Note: This page contains sample records for the topic identifying genetic determinants from Science.gov.
While these samples are representative of the content of Science.gov,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of Science.gov
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.
Last update: November 12, 2013.
1

A differential fluorescence-based genetic screen identifies Listeria monocytogenes determinants required for intracellular replication.  

PubMed

Listeria monocytogenes is a Gram-positive, facultative intracellular pathogen capable of causing severe invasive disease with high mortality rates in humans. While previous studies have largely elucidated the bacterial and host cell mechanisms necessary for invasion, vacuolar escape, and subsequent cell-to-cell spread, the L. monocytogenes factors required for rapid replication within the restrictive environment of the host cell cytosol are poorly understood. In this report, we describe a differential fluorescence-based genetic screen utilizing fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) and high-throughput microscopy to identify L. monocytogenes mutants defective in optimal intracellular replication. Bacteria harboring deletions within the identified gene menD or pepP were defective for growth in primary murine macrophages and plaque formation in monolayers of L2 fibroblasts, thus validating the ability of the screening method to identify intracellular replication-defective mutants. Genetic complementation of the menD and pepP deletion strains rescued the in vitro intracellular infection defects. Furthermore, the menD deletion strain displayed a general extracellular replication defect that could be complemented by growth under anaerobic conditions, while the intracellular growth defect of this strain could be complemented by the addition of exogenous menaquinone. As prior studies have indicated the importance of aerobic metabolism for L. monocytogenes infection, these findings provide further evidence for the importance of menaquinone and aerobic metabolism for L. monocytogenes pathogenesis. Lastly, both the menD and pepP deletion strains were attenuated during in vivo infection of mice. These findings demonstrate that the differential fluorescence-based screening approach provides a powerful tool for the identification of intracellular replication determinants in multiple bacterial systems. PMID:23687268

Perry, Kyle J; Higgins, Darren E

2013-05-17

2

Feature selection methods for identifying genetic determinants of host species in RNA viruses.  

PubMed

Despite environmental, social and ecological dependencies, emergence of zoonotic viruses in human populations is clearly also affected by genetic factors which determine cross-species transmission potential. RNA viruses pose an interesting case study given their mutation rates are orders of magnitude higher than any other pathogen - as reflected by the recent emergence of SARS and Influenza for example. Here, we show how feature selection techniques can be used to reliably classify viral sequences by host species, and to identify the crucial minority of host-specific sites in pathogen genomic data. The variability in alleles at those sites can be translated into prediction probabilities that a particular pathogen isolate is adapted to a given host. We illustrate the power of these methods by: 1) identifying the sites explaining SARS coronavirus differences between human, bat and palm civet samples; 2) showing how cross species jumps of rabies virus among bat populations can be readily identified; and 3) de novo identification of likely functional influenza host discriminant markers. PMID:24130470

Aguas, Ricardo; Ferguson, Neil M

2013-10-10

3

Feature Selection Methods for Identifying Genetic Determinants of Host Species in RNA Viruses  

PubMed Central

Despite environmental, social and ecological dependencies, emergence of zoonotic viruses in human populations is clearly also affected by genetic factors which determine cross-species transmission potential. RNA viruses pose an interesting case study given their mutation rates are orders of magnitude higher than any other pathogen – as reflected by the recent emergence of SARS and Influenza for example. Here, we show how feature selection techniques can be used to reliably classify viral sequences by host species, and to identify the crucial minority of host-specific sites in pathogen genomic data. The variability in alleles at those sites can be translated into prediction probabilities that a particular pathogen isolate is adapted to a given host. We illustrate the power of these methods by: 1) identifying the sites explaining SARS coronavirus differences between human, bat and palm civet samples; 2) showing how cross species jumps of rabies virus among bat populations can be readily identified; and 3) de novo identification of likely functional influenza host discriminant markers.

Aguas, Ricardo; Ferguson, Neil M.

2013-01-01

4

Genetic identifiers of epilepsy.  

PubMed

Epilepsy affects >0.5% of the world's population and has a large genetic component. The most common human genetic epilepsies display a complex pattern of inheritance, and the identity of the susceptibility genes is largely unknown despite recent advances in molecular biology. However, genetic identifiers of certain types of epilepsy with neurodegenerative characteristics and of a small number of familial idiopathic epilepsies have been uncovered to date. This article reviews recent progress made in molecular genetics of epilepsy, focusing mostly on idiopathic epilepsy together with our own discovery of novel mutations in the genes of autosomal dominant nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy and benign familial neonatal convulsions (BFNCs), and the genetic locus of benign adult familial myoclonic epilepsy. Pathogenesis of epilepsy as a channelopathy and of BFNC also is discussed. PMID:12383274

Kaneko, Sunao; Iwasa, Hiroto; Okada, Motohiro

2002-01-01

5

Identifying genetic determinants needed to establish a human gut symbiont in its habitat  

PubMed Central

Summary The human gut microbiota is a metabolic organ whose cellular composition is determined by a dynamic process of selection and competition. To identify microbial genes required for establishment of human symbionts in the gut, we developed an approach (insertion-sequencing, or INSeq) based on a mutagenic transposon that allows capture of adjacent chromosomal DNA to define its genomic location. We used massively parallel sequencing to monitor the relative abundance of tens of thousands of transposon mutants of a saccharolytic human gut bacterium, Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, as they established themselves in wild-type and immunodeficient gnotobiotic mice, in the presence or absence of other human gut commensals. In vivo selection transforms this population, revealing functions necessary for survival in the gut: we show how this selection is influenced by community composition and competition for nutrients (vitamin B12). INSeq provides a broadly applicable platform to explore microbial adaptation to the gut and other ecosystems.

Goodman, Andrew L.; McNulty, Nathan P.; Zhao, Yue; Leip, Douglas; Mitra, Robi D.; Lozupone, Catherine A.; Knight, Rob; Gordon, Jeffrey I.

2010-01-01

6

Yeast functional screen to identify genetic determinants capable of conferring abiotic stress tolerance in Jatropha curcas  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Environmentally inflicted stresses such as salinity and drought limit the plant productivity both in natural and agricultural system. Increasing emphasis has been directed to molecular breeding strategies to enhance the intrinsic ability of plant to survive stress conditions. Functional screens in microorganisms with heterologous genes are a rapid, effective and powerful tool to identify stress tolerant genes in plants.

Nalini Eswaran; Sriram Parameswaran; Balaji Sathram; Bhagyam Anantharaman; Raja Krishna Kumar G; Sudhakar Johnson Tangirala

2010-01-01

7

Yeast functional screen to identify genetic determinants capable of conferring abiotic stress tolerance in Jatropha curcas  

PubMed Central

Background Environmentally inflicted stresses such as salinity and drought limit the plant productivity both in natural and agricultural system. Increasing emphasis has been directed to molecular breeding strategies to enhance the intrinsic ability of plant to survive stress conditions. Functional screens in microorganisms with heterologous genes are a rapid, effective and powerful tool to identify stress tolerant genes in plants. Jatropha curcas (Physic nut) has been identified as a potential source of biodiesel plant. In order to improve its productivity under stress conditions to benefit commercial plantations, we initiated prospecting of novel genes expressed during stress in J. curcas that can be utilized to enhance stress tolerance ability of plant. Results To identify genes expressed during salt tolerance, cDNA expression libraries were constructed from salt-stressed roots of J. curcas, regulated under the control of the yeast GAL1 system. Using a replica based screening, twenty thousand yeast transformants were screened to identify transformants expressing heterologous gene sequences from J. curcas with enhanced ability to tolerate stress. From the screen we obtained 32 full length genes from J. curcas [GenBank accession numbers FJ489601-FJ489611, FJ619041-FJ619057 and FJ623457-FJ623460] that can confer abiotic stress tolerance. As a part of this screen, we optimized conditions for salt stress in J. curcas, defined parameters for salt stress in yeast, as well as isolated three salt hypersensitive yeast strains shs-2, shs-6 and shs-8 generated through a process of random mutagenesis, and exhibited growth retardation beyond 750 mM NaCl. Further, we demonstrated complementation of the salt sensitive phenotypes in the shs mutants, and analyzed the expression patterns for selected J. curcas genes obtained from the screen in both leaf and root tissues after salt stress treatments. Conclusions The approach described in this report provides a rapid and universal assay system for large scale screening of genes for varied abiotic stress tolerance within a short span of time. Using this screening strategy we could isolate both genes with previously known function in stress tolerance as well as novel sequences with yet unknown function in salt stress tolerance from J. curcas. The isolated genes could be over-expressed using plant expression system to generate and evaluate transgenic plants for stress tolerance as well as be used as markers for breeding salt stress tolerance in plants.

2010-01-01

8

Genome-Wide Association Study to Identify the Genetic Determinants of Otitis Media Susceptibility in Childhood  

PubMed Central

Background Otitis media (OM) is a common childhood disease characterised by middle ear inflammation and effusion. Susceptibility to recurrent acute OM (rAOM; ?3 episodes of AOM in 6 months) and chronic OM with effusion (COME; MEE ?3 months) is 40–70% heritable. Few underlying genes have been identified to date, and no genome-wide association study (GWAS) of OM has been reported. Methods and Findings Data for 2,524,817 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs; 535,544 quality-controlled SNPs genotyped by Illumina 660W-Quad; 1,989,273 by imputation) were analysed for association with OM in 416 cases and 1,075 controls from the Western Australian Pregnancy Cohort (Raine) Study. Logistic regression analyses under an additive model undertaken in GenABEL/ProbABEL adjusting for population substructure using principal components identified SNPs at CAPN14 (rs6755194: OR?=?1.90; 95%CI 1.47–2.45; Padj-PCA?=?8.3×10?7) on chromosome 2p23.1 as the top hit, with independent effects (rs1862981: OR?=?1.60; 95%CI 1.29–1.99; Padj-PCA?=?2.2×10?5) observed at the adjacent GALNT14 gene. In a gene-based analysis in VEGAS, BPIFA3 (PGene?=?2×10?5) and BPIFA1 (PGene?=?1.07×10?4) in the BPIFA gene cluster on chromosome 20q11.21 were the top hits. In all, 32 genomic regions show evidence of association (Padj-PCA<10?5) in this GWAS, with pathway analysis showing a connection between top candidates and the TGF? pathway. However, top and tag-SNP analysis for seven selected candidate genes in this pathway did not replicate in 645 families (793 affected individuals) from the Western Australian Family Study of Otitis Media (WAFSOM). Lack of replication may be explained by sample size, difference in OM disease severity between primary and replication cohorts or due to type I error in the primary GWAS. Conclusions This first discovery GWAS for an OM phenotype has identified CAPN14 and GALNT14 on chromosome 2p23.1 and the BPIFA gene cluster on chromosome 20q11.21 as novel candidate genes which warrant further analysis in cohorts matched more precisely for clinical phenotypes.

Rye, Marie S.; Warrington, Nicole M.; Scaman, Elizabeth S. H.; Vijayasekaran, Shyan; Coates, Harvey L.; Anderson, Denise; Pennell, Craig E.; Blackwell, Jenefer M.; Jamieson, Sarra E.

2012-01-01

9

Genome-wide association study identifies genetic variants in GOT1 determining serum aspartate aminotransferase levels.  

PubMed

We carried out a genome-wide association study of serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST) activity in 866 Amish participants of the Heredity and Phenotype Intervention Heart Study and identified significant association of AST activity with a cluster of single nucleotide polymorphisms located on chromosome 10q24.1 (peak association was rs17109512; P=2.80E-14), in the vicinity of GOT1, the gene encoding cytosolic AST (cAST). Sequencing of GOT1 revealed an in-frame deletion of three nucleic acids encoding asparagine at position 389 c.1165_1167delAAC (p.Asn389del) in the gene. Deletion carriers had significantly lower AST activity levels compared with homozygotes for the common allele (mean±s.d.: 10.0±2.8 versus 18.8±5.2?U?l(-1); P=2.80E-14). Further genotyping of the deletion in other Amish samples (n=1932) identified an additional 20 carriers (minor allele frequency (MAF)=0.0052). The deletion was not detected in 647 outbred Caucasians. Asn at codon 389 is conserved among known mammalian cASTs. In vitro transient transfection of wild-type and mutant cAST indicated that mutant cAST protein was barely detectable in the cells. Furthermore, even after correction for cAST expression, mutant cAST had markedly diminished enzymatic activity. Remarkably, we did not find any association between the deletion and metabolic traits including serum fasting glucose or insulin, fasting and post-meal lipids, inflammatory markers, or sub-clinical markers of cardiovascular disease. In conclusion, we discovered a rare in-frame deletion in GOT1 gene, which inactivates cAST enzyme in the Old Order Amish. This finding will help us to understand structure and function of the enzyme and would be useful for predicting serum AST levels. PMID:21900944

Shen, Haiqing; Damcott, Coleen; Shuldiner, Scott R; Chai, Sumbul; Yang, Rongze; Hu, Hong; Gibson, Quince; Ryan, Kathleen A; Mitchell, Braxton D; Gong, Da-Wei

2011-09-08

10

Genome-wide association study identifies genetic variants in GOT1 determining serum aspartate aminotransferase levels  

PubMed Central

We carried out a genome-wide association study of serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST) activity in 866 Amish participants of the Heredity and Phenotype Intervention Heart Study and identified significant association of AST activity with a cluster of single nucleotide polymorphisms located on chromosome 10q24.1 (peak association was rs17109512; P=2.80E-14), in the vicinity of GOT1, the gene encoding cytosolic AST (cAST). Sequencing of GOT1 revealed an in-frame deletion of three nucleic acids encoding asparagine at position 389 c.1165_1167delAAC (p.Asn389del) in the gene. Deletion carriers had significantly lower AST activity levels compared with homozygotes for the common allele (mean±s.d.: 10.0±2.8 versus 18.8±5.2 U l?1; P=2.80E-14). Further genotyping of the deletion in other Amish samples (n=1932) identified an additional 20 carriers (minor allele frequency (MAF)=0.0052). The deletion was not detected in 647 outbred Caucasians. Asn at codon 389 is conserved among known mammalian cASTs. In vitro transient transfection of wild-type and mutant cAST indicated that mutant cAST protein was barely detectable in the cells. Furthermore, even after correction for cAST expression, mutant cAST had markedly diminished enzymatic activity. Remarkably, we did not find any association between the deletion and metabolic traits including serum fasting glucose or insulin, fasting and post-meal lipids, inflammatory markers, or sub-clinical markers of cardiovascular disease. In conclusion, we discovered a rare in-frame deletion in GOT1 gene, which inactivates cAST enzyme in the Old Order Amish. This finding will help us to understand structure and function of the enzyme and would be useful for predicting serum AST levels.

Shen, Haiqing; Damcott, Coleen; Shuldiner, Scott R; Chai, Sumbul; Yang, Rongze; Hu, Hong; Gibson, Quince; Ryan, Kathleen A; Mitchell, Braxton D; Gong, Da-Wei

2013-01-01

11

Genetic modification and genetic determinism  

Microsoft Academic Search

In this article we examine four objections to the genetic modification of human beings: the freedom argument, the giftedness argument, the authenticity argument, and the uniqueness argument. We then demonstrate that each of these arguments against genetic modification assumes a strong version of genetic determinism. Since these strong deterministic assumptions are false, the arguments against genetic modification, which assume and

David B. Resnik; Daniel B. Vorhaus

2006-01-01

12

Forward Genetic Analysis to Identify Determinants of Dopamine Signaling in Caenorhabditis elegans Using Swimming-Induced Paralysis  

PubMed Central

Disrupted dopamine (DA) signaling is believed to contribute to the core features of multiple neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders. Essential features of DA neurotransmission are conserved in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, providing us with an opportunity to implement forward genetic approaches that may reveal novel, in vivo regulators of DA signaling. Previously, we identified a robust phenotype, termed Swimming-induced paralysis (Swip), that emerges in animals deficient in the plasma membrane DA transporter. Here, we report the use and quantitative analysis of Swip in the identification of mutant genes that control DA signaling. Two lines captured in our screen (vt21 and vt22) bear novel dat-1 alleles that disrupt expression and surface trafficking of transporter proteins in vitro and in vivo. Two additional lines, vt25 and vt29, lack transporter mutations but exhibit genetic, biochemical, and behavioral phenotypes consistent with distinct perturbations of DA signaling. Our studies validate the utility of the Swip screen, demonstrate the functional relevance of DA transporter structural elements, and reveal novel genomic loci that encode regulators of DA signaling.

Hardaway, J. Andrew; Hardie, Shannon L.; Whitaker, Sarah M.; Baas, Sarah R.; Zhang, Bing; Bermingham, Daniel P.; Lichtenstein, Ariana J.; Blakely, Randy D.

2012-01-01

13

Forward genetic analysis to identify determinants of dopamine signaling in Caenorhabditis elegans using swimming-induced paralysis.  

PubMed

Disrupted dopamine (DA) signaling is believed to contribute to the core features of multiple neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders. Essential features of DA neurotransmission are conserved in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, providing us with an opportunity to implement forward genetic approaches that may reveal novel, in vivo regulators of DA signaling. Previously, we identified a robust phenotype, termed Swimming-induced paralysis (Swip), that emerges in animals deficient in the plasma membrane DA transporter. Here, we report the use and quantitative analysis of Swip in the identification of mutant genes that control DA signaling. Two lines captured in our screen (vt21 and vt22) bear novel dat-1 alleles that disrupt expression and surface trafficking of transporter proteins in vitro and in vivo. Two additional lines, vt25 and vt29, lack transporter mutations but exhibit genetic, biochemical, and behavioral phenotypes consistent with distinct perturbations of DA signaling. Our studies validate the utility of the Swip screen, demonstrate the functional relevance of DA transporter structural elements, and reveal novel genomic loci that encode regulators of DA signaling. PMID:22908044

Hardaway, J Andrew; Hardie, Shannon L; Whitaker, Sarah M; Baas, Sarah R; Zhang, Bing; Bermingham, Daniel P; Lichtenstein, Ariana J; Blakely, Randy D

2012-08-01

14

Genetic determinants of plasma triglycerides  

PubMed Central

Plasma triglyceride (TG) concentration is reemerging as an important cardiovascular disease risk factor. More complete understanding of the genes and variants that modulate plasma TG should enable development of markers for risk prediction, diagnosis, prognosis, and response to therapies and might help specify new directions for therapeutic interventions. Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified both known and novel loci associated with plasma TG concentration. However, genetic variation at these loci explains only ?10% of overall TG variation within the population. As the GWAS approach may be reaching its limit for discovering genetic determinants of TG, alternative genetic strategies, such as rare variant sequencing studies and evaluation of animal models, may provide complementary information to flesh out knowledge of clinically and biologically important pathways in TG metabolism. Herein, we review genes recently implicated in TG metabolism and describe how some of these genes likely modulate plasma TG concentration. We also discuss lessons regarding plasma TG metabolism learned from various genomic and genetic experimental approaches. Treatment of patients with moderate to severe hypertriglyceridemia with existing therapies is often challenging; thus, gene products and pathways found in recent genetic research studies provide hope for development of more effective clinical strategies.

Johansen, Christopher T.; Kathiresan, Sekar; Hegele, Robert A.

2011-01-01

15

Genetic determinants of juvenile stroke.  

PubMed

Stroke is a heterogeneous multifactorial disorder. Although epidemiological data from twin and family studies provide substantial evidence for a genetic basis for stroke, the contribution of genetic factors identified so far is small. Large progress has been made in single-gene disorders associated with ischemic stroke, particularly at young age. The identification of NOTCH3 mutations in patients with cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leucoencephalopathy (CADASIL) and of TREX1 mutations in retinal vasculopathy with cerebral leukodystrophy (RVCL) have led to new insights on lacunar stroke and small-vessel disease. Studies of sickle-cell disease have drawn attention to the importance of modifier genes and of gene-gene interactions in determining stroke risk, while there is now evidence that Fabry disease is an underdiagnosed cause of stroke. Furthermore, stroke is a well-known complication of several heritable connective tissue disorders, including Marfan's syndrome (FBN1 mutations) and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type IV (COL3A1 mutations), which predispose to cervical artery dissection, the most frequent cause of cerebral ischemia at young age. By contrast, little is known about the genes associated with multifactorial stroke. The reported genome-wide association studies of ischemic stroke have shown that no single common genetic variant imparts major risk. Pharmacogenomic studies have uncovered genetic determinants of response to warfarin, statins and clopidogrel. Larger studies with samples numbering in the thousands are ongoing to identify common variants with smaller effects on risk. This approach will contribute to the identification of additional genes, novel pathways, and eventually novel therapeutic approaches to cerebrovascular disorders. PMID:22113147

Pezzini, Alessandro

2011-11-21

16

Identifying Genetic Variation for Alcohol Dependence  

PubMed Central

Various strategies are employed by researchers to identify the genes that may be associated with alcoholism. While prior studies have primarily relied on candidate gene methods and linkage studies, modern advances in genotyping have resulted in widespread use of genome-wide association studies for alcohol dependence. In this review, we revisit the key association findings between risk for alcoholism and candidate polymorphisms in ADH1B, ALDH2 and other alcohol metabolizing genes, and examine the impact of these polymorphisms on alcohol-related cancers, such as esophageal cancer. We also discuss the putative role of GABRA2 in the development of alcohol dependence. The emerging opportunities and challenges of genome-wide association studies are presented along with future directions for studies to discover the genetic etiology of alcohol dependence.

Agrawal, Arpana; Bierut, Laura J.

2013-01-01

17

Genetic determinants of athletic performance.  

PubMed

An extraordinary revolution in medical research has taken place over the past decade, enabled by the completion of the first human genome sequence in 2001. The Human Genome Project (HGP) has resulted in the 6 billion letter reference human genome sequence and the ultra-high throughput technologies used by medical researchers to identify correlations between positions within the human genome (genotypes) and diseases or traits (phenotypes). Just as every human disease has a genetic component, so too does every human trait. The vast majority of these diseases and traits also have an environmental component that works in conjunction with the body's hardwiring to produce the resultant phenotype- termed "complex genetic traits". A derivative of the HGP has been a deeper understanding not only of diseases but of normal human variability across the population, including aspects of athleticism. The technologies also now exist for consumers to cheaply gain access to variations in the genetic code that are correlated to traits that confer aspects of longevity, memory performance, athleticism and a multitude of others there-through gaining insight into propensities. Communication of propensity to a phenotype such as athletic performance is fraught with technical, legal (e.g., patents), social and ethical issues. That being said, the information is available, has benefit in some cases, and will be utilized in the future. Given that the "genie is out of the bottle" with respect to our ability to deliver this genetic information to individuals, over the past decade our team has worked diligently to craft the appropriate testing and communication paradigms for complex traits. Here we discuss several of the major risks and benefits of this type of testing for athletic performance. It is important to understand the limitations of genetic information in determining the vast majority of traits. PMID:22827596

Stephan, Dietrich A

2012-12-01

18

Development and Use of an Efficient System for Random mariner Transposon Mutagenesis To Identify Novel Genetic Determinants of Biofilm Formation in the Core Enterococcus faecalis Genome  

Microsoft Academic Search

Enterococcus faecalis is a gram-positive commensal bacterium of the gastrointestinal tract and an important opportunistic pathogen. Despite the increasing clinical significance of the enterococci, most of the genetic analysis of these organisms has focused on mobile genetic elements, and existing tools for manipulation and analysis of the core E. faecalis chromosome are limited. We are interested in a comprehensive analysis

Christopher J. Kristich; Vy T. Nguyen; Thinh Le; Aaron M. T. Barnes; Suzanne Grindle; Gary M. Dunny

2008-01-01

19

Genetic determinants of juvenile stroke  

Microsoft Academic Search

Stroke is a heterogeneous multifactorial disorder. Although epidemiological data from twin and family studies provide substantial evidence for a genetic basis for stroke, the contribution of genetic factors identified so far is small. Large progress has been made in single-gene disorders associated with ischemic stroke, particularly at young age. The identification of NOTCH3 mutations in patients with cerebral autosomal dominant

Alessandro Pezzini

20

Genetic determinants of cardiac hypertrophy  

PubMed Central

Purpose of review Cardiac hypertrophy is a common phenotypic response of the heart to stimulants. It is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in various cardiovascular disorders. Genetic factors are important determinants of phenotypic expression of cardiac hypertrophy, whether in single-gene disorders or in complex traits. We focus on the molecular genetics of cardiac hypertrophy in various conditions with an emphasis on hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, a genetic paradigm of cardiac hypertrophic response. Recent findings The molecular genetic basis of cardiac hypertrophy in single-gene disorders has been partially elucidated. Likewise, the impact of genetics on the expression of cardiac hypertrophy in the general population has been demonstrated. Identification of mutations in the Z disk proteins has expanded the spectrum of causal mutations beyond the thin and thick filaments of the sarcomeres. In addition, modifier loci have been mapped and shown to impart considerable effects on the expression of cardiac hypertrophy in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Elucidation of the molecular genetics of sarcomeric hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and many of the phenocopies has highlighted the limitations of clinical diagnosis as a determinant of management and prognostic advice. The findings have raised the importance of diagnosis and treatment algorithms, which are based on both genotype and phenotype information. Summary Cardiac hypertrophy, regardless of the cause, is the phenotypic consequence of complex interactions between genetic and nongenetic factors.

Marian, Ali J.

2009-01-01

21

Identifying Somatic Genetic Changes in Prostate Cancer.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Metastatic prostate cancer is not a curable disease and approximately 30% of men undergoing radical prostectomy will relapse, so there is a need to identify new markers of development and progression of prostate cancer, particularly those that can be used...

K. L. Nathanson

2005-01-01

22

Comparative genomics of Neisseria weaveri clarifies the taxonomy of this species and identifies genetic determinants that may be associated with virulence.  

PubMed

A group of bacterial strains formerly known as CDC group M-5 are opportunistic pathogens to humans. In 1993, a name, Neisseria weaveri, was proposed by two independent studies to harbor CDC group M-5 strains, namely N. weaveri Holmes et al. 1993 and N. weaveri Andersen et al. 1993, with two different 'type' strains. However, no study has been conducted on to the relatedness of the two 'type' strains, although the close relationship of the two taxa has long been accepted unofficially. Formally, the status of the name N. weaveri Andersen et al. 1993 is illegitimate because it is a later homonym of N. weaveri Holmes et al., 1993; but the name of the strain is still validly published. In this study, we attempt to resolve the confusion caused by the apparent duplication of the species N. weaveri (with different type strains) using whole genome shotgun sequencing. We also sought to gain insight into the genetic characteristics of N. weaveri by conducting comparative genomics. On the basis of genomic similarities revealed through a comparative genomic study, we propose that N. weaveri Andersen et al. 1993 should be re-classified as a later heterotypic synonym of N. weaveri Holmes et al., 1993. PMID:22188430

Yi, Hana; Cho, Yong-Joon; Yoon, Seok-Hwan; Park, Sang-Cheol; Chun, Jongsik

2012-01-06

23

Identifying individuals who might benefit from genetic services and information.  

PubMed

This is the second in a series of articles on genetics. This article focuses on competency 1 of the revised framework for genetics/genomics for nurses. The authors discuss the importance of nurses identifying individuals who may benefit from genetic services. Recording a family history and drawing a family tree are useful skills that will help to identify these individuals and inform the healthcare team. The article explains when to refer individuals to genetic services and what they may expect from these referrals. PMID:24168610

Jacobs, Chris; Patch, Christine

2013-10-30

24

Genetic Determinants of Bone Mass  

Microsoft Academic Search

A genetic contribution to bone mass determination was first described in the early 70s. Elucidation of gene contribution to this has since been attempted through studies analyzing associations between bone mass acquisition and\\/or maintenance and polymorphic variations of several genes. The first to be described was the vitamin D receptor gene (VDR), initially claimed to contribute to almost 75% of

Laura Audí; Marta García-Ramírez; Antonio Carrascosa

1999-01-01

25

Bacterial Vaccine Safety: Identify Genetic Determinants of ...  

Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research (CBER)

... catarrhalis infectious disease upon United States healthcare system is substantial with regard to both patient morbidity and health care expenditures ... More results from www.fda.gov/biologicsbloodvaccines/scienceresearch/biologicsresearchareas

26

Feasibility of identifying families for genetic studies of birth defects using the National Health Interview Survey  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to determine whether the National Health Interview Survey is a useful source to identify informative families for genetic studies of birth defects. METHODS: The 1994\\/1995 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) was used to identify households where individuals with two or more birth defects reside. Four groups of households were identified: 1) single non-familial

Diego F Wyszynski; Vikki G Nolan

2004-01-01

27

SEX DETERMINATION, SEX RATIOS, AND GENETIC CONFLICT  

Microsoft Academic Search

Genetic mechanisms of sex determination are unexpectedly diverse and change rapidly during evolution. We review the role of genetic conflict as the driving force behind this diversity and turnover. Genetic conflict occurs when different components of a genetic system are subject to selection in opposite directions. Conflict may occur between genomes (including paternal-maternal and parental- zygotic conflicts) or within genomes

John H. Werren; Leo W. Beukeboom

1998-01-01

28

Genetic determination of irritable bowel syndrome  

PubMed Central

Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common functional gastrointestinal disorder. According to the Rome III criteria, IBS is defined as recurrent abdominal pain or discomfort for at least 3 d per month during the previous 3 mo associated with two or more of the following symptoms: improvement with defecation, onset associated with a change in the frequency of stool and/or onset associated with a change in form or appearance of stool. There is growing evidence regarding the genetic contribution in IBS, however the precise etiology of IBS is still unknown. The evaluation of the genetic influence is based on twin studies, familial aggregation and genetic epidemiological investigations. Most studies showed a concordance for IBS significantly greater in monozygotic than in dizygotic twins. The majority of the studies have shown that familial aggregation may represent exposures to a similar environment, as well as the influence of genetic factors. Whereas no specific gene has been identified in association with IBS, recent studies have noticed the importance of polymorphisms in the promoter region of the serotonin reuptake transporter gene, G-protein beta 3 subunit gene (C825T), cholecystokinin receptor (CCKAR gene 779T>C), and high-producer tumor necrosis factor genotype. Further studies are necessary to determine how genetic factors influence the clinical manifestations and therapeutical response in IBS patients.

Hotoleanu, Cristina; Popp, Radu; Trifa, Adrian Pavel; Nedelcu, Laurentiu; Dumitrascu, Dan L

2008-01-01

29

Developmental genetics of Caenorhabditis elegans sex determination.  

PubMed

The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans has two naturally occurring sexes: a self-fertile XX hermaphrodite that first produces sperm, then oocytes, and an XO male. The primary determinant of sex is the X:A ratio, the number of X chromosomes to sets of autosomes. The X:A ratio regulates not only sex determination, but also dosage compensation. In the intervening years since the identification of the X:A ratio, most of the key regulatory genes that respond to the X:A ratio have been genetically identified and ordered into regulatory hierarchies. Advances have also been made in identifying the X chromosome numerator elements of the X:A ratio. This review highlights the genetic, molecular, and biochemical approaches that have led to an understanding of how these genes interact to control sex determination and dosage compensation. The review also discusses the differences between the control of sexual cell fate in the soma and germ line of C. elegans and addresses the role of germ-line-specific regulation in controlling the sperm-oocyte decision in the hermaphrodite germ line. Finally, strategies that take advantage of the availability of the entire C. elegans genome sequence, which is expected to be completed in 1998, are discussed for identifying hitherto unidentified genes that may play a role in the control of sexual cell fate. PMID:9784974

Kuwabara, P E

1999-01-01

30

Genetically determined encephalopathy: Rett syndrome.  

PubMed

Rett syndrome (RTT) is a severe neurodevelopmental disorder primarily affecting females that has an incidence of 1:10000 female births, one of the most common genetic causes of severe mental retardation in females. Development is apparently normal for the first 6-18 months until fine and gross motor skills and social interaction are lost, and stereotypic hand movements develop. Progression and severity of the classical form of RTT are most variable, and there are a number of atypical variants, including congenital, early onset seizure, preserved speech variant, and "forme fruste." Mutations in the X-linked gene methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2) involve most of the classical RTT patients. Mutations in cyclin-dependent kinase like 5 (CDKL5) and FoxG1 genes have been identified in the early onset seizure and the congenital variants respectively. Management of RTT is mainly symptomatic and individualized. It focuses on optimizing each patient's abilities. A dynamic multidisciplinary approach is most effective, with specific attention given to epileptic and nonepileptic paroxysmal events, as well as scoliosis, osteoporosis, and the development of spasticity, which can have a major impact on mobility, and to the development of effective communication strategies for these severely disabled individuals. PMID:23622176

Bahi-Buisson, Nadia

2013-01-01

31

A Genetic Screen Identifies Novel Polycomb Group Genes in Drosophila  

Microsoft Academic Search

Polycomb group (PcG) genes encode evolutionarily conserved transcriptional repressors that are re- quired for the long-term silencing of particular developmental control genes in animals and plants. PcG genes were first identified in Drosophila as regulators that keep HOX genes inactive in cells where these genes must remain silent during development. Here, we report the results of a genetic screen aimed

A. G. de Ayala Alonso; Luis Gutierrez; Cornelia Fritsch; Bernadett Papp; Dirk Beuchle; Jurg Muller

2007-01-01

32

A proposal of a novel experimental procedure to genetically identify disease gene loci in humans  

PubMed Central

Forward genetics in humans is beneficial in terms of diagnosis and treatment of genetic diseases, and discovery of gene functions. However, experimental mating is not possible among humans. In order to overcome this problem, I propose a novel experimental procedure to genetically identify human disease gene loci. To accomplish this, somatic cells from patients or their parents are reprogrammed to the pluripotent state, oogenesis is induced, the oocytes are parthenogenetically activated in the presence of cytochalasin, and embryonic stem cells are established from the parthenogenetic blastocysts. This protocol produces a set of diploid pluripotent stem cell clones having maternal and paternal chromosomes in different manners to each other. The genetic loci for the disease genes are determined through the conventional processes of positional cloning. Thus, taking advantage of the strategy proposed here, if the abnormality is reproducible using patient-derived pluripotent stem cells, a single carrier of the genetic mutations would be adequate to identify the disease gene loci.

MUTO, Taro

2011-01-01

33

Can we use genetic and genomic approaches to identify candidate animals for targeted selective treatment.  

PubMed

Estimated breeding values (EBV) for faecal egg count (FEC) and genetic markers for host resistance to nematodes may be used to identify resistant animals for selective breeding programmes. Similarly, targeted selective treatment (TST) requires the ability to identify the animals that will benefit most from anthelmintic treatment. A mathematical model was used to combine the concepts and evaluate the potential of using genetic-based methods to identify animals for a TST regime. EBVs obtained by genomic prediction were predicted to be the best determinant criterion for TST in terms of the impact on average empty body weight and average FEC, whereas pedigree-based EBVs for FEC were predicted to be marginally worse than using phenotypic FEC as a determinant criterion. Whilst each method has financial implications, if the identification of host resistance is incorporated into a wider genomic selection indices or selective breeding programmes, then genetic or genomic information may be plausibly included in TST regimes. PMID:23683653

Laurenson, Yan C S M; Kyriazakis, Ilias; Bishop, Stephen C

2013-04-26

34

Genetical Genomics Identifies the Genetic Architecture for Growth and Weevil Resistance in Spruce  

PubMed Central

In plants, relationships between resistance to herbivorous insect pests and growth are typically controlled by complex interactions between genetically correlated traits. These relationships often result in tradeoffs in phenotypic expression. In this study we used genetical genomics to elucidate genetic relationships between tree growth and resistance to white pine terminal weevil (Pissodes strobi Peck.) in a pedigree population of interior spruce (Picea glauca, P. engelmannii and their hybrids) that was growing at Vernon, B.C. and segregating for weevil resistance. Genetical genomics uses genetic perturbations caused by allelic segregation in pedigrees to co-locate quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for gene expression and quantitative traits. Bark tissue of apical leaders from 188 trees was assayed for gene expression using a 21.8K spruce EST-spotted microarray; the same individuals were genotyped for 384 SNP markers for the genetic map. Many of the expression QTLs (eQTL) co-localized with resistance trait QTLs. For a composite resistance phenotype of six attack and oviposition traits, 149 positional candidate genes were identified. Resistance and growth QTLs also overlapped with eQTL hotspots along the genome suggesting that: 1) genetic pleiotropy of resistance and growth traits in interior spruce was substantial, and 2) master regulatory genes were important for weevil resistance in spruce. These results will enable future work on functional genetic studies of insect resistance in spruce, and provide valuable information about candidate genes for genetic improvement of spruce.

Porth, Ilga; White, Richard; Jaquish, Barry; Alfaro, Rene; Ritland, Carol; Ritland, Kermit

2012-01-01

35

Identification of plant stress-responsive determinants in arabidopsis by large-scale forward genetic screens  

Microsoft Academic Search

All plants sense and adapt to adverse environmental conditions, however, crop plants exhibit less genetic diversity for abiotic stress tolerance than do wild relatives indicating that a genetic basis exists for stress adaptability. Model plant genetic systems and the plethora of molecular genetic resources that are currently available are greatly enhancing our ability to identify abiotic stress-responsive genetic determin- ants.

Hisashi Koiwa; Ray A. Bressan; Paul M. Hasegawa

2006-01-01

36

Genetic and proteomic approaches to identify cancer drug targets  

PubMed Central

While target-based small-molecule discovery has taken centre-stage in the pharmaceutical industry, there are many cancer-promoting proteins not easily addressed with a traditional target-based screening approach. In order to address this problem, as well as to identify modulators of biological states in the absence of knowing the protein target of the state switch, alternative phenotypic screening approaches, such as gene expression-based and high-content imaging, have been developed. With this renewed interest in phenotypic screening, however, comes the challenge of identifying the binding protein target(s) of small-molecule hits. Emerging technologies have the potential to improve the process of target identification. In this review, we discuss the application of genomic (gene expression-based), genetic (short hairpin RNA and open reading frame screening), and proteomic approaches to protein target identification.

Roti, G; Stegmaier, K

2012-01-01

37

Identifying Interacting Genetic Variations by Fish-Swarm Logic Regression  

PubMed Central

Understanding associations between genotypes and complex traits is a fundamental problem in human genetics. A major open problem in mapping phenotypes is that of identifying a set of interacting genetic variants, which might contribute to complex traits. Logic regression (LR) is a powerful multivariant association tool. Several LR-based approaches have been successfully applied to different datasets. However, these approaches are not adequate with regard to accuracy and efficiency. In this paper, we propose a new LR-based approach, called fish-swarm logic regression (FSLR), which improves the logic regression process by incorporating swarm optimization. In our approach, a school of fish agents are conducted in parallel. Each fish agent holds a regression model, while the school searches for better models through various preset behaviors. A swarm algorithm improves the accuracy and the efficiency by speeding up the convergence and preventing it from dropping into local optimums. We apply our approach on a real screening dataset and a series of simulation scenarios. Compared to three existing LR-based approaches, our approach outperforms them by having lower type I and type II error rates, being able to identify more preset causal sites, and performing at faster speeds.

Yang, Aiyuan; Yan, Chunxia; Zhu, Feng; Zhao, Zhongmeng; Cao, Zhi

2013-01-01

38

Nutritional and Genetic Determinants of Early Puberty.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Past studies suggest that early menarche, growth velocity, and specific hormonal patterns during breast development may be critical in determining risk of breast cancer later in life. Nutritional factors during childhood and puberty, and inherited genetic...

L. Le Marchand

2007-01-01

39

Nutritional and Genetic Determinants of Early Puberty.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

Past studies suggest that early menarche, growth velocity, and specific hormonal patterns during breast development may be critical in determining risk of breast cancer later in life. Nutritional factors during childhood and puberty, and inherited genetic...

L. LeMarchand

2005-01-01

40

Genetics might determine which smokers get hooked  

Cancer.gov

Researchers have identified genetic risk factors that may accelerate a teen's progression to becoming a lifelong heavy smoker. The team of scientists from the U.S., the U.K., and New Zealand examined earlier studies by other research teams to develop a genetic risk profile for heavy smoking. Then they looked at their own long-term study of 1,000 New Zealanders from birth to age 38 to identify whether individuals at high genetic risk got hooked on cigarettes more quickly as teens and whether, as adults, they had a harder time quitting. Duke University researchers developed a new "genetic risk score" for the study by examining prior genome-wide associations (GWAS) of adult smokers. Duke is home to the Duke Cancer Institute.

41

Genetic determinants of phosphate response in Drosophila.  

PubMed

Phosphate is required for many important cellular processes and having too little phosphate or too much can cause disease and reduce life span in humans. However, the mechanisms underlying homeostatic control of extracellular phosphate levels and cellular effects of phosphate are poorly understood. Here, we establish Drosophila melanogaster as a model system for the study of phosphate effects. We found that Drosophila larval development depends on the availability of phosphate in the medium. Conversely, life span is reduced when adult flies are cultured on high phosphate medium or when hemolymph phosphate is increased in flies with impaired malpighian tubules. In addition, RNAi-mediated inhibition of MAPK-signaling by knockdown of Ras85D, phl/D-Raf or Dsor1/MEK affects larval development, adult life span and hemolymph phosphate, suggesting that some in vivo effects involve activation of this signaling pathway by phosphate. To identify novel genetic determinants of phosphate responses, we used Drosophila hemocyte-like cultured cells (S2R+) to perform a genome-wide RNAi screen using MAPK activation as the readout. We identified a number of candidate genes potentially important for the cellular response to phosphate. Evaluation of 51 genes in live flies revealed some that affect larval development, adult life span and hemolymph phosphate levels. PMID:23520455

Bergwitz, Clemens; Wee, Mark J; Sinha, Sumi; Huang, Joanne; DeRobertis, Charles; Mensah, Lawrence B; Cohen, Jonathan; Friedman, Adam; Kulkarni, Meghana; Hu, Yanhui; Vinayagam, Arunachalam; Schnall-Levin, Michael; Berger, Bonnie; Perkins, Lizabeth A; Mohr, Stephanie E; Perrimon, Norbert

2013-03-08

42

Genetic Determinants of Phosphate Response in Drosophila  

PubMed Central

Phosphate is required for many important cellular processes and having too little phosphate or too much can cause disease and reduce life span in humans. However, the mechanisms underlying homeostatic control of extracellular phosphate levels and cellular effects of phosphate are poorly understood. Here, we establish Drosophila melanogaster as a model system for the study of phosphate effects. We found that Drosophila larval development depends on the availability of phosphate in the medium. Conversely, life span is reduced when adult flies are cultured on high phosphate medium or when hemolymph phosphate is increased in flies with impaired Malpighian tubules. In addition, RNAi-mediated inhibition of MAPK-signaling by knockdown of Ras85D, phl/D-Raf or Dsor1/MEK affects larval development, adult life span and hemolymph phosphate, suggesting that some in vivo effects involve activation of this signaling pathway by phosphate. To identify novel genetic determinants of phosphate responses, we used Drosophila hemocyte-like cultured cells (S2R+) to perform a genome-wide RNAi screen using MAPK activation as the readout. We identified a number of candidate genes potentially important for the cellular response to phosphate. Evaluation of 51 genes in live flies revealed some that affect larval development, adult life span and hemolymph phosphate levels.

Bergwitz, Clemens; Wee, Mark J.; Sinha, Sumi; Huang, Joanne; DeRobertis, Charles; Mensah, Lawrence B.; Cohen, Jonathan; Friedman, Adam; Kulkarni, Meghana; Hu, Yanhui; Vinayagam, Arunachalam; Schnall-Levin, Michael; Berger, Bonnie; Perkins, Lizabeth A.; Mohr, Stephanie E.; Perrimon, Norbert

2013-01-01

43

The genetic determinants of common human obesity  

Microsoft Academic Search

The genetic determinants of common human obesity have been elusive until recently, when work from several groups led to the\\u000a identification of 16 loci that reproducibly associate with common human obesity. These loci reveal that the genetic architecture\\u000a of common human obesity likely involves rare high penetrant loci, common low penetrant loci, and likely intermediate loci\\u000a that are yet to

Elizabeth K. Speliotes

2009-01-01

44

Evaluation of an efficient approach for identifying genetic disease loci  

SciTech Connect

Identification of disease loci by genetic linkage analysis has been enhanced by the availability of highly polymorphic short tandem repeat polymorphic markers (STRPs). The development of high quality tri- and tetranucleotide STRPs allows new strategies to increase the efficiency of genotyping resulting in streamlined linkage studies. We have tested a strategy using pooled DNA samples from affected individuals from large Bedouin pedigrees segregating recessive disorders. Equal molar amounts of DNA from affected individuals are pooled and used as a template for PCR of STRPs. Pooled DNA from unaffected siblings are used as controls. STRPS linked to the disorder show a shift in allele frequency in the affected compared to the control pool, whereas unlinked markers show an identical allele distribution in affected and control pools. We have demonstrated the sensitivity of this approach for identifying STRPs giving positive lod scores in recessive kindreds. We have also modelled this approach with dominant pedigrees. Application of this approach to polygenic disorders should be possible by using methods to quantitate allele frequencies in pooled samples. The high quality tri- and tetranucleotide repeat markers developed by the Cooperative Human Linkage Center (CHLC) facilitate the use of this method.

Sheffield, V.C.; Kwitek-Black, A.E.; Rokhlina, T. [Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States)] [and others

1994-09-01

45

An Integrative Genetics Approach to Identify Candidate Genes Regulating BMD: Combining Linkage, Gene Expression, and Association  

PubMed Central

Numerous quantitative trait loci (QTLs) affecting bone traits have been identified in the mouse; however, few of the underlying genes have been discovered. To improve the process of transitioning from QTL to gene, we describe an integrative genetics approach, which combines linkage analysis, expression QTL (eQTL) mapping, causality modeling, and genetic association in outbred mice. In C57BL/6J × C3H/HeJ (BXH) F2 mice, nine QTLs regulating femoral BMD were identified. To select candidate genes from within each QTL region, microarray gene expression profiles from individual F2 mice were used to identify 148 genes whose expression was correlated with BMD and regulated by local eQTLs. Many of the genes that were the most highly correlated with BMD have been previously shown to modulate bone mass or skeletal development. Candidates were further prioritized by determining whether their expression was predicted to underlie variation in BMD. Using network edge orienting (NEO), a causality modeling algorithm, 18 of the 148 candidates were predicted to be causally related to differences in BMD. To fine-map QTLs, markers in outbred MF1 mice were tested for association with BMD. Three chromosome 11 SNPs were identified that were associated with BMD within the Bmd11 QTL. Finally, our approach provides strong support for Wnt9a, Rasd1, or both underlying Bmd11. Integration of multiple genetic and genomic data sets can substantially improve the efficiency of QTL fine-mapping and candidate gene identification.

Farber, Charles R; van Nas, Atila; Ghazalpour, Anatole; Aten, Jason E; Doss, Sudheer; Sos, Brandon; Schadt, Eric E; Ingram-Drake, Leslie; Davis, Richard C; Horvath, Steve; Smith, Desmond J; Drake, Thomas A; Lusis, Aldons J

2009-01-01

46

Clinical impact of genetically determined platelet reactivity.  

PubMed

Dual antiplatelet therapy with aspirin and clopidogrel dramatically reduced the rate of major adverse cardiac events following percutaneous coronary intervention. Clopidogrel is a prodrug which requires a two-step hepatic biotransformation thanks to the cytochrome P450 (CYP450) enzyme system. Genetic polymorphism of CYP450 system (e.g., CYP2C19*2) responsible for altered clopidogrel metabolism is a major cause of high on-treatment platelet reactivity (HTPR), which translates into thrombotic events in stented patients. Studies demonstrated that HTPR could be overcome in poor metabolizers thanks to increased loading doses or maintenance doses of clopidogrel or with the use of more potent antiplatelet agents such as prasugrel. Other genetic polymorphisms have also been correlated with HTPR: ABCB1, ATP2B2, and TIAM2. Large-scale randomized trials with clinical endpoints remain necessary to determine the optimal antiplatelet therapy in patients carrying genetic polymorphism associated with HTPR and thrombotic events. PMID:23149816

Laine, Marc; Arméro, Sébastien; Peyrol, Michaël; Sbragia, Pascal; Thuny, Franck; Paganelli, Franck; Bonello, Laurent

2012-11-13

47

Identifying farmer attitudes towards genetically modified (GM) crops in Scotland  

Microsoft Academic Search

Consumer attitudes towards genetically modified (GM) food are well documented but there has been much less focus on farmer attitudes to GM technology in agriculture. This paper reports findings from a study investigating farmers’ attitudes to GM crops in Scotland. Results from a Q methodology study reveal three discourses, one apparently pro-GM and demonstrating an expectation of benefits, the second

Clare Hall

2006-01-01

48

Identifying the genetic basis of ecologically and biotechnologically useful functions of the bacterium Burkholderia vietnamiensis.  

PubMed

Signature-tagged mutagenesis (STM) was used to identify genetic determinants of fitness associated with two key ecological processes mediated by bacteria. Burkholderia vietnamiensis strain G4 was used as a model bacterium to investigate: phenol degradation as a model of bioremediation, and pea rhizosphere colonization as a prerequisite to biological control and phytoremediation. A total of 1900 mutants were screened and 196 putative fitness mutants identified; the genetic basis of 137 of these mutations was determined by correlation to the G4 genome. The phenol-STM screen was more successful at identifying phenol degradation mutations (83 mutants; 4.4% hit rate) than a conventional agar-based phenol screen (49 mutants, 5319 screened, 0.92% hit rate). The combination of both screens completely defined the components of the TOM pathway in strain G4 and also identified novel accessory genes not previously implicated in phenol utilization. The rhizosphere-STM screen identified 113 mutants (5.9% hit rate); 107 had reduced tag signals indicative of poor rhizosphere colonization (Rhiz-), while six mutants produced high hybridization signals suggesting increased rhizosphere competence (Rhiz+). Competition assays confirmed that 69% of Rhiz- mutants tested (24/35) were severely compromised in their rhizosphere fitness. Seventy Rhiz- mutations mapped to genes with the following putative functions: amino acid biosynthesis (25; 36%), general metabolism (18; 26%), hypothetical (9; 13%), regulatory genes (4; 5.7%), transport and stress (2 each; 2.8% respectively). One of the most interesting discoveries mediated by the rhizosphere-STM screen was the identification of three Rhiz+ mutants inactivated within a single virulence-associated autotransporter adhesin gene; this mutation consistently produced a hyper-colonization phenotype suggesting a highly novel role for this surface adhesin during plant interactions. Our study has shown that STM can be successfully applied to ecologically important microbial interactions, defining the underlying genetic systems important for biotechnological fitness of environmental bacteria such those from the Burkholderia cepacia complex. PMID:17359273

O'Sullivan, Louise A; Weightman, Andrew J; Jones, T Hefin; Marchbank, Angela M; Tiedje, James M; Mahenthiralingam, Eshwar

2007-04-01

49

Host genetic determinants of influenza pathogenicity.  

PubMed

Despite effective vaccines, influenza remains a major global health threat due to the morbidity and mortality caused by seasonal epidemics, as well as the 2009 pandemic. Also of profound concern are the rare but potentially catastrophic transmissions of avian influenza to humans, highlighted by a recent H7N9 influenza outbreak. Murine and human studies reveal that the clinical course of influenza is the result of a combination of both host and viral genetic determinants. While viral pathogenicity has long been the subject of intensive efforts, research to elucidate host genetic determinants, particularly human, is now in the ascendant, and the goal of this review is to highlight these recent insights. PMID:23933004

Lin, Tsai-Yu; Brass, Abraham L

2013-08-08

50

Identifying novel genes for atherosclerosis through mouse-human comparative genetics.  

PubMed

Susceptibility to atherosclerosis is determined by both environmental and genetic factors. Its genetic determinants have been studied by use of quantitative-trait-locus (QTL) analysis. So far, 21 atherosclerosis QTLs have been identified in the mouse: 7 in a high-fat-diet model only, 9 in a sensitized model (apolipoprotein E- or LDL [low-density lipoprotein] receptor-deficient mice) only, and 5 in both models, suggesting that different gene sets operate in each model and that a subset operates in both. Among the 27 human atherosclerosis QTLs reported, 17 (63%) are located in regions homologous (concordant) to mouse QTLs, suggesting that these mouse and human atherosclerosis QTLs have the same underlying genes. Therefore, genes regulating human atherosclerosis will be found most efficiently by first finding their orthologs in concordant mouse QTLs. Novel mouse QTL genes will be found most efficiently by using a combination of the following strategies: identifying QTLs in new crosses performed with previously unused parental strains; inducing mutations in large-scale, high-throughput mutagenesis screens; and using new genomic and bioinformatics tools. Once QTL genes are identified in mice, they can be tested in human association studies for their relevance in human atherosclerotic disease. PMID:15931593

Wang, Xiaosong; Ishimori, Naoki; Korstanje, Ron; Rollins, Jarod; Paigen, Beverly

2005-05-19

51

Identifying Novel Genes for Atherosclerosis through Mouse-Human Comparative Genetics  

PubMed Central

Susceptibility to atherosclerosis is determined by both environmental and genetic factors. Its genetic determinants have been studied by use of quantitative-trait–locus (QTL) analysis. So far, 21 atherosclerosis QTLs have been identified in the mouse: 7 in a high-fat–diet model only, 9 in a sensitized model (apolipoprotein E– or LDL [low-density lipoprotein] receptor–deficient mice) only, and 5 in both models, suggesting that different gene sets operate in each model and that a subset operates in both. Among the 27 human atherosclerosis QTLs reported, 17 (63%) are located in regions homologous (concordant) to mouse QTLs, suggesting that these mouse and human atherosclerosis QTLs have the same underlying genes. Therefore, genes regulating human atherosclerosis will be found most efficiently by first finding their orthologs in concordant mouse QTLs. Novel mouse QTL genes will be found most efficiently by using a combination of the following strategies: identifying QTLs in new crosses performed with previously unused parental strains; inducing mutations in large-scale, high-throughput mutagenesis screens; and using new genomic and bioinformatics tools. Once QTL genes are identified in mice, they can be tested in human association studies for their relevance in human atherosclerotic disease.

Wang, Xiaosong; Ishimori, Naoki; Korstanje, Ron; Rollins, Jarod; Paigen, Beverly

2005-01-01

52

Alphaviruses: Population genetics and determinants of emergence  

PubMed Central

Alphaviruses are responsible for several medically important emerging diseases and are also significant veterinary pathogens. Due to the aerosol infectivity of some alphaviruses and their ability to cause severe, sometimes fatal neurologic diseases, they are also of biodefense importance. This review discusses the ecology, epidemiology and molecular virology of the alphaviruses, then focuses on three of the most important members of the genus: Venezuelan and eastern equine encephalitis and chikungunya viruses, with emphasis on their genetics and emergence mechanisms, and how current knowledge as well as gaps influence our ability to detect and determine the source of both natural outbreaks and potential use for bioterrorism. This article is one of a series in Antiviral Research on the genetic diversity of emerging viruses.

Weaver, Scott C.; Winegar, Richard; Manger, Ian D.; Forrester, Naomi L.

2013-01-01

53

Genetic determinants of alcoholic liver disease.  

PubMed

Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) accounts for the majority of chronic liver disease in Western countries. The spectrum of ALD includes steatosis with or without fibrosis in virtually all individuals with an alcohol consumption of >80 g/day, alcoholic steatohepatitis of variable severity in 10-35% and liver cirrhosis in approximately 15% of patients. Once cirrhosis is established, there is an annual risk for hepatocellular carcinoma of 1-2%. Environmental factors such as drinking patterns, coexisting liver disease, obesity, diet composition and comedication may modify the natural course of ALD. Twin studies have revealed a substantial contribution of genetic factors to the evolution of ALD, as demonstrated by a threefold higher disease concordance between monozygotic twins and dizygotic twins. With genotyping becoming widely available, a large number of genetic case-control studies evaluating candidate gene variants coding for proteins involved in the degradation of alcohol, mediating antioxidant defence, the evolution and counteraction of necroinflammation and formation and degradation of extracellular matrix have been published with largely unconfirmed, impeached or even disproved associations. Recently, whole genome analyses of large numbers of genetic variants in several chronic liver diseases including gallstone disease, primary sclerosing cholangitis and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) have identified novel yet unconsidered candidate genes. Regarding the latter, a sequence variation within the gene coding for patatin-like phospholipase encoding 3 (PNPLA3, rs738409) was found to modulate steatosis, necroinflammation and fibrosis in NAFLD. Subsequently, the same variant was repeatedly confirmed as the first robust genetic risk factor for progressive ALD. PMID:22110053

Stickel, Felix; Hampe, Jochen

2011-11-22

54

Identifying and Estimating the Genetic Impact of Chemical Mutagens.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A battery of short-term mutagenicity tests using bacteria and mammalian cells in culture can often identify chemicals with potential mutagenic risk to mammals. Tests with mice are reserved for rare cases when short-term tests are equivocal or when human e...

1983-01-01

55

A vector space model approach to identify genetically related diseases  

PubMed Central

Objective The relationship between diseases and their causative genes can be complex, especially in the case of polygenic diseases. Further exacerbating the challenges in their study is that many genes may be causally related to multiple diseases. This study explored the relationship between diseases through the adaptation of an approach pioneered in the context of information retrieval: vector space models. Materials and Methods A vector space model approach was developed that bridges gene disease knowledge inferred across three knowledge bases: Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man, GenBank, and Medline. The approach was then used to identify potentially related diseases for two target diseases: Alzheimer disease and Prader-Willi Syndrome. Results In the case of both Alzheimer Disease and Prader-Willi Syndrome, a set of plausible diseases were identified that may warrant further exploration. Discussion This study furthers seminal work by Swanson, et al. that demonstrated the potential for mining literature for putative correlations. Using a vector space modeling approach, information from both biomedical literature and genomic resources (like GenBank) can be combined towards identification of putative correlations of interest. To this end, the relevance of the predicted diseases of interest in this study using the vector space modeling approach were validated based on supporting literature. Conclusion The results of this study suggest that a vector space model approach may be a useful means to identify potential relationships between complex diseases, and thereby enable the coordination of gene-based findings across multiple complex diseases.

2012-01-01

56

Identifying the status of genetic lesions in cancer clinical trial documents using machine learning  

PubMed Central

Background Many cancer clinical trials now specify the particular status of a genetic lesion in a patient's tumor in the inclusion or exclusion criteria for trial enrollment. To facilitate search and identification of gene-associated clinical trials by potential participants and clinicians, it is important to develop automated methods to identify genetic information from narrative trial documents. Methods We developed a two-stage classification method to identify genes and genetic lesion statuses in clinical trial documents extracted from the National Cancer Institute's (NCI's) Physician Data Query (PDQ) cancer clinical trial database. The method consists of two steps: 1) to distinguish gene entities from non-gene entities such as English words; and 2) to determine whether and which genetic lesion status is associated with an identified gene entity. We developed and evaluated the performance of the method using a manually annotated data set containing 1,143 instances of the eight most frequently mentioned genes in cancer clinical trials. In addition, we applied the classifier to a real-world task of cancer trial annotation and evaluated its performance using a larger sample size (4,013 instances from 249 distinct human gene symbols detected from 250 trials). Results Our evaluation using a manually annotated data set showed that the two-stage classifier outperformed the single-stage classifier and achieved the best average accuracy of 83.7% for the eight most frequently mentioned genes when optimized feature sets were used. It also showed better generalizability when we applied the two-stage classifier trained on one set of genes to another independent gene. When a gene-neutral, two-stage classifier was applied to the real-world task of cancer trial annotation, it achieved a highest accuracy of 89.8%, demonstrating the feasibility of developing a gene-neutral classifier for this task. Conclusions We presented a machine learning-based approach to detect gene entities and the genetic lesion statuses from clinical trial documents and demonstrated its use in cancer trial annotation. Such methods would be valuable for building information retrieval tools targeting gene-associated clinical trials.

2012-01-01

57

Tissue Specificity of Geminivirus Infection Is Genetically Determined  

PubMed Central

The types of cells and tissues infected by a virus define its tissue tropism. Determinants of tissue tropism in animal-infecting viruses have been extensively investigated, but little is known about plant viruses in this regard. Some geminiviruses in the genus Begomovirus exhibit phloem limitation and are restricted to cells of the vascular system, whereas others can invade mesophyll tissue. To identify viral genetic determinants of tissue tropism, we established a model system using two begomoviruses and their common host plant, Nicotiana benthamiana. Analysis by DNA in situ hybridization confirmed that tomato golden mosaic virus invades mesophyll tissues in systemically infected leaves, whereas bean golden mosaic virus remains phloem limited. Through genetic complementation and analysis of recombinant hybrid viruses, we demonstrated that three genetic elements of tomato golden mosaic virus determine its mesophyll tissue tropism. A noncoding region of the viral genome is essential for the phenotype, but it must be accompanied by one of two different coding regions. To our knowledge, this is the first example documented in a plant virus of noncoding DNA sequences that determine tissue tropism.

Morra, Marc R.; Petty, Ian T. D.

2000-01-01

58

AbsIDconvert: An absolute approach for converting genetic identifiers at different granularities  

PubMed Central

Background High-throughput molecular biology techniques yield vast amounts of data, often by detecting small portions of ribonucleotides corresponding to specific identifiers. Existing bioinformatic methodologies categorize and compare these elements using inferred descriptive annotation given this sequence information irrespective of the fact that it may not be representative of the identifier as a whole. Results All annotations, no matter the granularity, can be aligned to genomic sequences and therefore annotated by genomic intervals. We have developed AbsIDconvert, a methodology for converting between genomic identifiers by first mapping them onto a common universal coordinate system using an interval tree which is subsequently queried for overlapping identifiers. AbsIDconvert has many potential uses, including gene identifier conversion, identification of features within a genomic region, and cross-species comparisons. The utility is demonstrated in three case studies: 1) comparative genomic study mapping plasmodium gene sequences to corresponding human and mosquito transcriptional regions; 2) cross-species study of Incyte clone sequences; and 3) analysis of human Ensembl transcripts mapped by Affymetrix®; and Agilent microarray probes. AbsIDconvert currently supports ID conversion of 53 species for a given list of input identifiers, genomic sequence, or genome intervals. Conclusion AbsIDconvert provides an efficient and reliable mechanism for conversion between identifier domains of interest. The flexibility of this tool allows for custom definition identifier domains contingent upon the availability and determination of a genomic mapping interval. As the genomes and the sequences for genetic elements are further refined, this tool will become increasingly useful and accurate. AbsIDconvert is freely available as a web application or downloadable as a virtual machine at: http://bioinformatics.louisville.edu/abid/.

2012-01-01

59

Parkinson's Patients at Genetic Risk for Dementia Might Be Identified Sooner  

MedlinePLUS

... enable JavaScript. Parkinson's Patients at Genetic Risk for Dementia Might Be Identified Sooner Levels of specific kinds ... Preidt Friday, September 20, 2013 Related MedlinePlus Pages Dementia Laboratory Tests Parkinson's Disease FRIDAY, Sept. 20 (HealthDay ...

60

Two newly identified genetic determinants of pigmentation in Europeans.  

PubMed

We present results from a genome-wide association study for variants associated with human pigmentation characteristics among 5,130 Icelanders, with follow-up analyses in 2,116 Icelanders and 1,214 Dutch individuals. Two coding variants in TPCN2 are associated with hair color, and a variant at the ASIP locus shows strong association with skin sensitivity to sun, freckling and red hair, phenotypic characteristics similar to those affected by well-known mutations in MC1R. PMID:18488028

Sulem, Patrick; Gudbjartsson, Daniel F; Stacey, Simon N; Helgason, Agnar; Rafnar, Thorunn; Jakobsdottir, Margret; Steinberg, Stacy; Gudjonsson, Sigurjon A; Palsson, Arnar; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Pálsson, Snaebjörn; Sigurgeirsson, Bardur; Thorisdottir, Kristin; Ragnarsson, Rafn; Benediktsdottir, Kristrun R; Aben, Katja K; Vermeulen, Sita H; Goldstein, Alisa M; Tucker, Margaret A; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Olafsson, Jon H; Gulcher, Jeffrey; Kong, Augustine; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Stefansson, Kari

2008-05-18

61

Common genetic determinants of vitamin D insufficiency: a genome-wide association study  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background Vitamin D is crucial for maintenance of musculoskeletal health, and might also have a role in extraskeletal tissues. Determinants of circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations include sun exposure and diet, but high heritability suggests that genetic factors could also play a part. We aimed to identify common genetic variants affecting vitamin D concentrations and risk of insufficiency. Methods We undertook

Thomas J Wang; Feng Zhang; J Brent Richards; Bryan Kestenbaum; Joyce B van Meurs; Diane Berry; Douglas P Kiel; Elizabeth A Streeten; Claes Ohlsson; Daniel L Koller; Leena Peltonen; Jason D Cooper; Paul F O'Reilly; Denise K Houston; Nicole L Glazer; Liesbeth Vandenput; Munro Peacock; Julia Shi; Fernando Rivadeneira; Mark I McCarthy; Pouta Anneli; Ian H de Boer; Massimo Mangino; Bernet Kato; Deborah J Smyth; Sarah L Booth; Paul F Jacques; Greg L Burke; Mark Goodarzi; Ching-Lung Cheung; Myles Wolf; Kenneth Rice; David Goltzman; Nick Hidiroglou; Martin Ladouceur; Nicholas J Wareham; Lynne J Hocking; Deborah Hart; Nigel K Arden; Cyrus Cooper; Suneil Malik; William D Fraser; Anna-Liisa Hartikainen; Guangju Zhai; Helen M Macdonald; Nita G Forouhi; Ruth JF Loos; David M Reid; Alan Hakim; Elaine Dennison; Yongmei Liu; Chris Power; Helen E Stevens; Laitinen Jaana; Ramachandran S Vasan; Nicole Soranzo; Jörg Bojunga; Bruce M Psaty; Mattias Lorentzon; Tatiana Foroud; Tamara B Harris; Albert Hofman; John-Olov Jansson; Jane A Cauley; Andre G Uitterlinden; Quince Gibson; Marjo-Riitta Järvelin; David Karasik; David S Siscovick; Michael J Econs; Stephen B Kritchevsky; Jose C Florez; John A Todd; Josee Dupuis; Elina Hyppönen; Timothy D Spector

2010-01-01

62

Transcriptomic and genetic studies identify IL-33 as a candidate gene for Alzheimer's disease  

PubMed Central

The only recognised genetic determinant of the common forms of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the ?4 allele of the apolipoprotein E gene (APOE). To identify new candidate genes, we recently performed transcriptomic analysis of 2,741 genes in chromosomal regions of interest using brain tissue of AD cases and controls. From 82 differentially expressed genes, 1,156 polymorphisms were genotyped in two independent discovery sub-samples (n=945). Seventeen genes exhibited at least one polymorphism associated with AD risk and following correction for multiple testing, we retained the IL-33 gene. We first confirmed that the IL-33 expression was decreased in the brain of AD cases compared with that of controls. Further genetic analysis led us to select 3 polymorphisms within this gene, which we analysed in three independent case-control studies. These polymorphisms and a resulting protective haplotype were systematically associated with AD risk in non-APOE ?4 carriers. Using a large prospective study, these associations were also detected when analyzing the prevalent and incident AD cases together or the incident AD cases alone. These polymorphisms were also associated with less cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) in the brain of non-APOE ?4 AD cases. Immunohistochemistry experiments finally indicated that the IL-33 expression was consistently restricted to vascular capillaries in the brain. Moreover, IL-33 overexpression in cellular models led to a specific decrease in secretion of the A?40 peptides, the main CAA component. In conclusion, our data suggest that genetic variants in IL-33 gene may be associated with a decrease in AD risk potentially in modulating CAA formation.

Chapuis, J; Hot, D; Hansmannel, F; Kerdraon, O; Ferreira, S; Hubans, C; Maurage, CA; Huot, L; Bensemain, F; Laumet, G; Ayral, AM; Fievet, N; Hauw, JJ; DeKosky, ST; Lemoine, Y; Iwatsubo, T; Wavrant-Devrieze, F; Dartigues, JF; Tzourio, C; Buee, L; Pasquier, F; Berr, C; Mann, D; Lendon, C; Alperovitch, A; Kamboh, MI; Amouyel, P; Lambert, JC

2010-01-01

63

The Next Challenge for Psychiatric Genetics: Characterizing the Risk Associated with Identified Genes  

PubMed Central

Background As advances in genetics further our ability to identify genes influencing psychiatric disorders, the next challenge facing psychiatric genetics is to characterize the risk associated with specific genetic variants in order to better understand how these susceptibility genes are involved in the pathways leading to illness. Methods To further this goal, findings from behavior genetic analyses about how genetic influences act can be used to guide hypothesis testing about the effects associated with specific genes. Results Using the phenotype of alcohol dependence as an example, this paper provides an overview of how the integration of behavioral and statistical genetics can advance our knowledge about the genetics of psychiatric disorders. Areas currently being investigated in behavior genetics include careful delineation of phenotypes, to examine the heritability of various aspects of normal and abnormal behavior; developmental changes in the nature and magnitude of genetic and environmental effects; the extent to which different behaviors are influenced by common genes; and different forms of gene-environment correlation and interaction. Conclusions Understanding how specific genes are involved in these processes has the potential to significantly enhance our understanding of the development of psychiatric disorders.

Dick, Danielle M.; Rose, Richard J.; Kaprio, Jaakko

2006-01-01

64

Genetically determined severity of anti-myeloperoxidase glomerulonephritis.  

PubMed

Myeloperoxidase (MPO) is a target antigen for antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies (ANCA). There is evidence that MPO-ANCA cause necrotizing and crescentic glomerulonephritis (NCGN) and vasculitis. NCGN severity varies among patients with ANCA disease, and genetic factors influence disease severity. The role of genetics in MPO-ANCA NCGN severity was investigated using 13 inbred mouse strains, F1 and F2 hybrids, bone marrow chimeras, and neutrophil function assays. Mouse strains include founders of the Collaborative Cross. Intravenous injection of anti-MPO IgG induced glomerular crescents in >60% of glomeruli in 129S6/SvEv and CAST/EiJ mice, but <1% in A/J, DBA/1J, DBA/2J, NOD/LtJ, and PWK/PhJ mice. C57BL6J, 129S1/SvImJ, LP/J, WSB/EiJ, NZO/HILtJ, and C3H mice had intermediate severity. High-density genotypes at 542,190 single nucleotide polymorphisms were used to identify candidate loci for disease severity by identifying genomic regions that are different between 129S6/SvEv and 129S1/SvImJ mice, which are genetically similar but phenotypically distinct. C57BL/6 × 129S6 F2 mice were genotyped at 76 SNPs to capture quantitative trait loci for disease severity. The absence of a dominant quantitative trait locus suggests that differences in severity are the result of multiple gene interactions. In vivo studies using bone marrow chimeric mice and in vitro studies of neutrophil activation by anti-MPO IgG indicated that severity of NCGN is mediated by genetically determined differences in the function of neutrophils. PMID:23384999

Xiao, Hong; Ciavatta, Dominic; Aylor, David L; Hu, Peiqi; de Villena, Fernando Pardo-Manuel; Falk, Ronald J; Jennette, J Charles

2013-02-04

65

Penn Medicine researchers identify four new genetic risk factors for testicular cancer  

Cancer.gov

A new study looking at the genomes of more than 13,000 men identified four new genetic variants associated with an increased risk of testicular cancer, the most commonly diagnosed type in young men today. The findings from this first-of-its-kind meta-analysis were reported online May 12 in Nature Genetics by researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, home of the Abramson Cancer Center.

66

Comparative Genetics of Sex Determination: Masculinizing Mutations in Caenorhabditis briggsae  

PubMed Central

The nematodes Caenorhabditis elegans and C. briggsae independently evolved self-fertile hermaphroditism from gonochoristic ancestors. C. briggsae has variably divergent orthologs of nearly all genes in the C. elegans sex determination pathway. Their functional characterization has generally relied on reverse genetic approaches, such as RNA interference and cross-species transgene rescue and more recently on deletion mutations. We have taken an unbiased forward mutagenesis approach to isolating zygotic mutations that masculinize all tissues of C. briggsae hermaphrodites. The screens identified loss-of-function mutations in the C. briggsae orthologs of tra-1, tra-2, and tra-3. The somatic and germline phenotypes of these mutations are largely identical to those of their C. elegans homologs, including the poorly understood germline feminization of tra-1(lf) males. This overall conservation of Cb-tra phenotypes is in contrast to the fem genes, with which they directly interact and which are significantly divergent in germline function. In addition, we show that in both C. briggsae and C. elegans large C-terminal truncations of TRA-1 that retain the DNA-binding domain affect sex determination more strongly than somatic gonad development. Beyond these immediate results, this collection of mutations provides an essential foundation for further comparative genetic analysis of the Caenorhabditis sex determination pathway.

Kelleher, Danielle F.; de Carvalho, Carlos Egydio; Doty, Alana V.; Layton, Marnie; Cheng, Andy T.; Mathies, Laura D.; Pilgrim, Dave; Haag, Eric S.

2008-01-01

67

Genetic Diseases and Genetic Determinism Models in French Secondary School Biology Textbooks  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|The presentation of genetic diseases in French secondary school biology textbooks is analysed to determine the major conceptions taught in the field of human genetics. References to genetic diseases, and the processes by which they are explained (monogeny, polygeny, chromosomal anomaly and environmental influence) are studied in recent French…

Castera, Jeremy; Bruguiere, Catherine; Clement, Pierre

2008-01-01

68

Genetic Compatibility Determines Endophyte-Grass Combinations  

PubMed Central

Even highly mutually beneficial microbial-plant interactions, such as mycorrhizal- and rhizobial-plant exchanges, involve selfishness, cheating and power-struggles between the partners, which depending on prevailing selective pressures, lead to a continuum of interactions from antagonistic to mutualistic. Using manipulated grass-endophyte combinations in a five year common garden experiment, we show that grass genotypes and genetic mismatches constrain genetic combinations between the vertically (via host seeds) transmitted endophytes and the out-crossing host, thereby reducing infections in established grass populations. Infections were lost in both grass tillers and seedlings in F1 and F2 generations, respectively. Experimental plants were collected as seeds from two different environments, i.e., meadows and nearby riverbanks. Endophyte-related benefits to the host included an increased number of inflorescences, but only in meadow plants and not until the last growing season of the experiment. Our results illustrate the importance of genetic host specificity and trans-generational maternal effects on the genetic structure of a host population, which act as destabilizing forces in endophyte-grass symbioses. We propose that (1) genetic mismatches may act as a buffering mechanism against highly competitive endophyte-grass genotype combinations threatening the biodiversity of grassland communities and (2) these mismatches should be acknowledged, particularly in breeding programmes aimed at harnessing systemic and heritable endophytes to improve the agriculturally valuable characteristics of cultivars.

Saikkonen, Kari; Wali, Piippa R.; Helander, Marjo

2010-01-01

69

Ability to smell androstenone is genetically determined.  

PubMed Central

Some adult humans cannot detect the odor of androstenone (5 alpha-androst-16-en-3-one), a volatile steroid. To test for the presence of genetic variance associated with this trait, adult twins were tested for their ability to smell androstenone and another odorant, pyridine, that is readily perceived by most adults. Ascending concentration, two-sample (odor versus blank) forced choice tests were used to assess sensitivity to these odorants. Intraclass correlations for identical and fraternal twin detection thresholds to pyridine were small and not significantly different. However, intraclass correlations for thresholds to androstenone were significantly different, with the correlation for identical twins being greater than that for the fraternal twins. These data indicate a genetic component of variation in sensitivity to this odor. Investigations that use genetic variation could offer a new tool for studies of olfactory transduction mechanisms.

Wysocki, C J; Beauchamp, G K

1984-01-01

70

Synthetic lethal analysis of Caenorhabditis elegans posterior embryonic patterning genes identifies conserved genetic interactions  

Microsoft Academic Search

Phenotypic robustness is evidenced when single-gene mutations do not result in an obvious phenotype. It has been suggested\\u000a that such phenotypic stability results from 'buffering' activities of homologous genes as well as non-homologous genes acting\\u000a in parallel pathways. One approach to characterizing mechanisms of phenotypic robustness is to identify genetic interactions,\\u000a specifically, double mutants where buffering is compromised. To identify

L Ryan Baugh; Joanne C Wen; Andrew A Hill; Donna K Slonim; Eugene L Brown; Craig P Hunter

2005-01-01

71

Retrograde Intraflagellar Transport Mutants Identify Complex A Proteins With Multiple Genetic Interactions in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii  

Microsoft Academic Search

The intraflagellar transport machinery is required for the assembly of cilia. It has been investigated by biochemical, genetic, and computational methods that have identified at least 21 proteins that assemble into two subcomplexes. It has been hypothesized that complex A is required for retrograde transport. Temperature-sensitive mutations in FLA15 and FLA17 show defects in retrograde intraflagellar transport (IFT) in Chlamydomonas.

Carlo Iomini; Linya Li; Jessica M. Esparza; Susan K. Dutcher

2009-01-01

72

Enhancing the efficiency of genetic algorithm by identifying linkage groups using DSM clustering  

Microsoft Academic Search

Standard genetic algorithms are not very suited to problems with multivariate interactions among variables. This problem has been identified from the beginning of these algorithms and has been termed as the linkage learning problem. Numerous attempts have been carried out to solve this problem with various degree of success. In this paper, we employ an effective algorithm to cluster a

Amin Nikanjam; Hadi Sharifi; B. Hoda Helmi; Adel Rahmani

2010-01-01

73

Huntsman Cancer Institute scientists discover new method to identify cancer-causing rearrangements of genetic material  

Cancer.gov

Researchers from Huntsman Cancer Institute at the University of Utah report they have discovered a method to identify cancer-causing rearrangements of genetic material called chromosomal translocations quickly, accurately, and inexpensively. A description of the method and the research results appear online in this month's issue of the EMBO Molecular Medicine journal.

74

Using Genetic Algorithm to Identify Completely Unknown System in FTIR Spectra Analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

The article mainly focuses on how to identify completely unknown systems in FTIR spectra analysis by Genetic Algorithm (GA). The technique of multiplespot crossover combined with quantitative and adaptive mutation is used and the whole process is controlled by the fitness value and probability of selection in GA. A standard pure FTIR spectra database containing 101 air toxic organic compounds

Fang Liu; Junde Wang

2004-01-01

75

USC study identifies genetic basis for aggressive breast cancer in women of African ancestry:  

Cancer.gov

Researchers at the Keck School of Medicine of USC, together with other scientists, have identified the location of a genetic risk factor for a type of breast cancer that disproportionately affects women of African descent and carries a worse prognosis than other forms of the disease.

76

Genetic determinants of cardiovascular disease in Hispanics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) affects many people in the United States. Compared with other population groups in the United\\u000a States, epidemiologic data suggest that Hispanic Americans are at a disproportionate risk for CVD. The etiology of this disparity\\u000a is complex, with genetic, behavioral, cultural, and other environmental factors acting in an independent, interactive, and\\/or\\u000a synergistic fashion. Because many complex conditions mediate

Krista Casazza; José R. Fernández

2009-01-01

77

Ability to Smell Androstenone is Genetically Determined  

Microsoft Academic Search

Some adult humans cannot detect the odor of androstenone (5alpha -androst-16-en-3-one), a volatile steroid. To test for the presence of genetic variance associated with this trait, adult twins were tested for their ability to smell androstenone and another odorant, pyridine, that is readily perceived by most adults. Ascending concentration, two-sample (odor versus blank) forced choice tests were used to assess

Charles J. Wysocki; Gary K. Beauchamp

1984-01-01

78

Sphingolipids and membrane biology as determined from genetic models.  

PubMed

The importance of sphingolipids in membrane biology was appreciated early in the twentieth century when several human inborn errors of metabolism were linked to defects in sphingolipid degradation. The past two decades have seen an explosion of information linking sphingolipids with cellular processes. Studies have unraveled mechanistic details of the sphingolipid metabolic pathways, and these findings are being exploited in the development of novel therapies, some now in clinical trials. Pioneering work in yeast has laid the foundation for identifying genes encoding the enzymes of the pathways. The advent of the era of genomics and bioinformatics has led to the identification of homologous genes in other species and the subsequent creation of animal knock-out lines for these genes. Discoveries from these efforts have re-kindled interest in the role of sphingolipids in membrane biology. This review highlights some of the recent advances in understanding sphingolipids' roles in membrane biology as determined from genetic models. PMID:18035569

Rao, Raghavendra Pralhada; Acharya, Jairaj K

2007-10-13

79

Use of a nonradioactive genetic probe identified, synthesized, and labeled in the polymerase chain reaction.  

PubMed

This study introduces a strategy to identify and produce sequences useful as genetic markers, or native genetic probes for DNA-DNA hybridization in bacterial strains where the genetics is not well described. Actinobacillus actinomy-cetemcomitans (A.a.) was used as an example. Fifty ng genomic DNA from A.a. ATCC 33384 and Haemophilus aphrophilus ATCC 33389 was amplified in a thermocycler using a single 10-mer primer. The PCR products were separated by electrophoresis on a 1% submarine agarose gel containing ethidium bromide and visualized by UV illumination, and the strain-specific amplitypes were compared. DNA from two bands, 0.9 and 4 kb, unique for the A.a. strain, was cut out, amplified under high stringency with the same primer and labeled by replacing 33.3 microM dTTP with digoxigenin-labeled dUTP in the reaction mixture. The labeled probe was then repeatedly used for hybridization to DNA from various A.a., H. aphrophilus, and other bacterial strains of the Pasteurellaceae family. The results showed that the 0.9-kb probe detected all A.a. tested, and distinguished it from other closely related bacterial species. We conclude that the described strategy is useful for identifying and selecting genetic sequences useful as genetic markers in A.a. PMID:7521967

Preus, H R; Russell, D T

1994-06-01

80

Evolutionary genetic approach to determine junction temperature in electronic packages  

Microsoft Academic Search

Genetic algorithms are adaptive search algorithms based on the Darwinian principle of natural selection and survival of the fittest. They efficiently exploit data at hand to anticipate new search points with expected improvement in performance. The aim of this paper is to show the feasibility of applying genetic algorithms to determine the thermal profile of a basic package. To illustrate

A. Parthiban; K. Jeevan; K. N. Seetharamu; I. A. Azid

2000-01-01

81

Genomic studies have identified multiple mechanisms of genetic changes in Waldenström macroglobulinemia.  

PubMed

The pathophysiology of Waldenström macroglobulinemia (WM), a lymphoproliferative disorder characterized by lymphoplasmacytic bone marrow infiltration associated with serum IgM paraprotein, is rather unclear; however, progress has been made in recent years to better determine the genetic profile of WM tumor cells. Studies based on high-throughput genomic analyses-including single-nucleotide polymorphism array (SNPa), array-based comparative genomic hybridization, and, recently, whole-genome sequencing--have improved deciphering some of the key molecular pathways associated with WM. Beyond the discovery of the myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MYD88) L265P mutation, which will help greatly in the differential characterization of WM from other B-cell low-grade lymphomas, several other mechanisms of gene deregulation were identified and mapped that recurrently pointed out nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-?B), breakpoint cluster region (BCR), and Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling pathways as potential targets for a better understanding of the physiopathology of WM and for future drug development. Herein, we summarize the current knowledge of the genomic patterns of WM to highlight its complexity. PMID:23473949

Poulain, Stéphanie; Herbaux, Charles; Bertrand, Elisabeth; Decambron, Audrey; Fouquet, Guillemette; Boyle, Eileen; Gay, Julie; Manier, Salomon; Duthilleul, Patrick; Roumier, Christophe; Leleu, Xavier

2013-03-07

82

Integrating human and rodent data to identify the genetic factors involved in chronic kidney disease.  

PubMed

The increasing numbers of patients with chronic kidney disease combined with no satisfying interventions for preventing or curing the disease emphasize the need to better understand the genes involved in the initiation and progression of complex renal diseases, their interactions with other host genes, and the environment. Linkage and association studies in human, rat, and mouse have been successful in identifying genetic loci for various disease-related phenotypes but have thus far not been very successful identifying underlying genes. The purpose of this review is to summarize the progress in human, rat, and mouse genetic studies to show the concordance between the loci among the different species. The collective utilization of human and nonhuman mammalian datasets and resources can lead to a more rapid narrowing of disease loci and the subsequent identification of candidate genes. In addition, genes identified through these methods can be further characterized and investigated for interactions using animal models, which is not possible in humans. PMID:20133484

Garrett, Michael R; Pezzolesi, Marcus G; Korstanje, Ron

2010-02-04

83

Forward chemical genetic screens in Arabidopsis identify genes that influence sensitivity to the phytotoxic compound sulfamethoxazole  

PubMed Central

Background The sulfanilamide family comprises a clinically important group of antimicrobial compounds which also display bioactivity in plants. While there is evidence that sulfanilamides inhibit folate biosynthesis in both bacteria and plants, the complete network of plant responses to these compounds remains to be characterized. As such, we initiated two forward genetic screens in Arabidopsis in order to identify mutants that exhibit altered sensitivity to sulfanilamide compounds. These screens were based on the growth phenotype of seedlings germinated in the presence of the compound sulfamethoxazole (Smex). Results We identified a mutant with reduced sensitivity to Smex, and subsequent mapping indicated that a gene encoding 5-oxoprolinase was responsible for this phenotype. A mutation causing enhanced sensitivity to Smex was mapped to a gene lacking any functional annotation. Conclusions The genes identified through our forward genetic screens represent novel mediators of Arabidopsis responses to sulfanilamides and suggest that these responses extend beyond the perturbation of folate biosynthesis.

2012-01-01

84

Network-based SNP meta-analysis identifies joint and disjoint genetic features across common human diseases  

PubMed Central

Background Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have provided a large set of genetic loci influencing the risk for many common diseases. Association studies typically analyze one specific trait in single populations in an isolated fashion without taking into account the potential phenotypic and genetic correlation between traits. However, GWA data can be efficiently used to identify overlapping loci with analogous or contrasting effects on different diseases. Results Here, we describe a new approach to systematically prioritize and interpret available GWA data. We focus on the analysis of joint and disjoint genetic determinants across diseases. Using network analysis, we show that variant-based approaches are superior to locus-based analyses. In addition, we provide a prioritization of disease loci based on network properties and discuss the roles of hub loci across several diseases. We demonstrate that, in general, agonistic associations appear to reflect current disease classifications, and present the potential use of effect sizes in refining and revising these agonistic signals. We further identify potential branching points in disease etiologies based on antagonistic variants and describe plausible small-scale models of the underlying molecular switches. Conclusions The observation that a surprisingly high fraction (>15%) of the SNPs considered in our study are associated both agonistically and antagonistically with related as well as unrelated disorders indicates that the molecular mechanisms influencing causes and progress of human diseases are in part interrelated. Genetic overlaps between two diseases also suggest the importance of the affected entities in the specific pathogenic pathways and should be investigated further.

2012-01-01

85

Pattern Classification Using Genetic Algorithms: Determination of H.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

A methodology based on the concept of variable string length GA (VGA) is developed for determining automatically the number of hyperplanes for modeling the class boundaries in GA classifier. The genetic operators and fitness function are newly defined to ...

S. Bandyopadhyay C. A. Murthy S. K. Pal

1998-01-01

86

Genetic polymorphisms for identifying individuals at risk for drug-induced vestibular dysfunction  

US Patent & Trademark Office Database

In this application is described the identification of genetic variants that contribute to susceptibility to drug-induced vestibular dysfunction, more particularly, GM-induced vestibular dysfunction. Methods, compositions and kits for determining whether an individual has susceptibility for drug-induced vestibular dysfunction are disclosed.

2011-05-03

87

Chemical Genetic Screening Identifies a Novel Inhibitor of Parallel Alignment of Cortical Microtubules and Cellulose Microfibrils  

Microsoft Academic Search

It is a well-known hypothesis that cortical microtubules control the direction of cellulose microfibril deposition, and that the parallel cellulose microfibrils determine anisotropic cell expansion and plant cell morphogenesis. However, the molecular mechanism by which cortical microtubules regulate the orientation of cellulose microfibrils is still unclear. To investigate this mechanism, chemical genetic screening was performed. From this screening, 'SS compounds'

Arata Yoneda; Takumi Higaki; Natsumaro Kutsuna; Yoichi Kondo; Hiroyuki Osada; Seiichiro Hasezawa; Minami Matsui

2007-01-01

88

Genetic screens in yeast to identify mammalian nonreceptor modulators of G-protein signaling.  

PubMed

We describe genetic screens in Saccharomyces cerevisiae designed to identify mammalian nonreceptor modulators of G-protein signaling pathways. Strains lacking a pheromone-responsive G-protein coupled receptor and expressing a mammalian-yeast Galpha hybrid protein were made conditional for growth upon either pheromone pathway activation (activator screen) or pheromone pathway inactivation (inhibitor screen). Mammalian cDNAs that conferred plasmid-dependent growth under restrictive conditions were identified. One of the cDNAs identified from the activator screen, a human Ras-related G protein that we term AGS1 (for activator of G-protein signaling), appears to function by facilitating guanosine triphosphate (GTP) exchange on the heterotrimeric Galpha. A cDNA product identified from the inhibitor screen encodes a previously identified regulator of G-protein signaling, human RGS5. PMID:10471929

Cismowski, M J; Takesono, A; Ma, C; Lizano, J S; Xie, X; Fuernkranz, H; Lanier, S M; Duzic, E

1999-09-01

89

Harnessing genomics to identify environmental determinants of heritable disease  

PubMed Central

Next-generation sequencing technologies can now be used to directly measure heritable de novo DNA sequence mutations in humans. However, these techniques have not been used to examine environmental factors that induce such mutations and their associated diseases. To address this issue, a working group on environmentally induced germline mutation analysis (ENIGMA) met in October 2011 to propose the necessary foundational studies, which include sequencing of parent–offspring trios from highly exposed human populations, and controlled dose–response experiments in animals. These studies will establish background levels of variability in germline mutation rates and identify environmental agents that influence these rates and heritable disease. Guidance for the types of exposures to examine come from rodent studies that have identified agents such as cancer chemotherapeutic drugs, ionizing radiation, cigarette smoke, and air pollution as germ-cell mutagens. Research is urgently needed to establish the health consequences of parental exposures on subsequent generations.

Yauk, Carole Lyn; Argueso, J. Lucas; Auerbach, Scott S.; Awadalla, Philip; Davis, Sean R.; DeMarini, David M.; Douglas, George R.; Dubrova, Yuri E.; Elespuru, Rosalie K.; Glover, Thomas W.; Hales, Barbara F.; Hurles, Matthew E.; Klein, Catherine B.; Lupski, James R.; Manchester, David K.; Marchetti, Francesco; Montpetit, Alexandre; Mulvihill, John J.; Robaire, Bernard; Robbins, Wendie A.; Rouleau, Guy A.; Shaughnessy, Daniel T.; Somers, Christopher M.; Taylor, James G.; Trasler, Jacquetta; Waters, Michael D.; Wilson, Thomas E.; Witt, Kristine L.; Bishop, Jack B.

2012-01-01

90

New application of intelligent agents in sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis identifies unexpected specific genetic background  

PubMed Central

Background Few genetic factors predisposing to the sporadic form of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) have been identified, but the pathology itself seems to be a true multifactorial disease in which complex interactions between environmental and genetic susceptibility factors take place. The purpose of this study was to approach genetic data with an innovative statistical method such as artificial neural networks to identify a possible genetic background predisposing to the disease. A DNA multiarray panel was applied to genotype more than 60 polymorphisms within 35 genes selected from pathways of lipid and homocysteine metabolism, regulation of blood pressure, coagulation, inflammation, cellular adhesion and matrix integrity, in 54 sporadic ALS patients and 208 controls. Advanced intelligent systems based on novel coupling of artificial neural networks and evolutionary algorithms have been applied. The results obtained have been compared with those derived from the use of standard neural networks and classical statistical analysis Results Advanced intelligent systems based on novel coupling of artificial neural networks and evolutionary algorithms have been applied. The results obtained have been compared with those derived from the use of standard neural networks and classical statistical analysis. An unexpected discovery of a strong genetic background in sporadic ALS using a DNA multiarray panel and analytical processing of the data with advanced artificial neural networks was found. The predictive accuracy obtained with Linear Discriminant Analysis and Standard Artificial Neural Networks ranged from 70% to 79% (average 75.31%) and from 69.1 to 86.2% (average 76.6%) respectively. The corresponding value obtained with Advanced Intelligent Systems reached an average of 96.0% (range 94.4 to 97.6%). This latter approach allowed the identification of seven genetic variants essential to differentiate cases from controls: apolipoprotein E arg158cys; hepatic lipase -480 C/T; endothelial nitric oxide synthase 690 C/T and glu298asp; vitamin K-dependent coagulation factor seven arg353glu, glycoprotein Ia/IIa 873 G/A and E-selectin ser128arg. Conclusion This study provides an alternative and reliable method to approach complex diseases. Indeed, the application of a novel artificial intelligence-based method offers a new insight into genetic markers of sporadic ALS pointing out the existence of a strong genetic background.

Penco, Silvana; Buscema, Massimo; Patrosso, Maria Cristina; Marocchi, Alessandro; Grossi, Enzo

2008-01-01

91

Genetic Screens to Identify Elements of the Decapentaplegic Signaling Pathway in Drosophila  

PubMed Central

Pathways for regulation of signaling by transforming growth factor-? family members are poorly understood at present. The best genetically characterized member of this family is encoded by the Drosophila gene decapentaplegic (dpp), which is required for multiple events during fly development. We describe here the results of screens for genes required to maximize dpp signaling during embryonic dorsal-ventral patterning. Screens for genetic interactions in the zygote have identified an allele of tolloid, as well as two novel alleles of screw, a gene recently shown to encode another bone morphogenetic protein-like polypeptide. Both genes are required for patterning the dorsalmost tissues of the embryo. Screens for dpp interactions with maternally expressed genes have identified loss of function mutations in Mothers against dpp and Medea. These mutations are homozygous pupal lethal, engendering gut defects and severely reduced imaginal disks, reminiscent of dpp mutant phenotypes arising during other dpp-dependent developmental events. Genetic interaction phenotypes are consistent with reduction of dpp activity in the early embryo and in the imaginal disks. We propose that the novel screw mutations identified here titrate out some component(s) of the dpp signaling pathway. We propose that Mad and Medea encode rate-limiting components integral to dpp pathways throughout development.

Raftery, L. A.; Twombly, V.; Wharton, K.; Gelbart, W. M.

1995-01-01

92

Competitive Metagenomic DNA Hybridization Identifies Host-Specific Microbial Genetic Markers in Cow Fecal Samples†  

PubMed Central

Several PCR methods have recently been developed to identify fecal contamination in surface waters. In all cases, researchers have relied on one gene or one microorganism for selection of host-specific markers. Here we describe the application of a genome fragment enrichment (GFE) method to identify host-specific genetic markers from fecal microbial community DNA. As a proof of concept, bovine fecal DNA was challenged against a porcine fecal DNA background to select for bovine-specific DNA sequences. Bioinformatic analyses of 380 bovine enriched metagenomic sequences indicated a preponderance of Bacteroidales-like regions predicted to encode membrane-associated and secreted proteins. Oligonucleotide primers capable of annealing to select Bacteroidales-like bovine GFE sequences exhibited extremely high specificity (>99%) in PCR assays with total fecal DNAs from 279 different animal sources. These primers also demonstrated a broad distribution of corresponding genetic markers (81% positive) among 148 different bovine sources. These data demonstrate that direct metagenomic DNA analysis by the competitive solution hybridization approach described is an efficient method for identifying potentially useful fecal genetic markers and for characterizing differences between environmental microbial communities.

Shanks, Orin C.; Santo Domingo, Jorge W.; Lamendella, Regina; Kelty, Catherine A.; Graham, James E.

2006-01-01

93

Functional genomics complements quantitative genetics in identifying disease-gene associations.  

PubMed

An ultimate goal of genetic research is to understand the connection between genotype and phenotype in order to improve the diagnosis and treatment of diseases. The quantitative genetics field has developed a suite of statistical methods to associate genetic loci with diseases and phenotypes, including quantitative trait loci (QTL) linkage mapping and genome-wide association studies (GWAS). However, each of these approaches have technical and biological shortcomings. For example, the amount of heritable variation explained by GWAS is often surprisingly small and the resolution of many QTL linkage mapping studies is poor. The predictive power and interpretation of QTL and GWAS results are consequently limited. In this study, we propose a complementary approach to quantitative genetics by interrogating the vast amount of high-throughput genomic data in model organisms to functionally associate genes with phenotypes and diseases. Our algorithm combines the genome-wide functional relationship network for the laboratory mouse and a state-of-the-art machine learning method. We demonstrate the superior accuracy of this algorithm through predicting genes associated with each of 1157 diverse phenotype ontology terms. Comparison between our prediction results and a meta-analysis of quantitative genetic studies reveals both overlapping candidates and distinct, accurate predictions uniquely identified by our approach. Focusing on bone mineral density (BMD), a phenotype related to osteoporotic fracture, we experimentally validated two of our novel predictions (not observed in any previous GWAS/QTL studies) and found significant bone density defects for both Timp2 and Abcg8 deficient mice. Our results suggest that the integration of functional genomics data into networks, which itself is informative of protein function and interactions, can successfully be utilized as a complementary approach to quantitative genetics to predict disease risks. All supplementary material is available at http://cbfg.jax.org/phenotype. PMID:21085640

Guan, Yuanfang; Ackert-Bicknell, Cheryl L; Kell, Braden; Troyanskaya, Olga G; Hibbs, Matthew A

2010-11-11

94

Functional Genomics Complements Quantitative Genetics in Identifying Disease-Gene Associations  

PubMed Central

An ultimate goal of genetic research is to understand the connection between genotype and phenotype in order to improve the diagnosis and treatment of diseases. The quantitative genetics field has developed a suite of statistical methods to associate genetic loci with diseases and phenotypes, including quantitative trait loci (QTL) linkage mapping and genome-wide association studies (GWAS). However, each of these approaches have technical and biological shortcomings. For example, the amount of heritable variation explained by GWAS is often surprisingly small and the resolution of many QTL linkage mapping studies is poor. The predictive power and interpretation of QTL and GWAS results are consequently limited. In this study, we propose a complementary approach to quantitative genetics by interrogating the vast amount of high-throughput genomic data in model organisms to functionally associate genes with phenotypes and diseases. Our algorithm combines the genome-wide functional relationship network for the laboratory mouse and a state-of-the-art machine learning method. We demonstrate the superior accuracy of this algorithm through predicting genes associated with each of 1157 diverse phenotype ontology terms. Comparison between our prediction results and a meta-analysis of quantitative genetic studies reveals both overlapping candidates and distinct, accurate predictions uniquely identified by our approach. Focusing on bone mineral density (BMD), a phenotype related to osteoporotic fracture, we experimentally validated two of our novel predictions (not observed in any previous GWAS/QTL studies) and found significant bone density defects for both Timp2 and Abcg8 deficient mice. Our results suggest that the integration of functional genomics data into networks, which itself is informative of protein function and interactions, can successfully be utilized as a complementary approach to quantitative genetics to predict disease risks. All supplementary material is available at http://cbfg.jax.org/phenotype.

Guan, Yuanfang; Ackert-Bicknell, Cheryl L.; Kell, Braden; Troyanskaya, Olga G.; Hibbs, Matthew A.

2010-01-01

95

MOLECULAR GENETICS OF HONEY BEE SEX DETERMINATION  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Honey bees (Apis mellifera) are important for agriculture worldwide. Inbreeding is a hurdle to breeding any agricultural organism. This hurdle is particularly evident in honey bees, thanks to a requirement for variation at a single locus involved with sex determination. The gene involved in this ...

96

Genetic Determinants of Responses to Selenium Supplementation  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

In a cohort of healthy adults (106 M, 155 W) in eastern North Dakota, we determined the relationships of five biomarkers of selenium (Se) status (plasma Se, serum selenoprotein P [SePP], plasma glutathione peroxidase [GPX3] activity, buccal cell Se, urine Se) to genotype for four selenoproteins (cyt...

97

Tilapia sex determination: Where temperature and genetics meet  

Microsoft Academic Search

This review deals with the complex sex determining system of Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus, governed by the interactions between a genetic determination and the influence of temperature, shown in both domestic and wild populations. Naturally sex reversed individuals are strongly suggested in two wild populations. This can be due to the masculinising temperatures which some fry encounter during their sex

J. F. Baroiller; H. D'Cotta; E. Bezault; S. Wessels; G. Hoerstgen-Schwark

2009-01-01

98

Genetic Determinants of Pubertal Timing in the General Population  

PubMed Central

Puberty is an important developmental stage during which reproductive capacity is attained. The timing of puberty varies greatly among healthy individuals in the general population and is influenced by both genetic and environmental factors. Although genetic variation is known to influence the normal spectrum of pubertal timing, the specific genes involved remain largely unknown. Genetic analyses have identified a number of genes responsible for rare disorders of pubertal timing such as hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and Kallmann syndrome. Recently, the first loci with common variation reproducibly associated with population variation in the timing of puberty were identified at 6q21 in or near LIN28B and at 9q31.2. However, these two loci explain only a small fraction of the genetic contribution to population variation in pubertal timing, suggesting the need to continue to consider other loci and other types of variants. Here we provide an update of the genes implicated in disorders of puberty, discuss genes and pathways that may be involved in the timing of normal puberty, and suggest additional avenues of investigation to identify genetic regulators of puberty in the general population.

Gajdos, Zofia K.Z.; Henderson, Katherine D.; Hirschhorn, Joel N.

2010-01-01

99

The genetic map of Artemisia annua L. identifies loci affecting yield of the antimalarial drug artemisinin.  

PubMed

Artemisinin is a plant natural product produced by Artemisia annua and the active ingredient in the most effective treatment for malaria. Efforts to eradicate malaria are increasing demand for an affordable, high-quality, robust supply of artemisinin. We performed deep sequencing on the transcriptome of A. annua to identify genes and markers for fast-track breeding. Extensive genetic variation enabled us to build a detailed genetic map with nine linkage groups. Replicated field trials resulted in a quantitative trait loci (QTL) map that accounts for a significant amount of the variation in key traits controlling artemisinin yield. Enrichment for positive QTLs in parents of new high-yielding hybrids confirms that the knowledge and tools to convert A. annua into a robust crop are now available. PMID:20075252

Graham, Ian A; Besser, Katrin; Blumer, Susan; Branigan, Caroline A; Czechowski, Tomasz; Elias, Luisa; Guterman, Inna; Harvey, David; Isaac, Peter G; Khan, Awais M; Larson, Tony R; Li, Yi; Pawson, Tanya; Penfield, Teresa; Rae, Anne M; Rathbone, Deborah A; Reid, Sonja; Ross, Joe; Smallwood, Margaret F; Segura, Vincent; Townsend, Theresa; Vyas, Darshna; Winzer, Thilo; Bowles, Dianna

2010-01-15

100

Estimating genetic effects and quantifying missing heritability explained by identified rare-variant associations.  

PubMed

Next-generation sequencing has led to many complex-trait rare-variant (RV) association studies. Although single-variant association analysis can be performed, it is grossly underpowered. Therefore, researchers have developed many RV association tests that aggregate multiple variant sites across a genetic region (e.g., gene), and test for the association between the trait and the aggregated genotype. After these aggregate tests detect an association, it is only possible to estimate the average genetic effect for a group of RVs. As a result of the "winner's curse," such an estimate can be biased. Although for common variants one can obtain unbiased estimates of genetic parameters by analyzing a replication sample, for RVs it is desirable to obtain unbiased genetic estimates for the study where the association is identified. This is because there can be substantial heterogeneity of RV sites and frequencies even among closely related populations. In order to obtain an unbiased estimate for aggregated RV analysis, we developed bootstrap-sample-split algorithms to reduce the bias of the winner's curse. The unbiased estimates are greatly important for understanding the population-specific contribution of RVs to the heritability of complex traits. We also demonstrate both theoretically and via simulations that for aggregate RV analysis the genetic variance for a gene or region will always be underestimated, sometimes substantially, because of the presence of noncausal variants or because of the presence of causal variants with effects of different magnitudes or directions. Therefore, even if RVs play a major role in the complex-trait etiologies, a portion of the heritability will remain missing, and the contribution of RVs to the complex-trait etiologies will be underestimated. PMID:23022102

Liu, Dajiang J; Leal, Suzanne M

2012-09-27

101

A Genetic Screening Strategy Identifies Novel Regulators of the Proteostasis Network  

PubMed Central

A hallmark of diseases of protein conformation and aging is the appearance of protein aggregates associated with cellular toxicity. We posit that the functional properties of the proteostasis network (PN) protect the proteome from misfolding and combat the proteotoxic events leading to cellular pathology. In this study, we have identified new components of the proteostasis network that can suppress aggregation and proteotoxicity, by performing RNA interference (RNAi) genetic screens for multiple unrelated conformationally challenged cytoplasmic proteins expressed in Caenorhabditis elegans. We identified 88 suppressors of polyglutamine (polyQ) aggregation, of which 63 modifiers also suppressed aggregation of mutant SOD1G93A. Of these, only 23 gene-modifiers suppressed aggregation and restored animal motility, revealing that aggregation and toxicity can be genetically uncoupled. Nine of these modifiers were shown to be effective in restoring the folding and function of multiple endogenous temperature-sensitive (TS) mutant proteins, of which five improved folding in a HSF-1–dependent manner, by inducing cytoplasmic chaperones. This triage screening strategy also identified a novel set of PN regulatory components that, by altering metabolic and RNA processing functions, establish alternate cellular environments not generally dependent on stress response activation and that are broadly protective against misfolded and aggregation-prone proteins.

Silva, M. Catarina; Fox, Susan; Beam, Monica; Thakkar, Happy; Amaral, Margarida D.; Morimoto, Richard I.

2011-01-01

102

Determining Hydraulic Characteristics of Production Wells using Genetic Algorithm  

Microsoft Academic Search

Proper well management requires the determination of characteristic hydraulic parameters of production wells such as well loss coefficient (C) and aquifer loss coefficient (B), which are conventionally determined by the graphical analysis ofstep-drawdowntest data. However, in the present study, the efficacy of a non-conventional optimization technique called Genetic Algorithm (GA), which ensures near-optimal or optimal solutions, is assessedin determining well

Madan K. Jha; Gaurav Nanda; Manoj P. Samuel

2004-01-01

103

Determinism and mass-media portrayals of genetics.  

PubMed Central

Scholars have expressed concern that the introduction of substantial coverage of "medical genetics" in the mass media during the past 2 decades represents an increase in biological determinism in public discourse. To test this contention, we analyzed the contents of a randomly selected, structured sample of American public newspapers (n=250) and magazines (n=722) published during 1919-95. Three coders, using three measures, all with intercoder reliability >85%, were employed. Results indicate that the introduction of the discourse of medical genetics is correlated with both a statistically significant decrease in the degree to which articles attribute human characteristics to genetic causes (P<.001) and a statistically significant increase in the differentiation of attributions to genetic and other causes among various conditions or outcomes (P<. 016). There has been no statistically significant change in the relative proportions of physical phenomena attributed to genetic causes, but there has been a statistically significant decrease in the number of articles assigning genetic causes to mental (P<.002) and behavioral (P<.000) characteristics. These results suggest that the current discourse of medical genetics is not accurately described as more biologically deterministic than its antecedents.

Condit, C M; Ofulue, N; Sheedy, K M

1998-01-01

104

A screening method to identify genetic variation in root growth response to a salinity gradient.  

PubMed

Salinity as well as drought are increasing problems in agriculture. Durum wheat (Triticum turgidum L. ssp. durum Desf.) is relatively salt sensitive compared with bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), and yields poorly on saline soil. Field studies indicate that roots of durum wheat do not proliferate as extensively as bread wheat in saline soil. In order to look for genetic diversity in root growth within durum wheat, a screening method was developed to identify genetic variation in rates of root growth in a saline solution gradient similar to that found in many saline fields. Seedlings were grown in rolls of germination paper in plastic tubes 37 cm tall, with a gradient of salt concentration increasing towards the bottom of the tubes which contained from 50-200 mM NaCl with complete nutrients. Seedlings were grown in the light to the two leaf stage, and transpiration and evaporation were minimized so that the salinity gradient was maintained. An NaCl concentration of 150 mM at the bottom was found suitable to identify genetic variation. This corresponds to a level of salinity in the field that reduces shoot growth by 50% or more. The screen inhibited seminal axile root length more than branch root length in three out of four genotypes, highlighting changes in root system architecture caused by a saline gradient that is genotype dependent. This method can be extended to other species to identify variation in root elongation in response to gradients in salt, nutrients, or toxic elements. PMID:21118825

Rahnama, Afrasyab; Munns, Rana; Poustini, Kazem; Watt, Michelle

2011-01-01

105

Combining genetic and biochemical approaches to identify functional molecular contact points  

PubMed Central

Protein-protein interactions are required for many viral and cellular functions and are potential targets for novel therapies. Here we detail a series of genetic and biochemical techniques used in combination to find an essential molecular contact point on the duck hepatitis B virus polymerase. These techniques include differential immunoprecipitation, mutagenesis and peptide competition. The strength of these techniques is their ability to identify contact points on intact proteins or protein complexes employing functional assays. This approach can be used to aid identification of putative binding sites on proteins and protein complexes which are resistant to characterization by other methods.

Badtke, Matthew P.; Cao, Feng

2006-01-01

106

Early Determinants of Obesity: Genetic, Epigenetic, and In Utero Influences  

PubMed Central

There is an emerging body of work indicating that genes, epigenetics, and the in utero environment can impact whether or not a child is obese. While certain genes have been identified that increase one's risk for becoming obese, other factors such as excess gestational weight gain, gestational diabetes mellitus, and smoking can also influence this risk. Understanding these influences can help to inform which behaviors and exposures should be targeted if we are to decrease the prevalence of obesity. By helping parents and young children change certain behaviors and exposures during critical time periods, we may be able to alter or modify one's genetic predisposition. However, further research is needed to determine which efforts are effective at decreasing the incidence of obesity and to develop new methods of prevention. In this paper, we will discuss how genes, epigenetics, and in utero influences affect the development of obesity. We will then discuss current efforts to alter these influences and suggest future directions for this work.

Rhee, Kyung E.; Phelan, Suzanne; McCaffery, Jeanne

2012-01-01

107

Methods of determining relative genetic likelihoods of an individual matching a population  

US Patent & Trademark Office Database

Provided are methods of determining an individual's relative likelihood of having a genetic match with one or more local populations as compared to a generic index population. Also provided are systems, apparatuses, kits, and machine-readable medium relating to such methods. The methods may be used for example, to identify an individual's or individual's ancestor's most likely geographic origin, or to identify the breed, species, kingdom, etc. of an organism.

Martin; Lucas (Arlington, VA); Valaitis; Eduardas (Arlington, VA)

2012-10-09

108

Spatial and temporal determinants of genetic structure in Gentianella bohemica  

PubMed Central

The biennial plant Gentianella bohemica is a subendemic of the Bohemian Massif, where it occurs in seminatural grasslands. It has become rare in recent decades as a result of profound changes in land use. Using amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLP) fingerprint data, we investigated the genetic structure within and among populations of G. bohemica in Bavaria, the Czech Republic, and the Austrian border region. The aim of our study was (1) to analyze the genetic structure among populations and to discuss these findings in the context of present and historical patterns of connectivity and isolation of populations, (2) to analyze genetic structure among consecutive generations (cohorts of two consecutive years), and (3) to investigate relationships between intrapopulational diversity and effective population size (Ne) as well as plant traits. (1) The German populations were strongly isolated from each other (pairwise FST= 0.29–0.60) and from all other populations (FST= 0.24–0.49). We found a pattern of near panmixis among the latter (FST= 0.15–0.35) with geographical distance explaining only 8% of the genetic variance. These results were congruent with a principal coordinate analysis (PCoA) and analysis using STRUCTURE to identify genetically coherent groups. These findings are in line with the strong physical barrier and historical constraints, resulting in separation of the German populations from the others. (2) We found pronounced genetic differences between consecutive cohorts of the German populations (pairwise FST= 0.23 and 0.31), which can be explained by local population history (land use, disturbance). (3) Genetic diversity within populations (Shannon index, HSh) was significantly correlated with Ne (RS= 0.733) and reflected a loss of diversity due to several demographic bottlenecks. Overall, we found that the genetic structure in G. bohemica is strongly influenced by historical periods of high connectivity and isolation as well as by marked demographic fluctuations in declining populations.

Koniger, Julia; Rebernig, Carolin A; Brabec, Jiri; Kiehl, Kathrin; Greimler, Josef

2012-01-01

109

Genetic determinants of pathogenesis by feline infectious peritonitis virus.  

PubMed

Feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) is a fatal, immune-augmented, and progressive viral disease of cats associated with feline coronavirus (FCoV). Viral genetic determinants specifically associated with FIPV pathogenesis have not yet been discovered. Viral gene signatures in the spike, non-structural protein 3c, and membrane of the coronavirus genome have been shown to often correlate with disease manifestation. An "in vivo mutation transition hypothesis" is widely accepted and postulates that de novo virus mutation occurs in vivo giving rise to virulence. The existence of "distinct circulating avirulent and virulent strains" is an alternative hypothesis of viral pathogenesis. It may be possible that viral dynamics from both hypotheses are at play in the occurrence of FIP. Epidemiologic data suggests that the genetic background of the cat contributes to the manifestation of FIP. Further studies exploring both viral and host genetic determinants of disease in FIP offer specific opportunities for the management of this disease. PMID:21719115

Brown, Meredith A

2011-06-12

110

Linkage mapping identifies the sex determining region as a single locus in the Pennate diatom Seminavis robusta.  

PubMed

The pennate diatom Seminavis robusta, characterized by an archetypical diatom life cycle including a heterothallic mating system, is emerging as a model system for studying the molecular regulation of the diatom cell and life cycle. One of its main advantages compared with other diatom model systems is that sexual crosses can be made routinely, offering unprecedented possibilities for forward genetics. To date, nothing is known about the genetic basis of sex determination in diatoms. Here, we report on the construction of mating type-specific linkage maps for S. robusta, and use them to identify a single locus sex determination system in this diatom. We identified 13 mating type plus and 15 mating type minus linkage groups obtained from the analysis of 463 AFLP markers segregating in a full-sib family, covering 963.7 and 972.2 cM, respectively. Five linkage group pairs could be identified as putative homologues. The mating type phenotype mapped as a monogenic trait, disclosing the mating type plus as the heterogametic sex. This study provides the first evidence for a genetic sex determining mechanism in a diatom. PMID:23527302

Vanstechelman, Ives; Sabbe, Koen; Vyverman, Wim; Vanormelingen, Pieter; Vuylsteke, Marnik

2013-03-20

111

Linkage Mapping Identifies the Sex Determining Region as a Single Locus in the Pennate Diatom Seminavis robusta  

PubMed Central

The pennate diatom Seminavis robusta, characterized by an archetypical diatom life cycle including a heterothallic mating system, is emerging as a model system for studying the molecular regulation of the diatom cell and life cycle. One of its main advantages compared with other diatom model systems is that sexual crosses can be made routinely, offering unprecedented possibilities for forward genetics. To date, nothing is known about the genetic basis of sex determination in diatoms. Here, we report on the construction of mating type-specific linkage maps for S. robusta, and use them to identify a single locus sex determination system in this diatom. We identified 13 mating type plus and 15 mating type minus linkage groups obtained from the analysis of 463 AFLP markers segregating in a full-sib family, covering 963.7 and 972.2 cM, respectively. Five linkage group pairs could be identified as putative homologues. The mating type phenotype mapped as a monogenic trait, disclosing the mating type plus as the heterogametic sex. This study provides the first evidence for a genetic sex determining mechanism in a diatom.

Vanstechelman, Ives; Sabbe, Koen; Vyverman, Wim; Vanormelingen, Pieter; Vuylsteke, Marnik

2013-01-01

112

Genetic factors related to gastric cancer susceptibility identified using a genome-wide association study.  

PubMed

Gastric cancer (GC) is one of the major malignant diseases worldwide, especially in Asia, where Japan and Korea have the highest incidence in the world. Gastric cancer is classified into intestinal and diffuse types. While the former is almost absolutely caused by Helicobacter pylori infection as the initial insult, the latter seems to include cases in which the role of infection is limited, if any, and a contribution of genetic factors is anticipated. Previously, we performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) on diffuse-type GC by using single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) catalogued for Japanese population (JSNP), and identified a prostate stem cell antigen (PSCA) gene encoding a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored cell surface antigen as a GC susceptibility gene. From the second candidate locus identified using the GWAS, 1q22, we found the Mucin 1 (MUC1) gene encoding a cell membrane-bound mucin protein as another gene related to diffuse-type GC. A two-allele analysis based on risk genotypes of the two genes revealed approximately 95% of Japanese population have at least one of the two risk genotypes, and approximately 56% of the population have both risk genotypes. The two-SNP genotype might offer ample room to further stratify a high GC risk subpopulation in Japan and Asia by adding another genetic and/or non-genetic factor. Recently, a GWAS on the Chinese population disclosed an additional three GC susceptibility loci: 3q13.31, 5p13.1 and 10q23. PMID:23057512

Saeki, Norihisa; Ono, Hiroe; Sakamoto, Hiromi; Yoshida, Teruhiko

2012-11-24

113

Genetic Mapping and Exome Sequencing Identify Variants Associated with Five Novel Diseases  

PubMed Central

The Clinic for Special Children (CSC) has integrated biochemical and molecular methods into a rural pediatric practice serving Old Order Amish and Mennonite (Plain) children. Among the Plain people, we have used single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) microarrays to genetically map recessive disorders to large autozygous haplotype blocks (mean?=?4.4 Mb) that contain many genes (mean?=?79). For some, uninformative mapping or large gene lists preclude disease-gene identification by Sanger sequencing. Seven such conditions were selected for exome sequencing at the Broad Institute; all had been previously mapped at the CSC using low density SNP microarrays coupled with autozygosity and linkage analyses. Using between 1 and 5 patient samples per disorder, we identified sequence variants in the known disease-causing genes SLC6A3 and FLVCR1, and present evidence to strongly support the pathogenicity of variants identified in TUBGCP6, BRAT1, SNIP1, CRADD, and HARS. Our results reveal the power of coupling new genotyping technologies to population-specific genetic knowledge and robust clinical data.

Puffenberger, Erik G.; Jinks, Robert N.; Sougnez, Carrie; Cibulskis, Kristian; Willert, Rebecca A.; Achilly, Nathan P.; Cassidy, Ryan P.; Fiorentini, Christopher J.; Heiken, Kory F.; Lawrence, Johnny J.; Mahoney, Molly H.; Miller, Christopher J.; Nair, Devika T.; Politi, Kristin A.; Worcester, Kimberly N.; Setton, Roni A.; DiPiazza, Rosa; Sherman, Eric A.; Eastman, James T.; Francklyn, Christopher; Robey-Bond, Susan; Rider, Nicholas L.; Gabriel, Stacey; Morton, D. Holmes; Strauss, Kevin A.

2012-01-01

114

Genetic mapping and exome sequencing identify variants associated with five novel diseases.  

PubMed

The Clinic for Special Children (CSC) has integrated biochemical and molecular methods into a rural pediatric practice serving Old Order Amish and Mennonite (Plain) children. Among the Plain people, we have used single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) microarrays to genetically map recessive disorders to large autozygous haplotype blocks (mean?=?4.4 Mb) that contain many genes (mean?=?79). For some, uninformative mapping or large gene lists preclude disease-gene identification by Sanger sequencing. Seven such conditions were selected for exome sequencing at the Broad Institute; all had been previously mapped at the CSC using low density SNP microarrays coupled with autozygosity and linkage analyses. Using between 1 and 5 patient samples per disorder, we identified sequence variants in the known disease-causing genes SLC6A3 and FLVCR1, and present evidence to strongly support the pathogenicity of variants identified in TUBGCP6, BRAT1, SNIP1, CRADD, and HARS. Our results reveal the power of coupling new genotyping technologies to population-specific genetic knowledge and robust clinical data. PMID:22279524

Puffenberger, Erik G; Jinks, Robert N; Sougnez, Carrie; Cibulskis, Kristian; Willert, Rebecca A; Achilly, Nathan P; Cassidy, Ryan P; Fiorentini, Christopher J; Heiken, Kory F; Lawrence, Johnny J; Mahoney, Molly H; Miller, Christopher J; Nair, Devika T; Politi, Kristin A; Worcester, Kimberly N; Setton, Roni A; Dipiazza, Rosa; Sherman, Eric A; Eastman, James T; Francklyn, Christopher; Robey-Bond, Susan; Rider, Nicholas L; Gabriel, Stacey; Morton, D Holmes; Strauss, Kevin A

2012-01-17

115

Naturally occurring genetic variation affects Drosophila photoreceptor determination  

Microsoft Academic Search

The signal transduction pathway controlling determination of the identity of the R7 photoreceptor in the Drosophila eye is shown to harbor high levels of naturally occurring genetic variation. The number of ectopic R7 cells induced by the\\u000a dosage-sensitive Sev\\u000a \\u000a S11.1\\u000a transgene that encodes a mildly activated form of the Sevenless tyrosine kinase receptor is highly sensitive to the wild-type\\u000a genetic

Patricia J. Polaczyk; Robert Gasperini; Greg Gibson

1998-01-01

116

Genetic screening of Greek patients with Huntington’s disease phenocopies identifies an SCA8 expansion.  

PubMed

Huntington’s disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by a triad of chorea, psychiatric disturbance and cognitive decline. Around 1% of patients with HD-like symptoms lack the causative HD expansion and are considered HD phenocopies. Genetic diseases that can present as HD phenocopies include HD-like syndromes such as HDL1, HDL2 and HDL4 (SCA17), some spinocerebellar ataxias (SCAs) and dentatorubral-pallidoluysian atrophy (DRPLA). In this study we screened a cohort of 21 Greek patients with HD phenocopy syndromes formutations causing HDL2, SCA17, SCA1, SCA2, SCA3,SCA8, SCA12 and DRPLA. Fifteen patients (71%) had a positive family history. We identified one patient (4.8% of the total cohort) with an expansion of 81 combined CTA/CTG repeats at the SCA8 locus. This falls within what is believed to be the high-penetrance allele range. In addition to the classic HD triad, the patient had features of dystonia and oculomotor apraxia. There were no cases of HDL2, SCA17, SCA1, SCA2, SCA3, SCA12 or DRPLA. Given the controversy surrounding the SCA8 expansion, the present finding may be incidental. However, if pathogenic, it broadens the phenotype that may be associated with SCA8 expansions. The absence of any other mutations in our cohort is not surprising, given the low probability of reaching a genetic diagnosis in HD phenocopy patients. PMID:22297462

Koutsis, G; Karadima, G; Pandraud, A; Sweeney, M G; Paudel, R; Houlden, H; Wood, N W; Panas, M

2012-09-01

117

Identifying genetic diversity of avirulence genes in Leptosphaeria maculans using whole genome sequencing.  

PubMed

Next generation sequencing technology allows rapid re-sequencing of individuals, as well as the discovery of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), for genomic diversity and evolutionary analyses. By sequencing two isolates of the fungal plant pathogen Leptosphaeria maculans, the causal agent of blackleg disease in Brassica crops, we have generated a resource of over 76 million sequence reads aligned to the reference genome. We identified over 21,000 SNPs with an overall SNP frequency of one SNP every 2,065 bp. Sequence validation of a selection of these SNPs in additional isolates collected throughout Australia indicates a high degree of polymorphism in the Australian population. In preliminary phylogenetic analysis, isolates from Western Australia clustered together and those collected from Brassica juncea stubble were identical. These SNPs provide a novel marker resource to study the genetic diversity of this pathogen. We demonstrate that re-sequencing provides a method of validating previously characterised SNPs and analysing differences in important genes, such as the disease related avirulence genes of L. maculans. Understanding the genetic characteristics of this devastating pathogen is vital in developing long-term solutions to managing blackleg disease in Brassica crops. PMID:23793572

Zander, Manuel; Patel, Dhwani A; Van de Wouw, Angela; Lai, Kaitao; Lorenc, Michal T; Campbell, Emma; Hayward, Alice; Edwards, David; Raman, Harsh; Batley, Jacqueline

2013-06-21

118

Psoriasis Regression Analysis of MHC Loci Identifies Shared Genetic Variants with Vitiligo  

PubMed Central

Psoriasis is a common inflammatory skin disease with genetic components of both immune system and the epidermis. PSOR1 locus (6q21) has been strongly associated with psoriasis; however, it is difficult to identify additional independent association due to strong linkage disequilibrium in the MHC region. We performed stepwise regression analyses of more than 3,000 SNPs in the MHC region genotyped using Human 610-Quad (Illumina) in 1,139 cases with psoriasis and 1,132 controls of Han Chinese population to search for additional independent association. With four regression models obtained, two SNPs rs9468925 in HLA-C/HLA-B and rs2858881 in HLA-DQA2 were repeatedly selected in all models, suggesting that multiple loci outside PSOR1 locus were associated with psoriasis. More importantly we find that rs9468925 in HLA-C/HLA-B is associated with both psoriasis and vitiligo, providing first important evidence that two major skin diseases share a common genetic locus in the MHC, and a basis for elucidating the molecular mechanism of skin disorders.

Yin, Xian-Yong; Wang, Zai-Xing; Sun, Liang-Dan; He, Su-Min; Cheng, Hui; Hu, Da-Yan; Zhang, Zheng; Li, Yang; Zuo, Xian-Bo; Zhou, You-Wen; Yang, Sen; Fan, Xing; Zhang, Xue-Jun; Zhang, Feng-Yu

2011-01-01

119

Genome wide SNP array identified multiple mechanisms of genetic changes in Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia.  

PubMed

SNP array (SNPa) was developed to detect copy number alteration (CNA) and loss of heterozygosity (LOH) without copy number changes, CN-LOH. We aimed to identify novel genomic aberrations using SNPa in 31 WM with paired samples. Methylation status and mutation were analyzed on target genes. A total of 61 genetic aberrations were observed, 58 CNA (33 gains, 25 losses) in 58% of patients and CN-LOH in 6% of patients. The CNA were widely distributed throughout the genome, including 12 recurrent regions and identified new cryptic clonal chromosomal lesions that were mapped. Gene set expression analysis demonstrated a relationship between either deletion 6q or gain of chromosome 4 and alteration of gene expression profiling. We then studied methylation status and sought for mutations in altered regions on target genes. We observed methylation of DLEU7 on chromosome 13 in all patients (n?=?12) with WM, and mutations of CD79B/CD79A genes (17q region), a key component of the BCR pathway, in 15% of cases. Most importantly, higher frequency of ?3 CNA was observed in symptomatic WM. In conclusion, this study expands the view of the genomic complexity of WM, especially in symptomatic WM, including a potentially new mechanism of gene dysfunction, acquired uniparental disomy/CN-LOH. Finally, we have identified new potential target genes in WM, such as DLEU7 and CD79A/B. Am. J. Heamtol. 88:948-954, 2013. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:23861223

Poulain, Stéphanie; Roumier, Christophe; Galiègue-Zouitina, Sylvie; Daudignon, Agnès; Herbaux, Charles; Aiijou, Rachid; Lainelle, Amélie; Broucqsault, Natacha; Bertrand, Elisabeth; Manier, Salomon; Renneville, Aline; Soenen, Valérie; Tricot, Sabine; Roche-Lestienne, Catherine; Duthilleul, Patrick; Preudhomme, Claude; Quesnel, Bruno; Morel, Pierre; Leleu, Xavier

2013-08-30

120

A proton current drives action potentials in genetically identified sour taste cells.  

PubMed

Five tastes have been identified, each of which is transduced by a separate set of taste cells. Of these sour, which is associated with acid stimuli, is the least understood. Genetic ablation experiments have established that sour is detected by a subset of taste cells that express the TRP channel PKD2L1 and its partner PKD1L3, however the mechanisms by which this subset of cells detects acids remain unclear. Previous efforts to understand sour taste transduction have been hindered because sour responsive cells represent only a small fraction of cells in a taste bud, and numerous ion channels with no role in sour sensing are sensitive to acidic pH. To identify acid-sensitive conductances unique to sour cells, we created genetically modified mice in which sour cells were marked by expression of YFP under the control of the PKD2L1 promoter. To measure responses to sour stimuli we developed a method in which suction electrode recording is combined with UV photolysis of NPE-caged proton. Using these methods, we report that responses to sour stimuli are not mediated by Na(+) permeable channels as previously thought, but instead are mediated by a proton conductance specific to PKD2L1-expressing taste cells. This conductance is sufficient to drive action potential firing in response to acid stimuli, is enriched in the apical membrane of PKD2L1-expressing taste cells and is not affected by targeted deletion of the PKD1L3 gene. We conclude that, during sour transduction, protons enter through an apical proton conductance to directly depolarize the taste cell membrane. PMID:21098668

Chang, Rui B; Waters, Hang; Liman, Emily R

2010-11-23

121

A proton current drives action potentials in genetically identified sour taste cells  

PubMed Central

Five tastes have been identified, each of which is transduced by a separate set of taste cells. Of these sour, which is associated with acid stimuli, is the least understood. Genetic ablation experiments have established that sour is detected by a subset of taste cells that express the TRP channel PKD2L1 and its partner PKD1L3, however the mechanisms by which this subset of cells detects acids remain unclear. Previous efforts to understand sour taste transduction have been hindered because sour responsive cells represent only a small fraction of cells in a taste bud, and numerous ion channels with no role in sour sensing are sensitive to acidic pH. To identify acid-sensitive conductances unique to sour cells, we created genetically modified mice in which sour cells were marked by expression of YFP under the control of the PKD2L1 promoter. To measure responses to sour stimuli we developed a method in which suction electrode recording is combined with UV photolysis of NPE-caged proton. Using these methods, we report that responses to sour stimuli are not mediated by Na+ permeable channels as previously thought, but instead are mediated by a proton conductance specific to PKD2L1-expressing taste cells. This conductance is sufficient to drive action potential firing in response to acid stimuli, is enriched in the apical membrane of PKD2L1-expressing taste cells and is not affected by targeted deletion of the PKD1L3 gene. We conclude that, during sour transduction, protons enter through an apical proton conductance to directly depolarize the taste cell membrane.

Chang, Rui B.; Waters, Hang; Liman, Emily R.

2010-01-01

122

Integrated analysis of genetic and proteomic data identifies biomarkers associated with adverse events following smallpox vaccination.  

PubMed

Complex clinical outcomes, such as adverse reaction to vaccination, arise from the concerted interactions among the myriad components of a biological system. Therefore, comprehensive etiological models can be developed only through the integrated study of multiple types of experimental data. In this study, we apply this paradigm to high-dimensional genetic and proteomic data collected to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the development of adverse events (AEs) in patients after smallpox vaccination. As vaccination was successful in all of the patients under study, the AE outcomes reported likely represent the result of interactions among immune system components that result in excessive or prolonged immune stimulation. In this study, we examined 1442 genetic variables (single nucleotide polymorphisms) and 108 proteomic variables (serum cytokine concentrations) to model AE risk. To accomplish this daunting analytical task, we employed the Random Forests (RF) method to filter the most important attributes, then we used the selected attributes to build a final decision tree model. This strategy is well suited to integrated analysis, as relevant attributes may be selected from categorical or continuous data. Importantly, RF is a natural approach for studying the type of gene-gene, gene-protein and protein-protein interactions we hypothesize to be involved in the development of clinical AEs. RF importance scores for particular attributes take interactions into account, and there may be interactions across data types. Combining information from previous studies on AEs related to smallpox vaccination with the genetic and proteomic attributes identified by RF, we built a comprehensive model of AE development that includes the cytokines intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1 or CD54), interleukin-10 (IL-10), and colony stimulating factor-3 (CSF-3 or G-CSF) and a genetic polymorphism in the cytokine gene interleukin-4 (IL4). The biological factors included in the model support our hypothesized mechanism for the development of AEs involving prolonged stimulation of inflammatory pathways and an imbalance of normal tissue damage repair pathways. This study shows the utility of RF for such analytical tasks, while both enhancing and reinforcing our working model of AE development after smallpox vaccination. PMID:18923431

Reif, D M; Motsinger-Reif, A A; McKinney, B A; Rock, M T; Crowe, J E; Moore, J H

2008-10-16

123

Multifactor dimensionality reduction analysis identifies specific nucleotide patterns promoting genetic polymorphisms  

PubMed Central

Background The fidelity of DNA replication serves as the nidus for both genetic evolution and genomic instability fostering disease. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) constitute greater than 80% of the genetic variation between individuals. A new theory regarding DNA replication fidelity has emerged in which selectivity is governed by base-pair geometry through interactions between the selected nucleotide, the complementary strand, and the polymerase active site. We hypothesize that specific nucleotide combinations in the flanking regions of SNP fragments are associated with mutation. Results We modeled the relationship between DNA sequence and observed polymorphisms using the novel multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR) approach. MDR was originally developed to detect synergistic interactions between multiple SNPs that are predictive of disease susceptibility. We initially assembled data from the Broad Institute as a pilot test for the hypothesis that flanking region patterns associate with mutagenesis (n = 2194). We then confirmed and expanded our inquiry with human SNPs within coding regions and their flanking sequences collected from the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) database (n = 29967) and a control set of sequences (coding region) not associated with SNP sites randomly selected from the NCBI database (n = 29967). We discovered seven flanking region pattern associations in the Broad dataset which reached a minimum significance level of p ? 0.05. Significant models (p << 0.001) were detected for each SNP type examined in the larger NCBI dataset. Importantly, the flanking region models were elongated or truncated depending on the nucleotide change. Additionally, nucleotide distributions differed significantly at motif sites relative to the type of variation observed. The MDR approach effectively discerned specific sites within the flanking regions of observed SNPs and their respective identities, supporting the collective contribution of these sites to SNP genesis. Conclusion The present study represents the first use of this computational methodology for modeling nonlinear patterns in molecular genetics. MDR was able to identify distinct nucleotide patterning around sites of mutations dependent upon the observed nucleotide change. We discovered one flanking region set that included five nucleotides clustered around a specific type of SNP site. Based on the strongly associated patterns identified in this study, it may become possible to scan genomic databases for such clustering of nucleotides in order to predict likely sites of future SNPs, and even the type of polymorphism most likely to occur.

Arehart, Eric; Gleim, Scott; White, Bill; Hwa, John; Moore, Jason H

2009-01-01

124

Genetical genomic determinants of alcohol consumption in rats and humans  

PubMed Central

Background We have used a genetical genomic approach, in conjunction with phenotypic analysis of alcohol consumption, to identify candidate genes that predispose to varying levels of alcohol intake by HXB/BXH recombinant inbred rat strains. In addition, in two populations of humans, we assessed genetic polymorphisms associated with alcohol consumption using a custom genotyping array for 1,350 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Our goal was to ascertain whether our approach, which relies on statistical and informatics techniques, and non-human animal models of alcohol drinking behavior, could inform interpretation of genetic association studies with human populations. Results In the HXB/BXH recombinant inbred (RI) rats, correlation analysis of brain gene expression levels with alcohol consumption in a two-bottle choice paradigm, and filtering based on behavioral and gene expression quantitative trait locus (QTL) analyses, generated a list of candidate genes. A literature-based, functional analysis of the interactions of the products of these candidate genes defined pathways linked to presynaptic GABA release, activation of dopamine neurons, and postsynaptic GABA receptor trafficking, in brain regions including the hypothalamus, ventral tegmentum and amygdala. The analysis also implicated energy metabolism and caloric intake control as potential influences on alcohol consumption by the recombinant inbred rats. In the human populations, polymorphisms in genes associated with GABA synthesis and GABA receptors, as well as genes related to dopaminergic transmission, were associated with alcohol consumption. Conclusion Our results emphasize the importance of the signaling pathways identified using the non-human animal models, rather than single gene products, in identifying factors responsible for complex traits such as alcohol consumption. The results suggest cross-species similarities in pathways that influence predisposition to consume alcohol by rats and humans. The importance of a well-defined phenotype is also illustrated. Our results also suggest that different genetic factors predispose alcohol dependence versus the phenotype of alcohol consumption.

Tabakoff, Boris; Saba, Laura; Printz, Morton; Flodman, Pam; Hodgkinson, Colin; Goldman, David; Koob, George; Richardson, Heather N; Kechris, Katerina; Bell, Richard L; Hubner, Norbert; Heinig, Matthias; Pravenec, Michal; Mangion, Jonathan; Legault, Lucie; Dongier, Maurice; Conigrave, Katherine M; Whitfield, John B; Saunders, John; Grant, Bridget; Hoffman, Paula L

2009-01-01

125

Non-genetic determinants of mosquito competence for malaria parasites.  

PubMed

Understanding how mosquito vectors and malaria parasites interact is of fundamental interest, and it also offers novel perspectives for disease control. Both the genetic and environmental contexts are known to affect the ability of mosquitoes to support malaria development and transmission, i.e., vector competence. Although the role of environment has long been recognized, much work has focused on host and parasite genetic effects. However, the last few years have seen a surge of studies revealing a great diversity of ways in which non-genetic factors can interfere with mosquito-Plasmodium interactions. Here, we review the current evidence for such environmentally mediated effects, including ambient temperature, mosquito diet, microbial gut flora, and infection history, and we identify additional factors previously overlooked in mosquito-Plasmodium interactions. We also discuss epidemiological implications, and the evolutionary consequences for vector immunity and parasite transmission strategies. Finally, we propose directions for further research and argue that an improved knowledge of non-genetic influences on mosquito-Plasmodium interactions could aid in implementing conventional malaria control measures and contribute to the design of novel strategies. PMID:23818841

Lefèvre, Thierry; Vantaux, Amélie; Dabiré, Kounbobr R; Mouline, Karine; Cohuet, Anna

2013-06-20

126

GWAS of 126,559 individuals identifies genetic variants associated with educational attainment.  

PubMed

A genome-wide association study (GWAS) of educational attainment was conducted in a discovery sample of 101,069 individuals and a replication sample of 25,490. Three independent single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are genome-wide significant (rs9320913, rs11584700, rs4851266), and all three replicate. Estimated effects sizes are small (coefficient of determination R(2) ? 0.02%), approximately 1 month of schooling per allele. A linear polygenic score from all measured SNPs accounts for ?2% of the variance in both educational attainment and cognitive function. Genes in the region of the loci have previously been associated with health, cognitive, and central nervous system phenotypes, and bioinformatics analyses suggest the involvement of the anterior caudate nucleus. These findings provide promising candidate SNPs for follow-up work, and our effect size estimates can anchor power analyses in social-science genetics. PMID:23722424

Rietveld, Cornelius A; Medland, Sarah E; Derringer, Jaime; Yang, Jian; Esko, Tõnu; Martin, Nicolas W; Westra, Harm-Jan; Shakhbazov, Konstantin; Abdellaoui, Abdel; Agrawal, Arpana; Albrecht, Eva; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z; Amin, Najaf; Barnard, John; Baumeister, Sebastian E; Benke, Kelly S; Bielak, Lawrence F; Boatman, Jeffrey A; Boyle, Patricia A; Davies, Gail; de Leeuw, Christiaan; Eklund, Niina; Evans, Daniel S; Ferhmann, Rudolf; Fischer, Krista; Gieger, Christian; Gjessing, Håkon K; Hägg, Sara; Harris, Jennifer R; Hayward, Caroline; Holzapfel, Christina; Ibrahim-Verbaas, Carla A; Ingelsson, Erik; Jacobsson, Bo; Joshi, Peter K; Jugessur, Astanand; Kaakinen, Marika; Kanoni, Stavroula; Karjalainen, Juha; Kolcic, Ivana; Kristiansson, Kati; Kutalik, Zoltán; Lahti, Jari; Lee, Sang H; Lin, Peng; Lind, Penelope A; Liu, Yongmei; Lohman, Kurt; Loitfelder, Marisa; McMahon, George; Vidal, Pedro Marques; Meirelles, Osorio; Milani, Lili; Myhre, Ronny; Nuotio, Marja-Liisa; Oldmeadow, Christopher J; Petrovic, Katja E; Peyrot, Wouter J; Polasek, Ozren; Quaye, Lydia; Reinmaa, Eva; Rice, John P; Rizzi, Thais S; Schmidt, Helena; Schmidt, Reinhold; Smith, Albert V; Smith, Jennifer A; Tanaka, Toshiko; Terracciano, Antonio; van der Loos, Matthijs J H M; Vitart, Veronique; Völzke, Henry; Wellmann, Jürgen; Yu, Lei; Zhao, Wei; Allik, Jüri; Attia, John R; Bandinelli, Stefania; Bastardot, François; Beauchamp, Jonathan; Bennett, David A; Berger, Klaus; Bierut, Laura J; Boomsma, Dorret I; Bültmann, Ute; Campbell, Harry; Chabris, Christopher F; Cherkas, Lynn; Chung, Mina K; Cucca, Francesco; de Andrade, Mariza; De Jager, Philip L; De Neve, Jan-Emmanuel; Deary, Ian J; Dedoussis, George V; Deloukas, Panos; Dimitriou, Maria; Eiríksdóttir, Guðny; Elderson, Martin F; Eriksson, Johan G; Evans, David M; Faul, Jessica D; Ferrucci, Luigi; Garcia, Melissa E; Grönberg, Henrik; Guðnason, Vilmundur; Hall, Per; Harris, Juliette M; Harris, Tamara B; Hastie, Nicholas D; Heath, Andrew C; Hernandez, Dena G; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hofman, Adriaan; Holle, Rolf; Holliday, Elizabeth G; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Iacono, William G; Illig, Thomas; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Kähönen, Mika; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kirkpatrick, Robert M; Kowgier, Matthew; Latvala, Antti; Launer, Lenore J; Lawlor, Debbie A; Lehtimäki, Terho; Li, Jingmei; Lichtenstein, Paul; Lichtner, Peter; Liewald, David C; Madden, Pamela A; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Mäkinen, Tomi E; Masala, Marco; McGue, Matt; Metspalu, Andres; Mielck, Andreas; Miller, Michael B; Montgomery, Grant W; Mukherjee, Sutapa; Nyholt, Dale R; Oostra, Ben A; Palmer, Lyle J; Palotie, Aarno; Penninx, Brenda W J H; Perola, Markus; Peyser, Patricia A; Preisig, Martin; Räikkönen, Katri; Raitakari, Olli T; Realo, Anu; Ring, Susan M; Ripatti, Samuli; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rudan, Igor; Rustichini, Aldo; Salomaa, Veikko; Sarin, Antti-Pekka; Schlessinger, David; Scott, Rodney J; Snieder, Harold; St Pourcain, Beate; Starr, John M; Sul, Jae Hoon; Surakka, Ida; Svento, Rauli; Teumer, Alexander; Tiemeier, Henning; van Rooij, Frank J A; Van Wagoner, David R; Vartiainen, Erkki; Viikari, Jorma; Vollenweider, Peter; Vonk, Judith M; Waeber, Gérard; Weir, David R; Wichmann, H-Erich; Widen, Elisabeth; Willemsen, Gonneke; Wilson, James F; Wright, Alan F; Conley, Dalton; Davey-Smith, George; Franke, Lude; Groenen, Patrick J F; Hofman, Albert; Johannesson, Magnus; Kardia, Sharon L R; Krueger, Robert F; Laibson, David; Martin, Nicholas G; Meyer, Michelle N; Posthuma, Danielle; Thurik, A Roy; Timpson, Nicholas J; Uitterlinden, André G; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Visscher, Peter M; Benjamin, Daniel J; Cesarini, David; Koellinger, Philipp D

2013-05-30

127

A molecular genetic linkage map identifying the St and H subgenomes of Elymus (Poaceae: Triticeae) wheatgrass.  

PubMed

Elymus L. is the largest and most complex genus in the Triticeae tribe of grasses with approximately 150 polyploid perennial species occurring worldwide. We report here the first genetic linkage map for Elymus. Backcross mapping populations were created by crossing caespitose Elymus wawawaiensis (EW) (Snake River wheatgrass) and rhizomatous Elymus lanceolatus (EL) (thickspike wheatgrass) to produce F(1) interspecific hybrids that were then backcrossed to the same EL male to generate progeny with segregating phenotypes. EW and EL are both allotetraploid species (n = 14) containing the St (Pseudoroegneria) and H (Hordeum) genomes. A total of 387 backcross progeny from four populations were genotyped using 399 AFLP and 116 EST-based SSR and STS markers. The resulting consensus map was 2574 cM in length apportioned among the expected number of 14 linkage groups. EST-based SSR and STS markers with homology to rice genome sequences were used to identify Elymus linkage groups homoeologous to chromosomes 1-7 of wheat. The frequency of St-derived genome markers on each linkage group was used to assign genome designations to all linkage groups, resulting in the identification of the seven St and seven H linkage groups of Elymus. This map also confirms the alloploidy and disomic chromosome pairing and segregation of Elymus and will be useful in identifying QTLs controlling perennial grass traits in this genus. PMID:21942400

Mott, Ivan W; Larson, Steven R; Jones, Thomas A; Robins, Joseph G; Jensen, Kevin B; Peel, Michael D

2011-09-23

128

Identifying Genetic Traces of Historical Expansions: Phoenician Footprints in the Mediterranean  

PubMed Central

The Phoenicians were the dominant traders in the Mediterranean Sea two thousand to three thousand years ago and expanded from their homeland in the Levant to establish colonies and trading posts throughout the Mediterranean, but then they disappeared from history. We wished to identify their male genetic traces in modern populations. Therefore, we chose Phoenician-influenced sites on the basis of well-documented historical records and collected new Y-chromosomal data from 1330 men from six such sites, as well as comparative data from the literature. We then developed an analytical strategy to distinguish between lineages specifically associated with the Phoenicians and those spread by geographically similar but historically distinct events, such as the Neolithic, Greek, and Jewish expansions. This involved comparing historically documented Phoenician sites with neighboring non-Phoenician sites for the identification of weak but systematic signatures shared by the Phoenician sites that could not readily be explained by chance or by other expansions. From these comparisons, we found that haplogroup J2, in general, and six Y-STR haplotypes, in particular, exhibited a Phoenician signature that contributed > 6% to the modern Phoenician-influenced populations examined. Our methodology can be applied to any historically documented expansion in which contact and noncontact sites can be identified.

Zalloua, Pierre A.; Platt, Daniel E.; El Sibai, Mirvat; Khalife, Jade; Makhoul, Nadine; Haber, Marc; Xue, Yali; Izaabel, Hassan; Bosch, Elena; Adams, Susan M.; Arroyo, Eduardo; Lopez-Parra, Ana Maria; Aler, Mercedes; Picornell, Antonia; Ramon, Misericordia; Jobling, Mark A.; Comas, David; Bertranpetit, Jaume; Wells, R. Spencer; Tyler-Smith, Chris

2008-01-01

129

Additional records of metazoan parasites from Caribbean marine mammals, including genetically identified anisakid nematodes.  

PubMed

Studies of marine mammal parasites in the Caribbean are scarce. An assessment for marine mammal endo- and ectoparasites from Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, but extending to other areas of the Caribbean, was conducted between 1989 and 1994. The present study complements the latter and enhances identification of anisakid nematodes using molecular markers. Parasites were collected from 59 carcasses of stranded cetaceans and manatees from 1994 to 2006, including Globicephala macrorhynchus, Kogia breviceps, Kogia sima, Lagenodelphis hosei, Mesoplodon densirostris, Peponocephala electra, Stenella longirostris, Steno bredanensis, Trichechus manatus. Tursiops truncatus, and Ziphius cavirostris. Sixteen species of endoparasitic helminthes were morphologically identified, including two species of acanthocephalans (Bolbosoma capitatum, Bolbosoma vasculosum), nine species of nematodes (Anisakis sp., Anisakis brevispiculata, Anisakis paggiae, Anisakis simplex, Anisakis typica, Anisakis ziphidarium, Crassicauda anthonyi, Heterocheilus tunicatus, Pseudoterranova ceticola), two species of cestodes (Monorygma grimaldi, Phyllobothrium delphini), and three species of trematodes (Chiorchis groschafti, Pulmonicola cochleotrema, Monoligerum blairi). The nematodes belonging to the genus Anisakis recovered in some stranded animals were genetically identified to species level based on their sequence analysis of mitochondrial DNA (629 bp of mtDNA cox 2). A total of five new host records and six new geographic records are presented. PMID:19582477

Colón-Llavina, Marlene M; Mignucci-Giannoni, Antonio A; Mattiucci, Simonetta; Paoletti, Michela; Nascetti, Giuseppe; Williams, Ernest H

2009-07-07

130

Tilapia sex determination: Where temperature and genetics meet.  

PubMed

This review deals with the complex sex determining system of Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus, governed by the interactions between a genetic determination and the influence of temperature, shown in both domestic and wild populations. Naturally sex reversed individuals are strongly suggested in two wild populations. This can be due to the masculinising temperatures which some fry encounter during their sex differentiation period when they colonise shallow waters, and/or to the influence of minor genetic factors. Differences regarding a) thermal responsiveness of sex ratios between and within Nile tilapia populations, b) maternal and paternal effects on temperature dependent sex ratios and c) nearly identical results in offspring of repeated matings, demonstrate that thermosensitivity is under genetic control. Selection experiments to increase the thermosensitivity revealed high responses in the high and low sensitive lines. The high-line showed approximately 90% males after 2 generations of selection whereas the weakly sensitive line had 54% males. This is the first evidence that a surplus of males in temperature treated groups can be selected as a quantitative trait. Expression profiles of several genes (Cyp19a, Foxl2, Amh, Sox9a,b) from the gonad and brain were analysed to define temperature action on the sex determining/differentiating cascade in tilapia. The coexistence of GSD and TSD is discussed. PMID:19101647

Baroiller, J F; D'Cotta, H; Bezault, E; Wessels, S; Hoerstgen-Schwark, G

2008-12-06

131

The Real maccoyii: Identifying Tuna Sushi with DNA Barcodes - Contrasting Characteristic Attributes and Genetic Distances  

PubMed Central

Background The use of DNA barcodes for the identification of described species is one of the least controversial and most promising applications of barcoding. There is no consensus, however, as to what constitutes an appropriate identification standard and most barcoding efforts simply attempt to pair a query sequence with reference sequences and deem identification successful if it falls within the bounds of some pre-established cutoffs using genetic distance. Since the Renaissance, however, most biological classification schemes have relied on the use of diagnostic characters to identify and place species. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we developed a cytochrome c oxidase subunit I character-based key for the identification of all tuna species of the genus Thunnus, and compared its performance with distance-based measures for identification of 68 samples of tuna sushi purchased from 31 restaurants in Manhattan (New York City) and Denver, Colorado. Both the character-based key and GenBank BLAST successfully identified 100% of the tuna samples, while the Barcode of Life Database (BOLD) as well as genetic distance thresholds, and neighbor-joining phylogenetic tree building performed poorly in terms of species identification. A piece of tuna sushi has the potential to be an endangered species, a fraud, or a health hazard. All three of these cases were uncovered in this study. Nineteen restaurant establishments were unable to clarify or misrepresented what species they sold. Five out of nine samples sold as a variant of “white tuna” were not albacore (T. alalunga), but escolar (Lepidocybium flavorunneum), a gempylid species banned for sale in Italy and Japan due to health concerns. Nineteen samples were northern bluefin tuna (T. thynnus) or the critically endangered southern bluefin tuna (T. maccoyii), though nine restaurants that sold these species did not state these species on their menus. Conclusions/Significance The Convention on International Trade Endangered Species (CITES) requires that listed species must be identifiable in trade. This research fulfills this requirement for tuna, and supports the nomination of northern bluefin tuna for CITES listing in 2010.

Lowenstein, Jacob H.; Amato, George; Kolokotronis, Sergios-Orestis

2009-01-01

132

Developmental and genetic determinants of leadership role occupancy among women.  

PubMed

The genetic and developmental influences on leadership role occupancy were investigated using a sample of 178 fraternal and 214 identical female twins. Two general developmental factors were identified, one involving formal work experiences and the other a family experiences factor hypothesized to influence whether women move into positions of leadership in organizations. Results indicated that 32% of the variance in leadership role occupancy was associated with heritability. The 2 developmental factors also showed significant correlations with leadership role occupancy. However, after genetic factors were partialed out, only the work experience factor was significantly related to leadership role occupancy. Results are discussed in terms of prior life events and experiences that may trigger leadership development and the limitations of this study. PMID:17484551

Arvey, Richard D; Zhang, Zhen; Avolio, Bruce J; Krueger, Robert F

2007-05-01

133

Case-control study for colorectal cancer genetic susceptibility in EPICOLON: previously identified variants and mucins  

PubMed Central

Background Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second leading cause of cancer death in developed countries. Familial aggregation in CRC is also important outside syndromic forms and, in this case, a polygenic model with several common low-penetrance alleles contributing to CRC genetic predisposition could be hypothesized. Mucins and GALNTs (N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase) are interesting candidates for CRC genetic susceptibility and have not been previously evaluated. We present results for ten genetic variants linked to CRC risk in previous studies (previously identified category) and 18 selected variants from the mucin gene family in a case-control association study from the Spanish EPICOLON consortium. Methods CRC cases and matched controls were from EPICOLON, a prospective, multicenter, nationwide Spanish initiative, comprised of two independent stages. Stage 1 corresponded to 515 CRC cases and 515 controls, whereas stage 2 consisted of 901 CRC cases and 909 controls. Also, an independent cohort of 549 CRC cases and 599 controls outside EPICOLON was available for additional replication. Genotyping was performed for ten previously identified SNPs in ADH1C, APC, CCDN1, IL6, IL8, IRS1, MTHFR, PPARG, VDR and ARL11, and 18 selected variants in the mucin gene family. Results None of the 28 SNPs analyzed in our study was found to be associated with CRC risk. Although four SNPs were significant with a P-value < 0.05 in EPICOLON stage 1 [rs698 in ADH1C (OR = 1.63, 95% CI = 1.06-2.50, P-value = 0.02, recessive), rs1800795 in IL6 (OR = 1.62, 95% CI = 1.10-2.37, P-value = 0.01, recessive), rs3803185 in ARL11 (OR = 1.58, 95% CI = 1.17-2.15, P-value = 0.007, codominant), and rs2102302 in GALNTL2 (OR = 1.20, 95% CI = 1.00-1.44, P-value = 0.04, log-additive 0, 1, 2 alleles], only rs3803185 achieved statistical significance in EPICOLON stage 2 (OR = 1.34, 95% CI = 1.06-1.69, P-value = 0.01, recessive). In the joint analysis for both stages, results were only significant for rs3803185 (OR = 1.12, 95% CI = 1.00-1.25, P-value = 0.04, log-additive 0, 1, 2 alleles) and borderline significant for rs698 and rs2102302. The rs3803185 variant was not significantly associated with CRC risk in an external cohort (MCC-Spain), but it still showed some borderline significance in the pooled analysis of both cohorts (OR = 1.08, 95% CI = 0.98-1.18, P-value = 0.09, log-additive 0, 1, 2 alleles). Conclusions ARL11, ADH1C, GALNTL2 and IL6 genetic variants may have an effect on CRC risk. Further validation and meta-analyses should be undertaken in larger CRC studies.

2011-01-01

134

Identifying Genetic Susceptibility to Sensitization to Cephalosporins in Health Care Workers  

PubMed Central

Exposure to cephalosporins could cause occupational allergic diseases in health care workers (HCWs). We evaluated the prevalence of serum specific IgE and IgG antibodies to cephalosporin-human serum albumin (HSA) conjugate and to identify potential genetic risk factors associated with sensitization to cephalosporins in exposed HCWs. The study population consisted of 153 HCWs who had been exposed to antibiotics in a single university hospital and 86 unexposed healthy controls. A questionnaire survey of work-related symptoms (WRS) was administered. A skin-prick test (SPT) was performed, and serum-specific IgE and IgG antibodies to 3 commonly prescribed cephalosporins were measured by ELISA. Four single-nucleotide polymorphisms of the candidate genes related to IgE sensitization were genotyped. The prevalence of WRS to cephalosporins was 2.6%. The prevalence rates of serum-specific IgE and IgG antibodies to cephalosporins were 20.3% and 14.7%, respectively. The Fc?R1?-109T > C polymorphism was significantly associated with IgE sensitization to cephalosporins in HCWs (P = 0.036, OR = 3.553; CI, 1.324-9.532). The in vitro functional assay demonstrated that the T allele of Fc?R1?-109T had greater promoter activity than did the C allele (P < 0.001). The Fc?R1?-109T > C polymorphism may be a potential genetic risk factor for increased IgE sensitization to cephalosporins.

Nam, Young-Hee; Kim, Jeong-Eun; Kim, Seung-Hyun; Jin, Hyun Jung; Hwang, Eui-Kyung; Shin, Yoo-Seob; Ye, Young-Min

2012-01-01

135

Retrograde Intraflagellar Transport Mutants Identify Complex A Proteins With Multiple Genetic Interactions in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii  

PubMed Central

The intraflagellar transport machinery is required for the assembly of cilia. It has been investigated by biochemical, genetic, and computational methods that have identified at least 21 proteins that assemble into two subcomplexes. It has been hypothesized that complex A is required for retrograde transport. Temperature-sensitive mutations in FLA15 and FLA17 show defects in retrograde intraflagellar transport (IFT) in Chlamydomonas. We show that IFT144 and IFT139, two complex A proteins, are encoded by FLA15 and FLA17, respectively. The fla15 allele is a missense mutation in a conserved cysteine and the fla17 allele is an in-frame deletion of three exons. The flagellar assembly defect of each mutant is rescued by the respective transgenes. In fla15 and fla17 mutants, bulges form in the distal one-third of the flagella at the permissive temperature and this phenotype is also rescued by the transgenes. These bulges contain the complex B component IFT74/72, but not ?-tubulin or p28, a component of an inner dynein arm, which suggests specificity with respect to the proteins that accumulate in these bulges. IFT144 and IFT139 are likely to interact with each other and other proteins on the basis of three distinct genetic tests: (1) Double mutants display synthetic flagellar assembly defects at the permissive temperature, (2) heterozygous diploid strains exhibit second-site noncomplemention, and (3) transgenes confer two-copy suppression. Since these tests show different levels of phenotypic sensitivity, we propose they illustrate different gradations of gene interaction between complex A proteins themselves and with a complex B protein (IFT172).

Iomini, Carlo; Li, Linya; Esparza, Jessica M.; Dutcher, Susan K.

2009-01-01

136

Trust in Government Cross-Boundary Information Sharing Initiatives: Identifying the Determinants  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper identifies a set of determinants of trust in government cross-boundary information sharing (CBI) initiatives. Although there are some studies that identify the antecedents of trust in collaboration, research about trust relationships in government interorganizational initiatives is lacking. Little attention, in particular, has been paid to the determinants of trust in government CBI. To fill this gap in the

José Ramón Gil-García; Ahmet Guler; Theresa A. Pardo; G. Brian Burke

2010-01-01

137

Genome-wide association study identifies genetic loci associated with iron deficiency.  

PubMed

The existence of multiple inherited disorders of iron metabolism in man, rodents and other vertebrates suggests genetic contributions to iron deficiency. To identify new genomic locations associated with iron deficiency, a genome-wide association study (GWAS) was performed using DNA collected from white men aged?25 y and women?50 y in the Hemochromatosis and Iron Overload Screening (HEIRS) Study with serum ferritin (SF)?12 µg/L (cases) and iron replete controls (SF>100 µg/L in men, SF>50 µg/L in women). Regression analysis was used to examine the association between case-control status (336 cases, 343 controls) and quantitative serum iron measures and 331,060 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotypes, with replication analyses performed in a sample of 71 cases and 161 controls from a population of white male and female veterans screened at a US Veterans Affairs (VA) medical center. Five SNPs identified in the GWAS met genome-wide statistical significance for association with at least one iron measure, rs2698530 on chr. 2p14; rs3811647 on chr. 3q22, a known SNP in the transferrin (TF) gene region; rs1800562 on chr. 6p22, the C282Y mutation in the HFE gene; rs7787204 on chr. 7p21; and rs987710 on chr. 22q11 (GWAS observed P<1.51×10(-7) for all). An association between total iron binding capacity and SNP rs3811647 in the TF gene (GWAS observed P=7.0×10(-9), corrected P=0.012) was replicated within the VA samples (observed P=0.012). Associations with the C282Y mutation in the HFE gene also were replicated. The joint analysis of the HEIRS and VA samples revealed strong associations between rs2698530 on chr. 2p14 and iron status outcomes. These results confirm a previously-described TF polymorphism and implicate one potential new locus as a target for gene identification. PMID:21483845

McLaren, Christine E; Garner, Chad P; Constantine, Clare C; McLachlan, Stela; Vulpe, Chris D; Snively, Beverly M; Gordeuk, Victor R; Nickerson, Debbie A; Cook, James D; Leiendecker-Foster, Catherine; Beckman, Kenneth B; Eckfeldt, John H; Barcellos, Lisa F; Murray, Joseph A; Adams, Paul C; Acton, Ronald T; Killeen, Anthony A; McLaren, Gordon D

2011-03-31

138

Genomic and Genetic Characterization of Cholangiocarcinoma Identifies Therapeutic Targets for Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitors  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND & AIMS Cholangiocarcinoma is a heterogeneous disease with a poor outcome that accounts for 5%–10% of primary liver cancers. We characterized its genomic and genetic features and associated these with patient responses to therapy. METHODS We profiled the transcriptomes from 104 surgically resected cholangiocarcinoma samples collected from patients in Australia, Europe, and the United States; epithelial and stromal compartments from 23 tumors were laser capture microdissected. We analyzed mutations in KRAS, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), and BRAF in samples from 69 tumors. Changes in gene expression were validated by immunoblotting and immunohistochemistry; integrative genomics combined data from the patients with data from 7 human cholangiocarcinoma cell lines, which were then exposed to trastuzumab and lapatinib. RESULTS Patients were classified into 2 subclasses, based on 5-year survival rate (72% vs 30%; ?2 = 11.61; P < .0007), time to recurrence (13.7 vs 22.7 months; P < .001), and the absence or presence of KRAS mutations (24.6%), respectively. Class comparison identified 4 survival subgroups (SGI–IV; ?2 = 8.34; P < .03); SGIII was characterized by genes associated with proteasomal activity and the worst prognosis. The tumor epithelium was defined by deregulation of the HER2 network and frequent overexpression of EGFR, the hepatocyte growth factor receptor (MET), pRPS6, and Ki67, whereas stroma was enriched in inflammatory cytokines. Lapatinib, an inhibitor of HER2 and EGFR, was more effective in inhibiting growth of cholangiocarcinoma cell lines than trastuzumab. CONCLUSIONS We provide insight into the pathogenesis of cholangiocarcinoma and identify previously unrecognized subclasses of patients, based on KRAS mutations and increased levels of EGFR and HER2 signaling, who might benefit from dual-target tyrosine kinase inhibitors. The group of patients with the worst prognosis was characterized by transcriptional enrichment of genes that regulate proteasome activity, indicating new therapeutic targets.

Andersen, Jesper B.; Spee, Bart; Blechacz, Boris R.; Avital, Itzhak; Komuta, Mina; Barbour, Andrew; Conner, Elizabeth A.; Gillen, Matthew C.; Roskams, Tania; Roberts, Lewis R.; Factor, Valentina M.; Thorgeirsson, Snorri S.

2012-01-01

139

Identifying Predictors of Activity Based Anorexia Susceptibility in Diverse Genetic Rodent Populations  

PubMed Central

Animal studies are very useful in detection of early disease indicators and in unravelling the pathophysiological processes underlying core psychiatric disorder phenotypes. Early indicators are critical for preventive and efficient treatment of progressive psychiatric disorders like anorexia nervosa. Comparable to physical hyperactivity observed in anorexia nervosa patients, in the activity-based anorexia rodent model, mice and rats express paradoxical high voluntary wheel running activity levels when food restricted. Eleven inbred mouse strains and outbred Wistar WU rats were exposed to the activity-based anorexia model in search of identifying susceptibility predictors. Body weight, food intake and wheel running activity levels of each individual mouse and rat were measured. Mouse strains and rats with high wheel running activity levels during food restriction exhibited accelerated body weight loss. Linear mixed models for repeated measures analysis showed that baseline wheel running activity levels preceding the scheduled food restriction phase strongly predicted activity-based anorexia susceptibility (mice: Beta ?=? ?0.0158 (±0.003 SE), P<0.0001; rats: Beta ?=? ?0.0242 (±0.004 SE), P<0.0001) compared to other baseline parameters. These results suggest that physical activity levels play an important role in activity-based anorexia susceptibility in different rodent species with genetically diverse background. These findings support previous retrospective studies on physical activity levels in anorexia nervosa patients and indicate that pre-morbid physical activity levels could reflect an early indicator for disease severity.

Pjetri, Eneda; de Haas, Ria; de Jong, Simone; Gelegen, Cigdem; Oppelaar, Hugo; Verhagen, Linda A. W.; Eijkemans, Marinus J. C.; Adan, Roger A.; Olivier, Berend; Kas, Martien J.

2012-01-01

140

A Factor Graph Nested Effects Model To Identify Networks from Genetic Perturbations  

PubMed Central

Complex phenotypes such as the transformation of a normal population of cells into cancerous tissue result from a series of molecular triggers gone awry. We describe a method that searches for a genetic network consistent with expression changes observed under the knock-down of a set of genes that share a common role in the cell, such as a disease phenotype. The method extends the Nested Effects Model of Markowetz et al. (2005) by using a probabilistic factor graph to search for a network representing interactions among these silenced genes. The method also expands the network by attaching new genes at specific downstream points, providing candidates for subsequent perturbations to further characterize the pathway. We investigated an extension provided by the factor graph approach in which the model distinguishes between inhibitory and stimulatory interactions. We found that the extension yielded significant improvements in recovering the structure of simulated and Saccharomyces cerevisae networks. We applied the approach to discover a signaling network among genes involved in a human colon cancer cell invasiveness pathway. The method predicts several genes with new roles in the invasiveness process. We knocked down two genes identified by our approach and found that both knock-downs produce loss of invasive potential in a colon cancer cell line. Nested effects models may be a powerful tool for inferring regulatory connections and genes that operate in normal and disease-related processes.

Vaske, Charles J.; House, Carrie; Luu, Truong; Frank, Bryan; Yeang, Chen-Hsiang; Lee, Norman H.; Stuart, Joshua M.

2009-01-01

141

OptForce: An Optimization Procedure for Identifying All Genetic Manipulations Leading to Targeted Overproductions  

PubMed Central

Computational procedures for predicting metabolic interventions leading to the overproduction of biochemicals in microbial strains are widely in use. However, these methods rely on surrogate biological objectives (e.g., maximize growth rate or minimize metabolic adjustments) and do not make use of flux measurements often available for the wild-type strain. In this work, we introduce the OptForce procedure that identifies all possible engineering interventions by classifying reactions in the metabolic model depending upon whether their flux values must increase, decrease or become equal to zero to meet a pre-specified overproduction target. We hierarchically apply this classification rule for pairs, triples, quadruples, etc. of reactions. This leads to the identification of a sufficient and non-redundant set of fluxes that must change (i.e., MUST set) to meet a pre-specified overproduction target. Starting with this set we subsequently extract a minimal set of fluxes that must actively be forced through genetic manipulations (i.e., FORCE set) to ensure that all fluxes in the network are consistent with the overproduction objective. We demonstrate our OptForce framework for succinate production in Escherichia coli using the most recent in silico E. coli model, iAF1260. The method not only recapitulates existing engineering strategies but also reveals non-intuitive ones that boost succinate production by performing coordinated changes on pathways distant from the last steps of succinate synthesis.

Ranganathan, Sridhar; Suthers, Patrick F.; Maranas, Costas D.

2010-01-01

142

An interactive resource to identify cancer genetic and lineage dependencies targeted by small molecules.  

PubMed

The high rate of clinical response to protein-kinase-targeting drugs matched to cancer patients with specific genomic alterations has prompted efforts to use cancer cell line (CCL) profiling to identify additional biomarkers of small-molecule sensitivities. We have quantitatively measured the sensitivity of 242 genomically characterized CCLs to an Informer Set of 354 small molecules that target many nodes in cell circuitry, uncovering protein dependencies that: (1) associate with specific cancer-genomic alterations and (2) can be targeted by small molecules. We have created the Cancer Therapeutics Response Portal (http://www.broadinstitute.org/ctrp) to enable users to correlate genetic features to sensitivity in individual lineages and control for confounding factors of CCL profiling. We report a candidate dependency, associating activating mutations in the oncogene ?-catenin with sensitivity to the Bcl-2 family antagonist, navitoclax. The resource can be used to develop novel therapeutic hypotheses and to accelerate discovery of drugs matched to patients by their cancer genotype and lineage. PMID:23993102

Basu, Amrita; Bodycombe, Nicole E; Cheah, Jaime H; Price, Edmund V; Liu, Ke; Schaefer, Giannina I; Ebright, Richard Y; Stewart, Michelle L; Ito, Daisuke; Wang, Stephanie; Bracha, Abigail L; Liefeld, Ted; Wawer, Mathias; Gilbert, Joshua C; Wilson, Andrew J; Stransky, Nicolas; Kryukov, Gregory V; Dancik, Vlado; Barretina, Jordi; Garraway, Levi A; Hon, C Suk-Yee; Munoz, Benito; Bittker, Joshua A; Stockwell, Brent R; Khabele, Dineo; Stern, Andrew M; Clemons, Paul A; Shamji, Alykhan F; Schreiber, Stuart L

2013-08-29

143

A factor graph nested effects model to identify networks from genetic perturbations.  

PubMed

Complex phenotypes such as the transformation of a normal population of cells into cancerous tissue result from a series of molecular triggers gone awry. We describe a method that searches for a genetic network consistent with expression changes observed under the knock-down of a set of genes that share a common role in the cell, such as a disease phenotype. The method extends the Nested Effects Model of Markowetz et al. (2005) by using a probabilistic factor graph to search for a network representing interactions among these silenced genes. The method also expands the network by attaching new genes at specific downstream points, providing candidates for subsequent perturbations to further characterize the pathway. We investigated an extension provided by the factor graph approach in which the model distinguishes between inhibitory and stimulatory interactions. We found that the extension yielded significant improvements in recovering the structure of simulated and Saccharomyces cerevisae networks. We applied the approach to discover a signaling network among genes involved in a human colon cancer cell invasiveness pathway. The method predicts several genes with new roles in the invasiveness process. We knocked down two genes identified by our approach and found that both knock-downs produce loss of invasive potential in a colon cancer cell line. Nested effects models may be a powerful tool for inferring regulatory connections and genes that operate in normal and disease-related processes. PMID:19180177

Vaske, Charles J; House, Carrie; Luu, Truong; Frank, Bryan; Yeang, Chen-Hsiang; Lee, Norman H; Stuart, Joshua M

2009-01-30

144

Polynesian genetic affinities with Southeast Asian populations as identified by mtDNA analysis.  

PubMed Central

Polynesian genetic affinities to populations of Asia were studied using mtDNA markers. A total of 1,037 individuals from 12 populations were screened for a 9-bp deletion in the intergenic region between the COII and tRNA(Lys) genes that approaches fixation in Polynesians. Sequence-specific oligonucleotide probes that identify specific mtDNA control region nucleotide substitutions were used to describe variation in individuals with the 9-bp deletion. The 9-bp deletion was not observed in northern Indians, Bangladeshis, or Pakistanis but was seen at low to moderate frequencies in the nine other Southeast Asian populations. Three substitutions in the control region at positions 16217, 16247, and 16261 have previously been observed at high frequency in Polynesian mtDNAs; this "Polynesian motif" was observed in 20% of east Indonesians with the 9-bp deletion but was observed in only one additional individual. mtDNA types related to the Polynesian motif are highest in frequency in the corridor from Taiwan south through the Philippines and east Indonesia, and the highest diversity for these types is in Taiwan. These results are consistent with linguistic evidence of a Taiwanese origin for the proto-Polynesian expansion, which spread throughout Oceania by way of Indonesia.

Melton, T; Peterson, R; Redd, A J; Saha, N; Sofro, A S; Martinson, J; Stoneking, M

1995-01-01

145

Genetic determinants of mate recognition in Brachionus manjavacas (Rotifera)  

PubMed Central

Background Mate choice is of central importance to most animals, influencing population structure, speciation, and ultimately the survival of a species. Mating behavior of male brachionid rotifers is triggered by the product of a chemosensory gene, a glycoprotein on the body surface of females called the mate recognition pheromone. The mate recognition pheromone has been biochemically characterized, but little was known about the gene(s). We describe the isolation and characterization of the mate recognition pheromone gene through protein purification, N-terminal amino acid sequence determination, identification of the mate recognition pheromone gene from a cDNA library, sequencing, and RNAi knockdown to confirm the functional role of the mate recognition pheromone gene in rotifer mating. Results A 29 kD protein capable of eliciting rotifer male circling was isolated by high-performance liquid chromatography. Two transcript types containing the N-terminal sequence were identified in a cDNA library; further characterization by screening a genomic library and by polymerase chain reaction revealed two genes belonging to each type. Each gene begins with a signal peptide region followed by nearly perfect repeats of an 87 to 92 codon motif with no codons between repeats and the final motif prematurely terminated by the stop codon. The two Type A genes contain four and seven repeats and the two Type B genes contain three and five repeats, respectively. Only the Type B gene with three repeats encodes a peptide with a molecular weight of 29 kD. Each repeat of the Type B gene products contains three asparagines as potential sites for N-glycosylation; there are no asparagines in the Type A genes. RNAi with Type A double-stranded RNA did not result in less circling than in the phosphate-buffered saline control, but transfection with Type B double-stranded RNA significantly reduced male circling by 17%. The very low divergence between repeat units, even at synonymous positions, suggests that the repeats are kept nearly identical through a process of concerted evolution. Information-rich molecules like surface glycoproteins are well adapted for chemical communication and aquatic animals may have evolved signaling systems based on these compounds, whereas insects use cuticular hydrocarbons. Conclusion Owing to its critical role in mating, the mate recognition pheromone gene will be a useful molecular marker for exploring the mechanisms and rates of selection and the evolution of reproductive isolation and speciation using rotifers as a model system. The phylogenetic variation in the mate recognition pheromone gene can now be studied in conjunction with the large amount of ecological and population genetic data being gathered for the Brachionus plicatilis species complex to understand better the evolutionary drivers of cryptic speciation.

Snell, Terry W; Shearer, Tonya L; Smith, Hilary A; Kubanek, Julia; Gribble, Kristin E; Welch, David B Mark

2009-01-01

146

75 FR 8299 - Draft Environmental Impact Statement; Determination of Regulated Status of Alfalfa Genetically...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...connection with making a determination on the status of the Monsanto Company and Forage Genetics International alfalfa lines designated...connection with making a determination on the status of the Monsanto Company and Forage Genetics International alfalfa lines...

2010-02-24

147

Genetic determinants of hyaloid and retinal vasculature in zebrafish  

PubMed Central

Background The retinal vasculature is a capillary network of blood vessels that nourishes the inner retina of most mammals. Developmental abnormalities or microvascular complications in the retinal vasculature result in severe human eye diseases that lead to blindness. To exploit the advantages of zebrafish for genetic, developmental and pharmacological studies of retinal vasculature, we characterised the intraocular vasculature in zebrafish. Results We show a detailed morphological and developmental analysis of the retinal blood supply in zebrafish. Similar to the transient hyaloid vasculature in mammalian embryos, vessels are first found attached to the zebrafish lens at 2.5 days post fertilisation. These vessels progressively lose contact with the lens and by 30 days post fertilisation adhere to the inner limiting membrane of the juvenile retina. Ultrastructure analysis shows these vessels to exhibit distinctive hallmarks of mammalian retinal vasculature. For example, smooth muscle actin-expressing pericytes are ensheathed by the basal lamina of the blood vessel, and vesicle vacuolar organelles (VVO), subcellular mediators of vessel-retinal nourishment, are present. Finally, we identify 9 genes with cell membrane, extracellular matrix and unknown identity that are necessary for zebrafish hyaloid and retinal vasculature development. Conclusion Zebrafish have a retinal blood supply with a characteristic developmental and adult morphology. Abnormalities of these intraocular vessels are easily observed, enabling application of genetic and chemical approaches in zebrafish to identify molecular regulators of hyaloid and retinal vasculature in development and disease.

Alvarez, Yolanda; Cederlund, Maria L; Cottell, David C; Bill, Brent R; Ekker, Stephen C; Torres-Vazquez, Jesus; Weinstein, Brant M; Hyde, David R; Vihtelic, Thomas S; Kennedy, Breandan N

2007-01-01

148

Genetic Determinism and the Innate-Acquired Distinction in Medicine.  

PubMed

This article illustrates in which sense genetic determinism is still part of the contemporary interactionist consensus in medicine. Three dimensions of this consensus are discussed: kinds of causes, a continuum of traits ranging from monogenetic diseases to car accidents, and different kinds of determination due to different norms of reaction. On this basis, this article explicates in which sense the interactionist consensus presupposes the innate-acquired distinction. After a descriptive Part 1, Part 2 reviews why the innate-acquired distinction is under attack in contemporary philosophy of biology. Three arguments are then presented to provide a limited and pragmatic defense of the distinction: an epistemic, a conceptual, and a historical argument. If interpreted in a certain manner, and if the pragmatic goals of prevention and treatment (ideally specifying what medicine and health care is all about) are taken into account, then the innate-acquired distinction can be a useful epistemic tool. It can help, first, to understand that genetic determination does not mean fatalism, and, second, to maintain a system of checks and balances in the continuing nature-nurture debates. PMID:20234831

Kronfeldner, Maria E

2009-09-10

149

Genetic Determinism and the Innate-Acquired Distinction in Medicine  

PubMed Central

This article illustrates in which sense genetic determinism is still part of the contemporary interactionist consensus in medicine. Three dimensions of this consensus are discussed: kinds of causes, a continuum of traits ranging from monogenetic diseases to car accidents, and different kinds of determination due to different norms of reaction. On this basis, this article explicates in which sense the interactionist consensus presupposes the innate–acquired distinction. After a descriptive Part 1, Part 2 reviews why the innate–acquired distinction is under attack in contemporary philosophy of biology. Three arguments are then presented to provide a limited and pragmatic defense of the distinction: an epistemic, a conceptual, and a historical argument. If interpreted in a certain manner, and if the pragmatic goals of prevention and treatment (ideally specifying what medicine and health care is all about) are taken into account, then the innate–acquired distinction can be a useful epistemic tool. It can help, first, to understand that genetic determination does not mean fatalism, and, second, to maintain a system of checks and balances in the continuing nature–nurture debates.

2009-01-01

150

Historical and ecological determinants of genetic structure in arctic canids.  

PubMed

Wolves (Canis lupus) and arctic foxes (Alopex lagopus) are the only canid species found throughout the mainland tundra and arctic islands of North America. Contrasting evolutionary histories, and the contemporary ecology of each species, have combined to produce their divergent population genetic characteristics. Arctic foxes are more variable than wolves, and both island and mainland fox populations possess similarly high microsatellite variation. These differences result from larger effective population sizes in arctic foxes, and the fact that, unlike wolves, foxes were not isolated in discrete refugia during the Pleistocene. Despite the large physical distances and distinct ecotypes represented, a single, panmictic population of arctic foxes was found which spans the Svalbard Archipelago and the North American range of the species. This pattern likely reflects both the absence of historical population bottlenecks and current, high levels of gene flow following frequent long-distance foraging movements. In contrast, genetic structure in wolves correlates strongly to transitions in habitat type, and is probably determined by natal habitat-biased dispersal. Nonrandom dispersal may be cued by relative levels of vegetation cover between tundra and forest habitats, but especially by wolf prey specialization on ungulate species of familiar type and behaviour (sedentary or migratory). Results presented here suggest that, through its influence on sea ice, vegetation, prey dynamics and distribution, continued arctic climate change may have effects as dramatic as those of the Pleistocene on the genetic structure of arctic canid species. PMID:17688546

Carmichael, L E; Krizan, J; Nagy, J A; Fuglei, E; Dumond, M; Johnson, D; Veitch, A; Berteaux, D; Strobeck, C

2007-08-01

151

A Constant Light-Genetic Screen Identifies KISMET as a Regulator of Circadian Photoresponses  

PubMed Central

Circadian pacemakers are essential to synchronize animal physiology and behavior with the day?night cycle. They are self-sustained, but the phase of their oscillations is determined by environmental cues, particularly light intensity and temperature cycles. In Drosophila, light is primarily detected by a dedicated blue-light photoreceptor: CRYPTOCHROME (CRY). Upon light activation, CRY binds to the pacemaker protein TIMELESS (TIM) and triggers its proteasomal degradation, thus resetting the circadian pacemaker. To understand further the CRY input pathway, we conducted a misexpression screen under constant light based on the observation that flies with a disruption in the CRY input pathway remain robustly rhythmic instead of becoming behaviorally arrhythmic. We report the identification of more than 20 potential regulators of CRY-dependent light responses. We demonstrate that one of them, the chromatin-remodeling enzyme KISMET (KIS), is necessary for normal circadian photoresponses, but does not affect the circadian pacemaker. KIS genetically interacts with CRY and functions in PDF-negative circadian neurons, which play an important role in circadian light responses. It also affects daily CRY-dependent TIM oscillations in a peripheral tissue: the eyes. We therefore conclude that KIS is a key transcriptional regulator of genes that function in the CRY signaling cascade, and thus it plays an important role in the synchronization of circadian rhythms with the day?night cycle.

Dubruille, Raphaelle; Murad, Alejandro; Rosbash, Michael; Emery, Patrick

2009-01-01

152

Bayesian analysis of genetic associations of skin lesions and behavioural traits to identify genetic components of individual aggressiveness in pigs.  

PubMed

There is increasing interest in genetic selection against behavioural traits that impact negatively on welfare and productivity in commercial livestock production. Post-mixing aggressiveness in pigs shows wide phenotypic variation, affects health, welfare and growth performance and is a routine feature of production. A Bayesian approach was used to estimate the heritability of three traits associated with aggressiveness in pigs during the 24 h post-mixing; duration in reciprocal aggression, and in receipt of, or delivery of non-reciprocal aggression (NRA). For the purposes of genetic selection, recording aggressive behaviour is excessively labour intensive. The genetic correlations were quantified between the behavioural traits and an easily measurable indicator trait; the number of skin lesions following mixing (lesion score, LS). The heritabilities for the three behavioural traits ranged from 0.17 to 0.46 (receipt of NRA and reciprocal aggression respectively). The duration in reciprocal aggression and in delivery of NRA showed a strong genetic correlation (r g = 0.79 with 95% Bayesian credibility interval of 0.62-0.94). The genetic correlation between LS and these two behaviours indicated that selection on breeding values of LS could be used to reduce aggressiveness. The duration in receipt of NRA appeared to be regulated by different genes or genomic effects compared with the other behavioural traits and LS. Although duration in receipt of NRA was not genetically associated with LS, it was lowly but significantly environmentally associated with the residuals of central and caudal LS (r e = 0.28-0.32), indicating that pigs that received NRA also received bites on the central and caudal third of the body. The pen that the animals were mixed into was found to be a very important factor for the analysed traits, in particular those representing behavioural characteristics. Based on the estimated genetic parameters, it is concluded that selection on breeding values for reduced LS (especially central LS) is expected to reduce reciprocal aggression and the delivery of NRA but will not change the receipt of NRA directly. PMID:17987375

Turner, S P; Roehe, R; Mekkawy, W; Farnworth, M J; Knap, P W; Lawrence, A B

2007-11-07

153

Surfing a genetic association interaction network to identify modulators of antibody response to smallpox vaccine  

Microsoft Academic Search

The variation in antibody response to vaccination likely involves small contributions of numerous genetic variants, such as single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), which interact in gene networks and pathways. To accumulate the bits of genetic information relevant to the phenotype that are distributed throughout the interaction network, we develop a network eigenvector centrality algorithm (SNPrank) that is sensitive to the weak main

N A Davis; J E Crowe; N M Pajewski; B A McKinney

2010-01-01

154

Diverse Genetic Markers Concordantly Identify Bovine Origin Escherichia coli O157 Genotypes Underrepresented in Human Disease? †  

PubMed Central

Genetic markers previously reported to occur at significantly different frequencies in isolates of Escherichia coli O157:H7 obtained from cattle and from clinically affected humans concordantly delineate at least five genetic groups. Isolates in three of these groups consistently carry one or more markers rarely found among clinical isolates.

Whitworth, Joshua; Zhang, Yubei; Bono, James; Pleydell, Eve; French, Nigel; Besser, Thomas

2010-01-01

155

The molecular genetics of avian sex determination and its manipulation.  

PubMed

The chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus) has long been a useful model for developmental biologists. The developing avian embryo is easily accessible and fertile eggs are widely available. In addition, the embryo is also amenable to genetic manipulation allowing studies on many important morphological and cellular processes. More recently, the ability to directly manipulate gene expression through the production of transgenic or mutant chicken embryos by viral delivery methods has been useful to analyse gene function in a wide range of tissues, including the developing gonads. Chickens are amniotes and their development closely resembles that of mammals, implying underlying genetic conservation of key pathways, including sex development. Studies of sex determination and gonadal development in this model are providing insight into avian ovarian and testis developmental pathways and their evolution. Indeed, the chicken embryo is a suitable model for the functional analysis of genes implicated in human disorders of sex development, and studies in this model will complement those carried out in mammalian models such as the mouse. In this review we discuss the current knowledge of sex determination and sexual differentiation in avians, using chicken as model. We review how sex chromosomes contribute to this process and provide current information on our understanding of gonadal sexual differentiation at both the cellular and molecular level in the chicken embryo. Finally, we review the methods currently used to investigate the role of genes and signaling pathways during sexual differentiation, and discuss how these methods may contribute to further understanding of vertebrate gonadogenesis. PMID:23424056

Ayers, Katie L; Smith, Craig A; Lambeth, Luke S

2013-03-30

156

Gene networks associated with conditional fear in mice identified using a systems genetics approach  

Microsoft Academic Search

Background  Our understanding of the genetic basis of learning and memory remains shrouded in mystery. To explore the genetic networks\\u000a governing the biology of conditional fear, we used a systems genetics approach to analyze a hybrid mouse diversity panel (HMDP)\\u000a with high mapping resolution.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Results  A total of 27 behavioral quantitative trait loci were mapped with a false discovery rate of 5%.

Christopher C Park; Greg D Gale; Simone de Jong; Anatole Ghazalpour; Brian J Bennett; Charles R Farber; Peter Langfelder; Andy Lin; Arshad H Khan; Eleazar Eskin; Steve Horvath; Aldons J Lusis; Roel A Ophoff; Desmond J Smith

2011-01-01

157

What Determines Blood Vessel Structure? Genetic Prespecification vs. Hemodynamics  

NSDL National Science Digital Library

Vascular network remodeling, angiogenesis, and arteriogenesis play an important role in the pathophysiology of ischemic cardiovascular diseases and cancer. Based on recent studies of vascular network development in the embryo, several novel aspects to angiogenesis have been identified as crucial to generate a functional vascular network. These aspects include specification of arterial and venous identity in vessels and network patterning. In early embryogenesis, vessel identity and positioning are genetically hardwired and involve neural guidance genes expressed in the vascular system. We demonstrated that, during later stages of embryogenesis, blood flow plays a crucial role in regulating vessel identity and network remodeling. The flow-evoked remodeling process is dynamic and involves a high degree of vessel plasticity. The open question in the field is how genetically predetermined processes in vessel identity and patterning balance with the contribution of blood flow in shaping a functional vascular architecture. Although blood flow is essential, it remains unclear to what extent flow is able to act on the developing cardiovascular system. There is significant evidence that mechanical forces created by flowing blood are biologically active within the embryo and that the level of mechanical forces and the type of flow patterns present in the embryo are able to affect gene expression. Here, we highlight the pivotal role for blood flow and physical forces in shaping the cardiovascular system.

Elizabeth A. V. Jones (College de France); Ferdinand Noble (College de Frence); Anne Eichmann (College de France)

2006-10-01

158

A Simple PCR-RFLP Method for Genetic Phase Determination in Compound Heterozygotes  

PubMed Central

When susceptibility to diseases is caused by cis-effects of multiple alleles at adjacent polymorphic sites, it may be difficult to assess with confidence the genetic phase and identify individuals carrying the risk haplotype. Experimental assessment of genetic phase is still challenging and most population studies use statistical approaches to infer haplotypes given the observed genotypes. While these statistical approaches are powerful and have been proven very useful in large scale genetic population studies, they may be prone to errors in studies with small sample size, especially in the presence of compound heterozygotes. Here, we describe a simple and novel approach using the popular PCR–RFLP based strategy to assess the genetic phase in compound heterozygotes. We apply this method to two extensively studied SNPs in two clustered immune-related genes: The ?308 (G?>?A) and the +252 (A?>?G) SNPs of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) alpha and the lymphotoxin alpha (LTA) genes, respectively. Using this method, we successfully determined the genetic phase of these two SNPs in known compound heterozygous individuals and in every sample tested. We show that the A allele of TNF ?308 is carried on the same chromosome as the LTA +252(G) allele.

Perry, Rodney T.; Dwivedi, Harsh; Aissani, Brahim

2011-01-01

159

Chemical genetic screen identifies Toxoplasma DJ-1 as a regulator of parasite secretion, attachment, and invasion.  

PubMed

Toxoplasma gondii is a member of the phylum Apicomplexa that includes several important human pathogens, such as Cryptosporidium and Plasmodium falciparum, the causative agent of human malaria. It is an obligate intracellular parasite that can cause severe disease in congenitally infected neonates and immunocompromised individuals. Despite the importance of attachment and invasion to the success of the parasite, little is known about the underlying mechanisms that drive these processes. Here we describe a screen to identify small molecules that block the process of host cell invasion by the T. gondii parasite. We identified a small molecule that specifically and irreversibly blocks parasite attachment and subsequent invasion of host cells. Using tandem orthogonal proteolysis-activity-based protein profiling, we determined that this compound covalently modifies a single cysteine residue in a poorly characterized protein homologous to the human protein DJ-1. Mutation of this key cysteine residue in the native gene sequence resulted in parasites that were resistant to inhibition of host cell attachment and invasion by the compound. Further analysis of the invasion phenotype confirmed that modification of Cys127 on TgDJ-1 resulted in a block of microneme secretion and motility, even in the presence of direct stimulators of calcium release. Together, our results suggest that TgDJ-1 plays an important role that is likely downstream of the calcium flux required for microneme secretion, parasite motility, and subsequent invasion of host cells. PMID:21670272

Hall, Carolyn I; Reese, Michael L; Weerapana, Eranthie; Child, Matthew A; Bowyer, Paul W; Albrow, Victoria E; Haraldsen, Jeralyn D; Phillips, MacDonald R; Sandoval, Edgar Deu; Ward, Gary E; Cravatt, Benjamin F; Boothroyd, John C; Bogyo, Matthew

2011-06-13

160

Chemical genetic screen identifies Toxoplasma DJ-1 as a regulator of parasite secretion, attachment, and invasion  

PubMed Central

Toxoplasma gondii is a member of the phylum Apicomplexa that includes several important human pathogens, such as Cryptosporidium and Plasmodium falciparum, the causative agent of human malaria. It is an obligate intracellular parasite that can cause severe disease in congenitally infected neonates and immunocompromised individuals. Despite the importance of attachment and invasion to the success of the parasite, little is known about the underlying mechanisms that drive these processes. Here we describe a screen to identify small molecules that block the process of host cell invasion by the T. gondii parasite. We identified a small molecule that specifically and irreversibly blocks parasite attachment and subsequent invasion of host cells. Using tandem orthogonal proteolysis–activity-based protein profiling, we determined that this compound covalently modifies a single cysteine residue in a poorly characterized protein homologous to the human protein DJ-1. Mutation of this key cysteine residue in the native gene sequence resulted in parasites that were resistant to inhibition of host cell attachment and invasion by the compound. Further analysis of the invasion phenotype confirmed that modification of Cys127 on TgDJ-1 resulted in a block of microneme secretion and motility, even in the presence of direct stimulators of calcium release. Together, our results suggest that TgDJ-1 plays an important role that is likely downstream of the calcium flux required for microneme secretion, parasite motility, and subsequent invasion of host cells.

Hall, Carolyn I.; Reese, Michael L.; Weerapana, Eranthie; Child, Matthew A.; Bowyer, Paul W.; Albrow, Victoria E.; Haraldsen, Jeralyn D.; Phillips, MacDonald R.; Sandoval, Edgar Deu; Ward, Gary E.; Cravatt, Benjamin F.; Boothroyd, John C.; Bogyo, Matthew

2011-01-01

161

Mouse Genome-Wide Association and Systems Genetics Identify Asxl2 As a Regulator of Bone Mineral Density and Osteoclastogenesis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Significant advances have been made in the discovery of genes affecting bone mineral density (BMD); however, our understanding of its genetic basis remains incomplete. In the current study, genome-wide association (GWA) and co-expression network analysis were used in the recently described Hybrid Mouse Diversity Panel (HMDP) to identify and functionally characterize novel BMD genes. In the HMDP, a GWA of

Charles R. Farber; Brian J. Bennett; Luz Orozco; Wei Zou; Ana Lira; Emrah Kostem; Hyun Min Kang; Nicholas Furlotte; Ani Berberyan; Anatole Ghazalpour; Jaijam Suwanwela; Thomas A. Drake; Eleazar Eskin; Q. Tian Wang; Steven L. Teitelbaum; Aldons J. Lusis

2011-01-01

162

Functional characterization of genetic variants in NPC1L1 supports the sequencing extremes strategy to identify complex trait genes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Resequencing genes in individuals at extremes of the population distribution constitutes a powerful and efficient strategy to identify sequence variants associated with complex traits. An excess of sequence var- iants at one extreme relative to the other that is not due to chance or to population stratification constitutes evidence for genetic association and implies the presence of functionally significant sequence

Saleemah Fahmi; Chendong Yang; Sophie Esmail; Helen H. Hobbs; Jonathan C. Cohen

2008-01-01

163

A Green Fluorescent Protein Reporter Genetic Screen That Identifies Modifiers of Hox Gene Function in the Drosophila Embryo  

Microsoft Academic Search

Hox genes encode evolutionarily conserved transcription factors that play fundamental roles in the organization of the animal body plan. Molecular studies emphasize that unidentified genes contribute to the control of Hox activity. In this study, we describe a genetic screen designed to identify functions required for the control of the wingless (wg) and empty spiracles (ems) target genes by the

Samir Merabet; Francoise Catala; Jacques Pradel; Yacine Graba

164

Dana-Farber Cancer Institute researchers identify genetic mutation responsible for most cases of a rare lymphoma:  

Cancer.gov

Scientists at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute have identified a gene mutation that underlies the vast majority of cases of Waldenström's macroglobulinemia, a rare form of lymphoma that has eluded all previous efforts to find a genetic cause.

165

Genome-wide association analysis to identify chromosomal regions determining components of earliness in wheat.  

PubMed

The modification of flowering date is considered an important way to escape the current or future climatic constraints that affect wheat crops. A better understanding of its genetic bases would enable a more efficient and rapid modification through breeding. The objective of this study was to identify chromosomal regions associated with earliness in wheat. A 227-wheat core collection chosen to be highly contrasted for earliness was characterized for heading date. Experiments were conducted in controlled conditions and in the field for 3 years to break down earliness in the component traits: photoperiod sensitivity, vernalization requirement and narrow-sense earliness. Whole-genome association mapping was carried out using 760 molecular markers and taking into account the five ancestral group structure. We identified 62 markers individually associated to earliness components corresponding to 33 chromosomal regions. In addition, we identified 15 other significant markers and seven more regions by testing marker pair interactions. Co-localizations were observed with the Ppd-1, Vrn-1 and Rht-1 candidate genes. Using an independent set of lines to validate the model built for heading date, we were able to explain 34% of the variation using the structure and the significant markers. Results were compared with already published data using bi-parental populations giving an insight into the genetic architecture of flowering time in wheat. PMID:22065067

Le Gouis, J; Bordes, J; Ravel, C; Heumez, E; Faure, S; Praud, S; Galic, N; Remoué, C; Balfourier, F; Allard, V; Rousset, M

2011-11-08

166

Identifying Support Functions in Developmental Relationships: A Self-Determination Perspective  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This study examines the content of developmental networks from the perspective of self-determination theory. We qualitatively examine 18 proteges' constellations of developmental relationships to identify specific types of developmental support functions. Our study shows that the adoption of self-determination theory leads to a theory-based…

Janssen, Suzanne; van Vuuren, Mark; de Jong, Menno D. T.

2013-01-01

167

The role of height-associated loci identified in genome wide association studies in the determination of pediatric stature  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Human height is considered highly heritable and correlated with certain disorders, such as type 2 diabetes and cancer. Despite environmental influences, genetic factors are known to play an important role in stature determination. A number of genetic determinants of adult height have already been established through genome wide association studies. METHODS: To examine 51 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) corresponding

Jianhua Zhao; Mingyao Li; Jonathan P Bradfield; Haitao Zhang; Frank D Mentch; Kai Wang; Patrick M Sleiman; Cecilia E Kim; Joseph T Glessner; Cuiping Hou; Brendan J Keating; Kelly A Thomas; Maria L Garris; Sandra Deliard; Edward C Frackelton; F George Otieno; Rosetta M Chiavacci; Robert I Berkowitz; Hakon Hakonarson; Struan FA Grant

2010-01-01

168

Sarcolemmal phospholipid N-methylation in genetically determined hamster cardiomyopathy  

SciTech Connect

The heart sarcolemmal phosphatidylethanolamine N-methylation in UM-X7.1 strain of cardiomyopathic hamsters was examined by using 0.055, 10 and 150 microM S-adenosyl-L-(methyl-/sup 3/H) methionine as methyl donor for sites I, II and III, respectively. In comparison with control values, methylation activities at site I was increased in 40, 120 and 250 days old cardiomyopathic hamsters. On the other hand, methylation activities at sites II and III in 120 and 250 days old cardiomyopathic animals were depressed without any change in the 40 days old group. The alterations in N-methylation activities were associated with kinetic changes in apparent Vmax values without any changes in the apparent Km. These results indicate a defect in the phospholipid N-methylation process in heart sarcolemma during the development of genetically determined cardiomyopathy.

Okumura, K.; Panagia, V.; Jasmin, G.; Dhalla, N.S.

1987-02-27

169

Identifying the genomic determinants of aging and longevity in human population studies: Progress and challenges  

PubMed Central

Human lifespan variation is mainly determined by environmental factors, whereas the genetic contribution is 25–30% and expected to be polygenic. Two complementary fields go hand in hand in order to unravel the mechanisms of biological aging: genomic and biomarker research. Explorative and candidate gene studies of the human genome by genetic, transcriptomic, and epigenomic approaches have resulted in the identification of a limited number of interesting positive linkage regions, genes, and pathways that contribute to lifespan variation. The possibilities to further exploit these findings are rapidly increasing through the use of novel technologies, such as next-generation sequencing. Genomic research is progressively being integrated with biomarker studies on aging, including the application of (noninvasive) deep phenotyping and omics data – generated using novel technologies – in a wealth of studies in human populations. Hence, these studies may assist in obtaining a more holistic perspective on the role of the genome in aging and lifespan regulation.

Deelen, Joris; Beekman, Marian; Capri, Miriam; Franceschi, Claudio; Slagboom, P Eline

2013-01-01

170

Pharmacogenetics: A Tool for Identifying Genetic Factors in Drug Dependence and Response to Treatment  

PubMed Central

Pharmacogenetics research looks at variations in the human genome and ways in which genetic factors might influence how individuals respond to drugs. The authors review basic principles of pharmacogenetics and cite findings from several gene-phenotype studies to illustrate possible associations between genetic variants, drug-related behaviors, and risk for drug dependence. Some gene variants affect responses to one drug; others, to various drugs. Pharmacogenetics can inform medication development and personalized treatment strategies; challenges lie along the pathway to its general use in clinical practice.

Mroziewicz, Margaret; Tyndale, Rachel F.

2010-01-01

171

Sex-determining genes on mouse autosomes identified by linkage analysis of C57BL\\/6J-YPOS sex reversal  

Microsoft Academic Search

A powerful approach for identifying mammalian primary (gonadal) sex determination genes is the molecular genetic analyses of sex reversal conditions (that is, XX individuals with testicular tissue and XY individuals with ovarian tissue). Here we determined the number and chromosomal location of autosomal and X-linked genes that cause sex reversal in C57BL\\/6J (B6) mice carrying a Y chromosome of Mus

Eva M. Eicher; Linda L. Washburn; Nicholas J. Schork; Barbara K. Lee; Elaine P. Shown; Xiaoling Xu; Robert D. Dredge; M. Todeane Pringle; David C. Page

1996-01-01

172

Genetic determinants of ethanol-induced liver damage.  

PubMed Central

BACKGROUND: Although a clear correlation exists between cumulative alcohol intake and liver disease, only some of the alcohol abusers develop signs of ethanol-induced liver damage. To identify some of the genetic variations predisposing persons to alcoholic liver disease (ALD), a genetic study was performed in heavy drinkers from the cohort of the Dionysis study, a survey aimed at evaluating liver disease in the open population of two towns in Northern Italy (6917 individuals). MATERIALS AND METHODS: 158 heavy drinkers (approximately 85% of all heavy drinkers in the population; daily alcohol intake > 120 g in males and >60 g in females) were investigated by the analysis of nine polymorphic regions, mapping in exons III and IX of the alcohol-dehydrogenase (ADH)-2 gene, in exon VIII of the ADH3 gene, in intron VI, in the promoter region of the cytochrome P4502E1 (CYP2E1) gene, and in the promoter region of the tumor necrosis factor-alpha gene. RESULTS: Heavy drinkers with or without ALD significantly differed for the distribution of alleles of the cytochrome P4502E1 (CYP2E1) and alcohol-dehydrogenase-3 (ADH-3) genes. In one town, allele C2 in the promoter region of the CYP2E1 gene had a frequency of 0.06 in healthy heavy drinkers, of 0.19 in heavy drinkers with ALD (p = 0.012), and of 0.33 in heavy drinkers with cirrhosis (p = 0.033). In the other town, whose inhabitants have different genetic derivation, a prominent association between ALD and homozygosity for allele ADH3*2 of ADH3 was found, with a prevalence of 0.31 in heavy drinkers with ALD and of 0.07 in healthy heavy drinkers controls (p = 0.004). CONCLUSIONS. Both heterozygosity for allele C2 of CYP2E1 and homozygosity for allele ADH3*2 of ADH3 are independent risk factors for ALD in alcohol abusers. The relative contribution of these genotypes to ALD is dependent on their frequency in the population. Overall, heavy drinkers lacking either of these two genotypes are 3.2 and 4.3 times more protected from developing ALD and cirrhosis respectively.

Monzoni, A.; Masutti, F.; Saccoccio, G.; Bellentani, S.; Tiribelli, C.; Giacca, M.

2001-01-01

173

Genome-wide association mapping identifies the genetic basis of discrete and quantitative variation in sexual weaponry in a wild sheep population.  

PubMed

Understanding the genetic architecture of phenotypic variation in natural populations is a fundamental goal of evolutionary genetics. Wild Soay sheep (Ovis aries) have an inherited polymorphism for horn morphology in both sexes, controlled by a single autosomal locus, Horns. The majority of males have large normal horns, but a small number have vestigial, deformed horns, known as scurs; females have either normal horns, scurs or no horns (polled). Given that scurred males and polled females have reduced fitness within each sex, it is counterintuitive that the polymorphism persists within the population. Therefore, identifying the genetic basis of horn type will provide a vital foundation for understanding why the different morphs are maintained in the face of natural selection. We conducted a genome-wide association study using ?36000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and determined the main candidate for Horns as RXFP2, an autosomal gene with a known involvement in determining primary sex characters in humans and mice. Evidence from additional SNPs in and around RXFP2 supports a new model of horn-type inheritance in Soay sheep, and for the first time, sheep with the same horn phenotype but different underlying genotypes can be identified. In addition, RXFP2 was shown to be an additive quantitative trait locus (QTL) for horn size in normal-horned males, accounting for up to 76% of additive genetic variation in this trait. This finding contrasts markedly from genome-wide association studies of quantitative traits in humans and some model species, where it is often observed that mapped loci only explain a modest proportion of the overall genetic variation. PMID:21651634

Johnston, Susan E; McEwan, John C; Pickering, Natalie K; Kijas, James W; Beraldi, Dario; Pilkington, Jill G; Pemberton, Josephine M; Slate, Jon

2011-03-29

174

Metabolic and cardiovascular traits: an abundance of recently identified common genetic variants  

Microsoft Academic Search

Genome-wide association studies are providing new insights into the genetic basis of metabolic and cardi- ovascular traits. In the past 3 years, common variants in 50 loci have been strongly associated with meta- bolic and cardiovascular traits. Several of these loci have implicated genes without a previously known connection with metabolism. Further studies will be required to characterize the full

Karen L. Mohlke; Michael Boehnke; Goncalo R. Abecasis

2008-01-01

175

Social-Cognition and the Broad Autism Phenotype: Identifying Genetically Meaningful Phenotypes  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Background: Strong evidence from twin and family studies suggests that the genetic liability to autism may be expressed through personality and language characteristics qualitatively similar, but more subtly expressed than those defining the full syndrome. This study examined behavioral features of this "broad autism phenotype" (BAP) in relation…

Losh, Molly; Piven, Joseph

2007-01-01

176

Integrated analysis of genetic and proteomic data identifies biomarkers associated with adverse events following smallpox vaccination  

Microsoft Academic Search

Complex clinical outcomes, such as adverse reaction to vaccination, arise from the concerted interactions among the myriad components of a biological system. Therefore, comprehensive etiological models can be developed only through the integrated study of multiple types of experimental data. In this study, we apply this paradigm to high-dimensional genetic and proteomic data collected to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the

D M Reif; A A Motsinger-Reif; B A McKinney; M T Rock; J E Crowe; J H Moore

2009-01-01

177

Identifying genetic risk factors for serious adverse drug reactions: current progress and challenges  

Microsoft Academic Search

Serious adverse drug reactions (SADRs) are a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Some SADRs may be predictable, based upon a drug's pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic properties. Many, however, appear to be idiosyncratic. Genetic factors may underlie susceptibility to SADRs and the identification of predisposing genotypes may improve patient management through the prospective selection of appropriate candidates. Here we discuss

Russell A. Wilke; Debbie W. Lin; Dan M. Roden; Paul B. Watkins; David Flockhart; Issam Zineh; Kathleen M. Giacomini; Ronald M. Krauss

2007-01-01

178

Using the GRIN-Global System to Identify Useful Plant Genetic Resources & Information  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

The GRIN-Global (GG) System has been developed to provide the world's crop genebanks and plant genetic resource (PGR) users with a powerful, flexible, easy-to-use PGR information management system. Developed jointly by the USDA Agricultural Research Service, Bioversity International and the Global C...

179

Identifying the source of species invasions: sampling intensity vs. genetic diversity  

Microsoft Academic Search

Population geneticists and community ecologists have long recognized the importance of sampling design for uncovering patterns of diversity within and among populations and in communities. Invasion ecologists increasingly have utilized phylogeographical patterns of mitochondrial or chloroplast DNA sequence variation to link introduced populations with putative source populations. However, many studies have ignored lessons from population genetics and community ecology and

JIM R. MUIRHEAD; DEREK K. GRAY; DAVID W. KELLY; SANDRA M. ELLIS; DANIEL D. HEATH; HUGH J. MACISAAC

2008-01-01

180

A young woman with bilateral breast cancer: identifying a genetic cause and implications for management.  

PubMed

Breast cancer is a common manifestation of an underlying genetic susceptibility to cancer, and 5% to 10% of all breast cancers are associated with a germline mutation in a known risk allele. Detection of mutations has implications for targeted screening and prevention strategies for probands, and for genetic counseling and testing of their family members. This report presents a case involving a 35-year-old woman with no family history of breast or ovarian cancer who presented with a palpable right breast lump. Imaging revealed multiple bilateral breast masses and right axillary adenopathy, and core needle biopsies showed invasive ductal carcinoma in both the right and left breast. This report discusses the appropriate genetics evaluation for a patient with bilateral breast cancer at a young age, including testing for mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2, followed, if negative, by consideration of testing for mutations in TP53 (Li-Fraumeni syndrome). Given the specialized counseling and testing needs of patients with Li-Fraumeni syndrome, and the implications for targeted screening strategies if a mutation is found, referral to a cancer genetics expert is strongly recommended. PMID:23667202

de Bruin, Monique A; Ford, James M; Kurian, Allison W

2013-05-01

181

Genetically Modified Organisms and Trade Rules: Identifying Important Challenges for the WTO  

Microsoft Academic Search

Controversial debates associated with the establishment of international market access rules for genetically modified organisms (GMOs) illustrate a more general challenge facing the World Trade Organisation (WTO); to acceptably accommodate growing consumer concerns regarding a product's production and processing methods (PPM). This paper aims to clarify the debates by examining the foundations of and the procedures for the WTO's decision–making

Grant E. Isaac; William A. Kerr

2003-01-01

182

Genomewide gain-of-function genetic screen identifies functionally active genes in mouse embryonic stem cells  

Microsoft Academic Search

Embryonic stem (ES) cells hold great promise for the future of medicine. To elucidate the molecular mechanisms that control ES cell self-renewal and differentiation, a comprehensive knowledge of the molecules involved in these processes is required. Here we describe an effective approach for genomewide identification of functionally active genes in ES cells. This approach combines genetic screens based on cDNA

Moshe Pritsker; Nicole R. Ford; Harry T. Jenq; Ihor R. Lemischka

2006-01-01

183

Genetic and Environmental Factors in Prostate Cancer Genesis:Identifying High-Risk Cohorts  

Microsoft Academic Search

Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy found in males; however, little is as yet known regarding what initiates the disease. The incidence is highest among American Blacks and lowest in the East Asian population. Subtypes of the disease include familial clustering and a hereditary form (9%) supporting genetic events to be involved in prostate cancer pathogenesis. Chromosomal abberations so

Peter Ekman

1999-01-01

184

Towards identifying populations that increase the likelihood of success in genetic programming  

Microsoft Academic Search

This paper presents a comprehensive, multivariate account of how initial population material is used over the course of a genetic programming run as while various factors influencing problem difficulty are changed. The results corroborate both theoretical and empirical studies on factors that influence population dynamics. The results also indicate a clue for a possible empirical measurement that could be used

Jason M. Daida

2005-01-01

185

Harnessing gene expression to identify the genetic basis of drug resistance  

Microsoft Academic Search

The advent of cost-effective genotyping and sequencing methods have recently made it possible to ask questions that address the genetic basis of phenotypic diversity and how natural variants interact with the environment. We developed Camelot (CAusal Modelling with Expression Linkage for cOmplex Traits), a statistical method that integrates genotype, gene expression and phenotype data to automatically build models that both

Bo-Juen Chen; Helen C Causton; Denesy Mancenido; Noel L Goddard; Ethan O Perlstein; Dana Pe'er

2009-01-01

186

Mendelian randomization: how genetics is pushing the boundaries of epidemiology to identify new causes of heart disease.  

PubMed

The past 10 years have seen a remarkable revolution in the genetics of cardiovascular (CV) disease. Although much work remains to bring these discoveries to the bedside, genetics has opened up remarkable possibilities in understanding the causes of CV disease through a relatively novel study design known as "Mendelian randomization." Akin to a randomized trial, Mendelian randomization is a genetic study design that takes advantage of the "randomization" of genetic information at birth to evaluate a potential causal relationship between a genetically determined biomarker and an outcome. By providing evidence for causal relationships, Mendelian randomization can improve our understanding of fundamental mechanisms in human disease, potentially accelerate the identification of bona fide drug targets, and ultimately improve the care of patients with CV disease. This review describes the concept and design of Mendelian randomization genetic studies, discusses their strengths and weaknesses, and presents recent examples of Mendelian randomization studies in the CV literature that have helped clarify the causal role of selected biomarkers in CV medicine. PMID:23199790

Thanassoulis, George

2012-11-29

187

Identifying genetic marker sets associated with phenotypes via an efficient adaptive score test.  

PubMed

In recent years, genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and gene-expression profiling have generated a large number of valuable datasets for assessing how genetic variations are related to disease outcomes. With such datasets, it is often of interest to assess the overall effect of a set of genetic markers, assembled based on biological knowledge. Genetic marker-set analyses have been advocated as more reliable and powerful approaches compared with the traditional marginal approaches (Curtis and others, 2005. Pathways to the analysis of microarray data. TRENDS in Biotechnology 23, 429-435; Efroni and others, 2007. Identification of key processes underlying cancer phenotypes using biologic pathway analysis. PLoS One 2, 425). Procedures for testing the overall effect of a marker-set have been actively studied in recent years. For example, score tests derived under an Empirical Bayes (EB) framework (Liu and others, 2007. Semiparametric regression of multidimensional genetic pathway data: least-squares kernel machines and linear mixed models. Biometrics 63, 1079-1088; Liu and others, 2008. Estimation and testing for the effect of a genetic pathway on a disease outcome using logistic kernel machine regression via logistic mixed models. BMC bioinformatics 9, 292-2; Wu and others, 2010. Powerful SNP-set analysis for case-control genome-wide association studies. American Journal of Human Genetics 86, 929) have been proposed as powerful alternatives to the standard Rao score test (Rao, 1948. Large sample tests of statistical hypotheses concerning several parameters with applications to problems of estimation. Mathematical Proceedings of the Cambridge Philosophical Society, 44, 50-57). The advantages of these EB-based tests are most apparent when the markers are correlated, due to the reduction in the degrees of freedom. In this paper, we propose an adaptive score test which up- or down-weights the contributions from each member of the marker-set based on the Z-scores of their effects. Such an adaptive procedure gains power over the existing procedures when the signal is sparse and the correlation among the markers is weak. By combining evidence from both the EB-based score test and the adaptive test, we further construct an omnibus test that attains good power in most settings. The null distributions of the proposed test statistics can be approximated well either via simple perturbation procedures or via distributional approximations. Through extensive simulation studies, we demonstrate that the proposed procedures perform well in finite samples. We apply the tests to a breast cancer genetic study to assess the overall effect of the FGFR2 gene on breast cancer risk. PMID:22734045

Cai, Tianxi; Lin, Xihong; Carroll, Raymond J

2012-06-25

188

Global search in photoelectron diffraction structure determination using genetic algorithms  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Photoelectron diffraction (PED) is an experimental technique widely used to perform structural determinations of solid surfaces. Similarly to low-energy electron diffraction (LEED), structural determination by PED requires a fitting procedure between the experimental intensities and theoretical results obtained through simulations. Multiple scattering has been shown to be an effective approach for making such simulations. The quality of the fit can be quantified through the so-called R-factor. Therefore, the fitting procedure is, indeed, an R-factor minimization problem. However, the topography of the R-factor as a function of the structural and non-structural surface parameters to be determined is complex, and the task of finding the global minimum becomes tough, particularly for complex structures in which many parameters have to be adjusted. In this work we investigate the applicability of the genetic algorithm (GA) global optimization method to this problem. The GA is based on the evolution of species, and makes use of concepts such as crossover, elitism and mutation to perform the search. We show results of its application in the structural determination of three different systems: the Cu(111) surface through the use of energy-scanned experimental curves; the Ag(110)-c(2 × 2)-Sb system, in which a theory-theory fit was performed; and the Ag(111) surface for which angle-scanned experimental curves were used. We conclude that the GA is a highly efficient method to search for global minima in the optimization of the parameters that best fit the experimental photoelectron diffraction intensities to the theoretical ones.

Viana, M. L.; Díez Muiño, R.; Soares, E. A.; Van Hove, M. A.; de Carvalho, V. E.

2007-11-01

189

Identifying Genetic Components Controlling Fertility in the Outcrossing Grass Species Perennial Ryegrass (Lolium perenne) by Quantitative Trait Loci Analysis and Comparative Genetics  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mutational load and resource allocation factors and their effects on limiting seed set were investigated in ryegrass by comparative mapping genomics and quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis in two perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne) mapping families sharing common genetic markers. Quantitative trait loci for seed-set were identified on chromosome (LG) 7 in both families and on LG4 of the F2\\/WSC family.

I. P. Armstead; L. B. Turner; A. H. Marshall; M. O. Humphreys; I. P. King; D. Thorogood

2008-01-01

190

Genome-wide association identifies genetic variants associated with lentiform nucleus volume in N?=?1345 young and elderly subjects.  

PubMed

Deficits in lentiform nucleus volume and morphometry are implicated in a number of genetically influenced disorders, including Parkinson's disease, schizophrenia, and ADHD. Here we performed genome-wide searches to discover common genetic variants associated with differences in lentiform nucleus volume in human populations. We assessed structural MRI scans of the brain in two large genotyped samples: the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI; N?=?706) and the Queensland Twin Imaging Study (QTIM; N?=?639). Statistics of association from each cohort were combined meta-analytically using a fixed-effects model to boost power and to reduce the prevalence of false positive findings. We identified a number of associations in and around the flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO) gene cluster. The most highly associated SNP, rs1795240, was located in the FMO3 gene; after meta-analysis, it showed genome-wide significant evidence of association with lentiform nucleus volume (P MA ?=?4.79?×?10(-8)). This commonly-carried genetic variant accounted for 2.68 % and 0.84 % of the trait variability in the ADNI and QTIM samples, respectively, even though the QTIM sample was on average 50 years younger. Pathway enrichment analysis revealed significant contributions of this gene to the cytochrome P450 pathway, which is involved in metabolizing numerous therapeutic drugs for pain, seizures, mania, depression, anxiety, and psychosis. The genetic variants we identified provide replicated, genome-wide significant evidence for the FMO gene cluster's involvement in lentiform nucleus volume differences in human populations. PMID:22903471

Hibar, Derrek P; Stein, Jason L; Ryles, April B; Kohannim, Omid; Jahanshad, Neda; Medland, Sarah E; Hansell, Narelle K; McMahon, Katie L; de Zubicaray, Greig I; Montgomery, Grant W; Martin, Nicholas G; Wright, Margaret J; Saykin, Andrew J; Jack, Clifford R; Weiner, Michael W; Toga, Arthur W; Thompson, Paul M

2013-06-01

191

Genome-wide Association Study Identifies Four Genetic Loci Associated with Thyroid Volume and Goiter Risk  

PubMed Central

Thyroid disorders such as goiters represent important diseases, especially in iodine-deficient areas. Sibling studies have demonstrated that genetic factors substantially contribute to the interindividual variation of thyroid volume. We performed a genome-wide association study of this phenotype by analyzing a discovery cohort consisting of 3620 participants of the Study of Health in Pomerania (SHIP). Four genetic loci were associated with thyroid volume on a genome-wide level of significance. Of these, two independent loci are located upstream of and within CAPZB, which encodes the ? subunit of the barbed-end F-actin binding protein that modulates actin polymerization, a process crucial in the colloid engulfment during thyroglobulin mobilization in the thyroid. The third locus marks FGF7, which encodes fibroblast growth factor 7. Members of this protein family have been discussed as putative signal molecules involved in the regulation of thyroid development. The fourth locus represents a “gene desert” on chromosome 16q23, located directly downstream of the predicted coding sequence LOC440389, which, however, had already been removed from the NCBI database as a result of the standard genome annotation processing at the time that this study was initiated. Experimental proof of the formerly predicted mature mRNA, however, demonstrates that LOC440389 indeed represents a real gene. All four associations were replicated in an independent sample of 1290 participants of the KORA study. These results increase the knowledge about genetic factors and physiological mechanisms influencing thyroid volume.

Teumer, Alexander; Rawal, Rajesh; Homuth, Georg; Ernst, Florian; Heier, Margit; Evert, Matthias; Dombrowski, Frank; Volker, Uwe; Nauck, Matthias; Radke, Dorte; Ittermann, Till; Biffar, Reiner; Doring, Angela; Gieger, Christian; Klopp, Norman; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Wallaschofski, Henri; Meisinger, Christa; Volzke, Henry

2011-01-01

192

Newly identified genetic risk variants for celiac disease related to the immune response  

Microsoft Academic Search

Our genome-wide association study of celiac disease previously identified risk variants in the IL2–IL21 region. To identify additional risk variants, we genotyped 1,020 of the most strongly associated non-HLA markers in an additional 1,643 cases and 3,406 controls. Through joint analysis including the genome-wide association study data (767 cases, 1,422 controls), we identified seven previously unknown risk regions (P <

Karen A Hunt; Alexandra Zhernakova; Graham Turner; Graham A R Heap; Lude Franke; Marcel Bruinenberg; Jihane Romanos; Lotte C Dinesen; Anthony W Ryan; Davinder Panesar; Rhian Gwilliam; Fumihiko Takeuchi; William M McLaren; Geoffrey K T Holmes; Peter D Howdle; Julian R F Walters; David S Sanders; Raymond J Playford; Gosia Trynka; Chris J J Mulder; M Luisa Mearin; Wieke H M Verbeek; Valerie Trimble; Fiona M Stevens; Colm O'Morain; Nicholas P Kennedy; Dermot Kelleher; Daniel J Pennington; David P Strachan; Wendy L McArdle; Charles A Mein; Martin C Wapenaar; Panos Deloukas; Ralph McGinnis; Ross McManus; Cisca Wijmenga; David A van Heel

2008-01-01

193

Genetic modifiers of Hb E\\/?0 thalassemia identified by a two-stage genome-wide association study  

Microsoft Academic Search

BACKGROUND: Patients with Hb E\\/?0 thalassemia display remarkable variability in disease severity. To identify genetic modifiers influencing disease severity, we conducted a two-stage genome scan in groups of 207 mild and 305 severe unrelated patients from Thailand with Hb E\\/?0 thalassemia and normal ?-globin genes. METHODS: First, we estimated and compared the allele frequencies of approximately 110,000 gene-based single nucleotide

Richard Sherva; Orapan Sripichai; Kenneth Abel; Qianli Ma; Johanna Whitacre; Vach Angkachatchai; Wattanan Makarasara; Pranee Winichagoon; Saovaros Svasti; Suthat Fucharoen; Andreas Braun; Lindsay A Farrer

2010-01-01

194

Genetic Determinants of Intrinsic Colistin Tolerance in Acinetobacter baumannii  

PubMed Central

Acinetobacter baumannii is a leading cause of multidrug-resistant infections worldwide. This organism poses a particular challenge due to its ability to acquire resistance to new antibiotics through adaptation or mutation. This study was undertaken to determine the mechanisms governing the adaptability of A. baumannii to the antibiotic colistin. Screening of a transposon mutant library identified over 30 genes involved in inducible colistin resistance in A. baumannii. One of the genes identified was lpsB, which encodes a glycosyltransferase involved in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) synthesis. We demonstrate that loss of LpsB function results in increased sensitivity to both colistin and cationic antimicrobial peptides of the innate immune system. Moreover, LpsB is critical for pathogenesis in a pulmonary model of infection. Taken together, these data define bacterial processes required for intrinsic colistin tolerance in A. baumannii and underscore the importance of outer membrane structure in both antibiotic resistance and the pathogenesis of A. baumannii.

Hood, M. Indriati; Becker, Kyle W.; Roux, Christelle M.; Dunman, Paul M.

2013-01-01

195

Identifying and ranking attributes that determine sustainability in Dutch dairy farming  

Microsoft Academic Search

Recent developments in agriculture have stirred up interest in the concept of sustainable farming systems. Still it is difficult to determine the extent to which certain agricultural practices can be considered sustainable or not. Aiming at identifying the necessary attributes with respect to sustainability in Dutch dairy farming in the beginning of the third millennium, we first compiled a list

Klaas J. Van Calker; Paul B. M. Berentsen; Gerard W. J. Giesen; Ruud B. M. Huirne

2005-01-01

196

Genetics, genomics, and molecular biology of sex determination in small animals.  

PubMed

The genomic revolution is beginning to facilitate advances in canine and feline medicine, as illustrated in our research. Our studies are focused upon identifying the gene mutation that causes canine Sry-negative XX sex reversal, a disorder of sex determination in which chromosomal females (78,XX) develop testicular tissue, becoming either XX true hermaphrodites with ovotestes, or XX males with bilateral testes. A genome-wide screen, using mapped markers in our pedigree of Sry-negative XX sex reversed dogs founded upon the American cocker spaniel, identified five chromosomal regions in which the causative gene may be located. The canine genome was used to identify the canine homologue of goat Pisrt1 and so determine that canine and caprine Sry-negative XX sex reversal are genetically heterogeneous. A second goal of our research is to determine the molecular mechanism by which the mutation causes testis induction. Thus far, we have reported gonadal Sry and Sox9 expression patterns in normal embryos, which have temporal and spatial patterns similar to those reported in humans, sheep, and pigs. Once gene mutations causing such inherited disorders are identified, DNA tests will become a part of general veterinary practice, advancing both diagnostic techniques and preventative medicine. PMID:16466782

Meyers-Wallen, Vicki N

2006-02-08

197

Genetic Determinants of Rous Sarcoma Virus Particle Size  

PubMed Central

The Gag proteins of retroviruses are the only viral products required for the release of membrane-enclosed particles by budding from the host cell. Particles released when these proteins are expressed alone are identical to authentic virions in their rates of budding, proteolytic processing, and core morphology, as well as density and size. We have previously mapped three very small, modular regions of the Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) Gag protein that are necessary for budding. These assembly domains constitute only 20% of RSV Gag, and alterations within them block or severely impair particle formation. Regions outside of these domains can be deleted without any effect on the density of the particles that are released. However, since density and size are independent parameters for retroviral particles, we employed rate-zonal gradients and electron microscopy in an exhaustive study of mutants lacking the various dispensable segments of Gag to determine which regions would be required to constrain or define the particle dimensions. The only sequence found to be absolutely critical for determining particle size was that of the initial capsid cleavage product, CA-SP, which contains all of the CA sequence plus the spacer peptides located between CA and NC. Some regions of CA-SP appear to be more important than others. In particular, the major homology region does not contribute to defining particle size. Further evidence for interactions among CA-SP domains was obtained from genetic complementation experiments using mutant ?NC, which lacks the RNA interaction domains in the NC sequence but retains a complete CA-SP sequence. This mutant produces low-density particles heterogeneous in size. It was rescued into particles of normal size and density, but only when the complementing Gag molecules contained the complete CA-SP sequence. We conclude that CA-SP functions during budding in a manner that is independent of the other assembly domains.

Krishna, Neel K.; Campbell, Stephen; Vogt, Volker M.; Wills, John W.

1998-01-01

198

Whole-genome sequencing identifies genetic alterations in pediatric low-grade gliomas  

PubMed Central

The commonest pediatric brain tumors are low-grade gliomas (LGGs). We utilized whole genome sequencing to discover multiple novel genetic alterations involving BRAF, RAF1, FGFR1, MYB, MYBL1 and genes with histone-related functions, including H3F3A and ATRX, in 39 LGGs and low-grade glioneuronal tumors (LGGNTs). Only a single non-silent somatic alteration was detected in 24/39 (62%) tumors. Intragenic duplications of the FGFR1 tyrosine kinase domain (TKD) and rearrangements of MYB were recurrent and mutually exclusive in 53% of grade II diffuse LGGs. Transplantation of Trp53-null neonatal astrocytes containing TKD-duplicated FGFR1 into brains of nude mice generated high-grade astrocytomas with short latency and 100% penetrance. TKD-duplicated FGFR1 induced FGFR1 autophosphorylation and upregulation of the MAPK/ERK and PI3K pathways, which could be blocked by specific inhibitors. Focusing on the therapeutically challenging diffuse LGGs, our study of 151 tumors has discovered genetic alterations and potential therapeutic targets across the entire range of pediatric LGGs/LGGNTs.

Zhang, Jinghui; Wu, Gang; Miller, Claudia P.; Tatevossian, Ruth G.; Dalton, James D.; Tang, Bo; Orisme, Wilda; Punchihewa, Chandanamali; Parker, Matthew; Qaddoumi, Ibrahim; Boop, Fredrick A.; Lu, Charles; Kandoth, Cyriac; Ding, Li; Lee, Ryan; Huether, Robert; Chen, Xiang; Hedlund, Erin; Nagahawatte, Panduka; Rusch, Michael; Boggs, Kristy; Cheng, Jinjun; Becksfort, Jared; Ma, Jing; Song, Guangchun; Li, Yongjin; Wei, Lei; Wang, Jianmin; Shurtleff, Sheila; Easton, John; Zhao, David; Fulton, Robert S.; Fulton, Lucinda L.; Dooling, David J.; Vadodaria, Bhavin; Mulder, Heather L.; Tang, Chunlao; Ochoa, Kerri; Mullighan, Charles G.; Gajjar, Amar; Kriwacki, Richard; Sheer, Denise; Gilbertson, Richard J.; Mardis, Elaine R.; Wilson, Richard K.; Downing, James R.; Baker, Suzanne J.; Ellison, David W.

2013-01-01

199

Human embryonic stem cells from aneuploid blastocysts identified by pre-implantation genetic screening.  

PubMed

Human embryonic stem cells are derived from the inner cell mass of pre-implantation embryos. The cells have unlimited proliferation potential and capacity to differentiate into the cells of the three germ layers. Human embryonic stem cells are used to study human embryogenesis and disease modeling and may in the future serve as cells for cell therapy and drug screening. Human embryonic stem cells are usually isolated from surplus normal frozen embryos and were suggested to be isolated from diseased embryos detected by pre-implantation genetic diagnosis. Here we report the isolation of 12 human embryonic stem cell lines and their thorough characterization. The lines were derived from embryos detected to have aneuploidy by pre-implantation genetic screening. Karyotype analysis of these cell lines showed that they are euploid, having 46 chromosomes. Our interpretation is that the euploid cells originated from mosaic embryos, and in vitro selection favored the euploid cells. The undifferentiated cells exhibited long-term proliferation and expressed markers typical for embryonic stem cells such as OCT4, NANOG, and TRA-1-60. The cells manifested pluripotent differentiation both in vivo and in vitro. To further characterize the different lines, we have analyzed their ethnic origin and the family relatedness among them. The above results led us to conclude that the aneuploid mosaic embryos that are destined to be discarded can serve as source for normal euploid human embryonic stem cell lines. These lines represent various ethnic groups; more lines are needed to represent all populations. PMID:20224970

Narwani, Kavita; Biancotti, Juan-Carlos; Golan-Lev, Tamar; Buehler, Nicole; Hill, David; Shifman, Sagiv; Benvenisty, Nissim; Lavon, Neta

2010-03-12

200

Genetic Essentialism: On the Deceptive Determinism of DNA  

Microsoft Academic Search

This article introduces the notion of genetic essentialist biases: cognitive biases associated with essentialist thinking that are elicited when people encounter arguments that genes are relevant for a behavior, condition, or social group. Learning about genetic attributions for various human conditions leads to a particular set of thoughts regarding those conditions: they are more likely to be perceived as (a)

Ilan Dar-Nimrod; Steven J. Heine

2011-01-01

201

Genetic Essentialism: On the Deceptive Determinism of DNA  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|This article introduces the notion of genetic essentialist biases: cognitive biases associated with essentialist thinking that are elicited when people encounter arguments that genes are relevant for a behavior, condition, or social group. Learning about genetic attributions for various human conditions leads to a particular set of thoughts…

Dar-Nimrod, Ilan; Heine, Steven J.

2011-01-01

202

Genome Wide DNA Copy Number Analysis of Serous Type Ovarian Carcinomas Identifies Genetic Markers Predictive of Clinical Outcome  

PubMed Central

Ovarian cancer is the fifth leading cause of cancer death in women. Ovarian cancers display a high degree of complex genetic alterations involving many oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. Analysis of the association between genetic alterations and clinical endpoints such as survival will lead to improved patient management via genetic stratification of patients into clinically relevant subgroups. In this study, we aim to define subgroups of high-grade serous ovarian carcinomas that differ with respect to prognosis and overall survival. Genome-wide DNA copy number alterations (CNAs) were measured in 72 clinically annotated, high-grade serous tumors using high-resolution oligonucleotide arrays. Two clinically annotated, independent cohorts were used for validation. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering of copy number data derived from the 72 patient cohort resulted in two clusters with significant difference in progression free survival (PFS) and a marginal difference in overall survival (OS). GISTIC analysis of the two clusters identified altered regions unique to each cluster. Supervised clustering of two independent large cohorts of high-grade serous tumors using the classification scheme derived from the two initial clusters validated our results and identified 8 genomic regions that are distinctly different among the subgroups. These 8 regions map to 8p21.3, 8p23.2, 12p12.1, 17p11.2, 17p12, 19q12, 20q11.21 and 20q13.12; and harbor potential oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes that are likely to be involved in the pathogenesis of ovarian carcinoma. We have identified a set of genetic alterations that could be used for stratification of high-grade serous tumors into clinically relevant treatment subgroups.

Growdon, Whitfield B.; Drapkin, Ronny I.; Nitta, Mai; Sergent, Petra A.; Allred, Serena F.; Gross, Jenny; Deavers, Michael T.; Kuo, Wen-Lin; Karlan, Beth Y.; Rueda, Bo R.; Orsulic, Sandra; Gershenson, David M.; Birrer, Michael J.; Gray, Joe W.; Mohapatra, Gayatry

2012-01-01

203

Genome wide DNA copy number analysis of serous type ovarian carcinomas identifies genetic markers predictive of clinical outcome.  

PubMed

Ovarian cancer is the fifth leading cause of cancer death in women. Ovarian cancers display a high degree of complex genetic alterations involving many oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. Analysis of the association between genetic alterations and clinical endpoints such as survival will lead to improved patient management via genetic stratification of patients into clinically relevant subgroups. In this study, we aim to define subgroups of high-grade serous ovarian carcinomas that differ with respect to prognosis and overall survival. Genome-wide DNA copy number alterations (CNAs) were measured in 72 clinically annotated, high-grade serous tumors using high-resolution oligonucleotide arrays. Two clinically annotated, independent cohorts were used for validation. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering of copy number data derived from the 72 patient cohort resulted in two clusters with significant difference in progression free survival (PFS) and a marginal difference in overall survival (OS). GISTIC analysis of the two clusters identified altered regions unique to each cluster. Supervised clustering of two independent large cohorts of high-grade serous tumors using the classification scheme derived from the two initial clusters validated our results and identified 8 genomic regions that are distinctly different among the subgroups. These 8 regions map to 8p21.3, 8p23.2, 12p12.1, 17p11.2, 17p12, 19q12, 20q11.21 and 20q13.12; and harbor potential oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes that are likely to be involved in the pathogenesis of ovarian carcinoma. We have identified a set of genetic alterations that could be used for stratification of high-grade serous tumors into clinically relevant treatment subgroups. PMID:22355333

Engler, David A; Gupta, Sumeet; Growdon, Whitfield B; Drapkin, Ronny I; Nitta, Mai; Sergent, Petra A; Allred, Serena F; Gross, Jenny; Deavers, Michael T; Kuo, Wen-Lin; Karlan, Beth Y; Rueda, Bo R; Orsulic, Sandra; Gershenson, David M; Birrer, Michael J; Gray, Joe W; Mohapatra, Gayatry

2012-02-15

204

Genetic Determinants of Sindbis Virus Mosquito Infection Are Associated with a Highly Conserved Alphavirus and Flavivirus Envelope Sequence  

Microsoft Academic Search

Wild-type Sindbis virus (SINV) strain MRE16 efficiently infects Aedes aegypti midgut epithelial cells (MEC), but laboratory-derived neurovirulent SINV strain TE\\/52J infects MEC poorly. SINV determinants for MEC infection have been localized to the E2 glycoprotein. The E2 amino acid sequences of MRE16 and TE\\/52J differ at 60 residue sites. To identify the genetic determinants of MEC infection of MRE16, the

Dennis J. Pierro; Erik L. Powers; Ken E. Olson

2008-01-01

205

A Tissue-Specific Coactivator of Steroid Receptors, Identified in a Functional Genetic Screen  

Microsoft Academic Search

Steroid receptors mediate responses to lipophilic hormones in a tissue- and ligand-specific manner. To identify nonreceptor proteins that confer specificity or regulate steroid signaling, we screened a human cDNA library in a steroid-responsive yeast strain. One of the identified cDNAs, isolated in the screen as ligand effect modulator 6, showed no homology to yeast or Caenorhabditis elegans proteins but high

DARKO KNUTTI; ADESH KAUL; ANASTASIA KRALLI

2000-01-01

206

Common Genetic Determinants of Uveitis Shared with Other Autoimmune Disorders1  

PubMed Central

Uveitis is a complex multifactorial autoimmune disease of the eye characterized by inflammation of the uvea and retina, degeneration of the retina, and blindness in genetically predisposed patients. Using the rat model of experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU), we previously identified three quantitative trait loci (QTL) associated with EAU on rat chromosomes 4, 12, and 10 (Eau1, Eau2, and Eau3). The primary goal of the current study is to delineate additional non-MHC chromosomal regions that control susceptibility to EAU, and to identify any QTLs that overlap with the QTLs of other autoimmune diseases. Using a set of informative microsatellite markers and F2 generations of resistant and susceptible MHC class II-matched rat strains (F344 and LEW), we have identified several new significant or suggestive QTLs on rat chromosomes 2, 3, 7, 10, and 19 that control susceptibility to EAU. A protective allele was identified in the susceptible LEW strain in the Eau5 locus at D7Wox18, and epistatic interactions between QTLs were found to influence the severity of disease. The newly identified regions (Eau4 through Eau9) colocalize with the genetic determinants of other autoimmune disease models, and to disease-regulating syntenic regions identified in autoimmune patients on human chromosomes 4q21-31, 5q31-33, 16q22-24, 17p11-q12, 20q11-13, and 22q12-13. Our results suggest that uveitis shares some of the pathogenic mechanisms associated with other autoimmune diseases, and lends support to the “common gene, common pathway” hypothesis for autoimmune disorders.

Mattapallil, Mary J.; Sahin, Azize; Silver, Phyllis B.; Sun, Shu-Hui; Chan, Chi-Chao; Remmers, Elaine F.; Hejtmancik, J. Fielding; Caspi, Rachel R.

2008-01-01

207

A multistage association study identifies a breast cancer genetic locus at NCOA7.  

PubMed

Estrogen metabolism and growth factor signaling pathway genes play key roles in breast cancer development. We evaluated associations between breast cancer and tagging single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) of 107 candidate genes of these pathways using single allele- and haplotype-based tests. We first sought concordance of associations between two study populations: the Nashville Breast Cohort (NBC; 510 cases, 988 controls), and the Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility (CGEMS) breast cancer study (1,145 cases, 1,142 controls). Findings across the two study populations were concordant at tagging SNPs of six genes, and at previously published SNPs of FGFR2. We sought further replication of results for EGFR, NCOA7, and FGFR2 in the independent Collaborative Breast Cancer Study (CBCS; 1,552 cases, 1,185 controls). Associations at NCOA7 and FGFR2 replicated across all three studies. The association at NCOA7 on 6q22.32, detected by a haplotype spanning the initial protein-coding exon (5'-rs9375411, rs11967627, rs549438, rs529858, rs490361, rs17708107-3'), has not been previously reported. The haplotype had a significant inverse association with breast cancer in each study [OR(Het): 0.69 (NBC), 0.76 (CGEMS), 0.79 (CBCS)], and a meta-analysis OR(Het) of 0.75 (95% CI, 0.65-0.87, P = 1.4 × 10(-4)) in the combined study populations. The haplotype frequency was 0.07 among cases, and 0.09 among controls; homozygotes were infrequent and each OR(Hom) was not significant. NCOA7 encodes a nuclear receptor coactivator that interacts with estrogen receptor ? to modulate its activity. These observations provide consistent evidence that genetic variants at the NCOA7 locus may confer a reduced risk of breast cancer. PMID:21610108

Higginbotham, Kathryn S P; Breyer, Joan P; Bradley, Kevin M; Schuyler, Peggy A; Plummer, W Dale; Freudenthal, Marcia E; Trentham-Dietz, Amy; Newcomb, Polly A; Sanders, Melinda E; Page, David L; Parl, Fritz F; Egan, Kathleen M; Dupont, William D; Smith, Jeffrey R

2011-05-24

208

A multi-stage association study identifies a breast cancer genetic locus at NCOA7  

PubMed Central

Estrogen metabolism and growth factor signaling pathway genes play key roles in breast cancer development. We evaluated associations between breast cancer and tagging SNPs of 107 candidate genes of these pathways using single allele- and haplotype-based tests. We first sought concordance of associations between two study populations: the Nashville Breast Cohort (510 cases, 988 controls), and the Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility breast cancer study (1,145 cases, 1,142 controls). Findings across the two study populations were concordant at tagging SNPs of six genes, and at previously published SNPs of FGFR2. We sought further replication of results for EGFR, NCOA7, and FGFR2 in the independent Collaborative Breast Cancer Study (1,552 cases, 1,185 controls). Associations at NCOA7 and FGFR2 replicated across all three studies. The association at NCOA7 on 6q22.32, detected by a haplotype spanning the initial protein-coding exon (5? - rs9375411, rs11967627, rs549438, rs529858, rs490361, rs17708107 - 3?), has not been previously reported. The haplotype had a significant inverse association with breast cancer in each study (ORHet 0.69 (NBC), 0.76 (CGEMS), 0.79 (CBCS)), and a meta-analysis ORHet of 0.75 (95% CI 0.65-0.87, P = 1.4 × 10-4) in the combined study populations. The haplotype frequency was 0.07 among cases, and 0.09 among controls; homozygotes were infrequent and each ORHom was not significant. NCOA7 encodes a nuclear receptor co-activator that interacts with estrogen receptor ? to modulate its activity. These observations provide consistent evidence that genetic variants at the NCOA7 locus may confer a reduced risk of breast cancer.

Higginbotham, Kathryn S. P.; Breyer, Joan P.; Bradley, Kevin M.; Schuyler, Peggy A.; Plummer, W. Dale; Freudenthal, Marcia E.; Trentham-Dietz, Amy; Newcomb, Polly A.; Sanders, Melinda E.; Page, David L.; Parl, Fritz F.; Egan, Kathleen M.; Dupont, William D.; Smith, Jeffrey R.

2011-01-01

209

Genetic analysis of the two zebrafish patched homologues identifies novel roles for the hedgehog signaling pathway  

PubMed Central

Background Aberrant activation of the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway in different organisms has shown the importance of this family of morphogens during development. Genetic screens in zebrafish have assigned specific roles for Hh in proliferation, differentiation and patterning, but mainly as a result of a loss of its activity. We attempted to fully activate the Hh pathway by removing both receptors for the Hh proteins, called Patched1 and 2, which are functioning as negative regulators in this pathway. Results Here we describe a splice-donor mutation in Ptc1, called ptc1hu1602, which in a homozygous state results in a subtle eye and somite phenotype. Since we recently positionally cloned a ptc2 mutant, a ptc1;ptc2 double mutant was generated, showing severely increased levels of ptc1, gli1 and nkx2.2a, confirming an aberrant activation of Hh signaling. As a consequence, a number of phenotypes were observed that have not been reported previously using Shh mRNA overexpression. Somites of ptc1;ptc2 double mutants do not express anteroposterior polarity markers, however initial segmentation of the somites itself is not affected. This is the first evidence that segmentation and anterior/posterior (A/P) patterning of the somites are genetically uncoupled processes. Furthermore, a novel negative function of Hh signaling is observed in the induction of the fin field, acting well before any of the previously reported function of Shh in fin formation and in a way that is different from the proposed early role of Gli3 in limb/fin bud patterning. Conclusion The generation and characterization of the ptc1;ptc2 double mutant assigned novel and unexpected functions to the Hh signaling pathway. Additionally, these mutants will provide a useful system to further investigate the consequences of constitutively activated Hh signaling during vertebrate development.

Koudijs, Marco J; den Broeder, Marjo J; Groot, Evelyn; van Eeden, Fredericus JM

2008-01-01

210

41 CFR 102-75.775 - Is the disposal agency required to approve a determination by FEMA that identifies surplus...  

Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

...a determination by FEMA that identifies surplus property for emergency management response...PROPERTY 75-REAL PROPERTY DISPOSAL Surplus Real Property Disposal Property for...a determination by FEMA that identifies surplus property for emergency management...

2013-01-01

211

Genetic and Environmental Determinants of Bitter Perception and Sweet Preferences  

PubMed Central

Objective Flavor is the primary dimension by which young children determine food acceptance. However, children are not merely miniature adults because sensory systems mature postnatally and their responses to certain tastes differ markedly from adults. Among these differences are heightened preferences for sweet-tasting and greater rejection of bitter-tasting foods. The present study tests the hypothesis that genetic variations in the newly discovered TAS2R38 taste gene as well as cultural differences are associated with differences in sensitivity to the bitter taste of propylthiouracil (PROP) and preferences for sucrose and sweet-tasting foods and beverages in children and adults. Design Genomic DNA was extracted from cheek cells of a racially and ethnically diverse sample of 143 children and their mothers. Alleles of the gene TAS2R38 were genotyped. Participants were grouped by the first variant site, denoted A49P, because the allele predicts a change from the amino acid alanine (A) to proline (P) at position 49. Henceforth, individuals who were homozygous for the bitter-insensitive allele are referred to as AA, those who were heterozygous for the bitter-insensitive allele are referred to as AP, and those who were homozygous for the bitter-sensitive allele are referred to as PP. Using identical procedures for children and mothers, PROP sensitivity and sucrose preferences were assessed by using forced-choice procedures that were embedded in the context of games that minimized the impact of language development and were sensitive to the cognitive limitations of pediatric populations. Participants were also asked about their preferences in cereals and beverages, and mothers completed a standardized questionnaire that measured various dimensions of their children’s temperament. Results Genetic variation of the A49P allele influenced bitter perception in children and adults. However, the phenotype-genotype relationship was modified by age such that 64% of heterozygous children, but only 43% of the heterozygous mothers, were sensitive to the lowest concentration (56 micromoles/liter) of PROP. Genotypes at the TAS2R38 locus were significantly related to preferences for sucrose and for sweet-tasting beverages and foods such as cereals in children. AP and PP children preferred significantly higher concentrations of sucrose solutions than did AA children. They were also significantly less likely to include milk or water as 1 of their 2 favorite beverages (18.6% vs 40%) and were more likely to include carbonated beverages as 1 of their most preferred beverages (46.4% vs 28.9%). PP children liked cereals and beverages with a significantly higher sugar content. There were also significant main effects of race/ ethnicity on preferences and food habits. As a group, black children liked cereals with a significantly higher sugar content than did white children, and they were also significantly more likely to report that they added sugar to their cereals. Unlike children, there was no correspondence between TAS2R38 genotypes and sweet preference in adults. Here, the effects of race/ethnicity were the strongest determinants, thus suggesting that cultural forces and experience may override this genotype effect on sweet preferences. Differences in taste experiences also affected mother–child interaction, especially when the 2 resided in different sensory worlds. That is, children who had 1 or 2 bitter-sensitive alleles, but whose mothers had none, were perceived by their mothers as being more emotional than children who had no bitter-sensitive alleles. Conclusion Variations in a taste receptor gene accounted for a major portion of individual differences in PROP bitterness perception in both children and adults, as well as a portion of individual differences in preferences for sweet flavors in children but not in adults. These findings underscore the advantages of studying genotype effects on behavioral outcomes in children, especially as they relate to taste preferences because cultural forces may sometimes override the A49P

Mennella, Julie A.; Pepino, M. Yanina; Reed, Danielle R.

2006-01-01

212

Newly Identified Genetic Variations in Common Escherichia coli MG1655 Stock Cultures  

PubMed Central

We have recently identified seven mutations in commonly used stocks of the sequenced Escherichia coli strain MG1655 which do not appear in the reference sequence. The mutations are likely to cause loss of function of the glpR and crl genes, which may have serious implications for physiological experiments using the affected strains.

Freddolino, Peter L.; Amini, Sasan

2012-01-01

213

COMPETITIVE METAGENOMIC DNA HYBRIDIZATION IDENTIFIES HOST-SPECIFIC GENETIC MARKERS IN CATTLE FECAL SAMPLES - ABSTRACT  

EPA Science Inventory

Several PCR methods have recently been developed to identify fecal contamination in surface waters. In all cases, researchers have relied on one gene or one microorganism for selection of host specific markers. Here, we describe the application of a genome fragment enrichment met...

214

COMPETITIVE METAGENOMIC DNA HYBRIDIZATION IDENTIFIES HOST-SPECIFIC MICROBIAL GENETIC MARKERS IN COW FECAL SAMPLES  

EPA Science Inventory

Several PCR methods have recently been developed to identify fecal contamination in surface waters. In all cases, researchers have relied on one gene or one microorganism for selection of host specific markers. Here, we describe the application of a genome fragment enrichment met...

215

A Genetic Screening Strategy Identifies Novel Regulators of the Proteostasis Network  

Microsoft Academic Search

A hallmark of diseases of protein conformation and aging is the appearance of protein aggregates associated with cellular toxicity. We posit that the functional properties of the proteostasis network (PN) protect the proteome from misfolding and combat the proteotoxic events leading to cellular pathology. In this study, we have identified new components of the proteostasis network that can suppress aggregation

M. Catarina Silva; Susan Fox; Monica Beam; Happy Thakkar; Margarida D. Amaral; Richard I. Morimoto

2011-01-01

216

Multi-locus DNA sequencing of Toxoplasma gondii isolated from Brazilian pigs identifies genetically divergent strains  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Five Toxoplasma gondii isolates (TgPgBr1-5) were isolated from hearts and brains of pigs freshly purchased at the market of Campos dos Goytacazes, Northern Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil. Four of the five isolates were highly pathogenic in mice. Four genotypes were identified. Multi-locus DNA sequenci...

217

Inferring Genetic Networks and Identifying Compound Mode of Action via Expression Profiling  

Microsoft Academic Search

The complexity of cellular gene, protein, and metabolite networks can hinder attempts to elucidate their structure and function. To address this problem, we used systematic transcriptional perturbations to construct a first-order model of regulatory interactions in a nine-gene subnetwork of the SOS pathway in Escherichia coli. The model correctly identified the major regulatory genes and the transcriptional targets of mitomycin

Timothy S. Gardner; Diego di Bernardo; David Lorenz; James J. Collins

2003-01-01

218

Chemical Genetic Screening Identifies Tricyclic Compounds that Decrease Cellular Melanin Content  

Microsoft Academic Search

A screen of a library of 2,000 drugs and natural products in murine melanocytes identified 10 tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) as compounds that potently decreased intracellular melanin content. The rank order of potency of these compounds for decreasing melanin content was different than their relative potencies as antidepressants. These compounds had no effect on either the level or the enzymatic activity

Li Ni-Komatsu; Seth J Orlow

2008-01-01

219

Development of a Genome Fingerprint Database to Identify Genetically Engineered Microbes.  

National Technical Information Service (NTIS)

The development of recombinant DNA technology and the current state of bioscience has for the first time made the laboratory creation of new biological weapons a real possibility. A critical part of any countermeasures is the ability to identify strains t...

L. E. Lindler X. Huang

2002-01-01

220

Do Schools Moderate the Genetic Determinants of Smoking?  

PubMed Central

This paper uses data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health to examine the extent to which school-level social and institutional factors moderate genetic tendencies to smoke cigarettes. Our analysis relies on a sub-sample of 1,198 sibling and twin pairs nested within 84 schools. We develop a multilevel modeling extension of regression-based quantitative genetic techniques to calculate school-specific heritability estimates. We show that smoking onset (h2 = .51) and daily smoking (h2 = .58) are both genetically influenced. Whereas the genetic influence on smoking onset is consistent across schools, we show that schools moderate the heritability of daily smoking. The heritability of daily smoking is the highest within schools in which the most popular students are also smokers and reduced within schools in which the majority of the students are non-Hispanic and white. These findings make important contributions to the literature on gene-environment interactions.

Saint Onge, Jarron M.; Haberstick, Brett C.; Timberlake, David S.; Hewitt, John K.

2009-01-01

221

Chemical-Genetic Screen Identifies Riluzole as an Enhancer of Wnt/?-catenin signaling in Melanoma  

PubMed Central

SUMMARY To identify new protein and pharmacological regulators of Wnt/?-catenin signaling we used a cell-based reporter assay to screen a collection of 1857 human-experienced compounds for their ability to enhance activation of the ?-catenin reporter by a low concentration of WNT3A. This identified 44 unique compounds, including the FDA-approved drug riluzole, which is presently in clinical trials for treating melanoma. We found that treating melanoma cells with riluzole in vitro enhances the ability of WNT3A to regulate gene expression, to promote pigmentation, and to decrease cell proliferation. Furthermore riluzole, like WNT3A, decreases metastases in a mouse melanoma model. Interestingly, siRNAs targeting the metabotropic glutamate receptor, GRM1, a reported indirect target of riluzole, enhance ?-catenin signaling. The unexpected regulation of ?-catenin signaling by both riluzole and GRM1 has implications for the future uses of this drug.

Biechele, Travis L.; Camp, Nathan D.; Fass, Daniel M.; Kulikauskas, Rima M.; Robin, Nick C.; White, Bryan D.; Taraska, Corinne M.; Moore, Erin C.; Muster, Jeanot; Karmacharya, Rakesh; Haggarty, Stephen J.; Chien, Andy J.; Moon, Randall T.

2010-01-01

222

Utility of RAPD markers in identifying genetic linkages to genes of economic interest in peach  

Microsoft Academic Search

The identification of molecular markers linked to economically important traits for use in crop improvement is very important in long-lived perennial species. Three-hundred-and-sixty RAPD primers were used with bulked segregant analysis to identify markers linked to loci of specific interest in peach [(Prunus persica) L. Batch] and peach x almond [(Prunus dulcis) Batch] crosses. The traits analyzed included flesh color,

M. L. Warburton; V. L. Becerra-Velásquez; J. C. Goffreda; F. A. Bliss

1996-01-01

223

A population-based analysis of clustering identifies a strong genetic contribution to lethal prostate cancer.  

PubMed

Background: Prostate cancer is a common and often deadly cancer. Decades of study have yet to identify genes that explain much familial prostate cancer. Traditional linkage analysis of pedigrees has yielded results that are rarely validated. We hypothesize that there are rare segregating variants responsible for high-risk prostate cancer pedigrees, but recognize that within-pedigree heterogeneity is responsible for significant noise that overwhelms signal. Here we introduce a method to identify homogeneous subsets of prostate cancer, based on cancer characteristics, which show the best evidence for an inherited contribution. Methods: We have modified an existing method, the Genealogical Index of Familiality (GIF) used to show evidence for significant familial clustering. The modification allows a test for excess familial clustering of a subset of prostate cancer cases when compared to all prostate cancer cases. Results: Consideration of the familial clustering of eight clinical subsets of prostate cancer cases compared to the expected familial clustering of all prostate cancer cases identified three subsets of prostate cancer cases with evidence for familial clustering significantly in excess of expected. These subsets include prostate cancer cases diagnosed before age 50 years, prostate cancer cases with body mass index (BMI) greater than or equal to 30, and prostate cancer cases for whom prostate cancer contributed to death. Conclusions: This analysis identified several subsets of prostate cancer cases that cluster significantly more than expected when compared to all prostate cancer familial clustering. A focus on high-risk prostate cancer cases or pedigrees with these characteristics will reduce noise and could allow identification of the rare predisposition genes or variants responsible. PMID:23970893

Nelson, Quentin; Agarwal, Neeraj; Stephenson, Robert; Cannon-Albright, Lisa A

2013-08-20

224

Proposed nomenclature for human butyrylcholinesterase genetic variants identified by DNA sequencing  

Microsoft Academic Search

1.New information identifying nucleotide alterations of human butyrylcholinesterase allows the use of more specific nomenclature for the variants commonly known as atypical, fluoride, silent, and K variant.2.In addition to suggesting a system of trivial names and abbreviations, we provide a list of formal names that follow the guidelines of the Committee for Human Gene Nomenclature.3.It is suggested that formal names

Bert N. La Du; Cynthia F. Bartels; Christine P. Nogueira; Martine Arpagaus; Oksana Lockridge

1991-01-01

225

Integrative Approach to Pain Genetics Identifies Pain Sensitivity Loci across Diseases  

Microsoft Academic Search

Identifying human genes relevant for the processing of pain requires difficult-to-conduct and expensive large-scale clinical trials. Here, we examine a novel integrative paradigm for data-driven discovery of pain gene candidates, taking advantage of the vast amount of existing disease-related clinical literature and gene expression microarray data stored in large international repositories. First, thousands of diseases were ranked according to a

David Ruau; Joel T. Dudley; Rong Chen; Nicholas G. Phillips; Gary E. Swan; Laura C. Lazzeroni; J. David Clark; Atul J. Butte; Martin S. Angst

2012-01-01

226

A forward genetic screen in mice identifies Sema3AK108N which binds to Neuropilin-1 but cannot signal  

PubMed Central

We have performed a three-generation, forward genetic screen to identify recessive mutations that affect the patterning of the peripheral nervous system. Using this assay, we identified Sema3AK108N, a novel loss-of-function allele of Sema3A. Class 3 semaphorins, which include Sema3A, are structurally conserved secreted proteins that play critical roles in the development and function of the nervous system. Sema3AK108N mutant mice phenocopy Sema3A null mice, and Sema3AK108N protein fails to repel or collapse DRG axons in vitro. K108 is conserved among semaphorins, yet the loss-of-function effects associated with K108N are not the result of impaired expression, secretion, or binding of Sema3A to its high-affinity receptor Neuropilin-1 (Npn-1). Using in silico modeling and mutagenesis of other semaphorin family members, we predict that Sema3AK108N interacts poorly with the Npn-1/PlexA holoreceptor and, thus, interferes with its ability to signal at the growth cone. Therefore, through the use of a forward-genetic screen we have identified a novel allele of Sema3A that provides structural insight into the mechanism of Sema3A/Npn1/PlexinA signaling.

Merte, Janna; Wang, Qiang; Vander Kooi, Craig W.; Sarsfield, Sarah; Leahy, Daniel J.; Kolodkin, Alex L.; Ginty, David D.

2010-01-01

227

Genetic Determination of Colles' Fracture and Differential Bone Mass in Women With and Without Colles' Fracture  

Microsoft Academic Search

Osteoporotic fractures (OFs) are a major public health problem. Direct evidence of the importance and, particularly, the magnitude of genetic determination of OF per se is essentially nonexistent. Colles' fractures (CFs) are a common type of OF. In a metropolitan white female population in the midwestern United States, we found significant genetic determination of CF. The prevalence (K) of CF

HONG-WEN DENG; WEI-MIN CHEN; SUSAN RECKER; MARY RUTH STEGMAN; JIN-LONG LI; K. MICHAEL DAVIES; YAN ZHOU; HONGYI DENG; ROBERT HEANEY; ROBERT R. RECKER

2000-01-01

228

GENETIC CASTE DETERMINATION IN HARVESTER ANTS: POSSIBLE ORIGIN AND MAINTENANCE BY CYTO-NUCLEAR EPISTASIS  

Microsoft Academic Search

While reproductive caste in eusocial insects is usually determined by environ- mental factors, in some populations of the harvester ants, Pogonomyrmex barbatus and P. rugosus, caste has been shown to have a strong genetic component. This system of genetic caste determination (GCD) is characterized by between-caste nuclear variation and high levels of mitochondrial haplotype variation between alternative maternal lineages. Two

Timothy A. Linksvayer; Michael J. Wade; Deborah M. Gordon

2006-01-01

229

Characterization of Pellicle Inhibition in Gluconacetobacter xylinus 53582 by a Small Molecule, Pellicin, Identified by a Chemical Genetics Screen  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pellicin ([2E]-3-phenyl-1-[2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1,6-benzodioxocin-8-yl]prop-2-en-1-one) was identified in a chemical genetics screen of 10,000 small molecules for its ability to completely abolish pellicle production in Gluconacetobacter xylinus. Cells grown in the presence of pellicin grew 1.5 times faster than untreated cells. Interestingly, growth in pellicin also caused G. xylinus cells to elongate. Measurement of cellulose synthesis in vitro showed that cellulose synthase activity

Janice L. Strap; Andrew Latos; Isaac Shim; Dario T. Bonetta

2011-01-01

230

DREAM4: Combining Genetic and Dynamic Information to Identify Biological Networks and Dynamical Models  

PubMed Central

Background Current technologies have lead to the availability of multiple genomic data types in sufficient quantity and quality to serve as a basis for automatic global network inference. Accordingly, there are currently a large variety of network inference methods that learn regulatory networks to varying degrees of detail. These methods have different strengths and weaknesses and thus can be complementary. However, combining different methods in a mutually reinforcing manner remains a challenge. Methodology We investigate how three scalable methods can be combined into a useful network inference pipeline. The first is a novel t-test–based method that relies on a comprehensive steady-state knock-out dataset to rank regulatory interactions. The remaining two are previously published mutual information and ordinary differential equation based methods (tlCLR and Inferelator 1.0, respectively) that use both time-series and steady-state data to rank regulatory interactions; the latter has the added advantage of also inferring dynamic models of gene regulation which can be used to predict the system's response to new perturbations. Conclusion/Significance Our t-test based method proved powerful at ranking regulatory interactions, tying for first out of methods in the DREAM4 100-gene in-silico network inference challenge. We demonstrate complementarity between this method and the two methods that take advantage of time-series data by combining the three into a pipeline whose ability to rank regulatory interactions is markedly improved compared to either method alone. Moreover, the pipeline is able to accurately predict the response of the system to new conditions (in this case new double knock-out genetic perturbations). Our evaluation of the performance of multiple methods for network inference suggests avenues for future methods development and provides simple considerations for genomic experimental design. Our code is publicly available at http://err.bio.nyu.edu/inferelator/.

Ostrer, Harry; Bonneau, Richard

2010-01-01

231

A Transgene-Assisted Genetic Screen Identifies Essential Regulators of Vascular Development in Vertebrate Embryos  

PubMed Central

Formation of a functional vasculature during mammalian development is essential for embryonic survival. In addition, imbalance in blood vessel growth contributes to the pathogenesis of numerous disorders. Most of our understanding of vascular development and blood vessel growth comes from investigating the Vegf signaling pathway as well as the recent observation that molecules involved in axon guidance also regulate vascular patterning. In order to take an unbiased, yet focused, approach to identify novel genes regulating vascular development, we performed a three-step ENU mutagenesis screen in zebrafish. We first screened live embryos visually, evaluating blood flow in the main trunk vessels, which form by vasculogenesis, and the intersomitic vessels, which form by angiogenesis. Embryos that displayed reduced or absent circulation were fixed and stained for endogenous alkaline phosphatase activity to reveal blood vessel morphology. All putative mutants were then crossed into the Tg(flk1:EGFP)s843 transgenic background to facilitate detailed examination of endothelial cells in live and fixed embryos. We screened 4015 genomes and identified 30 mutations affecting various aspects of vascular development. Specifically, we identified 3 genes (or loci) that regulate the specification and/or differentiation of endothelial cells, 8 genes that regulate vascular tube and lumen formation, 8 genes that regulate vascular patterning, and 11 genes that regulate vascular remodeling, integrity and maintenance. Only 4 of these genes had previously been associated with vascular development in zebrafish illustrating the value of this focused screen. The analysis of the newly defined loci should lead to a greater understanding of vascular development and possibly provide new drug targets to treat the numerous pathologies associated with dysregulated blood vessel growth.

Jin, Suk-Won; Herzog, Wiebke; Santoro, Massimo M.; Mitchell, Tracy S.; Frantsve, Julie; Jungblut, Benno; Beis, Dimitris; Scott, Ian C.; D'Amico, Leonard A.; Ober, Elke A.; Verkade, Heather; Field, Holly A.; Chi, Neil C.; Wehman, Ann M.; Baier, Herwig; Stainier, Didier Y. R.

2009-01-01

232

An unbiased approach to identify genes involved in development in a turtle with temperature-dependent sex determination  

PubMed Central

Background Many reptiles exhibit temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD). The initial cue in TSD is incubation temperature, unlike genotypic sex determination (GSD) where it is determined by the presence of specific alleles (or genetic loci). We used patterns of gene expression to identify candidates for genes with a role in TSD and other developmental processes without making a priori assumptions about the identity of these genes (ortholog-based approach). We identified genes with sexually dimorphic mRNA accumulation during the temperature sensitive period of development in the Red-eared slider turtle (Trachemys scripta), a turtle with TSD. Genes with differential mRNA accumulation in response to estrogen (estradiol-17?; E2) exposure and developmental stages were also identified. Results Sequencing 767 clones from three suppression-subtractive hybridization libraries yielded a total of 581 unique sequences. Screening a macroarray with a subset of those sequences revealed a total of 26 genes that exhibited differential mRNA accumulation: 16 female biased and 10 male biased. Additional analyses revealed that C16ORF62 (an unknown gene) and MALAT1 (a long noncoding RNA) exhibited increased mRNA accumulation at the male producing temperature relative to the female producing temperature during embryonic sexual development. Finally, we identified four genes (C16ORF62, CCT3, MMP2, and NFIB) that exhibited a stage effect and five genes (C16ORF62, CCT3, MMP2, NFIB and NOTCH2) showed a response to E2 exposure. Conclusions Here we report a survey of genes identified using patterns of mRNA accumulation during embryonic development in a turtle with TSD. Many previous studies have focused on examining the turtle orthologs of genes involved in mammalian development. Although valuable, the limitations of this approach are exemplified by our identification of two genes (MALAT1 and C16ORF62) that are sexually dimorphic during embryonic development. MALAT1 is a noncoding RNA that has not been implicated in sexual differentiation in other vertebrates and C16ORF62 has an unknown function. Our results revealed genes that are candidates for having roles in turtle embryonic development, including TSD, and highlight the need to expand our search parameters beyond protein-coding genes.

2012-01-01

233

PPARA: a novel genetic determinant of CYP3A4 in vitro and in vivo.  

PubMed

Interindividual variability in cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) is believed to be largely heritable; however, predictive genetic factors have remained scarce. Using a candidate-gene approach in a human liver bank, we identified single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the Ah-receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT), glucocorticoid receptor (GR), progesterone receptor membrane component 2 (PGRMC2), and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-? (PPARA) that are associated with CYP3A4 phenotype. Validation in atorvastatin-treated volunteers confirmed a decrease in atorvastatin-2-hydroxylation in carriers of PPARA SNP rs4253728. Homozygous carriers expressed significantly less PPAR-? protein in the liver. Moreover, shRNA-mediated PPARA gene knockdown in primary human hepatocytes decreased expression levels of the PPAR-? target ACOX1 and of CYP3A4 by more than 50%. In conclusion, this study identified novel genetic determinants of CYP3A4 that, together with nongenetic factors, explained 52, 55, and 33% of hepatic CYP3A4 mRNA, protein, and atorvastatin-2-hydroxylase activity, respectively. These findings have implications for variability in response to drug substrates of CYP3A4. PMID:22510778

Klein, Kathrin; Thomas, Maria; Winter, Stefan; Nussler, Andreas K; Niemi, Mikko; Schwab, Matthias; Zanger, Ulrich M

2012-06-01

234

Using orthologous and paralogous proteins to identify specificity-determining residues in bacterial transcription factors.  

PubMed

Concepts of orthology and paralogy are become increasingly important as whole-genome comparison allows their identification in complete genomes. Functional specificity of proteins is assumed to be conserved among orthologs and is different among paralogs. We used this assumption to identify residues which determine specificity of protein-DNA and protein-ligand recognition. Finding such residues is crucial for understanding mechanisms of molecular recognition and for rational protein and drug design. Assuming conservation of specificity among orthologs and different specificity of paralogs, we identify residues that correlate with this grouping by specificity. The method is taking advantage of complete genomes to find multiple orthologs and paralogs. The central part of this method is a procedure to compute statistical significance of the predictions. The procedure is based on a simple statistical model of protein evolution. When applied to a large family of bacterial transcription factors, our method identified 12 residues that are presumed to determine the protein-DNA and protein-ligand recognition specificity. Structural analysis of the proteins and available experimental results strongly support our predictions. Our results suggest new experiments aimed at rational re-design of specificity in bacterial transcription factors by a minimal number of mutations. PMID:12139929

Mirny, Leonid A; Gelfand, Mikhail S

2002-08-01

235

Forward genetic screen for malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor formation identifies new genes and pathways driving tumorigenesis.  

PubMed

Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) are sarcomas of Schwann cell lineage origin that occur sporadically or in association with the inherited syndrome neurofibromatosis type 1. To identify genetic drivers of MPNST development, we used the Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon-based somatic mutagenesis system in mice with somatic loss of transformation-related protein p53 (Trp53) function and/or overexpression of human epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Common insertion site (CIS) analysis of 269 neurofibromas and 106 MPNSTs identified 695 and 87 sites with a statistically significant number of recurrent transposon insertions, respectively. Comparison to human data sets identified new and known driver genes for MPNST formation at these sites. Pairwise co-occurrence analysis of CIS-associated genes identified many cooperating mutations that are enriched in Wnt/?-catenin, PI3K-AKT-mTOR and growth factor receptor signaling pathways. Lastly, we identified several new proto-oncogenes, including Foxr2 (encoding forkhead box R2), which we functionally validated as a proto-oncogene involved in MPNST maintenance. PMID:23685747

Rahrmann, Eric P; Watson, Adrienne L; Keng, Vincent W; Choi, Kwangmin; Moriarity, Branden S; Beckmann, Dominic A; Wolf, Natalie K; Sarver, Aaron; Collins, Margaret H; Moertel, Christopher L; Wallace, Margaret R; Gel, Bernat; Serra, Eduard; Ratner, Nancy; Largaespada, David A

2013-05-19

236

A mouse forward genetics screen identifies LISTERIN as an E3 ubiquitin ligase involved in neurodegeneration  

PubMed Central

A mouse neurological mutant, lister, was identified through a genome-wide N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) mutagenesis screen. Homozygous lister mice exhibit profound early-onset and progressive neurological and motor dysfunction. lister encodes a RING finger protein, LISTERIN, which functions as an E3 ubiquitin ligase in vitro. Although lister is widely expressed in all tissues, motor and sensory neurons and neuronal processes in the brainstem and spinal cord are primarily affected in the mutant. Pathological signs include gliosis, dystrophic neurites, vacuolated mitochondria, and accumulation of soluble hyperphosphorylated tau. Analysis with a different lister allele generated through targeted gene trap insertion reveals LISTERIN is required for embryonic development and confirms that direct perturbation of a LISTERIN-regulated process causes neurodegeneration. The lister mouse uncovers a pathway involved in neurodegeneration and may serves as a model for understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying human neurodegenerative disorders.

Chu, Jessie; Hong, Nancy A.; Masuda, Claudio A.; Jenkins, Brian V.; Nelms, Keats A.; Goodnow, Christopher C.; Glynne, Richard J.; Wu, Hua; Masliah, Eliezer; Joazeiro, Claudio A. P.; Kay, Steve A.

2009-01-01

237

Multi-locus DNA sequencing of Toxoplasma gondii isolated from Brazilian pigs identifies genetically divergent strains  

PubMed Central

Five Toxoplasma gondii isolates (TgPgBr1–5) were isolated from hearts and brains of pigs freshly purchased at the market of Campos dos Goytacazes, Northern Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil. Four of the five isolates were highly pathogenic in mice. Four genotypes were identified. Multi-locus PCR-DNA sequencing showed that each strain possessed a unique combination of archetypal and novel alleles not previously described in South America. The data suggest that different strains circulate in pigs destined for human consumption from those previously isolated from cats and chickens in Brazil. Further, multi-locus PCR-RFLP analyses failed to accurately genotype the Brazilian isolates due to the high presence of atypical alleles. This is the first report of multi-locus DNA sequencing of T. gondii isolates in pigs from Brazil.

Frazao-Teixeira, E.; Sundar, N.; Dubey, J. P.; Grigg, M. E.; de Oliveira, F. C. R.

2010-01-01

238

Genome-wide association study identifies genetic variants influencing F-cell levels in sickle-cell patients.  

PubMed

Fetal hemoglobin (HbF) level has emerged as an important prognostic factor in sickle-cell disease (SCD) and can be measured by the proportion of HbF-containing erythrocytes (F-cells). Recently, BCL11A (zinc-finger protein) was identified as a regulator of HbF, and the strongest association signals were observed either directly for rs766432 or for correlated single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). To identify additional independently associated genetic variants, we performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) on the proportion of F-cells in individuals of African ancestry with SCD from the Silent Infarct Transfusion (SIT) Trial cohort. Our study not only confirms the association of rs766432 (P-value <3.32 × 10(-13)), but also identifies an independent novel intronic SNP, rs7606173, associated with F-cells (P-value <1.81 × 10(-15)). The F-cell variances explained independently by these two SNPs are ?13% (rs7606173) and ?11% (rs766432), whereas, together they explain ?16%. Additionally, in men, we identify a novel locus on chromosome 17, glucagon-like peptide-2 receptor (GLP2R), associated with F-cell regulation (rs12103880; P-value <3.41 × 10(-8)). GLP2R encodes a G protein-coupled receptor and involved in proliferative and anti-apoptotic cellular responses. These findings highlight the importance of denser genetic screens and suggest further exploration of the BCL11A and GLP2R loci to gain additional insight into HbF/F-cell regulation. PMID:21326311

Bhatnagar, Pallav; Purvis, Shirley; Barron-Casella, Emily; DeBaun, Michael R; Casella, James F; Arking, Dan E; Keefer, Jeffrey R

2011-02-17

239

Genome-wide association study identifies a genetic variant associated with risk for more aggressive prostate cancer  

PubMed Central

Background Of the 200,000 U.S. men annually diagnosed with prostate cancer, approximately 20–30% will have clinically aggressive disease. While factors such as Gleason score and tumor stage are used to assess prognosis, there are no biomarkers to identify men at greater risk for developing aggressive prostate cancer. We therefore undertook a search for genetic variants associated with risk of more aggressive disease. Methods A genome-wide scan was conducted in 202 prostate cancer cases with a more aggressive phenotype and 100 randomly sampled, age-matched PSA-screened negative controls. Analysis of 387,384 autosomal SNPs was followed by validation testing in an independent set of 527 cases with more aggressive and 595 cases with less aggressive prostate cancer, and 1,167 age-matched controls. Results A variant on 15q13, rs6497287, was confirmed to be most strongly associated with more aggressive (pdiscovery=5.20×10?5, pvalidation=0.004) than less aggressive disease (p=0.14). Another SNP on 3q26, rs3774315, was found to be associated with prostate cancer risk however the association was not stronger for more aggressive disease. Conclusions This study provides suggestive evidence for a genetic predisposition to more aggressive prostate cancer and highlights the fact that larger studies are warranted to confirm this supposition and identify further risk variants. Impact These findings raise the possibility that assessment of genetic variation may one day be useful to discern men at higher risk for developing clinically significant prostate cancer.

FitzGerald, Liesel M.; Kwon, Erika M.; Conomos, Matthew P.; Kolb, Suzanne; Holt, Sarah K.; Levine, David; Feng, Ziding; Ostrander, Elaine A.; Stanford, Janet L.

2011-01-01

240

A genetic screen using the PiggyBac transposon in haploid cells identifies Parp1 as a mediator of olaparib toxicity.  

PubMed

Genetic perturbation screens have the potential to dissect a wide range of cellular phenotypes. Such screens have historically been difficult in diploid mammalian cells. The recent derivation of haploid embryonic stem cells provides an opportunity to cause loss of function mutants with a random mutagen in a mammalian cell with a normal genetic background. We describe an approach to genetic screens that exploits the highly active piggyBac transposon in haploid mammalian cells. As an example of haploid transposon (HTP) screening, we apply this approach to identifying determinants of cancer drug toxicity and resistance. In a screen for 6-thioguanine resistance we recovered components of the DNA mismatch repair pathway, a known requirement for toxicity. In a further screen for resistance to the clinical poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitor olaparib we recovered multiple Parp1 mutants. Our results show that olaparib toxicity to normal cells is mediated predominantly via Parp1, and suggest that the clinical side effects of olaparib may be on target. The transposon mutant libraries are stable and can be readily reused to screen other drugs. The screening protocol described has several advantages over other methods such as RNA interference: it is rapid and low cost, and mutations can be easily reverted to establish causality. PMID:23634208

Pettitt, Stephen J; Rehman, Farah L; Bajrami, Ilirjana; Brough, Rachel; Wallberg, Fredrik; Kozarewa, Iwanka; Fenwick, Kerry; Assiotis, Ioannis; Chen, Lina; Campbell, James; Lord, Christopher J; Ashworth, Alan

2013-04-25

241

NOTCH1 mutations identify a genetic subgroup of chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients with high risk of transformation and poor outcome.  

PubMed

NOTCH1 has been found recurrently mutated in a subset of patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). To analyze biological features and clinical impact of NOTCH1 mutations in CLL, we sequenced this gene in 565 patients. NOTCH1 mutations, found in 63 patients (11%), were associated with unmutated IGHV, high expression of CD38 and ZAP-70, trisomy 12, advanced stage and elevated lactate dehydrogenase. Sequential analysis in 200 patients demonstrated acquisition of mutation in one case (0.5%) and disappearance after treatment in two. Binet A and B patients with NOTCH1-mutated had a shorter time to treatment. NOTCH1-mutated patients were more frequently refractory to therapy and showed shorter progression-free and overall survival after complete remission. Overall survival was shorter in NOTCH1-mutated patients, although not independently from IGHV. NOTCH1 mutation increased the risk of transformation to diffuse large B-cell lymphoma independently from IGHV, with this being validated in resampling tests of replicability. In summary, NOTCH1 mutational status, that was rarely acquired during the course of the disease, identify a genetic subgroup with high risk of transformation and poor outcome. This recently identified genetic subgroup of CLL patients deserves prospective studies to define their best management. PMID:23295735

Villamor, N; Conde, L; Martínez-Trillos, A; Cazorla, M; Navarro, A; Beà, S; López, C; Colomer, D; Pinyol, M; Aymerich, M; Rozman, M; Abrisqueta, P; Baumann, T; Delgado, J; Giné, E; González-Díaz, M; Hernández, J M; Colado, E; Payer, A R; Rayon, C; Navarro, B; José Terol, M; Bosch, F; Quesada, V; Puente, X S; López-Otín, C; Jares, P; Pereira, A; Campo, E; López-Guillermo, A

2012-12-06

242

Genetic determinism of fiber type proportion in human skeletal muscle  

Microsoft Academic Search

Skeletal muscle fiber type distribution is quite heterogeneous, with about 25% of North American Caucasian men and women having either less than 35% or more than 65% of type I fiber in their vastus lateralis muscle. To what extent human skeletal muscle fiber type proportion is under the control of genetic factors is examined in this paper. The results summarized

JEAN-AIME SIMONEAU; CLAUDE BOUCHARD

243

A genetic algorithm for determining the location of structural impacts  

Microsoft Academic Search

The spectral-element method, which is very suitable for solving force-identification problems, is combined with a stochastic\\u000a genetic algorithm to give a scheme that can locate the source of structural impacts. The results are demonstrated with experimental\\u000a data from the impact of an aluminum beam.

James F. Doyle

1994-01-01

244

Genetic determinism of the cellular immune reaction in Drosophila melanogaster  

Microsoft Academic Search

Larvae of Drosophila melanogaster produce a haemocytic reaction against eggs of the parasitoid Leptopilina boulardi, which leads to the formation of a multicellular capsule surrounding the foreign object. Melanization resulting from the conversion of phenol to o-quinones frequently accompanies the cellular reaction. Although various cytological and biochemical aspects of this reaction have been investigated, very little is known about genetic

Y Carton; F Frey; A Nappi

1992-01-01

245

Genetic and environmental determinants of malaria parasite virulence in mosquitoes  

Microsoft Academic Search

Models of malaria epidemiology and evolution are frequently based on the assumption that vector- para- sitic associations are benign. Implicit in this assumption is the supposition that all Plasmodium parasites have an equal and neutral effect on vector survival, and thus that there is no parasite genetic variation for vector virulence. While some data support the assumption of avirulence, there

L. F. Aguirre; A. Herrel; R. v. Damme; E. Matthysen

2002-01-01

246

Genetic engineering and food: what determines consumer acceptance?  

Microsoft Academic Search

Presents experimental work which attempts to understand what psychological mechanisms are likely to influence consumer acceptance of genetically engineered food, and the relationship between consumer attitudes towards the technology and consumer acceptance of its products. Discusses the relationship between consumer risk perceptions and consumer reactions; the influence of public knowledge and understanding of the technology on attitudes; media impact; ethical

Lynn J. Frewer; Chaya Howard; Richard Shepherd

1995-01-01

247

A chemical genetic approach identifies piperazine antipsychotics as promoters of CNS neurite growth on inhibitory substrates  

PubMed Central

Injury to the central nervous system (CNS) can result in lifelong loss of function due in part to the regenerative failure of CNS neurons. Inhibitory proteins derived from myelin and the astroglial scar are major barriers for the successful regeneration of injured CNS neurons. Previously, we described the identification of a novel compound, F05, which promotes neurite growth from neurons challenged with inhibitory substrates in vitro, and promotes axonal regeneration in vivo (Usher et al., 2010). To identify additional regeneration-promoting compounds, we used F05-induced gene expression profiles to query the Broad Institute Connectivity Map, a gene expression database of cells treated with >1,300 compounds. Despite no shared chemical similarity, F05-induced changes in gene expression were remarkably similar to those seen with a group of piperazine phenothiazine antipsychotics (PhAPs). In contrast to antipsychotics of other structural classes, PhAPs promoted neurite growth of CNS neurons challenged with two different glial derived inhibitory substrates. Our pharmacological studies suggest a mechanism whereby PhAPs promote growth through antagonism of calmodulin signaling, independent of dopamine receptor antagonism. These findings shed light on mechanisms underlying neurite-inhibitory signaling, and suggest that clinically approved antipsychotic compounds may be repurposed for use in CNS injured patients.

Johnstone, AL; Reierson, GW; Smith, RP; Goldberg, JL; Lemmon, VP; Bixby, JL

2012-01-01

248

A model for genetic and epigenetic regulatory networks identifies rare pathways for transcription factor induced pluripotency  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Most cells in an organism have the same DNA. Yet, different cell types express different proteins and carry out different functions. This is because of epigenetic differences; i.e., DNA in different cell types is packaged distinctly, making it hard to express certain genes while facilitating the expression of others. During development, upon receipt of appropriate cues, pluripotent embryonic stem cells differentiate into diverse cell types that make up the organism (e.g., a human). There has long been an effort to make this process go backward -- i.e., reprogram a differentiated cell (e.g., a skin cell) to pluripotent status. Recently, this has been achieved by transfecting certain transcription factors into differentiated cells. This method does not use embryonic material and promises the development of patient-specific regenerative medicine, but it is inefficient. The mechanisms that make reprogramming rare, or even possible, are poorly understood. We have developed the first computational model of transcription factor-induced reprogramming. Results obtained from the model are consistent with diverse observations, and identify the rare pathways that allow reprogramming to occur. If validated, our model could be further developed to design optimal strategies for reprogramming and shed light on basic questions in biology.

Artyomov, Maxim; Meissner, Alex; Chakraborty, Arup

2010-03-01

249

MLVA and SNP analysis identified a unique genetic cluster in Bulgarian Bacillus anthracis strains.  

PubMed

A collection of 40 Bacillus anthracis strains mostly isolated from soil in Bulgaria between 1960 and 1980 were investigated. All strains were proven to be B. anthracis by culture and amplification of a B. anthracis-specific chromosomal marker. PCR demonstrated that in nine strains both virulence plasmids (pX01+/pX02+) and in four strains only one plasmid (pX02+) were present, whereas the majority of strains (n = 27) lacked both plasmids (pX01-/pX02-). Multi-locus-variable number of tandem repeat-analysis (MLVA) using 15 markers differentiated three genotypes. Comparison with typing data of more than 1,000 different B. anthracis strains revealed that Bulgarian genotypes affiliated with the A1.a cluster and form their own unique cluster different from clusters containing strains isolated in geographical proximity, e.g., Turkey, Georgia, Hungary, Albania or Italy. In addition, a new allele of one marker (vrrC2) was identified. Canonical single nucleotide polymorphisms analysis allocated 31 Bulgarian strains into the A.Br.008/009 and nine strains into the A.Br.WNA group, which is the first description of B. anthracis strains of the A.Br.WNA group on the Eurasian continent. PMID:21279731

Antwerpen, M; Ilin, D; Georgieva, E; Meyer, H; Savov, E; Frangoulidis, D

2011-01-30

250

Analysis of common genetic variants identifies RELN as a risk gene for schizophrenia in Chinese population.  

PubMed

Abstract Objectives. Several lines of evidence have shown that both RELN mRNA and protein are possibly down-regulated in the brain of schizophrenia patients. Recent association studies in European populations suggested RELN as a risk gene for schizophrenia. In this study, we test if RELN contributes to the risk of schizophrenia in Chinese population. Methods. We conducted case-control association analysis of 19 representative single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) spanning the entire region of RELN in two independent Han Chinese samples from southwestern China (the Kunming sample and the Yuxi sample). Results. We identified six SNPs significantly associated with schizophrenia in the Kunming sample and four of them remained significant in the combined samples (the P values range from 0.006 to 4.0 × 10(-5)). Haplotype analysis also suggested significant associations for the haplotypes incorporating the six significant SNPs (global P < 1.0 × 10(-5)). Additionally, we also observed several other haplotypes (defined by a different set of SNPs) significantly associated with schizophrenia in the Kunming sample. However, the reported association of rs7341475 in Ashkenazi Jews was not significant in Han Chinese. Conclusions: Our findings demonstrate that RELN is a susceptibility gene for schizophrenia in Chinese population, and it is likely a common risk gene for schizophrenia in major populations worldwide. PMID:21745129

Li, Ming; Luo, Xiong-Jian; Xiao, Xiao; Shi, Lei; Liu, Xing-Yan; Yin, Li-De; Ma, Xiao-Yuan; Yang, Shun-Ying; Pu, Xing-Fu; Yu, Jin; Diao, Hong-Bo; Shi, Hong; Su, Bing

2011-07-11

251

Knowing a donor and identifying as one: Determinants of people's willingness for related and anonymous living donation in Australia  

Microsoft Academic Search

Although living related donation (LRD) (living donation to a genetically\\/emotionally related recipient) is well established in Australia, living anonymous donation (LAD) to a stranger is rare. Given the increasing use of LAD overseas, Australia may likely follow suit. Understanding the determinants of people's willingness for LAD is essential but infrequently studied in Australia. Consequently, we compared the determinants of people's

Melissa K. Hyde; Katherine M. White

2009-01-01

252

First Streptococcus pyogenes signature-tagged mutagenesis screen identifies novel virulence determinants.  

PubMed

The virulence of bacterial pathogens is a complex process that requires the dynamic expression of many genes for the pathogens to invade and circumvent host defenses, as well as to proliferate in vivo. In this study, we employed a large-scale screen, signature-tagged mutagenesis (STM), to identify Streptococcus pyogenes virulence genes important for pathogenesis within the host. Approximately 1,200 STM mutants were created and screened using the zebrafish infectious disease model. The transposon insertion site was identified for 29 of the 150 mutants that were considered attenuated for virulence. Previously reported streptococcal virulence genes, such as mga, hasA, amrA, smeZ, and two genes in the sil locus, were identified, confirming the utility of the model for revealing genes important for virulence. Multiple genes not previously implicated in virulence were also identified, including genes encoding putative transporters, hypothetical cytosolic proteins, and macrolide efflux pumps. The STM mutant strains display various levels of attenuation, and multiple separate insertions were identified in either the same gene or the same locus, suggesting that these factors are important for this type of acute, invasive infection. We further examined two such genes, silB and silC of a putative quorum-sensing regulon, and determined that they are significant virulence factors in our model of necrotizing fasciitis. sil locus promoter expression was examined under various in vitro conditions, as well as in zebrafish tissues, and was found to be differentially induced. This study was a unique investigation of S. pyogenes factors required for successful invasive infection. PMID:19223485

Kizy, Anne E; Neely, Melody N

2009-02-17

253

Novel Genetic Markers of Breast Cancer Survival Identified by a Genome-Wide Association Study  

PubMed Central

Only two genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been conducted to date to identify potential markers for total mortality after diagnosis of breast cancer. Here we report the identification of two SNPs associated with total mortality from a two-stage GWAS conducted among 6,110 Shanghai-resident Chinese women with TNM stage I-IV breast cancer. The discovery stage included 1,950 patients and evaluated 613,031 common SNPs. The top 49 associations were evaluated in an independent replication stage of 4,160 Shanghai breast cancer patients. A consistent and highly significant association with total mortality was documented for SNPs rs3784099 and rs9934948. SNP rs3784099, located in the RAD51L1 gene, was associated with total morality in both the discovery stage (P=1.44×10?8) and replication stage (P=0.06; P-combined=1.17×10?7). Adjusted hazard ratios (HR) for total mortality were 1.41 (95%CI=1.18–1.68) for the AG genotype and 2.64 (95%CI=1.74–4.03) for the AA genotype, when compared with the GG genotype. The variant C allele of rs9934948, located on chromosome 16, was associated with a similarly elevated risk of total mortality (P-combined: 5.75×10?6). We also observed this association among 1,145 breast cancer patients of European-ancestry from the Nurses’ Health Study (NHS; P=0.006); the association was highly significant in a combined analysis of NHS and Chinese data (P=1.39×10?7). Similar associations were observed for these two SNPs with breast cancer-specific mortality. This study provides strong evidence suggesting that the RAD51L1 gene and a chromosome 16 locus influence breast cancer prognosis.

Shu, Xiao Ou; Long, Jirong; Lu, Wei; Li, Chun; Chen, Wendy Y.; Delahanty, Ryan; Cheng, Jiarong; Cai, Hui; Zheng, Ying; Shi, Jiajun; Gu, Kai; Wang, Wen-Jing; Kraft, Peter; Gao, Yu-Tang; Cai, Qiuyin; Zheng, Wei

2012-01-01

254

Integrative approach to pain genetics identifies pain sensitivity loci across diseases.  

PubMed

Identifying human genes relevant for the processing of pain requires difficult-to-conduct and expensive large-scale clinical trials. Here, we examine a novel integrative paradigm for data-driven discovery of pain gene candidates, taking advantage of the vast amount of existing disease-related clinical literature and gene expression microarray data stored in large international repositories. First, thousands of diseases were ranked according to a disease-specific pain index (DSPI), derived from Medical Subject Heading (MESH) annotations in MEDLINE. Second, gene expression profiles of 121 of these human diseases were obtained from public sources. Third, genes with expression variation significantly correlated with DSPI across diseases were selected as candidate pain genes. Finally, selected candidate pain genes were genotyped in an independent human cohort and prospectively evaluated for significant association between variants and measures of pain sensitivity. The strongest signal was with rs4512126 (5q32, ABLIM3, P?=?1.3×10?¹?) for the sensitivity to cold pressor pain in males, but not in females. Significant associations were also observed with rs12548828, rs7826700 and rs1075791 on 8q22.2 within NCALD (P?=?1.7×10??, 1.8×10??, and 2.2×10?? respectively). Our results demonstrate the utility of a novel paradigm that integrates publicly available disease-specific gene expression data with clinical data curated from MEDLINE to facilitate the discovery of pain-relevant genes. This data-derived list of pain gene candidates enables additional focused and efficient biological studies validating additional candidates. PMID:22685391

Ruau, David; Dudley, Joel T; Chen, Rong; Phillips, Nicholas G; Swan, Gary E; Lazzeroni, Laura C; Clark, J David; Butte, Atul J; Angst, Martin S

2012-06-07

255

Integrative Approach to Pain Genetics Identifies Pain Sensitivity Loci across Diseases  

PubMed Central

Identifying human genes relevant for the processing of pain requires difficult-to-conduct and expensive large-scale clinical trials. Here, we examine a novel integrative paradigm for data-driven discovery of pain gene candidates, taking advantage of the vast amount of existing disease-related clinical literature and gene expression microarray data stored in large international repositories. First, thousands of diseases were ranked according to a disease-specific pain index (DSPI), derived from Medical Subject Heading (MESH) annotations in MEDLINE. Second, gene expression profiles of 121 of these human diseases were obtained from public sources. Third, genes with expression variation significantly correlated with DSPI across diseases were selected as candidate pain genes. Finally, selected candidate pain genes were genotyped in an independent human cohort and prospectively evaluated for significant association between variants and measures of pain sensitivity. The strongest signal was with rs4512126 (5q32, ABLIM3, P?=?1.3×10?10) for the sensitivity to cold pressor pain in males, but not in females. Significant associations were also observed with rs12548828, rs7826700 and rs1075791 on 8q22.2 within NCALD (P?=?1.7×10?4, 1.8×10?4, and 2.2×10?4 respectively). Our results demonstrate the utility of a novel paradigm that integrates publicly available disease-specific gene expression data with clinical data curated from MEDLINE to facilitate the discovery of pain-relevant genes. This data-derived list of pain gene candidates enables additional focused and efficient biological studies validating additional candidates.

Ruau, David; Dudley, Joel T.; Chen, Rong; Phillips, Nicholas G.; Swan, Gary E.; Lazzeroni, Laura C.; Clark, J. David

2012-01-01

256

Genetic Screening in C. Elegans Identifies Rho-GTPAse Activating Protein 6 as Novel HERG Regulator  

PubMed Central

The human ether-a-go-go related gene (HERG) constitutes the pore forming subunit of IKr, a K+ current involved in repolarization of the cardiac action potential. While mutations in HERG predispose patients to cardiac arrhythmias (Long QT syndrome; LQTS), altered function of HERG regulators are undoubtedly LQTS risk factors. We have combined RNA interference with behavioral screening in Caenorhabditis elegans to detect genes that influence function of the HERG homolog, UNC-103. One such gene encodes the worm ortholog of the rho-GTPase activating protein 6 (ARHGAP6). In addition to its GAP function, ARHGAP6 induces cytoskeletal rearrangements and activates phospholipase C (PLC). Here we show that IKr recorded in cells co-expressing HERG and ARHGAP6 was decreased by 43% compared to HERG alone. Biochemical measurements of cell-surface associated HERG revealed that ARHGAP6 reduced membrane expression of HERG by 35%, which correlates well with the reduction in current. In an atrial myocyte cell line, suppression of endogenous ARHGAP6 by virally transduced shRNA led to a 53 % enhancement of IKr. ARHGAP6 effects were maintained when we introduced a dominant negative rho-GTPase, or ARHGAP6 devoid of rhoGAP function, indicating ARHGAP6 regulation of HERG is independent of rho activation. However, ARHGAP6 lost effectiveness when PLC was inhibited. We further determined that ARHGAP6 effects are mediated by a consensus SH3 binding domain within the C-terminus of HERG, although stable ARHGAP6-HERG complexes were not observed. These data link a rhoGAP-activated PLC pathway to HERG membrane expression and implicate this family of proteins as candidate genes in disorders involving HERG.

Potet, Franck; Petersen, Christina I.; Boutaud, Olivier; Shuai, Wen; Stepanovic, Svetlana Z.; Balser, Jeffrey R.; Kupershmidt, Sabina

2009-01-01

257

Genetic analysis of fin development in zebrafish identifies furin and hemicentin1 as potential novel fraser syndrome disease genes.  

PubMed

Using forward genetics, we have identified the genes mutated in two classes of zebrafish fin mutants. The mutants of the first class are characterized by defects in embryonic fin morphogenesis, which are due to mutations in a Laminin subunit or an Integrin alpha receptor, respectively. The mutants of the second class display characteristic blistering underneath the basement membrane of the fin epidermis. Three of them are due to mutations in zebrafish orthologues of FRAS1, FREM1, or FREM2, large basement membrane protein encoding genes that are mutated in mouse bleb mutants and in human patients suffering from Fraser Syndrome, a rare congenital condition characterized by syndactyly and cryptophthalmos. Fin blistering in a fourth group of zebrafish mutants is caused by mutations in Hemicentin1 (Hmcn1), another large extracellular matrix protein the function of which in vertebrates was hitherto unknown. Our mutant and dose-dependent interaction data suggest a potential involvement of Hmcn1 in Fraser complex-dependent basement membrane anchorage. Furthermore, we present biochemical and genetic data suggesting a role for the proprotein convertase FurinA in zebrafish fin development and cell surface shedding of Fras1 and Frem2, thereby allowing proper localization of the proteins within the basement membrane of forming fins. Finally, we identify the extracellular matrix protein Fibrillin2 as an indispensable interaction partner of Hmcn1. Thus we have defined a series of zebrafish mutants modelling Fraser Syndrome and have identified several implicated novel genes that might help to further elucidate the mechanisms of basement membrane anchorage and of the disease's aetiology. In addition, the novel genes might prove helpful to unravel the molecular nature of thus far unresolved cases of the human disease. PMID:20419147

Carney, Thomas J; Feitosa, Natália Martins; Sonntag, Carmen; Slanchev, Krasimir; Kluger, Johannes; Kiyozumi, Daiji; Gebauer, Jan M; Coffin Talbot, Jared; Kimmel, Charles B; Sekiguchi, Kiyotoshi; Wagener, Raimund; Schwarz, Heinz; Ingham, Phillip W; Hammerschmidt, Matthias

2010-04-15

258

Chemical screening methods to identify ligands that promote protein stability, protein crystallization, and structure determination  

PubMed Central

The 3D structures of human therapeutic targets are enabling for drug discovery. However, their purification and crystallization remain rate determining. In individual cases, ligands have been used to increase the success rate of protein purification and crystallization, but the broad applicability of this approach is unknown. We implemented two screening platforms, based on either fluorimetry or static light scattering, to measure the increase in protein thermal stability upon binding of a ligand without the need to monitor enzyme activity. In total, 221 different proteins from humans and human parasites were screened against one or both of two sorts of small-molecule libraries. The first library comprised different salts, pH conditions, and commonly found small molecules and was applicable to all proteins. The second comprised compounds specific for protein families of particular interest (e.g., protein kinases). In 20 cases, including nine unique human protein kinases, a small molecule was identified that stabilized the proteins and promoted structure determination. The methods are cost-effective, can be implemented in any laboratory, promise to increase the success rates of purifying and crystallizing human proteins significantly, and identify new ligands for these proteins.

Vedadi, Masoud; Niesen, Frank H.; Allali-Hassani, Abdellah; Fedorov, Oleg Y.; Finerty, Patrick J.; Wasney, Gregory A.; Yeung, Ron; Arrowsmith, Cheryl; Ball, Linda J.; Berglund, Helena; Hui, Raymond; Marsden, Brian D.; Nordlund, Par; Sundstrom, Michael; Weigelt, Johan; Edwards, Aled M.

2006-01-01

259

Identifying genetic components controlling fertility in the outcrossing grass species perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne) by quantitative trait loci analysis and comparative genetics.  

PubMed

Mutational load and resource allocation factors and their effects on limiting seed set were investigated in ryegrass by comparative mapping genomics and quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis in two perennial ryegrass (Lolium perenne) mapping families sharing common genetic markers. Quantitative trait loci for seed-set were identified on chromosome (LG) 7 in both families and on LG4 of the F2/WSC family. On LG7, seed-set and heading date QTLs colocalized in both families and cannot be unequivocally resolved. Comparative genomics suggests that the LG7 region is syntenous to a region of rice LG6 which contains both fertility (S5(n)) and heading date (Hd1, Hd3a) candidate genes. The LG4 region is syntenous to a region of rice LG3 which contains a fertility (S33) candidate gene. QTL maxima for seed-set and heading date on LG4 in the F2/WSC family are separated by c. 8 cm, indicating distinct genetic control. Low seed set is under the control of recessive genes at both LG4 and LG7 locations. The identification of QTLs associated with seed set, a major component of seed yield in perennial ryegrass, indicates that mutational load associated with these genomic regions can be mitigated through marker-assisted selection. PMID:18346108

Armstead, I P; Turner, L B; Marshall, A H; Humphreys, M O; King, I P; Thorogood, D

2008-03-10

260

Plasticity in human motor cortex is in part genetically determined  

PubMed Central

Brain plasticity refers to changes in the organization of the brain as a result of different environmental stimuli. The aim of this study was to assess the genetic variation of brain plasticity, by comparing intrapair differences between monozygotic (MZ) and dizygotic (DZ) twins. Plasticity was examined by a paired associative stimulation (PAS) in 32 healthy female twins (9 MZ and 7 DZ pairs, aged 22.6 ± 2.7 and 23.8 ± 3.6 years, respectively). Stimulation consisted of low frequency repetitive application of single afferent electric stimuli, delivered to the right median nerve, paired with a single pulse transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) for activation of the abductor pollicis brevis muscle (APB). Corticospinal excitability was monitored for 30 min following the intervention. PAS induced an increase in the amplitudes of the motor evoked potentials (MEP) in the resting APB, compared to baseline. Intrapair differences, after baseline normalization, in the MEP amplitudes measured at 25–30 min post-intervention, were almost double for DZ (1.25) in comparison to MZ (0.64) twins (P = 0.036). The heritability estimate for brain plasticity was found to be 0.68. This finding implicates that genetic factors may contribute significantly to interindividual variability in plasticity paradigms. Genetic factors may be important in adaptive brain reorganization involved in motor learning and rehabilitation from brain injury.

Missitzi, Julia; Gentner, Reinhard; Geladas, Nickos; Politis, Panagiotis; Karandreas, Nikos; Classen, Joseph; Klissouras, Vassilis

2011-01-01

261

Genetic Determinants of Resistance to Fusidic Acid among Clinical Bacteremia Isolates of Staphylococcus aureus?  

PubMed Central

Resistance to fusidic acid in Staphylococcus aureus is caused by mutation of the elongation factor G (EF-G) drug target (FusA class) or by expression of a protein that protects the drug target (FusB and FusC classes). Recently, two novel genetic classes of small-colony variants (SCVs) were identified among fusidic acid-resistant mutants selected in vitro (FusA-SCV and FusE classes). We analyzed a phylogenetically diverse collection of fusidic acid-resistant bacteremia isolates to determine which resistance classes were prevalent and whether these were associated with particular phylogenetic lineages. Each isolate was shown by DNA sequencing and plasmid curing to carry only one determinant of fusidic acid resistance, with approximately equal frequencies of the FusA, FusB, and FusC genetic classes. The FusA class (mutations in fusA) were distributed among different phylogenetic types. Two distinct variants of the FusC class (chromosomal fusC gene) were identified, and FusC was also distributed among different phylogenetic types. In contrast, the FusB class (carrying fusB on a plasmid) was found in closely related types. No FusE-class mutants (carrying mutations in rplF) were found. However, one FusA-class isolate had multiple mutations in the fusA gene, including one altering a codon associated with the FusA-SCV class. SCVs are frequently unstable and may undergo compensatory evolution to a normal growth phenotype after their initial occurrence. Accordingly, this normal-growth isolate might have evolved from a fusidic acid-resistant SCV. We conclude that at least three different resistance classes are prevalent among fusidic acid-resistant bacteremia isolates of S. aureus.

Lannergard, Jonas; Norstrom, Tobias; Hughes, Diarmaid

2009-01-01

262

Genetic Determinism in School Textbooks: A Comparative Study Conducted among Sixteen Countries  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Genetic concepts have significantly evolved over the last ten years, and are now less connected to innate ideas and reductionism. Unique reference to genetic determinism has been replaced by the interaction between the genes and their environment (epigenetics). Our analyses relate to how current school biology textbooks present this new paradigm…

Castera, Jeremy; Clement, Pierre; Abrougui, Mondher; Nisiforou, Olympia; Valanides, Nicos; Turcinaviciene, Jurga; Sarapuu, Tago; Agorram, Boujemaa; Calado, Florbela; Bogner, Franz; Carvalho, Graca

2008-01-01

263

A Multistage Genetic Association Study Identifies Breast Cancer Risk Loci at 10q25 and 16q24  

PubMed Central

Background Heritable risk for breast cancer includes an increasing number of common, low effect risk variants. We conducted a multistage genetic association study in a series of independent epidemiologic breast cancer study populations to identify novel breast cancer risk variants. Methods We tested 1,162 SNPs of greatest nominal significance from stage I of the Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility breast cancer study (CGEMS; 1,145 cases, 1,142 controls) for evidence of replicated association with breast cancer in the Nashville Breast Cohort (NBC; 599 cases, 1,161 controls), the Collaborative Breast Cancer Study (CBCS; 1,552 cases, 1,185 controls), and BioVU Breast Cancer Study (BioVU; 1,172 cases, 1,172 controls). Results Among these SNPs, a series of validated breast cancer risk variants yielded expected associations in the study populations. In addition, we observed two previously unreported loci that were significantly associated with breast cancer risk in the CGEMS, NBC, and CBCS study populations and had a consistent, although not statistically significant, risk effect in the BioVU study population. These were rs1626678 at 10q25.3 near ENO4 and KIAA1598 (meta-analysis age-adjusted OR 1.13 [1.07–1.20], P = 5.6 × 10?5), and rs8046508 at 16q23.1 in the eighth intron of WWOX (meta-analysis age-adjusted OR = 1.20 [1.10–1.31], P = 3.5 × 10?5). Conclusions Our data supports the association of two novel loci, at 10q25.3 and 16q23.1, with risk of breast cancer. Impact The expanding compendium of known breast cancer genetic risk variants holds increasing power for clinical risk prediction models of breast cancer, improving upon the Gail model.

Higginbotham, Kathryn S.; Breyer, Joan P.; McReynolds, Kate M.; Bradley, Kevin M.; Schuyler, Peggy A.; Plummer, W. Dale; Freudenthal, Marcia E.; Trentham-Dietz, Amy; Newcomb, Polly A.; Parl, Fritz F.; Sanders, Melinda E.; Page, David L.; Egan, Kathleen M.; Dupont, William D.; Smith, Jeffrey R.

2013-01-01

264

Application of a Novel Radioimmunoassay to Identify Baculovirus Structural Proteins That Share Interspecies Antigenic Determinants  

PubMed Central

Immunological comparisons were made of baculovirus structural proteins by using a modification of the radioimmunological techniques described by Renart et al. (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 76: 3116-3120, 1979) and Towbin et al. (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 76: 4350-4354, 1979). Viral proteins were electrophoresed in polyacrylamide gels, transferred to nitrocellulose, and incubated with viral antisera, and the antibodies were detected with 125I-labeled Staphylococcus aureus protein A. Antisera were prepared to purified and intact virions from five baculoviruses: Autographa californica, Porthetria dispar, Trichoplusia ni, and Heliothis zea nuclear polyhedrosis viruses (NPVs) and T. ni granulosis virus (GV). These antisera were tested against the virion structural polypeptides of 17 different species of baculoviruses. Specific multiple-nucleocapsid NPV (MNPV), single-nucleocapsid NPV (SNPV), and GV virion polypeptides were shown to have similar antigenic determinants and thus be immunologically related. The molecular weights of the virion polypeptides with cross-reacting antigenic determinants were identified. Antisera prepared to purified A. californica and H. zea MNPV polyhedrin (the occlusion body protein from NPVs) recognized antigenic determinants on all the polyhedrins and granulins (occlusion body protein from GVs) that were tested. No immunological relationship was detected between A. californica MNPV polyhedrin and any of the A. californica MNPV virion structural polypeptides present on either the virus isolated from occlusion bodies or A. californica MNPV extracellular virus from infected-cell cultures. Images

Smith, Gale E.; Summers, Max D.

1981-01-01

265

Challenges Identifying Genetic Determinants of Pediatric Cancers – the Childhood Leukemia Experience  

Microsoft Academic Search

Pediatric cancers affect approximately 1 in every 500 children before the age of 15. Little is known about the etiology of\\u000a this heterogeneous group of diseases despite the fact they constitute the major cause of death by disease among this population.\\u000a Because of its relatively high prevalence, most of the work done in pediatric oncogenetics has been focused on leukemias,

Daniel Sinnett; Damian Labuda; Maja Krajinovic

2006-01-01

266

An in vivo RNAi assay identifies major genetic and cellular requirements for primary piRNA biogenesis in Drosophila  

PubMed Central

In Drosophila, PIWI proteins and bound PIWI-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) form the core of a small RNA-mediated defense system against selfish genetic elements. Within germline cells, piRNAs are processed from piRNA clusters and transposons to be loaded into Piwi/Aubergine/AGO3 and a subset of piRNAs undergoes target-dependent amplification. In contrast, gonadal somatic support cells express only Piwi, lack signs of piRNA amplification and exhibit primary piRNA biogenesis from piRNA clusters. Neither piRNA processing/loading nor Piwi-mediated target silencing is understood at the genetic, cellular or molecular level. We developed an in vivo RNAi assay for the somatic piRNA pathway and identified the RNA helicase Armitage, the Tudor domain containing RNA helicase Yb and the putative nuclease Zucchini as essential factors for primary piRNA biogenesis. Lack of any of these proteins leads to transposon de-silencing, to a collapse in piRNA levels and to a failure in Piwi-nuclear accumulation. We show that Armitage and Yb interact physically and co-localize in cytoplasmic Yb bodies, which flank P bodies. Loss of Zucchini leads to an accumulation of Piwi and Armitage in Yb bodies, indicating that Yb bodies are sites of primary piRNA biogenesis.

Olivieri, Daniel; Sykora, Martina M; Sachidanandam, Ravi; Mechtler, Karl; Brennecke, Julius

2010-01-01

267

AMBIENCE: A Novel Approach and Efficient Algorithm for Identifying Informative Genetic and Environmental Associations With Complex Phenotypes  

PubMed Central

We developed a computationally efficient algorithm AMBIENCE, for identifying the informative variables involved in gene–gene (GGI) and gene–environment interactions (GEI) that are associated with disease phenotypes. The AMBIENCE algorithm uses a novel information theoretic metric called phenotype-associated information (PAI) to search for combinations of genetic variants and environmental variables associated with the disease phenotype. The PAI-based AMBIENCE algorithm effectively and efficiently detected GEI in simulated data sets of varying size and complexity, including the 10K simulated rheumatoid arthritis data set from Genetic Analysis Workshop 15. The method was also successfully used to detect GGI in a Crohn's disease data set. The performance of the AMBIENCE algorithm was compared to the multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR), generalized MDR (GMDR), and pedigree disequilibrium test (PDT) methods. Furthermore, we assessed the computational speed of AMBIENCE for detecting GGI and GEI for data sets varying in size from 100 to 105 variables. Our results demonstrate that the AMBIENCE information theoretic algorithm is useful for analyzing a diverse range of epidemiologic data sets containing evidence for GGI and GEI.

Chanda, Pritam; Sucheston, Lara; Zhang, Aidong; Brazeau, Daniel; Freudenheim, Jo L.; Ambrosone, Christine; Ramanathan, Murali

2008-01-01

268

[Generation of epilepsy animal model bearing a genetic abnormality identified in autosomal dominant nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy (ADNFLE) of humans].  

PubMed

Nocturnal frontal lobe epilepsy is seen exclusively during sleep and is characterized by three distinct seizure phenotypes: paroxysmal arousals, paroxysmal dystonia, and episodic wandering. Mutations of CHRNA4, CHRNB2, or CHRNA2 genes encoding alpha4, beta2 or alpha2 subunits of neuronal nicotinic ACh receptor (nAChR) have been identified in the individuals with sporadic type NFLE and pedigrees with autosomal dominant type of NFLE (ADNFLE). In the past decade, various electrophysiological studies have analyzed the functional abnormalities of ADNFLE/NFLE mutant nAChR; however, the detailed pathogenesis of ADNFLE/NFLE has remained to be clarified. Therefore, to explore the pathogenesis of ADNFLE/NFLE, genetic animal models harboring ADNFLE mutant Chrna4 genes have recently been established. The face, construct and predictive validities have been demonstrated in a transgenic rat strain bearing the S284L mutant Chrna4 gene. The in vivo analyses of the functional abnormalities using genetic ADNFLE/NFLE animal models suggest the putative mechanisms of the ADNFLE/NFLE seizure onset during slow wave sleep. PMID:20297737

Okada, Motohiro

2010-02-01

269

Development of a chemical genetic approach for human aurora B kinase identifies novel substrates of the chromosomal passenger complex.  

PubMed

To understand how the chromosomal passenger complex ensures chromosomal stability, it is crucial to identify its substrates and to find ways to specifically inhibit the enzymatic core of the complex, Aurora B. We therefore developed a chemical genetic approach to selectively inhibit human Aurora B. By mutating the gatekeeper residue Leu-154 in the kinase active site, the ATP-binding pocket was enlarged, but kinase function was severely disrupted. A unique second site suppressor mutation was identified that rescued kinase activity in the Leu-154 mutant and allowed the accommodation of bulky N(6)-substituted adenine analogs. Using this analog-sensitive Aurora B kinase, we found that retention of the chromosomal passenger complex at the centromere depends on Aurora B kinase activity. Furthermore, analog-sensitive Aurora B was able to use bulky ATP?S analogs and could thiophosphorylate multiple proteins in cell extracts. Utilizing an unbiased approach for kinase substrate mapping, we identified several novel substrates of Aurora B, including the nucleosomal-binding protein HMGN2. We confirmed that HMGN2 is a bona fide Aurora B substrate in vivo and show that its dynamic association to chromatin is controlled by Aurora B. PMID:22267324

Hengeveld, Rutger C C; Hertz, Nicholas T; Vromans, Martijn J M; Zhang, Chao; Burlingame, Alma L; Shokat, Kevan M; Lens, Susanne M A

2012-01-20

270

Identifying rare disease variants in the Genetic Analysis Workshop 17 simulated data: a comparison of several statistical approaches  

PubMed Central

Genome-wide association studies have been successful at identifying common disease variants associated with complex diseases, but the common variants identified have small effect sizes and account for only a small fraction of the estimated heritability for common diseases. Theoretical and empirical studies suggest that rare variants, which are much less frequent in populations and are poorly captured by single-nucleotide polymorphism chips, could play a significant role in complex diseases. Several new statistical methods have been developed for the analysis of rare variants, for example, the combined multivariate and collapsing method, the weighted-sum method and a replication-based method. Here, we apply and compare these methods to the simulated data sets of Genetic Analysis Workshop 17 and thereby explore the contribution of rare variants to disease risk. In addition, we investigate the usefulness of extreme phenotypes in identifying rare risk variants when dealing with quantitative traits. Finally, we perform a pathway analysis and show the importance of the vascular endothelial growth factor pathway in explaining different phenotypes.

2011-01-01

271

Genetic determinants of acenocoumarol and phenprocoumon maintenance dose requirements  

Microsoft Academic Search

Objective  The variability in warfarin dose requirement is attributable to genetic and environmental factors. Acenocoumarol (AC) and\\u000a phenprocoumon (PC) are coumarin derivates widely prescribed in European countries for the prevention and treatment of thromboembolic\\u000a events. The aim of our study was to investigate the contribution of genes involved in the vitamin K cycle to AC and PC maintenance\\u000a doses.\\u000a \\u000a \\u000a \\u000a Methods  Common single

Janne Cadamuro; Benjamin Dieplinger; Thomas Felder; Igor Kedenko; Thomas Mueller; Meinhard Haltmayer; Wolfgang Patsch; Hannes Oberkofler

2010-01-01

272

Genetic determinism of anatomical and hydraulic traits within an apple progeny.  

PubMed

The apple tree is known to have an isohydric behaviour, maintaining rather constant leaf water potential in soil with low water status and/or under high evaporative demand. However, little is known on the xylem water transport from roots to leaves from the two perspectives of efficiency and safety, and on its genetic variability. We analysed 16 traits related to hydraulic efficiency and safety, and anatomical traits in apple stems, and the relationships between them. Most variables were found heritable, and we investigated the determinism underlying their genetic control through a quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis on 90 genotypes from the same progeny. Principal component analysis (PCA) revealed that all traits related to efficiency, whether hydraulic conductivity, vessel number and area or wood area, were included in the first PC, whereas the second PC included the safety variables, thus confirming the absence of trade-off between these two sets of traits. Our results demonstrated that clustered variables were characterized by common genomic regions. Together with previous results on the same progeny, our study substantiated that hydraulic efficiency traits co-localized with traits identified for tree growth and fruit production. PMID:21477120

Lauri, Pierre-Éric; Gorza, Olivier; Cochard, Hervé; Martinez, Sébastien; Celton, Jean-Marc; Ripetti, Véronique; Lartaud, Marc; Bry, Xavier; Trottier, Catherine; Costes, Evelyne

2011-06-22

273

The geographical and environmental determinants of genetic diversity for four alpine conifers of the European Alps.  

PubMed

Climate is one of the most important drivers of local adaptation in forest tree species. Standing levels of genetic diversity and structure within and among natural populations of forest trees are determined by the interplay between climatic heterogeneity and the balance between selection and gene flow. To investigate this interplay, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped in 24 to 37 populations from four subalpine conifers, Abies alba Mill., Larix decidua Mill., Pinus cembra L. and Pinus mugo Turra, across their natural ranges in the Italian Alps and Apennines. Patterns of population structure were apparent using a Bayesian clustering program, STRUCTURE, which identified three to five genetic groups per species. Geographical correlates with these patterns, however, were only apparent for P. cembra. Multivariate environmental variables [i.e. principal components (PCs)] were subsequently tested for association with SNPs using a Bayesian generalized linear mixed model. The majority of the SNPs, ranging from six in L. decidua to 18 in P. mugo, were associated with PC1, corresponding to winter precipitation and seasonal minimum temperature. In A. alba, four SNPs were associated with PC2, corresponding to the seasonal minimum temperature. Functional annotation of those genes with the orthologs in Arabidopsis revealed several genes involved in abiotic stress response. This study provides a detailed assessment of population structure and its association with environment and geography in four coniferous species in the Italian mountains. PMID:23058000

Mosca, E; Eckert, A J; Di Pierro, E A; Rocchini, D; La Porta, Nicola; Belletti, P; Neale, D B

2012-10-12

274

Novel Determinants of Intestinal Colonization of Salmonella enterica Serotype Typhimurium Identified in Bovine Enteric Infection.  

PubMed

Cattle are naturally infected with Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium and exhibit pathological features of enteric salmonellosis that closely resemble those in humans. Cattle are the most relevant model of gastrointestinal disease resulting from nontyphoidal Salmonella infection in an animal with an intact microbiota. We utilized this model to screen a library of targeted single-gene deletion mutants to identify novel genes of Salmonella Typhimurium required for survival during enteric infection. Fifty-four candidate mutants were strongly selected, including numerous mutations in genes known to be important for gastrointestinal survival of salmonellae. Three genes with previously unproven phenotypes in gastrointestinal infection were tested in bovine ligated ileal loops. Two of these mutants, STM3602 and STM3846, recapitulated the phenotype observed in the mutant pool. Complementation experiments successfully reversed the observed phenotypes, directly linking these genes to the colonization defects of the corresponding mutant strains. STM3602 encodes a putative transcriptional regulator that may be involved in phosphonate utilization, and STM3846 encodes a retron reverse transcriptase that produces a unique RNA-DNA hybrid molecule called multicopy single-stranded DNA. The genes identified in this study represent an exciting new class of virulence determinants for further mechanistic study to elucidate the strategies employed by Salmonella to survive within the small intestines of cattle. PMID:24019407

Elfenbein, Johanna R; Endicott-Yazdani, Tiana; Porwollik, Steffen; Bogomolnaya, Lydia M; Cheng, Pui; Guo, Jinbai; Zheng, Yi; Yang, Hee-Jeong; Talamantes, Marissa; Shields, Christine; Maple, Aimee; Ragoza, Yury; Deatley, Kimberly; Tatsch, Tyler; Cui, Ping; Andrews, Katharine D; McClelland, Michael; Lawhon, Sara D; Andrews-Polymenis, Helene

2013-09-09

275

Comparison of unrestrained plethysmography and forced oscillation for identifying genetic variability of airway responsiveness in inbred mice  

PubMed Central

Lung function detection in mice is currently most accurately measured by invasive techniques, which are costly, labor intensive, and terminal. This limits their use for large-scale or longitudinal studies. Noninvasive assays are often used instead, but their accuracy for measuring lung function parameters such as resistance and elastance has been questioned in studies involving small numbers of mouse strains. Here we compared parameters detected by two different methods using 29 inbred mouse strains: enhanced pause (Penh), detected by unrestrained plethysmography, and central airway resistance and lung elastance, detected by a forced oscillation technique. We further tested whether the phenotypic variations were determined by the same genomic location in genome-wide association studies using a linear mixed model algorithm. Penh, resistance, and elastance were measured in nonexposed mice or mice exposed to saline and increasing doses of aerosolized methacholine. Because Penh differed from airway resistance in several strains and because the peak genetic associations found for Penh, resistance, or elastance were located at different genomic regions, we conclude that using Penh as an indicator for lung function changes in high-throughput genetic studies (i.e., genome-wide association studies or quantitative trait locus studies) measures something fundamentally different than airway resistance and lung elastance.

Leme, Adriana S.; Williams, Laura K.; Smith, Randy Von; Savage, Holly S.; Stearns, Timothy M.; Tsaih, Shirng-Wern; Shapiro, Steven D.; Peters, Luanne L.; Paigen, Beverly; Svenson, Karen L.

2011-01-01

276

Genetic caste determination does not impose growth rate costs inPogonomyrmex harvester ants  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary 1. Caste determination in eusocial insects is the process by which individuals differentiate into reproducer or helper phenotypes. 2. Environmental caste determination (ECD) is predicted to be more efficient than genetic caste determination (GCD), yet GCD occurs in several populations of Pogonomyrmex harvester ants. 3. We tested whether GCD reduces efficiency by comparing colony growth rates of two GCD

Sara Helms Cahan; Amanda B. Daly; Tanja Schwander; H. Arthur Woods

277

A Specific Pathway Can Be Identified between Genetic Characteristics and Behaviour Profiles in Prader-Willi Syndrome via Cognitive, Environmental and Physiological Mechanisms  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

Background: Behavioural phenotypes associated with genetic syndromes have been extensively investigated in order to generate rich descriptions of phenomenology, determine the degree of specificity of behaviours for a particular syndrome, and examine potential interactions between genetic predispositions for behaviour and environmental influences.…

Woodcock, K. A.; Oliver, C.; Humphreys, G. W.

2009-01-01

278

Genetic Determinants of 21-Hydroxylase Autoantibodies Amongst Patients of the Type 1 Diabetes Genetics Consortium  

PubMed Central

Background: Autoantibodies to 21-hydroxylase (21OH-AA) precede the onset of autoimmune Addison's disease (AD) and are found in 1.5% of individuals with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). The greatest genetic risk for both disorders is found in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), suggesting a common pathophysiology between AD and T1DM. Screening for 21OH-AA in newly diagnosed T1DM patients is a valuable prognostic tool, made stronger when MHC genotype is considered. Methods: The Type 1 Diabetes Genetics Consortium has collected genotype data in T1DM subjects with tissue-specific autoantibody typing. Genotype and phenotype data in individuals positive and negative for 21OH-AA are compared. Results: Major genetic risk for 21OH-AA is in the MHC haplotypes DRB1*04-DQB1*0302 (primarily DRB1*0404) and DRB1*0301-DQB1*0201. Protective effects in class II MHC haplotypes DRB1*0101-DQB1*0501 and DRB1*0701-DQB1*0202 also were detected. There is no difference in the presence of HLA-B15 and little difference in the presence of HLA-B8 (after class II effects are accounted for) in T1DM patients with 21OH-AA compared with known associations (HLA-B8 positive and HLA-B15 negative) in AD. Conclusions: In 21OH-AA+ subjects, genetic risk is found mainly in MHC class II haplotypes DR3 and DR4 but not class I alleles (HLA-B8 or HLA-B15). This suggests a difference between autoantibody formation (class II dependent) and progression to overt disease (class I dependent) in AD.

Baker, Peter; Fain, Pam; Kahles, Heinrich; Yu, Liping; Hutton, John; Wenzlau, Janet; Rewers, Marian; Badenhoop, Klaus

2012-01-01

279

Cigarette Experimentation in Mexican Origin Youth: Psychosocial and Genetic Determinants  

PubMed Central

Background Established psychosocial risk factors increase the risk for experimentation among Mexican-origin youth. Now we comprehensively investigate the added contribution of select polymorphisms in candidate genetic pathways associated with sensation seeking, risk taking, and smoking phenotypes to predict experimentation. Methods Participants, (N=1,118 Mexican origin youth) recruited from a large population-based cohort study in Houston, Texas, provided prospective data on cigarette experimentation over three years. Psychosocial data were elicited twice—baseline and final follow-up. Participants were genotyped for 672 functional and tagging variants in the dopamine, serotonin and opioid pathways. Results After adjusting for gender and age, with a Bayesian False Discovery Probability set at 0.8 and prior probability of 0.05, six gene variants were significantly associated with risk of experimentation. After controlling for established risk factors, multivariable analyses revealed that participants with six or more risk alleles were 2.25 (95%CI: 1.62–3.13) times more likely to have experimented since baseline compared to participants with five or fewer. Among committed never smokers (N=872), three genes (OPRM1, SNAP25, HTR1B) were associated with experimentation as were all psychosocial factors. Among susceptible youth (N=246) older age at baseline, living with a smoker, and three different genes (HTR2A, DRD2, SLC6A3) predicted experimentation. Conclusions Our findings, which have implications for development of culturally-specific interventions, need to be validated in other ethnic groups. Impact These results suggest that variations in select genes interact with a cognitive predisposition toward smoking. In susceptible adolescents, the impact of the genetic variants appears to be larger compared to committed never smokers.

Wilkinson, Anna V.; Bondy, Melissa L.; Wu, Xifeng; Wang, Jian; Dong, Qiong; D'Amelio, Anthony M.; Prokhorov, Alexander V.; Pu, Xia; Yu, Robert K.; Etzel, Carol J.; Shete, Sanjay; Spitz, Margaret R.

2011-01-01

280

A Genetic Screen in Drosophila for Genes Interacting With senseless During Neuronal Development Identifies the Importin moleskin  

PubMed Central

Senseless (Sens) is a conserved transcription factor required for normal development of the Drosophila peripheral nervous system. In the Drosophila retina, sens is necessary and sufficient for differentiation of R8 photoreceptors and interommatidial bristles (IOBs). When Sens is expressed in undifferentiated cells posterior to the morphogenetic furrow, ectopic IOBs are formed. This phenotype was used to identify new members of the sens pathway in a dominant modifier screen. Seven suppressor and three enhancer complementation groups were isolated. Three groups from the screen are the known genes Delta, lilliputian, and moleskin/DIM-7 (msk), while the remaining seven groups represent novel genes with previously undefined functions in neural development. The nuclear import gene msk was identified as a potent suppressor of the ectopic interommatidial bristle phenotype. In addition, msk mutant adult eyes are extremely disrupted with defects in multiple cell types. Reminiscent of the sens mutant phenotype, msk eyes demonstrate reductions in the number of R8 photoreceptors due to an R8 to R2,5 fate switch, providing genetic evidence that Msk is a component of the sens pathway. Interestingly, in msk tissue, the loss of R8 fate occurs earlier than with sens and suggests a previously unidentified stage of R8 development between atonal and sens.

Pepple, Kathryn L.; Anderson, Aimee E.; Frankfort, Benjamin J.; Mardon, Graeme

2007-01-01

281

Genetic regulators of a pluripotent adult stem cell system in planarians identified by RNAi and clonal analysis.  

PubMed

Pluripotency is a central, well-studied feature of embryonic development, but the role of pluripotent cell regulation in somatic tissue regeneration remains poorly understood. In planarians, regeneration of entire animals from tissue fragments is promoted by the activity of adult pluripotent stem cells (cNeoblasts). We utilized transcriptional profiling to identify planarian genes expressed in adult proliferating, regenerative cells (neoblasts). We also developed quantitative clonal analysis methods for expansion and differentiation of cNeoblast descendants that, together with RNAi, revealed gene roles in stem cell biology. Genes encoding two zinc finger proteins, Vasa, a LIM domain protein, Sox and Jun-like transcription factors, two candidate RNA-binding proteins, a Setd8-like protein, and PRC2 (Polycomb) were required for proliferative expansion and/or differentiation of cNeoblast-derived clones. These findings suggest that planarian stem cells utilize molecular mechanisms found in germ cells and other pluripotent cell types and identify genetic regulators of the planarian stem cell system. PMID:22385657

Wagner, Daniel E; Ho, Jaclyn J; Reddien, Peter W

2012-03-01

282

Genetic regulators of a pluripotent adult stem cell system in planarians identified by RNAi and clonal analysis  

PubMed Central

Summary Pluripotency is a central, well-studied feature of embryonic development, but the role of pluripotent cell regulation in somatic tissue regeneration remains poorly understood. In planarians, regeneration of entire animals from tissue fragments is promoted by the activity of adult pluripotent stem cells (cNeoblasts). We utilized transcriptional profiling to identify planarian genes expressed in adult proliferating, regenerative cells (neoblasts). We also developed quantitative clonal analysis methods for expansion and differentiation of cNeoblast descendants that, together with RNAi, revealed gene roles in stem cell biology. Genes encoding two zinc finger proteins, Vasa, a LIM domain protein, Sox and Jun-like transcription factors, two candidate RNA-binding proteins, a Setd8-like protein, and PRC2 (Polycomb) were required for proliferative expansion and/or differentiation of cNeoblast-derived clones. These findings suggest that planarian stem cells utilize molecular mechanisms found in germ cells and other pluripotent cell types, and identify novel genetic regulators of the planarian stem cell system.

Wagner, Daniel E.; Ho, Jaclyn J.

2012-01-01

283

Genetic determinants of hair and eye colours in the Scottish and Danish populations  

PubMed Central

Background Eye and hair colour is highly variable in the European population, and is largely genetically determined. Both linkage and association studies have previously been used to identify candidate genes underlying this variation. Many of the genes found were previously known as underlying mutant mouse phenotypes or human genetic disease, but others, previously unsuspected as pigmentation genes, have also been discovered. Results We assayed the hair of a population of individuals of Scottish origin using tristimulus colorimetry, in order to produce a quantitative measure of hair colour. Cluster analysis of this data defined two groups, with overlapping borders, which corresponded to visually assessed dark versus red/light hair colour. The Danish population was assigned into categorical hair colour groups. Both cohorts were also assessed for eye colour. DNA from the Scottish group was genotyped at SNPs in 33 candidate genes, using 384 SNPs identified by HapMap as representatives of each gene. Associations found between SNPs and colorimetric hair data and eye colour categories were replicated in a cohort of the Danish population. The Danish population was also genotyped with SNPs in 4 previously described pigmentation genes. We found replicable associations of hair colour with the KITLG and OCA2 genes. MC1R variation correlated, as expected, with the red dimension of colorimetric hair colour in Scots. The Danish analysis excluded those with red hair, and no associations were found with MC1R in this group, emphasising that MC1R regulates the colour rather than the intensity of pigmentation. A previously unreported association with the HPS3 gene was seen in the Scottish population. However, although this replicated in the smaller cohort of the Danish population, no association was seen when the whole study population was analysed. Conclusions We have found novel associations with SNPs in known pigmentation genes and colorimetrically assessed hair colour in a Scottish and a Danish population.

2009-01-01

284

Expression profiling of mRNA obtained from single identified crustacean motor neurons: determination of specificity of hybridization  

Microsoft Academic Search

The purpose of this study was to determine if the technique of expression profiling would allow us to determine the changes in the abundance of certain mRNAs in identifiable, single neurons as a result of heightened electrical activity. In doing so we developed an approach to test the specificity of hybridization in expression profiling. Messenger RNA from single identified crayfish

Roman Pekhletski; Robin L. Cooper; Harold L. Atwood; David R. Hampson

1996-01-01

285

A genetic screen for ribosomal DNA silencing defects identifies multiple DNA replication and chromatin-modulating factors.  

PubMed

Transcriptional silencing in Saccharomyces cerevisiae occurs at several genetic loci, including the ribosomal DNA (rDNA). Silencing at telomeres (telomere position effect [TPE]) and the cryptic mating-type loci (HML and HMR) depends on the silent information regulator genes, SIR1, SIR2, SIR3, and SIR4. However, silencing of polymerase II-transcribed reporter genes integrated within the rDNA locus (rDNA silencing) requires only SIR2. The mechanism of rDNA silencing is therefore distinct from TPE and HM silencing. Few genes other than SIR2 have so far been linked to the rDNA silencing process. To identify additional non-Sir factors that affect rDNA silencing, we performed a genetic screen designed to isolate mutations which alter the expression of reporter genes integrated within the rDNA. We isolated two classes of mutants: those with a loss of rDNA silencing (lrs) phenotype and those with an increased rDNA silencing (irs) phenotype. Using transposon mutagenesis, lrs mutants were found in 11 different genes, and irs mutants were found in 22 different genes. Surprisingly, we did not isolate any genes involved in rRNA transcription. Instead, multiple genes associated with DNA replication and modulation of chromatin structure were isolated. We describe these two gene classes, and two previously uncharacterized genes, LRS4 and IRS4. Further characterization of the lrs and irs mutants revealed that many had alterations in rDNA chromatin structure. Several lrs mutants, including those in the cdc17 and rfc1 genes, caused lengthened telomeres, consistent with the hypothesis that telomere length modulates rDNA silencing. Mutations in the HDB (RPD3) histone deacetylase complex paradoxically increased rDNA silencing by a SIR2-dependent, SIR3-independent mechanism. Mutations in rpd3 also restored mating competence selectively to sir3Delta MATalpha strains, suggesting restoration of silencing at HMR in a sir3 mutant background. PMID:10082585

Smith, J S; Caputo, E; Boeke, J D

1999-04-01

286

Two Different High Throughput Sequencing Approaches Identify Thousands of De Novo Genomic Markers for the Genetically Depleted Bornean Elephant  

PubMed Central

High throughput sequencing technologies are being applied to an increasing number of model species with a high-quality reference genome. The application and analyses of whole-genome sequence data in non-model species with no prior genomic information are currently under way. Recent sequencing technologies provide new opportunities for gathering genomic data in natural populations, laying the empirical foundation for future research in the field of conservation and population genomics. Here we present the case study of the Bornean elephant, which is the most endangered subspecies of Asian elephant and exhibits very low genetic diversity. We used two different sequencing platforms, the Roche 454 FLX (shotgun) and Illumina, GAIIx (Restriction site associated DNA, RAD) to evaluate the feasibility of the two methodologies for the discovery of de novo markers (single nucleotide polymorphism, SNPs and microsatellites) using low coverage data. Approximately, 6,683 (shotgun) and 14,724 (RAD) SNPs were detected within our elephant sequence dataset. Genotyping of a representative sample of 194 SNPs resulted in a SNP validation rate of ? 83 to 94% and 17% of the loci were polymorphic with a low diversity (Ho?=?0.057). Different numbers of microsatellites were identified through shotgun (27,226) and RAD (868) techniques. Out of all di-, tri-, and tetra-microsatellite loci, 1,706 loci had sufficient flanking regions (shotgun) while only 7 were found with RAD. All microsatellites were monomorphic in the Bornean but polymorphic in another elephant subspecies. Despite using different sample sizes, and the well known differences in the two platforms used regarding sequence length and throughput, the two approaches showed high validation rate. The approaches used here for marker development in a threatened species demonstrate the utility of high throughput sequencing technologies as a starting point for the development of genomic tools in a non-model species and in particular for a species with low genetic diversity.

Sharma, Reeta; Goossens, Benoit; Kun-Rodrigues, Celia; Teixeira, Tatiana; Othman, Nurzhafarina; Boone, Jason Q.; Jue, Nathaniel K.; Obergfell, Craig; O'Neill, Rachel J.; Chikhi, Lounes

2012-01-01

287

[Genetic variability of Aedes Aegypti determined by mitochondrial gene ND4 analysis in eleven endemic areas for dengue in Peru].  

PubMed

In order to establish the genetic variability of Aedes aegypti determined by the analysis of the MT-ND4 gene, in eleven endemic regions for dengue in Peru, 51 samples of Ae. Aegypti were tested. The genetic variability was determined through the amplification and sequencing of a fragment of 336 base-pairs of MT ND4, the analysis of intra-specific phylogeny was conducted with the Network Ver. 4.6.10 program; and the phylogenetic analysis, with the Neighbor Joining distance method. The presence of five haplotypes of Ae. Aegypti grouped in two lineages was identified: the first one includes haplotypes 1, 3 and 5, and the second one comprises haplotypes 2 and 4. The geographic distribution of each of the haplotypes found is also shown. It is concluded that this variability is caused by the active migration of this vector and the human activity-mediated passive migration. PMID:23949510

Yáñez, Pamela; Mamani, Enrique; Valle, Jorge; García, María Paquita; León, Walter; Villaseca, Pablo; Torres, Dina; Cabezas, César

2013-06-01

288

Integrated Genetic and Epigenetic Analysis Identifies Haplotype-Specific Methylation in the FTO Type 2 Diabetes and Obesity Susceptibility Locus  

PubMed Central

Recent multi-dimensional approaches to the study of complex disease have revealed powerful insights into how genetic and epigenetic factors may underlie their aetiopathogenesis. We examined genotype-epigenotype interactions in the context of Type 2 Diabetes (T2D), focussing on known regions of genomic susceptibility. We assayed DNA methylation in 60 females, stratified according to disease susceptibility haplotype using previously identified association loci. CpG methylation was assessed using methylated DNA immunoprecipitation on a targeted array (MeDIP-chip) and absolute methylation values were estimated using a Bayesian algorithm (BATMAN). Absolute methylation levels were quantified across LD blocks, and we identified increased DNA methylation on the FTO obesity susceptibility haplotype, tagged by the rs8050136 risk allele A (p?=?9.40×10?4, permutation p?=?1.0×10?3). Further analysis across the 46 kb LD block using sliding windows localised the most significant difference to be within a 7.7 kb region (p?=?1.13×10?7). Sequence level analysis, followed by pyrosequencing validation, revealed that the methylation difference was driven by the co-ordinated phase of CpG-creating SNPs across the risk haplotype. This 7.7 kb region of haplotype-specific methylation (HSM), encapsulates a Highly Conserved Non-Coding Element (HCNE) that has previously been validated as a long-range enhancer, supported by the histone H3K4me1 enhancer signature. This study demonstrates that integration of Genome-Wide Association (GWA) SNP and epigenomic DNA methylation data can identify potential novel genotype-epigenotype interactions within disease-associated loci, thus providing a novel route to aid unravelling common complex diseases.

Wilson, Gareth A.; Rakyan, Vardhman K.; Teschendorff, Andrew E.; Akan, Pelin; Stupka, Elia; Down, Thomas A.; Prokopenko, Inga; Morison, Ian M.; Mill, Jonathan; Pidsley, Ruth; Deloukas, Panos; Frayling, Timothy M.; Hattersley, Andrew T.; McCarthy, Mark I.; Beck, Stephan; Hitman, Graham A.

2010-01-01

289

Excess infant mortality among native hawaiians: identifying determinants for preventive action.  

PubMed

Objectives. We identified potential determinants and cause-specific sources of excess infant mortality among Native Hawaiians. Methods. We compared infant mortality rates among Native Hawaiians and Whites by using data from the 2002 to 2009 Hawai'i State Linked Birth/Infant Death Cohort File. We evaluated the components of excess infant mortality by age and underlying cause of death as well as maternal sociodemographic, behavioral, and chronic condition disparities. Results. The Native Hawaiian infant mortality rate was more than twice that for Whites (7.9 vs 3.5/1000 live births). Excess Native Hawaiian infant mortality was equally apportioned to neonatal and postneonatal deaths. Preterm-related causes of death accounted for 43.9% of the infant mortality disparity, followed by sudden unexpected infant death (21.6%) and injury (5.6%). In multivariable models, maternal educational inequality accounted for the largest portion of the neonatal mortality disparity (20.9%); younger maternal age (12.2%) and smoking (9.5%) were the only significant contributors to the postneonatal mortality disparity. Conclusions. Addressing educational inequalities, promoting safe sleep practices, and reducing smoking among Native Hawaiian mothers would help to eliminate excess infant mortality. PMID:24028241

Hirai, Ashley H; Hayes, Donald K; Taualii, Maile M; Singh, Gopal K; Fuddy Acsw, Loretta J

2013-09-12

290

Identifying the determinants of premature mortality in Russia: overcoming a methodological challenge  

PubMed Central

Background It is thought that excessive alcohol consumption is related to the high mortality among working age men in Russia. Moreover it has been suggested that alcohol is a key proximate driver of the very sharp fluctuations in mortality seen in this group since the mid-1980s. Designing an individual-level study suitable to address the potential acute effects of alcohol consumption on mortality in Russia has posed a challenge to epidemiologists, especially because of the need to identify factors that could underlie the rapid changes up and down in mortality rates that have been such a distinctive feature of the Russian mortality crisis. In order to address this study question which focuses on exposures acting shortly before sudden death, a cohort would be unfeasibly large and would suffer from recruitment bias. Methods Although the situation in Russia is unusual, with a very high death rate characterised by many sudden and apparently unexpected deaths in young men, the methodological problem is common to research on any cause of death where many deaths are sudden. Results We describe the development of an innovative approach that has overcome some of these challenges: a case-control study employing proxy informants and external data sources to collect information about proximate determinants of mortality. Conclusion This offers a set of principles that can be adopted by epidemiologists studying sudden and unexpected deaths in other settings.

Tomkins, Susannah; Shkolnikov, Vladimir; Andreev, Evgueni; Kiryanov, Nikolay; Leon, David A; McKee, Martin; Saburova, Lyudmila

2007-01-01

291

Common genetic determinants of vitamin D insufficiency: the sunlight consortium  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Background: Vitamin D is crucial for maintaining musculoskeletal health. Recently, vitamin D insufficiency has been linked to a number of extraskeletal disorders, including diabetes, cancer, and cardiovascular disease. Determinants of circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OH D) include sun exposure an...

292

Patient responses to genetic information: studies of patients with hereditary cancer syndromes identify issues for use of genetic testing in nephrology practice  

PubMed Central

Advances in the genetic basis of kidney disease may mean that genetic testing is increasingly important in reducing disease morbidity and mortality among patients. However, there is little research examining patient responses to genetic information for Mendelian and common kidney diseases. Existing research on kidney and other hereditary cancer syndromes can inform three major issues relevant to the nephrology context: (1) how patients understand their risk of disease following genetic counseling and testing; (2) their emotional responses to the information; and (3) their uptake of recommended risk-reducing strategies. Prior research suggests that genetic counseling and testing may improve patient understanding of genetics, but patients still might not fully understand the meaning of their results for disease risk. Genetic counseling and testing does not appear to result in long-term negative emotional effects among patients who carry mutations or those who do not. Finally, while genetic counseling and testing may improve adherence to recommended screening strategies, adherence varies substantially across different risk-reduction options. Previous research also suggests that computer-based interventions might be a useful adjunct to genetic counseling approaches. Examining whether and how these prior findings relate to the context of hereditary kidney disease is an important area for future research.

Kaphingst, Kimberly A.; McBride, Colleen M.

2010-01-01

293

Determining the genetic diversity of lactobacilli from the oral cavity.  

PubMed

Several methods for determining the diversity of Lactobacillus spp were evaluated with the purpose of developing a realistic approach for further studies. The patient population was comprised of young children with an oral disease called severe early childhood caries. The ultimate goal of these studies was to ascertain the role of lactobacilli in the caries process. To accomplish that goal, we evaluated several methods and approaches for determining diversity including AP-PCR, chromosomal DNA fingerprinting, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Central to these methods was the gathering and screening of isolates from cultivation medium. Using various estimates of diversity, we addressed the question as to how many isolates represent the overall diversity and how cultivation compares to non-cultivation techniques. Finally, we proposed a working approach for achieving the goals outlined framed by both practical constraints in terms of time, effort and efficacy while yielding a reliable outcome. PMID:20573585

Yang, R; Argimon, S; Li, Y; Gu, H; Zhou, X; Caufield, P W

2010-06-01

294

Determining the Genetic Diversity of Lactobacilli from the Oral Cavity  

PubMed Central

Summary Several methods for determining the diversity of Lactobacillus spp were evaluated with the purpose of developing a realistic approach for further studies. The patient population was comprised of young children with an oral disease called severe early childhood caries. The ultimate goal of these studies was to ascertain the role of lactobacilli in the caries process. To accomplish that goal, we evaluated several methods and approaches for determining diversity including AP-PCR, chromosomal DNA fingerprinting, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Central to these methods was the gathering and screening of isolates from cultivation medium. Using various estimates of diversity, we addressed the question as to how many isolates represent the overall diversity and how cultivation compares to non-cultivation techniques. Finally, we proposed a working approach for achieving the goals outlined framed by both practical constraints in terms of time, effort and efficacy while yielding a reliable outcome.

Yang, R.; Argimon, S.; Li, Y.; Zhou, X.; Caufield, P. W.

2010-01-01

295

Genetic determination of the queen caste in an ant hybrid zone  

PubMed Central

The question of how reproductives and sterile workers differentiate within eusocial groups has long been a core issue in sociobiology because it requires the loss of individual direct fitness in favor of indirect or group-level fitness gains. The evolution of social behavior requires that differentiation between workers and female reproductives be environmentally determined, because genetically determined sterility would be quickly eliminated. Nevertheless, we report clear evidence of genetic caste determination in populations of two seed harvester ant species common to the southwestern USA, Pogonomyrmex rugosus and Pogonomyrmex barbatus. The genetic differentiation between workers and queens is found only in areas of sympatry of the two species, and thus appears to arisen from hybridization. Our data suggest that this hybridization has had a profound historical effect on the caste determination systems and mating patterns of each of these species.

Julian, Glennis E.; Fewell, Jennifer H.; Gadau, Jurgen; Johnson, Robert A.; Larrabee, Debbie

2002-01-01

296

An iterative genetic and dynamical modelling approach identifies novel features of the gene regulatory network underlying melanocyte development.  

PubMed

The mechanisms generating stably differentiated cell-types from multipotent precursors are key to understanding normal development and have implications for treatment of cancer and the therapeutic use of stem cells. Pigment cells are a major derivative of neural crest stem cells and a key model cell-type for our understanding of the genetics of cell differentiation. Several factors driving melanocyte fate specification have been identified, including the transcription factor and master regulator of melanocyte development, Mitf, and Wnt signalling and the multipotency and fate specification factor, Sox10, which drive mitf expression. While these factors together drive multipotent neural crest cells to become specified melanoblasts, the mechanisms stabilising melanocyte differentiation remain unclear. Furthermore, there is controversy over whether Sox10 has an ongoing role in melanocyte differentiation. Here we use zebrafish to explore in vivo the gene regulatory network (GRN) underlying melanocyte specification and differentiation. We use an iterative process of mathematical modelling and experimental observation to explore methodically the core melanocyte GRN we have defined. We show that Sox10 is not required for ongoing differentiation and expression is downregulated in differentiating cells, in response to Mitfa and Hdac1. Unexpectedly, we find that Sox10 represses Mitf-dependent expression of melanocyte differentiation genes. Our systems biology approach allowed us to predict two novel features of the melanocyte GRN, which we then validate experimentally. Specifically, we show that maintenance of mitfa expression is Mitfa-dependent, and identify Sox9b as providing an Mitfa-independent input to melanocyte differentiation. Our data supports our previous suggestion that Sox10 only functions transiently in regulation of mitfa and cannot be responsible for long-term maintenance of mitfa expression; indeed, Sox10 is likely to slow melanocyte differentiation in the zebrafish embryo. More generally, this novel approach to understanding melanocyte differentiation provides a basis for systematic modelling of differentiation in this and other cell-types. PMID:21909283

Greenhill, Emma R; Rocco, Andrea; Vibert, Laura; Nikaido, Masataka; Kelsh, Robert N

2011-09-01

297

An Iterative Genetic and Dynamical Modelling Approach Identifies Novel Features of the Gene Regulatory Network Underlying Melanocyte Development  

PubMed Central

The mechanisms generating stably differentiated cell-types from multipotent precursors are key to understanding normal development and have implications for treatment of cancer and the therapeutic use of stem cells. Pigment cells are a major derivative of neural crest stem cells and a key model cell-type for our understanding of the genetics of cell differentiation. Several factors driving melanocyte fate specification have been identified, including the transcription factor and master regulator of melanocyte development, Mitf, and Wnt signalling and the multipotency and fate specification factor, Sox10, which drive mitf expression. While these factors together drive multipotent neural crest cells to become specified melanoblasts, the mechanisms stabilising melanocyte differentiation remain unclear. Furthermore, there is controversy over whether Sox10 has an ongoing role in melanocyte differentiation. Here we use zebrafish to explore in vivo the gene regulatory network (GRN) underlying melanocyte specification and differentiation. We use an iterative process of mathematical modelling and experimental observation to explore methodically the core melanocyte GRN we have defined. We show that Sox10 is not required for ongoing differentiation and expression is downregulated in differentiating cells, in response to Mitfa and Hdac1. Unexpectedly, we find that Sox10 represses Mitf-dependent expression of melanocyte differentiation genes. Our systems biology approach allowed us to predict two novel features of the melanocyte GRN, which we then validate experimentally. Specifically, we show that maintenance of mitfa expression is Mitfa-dependent, and identify Sox9b as providing an Mitfa-independent input to melanocyte differentiation. Our data supports our previous suggestion that Sox10 only functions transiently in regulation of mitfa and cannot be responsible for long-term maintenance of mitfa expression; indeed, Sox10 is likely to slow melanocyte differentiation in the zebrafish embryo. More generally, this novel approach to understanding melanocyte differentiation provides a basis for systematic modelling of differentiation in this and other cell-types.

Greenhill, Emma R.; Rocco, Andrea; Vibert, Laura; Nikaido, Masataka; Kelsh, Robert N.

2011-01-01

298

Prenatal genetic testing: an investigation of determining factors affecting the decision-making process.  

PubMed

Despite the increase in popularity of prenatal genetic testing, relatively little is known about the role psychological factors play in the decision-making process. In this analogue study, a sample of Italian female university students was used to investigate determining factors that predict the intention of undergoing prenatal genetic testing. Structural Equation Modelling was used to describe the dynamic interplay between knowledge, beliefs, attitudes and health-related behaviour such as prenatal genetic testing. Following the Theory of Reasoned Action, three dimensions predicted the intention to undergo prenatal genetic testing: the need for more scientific information, a positive attitude towards genetic testing, and the inclination to terminate pregnancy after receiving a positive test result. Results showed that less religious women tended to be more in favour of prenatal tests and in undertaking such tests. This preliminary study provides genetic counsellors and policy makers with a clearer picture of their clients' motives and attitudes behind the decision-making process of prenatal genetic testing, contributing to improving both the communication process between counsellors and their clients and the organization of genetic services. PMID:22477148

Pivetti, Monica; Melotti, Giannino

2012-04-03

299

New loci associated with birth weight identify genetic links between intrauterine growth and adult height and metabolism.  

PubMed

Birth weight within the normal range is associated with a variety of adult-onset diseases, but the mechanisms behind these associations are poorly understood. Previous genome-wide association studies of birth weight identified a variant in the ADCY5 gene associated both with birth weight and type 2 diabetes and a second variant, near CCNL1, with no obvious link to adult traits. In an expanded genome-wide association meta-analysis and follow-up study of birth weight (of up to 69,308 individuals of European descent from 43 studies), we have now extended the number of loci associated at genome-wide significance to 7, accounting for a similar proportion of variance as maternal smoking. Five of the loci are known to be associated with other phenotypes: ADCY5 and CDKAL1 with type 2 diabetes, ADRB1 with adult blood pressure and HMGA2 and LCORL with adult height. Our findings highlight genetic links between fetal growth and postnatal growth and metabolism. PMID:23202124

Horikoshi, Momoko; Yaghootkar, Hanieh; Mook-Kanamori, Dennis O; Sovio, Ulla; Taal, H Rob; Hennig, Branwen J; Bradfield, Jonathan P; St Pourcain, Beate; Evans, David M; Charoen, Pimphen; Kaakinen, Marika; Cousminer, Diana L; Lehtimäki, Terho; Kreiner-Møller, Eskil; Warrington, Nicole M; Bustamante, Mariona; Feenstra, Bjarke; Berry, Diane J; Thiering, Elisabeth; Pfab, Thiemo; Barton, Sheila J; Shields, Beverley M; Kerkhof, Marjan; van Leeuwen, Elisabeth M; Fulford, Anthony J; Kutalik, Zoltán; Zhao, Jing Hua; den Hoed, Marcel; Mahajan, Anubha; Lindi, Virpi; Goh, Liang-Kee; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Wu, Ying; Raitakari, Olli T; Harder, Marie N; Meirhaeghe, Aline; Ntalla, Ioanna; Salem, Rany M; Jameson, Karen A; Zhou, Kaixin; Monies, Dorota M; Lagou, Vasiliki; Kirin, Mirna; Heikkinen, Jani; Adair, Linda S; Alkuraya, Fowzan S; Al-Odaib, Ali; Amouyel, Philippe; Andersson, Ehm Astrid; Bennett, Amanda J; Blakemore, Alexandra I F; Buxton, Jessica L; Dallongeville, Jean; Das, Shikta; de Geus, Eco J C; Estivill, Xavier; Flexeder, Claudia; Froguel, Philippe; Geller, Frank; Godfrey, Keith M; Gottrand, Frédéric; Groves, Christopher J; Hansen, Torben; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Hofman, Albert; Hollegaard, Mads V; Hougaard, David M; Hyppönen, Elina; Inskip, Hazel M; Isaacs, Aaron; Jørgensen, Torben; Kanaka-Gantenbein, Christina; Kemp, John P; Kiess, Wieland; Kilpeläinen, Tuomas O; Klopp, Norman; Knight, Bridget A; Kuzawa, Christopher W; McMahon, George; Newnham, John P; Niinikoski, Harri; Oostra, Ben A; Pedersen, Louise; Postma, Dirkje S; Ring, Susan M; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Robertson, Neil R; Sebert, Sylvain; Simell, Olli; Slowinski, Torsten; Tiesler, Carla M T; Tönjes, Anke; Vaag, Allan; Viikari, Jorma S; Vink, Jacqueline M; Vissing, Nadja Hawwa; Wareham, Nicholas J; Willemsen, Gonneke; Witte, Daniel R; Zhang, Haitao; Zhao, Jianhua; Wilson, James F; Stumvoll, Michael; Prentice, Andrew M; Meyer, Brian F; Pearson, Ewan R; Boreham, Colin A G; Cooper, Cyrus; Gillman, Matthew W; Dedoussis, George V; Moreno, Luis A; Pedersen, Oluf; Saarinen, Maiju; Mohlke, Karen L; Boomsma, Dorret I; Saw, Seang-Mei; Lakka, Timo A; Körner, Antje; Loos, Ruth J F; Ong, Ken K; Vollenweider, Peter; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Koppelman, Gerard H; Hattersley, Andrew T; Holloway, John W; Hocher, Berthold; Heinrich, Joachim; Power, Chris; Melbye, Mads; Guxens, Mònica; Pennell, Craig E; Bønnelykke, Klaus; Bisgaard, Hans; Eriksson, Johan G; Widén, Elisabeth; Hakonarson, Hakon; Uitterlinden, André G; Pouta, Anneli; Lawlor, Debbie A; Smith, George Davey; Frayling, Timothy M; McCarthy, Mark I; Grant, Struan F A; Jaddoe, Vincent W V; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Timpson, Nicholas J; Prokopenko, Inga; Freathy, Rachel M

2012-12-02

300

Quantitative Proteomic and Genetic Analyses of the Schizophrenia Susceptibility Factor Dysbindin Identify Novel Roles of the BLOC-1 Complex  

PubMed Central

The Biogenesis of Lysosome-Related Organelles Complex 1 (BLOC-1) is a protein complex containing the schizophrenia susceptibility factor dysbindin, which is encoded by the gene DTNBP1. However, mechanisms engaged by dysbindin defining schizophrenia susceptibility pathways have not been quantitatively elucidated. Here, we discovered prevalent and novel cellular roles of the BLOC-1 complex in neuronal cells by performing large-scale Stable Isotopic Labeling of Cells in Culture quantitative proteomics (SILAC) combined with genetic analyses in dysbindin-null mice (Mus musculus) and the genome of schizophrenia patients. We identified 24 proteins that associate with the BLOC-1 complex many of which were altered in content/distribution in cells or tissues deficient in BLOC-1. New findings include BLOC-1 interactions with the COG complex, a Golgi apparatus tether, and antioxidant enzymes peroxiredoxins 1-2. Importantly, loci encoding eight of the 24 proteins are affected by genomic copy number variation in schizophrenia patients. Thus, our quantitative proteomic studies expand the functional repertoire of the BLOC-1 complex and provide insight into putative molecular pathways of schizophrenia susceptibility.

Gokhale, Avanti; Larimore, Jennifer; Werner, Erica; So, Lomon; De Luca, Andres Moreno; Lese-Martin, Christa; Lupashin, Vladimir V.; Smith, Yoland; Faundez, Victor

2012-01-01

301

A genome-wide approach to identify genetic loci with a signature of natural selection in the Irish population  

PubMed Central

Background In this study we present a single population test (Ewens-Waterson) applied in a genomic context to investigate the presence of recent positive selection in the Irish population. The Irish population is an interesting focus for the investigation of recent selection since several lines of evidence suggest that it may have a relatively undisturbed genetic heritage. Results We first identified outlier single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), from previously published genome-wide data, with high FST branch specification in a European-American population. Eight of these were chosen for further analysis. Evidence for selective history was assessed using the Ewens-Watterson's statistic calculated using Irish genotypes of microsatellites flanking the eight outlier SNPs. Evidence suggestive of selection was detected in three of these by comparison with a population-specific genome-wide empirical distribution of the Ewens-Watterson's statistic. Conclusion The cystic fibrosis gene, a disease that has a world maximum frequency in Ireland, was among the genes showing evidence of selection. In addition to the demonstrated utility in detecting a signature of natural selection, this approach has the particular advantage of speed. It also illustrates concordance between results drawn from alternative methods implemented in different populations.

Mattiangeli, Valeria; Ryan, Anthony W; McManus, Ross; Bradley, Daniel G

2006-01-01

302

Prion Dynamics and the Quest for the Genetic Determinant in Protein-Only Inheritance  

PubMed Central

According to the prion hypothesis, proteins may act in atypical roles as genetic elements of infectivity and inheritance by undergoing self-replicating changes in physical state. While the preponderance of evidence strongly supports this concept particularly in fungi, the detailed mechanisms by which distinct protein forms specify unique phenotypes are emerging concepts. A particularly active area of investigation is the molecular nature of the heritable species, which has been probed through genetic, biochemical, and cell biological experimentation as well as by mathematical modeling. Here, we suggest that these studies are converging to implicate small aggregates composed of prion-state conformers as the transmissible genetic determinants of protein-based phenotypes.

Sindi, Suzanne S.

2009-01-01

303

Physical mapping identifies DXS265 as a useful genetic marker for carrier detection and prenatal diagnosis of X-linked agammaglobulinemia  

Microsoft Academic Search

The gene responsible for X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) has not been identified; however, in the course of genetic linkage studies designed to map the locus more precisely, a number of closely linked polymorphic loci have been identified. These have proved to be useful in identifying carriers and in pre-natal diagnosis of this disease. The DXS178 locus was found to be closest

Ruth Levering; Angela K. Sweatman; Marie-Anne J. O'Reilly; Sally A. Genet; Helen Middleton-Price; Sue Malcolm; Roland J. Levinsky; Christine Kinnon I

1993-01-01

304

The ends of a continuum: genetic and temperature-dependent sex determination in reptiles  

Microsoft Academic Search

Summary Two prevailing paradigms explain the diversity of sex- determining modes in reptiles. Many researchers, parti- cularly those who study reptiles, consider genetic and environmental sex-determining mechanisms to be fun- damentally different, and that one can be demonstrat- ed experimentally to the exclusion of the other. Other researchers, principally those who take a broader taxo- nomic perspective, argue that no

Stephen D. Sarre; Arthur Georges; Alex Quinn

2004-01-01

305

Comparison of French and Estonian Students' Conceptions in Genetic Determinism of Human Behaviours  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Innatism is the belief that most of the human personality can be determined by genes. This ideology is dangerous, especially when it claims to be scientific. The present study investigates conceptions of 1060 students from Estonia and France related to genetic determinism of some human behaviours. Factors taken into account included students'…

Castera, Jeremy; Sarapuu, Tago; Clement, Pierre

2013-01-01

306

Genetic Diversity of Cheju Horses ( Equus caballus ) Determined by Using Mitochondrial DNA D-loop Polymorphism  

Microsoft Academic Search

We used sequence polymorphism of the mitochondrial DNA D-loop (968 bp excluding the tandem repeat region) to determine genetic diversity of horses inhabiting Cheju (a southern island of Korea). Seventeen haplotypes with frequencies from 1.5 to 21.5% were found among 65 Cheju horse samples. Genetic diversity (h) of the 17 haplotypes was calculated to be 0.91, indicating that the extant

Y. H. Yang; K. I. Kim; E. G. Cothran; A. R. Flannery

2002-01-01

307

Genetic Approaches Identify Differential Roles for  4beta2* Nicotinic Receptors in Acute Models of Antinociception in Mice  

Microsoft Academic Search

The effects of nicotine on the tail-flick and hot-plate tests were determined to identify nicotinic receptor subtypes responsible for spinally and supraspinally mediated nicotine analgesia in knockin mice expressing hypersensitive 4 nicotinic receptors (L9S), in seven inbred mouse strains (C57BL\\/6, DBA\\/2, A\\/2, CBA\\/2, BALB\\/ cByJ, C3H\\/HeJ, and 129\\/SvEv), and in two F1 hybrids (B6CBAF1 and B6D2F1). L9S heterozygotes were 6-fold

M. I. Damaj; C. Fonck; M. J. Marks; P. Deshpande; C. Labarca; H. A. Lester; A. C. Collins; B. R. Martin

2007-01-01

308

Genetic determination of male sterility in gynodioecious Silene nutans  

PubMed Central

Gynodioecy, the coexistence of female and hermaphrodite plants within a species, is often under nuclear–cytoplasmic sex determination, involving cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) genes and nuclear restorers. A good knowledge of CMS and restorer polymorphism is essential for understanding the evolution and maintenance of gynodioecy, but reciprocal crossing studies remain scarce. Although mitochondrial diversity has been studied in a few gynodioecious species, the relationship between mitotype diversity and CMS status is poorly known. From a French sample of Silene nutans, a gynodioecious species whose sex determination remains unknown, we chose the four most divergent mitotypes that we had sampled at the cytochrome b gene and tested by reciprocal crosses whether they carry distinct CMS genes. We show that gynodioecy in S. nutans is under nuclear–cytoplasmic control, with at least two different CMSs and up to four restorers with epistatic interactions. Female occurrence and frequency were highly dependent on the mitotype, suggesting that the level of restoration varies greatly among CMSs. Two of the mitotypes, which have broad geographic distributions, represent different CMSs and are very unequally restored. We discuss the dynamics of gynodioecy at the large-scale meta-population level.

Garraud, C; Brachi, B; Dufay, M; Touzet, P; Shykoff, J A

2011-01-01

309

Genetic determination of fatty acid composition in Spanish Churra sheep milk.  

PubMed

The objective of this study was to estimate the genetic variation of ovine milk fatty acid (FA) composition. We collected 4,100 milk samples in 14 herds from 976 Churra ewes sired mostly by 15 AI rams and analyzed them by gas-liquid chromatography for milk fatty acid composition. The studied traits were 12 individual FA contents (proportion in relation to the total amount of FA), 3 groups of fatty acids [saturated fatty acids (SFA), monounsaturated FA (MUFA), and polyunsaturated FA (PUFA)], and 2 FA ratios (n-6:n-3 and C18:2 cis-9,trans-11:C18:1 trans-11). In addition, percentages of fat and protein and daily milk yield were studied. For the analysis, repeatability animal models were implemented using Bayesian methods. In an initial step, univariate methods were conducted to test the hypothesis of the traits showing additive genetic determination. Deviance information criterion and Bayes factor were employed as model choice criteria. All the studied SFA showed additive genetic variance, but the estimated heritabilities were low. Among unsaturated FA (UFA), only C18:1 trans-11 and C18:2 cis-9,cis-12 showed additive genetic variation, their estimated heritabilities being [marginal posterior mean (marginal posterior SD)] 0.02(0.01) and 0.11(0.04), respectively. For the FA groups, only PUFA showed significant additive genetic variation. None of the studied ratios of FA showed additive genetic variation. In second multitrait analyses, genetic correlations between individual FA and production traits, and between groups of FA and ratios of FA and production traits, were investigated. Positive genetic correlations were estimated among medium-chain SFA, ranging from 0 to 0.85, but this parameter was close to zero between long-chain SFA (C16:0 and C18:0). Between long- and medium-chain SFA, estimated genetic correlations were negative, around -0.6. Among those UFA showing significant additive genetic variance, genetic correlations were close to zero. The estimated genetic correlations among all the investigated FA, milk yield, and fat and protein percentages were not different from zero. Our results suggest that low additive genetic variation is involved in the determination of the FA composition of milk fat in Churra sheep under current production conditions, which results in low values of heritabilities. PMID:20059931

Sánchez, J P; San Primitivo, F; Barbosa, E; Varona, L; de la Fuente, L F

2010-01-01

310

Mutations in PDGFRB and NOTCH3 are the first genetic causes identified for autosomal dominant infantile myofibromatosis.  

PubMed

A recurrent PDGFRB mutation causes familial infantile myofibromatosis Cheung et al. (2013) The American Journal of Human Genetics 92: 996-1000. Mutations in PDGFRB cause autosomal-dominant infantile myofibromatosis Martignetti et al. (2013) The American Journal of Human Genetics 92: 1001-1007. PMID:23865785

Lee, Jw

2013-07-31

311

Natural genetic variation in Arabidopsis identifies BREVIS RADIX, a novel regulator of cell proliferation and elongation in the root  

Microsoft Academic Search

Mutant analysis has been tremendously successful in deciphering the genetics of plant development. However, less is known about the molecular basis of morphological variation within species, which is caused by naturally occurring alleles. In this study, we succeeded in isolating a novel regulator of root growth by exploiting natural genetic variation in the model plant Arabidopsis. Quantitative trait locus analysis

Céline F. Mouchel; Georgette C. Briggs; Christian S. Hardtke

2004-01-01

312

AFLATOXIN AND FUMONISIN ACCUMULATION IN GRAIN: IDENTIFYING NOVEL RESISTANCE SOURCES AND INCORPORATING RESISTANCE INTO COMMERCIAL GENETIC BACKGROUNDS  

Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

Corn hybrids with naturally occurring genetic resistance to disease and insects, and genetic tolerance to environmental stress, are generally considered to be the most effective, efficient, and publicly acceptable means of minimizing aflatoxin and fumonisin contamination in grain prior to harvest. ...

313

Hand grip strength: A phenotype suitable for identifying genetic variants affecting mid- and late-life physical functioning  

Microsoft Academic Search

Physical functioning late in life has been shown to be affected by genetic factors. Only a few genetic variants have been suggested to be associated with physical functioning, and this only in selected populations (e.g., young healthy males and elite athletes). Declining physical functioning late in life is a major problem in terms of prevalence, morbidity, functional limitations, and quality

Henrik Frederiksen; David Gaist; Hans Christian Petersen; Jacob Hjelmborg; Matt McGue; James W. Vaupel; Kaare Christensen

2002-01-01

314

Birth of healthy female twins after preimplantation genetic diagnosis of cystic fibrosis combined with gender determination  

Microsoft Academic Search

Two healthy sisters with a familial history of mental retardation were referred to our centre for preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD). Their two brothers showed severe mental retardation. The molecular basis for their disorder could not be identified, but one of the sisters and the mother presented a highly skewed pattern of X-inactivation reinforcing the likelihood of an X-linked mode of

Pierre F. Ray; Nelly Frydman; Tania Attie ´; Samir Hamamah; Violaine Kerbrat; Gerard Tachdjian; Serge Romana; Michel Vekemans; Arnold Munnich

2002-01-01

315

Simulating river discharges on a global scale - Identifying determinants of model performance  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Global hydrological models and land surface models are used to understand and simulate the global terrestrial water cycle. They, in particular, are applied to assess global scale impacts of global and climate change on water resources. While in recent years the growing availability of remote sensing products, e.g. evapotranspiration and soil moisture estimates, provide valuable information to validate simulated states and fluxes, however, the validation of simulated river discharges against observed time series is still widely-used. Thereby, most studies focus on: long-term mean monthly or annual discharges, discharge time series of the most downstream gauging stations of large-scale river basins (e.g. Amazon, Brahmaputra, etc.), or correlation-based metrics As global modeling approaches are constrained by simplified physical process representations and the implicit assumption that more or less the same model structure is globally valid, it is important to understand where and why these models perform good or poor in simulating 20th century river runoff and discharge fields. We present an extensive yet deliberately kept generic evaluation of the WaterGAP (Water - Global Assessment and Prognosis) Hydrology Model to simulate 20th century discharges. The model is designed as a conceptual water balance model, in the current version, WaterGAP3, operating on 5 arc minutes global grid. River runoff generated on the individual grid cells is routed along a global drainage direction map taking into account retention in natural surface water bodies, i.e. lakes and wetlands, as well as anthropogenic impacts, i.e. flow regulation and water abstraction for agriculture, industry and domestic purposes. Simulated discharges are evaluated against 1600 observed discharge records provided by the Global Runoff Data Centre (GRDC). Globally, the selected gauging stations differ substantially concerning their corresponding catchment areas, between 3000 and 3.6 mill sqkm, as well as regarding their available time series, between 5 and > 100 yrs. Model performance is judged by several simple metrics as Nash-Sutcliffe-Efficiency and modified forms or water balance related coefficients. Based on these metrics, we will further investigate if and how physiographic and climatic catchment characteristics impact model efficiency. Moreover we are aiming to identify the underlying determinants of spatial patterns of model performance. Although it is generally expected that model performance improves with increasing catchment area, first results show that catchment area has no significant effect. On the other hand, we find a distinct impact of climate conditions (represented by Köppen-regions).

Eisner, S.; Flörke, M.; Kynast, E.

2012-04-01

316

Characterization of Pellicle Inhibition in Gluconacetobacter xylinus 53582 by a Small Molecule, Pellicin, Identified by a Chemical Genetics Screen  

PubMed Central

Pellicin ([2E]-3-phenyl-1-[2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-1,6-benzodioxocin-8-yl]prop-2-en-1-one) was identified in a chemical genetics screen of 10,000 small molecules for its ability to completely abolish pellicle production in Gluconacetobacter xylinus. Cells grown in the presence of pellicin grew 1.5 times faster than untreated cells. Interestingly, growth in pellicin also caused G. xylinus cells to elongate. Measurement of cellulose synthesis in vitro showed that cellulose synthase activity was not directly inhibited by pellicin. Rather, when cellulose synthase activity was measured in cells that were pre-treated with the compound, the rate of cellulose synthesis increased eight-fold over that observed for untreated cells. This phenomenon was also apparent in the rapid production of cellulose when cells grown in the presence of pellicin were washed and transferred to media lacking the inhibitor. The rate at which cellulose was produced could not be accounted for by growth of the organism. Pellicin was not detected when intracellular contents were analyzed. Furthermore, it was found that pellicin exerts its effect extracellularly by interfering with the crystallization of pre-cellulosic tactoidal aggregates. This interference of the crystallization process resulted in enhanced production of cellulose II as evidenced by the ratio of acid insoluble to acid soluble product in in vitro assays and confirmed in vivo by scanning electron microscopy and powder X-ray diffraction. The relative crystallinity index, RCI, of pellicle produced by untreated G. xylinus cultures was 70% while pellicin-grown cultures had RCI of 38%. Mercerized pellicle of untreated cells had RCI of 42%, which further confirms the mechanism of action of pellicin as an inhibitor of the cellulose I crystallization process. Pellicin is a useful tool for the study of cellulose biosynthesis in G. xylinus.

Strap, Janice L.; Latos, Andrew; Shim, Isaac; Bonetta, Dario T.

2011-01-01

317

Common genetic determinants of intraocular pressure and primary open-angle glaucoma.  

PubMed

Intraocular pressure (IOP) is a highly heritable risk factor for primary open-angle glaucoma and is the only target for current glaucoma therapy. The genetic factors which determine IOP are largely unknown. We performed a genome-wide association study for IOP in 11,972 participants from 4 independent population-based studies in The Netherlands. We replicated our findings in 7,482 participants from 4 additional cohorts from the UK, Australia, Canada, and the Wellcome Trust Case-Control Consortium 2/Blue Mountains Eye Study. IOP was significantly associated with rs11656696, located in GAS7 at 17p13.1 (p=1.4×10(-8)), and with rs7555523, located in TMCO1 at 1q24.1 (p=1.6×10(-8)). In a meta-analysis of 4 case-control studies (total N?=?1,432 glaucoma cases), both variants also showed evidence for association with glaucoma (p=2.4×10(-2) for rs11656696 and p=9.1×10(-4) for rs7555523). GAS7 and TMCO1 are highly expressed in the ciliary body and trabecular meshwork as well as in the lamina cribrosa, optic nerve, and retina. Both genes functionally interact with known glaucoma disease genes. These data suggest that we have identified two clinically relevant genes involved in IOP regulation. PMID:22570627

van Koolwijk, Leonieke M E; Ramdas, Wishal D; Ikram, M Kamran; Jansonius, Nomdo M; Pasutto, Francesca; Hysi, Pirro G; Macgregor, Stuart; Janssen, Sarah F; Hewitt, Alex W; Viswanathan, Ananth C; ten Brink, Jacoline B; Hosseini, S Mohsen; Amin, Najaf; Despriet, Dominiek D G; Willemse-Assink, Jacqueline J M; Kramer, Rogier; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Struchalin, Maksim; Aulchenko, Yurii S; Weisschuh, Nicole; Zenkel, Matthias; Mardin, Christian Y; Gramer, Eugen; Welge-Lüssen, Ulrich; Montgomery, Grant W; Carbonaro, Francis; Young, Terri L; Bellenguez, Céline; McGuffin, Peter; Foster, Paul J; Topouzis, Fotis; Mitchell, Paul; Wang, Jie Jin; Wong, Tien Y; Czudowska, Monika A; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Wolfs, Roger C W; de Jong, Paulus T V M; Oostra, Ben A; Paterson, Andrew D; Mackey, David A; Bergen, Arthur A B; Reis, André; Hammond, Christopher J; Vingerling, Johannes R; Lemij, Hans G; Klaver, Caroline C W; van Duijn, Cornelia M

2012-05-03

318

Common Genetic Determinants of Intraocular Pressure and Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma  

PubMed Central

Intraocular pressure (IOP) is a highly heritable risk factor for primary open-angle glaucoma and is the only target for current glaucoma therapy. The genetic factors which determine IOP are largely unknown. We performed a genome-wide association study for IOP in 11,972 participants from 4 independent population-based studies in The Netherlands. We replicated our findings in 7,482 participants from 4 additional cohorts from the UK, Australia, Canada, and the Wellcome Trust Case-Control Consortium 2/Blue Mountains Eye Study. IOP was significantly associated with rs11656696, located in GAS7 at 17p13.1 (p?=?1.4×10?8), and with rs7555523, located in TMCO1 at 1q24.1 (p?=?1.6×10?8). In a meta-analysis of 4 case-control studies (total N?=?1,432 glaucoma cases), both variants also showed evidence for association with glaucoma (p?=?2.4×10?2 for rs11656696 and p?=?9.1×10?4 for rs7555523). GAS7 and TMCO1 are highly expressed in the ciliary body and trabecular meshwork as well as in the lamina cribrosa, optic nerve, and retina. Both genes functionally interact with known glaucoma disease genes. These data suggest that we have identified two clinically relevant genes involved in IOP regulation.

Ikram, M. Kamran; Jansonius, Nomdo M.; Pasutto, Francesca; Hysi, Pirro G.; Macgregor, Stuart; Janssen, Sarah F.; Hewitt, Alex W.; Viswanathan, Ananth C.; ten Brink, Jacoline B.; Hosseini, S. Mohsen; Amin, Najaf; Despriet, Dominiek D. G.; Willemse-Assink, Jacqueline J. M.; Kramer, Rogier; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Struchalin, Maksim; Aulchenko, Yurii S.; Weisschuh, Nicole; Zenkel, Matthias; Mardin, Christian Y.; Gramer, Eugen; Welge-Lussen, Ulrich; Montgomery, Grant W.; Carbonaro, Francis; Young, Terri L.; Bellenguez, Celine; McGuffin, Peter; Foster, Paul J.; Topouzis, Fotis; Mitchell, Paul; Wang, Jie Jin; Wong, Tien Y.; Czudowska, Monika A.; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Wolfs, Roger C. W.; de Jong, Paulus T. V. M.; Oostra, Ben A.; Paterson, Andrew D.; Mackey, David A.; Bergen, Arthur A. B.; Reis, Andre; Hammond, Christopher J.; Vingerling, Johannes R.; Lemij, Hans G.; Klaver, Caroline C. W.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.

2012-01-01

319

Conserved genetic determinant of motor organ identity in Medicago truncatula and related legumes  

PubMed Central

Plants exhibit various kinds of movements that have fascinated scientists and the public for centuries. Physiological studies in plants with the so-called motor organ or pulvinus suggest that cells at opposite sides of the pulvinus mediate leaf or leaflet movements by swelling and shrinking. How motor organ identity is determined is unknown. Using a genetic approach, we isolated a mutant designated elongated petiolule1 (elp1) from Medicago truncatula that fails to fold its leaflets in the dark due to loss of motor organs. Map-based cloning indicated that ELP1 encodes a putative plant-specific LOB domain transcription factor. RNA in situ analysis revealed that ELP1 is expressed in primordial cells that give rise to the motor organ. Ectopic expression of ELP1 resulted in dwarf plants with petioles and rachises reduced in length, and the epidermal cells gained characteristics of motor organ epidermal cells. By identifying ELP1 orthologs from other legume species, namely pea (Pisum sativum) and Lotus japonicus, we show that this motor organ identity is regulated by a conserved molecular mechanism.

Chen, Jianghua; Moreau, Carol; Liu, Yu; Kawaguchi, Masayoshi; Hofer, Julie; Ellis, Noel; Chen, Rujin

2012-01-01

320

Identifying the symmetry class and determining the closest symmetry class of an elasticity tensor  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

In this thesis, two main problems are solved and then applied to a geophysical problem. First, we identify the symmetry class of an elasticity tensor, if it exhibits a symmetry. Second, if the tensor is generally anisotropic, we find the closest symmetric elasticity tensor of a given class among all possible orientations of the coordinate systems. Using these results, we suggest a method to find the symmetry class that is the "best" choice to represent the given anisotropic elasticity tensor. For an application of these methods and results, we investigate the closest symmetry class of a medium that is obtained by combining two differently oriented planar structures. More precisely, we combine two transversely isotropic (TI) media that may correspond to layering and cracks in a subsurface, and whose rotation axes are neither parallel nor perpendicular to each other. Then, we find the closest symmetry class of the combined medium as the angle varies between their orientations. We give several examples for the case of two TI media where the angle between their rotation axes are small (< 15°), intermediate (40°--65°) and large (> 75°). We see that if the angle is large enough (> 75°), then the combination can be approximated as an orthotropic medium. If the angle is small (< 15°) then the resultant medium is close to TI symmetry. However, intermediate angles between the structures may or may not give the symmetry of the combined medium close to a higher symmetry class than monoclinic. Moreover, we investigate the velocities of the waves propagating in a combined medium that has more than one planar structure. We find that the fastest velocity direction of the waves is not aligned with any of the orientations of the TI media that composes the medium. To measure closeness in the space of elasticity tensors, we use the Euclidean norm for defining a distance function. The nonlinearity and existence of several extrema makes it difficult to find the absolute minimum of the distance function among all coordinate systems. Fortunately, in the case of monoclinic and TI symmetry, the parameters of the distance function reduce to two: there are three for other symmetry classes. Thus, one call plot the monoclinic- and TI-distance functions all the surface of the two-dimensional sphere. We prove that the symmetry of the elasticity tensor is also a symmetry of the monoclinic-distance function and vice versa. Furthermore, we show that the monoclinic-distance function vanishes along the normals of the mirror planes of the medium. Therefore, by observing the plot one can infer the symmetry of a given elasticity tensor. The plot also allows us to guide a search for finding the absolute minimum of the monoclinic-distance function. We prove that the value of the orthotropic-distance function for any coordinate system is half of the value of the sum of monoclinic-distance functions along particular directions. These directions correspond to three mutually perpendicular vectors that are the normals of the mirror planes of orthotropic symmetry. This relation allows us to use the plot of the monoclinic-distance function to determine the closest orthotropic elasticity tensor. Furthermore, we present examples of other symmetry classes, namely trigonal, tetragonal and cubic. We see that the orientations of the closest tetragonal, trigonal and cubic elasticity tensors are either the same as, or as close as 1°, to the orientation of the minimum of the sum of monoclinic-distance functions along some particular directions. These particular directions are aligned with the normals of the mirror planes of the corresponding symmetry class. Thus, one can use the plot of the monoclinic-distance function to infer about the closeness to any symmetry class.

Diner, Cagri

321

Genetic Determinants for Body Iron Store and Type 2 Diabetes Risk in US Men and Women  

PubMed Central

Background High body iron store has been associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D); it remains unknown whether the genetic variants related to body iron status affect T2D risk. We aimed at comprehensively investigating the associations between the genetic variants related to body iron status and the T2D risk. Methodology/Principal Findings Six common SNPs related to body iron status from recent genome-wide association (GWA) studies were determined in the Nurses’ Health Study (NHS; 1,467 diabetic cases and 1,754 controls) and the Health Professionals Follow-up Study (HPFS; 1,124, diabetic cases and 1,298 controls). Plasma levels of ferritin, soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR), and transferrin were measured in NHS. Significant associations were observed for loci in TPMRSS6 with sTfR (P?=?3.47×10?6), TF with transferrin (P?=?0.0002 to 1.72×10?10); and HFE with ferritin (P?=?0.017 to 1.6×10?8), sTfR (P?=?0.007 to 7.9×10?6), and transferrin (P?=?0.006 to 0.0007). The six SNPs together explained 5.7%, 2.7%, and 13.3% of the variation in plasma levels of ferritin, sTfR, and transferrin. After adjustment for the conventional risk factors, the T allele of SNP rs855791 in the TPMRSS6 gene was significantly associated with a 19% decreased risk of T2D (OR?=?0.81; 95% CI?=?0.66–0.98; P?=?0.03) in men. Multiple tests attenuated this significant association to null. No associations were observed in women. SNPs at HFE and TF were not associated with diabetes risk in either sex. Dietary iron intake did not modify the associations of the newly identified loci with diabetes risk. Conclusions/Significance The newly identified iron-related SNP rs855791 in TPMRSS6 was nominally associated with a decreased risk of T2D in men but not in women. The apparent differences by gender warrant further study.

He, Meian; Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie; Manson, JoAnn E.; Hu, Frank B.; Qi, Lu

2012-01-01

322

Using the Social Communication Questionnaire to Identify "Autistic Spectrum" Disorders Associated with Other Genetic Conditions: Findings from a Study of Individuals with Cohen Syndrome  

ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

|Increasingly, recent research has identified relatively high rates of autistic types of symptoms in a variety of genetic conditions, such as fragile X (Turk and Graham, 1997), tuberous sclerosis (Bolton and Griffiths, 1997), Angelman syndrome (Trillingsgaard and Ostergaard, this issue) and others (see Gillberg and Coleman, 2000). Detailed…

Howlin, Patricia; Karpf, Janne

2004-01-01

323

Molecular Genetic Markers Identifying Hybridization between the Colorado River-Greenback Cutthroat Trout Complex and Yellowstone Cutthroat Trout or Rainbow Trout  

Microsoft Academic Search

We used polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers that are complementary to interspersed nuclear DNA elements to identify genetic markers capable of detecting hybridization between native Colorado River cutthroat trout Oncorhynchus clarki pleuriticus (CRCT) or greenback cutthroat trout O. c. stomias (GCT) and introduced Yellowstone cutthroat trout O. c. bouvieri (YCT) or rainbow trout O. mykiss (RT). Using four different pair

Naohisa Kanda; Robb F. Leary; Paul Spruell; Fred W. Allendorf

2002-01-01

324

Diallelic analysis of genetic effects determining days to flowering in kenaf  

Microsoft Academic Search

The genetic control determining the days to flowering, defined as the number of days from emergence to the beginning of flowering is considered an important characteristic for breeding purpose. We investigated this factor in kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus L.), as part of an agroindustrial project in northwest Argentina. A diallelic cross approach was considered in this study. Six highly inbred photosensitive

Liliana N. Gray; Norma G. Collavino; Graciela E. Simón; Jorge A. Mariotti

2006-01-01

325

Chromosomal Breakage in a Rare and Probably Genetically Determined Syndrome of Man  

Microsoft Academic Search

A high frequency of chromosomal breakage and rearrangement has been found in cultured blood cells from six of seven individuals with a rare syndrome characterized by congenital telangiectatic erythema and stunted growth. Only 19 instances of this apparently genetically determined disorder are known, and malignant neoplasia has developed in three.

James German; Reginald Archibald; D. Bloom

1965-01-01

326

76 FR 5780 - Determination of Regulated Status of Alfalfa Genetically Engineered for Tolerance to the...  

Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013

...36917-36919, Docket No. 04-085-3), APHIS advised the public of its determination, effective June 14, 2005, that the Monsanto and Forage Genetics International GE glyphosate-tolerant alfalfa lines designated as events J101 and J163 were no...

2011-02-02

327

Teachers' Conceptions About the Genetic Determinism of Human Behaviour: A Survey in 23 Countries  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

This work analyses the answers to a questionnaire from 8,285 in-service and pre-service teachers from 23 countries, elaborated by the Biohead-Citizen research project, to investigate teachers' conceptions related to the genetic determinism of human behaviour. A principal components analysis is used to assess the main trends in all the interviewed teachers' conceptions. This illustrates that innatism is present in two distinct ways: in relation to individuals (e.g. genetic determinism to justify intellectual likeness between individuals such as twins) or in relation to groups of humans (e.g. genetic determinism to justify gender differences or the superiority of some human ethnic groups). A between-factor analysis discriminates between countries, showing very significant differences. There is more innatism among teachers' conceptions in African countries and Lebanon than in European countries, Brazil and Australia. Among the other controlled parameters, only two are significantly independent of the country: the level of training and the level of knowledge of biology. A co-inertia analysis shows a strong correlation between non-citizen attitudes towards and innatist conceptions of genetic determinism regarding human groups. We discuss these findings and their implications for education.

Castéra, Jérémy; Clément, Pierre

2012-07-01

328

YWHAE rearrangement identified by FISH and RT-PCR in endometrial stromal sarcomas: genetic and pathological correlations.  

PubMed

Endometrial stromal sarcomas represent the second most common mesenchymal uterine tumor. The 2003 WHO classification distinguishes low-grade and undifferentiated endometrial stromal sarcomas with different prognoses. Endometrial stromal sarcomas are a genetically heterogeneous group of sarcomas harboring different cytogenetic anomalies. Recently, a fusion between the YWHAE and FAM22A/B genes subsequent to a t(10;17) (q22;p13) has been described in endometrial sarcomas with high-grade histology. We examined YWHAE rearrangements by FISH break-apart and RT-PCR in a series of 27 undifferentiated uterine stromal sarcoma without JAZF1 rearrangements. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) was carried out with a panel of antibodies (estrogen (ER) and progesterone (PR) receptors, CD10, Cyclin D1, ?-catenin, p53, and Ki-67). We identified a subgroup of endometrial sarcomas with high-grade histology and uniform morphology harboring YWHAE rearrangements. FISH break-apart was interpretable in 20 cases (74%). Twelve cases (60%) showed <10% of tumor cells with a YWHAE rearrangement, 4 cases (20%) showed between 10 and ?20%, and 4 (20%) >20%. RT-PCR was tested on 24/27 cases (88%) and 19 cases were interpretable (79%). Five cases (26%) showed a specific fusion transcript YWHAE-FAM22A/B sequence. The best concordance rate between FISH and RT-PCR (94%) was obtained with the threshold of 20% of cells with a YWHAE rearrangement. The YWHAE-rearranged cases showed high-grade morphology with uniform appearance, spindle or round epithelioid cells, low ER and PR, CD10 expression, and a high and diffuse positivity for Cyclin D1, p53, and nuclear ?-catenin negativity. Cyclin D1 was the most sensitive marker for high-grade endometrial sarcomas with YWHAE rearrangement. All undifferentiated uterine sarcomas with pleomorphic appearances did not harbor any YWHAE rearrangements, except for one case. Overall, for endometrial sarcoma cases with high-grade morphology we recommend to test for YWHAE rearrangements by FISH break-apart, a cost- and time-efficient method, and to complete the investigation by RT-PCR in borderline cases. PMID:23599159

Croce, Sabrina; Hostein, Isabelle; Ribeiro, Agnes; Garbay, Delphine; Velasco, Valérie; Stoeckle, Eberhardt; Guyon, Frederic; Floquet, Anne; Neuville, Agnes; Coindre, Jean-Michel; Macgrogan, Gaëtan; Chibon, Frederic

2013-04-19

329

Genetic determinants of cerebral vasospasm, delayed cerebral ischemia, and outcome after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage  

PubMed Central

Despite extensive effort to elucidate the cellular and molecular bases for delayed cerebral injury after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH), the pathophysiology of these events remains poorly understood. Recently, much work has focused on evaluating the genetic underpinnings of various diseases in an effort to delineate the contribution of specific molecular pathways as well as to uncover novel mechanisms. The majority of subarachnoid hemorrhage genetic research has focused on gene expression and linkage studies of these markers as they relate to the development of intracranial aneurysms and their subsequent rupture. Far less work has centered on the genetic determinants of cerebral vasospasm, the predisposition to delayed cerebral injury, and the determinants of ensuing functional outcome after aSAH. The suspected genes are diverse and encompass multiple functional systems including fibrinolysis, inflammation, vascular reactivity, and neuronal repair. To this end, we present a systematic review of 21 studies suggesting a genetic basis for clinical outcome after aSAH, with a special emphasis on the pathogenesis of cerebral vasospasm and delayed cerebral ischemia. In addition, we highlight potential pitfalls in the interpretation of genetic association studies, and call for uniformity of design of larger multicenter studies in the future.

Ducruet, Andrew F; Gigante, Paul R; Hickman, Zachary L; Zacharia, Brad E; Arias, Eric J; Grobelny, Bartosz T; Gorski, Justin W; Mayer, Stephan A; Connolly, E Sander

2010-01-01

330

Active Efflux of Tetracycline Encoded by Four Genetically Different Tetracycline Resistance Determinants in Escherichia coli  

Microsoft Academic Search

Tetracycline resistance encoded by four genetically different determinants residing on plasmids in Escherichia coli was shown to be associated in each case with an energy-dependent decrease in accumulation of the antibiotic in whole cells in which resistance had been induced. The different class determinants examined were those on plasmids RP1 (class A), R222 (class B), R144 (class C), and RA1

Laura McMurry; Richard E. Petrucci; Stuart B. Levy

1980-01-01

331

Determination of best-fit potential parameters for a reactive force field using a genetic algorithm  

Microsoft Academic Search

The ReaxFF interatomic potential, used for organic materials, involves more than 600 adjustable parameters, the best-fit values\\u000a of which must be determined for different materials. A new method of determining the set of best-fit parameters for specific\\u000a molecules containing carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen and oxygen is presented, based on a parameter reduction technique followed\\u000a by genetic algorithm (GA) minimization. This work

Poonam Pahari; Shashank Chaturvedi

332

Environmental versus genetic sex determination: a possible factor in dinosaur extinction?  

Microsoft Academic Search

This study examined the possibility that genetically based sex-determination mechanisms have evolved to ensure a balanced male\\/female ratio and that this temperature-independent checkpoint might have been unavailable to long-extinct reptiles, notably the dinosaurs. A review of the literature on molecular and phylogenetic relationships between modes of reproduction and sex determination in extant animals was conducted. Mammals, birds, all snakes and

David Miller; Jonathan Summers; Sherman Silber

2004-01-01

333

High-Resolution Analysis of Intrahost Genetic Diversity in Dengue Virus Serotype 1 Infection Identifies Mixed Infections  

PubMed Central

Little is known about the rate at which genetic variation is generated within intrahost populations of dengue virus (DENV) and what implications this diversity has for dengue pathogenesis, disease severity, and host immunity. Previous studies of intrahost DENV variation have used a low frequency of sampling and/or experimental methods that do not fully account for errors generated through amplification and sequencing of viral RNAs. We investigated the extent and pattern of genetic diversity in sequence data in domain III (DIII) of the envelope (E) gene in serial plasma samples (n = 49) taken from 17 patients infected with DENV type 1 (DENV-1), totaling some 8,458 clones. Statistically rigorous approaches were employed to account for artifactual variants resulting from amplification and sequencing, which we suggest have played a major role in previous studies of intrahost genetic variation. Accordingly, nucleotide sequence diversities of viral populations were very low, with conservative estimates of the average levels of genetic diversity ranging from 0 to 0.0013. Despite such sequence conservation, we observed clear evidence for mixed infection, with the presence of multiple phylogenetically distinct lineages present within the same host, while the presence of stop codon mutations in some samples suggests the action of complementation. In contrast to some previous studies we observed no relationship between the extent and pattern of DENV-1 genetic diversity and disease severity, immune status, or level of viremia.

Henn, Matthew R.; Zody, Michael C.; Tricou, Vianney; Nguyet, Nguyen Minh; Charlebois, Patrick; Lennon, Niall J.; Green, Lisa; de Vries, Peter J.; Hien, Tran Tinh; Farrar, Jeremy; van Doorn, H. Rogier; de Jong, Menno D.; Birren, Bruce W.; Holmes, Edward C.; Simmons, Cameron P.

2012-01-01

334

In the name of the migrant father--Analysis of surname origins identifies genetic admixture events undetectable from genealogical records  

PubMed Central

Patrilineal heritable surnames are widely used to select autochthonous participants for studies on small-scale population genetic patterns owing to the unique link between the surname and a genetic marker, the Y-chromosome (Y-chr). Today, the question arises as to whether the surname origin will be informative on top of in-depth genealogical pedigrees. Admixture events that happened in the period after giving heritable surnames but before the start of genealogical records may be informative about the additional value of the surname origin. In this context, an interesting historical event is the demic migration from French-speaking regions in Northern France to the depopulated and Dutch-speaking region Flanders at the end of the sixteenth century. Y-chr subhaplogroups of individuals with a French/Roman surname that could be associated with this migration event were compared with those of a group with autochthonous Flemish surnames. Although these groups could not be differentiated based on in-depth genealogical data, they were significantly genetically different from each other. Moreover, the observed genetic divergence was related to the differences in the distributions of main Y-subhaplogroups between contemporary populations from Northern France and Flanders. Therefore, these results indicate that the surname origin can be an important feature on top of in-depth genealogical results to select autochthonous participants for a regional population genetic study based on Y-chromosomes.

Larmuseau, M H D; Vanoverbeke, J; Gielis, G; Vanderheyden, N; Larmuseau, H F M; Decorte, R

2012-01-01

335

In the name of the migrant father--analysis of surname origins identifies genetic admixture events undetectable from genealogical records.  

PubMed

Patrilineal heritable surnames are widely used to select autochthonous participants for studies on small-scale population genetic patterns owing to the unique link between the surname and a genetic marker, the Y-chromosome (Y-chr). Today, the question arises as to whether the surname origin will be informative on top of in-depth genealogical pedigrees. Admixture events that happened in the period after giving heritable surnames but before the start of genealogical records may be informative about the additional value of the surname origin. In this context, an interesting historical event is the demic migration from French-speaking regions in Northern France to the depopulated and Dutch-speaking region Flanders at the end of the sixteenth century. Y-chr subhaplogroups of individuals with a French/Roman surname that could be associated with this migration event were compared with those of a group with autochthonous Flemish surnames. Although these groups could not be differentiated based on in-depth genealogical data, they were significantly genetically different from each other. Moreover, the observed genetic divergence was related to the differences in the distributions of main Y-subhaplogroups between contemporary populations from Northern France and Flanders. Therefore, these results indicate that the surname origin can be an important feature on top of in-depth genealogical results to select autochthonous participants for a regional population genetic study based on Y-chromosomes. PMID:22511074

Larmuseau, M H D; Vanoverbeke, J; Gielis, G; Vanderheyden, N; Larmuseau, H F M; Decorte, R

2012-04-18

336

Identifying the Determinants of Attitudes towards Immigrants: A Structural Cross-Country Analysis  

Microsoft Academic Search

Utilizing subjective data to infer on fundamental issues of individual opinion is associated with severe conceptual and methodological problems. This paper addresses these problems and investigates the attitudes towards immigrants within a cross-country framework. To this end, we utilize data from the first wave of the European Social Survey (ESS) in a structural latent variable model. The determinants of attitudes

Michael Fertig

2006-01-01

337

Environmental and Climatic Determinants of Molecular Diversity and Genetic Population Structure in a Coenagrionid Damselfly  

PubMed Central

Identifying environmental factors that structure intraspecific genetic diversity is of interest for both habitat preservation and biodiversity conservation. Recent advances in statistical and geographical genetics make it possible to investigate how environmental factors affect geographic organisation and population structure of molecular genetic diversity within species. Here we present a study on a common and wide ranging insect, the blue tailed damselfly Ischnuraelegans, which has been the target of many ecological and evolutionary studies. We addressed the following questions: (i) Is the population structure affected by longitudinal or latitudinal gradients?; (ii) Do geographic boundaries limit gene flow?; (iii) Does geographic distance affect connectivity and is there a signature of past bottlenecks?; (iv) Is there evidence of a recent range expansion and (vi) what is the effect of geography and climatic factors on population structure? We found low to moderate genetic sub-structuring between populations (mean FST?=?0.06, Dest?=?0.12), and an effect of longitude, but not latitude, on genetic diversity. No significant effects of geographic boundaries (e.g. water bodies) were found. FST-and Dest-values increased with geographic distance; however, there was no evidence for recent bottlenecks. Finally, we did not detect any molecular signatures of range expansions or an effect of geographic suitability, although local precipitation had a strong effect on genetic differentiation. The population structure of this small insect has probably been shaped by ecological factors that are correlated with longitudinal gradients, geographic distances, and local precipitation. The relatively weak global population structure and high degree of genetic variation within populations suggest that I. elegans has high dispersal ability, which is consistent with this species being an effective and early coloniser of new habitats.

Wellenreuther, Maren; Sanchez-Guillen, Rosa A.; Cordero-Rivera, Adolfo; Svensson, Erik I.; Hansson, Bengt

2011-01-01

338

Genetic determination of human facial morphology: links between cleft-lips and normal variation  

PubMed Central

Recent genome-wide association studies have identified single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with non-syndromic cleft lip with or without cleft palate (NSCL/P), and other previous studies showed distinctly differing facial distance measurements when comparing unaffected relatives of NSCL/P patients with normal controls. Here, we test the hypothesis that genetic loci involved in NSCL/P also influence normal variation in facial morphology. We tested 11 SNPs from 10 genomic regions previously showing replicated evidence of association with NSCL/P for association with normal variation of nose width and bizygomatic distance in two cohorts from Germany (N=529) and the Netherlands (N=2497). The two most significant associations found were between nose width and SNP rs1258763 near the GREM1 gene in the German cohort (P=6 × 10?4), and between bizygomatic distance and SNP rs987525 at 8q24.21 near the CCDC26 gene (P=0.017) in the Dutch sample. A genetic prediction model explained 2% of phenotype variation in nose width in the German and 0.5% of bizygomatic distance variation in the Dutch cohort. Although preliminary, our data provide a first link between genetic loci involved in a pathological facial trait such as NSCL/P and variation of normal facial morphology. Moreover, we present a first approach for understanding the genetic basis of human facial appearance, a highly intriguing trait with implications on clinical practice, clinical genetics, forensic intelligence, social interactions and personal identity.

Boehringer, Stefan; van der Lijn, Fedde; Liu, Fan; Gunther, Manuel; Sinigerova, Stella; Nowak, Stefanie; Ludwig, Kerstin U; Herberz, Ruth; Klein, Stefan; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Niessen, Wiro J; Breteler, Monique M B; van der Lugt, Aad; Wurtz, Rolf P; Nothen, Markus M; Horsthemke, Bernhard; Wieczorek, Dagmar; Mangold, Elisabeth; Kayser, Manfred

2011-01-01

339

Genetic Variability in Six Mexican Gray Wolf (Canis lupus baileyi) Populations Determined by Microsatellite Markers  

Microsoft Academic Search

Jaramillo-Jaimes, M.T., Sifuentes-Rincón, A.M., Sánchez Torres-Esqueda, M.T., Mendoza-Martínez, G.D., Clemente-Sánchez, F., Olivera-López, J.I., Molina Hernández, M. and Martínez-Tripp, S.C. 2007. Genetic variability in six Mexican gray wolf (Canis lupus baileyi) populations determined by microsatellite markers. J. Appl. Anim. Res., 31: 131–136.A study was conducted to evaluate genetic diversity in six Mexican gray wolf populations based on six microsatellite loci. Allelic

M. T. Jaramillo-Jaimes; A. M. Sifuentes-Rincón; M. T. Sánchez Torres-Esqueda; G. D. Mendoza-Martínez; F. Clemente-Sánchez; J. I. Olivera-López; M. Molina Hernández; S. C. Martínez-Tripp

2007-01-01

340

In Vitro Genetic Analysis of an Erythrocyte Determinant of Malaria Infection  

PubMed Central

Invasion of erythrocytes by Plasmodium falciparum is an obligatory step in the life cycle of the parasite. A major challenge is the unambiguous identification and characterization of host receptors. Because erythrocytes lack nuclei, direct genetic analyses have been limited. In this work, we combined an in vitro erythrocyte culture system, which supports P. falciparum invasion and growth, with lentiviral transduction to knock down gene expression. We genetically demonstrate, in an isogenic background, that glycophorin A is required for efficient strain-specific parasite invasion. We establish the feasibility of in vitro systematic functional analysis of essential erythrocyte determinants of malaria and erythrocyte biology.

Bei, Amy K.; Brugnara, Carlo; Duraisingh, Manoj T.

2010-01-01

341

Congenic Mouse Strains Enable Discrimination of Genetic Determinants Contributing to Fear and Fear Memory  

Microsoft Academic Search

The ability to learn and remember is variable within a population of a given species, including humans. This is due in part\\u000a to genetic variation between individuals. However, only few genes have been identified that contribute to variation in learning\\u000a and memory. Two inbred mouse strains, C57Bl\\/6J (B6) and DBA\\/2J (D2), show significant variation both in fear conditioning\\u000a memory as

Yvette M. Wilson; Thomas C. Brodnicki; Andrew J. Lawrence; Mark Murphy

2011-01-01

342

The Genetical and Environmental Determination of Phally Polymorphism in the Freshwater Snail Bulinus Truncatus  

PubMed Central

In some species of self-fertile pulmonate snails, two sexual morphs co-occur in natural populations: regular individuals and aphallic individuals that cannot transmit sperm to other snails. Purely aphallic populations therefore reproduce obligatorily by selfing. Understanding the evolution of aphally and selfing in these snails requires a precise knowledge of phally determination. In this paper, we investigate the genetic and environmental determination of aphally in Bulinus truncatus by a survey of the family (offspring) aphally ratio of 233 individuals originating from seven natural populations and a study of the reaction norm of the family aphally ratio to temperature using 60 individuals from 10 selfed lineages of one population. Our results indicate a high genetic variability for the determination of aphally between populations and within some populations, associated with a high level of genetic determination. Our second experiment indicates a significant temperature and lineage effect though no interaction between these two effects. We discuss our results in the framework of threshold models developed for dimorphic traits with polygenic inheritance. We propose that the sexual morph of an individual at a given temperature is determined by a temperature threshold value depending on both the individual genotype and probabilistic processes.

Doums, C.; Bremond, P.; Delay, B.; Jarne, P.

1996-01-01

343

Genome-wide association identifies ATOH7 as a major gene determining human optic disc size  

PubMed Central

Optic nerve assessment is important for many blinding diseases, with cup-to-disc ratio (CDR) assessments commonly used in both diagnosis and progression monitoring of glaucoma patients. Optic disc, cup, rim area and CDR measurements all show substantial variation between human populations and high heritability estimates within populations. To identify loci underlying these quantitative traits, we performed a genome-wide association study in two Australian twin cohorts and identified rs3858145, P = 6.2 × 10?10, near the ATOH7 gene as associated with the mean disc area. ATOH7 is known from studies in model organisms to play a key role in retinal ganglion cell formation. The association with rs3858145 was replicated in a cohort of UK twins, with a meta-analysis of the combined data yielding P = 3.4 × 10?10. Imputation further increased the evidence for association for several SNPs in and around ATOH7 (P = 1.3 × 10?10 to 4.3 × 10?11, top SNP rs1900004). The meta-analysis also provided suggestive evidence for association for the cup area at rs690037, P = 1.5 × 10?7, in the gene RFTN1. Direct sequencing of ATOH7 in 12 patients with optic nerve hypoplasia, one of the leading causes of blindness in children, revealed two novel non-synonymous mutations (Arg65Gly, Ala47Thr) which were not found in 90 unrelated controls (combined Fisher's exact P = 0.0136). Furthermore, the Arg65Gly variant was found to have very low frequency (0.00066) in an additional set of 672 controls.

Macgregor, Stuart; Hewitt, Alex W.; Hysi, Pirro G.; Ruddle, Jonathan B.; Medland, Sarah E.; Henders, Anjali K.; Gordon, Scott D.; Andrew, Toby; McEvoy, Brian; Sanfilippo, Paul G.; Carbonaro, Francis; Tah, Vikas; Li, Yi Ju; Bennett, Sonya L.; Craig, Jamie E.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Tran-Viet, Khanh-Nhat; Brown, Nadean L.; Spector, Timothy D.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Young, Terri L.; Hammond, Christopher J.; Mackey, David A.

2010-01-01

344

Direct single cell determination of nitric oxide synthase related metabolites in identified nitrergic neurons.  

PubMed

The biochemical characterization of individual nitrergic (NO releasing) neurons is a non-trivial task both in vertebrate and invertebrate preparations. In spite of numerous efforts, there are limited data related to intracellular concentrations of essential metabolites involved in NO synthesis and degradation. This situation creates controversies in both identification of nitrergic neurons and the selection of reliable reporters of NOS activity in heterogeneous cell populations. We take advantage of identified neurons from the pulmonate mollusc Lymnaea stagnalis to perform direct single cell microanalysis of intracellular concentrations of the major nitric oxide synthase (NOS) related metabolites such as arginine, citrulline, argininosuccinate, NO(2)(-),and NO(3)(-). Capillary electrophoresis protocols have been developed to quantitate levels of these metabolites in single identified neurons from the buccal, cerebral, and pedal ganglia using laser-induced fluorescence and conductivity detection. The limits of detection (LODs) for arginine (Arg) and citrulline (Cit) are 84 amol (11nM) and 110 amol (15 nM), respectively, and LODs for NO(2)(-)and NO(3)(-) are <200 amol (<10nM) each. We report that intracellular concentrations of NOS related metabolites are in the millimolar range and less than 1% of a single cell is required for microchemical analysis. From four cell types tested, only the esophageal motoneuron B2 contains active NOS, and they also contain surprisingly high nitrite levels (up to 5mM) compared to other neurons tested (peptidergic B4, dopaminergic RPeD1, and serotonergic CGC). These B2 neurons also exhibit an Arg/Cit ratio susceptible to the selective NOS inhibitor l-iminoethyl-N-ornithine whereas others neurons do not even though they all may contain NOS transcripts. On the contrary, we found that absolute concentrations of other NOS related metabolites including nitrates are not reliable markers of NOS activity and demonstrate the need for multiple assays for NOS activity. PMID:15811510

Moroz, Leonid L; Dahlgren, Robin L; Boudko, Dmitry; Sweedler, Jonathan V; Lovell, Peter

2005-04-01

345

Application of Comparative Phylogenomics To Study the Evolution of Yersinia enterocolitica and To Identify Genetic Differences Relating to Pathogenicity  

Microsoft Academic Search

Yersinia enterocolitica, an important cause of human gastroenteritis generally caused by the consumption of livestock, has traditionally been categorized into three groups with respect to pathogenicity, i.e., nonpathogenic (biotype 1A), low pathogenicity (biotypes 2 to 5), and highly pathogenic (biotype 1B). However, genetic differences that explain variation in pathogenesis and whether different biotypes are associated with specific nonhuman hosts are

Sarah L. Howard; Michael W. Gaunt; Jason Hinds; Adam A. Witney; Richard Stabler; Brendan W. Wren

2006-01-01

346

A Genetic Screen for Anchorage-Independent Proliferation in Mammalian Cells Identifies a Membrane-Bound Neuregulin  

Microsoft Academic Search

Anchorage-independent proliferation is a hallmark of oncogenic transformation and is thought to be conducive to proliferation of cancer cells away from their site of origin. We have previously reported that primary Schwann cells expressing the SV40 Large T antigen (LT) are not fully transformed in that they maintain a strict requirement for attachment, requiring a further genetic change, such as

Davide Danovi; Catherine A. Cremona; Gisela Machado-da-Silva; Sreya Basu; Luke A. Noon; Simona Parrinello; Alison C. Lloyd; Neil A. Hotchin

2010-01-01

347

An examination of environmental and genetic contributions to the determinants of suicidal behavior among male twins  

PubMed Central

The purpose of the present study was to examine the relative association of genetic and environmental factors with individual differences in each of the proximal, jointly necessary, and sufficient causes for suicidal behavior, according to the Interpersonal-Psychological Theory of Suicide (IPTS; Joiner, 2005). We examined data on derived scales measuring acquired capability, belongingness, and burdensomeness (the determinants of suicidal behavior, according to theory) from 348 adolescent male twins. Univariate biometrical models were used to estimate the magnitude of additive genetic (A), non-additive genetic (D), shared environmental (C), and nonshared environmental (E) effects associated with the variance in acquired capability, belongingness, and burdensomeness. The best fitting model for the acquired capability allowed for additive genetic and environmental effects, whereas the best fitting model for burdensomeness and belongingness allowed for shared and nonshared environmental effects. The present research extends prior work by specifying the environmental and genetic contributions to the components of the IPTS, and our findings suggest that belongingness and burdensomeness may be more appropriate targets for clinical intervention than acquired capability as these factors may be more malleable or amenable to change.

Smith, April Rose; Ribeiro, Jessica; Mikolajewski, Amy; Taylor, Jeanette; Joiner, Thomas; Iacono, William G.

2012-01-01

348

Mapping Determinants of Gene Expression Plasticity by Genetical Genomics in C. elegans  

PubMed Central

Recent genetical genomics studies have provided intimate views on gene regulatory networks. Gene expression variations between genetically different individuals have been mapped to the causal regulatory regions, termed expression quantitative trait loci. Whether the environment-induced plastic response of gene expression also shows heritable difference has not yet been studied. Here we show that differential expression induced by temperatures of 16 °C and 24 °C has a strong genetic component in Caenorhabditis elegans recombinant inbred strains derived from a cross between strains CB4856 (Hawaii) and N2 (Bristol). No less than 59% of 308 trans-acting genes showed a significant eQTL-by-environment interaction, here termed plasticity quantitative trait loci. In contrast, only 8% of an estimated 188 cis-acting genes showed such interaction. This indicates that heritable differences in plastic responses of gene expression are largely regulated in trans. This regulation is spread over many different regulators. However, for one group of trans-genes we found prominent evidence for a common master regulator: a transband of 66 coregulated genes appeared at 24 °C. Our results suggest widespread genetic variation of differential expression responses to environmental impacts and demonstrate the potential of genetical genomics for mapping the molecular determinants of phenotypic plasticity.

Gutteling, Evert W; Tijsterman, Marcel; Fu, Jingyuan; Riksen, Joost A. G; Hazendonk, Esther; Prins, Pjotr; Plasterk, Ronald H. A; Jansen, Ritsert C; Breitling, Rainer; Kammenga, Jan E

2006-01-01

349

The role of obesity-associated loci identified in genome-wide association studies in the determination of pediatric BMI.  

PubMed

The prevalence of obesity in children and adults in the United States has increased dramatically over the past decade. Besides environmental factors, genetic factors are known to play an important role in the pathogenesis of obesity. A number of genetic determinants of adult BMI have already been established through genome-wide association (GWA) studies. In this study, we examined 25 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) corresponding to 13 previously reported genomic loci in 6,078 children with measures of BMI. Fifteen of these SNPs yielded at least nominally significant association to BMI, representing nine different loci including INSIG2, FTO, MC4R, TMEM18, GNPDA2, NEGR1, BDNF, KCTD15, and 1q25. Other loci revealed no evidence for association, namely at MTCH2, SH2B1, 12q13, and 3q27. For the 15 associated variants, the genotype score explained 1.12% of the total variation for BMI z-score. We conclude that among 13 loci that have been reported to associate with adult BMI, at least nine also contribute to the determination of BMI in childhood as demonstrated by their associations in our pediatric cohort. PMID:19478790

Zhao, Jianhua; Bradfield, Jonathan P; Li, Mingyao; Wang, Kai; Zhang, Haitao; Kim, Cecilia E; Annaiah, Kiran; Glessner, Joseph T; Thomas, Kelly; Garris, Maria; Frackelton, Edward C; Otieno, F George; Shaner, Julie L; Smith, Ryan M; Chiavacci, Rosetta M; Berkowitz, Robert I; Hakonarson, Hakon; Grant, Struan F A

2009-05-28

350

Balancing genetic uniqueness and genetic variation in determining conservation and translocation strategies: a comprehensive case study of threatened dwarf galaxias, Galaxiella pusilla (Mack) (Pisces: Galaxiidae).  

PubMed

Genetic markers are widely used to define and manage populations of threatened species based on the notion that populations with unique lineages of mtDNA and well-differentiated nuclear marker frequencies should be treated separately. However, a danger of this approach is that genetic uniqueness might be emphasized at the cost of genetic diversity, which is essential for adaptation and is potentially boosted by mixing geographically separate populations. Here, we re-explore the issue of defining management units, focussing on a detailed study of Galaxiella pusilla, a small freshwater fish of national conservation significance in Australia. Using a combination of microsatellite and mitochondrial markers, 51 populations across the species range were surveyed for genetic structure and diversity. We found an inverse relationship between genetic differentiation and genetic diversity, highlighting a long-term risk of deliberate isolation of G. pusilla populations based on protection of unique lineages. Instead, we adopt a method for identifying genetic management units that takes into consideration both uniqueness and genetic variation. This produced a management framework to guide future translocation and re-introduction efforts for G. pusilla, which contrasted to the framework based on a more traditional approach that may overlook important genetic variation in populations. PMID:23432132

Coleman, R A; Weeks, A R; Hoffmann, A A

2013-02-21

351

A genome-wide association study of host genetic determinants of the antibody response to Anthrax Vaccine Adsorbed.  

PubMed

Several lines of evidence have supported a host genetic contribution to vaccine response, but genome-wide assessments for specific determinants have been sparse. Here we describe a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of protective antigen-specific antibody (AbPA) responses among 726 European-Americans who received Anthrax Vaccine Adsorbed (AVA) as part of a clinical trial. After quality control, 736,996 SNPs were tested for association with the AbPA response to 3 or 4 AVA vaccinations given over a 6-month period. No SNP achieved the threshold of genome-wide significance (p=5 × 10(-8)), but suggestive associations (p<1 × 10(-5)) were observed for SNPs in or near the class II region of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), in the promoter region of SPSB1, and adjacent to MEX3C. Multivariable regression modeling suggested that much of the association signal within the MHC corresponded to previously identified HLA DR-DQ haplotypes involving component HLA-DRB1 alleles of *15:01, *01:01, or *01:02. We estimated the proportion of additive genetic variance explained by common SNP variation for the AbPA response after the 6 month vaccination. This analysis indicated a significant, albeit imprecisely estimated, contribution of variation tagged by common polymorphisms (p=0.032). Future studies will be required to replicate these findings in European Americans and to further elucidate the host genetic factors underlying variable immune response to AVA. PMID:22658931

Pajewski, Nicholas M; Shrestha, Sadeep; Quinn, Conrad P; Parker, Scott D; Wiener, Howard; Aissani, Brahim; McKinney, Brett A; Poland, Gregory A; Edberg, Jeffrey C; Kimberly, Robert P; Tang, Jianming; Kaslow, Richard A

2012-05-31

352

In-situ induction motor efficiency determination using the genetic algorithm  

SciTech Connect

Numerous methods exist for determining the efficiency of induction motors. Many of them require a no-load test, which is not possible for in-situ determination. The evaluation of motor efficiency based on the motor`s nameplate or manufacturer`s data, on the other hand, in many cases cannot ensure a fair assessment of induction motors employed in the plant. An extensive survey of techniques for efficiency measurement is given. A new method is proposed for in-situ induction motor efficiency determination, based on the genetic algorithm. Results are compared with torque-gauge results.

Pillay, P.; Levin, V. [Clarkson Univ., Potsdam, NY (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering; Otaduy, P.; Kueck, J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1998-12-01

353

Determining salinization extent, identifying salinity sources, and estimating chloride mass using surface, borehole, and airborne electromagnetic induction methods  

Microsoft Academic Search

(1) Using an example from an oil field in the semiarid Red River basin in Texas, we show that electromagnetic (EM) methods are useful in locating salinized soil and water, determining salinization extent, identifying likely salinity sources, and estimating the total mass of chloride within a saline-water plume. Each of these aspects assists in managing salinization and assessing its impact.

Jeffrey G. Paine

2003-01-01

354

Determinants of Success in National Programs to Eliminate Lymphatic Filariasis: A Perspective Identifying Essential Elements and Research Needs  

Microsoft Academic Search

The Global Programme to Eliminate Lymphatic Filariasis (GPELF) was launched in 2000. To understand why some national programs have been more successful than others, a panel of individuals with expertise in LF elimination efforts met to assess available data from programs in 8 countries. The goal was to identify: 1) the factors determining success for national LF elimination programs (defined

Dominique Kyelem; Gautam Biswas; Moses J. Bockarie; Mark H. Bradley; Maged El-Setouhy; Peter U. Fischer; Ralph H. Henderson; James W. Kazura; Patrick J. Lammie; Sammy M. Njenga; Eric A. Ottesen; Kapa D. Ramaiah; Frank O. Richards; Gary J. Weil; Steven A. Williams

355

Beneficence, determinism and justice: an engagement with the argument for the genetic selection of intelligence.  

PubMed

In 2001, Julian Savulescu wrote an article entitled 'Procreative Beneficence: Why We Should Select the Best Children', in which he argued for the genetic selection of intelligence in children. That article contributes to a debate on whether genetic research on intelligence should be undertaken at all and, if so, should intelligence selection be available to potential parents. As such, the question of intelligence selection relates to wider issues concerning the genetic determinism of behavioural traits, i.e. alcoholism. This article is designed as an engagement in the intelligence selection debate using an analysis of Savulescu's arguments to raise a series of problematic issues in relation to the ethics of parental selection of intelligence. These problematic issues relate to wider assumptions that are made in order to put forward intelligence selection as a viable ethical option. Such assumptions are more generic in character, but still relate to Savulescu's article, concerning issues of genetic determinism, private allocation and inequality, and, finally, individual versus aggregate justice. The conclusion focuses on what the implications are for the question of agency, especially if intelligence selection is allowed. PMID:15812970

Birch, Kean

2005-02-01

356

Genetic caste determination in harvester ants: possible origin and maintenance by cyto-nuclear epistasis.  

PubMed

While reproductive caste in eusocial insects is usually determined by environmental factors, in some populations of the harvester ants, Pogonomyrmex barbatus and P. rugosus, caste has been shown to have a strong genetic component. This system of genetic caste determination (GCD) is characterized by between-caste nuclear variation and high levels of mitochondrial haplotype variation between alternative maternal lineages. Two previous genetic models, involving a single nuclear caste-determining locus or interactions between two nuclear loci, respectively, have been proposed to explain the GCD system. We propose a new model based on interactions between nuclear and mitochondrial genes that can better explain the co-maintenance of distinct nuclear and mitochondrial lineages. In our model, females with coevolved cyto-nuclear gene complexes, derived from intra-lineage mating, develop into gynes, while females with disrupted cyto-nuclear complexes, derived from inter-lineage mating, develop into workers. Both haplodiploidy and inbreeding facilitate the buildup of such coevolved cyto-nuclear complexes within lineages. In addition, the opportunity for both intra-lineage and inter-lineage mating in polyandrous populations facilitates the accumulation of gyne-biasing genes. This model may also help to explain the evolution of workerless social, parasites. We discuss similarities of GCD and cytoplasmic male sterility in plants and how worker production of males would affect the stability of GCD. Finally, we propose experiments and observations that might help resolve the origin and maintenance of this unusual system of caste determination. PMID:16995617

Linksvayer, Timothy A; Wade, Michael J; Gordon, Deborah M

2006-09-01

357

Identifying microbial fitness determinants by Insertion Sequencing (INSeq) using genome-wide transposon mutant libraries  

PubMed Central

Insertion Sequencing (INSeq) is a method for determining the insertion site and relative abundance of large numbers of transposon mutants in a mixed population of isogenic mutants of a sequenced microbial species. INSeq is based on a modified mariner transposon containing MmeI sites at its ends, allowing cleavage at chromosomal sites 16–17bp from the inserted transposon. Genomic regions adjacent to the transposons are amplified by linear PCR with a biotinylated primer. Products are bound to magnetic beads, digested with MmeI, and barcoded with sample-specific linkers appended to each restriction fragment. After limited PCR amplification, fragments are sequenced using a high-throughput instrument. The sequence of each read can be used to map the location of a transposon in the genome. Read count measures the relative abundance of that mutant in the population. Solid-phase library preparation makes this protocol rapid (18h), easy to scale-up, amenable to automation, and useful for a variety of samples. A protocol for characterizing libraries of transposon mutant strains clonally arrayed in multi-well format is provided.

Goodman, Andrew L.; Wu, Meng; Gordon, Jeffrey I.

2012-01-01

358

Identifying microbial fitness determinants by insertion sequencing using genome-wide transposon mutant libraries.  

PubMed

Insertion sequencing (INSeq) is a method for determining the insertion site and relative abundance of large numbers of transposon mutants in a mixed population of isogenic mutants of a sequenced microbial species. INSeq is based on a modified mariner transposon containing MmeI sites at its ends, allowing cleavage at chromosomal sites 16-17 bp from the inserted transposon. Genomic regions adjacent to the transposons are amplified by linear PCR with a biotinylated primer. Products are bound to magnetic beads, digested with MmeI and barcoded with sample-specific linkers appended to each restriction fragment. After limited PCR amplification, fragments are sequenced using a high-throughput instrument. The sequence of each read can be used to map the location of a transposon in the genome. Read count measures the relative abundance of that mutant in the population. Solid-phase library preparation makes this protocol rapid (18 h), easy to scale up, amenable to automation and useful for a variety of samples. A protocol for characterizing libraries of transposon mutant strains clonally arrayed in a multiwell format is provided. PMID:22094732

Goodman, Andrew L; Wu, Meng; Gordon, Jeffrey I

2011-11-17

359

Alternative splicing of a Drosophila GABA receptor subunit gene identifies determinants of agonist potency.  

PubMed

Alternative splicing of the Drosophila melanogaster Rdl gene yields four ionotropic GABA receptor subunits. The two Rdl splice variants cloned to date, RDL(ac) and RDL(bd) (DRC17-1-2), differ in their apparent agonist affinity. Here, we report the cloning of a third splice variant of Rdl, RDL(ad). Two-electrode voltage clamp electrophysiology was used to investigate agonist pharmacology of this expressed subunit following cRNA injection into Xenopus laevis oocytes. The EC(so) values for GABA and its analogues isoguvacine, muscimol, isonipecotic acid and 3-amino sulphonic acid on the RDL(ad) homomeric receptor differed from those previously described for RDL(ac) and DRC17-1-2 receptors. In addition to providing a possible physiological role for the alternative splicing of Rdl, these data delineate a hitherto functionally unassigned region of the N-terminal domain of GABA receptor subunits, which affects agonist potency and aligns closely with known determinants of potency in nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Thus, using expression in Xenopus oocytes, we have demonstrated differences in agonist potency for the neurotransmitter GABA (and four analogues) between splice variant products of the Drosophila melanogaster Rdl gene encoding homomer-forming GABA receptor subunits. PMID:11226707

Hosie, A M; Buckingham, S D; Presnail, J K; Sattelle, D B

2001-01-01

360

Functional genomics of Pseudomonas aeruginosa to identify habitat-specific determinants of pathogenicity.  

PubMed

Half of all genes in the Pseudomonas aeruginosa genome have either no homology to any previously reported sequence or are homologues of previously reported genes of unknown function. The signature-tagged mutagenesis (STM) screening method allows to explore the role of these hypothetical and unknown proteins for the colonization and persistence of P. aeruginosa in eukaryotic hosts. A plasposon STM library was constructed in the virulent clinical P. aeruginosa isolate TBCF10839 that can persist in polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs). The STM library was screened for plasposon mutants that were attenuated in the killing of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, deficient in quorum sensing and production of type II secretion effector proteins or had become more susceptible to killing by PMNs in phagocytosis assays. The three screens revealed in total 69 attenuated mutants. Fifteen mutants that carried the transposon in potential novel virulence determinants of yet unknown function were selected for further analysis. The mutants were characterized in their transcriptome and proteome and their cytotoxicity in vitro and their virulence in worm and mouse infection models in vivo. Previous studies had revealed a remarkable degree of conservation in the virulence mechanisms used by P. aeruginosa to infect hosts of divergent evolutionary origins. Testing of our novel targets did not reveal such a strict conservation. The functional characterization revealed that the fifteen proteins play highly diverse roles in the cell and become habitat-specific virulence factors upon exposure to specific hosts and/or upon exposure to specific stress conditions or host defense mechanisms. PMID:17481950

Wiehlmann, Lutz; Munder, Antje; Adams, Thorsten; Juhas, Mario; Kolmar, Harald; Salunkhe, Prabhakar; Tümmler, Burkhard

2007-05-04

361

A Genetic Screen for Modifiers of Drosophila Src42A Identifies Mutations in Egfr, rolled and a Novel Signaling Gene  

Microsoft Academic Search

Drosophila Src42A, a close relative of the vertebrate c-Src, has been implicated in the Ras-Mapk signaling cascade. An allele of Src42A, Su(Raf )1, dominantly suppresses the lethality of partial loss-of-function Raf mutations. To isolate genes involved in the same pathway where Src42A functions, we carried out genetic screens for dominant suppressor mutations that prevented Su(Raf )1 from suppressing Raf. Thirty-six

Qian Zhang; Qingxia Zheng; Xiangyi Lu

1999-01-01

362

Absolute age Determinations on Diamond by Radioisotopic Methods: NOT the way to Accurately Identify Diamond Provenance  

NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

Gem-quality diamond contains such low abundances of parent-daughter radionuclides that dating the diamond lattice directly by isotopic measurements has been and will be impossible. Absolute ages on diamonds typically are obtained through measurements of their syngenetic mineral inclusions: Rb-Sr in garnet; Sm-Nd in garnet and pyroxene; Re-Os and U-Th-Pb in sulfide; K-Ar in pyroxene; and U-Pb in zircon. The application of the first two isotope schemes in the list requires putting together many inclusions from many diamonds whereas the latter isotope schemes permit ages on single diamonds. The key limitations on the application of these decay pairs are the availability and size of the inclusions, the abundance levels of the radionuclides, and instrumental sensitivity. Practical complications of radioisotope dating of inclusions are fatal to the application of the technique for diamond provenance. In all mines, the ratio of gem-quality diamonds to stones with datable inclusions is very high. Thus there is no way to date the valuable, marketable stones that are part of the conflict diamond problem, just their rare, flawed cousins. Each analysis destroys the diamond host plus the inclusion and can only be carried out in research labs by highly trained scientists. Thus, these methods can not be automated or applied to the bulk of diamond production. The geological problems with age dating are equally fatal to its application to diamond provenance. From the geological perspective, for age determination to work as a tool for diamond provenance studies, diamond ages would have to be specific to particular kimberlites or kimberlite fields and different between fields. The southern African Kaapvaal-Zimbabwe Craton and Limpopo Mobile Belt is the only cratonic region where age determinations have been applied on a large enough scale to a number of kimberlites to illustrate the geological problems in age measurements for diamond provenance. However, this southern African example is seen as typical of other cratons. Here, the nearly universal occurrence of Archean or Proterozoic diamonds in much younger (often Cretaceous) kimberlites proves that diamonds are xenocrysts inherited from the ancient mantle lithospheric keel by the host kimberlite as it erupts. Differences in diamond ages are on the scale of the geological assembly of the mantle lithospheric keel and relate to geological terranes in the lithosphere; they have little to do with individual kimberlites. In southern Africa, two age groupings of diamonds exist: Archean (3.2 to 2.9 Ga) diamonds associated with initial creation/final stabilization of the mantle lithosphere and Proterozoic (1 to 2 Ga) diamonds associated with compositional changes to the mantle keel from magmatism and metasomatism. The distribution of these two age types is cratonwide, encompasses many kimberlites and both age groupings can occur in an individual kimberlite. One expects a recurrence of similar ages with a possible 2 Ga age spread from many different kimberlites across the craton. Similar old ages are seen on other cratons (e.g. Siberian, Slave); thus age can not even distinguish diamond source at the scale of a craton. A further complication is that both sampling of diamonds from their lithospheric host and the resting position of diamonds at the final solidification level of the kimberlite in the crust are accidental. This can produce significant variability in the diamond population which is further complicated if erosion and deposition of the diamonds to form alluvial deposits has obscured their host kimberlite.

Shirey, S. B.

2002-05-01

363

Genetic determinants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa colonization in cystic fibrosis patients in Canada.  

PubMed

The present study was aimed at analyzing whether the rate of colonization and the age at colonization with Pseudomonas aeruginosa was genetically determined in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. These two variables were calculated among 127 CF patients whose genotypes were known and who were monitored at the Clinique de Fibrose Kystique in Saguenay Lac-Saint-Jean. No statistically significant differences were found in the rate or the age at colonization when the patients were grouped by genotype; however, this result could be due to the small number of patients in each genotype group. The rate of colonization was significantly lower among CF patients carrying the A455E mutation, a "mild" allele with respect to exocrine pancreatic function, than among those carrying either the deltaF508 or the 621 + IG- > T mutation, both of which are "severe" alleles. The results confirm previous reports that the rate of colonization with Pseudomonas aeruginosa is, at least in part, genetically determined. PMID:9707310

De Braekeleer, M; Allard, C; Leblanc, J P; Aubin, G; Simard, F

1998-04-01

364

The Use of Genome-Wide eQTL Associations in Lymphoblastoid Cell Lines to Identify Novel Genetic Pathways Involved in Complex Traits  

Microsoft Academic Search

The integrated analysis of genotypic and expression data for association with complex traits could identify novel genetic pathways involved in complex traits. We profiled 19,573 expression probes in Epstein-Barr virus-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) from 299 twins and correlated these with 44 quantitative traits (QTs). For 939 expressed probes correlating with more than one QT, we investigated the presence of

Josine L. Min; Jennifer M. Taylor; J. Brent Richards; Tim Watts; Fredrik H. Pettersson; John Broxholme; Kourosh R. Ahmadi; Gabriela L. Surdulescu; Ernesto Lowy; Christian Gieger; Chris Newton-Cheh; Markus Perola; Nicole Soranzo; Ida Surakka; Cecilia M. Lindgren; Jiannis Ragoussis; Andrew P. Morris; Lon R. Cardon; Tim D. Spector; Krina T. Zondervan

2011-01-01

365

Meta-analysis identifies 13 new loci associated with waist-hip ratio and reveals sexual dimorphism in the genetic basis of fat distribution  

Microsoft Academic Search

Waist-hip ratio (WHR) is a measure of body fat distribution and a predictor of metabolic consequences independent of overall adiposity. WHR is heritable, but few genetic variants influencing this trait have been identified. We conducted a meta-analysis of 32 genome-wide association studies for WHR adjusted for body mass index (comprising up to 77,167 participants), following up 16 loci in an

Iris M Heid; Anne U Jackson; Joshua C Randall; Thomas W Winkler; Lu Qi; Valgerdur Steinthorsdottir; Gudmar Thorleifsson; M Carola Zillikens; Elizabeth K Speliotes; Reedik Magi; Tsegaselassie Workalemahu; Charles C White; Nabila Bouatia-Naji; Tamara B Harris; Sonja I Berndt; Erik Ingelsson; Cristen J Willer; Michael N Weedon; Jian'an Luan; Sailaja Vedantam; Tonu Esko; Tuomas O Kilpelainen; Zoltan Kutalik; Shengxu Li; Keri L Monda; Anna L Dixon; Christopher C Holmes; Lee M Kaplan; Liming Liang; Josine L Min; Miriam F Moffatt; Cliona Molony; George Nicholson; Eric E Schadt; Krina T Zondervan; Mary F Feitosa; Teresa Ferreira; Hana Lango Allen; Robert J Weyant; Eleanor Wheeler; Andrew R Wood; Karol Estrada; Michael E Goddard; Guillaume Lettre; Massimo Mangino; Dale R Nyholt; Shaun Purcell; Albert Vernon Smith; Peter M Visscher; Jian Yang; Steven A McCarroll; James Nemesh; Benjamin F Voight; Devin Absher; Najaf Amin; Thor Aspelund; Lachlan Coin; Nicole L Glazer; Caroline Hayward; Nancy L Heard-Costa; Jouke-Jan Hottenga; Asa Johansson; Toby Johnson; Marika Kaakinen; Karen Kapur; Shamika Ketkar; Joshua W Knowles; Peter Kraft; Aldi T Kraja; Claudia Lamina; Michael F Leitzmann; Barbara McKnight; Andrew P Morris; Ken K Ong; John R B Perry; Marjolein J Peters; Ozren Polasek; Inga Prokopenko; Nigel W Rayner; Samuli Ripatti; Fernando Rivadeneira; Neil R Robertson; Serena Sanna; Ulla Sovio; Ida Surakka; Alexander Teumer; Sophie van Wingerden; Veronique Vitart; Jing Hua Zhao; Christine Cavalcanti-Proenca; Peter S Chines; Eva Fisher; Jennifer R Kulzer; Cecile Lecoeur; Narisu Narisu; Camilla Sandholt; Laura J Scott; Kaisa Silander; Klaus Stark; Mari-Liis Tammesoo; Tanya M Teslovich; Nicholas John Timpson; Richard M Watanabe; Ryan Welch; Daniel I Chasman; Matthew N Cooper; John-Olov Jansson; Johannes Kettunen; Robert W Lawrence; Niina Pellikka; Markus Perola; Liesbeth Vandenput; Helene Alavere; Peter Almgren; Larry D Atwood; Amanda J Bennett; Reiner Biffar; Lori L Bonnycastle; Stefan R Bornstein; Thomas A Buchanan; Harry Campbell; Ian N M Day; Mariano Dei; Marcus Dorr; Paul Elliott; Michael R Erdos; Johan G Eriksson; Nelson B Freimer; Mao Fu; Stefan Gaget; Eco J C Geus; Anette P Gjesing; Harald Grallert; Jurgen Graszler; Christopher J Groves; Candace Guiducci; Anna-Liisa Hartikainen; Neelam Hassanali; Aki S Havulinna; Karl-Heinz Herzig; Andrew A Hicks; Jennie Hui; Wilmar Igl; Pekka Jousilahti; Antti Jula; Eero Kajantie; Leena Kinnunen; Ivana Kolcic; Seppo Koskinen; Peter Kovacs; Heyo K Kroemer; Vjekoslav Krzelj; Johanna Kuusisto; Kirsti Kvaloy; Jaana Laitinen; Olivier Lantieri; G Mark Lathrop; Marja-Liisa Lokki; Robert N Luben; Barbara Ludwig; Wendy L McArdle; Anne McCarthy; Mario A Morken; Mari Nelis; Matt J Neville; Guillaume Pare; Alex N Parker; John F Peden; Irene Pichler; Kirsi H Pietilainen; Carl G P Platou; Anneli Pouta; Martin Ridderstrale; Nilesh J Samani; Jouko Saramies; Juha Sinisalo; Jan H Smit; Rona J Strawbridge; Heather M Stringham; Amy J Swift; Maris Teder-Laving; Brian Thomson; Gianluca Usala; Joyce B J van Meurs; Gert-Jan van Ommen; Vincent Vatin; Claudia B Volpato; Henri Wallaschofski; G Bragi Walters; Elisabeth Widen; Sarah H Wild; Gonneke Willemsen; Daniel R Witte; Lina Zgaga; Paavo Zitting; John P Beilby; Alan L James; Mika Kahonen; Terho Lehtimaki; Markku S Nieminen; Claes Ohlsson; Lyle J Palmer; Olli Raitakari; Paul M Ridker; Michael Stumvoll; Anke Tonjes; Jorma Viikari; Beverley Balkau; Yoav Ben-Shlomo; Richard N Bergman; Heiner Boeing; George Davey Smith; Shah Ebrahim; Philippe Froguel; Torben Hansen; Christian Hengstenberg; Kristian Hveem; Bo Isomaa; Torben Jorgensen; Fredrik Karpe; Kay-Tee Khaw; Markku Laakso; Debbie A Lawlor; Michel Marre; Thomas Meitinger; Andres Metspalu; Kristian Midthjell; Oluf Pedersen; Veikko Salomaa; Peter E H Schwarz; Tiinamaija Tuomi; Jaakko Tuomilehto; Timo T Valle; Nicholas J Wareham; Alice M Arnold; Jacques S Beckmann; Sven Bergmann; Eric Boerwinkle; Dorret I Boomsma; Mark J Caulfield; Francis S Collins; Gudny Eiriksdottir; Vilmundur Gudnason; Ulf Gyllensten; Anders Hamsten; Andrew T Hattersley; Albert Hofman; Frank B Hu; Thomas Illig; Carlos Iribarren; Marjo-Riitta Jarvelin; W H Linda Kao; Jaakko Kaprio; Lenore J Launer; Patricia B Munroe; Ben Oostra; Brenda W Penninx; Peter P Pramstaller; Bruce M Psaty; Thomas Quertermous; Aila Rissanen; Igor Rudan; Alan R Shuldiner; Nicole Soranzo; Timothy D Spector; Ann-Christine Syvanen; Manuela Uda; Andre Uitterlinden; Henry Volzke; Peter Vollenweider; James F Wilson; Jacqueline C Witteman; Alan F Wright; Goncalo R Abecasis; Michael Boehnke; Ingrid B Borecki; Panos Deloukas

2010-01-01

366

Genetic determinants of plasma HDL-cholesterol levels in familial hypercholesterolemia  

Microsoft Academic Search

The objective of this study was to determine the extent to which common genetic variants can explain the variation of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) plasma levels in familial hypercholesterolemia (FH). FH is characterized by elevated low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels and premature cardiovascular disease (CVD). Although low HDL-C levels have been shown to affect the severity of the clinical phenotype, little

Emily S van Aalst-Cohen; Angelique C M Jansen; S Matthijs Boekholdt; Michael W T Tanck; Marcel R Fontecha; Suzanne Cheng; Jia Li; Joep C Defesche; Jan Albert Kuivenhoven; John J P Kastelein; JJP Kastelein

2005-01-01

367

Direct calorimetry identifies deficiencies in respirometry for the determination of resting metabolic rate in C57Bl/6 and FVB mice.  

PubMed

Substantial research efforts have been aimed at identifying novel targets to increase resting metabolic rate (RMR) as an adjunct approach to the treatment of obesity. Respirometry (one form of "indirect calorimetry") is unquestionably the dominant technique used in the obesity research field to assess RMR in vivo, although this method relies upon a lengthy list of assumptions that are likely to be violated in pharmacologically or genetically manipulated animals. A "total" calorimeter, including a gradient layer direct calorimeter coupled to a conventional respirometer, was used to test the accuracy of respirometric-based estimations of RMR in laboratory mice (Mus musculus Linnaeus) of the C57Bl/6 and FVB background strains. Using this combined calorimeter, we determined that respirometry underestimates RMR of untreated 9- to 12-wk-old male mice by ?10-12%. Quantitative and qualitative differences resulted between methods for untreated C57Bl/6 and FVB mice, C57Bl/6 mice treated with ketamine-xylazine anesthesia, and FVB mice with genetic deletion of the angiotensin II type 2 receptor. We conclude that respirometric methods underestimate RMR in mice in a magnitude that is similar to or greater than the desired RMR effects of novel therapeutics. Sole reliance upon respirometry to assess RMR in mice may lead to false quantitative and qualitative conclusions regarding the effects of novel interventions. Increased use of direct calorimetry for the assessment of RMR and confirmation of respirometry results and the reexamination of previously discarded potential obesity therapeutics are warranted. PMID:23964071

Burnett, Colin M L; Grobe, Justin L

2013-08-20

368

The major genetic determinants of HIV-1 control affect HLA class I peptide presentation.  

PubMed

Infectious and inflammatory diseases have repeatedly shown strong genetic associations within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC); however, the basis for these associations remains elusive. To define host genetic effects on the outcome of a chronic viral infection, we performed genome-wide association analysis in a multiethnic cohort of HIV-1 controllers and progressors, and we analyzed the effects of individual amino acids within the classical human leukocyte antigen (HLA) proteins. We identified >300 genome-wide significant single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the MHC and none elsewhere. Specific amino acids in the HLA-B peptide binding groove, as well as an independent HLA-C effect, explain the SNP associations and reconcile both protective and risk HLA alleles. These results implicate the nature of the HLA-viral peptide interaction as the major factor modulating durable control of HIV infection. PMID:21051598

Pereyra, Florencia; Jia, Xiaoming; McLaren, Paul J; Telenti, Amalio; de Bakker, Paul I W; Walker, Bruce D; Ripke, Stephan; Brumme, Chanson J; Pulit, Sara L; Carrington, Mary; Kadie, Carl M; Carlson, Jonathan M; Heckerman, David; Graham, Robert R; Plenge, Robert M; Deeks, Steven G; Gianniny, Lauren; Crawford, Gabriel; Sullivan, Jordan; Gonzalez, Elena; Davies, Leela; Camargo, Amy; Moore, Jamie M; Beattie, Nicole; Gupta, Supriya; Crenshaw, Andrew; Burtt, Noël P; Guiducci, Candace; Gupta, Namrata; Gao, Xiaojiang; Qi, Ying; Yuki, Yuko; Piechocka-Trocha, Alicja; Cutrell, Emily; Rosenberg, Rachel; Moss, Kristin L; Lemay, Paul; O'Leary, Jessica; Schaefer, Todd; Verma, Pranshu; Toth, Ildiko; Block, Brian; Baker, Brett; Rothchild, Alissa; Lian, Jeffrey; Proudfoot, Jacqueline; Alvino, Donna Marie L; Vine, Seanna; Addo, Marylyn M; Allen, Todd M; Altfeld, Marcus; Henn, Matthew R; Le Gall, Sylvie; Streeck, Hendrik; Haas, David W; Kuritzkes, Daniel R; Robbins, Gregory K; Shafer, Robert W; Gulick, Roy M; Shikuma, Cecilia M; Haubrich, Richard; Riddler, Sharon; Sax, Paul E; Daar, Eric S; Ribaudo, Heather J; Agan, Brian; Agarwal, Shanu; Ahern, Richard L; Allen, Brady L; Altidor, Sherly; Altschuler, Eric L; Ambardar, Sujata; Anastos, Kathryn; Anderson, Ben; Anderson, Val; Andrady, Ushan; Antoniskis, Diana; Bangsberg, David; Barbaro, Daniel; Barrie, William; Bartczak, J; Barton, Simon; Basden, Patricia; Basgoz, Nesli; Bazner, Suzane; Bellos, Nicholaos C; Benson, Anne M; Berger, Judith; Bernard, Nicole F; Bernard, Annette M; Birch, Christopher; Bodner, Stanley J; Bolan, Robert K; Boudreaux, Emilie T; Bradley, Meg; Braun, James F; Brndjar, Jon E; Brown, Stephen J; Brown, Katherine; Brown, Sheldon T; Burack, Jedidiah; Bush, Larry M; Cafaro, Virginia; Campbell, Omobolaji; Campbell, John; Carlson, Robert H; Carmichael, J Kevin; Casey, Kathleen K; Cavacuiti, Chris; Celestin, Gregory; Chambers, Steven T; Chez, Nancy; Chirch, Lisa M; Cimoch, Paul J; Cohen, Daniel; Cohn, Lillian E; Conway, Brian; Cooper, David A; Cornelson, Brian; Cox, David T; Cristofano, Michael V; Cuchural, George; Czartoski, Julie L; Dahman, Joseph M; Daly, Jennifer S; Davis, Benjamin T; Davis, Kristine; Davod, Sheila M; DeJesus, Edwin; Dietz, Craig A; Dunham, Eleanor; Dunn, Michael E; Ellerin, Todd B; Eron, Joseph J; Fangman, John J W; Farel, Claire E; Ferlazzo, Helen; Fidler, Sarah; Fleenor-Ford, Anita; Frankel, Renee; Freedberg, Kenneth A; French, Neel K; Fuchs, Jonathan D; Fuller, Jon D; Gaberman, Jonna; Gallant, Joel E; Gandhi, Rajesh T; Garcia, Efrain; Garmon, Donald; Gathe, Joseph C; Gaultier, Cyril R; Gebre, Wondwoosen; Gilman, Frank D; Gilson, Ian; Goepfert, Paul A; Gottlieb, Michael S; Goulston, Claudia; Groger, Richard K; Gurley, T Douglas; Haber, Stuart; Hardwicke, Robin; Hardy, W David; Harrigan, P Richard; Hawkins, Trevor N; Heath, Sonya; Hecht, Frederick M; Henry, W Keith; Hladek, Melissa; Hoffman, Robert P; Horton, James M; Hsu, Ricky K; Huhn, Gregory D; Hunt, Peter; Hupert, Mark J; Illeman, Mark L; Jaeger, Hans; Jellinger, Robert M; John, Mina; Johnson, Jennifer A; Johnson, Kristin L; Johnson, Heather; Johnson, Kay; Joly, Jennifer; Jordan, Wilbert C; Kauffman, Carol A; Khanlou, Homayoon; Killian, Robert K; Kim, Arthur Y; Kim, David D; Kinder, Clifford A; Kirchner, Jeffrey T; Kogelman, Laura; Kojic, Erna Milunka; Korthuis, P Todd; Kurisu, Wayne; Kwon, Douglas S; LaMar, Melissa; Lampiris, Harry; Lanzafame, Massimiliano; Lederman, Michael M; Lee, David M; Lee, Jean M L; Lee, Marah J; Lee, Edward T Y; Lemoine, Janice; Levy, Jay A; Llibre, Josep M; Liguori, Michael A; Little, Susan J; Liu, Anne Y; Lopez, Alvaro J; Loutfy, Mono R; Loy, Dawn; Mohammed, Debbie Y; Man, Alan; Mansour, Michael K; Marconi, Vincent C; Markowitz, Martin; Marques, Rui; Martin, Jeffrey N; Martin, Harold L; Mayer, Kenneth Hugh; McElrath, M Juliana; McGhee, Theresa A; McGovern, Barbara H; McGowan, Katherine; McIntyre, Dawn; Mcleod, Gavin X; Menezes, Prema; Mesa, Greg; Metroka, Craig E; Meyer-Olson, Dirk; Miller, Andy O; Montgomery, Kate; Mounzer, Karam C; Nagami, Ellen H; Nagin, Iris; Nahass, Ronald G; Nelson, Margret O; Nielsen, Craig; Norene, David L; O'Connor, David H; Ojikutu, Bisola O; Okulicz, Jason; Oladehin, Olakunle O; Oldfield, Edward C; Olender, Susan A; Ostrowski, Mario; Owen, William F; Pae, Eunice; Parsonnet, Jeffrey; Pavlatos, Andrew M; Perlmutter, Aaron M; Pierce, Michael N; Pincus, Jonathan M; Pisani, Leandro; Price, Lawrence Jay; Proia, Laurie; Prokesch, Richard C; Pujet, Heather Calderon; Ramgopal, Moti; Rathod, Almas; Rausch, Michael; Ravishankar, J; Rhame, Frank S

2010-11-04

369

The Major Genetic Determinants of HIV-1 Control Affect HLA Class I Peptide Presentation  

PubMed Central

Infectious and inflammatory diseases have repeatedly shown strong genetic associations within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC); however, the basis for these associations remains elusive. To define host genetic effects on the outcome of a chronic viral infection, we performed genome-wide association analysis in a multiethnic cohort of HIV-1 controllers and progressors, and we analyzed the effects of individual amino acids within the classical human leukocyte antigen (HLA) proteins. We identified >300 genome-wide significant single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the MHC and none elsewhere. Specific amino acids in the HLA-B peptide binding groove, as well as an independent HLA-C effect, explain the SNP associations and reconcile both protective and risk HLA alleles. These results implicate the nature of the HLA–viral peptide interaction as the major factor modulating durable control of HIV infection.

Pereyra, Florencia; Jia, Xiaoming; McLaren, Paul J.; Telenti, Amalio; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Walker, Bruce D.; Jia, Xiaoming; McLaren, Paul J.; Ripke, Stephan; Brumme, Chanson J.; Pulit, Sara L.; Telenti, Amalio; Carrington, Mary; Kadie, Carl M.; Carlson, Jonathan M.; Heckerman, David; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Pereyra, Florencia; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Graham, Robert R.; Plenge, Robert M.; Deeks, Steven G.; Walker, Bruce D.; Gianniny, Lauren; Crawford, Gabriel; Sullivan, Jordan; Gonzalez, Elena; Davies, Leela; Camargo, Amy; Moore, Jamie M.; Beattie, Nicole; Gupta, Supriya; Crenshaw, Andrew; Burtt, Noel P.; Guiducci, Candace; Gupta, Namrata; Carrington, Mary; Gao, Xiaojiang; Qi, Ying; Yuki, Yuko; Pereyra, Florencia; Piechocka-Trocha, Alicja; Cutrell, Emily; Rosenberg, Rachel; Moss, Kristin L.; Lemay, Paul; O'Leary, Jessica; Schaefer, Todd; Verma, Pranshu; Toth, Ildiko; Block, Brian; Baker, Brett; Rothchild, Alissa; Lian, Jeffrey; Proudfoot, Jacqueline; Alvino, Donna Marie L.; Vine, Seanna; Addo, Marylyn M.; Allen, Todd M.; Altfeld, Marcus; Henn, Matthew R.; Le Gall, Sylvie; Streeck, Hendrik; Walker, Bruce D.; Haas, David W.; Kuritzkes, Daniel R.; Robbins, Gregory K.; Shafer, Robert W.; Gulick, Roy M.; Shikuma, Cecilia M.; Haubrich, Richard; Riddler, Sharon; Sax, Paul E.; Daar, Eric S.; Ribaudo, Heather J.; Agan, Brian; Agarwal, Shanu; Ahern, Richard L.; Allen, Brady L.; Altidor, Sherly; Altschuler, Eric L.; Ambardar, Sujata; Anastos, Kathryn; Anderson, Ben; Anderson, Val; Andrady, Ushan; Antoniskis, Diana; Bangsberg, David; Barbaro, Daniel; Barrie, William; Bartczak, J.; Barton, Simon; Basden, Patricia; Basgoz, Nesli; Bazner, Suzane; Bellos, Nicholaos C.; Benson, Anne M.; Berger, Judith; Bernard, Nicole F.; Bernard, Annette M.; Birch, Christopher; Bodner, Stanley J.; Bolan, Robert K.; Boudreaux, Emilie T.; Bradley, Meg; Braun, James F.; Brndjar, Jon E.; Brown, Stephen J.; Brown, Katherine; Brown, Sheldon T.; Burack, Jedidiah; Bush, Larry M.; Cafaro, Virginia; Campbell, Omobolaji; Campbell, John; Carlson, Robert H.; Carmichael, J. Kevin; Casey, Kathleen K.; Cavacuiti, Chris; Celestin, Gregory; Chambers, Steven T.; Chez, Nancy; Chirch, Lisa M.; Cimoch, Paul J.; Cohen, Daniel; Cohn, Lillian E.; Conway, Brian; Cooper, David A.; Cornelson, Brian; Cox, David T.; Cristofano, Michael V.; Cuchural, George; Czartoski, Julie L.; Dahman, Joseph M.; Daly, Jennifer S.; Davis, Benjamin T.; Davis, Kristine; Davod, Sheila M.; Deeks, Steven G.; DeJesus, Edwin; Dietz, Craig A.; Dunham, Eleanor; Dunn, Michael E.; Ellerin, Todd B.; Eron, Joseph J.; Fangman, John J.W.; Farel, Claire E.; Ferlazzo, Helen; Fidler, Sarah; Fleenor-Ford, Anita; Frankel, Renee; Freedberg, Kenneth A.; French, Neel K.; Fuchs, Jonathan D.; Fuller, Jon D.; Gaberman, Jonna; Gallant, Joel E.; Gandhi, Rajesh T.; Garcia, Efrain; Garmon, Donald; Gathe, Joseph C.; Gaultier, Cyril R.; Gebre, Wondwoosen; Gilman, Frank D.; Gilson, Ian; Goepfert, Paul A.; Gottlieb, Michael S.; Goulston, Claudia; Groger, Richard K.; Gurley, T. Douglas; Haber, Stuart; Hardwicke, Robin; Hardy, W. David; Harrigan, P. Richard; Hawkins, Trevor N.; Heath, Sonya; Hecht, Frederick M.; Henry, W. Keith; Hladek, Melissa; Hoffman, Robert P.; Horton, James M.; Hsu, Ricky K.; Huhn, Gregory D.; Hunt, Peter; Hupert, Mark J.; Illeman, Mark L.; Jaeger, Hans; Jellinger, Robert M.; John, Mina; Johnson, Jennifer A.; Johnson, Kristin L.; Johnson, Heather; Johnson, Kay; Joly, Jennifer; Jordan, Wilbert C.; Kauffman, Carol A.; Khanlou, Homayoon; Killian, Robert K.; Kim, Arthur Y.; Kim, David D.; Kinder, Clifford A.; Kirchner, Jeffrey T.; Kogelman, Laura; Kojic, Erna Milunka; Korthuis, P. Todd; Kurisu, Wayne; Kwon, Douglas S.; LaMar, Melissa; Lampiris, Harry; Lanzafame, Massimiliano; Lederman, Michael M.; Lee, David M.; Lee, Jean M.L.; Lee, Marah J.; Lee, Edward T.Y.; Lemoine, Janice; Levy, Jay A.; Llibre, Josep M.; Liguori, Michael A.; Little, Susan J.; Liu, Anne Y.; Lopez, Alvaro J.; Loutfy, Mono R.; Loy, Dawn; Mohammed, Debbie Y.; Man, Alan; Mansour, Michael K.; Marconi, Vincent C.; Markowitz, Martin; Marques, Rui; Martin, Jeffrey N.; Martin, Harold L.; Mayer, Kenneth Hugh; McElrath, M. Juliana; McGhee, Theresa A.; McGovern, Barbara H.; McGowan, Katherine; McIntyre, Dawn; Mcleod, Gavin X.; Menezes, Prema; Mesa, Greg; Metroka, Craig E.; Meyer-Olson, Dirk; Miller, Andy O.; Montgomery, Kate; Mounzer, Karam C.; Nagami, Ellen H.; Nagin, Iris; Nahass, Ronald G.; Nelson, Margret O.; Nielsen, Craig; Norene, David L.; O'Connor, David H.; Ojikutu, Bisola O.; Okulicz, Jason; Oladehin, Olakunle O.; Oldfield, Edward C.; Olender, Susan A.

2011-01-01

370

Genetics.  

PubMed

The present state of knowledge on the genetics of anxiety disorders, in particular panic disorder, comprising clinical and molecular genetic studies, interaction analyses, as well as meta-analyses of single association studies will be presented in detail. A particular focus will be on the most robust findings in panic disorder to date in the serotonergic, noradrenergic, and dopaminergic system, such as the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene. Additionally, findings on the adenosine receptor 2A (A2A) gene, which has been reported to be associated with panic disorder and also with anxiety levels after caffeine administration in a gene--environment interactional model, will be discussed. Furthermore, the first imaging genetic findings in panic disorder, social phobia, and anxiety-related traits using fMRI and PET techniques in combination with molecular genetic association analyses are reviewed, taking into account the present intermediate phenotype discussion in the investigation of complex genetic disorders. Finally, the first exemplary pharmacogenetic studies in panic disorder and generalized social phobia will be presented. The pathomechanism of anxiety disorders and in particular panic disorder is considered to be multifactorial with converging evidence for a pivotal role of genetic factors in particular, which will be presented in detail in this chapter. PMID:21309106

Domschke, Katharina; Deckert, Jürgen

2010-01-01

371

Skeletal Muscle-Specific Genetic Determinants Contribute to the Differential Strain-Dependent Effects of Hindlimb Ischemia in Mice  

PubMed Central

Genetics plays an important role in determining peripheral arterial disease (PAD) pathology, which causes a spectrum of clinical disorders that range from clinically silent reductions in blood flow to limb-threatening ischemia. The cell-type specificity of PAD pathology, however, has received little attention. To determine whether strain-dependent differences in skeletal muscle cells might account for the differential responses to ischemia observed in C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice, endothelial and skeletal muscle cells were subjected to hypoxia and nutrient deprivation (HND) in vitro, to mimic ischemia. Muscle cells were more susceptible to HND than were endothelial cells. In vivo, C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice displayed strain-specific differences in myofiber responses after hindlimb ischemia, with significantly greater myofiber atrophy, greater apoptosis, and attenuated myogenic regulatory gene expression and stress-responsive signaling in BALB/c mice. Strain-specific deficits were recapitulated in vitro in primary muscle cells from both strains after HND. Muscle cells from BALB/c mice congenic for the C57BL/6 Lsq-1 quantitative trait locus were protected from HND-induced atrophy, and gene expression of vascular growth factors and their receptors was significantly greater in C57BL/6 primary muscle cells. Our results indicate that the previously identified specific genetic locus regulating strain-dependent collateral vessel density has a nonvascular or muscle cell-autonomous role involving both the myogenic program and traditional vascular growth factor receptor expression.

McClung, Joseph M.; McCord, Timothy J.; Keum, Sehoon; Johnson, Soraya; Annex, Brian H.; Marchuk, Douglas A.; Kontos, Christopher D.

2012-01-01

372

Lay responses to health messages about the genetic risk factors for salt sensitivity: do mass media genetic health messages result in genetic determinism?  

PubMed

Media coverage of genetics may lead to overestimation of the impact of genetics on disease development. In this study, we presented one student sample and one general public sample from the Netherlands with a general or a genetic health message (HM) about salt sensitivity. After reading the genetic (but not the general) HM, participants reported higher perceived impact of genetic versus lifestyle factors and a higher attributable fraction of genetics on disease development. Nevertheless, participants were able to recognise the balance between lifestyle and genetic risk factors in disease development. They also contextualised and restricted the message's implications to the specific information provided, and did not extrapolate these implications to other diseases. These results illustrate the nuanced understanding the general public may have concerning genetic risk factors. PMID:20677077

Smerecnik, Chris M R

2010-08-01

373

The Birds and the Bees and the Flowers and the Trees: Lessons from Genetic Mapping of Sex Determination in Plants and Animals  

PubMed Central

The ability to identify genetic markers in nonmodel systems has allowed geneticists to construct linkage maps for a diversity of species, and the sex-determining locus is often among the first to be mapped. Sex determination is an important area of study in developmental and evolutionary biology, as well as ecology. Its importance for organisms might suggest that sex determination is highly conserved. However, genetic studies have shown that sex determination mechanisms, and the genes involved, are surprisingly labile. We review studies using genetic mapping and phylogenetic inferences, which can help reveal evolutionary pattern within this lability and potentially identify the changes that have occurred among different sex determination systems. We define some of the terminology, particularly where confusion arises in writing about such a diverse range of organisms, and highlight some major differences between plants and animals, and some important similarities. We stress the importance of studying taxa suitable for testing hypotheses, and the need for phylogenetic studies directed to taxa where the patterns of changes can be most reliably inferred, if the ultimate goal of testing hypotheses regarding the selective forces that have led to changes in such an essential trait is to become feasible.

Charlesworth, Deborah; Mank, Judith E.

2010-01-01

374

Genome-wide association study identified novel genetic variant on SLC45A3 gene associated with serum levels prostate-specific antigen (PSA) in a Chinese population.  

PubMed

Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) is a commonly used cancer biomarker for prostate cancer, and is often included as part of routine physical examinations in China. Serum levels of PSA may be influenced by genetic factors as well as other factors. A genome-wide association study (GWAS) conducted in a European population successfully identified six genetic loci that were significantly associated with PSA level. In this study, we aimed to identify common genetic variants that are associated with serum level of PSA in a Chinese population. We also evaluated the effects of those variants by creating personalized PSA cutoff values. A two-stage GWAS of PSA level was performed among men age 20-69 years and self-reported cancer-free participants that underwent routine physical examinations at several hospitals in Guangxi Province, China. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) significantly associated with PSA levels in the first stage of sample (N = 1,999) were confirmed in the second stage of sample (N = 1,496). Multivariate linear regression was used to assess the independent contribution of confirmed SNPs and known covariates, such as age, to the level of PSA. SNPs in three regions were significantly associated with levels of PSA in this two-stage GWAS, and had combined P values between 4.62 × 10(-17) and 6.45 × 10(-37). The three regions are located on 1q32.1 at SLC45A3, 10q11.23 at MSMB, and 19q13.33 at KLK3. The region 1q32.1 at SLC45A3 was identified as a novel locus. Genetic variants contributed significantly more to the variance of PSA level than known covariates such as age. Personalized cutoff values of serum PSA, calculated based on the inheritance of these associated SNPs, differ considerably among individuals. Identification of these genetic markers provides new insight into the molecular mechanisms of PSA. Taking individual variation into account, these genetic variants may improve the performance of PSA to predict prostate cancer. PMID:23269536

Sun, Jielin; Tao, Sha; Gao, Yong; Peng, Tao; Tan, Aihua; Zhang, Haiying; Yang, Xiaobo; Qin, Xue; Hu, Yanling; Feng, Junjie; Kim, Seong-Tae; Lin, Xiaoling; Wu, Yongming; Zhang, Ju; Li, Zhixian; Li, Li; Mo, Linjian; Liang, Zhengjia; Shi, Deyi; Huang, Zhang; Huang, Xianghua; Liu, Ming; Liu, Qian; Zhang, Shijun; Lilly Zheng, S; Xu, Jianfeng; Mo, Zengnan

2012-12-27

375

Genetically Determined Amerindian Ancestry Correlates with Increased Frequency of Risk Alleles for Systemic Lupus Erythematosus  

PubMed Central

Objectives To analyze if genetically determined Amerindian ancestry predicts the increased presence of risk alleles of known susceptibility genes for systemic lupus erythematosus. Methods Single nucleotide polymorphisms within 16 confirmed genetic susceptibility loci for SLE were genotyped in a set of 804 Mestizo lupus patients and 667 Mestizo normal healthy controls. In addition, 347 admixture informative markers were genotyped. Individual ancestry proportions were determined using STRUCTURE. Association analysis was performed using PLINK, and correlation of the presence of risk alleles with ancestry was done using linear regression. Results A meta-analysis of the genetic association of the 16 SNPs across populations showed that TNFSF4, STAT4, PDCD1, ITGAM, and IRF5 were associated with lupus in a Hispanic-Mestizo cohort enriched for European and Amerindian ancestry. In addition, two SNPs within the MHC region, previously associated in a genome-wide association study in Europeans, were also associated in Mestizos. Using linear regression we predict an average increase of 2.34 risk alleles when comparing a lupus patient with 100% Amerindian ancestry to an SLE patient with 0% American Indian Ancestry (p<0.0001). SLE patients with 43% more Amerindian ancestry are predicted to carry one additional risk allele. Conclusion Amerindian ancestry increased the number of risk alleles for lupus.

Sanchez, E; Webb, R; Rasmussen, A.; Kelly, J.A; Riba, L.; Kaufman, K.M.; Garcia-de la Torre, I.; Moctezuma, J.F.; Maradiaga-Cecena, M.A.; Cardiel, M.; Acevedo, E.; Cucho-Venegas, M.; Garcia, M.A.; Gamron, S.; Pons-Estel, B.A.; Vasconcelos, C.; Martin, J.; Tusie-Luna, T.; Harley, J.B.; Richardson, B.; Sawalha, A.H.; Alarcon-Riquelme, M.E.

2011-01-01

376

Genome-wide association study in RPGRIP1(-/-) dogs identifies a modifier locus that determines the onset of retinal degeneration.  

PubMed

Cone-rod dystrophy (CRD) is a form of inherited retinal degeneration (RD) causing blindness in man as well as in several breeds of dog. Previously, a 44 bp insertion in RPGRIP1 (retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator interacting protein-1) was associated with a recessive early-onset CRD (cone-rod dystrophy 1, cord1) in a Miniature longhaired dachshund (MLHD) research colony. Yet in the MLHD pet population, extensive range of the onset age has been observed among RD cases, with some RPGRIP1(-/-) dogs lacking obvious clinical signs. Phenotypic variation has been known in human homologous diseases, including retinitis pigmentosa and Leber congenital amaurosis, indicating possible involvement of modifiers. To explore additional genetic loci associated with the phenotypic variation observed in MLHDs, a genome-wide association study was carried out using Canine SNP20 arrays in 83 RPGRIP1(-/-) MLHDs with variable ages of onset or no clinical abnormality. Using these samples, comparison of 31 early-onset RD cases against 49 controls (15 late-onset RD and 34 normal dogs combined) identified a strong association (P = 5.05 × 10(-13)) at a single locus on canine chromosome 15. At this locus, the majority of early-onset RD cases but few of the controls were homozygous for a 1.49 Mb interval containing ~11 genes. We conclude that homozygosity at both RPGRIP1 and the newly mapped second locus is necessary to develop early-onset RD, whereas RPGRIP1(-/-) alone leads to late-onset RD or no apparent clinical phenotype. This study establishes a unique model of canine RD requiring homozygous mutations at two distinct genetic loci for the manifestation of early-onset RD. PMID:22193413

Miyadera, Keiko; Kato, Kumiko; Boursnell, Mike; Mellersh, Cathryn S; Sargan, David R

2011-12-23

377

Genetic Variation Within Adrenergic Pathways Determines In Vivo Effects of Presynaptic Stimulation in Humans  

PubMed Central

Background Catecholamines govern stress blood pressure responses. Catecholaminergic responses may be partially genetic and contribute to the complex heritability of hypertension. Methods and Results To evaluate catecholaminergic responses without systemic counterregulation, we infused graded concentrations of tyramine, an indirect presynaptic norepinephrine releaser, into dorsal hand veins of 49 normotensive men and women of 5 ethnicities. Vascular responses were coupled to common (minor allele frequency >10%) single-nucleotide polymorphisms at adrenergic target loci within presynaptic pathways. Significance was set at P<0.003 after Bonferroni correction. Generalized analysis of molecular variance (GAMOVA) was performed to determine whether genetic admixture contributed to results. Venoconstriction progressed to 47% with increasing concentrations of tyramine (0.129 to 25.8 mmol/L; P<0.001). Family history of hypertension (P<0.001) and female sex (P=0.02) predicted blunted tyramine responses. Two genetic loci significantly predicted vascular response: chromogranin B, which encodes a protein that catalyzes catecholamine vesicle formation (CHGB, exon 4, Glu348Glu; P=0.002), and cytochrome b-561 (CYB561, intron 1, C719G; P<0.001), an electron shuttle for catecholamine synthesis. Stepwise regression suggested important effects for the CHGB locus, with polymorphisms for the vacuolar-ATPase ?-subunit (ATP6V1B1, exon 1, Ile30Thr) and flavin-containing monooxygenase-3 (FMO3, exon 3, Lys158Glu, P=0.002). GAMOVA did not show a significant relationship between overall genetic profile and hand-vein constriction (P=0.29), which indicates that population stratification did not contribute to this phenotype. Conclusions Locally infused tyramine produced dose-dependent pressor responses, predicted by family history of hypertension, sex, and genetic variants at loci, particularly CHGB, that encode the biosynthesis, storage, and metabolism of catecholamines. Such variants may influence the complex heritability of adrenergic responses and perhaps hypertension.

Fung, Maple M.; Nguyen, Carie; Mehtani, Parag; Salem, Rany M.; Perez, Brandon; Thomas, Brenda; Das, Madhusudan; Schork, Nicholas J.; Mahata, Sushil K.; Ziegler, Michael G.; O'Connor, Daniel T.

2009-01-01

378

Combination of pharmacophore hypothesis, genetic function approximation model, and molecular docking to identify novel inhibitors of S6K1.  

PubMed

S6K1 has emerged as a potential target for the treatment for obesity, type II diabetes and cancer diseases. Discovery of S6K1 inhibitors has thus attracted much attention in recent years. In this investigation, a hybrid virtual screening method that involves pharmacophore hypothesis, genetic function approximation (GFA) model, and molecular docking technology has been used to discover S6K1 inhibitors especially with novel scaffolds. The common feature pharmacophore hypothesis and GFA regression model of S6K1 inhibitors were first developed and applied in a virtual screen of the Specs database for retrieving S6K1 inhibitors. Then, the molecular docking method was carried out to re-filter these screened compounds. Finally, 60 compounds with promising S6K1 inhibitory activity were carefully selected and have been handed over to the other group to complete the follow-up compound synthesis (or purchase) and activity test. PMID:23982212

Zhang, Hui; Xiang, Ming-Li; Liang, Jun-Yu; Zeng, Tao; Zhang, Xiao-Nuo; Zhang, Ji; Yang, Sheng-Yong

2013-08-28

379

DNase SISPA-Next Generation Sequencing Confirms Schmallenberg Virus in Belgian Field Samples and Identifies Genetic Variation in Europe  

Microsoft Academic Search

In 2011, a novel Orthobunyavirus was identified in cattle and sheep in Germany and the Netherlands. This virus was named Schmallenberg virus (SBV). Later, presence of the virus was confirmed using real time RT-PCR in cases of congenital malformations of bovines and ovines in several European countries, including Belgium. In the absence of specific sequencing protocols for this novel virus

Toon Rosseel; Matthias Scheuch; Dirk Höper; Nick De Regge; Ann Brigitte Caij; Frank Vandenbussche; Steven Van Borm

2012-01-01

380

A High Through-Put Reverse Genetic Screen Identifies Two Genes Involved in Remote Memory in Mice  

Microsoft Academic Search

Previous studies have revealed that the initial stages of memory formation require several genes involved in synaptic, transcriptional and translational mechanisms. In contrast, very little is known about the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying later stages of memory, including remote memory (i.e. 7-day memory). To identify genes required for remote memory, we screened randomly selected mouse strains harboring known mutations.

Anna Matynia; Stephan G. Anagnostaras; Brian J. Wiltgen; Maress Lacuesta; Michael S. Fanselow; Alcino J. Silva

2008-01-01