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Sample records for identifying gamma spectrometer

  1. NEAR Gamma Ray Spectrometer Characterization and Repair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groves, Joel Lee; Vajda, Stefan

    1998-01-01

    This report covers the work completed in the third year of the contract. The principle activities during this period were (1) the characterization of the NEAR 2 Gamma Ray Spectrometer using a neutron generator to generate complex gamma ray spectra and a large Ge Detecter to identify all the major peaks in the spectra; (2) the evaluation and repair of the Engineering Model Unit of the Gamma Ray Spectrometer for the NEAR mission; (3) the investigation of polycapillary x-ray optics for x-ray detection; and (4) technology transfer from NASA to forensic science.

  2. Towed seabed gamma ray spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, D.G. )

    1994-08-01

    For more than 50 years, the measurement of radioactivity has been used for onshore geological surveys and in laboratories. The British Geological Survey (BGS) has extended the use of this type of equipment to the marine environment with the development of seabed gamma ray spectrometer systems. The present seabed gamma ray spectrometer, known as the Eel, has been successfully used for sediment and solid rock mapping, mineral exploration, and radioactive pollution studies. The range of applications for the system continues to expand. This paper examines the technological aspects of the Eel and some of the applications for which it has been used.

  3. Gamma-ray spectrometer experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, J. R.; Peterson, L. E.; Metzger, A. E.; Trombka, J. I.

    1972-01-01

    The experiments in gamma-ray spectrometry to determine the geochemical composition of the lunar surface are reported. The theory is discussed of discrete energy lines of natural radioactivity, and the lines resulting from the bombardment of the lunar surface by high energy cosmic rays. The gamma-ray spectrometer used in lunar orbit and during transearth coast is described, and a preliminary analysis of the results is presented.

  4. Gamma Ray/neutron Spectrometers for Planetary Elemental Mapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reedy, R. C.; Auchampaugh, G. F.; Barraclough, B. L.; Burt, W. W.; Byrd, R. C.; Drake, D. M.; Edwards, B. C.; Feldman, W. C.; Martin, R. A.; Moss, C. E.

    1993-01-01

    Los Alamos has designed gamma ray and neutron spectrometers for Lunar Scout, two robotic missions to map the Moon from 100 km polar orbits. Knowledge of the elemental composition is desirable in identifying resources and for geochemical studies and can be obtained using gamma ray and neutron spectrometers. Measurements with gamma ray and neutron spectrometers complement each other in determining elemental abundances in a planet's surface. Various aspects of the instruments are discussed.

  5. Xenon gamma-ray spectrometer for radioactive waste controlling complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulin, S.; Novikov, A.; Dmitrenko, V.; Vlasik, K.; Krivova, K.; Petrenko, D.; Uteshev, Z.; Shustov, A.; Petkovich, E.

    2016-02-01

    Xenon detector based gamma-ray spectrometer for a radioactive waste sorting complex and its characteristics are described. It has been shown that the “thin-wall” modification of the detector allows better registration of low-energy gamma rays (tens of keV). The spectrometer is capable of operation in unfavorable field conditions and can identify radionuclides of interest in less than 1 second.

  6. A Compton scatter attenuation gamma ray spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Austin, W. E.

    1972-01-01

    A Compton scatter attenuation gamma ray spectrometer conceptual design is discussed for performing gamma spectral measurements in monodirectional gamma fields from 100 R per hour to 1,000,000 R per hour. Selectable Compton targets are used to scatter gamma photons onto an otherwise heavily shielded detector with changeable scattering efficiencies such that the count rate is maintained between 500 and 10,000 per second. Use of two sum-Compton coincident detectors, one for energies up to 1.5 MeV and the other for 600 keV to 10 MeV, will allow good peak to tail pulse height ratios to be obtained over the entire spectrum and reduces the neutron recoil background rate.

  7. Gamma ray spectrometer for Lunar Scout 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moss, C. E.; Burt, W. W.; Edwards, B. C.; Martin, R. A.; Nakano, George H.; Reedy, R. C.

    1993-01-01

    We review the current status of the Los Alamos program to develop a high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometer for the Lunar Scout-II mission, which is the second of two Space Exploration Initiative robotic precursor missions to study the Moon. This instrument will measure gamma rays in the energy range of approximately 0.1 - 10 MeV to determine the composition of the lunar surface. The instrument is a high-purity germanium crystal surrounded by an CsI anticoincidence shield and cooled by a split Stirling cycle cryocooler. It will provide the abundance of many elements over the entire lunar surface.

  8. Spectrometer of high energy gamma quantums

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blokhintsev, I. D.; Melioranskiy, A. S.; Kalinkin, L. F.; Nagornykh, Y. I.; Pryakhin, Y. A.

    1979-01-01

    A detailed description of the apparatus GG-2M is given. The spectrometer contains a Cerenkov and scintillation (including anticoincidence) counter. The energies of the gamma quantums are measured by a shower calorimeter, in which scintillation counters are used in the capacity of detectors. Results are given for tuning the device on mu-mesons of cosmic rays. The data of physical tuning allow more reliable interpretation of the results of measurements which are received on the satellites.

  9. Design Considerations for Passive Gamma-Ray Spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Leon E.; Swickard, Andrea R.; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro; Warren, Glen A.; Siciliano, Edward R.; Miller, Steven D.

    2005-10-01

    Passive gamma-ray spectrometers composed of attenuation filters and integrating detection materials provide important advantages for measurements in high-radiation environments and for long-term monitoring. Each of these applications has requirements that constrain the design of the instrument, such as incident energy range of interest, sensor size and weight, readout method and cost. In addition, the multitude of variable parameters in passive spectrometer design (e.g. attenuation filter material and thickness, integrating sensor type, numbers of pixels, reconstructed energy bin structure) results in a large design space to analyze. The development of generalized design optimization tools to interrogate this space and identify promising spectrometer designs are discussed, particularly the methods used to rapidly calculate system transfer functions and the search for suitable design evaluation metrics. Finally, specific examples of candidate spectrometer designs are provided, and preliminary measurements to validate the design tools are described.

  10. Design Considerations for Passive Gamma-Ray Spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Leon E.; Swickard, Andrea R.; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro; Warren, Glen A.; Siciliano, Edward R.; Miller, Steven D.

    2005-10-01

    Passive gamma-ray spectrometers composed of attenuation filters and integrating detection materials provide important advantages for measurements in high-radiation environments and for long-term monitoring. Each of these applications has requirements that constrain the design of the instrument, such as incident energy range of interest, sensor size and weight, readout method, and cost. In addition, the multitude of variable parameters in passive spectrometer design (e.g. attenuation filter material and thickness, integrating sensor type, numbers of pixels, reconstructed energy bin structure) results in a large design space to analyze. The development of generalized design optimization tools to interrogate this space and identify promising spectrometer designs are discussed, particularly the methods used to rapidly calculate system transfer functions and the use of genetic algorithms for design optimization. Finally, preliminary measurements to validate the design tools are described, and specific examples of preliminary design optimization efforts are provided.

  11. Software tool for xenon gamma-ray spectrometer control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernysheva, I. V.; Novikov, A. S.; Shustov, A. E.; Dmitrenko, V. V.; Pyae Nyein, Sone; Petrenko, D.; Ulin, S. E.; Uteshev, Z. M.; Vlasik, K. F.

    2016-02-01

    Software tool "Acquisition and processing of gamma-ray spectra" for xenon gamma-ray spectrometers control was developed. It supports the multi-windows interface. Software tool has the possibilities for acquisition of gamma-ray spectra from xenon gamma-ray detector via USB or RS-485 interfaces, directly or via TCP-IP protocol, energy calibration of gamma-ray spectra, saving gamma-ray spectra on a disk.

  12. Optimal Design of Passive Gamma-Ray Spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Jarman, Kenneth D.; Smith, Leon E.; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro; Renholds, Andrea S.; Kaye, William R.; Miller, Steven D.

    2005-10-23

    Passive gamma-ray spectrometers composed of attenuation filters and integrating detector materials provide important advantages in terms of zero-power operation and ruggedness for long-term monitoring scenarios (e.g. national security or environmental remediation). However, the many design parameters, including attenuation filter material and thickness and number of pixels (filter/integrating material combinations), present a challenging optimization problem in designing spectrometers for different applications. In many of these applications, the goal is simply one of anomaly detection?deciding that there is a gamma-ray source not normally found in the nuisance source populations of that particular measurement environment. A passive spectrometer design study approach using an anomaly detection metric is presented here, and is founded on ''injecting'' target sources of interest (e.g. 57Co, 133Ba, 137Cs) into a nuisance source population that represents the widely varying backgrounds typical of long-term monitoring scenarios. The design evaluation metric is quantified by the probability of detection given a required probability of false alarm. A genetic algorithm employs this metric to probe the large design space and identify superior spectrometer designs. Mapping the false alarm and detection probabilities against each other for each design produces receiver-operator characteristic curves that can be used to compare many instrument designs over a wide range of operating constraints.

  13. Gamma-ray spectrometer utilizing xenon at high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, G.C.; Mahler, G.J.; Yu, B.; Kane, W.R.; Markey, J.K.

    1994-08-01

    A prototype gamma-ray spectrometer utilizing xenon gas near the critical point (166{degrees}C, 58 atm) is under development. The spectrometer will function as a room-temperature ionization chamber detecting gamma rays in the energy range 100 keV2 MeV, with an energy resolution intermediate between semiconductor (Ge) and scintillation (NaI) spectrometers. The energy resolution is superior to that of a NaI scintillation spectrometer by a substantial margin (approximately a factor 5), and accordingly, much more information can be extracted from a given gamma-ray spectrum. Unlike germanium detectors, the spectrometer possesses the capability for sustained operation under ambient temperature conditions without a requirement for liquid nitrogen.

  14. Development and Characterization of a High Resolution Portable Gamma Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Muhammad

    The recent disaster of Fukushima in Japan combined with the high demand to enhance nuclear safety and to minimize personal exposure to radioactive materials has a significant impact on research and development of radiation detection instrumentation. Currently, there is ample effort worldwide in the pursuit of radiation detection to maximize the accuracy and meet international standards in terms of size and specifications to enable radiation protection decision making. Among the requirements is the development of a portable, light-weight gamma-ray isotope identifier to be used by first responders in nuclear accidents as well as for radiation security and identification of illicit material isotopes. From nuclear security perspective, research into advanced screening technologies has become a high priority in all aspects, while for occupational safety, and environmental radiation protection, the regulatory authorities are requiring specific performance of radiation detection and measuring devices. At the applied radiation laboratory of the University of Ontario Institute of Technology, UOIT, the development of a high resolution spectrometer for medium and high energy gamma ray has been conducted. The spectrometer used a newly developed scintillator based on a LaBr3(Ce) crystal. The detector has been modeled using advanced Monte Carlo code (MCNP/X code) for the response function simulation and parameter characterization. The simulation results have been validated by experimental investigations using a wide range of gamma radiation energies. The developed spectrometer has been characterized in terms of resolution and response in different fields. It has also been compared with other crystals such as NaI(TI) and LiI(Eu).

  15. The gamma ray spectrometer for the Solar Maximum Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forrest, D. J.; Chupp, E. L.; Ryan, J. M.; Cherry, M. L.; Gleske, I. U.; Reppin, C.; Pinkau, K.; Rieger, E.; Kanbach, G.; Kinzer, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    The paper describes an actively shielded, multicrystal scintillation spectrometer for measurement of the solar gamma ray flux used by the Solar Maximum Mission Gamma Ray Experiment. The instrument provides a 476-channel pulse height spectrum every 16.38 s over the 0.3-9 MeV energy range; the gamma ray spectral analysis can be extended to at least 15 MeV on command. The instrument is designed to measure the intensity, energy, and Doppler shift of narrow gamma ray lines, the intensity of extremely broadened lines, and the photon continuum.

  16. Induced Background in the Mars Observer Gamma-Ray Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boynton, William V.; Evans, Larry G.; Starr, Richard; Bruekner, Johnnes; Bailey, S. H.; Trombka, Jacob I.

    1997-01-01

    Gamma-Ray Spectrometers in space must necessarily work in an environment of a background of lines due to natural and cosmic-ray induced radioactivity and lines due to prompt emission following nuclear reactions caused by primary and secondary cosmic rays. The Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (GRS) on the Mar Observer mission has provided important data allowing one to estimate for future missions the extent of the background due to cosmic rays. These data will help in the design of instruments and in calculation of realistic background intensities that may effect the sensitivity of determining the intensity of lines of interest.

  17. Environmental gamma radiation in the KATRIN Spectrometer Hall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kippenbrock, Luke; Katrin Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    The KATRIN (KArlsruhe TRItium Neutrino) experiment, presently undergoing final assembly in Germany, will use tritium β-decay to probe the electron antineutrino mass down to a sensitivity of 0.2 eV/c2 (90% confidence level). The experimental apparatus has been designed to limit the effect of known and predicted backgrounds near the beta endpoint energy. However, recent commissioning measurements with the main spectrometer have shown that an elusive background source still remains. In this talk, the interaction of environmental gamma radiation inside the KATRIN main spectrometer is studied as a potential background creation mechanism. Geant4 simulations of the gamma flux, derived from concrete radioassay measurements, are compared with detector background rates collected under multiple gamma radiation conditions. Funded by U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Nuclear Physics under Grant #DE-FG02-97ER41020.

  18. Automatic Energy Calibration of Gamma-Ray Spectrometers

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2011-09-19

    The software provides automatic method for calibrating the energy scale of high-purity germanium (HPGe) and scintillation gamma-ray spectrometers, using natural background radiation as the source of calibration gamma rays. In field gamma-ray spectroscopy, radioactive check sources may not be available; temperature changes can shift detector electronic gain and scintillator light output; and a user’s experience and training may not include gamma-ray energy calibration. Hence, an automated method of calibrating the spectrometer using natural background wouldmore » simplify its operation, especially by technician-level users, and by enhancing spectroscopic data quality, it would reduce false detections. Following a typically one-minute count of background gamma-rays, the measured spectrum is searched for gamma-ray peaks, producing a list of peak centroids, in channels1. Next, the ratio algorithm attempts to match the peak centroids found in the search to a user-supplied list of calibration gamma-ray energies. Finally, if three or more calibration energies have been matched to peaks, the energy equation parameters are determined by a least-squares fit2, and the spectrum has been energy-calibrated. The ratio algorithm rests on the repeatable but irregular spacing of the background gammaray energies—together they form a unique set of ratios, when normalized to the highest energy calibration gamma ray; so too, the corresponding peak centroids in the spectrum. The algorithm matches energy ratios to peak centroid ratios, to determine which peak matches a given calibration energy.« less

  19. Automatic Energy Calibration of Gamma-Ray Spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    2011-09-19

    The software provides automatic method for calibrating the energy scale of high-purity germanium (HPGe) and scintillation gamma-ray spectrometers, using natural background radiation as the source of calibration gamma rays. In field gamma-ray spectroscopy, radioactive check sources may not be available; temperature changes can shift detector electronic gain and scintillator light output; and a user’s experience and training may not include gamma-ray energy calibration. Hence, an automated method of calibrating the spectrometer using natural background would simplify its operation, especially by technician-level users, and by enhancing spectroscopic data quality, it would reduce false detections. Following a typically one-minute count of background gamma-rays, the measured spectrum is searched for gamma-ray peaks, producing a list of peak centroids, in channels1. Next, the ratio algorithm attempts to match the peak centroids found in the search to a user-supplied list of calibration gamma-ray energies. Finally, if three or more calibration energies have been matched to peaks, the energy equation parameters are determined by a least-squares fit2, and the spectrum has been energy-calibrated. The ratio algorithm rests on the repeatable but irregular spacing of the background gammaray energies—together they form a unique set of ratios, when normalized to the highest energy calibration gamma ray; so too, the corresponding peak centroids in the spectrum. The algorithm matches energy ratios to peak centroid ratios, to determine which peak matches a given calibration energy.

  20. SWEPP Gamma-Ray Spectrometer System software design description

    SciTech Connect

    Femec, D.A.; Killian, E.W.

    1994-08-01

    To assist in the characterization of the radiological contents of contract-handled waste containers at the Stored Waste Examination Pilot Plant (SWEPP), the SWEPP Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (SGRS) System has been developed by the Radiation Measurements and Development Unit of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The SGRS system software controls turntable and detector system activities. In addition to determining the concentrations of gamma-ray-emitting radionuclides, this software also calculates attenuation-corrected isotopic mass ratios of-specific interest. This document describes the software design for the data acquisition and analysis software associated with the SGRS system.

  1. Observing gamma-ray bursts with the INTEGRAL spectrometer SPI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skinner, G. K.; Connell, P. H.; Naya, J. E.; Seifert, H.; Teegarden, B. J.

    1997-01-01

    The spectrometer for INTEGRAL (SPI) is a germanium spectrometer with a wide field of view and will provide the International Gamma Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL) mission with the opportunity of studying gamma ray bursts. Simulations carried out to assess the response of the instrument using data from real burst data as input are reported on. It is shown that, despite the angular resolution of 3 deg, it is possible to locate the direction of bursts with an accuracy of a few arcmin, while offering the high spectral resolution of the germanium detectors. It is remarked that the SPI field of view is similar to the size of the halo of bursts expected around M 31 on galactic models. The detectability of bursts with such a halo is discussed.

  2. High Pressure XENON Gamma-Ray Spectrometers for Field Use

    SciTech Connect

    David K. Wehe; Zong He; Glenn K. Knoll

    2004-02-16

    This project explored a new concept for high-pressure xenon ionization chambers by replacing the Frisch grid with coplanar grid electrodes similar to those used in wide bandgap semiconductor gamma-ray spectrometers. This work is the first attempt to apply the coplanar grid anode design in a gas ionization chamber in order to achieve to improved energy resolution. Three prototype detectors, two cylindrical and one parallel plate configurations, were built and tested. While the detectors did not demonstrate energy resolutions as good as other high pressure xenon gamma-ray spectrometers, the results demonstrated that the concept of single polarity charge sending using coplanar grid electrodes will work in a gas detector.

  3. Scintillation gamma spectrometer for analysis of hydraulic fracturing waste products.

    PubMed

    Ying, Leong; O'Connor, Frank; Stolz, John F

    2015-01-01

    Flowback and produced wastewaters from unconventional hydraulic fracturing during oil and gas explorations typically brings to the surface Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials (NORM), predominantly radioisotopes from the U238 and Th232 decay chains. Traditionally, radiological sampling are performed by sending collected small samples for laboratory tests either by radiochemical analysis or measurements by a high-resolution High-Purity Germanium (HPGe) gamma spectrometer. One of the main isotopes of concern is Ra226 which requires an extended 21-days quantification period to allow for full secular equilibrium to be established for the alpha counting of its progeny daughter Rn222. Field trials of a sodium iodide (NaI) scintillation detector offers a more economic solution for rapid screenings of radiological samples. To achieve the quantification accuracy, this gamma spectrometer must be efficiency calibrated with known standard sources prior to field deployments to analyze the radioactivity concentrations in hydraulic fracturing waste products. PMID:25734826

  4. CdZnTe gamma ray spectrometer for orbital gamma ray spectroscopy.

    SciTech Connect

    Prettyman, T. H.; Feldman, W. C.; Fuller, K. R.; Storms, S. A.; Soldner, S. A.; Lawrence, David J. ,; Browne, M. C.; Moss, C. E.

    2001-01-01

    We present the design and analysis of a new gamma ray spectrometer for planetary science that uses an array of CdZnTe detectors to achieve the detection efficiency needed for orbital measurements. The use of CdZnTe will provide significantly improved pulse height resolution relative to scintillation-based detectors, with commensurate improvement in the accuracy of elemental abundances determined by gamma ray and neutron spectroscopy. The spectrometer can be flown either on the instrument deck of the spacecraft or on a boom. For deck-mounted systems, a BGO anticoincidence shield is included in the design to suppress the response of the CdZnTe detector to gamma rays that originate in the spacecraft. The BGO shield also serves as a backup spectrometer, providing heritage from earlier planetary science missions and reducing the risk associated with the implementation of new technology.

  5. Preliminary observations of the SELENE Gamma Ray Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forni, O.; Diez, B.; Gasnault, O.; Munoz, B.; D'Uston, C.; Reedy, R. C.; Hasebe, N.

    2008-09-01

    Introduction We analyze the spectra measured by the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS) on board the SELENE satellite [1]. SELENE was inserted in lunar orbit on 4 Oct. 2007. After passing through a health check and a function check, the GRS was shifted to nominal observation on 21 Dec. 2007. The spectra consist in various lines of interest (O, Mg, Al, Si, Ti, Ca, Fe, K, Th, U, and possibly H) superposed on a continuum. The energies of the gamma rays identify the nuclides responsible for the gamma ray emission and their intensities relate to their abundance. Data collected through 17 Feb. 2008 are studied here, corresponding to an accumulation time (Fig. 1) sufficiently good to allow preliminary mapping. Analysis of the global gamma ray spectrum In order to obtain spectra with counting statistics sufficient for peak analysis, we accumulate all observations. The identification of lines is performed on this global lunar spectrum (Fig 2). Fit of individual lines The gamma ray lines that arise from decay of longlived radioactive species are among the easiest to analyze. So far the abundance of two species is studied thanks to such lines: potassium (1461 keV) and thorium (2614 keV). Secondary neutrons from cosmic ray interactions also produce gamma ray when reacting with the planetary material, according to scattering or absorption reactions. However these lines need substantial corrections before an interpretation in terms of abundance can be performed. Lines have been examined with different techniques. The simplest method consists in summing the spectra in a window containing the line of interest. The continuum is adjusted with a polynomial and removed. Such a method was used for the gamma ray spectra collected by Lunar Prospector [2]. This method is especially robust for isolated lines, such as those of K and Th mentioned above, or with very low statistics. The second method consists in fitting the lines by summing a quadratic continuum with Gaussian lines and exponential

  6. Martian volatiles determined using the Mars observer gamma ray spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, W. C.; Boynton, W. V.; Trombka, J. I.; Arnold, J. R.; Englert, P. A. J.; Metzger, A. E.; Reedy, R. C.; Squyres, S. W.; Wanke, H.

    1992-01-01

    The relative abundances of H2O and CO2 and their latitude, longitude, and depth profiles on Mars sensitively reflect, as well as help control, past and present Martian climate patterns. Seasonal variations of their distributions at high latitudes also reflect and help control global weather patterns and erosion through surface weathering. A combined analysis of gamma ray line and neutron flux maps constructed from data measured using the Mars Observer Gamma Ray Spectrometer (MOGRS) should allow a determination of seasonal changes in both the horizontal and vertical structure of CO2 ice that covers the north polar cap during winter and the south polar cap throughout the year and both the horizontal and vertical structure of residual H2O ice within the top meter of the surface that was predicted from Viking observations to exist primarily at high latitudes. Particularly important in this regard will be maps of thermal and epithermal neutron fluxes measured using the MOGRS anticoincidence shield, the intensity of the hydrogen, neutron capture gamma ray line at 2.223 MeV, the intensity of a capture gamma ray line as 1.725 MeV from iron, and the intensity of an inelastic scatter gamma ray line as 1.779 MeV from silicon.

  7. Low intensity X-ray and gamma-ray spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yin, L. I. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A low intensity X-ray and gamma ray spectrometer for imaging, counting, and energy resolving of single invisible radiation particles is described. The spectrometer includes a converting device for converting single invisible radiation particles to visible light photons. Another converting device converts the visible light photons to photoelectrons. A fiber optics coupling device couples together the two converting devices. An intensifying device intensifies the photoelectrons by an average gain factor of between 10 to the 4th power and 10 to the 7th power. The tensifying device is an anti-ion feedback microchannel plate amplifier which is operated substantially below saturation. A displaying device displays the intensified photoelectrons. The displaying device 32 indicates the spatial position, number, and energy of the incoming single invisible radiation particles.

  8. Superconducting High Energy Resolution Gamma-ray Spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Chow, D T

    2002-02-22

    We have demonstrated that a bulk absorber coupled to a TES can serve as a good gamma-ray spectrometer. Our measured energy resolution of 70 eV at 60 keV is among the best measurements in this field. We have also shown excellent agreement between the noise predictions and measured noise. Despite this good result, we noted that our detector design has shortcomings with a low count rate and vulnerabilities with the linearity of energy response. We addressed these issues by implementation of an active negative feedback bias. We demonstrated the effects of active bias such as additional pulse shortening, reduction of TES change in temperature during a pulse, and linearization of energy response at low energy. Linearization at higher energy is possible with optimized heat capacities and thermal conductivities of the microcalorimeter. However, the current fabrication process has low control and repeatability over the thermal properties. Thus, optimization of the detector performance is difficult until the fabrication process is improved. Currently, several efforts are underway to better control the fabrication of our gamma-ray spectrometers. We are developing a full-wafer process to produce TES films. We are investigating the thermal conductivity and surface roughness of thicker SiN membranes. We are exploring alternative methods to couple the absorber to the TES film for reproducibility. We are also optimizing the thermal conductivities within the detector to minimize two-element phonon noise. We are experimenting with different absorber materials to optimize absorption efficiency and heat capacity. We are also working on minimizing Johnson noise from the E S shunt and SQUID amplifier noise. We have shown that our performance, noise, and active bias models agree very well with measured data from several microcalorimeters. Once the fabrication improvements have been implemented, we have no doubt that our gamma-ray spectrometer will achieve even more spectacular results.

  9. Multichannel CdZnTe gamma ray spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doty, F. P.; Lingren, C. L.; Apotovsky, B. A.; Brunsch, J.; Butler, J. F.; Collins, T.; Conwell, R. L.; Friesenhahn, S.; Gormley, J.; Pi, B.; Zhao, S.; Augustine, F. L.; Bennett, B. A.; Cross, E.; James, R. B.

    1999-02-01

    A 3 cm 3 multichannel gamma spectrometer for DOE applications is under development by Digirad Corporation. The device is based on a position sensitive detector packaged in a compact multi-chip module (MCM) with integrated readout circuitry. The modular, multichannel design will enable identification and quantitative analysis of radionuclides in extended sources, or sources containing low levels of activity. The MCM approach has the advantages that the modules are designed for imaging applications, and the sensitivity can be arbitrarily increased by increasing the number of pixels, i.e. adding modules to the instrument. For a high sensitivity probe, the outputs for each pixel can be corrected for gain and offset variations, and summed digitally. Single pixel results obtained with discrete low noise readout indicate energy resolution of 3 keV can be approached with currently available CdZnTe. The energy resolution demonstrated to date with MCMs for 511 keV gamma rays is 10 keV.

  10. Isotopic response with small scintillator based gamma-ray spectrometers

    DOEpatents

    Madden, Norman W.; Goulding, Frederick S.; Asztalos, Stephen J.

    2012-01-24

    The intrinsic background of a gamma ray spectrometer is significantly reduced by surrounding the scintillator with a second scintillator. This second (external) scintillator surrounds the first scintillator and has an opening of approximately the same diameter as the smaller central scintillator in the forward direction. The second scintillator is selected to have a higher atomic number, and thus has a larger probability for a Compton scattering interaction than within the inner region. Scattering events that are essentially simultaneous in coincidence to the first and second scintillators, from an electronics perspective, are precluded electronically from the data stream. Thus, only gamma-rays that are wholly contained in the smaller central scintillator are used for analytic purposes.

  11. Design of a compact spectrometer for high-flux MeV gamma-ray beams

    SciTech Connect

    Corvan, D. J. Sarri, G.; Zepf, M.

    2014-06-15

    A novel design for a compact gamma-ray spectrometer is presented. The proposed system allows for spectroscopy of high-flux multi-MeV gamma-ray beams with MeV energy resolution in a compact design. In its basic configuration, the spectrometer exploits conversion of gamma-rays into electrons via Compton scattering in a low-Z material. The scattered electron population is then spectrally resolved using a magnetic spectrometer. The detector is shown to be effective for gamma-ray energies between 3 and 20 MeV. The main properties of the spectrometer are confirmed by Monte Carlo simulations.

  12. Surface chemistry of selected lunar regions. [using gamma ray spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bielefeld, M. J.; Reedy, R. C.; Metzger, A. E.; Trombka, A. I.; Arnold, J. R.

    1976-01-01

    A completely new analysis has been carried out on the data from the Apollo 15 and 16 gamma ray spectrometer experiments. The components of the continuum background have been estimated. The elements Th, K, Fe and Mg give useful results; results for Ti are significant only for a few high Ti regions. Errors are given, and the results are checked by other methods. Concentrations are reported for about sixty lunar regions; the ground track has been subdivided in various ways. The borders of the maria seem well-defined chemically, while the distribution of KREEP is broad. This wide distribution requires emplacement of KREEP before the era of mare formation. Its high concentration in western mare soils seems to require major vertical mixing.

  13. Monte Carlo calibration of the SMM gamma ray spectrometer for high energy gamma rays and neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, J. F.; Reppin, C.; Forrest, D. J.; Chupp, E. L.; Share, G. H.; Kinzer, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    The Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS) on the Solar Maximum Mission spacecraft was primarily designed and calibrated for nuclear gamma ray line measurements, but also has a high energy mode which allows the detection of gamma rays at energies above 10 MeV and solar neutrons above 20 MeV. The GRS response has been extrapolated until now for high energy gamma rays from an early design study employing Monte Carlo calculations. The response to 50 to 600 MeV solar neutrons was estimated from a simple model which did not consider secondary charged particles escaping into the veto shields. In view of numerous detections by the GRS of solar flares emitting high energy gamma rays, including at least two emitting directly detectable neutrons, the calibration of the high energy mode in the flight model has been recalculated by the use of more sophisticated Monte Carlo computer codes. New results presented show that the GRS response to gamma rays above 20 MeV and to neutrons above 100 MeV is significantly lower than the earlier estimates.

  14. A new all-digital time differential {gamma}-{gamma} angular correlation spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Nagl, Matthias; Vetter, Ulrich; Uhrmacher, Michael; Hofsaess, Hans

    2010-07-15

    A new digital time differential perturbed angular correlation spectrometer, designed to measure the energy of and coincidence time between correlated detector signals, here correlated {gamma} photons, is presented. The system overcomes limitations of earlier digital approaches and features improved performance and handling. By consequently separating the data recording and evaluation, it permits the simultaneous measurement of decays with several {gamma}-ray cascades at once and avoids the necessity of premeasurement configuration. Tests showed that the spectrometer reaches a time resolution of 460 ps [using a {sup 60}Co sample and Lu{sub 1.8}Y{sub 0.2}SiO{sub 5}:Ce (LYSO) scintillators, otherwise better than 100 ps], an energy resolution that is equivalent to the limit of the used scintillation material, and a processing capability of more than 200 000 {gamma} quanta per detector and second. Other possible applications of the presented methods include nuclear spectroscopy, positron emission tomography, time of flight studies, lidar, and radar.

  15. The Sandwich spectrometer for ultra low-level gamma-ray spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wieslander, J S Elisabeth; Hult, Mikael; Gasparro, Joël; Marissens, Gerd; Misiaszek, Marcin; Preusse, Werner

    2009-05-01

    The technical details and performance of the newly developed Sandwich spectrometer for ultra low-level gamma-ray spectrometry are presented. The spectrometer, which consists of two HPGe detectors, an active muon shield and a lead/copper shield with a convenient and rapid opening mechanism, is located in an underground laboratory at a depth of 500 m water equivalent. The data is collected in list mode, which enables off-line data analysis to identify muon-induced events and possible Ge detector crosstalk due to Compton scattering. The background count-rate from 40 to 2700 keV normalised to the mass of the Ge crystals is 220 day(-1)kg(-1). PMID:19246202

  16. Observation of gamma-ray bursts with the SMM gamma-ray spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Share, G. H.; Strickman, M. S.; Kinzer, R. L.; Chupp, E. L.; Forrest, D. J.; Ryan, J. M.; Rieger, E.; Reppin, C.; Kanbach, G.

    1982-01-01

    The gamma-ray spectrometer on SMM is sensitive to bursts within its field of view with intensities greater than 0.000005 erg/sq cm above 100 keV. It has detected 17 events between February 1980 and March 1981 with the characteristics of cosmic gamma-ray bursts. The most intense burst, on 19 April 1980, had a photon spectrum consistent with a power law with spectral index - 2.5 from 300 keV to approximately 7 MeV. It is not possible at present to exclude the sun as the source of this burst. Spectra of 11 of the bursts have been studied for line features with no clear evidence for line emission greater than 300 keV. The continuum radiation from about half of these events have hard emission extending to approximately equal to or greater than 2 MeV.

  17. Indoor Gamma Dose Rates In Kuwait Using Handheld Gamma-ray Spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Al-Azmi, Darwish

    2016-07-01

    A survey of indoor gamma dose rates was carried out in Kuwait using a NaI dosimeter/spectrometer. The measurements started from May 2013 until April 2015 and covered different locations within 200 dwellings: 158 halls, 26 rooms, 17 basements, and 43 kitchens (total of 244 locations). Alongside the dose rate measurements, gamma-ray spectra were also acquired to evaluate the relative contributions of K, Bi, and Tl and check the presence of Cs. The results show that the dose rates for all locations varied from 39.3 to 103.3 nSv h with a mean of 70.6 nSv h, indicating that the indoor dose rates are low and within the normal range. PMID:27218289

  18. Technology information profile: RL321103 -- In situ gamma spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Schilk, A.J.

    1993-11-01

    Past operations of uranium production and support facilities at several Department of Energy (DOE) sites have occasionally resulted in the local contamination of some surface and subsurface soils. Such contamination commonly occurs within waste burial sites, cribs, pond bottom sediments, and areas surrounding waste tanks or uranium scrap, ore, tailing, and slag heaps. The thorough cleanup of these sites is a major public concern and a high priority for the DOE, but before any effective remedial protocols can be established, the three-dimensional distributions of the uranium contaminants must be adequately characterized. Unfortunately, traditional means of obtaining soil activities (e.g., grab sampling followed by laboratory analyses) are notoriously cumbersome, expensive, time-consuming, and often non-representative when very large areas are being surveyed. Hence, new technologies must be developed, or existing ones improved, to allow for the cheaper, better, faster (i.e., real-time) and safer characterization of uranium concentrations at these critical sites. The primary objective for this program is to develop, construct, and field/pilot test the in situ gamma spectrometer for the rapid measurement of uranium in surface and shallow subsurface soils at the Fernald site in Ohio.

  19. The Gamma-Ray Imaging Spectrometer (GRIS): A new balloon-borne experiment for gamma-ray line astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teegarden, B. J.; Cline, T. L.; Gehrels, N.; Porreca, G.; Tueller, J.; Leventhal, M.; Huters, A. F.; Maccallum, C. J.; Stang, P. D.

    1985-01-01

    High resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy is a relatively new field that holds great promise for further understanding of high energy astrophysical processes. When the high resolution gamma-ray spectrometer (GRSE) was removed from the GRO payload, a balloon program was initiated to permit continued development and improvement of instrumentation in this field, as well as continued scientific observations. The Gamma-Ray Imaging Spectrometer (GRIS) is one of the experiments selected as part of this program. The instrument contains a number of new and innovative features that are expected to produce a significant improvement in source location accuracy and sensitivity over previous balloon and satellite experiments.

  20. A field-deployable gamma-ray spectrometer utilizing xenon at high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, G.C.; Mahler, G.J.; Yu, B.; Salwen, C.; Kane, W.R.; Lemley, J.R.

    1996-10-01

    Prototype gamma-ray spectrometers utilizing xenon gas at high pressure, suitable for applications in the nuclear safeguards, arms control, and nonproliferation communities, have been developed at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). These spectrometers function as ambient-temperature ionization chambers detecting gamma rays with good efficiency in the energy range 50 keV - 2 MeV, with an energy resolution intermediate between semiconductor (Ge) and scintillation (NaI) spectrometers. They are capable of prolonged, low-power operation without a requirement for cryogenic fluids or other cooling mechanisms, and with the addition of small quantities of {sup 3}He gas, can function simultaneously as efficient thermal neutron detectors.

  1. Portable LN 2 gamma-ray spectrometer system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McElhaney, S. A.; Brogle, R.; Guim, A.; Gerrish, A. M.; Lasché, G. P.; Nobel, J.; Pauly, S.

    1999-02-01

    The purpose of this program is to design and demonstrate a highly sensitive, portable spectrometer for detecting and identifying trace amounts of nuclear materials in a broad range of nonproliferation scenarios. A high-efficiency 100% n-type germanium (Ge) detector is combined with a special liquid nitrogen dewar designed to accommodate an active Compton suppression shield. The added collimation capability is required in order to be able to identify localized sources that may be obscured by background radiation. These components are complemented by the addition of a newly developed state-of-the-art multichannel analyzer (MCA) capable of 64×16 000 channel acquisition and electronic Compton suppression. The entire system fits into a watertight case that could be stored below the seat of commercial airliners. The unit has 2.74 keV resolution at 1.33 MeV, 8.5° angular resolution, low-power, >25 h full-time battery life, and operations between 35 keV< E<3 MeV.

  2. Enhanced Analysis Techniques for an Imaging Neutron and Gamma Ray Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madden, Amanda C.

    The presence of gamma rays and neutrons is a strong indicator of the presence of Special Nuclear Material (SNM). The imaging Neutron and gamma ray SPECTrometer (NSPECT) developed by the University of New Hampshire and Michigan Aerospace corporation detects the fast neutrons and prompt gamma rays from fissile material, and the gamma rays from radioactive material. The instrument operates as a double scatter device, requiring a neutron or a gamma ray to interact twice in the instrument. While this detection requirement decreases the efficiency of the instrument, it offers superior background rejection and the ability to measure the energy and momentum of the incident particle. These measurements create energy spectra and images of the emitting source for source identification and localization. The dual species instrument provides superior detection than a single species alone. In realistic detection scenarios, few particles are detected from a potential threat due to source shielding, detection at a distance, high background, and weak sources. This contributes to a small signal to noise ratio, and threat detection becomes difficult. To address these difficulties, several enhanced data analysis tools were developed. A Receiver Operating Characteristic Curve (ROC) helps set instrumental alarm thresholds as well as to identify the presence of a source. Analysis of a dual-species ROC curve provides superior detection capabilities. Bayesian analysis helps to detect and identify the presence of a source through model comparisons, and helps create a background corrected count spectra for enhanced spectroscopy. Development of an instrument response using simulations and numerical analyses will help perform spectra and image deconvolution. This thesis will outline the principles of operation of the NSPECT instrument using the double scatter technology, traditional analysis techniques, and enhanced analysis techniques as applied to data from the NSPECT instrument, and an

  3. Measurement of Radon concentration by Xenon gamma-ray spectrometer for seismic monitoring of the Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novikov, A.; Ulin, S.; Dmitrenko, V.; Vlasik, K.; Bychkova, O.; Petrenko, D.; Uteshev, Z.; Shustov, A.

    2016-02-01

    A method for earthquake precursors search based on variations of 222Rn concentration determined via intensity measurement of 222Rn daughter nuclei gamma ray emission lines by means of xenon gamma-ray spectrometer is discussed. The equipment description as well as the first experimental data are presented.

  4. Instrumental background in balloon-borne gamma-ray spectrometers and techniques for its reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, N.

    1985-01-01

    Instrumental background in balloon-borne gamma-ray spectrometers is presented. The calculations are based on newly available interaction cross sections and new analytic techniques, and are the most detailed and accurate published to date. Results compare well with measurements made in the 20 keV to 10 MeV energy range by the Goddard Low Energy Gamma-ray Spectrometer (LEGS). The principal components of the continuum background in spectrometers with GE detectors and thick active shields are: (1) elastic neutron scattering of atmospheric neutrons on the Ge nuclei; (2) aperture flux of atmospheric and cosmic gamma rays; (3) beta decays of unstable nuclides produced by nuclear interactions of atmospheric protons and neutrons with Ge nuclei; and (4) shield leakage of atmospheric gamma rays. The improved understanding of these components leads to several recommended techniques for reducing the background.

  5. Real time gamma-ray signature identifier

    DOEpatents

    Rowland, Mark; Gosnell, Tom B.; Ham, Cheryl; Perkins, Dwight; Wong, James

    2012-05-15

    A real time gamma-ray signature/source identification method and system using principal components analysis (PCA) for transforming and substantially reducing one or more comprehensive spectral libraries of nuclear materials types and configurations into a corresponding concise representation/signature(s) representing and indexing each individual predetermined spectrum in principal component (PC) space, wherein an unknown gamma-ray signature may be compared against the representative signature to find a match or at least characterize the unknown signature from among all the entries in the library with a single regression or simple projection into the PC space, so as to substantially reduce processing time and computing resources and enable real-time characterization and/or identification.

  6. Superconducting gamma and fast-neutron spectrometers with high energy resolution

    DOEpatents

    Friedrich, Stephan; , Niedermayr, Thomas R.; Labov, Simon E.

    2008-11-04

    Superconducting Gamma-ray and fast-neutron spectrometers with very high energy resolution operated at very low temperatures are provided. The sensor consists of a bulk absorber and a superconducting thermometer weakly coupled to a cold reservoir, and determines the energy of the incident particle from the rise in temperature upon absorption. A superconducting film operated at the transition between its superconducting and its normal state is used as the thermometer, and sensor operation at reservoir temperatures around 0.1 K reduces thermal fluctuations and thus enables very high energy resolution. Depending on the choice of absorber material, the spectrometer can be configured either as a Gamma-spectrometer or as a fast-neutron spectrometer.

  7. Scientific considerations in the design of the Mars observer gamma-ray spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, J.R.; Boynton, W.V.; Englert, P.; Feldman, W.C.; Metzger, A.E.; Reedy, R.C.; Squyres, S.W.; Trombka, J.I.; Wanke, H.

    1987-01-01

    Cosmic-ray primary and secondary particles induce characteristic gamma-ray and neutron emissions from condensed bodies in our solar system. These characteristic emissions can be used to obtain qualitative and quantitative elemental analyses of planetary surfaces from orbital altitudes. Remote sensing gamma-ray spectroscopy has been successfully used to obtain elemental composition of the Moon and Mars during United States Apollo 15 and 16 missions and the Soviet Luna and Mars missions. A remote sensing gamma-ray and neutron spectrometer will be included aboard the United States Mars Observer Mission. If proper care is not taken in the design of the spectrometer and choice of materials in the construction of the detector system and spacecraft, the sensitivity of these remote sensing spectrometers can be greatly degraded. A discussion of these design and material selection problems is presented. 16 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. The transient gamma-ray spectrometer: A new high resolution detector for gamma-ray burst spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Seifert, H.; Baker, R.; Cline, T.L.; Gehrels, N.; Jermakian, J.; Nolan, T.; Ramaty, R.; Sheppard, D.A.; Smith, G.; Stilwell, D.E.; Teegarden, B.J.; Trombka, J.; Owens, A.; Cork, C.P.; Landis, D.A.; Luke, P.N.; Madden, N.W.; Malone, D.; Pehl, R.H.; Yaver, H.; Hurley, K.; Mathias, S.; Post, A.H. Jr.

    1992-01-01

    The Transient Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (TGRS) to be flown aboard the WIND spacecraft is primarily designed to perform high resolution spectroscopy of transient gamma-ray events, such as cosmic [gamma]-ray bursts and solar flares, over the energy range 20 keV to 10 MeV with an expected spectroscopic resolution of E/[delta]E = 500. The detector itself consists of a 215 cm[sup 3] high purity n-type Ge crystal kept at cryogenic temperatures by a passive radiative cooler. The geometric field of view defined by the cooler is 170[degrees]. To avoid continuous triggers caused by soft solar events, a thin Be/Cu sun-shield around the sides of the cooler has been provided. A passive Mo/Pb occulter, which modulates signals from within [+-]5[degrees] of the ecliptic plane at the spacecraft spin frequency, is used to identify and study solar flares, as well as emission from the galactic plane and center. Thus, in addition to transient event measurements, the instrument will allow the search for possible diffuse background lines and monitor the 511 keV positron annihilation radiation from the galactic center. In order to handle the typically large burst count rates which can be in excess of 100 kHz, burst data are stored directly in an on-board 2.75 Mbit burst memory with an absolute timing accuracy of [+-]1.5 ms after ground processing. This capacity is sufficient to store the entire spectral data set of all but the largest bursts. The experiment is scheduled to be launched on a Delta II launch vehicle from Cape Canaveral in the fall of 1993.

  9. Particle transport simulation for spaceborne, NaI gamma-ray spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Dyer, C.S.; Truscott, P.R.; Sims, A.J.; Comber, C.; Hammond, N.D.A.

    1988-12-01

    Radioactivity induced in detectors by protons and secondary neutron limits the sensitivity of spaceborn gamma-ray spectrometers. Three-dimensional Monte Carlo transport codes have been employed to simulate particle transport of cosmic rays and inner-belt protons in various representations of the Gamma-Ray Observatory Spacecraft and the Oriented Scintillatin Spectrometer Experiment. Results are used to accurately quantify the contributions to the radioactive background, assess shielding options and examine the effect of detector and spacecraft orientation in anisotropic trapped proton fluxes.

  10. Venus Measurements by the MESSENGER Gamma-Ray and X-Ray Spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodes, E. A.; Starr, R. D.; Goldsten, J. O.; Schlemm, C. E.; Boynton, W. V.

    2007-12-01

    The Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (GRS), which is a part of the Gamma-Ray and Neutron Spectrometer Instrument, and the X-Ray Spectrometer (XRS) on the MESSENGER spacecraft made calibration measurements during the Venus flyby on June 5, 2007. The purpose of these instruments is to determine elemental abundances on the surface of Mercury. The GRS measures gamma-rays emitted from element interactions with cosmic rays impinging on the surface, while the XRS measures X-ray emissions induced on the surface by the incident solar flux. The GRS sensor is a high-resolution high-purity Ge detector cooled by a Stirling cryocooler, surrounded by a borated-plastic anticoincidence shield. The GRS is sensitive to gamma-rays up to ~10 MeV and can identify most major elements, sampling down to depths of about ten centimeters. Only the shield was powered on for this flyby in order to conserve cooler lifetime. Gamma-rays were observed coming from Venus as well as from the spacecraft. Although the Venus gamma-rays originate from its thick atmosphere rather than its surface, the GRS data from this encounter will provide useful calibration data from a source of known composition. In particular, the data will be useful for determining GRS sensitivity and pointing options for the Mercury flybys, the first of which will be in January 2008. The X-ray spectrum of a planetary surface is dominated by a combination of the fluorescence and scattered solar X-rays. The most prominent fluorescent lines are the Kα lines from the major elements Mg, Al, Si, S, Ca, Ti, and Fe (1-10 keV). The sampling depth is less than 100 u m. The XRS is similar in design to experiments flown on Apollo 15 and 16 and the NEAR-Shoemaker mission. Three large-area gas-proportional counters view the planet, and a small Si-PIN detector mounted on the spacecraft sunshade monitors the Sun. The energy resolution of the gas proportional counters (~850 eV at 5.9 keV) is sufficient to resolve the X-ray lines above 2 keV, but Al and Mg

  11. Research on CdZnTe and Other Novel Room Temperature Gamma Ray Spectrometer Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold Burger; Michael gGoza; Yunlong Cui; Utpal N. Roy; M. Guo

    2007-05-05

    Room temperature gamma-ray spectrometers are being developed for a number of years for national security applications where high sensitivity, low operating power and compactness are indispensable. The technology has matured now to the point where large volume (several cubic centimeters) and high energy resolution (approximately 1% at 660 eV) of gamma photons, are becoming available for their incorporation into portable systems for remote sensing of signatures from nuclear materials.

  12. Design of a Multi-Channel Ultra-High Resolution Superconducting Gamma-Ray Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Friedrich, S; Terracol, S F; Miyazaki, T; Drury, O B; Ali, Z A; Cunningham, M F; Niedermayr, T R; Barbee Jr., T W; Batteux, J D; Labov, S E

    2004-11-29

    Superconducting Gamma-ray microcalorimeters operated at temperatures around {approx}0.1 K offer an order of magnitude improvement in energy resolution over conventional high-purity Germanium spectrometers. The calorimeters consist of a {approx}1 mm{sup 3} superconducting or insulating absorber and a sensitive thermistor, which are weakly coupled to a cold bath. Gamma-ray capture increases the absorber temperature in proportion to the Gamma-ray energy, this is measured by the thermistor, and both subsequently cool back down to the base temperature through the weak link. We are developing ultra-high-resolution Gamma-ray spectrometers based on Sn absorbers and superconducting Mo/Cu multilayer thermistors for nuclear non-proliferation applications. They have achieved an energy resolution between 60 and 90 eV for Gamma-rays up to 100 keV. We also build two-stage adiabatic demagnetization refrigerators for user-friendly detector operation at 0.1 K. We present recent results on the performance of single pixel Gamma-ray spectrometers, and discuss the design of a large detector array for increased sensitivity.

  13. A high precision gamma-ray spectrometer for the Mars-94 mission

    SciTech Connect

    Mitrofanov, I.G.; Anfimov, D.S.; Chernenko, A.M.

    1994-06-01

    The high precision gamma-ray spectrometer (PGS) is scheduled to be launched on the Mars-94 mission in October 1994, and to go into an elliptical polar orbit around Mars. The PGS consists of two high-purity germanium (Ge) detectors, associated electronics, and a passive cooler and will be mounted on one of the solar panels. The PGS will measure nuclear gamma-ray emissions from the martian surface, cosmic gamma-ray bursts, and the high-energy component of solar flares in the broad energy range from 50 KeV to 8 MeV using 4096 energy channels.

  14. The ISEE-C gamma ray burst spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teegarden, B. J.; Porreca, G.; Stilwell, D.; Desai, U. D.; Cline, T. L.; Hovestadt, D.

    1978-01-01

    The technical properties, operation, and expected sensitivity are discussed for an experiment intended to search for narrow lines in the spectra of gamma ray bursts during the ISEE-C mission. At the heart of the experiment is a radiatively cooled germanium solid state photon detector. The instrumentation is capable of storing the entire spectrum of all but the largest bursts in the energy range 0.05-6.5 MeV. In addition, it analyzes the signals from two CsI detectors in two other experiments on the spacecraft and records event time histories from these to a few millisecond accuracy. A background mode permits spectral analysis during quiet times and will allow the determination of physically interesting upper limits for narrow lines in the diffuse gamma ray background radiation.

  15. Comparisons between digital gamma-ray spectrometer (DSPec) and standard nuclear instrumentation methods (NIM) systems

    SciTech Connect

    Vo, D.T.; Russo, P.A.; Sampson, T.E.

    1998-03-01

    Safeguards isotopic measurements require the best spectrometer systems with excellent resolution, stability and throughput. Up until about a year ago, gamma ray spectroscopy has always been done using the analog amplifier, which processes the pulses from the preamplifier to remove the noise, reject the pile up signals, and shape the signals into some desirable form before sending them to the analog to digital converter (ADC) to be digitized. In late 1996, EG and G Ortec introduced a digital gamma ray spectrometer (DSPec) which uses digital technology to analyze the preamplifiers` pulses from all types of germanium and silicon detectors. Considering its performance, digital based spectroscopy may become the way of future gamma ray spectroscopy.

  16. Innovative Gamma Ray Spectrometer Detection Systems for Conducting Scanning Surveys on Challenging Terrain - 13583

    SciTech Connect

    Palladino, Carl; Mason, Bryan; Engle, Matt; LeVangie, James; Dempsey, Gregg; Klemovich, Ron

    2013-07-01

    The Santa Susana Field Laboratory located near Simi Valley, California was investigated to determine the nature and extent of gamma radiation anomalies. The primary objective was to conduct gamma scanning surveys over 100 percent of the approximately 1,906,000 square meters (471 acre) project site with the most sensitive detection system possible. The site had challenging topography that was not conducive to traditional gamma scanning detection systems. Terrain slope varied from horizontal to 48 degrees and the ground surface ranged from flat, grassy meadows to steep, rocky hillsides. In addition, the site was home to many protected endangered plant and animal species, and archaeologically significant sites that required minimal to no disturbance of the ground surface. Therefore, four innovative and unique gamma ray spectrometer detection systems were designed and constructed to successfully conduct gamma scanning surveys of approximately 1,076,000 square meters (266 acres) of the site. (authors)

  17. Reissue of the American National Standard N42.14-1998: Calibration and use of germanium spectrometers for the measurement of gamma-ray emission rate of radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Gehrke, R.J.; Koskelo, M.; Montgomery, D.M.; Schima, F.J.

    1999-07-01

    The American National Standard entitled, Calibration and Use of Germanium Spectrometers for the Measurement of Gamma-Ray Emission Rates of Radionuclides has been reissued as N42-14-1998 and is now available from either the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE) or the American National Standards Institute. This performance standard contains the same information and tests of hardware and software as the previous edition but has been updated and reorganized to simplify its use by practitioners of gamma-ray spectrometry. In addition, a number of typographical and technical errors were identified and corrected. Not only does this standard find use in testing the performance of germanium gamma-ray spectrometer hardware, it is also used to test spectral analysis programs. In addition, it has been used as an aid in writing specifications in the procurement of germanium detectors and as a monograph in the teaching of gamma-ray spectrometry.

  18. An alpha–gamma coincidence spectrometer based on the Photon–Electron Rejecting Alpha Liquid Scintillation (PERALS®) system

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Cadieux, J. R.; Fugate, G. A.; King, III, G. S.

    2015-02-07

    Here, an alpha–gamma coincidence spectrometer has been developed for the measurement of selected actinide isotopes in the presence of high beta/gamma fields. The system is based on a PERALS® liquid scintillation counter for beta/alpha discrimination and was successfully tested with both high purity germanium and bismuth germanate, gamma-ray detectors using conventional analog electronics.

  19. Astrogam - A magnetic rigidity spectrometer for gamma-ray astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, James H., Jr.; Ahlen, S. P.; Beatty, J. J.; Barbier, L. M.; Ormes, J. F.; Streitmatter, R. E.; Carlson, P.

    1990-01-01

    A novel concept is presented for a high-energy gamma-ray telescope with an extended energy range and excellent energy and angular resolution. The characteristics of Astrogam, a wide-field camera which makes an all-sky survey, are enumerated. Consideration is given to the instrument's unique features: wide energy range (four orders of magnitude and energy, which will bridge the gap between satellite and ground-based observations); excellent source location precision (multiple scattering error dominating nuclear recoil and measurement error below 20 GeV); and excellent energy resolution (1-percent energy resolution). Astrogam will make observations in the GTE energy range possible and could resolve complex source regions like the Crab pulsar/Nebular system, the Galactic center, and the Geminga region as well as discover the true nature of the sources.

  20. A portable gamma-ray spectrometer using compressed xenon

    SciTech Connect

    Mahler, G.J.; Yu, B.; Smith, G.C.; Kane, W.R.; Lemley, J.R.

    1997-10-01

    An ionization chamber using compressed xenon has been designed and built for gamma-ray spectrometry. The device is based on signal measurement from a parallel plate detector, with the gas enclosure constructed specifically for packaging into a portable instrument; thus, appropriate engineering practices comprises two small containers that can be setup for operation in just a few minutes. Its sensitivity is 100 keV to over 1 MeV, with a resolution at 662 keV of 2.5% FWHM for uniform irradiation, and 2% FWHM for collimated irradiation, comparable to the best ever with compressed xenon. It also exhibits greater specificity that most scintillators, such as NaI. The device is insensitive to neutron damage and has a low power requirement.

  1. Direction-Sensitive Hand-Held Gamma-Ray Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhopadhyay, S.

    2012-10-04

    A novel, light-weight, hand-held gamma-ray detector with directional sensitivity is being designed. The detector uses a set of multiple rings around two cylindrical surfaces, which provides precise location of two interaction points on two concentric cylindrical planes, wherefrom the source location can be traced back by back projection and/or Compton imaging technique. The detectors are 2.0 × 2.0 mm europium-doped strontium iodide (SrI2:Eu2+) crystals, whose light output has been measured to exceed 120,000 photons/MeV, making it one of the brightest scintillators in existence. The crystal’s energy resolution, less than 3% at 662 keV, is also excellent, and the response is highly linear over a wide range of gamma-ray energies. The emission of SrI2:Eu2+ is well matched to both photo-multiplier tubes and blue-enhanced silicon photodiodes. The solid-state photomultipliers used in this design (each 2.0 × 2.0 mm) are arrays of active pixel sensors (avalanche photodiodes driven beyond their breakdown voltage in reverse bias); each pixel acts as a binary photon detector, and their summed output is an analog representation of the total photon energy, while the individual pixel accurately defines the point of interaction. A simple back-projection algorithm involving cone-surface mapping is being modeled. The back projection for an event cone is a conical surface defining the possible location of the source. The cone axis is the straight line passing through the first and second interaction points.

  2. Design, calibration, and application of an airborne gamma spectrometer system in Switzerland

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, G.F.; Rybach, L.; Klingele, E.E.

    1997-09-01

    Airborne radiometric surveys are finding increasingly wider application in environmental mapping and monitoring. They are the most efficient tool to delimit surface contamination and to locate lost radioactive sources. To secure radiometric capability in survey and emergency situations, a new sensitive airborne system has been built that includes an airborne spectrometer with 256 channels and a sodium iodide detector with a total volume of 16.8 liters. A rack-mounted PC with memory cards is used for data acquisition, with a GPS satellite navigation system for positioning. The system was calibrated with point sources using a mathematical correction to take into account the effects of gamma-ray scattering in the ground and in the atmosphere. The calibration was complemented by high precision ground gamma spectrometry and laboratory measurements on rock samples. In Switzerland, two major research programs make use of the capabilities of airborne radiometric measurements. The first one concerns nuclear power-plant monitoring. The five Swiss nuclear installations (four power plants and one research facility) and the surrounding regions of each site are surveyed annually. The project goal is to monitor the dose-rate distribution and to provide a documented baseline database. The measurements show that all sites (with the exception of the Goesgen power plant) can be identified clearly on the maps. No artificial radioactivity that could not be explained by the Chernobyl release or earlier nuclear weapons tests was detected outside of the fenced sites of the nuclear installations. The second program aims at a better evaluation of the natural radiation level in Switzerland. The survey focused on the crystalline rocks of the Central Massifs of the Swiss Alps because of their relatively high natural radioactivity and lithological variability.

  3. Estimation method of planetary fast neutron flux by a Ge gamma-ray spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hareyama, M.; Fujibayashi, Y.; Yamashita, Y.; Karouji, Y.; Nagaoka, H.; Kobayashi, S.; Reedy, R. C.; Gasnault, O.; Forni, O.; d'Uston, C.; Kim, K. J.; Hasebe, N.

    2016-08-01

    An intensity map of lunar fast neutrons (LFNs) and their temporal variation has been estimated by fitting "sawtooth" peaks in the energy spectra of lunar gamma rays observed by the Kaguya (SELENE) Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS) consisting of a high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector with a BGO scintillator. While an ordinary peak in the spectrum is produced by only gamma ray lines, the sawtooth peak is produced by gamma ray lines and recoil nuclei in the detector by Ge(n ,n‧ γ) reaction. We develop a model for the shape of the sawtooth peak and apply it to fit sawtooth peaks together with ordinary peaks in actual observed spectra on the Moon. The temporal variation of LFNs is synchronous with that of galactic cosmic rays (GCRs), and the global distribution of fast neutrons on the lunar surface agrees well with the past observation reported by the Neutron Spectrometer aboard Lunar Prospector. Based on these results, a new method is established to estimate the flux of fast neutrons by fitting sawtooth peaks on the gamma ray spectrum observed by the HPGe detector.

  4. SWEPP gamma-ray spectrometer system software user`s guide

    SciTech Connect

    Femec, D.A.

    1994-08-01

    The SWEPP Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (SGRS) System has been developed by the Radiation Measurement and Development Unit of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory to assist in the characterization of the radiological contents of contact-handled waste containers at the Stored Waste Examination Pilot Plant (SWEPP). In addition to determining the concentrations of gamma-ray-emitting radionuclides, the software also calculates attenuation-corrected isotopic mass ratios of specific interest, and provides controls for SGRS hardware as required. This document serves as a user`s guide for the data acquisition and analysis software associated with the SGRS system.

  5. Code CUGEL: A code to unfold Ge(Li) spectrometer polyenergetic gamma photon experimental distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steyn, J. J.; Born, U.

    1970-01-01

    A FORTRAN code was developed for the Univac 1108 digital computer to unfold lithium-drifted germanium semiconductor spectrometers, polyenergetic gamma photon experimental distributions. It was designed to analyze the combination continuous and monoenergetic gamma radiation field of radioisotope volumetric sources. The code generates the detector system response matrix function and applies it to monoenergetic spectral components discretely and to the continuum iteratively. It corrects for system drift, source decay, background, and detection efficiency. Results are presented in digital form for differential and integrated photon number and energy distributions, and for exposure dose.

  6. Combined, solid-state molecular property and gamma spectrometers for CBRNE detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Ben; Grate, Jay; Pearson, Brett; Gallagher, Neal; Wise, Barry; Whitten, Ralph; Adams, Jesse

    2013-05-01

    Nevada Nanotech Systems, Inc. (Nevada Nano) has developed a multi-sensor solution to Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear and Explosives (CBRNE) detection that combines the Molecular Property Spectrometer™ (MPS™)—a micro-electro-mechanical chip-based technology capable of measuring a variety of thermodynamic and electrostatic molecular properties of sampled vapors and particles—and a compact, high-resolution, solid-state gamma spectrometer module for identifying radioactive materials, including isotopes used in dirty bombs and nuclear weapons. By conducting multiple measurements, the system can provide a more complete characterization of an unknown sample, leading to a more accurate identification. Positive identifications of threats are communicated using an integrated wireless module. Currently, system development is focused on detection of commercial, military and improvised explosives, radioactive materials, and chemical threats. The system can be configured for a variety of CBRNE applications, including handheld wands and swab-type threat detectors requiring short sample times, and ultra-high sensitivity detectors in which longer sampling times are used. Here we provide an overview of the system design and operation and present results from preliminary testing.

  7. A field-deployable gamma-ray spectrometer utilizing high pressure xenon

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, G.C.; Mahler, G.J.; Yu, Bo; Kane, W.R.; Lemley, J.R.

    1997-05-01

    Most nuclear materials in the nuclear energy, safeguards, arms control, and nonproliferation regimes emit gamma rays with a unique signature. Currently, two categories of spectrometers are available to evaluate these materials: (1) Semiconductors, with excellent energy resolution, which operate at cryogenic temperatures. (2) Scintillation detectors, which function at ambient temperature, but with poor energy resolution. A detector which functions for extended periods in a range of environments, with an energy resolution superior to that of a scintillation spectrometer, would have evident utility. Recently, in the research community, such a device has evolved, an ionization chamber utilizing xenon gas at very high pressure (60 atm). Its energy resolution, typically, is 20 keV for the 661 keV gamma ray of {sup 137}Cs. With high xenon density and its high atomic number (Z=54), and superior energy resolution, its sensitivity is comparable to that of a scintillator.

  8. Characterization of a new modular decay total absorption gamma-ray spectrometer (DTAS) for FAIR

    SciTech Connect

    Montaner Piza, A.; Tain, J. L.; Agramunt, J.; Algora, A.; Guadilla, V.; Marin, E.; Rice, S.; Rubio, B.

    2013-06-10

    Beta-decay studies are one of the main goals of the DEcay SPECtroscopy experiment (DESPEC) to be installed at the future Facility for Antiproton and Ion Research (FAIR). DESPEC aims at the study of nuclear structure of exotic nuclei. A new modular Decay Total Absorption gamma-ray Spectrometer (DTAS) is being built at IFIC and is specially adapted to studies at fragmentation facilities such as the Super Fragment Separator (Super-FRS) at FAIR. The designed spectrometer is composed of 16 identical NaI(Tl) scintillation crystals. This work focuses on the characterization of these independent modules, as an initial step for the characterization of the full spectrometer. Monte Carlo simulations have been performed in order to understand the detector response.

  9. High performance gamma-ray spectrometer for runaway electron studies on the FT-2 tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevelev, A. E.; Khilkevitch, E. M.; Lashkul, S. I.; Rozhdestvensky, V. V.; Altukhov, A. B.; Chugunov, I. N.; Doinikov, D. N.; Esipov, L. A.; Gin, D. B.; Iliasova, M. V.; Naidenov, V. O.; Nersesyan, N. S.; Polunovsky, I. A.; Sidorov, A. V.; Kiptily, V. G.

    2016-09-01

    A gamma-ray spectrometer based on LaBr3(Ce) scintillator has been used for measurements of hard X-ray emission generated by runaway electrons in the FT-2 tokamak plasmas. Using of the fast LaBr3(Ce) has allowed extending count rate range of the spectrometer by a factor of 10. A developed digital processing algorithm of the detector signal recorded with a digitizer sampling rate of 250 MHz has provided a pulse height analysis at count rates up to 107 s-1. A spectrum deconvolution code DeGaSum has been applied for inferring the energy distribution of runaway electrons escaping from the plasma and interacting with materials of the FT-2 limiter in the vacuum chamber. The developed digital signal processing technique for LaBr3(Ce) spectrometer has allowed studying the evolution of runaways energy distribution in the FT-2 plasma discharges with time resolution of 1-5 ms.

  10. Solar gamma-ray spectrometer GRIS onboard the International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotov, Yu. D.; Yurov, V. N.; Trofimov, Yu. A.; Lupar, E. E.; Glyanenko, A. S.; Faradzhaev, R. M.

    2015-10-01

    GRIS (Gamma and Roentgen Irradiation of the Sun) is a scientific instrument for detection of hard X-rays and gamma-rays of solar flares with the energies from 50 keV to 200 MeV and for registration of solar neutrons with energies above 30 MeV. The experiment will be performed since 2019 onboard the International Space Station. The instrument includes two spectrometers: the low energy spectrometer based on a fast scintillator with high energy resolution 3.5-4.5% at 662 keV (LaBr3(Ce) or CeBr3) and dimensions ø7.62 × 7.62 cm, and the high energy spectrometer based on CsI(Tl) scintillator ø12 × 15 cm (which is also intended for neutron registration). The apparatus will be mounted on the oriented platform outside the Zvezda service module in 2019. Simulated response of the detectors to background radiation and to solar flares of different magnitudes and compositions obtained with GEANT4 toolkit confirms the instrument's possibility to measure different components of the solar flares spectra: narrow gamma lines, pion decay component, etc. with a sufficient confidence due to the usage of two types of detectors.

  11. Gamma-to-electron magnetic spectrometer (GEMS): An energy-resolved {gamma}-ray diagnostic for the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Y.; Herrmann, H. W.; Mack, J. M.; Young, C. S.; Barlow, D. B.; Schillig, J. B.; Sims, J. R. Jr.; Lopez, F. E.; Mares, D.; Oertel, J. A.; Hayes-Sterbenz, A. C.; Hilsabeck, T. J.; Wu, W.; Moy, K.; Stoeffl, W.

    2012-10-15

    The gamma-to-electron magnetic spectrometer, having better than 5% energy resolution, is proposed to resolve {gamma}-rays in the range of E{sub o}{+-} 20% in single shot, where E{sub o} is the central energy and is tunable from 2 to 25 MeV. Gamma-rays from inertial confinement fusion implosions interact with a thin Compton converter (e.g., beryllium) located at approximately 300 cm from the target chamber center (TCC). Scattered electrons out of the Compton converter enter an electromagnet placed outside the NIF chamber (approximately 600 cm from TCC) where energy selection takes place. The electromagnet provides tunable E{sub o} over a broad range in a compact manner. Energy resolved electrons are measured by an array of quartz Cherenkov converters coupled to photomultipliers. Given 100 detectable electrons in the energy bins of interest, 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} minimum deuterium/tritium (DT) neutrons will be required to measure the 4.44 MeV {sup 12}C {gamma}-rays assuming 200 mg/cm{sup 2} plastic ablator areal density and 3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} minimum DT neutrons to measure the 16.75 MeV DT {gamma}-ray line.

  12. Calibration of Ge gamma-ray spectrometers for complex sample geometries and matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semkow, T. M.; Bradt, C. J.; Beach, S. E.; Haines, D. K.; Khan, A. J.; Bari, A.; Torres, M. A.; Marrantino, J. C.; Syed, U.-F.; Kitto, M. E.; Hoffman, T. J.; Curtis, P.

    2015-11-01

    A comprehensive study of the efficiency calibration and calibration verification of Ge gamma-ray spectrometers was performed using semi-empirical, computational Monte-Carlo (MC), and transfer methods. The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of the quantification of gamma-emitting radionuclides in complex matrices normally encountered in environmental and food samples. A wide range of gamma energies from 59.5 to 1836.0 keV and geometries from a 10-mL jar to 1.4-L Marinelli beaker were studied on four Ge spectrometers with the relative efficiencies between 102% and 140%. Density and coincidence summing corrections were applied. Innovative techniques were developed for the preparation of artificial complex matrices from materials such as acidified water, polystyrene, ethanol, sugar, and sand, resulting in the densities ranging from 0.3655 to 2.164 g cm-3. They were spiked with gamma activity traceable to international standards and used for calibration verifications. A quantitative method of tuning MC calculations to experiment was developed based on a multidimensional chi-square paraboloid.

  13. Chang’E-1 gamma ray spectrometer and preliminary radioactive results on the lunar surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Meng-Hua; Ma, Tao; Chang, Jin

    2010-10-01

    The Chang'E-1(CE-1) spacecraft took a gamma-ray spectrometer (hereafter, CGRS) to detect the element distributions on the lunar surface in a circular, 200 km altitude, polar orbit with approximately 2 h periodicity. CGRS consists of two large CsI(Tl) crystals as the main and anticoincidence detectors. The large CsI crystal of CGRS has a higher detector effective area than other lunar gamma ray spectrometers. For its 1-year mission, gamma ray spectra including many peaks of major elements and trace elements on the lunar surface have been measured by CGRS. Global measurement within 0.55-0.75 MeV is given here to describe the distribution of radioactive composition (e.g., uranium and thorium) on the lunar surface. Although CGRS has a lower energy resolution that cannot separate the uranium peak from others in this energy region, 609 keV uranium gamma ray line dominates the shape of the spectrum in this energy region. Therefore, the radioactive map can indirectly describe the uranium distribution on the lunar surface. The radioactive map shows that the higher radiation is concentrated in the Procellarum KREEP Terrene (PKT) on the nearside with an oval shape. The secondary high-radiation is located in South Pole-Aitken (SPA) basin. Lunar highlands have lower concentration. The relationship between radiation and topography displays different linear correlations for lunar highlands and SPA basin, which imply the different processes for these two regions.

  14. Horizontal Ampoule Growth and Characterization of Mercuric Iodide at Controlled Gas Pressures for X-Ray and Gamma Ray Spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    McGregor, Douglas S.; Ariesanti, Elsa; Corcoran, Bridget

    2004-04-30

    The project developed a new method for producing high quality mercuric iodide crystals of x-ray and gamma spectrometers. Included are characterization of mercuric iodide crystal properties as a function of growth environment and fabrication and demonstration of room-temperature-operated high-resolution mercuric iodide spectrometers.

  15. Observations with the SMM gamma-ray spectrometer - The impulsive solar flares of 1980 March 29

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, J. M.; Forrest, D. J.; Chupp, E. L.; Cherry, M. L.; Reppin, C.; Rieger, E.; Pinkau, K.; Kanbach, G.; Share, G. H.; Kinzer, R. L.

    1981-01-01

    Gamma-ray continuum emission from 0.3 to 1 MeV was observed with the gamma-ray spectrometer on the Solar Maximum Mission satellite during two impulsive solar flares on 1980 March 29, from active region 2363 at 0918 UT and from active region 2357 at 0955 UT. Evidence is presented for a hardening of the spectrum during the impulsive phase of the flares. The photon intensity greater than 100 keV appears to decay at a slower rate than that at lower energies. Time-integrated photon spectra for both flares are incompatible with a single-temperature thermal-bremsstrahlung model. Upper limits for prompt and delayed gamma-ray lines are presented.

  16. In situ XRF and gamma ray spectrometer for Mars sample return mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, I. Yin; Trombka, Jacob I.; Evans, Larry G.; Squyres, Steven W.

    1988-01-01

    A combined in situ X-ray fluorescence (XRF) and passive gamma ray spectrometer instrument is proposed for the chemical elemental analysis of various Martian surfaces and samples. The combined instrument can be carried on board a rover. The passive gamma ray or the neutron excited gamma ray system would be used to determine the elemental composition of the Martian surface while the rover is in motion. The XRF system would be used to perform analysis either on the Martian surface or on collected samples when the rover is stationary. The latter function is important both in cataloging the collected samples and in the selection of samples to be returned to earth. For both systems, data accumulation time would be on the order of 30 minutes. No sample preparation would be necessary.

  17. A digital spectrometer approach to obtaining multiple time-resolved gamma-ray spectra for pulsed spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, H.; Mitra, S.; Fallu-Labruyere, A.; Hennig, W.; Chu, Y. X.; Wielopolski, L.; Warburton, W. K.

    2007-10-01

    Neutron-induced gamma-ray emission and its detection using a pulsed neutron generator system is an established analytical technique for quantitative multi-element analysis. Traditional gamma-ray spectrometers used for this type of analysis are normally operated either in coincidence mode - for counting prompt gamma-rays following inelastic neutron scattering (INS) events when the neutron generator is ON, or in anti-coincidence mode - for counting prompt gamma-rays from thermal neutron capture (TNC) processes when the neutron generator is OFF. We have developed a digital gamma-ray spectrometer for concurrently measuring both the INS and TNC gamma-rays using a 14 MeV pulsed neutron generator. The spectrometer separates the gamma-ray counts into two independent spectra together with two separate sets of counting statistics based on the external gate level. Because the TNC gamma-ray yields are time dependent, additional accuracy in analyzing the data can be obtained by acquiring multiple time-resolved gamma-ray spectra at finer time intervals than simply ON or OFF. For that purpose we are developing a multi-gating system that will allow gamma-ray spectra to be acquired concurrently in real time with up to 16 time slots. The conceptual system design is presented, especially focusing on considerations for tracking counting statistics in multiple time slots and on the placement of pulse heights into multiple spectra in real time.

  18. Ge-diode detector combined with crystal-diffraction spectrometer permits high-resolution gamma ray spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Namenson, A. I.; Smither, R. K.

    1969-01-01

    Crystal-diffraction spectrometer, combined with a lithium-drifted Ge-diode detector, performs high-resolution gamma ray spectroscopy on the complicated neutron-capture gamma ray spectra. The system is most useful in the 1-3 MeV energy range and improves the signal to background ratio.

  19. Scientific Objectives of the Mars Surveyor 2001 Gamma-Ray Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boynton, W. V.; Feldman, W. C.; Trombka, J. I.; d'Uston, C.; Mitrofanov, I.; Arnold, J. R.; Englert, P. A. J.; Metzger, A. E.; Reedy, R. C.; Squyres, S. W.

    2000-01-01

    The Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (GRS) is one of the instruments on the Mars Surveyor 2001 Orbiter, which is part of NASA's Mars-Surveyor program. The GRS is really an instrument suite consisting of the GRS, a neutron spectrometer (NS), and a high-energy neutron detector (FIEND). Each of these instruments/sensors are remotely mounted at different locations on the spacecraft and connect to a central electronics box. The GRS will achieve global mapping of the elemental composition of the surface and the abundance of hydrogen in the shallow subsurface. It is an updated design using the same technology as the lost Mars Observer mission. The Martian surface is continuously bombarded by cosmic ray particles; their interactions with the constituents of the soil produces nuclear reaction cascades with fast neutrons being the main secondaries. Those neutrons interact in turn with the nuclei of the elements that make up the soil and they eventually get slowed to thermal energies. In this process they leave the nuclei in an excited state that decays via the emission of characteristic gamma rays. All these processes are precisely known and have been simulated by means of numerical models. Thus, remote gamma-ray spectroscopy is a useful method for quantitatively measuring the geochemical composition of the surface down to a few tens of g/sq cm. Additional information is contained in original extended abstract.

  20. Superconducting Gamma/Neutron Spectrometer Task 1 Completion Report Evaluation of Candidate Neutron-Sensitive Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, Z.W.; Lamberti, V.E.

    2002-06-20

    A review of the scientific literature regarding boron- and lithium-containing compounds was completed. Information such as Debye temperature, heat capacity, superconductivity properties, physical and chemical characteristics, commercial availability, and recipes for synthesis was accumulated and evaluated to develop a list of neutron-sensitive materials likely to perform properly in the spectrometer. The best candidate borides appear to be MgB{sub 2} (a superconductor with T{sub c} = 39 K), B{sub 6}Si, B{sub 4}C, and elemental boron; all are commercially available. Among the lithium compounds are LiH, LiAl, Li{sub 12}Si{sub 7}, and Li{sub 7}Sn{sub 2}. These materials have or are expected to have high Debye temperatures and sufficiently low heat capacities at 100 mK to produce a useful signal. The responses of {sup 10}B and {sup 6}Li to a fission neutron spectrum were also estimated. These demonstrated that the contribution of scattering events is no more than 3% in a boron-based system and 1.5% in a lithium-based system. This project is concerned with the development of materials for use in a cryogenic neutron spectrometer and is complementary to work in progress by Labov at LLNL to develop a cryogenic gamma ray spectrometer. Refrigeration to 100 mK lowers the heat capacity of these materials to the point that the energy of absorbed gamma and x rays, nuclei scattered by fast neutrons, and ions from (n, {alpha}) reactions produce a measurable heat pulse, from which the energy of the incident radiation may be deduced. The objective of this project is the discovery, fabrication, and testing of candidate materials with which a cryogenic neutron spectrometer may be realized.

  1. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey: north/south tieline. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-05-01

    An airborne high sensitivity gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey was conducted along the 99/sup 0/ longitude meridian from the Canadian border southward to the Mexican border. A total of 1555 line miles of geophysical data were acquired and, subsequently, compiled. The north-south tieline was flown as part of the National Uranium Resources Evaluation. NURE is a program of the US Department of Energy's Grand Junction, Colorado, office to acquire and compile geologic and other information with which to assess the magnitude and distribution of uranium resources and to determine areas favorable for the occurrence of uranium in the United States.

  2. A pixilated design of high pressure xenon gamma-ray spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Yuxin; Baciak, James E.; Sullivan, Clair; Gardner, Gary

    2007-08-01

    A pixilated anode design of a high pressure xenon gamma-ray spectrometer is investigated. This design is composed of a single planar cathode and four anode pixels embedded in the center of a "non-collecting" anode plate. This design removes the Frisch grid which can suffer from excessive micro-phonics in real-world applications. To investigate the energy resolution of this design, the charge collecting efficiency and waveform of induced charge on each anode were calculated via tracking electron cloud drifting.

  3. Radioactivity observed in the sodium iodide gamma-ray spectrometer returned on the Apollo 17 mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyer, C. S.; Trombka, J. I.; Schmadebeck, R. L.; Eller, E.; Bielefeld, M. J.; Okelley, G. D.; Eldridge, J. S.; Northcutt, K. J.; Metzger, A. E.; Reedy, R. C.

    1975-01-01

    In order to obtain information on radioactive background induced in the Apollo 15 and 16 gamma-ray spectrometers (7 cm x 7 cm NaI) by particle irradiation during spaceflight, and identical detector was flown and returned to earth on the Apollo 17 mission. The induced radioactivity was monitored both internally and externally from one and a half hours after splashdown. When used in conjunction with a computation scheme for estimating induced activation from calculated trapped proton and cosmic-ray fluences, these results show an important contribution resulting from both thermal and energetic neutrons produced in the heavy spacecraft by cosmic-ray interactions.

  4. Wireless, low-cost, FPGA-based miniature gamma ray spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, E. M.; Farsoni, A. T.

    2014-10-01

    A compact, low-cost, wireless gamma-ray spectrometer is a tool sought by a number of different organizations in the field of radiation detection. Such a device has applications in emergency response, battlefield assessment, and personal dosimetry. A prototype device fitting this description has been constructed in the Advanced Radiation Instrumentation Laboratory at Oregon State University. The prototype uses a CsI(Tl) scintillator coupled to a solid-state photomultiplier and a 40 MHz, 12-bit, FPGA-based digital pulse processor to measure gamma radiation, and is able to be accessed wirelessly by mobile phone. The prototype device consumes roughly 420 mW, weighs about 28 g (not including battery), and measures 2.54×3.81 cm2. The prototype device is able to achieve 5.9% FWHM energy resolution at 662 keV.

  5. Gamma-Ray Spectrometer based on a Transition Edge Sensor for Nuclear Materials Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatakeyama, S.; Ohno, M.; Takahashi, H.; Damayanthi, R. M. T.; Otani, C.; Yasumune, T.; Ohnishi, T.; Takasaki, K.; Koyama, S.

    2014-08-01

    We designed and fabricated a hard X-ray and gamma-ray TES spectrometer for nuclear materials analysis. The superconducting tin absorber is coupled to an Ir/Au TES by using a gold post to improve the thermal contact between the absorber and the TES. The reported energy resolution is 156 eV FWHM at 59.5 keV and 166 eV FWHM at 122 keV gamma-rays. We performed measurement of a Pu sample and clearly separated the Pu (56.828 keV) and the Am (59.5 keV) peaks by this TES microcalorimeter which cannot be resolved by the HPGe detector.

  6. Global Map of Lunar Effective Dose Equivalents Observed by Kaguya Gamma-Ray Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayatsu, Kanako; Takeda, Yuko; Karouji, Yuzuru; Hareyama, Makoto; Kobayashi, Shingo; Hasebe, N.

    The Kaguya Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (KGRS) onboard the Japanese large-scale lunar ex-plorer, Kaguya (SELENE) measured gamma rays emitted from the global lunar surface with a large germanium crystal as a main detector [1]. In this study, we estimated the preliminary global maps of the effective dose equivalents due to gamma rays and neutrons from the Moon on the basis of the KGRS data. Especially, the global distribution of effective equivalent dose caused from neutrons on the Moon was evaluated for the first time by this study. Firstly, the effective dose equivalents at each Apollo and Luna landing site were calculated by using the Monte Carlo simulation and the conversion coefficients of gamma rays and neutrons [2]. Secondly, the preliminary global maps of annual effective dose equivalents due to gamma rays and neutrons on the lunar surface were made by the radiation data measured by KGRS and they were compared with the estimated values of effective dose equivalents at Apollo and Luna landing sites. The distribution of the effective dose equivalent due to gamma rays on the Moon mainly corresponds to the abundance distribution of natural radioactive elements as uranium, thorium and potassium. While the global distribution of effective dose equivalent due to neu-trons is closely similar to that of the abundance distribution of iron and titanium, because such elements have a large cross section of fast neutron production [3]. These results obtained by the KGRS will be precious and useful for a future manned exploration of the Moon. [1] Hasebe et al.: Earth, Planets and Space 60 (2008) 299. [2] ICRP: ICRP Publication 74: Conversion Coefficients for use in Radiological Protection against External Radiation (Elsevier Science, Oxford, 1997). [3] Yamashita et al.: Earth, Planets and Space 60 (2008) 313.

  7. Radiation measurement above the lunar surface by Kaguya gamma-ray spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasebe, Nobuyuki; Nagaoka, Hiroshi; Kusano, Hiroki; Hareyama, Matoko; Ideguchi, Yusuke; Shimizu, Sota; Shibamura, Eido

    The lunar surface is filled with various ionizing radiations such as high energy galactic particles, albedo particles and secondary radiations of neutrons, gamma rays and other elementary particles. A high-resolution Kaguya Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (KGRS) was carried on the Japan’s lunar explorer SELENE (Kaguya), the largest lunar orbiter since the Apollo missions. The KGRS instrument employed, for the first time in lunar exploration, a high-purity Ge crystal to increase the identification capability of elemental gamma-ray lines. The Ge detector is surrounded by BGO and plastic counters as for anticoincidence shields. The KGRS measured gamma rays in the energy range from 200 keV to 13 MeV with high precision to determine the chemical composition of the lunar surface. It provided data on the abundance of major elements over the entire lunar surface. In addition to the gamma-ray observation by the KGRS, it successfully measured the global distribution of fast neutrons. In the energy spectra of gamma-rays observed by the KGRS, several saw-tooth- peaks of Ge are included, which are formed by the collision interaction of lunar fast neutrons with Ge atoms in the Ge crystal. With these saw-tooth-peaks analysis, global distribution of neutrons emitted from the lunara surface was successfully created, which was compared with the previous results obtained by Lunar Prospector neutron maps. Another anticoincidence counter, the plastic counter with 5 mm thickness, was used to veto radiation events mostly generated by charged particles. A single photomultiplier serves to count scintillation light from the plastic scintillation counter. The global map of counting rates observed by the plastic counter was also created, implying that the radiation counting rate implies the geological distribution, in spite that the plastic counter mostly measures high energy charged particles and energetic neutrons. These results are presented and discussed.

  8. Development of Superconducting High-Resolution Gamma-Ray Spectrometers for Nuclear Safeguards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreyer, Jonathan Glen

    Superconducting high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometers based on molybdenum/ copper transition edge sensors (TES) with tin absorbers have been developed for nuclear safeguard applications. This dissertation focuses on plutonium analysis, specifically the direct measurement of the 242Pu gamma-ray signature at 44.915 keV. As existing nondestructive analysis methods cannot directly measure this or any other 242Pu signature, the feasibility of making such a measurement using a TES based system is presented. Analysis from of Monte Carlo simulations and analytical noise models shows that the direct detection of this gamma-ray line of is possible and can be quantified in the presence of a 240Pu gamma-ray line with a line separation of 324 eV, even if the emission from the 240Pu is several orders of magnitude stronger. Spectroscopic measurements conducted in a liquid cryogen system offered an energy resolution of 180 eV, adequate for the measurement of 242Pu; however, TES operation in a liquid-cryogen-free pulse tube refrigerator degraded sensor performance such that this measurement was no longer possible. The numerical noise model indicates that the energy resolution of this device is adequate to demonstrate a direct measurement of 242Pu if the noise pickup from the mechanical cooler can be suppressed. This work shows that the precise measurement of low-intensity gamma-ray signatures, such as the 44.915 keV gamma ray from 242Pu, will require arrays of low-noise TES sensors and that such a system would offer invaluable information in the analysis of plutonium bearing materials.

  9. Total Absorption Gamma-ray Spectrometer (TAGS) Intensity Distributions from INL's Gamma-Ray Spectrometry Center

    DOE Data Explorer

    Greenwood, R. E.

    A 252Cf fission-product source and the INL on-line isotope separator were used to supply isotope-separated fission-product nuclides to a total absorption -ray spectrometer. This spectrometer consisted of a large (25.4-cm diameter x 30.5-cm long) NaI(Tl) detector with a 20.3-cm deep axial well in which is placed a 300-mm2 x 1.0-mm Si detector. The spectra from the NaI(Tl) detector are collected both in the singles mode and in coincidence with the B-events detected in the Si detector. Ideally, this detector would sum all the energy of the B- rays in each cascade following the population of daughter level by B- decay, so that the event could be directly associated with a particular daughter level. However, there are losses of energy from attenuation of the rays before they reach the detector, transmission of rays through the detector, escape of secondary photons from Compton scattering, escape of rays through the detector well, internal conversion, etc., and the measured spectra are thus more complicated than the ideal case and the analysis is more complex. Analysis methods have been developed to simulate all of these processes and thus provide a direct measure of the B- intensity distribution as a function of the excitation energy in the daughter nucleus. These data yield more accurate information on the B- distribution than conventional decay-scheme studies for complex decay schemes with large decay energies, because in the latter there are generally many unobserved and observed but unplaced rays. The TAGS data have been analyzed and published [R. E. Greenwood et al., Nucl Instr. and metho. A390(1997)] for 40 fission product-nuclides to determine the B- intensity distributions. [Copied from the TAGS page at http://www.inl.gov/gammaray/spectrometry/tags.shtml]. Those values are listed on this page for quick reference.

  10. A high resolution gamma-ray spectrometer based on superconducting microcalorimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, D. A.; Horansky, R. D.; Schmidt, D. R.; Doriese, W. B.; Fowler, J. W.; Kotsubo, V.; Mates, J. A. B.; Hoover, A. S.; Winkler, R.; Rabin, M. W.; Alpert, B. K.; Beall, J. A.; Fitzgerald, C. P.; Hilton, G. C.; Irwin, K. D.; O'Neil, G. C.; Reintsema, C. D.; Schima, F. J.; Swetz, D. S.; Vale, L. R.; and others

    2012-09-15

    Improvements in superconductor device fabrication, detector hybridization techniques, and superconducting quantum interference device readout have made square-centimeter-sized arrays of gamma-ray microcalorimeters, based on transition-edge sensors (TESs), possible. At these collecting areas, gamma microcalorimeters can utilize their unprecedented energy resolution to perform spectroscopy in a number of applications that are limited by closely-spaced spectral peaks, for example, the nondestructive analysis of nuclear materials. We have built a 256 pixel spectrometer with an average full-width-at-half-maximum energy resolution of 53 eV at 97 keV, a useable dynamic range above 400 keV, and a collecting area of 5 cm{sup 2}. We have demonstrated multiplexed readout of the full 256 pixel array with 236 of the pixels (91%) giving spectroscopic data. This is the largest multiplexed array of TES microcalorimeters to date. This paper will review the spectrometer, highlighting the instrument design, detector fabrication, readout, operation of the instrument, and data processing. Further, we describe the characterization and performance of the newest 256 pixel array.

  11. Development and Performance Characteristics of Personal Gamma Spectrometer for Radiation Monitoring Applications.

    PubMed

    Park, Hye Min; Joo, Koan Sik

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a personal gamma (γ) spectrometer was developed for use in applications in various fields, such as homeland security and environmental radiation monitoring systems. The prototype consisted of a 3 × 3 × 20 mm³ Ce-doped Gd-Al-Ga-garnet (Ce:GAGG) crystal that was coupled to a Si photomultiplier (SiPM) to measure γ radiation. The γ spectrometer could be accessed remotely via a mobile device. At room temperature, the implemented Ce:GAGG-SiPM spectrometer achieved energy resolutions of 13.5%, 6.9%, 5.8%, and 2.3% for (133)Ba at 0.356 MeV, (22)Na at 0.511 MeV, (137)Cs at 0.662 MeV, and (60)Co at 1.33 MeV, respectively. It consumed only about 2.7 W of power, had a mass of just 340 g (including the battery), and measured only 5.0 × 7.0 cm². PMID:27338392

  12. Development and Performance Characteristics of Personal Gamma Spectrometer for Radiation Monitoring Applications

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hye Min; Joo, Koan Sik

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a personal gamma (γ) spectrometer was developed for use in applications in various fields, such as homeland security and environmental radiation monitoring systems. The prototype consisted of a 3 × 3 × 20 mm3 Ce-doped Gd–Al–Ga–garnet (Ce:GAGG) crystal that was coupled to a Si photomultiplier (SiPM) to measure γ radiation. The γ spectrometer could be accessed remotely via a mobile device. At room temperature, the implemented Ce:GAGG-SiPM spectrometer achieved energy resolutions of 13.5%, 6.9%, 5.8%, and 2.3% for 133Ba at 0.356 MeV, 22Na at 0.511 MeV, 137Cs at 0.662 MeV, and 60Co at 1.33 MeV, respectively. It consumed only about 2.7 W of power, had a mass of just 340 g (including the battery), and measured only 5.0 × 7.0 cm2. PMID:27338392

  13. HEGRS: Mechanical design of a high-energy, gamma-ray spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Pedersen, K.B.

    1993-06-04

    A large, 3200-kg (7000-lb) gamma-ray spectrometer was designed to move in a 1500 arc with an arc accuracy of 0.50, and to move radially over a distance of 650 mm (25 in.). The entire structure is aluminum rather than steel because of the high neutron background. The two-layer support accommodates rapid, accurate positioning of the spectrometer in both the rotational and radial directions within 0.1 mm (0.004 in.). All movements and positioning are computer-controlled. The centerline deviation over the entire surface is 0.25 mm (0.0100 in.). The bottom layer, called the table, permits arc motion. The table is a baseplate consisting of two 3.6-m {times} 1.2-m (12-ft {times} 4-ft) cast-aluminum jig plates. The top layer, called the sled, is an aluminum plate 2.12-m {times} 1.22-m (83.38-in. {times} 48-in.) wide, which provides for radial motion. Due to the large mass of the spectrometer and the accurate positioning required, air pads are used to facilitate movement. Hydraulic brakes are applied when the detector is in its rest position to comply with the seismic requirements of the installation.

  14. HAND-HELD GAMMA-RAY SPECTROMETER BASED ON HIGH-EFFICIENCY FRISCH-RING CdZnTe DETECTORS.

    SciTech Connect

    CUI,Y.

    2007-05-01

    Frisch-ring CdZnTe detectors have demonstrated good energy resolution, el% FWHM at 662 keV, and good efficiency for detecting gamma rays. This technique facilitates the application of CdZnTe materials for high efficiency gamma-ray detection. A hand-held gamma-ray spectrometer based on Frisch-ring detectors is being designed at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It employs an 8x8 CdZnTe detector array to achieve a high volume of 19.2 cm3, so that detection efficiency is significantly improved. By using the front-end ASICs developed at BNL, this spectrometer has a small profile and high energy resolution. The spectrometer includes signal processing circuit, digitization and storage circuit, high-voltage module, and USB interface. In this paper, we introduce the details of the system structure and report our test results with it.

  15. Apollo 17 mission Report. Supplement 6: Calibration results for gamma ray spectrometer sodium iodide crystal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyer, C.; Trombka, J. I.

    1975-01-01

    A major difficulty in medium energy gamma-ray remote sensing spectroscopy and astronomy measurements was the high rate of unwanted background resulting from the following major sources: (1) prompt secondary gamma-rays produced by cosmic-ray interactions in satellite materials; (2) direct charged-particle counts; (3) radioactivity induced in the detector materials by cosmic-ray and trapped protons; (4) radioactivity induced in detector materials by the planetary (e.g., earth or moon) albedo neutron flux; (5) radioactivity induced in the detector materials by the interaction of secondary neutrons produced throughout the spacecraft by cosmic-ray and trapped proton interactions; (6) radioactivity induced in spacecraft materials by the mechanisms outlined in 3, 4, and 5; and (7) natural radioactivity in spacecraft and detector materials. The purpose of this experiment was to obtain information on effects 3, 4, and 5, and from this information start developing calculational methods for predicting the background induced in the crystal detector in order to correct the Apollo gamma-ray spectrometer data for this interference.

  16. The Kaguya gamma-ray spectrometer: instrumentation and in-flight performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, M.; Hasebe, N.; Miyachi, T.; Fujii, M.; Shibamura, E.; Okudaira, O.; Karouji, Y.; Hareyama, M.; Takashima, T.; Kobayashi, S.; d'Uston, C.; Maurice, S.; Yamashita, N.; Reedy, Robert C.

    2013-04-01

    A Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (GRS) had been developed as a part of the science payload for the first Japanese lunar explorer, Kaguya. The Kaguya was successfully launched from Tanegashima Space Center on September 14, 2007 and was injected into an orbit around the Moon and the mission ended on June 11, 2009. The Kaguya GRS (hereafter KGRS) has a large-volume Ge semiconductor detector of 252 cc as the main detector and bismuth-germanate and plastic scintillators as an active shielding. The Ge detector achieved an energy resolution of 3.0 keV (FWHM) for 1332 keV gamma ray in ground test despite the use of a mechanical cryocooler and observed gamma rays in energies ranging 0.2 to 12 MeV in lunar orbit. It was the first use of a Ge detector for lunar exploration. During the mission, KGRS participated in geochemical survey and investigated the elemental compositions of subsurface materials of the Moon. In this paper, we summarize the overview of the KGRS describing the design and in-flight performance of the instrument. This paper provides basic information required for reading science articles regarding the KGRS's observation data.

  17. Germanium gamma-ray spectrometer PGS for the MARS-96 mission

    SciTech Connect

    Mitrofanov, I.G.; Anfimov, D.S.; Chernenko, A.M.

    1996-09-01

    The Precision Gamma-ray Spectrometer (PGS) on the Russian MARS-96 spacecraft is designed to measure 0.1--8 MeV gamma rays in order to determine the elemental composition of the Martian surface, to study solar flares, and to determine energy spectra and times of arrival of gamma-ray bursts. The PGS instrument contains two high-purity, n-type germanium crystals, each similar to the one used on the Mars Observer mission. Each crystal is contained in a titanium can with Helicoflex cryogenic metal seals. An annealing capability allows repair of radiation damage. The detectors are cooled via nitrogen heat pipes attached to a passive radiator mounted on the back side of a solar panel. The radiators are designed to keep the Ge detectors below 100 K during the interplanetary flight. The electronics include first-stage electronics mounted on each crystal can and 4096-channel pulse height analyzers. Two parallel channels of electronics are provided and can be cross-switched by telecommands. In November 1995 integration of the flight detectors with flight electronics and testing of the complete system cooled by the passive radiator were successfully completed. The energy resolution degrades to about 3 keV in the flight configuration. Warming the radiators indicated that for the worst case when the radiator views Mars at the equator the maximum temperature of the detectors will be limited by the diode action of the heat pipes to 118 K. Extensive calibrations with radioactive sources are in progress. The authors conclude that they have an improved design for planetary and gamma-ray burst studies and the PGS instrument is ready for launch in November 1996.

  18. Mapping the elemental composition of the moon: Current results of the Lunar Prospector gamma ray spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, D.J.; Feldman, W.C.; Barraclough, B.L.; Elphic, R.C.; Binder, A.B.; Maurice, S.

    1998-12-01

    One of the instruments on board the recently launched Lunar Prospector spacecraft is a Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (GRS) designed to map the surface elemental composition of the Moon. Specifically, the objectives of the GRS are to map abundances of Fe, Ti, U, Th, K, Si, O and if possible Mg, Al, and Ca. The GRS consists of a bismuth germanate (BGO) crystal placed within a well shaped borated plastic scintillator anti-coincidence (ACS) shield. Events triggering only the BGO are labeled as accepted events; events triggering both the BGO and ACS are labeled as rejected events. BGO spectra for both accepted and rejected events are telemetered to the ground for later analysis. Results of the study are given.

  19. Reset charge sensitive amplifier for NaI(Tl) gamma-ray spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Guoqiang; Tan, Chengjun; Li, Qiang; Ge, Liangquan; Liu, Xiyao; Luo, Qun

    2015-03-01

    The time constant of the output signal of the front-end readout circuit of a traditional gamma-ray spectrometer with a NaI(Tl)+PMT structure is affected by temperature, measurement environment and the signal transmission cable, so it is difficult to get a good resolution spectrum, especially at higher counting rates. In this paper, a reset charge sensitive amplifier (RCSA) is designed for the gamma-ray spectrometer with a NaI(Tl)+PMT structure. The designed RCSA outputs a step signal, thus enabling the acquisition of double-exponential signals with a stable time constant by using the next stage of a CR differentiating circuit. The designed RCSA is mainly composed of a basic amplifying circuit, a reset circuit and a dark current compensation circuit. It provides the output step signal through the integration of the PMT output charge signal. When the amplitude of the step signal exceeds a preset voltage threshold, it triggers the reset circuit to generate a reset pulse (about 5µs pulse width) to reset the output signal. Experimental results demonstrated that the designed RCSA achieves a charge sensitivity of 4.26×10(10)V/C, with a zero capacitance noise of 51.09fC and a noise slope of 1.98fC/pF. Supported by the digital shaping algorithm of the digital multi-channel analyzer (DMCA), it can maintain good energy resolution with high counting rates up to 150kcps and with a temperature range from -19°C to 50°C. PMID:25544664

  20. Thermal Design and Performance of the Gamma-Ray Spectrometer for the MESSENGER Spacecraft

    SciTech Connect

    Burks, M; Cork, C P; Eckels, D; Hull, E; Madden, N W; Miller, W; Goldsten, J; Rhodes, E; Williams, B

    2004-10-13

    A gamma-ray spectrometer (GRS) has been built and delivered to the Mercury MESSENGER spacecraft which launched on August 3, 2004, from Cape Canaveral, Florida. The GRS, a part of seven scientific instruments on board MESSENGER, is based on a coaxial high-purity germanium detector. Gamma-ray detectors based on germanium have the advantage of providing excellent energy resolution, which is critical to achieving the science goals of the mission. However, germanium has the disadvantage that it must operate at cryogenic temperatures (typically {approx}80 K). This requirement is easy to satisfy in the laboratory but difficult near Mercury, which has an extremely hot thermal radiation environment. To cool the detector, a Stirling cycle mechanical cooler is employed. In addition, radiation and conduction techniques a are used to reduce the GRS heat load. Before delivering the flight sensor, a complete thermal prototype was built and tested. The results of these test, including thermal design, radiative and conductive heat loads, and cooler performance are described.

  1. Search for Doppler-shifted gamma-ray emission from SS 433 using the SMM spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geldzahler, B. J.; Share, G. H.; Kinzer, R. L.; Magura, J.; Chupp, E. L.

    1989-01-01

    Data accumulated from 1980 to 1983 with the Gamma Ray Spectrometer aboard NASA's Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) satellite were searched for evidence of red and blue Doppler-shifted 1.37 MeV Mg-24 nuclear lines from SS 433. The SMM data base covers 270 days when SS 433 was in the field of view and includes periods of radio flaring and quiescence. No evidence was found for Doppler-shifted line emission in any of the spectra. The range of 3-sigma upper limits for individual 9 day integration periods was 0.0008-0.0023 photons/sq cm per sec for the blue beam, encompassing the reported about 1.5 MeV line, and 0.0008-0.002 photons/sq cm per sec for the red beam, encompassing the reported about 1.2 MeV line; the average 3-sigma upper limit in each beam for shifted about 1.37 MeV lines is 0.0015 photons/sq cm per sec for single 9 day integrations. The 3-sigma upper limit on 1.37 MeV gamma-ray emission over 23 9-day integration intervals for the red beam and 28 intervals for the blue beam is 0.0002 photons/sq cm per sec. These new limits from SMM can be reconciled with the HEAO 3 results only if SS 433 emits gamma radiation at or above the SMM sensitivity limit on rare occasions due to variable physical conditions in the system.

  2. Fe-Bearing Phases Identified by the Moessbauer Spectrometers on the Mars Exploration Rovers: An Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, R. V.; Klingelhoefer, G.; Rodionov, D.; Yen, A.; Gellert, R.

    2006-01-01

    The twin Mars Exploration Rovers Spirit and Opportunity have explored the martian surface at Gusev Crater (GC) and Meridiani Planum (MP), respectively, for about two Earth years. The Moessbauer (MB) spectrometers on both rovers have analyzed an aggregate of 200 surface targets and have returned to Earth information on the oxidation state of iron, the mineralogical composition of Febearing phases, and the distribution of Fe among oxidation states and phases at the two landing sites [1-7]. To date, 15 component subspectra (10 doublets and 5 sextets) have been identified and most have been assigned to mineralogical compositions. Two subspectra are assigned to phases (jarosite and goethite) that are marker minerals for aqueous processes because they contain hydroxide anion in their structures. In this paper, we give an overview of the Febearing phases identified and their distributions at Gusev crater and Meridiani Planum.

  3. Identifying high-redshift gamma-ray bursts with RATIR

    SciTech Connect

    Littlejohns, O. M.; Butler, N. R.; Cucchiara, A.; Watson, A. M.; Lee, W. H.; Richer, M. G.; De Diego, J. A.; Georgiev, L.; González, J.; Román-Zúñiga, C. G.; Kutyrev, A. S.; Troja, E.; Gehrels, N.; Moseley, H.; Klein, C. R.; Fox, O. D.; Bloom, J. S.; Prochaska, J. X.; Ramirez-Ruiz, E.

    2014-07-01

    We present a template-fitting algorithm for determining photometric redshifts, z {sub phot}, of candidate high-redshift gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Using afterglow photometry, obtained by the Reionization and Transients InfraRed (RATIR) camera, this algorithm accounts for the intrinsic GRB afterglow spectral energy distribution, host dust extinction, and the effect of neutral hydrogen (local and cosmological) along the line of sight. We present the results obtained by this algorithm and the RATIR photometry of GRB 130606A, finding a range of best-fit solutions, 5.6 < z {sub phot} < 6.0, for models of several host dust extinction laws (none, the Milky Way, Large Magellanic Clouds, and Small Magellanic Clouds), consistent with spectroscopic measurements of the redshift of this GRB. Using simulated RATIR photometry, we find that our algorithm provides precise measures of z {sub phot} in the ranges of 4 < z {sub phot} ≲ 8 and 9 < z {sub phot} < 10 and can robustly determine when z {sub phot} > 4. Further testing highlights the required caution in cases of highly dust-extincted host galaxies. These tests also show that our algorithm does not erroneously find z {sub phot} < 4 when z {sub sim} > 4, thereby minimizing false negatives and allowing us to rapidly identify all potential high-redshift events.

  4. Comprehensive survey of energetic electron events in Mercury's magnetosphere with data from the MESSENGER Gamma-Ray and Neutron Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrence, David J.; Anderson, Brian J.; Baker, Daniel N.; Feldman, William C.; Ho, George C.; Korth, Haje; McNutt, Ralph L.; Peplowski, Patrick N.; Solomon, Sean C.; Starr, Richard D.; Vandegriff, Jon D.; Winslow, Reka M.

    2015-04-01

    Data from the MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) Gamma-Ray and Neutron Spectrometer have been used to detect and characterize energetic electron (EE) events in Mercury's magnetosphere. This instrument detects EE events indirectly via bremsstrahlung photons that are emitted when instrument and spacecraft materials stop electrons having energies of tens to hundreds of keV. From Neutron Spectrometer data taken between 18 March 2011 and 31 December 2013 we have identified 2711 EE events. EE event amplitudes versus energy are distributed as a power law and have a dynamic range of a factor of 400. The duration of the EE events ranges from tens of seconds to nearly 20 min. EE events may be classified as bursty (large variation with time over an event) or smooth (small variation). Almost all EE events are detected inside Mercury's magnetosphere on closed field lines. The precise occurrence times of EE events are stochastic, but the events are located in well-defined regions with clear boundaries that persist in time and form what we call "quasi-permanent structures." Bursty events occur closer to dawn and at higher latitudes than smooth events, which are seen near noon-to-dusk local times at lower latitudes. A subset of EE events shows strong periodicities that range from hundreds of seconds to tens of milliseconds. The few-minute periodicities are consistent with the Dungey cycle timescale for the magnetosphere and the occurrence of substorm events in Mercury's magnetotail region. Shorter periods may be related to phenomena such as north-south bounce processes for the energetic electrons.

  5. Two CdZnTe Detector-Equipped Gamma-ray Spectrometers for Attribute Measurements on Irradiated Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Hartwell, John Kelvin; Winston, Philip Lon; Marts, Donna Jeanne; Moore-McAteer, Lisa Dawn; Taylor, Steven Cheney

    2003-04-01

    Some United States Department of Energy-owned spent fuel elements from foreign research reactors (FRRs) are presently being shipped from the reactor location to the US for storage at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Two cadmium zinc telluride detector-based gamma-ray spectrometers have been developed to confirm the irradiation status of these fuels. One spectrometer is configured to operate underwater in the spent fuel pool of the shipping location, while the other is configured to interrogate elements on receipt in the dry transfer cell at the INEEL’s Interim Fuel Storage Facility (IFSF). Both units have been operationally tested at the INEEL.

  6. Conceptual design of the gamma-to-electron magnetic spectrometer for the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Y. Herrmann, H. W.; Jorgenson, H. J.; Barlow, D. B.; Young, C. S.; Lopez, F. E.; Oertel, J. A.; Batha, S. H.; Stoeffl, W.; Casey, D.; Clancy, T.; Hilsabeck, T.; Moy, K.

    2014-11-15

    The Gamma-to-Electron Magnetic Spectrometer (GEMS) diagnostic is designed to measure the prompt γ-ray energy spectrum during high yield deuterium-tritium (DT) implosions at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The prompt γ-ray spectrum will provide “burn-averaged” observables, including total DT fusion yield, total areal density (ρR), ablator ρR, and fuel ρR. These burn-averaged observables are unique because they are essentially averaged over 4π, providing a global reference for the line-of-sight-specific measurements typical of x-ray and neutron diagnostics. The GEMS conceptual design meets the physics-based requirements: ΔE/E = 3%–5% can be achieved in the range of 2–25 MeV γ-ray energy. Minimum DT neutron yields required for 15% measurement uncertainty at low-resolution mode are: 5 × 10{sup 14} DT-n for ablator ρR (at 0.2 g/cm{sup 2}); 2 × 10{sup 15} DT-n for total DT yield (at 4.2 × 10{sup −5} γ/n); and 1 × 10{sup 16} DT-n for fuel ρR (at 1 g/cm{sup 2})

  7. Objective Crystal Spectrometer (OXS) for the Spectrum-X-Gamma satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, F. E.; Byrnak, B. P.; Hornstrup, A.; Schnopper, H. W.; Shou-Hua, Z.

    1990-11-01

    The status of the Objective Crystal Spectrometer (OXS) to be flown on the Soviet Spectrum-X-Gamma satellite together with the X-ray investigation of two of the three natural crystals (LiF(220), Ge(111) and RAP(001) which are chosen as the baseline option are presented. An important result of this study is the approximately 50 percent higher resolution obtained by polishing the LiF(220) surface. The measured X-ray data has been used to determine the OXS specifications. A simulation of the performance of the OXS for the LiF(220)-case are presented. A novel design in which multilayers are coated on the LiF(220) and Ge(111) surfaces is presented. This design allows simultaneous spectroscopy in two energy bands each centered on cosmically interesting line emission regions. X-ray reflectivity measurements demonstrate that the crystal surface can be made sufficiently smooth for the application of the multilayer coating. The first X-ray reflectivity data of multilayers deposited on these surfaces are also reported.

  8. Conceptual design of the gamma-to-electron magnetic spectrometer for the National Ignition Facility.

    PubMed

    Kim, Y; Herrmann, H W; Jorgenson, H J; Barlow, D B; Young, C S; Stoeffl, W; Casey, D; Clancy, T; Lopez, F E; Oertel, J A; Hilsabeck, T; Moy, K; Batha, S H

    2014-11-01

    The Gamma-to-Electron Magnetic Spectrometer (GEMS) diagnostic is designed to measure the prompt γ-ray energy spectrum during high yield deuterium-tritium (DT) implosions at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The prompt γ-ray spectrum will provide "burn-averaged" observables, including total DT fusion yield, total areal density (ρR), ablator ρR, and fuel ρR. These burn-averaged observables are unique because they are essentially averaged over 4π, providing a global reference for the line-of-sight-specific measurements typical of x-ray and neutron diagnostics. The GEMS conceptual design meets the physics-based requirements: ΔE/E = 3%-5% can be achieved in the range of 2-25 MeV γ-ray energy. Minimum DT neutron yields required for 15% measurement uncertainty at low-resolution mode are: 5 × 10(14) DT-n for ablator ρR (at 0.2 g/cm(2)); 2 × 10(15) DT-n for total DT yield (at 4.2 × 10(-5) γ/n); and 1 × 10(16) DT-n for fuel ρR (at 1 g/cm(2)). PMID:25430301

  9. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey, New Rockford Quadrangle, North Dakota. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-04-01

    An airborne high sensitivity gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey was conducted over eleven (11) 2/sup 0/ x 1/sup 0/ NTMS quadrangles located in the states of Minnesota and Wisconsin and seven (7) 2/sup 0/ x 1/sup 0/ NTMS quadrangles in North and South Dakota. The quadrangles located within the North and South Dakota survey area include Devil's Lake, New Rockford, Jamestown, Aberdeen, Huron, Mitchell, and Sioux Falls. This report discusses the results obtained over the New Rockford map area. Traverse lines were flown in an east-west direction at a line spacing of six (6) miles. Tie lines were flown north-south approximately twenty-four (24) miles apart. A total of 21,481 line miles of geophysical data were acquired, compiled, and interpreted during the survey, of which 1397 line miles are in this quadrangle. The purpose of this study is to acquire and compile geologic and other information with which to assess the magnitude and distribution of uranium resources and to determine areas favorable for the occurrence of uranium in the United States.

  10. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey: Eureka quadrangle, California. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-05-01

    An airborne high sensitivity gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey was conducted over ten (10) areas over northern California and southwestern Oregon. These include the 2/sup 0/ x 1/sup 0/ NTMS quadrangles of Roseburg, Medford, Weed, Alturas, Redding, Susanville, Ukiah, and Chico along with the 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ areas of the Coos Bay quadrangle and the Crescent City/Eureka areas combined. This report discusses the results obtained over the Eureka/Crescent City, California, map area. Traverse lines were flown in an east-west direction at a line spacing of six (6) miles. Tie lines were flown north-south approximately eighteen (18) miles apart. A total of 16,880.5 line miles of geophysical data were aquired, compiled, and interpreted during the survey, of which 349.5 line miles are in this area. The purpose of this study is to acquire and compile geologic and other information with which to assess the magnitude and distribution of uranium resources and to determine areas favorable for the occurrence of uranium in the United States.

  11. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey, Medford Quadrangle Oregon. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-04-01

    An airborne high sensitivity gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey was conducted over ten (10) areas over northern California and southwestern Oregon. These include the 2/sup 0/ x 1/sup 0/ NTMS quadrangles of Roseburg, Medford, Weed, Alturas, Redding, Susanville, Ukiah, and Chico along with the 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ areas of the Coos Bay quadrangle and the Crescent City/Eureka areas combined. This report discusses the results obtained over the Medford, Oregon, map area. Traverse lines were flown in an east-west direction at a line spacing of three miles. Tie lines were flown north-south approximately twelve miles apart. A total of 16,880.5 line miles of geophysical data were acquired, compiled, and interpreted during the survey, of which 2925 line miles are in this quadrangle. The purpose of this study is to acquire and compile geologic and other information with which to assess the magnitude and distribution of uranium resources and to determine areas favorable for the occurrence of uranium in the United States.

  12. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey, Roseburg Quadrangle, Oregon. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-03-01

    An airborne high sensitivity gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey was conducted over ten (10) areas over northern California and southwestern Oregon. These include the 2/sup 0/ x 1/sup 0/ NTMS quadrangles of Roseburg, Medford, Weed, Alturas, Redding, Susanville, Ukiah, and Chico along with the 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ areas of the Coos Bay quadrangle and the Crescent City/Eureka areas combined. This report discusses the results obtained over the Roseburg, Oregon, map area. Traverse lines were flown in an east-west direction at a line spacing of six (6) miles. Tie lines were flown north-south approximately eighteen (18) miles apart. A total of 16,880.5 line miles of geophysical data were acquired, compiled, and interpreted during the survey, of which 1596 line miles are in this quadrangle. The purpose of this study is to acquire and compile geologic and other information with which to assess the magnitude and distribution of uranium resources and to determine areas favorable for the occurrence of uranium in the United States.

  13. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey Coos Bay, Oregon. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-05-01

    During the months of August, September, and October of 1980, Aero Service Division Western Geophysical Company of America conducted an airborne high sensitivity gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey over ten (10) areas over northern California and southwestern Oregon. These include the 2/sup 0/ x 1/sup 0/ NTMS quadrangles of Roseburg, Medford, Weed, Alturas, Redding, Susanville, Ukiah, and Chico along with the 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ areas of the Coos Bay quadrangle and the Crescent City/Eureka areas combined. This report discusses the results obtained over the Coos Bay, Oregon, map area. Line spacing was generally six miles for east/west traverses and eighteen miles for north/south tie lines over the northern one-half of the area. Traverses and tie lines were flown at three miles and twelve miles respectively over the southern one-half of the area. A total of 16,880.5 line miles of geophysical data were acquired, compiled, and interpreted during the survey, of which 863.8 line miles are in this quadrangle.

  14. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey: Susanville quadrangle, California. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-05-01

    An airborne high sensitivity gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey was conducted over ten (10) areas over northern California and southwestern Oregon. These include the 2/sup 0/ x 1/sup 0/ NTMS quadrangles of Roseburg, Medford, Weed, Alturas, Redding, Susanville, Ukiah, and Chico along with the 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ areas of the Coos Bay quadrangle and the Crescent City/Eureka areas combined. This report discusses the results obtained over the Susanville, California, map area. Traverse lines were flown in an east-west direction at a line spacing of six (6) miles. Tie lines were flown north-south approximately eighteen (18) miles apart. A total of 16,880.5 line miles of geophysical data were acquired, compiled, and interpreted during the survey, of which 1642.8 line miles are in this quadrangle. The purpose of this study is to acquire and compile geologic and other information with which to assess the magnitude and distribution of uranium resources and to determine areas favorable for the occurrence of uranium in the United States.

  15. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey: Ukiah quadrangle, California. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-05-01

    An airborne high sensitivity gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey was conducted over ten (10) areas over northern California and southwestern Oregon. These include the 2/sup 0/ x 1/sup 0/ NTMS quadrangles of Roseburg, Medford, Weed, Alturas, Redding, Susanville, Ukiah, and Chico along with the 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ areas of the Coos Bay quadrangle and the Crescent City/Eureka areas combined. This report discusses the results obtained over the Ukiah, California, map area. Traverse lines were flown in an east-west direction at a line spacing of six (6) miles. Tie lines were flown north-south approximately eighteen (18) miles apart. A total of 16,880.5 line miles of geophysical data were acquired, compiled, and interpreted during the survey, of which 1517 line miles are in this quadrangle. The purpose of this study is to acquire and compile geologic and other information with which to assess the magnitude and distribution of uranium resources and to determine areas favorable for the occurrence of uranium in the United States.

  16. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey: Chico quadrangle, California. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-05-01

    An airborne high sensitivity gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey was conducted over ten (10) areas over northern California and southwestern Oregon. These include the 2/sup 0/ x 1/sup 0/ NTMS quadrangles of Roseburg, Medford, Weed, Alturas, Redding, Susanville, Ukiah, and Chico along with the 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ areas of the Coos Bay quadrangle and the Crescent City/Eureka areas combined. This report discusses the results obtained over the Chico, California, map area. Traverse lines were flown in an east-west direction at a line spacing of three. Tie lines were flown north-south approximately twelve miles apart. A total of 16,880.5 line miles of geophysical data were acquired, compiled, and interpreted during the survey, of which 3026.4 line miles are in the quadrangle. The purpose of this study is to acquire and compile geologic and other information with which to assess the magnitude and distribution of uranium resources with which to assess the magnitude and distribution of uranium resources and to determine areas favorable for the occurrence of uranium in the United States.

  17. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey: Alturas quadrangle, California. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-05-01

    An airborne high sensitivity gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey was conducted over ten (10) areas over northern California and southwestern Oregon. These include the 2/sup 0/ x 1/sup 0/ NTMS quadrangles of Roseburg, Medford, Weed, Alturas, Redding, Susanville, Ukiah, and Chico along with the 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ areas of the Coos Bay quadrangle and the Crescent City/Eureka areas combined. This report discusses the results obtained over the Alturas, California, map area. Traverse lines were flown in an east-west direction at a line spacing of six (6) miles. Tie lines were flown north-south approximately eighteen (18) miles apart. A total of 16,880.5 line miles of geophysical data were acquired, compiled, and interpreted during the survey, of which 1631.6 line miles are in this quadrangle. The purpose of this study is to acquire and compile geologic and other information with which to assess the magnitude and distribution of uranium resources and to determine areas favorable for the occurrence of uranium in the United States.

  18. Conceptual design of the gamma-to-electron magnetic spectrometer for the National Ignition Facilitya)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y.; Herrmann, H. W.; Jorgenson, H. J.; Barlow, D. B.; Young, C. S.; Stoeffl, W.; Casey, D.; Clancy, T.; Lopez, F. E.; Oertel, J. A.; Hilsabeck, T.; Moy, K.; Batha, S. H.

    2014-11-01

    The Gamma-to-Electron Magnetic Spectrometer (GEMS) diagnostic is designed to measure the prompt γ-ray energy spectrum during high yield deuterium-tritium (DT) implosions at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The prompt γ-ray spectrum will provide "burn-averaged" observables, including total DT fusion yield, total areal density (ρR), ablator ρR, and fuel ρR. These burn-averaged observables are unique because they are essentially averaged over 4π, providing a global reference for the line-of-sight-specific measurements typical of x-ray and neutron diagnostics. The GEMS conceptual design meets the physics-based requirements: ΔE/E = 3%-5% can be achieved in the range of 2-25 MeV γ-ray energy. Minimum DT neutron yields required for 15% measurement uncertainty at low-resolution mode are: 5 × 1014 DT-n for ablator ρR (at 0.2 g/cm2); 2 × 1015 DT-n for total DT yield (at 4.2 × 10-5 γ/n); and 1 × 1016 DT-n for fuel ρR (at 1 g/cm2).

  19. Thorium distribution on the lunar surface observed by Chang'E-2 gamma-ray spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xianmin; Zhang, Xubing; Wu, Ke

    2016-07-01

    The thorium distribution on the lunar surface is critical for understanding the lunar evolution. This work reports a global map of the thorium distribution on the lunar surface observed by Chang'E-2 gamma-ray spectrometer (GRS). Our work exhibits an interesting symmetrical structure of thorium distribution along the two sides of the belt of Th hot spots. Some potential positions of KREEP volcanism are suggested, which are the Fra Mauro region, Montes Carpatus, Aristarchus Plateau and the adjacent regions of Copernicus Crater. Based on the lunar map of thorium distribution, we draw some conclusions on two critical links of lunar evolution: (1) the thorium abundance within the lunar crust and mantle, in the last stage of Lunar Magma Ocean (LMO) crystallization, may have a positive correlation with the depth in the crust, reaches a peak when coming through the transitional zone between the crust and mantle, and decreases sharply toward the inside of the mantle; thus, the Th-enhanced materials originated from the lower crust and the layer between the crust and mantle, (2) in PKT, KREEP volcanism might be the primary mechanism of Th-elevated components to the lunar surface, whereas the Imbrium impact acted as a relatively minor role.

  20. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer survey data application in spatial methods

    SciTech Connect

    Bresnahan, P.J.

    1996-12-31

    The purpose of this research was to develop a methodology that used geographic information system (GIS) tools to convert airborne gamma-ray spectrometer (AGRS) survey data to various spatial data formats for use in radiological hazard mapping and risk assessments. The importance of this conversion methodology results from the versatility and consistency of spatial interpolations using commercially supported software as opposed to previous methods. Maps of interpolated AGRS data provide potential radiological hazard boundaries, delineated by user-defined limits, to guide intense field surveys. Resulting GIS products may be combined with other risk assessment inputs to model and monitor hazardous environments. The AGRS data used in this research was collected during the 1991 sitewide survey at Savannah River site (SRS) as part of the comprehensive integrated remote sensing (CIRS) program conducted by EG&G for the SRS. The AGRS survey component of the program is designed to provide a database for studying the transport of manufactured radionuclides through the environment at the SRS and surrounding areas. The AGRS data have historically been presented only in hardcopy format as acetate overlays on aerial photography. Recently, digital files representing contoured isotopic response have been delivered to the SRS as GIS themes. Since AGRS data are often a collection of dense sample points, interpolation of the data has previously been conducted by connecting points in series along flight paths. To improve on the original algorithm used to contour AGRS data, a triangulated irregular network (TIN) was used as the data model for contour and raster generation.

  1. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey, Mitchell Quadrangle, South Dakota. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-04-01

    An airborne high sensitivity gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey was conducted over eleven (11) 2/sup 0/ x 1/sup 0/ NTMS quadrangles located in the states of Minnesota and Wisconsin and seven (7) 2/sup 0/ x 1/sup 0/ NTMS quadrangles in North and South Dakota. The quadrangles located within the North and South Dakota survey area include Devil's Lake, New Rockford, Jamestown, Aberdeen, Huron, Mitchell, and Sioux Falls. This report discusses the results obtained over the Mitchell map area. The purpose of this program is to acquire and compile geologic and other information with which to assess the magnitude and distribution of uranium resources and to determine areas favorable for the occurrence of uranium in the United States. Traverse lines were flown in an east-west direction at a line spacing of six (6) miles. Tie lines were flown north-south approximately twenty-four (24) miles apart. A total of 21,481 line miles of geophysical data were acquired, compiled, and interpreted during the survey, of which 1479 line miles are in this quadrangle.

  2. Observations of the galactic center with the GSFC low-energy gamma-ray spectrometer - Preliminary results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paciesas, W. S.; Tueller, J.; Cline, T. L.; Teegarden, B. J.; Durouchoux, P.; Hameury, J. M.

    1982-01-01

    The results of measurements made of the gamma ray emission originating from the galactic center are reviewed. The data were gathered with balloon borne gamma ray spectrometers, with the scans centering on 511 keV. Minimum Chi-sq fits were calculated for the recorded emissions, assuming a constant source modulated by the detector response and superimposed on a constant background. A time history of the 511 keV line intensity demonstrated variability in the feature, whereas the continuum spectrum showed a high correlation with previous measurements. An excess in the continuum just below the 511 keV line was taken as an indication of positronium formation.

  3. Hand-Held Gamma-Ray Spectrometer Based on High-Efficiency Frisch-Ring Cdznte Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Y.; Bolotnikov, A; Camarda, G; Hossain, A; James, R; DeGeronimo, G; Fried, J; O'Connor, P; Kargar, A; et. al.

    2008-01-01

    Frisch-ring CdZnTe detectors have demonstrated both good energy resolution, <1% FWHM at 662 keV, and good efficiency in detecting gamma rays, highlighting the strong potential of CdZnTe materials for such applications. We are designing a hand-held gamma-ray spectrometer based on Frisch-ring detectors at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It employs an 8 times 8 CdZnTe detector array to achieve a high volume of 19.2 cm3, so greatly improving detection efficiency. By using the front-end application-specific integrated circuits (ASICs) developed at BNL, this spectrometer has a small profile and high energy-resolution. It includes a signal processing circuit, digitization and storage circuits, a high-voltage module, and a universal serial bus (USB) interface. In this paper, we detail the system's structure and report the results of our tests with it.

  4. Experimental set-up and optimization of a gamma-ray spectrometer for measurement of cosmogenic radionuclides in meteorites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taricco, C.; Bhandari, N.; Colombetti, P.; Verma, N.; Vivaldo, G.

    2007-03-01

    We have developed a highly efficient and selective gamma-ray spectrometer with extremely low background for activity measurement of gamma emitting cosmogenic radionuclides in meteorites. This spectrometer can operate in specific modes to match decay scheme of a particular radionuclide and is specially suited for measurement of positron emitters. The system consists of a hyperpure Ge detector (3 kg, 147% relative efficiency), operating in coincidence with an umbrella of NaI(Tl) scintillator (90 kg) in order to achieve low background. The system is tuned such that strong interference due to naturally occurring uranium daughters, e.g. 214Bi present in the meteorites and in the laboratory environment, is minimized. It enables us to measure 44Ti (T=59.2y) which is ideal for studying centennial scale variations of cosmic ray flux in the interplanetary space with good reliability. The specific configuration of the coincidence system and electronics are described here.

  5. Development of a method for activity measurements of 232Th daughters with a multidetector gamma-ray coincidence spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Antovic, N; Svrkota, N

    2009-06-01

    The method for activity measurements of the (232)Th daughters, developed at the six-crystal gamma-ray coincidence spectrometer PRIPYAT-2M and based on coincidence counting of the 583 and 2615 keV photons from cascade transitions which follow beta(-)-decay of (208)Tl, as well as on counting the 911 keV photons which follow beta(-)-decay of (228)Ac in the integral and non-coincidence mode of counting, is presented. PMID:19299155

  6. A sparse architecture low power gated integrator for use with germanium gamma-ray spectrometers in remote geochemistry measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Madden, N.; Landis, D.; Adachi, R.; Pehl, R.; Abott, R.; Stogsdill, E.

    1992-10-01

    Prototypical circuits of a low power gated integrator for use with germanium gamma-ray spectrometers in remote locations have been developed. The gated integrator is constructed from three very simple sub circuits. With a power consumption of <250mW the low count rate spectroscopy performance of this gated integrator is comparable to that of a conventional pulse shaping amplifier at energies of 1 MeV and greater.

  7. Lunar surface radioactivity - Preliminary results of the Apollo 15 and Apollo 16 gamma-ray spectrometer experiments.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metzger, A. E.; Trombka, J. I.; Peterson, L. E.; Reedy, R. C.; Arnold, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    Gamma-ray spectrometers on the Apollo 15 and Apollo 16 missions have been used to map the moon's radioactivity over 20 percent of its surface. The highest levels of natural radioactivity are found in Mare Imbrium and Oceanus Procellarum with contrastingly lower enhancements in the eastern maria. The ratio of potassium to uranium is higher on the far side than on the near side, although it is everywhere lower than commonly found on the earth.

  8. Hematite at Meridiani Planum and Gusev Crater as identified by the Moessbauer Spectrometer MIMOS II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klingelhoefer, G.; Morris, R. V.; Rodionov, D.; Schroeder, C.; de Souza, P. A.; Yen, A.; Renz, F.; Wdowiak, T.

    2006-01-01

    The Moessbauer (MB) spectrometers on the MER rovers Opportunity and Spirit, which landed on Mars in January 2004, have identified the iron-containing mineral hematite (a-Fe2O3) at both landing sites. On Earth, hematite can occur either by itself or with other iron oxides as massive deposits, in veins , and as particles dispersed through a silicate or other matrix material. Hematite particle size can range from nanophase (superparamagnetic) to multidomain and particle shape ranges from equant to acicular to platy. Fine-grained hematite is red in color and is a pigmenting agent. Coarse-grained hematite can be spectrally neutral (gray) at visible wavelengths. Substitutional impurities, particularly Al, are common in hematite. Chemically pure, coarse-grained, and well-crystalline hematite has a magnetic transition (the Morin transition) at 260 K. Moessbauer spectra, recorded as a function of temperature, provide a way to characterize Martian hematite with respect to some of the physical and chemical characteristics. At Meridiani Planum besides the iron-sulfate mineral jarosite also the Fe-oxide hematite has been identified by the Moessbauer spectrometer, mainly in three distinct types of reservoir: - outcrop matrix material dominated by the mineral jarosite in the MB spectrum, certain basaltic soils, and mm-sized spherules dubbed blueberries. Moessbauer spectra of each reservoir yield a distinct set of hyperfine parameters for hematite, suggesting different degrees of crystallinity and particle size. The hematite found by MB instrument MIMOS II in the outcrop material shows the Morin transition at relatively high temperatures (ca. 250 K) which is an indication of pure and well-crystallized hematite. The source of the hematite in the Blueberries as identified by Moessbauer spectroscopy, and also by MiniTES, is not known. These spherules, covering nearly the whole landing site area (Eagle crater, plains, Endurance crater), may be concretions formed in the outcrop

  9. Research and development of a gamma-ray imaging spectrometer in the MeV range in Barcelona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez, José-Manuel; Galvez, José-Luis; Hernanz, Margarita; Isern, Jordi; Lozano, Manuel; Pellegrini, Giulio; Chmeissani, Mokhtar; Cabruja, Enric; Ullán, Miguel

    2010-07-01

    Gamma-ray astrophysics in the MeV energy range plays an important role for the understanding of cosmic explosions and acceleration mechanisms in a variety of galactic and extragalactic sources, e.g., Supernovae, Classical Novae, Supernova Remnants (SNRs), Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs), Pulsars, Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). Through the development of focusing telescopes in the MeV energy range, it will be possible to reach unprecedented sensitivities, compared with those of the currently operating gamma ray telescopes. In order to achieve the needed performance, a detector with mm spatial resolution and very high peak efficiency is required. It will be also desirable that the detector could detect polarization of the source. Our research and development activities in Barcelona aim to study a gamma-ray imaging spectrometer in the MeV range suited for the focal plane of a gamma-ray telescope mission, based on CdTe pixel detectors arranged in multiple layers with increasing thicknesses, to enhance gamma-ray absorption in the Compton regime. We have developed an initial prototype based on several CdTe module detectors, with 11x11 pixels, a pixel pitch of 1mm and a thickness of 2mm. Each pixel is stud-bump bonded to a fanout board and routed to a readout ASIC to measure pixel position, pulse height and rise time information for each incident gamma-ray photon. We will report on the results of an optimization study based on simulations, to select the optimal thickness of each CdTe detector within the module to get the best energy resolution of the spectrometer.

  10. Studying Phobos subsurface structure elementary composition by neutron and gamma-rays spectrometers "NS HEND" from "Phobos-Grunt" mission.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozyrev, S. Alexander; Litvak, Maxim; Malakhov, Alexey; Mokrousov, Maxim; Mitrofanov, Igor; Sanin, Anton; Schulz, Rita; Shvetsov, Valery; Rogozhin, Alexander; Timoshenko, Genagy; Tretyakov, Vladislav; Vostrukhin, Andrey

    The Neutron Spectrometer HEND (NS HEND) has been proposed for studying elemental com-position of Phobos (the Mars's moon) regolith by "Phobos-Grunt" mission. NS HEND have been selected by the Federal Space Agency of Russia for the Lander of the "Phobos-Grunt" mission scheduled for launch in 2011. The shallow subsurface of Phobos might be studied by observations of induced nuclear gamma-ray lines and neutron emission. Secondary gamma-rays and neutrons are produced by energetic Galactic Cosmic Rays within 1-2 meter layer of subsur-face. The knowledge of the spectral density of neutrons in addition to measurements of nuclear gamma lines allows to deconvolve concentrations of soil-constituting elements. That is why nuclear instruments include both the segment for detection of gamma ray lines and segment of neutron spectrometer for the measurement of the neutron leakage spectra. Moreover, mea-surements of neutrons at 2.2 MeV line will also allow to study the content of hydrogen within subsurface layer about 1 meter deep. This instrument, will be able to provide observational data for composition of Phobos regolith and content of natural radioactive elements K, U and Th, and also for content of hydrogen or water ice in the Phobos subsurface. At present, the flight units of NS HEND instrument is manufactured, tested and current go through physical calibration.

  11. Educational Testing of an Auditory Display of Mars Gamma Ray Spectrometer Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, J. M.; Pompea, S. M.; Prather, E. E.; Slater, T. F.; Boynton, W. V.; Enos, H. L.; Quinn, M.

    2003-12-01

    A unique, alternative educational and public outreach product was created to investigate the use and effectiveness of auditory displays in science education. The product, which allows students to both visualize and hear seasonal variations in data detected by the Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS) aboard the Mars Odyssey spacecraft, consists of an animation of false-color maps of hydrogen concentrations on Mars along with a musical presentation, or sonification, of the same data. Learners can access this data using the visual false-color animation, the auditory false-pitch sonification, or both. Central to the development of this product is the question of its educational effectiveness and implementation. During the spring 2003 semester, three sections of an introductory astronomy course, each with ˜100 non-science undergraduates, were presented with one of three different exposures to GRS hydrogen data: one auditory, one visual, and one both auditory and visual. Student achievement data was collected through use of multiple-choice and open-ended surveys administered before, immediately following, and three and six weeks following the experiment. It was found that the three student groups performed equally well in their ability to perceive and interpret the data presented. Additionally, student groups exposed to the auditory display reported a higher interest and engagement level than the student group exposed to the visual data alone. Based upon this preliminary testing,we have made improvements to both the educational product and our evaluation protocol. This fall, we will conduct further testing with ˜100 additional students, half receiving auditory data and half receiving visual data, and we will conduct interviews with individual students as they interface with the auditory display. Through this process, we hope to further assess both learning and engagement gains associated with alternative and multi-modal representations of scientific data that extend beyond

  12. Destructive versus Nondestructive Assay Comparisons Using the SWEPP Gamma-ray Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Hartwell, John Kelvin; Harker, Yale Deon; Killian, Elmo Wayne; Yoon, Woo Yong

    1998-11-01

    In support of data quality objectives for the INEEL Stored Waste Examination Pilot Plant (SWEPP) a series of 208-liter (55-gallon) waste drums containing inorganic sludge have been sampled and destructively analyzed. The drums were non-destructively assayed by the SWEPP PAN system and the SWEPP Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (SGRS) prior to sampling. This paper reports some of the conclusions from the destructive versus NDA comparisons, and additionally presents the results of an on-going effort to use the destructive analyses to validate absolute efficiency curves calculated using Monte-Carlo and analytical modeling for the SGRS. Destructive analysis results are available from radiochemical assay of 128 sludge-containing drums. The content codes represented are CC001 (42 items), CC002 (8), CC007 (48), CC800 (16), CC803 (3), and CC807 (11.) Each drum had two full-length vertical cores removed from designated radial positions. The entire length of each core was composited and submitted for analysis. All of the core composites were analyzed radiochemically for Am-241, Pu-239/240, and Pu-238, and by inductively-coupled mass spectrometry (ICPMS) for U-235 and U-238. Not only have the destructive analysis results been useful in documenting the performance of both the SGRS and the PAN system, but also have allowed the determination of certain absolute counting efficiency values for the SGRS. The values, in turn will allow us to validate SGRS counting efficiencies computed by MCNP and analytical modeling, and perhaps use the SGRS as an absolute assay technique.

  13. Destructive versus Nondestructive Assay Comparisons Using the SWEPP Gamma-Ray Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    E. W. Killian; J. K. Hartwell; W. Yoon; Y. D. Harker

    1998-11-01

    In support of data quality objectives for the INEEL Stored Waste Examination Pilot Plant (SWEPP) a series of 208-liter (55-gallon) waste drums containing inorganic sludge have been sampled and destructively analyzed. The drums were non-destructively assayed by the SWEPP PAN system and the SWEPP Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (SGRS) prior to sampling. This paper reports some of the conclusions from the destructive versus NDA comparisons, and additionally presents the results of an on-going effort to use the destructive analyses to validate absolute efficiency curves calculated using Monte-Carlo and analytical modeling for the SGRS. Destructive analysis results are available from radiochemical assay of 128 sludge-containing drums. The content codes represented are CC001 (42 items), CC002 (8), CC007 (48), CC800 (16), CC803 (3), and CC807 (11.) Each drum had two full-length vertical cores removed from designated radial positions. The entire length of each core was composited and submitted for analysis. All of the core composites were analyzed radiochemically for Am-241, Pu-239/240, and Pu-238, and by inductively-coupled mass spectrometry (ICPMS) for U-235 and U-238. Not only have the destructive analysis results been useful in documenting the performance of both the SGRS and the PAN system, but also have allowed the determination of certain absolute counting efficiency values for the SGRS. The values, in turn will allow us to validate SGRS counting efficiencies computed by MCNP and analytical modeling, and perhaps use the SGRS as an absolute assay technique.

  14. Hematite at Meridiani Planum and Gusev Crater as identified by the Moessbauer Spectrometer MIMOS II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klingelhoefer, G.; Morris, R. V.; Rodionov, D.; Schroeder, C.; de Souza, P. A.; Yen, A.; Renz, F.; Wdowiak, T.

    2004-12-01

    The Moessbauer (MB) spectrometers on the MER rovers Opportunity and Spirit, which landed on Mars in January 2004, have identified the iron-containing mineral hematite (a-Fe2O3) at both landing sites. On Earth, hematite can occur either by itself or with other iron oxides as massive deposits, in veins , and as particles dispersed through a silicate or other matrix material. Hematite particle size can range from nanophase (superparamagnetic) to multidomain and particle shape ranges from equant to acicular to platy. Fine-grained hematite is red in color and is a pigmenting agent. Coarse-grained hematite can be spectrally neutral (gray) at visible wavelengths. Substitutional impurities, particularly Al, are common in hematite. Chemically pure, coarse-grained, and well-crystalline hematite has a magnetic transition (the Morin transition) at ~260 K. Moessbauer spectra, recorded as a function of temperature, provide a way to characterize Martian hematite with respect to some of the physical and chemical characteristics. At Meridiani Planum besides the iron-sulfate mineral jarosite also the Fe-oxide hematite has been identified by the Moessbauer spectrometer, mainly in three distinct types of reservoir: - outcrop matrix material dominated by the mineral jarosite in the MB spectrum, certain basaltic soils, and mm-sized spherules dubbed blueberries. Moessbauer spectra of each reservoir yield a distinct set of hyperfine parameters for hematite, suggesting different degrees of crystallinity and particle size. The hematite found by MB instrument MIMOS II in the outcrop material shows the Morin transition at relatively high temperatures (ca. 250 K) which is an indication of pure and well-crystallized hematite. The source of the hematite in the `Blueberries' as identified by Moessbauer spectroscopy, and also by MiniTES, is not known. These spherules, covering nearly the whole landing site area (Eagle crater, plains, Endurance crater), may be concretions formed in the outcrop

  15. Measuring GAMMA 10 end-loss ions with an ELIS (end-loss-ion spectrometers) from TMX-U

    SciTech Connect

    Foote, J.H.

    1987-09-03

    The author spent the period from March 22 to July 10, 1987, at the GAMMA 10 tandem-mirror experiment at the University of Tsukuba in Tsukuba, Japan. The purpose of this extended trip was to install on GAMMA 10 one of the end-loss-ion spectrometers (ELIS) used on TMX-U (Tandem Mirror Experiment-Upgrade) at LLNL and to make plasma measurements there with this diagnostic instrument. This report discusses the considerable planning and preparations that preceded the trip, the actual experience with the ELIS equipment at GAMMA 10, data and results obtained while the author was there, GAMMA 10 experimental procedures, the scientific and technical support during the stay, and some final comments and suggestions concerning an international exchange such as this one. The data acquired on GAMMA 10 while there, along with earlier data, present an encouraging picture of a plasma in a thermal-barrier mode in a tandem-mirror, magnetic-fusion machine. 6 refs.

  16. A high resolution gamma-ray and hard X-ray spectrometer (HIREGS) for long duration balloon flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pelling, M.; Feffer, P. T.; Hurley, K.; Kane, S. R.; Lin, R. P.; Mcbride, S.; Primbsch, J. H.; Smith, D. M.; Youseffi, K.; Zimmer, G.

    1992-01-01

    The elements of a high resolution gamma-ray spectrometer, developed for observations of solar flares, are described. Emphasis is given to those aspects of the system that relate to its operation on a long duration balloon platform. The performance of the system observed in its first flight, launched from McMurdo Station, Antarctica on 10 January, 1992, is discussed. Background characteristics of the antarctic balloon environment are compared with those observed in conventional mid-latitude balloon flights and the general advantages of long duration ballooning are discussed.

  17. Efficiency calibration and minimum detectable activity concentration of a real-time UAV airborne sensor system with two gamma spectrometers.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiao-Bin; Meng, Jia; Wang, Peng; Cao, Ye; Huang, Xi; Wen, Liang-Sheng; Chen, Da

    2016-04-01

    A small-sized UAV (NH-UAV) airborne system with two gamma spectrometers (LaBr3 detector and HPGe detector) was developed to monitor activity concentration in serious nuclear accidents, such as the Fukushima nuclear accident. The efficiency calibration and determination of minimum detectable activity concentration (MDAC) of the specific system were studied by MC simulations at different flight altitudes, different horizontal distances from the detection position to the source term center and different source term sizes. Both air and ground radiation were considered in the models. The results obtained may provide instructive suggestions for in-situ radioactivity measurements of NH-UAV. PMID:26773821

  18. Real time method and computer system for identifying radioactive materials from HPGe gamma-ray spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Rowland, Mark S.; Howard, Douglas E.; Wong, James L.; Jessup, James L.; Bianchini, Greg M.; Miller, Wayne O.

    2007-10-23

    A real-time method and computer system for identifying radioactive materials which collects gamma count rates from a HPGe gamma-radiation detector to produce a high-resolution gamma-ray energy spectrum. A library of nuclear material definitions ("library definitions") is provided, with each uniquely associated with a nuclide or isotope material and each comprising at least one logic condition associated with a spectral parameter of a gamma-ray energy spectrum. The method determines whether the spectral parameters of said high-resolution gamma-ray energy spectrum satisfy all the logic conditions of any one of the library definitions, and subsequently uniquely identifies the material type as that nuclide or isotope material associated with the satisfied library definition. The method is iteratively repeated to update the spectrum and identification in real time.

  19. A Comprehensive Search for Gamma-Ray Lines in the First Year of Data from the INTEGRAL Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teegarden, B. J.; Watanabe, K.

    2006-01-01

    Gamma-ray lines are produced in nature by a variety of different physical processes. They can be valuable astrophysical diagnostics providing information the may be unobtainable by other means. We have carried out an extensive search for gamma-ray lines in the first year of public data from the Spectrometer (SPI) on the INTEGRAL mission. INTEGRAL has spent a large fraction of its observing time in the Galactic Plane with particular concentration in the Galactic Center (GC) region (approximately 3 Msec in the first year). Hence the most sensitive search regions are in the Galactic Plane and Center. The phase space of the search spans the energy range 20-8000 keV, and line widths from 0-1000 keV (FWHM) and includes both diffuse and point-like emission. We have searched for variable emission on time scales down to approximately 1000 sec. Diffuse emission has been searched for on a range of different spatial scales from approximately 20 degrees (the approximate field-of-view of the spectrometer) up to the entire Galactic Plane. Our search procedures were verified by the recovery of the known gamma-ray lines at 511 keV and 1809 keV at the appropriate intensities and significances. We find no evidence for any previously unknown gamma-ray lines. The upper limits range from a few x10(exp -5) per square centimeter per second to a few x10(exp -3) per square centimeter per second depending on line width, energy and exposure. Comparison is made between our results and various prior predictions of astrophysical lines

  20. Man-made transients observed by the gamma-ray spectrometer on the solar maximum mission satellite.

    PubMed

    Rieger, E; Kanbach, G; Reppin, C; Vestrand, W T; Forrest, D J; Chupp, E L

    1989-04-28

    Since launch in early 1980 the Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (GRS) onboard the Solar Maximum Mission (SMM) satellite has monitored the sun at gamma-ray energies. In addition to observations of solar flares, cosmic gamma-ray bursts, and precipitating radiation belt electrons, the instrument has detected a new class of high-energy transient events that cannot be attributed to any of these phenomena. The duration of these transients can range from 1 second to more than 10 minutes. The average event rate between 1980 and 1986 was about five per month. However, in February 1987 this rate increased by more than a factor of 25 and continued at this high level until June 1988. These transients can be subdivided into three classes: (i) 0.511-megaelectron volt annihilation line events, (ii) particle events, and (iii) broad-band photon continuum-like events. Evidence is presented that these transients are not of natural origin. It is found that the most likely sources of these events are reactors in earth orbiting satellites. Apart from the threat these reactors pose upon accidental reentry, the reactor-generated transients may have a deleterious effect on cosmic observations obtained with gamma-ray detectors in low earth orbit. PMID:17807609

  1. Construction of. gamma pi. /sup 0/ spectrometer and photon tagging facility at Bates Linear Accelerator. Final report, July 31, 1979-July 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Booth, E.C.

    1981-08-01

    The funds provided under Contract No. DE-AC02-79ER10486 were totally expended for hardware and supplies required by two related devices at the Bates Linear Accelerator. These were a photon tagging facility and a ..gamma pi../sup 0/ spectrometer in Beam Line C of the new South Experimental Hall. Construction was begun in November of 1979 and both systems became fully operational in the summer of 1981. Preliminary data was taken in 1980 with a prototype ..gamma pi../sup 0/ spectrometer will be carried out in the fall of 1981 and spring of 1982. The photon tagging system has been used successfully to calibrate the ..gamma pi../sup 0/ spectrometer for the BU - MIT collaboration and to test a lead glass detector system for Brandeis University.

  2. Light collection optimization in scintillator-based gamma-ray spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hull, G.; Du, S.; Niedermayr, T.; Payne, S.; Cherepy, N.; Drobshoff, A.; Fabris, L.

    2008-04-01

    Scintillator-based gamma-ray detectors are being actively pursued for homeland security applications. A key property of such detectors is their energy resolution which enables faster detection and more precise identification of gamma-ray sources. In order to obtain the best energy resolution with a given scintillator material, it is crucial to collect the largest fraction possible of the light emitted after gamma-ray absorption. Different techniques to maximize the light collection efficiency were investigated and tested experimentally. In particular, the effect of the scintillator geometry has been simulated with Detect2000. Also, a number of wrapping materials have been tested for their reflectivity and their performance in terms of improving the energy resolution in a BGO-based gamma-ray detector. The best results were obtained with a tapered cylinder geometry and the GORE DRP tape.

  3. High-voltage power supply with improved thermostability for Xenon gamma-ray spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrenko, D.; Uteshev, Z.; Novikov, A.; Shustov, A.; Vlasik, K.; Chernysheva, I.; Smirnova, M.; Krivova, K.; Dmitrenko, V.; Ulin, S.

    2016-02-01

    In this article the high voltage power supply for xenon spectrometer is described. Result of time simulation for output voltage at different temperatures was shown. The experimental data is confirming results of the time simulations. The experimental data showed breadboard model provides a stability of voltage better than 1% of the generated voltage at different temperatures

  4. Evaluation of a digital data acquisition system and optimization of n-{gamma} discrimination for a compact neutron spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Giacomelli, L.; Zimbal, A.; Reginatto, M.; Tittelmeier, K.

    2011-01-15

    A compact NE213 liquid scintillation neutron spectrometer with a new digital data acquisition (DAQ) system is now in operation at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB). With the DAQ system, developed by ENEA Frascati, neutron spectrometry with high count rates in the order of 5x10{sup 5} s{sup -1} is possible, roughly an order of magnitude higher than with an analog acquisition system. To validate the DAQ system, a new data analysis code was developed and tests were done using measurements with 14-MeV neutrons made at the PTB accelerator. Additional analysis was carried out to optimize the two-gate method used for neutron and gamma (n-{gamma}) discrimination. The best results were obtained with gates of 35 ns and 80 ns. This indicates that the fast and medium decay time components of the NE213 light emission are the ones that are relevant for n-{gamma} discrimination with the digital acquisition system. This differs from what is normally implemented in the analog pulse shape discrimination modules, namely, the fast and long decay emissions of the scintillating light.

  5. Low level gamma-ray germanium-spectrometer to measure very low primordial radionuclide concentrations

    PubMed

    Neder; Heusser; Laubenstein

    2000-07-01

    A new germanium spectrometer especially suited for large sample measurements is described in detail. It is operated in the Gran Sasso underground laboratory under shielding rock of 3300 m water equivalent, which reduces the muon flux by six orders of magnitude. The integral background counting rate in the energy range from 50 to 2750 keV is about 0.15 min(-1). The low peak count rates of mostly less than 1 count per day together with a relative efficiency of 102% and the high sample capacity makes this spectrometer one of the most sensitive worldwide. Some sample measurements for the solar neutrino experiment BOREXINO and the detector efficiency calibration by the Monte Carlo method are discussed as well. PMID:10879860

  6. An introduction to γ(3) a new versatile ultralow background gamma spectrometer. Background description and analysis.

    PubMed

    Cagniant, A; Douysset, G; Fontaine, J-P; Gross, P; Petit, G Le

    2015-04-01

    The γ(3) setup has been designed as a versatile, high sensitivity spectrometry platform. State-of-the art techniques have been implemented to reduce its background to minimum level even though the system is installed at ground level. The shield design and background performance of the setup are presented. The spectrometer is composed of three identical HPGe detectors for high detection efficiency or coincidence measurement and can accommodate several sample geometries. Its shield includes three layers of increasing purity lead, a cosmic veto, an inner borated polyethylene layer, and a radon-free gas injection system. The spectrometer normalized background count rate is 4.4 counts per minutekgGe(-1) (in the 40-2500keV energy range). Its background characteristics, cosmic veto efficiency, and radon-free gas injection performances are discussed. PMID:25682499

  7. Multi-Line Gamma-Ray Spectrometer Performance of a Si(Li) Detector Stack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubbard, G. Scott; McMurray, Robert E., Jr.; Keller, Robert G.; Wercinski, Paul F.; Walton, J. T.

    1995-01-01

    Experimental data is presented which for the first time displays multi-line spectrometer performance of a Si(Li) detector stack at elevated temperature. The stack consists of four elements, each with a 2 cm diameter active area. Ba-133 and Ag-110m spectra are obtained using various techniques to enhance the peak-to-background ratio. Spectral data are shown as a function of temperature (94 K less than or = T less than or = 230 K) using optimized peak shaping.

  8. Data Processing for the Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR), X-ray and Gamma-ray Spectrometer (XGRS) Ground System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McClanahan, Timothy P.; Mikheeva, I.; Trombka, J. I.; Floyd, S. R.; Boynton, W. V.; Bailey, H.; Bhangoo, J.; Starr, R.; Clark, P. E.; Evans, L. G.

    1999-01-01

    An X-ray and Gamma-ray spectrometer (XGRS) is onboard the Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR) spacecraft to determine the elemental composition of the surface of the asteroid 433Eros. The Eros asteroid is highly non-spherical in physical shape and the development of data management and analysis methodologies are in several areas a divergence from traditional remotely sensed geographical information systems techniques. Field of view and asteroid surface geometry must be derived virtually and then combined with real measurements of solar, spectral and instrument calibration information to derive meaningful scientific results. Spatial resolution of planned geochemical maps will be improved from the initial conditions of low statistical significance per integration by repeated surface flyovers and regional spectral accumulation. This paper describes the results of a collaborative effort of design and development of the NEAR XGRS instrument ground system undertaken by participants at the Goddard Space Flight Center, University of Arizona, Cornell University, Applied Physics Laboratory, and Max Plank institute.

  9. Data Processing for the Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR), X-Ray and Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (XRS) Ground System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McClanahan, Timothy P.; Mikheeva, I.; Trombka, J. I.; Floyd, S. R.; Boynton, W. V.; Bailey, H.; Bhangoo, J.; Starr, R.; Clark, P. E.; Evans, L. G.

    1999-01-01

    An X-ray and Gamma-ray spectrometer (XGRS) is onboard the Near Earth Asteroid Rendezvous (NEAR) spacecraft to determine the elemental composition of the surface of the asteroid 433Eros. The Eros asteroid is highly non-spherical in physical shape and the development of data management and analysis methodologies are in several areas a divergence from traditional remotely sensed geographical information systems techniques. Field of view and asteroid surface geometry must be derived virtually and then combined with real measurements of solar, spectral and instrument calibration information to derive meaningful scientific results. Spatial resolution of planned geochemical maps will be improved from the initial conditions of low statistical significance per integration by repeated surface flyovers and regional spectral accumulation. This paper describes the results of a collaborative effort of design and development of the NEAR XGRS instrument ground system undertaken by participants at the Goddard Space Flight Center, University of Arizona, Cornell University, Applied Physics Laboratory, and Max Plank institute.

  10. Identifiability of UHE Gamma-ray Air Showers by Neural-Network-Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, Y.; Inoue, N.; Miyazawa, K.; Vankov, H.P.

    The chemical composition of Ultra-High-Energy (UHE) comic rays is one of unsolved mysteries, and its study will give us fruitful information on the origin and acceleration mechanism of UHE cosmic rays. Especially, a detection of UHE gamma-rays by hybrid experiments, such as AUGER and TA, will be a key to solve these questions. The characteristics of UHE gamma-ray showers have been studied on lateral and longitudinal structure of shower particles by AIRES and our own simulation code, so far. There are apparent differences in a slope of lateral distribution (Eta) and a depth of shower maximum (Xmax) between gamma-ray and proton induced showers because UHE gamma-ray showers are affected by the LPM effect and the geomagnetic cascading process in an energy region of > 1019.5eV. Different features between gamma-ray and proton showers are pointed out from the simulation study and an identifiability of gamma-ray showers from proton ones is also discussed by the method of Neural-Network-Analysis.

  11. Multi-Line Gamma-Ray Spectrometer Performance of a Si(Li) Detector Stack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hubbard, G. Scott; McMurray, Robert E., Jr.; Keller, Robert G.; Wercinski, Paul F.; Walton, J. T.

    1995-01-01

    Experimental data is presented which for the first time displays multi-line spectrometer performance of a Si(Li) detector stack at elevated temperature. The stack consists of four elements, each with a 2 cm diameter active area. Ba-133 and Ag-110m spectra are obtained using various techniques to enhance the peak-to-background ratio. Spectral data are shown as a function of temperature (94 K less than or equal to T less than or equal to 230 K) using optimized peak shaping.

  12. A high pressure xenon gamma-ray spectrometer using a coplanar anode configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, C. J.; He, Z.; Knoll, G. F.; Tepper, G.; Wehe, D. K.

    2003-06-01

    A new design of a high pressure xenon ionization chamber has been fabricated in an attempt to eliminate the problems associated with acoustical vibrations of the Frisch grid. The function of the traditional Frisch grid has been accomplished by employing a coplanar anode system capable of single polarity charge sensing. Two different detector designs have been fabricated using both cylindrical and parallel plate geometries. Each is filled with highly purified xenon gas at a pressure of approximately 57 atm. The designs of these new spectrometers and their measured characteristics will be presented.

  13. SCINTILLATION SPECTROMETER

    DOEpatents

    Bell, P.R.; Francis, J.E.

    1960-06-21

    A portable scintillation spectrometer is described which is especially useful in radio-biological studies for determining the uptake and distribution of gamma -emitting substances in tissue. The spectrometer includes a collimator having a plurality of apertures that are hexagonal in cross section. Two crystals are provided: one is activated to respond to incident rays from the collimator; the other is not activated and shields the first from external radiation.

  14. Abundance and distribution of radioelements in lunar terranes: Results of Chang'E-1 gamma ray spectrometer data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jian; Ling, Zongcheng; Li, Bo; Zhang, Jiang; Sun, Lingzhi; Liu, Jianzhong

    2016-02-01

    The gamma ray spectrometer (GRS) onboard Chang'E-1 has acquired valuable datasets recording the gamma ray intensities from radioelements (Potassium (K), Thorium (Th) and Uranium (U), etc.) on lunar surface. We extracted the elemental concentrations from the GRS data with spectral fitting techniques and mapped the global absolute abundance of radioelements in terms of the ground truths from lunar samples and meteorites. The obtained global concentration maps of these radioelements indicate heterogeneous distribution among three major lunar crustal terranes (i.e., Procellarum KREEP Terrane (PKT), Feldspathic Highlands Terrane (FHT), and South Pole Aitken Terrane (SPAT)) in relation with their origin and distinct geologic history. The majority of radioelements are restricted in PKT, approving the scenario of KREEP (Potassium (K), rare earth elements (REE), Phosphorus (P)) residua concentrating under the Procellarum region. Moreover, we found the consistency of distribution for radioelements and basalts, concluding that the subsequent volcanism might be associated with local concentrations of radioelements in western Oceanus Procellarum and northwestern South Pole Aitken Basin. The prominent and asymmetric radioactive signatures were confirmed in SPAT comparing to FHT dominated by low level radioactivity, while the magnitudes are much lower than that of PKT, indicating a primary geochemical heterogeneity for the Moon.

  15. Gamma-to-electron magnetic spectrometer (GEMS): An energy-resolved γ-ray diagnostic for the National Ignition Facilitya)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y.; Herrmann, H. W.; Hilsabeck, T. J.; Moy, K.; Stoeffl, W.; Mack, J. M.; Young, C. S.; Wu, W.; Barlow, D. B.; Schillig, J. B.; Sims, J. R.; Lopez, F. E.; Mares, D.; Oertel, J. A.; Hayes-Sterbenz, A. C.

    2012-10-01

    The gamma-to-electron magnetic spectrometer, having better than 5% energy resolution, is proposed to resolve γ-rays in the range of Eo ± 20% in single shot, where Eo is the central energy and is tunable from 2 to 25 MeV. Gamma-rays from inertial confinement fusion implosions interact with a thin Compton converter (e.g., beryllium) located at approximately 300 cm from the target chamber center (TCC). Scattered electrons out of the Compton converter enter an electromagnet placed outside the NIF chamber (approximately 600 cm from TCC) where energy selection takes place. The electromagnet provides tunable Eo over a broad range in a compact manner. Energy resolved electrons are measured by an array of quartz Cherenkov converters coupled to photomultipliers. Given 100 detectable electrons in the energy bins of interest, 3 × 1014 minimum deuterium/tritium (DT) neutrons will be required to measure the 4.44 MeV 12C γ-rays assuming 200 mg/cm2 plastic ablator areal density and 3 × 1015 minimum DT neutrons to measure the 16.75 MeV DT γ-ray line.

  16. Deletion mutagenesis identifies a haploinsufficient role for gamma-zein in opaque-2 endosperm modification

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Quality Protein Maize (QPM) is a hard kernel variant of the high-lysine mutant, opaque-2. Using gamma irradiation, we created opaque QPM variants to identify opaque-2 modifier genes and to investigate deletion mutagenesis combined with Illumina sequencing as a maize functional genomics tool. A K0326...

  17. SONGS - A high resolution imaging gamma-ray spectrometer for the Space Station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakano, G. H.; Chase, L. F.; Kilner, J. R.; Sandie, W. G.; Fishman, G. J.; Paciesas, W. S.

    1989-01-01

    The overall design and the instrumental features of the Space-Station Observer for Nuclear Gamma-ray Spectroscopy (SONGS) instrument are described. SONGS comprises an array of 19 two-segment n-type Ge detectors, which have the capability of determining the interaction site in either the upper or the lower segment or in both segments. The detectors provide high energy resolution of 1 keV at 100 keV and of 2 keV at 1 MeV. The close-packed Ge sensor array provides a natural sensitivity for the measurement of gamma ray polarization in the 100 keV to 1 MeV energy range, making it possible to obtain information on the structure of the magnetosphere of neutron stars and of the accretion disk of black holes.

  18. Selection of new innovation crystal for Mercury Gamma-ray and Neutron Spectrometer on-board MPO/BepiColombo mission.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozyrev, Alexander; Mitrofanov, Igor; Benkhoff, Johannes; Litvak, Maxim; McAuliffe, Jonathan; Mokrousov, Maxim; Owens, Alan; Quarati, Francesco; Shvetsov, Valery; Timoshenko, Gennady

    2015-04-01

    The Mercury Gamma-ray and Neutron Spectrometer (MGNS) was developed in Space Research Institute for detection the flux of neutron and gamma-ray from the Mercury subsurface on-board Mercury Polar Orbiter of ESA BepiColombo mission. The instrument consists of 3He proportional counters and organic scintillator for detection of neutron and also gamma-spectrometer based on scintillation crystal for detection of gamma-ray. For the gamma-ray spectrometer the LaBr3 crystal was selected, the best choice at the time of the instrument proposal in 2004. However, quite recently the European industry has developed the new crystal CeBr3, which could be much better than LaBr3 crystal for planetology. Such crystal with the necessary size of 3 inch became available in the stage of manufactory of Flight Spare Module of MGNS instrument. New CeBr3 crystal has much better signal-to-noise ratio than LaBr3 crystal in the energy band up to 3 MeV. Also, in the LaBr3 crystal, the important for planetology gamma-ray line of potassium at 1461 keV is overlapping with the background gamma-ray line of 138La isotope at 1473 keV. This CeBr3 crystal was integrated to MGNS instrument. We present the results of gamma-ray performance and environment tests of MGNS with CeBr3 crystal, and also comparison between LaBr3 and new CeBr3 crystals in context of space application for this instrument.

  19. Measurement of lifetimes in {sup 46}V with the EUROBALL {gamma}-ray spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Jessen, K.; Moeller, O.; Dewald, A.; Brentano, P. von; Fitzler, A.; Jolie, J.; Saha, B.; Petkov, P.; Brandolini, F.; Gadea, A.; Lenzi, S. M.; De Angelis, G.; Farnea, E.; Napoli, D. R.; Gall, B. J. P.

    2006-08-15

    In {sup 46}V picosecond lifetimes were determined using the recoil distance Doppler-shift technique with the Cologne plunger device coupled to the EUROBALL IV spectrometer. The experiment was carried out using the {sup 24}Mg({sup 28}Si, {alpha}pn) reaction at 110 MeV at the Strasbourg VIVITRON accelerator. Subsequently the differential decay curve method in coincidence mode was employed to derive lifetimes for four excited states in the K{sup {pi}}=0{sup -} band. The resulting transition probabilities give a comparison of isospin allowed and forbidden E1 transitions, which clarifies the decay properties of the 2{sup -},T=0 state. Furthermore the B(E2) values within the K{sup {pi}}=0{sup -} band are discussed.

  20. USING AN ACCURATE MASS, TRIPLE QUADRUPOLE MASS SPECTROMETER AND AN ION CORRELATION PROGRAM TO IDENTIFY COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Most compounds are not found in mass spectral libraries and must be identified by other means. Often, compound identities can be deduced from the compositions of the ions in their mass spectra and review of the chemical literature. Confirmation is provided by mass spectra and r...

  1. IDENTIFYING COMPOUNDS USING SOURCE CID ON AN ORTHOGONAL ACCELERATION TIME-OF-FLIGHT MASS SPECTROMETER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exact mass libraries of ESI and APCI mass spectra are not commercially available In-house libraries are dependent on CID parameters and are instrument specific. The ability to identify compounds without reliance on mass spectral libraries is therefore more crucial for liquid sam...

  2. A portable medium-resolution gamma-ray spectrometer and analysis software

    SciTech Connect

    Lavietes, A.D.; McQuaid, J.H.; Ruhter, W.D.; Buckley, W.M.; Clark, D-L.; Paulus, T.J.

    1996-07-01

    There is a strong need for portable radiometric instrumentation that can both accurately confirm the presence of nuclear materials and allow isotopic analysis of radionuclides in the field. To fulfill this need the Safeguards Technology Program at LLNL has developed a hand-held, non-cryogenic, low-power gamma-ray and x-ray measurements and analysis instrument that can both search for and then accurately verify the presence of nuclear materials. We will report on the use of cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detectors, detector electronics, and the new field-portable instrument being developed. We will also describe the isotopic analysis that allows enrichment measurements to be made accurately in the field. These systems provide capability for safeguards inspection and verification applications and could find application in counter-smuggling operations.

  3. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey: Weed quadrangle, California. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-05-01

    Twelve anamolous areas attributable to gamma radiation in the uranium spectral window, and twenty-three in the thorium channel, have been recognized and delineated on the Weed quadrangle. The majority of the uranium anomalies are located in the southwestern part of the map sheet. Most of these are correlated with the pre-Cretaceous metamorphic rock system and the Mesozoic granitic rocks intrusive into it. Of the twenty-three anomalous areas of increased gamma radiation in the thorium spectral window, most are located in the northeast and the east center in a north-south trending belt. However, this apparent alignment is probably fortuitous as the individual anomalies are correlated with several different rock formations. Three are correlated with upper Cretaceous marine sediments, six with Ordovician marine sediments, two with Mesozoic granitic intrusives, and two with Silurian marine sediments. In the northwestern part of the quadrangle, four thorium radiation anomalies are delineated over exposures of upper Jurassic marine rocks. Anomaly 6, in the southwest, warrants attention as it suggests strong radiation in the uranium channel with little or no thorium radiation. The uranium/thorium and uranium/potassium ratio anomalies are also strong, supporting the likelihood of uranium enrichment. The feature is located on line 540, fiducials 7700 to 7720. Anomaly 7, on line 540, fiducials 8390 to 8420, shows similar characteristics although a minor thorium excursion is present. Anomaly 10, on line 3010 fiducials 9820 to 9840, is also characterized by a strong uranium radiation spike, with minor thorium radiation. The uranium/thorium and uranium/potassium ratio anomalies are well defined and relatively intense.

  4. Proteomic profiling of human plasma exosomes identifies PPAR{gamma} as an exosome-associated protein

    SciTech Connect

    Looze, Christopher; Yui, David; Leung, Lester; Ingham, Matthew; Kaler, Maryann; Yao, Xianglan; Wu, Wells W.; Shen Rongfong; Daniels, Mathew P.; Levine, Stewart J.

    2009-01-16

    Exosomes are nanovesicles that are released from cells as a mechanism of cell-free intercellular communication. Only a limited number of proteins have been identified from the plasma exosome proteome. Here, we developed a multi-step fractionation scheme incorporating gel exclusion chromatography, rate zonal centrifugation through continuous sucrose gradients, and high-speed centrifugation to purify exosomes from human plasma. Exosome-associated proteins were separated by SDS-PAGE and 66 proteins were identified by LC-MS/MS, which included both cellular and extracellular proteins. Furthermore, we identified and characterized peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-{gamma} (PPAR{gamma}), a nuclear receptor that regulates adipocyte differentiation and proliferation, as well as immune and inflammatory cell functions, as a novel component of plasma-derived exosomes. Given the important role of exosomes as intercellular messengers, the discovery of PPAR{gamma} as a component of human plasma exosomes identifies a potential new pathway for the paracrine transfer of nuclear receptors.

  5. Feasibility studies on the burnup measurement of fuel pebbles with HPGe gamma spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Wei-Hua; Zhang, Li-Guo; Zhang, Zhao; Xiao, Zhi-Gang

    2013-06-01

    The feasibility of utilizing a High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detector for the fuel element burnup measurement in a future Modular Pebble Bed Reactor (MPBR) was studied. First, the HPGe spectrometer was set-up for running the detector at high count rates while keeping the energy resolution adequately high to discriminate the Cs-137 peak from other interfering peaks. Based on these settings, the geometrical conditions are settled. Next, experiments were performed with Co-60 and Cs-137 sources to mimic the counting rates in real applications. With the aid of KORIGEN and MCNP/G4 simulations, it was demonstrated that the uncertainty of the Cs-137 counting rate can be well controlled within 3.5%. Finally, a full size prototype was tested in comparison with detailed Monte Carlo simulation and the efficiency transfer method was further utilized for efficiency calibration. To reduce the uncertainty in the efficiency transfer process, a standard point source embedded in a graphite sphere was used for efficiency calibration. The correction factor due to pebble self-attenuation was carefully studied.

  6. Development of an ultracompact neutron spectrometer for identifying near-surface water on mars.

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, David J.; Wiens, R. C.; Moore, K. R.; Prettyman, T. H.

    2001-01-01

    One of the major goals of the Mars science program is to identify exact locations of near-surface water or hydrated minerals on Mars. Evidence is mounting that Mars may have contemporary near-surface groundwater activity. Though very water-poor by terrestrial igneous standards, the SNC meteorivtes were found to contain evaporite minerals suggestive of groundwater activity within the past 1.3 Ga. More recently, the Mars Surveyor camera recorded images of geologically young seepage and outflow channels attributed to liquid water. The sources of these channels were suggested to be only a few hundred meters or less below the surface. If these channels are truly geologically young, thinly buried ice may still exist at the termination of these channels.

  7. Qualification study of LiF flight crystals for the Objective Crystal Spectrometer on the SPECTRUM-X-GAMMA satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, F. E.; Rasmussen, I.; Schnopper, H. W.; Wiebicke, H.; Halm, I.; Geppert, U.; Borozdin, K.

    1992-10-01

    The Objective Crystal Spectrometer (OXS) on the SPECTRUM-X-GAMMA satellite will carry three types of natural crystals LiF(220), Ge(111) and RAP(001). They will be used to study, among others, the H- and the He-like emission from the cosmically important elements Fe, S, Ar and O. More than 300 LiF-crystals of dimension about 23 x 63 sq mm are required to cover one side of a large (about 1000 x 600 sq mm) panel which is to be mounted in front of one of the high throughput X-ray telescopes. A qualification study examined a large sample of LiF(220) crystals at Cu-K-(alpha)2 (8.0278 keV). Data from 124 flight crystals yields an average FWHM of rocking curves of 2.3 arcmin with a standard deviation of 0.4 arcmin. For more than 80 percent of the crystals, angular deviation of the (220) planes from the actual crystal surface is less than 1.5 arcmin. These data will be used to select the best crystals for the flight panel and will determine precisely the orientation of the crystals mounted on the OXS. Eight crystals were glued onto a small test panel of the OXS and for only one crystal was there measured a significant deviation of the crystal properties, including alignment relative to the others.

  8. Subsurface carbon-bearing material on Mercury revealed by the MESSENGER Gamma-Ray and Neutron Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peplowski, P. N.; Klima, R. L.; Lawrence, D. J.; Ernst, C. M.; Denevi, B. W.; Goldsten, J. O.; Murchie, S. L.; Nittler, L. R.; Solomon, S. C.

    2015-12-01

    Mercury's surface is markedly darker than is predicted from its major element composition. The major spectral unit lowest in reflectance, known as low-reflectance material (LRM), is typically seen in material excavated by impact craters. This observation has been taken as evidence that Mercury's darkening phase is endogenous. The MESSENGER Gamma-Ray and Neutron Spectrometer (GRNS) acquired spatially resolved measurements of three distinct LRM deposits during the low-altitude campaign that was conducted near the end of MESSENGER's orbital mission. The GRNS data reveal increases in thermal neutron count rates that are spatially correlated with the LRM deposits. The only element consistent with the neutron measurements and with the spectral reflectance of LRM at visible to near-infrared wavelengths is graphitic carbon, at an abundance that is 1-3 wt% higher than in surrounding non-LRM material. We infer that C is the primary darkening agent on Mercury, and that the LRM sampled C-bearing material within the crust. This interpretation supports the hypothesis that a graphite floatation crust formed on Mercury from an early global magma ocean, and we propose that its impact-gardened remains persist beneath the volcanic plains units that comprise the planet's present upper crust. The distribution of LRM on Mercury's surface requires numerous, discontinuous LRM source regions, as would be expected for the remains of the primordial crust given the disruptive effects of the late heavy bombardment and eons of intrusive magmatism.

  9. A Bayesian Method for Identifying Contaminated Detectors in Low-Level Alpha Spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Maclellan, Jay A.; Strom, Daniel J.; Joyce, Kevin E.

    2011-11-02

    Analyses used for radiobioassay and other radiochemical tests are normally designed to meet specified quality objectives, such relative bias, precision, and minimum detectable activity (MDA). In the case of radiobioassay analyses for alpha emitting radionuclides, a major determiner of the process MDA is the instrument background. Alpha spectrometry detectors are often restricted to only a few counts over multi-day periods in order to meet required MDAs for nuclides such as plutonium-239 and americium-241. A detector background criterion is often set empirically based on experience, or frequentist or classical statistics are applied to the calculated background count necessary to meet a required MDA. An acceptance criterion for the detector background is set at the multiple of the estimated background standard deviation above the assumed mean that provides an acceptably small probability of observation if the mean and standard deviation estimate are correct. The major problem with this method is that the observed background counts used to estimate the mean, and thereby the standard deviation when a Poisson distribution is assumed, are often in the range of zero to three counts. At those expected count levels it is impossible to obtain a good estimate of the true mean from a single measurement. As an alternative, Bayesian statistical methods allow calculation of the expected detector background count distribution based on historical counts from new, uncontaminated detectors. This distribution can then be used to identify detectors showing an increased probability of contamination. The effect of varying the assumed range of background counts (i.e., the prior probability distribution) from new, uncontaminated detectors will be is discussed.

  10. Lunar Silicon Abundance determined by Kaguya Gamma-ray Spectrometer and Chandrayaan-1 Moon Mineralogy Mapper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyeong; Berezhnoy, Alexey; Wöhler, Christian; Grumpe, Arne; Rodriguez, Alexis; Hasebe, Nobuyuki; Van Gasselt, Stephan

    2016-07-01

    Using Kaguya GRS data, we investigated Si distribution on the Moon, based on study of the 4934 keV Si gamma ray peak caused by interaction between thermal neutrons and lunar Si-28 atoms. A Si peak analysis for a grid of 10 degrees in longitude and latitude was accomplished by the IRAP Aquarius program followed by a correction for altitude and thermal neutron density. A spectral parameter based regression model of the Si distribution was built for latitudes between 60°S and 60°N based on the continuum slopes, band depths, widths and minimum wavelengths of the absorption bands near 1 μμm and 2 μμm. Based on these regression models a nearly global cpm (counts per minute) map of Si with a resolution of 20 pixels per degree was constructed. The construction of a nearly global map of lunar Si abundances has been achieved by a combination of regression-based analysis of KGRS cpm data and M ^{3} spectral reflectance data, it has been calibrated with respect to returned sample-based wt% values. The Si abundances estimated with our method systematically exceed those of the LP GRS Si data set but are consistent with typical Si abundances of lunar basalt samples (in the maria) and feldspathic mineral samples (in the highlands). Our Si map shows that the Si abundance values on the Moon are typically between 17 and 28 wt%. The obtained Si map will provide an important aspect in both understanding the distribution of minerals and the evolution of the lunar surface since its formation.

  11. A comparative study of LaBr3(Ce3+) and CeBr3 based gamma-ray spectrometers for planetary remote sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozyrev, A.; Mitrofanov, I.; Owens, A.; Quarati, F.; Benkhoff, J.; Bakhtin, B.; Fedosov, F.; Golovin, D.; Litvak, M.; Malakhov, A.; Mokrousov, M.; Nuzhdin, I.; Sanin, A.; Tretyakov, V.; Vostrukhin, A.; Timoshenko, G.; Shvetsov, V.; Granja, C.; Slavicek, T.; Pospisil, S.

    2016-08-01

    The recent availability of large volume cerium bromide crystals raises the possibility of substantially improving gamma-ray spectrometer limiting flux sensitivities over current systems based on the lanthanum tri-halides, e.g., lanthanum bromide and lanthanum chloride, especially for remote sensing, low-level counting applications or any type of measurement characterized by poor signal to noise ratios. The Russian Space Research Institute has developed and manufactured a highly sensitive gamma-ray spectrometer for remote sensing observations of the planet Mercury from the Mercury Polar Orbiter (MPO), which forms part of ESA's BepiColombo mission. The Flight Model (FM) gamma-ray spectrometer is based on a 3-in. single crystal of LaBr3(Ce3+) produced in a separate crystal development programme specifically for this mission. During the spectrometers development, manufacturing, and qualification phases, large crystals of CeBr3 became available in a subsequent phase of the same crystal development programme. Consequently, the Flight Spare Model (FSM) gamma-ray spectrometer was retrofitted with a 3-in. CeBr3 crystal and qualified for space. Except for the crystals, the two systems are essentially identical. In this paper, we report on a comparative assessment of the two systems, in terms of their respective spectral properties, as well as their suitability for use in planetary mission with respect to radiation tolerance and their propensity for activation. We also contrast their performance with a Ge detector representative of that flown on MESSENGER and show that: (a) both LaBr3(Ce3+) and CeBr3 provide superior detection systems over HPGe in the context of minimally resourced spacecraft and (b) CeBr3 is a more attractive system than LaBr3(Ce3+) in terms of sensitivities at lower gamma fluxes. Based on the tests, the FM has now been replaced by the FSM on the BepiColombo spacecraft. Thus, CeBr3 now forms the central gamma-ray detection element on the MPO spacecraft.

  12. A comparative study of LaBr3(Ce(3+)) and CeBr3 based gamma-ray spectrometers for planetary remote sensing applications.

    PubMed

    Kozyrev, A; Mitrofanov, I; Owens, A; Quarati, F; Benkhoff, J; Bakhtin, B; Fedosov, F; Golovin, D; Litvak, M; Malakhov, A; Mokrousov, M; Nuzhdin, I; Sanin, A; Tretyakov, V; Vostrukhin, A; Timoshenko, G; Shvetsov, V; Granja, C; Slavicek, T; Pospisil, S

    2016-08-01

    The recent availability of large volume cerium bromide crystals raises the possibility of substantially improving gamma-ray spectrometer limiting flux sensitivities over current systems based on the lanthanum tri-halides, e.g., lanthanum bromide and lanthanum chloride, especially for remote sensing, low-level counting applications or any type of measurement characterized by poor signal to noise ratios. The Russian Space Research Institute has developed and manufactured a highly sensitive gamma-ray spectrometer for remote sensing observations of the planet Mercury from the Mercury Polar Orbiter (MPO), which forms part of ESA's BepiColombo mission. The Flight Model (FM) gamma-ray spectrometer is based on a 3-in. single crystal of LaBr3(Ce(3+)) produced in a separate crystal development programme specifically for this mission. During the spectrometers development, manufacturing, and qualification phases, large crystals of CeBr3 became available in a subsequent phase of the same crystal development programme. Consequently, the Flight Spare Model (FSM) gamma-ray spectrometer was retrofitted with a 3-in. CeBr3 crystal and qualified for space. Except for the crystals, the two systems are essentially identical. In this paper, we report on a comparative assessment of the two systems, in terms of their respective spectral properties, as well as their suitability for use in planetary mission with respect to radiation tolerance and their propensity for activation. We also contrast their performance with a Ge detector representative of that flown on MESSENGER and show that: (a) both LaBr3(Ce(3+)) and CeBr3 provide superior detection systems over HPGe in the context of minimally resourced spacecraft and (b) CeBr3 is a more attractive system than LaBr3(Ce(3+)) in terms of sensitivities at lower gamma fluxes. Based on the tests, the FM has now been replaced by the FSM on the BepiColombo spacecraft. Thus, CeBr3 now forms the central gamma-ray detection element on the MPO spacecraft

  13. A high-resolution gamma-ray and hard X-ray spectrometer for solar flare observations in Max 1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, R. P.; Curtis, D. W.; Harvey, P.; Hurley, K.; Primbsch, J. H.; Smith, D. M.; Pelling, R. M.; Duttweiler, F.

    1988-01-01

    A long duration balloon flight instrument for Max 1991 designed to study the acceleration of greater than 10 MeV ions and greater than 15 keV electrons in solar flares through high resolution spectroscopy of the gamma ray lines and hard X-ray and gamma ray continuum is described. The instrument, HIREGS, consists of an array of high-purity, n-type coaxial germanium detectors (HPGe) cooled to less than 90 K and surrounded by a bismuth germanate (BGO) anticoincidence shield. It will cover the energy range 15 keV to 20 MeV with keV spectral resolution, sufficient for accurate measurement of all parameters of the expected gamma ray lines with the exception of the neutron capture deuterium line. Electrical segmentation of the HPGe detector into a thin front segment and a thick rear segment, together with pulse-shape discrimination, provides optimal dynamic range and signal-to-background characteristics for flare measurements. Neutrons and gamma rays up to approximately 0.1 to 1 GeV can be detected and identified with the combination of the HPGe detectors and rear BGO shield. The HIREGS is planned for long duration balloon flights (LDBF) for solar flare studies during Max 1991. The two exploratory LDBFs carried out at mid-latitudes in 1987 to 1988 are described, and the LDBFs in Antarctica, which could in principle provide 24 hour/day solar coverage and very long flight durations (20 to 30 days) because of minimal ballast requirements are discussed.

  14. In-house development of an FPGA-based MCA8K for gamma-ray spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Lanh, Dang; Son, Pham Ngoc; Son, Nguyen An

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this work is domestic development of electronics instruments. It used for measuring ionization radiation and practical training at Nuclear Research Institute (NRI), Dalat, Vietnam. The aim of this work is to study and develop a novel MCA8k for Gamma-ray spectrometer concerning experimental nuclear physics. An approach for design and construction of the aforementioned instrument is to apply logic integrating techniques via Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGA) under Max + PlusII, Altera. The instrument allows interfacing to PC with self-developed application software. Scientific significance of this work is partly to contribute to opening a research direction in the field of nuclear electronics science for design and construction of radiation measurement instruments with the advanced IC technology in Vietnam. Practical significance of this work is partly to contribute to enhancement of capabilities in developing radiation measurement instruments for experimental research as well as practical training in nuclear physics. The advantages of FPGA: overcoming ballistic deficit, decrement of serial and parallel noise, flexible in programming, control of the system by software without an interfere of hardware. The disadvantages of FPGA: requirement of good knowledge of VHDL and professional tools for development of a expected project. A new electronics module of MCA8k has been achieved. Some main results obtained from the experimental testing are as follows: differential nonlinearity (DNL) of FPGA-MCA8k approximately 1.27%, integral nonlinearity (INL) = 0.607%, time conversion ≈ 2.2 μs, deadtime (DT) is 0.75%. Data Acquisition Program MCANRI written in VC (+ +)6.0, self-executed under Windows XP environment. PMID:25485201

  15. Comparison of thunderstorm systems that produce or lack RHESSI identified terrestrial gamma ray flashes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Splitt, M. E.; Barnes, D. E.; Dwyer, J. R.; Rassoul, H.; Lazarus, S. M.; Smith, D. M.; Cramer, E. S.; Schaal, M.; Saleh, Z. H.; Ulrich, W.; Grefenstette, B.; Hazelton, B. J.

    2009-12-01

    Thunderstorms associated with RHESSI-identified terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs) tend to be tall tropical thunderstorms in regions of significant lower tropospheric convergence. Yet despite the frequent occurrence of thunderstorms with these attributes within the RHESSI footprint, TGF detection is relatively rare. Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) data that sync, in both space and time, with RHESSI, are used to determine whether there are observable differences between thunderstorm systems in which the RHESSI observes a TGF and those that it does not. In particular, TRMM Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) data are used to identify electrically active, but non-TGF producing, thunderstorms within a RHESSI footprint . TRMM precipitation and cloud-derived products from the null events are analyzed and compared to the same products composited from TGF producing storms. In addition, observations collected as part of the recent Airborne Detector for Energetic Lightning Emissions (ADELE) project are analyzed in this context.

  16. Optimising in situ gamma measurements to identify the presence of radioactive particles in land areas.

    PubMed

    Rostron, Peter D; Heathcote, John A; Ramsey, Michael H

    2014-12-01

    High-coverage in situ surveys with gamma detectors are the best means of identifying small hotspots of activity, such as radioactive particles, in land areas. Scanning surveys can produce rapid results, but the probabilities of obtaining false positive or false negative errors are often unknown, and they may not satisfy other criteria such as estimation of mass activity concentrations. An alternative is to use portable gamma-detectors that are set up at a series of locations in a systematic sampling pattern, where any positive measurements are subsequently followed up in order to determine the exact location, extent and nature of the target source. The preliminary survey is typically designed using settings of detector height, measurement spacing and counting time that are based on convenience, rather than using settings that have been calculated to meet requirements. This paper introduces the basis of a repeatable method of setting these parameters at the outset of a survey, for pre-defined probabilities of false positive and false negative errors in locating spatially small radioactive particles in land areas. It is shown that an un-collimated detector is more effective than a collimated detector that might typically be used in the field. PMID:25233216

  17. Final report of the environmental measurement-while-drilling-gamma ray spectrometer system technology demonstration at the Savannah River Site F-Area Retention Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Lockwood, G.J.; Normann, R.A.; Williams, C.V.

    1997-08-01

    The environmental measurement-while-drilling-gamma ray spectrometer (EMWD-GRS) system represents an innovative blend of new and existing technology that provides real-time environmental and drill bit data during drilling operations. The EMWD-GRS technology was demonstrated at Savannah River Site F-Area Retention Basin. The EMWD-GRS technology demonstration consisted of continuously monitoring for gamma-radiation-producing contamination while drilling two horizontal boreholes below the backfilled retention basin. These boreholes passed near previously sampled vertical borehole locations where concentrations of contaminant levels of cesium had been measured. Contaminant levels continuously recorded by the EMWD-GRs system during drilling are compared to contaminant levels previously determined through quantitative laboratory analysis of soil samples.

  18. Environmental measurement-while-drilling-gamma ray spectrometer (EMWD-GRS) system technology demonstration plan for use at the Savannah River Site F-Area Retention Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, C.V.; Lockwood, G.J.; Normann, R.A.; Gruebel, R.D.

    1996-08-01

    The Environmental Measurement-While-Drilling-Gamma Ray Spectrometer (EMWD-GRS) system represents an innovative blend of new and existing technology that provides the capability of producing real-time environmental and drillbit data during drilling operations. This demonstration plan presents information on the EMWD-GRS technology, demonstration design, Cs-137 contamination at the Savannah River Site F-Area Retention Basin, responsibilities of demonstration participants, and the policies and procedures for the demonstration to be conducted at the Savannah River Site F-Area Retention Basin. The EMWD-GRS technology demonstration will consist of continuously monitoring for gamma-radiation contamination while drilling two horizontal boreholes below the backfilled retention basin. These boreholes will pass near previously sampled vertical borehole locations where concentrations of contaminant levels are known. Contaminant levels continuously recorded by the EMWD-GRS system during drilling will be compared to contaminant levels previously determined through quantitative laboratory analysis of soil samples.

  19. Differential Moessbauer spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Kurinyi, Yu.A.; Grotov, Yu.D.

    1988-07-01

    A spectrometer is described that permits hardware differentiation of spectra with respect to the energy of gamma radiation, specimen temperature, etc. Differentiation is performed by secondary modulation of source motion with subsequent phase-sensitive detection at the harmonics. The spectrometer is CAMAC-compatible and permits simultaneous measurement of the first four harmonics.

  20. Combined Gamma-Ray Spectrometer and Pulsed Neutron Generator System for In-Situ Planetary Geochemical Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Starr, R. D.; Evans, L. G.; Parsons, A. M.; Akkurt, Hatice; Floyd, H.; Wraight, P.; Ziegler, W.; Schweitzer, J.

    2007-01-01

    A combined pulsed neutron/gamma-ray system can be used on planetary surfaces to provide valuable geochemical analysis of surface materials to depths of {approx}1 m. We describe experimental results that demonstrate the capabilities of such a system.

  1. Preliminary design and performance of an advanced gamma ray spectrometer for future orbiter missions. [composition and evolution of planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metzger, A. E.; Parker, R. H.; Arnold, J. R.; Reedy, R. C.; Trombka, J. I.

    1975-01-01

    A knowledge of the composition of planets, satellites, and asteroids is of primary importance in understanding the formation and evolution of the solar system. Gamma-ray spectroscopy is capable of measuring the composition of meter-depth surface material from orbit around any body possessing little or no atmosphere. Measurement sensitivity is determined by detector efficiency and resolution, counting time, and the background flux while the effective spatial resolution depends upon the field-of-view and counting time together with the regional contrast in composition. The advantages of using germanium as a detector of gamma rays in space are illustrated experimentally and a compact instrument cooled by passive thermal radiation is described. Calculations of the expected sensitivity of this instrument at the Moon and Mars show that at least a dozen elements will be detected, twice the number which have been isolated in the Apollo gamma-ray data.

  2. Feasibility study of a long duration balloon flight with NASA/GSFC and Soviet Space Agency Gamma Ray Spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharp, William E.; Knoll, Glenn

    1989-01-01

    A feasibility study of conducting a joint NASA/GSFC and Soviet Space Agency long duration balloon flight at the Antarctic in Jan. 1993 is reported. The objective of the mission is the verification and calibration of gamma ray and neutron remote sensing instruments which can be used to obtain geochemical maps of the surface of planetary bodies. The gamma ray instruments in question are the GRAD and the Soviet Phobos prototype. The neutron detectors are supplied by Los Alamos National Laboratory and the Soviet Phobos prototype. These are to be carried aboard a gondola that supplies the data and supplies the power for the period of up to two weeks.

  3. Integration and evaluation of a position sensor with continuous read-out for use with the Environmental Measurement-While-Drilling Gamma Ray Spectrometer system

    SciTech Connect

    Normann, R.A.; Lockwood, G.J.; Williams, C.V.; Selph, M.M.

    1998-02-01

    The Environmental Measurement-While-Drilling-Gamma Ray Spectrometer (EMWD-GRS) system represents an innovative blend of new and existing technology that provides real-time environmental and drill bit data during drilling operations. The EMWD-GRS technology was demonstrated at Savannah River Site (SRS) F-Area Retention Basin. The EMWD-GRS technology demonstration consisted of continuously monitoring for gamma-radiation-producing contamination while drilling two horizontal boreholes below the backfilled waste retention basin. These boreholes passed near previously sampled locations where concentrations of contaminant levels of cesium had been measured. Contaminant levels continuously recorded by the EMWD-GRS system during drilling were compared to contaminant levels previously determined through quantitative laboratory analysis of soil samples. The results show general agreement between the soil sampling and EMWD-GRS techniques for Cs-137. The EMWD-GRS system has been improved by the integration of an orientation sensor package for position sensing (PS) (EMWD-GRS/PS). This added feature gives the capability of calculating position, which is tied directly to EMWD-GRS sensor data obtained while drilling. The EMWD-GRS/PS system is described and the results of the field tests are presented.

  4. A comparative study of gamma-ray spectrometers with LaBr3(Ce3+) and CeBr3 scintillation crystals for planetary remote sensing applications.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozyrev, Alexander; Mitrofanov, Igor; Owens, Alan; Quarati, Francesco; Benkhoff, Johannes; Litvak, Maxim; Malakhov, Alexey; Mokrousov, Maxim; Vostrukhin, Andrey; Golovin, Dmitry; Tretyakov, Vladislav; Sanin, Anton; Bakhtin, Boris; Timoshenko, Gennady; Shvetsov, Valery; Granja, Carlos; Slavicek, Tomáš; Pospisil, Stanislav

    2016-04-01

    The Russian Space Research Institute has developed and manufactured the gamma-ray spectrometer MGNS for remote sensing observations of the Mercury from the Mercury Polar Orbiter (MPO), which is the part of ESA's BepiColombo mission. The Flight Model (FM) of MGNS is based on a 3-inch single crystal of LaBr3(Ce3+), which was produced in the crystal development programme specifically for this mission. During the instrument development and verification, the crystals of CeBr3(Ce3+) became available with the similar sizes in a subsequent phase of the same crystal development programme. Consequently, the Flight Spare Model (FSM) of MGNS was produced with the 3-inch CeBr3 crystal and qualified for space flight. Except for the crystals, the two units FM and FSM are essentially identical. We report the results on a comparative assessment of the two units in terms of their respective spectroscopic capabilities, well as for their suitability for interplanetary spacecraft with respect to radiation tolerance and redundancy for activation. We also compare their performance with that of the Ge detector, as one used on the Messenger mission. Based on the tests results, the decision was taken to use FSM onboard the MPO on the BepiColombo mission. Thus, the MGNS with CeBr3 is the central gamma-ray detection element on the MPO spacecraft.

  5. Analysis of Data from the Transient Gamma-Ray Spectrometer Experiment on the GGS/Wind Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurley, K.

    1997-01-01

    The data analysis from the TGRS experiment is continuing, although the UC Berkeley PI, K. Hurley, is no longer funded for this effort. This experiment has been returning data on the energy spectra and time histories of cosmic gamma-ray bursts since November 1994, and continues to operate in good health. Over a 3 year period ending in November 1997, 41 bursts have been detected simultaneously by TGRS and Dr. Hurley's Ulysses gamma-ray burst experiment. By comparing the times of arrival of a burst at Ulysses and TGRS, we can obtain an annulus of arrival directions for the event. Typical 3sigma annulus widths range from several arcminutes to tens of arcminutes. Because the WIND spacecraft is as far as several light-seconds from Earth, it is sometimes possible to obtain a second annulus using the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) aboard the GRO spacecraft. 23 of the 41 bursts were also observed by this experiment. Generally, the two annuli intersect at grazing incidence, leading to a long, narrow error box which reduces somewhat the error circles obtained from BATSE alone. Table 1 summarizes the burst data from TGRS. We plan to defer the publication of these locations until a larger number of events has been accumulated. Measuring the energy spectra of cosmic gamma-ray bursts to search for line emission is one of the prime objectives of this experiment. However, an intense gamma-ray burst is required, or the statistics become too weak to draw meaningful conclusions. One such event has occurred to date, on August 22, 1995, and we have examined it in detail. The spectrum shows no evidence for lines, however.

  6. The REgolith X-Ray Imaging Spectrometer (REXIS) for OSIRIS-REx: identifying regional elemental enrichment on asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Branden; Grindlay, Jonathan; Hong, Jaesub; Binzel, Richard P.; Masterson, Rebecca; Inamdar, Niraj K.; Chodas, Mark; Smith, Matthew W.; Bautz, Marshall W.; Kissel, Steven E.; Villasenor, Joel; Oprescu, Miruna; Induni, Nicholas

    2013-09-01

    The OSIRIS-REx Mission was selected under the NASA New Frontiers program and is scheduled for launch in September of 2016 for a rendezvous with, and collection of a sample from the surface of asteroid Bennu in 2019. 101955 Bennu (previously 1999 RQ36) is an Apollo (near-Earth) asteroid originally discovered by the LINEAR project in 1999 which has since been classified as a potentially hazardous near-Earth object. The REgolith X-Ray Imaging Spectrometer (REXIS) was proposed jointly by MIT and Harvard and was subsequently accepted as a student led instrument for the determination of the elemental composition of the asteroid's surface as well as the surface distribution of select elements through solar induced X-ray fluorescence. REXIS consists of a detector plane that contains 4 X-ray CCDs integrated into a wide field coded aperture telescope with a focal length of 20 em for the detection of regions with enhanced abundance in key elements at 50 m scales. Elemental surface distributions of approximately 50-200 m scales can be detected using the instrument as a simple collimator. An overview of the observation strategy of the REXIS instrument and expected performance are presented here.

  7. Lifetime effects for high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy at relativistic energies and their implications for the RISING spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doornenbal, P.; Reiter, P.; Grawe, H.; Saito, T.; Al-Khatib, A.; Banu, A.; Beck, T.; Becker, F.; Bednarczyk, P.; Benzoni, G.; Bracco, A.; Bürger, A.; Caceres, L.; Camera, F.; Chmel, S.; Crespi, F. C. L.; Geissel, H.; Gerl, J.; Górska, M.; Grebosz, J.; Hübel, H.; Kavatsyuk, M.; Kavatsyuk, O.; Kmiecik, M.; Kojouharov, I.; Kurz, N.; Lozeva, R.; Maj, A.; Mandal, S.; Meczynski, W.; Million, B.; Podolyák, Zs.; Richard, A.; Saito, N.; Schaffner, H.; Seidlitz, M.; Striepling, T.; Walker, J.; Warr, N.; Weick, H.; Wieland, O.; Winkler, M.; Wollersheim, H. J.

    2010-02-01

    The lineshapes and peak position of Doppler corrected γ-ray spectra from in-beam experiments at relativistic energies are investigated with respect to the intrinsic energy resolution of the employed detectors, the particles' velocities, and the photons' emission angle uncertainties at the moment of γ-ray emission. The uncertainties in velocity and photon emission angle are dependent on the lifetime of the excited state. The impact of these two observables on the lineshape and energy resolution are studied for the RISING γ-spectrometer by means of simulations and experimental results from a two-step fragmentation experiment at ≈200 MeV/u. Potential use of the distinct lineshape for lifetime determination is demonstrated for measured γ-ray transitions.

  8. An error budget for digital soil mapping using proximally sensed EM induction and remotely sensed gamma-ray spectrometer data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jingyi; Bishop, Thomas; Triantafilis, John

    2016-04-01

    The cation exchange capacity (CEC) of soil is widely used for agricultural assessment because it is a measure of fertility and an indicator of structural stability. However, measurement of CEC is time consuming. Whilst geostatistical methods have been used, a large number of samples must be collected. Using pedometric methods and specifically coupling easy-to-measure ancillary data with CEC have improved efficiency in spatial prediction. The evaluation of mapping uncertainty has not been considered, however. In this study, we use an error budget procedure to quantify the relative contributions that model, input and covariate error make to prediction error of a digital map of CEC using gamma-ray spectrometry and apparent electrical conductivity (ECa) data. The error budget uses empirical best linear unbiased prediction (E-BLUP) and conditional simulation to produce numerous realizations of the data and their underlying errors. Linear mixed models (LMM) estimated by residual maximum likelihood (REML) is used to create the prediction models. Results show that the combined error of model (5.07 cmol(+)/kg) and input error (12.88 cmol(+)/kg) is approximately 12.93 cmol(+)/kg, which is twice as large as the standard deviation of CEC (6.8 cmol(+)/kg). The individual covariate errors caused by the gamma-ray (9.64 cmol(+)/kg) and EM error (8.55 cmol(+)/kg) are also large. To overcome the former, pre-processing techniques to improve the quality of the gamma-ray data could be considered. In terms of the EM error, this could be reduced by the use of a smaller sampling interval and in particular near the edges of the study area and also at Pedoderm boundaries.

  9. A balloon-borne high-resolution spectrometer for observations of gamma-ray emission from solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crannell, C. J.; Starr, R.; Stottlemyre, A. R.; Trombka, J. I.

    1984-01-01

    The design, development, and balloon-flight verification of a payload for observations of gamma-ray emission from solar flares are reported. The payload incorporates a high-purity germanium semiconductor detector, standard NIM and CAMAC electronics modules, a thermally stabilized pressure housing, and regulated battery power supplies. The flight system is supported on the ground with interactive data-handling equipment comprised of similar electronics hardware. The modularity and flexibility of the payload, together with the resolution and stability obtained throughout a 30-hour flight, make it readily adaptable for high-sensitivity, long-duration balloon fight applications.

  10. Calculation of the decision thresholds for radionuclides identified in gamma-ray spectra by post-processing peak analysis results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korun, Matjaž; Vodenik, Branko; Zorko, Benjamin

    2016-03-01

    A method for calculating the decision thresholds for gamma-ray emitters, identified in gamma-ray spectrometric analyses, is described. The method is suitable for application in computerized spectra-analyzing procedures. In the calculation, the number of counts and the uncertainty in the number of counts for the peaks associated with the emitter are used. The method makes possible to calculate decision thresholds from peaks on a curved background and overlapping peaks. The uncertainty in the number of counts used in the calculation was computed using Canberra's Standard Peak Search Program (Canberra, 1986, Peak Search Algorithm Manual 07-0064). For isolated peaks, the decision threshold exceeds the value calculated from the channel contents in an energy region that is 2.5 FWHM wide, covering the background in the immediate vicinity of the peak. The decision thresholds vary by approximately 20% over a dynamic range of peak areas of about 1000. In the case of overlapping peaks, the decision threshold increases considerably. For multi-gamma-ray emitters, a common decision threshold is calculated from the decision thresholds obtained from individual gamma-ray emissions, being smaller than the smallest of the individual decision thresholds.

  11. Integration and Evaluation of a Position Sensor with Continuous Read-Out for use with the Environmental Measurement-While-Drilling Gamma Ray Spectrometer System

    SciTech Connect

    Lockwood, G.J.; Normann, R.A.; Selph, M.M.; Williams, C.V.

    1999-02-22

    The Environmental Measurement-While-Drilling-Gamma Ray Spectrometer (EMWD-GRS) system represents an innovative blend of new and existing technology that provides real-time environmental and drill bit data during drilling operations. The EMWD-GRS technology was demonstrated at Savannah River Site (SRS) F-Area Retention Basin. The EMWD-GRS technology demonstration consisted of continuously monitoring for gamma-radiation-producing contamination while drilling two horizontal boreholes below the backfilled waste retention basin. These boreholes passed near previously sampled locations where concentrations of contaminant levels of cesium had been measured. Contaminant levels continuously recorded by the EMWD-GRS system during drilling were compared to contaminant levels previously determined through quantitative laboratory analysis of soil samples. The demonstration of the EMWD-GRS was a complete success. The results show general agreement between the soil sampling and EMWD-GRS techniques for CS-137. It was recognized that the EMWD-GRS tool would better satisfy our customers' needs if the instrument location could be continuously monitored. During the demonstration at SRS, an electromagnetic beacon with a walkover monitor (Subsite{reg_sign}) was used to measure bit location at depth. To use a beacon locator drilling must be stopped, thus it is normally only used when a new section of pipe was added. The location of contamination could only be estimated based on the position of the EMED-GRS package and the distance between locator beacon readings. A continuous location system that would allow us to know the location of each spectrum as it is obtained is needed.

  12. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey: Sioux Falls quadrangle, South Dakota. Volume I. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-05-01

    Computer printer maps of the magnetic total intensity and the six radiometric parameters have been prepared in addition to the radiometric anomaly maps for this area. The magnetic total intensity map displays a rather subdued response pattern of broad low amplitude anomalies over much of the area with an average magnetic intensity of approximately 58,900 gammas. The radiometric response over much of the area is relatively low. Equivalent concentrations of uranium, thorium and potassium only rarely exceed 3.2 ppM, 7.5 ppM and 1.4% respectively. A number of these zones of increased concentrations show corresponding anomalous responses on the uranium/potassium and/or uranium/thorium pseudo-contour maps. Based on this set of computer printer maps alone however, it is, at times, difficult to discern the contribution of coinciding local decreases in the potassium and thorium parameters to these ratio anomalies. Based on the criteria stated in the general section on interpretation, a total of seven uranium and seven thorium anomalies have been outlined on the interpretation map. All of these features, described in Appendix B, exhibit only weakly to moderately anomalous responses. Due to the generally low radiometric levels encountered throughout the quadrangle along with the lack of any favorable indications for enriched accumulation of either uranium or thorium as seen in their radioelement distributions when correlated with the mapped geology and the weak, at best, evidence of preferential accumulations of either parameter, no follow-up work is recommended.

  13. Fluorescence of the gamma, epsilon, and delta systems of nitric oxide - Polarization and use of calculated intensities for spectrometer calibration.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poland, H. M.; Broida, H. P.

    1971-01-01

    Results of a study in which fluorescence of the gamma system of nitric oxide was obtained by excitation from both the 2144 A line of ionized cadmium and a continuum source. Individual rotational lines of the 2144 A excited fluorescence spectrum were found to be partially polarized and to have polarizations of differ ing sign. Measured relative vibrational band intensities from line and continuum excitation were compared to calculated Franck-Condon factors. Those Franck-Condon factors based on a single potential for the two spin states of the X super pi state agreed better with measured values than those based on separate potentials for the two spin states. Calculated intensities of the v prime = 3 progression were used to calibrate the instrument response in the wavelength region from 2000 to 2500 A and were checked with measured intensities of the v prime = 0.1, and 2 progressions. Fluorescence of the epsilon and delta bands obtained with continuum lamp excitation also were compared to calculated intensities.

  14. The target asymmetry P_z in {gamma}p-->p{pi}^+{pi}^- with the CLAS spectrometer at Jefferson Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Sungkyun Park, CLAS Collaboration

    2012-04-01

    The study of baryon resonances provides a deeper understanding of the strong interaction because the dynamics and relevant degrees of freedom hidden within them are reflected by the properties of the excited states of baryons. Higher-lying excited states at and above 1.9 GeV/c{sup 2} are generally predicted to have strong couplings to the {pi}{pi}N final states via {pi}{Delta} or {rho}N intermediate states. Double-pion photoproduction is therefore important to find and investigate properties of highmass resonances. The CLAS g9a (FROST) experiment, as part of the N* spectroscopy program at Jefferson Laboratory (JLab), has accumulated photoproduction data using linearly- and circularly-polarized photons incident on a longitudinally-polarized butanol target in the photon energy range 0.3 to 2.4 GeV. In this contribution, the extraction of the target asymmetry for the reaction {gamma}p {yields} p{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} will be described and preliminary results will be presented.

  15. Analysis of rocking curve measurements of LiF flight crystals for the objective crystal spectrometer on SPECTRUM-X-GAMMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halm, Ingolf; Wiebicke, Hans-Joachim; Geppert, U. R.; Christensen, Finn E.; Abdali, Salim; Schnopper, Herbert W.

    1993-11-01

    The Objective Crystal Spectrometer on the SPECTRUM-X-GAMMA satellite will use three types of natural crystals LiF(220), Si(111), RAP(001), and a multilayer structure providing high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy of Fe, S, O, and C line regions of bright cosmic X-ray sources. 330 - 360 LiF(220) crystals of dimensions approximately 23 X 63 mm(superscript 2) are required to cover one side of a large (1000 X 600 mm(superscript 2)) panel, which is to be mounted in front of one of two high throughput X-ray telescopes. Rocking curves of 441 LiF(220) crystals measured by using an expanded Cu - K(alpha) (subscript 2) beam were analyzed to select the best ones for the flight model. An important parameter is the non-parallelity of the crystal lattice planes with respect to the rear side of the crystals, since it is of the same order of magnitude as the rocking curve width. By lapping the rear side to diminish the non- parallelity and selection the main parameters of the rocking curve averaged over all crystals can be improved at least by a factor of 1.6 both in full width half maximum and peak reflectivity.

  16. Soft x-ray calibration of the Co/C multilayer mirrors for the Objective Crystal Spectrometer on the Spectrum Roentgen-Gamma satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdali, Salim; Tarrio, Charles; Christensen, Finn E.; Schnopper, Herbert W.

    1996-07-01

    The objective crystal spectrometer (OXS) on the forthcoming Spectrum-Roentgen-Gamma satellite is designed to carry three kinds of crystals: LiF(220), Si(111) and RAP(001), placed in front of the SODART telescope. Thirty six super polished (RMS roughness < 0.1nm) Si(111) substrates were coated with 65-80 periods of Co/C multilayers using electron beam evaporation deposition combined with ion polishing for the metal layers. These crystals are to be used in the energy band immediately below the C-K absorption edge of 0.284 keV. Because the crystals are to be assembled as one crystal on the OXS, the reflectivity performance as a function of energy and angle of incidence of all crystals has been measured using line radiation from an x-ray tube which provides 1.487 keV and 0.277 keV and using synchrotron radiation from 0.16 keV to 0.28 keV at the Synchrotron Ultraviolet Radiation electron storage ring a t the National Institute of Standards and Technology. The results from these measurements are discussed.

  17. Airborne gamma-ray spectrometer and magnetometer survey: Forsyth quadrangle, Round Up quadrangle, Hardin quadrangle (Montana), Sheridan quadrangle, (Wyoming). Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    An airborne combined radiometric and magnetic survey was performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) over the area covered by the Forsyth, Hardin, and Sheridan, and Roundup, 1:250,000 National Topographic Map Series (NTMS), quadrangle maps. The survey was part of DOE's National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) program. Data were collected by a helicopter equipped with a gamma-ray spectrometer with a large crystal volume, and with a high sensitivity proton precession magnetometer. The radiometric system was calibrated at the Walker Field Calibration Pads and the Lake Mead Dynamic Test Range. Data quality was ensured during the survey by daily test flights and equipment checks. Radiometric data were corrected for live time, aircraft and equipment background, cosmic background, atmospheric radon, Compton scatter, and altitude dependence. The corrected data were statistically evaluated, plotted, and contoured to produce anomaly maps based on the radiometric response of individual geological units. The anomalies were interpreted and an interpretation map produced. Volume I contains a description of the systems used in the survey, a discussion of the calibration of the systems, the data collection procedures, the data processing procedures, the data presentation, the interpretation rationale, and the interpretation methodology. A separate Volume II for each quadrangle contains the data displays and the interpretation results.

  18. The uniform K distribution of the mare deposits in the Orientale Basin: Insights from Chang'E-2 gamma-ray spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Meng-Hua; Chang, Jin; Xie, Minggang; Fritz, Jörg; Fernandes, Vera A.; Ip, Wing-Huen; Ma, Tao; Xu, Aoao

    2015-05-01

    The composition of mare basalt units in the Orientale Basin are investigated by using the potassium (K) map derived from Chang'E-2 gamma-ray spectrometer (CE-2 GRS) and FeO map derived from Clementine UV-Vis data set. Together with crater retention ages of the mare basalts from literature data, we aim to investigate possible magma sources underneath the Orientale Basin and their chemical evolution over time. Analyses of the chemical composition of the resurfaced mare basalts together with the reported eruption ages suggest a unique magma generating process for the resurfaced mare deposits. The early mare basalts in the central Mare Orientale and the later resurfaced mare deposits probably derived from magma generated by heat release due to high radioactive element concentrations. Based on forward modeling, the similar K abundances observed in the small mare deposits of the SW polygon area, Lacus Veris, and Lacus Autumni and those in the central Mare Orientale imply the same heat source for these lava eruptions. The chemical similarities (e.g., K, FeO, and TiO2) of these regions suggest that mare basalts within the Orientale Basin are a result of multiple eruptions from a relatively homogeneous source underneath the Basin.

  19. Prompt and Afterglow Emmision Properties of Gamma-ray Bursts with Spectroscopically Identified Supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaneko, Yuki; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; Granot, Jonathan; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Woosley, Stan E.; Patel, Sandeep K.; Rol, Evert; In'TZant, Jean J. M.; VanDerHorst, Alexander J.; Wijers, Ralph A. M. J.; Strom, Richard

    2007-01-01

    We present a detailed spectral analysis of the prompt and afterglow emission of four nearby long-soft gamma-ray bursts (GRBs 980425,030329,031203, and 060218) that were spectroscopically found to be associated with Type IC supernovae and compare them to the general GRB population. For each event, we investigate the spectral and luminosity evolution and estimate the total energy budget based on broadband observations. The observational inventory for these events has become rich enough to allow estimates of their energy content in relativistic and subrelativistic form. The result is a global portrait of the effects of the physical processes responsible for producing long-soft GRBs. In particular, we find that the values of the energy released in mildly relativistic out8ows appears to have a sigruficantly smaller scatter than those found in highly relativistic ejecta. This is consistent with a picture in which the energy released inside the progenitor star is roughly standard, while the fracti

  20. Fast-neutron spectrometer developments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moler, R. B.; Zagotta, W. E.; Baker, S. I.

    1973-01-01

    Li6 sandwich-type neutron spectrometer is equipped with proportional counter for particle identification. System uses current-sensitive preamplifiers to minimize pile-up of gamma-ray and particle pulses.

  1. Prompt and Afterglow Emission Properties of Gamma-Ray Bursts with Spectroscopically Identified Supernovae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaneko, Yuki; Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico; Granot, Jonathan; Kouveliotou, Chryssa; Woosley, Stan E.; Patel, Sandeep K.; Rol, Evert; In'TZand, Jean J. M.; VanDerHorst, Alexander J.; Wuers, Ralph A. M. J.; Strom, Richard

    2007-01-01

    We present a detailed spectral analysis of the prompt and afterglow emission of four nearby long-soft gamma-ray bursts (GRBs 980425,030329,031203, and 060218) that were spectroscopically found to be associated with Type Ic supernovae and compare them to the general GRB population. For each event, we investigate the spectral and luminosity evolution and estimate the total energy budget based on broadband observations. The observational inventory for these events has become rich enough to allow estimates of their energy content in relativistic and subrelativistic form. The result is a global portrait of the effects of the physical processes responsible for producing long-soft GRBs. In particular, we find that the values of the energy released in mildly relativistic outflows appears to have a significantly smaller scatter than those found in highly relativistic ejecta. This is consistent with a picture in which the energy released inside the progenitor star is roughly standard, while the fraction of that energy that ends up in highly relativistic ejecta outside the star can vary dramatically between different events.

  2. Prompt and Afterglow Emission Properties of Gamma-Ray Bursts with Spectroscopically Identified Supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Kaneko, Yuki; Ramirez-Ruiz, E.; Granot, J.; Kouveliotou, C.; Woosley, S.E.; Patel, S.K.; Rol, E.; Zand, J.J.M.in't; a; Wijers, R.A.M.J.; Strom, R.; /USRA, Huntsville /Princeton, Inst. Advanced Study /UC, Santa Cruz /KIPAC, Menlo Park /NASA, Marshall /Leicester U. /SRON, Utrecht /Utrecht, Astron. Inst. /Amsterdam U., Astron. Inst. /NFRA, Dwingeloo

    2006-07-12

    We present a detailed spectral analysis of the prompt and afterglow emission of four nearby long-soft gamma-ray bursts (GRBs 980425, 030329, 031203, and 060218) that were spectroscopically found to be associated with type Ic supernovae, and compare them to the general GRB population. For each event, we investigate the spectral and luminosity evolution, and estimate the total energy budget based upon broadband observations. The observational inventory for these events has become rich enough to allow estimates of their energy content in relativistic and sub-relativistic form. The result is a global portrait of the effects of the physical processes responsible for producing long-soft GRBs. In particular, we find that the values of the energy released in mildly relativistic outflows appears to have a significantly smaller scatter than those found in highly relativistic ejecta. This is consistent with a picture in which the energy released inside the progenitor star is roughly standard, while the fraction of that energy that ends up in highly relativistic ejecta outside the star can vary dramatically between different events.

  3. Exploring the Capabilities of the Anti-Coincidence Shield of the International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL) Spectrometer to Study Solar Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Gasén, R.; Kiener, J.; Tatischeff, V.; Vilmer, N.; Hamadache, C.; Klein, K.-L.

    2014-05-01

    The International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL) is a European Space Agency hard X-ray/ γ-ray observatory for astrophysics, covering photon energies from 15 keV to 10 MeV. It was launched in 2002, and since then the Bismuth Germanate (BGO) detectors of the Anti-Coincidence Shield (ACS) of the Spectrometer on INTEGRAL (SPI) have detected many hard X-ray (HXR) bursts from the Sun, producing light curves at photon energies above ≈ 100 keV. The spacecraft has a highly elliptical orbit, providing long uninterrupted observing (about 90 % of the orbital period) with nearly constant background due to the shorter time needed to cross Earth's radiation belts. However, because of technical constraints, INTEGRAL cannot be pointed at the Sun, and high-energy solar photons are always detected in nonstandard observation conditions. To make the data useable for solar studies, we have undertaken a major effort to specify the observing conditions through Monte Carlo simulations of the response of ACS for several selected flares. We checked the performance of the model employed for the Monte Carlo simulations using the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) observations for the same sample of solar flares. We conclude that although INTEGRAL was not designed to perform solar observations, ACS is a useful instrument for solar-flare research. In particular, its relatively large effective area allows determining good-quality HXR/ γ-ray light curves for X- and M-class solar flares and, in some cases, probably also for C-class flares.

  4. Identifying Dark Matter Annihilation Products In The Diffuse Gamma Ray Background

    SciTech Connect

    Dodelson, Scott; Belikov, Alexander V.; Hooper, Dan; Serpico, Pasquale

    2009-03-01

    Annihilation of cosmologically distributed dark matter is predicted to produce a potentially observable flux of high energy photons. Neglecting the contribution from local structure, this signal is predicted to be virtually uniform on the sky and, in order to be identified, must compete with various extragalactic backgrounds. We focus here on unresolved blazars and discuss several techniques for separating the dark matter signal from this background. First, the spectral shapes of the signal and background are expected to differ, a feature which can be exploited with the Fisher Matrix formalism. Second, in any given angular pixel, the number of photons from blazars is drawn from a distribution which is far from Poisson. A knowledge of this distribution enhances one's ability to extract the dark matter signal, while ignorance of it can lead to the introduction of a large systematic error.

  5. Monolithic spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Rajic, S.; Egert, C.M.; Kahl, W.K.; Snyder, W.B. Jr.; Evans, B.M. III; Marlar, T.A.; Cunningham, J.P.

    1998-05-19

    A monolithic spectrometer is disclosed for use in spectroscopy. The spectrometer is a single body of translucent material with positioned surfaces for the transmission, reflection and spectral analysis of light rays. 6 figs.

  6. Monolithic spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Rajic, Slobodan; Egert, Charles M.; Kahl, William K.; Snyder, Jr., William B.; Evans, III, Boyd M.; Marlar, Troy A.; Cunningham, Joseph P.

    1998-01-01

    A monolithic spectrometer is disclosed for use in spectroscopy. The spectrometer is a single body of translucent material with positioned surfaces for the transmission, reflection and spectral analysis of light rays.

  7. Novel and Distinct Metabolites Identified Following a Single Oral Dose of Alpha- or Gamma-Hexabromocyclododecane in Mice

    EPA Science Inventory

    The metabolism of alpha- and gamma-hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) was investigated in adult C57BL/6 female mice. Alpha- or gamma-[14C]HBCD (3 mg/kg bw) was orally administered with subsequent urine and feces collection for 4 consecutive days; a separate group of mice were dosed a...

  8. Correlation spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Sinclair, Michael B.; Pfeifer, Kent B.; Flemming, Jeb H.; Jones, Gary D.; Tigges, Chris P.

    2010-04-13

    A correlation spectrometer can detect a large number of gaseous compounds, or chemical species, with a species-specific mask wheel. In this mode, the spectrometer is optimized for the direct measurement of individual target compounds. Additionally, the spectrometer can measure the transmission spectrum from a given sample of gas. In this mode, infrared light is passed through a gas sample and the infrared transmission signature of the gasses present is recorded and measured using Hadamard encoding techniques. The spectrometer can detect the transmission or emission spectra in any system where multiple species are present in a generally known volume.

  9. Gamma-rays attenuation of zircons from Cambodia and South Africa at different energies: A new technique for identifying the origin of gemstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limkitjaroenporn, P.; Kaewkhao, J.

    2014-10-01

    In this work, the gamma-rays interaction properties of zircons from Cambodia and South Africa have been studied. The densities of Cambodian and South African's zircons are 4.6716±0.0040 g/cm3 and 4.5505±0.0018 g/cm3, respectively. The mass attenuation coefficient and the effective atomic number of gemstones were measured with the gamma-ray in energies range 223-662 keV using the Compton scattering technique. The mass attenuation coefficients of both zircons decreased with the increasing of gamma-rays energies. The different mass attenuation coefficients between the two zircons observed at gamma-ray energies below 400 keV are attributed to the differences in the photoelectric interaction. The effective atomic number of zircons was decreased with the increasing of gamma-ray energies and showed totally different values between the Cambodia and South Africa sources. The origins of the two zircons could be successfully identified by the method based on gamma-rays interaction with matter with advantage of being a non-destructive testing.

  10. Multidimensional spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Zanni, Martin Thomas; Damrauer, Niels H.

    2010-07-20

    A multidimensional spectrometer for the infrared, visible, and ultraviolet regions of the electromagnetic spectrum, and a method for making multidimensional spectroscopic measurements in the infrared, visible, and ultraviolet regions of the electromagnetic spectrum. The multidimensional spectrometer facilitates measurements of inter- and intra-molecular interactions.

  11. Improved multisphere spectrometer system

    SciTech Connect

    Shonka, J.J.; Schwahn, S.O.; Rogers, P.E.; Misko, C.J.

    1991-01-01

    Shonka Research Associated undertook a research program to improve the capabilities and ease of use of the Bonner sphere spectrometer system. Two key elements formed the heart of this research: replacement of the lithium iodide (LiI(Eu)) detector normally used in the spectrometer system with a spherical boron triflouride (BF{sub 3}) proportional counter and exploitation of an optimized set of nested polyethylene spheres, including boron-loaded spherical shells. Use of a spherical BF{sub 3} detector offers many advantages over the LiI(Eu) crystal. The BF{sub 3} detectors are insensitive to gamma radiation. Lack of gamma sensitivity permits acquiring data with simple electronics and allows determination of neutron spectra and dose in lower neutron-to-gamma ratio fields, including background terrestrial radiation fields. The importance of the lack of gamma sensitivity is underscored by the pending changes in neutron quality factors. The nearly perfect spherical symmetry offers advantages for BF{sub 3} over LiI(Eu) detectors as well. A light pipe, which perturbs measurements, is not needed. The bare BF{sub 3} detector response is not affected by the moderation of neutrons as is the case of the organic light pipe used with LiI(Eu). The spherical symmetry permits the use of smaller diameter shells, which add to the number of response functions.

  12. The first echinoderm gamma-interferon-inducible lysosomal thiol reductase (GILT) identified from sea cucumber (Stichopus monotuberculatus).

    PubMed

    Ren, Chunhua; Chen, Ting; Jiang, Xiao; Luo, Xing; Wang, Yanhong; Hu, Chaoqun

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-interferon-inducible lysosomal thiol reductase (GILT) has been described as a key enzyme that facilitating the processing and presentation of major histocompatibility complex class II-restricted antigen in mammals. In this study, the first echinoderm GILT named StmGILT was identified from sea cucumber (Stichopus monotuberculatus). The StmGILT cDNA is 1529 bp in length, containing a 5'-untranslated region (UTR) of 87 bp, a 3'-UTR of 674 bp and an open reading frame (ORF) of 768 bp that encoding a protein of 255 amino acids with a deduced molecular weight of 27.82 kDa and a predicted isoelectric point of 4.73. The putative StmGILT protein possesses all the main characteristics of known GILT proteins, including a signature sequence, a reductase active site CXXC, twelve conserved cysteines, and two potential N-linked glycosylation sites. For the gene structure, StmGILT contains four exons separated by three introns. In the promoter region of StmGILT gene, an NF-κB binding site and an IFN-γ activation site were found. The thiol reductase activity of recombinant StmGILT protein was also demonstrated in this study. In addition, the highest level of mRNA expression was noticed in coelomocytes of S. monotuberculatus. In in vitro experiments performed in coelomocytes, the expression of StmGILT mRNA was significantly up-regulated by lipopolysaccharides (LPS), inactivated bacteria or polyriboinosinic polyribocytidylic acid [poly (I:C)] challenge, suggested that the sea cucumber GILT might play critical roles in the innate immune defending against bacterial and viral infections. PMID:25449705

  13. Experimental Determination of the HPGe Spectrometer Efficiency Calibration Curves for Various Sample Geometry for Gamma Energy from 50 keV to 2000 keV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saat, Ahmad; Hamzah, Zaini; Yusop, Mohammad Fariz; Zainal, Muhd Amiruddin

    2010-07-01

    Detection efficiency of a gamma-ray spectrometry system is dependent upon among others, energy, sample and detector geometry, volume and density of the samples. In the present study the efficiency calibration curves of newly acquired (August 2008) HPGe gamma-ray spectrometry system was carried out for four sample container geometries, namely Marinelli beaker, disc, cylindrical beaker and vial, normally used for activity determination of gamma-ray from environmental samples. Calibration standards were prepared by using known amount of analytical grade uranium trioxide ore, homogenized in plain flour into the respective containers. The ore produces gamma-rays of energy ranging from 53 keV to 1001 keV. Analytical grade potassium chloride were prepared to determine detection efficiency of 1460 keV gamma-ray emitted by potassium isotope K-40. Plots of detection efficiency against gamma-ray energy for the four sample geometries were found to fit smoothly to a general form of ɛ = AΕa+BΕb, where ɛ is efficiency, Ε is energy in keV, A, B, a and b are constants that are dependent on the sample geometries. All calibration curves showed the presence of a "knee" at about 180 keV. Comparison between the four geometries showed that the efficiency of Marinelli beaker is higher than cylindrical beaker and vial, while cylindrical disk showed the lowest.

  14. Experimental Determination of the HPGe Spectrometer Efficiency Calibration Curves for Various Sample Geometry for Gamma Energy from 50 keV to 2000 keV

    SciTech Connect

    Saat, Ahmad; Hamzah, Zaini; Yusop, Mohammad Fariz; Zainal, Muhd Amiruddin

    2010-07-07

    Detection efficiency of a gamma-ray spectrometry system is dependent upon among others, energy, sample and detector geometry, volume and density of the samples. In the present study the efficiency calibration curves of newly acquired (August 2008) HPGe gamma-ray spectrometry system was carried out for four sample container geometries, namely Marinelli beaker, disc, cylindrical beaker and vial, normally used for activity determination of gamma-ray from environmental samples. Calibration standards were prepared by using known amount of analytical grade uranium trioxide ore, homogenized in plain flour into the respective containers. The ore produces gamma-rays of energy ranging from 53 keV to 1001 keV. Analytical grade potassium chloride were prepared to determine detection efficiency of 1460 keV gamma-ray emitted by potassium isotope K-40. Plots of detection efficiency against gamma-ray energy for the four sample geometries were found to fit smoothly to a general form of {epsilon} = A{Epsilon}{sup a}+B{Epsilon}{sup b}, where {epsilon} is efficiency, {Epsilon} is energy in keV, A, B, a and b are constants that are dependent on the sample geometries. All calibration curves showed the presence of a ''knee'' at about 180 keV. Comparison between the four geometries showed that the efficiency of Marinelli beaker is higher than cylindrical beaker and vial, while cylindrical disk showed the lowest.

  15. Part I. Development of a concept inventory addressing students' beliefs and reasoning difficulties regarding the greenhouse effect, Part II. Distribution of chlorine measured by the Mars Odyssey Gamma Ray Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, John Michael

    chlorine on Mars measured by the Mars Odyssey Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS). The distribution of chlorine is heterogeneous across the surface, with a concentration of high chlorine centered over the Medusa Fossae Formation. The distribution of chlorine correlates positively with hydrogen and negatively with silicon and thermal inertia. Four mechanisms (aeolian, volcanic, aqueous, and hydrothermal) are discussed as possible factors influencing the distribution of chlorine measured within the upper few tens of centimeters of the surface.

  16. Portable compton gamma-ray detection system

    DOEpatents

    Rowland, Mark S.; Oldaker, Mark E.

    2008-03-04

    A Compton scattered gamma-ray detector system. The system comprises a gamma-ray spectrometer and an annular array of individual scintillators. The scintillators are positioned so that they are arrayed around the gamma-ray spectrometer. The annular array of individual scintillators includes a first scintillator. A radiation shield is positioned around the first scintillator. A multi-channel analyzer is operatively connected to the gamma-ray spectrometer and the annular array of individual scintillators.

  17. The gamma-ray observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    An overview is given of the Gamma Ray Observatory (GRO) mission. Detection of gamma rays and gamma ray sources, operations using the Space Shuttle, and instruments aboard the GRO, including the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE), the Oriented Scintillation Spectrometer Experiment (OSSE), the Imaging Compton Telescope (COMPTEL), and the Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) are among the topics surveyed.

  18. γ-Ray background sources in the VESUVIO spectrometer at ISIS spallation neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietropaolo, A.; Perelli Cippo, E.; Gorini, G.; Tardocchi, M.; Schooneveld, E. M.; Andreani, C.; Senesi, R.

    2009-09-01

    An investigation of the gamma background was carried out in the VESUVIO spectrometer at the ISIS spallation neutron source. This study, performed with a yttrium-aluminum-perovskite (YAP) scintillator, follows high resolution pulse height measurements of the gamma background carried out on the same instrument with the use of a high-purity germanium detector. In this experimental work, a mapping of the gamma background was attempted, trying to find the spatial distribution and degree of directionality of the different contributions identified in the previous study. It is found that the gamma background at low times is highly directional and mostly due to the gamma rays generated in the moderator-decoupler system. The other contributions, consistently to the findings of a previous experiment, are identified as a nearly isotropic one due to neutron absorption in the walls of the experimental hall, and a directional one coming from the beam dump.

  19. Preliminary Simulations for Geometric Optimization of a High-Energy Delayed Gamma Spectrometer for Direct Assay of Pu in Spent Nuclear Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Kulisek, Jonathan A.; Campbell, Luke W.; Rodriguez, Douglas C.

    2012-06-07

    High-energy, beta-delayed gamma-ray spectroscopy is under investigation as part of the Next Generation Safeguard Initiative effort to develop non-destructive assay instruments for plutonium mass quantification in spent nuclear fuel assemblies. Results obtained to date indicate that individual isotope-specific signatures contained in the delayed gamma-ray spectra can potentially be used to quantify the total fissile content and individual weight fractions of fissile and fertile nuclides present in spent fuel. Adequate assay precision for inventory analysis can be obtained using a neutron generator of sufficient strength and currently available detection technology. In an attempt to optimize the geometric configuration and material composition for a delayed gamma measurement on spent fuel, the current study applies MCNPX, a Monte Carlo radiation transport code, in order to obtain the best signal-to-noise ratio. Results are presented for optimizing the neutron spectrum tailoring material, geometries to maximize thermal or fast fissions from a given neutron source, and detector location to allow an acceptable delayed gamma-ray signal while achieving a reasonable detector lifetime while operating in a high-energy neutron field. This work is supported in part by the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative, Office of Nuclear Safeguards and Security, National Nuclear Security Administration.

  20. Measurement of the Helicity Difference in {gamma}{sup {yields}p{yields}{yields}p{pi}+{pi}-} with the CLAS Spectrometer at Jefferson Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Sungkyun

    2010-08-05

    The study of the properties of baryon resonances can provide us with hints to help us understand the structure of non-perturbative QCD and the effect of a particular resonance on polarization observables. The investigation of double-pion photoproduction data is needed to discover higher-lying states and their properties at and above W {approx_equal} 1.8 GeV. Therefore, the analysis of the helicity difference in gp {gamma}p{yields}p{pi}{sup +{pi}-} will help us in our understanding of QCD.The CLAS g9a (FROST) experiment, as part of the N* spectroscopy program at Jefferson Laboratory, has accumulated photoproduction data using linearly and circularly polarized photons incident on a longitudinally-polarized butanol target in the photon energy range 0.3 to 2.4 GeV. The FROST experiment provides an important step toward a ''complete'' experiment for the reaction {gamma}N{yields}KY.In this contribution, the method to calculate the helicity difference for the reaction {gamma}p{yields}p{pi}{sup +{pi}-} will be described and preliminary results will be discussed.

  1. Multiaperture Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schindler, Rudolf A.; Pagano, Robert J.; O'Callaghan, Fred G.

    1991-01-01

    Proposed multiaperture spectrometer containing single grating provides high spectral resolution over broad spectrum. Produces parallel line images, each of which highly spectrally resolved display of intensity vs. wavelength in wavelength band of one of orders of spectrum produced by grating. Advantages; convenient two-dimensional spectral image, fewer components, and greater efficiency.

  2. Spectrometer gun

    DOEpatents

    Waechter, David A.; Wolf, Michael A.; Umbarger, C. John

    1985-01-01

    A hand-holdable, battery-operated, microprocessor-based spectrometer gun includes a low-power matrix display and sufficient memory to permit both real-time observation and extended analysis of detected radiation pulses. Universality of the incorporated signal processing circuitry permits operation with various detectors having differing pulse detection and sensitivity parameters.

  3. Spectrometer gun

    DOEpatents

    Waechter, D.A.; Wolf, M.A.; Umbarger, C.J.

    1981-11-03

    A hand-holdable, battery-operated, microprocessor-based spectrometer gun is described that includes a low-power matrix display and sufficient memory to permit both real-time observation and extended analysis of detected radiation pulses. Universality of the incorporated signal processing circuitry permits operation with various detectors having differing pulse detection and sensitivity parameters.

  4. The use of pulse processing techniques to improve the performance of Cd{sub 1{minus}x}Zn{sub x}Te gamma-ray spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, J.C.; Olsen, R.; Van Scyoc, J.M.; James, R.B.

    1996-06-01

    Cd{sub 1{minus}x}Zn{sub x}Te (CZT) has recently shown great promise for use as a room temperature gamma-ray detector material. The availability of large volume (>1 cm{sup 3}) high resistivity CZT crystals has allowed the demonstration of detectors much larger than can be built with the similar material CdTe. However, CZT--like many other room-temperature materials--suffers from the poor transport properties of holes. The poor hole drift properties of CZT cause the characteristic hole tailing in gamma-ray pulse height spectra. The authors have applied pulse processing methods to reduce the hole tailing effects and improve the energy resolution of CZT detectors. They have used two signal processing methods to reduce hole tailing in CZT detectors: digital rise-time compensation and dual time-constant sampling. They discuss the implementation of these techniques, demonstrate results obtained in the laboratory, and compare the performance obtained with other detector systems.

  5. The Spectrometer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenslade, Thomas B., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    In the fall of 1999 I was shown an Ocean Optics spectrometer-in-the-computer at St. Patricks College at Maynooth, Ireland, and thought that I had seen heaven. Of course, it could not resolve the sodium D-lines (I had done that many years before with a homemade wire diffraction grating), and I began to realize that inside was some familiar old…

  6. (60)Co in cast steel matrix: A European interlaboratory comparison for the characterisation of new activity standards for calibration of gamma-ray spectrometers in metallurgy.

    PubMed

    Tzika, Faidra; Burda, Oleksiy; Hult, Mikael; Arnold, Dirk; Marroyo, Belén Caro; Dryák, Pavel; Fazio, Aldo; Ferreux, Laurent; García-Toraño, Eduardo; Javornik, Andrej; Klemola, Seppo; Luca, Aurelian; Moser, Hannah; Nečemer, Marijan; Peyrés, Virginia; Reis, Mario; Silva, Lidia; Šolc, Jaroslav; Svec, Anton; Tyminski, Zbigniew; Vodenik, Branko; Wätjen, Uwe

    2016-08-01

    Two series of activity standards of (60)Co in cast steel matrix, developed for the calibration of gamma-ray spectrometry systems in the metallurgical sector, were characterised using a European interlaboratory comparison among twelve National Metrology Institutes and one international organisation. The first standard, consisting of 14 disc shaped samples, was cast from steel contaminated during production ("originally"), and the second, consisting of 15 similar discs, from artificially-contaminated ("spiked") steel. The reference activity concentrations of (60)Co in the cast steel standards were (1.077±0.019) Bqg(-1) on 1 January 2013 12h00 UT and (1.483±0.022) Bqg(-1) on 1 June 2013 12h00 UT, respectively. PMID:27236833

  7. MASS SPECTROMETER

    DOEpatents

    White, F.A.

    1960-08-23

    A mass spectrometer is designed with a first adjustable magnetic field for resolving an ion beam into beams of selected masses, a second adjustable magnetic field for further resolving the ion beam from the first field into beams of selected masses, a thin foil disposed in the path of the beam between the first and second magnets to dissociate molecular ions incident thereon, an electrostatic field for further resolving the ion beam from the second field into beams of selected masses, and a detector disposed adjacent to the electrostatic field to receive the ion beam.

  8. The tamas gene, identified as a mutation that disrupts larval behavior in Drosophila melanogaster, codes for the mitochondrial DNA polymerase catalytic subunit (DNApol-gamma125).

    PubMed Central

    Iyengar, B; Roote, J; Campos, A R

    1999-01-01

    From a screen of pupal lethal lines of Drosophila melanogaster we identified a mutant strain that displayed a reproducible reduction in the larval response to light. Moreover, this mutant strain showed defects in the development of the adult visual system and failure to undergo behavioral changes characteristic of the wandering stage. The foraging third instar larvae remained in the food substrate for a prolonged period and died at or just before pupariation. Using a new assay for individual larval photobehavior we determined that the lack of response to light in these mutants was due to a primary deficit in locomotion. The mutation responsible for these phenotypes was mapped to the lethal complementation group l(2)34Dc, which we renamed tamas (translated from Sanskrit as "dark inertia"). Sequencing of mutant alleles demonstrated that tamas codes for the mitochondrial DNA polymerase catalytic subunit (DNApol-gamma125). PMID:10581287

  9. Measurement of the polarization observables I(s) and I(c) for gamma-proton decaying to proton-pion-antipion using the CLAS spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanretty, Charles

    the effects of the missing resonances as this final state topology accounts for most of the cross section above ≈ 1 GeV. A study of double-meson final states very well may fill the holes in the experimental data as the majority of analyses regarding this issue have come from the analysis of quasi 2-body final states (such as Npi, Neta, No, KΛ, and KSigma). It is also likely that these missing resonances decay to high mass intermediate states instead of directly into a meson and a ground state nucleon. Therefore the decay of these resonances is more of a chain (resulting in a two-meson-one-ground-state-nucleon state) than a direct decay. Presented in this work are the first ever measurements of the polarization observable Is for a final state with two pions and the first ever measurements of Ic for a final state containing charged pions (let alone the first measurements of both observables for the specialized case of g⃗p → p pi+pi- reactions). The presented measurements were made using the high-statistics data available in the CLAS g8b data set. This data were taken at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (JLab) from July 20 th to September 1st of 2005 using linearly polarized photons, an unpolarized liquid hydrogen (LH 2 target), and the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS). The highly-polarized photons were produced via bremsstrahlung using an unpolarized electron beam provided by the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility (CEBAF) accelerator and a well-oriented diamond radiator. These polarized photons were produced at five different coherent edge energies: 1.3 GeV, 1.5 GeV, 1.7 GeV, 1.9 GeV, and 2.1 GeV. Considering the 200 MeV-wide window of highly polarized photons whose upper limit is the coherent edge energy, and the five different coherent edge energies used, highly polarized photons were produced covering an total energy range of 1 GeV. These data along with the utilized analysis tools have lead to clean, continuous, low

  10. A New Generation TDPAC Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herden, Christian H.; Alves, Mauro A.; Becker, Klaus D.; Gardner, John A.

    2004-12-01

    Time Differential gamma gamma Perturbed Angular Correlation spectroscopy has traditionally been done using scintillation detectors along with constant fraction discriminators, spectroscopy amplifiers, single channel analyzers, and time to amplitude detectors. We describe a new generation spectrometer where these electronics are replaced by high speed digital transient recorders that record the output from each scintillation detector. The energy and time-of-arrival of gamma rays in any detector can be determined accurately. Many experimental difficulties related to electronics are eliminated; the number of detectors can be increased with no increase in complexity of the apparatus; coincidences among any two detectors are measurable; and coincidences separated by as little as a ns are detectable in principle within one detector. All energies are collected, and energy windows are imposed by software filtering, permitting both high energy resolution and high data-gathering power.

  11. Genome scan identifies a locus affecting gamma-globin expression in human beta-cluster YAC transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, S.D.; Cooper, P.; Fung, J.; Weier, H.U.G.; Rubin, E.M.

    2000-03-01

    Genetic factors affecting post-natal g-globin expression - a major modifier of the severity of both b-thalassemia and sickle cell anemia, have been difficult to study. This is especially so in mice, an organism lacking a globin gene with an expression pattern equivalent to that of human g-globin. To model the human b-cluster in mice, with the goal of screening for loci affecting human g-globin expression in vivo, we introduced a human b-globin cluster YAC transgene into the genome of FVB mice . The b-cluster contained a Greek hereditary persistence of fetal hemoglobin (HPFH) g allele resulting in postnatal expression of human g-globin in transgenic mice. The level of human g-globin for various F1 hybrids derived from crosses between the FVB transgenics and other inbred mouse strains was assessed. The g-globin level of the C3HeB/FVB transgenic mice was noted to be significantly elevated. To map genes affecting postnatal g-globin expression, a 20 centiMorgan (cM) genome scan of a C3HeB/F VB transgenics [prime] FVB backcross was performed, followed by high-resolution marker analysis of promising loci. From this analysis we mapped a locus within a 2.2 cM interval of mouse chromosome 1 at a LOD score of 4.2 that contributes 10.4% of variation in g-globin expression level. Combining transgenic modeling of the human b-globin gene cluster with quantitative trait analysis, we have identified and mapped a murine locus that impacts on human g-globin expression in vivo.

  12. Cryogenic Neutron Spectrometer Development

    SciTech Connect

    Niedermayr, T; Hau, I D; Friedrich, S; Burger, A; Roy, U N; Bell, Z W

    2006-03-08

    Cryogenic microcalorimeter detectors operating at temperatures around {approx}0.1 K have been developed for the last two decades, driven mostly by the need for ultra-high energy resolution (<0.1%) in X-ray astrophysics and dark matter searches [1]. The Advanced Detector Group at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has developed different cryogenic detector technologies for applications ranging from X-ray astrophysics to nuclear science and non-proliferation. In particular, we have adapted cryogenic detector technologies for ultra-high energy resolution gamma-spectroscopy [2] and, more recently, fast-neutron spectroscopy [3]. Microcalorimeters are essentially ultra-sensitive thermometers that measure the energy of the radiation from the increase in temperature upon absorption. They consist of a sensitive superconducting thermometer operated at the transition between its superconducting and its normal state, where its resistance changes very rapidly with temperature such that even the minute energies deposited by single radiation quanta are sufficient to be detectable with high precision. The energy resolution of microcalorimeters is fundamentally limited by thermal fluctuations to {Delta}E{sub FWHM} {approx} 2.355 (k{sub B}T{sup 2}C{sub abs}){sup 1/2}, and thus allows an energy below 1 keV for neutron spectrometers for an operating temperature of T {approx} 0.1 K . The {Delta}E{sub FWHM} does not depend on the energy of the incident photon or particle. This expression is equivalent to the familiar (F{var_epsilon}E{sub {gamma}}){sup 1/2} considering that an absorber at temperature T contains a total energy C{sub abs}T, and the associated fluctuation are due to variations in uncorrelated (F=1) phonons ({var_epsilon} = k{sub B}T) dominated by the background energy C{sub abs}T >> E{gamma}. The rationale behind developing a cryogenic neutron spectrometer is the very high energy resolution combined with the high efficiency. Additionally, the response function is simple

  13. Automated transportable mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echo, M. W.

    1981-09-01

    The need was identified for a mass spectrometer (MS) which can be conveniently transported among several facilities for rapid verification of the isotopic composition of special nuclear material. This requirement for a light weight, transportable MS for U and Pu mass analysis was met by deleting the gas chromograph (GC) portions of a Hewlett-Packard Model 5992 Quadrupole GCMS and substituting a vacuum lock sample entry system. A programmable power supply and vacuum gauge were added and circuitry modifications were made to enable use of the supplied software.

  14. A cadmium-zinc-telluride crystal array spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    H. R. McHugh; W. Quam; T. DeVore; R. Vogle; J. Weslowski

    2003-09-01

    This paper describes a gamma detector employing an array of eight cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT) crystals configured as a high resolution gamma ray spectrometer. This detector is part of a more complex instrument that identifies the isotope,displays this information, and records the gamma spectrum. Various alarms and other operator features are incorporated in this battery operated rugged instrument. The CZT detector is the key component of this instrument and will be described in detail in this paper. We have made extensive spectral measurements of the usual laboratory gamma sources, common medical isotopes, and various Special Nuclear Materials (SNM) with this detector. Some of these data will be presented as spectra. We will also present energy resolution and detection efficiency for the basic 8-crystal array. Additional data will also be presented for a 32-crystal array. The basic 8-crystal array development was completed two years ago, and the system electronic design has been imp roved recently. This has resulted in significantly improved noise performance. We expect to have a much smaller detector package, using 8 crystals, in a few months. This package will use flip-chip packaging to reduce the electronics physical size by a factor of 5.

  15. First Results from GRETINA at the S800 Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, Heather

    2013-04-01

    The next-generation gamma-ray tracking array GRETINA has begun its first physics campaign at the National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory (NSCL). GRETINA, a first implementation of the future 4π GRETA device, consists of 28 highly segmented Ge detectors, covering 1π of the solid angle. The array makes use of the concepts of signal decomposition to localize the interaction of gamma-rays within the detector volumes, and gamma-ray tracking to identify the first hit position within the array. Combined, these techniques provide both an accurate position (within 2mm) for Doppler reconstruction, and rejection of Compton scattering events to reduce background and improve spectral quality. Completed in March 2011, GRETINA was successfully built and commissioned at LBNL, before moving to NSCL in the Spring of 2012. A physics campaign encompassing a wide range of topics in nuclear structure, nuclear reactions and astrophysics is currently underway at NSCL, using GRETINA coupled to the S800 spectrograph. The combination of these powerful devices, a cutting-edge gamma-ray spectrometer and a high-resolution, large acceptance spectrograph, allows spectroscopic studies of the most exotic nuclear systems, moving toward both the proton and neutron driplines. We will report on first results from the campaign of GRETINA at the S800, and present preliminary data from experiments studying nuclei across the chart of the nuclides.

  16. Particle Spectrometers for FRIB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amthor, A. M.

    2014-09-01

    FRIB promises to dramatically expand the variety of nuclear systems available for direct experimental study by providing rates of many rare isotopes orders of magnitude higher than those currently available. A new generation of experimental systems, including new particle spectrometers will be critical to our ability to take full advantage of the scientific opportunities offered by FRIB. The High-Rigidity Spectrometer (HRS) will allow for experiments with the most neutron-rich and short-lived isotopes produced by in-flight fragmentation at FRIB. The bending capability of the HRS (8 Tm) matches to the rigidity for which rare isotopes are produced at the highest intensity in the FRIB fragment separator. The experimental program will be focused on nuclear structure and astrophysics, and allow for the use of other cutting-edge detection systems for gamma, neutron, and charged-particle detection. Stopped and reaccelerated beam studies will be an important compliment to in-flight techniques at FRIB, providing world-unique, high quality, intense rare isotope beams at low energies up to and beyond the Coulomb barrier--with the completion of ReA12--and serving many of the science goals of the broader facility, from nuclear structure and astrophysics to applications. Two specialized recoil spectrometers are being developed for studies with reaccelerated beams. SECAR, the Separator for Capture Reactions, will be built following ReA3, coupled to a windowless gas jet target, JENSA, and will focus on radiative capture reactions for astrophysics, particularly those needed to improve our understanding of novae and X-ray bursts. A recoil separator following ReA12 is proposed to address a variety of physics cases based on fusion-evaporation, Coulomb excitation, transfer, and deep-inelastic reactions by providing a large angular, momentum and charge state acceptance; a high mass resolving power; and the flexibility to couple to a variety of auxiliary detector systems. Two designs

  17. Environmental Characterization of GLOBAL Sources of Atmospheric Soil DUST Identified with the NIMBUS 7 Total OZONE Mapping SPECTROMETER (toms) Absorbing Aerosol Product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prospero, Joseph M.; Ginoux, Paul; Torres, Omar; Nicholson, Sharon E.; Gill, Thomas E.

    2002-02-01

    We use the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) sensor on the Nimbus 7 satellite to map the global distribution of major atmospheric dust sources with the goal of identifying common environmental characteristics. The largest and most persistent sources are located in the Northern Hemisphere, mainly in a broad "dust belt" that extends from the west coast of North Africa, over the Middle East, Central and South Asia, to China. There is remarkably little large-scale dust activity outside this region. In particular, the Southern Hemisphere is devoid of major dust activity. Dust sources, regardless of size or strength, can usually be associated with topographical lows located in arid regions with annual rainfall under 200-250 mm. Although the source regions themselves are arid or hyperarid, the action of water is evident from the presence of ephemeral streams, rivers, lakes, and playas. Most major sources have been intermittently flooded through the Quaternary as evidenced by deep alluvial deposits. Many sources are associated with areas where human impacts are well documented, e.g., the Caspian and Aral Seas, Tigris-Euphrates River Basin, southwestern North America, and the loess lands in China. Nonetheless, the largest and most active sources are located in truly remote areas where there is little or no human activity. Thus, on a global scale, dust mobilization appears to be dominated by natural sources. Dust activity is extremely sensitive to many environmental parameters. The identification of major sources will enable us to focus on critical regions and to characterize emission rates in response to environmental conditions. With such knowledge we will be better able to improve global dust models and to assess the effects of climate change on emissions in the future. It will also facilitate the interpretation of the paleoclimate record based on dust contained in ocean sediments and ice cores.

  18. Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer and Airborne Emission Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glavich, T.; Beer, R.

    1996-01-01

    The Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) is an instrument being developed for the NASA Earth Observing System Chemistry Platform. TES will measure the distribution of ozone and its precursors in the lower atmosphere. The Airborne Emission Spectrometer (AES) is an aircraft precursor to TES. Applicable descriptions are given of instrument design, technology challenges, implementation and operations for both.

  19. Mass spectrometers and atomic oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunton, D. E.; Trzcinski, E.; Cross, J. B.; Spangler, L. H.; Hoffbauer, M. H.; Archuleta, F. H.; Visentine, J. T.

    1987-01-01

    The likely role of atmospheric atomic oxygen in the recession of spacecraft surfaces and in the shuttle glow has revived interest in the accurate measurement of atomic oxygen densities in the upper atmosphere. The Air Force Geophysics Laboratory is supplying a quadrupole mass spectrometer for a materials interactions flight experiment being planned by the Johnson Space Center. The mass spectrometer will measure the flux of oxygen on test materials and will also identify the products of surface reactions. The instrument will be calibrated at a new facility for producing high energy beams of atomic oxygen at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. The plans for these calibration experiments are summarized.

  20. Compact Infrared Spectrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mouroulis, Pantazis

    2009-01-01

    Concentric spectrometer forms are advantageous for constructing a variety of systems spanning the entire visible to infrared range. Spectrometer examples are given, including broadband or high resolution forms. Some issues associated with the Dyson catadioptric type are also discussed.

  1. Nuclear structure analysis using the Orange Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Regis, J.-M.; Pascovici, Gh.; Christen, S.; Meersschout, T.; Bernards, C.; Fransen, Ch.; Dewald, A.; Braun, N.; Heinze, S.; Thiel, S.; Jolie, J.; Materna, Th.

    2009-01-28

    Recently, an Orange spectrometer, a focusing iron-free magnetic spectrometer, has been installed at a beam line of the 10 MV Tandem accelerator of the IKP of the University of Cologne. The high efficiency of 15% of 4{pi} for the detection of conversion electrons and the energy resolution of 1% makes the Orange spectrometer a powerful instrument. From the conversion electron spectrum, transition multipolarities can be determined using the so called K to L ratio. In combination with an array of germanium and lanthanum bromide detectors, e{sup -}-{gamma}-coincidences can be performed to investigate the level scheme. Moreover, the very fast lanthanum bromide scintillator with an energy resolution of 3% allows e{sup -}-{gamma} lifetime measurements down to 0.3 ns. A second Orange spectrometer can be added to build the Double Orange Spectrometer for e{sup -}-e{sup -}-coincidences. It is indispensable for lifetime measurements of low intensity or nearby lying transitions as often occur in odd-A and odd-odd nuclei. The capabilities are illustrated with several examples.

  2. Mass Spectrometer for Airborne Micro-Organisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinha, M. P.; Friedlander, S. K.

    1986-01-01

    Bacteria and other micro-organisms identified continously with aid of new technique for producing samples for mass spectrometer. Technique generates aerosol of organisms and feeds to spectrometer. Given species of organism produces characteristic set of peaks in mass spectrum and thereby identified. Technique useful for monitoring bacterial makeup in environmental studies and in places where cleanliness is essential, such as hospital operating rooms, breweries, and pharmaceutical plants.

  3. Gamma ray optics

    SciTech Connect

    Jentschel, M.; Guenther, M. M.; Habs, D.; Thirolf, P. G.

    2012-07-09

    Via refractive or diffractive scattering one can shape {gamma} ray beams in terms of beam divergence, spot size and monochromaticity. These concepts might be particular important in combination with future highly brilliant gamma ray sources and might push the sensibility of planned experiments by several orders of magnitude. We will demonstrate the experimental feasibility of gamma ray monochromatization on a ppm level and the creation of a gamma ray beam with nanoradian divergence. The results are obtained using the inpile target position of the High Flux Reactor of the ILL Grenoble and the crystal spectrometer GAMS. Since the refractive index is believed to vanish to zero with 1/E{sup 2}, the concept of refractive optics has never been considered for gamma rays. The combination of refractive optics with monochromator crystals is proposed to be a promising design. Using the crystal spectrometer GAMS, we have measured for the first time the refractive index at energies in the energy range of 180 - 2000 keV. The results indicate a deviation from simple 1/E{sup 2} extrapolation of X-ray results towards higher energies. A first interpretation of these new results will be presented. We will discuss the consequences of these results on the construction of refractive optics such as lenses or refracting prisms for gamma rays and their combination with single crystal monochromators.

  4. Recent developments in thick mercuric iodide spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hull, K.; Beyerle, A.; Lopez, B.; Markakis, J.; Ortale, C.; Schnepple, W.; Vandenberg, L.

    Thick (approx. 1 cm) mercuric iodide gamma-ray detectors have been produced which show spectroscopic qualities at moderate detector biases (approx. 5 kV) comparable to those of thin spectrometers. Efficiency measurements indicate that the entire volume of the detectors is active. Spectra resolutions of less than 10% have been obtained for gamma-ray energies above 1 MeV. Short charge collection times have produced the best results. Measurement of crystal charge transport properties is discussed. A small amount of bias conditioning is necessary for best performance. Operating parameters of the detectors have been investigated.

  5. Spherical grating spectrometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Donoghue, Darragh; Clemens, J. Christopher

    2014-07-01

    We describe designs for spectrometers employing convex dispersers. The Offner spectrometer was the first such instrument; it has almost exclusively been employed on satellite platforms, and has had little impact on ground-based instruments. We have learned how to fabricate curved Volume Phase Holographic (VPH) gratings and, in contrast to the planar gratings of traditional spectrometers, describe how such devices can be used in optical/infrared spectrometers designed specifically for curved diffraction gratings. Volume Phase Holographic gratings are highly efficient compared to conventional surface relief gratings; they have become the disperser of choice in optical / NIR spectrometers. The advantage of spectrometers with curved VPH dispersers is the very small number of optical elements used (the simplest comprising a grating and a spherical mirror), as well as illumination of mirrors off axis, resulting in greater efficiency and reduction in size. We describe a "Half Offner" spectrometer, an even simpler version of the Offner spectrometer. We present an entirely novel design, the Spherical Transmission Grating Spectrometer (STGS), and discuss exemplary applications, including a design for a double-beam spectrometer without any requirement for a dichroic. This paradigm change in spectrometer design offers an alternative to all-refractive astronomical spectrometer designs, using expensive, fragile lens elements fabricated from CaF2 or even more exotic materials. The unobscured mirror layout avoids a major drawback of the previous generation of catadioptric spectrometer designs. We describe laboratory measurements of the efficiency and image quality of a curved VPH grating in a STGS design, demonstrating, simultaneously, efficiency comparable to planar VPH gratings along with good image quality. The stage is now set for construction of a prototype instrument with impressive performance.

  6. LIFTIRS, the Livermore imaging FTIR spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, C.L.

    1998-06-01

    The imaging FTIR spectrometer was invented 25 years ago. Only recently, however, with the development of infrared focal plane array technology and high speed microprocessors, has the imaging FTIR spectrometer become a practical instrument. Among the class of imaging spectrometer instruments, the imaging Fourier transform spectrometer enjoys a great advantage in terms of calibratibility, sensitivity, broad band coverage and resolution flexibility. Recent experience with the LIFTIRS instrument is summarized. As a concrete example of the acquisition, calibration, and comprehension of the data from an imaging Fourier transform spectrometer, the case history of a geological sample is discussed in great detail. In particular, the importance of principle component analysis to imaging spectroscopy is especially emphasized. It is shown how the various spatial/spectral constituents within a sample can be detected, located, identified and quantified. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  7. Fast neutron detection with a segmented spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langford, T. J.; Bass, C. D.; Beise, E. J.; Breuer, H.; Erwin, D. K.; Heimbach, C. R.; Nico, J. S.

    2015-01-01

    A fast neutron spectrometer consisting of segmented plastic scintillator and 3He proportional counters was constructed for the measurement of neutrons in the energy range 1-200 MeV. We discuss its design, principles of operation, and the method of analysis. The detector is capable of observing very low neutron fluxes in the presence of ambient gamma background and does not require scintillator pulse-shape discrimination. The spectrometer was characterized for its energy response in fast neutron fields of 2.5 MeV and 14 MeV, and the results are compared with Monte Carlo simulations. Measurements of the fast neutron flux and energy response at 120 m above sea-level (39.130°N, 77.218°W) and at a depth of 560 m in a limestone mine are presented. Finally, the design of a spectrometer with improved sensitivity and energy resolution is discussed.

  8. Performance of an INTEGRAL spectrometer model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jean, P.; Naya, J. E.; vonBallmoos, P.; Vedrenne, G.; Teegarden, B.

    1997-01-01

    Model calculations for the INTEGRAL spectrometer (SPI) onboard the future INTErnational Gamma Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGAL) are presented, where the sensitivity for narrow lines is based on estimates of the background level and the detection efficiency. The instrumental background rates are explained as the sum of various components that depend on the cosmic ray intensity and the spectrometer characteristics, such as the mass distribution around the Ge detectors, the passive material, the characteristics of the detector system and the background reduction techniques. Extended background calculations were performed with Monte Carlo simulations and using semi-empirical and calculated neutron and proton cross sections. In order to improve the INTEGRAL spectrometer sensitivity, several designs and background reduction techniques were compared for an instrument with a fixed detector volume.

  9. A new measurement of the rare decay eta -> pi^0 gamma gamma with the Crystal Ball/TAPS detectors at the Mainz Microtron

    SciTech Connect

    Nefkens, B M; Prakhov, S; Aguar-Bartolom��, P; Annand, J R; Arends, H J; Bantawa, K; Beck, R; Bekrenev, V; Bergh��user, H; Braghieri, A; Briscoe, W J; Brudvik, J; Cherepnya, S; Codling, R F; Collicott, C; Costanza, S; Danilkin, I V; Denig, A; Demissie, B; Dieterle, M; Downie, E J; Drexler, P; Fil'kov, L V; Fix, A; Garni, S; Glazier, D I; Gregor, R; Hamilton, D; Heid, E; Hornidge, D; Howdle, D; Jahn, O; Jude, T C; Kashevarov, V L; K��ser, A; Keshelashvili, I; Kondratiev, R; Korolija, M; Kotulla, M; Koulbardis, A; Kruglov, S; Krusche, B; Lisin, V; Livingston, K; MacGregor, I J; Maghrbi, Y; Mancel, J; Manley, D M; McNicoll, E F; Mekterovic, D; Metag, V; Mushkarenkov, A; Nikolaev, A; Novotny, R; Oberle, M; Ortega, H; Ostrick, M; Ott, P; Otte, P B; Oussena, B; Pedroni, P; Polonski, A; Robinson, J; Rosner, G; Rostomyan, T; Schumann, S; Sikora, M H; Starostin, A; Strakovsky, I I; Strub, T; Suarez, I M; Supek, I; Tarbert, C M; Thiel, M; Thomas, A; Unverzagt, M; Watts, D P; Werthmueller, D; Witthauer, L

    2014-08-01

    A new measurement of the rare, doubly radiative decay eta->pi^0 gamma gamma was conducted with the Crystal Ball and TAPS multiphoton spectrometers together with the photon tagging facility at the Mainz Microtron MAMI. New data on the dependence of the partial decay width, Gamma(eta->pi^0 gamma gamma), on the two-photon invariant mass squared, m^2(gamma gamma), as well as a new, more precise value for the decay width, Gamma(eta->pi^0 gamma gamma) = (0.33+/-0.03_tot) eV, are based on analysis of 1.2 x 10^3 eta->pi^0 gamma gamma decays from a total of 6 x 10^7 eta mesons produced in the gamma p -> eta p reaction. The present results for dGamma(eta->pi^0 gamma gamma)/dm^2(gamma gamma) are in good agreement with previous measurements and recent theoretical calculations for this dependence.

  10. Digital Signal Processing in the GRETINA Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cromaz, Mario

    2015-10-01

    Developments in the segmentation of large-volume HPGe crystals has enabled the development of high-efficiency gamma-ray spectrometers which have the ability to track the path of gamma-rays scattering through the detector volume. This technology has been successfully implemented in the GRETINA spectrometer whose high efficiency and ability to perform precise event-by-event Doppler correction has made it an important tool in nuclear spectroscopy. Tracking has required the spectrometer to employ a fully digital signal processing chain. Each of the systems 1120 channels are digitized by 100 Mhz, 14-bit flash ADCs. Filters that provide timing and high-resolution energies are implemented on local FPGAs acting on the ADC data streams while interaction point locations and tracks, derived from the trace on each detector segment, are calculated in real time on a computing cluster. In this presentation we will give a description of GRETINA's digital signal processing system, the impact of design decisions on system performance, and a discussion of possible future directions as we look towards soon developing larger spectrometers such as GRETA with full 4 π solid angle coverage. This work was supported by the Office of Science in the Department of Energy under grant DE-AC02-05CH11231.