also nominally associated with susceptibility to PBC (P=3.85 × 10(-2) and P=8.40 × 10(-3), respectively). Three PBC susceptibility genes, CXCR5 rs6421571, STAT4 rs7574865 and NFKB1 rs230534, were nominally associated with susceptibility to CD (P=2.82 × 10(-2), P=3.88 × 10(-2) and P=2.04 × 10(-2), respectively). The effect of ICOSLG and CXCR5 variants were concordant but the effect of STAT4, NFKB1 and IL12B variants were discordant for PBC and CD. TNFSF15 and ICOSLG-CXCR5 might constitute a shared pathogenic pathway in the development of PBC and CD in the Japanese population, whereas IL12B-STAT4-NFKB1 might constitute an opposite pathogenic pathway, reflecting the different balance between Th1 and Th17 in the two diseases. PMID:26084578

  13. Interaction of Crohn's Disease Susceptibility Genes in an Australian Paediatric Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Josef; Sim, Winnie H.; Ellis, Justine A.; Ong, Eng K.; Catto-Smith, Anthony G.; Cameron, Donald J. S.; Bishop, Ruth F.; Kirkwood, Carl D.

    2010-01-01

    Genetic susceptibility is an important contributor to the pathogenesis of Crohn's disease (CD). We investigated multiple CD susceptibility genes in an Australian paediatric onset CD cohort. Newly diagnosed paediatric onset CD patients (n?=?72) and controls (n?=?98) were genotyped for 34 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 18 genetic loci. Gene-gene interaction analysis, gene-disease phenotype analysis and genetic risk profiling were performed for all SNPs and all genes. Of the 34 SNPs analysed, four polymorphisms on three genes (NOD2, IL23R, and region 3p21) were significantly associated with CD status (p<0.05). All three CD specific paediatric polymorphisms on PSMG1 and TNFRSF6B showed a trend of association with p<0.1. An additive gene-gene interaction involving TLR4, PSMG1, TNFRSF6B and IRGM was identified with CD. Genes involved in microbial processing (TLR4, PSMG1, NOD2) were significantly associated either at the individual level or in gene-gene interactive roles. Colonic disease was significantly associated with disease SNP rs7517847 (IL23R) (p<0.05) and colonic and ileal/colonic disease was significantly associated with disease SNP rs125221868 (IBD5) and SLC22A4 & SLC22A4/5 variants (p<0.05). We were able to demonstrate genetic association of several genes to CD in a paediatric onset cohort. Several of the observed associations have not been reported previously in association with paediatric CD patients. Our findings demonstrate that CD genetic susceptibility in paediatric patients presents as a complex interaction between numerous genes. PMID:21079743

  14. Identifying the Association Between Alzheimer's Disease and Parkinson's Disease Using Genome-Wide Association Studies and Protein-Protein Interaction Network.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guiyou; Bao, Xinjie; Jiang, Yongshuai; Liao, Mingzhi; Jiang, Qinghua; Feng, Rennan; Zhang, Liangcai; Ma, Guoda; Chen, Zugen; Wang, Guangyu; Wang, Renzhi; Zhao, Bin; Li, Keshen

    2015-12-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD) are the first and second most common neurodegenerative diseases in the elderly. Shared clinical and pathological features have been reported. Recent large-scale genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been conducted and reported a number of AD and PD variants. Until now, the underlying genetic mechanisms for all these newly identified PD variants as well as the association between AD and PD are still unclear exactly. We think that PD variants may contribute to AD and PD by influence on brain gene expression. Here, we conducted a systems analysis using (1) AD and PD variants (P?identified by the published GWAS; (2) four brain expression GWAS datasets using expression quantitative trait loci from the cerebellum and temporal cortex; (3) large-scale AD GWAS from the Alzheimer Disease Genetics Consortium (ADGC); (4) a protein-protein interaction network. Our results indicated that PD variants around the 17q21 were associated with gene expression and suggestive AD risk. We also identified significant interaction among AD and PD susceptibility genes. We believe that our findings may explain the underlying genetic mechanisms for newly identified PD variants in PD and AD, as well as the association between AD and PD, which may be very useful for future genetic studies for both diseases. PMID:25370933

  15. An algorithm for identifying clusters of functionally related genes in genomes 

    E-print Network

    Yi, Gang Man

    2009-05-15

    common function and are not constrained by gene expression or other properties. I tested the algorithm by analyzing genomes of a representative set of species. I identified species specific variation in percentage of clustered genes as well...

  16. A P-Norm Robust Feature Extraction Method for Identifying Differentially Expressed Genes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jian; Liu, Jin-Xing; Gao, Ying-Lian; Kong, Xiang-Zhen; Wang, Xue-Song; Wang, Dong

    2015-01-01

    In current molecular biology, it becomes more and more important to identify differentially expressed genes closely correlated with a key biological process from gene expression data. In this paper, based on the Schatten p-norm and Lp-norm, a novel p-norm robust feature extraction method is proposed to identify the differentially expressed genes. In our method, the Schatten p-norm is used as the regularization function to obtain a low-rank matrix and the Lp-norm is taken as the error function to improve the robustness to outliers in the gene expression data. The results on simulation data show that our method can obtain higher identification accuracies than the competitive methods. Numerous experiments on real gene expression data sets demonstrate that our method can identify more differentially expressed genes than the others. Moreover, we confirmed that the identified genes are closely correlated with the corresponding gene expression data. PMID:26201006

  17. Limits of resolution of genetic linkage studies: Implications for the positional cloning of human disease genes

    SciTech Connect

    Boehnke, M. )

    1994-08-01

    Positional cloning studies to identify disease genes are being carried out for many human genetic diseases. Such studies often include a genome-scan linkage analysis to identify the rough chromosomal location of a disease gene, fine structure genetic mapping to define and narrow the chromosomal interval in which the disease gene may be located, and physical mapping and gene identification in the genetically defined interval to clone the disease gene. During the planning of a positional cloning study, it is important to know that, if linkage is found, the genetic interval identified is likely to be sufficiently narrow to be dissected efficiently by methods of physical mapping and gene identification. Thus, one wishes to know the limits of resolution of a genetic linkage study. In this paper, the author determines for Mendelian diseases the distributions and moments of three measures of linkage resolution: (1) in a set of N chromosomes, the distance between the nearest crossovers that flank a disease locus, (2) the distance between the nearest genetic markers that flank the pair of flanking crossovers after a genome scan, and (3) the distance between the nearest flanking markers after additional randomly placed markers are generated and typed in an identified interval. These results provide explicit sample-size guidelines for future positional cloning studies of Mendelian diseases and make possible a more objective evaluation of whether a proposed positional cloning study is likely to be successful. The author also briefly discusses the more difficult problem of linkage resolution for complex genetic diseases. 14 refs., 1 fig., 6 tabs.

  18. Standardized Plant Disease Evaluations will Enhance Resistance Gene Discovery

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gene discovery and marker development using DNA based tools require plant populations with well-documented phenotypes. Related crops such as apples and pears may share a number of genes, for example resistance to common diseases, and data mining in one crop may reveal genes for the other. However, u...

  19. Inherited Genetic Single-gene Disease Cystic Fibrosis (CF)

    E-print Network

    Brutlag, Doug

    on the symptoms displayed by the CF-diagnosed patient. (1) Respiratory problems = antibiotics, anti-inflammatory agents (2) Gastrointestinal complications = nutritional therapy, fat-soluble vitamins #12;3 - Physical of the disease? - Knowledge of CFTR gene has paved the way for possible gene therapy. - Gene therapy is currently

  20. Systems Approaches to Identifying Gene Regulatory Networks in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Long, Terri A.; Brady, Siobhan M.; Benfey, Philip N.

    2009-01-01

    Complex gene regulatory networks are composed of genes, noncoding RNAs, proteins, metabolites, and signaling components. The availability of genome-wide mutagenesis libraries; large-scale transcriptome, proteome, and metabalome data sets; and new high-throughput methods that uncover protein interactions underscores the need for mathematical modeling techniques that better enable scientists to synthesize these large amounts of information and to understand the properties of these biological systems. Systems biology approaches can allow researchers to move beyond a reductionist approach and to both integrate and comprehend the interactions of multiple components within these systems. Descriptive and mathematical models for gene regulatory networks can reveal emergent properties of these plant systems. This review highlights methods that researchers are using to obtain large-scale data sets, and examples of gene regulatory networks modeled with these data. Emergent properties revealed by the use of these network models and perspectives on the future of systems biology are discussed. PMID:18616425

  1. Engineering disease resistance with pectate lyase-like genes

    DOEpatents

    Vogel, John; Somerville, Shauna

    2005-03-08

    A mutant gene coding for pectate lyase and homologs thereof is provided, which when incorporated in transgenic plants effect an increased level disease resistance in such plants. Also is provided the polypeptide sequence for the pectate lyase of the present invention. Methods of obtaining the mutant gene, producing transgenic plants which include the nucleotide sequence for the mutant gene and producing improved disease resistance in a crop of such transgenic plants are also provided.

  2. MethylMix: an R package for identifying DNA methylation driven genes

    Cancer.gov

    DNA methylation is an important mechanism regulating gene transcription, and its role in carcinogenesis has been extensively studied. Hyper and hypomethylation of genes is an alternative mechanism to deregulate gene expression in a wide range of diseases. At the same time high throughput DNA methylation assays have been developed generating vast amounts of genome wide DNA methylation measurements.

  3. MethylMix: an R package for identifying DNA methylation driven genes | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    DNA methylation is an important mechanism regulating gene transcription, and its role in carcinogenesis has been extensively studied. Hyper and hypomethylation of genes is an alternative mechanism to deregulate gene expression in a wide range of diseases. At the same time high throughput DNA methylation assays have been developed generating vast amounts of genome wide DNA methylation measurements.

  4. Exome Sequencing Identifies a Novel Gene, WNK1, for Susceptibility to Pelvic Organ Prolapse (POP)

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Shuquan; Lang, Jinghe; Zhu, Lan; Chen, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Pelvic organ prolapse (POP) is a common gynecological disorder; however, the genetic components remain largely unidentified. Exome sequencing has been widely used to identify pathogenic gene mutations of several diseases because of its high chromosomal coverage and accuracy. In this study, we performed whole exome sequencing (WES), for the first time, on 8 peripheral blood DNA samples from representative POP cases. After filtering the sequencing data from the dbSNP database (build 138) and the 1000 Genomes Project, 2 missense variants in WNK1, c.2668G > A (p.G890R) and c.6761C> T (p.P2254L), were identified and further validated via Sanger sequencing. In validation stage, the c.2668G > A (p.G890R) variant and 8 additional variants were detected in 11 out of 161 POP patients. All these variants were absent in 231 healthy controls. Functional experiments showed that fibroblasts from the utero-sacral ligaments of POP with WNK1 mutations exhibited loose and irregular alignment compared with fibroblasts from healthy controls. In sum, our study identified a novel gene, WNK1, for POP susceptibility, expanded the causal mutation spectrums of POP, and provided evidence for the genetic diagnosis and medical management of POP in the future. PMID:25739019

  5. A Systems Genetics Approach Identifies CXCL14, ITGAX, and LPCAT2 as Novel Aggressive Prostate Cancer Susceptibility Genes

    PubMed Central

    Andreas, Jonathan; Patel, Shashank J.; Zhang, Suiyuan; Chines, Peter; Elkahloun, Abdel; Chandrasekharappa, Settara; Gutkind, J. Silvio; Molinolo, Alfredo A.; Crawford, Nigel P. S.

    2014-01-01

    Although prostate cancer typically runs an indolent course, a subset of men develop aggressive, fatal forms of this disease. We hypothesize that germline variation modulates susceptibility to aggressive prostate cancer. The goal of this work is to identify susceptibility genes using the C57BL/6-Tg(TRAMP)8247Ng/J (TRAMP) mouse model of neuroendocrine prostate cancer. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping was performed in transgene-positive (TRAMPxNOD/ShiLtJ) F2 intercross males (n?=?228), which facilitated identification of 11 loci associated with aggressive disease development. Microarray data derived from 126 (TRAMPxNOD/ShiLtJ) F2 primary tumors were used to prioritize candidate genes within QTLs, with candidate genes deemed as being high priority when possessing both high levels of expression-trait correlation and a proximal expression QTL. This process enabled the identification of 35 aggressive prostate tumorigenesis candidate genes. The role of these genes in aggressive forms of human prostate cancer was investigated using two concurrent approaches. First, logistic regression analysis in two human prostate gene expression datasets revealed that expression levels of five genes (CXCL14, ITGAX, LPCAT2, RNASEH2A, and ZNF322) were positively correlated with aggressive prostate cancer and two genes (CCL19 and HIST1H1A) were protective for aggressive prostate cancer. Higher than average levels of expression of the five genes that were positively correlated with aggressive disease were consistently associated with patient outcome in both human prostate cancer tumor gene expression datasets. Second, three of these five genes (CXCL14, ITGAX, and LPCAT2) harbored polymorphisms associated with aggressive disease development in a human GWAS cohort consisting of 1,172 prostate cancer patients. This study is the first example of using a systems genetics approach to successfully identify novel susceptibility genes for aggressive prostate cancer. Such approaches will facilitate the identification of novel germline factors driving aggressive disease susceptibility and allow for new insights into these deadly forms of prostate cancer. PMID:25411967

  6. SFM: A novel sequence-based fusion method for disease genes identification and prioritization.

    PubMed

    Yousef, Abdulaziz; Moghadam Charkari, Nasrollah

    2015-10-21

    The identification of disease genes from human genome is of great importance to improve diagnosis and treatment of disease. Several machine learning methods have been introduced to identify disease genes. However, these methods mostly differ in the prior knowledge used to construct the feature vector for each instance (gene), the ways of selecting negative data (non-disease genes) where there is no investigational approach to find them and the classification methods used to make the final decision. In this work, a novel Sequence-based fusion method (SFM) is proposed to identify disease genes. In this regard, unlike existing methods, instead of using a noisy and incomplete prior-knowledge, the amino acid sequence of the proteins which is universal data has been carried out to present the genes (proteins) into four different feature vectors. To select more likely negative data from candidate genes, the intersection set of four negative sets which are generated using distance approach is considered. Then, Decision Tree (C4.5) has been applied as a fusion method to combine the results of four independent state-of the-art predictors based on support vector machine (SVM) algorithm, and to make the final decision. The experimental results of the proposed method have been evaluated by some standard measures. The results indicate the precision, recall and F-measure of 82.6%, 85.6% and 84, respectively. These results confirm the efficiency and validity of the proposed method. PMID:26209022

  7. Increased Transcript Complexity in Genes Associated with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lackey, Lela; McArthur, Evonne; Laederach, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies aim to correlate genotype with phenotype. Many common diseases including Type II diabetes, Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) are complex genetic traits with hundreds of different loci that are associated with varied disease risk. Identifying common features in the genes associated with each disease remains a challenge. Furthermore, the role of post-transcriptional regulation, and in particular alternative splicing, is still poorly understood in most multigenic diseases. We therefore compiled comprehensive lists of genes associated with Type II diabetes, Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and COPD in an attempt to identify common features of their corresponding mRNA transcripts within each gene set. The SERPINA1 gene is a well-recognized genetic risk factor of COPD and it produces 11 transcript variants, which is exceptional for a human gene. This led us to hypothesize that other genes associated with COPD, and complex disorders in general, are highly transcriptionally diverse. We found that COPD-associated genes have a statistically significant enrichment in transcript complexity stemming from a disproportionately high level of alternative splicing, however, Type II Diabetes, Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease genes were not significantly enriched. We also identified a subset of transcriptionally complex COPD-associated genes (~40%) that are differentially expressed between mild, moderate and severe COPD. Although the genes associated with other lung diseases are not extensively documented, we found preliminary data that idiopathic pulmonary disease genes, but not cystic fibrosis modulators, are also more transcriptionally complex. Interestingly, complex COPD transcripts are more often the product of alternative acceptor site usage. To verify the biological importance of these alternative transcripts, we used RNA-sequencing analyses to determine that COPD-associated genes are frequently expressed in lung and liver tissues and are regulated in a tissue-specific manner. Additionally, many complex COPD-associated genes are spliced differently between COPD and non-COPD patients. Our analysis therefore suggests that post-transcriptional regulation, particularly alternative splicing, is an important feature specific to COPD disease etiology that warrants further investigation. PMID:26480348

  8. Identifying novel resistance genes in rice wild relatives

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice blast and sheath blight are major fungal diseases of cultivated rice (Oryza sativa L. ) that limit Arkansas rough rice yields and market potential. Resistance to these diseases has been found in rice wild relatives (Oryza spp.) A collection of these wild relatives originating from outside the U...

  9. The NACP/synuclein gene: Chromosomal assignment and screening for alterations in Alzheimer disease

    SciTech Connect

    Campion, D.; Martin, C.; Charbonnier, F.

    1995-03-20

    The major component of the vascular and plaque amyloid deposits in Alzheimer disease is the amyloid {beta} peptide (A{beta}). A second intrinsic component of amyloid, the NAC (non-A{beta} component of amyloid) peptide, has recently been identified, and its precursor protein was named NACP. A computer homology search allowed us to establish that the human NACP gene was homologous to the rat synuclein gene. We mapped the NACP/synuclein gene to chromosome 4 and cloned three alternatively spliced transcripts in lymphocytes derived from a normal subject. We analyzed by RT-PCR and direct sequencing the entire coding region of the NACP/synuclein gene in a group of patients with familial early onset Alzheimer disease. No mutation was found in 26 unrelated patients. Further studies are required to investigate the implication of the NACP/synuclein gene in Alzheimer disease. 21 refs., 3 tabs.

  10. Using Epidemiological Models and Genetic Selection to Identify Theoretical Opportunities to Reduce Disease Impact

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Selection for disease resistance is a contemporary topic with developing approaches for genetic improvement. Merging the sciences of genetic selection and epidemiology is essential to identify selection schemes to enhance disease resistance. Epidemiological models can identify theoretical opportuni...

  11. GeneTracer: Gene Sequence Analysis of Disease Mutations VAST 2010 Mini Challenge 3 Award: Excellent Process Explanation

    E-print Network

    Stasko, John T.

    GeneTracer: Gene Sequence Analysis of Disease Mutations VAST 2010 Mini Challenge 3 Award: Excellent outbreaks and native sequences along with disease character- istics. We successfully used Gene for a disease outbreak, which patient contracted the disease from the initial carrier, and the gene bases

  12. Gene-Gene Associations with the Susceptibility of Kawasaki Disease and Coronary Artery Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Ho-Chang; Chang, Jen-Chieh; Guo, Mindy Ming-Huey; Hsieh, Kai-Sheng; Yeter, Deniz; Li, Sung-Chou; Yang, Kuender D.

    2015-01-01

    Kawasaki disease (KD) is a systemic vasculitis primarily affecting children < 5 years old. Genes significantly associated with KD mostly involve cardiovascular, immune, and inflammatory responses. Recent studies have observed stronger associations for KD risk with multiple genes compared to individual genes. Therefore, we investigated whether gene combinations influenced KD susceptibility or coronary artery lesion (CAL) formation. We examined 384 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for 159 immune-related candidate genes in DNA samples from KD patients with CAL (n = 73), KD patients without CAL (n = 153), and cohort controls (n = 575). Individual SNPs were first assessed by univariate analysis (UVA) and multivariate analysis (MVA). We used multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR) to examine individual SNPs in one-, two-, and three-locus best fit models. UVA identified 53 individual SNPs that were significantly associated with KD risk or CAL formation (p < 0.10), while 35 individual SNPs were significantly associated using MVA (p ? 0.05). Significant associations in MDR analysis were only observed for the two-locus models after permutation testing (p ? 0.05). In logistic regression, combined possession of PDE2A (rs341058) and CYFIP2 (rs767007) significantly increased KD susceptibility (OR = 3.54; p = 4.14 x 10?7), while combinations of LOC100133214 (rs2517892) and IL2RA (rs3118470) significantly increased the risk of CAL in KD patients (OR = 5.35; p = 7.46 x 10?5). Our results suggest varying gene-gene associations respectively predispose individuals to KD risk or its complications of CAL. PMID:26619243

  13. Ensemble Positive Unlabeled Learning for Disease Gene Identification

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Peng; Li, Xiaoli; Chua, Hon-Nian; Kwoh, Chee-Keong; Ng, See-Kiong

    2014-01-01

    An increasing number of genes have been experimentally confirmed in recent years as causative genes to various human diseases. The newly available knowledge can be exploited by machine learning methods to discover additional unknown genes that are likely to be associated with diseases. In particular, positive unlabeled learning (PU learning) methods, which require only a positive training set P (confirmed disease genes) and an unlabeled set U (the unknown candidate genes) instead of a negative training set N, have been shown to be effective in uncovering new disease genes in the current scenario. Using only a single source of data for prediction can be susceptible to bias due to incompleteness and noise in the genomic data and a single machine learning predictor prone to bias caused by inherent limitations of individual methods. In this paper, we propose an effective PU learning framework that integrates multiple biological data sources and an ensemble of powerful machine learning classifiers for disease gene identification. Our proposed method integrates data from multiple biological sources for training PU learning classifiers. A novel ensemble-based PU learning method EPU is then used to integrate multiple PU learning classifiers to achieve accurate and robust disease gene predictions. Our evaluation experiments across six disease groups showed that EPU achieved significantly better results compared with various state-of-the-art prediction methods as well as ensemble learning classifiers. Through integrating multiple biological data sources for training and the outputs of an ensemble of PU learning classifiers for prediction, we are able to minimize the potential bias and errors in individual data sources and machine learning algorithms to achieve more accurate and robust disease gene predictions. In the future, our EPU method provides an effective framework to integrate the additional biological and computational resources for better disease gene predictions. PMID:24816822

  14. Inductive matrix completion for predicting gene–disease associations

    PubMed Central

    Natarajan, Nagarajan; Dhillon, Inderjit S.

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: Most existing methods for predicting causal disease genes rely on specific type of evidence, and are therefore limited in terms of applicability. More often than not, the type of evidence available for diseases varies—for example, we may know linked genes, keywords associated with the disease obtained by mining text, or co-occurrence of disease symptoms in patients. Similarly, the type of evidence available for genes varies—for example, specific microarray probes convey information only for certain sets of genes. In this article, we apply a novel matrix-completion method called Inductive Matrix Completion to the problem of predicting gene-disease associations; it combines multiple types of evidence (features) for diseases and genes to learn latent factors that explain the observed gene–disease associations. We construct features from different biological sources such as microarray expression data and disease-related textual data. A crucial advantage of the method is that it is inductive; it can be applied to diseases not seen at training time, unlike traditional matrix-completion approaches and network-based inference methods that are transductive. Results: Comparison with state-of-the-art methods on diseases from the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database shows that the proposed approach is substantially better—it has close to one-in-four chance of recovering a true association in the top 100 predictions, compared to the recently proposed Catapult method (second best) that has <15% chance. We demonstrate that the inductive method is particularly effective for a query disease with no previously known gene associations, and for predicting novel genes, i.e. genes that are previously not linked to diseases. Thus the method is capable of predicting novel genes even for well-characterized diseases. We also validate the novelty of predictions by evaluating the method on recently reported OMIM associations and on associations recently reported in the literature. Availability: Source code and datasets can be downloaded from http://bigdata.ices.utexas.edu/project/gene-disease. Contact: naga86@cs.utexas.edu PMID:24932006

  15. Candidate genes for limiting cholestatic intestinal injury identified by gene expression profiling

    PubMed Central

    Alaish, Samuel M; Timmons, Jennifer; Smith, Alexis; Buzza, Marguerite S; Murphy, Ebony; Zhao, Aiping; Sun, Yezhou; Turner, Douglas J; Shea-Donahue, Terez; Antalis, Toni M; Cross, Alan; Dorsey, Susan G

    2013-01-01

    The lack of bile flow from the liver into the intestine can have devastating complications including hepatic failure, sepsis, and even death. This pathologic condition known as cholestasis can result from etiologies as diverse as total parenteral nutrition (TPN), hepatitis, and pancreatic cancer. The intestinal injury associated with cholestasis has been shown to result in decreased intestinal resistance, increased bacterial translocation, and increased endotoxemia. Anecdotal clinical evidence suggests a genetic predisposition to exaggerated injury. Recent animal research on two different strains of inbred mice demonstrating different rates of bacterial translocation with different mortality rates supports this premise. In this study, a microarray analysis of intestinal tissue following common bile duct ligation (CBDL) performed under general anesthesia on these same two strains of inbred mice was done with the goal of identifying the potential molecular mechanistic pathways responsible. Over 500 genes were increased more than 2.0-fold following CBDL. The most promising candidate genes included major urinary proteins (MUPs), serine protease-1-inhibitor (Serpina1a), and lipocalin-2 (LCN-2). Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) validated the microarray results for these candidate genes. In an in vitro experiment using differentiated intestinal epithelial cells, inhibition of MUP-1 by siRNA resulted in increased intestinal epithelial cell permeability. Diverse novel mechanisms involving the growth hormone pathway, the acute phase response, and the innate immune response are thus potential avenues for limiting cholestatic intestinal injury. Changes in gene expression were at times found to be not only due to the CBDL but also due to the murine strain. Should further studies in cholestatic patients demonstrate interindividual variability similar to what we have shown in mice, then a “personalized medicine” approach to cholestatic patients may become possible. PMID:24179676

  16. Chromatin Signature Identifies Monoallelic Gene Expression Across Mammalian Cell Types

    PubMed Central

    Nag, Anwesha; Vigneau, Sébastien; Savova, Virginia; Zwemer, Lillian M.; Gimelbrant, Alexander A.

    2015-01-01

    Monoallelic expression of autosomal genes (MAE) is a widespread epigenetic phenomenon which is poorly understood, due in part to current limitations of genome-wide approaches for assessing it. Recently, we reported that a specific histone modification signature is strongly associated with MAE and demonstrated that it can serve as a proxy of MAE in human lymphoblastoid cells. Here, we use murine cells to establish that this chromatin signature is conserved between mouse and human and is associated with MAE in multiple cell types. Our analyses reveal extensive conservation in the identity of MAE genes between the two species. By analyzing MAE chromatin signature in a large number of cell and tissue types, we show that it remains consistent during terminal cell differentiation and is predominant among cell-type specific genes, suggesting a link between MAE and specification of cell identity. PMID:26092837

  17. Family-based analysis identified CD2 as a susceptibility gene for primary open angle glaucoma in Chinese Han population.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ting; Xie, Lin; Ye, Jian; He, Xiangge

    2014-04-01

    Primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) is characterized by optic disc cupping and irreversible loss of retinal ganglion cells. Few genes have been detected that influence POAG susceptibility and little is known about its genetic architecture. In this study, we employed exome sequencing on three members from a high frequency POAG family to identify the risk factors of POAG in Chinese population. Text-mining method was applied to identify genes associated with glaucoma in literature, and protein-protein interaction networks were constructed. Furthermore, reverse transcription PCR and Western blot were performed to confirm the differential gene expression. Six genes, baculoviral inhibitors of apoptosis protein repeat containing 6 (BIRC6), CD2, luteinizing hormone/choriogonadotropin receptor (LHCGR), polycystic kidney and hepatic disease gene 1 (PKHD1), phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) and fucosyltransferase 7 (FUT7), which might be associated with POAG, were identified. Both the mRNA expression levels and protein expression levels of HSP27 were increased in astrocytes from POAG patients compared with those from normal control, suggesting that mutation in CD2 might pose a risk for POAG in Chinese population. In conclusion, novel rare variants detected by exome sequencing may hold the key to unravelling the remaining contribution of genetics to complex diseases such as POAG. PMID:24597656

  18. [From gene to disease; pseudoxanthoma elasticum and the ABCC6 gene].

    PubMed

    Bergen, A A B; Plomp, A S; Gorgels, T G M F; de Jong, P T V M

    2004-08-01

    Pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE) is a hereditary disease of the connective tissue characterized by progressive dystrophic mineralization of elastic fibres. PXE patients have skin lesions, may experience loss of visual acuity and cardiovascular complications. The inheritance pattern of PXE is almost always autosomal recessive. In less than 2% of the families, PXE may be inherited in an autosomal dominant fashion. PXE is caused by mutations in the ABCC6 (MRP6) gene. The R1141X mutation is by far the most common mutation; it has been identified in 19 patients, or 30% of all PXE-patients in the Netherlands. The molecular pathology of PXE is complicated by yet unknown factors causing a variable clinical expression of the disease. In 80% of the 110 PXE patients the authors studied, at least one ABCC6 mutation was found. Molecular diagnostics of PXE is especially useful to confirm the clinical diagnosis. PMID:15382558

  19. Identification of Genes Expressed in Premalignant Breast Disease by Microscopy-Directed Cloning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Roy A.; Page, David L.; Holt, Jeffrey T.

    1994-09-01

    Histopathologic study of human breast biopsy samples has identified specific lesions which are associated with a high risk of development of invasive breast cancer. Presumably, these lesions (collectively termed premalignant breast disease) represent the earliest recognizable morphologic expression of fundamental molecular events that lead to the development of invasive breast cancer. To study molecular events underlying premalignant breast disease, we have developed a method for isolating RNA from histologically identified lesions from frozen human breast tissue. This method specifically obtains mRNA from breast epithelial cells and has identified three genes which are differentially expressed in premalignant breast epithelial lesions. One gene identified by this method is overexpressed in four of five noncomedo ductal carcinoma in situ lesions and appears to be the human homologue of the gene encoding the M2 subunit of ribonucleotide reductase, an enzyme involved in DNA synthesis.

  20. Interactogeneous: Disease Gene Prioritization Using Heterogeneous Networks and Full Topology Scores

    E-print Network

    Interactogeneous: Disease Gene Prioritization Using Heterogeneous Networks and Full Topology Scores Engineering Department, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Leuven, Belgium Abstract Disease gene prioritization aims to suggest potential implications of genes in disease susceptibility. Often accomplished

  1. Small RNAs and Gene Network in a Durable Disease Resistance Gene—Mediated Defense Responses in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haitao; Xiao, Jinghua; Li, Xianghua; Wang, Shiping

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating data have suggested that small RNAs (sRNAs) have important functions in plant responses to pathogen invasion. However, it is largely unknown whether and how sRNAs are involved in the regulation of rice responses to the invasion of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo), which causes bacterial blight, the most devastating bacterial disease of rice worldwide. We performed simultaneous genome-wide analyses of the expression of sRNAs and genes during early defense responses of rice to Xoo mediated by a major disease resistance gene, Xa3/Xa26, which confers durable and race-specific qualitative resistance. A large number of sRNAs and genes showed differential expression in Xa3/Xa26-mediated resistance. These differentially expressed sRNAs include known microRNAs (miRNAs), unreported miRNAs, and small interfering RNAs. The candidate genes, with expression that was negatively correlated with the expression of sRNAs, were identified, indicating that these genes may be regulated by sRNAs in disease resistance in rice. These results provide a new perspective regarding the putative roles of sRNA candidates and their putative target genes in durable disease resistance in rice. PMID:26335702

  2. Screening Leishmania donovani complex-specific genes required for visceral disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen-Wei; Matlashewski, Greg

    2015-01-01

    Leishmania protozoan parasites are the causing agent of leishmaniasis. Depending on the infecting species, Leishmania infection can causes a wide variety of diseases such as self-healing cutaneous lesions by L. major and fatal visceral leishmaniasis by L. donovani and L. infantum. Comparison of the visceral disease causing L. infantum genome with cutaneous disease causing L. major and L. braziliensis genomes has identified 25 L. infantum (L. donovani complex) species-specific genes that are absent or pseudogenes in L. major and L. braziliensis. To investigate whether these L. donovani complex species-specific genes are involved in visceral infection, we cloned these genes from L. donovani and introduced them into L. major and then determined whether the transgenic L. major had an increased ability to survive in liver and spleen of BALB/c mice. Several of these L. donovani complex specific genes were found to significantly increase L. major survival in visceral organs in BALB/c mice including the A2 and Ld2834 genes, while down regulation of these genes in L. donovani by either antisense RNA or gene knockout dramatically reduced L. donovani virulence in BALB/c mice. This demonstrated that L. donovani complex species-specific genes play important roles in visceral infection. In this chapter, we describe procedures to screen L. donovani complex specific genes required for visceral infection by cross species transgenic expression, gene deletion targeting and measuring infection levels in mice. PMID:25388124

  3. Unravelling personalized dysfunctional gene network of complex diseases based on differential network model.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiangtian; Zeng, Tao; Wang, Xiangdong; Li, Guojun; Chen, Luonan

    2015-01-01

    In the conventional analysis of complex diseases, the control and case samples are assumed to be of great purity. However, due to the heterogeneity of disease samples, many disease genes are even not always consistently up-/down-regulated, leading to be under-estimated. This problem will seriously influence effective personalized diagnosis or treatment. The expression variance and expression covariance can address such a problem in a network manner. But, these analyses always require multiple samples rather than one sample, which is generally not available in clinical practice for each individual. To extract the common and specific network characteristics for individual patients in this paper, a novel differential network model, e.g. personalized dysfunctional gene network, is proposed to integrate those genes with different features, such as genes with the differential gene expression (DEG), genes with the differential expression variance (DEVG) and gene-pairs with the differential expression covariance (DECG) simultaneously, to construct personalized dysfunctional networks. This model uses a new statistic-like measurement on differential information, i.e., a differential score (DEVC), to reconstruct the differential expression network between groups of normal and diseased samples; and further quantitatively evaluate different feature genes in the patient-specific network for each individual. This DEVC-based differential expression network (DEVC-net) has been applied to the study of complex diseases for prostate cancer and diabetes. (1) Characterizing the global expression change between normal and diseased samples, the differential gene networks of those diseases were found to have a new bi-coloured topological structure, where their non hub-centred sub-networks are mainly composed of genes/proteins controlling various biological processes. (2) The differential expression variance/covariance rather than differential expression is new informative sources, and can be used to identify genes or gene-pairs with discriminative power, which are ignored by traditional methods. (3) More importantly, DEVC-net is effective to measure the expression state or activity of different feature genes and their network or modules in one sample for an individual. All of these results support that DEVC-net indeed has a clear advantage to effectively extract discriminatively interpretable features of gene/protein network of one sample (i.e. personalized dysfunctional network) even when disease samples are heterogeneous, and thus can provide new features like gene-pairs, in addition to the conventional individual genes, to the analysis of the personalized diagnosis and prognosis, and a better understanding on the underlying biological mechanisms. PMID:26070628

  4. Ancient origin of the Parkinson disease gene LRRK2.

    PubMed

    Marín, Ignacio

    2008-07-01

    Dominant mutations in the LRRK2 gene, a member of the Roco family, cause both familial and sporadic Parkinson disease. LRRK genes had so far been detected only in bilaterian animals. In deuterostomes, including humans, two LRRK genes (LRRK1 and LRRK2) exist, while in protostomes a single LRRK gene has been found. In this study, I combine structural and phylogenetic analyses to show that the cnidarian Nematostella vectensis has four LRRK genes. One of them is a bona fide orthologue of the human LRRK2 gene, demonstrating that this gene has an ancient origin. Two others are, respectively, orthologues of the deuterostome LRRK1 and the protostome LRRK genes. The fourth gene is probably cnidarian-specific. This precise characterization of the early evolution of LRRK genes in animals has important implications, because it indicates that the Drosophila and Caenorhabditis LRRK genes, which are studied to gain an understanding of LRRK2 function, are not true orthologues of the human Parkinson disease gene. Novel functional insights are also gained by comparison of the structures of LRRK2 genes in distantly related species. PMID:18523712

  5. Identifying Neisseria Species by Use of the 50S Ribosomal Protein L6 (rplF) Gene

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Julia S.; Watkins, Eleanor R.; Jolley, Keith A.; Harrison, Odile B.

    2014-01-01

    The comparison of 16S rRNA gene sequences is widely used to differentiate bacteria; however, this gene can lack resolution among closely related but distinct members of the same genus. This is a problem in clinical situations in those genera, such as Neisseria, where some species are associated with disease while others are not. Here, we identified and validated an alternative genetic target common to all Neisseria species which can be readily sequenced to provide an assay that rapidly and accurately discriminates among members of the genus. Ribosomal multilocus sequence typing (rMLST) using ribosomal protein genes has been shown to unambiguously identify these bacteria. The PubMLST Neisseria database (http://pubmlst.org/neisseria/) was queried to extract the 53 ribosomal protein gene sequences from 44 genomes from diverse species. Phylogenies reconstructed from these genes were examined, and a single 413-bp fragment of the 50S ribosomal protein L6 (rplF) gene was identified which produced a phylogeny that was congruent with the phylogeny reconstructed from concatenated ribosomal protein genes. Primers that enabled the amplification and direct sequencing of the rplF gene fragment were designed to validate the assay in vitro and in silico. Allele sequences were defined for the gene fragment, associated with particular species names, and stored on the PubMLST Neisseria database, providing a curated electronic resource. This approach provides an alternative to 16S rRNA gene sequencing, which can be readily replicated for other organisms for which more resolution is required, and it has potential applications in high-resolution metagenomic studies. PMID:24523465

  6. A STRATEGY FOR IDENTIFYING PUTATIVE CAUSES OF GENE EXPRESSION VARIATION IN HUMAN CANCER

    E-print Network

    Ringnér, Markus

    intrinsic (DNA sequence, biological role) or extrinsic features (measured with another method) of the genes sequence etc. The procedure allows missing values, so actually we assume that for each gene expressionA STRATEGY FOR IDENTIFYING PUTATIVE CAUSES OF GENE EXPRESSION VARIATION IN HUMAN CANCER Sampsa

  7. Prioritizing candidate disease genes by network-based boosting of genome-wide association data

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Insuk; Blom, U. Martin; Wang, Peggy I.; Shim, Jung Eun; Marcotte, Edward M.

    2011-01-01

    Network “guilt by association” (GBA) is a proven approach for identifying novel disease genes based on the observation that similar mutational phenotypes arise from functionally related genes. In principle, this approach could account even for nonadditive genetic interactions, which underlie the synergistic combinations of mutations often linked to complex diseases. Here, we analyze a large-scale, human gene functional interaction network (dubbed HumanNet). We show that candidate disease genes can be effectively identified by GBA in cross-validated tests using label propagation algorithms related to Google's PageRank. However, GBA has been shown to work poorly in genome-wide association studies (GWAS), where many genes are somewhat implicated, but few are known with very high certainty. Here, we resolve this by explicitly modeling the uncertainty of the associations and incorporating the uncertainty for the seed set into the GBA framework. We observe a significant boost in the power to detect validated candidate genes for Crohn's disease and type 2 diabetes by comparing our predictions to results from follow-up meta-analyses, with incorporation of the network serving to highlight the JAK–STAT pathway and associated adaptors GRB2/SHC1 in Crohn's disease and BACH2 in type 2 diabetes. Consideration of the network during GWAS thus conveys some of the benefits of enrolling more participants in the GWAS study. More generally, we demonstrate that a functional network of human genes provides a valuable statistical framework for prioritizing candidate disease genes, both for candidate gene-based and GWAS-based studies. PMID:21536720

  8. Detection and preliminary screening of the human gene expression profile for Hirschsprung's disease

    PubMed Central

    WANG, XIN; WANG, SHIQI; JIN, XIANQING; WANG, NING; LUO, YUANYUAN; TENG, YINPING

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated a genome microarray of colorectal lesions (spasm segments) in children with Hirschsprung's disease (HSCR), and analyzed the results. In addition, the present study screened for differentially expressed genes in children with HSCR. Microarray technology was used to examine the human gene expression profiles of the colorectal lesions (spasm segments) of six children with HSCR, and three normal colon tissue samples. The data were analyzed be determining P-values of significance and absolute fold changes. Preliminary screening was performed to identify genes exhibiting significant differential expression in children with HSCR, and these target genes were analyzed in subsequent verification and analytical investigations. Of >20,000 detected human genes, the preliminary screenings demonstrated that 3,850 genes were differentially expressed and upregulated, with P<0.05 and >2-fold absolute changes in expression. In addition, 645 differentially expressed genes with P<0.05 and >2-fold absolute changes were downregulated. Of the upregulated genes, 118 were involved in classic signaling pathways, compared with 11 of the downregulated genes (P<0.001; absolute fold change >2-fold). HSCR etiology is complex and often involves multiple gene changes. Microarray technology can produce large quantities of gene expression data simultaneously, and analyzing this data using various techniques may provide a fast and efficient method for identifying novel gene targets and for investigating the mechanisms underlying HSCR pathogenesis. PMID:26648025

  9. Whole exome sequencing identifies three recessive FIG4 mutations in an apparently dominant pedigree with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease

    PubMed Central

    Menezes, Manoj P.; Waddell, Leigh; Lenk, Guy M.; Kaur, Simranpreet; MacArthur, Daniel G.; Meisler, Miriam H.; Clarke, Nigel F.

    2014-01-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT) is genetically heterogeneous and classification based on motor nerve conduction velocity and inheritance is used to direct genetic testing. With the less common genetic forms of CMT, identifying the causative genetic mutation by Sanger sequencing of individual genes can be time-consuming and costly. Next-generation sequencing technologies show promise for clinical testing in diseases where a similar phenotype is caused by different genes. We report the unusual occurrence of CMT4J, caused by mutations in FIG4, in a apparently dominant pedigree. The affected proband and her mother exhibit different disease severities associated with different combinations of compound heterozygous FIG4 mutations, identified by whole exome sequencing. The proband was also shown to carry a de novo nonsense mutation in the dystrophin gene, which may contribute to her more severe phenotype. This study is a cautionary reminder that in families with two generations affected, explanations other than dominant inheritance are possible, such as recessive inheritance due to three mutations segregating in the family. It also emphasizes the advantages of next-generation sequencing approaches that screen multiple CMT genes at once for patients in whom the common genes have been excluded. PMID:24878229

  10. Identifying mechanistic indicators of childhood asthma from blood gene expression

    EPA Science Inventory

    Asthmatic individuals have been identified as a susceptible subpopulation for air pollutants. However, asthma represents a syndrome with multiple probable etiologies, and the identification of these asthma endotypes is critical to accurately define the most susceptible subpopula...

  11. Identifying the genetic basis of attenuation in Marek's disease virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Marek’s disease virus (MDV) is an oncogenic alphaherpesvirus of chickens that induces lymphoid tumors in susceptible birds. This agronomically-important disease is controlled primarily through vaccines that prevent tumor formation but are non-sterilizing. Currently most efficacious vaccines consist ...

  12. Towards the Discovery of Diseases Related by Genes Using Vertex Similarity Measures

    E-print Network

    Giles, C. Lee

    Towards the Discovery of Diseases Related by Genes Using Vertex Similarity Measures Hung-Hsuan Chen--Discovering the relationships of gene to gene, gene to its related diseases, and diseases implicated in common genes is important. However, traditional biological methods can be expensive. Here, we show that the diseases

  13. Mapping eQTLs in the Norfolk Island Genetic Isolate Identifies Candidate Genes for CVD Risk Traits

    PubMed Central

    Benton, Miles C.; Lea, Rod A.; Macartney-Coxson, Donia; Carless, Melanie A.; Göring, Harald H.; Bellis, Claire; Hanna, Michelle; Eccles, David; Chambers, Geoffrey K.; Curran, Joanne E.; Harper, Jacquie L.; Blangero, John; Griffiths, Lyn R.

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) affects millions of people worldwide and is influenced by numerous factors, including lifestyle and genetics. Expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) influence gene expression and are good candidates for CVD risk. Founder-effect pedigrees can provide additional power to map genes associated with disease risk. Therefore, we identified eQTLs in the genetic isolate of Norfolk Island (NI) and tested for associations between these and CVD risk factors. We measured genome-wide transcript levels of blood lymphocytes in 330 individuals and used pedigree-based heritability analysis to identify heritable transcripts. eQTLs were identified by genome-wide association testing of these transcripts. Testing for association between CVD risk factors (i.e., blood lipids, blood pressure, and body fat indices) and eQTLs revealed 1,712 heritable transcripts (p < 0.05) with heritability values ranging from 0.18 to 0.84. From these, we identified 200 cis-acting and 70 trans-acting eQTLs (p < 1.84 × 10?7) An eQTL-centric analysis of CVD risk traits revealed multiple associations, including 12 previously associated with CVD-related traits. Trait versus eQTL regression modeling identified four CVD risk candidates (NAAA, PAPSS1, NME1, and PRDX1), all of which have known biological roles in disease. In addition, we implicated several genes previously associated with CVD risk traits, including MTHFR and FN3KRP. We have successfully identified a panel of eQTLs in the NI pedigree and used this to implicate several genes in CVD risk. Future studies are required for further assessing the functional importance of these eQTLs and whether the findings here also relate to outbred populations. PMID:24314549

  14. Seven newly identified loci for autoimmune thyroid disease.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Jason D; Simmonds, Matthew J; Walker, Neil M; Burren, Oliver; Brand, Oliver J; Guo, Hui; Wallace, Chris; Stevens, Helen; Coleman, Gillian; Franklyn, Jayne A; Todd, John A; Gough, Stephen C L

    2012-12-01

    Autoimmune thyroid disease (AITD), including Graves' disease (GD) and Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT), is one of the most common of the immune-mediated diseases. To further investigate the genetic determinants of AITD, we conducted an association study using a custom-made single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array, the ImmunoChip. The SNP array contains all known and genotype-able SNPs across 186 distinct susceptibility loci associated with one or more immune-mediated diseases. After stringent quality control, we analysed 103 875 common SNPs (minor allele frequency >0.05) in 2285 GD and 462 HT patients and 9364 controls. We found evidence for seven new AITD risk loci (P < 1.12 × 10(-6); a permutation test derived significance threshold), five at locations previously associated and two at locations awaiting confirmation, with other immune-mediated diseases. PMID:22922229

  15. Insect Innate Immunity Database (IIID): An Annotation Tool for Identifying Immune Genes in Insect Genomes

    E-print Network

    Bordenstein, Seth

    Insect Innate Immunity Database (IIID): An Annotation Tool for Identifying Immune Genes in Insect The innate immune system is an ancient component of host defense. Since innate immunity pathways are well conserved throughout many eukaryotes, immune genes in model animals can be used to putatively identify

  16. Ultra-deep targeted sequencing of advanced oral squamous cell carcinoma identifies a mutation-based prognostic gene signature

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Po-Jung; Huang, Yi; Hsu, An; Tang, Petrus; Chang, Yu-Sun; Chen, Hua-Chien; Yen, Tzu-Chen

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients with advanced oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) have heterogeneous outcomes that limit the implementation of tailored treatment options. Genetic markers for improved prognostic stratification are eagerly awaited. Methods Herein, next-generation sequencing (NGS) was performed in 345 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) samples obtained from advanced OSCC patients. Genetic mutations on the hotspot regions of 45 cancer-related genes were detected using an ultra-deep (>1000×) sequencing approach. Kaplan-Meier plots and Cox regression analyses were used to investigate the associations between the mutation status and disease-free survival (DFS). Results We identified 1269 non-synonymous mutations in 276 OSCC samples. TP53, PIK3CA, CDKN2A, HRAS and BRAF were the most frequently mutated genes. Mutations in 14 genes were found to predict DFS. A mutation-based signature affecting ten genes (HRAS, BRAF, FGFR3, SMAD4, KIT, PTEN, NOTCH1, AKT1, CTNNB1, and PTPN11) was devised to predict DFS. Two different resampling methods were used to validate the prognostic value of the identified gene signature. Multivariate analysis demonstrated that presence of a mutated gene signature was an independent predictor of poorer DFS (P = 0.005). Conclusions Genetic variants identified by NGS technology in FFPE samples are clinically useful to predict prognosis in advanced OSCC patients. PMID:25980437

  17. Positional cloning of disease genes on chromosome 16

    SciTech Connect

    Doggett, N.; Bruening, M.; Callen, D.; Gardiner, M.; Lerner, T.

    1996-04-01

    The project seeks to elucidate the molecular basis of an important genetic disease (Batten`s disease) by molecular cloning of the affected gene by utilizing an overlapping clone map of chromosome 16. Batten disease (also known as juvenile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis) is a recessively inherited neurodegenerative disorder of childhood characterized by progressive loss of vision, seizures, and psychomoter disturbances. The Batten disease gene was genetically mapped to the chromosome region 16p 12.1 in close linkage with the genetic markers D16S299 and D16S298. Exon amplification of a cosmid containing D16S298 yielded a candidate gene that was disrupted by a 1 kb genomic deletion in all patients containing the most common haplotype for the disease. Two separate deletions and a point mutation altering a splice site in three unrelated families have confirmed the gene as the Batten disease gene. The disease gene encodes a novel 438 amino acid membrane binding protein of unknown function.

  18. Evolutionary history of human disease genes reveals phenotypic connections and comorbidity among genetic diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Solip; Yang, Jae-Seong; Kim, Jinho; Shin, Young-Eun; Hwang, Jihye; Park, Juyong; Jang, Sung Key; Kim, Sanguk

    2012-10-01

    The extent to which evolutionary changes have impacted the phenotypic relationships among human diseases remains unclear. In this work, we report that phenotypically similar diseases are connected by the evolutionary constraints on human disease genes. Human disease groups can be classified into slowly or rapidly evolving classes, where the diseases in the slowly evolving class are enriched with morphological phenotypes and those in the rapidly evolving class are enriched with physiological phenotypes. Our findings establish a clear evolutionary connection between disease classes and disease phenotypes for the first time. Furthermore, the high comorbidity found between diseases connected by similar evolutionary constraints enables us to improve the predictability of the relative risk of human diseases. We find the evolutionary constraints on disease genes are a new layer of molecular connection in the network-based exploration of human diseases.

  19. Identifying microRNA targets in different gene regions

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Currently available microRNA (miRNA) target prediction algorithms require the presence of a conserved seed match to the 5' end of the miRNA and limit the target sites to the 3' untranslated regions of mRNAs. However, it has been noted that these requirements may be too stringent, leading to a substantial number of missing targets. Results We have developed TargetS, a novel computational approach for predicting miRNA targets with the target sites located along entire gene sequences, which permits finding additional targets that are not located in the 3' un-translated regions. Our model is based on both canonical seed matching and non-canonical seed pairing, which discovers targets that allow one bit GU wobble. It does not rely on evolutionary conservation, so it allows the detection of species-specific miRNA-mRNA interactions and makes it suitable for analyzing un-conserved gene sequences. To test the performance of our approach, we have imported the widely used benchmark dataset revealing fold-changes in protein production corresponding to each of the five selected microRNAs. Compared to well-known miRNA target prediction tools, including TargetScanS, PicTar and MicroT_CDS, our method yields the highest sensitivity, while achieving a comparable level of accuracy. Human miRNA target predictions using our computational approach are available online at http://liubioinfolab.org/targetS/mirna.html Conclusions A simple but powerful computational miRNA target prediction method is developed that is solely based on canonical and non-canonical seed matches without requiring evolutionary conservation of the target sites. Our method also expands the target search space to different gene regions, rather than limiting to 3'UTR only. This improves the sensitivity of miRNA target identification, while achieving a comparable accuracy with existing methods. PMID:25077573

  20. An integrated approach for identifying and mapping human genes.

    PubMed Central

    Das Gupta, R; Morrow, B; Marondel, I; Parimoo, S; Goei, V L; Gruen, J; Weissman, S; Skoultchi, A; Kucherlapati, R

    1993-01-01

    We have developed a method for generating expressed-sequence maps of human chromosomes. The method involves several steps that begin with libraries of highly representative short cDNAs prepared by using random oligomers as primers. The cDNA inserts are amplified by PCR with flanking vector primers. Chromosomal region-specific cDNA packets are prepared by hybridization of the cDNA inserts to DNA derived from yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) assigned to defined regions of human chromosomes. The cDNA packets are cloned into yeast chromosome fragmentation vectors and used for transformation of yeast bearing the YAC used for affinity purification. Sequences in the cDNAs undergo homologous recombination with the corresponding exons in the genomic DNA yielding a set of truncated YACs. Each unique truncation specifies the location of an exon in the YAC. Since all of the truncation events end with the same vector sequence, it is possible to rescue and sequence these ends to generate expressed sequence tags. The method couples rapid purification of region-specific cDNAs with precise mapping of their genes on YACs. Appropriately truncated YACs also provide easy access to gene regulatory sequences. We describe the feasibility of individual steps of the method using the factor IX (F9) gene as a model system and we present the mapping of several expressed sequences corresponding to a 330-kb YAC containing DNA from human chromosome 6p21. In addition, we obtained the sequence, including an intron-exon junction, flanking a particular truncation event. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8506274

  1. Loci influencing blood pressure identified using a cardiovascular gene-centric array

    PubMed Central

    Ganesh, Santhi K.; Tragante, Vinicius; Guo, Wei; Guo, Yiran; Lanktree, Matthew B.; Smith, Erin N.; Johnson, Toby; Castillo, Berta Almoguera; Barnard, John; Baumert, Jens; Chang, Yen-Pei Christy; Elbers, Clara C.; Farrall, Martin; Fischer, Mary E.; Franceschini, Nora; Gaunt, Tom R.; Gho, Johannes M.I.H.; Gieger, Christian; Gong, Yan; Isaacs, Aaron; Kleber, Marcus E.; Leach, Irene Mateo; McDonough, Caitrin W.; Meijs, Matthijs F.L.; Mellander, Olle; Molony, Cliona M.; Nolte, Ilja M.; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Price, Tom S.; Rajagopalan, Ramakrishnan; Shaffer, Jonathan; Shah, Sonia; Shen, Haiqing; Soranzo, Nicole; van der Most, Peter J.; Van Iperen, Erik P.A.; Van Setten, Jessic A.; Vonk, Judith M.; Zhang, Li; Beitelshees, Amber L.; Berenson, Gerald S.; Bhatt, Deepak L.; Boer, Jolanda M.A.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Burkley, Ben; Burt, Amber; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Chen, Wei; Cooper-DeHoff, Rhonda M.; Curtis, Sean P.; Dreisbach, Albert; Duggan, David; Ehret, Georg B.; Fabsitz, Richard R.; Fornage, Myriam; Fox, Ervin; Furlong, Clement E.; Gansevoort, Ron T.; Hofker, Marten H.; Hovingh, G. Kees; Kirkland, Susan A.; Kottke-Marchant, Kandice; Kutlar, Abdullah; LaCroix, Andrea Z.; Langaee, Taimour Y.; Li, Yun R.; Lin, Honghuang; Liu, Kiang; Maiwald, Steffi; Malik, Rainer; Murugesan, Gurunathan; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; O'Connell, Jeffery R.; Onland-Moret, N. Charlotte; Ouwehand, Willem H.; Palmas, Walter; Penninx, Brenda W.; Pepine, Carl J.; Pettinger, Mary; Polak, Joseph F.; Ramachandran, Vasan S.; Ranchalis, Jane; Redline, Susan; Ridker, Paul M.; Rose, Lynda M.; Scharnag, Hubert; Schork, Nicholas J.; Shimbo, Daichi; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Srinivasan, Sathanur R.; Stolk, Ronald P.; Taylor, Herman A.; Thorand, Barbara; Trip, Mieke D.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Verschuren, W. Monique; Wijmenga, Cisca; Winkelmann, Bernhard R.; Wyatt, Sharon; Young, J. Hunter; Boehm, Bernhard O.; Caulfield, Mark J.; Chasman, Daniel I.; Davidson, Karina W.; Doevendans, Pieter A.; FitzGerald, Garret A.; Gums, John G.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Hillege, Hans L.; Illig, Thomas; Jarvik, Gail P.; Johnson, Julie A.; Kastelein, John J.P.; Koenig, Wolfgang; März, Winfried; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Murray, Sarah S.; Oldehinkel, Albertine J.; Rader, Daniel J.; Reilly, Muredach P.; Reiner, Alex P.; Schadt, Eric E.; Silverstein, Roy L.; Snieder, Harold; Stanton, Alice V.; Uitterlinden, André G.; van der Harst, Pim; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; Samani, Nilesh J.; Johnson, Andrew D.; Munroe, Patricia B.; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Levy, Daniel; Keating, Brendan J.; Asselbergs, Folkert W.

    2013-01-01

    Blood pressure (BP) is a heritable determinant of risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD). To investigate genetic associations with systolic BP (SBP), diastolic BP (DBP), mean arterial pressure (MAP) and pulse pressure (PP), we genotyped ?50 000 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that capture variation in ?2100 candidate genes for cardiovascular phenotypes in 61 619 individuals of European ancestry from cohort studies in the USA and Europe. We identified novel associations between rs347591 and SBP (chromosome 3p25.3, in an intron of HRH1) and between rs2169137 and DBP (chromosome1q32.1 in an intron of MDM4) and between rs2014408 and SBP (chromosome 11p15 in an intron of SOX6), previously reported to be associated with MAP. We also confirmed 10 previously known loci associated with SBP, DBP, MAP or PP (ADRB1, ATP2B1, SH2B3/ATXN2, CSK, CYP17A1, FURIN, HFE, LSP1, MTHFR, SOX6) at array-wide significance (P < 2.4 × 10?6). We then replicated these associations in an independent set of 65 886 individuals of European ancestry. The findings from expression QTL (eQTL) analysis showed associations of SNPs in the MDM4 region with MDM4 expression. We did not find any evidence of association of the two novel SNPs in MDM4 and HRH1 with sequelae of high BP including coronary artery disease (CAD), left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) or stroke. In summary, we identified two novel loci associated with BP and confirmed multiple previously reported associations. Our findings extend our understanding of genes involved in BP regulation, some of which may eventually provide new targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:23303523

  2. Using gene carrier probability to select high risk families for identifying germline mutations in breast cancer susceptibility genes.

    PubMed Central

    Chang-Claude, J; Dong, J; Schmidt, S; Shayeghi, M; Komitowski, D; Becher, H; Stratton, M R; Royer-Pokora, B

    1998-01-01

    Germline mutations in highly penetrant autosomal dominant genes explain about 5% of all breast cancer, and heritable mutations in the BRCA1 breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility gene account for 2-3% of breast cancer in the general population. Nevertheless, the presence of such mutations is highly predictive of disease development. Since screening for mutations is still technically laborious, we investigated whether the prior probability of being a carrier of a dominant breast cancer susceptibility gene in the youngest affected family member could be used to identify families in which the probability of finding a mutation is sufficiently high. Sixty German families with three or more cases of breast/ovarian cancer with at least two cases diagnosed under the age of 60 were screened for mutations by SSCP/CSGE and subsequent direct sequencing. Thirteen germline truncating/splicing mutations in BRCA1 were found in 33% (6/18) of the breast-ovarian cancer families and in 17% (7/42) of breast cancer only families. All the families showing mutations in BRCA1 had carrier probabilities of 0.65 or higher. In families with prior carrier probabilities above 0.6, the proportion detected was 0.46 in breast-ovarian cancer families and 0.26 in breast cancer only families. The average age at diagnosis of breast or ovarian cancer in families with BRCA1 mutations was 41.9 years and significantly lower than in families without mutations (p < 0.05). Mutation carriers and obligate carriers were also found to have cancers at other sites. The probability of being a susceptibility gene carrier, taking into account the complete pedigree information, allows uniform characterisation of all types of families for identifying those in which mutation analysis for BRCA1/2 is warranted. However, prior probabilities calculated using this method can be reduced when the correlation between genotype and phenotype is imperfect. A larger series of families needs to be investigated in this fashion to provide better estimates of the detection rate for different ranges of carrier probabilities. PMID:9507390

  3. PTEN identified as important risk factor of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Hosgood, H Dean; Menashe, Idan; He, Xingzhou; Chanock, Stephen; Lan, Qing

    2009-12-01

    Common genetic variation may play an important role in altering chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) risk. In Xuanwei, China, the COPD rate is more than twice the Chinese national average, and COPD is strongly associated with in-home coal use. To identify genetic variation that may be associated with COPD in a population with substantial in-home coal smoke exposures, we evaluated 1261 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 380 candidate genes potentially relevant for cancer and other human diseases in a population-based case-control study in Xuanwei (53 cases; 107 controls). PTEN was the most significantly associated gene with COPD in a minP analysis using 20,000 permutations (P=0.00005). SNP-based analyses found that homozygote variant carriers of PTEN rs701848 (OR(TT)=0.12, 95% CI=0.03-0.47) had a significant decreased risk of COPD. PTEN, or phosphatase and tensin homolog, is an important regulator of cell cycle progression and cellular survival via the AKT signaling pathway. Our exploratory analysis suggests that genetic variation in PTEN may be an important risk factor of COPD in Xuanwei. However, due to the small sample size, additional studies are needed to evaluate these associations within Xuanwei and other populations with coal smoke exposures. PMID:19625176

  4. A gene expression signature identifies two prognostic subgroups of basal breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Sabatier, Renaud; Finetti, Pascal; Cervera, Nathalie; Lambaudie, Eric; Esterni, Benjamin; Mamessier, Emilie; Tallet, Agnès; Chabannon, Christian; Extra, Jean-Marc; Jacquemier, Jocelyne; Viens, Patrice; Birnbaum, Daniel; Bertucci, François

    2011-04-01

    Prognosis of basal breast cancers is poor but heterogeneous. Medullary breast cancers (MBC) display a basal profile, but a favorable prognosis. We hypothesized that a previously published 368-gene expression signature associated with MBC might serve to define a prognostic classifier in basal cancers. We collected public gene expression and histoclinical data of 2145 invasive early breast adenocarcinomas. We developed a Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifier based on this 368-gene list in a learning set, and tested its predictive performances in an independent validation set. Then, we assessed its prognostic value and that of six prognostic signatures for disease-free survival (DFS) in the remaining 2034 samples. The SVM model accurately classified all MBC samples in the learning and validation sets. A total of 466 cases were basal across other sets. The SVM classifier separated them into two subgroups, subgroup 1 (resembling MBC) and subgroup 2 (not resembling MBC). Subgroup 1 exhibited 71% 5-year DFS, whereas subgroup 2 exhibited 50% (P = 9.93E-05). The classifier outperformed the classical prognostic variables in multivariate analysis, conferring lesser risk for relapse in subgroup 1 (HR = 0.52, P = 3.9E-04). This prognostic value was specific to the basal subtype, in which none of the other prognostic signatures was informative. Ontology analysis revealed effective immune response (IR), enhanced tumor cell apoptosis, elevated levels of metastasis-inhibiting factors and low levels of metastasis-promoting factors in the good-prognosis subgroup, and a more developed cell migration system in the poor-prognosis subgroup. In conclusion, based on this 368-gene SVM model derived from an MBC signature, basal breast cancers were classified in two prognostic subgroups, suggesting that MBC and basal breast cancers share similar molecular alterations associated with aggressiveness. This signature could help define the prognosis, adapt the systemic treatment, and identify new therapeutic targets. PMID:20490655

  5. Whole-Genome Sequencing of Individuals from a Founder Population Identifies Candidate Genes for Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Catarina D.; Mohajeri, Kiana; Malig, Maika; Hormozdiari, Fereydoun; Nelson, Benjamin; Du, Gaixin; Patterson, Kristen M.; Eng, Celeste; Torgerson, Dara G.; Hu, Donglei; Herman, Catherine; Chong, Jessica X.; Ko, Arthur; O'Roak, Brian J.; Krumm, Niklas; Vives, Laura; Lee, Choli; Roth, Lindsey A.; Rodriguez-Cintron, William; Rodriguez-Santana, Jose; Brigino-Buenaventura, Emerita; Davis, Adam; Meade, Kelley; LeNoir, Michael A.; Thyne, Shannon; Jackson, Daniel J.; Gern, James E.; Lemanske, Robert F.; Shendure, Jay; Abney, Mark; Burchard, Esteban G.; Ober, Carole; Eichler, Evan E.

    2014-01-01

    Asthma is a complex genetic disease caused by a combination of genetic and environmental risk factors. We sought to test classes of genetic variants largely missed by genome-wide association studies (GWAS), including copy number variants (CNVs) and low-frequency variants, by performing whole-genome sequencing (WGS) on 16 individuals from asthma-enriched and asthma-depleted families. The samples were obtained from an extended 13-generation Hutterite pedigree with reduced genetic heterogeneity due to a small founding gene pool and reduced environmental heterogeneity as a result of a communal lifestyle. We sequenced each individual to an average depth of 13-fold, generated a comprehensive catalog of genetic variants, and tested the most severe mutations for association with asthma. We identified and validated 1960 CNVs, 19 nonsense or splice-site single nucleotide variants (SNVs), and 18 insertions or deletions that were out of frame. As follow-up, we performed targeted sequencing of 16 genes in 837 cases and 540 controls of Puerto Rican ancestry and found that controls carry a significantly higher burden of mutations in IL27RA (2.0% of controls; 0.23% of cases; nominal p?=?0.004; Bonferroni p?=?0.21). We also genotyped 593 CNVs in 1199 Hutterite individuals. We identified a nominally significant association (p?=?0.03; Odds ratio (OR)?=?3.13) between a 6 kbp deletion in an intron of NEDD4L and increased risk of asthma. We genotyped this deletion in an additional 4787 non-Hutterite individuals (nominal p?=?0.056; OR?=?1.69). NEDD4L is expressed in bronchial epithelial cells, and conditional knockout of this gene in the lung in mice leads to severe inflammation and mucus accumulation. Our study represents one of the early instances of applying WGS to complex disease with a large environmental component and demonstrates how WGS can identify risk variants, including CNVs and low-frequency variants, largely untested in GWAS. PMID:25116239

  6. Prioritization of neurodevelopmental disease genes by discovery of new mutations

    PubMed Central

    Hoischen, Alexander; Krumm, Niklas; Eichler, Evan E.

    2014-01-01

    Advances in genome sequencing technologies have begun to revolutionize neurogenetics allowing the full spectrum of genetic variation to be better understood in relationship to disease. Exome sequencing of hundreds to thousands of samples from patients with autism spectrum disorder, intellectual disability, epilepsy, and schizophrenia provide strong evidence of the importance of de novo and gene-disruptive events. There are now several hundred new candidate genes and targeted resequencing technologies that allow screening of dozens of genes in tens of thousands of individuals with high specificity and sensitivity. The decision of which genes to pursue depends on numerous factors including recurrence, prior evidence of overlap with pathogenic copy number variants, the position of the mutation within the protein, the mutational burden among healthy individuals, and membership of the candidate gene within disease-implicated protein networks. We discuss these emerging criteria for gene prioritization and the potential impact on the field of neuroscience. PMID:24866042

  7. GenDrux: A biomedical literature search system to identify gene expression-based drug sensitivity in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background This paper describes the development of a web-based tool, GenDrux, which extracts and presents (over the Internet) information related to the disease-gene-drug nexus. This information is archived from the relevant biomedical literature using automated methods. GenDrux is designed to alleviate the difficulties of manually processing the vast biomedical literature to identify disease-gene-drug relationships. GenDrux will evolve with the literature without additional algorithmic modifications. Results GenDrux, a pilot system, is developed in the domain of breast cancer and can be accessed at http://www.microarray.uab.edu/drug_gene.pl. GenDrux can be queried based on drug, gene and/or disease name. From over 8,000 relevant abstracts from the biomedical literature related to breast cancer, we have archived a corpus of more than 4,000 articles that depict gene expression-drug activity relationships for breast cancer and related cancers. The archiving process has been automated. Conclusions The successful development, implementation, and evaluation of this and similar systems when created may provide clinicians with a tool for literature management, clinical decision making, thus setting the platform for personalized therapy in the future. PMID:21545721

  8. Sequential Waves of Gene Expression in Patients with Clinically Defined Dengue Illnesses Reveal Subtle Disease Phases and Predict Disease Severity

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Peifang; García, Josefina; Comach, Guillermo; Vahey, Maryanne T.; Wang, Zhining; Forshey, Brett M.; Morrison, Amy C.; Sierra, Gloria; Bazan, Isabel; Rocha, Claudio; Vilcarromero, Stalin; Blair, Patrick J.; Scott, Thomas W.; Camacho, Daria E.; Ockenhouse, Christian F.; Halsey, Eric S.; Kochel, Tadeusz J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Dengue virus (DENV) infection can range in severity from mild dengue fever (DF) to severe dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) or dengue shock syndrome (DSS). Changes in host gene expression, temporally through the progression of DENV infection, especially during the early days, remains poorly characterized. Early diagnostic markers for DHF are also lacking. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we investigated host gene expression in a cohort of DENV-infected subjects clinically diagnosed as DF (n?=?51) and DHF (n?=?13) from Maracay, Venezuela. Blood specimens were collected daily from these subjects from enrollment to early defervescence and at one convalescent time-point. Using convalescent expression levels as baseline, two distinct groups of genes were identified: the “early” group, which included genes associated with innate immunity, type I interferon, cytokine-mediated signaling, chemotaxis, and complement activity peaked at day 0–1 and declined on day 3–4; the second “late” group, comprised of genes associated with cell cycle, emerged from day 4 and peaked at day 5–6. The up-regulation of innate immune response genes coincided with the down-regulation of genes associated with viral replication during day 0–3. Furthermore, DHF patients had lower expression of genes associated with antigen processing and presentation, MHC class II receptor, NK and T cell activities, compared to that of DF patients. These results suggested that the innate and adaptive immunity during the early days of the disease are vital in suppressing DENV replication and in affecting outcome of disease severity. Gene signatures of DHF were identified as early as day 1. Conclusions/Significance Our study reveals a broad and dynamic picture of host responses in DENV infected subjects. Host response to DENV infection can now be understood as two distinct phases with unique transcriptional markers. The DHF signatures identified during day 1–3 may have applications in developing early molecular diagnostics for DHF. PMID:23875036

  9. Affected Kindred Analysis of Human X Chromosome Exomes to Identify Novel X-Linked Intellectual Disability Genes

    PubMed Central

    Niranjan, Tejasvi S.; Skinner, Cindy; May, Melanie; Turner, Tychele; Rose, Rebecca; Stevenson, Roger; Schwartz, Charles E.; Wang, Tao

    2015-01-01

    X-linked Intellectual Disability (XLID) is a group of genetically heterogeneous disorders caused by mutations in genes on the X chromosome. Deleterious mutations in ~10% of X chromosome genes are implicated in causing XLID disorders in ~50% of known and suspected XLID families. The remaining XLID genes are expected to be rare and even private to individual families. To systematically identify these XLID genes, we sequenced the X chromosome exome (X-exome) in 56 well-established XLID families (a single affected male from 30 families and two affected males from 26 families) using an Agilent SureSelect X-exome kit and the Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform. To enrich for disease-causing mutations, we first utilized variant filters based on dbSNP, the male-restricted portions of the 1000 Genomes Project, or the Exome Variant Server datasets. However, these databases present limitations as automatic filters for enrichment of XLID genes. We therefore developed and optimized a strategy that uses a cohort of affected male kindred pairs and an additional small cohort of affected unrelated males to enrich for potentially pathological variants and to remove neutral variants. This strategy, which we refer to as Affected Kindred/Cross-Cohort Analysis, achieves a substantial enrichment for potentially pathological variants in known XLID genes compared to variant filters from public reference databases, and it has identified novel XLID candidate genes. We conclude that Affected Kindred/Cross-Cohort Analysis can effectively enrich for disease-causing genes in rare, Mendelian disorders, and that public reference databases can be used effectively, but cautiously, as automatic filters for X-linked disorders. PMID:25679214

  10. Dataset S1. Predicted BqsR-regulated genes identified by regular expression and PWM Gene Regular

    E-print Network

    Heaton, Thomas H.

    Dataset S1. Predicted BqsR-regulated genes identified by regular expression and PWM Gene Regular expression (3A) e- value Function PA14_29690 + 0.9 Transcriptional regulator (cog, pfam) PA14_58390 2.3 ABC-type dipeptide transport system

  11. Large-scale association analysis identifies new risk loci for coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the commonest cause of death. Here, we report an association analysis in 63,746 CAD cases and 130,681 controls identifying 15 loci reaching genome-wide significance, taking the number of susceptibility loci for CAD to 46, and a further 104 independent variants (r2 < 0.2) strongly associated with CAD at a 5% false discovery rate (FDR). Together, these variants explain approximately 10.6% of CAD heritability. Of the 46 genome-wide significant lead SNPs, 12 show a significant association with a lipid trait, and 5 show a significant association with blood pressure, but none is significantly associated with diabetes. Network analysis with 233 candidate genes (loci at 10% FDR) generated 5 interaction networks comprising 85% of these putative genes involved in CAD. The four most significant pathways mapping to these networks are linked to lipid metabolism and inflammation, underscoring the causal role of these activities in the genetic etiology of CAD. Our study provides insights into the genetic basis of CAD and identifies key biological pathways. PMID:23202125

  12. WNT3A gene expression is associated with isolated Hirschsprung disease polymorphism and disease status

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Dong; Mi, Jie; Liu, Xiaomei; Zhang, Juan; Wang, Weilin; Gao, Hong

    2014-01-01

    WNT3A has been regarded as an activator of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway. It has been found Wnt signaling pathway is closely related with embrionic development and Hirschsprung disease (HSCR). A common haplotype consisting of minor SNPs alleles located in the WNT3A gene has been described as a risk factor for various genetic disorders. However, whether WNT3A contributes to the onset of HSCR has not been identified. The present study aims to detect the interactions of genetic variations in the WNT3A gene and examine the biological expression levels with Hirschsprung disease (HSCR) in the Chinese people. We analyzed WNT3A gene (rs61743220, rs192966556 and rs145882986) variants in the whole blood samples from HSCR patients and normal children (control groups). WNT3A expression was also examined by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR), western blotting and immunostaining. Consequently, when rs192966556 and rs145882986 alleles of the WNT3A gene lack the SNPs, they are especially associated with a greater risk of HSCR (OR [95% confidence interval] = 1.791, p = 0.001; OR [95% confidence interval] = 1.556, p = 0.003, respectively). The mRNA and protein expressions of WNT3A were higher in the aganglionic colon segment tissues than in the normal ganglionic segments tissues. Immunostaining indicates that the staining of WNT3A was much stronger (brown) in the aganglionic colon segment tissues than that in the normal ganglionic colon segment tissues (colorless or light yellow) in the mucous layer and muscular layer. Although preliminary, these results suggest that WNT3A may play an important role in the pathogenesis of HSCR. PMID:24817932

  13. An Orthologous Epigenetic Gene Expression Signature Derived from Differentiating Embryonic Stem Cells Identifies Regulators of Cardiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Busser, Brian W.; Lin, Yongshun; Yang, Yanqin; Zhu, Jun; Chen, Guokai; Michelson, Alan M.

    2015-01-01

    Here we used predictive gene expression signatures within a multi-species framework to identify the genes that underlie cardiac cell fate decisions in differentiating embryonic stem cells. We show that the overlapping orthologous mouse and human genes are the most accurate candidate cardiogenic genes as these genes identified the most conserved developmental pathways that characterize the cardiac lineage. An RNAi-based screen of the candidate genes in Drosophila uncovered numerous novel cardiogenic genes. shRNA knockdown combined with transcriptome profiling of the newly-identified transcription factors zinc finger protein 503 and zinc finger E-box binding homeobox 2 and the well-known cardiac regulatory factor NK2 homeobox 5 revealed that zinc finger E-box binding homeobox 2 activates terminal differentiation genes required for cardiomyocyte structure and function whereas zinc finger protein 503 and NK2 homeobox 5 are required for specification of the cardiac lineage. We further demonstrated that an essential role of NK2 homeobox 5 and zinc finger protein 503 in specification of the cardiac lineage is the repression of gene expression programs characteristic of alternative cell fates. Collectively, these results show that orthologous gene expression signatures can be used to identify conserved cardiogenic pathways. PMID:26485529

  14. Identifying rhesus macaque gene orthologs using heterospecific human CNV probes

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Jillian; Fass, Joseph N.; Durbin-Johnson, Blythe; Smith, David Glenn; Kanthaswamy, Sree

    2015-01-01

    We used the Affymetrix® Genome-Wide Human SNP Array 6.0 to identify heterospecific markers and compare copy number and structural genomic variation between humans and rhesus macaques. Over 200,000 human copy number variation (CNV) probes were mapped to a Chinese and an Indian rhesus macaque sample. Observed genomic rearrangements and synteny were in agreement with the results of a previously published genomic comparison between humans and rhesus macaques. Comparisons between each of the two rhesus macaques and humans yielded 206 regions with copy numbers that differed by at least two fold in the Indian rhesus macaque and human, 32 in the Chinese rhesus macaque and human, and 147 in both rhesus macaques. The detailed genomic map and preliminary CNV data are useful for better understanding genetic variation in rhesus macaques, identifying derived changes in human CNVs that may have evolved by selection, and determining the suitability of rhesus macaques as human models for particular biomedical studies.

  15. Common Variants in Mendelian Kidney Disease Genes and Their Association with Renal Function

    PubMed Central

    Fuchsberger, Christian; Köttgen, Anna; O’Seaghdha, Conall M.; Pattaro, Cristian; de Andrade, Mariza; Chasman, Daniel I.; Teumer, Alexander; Endlich, Karlhans; Olden, Matthias; Chen, Ming-Huei; Tin, Adrienne; Kim, Young J.; Taliun, Daniel; Li, Man; Feitosa, Mary; Gorski, Mathias; Yang, Qiong; Hundertmark, Claudia; Foster, Meredith C.; Glazer, Nicole; Isaacs, Aaron; Rao, Madhumathi; Smith, Albert V.; O’Connell, Jeffrey R.; Struchalin, Maksim; Tanaka, Toshiko; Li, Guo; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Atkinson, Elizabeth J.; Lohman, Kurt; Cornelis, Marilyn C.; Johansson, Åsa; Tönjes, Anke; Dehghan, Abbas; Couraki, Vincent; Holliday, Elizabeth G.; Sorice, Rossella; Kutalik, Zoltan; Lehtimäki, Terho; Esko, Tõnu; Deshmukh, Harshal; Ulivi, Sheila; Chu, Audrey Y.; Murgia, Federico; Trompet, Stella; Imboden, Medea; Kollerits, Barbara; Pistis, Giorgio; Harris, Tamara B.; Launer, Lenore J.; Aspelund, Thor; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Schmidt, Helena; Hofer, Edith; Hu, Frank; Demirkan, Ayse; Oostra, Ben A.; Turner, Stephen T.; Ding, Jingzhong; Andrews, Jeanette S.; Freedman, Barry I.; Giulianini, Franco; Koenig, Wolfgang; Illig, Thomas; Döring, Angela; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Zgaga, Lina; Zemunik, Tatijana; Boban, Mladen; Minelli, Cosetta; Wheeler, Heather E.; Igl, Wilmar; Zaboli, Ghazal; Wild, Sarah H.; Wright, Alan F.; Campbell, Harry; Ellinghaus, David; Nöthlings, Ute; Jacobs, Gunnar; Biffar, Reiner; Ernst, Florian; Homuth, Georg; Kroemer, Heyo K.; Nauck, Matthias; Stracke, Sylvia; Völker, Uwe; Völzke, Henry; Kovacs, Peter; Stumvoll, Michael; Mägi, Reedik; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Aulchenko, Yurii S.; Polasek, Ozren; Hastie, Nick; Vitart, Veronique; Helmer, Catherine; Wang, Jie Jin; Stengel, Bénédicte; Ruggiero, Daniela; Bergmann, Sven; Kähönen, Mika; Viikari, Jorma; Nikopensius, Tiit; Province, Michael; Colhoun, Helen; Doney, Alex; Robino, Antonietta; Krämer, Bernhard K.; Portas, Laura; Ford, Ian; Buckley, Brendan M.; Adam, Martin; Thun, Gian-Andri; Paulweber, Bernhard; Haun, Margot; Sala, Cinzia; Mitchell, Paul; Ciullo, Marina; Vollenweider, Peter; Raitakari, Olli; Metspalu, Andres; Palmer, Colin; Gasparini, Paolo; Pirastu, Mario; Jukema, J. Wouter; Probst-Hensch, Nicole M.; Kronenberg, Florian; Toniolo, Daniela; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Coresh, Josef; Schmidt, Reinhold; Ferrucci, Luigi; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Borecki, Ingrid; Kardia, Sharon L.R.; Liu, Yongmei; Curhan, Gary C.; Rudan, Igor; Gyllensten, Ulf; Wilson, James F.; Franke, Andre; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Rettig, Rainer; Prokopenko, Inga; Witteman, Jacqueline; Hayward, Caroline; Ridker, Paul M.; Bochud, Murielle; Heid, Iris M.; Siscovick, David S.; Fox, Caroline S.; Kao, W. Linda; Böger, Carsten A.

    2013-01-01

    Many common genetic variants identified by genome-wide association studies for complex traits map to genes previously linked to rare inherited Mendelian disorders. A systematic analysis of common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes responsible for Mendelian diseases with kidney phenotypes has not been performed. We thus developed a comprehensive database of genes for Mendelian kidney conditions and evaluated the association between common genetic variants within these genes and kidney function in the general population. Using the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man database, we identified 731 unique disease entries related to specific renal search terms and confirmed a kidney phenotype in 218 of these entries, corresponding to mutations in 258 genes. We interrogated common SNPs (minor allele frequency >5%) within these genes for association with the estimated GFR in 74,354 European-ancestry participants from the CKDGen Consortium. However, the top four candidate SNPs (rs6433115 at LRP2, rs1050700 at TSC1, rs249942 at PALB2, and rs9827843 at ROBO2) did not achieve significance in a stage 2 meta-analysis performed in 56,246 additional independent individuals, indicating that these common SNPs are not associated with estimated GFR. The effect of less common or rare variants in these genes on kidney function in the general population and disease-specific cohorts requires further research. PMID:24029420

  16. Phenotypic Variability and Newly Identified Mutations of the IVD Gene in Japanese Patients with Isovaleric Acidemia.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Osamu; Arai-Ichinoi, Natsuko; Mitsubuchi, Hiroshi; Chinen, Yasutsugu; Haruna, Hidenori; Maruyama, Hidehiko; Sugawara, Hidenori; Kure, Shigeo

    2015-01-01

    Isovaleric acidemia (IVA) is an autosomal recessive inborn error affecting leucine metabolism. It is caused by a deficiency in isovaleryl-CoA dehydrogenase (IVD), a mitochondrial matrix enzyme that catalyzes the oxidation of isovaleryl-CoA to 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA. IVD is a FAD-containing enzyme, consisting of four identical subunits. Clinical features of IVA include poor feeding, vomiting, lethargy, developmental delay, metabolic acidosis, and a characteristic "sweaty foot" odor. IVA is one of the target disorders for newborn screening by tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). The human IVD gene is located on chromosome 15q. To date, over 50 disease-causing mutations have been reported worldwide. In this study, we searched for IVD mutations in five Japanese patients with IVA (neonatal type, two patients; chronic intermittent type, two patients; and mild biochemical type, one patient). The diagnosis of IVA was confirmed by urinary organic acid analysis using gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. All coding exons and the flanking introns in the IVD gene were amplified by PCR and were directly sequenced. We thus identified six hitherto unknown mutations (p.G94D, p.E116K, p.M167T, p.L243P, p.L246P, and c.696+1G>T) and four previously reported (p.R53P, p.R395C, p.Y403C, and p.E411K) pathogenic mutations. All patients were compound heterozygotes, and each mutation was identified in a single patient. Pathogenicity of newly identified mutations was validated using computational programs. Among them, the p.M167T is believed to influence FAD binding, as the position 167 is present in one of the FAD-binding sites. Our results have illustrated the heterogeneous mutation spectrum and clinical presentation of IVA in the Japanese patients. PMID:26018748

  17. A genetic screen in zebrafish identifies the mutants vps18, nf2 and foie gras as models of liver disease.

    PubMed

    Sadler, Kirsten C; Amsterdam, Adam; Soroka, Carol; Boyer, James; Hopkins, Nancy

    2005-08-01

    Hepatomegaly is a sign of many liver disorders. To identify zebrafish mutants to serve as models for hepatic pathologies, we screened for hepatomegaly at day 5 of embryogenesis in 297 zebrafish lines bearing mutations in genes that are essential for embryonic development. Seven mutants were identified, and three have phenotypes resembling different liver diseases. Mutation of the class C vacuolar protein sorting gene vps18 results in hepatomegaly associated with large, vesicle-filled hepatocytes, which we attribute to the failure of endosomal-lysosomal trafficking. Additionally, these mutants develop defects in the bile canaliculi and have marked biliary paucity, suggesting that vps18 also functions to traffic vesicles to the hepatocyte apical membrane and may play a role in the development of the intrahepatic biliary tree. Similar findings have been reported for individuals with arthrogryposis-renal dysfunction-cholestasis (ARC) syndrome, which is due to mutation of another class C vps gene. A second mutant, resulting from disruption of the tumor suppressor gene nf2, develops extrahepatic choledochal cysts in the common bile duct, suggesting that this gene regulates division of biliary cells during development and that nf2 may play a role in the hyperplastic tendencies observed in biliary cells in individuals with choledochal cysts. The third mutant is in the novel gene foie gras, which develops large, lipid-filled hepatocytes, resembling those in individuals with fatty liver disease. These mutants illustrate the utility of zebrafish as a model for studying liver development and disease, and provide valuable tools for investigating the molecular pathogenesis of congenital biliary disorders and fatty liver disease. PMID:16000385

  18. Bioenergetics and the Epigenome: Interface between the Environment and Genes in Common Diseases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, Douglas C.

    2010-01-01

    Extensive efforts have been directed at using genome-wide association studies (GWAS) to identify the genes responsible for common metabolic and degenerative diseases, cancer, and aging, but with limited success. While environmental factors have been evoked to explain this conundrum, the nature of these environmental factors remains unexplained.…

  19. FUNCTIONAL GENOMIC ASSESSMENT OF PORCINE DISEASE RESISTANCE: REAL TIME ASSAYS OF PORCINE IMMUNE GENE EXPRESSION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Quantitation of genes involved in regulating disease resistance in swine is essential for identifying pigs, which are genetically resistant to infections. To this end we have developed quantitative TaqMan real-time PCR assays for assessing mRNA levels of immune regulatory molecules, specifically for...

  20. An MHC Class I Immune Evasion Gene of Marek's Disease Virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Marek’s Disease Virus (MDV) is a widespread pathogen of chickens that causes T cell tumors. Acute, but not latent, MDV infection has previously been shown to lead to MHC class I down-regulation (Virology 282:198–205 (2001)), but the gene(s)involved have not been identified. Here we demonstrate tha...

  1. Credibility Analysis of Putative Disease-Causing Genes Using Bioinformatics

    PubMed Central

    Abel, Olubunmi; Powell, John F.; Andersen, Peter M.; Al-Chalabi, Ammar

    2013-01-01

    Background Genetic studies are challenging in many complex diseases, particularly those with limited diagnostic certainty, low prevalence or of old age. The result is that genes may be reported as disease-causing with varying levels of evidence, and in some cases, the data may be so limited as to be indistinguishable from chance findings. When there are large numbers of such genes, an objective method for ranking the evidence is useful. Using the neurodegenerative and complex disease amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) as a model, and the disease-specific database ALSoD, the objective is to develop a method using publicly available data to generate a credibility score for putative disease-causing genes. Methods Genes with at least one publication suggesting involvement in adult onset familial ALS were collated following an exhaustive literature search. SQL was used to generate a score by extracting information from the publications and combined with a pathogenicity analysis using bioinformatics tools. The resulting score allowed us to rank genes in order of credibility. To validate the method, we compared the objective ranking with a rank generated by ALS genetics experts. Spearman's Rho was used to compare rankings generated by the different methods. Results The automated method ranked ALS genes in the following order: SOD1, TARDBP, FUS, ANG, SPG11, NEFH, OPTN, ALS2, SETX, FIG4, VAPB, DCTN1, TAF15, VCP, DAO. This compared very well to the ranking of ALS genetics experts, with Spearman's Rho of 0.69 (P?=?0.009). Conclusion We have presented an automated method for scoring the level of evidence for a gene being disease-causing. In developing the method we have used the model disease ALS, but it could equally be applied to any disease in which there is genotypic uncertainty. PMID:23755159

  2. Characterization of foot-and-mouth disease virus gene products with antisera against bacterially synthesized fusion proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Strebel, K.; Beck, E.; Strohmaier, K.; Schaller, H.

    1986-03-01

    Defined segments of the cloned foot-and-mouth disease virus genome corresponding to all parts of the coding region were expressed in Escherichia coli as fusions to the N-terminal part of the MS2-polymerase gene under the control of the inducible lambdaPL promoter. All constructs yielded large amounts of proteins, which were purified and used to raise sequence-specific antisera in rabbits. These antisera were used to identify the corresponding viral gene products in /sup 35/S-labeled extracts from foot-and-mouth disease virus-infected BHK cells. This allowed us to locate unequivocally all mature foot-and-mouth disease virus gene products in the nucleotide sequence, to identify precursor-product relationships, and to detect several foot-and mouth disease virus gene products not previously identified in vivo or in vitro.

  3. Identifying Alzheimers Disease-Related Brain Regions from Multi-Modality Neuroimaging Data

    E-print Network

    Li, Jing

    1 Identifying Alzheimers Disease-Related Brain Regions from Multi-Modality Neuroimaging Data using Abstract5 Diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) at the early stage of the disease development is of great628 Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a fatal, neurodegenerative disorder that currently affects over five29

  4. Gene Therapy Ameliorates Cardiovascular Disease in Dogs With Mucopolysaccharidosis VII

    E-print Network

    Ponder, Katherine P.

    Gene Therapy Ameliorates Cardiovascular Disease in Dogs With Mucopolysaccharidosis VII M.M. Sleeper the effect on cardiac disease. Methods and Results--Six MPS VII dogs were treated intravenously with an RV of these dogs were compared with those of normal and untreated MPS VII dogs. Conclusions--RV-treated dogs were

  5. A Drosophila Model Identifies a Critical Role for Zinc in Mineralization for Kidney Stone Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Sven; Bose, Neelanjan; Kahn, Arnold; Flechner, Lawrence; Blaschko, Sarah D.; Zee, Tiffany; Muteliefu, Gulinuer; Bond, Nichole; Kolipinski, Marysia; Fakra, Sirine C.; Mandel, Neil; Miller, Joe; Ramanathan, Arvind; Killilea, David W.; Brückner, Katja; Kapahi, Pankaj; Stoller, Marshall L.

    2015-01-01

    Ectopic calcification is a driving force for a variety of diseases, including kidney stones and atherosclerosis, but initiating factors remain largely unknown. Given its importance in seemingly divergent disease processes, identifying fundamental principal actors for ectopic calcification may have broad translational significance. Here we establish a Drosophila melanogaster model for ectopic calcification by inhibiting xanthine dehydrogenase whose deficiency leads to kidney stones in humans and dogs. Micro X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (?XANES) synchrotron analyses revealed high enrichment of zinc in the Drosophila equivalent of kidney stones, which was also observed in human kidney stones and Randall’s plaques (early calcifications seen in human kidneys thought to be the precursor for renal stones). To further test the role of zinc in driving mineralization, we inhibited zinc transporter genes in the ZnT family and observed suppression of Drosophila stone formation. Taken together, genetic, dietary, and pharmacologic interventions to lower zinc confirm a critical role for zinc in driving the process of heterogeneous nucleation that eventually leads to stone formation. Our findings open a novel perspective on the etiology of urinary stones and related diseases, which may lead to the identification of new preventive and therapeutic approaches. PMID:25970330

  6. Evidence for somatic gene conversion and deletion in bipolar disorder, Crohn's disease, coronary artery disease, hypertension, rheumatoid arthritis, type-1 diabetes, and type-2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background During gene conversion, genetic information is transferred unidirectionally between highly homologous but non-allelic regions of DNA. While germ-line gene conversion has been implicated in the pathogenesis of some diseases, somatic gene conversion has remained technically difficult to investigate on a large scale. Methods A novel analysis technique is proposed for detecting the signature of somatic gene conversion from SNP microarray data. The Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium has gathered SNP microarray data for two control populations and cohorts for bipolar disorder (BD), cardiovascular disease (CAD), Crohn's disease (CD), hypertension (HT), rheumatoid arthritis (RA), type-1 diabetes (T1D) and type-2 diabetes (T2D). Using the new analysis technique, the seven disease cohorts are analyzed to identify cohort-specific SNPs at which conversion is predicted. The quality of the predictions is assessed by identifying known disease associations for genes in the homologous duplicons, and comparing the frequency of such associations with background rates. Results Of 28 disease/locus pairs meeting stringent conditions, 22 show various degrees of disease association, compared with only 8 of 70 in a mock study designed to measure the background association rate (P < 10-9). Additional candidate genes are identified using less stringent filtering conditions. In some cases, somatic deletions appear likely. RA has a distinctive pattern of events relative to other diseases. Similarities in patterns are apparent between BD and HT. Conclusions The associations derived represent the first evidence that somatic gene conversion could be a significant causative factor in each of the seven diseases. The specific genes provide potential insights about disease mechanisms, and are strong candidates for further study. Please see Commentary: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7015/9/13/abstract. PMID:21291537

  7. Harnessing genomics to identify environmental determinants of heritable disease

    EPA Science Inventory

    De novo mutation is increasingly being recognized as the cause for a range of human genetic diseases and disorders. Important examples of this include inherited genetic disorders such as autism, schizophrenia, mental retardation, epilepsy, and a broad range of adverse reproductiv...

  8. Rapid in vivo forward genetic approach for identifying axon death genes in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Neukomm, Lukas J.; Burdett, Thomas C.; Gonzalez, Michael A.; Züchner, Stephan; Freeman, Marc R.

    2014-01-01

    Axons damaged by acute injury, toxic insults, or neurodegenerative diseases execute a poorly defined autodestruction signaling pathway leading to widespread fragmentation and functional loss. Here, we describe an approach to study Wallerian degeneration in the Drosophila L1 wing vein that allows for analysis of axon degenerative phenotypes with single-axon resolution in vivo. This method allows for the axotomy of specific subsets of axons followed by examination of progressive axonal degeneration and debris clearance alongside uninjured control axons. We developed new Flippase (FLP) reagents using proneural gene promoters to drive FLP expression very early in neural lineages. These tools allow for the production of mosaic clone populations with high efficiency in sensory neurons in the wing. We describe a collection of lines optimized for forward genetic mosaic screens using MARCM (mosaic analysis with a repressible cell marker; i.e., GFP-labeled, homozygous mutant) on all major autosomal arms (?95% of the fly genome). Finally, as a proof of principle we screened the X chromosome and identified a collection eight recessive and two dominant alleles of highwire, a ubiquitin E3 ligase required for axon degeneration. Similar unbiased forward genetic screens should help rapidly delineate axon death genes, thereby providing novel potential drug targets for therapeutic intervention to prevent axonal and synaptic loss. PMID:24958874

  9. Investigation of manic and euthymic episodes identifies state- and trait-specific gene expression and STAB1 as a new candidate gene for bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Witt, S H; Juraeva, D; Sticht, C; Strohmaier, J; Meier, S; Treutlein, J; Dukal, H; Frank, J; Lang, M; Deuschle, M; Schulze, T G; Degenhardt, F; Mattheisen, M; Brors, B; Cichon, S; Nöthen, M M; Witt, C C; Rietschel, M

    2014-01-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a highly heritable psychiatric disease characterized by recurrent episodes of mania and depression. To identify new BD genes and pathways, the present study employed a three-step approach. First, gene-expression profiles of BD patients were assessed during both a manic and an euthymic phase. These profiles were compared intra-individually and with the gene-expression profiles of controls. Second, those differentially expressed genes that were considered potential trait markers of BD were validated using data from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortiums' genome-wide association study (GWAS) of BD. Third, the implicated molecular mechanisms were investigated using pathway analytical methods. In the present patients, this novel approach identified: (i) sets of differentially expressed genes specific to mania and euthymia; and (ii) a set of differentially expressed genes that were common to both mood states. In the GWAS data integration analysis, one gene (STAB1) remained significant (P=1.9 × 10?4) after adjustment for multiple testing. STAB1 is located in close proximity to PBMR1 and the NEK4-ITIH1-ITIH3-ITIH4 region, which are the top findings from GWAS meta-analyses of mood disorder, and a combined BD and schizophrenia data set. Pathway analyses in the mania versus control comparison revealed three distinct clusters of pathways tagging molecular mechanisms implicated in BD, for example, energy metabolism, inflammation and the ubiquitin proteasome system. The present findings suggest that STAB1 is a new and highly promising candidate gene in this region. The combining of gene expression and GWAS data may provide valuable insights into the biological mechanisms of BD. PMID:25136889

  10. Partial gene deletion in LEC rat: An animal model for Wilson disease

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J.; Forbes, J.R.; Cox, D.W.

    1994-09-01

    Wilson disease is an inherited disorder of copper transport in which incorporation of copper into ceruloplasmin and excretion of copper into bile are greatly reduced. Copper accumulates to a toxic level in the liver and also in the brain and kidney, causing a spectrum of hepatic and neurological abnormalities. We have recently cloned the gene for Wilson disease (designated ATP7B), which encodes a putative copper-transporting P-type ATPase. The inbred mutant Long-Evans Cinnamon (LEC) rat strain shows similarity to Wilson disease in many clinical and biochemical features. We have cloned cDNAs for the rat homologue (Atp7b) of the human Wilson disease gene (ATP7B) and have shown that the two genes have {approximately}82% identity at the amino acid sequence level. Rat cDNA sequences were used to identify a partial deletion in the Atp7b gene in the LEC rat. The deletion removes at least 750 bp of the coding region at the 3{prime} end, which includes the crucial ATP binding domain and extends downstream of the gene. The proximal breakpoint has been precisely localized at the cDNA level. Our results provide convincing evidence that the LEC rat is an animal model for Wilson disease. This model will be important for studying liver pathophysiology, for developing therapy for Wilson disease, and for studying the pathway of copper transport and its possible interaction with other heavy metals.

  11. Towards the isolation of the idiopathic hemochromatosis disease gene

    SciTech Connect

    Chorney, M.J.; Venditti, C.P.; Harris, J.M.

    1994-09-01

    Despite the existence of many useful reagents which exist to aid in the positional cloning of the idiopathic hermochromatosis disease gene (HFE), the nature and precise location of this common genetic disease has remained elusive. Our group has pursued an MHC-based positional cloning approach which has centered on the precise physical definition of HLA-A variant chromosomes. Using deletion breakpoint locations in combination with genetic data derived from the Brittany founder population, we have used cDNA selection techniques to isolate new members of distinct multigene families which reside in the HFE critical region (distal to the HLA-A9 breakpoint/proximal to HLA-F). We have also initiated an independent set of cytogenetic and physical mapping studies to position the marker D6S105 with respect to the telomeric end of the class I subregion. Toward this end, we have performed double labelling FISH experiments which have allowed the localization of D6S105-containing YACs with respect to the HLA-A subregion and to the major G-bands which contain these loci. We have also derived single-copy probes, cosmids and cDNA clones from the region which have been used to create a physical map around D6S105. The combination of the cytogenetic and physical mapping data indicate that D6S105 is at least 2 Mb from HLA-A and that the distal limit of the MHC class I region may extend much further into the the euchromatic region of 6p21.3 than previously expected. A mega-YAC walk is now in progress to link the two loci. Finally, we have identified and characterized a family which is segregating a balanced inversion in phase with HFE. The breakpoint locations of this mutant chromosome may be important in the precise positioning of the HFE gene and attempts to define coding sequences in the proximity of this rearrangement are underway.

  12. Identification of the von Hippel-Lindau disease tumor suppressor gene

    SciTech Connect

    Latif, F.; Masahiro Yao; Orcutt, L.; Kuzmin, I.; Fangwei Zhou; Zbar, B.; Lerman, M.I.; Dean, M. ); Tory, K.; Fuhmei Duh; Stackhouse, T.; Modi, W.; Geil, L.; Schmidt, L.; Hua Li; Ming Hui Wei; Fan Chen; Glavac, D. National Cancer Inst., Frederick, MD ); Gnarra, J.; Walther, M.M.; Yongkai Weng; Duan, D.S.R.; Linehan, W.M.; Glenn, G.; Choyke, P. ); Richards, F.M.; Crossey, P.A.; Ferguson-Smith, M.A.; Maher, E.R. ); Paslier D. Le; Chumakov, I.; Cohen, D. ); Chinault, A.C. )

    1993-05-28

    A gene discovered by positional cloning has been identified as the von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease tumor suppressor gene. A restriction fragment encompassing the gene showed rearrangements in 28 of 221 VHL kindreds. Eighteen of these rearrangements were due to deletions in the candidate gene, including three large nonoverlapping deletions. Intragenic mutations were detected in cell lines derived from VHL patients and from sporadic renal cell carcinomas. The VHL gene is evolutionarily conserved and encodes two widely expressed transcripts of approximately 6 and 6.5 kilobases. The partial sequence of the inferred gene product shows no homology to other proteins, except for an acidic repeat domain found in the procyclic surface membrane glycoprotein of Trypanosoma brucei. 17 refs., 4 figs. 1 tab.

  13. Methods for detecting additional genes underlying Alzheimer disease

    SciTech Connect

    Locke, P.A.; Haines, J.L.; Ter-Minassian, M.

    1994-09-01

    Alzheimer`s disease (AD) is a complex inherited disorder with proven genetic heterogeneity. To date, genes on chromosome 21 (APP) and 14 (not yet identified) are associated with early-onset familial AD, while the APOE gene on chromosome 19 is associated with both late onset familial and sporadic AD and early onset sporadic AD. Although these genes likely account for the majority of AD, many familial cases cannot be traced to any of these genes. From a set of 127 late-onset multiplex families screened for APOE, 43 (34%) families have at least one affected individual with no APOE-4 allele, suggesting an alternative genetic etiology. Simulation studies indicated that additional loci could be identified through a genomic screen with a 10 cM sieve on a subset of 21 well documented, non-APOE-4 families. Given the uncertainties in the mode of inheritance, reliance on a single analytical method could result in a missed linkage. Therefore, we have developed a strategy of using multiple overlapping yet complementary methods to detect linkage. These include sib-pair analysis and affected-pedigree-member analysis, neither of which makes assumptions about mode of inheritance, and lod score analysis (using two predefined genetic models). In order for a marker to qualify for follow-up, it must fit at least two of three criteria. These are nominal P values of 0.05 or less for the non-parametric methods, and/or a lod score greater than 1.0. Adjacent markers each fulfilling a single criterion also warrant follow-up. To date, we have screened 61 markers on chromosomes 1, 2, 3, 18, 19, 21, and 22. One marker, D2S163, generated a lod score of 1.06 ({theta} = 0.15) and an APMT statistic of 3.68 (P < 0.001). This region is currently being investigated in more detail. Updated results of this region plus additional screening data will be presented.

  14. Human disease genes: patterns and predictions Nick G.C. Smitha,*, Adam Eyre-Walkerb

    E-print Network

    Eyre-Walker, Adam

    Human disease genes: patterns and predictions Nick G.C. Smitha,*, Adam Eyre-Walkerb a Department Received by W. Makalowski Abstract We compared genes at which mutations are known to cause human disease (disease genes) with other human genes (nondisease genes) using a large set of human­rodent alignments

  15. Using registries to identify adverse events in rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Lionetti, Geraldina; Kimura, Yukiko; Schanberg, Laura E; Beukelman, Timothy; Wallace, Carol A; Ilowite, Norman T; Winsor, Jane; Fox, Kathleen; Natter, Marc; Sundy, John S; Brodsky, Eric; Curtis, Jeffrey R; Del Gaizo, Vincent; Iyasu, Solomon; Jahreis, Angelika; Meeker-O'Connell, Ann; Mittleman, Barbara B; Murphy, Bernard M; Peterson, Eric D; Raymond, Sandra C; Setoguchi, Soko; Siegel, Jeffrey N; Sobel, Rachel E; Solomon, Daniel; Southwood, Taunton R; Vesely, Richard; White, Patience H; Wulffraat, Nico M; Sandborg, Christy I

    2013-11-01

    The proven effectiveness of biologics and other immunomodulatory products in inflammatory rheumatic diseases has resulted in their widespread use as well as reports of potential short- and long-term complications such as infection and malignancy. These complications are especially worrisome in children who often have serial exposures to multiple immunomodulatory products. Post-marketing surveillance of immunomodulatory products in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and pediatric systemic lupus erythematosus is currently based on product-specific registries and passive surveillance, which may not accurately reflect the safety risks for children owing to low numbers, poor long-term retention, and inadequate comparators. In collaboration with the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), patient and family advocacy groups, biopharmaceutical industry representatives and other stakeholders, the Childhood Arthritis and Rheumatology Research Alliance (CARRA) and the Duke Clinical Research Institute (DCRI) have developed a novel pharmacosurveillance model (CARRA Consolidated Safety Registry [CoRe]) based on a multicenter longitudinal pediatric rheumatic diseases registry with over 8000 participants. The existing CARRA infrastructure provides access to much larger numbers of subjects than is feasible in single-product registries. Enrollment regardless of medication exposure allows more accurate detection and evaluation of safety signals. Flexibility built into the model allows the addition of specific data elements and safety outcomes, and designation of appropriate disease comparator groups relevant to each product, fulfilling post-marketing requirements and commitments. The proposed model can be applied to other pediatric and adult diseases, potentially transforming the paradigm of pharmacosurveillance in response to the growing public mandate for rigorous post-marketing safety monitoring. PMID:24144710

  16. Using Registries to Identify Adverse Events in Rheumatic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Lionetti, Geraldina; Kimura, Yukiko; Schanberg, Laura E.; Beukelman, Timothy; Wallace, Carol A.; Ilowite, Norman T.; Winsor, Jane; Fox, Kathleen; Natter, Marc; Sundy, John S.; Brodsky, Eric; Curtis, Jeffrey R.; Del Gaizo, Vincent; Iyasu, Solomon; Jahreis, Angelika; Meeker-O’Connell, Ann; Mittleman, Barbara B.; Murphy, Bernard M.; Peterson, Eric D.; Raymond, Sandra C.; Setoguchi, Soko; Siegel, Jeffrey N.; Sobel, Rachel E.; Solomon, Daniel; Southwood, Taunton R.; Vesely, Richard; White, Patience H.; Wulffraat, Nico M.; Sandborg, Christy I.

    2013-01-01

    The proven effectiveness of biologics and other immunomodulatory products in inflammatory rheumatic diseases has resulted in their widespread use as well as reports of potential short- and long-term complications such as infection and malignancy. These complications are especially worrisome in children who often have serial exposures to multiple immunomodulatory products. Post-marketing surveillance of immunomodulatory products in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and pediatric systemic lupus erythematosus is currently based on product-specific registries and passive surveillance, which may not accurately reflect the safety risks for children owing to low numbers, poor long-term retention, and inadequate comparators. In collaboration with the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), patient and family advocacy groups, biopharmaceutical industry representatives and other stakeholders, the Childhood Arthritis and Rheumatology Research Alliance (CARRA) and the Duke Clinical Research Institute (DCRI) have developed a novel pharmacosurveillance model (CARRA Consolidated Safety Registry [CoRe]) based on a multicenter longitudinal pediatric rheumatic diseases registry with over 8000 participants. The existing CARRA infrastructure provides access to much larger numbers of subjects than is feasible in single-product registries. Enrollment regardless of medication exposure allows more accurate detection and evaluation of safety signals. Flexibility built into the model allows the addition of specific data elements and safety outcomes, and designation of appropriate disease comparator groups relevant to each product, fulfilling post-marketing requirements and commitments. The proposed model can be applied to other pediatric and adult diseases, potentially transforming the paradigm of pharmacosurveillance in response to the growing public mandate for rigorous post-marketing safety monitoring. PMID:24144710

  17. Epigenetic characterization of the growth hormone gene identifies SmcHD1 as a regulator of autosomal gene clusters.

    PubMed

    Massah, Shabnam; Hollebakken, Robert; Labrecque, Mark P; Kolybaba, Addie M; Beischlag, Timothy V; Prefontaine, Gratien G

    2014-01-01

    Regulatory elements for the mouse growth hormone (GH) gene are located distally in a putative locus control region (LCR) in addition to key elements in the promoter proximal region. The role of promoter DNA methylation for GH gene regulation is not well understood. Pit-1 is a POU transcription factor required for normal pituitary development and obligatory for GH gene expression. In mammals, Pit-1 mutations eliminate GH production resulting in a dwarf phenotype. In this study, dwarf mice illustrated that Pit-1 function was obligatory for GH promoter hypomethylation. By monitoring promoter methylation levels during developmental GH expression we found that the GH promoter became hypomethylated coincident with gene expression. We identified a promoter differentially methylated region (DMR) that was used to characterize a methylation-dependent DNA binding activity. Upon DNA affinity purification using the DMR and nuclear extracts, we identified structural maintenance of chromosomes hinge domain containing -1 (SmcHD1). To better understand the role of SmcHD1 in genome-wide gene expression, we performed microarray analysis and compared changes in gene expression upon reduced levels of SmcHD1 in human cells. Knock-down of SmcHD1 in human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells revealed a disproportionate number of up-regulated genes were located on the X-chromosome, but also suggested regulation of genes on non-sex chromosomes. Among those, we identified several genes located in the protocadherin ? cluster. In addition, we found that imprinted genes in the H19/Igf2 cluster associated with Beckwith-Wiedemann and Silver-Russell syndromes (BWS & SRS) were dysregulated. For the first time using human cells, we showed that SmcHD1 is an important regulator of imprinted and clustered genes. PMID:24818964

  18. Epigenetic Characterization of the Growth Hormone Gene Identifies SmcHD1 as a Regulator of Autosomal Gene Clusters

    PubMed Central

    Massah, Shabnam; Hollebakken, Robert; Labrecque, Mark P.; Kolybaba, Addie M.; Beischlag, Timothy V.; Prefontaine, Gratien G.

    2014-01-01

    Regulatory elements for the mouse growth hormone (GH) gene are located distally in a putative locus control region (LCR) in addition to key elements in the promoter proximal region. The role of promoter DNA methylation for GH gene regulation is not well understood. Pit-1 is a POU transcription factor required for normal pituitary development and obligatory for GH gene expression. In mammals, Pit-1 mutations eliminate GH production resulting in a dwarf phenotype. In this study, dwarf mice illustrated that Pit-1 function was obligatory for GH promoter hypomethylation. By monitoring promoter methylation levels during developmental GH expression we found that the GH promoter became hypomethylated coincident with gene expression. We identified a promoter differentially methylated region (DMR) that was used to characterize a methylation-dependent DNA binding activity. Upon DNA affinity purification using the DMR and nuclear extracts, we identified structural maintenance of chromosomes hinge domain containing -1 (SmcHD1). To better understand the role of SmcHD1 in genome-wide gene expression, we performed microarray analysis and compared changes in gene expression upon reduced levels of SmcHD1 in human cells. Knock-down of SmcHD1 in human embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells revealed a disproportionate number of up-regulated genes were located on the X-chromosome, but also suggested regulation of genes on non-sex chromosomes. Among those, we identified several genes located in the protocadherin ? cluster. In addition, we found that imprinted genes in the H19/Igf2 cluster associated with Beckwith-Wiedemann and Silver-Russell syndromes (BWS & SRS) were dysregulated. For the first time using human cells, we showed that SmcHD1 is an important regulator of imprinted and clustered genes. PMID:24818964

  19. Digging for Knowledge with Information Extraction: A Case Study on Human Gene-Disease Associations

    E-print Network

    Tresp, Volker

    Digging for Knowledge with Information Extraction: A Case Study on Human Gene-Disease Associations consisting of gene-disease associa- tions. The resulting knowledge base, the Literature-derived Human Gene-Disease the largest pub- licly available gene-disease repository. The LHGDN is compared against several curated state

  20. Thiamine responsive megaloblastic anemia syndrome: a novel homozygous SLC19A2 gene mutation identified.

    PubMed

    Mikstiene, Violeta; Songailiene, Jurgita; Byckova, Jekaterina; Rutkauskiene, Giedre; Jasinskiene, Edita; Verkauskiene, Rasa; Lesinskas, Eugenijus; Utkus, Algirdas

    2015-07-01

    Thiamine responsive megaloblastic anemia syndrome (TRMAS) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder especially in countries where consanguinity is uncommon. Three main features are characteristic of the disease - megaloblastic anemia, early onset deafness, and non-type I diabetes. TRMAS is a Mendelian disorder; a gene SLC19A2 coding high affinity thiamine transporter mediating vitamin B1 uptake through cell membrane has been identified. We present the first patient with TRMAS in Lithuania - a 3-year-old boy born to a non-consanguineous family with a novel homozygous SLC19A2 gene mutation. The patient had insulin dependent diabetes (onset 11 months), respiratory illness (onset 11 months), bilateral profound hearing loss (onset at 7 months, verified at 20 months), refractory anemia (onset 2 years), and decreased vision acuity and photophobia (onset 2.5 years). The psychomotor abilities developed according to age. Phenotypic evaluation did not reveal any dysmorphic features. The clinical diagnosis of TRMAS was suspected and daily supplementation with thiamine 100?mg was started. The condition of the patient markedly improved several days after the initiation of treatment. The results of SLC19A2 gene molecular testing confirmed the clinical diagnosis - novel homozygous c.[205G>T], p.[(Val69Phe)] mutation changing conserved amino acid residue or even interfering the mRNA splicing. Clinical heterogeneity, diverse dynamics, and wide spectrum of symptoms are aggravating factors in the diagnosis. The possibility of treatment demands early recognition of disorder to facilitate the improvement of the patient's condition. PMID:25707023

  1. Speeding disease gene discovery by sequence based candidate prioritization 

    E-print Network

    Adie, Euan A; Adams, Richard R; Evans, Kathryn L; Porteous, David; Pickard, Ben S

    2005-03-14

    Background: Regions of interest identified through genetic linkage studies regularly exceed 30 centimorgans in size and can contain hundreds of genes. Traditionally this number is reduced by matching functional annotation ...

  2. Protein functional links in Trypanosoma brucei, identified by gene fusion analysis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Domain or gene fusion analysis is a bioinformatics method for detecting gene fusions in one organism by comparing its genome to that of other organisms. The occurrence of gene fusions suggests that the two original genes that participated in the fusion are functionally linked, i.e. their gene products interact either as part of a multi-subunit protein complex, or in a metabolic pathway. Gene fusion analysis has been used to identify protein functional links in prokaryotes as well as in eukaryotic model organisms, such as yeast and Drosophila. Results In this study we have extended this approach to include a number of recently sequenced protists, four of which are pathogenic, to identify fusion linked proteins in Trypanosoma brucei, the causative agent of African sleeping sickness. We have also examined the evolution of the gene fusion events identified, to determine whether they can be attributed to fusion or fission, by looking at the conservation of the fused genes and of the individual component genes across the major eukaryotic and prokaryotic lineages. We find relatively limited occurrence of gene fusions/fissions within the protist lineages examined. Our results point to two trypanosome-specific gene fissions, which have recently been experimentally confirmed, one fusion involving proteins involved in the same metabolic pathway, as well as two novel putative functional links between fusion-linked protein pairs. Conclusions This is the first study of protein functional links in T. brucei identified by gene fusion analysis. We have used strict thresholds and only discuss results which are highly likely to be genuine and which either have already been or can be experimentally verified. We discuss the possible impact of the identification of these novel putative protein-protein interactions, to the development of new trypanosome therapeutic drugs. PMID:21729286

  3. Mechanistic phenotypes: an aggregative phenotyping strategy to identify disease mechanisms using GWAS data.

    PubMed

    Mosley, Jonathan D; Van Driest, Sara L; Larkin, Emma K; Weeke, Peter E; Witte, John S; Wells, Quinn S; Karnes, Jason H; Guo, Yan; Bastarache, Lisa; Olson, Lana M; McCarty, Catherine A; Pacheco, Jennifer A; Jarvik, Gail P; Carrell, David S; Larson, Eric B; Crosslin, David R; Kullo, Iftikhar J; Tromp, Gerard; Kuivaniemi, Helena; Carey, David J; Ritchie, Marylyn D; Denny, Josh C; Roden, Dan M

    2013-01-01

    A single mutation can alter cellular and global homeostatic mechanisms and give rise to multiple clinical diseases. We hypothesized that these disease mechanisms could be identified using low minor allele frequency (MAF<0.1) non-synonymous SNPs (nsSNPs) associated with "mechanistic phenotypes", comprised of collections of related diagnoses. We studied two mechanistic phenotypes: (1) thrombosis, evaluated in a population of 1,655 African Americans; and (2) four groupings of cancer diagnoses, evaluated in 3,009 white European Americans. We tested associations between nsSNPs represented on GWAS platforms and mechanistic phenotypes ascertained from electronic medical records (EMRs), and sought enrichment in functional ontologies across the top-ranked associations. We used a two-step analytic approach whereby nsSNPs were first sorted by the strength of their association with a phenotype. We tested associations using two reverse genetic models and standard additive and recessive models. In the second step, we employed a hypothesis-free ontological enrichment analysis using the sorted nsSNPs to identify functional mechanisms underlying the diagnoses comprising the mechanistic phenotypes. The thrombosis phenotype was solely associated with ontologies related to blood coagulation (Fisher's p?=?0.0001, FDR p?=?0.03), driven by the F5, P2RY12 and F2RL2 genes. For the cancer phenotypes, the reverse genetics models were enriched in DNA repair functions (p?=?2×10-5, FDR p?=?0.03) (POLG/FANCI, SLX4/FANCP, XRCC1, BRCA1, FANCA, CHD1L) while the additive model showed enrichment related to chromatid segregation (p?=?4×10-6, FDR p?=?0.005) (KIF25, PINX1). We were able to replicate nsSNP associations for POLG/FANCI, BRCA1, FANCA and CHD1L in independent data sets. Mechanism-oriented phenotyping using collections of EMR-derived diagnoses can elucidate fundamental disease mechanisms. PMID:24349080

  4. Statistics and Its Interface Volume 8 (2015) 137151 A Bayesian approach to identify genes

    E-print Network

    Vannucci, Marina

    2015-01-01

    knowledge on gene function to achieve a more powerful analysis of genome-wide association studies (GWAS]. However, as noted for example by [41], in most situations the identified SNPs from GWAS and/or candi- ate

  5. Mammary Cancer and Social Interactions: Identifying Multiple Environments That Regulate Gene

    E-print Network

    Ruvinsky, Ilya

    Mammary Cancer and Social Interactions: Identifying Multiple Environments That Regulate Gene selection at the level of the individual, in dynamic interaction with its social and physical environment Medicine, and 4 School of Social Service Administration, University of Chicago, Illinois. Now

  6. The compact Selaginella genome identifies changes in gene content associated with the evolution of vascular plants

    SciTech Connect

    Grigoriev, Igor V.; Banks, Jo Ann; Nishiyama, Tomoaki; Hasebe, Mitsuyasu; Bowman, John L.; Gribskov, Michael; dePamphilis, Claude; Albert, Victor A.; Aono, Naoki; Aoyama, Tsuyoshi; Ambrose, Barbara A.; Ashton, Neil W.; Axtell, Michael J.; Barker, Elizabeth; Barker, Michael S.; Bennetzen, Jeffrey L.; Bonawitz, Nicholas D.; Chapple, Clint; Cheng, Chaoyang; Correa, Luiz Gustavo Guedes; Dacre, Michael; DeBarry, Jeremy; Dreyer, Ingo; Elias, Marek; Engstrom, Eric M.; Estelle, Mark; Feng, Liang; Finet, Cedric; Floyd, Sandra K.; Frommer, Wolf B.; Fujita, Tomomichi; Gramzow, Lydia; Gutensohn, Michael; Harholt, Jesper; Hattori, Mitsuru; Heyl, Alexander; Hirai, Tadayoshi; Hiwatashi, Yuji; Ishikawa, Masaki; Iwata, Mineko; Karol, Kenneth G.; Koehler, Barbara; Kolukisaoglu, Uener; Kubo, Minoru; Kurata, Tetsuya; Lalonde, Sylvie; Li, Kejie; Li, Ying; Litt, Amy; Lyons, Eric; Manning, Gerard; Maruyama, Takeshi; Michael, Todd P.; Mikami, Koji; Miyazaki, Saori; Morinaga, Shin-ichi; Murata, Takashi; Mueller-Roeber, Bernd; Nelson, David R.; Obara, Mari; Oguri, Yasuko; Olmstead, Richard G.; Onodera, Naoko; Petersen, Bent Larsen; Pils, Birgit; Prigge, Michael; Rensing, Stefan A.; Riano-Pachon, Diego Mauricio; Roberts, Alison W.; Sato, Yoshikatsu; Scheller, Henrik Vibe; Schulz, Burkhard; Schulz, Christian; Shakirov, Eugene V.; Shibagaki, Nakako; Shinohara, Naoki; Shippen, Dorothy E.; Sorensen, Iben; Sotooka, Ryo; Sugimoto, Nagisa; Sugita, Mamoru; Sumikawa, Naomi; Tanurdzic, Milos; Theilsen, Gunter; Ulvskov, Peter; Wakazuki, Sachiko; Weng, Jing-Ke; Willats, William W.G.T.; Wipf, Daniel; Wolf, Paul G.; Yang, Lixing; Zimmer, Andreas D.; Zhu, Qihui; Mitros, Therese; Hellsten, Uffe; Loque, Dominique; Otillar, Robert; Salamov, Asaf; Schmutz, Jeremy; Shapiro, Harris; Lindquist, Erika; Lucas, Susan; Rokhsar, Daniel

    2011-04-28

    We report the genome sequence of the nonseed vascular plant, Selaginella moellendorffii, and by comparative genomics identify genes that likely played important roles in the early evolution of vascular plants and their subsequent evolution

  7. Exploiting Gene Expression Variation to Capture Gene-Environment Interactions for Disease

    PubMed Central

    Idaghdour, Youssef; Awadalla, Philip

    2013-01-01

    Gene-environment interactions have long been recognized as a fundamental concept in evolutionary, quantitative, and medical genetics. In the genomics era, study of how environment and genome interact to shape gene expression variation is relevant to understanding the genetic architecture of complex phenotypes. While genetic analysis of gene expression variation focused on main effects, little is known about the extent of interaction effects implicating regulatory variants and their consequences on transcriptional variation. Here we survey the current state of the concept of transcriptional gene-environment interactions and discuss its utility for mapping disease phenotypes in light of the insights gained from genome-wide association studies of gene expression. PMID:23755064

  8. Expected size of shared haplotypes surrounding a common disease gene

    SciTech Connect

    Meerman, G.J. te; Meulen, M.A. van der; Sandkuijl, L.A.

    1994-09-01

    If two persons in a founder population share a rare disease, they may share genes involved in that disease Identical By Descent. We have calculated the probability of the size of the region IBD on either side of a shared common gene. Probabilities are plotted for various values of the meiotic count: the number of independent meioses connecting the persons. Even if this number is quite large, the shared area will, given the present density of markers, contain several markers. To be 95% certain that the area surrounding a gene can be delimited to less than 1 cM, approximately 500 meioses need to be observed. The many generations that are required before a gene is separated from its surrounding polymorphisms indicate that association between disease and marker alleles can be explained as IBD around a common gene. In founder populations apparantly unrelated affected persons will likely share disease genes introduced or mutated between 10 and 40 generations ago. Analyzing the overlap of haplotypes gives excellent opportunities to observe implicitly the many meioses required for genetic fine mapping.

  9. From worm to human: bioinformatics approaches to identify FOXO target genes

    E-print Network

    From worm to human: bioinformatics approaches to identify FOXO target genes Zhenyu Xuan, Michael Q analyses in the nematode worm C. elegans have found that inhibition of the worm FOXO transcription factor). The identification of more DAF-16/FOXO target genes in worm and higher eukaryotes will likely contribute to our

  10. Paleo-evolutionary plasticity of plant disease resistance genes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The recent access to a large set of genome sequences, combined with a robust evolutionary scenario of modern monocot (i.e. grasses) and eudicot (i.e. rosids) species from their founder ancestors, offered the opportunity to gain insights into disease resistance genes (R-genes) evolutionary plasticity. Results We unravel in the current article (i) a R-genes repertoire consisting in 7883 for monocots and 15758 for eudicots, (ii) a contrasted R-genes conservation with 23.8% for monocots and 6.6% for dicots, (iii) a minimal ancestral founder pool of 384 R-genes for the monocots and 150 R-genes for the eudicots, (iv) a general pattern of organization in clusters accounting for more than 60% of mapped R-genes, (v) a biased deletion of ancestral duplicated R-genes between paralogous blocks possibly compensated by clusterization, (vi) a bias in R-genes clusterization where Leucine-Rich Repeats act as a ‘glue’ for domain association, (vii) a R-genes/miRNAs interome enriched toward duplicated R-genes. Conclusions Together, our data may suggest that R-genes family plasticity operated during plant evolution (i) at the structural level through massive duplicates loss counterbalanced by massive clusterization following polyploidization; as well as at (ii) the regulation level through microRNA/R-gene interactions acting as a possible source of functional diploidization of structurally retained R-genes duplicates. Such evolutionary shuffling events leaded to CNVs (i.e. Copy Number Variation) and PAVs (i.e. Presence Absence Variation) between related species operating in the decay of R-genes colinearity between plant species. PMID:24617999

  11. The Disease and Gene Annotations (DGA): an annotation resource for human disease.

    PubMed

    Peng, Kai; Xu, Wei; Zheng, Jianyong; Huang, Kegui; Wang, Huisong; Tong, Jiansong; Lin, Zhifeng; Liu, Jun; Cheng, Wenqing; Fu, Dong; Du, Pan; Kibbe, Warren A; Lin, Simon M; Xia, Tian

    2013-01-01

    Disease and Gene Annotations database (DGA, http://dga.nubic.northwestern.edu) is a collaborative effort aiming to provide a comprehensive and integrative annotation of the human genes in disease network context by integrating computable controlled vocabulary of the Disease Ontology (DO version 3 revision 2510, which has 8043 inherited, developmental and acquired human diseases), NCBI Gene Reference Into Function (GeneRIF) and molecular interaction network (MIN). DGA integrates these resources together using semantic mappings to build an integrative set of disease-to-gene and gene-to-gene relationships with excellent coverage based on current knowledge. DGA is kept current by periodically reparsing DO, GeneRIF, and MINs. DGA provides a user-friendly and interactive web interface system enabling users to efficiently query, download and visualize the DO tree structure and annotations as a tree, a network graph or a tabular list. To facilitate integrative analysis, DGA provides a web service Application Programming Interface for integration with external analytic tools. PMID:23197658

  12. The disease and gene annotations (DGA): an annotation resource for human disease

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Kai; Xu, Wei; Zheng, Jianyong; Huang, Kegui; Wang, Huisong; Tong, Jiansong; Lin, Zhifeng; Liu, Jun; Cheng, Wenqing; Fu, Dong; Du, Pan; Kibbe, Warren A.; Lin, Simon M.; Xia, Tian

    2013-01-01

    Disease and Gene Annotations database (DGA, http://dga.nubic.northwestern.edu) is a collaborative effort aiming to provide a comprehensive and integrative annotation of the human genes in disease network context by integrating computable controlled vocabulary of the Disease Ontology (DO version 3 revision 2510, which has 8043 inherited, developmental and acquired human diseases), NCBI Gene Reference Into Function (GeneRIF) and molecular interaction network (MIN). DGA integrates these resources together using semantic mappings to build an integrative set of disease-to-gene and gene-to-gene relationships with excellent coverage based on current knowledge. DGA is kept current by periodically reparsing DO, GeneRIF, and MINs. DGA provides a user-friendly and interactive web interface system enabling users to efficiently query, download and visualize the DO tree structure and annotations as a tree, a network graph or a tabular list. To facilitate integrative analysis, DGA provides a web service Application Programming Interface for integration with external analytic tools. PMID:23197658

  13. A Thirteen-Gene Expression Signature Predicts Survival of Patients with Pancreatic Cancer and Identifies New Genes of Interest

    PubMed Central

    Newhook, Timothy E.; Blais, Edik M.; Lindberg, James M.; Adair, Sara J.; Xin, Wenjun; Lee, Jae K.; Papin, Jason A.; Parsons, J. Thomas; Bauer, Todd W.

    2014-01-01

    Background Currently, prognostication for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is based upon a coarse clinical staging system. Thus, more accurate prognostic tests are needed for PDAC patients to aid treatment decisions. Methods and Findings Affymetrix gene expression profiling was carried out on 15 human PDAC tumors and from the data we identified a 13-gene expression signature (risk score) that correlated with patient survival. The gene expression risk score was then independently validated using published gene expression data and survival data for an additional 101 patients with pancreatic cancer. Patients with high-risk scores had significantly higher risk of death compared to patients with low-risk scores (HR 2.27, p?=?0.002). When the 13-gene score was combined with lymph node status the risk-score further discriminated the length of patient survival time (p<0.001). Patients with a high-risk score had poor survival independent of nodal status; however, nodal status increased predictability for survival in patients with a low-risk gene signature score (low-risk N1 vs. low-risk N0: HR?=?2.0, p?=?0.002). While AJCC stage correlated with patient survival (p?=?0.03), the 13-gene score was superior at predicting survival. Of the 13 genes comprising the predictive model, four have been shown to be important in PDAC, six are unreported in PDAC but important in other cancers, and three are unreported in any cancer. Conclusions We identified a 13-gene expression signature that predicts survival of PDAC patients and could prove useful for making treatment decisions. This risk score should be evaluated prospectively in clinical trials for prognostication and for predicting response to chemotherapy. Investigation of new genes identified in our model may lead to novel therapeutic targets. PMID:25180633

  14. Integrative Analysis of a Cross-Loci Regulation Network Identifies App as a Gene Regulating Insulin Secretion from Pancreatic Islets

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chunsheng; Rabaglia, Mary E.; Greenawalt, Danielle M.; Yang, Xia; Wang, I-Ming; Dai, Hongyue; Bruss, Matthew D.; Lum, Pek Y.; Zhou, Yun-Ping; Kemp, Daniel M.; Kendziorski, Christina; Yandell, Brian S.; Attie, Alan D.; Schadt, Eric E.; Zhu, Jun

    2012-01-01

    Complex diseases result from molecular changes induced by multiple genetic factors and the environment. To derive a systems view of how genetic loci interact in the context of tissue-specific molecular networks, we constructed an F2 intercross comprised of >500 mice from diabetes-resistant (B6) and diabetes-susceptible (BTBR) mouse strains made genetically obese by the Leptinob/ob mutation (Lepob). High-density genotypes, diabetes-related clinical traits, and whole-transcriptome expression profiling in five tissues (white adipose, liver, pancreatic islets, hypothalamus, and gastrocnemius muscle) were determined for all mice. We performed an integrative analysis to investigate the inter-relationship among genetic factors, expression traits, and plasma insulin, a hallmark diabetes trait. Among five tissues under study, there are extensive protein–protein interactions between genes responding to different loci in adipose and pancreatic islets that potentially jointly participated in the regulation of plasma insulin. We developed a novel ranking scheme based on cross-loci protein-protein network topology and gene expression to assess each gene's potential to regulate plasma insulin. Unique candidate genes were identified in adipose tissue and islets. In islets, the Alzheimer's gene App was identified as a top candidate regulator. Islets from 17-week-old, but not 10-week-old, App knockout mice showed increased insulin secretion in response to glucose or a membrane-permeant cAMP analog, in agreement with the predictions of the network model. Our result provides a novel hypothesis on the mechanism for the connection between two aging-related diseases: Alzheimer's disease and type 2 diabetes. PMID:23236292

  15. Application of Genomic and Quantitative Genetic Tools to Identify Candidate Resistance Genes for Brown Rot Resistance in Peach

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-García, Pedro J.; Parfitt, Dan E.; Bostock, Richard M.; Fresnedo-Ramírez, Jonathan; Vazquez-Lobo, Alejandra; Ogundiwin, Ebenezer A.; Gradziel, Thomas M.; Crisosto, Carlos H.

    2013-01-01

    The availability of a complete peach genome assembly and three different peach genome sequences created by our group provide new opportunities for application of genomic data and can improve the power of the classical Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) approaches to identify candidate genes for peach disease resistance. Brown rot caused by Monilinia spp., is the most important fungal disease of stone fruits worldwide. Improved levels of peach fruit rot resistance have been identified in some cultivars and advanced selections developed in the UC Davis and USDA breeding programs. Whole genome sequencing of the Pop-DF parents lead to discovery of high-quality SNP markers for QTL genome scanning in this experimental population. Pop-DF created by crossing a brown rot moderately resistant cultivar ‘Dr. Davis’ and a brown rot resistant introgression line, ‘F8,1–42’, derived from an initial almond × peach interspecific hybrid, was evaluated for brown rot resistance in fruit of harvest maturity over three seasons. Using the SNP linkage map of Pop-DF and phenotypic data collected with inoculated fruit, a genome scan for QTL identified several SNP markers associated with brown rot resistance. Two of these QTLs were placed on linkage group 1, covering a large (physical) region on chromosome 1. The genome scan for QTL and SNP effects predicted several candidate genes associated with disease resistance responses in other host-pathogen systems. Two potential candidate genes, ppa011763m and ppa026453m, may be the genes primarily responsible for M. fructicola recognition in peach, activating both PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI) and effector-triggered immunity (ETI) responses. Our results provide a foundation for further genetic dissection, marker assisted breeding for brown rot resistance, and development of peach cultivars resistant to brown rot. PMID:24244329

  16. Genetic analysis of the RAB39B gene in Chinese Han patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Lamei; Deng, Xiong; Song, Zhi; Yang, Zhijian; Ni, Bin; Chen, Yong; Deng, Hao

    2015-10-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a common neurodegenerative disorder of complex etiology. Mounting evidence indicates that genetic abnormalities play an important role in the pathogenesis of PD. To date, at least 20 genetic loci and 15 disease-causing genes for parkinsonism have been identified, as well as some susceptibility genes conferring risk to PD. More recently, mutations in the RAB39B gene (RAB39B, member RAS oncogene family) have been reported to cause X-linked intellectual disability and early-onset PD with ?-synuclein pathology. To evaluate whether variants in the RAB39B gene are related to PD in Chinese Han population, we conducted genetic analysis of the RAB39B gene in 502 patients with PD from Mainland China. No pathogenic mutation or variant was identified in the coding region or exon-intron boundaries of the gene. Our results suggest that mutation(s) in the coding region of the RAB39B gene plays little or no role in the development of PD in Chinese population. PMID:26163985

  17. Identifying type 1 diabetes candidate genes by DNA microarray analysis of islet-specific CD4 + T cells.

    PubMed

    Berry, Gregory J; Frielle, Christine; Brucklacher, Robert M; Salzberg, Anna C; Waldner, Hanspeter

    2015-09-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a T cell-mediated autoimmune disease resulting from the destruction of insulin-producing pancreatic beta cells and is fatal unless treated with insulin. During the last four decades, multiple insulin-dependent diabetes (Idd) susceptibility/resistance loci that regulate T1D development have been identified in humans and non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice, an established animal model for T1D. However, the exact mechanisms by which these loci confer diabetes risk and the identity of the causative genes remain largely elusive. To identify genes and molecular mechanisms that control the function of diabetogenic T cells, we conducted DNA microarray analysis in islet-specific CD4 + T cells from BDC2.5 TCR transgenic NOD mice that contain the Idd9 locus from T1D-susceptible NOD mice or T1D-resistant C57BL/10 mice. Here we describe in detail the contents and analyses for these gene expression data associated with our previous study [1]. Gene expression data are available at the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) repository from the National Center for Biotechnology Information (accession number GSE64674). PMID:26484253

  18. Genetics, environment, and gene-environment interactions in the development of systemic rheumatic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Sparks, Jeffrey A.; Costenbader, Karen H.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding disease susceptibility factors and gene-environment interactions may offer valuable insights into the biological mechanisms for the etiology of rheumatic diseases. Defining the contributions of genetic and environmental factors to the pathogenesis of rheumatic diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and ankylosing spondylitis (AS), may have important implications for understanding risk prediction, pathogenic mechanisms, cellular pathways, drug discovery, and prevention strategies. However, rheumatic diseases offer distinct challenges to researchers due to heterogeneity in disease phenotypes, low disease incidence, and geographic variation in both genetic and environmental factors. Emerging research areas, including epigenetics, metabolomics, and the microbiome, may provide additional links between genetic and environmental risk factors in rheumatic disease pathogenesis. This article reviews the methods used to establish genetic and environmental risk factors and to study gene-environment interactions in rheumatic diseases and provides specific examples of successes and challenges for identifying gene-environment interactions in RA, SLE, and AS. Finally, we describe how emerging research strategies may build upon previous discoveries as well as future challenges. PMID:25437282

  19. De Novo Assembly of the Japanese Flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) Spleen Transcriptome to Identify Putative Genes Involved in Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lin; Li, Guiyang; Mo, Zhaolan; Xiao, Peng; Li, Jie; Huang, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Background Japanese flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) is an economically important marine fish in Asia and has suffered from disease outbreaks caused by various pathogens, which requires more information for immune relevant genes on genome background. However, genomic and transcriptomic data for Japanese flounder remain scarce, which limits studies on the immune system of this species. In this study, we characterized the Japanese flounder spleen transcriptome using an Illumina paired-end sequencing platform to identify putative genes involved in immunity. Methodology/Principal Findings A cDNA library from the spleen of P. olivaceus was constructed and randomly sequenced using an Illumina technique. The removal of low quality reads generated 12,196,968 trimmed reads, which assembled into 96,627 unigenes. A total of 21,391 unigenes (22.14%) were annotated in the NCBI Nr database, and only 1.1% of the BLASTx top-hits matched P. olivaceus protein sequences. Approximately 12,503 (58.45%) unigenes were categorized into three Gene Ontology groups, 19,547 (91.38%) were classified into 26 Cluster of Orthologous Groups, and 10,649 (49.78%) were assigned to six Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathways. Furthermore, 40,928 putative simple sequence repeats and 47, 362 putative single nucleotide polymorphisms were identified. Importantly, we identified 1,563 putative immune-associated unigenes that mapped to 15 immune signaling pathways. Conclusions/Significance The P. olivaceus transciptome data provides a rich source to discover and identify new genes, and the immune-relevant sequences identified here will facilitate our understanding of the mechanisms involved in the immune response. Furthermore, the plentiful potential SSRs and SNPs found in this study are important resources with respect to future development of a linkage map or marker assisted breeding programs for the flounder. PMID:25723398

  20. An insertional mutagenesis screen identifies genes that cooperate with Mll-AF9 in a murine leukemogenesis model

    PubMed Central

    Bergerson, Rachel J.; Collier, Lara S.; Sarver, Aaron L.; Been, Raha A.; Lugthart, Sanne; Diers, Miechaleen D.; Zuber, Johannes; Rappaport, Amy R.; Nixon, Molly J.; Silverstein, Kevin A. T.; Fan, Danhua; Lamblin, Anne-Francoise J.; Wolff, Linda; Kersey, John H.; Delwel, Ruud; Lowe, Scott W.; O'Sullivan, M. Gerard; Kogan, Scott C.; Adams, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Patients with a t(9;11) translocation (MLL-AF9) develop acute myeloid leukemia (AML), and while in mice the expression of this fusion oncogene also results in the development of myeloid leukemia, it is with long latency. To identify mutations that cooperate with Mll-AF9, we infected neonatal wild-type (WT) or Mll-AF9 mice with a murine leukemia virus (MuLV). MuLV-infected Mll-AF9 mice succumbed to disease significantly faster than controls presenting predominantly with myeloid leukemia while infected WT animals developed predominantly lymphoid leukemia. We identified 88 candidate cancer genes near common sites of proviral insertion. Analysis of transcript levels revealed significantly elevated expression of Mn1, and a trend toward increased expression of Bcl11a and Fosb in Mll-AF9 murine leukemia samples with proviral insertions proximal to these genes. Accordingly, FOSB and BCL11A were also overexpressed in human AML harboring MLL gene translocations. FOSB was revealed to be essential for growth in mouse and human myeloid leukemia cells using shRNA lentiviral vectors in vitro. Importantly, MN1 cooperated with Mll-AF9 in leukemogenesis in an in vivo BM viral transduction and transplantation assay. Together, our data identified genes that define transcription factor networks and important genetic pathways acting during progression of leukemia induced by MLL fusion oncogenes. PMID:22427200

  1. An Image-Based Genetic Assay Identifies Genes in T1D Susceptibility Loci Controlling Cellular Antiviral Immunity in Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Juan; Jijon, Humberto B.; Kim, Ira R.; Goel, Gautam; Doan, Aivi; Sokol, Harry; Bauer, Hermann; Herrmann, Bernhard G.; Lassen, Kara G.; Xavier, Ramnik J.

    2014-01-01

    The pathogenesis of complex diseases, such as type 1 diabetes (T1D), derives from interactions between host genetics and environmental factors. Previous studies have suggested that viral infection plays a significant role in initiation of T1D in genetically predisposed individuals. T1D susceptibility loci may therefore be enriched in previously uncharacterized genes functioning in antiviral defense pathways. To identify genes involved in antiviral immunity, we performed an image-based high-throughput genetic screen using short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) against 161 genes within T1D susceptibility loci. RAW 264.7 cells transduced with shRNAs were infected with GFP-expressing herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and fluorescent microscopy was performed to assess the viral infectivity by fluorescence reporter activity. Of the 14 candidates identified with high confidence, two candidates were selected for further investigation, Il27 and Tagap. Administration of recombinant IL-27 during viral infection was found to act synergistically with interferon gamma (IFN-?) to activate expression of type I IFNs and proinflammatory cytokines, and to enhance the activities of interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3). Consistent with a role in antiviral immunity, Tagap-deficient macrophages demonstrated increased viral replication, reduced expression of proinflammatory chemokines and cytokines, and decreased production of IFN-?. Taken together, our unbiased loss-of-function genetic screen identifies genes that play a role in host antiviral immunity and delineates roles for IL-27 and Tagap in the production of antiviral cytokines. PMID:25268627

  2. GTI: A Novel Algorithm for Identifying Outlier Gene Expression Profiles from Integrated Microarray Datasets

    PubMed Central

    Mpindi, John Patrick; Sara, Henri; Haapa-Paananen, Saija; Kilpinen, Sami; Pisto, Tommi; Bucher, Elmar; Ojala, Kalle; Iljin, Kristiina; Vainio, Paula; Björkman, Mari; Gupta, Santosh; Kohonen, Pekka; Nees, Matthias; Kallioniemi, Olli

    2011-01-01

    Background Meta-analysis of gene expression microarray datasets presents significant challenges for statistical analysis. We developed and validated a new bioinformatic method for the identification of genes upregulated in subsets of samples of a given tumour type (‘outlier genes’), a hallmark of potential oncogenes. Methodology A new statistical method (the gene tissue index, GTI) was developed by modifying and adapting algorithms originally developed for statistical problems in economics. We compared the potential of the GTI to detect outlier genes in meta-datasets with four previously defined statistical methods, COPA, the OS statistic, the t-test and ORT, using simulated data. We demonstrated that the GTI performed equally well to existing methods in a single study simulation. Next, we evaluated the performance of the GTI in the analysis of combined Affymetrix gene expression data from several published studies covering 392 normal samples of tissue from the central nervous system, 74 astrocytomas, and 353 glioblastomas. According to the results, the GTI was better able than most of the previous methods to identify known oncogenic outlier genes. In addition, the GTI identified 29 novel outlier genes in glioblastomas, including TYMS and CDKN2A. The over-expression of these genes was validated in vivo by immunohistochemical staining data from clinical glioblastoma samples. Immunohistochemical data were available for 65% (19 of 29) of these genes, and 17 of these 19 genes (90%) showed a typical outlier staining pattern. Furthermore, raltitrexed, a specific inhibitor of TYMS used in the therapy of tumour types other than glioblastoma, also effectively blocked cell proliferation in glioblastoma cell lines, thus highlighting this outlier gene candidate as a potential therapeutic target. Conclusions/Significance Taken together, these results support the GTI as a novel approach to identify potential oncogene outliers and drug targets. The algorithm is implemented in an R package (Text S1). PMID:21365010

  3. Identifying transcriptional regulatory regions using reporter genes and DNA-protein interactions by chromatin immunoprecipitation.

    PubMed

    Ooi, Lezanne; Wood, Ian C

    2008-01-01

    A comprehensive understanding of regulatory protein interactions with their target genes is fundamental to determining transcriptional networks and identifying important events in the regulation of gene expression. Here we describe how transcriptional regulatory regions are to be identified using luciferase assays (including the transfection of cells by Amaxa and lipid-based reagents) and how protein-DNA interactions are to be characterised by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) coupled with quantitative PCR. Together these techniques provide a powerful combination for investigating potassium channel gene regulation. PMID:18998080

  4. Genetic variation in the 5q31 cytokine gene cluster confers susceptibility to Crohn disease.

    PubMed

    Rioux, J D; Daly, M J; Silverberg, M S; Lindblad, K; Steinhart, H; Cohen, Z; Delmonte, T; Kocher, K; Miller, K; Guschwan, S; Kulbokas, E J; O'Leary, S; Winchester, E; Dewar, K; Green, T; Stone, V; Chow, C; Cohen, A; Langelier, D; Lapointe, G; Gaudet, D; Faith, J; Branco, N; Bull, S B; McLeod, R S; Griffiths, A M; Bitton, A; Greenberg, G R; Lander, E S; Siminovitch, K A; Hudson, T J

    2001-10-01

    Linkage disequilibrium (LD) mapping provides a powerful method for fine-structure localization of rare disease genes, but has not yet been widely applied to common disease. We sought to design a systematic approach for LD mapping and apply it to the localization of a gene (IBD5) conferring susceptibility to Crohn disease. The key issues are: (i) to detect a significant LD signal (ii) to rigorously bound the critical region and (iii) to identify the causal genetic variant within this region. We previously mapped the IBD5 locus to a large region spanning 18 cM of chromosome 5q31 (P<10(-4)). Using dense genetic maps of microsatellite markers and single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) across the entire region, we found strong evidence of LD. We bound the region to a common haplotype spanning 250 kb that shows strong association with the disease (P< 2 x 10(-7)) and contains the cytokine gene cluster. This finding provides overwhelming evidence that a specific common haplotype of the cytokine region in 5q31 confers susceptibility to Crohn disease. However, genetic evidence alone is not sufficient to identify the causal mutation within this region, as strong LD across the region results in multiple SNPs having equivalent genetic evidence-each consistent with the expected properties of the IBD5 locus. These results have important implications for Crohn disease in particular and LD mapping in general. PMID:11586304

  5. Large-scale association analyses identifies 13 new susceptibility loci for coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Schunkert, Heribert; König, Inke R.; Kathiresan, Sekar; Reilly, Muredach P.; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Holm, Hilma; Preuss, Michael; Stewart, Alexandre F. R.; Barbalic, Maja; Gieger, Christian; Absher, Devin; Aherrahrou, Zouhair; Allayee, Hooman; Altshuler, David; Anand, Sonia S.; Andersen, Karl; Anderson, Jeffrey L.; Ardissino, Diego; Ball, Stephen G.; Balmforth, Anthony J.; Barnes, Timothy A.; Becker, Diane M.; Becker, Lewis C.; Berger, Klaus; Bis, Joshua C.; Boekholdt, S. Matthijs; Boerwinkle, Eric; Braund, Peter S.; Brown, Morris J.; Burnett, Mary Susan; Buysschaert, Ian; Carlquist, Cardiogenics, John F.; Chen, Li; Cichon, Sven; Codd, Veryan; Davies, Robert W.; Dedoussis, George; Dehghan, Abbas; Demissie, Serkalem; Devaney, Joseph M.; Do, Ron; Doering, Angela; Eifert, Sandra; El Mokhtari, Nour Eddine; Ellis, Stephen G.; Elosua, Roberto; Engert, James C.; Epstein, Stephen E.; Faire, Ulf de; Fischer, Marcus; Folsom, Aaron R.; Freyer, Jennifer; Gigante, Bruna; Girelli, Domenico; Gretarsdottir, Solveig; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Gulcher, Jeffrey R.; Halperin, Eran; Hammond, Naomi; Hazen, Stanley L.; Hofman, Albert; Horne, Benjamin D.; Illig, Thomas; Iribarren, Carlos; Jones, Gregory T.; Jukema, J.Wouter; Kaiser, Michael A.; Kaplan, Lee M.; Kastelein, John J.P.; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Knowles, Joshua W.; Kolovou, Genovefa; Kong, Augustine; Laaksonen, Reijo; Lambrechts, Diether; Leander, Karin; Lettre, Guillaume; Li, Mingyao; Lieb, Wolfgang; Linsel-Nitschke, Patrick; Loley, Christina; Lotery, Andrew J.; Mannucci, Pier M.; Maouche, Seraya; Martinelli, Nicola; McKeown, Pascal P.; Meisinger, Christa; Meitinger, Thomas; Melander, Olle; Merlini, Pier Angelica; Mooser, Vincent; Morgan, Thomas; Mühleisen, Thomas W.; Muhlestein, Joseph B.; Münzel, Thomas; Musunuru, Kiran; Nahrstaedt, Janja; Nelson, Christopher P.; Nöthen, Markus M.; Olivieri, Oliviero; Patel, Riyaz S.; Patterson, Chris C.; Peters, Annette; Peyvandi, Flora; Qu, Liming; Quyyumi, Arshed A.; Rader, Daniel J.; Rallidis, Loukianos S.; Rice, Catherine; Rosendaal, Frits R.; Rubin, Diana; Salomaa, Veikko; Sampietro, M. Lourdes; Sandhu, Manj S.; Schadt, Eric; Schäfer, Arne; Schillert, Arne; Schreiber, Stefan; Schrezenmeir, Jürgen; Schwartz, Stephen M.; Siscovick, David S.; Sivananthan, Mohan; Sivapalaratnam, Suthesh; Smith, Albert; Smith, Tamara B.; Snoep, Jaapjan D.; Soranzo, Nicole; Spertus, John A.; Stark, Klaus; Stirrups, Kathy; Stoll, Monika; Tang, W. H. Wilson; Tennstedt, Stephanie; Thorgeirsson, Gudmundur; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Tomaszewski, Maciej; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; van Rij, Andre M.; Voight, Benjamin F.; Wareham, Nick J.; Wells, George A.; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Wild, Philipp S.; Willenborg, Christina; Witteman, Jaqueline C. M.; Wright, Benjamin J.; Ye, Shu; Zeller, Tanja; Ziegler, Andreas; Cambien, Francois; Goodall, Alison H.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Quertermous, Thomas; März, Winfried; Hengstenberg, Christian; Blankenberg, Stefan; Ouwehand, Willem H.; Hall, Alistair S.; Deloukas, Panos; Thompson, John R.; Stefansson, Kari; Roberts, Robert; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; O’Donnell, Christopher J.; McPherson, Ruth; Erdmann, Jeanette; Samani, Nilesh J.

    2011-01-01

    We performed a meta-analysis of 14 genome-wide association studies of coronary artery disease (CAD) comprising 22,233 cases and 64,762 controls of European descent, followed by genotyping of top association signals in 60,738 additional individuals. This genomic analysis identified 13 novel loci harboring one or more SNPs that were associated with CAD at P<5×10?8 and confirmed the association of 10 of 12 previously reported CAD loci. The 13 novel loci displayed risk allele frequencies ranging from 0.13 to 0.91 and were associated with a 6 to 17 percent increase in the risk of CAD per allele. Notably, only three of the novel loci displayed significant association with traditional CAD risk factors, while the majority lie in gene regions not previously implicated in the pathogenesis of CAD. Finally, five of the novel CAD risk loci appear to have pleiotropic effects, showing strong association with various other human diseases or traits. PMID:21378990

  6. Comparative Genomic Analysis of Asian Haemorrhagic Septicaemia-Associated Strains of Pasteurella multocida Identifies More than 90 Haemorrhagic Septicaemia-Specific Genes

    PubMed Central

    Moustafa, Ahmed M.; Seemann, Torsten; Gladman, Simon; Adler, Ben; Harper, Marina; Boyce, John D.; Bennett, Mark D.

    2015-01-01

    Pasteurella multocida is the primary causative agent of a range of economically important diseases in animals, including haemorrhagic septicaemia (HS), a rapidly fatal disease of ungulates. There is limited information available on the diversity of P. multocida strains that cause HS. Therefore, we determined draft genome sequences of ten disease-causing isolates and two vaccine strains and compared these genomes using a range of bioinformatic analyses. The draft genomes of the 12 HS strains were between 2,298,035 and 2,410,300 bp in length. Comparison of these genomes with the North American HS strain, M1404, and other available P. multocida genomes (Pm70, 3480, 36950 and HN06) identified a core set of 1,824 genes. A set of 96 genes was present in all HS isolates and vaccine strains examined in this study, but absent from Pm70, 3480, 36950 and HN06. Moreover, 59 genes were shared only by the Asian B:2 strains. In two Pakistani isolates, genes with high similarity to genes in the integrative and conjugative element, ICEPmu1 from strain 36950 were identified along with a range of other antimicrobial resistance genes. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that the HS strains formed clades based on their country of isolation. Future analysis of the 96 genes unique to the HS isolates will aid the identification of HS-specific virulence attributes and facilitate the development of disease-specific diagnostic tests. PMID:26151935

  7. Identifying Gene Regulatory Networks in Arabidopsis by In Silico Prediction, Yeast-1-Hybrid, and Inducible Gene Profiling Assays.

    PubMed

    Sparks, Erin E; Benfey, Philip N

    2016-01-01

    A system-wide understanding of gene regulation will provide deep insights into plant development and physiology. In this chapter we describe a threefold approach to identify the gene regulatory networks in Arabidopsis thaliana that function in a specific tissue or biological process. Since no single method is sufficient to establish comprehensive and high-confidence gene regulatory networks, we focus on the integration of three approaches. First, we describe an in silico prediction method of transcription factor-DNA binding, then an in vivo assay of transcription factor-DNA binding by yeast-1-hybrid and lastly the identification of co-expression clusters by transcription factor induction in planta. Each of these methods provides a unique tool to advance our understanding of gene regulation, and together provide a robust model for the generation of gene regulatory networks. PMID:26659952

  8. Genes associated with agronomic traits in non-heading Chinese cabbage identified by expression profiling

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The genomes of non-heading Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa ssp. chinensis), heading Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa ssp. pekinensis) and their close relative Arabidopsis thaliana have provided important resources for studying the evolution and genetic improvement of cruciferous plants. Natural growing conditions present these plants with a variety of physiological challenges for which they have a repertoire of genes that ensure adaptability and normal growth. We investigated the differential expressions of genes that control adaptability and development in plants growing in the natural environment to study underlying mechanisms of their expression. Results Using digital gene expression tag profiling, we constructed an expression profile to identify genes related to important agronomic traits under natural growing conditions. Among three non-heading Chinese cabbage cultivars, we found thousands of genes that exhibited significant differences in expression levels at five developmental stages. Through comparative analysis and previous reports, we identified several candidate genes associated with late flowering, cold tolerance, self-incompatibility, and leaf color. Two genes related to cold tolerance were verified using quantitative real-time PCR. Conclusions We identified a large number of genes associated with important agronomic traits of non-heading Chinese cabbage. This analysis will provide a wealth of resources for molecular-assisted breeding of cabbage. The raw data and detailed results of this analysis are available at the website http://nhccdata.njau.edu.cn. PMID:24655567

  9. A cross-species genetic analysis identifies candidate genes for mouse anxiety and human bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Ashbrook, David G.; Williams, Robert W.; Lu, Lu; Hager, Reinmar

    2015-01-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a significant neuropsychiatric disorder with a lifetime prevalence of ~1%. To identify genetic variants underlying BD genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been carried out. While many variants of small effect associated with BD have been identified few have yet been confirmed, partly because of the low power of GWAS due to multiple comparisons being made. Complementary mapping studies using murine models have identified genetic variants for behavioral traits linked to BD, often with high power, but these identified regions often contain too many genes for clear identification of candidate genes. In the current study we have aligned human BD GWAS results and mouse linkage studies to help define and evaluate candidate genes linked to BD, seeking to use the power of the mouse mapping with the precision of GWAS. We use quantitative trait mapping for open field test and elevated zero maze data in the largest mammalian model system, the BXD recombinant inbred mouse population, to identify genomic regions associated with these BD-like phenotypes. We then investigate these regions in whole genome data from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium's bipolar disorder GWAS to identify candidate genes associated with BD. Finally we establish the biological relevance and pathways of these genes in a comprehensive systems genetics analysis. We identify four genes associated with both mouse anxiety and human BD. While TNR is a novel candidate for BD, we can confirm previously suggested associations with CMYA5, MCTP1, and RXRG. A cross-species, systems genetics analysis shows that MCTP1, RXRG, and TNR coexpress with genes linked to psychiatric disorders and identify the striatum as a potential site of action. CMYA5, MCTP1, RXRG, and TNR are associated with mouse anxiety and human BD. We hypothesize that MCTP1, RXRG, and TNR influence intercellular signaling in the striatum. PMID:26190982

  10. A Computational Approach to Identifying Gene-microRNA Modules in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Daeyong; Lee, Hyunju

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play key roles in the initiation and progression of various cancers by regulating genes. Regulatory interactions between genes and miRNAs are complex, as multiple miRNAs can regulate multiple genes. In addtion, these interactions vary from patient to patient and even among patients with the same cancer type, as cancer development is a heterogeneous process. These relationships are more complicated because transcription factors and other regulatory molecules can also regulate miRNAs and genes. Hence, it is important to identify the complex relationships between genes and miRNAs in cancer. In this study, we propose a computational approach to constructing modules that represent these relationships by integrating the expression data of genes and miRNAs with gene-gene interaction data. First, we used a biclustering algorithm to construct modules consisting of a subset of genes and a subset of samples to incorporate the heterogeneity of cancer cells. Second, we combined gene-gene interactions to include genes that play important roles in cancer-related pathways. Then, we selected miRNAs that are closely associated with genes in the modules based on a Gaussian Bayesian network and Bayesian Information Criteria. When we applied our approach to ovarian cancer and glioblastoma (GBM) data sets, 33 and 54 modules were constructed, respectively. In these modules, 91% and 94% of ovarian cancer and GBM modules, respectively, were explained either by direct regulation between genes and miRNAs or by indirect relationships via transcription factors. In addition, 48.4% and 74.0% of modules from ovarian cancer and GBM, respectively, were enriched with cancer-related pathways, and 51.7% and 71.7% of miRNAs in modules were ovarian cancer-related miRNAs and GBM-related miRNAs, respectively. Finally, we extensively analyzed significant modules and showed that most genes in these modules were related to ovarian cancer and GBM. PMID:25611546

  11. Simultaneous Identification of Causal Genes and Dys-Regulated Pathways in Complex Diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yoo-Ah; Wuchty, Stefan; Przytycka, Teresa M.

    In complex diseases different genotypic perturbations of the cellular system often lead to the same phenotype. While characteristic genomic alterations in many cancers exist, other combinations of genomic perturbations potentially lead to the same disease, dysregulating important pathways of the cellular system. In this study, we developed novel computational methods to identify dysregulated pathways and their direct causes in individual patients or patient groups. Specifically, we introduced efficient and powerful graph theoretic algorithms to identify such dysregulated pathways and their causal genes and applied our methods to a large set of glioma specific molecular data.

  12. The Disruption of Celf6, a Gene Identified by Translational Profiling of Serotonergic Neurons, Results in Autism-Related Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Dougherty, Joseph D.; Maloney, Susan E.; Wozniak, David F.; Rieger, Michael A.; Sonnenblick, Lisa; Coppola, Giovanni; Mahieu, Nathaniel G.; Zhang, Juliet; Cai, Jinlu; Patti, Gary J.; Abrahams, Brett S.; Geschwind, Daniel H.; Heintz, Nathaniel

    2013-01-01

    The immense molecular diversity of neurons challenges our ability to understand the genetic and cellular etiology of neuropsychiatric disorders. Leveraging knowledge from neurobiology may help parse the genetic complexity: identifying genes important for a circuit that mediates a particular symptom of a disease may help identify polymorphisms that contribute to risk for the disease as a whole. The serotonergic system has long been suspected in disorders that have symptoms of repetitive behaviors and resistance to change, including autism. We generated a bacTRAP mouse line to permit translational profiling of serotonergic neurons. From this, we identified several thousand serotonergic-cell expressed transcripts, of which 174 were highly enriched, including all known markers of these cells. Analysis of common variants near the corresponding genes in the AGRE collection implicated the RNA binding protein CELF6 in autism risk. Screening for rare variants in CELF6 identified an inherited premature stop codon in one of the probands. Subsequent disruption of Celf6 in mice resulted in animals exhibiting resistance to change and decreased ultrasonic vocalization as well as abnormal levels of serotonin in the brain. This work provides a reproducible and accurate method to profile serotonergic neurons under a variety of conditions and suggests a novel paradigm for gaining information on the etiology of psychiatric disorders. PMID:23407934

  13. The disruption of Celf6, a gene identified by translational profiling of serotonergic neurons, results in autism-related behaviors.

    PubMed

    Dougherty, Joseph D; Maloney, Susan E; Wozniak, David F; Rieger, Michael A; Sonnenblick, Lisa; Coppola, Giovanni; Mahieu, Nathaniel G; Zhang, Juliet; Cai, Jinlu; Patti, Gary J; Abrahams, Brett S; Geschwind, Daniel H; Heintz, Nathaniel

    2013-02-13

    The immense molecular diversity of neurons challenges our ability to understand the genetic and cellular etiology of neuropsychiatric disorders. Leveraging knowledge from neurobiology may help parse the genetic complexity: identifying genes important for a circuit that mediates a particular symptom of a disease may help identify polymorphisms that contribute to risk for the disease as a whole. The serotonergic system has long been suspected in disorders that have symptoms of repetitive behaviors and resistance to change, including autism. We generated a bacTRAP mouse line to permit translational profiling of serotonergic neurons. From this, we identified several thousand serotonergic-cell expressed transcripts, of which 174 were highly enriched, including all known markers of these cells. Analysis of common variants near the corresponding genes in the AGRE collection implicated the RNA binding protein CELF6 in autism risk. Screening for rare variants in CELF6 identified an inherited premature stop codon in one of the probands. Subsequent disruption of Celf6 in mice resulted in animals exhibiting resistance to change and decreased ultrasonic vocalization as well as abnormal levels of serotonin in the brain. This work provides a reproducible and accurate method to profile serotonergic neurons under a variety of conditions and suggests a novel paradigm for gaining information on the etiology of psychiatric disorders. PMID:23407934

  14. RNA interference screen to identify genes required for Drosophila embryonic nervous system development

    PubMed Central

    Koizumi, Keita; Higashida, Haruhiro; Yoo, Siuk; Islam, Mohamad Saharul; Ivanov, Andrej I.; Guo, Vicky; Pozzi, Paola; Yu, Shu-Hua; Rovescalli, Alessandra C.; Tang, Derek; Nirenberg, Marshall

    2007-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) has been shown to be a powerful method to study the function of genes in vivo by silencing endogenous mRNA with double-stranded (ds) RNA. Previously, we performed in vivo RNAi screening and identified 43 Drosophila genes, including 18 novel genes required for the development of the embryonic nervous system. In the present study, 22 additional genes affecting embryonic nervous system development were found. Novel RNAi-induced phenotypes affecting nervous system development were found for 16 of the 22 genes. Seven of the genes have unknown functions. Other genes found encode transcription factors, a chromatin-remodeling protein, membrane receptors, signaling molecules, and proteins involved in cell adhesion, RNA binding, and ion transport. Human orthologs were identified for proteins encoded by 16 of the genes. The total number of dsRNAs that we have tested for an RNAi-induced phenotype affecting the embryonic nervous system, including our previous study, is 7,312, which corresponds to ?50% of the genes in the Drosophila genome. PMID:17376868

  15. Screening of 38 genes identifies mutations in 62% of families with nonsyndromic deafness in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Duman, Duygu; Sirmaci, Asli; Cengiz, F Basak; Ozdag, Hilal; Tekin, Mustafa

    2011-01-01

    More than 60% of prelingual deafness is genetic in origin, and of these up to 95% are monogenic autosomal recessive traits. Causal mutations have been identified in 1 of 38 different genes in a subset of patients with nonsyndromic autosomal recessive deafness. In this study, we screened 49 unrelated Turkish families with at least three affected children born to consanguineous parents. Probands from all families were negative for mutations in the GJB2 gene, two large deletions in the GJB6 gene, and the 1555A>G substitution in the mitochondrial DNA MTRNR1 gene. Each family was subsequently screened via autozygosity mapping with genomewide single-nucleotide polymorphism arrays. If the phenotype cosegregated with a haplotype flanking one of the 38 genes, mutation analysis of the gene was performed. We identified 22 different autozygous mutations in 11 genes, other than GJB2, in 26 of 49 families, which overall explains deafness in 62% of families. Relative frequencies of genes following GJB2 were MYO15A (9.9%), TMIE (6.6%), TMC1 (6.6%), OTOF (5.0%), CDH23 (3.3%), MYO7A (3.3%), SLC26A4 (1.7%), PCDH15 (1.7%), LRTOMT (1.7%), SERPINB6 (1.7%), and TMPRSS3 (1.7%). Nineteen of 22 mutations are reported for the first time in this study. Unknown rare genes for deafness appear to be present in the remaining 23 families. PMID:21117948

  16. Gene regulation by long purine tracks in brain related diseases.

    PubMed

    Singh, Himanshu Narayan; Rajeswari, Moganty R

    2015-12-01

    Purine repeats are randomly distributed in the human genome, however, they show potential role in the transcriptional deregulation of genes. Presence of long tracks of purine repeats in the genome can disturb its integrity and interfere with the cellular behavior by introducing mutations and/or triple stranded structure formation in DNA. Our data revealed interesting finding that a majority of genes carrying purine repeats, of length n?200, were down regulated and found to be linked with several brain related diseases [1]. The unique feature of the purine repeats found in the present study clearly manifests their significant application in developing therapeutics for neurological diseases. PMID:26543885

  17. NATURE BIOTECHNOLOGY VOLUME 25 NUMBER 10 OCTOBER 2007 1111 and drugs that act directly on disease genes.

    E-print Network

    Kay, Mark A.

    NATURE BIOTECHNOLOGY VOLUME 25 NUMBER 10 OCTOBER 2007 1111 and drugs that act directly on disease an increase in drugs that target the genes asso- ciated with disease. Networkbiologymayalsoplayaroleindrug- target identification. Is it possible to identify drug targets from their position in a biological

  18. Inflammatory bowel disease: the role of inflammatory cytokine gene polymorphisms.

    PubMed Central

    Balding, Joanna; Livingstone, Wendy J; Conroy, Judith; Mynett-Johnson, Lesley; Weir, Donald G; Mahmud, Nasir; Smith, Owen P

    2004-01-01

    The mechanisms responsible for development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have not been fully elucidated, although the main cause of disease pathology is attributed to up-regulated inflammatory processes. The aim of this study was to investigate frequencies of polymorphisms in genes encoding pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory markers in IBD patients and controls. We determined genotypes of patients with IBD (n= 172) and healthy controls (n= 389) for polymorphisms in genes encoding various cytokines (interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-6, tumour necrosis factor (TNF), IL-10, IL-1 receptor antagonist). Association of these genotypes to disease incidence and pathophysiology was investigated. No strong association was found with occurrence of IBD. Variation was observed between the ulcerative colitis study group and the control population for the TNF-alpha-308 polymorphism (p= 0.0135). There was also variation in the frequency of IL-6-174 and TNF-alpha-308 genotypes in the ulcerative colitis group compared with the Crohn's disease group (p= 0.01). We concluded that polymorphisms in inflammatory genes are associated with variations in IBD phenotype and disease susceptibility. Whether the polymorphisms are directly involved in regulating cytokine production, and consequently pathophysiology of IBD, or serve merely as markers in linkage disequilibrium with susceptibility genes remains unclear. PMID:15223609

  19. The clustering of functionally related genes contributes to CNV-mediated disease

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, Tallulah; Honti, Frantisek; Pfundt, Rolph; de Leeuw, Nicole; Hehir-Kwa, Jayne; Vulto-van Silfhout, Anneke; de Vries, Bert; Webber, Caleb

    2015-01-01

    Clusters of functionally related genes can be disrupted by a single copy number variant (CNV). We demonstrate that the simultaneous disruption of multiple functionally related genes is a frequent and significant characteristic of de novo CNVs in patients with developmental disorders (P = 1 × 10?3). Using three different functional networks, we identified unexpectedly large numbers of functionally related genes within de novo CNVs from two large independent cohorts of individuals with developmental disorders. The presence of multiple functionally related genes was a significant predictor of a CNV's pathogenicity when compared to CNVs from apparently healthy individuals and a better predictor than the presence of known disease or haploinsufficient genes for larger CNVs. The functionally related genes found in the de novo CNVs belonged to 70% of all clusters of functionally related genes found across the genome. De novo CNVs were more likely to affect functional clusters and affect them to a greater extent than benign CNVs (P = 6 × 10?4). Furthermore, such clusters of functionally related genes are phenotypically informative: Different patients possessing CNVs that affect the same cluster of functionally related genes exhibit more similar phenotypes than expected (P < 0.05). The spanning of multiple functionally similar genes by single CNVs contributes substantially to how these variants exert their pathogenic effects. PMID:25887030

  20. Functional genomics identifies novel genes essential for clear cell renal cell carcinoma tumor cell proliferation and migration

    PubMed Central

    von Roemeling, Christina A.; Marlow, Laura A.; Radisky, Derek C.; Rohl, Austin; Larsen, Hege E.; Wei, Johnny; Sasinowska, Heather; Zhu, Heng; Drake, Richard; Sasinowski, Maciek; Tun, Han W.; Copland, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Currently there is a lack of targeted therapies that lead to long-term attenuation or regression of disease in patients with advanced clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC). Our group has implemented a high-throughput genetic analysis coupled with a high-throughput proliferative screen in order to investigate the genetic contributions of a large cohort of overexpressed genes at the functional level in an effort to better understand factors involved in tumor initiation and progression. Patient gene array analysis identified transcripts that are consistently elevated in patient ccRCC as compared to matched normal renal tissues. This was followed by a high-throughput lentivirus screen, independently targeting 195 overexpressed transcripts identified in the gene array in four ccRCC cell lines. This revealed 31 ‘hits’ that contribute to ccRCC cell proliferation. Many of the hits identified are not only presented in the context of ccRCC for the first time, but several have not been previously linked to cancer. We further characterize the function of a group of hits in tumor cell invasion. Taken together these findings reveal pathways that may be critical in ccRCC tumorigenicity, and identifies novel candidate factors that could serve as targets for therapeutic intervention or diagnostic/prognostic biomarkers for patients with advanced ccRCC. PMID:24979721

  1. ICan: An Integrated Co-Alteration Network to Identify Ovarian Cancer-Related Genes

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yuanshuai; Liu, Yongjing; Li, Kening; Zhang, Rui; Qiu, Fujun; Zhao, Ning; Xu, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Background Over the last decade, an increasing number of integrative studies on cancer-related genes have been published. Integrative analyses aim to overcome the limitation of a single data type, and provide a more complete view of carcinogenesis. The vast majority of these studies used sample-matched data of gene expression and copy number to investigate the impact of copy number alteration on gene expression, and to predict and prioritize candidate oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. However, correlations between genes were neglected in these studies. Our work aimed to evaluate the co-alteration of copy number, methylation and expression, allowing us to identify cancer-related genes and essential functional modules in cancer. Results We built the Integrated Co-alteration network (ICan) based on multi-omics data, and analyzed the network to uncover cancer-related genes. After comparison with random networks, we identified 155 ovarian cancer-related genes, including well-known (TP53, BRCA1, RB1 and PTEN) and also novel cancer-related genes, such as PDPN and EphA2. We compared the results with a conventional method: CNAmet, and obtained a significantly better area under the curve value (ICan: 0.8179, CNAmet: 0.5183). Conclusion In this paper, we describe a framework to find cancer-related genes based on an Integrated Co-alteration network. Our results proved that ICan could precisely identify candidate cancer genes and provide increased mechanistic understanding of carcinogenesis. This work suggested a new research direction for biological network analyses involving multi-omics data. PMID:25803614

  2. High-Resolution Linkage Analyses to Identify Genes That Influence Varroa Sensitive Hygiene Behavior in Honey

    E-print Network

    Pittendrigh, Barry

    High-Resolution Linkage Analyses to Identify Genes That Influence Varroa Sensitive Hygiene Behavior lack of chemical residues and decreased likelihood of resistance. Varroa sensitive hygiene behavior of Varroa sensitive hygiene. We identified one major QTL on chromosome 9 (LOD score = 3.21) and a suggestive

  3. Assessment of Three Mitochondrial Genes (16S, Cytb, CO1) for Identifying Species in the Praomyini Tribe (Rodentia: Muridae)

    PubMed Central

    Nicolas, Violaine; Schaeffer, Brigitte; Missoup, Alain Didier; Kennis, Jan; Colyn, Marc; Denys, Christiane; Tatard, Caroline; Cruaud, Corinne; Laredo, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    The Praomyini tribe is one of the most diverse and abundant groups of Old World rodents. Several species are known to be involved in crop damage and in the epidemiology of several human and cattle diseases. Due to the existence of sibling species their identification is often problematic. Thus an easy, fast and accurate species identification tool is needed for non-systematicians to correctly identify Praomyini species. In this study we compare the usefulness of three genes (16S, Cytb, CO1) for identifying species of this tribe. A total of 426 specimens representing 40 species (sampled across their geographical range) were sequenced for the three genes. Nearly all of the species included in our study are monophyletic in the neighbour joining trees. The degree of intra-specific variability tends to be lower than the divergence between species, but no barcoding gap is detected. The success rate of the statistical methods of species identification is excellent (up to 99% or 100% for statistical supervised classification methods as the k-Nearest Neighbour or Random Forest). The 16S gene is 2.5 less variable than the Cytb and CO1 genes. As a result its discriminatory power is smaller. To sum up, our results suggest that using DNA markers for identifying species in the Praomyini tribe is a largely valid approach, and that the CO1 and Cytb genes are better DNA markers than the 16S gene. Our results confirm the usefulness of statistical methods such as the Random Forest and the 1-NN methods to assign a sequence to a species, even when the number of species is relatively large. Based on our NJ trees and the distribution of all intraspecific and interspecific pairwise nucleotide distances, we highlight the presence of several potentially new species within the Praomyini tribe that should be subject to corroboration assessments. PMID:22574186

  4. A duplicated PLP gene causing Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease detected by comparative multiplex PCR

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, K.; Sugiyama, N.; Kawanishi, C.

    1996-07-01

    Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PMD) is an X-linked dysmyelinating disorder caused by abnormalities in the proteolipid protein (PLP) gene, which is essential for oligodendrocyte differentiation and CNS myelin formation. Although linkage analysis has shown the homogeneity at the PLP locus in patients with PMD, exonic mutations in the PLP gene have been identified in only 10% - 25% of all cases, which suggests the presence of other genetic aberrations, including gene duplication. In this study, we examined five families with PMD not carrying exonic mutations in PLP gene, using comparative multiplex PCR (CM-PCR) as a semiquantitative assay of gene dosage. PLP gene duplications were identified in four families by CM-PCR and confirmed in three families by densitometric RFLP analysis. Because a homologous myelin protein gene, PMP22, is duplicated in the majority of patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth 1A, PLP gene overdosage may be an important genetic abnormality in PMD and affect myelin formation. 38 ref., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Gene Therapy Models of Alzheimer's Disease and Other Dementias.

    PubMed

    Combs, Benjamin; Kneynsberg, Andrew; Kanaan, Nicholas M

    2016-01-01

    Dementias are among the most common neurological disorders, and Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia worldwide. AD remains a looming health crisis despite great efforts to learn the mechanisms surrounding the neuron dysfunction and neurodegeneration that accompanies AD primarily in the medial temporal lobe. In addition to AD, a group of diseases known as frontotemporal dementias (FTDs) are degenerative diseases involving atrophy and degeneration in the frontal and temporal lobe regions. Importantly, AD and a number of FTDs are collectively known as tauopathies due to the abundant accumulation of pathological tau inclusions in the brain. The precise role tau plays in disease pathogenesis remains an area of strong research focus. A critical component to effectively study any human disease is the availability of models that recapitulate key features of the disease. Accordingly, a number of animal models are currently being pursued to fill the current gaps in our knowledge of the causes of dementias and to develop effective therapeutics. Recent developments in gene therapy-based approaches, particularly in recombinant adeno-associated viruses (rAAVs), have provided new tools to study AD and other related neurodegenerative disorders. Additionally, gene therapy approaches have emerged as an intriguing possibility for treating these diseases in humans. This chapter explores the current state of rAAV models of AD and other dementias, discuss recent efforts to improve these models, and describe current and future possibilities in the use of rAAVs and other viruses in treatments of disease. PMID:26611599

  6. Supplementary data Distinct Properties of Human Disease Genes in Protein Interaction

    E-print Network

    Borenstein, Elhanan

    Page | 1 Supplementary data Distinct Properties of Human Disease Genes in Protein Interaction,543 connections. The layout was done using Pajek (http://pajek.imfm.si/). Mendelian disease genes in hOMIM data of nondisease, Mendelian and complex disease genes. The number of genes belong to 19 different phylostrata

  7. ABCA4 disease progression and a proposed strategy for gene therapy

    E-print Network

    Palczewski, Krzysztof

    ABCA4 disease progression and a proposed strategy for gene therapy Artur V. Cideciyan1,Ã Autosomal recessive retinal diseases caused by mutations in the ABCA4 gene are being considered for gene- retinal gene therapy will aim to arrest disease progression in the extramacular retina. In 66 individuals

  8. Functional Genomics Screening Utilizing Mutant Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells Identifies Novel Radiation-Response Genes

    PubMed Central

    Loesch, Kimberly; Galaviz, Stacy; Hamoui, Zaher; Clanton, Ryan; Akabani, Gamal; Deveau, Michael; DeJesus, Michael; Ioerger, Thomas; Sacchettini, James C.; Wallis, Deeann

    2015-01-01

    Elucidating the genetic determinants of radiation response is crucial to optimizing and individualizing radiotherapy for cancer patients. In order to identify genes that are involved in enhanced sensitivity or resistance to radiation, a library of stable mutant murine embryonic stem cells (ESCs), each with a defined mutation, was screened for cell viability and gene expression in response to radiation exposure. We focused on a cancer-relevant subset of over 500 mutant ESC lines. We identified 13 genes; 7 genes that have been previously implicated in radiation response and 6 other genes that have never been implicated in radiation response. After screening, proteomic analysis showed enrichment for genes involved in cellular component disassembly (e.g. Dstn and Pex14) and regulation of growth (e.g. Adnp2, Epc1, and Ing4). Overall, the best targets with the highest potential for sensitizing cancer cells to radiation were Dstn and Map2k6, and the best targets for enhancing resistance to radiation were Iqgap and Vcan. Hence, we provide compelling evidence that screening mutant ESCs is a powerful approach to identify genes that alter radiation response. Ultimately, this knowledge can be used to define genetic variants or therapeutic targets that will enhance clinical therapy. PMID:25853515

  9. Human gene therapy and imaging in neurological diseases

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Andreas H.; Winkler, Alexandra; Castro, Maria G.; Lowenstein, Pedro

    2010-01-01

    Molecular imaging aims to assess non-invasively disease-specific biological and molecular processes in animal models and humans in vivo. Apart from precise anatomical localisation and quantification, the most intriguing advantage of such imaging is the opportunity it provides to investigate the time course (dynamics) of disease-specific molecular events in the intact organism. Further, molecular imaging can be used to address basic scientific questions, e.g. transcriptional regulation, signal transduction or protein/protein interaction, and will be essential in developing treatment strategies based on gene therapy. Most importantly, molecular imaging is a key technology in translational research, helping to develop experimental protocols which may later be applied to human patients. Over the past 20 years, imaging based on positron emission tomography (PET) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been employed for the assessment and “phenotyping” of various neurological diseases, including cerebral ischaemia, neurodegeneration and brain gliomas. While in the past neuro-anatomical studies had to be performed post mortem, molecular imaging has ushered in the era of in vivo functional neuro-anatomy by allowing neuroscience to image structure, function, metabolism and molecular processes of the central nervous system in vivo in both health and disease. Recently, PET and MRI have been successfully utilised together in the non-invasive assessment of gene transfer and gene therapy in humans. To assess the efficiency of gene transfer, the same markers are being used in animals and humans, and have been applied for phenotyping human disease. Here, we review the imaging hallmarks of focal and disseminated neurological diseases, such as cerebral ischaemia, neurodegeneration and glioblastoma multiforme, as well as the attempts to translate gene therapy’s experimental knowledge into clinical applications and the way in which this process is being promoted through the use of novel imaging approaches. PMID:16328505

  10. Computational studies on Alzheimer's disease associated pathways and regulatory patterns using microarray gene expression and network data: revealed association with aging and other diseases.

    PubMed

    Panigrahi, Priya P; Singh, Tiratha Raj

    2013-10-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), which is one of the most common age-associated neurodegenerative disorders, affects millions of people worldwide. Due to its polygenic nature, AD is believed to be caused not by defects in single genes, but by variations in a large number of genes and their complex interactions, which ultimately contribute to the broad spectrum of disease phenotypes. Extraction of insights and knowledge from microarray and network data will lead to a better understanding of complex diseases. The present study aimed to identify genes with differential topology and their further association with other biological processes that regulate causative factors for AD, ageing (AG) and other diseases. Our analysis revealed a common sharing of important biological processes and putative candidate genes among AD and AG. Some significant novel genes and other variants for various biological processes have been reported as being associated with AD, AG, and other diseases, and these could be implicated in biochemical events leading to AD from AG through pathways, interactions, and associations. Novel information for network motifs such as BiFan, MIM (multiple input module), and SIM (single input module) and their close variants has also been discovered and this implicit information will help to improve research into AD and AG. Ten major classes for TFs (transcription factors) have been identified in our data, where hundreds of TFBS patterns are being found associated with AD, and other disease. Structural and physico-chemical properties analysis for these TFBS classes revealed association of biological processes involved with other severe human disease. Nucleosomes and linkers positional information could provide insights into key cellular processes. Unique miRNA (micro RNA) targets were identified as another regulatory process for AD. The association of novel genes and variants of existing genes have also been explored for their interaction and association with other diseases that are either directly or indirectly implicated through AG and AD. PMID:23811083

  11. An empiric comparison of linkage disequilibrium parameters in disease gene localizations; the myotonic dystrophy experience

    SciTech Connect

    Podolsky, L.; Baird, S.; Korneluk, R.G.

    1994-09-01

    Analyses of linkage disequilibrium (LD) between markers of known location and disease phenotypes often provide valuable information in efforts to clone the causative genes. However, there exist a number of factors which may attenuate a consistent inverse relationship between physical distance and LD for a given pairing of a genetic marker and a human disease gene. Chief among these is the effect of the general population frequency of an allele which demonstrates LD with a disease gene. Possibly as a result of this, a number of methods of calculating LD has been proposed. We have calculated seven such LD parameters for twelve physically mapped RFLP`s from a 1.3 Mb DM gene containing region of 19q13.3 using 107 DM and 213 non-DM chromosomes. Correlation of the DM-marker physical distance with LD for the 12 loci reveals the Yule coefficient and Dij{prime} parameter to give the most consistent relationship. The D{prime} parameter shown to have a relative allele frequency independence gave only a weak correlation. A similar analysis is being carried out on published cystic fibrosis genetic and physical mapping data. The parameters identified in this study may be the most appropriate for future LD based localizations of disease genes.

  12. Expression study of the Norrie disease (NDP) gene

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Z.Y.; Battinelli, E.M.; Breakefield, X.O.

    1994-09-01

    Norrie disease is a severe X-linked recessive neurological disorder of unknown pathogenesis. Typically, Norrie disease is characterized by congenital blindness with progressive loss of hearing; over half of Norrie patients also manifest different degrees of mental retardation. The gene for Norrie disease (NDP) comprises three exons, with the first exon being untranslated. The open reading frame is confined within exons 2 and 3. The mouse NDP gene has essentially the same structure as the human. In order to determine the expression pattern of the NDP gene, RT-PCR was performed on mRNAs isolated from brain, retina, cochlea, and liver tissues of mice at different developmental stages. Transcripts were detected in all tissues at all times. This result, however, is different from the results we obtained from human tissue in which all tissues examined showed expression of the NDP gene with the exception of liver. We further analyzed the transcription initiation sites of the mouse NDP gene by random amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) method. The results showed that there are multiple transcription initiation sites associated with the expression of the NDP gene. The transcription start sites are utilized differentially in the tissues at different developmental stages. By using different intronic genomic fragments, we detected a possible second transcript which does not include the untranslated first exon. Northern analysis also revealed that there are at least two abundant transcripts associated with the NDP gene in brain. The results suggest that both multiple transcription initiation sites and different promoters may contribute to the expression of the NDP gene in different tissues during development.

  13. Integrating Autoimmune Risk Loci with Gene-Expression Data Identifies Specific Pathogenic Immune Cell Subsets

    E-print Network

    Hu, Xinli

    Although genome-wide association studies have implicated many individual loci in complex diseases, identifying the exact causal alleles and the cell types within which they act remains greatly challenging. To ultimately ...

  14. Senescence Mutants of Saccharomyces Cerevisiae with a Defect in Telomere Replication Identify Three Additional Est Genes

    PubMed Central

    Lendvay, T. S.; Morris, D. K.; Sah, J.; Balasubramanian, B.; Lundblad, V.

    1996-01-01

    The primary determinant for telomere replication is the enzyme telomerase, responsible for elongating the G-rich strand of the telomere. The only component of this enzyme that has been identified in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is the TLC1 gene, encoding the telomerase RNA subunit. However, a yeast strain defective for the EST1 gene exhibits the same phenotypes (progressively shorter telomeres and a senescence phenotype) as a strain deleted for TLC1, suggesting that EST1 encodes either a component of telomerase or some other factor essential for telomerase function. We designed a multitiered screen that led to the isolation of 22 mutants that display the same phenotypes as est1 and tlc1 mutant strains. These mutations mapped to four complementation groups: the previously identified EST1 gene and three additional genes, called EST2, EST3 and EST4. Cloning of the EST2 gene demonstrated that it encodes a large, extremely basic novel protein with no motifs that provide clues as to function. Epistasis analysis indicated that the four EST genes function in the same pathway for telomere replication as defined by the TLC1 gene, suggesting that the EST genes encode either components of telomerase or factors that positively regulate telomerase activity. PMID:8978029

  15. Microarray expression profiling identifies genes with altered expression in HDL-deficient mice

    SciTech Connect

    Callow, Matthew J.; Dudoit, Sandrine; Gong, Elaine L.; Speed, Terence P.; Rubin, Edward M.

    2000-05-05

    Based on the assumption that severe alterations in the expression of genes known to be involved in HDL metabolism may affect the expression of other genes we screened an array of over 5000 mouse expressed sequence tags (ESTs) for altered gene expression in the livers of two lines of mice with dramatic decreases in HDL plasma concentrations. Labeled cDNA from livers of apolipoprotein AI (apo AI) knockout mice, Scavenger Receptor BI (SR-BI) transgenic mice and control mice were co-hybridized to microarrays. Two-sample t-statistics were used to identify genes with altered expression levels in the knockout or transgenic mice compared with the control mice. In the SR-BI group we found 9 array elements representing at least 5 genes to be significantly altered on the basis of an adjusted p value of less than 0.05. In the apo AI knockout group 8 array elements representing 4 genes were altered compared with the control group (p < 0.05). Several of the genes identified in the SR-BI transgenic suggest altered sterol metabolism and oxidative processes. These studies illustrate the use of multiple-testing methods for the identification of genes with altered expression in replicated microarray experiments of apo AI knockout and SR-BI transgenic mice.

  16. Statistical completion of a partially identified graph with applications for the estimation of gene regulatory networks.

    PubMed

    Yu, Donghyeon; Son, Won; Lim, Johan; Xiao, Guanghua

    2015-10-01

    We study the estimation of a Gaussian graphical model whose dependent structures are partially identified. In a Gaussian graphical model, an off-diagonal zero entry in the concentration matrix (the inverse covariance matrix) implies the conditional independence of two corresponding variables, given all other variables. A number of methods have been proposed to estimate a sparse large-scale Gaussian graphical model or, equivalently, a sparse large-scale concentration matrix. In practice, the graph structure to be estimated is often partially identified by other sources or a pre-screening. In this paper, we propose a simple modification of existing methods to take into account this information in the estimation. We show that the partially identified dependent structure reduces the error in estimating the dependent structure. We apply the proposed method to estimating the gene regulatory network from lung cancer data, where protein-protein interactions are partially identified from the human protein reference database. The application shows that proposed method identified many important cancer genes as hub genes in the constructed lung cancer network. In addition, we validated the prognostic importance of a newly identified cancer gene, PTPN13, in four independent lung cancer datasets. The results indicate that the proposed method could facilitate studying underlying lung cancer mechanisms and identifying reliable biomarkers for lung cancer prognosis. PMID:25837438

  17. Relating diseases by integrating gene associations and information flow through protein interaction network.

    PubMed

    Hamaneh, Mehdi Bagheri; Yu, Yi-Kuo

    2014-01-01

    Identifying similar diseases could potentially provide deeper understanding of their underlying causes, and may even hint at possible treatments. For this purpose, it is necessary to have a similarity measure that reflects the underpinning molecular interactions and biological pathways. We have thus devised a network-based measure that can partially fulfill this goal. Our method assigns weights to all proteins (and consequently their encoding genes) by using information flow from a disease to the protein interaction network and back. Similarity between two diseases is then defined as the cosine of the angle between their corresponding weight vectors. The proposed method also provides a way to suggest disease-pathway associations by using the weights assigned to the genes to perform enrichment analysis for each disease. By calculating pairwise similarities between 2534 diseases, we show that our disease similarity measure is strongly correlated with the probability of finding the diseases in the same disease family and, more importantly, sharing biological pathways. We have also compared our results to those of MimMiner, a text-mining method that assigns pairwise similarity scores to diseases. We find the results of the two methods to be complementary. It is also shown that clustering diseases based on their similarities and performing enrichment analysis for the cluster centers significantly increases the term association rate, suggesting that the cluster centers are better representatives for biological pathways than the diseases themselves. This lends support to the view that our similarity measure is a good indicator of relatedness of biological processes involved in causing the diseases. Although not needed for understanding this paper, the raw results are available for download for further study at ftp://ftp.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pub/qmbpmn/DiseaseRelations/. PMID:25360770

  18. A hormone-encoding gene identifies a pathway for cardiac but not skeletal muscle gene transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Grépin, C; Dagnino, L; Robitaille, L; Haberstroh, L; Antakly, T; Nemer, M

    1994-01-01

    In contrast to skeletal muscle, the mechanisms responsible for activation and maintenance of tissue-specific transcription in cardiac muscle remain poorly understood. A family of hormone-encoding genes is expressed in a highly specific manner in cardiac but not skeletal myocytes. This includes the A- and B-type natriuretic peptide (ANP and BNP) genes, which encode peptide hormones with crucial roles in the regulation of blood volume and pressure. Since these genes are markers of cardiac cells, we have used them to probe the mechanisms for cardiac muscle-specific transcription. Cloning and functional analysis of the rat BNP upstream sequences revealed unexpected structural resemblance to erythroid but not to muscle-specific promoters and enhancers, including a requirement for regulatory elements containing GATA motifs. A cDNA clone corresponding to a member of the GATA family of transcription factors was isolated from a cardiomyocyte cDNA library. Transcription of this GATA gene is restricted mostly to the heart and is undetectable in skeletal muscle. Within the heart, GATA transcripts are localized in ANP- and BNP-expressing myocytes, and forced expression of the GATA protein in heterologous cells markedly activates transcription from the natural cardiac muscle-specific ANP and BNP promoters. This GATA-dependent pathway defines the first mechanism for cardiac muscle-specific transcription. Moreover, the present findings reveal striking similarities between the mechanisms controlling gene expression in hematopoietic and cardiac cells and may have important implications for studies of cardiogenesis. Images PMID:8164667

  19. Functional markers of common bean from disease resistance gene othologs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Disease infestation is a major constraint for subsistence production and economic yield of common bean. Development of cultivars with improved disease resistance is a primary goal of bean breeding programs throughout the world. Genetic linkage maps have been used to identify DNA markers tightly link...

  20. Lateral organ boundaries 1 is a disease susceptibility gene for citrus bacterial canker disease

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yang; Zhang, Junli; Jia, Hongge; Sosso, Davide; Li, Ting; Frommer, Wolf B.; Yang, Bing; White, Frank F.; Wang, Nian; Jones, Jeffrey B.

    2014-01-01

    Citrus bacterial canker (CBC) disease occurs worldwide and incurs considerable costs both from control measures and yield losses. Bacteria that cause CBC require one of six known type III transcription activator-like (TAL) effector genes for the characteristic pustule formation at the site of infection. Here, we show that Xanthomonas citri subspecies citri strain Xcc306, with the type III TAL effector gene pthA4 or with the distinct yet biologically equivalent gene pthAw from strain XccAw, induces two host genes, CsLOB1 and CsSWEET1, in a TAL effector-dependent manner. CsLOB1 is a member of the Lateral Organ Boundaries (LOB) gene family of transcription factors, and CsSWEET1 is a homolog of the SWEET sugar transporter and rice disease susceptibility gene. Both TAL effectors drive expression of CsLOB1 and CsSWEET1 promoter reporter gene fusions when coexpressed in citrus or Nicotiana benthamiana. Artificially designed TAL effectors directed to sequences in the CsLOB1 promoter region, but not the CsSWEET1 promoter, promoted pustule formation and higher bacterial leaf populations. Three additional distinct TAL effector genes, pthA*, pthB, and pthC, also direct pustule formation and expression of CsLOB1. Unlike pthA4 and pthAw, pthB and pthC do not promote the expression of CsSWEET1. CsLOB1 expression was associated with the expression of genes associated with cell expansion. The results indicate that CBC-inciting species of Xanthomonas exploit a single host disease susceptibility gene by altering the expression of an otherwise developmentally regulated gene using any one of a diverse set of TAL effector genes in the pathogen populations. PMID:24474801

  1. Lateral organ boundaries 1 is a disease susceptibility gene for citrus bacterial canker disease.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yang; Zhang, Junli; Jia, Hongge; Sosso, Davide; Li, Ting; Frommer, Wolf B; Yang, Bing; White, Frank F; Wang, Nian; Jones, Jeffrey B

    2014-01-28

    Citrus bacterial canker (CBC) disease occurs worldwide and incurs considerable costs both from control measures and yield losses. Bacteria that cause CBC require one of six known type III transcription activator-like (TAL) effector genes for the characteristic pustule formation at the site of infection. Here, we show that Xanthomonas citri subspecies citri strain Xcc306, with the type III TAL effector gene pthA4 or with the distinct yet biologically equivalent gene pthAw from strain XccA(w), induces two host genes, CsLOB1 and CsSWEET1, in a TAL effector-dependent manner. CsLOB1 is a member of the Lateral Organ Boundaries (LOB) gene family of transcription factors, and CsSWEET1 is a homolog of the SWEET sugar transporter and rice disease susceptibility gene. Both TAL effectors drive expression of CsLOB1 and CsSWEET1 promoter reporter gene fusions when coexpressed in citrus or Nicotiana benthamiana. Artificially designed TAL effectors directed to sequences in the CsLOB1 promoter region, but not the CsSWEET1 promoter, promoted pustule formation and higher bacterial leaf populations. Three additional distinct TAL effector genes, pthA*, pthB, and pthC, also direct pustule formation and expression of CsLOB1. Unlike pthA4 and pthAw, pthB and pthC do not promote the expression of CsSWEET1. CsLOB1 expression was associated with the expression of genes associated with cell expansion. The results indicate that CBC-inciting species of Xanthomonas exploit a single host disease susceptibility gene by altering the expression of an otherwise developmentally regulated gene using any one of a diverse set of TAL effector genes in the pathogen populations. PMID:24474801

  2. Diversified Control Paths: A Significant Way Disease Genes Perturb the Human Regulatory Network

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bingbo; Gao, Lin; Zhang, Qingfang; Li, Aimin; Deng, Yue; Guo, Xingli

    2015-01-01

    Background The complexity of biological systems motivates us to use the underlying networks to provide deep understanding of disease etiology and the human diseases are viewed as perturbations of dynamic properties of networks. Control theory that deals with dynamic systems has been successfully used to capture systems-level knowledge in large amount of quantitative biological interactions. But from the perspective of system control, the ways by which multiple genetic factors jointly perturb a disease phenotype still remain. Results In this work, we combine tools from control theory and network science to address the diversified control paths in complex networks. Then the ways by which the disease genes perturb biological systems are identified and quantified by the control paths in a human regulatory network. Furthermore, as an application, prioritization of candidate genes is presented by use of control path analysis and gene ontology annotation for definition of similarities. We use leave-one-out cross-validation to evaluate the ability of finding the gene-disease relationship. Results have shown compatible performance with previous sophisticated works, especially in directed systems. Conclusions Our results inspire a deeper understanding of molecular mechanisms that drive pathological processes. Diversified control paths offer a basis for integrated intervention techniques which will ultimately lead to the development of novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:26284649

  3. Integration of network theory with gene expression data on disease progression significantly improves

    E-print Network

    Lee, H.C. Paul

    Integration of network theory with gene expression data on disease progression significantly-protein interaction, regulatory pathways, gene-disease relation, and disease-drug relation. Separately, microarray of biological condition types, including those of cancer. In a systems disease such as cancer, how genes

  4. A benefit of high temperature: increased effectiveness of a rice bacterial blight disease resistance gene

    E-print Network

    Garrett, Karen A.

    single disease resistance (R) genes imposes a strong selection for virulence in pathogen populations-mediated disease control because high temperatures often promote disease development and reduce R gene effectiveness. Here, performance of one rice bac- terial blight disease R gene was assessed in field and growth

  5. Bayesian approach to transforming public gene expression repositories into disease

    E-print Network

    Zhou, Xianghong Jasmine

    , University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720; b Program in Molecular and Computational Biology, University February 19, 2010 (received for review October 26, 2009) The rapid accumulation of gene expression data has learning approach, to achieve the diagnosis of one or multiple diseases for a query expression profile

  6. Identification of blast resistance genes for managing rice blast disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice blast, caused by the fungal pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae, is one of the most devastating diseases worldwide. In the present study, an international set of monogenic differentials carrying 24 major blast resistance (R) genes (Pia, Pib, Pii, Pik, Pik-h, Pik-m, Pik-p, Pik-s, Pish, Pit, Pita, Pita2,...

  7. Network-based methods for human disease gene prediction

    E-print Network

    Yu, Haiyuan

    . It has been reported that the genes established to be asso- ciated with diseases such as cancer and type networks. HaiyuanYu is an assistant professor in the Department of Biological Statistics and Computational computational methodologies. Corresponding author. Haiyuan Yu, Department of Biological Statistics

  8. Les Liaisons Dangereuses: Cancer-Related Genes and Neurodegenerative Diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghetti, Bernardino; Buonaguro, Franco M.

    2014-07-01

    The following sections are included: * INTRODUCTION * MUTATIONS IN THE CSF1R GENE ASSOCIATED WITH DIFFUSE LEUKOENCEPHALOPATHY WITH SPHEROIDS AND HUMAN CANCERS. * A SPECIAL LINK HAS BEEN SHOWN BETWEEN PTEN AND AD. * ACETYLCHOLINE DEFICIENCY AND PATHOGENESIS OF AD. * MIRNAS AND COMMON PATHWAYS IN CANCER AND NEURODEGENERATIVE DISEASE. * SUMMARY * REFERENCES

  9. A systems-wide comparison of red rice (Oryza longistaminata) tissues identifies rhizome specific genes and proteins that are targets for cultivated rice improvement

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The rhizome, the original stem of land plants, enables species to invade new territory and is a critical component of perenniality, especially in grasses. Red rice (Oryza longistaminata) is a perennial wild rice species with many valuable traits that could be used to improve cultivated rice cultivars, including rhizomatousness, disease resistance and drought tolerance. Despite these features, little is known about the molecular mechanisms that contribute to rhizome growth, development and function in this plant. Results We used an integrated approach to compare the transcriptome, proteome and metabolome of the rhizome to other tissues of red rice. 116 Gb of transcriptome sequence was obtained from various tissues and used to identify rhizome-specific and preferentially expressed genes, including transcription factors and hormone metabolism and stress response-related genes. Proteomics and metabolomics approaches identified 41 proteins and more than 100 primary metabolites and plant hormones with rhizome preferential accumulation. Of particular interest was the identification of a large number of gene transcripts from Magnaportha oryzae, the fungus that causes rice blast disease in cultivated rice, even though the red rice plants showed no sign of disease. Conclusions A significant set of genes, proteins and metabolites appear to be specifically or preferentially expressed in the rhizome of O. longistaminata. The presence of M. oryzae gene transcripts at a high level in apparently healthy plants suggests that red rice is resistant to this pathogen, and may be able to provide genes to cultivated rice that will enable resistance to rice blast disease. PMID:24521476

  10. Norrie disease gene: Characterization of deletions and possible function

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Z.Y.; Battinelli, E.M.; Hendriks, R.W.; Craig, I.W.; Powell, J.F.; Middleton-Price, H.; Sims, K.B.; Breakefield, X.O.

    1993-05-01

    Positional cloning experiments have resulted recently in the isolation of a candidate gene for Norrie disease (pseudoglioma; NDP), a severe X-linked neuro-developmental disorder. Here the authors report the isolation and analysis of human genomic DNA clones encompassing the NDP gene. The gene spans 28 kb and consists of 3 exons, the first of which is entirely contained within the 5{prime} untranslated region. Detailed analysis of genomic deletions in Norrie patients shows that they are heterogeneous, both in size and in position. By PCR analysis, they found that expression of the NDP gene was not confined to the eye or to the brain. An extensive DNA and protein sequence comparison between the human NDP gene and related genes from the database revealed homology with cysteine-rich protein-binding domains of immediate--early genes implicated in the regulation of cell proliferation. They propose that NDP is a molecule related in function to these genes and may be involved in a pathway that regulates neural cell differentiation and proliferation. 19 refs., 2 figs.

  11. Genomic structure and expression of STM2, the chromosome 1 familial Alzheimer disease gene

    SciTech Connect

    Levy-Lahad, E.; Wang, Kai; Fu, Ying Hui

    1996-06-01

    Mutations in the gene STM2 result in autosomal dominant familial Alzheimer disease. To screen for mutations and to identify regulatory elements for this gene, the genomic DNA sequence and intron-exon structure were determined. Twelve exons including 10 coding exons were identified in a genomic region spanning 23, 737 bp. The first 2 exons encode the 5{prime}-untranslated region. Expression analysis of STM2 indicates that two transcripts of 2.4 and 2.8 kb are found in skeletal muscle, pancreas, and heart. In addition, a splice variant of the 2.4-kb transcript was identified that is the result of the use of an alternative splice acceptor site located in exon 10. The use of this site results in a transcript lacking a single glutamate. The promotor for this gene and the alternatively spliced exons leading to the 2.8-kb form of the gene remain to be identified. Expression of STM2 was high in skeletal muscle and pancreas, with comparatively low levels observed in brain. This expression pattern is intriguing since in Alzheimer disease, pathology and degeneration are observed only in the central nervous system. 19 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Immunogenomics for identification of disease resistance genes in pigs: a review focusing on Gram-negative bacilli

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Over the past years, infectious disease has caused enormous economic loss in pig industry. Among the pathogens, gram negative bacteria not only cause inflammation, but also cause different diseases and make the pigs more susceptible to virus infection. Vaccination, medication and elimination of sick pigs are major strategies of controlling disease. Genetic methods, such as selection of disease resistance in the pig, have not been widely used. Recently, the completion of the porcine whole genome sequencing has provided powerful tools to identify the genome regions that harboring genes controlling disease or immunity. Immunogenomics, which combines DNA variations, transcriptome, immune response, and QTL mapping data to illustrate the interactions between pathogen and host immune system, will be an effective genomics tool for identification of disease resistance genes in pigs. These genes will be potential targets for disease resistance in breeding programs. This paper reviewed the progress of disease resistance study in the pig focusing on Gram-negative bacilli. Major porcine Gram-negative bacilli and diseases, suggested candidate genes/pathways against porcine Gram-negative bacilli, and distributions of QTLs for immune capacity on pig chromosomes were summarized. Some tools for immunogenomics research were described. We conclude that integration of sequencing, whole genome associations, functional genomics studies, and immune response information is necessary to illustrate molecular mechanisms and key genes in disease resistance. PMID:23137309

  13. Harnessing Single Cell Sorting to Identify Cell Division Genes and Regulators in Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Catherine; Liu, Michael; Britton, Warwick; Triccas, James A.; Thomas, Torsten; Smith, Adrian L.; Allen, Steven; Salomon, Robert; Harry, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Cell division is an essential cellular process that requires an array of known and unknown proteins for its spatial and temporal regulation. Here we develop a novel, high-throughput screening method for the identification of bacterial cell division genes and regulators. The method combines the over-expression of a shotgun genomic expression library to perturb the cell division process with high-throughput flow cytometry sorting to screen many thousands of clones. Using this approach, we recovered clones with a filamentous morphology for the model bacterium, Escherichia coli. Genetic analysis revealed that our screen identified both known cell division genes, and genes that have not previously been identified to be involved in cell division. This novel screening strategy is applicable to a wide range of organisms, including pathogenic bacteria, where cell division genes and regulators are attractive drug targets for antibiotic development. PMID:23565292

  14. A loss of function screen identifies nine new radiation susceptibility genes

    SciTech Connect

    Sudo, Hitomi; Tsuji, Atsushi B. Sugyo, Aya; Imai, Takashi; Saga, Tsuneo; Harada, Yoshi-nobu

    2007-12-21

    Genomic instability is considered a hallmark of carcinogenesis, and dysfunction of DNA repair and cell cycle regulation in response to DNA damage caused by ionizing radiation are thought to be important factors in the early stages of genomic instability. We performed cell-based functional screening using an RNA interference library targeting 200 genes in human cells. We identified three known and nine new radiation susceptibility genes, eight of which are linked directly or potentially with cell cycle progression. Cell cycle analysis on four of the genes not previously linked to cell cycle progression demonstrated that one, ZDHHC8, was associated with the G{sub 2}/M checkpoint in response to DNA damage. Further study of the 12 radiation susceptibility genes identified in this screen may help to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of cell cycle progression, DNA repair, cell death, cell growth and genomic instability, and to develop new radiation sensitizing agents for radiotherapy.

  15. Bayesian Joint Modeling of Multiple Gene Networks and Diverse Genomic Data to Identify Target Genes of a Transcription Factor

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Peng; Pan, Wei

    2012-01-01

    We consider integrative modeling of multiple gene networks and diverse genomic data, including protein-DNA binding, gene expression and DNA sequence data, to accurately identify the regulatory target genes of a transcription factor (TF). Rather than treating all the genes equally and independently a priori in existing joint modeling approaches, we incorporate the biological prior knowledge that neighboring genes on a gene network tend to be (or not to be) regulated together by a TF. A key contribution of our work is that, to maximize the use of all existing biological knowledge, we allow incorporation of multiple gene networks into joint modeling of genomic data by introducing a mixture model based on the use of multiple Markov random fields (MRFs). Another important contribution of our work is to allow different genomic data to be correlated and to examine the validity and effect of the independence assumption as adopted in existing methods. Due to a fully Bayesian approach, inference about model parameters can be carried out based on MCMC samples. Application to an E. coli data set, together with simulation studies, demonstrates the utility and statistical efficiency gains with the proposed joint model. PMID:22408712

  16. IDENTIFYING NOVEL R-GENES IN RICE WILD RELATIVES WITH MICROSATELLITE MARKERS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice wild relatives (Oryza spp.) are an important source of novel R(resistance)-genes for rice improvement. Rice sheath blight, caused by Rhizoctonia solani, and leaf blast, caused by Magnaporthe grisea, are major fungal diseases of cultivated rice (O. sativa) in the USA and of irrigated rice world...

  17. High-throughput screening of mouse gene knockouts identifies established and novel skeletal phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Brommage, Robert; Liu, Jeff; Hansen, Gwenn M; Kirkpatrick, Laura L; Potter, David G; Sands, Arthur T; Zambrowicz, Brian; Powell, David R; Vogel, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Screening gene function in vivo is a powerful approach to discover novel drug targets. We present high-throughput screening (HTS) data for 3?762 distinct global gene knockout (KO) mouse lines with viable adult homozygous mice generated using either gene-trap or homologous recombination technologies. Bone mass was determined from DEXA scans of male and female mice at 14 weeks of age and by microCT analyses of bones from male mice at 16 weeks of age. Wild-type (WT) cagemates/littermates were examined for each gene KO. Lethality was observed in an additional 850 KO lines. Since primary HTS are susceptible to false positive findings, additional cohorts of mice from KO lines with intriguing HTS bone data were examined. Aging, ovariectomy, histomorphometry and bone strength studies were performed and possible non-skeletal phenotypes were explored. Together, these screens identified multiple genes affecting bone mass: 23 previously reported genes (Calcr, Cebpb, Crtap, Dcstamp, Dkk1, Duoxa2, Enpp1, Fgf23, Kiss1/Kiss1r, Kl (Klotho), Lrp5, Mstn, Neo1, Npr2, Ostm1, Postn, Sfrp4, Slc30a5, Slc39a13, Sost, Sumf1, Src, Wnt10b), five novel genes extensively characterized (Cldn18, Fam20c, Lrrk1, Sgpl1, Wnt16), five novel genes with preliminary characterization (Agpat2, Rassf5, Slc10a7, Slc26a7, Slc30a10) and three novel undisclosed genes coding for potential osteoporosis drug targets. PMID:26273529

  18. Systematically identify key genes in inflammatory and non-inflammatory breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Chai, Fan; Liang, Yan; Zhang, Fan; Wang, Minghao; Zhong, Ling; Jiang, Jun

    2016-01-10

    Although the gene expression in breast tumor stroma, playing a critical role in determining inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) phenotype, has been proved to be significantly different between IBC and non-inflammatory breast cancer (non-IBC), more effort needs to systematically investigate the gene expression profiles between tumor epithelium and stroma and to efficiently uncover the potential molecular networks and critical genes for IBC and non-IBC. Here, we comprehensively analyzed and compared the transcriptional profiles from IBC and non-IBC patients using hierarchical clustering, protein-protein interaction (PPI) network, Gene Ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) database analyses, and identified PDGFR?, SUMO1, COL1A1, FYN, CAV1, COL5A1 and MMP2 to be the key genes for breast cancer. Interestingly, PDGFR? was found to be the hub gene in both IBC and non-IBC; SUMO1 and COL1A1 were respectively the key genes for IBC and non-IBC. These analysis results indicated that those key genes might play important role in IBC and non-IBC and provided some clues for future studies. PMID:26403314

  19. Rmg7, a New Gene for Resistance to Triticum Isolates of Pyricularia oryzae Identified in Tetraploid Wheat.

    PubMed

    Tagle, Analiza Grubanzo; Chuma, Izumi; Tosa, Yukio

    2015-04-01

    A single gene for resistance, designated Rmg7 (Resistance to Magnaporthe grisea 7), was identified in a tetraploid wheat accession, St24 (Triticum dicoccum, KU120), against Br48, a Triticum isolate of Pyricularia oryzae. Two other wheat accessions, St17 (T. dicoccum, KU112) and St25 (T. dicoccum, KU122), were also resistant against Br48 and showed a similar disease reaction pattern to St24. Crosses between these resistant accessions yielded no susceptible F2 seedlings, suggesting that St24, St17, and St25 carry the same resistance gene. Furthermore, a single avirulence gene corresponding to Rmg7 was detected in a segregation analysis of random F1 progenies between Br48 and MZ5-1-6, an Eleusine isolate virulent to St24 at a higher temperature. This avirulence gene was recognized not only by St24, but also by St17 and St25, thus supporting the preceding results indicating that all three accessions carry Rmg7. This resistance gene may have potential in future wheat breeding programs. PMID:25870924

  20. INTERLEUKIN-6 GENE POLYMORPHISM MODULATES THE RISK OF PERIODONTAL DISEASES.

    PubMed

    Scapoli, L; Girardi, A; Palmieri, A; Martinelli, M; Cura, F; Lauritano, D; Pezzetti, F; Carinci, F

    2015-01-01

    Gingivitis and periodontitis are the two main periodontal diseases. Both are characterized by inflammation of the tissues surrounding the teeth but while tissue damages observed in gingivitis are mild and reversible, destruction caused by periodontitis is deeper and irreversible. Periodontal diseases and levels of degeneration of tissues surrounding teeth depend on several interacting endogenous and exogenous factors. Polymorphisms of genes encoding molecules that modulate the immune response and tissue homeostasis are the main causes of individual susceptibility to periodontal diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate IL6, IL10 and VDR gene polymorphisms in a large number of subjects affected by either gingivitis or chronic periodontitis. The sample included 750 Italian patients. We found that the rs1800795 SNP located in the IL6 gene promoter was strongly associated with the occurrence of both gingivitis and periodontitis. Indeed, homozygous individuals with variant allele appeared less-susceptible to both gingivitis OR=0.47 (95% C.I. 0.27-0.82) and periodontitis OR=0.36 (95% C.I. 0.21-0.64). No evidence of association between periodontal diseases and IL10 or VDR polymorphisms was obtained. This data confirmed the role of IL6 in susceptibility to periodontitis among the Italian population. The evidence that IL6 polymorphisms are also involved in gingivitis has implications in periodontal disease pathogenesis and reduces the appeal of IL6 as a periodontitis biomarker. PMID:26511189

  1. Gene expression differences between Noccaea caerulescens ecotypes help to identify candidate genes for metal phytoremediation.

    PubMed

    Halimaa, Pauliina; Lin, Ya-Fen; Ahonen, Viivi H; Blande, Daniel; Clemens, Stephan; Gyenesei, Attila; Häikiö, Elina; Kärenlampi, Sirpa O; Laiho, Asta; Aarts, Mark G M; Pursiheimo, Juha-Pekka; Schat, Henk; Schmidt, Holger; Tuomainen, Marjo H; Tervahauta, Arja I

    2014-03-18

    Populations of Noccaea caerulescens show tremendous differences in their capacity to hyperaccumulate and hypertolerate metals. To explore the differences that could contribute to these traits, we undertook SOLiD high-throughput sequencing of the root transcriptomes of three phenotypically well-characterized N. caerulescens accessions, i.e., Ganges, La Calamine, and Monte Prinzera. Genes with possible contribution to zinc, cadmium, and nickel hyperaccumulation and hypertolerance were predicted. The most significant differences between the accessions were related to metal ion (di-, trivalent inorganic cation) transmembrane transporter activity, iron and calcium ion binding, (inorganic) anion transmembrane transporter activity, and antioxidant activity. Analysis of correlation between the expression profile of each gene and the metal-related characteristics of the accessions disclosed both previously characterized (HMA4, HMA3) and new candidate genes (e.g., for nickel IRT1, ZIP10, and PDF2.3) as possible contributors to the hyperaccumulation/tolerance phenotype. A number of unknown Noccaea-specific transcripts also showed correlation with Zn(2+), Cd(2+), or Ni(2+) hyperaccumulation/tolerance. This study shows that N. caerulescens populations have evolved great diversity in the expression of metal-related genes, facilitating adaptation to various metalliferous soils. The information will be helpful in the development of improved plants for metal phytoremediation. PMID:24559272

  2. Network-based metaanalysis identifies HNF4A and PTBP1 as longitudinally dynamic biomarkers for Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Santiago, Jose A.; Potashkin, Judith A.

    2015-01-01

    Environmental and genetic factors are likely to be involved in the pathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease (PD), the second most prevalent neurodegenerative disease among the elderly. Network-based metaanalysis of four independent microarray studies identified the hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 alpha (HNF4A), a transcription factor associated with gluconeogenesis and diabetes, as a central regulatory hub gene up-regulated in blood of PD patients. In parallel, the polypyrimidine tract binding protein 1 (PTBP1), involved in the stabilization and mRNA translation of insulin, was identified as the most down-regulated gene. Quantitative PCR assays revealed that HNF4A and PTBP1 mRNAs were up- and down-regulated, respectively, in blood of 51 PD patients and 45 controls nested in the Diagnostic and Prognostic Biomarkers for Parkinson’s Disease. These results were confirmed in blood of 50 PD patients compared with 46 healthy controls nested in the Harvard Biomarker Study. Relative abundance of HNF4A mRNA correlated with the Hoehn and Yahr stage at baseline, suggesting its clinical utility to monitor disease severity. Using both markers, PD patients were classified with 90% sensitivity and 80% specificity. Longitudinal performance analysis demonstrated that relative abundance of HNF4A and PTBP1 mRNAs significantly decreased and increased, respectively, in PD patients during the 3-y follow-up period. The inverse regulation of HNF4A and PTBP1 provides a molecular rationale for the altered insulin signaling observed in PD patients. The longitudinally dynamic biomarkers identified in this study may be useful for monitoring disease-modifying therapies for PD. PMID:25646437

  3. Network-based metaanalysis identifies HNF4A and PTBP1 as longitudinally dynamic biomarkers for Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Santiago, Jose A; Potashkin, Judith A

    2015-02-17

    Environmental and genetic factors are likely to be involved in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD), the second most prevalent neurodegenerative disease among the elderly. Network-based metaanalysis of four independent microarray studies identified the hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 alpha (HNF4A), a transcription factor associated with gluconeogenesis and diabetes, as a central regulatory hub gene up-regulated in blood of PD patients. In parallel, the polypyrimidine tract binding protein 1 (PTBP1), involved in the stabilization and mRNA translation of insulin, was identified as the most down-regulated gene. Quantitative PCR assays revealed that HNF4A and PTBP1 mRNAs were up- and down-regulated, respectively, in blood of 51 PD patients and 45 controls nested in the Diagnostic and Prognostic Biomarkers for Parkinson's Disease. These results were confirmed in blood of 50 PD patients compared with 46 healthy controls nested in the Harvard Biomarker Study. Relative abundance of HNF4A mRNA correlated with the Hoehn and Yahr stage at baseline, suggesting its clinical utility to monitor disease severity. Using both markers, PD patients were classified with 90% sensitivity and 80% specificity. Longitudinal performance analysis demonstrated that relative abundance of HNF4A and PTBP1 mRNAs significantly decreased and increased, respectively, in PD patients during the 3-y follow-up period. The inverse regulation of HNF4A and PTBP1 provides a molecular rationale for the altered insulin signaling observed in PD patients. The longitudinally dynamic biomarkers identified in this study may be useful for monitoring disease-modifying therapies for PD. PMID:25646437

  4. Candidate Luminal B Breast Cancer Genes Identified by Genome, Gene Expression and DNA Methylation Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Addou-Klouche, Lynda; Finetti, Pascal; Saade, Marie-Rose; Manai, Marwa; Carbuccia, Nadine; Bekhouche, Ismahane; Letessier, Anne; Charafe-Jauffret, Emmanuelle; Jacquemier, Jocelyne; Spicuglia, Salvatore; de The, Hugues; Viens, Patrice; Bertucci, François; Birnbaum, Daniel; Chaffanet, Max

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancers (BCs) of the luminal B subtype are estrogen receptor-positive (ER+), highly proliferative, resistant to standard therapies and have a poor prognosis. To better understand this subtype we compared DNA copy number aberrations (CNAs), DNA promoter methylation, gene expression profiles, and somatic mutations in nine selected genes, in 32 luminal B tumors with those observed in 156 BCs of the other molecular subtypes. Frequent CNAs included 8p11-p12 and 11q13.1-q13.2 amplifications, 7q11.22-q34, 8q21.12-q24.23, 12p12.3-p13.1, 12q13.11-q24.11, 14q21.1-q23.1, 17q11.1-q25.1, 20q11.23-q13.33 gains and 6q14.1-q24.2, 9p21.3-p24,3, 9q21.2, 18p11.31-p11.32 losses. A total of 237 and 101 luminal B-specific candidate oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) presented a deregulated expression in relation with their CNAs, including 11 genes previously reported associated with endocrine resistance. Interestingly, 88% of the potential TSGs are located within chromosome arm 6q, and seven candidate oncogenes are potential therapeutic targets. A total of 100 candidate oncogenes were validated in a public series of 5,765 BCs and the overexpression of 67 of these was associated with poor survival in luminal tumors. Twenty-four genes presented a deregulated expression in relation with a high DNA methylation level. FOXO3, PIK3CA and TP53 were the most frequent mutated genes among the nine tested. In a meta-analysis of next-generation sequencing data in 875 BCs, KCNB2 mutations were associated with luminal B cases while candidate TSGs MDN1 (6q15) and UTRN (6q24), were mutated in this subtype. In conclusion, we have reported luminal B candidate genes that may play a role in the development and/or hormone resistance of this aggressive subtype. PMID:24416132

  5. Candidate luminal B breast cancer genes identified by genome, gene expression and DNA methylation profiling.

    PubMed

    Cornen, Stéphanie; Guille, Arnaud; Adélaïde, José; Addou-Klouche, Lynda; Finetti, Pascal; Saade, Marie-Rose; Manai, Marwa; Carbuccia, Nadine; Bekhouche, Ismahane; Letessier, Anne; Raynaud, Stéphane; Charafe-Jauffret, Emmanuelle; Jacquemier, Jocelyne; Spicuglia, Salvatore; de The, Hugues; Viens, Patrice; Bertucci, François; Birnbaum, Daniel; Chaffanet, Max

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancers (BCs) of the luminal B subtype are estrogen receptor-positive (ER+), highly proliferative, resistant to standard therapies and have a poor prognosis. To better understand this subtype we compared DNA copy number aberrations (CNAs), DNA promoter methylation, gene expression profiles, and somatic mutations in nine selected genes, in 32 luminal B tumors with those observed in 156 BCs of the other molecular subtypes. Frequent CNAs included 8p11-p12 and 11q13.1-q13.2 amplifications, 7q11.22-q34, 8q21.12-q24.23, 12p12.3-p13.1, 12q13.11-q24.11, 14q21.1-q23.1, 17q11.1-q25.1, 20q11.23-q13.33 gains and 6q14.1-q24.2, 9p21.3-p24,3, 9q21.2, 18p11.31-p11.32 losses. A total of 237 and 101 luminal B-specific candidate oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) presented a deregulated expression in relation with their CNAs, including 11 genes previously reported associated with endocrine resistance. Interestingly, 88% of the potential TSGs are located within chromosome arm 6q, and seven candidate oncogenes are potential therapeutic targets. A total of 100 candidate oncogenes were validated in a public series of 5,765 BCs and the overexpression of 67 of these was associated with poor survival in luminal tumors. Twenty-four genes presented a deregulated expression in relation with a high DNA methylation level. FOXO3, PIK3CA and TP53 were the most frequent mutated genes among the nine tested. In a meta-analysis of next-generation sequencing data in 875 BCs, KCNB2 mutations were associated with luminal B cases while candidate TSGs MDN1 (6q15) and UTRN (6q24), were mutated in this subtype. In conclusion, we have reported luminal B candidate genes that may play a role in the development and/or hormone resistance of this aggressive subtype. PMID:24416132

  6. Digital Gene Expression Analysis to Screen Disease Resistance-Relevant Genes from Leaves of Herbaceous Peony (Paeonia lactiflora Pall.) Infected by Botrytis cinerea

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Saijie; Hao, Zhaojun; Meng, Jiasong; Liu, Ding; Wei, Mengran; Tao, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Herbaceous peony (Paeonia lactiflora Pall.) is a well-known traditional flower in China and is widely used for landscaping and garden greening due to its high ornamental value. However, disease spots usually appear after the flowering of the plant and may result in the withering of the plant in severe cases. This study examined the disease incidence in an herbaceous peony field in the Yangzhou region, Jiangsu Province. Based on morphological characteristics and molecular data, the disease in this area was identified as a gray mold caused by Botrytis cinerea. Based on previously obtained transcriptome data, eight libraries generated from two herbaceous peony cultivars ‘Zifengyu’ and ‘Dafugui’ with different susceptibilities to the disease were then analyzed using digital gene expression profiling (DGE). Thousands of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were screened by comparing the eight samples, and these genes were annotated using the Gene ontology (GO) and Kyoto encyclopedia of genes and genomes (KEGG) database. The pathways related to plant-pathogen interaction, secondary metabolism synthesis and antioxidant system were concentrated, and 51, 76, and 13 disease resistance-relevant candidate genes were identified, respectively. The expression patterns of these candidate genes differed between the two cultivars: their expression of the disease-resistant cultivar ‘Zifengyu’ sharply increased during the early stages of infection, while it was relatively subdued in the disease-sensitive cultivar ‘Dafugui’. A selection of ten candidate genes was evaluated by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) to validate the DGE data. These results revealed the transcriptional changes that took place during the interaction of herbaceous peony with B. cinerea, providing insight into the molecular mechanisms of host resistance to gray mold. PMID:26208357

  7. Digital Gene Expression Analysis to Screen Disease Resistance-Relevant Genes from Leaves of Herbaceous Peony (Paeonia lactiflora Pall.) Infected by Botrytis cinerea.

    PubMed

    Gong, Saijie; Hao, Zhaojun; Meng, Jiasong; Liu, Ding; Wei, Mengran; Tao, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Herbaceous peony (Paeonia lactiflora Pall.) is a well-known traditional flower in China and is widely used for landscaping and garden greening due to its high ornamental value. However, disease spots usually appear after the flowering of the plant and may result in the withering of the plant in severe cases. This study examined the disease incidence in an herbaceous peony field in the Yangzhou region, Jiangsu Province. Based on morphological characteristics and molecular data, the disease in this area was identified as a gray mold caused by Botrytis cinerea. Based on previously obtained transcriptome data, eight libraries generated from two herbaceous peony cultivars 'Zifengyu' and 'Dafugui' with different susceptibilities to the disease were then analyzed using digital gene expression profiling (DGE). Thousands of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were screened by comparing the eight samples, and these genes were annotated using the Gene ontology (GO) and Kyoto encyclopedia of genes and genomes (KEGG) database. The pathways related to plant-pathogen interaction, secondary metabolism synthesis and antioxidant system were concentrated, and 51, 76, and 13 disease resistance-relevant candidate genes were identified, respectively. The expression patterns of these candidate genes differed between the two cultivars: their expression of the disease-resistant cultivar 'Zifengyu' sharply increased during the early stages of infection, while it was relatively subdued in the disease-sensitive cultivar 'Dafugui'. A selection of ten candidate genes was evaluated by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) to validate the DGE data. These results revealed the transcriptional changes that took place during the interaction of herbaceous peony with B. cinerea, providing insight into the molecular mechanisms of host resistance to gray mold. PMID:26208357

  8. Identifying functional gene regulatory network phenotypes underlying single cell transcriptional variability.

    PubMed

    Park, James; Ogunnaike, Babatunde; Schwaber, James; Vadigepalli, Rajanikanth

    2015-01-01

    Recent analysis of single-cell transcriptomic data has revealed a surprising organization of the transcriptional variability pervasive across individual neurons. In response to distinct combinations of synaptic input-type, a new organization of neuronal subtypes emerged based on transcriptional states that were aligned along a gradient of correlated gene expression. Individual neurons traverse across these transcriptional states in response to cellular inputs. However, the regulatory network interactions driving these changes remain unclear. Here we present a novel fuzzy logic-based approach to infer quantitative gene regulatory network models from highly variable single-cell gene expression data. Our approach involves developing an a priori regulatory network that is then trained against in vivo single-cell gene expression data in order to identify causal gene interactions and corresponding quantitative model parameters. Simulations of the inferred gene regulatory network response to experimentally observed stimuli levels mirrored the pattern and quantitative range of gene expression across individual neurons remarkably well. In addition, the network identification results revealed that distinct regulatory interactions, coupled with differences in the regulatory network stimuli, drive the variable gene expression patterns observed across the neuronal subtypes. We also identified a key difference between the neuronal subtype-specific networks with respect to negative feedback regulation, with the catecholaminergic subtype network lacking such interactions. Furthermore, by varying regulatory network stimuli over a wide range, we identified several cases in which divergent neuronal subtypes could be driven towards similar transcriptional states by distinct stimuli operating on subtype-specific regulatory networks. Based on these results, we conclude that heterogenous single-cell gene expression profiles should be interpreted through a regulatory network modeling perspective in order to separate the contributions of network interactions from those of cellular inputs. PMID:25433230

  9. Functional genomics identifies neural stem cell sub-type expression profiles and genes regulating neuroblast homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Carney, Travis D.; Miller, Michael R.; Robinson, Kristin J.; Bayraktar, Omer A.; Osterhout, Jessica A.; Doe, Chris Q.

    2014-01-01

    The Drosophila larval central brain contains about 10,000 differentiated neurons and 200 scattered neural progenitors (neuroblasts), which can be further subdivided into ~95 type I neuroblasts and eight type II neuroblasts per brain lobe. Only type II neuroblasts generate self-renewing intermediate neural progenitors (INPs), and consequently each contributes more neurons to the brain, including much of the central complex. We characterized six different mutant genotypes that lead to expansion of neuroblast numbers; some preferentially expand type II or type I neuroblasts. Transcriptional profiling of larval brains from these mutant genotypes versus wild-type allowed us to identify small clusters of transcripts enriched in type II or type I neuroblasts, and we validated these clusters by gene expression analysis. Unexpectedly, only a few genes were found to be differentially expressed between type I/II neuroblasts, suggesting that these genes play a large role in establishing the different cell types. We also identified a large group of genes predicted to be expressed in all neuroblasts but not neurons. We performed a neuroblast-specific, RNAi-based functional screen and identified 84 genes that are required to maintain proper neuroblast numbers; all have conserved mammalian orthologs. These genes are excellent candidates for regulating neural progenitor self-renewal in Drosophila and mammals. PMID:22061480

  10. Genome-Wide DNA Methylation Analysis Identifies Novel Hypomethylated Non-Pericentromeric Genes with Potential Clinical Implications in ICF Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gatto, S.; Gagliardi, M.; Crujeiras, A. B.; Matarazzo, M. R.; Esteller, M.; Sandoval, J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction and Results Immunodeficiency, centromeric instability and facial anomalies syndrome (ICF) is a rare autosomal recessive disease, characterized by severe hypomethylation in pericentromeric regions of chromosomes (1, 16 and 9), marked immunodeficiency and facial anomalies. The majority of ICF patients present mutations in the DNMT3B gene, affecting the DNA methyltransferase activity of the protein. In the present study, we have used the Infinium 450K DNA methylation array to evaluate the methylation level of 450,000 CpGs in lymphoblastoid cell lines and untrasformed fibroblasts derived from ICF patients and healthy donors. Our results demonstrate that ICF-specific DNMT3B variants A603T/STP807ins and V699G/R54X cause global DNA hypomethylation compared to wild-type protein. We identified 181 novel differentially methylated positions (DMPs) including subtelomeric and intrachromosomic regions, outside the classical ICF-related pericentromeric hypomethylated positions. Interestingly, these sites were mainly located in intergenic regions and inside the CpG islands. Among the identified hypomethylated CpG-island associated genes, we confirmed the overexpression of three selected genes, BOLL, SYCP2 and NCRNA00221, in ICF compared to healthy controls, which are supposed to be expressed in germ line and silenced in somatic tissues. Conclusions In conclusion, this study contributes in clarifying the direct relationship between DNA methylation defect and gene expression impairment in ICF syndrome, identifying novel direct target genes of DNMT3B. A high percentage of the DMPs are located in the subtelomeric regions, indicating a specific role of DNMT3B in methylating these chromosomal sites. Therefore, we provide further evidence that hypomethylation in specific non-pericentromeric regions of chromosomes might be involved in the molecular pathogenesis of ICF syndrome. The detection of DNA hypomethylation at BOLL, SYCP2 and NCRNA00221 may pave the way for the development of specific clinical biomarkers with the aim to facilitate the identification of ICF patients. PMID:26161907

  11. Transcriptome analysis identifies genes involved in ethanol response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in Agave tequilana juice.

    PubMed

    Ramirez-Córdova, Jesús; Drnevich, Jenny; Madrigal-Pulido, Jaime Alberto; Arrizon, Javier; Allen, Kirk; Martínez-Velázquez, Moisés; Alvarez-Maya, Ikuri

    2012-08-01

    During ethanol fermentation, yeast cells are exposed to stress due to the accumulation of ethanol, cell growth is altered and the output of the target product is reduced. For Agave beverages, like tequila, no reports have been published on the global gene expression under ethanol stress. In this work, we used microarray analysis to identify Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes involved in the ethanol response. Gene expression of a tequila yeast strain of S. cerevisiae (AR5) was explored by comparing global gene expression with that of laboratory strain S288C, both after ethanol exposure. Additionally, we used two different culture conditions, cells grown in Agave tequilana juice as a natural fermentation media or grown in yeast-extract peptone dextrose as artificial media. Of the 6368 S. cerevisiae genes in the microarray, 657 genes were identified that had different expression responses to ethanol stress due to strain and/or media. A cluster of 28 genes was found over-expressed specifically in the AR5 tequila strain that could be involved in the adaptation to tequila yeast fermentation, 14 of which are unknown such as yor343c, ylr162w, ygr182c, ymr265c, yer053c-a or ydr415c. These could be the most suitable genes for transforming tequila yeast to increase ethanol tolerance in the tequila fermentation process. Other genes involved in response to stress (RFC4, TSA1, MLH1, PAU3, RAD53) or transport (CYB2, TIP20, QCR9) were expressed in the same cluster. Unknown genes could be good candidates for the development of recombinant yeasts with ethanol tolerance for use in industrial tequila fermentation. PMID:22535436

  12. A Genome-Wide Regulatory Framework Identifies Maize Pericarp Color1 Controlled Genes[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Morohashi, Kengo; Casas, María Isabel; Ferreyra, Lorena Falcone; Mejía-Guerra, María Katherine; Pourcel, Lucille; Yilmaz, Alper; Feller, Antje; Carvalho, Bruna; Emiliani, Julia; Rodriguez, Eduardo; Pellegrinet, Silvina; McMullen, Michael; Casati, Paula; Grotewold, Erich

    2012-01-01

    Pericarp Color1 (P1) encodes an R2R3-MYB transcription factor responsible for the accumulation of insecticidal flavones in maize (Zea mays) silks and red phlobaphene pigments in pericarps and other floral tissues, which makes P1 an important visual marker. Using genome-wide expression analyses (RNA sequencing) in pericarps and silks of plants with contrasting P1 alleles combined with chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled with high-throughput sequencing, we show here that the regulatory functions of P1 are much broader than the activation of genes corresponding to enzymes in a branch of flavonoid biosynthesis. P1 modulates the expression of several thousand genes, and ?1500 of them were identified as putative direct targets of P1. Among them, we identified F2H1, corresponding to a P450 enzyme that converts naringenin into 2-hydroxynaringenin, a key branch point in the P1-controlled pathway and the first step in the formation of insecticidal C-glycosyl flavones. Unexpectedly, the binding of P1 to gene regulatory regions can result in both gene activation and repression. Our results indicate that P1 is the major regulator for a set of genes involved in flavonoid biosynthesis and a minor modulator of the expression of a much larger gene set that includes genes involved in primary metabolism and production of other specialized compounds. PMID:22822204

  13. Identifying pathogenicity genes in the rubber tree anthracnose fungus Colletotrichum gloeosporioides through random insertional mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Cai, Zhiying; Li, Guohua; Lin, Chunhua; Shi, Tao; Zhai, Ligang; Chen, Yipeng; Huang, Guixiu

    2013-07-19

    To gain more insight into the molecular mechanisms of Colletotrichum gloeosporioides pathogenesis, Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation (ATMT) was used to identify mutants of C. gloeosporioides impaired in pathogenicity. An ATMT library of 4128 C. gloeosporioides transformants was generated. Transformants were screened for defects in pathogenicity with a detached copper brown leaf assay. 32 mutants showing reproducible pathogenicity defects were obtained. Southern blot analysis showed 60.4% of the transformants had single-site T-DNA integrations. 16 Genomic sequences flanking T-DNA were recovered from mutants by thermal asymmetric interlaced PCR, and were used to isolate the tagged genes from the genome sequence of wild-type C. gloeosporioides by Basic Local Alignment Search Tool searches against the local genome database of the wild-type C. gloeosporioides. One potential pathogenicity genes encoded calcium-translocating P-type ATPase. Six potential pathogenicity genes had no known homologs in filamentous fungi and were likely to be novel fungal virulence factors. Two putative genes encoded Glycosyltransferase family 28 domain-containing protein and Mov34/MPN/PAD-1 family protein, respectively. Five potential pathogenicity genes had putative function matched with putative protein of other Colletotrichum species. Two known C. gloeosporioides pathogenicity genes were also identified, the encoding Glomerella cingulata hard-surface induced protein and C. gloeosporioides regulatory subunit of protein kinase A gene involved in cAMP-dependent PKA signal transduction pathway. PMID:23602122

  14. Correlation between GATA4 gene polymorphism and congenital heart disease

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xue-Yong; Jing, Xiao-Yong; Chen, Zhe; Liu, Ying-Long

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The correlation between GATA4 gene polymorphism and congenital heart disease (CHD) was analyzed. Method: Clinical data and blood samples were collected from 350 CHD patients who were treated at the Department of Cardiology in Beijing Anzhen Hospital. The control group consisted of 350 healthy subjects receiving physical examination at our hospital during the same period. Polymorphism was detected by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) analysis for locus rs11392441 of GATA4 gene. Results: Polymorphism of locus rs1139244 of GATA4 gene was detected in CHD patients. The distribution frequencies of GG genotype and G allele were significantly higher than those of the control group. Conclusion: Polymorphism of locus rs1139244 of GATA4 gene was correlated with CHD. PMID:26629213

  15. Transcriptome analysis of the Cryptocaryon irritans tomont stage identifies potential genes for the detection and control of cryptocaryonosis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Cryptocaryon irritans is a parasitic ciliate that causes cryptocaryonosis (white spot disease) in marine fish. Diagnosis of cryptocaryonosis often depends on the appearance of white spots on the surface of the fish, which are usually visible only during later stages of the disease. Identifying suitable biomarkers of this parasite would aid the development of diagnostic tools and control strategies for C. irritans. The C. irritans genome is virtually unexplored; therefore, we generated and analyzed expressed sequence tags (ESTs) of the parasite to identify genes that encode for surface proteins, excretory/secretory proteins and repeat-containing proteins. Results ESTs were generated from a cDNA library of C. irritans tomonts isolated from infected Asian sea bass, Lates calcarifer. Clustering of the 5356 ESTs produced 2659 unique transcripts (UTs) containing 1989 singletons and 670 consensi. BLAST analysis showed that 74% of the UTs had significant similarity (E-value < 10-5) to sequences that are currently available in the GenBank database, with more than 15% of the significant hits showing unknown function. Forty percent of the UTs had significant similarity to ciliates from the genera Tetrahymena and Paramecium. Comparative gene family analysis with related taxa showed that many protein families are conserved among the protozoans. Based on gene ontology annotation, functional groups were successfully assigned to 790 UTs. Genes encoding excretory/secretory proteins and membrane and membrane-associated proteins were identified because these proteins often function as antigens and are good antibody targets. A total of 481 UTs were classified as encoding membrane proteins, 54 were classified as encoding for membrane-bound proteins, and 155 were found to contain excretory/secretory protein-coding sequences. Amino acid repeat-containing proteins and GPI-anchored proteins were also identified as potential candidates for the development of diagnostic and control strategies for C. irritans. Conclusions We successfully discovered and examined a large portion of the previously unexplored C. irritans transcriptome and identified potential genes for the development and validation of diagnostic and control strategies for cryptocaryonosis. PMID:20113487

  16. Preferential Allele Expression Analysis Identifies Shared Germline and Somatic Driver Genes in Advanced Ovarian Cancer.

    PubMed

    Halabi, Najeeb M; Martinez, Alejandra; Al-Farsi, Halema; Mery, Eliane; Puydenus, Laurence; Pujol, Pascal; Khalak, Hanif G; McLurcan, Cameron; Ferron, Gwenael; Querleu, Denis; Al-Azwani, Iman; Al-Dous, Eman; Mohamoud, Yasmin A; Malek, Joel A; Rafii, Arash

    2016-01-01

    Identifying genes where a variant allele is preferentially expressed in tumors could lead to a better understanding of cancer biology and optimization of targeted therapy. However, tumor sample heterogeneity complicates standard approaches for detecting preferential allele expression. We therefore developed a novel approach combining genome and transcriptome sequencing data from the same sample that corrects for sample heterogeneity and identifies significant preferentially expressed alleles. We applied this analysis to epithelial ovarian cancer samples consisting of matched primary ovary and peritoneum and lymph node metastasis. We find that preferentially expressed variant alleles include germline and somatic variants, are shared at a relatively high frequency between patients, and are in gene networks known to be involved in cancer processes. Analysis at a patient level identifies patient-specific preferentially expressed alleles in genes that are targets for known drugs. Analysis at a site level identifies patterns of site specific preferential allele expression with similar pathways being impacted in the primary and metastasis sites. We conclude that genes with preferentially expressed variant alleles can act as cancer drivers and that targeting those genes could lead to new therapeutic strategies. PMID:26735499

  17. Genetic variation of oxidative phosphorylation genes in stroke and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Biffi, Alessandro; Sabuncu, Mert R; Desikan, Rahul S; Schmansky, Nick; Salat, David H; Rosand, Jonathan; Anderson, Christopher D

    2014-08-01

    Previous research implicates alterations in oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) in the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD). We sought to test whether genetic variants within OXPHOS genes increase the risk of AD. We first used gene-set enrichment analysis to identify associations, and then applied a previously replicated stroke genetic risk score to determine if OXPHOS genetic overlap exists between stroke and AD. Gene-set enrichment analysis identified associations between variation in OXPHOS genes and AD versus control status (p = 0.012). Conversion from cognitively normal controls to mild cognitive impairment was also associated with the OXPHOS gene-set (p = 0.045). Subset analyses demonstrated association for complex I genes (p < 0.05), but not for complexes II-V. Among neuroimaging measures, hippocampal volume and entorhinal cortex thickness were associated with OXPHOS genes (all p < 0.025). The stroke genetic risk score demonstrated association with clinical status, baseline and longitudinal imaging measures (p < 0.05). OXPHOS genetic variation influences clinical status and neuroimaging intermediates of AD. OXPHOS genetic variants associated with stroke are also linked to AD progression. Further studies are needed to explore functional consequences of these OXPHOS variants. PMID:24650791

  18. An automatic and efficient pipeline for disease gene identification through utilizing family-based sequencing data.

    PubMed

    Song, Dandan; Li, Ning; Liao, Lejian

    2015-01-01

    Due to the generation of enormous amounts of data at both lower costs as well as in shorter times, whole-exome sequencing technologies provide dramatic opportunities for identifying disease genes implicated in Mendelian disorders. Since upwards of thousands genomic variants can be sequenced in each exome, it is challenging to filter pathogenic variants in protein coding regions and reduce the number of missing true variants. Therefore, an automatic and efficient pipeline for finding disease variants in Mendelian disorders is designed by exploiting a combination of variants filtering steps to analyze the family-based exome sequencing approach. Recent studies on the Freeman-Sheldon disease are revisited and show that the proposed method outperforms other existing candidate gene identification methods. PMID:26405949

  19. A tutorial to identify nonlinear associations in gene expression time series data.

    PubMed

    Fujita, André; Miyano, Satoru

    2014-01-01

    The study of gene regulatory networks is the basis to understand the biological complexity of several diseases and/or cell states. It has become the core of research in the field of systems biology. Several mathematical methods have been developed in the last decade, especially in the analysis of time series gene expression data derived from microarrays and sequencing-based methods. Most of the models available in the literature assumes linear associations among genes and do not infer directionality in these connections or uses a priori biological knowledge to set the directionality. However, in several cases, a priori biological information is not available. In this context, we describe a statistical method, namely nonlinear vector autoregressive model to estimate nonlinear relationships and also to infer directionality at the edges of the network by using the temporal information of the time series gene expression data without a priori biological information. PMID:24927837

  20. Genome-wide association meta-analysis identifies five modifier loci of lung disease severity in cystic fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Corvol, Harriet; Blackman, Scott M.; Boëlle, Pierre-Yves; Gallins, Paul J.; Pace, Rhonda G.; Stonebraker, Jaclyn R.; Accurso, Frank J.; Clement, Annick; Collaco, Joseph M.; Dang, Hong; Dang, Anthony T.; Franca, Arianna; Gong, Jiafen; Guillot, Loic; Keenan, Katherine; Li, Weili; Lin, Fan; Patrone, Michael V.; Raraigh, Karen S.; Sun, Lei; Zhou, Yi-Hui; O'Neal, Wanda K.; Sontag, Marci K.; Levy, Hara; Durie, Peter R.; Rommens, Johanna M.; Drumm, Mitchell L.; Wright, Fred A.; Strug, Lisa J.; Cutting, Garry R.; Knowles, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    The identification of small molecules that target specific CFTR variants has ushered in a new era of treatment for cystic fibrosis (CF), yet optimal, individualized treatment of CF will require identification and targeting of disease modifiers. Here we use genome-wide association analysis to identify genetic modifiers of CF lung disease, the primary cause of mortality. Meta-analysis of 6,365 CF patients identifies five loci that display significant association with variation in lung disease. Regions on chr3q29 (MUC4/MUC20; P=3.3 × 10?11), chr5p15.3 (SLC9A3; P=6.8 × 10?12), chr6p21.3 (HLA Class II; P=1.2 × 10?8) and chrXq22-q23 (AGTR2/SLC6A14; P=1.8 × 10?9) contain genes of high biological relevance to CF pathophysiology. The fifth locus, on chr11p12-p13 (EHF/APIP; P=1.9 × 10?10), was previously shown to be associated with lung disease. These results provide new insights into potential targets for modulating lung disease severity in CF. PMID:26417704

  1. Antioxidant defense enzyme genes and asthma susceptibility: gender-specific effects and heterogeneity in gene-gene interactions between pathogenetic variants of the disease.

    PubMed

    Polonikov, Alexey V; Ivanov, Vladimir P; Bogomazov, Alexey D; Freidin, Maxim B; Illig, Thomas; Solodilova, Maria A

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress resulting from an increased amount of reactive oxygen species and an imbalance between oxidants and antioxidants plays an important role in the pathogenesis of asthma. The present study tested the hypothesis that genetic susceptibility to allergic and nonallergic variants of asthma is determined by complex interactions between genes encoding antioxidant defense enzymes (ADE). We carried out a comprehensive analysis of the associations between adult asthma and 46 single nucleotide polymorphisms of 34 ADE genes and 12 other candidate genes of asthma in Russian population using set association analysis and multifactor dimensionality reduction approaches. We found for the first time epistatic interactions between ADE genes underlying asthma susceptibility and the genetic heterogeneity between allergic and nonallergic variants of the disease. We identified GSR (glutathione reductase) and PON2 (paraoxonase 2) as novel candidate genes for asthma susceptibility. We observed gender-specific effects of ADE genes on the risk of asthma. The results of the study demonstrate complexity and diversity of interactions between genes involved in oxidative stress underlying susceptibility to allergic and nonallergic asthma. PMID:24895604

  2. Antioxidant Defense Enzyme Genes and Asthma Susceptibility: Gender-Specific Effects and Heterogeneity in Gene-Gene Interactions between Pathogenetic Variants of the Disease

    PubMed Central

    Polonikov, Alexey V.; Ivanov, Vladimir P.; Bogomazov, Alexey D.; Freidin, Maxim B.; Illig, Thomas; Solodilova, Maria A.

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress resulting from an increased amount of reactive oxygen species and an imbalance between oxidants and antioxidants plays an important role in the pathogenesis of asthma. The present study tested the hypothesis that genetic susceptibility to allergic and nonallergic variants of asthma is determined by complex interactions between genes encoding antioxidant defense enzymes (ADE). We carried out a comprehensive analysis of the associations between adult asthma and 46 single nucleotide polymorphisms of 34 ADE genes and 12 other candidate genes of asthma in Russian population using set association analysis and multifactor dimensionality reduction approaches. We found for the first time epistatic interactions between ADE genes underlying asthma susceptibility and the genetic heterogeneity between allergic and nonallergic variants of the disease. We identified GSR (glutathione reductase) and PON2 (paraoxonase 2) as novel candidate genes for asthma susceptibility. We observed gender-specific effects of ADE genes on the risk of asthma. The results of the study demonstrate complexity and diversity of interactions between genes involved in oxidative stress underlying susceptibility to allergic and nonallergic asthma. PMID:24895604

  3. Prenatal Exposure to Arsenic and Cadmium Impacts Infectious Disease-Related Genes within the Glucocorticoid Receptor Signal Transduction Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Rager, Julia E.; Yosim, Andrew; Fry, Rebecca C.

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that environmental agents mediate susceptibility to infectious disease. Studies support the impact of prenatal/early life exposure to the environmental metals inorganic arsenic (iAs) and cadmium (Cd) on increased risk for susceptibility to infection. The specific biological mechanisms that underlie such exposure-mediated effects remain understudied. This research aimed to identify key genes/signal transduction pathways that associate prenatal exposure to these toxic metals with changes in infectious disease susceptibility using a Comparative Genomic Enrichment Method (CGEM). Using CGEM an infectious disease gene (IDG) database was developed comprising 1085 genes with known roles in viral, bacterial, and parasitic disease pathways. Subsequently, datasets collected from human pregnancy cohorts exposed to iAs or Cd were examined in relationship to the IDGs, specifically focusing on data representing epigenetic modifications (5-methyl cytosine), genomic perturbations (mRNA expression), and proteomic shifts (protein expression). A set of 82 infection and exposure-related genes was identified and found to be enriched for their role in the glucocorticoid receptor signal transduction pathway. Given their common identification across numerous human cohorts and their known toxicological role in disease, the identified genes within the glucocorticoid signal transduction pathway may underlie altered infectious disease susceptibility associated with prenatal exposures to the toxic metals iAs and Cd in humans. PMID:25479081

  4. Abnormalities in Alternative Splicing of Apoptotic Genes and Cardiovascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Dlamini, Zodwa; Tshidino, Shonisani C.; Hull, Rodney

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis is required for normal heart development in the embryo, but has also been shown to be an important factor in the occurrence of heart disease. Alternative splicing of apoptotic genes is currently emerging as a diagnostic and therapeutic target for heart disease. This review addresses the involvement of abnormalities in alternative splicing of apoptotic genes in cardiac disorders including cardiomyopathy, myocardial ischemia and heart failure. Many pro-apoptotic members of the Bcl-2 family have alternatively spliced isoforms that lack important active domains. These isoforms can play a negative regulatory role by binding to and inhibiting the pro-apoptotic forms. Alternative splicing is observed to be increased in various cardiovascular diseases with the level of alternate transcripts increasing elevated in diseased hearts compared to healthy subjects. In many cases these isoforms appear to be the underlying cause of the disease, while in others they may be induced in response to cardiovascular pathologies. Regardless of this, the detection of alternate splicing events in the heart can serve as useful diagnostic or prognostic tools, while those splicing events that seem to play a causative role in cardiovascular disease make attractive future drug targets. PMID:26580598

  5. Abnormalities in Alternative Splicing of Apoptotic Genes and Cardiovascular Diseases.

    PubMed

    Dlamini, Zodwa; Tshidino, Shonisani C; Hull, Rodney

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis is required for normal heart development in the embryo, but has also been shown to be an important factor in the occurrence of heart disease. Alternative splicing of apoptotic genes is currently emerging as a diagnostic and therapeutic target for heart disease. This review addresses the involvement of abnormalities in alternative splicing of apoptotic genes in cardiac disorders including cardiomyopathy, myocardial ischemia and heart failure. Many pro-apoptotic members of the Bcl-2 family have alternatively spliced isoforms that lack important active domains. These isoforms can play a negative regulatory role by binding to and inhibiting the pro-apoptotic forms. Alternative splicing is observed to be increased in various cardiovascular diseases with the level of alternate transcripts increasing elevated in diseased hearts compared to healthy subjects. In many cases these isoforms appear to be the underlying cause of the disease, while in others they may be induced in response to cardiovascular pathologies. Regardless of this, the detection of alternate splicing events in the heart can serve as useful diagnostic or prognostic tools, while those splicing events that seem to play a causative role in cardiovascular disease make attractive future drug targets. PMID:26580598

  6. Disease isolates of Streptococcus pseudopneumoniae and non-typeable S. pneumoniae presumptively identified as atypical S. pneumoniae in Spain.

    PubMed

    Rolo, Dora; S Simões, Alexandra; Domenech, Arnau; Fenoll, Asunción; Liñares, Josefina; de Lencastre, Hermínia; Ardanuy, Carmen; Sá-Leão, Raquel

    2013-01-01

    We aimed to obtain insights on the nature of a collection of isolates presumptively identified as atypical Streptococcus pneumoniae recovered from invasive and non-invasive infections in Spain. One-hundred and thirty-two isolates were characterized by: optochin susceptibility in ambient and CO(2)-enriched atmosphere; bile solubility; PCR-based assays targeting pneumococcal genes lytA, ply, pspA, cpsA, Spn9802, aliB-like ORF2, and a specific 16S rRNA region; multilocus sequence analysis; and antimicrobial susceptibility. By multilocus sequence analysis, 61 isolates were S. pseudopneumoniae, 34 were pneumococci, 13 were S. mitis, and 24 remained unclassified as non-pneumococci. Among S. pseudopneumoniae isolates, 51 (83.6%) were collected from respiratory tract samples; eight isolates were obtained from sterile sources. High frequency of non-susceptibility to penicillin (60.7%) and erythromycin (42.6%) was found. Only 50.8% of the S. pseudopneumoniae isolates displayed the typical optochin phenotype originally described for this species. None harbored the cpsA gene or the pneumococcal typical lytA restriction fragment length polymorphism. The Spn9802 and the specific 16S rRNA regions were detected among the majority of the S. pseudopneumoniae isolates (n?=?59 and n?=?49, respectively). The ply and pspA genes were rarely found. A high genetic diversity was found and 59 profiles were identified. Among the S. pneumoniae, 23 were capsulated and 11 were non-typeable. Three non-typeable isolates, associated to international non-capsulated lineages, were recovered from invasive disease sources. In conclusion, half of the atypical pneumococcal clinical isolates were, in fact, S. pseudopneumoniae and one-fourth were other streptococci. We identified S. pseudopneumoniae and non-typeable pneumococci as cause of disease in Spain including invasive disease. PMID:23437306

  7. Identification of candidate target genes for human peripheral arterial disease using weighted gene co?expression network analysis.

    PubMed

    Yin, De-Xin; Zhao, Hao-Min; Sun, Da-Jun; Yao, Jian; Ding, Da-Yong

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to identify the potential treatment targets of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and provide further insights into the underlying mechanism of PAD, based on a weighted gene co?expression network analysis (WGCNA) method. The mRNA expression profiles (accession. no. GSE27034), which included 19 samples from patients with PAD and 18 samples from normal control individuals were extracted from the Gene Expression Omnibus database. Subsequently, the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were obtained using the Limma package and the co?expression network modules were screened using the WGCNA approach. In addition, the protein?protein interaction network for the DEGs in the most significant module was constructed using Cytoscape software. Functional enrichment analyses of the DEGs in the most significant module were also performed using the Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) Orthology?Based Annotation System, respectively. A total of 148 DEGs were identified in PAD, which were used to construct the WGCN, in which two modules (gray module and turquoise module) were identified, with the gray module exhibiting a higher gene significance (GS) value than the turquoise module. In addition, a co?expression network was constructed for 60 DEGs in the gray module. The functional enrichment results showed that the DEGs in the gray module were enriched in five Gene Ontology terms and four KEGG pathways. For example, cyclin?dependent kinase inhibitor 1A (CDKN1A), FBJ murine osteosarcoma viral oncogene homolog (FOS) and prostaglandin?endoperoxide synthase 2 (PTGS2) were enriched in response to glucocorticoid stimulus. The results of the present study suggested that DEGs in the gray module, including CDKN1A, FOS and PTGS2, may be associated with the pathogenesis of PAD, by modulating the cell cycle, and may offer potential for use as candidate treatment targets for PAD. PMID:26498853

  8. Comparative genomics using teleost fish helps to systematically identify target gene bodies of functionally defined human enhancers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Human genome is enriched with thousands of conserved non-coding elements (CNEs). Recently, a medium throughput strategy was employed to analyze the ability of human CNEs to drive tissue specific expression during mouse embryogenesis. These data led to the establishment of publicly available genome wide catalog of functionally defined human enhancers. Scattering of enhancers over larger regions in vertebrate genomes seriously impede attempts to pinpoint their precise target genes. Such associations are prerequisite to explore the significance of this in vivo characterized catalog of human enhancers in development, disease and evolution. Results This study is an attempt to systematically identify the target gene-bodies for functionally defined human CNE-enhancers. For the purpose we adopted the orthology/paralogy mapping approach and compared the CNE induced reporter expression with reported endogenous expression pattern of neighboring genes. This procedure pinpointed specific target gene-bodies for the total of 192 human CNE-enhancers. This enables us to gauge the maximum genomic search space for enhancer hunting: 4 Mb of genomic sequence around the gene of interest (2 Mb on either side). Furthermore, we used human-rodent comparison for a set of 159 orthologous enhancer pairs to infer that the central nervous system (CNS) specific gene expression is closely associated with the cooperative interaction among at least eight distinct transcription factors: SOX5, HFH, SOX17, HNF3?, c-FOS, Tal1beta-E47S, MEF and FREAC. Conclusions In conclusion, the systematic wiring of cis-acting sites and their target gene bodies is an important step to unravel the role of in vivo characterized catalog of human enhancers in development, physiology and medicine. PMID:23432897

  9. siRNA screen identifies QPCT as a druggable target for Huntington’s disease

    E-print Network

    Jimenez-Sanchez, Maria; Lam, Wun; Hannus, Michael; Sönnichsen, Birte; Imarisio, Sara; Fleming, Angeleen; Tarditi, Alessia; Menzies, Fiona; Dami, Teresa Ed; Xu, Catherine; Gonzalez-Couto, Eduardo; Lazzeroni, Giulia; Heitz, Freddy; Diamanti, Daniela; Massai, Luisa; Satagopam, Venkata P.; Marconi, Guido; Caramelli, Chiara; Nencini, Arianna; Andreini, Matteo; Sardone, Gian Luca; Caradonna, Nicola P.; Porcari, Valentina; Scali, Carla; Schneider, Reinhard; Pollio, Giuseppe; O’Kane, Cahir J.; Caricasole, Andrea; Rubinsztein, David C.

    2015-04-06

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a currently incurable neurodegenerative condition caused by an abnormally expanded polyglutamine tract in ?huntingtin (?HTT). We identified new modifiers of mutant ?HTT toxicity by performing a large-scale 'druggable...

  10. Identifying the Right Disease Targets to Develop Better Drugs, Faster | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Identifying the Right Disease Targets to Develop Better Drugs, Faster Past Issues / Spring 2014 Table of Contents ... ones can't wait. Aren't there enough drugs already? No. Drug development is a terribly difficult, ...

  11. Automated MRI measures identify individuals with mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease

    E-print Network

    Desikan, Rahul S.

    Mild cognitive impairment can represent a transitional state between normal ageing and Alzheimer's disease. Non-invasive diagnostic methods are needed to identify mild cognitive impairment individuals for early therapeutic ...

  12. Transposon tagging of disease resistance genes. Final report, May 1, 1988--April 30, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Michelmore, R.

    1994-09-01

    The goal of this project was to develop a transposon mutagenesis system for lettuce and to clone and characterize disease resistance genes by transposon tagging. The majority of studies were conducted with the Ac/Ds System. Researchers made and tested several constructs as well as utilized constructions shown to be functional in other plant species. Researchers demonstrated movement of Ac and DS in lettuce; however, they transposed at much lower frequencies in lettuce than in other plant species. Therefore, further manipulation of the system, particularly for flower specific expression of transposase, is required before a routine transposon system is available for lettuce. Populations of lettuce were generated and screened to test for the stability of resistance genes and several spontaneous mutations were isolated. Researchers also identified a resistance gene mutant in plants transformed with a Ds element and chimeric transposase gene. This is currently being characterized in detail.

  13. Transcriptome Analysis to Identify Cold-Responsive Genes in Amur Carp (Cyprinus carpio haematopterus)

    PubMed Central

    He, XuLing

    2015-01-01

    The adaptation of fish to low temperatures is the result of long-term evolution. Amur carp (Cyprinus carpio haematopterus) survives low temperatures (0-4°C) for six months per year. Therefore, we chose this fish as a model organism to study the mechanisms of cold-adaptive responses using high-throughput sequencing technology. This system provided an excellent model for exploring the relationship between evolutionary genomic changes and environmental adaptations. The Amur carp transcriptome was sequenced using the Illumina platform and was assembled into 163,121 cDNA contigs, with an average read length of 594 bp and an N50 length of 913 bp. A total of 162,339 coding sequences (CDSs) were identified and of 32,730 unique CDSs were annotated. Gene Ontology (GO), EuKaryotic Orthologous Groups (KOG) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) analyses were performed to classify all CDSs into different functional categories. A large number of cold-responsive genes were detected in different tissues at different temperatures. A total of 9,427 microsatellites were identified and classified, with 1952 identifying in cold-responsive genes. Based on GO enrichment analysis of the cold-induced genes, “protein localization” and “protein transport” were the most highly represented biological processes. “Circadian rhythm,” “protein processing in endoplasmic reticulum,” “endocytosis,” “insulin signaling pathway,” and “lysosome” were the most highly enriched pathways for the genes induced by cold stress. Our data greatly contribute to the common carp (C. carpio) transcriptome resource, and the identification of cold-responsive genes in different tissues at different temperatures will aid in deciphering the genetic basis of ecological and environmental adaptations in this species. Based on our results, the Amur carp has evolved special strategies to survive low temperatures, and these strategies include the system-wide or tissue-specific induction of gene expression during their six-month overwintering period. PMID:26098567

  14. Transcriptome analysis identifies genes with enriched expression in the mouse central Extended Amygdala

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Jérôme A. J.; Befort, Katia; Blad, Clara; Filliol, Dominique; Ghate, Aditee; Dembele, Doulaye; Thibault, Christelle; Koch, Muriel; Muller, Jean; Lardenois, Aurélie; Poch, Olivier; Kieffer, Brigitte L.

    2008-01-01

    The central Extended Amygdala (EAc) is an ensemble of highly interconnected limbic structures of the anterior brain, and forms a cellular continuum including the Bed Nucleus of the Stria Terminalis (BNST), the central nucleus of the Amygdala (CeA) and the Nucleus Accumbens shell (AcbSh). This neural network is a key site for interactions between brain reward and stress systems, and has been implicated in several aspects of drug abuse. In order to increase our understanding of EAc function at the molecular level, we undertook a genome-wide screen (Affymetrix) to identify genes whose expression is enriched in the EAc. We focused on the less-well known BNST-CeA areas of the EAc, and identified 121 genes that exhibit more than 2-fold higher expression level in the EAc compared to whole brain. Among these, forty-three genes have never been described to be expressed in the EAc. We mapped these genes throughout the brain, using non-radioactive in situ hybridization, and identified eight genes with a unique and distinct rostro-caudal expression pattern along AcbSh, BNST and CeA. Q-PCR analysis performed in brain and peripheral organ tissues indicated that, with the exception of one (Spata13), all these genes are predominantly expressed in brain. These genes encode signaling proteins (Adora2, GPR88, Arpp21 and Rem2), a transcription factor (Limh6) or proteins of unknown function (Rik130, Spata13 and Wfs1). The identification of genes with enriched expression expands our knowledge of EAc at a molecular level, and provides useful information to towards genetic manipulations within the EAc. PMID:18786617

  15. X-exome sequencing of 405 unresolved families identifies seven novel intellectual disability genes.

    PubMed

    Hu, H; Haas, S A; Chelly, J; Van Esch, H; Raynaud, M; de Brouwer, A P M; Weinert, S; Froyen, G; Frints, S G M; Laumonnier, F; Zemojtel, T; Love, M I; Richard, H; Emde, A-K; Bienek, M; Jensen, C; Hambrock, M; Fischer, U; Langnick, C; Feldkamp, M; Wissink-Lindhout, W; Lebrun, N; Castelnau, L; Rucci, J; Montjean, R; Dorseuil, O; Billuart, P; Stuhlmann, T; Shaw, M; Corbett, M A; Gardner, A; Willis-Owen, S; Tan, C; Friend, K L; Belet, S; van Roozendaal, K E P; Jimenez-Pocquet, M; Moizard, M-P; Ronce, N; Sun, R; O'Keeffe, S; Chenna, R; van Bömmel, A; Göke, J; Hackett, A; Field, M; Christie, L; Boyle, J; Haan, E; Nelson, J; Turner, G; Baynam, G; Gillessen-Kaesbach, G; Müller, U; Steinberger, D; Budny, B; Badura-Stronka, M; Latos-Biele?ska, A; Ousager, L B; Wieacker, P; Rodríguez Criado, G; Bondeson, M-L; Annerén, G; Dufke, A; Cohen, M; Van Maldergem, L; Vincent-Delorme, C; Echenne, B; Simon-Bouy, B; Kleefstra, T; Willemsen, M; Fryns, J-P; Devriendt, K; Ullmann, R; Vingron, M; Wrogemann, K; Wienker, T F; Tzschach, A; van Bokhoven, H; Gecz, J; Jentsch, T J; Chen, W; Ropers, H-H; Kalscheuer, V M

    2016-01-01

    X-linked intellectual disability (XLID) is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorder. During the past two decades in excess of 100 X-chromosome ID genes have been identified. Yet, a large number of families mapping to the X-chromosome remained unresolved suggesting that more XLID genes or loci are yet to be identified. Here, we have investigated 405 unresolved families with XLID. We employed massively parallel sequencing of all X-chromosome exons in the index males. The majority of these males were previously tested negative for copy number variations and for mutations in a subset of known XLID genes by Sanger sequencing. In total, 745 X-chromosomal genes were screened. After stringent filtering, a total of 1297 non-recurrent exonic variants remained for prioritization. Co-segregation analysis of potential clinically relevant changes revealed that 80 families (20%) carried pathogenic variants in established XLID genes. In 19 families, we detected likely causative protein truncating and missense variants in 7 novel and validated XLID genes (CLCN4, CNKSR2, FRMPD4, KLHL15, LAS1L, RLIM and USP27X) and potentially deleterious variants in 2 novel candidate XLID genes (CDK16 and TAF1). We show that the CLCN4 and CNKSR2 variants impair protein functions as indicated by electrophysiological studies and altered differentiation of cultured primary neurons from Clcn4(-/-) mice or after mRNA knock-down. The newly identified and candidate XLID proteins belong to pathways and networks with established roles in cognitive function and intellectual disability in particular. We suggest that systematic sequencing of all X-chromosomal genes in a cohort of patients with genetic evidence for X-chromosome locus involvement may resolve up to 58% of Fragile X-negative cases. PMID:25644381

  16. Transcriptome Analysis to Identify Cold-Responsive Genes in Amur Carp (Cyprinus carpio haematopterus).

    PubMed

    Liang, LiQun; Chang, YuMei; He, XuLing; Tang, Ran

    2015-01-01

    The adaptation of fish to low temperatures is the result of long-term evolution. Amur carp (Cyprinus carpio haematopterus) survives low temperatures (0-4°C) for six months per year. Therefore, we chose this fish as a model organism to study the mechanisms of cold-adaptive responses using high-throughput sequencing technology. This system provided an excellent model for exploring the relationship between evolutionary genomic changes and environmental adaptations. The Amur carp transcriptome was sequenced using the Illumina platform and was assembled into 163,121 cDNA contigs, with an average read length of 594 bp and an N50 length of 913 bp. A total of 162,339 coding sequences (CDSs) were identified and of 32,730 unique CDSs were annotated. Gene Ontology (GO), EuKaryotic Orthologous Groups (KOG) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) analyses were performed to classify all CDSs into different functional categories. A large number of cold-responsive genes were detected in different tissues at different temperatures. A total of 9,427 microsatellites were identified and classified, with 1952 identifying in cold-responsive genes. Based on GO enrichment analysis of the cold-induced genes, "protein localization" and "protein transport" were the most highly represented biological processes. "Circadian rhythm," "protein processing in endoplasmic reticulum," "endocytosis," "insulin signaling pathway," and "lysosome" were the most highly enriched pathways for the genes induced by cold stress. Our data greatly contribute to the common carp (C. carpio) transcriptome resource, and the identification of cold-responsive genes in different tissues at different temperatures will aid in deciphering the genetic basis of ecological and environmental adaptations in this species. Based on our results, the Amur carp has evolved special strategies to survive low temperatures, and these strategies include the system-wide or tissue-specific induction of gene expression during their six-month overwintering period. PMID:26098567

  17. Gene-expression profiling to identify genes related to spontaneous tumor regression in a canine cancer model.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Hsin-Chien; Liao, Albert Tai-Ching; Jan, Tong-Rong; Wang, Yu-Shan; Lei, Han-Jung; Tsai, Mong-Hsun; Chen, Mo-Fen; Lee, Chien-Yueh; Lin, Yi-Chen; Chu, Rea-Min; Lin, Chen-Si

    2013-02-15

    Microarray transcriptome study in cancer has been commonly used to investigate tumorigenic mechanisms. The unique growth pattern of spontaneous regression (SR) after progressive (P) growth in canine transmissible venereal tumor (CTVT) provides a valuable cancer model to study the genome-wide differences in samples between the two stages of growth. In this study, Affymetrix analysis was performed based on the canine genome to compare the gene expression profiles of CTVT P- and SR-phase tumors. A total of 459 (278 up-regulated and 181 down-regulated) genes were identified as being differentially-expressed during the SR phase by the 2-fold method. Further analysis of these genes revealed that the expression of three genes associated with IL-6 production -TIMD-4, GPNMB and PLTP - was significantly higher in SR-phase tumors than in P-phase tumors; these results were also confirmed by real time RT-PCR in tumor tissues of beagles. In addition, we found that Th17-related genes were over-expressed in the SR phase, suggesting autoimmune responses involvement in tumor regression. Although the interaction between CTVT and host immunity were partially investigated in previous studies, our results enable us to gain new insight into the genes and possible mechanisms involved in tumor regression and reveal potentially useful targets for cancer therapy. PMID:23237908

  18. An Integrative Analysis to Identify Driver Genes in Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Sawada, Genta; Niida, Atsushi; Hirata, Hidenari; Komatsu, Hisateru; Uchi, Ryutaro; Shimamura, Teppei; Takahashi, Yusuke; Kurashige, Junji; Matsumura, Tae; Ueo, Hiroki; Takano, Yuki; Ueda, Masami; Sakimura, Shotaro; Shinden, Yoshiaki; Eguchi, Hidetoshi; Sudo, Tomoya; Sugimachi, Keishi; Yamasaki, Makoto; Tanaka, Fumiaki; Tachimori, Yuji; Kajiyama, Yoshiaki; Natsugoe, Shoji; Fujita, Hiromasa; Tanaka, Yoichi; Calin, George; Miyano, Satoru; Doki, Yuichiro; Mori, Masaki; Mimori, Koshi

    2015-01-01

    Background Few driver genes have been well established in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Identification of the genomic aberrations that contribute to changes in gene expression profiles can be used to predict driver genes. Methods We searched for driver genes in ESCC by integrative analysis of gene expression microarray profiles and copy number data. To narrow down candidate genes, we performed survival analysis on expression data and tested the genetic vulnerability of each genes using public RNAi screening data. We confirmed the results by performing RNAi experiments and evaluating the clinical relevance of candidate genes in an independent ESCC cohort. Results We found 10 significantly recurrent copy number alterations accompanying gene expression changes, including loci 11q13.2, 7p11.2, 3q26.33, and 17q12, which harbored CCND1, EGFR, SOX2, and ERBB2, respectively. Analysis of survival data and RNAi screening data suggested that GRB7, located on 17q12, was a driver gene in ESCC. In ESCC cell lines harboring 17q12 amplification, knockdown of GRB7 reduced the proliferation, migration, and invasion capacities of cells. Moreover, siRNA targeting GRB7 had a synergistic inhibitory effect when combined with trastuzumab, an anti-ERBB2 antibody. Survival analysis of the independent cohort also showed that high GRB7 expression was associated with poor prognosis in ESCC. Conclusion Our integrative analysis provided important insights into ESCC pathogenesis. We identified GRB7 as a novel ESCC driver gene and potential new therapeutic target. PMID:26465158

  19. An orphan viral TNF receptor superfamily member identified in lymphocystis disease virus

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Lymphocystis disease virus (LCDV) is a large icosahedral dsDNA-containing virus of the Lymphocystivirus genus within the Iridoviridae family that can cause disease in more than 140 marine and freshwater fish species. While several isolates have been charcaterized and classified into distinct genotypes the complete genomic sequence is currently only available from two species, the LCDV-1, isolated from flounder (Platichtys flesus) in Europe and the LCDV-C, isolated from Japanese cultured flounder (Paralichthys olivaceus) in China. Analysis of the genome of LCDV-C showed it to encode a protein named LDVICp016 with similarities to the Tumour necrosis factor receptor (TNFR) superfamily with immunomodulatory potential. Findings We have expressed and purified the recombinant protein LDVICp016 and screened for potential interaction partners using surface plasmon resonance. Commercially available human and mouse members of the TNF superfamily (TNFSF), along with a representative set of fish-derived TNFSF were tested. We have found the LDVICp016 protein to be secreted and we have identified a second viral TNFR encoded by ORF 095 of the same virus. None of the 42 tested proteins were found to interact with LDVICp016. Conclusions We show that LDVICp016 is a secreted protein belonging to the TNF receptor family that may be part of a larger gene family in Lymphocystiviruses. While the ligand of this protein remains unknown, possibly due to the species specific nature of this interaction, further investigations into the potential role of this protein in the blockade of immune responses in its fish host are required. PMID:23758704

  20. Novel stop and frameshifting mutations in the autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease 2 (PKD2) gene.

    PubMed

    Viribay, M; Hayashi, T; Tellería, D; Mochizuki, T; Reynolds, D M; Alonso, R; Lens, X M; Moreno, F; Harris, P C; Somlo, S; San Millán, J L

    1997-12-01

    Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is one of the most frequent inherited disorders. The majority of cases are due to mutation of the PKD1 gene, on 16p13.3, while in most of the remainder the disease maps to the PKD2 locus, at chromosome 4q21-q23. Recently, the PKD2 gene has been positionally cloned and three nonsense mutations within the coding sequence of the gene identified. Here we report a systematic mutation screening of all 15 exons of the PKD2 gene in chromosome 4-linked ADPKD families, using heteroduplex and SSCP analyses. We have identified and characterized seven novel mutations, with a detection rate of approximately 90% in the population studied. All of the mutations result in the premature stop of translation: four nonsense changes and three deletions. The deletions are all frameshifting, of four T nucleotides in one case and one G nucleotide in the other two. All mutations are unique and are distributed throughout the gene without evidence of clustering. Comparison of specific mutations with the clinical profile in ADPKD2 families shows no clear correlation. PMID:9402976

  1. Mutation analysis of the polycystic kidney disease 1 (PKD1) gene

    SciTech Connect

    Peral, B.; Ward, C.J.; Thomas, S.

    1994-09-01

    The gene which is mutated in most cases of autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), PKD1, has recently been identified on chromosome 16. Three quarters of this gene lies in a region of genomic DNA that is duplicated elsewhere on chromosome 16. Consequently, the search for mutations has proved difficult and our efforts so far have concentrated on screening the single copy 3{prime} region of the gene. We have employed the methods of field inversion gel electrophoresis, conventional Southern blotting, RT-PCR and heteroduplex analysis. From the examination of DNA of approximately 300 PKD1 patients, two deletions have been identified. One is a 5.5 kb genomic deletion, which is transmitted with the disease and results in a 3 kb deletion of the PKD1 transcript. The other is a de novo genomic deletion of 2 kb which removes {approximately}500 bp of the transcript. In addition, analysis of lymphoblast RNA by RT-PCR from 50 patients has revealed one splicing mutation resulting in the removal of a 135 bp exon. Further analysis of the single copy region of this gene is underway and strategies to screen the duplicated area of the gene for mutations are being explored.

  2. Heterogeneous Network Edge Prediction: A Data Integration Approach to Prioritize Disease-Associated Genes

    PubMed Central

    Himmelstein, Daniel S.; Baranzini, Sergio E.

    2015-01-01

    The first decade of Genome Wide Association Studies (GWAS) has uncovered a wealth of disease-associated variants. Two important derivations will be the translation of this information into a multiscale understanding of pathogenic variants and leveraging existing data to increase the power of existing and future studies through prioritization. We explore edge prediction on heterogeneous networks—graphs with multiple node and edge types—for accomplishing both tasks. First we constructed a network with 18 node types—genes, diseases, tissues, pathophysiologies, and 14 MSigDB (molecular signatures database) collections—and 19 edge types from high-throughput publicly-available resources. From this network composed of 40,343 nodes and 1,608,168 edges, we extracted features that describe the topology between specific genes and diseases. Next, we trained a model from GWAS associations and predicted the probability of association between each protein-coding gene and each of 29 well-studied complex diseases. The model, which achieved 132-fold enrichment in precision at 10% recall, outperformed any individual domain, highlighting the benefit of integrative approaches. We identified pleiotropy, transcriptional signatures of perturbations, pathways, and protein interactions as influential mechanisms explaining pathogenesis. Our method successfully predicted the results (with AUROC = 0.79) from a withheld multiple sclerosis (MS) GWAS despite starting with only 13 previously associated genes. Finally, we combined our network predictions with statistical evidence of association to propose four novel MS genes, three of which (JAK2, REL, RUNX3) validated on the masked GWAS. Furthermore, our predictions provide biological support highlighting REL as the causal gene within its gene-rich locus. Users can browse all predictions online (http://het.io). Heterogeneous network edge prediction effectively prioritized genetic associations and provides a powerful new approach for data integration across multiple domains. PMID:26158728

  3. Dizeez: an online game for human gene-disease annotation.

    PubMed

    Loguercio, Salvatore; Good, Benjamin M; Su, Andrew I

    2013-01-01

    Structured gene annotations are a foundation upon which many bioinformatics and statistical analyses are built. However the structured annotations available in public databases are a sparse representation of biological knowledge as a whole. The rate of biomedical data generation is such that centralized biocuration efforts struggle to keep up. New models for gene annotation need to be explored that expand the pace at which we are able to structure biomedical knowledge. Recently, online games have emerged as an effective way to recruit, engage and organize large numbers of volunteers to help address difficult biological challenges. For example, games have been successfully developed for protein folding (Foldit), multiple sequence alignment (Phylo) and RNA structure design (EteRNA). Here we present Dizeez, a simple online game built with the purpose of structuring knowledge of gene-disease associations. Preliminary results from game play online and at scientific conferences suggest that Dizeez is producing valid gene-disease annotations not yet present in any public database. These early results provide a basic proof of principle that online games can be successfully applied to the challenge of gene annotation. Dizeez is available at http://genegames.org. PMID:23951102

  4. Pluripotent stem cell based gene therapy for hematological diseases.

    PubMed

    Vanhee, Stijn; Vandekerckhove, Bart

    2016-01-01

    Standard treatment for severe inherited hematopoietic diseases consists of allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Alternatively, patients can be treated with gene therapy: gene-corrected autologous hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC) are transplanted. By using retro- or lentiviral vectors, a copy of the functional gene is randomly inserted in the DNA of the HSPC and becomes constitutively expressed. Gene therapy is currently limited to monogenic diseases for which clinical trials are being actively conducted in highly specialized centers around the world. This approach, although successful, carries with it inherent safety and efficacy issues. Recently, two technologies became available that, when combined, may enable treatment of genetic defects by HSPC that have the non-functional allele replaced by a functional copy. One technology consists of the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) from patient blood samples or skin biopsies, the other concerns nuclease-mediated gene editing. Both technologies have been successfully combined in basic research and appear applicable in the clinic. This paper reviews recent literature, discusses what can be achieved in the clinic using present knowledge and points out further research directions. PMID:26381313

  5. Selection on Plant Male Function Genes Identifies Candidates for Reproductive Isolation of Yellow Monkeyflowers

    PubMed Central

    Aagaard, Jan E.; George, Renee D.; Fishman, Lila; MacCoss, Michael J.; Swanson, Willie J.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the genetic basis of reproductive isolation promises insight into speciation and the origins of biological diversity. While progress has been made in identifying genes underlying barriers to reproduction that function after fertilization (post-zygotic isolation), we know much less about earlier acting pre-zygotic barriers. Of particular interest are barriers involved in mating and fertilization that can evolve extremely rapidly under sexual selection, suggesting they may play a prominent role in the initial stages of reproductive isolation. A significant challenge to the field of speciation genetics is developing new approaches for identification of candidate genes underlying these barriers, particularly among non-traditional model systems. We employ powerful proteomic and genomic strategies to study the genetic basis of conspecific pollen precedence, an important component of pre-zygotic reproductive isolation among yellow monkeyflowers (Mimulus spp.) resulting from male pollen competition. We use isotopic labeling in combination with shotgun proteomics to identify more than 2,000 male function (pollen tube) proteins within maternal reproductive structures (styles) of M. guttatus flowers where pollen competition occurs. We then sequence array-captured pollen tube exomes from a large outcrossing population of M. guttatus, and identify those genes with evidence of selective sweeps or balancing selection consistent with their role in pollen competition. We also test for evidence of positive selection on these genes more broadly across yellow monkeyflowers, because a signal of adaptive divergence is a common feature of genes causing reproductive isolation. Together the molecular evolution studies identify 159 pollen tube proteins that are candidate genes for conspecific pollen precedence. Our work demonstrates how powerful proteomic and genomic tools can be readily adapted to non-traditional model systems, allowing for genome-wide screens towards the goal of identifying the molecular basis of genetically complex traits. PMID:24339787

  6. Gene Technology for Papaya Ringspot Virus Disease Management

    PubMed Central

    Azad, Md. Abul Kalam; Sidik, Nik Marzuki

    2014-01-01

    Papaya (Carica papaya) is severely damaged by the papaya ringspot virus (PRSV). This review focuses on the development of PRSV resistant transgenic papaya through gene technology. The genetic diversity of PRSV depends upon geographical distribution and the influence of PRSV disease management on a sequence of PRSV isolates. The concept of pathogen-derived resistance has been employed for the development of transgenic papaya, using a coat protein-mediated, RNA-silencing mechanism and replicase gene-mediated transformation for effective PRSV disease management. The development of PRSV-resistant papaya via post-transcriptional gene silencing is a promising technology for PRSV disease management. PRSV-resistant transgenic papaya is environmentally safe and has no harmful effects on human health. Recent studies have revealed that the success of adoption of transgenic papaya depends upon the application, it being a commercially viable product, bio-safety regulatory issues, trade regulations, and the wider social acceptance of the technology. This review discusses the genome and the genetic diversity of PRSV, host range determinants, molecular diagnosis, disease management strategies, the development of transgenic papaya, environmental issues, issues in the adoption of transgenic papaya, and future directions for research. PMID:24757435

  7. Gene technology for papaya ringspot virus disease management.

    PubMed

    Azad, Md Abul Kalam; Amin, Latifah; Sidik, Nik Marzuki

    2014-01-01

    Papaya (Carica papaya) is severely damaged by the papaya ringspot virus (PRSV). This review focuses on the development of PRSV resistant transgenic papaya through gene technology. The genetic diversity of PRSV depends upon geographical distribution and the influence of PRSV disease management on a sequence of PRSV isolates. The concept of pathogen-derived resistance has been employed for the development of transgenic papaya, using a coat protein-mediated, RNA-silencing mechanism and replicase gene-mediated transformation for effective PRSV disease management. The development of PRSV-resistant papaya via post-transcriptional gene silencing is a promising technology for PRSV disease management. PRSV-resistant transgenic papaya is environmentally safe and has no harmful effects on human health. Recent studies have revealed that the success of adoption of transgenic papaya depends upon the application, it being a commercially viable product, bio-safety regulatory issues, trade regulations, and the wider social acceptance of the technology. This review discusses the genome and the genetic diversity of PRSV, host range determinants, molecular diagnosis, disease management strategies, the development of transgenic papaya, environmental issues, issues in the adoption of transgenic papaya, and future directions for research. PMID:24757435

  8. Low-copy piggyBac transposon mutagenesis in mice identifies genes driving melanoma.

    PubMed

    Ni, Thomas K; Landrette, Sean F; Bjornson, Robert D; Bosenberg, Marcus W; Xu, Tian

    2013-09-17

    Despite considerable efforts to sequence hypermutated cancers such as melanoma, distinguishing cancer-driving genes from thousands of recurrently mutated genes remains a significant challenge. To circumvent the problematic background mutation rates and identify new melanoma driver genes, we carried out a low-copy piggyBac transposon mutagenesis screen in mice. We induced eleven melanomas with mutation burdens that were 100-fold lower relative to human melanomas. Thirty-eight implicated genes, including two known drivers of human melanoma, were classified into three groups based on high, low, or background-level mutation frequencies in human melanomas, and we further explored the functional significance of genes in each group. For two genes overlooked by prevailing discovery methods, we found that loss of membrane associated guanylate kinase, WW and PDZ domain containing 2 and protein tyrosine phosphatase, receptor type, O cooperated with the v-raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B (BRAF) recurrent V600E mutation to promote cellular transformation. Moreover, for infrequently mutated genes often disregarded by current methods, we discovered recurrent mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase 1 (Map3k1)-activating insertions in our screen, mirroring recurrent MAP3K1 up-regulation in human melanomas. Aberrant expression of Map3k1 enabled growth factor-autonomous proliferation and drove BRAF-independent ERK signaling, thus shedding light on alternative means of activating this prominent signaling pathway in melanoma. In summary, our study contributes several previously undescribed genes involved in melanoma and establishes an important proof-of-principle for the utility of the low-copy transposon mutagenesis approach for identifying cancer-driving genes, especially those masked by hypermutation. PMID:24003131

  9. Human genes involved in copy number variation: mechanisms of origin, functional effects and implications for disease

    PubMed Central

    de Smith, A.J.; Walters, R.G.; Froguel, P.; Blakemore, A.I.

    2009-01-01

    Copy number variants (CNVs) overlap over 7000 genes, many of which are pivotal in biological pathways. The implications of this are profound, with consequences for evolutionary studies, population genetics, gene function and human phenotype, including elucidation of genetic susceptibility to major common diseases, the heritability of which has thus far defied full explanation. Even though this research is still in its infancy, CNVs have already been associated with a number of monogenic, syndromic and complex diseases: the development of high throughput and high resolution techniques for CNV screening is likely to bring further new insights into the contribution of copy number variation to common diseases. Amongst genes overlapped by CNVs, significant enrichments for certain gene ontology categories have been identified, including those related to immune responses and interactions with the environment. Genes in both of these categories are thought to be important in evolutionary adaptation and to be particular targets of natural selection. Thus, a full appreciation of copy number variation may be important for our understanding of human evolution. PMID:19287135

  10. Association of radiation-induced genes with noncancer chronic diseases in Mayak workers occupationally exposed to prolonged radiation.

    PubMed

    Abend, Michael; Azizova, Tamara; Müller, Kerstin; Dörr, Harald; Doucha-Senf, Sven; Kreppel, Helmut; Rusinova, Galina; Glazkova, Irina; Vyazovskaya, Natalia; Unger, Kristian; Braselmann, Herbert; Meineke, Viktor

    2015-03-01

    We examined the association of gene expression with noncancer chronic disease outcomes in Mayak nuclear weapons plant workers who were exposed to radiation due to their occupation. We conducted a cross-sectional study with selection based on radiation exposure status of Mayak plant workers living in Ozyorsk who were alive in 2011 and either exposed to: combined incorporated Plutonium-239 ((239)Pu) and external gamma-ray exposure (n = 82); external gamma-ray exposure alone (n = 18); or were unexposed (n = 50) of Ozyorsk residents who provided community-based professional support for plant personnel and who were alive in 2011. Peripheral blood was taken and RNA was isolated and then converted into cDNA and stored at -20°C. In a previous analysis we screened the whole genome for radiation-associated candidate genes, and validated 15 mRNAs and 15 microRNAs using qRT-PCR. In the current analysis we examined the association of these genes with 15 different chronic diseases on 92 samples (47 males, 45 females). We examined the radiation-to-gene and gene-to-disease associations in statistical models stratified by gender and separately for each disease and exposure. We modeled radiation exposure as gamma or (239)Pu on both the continuous and categorical scales. Unconditional logistic regression was used to calculate odds ratios (OR), 95% confidence intervals (CI), and the concordance for genes that were significantly associated with radiation exposure and a specific disease outcome were identified. Altogether 12 mRNAs and 9 microRNAs appeared to be significantly associated with 6 diseases, including thyroid diseases (3 genes, OR: 1.2-5.1, concordance: 71-78%), atherosclerotic diseases (4 genes, OR: 2.5-10, concordance: 70-75%), kidney diseases (6 genes, OR: 1.3-8.6, concordance: 69-85%), cholelithiasis (3 genes, OR: 0.2-0.3, concordance: 74-75%), benign tumors [1 gene (AGAP4), OR: 3.7, concordance: 81%] and chronic radiation syndrome (4 genes, OR: 2.5-4.3, concordance: 70-99%). Further associations were found for systolic blood pressure (6 genes, OR: 3.7-10.6, concordance: 81-88%) and body mass index [1 gene (miR-484), OR: 3.7, concordance: 81%]. All associations were gender and exposure dependent. These findings suggest that gene expression changes observed after occupational prolonged radiation exposures may increase the risk for certain noncancer chronic diseases. PMID:25706777

  11. A gene expression pattern in blood for the early detection of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Booij, Birgitte Boonstra; Lindahl, Torbjørn; Wetterberg, Peter; Skaane, Nina Voss; Sæbø, Solve; Feten, Guri; Rye, Phil D; Kristiansen, Lena Iren; Hagen, Nina; Jensen, Marianne; Bårdsen, Ken; Winblad, Bengt; Sharma, Praveen; Lönneborg, Anders

    2011-01-01

    A whole genome screen was performed using oligonucleotide microarray analysis on blood from a large clinical cohort of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients and control subjects as clinical sample. Blood samples for total RNA extraction were collected in PAXgene tubes, and gene expression analysis performed on the AB1700 Whole Genome Survey Microarrays. When comparing the gene expression of 94 AD patients and 94 cognitive healthy controls, a Jackknife gene selection based method and Partial Least Square Regression (PLSR) was used to develop a disease classifier algorithm, which gives a test score indicating the presence (positive) or absence (negative) of AD. This algorithm, based on 1239 probes, was validated in an independent test set of 63 subjects comprising 31 AD patients, 25 age-matched cognitively healthy controls, and 7 young controls. This algorithm correctly predicted the class of 55/63 (accuracy 87%), including 26/31 AD samples (sensitivity 84%) and 29/32 controls (specificity 91%). The positive likelihood ratio was 8.9 and the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC AUC) was 0.94. Furthermore, the algorithm also discriminated AD from Parkinson's disease in 24/27 patients (accuracy 89%). We have identified and validated a gene expression signature in blood that classifies AD patients and cognitively healthy controls with high accuracy and show that alterations specific for AD can be detected distant from the primary site of the disease. PMID:20930264

  12. Nonblack patients with sickle cell disease have African. beta. sup s gene cluster haplotypes

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, Z.R.; Powars, D.R.; Williams, W.D. ); Kinney, T.R. ); Schroeder, W.A. )

    1989-05-26

    Of 18 nonblack patients with sickle cell disease, 14 had sickle cell anemia, 2 had hemoglobin SC disease, and 2 had hemoglobin S-{beta}{sup o}-thalassemia. The {beta}{sup s} gene cluster haplotypes that were determined in 7 patients were of African origin and were identified as Central African Republic, Central African Republic minor II, Benin, and Senegal. The haplotype Central African Republic minor II was present on the {beta}{sup o}-thalassemia chromosome in 2 patients. None of 10 patients whose {alpha}-gene status was determined had {alpha}-thalassemia-2. These data strongly support the concept that the {beta}{sup s} gene on chromosome 11 of these individuals is of African origin and that the {alpha}-gene locus on chromosome 16 is of white or native American origin. The clinical severity of the disease in these nonblack patients is appropriate to their haplotype without {alpha}-thalassemia-2 and is comparable with that of black patients. All persons with congenital hemolytic anemia should be examined for the presence of sickle cell disease regardless of physical appearance or ethnic background.

  13. Gene expression profiling of R6/2 transgenic mice with different CAG repeat lengths reveals genes associated with disease onset and progression in Huntington's disease

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Bin; Seredenina, Tamara; Coppola, Giovanni; Kuhn, Alexandre; Geschwind, Daniel H.; Luthi-Carter, Ruth; Thomas, Elizabeth A.

    2011-01-01

    R6/2 transgenic mice with expanded CAG repeats (>300) have a surprisingly prolonged disease progression and longer lifespan than prototypical parent R6/2 mice (carrying 150 CAGs), however, the mechanism of this phenotype amelioration is unknown. We compared gene expression profiles in the striatum of R6/2 transgenic mice carrying ~300 CAG repeats (R6/2Q300 transgenic mice), those carrying ~150 CAG repeats (R6/2Q150 transgenic mice) and littermate wt controls in order to identify genes that may play determinant roles in the time course of phenotypic expression in these mice. Of the top genes showing concordant expression changes in the striatum of both R6/2 lines, 85% were decreased in expression, while discordant expression changes were observed mostly for genes upregulated in R6/2Q300 transgenic mice. Upregulated genes in the R6/2Q300 mice were associated with the ubiquitin ligase complex, cell adhesion, protein folding and establishment of protein localization. We qPCR-validated increases in expression of genes related to the latter category, including Lrsam1, Erp29, Nasp, Tap1, Rab9b and Pfdn5 in R6/2Q300 mice, changes that were not observed in R6/2 mice with shorter CAG repeats, even in late stages (i.e. 12 weeks of age). We further tested Lrsam1 and Erp29, the two genes showing the greatest upregulation in R6/2Q300 transgenic mice, for potential neuroprotective effects in primary striatal cultures overexpressing a mutated human huntingtin (htt) fragment. Overexpression of Lrsam1 prevented the loss of NeuN-positive cell bodies in htt171-82Q cultures, concomitant with a reduction of nuclear htt aggregates. Erp29 showed no significant effects in this model. This is consistent with the distinct pattern of htt inclusion localization observed in R6/2Q300 transgenic mice, in which smaller cytoplasmic inclusions represent the major form of insoluble htt in the cell, as opposed to large nuclear inclusions observed in R6/2Q150 transgenic mice. We suggest that the prolonged onset and disease course observed in R6/2 mice with greatly expanded CAG repeats might result from differential upregulation of genes related to protein localization and clearance. Such genes may represent novel therapeutic avenues to decrease htt aggregate toxicity and cell death in HD patients, with Lrsam1 being a promising, novel candidate disease modifier. PMID:21334439

  14. Gene expression profiling of R6/2 transgenic mice with different CAG repeat lengths reveals genes associated with disease onset and progression in Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Tang, Bin; Seredenina, Tamara; Coppola, Giovanni; Kuhn, Alexandre; Geschwind, Daniel H; Luthi-Carter, Ruth; Thomas, Elizabeth A

    2011-06-01

    R6/2 transgenic mice with expanded CAG repeats (>300) have a surprisingly prolonged disease progression and longer lifespan than prototypical parent R6/2 mice (carrying 150 CAGs); however, the mechanism of this phenotype amelioration is unknown. We compared gene expression profiles in the striatum of R6/2 transgenic mice carrying ~300 CAG repeats (R6/2(Q300) transgenic mice) to those carrying ~150 CAG repeats (R6/2(Q150) transgenic mice) and littermate wildtype controls in order to identify genes that may play determinant roles in the time course of phenotypic expression in these mice. Of the top genes showing concordant expression changes in the striatum of both R6/2 lines, 85% were decreased in expression, while discordant expression changes were observed mostly for genes upregulated in R6/2(Q300) transgenic mice. Upregulated genes in the R6/2(Q300) mice were associated with the ubiquitin ligase complex, cell adhesion, protein folding, and establishment of protein localization. We qPCR-validated increases in expression of genes related to the latter category, including Lrsam1, Erp29, Nasp, Tap1, Rab9b, and Pfdn5 in R6/2(Q300) mice, changes that were not observed in R6/2 mice with shorter CAG repeats, even in late stages (i.e., 12 weeks of age). We further tested Lrsam1 and Erp29, the two genes showing the greatest upregulation in R6/2(Q300) transgenic mice, for potential neuroprotective effects in primary striatal cultures overexpressing a mutated human huntingtin (htt) fragment. Overexpression of Lrsam1 prevented the loss of NeuN-positive cell bodies in htt171-82Q cultures, concomitant with a reduction of nuclear htt aggregates. Erp29 showed no significant effects in this model. This is consistent with the distinct pattern of htt inclusion localization observed in R6/2(Q300) transgenic mice, in which smaller cytoplasmic inclusions represent the major form of insoluble htt in the cell, as opposed to large nuclear inclusions observed in R6/