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Sample records for identifying genetic determinants

  1. Identifying genetic determinants needed to establish a human gut symbiont in its habitat

    E-print Network

    Mitra, Rob

    Identifying genetic determinants needed to establish a human gut symbiont in its habitat Andrew L, plus their viruses. The density of organisms occupying this habitat is astonishing, exceeding 1012 in determining fitness in this habitat. The paucity of tools is unfortunate, as fundamental questions connecting

  2. Sugarcane brown rust – determining genetic variation in the pathogen and identifying potential novel sources of resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A major reason for the withdrawal of sugarcane cultivars from production in is the breakdown of resistance to brown rust caused by Puccinia melanaocephala. Genetic characterization of diversity among races of P. melanocephala would help in breeding for resistance to the pathogen. Breeding for durabl...

  3. Yeast functional screen to identify genetic determinants capable of conferring abiotic stress tolerance in Jatropha curcas

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Environmentally inflicted stresses such as salinity and drought limit the plant productivity both in natural and agricultural system. Increasing emphasis has been directed to molecular breeding strategies to enhance the intrinsic ability of plant to survive stress conditions. Functional screens in microorganisms with heterologous genes are a rapid, effective and powerful tool to identify stress tolerant genes in plants. Jatropha curcas (Physic nut) has been identified as a potential source of biodiesel plant. In order to improve its productivity under stress conditions to benefit commercial plantations, we initiated prospecting of novel genes expressed during stress in J. curcas that can be utilized to enhance stress tolerance ability of plant. Results To identify genes expressed during salt tolerance, cDNA expression libraries were constructed from salt-stressed roots of J. curcas, regulated under the control of the yeast GAL1 system. Using a replica based screening, twenty thousand yeast transformants were screened to identify transformants expressing heterologous gene sequences from J. curcas with enhanced ability to tolerate stress. From the screen we obtained 32 full length genes from J. curcas [GenBank accession numbers FJ489601-FJ489611, FJ619041-FJ619057 and FJ623457-FJ623460] that can confer abiotic stress tolerance. As a part of this screen, we optimized conditions for salt stress in J. curcas, defined parameters for salt stress in yeast, as well as isolated three salt hypersensitive yeast strains shs-2, shs-6 and shs-8 generated through a process of random mutagenesis, and exhibited growth retardation beyond 750 mM NaCl. Further, we demonstrated complementation of the salt sensitive phenotypes in the shs mutants, and analyzed the expression patterns for selected J. curcas genes obtained from the screen in both leaf and root tissues after salt stress treatments. Conclusions The approach described in this report provides a rapid and universal assay system for large scale screening of genes for varied abiotic stress tolerance within a short span of time. Using this screening strategy we could isolate both genes with previously known function in stress tolerance as well as novel sequences with yet unknown function in salt stress tolerance from J. curcas. The isolated genes could be over-expressed using plant expression system to generate and evaluate transgenic plants for stress tolerance as well as be used as markers for breeding salt stress tolerance in plants. PMID:20302659

  4. Genetic modification and genetic determinism

    PubMed Central

    Resnik, David B; Vorhaus, Daniel B

    2006-01-01

    In this article we examine four objections to the genetic modification of human beings: the freedom argument, the giftedness argument, the authenticity argument, and the uniqueness argument. We then demonstrate that each of these arguments against genetic modification assumes a strong version of genetic determinism. Since these strong deterministic assumptions are false, the arguments against genetic modification, which assume and depend upon these assumptions, are therefore unsound. Serious discussion of the morality of genetic modification, and the development of sound science policy, should be driven by arguments that address the actual consequences of genetic modification for individuals and society, not by ones propped up by false or misleading biological assumptions. PMID:16800884

  5. Genetic determinants of cognitive responses to caffeine drinking identified from a double-blind, randomized, controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Renda, Giulia; Committeri, Giorgia; Zimarino, Marco; Di Nicola, Marta; Tatasciore, Alfonso; Ruggieri, Benedetta; Ambrosini, Ettore; Viola, Vanda; Antonucci, Ivana; Stuppia, Liborio; De Caterina, Raffaele

    2015-06-01

    The widely observed between-subject variability in cognitive responses to coffee may have a genetic basis. We evaluated cognitive responses to caffeine throughout three complex cognitive tasks assessing different subdomains of attention, namely Alerting and Orienting (Categorical Search Task) and Executive Control (Stroop Task and Eriksen Flanker Task). We explored whether they are influenced by gene variants affecting adenosine metabolism or catecholamine receptors. We recruited 106 healthy male subjects who were administered, in a double-blind design, 40mL of either a decaffeinated coffee preparation plus 3mg/kg caffeine (caf) or the corresponding vehicle (decaf). The protocol was repeated 24h later with the alternative preparation. Cognitive tasks were performed between 30min and 2h after caf or decaf administration. Each subject underwent ambulatory blood pressure monitoring for 2h. Blood samples were collected for genetic evaluations and for plasma caffeine and catecholamines measures. We found a significant reduction of reaction times in two of the cognitive tasks (Categorical Search Task and Stroop Task) after caf compared with decaf, indicating that caffeine, on average, improved the attention level in the domains under investigation. We also found, however, a great inter-individual variability in the cognitive performance responses to caffeine. In exploring genetic sources for such variability, we found a relation between polymorphisms of adenosine A2A and the caffeine effects on the attentional domains of Orienting and Executive control. In conclusion, variability in the attentional response to coffee may be partly explained by genetic polymorphisms of adenosine and adrenergic receptors. PMID:25819143

  6. Genetic determinants of plasma triglycerides

    PubMed Central

    Johansen, Christopher T.; Kathiresan, Sekar; Hegele, Robert A.

    2011-01-01

    Plasma triglyceride (TG) concentration is reemerging as an important cardiovascular disease risk factor. More complete understanding of the genes and variants that modulate plasma TG should enable development of markers for risk prediction, diagnosis, prognosis, and response to therapies and might help specify new directions for therapeutic interventions. Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified both known and novel loci associated with plasma TG concentration. However, genetic variation at these loci explains only ?10% of overall TG variation within the population. As the GWAS approach may be reaching its limit for discovering genetic determinants of TG, alternative genetic strategies, such as rare variant sequencing studies and evaluation of animal models, may provide complementary information to flesh out knowledge of clinically and biologically important pathways in TG metabolism. Herein, we review genes recently implicated in TG metabolism and describe how some of these genes likely modulate plasma TG concentration. We also discuss lessons regarding plasma TG metabolism learned from various genomic and genetic experimental approaches. Treatment of patients with moderate to severe hypertriglyceridemia with existing therapies is often challenging; thus, gene products and pathways found in recent genetic research studies provide hope for development of more effective clinical strategies. PMID:21041806

  7. Eggplant and related species are promising genetic resources to dissect the plant immune response to Pseudomonas syringae and Xanthomonas euvesicatoria and to identify new resistance determinants.

    PubMed

    Clarke, Christopher R; Hayes, Byron W; Runde, Brendan J; Wicker, Emmanuel; Vinatzer, Boris A

    2014-10-01

    The apparent lack of durability of many resistance (R) genes highlights the need for the constant identification of new genetic sources of resistance for the breeding of new disease-resistant crop cultivars. To this end, we screened a collection of accessions of eggplant and close relatives for resistance against Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pto) and Xanthomonas euvesicatoria (Xeu), foliar plant pathogens of many solanaceous crops. Both pathogens caused substantial disease on most genotypes of eggplant and its relatives. Promisingly, however, some of the genotypes were fully or partially resistant to either of the pathogens, suggesting the presence of effective resistance determinants in these genotypes. Segregation of resistance to the growth of Xeu following infiltration in F2 progeny from a cross of a resistant and susceptible genotype suggests that resistance to Xeu is inherited as a multigenic trait. With regard to Pto, a mutant strain lacking all 28 functional type III secreted effectors, and a Pseudomonas fluorescens strain expressing a P.?syringae type III secretion system (T3SS), both elicit a strong cell death response on most eggplant lines. Several genotypes thus appear to harbour a mechanism for the direct recognition of a component of the T3SS. Therefore, eggplant and its close relatives are promising resources to unravel novel aspects of plant immunity and to identify new candidate R genes that could be employed in other Solanaceae in which Xeu and Pto cause agriculturally relevant diseases. PMID:24684604

  8. Genetic determinants of athletic performance.

    PubMed

    Stephan, Dietrich A

    2012-12-01

    An extraordinary revolution in medical research has taken place over the past decade, enabled by the completion of the first human genome sequence in 2001. The Human Genome Project (HGP) has resulted in the 6 billion letter reference human genome sequence and the ultra-high throughput technologies used by medical researchers to identify correlations between positions within the human genome (genotypes) and diseases or traits (phenotypes). Just as every human disease has a genetic component, so too does every human trait. The vast majority of these diseases and traits also have an environmental component that works in conjunction with the body's hardwiring to produce the resultant phenotype- termed "complex genetic traits". A derivative of the HGP has been a deeper understanding not only of diseases but of normal human variability across the population, including aspects of athleticism. The technologies also now exist for consumers to cheaply gain access to variations in the genetic code that are correlated to traits that confer aspects of longevity, memory performance, athleticism and a multitude of others there-through gaining insight into propensities. Communication of propensity to a phenotype such as athletic performance is fraught with technical, legal (e.g., patents), social and ethical issues. That being said, the information is available, has benefit in some cases, and will be utilized in the future. Given that the "genie is out of the bottle" with respect to our ability to deliver this genetic information to individuals, over the past decade our team has worked diligently to craft the appropriate testing and communication paradigms for complex traits. Here we discuss several of the major risks and benefits of this type of testing for athletic performance. It is important to understand the limitations of genetic information in determining the vast majority of traits. PMID:22827596

  9. Genetic Marker Identified for Aggressive Bladder Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Researchers led by Ludmila Prokunina-Olsson, Ph.D., in DCEG's Laboratory of Translational Genomics, have identified the first genetic variant associated with risk of aggressive bladder cancer. The variant, rs7257330, is in the promoter region of the CCNE1 gene, which encodes for cyclin E protein, a cell cycle regulator. This result comes from a fine-mapping analysis of data from two bladder cancer genome-wide association studies and functional studies.

  10. Genetically Determined Height and Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, C.P.; Hamby, S.E.; Saleheen, D.; Hopewell, J.C.; Zeng, L.; Assimes, T.L.; Kanoni, S.; Willenborg, C.; Burgess, S.; Amouyel, P.; Anand, S.; Blankenberg, S.; Boehm, B.O.; Clarke, R.J.; Collins, R.; Dedoussis, G.; Farrall, M.; Franks, P.W.; Groop, L.; Hall, A.S.; Hamsten, A.; Hengstenberg, C.; Hovingh, G. Kees; Ingelsson, E.; Kathiresan, S.; Kee, F.; König, I.R.; Kooner, J.; Lehtimäki, T.; März, W.; McPherson, R.; Metspalu, A.; Nieminen, M.S.; O’Donnell, C.J.; Palmer, C.N.A.; Peters, A.; Perola, M.; Reilly, M.P.; Ripatti, S.; Roberts, R.; Salomaa, V.; Shah, S.H.; Schreiber, S.; Siegbahn, A.; Thorsteinsdottir, U.; Veronesi, G.; Wareham, N.; Willer, C.J.; Zalloua, P.A.; Erdmann, J.; Deloukas, P.; Watkins, H.; Schunkert, H.; Danesh, J.; Thompson, J.R.; Samani, N.J.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The nature and underlying mechanisms of an inverse association between adult height and the risk of coronary artery disease (CAD) are unclear. METHODS We used a genetic approach to investigate the association between height and CAD, using 180 height-associated genetic variants. We tested the association between a change in genetically determined height of 1 SD (6.5 cm) with the risk of CAD in 65,066 cases and 128,383 controls. Using individual-level genotype data from 18,249 persons, we also examined the risk of CAD associated with the presence of various numbers of height-associated alleles. To identify putative mechanisms, we analyzed whether genetically determined height was associated with known cardiovascular risk factors and performed a pathway analysis of the height-associated genes. RESULTS We observed a relative increase of 13.5% (95% confidence interval [CI], 5.4 to 22.1; P<0.001) in the risk of CAD per 1-SD decrease in genetically determined height. There was a graded relationship between the presence of an increased number of height-raising variants and a reduced risk of CAD (odds ratio for height quartile 4 versus quartile 1, 0.74; 95% CI, 0.68 to 0.84; P<0.001). Of the 12 risk factors that we studied, we observed significant associations only with levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglycerides (accounting for approximately 30% of the association). We identified several overlapping pathways involving genes associated with both development and atherosclerosis. CONCLUSIONS There is a primary association between a genetically determined shorter height and an increased risk of CAD, a link that is partly explained by the association between shorter height and an adverse lipid profile. Shared biologic processes that determine achieved height and the development of atherosclerosis may explain some of the association. PMID:25853659

  11. Genetic markers cannot determine Jewish descent

    PubMed Central

    Falk, Raphael

    2015-01-01

    Humans differentiate, classify, and discriminate: social interaction is a basic property of human Darwinian evolution. Presumably inherent differential physical as well as behavioral properties have always been criteria for identifying friend or foe. Yet, biological determinism is a relatively modern term, and scientific racism is, oddly enough, largely a consequence or a product of the Age of Enlightenment and the establishment of the notion of human equality. In recent decades ever-increasing efforts and ingenuity were invested in identifying Biblical Israelite genotypic common denominators by analysing an assortment of phenotypes, like facial patterns, blood types, diseases, DNA-sequences, and more. It becomes overwhelmingly clear that although Jews maintained detectable vertical genetic continuity along generations of socio-religious-cultural relationship, also intensive horizontal genetic relations were maintained both between Jewish communities and with the gentile surrounding. Thus, in spite of considerable consanguinity, there is no Jewish genotype to identify. PMID:25653666

  12. Genetic determinants of voluntary exercise

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Scott A.; Pomp, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Variation in voluntary exercise behavior is an important determinant of long-term human health. Increased physical activity is used as a preventative measure or therapeutic intervention for disease, and a sedentary lifestyle has generally been viewed as unhealthy. Predisposition to engage in voluntary activity is heritable and induces protective metabolic changes, but its complex genetic/genomic architecture has only recently begun to emerge. We first present a brief historical perspective and summary of the known benefits of voluntary exercise. Second, we describe human and mouse model studies using genomic and transcriptomic approaches to reveal the genetic architecture of exercise. Third, we discuss the merging of genomic information and physiological observations, revealing systems and networks that lead to a more complete mechanistic understanding of how exercise protects against disease pathogenesis. Finally, we explore potential regulation of physical activity through epigenetic mechanisms, including those that persist across multiple generations. PMID:23351966

  13. Genetic Essentialism: On the Deceptive Determinism of DNA

    PubMed Central

    Dar-Nimrod, Ilan; Heine, Steven J.

    2012-01-01

    This paper introduces the notion of genetic essentialist biases: cognitive biases associated with essentialist thinking that are elicited when people encounter arguments that genes are relevant for a behavior, condition, or social group. Learning about genetic attributions for various human conditions leads to a particular set of thoughts regarding those conditions: they are more likely to be perceived as a) immutable and determined, b) having a specific etiology, c) homogeneous and discrete, and, d) natural, which can lead to the naturalistic fallacy. There are rare cases of “strong genetic explanation” when such responses to genetic attributions may be appropriate, however people tend to over-weigh genetic attributions compared with competing attributions even in cases of “weak genetic explanation,” which are far more common. Research on people’s understanding of race, gender, sexual orientation, criminality, mental illness and obesity is reviewed through a genetic essentialism lens, highlighting attitudinal, cognitive and behavioral changes that stem from consideration of genetic attributions as bases of these categories. Scientists and media portrayals of genetic discoveries are discussed with respect to genetic essentialism, as is the role that genetic essentialism has played (and continues to play) in various public policies, legislation, scientific endeavors, and ideological movements in recent history. Last, moderating factors and interventions to reduce the magnitude of genetic essentialism are discussed that identify promising directions to explore in order to reduce these biases. PMID:21142350

  14. nature genetics advance online publication 1 Identifying regulatory networks by

    E-print Network

    Church, George M.

    article nature genetics · advance online publication 1 Identifying regulatory networks the combinatorial nature of transcription, a well-established phe- nomenon in eukaryotes. Here we describe a new­11 does not explicitly address the combinatorial nature of transcriptional regulation. Here, however, we

  15. Genetic Determinants of Phosphate Response in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Bergwitz, Clemens; Wee, Mark J.; Sinha, Sumi; Huang, Joanne; DeRobertis, Charles; Mensah, Lawrence B.; Cohen, Jonathan; Friedman, Adam; Kulkarni, Meghana; Hu, Yanhui; Vinayagam, Arunachalam; Schnall-Levin, Michael; Berger, Bonnie; Perkins, Lizabeth A.; Mohr, Stephanie E.; Perrimon, Norbert

    2013-01-01

    Phosphate is required for many important cellular processes and having too little phosphate or too much can cause disease and reduce life span in humans. However, the mechanisms underlying homeostatic control of extracellular phosphate levels and cellular effects of phosphate are poorly understood. Here, we establish Drosophila melanogaster as a model system for the study of phosphate effects. We found that Drosophila larval development depends on the availability of phosphate in the medium. Conversely, life span is reduced when adult flies are cultured on high phosphate medium or when hemolymph phosphate is increased in flies with impaired Malpighian tubules. In addition, RNAi-mediated inhibition of MAPK-signaling by knockdown of Ras85D, phl/D-Raf or Dsor1/MEK affects larval development, adult life span and hemolymph phosphate, suggesting that some in vivo effects involve activation of this signaling pathway by phosphate. To identify novel genetic determinants of phosphate responses, we used Drosophila hemocyte-like cultured cells (S2R+) to perform a genome-wide RNAi screen using MAPK activation as the readout. We identified a number of candidate genes potentially important for the cellular response to phosphate. Evaluation of 51 genes in live flies revealed some that affect larval development, adult life span and hemolymph phosphate levels. PMID:23520455

  16. Identifying Common Genetic Risk Factors of Diabetic Neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Witzel, Ini-Isabée; Jelinek, Herbert F.; Khalaf, Kinda; Lee, Sungmun; Khandoker, Ahsan H.; Alsafar, Habiba

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a global public health problem of epidemic proportions, with 60–70% of affected individuals suffering from associated neurovascular complications that act on multiple organ systems. The most common and clinically significant neuropathies of T2DM include uremic neuropathy, peripheral neuropathy, and cardiac autonomic neuropathy. These conditions seriously impact an individual’s quality of life and significantly increase the risk of morbidity and mortality. Although advances in gene sequencing technologies have identified several genetic variants that may regulate the development and progression of T2DM, little is known about whether or not the variants are involved in disease progression and how these genetic variants are associated with diabetic neuropathy specifically. Significant missing heritability data and complex disease etiologies remain to be explained. This article is the first to provide a review of the genetic risk variants implicated in the diabetic neuropathies and to highlight potential commonalities. We thereby aim to contribute to the creation of a genetic-metabolic model that will help to elucidate the cause of diabetic neuropathies, evaluate a patient’s risk profile, and ultimately facilitate preventative and targeted treatment for the individual. PMID:26074879

  17. Unconventional P-35S sequence identified in genetically modified maize.

    PubMed

    Al-Hmoud, Nisreen; Al-Husseini, Nawar; Ibrahim-Alobaide, Mohammed A; Kübler, Eric; Farfoura, Mahmoud; Alobydi, Hytham; Al-Rousan, Hiyam

    2014-01-01

    The Cauliflower Mosaic Virus 35S promoter sequence, CaMV P-35S, is one of several commonly used genetic targets to detect genetically modified maize and is found in most GMOs. In this research we report the finding of an alternative P-35S sequence and its incidence in GM maize marketed in Jordan. The primer pair normally used to amplify a 123 bp DNA fragment of the CaMV P-35S promoter in GMOs also amplified a previously undetected alternative sequence of CaMV P-35S in GM maize samples which we term V3. The amplified V3 sequence comprises 386 base pairs and was not found in the standard wild-type maize, MON810 and MON 863 GM maize. The identified GM maize samples carrying the V3 sequence were found free of CaMV when compared with CaMV infected brown mustard sample. The data of sequence alignment analysis of the V3 genetic element showed 90% similarity with the matching P-35S sequence of the cauliflower mosaic virus isolate CabbB-JI and 99% similarity with matching P-35S sequences found in several binary plant vectors, of which the binary vector locus JQ693018 is one example. The current study showed an increase of 44% in the incidence of the identified 386 bp sequence in GM maize sold in Jordan's markets during the period 2009 and 2012. PMID:24495911

  18. A forward genetic screen identifies erythrocyte CD55 as essential for Plasmodium falciparum invasion **

    PubMed Central

    Egan, Elizabeth S.; Jiang, Rays H.Y.; Moechtar, Mischka A.; Barteneva, Natasha S.; Weekes, Michael P.; Nobre, Luis V.; Gygi, Steven P.; Paulo, Joao A.; Frantzreb, Charles; Tani, Yoshihiko; Takahashi, Junko; Watanabe, Seishi; Goldberg, Jonathan; Paul, Aditya S.; Brugnara, Carlo; Root, David E.; Wiegand, Roger C.; Doench, John G.; Duraisingh, Manoj T.

    2015-01-01

    Efforts to identify host determinants for malaria have been hindered by the absence of a nucleus in erythrocytes, precluding genetic manipulation in the cell where the parasite replicates. We used cultured red blood cells derived from hematopoietic stem cells to carry out a forward genetic screen for Plasmodium falciparum host determinants. We found that CD55 is an essential host factor for P. falciparum invasion. CD55-null erythrocytes were refractory to invasion by all isolates of P. falciparum because parasites failed to attach properly to the erythrocyte surface. Thus, CD55 is an attractive target for the development of malaria therapeutics. Hematopoietic stem cell-based forward genetic screens may be valuable for the identification of additional host determinants of malaria pathogenesis. PMID:25954012

  19. Identifying Interacting Genetic Variations by Fish-Swarm Logic Regression

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Aiyuan; Yan, Chunxia; Zhu, Feng; Zhao, Zhongmeng; Cao, Zhi

    2013-01-01

    Understanding associations between genotypes and complex traits is a fundamental problem in human genetics. A major open problem in mapping phenotypes is that of identifying a set of interacting genetic variants, which might contribute to complex traits. Logic regression (LR) is a powerful multivariant association tool. Several LR-based approaches have been successfully applied to different datasets. However, these approaches are not adequate with regard to accuracy and efficiency. In this paper, we propose a new LR-based approach, called fish-swarm logic regression (FSLR), which improves the logic regression process by incorporating swarm optimization. In our approach, a school of fish agents are conducted in parallel. Each fish agent holds a regression model, while the school searches for better models through various preset behaviors. A swarm algorithm improves the accuracy and the efficiency by speeding up the convergence and preventing it from dropping into local optimums. We apply our approach on a real screening dataset and a series of simulation scenarios. Compared to three existing LR-based approaches, our approach outperforms them by having lower type I and type II error rates, being able to identify more preset causal sites, and performing at faster speeds. PMID:23984382

  20. Using Epidemiological Models and Genetic Selection to Identify Theoretical Opportunities to Reduce Disease Impact

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Selection for disease resistance is a contemporary topic with developing approaches for genetic improvement. Merging the sciences of genetic selection and epidemiology is essential to identify selection schemes to enhance disease resistance. Epidemiological models can identify theoretical opportuni...

  1. An interactive resource to identify cancer genetic and lineage dependencies targeted by small molecules

    Cancer.gov

    Published on Office of Cancer Genomics (http://ocg.cancer.gov) Home > An interactive resource to identify cancer genetic and lineage dependencies targeted by small molecules An interactive resource to identify cancer genetic and lineage dependencies

  2. An interactive resource to identify cancer genetic and lineage dependencies targeted by small molecules

    Cancer.gov

    Published on Office of Cancer Genomics (https://ocg.cancer.gov) Home > An interactive resource to identify cancer genetic and lineage dependencies targeted by small molecules An interactive resource to identify cancer genetic and lineage dependencies

  3. Genetically identified spinal interneurons integrating tactile afferents for motor control.

    PubMed

    Bui, Tuan V; Stifani, Nicolas; Panek, Izabela; Farah, Carl

    2015-12-01

    Our movements are shaped by our perception of the world as communicated by our senses. Perception of sensory information has been largely attributed to cortical activity. However, a prior level of sensory processing occurs in the spinal cord. Indeed, sensory inputs directly project to many spinal circuits, some of which communicate with motor circuits within the spinal cord. Therefore, the processing of sensory information for the purpose of ensuring proper movements is distributed between spinal and supraspinal circuits. The mechanisms underlying the integration of sensory information for motor control at the level of the spinal cord have yet to be fully described. Recent research has led to the characterization of spinal neuron populations that share common molecular identities. Identification of molecular markers that define specific populations of spinal neurons is a prerequisite to the application of genetic techniques devised to both delineate the function of these spinal neurons and their connectivity. This strategy has been used in the study of spinal neurons that receive tactile inputs from sensory neurons innervating the skin. As a result, the circuits that include these spinal neurons have been revealed to play important roles in specific aspects of motor function. We describe these genetically identified spinal neurons that integrate tactile information and the contribution of these studies to our understanding of how tactile information shapes motor output. Furthermore, we describe future opportunities that these circuits present for shedding light on the neural mechanisms of tactile processing. PMID:26445867

  4. DAWN: a framework to identify autism genes and subnetworks using gene expression and genetics

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background De novo loss-of-function (dnLoF) mutations are found twofold more often in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) probands than their unaffected siblings. Multiple independent dnLoF mutations in the same gene implicate the gene in risk and hence provide a systematic, albeit arduous, path forward for ASD genetics. It is likely that using additional non-genetic data will enhance the ability to identify ASD genes. Methods To accelerate the search for ASD genes, we developed a novel algorithm, DAWN, to model two kinds of data: rare variations from exome sequencing and gene co-expression in the mid-fetal prefrontal and motor-somatosensory neocortex, a critical nexus for risk. The algorithm casts the ensemble data as a hidden Markov random field in which the graph structure is determined by gene co-expression and it combines these interrelationships with node-specific observations, namely gene identity, expression, genetic data and the estimated effect on risk. Results Using currently available genetic data and a specific developmental time period for gene co-expression, DAWN identified 127 genes that plausibly affect risk, and a set of likely ASD subnetworks. Validation experiments making use of published targeted resequencing results demonstrate its efficacy in reliably predicting ASD genes. DAWN also successfully predicts known ASD genes, not included in the genetic data used to create the model. Conclusions Validation studies demonstrate that DAWN is effective in predicting ASD genes and subnetworks by leveraging genetic and gene expression data. The findings reported here implicate neurite extension and neuronal arborization as risks for ASD. Using DAWN on emerging ASD sequence data and gene expression data from other brain regions and tissues would likely identify novel ASD genes. DAWN can also be used for other complex disorders to identify genes and subnetworks in those disorders. PMID:24602502

  5. Transcriptomic classification of genetically engineered mouse models of breast cancer identifies human subtype counterparts

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Human breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease consisting of multiple molecular subtypes. Genetically engineered mouse models are a useful resource for studying mammary cancers in vivo under genetically controlled and immune competent conditions. Identifying murine models with conserved human tumor features will facilitate etiology determinations, highlight the effects of mutations on pathway activation, and should improve preclinical drug testing. Results Transcriptomic profiles of 27 murine models of mammary carcinoma and normal mammary tissue were determined using gene expression microarrays. Hierarchical clustering analysis identified 17 distinct murine subtypes. Cross-species analyses using three independent human breast cancer datasets identified eight murine classes that resemble specific human breast cancer subtypes. Multiple models were associated with human basal-like tumors including TgC3(1)-Tag, TgWAP-Myc and Trp53-/-. Interestingly, the TgWAPCre-Etv6 model mimicked the HER2-enriched subtype, a group of human tumors without a murine counterpart in previous comparative studies. Gene signature analysis identified hundreds of commonly expressed pathway signatures between linked mouse and human subtypes, highlighting potentially common genetic drivers of tumorigenesis. Conclusions This study of murine models of breast carcinoma encompasses the largest comprehensive genomic dataset to date to identify human-to-mouse disease subtype counterparts. Our approach illustrates the value of comparisons between species to identify murine models that faithfully mimic the human condition and indicates that multiple genetically engineered mouse models are needed to represent the diversity of human breast cancers. The reported trans-species associations should guide model selection during preclinical study design to ensure appropriate representatives of human disease subtypes are used. PMID:24220145

  6. Genetic Determinants of P Wave Duration and PR Segment

    PubMed Central

    Verweij, Niek; Leach, Irene Mateo; van den Boogaard, Malou; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Christoffels, Vincent M.; Hillege, Hans L.; van Gilst, Wiek H.; Barnett, Phil; de Boer, Rudolf A.; van der Harst, Pim

    2014-01-01

    Background The PR interval on the electrocardiogram reflects atrial depolarization and AV nodal delay which can be partially differentiated by P wave duration and PR segment, respectively. GWAS have identified a number of genetic loci for PR interval but it remains to be determined whether this is driven by P wave duration, PR segment or both. Methods and Results We replicated 7 of the 9 known PR interval loci in 16,468 individuals of European ancestry. Four loci were unambiguously associated with PR segment while the others were shared for P wave duration and PR segment. Next, we performed a genome-wide analysis on P wave duration and PR segment separately and identified five novel loci. SNPs in KCND3 (P=8.3×10?11) and FADS2 (P=2.7×10?8) were associated with P wave duration, whereas SNPs near IL17D (P=2.3×10?8), in EFHA1 (P=3.3×10?10) and LRCH1 (P=2.1×10?8) were associated with PR segment. Analysis on DNA elements indicated that genome-wide significant SNPs were enriched at genomic regions suggesting active gene transcription in the human right atrium. Quantitative-PCR showed that genes were significantly higher expressed in the right atrium and AV-node compared to left ventricle (P=5.6×10?6). Conclusions Genetic associations of PR interval appear to be mainly driven by genetic determinants of the PR segment. Some of the PR interval associations are strengthened by a directional consistent effect of genetic determinants of P wave duration. Through genome-wide association we also identified genetic variants specifically associated with P wave duration which might be relevant for cardiac biology. PMID:24850809

  7. Alphaviruses: Population genetics and determinants of emergence

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, Scott C.; Winegar, Richard; Manger, Ian D.; Forrester, Naomi L.

    2013-01-01

    Alphaviruses are responsible for several medically important emerging diseases and are also significant veterinary pathogens. Due to the aerosol infectivity of some alphaviruses and their ability to cause severe, sometimes fatal neurologic diseases, they are also of biodefense importance. This review discusses the ecology, epidemiology and molecular virology of the alphaviruses, then focuses on three of the most important members of the genus: Venezuelan and eastern equine encephalitis and chikungunya viruses, with emphasis on their genetics and emergence mechanisms, and how current knowledge as well as gaps influence our ability to detect and determine the source of both natural outbreaks and potential use for bioterrorism. This article is one of a series in Antiviral Research on the genetic diversity of emerging viruses. PMID:22522323

  8. Sex determination: where environment and genetics meet.

    PubMed

    Crews, David

    2003-01-01

    In mammals and birds the genetic constitution established at the time of fertilization determines the type of gonad that develops, whereas in all crocodilians and many turtles it is the temperature experienced during the mid-trimester of embryogenesis that initiates gonadal differentiation. Research with the red-eared slider suggests considerable conservation in the genetic cascades that underlie the sex determination process in vertebrates and, further, that the patterns of expression of these genes appear to reflect phylogenetic relationships, with turtles being more similar to mammals than they are to birds and crocodilians. After the determination and differentiation of an individual's gonadal sex, epigenetic forces shape those morphological, physiological, and behavioral traits that characterize each individual's unique sexuality. Research with the leopard gecko thus relates to the fundamental question of what factors determine individual variability, particularly as it relates to sexually dimorphic behaviors. Taken together, this research illustrates how sexuality depends on sex, but sex should not be confused with sexuality. That is, sex is merely a means of categorizing individuals or gonads, whereas sexuality serves as a descriptor of concordant traits each of which is typically sexually dimorphic in its expression. PMID:12492409

  9. Genetic lineage tracing identifies in situ Kit-expressing cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qiaozhen; Yang, Rui; Huang, Xiuzhen; Zhang, Hui; He, Lingjuan; Zhang, Libo; Tian, Xueying; Nie, Yu; Hu, Shengshou; Yan, Yan; Zhang, Li; Qiao, Zengyong; Wang, Qing-Dong; Lui, Kathy O; Zhou, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac cells marked by c-Kit or Kit, dubbed cardiac stem cells (CSCs), are in clinical trials to investigate their ability to stimulate cardiac regeneration and repair. These studies were initially motivated by the purported cardiogenic activity of these cells. Recent lineage tracing studies using Kit promoter to drive expression of the inducible Cre recombinase showed that these CSCs had highly limited cardiogenic activity, inadequate to support efficient cardiac repair. Here we reassess the lineage tracing data by investigating the identity of cells immediately after Cre labeling. Our instant lineage tracing approach identifies Kit-expressing cardiomyocytes, which are labeled immediately after tamoxifen induction. In combination with long-term lineage tracing experiments, these data reveal that the large majority of long-term labeled cardiomyocytes are pre-existing Kit-expressing cardiomyocytes rather than cardiomyocytes formed de novo from CSCs. This study presents a new interpretation for the contribution of Kit(+) cells to cardiomyocytes and shows that Kit genetic lineage tracing over-estimates the cardiogenic activity of Kit(+) CSCs. PMID:26634606

  10. Genetic determinants of dietary antioxidant status.

    PubMed

    Da Costa, Laura A; García-Bailo, Bibiana; Badawi, Alaa; El-Sohemy, Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative stress refers to a physiological state in which an imbalance between pro-oxidants and antioxidants results in oxidative damage. Oxidative stress has been associated with the development of numerous chronic diseases such as type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease (CVD), osteoporosis, and cancer. Endogenous production of free radicals occurs during normal physiological processes, such as aerobic metabolism, oxidation of biological molecules, and enzymatic activity. Environmental factors such as ultraviolet radiation, air pollution, and cigarette smoking can also contribute to the accumulation of free radicals in the body. Excess free radicals can damage tissues and promote the upregulation of disease-related pathways such as inflammation. Modulating oxidative stress by dietary supplementation with antioxidant micronutrients such as vitamins C and E or phytochemicals such as different carotenoids may help prevent or delay the development of certain diseases. However, research on antioxidant supplementation and disease has yielded inconsistent findings, which may be due, in part, to interindividual genetic variation. Polymorphisms in genes coding for endogenous antioxidant enzymes or proteins responsible for the absorption, transport, distribution, or metabolism of dietary antioxidants have been shown to affect antioxidant status and response to supplementation. These genetic variants may also interact with environmental factors, such as diet, to determine an individual's overall antioxidant status. This chapter examines current knowledge of the relationship between genetic variation and dietary antioxidant status. PMID:22656378

  11. Optical Constants Determined by Genetic Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, David Y.; Karstens, William; Malghani, Shaheen M.

    2005-03-01

    A recent determination^a of the complex refractive index, n(?) + i ?(?), of porous silicon employed a genetic^b algorithm to fit the Fresnel equations to reflectance spectra. The procedure appeared to involve more unknowns than explicit equations available for fitting, an indeterminate problem. However, the index values obtained were reasonable, and predicted the properties of porous-silicon multilayes. We have traced this success to the interpolation formulas used for n and ? in the fitting algorithm. They amount to an implicit optical-constant model with the de facto assumption of an analytic complex index that can be approximated by a cubic polynomial. Our analysis suggests the procedure can be improved by explicitly using a more appropriate model, e.g., one that uses wave number as the expansion variable and requires that n and ? be even and odd functions of ?, respectively. ^a V. Torres-Costa, R. J. Mart'in-Palma, and J. M. Mart'inez-Duart, J. Appl. Phys. 96, 4197 (2004). ^b D. E. Goldberg, Genetic Algorithms in Search, Optimization and Machine Learning (Addison-Wesley, Reading, 1989).

  12. Method of detecting genetic translocations identified with chromosomal abnormalities

    DOEpatents

    Gray, Joe W. (Livermore, CA); Pinkel, Daniel (Walnut Creek, CA); Tkachuk, Douglas (Livermore, CA)

    2001-01-01

    Methods and compositions for staining based upon nucleic acid sequence that employ nucleic acid probes are provided. Said methods produce staining patterns that can be tailored for specific cytogenetic analyses. Said probes are appropriate for in situ hybridization and stain both interphase and metaphase chromosomal material with reliable signals. The nucleic acid probes are typically of a complexity greater than 50 kb, the complexity depending upon the cytogenetic application. Methods and reagents are provided for the detection of genetic rearrangements. Probes and test kits are provided for use in detecting genetic rearrangements, particularly for use in tumor cytogenetics, in the detection of disease related loci, specifically cancer, such as chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and for biological dosimetry. Methods and reagents are described for cytogenetic research, for the differentiation of cytogenetically similar but genetically different diseases, and for many prognostic and diagnostic applications.

  13. Method of detecting genetic deletions identified with chromosomal abnormalities

    DOEpatents

    Gray, Joe W; Pinkel, Daniel; Tkachuk, Douglas

    2013-11-26

    Methods and compositions for staining based upon nucleic acid sequence that employ nucleic acid probes are provided. Said methods produce staining patterns that can be tailored for specific cytogenetic analyzes. Said probes are appropriate for in situ hybridization and stain both interphase and metaphase chromosomal material with reliable signals. The nucleic acids probes are typically of a complexity greater tha 50 kb, the complexity depending upon the cytogenetic application. Methods and reagents are provided for the detection of genetic rearrangements. Probes and test kits are provided for use in detecting genetic rearrangements, particlularly for use in tumor cytogenetics, in the detection of disease related loci, specifically cancer, such as chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and for biological dosimetry. Methods and reagents are described for cytogenetic research, for the differentiation of cytogenetically similar ut genetically different diseases, and for many prognostic and diagnostic applications.

  14. Fluorescence Imaging-Based Forward Genetic Screens to Identify Trafficking Regulators in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Zwiewka, Marta; Friml, Ji?í

    2012-01-01

    Coordinated, subcellular trafficking of proteins is one of the fundamental properties of the multicellular eukaryotic organisms. Trafficking involves a large diversity of compartments, pathways, cargo molecules, and vesicle-sorting events. It is also crucial in regulating the localization and, thus, the activity of various proteins, but the process is still poorly genetically defined in plants. In the past, forward genetics screens had been used to determine the function of genes by searching for a specific morphological phenotype in the organism population in which mutations had been induced chemically or by irradiation. Unfortunately, these straightforward genetic screens turned out to be limited in identifying new regulators of intracellular protein transport, because mutations affecting essential trafficking pathways often lead to lethality. In addition, the use of these approaches has been restricted by functional redundancy among trafficking regulators. Screens for mutants that rely on the observation of changes in the cellular localization or dynamics of fluorescent subcellular markers enable, at least partially, to circumvent these issues. Hence, such image-based screens provide the possibility to identify either alleles with weak effects or components of the subcellular trafficking machinery that have no strong impact on the plant growth. PMID:22654887

  15. Use of genetic testing to identify sudden cardiac death syndromes.

    PubMed

    Vatta, Matteo; Spoonamore, Katherine G

    2015-11-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) is a leading cause of mortality worldwide. Although coronary artery disease remains the most common substrate for SCD, primary cardiac genetic diseases, presenting with or without structural heart abnormalities, play a significant role. In the last 30 years, the study of large family pedigrees allowed the discovery of causative genes unveiling the genetic basis of diseases such as primary cardiomyopathies and arrhythmia syndromes, which are known to increase the risk of SCD. However, recent technological advancement with the ability to perform massive parallel sequencing and analyze the entire genome has uncovered a higher level of complexity in the genetic predisposition for cardiac diseases, which are usually characterized by Mendelian inheritance patterns. Clinical genetic testing, historically shaped around a monogenic Mendelian disorder paradigm, is now facing the challenge to adopt and adapt to a more complex model in which a significant portion of subjects may present with multi-allelic inheritance involving additional genes that could modulate the severity and type of disease-related phenotypes. Here, we will try to provide a viewpoint that will hopefully foster further debate in the field. PMID:25864170

  16. Determining Relative Importance and Effective Settings for Genetic Algorithm

    E-print Network

    Determining Relative Importance and Effective Settings for Genetic Algorithm Control Parameters K the control parameters of a genetic algorithm so as to obtain good results is a long-standing problem. We-encoded genetic algorithm (GA). Subsequently, as reported elsewhere, we applied the GA, with the control

  17. Identifying the genetic components underlying the pathophysiology of movement disorders

    PubMed Central

    Ezquerra, Mario; Compta, Yaroslau; Marti, Maria J

    2011-01-01

    Movement disorders are a heterogeneous group of neurological conditions, few of which have been classically described as bona fide hereditary illnesses (Huntington’s chorea, for instance). Most are considered to be either sporadic or to feature varying degrees of familial aggregation (parkinsonism and dystonia). In the late twentieth century, Mendelian monogenic mutations were found for movement disorders with a clear and consistent family history. Although important, these findings apply only to very rare forms of movement disorders. Already in the twenty-first century, and taking advantage of the modern developments in genetics and molecular biology, growing attention is being paid to the complex genetics of movement disorders. The search for risk genetic variants (polymorphisms) in large cohorts and the identification of different risk variants across different populations and ethnic groups are under way, with the most relevant findings to date corresponding to recent genome wide association studies in Parkinson’s disease. These new approaches focusing on risk variants may enable the design of screening tests for early or even preclinical disease, and the identification of likely therapeutic targets. PMID:23776369

  18. Genetic screens to identify bacterial sRNA regulators.

    PubMed

    Mandin, Pierre

    2012-01-01

    Small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs) are versatile regulators that have been shown to be involved in the gene regulation of a growing number of biological pathways in bacteria. While finding the targets of a given sRNA has been the focus of many studies, fewer methods have been described to uncover which, if any, sRNAs regulate a given gene. Here I present two genetic screens that are designed to search for sRNAs regulating a gene of interest. Before the screens are performed, a translational fusion is made between the gene of interest and lacZ, designed so that mostly post-transcriptional effects on the gene's expression can be analyzed. I describe here a simple and rapid way to obtain this fusion, even when the transcriptional start site is unknown, by combining PCR or 5'RACE with recombination in the chromosome of a special strain of Escherichia coli. The first genetic screen uses a genomic multicopy library to find regulator genes that, when overexpressed, affect the expression of the fusion. While this technique is a classical genetic screen, particular attention is paid to how it can be used to specifically find sRNAs. A second screen is described that takes advantage of a specific library of sRNAs of E. coli that provides an easier and more rapid way to look for sRNA regulation. The library is transformed into the fusion containing strain using a serial transformation protocol developed in microtiter plates. The transformants can then be directly assayed for effects on the beta-galactosidase activity of the fusion in liquid, providing a precise and rapid way to evaluate sRNA regulation. Use of one or both of these screens should help uncover new pathways of regulation by sRNAs. PMID:22735997

  19. Genetic Determinants of Epigenetic Patterns: Providing Insight into Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cazaly, Emma; Charlesworth, Jac; Dickinson, Joanne L; Holloway, Adele F

    2015-01-01

    The field of epigenetics and our understanding of the mechanisms that regulate the establishment, maintenance and heritability of epigenetic patterns continue to grow at a remarkable rate. This information is providing increased understanding of the role of epigenetic changes in disease, insight into the underlying causes of these epigenetic changes and revealing new avenues for therapeutic intervention. Epigenetic modifiers are increasingly being pursued as therapeutic targets in a range of diseases, with a number of agents targeting epigenetic modifications already proving effective in diseases such as cancer. Although it is well established that DNA mutations and aberrant expression of epigenetic modifiers play a key role in disease, attention is now turning to the interplay between genetic and epigenetic factors in complex disease etiology. The role of genetic variability in determining epigenetic profiles, which can then be modified by environmental and stochastic factors, is becoming more apparent. Understanding the interplay between genetic and epigenetic factors is likely to aid in identifying individuals most likely to benefit from epigenetic therapies. This goal is coming closer to realization because of continual advances in laboratory and statistical tools enabling improvements in the integration of genomic, epigenomic and phenotypic data. PMID:25822796

  20. Identifying the genetic relatedness of poa utilizing PAL-PCR

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant genomes maintain a vast array of chromosomal arrangements ranging from miniature inverted repeat tandem elements and short interspersed regions; to larger genome rearrangements containing inverted repeats. Such regions may be randomly identified by utilizing single primer PCR, also called pal...

  1. AbsIDconvert: An absolute approach for converting genetic identifiers at different granularities

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background High-throughput molecular biology techniques yield vast amounts of data, often by detecting small portions of ribonucleotides corresponding to specific identifiers. Existing bioinformatic methodologies categorize and compare these elements using inferred descriptive annotation given this sequence information irrespective of the fact that it may not be representative of the identifier as a whole. Results All annotations, no matter the granularity, can be aligned to genomic sequences and therefore annotated by genomic intervals. We have developed AbsIDconvert, a methodology for converting between genomic identifiers by first mapping them onto a common universal coordinate system using an interval tree which is subsequently queried for overlapping identifiers. AbsIDconvert has many potential uses, including gene identifier conversion, identification of features within a genomic region, and cross-species comparisons. The utility is demonstrated in three case studies: 1) comparative genomic study mapping plasmodium gene sequences to corresponding human and mosquito transcriptional regions; 2) cross-species study of Incyte clone sequences; and 3) analysis of human Ensembl transcripts mapped by Affymetrix®; and Agilent microarray probes. AbsIDconvert currently supports ID conversion of 53 species for a given list of input identifiers, genomic sequence, or genome intervals. Conclusion AbsIDconvert provides an efficient and reliable mechanism for conversion between identifier domains of interest. The flexibility of this tool allows for custom definition identifier domains contingent upon the availability and determination of a genomic mapping interval. As the genomes and the sequences for genetic elements are further refined, this tool will become increasingly useful and accurate. AbsIDconvert is freely available as a web application or downloadable as a virtual machine at: http://bioinformatics.louisville.edu/abid/. PMID:22967011

  2. Susceptibility and Prevention Recent Natural Selection Identifies a Genetic Variant in a Regulatory

    E-print Network

    Vazquez, Alexei

    in the onset (up to 19.2 years; P = 0.0002) and risk (odds ratio, up to 8.1; P = 0.0009) of soft tissue sarcomaSusceptibility and Prevention Recent Natural Selection Identifies a Genetic Variant in a Regulatory is known about the human, inherited genetics of this important signaling pathway. Experimental Design

  3. A Yeast Chemical Genetic Screen Identifies Inhibitors of Human Telomerase

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Lai Hong; Unciti-Broceta, Asier; Spitzer, Michaela; White, Rachel; Tyers, Mike; Harrington, Lea

    2013-01-01

    Summary Telomerase comprises a reverse transcriptase and an internal RNA template that maintains telomeres in many eukaryotes, and it is a well-validated cancer target. However, there is a dearth of small molecules with efficacy against human telomerase in vivo. We developed a surrogate yeast high-throughput assay to identify human telomerase inhibitors. The reversibility of growth arrest induced by active human telomerase was assessed against a library of 678 compounds preselected for bioactivity in S. cerevisiae. Four of eight compounds identified reproducibly restored growth to strains expressing active human telomerase, and three of these four compounds also specifically inhibited purified human telomerase in vitro. These compounds represent probes for human telomerase function, and potential entry points for development of lead compounds against telomerase-positive cancers. PMID:23521791

  4. A novel approach to identify genes that determine grain protein deviation in cereals.

    PubMed

    Mosleth, Ellen F; Wan, Yongfang; Lysenko, Artem; Chope, Gemma A; Penson, Simon P; Shewry, Peter R; Hawkesford, Malcolm J

    2015-06-01

    Grain yield and protein content were determined for six wheat cultivars grown over 3 years at multiple sites and at multiple nitrogen (N) fertilizer inputs. Although grain protein content was negatively correlated with yield, some grain samples had higher protein contents than expected based on their yields, a trait referred to as grain protein deviation (GPD). We used novel statistical approaches to identify gene transcripts significantly related to GPD across environments. The yield and protein content were initially adjusted for nitrogen fertilizer inputs and then adjusted for yield (to remove the negative correlation with protein content), resulting in a parameter termed corrected GPD. Significant genetic variation in corrected GPD was observed for six cultivars grown over a range of environmental conditions (a total of 584 samples). Gene transcript profiles were determined in a subset of 161 samples of developing grain to identify transcripts contributing to GPD. Principal component analysis (PCA), analysis of variance (ANOVA) and means of scores regression (MSR) were used to identify individual principal components (PCs) correlating with GPD alone. Scores of the selected PCs, which were significantly related to GPD and protein content but not to the yield and significantly affected by cultivar, were identified as reflecting a multivariate pattern of gene expression related to genetic variation in GPD. Transcripts with consistent variation along the selected PCs were identified by an approach hereby called one-block means of scores regression (one-block MSR). PMID:25400203

  5. NCI Launches New Initiative to Identify Genetic Risk Factors for Breast and Prostate Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI), part of the National Institutes of Health, today launched an initiative to identify genetic alterations that make people susceptible to prostate and breast cancer, two of the most commonly diagnosed cancers in the United States. Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility (CGEMS) is a three-year initiative, funded for $14 million, that will conduct scans of the entire human genome (genotyping) to identify common, inherited gene mutations that increase the risks for breast and prostate cancer.

  6. A Novel WRN Frameshift Mutation Identified by Multiplex Genetic Testing in a Family with Multiple Cases of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Liu; Wang, Guosheng; Zhao, Xinyi; Ye, Song; Shen, Peng; Wang, Weilin; Zheng, Shusen

    2015-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing technology allows simultaneous analysis of multiple susceptibility genes for clinical cancer genetics. In this study, multiplex genetic testing was conducted in a Chinese family with multiple cases of cancer to determine the variations in cancer predisposition genes. The family comprises a mother and her five daughters, of whom the mother and the eldest daughter have cancer and the secondary daughter died of cancer. We conducted multiplex genetic testing of 90 cancer susceptibility genes using the peripheral blood DNA of the mother and all five daughters. WRN frameshift mutation is considered a potential pathogenic variation according to the guidelines of the American College of Medical Genetics. A novel WRN frameshift mutation (p.N1370Tfs*23) was identified in the three cancer patients and in the youngest unaffected daughter. Other rare non-synonymous germline mutations were also detected in DICER and ELAC2. Functional mutations in WRN cause Werner syndrome, a human autosomal recessive disease characterized by premature aging and associated with genetic instability and increased cancer risk. Our results suggest that the WRN frameshift mutation is important in the surveillance of other members of this family, especially the youngest daughter, but the pathogenicity of the novel WRN frameshift mutation needs to be investigated further. Given its extensive use in clinical genetic screening, multiplex genetic testing is a promising tool in clinical cancer surveillance. PMID:26241669

  7. INNER EAR EMBRYOGENESIS: GENETIC AND ENVIRONMENTAL DETERMINANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The anatomy and developmental molecular genetics of the inner ear from establishment of the otic placode to formation of the definitive cochlea and vestibular apparatus will be reviewed and the complex 3-D structural changes that shape the developing inner ear will be illustrated...

  8. Genetic Approaches To Identifying Novel Osteoporosis Drug Targets.

    PubMed

    Brommage, Robert

    2015-10-01

    During the past two decades effective drugs for treating osteoporosis have been developed, including anti-resorptives inhibiting bone resorption (estrogens, the SERM raloxifene, four bisphosphonates, RANKL inhibitor denosumab) and the anabolic bone forming daily injectable peptide teriparatide. Two potential drugs (odanacatib and romosozumab) are in late stage clinical development. The most pressing unmet need is for orally active anabolic drugs. This review describes the basic biological studies involved in developing these drugs, including the animal models employed for osteoporosis drug development. The genomics revolution continues to identify potential novel osteoporosis drug targets. Studies include human GWAS studies and identification of mutant genes in subjects having abnormal bone mass, mouse QTL and gene knockouts, and gene expression studies. Multiple lines of evidence indicate that Wnt signaling plays a major role in regulating bone formation and continued study of this complex pathway is likely to lead to key discoveries. In addition to the classic Wnt signaling targets DKK1 and sclerostin, LRP4, LRP5/LRP6, SFRP4, WNT16, and NOTUM can potentially be targeted to modulate Wnt signaling. Next-generation whole genome and exome sequencing, RNA-sequencing and CRISPR/CAS9 gene editing are new experimental techniques contributing to understanding the genome. The International Knockout Mouse Consortium efforts to knockout and phenotype all mouse genes are poised to accelerate. Accumulating knowledge will focus attention on readily accessible databases (Big Data). Efforts are underway by the International Bone and Mineral Society to develop an annotated Skeletome database providing information on all genes directly influencing bone mass, architecture, mineralization or strength. PMID:25833316

  9. Methods for determining the genetic affinity of microorganisms and viruses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, George E. (Inventor); Willson, III, Richard C. (Inventor); Zhang, Zhengdong (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Selecting which sub-sequences in a database of nucleic acid such as 16S rRNA are highly characteristic of particular groupings of bacteria, microorganisms, fungi, etc. on a substantially phylogenetic tree. Also applicable to viruses comprising viral genomic RNA or DNA. A catalogue of highly characteristic sequences identified by this method is assembled to establish the genetic identity of an unknown organism. The characteristic sequences are used to design nucleic acid hybridization probes that include the characteristic sequence or its complement, or are derived from one or more characteristic sequences. A plurality of these characteristic sequences is used in hybridization to determine the phylogenetic tree position of the organism(s) in a sample. Those target organisms represented in the original sequence database and sufficient characteristic sequences can identify to the species or subspecies level. Oligonucleotide arrays of many probes are especially preferred. A hybridization signal can comprise fluorescence, chemiluminescence, or isotopic labeling, etc.; or sequences in a sample can be detected by direct means, e.g. mass spectrometry. The method's characteristic sequences can also be used to design specific PCR primers. The method uniquely identifies the phylogenetic affinity of an unknown organism without requiring prior knowledge of what is present in the sample. Even if the organism has not been previously encountered, the method still provides useful information about which phylogenetic tree bifurcation nodes encompass the organism.

  10. Genetic determinants of heat resistance in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Mercer, Ryan G.; Zheng, Jinshui; Garcia-Hernandez, Rigoberto; Ruan, Lifang; Gänzle, Michael G.; McMullen, Lynn M.

    2015-01-01

    Escherichia coli AW1.7 is a heat resistant food isolate and the occurrence of pathogenic strains with comparable heat resistance may pose a risk to food safety. To identify the genetic determinants of heat resistance, 29 strains of E. coli that differed in their of heat resistance were analyzed by comparative genomics. Strains were classified as highly heat resistant strains, exhibiting a D60-value of more than 6 min; moderately heat resistant strains, exhibiting a D60-value of more than 1 min; or as heat sensitive. A ~14 kb genomic island containing 16 predicted open reading frames encoding putative heat shock proteins and proteases was identified only in highly heat resistant strains. The genomic island was termed the locus of heat resistance (LHR). This putative operon is flanked by mobile elements and possesses >99% sequence identity to genomic islands contributing to heat resistance in Cronobacter sakazakii and Klebsiella pneumoniae. An additional 41 LHR sequences with >87% sequence identity were identified in 11 different species of ?- and ?-proteobacteria. Cloning of the full length LHR conferred high heat resistance to the heat sensitive E. coli AW1.7?pHR1 and DH5?. The presence of the LHR correlates perfectly to heat resistance in several species of Enterobacteriaceae and occurs at a frequency of 2% of all E. coli genomes, including pathogenic strains. This study suggests the LHR has been laterally exchanged among the ?- and ?-proteobacteria and is a reliable indicator of high heat resistance in E. coli. PMID:26441869

  11. Identifying Genetic Hotspots by Mapping Molecular Diversity of Widespread Trees: When Commonness Matters.

    PubMed

    Souto, Cintia P; Mathiasen, Paula; Acosta, María Cristina; Quiroga, María Paula; Vidal-Russell, Romina; Echeverría, Cristian; Premoli, Andrea C

    2015-01-01

    Conservation planning requires setting priorities at the same spatial scale at which decision-making processes are undertaken considering all levels of biodiversity, but current methods for identifying biodiversity hotspots ignore its genetic component. We developed a fine-scale approach based on the definition of genetic hotspots, which have high genetic diversity and unique variants that represent their evolutionary potential and evolutionary novelties. Our hypothesis is that wide-ranging taxa with similar ecological tolerances, yet of phylogenetically independent lineages, have been and currently are shaped by ecological and evolutionary forces that result in geographically concordant genetic patterns. We mapped previously published genetic diversity and unique variants of biparentally inherited markers and chloroplast sequences for 9 species from 188 and 275 populations, respectively, of the 4 woody dominant families of the austral temperate forest, an area considered a biodiversity hotspot. Spatial distribution patterns of genetic polymorphisms differed among taxa according to their ecological tolerances. Eight genetic hotspots were detected and we recommend conservation actions for some in the southern Coastal Range in Chile. Existing spatially explicit genetic data from multiple populations and species can help to identify biodiversity hotspots and guide conservation actions to establish science-based protected areas that will preserve the evolutionary potential of key habitats and species. PMID:26245788

  12. Harnessing genomics to identify environmental determinants of heritable disease

    EPA Science Inventory

    De novo mutation is increasingly being recognized as the cause for a range of human genetic diseases and disorders. Important examples of this include inherited genetic disorders such as autism, schizophrenia, mental retardation, epilepsy, and a broad range of adverse reproductiv...

  13. Genetic determinants of response to cardiovascular drugs

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Quinn S.; Delaney, Jessica T.; Roden, Dan M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of review To survey genetic variation contributing to variable responsiveness and toxicity to important cardiovascular drugs and highlight recent developments in the field of cardiovascular pharmacogenomics and personalized medicine. Recent findings Previously recognized pharmacogenomic associations with drug efficacy have been further validated (e.g. with clopidogrel and warfarin) and shown to influence clinically important outcomes. The clinical significance of variants modulating toxicity (e.g. SLCO1B1 with simvastatin) has also been confirmed. The genetic contribution to variable efficacy and toxicity of other important classes of cardiovascular drugs, such as beta-blockers, is becoming increasingly recognized. Prospective trials testing whether the use of genomic information improves clinical care are underway. Guidance based on the most well-established pharmacogenomic findings has appeared in prescribing labeling and is in the early stages of being implemented into routine clinical care. Summary Clinically validated gene variants that modulate responsiveness to cardiovascular drugs continue to be discovered and validated. Early steps are underway to translate these discoveries into clinical care. PMID:22382501

  14. New de novo Genetic Mutations in Schizophrenia Identified http://scicasts.com/bio/2039-disease-processes/4882-new-de-novo-genetic-mutations-in-schizophrenia-identified[11/12/2012 12:43:09 PM

    E-print Network

    Healthcare Tech Green Tech Trending Stories Genetic Engineering Scientists Remove Extra Copy of Chromosome 21New de novo Genetic Mutations in Schizophrenia Identified http://scicasts.com/bio/2039-disease-processes/4882-new-de-novo-genetic-mutations-in-schizophrenia-identified[11/12/2012 12:43:09 PM] Image: Dr. Bin

  15. Genome-Wide Association Studies: Progress in Identifying Genetic Biomarkers in Common, Complex Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kingsmore, Stephen F.; Lindquist, Ingrid E.; Mudge, Joann; Beavis, William D.

    2007-01-01

    Novel, comprehensive approaches for biomarker discovery and validation are urgently needed. One particular area of methodologic need is for discovery of novel genetic biomarkers in complex diseases and traits. Here, we review recent successes in the use of genome wide association (GWA) approaches to identify genetic biomarkers in common human diseases and traits. Such studies are yielding initial insights into the allelic architecture of complex traits. In general, it appears that complex diseases are associated with many common polymorphisms, implying profound genetic heterogeneity between affected individuals. PMID:19662211

  16. Regulators of genetic risk of breast cancer identified by integrative network analysis.

    PubMed

    Castro, Mauro A A; de Santiago, Ines; Campbell, Thomas M; Vaughn, Courtney; Hickey, Theresa E; Ross, Edith; Tilley, Wayne D; Markowetz, Florian; Ponder, Bruce A J; Meyer, Kerstin B

    2016-01-01

    Genetic risk for breast cancer is conferred by a combination of multiple variants of small effect. To better understand how risk loci might combine, we examined whether risk-associated genes share regulatory mechanisms. We created a breast cancer gene regulatory network comprising transcription factors and groups of putative target genes (regulons) and asked whether specific regulons are enriched for genes associated with risk loci via expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs). We identified 36 overlapping regulons that were enriched for risk loci and formed a distinct cluster within the network, suggesting shared biology. The risk transcription factors driving these regulons are frequently mutated in cancer and lie in two opposing subgroups, which relate to estrogen receptor (ER)(+) luminal A or luminal B and ER(-) basal-like cancers and to different luminal epithelial cell populations in the adult mammary gland. Our network approach provides a foundation for determining the regulatory circuits governing breast cancer, to identify targets for intervention, and is transferable to other disease settings. PMID:26618344

  17. DETERMINING GENETIC DIVERSITY AMONG LINES OF VIGNA UNGUICULATA SUBSPECIES BY AFLP AND SSR MARKERS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    AFLP and SSR markers were utilized to determine the genetic diversity among Vigna unguiculata subspecies. The three AFLP primer sets and the 10 SSR primer sets successfully identified very closely related accessions and a lack of homogeneity in some accessions. The AFLP methodology was successful f...

  18. Milk protein genetic variants and isoforms identified in bovine milk representing extremes in coagulation properties.

    PubMed

    Jensen, H B; Holland, J W; Poulsen, N A; Larsen, L B

    2012-06-01

    A gel-based proteomic approach consisting of 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis coupled with mass spectrometry was applied for detailed protein characterization of a subset of individual milk samples with extreme rennet coagulation properties. A milk subset with either good or poor coagulation abilities was selected from 892 Danish Holstein-Friesian and Jersey cows. Screening of genetic variants of the major milk proteins resulted in the identification of common genetic variants of ?-casein (CN; A(1), A(2), B), ?-CN (A, B), and ?-lactoglobulin (LG; A, B), as well as a low frequency variant, ?-CN variant E, and variants not previously reported in Danish breeds (i.e., ?-CN variant I and ?-LG variant C). Clear differences in the frequencies of the identified genetic variants were evident between breeds and, to some extent, between coagulation groups within breeds, indicating that an underlying genetic variation of the major milk proteins affects the overall milk coagulation ability. In milk with good coagulation ability, a high prevalence of the B variants of all 3 analyzed proteins were identified, whereas poorly coagulating milk was associated with the ?-CN variant A(2), ?-CN variant A or E, and ?-LG variant A or C. The ?-CN variant I was identified in milk with both good and poor coagulation ability, a variant that has not usually been discriminated from ?-CN variant A(2) in other studied cow populations. Additionally, a detailed characterization of ?-CN isoforms was conducted. Six ?-CN isoforms varying in phosphorylation and glycosylation levels from each of the genetic variants of ?-CN were separated and identified, along with an unmodified ?-CN form at low abundance. Relative quantification showed that around 95% of total ?-CN was phosphorylated with 1 or 2 phosphates attached, whereas approximately 35% of the identified ?-CN was glycosylated with 1 to 3 tetrasaccharides. Comparing isoforms from individual samples, we found a very consistent ?-CN isoform pattern, with only minor differences in relation to breed, ?-CN genetic variant, and milk coagulation ability. PMID:22612926

  19. Genetic Determinants of Responses to Selenium Supplementation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In a cohort of healthy adults (106 M, 155 W) in eastern North Dakota, we determined the relationships of five biomarkers of selenium (Se) status (plasma Se, serum selenoprotein P [SePP], plasma glutathione peroxidase [GPX3] activity, buccal cell Se, urine Se) to genotype for four selenoproteins (cyt...

  20. Genetic similarity between cancers and comorbid Mendelian diseases identifies candidate driver genes

    PubMed Central

    Melamed, Rachel D.; Emmett, Kevin J.; Madubata, Chioma; Rzhetsky, Andrey; Rabadan, Raul

    2015-01-01

    Despite large-scale cancer genomics studies, key somatic mutations driving cancer, and their functional roles, remain elusive. Here we propose that analysis of comorbidities of Mendelian diseases with cancers provides a novel, systematic way to discover new cancer genes. If germline genetic variation in Mendelian loci predisposes bearers to common cancers, the same loci may harbor cancer-associated somatic variation. Compilations of clinical records spanning over 100 million patients provide an unprecedented opportunity to assess clinical associations between Mendelian diseases and cancers. We systematically compare these comorbidities against recurrent somatic mutations from more than five thousand patients across many cancers. Using multiple measures of genetic similarity, we show that a Mendelian disease and comorbid cancer indeed have genetic alterations of significant functional similarity. This result provides a basis to identify candidate drivers in cancers including melanoma and glioblastoma. Some Mendelian diseases demonstrate “pan-cancer” comorbidity and shared genetics across cancers. PMID:25926297

  1. A screen of zebrafish mutants identifies ethanol-sensitive genetic loci

    PubMed Central

    Swartz, Mary E.; Wells, M. Ben; Griffin, Melissa; McCarthy, Neil; Lovely, C. Ben; McGurk, Patrick; Rozacky, Jenna; Eberhart, Johann K.

    2013-01-01

    Background Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD) are a highly variable set of phenotypes caused by fetal alcohol exposure. Numerous factors influence FASD phenotypes, including genetics. The zebrafish is a powerful vertebrate model system with which to identify these genetic factors. Many zebrafish mutants are housed at the Zebrafish International Resource Center (ZIRC). These mutants are readily accessible and an excellent source to screen for ethanol-sensitive developmental structural mutants. Methods We screened mutants obtained from ZIRC for sensitivity to ethanol teratogenesis. Embryos were treated with 1% ethanol (41 mM tissue levels) from 6 hours post fertilization onward. Levels of apoptosis were evaluated at 24 hpf. At 5 days post fertilization, the craniofacial skeleton, peripheral axon projections and sensory neurons of neuromasts were examined. Fish were genotyped to determine if there were phenotype/genotype correlations. Results Five of twenty loci interacted with ethanol. Notable among these was that vangl2, involved in convergent/extension movements of the embryonic axis, interacted strongly with ethanol. Untreated vangl2 mutants had normal craniofacial morphology while severe midfacial defects including synophthalmia and narrowing of the palatal skeleton were found in all ethanol-treated mutants and a low percentage of heterozygotes. The cell cycle gene, plk1, also interacted strongly with ethanol. Untreated mutants have slightly elevated levels of apoptosis and loss of ventral craniofacial elements. Exposure to ethanol results in extensive apoptosis along with loss of neural tissue and the entire craniofacial skeleton. Phenotypes of hinfp, mars and foxi1 mutants were also exacerbated by ethanol. Conclusions Our results provide insight into the gene/ethanol interactions that may underlie ethanol teratogenesis. They support previous findings that ethanol disrupts elongation of the embryonic axis. Importantly, these results show that the zebrafish is an efficient model with which to test for gene/ethanol interactions. Understanding these interactions will be crucial to understanding of the FASD variation. PMID:24164477

  2. Genetic Determinants of Reutericyclin Biosynthesis in Lactobacillus reuteri

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Xiaoxi B.; Lohans, Christopher T.; Duar, Rebbeca; Zheng, Jinshui; Vederas, John C.; Walter, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Reutericyclin is a unique antimicrobial tetramic acid produced by some strains of Lactobacillus reuteri. This study aimed to identify the genetic determinants of reutericyclin biosynthesis. Comparisons of the genomes of reutericyclin-producing L. reuteri strains with those of non-reutericyclin-producing strains identified a genomic island of 14 open reading frames (ORFs) including genes coding for a nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS), a polyketide synthase (PKS), homologues of PhlA, PhlB, and PhlC, and putative transport and regulatory proteins. The protein encoded by rtcN is composed of a condensation domain, an adenylation domain likely specific for d-leucine, and a thiolation domain. rtcK codes for a PKS that is composed of a ketosynthase domain, an acyl-carrier protein domain, and a thioesterase domain. The products of rtcA, rtcB, and rtcC are homologous to the diacetylphloroglucinol-biosynthetic proteins PhlABC and may acetylate the tetramic acid moiety produced by RtcN and RtcK, forming reutericyclin. Deletion of rtcN or rtcABC in L. reuteri TMW1.656 abrogated reutericyclin production but did not affect resistance to reutericyclin. Genes coding for transport and regulatory proteins could be deleted only in the reutericyclin-negative L. reuteri strain TMW1.656?rtcN, and these deletions eliminated reutericyclin resistance. The genomic analyses suggest that the reutericyclin genomic island was horizontally acquired from an unknown source during a unique event. The combination of PhlABC homologues with both an NRPS and a PKS has also been identified in the lactic acid bacteria Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus plantarum, suggesting that the genes in these organisms and those in L. reuteri share an evolutionary origin. PMID:25576609

  3. Genetic risk factors for the development of allergic disease identified by genome-wide association

    PubMed Central

    Portelli, M A; Hodge, E; Sayers, I

    2015-01-01

    An increasing proportion of the worldwide population is affected by allergic diseases such as allergic rhinitis (AR), atopic dermatitis (AD) and allergic asthma and improved treatment options are needed particularly for severe, refractory disease. Allergic diseases are complex and development involves both environmental and genetic factors. Although the existence of a genetic component for allergy was first described almost 100 years ago, progress in gene identification has been hindered by lack of high throughput technologies to investigate genetic variation in large numbers of subjects. The development of Genome-Wide Association Studies (GWAS), a hypothesis-free method of interrogating large numbers of common variants spanning the entire genome in disease and non-disease subjects has revolutionised our understanding of the genetics of allergic disease. Susceptibility genes for asthma, AR and AD have now been identified with confidence, suggesting there are common and distinct genetic loci associated with these diseases, providing novel insights into potential disease pathways and mechanisms. Genes involved in both adaptive and innate immune mechanisms have been identified, notably including multiple genes involved in epithelial function/secretion, suggesting that the airway epithelium may be particularly important in asthma. Interestingly, concordance/discordance between the genetic factors driving allergic traits such as IgE levels and disease states such as asthma have further supported the accumulating evidence for heterogeneity in these diseases. While GWAS have been useful and continue to identify novel genes for allergic diseases through increased sample sizes and phenotype refinement, future approaches will integrate analyses of rare variants, epigenetic mechanisms and eQTL approaches, leading to greater insight into the genetic basis of these diseases. Gene identification will improve our understanding of disease mechanisms and generate potential therapeutic opportunities. PMID:24766371

  4. A cross-species genetic analysis identifies candidate genes for mouse anxiety and human bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Ashbrook, David G.; Williams, Robert W.; Lu, Lu; Hager, Reinmar

    2015-01-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a significant neuropsychiatric disorder with a lifetime prevalence of ~1%. To identify genetic variants underlying BD genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been carried out. While many variants of small effect associated with BD have been identified few have yet been confirmed, partly because of the low power of GWAS due to multiple comparisons being made. Complementary mapping studies using murine models have identified genetic variants for behavioral traits linked to BD, often with high power, but these identified regions often contain too many genes for clear identification of candidate genes. In the current study we have aligned human BD GWAS results and mouse linkage studies to help define and evaluate candidate genes linked to BD, seeking to use the power of the mouse mapping with the precision of GWAS. We use quantitative trait mapping for open field test and elevated zero maze data in the largest mammalian model system, the BXD recombinant inbred mouse population, to identify genomic regions associated with these BD-like phenotypes. We then investigate these regions in whole genome data from the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium's bipolar disorder GWAS to identify candidate genes associated with BD. Finally we establish the biological relevance and pathways of these genes in a comprehensive systems genetics analysis. We identify four genes associated with both mouse anxiety and human BD. While TNR is a novel candidate for BD, we can confirm previously suggested associations with CMYA5, MCTP1, and RXRG. A cross-species, systems genetics analysis shows that MCTP1, RXRG, and TNR coexpress with genes linked to psychiatric disorders and identify the striatum as a potential site of action. CMYA5, MCTP1, RXRG, and TNR are associated with mouse anxiety and human BD. We hypothesize that MCTP1, RXRG, and TNR influence intercellular signaling in the striatum. PMID:26190982

  5. The Genetic Architecture of Hearing Impairment in Mice: Evidence for Frequency-Specific Genetic Determinants

    PubMed Central

    Crow, Amanda L.; Ohmen, Jeffrey; Wang, Juemei; Lavinsky, Joel; Hartiala, Jaana; Li, Qingzhong; Li, Xin; Salehide, Pezhman; Eskin, Eleazar; Pan, Calvin; Lusis, Aldons J.; Allayee, Hooman; Friedman, Rick A.

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been successfully applied in humans for the study of many complex phenotypes. However, identification of the genetic determinants of hearing in adults has been hampered, in part, by the relative inability to control for environmental factors that might affect hearing throughout the lifetime, as well as a large degree of phenotypic heterogeneity. These and other factors have limited the number of large-scale studies performed in humans that have identified candidate genes that contribute to the etiology of this complex trait. To address these limitations, we performed a GWAS analysis using a set of inbred mouse strains from the Hybrid Mouse Diversity Panel. Among 99 strains characterized, we observed approximately two-fold to five-fold variation in hearing at six different frequencies, which are differentiated biologically from each other by the location in the cochlea where each frequency is registered. Among all frequencies tested, we identified a total of nine significant loci, several of which contained promising candidate genes for follow-up study. Taken together, our results indicate the existence of both genes that affect global cochlear function, as well as anatomical- and frequency-specific genes, and further demonstrate the complex nature of mammalian hearing variation. PMID:26342000

  6. nature genetics volume 29 october 2001 1 Identifying regulatory networks by

    E-print Network

    Church, George M.

    article nature genetics · volume 29 · october 2001 1 Identifying regulatory networks the combinatorial nature of transcription, a well-established phe- nomenon in eukaryotes. Here we describe a new­11 does not explicitly address the combinatorial nature of transcriptional regulation. Here, however, we

  7. Yeast Chemical Genetics For Identifying Regulators of Late Secretory Traffic Pathways

    E-print Network

    Zhang, Lisha

    2011-04-25

    was to use a yeast chemical genetic strategy to identify components of the exocytic transport machinery, and to generate useful chemical tools that will help us to understand how the machinery functions. I analyzed the effects of small molecules that we...

  8. Evolutionary Analyses of Staphylococcus aureus Identify Genetic Relationships between Nasal Carriage and

    E-print Network

    Parkinson, Christopher L.

    Evolutionary Analyses of Staphylococcus aureus Identify Genetic Relationships between Nasal of America Abstract Nasal carriage of Staphylococcus aureus has long been hypothesized to be a major vector, Stinnett JW, Muthukrishnan G, Parkinson CL, Cole AM (2011) Evolutionary Analyses of Staphylococcus aureus

  9. Mapping of Craniofacial Traits in Outbred Mice Identifies Major Developmental Genes Involved in Shape Determination

    PubMed Central

    Pallares, Luisa F.; Carbonetto, Peter; Gopalakrishnan, Shyam; Parker, Clarissa C.; Ackert-Bicknell, Cheryl L.; Palmer, Abraham A.; Tautz, Diethard

    2015-01-01

    The vertebrate cranium is a prime example of the high evolvability of complex traits. While evidence of genes and developmental pathways underlying craniofacial shape determination is accumulating, we are still far from understanding how such variation at the genetic level is translated into craniofacial shape variation. Here we used 3D geometric morphometrics to map genes involved in shape determination in a population of outbred mice (Carworth Farms White, or CFW). We defined shape traits via principal component analysis of 3D skull and mandible measurements. We mapped genetic loci associated with shape traits at ~80,000 candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms in ~700 male mice. We found that craniofacial shape and size are highly heritable, polygenic traits. Despite the polygenic nature of the traits, we identified 17 loci that explain variation in skull shape, and 8 loci associated with variation in mandible shape. Together, the associated variants account for 11.4% of skull and 4.4% of mandible shape variation, however, the total additive genetic variance associated with phenotypic variation was estimated in ~45%. Candidate genes within the associated loci have known roles in craniofacial development; this includes 6 transcription factors and several regulators of bone developmental pathways. One gene, Mn1, has an unusually large effect on shape variation in our study. A knockout of this gene was previously shown to affect negatively the development of membranous bones of the cranial skeleton, and evolutionary analysis shows that the gene has arisen at the base of the bony vertebrates (Eutelostomi), where the ossified head first appeared. Therefore, Mn1 emerges as a key gene for both skull formation and within-population shape variation. Our study shows that it is possible to identify important developmental genes through genome-wide mapping of high-dimensional shape features in an outbred population. PMID:26523602

  10. Mapping of Craniofacial Traits in Outbred Mice Identifies Major Developmental Genes Involved in Shape Determination.

    PubMed

    Pallares, Luisa F; Carbonetto, Peter; Gopalakrishnan, Shyam; Parker, Clarissa C; Ackert-Bicknell, Cheryl L; Palmer, Abraham A; Tautz, Diethard

    2015-11-01

    The vertebrate cranium is a prime example of the high evolvability of complex traits. While evidence of genes and developmental pathways underlying craniofacial shape determination is accumulating, we are still far from understanding how such variation at the genetic level is translated into craniofacial shape variation. Here we used 3D geometric morphometrics to map genes involved in shape determination in a population of outbred mice (Carworth Farms White, or CFW). We defined shape traits via principal component analysis of 3D skull and mandible measurements. We mapped genetic loci associated with shape traits at ~80,000 candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms in ~700 male mice. We found that craniofacial shape and size are highly heritable, polygenic traits. Despite the polygenic nature of the traits, we identified 17 loci that explain variation in skull shape, and 8 loci associated with variation in mandible shape. Together, the associated variants account for 11.4% of skull and 4.4% of mandible shape variation, however, the total additive genetic variance associated with phenotypic variation was estimated in ~45%. Candidate genes within the associated loci have known roles in craniofacial development; this includes 6 transcription factors and several regulators of bone developmental pathways. One gene, Mn1, has an unusually large effect on shape variation in our study. A knockout of this gene was previously shown to affect negatively the development of membranous bones of the cranial skeleton, and evolutionary analysis shows that the gene has arisen at the base of the bony vertebrates (Eutelostomi), where the ossified head first appeared. Therefore, Mn1 emerges as a key gene for both skull formation and within-population shape variation. Our study shows that it is possible to identify important developmental genes through genome-wide mapping of high-dimensional shape features in an outbred population. PMID:26523602

  11. Genetic determinants of depression: Recent findings and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Erin C.; Brown, Ruth C.; Dai, Yael; Rosand, Jonathan; Nugent, Nicole R.; Amstadter, Ananda B.; Smoller, Jordan W.

    2014-01-01

    Depression is one of the most prevalent, disabling, and costly mental health conditions in the United States. One promising avenue for preventing depression and informing its clinical treatment lies in uncovering both the genetic and environmental determinants of the disorder as well as their interaction (i.e. gene-environment intervention; GxE). The overarching goal of this review paper is to translate recent findings from studies of genetic association and GxE related to depression, particularly for readers without in-depth knowledge of genetics or genetic methods. This review is organized into three major sections. In the first section, we summarize what is currently known about the genetic determinants of depression, focusing on findings from genome-wide association studies (GWAS). In the second section, we review findings from studies of GxE, which seek to simultaneously examine the role of genes and exposure to specific environments or experiences in the etiology of depression. In the third section, we describe the challenges to genetic discovery in depression and promising strategies for making progress. PMID:25563565

  12. A genetic evaluation of morphology used to identify harvested Canada geese

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pearce, J.M.; Pierson, B. J.; Talbot, S.L.; Derksen, D.V.; Kraege, Donald K.; Scribner, K.T.

    2000-01-01

    Using maximum likelihood estimators (in genetic stock identification), we used genetic markers to evaluate the utility of 2 morphological measures (culmen length and plumage color) to correctly identify groups of hunter-harvested dusky (Branta canadensis occidentalis) and dusky-like Canada geese on the wintering grounds within the Pacific Flyway. Significant levels of genetic differentiation were observed across all sampled breeding sites for both nuclear microsatellite loci and mtDNA when analyzed at the sequence level. The ability to discriminate among geese from these sites using genetic markers was further demonstrated using computer simulations. We estimated contributions from the Copper River Delta, the primary breeding area of dusky Canada geese, to groups of hunter-harvested geese classified as dusky Canada geese on the basis of morphology as 50.6 ?? 10.1(SE)% for females and 50.3 ?? 13.0% for males. We also estimated that 16 ?? 8.1% of females classified as dusky Canada geese on the basis of morphology originated from Middleton Island, Alaska; a locale currently managed as a subpopulation of dusky Canada geese, even though the majority of geese from this area possess a unique mtdna haplotype not found on the Copper River Delta. The use of culmen length and plumage color to identify the origin of breeding populations in the harvest provides conservative criteria for management of dusky Canada geese as individuals of other breeding populations are misassigned as dusky Canada geese and birds of the lighter-plumaged dusky-like group did not appear to originate from, breeding sites of the dusky Canada goose. Our analyses demonstrate that genetic markers can accurately estimate the proportion of genetically differentiated areas that comprise an admixed group, but they also raise questions about the management scale of Pacific Flyway Canada geese (e.g., at the subspecies or breeding population level) and the use of morphological and genetic characteristics to monitor the harvest of different populations within admixed wintering flocks.

  13. Pleiotropy among Common Genetic Loci Identified for Cardiometabolic Disorders and C-Reactive Protein

    PubMed Central

    Ligthart, Symen; de Vries, Paul S.; Uitterlinden, André G.; Hofman, Albert; Franco, Oscar H.; Chasman, Daniel I.; Dehghan, Abbas

    2015-01-01

    Pleiotropic genetic variants have independent effects on different phenotypes. C-reactive protein (CRP) is associated with several cardiometabolic phenotypes. Shared genetic backgrounds may partially underlie these associations. We conducted a genome-wide analysis to identify the shared genetic background of inflammation and cardiometabolic phenotypes using published genome-wide association studies (GWAS). We also evaluated whether the pleiotropic effects of such loci were biological or mediated in nature. First, we examined whether 283 common variants identified for 10 cardiometabolic phenotypes in GWAS are associated with CRP level. Second, we tested whether 18 variants identified for serum CRP are associated with 10 cardiometabolic phenotypes. We used a Bonferroni corrected p-value of 1.1×10-04 (0.05/463) as a threshold of significance. We evaluated the independent pleiotropic effect on both phenotypes using individual level data from the Women Genome Health Study. Evaluating the genetic overlap between inflammation and cardiometabolic phenotypes, we found 13 pleiotropic regions. Additional analyses showed that 6 regions (APOC1, HNF1A, IL6R, PPP1R3B, HNF4A and IL1F10) appeared to have a pleiotropic effect on CRP independent of the effects on the cardiometabolic phenotypes. These included loci where individuals carrying the risk allele for CRP encounter higher lipid levels and risk of type 2 diabetes. In addition, 5 regions (GCKR, PABPC4, BCL7B, FTO and TMEM18) had an effect on CRP largely mediated through the cardiometabolic phenotypes. In conclusion, our results show genetic pleiotropy among inflammation and cardiometabolic phenotypes. In addition to reverse causation, our data suggests that pleiotropic genetic variants partially underlie the association between CRP and cardiometabolic phenotypes. PMID:25768928

  14. Genetic determinants of trabecular and cortical volumetric bone mineral densities and bone microstructure.

    PubMed

    Paternoster, Lavinia; Lorentzon, Mattias; Lehtimäki, Terho; Eriksson, Joel; Kähönen, Mika; Raitakari, Olli; Laaksonen, Marika; Sievänen, Harri; Viikari, Jorma; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Mellström, Dan; Karlsson, Magnus; Ljunggren, Osten; Grundberg, Elin; Kemp, John P; Sayers, Adrian; Nethander, Maria; Evans, David M; Vandenput, Liesbeth; Tobias, Jon H; Ohlsson, Claes

    2013-01-01

    Most previous genetic epidemiology studies within the field of osteoporosis have focused on the genetics of the complex trait areal bone mineral density (aBMD), not being able to differentiate genetic determinants of cortical volumetric BMD (vBMD), trabecular vBMD, and bone microstructural traits. The objective of this study was to separately identify genetic determinants of these bone traits as analysed by peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT). Separate GWA meta-analyses for cortical and trabecular vBMDs were performed. The cortical vBMD GWA meta-analysis (n?=?5,878) followed by replication (n?=?1,052) identified genetic variants in four separate loci reaching genome-wide significance (RANKL, rs1021188, p?=?3.6×10?¹?; LOC285735, rs271170, p?=?2.7×10?¹²; OPG, rs7839059, p?=?1.2×10?¹?; and ESR1/C6orf97, rs6909279, p?=?1.1×10??). The trabecular vBMD GWA meta-analysis (n?=?2,500) followed by replication (n?=?1,022) identified one locus reaching genome-wide significance (FMN2/GREM2, rs9287237, p?=?1.9×10??). High-resolution pQCT analyses, giving information about bone microstructure, were available in a subset of the GOOD cohort (n?=?729). rs1021188 was significantly associated with cortical porosity while rs9287237 was significantly associated with trabecular bone fraction. The genetic variant in the FMN2/GREM2 locus was associated with fracture risk in the MrOS Sweden cohort (HR per extra T allele 0.75, 95% confidence interval 0.60-0.93) and GREM2 expression in human osteoblasts. In conclusion, five genetic loci associated with trabecular or cortical vBMD were identified. Two of these (FMN2/GREM2 and LOC285735) are novel bone-related loci, while the other three have previously been reported to be associated with aBMD. The genetic variants associated with cortical and trabecular bone parameters differed, underscoring the complexity of the genetics of bone parameters. We propose that a genetic variant in the RANKL locus influences cortical vBMD, at least partly, via effects on cortical porosity, and that a genetic variant in the FMN2/GREM2 locus influences GREM2 expression in osteoblasts and thereby trabecular number and thickness as well as fracture risk. PMID:23437003

  15. Genetic Determinants of Trabecular and Cortical Volumetric Bone Mineral Densities and Bone Microstructure

    PubMed Central

    Kähönen, Mika; Raitakari, Olli; Laaksonen, Marika; Sievänen, Harri; Viikari, Jorma; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Mellström, Dan; Karlsson, Magnus; Ljunggren, Östen; Grundberg, Elin; Kemp, John P.; Sayers, Adrian; Nethander, Maria; Evans, David M.; Vandenput, Liesbeth; Tobias, Jon H.; Ohlsson, Claes

    2013-01-01

    Most previous genetic epidemiology studies within the field of osteoporosis have focused on the genetics of the complex trait areal bone mineral density (aBMD), not being able to differentiate genetic determinants of cortical volumetric BMD (vBMD), trabecular vBMD, and bone microstructural traits. The objective of this study was to separately identify genetic determinants of these bone traits as analysed by peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT). Separate GWA meta-analyses for cortical and trabecular vBMDs were performed. The cortical vBMD GWA meta-analysis (n?=?5,878) followed by replication (n?=?1,052) identified genetic variants in four separate loci reaching genome-wide significance (RANKL, rs1021188, p?=?3.6×10?14; LOC285735, rs271170, p?=?2.7×10?12; OPG, rs7839059, p?=?1.2×10?10; and ESR1/C6orf97, rs6909279, p?=?1.1×10?9). The trabecular vBMD GWA meta-analysis (n?=?2,500) followed by replication (n?=?1,022) identified one locus reaching genome-wide significance (FMN2/GREM2, rs9287237, p?=?1.9×10?9). High-resolution pQCT analyses, giving information about bone microstructure, were available in a subset of the GOOD cohort (n?=?729). rs1021188 was significantly associated with cortical porosity while rs9287237 was significantly associated with trabecular bone fraction. The genetic variant in the FMN2/GREM2 locus was associated with fracture risk in the MrOS Sweden cohort (HR per extra T allele 0.75, 95% confidence interval 0.60–0.93) and GREM2 expression in human osteoblasts. In conclusion, five genetic loci associated with trabecular or cortical vBMD were identified. Two of these (FMN2/GREM2 and LOC285735) are novel bone-related loci, while the other three have previously been reported to be associated with aBMD. The genetic variants associated with cortical and trabecular bone parameters differed, underscoring the complexity of the genetics of bone parameters. We propose that a genetic variant in the RANKL locus influences cortical vBMD, at least partly, via effects on cortical porosity, and that a genetic variant in the FMN2/GREM2 locus influences GREM2 expression in osteoblasts and thereby trabecular number and thickness as well as fracture risk. PMID:23437003

  16. Spatial and temporal determinants of genetic structure in Gentianella bohemica

    PubMed Central

    Königer, Julia; Rebernig, Carolin A; Brabec, Ji?í; Kiehl, Kathrin; Greimler, Josef

    2012-01-01

    The biennial plant Gentianella bohemica is a subendemic of the Bohemian Massif, where it occurs in seminatural grasslands. It has become rare in recent decades as a result of profound changes in land use. Using amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLP) fingerprint data, we investigated the genetic structure within and among populations of G. bohemica in Bavaria, the Czech Republic, and the Austrian border region. The aim of our study was (1) to analyze the genetic structure among populations and to discuss these findings in the context of present and historical patterns of connectivity and isolation of populations, (2) to analyze genetic structure among consecutive generations (cohorts of two consecutive years), and (3) to investigate relationships between intrapopulational diversity and effective population size (Ne) as well as plant traits. (1) The German populations were strongly isolated from each other (pairwise FST= 0.29–0.60) and from all other populations (FST= 0.24–0.49). We found a pattern of near panmixis among the latter (FST= 0.15–0.35) with geographical distance explaining only 8% of the genetic variance. These results were congruent with a principal coordinate analysis (PCoA) and analysis using STRUCTURE to identify genetically coherent groups. These findings are in line with the strong physical barrier and historical constraints, resulting in separation of the German populations from the others. (2) We found pronounced genetic differences between consecutive cohorts of the German populations (pairwise FST= 0.23 and 0.31), which can be explained by local population history (land use, disturbance). (3) Genetic diversity within populations (Shannon index, HSh) was significantly correlated with Ne (RS= 0.733) and reflected a loss of diversity due to several demographic bottlenecks. Overall, we found that the genetic structure in G. bohemica is strongly influenced by historical periods of high connectivity and isolation as well as by marked demographic fluctuations in declining populations. PMID:22822440

  17. Genetic Determinants of Phosphate Response in Clemens Bergwitz1

    E-print Network

    Higgins, Darren

    Genetic Determinants of Phosphate Response in Drosophila Clemens Bergwitz1 *, Mark J. Wee1 , Sumi Abstract Phosphate is required for many important cellular processes and having too little phosphate or too control of extracellular phosphate levels and cellular effects of phosphate are poorly understood. Here

  18. Intelligence and Race, Gender, Class: The Fallacy of Genetic Determinism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belkhir, Jean Ait; Duyme, Michael

    1998-01-01

    Biological determinism represents a pseudo-scientific inquiry that is ultimately used to foster a scientific rationale for the maintenance of classism, racism, and sexism in general. Genetic diversity is an inescapable fact, but it is cultures that human brains have created that most severely limit potential. (SLD)

  19. Genetic Mapping Identifies Novel Highly Protective Antigens for an Apicomplexan Parasite

    PubMed Central

    Blake, Damer P.; Billington, Karen J.; Copestake, Susan L.; Oakes, Richard D.; Quail, Michael A.; Wan, Kiew-Lian; Shirley, Martin W.; Smith, Adrian L.

    2011-01-01

    Apicomplexan parasites are responsible for a myriad of diseases in humans and livestock; yet despite intensive effort, development of effective sub-unit vaccines remains a long-term goal. Antigenic complexity and our inability to identify protective antigens from the pool that induce response are serious challenges in the development of new vaccines. Using a combination of parasite genetics and selective barriers with population-based genetic fingerprinting, we have identified that immunity against the most important apicomplexan parasite of livestock (Eimeria spp.) was targeted against a few discrete regions of the genome. Herein we report the identification of six genomic regions and, within two of those loci, the identification of true protective antigens that confer immunity as sub-unit vaccines. The first of these is an Eimeria maxima homologue of apical membrane antigen-1 (AMA-1) and the second is a previously uncharacterised gene that we have termed ‘immune mapped protein-1’ (IMP-1). Significantly, homologues of the AMA-1 antigen are protective with a range of apicomplexan parasites including Plasmodium spp., which suggest that there may be some characteristic(s) of protective antigens shared across this diverse group of parasites. Interestingly, homologues of the IMP-1 antigen, which is protective against E. maxima infection, can be identified in Toxoplasma gondii and Neospora caninum. Overall, this study documents the discovery of novel protective antigens using a population-based genetic mapping approach allied with a protection-based screen of candidate genes. The identification of AMA-1 and IMP-1 represents a substantial step towards development of an effective anti-eimerian sub-unit vaccine and raises the possibility of identification of novel antigens for other apicomplexan parasites. Moreover, validation of the parasite genetics approach to identify effective antigens supports its adoption in other parasite systems where legitimate protective antigen identification is difficult. PMID:21347348

  20. New application of intelligent agents in sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis identifies unexpected specific genetic background

    PubMed Central

    Penco, Silvana; Buscema, Massimo; Patrosso, Maria Cristina; Marocchi, Alessandro; Grossi, Enzo

    2008-01-01

    Background Few genetic factors predisposing to the sporadic form of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) have been identified, but the pathology itself seems to be a true multifactorial disease in which complex interactions between environmental and genetic susceptibility factors take place. The purpose of this study was to approach genetic data with an innovative statistical method such as artificial neural networks to identify a possible genetic background predisposing to the disease. A DNA multiarray panel was applied to genotype more than 60 polymorphisms within 35 genes selected from pathways of lipid and homocysteine metabolism, regulation of blood pressure, coagulation, inflammation, cellular adhesion and matrix integrity, in 54 sporadic ALS patients and 208 controls. Advanced intelligent systems based on novel coupling of artificial neural networks and evolutionary algorithms have been applied. The results obtained have been compared with those derived from the use of standard neural networks and classical statistical analysis Results Advanced intelligent systems based on novel coupling of artificial neural networks and evolutionary algorithms have been applied. The results obtained have been compared with those derived from the use of standard neural networks and classical statistical analysis. An unexpected discovery of a strong genetic background in sporadic ALS using a DNA multiarray panel and analytical processing of the data with advanced artificial neural networks was found. The predictive accuracy obtained with Linear Discriminant Analysis and Standard Artificial Neural Networks ranged from 70% to 79% (average 75.31%) and from 69.1 to 86.2% (average 76.6%) respectively. The corresponding value obtained with Advanced Intelligent Systems reached an average of 96.0% (range 94.4 to 97.6%). This latter approach allowed the identification of seven genetic variants essential to differentiate cases from controls: apolipoprotein E arg158cys; hepatic lipase -480 C/T; endothelial nitric oxide synthase 690 C/T and glu298asp; vitamin K-dependent coagulation factor seven arg353glu, glycoprotein Ia/IIa 873 G/A and E-selectin ser128arg. Conclusion This study provides an alternative and reliable method to approach complex diseases. Indeed, the application of a novel artificial intelligence-based method offers a new insight into genetic markers of sporadic ALS pointing out the existence of a strong genetic background. PMID:18513389

  1. Results of the BRD CAP project: progress toward identifying genetic markers associated with BRD susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Van Eenennaam, Alison; Neibergs, Holly; Seabury, Christopher; Taylor, Jeremy; Wang, Zeping; Scraggs, Erik; Schnabel, Robert D; Decker, Jared; Wojtowicz, Andrzej; Aly, Sharif; Davis, Jessica; Blanchard, Patricia; Crossley, Beate; Rossitto, Paul; Lehenbauer, Terry; Hagevoort, Robert; Chavez, Erik; Neibergs, J Shannon; Womack, James E

    2014-12-01

    The Bovine Respiratory Disease Coordinated Agricultural Project (BRD CAP) is a 5-year project funded by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), with an overriding objective to use the tools of modern genomics to identify cattle that are less susceptible to BRD. To do this, two large genome wide association studies (GWAS) were conducted using a case:control design on preweaned Holstein dairy heifers and beef feedlot cattle. A health scoring system was used to identify BRD cases and controls. Heritability estimates for BRD susceptibility ranged from 19 to 21% in dairy calves to 29.2% in beef cattle when using numerical scores as a semi-quantitative definition of BRD. A GWAS analysis conducted on the dairy calf data showed that single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) effects explained 20% of the variation in BRD incidence and 17-20% of the variation in clinical signs. These results represent a preliminary analysis of ongoing work to identify loci associated with BRD. Future work includes validation of the chromosomal regions and SNPs that have been identified as important for BRD susceptibility, fine mapping of chromosomes to identify causal SNPs, and integration of predictive markers for BRD susceptibility into genetic tests and national cattle genetic evaluations. PMID:25384903

  2. Incorporating Known Genetic Variants Does Not Improve the Accuracy of PSA Testing to Identify High Risk Prostate Cancer on Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Rebecca; Martin, Richard M.; Evans, David M.; Tilling, Kate; Davey Smith, George; Kemp, John P.; Lane, J. Athene; Hamdy, Freddie C.; Neal, David E.; Donovan, Jenny L.; Metcalfe, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing is a widely accepted screening method for prostate cancer, but with low specificity at thresholds giving good sensitivity. Previous research identified four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) principally associated with circulating PSA levels rather than with prostate cancer risk (TERT rs2736098, FGFR2 rs10788160, TBX3 rs11067228, KLK3 rs17632542). Removing the genetic contribution to PSA levels may improve the ability of the remaining biologically-determined variation in PSA to discriminate between high and low risk of progression within men with identified prostate cancer. We investigate whether incorporating information on the PSA-SNPs improves the discrimination achieved by a single PSA threshold in men with raised PSA levels. Materials and Methods Men with PSA between 3-10ng/mL and histologically-confirmed prostate cancer were categorised as high or low risk of progression (Low risk: Gleason score?6 and stage T1-T2a; High risk: Gleason score 7–10 or stage T2C). We used the combined genetic effect of the four PSA-SNPs to calculate a genetically corrected PSA risk score. We calculated the Area under the Curve (AUC) to determine how well genetically corrected PSA risk scores distinguished men at high risk of progression from low risk men. Results The analysis includes 868 men with prostate cancer (Low risk: 684 (78.8%); High risk: 184 (21.2%)). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves indicate that including the 4 PSA-SNPs does not improve the performance of measured PSA as a screening tool for high/low risk prostate cancer (measured PSA level AU C = 59.5% (95% CI: 54.7,64.2) vs additionally including information from the 4 PSA-SNPs AUC = 59.8% (95% CI: 55.2,64.5) (p-value = 0.40)). Conclusion We demonstrate that genetically correcting PSA for the combined genetic effect of four PSA-SNPs, did not improve discrimination between high and low risk prostate cancer in men with raised PSA levels (3-10ng/mL). Replication and gaining more accurate estimates of the effects of the 4 PSA-SNPs and additional variants associated with PSA levels and not prostate cancer could be obtained from subsequent GWAS from larger prospective studies. PMID:26431041

  3. Genetical genomic determinants of alcohol consumption in rats and humans

    PubMed Central

    Tabakoff, Boris; Saba, Laura; Printz, Morton; Flodman, Pam; Hodgkinson, Colin; Goldman, David; Koob, George; Richardson, Heather N; Kechris, Katerina; Bell, Richard L; Hübner, Norbert; Heinig, Matthias; Pravenec, Michal; Mangion, Jonathan; Legault, Lucie; Dongier, Maurice; Conigrave, Katherine M; Whitfield, John B; Saunders, John; Grant, Bridget; Hoffman, Paula L

    2009-01-01

    Background We have used a genetical genomic approach, in conjunction with phenotypic analysis of alcohol consumption, to identify candidate genes that predispose to varying levels of alcohol intake by HXB/BXH recombinant inbred rat strains. In addition, in two populations of humans, we assessed genetic polymorphisms associated with alcohol consumption using a custom genotyping array for 1,350 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Our goal was to ascertain whether our approach, which relies on statistical and informatics techniques, and non-human animal models of alcohol drinking behavior, could inform interpretation of genetic association studies with human populations. Results In the HXB/BXH recombinant inbred (RI) rats, correlation analysis of brain gene expression levels with alcohol consumption in a two-bottle choice paradigm, and filtering based on behavioral and gene expression quantitative trait locus (QTL) analyses, generated a list of candidate genes. A literature-based, functional analysis of the interactions of the products of these candidate genes defined pathways linked to presynaptic GABA release, activation of dopamine neurons, and postsynaptic GABA receptor trafficking, in brain regions including the hypothalamus, ventral tegmentum and amygdala. The analysis also implicated energy metabolism and caloric intake control as potential influences on alcohol consumption by the recombinant inbred rats. In the human populations, polymorphisms in genes associated with GABA synthesis and GABA receptors, as well as genes related to dopaminergic transmission, were associated with alcohol consumption. Conclusion Our results emphasize the importance of the signaling pathways identified using the non-human animal models, rather than single gene products, in identifying factors responsible for complex traits such as alcohol consumption. The results suggest cross-species similarities in pathways that influence predisposition to consume alcohol by rats and humans. The importance of a well-defined phenotype is also illustrated. Our results also suggest that different genetic factors predispose alcohol dependence versus the phenotype of alcohol consumption. PMID:19874574

  4. Large genetic screens for gynogenesis and androgenesis haploid inducers in Arabidopsis thaliana failed to identify mutants

    PubMed Central

    Portemer, Virginie; Renne, Charlotte; Guillebaux, Alexia; Mercier, Raphael

    2015-01-01

    Gynogenesis is a process in which the embryo genome originates exclusively from female origin, following embryogenesis stimulation by a male gamete. In contrast, androgenesis is the development of embryos that contain only the male nuclear genetic background. Both phenomena are of great interest in plant breeding as haploidization is an efficient tool to reduce the length of breeding schemes to create varieties. Although few inducer lines have been described, the genetic control of these phenomena is poorly understood. We developed genetic screens to identify mutations that would induce gynogenesis or androgenesis in Arabidopsis thaliana. The ability of mutant pollen to induce either gynogenesis or androgenesis was tested by crossing mutagenized plants as males. Seedlings from these crosses were screened with recessive phenotypic markers, one genetically controlled by the female genome and another by the male genome. Positive and negative controls confirmed the unambiguous detection of both gynogenesis and androgenesis events. This strategy was applied to 1,666 EMS-mutagenised lines and 47 distant Arabidopsis strains. While an internal control suggested that the mutagenesis reached saturation, no gynogenesis or androgenesis inducer was found. However, spontaneous gynogenesis was observed at a frequency of 1/10,800. Altogether, these results suggest that no simple EMS-induced mutation in the male genome is able to induce gynogenesis or androgenesis in Arabidopsis. PMID:25814999

  5. Gene networks associated with conditional fear in mice identified using a systems genetics approach

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Our understanding of the genetic basis of learning and memory remains shrouded in mystery. To explore the genetic networks governing the biology of conditional fear, we used a systems genetics approach to analyze a hybrid mouse diversity panel (HMDP) with high mapping resolution. Results A total of 27 behavioral quantitative trait loci were mapped with a false discovery rate of 5%. By integrating fear phenotypes, transcript profiling data from hippocampus and striatum and also genotype information, two gene co-expression networks correlated with context-dependent immobility were identified. We prioritized the key markers and genes in these pathways using intramodular connectivity measures and structural equation modeling. Highly connected genes in the context fear modules included Psmd6, Ube2a and Usp33, suggesting an important role for ubiquitination in learning and memory. In addition, we surveyed the architecture of brain transcript regulation and demonstrated preservation of gene co-expression modules in hippocampus and striatum, while also highlighting important differences. Rps15a, Kif3a, Stard7, 6330503K22RIK, and Plvap were among the individual genes whose transcript abundance were strongly associated with fear phenotypes. Conclusion Application of our multi-faceted mapping strategy permits an increasingly detailed characterization of the genetic networks underlying behavior. PMID:21410935

  6. Systems Genetics Reveals the Functional Context of PCOS Loci and Identifies Genetic and Molecular Mechanisms of Disease Heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ning; Cui, Jinrui; Mengesha, Emebet; Chen, Yii-Der I.; Taylor, Kent D.; Azziz, Ricardo; Goodarzi, Mark O.

    2015-01-01

    Genome wide association studies (GWAS) have revealed 11 independent risk loci for polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), a common disorder in young women characterized by androgen excess and oligomenorrhea. To put these risk loci and the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) therein into functional context, we measured DNA methylation and gene expression in subcutaneous adipose tissue biopsies to identify PCOS-specific alterations. Two genes from the LHCGR region, STON1-GTF2A1L and LHCGR, were overexpressed in PCOS. In analysis stratified by obesity, LHCGR was overexpressed only in non-obese PCOS women. Although not differentially expressed in the entire PCOS group, INSR was underexpressed in obese PCOS subjects only. Alterations in gene expression in the LHCGR, RAB5B and INSR regions suggest that SNPs in these loci may be functional and could affect gene expression directly or indirectly via epigenetic alterations. We identified reduced methylation in the LHCGR locus and increased methylation in the INSR locus, changes that are concordant with the altered gene expression profiles. Complex patterns of meQTL and eQTL were identified in these loci, suggesting that local genetic variation plays an important role in gene regulation. We propose that non-obese PCOS women possess significant alterations in LH receptor expression, which drives excess androgen secretion from the ovary. Alternatively, obese women with PCOS possess alterations in insulin receptor expression, with underexpression in metabolic tissues and overexpression in the ovary, resulting in peripheral insulin resistance and excess ovarian androgen production. These studies provide a genetic and molecular basis for the reported clinical heterogeneity of PCOS. PMID:26305227

  7. Non-Genetic Determinants of Mosquito Competence for Malaria Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Lefèvre, Thierry; Vantaux, Amélie; Dabiré, Kounbobr R.; Mouline, Karine; Cohuet, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Understanding how mosquito vectors and malaria parasites interact is of fundamental interest, and it also offers novel perspectives for disease control. Both the genetic and environmental contexts are known to affect the ability of mosquitoes to support malaria development and transmission, i.e., vector competence. Although the role of environment has long been recognized, much work has focused on host and parasite genetic effects. However, the last few years have seen a surge of studies revealing a great diversity of ways in which non-genetic factors can interfere with mosquito-Plasmodium interactions. Here, we review the current evidence for such environmentally mediated effects, including ambient temperature, mosquito diet, microbial gut flora, and infection history, and we identify additional factors previously overlooked in mosquito-Plasmodium interactions. We also discuss epidemiological implications, and the evolutionary consequences for vector immunity and parasite transmission strategies. Finally, we propose directions for further research and argue that an improved knowledge of non-genetic influences on mosquito-Plasmodium interactions could aid in implementing conventional malaria control measures and contribute to the design of novel strategies. PMID:23818841

  8. Resistance to hepatitis C virus: potential genetic and immunological determinants.

    PubMed

    Mina, Michael M; Luciani, Fabio; Cameron, Barbara; Bull, Rowena A; Beard, Michael R; Booth, David; Lloyd, Andrew R

    2015-04-01

    Studies of individuals who were highly exposed but seronegative (HESN) for HIV infection led to the discovery that homozygosity for the ?32 deletion mutation in the CCR5 gene prevents viral entry into target cells, and is associated with resistance to infection. Additionally, evidence for protective immunity has been noted in some HESN groups, such as sex workers in The Gambia. Population studies of individuals at high risk for hepatitis C virus infection suggest that an HESN phenotype exists. The body of evidence, which suggests that protective immunity allows clearance of hepatitis C virus without seroconversion is growing. Furthermore, proof-of-principle evidence from in-vitro studies shows that genetic polymorphisms can confer resistance to establishment of infection. This Review discusses the possibility that genetic mutations confer resistance against hepatitis C virus, and also explores evidence for protective immunity, including via genetically programmed variations in host responses. The data generally strengthens the notion that investigations of naturally arising polymorphisms within the hepatitis C virus interactome, and genetic association studies of well characterised HESN individuals, could identify potential targets for vaccine design and inform novel therapies. PMID:25703062

  9. Quantiles Regression Approach to Identifying the Determinant of Breastfeeding Duration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahdiyah; Norsiah Mohamed, Wan; Ibrahim, Kamarulzaman

    In this study, quantiles regression approach is applied to the data of Malaysian Family Life Survey (MFLS), to identify factors which are significantly related to the different conditional quantiles of the breastfeeding duration. It is known that the classical linear regression methods are based on minimizing residual sum of squared, but quantiles regression use a mechanism which are based on the conditional median function and the full range of other conditional quantile functions. Overall, it is found that the period of breastfeeding is significantly related to place of living, religion and total number of children in the family.

  10. A cellular genetics approach identifies gene-drug interactions and pinpoints drug toxicity pathway nodes

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Oscar T.; Frick, Amber; Parks, Bethany B.; Trask, O. Joseph; Butz, Natasha; Steffy, Brian; Chan, Emmanuel; Scoville, David K.; Healy, Eric; Benton, Cristina; McQuaid, Patricia E.; Thomas, Russell S.; Wiltshire, Tim

    2014-01-01

    New approaches to toxicity testing have incorporated high-throughput screening across a broad-range of in vitro assays to identify potential key events in response to chemical or drug treatment. To date, these approaches have primarily utilized repurposed drug discovery assays. In this study, we describe an approach that combines in vitro screening with genetic approaches for the experimental identification of genes and pathways involved in chemical or drug toxicity. Primary embryonic fibroblasts isolated from 32 genetically-characterized inbred mouse strains were treated in concentration-response format with 65 compounds, including pharmaceutical drugs, environmental chemicals, and compounds with known modes-of-action. Integrated cellular responses were measured at 24 and 72 h using high-content imaging and included cell loss, membrane permeability, mitochondrial function, and apoptosis. Genetic association analysis of cross-strain differences in the cellular responses resulted in a collection of candidate loci potentially underlying the variable strain response to each chemical. As a demonstration of the approach, one candidate gene involved in rotenone sensitivity, Cybb, was experimentally validated in vitro and in vivo. Pathway analysis on the combined list of candidate loci across all chemicals identified a number of over-connected nodes that may serve as core regulatory points in toxicity pathways. PMID:25221565

  11. Genetically encoded redox sensor identifies the role of ROS in degenerative and mitochondrial disease pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhaohui; Celotto, Alicia M.; Romero, Guillermo; Wipf, Peter; Palladino, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction plays an important role in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases, numerous other disease states and senescence. The ability to monitor reactive oxygen species (ROS) within tissues and over time in animal model systems is of significant research value. Recently, redox-sensitive fluorescent proteins have been developed. Transgenic flies expressing genetically encoded redox-sensitive GFPs (roGFPs) targeted to the mitochondria function as a useful in vivo assay of mitochondrial dysfunction and ROS. We have generated transgenic flies expressing a mitochondrial-targeted roGFP2, demonstrated its responsiveness to redox changes in cultured cells and in vivo and utilized this protein to discover elevated ROS as a contributor to pathogenesis in a characterized neurodegeneration mutant and in a model of mitochondrial encephalomyopathy. These studies identify the role of ROS in pathogenesis associated with mitochondrial disease and demonstrate the utility of genetically encoded redox sensors in Drosophila. PMID:21889980

  12. Using a family history questionnaire to identify adult patients with increased genetic risk for sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Schiavi, A.; Lavigne, J.; Turcotte, R.; Kasprzak, L.; Dumas, N.; Chong, G.; Freeman, C.; Alameldin, M.; Galiatsatos, P.; Palma, L.; Foulkes, W.D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Sarcomas in adults can be associated with hereditary cancer syndromes characterized by early-onset predisposition to numerous types of cancer. Because of variability in familial presentation and the largely unexplained genetic basis of sarcomas, ascertainment of patients for whom a genetics evaluation is most indicated poses challenges. We assessed the utility of a Sarcoma Clinic Genetic Screening (scgs) questionnaire in facilitating that task. Methods Between 2008 and 2012, 169 patients (median age: 53 years; range: 17–88 years) completed a self-administered scgs questionnaire. A retrospective chart review was completed for all respondents, and descriptive statistics were reported. Probands were divided into two groups depending on whether they did or did not report a family history of Li–Fraumeni syndrome–type cancers. Results A family history of cancer (as far as 3rd-degree relatives) was reported in 113 of 163 sarcoma patients (69%). Eeles Li–Fraumeni–like (lfl) criteria were fulfilled in 46 probands (28%), Chompret lfl in 21 (13%), Birch lfl in 8 (5%), and classic Li–Fraumeni in none. In the 10 probands tested for TP53 mutations, 1 pathogenic mutation was found. Further investigation of selected families led to the discovery of germline mutations in MLH1, MSH2, and APC genes in 3 individuals. Conclusions The scgs questionnaire was useful for ascertaining probands with sarcoma who could benefit from a genetic assessment. The tool allowed us to identify high-risk families fitting the criteria for lfl and, surprisingly, other hereditary cancer syndromes. Similar questionnaires could be used in other cancer-specific clinics to increase awareness of the genetic component of these cancers. PMID:26628864

  13. Identifying Litchi (Litchi chinensis Sonn.) Cultivars and Their Genetic Relationships Using Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) Markers

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wei; Xiao, Zhidan; Bao, Xiuli; Yang, Xiaoyan; Fang, Jing; Xiang, Xu

    2015-01-01

    Litchi is an important fruit tree in tropical and subtropical areas of the world. However, there is widespread confusion regarding litchi cultivar nomenclature and detailed information of genetic relationships among litchi germplasm is unclear. In the present study, the potential of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) for the identification of 96 representative litchi accessions and their genetic relationships in China was evaluated using 155 SNPs that were evenly spaced across litchi genome. Ninety SNPs with minor allele frequencies above 0.05 and a good genotyping success rate were used for further analysis. A relatively high level of genetic variation was observed among litchi accessions, as quantified by the expected heterozygosity (He = 0.305). The SNP based multilocus matching identified two synonymous groups, ‘Heiye’ and ‘Wuye’, and ‘Chengtuo’ and ‘Baitangli 1’. A subset of 14 SNPs was sufficient to distinguish all the non-redundant litchi genotypes, and these SNPs were proven to be highly stable by repeated analyses of a selected group of cultivars. Unweighted pair-group method of arithmetic averages (UPGMA) cluster analysis divided the litchi accessions analyzed into four main groups, which corresponded to the traits of extremely early-maturing, early-maturing, middle-maturing, and late-maturing, indicating that the fruit maturation period should be considered as the primary criterion for litchi taxonomy. Two subpopulations were detected among litchi accessions by STRUCTURE analysis, and accessions with extremely early- and late-maturing traits showed membership coefficients above 0.99 for Cluster 1 and Cluster 2, respectively. Accessions with early- and middle-maturing traits were identified as admixture forms with varying levels of membership shared between the two clusters, indicating their hybrid origin during litchi domestication. The results of this study will benefit litchi germplasm conservation programs and facilitate maximum genetic gains in litchi breeding programs. PMID:26261993

  14. A New System Identification Approach to Identifying Genetic Variants in Sequencing Studies for A Binary Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Guolian; Bi, Wenjian; Zhao, Yanlong; Zhang, Ji-Feng; Yang, Jun J.; Xu, Heng; Loh, Mignon L.; Hunger, Stephen P.; Relling, Mary V.; Pounds, Stanley; Cheng, Cheng

    2014-01-01

    We propose in this paper a set-valued (SV) system model, which is a generalized form of Logistic (LG) and Probit (Probit) regression, to be considered as a method for discovering genetic variants, especially rare genetic variants in next generation sequencing studies, for a binary phenotype. We propose a new set-valued system identification method to estimate all the underlying key system parameters for the Probit model and compare it with the LG model in the setting of genetic association studies. Across an extensive series of simulation studies, the Probit method maintained Type I error control and had similar or greater power than the LG method which is robust to different distributions of noise: logistic, normal or t distributions. Additionally, the Probit association parameter estimate was 2.7–46.8 fold less variable than the LG log-odds ratio association parameter estimate. Less variability in the association parameter estimate translates to greater power and robustness across the spectrum of minor allele frequencies (MAFs), and these advantages are the most pronounced for rare variants. For instance, in a simulation that generated data from an additive logistic model with odds ratio of 7.4 for a rare single nucleotide polymorphism with a MAF of 0.005 and a sample size of 2300, the Probit method had 60% power whereas the LG method had 25% power at the ?=10?6 level. Consistent with these simulation results, the set of variants identified by the LG method was a subset of those identified by the Probit method in two example analyses. Thus, we suggest the Probit method may be a competitive alternative to the LG method in genetic association studies such as candidate gene, genome-wide, or next generation sequencing studies for a binary phenotype. PMID:25096228

  15. A new system identification approach to identify genetic variants in sequencing studies for a binary phenotype.

    PubMed

    Kang, Guolian; Bi, Wenjian; Zhao, Yanlong; Zhang, Ji-Feng; Yang, Jun J; Xu, Heng; Loh, Mignon L; Hunger, Stephen P; Relling, Mary V; Pounds, Stanley; Cheng, Cheng

    2014-01-01

    We propose in this paper a set-valued (SV) system model, which is a generalized form of logistic (LG) and Probit (Probit) regression, to be considered as a method for discovering genetic variants, especially rare genetic variants in next-generation sequencing studies, for a binary phenotype. We propose a new SV system identification method to estimate all underlying key system parameters for the Probit model and compare it with the LG model in the setting of genetic association studies. Across an extensive series of simulation studies, the Probit method maintained type I error control and had similar or greater power than the LG method, which is robust to different distributions of noise: logistic, normal, or t distributions. Additionally, the Probit association parameter estimate was 2.7-46.8-fold less variable than the LG log-odds ratio association parameter estimate. Less variability in the association parameter estimate translates to greater power and robustness across the spectrum of minor allele frequencies (MAFs), and these advantages are the most pronounced for rare variants. For instance, in a simulation that generated data from an additive logistic model with an odds ratio of 7.4 for a rare single nucleotide polymorphism with a MAF of 0.005 and a sample size of 2,300, the Probit method had 60% power whereas the LG method had 25% power at the ? = 10(-6) level. Consistent with these simulation results, the set of variants identified by the LG method was a subset of those identified by the Probit method in two example analyses. Thus, we suggest the Probit method may be a competitive alternative to the LG method in genetic association studies such as candidate gene, genome-wide, or next-generation sequencing studies for a binary phenotype. PMID:25096228

  16. Genetic and environmental determinants of malaria parasite virulence in mosquitoes.

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, H M; Read, A F

    2002-01-01

    Models of malaria epidemiology and evolution are frequently based on the assumption that vector-parasitic associations are benign. Implicit in this assumption is the supposition that all Plasmodium parasites have an equal and neutral effect on vector survival, and thus that there is no parasite genetic variation for vector virulence. While some data support the assumption of avirulence, there has been no examination of the impact of parasite genetic diversity. We conducted a laboratory study with the rodent malaria parasite, Plasmodium chabaudi and the vector, Anopheles stephensi, to determine whether mosquito mortality varied with parasite genotype (CR and ER clones), infection diversity (single versus mixed genotype) and nutrient availability. Vector mortality varied significantly between parasite genotypes, but the rank order of virulence depended on environmental conditions. In standard conditions, mixed genotype infections were the most virulent but when glucose water was limited, mortality was highest in mosquitoes infected with CR. These genotype-by-environment interactions were repeatable across two experiments and could not be explained by variation in anaemia, gametocytaemia, blood meal size, mosquito body size, infection rate or oocyst burden. Variation in the genetic and environmental determinants of virulence may explain conflicting accounts of Plasmodium pathogenicity to mosquitoes in the malaria literature. PMID:12065037

  17. New genetic risk variants identified in multiethnic analysis of prostate cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Researchers have newly identified 23 common genetic variants—one-letter changes in DNA known as single-nucleotide polymorphisms or SNPs—that are associated with risk of prostate cancer. These results come from an analysis of more than 10 million SNPs in data pooled from studies that included over 43,000 men with prostate cancer and nearly 44,000 men without the disease. Study participants were from Australia, Ghana, Japan, the United Kingdom, and the United States and were of diverse ancestry.

  18. Use of a twin dataset to identify AMD-related visual patterns controlled by genetic factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quellec, Gwénolé; Abràmoff, Michael D.; Russell, Stephen R.

    2010-03-01

    The mapping of genotype to the phenotype of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is expected to improve the diagnosis and treatment of the disease in a near future. In this study, we focused on the first step to discover this mapping: we identified visual patterns related to AMD which seem to be controlled by genetic factors, without explicitly relating them to the genes. For this purpose, we used a dataset of eye fundus photographs from 74 twin pairs, either monozygotic twins, who have the same genotype, or dizygotic twins, whose genes responsible for AMD are less likely to be identical. If we are able to differentiate monozygotic twins from dizygotic twins, based on a given visual pattern, then this pattern is likely to be controlled by genetic factors. The main visible consequence of AMD is the apparition of drusen between the retinal pigment epithelium and Bruch's membrane. We developed two automated drusen detectors based on the wavelet transform: a shape-based detector for hard drusen, and a texture- and color- based detector for soft drusen. Forty visual features were evaluated at the location of the automatically detected drusen. These features characterize the texture, the shape, the color, the spatial distribution, or the amount of drusen. A distance measure between twin pairs was defined for each visual feature; a smaller distance should be measured between monozygotic twins for visual features controlled by genetic factors. The predictions of several visual features (75.7% accuracy) are comparable or better than the predictions of human experts.

  19. Genetic determinants of quantitative traits associated with cardiovascular disease risk.

    PubMed

    Smolková, Božena; Bonassi, Stefano; Buociková, Verona; Dušinská, Mária; Horská, Alexandra; Kuba, Daniel; Džupinková, Zuzana; Rašlová, Katarína; Gašparovi?, Juraj; Slíž, Ivan; Ceppi, Marcello; Vohnout, Branislav; Wsólová, Ladislava; Volkovová, Katarína

    2015-08-01

    Established risk factors for cardiovascular diseases (CVD) may be moderated by genetic variants. In 2403 unrelated individuals from general practice (mean age 40.5 years), we evaluated the influence of 15 variants in 12 candidate genes on quantitative traits (QT) associated with CVD (body mass index, abdominal obesity, glucose, serum lipids, and blood pressure). Prior to multiple testing correction, univariate analysis associated APOE rs429358, rs7412 and ATG16L1 rs2241880 variants with serum lipid levels, while LEPR rs1137100 and ATG16L1 rs2241880 variants were linked to obesity related QTs. After taking into account confounding factors and correcting for multiple comparisons only APOE rs429358 and rs7412 variants remained significantly associated with risk of dyslipidemia. APOE rs429358 variant almost tripled the risk in homozygous subjects (OR = 2.97; 95% CI 1.09-8.10, p < 0.03) and had a lesser but still highly significant association also in heterozygous individuals (OR = 1.67; 95% CI 1.24-2.10; p < 0.001). Associations with hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and metabolic syndrome were not significant after Bonferroni correction. The influence of genetic variation is more evident in dyslipidemia than in other analyzed QTs. These results may contribute to strategic research aimed at including genetic variation in the set of data required to identify subjects at high risk of CVD. PMID:26043189

  20. Using multilevel models to identify drivers of landscape-genetic structure among management areas.

    PubMed

    Dudaniec, Rachael Y; Rhodes, Jonathan R; Worthington Wilmer, Jessica; Lyons, Mitchell; Lee, Kristen E; McAlpine, Clive A; Carrick, Frank N

    2013-07-01

    Landscape genetics offers a powerful approach to understanding species' dispersal patterns. However, a central obstacle is to account for ecological processes operating at multiple spatial scales, while keeping research outcomes applicable to conservation management. We address this challenge by applying a novel multilevel regression approach to model landscape drivers of genetic structure at both the resolution of individuals and at a spatial resolution relevant to management (i.e. local government management areas: LGAs) for the koala (Phascolartos cinereus) in Australia. Our approach allows for the simultaneous incorporation of drivers of landscape-genetic relationships operating at multiple spatial resolutions. Using microsatellite data for 1106 koalas, we show that, at the individual resolution, foliage projective cover (FPC) facilitates high gene flow (i.e. low resistance) until it falls below approximately 30%. Out of six additional land-cover variables, only highways and freeways further explained genetic distance after accounting for the effect of FPC. At the LGA resolution, there was significant variation in isolation-by-resistance (IBR) relationships in terms of their slopes and intercepts. This was predominantly explained by the average resistance distance among LGAs, with a weaker effect of historical forest cover. Rates of recent landscape change did not further explain variation in IBR relationships among LGAs. By using a novel multilevel model, we disentangle the effect of landscape resistance on gene flow at the fine resolution (i.e. among individuals) from effects occurring at coarser resolutions (i.e. among LGAs). This has important implications for our ability to identify appropriate scale-dependent management actions. PMID:23730800

  1. Identifying flavor preference subgroups. Genetic basis and related eating behavior traits.

    PubMed

    Törnwall, Outi; Silventoinen, Karri; Hiekkalinna, Tero; Perola, Markus; Tuorila, Hely; Kaprio, Jaakko

    2014-04-01

    Subgroups based on flavor preferences were identified and their genetic and behavior related characteristics investigated using extensive data from 331 Finnish twins (21-25years, 146 men) including 47 monozygotic (MZ) and 93 dizygotic (DZ) pairs, and 51 twin individuals. The subgroup identification (hierarchical and K-means clustering) was based on liking responses to food names representing sour, umami, and spicy flavor qualities. Furthermore, sensory tests were conducted, a questionnaire on food likes completed, and various eating behavior related traits measured with validated scales. Sensory data included intensity ratings of PROP (6-n-propylthiouracil-impregnated filter paper), hedonic and intensity responses to sourness (orange juice with and without added citric acid, 0.42%), pungency (strawberry jelly with and without added capsaicin 0.00013%) and umami ('mouthfeel flavor' taste solution). Ratings of liking of 41 general food names were categorized into salty-and-fatty, sweet-and-fatty, fruits and vegetables and fish foods. Subgroup differences (complex samples procedure) and the genetics underlying the subgroups (structural equation modeling) were investigated. Of the resulting two groups (basic, n=140, adventurous n=152; non-grouped n=39), the adventurous expressed higher liking for sour and spicy foods, and had more tolerance for capsaicin burn in the sensory-hedonic test. The adventurous were also less food neophobic (25.9±9.1 vs. 32.5±10.6, respectively) and expressed higher liking for fruits and vegetables compared to the basic group. Genetic effects were shown to underlie the subgroups (heritability 72%, CI: 36-92%). Linkage analysis for 27 candidate gene regions revealed suggestively that being adventurous is linked to TAS1R1 and PKD1L3 genes. These results indicate that food neophobia and genetic differences may form a barrier through which individual flavor preferences are generated. PMID:24361469

  2. Monitoring and identifying genetically-engineered microorganisms in the environment by time-resolved laser fluorometry

    SciTech Connect

    Basile, F.

    1992-01-01

    A large percentage of the applications of Genetically Engineered Microorganisms (GEMs) involve their release into the environment. At the present time there is no rapid analytical method that can accurately identify and quantify the number of microorganisms and their foreign genes. In the past several years the author's laboratory has used successfully laser-based enzymatic assays to identify and differentiate pathogens, microorganisms, and genetically modified microorganisms. This work focused on the use of the above technology to track and identify agricultural beneficially GEMs that have been released into the environment. The first stage of this work dealt with the detection of the marker gene, the lactose operon. It was successfully demonstrated that the laser-based enzymatic assay can detect enzymatic activity in E. coli after 5 minutes of induction. Moreover, the author has achieved quantitation of GEMs in the laboratory down to 10[sup 4] cells with only a 30 minute incubation time. The second stage of this work dealt with the characterization of the analytical blank present in environmental samples. Strategies were devised to circumvent this interference and new substrates were synthesized that improved the S/B of the analysis. The last stage of this research dealt with devising new instrumental methods to detect small number (single cell) of microorganisms. These included incorporation of time-resolved detection in flow cytometry, Capillary Electrophoresis of microorganisms, and two-photon spectroscopy of centrosymmetric probes. The results found here will complement the large array of techniques available for monitoring and identifying GEMs in the environment. Ultimately, the technique chosen will depend heavily on the type of gene being monitored, the sensitivity required, and the environmental conditions.

  3. High-Throughput Transcriptome Sequencing Identifies Candidate Genetic Modifiers of Vulnerability to Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Garic, Ana; Berres, Mark E.; Smith, Susan M.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction FASD is a leading cause of neurodevelopmental disability. Genetic factors can modify vulnerability to FASD, but these elements are poorly characterized. Methods We performed high-throughput transcriptional profiling to identify gene candidates that could potentially modify vulnerability to ethanol’s neurotoxicity. We interrogated a unique genetic resource, neuroprogenitor cells from two closely-related Gallus gallus lines having well-characterized robust or attenuated ethanol responses with respect to intracellular calcium mobilization and CaMKII / ?-catenin-dependent apoptosis. Samples were not exposed to ethanol prior to analysis. Results We identified 363 differentially expressed genes in neuroprogenitors from these two lines. KEGG analysis revealed several gene clusters having significantly differential enrichment in gene expression. The largest and most significant cluster comprised ribosomal proteins (38 genes, p = 1.85 × 10?47). Other significantly enriched gene clusters included metabolism (25 genes, p = 0.0098), oxidative phosphorylation (18 genes, p = 1.10 × 10?11), spliceosome (13 genes, p = 7.02 × 10?8) and protein processing in the endoplasmic reticulum (9 genes, p = 0.0011). Inspection of GO-terms identified 24 genes involved in the calcium/?-catenin signals that mediate ethanol's neurotoxicity in this model, including ?-catenin itself and both calmodulin isoforms. Conclusions Four of the identified pathways with altered transcript abundance mediate the flow of cellular information from RNA to protein. Importantly, ribosome biogenesis also senses nucleolar stress and regulates p53-mediated apoptosis in neural crest. Human ribosomopathies produce craniofacial malformations and eleven known ribosomopathy genes were differentially expressed in this model of neural crest apoptosis. Rapid changes in ribosome expression are consistently observed in ethanol-treated mouse embryo neural folds, a model that is developmentally similar to ours. The recurring identification of ribosome biogenesis suggests it is a candidate modifier of ethanol vulnerability. These results highlight this approach’s efficacy to formulate new, mechanistic hypotheses regarding ethanol’s developmental damage. PMID:24962712

  4. May genetic factors in fibromyalgia help to identify patients with differentially altered frequencies of immune cells?

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, L S C; Correa, H; Silva, G C; Campos, F S; Baião, F R; Ribeiro, L S; Faria, A M; d'Avila Reis, D

    2008-01-01

    There is common agreement that fibromyalgia (FM) is an extremely heterogeneous entity. Patients differ in their clinical symptoms, endocrine and immune parameters. In this study we evaluated endocrine and immunological features of distinct subsets of FM patients. In contrast to previous attempts to identify subsets of FM patients, based solely on their psychological and cognitive features, herein we propose to separate FM patients by genetic features. Allelic expression of the polymorphic promoter region of the serotonin transporter (5-HTTLPR) was analysed as a relevant genetic factor for FM. Seventy-five patients meeting the American College of Rheumatology criteria and 27 healthy age-matched controls participated in this study. All controls and FM patients were submitted to genotyping of 5-HTTLPR. Twenty-seven FM patients, who were able to discontinue hypnotic, sedative or psychotropic prescription medications for at least 2 weeks, were then subdivided into L (homozygote LL) or S groups (genotypes LS and SS). They were evaluated for salivary cortisol levels, absolute number of leucocyte subpopulations, including natural killer (NK) cells and activated T and B lymphocytes. Both groups presented decreased cortisol levels, more intense in the L group, increased all B lymphocytes subsets and reduced CD4+CD25high T lymphocytes. The L group had increased CD4+CD25low activated T lymphocytes, while the S group displayed elevated CD4+human leucocyte antigen D-related (HLA-DR)+ activated T lymphocytes and decreased NK cells. We demonstrate that genetic factors may help to identify FM individuals with differentially altered frequencies of immune cells. PMID:19037919

  5. Genetic Determinism and the Innate-Acquired Distinction in Medicine

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    This article illustrates in which sense genetic determinism is still part of the contemporary interactionist consensus in medicine. Three dimensions of this consensus are discussed: kinds of causes, a continuum of traits ranging from monogenetic diseases to car accidents, and different kinds of determination due to different norms of reaction. On this basis, this article explicates in which sense the interactionist consensus presupposes the innate–acquired distinction. After a descriptive Part 1, Part 2 reviews why the innate–acquired distinction is under attack in contemporary philosophy of biology. Three arguments are then presented to provide a limited and pragmatic defense of the distinction: an epistemic, a conceptual, and a historical argument. If interpreted in a certain manner, and if the pragmatic goals of prevention and treatment (ideally specifying what medicine and health care is all about) are taken into account, then the innate–acquired distinction can be a useful epistemic tool. It can help, first, to understand that genetic determination does not mean fatalism, and, second, to maintain a system of checks and balances in the continuing nature–nurture debates. PMID:20234831

  6. Rectal cancer profiling identifies distinct subtypes in India based on age at onset, genetic, epigenetic and clinicopathological characteristics.

    PubMed

    Laskar, Ruhina Shirin; Ghosh, Sankar Kumar; Talukdar, Fazlur Rahman

    2015-12-01

    Rectal cancer is a heterogeneous disease that develops through multiple pathways characterized by genetic and epigenetic alterations. India has a comparatively higher proportion of rectal cancers and early-onset cases. We analyzed genetic (KRAS, TP53 and BRAF mutations, and MSI), epigenetic alterations (CpG island methylation detection of 10 tumor-related genes/loci), the associated clinicopathological features and survival trend in 80 primary rectal cancer patients from India. MSI was detected using BAT 25 and BAT 26 mononucleotide markers and mutation of KRAS, TP53, and BRAF V600E was detected by direct sequencing. Methyl specific polymerase chain reaction was used to determine promoter methylation status of the classic CIMP panel markers (P16, hMLH1, MINT1, MINT2, and MINT31) as well as other tumor specific genes (DAPK, RASSF1, BRCA1, and GSTP1). MSI and BRAF mutations were uncommon but high frequencies of overall KRAS mutations (67.5%); low KRAS codon 12 and a novel KRAS G15S mutation with concomitant RASSF1 methylation in early onset cases were remarkable. Hierarchical clustering as well as principal component analysis identified three distinct subgroups of patients having discrete age at onset, clinicopathological, molecular and survival characteristics: (i) a KRAS associated CIMP-high subgroup; (ii) a significantly younger MSS, CIMP low, TP53 mutant group having differential KRAS mutation patterns, and (iii) a CIMP-negative, TP53 mutated group. The early onset subgroup exhibited the most unfavorable disease characteristics with advanced stage, poorly differentiated tumors and had the poorest survival compared to the other subgroups. Genetic and epigenetic profiling of rectal cancer patients identified distinct subtypes in Indian population. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25418895

  7. Hierarchical Genetic Algorithm Approach to Determine Pulse Sequences in NMR

    E-print Network

    Ashok Ajoy; Anil Kumar

    2009-12-04

    We develop a new class of genetic algorithm that computationally determines efficient pulse sequences to implement a quantum gate U in a three-qubit system. The method is shown to be quite general, and the same algorithm can be used to derive efficient sequences for a variety of target matrices. We demonstrate this by implementing the inversion-on-equality gate efficiently when the spin-spin coupling constants $J_{12}=J_{23}=J$ and $J_{13}=0$. We also propose new pulse sequences to implement the Parity gate and Fanout gate, which are about 50% more efficient than the previous best efforts. Moreover, these sequences are shown to require significantly less RF power for their implementation. The proposed algorithm introduces several new features in the conventional genetic algorithm framework. We use matrices instead of linear chains, and the columns of these matrices have a well defined hierarchy. The algorithm is a genetic algorithm coupled to a fast local optimizer, and is hence a hybrid GA. It shows fast convergence, and running on a MATLAB platform takes about 20 minutes on a standard personal computer to derive efficient pulse sequences for any target 8X8 matrix $U$.

  8. NCI Launches New Initiative to Identify Genetic Risk Factors for Breast and Prostate Cancer | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI), part of the National Institutes of Health, today launched an initiative to identify genetic alterations that make people susceptible to prostate and breast cancer, two of the most commonly diagnosed cancers in the United States. Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility (CGEMS) is a three-year initiative, funded for $14 million, that will conduct scans of the entire human genome (genotyping) to identify common, inherited gene mutations that increase the risks for breast and prostate cancer.

  9. Promoter Hypermethylation Profiling Identifies Subtypes of Head and Neck Cancer with Distinct Viral, Environmental, Genetic and Survival Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Choudhury, Javed Hussain; Ghosh, Sankar Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Background Epigenetic and genetic alteration plays a major role to the development of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Consumption of tobacco (smoking/chewing) and human papilloma virus (HPV) are also associated with an increase the risk of HNSCC. Promoter hypermethylation of the tumor suppression genes is related with transcriptional inactivation and loss of gene expression. We investigated epigenetic alteration (promoter methylation of tumor-related genes/loci) in tumor tissues in the context of genetic alteration, viral infection, and tobacco exposure and survival status. Methodology The study included 116 tissue samples (71 tumor and 45 normal tissues) from the Northeast Indian population. Methylation specific polymerase chain reaction (MSP) was used to determine the methylation status of 10 tumor-related genes/loci (p16, DAPK, RASSF1, BRAC1, GSTP1, ECAD, MLH1, MINT1, MINT2 and MINT31). Polymorphisms of CYP1A1, GST (M1 & T1), XRCC1and XRCC2 genes were studied by using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) and multiplex-PCR respectively. Principal Findings Unsupervised hierarchical clustering analysis based on methylation pattern had identified two tumor clusters, which significantly differ by CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP), tobacco, GSTM1, CYP1A1, HPV and survival status. Analyzing methylation of genes/loci individually, we have found significant higher methylation of DAPK, RASSF1, p16 and MINT31genes (P = 0.031, 0.013, 0.031 and 0.015 respectively) in HPV (+) cases compared to HPV (-). Furthermore, a CIMP-high and Cluster-1 characteristic was also associated with poor survival. Conclusions Promoter methylation profiles reflecting a correlation with tobacco, HPV, survival status and genetic alteration and may act as a marker to determine subtypes and patient outcome in HNSCC. PMID:26098903

  10. Release of genetically engineered insects: a framework to identify potential ecological effects

    PubMed Central

    David, Aaron S; Kaser, Joe M; Morey, Amy C; Roth, Alexander M; Andow, David A

    2013-01-01

    Genetically engineered (GE) insects have the potential to radically change pest management worldwide. With recent approvals of GE insect releases, there is a need for a synthesized framework to evaluate their potential ecological and evolutionary effects. The effects may occur in two phases: a transitory phase when the focal population changes in density, and a steady state phase when it reaches a new, constant density. We review potential effects of a rapid change in insect density related to population outbreaks, biological control, invasive species, and other GE organisms to identify a comprehensive list of potential ecological and evolutionary effects of GE insect releases. We apply this framework to the Anopheles gambiae mosquito – a malaria vector being engineered to suppress the wild mosquito population – to identify effects that may occur during the transitory and steady state phases after release. Our methodology reveals many potential effects in each phase, perhaps most notably those dealing with immunity in the transitory phase, and with pathogen and vector evolution in the steady state phase. Importantly, this framework identifies knowledge gaps in mosquito ecology. Identifying effects in the transitory and steady state phases allows more rigorous identification of the potential ecological effects of GE insect release. PMID:24198955

  11. Release of genetically engineered insects: a framework to identify potential ecological effects.

    PubMed

    David, Aaron S; Kaser, Joe M; Morey, Amy C; Roth, Alexander M; Andow, David A

    2013-10-01

    Genetically engineered (GE) insects have the potential to radically change pest management worldwide. With recent approvals of GE insect releases, there is a need for a synthesized framework to evaluate their potential ecological and evolutionary effects. The effects may occur in two phases: a transitory phase when the focal population changes in density, and a steady state phase when it reaches a new, constant density. We review potential effects of a rapid change in insect density related to population outbreaks, biological control, invasive species, and other GE organisms to identify a comprehensive list of potential ecological and evolutionary effects of GE insect releases. We apply this framework to the Anopheles gambiae mosquito - a malaria vector being engineered to suppress the wild mosquito population - to identify effects that may occur during the transitory and steady state phases after release. Our methodology reveals many potential effects in each phase, perhaps most notably those dealing with immunity in the transitory phase, and with pathogen and vector evolution in the steady state phase. Importantly, this framework identifies knowledge gaps in mosquito ecology. Identifying effects in the transitory and steady state phases allows more rigorous identification of the potential ecological effects of GE insect release. PMID:24198955

  12. The determinant role of temporary proglacial drainages on the genetic structure of fishes.

    PubMed

    Gagnon, M-C; Angers, B

    2006-04-01

    Phylogeographic studies have shed light on Pleistocene glaciations as a key factor in shaping present-day genetic structure of many organisms. In formerly glaciated regions, the combined action of several factors such as refuges origin, physiological capacities and demographic parameters have contributed importantly to this process but specifically for each species. Therefore, a fine-scale genetic structure is not expected to be similar for different species, unless it has been modulated by the action of a strong environmental pressure. The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of postglacial environment on the genetic structure of fishes. To achieve this objective, three fish species (northern pike, lake whitefish and yellow perch) commonly found in sympatry in Laurentian Shield lakes but displaying different ecological and physiological characteristics were analysed. The comparison of these unrelated species was performed to identify the factors determining the organization of their genetic structure. Populations of all species mostly originated from the Mississippian refuge. Low genetic differentiation was observed among populations but significant structures were detected for the three species. Despite marked differences among species, these structures presented common characteristics: a lack of congruence with drainage and a longitudinal organization. This suggested that the dispersion of species occurred independently, leading to a species-specific structure. However, the settling of populations appeared to be mediated by a dynamic system of proglacial meltwater streams associated to the glacial Lake Ojibway-Barlow, providing such similarities among species. PMID:16599966

  13. Genetic and environmental determinants of risk for cholangiocarcinoma in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Miwa, Masanao; Honjo, Satoshi; You, Gyokukou; Tanaka, Masakazu; Uchida, Kazuhiko; Srivatanakul, Petcharin; Khuhaprema, Thiravud; Loilome, Watcharin; Techasen, Anchalee; Wongkham, Chaisiri; Limpaiboon, Temduang; Yongvanit, Puangrat; Wongkham, Sopit

    2014-01-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is a difficult cancer to diagnose in the early stage and to treat by curative resection. The incidence of CCA in the northeast of Thailand is the highest in the world. To make progress in detecting a high risk group and in the prevention and detection of CCA, we have been analyzing the risk factors for CCA. Although liver fluke infection is known to be a risk factor, there are patients who are not infected with the liver fluke and not all people infected with the liver fluke will suffer from the disease. Therefore, it is of the utmost importance to analyze the risk factors and the mechanism to prevent the disease and also to detect the disease in its early stage to save patients’ lives. Through collaboration among Thai and Japanese researchers, we analyzed the genetic and environmental determinants of risks for CCA. Also, we have been trying to develop methods to detect the disease in a non-invasive way. Without repeating findings reported in various reviews on CCA, we will first discuss the environmental and genetic determinants of the risks for CCA. Second, we will discuss the properties of CCA, including the etiological agents and the mechanism of cholangiocarcinogenesis, and finally, we will discuss future approaches to prevent and cure CCA from the standpoint of evidence-based medicine. We will discuss these points by including the data from our laboratories. We would like to emphasize the importance of the genetic data, especially whole genome approaches, to understand the properties of CCA, to find a high risk population for CCA and to develop effective preventative methods to stop the carcinogenic steps toward CCA in the near future. In addition, it is of the upmost importance to develop a non-invasive, specific and sensitive method to detect CCA in its early stage for the application of modern medical approaches to help patients with CCA. PMID:25401000

  14. Low-Dose Radiation Cataract and Genetic Determinants of Radiosensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Kleiman, Norman Jay

    2013-11-30

    The lens of the eye is one of the most radiosensitive tissues in the body. Ocular ionizing radiation exposure results in characteristic, dose related, progressive lens changes leading to cataract formation. While initial, early stages of lens opacification may not cause visual disability, the severity of such changes progressively increases with dose until vision is impaired and cataract extraction surgery may be required. Because of the transparency of the eye, radiation induced lens changes can easily be followed non-invasively over time. Thus, the lens provides a unique model system in which to study the effects of low dose ionizing radiation exposure in a complex, highly organized tissue. Despite this observation, considerable uncertainties remain surrounding the relationship between dose and risk of developing radiation cataract. For example, a growing number of human epidemiological findings suggest significant risk among various groups of occupationally and accidentally exposed individuals and confidence intervals that include zero dose. Nevertheless, questions remain concerning the relationship between lens opacities, visual disability, clinical cataract, threshold dose and/or the role of genetics in determining radiosensitivity. Experimentally, the response of the rodent eye to radiation is quite similar to that in humans and thus animal studies are well suited to examine the relationship between radiation exposure, genetic determinants of radiosensitivity and cataractogenesis. The current work has expanded our knowledge of the low-dose effects of X-irradiation or high-LET heavy ion exposure on timing and progression of radiation cataract and has provided new information on the genetic, molecular, biochemical and cell biological features which contribute to this pathology. Furthermore, findings have indicated that single and/or multiple haploinsufficiency for various genes involved in DNA repair and cell cycle checkpoint control, such as Atm, Brca1 or Rad9, influence cataract development and thus radiosensitivity. These observations have direct applicability to various human populations including accidentally exposed individuals, interventional medical workers, astronauts and nuclear plant workers.

  15. An Efficient Stepwise Statistical Test to Identify Multiple Linked Human Genetic Variants Associated with Specific Phenotypic Traits

    PubMed Central

    Huh, Iksoo; Kwon, Min-Seok; Park, Taesung

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in genotyping methodologies have allowed genome-wide association studies (GWAS) to accurately identify genetic variants that associate with common or pathological complex traits. Although most GWAS have focused on associations with single genetic variants, joint identification of multiple genetic variants, and how they interact, is essential for understanding the genetic architecture of complex phenotypic traits. Here, we propose an efficient stepwise method based on the Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel test (for stratified categorical data) to identify causal joint multiple genetic variants in GWAS. This method combines the CMH statistic with a stepwise procedure to detect multiple genetic variants associated with specific categorical traits, using a series of associated I × J contingency tables and a null hypothesis of no phenotype association. Through a new stratification scheme based on the sum of minor allele count criteria, we make the method more feasible for GWAS data having sample sizes of several thousands. We also examine the properties of the proposed stepwise method via simulation studies, and show that the stepwise CMH test performs better than other existing methods (e.g., logistic regression and detection of associations by Markov blanket) for identifying multiple genetic variants. Finally, we apply the proposed approach to two genomic sequencing datasets to detect linked genetic variants associated with bipolar disorder and obesity, respectively. PMID:26406920

  16. Genetic Determinants of Circulating Sphingolipid Concentrations in European Populations

    PubMed Central

    Pramstaller, Peter P.; Rudan, Igor; Franklin, Christopher S.; Liebisch, Gerhard; Erdmann, Jeanette; Jonasson, Inger; Zorkoltseva, Irina V.; Pattaro, Cristian; Hayward, Caroline; Isaacs, Aaron; Hengstenberg, Christian; Campbell, Susan; Gnewuch, Carsten; Janssens, A. CecileJ.W.; Kirichenko, Anatoly V.; König, Inke R.; Marroni, Fabio; Polasek, Ozren; Demirkan, Ayse; Kolcic, Ivana; Schwienbacher, Christine; Igl, Wilmar; Biloglav, Zrinka; Witteman, Jacqueline C. M.; Pichler, Irene; Zaboli, Ghazal; Axenovich, Tatiana I.; Peters, Annette; Schreiber, Stefan; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Schunkert, Heribert; Hastie, Nick; Oostra, Ben A.; Wild, Sarah H.; Meitinger, Thomas; Gyllensten, Ulf; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Wilson, James F.; Wright, Alan; Schmitz, Gerd; Campbell, Harry

    2009-01-01

    Sphingolipids have essential roles as structural components of cell membranes and in cell signalling, and disruption of their metabolism causes several diseases, with diverse neurological, psychiatric, and metabolic consequences. Increasingly, variants within a few of the genes that encode enzymes involved in sphingolipid metabolism are being associated with complex disease phenotypes. Direct experimental evidence supports a role of specific sphingolipid species in several common complex chronic disease processes including atherosclerotic plaque formation, myocardial infarction (MI), cardiomyopathy, pancreatic ?-cell failure, insulin resistance, and type 2 diabetes mellitus. Therefore, sphingolipids represent novel and important intermediate phenotypes for genetic analysis, yet little is known about the major genetic variants that influence their circulating levels in the general population. We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) between 318,237 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and levels of circulating sphingomyelin (SM), dihydrosphingomyelin (Dih-SM), ceramide (Cer), and glucosylceramide (GluCer) single lipid species (33 traits); and 43 matched metabolite ratios measured in 4,400 subjects from five diverse European populations. Associated variants (32) in five genomic regions were identified with genome-wide significant corrected p-values ranging down to 9.08×10?66. The strongest associations were observed in or near 7 genes functionally involved in ceramide biosynthesis and trafficking: SPTLC3, LASS4, SGPP1, ATP10D, and FADS1–3. Variants in 3 loci (ATP10D, FADS3, and SPTLC3) associate with MI in a series of three German MI studies. An additional 70 variants across 23 candidate genes involved in sphingolipid-metabolizing pathways also demonstrate association (p?=?10?4 or less). Circulating concentrations of several key components in sphingolipid metabolism are thus under strong genetic control, and variants in these loci can be tested for a role in the development of common cardiovascular, metabolic, neurological, and psychiatric diseases. PMID:19798445

  17. Nature and Extent of Genetic Diversity of Dengue Viruses Determined by 454 Pyrosequencing

    PubMed Central

    Choudhury, Md Abu; Lott, William B; Banu, Shahera; Cheng, Anthony Youzhi; Teo, Yik-Ying; Ong, Rick Twee-Hee; Aaskov, John

    2015-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) populations are characteristically highly diverse. Regular lineage extinction and replacement is an important dynamic DENV feature, and most DENV lineage turnover events are associated with increased incidence of disease. The role of genetic diversity in DENV lineage extinctions is not understood. We investigated the nature and extent of genetic diversity in the envelope (E) gene of DENV serotype 1 representing different lineages histories. A region of the DENV genome spanning the E gene was amplified and sequenced by Roche/454 pyrosequencing. The pyrosequencing results identified distinct sub-populations (haplotypes) for each DENV-1 E gene. A phylogenetic tree was constructed with the consensus DENV-1 E gene nucleotide sequences, and the sequences of each constructed haplotype showed that the haplotypes segregated with the Sanger consensus sequence of the population from which they were drawn. Haplotypes determined through pyrosequencing identified a recombinant DENV genome that could not be identified through Sanger sequencing. Nucleotide level sequence diversities of DENV-1 populations determined from SNP analysis were very low, estimated from 0.009–0.01. There were also no stop codon, frameshift or non-frameshift mutations observed in the E genes of any lineage. No significant correlations between the accumulation of deleterious mutations or increasing genetic diversity and lineage extinction were observed (p>0.5). Although our hypothesis that accumulation of deleterious mutations over time led to the extinction and replacement of DENV lineages was ultimately not supported by the data, our data does highlight the significant technical issues that must be resolved in the way in which population diversity is measured for DENV and other viruses. The results provide an insight into the within-population genetic structure and diversity of DENV-1 populations. PMID:26566128

  18. Yeast Augmented Network Analysis (YANA): a new systems approach to identify therapeutic targets for human genetic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wiley, David J.; Juan, Ilona; Le, Hao; Cai, Xiaodong; Baumbach, Lisa; Beattie, Christine; D'Urso, Gennaro

    2014-01-01

    Genetic interaction networks that underlie most human diseases are highly complex and poorly defined. Better-defined networks will allow identification of a greater number of therapeutic targets. Here we introduce our Yeast Augmented Network Analysis (YANA) approach and test it with the X-linked spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) disease gene UBA1. First, we express UBA1 and a mutant variant in fission yeast and use high-throughput methods to identify fission yeast genetic modifiers of UBA1. Second, we analyze available protein-protein interaction network databases in both fission yeast and human to construct UBA1 genetic networks. Third, from these networks we identified potential therapeutic targets for SMA. Finally, we validate one of these targets in a vertebrate (zebrafish) SMA model. This study demonstrates the power of combining synthetic and chemical genetics with a simple model system to identify human disease gene networks that can be exploited for treating human diseases. PMID:25075304

  19. Whole-genome sequencing identifies genetic alterations in pediatric low-grade gliomas.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinghui; Wu, Gang; Miller, Claudia P; Tatevossian, Ruth G; Dalton, James D; Tang, Bo; Orisme, Wilda; Punchihewa, Chandanamali; Parker, Matthew; Qaddoumi, Ibrahim; Boop, Fredrick A; Lu, Charles; Kandoth, Cyriac; Ding, Li; Lee, Ryan; Huether, Robert; Chen, Xiang; Hedlund, Erin; Nagahawatte, Panduka; Rusch, Michael; Boggs, Kristy; Cheng, Jinjun; Becksfort, Jared; Ma, Jing; Song, Guangchun; Li, Yongjin; Wei, Lei; Wang, Jianmin; Shurtleff, Sheila; Easton, John; Zhao, David; Fulton, Robert S; Fulton, Lucinda L; Dooling, David J; Vadodaria, Bhavin; Mulder, Heather L; Tang, Chunlao; Ochoa, Kerri; Mullighan, Charles G; Gajjar, Amar; Kriwacki, Richard; Sheer, Denise; Gilbertson, Richard J; Mardis, Elaine R; Wilson, Richard K; Downing, James R; Baker, Suzanne J; Ellison, David W

    2013-06-01

    The most common pediatric brain tumors are low-grade gliomas (LGGs). We used whole-genome sequencing to identify multiple new genetic alterations involving BRAF, RAF1, FGFR1, MYB, MYBL1 and genes with histone-related functions, including H3F3A and ATRX, in 39 LGGs and low-grade glioneuronal tumors (LGGNTs). Only a single non-silent somatic alteration was detected in 24 of 39 (62%) tumors. Intragenic duplications of the portion of FGFR1 encoding the tyrosine kinase domain (TKD) and rearrangements of MYB were recurrent and mutually exclusive in 53% of grade II diffuse LGGs. Transplantation of Trp53-null neonatal astrocytes expressing FGFR1 with the duplication involving the TKD into the brains of nude mice generated high-grade astrocytomas with short latency and 100% penetrance. FGFR1 with the duplication induced FGFR1 autophosphorylation and upregulation of the MAPK/ERK and PI3K pathways, which could be blocked by specific inhibitors. Focusing on the therapeutically challenging diffuse LGGs, our study of 151 tumors has discovered genetic alterations and potential therapeutic targets across the entire range of pediatric LGGs and LGGNTs. PMID:23583981

  20. Can novel genetic analyses help to identify low-dispersal marine invasive species?

    PubMed

    Teske, Peter R; Sandoval-Castillo, Jonathan; Waters, Jonathan M; Beheregaray, Luciano B

    2014-07-01

    Genetic methods can be a powerful tool to resolve the native versus introduced status of populations whose taxonomy and biogeography are poorly understood. The genetic study of introduced species is presently dominated by analyses that identify signatures of recent colonization by means of summary statistics. Unfortunately, such approaches cannot be used in low-dispersal species, in which recently established populations originating from elsewhere in the species' native range also experience periods of low population size because they are founded by few individuals. We tested whether coalescent-based molecular analyses that provide detailed information about demographic history supported the hypothesis that a sea squirt whose distribution is centered on Tasmania was recently introduced to mainland Australia and New Zealand through human activities. Methods comparing trends in population size (Bayesian Skyline Plots and Approximate Bayesian Computation) were no more informative than summary statistics, likely because of recent intra-Tasmanian dispersal. However, IMa2 estimates of divergence between putatively native and introduced populations provided information at a temporal scale suitable to differentiate between recent (potentially anthropogenic) introductions and ancient divergence, and indicated that all three non-Tasmanian populations were founded during the period of European settlement. While this approach can be affected by inaccurate molecular dating, it has considerable (albeit largely unexplored) potential to corroborate nongenetic information in species with limited dispersal capabilities. PMID:25165524

  1. Criteria for Identifying and Evaluating Candidate Sites for Open-Field Trials of Genetically Engineered Mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Brown, David M.; Alphey, Luke S.; McKemey, Andrew; Beech, Camilla

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Recent laboratory successes in the development of genetically engineered mosquitoes for controlling pathogen transmission have fostered the need for standardized procedures for advancing the technical achievements to practical tools. It is incumbent in many cases for the same scientists doing the in-laboratory discovery research to also take on the initial challenges of developing the pathway that will move the technologies to the field. One of these challenges is having a set of criteria for selecting collaborators and sites for efficacy and safety field trials that combine rigorous science with good ethical and legal practices. Specific site-selection criteria were developed in four categories—Scientific, Regulatory, Community Engagement, and Resources—in anticipation of open-field releases of a transgenic mosquito strain designed to suppress populations of the dengue vector mosquito, Aedes aegypti. The criteria are derived from previous published material, discussions, and personal experiences with the expectation of providing guidance to laboratory scientists for addressing the conceptual and operational considerations for identifying partner researchers and countries with whom to collaborate. These criteria are not intended to be prescriptive nor can they be applied to every circumstance where genetic approaches are proposed for deployment. However, we encourage those involved in the discovery phase of research to consider each criterion during project planning activities, and where appropriate, incorporate them into a “go/no-go” decision-making process for further development and testing of the technologies. PMID:24689963

  2. Identifying Genetic Variants for Heart Rate Variability in the Acetylcholine Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Riese, Harriëtte; Muñoz, Loretto M.; Hartman, Catharina A.; Ding, Xiuhua; Su, Shaoyong; Oldehinkel, Albertine J.; van Roon, Arie M.; van der Most, Peter J.; Lefrandt, Joop; Gansevoort, Ron T.; van der Harst, Pim; Verweij, Niek; Licht, Carmilla M. M.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Willemsen, Gonneke; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.; Nolte, Ilja M.; de Geus, Eco J. C.; Wang, Xiaoling; Snieder, Harold

    2014-01-01

    Heart rate variability is an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease and all-cause mortality. The acetylcholine pathway plays a key role in explaining heart rate variability in humans. We assessed whether 443 genotyped and imputed common genetic variants in eight key genes (CHAT, SLC18A3, SLC5A7, CHRNB4, CHRNA3, CHRNA, CHRM2 and ACHE) of the acetylcholine pathway were associated with variation in an established measure of heart rate variability reflecting parasympathetic control of the heart rhythm, the root mean square of successive differences (RMSSD) of normal RR intervals. The association was studied in a two stage design in individuals of European descent. First, analyses were performed in a discovery sample of four cohorts (n?=?3429, discovery stage). Second, findings were replicated in three independent cohorts (n?=?3311, replication stage), and finally the two stages were combined in a meta-analysis (n?=?6740). RMSSD data were obtained under resting conditions. After correction for multiple testing, none of the SNPs showed an association with RMSSD. In conclusion, no common genetic variants for heart rate variability were identified in the largest and most comprehensive candidate gene study on the acetylcholine pathway to date. Future gene finding efforts for RMSSD may want to focus on hypothesis free approaches such as the genome-wide association study. PMID:25384021

  3. Criteria for identifying and evaluating candidate sites for open-field trials of genetically engineered mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Brown, David M; Alphey, Luke S; McKemey, Andrew; Beech, Camilla; James, Anthony A

    2014-04-01

    Recent laboratory successes in the development of genetically engineered mosquitoes for controlling pathogen transmission have fostered the need for standardized procedures for advancing the technical achievements to practical tools. It is incumbent in many cases for the same scientists doing the in-laboratory discovery research to also take on the initial challenges of developing the pathway that will move the technologies to the field. One of these challenges is having a set of criteria for selecting collaborators and sites for efficacy and safety field trials that combine rigorous science with good ethical and legal practices. Specific site-selection criteria were developed in four categories-Scientific, Regulatory, Community Engagement, and Resources-in anticipation of open-field releases of a transgenic mosquito strain designed to suppress populations of the dengue vector mosquito, Aedes aegypti. The criteria are derived from previous published material, discussions, and personal experiences with the expectation of providing guidance to laboratory scientists for addressing the conceptual and operational considerations for identifying partner researchers and countries with whom to collaborate. These criteria are not intended to be prescriptive nor can they be applied to every circumstance where genetic approaches are proposed for deployment. However, we encourage those involved in the discovery phase of research to consider each criterion during project planning activities, and where appropriate, incorporate them into a "go/no-go" decision-making process for further development and testing of the technologies. PMID:24689963

  4. A reverse genetics approach identifies novel mutants in light responses and anthocyanin metabolism in petunia.

    PubMed

    Berenschot, Amanda S; Quecini, Vera

    2014-01-01

    Flower color and plant architecture are important commercially valuable features for ornamental petunias (Petunia x hybrida Vilm.). Photoperception and light signaling are the major environmental factors controlling anthocyanin and chlorophyll biosynthesis and shade-avoidance responses in higher plants. The genetic regulators of these processes were investigated in petunia by in silico analyses and the sequence information was used to devise a reverse genetics approach to probe mutant populations. Petunia orthologs of photoreceptor, light-signaling components and anthocyanin metabolism genes were identified and investigated for functional conservation by phylogenetic and protein motif analyses. The expression profiles of photoreceptor gene families and of transcription factors regulating anthocyanin biosynthesis were obtained by bioinformatic tools. Two mutant populations, generated by an alkalyting agent and by gamma irradiation, were screened using a phenotype-independent, sequence-based method by high-throughput PCR-based assay. The strategy allowed the identification of novel mutant alleles for anthocyanin biosynthesis (CHALCONE SYNTHASE) and regulation (PH4), and for light signaling (CONSTANS) genes. PMID:24554834

  5. Rapid in vivo forward genetic approach for identifying axon death genes in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Neukomm, Lukas J.; Burdett, Thomas C.; Gonzalez, Michael A.; Züchner, Stephan; Freeman, Marc R.

    2014-01-01

    Axons damaged by acute injury, toxic insults, or neurodegenerative diseases execute a poorly defined autodestruction signaling pathway leading to widespread fragmentation and functional loss. Here, we describe an approach to study Wallerian degeneration in the Drosophila L1 wing vein that allows for analysis of axon degenerative phenotypes with single-axon resolution in vivo. This method allows for the axotomy of specific subsets of axons followed by examination of progressive axonal degeneration and debris clearance alongside uninjured control axons. We developed new Flippase (FLP) reagents using proneural gene promoters to drive FLP expression very early in neural lineages. These tools allow for the production of mosaic clone populations with high efficiency in sensory neurons in the wing. We describe a collection of lines optimized for forward genetic mosaic screens using MARCM (mosaic analysis with a repressible cell marker; i.e., GFP-labeled, homozygous mutant) on all major autosomal arms (?95% of the fly genome). Finally, as a proof of principle we screened the X chromosome and identified a collection eight recessive and two dominant alleles of highwire, a ubiquitin E3 ligase required for axon degeneration. Similar unbiased forward genetic screens should help rapidly delineate axon death genes, thereby providing novel potential drug targets for therapeutic intervention to prevent axonal and synaptic loss. PMID:24958874

  6. A genome-wide association study to identify genetic markers associated with endometrial cancer grade

    E-print Network

    2012-04-12

    stream_source_info 1897-4287-10-S2-A47.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 4081 Content-Encoding UTF-8 stream_name 1897-4287-10-S2-A47.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 MEETING ABSTRACT Open Access A... genome-wide association study to identify genetic markers associated with endometrial cancer grade T O’Mara1,2, D Duffy2, DJ Thompson3, S Ahmed4, K Ferguson2, CS Healey4, ANECS2, G Montgomery2, M Shah4, J Morrison3, PP Pharoah3,4, AM Dunning4, PM Webb2...

  7. Genetic determinants of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor related sexual dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, James M; Bishop, Jeffrey R

    2014-11-01

    Sexual dysfunction is a troubling obstacle for individuals being treated for depression and can be caused by both depressive symptoms as well as antidepressant drugs. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) represent a class of antidepressants commonly associated with sexual dysfunction, even after symptomatic improvement. Candidate gene studies have identified associations between sexual dysfunction and altered SSRI pharmacokinetics or to the neurotransmitter systems affected by depression and SSRI treatment. The multifactorial nature of this phenotype and study heterogeneity are currently limitations to the translation of these findings to clinical use. Larger, prospective studies of genetic-guided antidepressant selection may help to clarify the clinical utility of pharmacogenetics in minimizing sexual side effects. PMID:25493571

  8. Genetic Determinants of Serum Testosterone Concentrations in Men

    PubMed Central

    Maggio, Marcello; Coviello, Andrea D.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Heier, Margit; Hofman, Albert; Holliday, Kate L.; Jansson, John-Olov; Kähönen, Mika; Karasik, David; Karlsson, Magnus K.; Kiel, Douglas P.; Liu, Yongmei; Ljunggren, Östen; Lorentzon, Mattias; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Meitinger, Thomas; Mellström, Dan; Melzer, David; Miljkovic, Iva; Nauck, Matthias; Nilsson, Maria; Penninx, Brenda; Pye, Stephen R.; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; Reincke, Martin; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Tajar, Abdelouahid; Teumer, Alexander; Uitterlinden, André G.; Ulloor, Jagadish; Viikari, Jorma; Völker, Uwe; Völzke, Henry; Wichmann, H. Erich; Wu, Tsung-Sheng; Zhuang, Wei Vivian; Ziv, Elad; Wu, Frederick C. W.; Raitakari, Olli; Eriksson, Anna; Bidlingmaier, Martin; Harris, Tamara B.; Murray, Anna; de Jong, Frank H.; Murabito, Joanne M.; Bhasin, Shalender; Vandenput, Liesbeth; Haring, Robin

    2011-01-01

    Testosterone concentrations in men are associated with cardiovascular morbidity, osteoporosis, and mortality and are affected by age, smoking, and obesity. Because of serum testosterone's high heritability, we performed a meta-analysis of genome-wide association data in 8,938 men from seven cohorts and followed up the genome-wide significant findings in one in silico (n?=?871) and two de novo replication cohorts (n?=?4,620) to identify genetic loci significantly associated with serum testosterone concentration in men. All these loci were also associated with low serum testosterone concentration defined as <300 ng/dl. Two single-nucleotide polymorphisms at the sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) locus (17p13-p12) were identified as independently associated with serum testosterone concentration (rs12150660, p?=?1.2×10?41 and rs6258, p?=?2.3×10?22). Subjects with ?3 risk alleles of these variants had 6.5-fold higher risk of having low serum testosterone than subjects with no risk allele. The rs5934505 polymorphism near FAM9B on the X chromosome was also associated with testosterone concentrations (p?=?5.6×10?16). The rs6258 polymorphism in exon 4 of SHBG affected SHBG's affinity for binding testosterone and the measured free testosterone fraction (p<0.01). Genetic variants in the SHBG locus and on the X chromosome are associated with a substantial variation in testosterone concentrations and increased risk of low testosterone. rs6258 is the first reported SHBG polymorphism, which affects testosterone binding to SHBG and the free testosterone fraction and could therefore influence the calculation of free testosterone using law-of-mass-action equation. PMID:21998597

  9. Cellular and network mechanisms of genetically-determined absence seizures.

    PubMed

    Pinault, Didier; O'Brien, Terence J

    2005-01-01

    The absence epilepsies are characterized by recurrent episodes of loss of consciousness associated with generalized spike-and-wave discharges, with an abrupt onset and offset, in the thalamocortical system. In the absence of detailed neurophysiological studies in humans, many of the concepts regarding the pathophysiological basis of absence seizures are based on studies in animal models. Each of these models has its particular strengths and limitations, and the validity of findings from these models for the human condition cannot be assumed. Consequently, studies in different models have produced some conflicting findings and conclusions. A long-standing concept, based primarily from studies in vivo in cats and in vitro brain slices, is that these paroxysmal electrical events develop suddenly from sleep-related spindle oscillations. More specifically, it is proposed that the initial mechanisms that underlie absence-related spike-and-wave discharges are located in the thalamus, involving especially the thalamic reticular nucleus. By contrast, more recent studies in well-established, genetic models of absence epilepsy in rats demonstrate that spike-and-wave discharges originate in a cortical focus and develop from a wake-related natural corticothalamic sensorimotor rhythm. In this review we integrate recent findings showing that, in both the thalamus and the neocortex, genetically-determined, absence-related spike-and-wave discharges are the manifestation of hypersynchronized, cellular, rhythmic excitations and inhibitions that result from a combination of complex, intrinsic, synaptic mechanisms. Arguments are put forward supporting the hypothesis that layer VI corticothalamic neurons act as 'drivers' in the generation of spike-and-wave discharges in the somatosensory thalamocortical system that result in corticothalamic resonances particularly initially involving the thalamic reticular nucleus. However an important unresolved question is: what are the cellular and network mechanisms responsible for the switch from physiological, wake-related, natural oscillations into pathological spike-and-wave discharges? We speculate on possible answers to this, building particularly on recent findings from genetic models in rats. PMID:21909233

  10. Genetic determinants of mate recognition in Brachionus manjavacas (Rotifera)

    PubMed Central

    Snell, Terry W; Shearer, Tonya L; Smith, Hilary A; Kubanek, Julia; Gribble, Kristin E; Welch, David B Mark

    2009-01-01

    Background Mate choice is of central importance to most animals, influencing population structure, speciation, and ultimately the survival of a species. Mating behavior of male brachionid rotifers is triggered by the product of a chemosensory gene, a glycoprotein on the body surface of females called the mate recognition pheromone. The mate recognition pheromone has been biochemically characterized, but little was known about the gene(s). We describe the isolation and characterization of the mate recognition pheromone gene through protein purification, N-terminal amino acid sequence determination, identification of the mate recognition pheromone gene from a cDNA library, sequencing, and RNAi knockdown to confirm the functional role of the mate recognition pheromone gene in rotifer mating. Results A 29 kD protein capable of eliciting rotifer male circling was isolated by high-performance liquid chromatography. Two transcript types containing the N-terminal sequence were identified in a cDNA library; further characterization by screening a genomic library and by polymerase chain reaction revealed two genes belonging to each type. Each gene begins with a signal peptide region followed by nearly perfect repeats of an 87 to 92 codon motif with no codons between repeats and the final motif prematurely terminated by the stop codon. The two Type A genes contain four and seven repeats and the two Type B genes contain three and five repeats, respectively. Only the Type B gene with three repeats encodes a peptide with a molecular weight of 29 kD. Each repeat of the Type B gene products contains three asparagines as potential sites for N-glycosylation; there are no asparagines in the Type A genes. RNAi with Type A double-stranded RNA did not result in less circling than in the phosphate-buffered saline control, but transfection with Type B double-stranded RNA significantly reduced male circling by 17%. The very low divergence between repeat units, even at synonymous positions, suggests that the repeats are kept nearly identical through a process of concerted evolution. Information-rich molecules like surface glycoproteins are well adapted for chemical communication and aquatic animals may have evolved signaling systems based on these compounds, whereas insects use cuticular hydrocarbons. Conclusion Owing to its critical role in mating, the mate recognition pheromone gene will be a useful molecular marker for exploring the mechanisms and rates of selection and the evolution of reproductive isolation and speciation using rotifers as a model system. The phylogenetic variation in the mate recognition pheromone gene can now be studied in conjunction with the large amount of ecological and population genetic data being gathered for the Brachionus plicatilis species complex to understand better the evolutionary drivers of cryptic speciation. PMID:19740420

  11. The Genetic Architecture of Maize (Zea mays L.) Kernel Weight Determination

    PubMed Central

    Prado, Santiago Alvarez; López, César G.; Senior, M. Lynn; Borrás, Lucas

    2014-01-01

    Individual kernel weight is an important trait for maize yield determination. We have identified genomic regions controlling this trait by using the B73xMo17 population; however, the effect of genetic background on control of this complex trait and its physiological components is not yet known. The objective of this study was to understand how genetic background affected our previous results. Two nested stable recombinant inbred line populations (N209xMo17 and R18xMo17) were designed for this purpose. A total of 408 recombinant inbred lines were genotyped and phenotyped at two environments for kernel weight and five other traits related to kernel growth and development. All traits showed very high and significant (P < 0.001) phenotypic variability and medium-to-high heritability (0.60?0.90). When N209xMo17 and R18xMo17 were analyzed separately, a total of 23 environmentally stable quantitative trait loci (QTL) and five epistatic interactions were detected for N209xMo17. For R18xMo17, 59 environmentally stable QTL and 17 epistatic interactions were detected. A joint analysis detected 14 stable QTL regardless of the genetic background. Between 57 and 83% of detected QTL were population specific, denoting medium-to-high genetic background effects. This percentage was dependent on the trait. A meta-analysis including our previous B73xMo17 results identified five relevant genomic regions deserving further characterization. In summary, our grain filling traits were dominated by small additive QTL with several epistatic and few environmental interactions and medium-to-high genetic background effects. This study demonstrates that the number of detected QTL and additive effects for different physiologically related grain filling traits need to be understood relative to the specific germplasm. PMID:25237113

  12. Sarcolemmal phospholipid N-methylation in genetically determined hamster cardiomyopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Okumura, K.; Panagia, V.; Jasmin, G.; Dhalla, N.S.

    1987-02-27

    The heart sarcolemmal phosphatidylethanolamine N-methylation in UM-X7.1 strain of cardiomyopathic hamsters was examined by using 0.055, 10 and 150 microM S-adenosyl-L-(methyl-/sup 3/H) methionine as methyl donor for sites I, II and III, respectively. In comparison with control values, methylation activities at site I was increased in 40, 120 and 250 days old cardiomyopathic hamsters. On the other hand, methylation activities at sites II and III in 120 and 250 days old cardiomyopathic animals were depressed without any change in the 40 days old group. The alterations in N-methylation activities were associated with kinetic changes in apparent Vmax values without any changes in the apparent Km. These results indicate a defect in the phospholipid N-methylation process in heart sarcolemma during the development of genetically determined cardiomyopathy.

  13. Genetics of Kidneys in Diabetes (GoKinD) study: a genetics collection available for identifying genetic susceptibility factors for diabetic nephropathy in type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Patricia W; Rogus, John J; Cleary, Patricia A; Zhao, Yuan; Smiles, Adam M; Steffes, Michael W; Bucksa, Jean; Gibson, Therese B; Cordovado, Suzanne K; Krolewski, Andrzej S; Nierras, Concepcion R; Warram, James H

    2006-07-01

    The Genetics of Kidneys in Diabetes (GoKinD) study is an initiative that aims to identify genes that are involved in diabetic nephropathy. A large number of individuals with type 1 diabetes were screened to identify two subsets, one with clear-cut kidney disease and another with normal renal status despite long-term diabetes. Those who met additional entry criteria and consented to participate were enrolled. When possible, both parents also were enrolled to form family trios. As of November 2005, GoKinD included 3075 participants who comprise 671 case singletons, 623 control singletons, 272 case trios, and 323 control trios. Interested investigators may request the DNA collection and corresponding clinical data for GoKinD participants using the instructions and application form that are available at http://www.gokind.org/access. Participating scientists will have access to three data sets, each with distinct advantages. The set of 1294 singletons has adequate power to detect a wide range of genetic effects, even those of modest size. The set of case trios, which has adequate power to detect effects of moderate size, is not susceptible to false-positive results because of population substructure. The set of control trios is critical for excluding certain false-positive results that can occur in case trios and may be particularly useful for testing gene-environment interactions. Integration of the evidence from these three components into a single, unified analysis presents a challenge. This overview of the GoKinD study examines in detail the power of each study component and discusses analytic challenges that investigators will face in using this resource. PMID:16775037

  14. Novel genetic algorithm search procedure for LEED surface structure determination.

    PubMed

    Viana, M L; dos Reis, D D; Soares, E A; Van Hove, M A; Moritz, W; de Carvalho, V E

    2014-06-01

    Low Energy Electron Diffraction (LEED) is one of the most powerful experimental techniques for surface structure analysis but until now only a trial-and-error approach has been successful. So far, fitting procedures developed to optimize structural and nonstructural parameters-by minimization of the R-factor-have had a fairly small convergence radius, suitable only for local optimization. However, the identification of the global minimum among the several local minima is essential for complex surface structures. Global optimization methods have been applied to LEED structure determination, but they still require starting from structures that are relatively close to the correct one, in order to find the final structure. For complex systems, the number of trial structures and the resulting computation time increase so rapidly that the task of finding the correct model becomes impractical using the present methodologies. In this work we propose a new search method, based on Genetic Algorithms, which is able to determine the correct structural model starting from completely random structures. This method-called here NGA-LEED for Novel Genetic Algorithm for LEED-utilizes bond lengths and symmetry criteria to select reasonable trial structures before performing LEED calculations. This allows a reduction of the parameter space and, consequently of the calculation time, by several orders of magnitude. A refinement of the parameters by least squares fit of simulated annealing is performed only at some intermediate stages and in the final step. The method was successfully tested for two systems, Ag(1?1?1)(4 × 4)-O and Au(1?1?0)-(1 × 2), both in theory versus theory and in theory versus experiment comparisons. Details of the implementation as well as the results for these two systems are presented. PMID:24824047

  15. Identifying Genetic Traces of Historical Expansions: Phoenician Footprints in the Mediterranean

    PubMed Central

    Zalloua, Pierre A.; Platt, Daniel E.; El Sibai, Mirvat; Khalife, Jade; Makhoul, Nadine; Haber, Marc; Xue, Yali; Izaabel, Hassan; Bosch, Elena; Adams, Susan M.; Arroyo, Eduardo; López-Parra, Ana María; Aler, Mercedes; Picornell, Antònia; Ramon, Misericordia; Jobling, Mark A.; Comas, David; Bertranpetit, Jaume; Wells, R. Spencer; Tyler-Smith, Chris

    2008-01-01

    The Phoenicians were the dominant traders in the Mediterranean Sea two thousand to three thousand years ago and expanded from their homeland in the Levant to establish colonies and trading posts throughout the Mediterranean, but then they disappeared from history. We wished to identify their male genetic traces in modern populations. Therefore, we chose Phoenician-influenced sites on the basis of well-documented historical records and collected new Y-chromosomal data from 1330 men from six such sites, as well as comparative data from the literature. We then developed an analytical strategy to distinguish between lineages specifically associated with the Phoenicians and those spread by geographically similar but historically distinct events, such as the Neolithic, Greek, and Jewish expansions. This involved comparing historically documented Phoenician sites with neighboring non-Phoenician sites for the identification of weak but systematic signatures shared by the Phoenician sites that could not readily be explained by chance or by other expansions. From these comparisons, we found that haplogroup J2, in general, and six Y-STR haplotypes, in particular, exhibited a Phoenician signature that contributed > 6% to the modern Phoenician-influenced populations examined. Our methodology can be applied to any historically documented expansion in which contact and noncontact sites can be identified. PMID:18976729

  16. A molecular genetic linkage map identifying the St and H subgenomes of Elymus (Poaceae: Triticeae) wheatgrass.

    PubMed

    Mott, Ivan W; Larson, Steven R; Jones, Thomas A; Robins, Joseph G; Jensen, Kevin B; Peel, Michael D

    2011-10-01

    Elymus L. is the largest and most complex genus in the Triticeae tribe of grasses with approximately 150 polyploid perennial species occurring worldwide. We report here the first genetic linkage map for Elymus. Backcross mapping populations were created by crossing caespitose Elymus wawawaiensis (EW) (Snake River wheatgrass) and rhizomatous Elymus lanceolatus (EL) (thickspike wheatgrass) to produce F(1) interspecific hybrids that were then backcrossed to the same EL male to generate progeny with segregating phenotypes. EW and EL are both allotetraploid species (n = 14) containing the St (Pseudoroegneria) and H (Hordeum) genomes. A total of 387 backcross progeny from four populations were genotyped using 399 AFLP and 116 EST-based SSR and STS markers. The resulting consensus map was 2574 cM in length apportioned among the expected number of 14 linkage groups. EST-based SSR and STS markers with homology to rice genome sequences were used to identify Elymus linkage groups homoeologous to chromosomes 1-7 of wheat. The frequency of St-derived genome markers on each linkage group was used to assign genome designations to all linkage groups, resulting in the identification of the seven St and seven H linkage groups of Elymus. This map also confirms the alloploidy and disomic chromosome pairing and segregation of Elymus and will be useful in identifying QTLs controlling perennial grass traits in this genus. PMID:21942400

  17. The Real maccoyii: Identifying Tuna Sushi with DNA Barcodes – Contrasting Characteristic Attributes and Genetic Distances

    PubMed Central

    Lowenstein, Jacob H.; Amato, George; Kolokotronis, Sergios-Orestis

    2009-01-01

    Background The use of DNA barcodes for the identification of described species is one of the least controversial and most promising applications of barcoding. There is no consensus, however, as to what constitutes an appropriate identification standard and most barcoding efforts simply attempt to pair a query sequence with reference sequences and deem identification successful if it falls within the bounds of some pre-established cutoffs using genetic distance. Since the Renaissance, however, most biological classification schemes have relied on the use of diagnostic characters to identify and place species. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we developed a cytochrome c oxidase subunit I character-based key for the identification of all tuna species of the genus Thunnus, and compared its performance with distance-based measures for identification of 68 samples of tuna sushi purchased from 31 restaurants in Manhattan (New York City) and Denver, Colorado. Both the character-based key and GenBank BLAST successfully identified 100% of the tuna samples, while the Barcode of Life Database (BOLD) as well as genetic distance thresholds, and neighbor-joining phylogenetic tree building performed poorly in terms of species identification. A piece of tuna sushi has the potential to be an endangered species, a fraud, or a health hazard. All three of these cases were uncovered in this study. Nineteen restaurant establishments were unable to clarify or misrepresented what species they sold. Five out of nine samples sold as a variant of “white tuna” were not albacore (T. alalunga), but escolar (Lepidocybium flavorunneum), a gempylid species banned for sale in Italy and Japan due to health concerns. Nineteen samples were northern bluefin tuna (T. thynnus) or the critically endangered southern bluefin tuna (T. maccoyii), though nine restaurants that sold these species did not state these species on their menus. Conclusions/Significance The Convention on International Trade Endangered Species (CITES) requires that listed species must be identifiable in trade. This research fulfills this requirement for tuna, and supports the nomination of northern bluefin tuna for CITES listing in 2010. PMID:19924239

  18. Genetic and epigenetic determinants of neurogenesis and myogenesis.

    PubMed

    Fong, Abraham P; Yao, Zizhen; Zhong, Jun Wen; Cao, Yi; Ruzzo, Walter L; Gentleman, Robert C; Tapscott, Stephen J

    2012-04-17

    The regulatory networks of differentiation programs have been partly characterized; however, the molecular mechanisms of lineage-specific gene regulation by highly similar transcription factors remain largely unknown. Here we compare the genome-wide binding and transcription profiles of NEUROD2-mediated neurogenesis with MYOD-mediated myogenesis. We demonstrate that NEUROD2 and MYOD bind a shared CAGCTG E box motif and E box motifs specific for each factor: CAGGTG for MYOD and CAGATG for NEUROD2. Binding at factor-specific motifs is associated with gene transcription, whereas binding at shared sites is associated with regional epigenetic modifications but is not as strongly associated with gene transcription. Binding is largely constrained to E boxes preset in an accessible chromatin context that determines the set of target genes activated in each cell type. These findings demonstrate that the differentiation program is genetically determined by E box sequence, whereas cell lineage epigenetically determines the availability of E boxes for each differentiation program. PMID:22445365

  19. Genetic and Epigenetic Determinants of Neurogenesis and Myogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Abraham P.; Yao, Zizhen; Zhong, Jun W.; Cao, Yi; Ruzzo, Walter L.; Gentleman, Robert C.; Tapscott, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY The regulatory networks of differentiation programs have been partly characterized; however, the molecular mechanisms of lineage-specific gene regulation by highly similar transcription factors remain largely unknown. Here we compare the genome-wide binding and transcription profiles of NEUROD2-mediated neurogenesis with MYOD-mediated myogenesis. We demonstrate that NEUROD2 and MYOD bind a shared CAGCTG E-box motif and E-box motifs specific for each factor: CAGGTG for MYOD and CAGATG for NEUROD2. Binding at factor-specific motifs is associated with gene transcription, whereas binding at shared sites is associated with regional epigenetic modifications but not as strongly associated with gene transcription. Binding is largely constrained to E-boxes pre-set in an accessible chromatin context that determines the set of target genes activated in each cell type. These findings demonstrate that the differentiation program is genetically determined by E-box sequence whereas cell lineage epigenetically determines the availability of E-boxes for each differentiation program. PMID:22445365

  20. Using the Drosophila Melanogaster Genetics Reference Panel to Identify Toxicity Pathways for Toluene

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mechanistic information is needed to link effects of chemicals at molecular targets in high­ throughput screening assays to adverse outcomes in whole organisms. This study was designed to use the Drosophila Genetic Reference Panel (DGRP), a set of genetically well...

  1. Case-control study for colorectal cancer genetic susceptibility in EPICOLON: previously identified variants and mucins

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the second leading cause of cancer death in developed countries. Familial aggregation in CRC is also important outside syndromic forms and, in this case, a polygenic model with several common low-penetrance alleles contributing to CRC genetic predisposition could be hypothesized. Mucins and GALNTs (N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase) are interesting candidates for CRC genetic susceptibility and have not been previously evaluated. We present results for ten genetic variants linked to CRC risk in previous studies (previously identified category) and 18 selected variants from the mucin gene family in a case-control association study from the Spanish EPICOLON consortium. Methods CRC cases and matched controls were from EPICOLON, a prospective, multicenter, nationwide Spanish initiative, comprised of two independent stages. Stage 1 corresponded to 515 CRC cases and 515 controls, whereas stage 2 consisted of 901 CRC cases and 909 controls. Also, an independent cohort of 549 CRC cases and 599 controls outside EPICOLON was available for additional replication. Genotyping was performed for ten previously identified SNPs in ADH1C, APC, CCDN1, IL6, IL8, IRS1, MTHFR, PPARG, VDR and ARL11, and 18 selected variants in the mucin gene family. Results None of the 28 SNPs analyzed in our study was found to be associated with CRC risk. Although four SNPs were significant with a P-value < 0.05 in EPICOLON stage 1 [rs698 in ADH1C (OR = 1.63, 95% CI = 1.06-2.50, P-value = 0.02, recessive), rs1800795 in IL6 (OR = 1.62, 95% CI = 1.10-2.37, P-value = 0.01, recessive), rs3803185 in ARL11 (OR = 1.58, 95% CI = 1.17-2.15, P-value = 0.007, codominant), and rs2102302 in GALNTL2 (OR = 1.20, 95% CI = 1.00-1.44, P-value = 0.04, log-additive 0, 1, 2 alleles], only rs3803185 achieved statistical significance in EPICOLON stage 2 (OR = 1.34, 95% CI = 1.06-1.69, P-value = 0.01, recessive). In the joint analysis for both stages, results were only significant for rs3803185 (OR = 1.12, 95% CI = 1.00-1.25, P-value = 0.04, log-additive 0, 1, 2 alleles) and borderline significant for rs698 and rs2102302. The rs3803185 variant was not significantly associated with CRC risk in an external cohort (MCC-Spain), but it still showed some borderline significance in the pooled analysis of both cohorts (OR = 1.08, 95% CI = 0.98-1.18, P-value = 0.09, log-additive 0, 1, 2 alleles). Conclusions ARL11, ADH1C, GALNTL2 and IL6 genetic variants may have an effect on CRC risk. Further validation and meta-analyses should be undertaken in larger CRC studies. PMID:21819567

  2. Complementary genetic screens identify the E3 ubiquitin ligase CBLC, as a modifier of PARP inhibitor sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Brough, Rachel; Hodny, Zdenek; Ashworth, Alan; Bartek, Jiri; Lord, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    Based on a series of basic, preclinical and clinical studies, the Poly (ADP-ribose) Polymerase 1 (PARP1) inhibitor, olaparib, has recently been approved for use in ovarian cancer patients with BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations. By identifying novel predictive biomarkers of tumour cell sensitivity to olaparib, it is possible that the utility of PARP inhibitors could be extended beyond this patient subgroup. Many of the known genetic determinants of PARP inhibitor response have key roles in DNA damage response (DDR) pathways. Although protein ubiquitylation is known to play an important role in regulating the DDR, the exact mechanisms by which this occurs are not fully understood. Using two parallel RNA interference-based screening approaches, we identified the E3 ubiquitin ligase, CBLC, as a candidate biomarker of response to olaparib. We validated this observation by demonstrating that silencing of CBLC causes increased sensitivity to olaparib in breast cancer cell line models and that defective homologous recombination (HR) DNA repair is the likely cause. This data provides an example of how defects in the ubiquitin machinery have the potential to influence the response of tumour cells to PARP inhibitors. PMID:25883215

  3. Genetic determinants of metamizole metabolism modify the risk of developing anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    García-Martín, Elena; Esguevillas, Gara; Blanca-López, Natalia; García-Menaya, Jesús; Blanca, Miguel; Amo, Gemma; Canto, Gabriela; Martínez, Carmen; Cordobés, Concepción; Agúndez, José A G

    2015-09-01

    Metamizole is a NSAID that has been banned in several countries because of its toxicity. It is often involved in selective hypersensitivity reactions and most hypersensitivity patients develop anaphylaxis. Metamizole is rapidly metabolized, and metabolic profiles are related to genetic factors. We analyzed whether genetic determinants of metamizole metabolism influence the risk of developing hypersensitivity in 265 patients diagnosed with hypersensitivity to metamizole and 362 healthy individuals who tolerated metamizole. Slow acetylation is associated with an increased risk of developing selective hypersensitivity to metamizole [odds ratio for slow alleles=2.17 (95% confidence interval=1.44-3.27); P=0.00016], and particularly anaphylaxis [odds ratio=4.77 (95% confidence interval=2.28-9.98); P=0.000006], with a significant gene-dose effect. The association was not identified in patients with cross-hypersensitivity. Cytochrome P450 2C9 (CYP2C9) and cytochrome P450 2C19 (CYP2C19) genotypes did not influence risk association. Our findings raise the hypothesis of genetically determined metabolic variability as a risk factor for developing anaphylaxis with metamizole. PMID:26111152

  4. Determining the Pathogenicity of Genetic Variants Associated with Cardiac Channelopathies

    PubMed Central

    Campuzano, Oscar; Allegue, Catarina; Fernandez, Anna; Iglesias, Anna; Brugada, Ramon

    2015-01-01

    Advancements in genetic screening have generated massive amounts of data on genetic variation; however, a lack of clear pathogenic stratification has left most variants classified as being of unknown significance. This is a critical limitation for translating genetic data into clinical practice. Genetic screening is currently recommended in the guidelines for diagnosis and treatment of cardiac channelopathies, which are major contributors to sudden cardiac death in young people. We propose to characterize the pathogenicity of genetic variants associated with cardiac channelopathies using a stratified scoring system. The development of this system was considered by using all of the tools currently available to define pathogenicity. The use of this scoring system could help clinicians to understand the limitations of genetic associations with a disease, and help them better define the role that genetics can have in their clinical routine. PMID:25608792

  5. Copyright 2003 by the Genetics Society of America Mapping Determinants of Variation in Energy Metabolism,

    E-print Network

    Marden, James

    Copyright 2003 by the Genetics Society of America Mapping Determinants of Variation in Energy* *Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 and Department) mapping to dissect the genetic architecture of a hierarchy of functionally related physiological traits

  6. Association between GWAS-Identified Genetic Variations and Disease Prognosis for Patients with Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chae, Yee Soo; Lee, Soo Jung; Park, Jae Yong; Choi, Jin Eun; Park, Jun Seok; Choi, Gyu Seog; Kim, Jong Gwang

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have already identified at least 22 common susceptibility loci associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). This study examined the relationship between these single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and the clinical outcomes of patients with colorectal cancer. Seven hundred seventy-six patients with surgically resected colorectal adenocarcinoma were enrolled in the present study. Twenty-two of the GWAS-identified SNPs were genotyped using a Sequenom MassARRAY. Among the 22 SNPs, two (rs1321311G>T in CDKN1A and rs10411210C>T in RHPN2) were significantly associated with the survival outcomes of CRC in a multivariate survival analysis. In a recessive model, the rs1321311 TT genotype (vs. GG + GT) and rs10411210 TT genotype (vs. CC + CT) were associated with a worse prognosis for disease-free survival (adjusted HR = 1.90; 95% confidence interval = 1.00-3.60; P = 0.050, adjusted HR = 1.94; 95% confidence interval = 1.05-3.57; P = 0.034, respectively) and overall survival (adjusted HR = 2.05; 95% confidence interval = 1.00-4.20; P = 0.049, adjusted HR = 2.06; 95% confidence interval = 1.05-4.05; P = 0.036, respectively). None of the other SNPs was significantly associated with any clinicopathologic features or survival. The present results suggest that the genetic variants of the CDKN1A (rs1321311) and RHPN2 (rs10411210) genes can be used as prognostic biomarkers for patients with surgically resected colorectal cancer. PMID:25799222

  7. Identifying Predictors of Activity Based Anorexia Susceptibility in Diverse Genetic Rodent Populations

    PubMed Central

    Pjetri, Eneda; de Haas, Ria; de Jong, Simone; Gelegen, Cigdem; Oppelaar, Hugo; Verhagen, Linda A. W.; Eijkemans, Marinus J. C.; Adan, Roger A.; Olivier, Berend; Kas, Martien J.

    2012-01-01

    Animal studies are very useful in detection of early disease indicators and in unravelling the pathophysiological processes underlying core psychiatric disorder phenotypes. Early indicators are critical for preventive and efficient treatment of progressive psychiatric disorders like anorexia nervosa. Comparable to physical hyperactivity observed in anorexia nervosa patients, in the activity-based anorexia rodent model, mice and rats express paradoxical high voluntary wheel running activity levels when food restricted. Eleven inbred mouse strains and outbred Wistar WU rats were exposed to the activity-based anorexia model in search of identifying susceptibility predictors. Body weight, food intake and wheel running activity levels of each individual mouse and rat were measured. Mouse strains and rats with high wheel running activity levels during food restriction exhibited accelerated body weight loss. Linear mixed models for repeated measures analysis showed that baseline wheel running activity levels preceding the scheduled food restriction phase strongly predicted activity-based anorexia susceptibility (mice: Beta ?=? ?0.0158 (±0.003 SE), P<0.0001; rats: Beta ?=? ?0.0242 (±0.004 SE), P<0.0001) compared to other baseline parameters. These results suggest that physical activity levels play an important role in activity-based anorexia susceptibility in different rodent species with genetically diverse background. These findings support previous retrospective studies on physical activity levels in anorexia nervosa patients and indicate that pre-morbid physical activity levels could reflect an early indicator for disease severity. PMID:23226287

  8. Identifying predictors of activity based anorexia susceptibility in diverse genetic rodent populations.

    PubMed

    Pjetri, Eneda; de Haas, Ria; de Jong, Simone; Gelegen, Cigdem; Oppelaar, Hugo; Verhagen, Linda A W; Eijkemans, Marinus J C; Adan, Roger A; Olivier, Berend; Kas, Martien J

    2012-01-01

    Animal studies are very useful in detection of early disease indicators and in unravelling the pathophysiological processes underlying core psychiatric disorder phenotypes. Early indicators are critical for preventive and efficient treatment of progressive psychiatric disorders like anorexia nervosa. Comparable to physical hyperactivity observed in anorexia nervosa patients, in the activity-based anorexia rodent model, mice and rats express paradoxical high voluntary wheel running activity levels when food restricted. Eleven inbred mouse strains and outbred Wistar WU rats were exposed to the activity-based anorexia model in search of identifying susceptibility predictors. Body weight, food intake and wheel running activity levels of each individual mouse and rat were measured. Mouse strains and rats with high wheel running activity levels during food restriction exhibited accelerated body weight loss. Linear mixed models for repeated measures analysis showed that baseline wheel running activity levels preceding the scheduled food restriction phase strongly predicted activity-based anorexia susceptibility (mice: Beta ?=? -0.0158 (±0.003 SE), P<0.0001; rats: Beta ?=? -0.0242 (±0.004 SE), P<0.0001) compared to other baseline parameters. These results suggest that physical activity levels play an important role in activity-based anorexia susceptibility in different rodent species with genetically diverse background. These findings support previous retrospective studies on physical activity levels in anorexia nervosa patients and indicate that pre-morbid physical activity levels could reflect an early indicator for disease severity. PMID:23226287

  9. Common genetic variants associated with cognitive performance identified using the proxy-phenotype method.

    PubMed

    Rietveld, Cornelius A; Esko, Tõnu; Davies, Gail; Pers, Tune H; Turley, Patrick; Benyamin, Beben; Chabris, Christopher F; Emilsson, Valur; Johnson, Andrew D; Lee, James J; de Leeuw, Christiaan; Marioni, Riccardo E; Medland, Sarah E; Miller, Michael B; Rostapshova, Olga; van der Lee, Sven J; Vinkhuyzen, Anna A E; Amin, Najaf; Conley, Dalton; Derringer, Jaime; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Fehrmann, Rudolf; Franke, Lude; Glaeser, Edward L; Hansell, Narelle K; Hayward, Caroline; Iacono, William G; Ibrahim-Verbaas, Carla; Jaddoe, Vincent; Karjalainen, Juha; Laibson, David; Lichtenstein, Paul; Liewald, David C; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Martin, Nicholas G; McGue, Matt; McMahon, George; Pedersen, Nancy L; Pinker, Steven; Porteous, David J; Posthuma, Danielle; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Smith, Blair H; Starr, John M; Tiemeier, Henning; Timpson, Nicholas J; Trzaskowski, Maciej; Uitterlinden, André G; Verhulst, Frank C; Ward, Mary E; Wright, Margaret J; Davey Smith, George; Deary, Ian J; Johannesson, Magnus; Plomin, Robert; Visscher, Peter M; Benjamin, Daniel J; Cesarini, David; Koellinger, Philipp D

    2014-09-23

    We identify common genetic variants associated with cognitive performance using a two-stage approach, which we call the proxy-phenotype method. First, we conduct a genome-wide association study of educational attainment in a large sample (n = 106,736), which produces a set of 69 education-associated SNPs. Second, using independent samples (n = 24,189), we measure the association of these education-associated SNPs with cognitive performance. Three SNPs (rs1487441, rs7923609, and rs2721173) are significantly associated with cognitive performance after correction for multiple hypothesis testing. In an independent sample of older Americans (n = 8,652), we also show that a polygenic score derived from the education-associated SNPs is associated with memory and absence of dementia. Convergent evidence from a set of bioinformatics analyses implicates four specific genes (KNCMA1, NRXN1, POU2F3, and SCRT). All of these genes are associated with a particular neurotransmitter pathway involved in synaptic plasticity, the main cellular mechanism for learning and memory. PMID:25201988

  10. Genetic testing for sporadic hearing loss using targeted massively parallel sequencing identifies 10 novel mutations.

    PubMed

    Gu, X; Guo, L; Ji, H; Sun, S; Chai, R; Wang, L; Li, H

    2015-06-01

    The genetic heterogeneity of non-syndromic hearing loss (NSHL) has hampered the identification of its pathogenic mutations. Several recent studies applied targeted genome enrichment (TGE) and massively parallel sequencing (MPS) to simultaneously screen a large set of known hearing loss (HL) genes. However, most of these studies were focused on familial cases. To evaluate the effectiveness of TGE and MPS on screening sporadic NSHL patients, we recruited 63 unrelated sporadic NSHL probands, who had various levels of HL and were excluded for mutations in GJB2, MT-RNR1, and SLC26A4 genes. TGE and MPS were performed on 131 known HL genes using the Human Deafness Panel oto-DA3 (Otogenetics Corporation., Norcross, GA). We identified 14 pathogenic variants in STRC, CATSPER2, USH2A, TRIOBP, MYO15A, GPR98, and TMPRSS3 genes in eight patients (diagnostic rate = 12.7%). Among these variants, 10 were novel compound heterozygous mutations. The identification of pathogenic mutations could predict the progression of HL, and guide diagnosis and treatment of the disease. PMID:24853665

  11. GWASdb: a database for human genetic variants identified by genome-wide association studies

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mulin Jun; Wang, Panwen; Liu, Xiaorong; Lim, Ee Lyn; Wang, Zhangyong; Yeager, Meredith; Wong, Maria P.; Sham, Pak Chung; Chanock, Stephen J.; Wang, Junwen

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have enabled us to identify thousands of genetic variants (GVs) that are associated with human diseases. As next-generation sequencing technologies become less expensive, more GVs will be discovered in the near future. Existing databases, such as NHGRI GWAS Catalog, collect GVs with only genome-wide level significance. However, many true disease susceptibility loci have relatively moderate P values and are not included in these databases. We have developed GWASdb that contains 20 times more data than the GWAS Catalog and includes less significant GVs (P?

  12. Comprehensive genetic assessment of the ESR1 locus identifies a risk region for endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    O'Mara, Tracy A; Glubb, Dylan M; Painter, Jodie N; Cheng, Timothy; Dennis, Joe; Attia, John; Holliday, Elizabeth G; McEvoy, Mark; Scott, Rodney J; Ashton, Katie; Proietto, Tony; Otton, Geoffrey; Shah, Mitul; Ahmed, Shahana; Healey, Catherine S; Gorman, Maggie; Martin, Lynn; Hodgson, Shirley; Fasching, Peter A; Hein, Alexander; Beckmann, Matthias W; Ekici, Arif B; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila; Darabi, Hatef; Li, Jingmei; Dürst, Matthias; Runnebaum, Ingo; Hillemanns, Peter; Dörk, Thilo; Lambrechts, Diether; Depreeuw, Jeroen; Annibali, Daniela; Amant, Frederic; Zhao, Hui; Goode, Ellen L; Dowdy, Sean C; Fridley, Brooke L; Winham, Stacey J; Salvesen, Helga B; Njølstad, Tormund S; Trovik, Jone; Werner, Henrica M J; Tham, Emma; Liu, Tao; Mints, Miriam; Bolla, Manjeet K; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Tyrer, Jonathan P; Wang, Qin; Hopper, John L; Peto, Julian; Swerdlow, Anthony J; Burwinkel, Barbara; Brenner, Hermann; Meindl, Alfons; Brauch, Hiltrud; Lindblom, Annika; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Couch, Fergus J; Giles, Graham G; Kristensen, Vessela N; Cox, Angela; Pharoah, Paul D P; Dunning, Alison M; Tomlinson, Ian; Easton, Douglas F; Thompson, Deborah J; Spurdle, Amanda B

    2015-10-01

    Excessive exposure to estrogen is a well-established risk factor for endometrial cancer (EC), particularly for cancers of endometrioid histology. The physiological function of estrogen is primarily mediated by estrogen receptor alpha, encoded by ESR1. Consequently, several studies have investigated whether variation at the ESR1 locus is associated with risk of EC, with conflicting results. We performed comprehensive fine-mapping analyses of 3633 genotyped and imputed single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 6607 EC cases and 37 925 controls. There was evidence of an EC risk signal located at a potential alternative promoter of the ESR1 gene (lead SNP rs79575945, P=1.86×10(-5)), which was stronger for cancers of endometrioid subtype (P=3.76×10(-6)). Bioinformatic analysis suggests that this risk signal is in a functionally important region targeting ESR1, and eQTL analysis found that rs79575945 was associated with expression of SYNE1, a neighbouring gene. In summary, we have identified a single EC risk signal located at ESR1, at study-wide significance. Given SNPs located at this locus have been associated with risk for breast cancer, also a hormonally driven cancer, this study adds weight to the rationale for performing informed candidate fine-scale genetic studies across cancer types. PMID:26330482

  13. Determinants of Public Attitudes to Genetically Modified Salmon

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Latifah; Azad, Md. Abul Kalam; Gausmian, Mohd Hanafy; Zulkifli, Faizah

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to assess the attitude of Malaysian stakeholders to genetically modified (GM) salmon and to identify the factors that influence their acceptance of GM salmon using a structural equation model. A survey was carried out on 434 representatives from various stakeholder groups in the Klang Valley region of Malaysia. Public attitude towards GM salmon was measured using self-developed questionnaires with seven-point Likert scales. The findings of this study have confirmed that public attitudes towards GM salmon is a complex issue and should be seen as a multi-faceted process. The most important direct predictors for the encouragement of GM salmon are the specific application-linked perceptions about religious acceptability of GM salmon followed by perceived risks and benefits, familiarity, and general promise of modern biotechnology. Encouragement of GM salmon also involves the interplay among other factors such as general concerns of biotechnology, threatening the natural order of things, the need for labeling, the need for patenting, confidence in regulation, and societal values. The research findings can serve as a database that will be useful for understanding the social construct of public attitude towards GM foods in a developing country. PMID:24489695

  14. New de novo genetic mutations in schizophrenia identified -Mental Wellness Today http://www.mentalwellnesstoday.com/...hizophrenia/schizophrenia-articles/16-shizophrenia-research/194-new-de-novo-genetic-mutations-in-schizophrenia-identified[10/10/2012 4:3

    E-print Network

    of hope? My Shopping cart Cart empty Our Social Networks Pinterest Trace your steps:Home Mental Illnesses In Twitter YouTube Page Down Page Up Home Our Mental Health Magazines Mental Illnesses Community Store UserNew de novo genetic mutations in schizophrenia identified - Mental Wellness Today http

  15. Gold causes genetically determined autoimmune and immunostimulatory responses in mice

    PubMed Central

    Havarinasab, S; Johansson, U; Pollard, K M; Hultman, P

    2007-01-01

    Natrium aurothiomaleate (GSTM) is a useful disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drug, but causes a variety of immune-mediated adverse effects in many patients. A murine model was used to study further the interaction of GSTM with the immune system, including induction of systemic autoimmunity. Mice were given weekly intramuscular injections of GSTM and controls equimolar amounts of sodium thiomaleate. The effects of gold on lymphocyte subpopulations were determined by flow cytometry. Humoral autoimmunity was measured by indirect immunofluorescence and immunoblotting, and deposition of immunoglobulin and C3 used to assess immunopathology. Gold, in the form of GSTM, stimulated the murine immune system causing strain-dependent lymphoproliferation and autoimmunity, including a major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-restricted autoantibody response against the nucleolar protein fibrillarin. GSTM did not cause glomerular or vessel wall IgG deposits. However, it did elicit a strong B cell-stimulating effect, including both T helper 1 (Th1)- and Th2-dependent isotypes. All these effects on the immune system were dependent on the MHC genotype, emphasizing the clinical observations of a strong genetic linkage for the major adverse immune reactions seen with GSTM treatment. PMID:17680821

  16. Diverse Genetic Markers Concordantly Identify Bovine Origin Escherichia coli O157 Genotypes Underrepresented in Human Disease? †

    PubMed Central

    Whitworth, Joshua; Zhang, Yubei; Bono, James; Pleydell, Eve; French, Nigel; Besser, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Genetic markers previously reported to occur at significantly different frequencies in isolates of Escherichia coli O157:H7 obtained from cattle and from clinically affected humans concordantly delineate at least five genetic groups. Isolates in three of these groups consistently carry one or more markers rarely found among clinical isolates. PMID:19880648

  17. Genetic Essentialism: On the Deceptive Determinism of DNA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dar-Nimrod, Ilan; Heine, Steven J.

    2011-01-01

    This article introduces the notion of genetic essentialist biases: cognitive biases associated with essentialist thinking that are elicited when people encounter arguments that genes are relevant for a behavior, condition, or social group. Learning about genetic attributions for various human conditions leads to a particular set of thoughts…

  18. Cell-based chemical genetic screen identifies damnacanthal as an inhibitor of HIV-1 Vpr induced cell death

    E-print Network

    Huang, Jing

    Cell-based chemical genetic screen identifies damnacanthal as an inhibitor of HIV-1 Vpr induced August 2006 Abstract Viral protein R (Vpr), one of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1. The mechanisms of Vpr have been intensely studied because it is believed that they underlie HIV-1 pathogenesis

  19. In Vivo RNAi Screening Identifies Regulators of Actin Dynamics as Key Determinants of Lymphoma Progression

    PubMed Central

    Meacham, Corbin E.; Ho, Emily E.; Dubrovsky, Esther; Gertler, Frank B.; Hemann, Michael T.

    2009-01-01

    Mouse models have dramatically improved our understanding of cancer development and tumor biology. However, these models have shown limited efficacy as tractable systems for unbiased genetic experimentation. Here, we report the adaptation of loss of function screening to mouse models of cancer. Specifically, we have been able to introduce a library of shRNAs into individual mice using transplantable E?-myc lymphoma cells. This approach has allowed us to screen nearly 1000 genetic alterations in the context of a single tumor-bearing mouse. Results from these experiments have identified a central role for regulators of actin dynamics and cell motility in lymphoma cell homeostasis in vivo, and validation experiments confirmed that these proteins represent bona fide lymphoma drug targets. Additionally, suppression of two of these targets, Rac2 and Twinfilin, potentiated the action of the front-line chemotherapeutic vincristine, suggesting a critical relationship between cell motility and tumor relapse in hematopoietic malignancies. PMID:19783987

  20. Determining Relative Importance and Effective Settings for Genetic Algorithm Control Parameters.

    PubMed

    Mills, K L; Filliben, J J; Haines, A L

    2015-01-01

    Setting the control parameters of a genetic algorithm to obtain good results is a long-standing problem. We define an experiment design and analysis method to determine relative importance and effective settings for control parameters of any evolutionary algorithm, and we apply this method to a classic binary-encoded genetic algorithm (GA). Subsequently, as reported elsewhere, we applied the GA, with the control parameter settings determined here, to steer a population of cloud-computing simulators toward behaviors that reveal degraded performance and system collapse. GA-steered simulators could serve as a design tool, empowering system engineers to identify and mitigate low-probability, costly failure scenarios. In the existing GA literature, we uncovered conflicting opinions and evidence regarding key GA control parameters and effective settings to adopt. Consequently, we designed and executed an experiment to determine relative importance and effective settings for seven GA control parameters, when applied across a set of numerical optimization problems drawn from the literature. This paper describes our experiment design, analysis, and results. We found that crossover most significantly influenced GA success, followed by mutation rate and population size and then by rerandomization point and elite selection. Selection method and the precision used within the chromosome to represent numerical values had least influence. Our findings are robust over 60 numerical optimization problems. PMID:25254350

  1. New de novo Genetic Mutations in Schizophrenia Identified | Columbia University Medical Center http://www.cumc.columbia.edu/news-room/2012/10/03/new-de-novo-genetic-mutations-in-schizophrenia-identified/#.UKJgImdNKuJ[11/13/2012 9:59:28 AM

    E-print Network

    New de novo Genetic Mutations in Schizophrenia Identified | Columbia University Medical Center http://www.cumc.columbia.edu/news-room/2012/10/03/new-de-novo-genetic-mutations-in-schizophrenia-identified/#.UKJgImdNKuJ[11/13/2012 9 Profiles | Map | RSS | Giving New de novo Genetic Mutations in Schizophrenia Identified October 3, 2012 New

  2. The role of nutrition and genetics as key determinants of the positive height trend.

    PubMed

    Grasgruber, P; Cacek, J; Kalina, T; Sebera, M

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the most important variables determining current differences in physical stature in Europe and some of its overseas offshoots such as Australia, New Zealand and USA. We collected data on the height of young men from 45 countries and compared them with long-term averages of food consumption from the FAOSTAT database, various development indicators compiled by the World Bank and the CIA World Factbook, and frequencies of several genetic markers. Our analysis demonstrates that the most important factor explaining current differences in stature among nations of European origin is the level of nutrition, especially the ratio between the intake of high-quality proteins from milk products, pork meat and fish, and low-quality proteins from wheat. Possible genetic factors such as the distribution of Y haplogroup I-M170, combined frequencies of Y haplogroups I-M170 and R1b-U106, or the phenotypic distribution of lactose tolerance emerge as comparably important, but the available data are more limited. Moderately significant positive correlations were also found with GDP per capita, health expenditure and partly with the level of urbanization that influences male stature in Western Europe. In contrast, male height correlated inversely with children's mortality and social inequality (Gini index). These results could inspire social and nutritional guidelines that would lead to the optimization of physical growth in children and maximization of the genetic potential, both at the individual and national level. PMID:25190282

  3. Identifying Support Functions in Developmental Relationships: A Self-Determination Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janssen, Suzanne; van Vuuren, Mark; de Jong, Menno D. T.

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the content of developmental networks from the perspective of self-determination theory. We qualitatively examine 18 proteges' constellations of developmental relationships to identify specific types of developmental support functions. Our study shows that the adoption of self-determination theory leads to a theory-based…

  4. 75 FR 8299 - Draft Environmental Impact Statement; Determination of Regulated Status of Alfalfa Genetically...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-24

    ...determination on the status of the Monsanto Company and Forage Genetics International alfalfa lines designated as events J101 and J163...determination on the status of the Monsanto Company and Forage Genetics International alfalfa lines designated as events J101 and...

  5. A Candidate Gene Approach Identifies an IL33 Genetic Variant as a Novel Genetic Risk Factor for GCA

    PubMed Central

    Márquez, Ana; Solans, Roser; Hernández-Rodríguez, José; Cid, Maria C.; Castañeda, Santos; Ramentol, Marc; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Luis; Narváez, Javier; Blanco, Ricardo; Ortego-Centeno, Norberto; Palm, Øyvind; Diamantopoulos, Andreas P.; Braun, Niko; Moosig, Frank; Witte, Torsten; Beretta, Lorenzo; Lunardi, Claudio; Cimmino, Marco A.; Vaglio, Augusto; Salvarani, Carlo; González-Gay, Miguel A.; Martín, Javier

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Increased expression of IL-33 and its receptor ST2, encoded by the IL1RL1 gene, has been detected in the inflamed arteries of giant cell arteritis (GCA) patients. The aim of the present study was to investigate for the first time the potential influence of the IL33 and IL1RL1 loci on GCA predisposition. Methods A total of 1,363 biopsy-proven GCA patients and 3,908 healthy controls from four European cohorts (Spain, Italy, Germany and Norway) were combined in a meta-analysis. Six genetic variants: rs3939286, rs7025417 and rs7044343, within the IL33 gene, and rs2058660, rs2310173 and rs13015714, within the IL1RL1 gene, previously associated with immune-related diseases, were genotyped using predesigned TaqMan assays. Results A consistent association between the rs7025417 polymorphism and GCA was evident in the overall meta-analysis, under both allele (PMH?=?0.041, OR?=?0.88, CI 95% 0.78–0.99) and recessive (PMH?=?3.40E-03, OR?=?0.53, CI 95% 0.35–0.80) models. No statistically significant differences between allele or genotype frequencies for the other IL33 and IL1RL1 genetic variants were detected in this pooled analysis. Conclusions Our results clearly evidenced the implication of the IL33 rs7025417 polymorphism in the genetic network underlying GCA. PMID:25409453

  6. Identifying future models for delivering genetic services: a nominal group study in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Elwyn, Glyn; Edwards, Adrian; Iredale, Rachel; Davies, Peter; Gray, Jonathon

    2005-01-01

    Background To enable primary care medical practitioners to generate a range of possible service delivery models for genetic counselling services and critically assess their suitability. Methods Modified nominal group technique using in primary care professional development workshops. Results 37 general practitioners in Wales, United Kingdom too part in the nominal group process. The practitioners who attended did not believe current systems were sufficient to meet anticipated demand for genetic services. A wide range of different service models was proposed, although no single option emerged as a clear preference. No argument was put forward for genetic assessment and counselling being central to family practice, neither was there a voice for the view that the family doctor should become skilled at advising patients about predictive genetic testing and be able to counsel patients about the wider implications of genetic testing for patients and their family members, even for areas such as common cancers. Nevertheless, all the preferred models put a high priority on providing the service in the community, and often co-located in primary care, by clinicians who had developed expertise. Conclusion There is a need for a wider debate about how healthcare systems address individual concerns about genetic concerns and risk, especially given the increasing commercial marketing of genetic tests. PMID:15831099

  7. Genome-wide association analysis to identify chromosomal regions determining components of earliness in wheat.

    PubMed

    Le Gouis, J; Bordes, J; Ravel, C; Heumez, E; Faure, S; Praud, S; Galic, N; Remoué, C; Balfourier, F; Allard, V; Rousset, M

    2012-02-01

    The modification of flowering date is considered an important way to escape the current or future climatic constraints that affect wheat crops. A better understanding of its genetic bases would enable a more efficient and rapid modification through breeding. The objective of this study was to identify chromosomal regions associated with earliness in wheat. A 227-wheat core collection chosen to be highly contrasted for earliness was characterized for heading date. Experiments were conducted in controlled conditions and in the field for 3 years to break down earliness in the component traits: photoperiod sensitivity, vernalization requirement and narrow-sense earliness. Whole-genome association mapping was carried out using 760 molecular markers and taking into account the five ancestral group structure. We identified 62 markers individually associated to earliness components corresponding to 33 chromosomal regions. In addition, we identified 15 other significant markers and seven more regions by testing marker pair interactions. Co-localizations were observed with the Ppd-1, Vrn-1 and Rht-1 candidate genes. Using an independent set of lines to validate the model built for heading date, we were able to explain 34% of the variation using the structure and the significant markers. Results were compared with already published data using bi-parental populations giving an insight into the genetic architecture of flowering time in wheat. PMID:22065067

  8. Whole genome sequencing to identify host genetic risk factors for severe outcomes of hepatitis a virus infection.

    PubMed

    Long, Dustin; Fix, Oren K; Deng, Xutao; Seielstad, Mark; Lauring, Adam S

    2014-10-01

    Acute liver failure is a severe, but rare, outcome of hepatitis A virus infection. Unusual presentations of prevalent infections have often been attributed to pathogen-specific immune deficits that exhibit Mendelian inheritance. Genome-wide resequencing of unrelated cases has proven to be a powerful approach for identifying highly penetrant risk alleles that underlie such syndromes. Rare mutations likely to affect protein expression or function can be identified from sequence data, and their association with a similarly rare phenotype rests on their existence in multiple affected individuals. A rare or novel sequence variant that is enriched to a significant degree in a genetically diverse cohort suggests a candidate susceptibility allele. Whole genome sequencing of ten individuals from ethnically diverse backgrounds with HAV-associated acute liver failure was performed. A set of rational filtering criteria was used to identify genetic variants that are rare in the population, but enriched in this cohort. Single nucleotide polymorphisms, insertions, and deletions were considered and autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, and polygenic models were applied. Analysis of the protein-coding exome identified no single gene with putatively deleterious mutations shared by multiple individuals, arguing against a simple Mendelian model of inheritance. A number of rare variants were significantly enriched in this cohort, consistent with a complex and genetically heterogeneous trait. Several of the variants identified in this genome-wide study lie within genes important to hepatic pathophysiology and are candidate susceptibility alleles for hepatitis A virus infection. PMID:24978929

  9. An Image-Based Genetic Assay Identifies Genes in T1D Susceptibility Loci Controlling Cellular Antiviral Immunity in Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Juan; Jijon, Humberto B.; Kim, Ira R.; Goel, Gautam; Doan, Aivi; Sokol, Harry; Bauer, Hermann; Herrmann, Bernhard G.; Lassen, Kara G.; Xavier, Ramnik J.

    2014-01-01

    The pathogenesis of complex diseases, such as type 1 diabetes (T1D), derives from interactions between host genetics and environmental factors. Previous studies have suggested that viral infection plays a significant role in initiation of T1D in genetically predisposed individuals. T1D susceptibility loci may therefore be enriched in previously uncharacterized genes functioning in antiviral defense pathways. To identify genes involved in antiviral immunity, we performed an image-based high-throughput genetic screen using short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) against 161 genes within T1D susceptibility loci. RAW 264.7 cells transduced with shRNAs were infected with GFP-expressing herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and fluorescent microscopy was performed to assess the viral infectivity by fluorescence reporter activity. Of the 14 candidates identified with high confidence, two candidates were selected for further investigation, Il27 and Tagap. Administration of recombinant IL-27 during viral infection was found to act synergistically with interferon gamma (IFN-?) to activate expression of type I IFNs and proinflammatory cytokines, and to enhance the activities of interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3). Consistent with a role in antiviral immunity, Tagap-deficient macrophages demonstrated increased viral replication, reduced expression of proinflammatory chemokines and cytokines, and decreased production of IFN-?. Taken together, our unbiased loss-of-function genetic screen identifies genes that play a role in host antiviral immunity and delineates roles for IL-27 and Tagap in the production of antiviral cytokines. PMID:25268627

  10. Phylogeography of Pogonomyrmex barbatus and P. rugosus harvester ants with genetic and environmental caste determination

    PubMed Central

    Mott, Brendon M; Gadau, Jürgen; Anderson, Kirk E

    2015-01-01

    We present a phylogeographic study of at least six reproductively isolated lineages of new world harvester ants within the Pogonomyrmex barbatus and P. rugosus species group. The genetic and geographic relationships within this clade are complex: Four of the identified lineages show genetic caste determination (GCD) and are divided into two pairs. Each pair has evolved under a mutualistic system that necessitates sympatry. These paired lineages are dependent upon one another because their GCD requires interlineage matings for the production of F1 hybrid workers, and intralineage matings are required to produce queens. This GCD system maintains genetic isolation among these interdependent lineages, while simultaneously requiring co-expansion and emigration as their distributions have changed over time. It has also been demonstrated that three of these four GCD lineages have undergone historical hybridization, but the narrower sampling range of previous studies has left questions on the hybrid parentage, breadth, and age of these groups. Thus, reconstructing the phylogenetic and geographic history of this group allows us to evaluate past insights and hypotheses and to plan future inquiries in a more complete historical biogeographic context. Using mitochondrial DNA sequences sampled across most of the morphospecies’ ranges in the U.S.A. and Mexico, we conducted a detailed phylogeographic study. Remarkably, our results indicate that one of the GCD lineage pairs has experienced a dramatic range expansion, despite the genetic load and fitness costs of the GCD system. Our analyses also reveal a complex pattern of vicariance and dispersal in Pogonomyrmex harvester ants that is largely concordant with models of late Miocene, Pliocene, and Pleistocene range shifts among various arid-adapted taxa in North America. PMID:26306168

  11. Mathematics Helps Determine Time Sequence of Genetic Events in Cancer | Physical Sciences in Oncology

    Cancer.gov

    Cancer is inevitably a genetic disease, one characterized by multiple genetic mutations that end up transforming a healthy cell into one that grows uncontrollably. The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) project, a joint effort of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI), is in the process of identifying the many mutations that occur in several different cancers.

  12. Genetic variants are major determinants of CSF antibody levels in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Goris, An; Pauwels, Ine; Gustavsen, Marte W; van Son, Brechtje; Hilven, Kelly; Bos, Steffan D; Celius, Elisabeth Gulowsen; Berg-Hansen, Pål; Aarseth, Jan; Myhr, Kjell-Morten; D'Alfonso, Sandra; Barizzone, Nadia; Leone, Maurizio A; Martinelli Boneschi, Filippo; Sorosina, Melissa; Liberatore, Giuseppe; Kockum, Ingrid; Olsson, Tomas; Hillert, Jan; Alfredsson, Lars; Bedri, Sahl Khalid; Hemmer, Bernhard; Buck, Dorothea; Berthele, Achim; Knier, Benjamin; Biberacher, Viola; van Pesch, Vincent; Sindic, Christian; Bang Oturai, Annette; Søndergaard, Helle Bach; Sellebjerg, Finn; Jensen, Poul Erik H; Comabella, Manuel; Montalban, Xavier; Pérez-Boza, Jennifer; Malhotra, Sunny; Lechner-Scott, Jeannette; Broadley, Simon; Slee, Mark; Taylor, Bruce; Kermode, Allan G; Gourraud, Pierre-Antoine; Sawcer, Stephen J; Andreassen, Bettina Kullle; Dubois, Bénédicte; Harbo, Hanne F

    2015-03-01

    Immunological hallmarks of multiple sclerosis include the production of antibodies in the central nervous system, expressed as presence of oligoclonal bands and/or an increased immunoglobulin G index-the level of immunoglobulin G in the cerebrospinal fluid compared to serum. However, the underlying differences between oligoclonal band-positive and -negative patients with multiple sclerosis and reasons for variability in immunoglobulin G index are not known. To identify genetic factors influencing the variation in the antibody levels in the cerebrospinal fluid in multiple sclerosis, we have performed a genome-wide association screen in patients collected from nine countries for two traits, presence or absence of oligoclonal bands (n = 3026) and immunoglobulin G index levels (n = 938), followed by a replication in 3891 additional patients. We replicate previously suggested association signals for oligoclonal band status in the major histocompatibility complex region for the rs9271640*A-rs6457617*G haplotype, correlated with HLA-DRB1*1501, and rs34083746*G, correlated with HLA-DQA1*0301 (P comparing two haplotypes = 8.88 × 10(-16)). Furthermore, we identify a novel association signal of rs9807334, near the ELAC1/SMAD4 genes, for oligoclonal band status (P = 8.45 × 10(-7)). The previously reported association of the immunoglobulin heavy chain locus with immunoglobulin G index reaches strong evidence for association in this data set (P = 3.79 × 10(-37)). We identify two novel associations in the major histocompatibility complex region with immunoglobulin G index: the rs9271640*A-rs6457617*G haplotype (P = 1.59 × 10(-22)), shared with oligoclonal band status, and an additional independent effect of rs6457617*G (P = 3.68 × 10(-6)). Variants identified in this study account for up to 2-fold differences in the odds of being oligoclonal band positive and 7.75% of the variation in immunoglobulin G index. Both traits are associated with clinical features of disease such as female gender, age at onset and severity. This is the largest study population so far investigated for the genetic influence on antibody levels in the cerebrospinal fluid in multiple sclerosis, including 6950 patients. We confirm that genetic factors underlie these antibody levels and identify both the major histocompatibility complex and immunoglobulin heavy chain region as major determinants. PMID:25616667

  13. A Systems Genetic Approach to Identify Low Dose Radiation-Induced Lymphoma Susceptibility/DOE2013FinalReport

    SciTech Connect

    Balmain, Allan; Song, Ihn Young

    2013-05-15

    The ultimate goal of this project is to identify the combinations of genetic variants that confer an individual's susceptibility to the effects of low dose (0.1 Gy) gamma-radiation, in particular with regard to tumor development. In contrast to the known effects of high dose radiation in cancer induction, the responses to low dose radiation (defined as 0.1 Gy or less) are much less well understood, and have been proposed to involve a protective anti-tumor effect in some in vivo scientific models. These conflicting results confound attempts to develop predictive models of the risk of exposure to low dose radiation, particularly when combined with the strong effects of inherited genetic variants on both radiation effects and cancer susceptibility. We have used a Â?Â?Systems Genetics approach in mice that combines genetic background analysis with responses to low and high dose radiation, in order to develop insights that will allow us to reconcile these disparate observations. Using this comprehensive approach we have analyzed normal tissue gene expression (in this case the skin and thymus), together with the changes that take place in this gene expression architecture a) in response to low or high- dose radiation and b) during tumor development. Additionally, we have demonstrated that using our expression analysis approach in our genetically heterogeneous/defined radiation-induced tumor mouse models can uniquely identify genes and pathways relevant to human T-ALL, and uncover interactions between common genetic variants of genes which may lead to tumor susceptibility.

  14. Identifying Shared Genetic Structure Patterns among Pacific Northwest Forest Taxa: Insights from Use of Visualization Tools and Computer Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Mark P.; Haig, Susan M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Identifying causal relationships in phylogeographic and landscape genetic investigations is notoriously difficult, but can be facilitated by use of multispecies comparisons. Methodology/Principal Findings We used data visualizations to identify common spatial patterns within single lineages of four taxa inhabiting Pacific Northwest forests (northern spotted owl: Strix occidentalis caurina; red tree vole: Arborimus longicaudus; southern torrent salamander: Rhyacotriton variegatus; and western white pine: Pinus monticola). Visualizations suggested that, despite occupying the same geographical region and habitats, species responded differently to prevailing historical processes. S. o. caurina and P. monticola demonstrated directional patterns of spatial genetic structure where genetic distances and diversity were greater in southern versus northern locales. A. longicaudus and R. variegatus displayed opposite patterns where genetic distances were greater in northern versus southern regions. Statistical analyses of directional patterns subsequently confirmed observations from visualizations. Based upon regional climatological history, we hypothesized that observed latitudinal patterns may have been produced by range expansions. Subsequent computer simulations confirmed that directional patterns can be produced by expansion events. Conclusions/Significance We discuss phylogeographic hypotheses regarding historical processes that may have produced observed patterns. Inferential methods used here may become increasingly powerful as detailed simulations of organisms and historical scenarios become plausible. We further suggest that inter-specific comparisons of historical patterns take place prior to drawing conclusions regarding effects of current anthropogenic change within landscapes. PMID:21060824

  15. Identifying rare variants for genetic risk through a combined pedigree and phenotype approach: application to suicide and asthma

    PubMed Central

    Darlington, T M; Pimentel, R; Smith, K; Bakian, A V; Jerominski, L; Cardon, J; Camp, N J; Callor, W B; Grey, T; Singleton, M; Yandell, M; Renshaw, P F; Yurgelun-Todd, D A; Gray, D; Coon, H

    2014-01-01

    Suicidal behavior is a complex disorder, with evidence for genetic risk independent of other genetic risk factors including psychiatric disorders. Since 1996, over 3000 DNA samples from Utah suicide decedents have been collected and banked for research use through the Utah Medical Examiner. In addition, over 12?000 Utah suicides were identified through examination of death certificates back to 1904. By linking this data with the Utah Population Database, we have identified multiple extended pedigrees with increased risk for suicide completion. A number of medical conditions co-occur with suicide, including asthma, and this study was undertaken to identify genetic risk common to asthma and suicide. This study tests the hypothesis that a particular comorbid condition may identify a more homogeneous genetic subgroup, facilitating the identification of specific genetic risk factors in that group. From pedigrees at increased risk for suicide, we identified three pedigrees also at significantly increased familial risk for asthma. Five suicide decedents from each of these pedigrees, plus an additional three decedents not from these pedigrees with diagnosed asthma, and 10 decedents with close relatives with asthma were genotyped. Results were compared with 183 publicly available unaffected control exomes from 1000 Genomes and CEPH (Centre d'etude du polymorphisme humain) samples genotyped on the same platform. A further 432 suicide decedents were also genotyped as non-asthma suicide controls. Genotyping was done using the Infinium HumanExome BeadChip. For analysis, we used the pedigree extension of Variant Annotation, Analysis and Search Tool (pVAAST) to calculate the disease burden of each gene. The Phenotype Driven Variant Ontological Re-ranking tool (Phevor) then re-ranked our pVAAST results in context of the phenotype. Using asthma as a seed phenotype, Phevor traversed biomedical ontologies and identified genes with similar biological properties to those known to result in asthma. Our top associated genes included those related to neurodevelopment or neural signaling (brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), neutral sphingomyelinase 2 (SMPD2), homeobox b2 (HOXB2), neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM2), heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A0 (HNRNPA0)), inflammation (free fatty acid receptor 2 (FFAR2)) and inflammation with additional evidence of neuronal involvement (oxidized low density lipoprotein receptor 1 (OLR1), toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3)). Of particular interest, BDNF has been previously implicated in both psychiatric disorders and asthma. Our results demonstrate the utility of combining pedigree and co-occurring phenotypes to identify rare variants associated with suicide risk in conjunction with specific co-occurring conditions. PMID:25335167

  16. Social-Cognition and the Broad Autism Phenotype: Identifying Genetically Meaningful Phenotypes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Losh, Molly; Piven, Joseph

    2007-01-01

    Background: Strong evidence from twin and family studies suggests that the genetic liability to autism may be expressed through personality and language characteristics qualitatively similar, but more subtly expressed than those defining the full syndrome. This study examined behavioral features of this "broad autism phenotype" (BAP) in relation…

  17. Using the GRIN-Global System to Identify Useful Plant Genetic Resources & Information

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The GRIN-Global (GG) System has been developed to provide the world's crop genebanks and plant genetic resource (PGR) users with a powerful, flexible, easy-to-use PGR information management system. Developed jointly by the USDA Agricultural Research Service, Bioversity International and the Global C...

  18. Genetic characterization of Asian fine fescue identifies unique germplasm for forage and turf breeding

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Evaluation of genetic structure and plant morphology are essential to better utilize introduced germplasm in fine-leaved fescue breeding. Recent collections (2006-2010) of fine-leaved Festuca valesiaca and Festuca rubra germplasm have been made by the USDA, ARS in Kyrgyzstan (KGZ) and the People's ...

  19. Identifying genetic loci controlling neonatal passive transfer of immunity using a hybrid genotyping strategy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Colostrum intake is critical to a piglet’s survival and can be measured by precipitating out the gamma-immunoglobulins from serum with ammonium sulfate (immunocrit). Genetic analysis of immunocrits on 5,312 piglets indicated that the heritabilities (se) for direct and maternal effects were 0.13(0.06...

  20. Application of complementation tests in identifying pathogenicity determinants of the chickpea pathogen Ascochyta rabiei

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The necrotrophic pathogen Ascochyta rabiei causes chickpea Ascochyta blight. Very little is known about its pathogenicity mechanisms. The objective of this research was to identify pathogenicity determinants of A. rabiei using complementation tests. The hygromycin-resistant mutant ArW519 was non-pa...

  1. Genetic Determinism in School Textbooks: A Comparative Study Conducted among Sixteen Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castera, Jeremy; Clement, Pierre; Abrougui, Mondher; Nisiforou, Olympia; Valanides, Nicos; Turcinaviciene, Jurga; Sarapuu, Tago; Agorram, Boujemaa; Calado, Florbela; Bogner, Franz; Carvalho, Graca

    2008-01-01

    Genetic concepts have significantly evolved over the last ten years, and are now less connected to innate ideas and reductionism. Unique reference to genetic determinism has been replaced by the interaction between the genes and their environment (epigenetics). Our analyses relate to how current school biology textbooks present this new paradigm…

  2. Genetic determinants of swimming motility in the squid light-organ symbiont Vibrio fischeri

    PubMed Central

    Brennan, Caitlin A; Mandel, Mark J; Gyllborg, Mattias C; Thomasgard, Krista A; Ruby, Edward G

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Bacterial flagellar motility is a complex cellular behavior required for the colonization of the light-emitting organ of the Hawaiian bobtail squid, Euprymna scolopes, by the beneficial bioluminescent symbiont Vibrio fischeri. We characterized the basis of this behavior by performing (i) a forward genetic screen to identify mutants defective in soft-agar motility, as well as (ii) a transcriptional analysis to determine the genes that are expressed downstream of the flagellar master regulator FlrA. Mutants with severe defects in soft-agar motility were identified due to insertions in genes with putative roles in flagellar motility and in genes that were unexpected, including those predicted to encode hypothetical proteins and cell division–related proteins. Analysis of mutants for their ability to enter into a productive symbiosis indicated that flagellar motility mutants are deficient, while chemotaxis mutants are able to colonize a subset of juvenile squid to light-producing levels. Thirty-three genes required for normal motility in soft agar were also downregulated in the absence of FlrA, suggesting they belong to the flagellar regulon of V. fischeri. Mutagenesis of putative paralogs of the flagellar motility genes motA motB, and fliL revealed that motA1 motB1, and both fliL1 and fliL2, but not motA2 and motB2, likely contribute to soft-agar motility. Using these complementary approaches, we have characterized the genetic basis of flagellar motility in V. fischeri and furthered our understanding of the roles of flagellar motility and chemotaxis in colonization of the juvenile squid, including identifying 11 novel mutants unable to enter into a productive light-organ symbiosis. PMID:23907990

  3. Whole-genome sequencing identifies EN1 as a determinant of bone density and fracture.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hou-Feng; Forgetta, Vincenzo; Hsu, Yi-Hsiang; Estrada, Karol; Rosello-Diez, Alberto; Leo, Paul J; Dahia, Chitra L; Park-Min, Kyung Hyun; Tobias, Jonathan H; Kooperberg, Charles; Kleinman, Aaron; Styrkarsdottir, Unnur; Liu, Ching-Ti; Uggla, Charlotta; Evans, Daniel S; Nielson, Carrie M; Walter, Klaudia; Pettersson-Kymmer, Ulrika; McCarthy, Shane; Eriksson, Joel; Kwan, Tony; Jhamai, Mila; Trajanoska, Katerina; Memari, Yasin; Min, Josine; Huang, Jie; Danecek, Petr; Wilmot, Beth; Li, Rui; Chou, Wen-Chi; Mokry, Lauren E; Moayyeri, Alireza; Claussnitzer, Melina; Cheng, Chia-Ho; Cheung, Warren; Medina-Gómez, Carolina; Ge, Bing; Chen, Shu-Huang; Choi, Kwangbom; Oei, Ling; Fraser, James; Kraaij, Robert; Hibbs, Matthew A; Gregson, Celia L; Paquette, Denis; Hofman, Albert; Wibom, Carl; Tranah, Gregory J; Marshall, Mhairi; Gardiner, Brooke B; Cremin, Katie; Auer, Paul; Hsu, Li; Ring, Sue; Tung, Joyce Y; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Enneman, Anke W; van Schoor, Natasja M; de Groot, Lisette C P G M; van der Velde, Nathalie; Melin, Beatrice; Kemp, John P; Christiansen, Claus; Sayers, Adrian; Zhou, Yanhua; Calderari, Sophie; van Rooij, Jeroen; Carlson, Chris; Peters, Ulrike; Berlivet, Soizik; Dostie, Josée; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Williams, Stephen R; Farber, Charles; Grinberg, Daniel; LaCroix, Andrea Z; Haessler, Jeff; Chasman, Daniel I; Giulianini, Franco; Rose, Lynda M; Ridker, Paul M; Eisman, John A; Nguyen, Tuan V; Center, Jacqueline R; Nogues, Xavier; Garcia-Giralt, Natalia; Launer, Lenore L; Gudnason, Vilmunder; Mellström, Dan; Vandenput, Liesbeth; Amin, Najaf; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Karlsson, Magnus K; Ljunggren, Östen; Svensson, Olle; Hallmans, Göran; Rousseau, François; Giroux, Sylvie; Bussière, Johanne; Arp, Pascal P; Koromani, Fjorda; Prince, Richard L; Lewis, Joshua R; Langdahl, Bente L; Hermann, A Pernille; Jensen, Jens-Erik B; Kaptoge, Stephen; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Reeve, Jonathan; Formosa, Melissa M; Xuereb-Anastasi, Angela; Åkesson, Kristina; McGuigan, Fiona E; Garg, Gaurav; Olmos, Jose M; Zarrabeitia, Maria T; Riancho, Jose A; Ralston, Stuart H; Alonso, Nerea; Jiang, Xi; Goltzman, David; Pastinen, Tomi; Grundberg, Elin; Gauguier, Dominique; Orwoll, Eric S; Karasik, David; Davey-Smith, George; Smith, Albert V; Siggeirsdottir, Kristin; Harris, Tamara B; Zillikens, M Carola; van Meurs, Joyce B J; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Maurano, Matthew T; Timpson, Nicholas J; Soranzo, Nicole; Durbin, Richard; Wilson, Scott G; Ntzani, Evangelia E; Brown, Matthew A; Stefansson, Kari; Hinds, David A; Spector, Tim; Cupples, L Adrienne; Ohlsson, Claes; Greenwood, Celia M T; Jackson, Rebecca D; Rowe, David W; Loomis, Cynthia A; Evans, David M; Ackert-Bicknell, Cheryl L; Joyner, Alexandra L; Duncan, Emma L; Kiel, Douglas P; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Richards, J Brent

    2015-10-01

    The extent to which low-frequency (minor allele frequency (MAF) between 1-5%) and rare (MAF???1%) variants contribute to complex traits and disease in the general population is mainly unknown. Bone mineral density (BMD) is highly heritable, a major predictor of osteoporotic fractures, and has been previously associated with common genetic variants, as well as rare, population-specific, coding variants. Here we identify novel non-coding genetic variants with large effects on BMD (ntotal?=?53,236) and fracture (ntotal?=?508,253) in individuals of European ancestry from the general population. Associations for BMD were derived from whole-genome sequencing (n?=?2,882 from UK10K (ref. 10); a population-based genome sequencing consortium), whole-exome sequencing (n?=?3,549), deep imputation of genotyped samples using a combined UK10K/1000 Genomes reference panel (n?=?26,534), and de novo replication genotyping (n?=?20,271). We identified a low-frequency non-coding variant near a novel locus, EN1, with an effect size fourfold larger than the mean of previously reported common variants for lumbar spine BMD (rs11692564(T), MAF?=?1.6%, replication effect size?=?+0.20 s.d., Pmeta?=?2?×?10(-14)), which was also associated with a decreased risk of fracture (odds ratio?=?0.85; P?=?2?×?10(-11); ncases?=?98,742 and ncontrols?=?409,511). Using an En1(cre/flox) mouse model, we observed that conditional loss of En1 results in low bone mass, probably as a consequence of high bone turnover. We also identified a novel low-frequency non-coding variant with large effects on BMD near WNT16 (rs148771817(T), MAF?=?1.2%, replication effect size?=?+0.41 s.d., Pmeta?=?1?×?10(-11)). In general, there was an excess of association signals arising from deleterious coding and conserved non-coding variants. These findings provide evidence that low-frequency non-coding variants have large effects on BMD and fracture, thereby providing rationale for whole-genome sequencing and improved imputation reference panels to study the genetic architecture of complex traits and disease in the general population. PMID:26367794

  4. Genetic Determinants of Circulating Interleukin-1 Receptor Antagonist Levels and Their Association With Glycemic Traits

    PubMed Central

    Nuotio, Marja-Liisa; Shah, Sonia; Blankenberg, Stefan; Brunner, Eric J.; Carstensen, Maren; Gieger, Christian; Grallert, Harald; Jula, Antti; Kähönen, Mika; Kettunen, Johannes; Kivimäki, Mika; Koenig, Wolfgang; Kristiansson, Kati; Langenberg, Claudia; Lehtimäki, Terho; Luotola, Kari; Marzi, Carola; Müller, Christian; Peters, Annette; Prokisch, Holger; Raitakari, Olli; Rathmann, Wolfgang; Roden, Michael; Salmi, Marko; Schramm, Katharina; Swerdlow, Daniel; Tabak, Adam G.; Thorand, Barbara; Wareham, Nick; Wild, Philipp S.; Zeller, Tanja; Hingorani, Aroon D.; Witte, Daniel R.; Kumari, Meena; Perola, Markus; Salomaa, Veikko

    2014-01-01

    The proinflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-1? is implicated in the development of insulin resistance and ?-cell dysfunction, whereas higher circulating levels of IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1RA), an endogenous inhibitor of IL-1?, has been suggested to improve glycemia and ?-cell function in patients with type 2 diabetes. To elucidate the protective role of IL-1RA, this study aimed to identify genetic determinants of circulating IL-1RA concentration and to investigate their associations with immunological and metabolic variables related to cardiometabolic risk. In the analysis of seven discovery and four replication cohort studies, two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were independently associated with circulating IL-1RA concentration (rs4251961 at the IL1RN locus [n = 13,955, P = 2.76 × 10?21] and rs6759676, closest gene locus IL1F10 [n = 13,994, P = 1.73 × 10?17]). The proportion of the variance in IL-1RA explained by both SNPs combined was 2.0%. IL-1RA–raising alleles of both SNPs were associated with lower circulating C-reactive protein concentration. The IL-1RA–raising allele of rs6759676 was also associated with lower fasting insulin levels and lower HOMA insulin resistance. In conclusion, we show that circulating IL-1RA levels are predicted by two independent SNPs at the IL1RN and IL1F10 loci and that genetically raised IL-1RA may be protective against the development of insulin resistance. PMID:24969107

  5. Structural Findings in the Basal Ganglia in Genetically Determined and Idiopathic Parkinson's Disease

    E-print Network

    Gaser, Christian

    Structural Findings in the Basal Ganglia in Genetically Determined and Idiopathic Parkinson likely have an increased risk to develop Parkinson's disease (PD). We hypothesized BG morphological Key words: basal ganglia; magnetic resonance imaging; Parkinson's disease; Parkin mutation carriers

  6. Application of Genetic Algorithms and Thermogravimetry to Determine the Kinetics of Polyurethane Foam in Smoldering Combustion 

    E-print Network

    Rein, Guillermo; Lautenberger, Chris; Fernandez-Pello, Carlos; Torero, Jose L; Urban, David

    In this work, the kinetic parameters governing the thermal and oxidative degradation of flexible polyurethane foam are determined using thermogravimetric data and a genetic algorithm. These kinetic parameters are needed ...

  7. Identifying genetic risk factors for serious adverse drug reactions: current progress and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Wilke, Russell A.; Lin, Debbie W.; Roden, Dan M.; Watkins, Paul B.; Flockhart, David; Zineh, Issam; Giacomini, Kathleen M.; Krauss, Ronald M.

    2009-01-01

    Serious adverse drug reactions (SADRs) are a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Some SADRs may be predictable, based upon a drug's pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic properties. Many, however, appear to be idiosyncratic. Genetic factors may underlie susceptibility to SADRs and the identification of predisposing genotypes may improve patient management through the prospective selection of appropriate candidates. Here we discuss three specific SADRs with an emphasis on genetic risk factors. These SADRs, selected based on wide-sweeping clinical interest, are drug-induced liver injury, statin-induced myotoxicity and drug-induced long QT and torsades de pointes. Key challenges for the discovery of predictive risk alleles for these SADRs are also considered. PMID:17971785

  8. Diversity Outbred Mice Identify Population-Based Exposure Thresholds and Genetic Factors that Influence Benzene-Induced Genotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Gatti, Daniel M.; Morgan, Daniel L.; Kissling, Grace E.; Shockley, Keith R.; Knudsen, Gabriel A.; Shepard, Kim G.; Price, Herman C.; King, Deborah; Witt, Kristine L.; Pedersen, Lars C.; Munger, Steven C.; Svenson, Karen L.; Churchill, Gary A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Inhalation of benzene at levels below the current exposure limit values leads to hematotoxicity in occupationally exposed workers. Objective We sought to evaluate Diversity Outbred (DO) mice as a tool for exposure threshold assessment and to identify genetic factors that influence benzene-induced genotoxicity. Methods We exposed male DO mice to benzene (0, 1, 10, or 100 ppm; 75 mice/exposure group) via inhalation for 28 days (6 hr/day for 5 days/week). The study was repeated using two independent cohorts of 300 animals each. We measured micronuclei frequency in reticulocytes from peripheral blood and bone marrow and applied benchmark concentration modeling to estimate exposure thresholds. We genotyped the mice and performed linkage analysis. Results We observed a dose-dependent increase in benzene-induced chromosomal damage and estimated a benchmark concentration limit of 0.205 ppm benzene using DO mice. This estimate is an order of magnitude below the value estimated using B6C3F1 mice. We identified a locus on Chr 10 (31.87 Mb) that contained a pair of overexpressed sulfotransferases that were inversely correlated with genotoxicity. Conclusions The genetically diverse DO mice provided a reproducible response to benzene exposure. The DO mice display interindividual variation in toxicity response and, as such, may more accurately reflect the range of response that is observed in human populations. Studies using DO mice can localize genetic associations with high precision. The identification of sulfotransferases as candidate genes suggests that DO mice may provide additional insight into benzene-induced genotoxicity. Citation French JE, Gatti DM, Morgan DL, Kissling GE, Shockley KR, Knudsen GA, Shepard KG, Price HC, King D, Witt KL, Pedersen LC, Munger SC, Svenson KL, Churchill GA. 2015. Diversity Outbred mice identify population-based exposure thresholds and genetic factors that influence benzene-induced genotoxicity. Environ Health Perspect 123:237–245;?http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1408202 PMID:25376053

  9. Genetic Screens for Determination of Mechanism of Action.

    PubMed

    Gay-Andrieu, Françoise; Alex, Deepu; Calderone, Richard

    2016-01-01

    The search for new antifungal drugs and cell targets continues. During the discovery process, mechanism-of-action (MOA) studies are critical to the continued progress of the compound through the pipeline. There are many approaches that can be utilized in understanding the MOA. One of these approaches is a genetic screen utilizing the availability of Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant libraries. Both null and heterozygous library mutants covering the entire genome of this model yeast are available. The desired phenotype when screening the new compound is either resistance (null mutants) or haploinsufficiency or loss of fitness (heterozygote mutants). Both types of mutants can be clustered by software into common targets that provide clues as to a pathway or other cell process. Below, methods are described for genetic screens. PMID:26519072

  10. Connexin hemichannels influence genetically determined inflammatory and hyperproliferative skin diseases.

    PubMed

    Levit, Noah A; White, Thomas W

    2015-09-01

    Connexin mutations underlie numerous human genetic diseases. Several connexin genes have been linked to skin diseases, and mechanistic studies have indicated that a gain of abnormal channel function may be responsible for pathology. The topical accessibility of the epidermal connexins, the existence of several mouse models of human skin disease, and the ongoing identification of pharmacological inhibitors targeting connexins provide an opportunity to test new therapeutic approaches. PMID:26211951

  11. Clinical, genetic and imaging findings identify new causes for corpus callosum development syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Timothy J.; Sherr, Elliott H.; Barkovich, A. James

    2014-01-01

    The corpus callosum is the largest fibre tract in the brain, connecting the two cerebral hemispheres, and thereby facilitating the integration of motor and sensory information from the two sides of the body as well as influencing higher cognition associated with executive function, social interaction and language. Agenesis of the corpus callosum is a common brain malformation that can occur either in isolation or in association with congenital syndromes. Understanding the causes of this condition will help improve our knowledge of the critical brain developmental mechanisms required for wiring the brain and provide potential avenues for therapies for callosal agenesis or related neurodevelopmental disorders. Improved genetic studies combined with mouse models and neuroimaging have rapidly expanded the diverse collection of copy number variations and single gene mutations associated with callosal agenesis. At the same time, advances in our understanding of the developmental mechanisms involved in corpus callosum formation have provided insights into the possible causes of these disorders. This review provides the first comprehensive classification of the clinical and genetic features of syndromes associated with callosal agenesis, and provides a genetic and developmental framework for the interpretation of future research that will guide the next advances in the field. PMID:24477430

  12. Genetic implanted fuzzy model for water saturation determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagheripour, Parisa; Asoodeh, Mojtaba

    2014-04-01

    The portion of rock pore volume occupied with non-hydrocarbon fluids is called water saturation, which plays a significant role in reservoir description and management. Accurate water saturation, directly measured from special core analysis is highly expensive and time consuming. Furthermore, indirect measurements of water saturation from well log interpretation such as empirical correlations or statistical methods do not provide satisfying results. Recent works showed that fuzzy logic is a robust tool for handling geosciences problems which provide more reliable results compared with empirical correlations or statistical methods. This study goes further to improve fuzzy logic for enhancing accuracy of final prediction. It employs hybrid genetic algorithm-pattern search technique instead of widely held subtractive clustering approach for setting up fuzzy rules and for extracting optimal parameters involved in computational structure of fuzzy model. The proposed strategy, called genetic implanted fuzzy model, was used to formulate conventional well log data, including sonic transit time, neutron porosity, formation bulk density, true resistivity, and gamma ray into water saturation, obtained from subtractive clustering approach. Results indicated genetic implanted fuzzy model performed more satisfyingly compared with traditional fuzzy logic model. The propounded model was successfully applied to one of Iranian carbonate reservoir rocks.

  13. Patterns of genetic differentiation at MHC class I genes and microsatellites identify conservation units in the giant panda

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Evaluating patterns of genetic variation is important to identify conservation units (i.e., evolutionarily significant units [ESUs], management units [MUs], and adaptive units [AUs]) in endangered species. While neutral markers could be used to infer population history, their application in the estimation of adaptive variation is limited. The capacity to adapt to various environments is vital for the long-term survival of endangered species. Hence, analysis of adaptive loci, such as the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes, is critical for conservation genetics studies. Here, we investigated 4 classical MHC class I genes (Aime-C, Aime-F, Aime-I, and Aime-L) and 8 microsatellites to infer patterns of genetic variation in the giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) and to further define conservation units. Results Overall, we identified 24 haplotypes (9 for Aime-C, 1 for Aime-F, 7 for Aime-I, and 7 for Aime-L) from 218 individuals obtained from 6 populations of giant panda. We found that the Xiaoxiangling population had the highest genetic variation at microsatellites among the 6 giant panda populations and higher genetic variation at Aime-MHC class I genes than other larger populations (Qinling, Qionglai, and Minshan populations). Differentiation index (FST)-based phylogenetic and Bayesian clustering analyses for Aime-MHC-I and microsatellite loci both supported that most populations were highly differentiated. The Qinling population was the most genetically differentiated. Conclusions The giant panda showed a relatively higher level of genetic diversity at MHC class I genes compared with endangered felids. Using all of the loci, we found that the 6 giant panda populations fell into 2 ESUs: Qinling and non-Qinling populations. We defined 3 MUs based on microsatellites: Qinling, Minshan-Qionglai, and Daxiangling-Xiaoxiangling-Liangshan. We also recommended 3 possible AUs based on MHC loci: Qinling, Minshan-Qionglai, and Daxiangling-Xiaoxiangling-Liangshan. Furthermore, we recommend that a captive breeding program be considered for the Qinling panda population. PMID:24144019

  14. Genetic Determinants of On-Aspirin Platelet Reactivity: Focus on the Influence of PEAR1

    PubMed Central

    Würtz, Morten; Nissen, Peter H.; Grove, Erik Lerkevang; Kristensen, Steen Dalby; Hvas, Anne-Mette

    2014-01-01

    Background Platelet aggregation during aspirin treatment displays considerable inter-individual variability. A genetic etiology likely exists, but it remains unclear to what extent genetic polymorphisms determine platelet aggregation in aspirin-treated individuals. Aim To identify platelet-related single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) influencing platelet aggregation during aspirin treatment. Furthermore, we explored to what extent changes in cyclooxygenase-1 activity and platelet activation may explain such influence. Methods We included 985 Danish patients with stable coronary artery disease treated with aspirin 75 mg/day mono antiplatelet therapy. Patients were genotyped for 16 common SNPs in platelet-related genes using standard PCR-based methods (TaqMan). Platelet aggregation was evaluated by whole blood platelet aggregometry employing Multiplate Analyzer (agonists: arachidonic acid and collagen) and VerifyNow Aspirin. Serum thromboxane B2 was measured to confirm aspirin adherence and was used as a marker of cyclooxygenase-1 activity. Soluble P-selectin was used as marker of platelet activation. Platelet aggregation, cyclooxygenase-1 activity, and platelet activation were compared across genotypes in adjusted analyses. Results The A-allele of the rs12041331 SNP in the platelet endothelial aggregation receptor-1 (PEAR1) gene was associated with reduced platelet aggregation and increased platelet activation, but not with cyclooxygenase-1 activity. Platelet aggregation was unaffected by the other SNPs analyzed. Conclusion A common genetic variant in PEAR1 (rs12041331) reproducibly influenced platelet aggregation in aspirin-treated patients with coronary artery disease. The exact biological mechanism remains elusive, but the effect of this polymorphism may be related to changes in platelet activation. Furthermore, 14 SNPs previously suggested to influence aspirin efficacy were not associated with on-aspirin platelet aggregation. Clinical Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01383304 PMID:25360888

  15. Systems genetics identifies Sestrin 3 as a regulator of a proconvulsant gene network in human epileptic hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Michael R.; Rossetti, Tiziana; Speed, Doug; Srivastava, Prashant K.; Chadeau-Hyam, Marc; Hajji, Nabil; Dabrowska, Aleksandra; Rotival, Maxime; Razzaghi, Banafsheh; Kovac, Stjepana; Wanisch, Klaus; Grillo, Federico W.; Slaviero, Anna; Langley, Sarah R.; Shkura, Kirill; Roncon, Paolo; De, Tisham; Mattheisen, Manuel; Niehusmann, Pitt; O’Brien, Terence J.; Petrovski, Slave; von Lehe, Marec; Hoffmann, Per; Eriksson, Johan; Coffey, Alison J.; Cichon, Sven; Walker, Matthew; Simonato, Michele; Danis, Bénédicte; Mazzuferi, Manuela; Foerch, Patrik; Schoch, Susanne; De Paola, Vincenzo; Kaminski, Rafal M.; Cunliffe, Vincent T.; Becker, Albert J.; Petretto, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    Gene-regulatory network analysis is a powerful approach to elucidate the molecular processes and pathways underlying complex disease. Here we employ systems genetics approaches to characterize the genetic regulation of pathophysiological pathways in human temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). Using surgically acquired hippocampi from 129 TLE patients, we identify a gene-regulatory network genetically associated with epilepsy that contains a specialized, highly expressed transcriptional module encoding proconvulsive cytokines and Toll-like receptor signalling genes. RNA sequencing analysis in a mouse model of TLE using 100 epileptic and 100 control hippocampi shows the proconvulsive module is preserved across-species, specific to the epileptic hippocampus and upregulated in chronic epilepsy. In the TLE patients, we map the trans-acting genetic control of this proconvulsive module to Sestrin 3 (SESN3), and demonstrate that SESN3 positively regulates the module in macrophages, microglia and neurons. Morpholino-mediated Sesn3 knockdown in zebrafish confirms the regulation of the transcriptional module, and attenuates chemically induced behavioural seizures in vivo. PMID:25615886

  16. A Novel Approach to Identify Candidate Prognostic Factors for Hepatitis C Treatment Response Integrating Clinical and Viral Genetic Data

    PubMed Central

    Amadoz, Alicia; González-Candelas, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    The combined therapy of pegylated interferon (IFN) plus ribavirin (RBV) has been for a long time the standard treatment for patients infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV). In the case of genotype 1, only 38%–48% of patients have a positive response to the combined treatment. In previous studies, viral genetic information has been occasionally included as a predictor. Here, we consider viral genetic variation in addition to 11 clinical and 19 viral populations and evolutionary parameters to identify candidate baseline prognostic factors that could be involved in the treatment outcome. We obtained potential prognostic models for HCV subtypes la and lb in combination as well as separately. We also found that viral genetic information is relevant for the combined treatment assessment of patients, as the potential prognostic model of joint subtypes includes 9 viral-related variables out of 11. Our proposed methodology fully characterizes viral genetic information and finds a combination of positions that modulate inter-patient variability. PMID:25780333

  17. Genetic Analysis of the Pathogenic Molecular Sub-phenotype Interferon Alpha Identifies Multiple Novel Loci Involved in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Kariuki, Silvia N.; Ghodke-Puranik, Yogita; Dorschner, Jessica M.; Chrabot, Beverly S.; Kelly, Jennifer A.; Tsao, Betty P.; Kimberly, Robert P.; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta E.; Jacob, Chaim O.; Criswell, Lindsey A.; Sivils, Kathy L.; Langefeld, Carl D.; Harley, John B.; Skol, Andrew D.; Niewold, Timothy B.

    2014-01-01

    Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) is a chronic autoimmune disorder characterized by inflammation of multiple organ systems and dysregulated interferon responses. SLE is both genetically and phenotypically heterogeneous, greatly reducing the power of case-control studies in SLE. Elevated circulating interferon alpha (IFN-?) is a stable, heritable trait in SLE, which has been implicated in primary disease pathogenesis. 40–50% of patients have high IFN-?, and high levels correspond with clinical differences. To study genetic heterogeneity in SLE, we performed a case-case study comparing patients with high vs. low IFN-? in over 1550 SLE cases, including GWAS and replication cohorts. In meta-analysis, the top associations in European ancestry were PRKG1 rs7897633 (PMeta=2.75 × 10?8) and PNP rs1049564 (PMeta=1.24 × 10?7). We also found evidence for cross-ancestral background associations with the ANKRD44 and PLEKHF2 loci. These loci have not been previously identified in case-control SLE genetic studies. Bioinformatic analyses implicated these loci functionally in dendritic cells and natural killer cells, both of which are involved in IFN-? production in SLE. As case-control studies of heterogeneous diseases reach a limit of feasibility with respect to subject number and detectable effect size, the study of informative pathogenic subphenotypes becomes an attractive strategy for genetic discovery in complex disease. PMID:25338677

  18. Population size and time since island isolation determine genetic diversity loss in insular frog populations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Supen; Zhu, Wei; Gao, Xu; Li, Xianping; Yan, Shaofei; Liu, Xuan; Yang, Ji; Gao, Zengxiang; Li, Yiming

    2014-02-01

    Understanding the factors that contribute to loss of genetic diversity in fragmented populations is crucial for conservation measurements. Land-bridge archipelagoes offer ideal model systems for identifying the long-term effects of these factors on genetic variations in wild populations. In this study, we used nine microsatellite markers to quantify genetic diversity and differentiation of 810 pond frogs (Pelophylax nigromaculatus) from 24 islands of the Zhoushan Archipelago and three sites on nearby mainland China and estimated the effects of the island area, population size, time since island isolation, distance to the mainland and distance to the nearest larger island on reduced genetic diversity of insular populations. The mainland populations displayed higher genetic diversity than insular populations. Genetic differentiations and no obvious gene flow were detected among the frog populations on the islands. Hierarchical partitioning analysis showed that only time since island isolation (square-root-transformed) and population size (log-transformed) significantly contributed to insular genetic diversity. These results suggest that decreased genetic diversity and genetic differentiations among insular populations may have been caused by random genetic drift following isolation by rising sea levels during the Holocene. The results provide strong evidence for a relationship between retained genetic diversity and population size and time since island isolation for pond frogs on the islands, consistent with the prediction of the neutral theory for finite populations. Our study highlights the importance of the size and estimated isolation time of populations in understanding the mechanisms of genetic diversity loss and differentiation in fragmented wild populations. PMID:24351057

  19. Genomic and transcriptome profiling identified both human and HBV genetic variations and their interactions in Chinese hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Dong, Hua; Qian, Ziliang; Zhang, Lan; Chen, Yunqin; Ren, Zhenggang; Ji, Qunsheng

    2015-12-01

    Interaction between HBV and host genome integrations in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) development is a complex process and the mechanism is still unclear. Here we described in details the quality controls and data mining of aCGH and transcriptome sequencing data on 50 HCC samples from the Chinese patients, published by Dong et al. (2015) (GEO#: GSE65486). In additional to the HBV-MLL4 integration discovered, we also investigated the genetic aberrations of HBV and host genes as well as their genetic interactions. We reported human genome copy number changes and frequent transcriptome variations (e.g. TP53, CTNNB1 mutation, especially MLL family mutations) in this cohort of the patients. For HBV genotype C, we identified a novel linkage disequilibrium region covering HBV replication regulatory elements, including basal core promoter, DR1, epsilon and poly-A regions, which is associated with HBV core antigen over-expression and almost exclusive to HBV-MLL4 integration. PMID:26697315

  20. Genomic and transcriptome profiling identified both human and HBV genetic variations and their interactions in Chinese hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Hua; Qian, Ziliang; Zhang, Lan; Chen, Yunqin; Ren, Zhenggang; Ji, Qunsheng

    2015-01-01

    Interaction between HBV and host genome integrations in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) development is a complex process and the mechanism is still unclear. Here we described in details the quality controls and data mining of aCGH and transcriptome sequencing data on 50 HCC samples from the Chinese patients, published by Dong et al. (2015) (GEO#: GSE65486). In additional to the HBV-MLL4 integration discovered, we also investigated the genetic aberrations of HBV and host genes as well as their genetic interactions. We reported human genome copy number changes and frequent transcriptome variations (e.g. TP53, CTNNB1 mutation, especially MLL family mutations) in this cohort of the patients. For HBV genotype C, we identified a novel linkage disequilibrium region covering HBV replication regulatory elements, including basal core promoter, DR1, epsilon and poly-A regions, which is associated with HBV core antigen over-expression and almost exclusive to HBV-MLL4 integration. PMID:26697315

  1. Mapping eQTLs in the Norfolk Island Genetic Isolate Identifies Candidate Genes for CVD Risk Traits

    PubMed Central

    Benton, Miles C.; Lea, Rod A.; Macartney-Coxson, Donia; Carless, Melanie A.; Göring, Harald H.; Bellis, Claire; Hanna, Michelle; Eccles, David; Chambers, Geoffrey K.; Curran, Joanne E.; Harper, Jacquie L.; Blangero, John; Griffiths, Lyn R.

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) affects millions of people worldwide and is influenced by numerous factors, including lifestyle and genetics. Expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) influence gene expression and are good candidates for CVD risk. Founder-effect pedigrees can provide additional power to map genes associated with disease risk. Therefore, we identified eQTLs in the genetic isolate of Norfolk Island (NI) and tested for associations between these and CVD risk factors. We measured genome-wide transcript levels of blood lymphocytes in 330 individuals and used pedigree-based heritability analysis to identify heritable transcripts. eQTLs were identified by genome-wide association testing of these transcripts. Testing for association between CVD risk factors (i.e., blood lipids, blood pressure, and body fat indices) and eQTLs revealed 1,712 heritable transcripts (p < 0.05) with heritability values ranging from 0.18 to 0.84. From these, we identified 200 cis-acting and 70 trans-acting eQTLs (p < 1.84 × 10?7) An eQTL-centric analysis of CVD risk traits revealed multiple associations, including 12 previously associated with CVD-related traits. Trait versus eQTL regression modeling identified four CVD risk candidates (NAAA, PAPSS1, NME1, and PRDX1), all of which have known biological roles in disease. In addition, we implicated several genes previously associated with CVD risk traits, including MTHFR and FN3KRP. We have successfully identified a panel of eQTLs in the NI pedigree and used this to implicate several genes in CVD risk. Future studies are required for further assessing the functional importance of these eQTLs and whether the findings here also relate to outbred populations. PMID:24314549

  2. Epistasis Is a Major Determinant of the Additive Genetic Variance in Mimulus guttatus

    PubMed Central

    Monnahan, Patrick J.; Kelly, John K.

    2015-01-01

    The influence of genetic interactions (epistasis) on the genetic variance of quantitative traits is a major unresolved problem relevant to medical, agricultural, and evolutionary genetics. The additive genetic component is typically a high proportion of the total genetic variance in quantitative traits, despite that underlying genes must interact to determine phenotype. This study estimates direct and interaction effects for 11 pairs of Quantitative Trait Loci (QTLs) affecting floral traits within a single population of Mimulus guttatus. With estimates of all 9 genotypes for each QTL pair, we are able to map from QTL effects to variance components as a function of population allele frequencies, and thus predict changes in variance components as allele frequencies change. This mapping requires an analytical framework that properly accounts for bias introduced by estimation errors. We find that even with abundant interactions between QTLs, most of the genetic variance is likely to be additive. However, the strong dependency of allelic average effects on genetic background implies that epistasis is a major determinant of the additive genetic variance, and thus, the population’s ability to respond to selection. PMID:25946702

  3. A principal target of human immunity to malaria identified by molecular population genetic and immunological analyses 

    E-print Network

    Conway, David J; Cavanagh, David R; Tanabe, K; Roper, C; Mikes, Z S; Sakihama, N; Bojang, K A; Oduola, A M J; Kremsner, P G; Arnot, D E; Greenwood, B M; McBride, J S

    New strategies are required to identify the most important targets of protective immunity in complex eukaryotic pathogens. Natural selection maintains allelic variation in some antigens of the malaria parasite Plasmodium ...

  4. Regulators of genetic risk of breast cancer identified by integrative network analysis

    E-print Network

    Castro, Mauro A. A.; de Santiago, Ines; Campbell, Thomas M.; Vaughn, Courtney; Hickey, Theresa E.; Ross, Edith; Tilley, Wayne D.; Markowetz, Florian; Ponder, Bruce A. J.; Meyer, Kerstin B.

    2015-01-01

    and to different, luminal epithelial cell populations in the adult mammary gland. Our network approach provides a foundation to reveal the regulatory circuits governing breast cancer, to identify targets for intervention, and is transferable to other disease...

  5. Maternal and genetic factors determine early life telomere length.

    PubMed

    Asghar, Muhammad; Bensch, Staffan; Tarka, Maja; Hansson, Bengt; Hasselquist, Dennis

    2015-01-22

    In a broad range of species--including humans--it has been demonstrated that telomere length declines throughout life and that it may be involved in cell and organismal senescence. This potential link to ageing and thus to fitness has triggered recent interest in understanding how variation in telomere length is inherited and maintained. However, previous studies suffer from two main drawbacks that limit the possibility of understanding the relative importance of genetic, parental and environmental influences on telomere length variation. These studies have been based on (i) telomere lengths measured at different time points in different individuals, despite the fact that telomere length changes over life, and (ii) parent-offspring regression techniques, which do not enable differentiation between genetic and parental components of inheritance. To overcome these drawbacks, in our study of a songbird, the great reed warbler, we have analysed telomere length measured early in life in both parents and offspring and applied statistical models (so-called 'animal models') that are based on long-term pedigree data. Our results showed a significant heritability of telomere length on the maternal but not on the paternal side, and that the mother's age was positively correlated with their offspring's telomere length. Furthermore, the pedigree-based analyses revealed a significant heritability and an equally large maternal effect. Our study demonstrates strong maternal influence on telomere length and future studies now need to elucidate possible underlying factors, including which types of maternal effects are involved. PMID:25621325

  6. Determination of Supersymmetric Particle Masses and Attributes with Genetic Divisors

    SciTech Connect

    DAI,YANG; BORISOV,ALEXEY B.; BOYER,KEITH; RHODES,CHARLES K.

    2001-06-01

    Arithmetic conditions relating particle masses can be defined on the basis of (1) the supersymmetric conservation of congruence and (2) the observed characteristics of particle reactions and stabilities. Stated in the form of common divisors, these relations can be interpreted as expressions of genetic elements that represent specific particle characteristics. In order to illustrate this concept, it is shown that the pion triplet ({pi}{sup {+-}}, {pi}{sup 0}) can be associated with the existence of a greatest common divisor d{sub 0{+-}} in a way that can account for both the highly similar physical properties of these particles and the observed {pi}{sup {+-}}/{pi}{sup 0} mass splitting. These results support the conclusion that a corresponding statement holds generally for all particle multiplets. Classification of the respective physical states is achieved by assignment of the common divisors to residue classes in a finite field F{sub P{sub {alpha}}} and the existence of the multiplicative group of units F{sub P{sub {alpha}}} enables the corresponding mass parameters to be associated with a rich subgroup structure. The existence of inverse states in F{sub P{sub {alpha}}} allows relationships connecting particle mass values to be conveniently expressed in a form in which the genetic divisor structure is prominent. An example is given in which the masses of two neutral mesons (K{degree} {r_arrow} {pi}{degree}) are related to the properties of the electron (e), a charged lepton. Physically, since this relationship reflects the cascade decay K{degree} {r_arrow} {pi}{degree} + {pi}{degree}/{pi}{degree} {r_arrow} e{sup +} + e{sup {minus}}, in which a neutral kaon is converted into four charged leptons, it enables the genetic divisor concept, through the intrinsic algebraic structure of the field, to provide a theoretical basis for the conservation of both electric charge and lepton number. It is further shown that the fundamental source of supersymmetry can be expressed in terms of hierarchical relationships between odd and even order subgroups of F{sub P{sub {alpha}}}, an outcome that automatically reflects itself in the phenomenon of fermion/boson pairing of individual particle systems. Accordingly, supersymmetry is best represented as a group rather than a particle property. The status of the Higgs subgroup of order 4 is singular; it is isolated from the hierarchical pattern and communicates globally to the mass scale through the seesaw congruence by (1) fusing the concepts of mass and space and (2) specifying the generators of the physical masses.

  7. Mutation in the 3'untranslated region of APP as a genetic determinant of cerebral amyloid angiopathy.

    PubMed

    Nicolas, Gaël; Wallon, David; Goupil, Claudia; Richard, Anne-Claire; Pottier, Cyril; Dorval, Véronique; Sarov-Rivière, Mariana; Riant, Florence; Hervé, Dominique; Amouyel, Philippe; Guerchet, Maelenn; Ndamba-Bandzouzi, Bebene; Mbelesso, Pascal; Dartigues, Jean-François; Lambert, Jean-Charles; Preux, Pierre-Marie; Frebourg, Thierry; Campion, Dominique; Hannequin, Didier; Tournier-Lasserve, Elisabeth; Hébert, Sébastien S; Rovelet-Lecrux, Anne

    2016-01-01

    A?-related cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is a major cause of primary non-traumatic brain hemorrhage. In families with an early onset of the disease, CAA can be due to amyloid precursor protein (APP) pathogenic variants or duplications. APP duplications lead to a ~1.5-fold increased APP expression, resulting in A? overproduction and deposition in the walls of leptomeningeal vessels. We hypothesized that rare variants in the 3'untranslated region (UTR) of APP might lead to APP overexpression in patients with CAA and no APP pathogenic variant or duplication. We performed direct sequencing of the whole APP 3'UTR in 90 patients with CAA and explored the functional consequences of one previously unreported variant. We identified three sequence variants in four patients, of which a two-base pair deletion (c.*331_*332del) was previously unannotated and absent from 175 controls of same ethnicity. This latter variant was associated with increased APP expression in vivo and in vitro. Bioinformatics and functional assays showed that the APP c.*331_*332del variant affected APP messenger RNA (mRNA) structure and binding of two microRNAs (miR-582-3p and miR-892b), providing a mechanism for the observed effects on APP expression. These results identify APP 3'UTR sequence variants as genetic determinants of A?-CAA. PMID:25828868

  8. Niche Divergence versus Neutral Processes: Combined Environmental and Genetic Analyses Identify Contrasting Patterns of Differentiation in Recently Diverged Pine Species

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Letelier, Alejandra; Ortíz-Medrano, Alejandra; Piñero, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims Solving relationships of recently diverged taxa, poses a challenge due to shared polymorphism and weak reproductive barriers. Multiple lines of evidence are needed to identify independently evolving lineages. This is especially true of long-lived species with large effective population sizes, and slow rates of lineage sorting. North American pines are an interesting group to test this multiple approach. Our aim is to combine cytoplasmic genetic markers with environmental information to clarify species boundaries and relationships of the species complex of Pinus flexilis, Pinus ayacahuite, and Pinus strobiformis. Methods Mitochondrial and chloroplast sequences were combined with previously obtained microsatellite data and contrasted with environmental information to reconstruct phylogenetic relationships of the species complex. Ecological niche models were compared to test if ecological divergence is significant among species. Key Results and Conclusion Separately, both genetic and ecological evidence support a clear differentiation of all three species but with different topology, but also reveal an ancestral contact zone between P. strobiformis and P. ayacahuite. The marked ecological differentiation of P. flexilis suggests that ecological speciation has occurred in this lineage, but this is not reflected in neutral markers. The inclusion of environmental traits in phylogenetic reconstruction improved the resolution of internal branches. We suggest that combining environmental and genetic information would be useful for species delimitation and phylogenetic studies in other recently diverged species complexes. PMID:24205167

  9. Multi-locus DNA sequencing of Toxoplasma gondii isolated from Brazilian pigs identifies genetically divergent strains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Five Toxoplasma gondii isolates (TgPgBr1-5) were isolated from hearts and brains of pigs freshly purchased at the market of Campos dos Goytacazes, Northern Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil. Four of the five isolates were highly pathogenic in mice. Four genotypes were identified. Multi-locus DNA sequenci...

  10. Cell Reports A Genetic Screen Identifies TCF3/E2A

    E-print Network

    target gene CDKN1A (p21), an in- hibitor of cell-cycle progression, versus BBC3 (PUMA), a key mediator of apoptosis. Our screen identified numerous factors whose depletion cre- ates an imbalance in the p21:PUMA re- pressing PUMA across cancer cell types of multiple origins. Accordingly, TCF3/E2A depletion

  11. COMPETITIVE METAGENOMIC DNA HYBRIDIZATION IDENTIFIES HOST-SPECIFIC GENETIC MARKERS IN CATTLE FECAL SAMPLES - ABSTRACT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several PCR methods have recently been developed to identify fecal contamination in surface waters. In all cases, researchers have relied on one gene or one microorganism for selection of host specific markers. Here, we describe the application of a genome fragment enrichment met...

  12. COMPETITIVE METAGENOMIC DNA HYBRIDIZATION IDENTIFIES HOST-SPECIFIC MICROBIAL GENETIC MARKERS IN COW FECAL SAMPLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several PCR methods have recently been developed to identify fecal contamination in surface waters. In all cases, researchers have relied on one gene or one microorganism for selection of host specific markers. Here, we describe the application of a genome fragment enrichment met...

  13. High-density genetic mapping identifies new susceptibility loci for rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Eyre, Steve; Bowes, John; Diogo, Dorothée; Lee, Annette; Barton, Anne; Martin, Paul; Zhernakova, Alexandra; Stahl, Eli; Viatte, Sebastien; McAllister, Kate; Amos, Christopher I; Padyukov, Leonid; Toes, Rene E M; Huizinga, Tom W J; Wijmenga, Cisca; Trynka, Gosia; Franke, Lude; Westra, Harm-Jan; Alfredsson, Lars; Hu, Xinli; Sandor, Cynthia; de Bakker, Paul I W; Davila, Sonia; Khor, Chiea Chuen; Heng, Khai Koon; Andrews, Robert; Edkins, Sarah; Hunt, Sarah E; Langford, Cordelia; Symmons, Deborah; Concannon, Pat; Onengut-Gumuscu, Suna; Rich, Stephen S; Deloukas, Panos; Gonzalez-Gay, Miguel A; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Luis; Ärlsetig, Lisbeth; Martin, Javier; Rantapää-Dahlqvist, Solbritt; Plenge, Robert M; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Klareskog, Lars; Gregersen, Peter K; Worthington, Jane

    2012-12-01

    Using the Immunochip custom SNP array, which was designed for dense genotyping of 186 loci identified through genome-wide association studies (GWAS), we analyzed 11,475 individuals with rheumatoid arthritis (cases) of European ancestry and 15,870 controls for 129,464 markers. We combined these data in a meta-analysis with GWAS data from additional independent cases (n = 2,363) and controls (n = 17,872). We identified 14 new susceptibility loci, 9 of which were associated with rheumatoid arthritis overall and five of which were specifically associated with disease that was positive for anticitrullinated peptide antibodies, bringing the number of confirmed rheumatoid arthritis risk loci in individuals of European ancestry to 46. We refined the peak of association to a single gene for 19 loci, identified secondary independent effects at 6 loci and identified association to low-frequency variants at 4 loci. Bioinformatic analyses generated strong hypotheses for the causal SNP at seven loci. This study illustrates the advantages of dense SNP mapping analysis to inform subsequent functional investigations. PMID:23143596

  14. Identifying determinants of effective complementary feeding behaviour change interventions in developing countries

    PubMed Central

    Fabrizio, Cecilia S; van Liere, Marti; Pelto, Gretel

    2014-01-01

    As stunting moves to the forefront of the global agenda, there is substantial evidence that behaviour change interventions (BCI) can improve infant feeding practices and growth. However, this evidence has not been translated into improved outcomes on a national level because we do not know enough about what makes these interventions work, for whom, when, why, at what cost and for how long. Our objective was to examine the design and implementation of complementary feeding BCI, from the peer-reviewed literature, to identify generalisable key determinants. We identified 29 studies that evaluated BCI efficacy or effectiveness, were conducted in developing countries, and reported outcomes on infant and young children aged 6–24 months. Two potential determinants emerged: (1) effective studies used formative research to identify cultural barriers and enablers to optimal feeding practices, to shape the intervention strategy, and to formulate appropriate messages and mediums for delivery; (2) effective studies delineated the programme impact pathway to the target behaviour change and assessed intermediary behaviour changes to learn what worked. We found that BCI that used these developmental and implementation processes could be effective despite heterogeneous approaches and design components. Our analysis was constrained, however, by the limited published data on how design and implementation were carried out, perhaps because of publishing space limits. Information on cost-effectiveness, sustainability and scalability was also very limited. We suggest a more comprehensive reporting process and a more strategic research agenda to enable generalisable evidence to accumulate. PMID:24798264

  15. Why the `meta' in metagenomics? Genomics determines the complete genetic

    E-print Network

    Cai, Long

    , which targeted a biofilm in acid drainage from mines that consisted of only a handful of dominant proteins, light-driven proton pumps that were first identified in environmental DNA from bac- terioplankton that bacteria were solely responsible for aerobic ammonia oxidation, although their numbers often could

  16. Comparison of French and Estonian Students' Conceptions in Genetic Determinism of Human Behaviours

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castera, Jeremy; Sarapuu, Tago; Clement, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Innatism is the belief that most of the human personality can be determined by genes. This ideology is dangerous, especially when it claims to be scientific. The present study investigates conceptions of 1060 students from Estonia and France related to genetic determinism of some human behaviours. Factors taken into account included students'…

  17. An In vivo Chemical Genetic Screen Identifies Phosphodiesterase 4 as a Pharmacological Target for Hedgehog signaling Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Charles H.; Hempel, Jonathan E.; Hao, Jijun; Frist, Audrey Y.; Williams, Michelle M.; Fleming, Jonathan T.; Sulikowski, Gary A.; Cooper, Michael K.; Chiang, Chin; Hong, Charles C.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Hedgehog (Hh) signaling plays an integral role in vertebrate development, and its dysregulation has been widely accepted as a driver of numerous malignancies. While a variety of small molecules target Smoothened (Smo) as a strategy for Hh inhibition, Smo gain of function mutations have limited their clinical implementation. Modulation of targets downstream of Smo could define a paradigm for treatment of Hh-dependent cancers. Here, we describe eggmanone, a small molecule identified from a chemical genetic zebrafish screen which induced a Hh-null phenotype. Eggmanone exerts its Hh-inhibitory effects through selective antagonism of phosphodiesterase (PDE) 4, leading to protein kinase A activation and subsequent Hh blockade. Our study implicates PDE4 as a target for Hh inhibition, suggests an improved strategy for Hh-dependent cancer therapy and identifies a unique probe of downstream-of-Smo Hh modulation. PMID:25818300

  18. Genome-wide meta-analysis identifies 11 new loci for anthropometric traits and provides insights into genetic architecture.

    PubMed

    Berndt, Sonja I; Gustafsson, Stefan; Mägi, Reedik; Ganna, Andrea; Wheeler, Eleanor; Feitosa, Mary F; Justice, Anne E; Monda, Keri L; Croteau-Chonka, Damien C; Day, Felix R; Esko, Tõnu; Fall, Tove; Ferreira, Teresa; Gentilini, Davide; Jackson, Anne U; Luan, Jian'an; Randall, Joshua C; Vedantam, Sailaja; Willer, Cristen J; Winkler, Thomas W; Wood, Andrew R; Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie; Hu, Yi-Juan; Lee, Sang Hong; Liang, Liming; Lin, Dan-Yu; Min, Josine L; Neale, Benjamin M; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Yang, Jian; Albrecht, Eva; Amin, Najaf; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L; Cadby, Gemma; den Heijer, Martin; Eklund, Niina; Fischer, Krista; Goel, Anuj; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Huffman, Jennifer E; Jarick, Ivonne; Johansson, Åsa; Johnson, Toby; Kanoni, Stavroula; Kleber, Marcus E; König, Inke R; Kristiansson, Kati; Kutalik, Zoltán; Lamina, Claudia; Lecoeur, Cecile; Li, Guo; Mangino, Massimo; McArdle, Wendy L; Medina-Gomez, Carolina; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Ngwa, Julius S; Nolte, Ilja M; Paternoster, Lavinia; Pechlivanis, Sonali; Perola, Markus; Peters, Marjolein J; Preuss, Michael; Rose, Lynda M; Shi, Jianxin; Shungin, Dmitry; Smith, Albert Vernon; Strawbridge, Rona J; Surakka, Ida; Teumer, Alexander; Trip, Mieke D; Tyrer, Jonathan; Van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V; Vandenput, Liesbeth; Waite, Lindsay L; Zhao, Jing Hua; Absher, Devin; Asselbergs, Folkert W; Atalay, Mustafa; Attwood, Antony P; Balmforth, Anthony J; Basart, Hanneke; Beilby, John; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Brambilla, Paolo; Bruinenberg, Marcel; Campbell, Harry; Chasman, Daniel I; Chines, Peter S; Collins, Francis S; Connell, John M; Cookson, William O; de Faire, Ulf; de Vegt, Femmie; Dei, Mariano; Dimitriou, Maria; Edkins, Sarah; Estrada, Karol; Evans, David M; Farrall, Martin; Ferrario, Marco M; Ferrières, Jean; Franke, Lude; Frau, Francesca; Gejman, Pablo V; Grallert, Harald; Grönberg, Henrik; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Hall, Alistair S; Hall, Per; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Hayward, Caroline; Heard-Costa, Nancy L; Heath, Andrew C; Hebebrand, Johannes; Homuth, Georg; Hu, Frank B; Hunt, Sarah E; Hyppönen, Elina; Iribarren, Carlos; Jacobs, Kevin B; Jansson, John-Olov; Jula, Antti; Kähönen, Mika; Kathiresan, Sekar; Kee, Frank; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kivimäki, Mika; Koenig, Wolfgang; Kraja, Aldi T; Kumari, Meena; Kuulasmaa, Kari; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laitinen, Jaana H; Lakka, Timo A; Langenberg, Claudia; Launer, Lenore J; Lind, Lars; Lindström, Jaana; Liu, Jianjun; Liuzzi, Antonio; Lokki, Marja-Liisa; Lorentzon, Mattias; Madden, Pamela A; Magnusson, Patrik K; Manunta, Paolo; Marek, Diana; März, Winfried; Mateo Leach, Irene; McKnight, Barbara; Medland, Sarah E; Mihailov, Evelin; Milani, Lili; Montgomery, Grant W; Mooser, Vincent; Mühleisen, Thomas W; Munroe, Patricia B; Musk, Arthur W; Narisu, Narisu; Navis, Gerjan; Nicholson, George; Nohr, Ellen A; Ong, Ken K; Oostra, Ben A; Palmer, Colin N A; Palotie, Aarno; Peden, John F; Pedersen, Nancy; Peters, Annette; Polasek, Ozren; Pouta, Anneli; Pramstaller, Peter P; Prokopenko, Inga; Pütter, Carolin; Radhakrishnan, Aparna; Raitakari, Olli; Rendon, Augusto; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rudan, Igor; Saaristo, Timo E; Sambrook, Jennifer G; Sanders, Alan R; Sanna, Serena; Saramies, Jouko; Schipf, Sabine; Schreiber, Stefan; Schunkert, Heribert; Shin, So-Youn; Signorini, Stefano; Sinisalo, Juha; Skrobek, Boris; Soranzo, Nicole; Stan?áková, Alena; Stark, Klaus; Stephens, Jonathan C; Stirrups, Kathleen; Stolk, Ronald P; Stumvoll, Michael; Swift, Amy J; Theodoraki, Eirini V; Thorand, Barbara; Tregouet, David-Alexandre; Tremoli, Elena; Van der Klauw, Melanie M; van Meurs, Joyce B J; Vermeulen, Sita H; Viikari, Jorma; Virtamo, Jarmo; Vitart, Veronique; Waeber, Gérard; Wang, Zhaoming; Widén, Elisabeth; Wild, Sarah H; Willemsen, Gonneke; Winkelmann, Bernhard R; Witteman, Jacqueline C M; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H R; Wong, Andrew; Wright, Alan F; Zillikens, M Carola; Amouyel, Philippe; Boehm, Bernhard O; Boerwinkle, Eric; Boomsma, Dorret I; Caulfield, Mark J; Chanock, Stephen J; Cupples, L Adrienne; Cusi, Daniele; Dedoussis, George V; Erdmann, Jeanette; Eriksson, Johan G; Franks, Paul W; Froguel, Philippe; Gieger, Christian; Gyllensten, Ulf; Hamsten, Anders; Harris, Tamara B; Hengstenberg, Christian; Hicks, Andrew A; Hingorani, Aroon; Hinney, Anke; Hofman, Albert; Hovingh, Kees G; Hveem, Kristian; Illig, Thomas; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz; Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka M; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Kuh, Diana; Laakso, Markku; Lehtimäki, Terho; Levinson, Douglas F; Martin, Nicholas G; Metspalu, Andres; Morris, Andrew D; Nieminen, Markku S

    2013-05-01

    Approaches exploiting trait distribution extremes may be used to identify loci associated with common traits, but it is unknown whether these loci are generalizable to the broader population. In a genome-wide search for loci associated with the upper versus the lower 5th percentiles of body mass index, height and waist-to-hip ratio, as well as clinical classes of obesity, including up to 263,407 individuals of European ancestry, we identified 4 new loci (IGFBP4, H6PD, RSRC1 and PPP2R2A) influencing height detected in the distribution tails and 7 new loci (HNF4G, RPTOR, GNAT2, MRPS33P4, ADCY9, HS6ST3 and ZZZ3) for clinical classes of obesity. Further, we find a large overlap in genetic structure and the distribution of variants between traits based on extremes and the general population and little etiological heterogeneity between obesity subgroups. PMID:23563607

  19. Prenatal genetic testing: an investigation of determining factors affecting the decision-making process.

    PubMed

    Pivetti, Monica; Melotti, Giannino

    2013-02-01

    Despite the increase in popularity of prenatal genetic testing, relatively little is known about the role psychological factors play in the decision-making process. In this analogue study, a sample of Italian female university students was used to investigate determining factors that predict the intention of undergoing prenatal genetic testing. Structural Equation Modelling was used to describe the dynamic interplay between knowledge, beliefs, attitudes and health-related behaviour such as prenatal genetic testing. Following the Theory of Reasoned Action, three dimensions predicted the intention to undergo prenatal genetic testing: the need for more scientific information, a positive attitude towards genetic testing, and the inclination to terminate pregnancy after receiving a positive test result. Results showed that less religious women tended to be more in favour of prenatal tests and in undertaking such tests. This preliminary study provides genetic counsellors and policy makers with a clearer picture of their clients' motives and attitudes behind the decision-making process of prenatal genetic testing, contributing to improving both the communication process between counsellors and their clients and the organization of genetic services. PMID:22477148

  20. Identifying Determinants of EGFR-Targeted Therapeutic Biochemical Efficacy Using Computational Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Monast, C S; Lazzara, M J

    2014-01-01

    We modeled cellular epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine phosphorylation dynamics in the presence of receptor-targeting kinase inhibitors (e.g., gefitinib) or antibodies (e.g., cetuximab) to identify systematically the factors that contribute most to the ability of the therapeutics to antagonize EGFR phosphorylation, an effect we define here as biochemical efficacy. Our model identifies distinct processes as controlling gefitinib or cetuximab biochemical efficacy, suggests biochemical efficacy is favored in the presence of certain EGFR ligands, and suggests new drug design principles. For example, the model predicts that gefitinib biochemical efficacy is preferentially sensitive to perturbations in the activity of tyrosine phosphatases regulating EGFR, but that cetuximab biochemical efficacy is preferentially sensitive to perturbations in ligand binding. Our results highlight numerous other considerations that determine biochemical efficacy beyond those reflected by equilibrium affinities. By integrating these considerations, our model also predicts minimum therapeutic combination concentrations to maximally reduce receptor phosphorylation. PMID:25317724

  1. Genome-wide association study identifies novel genetic variants contributing to variation in blood metabolite levels.

    PubMed

    Draisma, Harmen H M; Pool, René; Kobl, Michael; Jansen, Rick; Petersen, Ann-Kristin; Vaarhorst, Anika A M; Yet, Idil; Haller, Toomas; Demirkan, Ay?e; Esko, Tõnu; Zhu, Gu; Böhringer, Stefan; Beekman, Marian; van Klinken, Jan Bert; Römisch-Margl, Werner; Prehn, Cornelia; Adamski, Jerzy; de Craen, Anton J M; van Leeuwen, Elisabeth M; Amin, Najaf; Dharuri, Harish; Westra, Harm-Jan; Franke, Lude; de Geus, Eco J C; Hottenga, Jouke Jan; Willemsen, Gonneke; Henders, Anjali K; Montgomery, Grant W; Nyholt, Dale R; Whitfield, John B; Penninx, Brenda W; Spector, Tim D; Metspalu, Andres; Eline Slagboom, P; van Dijk, Ko Willems; 't Hoen, Peter A C; Strauch, Konstantin; Martin, Nicholas G; van Ommen, Gert-Jan B; Illig, Thomas; Bell, Jordana T; Mangino, Massimo; Suhre, Karsten; McCarthy, Mark I; Gieger, Christian; Isaacs, Aaron; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Boomsma, Dorret I

    2015-01-01

    Metabolites are small molecules involved in cellular metabolism, which can be detected in biological samples using metabolomic techniques. Here we present the results of genome-wide association and meta-analyses for variation in the blood serum levels of 129 metabolites as measured by the Biocrates metabolomic platform. In a discovery sample of 7,478 individuals of European descent, we find 4,068 genome- and metabolome-wide significant (Z-test, P < 1.09 × 10(-9)) associations between single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and metabolites, involving 59 independent SNPs and 85 metabolites. Five of the fifty-nine independent SNPs are new for serum metabolite levels, and were followed-up for replication in an independent sample (N = 1,182). The novel SNPs are located in or near genes encoding metabolite transporter proteins or enzymes (SLC22A16, ARG1, AGPS and ACSL1) that have demonstrated biomedical or pharmaceutical importance. The further characterization of genetic influences on metabolic phenotypes is important for progress in biological and medical research. PMID:26068415

  2. Genetically determined dopamine availability predicts disposition for depression

    PubMed Central

    Felten, Andrea; Montag, Christian; Markett, Sebastian; Walter, Nora T; Reuter, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Although prominent personality theories postulate orthogonality between traits of positive emotionality (PEM) and negative emotionality (NEM), empirical evidence often demonstrates the opposite indicating a negative relationship. Therefore, it is not surprising that dopaminergic (DA) gene loci have been related to traits of positive and of NEM. The present genetic association study investigates the influence of two functional DA gene polymorphisms on Sadness as defined by the Affective Neuroscience Personality Scales (ANPS) in healthy Caucasians (n = 1041). We observed a significant interaction effect between the 10-repeat (10R) allele of the dopamine transporter (DAT1) gene and the methionine (Met) allele of the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) Val158Met polymorphism (F(1,1018) = 11.11; P < 0.001). Carriers of the 9R/9R and the Val/Val genotype showed dramatically reduced Sadness scores in comparison to the other three genotype configurations. Both the 9R/9R and the Val/Val genotypes characterized by reduced transporter density and high dopamine catabolism, respectively, have been separately related to personality traits of PEM and externalizing behavior in the past. The present findings indicate that gene variations of the DA system previously associated with PEM are at the same time protective against high NEM and can therefore constitute a resilience factor against depression. PMID:22399090

  3. C. elegans Model Identifies Genetic Modifiers of ?-Synuclein Inclusion Formation During Aging

    PubMed Central

    van Ham, Tjakko J.; Thijssen, Karen L.; Breitling, Rainer; Hofstra, Robert M. W.; Plasterk, Ronald H. A.; Nollen, Ellen A. A.

    2008-01-01

    Inclusions in the brain containing ?-synuclein are the pathological hallmark of Parkinson's disease, but how these inclusions are formed and how this links to disease is poorly understood. We have developed a C. elegans model that makes it possible to monitor, in living animals, the formation of ?-synuclein inclusions. In worms of old age, inclusions contain aggregated ?- synuclein, resembling a critical pathological feature. We used genome-wide RNA interference to identify processes involved in inclusion formation, and identified 80 genes that, when knocked down, resulted in a premature increase in the number of inclusions. Quality control and vesicle-trafficking genes expressed in the ER/Golgi complex and vesicular compartments were overrepresented, indicating a specific role for these processes in ?-synuclein inclusion formation. Suppressors include aging-associated genes, such as sir-2.1/SIRT1 and lagr-1/LASS2. Altogether, our data suggest a link between ?-synuclein inclusion formation and cellular aging, likely through an endomembrane-related mechanism. The processes and genes identified here present a framework for further study of the disease mechanism and provide candidate susceptibility genes and drug targets for Parkinson's disease and other ?-synuclein related disorders. PMID:18369446

  4. NOTCH1 mutations identify a genetic subgroup of chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients with high risk of transformation and poor outcome.

    PubMed

    Villamor, N; Conde, L; Martínez-Trillos, A; Cazorla, M; Navarro, A; Beà, S; López, C; Colomer, D; Pinyol, M; Aymerich, M; Rozman, M; Abrisqueta, P; Baumann, T; Delgado, J; Giné, E; González-Díaz, M; Hernández, J M; Colado, E; Payer, A R; Rayon, C; Navarro, B; José Terol, M; Bosch, F; Quesada, V; Puente, X S; López-Otín, C; Jares, P; Pereira, A; Campo, E; López-Guillermo, A

    2013-04-01

    NOTCH1 has been found recurrently mutated in a subset of patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). To analyze biological features and clinical impact of NOTCH1 mutations in CLL, we sequenced this gene in 565 patients. NOTCH1 mutations, found in 63 patients (11%), were associated with unmutated IGHV, high expression of CD38 and ZAP-70, trisomy 12, advanced stage and elevated lactate dehydrogenase. Sequential analysis in 200 patients demonstrated acquisition of mutation in one case (0.5%) and disappearance after treatment in two. Binet A and B patients with NOTCH1-mutated had a shorter time to treatment. NOTCH1-mutated patients were more frequently refractory to therapy and showed shorter progression-free and overall survival after complete remission. Overall survival was shorter in NOTCH1-mutated patients, although not independently from IGHV. NOTCH1 mutation increased the risk of transformation to diffuse large B-cell lymphoma independently from IGHV, with this being validated in resampling tests of replicability. In summary, NOTCH1 mutational status, that was rarely acquired during the course of the disease, identify a genetic subgroup with high risk of transformation and poor outcome. This recently identified genetic subgroup of CLL patients deserves prospective studies to define their best management. PMID:23295735

  5. Comparative analysis of Edwardsiella isolates from fish in the eastern United States identifies two distinct genetic taxa amongst organisms phenotypically classified as E. tarda

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Griffin, Matt J.; Quiniou, Sylvie M.; Cody, Theresa; Tabuchi, Maki; Ware, Cynthia; Cipriano, Rocco C.; Mauel, Michael J.; Soto, Esteban

    2013-01-01

    Edwardsiella tarda, a Gram-negative member of the family Enterobacteriaceae, has been implicated in significant losses in aquaculture facilities worldwide. Here, we assessed the intra-specific variability of E. tarda isolates from 4 different fish species in the eastern United States. Repetitive sequence mediated PCR (rep-PCR) using 4 different primer sets (ERIC I & II, ERIC II, BOX, and GTG5) and multi-locus sequence analysis of 16S SSU rDNA, groEl, gyrA, gyrB, pho, pgi, pgm, and rpoA gene fragments identified two distinct genotypes of E. tarda (DNA group I; DNA group II). Isolates that fell into DNA group II demonstrated more similarity to E. ictaluri than DNA group I, which contained the reference E. tarda strain (ATCC #15947). Conventional PCR analysis using published E. tarda-specific primer sets yielded variable results, with several primer sets producing no observable amplification of target DNA from some isolates. Fluorometric determination of G + C content demonstrated 56.4% G + C content for DNA group I, 60.2% for DNA group II, and 58.4% for E. ictaluri. Surprisingly, these isolates were indistinguishable using conventional biochemical techniques, with all isolates demonstrating phenotypic characteristics consistent with E. tarda. Analysis using two commercial test kits identified multiple phenotypes, although no single metabolic characteristic could reliably discriminate between genetic groups. Additionally, anti-microbial susceptibility and fatty acid profiles did not demonstrate remarkable differences between groups. The significant genetic variation (<90% similarity at gyrA, gyrB, pho, phi and pgm; <40% similarity by rep-PCR) between these groups suggests organisms from DNA group II may represent an unrecognized, genetically distinct taxa of Edwardsiella that is phenotypically indistinguishable from E. tarda.

  6. Common genetic determinants of vitamin D insufficiency: the sunlight consortium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Vitamin D is crucial for maintaining musculoskeletal health. Recently, vitamin D insufficiency has been linked to a number of extraskeletal disorders, including diabetes, cancer, and cardiovascular disease. Determinants of circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OH D) include sun exposure an...

  7. Human Infections with Spirometra decipiens Plerocercoids Identified by Morphologic and Genetic Analyses in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Hyeong-Kyu; Park, Hansol; Lee, Dongmin; Choe, Seongjun; Kim, Kyu-Heon; Huh, Sun; Sohn, Woon-Mok; Chai, Jong-Yil; Eom, Keeseon S.

    2015-01-01

    Tapeworms of the genus Spirometra are pseudophyllidean cestodes endemic in Korea. At present, it is unclear which Spirometra species are responsible for causing human infections, and little information is available on the epidemiological profiles of Spirometra species infecting humans in Korea. Between 1979 and 2009, a total of 50 spargana from human patients and 2 adult specimens obtained from experimentally infected carnivorous animals were analyzed according to genetic and taxonomic criteria and classified as Spirometra erinaceieuropaei or Spirometra decipiens depending on the morphology. Morphologically, S. erinaceieuropaei and S. decipiens are different in that the spirally coiled uterus in S. erinaceieuropaei has 5-7 complete coils, while in S. decipiens it has only 4.5 coils. In addition, there is a 9.3% (146/1,566) sequence different between S. erinaceieuropaei and S. decipiens in the cox1 gene. Partial cox1 sequences (390 bp) from 35 Korean isolates showed 99.4% (388/390) similarity with the reference sequence of S. erinaceieuropaei from Korea (G1724; GenBank KJ599680) and an additional 15 Korean isolates revealed 99.2% (387/390) similarity with the reference sequences of S. decipiens from Korea (G1657; GenBank KJ599679). Based on morphologic and molecular databases, the estimated population ratio of S. erinaceieuropaei to S. decipiens was 35: 15. Our results indicate that both S. erinaceieuropaei and S. decipiens found in Korea infect humans, with S. erinaceieuropaei being 2 times more prevalent than S. decipiens. This study is the first to report human sparganosis caused by S. decipiens in humans in Korea. PMID:26174823

  8. Genetic Determinants of Age-Related Macular Degeneration in Diverse Populations From the PAGE Study

    PubMed Central

    Restrepo, Nicole A.; Spencer, Kylee L.; Goodloe, Robert; Garrett, Tiana A.; Heiss, Gerardo; B?žková, Petra; Jorgensen, Neal; Jensen, Richard A.; Matise, Tara C.; Hindorff, Lucia A.; Klein, Barbara E. K.; Klein, Ronald; Wong, Tien Y.; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Cornes, Belinda K.; Tai, E.-Shyong; Ritchie, Marylyn D.; Haines, Jonathan L.; Crawford, Dana C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Substantial progress has been made in identifying susceptibility variants for AMD in European populations; however, few studies have been conducted to understand the role these variants play in AMD risk in diverse populations. The present study aims to examine AMD risk across diverse populations in known and suspected AMD complement factor and lipid-related loci. Methods. Targeted genotyping was performed across study sites for AMD and lipid trait-associated single nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs). Genetic association tests were performed at individual sites and then meta-analyzed using logistic regression assuming an additive genetic model stratified by self-described race/ethnicity. Participants included cases with early or late AMD and controls with no signs of AMD as determined by fundus photography. Populations included in this study were European Americans, African Americans, Mexican Americans, and Singaporeans from the Population Architecture using Genomics and Epidemiology (PAGE) study. Results. Index variants of AMD, rs1061170 (CFH) and rs10490924 (ARMS2), were associated with AMD at P = 3.05 × 10?8 and P = 6.36 × 10?6, respectively, in European Americans. In general, none of the major AMD index variants generalized to our non-European populations with the exception of rs10490924 in Mexican Americans at an uncorrected P value < 0.05. Four lipid-associated SNPS (LPL rs328, TRIB1 rs6987702, CETP rs1800775, and KCTD10/MVK rs2338104) were associated with AMD in African Americans and Mexican Americans (P < 0.05), but these associations did not survive strict corrections for multiple testing. Conclusions. While most associations did not generalize in the non-European populations, variants within lipid-related genes were found to be associated with AMD. This study highlights the need for larger well-powered studies in non-European populations. PMID:25205864

  9. A Systems Genetics Approach Identifies Gene Regulatory Networks Associated with Fatty Acid Composition in Brassica rapa Seed.

    PubMed

    Basnet, Ram Kumar; Del Carpio, Dunia Pino; Xiao, Dong; Bucher, Johan; Jin, Mina; Boyle, Kerry; Fobert, Pierre; Visser, Richard G F; Maliepaard, Chris; Bonnema, Guusje

    2016-01-01

    Fatty acids in seeds affect seed germination and seedling vigor, and fatty acid composition determines the quality of seed oil. In this study, quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping of fatty acid and transcript abundance was integrated with gene network analysis to unravel the genetic regulation of seed fatty acid composition in a Brassica rapa doubled haploid population from a cross between a yellow sarson oil type and a black-seeded pak choi. The distribution of major QTLs for fatty acids showed a relationship with the fatty acid types: linkage group A03 for monounsaturated fatty acids, A04 for saturated fatty acids, and A05 for polyunsaturated fatty acids. Using a genetical genomics approach, expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) hotspots were found at major fatty acid QTLs on linkage groups A03, A04, A05, and A09. An eQTL-guided gene coexpression network of lipid metabolism-related genes showed major hubs at the genes BrPLA2-ALPHA, BrWD-40, a number of seed storage protein genes, and the transcription factor BrMD-2, suggesting essential roles for these genes in lipid metabolism. Three subnetworks were extracted for the economically important and most abundant fatty acids erucic, oleic, linoleic, and linolenic acids. Network analysis, combined with comparison of the genome positions of cis- or trans-eQTLs with fatty acid QTLs, allowed the identification of candidate genes for genetic regulation of these fatty acids. The generated insights in the genetic architecture of fatty acid composition and the underlying complex gene regulatory networks in B. rapa seeds are discussed. PMID:26518343

  10. Genetics

    MedlinePLUS

    Homozygous; Inheritance; Heterozygous; Inheritance patterns; Heredity and disease; Heritable; Genetic markers ... The chromosomes are made up of strands of genetic information called DNA. Each chromosome contains sections of ...

  11. Identifiers Identifiers

    E-print Network

    Brass, Stefan

    , July 1998. . Tim Berners­Lee: Cool URIs don't change. [http://www.w3.org/Provider/Style/URI] . Uniform://archive.ncsa.uiuc.edu/demoweb/url­primer.html] . T. Berners­Lee, R. Fielding, L. Masinter: Uniform Resource Identifiers (URI): Generic Syntax. RFC Names. RFC 1737, December 1994, 7 pages. . T. Berners­Lee, L. Masinter, M. McCahill: Uniform Resource

  12. Identifiers Identifiers

    E-print Network

    Brass, Stefan

    , July 1998. . Tim Berners­Lee: Cool URIs don't change. [http://www.w3.org/Provider/Style/URI] Stefan://archive.ncsa.uiuc.edu/demoweb/url­primer.html] . T. Berners­Lee, R. Fielding, L. Masinter: Uniform Resource Identifiers (URI): Generic Syntax. RFC Names. RFC 1737, December 1994, 7 pages. . T. Berners­Lee, L. Masinter, M. McCahill: Uniform Resource

  13. Age-Based Differences in the Genetic Determinants of Glycemic Control: A Case of FOXO3 Variations

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Liang; Hu, Caiyou; Qian, Yu; Zheng, Chenguang; Liang, Qinghua; Lv, Zeping; Huang, Zezhi; Qi, Keyan; Huang, Jin; Zhou, Qin; Yang, Ze

    2015-01-01

    Background Glucose homeostasis is a trait of healthy ageing and is crucial to the elderly, but less consideration has been given to the age composition in most studies involving genetics and hyperglycemia. Methods Seven variants in FOXO3 were genotyped in three cohorts (n = 2037; LLI, MI_S and MI_N; mean age: 92.5±3.6, 45.9±8.2 and 46.8±10.3, respectively) to compare the contribution of FOXO3 to fasting hyperglycemia (FH) between long-lived individuals (LLI, aged over 90 years) and middle-aged subjects (aged from 35–65 years). Results A different genetic predisposition of FOXO3 alleles to FH was observed between LLI and both of two middle-aged cohorts. In the LLI cohort, the longevity beneficial alleles of three variants with the haplotype “AGGC” in block 1 were significantly protective to FH, fasting glucose, hemoglobin A1C and HOMA-IR. Notably, combining multifactor dimensionality reduction and logistic regression, we identified a significant 3-factor interaction model (rs2802288, rs2802292 and moderate physical activity) associated with lower FH risk. However, not all of the findings were replicated in the two middle-aged cohorts. Conclusion Our data provides a novel insight into the inconsistent genetic determinants between middle-aged and LLI subjects. FOXO3 might act as a shared genetic predisposition to hyperglycemia and lifespan. PMID:25993007

  14. Genetic and Molecular Characterization of Submergence Response Identifies Subtol6 as a Major Submergence Tolerance Locus in Maize

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Malachy T.; Proctor, Christopher A.; Dou, Yongchao; Schmitz, Aaron J.; Phansak, Piyaporn; Kruger, Greg R.; Zhang, Chi; Walia, Harkamal

    2015-01-01

    Maize is highly sensitive to short term flooding and submergence. Early season flooding reduces germination, survival and growth rate of maize seedlings. We aimed to discover genetic variation for submergence tolerance in maize and elucidate the genetic basis of submergence tolerance through transcriptional profiling and linkage analysis of contrasting genotypes. A diverse set of maize nested association mapping (NAM) founder lines were screened, and two highly tolerant (Mo18W and M162W) and sensitive (B97 and B73) genotypes were identified. Tolerant lines exhibited delayed senescence and lower oxidative stress levels compared to sensitive lines. Transcriptome analysis was performed on these inbreds to provide genome level insights into the molecular responses to submergence. Tolerant lines had higher transcript abundance of several fermentation-related genes and an unannotated Pyrophosphate-Dependent Fructose-6-Phosphate 1-Phosphotransferase gene during submergence. A coexpression network enriched for CBF (C-REPEAT/DRE BINDING FACTOR: C-REPEAT/DRE BINDING FACTOR) genes, was induced by submergence in all four inbreds, but was more activated in the tolerant Mo18W. A recombinant inbred line (RIL) population derived from Mo18W and B73 was screened for submergence tolerance. A major QTL named Subtol6 was mapped to chromosome 6 that explains 22% of the phenotypic variation within the RIL population. We identified two candidate genes (HEMOGLOBIN2 and RAV1) underlying Subtol6 based on contrasting expression patterns observed in B73 and Mo18W. Sources of tolerance identified in this study (Subtol6) can be useful to increase survival rate during flooding events that are predicted to increase in frequency with climate change. PMID:25806518

  15. A genetic screen in Myxococcus xanthus identifies mutants that uncouple outer membrane exchange from a downstream cellular response.

    PubMed

    Dey, Arup; Wall, Daniel

    2014-12-01

    Upon physical contact with sibling cells, myxobacteria transiently fuse their outer membranes (OMs) and exchange OM proteins and lipids. From previous work, TraA and TraB were identified to be essential factors for OM exchange (OME) in donor and recipient cells. To define the genetic complexity of OME, we carried out a comprehensive forward genetic screen. The screen was based on the observation that Myxococcus xanthus nonmotile cells, by a Tra-dependent mechanism, block swarm expansion of motile cells when mixed. Thus, mutants defective in OME or a downstream responsive pathway were readily identified as escape flares from mixed inocula seeded on agar. This screen was surprisingly powerful, as we found >50 mutants defective in OME. Importantly, all of the mutations mapped to the traAB operon, suggesting that there may be few, if any, proteins besides TraA and TraB directly required for OME. We also found a second and phenotypically different class of mutants that exhibited wild-type OME but were defective in a responsive pathway. This pathway is postulated to control inner membrane homeostasis by covalently attaching amino acids to phospholipids. The identified proteins are homologous to the Staphylococcus aureus MprF protein, which is involved in membrane adaptation and antibiotic resistance. Interestingly, we also found that a small number of nonmotile cells were sufficient to block the swarming behavior of a large gliding-proficient population. This result suggests that an OME-derived signal could be amplified from a few nonmotile producers to act on many responder cells. PMID:25266387

  16. Forward genetics screens using macrophages to identify Toxoplasma gondii genes important for resistance to IFN-?-dependent cell autonomous immunity.

    PubMed

    Walwyn, Odaelys; Skariah, Sini; Lynch, Brian; Kim, Nathaniel; Ueda, Yukari; Vohora, Neal; Choe, Josh; Mordue, Dana G

    2015-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii, the causative agent of toxoplasmosis, is an obligate intracellular protozoan pathogen. The parasite invades and replicates within virtually any warm blooded vertebrate cell type. During parasite invasion of a host cell, the parasite creates a parasitophorous vacuole (PV) that originates from the host cell membrane independent of phagocytosis within which the parasite replicates. While IFN-dependent-innate and cell mediated immunity is important for eventual control of infection, innate immune cells, including neutrophils, monocytes and dendritic cells, can also serve as vehicles for systemic dissemination of the parasite early in infection. An approach is described that utilizes the host innate immune response, in this case macrophages, in a forward genetic screen to identify parasite mutants with a fitness defect in infected macrophages following activation but normal invasion and replication in naïve macrophages. Thus, the screen isolates parasite mutants that have a specific defect in their ability to resist the effects of macrophage activation. The paper describes two broad phenotypes of mutant parasites following activation of infected macrophages: parasite stasis versus parasite degradation, often in amorphous vacuoles. The parasite mutants are then analyzed to identify the responsible parasite genes specifically important for resistance to induced mediators of cell autonomous immunity. The paper presents a general approach for the forward genetics screen that, in theory, can be modified to target parasite genes important for resistance to specific antimicrobial mediators. It also describes an approach to evaluate the specific macrophage antimicrobial mediators to which the parasite mutant is susceptible. Activation of infected macrophages can also promote parasite differentiation from the tachyzoite to bradyzoite stage that maintains chronic infection. Therefore, methodology is presented to evaluate the importance of the identified parasite gene to establishment of chronic infection. PMID:25867017

  17. Phylogeography of Pogonomyrmex barbatus and P. rugosus harvester ants with genetic and environmental caste determination

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Here we present a phylogeographic study of at least six reproductively isolated lineages of new world harvester ants within the Pogonomyrmex barbatus and P. rugosus species group. The genetic and geographic relationships within this clade are complex: four of the identified lineages are divided into...

  18. A novel genetic screen identifies checkpoint-defective alleles of Schizosaccharomyces pombe chk1.

    PubMed

    Wan, S; Walworth, N C

    2001-01-01

    The protein kinase Chk1 is required in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe for delaying cell cycle progression in response to DNA damage. Chk1 becomes phosphorylated when DNA is damaged by a variety of agents, including the anti-tumor drug camptothecin. To further characterize the behavior of Chk1 in response to DNA damage, we used PCR-based mutagenesis of the chk1 gene coupled with in vivo gap repair to generate mutant alleles. Of 44 chk1 mutants recovered, six encode full-length proteins that confer a DNA damage-sensitive phenotype. All of the alleles render cells checkpoint-defective, but confer subtle differences in sensitivity to camptothecin or UV light. Mutant alleles were sequenced and served to identify regions of the protein that are critical for checkpoint function. PMID:11270571

  19. Multi-locus DNA sequencing of Toxoplasma gondii isolated from Brazilian pigs identifies genetically divergent strains

    PubMed Central

    Frazão-Teixeira, E.; Sundar, N.; Dubey, J. P.; Grigg, M. E.; de Oliveira, F. C. R.

    2010-01-01

    Five Toxoplasma gondii isolates (TgPgBr1–5) were isolated from hearts and brains of pigs freshly purchased at the market of Campos dos Goytacazes, Northern Rio de Janeiro State, Brazil. Four of the five isolates were highly pathogenic in mice. Four genotypes were identified. Multi-locus PCR-DNA sequencing showed that each strain possessed a unique combination of archetypal and novel alleles not previously described in South America. The data suggest that different strains circulate in pigs destined for human consumption from those previously isolated from cats and chickens in Brazil. Further, multi-locus PCR-RFLP analyses failed to accurately genotype the Brazilian isolates due to the high presence of atypical alleles. This is the first report of multi-locus DNA sequencing of T. gondii isolates in pigs from Brazil. PMID:21051148

  20. Integrated Model of De Novo and Inherited Genetic Variants Yields Greater Power to Identify Risk Genes

    PubMed Central

    He, Xin; Sanders, Stephan J.; Liu, Li; De Rubeis, Silvia; Lim, Elaine T.; Sutcliffe, James S.; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Daly, Mark J.; Buxbaum, Joseph D.; State, Matthew W.; Devlin, Bernie; Roeder, Kathryn

    2013-01-01

    De novo mutations affect risk for many diseases and disorders, especially those with early-onset. An example is autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Four recent whole-exome sequencing (WES) studies of ASD families revealed a handful of novel risk genes, based on independent de novo loss-of-function (LoF) mutations falling in the same gene, and found that de novo LoF mutations occurred at a twofold higher rate than expected by chance. However successful these studies were, they used only a small fraction of the data, excluding other types of de novo mutations and inherited rare variants. Moreover, such analyses cannot readily incorporate data from case-control studies. An important research challenge in gene discovery, therefore, is to develop statistical methods that accommodate a broader class of rare variation. We develop methods that can incorporate WES data regarding de novo mutations, inherited variants present, and variants identified within cases and controls. TADA, for Transmission And De novo Association, integrates these data by a gene-based likelihood model involving parameters for allele frequencies and gene-specific penetrances. Inference is based on a Hierarchical Bayes strategy that borrows information across all genes to infer parameters that would be difficult to estimate for individual genes. In addition to theoretical development we validated TADA using realistic simulations mimicking rare, large-effect mutations affecting risk for ASD and show it has dramatically better power than other common methods of analysis. Thus TADA's integration of various kinds of WES data can be a highly effective means of identifying novel risk genes. Indeed, application of TADA to WES data from subjects with ASD and their families, as well as from a study of ASD subjects and controls, revealed several novel and promising ASD candidate genes with strong statistical support. PMID:23966865

  1. Genetic determination of male sterility in gynodioecious Silene nutans

    PubMed Central

    Garraud, C; Brachi, B; Dufay, M; Touzet, P; Shykoff, J A

    2011-01-01

    Gynodioecy, the coexistence of female and hermaphrodite plants within a species, is often under nuclear–cytoplasmic sex determination, involving cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS) genes and nuclear restorers. A good knowledge of CMS and restorer polymorphism is essential for understanding the evolution and maintenance of gynodioecy, but reciprocal crossing studies remain scarce. Although mitochondrial diversity has been studied in a few gynodioecious species, the relationship between mitotype diversity and CMS status is poorly known. From a French sample of Silene nutans, a gynodioecious species whose sex determination remains unknown, we chose the four most divergent mitotypes that we had sampled at the cytochrome b gene and tested by reciprocal crosses whether they carry distinct CMS genes. We show that gynodioecy in S. nutans is under nuclear–cytoplasmic control, with at least two different CMSs and up to four restorers with epistatic interactions. Female occurrence and frequency were highly dependent on the mitotype, suggesting that the level of restoration varies greatly among CMSs. Two of the mitotypes, which have broad geographic distributions, represent different CMSs and are very unequally restored. We discuss the dynamics of gynodioecy at the large-scale meta-population level. PMID:20808324

  2. Alteration of Genetic Make-up in Karnal Bunt Pathogen (Tilletia indica) of Wheat in Presence of Host Determinants

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Atul K.; Seneviratne, J. M.; Bala, Ritu; Jaiswal, J. P.; Kumar, Anil

    2015-01-01

    Alteration of genetic make-up of the isolates and monosporidial strains of Tilletia indica causing Karnal bunt (KB) disease in wheat was analyzed using DNA markers and SDS-PAGE. The generation of new variation with different growth characteristics is not a generalized feature and is not only dependant on the original genetic make up of the base isolate/monosporidial strains but also on interaction with host. Host determinant(s) plays a significant role in the generation of variability and the effect is much pronounced in monosporidial strains with narrow genetic base as compared to broad genetic base. The most plausible explanation of genetic variation in presence of host determinant(s) are the recombination of genetic material from two different mycelial/sporidia through sexual mating as well as through para-sexual means. The morphological and development dependent variability further suggests that the variation in T. indica strains predominantly derived through the genetic rearrangements. PMID:26060428

  3. A Specific Pathway Can Be Identified between Genetic Characteristics and Behaviour Profiles in Prader-Willi Syndrome via Cognitive, Environmental and Physiological Mechanisms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodcock, K. A.; Oliver, C.; Humphreys, G. W.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Behavioural phenotypes associated with genetic syndromes have been extensively investigated in order to generate rich descriptions of phenomenology, determine the degree of specificity of behaviours for a particular syndrome, and examine potential interactions between genetic predispositions for behaviour and environmental influences.…

  4. RNA-RNA hybridization identifies a human rotavirus that is genetically related to feline rotavirus.

    PubMed Central

    Nakagomi, T; Nakagomi, O

    1989-01-01

    A human rotavirus AU228 strain which resembled the AU-1 strain (O. Nakagomi, T. Nakagomi, Y. Hoshino, J. Flores, and A. Z. Kapikian, J. Clin. Microbiol. 25:1159-1164, 1987) in its novel characteristics (that it belonged to subgroup I yet possessed a long RNA pattern) was compared with various human and animal strains by RNA-RNA hybridization in solution. This strain showed a high degree of homology with the AU-1 strain but not with either the Wa (subgroup II, long pattern) or the KUN (subgroup I, short pattern) strain, indicating the presence of an additional group of human rotaviruses that do not belong to either of the two human rotavirus families previously identified by RNA-RNA hybridization. It is of particular interest that the AU228 strain showed an unexpectedly high degree of homology with a feline rotavirus isolated recently in Japan. These results indicate transmission of a feline rotavirus to humans and suggest a role of animal rotaviruses in the evolution of human rotaviruses. Images PMID:2536843

  5. A chemical genetic approach identifies piperazine antipsychotics as promoters of CNS neurite growth on inhibitory substrates.

    PubMed

    Johnstone, Andrea L; Reierson, Gillian W; Smith, Robin P; Goldberg, Jeffrey L; Lemmon, Vance P; Bixby, John L

    2012-06-01

    Injury to the central nervous system (CNS) can result in lifelong loss of function due in part to the regenerative failure of CNS neurons. Inhibitory proteins derived from myelin and the astroglial scar are major barriers for the successful regeneration of injured CNS neurons. Previously, we described the identification of a novel compound, F05, which promotes neurite growth from neurons challenged with inhibitory substrates in vitro, and promotes axonal regeneration in vivo (Usher et al., 2010). To identify additional regeneration-promoting compounds, we used F05-induced gene expression profiles to query the Broad Institute Connectivity Map, a gene expression database of cells treated with >1300 compounds. Despite no shared chemical similarity, F05-induced changes in gene expression were remarkably similar to those seen with a group of piperazine phenothiazine antipsychotics (PhAPs). In contrast to antipsychotics of other structural classes, PhAPs promoted neurite growth of CNS neurons challenged with two different glial derived inhibitory substrates. Our pharmacological studies suggest a mechanism whereby PhAPs promote growth through antagonism of calmodulin signaling, independent of dopamine receptor antagonism. These findings shed light on mechanisms underlying neurite-inhibitory signaling, and suggest that clinically approved antipsychotic compounds may be repurposed for use in CNS injured patients. PMID:22561309

  6. Coupled biophysical global ocean model and molecular genetic analyses identify multiple introductions of cryptogenic species

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Michael N; Gupta, Alex Sen; England, Matthew H.

    2005-01-01

    The anthropogenic introduction of exotic species is one of the greatest modern threats to marine biodiversity. Yet exotic species introductions remain difficult to predict and are easily misunderstood because knowledge of natural dispersal patterns, species diversity, and biogeography is often insufficient to distinguish between a broadly dispersed natural population and an exotic one. Here we compare a global molecular phylogeny of a representative marine meroplanktonic taxon, the moon-jellyfish Aurelia, with natural dispersion patterns predicted by a global biophysical ocean model. Despite assumed high dispersal ability, the phylogeny reveals many cryptic species and predominantly regional structure with one notable exception: the globally distributed Aurelia sp.1, which, molecular data suggest, may occasionally traverse the Pacific unaided. This possibility is refuted by the ocean model, which shows much more limited dispersion and patterns of distribution broadly consistent with modern biogeographic zones, thus identifying multiple introductions worldwide of this cryptogenic species. This approach also supports existing evidence that (i) the occurrence in Hawaii of Aurelia sp. 4 and other native Indo-West Pacific species with similar life histories is most likely due to anthropogenic translocation, and (ii) there may be a route for rare natural colonization of northeast North America by the European marine snail Littorina littorea, whose status as endemic or exotic is unclear. PMID:16103373

  7. A model for genetic and epigenetic regulatory networks identifies rare pathways for transcription factor induced pluripotency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artyomov, Maxim; Meissner, Alex; Chakraborty, Arup

    2010-03-01

    Most cells in an organism have the same DNA. Yet, different cell types express different proteins and carry out different functions. This is because of epigenetic differences; i.e., DNA in different cell types is packaged distinctly, making it hard to express certain genes while facilitating the expression of others. During development, upon receipt of appropriate cues, pluripotent embryonic stem cells differentiate into diverse cell types that make up the organism (e.g., a human). There has long been an effort to make this process go backward -- i.e., reprogram a differentiated cell (e.g., a skin cell) to pluripotent status. Recently, this has been achieved by transfecting certain transcription factors into differentiated cells. This method does not use embryonic material and promises the development of patient-specific regenerative medicine, but it is inefficient. The mechanisms that make reprogramming rare, or even possible, are poorly understood. We have developed the first computational model of transcription factor-induced reprogramming. Results obtained from the model are consistent with diverse observations, and identify the rare pathways that allow reprogramming to occur. If validated, our model could be further developed to design optimal strategies for reprogramming and shed light on basic questions in biology.

  8. Genetic Determinants of Time Perception Mediated by the Serotonergic System

    PubMed Central

    Sysoeva, Olga V.; Tonevitsky, Alexander G.; Wackermann, Ji?í

    2010-01-01

    Background The present study investigates neurobiological underpinnings of individual differences in time perception. Methodology Forty-four right-handed Russian Caucasian males (18–35 years old) participated in the experiment. The polymorphism of the genes related to the activity of serotonin (5-HT) and dopamine (DA)-systems (such as 5-HTT, 5HT2a, MAOA, DAT, DRD2, COMT) was determined upon the basis of DNA analysis according to a standard procedure. Time perception in the supra-second range (mean duration 4.8 s) was studied, using the duration discrimination task and parametric fitting of psychometric functions, resulting in individual determination of the point of subjective equality (PSE). Assuming the ‘dual klepsydra model’ of internal duration representation, the PSE values were transformed into equivalent values of the parameter (kappa), which is a measure of the ‘loss rate’ of the duration representation. An association between time representation parameters (PSE and , respectively) and 5-HT-related genes was found, but not with DA-related genes. Higher ‘loss rate’ () of the cumulative duration representation were found for the carriers of genotypes characterized by higher 5-HT transmission, i.e., 1) lower 5-HT reuptake, known for the 5-HTTLPR SS polymorphism compared with LL, 2) lower 5-HT degradation, described for the ‘low expression’ variant of MAOA VNTR gene compared with ‘high expression’ variant, and 3) higher 5-HT2a receptor density, proposed for the TT polymorphism of 5-HT2a T102C gene compared with CC. Conclusion Convergent findings of the present study and previous psychopharmacological studies suggest an action path from 5-HT-activity-related genes, via activity of 5-HT in the brain, to time perception. An involvement of the DA-system in the encoding of durations in the supra-second range is questioned. PMID:20862259

  9. Genetic Background is a Key Determinant of Glomerular Extracellular Matrix Composition and Organization

    PubMed Central

    Randles, Michael J.; Woolf, Adrian S.; Huang, Jennifer L.; Byron, Adam; Humphries, Jonathan D.; Price, Karen L.; Kolatsi-Joannou, Maria; Collinson, Sophie; Denny, Thomas; Knight, David; Mironov, Aleksandr; Starborg, Toby; Korstanje, Ron; Humphries, Martin J.; Long, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Glomerular disease often features altered histologic patterns of extracellular matrix (ECM). Despite this, the potential complexities of the glomerular ECM in both health and disease are poorly understood. To explore whether genetic background and sex determine glomerular ECM composition, we investigated two mouse strains, FVB and B6, using RNA microarrays of isolated glomeruli combined with proteomic glomerular ECM analyses. These studies, undertaken in healthy young adult animals, revealed unique strain- and sex-dependent glomerular ECM signatures, which correlated with variations in levels of albuminuria and known predisposition to progressive nephropathy. Among the variation, we observed changes in netrin 4, fibroblast growth factor 2, tenascin C, collagen 1, meprin 1-?, and meprin 1-?. Differences in protein abundance were validated by quantitative immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis, and the collective differences were not explained by mutations in known ECM or glomerular disease genes. Within the distinct signatures, we discovered a core set of structural ECM proteins that form multiple protein–protein interactions and are conserved from mouse to man. Furthermore, we found striking ultrastructural changes in glomerular basement membranes in FVB mice. Pathway analysis of merged transcriptomic and proteomic datasets identified potential ECM regulatory pathways involving inhibition of matrix metalloproteases, liver X receptor/retinoid X receptor, nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2, notch, and cyclin-dependent kinase 5. These pathways may therefore alter ECM and confer susceptibility to disease. PMID:25896609

  10. Genetic Background is a Key Determinant of Glomerular Extracellular Matrix Composition and Organization.

    PubMed

    Randles, Michael J; Woolf, Adrian S; Huang, Jennifer L; Byron, Adam; Humphries, Jonathan D; Price, Karen L; Kolatsi-Joannou, Maria; Collinson, Sophie; Denny, Thomas; Knight, David; Mironov, Aleksandr; Starborg, Toby; Korstanje, Ron; Humphries, Martin J; Long, David A; Lennon, Rachel

    2015-12-01

    Glomerular disease often features altered histologic patterns of extracellular matrix (ECM). Despite this, the potential complexities of the glomerular ECM in both health and disease are poorly understood. To explore whether genetic background and sex determine glomerular ECM composition, we investigated two mouse strains, FVB and B6, using RNA microarrays of isolated glomeruli combined with proteomic glomerular ECM analyses. These studies, undertaken in healthy young adult animals, revealed unique strain- and sex-dependent glomerular ECM signatures, which correlated with variations in levels of albuminuria and known predisposition to progressive nephropathy. Among the variation, we observed changes in netrin 4, fibroblast growth factor 2, tenascin C, collagen 1, meprin 1-?, and meprin 1-?. Differences in protein abundance were validated by quantitative immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis, and the collective differences were not explained by mutations in known ECM or glomerular disease genes. Within the distinct signatures, we discovered a core set of structural ECM proteins that form multiple protein-protein interactions and are conserved from mouse to man. Furthermore, we found striking ultrastructural changes in glomerular basement membranes in FVB mice. Pathway analysis of merged transcriptomic and proteomic datasets identified potential ECM regulatory pathways involving inhibition of matrix metalloproteases, liver X receptor/retinoid X receptor, nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2, notch, and cyclin-dependent kinase 5. These pathways may therefore alter ECM and confer susceptibility to disease. PMID:25896609

  11. Forward Genetics Identifies a Requirement for the Izumo-like Immunoglobulin Superfamily spe-45 Gene in Caenorhabditis elegans Fertilization.

    PubMed

    Singaravelu, Gunasekaran; Rahimi, Sina; Krauchunas, Amber; Rizvi, Anam; Dharia, Sunny; Shakes, Diane; Smith, Harold; Golden, Andy; Singson, Andrew

    2015-12-21

    Fertilization is a conserved process in all sexually reproducing organisms whereby sperm bind and fuse with oocytes. Despite the importance of sperm-oocyte interactions in fertilization, the molecular underpinnings of this process are still not well understood. The only cognate ligand-receptor pair identified in the context of fertilization is sperm-surface Izumo and egg-surface Juno in the mouse [1]. Here we describe a genetic screening strategy to isolate fertilization mutants in Caenorhabditis elegans in order to generate a more complete inventory of molecules required for gamete interactions. From this screening strategy, we identified, cloned, and characterized spe-45, a gene that encodes an Izumo-like immunoglobulin superfamily protein. Mammalian Izumo is required for male fertility and has the same basic mutant phenotype as spe-45. Worms lacking spe-45 function produce morphologically normal and motile sperm that cannot fuse with oocytes despite direct contact in the reproductive tract. The power of this screen to identify proteins with ancient sperm functions suggests that characterization of additional mutants from our screen may reveal other deeply conserved components in fertility pathways and complement studies in other organisms. PMID:26671668

  12. Genome-wide association study identifies three novel genetic markers associated with elite endurance performance.

    PubMed

    Ahmetov, Ii; Kulemin, Na; Popov, Dv; Naumov, Va; Akimov, Eb; Bravy, Yr; Egorova, Es; Galeeva, Aa; Generozov, Ev; Kostryukova, Es; Larin, Ak; Mustafina, Lj; Ospanova, Ea; Pavlenko, Av; Starnes, Lm; ?mijewski, P; Alexeev, Dg; Vinogradova, Ol; Govorun, Vm

    2015-03-01

    To investigate the association between multiple single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), aerobic performance and elite endurance athlete status in Russians. By using GWAS approach, we examined the association between 1,140,419 SNPs and relative maximal oxygen consumption rate ([Formula: see text]O2max) in 80 international-level Russian endurance athletes (46 males and 34 females). To validate obtained results, we further performed case-control studies by comparing the frequencies of the most significant SNPs (with P < 10(-5)-10(-8)) between 218 endurance athletes and opposite cohorts (192 Russian controls, 1367 European controls, and 230 Russian power athletes). Initially, six 'endurance alleles' were identified showing discrete associations with [Formula: see text]O2max both in males and females. Next, case-control studies resulted in remaining three SNPs (NFIA-AS2 rs1572312, TSHR rs7144481, RBFOX1 rs7191721) associated with endurance athlete status. The C allele of the most significant SNP, rs1572312, was associated with high values of [Formula: see text]O2max (males: P = 0.0051; females: P = 0.0005). Furthermore, the frequency of the rs1572312 C allele was significantly higher in elite endurance athletes (95.5%) in comparison with non-elite endurance athletes (89.8%, P = 0.0257), Russian (88.8%, P = 0.007) and European (90.6%, P = 0.0197) controls and power athletes (86.2%, P = 0.0005). The rs1572312 SNP is located on the nuclear factor I A antisense RNA 2 (NFIA-AS2) gene which is supposed to regulate the expression of the NFIA gene (encodes transcription factor involved in activation of erythropoiesis and repression of the granulopoiesis). Our data show that the NFIA-AS2 rs1572312, TSHR rs7144481 and RBFOX1 rs7191721 polymorphisms are associated with aerobic performance and elite endurance athlete status. PMID:25729143

  13. Genome-wide association study identifies three novel genetic markers associated with elite endurance performance

    PubMed Central

    Kulemin, NA; Popov, DV; Naumov, VA; Akimov, EB; Bravy, YR; Egorova, ES; Galeeva, AA; Generozov, EV; Kostryukova, ES; Larin, AK; Mustafina, LJ; Ospanova, EA; Pavlenko, AV; Starnes, LM; ?mijewski, P; Alexeev, DG; Vinogradova, OL; Govorun, VM

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the association between multiple single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), aerobic performance and elite endurance athlete status in Russians. By using GWAS approach, we examined the association between 1,140,419 SNPs and relative maximal oxygen consumption rate (V.O2max) in 80 international-level Russian endurance athletes (46 males and 34 females). To validate obtained results, we further performed case-control studies by comparing the frequencies of the most significant SNPs (with P < 10?5-10?8) between 218 endurance athletes and opposite cohorts (192 Russian controls, 1367 European controls, and 230 Russian power athletes). Initially, six ‘endurance alleles’ were identified showing discrete associations with V.O2max both in males and females. Next, case-control studies resulted in remaining three SNPs (NFIA-AS2 rs1572312, TSHR rs7144481, RBFOX1 rs7191721) associated with endurance athlete status. The C allele of the most significant SNP, rs1572312, was associated with high values of V.O2max (males: P = 0.0051; females: P = 0.0005). Furthermore, the frequency of the rs1572312 C allele was significantly higher in elite endurance athletes (95.5%) in comparison with non-elite endurance athletes (89.8%, P = 0.0257), Russian (88.8%, P = 0.007) and European (90.6%, P = 0.0197) controls and power athletes (86.2%, P = 0.0005). The rs1572312 SNP is located on the nuclear factor I A antisense RNA 2 (NFIA-AS2) gene which is supposed to regulate the expression of the NFIA gene (encodes transcription factor involved in activation of erythropoiesis and repression of the granulopoiesis). Our data show that the NFIA-AS2 rs1572312, TSHR rs7144481 and RBFOX1 rs7191721 polymorphisms are associated with aerobic performance and elite endurance athlete status. PMID:25729143

  14. Determinants of Genetic Structure in a Nonequilibrium Metapopulation of the Plant Silene latifolia

    PubMed Central

    Fields, Peter D.; Taylor, Douglas R.

    2014-01-01

    Population genetic differentiation will be influenced by the demographic history of populations, opportunities for migration among neighboring demes and founder effects associated with repeated extinction and recolonization. In natural populations, these factors are expected to interact with each other and their magnitudes will vary depending on the spatial distribution and age structure of local demes. Although each of these effects has been individually identified as important in structuring genetic variance, their relative magnitude is seldom estimated in nature. We conducted a population genetic analysis in a metapopulation of the angiosperm, Silene latifolia, from which we had more than 20 years of data on the spatial distribution, demographic history, and extinction and colonization of demes. We used hierarchical Bayesian methods to disentangle which features of the populations contributed to among population variation in allele frequencies, including the magnitude and direction of their effects. We show that population age, long-term size and degree of connectivity all combine to affect the distribution of genetic variance; small, recently-founded, isolated populations contributed most to increase FST in the metapopulation. However, the effects of population size and population age are best understood as being modulated through the effects of connectivity to other extant populations, i.e. FST diminishes as populations age, but at a rate that depends how isolated the population is. These spatial and temporal correlates of population structure give insight into how migration, founder effect and within-deme genetic drift have combined to enhance and restrict genetic divergence in a natural metapopulation. PMID:25198341

  15. Genome-wide meta-analysis identifies 11 new loci for anthropometric traits and provides insights into genetic architecture

    PubMed Central

    Berndt, Sonja I.; Gustafsson, Stefan; Mägi, Reedik; Ganna, Andrea; Wheeler, Eleanor; Feitosa, Mary F.; Justice, Anne E.; Monda, Keri L.; Croteau-Chonka, Damien C.; Day, Felix R.; Esko, Tõnu; Fall, Tove; Ferreira, Teresa; Gentilini, Davide; Jackson, Anne U.; Luan, Jian’an; Randall, Joshua C.; Vedantam, Sailaja; Willer, Cristen J.; Winkler, Thomas W.; Wood, Andrew R.; Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie; Hu, Yi-Juan; Lee, Sang Hong; Liang, Liming; Lin, Dan-Yu; Min, Josine L.; Neale, Benjamin M.; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Yang, Jian; Albrecht, Eva; Amin, Najaf; Bragg-Gresham, Jennifer L.; Cadby, Gemma; den Heijer, Martin; Eklund, Niina; Fischer, Krista; Goel, Anuj; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Huffman, Jennifer E.; Jarick, Ivonne; Johansson, Åsa; Johnson, Toby; Kanoni, Stavroula; Kleber, Marcus E.; König, Inke R.; Kristiansson, Kati; Kutalik, Zoltán; Lamina, Claudia; Lecoeur, Cecile; Li, Guo; Mangino, Massimo; McArdle, Wendy L.; Medina-Gomez, Carolina; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Ngwa, Julius S.; Nolte, Ilja M.; Paternoster, Lavinia; Pechlivanis, Sonali; Perola, Markus; Peters, Marjolein J.; Preuss, Michael; Rose, Lynda M.; Shi, Jianxin; Shungin, Dmitry; Smith, Albert Vernon; Strawbridge, Rona J.; Surakka, Ida; Teumer, Alexander; Trip, Mieke D.; Tyrer, Jonathan; Van Vliet-Ostaptchouk, Jana V.; Vandenput, Liesbeth; Waite, Lindsay L.; Zhao, Jing Hua; Absher, Devin; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Atalay, Mustafa; Attwood, Antony P.; Balmforth, Anthony J.; Basart, Hanneke; Beilby, John; Bonnycastle, Lori L.; Brambilla, Paolo; Bruinenberg, Marcel; Campbell, Harry; Chasman, Daniel I.; Chines, Peter S.; Collins, Francis S.; Connell, John M.; Cookson, William; de Faire, Ulf; de Vegt, Femmie; Dei, Mariano; Dimitriou, Maria; Edkins, Sarah; Estrada, Karol; Evans, David M.; Farrall, Martin; Ferrario, Marco M.; Ferrières, Jean; Franke, Lude; Frau, Francesca; Gejman, Pablo V.; Grallert, Harald; Grönberg, Henrik; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Hall, Alistair S.; Hall, Per; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Hayward, Caroline; Heard-Costa, Nancy L.; Heath, Andrew C.; Hebebrand, Johannes; Homuth, Georg; Hu, Frank B.; Hunt, Sarah E.; Hyppönen, Elina; Iribarren, Carlos; Jacobs, Kevin B.; Jansson, John-Olov; Jula, Antti; Kähönen, Mika; Kathiresan, Sekar; Kee, Frank; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Kivimaki, Mika; Koenig, Wolfgang; Kraja, Aldi T.; Kumari, Meena; Kuulasmaa, Kari; Kuusisto, Johanna; Laitinen, Jaana H.; Lakka, Timo A.; Langenberg, Claudia; Launer, Lenore J.; Lind, Lars; Lindström, Jaana; Liu, Jianjun; Liuzzi, Antonio; Lokki, Marja-Liisa; Lorentzon, Mattias; Madden, Pamela A.; Magnusson, Patrik K.; Manunta, Paolo; Marek, Diana; März, Winfried; Mateo Leach, Irene; McKnight, Barbara; Medland, Sarah E.; Mihailov, Evelin; Milani, Lili; Montgomery, Grant W.; Mooser, Vincent; Mühleisen, Thomas W.; Munroe, Patricia B.; Musk, Arthur W.; Narisu, Narisu; Navis, Gerjan; Nicholson, George; Nohr, Ellen A.; Ong, Ken K.; Oostra, Ben A.; Palmer, Colin N.A.; Palotie, Aarno; Peden, John F.; Pedersen, Nancy; Peters, Annette; Polasek, Ozren; Pouta, Anneli; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Prokopenko, Inga; Pütter, Carolin; Radhakrishnan, Aparna; Raitakari, Olli; Rendon, Augusto; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Rudan, Igor; Saaristo, Timo E.; Sambrook, Jennifer G.; Sanders, Alan R.; Sanna, Serena; Saramies, Jouko; Schipf, Sabine; Schreiber, Stefan; Schunkert, Heribert; Shin, So-Youn; Signorini, Stefano; Sinisalo, Juha; Skrobek, Boris; Soranzo, Nicole; Stan?áková, Alena; Stark, Klaus; Stephens, Jonathan C.; Stirrups, Kathleen; Stolk, Ronald P.; Stumvoll, Michael; Swift, Amy J.; Theodoraki, Eirini V.; Thorand, Barbara; Tregouet, David-Alexandre; Tremoli, Elena; Van der Klauw, Melanie M.; van Meurs, Joyce B.J.; Vermeulen, Sita H.; Viikari, Jorma; Virtamo, Jarmo; Vitart, Veronique; Waeber, Gérard; Wang, Zhaoming; Widén, Elisabeth; Wild, Sarah H.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Winkelmann, Bernhard R.; Witteman, Jacqueline C.M.; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H.R.; Wong, Andrew; Wright, Alan F.; Zillikens, M. Carola; Amouyel, Philippe; Boehm, Bernhard O.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Caulfield, Mark J.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Cupples, L. Adrienne; Cusi, Daniele; Dedoussis, George V.; Erdmann, Jeanette; Eriksson, Johan G.; Franks, Paul W.; Froguel, Philippe; Gieger, Christian; Gyllensten, Ulf; Hamsten, Anders; Harris, Tamara B.; Hengstenberg, Christian; Hicks, Andrew A.; Hingorani, Aroon; Hinney, Anke; Hofman, Albert; Hovingh, Kees G.; Hveem, Kristian; Illig, Thomas; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jöckel, Karl-Heinz

    2014-01-01

    Approaches exploiting extremes of the trait distribution may reveal novel loci for common traits, but it is unknown whether such loci are generalizable to the general population. In a genome-wide search for loci associated with upper vs. lower 5th percentiles of body mass index, height and waist-hip ratio, as well as clinical classes of obesity including up to 263,407 European individuals, we identified four new loci (IGFBP4, H6PD, RSRC1, PPP2R2A) influencing height detected in the tails and seven new loci (HNF4G, RPTOR, GNAT2, MRPS33P4, ADCY9, HS6ST3, ZZZ3) for clinical classes of obesity. Further, we show that there is large overlap in terms of genetic structure and distribution of variants between traits based on extremes and the general population and little etiologic heterogeneity between obesity subgroups. PMID:23563607

  16. Determining DNA Sequence Specificity of Natural and Artificial Transcription Factors by Cognate Site Identifier Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozers, Mary S.; Warren, Christopher L.; Ansari, Aseem Z.

    Artificial transcription factors (ATFs) are designed to mimic natural transcription factors in the control of gene expression and are comprised of domains for DNA binding and gene regulation. ATF domains are modular, interchangeable, and can be composed of protein-based or nonpeptidic moieties, yielding DNA-interacting regulatory molecules that can either activate or inhibit transcription. Sequence-specific targeting is a key determinant in ATF activity, and DNA-binding domains such as natural zinc fingers and synthetic polyamides have emerged as useful DNA targeting molecules. Defining the comprehensive DNA binding specificity of these targeting molecules for accurate manipulations of the genome can be achieved using cognate site identifier DNA microarrays to explore the entire sequence space of binding sites. Design of ATFs that regulate gene expression with temporal control will generate important molecular tools to probe cell- and tissue-specific gene regulation and to function as potential therapeutic agents.

  17. The genetic and metabolic determinants of cardiovascular complications in type 2 diabetes: recent insights from animal models and clinical investigations.

    PubMed

    Kohen Avramoglu, Rita; Laplante, Marc-André; Le Quang, Khai; Deshaies, Yves; Després, Jean-Pierre; Larose, Eric; Mathieu, Patrick; Poirier, Paul; Pérusse, Louis; Vohl, Marie-Claude; Sweeney, Gary; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo; Laakso, Markku; Uusitupa, Matti; Marette, André

    2013-10-01

    Cardiovascular complications (CVC) are the most common causes of death in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D). However the pathophysiological determinants and molecular mechanisms involved in the progression of CVC in T2D are poorly understood. We have undertaken the challenging task of identifying some of the genetic and clinical determinants of CVC through a unique multidisciplinary approach involving Canadian and Finnish investigators. We are studying novel animal models combining atherosclerosis, diet-induced obesity and T2D to understand the molecular basis of CVC in obesity-linked T2D. We are also conducting clinical studies to identify key determinants of CVC in T2D patients and to determine whether a lifestyle modification program targeting loss of visceral adipose tissue/ectopic fat could be associated with clinical benefits in these patients. Together, we strongly believe that we can fill some gaps in our understanding of the CVC pathogenesis in T2D and identify novel therapeutic targets and hope that this new knowledge may be translated into the design of effective clinical interventions to optimally reduce cardiovascular risk in T2D subjects. PMID:24500564

  18. Identifying the Prevalence, Trajectory, and Determinants of Psychological Distress in Extremity Sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Melissa H.; Castle, David J.; Choong, Peter F. M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Extremity sarcoma (ES) is a rare cancer that presents with unique challenges. This study was performed to identify the prevalence, trajectory, and determinants of distress and characterise sources of stress in this cohort. Methods. Consecutive patients with ES were prospectively recruited between May 2011 and December 2012. Questionnaires were administered during initial diagnosis and then six months and one year after surgery. Results. Distress was reported by about a third of our cohort and associated with poorer physical function, poorer quality of life, and pain. In addition to fears regarding mortality and life role changes, the most common sources of stress were centered on dissatisfaction with the healthcare system, such as frustrations with a lack of communication with the hospital regarding appointments and lack of education regarding management and outcomes. Conclusions. Psychological distress presents early in the cancer journey and persists up to one year after surgery. Distress is associated with negative outcomes. Active screening and effective interventions are necessary to improve outcomes. Sources of stress have been identified that may be amenable to targeted interventions. PMID:25767410

  19. Quantitative determinants of aerobic glycolysis identify flux through the enzyme GAPDH as a limiting step

    PubMed Central

    Shestov, Alexander A; Liu, Xiaojing; Ser, Zheng; Cluntun, Ahmad A; Hung, Yin P; Huang, Lei; Kim, Dongsung; Le, Anne; Yellen, Gary; Albeck, John G; Locasale, Jason W

    2014-01-01

    Aerobic glycolysis or the Warburg Effect (WE) is characterized by the increased metabolism of glucose to lactate. It remains unknown what quantitative changes to the activity of metabolism are necessary and sufficient for this phenotype. We developed a computational model of glycolysis and an integrated analysis using metabolic control analysis (MCA), metabolomics data, and statistical simulations. We identified and confirmed a novel mode of regulation specific to aerobic glycolysis where flux through GAPDH, the enzyme separating lower and upper glycolysis, is the rate-limiting step in the pathway and the levels of fructose (1,6) bisphosphate (FBP), are predictive of the rate and control points in glycolysis. Strikingly, negative flux control was found and confirmed for several steps thought to be rate-limiting in glycolysis. Together, these findings enumerate the biochemical determinants of the WE and suggest strategies for identifying the contexts in which agents that target glycolysis might be most effective. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03342.001 PMID:25009227

  20. Teachers' Conceptions About the Genetic Determinism of Human Behaviour: A Survey in 23 Countries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castéra, Jérémy; Clément, Pierre

    2012-07-01

    This work analyses the answers to a questionnaire from 8,285 in-service and pre-service teachers from 23 countries, elaborated by the Biohead-Citizen research project, to investigate teachers' conceptions related to the genetic determinism of human behaviour. A principal components analysis is used to assess the main trends in all the interviewed teachers' conceptions. This illustrates that innatism is present in two distinct ways: in relation to individuals (e.g. genetic determinism to justify intellectual likeness between individuals such as twins) or in relation to groups of humans (e.g. genetic determinism to justify gender differences or the superiority of some human ethnic groups). A between-factor analysis discriminates between countries, showing very significant differences. There is more innatism among teachers' conceptions in African countries and Lebanon than in European countries, Brazil and Australia. Among the other controlled parameters, only two are significantly independent of the country: the level of training and the level of knowledge of biology. A co-inertia analysis shows a strong correlation between non-citizen attitudes towards and innatist conceptions of genetic determinism regarding human groups. We discuss these findings and their implications for education.

  1. The HapMap project has raised high hopes for mapping genetic determinants of complex human

    E-print Network

    Rosenberg, Noah

    The HapMap project has raised high hopes for mapping genetic determinants of complex human disease for mapping studies in human populations around the world. The HapMap project has characterized haplotype structures across the genome for four human populations with the goal of enabling genome-wide sets of SNPs

  2. Teachers' Conceptions about the Genetic Determinism of Human Behaviour: A Survey in 23 Countries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castéra, Jérémy; Clément, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    This work analyses the answers to a questionnaire from 8,285 in-service and pre-service teachers from 23 countries, elaborated by the Biohead-Citizen research project, to investigate teachers' conceptions related to the genetic determinism of human behaviour. A principal components analysis is used to assess the main trends in all the…

  3. 76 FR 5780 - Determination of Regulated Status of Alfalfa Genetically Engineered for Tolerance to the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-02

    ...This notice advises the public of the Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service's (APHIS) record of decision and determination on the petition regarding the regulated status of alfalfa genetically engineered for tolerance to the herbicide glyphosate based on APHIS' final environmental impact...

  4. Type 3 Reovirus Neuroinvasion after Intramuscular Inoculation: Viral Genetic Determinants of Lethality and Spinal Cord Infection

    E-print Network

    Knipe, David M.

    Type 3 Reovirus Neuroinvasion after Intramuscular Inoculation: Viral Genetic Determinants peripheral nerve pathways and produce CNS disease, we defined the type 3 (T3) reovirus genes in the meninges or choroid plexus. Neurally spreading viruses can evade the blood­brain barrier by utilizing

  5. Chemical and Synthetic Genetic Array Analysis Identifies Genes that Suppress Xylose Utilization and Fermentation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Usher, Jane; Balderas-Hernandez, Victor; Quon, Peter; Gold, Nicholas D.; Martin, Vincent J. J.; Mahadevan, Radhakrishnan; Baetz, Kristin

    2011-01-01

    Though highly efficient at fermenting hexose sugars, Saccharomyces cerevisiae has limited ability to ferment five-carbon sugars. As a significant portion of sugars found in cellulosic biomass is the five-carbon sugar xylose, S. cerevisiae must be engineered to metabolize pentose sugars, commonly by the addition of exogenous genes from xylose fermenting fungi. However, these recombinant strains grow poorly on xylose and require further improvement through rational engineering or evolutionary adaptation. To identify unknown genes that contribute to improved xylose fermentation in these recombinant S. cerevisiae, we performed genome-wide synthetic interaction screens to identify deletion mutants that impact xylose utilization of strains expressing the xylose isomerase gene XYLA from Piromyces sp. E2 alone or with an additional copy of the endogenous xylulokinase gene XKS1. We also screened the deletion mutant array to identify mutants whose growth is affected by xylose. Our genetic network reveals that more than 80 nonessential genes from a diverse range of cellular processes impact xylose utilization. Surprisingly, we identified four genes, ALP1, ISC1, RPL20B, and BUD21, that when individually deleted improved xylose utilization of both S. cerevisiae S288C and CEN.PK strains. We further characterized BUD21 deletion mutant cells in batch fermentations and found that they produce ethanol even the absence of exogenous XYLA. We have demonstrated that the ability of laboratory strains of S. cerevisiae to utilize xylose as a sole carbon source is suppressed, which implies that S. cerevisiae may not require the addition of exogenous genes for efficient xylose fermentation. PMID:22384336

  6. A Tyrosine-Rich Cell Surface Protein in the Diatom Amphora coffeaeformis Identified through Transcriptome Analysis and Genetic Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Buhmann, Matthias T.; Poulsen, Nicole; Klemm, Jennifer; Kennedy, Matthew R.; Sherrill, C. David; Kröger, Nils

    2014-01-01

    Diatoms are single-celled eukaryotic microalgae that are ubiquitously found in almost all aquatic ecosystems, and are characterized by their intricately structured SiO2 (silica)-based cell walls. Diatoms with a benthic life style are capable of attaching to any natural or man-made submerged surface, thus contributing substantially to both microbial biofilm communities and economic losses through biofouling. Surface attachment of diatoms is mediated by a carbohydrate- and protein- based glue, yet no protein involved in diatom underwater adhesion has been identified so far. In the present work, we have generated a normalized transcriptome database from the model adhesion diatom Amphora coffeaeformis. Using an unconventional bioinformatics analysis we have identified five proteins that exhibit unique amino acid sequences resembling the amino acid composition of the tyrosine-rich adhesion proteins from mussel footpads. Establishing the first method for the molecular genetic transformation of A. coffeaeformis has enabled investigations into the function of one of these proteins, AC3362, through expression as YFP fusion protein. Biochemical analysis and imaging by fluorescence microscopy revealed that AC3362 is not involved in adhesion, but rather plays a role in biosynthesis and/or structural stability of the cell wall. The methods established in the present study have paved the way for further molecular studies on the mechanisms of underwater adhesion and biological silica formation in the diatom A. coffeaeformis. PMID:25372470

  7. Dispersal ability and habitat requirements determine landscape-level genetic patterns in desert aquatic insects.

    PubMed

    Phillipsen, Ivan C; Kirk, Emily H; Bogan, Michael T; Mims, Meryl C; Olden, Julian D; Lytle, David A

    2015-01-01

    Species occupying the same geographic range can exhibit remarkably different population structures across the landscape, ranging from highly diversified to panmictic. Given limitations on collecting population-level data for large numbers of species, ecologists seek to identify proximate organismal traits-such as dispersal ability, habitat preference and life history-that are strong predictors of realized population structure. We examined how dispersal ability and habitat structure affect the regional balance of gene flow and genetic drift within three aquatic insects that represent the range of dispersal abilities and habitat requirements observed in desert stream insect communities. For each species, we tested for linear relationships between genetic distances and geographic distances using Euclidean and landscape-based metrics of resistance. We found that the moderate-disperser Mesocapnia arizonensis (Plecoptera: Capniidae) has a strong isolation-by-distance pattern, suggesting migration-drift equilibrium. By contrast, population structure in the flightless Abedus herberti (Hemiptera: Belostomatidae) is influenced by genetic drift, while gene flow is the dominant force in the strong-flying Boreonectes aequinoctialis (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae). The best-fitting landscape model for M. arizonensis was based on Euclidean distance. Analyses also identified a strong spatial scale-dependence, where landscape genetic methods only performed well for species that were intermediate in dispersal ability. Our results highlight the fact that when either gene flow or genetic drift dominates in shaping population structure, no detectable relationship between genetic and geographic distances is expected at certain spatial scales. This study provides insight into how gene flow and drift interact at the regional scale for these insects as well as the organisms that share similar habitats and dispersal abilities. PMID:25402260

  8. Environmental versus geographical determinants of genetic structure in two subalpine conifers.

    PubMed

    Mosca, Elena; González-Martínez, Santiago C; Neale, David B

    2014-01-01

    Alpine ecosystems are facing rapid human-induced environmental changes, and so more knowledge about tree adaptive potential is needed. This study investigated the relative role of isolation by distance (IBD) versus isolation by adaptation (IBA) in explaining population genetic structure in Abies alba and Larix decidua, based on 231 and 233 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) sampled across 36 and 22 natural populations, respectively, in the Alps and Apennines. Genetic structure was investigated for both geographical and environmental groups, using analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA). For each species, nine environmental groups were defined using climate variables selected from a multiple factor analysis. Complementary methods were applied to identify outliers based on these groups, and to test for IBD versus IBA. AMOVA showed weak but significant genetic structure for both species, with higher values in L. decidua. Among the potential outliers detected, up to two loci were found for geographical groups and up to seven for environmental groups. A stronger effect of IBD than IBA was found in both species; nevertheless, once spatial effects had been removed, temperature and soil in A. alba, and precipitation in both species, were relevant factors explaining genetic structure. Based on our findings, in the Alpine region, genetic structure seems to be affected by both geographical isolation and environmental gradients, creating opportunities for local adaptation. PMID:24102203

  9. The genetic sex-determination system predicts adult sex ratios in tetrapods.

    PubMed

    Pipoly, Ivett; Bókony, Veronika; Kirkpatrick, Mark; Donald, Paul F; Székely, Tamás; Liker, András

    2015-11-01

    The adult sex ratio (ASR) has critical effects on behaviour, ecology and population dynamics, but the causes of variation in ASRs are unclear. Here we assess whether the type of genetic sex determination influences the ASR using data from 344 species in 117 families of tetrapods. We show that taxa with female heterogamety have a significantly more male-biased ASR (proportion of males: 0.55 ± 0.01 (mean ± s.e.m.)) than taxa with male heterogamety (0.43 ± 0.01). The genetic sex-determination system explains 24% of interspecific variation in ASRs in amphibians and 36% in reptiles. We consider several genetic factors that could contribute to this pattern, including meiotic drive and sex-linked deleterious mutations, but further work is needed to quantify their effects. Regardless of the mechanism, the effects of the genetic sex-determination system on the adult sex ratio are likely to have profound effects on the demography and social behaviour of tetrapods. PMID:26444239

  10. Application of Genomic and Quantitative Genetic Tools to Identify Candidate Resistance Genes for Brown Rot Resistance in Peach

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-García, Pedro J.; Parfitt, Dan E.; Bostock, Richard M.; Fresnedo-Ramírez, Jonathan; Vazquez-Lobo, Alejandra; Ogundiwin, Ebenezer A.; Gradziel, Thomas M.; Crisosto, Carlos H.

    2013-01-01

    The availability of a complete peach genome assembly and three different peach genome sequences created by our group provide new opportunities for application of genomic data and can improve the power of the classical Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) approaches to identify candidate genes for peach disease resistance. Brown rot caused by Monilinia spp., is the most important fungal disease of stone fruits worldwide. Improved levels of peach fruit rot resistance have been identified in some cultivars and advanced selections developed in the UC Davis and USDA breeding programs. Whole genome sequencing of the Pop-DF parents lead to discovery of high-quality SNP markers for QTL genome scanning in this experimental population. Pop-DF created by crossing a brown rot moderately resistant cultivar ‘Dr. Davis’ and a brown rot resistant introgression line, ‘F8,1–42’, derived from an initial almond × peach interspecific hybrid, was evaluated for brown rot resistance in fruit of harvest maturity over three seasons. Using the SNP linkage map of Pop-DF and phenotypic data collected with inoculated fruit, a genome scan for QTL identified several SNP markers associated with brown rot resistance. Two of these QTLs were placed on linkage group 1, covering a large (physical) region on chromosome 1. The genome scan for QTL and SNP effects predicted several candidate genes associated with disease resistance responses in other host-pathogen systems. Two potential candidate genes, ppa011763m and ppa026453m, may be the genes primarily responsible for M. fructicola recognition in peach, activating both PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI) and effector-triggered immunity (ETI) responses. Our results provide a foundation for further genetic dissection, marker assisted breeding for brown rot resistance, and development of peach cultivars resistant to brown rot. PMID:24244329

  11. Integrated Genetic and Epigenetic Analysis Identifies Haplotype-Specific Methylation in the FTO Type 2 Diabetes and Obesity Susceptibility Locus

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Gareth A.; Rakyan, Vardhman K.; Teschendorff, Andrew E.; Akan, Pelin; Stupka, Elia; Down, Thomas A.; Prokopenko, Inga; Morison, Ian M.; Mill, Jonathan; Pidsley, Ruth; Deloukas, Panos; Frayling, Timothy M.; Hattersley, Andrew T.; McCarthy, Mark I.; Beck, Stephan; Hitman, Graham A.

    2010-01-01

    Recent multi-dimensional approaches to the study of complex disease have revealed powerful insights into how genetic and epigenetic factors may underlie their aetiopathogenesis. We examined genotype-epigenotype interactions in the context of Type 2 Diabetes (T2D), focussing on known regions of genomic susceptibility. We assayed DNA methylation in 60 females, stratified according to disease susceptibility haplotype using previously identified association loci. CpG methylation was assessed using methylated DNA immunoprecipitation on a targeted array (MeDIP-chip) and absolute methylation values were estimated using a Bayesian algorithm (BATMAN). Absolute methylation levels were quantified across LD blocks, and we identified increased DNA methylation on the FTO obesity susceptibility haplotype, tagged by the rs8050136 risk allele A (p?=?9.40×10?4, permutation p?=?1.0×10?3). Further analysis across the 46 kb LD block using sliding windows localised the most significant difference to be within a 7.7 kb region (p?=?1.13×10?7). Sequence level analysis, followed by pyrosequencing validation, revealed that the methylation difference was driven by the co-ordinated phase of CpG-creating SNPs across the risk haplotype. This 7.7 kb region of haplotype-specific methylation (HSM), encapsulates a Highly Conserved Non-Coding Element (HCNE) that has previously been validated as a long-range enhancer, supported by the histone H3K4me1 enhancer signature. This study demonstrates that integration of Genome-Wide Association (GWA) SNP and epigenomic DNA methylation data can identify potential novel genotype-epigenotype interactions within disease-associated loci, thus providing a novel route to aid unravelling common complex diseases. PMID:21124985

  12. Using structural MRI to identify individuals at genetic risk for bipolar disorders: a 2-cohort, machine learning study

    PubMed Central

    Hajek, Tomas; Cooke, Christopher; Kopecek, Miloslav; Novak, Tomas; Hoschl, Cyril; Alda, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Background Brain imaging is of limited diagnostic use in psychiatry owing to clinical heterogeneity and low sensitivity/specificity of between-group neuroimaging differences. Machine learning (ML) may better translate neuroimaging to the level of individual participants. Studying unaffected offspring of parents with bipolar disorders (BD) decreases clinical heterogeneity and thus increases sensitivity for detection of biomarkers. The present study used ML to identify individuals at genetic high risk (HR) for BD based on brain structure. Methods We studied unaffected and affected relatives of BD probands recruited from 2 sites (Halifax, Canada, and Prague, Czech Republic). Each participant was individually matched by age and sex to controls without personal or family history of psychiatric disorders. We applied support vector machines (SVM) and Gaussian process classifiers (GPC) to structural MRI. Results We included 45 unaffected and 36 affected relatives of BD probands matched by age and sex on an individual basis to healthy controls. The SVM of white matter distinguished unaffected HR from control participants (accuracy = 68.9%, p = 0.001), with similar accuracy for the GPC (65.6%, p = 0.002) or when analyzing data from each site separately. Differentiation of the more clinically heterogeneous affected familiar group from healthy controls was less accurate (accuracy = 59.7%, p = 0.05). Machine learning applied to grey matter did not distinguish either the unaffected HR or affected familial groups from controls. The regions that most contributed to between-group discrimination included white matter of the inferior/middle frontal gyrus, inferior/middle temporal gyrus and precuneus. Limitations Although we recruited 126 participants, ML benefits from even larger samples. Conclusions Machine learning applied to white but not grey matter distinguished unaffected participants at high and low genetic risk for BD based on regions previously implicated in the pathophysiology of BD. PMID:25853284

  13. A High-Density Genetic Map Identifies a Novel Major QTL for Boron Efficiency in Oilseed Rape (Brassica napus L.)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaohua; Zhao, Hua; Shi, Lei; Xu, Fangsen

    2014-01-01

    Low boron (B) seriously limits the growth of oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.), a high B demand species that is sensitive to low B conditions. Significant genotypic variations in response to B deficiency have been observed among B. napus cultivars. To reveal the genetic basis for B efficiency in B. napus, quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for the plant growth traits, B uptake traits and the B efficiency coefficient (BEC) were analyzed using a doubled haploid (DH) population derived from a cross between a B-efficient parent, Qingyou 10, and a B-inefficient parent, Westar 10. A high-density genetic map was constructed based on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) assayed using Brassica 60 K Infinium BeadChip Array, simple sequence repeats (SSRs) and amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs). The linkage map covered a total length of 2139.5 cM, with 19 linkage groups (LGs) and an average distance of 1.6 cM between adjacent markers. Based on hydroponic evaluation of six B efficiency traits measured in three separate repeated trials, a total of 52 QTLs were identified, accounting for 6.14–46.27% of the phenotypic variation. A major QTL for BEC, qBEC-A3a, was co-located on A3 with other QTLs for plant growth and B uptake traits under low B stress. Using a subset of substitution lines, qBEC-A3a was validated and narrowed down to the interval between CNU384 and BnGMS436. The results of this study provide a novel major locus located on A3 for B efficiency in B. napus that will be suitable for fine mapping and marker-assisted selection breeding for B efficiency in B. napus. PMID:25375356

  14. Two Different High Throughput Sequencing Approaches Identify Thousands of De Novo Genomic Markers for the Genetically Depleted Bornean Elephant

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Reeta; Goossens, Benoit; Kun-Rodrigues, Célia; Teixeira, Tatiana; Othman, Nurzhafarina; Boone, Jason Q.; Jue, Nathaniel K.; Obergfell, Craig; O'Neill, Rachel J.; Chikhi, Lounès

    2012-01-01

    High throughput sequencing technologies are being applied to an increasing number of model species with a high-quality reference genome. The application and analyses of whole-genome sequence data in non-model species with no prior genomic information are currently under way. Recent sequencing technologies provide new opportunities for gathering genomic data in natural populations, laying the empirical foundation for future research in the field of conservation and population genomics. Here we present the case study of the Bornean elephant, which is the most endangered subspecies of Asian elephant and exhibits very low genetic diversity. We used two different sequencing platforms, the Roche 454 FLX (shotgun) and Illumina, GAIIx (Restriction site associated DNA, RAD) to evaluate the feasibility of the two methodologies for the discovery of de novo markers (single nucleotide polymorphism, SNPs and microsatellites) using low coverage data. Approximately, 6,683 (shotgun) and 14,724 (RAD) SNPs were detected within our elephant sequence dataset. Genotyping of a representative sample of 194 SNPs resulted in a SNP validation rate of ? 83 to 94% and 17% of the loci were polymorphic with a low diversity (Ho?=?0.057). Different numbers of microsatellites were identified through shotgun (27,226) and RAD (868) techniques. Out of all di-, tri-, and tetra-microsatellite loci, 1,706 loci had sufficient flanking regions (shotgun) while only 7 were found with RAD. All microsatellites were monomorphic in the Bornean but polymorphic in another elephant subspecies. Despite using different sample sizes, and the well known differences in the two platforms used regarding sequence length and throughput, the two approaches showed high validation rate. The approaches used here for marker development in a threatened species demonstrate the utility of high throughput sequencing technologies as a starting point for the development of genomic tools in a non-model species and in particular for a species with low genetic diversity. PMID:23185354

  15. Tumor cell migration screen identifies SRPK1 as breast cancer metastasis determinant

    PubMed Central

    van Roosmalen, Wies; Le Dévédec, Sylvia E.; Golani, Ofra; Smid, Marcel; Pulyakhina, Irina; Timmermans, Annemieke M.; Look, Maxime P.; Zi, Di; Pont, Chantal; de Graauw, Marjo; Naffar-Abu-Amara, Suha; Kirsanova, Catherine; Rustici, Gabriella; Hoen, Peter A.C. ‘t; Martens, John W.M.; Foekens, John A.; Geiger, Benjamin; van de Water, Bob

    2015-01-01

    Tumor cell migration is a key process for cancer cell dissemination and metastasis that is controlled by signal-mediated cytoskeletal and cell matrix adhesion remodeling. Using a phagokinetic track assay with migratory H1299 cells, we performed an siRNA screen of almost 1,500 genes encoding kinases/phosphatases and adhesome- and migration-related proteins to identify genes that affect tumor cell migration speed and persistence. Thirty candidate genes that altered cell migration were validated in live tumor cell migration assays. Eight were associated with metastasis-free survival in breast cancer patients, with integrin ?3–binding protein (ITGB3BP), MAP3K8, NIMA-related kinase (NEK2), and SHC-transforming protein 1 (SHC1) being the most predictive. Examination of genes that modulate migration indicated that SRPK1, encoding the splicing factor kinase SRSF protein kinase 1, is relevant to breast cancer outcomes, as it was highly expressed in basal breast cancer. Furthermore, high SRPK1 expression correlated with poor breast cancer disease outcome and preferential metastasis to the lungs and brain. In 2 independent murine models of breast tumor metastasis, stable shRNA-based SRPK1 knockdown suppressed metastasis to distant organs, including lung, liver, and spleen, and inhibited focal adhesion reorganization. Our study provides comprehensive information on the molecular determinants of tumor cell migration and suggests that SRPK1 has potential as a drug target for limiting breast cancer metastasis. PMID:25774502

  16. Nickel-Resistance Determinants in Acidiphilium sp. PM Identified by Genome-Wide Functional Screening

    PubMed Central

    San Martin-Uriz, Patxi; Mirete, Salvador; Alcolea, Pedro J.; Gomez, Manuel J.; Amils, Ricardo; Gonzalez-Pastor, Jose E.

    2014-01-01

    Acidiphilium spp. are conspicuous dwellers of acidic, metal-rich environments. Indeed, they are among the most metal-resistant organisms; yet little is known about the mechanisms behind the metal tolerance in this genus. Acidiphilium sp. PM is an environmental isolate from Rio Tinto, an acidic, metal-laden river located in southwestern Spain. The characterization of its metal resistance revealed a remarkable ability to tolerate high Ni concentrations. Here we report the screening of a genomic library of Acidiphilium sp. PM to identify genes involved in Ni resistance. This approach revealed seven different genes conferring Ni resistance to E. coli, two of which form an operon encoding the ATP-dependent protease HslVU (ClpQY). This protease was found to enhance resistance to both Ni and Co in E. coli, a function not previously reported. Other Ni-resistance determinants include genes involved in lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis and the synthesis of branched amino acids. The diversity of molecular functions of the genes recovered in the screening suggests that Ni resistance in Acidiphilium sp. PM probably relies on different molecular mechanisms. PMID:24740277

  17. 41 CFR 102-5.85 - What information should our determination for field work include if positions are identified...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...information should our determination for field work include if positions are identified rather than...MANAGEMENT REGULATION GENERAL 5-HOME-TO-WORK TRANSPORTATION Authorizing Home-to-Work Transportation § 102-5.85 What...

  18. 41 CFR 102-5.85 - What information should our determination for field work include if positions are identified...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...information should our determination for field work include if positions are identified rather than...MANAGEMENT REGULATION GENERAL 5-HOME-TO-WORK TRANSPORTATION Authorizing Home-to-Work Transportation § 102-5.85 What...

  19. 41 CFR 102-5.85 - What information should our determination for field work include if positions are identified...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...information should our determination for field work include if positions are identified rather than...MANAGEMENT REGULATION GENERAL 5-HOME-TO-WORK TRANSPORTATION Authorizing Home-to-Work Transportation § 102-5.85 What...

  20. 41 CFR 102-5.85 - What information should our determination for field work include if positions are identified...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...information should our determination for field work include if positions are identified rather than...MANAGEMENT REGULATION GENERAL 5-HOME-TO-WORK TRANSPORTATION Authorizing Home-to-Work Transportation § 102-5.85 What...

  1. 41 CFR 102-5.85 - What information should our determination for field work include if positions are identified...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...information should our determination for field work include if positions are identified rather than...MANAGEMENT REGULATION GENERAL 5-HOME-TO-WORK TRANSPORTATION Authorizing Home-to-Work Transportation § 102-5.85 What...

  2. GLA variation p.E66Q identified as the genetic etiology of Fabry disease using exome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hao; Xu, Xiaojuan; Zhang, Lusi; Zhang, Xuehong; Peng, Hexiang; Zheng, Yu; Luo, Sanchuan; Guo, Hui; Xia, Kun; Li, Jiada; Yao, Hongliang; Hu, Zhengmao

    2016-01-10

    Fabry disease (FD) was an X-linked lysosomal storage disorder resulting from a deficiency in glycosphingolipid catabolism caused by mutations in the ?-galactosidase A gene GLA. Variant FD patients did not present with classical symptoms during childhood and were undiagnosed or misdiagnosed with other kidney diseases, such as chronic glomerulonephritis (CGN). In this study, we utilized exome sequencing and Sanger sequencing identified the variation p.E66Q of GLA completely co-segregated with the disease phenotype in a Chinese family, which previously been diagnosed as possible CGN. Female patients exhibited preferential X-chromosome inactivation (XCI) of the normal p.E66 allele, as indicated by XCI analysis. By measuring ?-Gal A activity, we found that male patients in the pedigree had just little enzymatic activity while female patients had residual enzymatic activity. These patients were diagnosed with renal variant FD in subsequent clinical review. Our results directly implicated the GLA mutation p.E66Q as the genetic etiology of the Chinese renal variant FD pedigree. PMID:26456105

  3. In vitro genetic screen identifies a cooperative role for LPA signaling and c-Myc in cell transformation.

    PubMed

    Taghavi, P; Verhoeven, E; Jacobs, J J L; Lambooij, J P; Stortelers, C; Tanger, E; Moolenaar, W H; van Lohuizen, M

    2008-11-20

    c-Myc drives uncontrolled cell proliferation in various human cancers. However, in mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs), c-Myc also induces apoptosis by activating the p19Arf tumor suppressor pathway. Tbx2, a transcriptional repressor of p19Arf, can collaborate with c-Myc by suppressing apoptosis. MEFs overexpressing c-Myc and Tbx2 are immortal but not transformed. We have performed an unbiased genetic screen, which identified 12 oncogenes that collaborate with c-Myc and Tbx2 to transform MEFs in vitro. One of them encodes the LPA2 receptor for the lipid growth factor lysophosphatidic acid (LPA). We find that LPA1 and LPA4, but not LPA3, can reproduce the transforming effect of LPA2. Using pharmacological inhibitors, we show that the in vitro cell transformation induced by LPA receptors is dependent on the Gi-linked ERK and PI3K signaling pathways. The transforming ability of LPA1, LPA2 and LPA4 was confirmed by tumor formation assays in vivo and correlated with prolonged ERK1/2 activation in response to LPA. Our results reveal a direct role for LPA receptor signaling in cell transformation and tumorigenesis in conjunction with c-Myc and reduced p19Arf expression. PMID:18762810

  4. Comparative Genomic Hybridization Analysis of Yersinia enterocolitica and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis Identifies Genetic Traits to Elucidate Their Different Ecologies

    PubMed Central

    Jaakkola, Kaisa; Somervuo, Panu; Korkeala, Hannu

    2015-01-01

    Enteropathogenic Yersinia enterocolitica and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis are both etiological agents for intestinal infection known as yersiniosis, but their epidemiology and ecology bear many differences. Swine are the only known reservoir for Y. enterocolitica 4/O:3 strains, which are the most common cause of human disease, while Y. pseudotuberculosis has been isolated from a variety of sources, including vegetables and wild animals. Infections caused by Y. enterocolitica mainly originate from swine, but fresh produce has been the source for widespread Y. pseudotuberculosis outbreaks within recent decades. A comparative genomic hybridization analysis with a DNA microarray based on three Yersinia enterocolitica and four Yersinia pseudotuberculosis genomes was conducted to shed light on the genomic differences between enteropathogenic Yersinia. The hybridization results identified Y. pseudotuberculosis strains to carry operons linked with the uptake and utilization of substances not found in living animal tissues but present in soil, plants, and rotting flesh. Y. pseudotuberculosis also harbors a selection of type VI secretion systems targeting other bacteria and eukaryotic cells. These genetic traits are not found in Y. enterocolitica, and it appears that while Y. pseudotuberculosis has many tools beneficial for survival in varied environments, the Y. enterocolitica genome is more streamlined and adapted to their preferred animal reservoir. PMID:26605338

  5. New loci associated with birth weight identify genetic links between intrauterine growth and adult height and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Horikoshi, Momoko; Yaghootkar, Hanieh; Mook-Kanamori, Dennis O; Sovio, Ulla; Taal, H Rob; Hennig, Branwen J; Bradfield, Jonathan P; St Pourcain, Beate; Evans, David M; Charoen, Pimphen; Kaakinen, Marika; Cousminer, Diana L; Lehtimäki, Terho; Kreiner-Møller, Eskil; Warrington, Nicole M; Bustamante, Mariona; Feenstra, Bjarke; Berry, Diane J; Thiering, Elisabeth; Pfab, Thiemo; Barton, Sheila J; Shields, Beverley M; Kerkhof, Marjan; van Leeuwen, Elisabeth M; Fulford, Anthony J; Kutalik, Zoltán; Zhao, Jing Hua; den Hoed, Marcel; Mahajan, Anubha; Lindi, Virpi; Goh, Liang-Kee; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Wu, Ying; Raitakari, Olli T; Harder, Marie N; Meirhaeghe, Aline; Ntalla, Ioanna; Salem, Rany M; Jameson, Karen A; Zhou, Kaixin; Monies, Dorota M; Lagou, Vasiliki; Kirin, Mirna; Heikkinen, Jani; Adair, Linda S; Alkuraya, Fowzan S; Al-Odaib, Ali; Amouyel, Philippe; Andersson, Ehm Astrid; Bennett, Amanda J; Blakemore, Alexandra I F; Buxton, Jessica L; Dallongeville, Jean; Das, Shikta; de Geus, Eco J C; Estivill, Xavier; Flexeder, Claudia; Froguel, Philippe; Geller, Frank; Godfrey, Keith M; Gottrand, Frédéric; Groves, Christopher J; Hansen, Torben; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Hofman, Albert; Hollegaard, Mads V; Hougaard, David M; Hyppönen, Elina; Inskip, Hazel M; Isaacs, Aaron; Jørgensen, Torben; Kanaka-Gantenbein, Christina; Kemp, John P; Kiess, Wieland; Kilpeläinen, Tuomas O; Klopp, Norman; Knight, Bridget A; Kuzawa, Christopher W; McMahon, George; Newnham, John P; Niinikoski, Harri; Oostra, Ben A; Pedersen, Louise; Postma, Dirkje S; Ring, Susan M; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Robertson, Neil R; Sebert, Sylvain; Simell, Olli; Slowinski, Torsten; Tiesler, Carla M T; Tönjes, Anke; Vaag, Allan; Viikari, Jorma S; Vink, Jacqueline M; Vissing, Nadja Hawwa; Wareham, Nicholas J; Willemsen, Gonneke; Witte, Daniel R; Zhang, Haitao; Zhao, Jianhua; Wilson, James F; Stumvoll, Michael; Prentice, Andrew M; Meyer, Brian F; Pearson, Ewan R; Boreham, Colin A G; Cooper, Cyrus; Gillman, Matthew W; Dedoussis, George V; Moreno, Luis A; Pedersen, Oluf; Saarinen, Maiju; Mohlke, Karen L; Boomsma, Dorret I; Saw, Seang-Mei; Lakka, Timo A; Körner, Antje; Loos, Ruth J F; Ong, Ken K; Vollenweider, Peter; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Koppelman, Gerard H; Hattersley, Andrew T; Holloway, John W; Hocher, Berthold; Heinrich, Joachim; Power, Chris; Melbye, Mads; Guxens, Mònica; Pennell, Craig E; Bønnelykke, Klaus; Bisgaard, Hans; Eriksson, Johan G; Widén, Elisabeth; Hakonarson, Hakon; Uitterlinden, André G; Pouta, Anneli; Lawlor, Debbie A; Smith, George Davey; Frayling, Timothy M; McCarthy, Mark I; Grant, Struan F A; Jaddoe, Vincent W V; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Timpson, Nicholas J; Prokopenko, Inga; Freathy, Rachel M

    2013-01-01

    Birth weight within the normal range is associated with a variety of adult-onset diseases, but the mechanisms behind these associations are poorly understood. Previous genome-wide association studies of birth weight identified a variant in the ADCY5 gene associated both with birth weight and type 2 diabetes and a second variant, near CCNL1, with no obvious link to adult traits. In an expanded genome-wide association meta-analysis and follow-up study of birth weight (of up to 69,308 individuals of European descent from 43 studies), we have now extended the number of loci associated at genome-wide significance to 7, accounting for a similar proportion of variance as maternal smoking. Five of the loci are known to be associated with other phenotypes: ADCY5 and CDKAL1 with type 2 diabetes, ADRB1 with adult blood pressure and HMGA2 and LCORL with adult height. Our findings highlight genetic links between fetal growth and postnatal growth and metabolism. PMID:23202124

  6. Robust Flight Path Determination for Mars Precision Landing Using Genetic Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bayard, David S.; Kohen, Hamid

    1997-01-01

    This paper documents the application of genetic algorithms (GAs) to the problem of robust flight path determination for Mars precision landing. The robust flight path problem is defined here as the determination of the flight path which delivers a low-lift open-loop controlled vehicle to its desired final landing location while minimizing the effect of perturbations due to uncertainty in the atmospheric model and entry conditions. The genetic algorithm was capable of finding solutions which reduced the landing error from 111 km RMS radial (open-loop optimal) to 43 km RMS radial (optimized with respect to perturbations) using 200 hours of computation on an Ultra-SPARC workstation. Further reduction in the landing error is possible by going to closed-loop control which can utilize the GA optimized paths as nominal trajectories for linearization.

  7. USGS Genetics and Genomics Showcase

    USGS Multimedia Gallery

    The USGS Biology Resources Discipline showcased research in the fields of genetics and genomics on March 10, 2010 in the South Interior Building of the Department of the Interior. Topics included genetics to determine populations and recover endangered species, genetics that can identify wildlife in...

  8. Placebo Responses in Genetically Determined Intellectual Disability: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Curie, Aurore; Yang, Kathy; Kirsch, Irving; Gollub, Randy L.; des Portes, Vincent; Kaptchuk, Ted J.; Jensen, Karin B.

    2015-01-01

    Background Genetically determined Intellectual Disability (ID) is an intractable condition that involves severe impairment of mental abilities such as learning, reasoning and predicting the future. As of today, little is known about the placebo response in patients with ID. Objective To determine if placebo response exists in patients with genetically determined ID. Data sources and Study selection We searched Medline/PubMed, EMBASE, CENTRAL and PsycINFO to find all placebo-controlled double-blind randomized clinical trials (RCTs) in patients with genetically determined ID, published up to April 2013, focusing on core ID symptoms. Data extraction and synthesis Two investigators extracted outcome data independently. Main outcomes and measures Bias-corrected standardized mean difference (Hedge’s g) was computed for each outcome measure, using the Comprehensive Meta-Analysis software. A priori defined patient sub-groups were analyzed using a mixed-effect model. The relationship between pre-defined continuous variable moderators (age, IQ, year of publication and trial duration) and effect size was analyzed using meta-regression Results Twenty-two placebo-controlled double-blind RCTs met the inclusion criteria (n = 721, mean age = 17.1 years, 62% men, mean trial duration = 35 weeks). There was a significant overall placebo response from pre- to post-treatment in patients with ID (g = 0.468, p = 0.002), both for “subjective outcomes” (a third-person’s evaluation of the patient) (g = 0.563, p = 0.022) and “objective outcomes” (direct evaluation of the patient’s abilities) (g = 0.434, p = 0.036). Individuals with higher IQ had higher response to placebo (p = 0.02) and no placebo response was observed in ID patients with comorbid dementia. A significant effect of age (p = 0.02) was found, indicating higher placebo responses in treatment of younger patients. Conclusions and relevance Results suggest that patients with genetically determined ID improve in the placebo arm of RCTs. Several mechanisms may contribute to placebo effects in ID, including expectancy, implicit learning and “placebo-by-proxy” induced by clinicians/family members. As the condition is refractory, there is little risk that improvements are explained by spontaneous remission. While new avenues for treatment of genetically determined ID are emerging, our results demonstrate how contextual factors can affect clinical outcomes and emphasize the importance of being vigilant on the role of placebos when testing novel treatments in ID. PMID:26226597

  9. Epistasis Is a Major Determinant of the Additive Genetic Variance in Mimulus guttatus

    E-print Network

    Monnahan, Patrick J.; Kelly, John K.

    2015-05-11

    The influence of genetic interactions (epistasis) on the genetic variance of quantitative traits is a major unresolved problem relevant to medical, agricultural, and evolutionary genetics. The additive genetic component is typically a high...

  10. Exploitation of a "hockey-puck" phenotype to identify pilus and biofilm regulators in Serratia marcescens through genetic analysis.

    PubMed

    Shanks, Robert M Q; Stella, Nicholas A; Brothers, Kimberly M; Polaski, Denise M

    2016-01-01

    Pili are essential adhesive determinants for many bacterial pathogens. A suppressor mutation screen that takes advantage of a pilus-mediated self-aggregative "hockey-puck" colony phenotype was designed to identify novel regulators of type I pili in Serratia marcescens. Mutations that decreased pilus biosynthesis mapped to the fimABCD operon; to the genes alaT, fkpA, and oxyR; upstream of the flagellar master regulator operon flhDC; and to an uncharacterized gene encoding a predicted DUF1401 domain. Biofilm formation and pilus-dependent agglutination assays were used to characterize the relative importance of the identified genes in pilus biosynthesis. Additional mutagenic or complementation analysis was used to verify the role of candidate genes in pilus biosynthesis. Presented data support a model that CRP negatively regulates pilus biosynthesis through increased expression of flhDC and decreased expression of oxyR. Further studies are warranted to determine the mechanism by which these genes mediate pilus biosynthesis or function. PMID:26640000

  11. The major genetic determinants of HIV-1 control affect HLA class I peptide presentation.

    PubMed

    Pereyra, Florencia; Jia, Xiaoming; McLaren, Paul J; Telenti, Amalio; de Bakker, Paul I W; Walker, Bruce D; Ripke, Stephan; Brumme, Chanson J; Pulit, Sara L; Carrington, Mary; Kadie, Carl M; Carlson, Jonathan M; Heckerman, David; Graham, Robert R; Plenge, Robert M; Deeks, Steven G; Gianniny, Lauren; Crawford, Gabriel; Sullivan, Jordan; Gonzalez, Elena; Davies, Leela; Camargo, Amy; Moore, Jamie M; Beattie, Nicole; Gupta, Supriya; Crenshaw, Andrew; Burtt, Noël P; Guiducci, Candace; Gupta, Namrata; Gao, Xiaojiang; Qi, Ying; Yuki, Yuko; Piechocka-Trocha, Alicja; Cutrell, Emily; Rosenberg, Rachel; Moss, Kristin L; Lemay, Paul; O'Leary, Jessica; Schaefer, Todd; Verma, Pranshu; Toth, Ildiko; Block, Brian; Baker, Brett; Rothchild, Alissa; Lian, Jeffrey; Proudfoot, Jacqueline; Alvino, Donna Marie L; Vine, Seanna; Addo, Marylyn M; Allen, Todd M; Altfeld, Marcus; Henn, Matthew R; Le Gall, Sylvie; Streeck, Hendrik; Haas, David W; Kuritzkes, Daniel R; Robbins, Gregory K; Shafer, Robert W; Gulick, Roy M; Shikuma, Cecilia M; Haubrich, Richard; Riddler, Sharon; Sax, Paul E; Daar, Eric S; Ribaudo, Heather J; Agan, Brian; Agarwal, Shanu; Ahern, Richard L; Allen, Brady L; Altidor, Sherly; Altschuler, Eric L; Ambardar, Sujata; Anastos, Kathryn; Anderson, Ben; Anderson, Val; Andrady, Ushan; Antoniskis, Diana; Bangsberg, David; Barbaro, Daniel; Barrie, William; Bartczak, J; Barton, Simon; Basden, Patricia; Basgoz, Nesli; Bazner, Suzane; Bellos, Nicholaos C; Benson, Anne M; Berger, Judith; Bernard, Nicole F; Bernard, Annette M; Birch, Christopher; Bodner, Stanley J; Bolan, Robert K; Boudreaux, Emilie T; Bradley, Meg; Braun, James F; Brndjar, Jon E; Brown, Stephen J; Brown, Katherine; Brown, Sheldon T; Burack, Jedidiah; Bush, Larry M; Cafaro, Virginia; Campbell, Omobolaji; Campbell, John; Carlson, Robert H; Carmichael, J Kevin; Casey, Kathleen K; Cavacuiti, Chris; Celestin, Gregory; Chambers, Steven T; Chez, Nancy; Chirch, Lisa M; Cimoch, Paul J; Cohen, Daniel; Cohn, Lillian E; Conway, Brian; Cooper, David A; Cornelson, Brian; Cox, David T; Cristofano, Michael V; Cuchural, George; Czartoski, Julie L; Dahman, Joseph M; Daly, Jennifer S; Davis, Benjamin T; Davis, Kristine; Davod, Sheila M; DeJesus, Edwin; Dietz, Craig A; Dunham, Eleanor; Dunn, Michael E; Ellerin, Todd B; Eron, Joseph J; Fangman, John J W; Farel, Claire E; Ferlazzo, Helen; Fidler, Sarah; Fleenor-Ford, Anita; Frankel, Renee; Freedberg, Kenneth A; French, Neel K; Fuchs, Jonathan D; Fuller, Jon D; Gaberman, Jonna; Gallant, Joel E; Gandhi, Rajesh T; Garcia, Efrain; Garmon, Donald; Gathe, Joseph C; Gaultier, Cyril R; Gebre, Wondwoosen; Gilman, Frank D; Gilson, Ian; Goepfert, Paul A; Gottlieb, Michael S; Goulston, Claudia; Groger, Richard K; Gurley, T Douglas; Haber, Stuart; Hardwicke, Robin; Hardy, W David; Harrigan, P Richard; Hawkins, Trevor N; Heath, Sonya; Hecht, Frederick M; Henry, W Keith; Hladek, Melissa; Hoffman, Robert P; Horton, James M; Hsu, Ricky K; Huhn, Gregory D; Hunt, Peter; Hupert, Mark J; Illeman, Mark L; Jaeger, Hans; Jellinger, Robert M; John, Mina; Johnson, Jennifer A; Johnson, Kristin L; Johnson, Heather; Johnson, Kay; Joly, Jennifer; Jordan, Wilbert C; Kauffman, Carol A; Khanlou, Homayoon; Killian, Robert K; Kim, Arthur Y; Kim, David D; Kinder, Clifford A; Kirchner, Jeffrey T; Kogelman, Laura; Kojic, Erna Milunka; Korthuis, P Todd; Kurisu, Wayne; Kwon, Douglas S; LaMar, Melissa; Lampiris, Harry; Lanzafame, Massimiliano; Lederman, Michael M; Lee, David M; Lee, Jean M L; Lee, Marah J; Lee, Edward T Y; Lemoine, Janice; Levy, Jay A; Llibre, Josep M; Liguori, Michael A; Little, Susan J; Liu, Anne Y; Lopez, Alvaro J; Loutfy, Mono R; Loy, Dawn; Mohammed, Debbie Y; Man, Alan; Mansour, Michael K; Marconi, Vincent C; Markowitz, Martin; Marques, Rui; Martin, Jeffrey N; Martin, Harold L; Mayer, Kenneth Hugh; McElrath, M Juliana; McGhee, Theresa A; McGovern, Barbara H; McGowan, Katherine; McIntyre, Dawn; Mcleod, Gavin X; Menezes, Prema; Mesa, Greg; Metroka, Craig E; Meyer-Olson, Dirk; Miller, Andy O; Montgomery, Kate; Mounzer, Karam C; Nagami, Ellen H; Nagin, Iris; Nahass, Ronald G; Nelson, Margret O; Nielsen, Craig; Norene, David L; O'Connor, David H; Ojikutu, Bisola O; Okulicz, Jason; Oladehin, Olakunle O; Oldfield, Edward C; Olender, Susan A; Ostrowski, Mario; Owen, William F; Pae, Eunice; Parsonnet, Jeffrey; Pavlatos, Andrew M; Perlmutter, Aaron M; Pierce, Michael N; Pincus, Jonathan M; Pisani, Leandro; Price, Lawrence Jay; Proia, Laurie; Prokesch, Richard C; Pujet, Heather Calderon; Ramgopal, Moti; Rathod, Almas; Rausch, Michael; Ravishankar, J; Rhame, Frank S

    2010-12-10

    Infectious and inflammatory diseases have repeatedly shown strong genetic associations within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC); however, the basis for these associations remains elusive. To define host genetic effects on the outcome of a chronic viral infection, we performed genome-wide association analysis in a multiethnic cohort of HIV-1 controllers and progressors, and we analyzed the effects of individual amino acids within the classical human leukocyte antigen (HLA) proteins. We identified >300 genome-wide significant single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within the MHC and none elsewhere. Specific amino acids in the HLA-B peptide binding groove, as well as an independent HLA-C effect, explain the SNP associations and reconcile both protective and risk HLA alleles. These results implicate the nature of the HLA-viral peptide interaction as the major factor modulating durable control of HIV infection. PMID:21051598

  12. Genetic Diversity and Geographic Population Structure of Bovine Neospora caninum Determined by Microsatellite Genotyping Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Regidor-Cerrillo, Javier; Díez-Fuertes, Francisco; García-Culebras, Alicia; Moore, Dadín P.; González-Warleta, Marta; Cuevas, Carmen; Schares, Gereon; Katzer, Frank; Pedraza-Díaz, Susana; Mezo, Mercedes; Ortega-Mora, Luis M.

    2013-01-01

    The cyst-forming protozoan parasite Neosporacaninum is one of the main causes of bovine abortion worldwide and is of great economic importance in the cattle industry. Recent studies have revealed extensive genetic variation among N. caninum isolates based on microsatellite sequences (MSs). MSs may be suitable molecular markers for inferring the diversity of parasite populations, molecular epidemiology and the basis for phenotypic variations in N. caninum, which have been poorly defined. In this study, we evaluated nine MS markers using a panel of 11 N. caninum-derived reference isolates from around the world and 96 N. caninum bovine clinical samples and one ovine clinical sample collected from four countries on two continents, including Spain, Argentina, Germany and Scotland, over a 10-year period. These markers were used as molecular tools to investigate the genetic diversity, geographic distribution and population structure of N. caninum. Multilocus microsatellite genotyping based on 7 loci demonstrated high levels of genetic diversity in the samples from all of the different countries, with 96 microsatellite multilocus genotypes (MLGs) identified from 108 N. caninum samples. Geographic sub-structuring was present in the country populations according to pairwise FST. Principal component analysis (PCA) and Neighbor Joining tree topologies also suggested MLG segregation partially associated with geographical origin. An analysis of the MLG relationships, using eBURST, confirmed that the close genetic relationship observed between the Spanish and Argentinean populations may be the result of parasite migration (i.e., the introduction of novel MLGs from Spain to South America) due to cattle movement. The eBURST relationships also revealed genetically different clusters associated with the abortion. The presence of linkage disequilibrium, the co-existence of specific MLGs to individual farms and eBURST MLG relationships suggest a predominant clonal propagation for Spanish N. caninum MLGs in cattle. PMID:23940816

  13. Using the Social Communication Questionnaire to Identify "Autistic Spectrum" Disorders Associated with Other Genetic Conditions: Findings from a Study of Individuals with Cohen Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howlin, Patricia; Karpf, Janne

    2004-01-01

    Increasingly, recent research has identified relatively high rates of autistic types of symptoms in a variety of genetic conditions, such as fragile X (Turk and Graham, 1997), tuberous sclerosis (Bolton and Griffiths, 1997), Angelman syndrome (Trillingsgaard and Ostergaard, this issue) and others (see Gillberg and Coleman, 2000). Detailed…

  14. Copyright 2000 by the Genetics Society of America Suppressors of mdm20 in Yeast Identify New Alleles of ACT1 and TPM1

    E-print Network

    Shaw, Janet M.

    Copyright © 2000 by the Genetics Society of America Suppressors of mdm20 in Yeast Identify New to isolate second-site suppressor mutations. Nine dominant suppressors selected in an mdm20/mdm20 background actin cables in haploid and diploid mdm20 strains. The suppressor mutations define new alleles of ACT1

  15. A Matter of Timing: Identifying Significant Multi-Dose Radiotherapy Improvements by Numerical Simulation and Genetic Algorithm Search

    PubMed Central

    Angus, Simon D.; Piotrowska, Monika Joanna

    2014-01-01

    Multi-dose radiotherapy protocols (fraction dose and timing) currently used in the clinic are the product of human selection based on habit, received wisdom, physician experience and intra-day patient timetabling. However, due to combinatorial considerations, the potential treatment protocol space for a given total dose or treatment length is enormous, even for relatively coarse search; well beyond the capacity of traditional in-vitro methods. In constrast, high fidelity numerical simulation of tumor development is well suited to the challenge. Building on our previous single-dose numerical simulation model of EMT6/Ro spheroids, a multi-dose irradiation response module is added and calibrated to the effective dose arising from 18 independent multi-dose treatment programs available in the experimental literature. With the developed model a constrained, non-linear, search for better performing cadidate protocols is conducted within the vicinity of two benchmarks by genetic algorithm (GA) techniques. After evaluating less than 0.01% of the potential benchmark protocol space, candidate protocols were identified by the GA which conferred an average of 9.4% (max benefit 16.5%) and 7.1% (13.3%) improvement (reduction) on tumour cell count compared to the two benchmarks, respectively. Noticing that a convergent phenomenon of the top performing protocols was their temporal synchronicity, a further series of numerical experiments was conducted with periodic time-gap protocols (10 h to 23 h), leading to the discovery that the performance of the GA search candidates could be replicated by 17–18 h periodic candidates. Further dynamic irradiation-response cell-phase analysis revealed that such periodicity cohered with latent EMT6/Ro cell-phase temporal patterning. Taken together, this study provides powerful evidence towards the hypothesis that even simple inter-fraction timing variations for a given fractional dose program may present a facile, and highly cost-effecitive means of significantly improving clinical efficacy. PMID:25460164

  16. Genetic Determinants of the Network of Primary Metabolism and Their Relationships to Plant Performance in a Maize Recombinant Inbred Line Population[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Weiwei; Li, Kun; Alseekh, Saleh; Omranian, Nooshin; Zhao, Lijun; Zhou, Yang; Xiao, Yingjie; Jin, Min; Yang, Ning; Liu, Haijun; Florian, Alexandra; Li, Wenqiang; Pan, Qingchun; Nikoloski, Zoran; Yan, Jianbing; Fernie, Alisdair R.

    2015-01-01

    Deciphering the influence of genetics on primary metabolism in plants will provide insights useful for genetic improvement and enhance our fundamental understanding of plant growth and development. Although maize (Zea mays) is a major crop for food and feed worldwide, the genetic architecture of its primary metabolism is largely unknown. Here, we use high-density linkage mapping to dissect large-scale metabolic traits measured in three different tissues (leaf at seedling stage, leaf at reproductive stage, and kernel at 15 d after pollination [DAP]) of a maize recombinant inbred line population. We identify 297 quantitative trait loci (QTLs) with moderate (86.2% of the mapped QTL, R2 = 2.4 to 15%) to major effects (13.8% of the mapped QTL, R2 >15%) for 79 primary metabolites across three tissues. Pairwise epistatic interactions between these identified loci are detected for more than 25.9% metabolites explaining 6.6% of the phenotypic variance on average (ranging between 1.7 and 16.6%), which implies that epistasis may play an important role for some metabolites. Key candidate genes are highlighted and mapped to carbohydrate metabolism, the tricarboxylic acid cycle, and several important amino acid biosynthetic and catabolic pathways, with two of them being further validated using candidate gene association and expression profiling analysis. Our results reveal a metabolite-metabolite-agronomic trait network that, together with the genetic determinants of maize primary metabolism identified herein, promotes efficient utilization of metabolites in maize improvement. PMID:26187921

  17. A Systems Genetics Approach Identifies CXCL14, ITGAX, and LPCAT2 as Novel Aggressive Prostate Cancer Susceptibility Genes

    PubMed Central

    Andreas, Jonathan; Patel, Shashank J.; Zhang, Suiyuan; Chines, Peter; Elkahloun, Abdel; Chandrasekharappa, Settara; Gutkind, J. Silvio; Molinolo, Alfredo A.; Crawford, Nigel P. S.

    2014-01-01

    Although prostate cancer typically runs an indolent course, a subset of men develop aggressive, fatal forms of this disease. We hypothesize that germline variation modulates susceptibility to aggressive prostate cancer. The goal of this work is to identify susceptibility genes using the C57BL/6-Tg(TRAMP)8247Ng/J (TRAMP) mouse model of neuroendocrine prostate cancer. Quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping was performed in transgene-positive (TRAMPxNOD/ShiLtJ) F2 intercross males (n?=?228), which facilitated identification of 11 loci associated with aggressive disease development. Microarray data derived from 126 (TRAMPxNOD/ShiLtJ) F2 primary tumors were used to prioritize candidate genes within QTLs, with candidate genes deemed as being high priority when possessing both high levels of expression-trait correlation and a proximal expression QTL. This process enabled the identification of 35 aggressive prostate tumorigenesis candidate genes. The role of these genes in aggressive forms of human prostate cancer was investigated using two concurrent approaches. First, logistic regression analysis in two human prostate gene expression datasets revealed that expression levels of five genes (CXCL14, ITGAX, LPCAT2, RNASEH2A, and ZNF322) were positively correlated with aggressive prostate cancer and two genes (CCL19 and HIST1H1A) were protective for aggressive prostate cancer. Higher than average levels of expression of the five genes that were positively correlated with aggressive disease were consistently associated with patient outcome in both human prostate cancer tumor gene expression datasets. Second, three of these five genes (CXCL14, ITGAX, and LPCAT2) harbored polymorphisms associated with aggressive disease development in a human GWAS cohort consisting of 1,172 prostate cancer patients. This study is the first example of using a systems genetics approach to successfully identify novel susceptibility genes for aggressive prostate cancer. Such approaches will facilitate the identification of novel germline factors driving aggressive disease susceptibility and allow for new insights into these deadly forms of prostate cancer. PMID:25411967

  18. Genetic architecture of sex determination in fish: applications to sex ratio control in aquaculture

    PubMed Central

    Martínez, Paulino; Viñas, Ana M.; Sánchez, Laura; Díaz, Noelia; Ribas, Laia; Piferrer, Francesc

    2014-01-01

    Controlling the sex ratio is essential in finfish farming. A balanced sex ratio is usually good for broodstock management, since it enables to develop appropriate breeding schemes. However, in some species the production of monosex populations is desirable because the existence of sexual dimorphism, primarily in growth or first time of sexual maturation, but also in color or shape, can render one sex more valuable. The knowledge of the genetic architecture of sex determination (SD) is convenient for controlling sex ratio and for the implementation of breeding programs. Unlike mammals and birds, which show highly conserved master genes that control a conserved genetic network responsible for gonad differentiation (GD), a huge diversity of SD mechanisms has been reported in fish. Despite theory predictions, more than one gene is in many cases involved in fish SD and genetic differences have been observed in the GD network. Environmental factors also play a relevant role and epigenetic mechanisms are becoming increasingly recognized for the establishment and maintenance of the GD pathways. Although major genetic factors are frequently involved in fish SD, these observations strongly suggest that SD in this group resembles a complex trait. Accordingly, the application of quantitative genetics combined with genomic tools is desirable to address its study and in fact, when applied, it has frequently demonstrated a multigene trait interacting with environmental factors in model and cultured fish species. This scenario has notable implications for aquaculture and, depending upon the species, from chromosome manipulation or environmental control techniques up to classical selection or marker assisted selection programs, are being applied. In this review, we selected four relevant species or fish groups to illustrate this diversity and hence the technologies that can be used by the industry for the control of sex ratio: turbot and European sea bass, two reference species of the European aquaculture, and salmonids and tilapia, representing the fish for which there are well established breeding programs. PMID:25324858

  19. Genetically determined angiotensin converting enzyme level and myocardial tolerance to ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Messadi, Erij; Vincent, Marie-Pascale; Griol-Charhbili, Violaine; Mandet, Chantal; Colucci, Juliana; Krege, John H.; Bruneval, Patrick; Bouby, Nadine; Smithies, Oliver; Alhenc-Gelas, François; Richer, Christine

    2010-01-01

    Angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE; kininase II) levels in humans are genetically determined. ACE levels have been linked to risk of myocardial infarction, but the association has been inconsistent, and the causality underlying it remains undocumented. We tested the hypothesis that genetic variation in ACE levels influences myocardial tolerance to ischemia. We studied ischemia-reperfusion injury in mice bearing 1 (ACE1c), 2 (ACE2c, wild type), or 3 (ACE3c) functional copies of the ACE gene and displaying an ACE level range similar to humans. Infarct size in ACE1c was 29% lower than in ACE2c (P<0.05). Pretreatment with a kinin B2 receptor antagonist suppressed this reduction. In ACE3c, infarct size was the same as in ACE2c. But ischemic preconditioning, which reduced infarct size in ACE2c (?63%, P<0.001) and ACE1c (?52%, P<0.05), was not efficient in ACE3c (?2%, NS, P<0.01 vs. ACE2c). In ACE3c, ischemic preconditioning did not decrease myocardial inflammation or cardiomyocyte apoptosis. Pretreatment with a renin inhibitor had no cardioprotective effect in ACE2c, but in ACE3c partially restored (38%) the cardioprotection of ischemic preconditioning. Thus, a modest genetic increase in ACE impairs myocardial tolerance to ischemia. ACE level plays a critical role in cardiac ischemia, through both kinin and angiotensin mediated mechanisms.—Messadi, E., Vincent, M.-P., Griol-Charhbili, V., Mandet, C., Colucci, J., Krege, J. H., Bruneval, P., Bouby, N., Smithies, O., Alhenc-Gelas, F., Richer, C. Genetically determined angiotensin converting enzyme level and myocardial tolerance to ischemia. PMID:20667972

  20. Phylogenomics of Xanthomonas field strains infecting pepper and tomato reveals diversity in effector repertoires and identifies determinants of host specificity

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Allison R.; Potnis, Neha; Timilsina, Sujan; Wilson, Mark; Patané, José; Martins, Joaquim; Minsavage, Gerald V.; Dahlbeck, Douglas; Akhunova, Alina; Almeida, Nalvo; Vallad, Gary E.; Barak, Jeri D.; White, Frank F.; Miller, Sally A.; Ritchie, David; Goss, Erica; Bart, Rebecca S.; Setubal, João C.; Jones, Jeffrey B.; Staskawicz, Brian J.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial spot disease of pepper and tomato is caused by four distinct Xanthomonas species and is a severely limiting factor on fruit yield in these crops. The genetic diversity and the type III effector repertoires of a large sampling of field strains for this disease have yet to be explored on a genomic scale, limiting our understanding of pathogen evolution in an agricultural setting. Genomes of 67 Xanthomonas euvesicatoria (Xe), Xanthomonas perforans (Xp), and Xanthomonas gardneri (Xg) strains isolated from diseased pepper and tomato fields in the southeastern and midwestern United States were sequenced in order to determine the genetic diversity in field strains. Type III effector repertoires were computationally predicted for each strain, and multiple methods of constructing phylogenies were employed to understand better the genetic relationship of strains in the collection. A division in the Xp population was detected based on core genome phylogeny, supporting a model whereby the host-range expansion of Xp field strains on pepper is due, in part, to a loss of the effector AvrBsT. Xp-host compatibility was further studied with the observation that a double deletion of AvrBsT and XopQ allows a host range expansion for Nicotiana benthamiana. Extensive sampling of field strains and an improved understanding of effector content will aid in efforts to design disease resistance strategies targeted against highly conserved core effectors. PMID:26089818

  1. Genome-wide association study identifies ABCG2 (BCRP) as an allopurinol transporter and a determinant of drug response

    PubMed Central

    Wen, CC; Yee, SW; Liang, X; Hoffmann, TJ; Kvale, MN; Banda, Y; Jorgenson, E; Schaefer, C; Risch, N; Giacomini, KM

    2015-01-01

    The first-line treatment of hyperuricemia, which causes gout, is allopurinol. The allopurinol response is highly variable, with many users failing to achieve target serum uric acid (SUA) levels. No genome-wide association study (GWAS) has examined the genetic factors affecting allopurinol effectiveness. Using 2,027 subjects in Kaiser Permanente’s Genetic Epidemiology Research on Adult Health and Aging (GERA) Cohort, we conducted a GWAS of allopurinol-related SUA reduction, first in the largest ethnic group, non-Hispanic white (NHW) subjects, and then in a stratified transethnic meta-analysis. ABCG2, encoding the efflux pump BCRP, was associated with SUA reduction in NHW subjects (P = 2 × 10?8), and a missense allele (rs2231142) was associated with a reduced response (P = 3 × 10?7) in the meta-analysis. Isotopic uptake studies in cells demonstrated that BCRP transports allopurinol and genetic variants in ABCG2 affect this transport. Collectively, this first GWAS of allopurinol response demonstrates that ABCG2 is a key determinant of response to the drug. PMID:25676789

  2. A High-Resolution Genetic Map of Yellow Monkeyflower Identifies Chemical Defense QTLs and Recombination Rate Variation

    E-print Network

    Holeski, Liza M.; Monnahan, Patrick J.; Koseva, Boryana S.; McCool, Nick; Lindroth, Richard L.; Kelly, John K.

    2014-05-04

    Genotyping-by-sequencing methods have vastly improved the resolution and accuracy of genetic linkage maps by increasing both the number of marker loci as well as the number of individuals genotyped at these loci. Using ...

  3. A screen for genetic suppressor elements of hepatitis C virus identifies a supercharged protein inhibitor of viral replication 

    E-print Network

    Simeon, Rudo L.; Chen, Zhilei

    2013-12-31

    Genetic suppressor elements (GSEs) are biomolecules derived from a gene or genome of interest that act as transdominant inhibitors of biological functions presumably by disruption of critical biological interfaces. We ...

  4. Human genome screen to identify the genetic basis of the anti-inflammatory effects of Boswellia in microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Roy, Sashwati; Khanna, Savita; Shah, Hiral; Rink, Cameron; Phillips, Christina; Preuss, Harry; Subbaraju, Gottumukkala V; Trimurtulu, Golakoti; Krishnaraju, Alluri V; Bagchi, Manashi; Bagchi, Debasis; Sen, Chandan K

    2005-04-01

    Inflammatory disorders represent a substantial health problem. Medicinal plants belonging to the Burseraceae family, including Boswellia, are especially known for their anti-inflammatory properties. The gum resin of Boswellia serrata contains boswellic acids, which inhibit leukotriene biosynthesis. A series of chronic inflammatory diseases are perpetuated by leukotrienes. Although Boswellia extract has proven to be anti-inflammatory in clinical trials, the underlying mechanisms remain to be characterized. TNF alpha represents one of the most widely recognized mediators of inflammation. One mechanism by which TNFalpha causes inflammation is by potently inducing the expression of adhesion molecules such as VCAM-1. We sought to test the genetic basis of the antiinflammatory effects of BE (standardized Boswellia extract, 5-Loxin) in a system of TNF alpha-induced gene expression in human microvascular endothelial cells. We conducted the first whole genome screen for TNF alpha- inducible genes in human microvascular cells (HMEC). Acutely, TNF alpha induced 522 genes and downregulated 141 genes in nine out of nine pairwise comparisons. Of the 522 genes induced by TNF alpha in HMEC, 113 genes were clearly sensitive to BE treatment. Such genes directly related to inflammation, cell adhesion, and proteolysis. The robust BE-sensitive candidate genes were then subjected to further processing for the identification of BE-sensitive signaling pathways. The use of resources such as GenMAPP, KEGG, and gene ontology led to the recognition of the primary BE-sensitive TNF alpha-inducible pathways. BE prevented the TNF alpha-induced expression of matrix metalloproteinases. BE also prevented the inducible expression of mediators of apoptosis. Most strikingly, however, TNF alpha-inducible expression of VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 were observed to be sensitive to BE. Realtime PCR studies showed that while TNF alpha potently induced VCAM-1 gene expression, BE completely prevented it. This result confirmed our microarray findings and built a compelling case for the anti-inflammatory property of BE. In an in vivo model of carrageenan-induced rat paw inflammation, we observed a significant antiinflammatory property of BE consistent with our in vitro findings. These findings warrant further research aimed at identifying the signaling mechanisms by which BE exerts its anti-inflammatory effects. PMID:15812241

  5. Disruption of the Aortic Elastic Lamina and Medial Calcification Share Genetic Determinants in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Susanna S.; Martin, Lisa J.; Schadt, Eric E.; Meng, Haijin; Wang, Xuping; Zhao, Wei; Ingram-Drake, Leslie; Nebohacova, Martina; Mehrabian, Margarete; Drake, Thomas A.; Lusis, Aldons J.

    2010-01-01

    Background Disruption of the elastic lamina, as an early indicator of aneurysm formation, and vascular calcification frequently occur together in atherosclerotic lesions of humans. Methods and Results We now report evidence of shared genetic basis for disruption of the elastic lamina (medial disruption) and medial calcification in an F2 mouse intercross between C57BL/6J and C3H/HeJ on a hyperlipidemic apolipoprotein E (ApoE?/?) null background. We identified 3 quantitative trait loci (QTLs) on chromosomes 6, 13, and 18, which are common to both traits, and 2 additional QTLs for medial calcification on chromosomes 3 and 7. Medial disruption, including severe disruptions leading to aneurysm formation, and medial calcification were highly correlated and occurred concomitantly in the cross. The chromosome 18 locus showed a striking male sex-specificity for both traits. To identify candidate genes, we integrated data from microarray analysis, genetic segregation, and clinical traits. The chromosome 7 locus contains the Abcc6 gene, known to mediate myocardial calcification. Using transgenic complementation, we show that Abcc6 also contributes to aortic medial calcification. Conclusions Our data indicate that calcification, though possibly contributory, does not always lead to medial disruption and that in addition to aneurysm formation, medial disruption may be the precursor to calcification. PMID:20031637

  6. Genetic background determines if Stat5b suppresses or enhances murine hepatocarcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Oberley, Christopher C; Bilger, Andrea; Drinkwater, Norman R

    2015-10-01

    Murine hepatocarcinogenesis requires growth hormone (GH). To determine if the GH-responsive transcription factor STAT5b (signal transducer and activator of transcription 5b) is also required, we compared the hepatic gene expression profiles of global Stat5b null mice to cancer-resistant mice mutant in the GH pathway-GH-deficient little and androgen receptor-null Tfm males. We found a high degree of overlap among Tfm, little, and Stat5b null males. The liver cancer susceptibility of global Stat5b null mice was assessed on three distinct genetic backgrounds: BALB/cJ (BALB), C57BL/6J (B6), and C3H/HeJ (C3H). The effect of Stat5b on hepatocarcinogenesis depended on the genetic background. B6 Stat5b null congenic males and females developed 2.4 times as many tumors as wild-type (WT) controls (P?genetic backgrounds. PMID:24838184

  7. Normal Variation in Pubertal Timing: Genetic Determinants in Relation to Growth and Adiposity.

    PubMed

    Willemsen, Ruben H; Dunger, David B

    2016-01-01

    In humans, there is a considerable variation in age of onset of puberty. Twin studies have indicated that pubertal timing is a highly heritable trait. Recently, a few rare genetic causes of precocious puberty have been reported as well as genetic mutations associated with isolated hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. Genome-wide association (GWA) studies have helped to explore the genetic determinants of the normal variation in pubertal timing, but have been able to explain only 2.7% of the variance in age at menarche, highlighting the involvement of multiple genes with small effect sizes. These studies indicate an overlap of genes involved in pubertal timing and adiposity, and epidemiological data suggest the existence of a pathway of early infancy weight gain, increased height gain in childhood, earlier pubertal timing and increased adiposity in adulthood. This chapter summarises the data from GWA and epidemiological studies on the normal variation in pubertal timing in relation to growth and adiposity. We discuss putative mechanisms linking early life events to pubertal timing, potential short-term and life-course consequences of earlier pubertal timing, and the impact of these data on clinical management of pubertal disorders. PMID:26680570

  8. Genetic background determines if Stat5b suppresses or enhances murine hepatocarcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Oberley, Christopher; Bilger, Andrea; Drinkwater, Norman R.

    2014-01-01

    Murine hepatocarcinogenesis requires growth hormone (GH). To determine if the GH-responsive transcription factor STAT5b (signal transducer and activator of transcription 5b) is also required, we compared the hepatic gene expression profiles of global Stat5b null mice to cancer-resistant mice mutant in the GH pathway -- GH-deficient little and androgen receptor-null Tfm males. We found a high degree of overlap among Tfm, little, and Stat5b null males. The liver cancer susceptibility of global Stat5b null mice was assessed on three distinct genetic backgrounds: BALB/cJ (BALB), C57BL/6J (B6), and C3H/HeJ (C3H). The effect of Stat5b on hepatocarcinogenesis depended on the genetic background. B6 Stat5b null congenic males and females developed 2.4 times as many tumors as wild-type (WT) controls (P < 0.002) and the tumors were larger (P < 0.003). In BALB/c congenics, loss of STAT5b had no effect on either sex. C3H Stat5b null congenic males and females were resistant to liver cancer, developing 2.7- and 6-fold fewer tumors, respectively (P < 0.02, 0.003). These results provide the first example of a single gene behaving as both oncogene and tumor suppressor in a given tissue, depending only on the endogenous modifier alleles carried by different genetic backgrounds. PMID:24838184

  9. 76 FR 8707 - Syngenta Seeds, Inc.; Determination of Nonregulated Status for Corn Genetically Engineered To...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-15

    ...Corn Genetically Engineered To Produce an Enzyme That Facilitates Ethanol Production AGENCY...genetically engineered to produce a microbial enzyme that facilitates ethanol production...genetically engineered to produce a microbial enzyme that facilitates ethanol...

  10. In the name of the migrant father--analysis of surname origins identifies genetic admixture events undetectable from genealogical records.

    PubMed

    Larmuseau, M H D; Vanoverbeke, J; Gielis, G; Vanderheyden, N; Larmuseau, H F M; Decorte, R

    2012-08-01

    Patrilineal heritable surnames are widely used to select autochthonous participants for studies on small-scale population genetic patterns owing to the unique link between the surname and a genetic marker, the Y-chromosome (Y-chr). Today, the question arises as to whether the surname origin will be informative on top of in-depth genealogical pedigrees. Admixture events that happened in the period after giving heritable surnames but before the start of genealogical records may be informative about the additional value of the surname origin. In this context, an interesting historical event is the demic migration from French-speaking regions in Northern France to the depopulated and Dutch-speaking region Flanders at the end of the sixteenth century. Y-chr subhaplogroups of individuals with a French/Roman surname that could be associated with this migration event were compared with those of a group with autochthonous Flemish surnames. Although these groups could not be differentiated based on in-depth genealogical data, they were significantly genetically different from each other. Moreover, the observed genetic divergence was related to the differences in the distributions of main Y-subhaplogroups between contemporary populations from Northern France and Flanders. Therefore, these results indicate that the surname origin can be an important feature on top of in-depth genealogical results to select autochthonous participants for a regional population genetic study based on Y-chromosomes. PMID:22511074

  11. Coming to grips with complex disorders: genetic risk prediction in bipolar disorder using panels of genes identified through convergent functional genomics.

    PubMed

    Patel, S D; Le-Niculescu, H; Koller, D L; Green, S D; Lahiri, D K; McMahon, F J; Nurnberger, J I; Niculescu, A B

    2010-06-01

    We previously proposed and provided proof of principle for the use of a complementary approach, convergent functional genomics (CFG), combining gene expression and genetic data, from human and animal model studies, as a way of mining the existing GWAS datasets for signals that are there already, but did not reach significance using a genetics-only approach [Le-Niculescu et al., 2009b]. CFG provides a fit-to-disease prioritization of genes that leads to generalizability in independent cohorts, and counterbalances the fit-to-cohort prioritization inherent in classic genetic-only approaches, which have been plagued by poor reproducibility across cohorts. We have now extended our previous work to include more datasets of GWAS, and more recent evidence from other lines of work. In essence our analysis is the most comprehensive integration of genetics and functional genomics to date in the field of bipolar disorder. Biological pathway analyses identified top canonical pathways, and epistatic interaction testing inside these pathways has identified genes that merit future follow-up as direct interactors (intra-pathway epistasis, INPEP). Moreover, we have put together a panel of best P-value single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), based on the top candidate genes we identified. We have developed a genetic risk prediction score (GRPS) based on our panel, and demonstrate how in two independent test cohorts the GRPS differentiates between subjects with bipolar disorder and normal controls, in both European-American and African-American populations. Lastly, we describe a prototype of how such testing could be used to categorize disease risk in individuals and aid personalized medicine approaches, in psychiatry and beyond. PMID:20468069

  12. New insights into the pathogenesis of pseudoxanthoma elasticum and related soft tissue calcification disorders by identifying genetic interactions and modifiers

    PubMed Central

    Hendig, Doris; Knabbe, Cornelius; Götting, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Screening of the adenosine triphosphate binding cassette transporter protein subfamily C member 6 gene (ABCC6) in pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE) revealed a mutation detection rate of approximately 87%. Although 25% of the unidentified disease alleles underlie deletions/insertions, there remain several PXE patients with no clear genotype. The recent identification of PXE-related diseases and the high intra-familiar and inter-individual clinical variability of PXE led to the assumption that secondary genetic co-factors exist. Here, we summarize current knowledge of the genetics underlying PXE and PXE-related disorders based on human and animal studies. Furthermore, we discuss the role of genetic interactions and modifier genes in PXE and PXE-related diseases characterized by soft tissue calcification. PMID:23802012

  13. Genetic interaction of P2X7 receptor and VEGFR-2 polymorphisms identifies a favorable prognostic profile in prostate cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Solini, Anna; Simeon, Vittorio; Derosa, Lisa; Orlandi, Paola; Rossi, Chiara; Fontana, Andrea; Galli, Luca; Di Desidero, Teresa; Fioravanti, Anna; Lucchesi, Sara; Coltelli, Luigi; Ginocchi, Laura; Allegrini, Giacomo; Danesi, Romano; Falcone, Alfredo; Bocci, Guido

    2015-10-01

    VEGFR-2 and P2X7 receptor (P2X7R) have been described to stimulate the angiogenesis and inflammatory processes of prostate cancer. The present study has been performed to investigate the genetic interactions among VEGFR-2 and P2X7R SNPs and their correlation with overall survival (OS) in a population of metastatic prostate cancer patients. Analyses were performed on germline DNA obtained from blood samples and SNPs were investigated by real-time PCR technique. The survival dimensionality reduction (SDR) methodology was applied to investigate the genetic interaction between SNPs. One hundred patients were enrolled. The SDR software provided two genetic interaction profiles consisting of the combination between specific VEGFR-2 (rs2071559, rs11133360) and P2X7R (rs3751143, rs208294) genotypes. The median OS was 126 months (95% CI, 115.94-152.96) and 65.65 months (95% CI, 52.95-76.53) for the favorable and the unfavorable genetic profile, respectively (p < 0.0001). The genetic statistical interaction between VEGFR-2 (rs2071559, rs11133360) and P2X7R (rs3751143, rs208294) genotypes may identify a population of prostate cancer patients with a better prognosis. PMID:26337470

  14. Genome-wide association study identifies HLA 8.1 ancestral haplotype alleles as major genetic risk factors for myositis phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Miller, F W; Chen, W; O'Hanlon, T P; Cooper, R G; Vencovsky, J; Rider, L G; Danko, K; Wedderburn, L R; Lundberg, I E; Pachman, L M; Reed, A M; Ytterberg, S R; Padyukov, L; Selva-O'Callaghan, A; Radstake, T R; Isenberg, D A; Chinoy, H; Ollier, W E R; Scheet, P; Peng, B; Lee, A; Byun, J; Lamb, J A; Gregersen, P K; Amos, C I

    2015-10-01

    Autoimmune muscle diseases (myositis) comprise a group of complex phenotypes influenced by genetic and environmental factors. To identify genetic risk factors in patients of European ancestry, we conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) of the major myositis phenotypes in a total of 1710 cases, which included 705 adult dermatomyositis, 473 juvenile dermatomyositis, 532 polymyositis and 202 adult dermatomyositis, juvenile dermatomyositis or polymyositis patients with anti-histidyl-tRNA synthetase (anti-Jo-1) autoantibodies, and compared them with 4724 controls. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms showing strong associations (P<5 × 10(-8)) in GWAS were identified in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region for all myositis phenotypes together, as well as for the four clinical and autoantibody phenotypes studied separately. Imputation and regression analyses found that alleles comprising the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) 8.1 ancestral haplotype (AH8.1) defined essentially all the genetic risk in the phenotypes studied. Although the HLA DRB1*03:01 allele showed slightly stronger associations with adult and juvenile dermatomyositis, and HLA B*08:01 with polymyositis and anti-Jo-1 autoantibody-positive myositis, multiple alleles of AH8.1 were required for the full risk effects. Our findings establish that alleles of the AH8.1 comprise the primary genetic risk factors associated with the major myositis phenotypes in geographically diverse Caucasian populations. PMID:26291516

  15. Evolving Attractive Faces Using Morphing Technology and a Genetic Algorithm: A New Approach to Determining Ideal Facial Aesthetics

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Brian J. F.; Karmi, Koohyar; Devcic, Zlatko; McLaren, Christine E.; Chen, Wen-Pin

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The objectives of this study were to: 1) determine if a genetic algorithm in combination with morphing software can be used to evolve more attractive faces; and 2) evaluate whether this approach can be used as a tool to define or identify the attributes of the ideal attractive face. Study Design Basic research study incorporating focus group evaluations. Methods Digital images were acquired of 250 female volunteers (18–25 y). Randomly selected images were used to produce a parent generation (P) of 30 synthetic faces using morphing software. Then, a focus group of 17 trained volunteers (18–25 y) scored each face on an attractiveness scale ranging from 1 (unattractive) to 10 (attractive). A genetic algorithm was used to select 30 new pairs from the parent generation, and these were morphed using software to produce a new first generation (F1) of faces. The F1 faces were scored by the focus group, and the process was repeated for a total of four iterations of the algorithm. The algorithm mimics natural selection by using the attractiveness score as the selection pressure; the more attractive faces are more likely to morph. All five generations (P-F4) were then scored by three focus groups: a) surgeons (n = 12), b) cosmetology students (n = 44), and c) undergraduate students (n = 44). Morphometric measurements were made of 33 specific features on each of the 150 synthetic faces, and correlated with attractiveness scores using univariate and multivariate analysis. Results The average facial attractiveness scores increased with each generation and were 3.66 (+0.60), 4.59 (±0.73), 5.50 (±0.62), 6.23 (±0.31), and 6.39 (±0.24) for P and F1–F4 generations, respectively. Histograms of attractiveness score distributions show a significant shift in the skew of each curve toward more attractive faces with each generation. Univariate analysis identified nasal width, eyebrow arch height, and lip thickness as being significantly correlated with attractiveness scores. Multivariate analysis identified a similar collection of morphometric measures. No correlation with more commonly accepted measures such as the length facial thirds or fifths were identified. When images are examined as a montage (by generation), clear distinct trends are identified: oval shaped faces, distinct arched eyebrows, and full lips predominate. Faces evolve to approximate the guidelines suggested by classical canon. F3 and F4 generation faces look profoundly similar. The statistical and qualitative analysis indicates that the algorithm and methodology succeeds in generating successively more attractive faces. Conclusions The use of genetic algorithms in combination with a morphing software and traditional focus-group derived attractiveness scores can be used to evolve attractive synthetic faces. We have demonstrated that the evolution of attractive faces can be mimicked in software. Genetic algorithms and morphing provide a robust alternative to traditional approaches rooted in comparing attractiveness scores with a series of morphometric measurements in human subjects. PMID:18401273

  16. Genetics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The genus Capsicum represents one of several well characterized Solanaceous genera. A wealth of classical and molecular genetics research is available for the genus. Information gleaned from its cultivated relatives, tomato and potato, provide further insight for basic and applied studies. Early ...

  17. Genetics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maintaining genetic variation in wild populations of Arctic organisms is fundamental to the long-term persistence of high latitude biodiversity. Variability is important because it provides options for species to respond to changing environmental conditions and novel challenges such as emerging path...

  18. First Attempt of Orbit Determination of SLR Satellites and Space Debris Using Genetic Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deleflie, F.; Coulot, D.; Descosta, R.; Fernier, A.; Richard, P.

    2013-08-01

    We present an orbit determination method based on genetic algorithms. Contrary to usual estimation methods mainly based on least-squares methods, these algorithms do not require any a priori knowledge of the initial state vector to be estimated. These algorithms can be applied when a new satellite is launched or for uncatalogued objects that appear in images obtained from robotic telescopes such as the TAROT ones. We show in this paper preliminary results obtained from an SLR satellite, for which tracking data acquired by the ILRS network enable to build accurate orbital arcs at a few centimeter level, which can be used as a reference orbit ; in this case, the basic observations are made up of time series of ranges, obtained from various tracking stations. We show as well the results obtained from the observations acquired by the two TAROT telescopes on the Telecom-2D satellite operated by CNES ; in that case, the observations are made up of time series of azimuths and elevations, seen from the two TAROT telescopes. The method is carried out in several steps: (i) an analytical propagation of the equations of motion, (ii) an estimation kernel based on genetic algorithms, which follows the usual steps of such approaches: initialization and evolution of a selected population, so as to determine the best parameters. Each parameter to be estimated, namely each initial keplerian element, has to be searched among an interval that is preliminary chosen. The algorithm is supposed to converge towards an optimum over a reasonable computational time.

  19. Biased Random-Key Genetic Algorithms for the Winner Determination Problem in Combinatorial Auctions.

    PubMed

    de Andrade, Carlos Eduardo; Toso, Rodrigo Franco; Resende, Mauricio G C; Miyazawa, Flávio Keidi

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we address the problem of picking a subset of bids in a general combinatorial auction so as to maximize the overall profit using the first-price model. This winner determination problem assumes that a single bidding round is held to determine both the winners and prices to be paid. We introduce six variants of biased random-key genetic algorithms for this problem. Three of them use a novel initialization technique that makes use of solutions of intermediate linear programming relaxations of an exact mixed integer linear programming model as initial chromosomes of the population. An experimental evaluation compares the effectiveness of the proposed algorithms with the standard mixed linear integer programming formulation, a specialized exact algorithm, and the best-performing heuristics proposed for this problem. The proposed algorithms are competitive and offer strong results, mainly for large-scale auctions. PMID:25299242

  20. Methodology of determining the uncertainty in the accessible geothermal resource base of identified hydrothermal convection systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nathenson, Manuel

    1978-01-01

    In order to quantify the uncertainty of estimates of the geothermal resource base in identified hydrothermal convection systems, a methodology is presented for combining estimates with uncertainties for temperature, area, and thickness of a geothermal reservoir into an estimate of the stored energy with uncertainty. Probability density functions for temperature, area, and thickness are assumed to be triangular in form. In order to calculate the probability distribution function for the stored energy in a single system or in many systems, a computer program for aggregating the input distribution functions using the Monte-Carlo method has been developed. To calculate the probability distribution of stored energy in a single system, an analytical expression is also obtained that is useful for calibrating the Monte Carlo approximation. For the probability distributions of stored energy in a single and in many systems, the central limit approximation is shown to give results ranging from good to poor.

  1. Identifying and selecting for genetic diversity in Papua New Guinea sweetpotato Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam. germplasm collected as botanical seed

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic analysis was conducted on 141 "Ipomoea batatas" L. (Lam.) Genotypes derived from botanical seed originally collected from 26 sites in 4 provinces in Papua New Guinea. Relatedness among accessions was estimated by analysis of the AFLP data using the Dice coefficient of similarity and UPGMA. ...

  2. Single-Cell Analysis of RNA Virus Infection Identifies Multiple Genetically Diverse Viral Genomes within Single Infectious Units

    PubMed Central

    Combe, Marine; Garijo, Raquel; Geller, Ron; Cuevas, José M.; Sanjuán, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Summary Genetic diversity enables a virus to colonize novel hosts, evade immunity, and evolve drug resistance. However, viral diversity is typically assessed at the population level. Given the existence of cell-to-cell variation, it is critical to understand viral genetic structure at the single-cell level. By combining single-cell isolation with ultra-deep sequencing, we characterized the genetic structure and diversity of a RNA virus shortly after single-cell bottlenecks. Full-length sequences from 881 viral plaques derived from 90 individual cells reveal that sequence variants pre-existing in different viral genomes can be co-transmitted within the same infectious unit to individual cells. Further, the rate of spontaneous virus mutation varies across individual cells, and early production of diversity depends on the viral yield of the very first infected cell. These results unravel genetic and structural features of a virus at the single-cell level, with implications for viral diversity and evolution. PMID:26468746

  3. Copyright 1999 by the Genetics Society of America Suppressors of the Arabidopsis lsd5 Cell Death Mutation Identify Genes

    E-print Network

    Dangl, Jeff

    Copyright © 1999 by the Genetics Society of America Suppressors of the Arabidopsis lsd5 Cell Death hypersensitive reaction (HR). Arabidopsis lsd mutants that spontaneously exhibit cell death reminiscent of the HR disease resistance, one of these mutants, lsd5, was used to isolate new mutations that suppress its cell

  4. A molecular genetic linkage map identifying the St and H sub-genomes of Elymus wheatgrass (Poaceae: Triticeae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Elymus L. is the largest and most complex genus in the Triticeae with approximately 150 polyploid perennial grass species occurring worldwide. We report here the first genetic linkage map for Elymus. Backcross mapping populations were created by crossing caespitose Elymus wawawaiensis (EW) (Snake ...

  5. Vibrational Stark effects to identify ion pairing and determine reduction potentials in electrolyte-free environments.

    PubMed

    Mani, Tomoyasu; Grills, David C; Miller, John R

    2015-01-28

    A recently developed instrument for time-resolved infrared detection following pulse radiolysis has been used to measure the ?(C?N) IR band of the radical anion of a CN-substituted fluorene in tetrahydrofuran. Specific vibrational frequencies can exhibit distinct frequency shifts due to ion pairing, which can be explained in the framework of the vibrational Stark effect. Measurements of the ratio of free ions and ion pairs in different electrolyte concentrations allowed us to obtain an association constant and free energy change for ion pairing. This new method has the potential to probe the geometry of ion pairing and allows the reduction potentials of molecules to be determined in the absence of electrolyte in an environment of low dielectric constant. PMID:25554821

  6. Vibrational stark effects to identify ion pairing and determine reduction potentials in electrolyte-free environments

    SciTech Connect

    Mani, Tomoyasu; Grills, David C.; Miller, John R.

    2015-01-02

    A recently-developed instrument for time-resolved infrared detection following pulse radiolysis has been used to measure the ?(C?N) IR band of the radical anion of a CN-substituted fluorene in tetrahydrofuran. Specific vibrational frequencies can exhibit distinct frequency shifts due to ion-pairing, which can be explained in the framework of the vibrational Stark effect. Measurements of the ratio of free ions and ion-pairs in different electrolyte concentrations allowed us to obtain an association constant and free energy change for ion-pairing. As a result, this new method has the potential to probe the geometry of ion-pairing and allows the reduction potentials of molecules to be determined in the absence of electrolyte in an environment of low dielectric constant.

  7. Vibrational stark effects to identify ion pairing and determine reduction potentials in electrolyte-free environments

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mani, Tomoyasu; Grills, David C.; Miller, John R.

    2015-01-02

    A recently-developed instrument for time-resolved infrared detection following pulse radiolysis has been used to measure the ?(C?N) IR band of the radical anion of a CN-substituted fluorene in tetrahydrofuran. Specific vibrational frequencies can exhibit distinct frequency shifts due to ion-pairing, which can be explained in the framework of the vibrational Stark effect. Measurements of the ratio of free ions and ion-pairs in different electrolyte concentrations allowed us to obtain an association constant and free energy change for ion-pairing. As a result, this new method has the potential to probe the geometry of ion-pairing and allows the reduction potentials of moleculesmore »to be determined in the absence of electrolyte in an environment of low dielectric constant.« less

  8. A pilot study to determine genetic polymorphism in Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates in Central India.

    PubMed

    Desikan, P; Chauhan, D S; Sharma, P; Panwalkar, N; Gautam, S; Katoch, V M

    2012-01-01

    This study was carried out to identify predominant spoligotypes responsible for transmission and prevalence of tuberculosis in central India since there is no data available about the genetic biodiversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates from patients with tuberculosis in this region. 35 strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis were subjected to spoligotyping according to the standard protocol. A total of 25 strains out of the 35 (71.42%) could be grouped in to 6 clusters. The largest cluster comprised 8 isolates. Unique (Non-clustered) spoligotypes were seen in 10 isolates, Nine strains did not match the data base (Spol DB-4 data base). The results indicate that there may be a number of orphan strains unique to this geographical area. Further studies on a larger sample size derived from this area would help us delineate the epidemiology of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in this area. PMID:23183476

  9. A Participatory Method to Identify Root Determinants of Health: The Heart of the Matter

    PubMed Central

    Barnidge, Ellen; Baker, Elizabeth A.; Motton, Freda; Rose, Frank; Fitzgerald, Teresa

    2010-01-01

    Background Co-learning is one of the core principles of community-based participatory research (CBPR). Often, it is difficult to engage community members beyond those involved in the formal partnership in co-learning processes. However, to understand and address locally relevant root factors of health, it is essential to engage the broader community in participatory dialogues around these factors. Objective This article provides a glimpse into how using a photo-elicitation process allowed a community–academic partnership to engage community members in a participatory dialogue about root factors influencing health. The article details the decision to use photo-elicitation and describes the photo-elicitation method. Method Similar to a focus group process, photo-elicitation uses photographs and questions to prompt reflection and dialogue. Used in conjunction with an economic development framework, this method allows participants to discuss underlying, or root, community processes and structures that influence health. Conclusion Photo-elicitation is one way to engage community members in a participatory dialogue that stimulates action around root factors of health. To use this method successfully within a CBPR approach, it is important to build on existing relationships of trust among community and academic partners and create opportunities for community partners to determine the issues for discussion. PMID:20364079

  10. Integration of Sequence Data from a Consanguineous Family with Genetic Data from an Outbred Population Identifies PLB1 as a Candidate Rheumatoid Arthritis Risk Gene

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Yukinori; Diogo, Dorothee; Greenberg, Jeffrey D.; Mouassess, Faten; Achkar, Walid A. L.; Fulton, Robert S.; Denny, Joshua C.; Gupta, Namrata; Mirel, Daniel; Gabriel, Stacy; Li, Gang; Kremer, Joel M.; Pappas, Dimitrios A.; Carroll, Robert J.; Eyler, Anne E.; Trynka, Gosia; Stahl, Eli A.; Cui, Jing; Saxena, Richa; Coenen, Marieke J. H.; Guchelaar, Henk-Jan; Huizinga, Tom W. J.; Dieudé, Philippe; Mariette, Xavier; Barton, Anne; Canhão, Helena; Fonseca, João E.; de Vries, Niek; Tak, Paul P.; Moreland, Larry W.; Bridges, S. Louis; Miceli-Richard, Corinne; Choi, Hyon K.; Kamatani, Yoichiro; Galan, Pilar; Lathrop, Mark; Raj, Towfique; De Jager, Philip L.; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Worthington, Jane; Padyukov, Leonid; Klareskog, Lars; Siminovitch, Katherine A.; Gregersen, Peter K.; Mardis, Elaine R.; Arayssi, Thurayya; Kazkaz, Layla A.; Plenge, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    Integrating genetic data from families with highly penetrant forms of disease together with genetic data from outbred populations represents a promising strategy to uncover the complete frequency spectrum of risk alleles for complex traits such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Here, we demonstrate that rare, low-frequency and common alleles at one gene locus, phospholipase B1 (PLB1), might contribute to risk of RA in a 4-generation consanguineous pedigree (Middle Eastern ancestry) and also in unrelated individuals from the general population (European ancestry). Through identity-by-descent (IBD) mapping and whole-exome sequencing, we identified a non-synonymous c.2263G>C (p.G755R) mutation at the PLB1 gene on 2q23, which significantly co-segregated with RA in family members with a dominant mode of inheritance (P?=?0.009). We further evaluated PLB1 variants and risk of RA using a GWAS meta-analysis of 8,875 RA cases and 29,367 controls of European ancestry. We identified significant contributions of two independent non-coding variants near PLB1 with risk of RA (rs116018341 [MAF?=?0.042] and rs116541814 [MAF?=?0.021], combined P?=?3.2×10?6). Finally, we performed deep exon sequencing of PLB1 in 1,088 RA cases and 1,088 controls (European ancestry), and identified suggestive dispersion of rare protein-coding variant frequencies between cases and controls (P?=?0.049 for C-alpha test and P?=?0.055 for SKAT). Together, these data suggest that PLB1 is a candidate risk gene for RA. Future studies to characterize the full spectrum of genetic risk in the PLB1 genetic locus are warranted. PMID:24520335

  11. Genetic determinants of telomere length and risk of common cancers: a Mendelian randomization study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chenan; Doherty, Jennifer A; Burgess, Stephen; Hung, Rayjean J; Lindström, Sara; Kraft, Peter; Gong, Jian; Amos, Christopher I; Sellers, Thomas A; Monteiro, Alvaro N A; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Bickeböller, Heike; Risch, Angela; Brennan, Paul; Mckay, James D; Houlston, Richard S; Landi, Maria Teresa; Timofeeva, Maria N; Wang, Yufei; Heinrich, Joachim; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Eeles, Rosalind A; Muir, Ken; Wiklund, Fredrik; Grönberg, Henrik; Berndt, Sonja I; Chanock, Stephen J; Schumacher, Fredrick; Haiman, Christopher A; Henderson, Brian E; Amin Al Olama, Ali; Andrulis, Irene L; Hopper, John L; Chang-Claude, Jenny; John, Esther M; Malone, Kathleen E; Gammon, Marilie D; Ursin, Giske; Whittemore, Alice S; Hunter, David J; Gruber, Stephen B; Knight, Julia A; Hou, Lifang; Le Marchand, Loic; Newcomb, Polly A; Hudson, Thomas J; Chan, Andrew T; Li, Li; Woods, Michael O; Ahsan, Habibul; Pierce, Brandon L

    2015-09-15

    Epidemiological studies have reported inconsistent associations between telomere length (TL) and risk for various cancers. These inconsistencies are likely attributable, in part, to biases that arise due to post-diagnostic and post-treatment TL measurement. To avoid such biases, we used a Mendelian randomization approach and estimated associations between nine TL-associated SNPs and risk for five common cancer types (breast, lung, colorectal, ovarian and prostate cancer, including subtypes) using data on 51 725 cases and 62 035 controls. We then used an inverse-variance weighted average of the SNP-specific associations to estimate the association between a genetic score representing long TL and cancer risk. The long TL genetic score was significantly associated with increased risk of lung adenocarcinoma (P = 6.3 × 10(-15)), even after exclusion of a SNP residing in a known lung cancer susceptibility region (TERT-CLPTM1L) P = 6.6 × 10(-6)). Under Mendelian randomization assumptions, the association estimate [odds ratio (OR) = 2.78] is interpreted as the OR for lung adenocarcinoma corresponding to a 1000 bp increase in TL. The weighted TL SNP score was not associated with other cancer types or subtypes. Our finding that genetic determinants of long TL increase lung adenocarcinoma risk avoids issues with reverse causality and residual confounding that arise in observational studies of TL and disease risk. Under Mendelian randomization assumptions, our finding suggests that longer TL increases lung adenocarcinoma risk. However, caution regarding this causal interpretation is warranted in light of the potential issue of pleiotropy, and a more general interpretation is that SNPs influencing telomere biology are also implicated in lung adenocarcinoma risk. PMID:26138067

  12. Genetic determinants of telomere length and risk of common cancers: a Mendelian randomization study

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chenan; Doherty, Jennifer A.; Burgess, Stephen; Hung, Rayjean J.; Lindström, Sara; Kraft, Peter; Gong, Jian; Amos, Christopher I.; Sellers, Thomas A.; Monteiro, Alvaro N.A.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Bickeböller, Heike; Risch, Angela; Brennan, Paul; Mckay, James D.; Houlston, Richard S.; Landi, Maria Teresa; Timofeeva, Maria N.; Wang, Yufei; Heinrich, Joachim; Kote-Jarai, Zsofia; Eeles, Rosalind A.; Muir, Ken; Wiklund, Fredrik; Grönberg, Henrik; Berndt, Sonja I.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian E.; Amin Al Olama, Ali; Andrulis, Irene L.; Hopper, John L.; Chang-Claude, Jenny; John, Esther M.; Malone, Kathleen E.; Gammon, Marilie D.; Ursin, Giske; Whittemore, Alice S.; Hunter, David J.; Gruber, Stephen B.; Knight, Julia A.; Hou, Lifang; Le Marchand, Loic; Newcomb, Polly A.; Hudson, Thomas J.; Chan, Andrew T.; Li, Li; Woods, Michael O.; Ahsan, Habibul; Pierce, Brandon L.

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have reported inconsistent associations between telomere length (TL) and risk for various cancers. These inconsistencies are likely attributable, in part, to biases that arise due to post-diagnostic and post-treatment TL measurement. To avoid such biases, we used a Mendelian randomization approach and estimated associations between nine TL-associated SNPs and risk for five common cancer types (breast, lung, colorectal, ovarian and prostate cancer, including subtypes) using data on 51 725 cases and 62 035 controls. We then used an inverse-variance weighted average of the SNP-specific associations to estimate the association between a genetic score representing long TL and cancer risk. The long TL genetic score was significantly associated with increased risk of lung adenocarcinoma (P = 6.3 × 10?15), even after exclusion of a SNP residing in a known lung cancer susceptibility region (TERT-CLPTM1L) P = 6.6 × 10?6). Under Mendelian randomization assumptions, the association estimate [odds ratio (OR) = 2.78] is interpreted as the OR for lung adenocarcinoma corresponding to a 1000 bp increase in TL. The weighted TL SNP score was not associated with other cancer types or subtypes. Our finding that genetic determinants of long TL increase lung adenocarcinoma risk avoids issues with reverse causality and residual confounding that arise in observational studies of TL and disease risk. Under Mendelian randomization assumptions, our finding suggests that longer TL increases lung adenocarcinoma risk. However, caution regarding this causal interpretation is warranted in light of the potential issue of pleiotropy, and a more general interpretation is that SNPs influencing telomere biology are also implicated in lung adenocarcinoma risk. PMID:26138067

  13. Genetic determinants of risk factors for cardiovascular disease in a population from rural Brazil.

    PubMed

    Velásquez-Meléndez, Gustavo; Parra, Flavia C; Gazzinelli, Andrea; Williams-Blangero, Sarah; Correa-Oliveira, Rodrigo

    2007-04-01

    We investigate the heritability of and pleiotropic relationships among triglycerides and cholesterol lipoproteins that have long been considered traditional risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Quantitative lipid and lipoprotein phenotypes were determined for a cross-sectional sample of a community in Jequitinhonha valley in northern Minas Gerais state, Brazil. The sample consisted primarily of subsistence farmers. Two hundred sixty-nine individuals (128 males and 141 females), ages 18-88 years, were sampled. Eighty-eight percent (n = 252) of the individuals belonged to a single pedigree, which was highly informative for genetic analysis. Data on anthropometrics, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), total cholesterol, and triglycerides were available for each study participant. Extended pedigrees were constructed using the pedigree-based data management software PedSys. Univariate and bivariate variance-components analyses, adjusted by sex and age, were performed using the SOLAR software package. Heritability estimates of lipids and lipoproteins ranged from 29% to 45% (p < 0.008). The highest heritability estimated was for HDL-C (h2 = 44.8%, p < 0.0001), and this was the only trait that exhibited a significant household effect (c2 = 25%). Strong positive genetic correlations were found between triglycerides and very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) (rhog = 0.998) and between total cholesterol and LDL-C (rhog = 0.948). Significant genetic correlations were also found between triglycerides and LDL-C, between total cholesterol and VLDL, and between total cholesterol and LDL-C and VLDL, and finally between LDL and VLDL. There was a significant negative environmental correlation between triglycerides and HDL-C (rhoe = -0.406). PMID:18027813

  14. Plant genetics and interspecific competitive interactions determine ectomycorrhizal fungal community responses to climate change.

    PubMed

    Gehring, Catherine; Flores-Rentería, Dulce; Sthultz, Christopher M; Leonard, Tierra M; Flores-Rentería, Lluvia; Whipple, Amy V; Whitham, Thomas G

    2014-03-01

    Although the importance of plant-associated microbes is increasingly recognized, little is known about the biotic and abiotic factors that determine the composition of that microbiome. We examined the influence of plant genetic variation, and two stressors, one biotic and one abiotic, on the ectomycorrhizal (EM) fungal community of a dominant tree species, Pinus edulis. During three periods across 16 years that varied in drought severity, we sampled the EM fungal communities of a wild stand of P. edulis in which genetically based resistance and susceptibility to insect herbivory was linked with drought tolerance and the abundance of competing shrubs. We found that the EM fungal communities of insect-susceptible trees remained relatively constant as climate dried, while those of insect-resistant trees shifted significantly, providing evidence of a genotype by environment interaction. Shrub removal altered the EM fungal communities of insect-resistant trees, but not insect-susceptible trees, also a genotype by environment interaction. The change in the EM fungal community of insect-resistant trees following shrub removal was associated with greater shoot growth, evidence of competitive release. However, shrub removal had a 7-fold greater positive effect on the shoot growth of insect-susceptible trees than insect-resistant trees when shrub density was taken into account. Insect-susceptible trees had higher growth than insect-resistant trees, consistent with the hypothesis that the EM fungi associated with susceptible trees were superior mutualists. These complex, genetic-based interactions among species (tree-shrub-herbivore-fungus) argue that the ultimate impacts of climate change are both ecological and evolutionary. PMID:24118611

  15. Finding Markers That Make a Difference: DNA Pooling and SNP-Arrays Identify Population Informative Markers for Genetic Stock Identification

    PubMed Central

    Ozerov, Mikhail; Vasemägi, Anti; Wennevik, Vidar; Diaz-Fernandez, Rogelio; Kent, Matthew; Gilbey, John; Prusov, Sergey; Niemelä, Eero; Vähä, Juha-Pekka

    2013-01-01

    Genetic stock identification (GSI) using molecular markers is an important tool for management of migratory species. Here, we tested a cost-effective alternative to individual genotyping, known as allelotyping, for identification of highly informative SNPs for accurate genetic stock identification. We estimated allele frequencies of 2880 SNPs from DNA pools of 23 Atlantic salmon populations using Illumina SNP-chip. We evaluated the performance of four common strategies (global FST, pairwise FST, Delta and outlier approach) for selection of the most informative set of SNPs and tested their effectiveness for GSI compared to random sets of SNP and microsatellite markers. For the majority of cases, SNPs selected using the outlier approach performed best followed by pairwise FST and Delta methods. Overall, the selection procedure reduced the number of SNPs required for accurate GSI by up to 53% compared with randomly chosen SNPs. However, GSI accuracy was more affected by populations in the ascertainment group rather than the ranking method itself. We demonstrated for the first time the compatibility of different large-scale SNP datasets by compiling the largest population genetic dataset for Atlantic salmon to date. Finally, we showed an excellent performance of our top SNPs on an independent set of populations covering the main European distribution range of Atlantic salmon. Taken together, we demonstrate how combination of DNA pooling and SNP arrays can be applied for conservation and management of salmonids as well as other species. PMID:24358184

  16. A chemical genetic strategy identify the PHOSTIN, a synthetic molecule that triggers phosphate starvation responses in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Bonnot, Clémence; Pinson, Benoît; Clément, Mathilde; Bernillon, Stéphane; Chiarenza, Serge; Kanno, Satomi; Kobayashi, Natsuko; Delannoy, Etienne; Nakanishi, Tomoko M; Nussaume, Laurent; Desnos, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    Plants display numerous strategies to cope with phosphate (Pi)-deficiency. Despite multiple genetic studies, the molecular mechanisms of low-Pi-signalling remain unknown. To validate the interest of chemical genetics to investigate this pathway we discovered and analysed the effects of PHOSTIN (PSN), a drug mimicking Pi-starvation in Arabidopsis. We assessed the effects of PSN and structural analogues on the induction of Pi-deficiency responses in mutants and wild-type and followed their accumulation in plants organs by high pressure liquid chromotography (HPLC) or mass-spectrophotometry. We show that PSN is cleaved in the growth medium, releasing its active motif (PSN11), which accumulates in plants roots. Despite the overaccumulation of Pi in the roots of treated plants, PSN11 elicits both local and systemic Pi-starvation effects. Nevertheless, albeit that the transcriptional activation of low-Pi genes by PSN11 is lost in the phr1;phl1 double mutant, neither PHO1 nor PHO2 are required for PSN11 effects. The range of local and systemic responses to Pi-starvation elicited, and their dependence on the PHR1/PHL1 function suggests that PSN11 affects an important and early step of Pi-starvation signalling. Its independence from PHO1 and PHO2 suggest the existence of unknown pathway(s), showing the usefulness of PSN and chemical genetics to bring new elements to this field. PMID:26243630

  17. A multiplexed immunofluorescence method identifies Phakopsora pachyrhizi Urediniospores and determines their viability.

    PubMed

    Vittal, R; Haudenshield, J S; Hartman, G L

    2012-12-01

    Soybean rust, caused by Phakopsora pachyrhizi, occurs concomitantly wherever soybean is grown in the tropical and subtropical regions of the world. After reports of its first occurrence in Brazil in 2001 and the continental United States in 2004, research on the disease and its pathogen has greatly increased. One area of research has focused on capturing urediniospores, primarily by rain collection or wind traps, and detecting them either by microscopic observations or by immunological or molecular techniques. This system of detection has been touted for use as a potential warning system to recommend early applications of fungicides. One shortcoming of the method has been an inability to determine whether the spores are viable. Our study developed a method to detect viable P. pachyrhizi urediniospores using an immunofluorescence assay combined with propidium iodide (PI) staining. Antibodies reacted to P. pachyrhizi and other Phakopsora spp. but did not react with other common soybean pathogens or most other rust fungi tested, based on an indirect immunofluorescence assay using fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled secondary antibodies. Two vital staining techniques were used to assess viability of P. pachyrhizi urediniospores: one combined carboxy fluorescein diacetate (CFDA) and PI, and the other utilized (2-chloro-4-[2,3-dihydro-3-methyl-(benzo-1,3-thiazol-2-yl)-methylidene]-1-phenylquinolinium iodide] (FUN 1). Using the CFDA-PI method, viable spores stained green with CFDA and nonviable spores counterstained red with PI. Using the FUN 1 method, cylindrical intravacuolar structures were induced to form within metabolically active urediniospores, causing them to fluoresce bright red to reddish-orange, whereas dead spores, with no metabolic activity, had an extremely diffused, faint fluorescence. An immunofluorescence technique in combination with PI counterstaining was developed to specifically detect viable P. pachyrhizi urediniospores. The method is rapid and reliable, with a potential for application in forecasting soybean rust based on the detection of viable urediniospores. PMID:22894915

  18. Genetic determination of telomere size in humans: A twin study of three age groups

    SciTech Connect

    Slagboom, P.E.; Droog, S.; Boomsma, D.I.

    1994-11-01

    Reduction of telomere length has been postulated to be a casual factor in cellular aging. Human telomeres terminate in tandemly arranged repeat arrays consisting of the (TTAGGG) motif. The length of these arrays in cells from human mitotic tissues is inversely related to the age of the donor, indicating telomere reduction with age. In addition to telemore length differences between different age cohorts, considerable variation is present among individuals of the same age. To investigate whether this variation can be ascribed to genetic influences, we have measured the size of terminal restriction fragments (TRFs) in HaeIII-digested genomic DNA from 123 human MZ and DZ twin pairs 2-95 years of age. The average rate of telomere shortening was 31 bp/year, which is similar to that observed by others. Statistical analysis in 115 pairs 2-63 years of age indicates a 78% heritability for mean TRF length in this age cohort. The individual differences in mean TRF length in blood, therefore, seem to a large extent to be genetically determined. 24 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Defining genes using "blueprint" versus "instruction" metaphors: effects for genetic determinism, response efficacy, and perceived control.

    PubMed

    Parrott, Roxanne; Smith, Rachel A

    2014-01-01

    Evidence supports mixed attributions aligned with personal and/or clinical control and gene expression for health in this era of genomic science and health care. We consider variance in these attributions and possible relationships to individual mind sets associated with essentialist beliefs that genes determine health versus threat beliefs that genes increase susceptibility for disease and severity linked to gene-environment interactions. Further, we contribute to theory and empirical research to evaluate the use of metaphors to define genes. Participants (N?=?324) read a message that varied the introduction by providing a definition of genes that used either an "instruction" metaphor or a "blueprint" metaphor. The "instruction" metaphor compared to the "blueprint" metaphor promoted stronger threat perceptions, which aligned with both belief in the response efficacy of genetic research for health and perceived behavioral control linked to genes and health. The "blueprint" metaphor compared to the "instruction" metaphor promoted stronger essentialist beliefs, which aligned with more intense positive regard for the efficacy of genetic research and human health. Implications for health communicators include societal effects aligned with stigma and discrimination that such findings portend. PMID:23448621

  20. Determination of Slope Safety Factor with Analytical Solution and Searching Critical Slip Surface with Genetic-Traversal Random Method

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In the current practice, to determine the safety factor of a slope with two-dimensional circular potential failure surface, one of the searching methods for the critical slip surface is Genetic Algorithm (GA), while the method to calculate the slope safety factor is Fellenius' slices method. However GA needs to be validated with more numeric tests, while Fellenius' slices method is just an approximate method like finite element method. This paper proposed a new method to determine the minimum slope safety factor which is the determination of slope safety factor with analytical solution and searching critical slip surface with Genetic-Traversal Random Method. The analytical solution is more accurate than Fellenius' slices method. The Genetic-Traversal Random Method uses random pick to utilize mutation. A computer automatic search program is developed for the Genetic-Traversal Random Method. After comparison with other methods like slope/w software, results indicate that the Genetic-Traversal Random Search Method can give very low safety factor which is about half of the other methods. However the obtained minimum safety factor with Genetic-Traversal Random Search Method is very close to the lower bound solutions of slope safety factor given by the Ansys software. PMID:24782679

  1. Plant genetics. A Y-chromosome-encoded small RNA acts as a sex determinant in persimmons.

    PubMed

    Akagi, Takashi; Henry, Isabelle M; Tao, Ryutaro; Comai, Luca

    2014-10-31

    In plants, multiple lineages have evolved sex chromosomes independently, providing a powerful comparative framework, but few specific determinants controlling the expression of a specific sex have been identified. We investigated sex determinants in the Caucasian persimmon, Diospyros lotus, a dioecious plant with heterogametic males (XY). Male-specific short nucleotide sequences were used to define a male-determining region. A combination of transcriptomics and evolutionary approaches detected a Y-specific sex-determinant candidate, OGI, that displays male-specific conservation among Diospyros species. OGI encodes a small RNA targeting the autosomal MeGI gene, a homeodomain transcription factor regulating anther fertility in a dosage-dependent fashion. This identification of a feminizing gene suppressed by a Y-chromosome-encoded small RNA contributes to our understanding of the evolution of sex chromosome systems in higher plants. PMID:25359977

  2. Genome-wide association study in RPGRIP1?/? dogs identifies a modifier locus that determines the onset of retinal degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Kumiko; Boursnell, Mike; Mellersh, Cathryn S.; Sargan, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Cone-rod dystrophy (CRD) is a form of inherited retinal degeneration (RD) causing blindness in man as well as in several breeds of dog. Previously, a 44 bp insertion in RPGRIP1 (retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator interacting protein-1) was associated with a recessive early-onset CRD (cone-rod dystrophy 1, cord1) in a Miniature longhaired dachshund (MLHD) research colony. Yet in the MLHD pet population, extensive range of the onset age has been observed among RD cases, with some RPGRIP1?/? dogs lacking obvious clinical signs. Phenotypic variation has been known in human homologous diseases, including retinitis pigmentosa and Leber congenital amaurosis, indicating possible involvement of modifiers. To explore additional genetic loci associated with the phenotypic variation observed in MLHDs, a genome-wide association study was carried out using Canine SNP20 arrays in 83 RPGRIP1?/? MLHDs with variable ages of onset or no clinical abnormality. Using these samples, comparison of 31 early-onset RD cases against 49 controls (15 late-onset RD and 34 normal dogs combined) identified a strong association (P = 5.05 × 10?13) at a single locus on canine chromosome 15. At this locus, the majority of early-onset RD cases but few of the controls were homozygous for a 1.49 Mb interval containing ?11 genes. We conclude that homozygosity at both RPGRIP1 and the newly mapped second locus is necessary to develop early-onset RD, whereas RPGRIP1?/? alone leads to late-onset RD or no apparent clinical phenotype. This study establishes a unique model of canine RD requiring homozygous mutations at two distinct genetic loci for the manifestation of early-onset RD. PMID:22193413

  3. Genome-wide association study in RPGRIP1(-/-) dogs identifies a modifier locus that determines the onset of retinal degeneration.

    PubMed

    Miyadera, Keiko; Kato, Kumiko; Boursnell, Mike; Mellersh, Cathryn S; Sargan, David R

    2012-02-01

    Cone-rod dystrophy (CRD) is a form of inherited retinal degeneration (RD) causing blindness in man as well as in several breeds of dog. Previously, a 44 bp insertion in RPGRIP1 (retinitis pigmentosa GTPase regulator interacting protein-1) was associated with a recessive early-onset CRD (cone-rod dystrophy 1, cord1) in a Miniature longhaired dachshund (MLHD) research colony. Yet in the MLHD pet population, extensive range of the onset age has been observed among RD cases, with some RPGRIP1(-/-) dogs lacking obvious clinical signs. Phenotypic variation has been known in human homologous diseases, including retinitis pigmentosa and Leber congenital amaurosis, indicating possible involvement of modifiers. To explore additional genetic loci associated with the phenotypic variation observed in MLHDs, a genome-wide association study was carried out using Canine SNP20 arrays in 83 RPGRIP1(-/-) MLHDs with variable ages of onset or no clinical abnormality. Using these samples, comparison of 31 early-onset RD cases against 49 controls (15 late-onset RD and 34 normal dogs combined) identified a strong association (P = 5.05 × 10(-13)) at a single locus on canine chromosome 15. At this locus, the majority of early-onset RD cases but few of the controls were homozygous for a 1.49 Mb interval containing ~11 genes. We conclude that homozygosity at both RPGRIP1 and the newly mapped second locus is necessary to develop early-onset RD, whereas RPGRIP1(-/-) alone leads to late-onset RD or no apparent clinical phenotype. This study establishes a unique model of canine RD requiring homozygous mutations at two distinct genetic loci for the manifestation of early-onset RD. PMID:22193413

  4. Protocols to determine pollination requirements and optimal pollinators for plant genetic resource regeneration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Guidelines have been established for the maintenance of plant genetic resource collections, including seed regeneration. When carefully conducted, regeneration is a key tool in germplasm conservation, helping reduce the negative effects of genetic erosion. However, inadequate knowledge of basic p...

  5. Investigation for Genetic Determinants of Flexion Contractures and Contracted Foal Syndrome in Neonatal Thoroughbred Foals 

    E-print Network

    Caldwell, Jana Denise

    2014-09-04

    predisposition was observed in some cases. In addition, veterinarians reported increased incidence of contracted foals in one particular sire line. This, coupled with model genetic disorders in other species, prompted us to conduct the first molecular genetics...

  6. 78 FR 66891 - Monsanto Co.; Determination of Nonregulated Status of Soybean Genetically Engineered for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-07

    ...Organisms and Products Altered or Produced Through Genetic Engineering Which Are Plant Pests or Which There Is Reason to...organisms and products altered or produced through genetic engineering that are plant pests or that there is reason...

  7. 76 FR 78232 - Monsanto Co.; Determination of Nonregulated Status for Soybean Genetically Engineered To Have a...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-16

    ...Organisms and Products Altered or Produced Through Genetic Engineering Which Are Plant Pests or Which There Is Reason to...organisms and products altered or produced through genetic engineering that are plant pests or that there is reason...

  8. 78 FR 13302 - Syngenta Biotechnology, Inc.; Determination of Nonregulated Status of Corn Genetically Engineered...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-27

    ...Organisms and Products Altered or Produced Through Genetic Engineering Which Are Plant Pests or Which There Is Reason to...organisms and products altered or produced through genetic engineering that are plant pests or that there is reason...

  9. 75 FR 29969 - Environmental Impact Statement; Determination of Nonregulated Status of Sugar Beet Genetically...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-28

    ...Organisms and Products Altered or Produced Through Genetic Engineering Which Are Plant Pests or Which There Is Reason to...organisms and products altered or produced through genetic engineering that are plant pests or that there is reason...

  10. 76 FR 63279 - Monsanto Co.; Determination of Nonregulated Status for Soybean Genetically Engineered for Insect...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-12

    ...Organisms and Products Altered or Produced Through Genetic Engineering Which Are Plant Pests or Which There Is Reason to...organisms and products altered or produced through genetic engineering that are plant pests or that there is reason...

  11. 77 FR 41350 - Monsanto Co.; Determination of Nonregulated Status of Soybean Genetically Engineered To Produce...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-13

    ...Organisms and Products Altered or Produced Through Genetic Engineering Which Are Plant Pests or Which There Is Reason to...organisms and products altered or produced through genetic engineering that are plant pests or that there is reason...

  12. 76 FR 80869 - Monsanto Co.; Determination of Nonregulated Status of Corn Genetically Engineered for Drought...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-27

    ...Organisms and Products Altered or Produced Through Genetic Engineering Which Are Plant Pests or Which There Is Reason to...organisms and products altered or produced through genetic engineering that are plant pests or that there is reason...

  13. 75 FR 1585 - Draft Environmental Impact Statement; Determination of Regulated Status of Alfalfa Genetically...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-12

    ...Organisms and Products Altered or Produced Through Genetic Engineering Which Are Plant Pests or Which There Is Reason to...organisms and products altered or produced through genetic engineering that are plant pests or that there is reason...

  14. 78 FR 37201 - Pioneer Hi-Bred International, Inc.; Determination of Nonregulated Status of Maize Genetically...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-20

    ...Organisms and Products Altered or Produced Through Genetic Engineering Which Are Plant Pests or Which There Is Reason to...organisms and products altered or produced through genetic engineering that are plant pests or that there is reason...

  15. 75 FR 32356 - Pioneer Hi-Bred International, Inc.; Determination of Nonregulated Status for Genetically...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-08

    ...Organisms and Products Altered or Produced Through Genetic Engineering Which Are Plant Pests or Which There Is Reason to...organisms and products altered or produced through genetic engineering that are plant pests or that there is reason...

  16. 76 FR 5780 - Determination of Regulated Status of Alfalfa Genetically Engineered for Tolerance to the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-02

    ...Organisms and Products Altered or Produced Through Genetic Engineering Which Are Plant Pests or Which There Is Reason to...organisms and products altered or produced through genetic engineering that are plant pests or that there is reason...

  17. 75 FR 20560 - Syngenta Biotechnology, Inc.; Determination of Nonregulated Status for Corn Genetically...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-20

    ...Organisms and Products Altered or Produced Through Genetic Engineering Which Are Plant Pests or Which There Is Reason to...organisms and products altered or produced through genetic engineering that are plant pests or that there is reason...

  18. 76 FR 37767 - Pioneer Hi-Bred International, Inc.; Determination of Nonregulated Status for Corn Genetically...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-28

    ...Organisms and Products Altered or Produced Through Genetic Engineering Which Are Plant Pests or Which There Is Reason to...organisms and products altered or produced through genetic engineering that are plant pests or that there is reason...

  19. A genome-wide approach accounting for body mass index identifies genetic variants influencing fasting glycemic traits and insulin resistance

    PubMed Central

    Manning, Alisa K.; Hivert, Marie-France; Scott, Robert A.; Grimsby, Jonna L.; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Chen, Han; Rybin, Denis; Liu, Ching-Ti; Bielak, Lawrence F.; Prokopenko, Inga; Amin, Najaf; Barnes, Daniel; Cadby, Gemma; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Ingelsson, Erik; Jackson, Anne U.; Johnson, Toby; Kanoni, Stavroula; Ladenvall, Claes; Lagou, Vasiliki; Lahti, Jari; Lecoeur, Cecile; Liu, Yongmei; Martinez-Larrad, Maria Teresa; Montasser, May E.; Navarro, Pau; Perry, John R. B.; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J.; Salo, Perttu; Sattar, Naveed; Shungin, Dmitry; Strawbridge, Rona J.; Tanaka, Toshiko; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; An, Ping; de Andrade, Mariza; Andrews, Jeanette S.; Aspelund, Thor; Atalay, Mustafa; Aulchenko, Yurii; Balkau, Beverley; Bandinelli, Stefania; Beckmann, Jacques S.; Beilby, John P.; Bellis, Claire; Bergman, Richard N.; Blangero, John; Boban, Mladen; Boehnke, Michael; Boerwinkle, Eric; Bonnycastle, Lori L.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Böttcher, Yvonne; Bouchard, Claude; Brunner, Eric; Budimir, Danijela; Campbell, Harry; Carlson, Olga; Chines, Peter S.; Clarke, Robert; Collins, Francis S.; Corbatón-Anchuelo, Arturo; Couper, David; de Faire, Ulf; Dedoussis, George V; Deloukas, Panos; Dimitriou, Maria; Egan, Josephine M; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Erdos, Michael R.; Eriksson, Johan G.; Eury, Elodie; Ferrucci, Luigi; Ford, Ian; Forouhi, Nita G.; Fox, Caroline S; Franzosi, Maria Grazia; Franks, Paul W; Frayling, Timothy M; Froguel, Philippe; Galan, Pilar; de Geus, Eco; Gigante, Bruna; Glazer, Nicole L.; Goel, Anuj; Groop, Leif; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Hallmans, Göran; Hamsten, Anders; Hansson, Ola; Harris, Tamara B.; Hayward, Caroline; Heath, Simon; Hercberg, Serge; Hicks, Andrew A.; Hingorani, Aroon; Hofman, Albert; Hui, Jennie; Hung, Joseph; Jarvelin, Marjo Riitta; Jhun, Min A.; Johnson, Paul C.D.; Jukema, J Wouter; Jula, Antti; Kao, W.H.; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kardia, Sharon L. R.; Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka; Kivimaki, Mika; Kolcic, Ivana; Kovacs, Peter; Kumari, Meena; Kuusisto, Johanna; Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm; Laakso, Markku; Lakka, Timo; Lannfelt, Lars; Lathrop, G Mark; Launer, Lenore J.; Leander, Karin; Li, Guo; Lind, Lars; Lindstrom, Jaana; Lobbens, Stéphane; Loos, Ruth J. F.; Luan, Jian’an; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Mägi, Reedik; Magnusson, Patrik K. E.; Marmot, Michael; Meneton, Pierre; Mohlke, Karen L.; Mooser, Vincent; Morken, Mario A.; Miljkovic, Iva; Narisu, Narisu; O’Connell, Jeff; Ong, Ken K.; Oostra, Ben A.; Palmer, Lyle J.; Palotie, Aarno; Pankow, James S.; Peden, John F.; Pedersen, Nancy L.; Pehlic, Marina; Peltonen, Leena; Penninx, Brenda; Pericic, Marijana; Perola, Markus; Perusse, Louis; Peyser, Patricia A; Polasek, Ozren; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Province, Michael A.; Räikkönen, Katri; Rauramaa, Rainer; Rehnberg, Emil; Rice, Ken; Rotter, Jerome I.; Rudan, Igor; Ruokonen, Aimo; Saaristo, Timo; Sabater-Lleal, Maria; Salomaa, Veikko; Savage, David B.; Saxena, Richa; Schwarz, Peter; Seedorf, Udo; Sennblad, Bengt; Serrano-Rios, Manuel; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Sijbrands, Eric J.G.; Siscovick, David S.; Smit, Johannes H.; Small, Kerrin S.; Smith, Nicholas L.; Smith, Albert Vernon; Stan?áková, Alena; Stirrups, Kathleen; Stumvoll, Michael; Sun, Yan V.; Swift, Amy J.; Tönjes, Anke; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Trompet, Stella; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Uusitupa, Matti; Vikström, Max; Vitart, Veronique; Vohl, Marie-Claude; Voight, Benjamin F.; Vollenweider, Peter; Waeber, Gerard; Waterworth, Dawn M; Watkins, Hugh; Wheeler, Eleanor; Widen, Elisabeth; Wild, Sarah H.; Willems, Sara M.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Wilson, James F.; Witteman, Jacqueline C.M.; Wright, Alan F.; Yaghootkar, Hanieh; Zelenika, Diana; Zemunik, Tatijana; Zgaga, Lina; Wareham, Nicholas J.; McCarthy, Mark I.; Barroso, Ines; Watanabe, Richard M.; Florez, Jose C.; Dupuis, Josée; Meigs, James B.; Langenberg, Claudia

    2013-01-01

    Recent genome-wide association studies have described many loci implicated in type 2 diabetes (T2D) pathophysiology and beta-cell dysfunction, but contributed little to our understanding of the genetic basis of insulin resistance. We hypothesized that genes implicated in insulin resistance pathways may be uncovered by accounting for differences in body mass index (BMI) and potential interaction between BMI and genetic variants. We applied a novel joint meta-analytical approach to test associations with fasting insulin (FI) and glucose (FG) on a genome-wide scale. We present six previously unknown FI loci at P<5×10?8 in combined discovery and follow-up analyses of 52 studies comprising up to 96,496non-diabetic individuals. Risk variants were associated with higher triglyceride and lower HDL cholesterol levels, suggestive of a role for these FI loci in insulin resistance pathways. The localization of these additional loci will aid further characterization of the role of insulin resistance in T2D pathophysiology. PMID:22581228

  20. Genetic evidence and new morphometric data as essential tools to identify the Patagonian seahorse Hippocampus patagonicus (Pisces, Syngnathidae).

    PubMed

    González, R; Dinghi, P; Corio, C; Medina, A; Maggioni, M; Storero, L; Gosztonyi, A

    2014-02-01

    A genetic study to support morphometric analyses was used to improve the description and validate the Patagonian seahorse Hippocampus patagonicus (Syngnathidae) on the basis of a large number of specimens collected in the type locality (San Antonio Bay, Patagonia, Argentina). DNA sequence data (from the cytochrome b region of the mitochondrial genome) were used to differentiate this species from its relatives cited for the west Atlantic Ocean. Both phylogenetic and genetic distance analyses supported the hypothesis that H. patagonicus is a species clearly differentiated from others, in agreement with morphometric studies. Hippocampus patagonicus can be distinguished from Hippocampus erectus by the combination of the following morphometric characteristics: (1) in both sexes and all sizes of H. patagonicus, the snout length is always less than the postorbital length, whereas the snout length of H. erectus is not shorter than the postorbital length in the largest specimens; (2) in both sexes of H. patagonicus, the trunk length:total length (LTr :LT ) is lower than in H. erectus (in female H. patagonicus: 0·27-0·39, H. erectus: 0·36-0·40 and in male H. patagonicus: 0·24-0·34, H. erectus: 0·33-0·43) and (3) in both sexes, tail length:total length (LTa :LT ) in H. patagonicus is larger than in H. erectus (0·61-0·78 v. 0·54-0·64). PMID:24446770

  1. Association analyses identify 38 susceptibility loci for inflammatory bowel disease and highlight shared genetic risk across populations.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jimmy Z; van Sommeren, Suzanne; Huang, Hailiang; Ng, Siew C; Alberts, Rudi; Takahashi, Atsushi; Ripke, Stephan; Lee, James C; Jostins, Luke; Shah, Tejas; Abedian, Shifteh; Cheon, Jae Hee; Cho, Judy; Daryani, Naser E; Franke, Lude; Fuyuno, Yuta; Hart, Ailsa; Juyal, Ramesh C; Juyal, Garima; Kim, Won Ho; Morris, Andrew P; Poustchi, Hossein; Newman, William G; Midha, Vandana; Orchard, Timothy R; Vahedi, Homayon; Sood, Ajit; Sung, Joseph J Y; Malekzadeh, Reza; Westra, Harm-Jan; Yamazaki, Keiko; Yang, Suk-Kyun; Barrett, Jeffrey C; Franke, Andre; Alizadeh, Behrooz Z; Parkes, Miles; B K, Thelma; Daly, Mark J; Kubo, Michiaki; Anderson, Carl A; Weersma, Rinse K

    2015-09-01

    Ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease are the two main forms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Here we report the first trans-ancestry association study of IBD, with genome-wide or Immunochip genotype data from an extended cohort of 86,640 European individuals and Immunochip data from 9,846 individuals of East Asian, Indian or Iranian descent. We implicate 38 loci in IBD risk for the first time. For the majority of the IBD risk loci, the direction and magnitude of effect are consistent in European and non-European cohorts. Nevertheless, we observe genetic heterogeneity between divergent populations at several established risk loci driven by differences in allele frequency (NOD2) or effect size (TNFSF15 and ATG16L1) or a combination of these factors (IL23R and IRGM). Our results provide biological insights into the pathogenesis of IBD and demonstrate the usefulness of trans-ancestry association studies for mapping loci associated with complex diseases and understanding genetic architecture across diverse populations. PMID:26192919

  2. A genome-wide approach accounting for body mass index identifies genetic variants influencing fasting glycemic traits and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Manning, Alisa K; Hivert, Marie-France; Scott, Robert A; Grimsby, Jonna L; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Chen, Han; Rybin, Denis; Liu, Ching-Ti; Bielak, Lawrence F; Prokopenko, Inga; Amin, Najaf; Barnes, Daniel; Cadby, Gemma; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Ingelsson, Erik; Jackson, Anne U; Johnson, Toby; Kanoni, Stavroula; Ladenvall, Claes; Lagou, Vasiliki; Lahti, Jari; Lecoeur, Cecile; Liu, Yongmei; Martinez-Larrad, Maria Teresa; Montasser, May E; Navarro, Pau; Perry, John R B; Rasmussen-Torvik, Laura J; Salo, Perttu; Sattar, Naveed; Shungin, Dmitry; Strawbridge, Rona J; Tanaka, Toshiko; van Duijn, Cornelia M; An, Ping; de Andrade, Mariza; Andrews, Jeanette S; Aspelund, Thor; Atalay, Mustafa; Aulchenko, Yurii; Balkau, Beverley; Bandinelli, Stefania; Beckmann, Jacques S; Beilby, John P; Bellis, Claire; Bergman, Richard N; Blangero, John; Boban, Mladen; Boehnke, Michael; Boerwinkle, Eric; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Boomsma, Dorret I; Borecki, Ingrid B; Böttcher, Yvonne; Bouchard, Claude; Brunner, Eric; Budimir, Danijela; Campbell, Harry; Carlson, Olga; Chines, Peter S; Clarke, Robert; Collins, Francis S; Corbatón-Anchuelo, Arturo; Couper, David; de Faire, Ulf; Dedoussis, George V; Deloukas, Panos; Dimitriou, Maria; Egan, Josephine M; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Erdos, Michael R; Eriksson, Johan G; Eury, Elodie; Ferrucci, Luigi; Ford, Ian; Forouhi, Nita G; Fox, Caroline S; Franzosi, Maria Grazia; Franks, Paul W; Frayling, Timothy M; Froguel, Philippe; Galan, Pilar; de Geus, Eco; Gigante, Bruna; Glazer, Nicole L; Goel, Anuj; Groop, Leif; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Hallmans, Göran; Hamsten, Anders; Hansson, Ola; Harris, Tamara B; Hayward, Caroline; Heath, Simon; Hercberg, Serge; Hicks, Andrew A; Hingorani, Aroon; Hofman, Albert; Hui, Jennie; Hung, Joseph; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jhun, Min A; Johnson, Paul C D; Jukema, J Wouter; Jula, Antti; Kao, W H; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kardia, Sharon L R; Keinanen-Kiukaanniemi, Sirkka; Kivimaki, Mika; Kolcic, Ivana; Kovacs, Peter; Kumari, Meena; Kuusisto, Johanna; Kyvik, Kirsten Ohm; Laakso, Markku; Lakka, Timo; Lannfelt, Lars; Lathrop, G Mark; Launer, Lenore J; Leander, Karin; Li, Guo; Lind, Lars; Lindstrom, Jaana; Lobbens, Stéphane; Loos, Ruth J F; Luan, Jian'an; Lyssenko, Valeriya; Mägi, Reedik; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Marmot, Michael; Meneton, Pierre; Mohlke, Karen L; Mooser, Vincent; Morken, Mario A; Miljkovic, Iva; Narisu, Narisu; O'Connell, Jeff; Ong, Ken K; Oostra, Ben A; Palmer, Lyle J; Palotie, Aarno; Pankow, James S; Peden, John F; Pedersen, Nancy L; Pehlic, Marina; Peltonen, Leena; Penninx, Brenda; Pericic, Marijana; Perola, Markus; Perusse, Louis; Peyser, Patricia A; Polasek, Ozren; Pramstaller, Peter P; Province, Michael A; Räikkönen, Katri; Rauramaa, Rainer; Rehnberg, Emil; Rice, Ken; Rotter, Jerome I; Rudan, Igor; Ruokonen, Aimo; Saaristo, Timo; Sabater-Lleal, Maria; Salomaa, Veikko; Savage, David B; Saxena, Richa; Schwarz, Peter; Seedorf, Udo; Sennblad, Bengt; Serrano-Rios, Manuel; Shuldiner, Alan R; Sijbrands, Eric J G; Siscovick, David S; Smit, Johannes H; Small, Kerrin S; Smith, Nicholas L; Smith, Albert Vernon; Stan?áková, Alena; Stirrups, Kathleen; Stumvoll, Michael; Sun, Yan V; Swift, Amy J; Tönjes, Anke; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Trompet, Stella; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Uusitupa, Matti; Vikström, Max; Vitart, Veronique; Vohl, Marie-Claude; Voight, Benjamin F; Vollenweider, Peter; Waeber, Gerard; Waterworth, Dawn M; Watkins, Hugh; Wheeler, Eleanor; Widen, Elisabeth; Wild, Sarah H; Willems, Sara M; Willemsen, Gonneke; Wilson, James F; Witteman, Jacqueline C M; Wright, Alan F; Yaghootkar, Hanieh; Zelenika, Diana; Zemunik, Tatijana; Zgaga, Lina; Wareham, Nicholas J; McCarthy, Mark I; Barroso, Ines; Watanabe, Richard M; Florez, Jose C; Dupuis, Josée; Meigs, James B; Langenberg, Claudia

    2012-06-01

    Recent genome-wide association studies have described many loci implicated in type 2 diabetes (T2D) pathophysiology and ?-cell dysfunction but have contributed little to the understanding of the genetic basis of insulin resistance. We hypothesized that genes implicated in insulin resistance pathways might be uncovered by accounting for differences in body mass index (BMI) and potential interactions between BMI and genetic variants. We applied a joint meta-analysis approach to test associations with fasting insulin and glucose on a genome-wide scale. We present six previously unknown loci associated with fasting insulin at P < 5 × 10(-8) in combined discovery and follow-up analyses of 52 studies comprising up to 96,496 non-diabetic individuals. Risk variants were associated with higher triglyceride and lower high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol levels, suggesting a role for these loci in insulin resistance pathways. The discovery of these loci will aid further characterization of the role of insulin resistance in T2D pathophysiology. PMID:22581228

  3. Multivariate genetic determinants of EEG oscillations in schizophrenia and psychotic bipolar disorder from the BSNIP study

    PubMed Central

    Narayanan, B; Soh, P; Calhoun, V D; Ruaño, G; Kocherla, M; Windemuth, A; Clementz, B A; Tamminga, C A; Sweeney, J A; Keshavan, M S; Pearlson, G D

    2015-01-01

    Schizophrenia (SZ) and psychotic bipolar disorder (PBP) are disabling psychiatric illnesses with complex and unclear etiologies. Electroencephalogram (EEG) oscillatory abnormalities in SZ and PBP probands are heritable and expressed in their relatives, but the neurobiology and genetic factors mediating these abnormalities in the psychosis dimension of either disorder are less explored. We examined the polygenic architecture of eyes-open resting state EEG frequency activity (intrinsic frequency) from 64 channels in 105 SZ, 145 PBP probands and 56 healthy controls (HCs) from the multisite BSNIP (Bipolar-Schizophrenia Network on Intermediate Phenotypes) study. One million single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were derived from DNA. We assessed eight data-driven EEG frequency activity derived from group-independent component analysis (ICA) in conjunction with a reduced subset of 10?422 SNPs through novel multivariate association using parallel ICA (para-ICA). Genes contributing to the association were examined collectively using pathway analysis tools. Para-ICA extracted five frequency and nine SNP components, of which theta and delta activities were significantly correlated with two different gene components, comprising genes participating extensively in brain development, neurogenesis and synaptogenesis. Delta and theta abnormality was present in both SZ and PBP, while theta differed between the two disorders. Theta abnormalities were also mediated by gene clusters involved in glutamic acid pathways, cadherin and synaptic contact-based cell adhesion processes. Our data suggest plausible multifactorial genetic networks, including novel and several previously identified (DISC1) candidate risk genes, mediating low frequency delta and theta abnormalities in psychoses. The gene clusters were enriched for biological properties affecting neural circuitry and involved in brain function and/or development. PMID:26101851

  4. Multivariate genetic determinants of EEG oscillations in schizophrenia and psychotic bipolar disorder from the BSNIP study.

    PubMed

    Narayanan, B; Soh, P; Calhoun, V D; Ruaño, G; Kocherla, M; Windemuth, A; Clementz, B A; Tamminga, C A; Sweeney, J A; Keshavan, M S; Pearlson, G D

    2015-01-01

    Schizophrenia (SZ) and psychotic bipolar disorder (PBP) are disabling psychiatric illnesses with complex and unclear etiologies. Electroencephalogram (EEG) oscillatory abnormalities in SZ and PBP probands are heritable and expressed in their relatives, but the neurobiology and genetic factors mediating these abnormalities in the psychosis dimension of either disorder are less explored. We examined the polygenic architecture of eyes-open resting state EEG frequency activity (intrinsic frequency) from 64 channels in 105 SZ, 145 PBP probands and 56 healthy controls (HCs) from the multisite BSNIP (Bipolar-Schizophrenia Network on Intermediate Phenotypes) study. One million single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were derived from DNA. We assessed eight data-driven EEG frequency activity derived from group-independent component analysis (ICA) in conjunction with a reduced subset of 10,422 SNPs through novel multivariate association using parallel ICA (para-ICA). Genes contributing to the association were examined collectively using pathway analysis tools. Para-ICA extracted five frequency and nine SNP components, of which theta and delta activities were significantly correlated with two different gene components, comprising genes participating extensively in brain development, neurogenesis and synaptogenesis. Delta and theta abnormality was present in both SZ and PBP, while theta differed between the two disorders. Theta abnormalities were also mediated by gene clusters involved in glutamic acid pathways, cadherin and synaptic contact-based cell adhesion processes. Our data suggest plausible multifactorial genetic networks, including novel and several previously identified (DISC1) candidate risk genes, mediating low frequency delta and theta abnormalities in psychoses. The gene clusters were enriched for biological properties affecting neural circuitry and involved in brain function and/or development. PMID:26101851

  5. Identifying quantitative trait loci and determining closely related stalk traits for rind penetrometer resistance in a high-oil maize population.

    PubMed

    Hu, Haixiao; Meng, Yujie; Wang, Hongwu; Liu, Hai; Chen, Shaojiang

    2012-05-01

    Stalk lodging in maize causes annual yield losses between 5 and 20% worldwide. Many studies have indicated that maize stalk strength significantly negatively correlates with lodging observed in the field. Rind penetrometer resistance (RPR) measurements can be used to effectively evaluate maize stalk strength, but little is known about the genetic basis of this parameter. The objective of this study was to explore a genetic model and detect quantitative trait loci (QTL) of RPR and determine relationships between RPR and other stalk traits, especially cell wall chemical components. RPR is quantitative trait in nature, and both additive and non-additive effects may be important to consider for the improvement of RPR. Nine additive-effect QTLs covering nine chromosomes, except chromosome 5, and one pair of epistatic QTLs were detected for RPR. CeSA11 involved in cellulose synthesis and colorless2 involved in lignin synthesis were identified as possible candidate genes for RPR. Internode diameter (InD), fresh weight of internode (FreW), dry weight of internode (DryW), fresh weight and dry weight as well as cell wall components per unit volume significantly positively correlated with RPR. The internode water content (InW) significantly negatively correlated with RPR. Notably, these traits significantly correlated with RPR, and the QTLs of these traits co-localized with those of RPR. The corresponding results obtained from correlation analysis and QTL mapping suggested the presence of pleitropism or linkage between genes and indicated that these different approaches may be used for cross authentication of relationships between different traits. PMID:22314785

  6. Tetra-primer ARMS-PCR identified four pivotal genetic variations in bovine PNPLA3 gene and its expression patterns.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zi-Nian; Cai, Han-Fang; Li, Ming-Xun; Cao, Xiu-Kai; Lan, Xian-Yong; Lei, Chu-Zhao; Chen, Hong

    2016-01-10

    Patatin-like phospholipase domain-containing protein 3 (PNPLA3), a member of the patatin like phospholipase domain-containing (PNPLA) family, plays an important role in energy balance, fat metabolism regulation, glucose metabolism and fatty liver disease. Tetra-primer amplification refractory mutation system PCR (T-ARMS-PCR) is a new method offering fast detection and extreme simplicity at a negligible cost for SNP genotyping. In this paper, we investigated the genetic variations at different ages of 660 Chinese indigenous cattle belonging to three breeds (QC, NY, JX) and applied T-ARMS-PCR and PCR-RFLP methods to genotype four SNPs, SNP1: g.A2980G, SNP2: g.A2996T, SNP3: g.A36718G, SNP4: g.G36850A. The statistical analyses indicated that these 4 SNPs affected growth traits markedly (P<0.05) in QC population, whereas combined haplotypes were not (P>0.05). The qPCR (quantitative PCR) indicated that bovine PNPLA3 gene was exclusively expressed in fat tissues. Besides, the analysis between SNP and mRNA expression revealed that, in SNP1, the expression of AG was much higher than AA and GG (P<0.05), which was in accordance with the results of growth traits association analysis, while the results of SNP4 was not. These results supported high potential that SNPs of bovine PNPLA3 gene might be utilized as genetic markers in marker-assisted selection (MAS) for Chinese cattle breeding programs. PMID:26318478

  7. Accurate determination of genetic identity for a single cacao bean, using molecular markers with a nanofluidic system, ensures cocoa authentication.

    PubMed

    Fang, Wanping; Meinhardt, Lyndel W; Mischke, Sue; Bellato, Cláudia M; Motilal, Lambert; Zhang, Dapeng

    2014-01-15

    Cacao (Theobroma cacao L.), the source of cocoa, is an economically important tropical crop. One problem with the premium cacao market is contamination with off-types adulterating raw premium material. Accurate determination of the genetic identity of single cacao beans is essential for ensuring cocoa authentication. Using nanofluidic single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping with 48 SNP markers, we generated SNP fingerprints for small quantities of DNA extracted from the seed coat of single cacao beans. On the basis of the SNP profiles, we identified an assumed adulterant variety, which was unambiguously distinguished from the authentic beans by multilocus matching. Assignment tests based on both Bayesian clustering analysis and allele frequency clearly separated all 30 authentic samples from the non-authentic samples. Distance-based principle coordinate analysis further supported these results. The nanofluidic SNP protocol, together with forensic statistical tools, is sufficiently robust to establish authentication and to verify gourmet cacao varieties. This method shows significant potential for practical application. PMID:24354624

  8. Identification of Combined Genetic Determinants of Liver Stiffness within the SREBP1c-PNPLA3 Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Krawczyk, Marcin; Grünhage, Frank; Lammert, Frank

    2013-01-01

    The common PNPLA3 (adiponutrin) variant, p.I148M, was identified as a genetic determinant of liver fibrosis. Since the expression of PNPLA3 is induced by sterol regulatory element binding protein 1c (SREBP1c), we investigate two common SREBP1c variants (rs2297508 and rs11868035) for their association with liver stiffness. In 899 individuals (aged 17–83 years, 547 males) with chronic liver diseases, hepatic fibrosis was non-invasively phenotyped by transient elastography (TE). The SREBP1c single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped using PCR-based assays with 5?-nuclease and fluorescence detection. The SREBP1c rs11868035 variant affected liver fibrosis significantly (p = 0.029): median TE levels were 7.2, 6.6 and 6.0 kPa in carriers of (TT) (n = 421), (CT) (n = 384) and (CC) (n = 87) genotypes, respectively. Overall, the SREBP1c SNP was associated with low TE levels (5.0–8.0 kPa). Carriers of both PNPLA3 and SREBP1c risk genotypes displayed significantly (p = 0.005) higher median liver stiffness, as compared to patients carrying none of these variants. The common SREBP1c variant may affect early stages of liver fibrosis. Our study supports a role of the SREBP1c-PNPLA3 pathway as a “disease module” that promotes hepatic fibrogenesis. PMID:24152445

  9. Genetic Determination of the Status of an Endangered Species of Pocket Gopher in Georgia Author(s): Joshua Laerm, John C. Avise, John C. Patton, Robert A. Lansman

    E-print Network

    Avise, John

    Genetic Determination of the Status of an Endangered Species of Pocket Gopher in Georgia Author 1980. Accepted 6 September 1981. GENETIC DETERMINATIONOF THE STATUS OF AN ENDANGERED SPECIES OF POCKET GOPHER IN GEORGIA GENETIC DETERMINATIONOF THE STATUS OF AN ENDANGERED SPECIES OF POCKET GOPHER IN GEORGIA

  10. Combining field performance with controlled environment plant imaging to identify the genetic control of growth and transpiration underlying yield response to water-deficit stress in wheat

    PubMed Central

    Parent, Boris; Shahinnia, Fahimeh; Maphosa, Lance; Berger, Bettina; Rabie, Huwaida; Chalmers, Ken; Kovalchuk, Alex; Langridge, Peter; Fleury, Delphine

    2015-01-01

    Crop yield in low-rainfall environments is a complex trait under multigenic control that shows significant genotype×environment (G×E) interaction. One way to understand and track this trait is to link physiological studies to genetics by using imaging platforms to phenotype large segregating populations. A wheat population developed from parental lines contrasting in their mechanisms of yield maintenance under water deficit was studied in both an imaging platform and in the field. We combined phenotyping methods in a common analysis pipeline to estimate biomass and leaf area from images and then inferred growth and relative growth rate, transpiration, and water-use efficiency, and applied these to genetic analysis. From the 20 quantitative trait loci (QTLs) found for several traits in the platform, some showed strong effects, accounting for between 26 and 43% of the variation on chromosomes 1A and 1B, indicating that the G×E interaction could be reduced in a controlled environment and by using dynamic variables. Co-location of QTLs identified in the platform and in the field showed a possible common genetic basis at some loci. Co-located QTLs were found for average growth rate, leaf expansion rate, transpiration rate, and water-use efficiency from the platform with yield, spike number, grain weight, grain number, and harvest index in the field. These results demonstrated that imaging platforms are a suitable alternative to field-based screening and may be used to phenotype recombinant lines for positional cloning. PMID:26179580

  11. Combining field performance with controlled environment plant imaging to identify the genetic control of growth and transpiration underlying yield response to water-deficit stress in wheat.

    PubMed

    Parent, Boris; Shahinnia, Fahimeh; Maphosa, Lance; Berger, Bettina; Rabie, Huwaida; Chalmers, Ken; Kovalchuk, Alex; Langridge, Peter; Fleury, Delphine

    2015-09-01

    Crop yield in low-rainfall environments is a complex trait under multigenic control that shows significant genotype×environment (G×E) interaction. One way to understand and track this trait is to link physiological studies to genetics by using imaging platforms to phenotype large segregating populations. A wheat population developed from parental lines contrasting in their mechanisms of yield maintenance under water deficit was studied in both an imaging platform and in the field. We combined phenotyping methods in a common analysis pipeline to estimate biomass and leaf area from images and then inferred growth and relative growth rate, transpiration, and water-use efficiency, and applied these to genetic analysis. From the 20 quantitative trait loci (QTLs) found for several traits in the platform, some showed strong effects, accounting for between 26 and 43% of the variation on chromosomes 1A and 1B, indicating that the G×E interaction could be reduced in a controlled environment and by using dynamic variables. Co-location of QTLs identified in the platform and in the field showed a possible common genetic basis at some loci. Co-located QTLs were found for average growth rate, leaf expansion rate, transpiration rate, and water-use efficiency from the platform with yield, spike number, grain weight, grain number, and harvest index in the field. These results demonstrated that imaging platforms are a suitable alternative to field-based screening and may be used to phenotype recombinant lines for positional cloning. PMID:26179580

  12. Organization of the Mammalian Locomotor CPG: Review of Computational Model and Circuit Architectures Based on Genetically Identified Spinal Interneurons1,2,3

    PubMed Central

    Dougherty, Kimberly J.; Shevtsova, Natalia A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The organization of neural circuits that form the locomotor central pattern generator (CPG) and provide flexor–extensor and left–right coordination of neuronal activity remains largely unknown. However, significant progress has been made in the molecular/genetic identification of several types of spinal interneurons, including V0 (V0D and V0V subtypes), V1, V2a, V2b, V3, and Shox2, among others. The possible functional roles of these interneurons can be suggested from changes in the locomotor pattern generated in mutant mice lacking particular neuron types. Computational modeling of spinal circuits may complement these studies by bringing together data from different experimental studies and proposing the possible connectivity of these interneurons that may define rhythm generation, flexor–extensor interactions on each side of the cord, and commissural interactions between left and right circuits. This review focuses on the analysis of potential architectures of spinal circuits that can reproduce recent results and suggest common explanations for a series of experimental data on genetically identified spinal interneurons, including the consequences of their genetic ablation, and provides important insights into the organization of the spinal CPG and neural control of locomotion. PMID:26478909

  13. PROTEOMIC AND GENETIC APPROACHES TO IDENTIFYING DEFENSE-RELATED PROTEINS IN RICE CHALLENGED WITH THE FUNGAL PATHOGEN RHIZOCTONIA SOLANI

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sheath blight, caused by the fungus Rhizoctonia solani, is a major disease of rice worldwide, but little is known about the host response to infection. The objective of this study was to identify proteins and DNA markers in resistant and susceptible rice associated with response to infection by R. s...

  14. Am. J. Hum. Genet. 76:934949, 2005 Joint Modeling of Linkage and Association: Identifying SNPs Responsible

    E-print Network

    Abecasis, Goncalo

    unaffected family members. Introduction Positional cloning is widely used for identification of genes involved in human diseases. To date, hundreds of disease genes have been identified solely on the basis. 2002). The first step in a traditional positional-cloning approach involves a genomewide linkage

  15. Genetic identification and fisher identifiability analysis of the Doyle-Fuller-Newman model from experimental cycling of a LiFePO4 cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forman, Joel C.; Moura, Scott J.; Stein, Jeffrey L.; Fathy, Hosam K.

    2012-07-01

    This article examines the problem of identifying the physical parameters of fundamental electrochemistry-based battery models from non-invasive voltage/current cycling tests. The article is particularly motivated by the problem of fitting the Doyle-Fuller-Newman (DFN) battery model to lithium-ion battery cycling data. Previous research in the literature identifies subsets of the DFN model's parameter experimentally. In contrast, this article makes the two unique contributions of: (i) identifying the full set of DFN model parameters from cycling data using a genetic algorithm (GA), and (ii) assessing the accuracy and identifiability of the resulting full parameter set using Fisher information. The specific battery used within this study has lithium iron phosphate cathode chemistry and is intended for high-power applications such as plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs). We use seven experimental cycling data sets for model fitting and validation, six of them derived from PHEV drive cycles. This makes the identified parameter values appropriate for PHEV battery simulation and model-based design and control optimization.

  16. Novel common and rare genetic determinants of paraoxonase activity: FTO, SERPINA12, and ITGAL[S

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Daniel S.; Burt, Amber A.; Crosslin, David R.; Robertson, Peggy D.; Ranchalis, Jane E.; Boyko, Edward J.; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Furlong, Clement E.; Jarvik, Gail P.

    2013-01-01

    HDL-associated paraoxonase 1 (PON1) activity is associated with cardiovascular and other human diseases. As the role of genetic variants outside of the PON gene cluster on PON1 activity is unknown, we sought to identify common and rare variants in such loci. We typed 33,057 variants on the CVD chip in 1,362 subjects to test for their effects on adjusted-PON1 activity. Three novel genes (FTO, ITGAL, and SERPINA12) and the PON gene cluster had SNPs associated with PON1 arylesterase (AREase) activity. These loci were carried forward for rare-variant analysis using Exome chip genotypes in an overlapping subset of 1,051 subjects using sequence kernel association testing. PON1 (P = 2.24 × 10?4), PON3 (P = 0.022), FTO (P = 0.019), and SERPINA12 (P = 0.039) had both common and rare variants associated with PON1 AREase. ITGAL variants were associated with PON1 activity when using weighted sequence kernel association testing (SKAT) analysis (P = 2.63 × 10?3). When adjusting for the initial common variants, SERPINA12 became marginally significant (P = 0.09), whereas all other findings remained significant (P < 0.05), suggesting independent rare-variant effects. We present novel findings that common and rare variants in FTO, SERPINA12, and ITGAL predict PON1 activity. These results further link PON1 to diabetes and inflammation and may inform the role of HDL in human disease. PMID:23160181

  17. Pyrazinamide resistance determined by liquid culture at low pH better correlates with genetic mutations in MDR tuberculosis isolates.

    PubMed

    Pang, Yu; Wang, Zhongdong; Zheng, Huiwen; Song, Yuanyuan; Wang, Yufeng; Zhao, Yanlin

    2015-12-01

    We detected the pyrazinamide (PZA) susceptibility of Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains in the Bactec MGIT 960 liquid medium with different pH values. Our results demonstrated that PZA resistance determined by liquid culture at pH5.7 (94.9%) showed better correlation with genetic changes among multidrug-resistant M. tuberculosis isolates (P=0.001). PMID:26506283

  18. A chemical genetic screen in Mycobacterium tuberculosis identifies carbon-source-dependent growth inhibitors devoid of in vivo efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Pethe, Kevin; Sequeira, Patricia C.; Agarwalla, Sanjay; Rhee, Kyu; Kuhen, Kelli; Phong, Wai Yee; Patel, Viral; Beer, David; Walker, John R.; Duraiswamy, Jeyaraj; Jiricek, Jan; Keller, Thomas H.; Chatterjee, Arnab; Tan, Mai Ping; Ujjini, Manjunatha; Rao, Srinivasa P.S.; Camacho, Luis; Bifani, Pablo; Mak, Puiying A.; Ma, Ida; Barnes, S. Whitney; Chen, Zhong; Plouffe, David; Thayalan, Pamela; Ng, Seow Hwee; Au, Melvin; Lee, Boon Heng; Tan, Bee Huat; Ravindran, Sindhu; Nanjundappa, Mahesh; Lin, Xiuhua; Goh, Anne; Lakshminarayana, Suresh B.; Shoen, Carolyn; Cynamon, Michael; Kreiswirth, Barry; Dartois, Veronique; Peters, Eric C.; Glynne, Richard; Brenner, Sydney; Dick, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Candidate antibacterials are usually identified on the basis of their in vitro activity. However, the apparent inhibitory activity of new leads can be misleading because most culture media do not reproduce an environment relevant to infection in vivo. In this study, while screening for novel anti-tuberculars, we uncovered how carbon metabolism can affect antimicrobial activity. Novel pyrimidine–imidazoles (PIs) were identified in a whole-cell screen against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Lead optimization generated in vitro potent derivatives with desirable pharmacokinetic properties, yet without in vivo efficacy. Mechanism of action studies linked the PI activity to glycerol metabolism, which is not relevant for M. tuberculosis during infection. PIs induced self-poisoning of M. tuberculosis by promoting the accumulation of glycerol phosphate and rapid ATP depletion. This study underlines the importance of understanding central bacterial metabolism in vivo and of developing predictive in vitro culture conditions as a prerequisite for the rational discovery of new antibiotics. PMID:20975714

  19. Channelrhodopsin-assisted patching: in vivo electrophysiological recording of genetically and morphologically identified neurons throughout the brain

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, William; Tremblay, Robin; Rudy, Bernardo

    2014-01-01

    Summary Brain networks contain a large diversity of functionally distinct neuronal elements, each with unique properties, enabling computational capacities and supporting brain functions. Understanding their functional implications for behavior requires the precise identification of the cell types of a network and in vivo monitoring of their activity profiles. Here, we developed a channelrhodopsin-assisted patching method allowing the efficient in vivo targeted recording of neurons identified by their molecular, electrophysiological and morphological features. The method has a high yield, does not require visual guidance, and thus can be applied at any depth in the brain. This approach overcomes limitations of present technologies. We validate this strategy by in vivo recordings of identified subtypes of GABAergic and glutamatergic neurons in deep cortical layers, subcortical cholinergic neurons and neurons in the thalamic reticular nucleus in anesthetized and awake mice. We propose this method as an important complement to existing technologies to relate specific cell type activity to brain circuitry, function and behavior. PMID:25533350

  20. DNA Polymerase ? Subunit Residues and Interactions Required for Efficient Initiation Complex Formation Identified by a Genetic Selection.

    PubMed

    Lindow, Janet C; Dohrmann, Paul R; McHenry, Charles S

    2015-07-01

    Biophysical and structural studies have defined many of the interactions that occur between individual components or subassemblies of the bacterial replicase, DNA polymerase III holoenzyme (Pol III HE). Here, we extended our knowledge of residues and interactions that are important for the first step of the replicase reaction: the ATP-dependent formation of an initiation complex between the Pol III HE and primed DNA. We exploited a genetic selection using a dominant negative variant of the polymerase catalytic subunit that can effectively compete with wild-type Pol III ? and form initiation complexes, but cannot elongate. Suppression of the dominant negative phenotype was achieved by secondary mutations that were ineffective in initiation complex formation. The corresponding proteins were purified and characterized. One class of mutant mapped to the PHP domain of Pol III ?, ablating interaction with the ? proofreading subunit and distorting the polymerase active site in the adjacent polymerase domain. Another class of mutation, found near the C terminus, interfered with ? binding. A third class mapped within the known ?-binding domain, decreasing interaction with the ?2 processivity factor. Surprisingly, mutations within the ? binding domain also ablated interaction with ?, suggesting a larger ? binding site than previously recognized. PMID:25987558

  1. Complete genome sequence of hypervirulent and outbreak-associated Acinetobacter baumannii strain LAC-4: epidemiology, resistance genetic determinants and potential virulence factors

    PubMed Central

    Ou, Hong-Yu; Kuang, Shan N.; He, Xinyi; Molgora, Brenda M.; Ewing, Peter J.; Deng, Zixin; Osby, Melanie; Chen, Wangxue; Xu, H. Howard

    2015-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an important human pathogen due to its multi-drug resistance. In this study, the genome of an ST10 outbreak A. baumannii isolate LAC-4 was completely sequenced to better understand its epidemiology, antibiotic resistance genetic determinants and potential virulence factors. Compared with 20 other complete genomes of A. baumannii, LAC-4 genome harbors at least 12 copies of five distinct insertion sequences. It contains 12 and 14 copies of two novel IS elements, ISAba25 and ISAba26, respectively. Additionally, three novel composite transposons were identified: Tn6250, Tn6251 and Tn6252, two of which contain resistance genes. The antibiotic resistance genetic determinants on the LAC-4 genome correlate well with observed antimicrobial susceptibility patterns. Moreover, twelve genomic islands (GI) were identified in LAC-4 genome. Among them, the 33.4-kb GI12 contains a large number of genes which constitute the K (capsule) locus. LAC-4 harbors several unique putative virulence factor loci. Furthermore, LAC-4 and all 19 other outbreak isolates were found to harbor a heme oxygenase gene (hemO)-containing gene cluster. The sequencing of the first complete genome of an ST10 A. baumannii clinical strain should accelerate our understanding of the epidemiology, mechanisms of resistance and virulence of A. baumannii. PMID:25728466

  2. TfoX-based genetic mapping identifies Vibrio fischeri strain-level differences and reveals a common lineage of laboratory strains.

    PubMed

    Brooks, John F; Gyllborg, Mattias C; Kocher, Acadia A; Markey, Laura E H; Mandel, Mark J

    2015-03-01

    Bacterial strain variation exists in natural populations of bacteria and can be generated experimentally through directed or random mutation. The advent of rapid and cost-efficient whole-genome sequencing has facilitated strain-level genotyping. Even with modern tools, however, it often remains a challenge to map specific traits to individual genetic loci, especially for traits that cannot be selected under culture conditions (e.g., colonization level or pathogenicity). Using a combination of classical and modern approaches, we analyzed strain-level variation in Vibrio fischeri and identified the basis by which some strains lack the ability to utilize glycerol as a carbon source. We proceeded to reconstruct the lineage of the commonly used V. fischeri laboratory strains. Compared to the wild-type ES114 strain, we identify in ES114-L a 9.9-kb deletion with endpoints in tadB2 and glpF; restoration of the missing portion of glpF restores the wild-type phenotype. The widely used strains ESR1, JRM100, and JRM200 contain the same deletion, and ES114-L is likely a previously unrecognized intermediate strain in the construction of many ES114 derivatives. ES114-L does not exhibit a defect in competitive squid colonization but ESR1 does, demonstrating that glycerol utilization is not required for early squid colonization. Our genetic mapping approach capitalizes on the recently discovered chitin-based transformation pathway, which is conserved in the Vibrionaceae; therefore, the specific approach used is likely to be useful for mapping genetic traits in other Vibrio species. PMID:25561715

  3. TfoX-Based Genetic Mapping Identifies Vibrio fischeri Strain-Level Differences and Reveals a Common Lineage of Laboratory Strains

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, John F.; Gyllborg, Mattias C.; Kocher, Acadia A.; Markey, Laura E. H.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial strain variation exists in natural populations of bacteria and can be generated experimentally through directed or random mutation. The advent of rapid and cost-efficient whole-genome sequencing has facilitated strain-level genotyping. Even with modern tools, however, it often remains a challenge to map specific traits to individual genetic loci, especially for traits that cannot be selected under culture conditions (e.g., colonization level or pathogenicity). Using a combination of classical and modern approaches, we analyzed strain-level variation in Vibrio fischeri and identified the basis by which some strains lack the ability to utilize glycerol as a carbon source. We proceeded to reconstruct the lineage of the commonly used V. fischeri laboratory strains. Compared to the wild-type ES114 strain, we identify in ES114-L a 9.9-kb deletion with endpoints in tadB2 and glpF; restoration of the missing portion of glpF restores the wild-type phenotype. The widely used strains ESR1, JRM100, and JRM200 contain the same deletion, and ES114-L is likely a previously unrecognized intermediate strain in the construction of many ES114 derivatives. ES114-L does not exhibit a defect in competitive squid colonization but ESR1 does, demonstrating that glycerol utilization is not required for early squid colonization. Our genetic mapping approach capitalizes on the recently discovered chitin-based transformation pathway, which is conserved in the Vibrionaceae; therefore, the specific approach used is likely to be useful for mapping genetic traits in other Vibrio species. PMID:25561715

  4. Forward genetics identifies Kdf1/1810019J16Rik as an essential regulator of the proliferation-differentiation decision in epidermal progenitor cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sunjin; Kong, Yong; Weatherbee, Scott D.

    2013-01-01

    Cell fate decisions during embryogenesis and adult life govern tissue formation, homeostasis and repair. Two key decisions that must be tightly coordinated are proliferation and differentiation. Overproliferation can lead to hyperplasia or tumor formation while premature differentiation can result in a depletion of proliferating cells and organ failure. Maintaining this balance is especially important in tissues that undergo rapid turnover like skin however, despite recent advances, the genetic mechanisms that balance cell differentiation and proliferation are still unclear. In an unbiased genetic screen to identify genes affecting early development, we identified an essential regulator of the proliferation-differentiation balance in epidermal progenitor cells, the Keratinocyte differentiation factor 1 (Kdf1; 1810019J16Rik) gene. Kdf1 is expressed in epidermal cells from early stages of epidermis formation through adulthood. Specifically, Kdf1 is expressed both in epidermal progenitor cells where it acts to curb the rate of proliferation as well as in their progeny where it is required to block proliferation and promote differentiation. Consequently, Kdf1 mutants display both uncontrolled cell proliferation in the epidermis and failure to develop terminal fates. Our findings reveal a dual role for the novel gene Kdf1 both as a repressive signal for progenitor cell proliferation through its inhibition of p63 and a strong inductive signal for terminal differentiation through its interaction with the cell cycle regulator Stratifin. PMID:24075906

  5. Genetic meta-analysis of 15,901 African Americans identifies variation in EXOC3L1 is associated with HDL concentration.

    PubMed

    Lanktree, Matthew B; Elbers, Clara C; Li, Yun; Zhang, Guosheng; Duan, Qing; Karczewski, Konrad J; Guo, Yiran; Tragante, Vinicius; North, Kari E; Cushman, Mary; Asselbergs, Folkert W; Wilson, James G; Lange, Leslie A; Drenos, Fotios; Reiner, Alex P; Barnes, Michael R; Keating, Brendan J

    2015-09-01

    Meta-analyses of European populations has successfully identified genetic variants in over 150 loci associated with lipid levels, but results from additional ethnicities remain limited. Previously, we reported two novel lipid loci identified in a sample of 7,657 African Americans using a gene-centric array including 50,000 SNPs in 2,100 candidate genes. Initial discovery and follow-up of signals with P < 10(-5) in additional African American samples confirmed CD36 and ICAM1. Using an additional 8,244 African American female samples from the Women's Health Initiative SNP Health Association Resource genome-wide association study dataset, we further examined the previous meta-analyses results by attempting to replicate 20 additional putative lipid signals with P < 10(-4). Replication confirmed rs868213, located in a splice donor region of exocyst complex component 3-like 1 (EXOC3L1) as a novel signal for HDL (additive allelic effect ? = 0.02; P = 1.4 × 10(-8); meta-analyses of discovery and replication). EXOC3L1 is strongly expressed in vascular endothelium and forms part of the exocyst complex, a key facilitator of the trafficking of lipid receptors. Increasing sample sizes for genetic studies in nonEuropean populations will continue to improve our understanding of lipid metabolism. PMID:26199122

  6. Use of a genetic isolate to identify rare disease variants: C7 on 5p associated with MS

    PubMed Central

    Kallio, Suvi P.; Jakkula, Eveliina; Purcell, Shaun; Suvela, Minna; Koivisto, Keijo; Tienari, Pentti J.; Elovaara, Irina; Pirttilä, Tuula; Reunanen, Mauri; Bronnikov, Denis; Viander, Markku; Meri, Seppo; Hillert, Jan; Lundmark, Frida; Harbo, Hanne F.; Lorentzen, Åslaug R.; De Jager, Philip L.; Daly, Mark J.; Hafler, David A.; Palotie, Aarno; Peltonen, Leena; Saarela, Janna

    2009-01-01

    Large case–control genome-wide association studies primarily expose common variants contributing to disease pathogenesis with modest effects. Thus, alternative strategies are needed to tackle rare, possibly more penetrant alleles. One strategy is to use special populations with a founder effect and isolation, resulting in allelic enrichment. For multiple sclerosis such a unique setting is reported in Southern Ostrobothnia in Finland, where the prevalence and familial occurrence of multiple sclerosis (MS) are exceptionally high. Here, we have studied one of the best replicated MS loci, 5p, and monitored for haplotypes shared among 72 regional MS cases, the majority of which are genealogically distantly related. The haplotype analysis over the 45 Mb region, covering the linkage peak identified in Finnish MS families, revealed only modest association at IL7R (P = 0.04), recently implicated in MS, whereas most significant association was found with one haplotype covering the C7-FLJ40243 locus (P = 0.0001), 5.1 Mb centromeric of IL7R. The finding was validated in an independent sample from the isolate and resulted in an odds ratio of 2.73 (P = 0.000003) in the combined data set. The identified relatively rare risk haplotype contains C7 (complement component 7), an important player of the innate immune system. Suggestive association with alleles of the region was seen also in more heterogeneous populations. Interestingly, also the complement activity correlated with the identified risk haplotype. These results suggest that the MS predisposing locus on 5p is more complex than assumed and exemplify power of population isolates in the identification of rare disease alleles. PMID:19221116

  7. An Image Segmentation Based on a Genetic Algorithm for Determining Soil Coverage by Crop Residues

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Angela; Ranz, Juan; Burgos-Artizzu, Xavier P.; Pajares, Gonzalo; Sanchez del Arco, Maria J.; Navarrete, Luis

    2011-01-01

    Determination of the soil coverage by crop residues after ploughing is a fundamental element of Conservation Agriculture. This paper presents the application of genetic algorithms employed during the fine tuning of the segmentation process of a digital image with the aim of automatically quantifying the residue coverage. In other words, the objective is to achieve a segmentation that would permit the discrimination of the texture of the residue so that the output of the segmentation process is a binary image in which residue zones are isolated from the rest. The RGB images used come from a sample of images in which sections of terrain were photographed with a conventional camera positioned in zenith orientation atop a tripod. The images were taken outdoors under uncontrolled lighting conditions. Up to 92% similarity was achieved between the images obtained by the segmentation process proposed in this paper and the templates made by an elaborate manual tracing process. In addition to the proposed segmentation procedure and the fine tuning procedure that was developed, a global quantification of the soil coverage by residues for the sampled area was achieved that differed by only 0.85% from the quantification obtained using template images. Moreover, the proposed method does not depend on the type of residue present in the image. The study was conducted at the experimental farm “El Encín” in Alcalá de Henares (Madrid, Spain). PMID:22163966

  8. Preimplantation diagnosis after assisted reproduction techniques for genetically-determined male infertility.

    PubMed

    Gianaroli, L; Magli, M C; Ferraretti, A P; Iammarrone, E

    2000-11-01

    One hundred and thirty-six cycles with a poor prognosis for full-term pregnancy underwent preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) of aneuploidy. The mean maternal age was 31.8 +/- 2.5 years. Only patients younger than 36 years were included in the study with the aim of evaluating whether sperm indices have an effect on the chromosomal constitution of preimplantation embryos. No differences were detected in the percentage of aneuploid embryos; however a higher incidence of monosomies and trisomies was found in MESA-TESE embryos compared to the group of normospermic patients. In addition, an increase in the proportion of gonosomal aneuploidy seemed to be associated with the severity of the male factor parameters. The rate of de-novo chromosomal abnormalities in embryos from patients with a normal karyotype suggested an increased frequency proportional to the severity of the male factor condition, the proportion of monosomic and trisomic embryos, and the percentage of gonosomal aneuploidy increased accordingly. In the case of couples with a male altered karyotype, comparable frequency of chromosomally abnormal embryos, and monosomy and trisomy were observed irrespective of semen indices, gonosomal aneuploidy was only observed in one case where the patient had a karyotype with gonosomal mosaicism. These data confirm that the severe male infertility condition determines an increase in the rate of de-novo abnormalities, as anticipate by the follow-up of the children born after ICSI. PMID:11097437

  9. Determination of optimum allocation and pricing of distributed generation using genetic algorithm methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mwakabuta, Ndaga Stanslaus

    Electric power distribution systems play a significant role in providing continuous and "quality" electrical energy to different classes of customers. In the context of the present restrictions on transmission system expansions and the new paradigm of "open and shared" infrastructure, new approaches to distribution system analyses, economic and operational decision-making need investigation. This dissertation includes three layers of distribution system investigations. In the basic level, improved linear models are shown to offer significant advantages over previous models for advanced analysis. In the intermediate level, the improved model is applied to solve the traditional problem of operating cost minimization using capacitors and voltage regulators. In the advanced level, an artificial intelligence technique is applied to minimize cost under Distributed Generation injection from private vendors. Soft computing techniques are finding increasing applications in solving optimization problems in large and complex practical systems. The dissertation focuses on Genetic Algorithm for investigating the economic aspects of distributed generation penetration without compromising the operational security of the distribution system. The work presents a methodology for determining the optimal pricing of distributed generation that would help utilities make a decision on how to operate their system economically. This would enable modular and flexible investments that have real benefits to the electric distribution system. Improved reliability for both customers and the distribution system in general, reduced environmental impacts, increased efficiency of energy use, and reduced costs of energy services are some advantages.

  10. Genetic and environmental determinants of human NK cell diversity revealed by mass cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Horowitz, Amir; Strauss-Albee, Dara M.; Leipold, Michael; Kubo, Jessica; Nemat-Gorgani, Neda; Dogan, Ozge C.; Dekker, Cornelia L.; Mackey, Sally; Maecker, Holden; Swan, Gary E.; Davis, Mark M.; Norman, Paul J.; Guethlein, Lisbeth A.; Desai, Manisha; Parham, Peter; Blish, Catherine A.

    2013-01-01

    Natural Killer (NK) cells play critical roles in immune defense and reproduction, yet remain the most poorly understood major lymphocyte population. Because their activation is controlled by a variety of combinatorially expressed activating and inhibitory receptors, NK cell diversity and function are closely linked. To provide an unprecedented understanding of NK cell repertoire diversity, we used mass cytometry to simultaneously analyze 35 parameters, including 28 NK cell receptors, on peripheral blood NK cells from five sets of monozygotic twins and twelve unrelated donors of defined HLA and killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) genotype. This analysis revealed a remarkable degree of NK cell diversity, with an estimated 6,000-30,000 phenotypic populations within an individual and >100,000 phenotypes in this population. Genetics largely determined inhibitory receptor expression, whereas activation receptor expression was heavily environmentally influenced. Therefore, NK cells may maintain self-tolerance through strictly regulated expression of inhibitory receptors, while using adaptable expression patterns of activating and costimulatory receptors to respond to pathogens and tumors. These findings further suggest the possibility that discrete NK cell subpopulations could be harnessed for immunotherapeutic strategies in the settings of infection, reproduction, and transplantation. PMID:24154599

  11. Genetically determined differences in ethanol sensitivity influenced by body temperature during intoxication

    SciTech Connect

    Alkana, R.L.; Finn, D.A.; Bejanian, M.; Crabbe, J.C.

    1988-01-01

    The present study investigated the importance of body temperature during intoxication in mediating differences between five inbred strains of mice (C57BL/6J; BALB/cJ; DBA/2J; A/HeJ; 129/J) in their acute sensitivity to the hypnotic effects of ethanol. Mice exposed to 22/degrees/C after ethanol injection became hypothermic and exhibited statistically significant differences between strains in rectal temperatures at the return of the righting reflex (RORR), duration of loss of the righting reflex (LORR), and blood and brain ethanol concentrations at RORR. Exposure to 34/degrees/C after injection offset ethanol-hypothermia and markedly reduced strain-related differences in rectal temperatures and blood and brain ethanol concentrations at RORR. Brain ethanol concentrations at RORR were significantly lower in C57, BALB, DBA and A/He mice exposed to 34/degrees/C compared to mice exposed to 22/degrees/C during intoxication suggesting that offsetting hypothermia increased ethanol sensitivity in these strains. Taken with previous in vitro studies, these results suggest that genetically determined differences in acute sensitivity to the behavioral effects of ethanol reflect differences in body temperature during intoxication as well as differences in sensitivity to the initial actions of ethanol at the cellular level.

  12. Transcription closed and open complex dynamics studies reveal balance between genetic determinants and co-factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sala, Adrien; Shoaib, Muhammad; Anufrieva, Olga; Mutharasu, Gnanavel; Jahan Hoque, Rawnak; Yli-Harja, Olli; Kandhavelu, Meenakshisundaram

    2015-05-01

    In E. coli, promoter closed and open complexes are key steps in transcription initiation, where magnesium-dependent RNA polymerase catalyzes RNA synthesis. However, the exact mechanism of initiation remains to be fully elucidated. Here, using single mRNA detection and dual reporter studies, we show that increased intracellular magnesium concentration affects Plac initiation complex formation resulting in a highly dynamic process over the cell growth phases. Mg2+ regulates transcription transition, which modulates bimodality of mRNA distribution in the exponential phase. We reveal that Mg2+ regulates the size and frequency of the mRNA burst by changing the open complex duration. Moreover, increasing magnesium concentration leads to higher intrinsic and extrinsic noise in the exponential phase. RNAP-Mg2+ interaction simulation reveals critical movements creating a shorter contact distance between aspartic acid residues and Nucleotide Triphosphate residues and increasing electrostatic charges in the active site. Our findings provide unique biophysical insights into the balanced mechanism of genetic determinants and magnesium ion in transcription initiation regulation during cell growth.

  13. Determination of thermal emission spectra maximizing thermophotovoltaic performance using a genetic algorithm

    E-print Network

    DeSutter, John; Francoeur, Mathieu

    2015-01-01

    Optimal radiator thermal emission spectra maximizing thermophotovoltaic (TPV) conversion efficiency and output power density are determined when temperature effects in the cell are considered. To do this, a framework is designed in which a TPV model that accounts for radiative, electrical and thermal losses is coupled with a genetic algorithm. The TPV device under study involves a spectrally selective radiator at a temperature of 2000 K, a gallium antimonide cell, and a cell thermal management system characterized by a fluid temperature and a heat transfer coefficient of 293 K and 600 Wm-2K-1. It is shown that a maximum conversion efficiency of 38.8% is achievable with an emission spectrum that has emissivity of unity between 0.719 eV and 0.763 eV and zero elsewhere. This optimal spectrum is less than half of the width of those when thermal losses are neglected. A maximum output power density of 41708 Wm-2 is achievable with a spectrum having emissivity values of unity between 0.684 eV and 1.082 eV and zero e...

  14. A genetic algorithm to determine metastable MS1 phase of the Al-Sm system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Zhuo; Zhang, Feng; Sun, Yang; Nguyen, Manh Cuong; Mendelev, Mikhail; Kramer, Matthew; Wang, Cai-Zhuang; Ho, Kai-Ming; Ames Lab Team

    2014-03-01

    An efficient genetic algorithm (GA) was used to determine a metastable Al60Sm11 phase [termed MS1 in Mater. Sci. Eng. A179-A180, 600 (1994)] that evolves during rapid solidification of an amorphous melt-spun Al-10%Sm alloy. The MS1 phase is of particular interest as it is the 1st observed phase during devitrification and is believed to possess a strong connection to the undercooled liquids. It also presents a severe challenge to theoretical crystal structure prediction methods since it 1) has a big unit cell with a ~1.4 nm, 2) is metastable and not necessarily the ground state, and 3) contains site-occupancy and anti-site defects. A GA combined with experimental characterization of phase transitions and Rietveld refinements provides the necessary identification of the MS1 crystal structure. Calculated X-ray diffraction patterns of the MS1 phase match perfectly with experiments. Interestingly, the MS1 phase shares the same motif as undercooled Al-10%Sm liquids. The topological connection between undercooled liquid and crystal structures is worth further investigation, to understand how the topological order in the starting amorphous phase correlates with phase selection during devitrification.

  15. An image segmentation based on a genetic algorithm for determining soil coverage by crop residues.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Angela; Ranz, Juan; Burgos-Artizzu, Xavier P; Pajares, Gonzalo; del Arco, Maria J Sanchez; Navarrete, Luis

    2011-01-01

    Determination of the soil coverage by crop residues after ploughing is a fundamental element of Conservation Agriculture. This paper presents the application of genetic algorithms employed during the fine tuning of the segmentation process of a digital image with the aim of automatically quantifying the residue coverage. In other words, the objective is to achieve a segmentation that would permit the discrimination of the texture of the residue so that the output of the segmentation process is a binary image in which residue zones are isolated from the rest. The RGB images used come from a sample of images in which sections of terrain were photographed with a conventional camera positioned in zenith orientation atop a tripod. The images were taken outdoors under uncontrolled lighting conditions. Up to 92% similarity was achieved between the images obtained by the segmentation process proposed in this paper and the templates made by an elaborate manual tracing process. In addition to the proposed segmentation procedure and the fine tuning procedure that was developed, a global quantification of the soil coverage by residues for the sampled area was achieved that differed by only 0.85% from the quantification obtained using template images. Moreover, the proposed method does not depend on the type of residue present in the image. The study was conducted at the experimental farm "El Encín" in Alcalá de Henares (Madrid, Spain). PMID:22163966

  16. "It's all very well reading the letters in the genome, but it's a long way to being able to write": Men's interpretations of undergoing genetic profiling to determine future risk of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Bancroft, Elizabeth K; Castro, Elena; Ardern-Jones, Audrey; Moynihan, Clare; Page, Elizabeth; Taylor, Natalie; Eeles, Rosalind A; Rowley, Emma; Cox, Karen

    2014-12-01

    A family history of prostate cancer (PC) is one of the main risk factors for the disease. A number of common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that confer small but cumulatively substantial risks of PC have been identified, opening the possibility for the use of SNPs in PC risk stratification for targeted screening and prevention in the future. The objective of this study was to explore the psychosocial impact of receiving information about genetic risk of PC. The participants were men who had a family history of PC and were enrolled in a screening study providing research genetic profiling alongside screening for PC. A combination of questionnaires and in-depth interviews were used. Questionnaires were completed by men at two time points: both before and after joining the study and going through the genetic profiling process. The interviews were completed after all study process were complete and were analysed using a framework analysis. In total 95 men completed both questionnaires and 26 men were interviewed. A number of issues facing men at risk of PC were identified. The results fell into two main categories: personal relevance and societal relevance. The strength of men's innate beliefs about their risk, shaped by genetic and environmental assumptions, outweigh the information provided by genetic testing. Men felt genetic profile results would have future use for accessing prostate screening, being aware of symptoms and in communicating with others. The findings reinforce the importance of providing contextual information alongside genetic profiling test results, and emphasises the importance of the counselling process in providing genetic risk information. This research raises some key issues to facilitate clinical practice and future research related to the use of genetic profiling to determine risk of PC and other diseases. PMID:24980079

  17. 75 FR 1585 - Draft Environmental Impact Statement; Determination of Regulated Status of Alfalfa Genetically...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-12

    ... Through Genetic Engineering Which Are Plant Pests or Which There Is Reason to Believe Are Plant Pests... environment) of organisms and products altered or produced through genetic engineering that are plant pests or... included in the petition. In a notice published in the Federal Register on June 27, 2005 (70 FR...

  18. 75 FR 29969 - Environmental Impact Statement; Determination of Nonregulated Status of Sugar Beet Genetically...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-28

    ... of Organisms and Products Altered or Produced Through Genetic Engineering Which Are Plant Pests or... produced through genetic engineering that are plant pests or that there is reason to believe are plant..., APHIS published a notice in the Federal Register (69 FR 61466-61467, Docket No. 04-075-1)...

  19. Identifying the genome-wide sequence variations and developing new molecular markers for genetics research by re-sequencing a Landrace cultivar of foxtail millet.

    PubMed

    Bai, Hui; Cao, Yinghao; Quan, Jianzhang; Dong, Li; Li, Zhiyong; Zhu, Yanbin; Zhu, Lihuang; Dong, Zhiping; Li, Dayong

    2013-01-01

    Foxtail millet (Setariaitalica) is a drought-resistant, barren-tolerant grain crop and forage. Currently, it has become a new model plant for cereal crops and biofuel grasses. Although two reference genome sequences were released recently, comparative genomics research on foxtail millet is still in its infancy. Using the Solexa sequencing technology, we performed genome re-sequencing on one important foxtail millet Landrace, Shi-Li-Xiang (SLX). Compared with the two reference genome sequences, the following genetic variation patterns were identified: 762,082 SNPs, 26,802 insertion/deletion polymorphisms of 1 to 5 bp in length (indels), and 10,109 structural variations (SVs) between SLX and Yugu1 genomes; 915,434 SNPs, 28,546 indels and 12,968 SVs between SLX and Zhang gu genomes. Furthermore, based on the Yugu1 genome annotation, we found out that ~ 40% SNPs resided in genes containing NB-ARC domain, protein kinase or leucine-rich repeats, which had higher non-synonymous to synonymous SNPs ratios than average, suggesting that the diversification of plant disease resistance proteins might be caused by pathogen pressure. In addition, out of the polymorphisms identified between SLX and Yugu1, 465 SNPs and 146 SVs were validated with more than 90% accuracy, which could be used as DNA markers for whole-genome genotyping and marker-assisted breeding. Here, we also represented an example of fine mapping and identifying a waxy locus in SLX using these newly developed DNA markers. This work provided important information that will allow a deeper understanding of the foxtail millet genome and will be helpful for dissecting the genetic basis of important traits in foxtail millet. PMID:24039970

  20. Dissecting the genetics of the human transcriptome identifies novel trait-related trans-eQTLs and corroborates the regulatory relevance of non-protein coding loci†

    PubMed Central

    Kirsten, Holger; Al-Hasani, Hoor; Holdt, Lesca; Gross, Arnd; Beutner, Frank; Krohn, Knut; Horn, Katrin; Ahnert, Peter; Burkhardt, Ralph; Reiche, Kristin; Hackermüller, Jörg; Löffler, Markus; Teupser, Daniel; Thiery, Joachim; Scholz, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Genetics of gene expression (eQTLs or expression QTLs) has proved an indispensable tool for understanding biological pathways and pathomechanisms of trait-associated SNPs. However, power of most genome-wide eQTL studies is still limited. We performed a large eQTL study in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of 2112 individuals increasing the power to detect trans-effects genome-wide. Going beyond univariate SNP-transcript associations, we analyse relations of eQTLs to biological pathways, polygenetic effects of expression regulation, trans-clusters and enrichment of co-localized functional elements. We found eQTLs for about 85% of analysed genes, and 18% of genes were trans-regulated. Local eSNPs were enriched up to a distance of 5 Mb to the transcript challenging typically implemented ranges of cis-regulations. Pathway enrichment within regulated genes of GWAS-related eSNPs supported functional relevance of identified eQTLs. We demonstrate that nearest genes of GWAS-SNPs might frequently be misleading functional candidates. We identified novel trans-clusters of potential functional relevance for GWAS-SNPs of several phenotypes including obesity-related traits, HDL-cholesterol levels and haematological phenotypes. We used chromatin immunoprecipitation data for demonstrating biological effects. Yet, we show for strongly heritable transcripts that still little trans-chromosomal heritability is explained by all identified trans-eSNPs; however, our data suggest that most cis-heritability of these transcripts seems explained. Dissection of co-localized functional elements indicated a prominent role of SNPs in loci of pseudogenes and non-coding RNAs for the regulation of coding genes. In summary, our study substantially increases the catalogue of human eQTLs and improves our understanding of the complex genetic regulation of gene expression, pathways and disease-related processes. PMID:26019233

  1. Genetic Analysis Using an Isogenic Mating Pair of Aspergillus fumigatus Identifies Azole Resistance Genes and Lack of MAT Locus's Role in Virulence.

    PubMed

    Losada, Liliana; Sugui, Janyce A; Eckhaus, Michael A; Chang, Yun C; Mounaud, Stephanie; Figat, Abigail; Joardar, Vinita; Pakala, Suman B; Pakala, Suchitra; Venepally, Pratap; Fedorova, Natalie; Nierman, William C; Kwon-Chung, Kyung J

    2015-04-01

    Invasive aspergillosis (IA) due to Aspergillus fumigatus is a major cause of mortality in immunocompromised patients. The discovery of highly fertile strains of A. fumigatus opened the possibility to merge classical and contemporary genetics to address key questions about this pathogen. The merger involves sexual recombination, selection of desired traits, and genomics to identify any associated loci. We constructed a highly fertile isogenic pair of A. fumigatus strains with opposite mating types and used them to investigate whether mating type is associated with virulence and to find the genetic loci involved in azole resistance. The pair was made isogenic by 9 successive backcross cycles of the foundational strain AFB62 (MAT1-1) with a highly fertile (MAT1-2) progeny. Genome sequencing showed that the F9 MAT1-2 progeny was essentially identical to the AFB62. The survival curves of animals infected with either strain in three different animal models showed no significant difference, suggesting that virulence in A. fumigatus was not associated with mating type. We then employed a relatively inexpensive, yet highly powerful strategy to identify genomic loci associated with azole resistance. We used traditional in vitro drug selection accompanied by classical sexual crosses of azole-sensitive with resistant isogenic strains. The offspring were plated under varying drug concentrations and pools of resulting colonies were analyzed by whole genome sequencing. We found that variants in 5 genes contributed to azole resistance, including mutations in erg11A (cyp51A), as well as multi-drug transporters, erg25, and in HMG-CoA reductase. The results demonstrated that with minimal investment into the sequencing of three pools from a cross of interest, the variation(s) that contribute any phenotype can be identified with nucleotide resolution. This approach can be applied to multiple areas of interest in A. fumigatus or other heterothallic pathogens, especially for virulence associated traits. PMID:25909486

  2. Using Ambystoma mexicanum (Mexican axolotl) embryos, chemical genetics, and microarray analysis to identify signaling pathways associated with tissue regeneration.

    PubMed

    Ponomareva, Larissa V; Athippozhy, Antony; Thorson, Jon S; Voss, S Randal

    2015-12-01

    Amphibian vertebrates are important models in regenerative biology because they present exceptional regenerative capabilities throughout life. However, it takes considerable effort to rear amphibians to juvenile and adult stages for regeneration studies, and the relatively large sizes that frogs and salamanders achieve during development make them difficult to use in chemical screens. Here, we introduce a new tail regeneration model using late stage Mexican axolotl embryos. We show that axolotl embryos completely regenerate amputated tails in 7days before they exhaust their yolk supply and begin to feed. Further, we show that axolotl embryos can be efficiently reared in microtiter plates to achieve moderate throughput screening of soluble chemicals to investigate toxicity and identify molecules that alter regenerative outcome. As proof of principle, we identified integration 1 / wingless (Wnt), transforming growth factor beta (Tgf-?), and fibroblast growth factor (Fgf) pathway antagonists that completely block tail regeneration and additional chemicals that significantly affected tail outgrowth. Furthermore, we used microarray analysis to show that inhibition of Wnt signaling broadly affects transcription of genes associated with Wnt, Fgf, Tgf-?, epidermal growth factor (Egf), Notch, nerve growth factor (Ngf), homeotic gene (Hox), rat sarcoma/mitogen-activated protein kinase (Ras/Mapk), myelocytomatosis viral oncogene (Myc), tumor protein 53 (p53), and retinoic acid (RA) pathways. Punctuated changes in the expression of genes known to regulate vertebrate development were observed; this suggests the tail regeneration transcriptional program is hierarchically structured and temporally ordered. Our study establishes the axolotl as a chemical screening model to investigate signaling pathways associated with tissue regeneration. PMID:26092703

  3. A genetic screen in zebrafish identifies the mutants vps18, nf2 and foie gras as models of liver disease.

    PubMed

    Sadler, Kirsten C; Amsterdam, Adam; Soroka, Carol; Boyer, James; Hopkins, Nancy

    2005-08-01

    Hepatomegaly is a sign of many liver disorders. To identify zebrafish mutants to serve as models for hepatic pathologies, we screened for hepatomegaly at day 5 of embryogenesis in 297 zebrafish lines bearing mutations in genes that are essential for embryonic development. Seven mutants were identified, and three have phenotypes resembling different liver diseases. Mutation of the class C vacuolar protein sorting gene vps18 results in hepatomegaly associated with large, vesicle-filled hepatocytes, which we attribute to the failure of endosomal-lysosomal trafficking. Additionally, these mutants develop defects in the bile canaliculi and have marked biliary paucity, suggesting that vps18 also functions to traffic vesicles to the hepatocyte apical membrane and may play a role in the development of the intrahepatic biliary tree. Similar findings have been reported for individuals with arthrogryposis-renal dysfunction-cholestasis (ARC) syndrome, which is due to mutation of another class C vps gene. A second mutant, resulting from disruption of the tumor suppressor gene nf2, develops extrahepatic choledochal cysts in the common bile duct, suggesting that this gene regulates division of biliary cells during development and that nf2 may play a role in the hyperplastic tendencies observed in biliary cells in individuals with choledochal cysts. The third mutant is in the novel gene foie gras, which develops large, lipid-filled hepatocytes, resembling those in individuals with fatty liver disease. These mutants illustrate the utility of zebrafish as a model for studying liver development and disease, and provide valuable tools for investigating the molecular pathogenesis of congenital biliary disorders and fatty liver disease. PMID:16000385

  4. VHL Genetic Alteration in CCRCC Does Not Determine De-Regulation of HIF, CAIX, hnRNP A2/B1 and Osteopontin

    PubMed Central

    Nyhan, Michelle J.; El Mashad, Shereen M.; O’Donovan, Tracey R.; Ahmad, Sarfraz; Collins, Chris; Sweeney, Paul; Rogers, Eamonn; O’Sullivan, Gerald C.; McKenna, Sharon L.

    2010-01-01

    Background: von Hippel–Lindau (VHL) tumour suppressor gene inactivation is associated with clear cell renal cell carcinoma (CCRCC) development. The VHL protein (pVHL) has been proposed to regulate the expression of several proteins including Hypoxia Inducible Factor-? (HIF-?), carbonic anhydrase (CA)IX, heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) A2/B1 and osteopontin. pVHL has been characterized in vitro, however, clinical studies are limited. We evaluated the impact of VHL genetic alterations on the expression of several pVHL protein targets in paired normal and tumor tissue. Methods: The VHL gene was sequenced in 23 CCRCC patients and VHL transcript levels were evaluated by real-time RT-PCR. Expression of pVHL’s protein targets were determined by Western blotting in 17 paired patient samples. Results: VHL genetic alterations were identified in 43.5% (10/23) of CCRCCs. HIF-1?, HIF-2? and CAIX were up-regulated in 88.2% (15/17), 100% (17/17) and 88.2% (15/17) of tumors respectively and their expression is independent of VHL status. hnRNP A2/B1 and osteopontin expression was variable in CCRCCs and had no association with VHL genetic status. Conclusion: As expression of these proposed pVHL targets can be achieved independently of VHL mutation (and possibly by hypoxia alone), these data suggests that other pVHL targets may be more crucial in renal carcinogenesis. PMID:20978319

  5. Virulence determinants, drug resistance and mobile genetic elements of Laribacter hongkongensis: a genome-wide analysis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Laribacter hongkongensis is associated with community-acquired gastroenteritis and traveler's diarrhea. In this study, we performed an in-depth annotation of the genes in its genome related to the various steps in the infective process, drug resistance and mobile genetic elements. Results For acid and bile resistance, L. hongkongensis possessed a urease gene cassette, two arc gene clusters and bile salt efflux systems. For intestinal colonization, it possessed a putative adhesin of the autotransporter family homologous to those of diffusely adherent Escherichia coli (E. coli) and enterotoxigenic E. coli. To evade from host defense, it possessed superoxide dismutase and catalases. For lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis, it possessed the same set of genes that encode enzymes for synthesizing lipid A, two Kdo units and heptose units as E. coli, but different genes for its symmetrical acylation pattern, and nine genes for polysaccharide side chains biosynthesis. It contained a number of CDSs that encode putative cell surface acting (RTX toxin and hemolysins) and intracellular cytotoxins (patatin-like proteins) and enzymes for invasion (outer membrane phospholipase A). It contained a broad variety of antibiotic resistance-related genes, including genes related to ?-lactam (n = 10) and multidrug efflux (n = 54). It also contained eight prophages, 17 other phage-related CDSs and 26 CDSs for transposases. Conclusions The L. hongkongensis genome possessed genes for acid and bile resistance, intestinal mucosa colonization, evasion of host defense and cytotoxicity and invasion. A broad variety of antibiotic resistance or multidrug resistance genes, a high number of prophages, other phage-related CDSs and CDSs for transposases, were also identified. PMID:21711902

  6. Genetic determinants of immunogenicity to factor IX during the treatment of haemophilia B.

    PubMed

    Saini, S; Hamasaki-Katagiri, N; Pandey, G S; Yanover, C; Guelcher, C; Simhadri, V L; Dandekar, S; Guerrera, M F; Kimchi-Sarfaty, C; Sauna, Z E

    2015-03-01

    Inhibitors are an impediment to the effective management of haemophilia B (HB), but there is limited understanding of the underlying genetic risk factors. In this study we aim to understand the role of F9 gene mutations on inhibitor development in patients with HB. Mutations in the F9 gene were identified and HLA typing performed for five boys with severe HB. Data from the CDC Haemophilia B Mutation Project (CHBMP) database were used to assess association between F9 gene mutation type and inhibitor development. Analysis of the CHBMP database showed that larger disruptions in the F9 gene are associated with a higher life-time prevalence of inhibitors. We detected the following mutations in the five subjects, including four novel mutations: Nonsense in three patients (c.223 C>T; p.Arg75* in two siblings, c.553 C>T; p.Glu185*); Splice site in two patients (c.723 + 1 G>A, c.278-27 A>G); Missense in one patient (c.580 A>G, p.Thr194Ala; c.723 G>T; p.Gln241His). Of the two siblings only one responded to immune tolerance induction (ITI). These siblings have identical F9 gene mutations but differ with respect to the HLA alleles. Interestingly, an analysis of peptide-MHC binding affinities shows a significantly higher (one-sided unpaired t-test, P = 0.0018) median affinity for FIX-derived peptides in the sibling that responded to ITI. We conclude that the nature of the F9 gene mutation may be an important risk factor for the development of inhibitors. In addition, the HLA alleles of the individual patients, in conjunction with the mutation type, could be a predictor for the development of inhibitors as well as the response to ITI. PMID:25470321

  7. Genome-wide multi-omics profiling of colorectal cancer identifies immune determinants strongly associated with relapse

    PubMed Central

    Madhavan, Subha; Gusev, Yuriy; Natarajan, Thanemozhi G.; Song, Lei; Bhuvaneshwar, Krithika; Gauba, Robinder; Pandey, Abhishek; Haddad, Bassem R.; Goerlitz, David; Cheema, Amrita K.; Juhl, Hartmut; Kallakury, Bhaskar; Marshall, John L.; Byers, Stephen W.; Weiner, Louis M.

    2013-01-01

    The use and benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy to treat stage II colorectal cancer (CRC) patients is not well understood since the majority of these patients are cured by surgery alone. Identification of biological markers of relapse is a critical challenge to effectively target treatments to the ~20% of patients destined to relapse. We have integrated molecular profiling results of several “omics” data types to determine the most reliable prognostic biomarkers for relapse in CRC using data from 40 stage I and II CRC patients. We identified 31 multi-omics features that highly correlate with relapse. The data types were integrated using multi-step analytical approach with consecutive elimination of redundant molecular features. For each data type a systems biology analysis was performed to identify pathways biological processes and disease categories most affected in relapse. The biomarkers detected in tumors urine and blood of patients indicated a strong association with immune processes including aberrant regulation of T-cell and B-cell activation that could lead to overall differences in lymphocyte recruitment for tumor infiltration and markers indicating likelihood of future relapse. The immune response was the biologically most coherent signature that emerged from our analyses among several other biological processes and corroborates other studies showing a strong immune response in patients less likely to relapse. PMID:24312117

  8. A multiancestry study identifies novel genetic associations with CHRNA5 methylation in human brain and risk of nicotine dependence.

    PubMed

    Hancock, Dana B; Wang, Jen-Chyong; Gaddis, Nathan C; Levy, Joshua L; Saccone, Nancy L; Stitzel, Jerry A; Goate, Alison; Bierut, Laura J; Johnson, Eric O

    2015-10-15

    Nicotine dependence is influenced by chromosome 15q25.1 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), including the missense SNP rs16969968 that alters function of the ?5 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (CHRNA5) and noncoding SNPs that regulate CHRNA5 mRNA expression. We tested for cis-methylation quantitative trait loci (cis-meQTLs) using SNP genotypes and DNA methylation levels measured across the IREB2-HYKK-PSMA4-CHRNA5-CHRNA3-CHRNB4 genes on chromosome 15q25.1 in the BrainCloud and Brain QTL cohorts [total N = 175 European-Americans and 65 African-Americans (AAs)]. We identified eight SNPs that were significantly associated with CHRNA5 methylation in prefrontal cortex: P ranging from 6.0 × 10(-10) to 5.6 × 10(-5). These SNP-methylation associations were also significant in frontal cortex, temporal cortex and pons: P ranging from 4.8 × 10(-12) to 3.4 × 10(-3). Of the eight cis-meQTL SNPs, only the intronic CHRNB4 SNP rs11636753 was associated with CHRNA5 methylation independently of the known SNP effects in prefrontal cortex, and it was the most significantly associated SNP with nicotine dependence across five independent cohorts (total N = 7858 European ancestry and 3238 AA participants): P = 6.7 × 10(-4), odds ratio (OR) [95% confidence interval (CI)] = 1.11 (1.05-1.18). The rs11636753 major allele (G) was associated with lower CHRNA5 DNA methylation, lower CHRNA5 mRNA expression and increased nicotine dependence risk. Haplotype analyses showed that rs11636753-G and the functional rs16969968-A alleles together increased risk of nicotine dependence more than each variant alone: P = 3.1 × 10(-12), OR (95% CI) = 1.32 (1.22-1.43). Our findings identify a novel regulatory SNP association with nicotine dependence and connect, for the first time, previously observed differences in CHRNA5 mRNA expression and nicotine dependence risk to underlying DNA methylation differences. PMID:26220977

  9. Genetic determinants of mortality. Can findings from genome-wide association studies explain variation in human mortality?

    PubMed

    Ganna, Andrea; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, André G; Magnusson, Patrik K E; Pedersen, Nancy L; Ingelsson, Erik; Tiemeier, Henning

    2013-05-01

    Twin studies have estimated the heritability of longevity to be approximately 20-30 %. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have revealed a large number of determinants of morbidity, but so far, no new polymorphisms have been discovered to be associated with longevity per se in GWAS. We aim to determine whether the genetic architecture of mortality can be explained by single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with common traits and diseases related to mortality. By extensive quality control of published GWAS we created a genetic score from 707 common SNPs associated with 125 diseases or risk factors related with overall mortality. We prospectively studied the association of the genetic score with: (1) time-to-death; (2) incidence of the first of nine major diseases (coronary heart disease, stroke, heart failure, diabetes, dementia, lung, breast, colon and prostate cancers) in two population-based cohorts of Dutch and Swedish individuals (N = 15,039; age range 47-99 years). During a median follow-up of 6.3 years (max 22.2 years), we observed 4,318 deaths and 2,132 incident disease events. The genetic score was significantly associated with time-to-death [hazard ratio (HR) per added risk allele = 1.003, P value = 0.006; HR 4th vs. 1st quartile = 1.103]. The association between the genetic score and incidence of major diseases was stronger (HR per added risk allele = 1.004, P value = 0.002; HR 4th vs. 1st quartile = 1.160). Associations were stronger for individuals dying at older ages. Our findings are compatible with the view of mortality as a complex and highly polygenetic trait, not easily explainable by common genetic variants related to diseases and physiological traits. PMID:23354976

  10. The Nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, Stress and Aging: Identifying the Complex Interplay of Genetic Pathways Following the Treatment with Humic Substances

    PubMed Central

    Menzel, Ralph; Menzel, Stefanie; Swain, Suresh C.; Pietsch, Kerstin; Tiedt, Sophie; Witczak, Jördis; Stürzenbaum, Stephen R.; Steinberg, Christian E. W.

    2012-01-01

    Low concentrations of the dissolved leonardite humic acid HuminFeed® (HF) prolonged the lifespan and enhanced the thermal stress resistance of the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans. However, growth was impaired and reproduction delayed, effects which have also been identified in response to other polyphenolic monomers, including Tannic acid, Rosmarinic acid, and Caffeic acid. Moreover, a chemical modification of HF, which increases its phenolic/quinonoid moieties, magnified the biological impact on C. elegans. To gain a deep insight into the molecular basis of these effects, we performed global transcriptomics on young adult (3?days) and old adult (11?days) nematodes exposed to two different concentrations of HF. We also studied several C. elegans mutant strains in respect to HF derived longevity and compared all results with data obtained for the chemically modified HF. The gene expression pattern of young HF-treated nematodes displayed a significant overlap to other conditions known to provoke longevity, including various plant polyphenol monomers. Besides the regulation of parts of the metabolism, transforming growth factor-beta signaling, and Insulin-like signaling, lysosomal activities seem to contribute most to HF’s and modified HF’s lifespan prolonging action. These results support the notion that the phenolic/quinonoid moieties of humic substances are major building blocks that drive the physiological effects observed in C. elegans. PMID:22529848

  11. The Nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, Stress and Aging: Identifying the Complex Interplay of Genetic Pathways Following the Treatment with Humic Substances.

    PubMed

    Menzel, Ralph; Menzel, Stefanie; Swain, Suresh C; Pietsch, Kerstin; Tiedt, Sophie; Witczak, Jördis; Stürzenbaum, Stephen R; Steinberg, Christian E W

    2012-01-01

    Low concentrations of the dissolved leonardite humic acid HuminFeed(®) (HF) prolonged the lifespan and enhanced the thermal stress resistance of the model organism Caenorhabditis elegans. However, growth was impaired and reproduction delayed, effects which have also been identified in response to other polyphenolic monomers, including Tannic acid, Rosmarinic acid, and Caffeic acid. Moreover, a chemical modification of HF, which increases its phenolic/quinonoid moieties, magnified the biological impact on C. elegans. To gain a deep insight into the molecular basis of these effects, we performed global transcriptomics on young adult (3?days) and old adult (11?days) nematodes exposed to two different concentrations of HF. We also studied several C. elegans mutant strains in respect to HF derived longevity and compared all results with data obtained for the chemically modified HF. The gene expression pattern of young HF-treated nematodes displayed a significant overlap to other conditions known to provoke longevity, including various plant polyphenol monomers. Besides the regulation of parts of the metabolism, transforming growth factor-beta signaling, and Insulin-like signaling, lysosomal activities seem to contribute most to HF's and modified HF's lifespan prolonging action. These results support the notion that the phenolic/quinonoid moieties of humic substances are major building blocks that drive the physiological effects observed in C. elegans. PMID:22529848

  12. Molecular and genetic analyses of four nonfunctional S haplotype variants derived from a common ancestral S haplotype identified in sour cherry (Prunus cerasus L.).

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto, Tatsuya; Hauck, Nathanael R; Tao, Ryutaro; Jiang, Ning; Iezzoni, Amy F

    2010-02-01

    Tetraploid sour cherry (Prunus cerasus) has an S-RNase-based gametophytic self-incompatibility (GSI) system; however, individuals can be either self-incompatible (SI) or self-compatible (SC). Unlike the situation in the Solanaceae, where self-compatibility accompanying polyploidization is often due to the compatibility of heteroallelic pollen, the genotype-dependent loss of SI in sour cherry is due to the compatibility of pollen containing two nonfunctional S haplotypes. Sour cherry individuals with the S(4)S(6)S(36a)S(36b) genotype are predicted to be SC, as only pollen containing both nonfunctional S(36a) and S(36b) haplotypes would be SC. However, we previously found that individuals of this genotype were SI. Here we describe four nonfunctional S(36) variants. Our molecular analyses identified a mutation that would confer loss of stylar S function for one of the variants, and two alterations that might cause loss of pollen S function for all four variants. Genetic crosses showed that individuals possessing two nonfunctional S(36) haplotypes and two functional S haplotypes have reduced self-fertilization due to a very low frequency of transmission of the one pollen type that would be SC. Our finding that the underlying mechanism limiting successful transmission of genetically compatible gametes does not involve GSI is consistent with our previous genetic model for Prunus in which heteroallelic pollen is incompatible. This provides a unique case in which breakdown of SI does not occur despite the potential to generate SC pollen genotypes. PMID:19917768

  13. Molecular genetics of addiction and related heritable phenotypes: genome wide association approaches identify “connectivity constellation” and drug target genes with pleiotropic effects

    PubMed Central

    Uhl, George R; Drgon, Tomas; Johnson, Catherine; Li, Chuan-Yun; Contoreggi, Carlo; Hess, Judith; Naiman, Daniel; Liu, Qing-Rong

    2013-01-01

    Genome wide association (GWA) can elucidate molecular genetic bases for human individual differences in “complex” phenotypes that include vulnerability to addiction. Here, we review: a) evidence that supports polygenic models with (at least) modest heterogeneity for the genetic architectures of addiction and several related phenotypes; b) technical and ethical aspects of importance for understanding genome wide association data: genotyping in individual samples vs DNA pools, analytic approaches, power estimation and ethical issues in genotyping individuals with illegal behaviors; c) the samples and the data that shape our current understanding of the molecular genetics of individual differences in vulnerability to substance dependence and related phenotypes; d) overlaps between GWA datasets for dependence on different substances; e) overlaps between GWA data for addictions vs other heritable, brain-based phenotypes that include: i) bipolar disorder, ii) cognitive ability, iii) frontal lobe brain volume, iv) ability to successfully quit smoking, v) neuroticism and vi) Alzheimer’s disease. These convergent results identify potential targets for drugs that might modify addictions and play roles in these other phenotypes. They add to evidence that individual differences in the quality and quantity of brain connections make pleiotropic contributions to individual differences in vulnerability to addictions and to related brain disorders and phenotypes. A “connectivity constellation” of brain phenotypes and disorders appears to receive substantial pathogenic contributions from individual differences in a constellation of genes whose variants provide individual differences in the specification of brain connectivities during development and in adulthood. Heritable brain differences that underlie addiction vulnerability thus lie squarely in the midst of the repertoire of heritable brain differences that underlie vulnerability to other common brain disorders and phenotypes. PMID:18991966

  14. Population genetic relationships between Mediterranean populations determined by HLA allele distribution and a historic perspective.

    PubMed

    Arnaiz-Villena, A; Gomez-Casado, E; Martinez-Laso, J

    2002-08-01

    HLA genes allele distribution has been studied in Mediterranean and sub-Saharan populations. Their relatedness has been tested by genetic distances, neighbour-joining dendrograms and correspondence analyses. The population genetic relationships have been compared with the history of the classical populations living in the area. A revision of the historic postulates would have to be undertaken, particularly in the cases when genetics and history are overtly discordant. HLA genomics shows that: 1) Greeks share an important part of their genetic pool with sub-Saharan Africans (Ethiopians and west Africans) also supported by Chr 7 Markers. The gene flow from Black Africa to Greece may have occurred in Pharaonic times or when Saharan people emigrated after the present hyperarid conditions were established (5000 years B.C.). 2) Turks (Anatolians) do not significantly differ from other Mediterraneans, indicating that while the Asians Turks carried out an invasion with cultural significance (language), it is not genetically detectable. 3) Kurds and Armenians are genetically very close to Turks and other Middle East populations. 4) There is no HLA genetic trace of the so called Aryan invasion, which has only been defined on doubtful linguistic bases. 5) Iberians, including Basques, are related to north-African Berbers. 6) Present-day Algerian and Moroccan urban and country people show an indistinguishable Berber HLA profile. PMID:12392505

  15. The Pakistan Risk of Myocardial Infarction Study: a resource for the study of genetic, lifestyle and other determinants of myocardial infarction in South Asia

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The burden of coronary heart disease (CHD) is increasing at a greater rate in South Asia than in any other region globally, but there is little direct evidence about its determinants. The Pakistan Risk of Myocardial Infarction Study (PROMIS) is an epidemiological resource to enable reliable study of genetic, lifestyle and other determinants of CHD in South Asia. By March 2009, PROMIS had recruited over 5,000 cases of first-ever confirmed acute myocardial infarction (MI) and over 5,000 matched controls aged 30–80 years. For each participant, information has been recorded on demographic factors, lifestyle, medical and family history, anthropometry, and a 12-lead electrocardiogram. A range of biological samples has been collected and stored, including DNA, plasma, serum and whole blood. During its next stage, the study aims to expand recruitment to achieve a total of about 20,000 cases and about 20,000 controls, and, in subsets of participants, to enrich the resource by collection of monocytes, establishment of lymphoblastoid cell lines, and by resurveying participants. Measurements in progress include profiling of candidate biochemical factors, assay of 45,000 variants in 2,100 candidate genes, and a genomewide association scan of over 650,000 genetic markers. We have established a large epidemiological resource for CHD in South Asia. In parallel with its further expansion and enrichment, the PROMIS resource will be systematically harvested to help identify and evaluate genetic and other determinants of MI in South Asia. Findings from this study should advance scientific understanding and inform regionally appropriate disease prevention and control strategies. PMID:19404752

  16. Intrinsic susceptibility MRI identifies tumors with ALKF1174L mutation in genetically-engineered murine models of high-risk neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Jamin, Yann; Glass, Laura; Hallsworth, Albert; George, Rani; Koh, Dow-Mu; Pearson, Andrew D J; Chesler, Louis; Robinson, Simon P

    2014-01-01

    The early identification of children presenting ALK(F1174L)-mutated neuroblastoma, which are associated with resistance to the promising ALK inhibitor crizotinib and a marked poorer prognosis, has become a clinical priority. In comparing the radiology of the novel Th-ALK(F1174L)/Th-MYCN and the well-established Th-MYCN genetically-engineered murine models of neuroblastoma using MRI, we have identified a marked ALK(F1174L)-driven vascular phenotype. We demonstrate that quantitation of the transverse relaxation rate R2* (s(-1)) using intrinsic susceptibility-MRI under baseline conditions and during hyperoxia, can robustly discriminate this differential vascular phenotype, and identify MYCN-driven tumors harboring the ALK(F1174L) mutation with high specificity and selectivity. Intrinsic susceptibility-MRI could thus potentially provide a non-invasive and clinically-exploitable method to help identifying children with MYCN-driven neuroblastoma harboring the ALK(F1174L) mutation at the time of diagnosis. PMID:24667968

  17. The Use of Patient-Specific Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells (iPSCs) to Identify Osteoclast Defects in Rare Genetic Bone Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Chen, I-Ping

    2014-01-01

    More than 500 rare genetic bone disorders have been described, but for many of them only limited treatment options are available. Challenges for studying these bone diseases come from a lack of suitable animal models and unavailability of skeletal tissues for studies. Effectors for skeletal abnormalities of bone disorders may be abnormal bone formation directed by osteoblasts or anomalous bone resorption by osteoclasts, or both. Patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) can be generated from somatic cells of various tissue sources and in theory can be differentiated into any desired cell type. However, successful differentiation of hiPSCs into functional bone cells is still a challenge. Our group focuses on the use of human iPSCs (hiPSCs) to identify osteoclast defects in craniometaphyseal dysplasia. In this review, we describe the impact of stem cell technology on research for better treatment of such disorders, the generation of hiPSCs from patients with rare genetic bone disorders and current protocols for differentiating hiPSCs into osteoclasts. PMID:25621177

  18. Trans-ancestry genome-wide association study identifies 12 genetic loci influencing blood pressure and implicates a role for DNA methylation.

    PubMed

    Kato, Norihiro; Loh, Marie; Takeuchi, Fumihiko; Verweij, Niek; Wang, Xu; Zhang, Weihua; Kelly, Tanika N; Saleheen, Danish; Lehne, Benjamin; Mateo Leach, Irene; Drong, Alexander W; Abbott, James; Wahl, Simone; Tan, Sian-Tsung; Scott, William R; Campanella, Gianluca; Chadeau-Hyam, Marc; Afzal, Uzma; Ahluwalia, Tarunveer S; Bonder, Marc Jan; Chen, Peng; Dehghan, Abbas; Edwards, Todd L; Esko, Tõnu; Go, Min Jin; Harris, Sarah E; Hartiala, Jaana; Kasela, Silva; Kasturiratne, Anuradhani; Khor, Chiea-Chuen; Kleber, Marcus E; Li, Huaixing; Mok, Zuan Yu; Nakatochi, Masahiro; Sapari, Nur Sabrina; Saxena, Richa; Stewart, Alexandre F R; Stolk, Lisette; Tabara, Yasuharu; Teh, Ai Ling; Wu, Ying; Wu, Jer-Yuarn; Zhang, Yi; Aits, Imke; Da Silva Couto Alves, Alexessander; Das, Shikta; Dorajoo, Rajkumar; Hopewell, Jemma C; Kim, Yun Kyoung; Koivula, Robert W; Luan, Jian'an; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Nguyen, Quang N; Pereira, Mark A; Postmus, Iris; Raitakari, Olli T; Bryan, Molly Scannell; Scott, Robert A; Sorice, Rossella; Tragante, Vinicius; Traglia, Michela; White, Jon; Yamamoto, Ken; Zhang, Yonghong; Adair, Linda S; Ahmed, Alauddin; Akiyama, Koichi; Asif, Rasheed; Aung, Tin; Barroso, Inês; Bjonnes, Andrew; Braun, Timothy R; Cai, Hui; Chang, Li-Ching; Chen, Chien-Hsiun; Cheng, Ching-Yu; Chong, Yap-Seng; Collins, Rory; Courtney, Regina; Davies, Gail; Delgado, Graciela; Do, Loi D; Doevendans, Pieter A; Gansevoort, Ron T; Gao, Yu-Tang; Grammer, Tanja B; Grarup, Niels; Grewal, Jagvir; Gu, Dongfeng; Wander, Gurpreet S; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Hazen, Stanley L; He, Jing; Heng, Chew-Kiat; Hixson, James E; Hofman, Albert; Hsu, Chris; Huang, Wei; Husemoen, Lise L N; Hwang, Joo-Yeon; Ichihara, Sahoko; Igase, Michiya; Isono, Masato; Justesen, Johanne M; Katsuya, Tomohiro; Kibriya, Muhammad G; Kim, Young Jin; Kishimoto, Miyako; Koh, Woon-Puay; Kohara, Katsuhiko; Kumari, Meena; Kwek, Kenneth; Lee, Nanette R; Lee, Jeannette; Liao, Jiemin; Lieb, Wolfgang; Liewald, David C M; Matsubara, Tatsuaki; Matsushita, Yumi; Meitinger, Thomas; Mihailov, Evelin; Milani, Lili; Mills, Rebecca; Mononen, Nina; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Nabika, Toru; Nakashima, Eitaro; Ng, Hong Kiat; Nikus, Kjell; Nutile, Teresa; Ohkubo, Takayoshi; Ohnaka, Keizo; Parish, Sarah; Paternoster, Lavinia; Peng, Hao; Peters, Annette; Pham, Son T; Pinidiyapathirage, Mohitha J; Rahman, Mahfuzar; Rakugi, Hiromi; Rolandsson, Olov; Rozario, Michelle Ann; Ruggiero, Daniela; Sala, Cinzia F; Sarju, Ralhan; Shimokawa, Kazuro; Snieder, Harold; Sparsø, Thomas; Spiering, Wilko; Starr, John M; Stott, David J; Stram, Daniel O; Sugiyama, Takao; Szymczak, Silke; Tang, W H Wilson; Tong, Lin; Trompet, Stella; Turjanmaa, Väinö; Ueshima, Hirotsugu; Uitterlinden, André G; Umemura, Satoshi; Vaarasmaki, Marja; van Dam, Rob M; van Gilst, Wiek H; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J; Viikari, Jorma S; Waldenberger, Melanie; Wang, Yiqin; Wang, Aili; Wilson, Rory; Wong, Tien-Yin; Xiang, Yong-Bing; Yamaguchi, Shuhei; Ye, Xingwang; Young, Robin D; Young, Terri L; Yuan, Jian-Min; Zhou, Xueya; Asselbergs, Folkert W; Ciullo, Marina; Clarke, Robert; Deloukas, Panos; Franke, Andre; Franks, Paul W; Franks, Steve; Friedlander, Yechiel; Gross, Myron D; Guo, Zhirong; Hansen, Torben; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Jørgensen, Torben; Jukema, J Wouter; Kähönen, Mika; Kajio, Hiroshi; Kivimaki, Mika; Lee, Jong-Young; Lehtimäki, Terho; Linneberg, Allan; Miki, Tetsuro; Pedersen, Oluf; Samani, Nilesh J; Sørensen, Thorkild I A; Takayanagi, Ryoichi; Toniolo, Daniela; Ahsan, Habibul; Allayee, Hooman; Chen, Yuan-Tsong; Danesh, John; Deary, Ian J; Franco, Oscar H; Franke, Lude; Heijman, Bastiaan T; Holbrook, Joanna D; Isaacs, Aaron; Kim, Bong-Jo; Lin, Xu; Liu, Jianjun; März, Winfried; Metspalu, Andres; Mohlke, Karen L; Sanghera, Dharambir K; Shu, Xiao-Ou; van Meurs, Joyce B J; Vithana, Eranga; Wickremasinghe, Ananda R; Wijmenga, Cisca; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce H W; Yokota, Mitsuhiro; Zheng, Wei; Zhu, Dingliang; Vineis, Paolo; Kyrtopoulos, Soterios A; Kleinjans, Jos C S; McCarthy, Mark I; Soong, Richie; Gieger, Christian; Scott, James; Teo, Yik-Ying; He, Jiang; Elliott, Paul; Tai, E Shyong; van der Harst, Pim; Kooner, Jaspal S; Chambers, John C

    2015-11-01

    We carried out a trans-ancestry genome-wide association and replication study of blood pressure phenotypes among up to 320,251 individuals of East Asian, European and South Asian ancestry. We find genetic variants at 12 new loci to be associated with blood pressure (P = 3.9 × 10(-11) to 5.0 × 10(-21)). The sentinel blood pressure SNPs are enriched for association with DNA methylation at multiple nearby CpG sites, suggesting that, at some of the loci identified, DNA methylation may lie on the regulatory pathway linking sequence variation to blood pressure. The sentinel SNPs at the 12 new loci point to genes involved in vascular smooth muscle (IGFBP3, KCNK3, PDE3A and PRDM6) and renal (ARHGAP24, OSR1, SLC22A7 and TBX2) function. The new and known genetic variants predict increased left ventricular mass, circulating levels of NT-proBNP, and cardiovascular and all-cause mortality (P = 0.04 to 8.6 × 10(-6)). Our results provide new evidence for the role of DNA methylation in blood pressure regulation. PMID:26390057

  19. An Integrated Approach to Identify and Deploy Novel Genetic Determinants From Resurrection Plants for Improved Dehydration Tolerance of Crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An understanding of plant responses to dehydration has important consequences not only for plant biology in general but also more directly for agriculture and bioenergy. Over 10% of arable lands are affected by drought and salinity, declining average yields for most crops by more than 50%. In 2000 c...

  20. Genetic disassembly and combinatorial reassembly identify a minimal functional repertoire of type III effectors in Pseudomonas syringae.

    PubMed

    Cunnac, Sébastien; Chakravarthy, Suma; Kvitko, Brian H; Russell, Alistair B; Martin, Gregory B; Collmer, Alan

    2011-02-15

    The virulence of Pseudomonas syringae and many other proteobacterial pathogens is dependent on complex repertoires of effector proteins injected into host cells by type III secretion systems. The 28 well-expressed effector genes in the repertoire of the model pathogen P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000 were deleted to produce polymutant DC3000D28E. Growth of DC3000D28E in Nicotiana benthamiana was symptomless and 4 logs lower than that of DC3000?hopQ1-1, which causes disease in this model plant. DC3000D28E seemed functionally effectorless but otherwise WT in diagnostic phenotypes relevant to plant interactions (for example, ability to inject the AvrPto-Cya reporter into N. benthamiana). Various effector genes were integrated by homologous recombination into native loci or by a programmable or random in vivo assembly shuttle (PRIVAS) system into the exchangeable effector locus in the Hrp pathogenicity island of DC3000D28E. The latter method exploited dual adapters and recombination in yeast for efficient assembly of PCR products into programmed or random combinations of multiple effector genes. Native and PRIVAS-mediated integrations were combined to identify a minimal functional repertoire of eight effector genes that restored much of the virulence of DC3000?hopQ1-1 in N. benthamiana, revealing a hierarchy in effector function: AvrPtoB acts with priority in suppressing immunity, enabling other effectors to promote further growth (HopM1 and HopE1), chlorosis (HopG1), lesion formation (HopAM1-1), and near full growth and symptom production (AvrE, HopAA1-1, and/or HopN1 functioning synergistically with the previous effectors). DC3000D28E, the PRIVAS method, and minimal functional repertoires provide new resources for probing the plant immune system. PMID:21282655

  1. Linkage Group Selection to Investigate Genetic Determinants of Complex Traits of Malaria Parasites 

    E-print Network

    Pattaradilokrat, Sittiporn

    2008-01-01

    Malaria parasites of the species infecting humans and animal hosts exhibit genetic and phenotypic diversity. Some of this diversity, including the responses to anti-malarial drugs, growth rate and virulence and antigenic ...

  2. Heterogeneity of Genetic Pathways toward Daptomycin Nonsusceptibility in Staphylococcus aureus Determined by Adjunctive

    E-print Network

    Nizet, Victor

    Heterogeneity of Genetic Pathways toward Daptomycin Nonsusceptibility in Staphylococcus aureus of daptomycin nonsusceptibility (DNS). This study used a clinical methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus of me- thicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection. However, DAP-nonsusceptible (DNS

  3. Behavioral versus genetic determination of lipoproteins andidentical twins discordant for exercise

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Paul T.; Blanche, Patricia J.; Krauss, Ronald M.

    2004-06-01

    Lipoprotein and weight differences between vigorously active and sedentary MZ twins are used to: (1) estimate the effects of training while controlling for genotype; (2) estimate genetic concordance in the presence of divergent lifestyles.

  4. Genes determining yeast replicative life span in a long-lived genetic background

    E-print Network

    Fields, Stan

    (three genetic models of calorie restriction) significantly enhanced longevity. In addition, over in a strain-specific fashion. This is also not the case, as some interventions, such as calorie restriction

  5. Genetic counseling

    MedlinePLUS

    ... certain diseases are also often determined by genes. Genetic counseling is the process where parents can learn more ... up to you whether or not to have genetic counseling and testing. You will want to think about ...

  6. Identifying the ionically bound cell wall and intracellular glycoside hydrolases in late growth stage Arabidopsis stems: implications for the genetic engineering of bioenergy crops.

    PubMed

    Wei, Hui; Brunecky, Roman; Donohoe, Bryon S; Ding, Shi-You; Ciesielski, Peter N; Yang, Shihui; Tucker, Melvin P; Himmel, Michael E

    2015-01-01

    Identifying the cell wall-ionically bound glycoside hydrolases (GHs) in Arabidopsis stems is important for understanding the regulation of cell wall integrity. For cell wall proteomics studies, the preparation of clean cell wall fractions is a challenge since cell walls constitute an open compartment, which is more likely to contain a mixture of intracellular and extracellular proteins due to cell leakage at the late growth stage. Here, we utilize a CaCl2-extraction procedure to isolate non-structural proteins from Arabidopsis whole stems, followed by the in-solution and in-gel digestion methods coupled with Nano-LC-MS/MS, bioinformatics and literature analyses. This has led to the identification of 75 proteins identified using the in-solution method and 236 proteins identified by the in-gel method, among which about 10% of proteins predicted to be secreted. Together, eight cell wall proteins, namely AT1G75040, AT5G26000, AT3G57260, AT4G21650, AT3G52960, AT3G49120, AT5G49360, and AT3G14067, were identified by the in-solution method; among them, three were the GHs (AT5G26000, myrosinase 1, GH1; AT3G57260, ?-1,3-glucanase 2, GH17; AT5G49360, bifunctional XYL 1/?-L-arabinofuranosidase, GH3). Moreover, four more GHs: AT4G30270 (xyloglucan endotransferase, GH16), AT1G68560 (bifunctional ?-l-arabinofuranosidase/XYL, GH31), AT1G12240 (invertase, GH32) and AT2G28470 (?-galactosidase 8, GH35), were identified by the in-gel solution method only. Notably, more than half of above identified GHs are xylan- or hemicellulose-modifying enzymes, and will likely have an impact on cellulose accessibility, which is a critical factor for downstream enzymatic hydrolysis of plant tissues for biofuels production. The implications of these cell wall proteins identified at the late growth stage for the genetic engineering of bioenergy crops are discussed. PMID:26029221

  7. Identifying the ionically bound cell wall and intracellular glycoside hydrolases in late growth stage Arabidopsis stems: implications for the genetic engineering of bioenergy crops

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Hui; Brunecky, Roman; Donohoe, Bryon S.; Ding, Shi-You; Ciesielski, Peter N.; Yang, Shihui; Tucker, Melvin P.; Himmel, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    Identifying the cell wall-ionically bound glycoside hydrolases (GHs) in Arabidopsis stems is important for understanding the regulation of cell wall integrity. For cell wall proteomics studies, the preparation of clean cell wall fractions is a challenge since cell walls constitute an open compartment, which is more likely to contain a mixture of intracellular and extracellular proteins due to cell leakage at the late growth stage. Here, we utilize a CaCl2-extraction procedure to isolate non-structural proteins from Arabidopsis whole stems, followed by the in-solution and in-gel digestion methods coupled with Nano-LC-MS/MS, bioinformatics and literature analyses. This has led to the identification of 75 proteins identified using the in-solution method and 236 proteins identified by the in-gel method, among which about 10% of proteins predicted to be secreted. Together, eight cell wall proteins, namely AT1G75040, AT5G26000, AT3G57260, AT4G21650, AT3G52960, AT3G49120, AT5G49360, and AT3G14067, were identified by the in-solution method; among them, three were the GHs (AT5G26000, myrosinase 1, GH1; AT3G57260, ?-1,3-glucanase 2, GH17; AT5G49360, bifunctional XYL 1/?-L-arabinofuranosidase, GH3). Moreover, four more GHs: AT4G30270 (xyloglucan endotransferase, GH16), AT1G68560 (bifunctional ?-l-arabinofuranosidase/XYL, GH31), AT1G12240 (invertase, GH32) and AT2G28470 (?-galactosidase 8, GH35), were identified by the in-gel solution method only. Notably, more than half of above identified GHs are xylan- or hemicellulose-modifying enzymes, and will likely have an impact on cellulose accessibility, which is a critical factor for downstream enzymatic hydrolysis of plant tissues for biofuels production. The implications of these cell wall proteins identified at the late growth stage for the genetic engineering of bioenergy crops are discussed. PMID:26029221

  8. Sex without sex chromosomes: genetic architecture of multiple loci independently segregating to determine sex ratios in the copepod Tigriopus californicus.

    PubMed

    Alexander, H J; Richardson, J M L; Edmands, S; Anholt, B R

    2015-12-01

    Sex-determining systems are remarkably diverse and may evolve rapidly. Polygenic sex-determination systems are predicted to be transient and evolutionarily unstable, yet examples have been reported across a range of taxa. Here, we provide the first direct evidence of polygenic sex determination in Tigriopus californicus, a harpacticoid copepod with no heteromorphic sex chromosomes. Using genetically distinct inbred lines selected for male- and female-biased clutches, we generated a genetic map with 39 SNPs across 12 chromosomes. Quantitative trait locus mapping of sex ratio phenotype (the proportion of male offspring produced by an F2 female) in four F2 families revealed six independently segregating quantitative trait loci on five separate chromosomes, explaining 19% of the variation in sex ratios. The sex ratio phenotype varied among loci across chromosomes in both direction and magnitude, with the strongest phenotypic effects on chromosome 10 moderated to some degree by loci on four other chromosomes. For a given locus, sex ratio phenotype varied in magnitude for individuals derived from different dam lines. These data, together with the environmental factors known to contribute to sex determination, characterize the underlying complexity and potential lability of sex determination, and confirm the polygenic architecture of sex determination in T. californicus. PMID:26332493

  9. Quantitative determination of casein genetic variants in goat milk: Application in Girgentana dairy goat breed.

    PubMed

    Montalbano, Maria; Segreto, Roberta; Di Gerlando, Rosalia; Mastrangelo, Salvatore; Sardina, Maria Teresa

    2016-02-01

    The study was conducted to develop a high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) method to quantify casein genetic variants (?s2-, ?-, and ?-casein) in milk of homozygous individuals of Girgentana goat breed. For calibration experiments, pure genetic variants were extracted from individual milk samples of animals with known genotypes. The described HPLC approach was precise, accurate and highly suitable for quantification of goat casein genetic variants of homozygous individuals. The amount of each casein per allele was: ?s2-casein A = 2.9 ± 0.8 g/L and F = 1.8 ± 0.4 g/L; ?-casein C = 3.0 ± 0.8 g/L and C1 = 2.0 ± 0.7 g/L and ?-casein A = 1.6 ± 0.3 g/L and B = 1.1 ± 0.2 g/L. A good correlation was found between the quantities of ?s2-casein genetic variants A and F, and ?-casein C and C1 with other previously described method. The main important result was obtained for ?-casein because, till now, no data were available on quantification of single genetic variants for this protein. PMID:26304408

  10. Connectivity in grey reef sharks (Carcharhinus amblyrhynchos) determined using empirical and simulated genetic data

    PubMed Central

    Momigliano, Paolo; Harcourt, Robert; Robbins, William D.; Stow, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Grey reef sharks (Carcharhinus amblyrhynchos) can be one of the numerically dominant high order predators on pristine coral reefs, yet their numbers have declined even in the highly regulated Australian Great Barrier Reef (GBR) Marine Park. Knowledge of both large scale and fine scale genetic connectivity of grey reef sharks is essential for their effective management, but no genetic data are yet available. We investigated grey reef shark genetic structure in the GBR across a 1200?km latitudinal gradient, comparing empirical data with models simulating different levels of migration. The empirical data did not reveal any genetic structuring along the entire latitudinal gradient sampled, suggesting regular widespread dispersal and gene flow of the species throughout most of the GBR. Our simulated datasets indicate that even with substantial migrations (up to 25% of individuals migrating between neighboring reefs) both large scale genetic structure and genotypic spatial autocorrelation at the reef scale were maintained. We suggest that present migration rates therefore exceed this level. These findings have important implications regarding the effectiveness of networks of spatially discontinuous Marine Protected Areas to protect reef sharks. PMID:26314287

  11. Connectivity in grey reef sharks (Carcharhinus amblyrhynchos) determined using empirical and simulated genetic data.

    PubMed

    Momigliano, Paolo; Harcourt, Robert; Robbins, William D; Stow, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Grey reef sharks (Carcharhinus amblyrhynchos) can be one of the numerically dominant high order predators on pristine coral reefs, yet their numbers have declined even in the highly regulated Australian Great Barrier Reef (GBR) Marine Park. Knowledge of both large scale and fine scale genetic connectivity of grey reef sharks is essential for their effective management, but no genetic data are yet available. We investigated grey reef shark genetic structure in the GBR across a 1200?km latitudinal gradient, comparing empirical data with models simulating different levels of migration. The empirical data did not reveal any genetic structuring along the entire latitudinal gradient sampled, suggesting regular widespread dispersal and gene flow of the species throughout most of the GBR. Our simulated datasets indicate that even with substantial migrations (up to 25% of individuals migrating between neighboring reefs) both large scale genetic structure and genotypic spatial autocorrelation at the reef scale were maintained. We suggest that present migration rates therefore exceed this level. These findings have important implications regarding the effectiveness of networks of spatially discontinuous Marine Protected Areas to protect reef sharks. PMID:26314287

  12. Meta-analysis identifies 13 new loci associated with waist-hip ratio and reveals sexual dimorphism in the genetic basis of fat distribution

    PubMed Central

    Heid, Iris M; Jackson, Anne U; Randall, Joshua C; Winkler, Thomas W; Qi, Lu; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Zillikens, M Carola; Speliotes, Elizabeth K; Mägi, Reedik; Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie; White, Charles C; Bouatia-Naji, Nabila; Harris, Tamara B; Berndt, Sonja I; Ingelsson, Erik; Willer, Cristen J; Weedon, Michael N; Luan, Jian’An; Vedantam, Sailaja; Esko, Tõnu; Kilpeläinen, Tuomas O; Kutalik, Zoltán; Li, Shengxu; Monda, Keri L; Dixon, Anna L; Holmes, Christopher C; Kaplan, Lee M; Liang, Liming; Min, Josine L; Moffatt, Miriam F; Molony, Cliona; Nicholson, George; Schadt, Eric E; Zondervan, Krina T; Feitosa, Mary F; Ferreira, Teresa; Allen, Hana Lango; Weyant, Robert J; Wheeler, Eleanor; Wood, Andrew R; Estrada, Karol; Goddard, Michael E; Lettre, Guillaume; Mangino, Massimo; Nyholt, Dale R; Purcell, Shaun; Smith, Albert Vernon; Visscher, Peter M; Yang, Jian; McCarroll, Steven A; Nemesh, James; Voight, Benjamin F; Absher, Devin; Amin, Najaf; Aspelund, Thor; Coin, Lachlan; Glazer, Nicole L; Hayward, Caroline; Heard-costa, Nancy L; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Johansson, Åsa; Johnson, Toby; Kaakinen, Marika; Kapur, Karen; Ketkar, Shamika; Knowles, Joshua W; Kraft, Peter; Kraja, Aldi T; Lamina, Claudia; Leitzmann, Michael F; McKnight, Barbara; Morris, Andrew P; Ong, Ken K; Perry, John R B; Peters, Marjolein J; Polasek, Ozren; Prokopenko, Inga; Rayner, Nigel W; Ripatti, Samuli; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Robertson, Neil R; Sanna, Serena; Sovio, Ulla; Surakka, Ida; Teumer, Alexander; van Wingerden, Sophie; Vitart, Veronique; Zhao, Jing Hua; Cavalcanti-Proença, Christine; Chines, Peter S; Fisher, Eva; Kulzer, Jennifer R; Lecoeur, Cecile; Narisu, Narisu; Sandholt, Camilla; Scott, Laura J; Silander, Kaisa; Stark, Klaus; Tammesoo, Mari-Liis; Teslovich, Tanya M; Timpson, Nicholas John; Watanabe, Richard M; Welch, Ryan; Chasman, Daniel I; Cooper, Matthew N; Jansson, John-Olov; Kettunen, Johannes; Lawrence, Robert W; Pellikka, Niina; Perola, Markus; Vandenput, Liesbeth; Alavere, Helene; Almgren, Peter; Atwood, Larry D; Bennett, Amanda J; Biffar, Reiner; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Bornstein, Stefan R; Buchanan, Thomas A; Campbell, Harry; Day, Ian N M; Dei, Mariano; Dörr, Marcus; Elliott, Paul; Erdos, Michael R; Eriksson, Johan G; Freimer, Nelson B; Fu, Mao; Gaget, Stefan; Geus, Eco J C; Gjesing, Anette P; Grallert, Harald; Gräßler, Jürgen; Groves, Christopher J; Guiducci, Candace; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Hassanali, Neelam; Havulinna, Aki S; Herzig, Karl-Heinz; Hicks, Andrew A; Hui, Jennie; Igl, Wilmar; Jousilahti, Pekka; Jula, Antti; Kajantie, Eero; Kinnunen, Leena; Kolcic, Ivana; Koskinen, Seppo; Kovacs, Peter; Kroemer, Heyo K; Krzelj, Vjekoslav; Kuusisto, Johanna; Kvaloy, Kirsti; Laitinen, Jaana; Lantieri, Olivier; Lathrop, G Mark; Lokki, Marja-Liisa; Luben, Robert N; Ludwig, Barbara; McArdle, Wendy L; McCarthy, Anne; Morken, Mario A; Nelis, Mari; Neville, Matt J; Paré, Guillaume; Parker, Alex N; Peden, John F; Pichler, Irene; Pietiläinen, Kirsi H; Platou, Carl G P; Pouta, Anneli; Ridderstråle, Martin; Samani, Nilesh J; Saramies, Jouko; Sinisalo, Juha; Smit, Jan H; Strawbridge, Rona J; Stringham, Heather M; Swift, Amy J; Teder-Laving, Maris; Thomson, Brian; Usala, Gianluca; van Meurs, Joyce B J; van Ommen, Gert-Jan; Vatin, Vincent; Volpato, Claudia B; Wallaschofski, Henri; Walters, G Bragi; Widen, Elisabeth; Wild, Sarah H; Willemsen, Gonneke; Witte, Daniel R; Zgaga, Lina; Zitting, Paavo; Beilby, John P; James, Alan L; Kähönen, Mika; Lehtimäki, Terho; Nieminen, Markku S; Ohlsson, Claes; Palmer, Lyle J; Raitakari, Olli; Ridker, Paul M; Stumvoll, Michael; Tönjes, Anke; Viikari, Jorma; Balkau, Beverley; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Bergman, Richard N; Boeing, Heiner; Smith, George Davey; Ebrahim, Shah; Froguel, Philippe; Hansen, Torben; Hengstenberg, Christian; Hveem, Kristian; Isomaa, Bo; Jørgensen, Torben; Karpe, Fredrik; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Laakso, Markku; Lawlor, Debbie A; Marre, Michel; Meitinger, Thomas; Metspalu, Andres; Midthjell, Kristian; Pedersen, Oluf; Salomaa, Veikko; Schwarz, Peter E H; Tuomi, Tiinamaija; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Valle, Timo T; Wareham, Nicholas J; Arnold, Alice M; Beckmann, Jacques S; Bergmann, Sven; Boerwinkle, Eric; Boomsma, Dorret I; Caulfield, Mark J; Collins, Francis S; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Gyllensten, Ulf; Hamsten, Anders; Hattersley, Andrew T; Hofman, Albert; Hu, Frank B; Illig, Thomas; Iribarren, Carlos; Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta; Kao, W H Linda; Kaprio, Jaakko; Launer, Lenore J

    2011-01-01

    Waist-hip ratio (WHR) is a measure of body fat distribution and a predictor of metabolic consequences independent of overall adiposity. WHR is heritable, but few genetic variants influencing this trait have been identified. We conducted a meta-analysis of 32 genome-wide association studies for WHR adjusted for body mass index (comprising up to 77,167 participants), following up 16 loci in an additional 29 studies (comprising up to 113,636 subjects). We identified 13 new loci in or near RSPO3, VEGFA, TBX15-WARS2, NFE2L3, GRB14, DNM3-PIGC, ITPR2-SSPN, LY86, HOXC13, ADAMTS9, ZNRF3-KREMEN1, NISCH-STAB1 and CPEB4 (P = 1.9 × 10?9 to P = 1.8 × 10?40) and the known signal at LYPLAL1. Seven of these loci exhibited marked sexual dimorphism, all with a stronger effect on WHR in women than men (P for sex difference = 1.9 × 10?3 to P = 1.2 × 10?13). These findings provide evidence for multiple loci that modulate body fat distribution independent of overall adiposity and reveal strong gene-by-sex interactions. PMID:20935629

  13. Genetically determined mitochondrial preservation and cardioprotection against myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury in a consomic rat model

    PubMed Central

    Nabbi, Raha; Gadicherla, Ashish K.; Kersten, Judy R.; Stowe, David F.; Lazar, Jozef

    2013-01-01

    Cardioprotection may be genome dependent. One example is the increased tolerance to cardiac ischemia-reperfusion (IR) in Brown Norway (BN) compared with Dahl salt-sensitive (SS) rats. By narrowing the genetic difference to chromosome 6 only, we found the consomic SS6BN to be similarly IR tolerant as BN. We hypothesized that better preserved mitochondrial structure and function are genetically determined and therefore critically linked to myocardial IR tolerance associated with BN chromosome 6. Langendorff-prepared BN, SS, and SS6BN rat hearts were subjected to IR, while corresponding controls were continuously perfused. Though largely equal in nonischemic controls, assessment of functional data and ventricular infarct size in IR experiments confirmed that BN and SS6BN have an equally higher tolerance to IR than SS hearts. This was complemented by equally better preserved mitochondrial structure, oxidative phosphorylation, and calcium retention capacity in BN and SS6BN vs. SS hearts. For the first time, our data indicate that SS6BN are as resistant to IR injury as BN hearts in mitochondrial and myocardial function and viability compared with SS hearts. These findings not only link myocardial and mitochondrial protection in a genetic model but also suggest that genetic information on rat chromosome 6 is critical for mitochondrial preservation and IR tolerance. PMID:24380873

  14. A High-Throughput In Vitro Drug Screen in a Genetically Engineered Mouse Model of Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma Identifies BMS-754807 as a Promising Therapeutic Agent

    PubMed Central

    Halvorson, Kyle G.; Barton, Kelly L.; Schroeder, Kristin; Misuraca, Katherine L.; Hoeman, Christine; Chung, Alex; Crabtree, Donna M.; Cordero, Francisco J.; Singh, Raj; Spasojevic, Ivan; Berlow, Noah; Pal, Ranadip; Becher, Oren J.

    2015-01-01

    Diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas (DIPGs) represent a particularly lethal type of pediatric brain cancer with no effective therapeutic options. Our laboratory has previously reported the development of genetically engineered DIPG mouse models using the RCAS/tv-a system, including a model driven by PDGF-B, H3.3K27M, and p53 loss. These models can serve as a platform in which to test novel therapeutics prior to the initiation of human clinical trials. In this study, an in vitro high-throughput drug screen as part of the DIPG preclinical consortium using cell-lines derived from our DIPG models identified BMS-754807 as a drug of interest in DIPG. BMS-754807 is a potent and reversible small molecule multi-kinase inhibitor with many targets including IGF-1R, IR, MET, TRKA, TRKB, AURKA, AURKB. In vitro evaluation showed significant cytotoxic effects with an IC50 of 0.13 ?M, significant inhibition of proliferation at a concentration of 1.5 ?M, as well as inhibition of AKT activation. Interestingly, IGF-1R signaling was absent in serum-free cultures from the PDGF-B; H3.3K27M; p53 deficient model suggesting that the antitumor activity of BMS-754807 in this model is independent of IGF-1R. In vivo, systemic administration of BMS-754807 to DIPG-bearing mice did not prolong survival. Pharmacokinetic analysis demonstrated that tumor tissue drug concentrations of BMS-754807 were well below the identified IC50, suggesting that inadequate drug delivery may limit in vivo efficacy. In summary, an unbiased in vitro drug screen identified BMS-754807 as a potential therapeutic agent in DIPG, but BMS-754807 treatment in vivo by systemic delivery did not significantly prolong survival of DIPG-bearing mice. PMID:25748921

  15. The Roles of Standing Genetic Variation and Evolutionary History in Determining the Evolvability of Anti-Predator Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Dworkin, Ian; Wagner, Aaron P.

    2014-01-01

    Standing genetic variation and the historical environment in which that variation arises (evolutionary history) are both potentially significant determinants of a population's capacity for evolutionary response to a changing environment. Using the open-ended digital evolution software Avida, we evaluated the relative importance of these two factors in influencing evolutionary trajectories in the face of sudden environmental change. We examined how historical exposure to predation pressures, different levels of genetic variation, and combinations of the two, affected the evolvability of anti-predator strategies and competitive abilities in the presence or absence of threats from new, invasive predator populations. We show that while standing genetic variation plays some role in determining evolutionary responses, evolutionary history has the greater influence on a population's capacity to evolve anti-predator traits, i.e. traits effective against novel predators. This adaptability likely reflects the relative ease of repurposing existing, relevant genes and traits, and the broader potential value of the generation and maintenance of adaptively flexible traits in evolving populations. PMID:24955847

  16. 75 FR 8299 - Draft Environmental Impact Statement; Determination of Regulated Status of Alfalfa Genetically...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-24

    ... INFORMATION: On January 12, 2010, we published in the Federal Register (APHIS-2007-0044, 75 FR 1585-1586) a... Agency in the Federal Register on February 5, 2010 (75 FR 6026-6027; Docket No. ER-FRL-8987- 9... and Forage Genetics International alfalfa lines designated as events J101 and J163 as...

  17. 76 FR 63279 - Monsanto Co.; Determination of Nonregulated Status for Soybean Genetically Engineered for Insect...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-12

    ... Products Altered or Produced Through Genetic Engineering Which Are Plant Pests or Which There Is Reason to... notice\\1\\ published in the Federal Register on June 28, 2011 (76 FR 37770-37771, Docket No. APHIS-2011... movement, or release into the environment) of organisms and products altered or produced through...

  18. 76 FR 80869 - Monsanto Co.; Determination of Nonregulated Status of Corn Genetically Engineered for Drought...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-27

    ... Products Altered or Produced Through Genetic Engineering Which Are Plant Pests or Which There Is Reason to...\\ published in the Federal Register on May 11, 2011 (76 FR 27303-27304, Docket No. APHIS-2011-0023), APHIS..., 2011. On July 27, 2011, APHIS published in the Federal Register (76 FR 44891-44892, Docket No....

  19. 78 FR 66891 - Monsanto Co.; Determination of Nonregulated Status of Soybean Genetically Engineered for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-07

    ... and products altered or produced through genetic engineering that are plant pests or that there is.... In a notice \\2\\ published in the Federal Register on July 13, 2012, (77 FR 41354-41355, Docket No... (77 FR 13258-13260, Docket No. APHIS-2011-0129) a notice describing our public review process...

  20. Genetic diversity and phylogenetic relationships among sugarcane and related species determined from microsatellite DNA data

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic diversity and phylogenetic relationships were assessed among 105 clones of commercial sugarcane hybrids and related Saccharum species using 22 microsatellite (SSR) DNA markers. These included 17 sugarcane cultivars from the U.S. mainland, 23 S. officinarum clones, 16 S. robustum clones, 15 ...

  1. Independent genetic control of maize (Zea mays L.) kernel weight determination and its phenotypic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Alvarez Prado, Santiago; Sadras, Víctor O; Borrás, Lucas

    2014-08-01

    Maize kernel weight (KW) is associated with the duration of the grain-filling period (GFD) and the rate of kernel biomass accumulation (KGR). It is also related to the dynamics of water and hence is physiologically linked to the maximum kernel water content (MWC), kernel desiccation rate (KDR), and moisture concentration at physiological maturity (MCPM). This work proposed that principles of phenotypic plasticity can help to consolidated the understanding of the environmental modulation and genetic control of these traits. For that purpose, a maize population of 245 recombinant inbred lines (RILs) was grown under different environmental conditions. Trait plasticity was calculated as the ratio of the variance of each RIL to the overall phenotypic variance of the population of RILs. This work found a hierarchy of plasticities: KDR ? GFD > MCPM > KGR > KW > MWC. There was no phenotypic and genetic correlation between traits per se and trait plasticities. MWC, the trait with the lowest plasticity, was the exception because common quantitative trait loci were found for the trait and its plasticity. Independent genetic control of a trait per se and genetic control of its plasticity is a condition for the independent evolution of traits and their plasticities. This allows breeders potentially to select for high or low plasticity in combination with high or low values of economically relevant traits. PMID:24895355

  2. Investigating genetic determinants of phenotypic variation in natural isolates of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    E-print Network

    Lee, Hana

    2012-01-01

    evolutionary change. Our work in the wild yeast model makesIn this work, we set out to use wild yeast as a model systemwork, we undertook a proof of concept for hypothesis- driven genetic dissection of natural variation, using yeast

  3. Embryonic PCB exposure alters phenotypic, genetic, and epigenetic profiles in turtle sex determination, a

    E-print Network

    Crews, David

    Embryonic PCB exposure alters phenotypic, genetic, and epigenetic profiles in turtle sex biphenyls (PCBs) on gonad differentiation in red-eared slider turtles (Trachemys scripta). Some PCB of two potent PCB congeners alter the physiological processes of gonad development normally dictated

  4. Using genetic programming to determine Che` zy resistance coefficient in corrugated channels

    E-print Network

    Fernandez, Thomas

    . The tests aim at measuring hydraulic parameters of the open-channel flow for some slopes, from 3 be easily manipulated by means of `human' physical insight. Therefore, Genetic Programming should-interference flow occurs and that the Che`zy resistance coefficient is a function of the hydraulic radius, channel

  5. Genetic distances and variations of three clupeid species determined by PCR technique.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sang-Hoon; Yoon, Jong-Man

    2014-12-01

    In this study, seven oligonucleotides primers were shown to generate the shared loci, specific loci, unique shared loci to each species and shared loci by the three species which could be obviously calculated. Euclidean genetic distances within- and between-species were also calculated by complete linkage method with the sustenance of the hierarchical dendevrepogram program Systat version 13. The genomic DNA isolated from herring (Clupea pallasii), Korean anchovy (Coilia nasus) and large-eyed herring (Harengula zunashi), respectively, in the Yellow Sea, were amplified several times by PCR reaction. The hierarchical dendevrepogram shows three chief branches: cluster 1 (PALLASII 01, 02, 03, 04, 06 and 07), cluster 2 (NASUS 08, 09, 10, 11, 12, 13 and 14), and cluster 3 (ZUNASHI 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21 and PALLASII 05). In three clupeid species, the shortest genetic distance displaying significant molecular difference was between individual PALLASII no. 03 and PALLASII no. 02 (0.018). Individual no. 06 of PALLASII was most distantly related to NASUS no. 11 (genetic distance = 0.318). Individuals from herring (C. pallasii) species (0.920) exhibited higher bandsharing values than did individuals from Korean anchovy (C. nasus) species (0.872) (P<0.05). As a result, this PCR analysis generated on the genetic data displayed that the herring (C. pallasii) species was widely separated from Korean anchovy (C. nasus) species. Reversely, individuals of Korean anchovy (C. nasus) species were a little closely related to those of large-eyed herring (H. zunashi) species. PMID:25949199

  6. In Defence of Situational Morality: Genetic, Dispositional and Situational Determinants of Children's Donating to Charity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van IJzendoorn, Marinus H.; Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J.; Pannebakker, Fieke; Out, Dorothee

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we argue that moral behaviour is largely situation-specific. Genetic make-up, neurobiological factors, attachment security and rearing experiences have only limited influence on individual differences in moral performance. Moral behaviour does not develop in a linear and cumulative fashion and individual morality is not stable across…

  7. Genetic Distances and Variations of Three Clupeid Species Determined by PCR Technique

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Sang-Hoon; Yoon, Jong-Man

    2014-01-01

    In this study, seven oligonucleotides primers were shown to generate the shared loci, specific loci, unique shared loci to each species and shared loci by the three species which could be obviously calculated. Euclidean genetic distances within- and between-species were also calculated by complete linkage method with the sustenance of the hierarchical dendevrepogram program Systat version 13. The genomic DNA isolated from herring (Clupea pallasii), Korean anchovy (Coilia nasus) and large-eyed herring (Harengula zunashi), respectively, in the Yellow Sea, were amplified several times by PCR reaction. The hierarchical dendevrepogram shows three chief branches: cluster 1 (PALLASII 01, 02, 03, 04, 06 and 07), cluster 2 (NASUS 08, 09, 10, 11, 12, 13 and 14), and cluster 3 (ZUNASHI 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21 and PALLASII 05). In three clupeid species, the shortest genetic distance displaying significant molecular difference was between individual PALLASII no. 03 and PALLASII no. 02 (0.018). Individual no. 06 of PALLASII was most distantly related to NASUS no. 11 (genetic distance = 0.318). Individuals from herring (C. pallasii) species (0.920) exhibited higher bandsharing values than did individuals from Korean anchovy (C. nasus) species (0.872) (P<0.05). As a result, this PCR analysis generated on the genetic data displayed that the herring (C. pallasii) species was widely separated from Korean anchovy (C. nasus) species. Reversely, individuals of Korean anchovy (C. nasus) species were a little closely related to those of large-eyed herring (H. zunashi) species. PMID:25949199

  8. Genetic variability in spotted seatrout (Cynoscion nebulosus), determined with microsatellite DNA markers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ward, R.; Bowers, K.; Hensley, R.; Mobley, B.; Belouski, E.

    2007-01-01

    Variation in the allele frequencies of five microsatellite loci was surveyed in 1256 individual spotted seatrout (Cynoscion nebulosus) obtained from 12 bays and estuaries from Laguna Madre, Texas, to Charlotte Harbor, Florida, to St. John's River on the Florida Atlantic Coast. Texas and Louisiana collection sites were resampled each year for two to four years (1998-2001). Genetic differentiation was observed. Spotted seatrout from Florida waters were strongly differentiated from spotted seatrout collected in Louisiana and Texas. The greatest genetic discontinuity was observed between Tampa Bay and Charlotte Harbor, and Charlotte Harbor seatrout were most similar to Atlantic Coast spotted seatrout. Texas and Louisiana samples were not strongly structured within the northwestern Gulf of Mexico and there was little evidence of temporal differentiation within bays. These findings are contrary to those of earlier analyses with allozymes and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) where evidence of spatial differentiation was found for spotted seatrout resident on the Texas coast. The differences in genetic structure observed among these markers may reflect differences in response to selective pressure, or may be due to differences in underlying genetic processes.

  9. The European Prader-Willi Syndrome Clinical Research Database: An Aid in the Investigation of a Rare Genetically Determined Neurodevelopmental Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holland, A.; Whittington, J.; Cohen, O.; Curfs, L.; Delahaye, F.; Dudley, O.; Horsthemke, B.; Lindgren, A. -C.; Nourissier, C.; Sharma, N.; Vogels, A.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Prader-Willi Syndrome (PWS) is a rare genetically determined neurodevelopmental disorder with a complex phenotype that changes with age. The rarity of the syndrome and the need to control for different variables such as genetic sub-type, age and gender limits clinical studies of sufficient size in any one country. A clinical research…

  10. Determination of Genetic Diversity among Korean Hanwoo Cattle Based on Physical Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Choi, T. J.; Lee, S. S.; Yoon, D. H.; Kang, H. S.; Kim, C. D.; Hwang, I. H.; Kim, C. Y.; Jin, X.; Yang, C. G.; Seo, K. S.

    2012-01-01

    This study was conducted to establish genetic criteria for phenotypic characteristics of Hanwoo cattle based on allele frequencies and genetic variance analysis using microsatellite markers. Analysis of the genetic diversity among 399 Hanwoo cattle classified according to nose pigmentation and coat color was carried out using 22 microsatellite markers. The results revealed that the INRA035 locus was associated with the highest Fis (0.536). Given that the Fis value for the Hanwoo INRA035 population ranged from 0.533 (white) to 1.000 (white spotted), this finding was consistent with the loci being fixed in Hanwoo cattle. Expected heterozygosities of the Hanwoo groups classified by coat colors and degree of nose pigmentation ranged from 0.689±0.023 (Holstein) to 0.743±0.021 (nose pigmentation level of d). Normal Hanwoo and animals with a mixed white coat showed the closest relationship because the lowest DA value was observed between these groups. However, a pair-wise differentiation test of Fst showed no significant difference among the Hanwoo groups classified by coat color and degree of nose pigmentation (p<0.01). Moreover, results of the neighbor-joining tree based on a DA genetic distance matrix within 399 Hanwoo individuals and principal component analyses confirmed that different groups of cattle with mixed coat color and nose pigmentation formed other specific groups representing Hanwoo genetic and phenotypic characteristics. The results of this study support a relaxation of policies regulating bull selection or animal registration in an effort to minimize financial loss, and could provide basic information that can be used for establishing criteria to classify Hanwoo phenotypes. PMID:25049682

  11. Determinate primary root growth as an adaptation to aridity in Cactaceae: towards an understanding of the evolution and genetic control of the trait

    PubMed Central

    Shishkova, Svetlana; Las Peñas, María Laura; Napsucialy-Mendivil, Selene; Matvienko, Marta; Kozik, Alex; Montiel, Jesús; Patiño, Anallely; Dubrovsky, Joseph G.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims Species of Cactaceae are well adapted to arid habitats. Determinate growth of the primary root, which involves early and complete root apical meristem (RAM) exhaustion and differentiation of cells at the root tip, has been reported for some Cactoideae species as a root adaptation to aridity. In this study, the primary root growth patterns of Cactaceae taxa from diverse habitats are classified as being determinate or indeterminate, and the molecular mechanisms underlying RAM maintenance in Cactaceae are explored. Genes that were induced in the primary root of Stenocereus gummosus before RAM exhaustion are identified. Methods Primary root growth was analysed in Cactaceae seedlings cultivated in vertically oriented Petri dishes. Differentially expressed transcripts were identified after reverse northern blots of clones from a suppression subtractive hybridization cDNA library. Key Results All species analysed from six tribes of the Cactoideae subfamily that inhabit arid and semi-arid regions exhibited determinate primary root growth. However, species from the Hylocereeae tribe, which inhabit mesic regions, exhibited mostly indeterminate primary root growth. Preliminary results suggest that seedlings of members of the Opuntioideae subfamily have mostly determinate primary root growth, whereas those of the Maihuenioideae and Pereskioideae subfamilies have mostly indeterminate primary root growth. Seven selected transcripts encoding homologues of heat stress transcription factor B4, histone deacetylase, fibrillarin, phosphoethanolamine methyltransferase, cytochrome P450 and gibberellin-regulated protein were upregulated in S. gummosus root tips during the initial growth phase. Conclusions Primary root growth in Cactoideae species matches their environment. The data imply that determinate growth of the primary root became fixed after separation of the Cactiodeae/Opuntioideae and Maihuenioideae/Pereskioideae lineages, and that the genetic regulation of RAM maintenance and its loss in Cactaceae is orchestrated by genes involved in the regulation of gene expression, signalling, and redox and hormonal responses. PMID:23666887

  12. The role of GHR and IGF1 genes in the genetic determination of African pygmies' short stature

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Noémie SA; Verdu, Paul; Georges, Myriam; Duquesnoy, Philippe; Froment, Alain; Amselem, Serge; Le Bouc, Yves; Heyer, Evelyne

    2013-01-01

    African pygmies are at the lower extreme of human variation in adult stature and many evolutionary hypotheses have been proposed to explain this phenotype. We showed in a recent study that the difference in average stature of about 10?cm observed between contemporary pygmies and neighboring non-pygmies has a genetic component. Nevertheless, the genetic basis of African pygmies' short stature remains unknown. Using a candidate-gene approach, we show that intronic polymorphisms in GH receptor (GHR) and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) genes present outlying values of the genetic distance between Baka pygmies and their non-pygmy Nzimé neighbors. We further show that GHR and IGF1 genes have experienced divergent natural selection pressures between pygmies and non-pygmies throughout evolution. In addition, these SNPs are associated with stature in a sample composed of 60 pygmies and 30 non-pygmies and this association remains significant when correcting for population structure for the GHR locus. We conclude that the GHR and IGF1 genes may have a role in African pygmies' short stature. The use of phenotypically contrasted populations is a promising strategy to identify new variants associated with complex traits in humans. PMID:23047741

  13. Antibiotic resistance determinants and genetic analysis of Salmonella enterica isolated from food in Morocco.

    PubMed

    Murgia, Manuela; Bouchrif, Brahim; Timinouni, Mohammed; Al-Qahtani, Ahmed; Al-Ahdal, Mohammed N; Cappuccinelli, Pietro; Rubino, Salvatore; Paglietti, Bianca

    2015-12-23

    Antimicrobial-resistant non-typhoidal Salmonella (NTS) are an important cause of infection in Africa, but there is a lack of information on their molecular mechanisms of resistance and epidemiology. This study contributes to fill this gap through the characterization by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), multilocus sequence typing (MLST), plasmid profiling and analysis of antibiotic-resistance determinants of 94 Salmonella enterica strains isolated from food in Morocco. PFGE revealed considerable heterogeneity among the strains, showing 32 pulsotypes. MLST of strains representative of the different serovars evidenced 13 sequence types (STs), three of which were newly identified (ST1694, ST1768 and ST1818) and nine not previously reported in Morocco. Thirty-four strains harbored from one to four plasmids, of IncI1 group in S. Mbandaka, IncFIIA in S. Typhimurium, IncL/M in S. Hadar and S. Blockley. For the first time in Morocco an intact Salmonella Genomic Island 1 (SGI1) carrying the resistance genes aadA2, floR, tetG, blaPSE-1 and sul1 was detected in S. Typhimurium DT104. In serovar Hadar resistance to ampicillin, tetracycline and streptomycin was associated to blaTEM-1, tetA and strA genes respectively, whereas one mutation in gyrA (Asp87Asn) and one in parC (Thr54Ser) genes conferred resistance to nalidixic acid. These findings improve the information on foodborne Salmonella in Morocco, evidencing the presence of MDR strains potentially dangerous to humans, and provide useful data for future studies. PMID:26325598

  14. Whole-exome sequencing and imaging genetics identify functional variants for rate of change in hippocampal volume in mild cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Nho, K; Corneveaux, J J; Kim, S; Lin, H; Risacher, S L; Shen, L; Swaminathan, S; Ramanan, V K; Liu, Y; Foroud, T; Inlow, M H; Siniard, A L; Reiman, R A; Aisen, P S; Petersen, R C; Green, R C; Jack, C R; Weiner, M W; Baldwin, C T; Lunetta, K; Farrer, L A; Furney, S J; Lovestone, S; Simmons, A; Mecocci, P; Vellas, B; Tsolaki, M; Kloszewska, I; Soininen, H; McDonald, B C; Farlow, M R; Ghetti, B; Huentelman, M J; Saykin, A J

    2013-07-01

    Whole-exome sequencing of individuals with mild cognitive impairment, combined with genotype imputation, was used to identify coding variants other than the apolipoprotein E (APOE) ?4 allele associated with rate of hippocampal volume loss using an extreme trait design. Matched unrelated APOE ?3 homozygous male Caucasian participants from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI) were selected at the extremes of the 2-year longitudinal change distribution of hippocampal volume (eight subjects with rapid rates of atrophy and eight with slow/stable rates of atrophy). We identified 57 non-synonymous single nucleotide variants (SNVs) which were found exclusively in at least 4 of 8 subjects in the rapid atrophy group, but not in any of the 8 subjects in the slow atrophy group. Among these SNVs, the variants that accounted for the greatest group difference and were predicted in silico as 'probably damaging' missense variants were rs9610775 (CARD10) and rs1136410 (PARP1). To further investigate and extend the exome findings in a larger sample, we conducted quantitative trait analysis including whole-brain search in the remaining ADNI APOE ?3/?3 group (N=315). Genetic variation within PARP1 and CARD10 was associated with rate of hippocampal neurodegeneration in APOE ?3/?3. Meta-analysis across five independent cross sectional cohorts indicated that rs1136410 is also significantly associated with hippocampal volume in APOE ?3/?3 individuals (N=923). Larger sequencing studies and longitudinal follow-up are needed for confirmation. The combination of next-generation sequencing and quantitative imaging phenotypes holds significant promise for discovery of variants involved in neurodegeneration. PMID:23608917

  15. A Genetic Screen for Pathogenicity Genes in the Hemibiotrophic Fungus Colletotrichum higginsianum Identifies the Plasma Membrane Proton Pump Pma2 Required for Host Penetration

    PubMed Central

    Dahl, Marlis; Müller, Susanne; Voll, Lars M.; Koch, Christian

    2015-01-01

    We used insertional mutagenesis by Agrobacterium tumefaciens mediated transformation (ATMT) to isolate pathogenicity mutants of Colletotrichum higginsianum. From a collection of 7200 insertion mutants we isolated 75 mutants with reduced symptoms. 19 of these were affected in host penetration, while 17 were affected in later stages of infection, like switching to necrotrophic growth. For 16 mutants the location of T-DNA insertions could be identified by PCR. A potential plasma membrane H+-ATPase Pma2 was targeted in five independent insertion mutants. We genetically inactivated the Ku80 component of the non-homologous end-joining pathway in C. higginsianum to establish an efficient gene knockout protocol. Chpma2 deletion mutants generated by homologous recombination in the ?Chku80 background form fully melanized appressoria but entirely fail to penetrate the host tissue and are non-pathogenic. The ChPMA2 gene is induced upon appressoria formation and infection of A. thaliana. Pma2 activity is not important for vegetative growth of saprophytically growing mycelium, since the mutant shows no growth penalty under these conditions. Colletotrichum higginsianum codes for a closely related gene (ChPMA1), which is highly expressed under most growth conditions. ChPMA1 is more similar to the homologous yeast genes for plasma membrane pumps. We propose that expression of a specific proton pump early during infection may be common to many appressoria forming fungal pathogens as we found ChPMA2 orthologs in several plant pathogenic fungi. PMID:25992547

  16. Use of suppression subtractive hybridization to identify genetic differences between differentially virulent genotypes of Paenibacillus larvae, the etiological agent of American Foulbrood of honeybees.

    PubMed

    Fünfhaus, Anne; Ashiralieva, Ainura; Borriss, Rainer; Genersch, Elke

    2009-08-01

    Paenibacillus larvae is the causative agent of American Foulbrood of honeybees, a fatal brood disease not only killing infected larvae but also lethal to infected colonies. Recently four different genotypes of P. larvae (enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus I-IV) have been described and it was shown that these genotypes also differ in phenotype, especially in virulence. To unravel the genetic differences between these four genotypes, suppression subtractive hybridization was used. From 106 analysed clones, 92 represented genotype-specific sequences, whereas 14 sequences turned out to be specific only for the particular strain used as tester in the subtraction. Nearly half of the sequences (46%) could only be annotated based on poorly characterized sequences. The remaining sequences corresponded to categories related to metabolism, especially secondary metabolite biosynthesis, transport and catabolism, to information storage and processing, and to cellular processes. In particular, we could show that the P. larvae genome contains genes and/or giant gene clusters coding for antibiotics, and we identified the first P. larvae toxin, a member of the family of adenosine diphosphate-ribosyltransferases. PMID:23765853

  17. A retroviral library genetic screen identifies IRF-2 as an inhibitor of N-ras-induced growth suppression in leukemic cells.

    PubMed

    Passioura, Toby; Shen, Sylvie; Symonds, Geoff; Dolnikov, Alla

    2005-11-10

    Activating mutations of the N-ras gene occur at relatively high frequency in acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome. Somewhat paradoxically, ectopic expression of activated N-ras in primary hematopoietic cells and myeloid cell lines (in some cases) can lead to inhibition of proliferation. Expression of mutant N-ras in murine hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells is sufficient to induce myeloid malignancies, but these pathologies occur with long latency. This suggests that mutations that disable the growth suppressive properties of N-ras in hematopoietic cells are required for the development of frank malignancy. In the present work, the growth suppression induced by a mutant N-ras gene in U937 myeloid cells was used as the basis to screen a retroviral cDNA library for genes that prevent mutant N-ras-induced growth suppression (i.e., putative cooperating oncogenes). This screen identified the gene for the transcription factor interferon regulatory factor-2 (IRF-2), and as confirmation of the screen, overexpression of this gene in U937 cells was shown to inhibit mutant N-ras-induced growth suppression. Also recovered from the screen were two truncated clones of an uncharacterized gene (interim official symbol: PP2135). Overexpression of this truncated PP2135 gene in U937 cells did not appear to abrogate mutant N-ras-induced growth suppression, but rather appeared to confer an increased sensitivity of U937 cells to retroviral infection, accounting for the recovery of this gene from the genetic screen. PMID:16007130

  18. PNPLA3 genetic variants determine hepatic steatosis in non-obese chronic hepatitis C patients

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chung-Feng; Chen, Jyh-Jou; Yeh, Ming-Lun; Huang, Ching-I; Hsieh, Ming-Yen; Yang, Hua-Ling; Dai, Chia-Yen; Huang, Jee-Fu; Lin, Zu-Yau; Chen, Shinn-Cherng; Chuang, Wan-Long; Chen, Yao-Li; Yu, Ming-Lung

    2015-01-01

    The influence of patatin-like phospholipase domain-containing 3 (PNPLA3) genetic variants in the development of liver steatosis in Asian chronic hepatitis C patients remains elusive. A total of 1018 biopsy-proven chronic hepatitis C patients were enrolled for evaluation. The proportions of PNPLA3 rs738409 GG genotype carriage were 7.8% (44/563), 15.8% (58/367) and 19.3% (17/88) in patients with no (liver fat content <5%), mild (5–33%) and moderate/severe (>66%) hepatic steatosis, respectively (trend P?genetic variants had minimal effects on hepatic steatosis among overweight or obese patients. Compared to patients with BMI<24?kg/m2/non-GG genotype, those with BMI>24?kg/m2/GG genotype were more likely to have hepatic steatosis (OR/CI:3.87/2.292–6.524, P?genetic variants and BMI played important roles in hepatic steatosis among Asian chronic hepatitis C patients. However, the genetic effect was mainly restricted to non-obese patients. PMID:26139292

  19. Genetic Determinants for Gestational Diabetes Mellitus and Related Metabolic Traits in Mexican Women

    PubMed Central

    Huerta-Chagoya, Alicia; Vázquez-Cárdenas, Paola; Moreno-Macías, Hortensia; Tapia-Maruri, Leonardo; Rodríguez-Guillén, Rosario; López-Vite, Erika; García-Escalante, Guadalupe; Escobedo-Aguirre, Fernando; Parra-Covarrubias, Adalberto; Cordero-Brieño, Roberto; Manzo-Carrillo, Lizette; Zacarías-Castillo, Rogelio; Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos; Tusié-Luna, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological and physiological similarities among Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM) and Type 2 Diabetes (T2D) suggest that both diseases, share a common genetic background. T2D risk variants have been associated to GDM susceptibility. However, the genetic architecture of GDM is not yet completely understood. We analyzed 176 SNPs for 115 loci previously associated to T2D, GDM and body mass index (BMI), as well as a set of 118 Ancestry Informative Markers (AIMs), in 750 pregnant Mexican women. Association with GDM was found for two of the most frequently replicated T2D loci: a TCF7L2 haplotype (CTTC: rs7901695, rs4506565, rs7903146, rs12243326; P=2.16x10-06; OR=2.95) and a KCNQ1 haplotype (TTT: rs2237892, rs163184, rs2237897; P=1.98x10-05; OR=0.55). In addition, we found two loci associated to glycemic traits: CENTD2 (60’ OGTT glycemia: rs1552224, P=0.03727) and MTNR1B (HOMA B: rs1387153, P=0.05358). Remarkably, a major susceptibility SLC16A11 locus for T2D in Mexicans was not shown to play a role in GDM risk. The fact that two of the main T2D associated loci also contribute to the risk of developing GDM in Mexicans, confirm that both diseases share a common genetic background. However, lack of association with a Native American contribution T2D risk haplotype, SLC16A11, suggests that other genetic mechanisms may be in play for GDM. PMID:25973943

  20. Determination of bone size of hip, spine, and wrist in human pedigrees by genetic and lifestyle factors.

    PubMed

    Deng, Hong-Wen; Deng, Xu-Tao; Conway, Theresa; Xu, Fu-Hua; Heaney, Robert; Recker, Robert R

    2002-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a major public health problem defined as a loss of bone strength, of which bone size is an important determinant. Compared with extensive studies on bone mass, studies on the importance of factors determining variation in bone size are relatively few. In particular, the significance of genetic factors is largely unknown. In 49 pedigrees with 703 subjects bone sizes of the hip, spine, and wrist were measured by dual X-ray absorptiometry. We evaluated the contribution of genetic factors in determining variation in bone size of the hip, spine, and wrist while studying age, sex, weight, height, exercise, smoking, alcohol consumption, and the interaction among these factors as covariates for their effects on bone size. We found that, on average, males have larger bone sizes. Male bone sizes at the spine and hip increased with age; however, the effect of age in our female subjects was nonsignificant. Height invariably affected bone size at all the sites studied. Alcohol consumption and exercise generally had significant effects in increasing bone size at the spine and/or hip in both males and females. After adjusting for sex, age, weight, height, lifestyle factors, and the significant interactions among these factors, heritabilities (+/-SE) were, respectively, 0.48 (0.09), 0.64 (0.08), and 0.60 (0.09) for bone size at the hip, spine, and wrist. PMID:11940728

  1. A SImplified method for Segregation Analysis (SISA) to determine penetrance and expression of a genetic variant in a family.

    PubMed

    Møller, Pål; Clark, Neal; Mæhle, Lovise

    2011-05-01

    A method for SImplified rapid Segregation Analysis (SISA) to assess penetrance and expression of genetic variants in pedigrees of any complexity is presented. For this purpose the probability for recombination between the variant and the gene is zero. An assumption is that the variant of undetermined significance (VUS) is introduced into the family once only. If so, all family members in between two members demonstrated to carry a VUS, are obligate carriers. Probabilities for cosegregation of disease and VUS by chance, penetrance, and expression, may be calculated. SISA return values do not include person identifiers and need no explicit informed consent. There will be no ethical complications in submitting SISA return values to central databases. Values for several families may be combined. Values for a family may be updated by the contributor. SISA is used to consider penetrance whenever sequencing demonstrates a VUS in the known cancer-predisposing genes. Any family structure at hand in a genetic clinic may be used. One may include an extended lineage in a family through demonstrating the same VUS in a distant relative, and thereby identifying all obligate carriers in between. Such extension is a way to escape the selection biases through expanding the families outside the clusters used to select the families. PMID:21309035

  2. Families with familial combined hyperlipidemia and families enriched for coronary artery disease share genetic determinants for the atherogenic lipoprotein phenotype

    SciTech Connect

    Allayee, H.; Aouizerat, B.E.; Lusis, A.J.; Cantor, R.M.; Lanning, C.D.; Rotter, J.I.; Dallinga-Thie, G.M.; Krauss, R.M.; Bruin, T.W.A. de

    1998-08-01

    Small, dense LDL particles consistently have been associated with hypertriglyceridemia, premature coronary artery disease (CAD), and familial combined hyperlipidemia (FCH). Previously, the authors have observed linkage of LDL particle size with four separate candidate-gene loci in a study of families enriched for CAD. These loci contain the genes for manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), on chromosome 6q; for apolipoprotein AI-CIII-AIV, on chromosome 11q; for cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) and lecithin:cholesterol acyl-transferase (LCAT), on chromosome 16q; and for the LDL receptor (LDLR), on chromosome 19p. The authors have now tested whether these loci also contribute to LDL particle size in families ascertained for FCH. The members of 18 families (481 individuals) were typed for genetic markers at the four loci, and linkage to LDL particle size was assessed by nonparametric sib-pair linkage analysis. The presence of small, dense LDL (pattern B) was much more frequent in the FCH probands than in the spouse controls. Evidence for linkage was observed at the MnSOD (P = .02), CETP/LCAT (P = .03), and apolipoprotein AI0CIII0AIV loci (P = .005) but not at the LDLR locus. The authors conclude that there is a genetically based association between FCH and small, dense LDL and that the genetic determinants for LDL particle size are shared, at least in part, among FCH families and the more general population at risk for CAD.

  3. 41 CFR 102-75.775 - Is the disposal agency required to approve a determination by FEMA that identifies surplus...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01...identifies surplus property for emergency management response use? 102-75.775 Section...775 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management...

  4. Growth-based Determination and Biochemical Confirmation of Genetic Requirements for Protein Degradation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Coffey, Samuel Z.; Rubenstein, Eric M.

    2015-01-01

    Regulated protein degradation is crucial for virtually every cellular function. Much of what is known about the molecular mechanisms and genetic requirements for eukaryotic protein degradation was initially established in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Classical analyses of protein degradation have relied on biochemical pulse-chase and cycloheximide-chase methodologies. While these techniques provide sensitive means for observing protein degradation, they are laborious, time-consuming, and low-throughput. These approaches are not amenable to rapid or large-scale screening for mutations that prevent protein degradation. Here, a yeast growth-based assay for the facile identification of genetic requirements for protein degradation is described. In this assay, a reporter enzyme required for growth under specific selective conditions is fused to an unstable protein. Cells lacking the endogenous reporter enzyme but expressing the fusion protein can grow under selective conditions only when the fusion protein is stabilized (i.e. when protein degradation is compromised). In the growth assay described here, serial dilutions of wild-type and mutant yeast cells harboring a plasmid encoding a fusion protein are spotted onto selective and non-selective medium. Growth under selective conditions is consistent with degradation impairment by a given mutation. Increased protein abundance should be biochemically confirmed. A method for the rapid extraction of yeast proteins in a form suitable for electrophoresis and western blotting is also demonstrated. A growth-based readout for protein stability, combined with a simple protocol for protein extraction for biochemical analysis, facilitates rapid identification of genetic requirements for protein degradation. These techniques can be adapted to monitor degradation of a variety of short-lived proteins. In the example presented, the His3 enzyme, which is required for histidine biosynthesis, was fused to Deg1-Sec62. Deg1-Sec62 is targeted for degradation after it aberrantly engages the endoplasmic reticulum translocon. Cells harboring Deg1-Sec62-His3 were able to grow under selective conditions when the protein was stabilized. PMID:25742191

  5. Iminodipeptiduria: a genetic defect in recycling collagen; a method for determining prolidase in erythrocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, S. H.; Dennis, A. W.; Greenberg, M.

    1975-01-01

    A 39-month-old girl was found to have a genetic deficiency of prolidase. This enzyme specifically splits dipeptides with proline or hydroxyproline at the C-terminus. Absence of the enzyme leads to massive urinary excretion of iminodipeptides. Clinical symptoms include some that can be ascribed to collagen defects. Previously we had demonstrated that the efficient recycling of proline by the breakdown and resynthesis of collagen is a normal physiological process. The collagen defects in this condition could result from interference with the normal recycling of collagen. PMID:803128

  6. BCL-2 family genetic profiling reveals microenvironment-specific determinants of chemotherapeutic response

    E-print Network

    Pritchard, Justin Robert

    The Bcl-2 family encompasses a diverse set of apoptotic regulators that are dynamically activated in response to various cell-intrinsic and -extrinsic stimuli. An extensive variety of cell culture experiments have identified ...

  7. Population differentiation determined from putative neutral and divergent adaptive genetic markers in Eulachon (Thaleichthys pacificus, Osmeridae), an anadromous Pacific smelt.

    PubMed

    Candy, John R; Campbell, Nathan R; Grinnell, Matthew H; Beacham, Terry D; Larson, Wesley A; Narum, Shawn R

    2015-11-01

    Twelve eulachon (Thaleichthys pacificus, Osmeridae) populations ranging from Cook Inlet, Alaska and along the west coast of North America to the Columbia River were examined by restriction-site-associated DNA (RAD) sequencing to elucidate patterns of neutral and adaptive variation in this high geneflow species. A total of 4104 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were discovered across the genome, with 193 putatively adaptive SNPs as determined by FST outlier tests. Estimates of population structure in eulachon with the putatively adaptive SNPs were similar, but provided greater resolution of stocks compared with a putatively neutral panel of 3911 SNPs or previous estimates with 14 microsatellites. A cline of increasing measures of genetic diversity from south to north was found in the adaptive panel, but not in the neutral markers (SNPs or microsatellites). This may indicate divergent selective pressures in differing freshwater and marine environments between regional eulachon populations and that these adaptive diversity patterns not seen with neutral markers could be a consideration when determining genetic boundaries for conservation purposes. Estimates of effective population size (Ne ) were similar with the neutral SNP panel and microsatellites and may be utilized to monitor population status for eulachon where census sizes are difficult to obtain. Greater differentiation with the panel of putatively adaptive SNPs provided higher individual assignment accuracy compared to the neutral panel or microsatellites for stock identification purposes. This study presents the first SNPs that have been developed for eulachon, and analyses with these markers highlighted the importance of integrating genome-wide neutral and adaptive genetic variation for the applications of conservation and management. PMID:25737187

  8. Copyright 1998 by the Genetics Society of America Evidence for a Genomic Imprinting Sex Determination Mechanism

    E-print Network

    Dobson, Stephen L.

    determination. This test utilizes the parasitic wasp Nasonia vitripennis, crossing polyploid females with males shown to function in somenipulate economically important hymenopteran pests and beneficial parasitoids

  9. Transgenerational genetic effects

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Vicki R; Nadeau, Joseph H

    2012-01-01

    Since Mendel, studies of phenotypic variation and disease risk have emphasized associations between genotype and phenotype among affected individuals in families and populations. Although this paradigm has led to important insights into the molecular basis for many traits and diseases, most of the genetic variants that control the inheritance of these conditions continue to elude detection. Recent studies suggest an alternative mode of inheritance where genetic variants that are present in one generation affect phenotypes in subsequent generations, thereby decoupling the conventional relations between genotype and phenotype, and perhaps, contributing to ‘missing heritability’. Under some conditions, these transgenerational genetic effects can be as frequent and strong as conventional inheritance, and can persist for multiple generations. Growing evidence suggests that RNA mediates these heritable epigenetic changes. The primary challenge now is to identify the molecular basis for these effects, characterize mechanisms and determine whether transgenerational genetic effects occur in humans. PMID:22122083

  10. Modelling foot-and-mouth disease virus dynamics in oral epithelium to help identify the determinants of lysis

    E-print Network

    Modelling foot-and-mouth disease virus dynamics in oral epithelium to help identify University, Leicestershire, LE11 3TU, UK. Abstract Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) causes an economically: Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus; Epithelium; Lysis; Model. 1 Introduction Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD

  11. Genetic mechanisms of antimicrobial resistance identified in Salmonella enterica, Escherichia coli, and Enteroccocus spp. isolated from U.S. food animals

    PubMed Central

    Frye, Jonathan G.; Jackson, Charlene R.

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of antimicrobial resistance (AR) in bacteria isolated from U.S. food animals has increased over the last several decades as have concerns of AR foodborne zoonotic human infections. Resistance mechanisms identified in U.S. animal isolates of Salmonella enterica included resistance to aminoglycosides (e.g., alleles of aacC, aadA, aadB, ant, aphA, and StrAB), ?-lactams (e.g., blaCMY?2, TEM?1, PSE?1), chloramphenicol (e.g., floR, cmlA, cat1, cat2), folate pathway inhibitors (e.g., alleles of sul and dfr), and tetracycline [e.g., alleles of tet(A), (B), (C), (D), (G), and tetR]. In the U.S., multi-drug resistance (MDR) mechanisms in Salmonella animal isolates were associated with integrons, or mobile genetic elements (MGEs) such as IncA/C plasmids which can be transferred among bacteria. It is thought that AR Salmonella originates in food animals and is transmitted through food to humans. However, some AR Salmonella isolated from humans in the U.S. have different AR elements than those isolated from food animals, suggesting a different etiology for some AR human infections. The AR mechanisms identified in isolates from outside the U.S. are also predominantly different. For example the extended spectrum ?-lactamases (ESBLs) are found in human and animal isolates globally; however, in the U.S., ESBLs thus far have only been found in human and not food animal isolates. Commensal bacteria in animals including Escherichia coli and Enterococcus spp. may be reservoirs for AR mechanisms. Many of the AR genes and MGEs found in E. coli isolated from U.S. animals are similar to those found in Salmonella. Enterococcus spp. isolated from animals frequently carry MGEs with AR genes, including resistances to aminoglycosides (e.g., alleles of aac, ant, and aph), macrolides [e.g., erm(A), erm(B), and msrC], and tetracyclines [e.g., tet(K), (L), (M), (O), (S)]. Continuing investigations are required to help understand and mitigate the impact of AR bacteria on human and animal health. PMID:23734150

  12. 78 FR 37201 - Pioneer Hi-Bred International, Inc.; Determination of Nonregulated Status of Maize Genetically...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-20

    ... Register on February 27, 2013 (78 FR 13312-13313, Docket No. APHIS-2012-0026), APHIS announced the... Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service Pioneer Hi-Bred International, Inc.; Determination of... determination that a maize line developed by Pioneer Hi-Bred International Inc., designated as maize event...

  13. 76 FR 37767 - Pioneer Hi-Bred International, Inc.; Determination of Nonregulated Status for Corn Genetically...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-28

    ..., 2011 (76 FR 83-84, Docket No. APHIS-2010-0041), APHIS announced the availability of the Pioneer... Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service Pioneer Hi-Bred International, Inc.; Determination of... determination that a corn line developed by Pioneer Hi-Bred International, Inc., designated as event...

  14. Sex impact on the quality of fatty liver and its genetic determinism in mule ducks.

    PubMed

    Marie-Etancelin, C; Retailleau, B; Alinier, A; Vitezica, Z G

    2015-09-01

    Recent changes to French regulations now allow farmers to produce "foie gras" from both male and female mule ducks. The aim of this study was to assess the quality of female fatty liver and to compare, from a phenotypic and genetic point of view, liver quality in males and females. A total of 914 mule ducks (591 males and 323 females), hatched in a single pedigree batch, were reared until 86 d of age and then force-fed for 12 d, before being slaughtered. Carcasses and livers were weighed and liver quality was assessed by grading the extent of liver veining and measuring the liver melting rate, either after sterilization of 60 g of liver or pasteurization of 180 g of liver. Sexual dimorphism was observed in favor of males, with a difference of approximately 10% in carcass and liver weights and up to 54% for the liver mel