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  1. Discovering biomedical semantic relations in PubMed queries for information retrieval and database curation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chung-Chi; Lu, Zhiyong

    2016-01-01

    Identifying relevant papers from the literature is a common task in biocuration. Most current biomedical literature search systems primarily rely on matching user keywords. Semantic search, on the other hand, seeks to improve search accuracy by understanding the entities and contextual relations in user keywords. However, past research has mostly focused on semantically identifying biological entities (e.g. chemicals, diseases and genes) with little effort on discovering semantic relations. In this work, we aim to discover biomedical semantic relations in PubMed queries in an automated and unsupervised fashion. Specifically, we focus on extracting and understanding the contextual information (or context patterns) that is used by PubMed users to represent semantic relations between entities such as ‘CHEMICAL-1 compared to CHEMICAL-2.’ With the advances in automatic named entity recognition, we first tag entities in PubMed queries and then use tagged entities as knowledge to recognize pattern semantics. More specifically, we transform PubMed queries into context patterns involving participating entities, which are subsequently projected to latent topics via latent semantic analysis (LSA) to avoid the data sparseness and specificity issues. Finally, we mine semantically similar contextual patterns or semantic relations based on LSA topic distributions. Our two separate evaluation experiments of chemical-chemical (CC) and chemical–disease (CD) relations show that the proposed approach significantly outperforms a baseline method, which simply measures pattern semantics by similarity in participating entities. The highest performance achieved by our approach is nearly 0.9 and 0.85 respectively for the CC and CD task when compared against the ground truth in terms of normalized discounted cumulative gain (nDCG), a standard measure of ranking quality. These results suggest that our approach can effectively identify and return related semantic patterns in a ranked

  2. Discovering biomedical semantic relations in PubMed queries for information retrieval and database curation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chung-Chi; Lu, Zhiyong

    2016-01-01

    Identifying relevant papers from the literature is a common task in biocuration. Most current biomedical literature search systems primarily rely on matching user keywords. Semantic search, on the other hand, seeks to improve search accuracy by understanding the entities and contextual relations in user keywords. However, past research has mostly focused on semantically identifying biological entities (e.g. chemicals, diseases and genes) with little effort on discovering semantic relations. In this work, we aim to discover biomedical semantic relations in PubMed queries in an automated and unsupervised fashion. Specifically, we focus on extracting and understanding the contextual information (or context patterns) that is used by PubMed users to represent semantic relations between entities such as 'CHEMICAL-1 compared to CHEMICAL-2' With the advances in automatic named entity recognition, we first tag entities in PubMed queries and then use tagged entities as knowledge to recognize pattern semantics. More specifically, we transform PubMed queries into context patterns involving participating entities, which are subsequently projected to latent topics via latent semantic analysis (LSA) to avoid the data sparseness and specificity issues. Finally, we mine semantically similar contextual patterns or semantic relations based on LSA topic distributions. Our two separate evaluation experiments of chemical-chemical (CC) and chemical-disease (CD) relations show that the proposed approach significantly outperforms a baseline method, which simply measures pattern semantics by similarity in participating entities. The highest performance achieved by our approach is nearly 0.9 and 0.85 respectively for the CC and CD task when compared against the ground truth in terms of normalized discounted cumulative gain (nDCG), a standard measure of ranking quality. These results suggest that our approach can effectively identify and return related semantic patterns in a ranked order

  3. PUBMED OR NLM GATEWAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    PubMed, a service of the National Library of Medicine, provides access to over 12 million MEDLINE citations back to the mid-1960's and additional life science journals. PubMed includes links to many sites providing full text articles and other related resources. PubMed was design...

  4. PubMed related articles: a probabilistic topic-based model for content similarity

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jimmy; Wilbur, W John

    2007-01-01

    Background We present a probabilistic topic-based model for content similarity called pmra that underlies the related article search feature in PubMed. Whether or not a document is about a particular topic is computed from term frequencies, modeled as Poisson distributions. Unlike previous probabilistic retrieval models, we do not attempt to estimate relevance–but rather our focus is "relatedness", the probability that a user would want to examine a particular document given known interest in another. We also describe a novel technique for estimating parameters that does not require human relevance judgments; instead, the process is based on the existence of MeSH ® in MEDLINE ®. Results The pmra retrieval model was compared against bm25, a competitive probabilistic model that shares theoretical similarities. Experiments using the test collection from the TREC 2005 genomics track shows a small but statistically significant improvement of pmra over bm25 in terms of precision. Conclusion Our experiments suggest that the pmra model provides an effective ranking algorithm for related article search. PMID:17971238

  5. Automated Determination of Publications Related to Adverse Drug Reactions in PubMed

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Hayden; Friedman, Carol; Finkelstein, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Timely dissemination of up-to-date information concerning adverse drug reactions (ADRs) at the point of care can significantly improve medication safety and prevent ADRs. Automated methods for finding relevant articles in MEDLINE which discuss ADRs for specific medications can facilitate decision making at the point of care. Previous work has focused on other types of clinical queries and on retrieval for specific ADRs or drug-ADR pairs, but little work has been published on finding ADR articles for a specific medication. We have developed a method to generate a PubMED query based on MESH, supplementary concepts, and textual terms for a particular medication. Evaluation was performed on a limited sample, resulting in a sensitivity of 90% and precision of 93%. Results demonstrated that this method is highly effective. Future work will integrate this method within an interface aimed at facilitating access to ADR information for specified drugs at the point of care. PMID:26306227

  6. Development of a PubMed Based Search Tool for Identifying Sex and Gender Specific Health Literature

    PubMed Central

    Song, Michael M.; Simonsen, Cheryl K.; Wilson, Joanna D.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: An effective literature search strategy is critical to achieving the aims of Sex and Gender Specific Health (SGSH): to understand sex and gender differences through research and to effectively incorporate the new knowledge into the clinical decision making process to benefit both male and female patients. The goal of this project was to develop and validate an SGSH literature search tool that is readily and freely available to clinical researchers and practitioners. Methods: PubMed, a freely available search engine for the Medline database, was selected as the platform to build the SGSH literature search tool. Combinations of Medical Subject Heading terms, text words, and title words were evaluated for optimal specificity and sensitivity. The search tool was then validated against reference bases compiled for two disease states, diabetes and stroke. Results: Key sex and gender terms and limits were bundled to create a search tool to facilitate PubMed SGSH literature searches. During validation, the search tool retrieved 50 of 94 (53.2%) stroke and 62 of 95 (65.3%) diabetes reference articles selected for validation. A general keyword search of stroke or diabetes combined with sex difference retrieved 33 of 94 (35.1%) stroke and 22 of 95 (23.2%) diabetes reference base articles, with lower sensitivity and specificity for SGSH content. Conclusions: The Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center SGSH PubMed Search Tool provides higher sensitivity and specificity to sex and gender specific health literature. The tool will facilitate research, clinical decision-making, and guideline development relevant to SGSH. PMID:26555409

  7. Relative Citation Ratio of Top Twenty Macedonian Biomedical Scientists in PubMed: A New Metric that Uses Citation Rates to Measure Influence at the Article Level

    PubMed Central

    Spiroski, Mirko

    2016-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this study was to analyze relative citation ratio (RCR) of top twenty Macedonian biomedical scientists with a new metric that uses citation rates to measure influence at the article level. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Top twenty Macedonian biomedical scientists were identified by GoPubMed on the base of the number of deposited abstracts in PubMed, corrected with the data from previously published paper, and completed with the Macedonian biomedical scientists working in countries outside the Republic of Macedonia, but born or previously worked in the country. iCite was used as a tool to access a dashboard of bibliometrics for papers associated with a portfolio. RESULTS: The biggest number of top twenty Macedonian biomedical scientists has RCR lower than one. Only four Macedonian biomedical scientists have bigger RCR in comparison with those in PubMed. The most prominent RCR of 2.29 has Rosoklija G. RCR of the most influenced individual papers deposited in PubMed has shown the biggest value for the paper of Efremov D (35.19). This paper has the biggest number of authors (860). CONCLUSION: It is necessary to accept top twenty Macedonian biomedical scientists as an example of new metric that uses citation rates to measure influence at the article level, rather than qualification of the best Macedonian biomedical scientists. PMID:27335586

  8. All Information Is Not Equal: Using the Literature Databases PubMed and The Cochrane Library for Identifying the Evidence on Granulocyte Transfusion Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Metzendorf, Maria-Inti; Schulz, Manuela; Braun, Volker

    2014-01-01

    Summary To be able to take well-informed decisions or carry out sound research, clinicians and researchers alike require specific information seeking skills matching their respective information needs. Biomedical information is traditionally available via different literature databases. This article gives an introduction to two diverging sources, PubMed (23 million references) and The Cochrane Library (800,000 references), both of which offer sophisticated instruments for searching an increasing amount of medical publications of varied quality and ambition. Whereas PubMed as an unfiltered source of primary literature comprises all different kinds of publication types occurring in academic journals, The Cochrane Library is a pre-filtered source which offers access to either synthesized publication types or critically appraised and carefully selected references. A search approach has to be carried out deliberately and requires a good knowledge on the scope and features of the databases as well as on the ability to build a search strategy in a structured way. We present a specific and a sensitive search approach, making use of both databases within two application case scenarios in order to identify the evidence on granulocyte transfusions for infections in adult patients with neutropenia. PMID:25538539

  9. Identifying related journals through log analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zhiyong; Xie, Natalie; Wilbur, W. John

    2009-01-01

    Motivation: With the explosion of biomedical literature and the evolution of online and open access, scientists are reading more articles from a wider variety of journals. Thus, the list of core journals relevant to their research may be less obvious and may often change over time. To help researchers quickly identify appropriate journals to read and publish in, we developed a web application for finding related journals based on the analysis of PubMed log data. Availability: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/IRET/Journals Contact: luzh@ncbi.nlm.nih.gov Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:19734155

  10. Semi-Supervised Learning to Identify UMLS Semantic Relations

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yuan; Uzuner, Ozlem

    2014-01-01

    The UMLS Semantic Network is constructed by experts and requires periodic expert review to update. We propose and implement a semi-supervised approach for automatically identifying UMLS semantic relations from narrative text in PubMed. Our method analyzes biomedical narrative text to collect semantic entity pairs, and extracts multiple semantic, syntactic and orthographic features for the collected pairs. We experiment with seeded k-means clustering with various distance metrics. We create and annotate a ground truth corpus according to the top two levels of the UMLS semantic relation hierarchy. We evaluate our system on this corpus and characterize the learning curves of different clustering configuration. Using KL divergence consistently performs the best on the held-out test data. With full seeding, we obtain macro-averaged F-measures above 70% for clustering the top level UMLS relations (2-way), and above 50% for clustering the second level relations (7-way). PMID:25954580

  11. Gaps in affiliation indexing in Scopus and PubMed

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Cynthia M.; Cox, Roxanne; Fial, Alissa V.; Hartman, Teresa L.; Magee, Martha L.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The authors sought to determine whether unexpected gaps existed in Scopus's author affiliation indexing of publications written by the University of Nebraska Medical Center or Nebraska Medicine (UNMC/NM) authors during 2014. Methods First, we compared Scopus affiliation identifier search results to PubMed affiliation keyword search results. Then, we searched Scopus using affiliation keywords (UNMC, etc.) and compared the results to PubMed affiliation keyword and Scopus affiliation identifier searches. Results We found that Scopus's records for approximately 7% of UNMC/NM authors' publications lacked appropriate UNMC/NM author affiliation identifiers, and many journals' publishers were supplying incomplete author affiliation information to PubMed. Conclusions Institutions relying on Scopus to track their impact should determine whether Scopus's affiliation identifiers will, in fact, identify all articles published by their authors and investigators. PMID:27076801

  12. Identifying genetic relatives without compromising privacy

    PubMed Central

    He, Dan; Furlotte, Nicholas A.; Hormozdiari, Farhad; Joo, Jong Wha J.; Wadia, Akshay; Ostrovsky, Rafail; Sahai, Amit; Eskin, Eleazar

    2014-01-01

    The development of high-throughput genomic technologies has impacted many areas of genetic research. While many applications of these technologies focus on the discovery of genes involved in disease from population samples, applications of genomic technologies to an individual’s genome or personal genomics have recently gained much interest. One such application is the identification of relatives from genetic data. In this application, genetic information from a set of individuals is collected in a database, and each pair of individuals is compared in order to identify genetic relatives. An inherent issue that arises in the identification of relatives is privacy. In this article, we propose a method for identifying genetic relatives without compromising privacy by taking advantage of novel cryptographic techniques customized for secure and private comparison of genetic information. We demonstrate the utility of these techniques by allowing a pair of individuals to discover whether or not they are related without compromising their genetic information or revealing it to a third party. The idea is that individuals only share enough special-purpose cryptographically protected information with each other to identify whether or not they are relatives, but not enough to expose any information about their genomes. We show in HapMap and 1000 Genomes data that our method can recover first- and second-order genetic relationships and, through simulations, show that our method can identify relationships as distant as third cousins while preserving privacy. PMID:24614977

  13. Identifying Adverse Drug Events by Relational Learning

    PubMed Central

    Page, David; Costa, Vítor Santos; Natarajan, Sriraam; Barnard, Aubrey; Peissig, Peggy; Caldwell, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The pharmaceutical industry, consumer protection groups, users of medications and government oversight agencies are all strongly interested in identifying adverse reactions to drugs. While a clinical trial of a drug may use only a thousand patients, once a drug is released on the market it may be taken by millions of patients. As a result, in many cases adverse drug events (ADEs) are observed in the broader population that were not identified during clinical trials. Therefore, there is a need for continued, post-marketing surveillance of drugs to identify previously-unanticipated ADEs. This paper casts this problem as a reverse machine learning task, related to relational subgroup discovery and provides an initial evaluation of this approach based on experiments with an actual EMR/EHR and known adverse drug events. PMID:24955289

  14. Identifying and intervening in relational aggression.

    PubMed

    Raskauskas, Juliana; Stoltz, Ann D

    2004-08-01

    Chronic victimization by bullies has been associated with academic failure in adolescence, as well as adjustment difficulties, depression, and suicidal ideation. Relational aggression is a form of bullying that is a problem for adolescent girls. It often takes the form of damaging peer relationships and includes verbal assaults such as teasing or name calling, as well as psychological attacks such as gossip, social exclusion, and strategic friendship manipulations. A girl's ability to identify these indirect attacks may be imperative for her to enact an effective defense. Because many students do not recognize relational aggression as a form of bullying, their experiences often go unreported to parents or teachers. School nurses may be the front line of defense. With this in mind, school nurses must be informed about bullying behaviors, equipped to identify these behaviors, and prepared to intervene with victims as well as perpetrators of bullying. PMID:15283614

  15. Risk Factors for Bladder Cancer: Challenges of Conducting a Literature Search Using PubMed

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Ashish; Preslan, Elicia

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the risk factors for bladder cancer using PubMed articles from January 2000 to December 2009. The study also aimed to describe the challenges encountered in the methodology of a literature search for bladder cancer risk factors using PubMed. Twenty-six categories of risk factors for bladder cancer were identified using the National Cancer Institute Web site and the Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) Web site. A total of 1,338 PubMed searches were run using the term “urinary bladder cancer” and a risk factor term (e.g., “cigarette smoking”) and were screened to identify 260 articles for final analysis. The search strategy had an overall precision of 3.42 percent, relative recall of 12.64 percent, and an F -measure of 5.39 percent. Although search terms derived from MeSH had the highest overall precision and recall, the differences did not reach significance, which indicates that for generalized, free-text searches of the PubMed database, the searchers' own terms are generally as effective as MeSH terms. PMID:21464862

  16. How Complementary and Alternative Medicine Practitioners Use PubMed

    PubMed Central

    Quint-Rapoport, Mia

    2007-01-01

    Background PubMed is the largest bibliographic index in the life sciences. It is freely available online and is used by professionals and the public to learn more about medical research. While primarily intended to serve researchers, PubMed provides an array of tools and services that can help a wider readership in the location, comprehension, evaluation, and utilization of medical research. Objective This study sought to establish the potential contributions made by a range of PubMed tools and services to the use of the database by complementary and alternative medicine practitioners. Methods In this study, 10 chiropractors, 7 registered massage therapists, and a homeopath (N = 18), 11 with prior research training and 7 without, were taken through a 2-hour introductory session with PubMed. The 10 PubMed tools and services considered in this study can be divided into three functions: (1) information retrieval (Boolean Search, Limits, Related Articles, Author Links, MeSH), (2) information access (Publisher Link, LinkOut, Bookshelf ), and (3) information management (History, Send To, Email Alert). Participants were introduced to between six and 10 of these tools and services. The participants were asked to provide feedback on the value of each tool or service in terms of their information needs, which was ranked as positive, positive with emphasis, negative, or indifferent. Results The participants in this study expressed an interest in the three types of PubMed tools and services (information retrieval, access, and management), with less well-regarded tools including MeSH Database and Bookshelf. In terms of their comprehension of the research, the tools and services led the participants to reflect on their understanding as well as their critical reading and use of the research. There was universal support among the participants for greater access to complete articles, beyond the approximately 15% that are currently open access. The abstracts provided by PubMed were

  17. Acta Informatica Medica Is Indexed In Pubmed And Archived In Pubmed Central

    PubMed Central

    Masic, Izet

    2013-01-01

    Acta Informatica Medica journal has been accepted for archiving in PubMed Central from 2011 onward. The journal started in 1993 as the official journal of the Society for Medical Informatics of Bosnia and Herzegovina. During the last 3 years, Acta Informatica Medica has een included in almost all prestigious online databases, including PubMed, Scopus and EMBASE. The 20th volume of the journal is fully international, with papers from 18 countries. PMID:23572852

  18. SPELLING CORRECTION IN THE PUBMED SEARCH ENGINE.

    PubMed

    Wilbur, W John; Kim, Won; Xie, Natalie

    2006-11-01

    It is known that users of internet search engines often enter queries with misspellings in one or more search terms. Several web search engines make suggestions for correcting misspelled words, but the methods used are proprietary and unpublished to our knowledge. Here we describe the methodology we have developed to perform spelling correction for the PubMed search engine. Our approach is based on the noisy channel model for spelling correction and makes use of statistics harvested from user logs to estimate the probabilities of different types of edits that lead to misspellings. The unique problems encountered in correcting search engine queries are discussed and our solutions are outlined. PMID:18080004

  19. Identifying and Intervening in Relational Aggression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raskauskas, Juliana; Stoltz, Ann D.

    2004-01-01

    Chronic victimization by bullies has been associated with academic failure in adolescence, as well as adjustment difficulties, depression, and suicidal ideation. Relational aggression is a form of bullying that is a problem for adolescent girls. It often takes the form of damaging peer relationships and includes verbal assaults such as teasing or…

  20. Complex event extraction at PubMed scale

    PubMed Central

    Björne, Jari; Ginter, Filip; Pyysalo, Sampo; Tsujii, Jun'ichi; Salakoski, Tapio

    2010-01-01

    Motivation: There has recently been a notable shift in biomedical information extraction (IE) from relation models toward the more expressive event model, facilitated by the maturation of basic tools for biomedical text analysis and the availability of manually annotated resources. The event model allows detailed representation of complex natural language statements and can support a number of advanced text mining applications ranging from semantic search to pathway extraction. A recent collaborative evaluation demonstrated the potential of event extraction systems, yet there have so far been no studies of the generalization ability of the systems nor the feasibility of large-scale extraction. Results: This study considers event-based IE at PubMed scale. We introduce a system combining publicly available, state-of-the-art methods for domain parsing, named entity recognition and event extraction, and test the system on a representative 1% sample of all PubMed citations. We present the first evaluation of the generalization performance of event extraction systems to this scale and show that despite its computational complexity, event extraction from the entire PubMed is feasible. We further illustrate the value of the extraction approach through a number of analyses of the extracted information. Availability: The event detection system and extracted data are open source licensed and available at http://bionlp.utu.fi/. Contact: jari.bjorne@utu.fi PMID:20529932

  1. Connecting the Dots between PubMed Abstracts

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, M. Shahriar; Gresock, Joseph; Edmonds, Yvette; Helm, Richard; Potts, Malcolm; Ramakrishnan, Naren

    2012-01-01

    Background There are now a multitude of articles published in a diversity of journals providing information about genes, proteins, pathways, and diseases. Each article investigates subsets of a biological process, but to gain insight into the functioning of a system as a whole, we must integrate information from multiple publications. Particularly, unraveling relationships between extra-cellular inputs and downstream molecular response mechanisms requires integrating conclusions from diverse publications. Methodology We present an automated approach to biological knowledge discovery from PubMed abstracts, suitable for “connecting the dots” across the literature. We describe a storytelling algorithm that, given a start and end publication, typically with little or no overlap in content, identifies a chain of intermediate publications from one to the other, such that neighboring publications have significant content similarity. The quality of discovered stories is measured using local criteria such as the size of supporting neighborhoods for each link and the strength of individual links connecting publications, as well as global metrics of dispersion. To ensure that the story stays coherent as it meanders from one publication to another, we demonstrate the design of novel coherence and overlap filters for use as post-processing steps. Conclusions We demonstrate the application of our storytelling algorithm to three case studies: i) a many-one study exploring relationships between multiple cellular inputs and a molecule responsible for cell-fate decisions, ii) a many-many study exploring the relationships between multiple cytokines and multiple downstream transcription factors, and iii) a one-to-one study to showcase the ability to recover a cancer related association, viz. the Warburg effect, from past literature. The storytelling pipeline helps narrow down a scientist's focus from several hundreds of thousands of relevant documents to only around a hundred

  2. Bosnian and Herzegovinian medical scientists in PubMed database.

    PubMed

    Masic, Izet

    2013-01-01

    In this paper it is shortly presented PubMed as one of the most important on-line databases of the scientific biomedical literature. Also, the author has analyzed the most cited authors, professors of the medical faculties in Bosnia and Herzegovina, from the published papers in the biomedical journals abstracted and indexed in PubMed. PMID:24341067

  3. History and Trends of "Personal Health Record" Research in PubMed

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jeongeun; Bates, David W.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to review history and trends of personal health record research in PubMed and to provide accurate understanding and categorical analysis of expert opinions. Methods For the search strategy, PubMed was queried for 'personal health record, personal record, and PHR' in the title and abstract fields. Those containing different definitions of the word were removed by one-by-one analysis from the results, 695 articles. In the end, total of 229 articles were analyzed in this research. Results The results show that the changes in terms over the years and the shift to patient centeredness and mixed usage. And we identified history and trend of PHR research in some category that the number of publications by year, topic, methodologies and target diseases. Also from analysis of MeSH terms, we can show the focal interest in regards the PHR boundaries and related subjects. Conclusions For PHRs to be efficiently used by general public, initial understanding of the history and trends of PHR research may be helpful. Simultaneously, accurate understanding and categorical analysis of expert opinions that can lead to the development and growth of PHRs will be valuable to their adoption and expansion. PMID:21818452

  4. MET network in PubMed: a text-mined network visualization and curation system

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Hong-Jie; Su, Chu-Hsien; Lai, Po-Ting; Huang, Ming-Siang; Jonnagaddala, Jitendra; Rose Jue, Toni; Rao, Shruti; Chou, Hui-Jou; Milacic, Marija; Singh, Onkar; Syed-Abdul, Shabbir; Hsu, Wen-Lian

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis is the dissemination of a cancer/tumor from one organ to another, and it is the most dangerous stage during cancer progression, causing more than 90% of cancer deaths. Improving the understanding of the complicated cellular mechanisms underlying metastasis requires investigations of the signaling pathways. To this end, we developed a METastasis (MET) network visualization and curation tool to assist metastasis researchers retrieve network information of interest while browsing through the large volume of studies in PubMed. MET can recognize relations among genes, cancers, tissues and organs of metastasis mentioned in the literature through text-mining techniques, and then produce a visualization of all mined relations in a metastasis network. To facilitate the curation process, MET is developed as a browser extension that allows curators to review and edit concepts and relations related to metastasis directly in PubMed. PubMed users can also view the metastatic networks integrated from the large collection of research papers directly through MET. For the BioCreative 2015 interactive track (IAT), a curation task was proposed to curate metastatic networks among PubMed abstracts. Six curators participated in the proposed task and a post-IAT task, curating 963 unique metastatic relations from 174 PubMed abstracts using MET. Database URL: http://btm.tmu.edu.tw/metastasisway PMID:27242035

  5. MET network in PubMed: a text-mined network visualization and curation system.

    PubMed

    Dai, Hong-Jie; Su, Chu-Hsien; Lai, Po-Ting; Huang, Ming-Siang; Jonnagaddala, Jitendra; Rose Jue, Toni; Rao, Shruti; Chou, Hui-Jou; Milacic, Marija; Singh, Onkar; Syed-Abdul, Shabbir; Hsu, Wen-Lian

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis is the dissemination of a cancer/tumor from one organ to another, and it is the most dangerous stage during cancer progression, causing more than 90% of cancer deaths. Improving the understanding of the complicated cellular mechanisms underlying metastasis requires investigations of the signaling pathways. To this end, we developed a METastasis (MET) network visualization and curation tool to assist metastasis researchers retrieve network information of interest while browsing through the large volume of studies in PubMed. MET can recognize relations among genes, cancers, tissues and organs of metastasis mentioned in the literature through text-mining techniques, and then produce a visualization of all mined relations in a metastasis network. To facilitate the curation process, MET is developed as a browser extension that allows curators to review and edit concepts and relations related to metastasis directly in PubMed. PubMed users can also view the metastatic networks integrated from the large collection of research papers directly through MET. For the BioCreative 2015 interactive track (IAT), a curation task was proposed to curate metastatic networks among PubMed abstracts. Six curators participated in the proposed task and a post-IAT task, curating 963 unique metastatic relations from 174 PubMed abstracts using MET.Database URL: http://btm.tmu.edu.tw/metastasisway. PMID:27242035

  6. PubMed searches: overview and strategies for clinicians.

    PubMed

    Lindsey, Wesley T; Olin, Bernie R

    2013-04-01

    PubMed is a biomedical and life sciences database maintained by a division of the National Library of Medicine known as the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI). It is a large resource with more than 5600 journals indexed and greater than 22 million total citations. Searches conducted in PubMed provide references that are more specific for the intended topic compared with other popular search engines. Effective PubMed searches allow the clinician to remain current on the latest clinical trials, systematic reviews, and practice guidelines. PubMed continues to evolve by allowing users to create a customized experience through the My NCBI portal, new arrangements and options in search filters, and supporting scholarly projects through exportation of citations to reference managing software. Prepackaged search options available in the Clinical Queries feature also allow users to efficiently search for clinical literature. PubMed also provides information regarding the source journals themselves through the Journals in NCBI Databases link. This article provides an overview of the PubMed database's structure and features as well as strategies for conducting an effective search. PMID:23442731

  7. Demystifying the Search Button: A Comprehensive PubMed Search Strategy for Performing an Exhaustive Literature Review.

    PubMed

    McKeever, Liam; Nguyen, Van; Peterson, Sarah J; Gomez-Perez, Sandra; Braunschweig, Carol

    2015-08-01

    A thorough review of the literature is the basis of all research and evidence-based practice. A gold-standard efficient and exhaustive search strategy is needed to ensure all relevant citations have been captured and that the search performed is reproducible. The PubMed database comprises both the MEDLINE and non-MEDLINE databases. MEDLINE-based search strategies are robust but capture only 89% of the total available citations in PubMed. The remaining 11% include the most recent and possibly relevant citations but are only searchable through less efficient techniques. An effective search strategy must employ both the MEDLINE and the non-MEDLINE portion of PubMed to ensure all studies have been identified. The robust MEDLINE search strategies are used for the MEDLINE portion of the search. Usage of the less robust strategies is then efficiently confined to search only the remaining 11% of PubMed citations that have not been indexed for MEDLINE. The current article offers step-by-step instructions for building such a search exploring methods for the discovery of medical subject heading (MeSH) terms to search MEDLINE, text-based methods for exploring the non-MEDLINE database, information on the limitations of convenience algorithms such as the "related citations feature," the strengths and pitfalls associated with commonly used filters, the proper usage of Boolean operators to organize a master search strategy, and instructions for automating that search through "MyNCBI" to receive search query updates by email as new citations become available. PMID:26129895

  8. How Twitter Is Studied in the Medical Professions: A Classification of Twitter Papers Indexed in PubMed

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Since their inception, Twitter and related microblogging systems have provided a rich source of information for researchers and have attracted interest in their affordances and use. Since 2009 PubMed has included 123 journal articles on medicine and Twitter, but no overview exists as to how the field uses Twitter in research. Objective This paper aims to identify published work relating to Twitter within the fields indexed by PubMed, and then to classify it. This classification will provide a framework in which future researchers will be able to position their work, and to provide an understanding of the current reach of research using Twitter in medical disciplines. Methods Papers on Twitter and related topics were identified and reviewed. The papers were then qualitatively classified based on the paper’s title and abstract to determine their focus. The work that was Twitter focused was studied in detail to determine what data, if any, it was based on, and from this a categorization of the data set size used in the studies was developed. Using open coded content analysis additional important categories were also identified, relating to the primary methodology, domain, and aspect. Results As of 2012, PubMed comprises more than 21 million citations from biomedical literature, and from these a corpus of 134 potentially Twitter related papers were identified, eleven of which were subsequently found not to be relevant. There were no papers prior to 2009 relating to microblogging, a term first used in 2006. Of the remaining 123 papers which mentioned Twitter, thirty were focused on Twitter (the others referring to it tangentially). The early Twitter focused papers introduced the topic and highlighted the potential, not carrying out any form of data analysis. The majority of published papers used analytic techniques to sort through thousands, if not millions, of individual tweets, often depending on automated tools to do so. Our analysis demonstrates that

  9. pubmed.mineR: an R package with text-mining algorithms to analyse PubMed abstracts.

    PubMed

    Rani, Jyoti; Shah, A B Rauf; Ramachandran, Srinivasan

    2015-10-01

    The PubMed literature database is a valuable source of information for scientific research. It is rich in biomedical literature with more than 24 million citations. Data-mining of voluminous literature is a challenging task. Although several text-mining algorithms have been developed in recent years with focus on data visualization, they have limitations such as speed, are rigid and are not available in the open source. We have developed an R package, pubmed.mineR, wherein we have combined the advantages of existing algorithms, overcome their limitations, and offer user flexibility and link with other packages in Bioconductor and the Comprehensive R Network (CRAN) in order to expand the user capabilities for executing multifaceted approaches. Three case studies are presented, namely, 'Evolving role of diabetes educators', 'Cancer risk assessment' and 'Dynamic concepts on disease and comorbidity' to illustrate the use of pubmed.mineR. The package generally runs fast with small elapsed times in regular workstations even on large corpus sizes and with compute intensive functions. The pubmed.mineR is available at http://cran.rproject. org/web/packages/pubmed.mineR. PMID:26564970

  10. PubMed Central Canada: Beyond an Open Access Repository?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nariani, Rajiv

    2013-01-01

    PubMed Central Canada (PMC Canada) represents a partnership between the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR), the National Research Council's Canada Institute for Scientific and Technical Information (NRC-CISTI), and the National Library of Medicine of the US. The present study was done to gauge faculty awareness about the CIHR Policy on…

  11. Identifying and relating biological concepts in the Catalogue of Life

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In this paper we describe our experience of adding globally unique identifiers to the Species 2000 and ITIS Catalogue of Life, an on-line index of organisms which is intended, ultimately, to cover all the world's known species. The scientific species names held in the Catalogue are names that already play an extensive role as terms in the organisation of information about living organisms in bioinformatics and other domains, but the effectiveness of their use is hindered by variation in individuals' opinions and understanding of these terms; indeed, in some cases more than one name will have been used to refer to the same organism. This means that it is desirable to be able to give unique labels to each of these differing concepts within the catalogue and to be able to determine which concepts are being used in other systems, in order that they can be associated with the concepts in the catalogue. Not only is this needed, but it is also necessary to know the relationships between alternative concepts that scientists might have employed, as these determine what can be inferred when data associated with related concepts is being processed. A further complication is that the catalogue itself is evolving as scientific opinion changes due to an increasing understanding of life. Results We describe how we are using Life Science Identifiers (LSIDs) as globally unique identifiers in the Catalogue of Life, explaining how the mapping to species concepts is performed, how concepts are associated with specific editions of the catalogue, and how the Taxon Concept Schema has been adopted in order to express information about concepts and their relationships. We explore the implications of using globally unique identifiers in order to refer to abstract concepts such as species, which incorporate at least a measure of subjectivity in their definition, in contrast with the more traditional use of such identifiers to refer to more tangible entities, events, documents

  12. MICROTASK CROWDSOURCING FOR DISEASE MENTION ANNOTATION IN PUBMED ABSTRACTS

    PubMed Central

    Good, Benjamin M; Nanis, Max; Wu, Chunlei; Su, Andrew I

    2014-01-01

    Identifying concepts and relationships in biomedical text enables knowledge to be applied in computational analyses. Many biological natural language processing (BioNLP) projects attempt to address this challenge, but the state of the art still leaves much room for improvement. Progress in BioNLP research depends on large, annotated corpora for evaluating information extraction systems and training machine learning models. Traditionally, such corpora are created by small numbers of expert annotators often working over extended periods of time. Recent studies have shown that workers on microtask crowdsourcing platforms such as Amazon’s Mechanical Turk (AMT) can, in aggregate, generate high-quality annotations of biomedical text. Here, we investigated the use of the AMT in capturing disease mentions in PubMed abstracts. We used the NCBI Disease corpus as a gold standard for refining and benchmarking our crowdsourcing protocol. After several iterations, we arrived at a protocol that reproduced the annotations of the 593 documents in the ‘training set’ of this gold standard with an overall F measure of 0.872 (precision 0.862, recall 0.883). The output can also be tuned to optimize for precision (max = 0.984 when recall = 0.269) or recall (max = 0.980 when precision = 0.436). Each document was completed by 15 workers, and their annotations were merged based on a simple voting method. In total 145 workers combined to complete all 593 documents in the span of 9 days at a cost of $.066 per abstract per worker. The quality of the annotations, as judged with the F measure, increases with the number of workers assigned to each task; however minimal performance gains were observed beyond 8 workers per task. These results add further evidence that microtask crowdsourcing can be a valuable tool for generating well-annotated corpora in BioNLP. Data produced for this analysis are available at http

  13. Trends and topics in eye disease research in PubMed from 2010 to 2014

    PubMed Central

    Denion, Eric; Mortemousque, Bruno; Mouriaux, Fréderic

    2016-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study is to provide a report on scientific production during the period 2010–2014 in order to identify the major topics as well as the predominant actors (journals, countries, continents) involved in the field of eye disease. Methods: A PubMed search was carried out to extract articles related to eye diseases during the period 2010–2014. Data were downloaded and processed through developed PHP scripts for further analysis. Results: A total of 62,123 articles were retrieved. A total of 3,368 different journals were found, and 19 journals were identified as “core journals” according to Braford’s law. English was by far the predominant language. A total of 853,182 MeSH terms were found, representing an average of 13.73 (SD = 4.98) MeSH terms per article. Among these 853,182 MeSH terms, 14,689 different MeSH terms were identified. Vision Disorders, Glaucoma, Diabetic Retinopathy, Macular Degeneration, and Cataract were the most frequent five MeSH terms related to eye diseases. The analysis of the total number of publications showed that Europe and Asia were the most productive continents, and the USA and China the most productive countries. Interestingly, using the mean Five-Year Impact Factor, the two most productive continents were North America and Oceania. After adjustment for population, the overall ranking positions changed in favor of smaller countries (i.e. Iceland, Switzerland, Denmark, and New Zealand), while after adjustment for Gross Domestic Product (GDP), the overall ranking positions changed in favor of some developing countries (Malawi, Guatemala, Singapore). Conclusions: Due to the large number of articles included and the numerous parameters analyzed, this study provides a wide view of scientific productivity related to eye diseases during the period 2010–2014 and allows us to better understand this field. PMID:26819840

  14. An analysis of gene/protein associations at PubMed scale

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Event extraction following the GENIA Event corpus and BioNLP shared task models has been a considerable focus of recent work in biomedical information extraction. This work includes efforts applying event extraction methods to the entire PubMed literature database, far beyond the narrow subdomains of biomedicine for which annotated resources for extraction method development are available. Results In the present study, our aim is to estimate the coverage of all statements of gene/protein associations in PubMed that existing resources for event extraction can provide. We base our analysis on a recently released corpus automatically annotated for gene/protein entities and syntactic analyses covering the entire PubMed, and use named entity co-occurrence, shortest dependency paths and an unlexicalized classifier to identify likely statements of gene/protein associations. A set of high-frequency/high-likelihood association statements are then manually analyzed with reference to the GENIA ontology. Conclusions We present a first estimate of the overall coverage of gene/protein associations provided by existing resources for event extraction. Our results suggest that for event-type associations this coverage may be over 90%. We also identify several biologically significant associations of genes and proteins that are not addressed by these resources, suggesting directions for further extension of extraction coverage. PMID:22166173

  15. Identifying Indicators Related to Constructs for Engineering Design Outcome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilhelmsen, Cheryl A.; Dixon, Raymond A.

    2016-01-01

    This study ranked constructs articulated by Childress and Rhodes (2008) and identified the key indicators for each construct as a starting point to explore what should be included on an instrument to measure the engineering design process and outcomes of students in high schools that use the PLTW and EbDTM curricula in Idaho. A case-study design…

  16. Identifying novel resistance genes in rice wild relatives

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rice blast and sheath blight are major fungal diseases of cultivated rice (Oryza sativa L. ) that limit Arkansas rough rice yields and market potential. Resistance to these diseases has been found in rice wild relatives (Oryza spp.) A collection of these wild relatives originating from outside the U...

  17. Identifying synonymy between relational phrases using word embeddings.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Nhung T H; Miwa, Makoto; Tsuruoka, Yoshimasa; Tojo, Satoshi

    2015-08-01

    Many text mining applications in the biomedical domain benefit from automatic clustering of relational phrases into synonymous groups, since it alleviates the problem of spurious mismatches caused by the diversity of natural language expressions. Most of the previous work that has addressed this task of synonymy resolution uses similarity metrics between relational phrases based on textual strings or dependency paths, which, for the most part, ignore the context around the relations. To overcome this shortcoming, we employ a word embedding technique to encode relational phrases. We then apply the k-means algorithm on top of the distributional representations to cluster the phrases. Our experimental results show that this approach outperforms state-of-the-art statistical models including latent Dirichlet allocation and Markov logic networks. PMID:26004792

  18. Identifying Fracture Types and Relative Ages Using Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Dilley, Lorie M.; Norman, David; Owens, Lara

    2008-06-30

    Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) are designed to recover heat from the subsurface by mechanically creating fractures in subsurface rocks. Understanding the life cycle of a fracture in a geothermal system is fundamental to the development of techniques for creating fractures. Recognizing the stage of a fracture, whether it is currently open and transmitting fluids; if it recently has closed; or if it is an ancient fracture would assist in targeting areas for further fracture stimulation. Identifying dense fracture areas as well as large open fractures from small fracture systems will also assist in fracture stimulation selection. Geothermal systems are constantly generating fractures, and fluids and gases passing through rocks in these systems leave small fluid and gas samples trapped in healed microfractures. Fluid inclusions trapped in minerals as the fractures heal are characteristic of the fluids that formed them, and this signature can be seen in fluid inclusion gas analysis. Our hypothesis is that fractures over their life cycle have different chemical signatures that we can see in fluid inclusion gas analysis and by using the new method of fluid inclusion stratigraphy (FIS) the different stages of fractures, along with an estimate of fracture size can be identified during the well drilling process. We have shown with this study that it is possible to identify fracture locations using FIS and that different fractures have different chemical signatures however that signature is somewhat dependent upon rock type. Open, active fractures correlate with increase concentrations of CO2, N2, Ar, and to a lesser extent H2O. These fractures would be targets for further enhancement. The usefulness of this method is that it is low cost alternative to current well logging techniques and can be done as a well is being drilled.

  19. Identifying Girls Who Use Relational Aggression: A Proposed Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Page, Angela; Smith, Lisa F.

    2012-01-01

    This study used mixed methods to compare perceptions of relational aggression (RA) of adolescent girls (n = 282) and their teachers (n = 15) in New Zealand, and to explore strategies for teachers to effectively manage RA in the classroom. Results indicated that younger adolescent girls view physical aggression as more acceptable than older girls,…

  20. COMPONENTS IDENTIFIED IN ENERGY-RELATED WASTES AND EFFLUENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A state-of-the-art review of the characterization of solid wastes and aqueous effluents generated by energy-related processes was conducted. The reliability of these data was evaluated according to preselected criteria or sample source, sampling and analytical methodology, and da...

  1. Identifying Dyscalculia Symptoms Related to Magnocellular Reasoning Using Smartphones.

    PubMed

    Knudsen, Greger Siem; Babic, Ankica

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a study that has developed a mobile software application for assisting diagnosis of learning disabilities in mathematics, called dyscalculia, and measuring correlations between dyscalculia symptoms and magnocellular reasoning. Usually, software aids for dyscalculic individuals are focused on both assisting diagnosis and teaching the material. The software developed in this study however maintains a specific focus on the former, and in the process attempts to capture alleged correlations between dyscalculia symptoms and possible underlying causes of the condition. Classification of symptoms is performed by k-Nearest Neighbor algorithm classifying five parameters evaluating user's skills, returning calculated performance in each category as well as correlation strength between detected symptoms and magnocellular reasoning abilities. Expert evaluations has found the application to be appropriate and productive for its intended purpose, proving that mobile software is a suitable and valuable tool for assisting dyscalculia diagnosis and identifying root causes of developing the condition. PMID:27350512

  2. A Study on Pubmed Search Tag Usage Pattern: Association Rule Mining of a Full-day Pubmed Query Log

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The practice of evidence-based medicine requires efficient biomedical literature search such as PubMed/MEDLINE. Retrieval performance relies highly on the efficient use of search field tags. The purpose of this study was to analyze PubMed log data in order to understand the usage pattern of search tags by the end user in PubMed/MEDLINE search. Methods A PubMed query log file was obtained from the National Library of Medicine containing anonymous user identification, timestamp, and query text. Inconsistent records were removed from the dataset and the search tags were extracted from the query texts. A total of 2,917,159 queries were selected for this study issued by a total of 613,061 users. The analysis of frequent co-occurrences and usage patterns of the search tags was conducted using an association mining algorithm. Results The percentage of search tag usage was low (11.38% of the total queries) and only 2.95% of queries contained two or more tags. Three out of four users used no search tag and about two-third of them issued less than four queries. Among the queries containing at least one tagged search term, the average number of search tags was almost half of the number of total search terms. Navigational search tags are more frequently used than informational search tags. While no strong association was observed between informational and navigational tags, six (out of 19) informational tags and six (out of 29) navigational tags showed strong associations in PubMed searches. Conclusions The low percentage of search tag usage implies that PubMed/MEDLINE users do not utilize the features of PubMed/MEDLINE widely or they are not aware of such features or solely depend on the high recall focused query translation by the PubMed’s Automatic Term Mapping. The users need further education and interactive search application for effective use of the search tags in order to fulfill their biomedical information needs from PubMed/MEDLINE. PMID:23302604

  3. Identifying electromagnetic transients related to gravitational-wave emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padilla, Cinthia; LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration

    2011-04-01

    Over the past several years the LIGO, Virgo and GEO600 gravitational-wave detectors have operated together as a worldwide network. The combined data from these detectors allows sky localization of astrophysical gravitational-wave sources. By running searches for transient gravitational waves shortly after the data is taken, sky locations can be communicated to electromagnetic observers early enough to allow measurement of any electromagnetic emission in the aftermath of a strong gravitational-wave signal. By measuring both the gravitational and the electromagnetic radiation we can learn a significant amount about their source. Over the past year, electromagnetic images of sky locations corresponding to low-threshold gravitational-wave triggers have been acquired. These are now being analyzed for optical transients. Challenges include unrelated disturbances such as asteroids, satellites, clouds and other objects in space. In this poster we describe the procedure for identifying EM transients with a developed pipeline designed to compare images and sky catalogs to distinguish stars in nearby galaxies and reject background events.

  4. Using Facility Condition Assessments to Identify Actions Related to Infrastructure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubert, Kennedy F.

    2010-01-01

    To support cost effective, quality research it is essential that laboratory and testing facilities are maintained in a continuous and reliable state of availability at all times. NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) and its maintenance contractor, Jacobs Technology, Inc. Research Operations, Maintenance, and Engineering (ROME) group, are in the process of implementing a combined Facility Condition Assessment (FCA) and Reliability Centered Maintenance (RCM) program to improve asset management and overall reliability of testing equipment in facilities such as wind tunnels. Specific areas are being identified for improvement, the deferred maintenance cost is being estimated, and priority is being assigned against facilities where conditions have been allowed to deteriorate. This assessment serves to assist in determining where to commit available funds on the Center. RCM methodologies are being reviewed and enhanced to assure that appropriate preventive, predictive, and facilities/equipment acceptance techniques are incorporated to prolong lifecycle availability and assure reliability at minimum cost. The results from the program have been favorable, better enabling LaRC to manage assets prudently.

  5. NEMO: Extraction and normalization of organization names from PubMed affiliation strings

    PubMed Central

    Jonnalagadda, Siddhartha; Topham, Philip

    2010-01-01

    Background. We are witnessing an exponential increase in biomedical research citations in PubMed. However, translating biomedical discoveries into practical treatments is estimated to take around 17 years, according to the 2000 Yearbook of Medical Informatics, and much information is lost during this transition. Pharmaceutical companies spend huge sums to identify opinion leaders and centers of excellence. Conventional methods such as literature search, survey, observation, self-identification, expert opinion, and sociometry not only need much human effort, but are also noncomprehensive. Such huge delays and costs can be reduced by “connecting those who produce the knowledge with those who apply it”. A humble step in this direction is large scale discovery of persons and organizations involved in specific areas of research. This can be achieved by automatically extracting and disambiguating author names and affiliation strings retrieved through Medical Subject Heading (MeSH) terms and other keywords associated with articles in PubMed. In this study, we propose NEMO (Normalization Engine for Matching Organizations), a system for extracting organization names from the affiliation strings provided in PubMed abstracts, building a thesaurus (list of synonyms) of organization names, and subsequently normalizing them to a canonical organization name using the thesaurus. Results: We used a parsing process that involves multi-layered rule matching with multiple dictionaries. The normalization process involves clustering based on weighted local sequence alignment metrics to address synonymy at word level, and local learning based on finding connected components to address synonymy. The graphical user interface and java client library of NEMO are available at http://lnxnemo.sourceforge.net . Conclusion: NEMO is developed to associate each biomedical paper and its authors with a unique organization name and the geopolitical location of that organization. This system

  6. GeneView: a comprehensive semantic search engine for PubMed.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Philippe; Starlinger, Johannes; Vowinkel, Alexander; Arzt, Sebastian; Leser, Ulf

    2012-07-01

    Research results are primarily published in scientific literature and curation efforts cannot keep up with the rapid growth of published literature. The plethora of knowledge remains hidden in large text repositories like MEDLINE. Consequently, life scientists have to spend a great amount of time searching for specific information. The enormous ambiguity among most names of biomedical objects such as genes, chemicals and diseases often produces too large and unspecific search results. We present GeneView, a semantic search engine for biomedical knowledge. GeneView is built upon a comprehensively annotated version of PubMed abstracts and openly available PubMed Central full texts. This semi-structured representation of biomedical texts enables a number of features extending classical search engines. For instance, users may search for entities using unique database identifiers or they may rank documents by the number of specific mentions they contain. Annotation is performed by a multitude of state-of-the-art text-mining tools for recognizing mentions from 10 entity classes and for identifying protein-protein interactions. GeneView currently contains annotations for >194 million entities from 10 classes for ∼21 million citations with 271,000 full text bodies. GeneView can be searched at http://bc3.informatik.hu-berlin.de/. PMID:22693219

  7. Retrieval comparison of EndNote to search MEDLINE (Ovid and PubMed) versus searching them directly.

    PubMed

    Gall, Carole; Brahmi, Frances A

    2004-01-01

    Using EndNote version 7.0, the authors tested the search capabilities of the EndNote search engine for retrieving citations from MEDLINE for importation into EndNote, a citation management software package. Ovid MEDLINE and PubMed were selected for the comparison. Several searches were performed on Ovid MEDLINE and PubMed using EndNote as the search engine, and the same searches were run on both Ovid and PubMed directly. Findings indicate that it is preferable to search MEDLINE directly rather than using EndNote. The publishers of EndNote do warn its users about the limitations of their product as a search engine when searching external databases. In this article, the limitations of EndNote as a search engine for searching MEDLINE were explored as related to MeSH, non-MeSH, citation verification, and author searching. PMID:15364649

  8. Technical development of PubMed Interact: an improved interface for MEDLINE/PubMed searches

    PubMed Central

    Muin, Michael; Fontelo, Paul

    2006-01-01

    Background The project aims to create an alternative search interface for MEDLINE/PubMed that may provide assistance to the novice user and added convenience to the advanced user. An earlier version of the project was the 'Slider Interface for MEDLINE/PubMed searches' (SLIM) which provided JavaScript slider bars to control search parameters. In this new version, recent developments in Web-based technologies were implemented. These changes may prove to be even more valuable in enhancing user interactivity through client-side manipulation and management of results. Results PubMed Interact is a Web-based MEDLINE/PubMed search application built with HTML, JavaScript and PHP. It is implemented on a Windows Server 2003 with Apache 2.0.52, PHP 4.4.1 and MySQL 4.1.18. PHP scripts provide the backend engine that connects with E-Utilities and parses XML files. JavaScript manages client-side functionalities and converts Web pages into interactive platforms using dynamic HTML (DHTML), Document Object Model (DOM) tree manipulation and Ajax methods. With PubMed Interact, users can limit searches with JavaScript slider bars, preview result counts, delete citations from the list, display and add related articles and create relevance lists. Many interactive features occur at client-side, which allow instant feedback without reloading or refreshing the page resulting in a more efficient user experience. Conclusion PubMed Interact is a highly interactive Web-based search application for MEDLINE/PubMed that explores recent trends in Web technologies like DOM tree manipulation and Ajax. It may become a valuable technical development for online medical search applications. PMID:17083729

  9. A Bibliometric Analysis of PubMed Literature on Middle East Respiratory Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhengting; Chen, Yongdi; Cai, Gaofeng; Jiang, Zhenggang; Liu, Kui; Chen, Bin; Jiang, Jianmin; Gu, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS), a pandemic threat to human beings, has aroused huge concern worldwide, but no bibliometric studies have been conducted on MERS research. The aim of this study was to map research productivity on the disease based on the articles indexed in PubMed. The articles related to MERS dated from 2012 to 2015 were retrieved from PubMed. The articles were classified into three categories according to their focus. Publication outputs were assessed and frequently used terms were mapped using the VOS viewer software. A total of 443 articles were included for analysis. They were published in 162 journals, with Journal of Virology being the most productive (44 articles; 9.9%) and by six types of organizations, with universities being the most productive (276 articles; 62.4%).The largest proportion of the articles focused on basic medical sciences and clinical studies (47.2%) and those on prevention and control ranked third (26.2%), with those on other focuses coming in between (26.6%). The articles on prevention and control had the highest mean rank for impact factor (IF) (226.34), followed by those on basic medical sciences and clinical studies (180.23) and those on other focuses (168.03). The mean rank differences were statistically significant (p = 0.000). Besides, “conronavirus”, “case”, “transmission” and “detection” were found to be the most frequently used terms. The findings of this first bibliometric study on MERS suggest that the prevention and control of the disease has become a big concern and related research should be strengthened. PMID:27304963

  10. A Bibliometric Analysis of PubMed Literature on Middle East Respiratory Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhengting; Chen, Yongdi; Cai, Gaofeng; Jiang, Zhenggang; Liu, Kui; Chen, Bin; Jiang, Jianmin; Gu, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS), a pandemic threat to human beings, has aroused huge concern worldwide, but no bibliometric studies have been conducted on MERS research. The aim of this study was to map research productivity on the disease based on the articles indexed in PubMed. The articles related to MERS dated from 2012 to 2015 were retrieved from PubMed. The articles were classified into three categories according to their focus. Publication outputs were assessed and frequently used terms were mapped using the VOS viewer software. A total of 443 articles were included for analysis. They were published in 162 journals, with Journal of Virology being the most productive (44 articles; 9.9%) and by six types of organizations, with universities being the most productive (276 articles; 62.4%).The largest proportion of the articles focused on basic medical sciences and clinical studies (47.2%) and those on prevention and control ranked third (26.2%), with those on other focuses coming in between (26.6%). The articles on prevention and control had the highest mean rank for impact factor (IF) (226.34), followed by those on basic medical sciences and clinical studies (180.23) and those on other focuses (168.03). The mean rank differences were statistically significant (p = 0.000). Besides, "conronavirus", "case", "transmission" and "detection" were found to be the most frequently used terms. The findings of this first bibliometric study on MERS suggest that the prevention and control of the disease has become a big concern and related research should be strengthened. PMID:27304963

  11. The inclusion of an online journal in PubMed central - a difficult path.

    PubMed

    Grech, Victor

    2016-01-01

    The indexing of a journal in a prominent database (such as PubMed) is an important imprimatur. Journals accepted for inclusion in PubMed Central (PMC) are automatically indexed in PubMed but must provide the entire contents of their publications as XML-tagged (Extensible Markup Language) data files compliant with PubMed's document type definition (DTD). This paper describes the various attempts that the journal Images in Paediatric Cardiology made in its efforts to convert the journal contents (including all of the extant backlog) to PMC-compliant XML for archiving and indexing in PubMed after the journal was accepted for inclusion by the database. PMID:27244254

  12. Retrieving Clinical Evidence: A Comparison of PubMed and Google Scholar for Quick Clinical Searches

    PubMed Central

    Bejaimal, Shayna AD; Sontrop, Jessica M; Iansavichus, Arthur V; Haynes, R Brian; Weir, Matthew A; Garg, Amit X

    2013-01-01

    Background Physicians frequently search PubMed for information to guide patient care. More recently, Google Scholar has gained popularity as another freely accessible bibliographic database. Objective To compare the performance of searches in PubMed and Google Scholar. Methods We surveyed nephrologists (kidney specialists) and provided each with a unique clinical question derived from 100 renal therapy systematic reviews. Each physician provided the search terms they would type into a bibliographic database to locate evidence to answer the clinical question. We executed each of these searches in PubMed and Google Scholar and compared results for the first 40 records retrieved (equivalent to 2 default search pages in PubMed). We evaluated the recall (proportion of relevant articles found) and precision (ratio of relevant to nonrelevant articles) of the searches performed in PubMed and Google Scholar. Primary studies included in the systematic reviews served as the reference standard for relevant articles. We further documented whether relevant articles were available as free full-texts. Results Compared with PubMed, the average search in Google Scholar retrieved twice as many relevant articles (PubMed: 11%; Google Scholar: 22%; P<.001). Precision was similar in both databases (PubMed: 6%; Google Scholar: 8%; P=.07). Google Scholar provided significantly greater access to free full-text publications (PubMed: 5%; Google Scholar: 14%; P<.001). Conclusions For quick clinical searches, Google Scholar returns twice as many relevant articles as PubMed and provides greater access to free full-text articles. PMID:23948488

  13. Publication Productivity of Faculty of Medicine, Mansoura University Indexed in PubMed

    PubMed Central

    Helal, RM; Abou-ElWafa, HS; El-Gilany, AH

    2014-01-01

    Background: Analysis of PubMed publications as an indicator of the research productivity of individual countries, regions, or institutions has recently become a field of interest. Aim: The aim was to assess the past trends in PubMed-indexed medical publications from Mansoura Faculty of Medicine and to have an idea about the current situation in medical research. Materials and Methods: PubMed was searched for publications affiliated to Mansoura from the end of the calendar year 2012 and earlier. Results: Of 2798 papers related to Mansoura, 1756 publications were included in the analysis, and 1042 publications were excluded (false positives). The highest number of publications was in 2011 (10.6%, 187/1756) followed by 2012 (10.2%, 179/1756). There was an increase of the publication rate over 5-years period until it reaches 47.0% (826/1756) during the period from 2008 to 2012. The main high-producing department was Urology and Nephrology, which accounted for 35.9% (631/1756) of the total publications followed by Pediatrics and Parasitology. The median number of authors participated in the researches was four ranging from 1 to 23. Most of the publications were in the form of intervention/clinical trials (38.4%, 662/1756) followed by descriptive/cross-sectional study (38.3%, 659/1756). The median of the impact factor was 1.99 ranging from 0.27 to 53.3. Conclusion: The publication productivity of Mansoura Faculty of Medicine showed fluctuating pattern from the end of the calendar year 2012 and earlier. Future prospects for increasing research productivity should be considered to increase the number and quality of publications and academic staff participating in high-quality international researches. PMID:25364602

  14. Using Noun Phrases for Navigating Biomedical Literature on Pubmed: How Many Updates Are We Losing Track of?

    PubMed Central

    Srikrishna, Devabhaktuni; Coram, Marc A.

    2011-01-01

    Author-supplied citations are a fraction of the related literature for a paper. The “related citations” on PubMed is typically dozens or hundreds of results long, and does not offer hints why these results are related. Using noun phrases derived from the sentences of the paper, we show it is possible to more transparently navigate to PubMed updates through search terms that can associate a paper with its citations. The algorithm to generate these search terms involved automatically extracting noun phrases from the paper using natural language processing tools, and ranking them by the number of occurrences in the paper compared to the number of occurrences on the web. We define search queries having at least one instance of overlap between the author-supplied citations of the paper and the top 20 search results as citation validated (CV). When the overlapping citations were written by same authors as the paper itself, we define it as CV-S and different authors is defined as CV-D. For a systematic sample of 883 papers on PubMed Central, at least one of the search terms for 86% of the papers is CV-D versus 65% for the top 20 PubMedrelated citations.” We hypothesize these quantities computed for the 20 million papers on PubMed to differ within 5% of these percentages. Averaged across all 883 papers, 5 search terms are CV-D, and 10 search terms are CV-S, and 6 unique citations validate these searches. Potentially related literature uncovered by citation-validated searches (either CV-S or CV-D) are on the order of ten per paper – many more if the remaining searches that are not citation-validated are taken into account. The significance and relationship of each search result to the paper can only be vetted and explained by a researcher with knowledge of or interest in that paper. PMID:21935487

  15. Use of Event-Related Potentials to Identify Language and Reading Skills

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molfese, Victoria J.; Molfese, Dennis L.; Beswick, Jennifer L.; Jacobi-Vessels, Jill; Molfese, Peter J.; Molnar, Andrew E.; Wagner, Mary C.; Haines, Brittany L.

    2008-01-01

    The extent to which oral language and emergent literacy skills are influenced by event-related potential measures of phonological processing was examined. Results revealed that event-related potential responses identify differences in letter naming but not receptive language skills.

  16. [Use of PubMed to improve evidence-based medicine in routine urological practice].

    PubMed

    Rink, M; Kluth, L A; Shariat, S F; Chun, F K; Fisch, M; Dahm, P

    2013-03-01

    Applying evidence-based medicine in daily clinical practice is the basis of patient-centered medicine and knowledge of accurate literature acquisition skills is necessary for informed clinical decision-making. PubMed is an easy accessible, free bibliographic database comprising over 21 million citations from the medical field, life-science journals and online books. The article summarizes the effective use of PubMed in routine urological clinical practice based on a common case scenario. This article explains the simple use of PubMed to obtain the best search results with the highest evidence. Accurate knowledge about the use of PubMed in routine clinical practice can improve evidence-based medicine and also patient treatment. PMID:23503794

  17. Literature Mapping with PubAtlas — extending PubMed with a ‘BLASTing interface’ *

    PubMed Central

    Parker, D.S.; Chu, W.W.; Sabb, F.W.; Toga, A.W.; Bilder, R.M.

    2009-01-01

    PubAtlas (www.pubatlas.org) is a web service and standalone program providing literature maps for the biomedical research literature. It accepts user-defined sets of terms (PubMed queries) as input, and permits ‘BLASTing’ of one set against another: for all terms x and y in these sets, deriving the results of the pairwise intersections x AND y. This all vs. all capability extends PubMed with a literature analysis interface. Correspondingly, the basic form of literature map that PubAtlas provides for exploring associations among sets of terms is an interactive tabular display, in heatmap/microarray format. PubAtlas supports development of specialized lexica -- hierarchies of controlled terminology that can represent sets of related concepts or a ‘user-defined query language’. PubAtlas also provides historical perspectives on the literature, with temporal query features that highlight historical patterns. Generally, it is a framework for extending the PubMed interface, and an extensible platform for producing interactive literature maps. PMID:21347177

  18. B.E.A.R. GeneInfo: A tool for identifying gene-related biomedical publications through user modifiable queries

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Guohui; Wen, Xinyu; Liu, Hang; Schlicht, Michael J; Hessner, Martin J; Tonellato, Peter J; Datta, Milton W

    2004-01-01

    Background Once specific genes are identified through high throughput genomics technologies there is a need to sort the final gene list to a manageable size for validation studies. The triaging and sorting of genes often relies on the use of supplemental information related to gene structure, metabolic pathways, and chromosomal location. Yet in disease states where the genes may not have identifiable structural elements, poorly defined metabolic pathways, or limited chromosomal data, flexible systems for obtaining additional data are necessary. In these situations having a tool for searching the biomedical literature using the list of identified genes while simultaneously defining additional search terms would be useful. Results We have built a tool, BEAR GeneInfo, that allows flexible searches based on the investigators knowledge of the biological process, thus allowing for data mining that is specific to the scientist's strengths and interests. This tool allows a user to upload a series of GenBank accession numbers, Unigene Ids, Locuslink Ids, or gene names. BEAR GeneInfo takes these IDs and identifies the associated gene names, and uses the lists of gene names to query PubMed. The investigator can add additional modifying search terms to the query. The subsequent output provides a list of publications, along with the associated reference hyperlinks, for reviewing the identified articles for relevance and interest. An example of the use of this tool in the study of human prostate cancer cells treated with Selenium is presented. Conclusions This tool can be used to further define a list of genes that have been identified through genomic or genetic studies. Through the use of targeted searches with additional search terms the investigator can limit the list to genes that match their specific research interests or needs. The tool is freely available on the web at [1], and the authors will provide scripts and database components if requested mdatta@mcw.edu PMID

  19. GLAD4U: deriving and prioritizing gene lists from PubMed literature

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Answering questions such as "Which genes are related to breast cancer?" usually requires retrieving relevant publications through the PubMed search engine, reading these publications, and creating gene lists. This process is not only time-consuming, but also prone to errors. Results We report GLAD4U (Gene List Automatically Derived For You), a new, free web-based gene retrieval and prioritization tool. GLAD4U takes advantage of existing resources of the NCBI to ensure computational efficiency. The quality of gene lists created by GLAD4U for three Gene Ontology (GO) terms and three disease terms was assessed using corresponding "gold standard" lists curated in public databases. For all queries, GLAD4U gene lists showed very high recall but low precision, leading to low F-measure. As a comparison, EBIMed's recall was consistently lower than GLAD4U, but its precision was higher. To present the most relevant genes at the top of a list, we studied two prioritization methods based on publication count and the hypergeometric test, and compared the ranked lists and those generated by EBIMed to the gold standards. Both GLAD4U methods outperformed EBIMed for all queries based on a variety of quality metrics. Moreover, the hypergeometric method allowed for a better performance by thresholding genes with low scores. In addition, manual examination suggests that many false-positives could be explained by the incompleteness of the gold standards. The GLAD4U user interface accepts any valid queries for PubMed, and its output page displays the ranked gene list and information associated with each gene, chronologically-ordered supporting publications, along with a summary of the run and links for file export and functional enrichment and protein interaction network analysis. Conclusions GLAD4U has a high overall recall. Although precision is generally low, the prioritization methods successfully rank truly relevant genes at the top of the lists to facilitate efficient

  20. Find Duplicates among the PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library Databases in Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Juan; Han, Guohong; Fan, Daiming

    2013-01-01

    Background Finding duplicates is an important phase of systematic review. However, no consensus regarding the methods to find duplicates has been provided. This study aims to describe a pragmatic strategy of combining auto- and hand-searching duplicates in systematic review and to evaluate the prevalence and characteristics of duplicates. Methods and Findings Literatures regarding portal vein thrombosis (PVT) and Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS) were searched by the PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane library databases. Duplicates included one index paper and one or more redundant papers. They were divided into type-I (duplicates among different databases) and type-II (duplicate publications in different journals/issues) duplicates. For type-I duplicates, reference items were further compared between index and redundant papers. Of 10936 papers regarding PVT, 2399 and 1307 were identified as auto- and hand-searched duplicates, respectively. The prevalence of auto- and hand-searched redundant papers was 11.0% (1201/10936) and 6.1% (665/10936), respectively. They included 3431 type-I and 275 type-II duplicates. Of 11403 papers regarding BCS, 3275 and 2064 were identified as auto- and hand-searched duplicates, respectively. The prevalence of auto- and hand-searched redundant papers was 14.4% (1640/11403) and 9.1% (1039/11403), respectively. They included 5053 type-I and 286 type-II duplicates. Most of type-I duplicates were identified by auto-searching method (69.5%, 2385/3431 in PVT literatures; 64.6%, 3263/5053 in BCS literatures). Nearly all type-II duplicates were identified by hand-searching method (94.9%, 261/275 in PVT literatures; 95.8%, 274/286 in BCS literatures). Compared with those identified by auto-searching method, type-I duplicates identified by hand-searching method had a significantly higher prevalence of wrong items (47/2385 versus 498/1046, p<0.0001 in PVT literatures; 30/3263 versus 778/1790, p<0.0001 in BCS literatures). Most of wrong items originated from

  1. Mining locus tags in PubMed Central to improve microbial gene annotation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The scientific literature contains millions of microbial gene identifiers within the full text and tables, but these annotations rarely get incorporated into public sequence databases. We propose to utilize the Open Access (OA) subset of PubMed Central (PMC) as a gene annotation database and have developed an R package called pmcXML to automatically mine and extract locus tags from full text, tables and supplements. Results We mined locus tags from 1835 OA publications in ten microbial genomes and extracted tags mentioned in 30,891 sentences in main text and 20,489 rows in tables. We identified locus tag pairs marking the start and end of a region such as an operon or genomic island and expanded these ranges to add another 13,043 tags. We also searched for locus tags in supplementary tables and publications outside the OA subset in Burkholderia pseudomallei K96243 for comparison. There were 168 publications containing 48,470 locus tags and 83% of mentions were from supplementary materials and 9% from publications outside the OA subset. Conclusions B. pseudomallei locus tags within the full text and tables of OA publications represent only a small fraction of the total mentions in the literature. For microbial genomes with very few functionally characterized proteins, the locus tags mentioned in supplementary tables and within ranges like genomic islands contain the majority of locus tags. Significantly, the functions in the R package provide access to additional resources in the OA subset that are not currently indexed or returned by searching PMC. PMID:24499370

  2. Contingency Space Analysis: An Alternative Method for Identifying Contingent Relations from Observational Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martens, Brian K.; DiGennaro, Florence D.; Reed, Derek D.; Szczech, Frances M.; Rosenthal, Blair D.

    2008-01-01

    Descriptive assessment methods have been used in applied settings to identify consequences for problem behavior, thereby aiding in the design of effective treatment programs. Consensus has not been reached, however, regarding the types of data or analytic strategies that are most useful for describing behavior-consequence relations. One promising…

  3. Identifying wild relatives of subtropical and temperate fruit and nut crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 2008 the Plant Exchange Office (PEO) of the Agricultural Research Service began a concentrated effort to identify, classify, and provide a full treatment in the taxonomy area of the Germplasm Resources Information Network (GRIN) for all primary, secondary, and tertiary genetic wild relatives (CWR...

  4. Measuring Medical Student Preference: A Comparison of Classroom Versus Online Instruction for Teaching Pubmed*EC

    PubMed Central

    Schimming, Laura M.

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The research analyzed evaluation data to assess medical student satisfaction with the learning experience when required PubMed training is offered entirely online. Methods: A retrospective study analyzed skills assessment scores and student feedback forms from 455 first-year medical students who completed PubMed training either through classroom sessions or an online tutorial. The class of 2006 (n = 99) attended traditional librarian-led sessions in a computer classroom. The classes of 2007 (n = 120), 2008 (n = 121), and 2009 (n = 115) completed the training entirely online through a self-paced tutorial. PubMed skills assessment scores and student feedback about the training were compared for all groups. Results: As evidenced by open-ended comments about the training, students who took the online tutorial were equally or more satisfied with the learning experience than students who attended classroom sessions, with the classes of 2008 and 2009 reporting greater satisfaction (P<0.001) than the other 2 groups. The mean score on the PubMed skills assessment (91%) was the same for all groups of students. Conclusions: Student satisfaction improved and PubMed assessment scores did not change when instruction was offered online to first-year medical students. Comments from the students who received online training suggest that the increased control and individual engagement with the web-based content led to their satisfaction with the online tutorial. PMID:18654658

  5. Multiple genome alignment for identifying the core structure among moderately related microbial genomes

    PubMed Central

    Uchiyama, Ikuo

    2008-01-01

    Background Identifying the set of intrinsically conserved genes, or the genomic core, among related genomes is crucial for understanding prokaryotic genomes where horizontal gene transfers are common. Although core genome identification appears to be obvious among very closely related genomes, it becomes more difficult when more distantly related genomes are compared. Here, we consider the core structure as a set of sufficiently long segments in which gene orders are conserved so that they are likely to have been inherited mainly through vertical transfer, and developed a method for identifying the core structure by finding the order of pre-identified orthologous groups (OGs) that maximally retains the conserved gene orders. Results The method was applied to genome comparisons of two well-characterized families, Bacillaceae and Enterobacteriaceae, and identified their core structures comprising 1438 and 2125 OGs, respectively. The core sets contained most of the essential genes and their related genes, which were primarily included in the intersection of the two core sets comprising around 700 OGs. The definition of the genomic core based on gene order conservation was demonstrated to be more robust than the simpler approach based only on gene conservation. We also investigated the core structures in terms of G+C content homogeneity and phylogenetic congruence, and found that the core genes primarily exhibited the expected characteristic, i.e., being indigenous and sharing the same history, more than the non-core genes. Conclusion The results demonstrate that our strategy of genome alignment based on gene order conservation can provide an effective approach to identify the genomic core among moderately related microbial genomes. PMID:18976470

  6. Microtask crowdsourcing for disease mention annotation in PubMed abstracts.

    PubMed

    Good, Benjamin M; Nanis, Max; Wu, Chunlei; Su, Andrew I

    2015-01-01

    Identifying concepts and relationships in biomedical text enables knowledge to be applied in computational analyses. Many biological natural language processing (BioNLP) projects attempt to address this challenge, but the state of the art still leaves much room for improvement. Progress in BioNLP research depends on large, annotated corpora for evaluating information extraction systems and training machine learning models. Traditionally, such corpora are created by small numbers of expert annotators often working over extended periods of time. Recent studies have shown that workers on microtask crowdsourcing platforms such as Amazon's Mechanical Turk (AMT) can, in aggregate, generate high-quality annotations of biomedical text. Here, we investigated the use of the AMT in capturing disease mentions in PubMed abstracts. We used the NCBI Disease corpus as a gold standard for refining and benchmarking our crowdsourcing protocol. After several iterations, we arrived at a protocol that reproduced the annotations of the 593 documents in the 'training set' of this gold standard with an overall F measure of 0.872 (precision 0.862, recall 0.883). The output can also be tuned to optimize for precision (max = 0.984 when recall = 0.269) or recall (max = 0.980 when precision = 0.436). Each document was completed by 15 workers, and their annotations were merged based on a simple voting method. In total 145 workers combined to complete all 593 documents in the span of 9 days at a cost of $.066 per abstract per worker. The quality of the annotations, as judged with the F measure, increases with the number of workers assigned to each task; however minimal performance gains were observed beyond 8 workers per task. These results add further evidence that microtask crowdsourcing can be a valuable tool for generating well-annotated corpora in BioNLP. Data produced for this analysis are available at http://figshare.com/articles/Disease_Mention_Annotation_with_Mechanical_Turk/1126402

  7. Identifying work related injuries: comparison of methods for interrogating text fields

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Work-related injuries in Australia are estimated to cost around $57.5 billion annually, however there are currently insufficient surveillance data available to support an evidence-based public health response. Emergency departments (ED) in Australia are a potential source of information on work-related injuries though most ED's do not have an 'Activity Code' to identify work-related cases with information about the presenting problem recorded in a short free text field. This study compared methods for interrogating text fields for identifying work-related injuries presenting at emergency departments to inform approaches to surveillance of work-related injury. Methods Three approaches were used to interrogate an injury description text field to classify cases as work-related: keyword search, index search, and content analytic text mining. Sensitivity and specificity were examined by comparing cases flagged by each approach to cases coded with an Activity code during triage. Methods to improve the sensitivity and/or specificity of each approach were explored by adjusting the classification techniques within each broad approach. Results The basic keyword search detected 58% of cases (Specificity 0.99), an index search detected 62% of cases (Specificity 0.87), and the content analytic text mining (using adjusted probabilities) approach detected 77% of cases (Specificity 0.95). Conclusions The findings of this study provide strong support for continued development of text searching methods to obtain information from routine emergency department data, to improve the capacity for comprehensive injury surveillance. PMID:20374657

  8. Multi-lingual search engine to access PubMed monolingual subsets: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Darmoni, Stéfan J; Soualmia, Lina F; Griffon, Nicolas; Grosjean, Julien; Kerdelhué, Gaétan; Kergourlay, Ivan; Dahamna, Badisse

    2013-01-01

    PubMed contains many articles in languages other than English but it is difficult to find them using the English version of the Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) Thesaurus. The aim of this work is to propose a tool allowing access to a PubMed subset in one language, and to evaluate its performance. Translations of MeSH were enriched and gathered in the information system. PubMed subsets in main European languages were also added in our database, using a dedicated parser. The CISMeF generic semantic search engine was evaluated on the response time for simple queries. MeSH descriptors are currently available in 11 languages in the information system. All the 654,000 PubMed citations in French were integrated into CISMeF database. None of the response times exceed the threshold defined for usability (2 seconds). It is now possible to freely access biomedical literature in French using a tool in French; health professionals and lay people with a low English language may find it useful. It will be expended to several European languages: German, Spanish, Norwegian and Portuguese. PMID:23920740

  9. Mobile app versus Web app: a comparison using 2008-2012 "PubMed for Handhelds" server data.

    PubMed

    Fontelo, Paul; Liu, Fang

    2013-01-01

    Recent surveys show that mobile apps are more popular than Web apps. Apple's iTunes Store, now has about 800,000 apps and reported to have about 40 billion downloads. Android apps, although fewer, is available to the most number of smartphones today. About 40,000 apps are medical or health related. We developed a PubMed4Hh mobile app for iPhone/iPad users to search MEDLINE/PubMed with same features as our Web-based search tools, in use since 2002. Five-year (2008-2012) server data for PubMed4Hh and Web app were analyzed. Searches using the mobile app significantly increased compared to the same five-year time period. Month-by-month comparison showed a 3 to 5-fold increase in queries. The six-month total accesses comparison increased 280% from the previous four-year average. A review of 500 randomly selected queries revealed that the majority of queries were clinical questions ((97.8%) and 61% of these queries are searches related to therapy. PMID:24551349

  10. Identifying Novel Candidate Genes Related to Apoptosis from a Protein-Protein Interaction Network

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Baoman; Yuan, Fei; Kong, Xiangyin; Hu, Lan-Dian; Cai, Yu-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis is the process of programmed cell death (PCD) that occurs in multicellular organisms. This process of normal cell death is required to maintain the balance of homeostasis. In addition, some diseases, such as obesity, cancer, and neurodegenerative diseases, can be cured through apoptosis, which produces few side effects. An effective comprehension of the mechanisms underlying apoptosis will be helpful to prevent and treat some diseases. The identification of genes related to apoptosis is essential to uncover its underlying mechanisms. In this study, a computational method was proposed to identify novel candidate genes related to apoptosis. First, protein-protein interaction information was used to construct a weighted graph. Second, a shortest path algorithm was applied to the graph to search for new candidate genes. Finally, the obtained genes were filtered by a permutation test. As a result, 26 genes were obtained, and we discuss their likelihood of being novel apoptosis-related genes by collecting evidence from published literature. PMID:26543496

  11. Identifying aging-related genes in mouse hippocampus using gateway nodes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background High-throughput studies continue to produce volumes of metadata representing valuable sources of information to better guide biological research. With a stronger focus on data generation, analysis models that can readily identify actual signals have not received the same level of attention. This is due in part to high levels of noise and data heterogeneity, along with a lack of sophisticated algorithms for mining useful information. Networks have emerged as a powerful tool for modeling high-throughput data because they are capable of representing not only individual biological elements but also different types of relationships en masse. Moreover, well-established graph theoretic methodology can be applied to network models to increase efficiency and speed of analysis. In this project, we propose a network model that examines temporal data from mouse hippocampus at the transcriptional level via correlation of gene expression. Using this model, we formally define the concept of “gateway” nodes, loosely defined as nodes representing genes co-expressed in multiple states. We show that the proposed network model allows us to identify target genes implicated in hippocampal aging-related processes. Results By mining gateway genes related to hippocampal aging from networks made from gene expression in young and middle-aged mice, we provide a proof-of-concept of existence and importance of gateway nodes. Additionally, these results highlight how network analysis can act as a supplement to traditional statistical analysis of differentially expressed genes. Finally, we use the gateway nodes identified by our method as well as functional databases and literature to propose new targets for study of aging in the mouse hippocampus. Conclusions This research highlights the need for methods of temporal comparison using network models and provides a systems biology approach to extract information from correlation networks of gene expression. Our results identify a

  12. Exploring methods for identifying related patient safety events using structured and unstructured data.

    PubMed

    Fong, Allan; Hettinger, A Zachary; Ratwani, Raj M

    2015-12-01

    Most healthcare systems have implemented patient safety event reporting systems to identify safety hazards. Searching the safety event data to find related patient safety reports and identify trends is challenging given the complexity and quantity of these reports. Structured data elements selected by the event reporter may be inaccurate and the free-text narrative descriptions are difficult to analyze. In this paper we present and explore methods for utilizing both the unstructured free-text and structured data elements in safety event reports to identify and rank similar events. We evaluate the results of three different free-text search methods, including a unique topic modeling adaptation, and structured element weights, using a patient fall use case. The various search techniques and weight combinations tended to prioritize different aspects of the event reports leading to different search and ranking results. These search and prioritization methods have the potential to greatly improve patient safety officers, and other healthcare workers, understanding of which safety event reports are related. PMID:26432354

  13. Development of biomedical publications on ametropia research in PubMed from 1845 to 2010: a bibliometric analysis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Chang-Tai; Li, Shan-Qu; Lü, Yong-Gang; Pan, Bo-Rong

    2011-01-01

    AIM We have carried out a bibliometric analysis on the development of ametropia literature to determine its growth rule and tendency, and to provide the basis for the problems related to ametropia research. METHODS Literatures that contained the descriptors of ametropia in title or paper published before Nov. 10, 2010 in PubMed databases (www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/Pubmed) were selected. As bibliometric indicators of ametropia, biomedical journals referring to ophthalmology by ISSN were calculated. The principal bibliometric indicators: Price's and Bradford's laws were applied on the increase or dispersion of scientific literature, the participation index of languages and the journals. By means of manual coding, literatures were classified according to documents study and statistical analysis. RESULTS The literatures cited in ametropia, astigmatism, myopia and hypermetropia had accumulated to 26475, which consists of Review (n=1560), Randomized Controlled Trial (n=776), Practice Guideline (n=10), Meta-Analysis (n=23), Letter (n=1222), Editorial (n=328), Clinical Trial (n=1726) and Others (n=20830), and Humans (n=23073), Animals(n=1434) and others (n=1968). 1136 literatures were included in PubMed Central, 22384 in MEDLINE and 2955 in others. The ametropia literatures rose every 5 years which of the ametropia-year cumulated amount of the literatures had three periods: before 1900, slowly increasing from 1901 to 1950, rapidly rising from 1951 to 2010 (increased approximate exponentiation exponent). Sixty kinds of languages listed in PubMed databases, of which English is dominant for aborting to ametropia research documents before 2010 (77.32%, 20471/26475). The document languages of top eight account for 95.58% (English, German, French, Japanese, Russian, Italian, Spanish, Chinese), and others for 4.42% (1171/26475). The SCI database includes 48 ophthalmologic journals and the impact factor of 39 journals is ≥1 on Thomson-Reuters in 2010. Of 48 ophthalmologic journals

  14. Author Disambiguation in PubMed: Evidence on the Precision and Recall of Author-ity among NIH-Funded Scientists.

    PubMed

    Lerchenmueller, Marc J; Sorenson, Olav

    2016-01-01

    We examined the usefulness (precision) and completeness (recall) of the Author-ity author disambiguation for PubMed articles by associating articles with scientists funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH). In doing so, we exploited established unique identifiers-Principal Investigator (PI) IDs-that the NIH assigns to funded scientists. Analyzing a set of 36,987 NIH scientists who received their first R01 grant between 1985 and 2009, we identified 355,921 articles appearing in PubMed that would allow us to evaluate the precision and recall of the Author-ity disambiguation. We found that Author-ity identified the NIH scientists with 99.51% precision across the articles. It had a corresponding recall of 99.64%. Precision and recall, moreover, appeared stable across common and uncommon last names, across ethnic backgrounds, and across levels of scientist productivity. PMID:27367860

  15. Real-time analysis application for identifying bursty local areas related to emergency topics.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Tatsuhiro; Tamura, Keiichi

    2015-01-01

    Since social media started getting more attention from users on the Internet, social media has been one of the most important information source in the world. Especially, with the increasing popularity of social media, data posted on social media sites are rapidly becoming collective intelligence, which is a term used to refer to new media that is displacing traditional media. In this paper, we focus on geotagged tweets on the Twitter site. These geotagged tweets are referred to as georeferenced documents because they include not only a short text message, but also the documents' posting time and location. Many researchers have been tackling the development of new data mining techniques for georeferenced documents to identify and analyze emergency topics, such as natural disasters, weather, diseases, and other incidents. In particular, the utilization of geotagged tweets to identify and analyze natural disasters has received much attention from administrative agencies recently because some case studies have achieved compelling results. In this paper, we propose a novel real-time analysis application for identifying bursty local areas related to emergency topics. The aim of our new application is to provide new platforms that can identify and analyze the localities of emergency topics. The proposed application is composed of three core computational intelligence techniques: the Naive Bayes classifier technique, the spatiotemporal clustering technique, and the burst detection technique. Moreover, we have implemented two types of application interface: a Web application interface and an android application interface. To evaluate the proposed application, we have implemented a real-time weather observation system embedded the proposed application. we used actual crawling geotagged tweets posted on the Twitter site. The weather observation system successfully detected bursty local areas related to observed emergency weather topics. PMID:25918679

  16. Identifying Liver Cancer and Its Relations with Diseases, Drugs, and Genes: A Literature-Based Approach

    PubMed Central

    Song, Min

    2016-01-01

    In biomedicine, scientific literature is a valuable source for knowledge discovery. Mining knowledge from textual data has become an ever important task as the volume of scientific literature is growing unprecedentedly. In this paper, we propose a framework for examining a certain disease based on existing information provided by scientific literature. Disease-related entities that include diseases, drugs, and genes are systematically extracted and analyzed using a three-level network-based approach. A paper-entity network and an entity co-occurrence network (macro-level) are explored and used to construct six entity specific networks (meso-level). Important diseases, drugs, and genes as well as salient entity relations (micro-level) are identified from these networks. Results obtained from the literature-based literature mining can serve to assist clinical applications. PMID:27195695

  17. Mentoring programs for medical students - a review of the PubMed literature 2000 - 2008

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Although mentoring is acknowledged as a key to successful and satisfying careers in medicine, formal mentoring programs for medical students are lacking in most countries. Within the framework of planning a mentoring program for medical students at Zurich University, an investigation was carried out into what types of programs exist, what the objectives pursued by such programs are, and what effects are reported. Methods A PubMed literature search was conducted for 2000 - 2008 using the following keywords or their combinations: mentoring, mentoring program, medical student, mentor, mentee, protégé, mentorship. Although a total of 438 publications were identified, only 25 papers met the selection criteria for structured programs and student mentoring surveys. Results The mentoring programs reported in 14 papers aim to provide career counseling, develop professionalism, increase students' interest in research, and support them in their personal growth. There are both one-to-one and group mentorships, established in the first two years of medical school and continuing through graduation. The personal student-faculty relationship is important in that it helps students to feel that they are benefiting from individual advice and encourages them to give more thought to their career choices. Other benefits are an increase in research productivity and improved medical school performance in general. Mentored students also rate their overall well-being as higher. - The 11 surveys address the requirements for being an effective mentor as well as a successful mentee. A mentor should empower and encourage the mentee, be a role model, build a professional network, and assist in the mentee's personal development. A mentee should set agendas, follow through, accept criticism, and be able to assess performance and the benefits derived from the mentoring relationship. Conclusion Mentoring is obviously an important career advancement tool for medical students. In Europe

  18. Metabolism-related enzyme alterations identified by proteomic analysis in human renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zejun; Yao, Yuqin; Song, Qi; Yang, Jinliang; Zhao, Xiangfei; Yang, Ping; Kang, Jingbo

    2016-01-01

    The renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is one of the most common types of kidney neoplasia in Western countries; it is relatively resistant to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Metabolic disorders have a profound effect on the degree of malignancy and treatment resistance of the tumor. However, the molecular characteristics related to impaired metabolism leading to the initiation of RCC are still not very clear. In this study, two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and mass spectra (MS) technologies were utilized to identify the proteins involved in energy metabolism of RCC. A total of 73 proteins that were differentially expressed in conventional RCC, in comparison with the corresponding normal kidney tissues, were identified. Bioinformatics analysis has shown that these proteins are involved in glycolysis, urea cycle, and the metabolic pathways of pyruvate, propanoate, and arginine/proline. In addition, some were also involved in the signaling network of p53 and FAS. These results provide some clues for new therapeutic targets and treatment strategies of RCC. PMID:27022288

  19. Identifying novel genes and chemicals related to nasopharyngeal cancer in a heterogeneous network.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhandong; An, Lifeng; Li, Hao; Wang, ShaoPeng; Zhou, You; Yuan, Fei; Li, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Nasopharyngeal cancer or nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is the most common cancer originating in the nasopharynx. The factors that induce nasopharyngeal cancer are still not clear. Additional information about the chemicals or genes related to nasopharyngeal cancer will promote a better understanding of the pathogenesis of this cancer and the factors that induce it. Thus, a computational method NPC-RGCP was proposed in this study to identify the possible relevant chemicals and genes based on the presently known chemicals and genes related to nasopharyngeal cancer. To extensively utilize the functional associations between proteins and chemicals, a heterogeneous network was constructed based on interactions of proteins and chemicals. The NPC-RGCP included two stages: the searching stage and the screening stage. The former stage is for finding new possible genes and chemicals in the heterogeneous network, while the latter stage is for screening and removing false discoveries and selecting the core genes and chemicals. As a result, five putative genes, CXCR3, IRF1, CDK1, GSTP1, and CDH2, and seven putative chemicals, iron, propionic acid, dimethyl sulfoxide, isopropanol, erythrose 4-phosphate, β-D-Fructose 6-phosphate, and flavin adenine dinucleotide, were identified by NPC-RGCP. Extensive analyses provided confirmation that the putative genes and chemicals have significant associations with nasopharyngeal cancer. PMID:27149165

  20. Rare Copy Number Variants Identified Suggest the Regulating Pathways in Hypertension-Related Left Ventricular Hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Boon-Peng, Hoh; Mat Jusoh, Julia Ashazila; Marshall, Christian R; Majid, Fadhlina; Danuri, Norlaila; Basir, Fashieha; Thiruvahindrapuram, Bhooma; Scherer, Stephen W; Yusoff, Khalid

    2016-01-01

    Left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, and a powerful predictor of adverse cardiovascular outcomes in the hypertensive patients. It has complex multifactorial and polygenic basis for its pathogenesis. We hypothesized that rare copy number variants (CNVs) contribute to the LVH pathogenesis in hypertensive patients. Copy number variants (CNV) were identified in 258 hypertensive patients, 95 of whom had LVH, after genotyping with a high resolution SNP array. Following stringent filtering criteria, we identified 208 rare, or private CNVs that were only present in our patients with hypertension related LVH. Preliminary findings from Gene Ontology and pathway analysis of this study confirmed the involvement of the genes known to be functionally involved in cardiac development and phenotypes, in line with previously reported transcriptomic studies. Network enrichment analyses suggested that the gene-set was, directly or indirectly, involved in the transcription factors regulating the "foetal cardiac gene programme" which triggered the hypertrophic cascade, confirming previous reports. These findings suggest that multiple, individually rare copy number variants altering genes may contribute to the pathogenesis of hypertension-related LVH. In summary, we have provided further supporting evidence that rare CNV could potentially impact this common and complex disease susceptibility with lower heritability. PMID:26930585

  1. Identifying novel genes and chemicals related to nasopharyngeal cancer in a heterogeneous network

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhandong; An, Lifeng; Li, Hao; Wang, ShaoPeng; Zhou, You; Yuan, Fei; Li, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Nasopharyngeal cancer or nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is the most common cancer originating in the nasopharynx. The factors that induce nasopharyngeal cancer are still not clear. Additional information about the chemicals or genes related to nasopharyngeal cancer will promote a better understanding of the pathogenesis of this cancer and the factors that induce it. Thus, a computational method NPC-RGCP was proposed in this study to identify the possible relevant chemicals and genes based on the presently known chemicals and genes related to nasopharyngeal cancer. To extensively utilize the functional associations between proteins and chemicals, a heterogeneous network was constructed based on interactions of proteins and chemicals. The NPC-RGCP included two stages: the searching stage and the screening stage. The former stage is for finding new possible genes and chemicals in the heterogeneous network, while the latter stage is for screening and removing false discoveries and selecting the core genes and chemicals. As a result, five putative genes, CXCR3, IRF1, CDK1, GSTP1, and CDH2, and seven putative chemicals, iron, propionic acid, dimethyl sulfoxide, isopropanol, erythrose 4-phosphate, β-D-Fructose 6-phosphate, and flavin adenine dinucleotide, were identified by NPC-RGCP. Extensive analyses provided confirmation that the putative genes and chemicals have significant associations with nasopharyngeal cancer. PMID:27149165

  2. Metabolism-related enzyme alterations identified by proteomic analysis in human renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zejun; Yao, Yuqin; Song, Qi; Yang, Jinliang; Zhao, Xiangfei; Yang, Ping; Kang, Jingbo

    2016-01-01

    The renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is one of the most common types of kidney neoplasia in Western countries; it is relatively resistant to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Metabolic disorders have a profound effect on the degree of malignancy and treatment resistance of the tumor. However, the molecular characteristics related to impaired metabolism leading to the initiation of RCC are still not very clear. In this study, two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and mass spectra (MS) technologies were utilized to identify the proteins involved in energy metabolism of RCC. A total of 73 proteins that were differentially expressed in conventional RCC, in comparison with the corresponding normal kidney tissues, were identified. Bioinformatics analysis has shown that these proteins are involved in glycolysis, urea cycle, and the metabolic pathways of pyruvate, propanoate, and arginine/proline. In addition, some were also involved in the signaling network of p53 and FAS. These results provide some clues for new therapeutic targets and treatment strategies of RCC. PMID:27022288

  3. Rare Copy Number Variants Identified Suggest the Regulating Pathways in Hypertension-Related Left Ventricular Hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Christian R.; Majid, Fadhlina; Danuri, Norlaila; Basir, Fashieha; Thiruvahindrapuram, Bhooma; Scherer, Stephen W.; Yusoff, Khalid

    2016-01-01

    Left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, and a powerful predictor of adverse cardiovascular outcomes in the hypertensive patients. It has complex multifactorial and polygenic basis for its pathogenesis. We hypothesized that rare copy number variants (CNVs) contribute to the LVH pathogenesis in hypertensive patients. Copy number variants (CNV) were identified in 258 hypertensive patients, 95 of whom had LVH, after genotyping with a high resolution SNP array. Following stringent filtering criteria, we identified 208 rare, or private CNVs that were only present in our patients with hypertension related LVH. Preliminary findings from Gene Ontology and pathway analysis of this study confirmed the involvement of the genes known to be functionally involved in cardiac development and phenotypes, in line with previously reported transcriptomic studies. Network enrichment analyses suggested that the gene-set was, directly or indirectly, involved in the transcription factors regulating the “foetal cardiac gene programme” which triggered the hypertrophic cascade, confirming previous reports. These findings suggest that multiple, individually rare copy number variants altering genes may contribute to the pathogenesis of hypertension-related LVH. In summary, we have provided further supporting evidence that rare CNV could potentially impact this common and complex disease susceptibility with lower heritability. PMID:26930585

  4. Identifying personality-related problems in living: the multi-context problems checklist.

    PubMed

    Boudreaux, Michael J; Piedmont, Ralph L; Sherman, Martin F; Ozer, Daniel J

    2013-01-01

    The Multi-Context Problems Checklist (MCPC) is a new measure of personality-related problems designed for a young adult population. Previously published problem checklists either have little supporting empirical documentation to support their validity or focus on specific kinds of difficulties in specific contexts (e.g., interpersonal, close relationships). The MCPC is a straightforward and easy-to-use instrument covering 6 domains of functioning, takes about 5 minutes to complete, and is intended for young adults ages 18 to 29. Psychometric data are presented in 3 studies. In Study 1, correlations with self- and observer ratings showed scores on the MCPC to be consensually valid, and associations with measures of well-being and personality provided evidence of construct validity. Study 2 added to these findings by identifying specific personality-related problems associated with each pole of each trait of the five-factor model of personality, demonstrating moderate to high test-retest reliability of problem endorsements, and showing strong associations with measures of psychological distress. Study 3 indicated that the MCPC is sufficiently sensitive to capture more frequent problem reporting among individuals undergoing counseling. Problem-trait associations are related to a broader literature on global personality dimensions and psychosocial outcomes at the individual, interpersonal, and social and institutional levels. The MCPC deserves attention from both researchers and clinicians who are interested in assessing personality-related problems in living. PMID:22946821

  5. Studying PubMed usages in the field for complex problem solving: Implications for tool design.

    PubMed

    Mirel, Barbara; Song, Jean; Tonks, Jennifer Steiner; Meng, Fan; Xuan, Weijian; Ameziane, Rafiqa

    2013-05-01

    Many recent studies on MEDLINE-based information seeking have shed light on scientists' behaviors and associated tool innovations that may improve efficiency and effectiveness. Few if any studies, however, examine scientists' problem-solving uses of PubMed in actual contexts of work and corresponding needs for better tool support. Addressing this gap, we conducted a field study of novice scientists (14 upper level undergraduate majors in molecular biology) as they engaged in a problem solving activity with PubMed in a laboratory setting. Findings reveal many common stages and patterns of information seeking across users as well as variations, especially variations in cognitive search styles. Based on findings, we suggest tool improvements that both confirm and qualify many results found in other recent studies. Our findings highlight the need to use results from context-rich studies to inform decisions in tool design about when to offer improved features to users. PMID:24376375

  6. Studying PubMed usages in the field for complex problem solving: Implications for tool design

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jean; Tonks, Jennifer Steiner; Meng, Fan; Xuan, Weijian; Ameziane, Rafiqa

    2012-01-01

    Many recent studies on MEDLINE-based information seeking have shed light on scientists’ behaviors and associated tool innovations that may improve efficiency and effectiveness. Few if any studies, however, examine scientists’ problem-solving uses of PubMed in actual contexts of work and corresponding needs for better tool support. Addressing this gap, we conducted a field study of novice scientists (14 upper level undergraduate majors in molecular biology) as they engaged in a problem solving activity with PubMed in a laboratory setting. Findings reveal many common stages and patterns of information seeking across users as well as variations, especially variations in cognitive search styles. Based on findings, we suggest tool improvements that both confirm and qualify many results found in other recent studies. Our findings highlight the need to use results from context-rich studies to inform decisions in tool design about when to offer improved features to users. PMID:24376375

  7. Teaching PubMed in cyberspace: the development of a self-learning package.

    PubMed

    King, Samuel; Kaplan, Richard; MacDonald, Kathleen

    2008-01-01

    This article discusses the development of a series of online modules for learning the PubMed version of MEDLINE. Funded by a National Library of Medicine grant and targeted initially to physician assistants practicing in New Hampshire, the project is approved for CE credit nationally by the American Association of Physician Assistants. The development of the project is described, the tutorial modules are reviewed, and issues encountered with technology and human factors are discussed and evaluated. PMID:19042708

  8. Author Disambiguation in PubMed: Evidence on the Precision and Recall of Author-ity among NIH-Funded Scientists

    PubMed Central

    Lerchenmueller, Marc J.; Sorenson, Olav

    2016-01-01

    We examined the usefulness (precision) and completeness (recall) of the Author-ity author disambiguation for PubMed articles by associating articles with scientists funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH). In doing so, we exploited established unique identifiers—Principal Investigator (PI) IDs—that the NIH assigns to funded scientists. Analyzing a set of 36,987 NIH scientists who received their first R01 grant between 1985 and 2009, we identified 355,921 articles appearing in PubMed that would allow us to evaluate the precision and recall of the Author-ity disambiguation. We found that Author-ity identified the NIH scientists with 99.51% precision across the articles. It had a corresponding recall of 99.64%. Precision and recall, moreover, appeared stable across common and uncommon last names, across ethnic backgrounds, and across levels of scientist productivity. PMID:27367860

  9. Use of a twin dataset to identify AMD-related visual patterns controlled by genetic factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quellec, Gwénolé; Abràmoff, Michael D.; Russell, Stephen R.

    2010-03-01

    The mapping of genotype to the phenotype of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is expected to improve the diagnosis and treatment of the disease in a near future. In this study, we focused on the first step to discover this mapping: we identified visual patterns related to AMD which seem to be controlled by genetic factors, without explicitly relating them to the genes. For this purpose, we used a dataset of eye fundus photographs from 74 twin pairs, either monozygotic twins, who have the same genotype, or dizygotic twins, whose genes responsible for AMD are less likely to be identical. If we are able to differentiate monozygotic twins from dizygotic twins, based on a given visual pattern, then this pattern is likely to be controlled by genetic factors. The main visible consequence of AMD is the apparition of drusen between the retinal pigment epithelium and Bruch's membrane. We developed two automated drusen detectors based on the wavelet transform: a shape-based detector for hard drusen, and a texture- and color- based detector for soft drusen. Forty visual features were evaluated at the location of the automatically detected drusen. These features characterize the texture, the shape, the color, the spatial distribution, or the amount of drusen. A distance measure between twin pairs was defined for each visual feature; a smaller distance should be measured between monozygotic twins for visual features controlled by genetic factors. The predictions of several visual features (75.7% accuracy) are comparable or better than the predictions of human experts.

  10. Cardiovascular-related proteins identified in human plasma by the HUPO Plasma Proteome Project pilot phase.

    PubMed

    Berhane, Beniam T; Zong, Chenggong; Liem, David A; Huang, Aaron; Le, Steven; Edmondson, Ricky D; Jones, Richard C; Qiao, Xin; Whitelegge, Julian P; Ping, Peipei; Vondriska, Thomas M

    2005-08-01

    Proteomic profiling of accessible bodily fluids, such as plasma, has the potential to accelerate biomarker/biosignature development for human diseases. The HUPO Plasma Proteome Project pilot phase examined human plasma with distinct proteomic approaches across multiple laboratories worldwide. Through this effort, we confidently identified 3020 proteins, each requiring a minimum of two high-scoring MS/MS spectra. A critical step subsequent to protein identification is functional annotation, in particular with regard to organ systems and disease. Performing exhaustive literature searches, we have manually annotated a subset of these 3020 proteins that have cardiovascular-related functions on the basis of an existing body of published information. These cardiovascular-related proteins can be organized into eight groups: markers of inflammation and/or cardiovascular disease, vascular and coagulation, signaling, growth and differentiation, cytoskeletal, transcription factors, channels/receptors and heart failure and remodeling. In addition, analysis of the peptide per protein ratio for MS/MS identification reveals group-specific trends. These findings serve as a resource to interrogate the functions of plasma proteins, and moreover, the list of cardiovascular-related proteins in plasma constitutes a baseline proteomic blueprint for the future development of biosignatures for diseases such as myocardial ischemia and atherosclerosis. PMID:16052623

  11. QTLs for seed vigor-related traits identified in maize seeds germinated under artificial aging conditions.

    PubMed

    Han, Zanping; Ku, Lixia; Zhang, Zhenzhen; Zhang, Jun; Guo, Shulei; Liu, Haiying; Zhao, Ruifang; Ren, Zhenzhen; Zhang, Liangkun; Su, Huihui; Dong, Lei; Chen, Yanhui

    2014-01-01

    High seed vigor is important for agricultural production due to the associated potential for increased growth and productivity. However, a better understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms is required because the genetic basis for seed vigor remains unknown. We used single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers to map quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for four seed vigor traits in two connected recombinant inbred line (RIL) maize populations under four treatment conditions during seed germination. Sixty-five QTLs distributed between the two populations were identified and a meta-analysis was used to integrate genetic maps. Sixty-one initially identified QTLs were integrated into 18 meta-QTLs (mQTLs). Initial QTLs with contribution to phenotypic variation values of R(2)>10% were integrated into mQTLs. Twenty-three candidate genes for association with seed vigor traits coincided with 13 mQTLs. The candidate genes had functions in the glycolytic pathway and in protein metabolism. QTLs with major effects (R(2)>10%) were identified under at least one treatment condition for mQTL2, mQTL3-2, and mQTL3-4. Candidate genes included a calcium-dependent protein kinase gene (302810918) involved in signal transduction that mapped in the mQTL3-2 interval associated with germination energy (GE) and germination percentage (GP), and an hsp20/alpha crystallin family protein gene (At5g51440) that mapped in the mQTL3-4 interval associated with GE and GP. Two initial QTLs with a major effect under at least two treatment conditions were identified for mQTL5-2. A cucumisin-like Ser protease gene (At5g67360) mapped in the mQTL5-2 interval associated with GP. The chromosome regions for mQTL2, mQTL3-2, mQTL3-4, and mQTL5-2 may be hot spots for QTLs related to seed vigor traits. The mQTLs and candidate genes identified in this study provide valuable information for the identification of additional quantitative trait genes. PMID:24651614

  12. QTLs for Seed Vigor-Related Traits Identified in Maize Seeds Germinated under Artificial Aging Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Han, Zanping; Ku, Lixia; Zhang, Zhenzhen; Zhang, Jun; Guo, ShuLei; Liu, Haiying; Zhao, Ruifang; Ren, Zhenzhen; Zhang, Liangkun; Su, Huihui; Dong, Lei; Chen, Yanhui

    2014-01-01

    High seed vigor is important for agricultural production due to the associated potential for increased growth and productivity. However, a better understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms is required because the genetic basis for seed vigor remains unknown. We used single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers to map quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for four seed vigor traits in two connected recombinant inbred line (RIL) maize populations under four treatment conditions during seed germination. Sixty-five QTLs distributed between the two populations were identified and a meta-analysis was used to integrate genetic maps. Sixty-one initially identified QTLs were integrated into 18 meta-QTLs (mQTLs). Initial QTLs with contribution to phenotypic variation values of R2>10% were integrated into mQTLs. Twenty-three candidate genes for association with seed vigor traits coincided with 13 mQTLs. The candidate genes had functions in the glycolytic pathway and in protein metabolism. QTLs with major effects (R2>10%) were identified under at least one treatment condition for mQTL2, mQTL3-2, and mQTL3-4. Candidate genes included a calcium-dependent protein kinase gene (302810918) involved in signal transduction that mapped in the mQTL3-2 interval associated with germination energy (GE) and germination percentage (GP), and an hsp20/alpha crystallin family protein gene (At5g51440) that mapped in the mQTL3-4 interval associated with GE and GP. Two initial QTLs with a major effect under at least two treatment conditions were identified for mQTL5-2. A cucumisin-like Ser protease gene (At5g67360) mapped in the mQTL5-2 interval associated with GP. The chromosome regions for mQTL2, mQTL3-2, mQTL3-4, and mQTL5-2 may be hot spots for QTLs related to seed vigor traits. The mQTLs and candidate genes identified in this study provide valuable information for the identification of additional quantitative trait genes. PMID:24651614

  13. Hillslopes to Hollows to Channels: Identifying Process Transitions and Domains using Characteristic Scaling Relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, K.; Locke, W. W.

    2011-12-01

    Headwater catchments are partitioned into hillslopes, unchanneled valleys (hollows), and channels. Low order (less than or equal to two) channels comprise most of the stream length in the drainage network so defining where hillslopes end and hollows begin, and where hollows end and channels begin, is important for calibration and verification of hydrologic runoff and sediment production modeling. We test the use of landscape scaling relations to detect flow regimes characteristic of diffusive, concentrated, and incisive runoff, and use these flow regimes as proxies for hillslope, hollow, and channeled landforms. We use LiDAR-derived digital elevation models (DEMs) of two pairs of headwater catchments in southwest and north-central Montana to develop scaling relations of flowpath length, total stream power, and contributing area. The catchment pairs contrast low versus high drainage density and north versus south aspect. Inflections in scaling relations of contributing area and flowpath length in a single basin (modified Hack's law) and contributing area and total stream power were used to identify hillslope and fluvial process domain transitions. In the modified Hack's law, inflections in the slope of the log-log power law are hypothesized to correspond to changes in flow regime used as proxies for hillslope, hollow, and channeled landforms. Similarly, rate of change of total stream power with contributing area is hypothesized to become constant and then decrease at the hillslope to fluvial domain transition. Power law scaling of frequency-magnitude plots of curvature and an aspect-related parameter were also tested as an indicator of the transition from scale-dependent hillslope length to the scale invariant fluvial domain. Curvature and aspect were calculated at each cell in spectrally filtered DEMs. Spectral filtering by fast Fourier and wavelet transforms enhances detection of fine-scale fluvial features by removing long wavelength topography. Using the

  14. Meta-Analysis of Placental Transcriptome Data Identifies a Novel Molecular Pathway Related to Preeclampsia.

    PubMed

    van Uitert, Miranda; Moerland, Perry D; Enquobahrie, Daniel A; Laivuori, Hannele; van der Post, Joris A M; Ris-Stalpers, Carrie; Afink, Gijs B

    2015-01-01

    Studies using the placental transcriptome to identify key molecules relevant for preeclampsia are hampered by a relatively small sample size. In addition, they use a variety of bioinformatics and statistical methods, making comparison of findings challenging. To generate a more robust preeclampsia gene expression signature, we performed a meta-analysis on the original data of 11 placenta RNA microarray experiments, representing 139 normotensive and 116 preeclamptic pregnancies. Microarray data were pre-processed and analyzed using standardized bioinformatics and statistical procedures and the effect sizes were combined using an inverse-variance random-effects model. Interactions between genes in the resulting gene expression signature were identified by pathway analysis (Ingenuity Pathway Analysis, Gene Set Enrichment Analysis, Graphite) and protein-protein associations (STRING). This approach has resulted in a comprehensive list of differentially expressed genes that led to a 388-gene meta-signature of preeclamptic placenta. Pathway analysis highlights the involvement of the previously identified hypoxia/HIF1A pathway in the establishment of the preeclamptic gene expression profile, while analysis of protein interaction networks indicates CREBBP/EP300 as a novel element central to the preeclamptic placental transcriptome. In addition, there is an apparent high incidence of preeclampsia in women carrying a child with a mutation in CREBBP/EP300 (Rubinstein-Taybi Syndrome). The 388-gene preeclampsia meta-signature offers a vital starting point for further studies into the relevance of these genes (in particular CREBBP/EP300) and their concomitant pathways as biomarkers or functional molecules in preeclampsia. This will result in a better understanding of the molecular basis of this disease and opens up the opportunity to develop rational therapies targeting the placental dysfunction causal to preeclampsia. PMID:26171964

  15. Meta-Analysis of Placental Transcriptome Data Identifies a Novel Molecular Pathway Related to Preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    van Uitert, Miranda; Moerland, Perry D.; Enquobahrie, Daniel A.; Laivuori, Hannele; van der Post, Joris A. M.; Ris-Stalpers, Carrie; Afink, Gijs B.

    2015-01-01

    Studies using the placental transcriptome to identify key molecules relevant for preeclampsia are hampered by a relatively small sample size. In addition, they use a variety of bioinformatics and statistical methods, making comparison of findings challenging. To generate a more robust preeclampsia gene expression signature, we performed a meta-analysis on the original data of 11 placenta RNA microarray experiments, representing 139 normotensive and 116 preeclamptic pregnancies. Microarray data were pre-processed and analyzed using standardized bioinformatics and statistical procedures and the effect sizes were combined using an inverse-variance random-effects model. Interactions between genes in the resulting gene expression signature were identified by pathway analysis (Ingenuity Pathway Analysis, Gene Set Enrichment Analysis, Graphite) and protein-protein associations (STRING). This approach has resulted in a comprehensive list of differentially expressed genes that led to a 388-gene meta-signature of preeclamptic placenta. Pathway analysis highlights the involvement of the previously identified hypoxia/HIF1A pathway in the establishment of the preeclamptic gene expression profile, while analysis of protein interaction networks indicates CREBBP/EP300 as a novel element central to the preeclamptic placental transcriptome. In addition, there is an apparent high incidence of preeclampsia in women carrying a child with a mutation in CREBBP/EP300 (Rubinstein-Taybi Syndrome). The 388-gene preeclampsia meta-signature offers a vital starting point for further studies into the relevance of these genes (in particular CREBBP/EP300) and their concomitant pathways as biomarkers or functional molecules in preeclampsia. This will result in a better understanding of the molecular basis of this disease and opens up the opportunity to develop rational therapies targeting the placental dysfunction causal to preeclampsia. PMID:26171964

  16. Applying the Fisher score to identify Alzheimer's disease-related genes.

    PubMed

    Yang, J; Liu, Y L; Feng, C S; Zhu, G Q

    2016-01-01

    Biologists and scientists can use the data from Alzheimer's disease (AD) gene expression microarrays to mine AD disease-related genes. Because of disadvantages such as small sample sizes, high dimensionality, and a high level of noise, it is difficult to obtain accurate and meaningful biological information from gene expression profiles. In this paper, we present a novel approach for utilizing AD microarray data to identify the morbigenous genes. The Fisher score, a classical feature selection method, is utilized to evaluate the importance of each gene. Genes with a large between-classes variance and small within-class variance are selected as candidate morbigenous genes. The results using an AD dataset show that the proposed approach is effective for gene selection. Satisfactory accuracy can be achieved by using only a small number of selected genes. PMID:27420981

  17. Identifying Tinnitus-Related Genes Based on a Side-Effect Network Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Elgoyhen, A B; Langguth, B; Nowak, W; Schecklmann, M; De Ridder, D; Vanneste, S

    2014-01-01

    Tinnitus, phantom sound perception, is a worldwide highly prevalent disorder for which no clear underlying pathology has been established and for which no approved drug is on the market. Thus, there is an urgent need for new approaches to understand this condition. We used a network pharmacology side-effect analysis to search for genes that are involved in tinnitus generation. We analyzed a network of 1,313 drug–target pairs, based on 275 compounds that elicit tinnitus as side effect and their targets reported in databases, and used a quantitative score to identify emergent significant targets that were more common than expected at random. Cyclooxigenase 1 and 2 were significant, which validates our approach, since salicylate is a known tinnitus generator. More importantly, we predict previously unknown tinnitus-related targets. The present results have important implications toward understanding tinnitus pathophysiology and might pave the way toward the design of novel pharmacotherapies. PMID:24477090

  18. Acute Aortic Dissection Biomarkers Identified Using Isobaric Tags for Relative and Absolute Quantitation

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Ziya; Xue, Yuan; Gu, Guorong; Zhang, Yaping; Zhang, Jin; Fan, Fan; Luan, Xiao; Deng, Zhi; Tao, Zhengang; Song, Zhen-ju; Tong, Chaoyang; Wang, Haojun

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the utility of potential serum biomarkers for acute aortic dissection (AAD) that were identified by isobaric Tags for Relative and Absolute Quantitation (iTRAQ) approaches. Serum samples from 20 AAD patients and 20 healthy volunteers were analyzed using iTRAQ technology. Protein validation was performed using samples from 120 patients with chest pain. A total of 355 proteins were identified with the iTRAQ approach; 164 proteins reached the strict quantitative standard, and 125 proteins were increased or decreased more than 1.2-fold (64 and 61 proteins were up- and downregulated, resp.). Lumican, C-reactive protein (CRP), thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1), and D-dimer were selected as candidate biomarkers for the validation tests. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves show that Lumican and D-dimer have diagnostic value (area under the curves [AUCs] 0.895 and 0.891, P < 0.05). For Lumican, the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity were 73.33% and 98.33%, while the corresponding values for D-dimer were 93.33% and 68.33%. For Lumican and D-dimer AAD combined diagnosis, the sensitivity and specificity were 88.33% and 95%, respectively. In conclusion, Lumican has good specificity and D-dimer has good sensitivity for the diagnosis of AAD, while the combined detection of D-dimer and Lumican has better diagnostic value. PMID:27403433

  19. Acute Aortic Dissection Biomarkers Identified Using Isobaric Tags for Relative and Absolute Quantitation.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Ziya; Xue, Yuan; Yao, Chenling; Gu, Guorong; Zhang, Yaping; Zhang, Jin; Fan, Fan; Luan, Xiao; Deng, Zhi; Tao, Zhengang; Song, Zhen-Ju; Tong, Chaoyang; Wang, Haojun

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the utility of potential serum biomarkers for acute aortic dissection (AAD) that were identified by isobaric Tags for Relative and Absolute Quantitation (iTRAQ) approaches. Serum samples from 20 AAD patients and 20 healthy volunteers were analyzed using iTRAQ technology. Protein validation was performed using samples from 120 patients with chest pain. A total of 355 proteins were identified with the iTRAQ approach; 164 proteins reached the strict quantitative standard, and 125 proteins were increased or decreased more than 1.2-fold (64 and 61 proteins were up- and downregulated, resp.). Lumican, C-reactive protein (CRP), thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1), and D-dimer were selected as candidate biomarkers for the validation tests. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves show that Lumican and D-dimer have diagnostic value (area under the curves [AUCs] 0.895 and 0.891, P < 0.05). For Lumican, the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity were 73.33% and 98.33%, while the corresponding values for D-dimer were 93.33% and 68.33%. For Lumican and D-dimer AAD combined diagnosis, the sensitivity and specificity were 88.33% and 95%, respectively. In conclusion, Lumican has good specificity and D-dimer has good sensitivity for the diagnosis of AAD, while the combined detection of D-dimer and Lumican has better diagnostic value. PMID:27403433

  20. Drug-related problems (DRPs) identified from geriatric medication safety review clinics.

    PubMed

    Chan, Ding-Cheng; Chen, Jen-Hau; Kuo, Hsu-Ko; We, Chiung-Jung; Lu, I-Shu; Chiu, Lee-Shu; Wu, Shwu-Chong

    2012-01-01

    Drug-related problems (DRPs) were identified from baseline data of 193 Medication Safety Review Clinic (MSRC) patients. MSRCs enroll older adults (≥ 65 years) with either (1) prescriptions of ≥ 8 chronic medications (drugs prescribed for ≥ 28 days) or (2) a visit to ≥ 3 different physicians at the two participating hospitals in Taipei, Taiwan from August to October 2007. The Pharmaceutical Care Network Europe (PCNE) Classification Version 5.01 was used to report DRPs. Mean age was 76.2 ± 6.2 years and 53% of participants were male. Participants had, on average, 9.0 ± 2.6 chronic conditions and took 8.9 ± 3.1 chronic medications and 1.7 ± 1.8 dietary supplements. Eighty-seven percent had at least one DRP. Being older, having orthostatic hypotension and taking more chronic medications were associated with higher likelihood of having at least one DRP. For the 1713 medications and 331 diet supplements reviewed, 427 DRPs were found, 490 causes (1.1 ± 0.4 per problem) identified and 1067 interventions proposed (2.5 ± 0.6 per problem). The most common DRP category was "drug not taken/administered" (35%), and the most common offending drug category was cardiovascular agents (33%). Prevalence of DRPs was high among geriatric outpatients prescribed multiple medications. Careful medication review is needed in routine clinical practice to improve prescription quality. PMID:21353318

  1. Identifying metabolites related to nitrogen mineralisation using 1H NMR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    . T McDonald, Noeleen; Graham, Stewart; Watson, Catherine; Gordon, Alan; Lalor, Stan; Laughlin, Ronnie; Elliott, Chris; . P Wall, David

    2015-04-01

    Exploring new analysis techniques to enhance our knowledge of the various metabolites within our soil systems is imperative. Principally, this knowledge would allow us to link key metabolites with functional influences on critical nutrient processes, such as the nitrogen (N) mineralisation in soils. Currently there are few studies that utilize proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H NMR) to characterize multiple metabolites within a soil sample. The aim of this research study was to examine the effectiveness of 1H NMR for isolating multiple metabolites that are related to the mineralizable N (MN) capacity across a range of 35 Irish grassland soils. Soils were measured for MN using the standard seven day anaerobic incubation (AI-7). Additionally, soils were also analysed for a range of physio-chemical properties [e.g. total N, total C, mineral N, texture and soil organic matter (SOM)]. Proton NMR analysis was carried on these soils by extracting with 40% methanol:water, lyophilizing and reconstituting in deuterium oxide and recording the NMR spectra on a 400MHz Bruker AVANCE III spectrometer. Once the NMR data were spectrally processed and analysed using multivariate statistical analysis, seven metabolites were identified as having significant relationships with MN (glucose, trimethylamine, glutamic acid, serine, aspartic acid, 4-aminohippuirc acid and citric acid). Following quantification, glucose was shown to explain the largest percentage variability in MN (72%). These outcomes suggest that sources of labile carbon are essential in regulating N mineralisation and the capacity of plant available N derived from SOM-N pools in these soils. Although, smaller in concentration, the amino acids; 4-aminohippuirc acid, glutamic acid and serine also significantly (P<0.05) explained 43%, 27% and 19% of the variability in MN, respectively. This novel study highlights the effectiveness of using 1H NMR as a practical approach to profile multiple metabolites in

  2. Genome-Wide Scan Informed by Age-Related Disease Identifies Loci for Exceptional Human Longevity

    PubMed Central

    Fortney, Kristen; Dobriban, Edgar; Garagnani, Paolo; Pirazzini, Chiara; Monti, Daniela; Mari, Daniela; Atzmon, Gil; Barzilai, Nir; Franceschi, Claudio; Owen, Art B.; Kim, Stuart K.

    2015-01-01

    We developed a new statistical framework to find genetic variants associated with extreme longevity. The method, informed GWAS (iGWAS), takes advantage of knowledge from large studies of age-related disease in order to narrow the search for SNPs associated with longevity. To gain support for our approach, we first show there is an overlap between loci involved in disease and loci associated with extreme longevity. These results indicate that several disease variants may be depleted in centenarians versus the general population. Next, we used iGWAS to harness information from 14 meta-analyses of disease and trait GWAS to identify longevity loci in two studies of long-lived humans. In a standard GWAS analysis, only one locus in these studies is significant (APOE/TOMM40) when controlling the false discovery rate (FDR) at 10%. With iGWAS, we identify eight genetic loci to associate significantly with exceptional human longevity at FDR < 10%. We followed up the eight lead SNPs in independent cohorts, and found replication evidence of four loci and suggestive evidence for one more with exceptional longevity. The loci that replicated (FDR < 5%) included APOE/TOMM40 (associated with Alzheimer’s disease), CDKN2B/ANRIL (implicated in the regulation of cellular senescence), ABO (tags the O blood group), and SH2B3/ATXN2 (a signaling gene that extends lifespan in Drosophila and a gene involved in neurological disease). Our results implicate new loci in longevity and reveal a genetic overlap between longevity and age-related diseases and traits, including coronary artery disease and Alzheimer’s disease. iGWAS provides a new analytical strategy for uncovering SNPs that influence extreme longevity, and can be applied more broadly to boost power in other studies of complex phenotypes. PMID:26677855

  3. Bibliometric Analysis of the Korean Journal of Parasitology: Measured from SCI, PubMed, Scopus, and Synapse Databases

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The Korean Journal of Parasitology (KJP) is the official journal of the Korean Society for Parasitology which is celebrating its 50th anniversary in 2009. To assess the contributions and achievements of the KJP, bibliometric analysis was conducted based on the citation data retrieved from 4 major databases; SCI, PubMed, Synapse, and Scopus. It was found that the KJP articles were constantly cited by the articles published in major international journals represented in these databases. More than 60% of 1,370 articles published in the KJP from 1963 to June 2009 were cited at least once by SCI articles. The overall average times cited by SCI articles are 2.6. The rate is almost 3 times higher for the articles published in the last 10 years compared to 1.0 for the articles of the 1960s. The SCI journal impact factor for 2008 is calculated as 0.871. It is increasing and it is expected to increase further with the introduction of the KJP in the database in 2008. The more realistic h-indixes were measured from the study data set covering all the citations to the KJP; 17 for SCI, 6 for PubMed, 19 for Synapse, and 17 for Scopus. Synapse extensively picked up the citations to the earlier papers not retrievable from the other 3 databases. It identified many papers published in the 1960s and in the 1980s which have been cited heavily, proving the central role of the KJP in the dissemination of the important research findings over the last 5 decades. PMID:19885331

  4. Identifying genes related to choriogenesis in insect panoistic ovaries by Suppression Subtractive Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Irles, Paula; Bellés, Xavier; Piulachs, M Dolors

    2009-01-01

    Background Insect ovarioles are classified into two categories: panoistic and meroistic, the later having apparently evolved from an ancestral panoistic type. Molecular data on oogenesis is practically restricted to meroistic ovaries. If we aim at studying the evolutionary transition from panoistic to meroistic, data on panoistic ovaries should be gathered. To this end, we planned the construction of a Suppression Subtractive Hybridization (SSH) library to identify genes involved in panoistic choriogenesis, using the cockroach Blattella germanica as model. Results We constructed a post-vitellogenic ovary library by SSH to isolate genes involved in choriogenesis in B. germanica. The tester library was prepared with an ovary pool from 6- to 7-day-old females, whereas the driver library was prepared with an ovary pool from 3- to 4-day-old females. From the SSH library, we obtained 258 high quality sequences which clustered into 34 unique sequences grouped in 19 contigs and 15 singlets. The sequences were compared against non-redundant NCBI databases using BLAST. We found that 44% of the unique sequences had homologous sequences in known genes of other organisms, whereas 56% had no significant similarity to any of the databases entries. A Gene Ontology analysis was carried out, classifying the 34 sequences into different functional categories. Seven of these gene sequences, representative of different categories and processes, were chosen to perform expression studies during the first gonadotrophic cycle by real-time PCR. Results showed that they were mainly expressed during post-vitellogenesis, which validates the SSH technique. In two of them corresponding to novel genes, we demonstrated that they are specifically expressed in the cytoplasm of follicular cells in basal oocytes at the time of choriogenesis. Conclusion The SSH approach has proven to be useful in identifying ovarian genes expressed after vitellogenesis in B. germanica. For most of the genes, functions

  5. Kelvin Absolute Temperature Scale Identified as Length Scale and Related to de Broglie Thermal Wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohrab, Siavash

    Thermodynamic equilibrium between matter and radiation leads to de Broglie wavelength λdβ = h /mβvrβ and frequency νdβ = k /mβvrβ of matter waves and stochastic definitions of Planck h =hk =mk <λrk > c and Boltzmann k =kk =mk <νrk > c constants, λrkνrk = c , that respectively relate to spatial (λ) and temporal (ν) aspects of vacuum fluctuations. Photon massmk =√{ hk /c3 } , amu =√{ hkc } = 1 /No , and universal gas constant Ro =No k =√{ k / hc } result in internal Uk = Nhνrk = Nmkc2 = 3 Nmkvmpk2 = 3 NkT and potential pV = uN\\vcirc / 3 = N\\ucirc / 3 = NkT energy of photon gas in Casimir vacuum such that H = TS = 4 NkT . Therefore, Kelvin absolute thermodynamic temperature scale [degree K] is identified as length scale [meter] and related to most probable wavelength and de Broglie thermal wavelength as Tβ =λmpβ =λdβ / 3 . Parallel to Wien displacement law obtained from Planck distribution, the displacement law λwS T =c2 /√{ 3} is obtained from Maxwell -Boltzmann distribution of speed of ``photon clusters''. The propagation speeds of sound waves in ideal gas versus light waves in photon gas are described in terms of vrβ in harmony with perceptions of Huygens. Newton formula for speed of long waves in canals √{ p / ρ } is modified to √{ gh } =√{ γp / ρ } in accordance with adiabatic theory of Laplace.

  6. Identifying flavor preference subgroups. Genetic basis and related eating behavior traits.

    PubMed

    Törnwall, Outi; Silventoinen, Karri; Hiekkalinna, Tero; Perola, Markus; Tuorila, Hely; Kaprio, Jaakko

    2014-04-01

    Subgroups based on flavor preferences were identified and their genetic and behavior related characteristics investigated using extensive data from 331 Finnish twins (21-25years, 146 men) including 47 monozygotic (MZ) and 93 dizygotic (DZ) pairs, and 51 twin individuals. The subgroup identification (hierarchical and K-means clustering) was based on liking responses to food names representing sour, umami, and spicy flavor qualities. Furthermore, sensory tests were conducted, a questionnaire on food likes completed, and various eating behavior related traits measured with validated scales. Sensory data included intensity ratings of PROP (6-n-propylthiouracil-impregnated filter paper), hedonic and intensity responses to sourness (orange juice with and without added citric acid, 0.42%), pungency (strawberry jelly with and without added capsaicin 0.00013%) and umami ('mouthfeel flavor' taste solution). Ratings of liking of 41 general food names were categorized into salty-and-fatty, sweet-and-fatty, fruits and vegetables and fish foods. Subgroup differences (complex samples procedure) and the genetics underlying the subgroups (structural equation modeling) were investigated. Of the resulting two groups (basic, n=140, adventurous n=152; non-grouped n=39), the adventurous expressed higher liking for sour and spicy foods, and had more tolerance for capsaicin burn in the sensory-hedonic test. The adventurous were also less food neophobic (25.9±9.1 vs. 32.5±10.6, respectively) and expressed higher liking for fruits and vegetables compared to the basic group. Genetic effects were shown to underlie the subgroups (heritability 72%, CI: 36-92%). Linkage analysis for 27 candidate gene regions revealed suggestively that being adventurous is linked to TAS1R1 and PKD1L3 genes. These results indicate that food neophobia and genetic differences may form a barrier through which individual flavor preferences are generated. PMID:24361469

  7. PubMed, The New York Times and The Chicago Tribune as Tools for Teaching Genetics

    PubMed Central

    Strauss, Bernard S.

    2005-01-01

    An elementary course in human heredity for students not planning to major in the sciences can be based on current scientific literature and on the popular media. Examinations are constructed from questions on recent abstracts obtained from PubMed. The course is designed to promote writing skills in the sciences, and students write two papers in the course of a quarter. In the first paper, students trace the primary source of media reports on genetics and attempt to evaluate the reporter's translation. In a second paper, students write popular articles on the basis of current primary sources. PMID:16143615

  8. Beyond PubMed: Searching the "Grey Literature" for Clinical Trial Results.

    PubMed

    Citrome, Leslie

    2014-07-01

    Clinical trial results have been traditionally communicated through the publication of scholarly reports and reviews in biomedical journals. However, this dissemination of information can be delayed or incomplete, making it difficult to appraise new treatments, or in the case of missing data, evaluate older interventions. Going beyond the routine search of PubMed, it is possible to discover additional information in the "grey literature." Examples of the grey literature include clinical trial registries, patent databases, company and industrywide repositories, regulatory agency digital archives, abstracts of paper and poster presentations on meeting/congress websites, industry investor reports and press releases, and institutional and personal websites. PMID:25337445

  9. Beyond PubMed: Searching the “Grey Literature” for Clinical Trial Results

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Clinical trial results have been traditionally communicated through the publication of scholarly reports and reviews in biomedical journals. However, this dissemination of information can be delayed or incomplete, making it difficult to appraise new treatments, or in the case of missing data, evaluate older interventions. Going beyond the routine search of PubMed, it is possible to discover additional information in the “grey literature.” Examples of the grey literature include clinical trial registries, patent databases, company and industrywide repositories, regulatory agency digital archives, abstracts of paper and poster presentations on meeting/congress websites, industry investor reports and press releases, and institutional and personal websites. PMID:25337445

  10. Electroretinogram analysis of relative spectral sensitivity in genetically identified dichromatic macaques

    PubMed Central

    Hanazawa, Akitoshi; Mikami, Akichika; Angelika, Puti Sulistyo; Takenaka, Osamu; Goto, Shunji; Onishi, Akishi; Koike, Satoshi; Yamamori, Tetsuo; Kato, Keichiro; Kondo, Aya; Suryobroto, Bambang; Farajallah, Achmad; Komatsu, Hidehiko

    2001-01-01

    The retinas of macaque monkeys usually contain three types of photopigment, providing them with trichromatic color vision homologous to that of humans. However, we recently used molecular genetic analysis to identify several macaques with a dichromatic genotype. The affected X chromosome of these animals contains a hybrid gene of long-wavelength-sensitive (L) and middle-wavelength-sensitive (M) photopigments instead of separate genes encoding L and M photopigments. The product of the hybrid gene exhibits a spectral sensitivity close to that of M photopigment; consequently, male monkeys carrying the hybrid gene are genetic protanopes, effectively lacking L photopigment. In the present study, we assessed retinal expression of L photopigment in monkeys carrying the hybrid gene. The relative sensitivities to middle-wavelength (green) and long-wavelength (red) light were measured by electroretinogram flicker photometry. We found the sensitivity to red light to be extremely low in protanopic male monkeys compared with monkeys with the normal genotype. In female heterozygotes, sensitivity to red light was intermediate between the genetic protanopes and normal monkeys. Decreased sensitivity to long wavelengths was thus consistent with genetic loss of L photopigment. PMID:11427736

  11. Feasibility of Identifying the Tobacco-related Global Metabolome in Blood by UPLC–QTOF-MS

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Metabolomics is likely an ideal tool to assess tobacco smoke exposure and the impact of cigarette smoke on human exposure and health. To assess reproducibility and feasibility of this by UPLC–QTOF-MS, three experiments were designed for the assessment of smokers’ blood. Experiment I was an analysis of 8 smokers with 8 replicates. Experiment II was an analysis of 62 pooled quality control (QC) samples from 7 nonsmokers’ plasma placed as every tenth sample among a study of 613 samples from 160 smokers. Finally, to examine the feasibility of metabolomic study in assessing smoke exposure, Experiment III consisted of 9 smokers and 10 nonsmokers’ serum to evaluate differences in their global metabolome. There was minimal measurement and sample preparation variation in all experiments, although some caution is needed when analyzing specific parts of the chromatogram. When assessing QC samples in the large scale study, QC clustering indicated high stability, reproducibility, and consistency. Finally, in addition to the identification of nicotine metabolites as expected, there was a characteristic profile distinguishing smokers from nonsmokers. Metabolites selected from putative identifications were verified by MS/MS, showing the potential to identify metabolic phenotypes and new metabolites relating to cigarette smoke exposure and toxicity. PMID:23240883

  12. Comparative Transcriptome Analysis Identifies Candidate Genes Related to Skin Color Differentiation in Red Tilapia.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wenbin; Wang, Lanmei; Dong, Zaijie; Chen, Xingting; Song, Feibiao; Liu, Nian; Yang, Hui; Fu, Jianjun

    2016-01-01

    Red tilapia is becoming more popular for aquaculture production in China in recent years. However, the pigmentation differentiation in genetic breeding is the main problem limiting its development of commercial red tilapia culture and the genetic basis of skin color variation is still unknown. In this study, we conducted Illumina sequencing of transcriptome on three color variety red tilapia. A total of 224,895,758 reads were generated, resulting in 160,762 assembled contigs that were used as reference contigs. The contigs of red tilapia transcriptome had hits in the range of 53.4% to 86.7% of the unique proteins of zebrafish, fugu, medaka, three-spined stickleback and tilapia. And 44,723 contigs containing 77,423 simple sequence repeats (SSRs) were identified, with 16,646 contigs containing more than one SSR. Three skin transcriptomes were compared pairwise and the results revealed that there were 148 common significantly differentially expressed unigenes and several key genes related to pigment synthesis, i.e. tyr, tyrp1, silv, sox10, slc24a5, cbs and slc7a11, were included. The results will facilitate understanding the molecular mechanisms of skin pigmentation differentiation in red tilapia and accelerate the molecular selection of the specific strain with consistent skin colors. PMID:27511178

  13. Utilization of digital differential display to identify differentially expressed genes related to rumen development.

    PubMed

    Kato, Daichi; Suzuki, Yutaka; Haga, Satoshi; So, KyoungHa; Yamauchi, Eri; Nakano, Miwa; Ishizaki, Hiroshi; Choi, Kichoon; Katoh, Kazuo; Roh, Sang-Gun

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to identify the genes associated with the development of the rumen epithelium by screening for candidate genes by digital differential display (DDD) in silico. Using DDD in NCBI's UniGene database, expressed sequence tag (EST)-based gene expression profiles were analyzed in rumen, reticulum, omasum, abomasum and other tissues in cattle. One hundred and ten candidate genes with high expression in the rumen were derived from a library of all tissues. The expression levels of 11 genes in all candidate genes were analyzed in the rumen, reticulum, omasum and abomasum of nine Japanese Black male calves (5-week-old pre-weaning: n = 3; 15-week-old weaned calves: n = 6). Among the 11 genes, only 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase 2 (HMGCS2), aldo-keto reductase family 1, member C1-like (AKR1C1), and fatty acid binding protein 3 (FABP3) showed significant changes in the levels of gene expression in the rumen between the pre- and post-weaning of calves. These results indicate that DDD analysis in silico can be useful for screening candidate genes related to rumen development, and that the changes in expression levels of three genes in the rumen may have been caused by weaning, aging or both. © 2015 Japanese Society of Animal Science. PMID:26388291

  14. Comparative Transcriptome Analysis Identifies Candidate Genes Related to Skin Color Differentiation in Red Tilapia

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Wenbin; Wang, Lanmei; Dong, Zaijie; Chen, Xingting; Song, Feibiao; Liu, Nian; Yang, Hui; Fu, Jianjun

    2016-01-01

    Red tilapia is becoming more popular for aquaculture production in China in recent years. However, the pigmentation differentiation in genetic breeding is the main problem limiting its development of commercial red tilapia culture and the genetic basis of skin color variation is still unknown. In this study, we conducted Illumina sequencing of transcriptome on three color variety red tilapia. A total of 224,895,758 reads were generated, resulting in 160,762 assembled contigs that were used as reference contigs. The contigs of red tilapia transcriptome had hits in the range of 53.4% to 86.7% of the unique proteins of zebrafish, fugu, medaka, three-spined stickleback and tilapia. And 44,723 contigs containing 77,423 simple sequence repeats (SSRs) were identified, with 16,646 contigs containing more than one SSR. Three skin transcriptomes were compared pairwise and the results revealed that there were 148 common significantly differentially expressed unigenes and several key genes related to pigment synthesis, i.e. tyr, tyrp1, silv, sox10, slc24a5, cbs and slc7a11, were included. The results will facilitate understanding the molecular mechanisms of skin pigmentation differentiation in red tilapia and accelerate the molecular selection of the specific strain with consistent skin colors. PMID:27511178

  15. Transcriptome Sequencing of Chemically Induced Aquilaria sinensis to Identify Genes Related to Agarwood Formation

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Wei; Wu, Hongqing; He, Xin; Wang, Lei; Zhang, Weimin; Li, Haohua; Fan, Yunfei; Tan, Guohui; Liu, Taomei; Gao, Xiaoxia

    2016-01-01

    Background Agarwood is a traditional Chinese medicine used as a clinical sedative, carminative, and antiemetic drug. Agarwood is formed in Aquilaria sinensis when A. sinensis trees are threatened by external physical, chemical injury or endophytic fungal irritation. However, the mechanism of agarwood formation via chemical induction remains unclear. In this study, we characterized the transcriptome of different parts of a chemically induced A. sinensis trunk sample with agarwood. The Illumina sequencing platform was used to identify the genes involved in agarwood formation. Methodology/Principal Findings A five-year-old Aquilaria sinensis treated by formic acid was selected. The white wood part (B1 sample), the transition part between agarwood and white wood (W2 sample), the agarwood part (J3 sample), and the rotten wood part (F5 sample) were collected for transcriptome sequencing. Accordingly, 54,685,634 clean reads, which were assembled into 83,467 unigenes, were obtained with a Q20 value of 97.5%. A total of 50,565 unigenes were annotated using the Nr, Nt, SWISS-PROT, KEGG, COG, and GO databases. In particular, 171,331,352 unigenes were annotated by various pathways, including the sesquiterpenoid (ko00909) and plant–pathogen interaction (ko03040) pathways. These pathways were related to sesquiterpenoid biosynthesis and defensive responses to chemical stimulation. Conclusions/Significance The transcriptome data of the different parts of the chemically induced A. sinensis trunk provide a rich source of materials for discovering and identifying the genes involved in sesquiterpenoid production and in defensive responses to chemical stimulation. This study is the first to use de novo sequencing and transcriptome assembly for different parts of chemically induced A. sinensis. Results demonstrate that the sesquiterpenoid biosynthesis pathway and WRKY transcription factor play important roles in agarwood formation via chemical induction. The comparative analysis of

  16. Geography of Africa biomedical publications: An analysis of 1996–2005 PubMed papers

    PubMed Central

    Uthman, Olalekan A; Uthman, Mubashir B

    2007-01-01

    Background Scientific publications play an important role in scientific process providing a key linkage between knowledge production and use. Scientific publishing activity worldwide over the past decades shows that most countries in Africa have low levels of publication. We sought to examine trends and contribution of different Africa subregions and individual countries as represented by the articles indexed by PubMed between 1996 and 2005. Results Research production in Africa is highly skewed; South Africa, Egypt, and Nigeria make up a striking 60% of the total number of articles indexed by PubMed between 1996 and 2005. When adjusted for population size smaller countries, such as The Gambia, Gabon and Botswana, were more productive than Nigeria and Kenya. The Gambia and Eritrea had better records when total production was adjusted for gross domestic product. The contribution of Africa to global research production was persistently low through the period studied. Conclusion In this study, we found that most populous and rich countries (such as South Africa, Egypt, and Nigeria) have correspondingly higher research production; but smaller countries can be productive. We noted continuous increases and reassuring trends in the production of research articles from all African subregions during the period 1996 – 2005. However, contribution of Africa to global research production was limited. PMID:17927837

  17. Improving efficacy of PubMed Clinical Queries for retrieving scientifically strong studies on treatment.

    PubMed

    Corrao, Salvatore; Colomba, Daniela; Arnone, Sabrina; Argano, Christiano; Di Chiara, Tiziana; Scaglione, Rosario; Licata, Giuseppe

    2006-01-01

    The authors evaluated the retrieval power of PubMed "Clinical Queries," narrow search string, about therapy in comparison with a modified search string to avoid possible retrieval bias. PubMed search strategy was compared to a slightly modified string that included the Britannic English term "randomised." The authors tested the two strings joined onto each of four terms concerning topics of broad interest: hypertension, hepatitis, diabetes, and heart failure. In particular, precision was computed for not-indexed citations. The added word "randomised" improved total citation retrieval in any case. Total retrieval gain for not-indexed citations ranged from 11.1% to 21.4%. A significant number of Randomized Controlled Trial(s) (RCT)s (9.1-18.2%) was retrieved for each of the selected topics. They were often recently published RCTs. The authors think that correction of the Clinical Queries filter (when they focus on therapy and use narrow searches) is necessary to avoid biased search results with loss of relevant and up-to-date scientifically sound information. PMID:16799123

  18. Genome-Wide Association Study to Identify Genes Related to Renal Mercury Concentrations in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Alkaissi, Hammoudi; Ekstrand, Jimmy; Jawad, Aksa; Nielsen, Jesper Bo; Havarinasab, Said; Soderkvist, Peter; Hultman, Per

    2016-01-01

    , Hultman P. 2016. Genome-wide association study to identify genes related to renal mercury concentrations in mice. Environ Health Perspect 124:920–926; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1409284 PMID:26942574

  19. Association of eGFR-Related Loci Identified by GWAS with Incident CKD and ESRD

    PubMed Central

    Böger, Carsten A.; Gorski, Mathias; Li, Man; Hoffmann, Michael M.; Huang, Chunmei; Yang, Qiong; Teumer, Alexander; Krane, Vera; O'Seaghdha, Conall M.; Kutalik, Zoltán; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Haak, Thomas; Boes, Eva; Coassin, Stefan; Coresh, Josef; Kollerits, Barbara; Haun, Margot; Paulweber, Bernhard; Köttgen, Anna; Li, Guo; Shlipak, Michael G.; Powe, Neil; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Dehghan, Abbas; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Uitterlinden, André; Hofman, Albert; Beckmann, Jacques S.; Krämer, Bernhard K.; Witteman, Jacqueline; Bochud, Murielle; Siscovick, David; Rettig, Rainer; Kronenberg, Florian; Wanner, Christoph; Thadhani, Ravi I.; Heid, Iris M.

    2011-01-01

    Family studies suggest a genetic component to the etiology of chronic kidney disease (CKD) and end stage renal disease (ESRD). Previously, we identified 16 loci for eGFR in genome-wide association studies, but the associations of these single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for incident CKD or ESRD are unknown. We thus investigated the association of these loci with incident CKD in 26,308 individuals of European ancestry free of CKD at baseline drawn from eight population-based cohorts followed for a median of 7.2 years (including 2,122 incident CKD cases defined as eGFR <60ml/min/1.73m2 at follow-up) and with ESRD in four case-control studies in subjects of European ancestry (3,775 cases, 4,577 controls). SNPs at 11 of the 16 loci (UMOD, PRKAG2, ANXA9, DAB2, SHROOM3, DACH1, STC1, SLC34A1, ALMS1/NAT8, UBE2Q2, and GCKR) were associated with incident CKD; p-values ranged from p = 4.1e-9 in UMOD to p = 0.03 in GCKR. After adjusting for baseline eGFR, six of these loci remained significantly associated with incident CKD (UMOD, PRKAG2, ANXA9, DAB2, DACH1, and STC1). SNPs in UMOD (OR = 0.92, p = 0.04) and GCKR (OR = 0.93, p = 0.03) were nominally associated with ESRD. In summary, the majority of eGFR-related loci are either associated or show a strong trend towards association with incident CKD, but have modest associations with ESRD in individuals of European descent. Additional work is required to characterize the association of genetic determinants of CKD and ESRD at different stages of disease progression. PMID:21980298

  20. A fibrinogen-related protein identified from hepatopancreas of crayfish is a potential pattern recognition receptor.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qiming; Bai, Suhua; Dong, Chaohua

    2016-09-01

    Fibrinogen-related protein (FREP) family is a large group of proteins containing fibrinogen-like (FBG) domain and plays multiple physiological roles in animals. However, their immune functions in crayfish are not fully explored. In the present study, a novel fibrinogen-like protein (designated as PcFBN1) was identified and characterized from hepatopancreas of red swamp crayfish Procambarus clarkii. The cDNA sequence of PcFBN1 contains an open reading frame (ORF) of 1353 bp encoding a protein of 450 amino acids. Sequence and structural analysis indicated that PcFBN1 contains an FBG domain in C-terminal and a putative signal peptide of 19 amino acids in N-terminal. Semi-quantitative PCR revealed that the main expression of PcFBN1 was observed in hepatopancreas and hemocyte. Temporal expression analysis exhibited that PcFBN1 expression could be significantly induced by heat-killed Aeromonas hydrophila. Tissue distribution and temporal change of PcFBN1 suggested that PcFBN1 may be involved in immune responses of red swamp crayfish. Recombinant PcFBN1 protein binds and agglutinates both gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli and gram-positive bacteria Micrococcus lysodeikticus. Moreover, binding and agglutination is Ca(2+) dependent. Further analysis indicated that PcFBN1 recognizes some acetyl group-containing substance LPS and PGN. RNAi experiment revealed that PcFBN1 is required for bacterial clearance and survival from A. hydrophila infection. Reduction of PcFBN1 expression significantly decreased the survival and enhanced the number of A. hydrophila in the hemolymph. These results indicated that PcFBN1 plays an important role in the innate immunity of red swamp crayfish as a potential pattern recognition receptor. PMID:27417229

  1. Identifying specific cues and contexts related to smoking craving for the development of effective virtual environments.

    PubMed

    García-Rodríguez, Olaya; Ferrer-García, Marta; Pericot-Valverde, Irene; Gutiérrez-Maldonado, José; Secades-Villa, Roberto; Carballo, José L

    2011-03-01

    Craving is considered the main variable associated with relapse after smoking cessation. Cue Exposure Therapy (CET) consists of controlled and repeated exposure to drug-related cues with the aim of extinguishing craving responses. Some virtual reality (VR) environments, such as virtual bars or parties, have previously shown their efficacy as tools for eliciting smoking craving. However, in order to adapt this technology to smoking cessation interventions, there is a need for more diverse environments that enhance the probability of generalization of extinction in real life. The main objective of this study was to identify frequent situations that produce smoking craving, as well as detecting specific craving cues in those contexts. Participants were 154 smokers who responded to an ad hoc self-administered inventory for assessing craving level in 12 different situations. Results showed that having a drink in a bar/pub at night, after having lunch/dinner in a restaurant and having a coffee in a cafe or after lunch/dinner at home were reported as the most craving-inducing scenarios. Some differences were found with regard to participants' gender, age, and number of cigarettes smoked per day. Females, younger people, and heavier smokers reported higher levels of craving in most situations. In general, the most widely cited specific cues across the contexts were people smoking, having a coffee, being with friends, and having finished eating. These results are discussed with a view to their consideration in the design of valid and reliable VR environments that could be used in the treatment of nicotine addicts who wish to give up smoking. PMID:20575707

  2. PubMed vs. HighWire Press: a head-to-head comparison of two medical literature search engines.

    PubMed

    Vanhecke, Thomas E; Barnes, Michael A; Zimmerman, Janet; Shoichet, Sandor

    2007-09-01

    PubMed and HighWire Press are both useful medical literature search engines available for free to anyone on the internet. We measured retrieval accuracy, number of results generated, retrieval speed, features and search tools on HighWire Press and PubMed using the quick search features of each. We found that using HighWire Press resulted in a higher likelihood of retrieving the desired article and higher number of search results than the same search on PubMed. PubMed was faster than HighWire Press in delivering search results regardless of search settings. There are considerable differences in search features between these two search engines. PMID:17184763

  3. PubMedMiner: Mining and Visualizing MeSH-based Associations in PubMed.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yucan; Sarkar, Indra Neil; Chen, Elizabeth S

    2014-01-01

    The exponential growth of biomedical literature provides the opportunity to develop approaches for facilitating the identification of possible relationships between biomedical concepts. Indexing by Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) represent high-quality summaries of much of this literature that can be used to support hypothesis generation and knowledge discovery tasks using techniques such as association rule mining. Based on a survey of literature mining tools, a tool implemented using Ruby and R - PubMedMiner - was developed in this study for mining and visualizing MeSH-based associations for a set of MEDLINE articles. To demonstrate PubMedMiner's functionality, a case study was conducted that focused on identifying and comparing comorbidities for asthma in children and adults. Relative to the tools surveyed, the initial results suggest that PubMedMiner provides complementary functionality for summarizing and comparing topics as well as identifying potentially new knowledge. PMID:25954472

  4. PubMedMiner: Mining and Visualizing MeSH-based Associations in PubMed

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yucan; Sarkar, Indra Neil; Chen, Elizabeth S.

    2014-01-01

    The exponential growth of biomedical literature provides the opportunity to develop approaches for facilitating the identification of possible relationships between biomedical concepts. Indexing by Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) represent high-quality summaries of much of this literature that can be used to support hypothesis generation and knowledge discovery tasks using techniques such as association rule mining. Based on a survey of literature mining tools, a tool implemented using Ruby and R – PubMedMiner – was developed in this study for mining and visualizing MeSH-based associations for a set of MEDLINE articles. To demonstrate PubMedMiner’s functionality, a case study was conducted that focused on identifying and comparing comorbidities for asthma in children and adults. Relative to the tools surveyed, the initial results suggest that PubMedMiner provides complementary functionality for summarizing and comparing topics as well as identifying potentially new knowledge. PMID:25954472

  5. Identifying Students Difficulties in Understanding Concepts Pertaining to Cell Water Relations: An Exploratory Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedler, Y.; And Others

    This study identified students' conceptual difficulties in understanding concepts and processes associated with cell water relationships (osmosis), determined possible reasons for these difficulties, and pilot-tested instruments and research strategies for a large scale comprehensive study. Research strategies used included content analysis of…

  6. Analysis of immune-related loci identifies 48 new susceptibility variants for multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Beecham, Ashley H; Patsopoulos, Nikolaos A; Xifara, Dionysia K; Davis, Mary F; Kemppinen, Anu; Cotsapas, Chris; Shahi, Tejas S; Spencer, Chris; Booth, David; Goris, An; Oturai, Annette; Saarela, Janna; Fontaine, Bertrand; Hemmer, Bernhard; Martin, Claes; Zipp, Frauke; D’alfonso, Sandra; Martinelli-Boneschi, Filippo; Taylor, Bruce; Harbo, Hanne F; Kockum, Ingrid; Hillert, Jan; Olsson, Tomas; Ban, Maria; Oksenberg, Jorge R; Hintzen, Rogier; Barcellos, Lisa F; Agliardi, Cristina; Alfredsson, Lars; Alizadeh, Mehdi; Anderson, Carl; Andrews, Robert; Søndergaard, Helle Bach; Baker, Amie; Band, Gavin; Baranzini, Sergio E; Barizzone, Nadia; Barrett, Jeffrey; Bellenguez, Céline; Bergamaschi, Laura; Bernardinelli, Luisa; Berthele, Achim; Biberacher, Viola; Binder, Thomas M C; Blackburn, Hannah; Bomfim, Izaura L; Brambilla, Paola; Broadley, Simon; Brochet, Bruno; Brundin, Lou; Buck, Dorothea; Butzkueven, Helmut; Caillier, Stacy J; Camu, William; Carpentier, Wassila; Cavalla, Paola; Celius, Elisabeth G; Coman, Irène; Comi, Giancarlo; Corrado, Lucia; Cosemans, Leentje; Cournu-Rebeix, Isabelle; Cree, Bruce A C; Cusi, Daniele; Damotte, Vincent; Defer, Gilles; Delgado, Silvia R; Deloukas, Panos; di Sapio, Alessia; Dilthey, Alexander T; Donnelly, Peter; Dubois, Bénédicte; Duddy, Martin; Edkins, Sarah; Elovaara, Irina; Esposito, Federica; Evangelou, Nikos; Fiddes, Barnaby; Field, Judith; Franke, Andre; Freeman, Colin; Frohlich, Irene Y; Galimberti, Daniela; Gieger, Christian; Gourraud, Pierre-Antoine; Graetz, Christiane; Graham, Andrew; Grummel, Verena; Guaschino, Clara; Hadjixenofontos, Athena; Hakonarson, Hakon; Halfpenny, Christopher; Hall, Gillian; Hall, Per; Hamsten, Anders; Harley, James; Harrower, Timothy; Hawkins, Clive; Hellenthal, Garrett; Hillier, Charles; Hobart, Jeremy; Hoshi, Muni; Hunt, Sarah E; Jagodic, Maja; Jelčić, Ilijas; Jochim, Angela; Kendall, Brian; Kermode, Allan; Kilpatrick, Trevor; Koivisto, Keijo; Konidari, Ioanna; Korn, Thomas; Kronsbein, Helena; Langford, Cordelia; Larsson, Malin; Lathrop, Mark; Lebrun-Frenay, Christine; Lechner-Scott, Jeannette; Lee, Michelle H; Leone, Maurizio A; Leppä, Virpi; Liberatore, Giuseppe; Lie, Benedicte A; Lill, Christina M; Lindén, Magdalena; Link, Jenny; Luessi, Felix; Lycke, Jan; Macciardi, Fabio; Männistö, Satu; Manrique, Clara P; Martin, Roland; Martinelli, Vittorio; Mason, Deborah; Mazibrada, Gordon; McCabe, Cristin; Mero, Inger-Lise; Mescheriakova, Julia; Moutsianas, Loukas; Myhr, Kjell-Morten; Nagels, Guy; Nicholas, Richard; Nilsson, Petra; Piehl, Fredrik; Pirinen, Matti; Price, Siân E; Quach, Hong; Reunanen, Mauri; Robberecht, Wim; Robertson, Neil P; Rodegher, Mariaemma; Rog, David; Salvetti, Marco; Schnetz-Boutaud, Nathalie C; Sellebjerg, Finn; Selter, Rebecca C; Schaefer, Catherine; Shaunak, Sandip; Shen, Ling; Shields, Simon; Siffrin, Volker; Slee, Mark; Sorensen, Per Soelberg; Sorosina, Melissa; Sospedra, Mireia; Spurkland, Anne; Strange, Amy; Sundqvist, Emilie; Thijs, Vincent; Thorpe, John; Ticca, Anna; Tienari, Pentti; van Duijn, Cornelia; Visser, Elizabeth M; Vucic, Steve; Westerlind, Helga; Wiley, James S; Wilkins, Alastair; Wilson, James F; Winkelmann, Juliane; Zajicek, John; Zindler, Eva; Haines, Jonathan L; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A; Ivinson, Adrian J; Stewart, Graeme; Hafler, David; Hauser, Stephen L; Compston, Alastair; McVean, Gil; De Jager, Philip; Sawcer, Stephen; McCauley, Jacob L

    2013-01-01

    Using the ImmunoChip custom genotyping array, we analysed 14,498 multiple sclerosis subjects and 24,091 healthy controls for 161,311 autosomal variants and identified 135 potentially associated regions (p-value < 1.0 × 10-4). In a replication phase, we combined these data with previous genome-wide association study (GWAS) data from an independent 14,802 multiple sclerosis subjects and 26,703 healthy controls. In these 80,094 individuals of European ancestry we identified 48 new susceptibility variants (p-value < 5.0 × 10-8); three found after conditioning on previously identified variants. Thus, there are now 110 established multiple sclerosis risk variants in 103 discrete loci outside of the Major Histocompatibility Complex. With high resolution Bayesian fine-mapping, we identified five regions where one variant accounted for more than 50% of the posterior probability of association. This study enhances the catalogue of multiple sclerosis risk variants and illustrates the value of fine-mapping in the resolution of GWAS signals. PMID:24076602

  7. PubMed Informer: Monitoring MEDLINE/PubMed through E-mail Alerts, SMS, PDA downloads and RSS feeds

    PubMed Central

    Muin, Michael; Fontelo, Paul; Ackerman, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Summary PubMed Informer is a Web-based monitoring tool for topics of interest from MEDLINE/PubMed primarily designed for healthcare professionals. Five tracking methods are available: Web access, e-mail, Short Message Service (SMS), PDA downloads and RSS feeds. PubMed Informer delivers focused search updates and specific information to users with varying information-seeking practices. PMID:16779344

  8. Anne O'Tate: A tool to support user-driven summarization, drill-down and browsing of PubMed search results

    PubMed Central

    Smalheiser, Neil R; Zhou, Wei; Torvik, Vetle I

    2008-01-01

    Background PubMed is designed to provide rapid, comprehensive retrieval of papers that discuss a given topic. However, because PubMed does not organize the search output further, it is difficult for users to grasp an overview of the retrieved literature according to non-topical dimensions, to drill-down to find individual articles relevant to a particular individual's need, or to browse the collection. Results In this paper, we present Anne O'Tate, a web-based tool that processes articles retrieved from PubMed and displays multiple aspects of the articles to the user, according to pre-defined categories such as the "most important" words found in titles or abstracts; topics; journals; authors; publication years; and affiliations. Clicking on a given item opens a new window that displays all papers that contain that item. One can navigate by drilling down through the categories progressively, e.g., one can first restrict the articles according to author name and then restrict that subset by affiliation. Alternatively, one can expand small sets of articles to display the most closely related articles. We also implemented a novel cluster-by-topic method that generates a concise set of topics covering most of the retrieved articles. Conclusion Anne O'Tate is an integrated, generic tool for summarization, drill-down and browsing of PubMed search results that accommodates a wide range of biomedical users and needs. It can be accessed at [4]. Peer review and editorial matters for this article were handled by Aaron Cohen. PMID:18279519

  9. Distributed Leadership and Relational Trust: Bridging Two Frameworks to Identify Effective Leadership Behaviors and Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abdul-Jabbar, Mustafa

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation investigates how relational trust manifests within schools that have recently enacted the distributed leadership framework, a program implementation by the Penn Center for Educational Leadership. First, the dissertation highlights research that connects the distributed leadership and relational trust frameworks in the task of…

  10. Generating parity relations for detecting and identifying control system component failures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vander Velder, Wallace E.; Massoumnia, Mohammad-Ali

    1988-01-01

    The monitoring of control system sensors and actuators for failures is presently undertaken by means of an exceptionally simple form of generalized parity relations based on a discrete-time model of the dynamics of linear, time-invariant systems. These generalized parity relations are constructed by recourse to a transfer matrix-description of the system that is additionally useful in the interpretation of their properties. Attention is given to a novel method for constructing the parity relation of minimum length that depends on the output of only a single sensor.

  11. Platelet-Related Variants Identified by Exomechip Meta-analysis in 157,293 Individuals.

    PubMed

    Eicher, John D; Chami, Nathalie; Kacprowski, Tim; Nomura, Akihiro; Chen, Ming-Huei; Yanek, Lisa R; Tajuddin, Salman M; Schick, Ursula M; Slater, Andrew J; Pankratz, Nathan; Polfus, Linda; Schurmann, Claudia; Giri, Ayush; Brody, Jennifer A; Lange, Leslie A; Manichaikul, Ani; Hill, W David; Pazoki, Raha; Elliot, Paul; Evangelou, Evangelos; Tzoulaki, Ioanna; Gao, He; Vergnaud, Anne-Claire; Mathias, Rasika A; Becker, Diane M; Becker, Lewis C; Burt, Amber; Crosslin, David R; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Nikus, Kjell; Hernesniemi, Jussi; Kähönen, Mika; Raitoharju, Emma; Mononen, Nina; Raitakari, Olli T; Lehtimäki, Terho; Cushman, Mary; Zakai, Neil A; Nickerson, Deborah A; Raffield, Laura M; Quarells, Rakale; Willer, Cristen J; Peloso, Gina M; Abecasis, Goncalo R; Liu, Dajiang J; Deloukas, Panos; Samani, Nilesh J; Schunkert, Heribert; Erdmann, Jeanette; Fornage, Myriam; Richard, Melissa; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Rioux, John D; Dube, Marie-Pierre; de Denus, Simon; Lu, Yingchang; Bottinger, Erwin P; Loos, Ruth J F; Smith, Albert Vernon; Harris, Tamara B; Launer, Lenore J; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Velez Edwards, Digna R; Torstenson, Eric S; Liu, Yongmei; Tracy, Russell P; Rotter, Jerome I; Rich, Stephen S; Highland, Heather M; Boerwinkle, Eric; Li, Jin; Lange, Ethan; Wilson, James G; Mihailov, Evelin; Mägi, Reedik; Hirschhorn, Joel; Metspalu, Andres; Esko, Tõnu; Vacchi-Suzzi, Caterina; Nalls, Mike A; Zonderman, Alan B; Evans, Michele K; Engström, Gunnar; Orho-Melander, Marju; Melander, Olle; O'Donoghue, Michelle L; Waterworth, Dawn M; Wallentin, Lars; White, Harvey D; Floyd, James S; Bartz, Traci M; Rice, Kenneth M; Psaty, Bruce M; Starr, J M; Liewald, David C M; Hayward, Caroline; Deary, Ian J; Greinacher, Andreas; Völker, Uwe; Thiele, Thomas; Völzke, Henry; van Rooij, Frank J A; Uitterlinden, André G; Franco, Oscar H; Dehghan, Abbas; Edwards, Todd L; Ganesh, Santhi K; Kathiresan, Sekar; Faraday, Nauder; Auer, Paul L; Reiner, Alex P; Lettre, Guillaume; Johnson, Andrew D

    2016-07-01

    Platelet production, maintenance, and clearance are tightly controlled processes indicative of platelets' important roles in hemostasis and thrombosis. Platelets are common targets for primary and secondary prevention of several conditions. They are monitored clinically by complete blood counts, specifically with measurements of platelet count (PLT) and mean platelet volume (MPV). Identifying genetic effects on PLT and MPV can provide mechanistic insights into platelet biology and their role in disease. Therefore, we formed the Blood Cell Consortium (BCX) to perform a large-scale meta-analysis of Exomechip association results for PLT and MPV in 157,293 and 57,617 individuals, respectively. Using the low-frequency/rare coding variant-enriched Exomechip genotyping array, we sought to identify genetic variants associated with PLT and MPV. In addition to confirming 47 known PLT and 20 known MPV associations, we identified 32 PLT and 18 MPV associations not previously observed in the literature across the allele frequency spectrum, including rare large effect (FCER1A), low-frequency (IQGAP2, MAP1A, LY75), and common (ZMIZ2, SMG6, PEAR1, ARFGAP3/PACSIN2) variants. Several variants associated with PLT/MPV (PEAR1, MRVI1, PTGES3) were also associated with platelet reactivity. In concurrent BCX analyses, there was overlap of platelet-associated variants with red (MAP1A, TMPRSS6, ZMIZ2) and white (PEAR1, ZMIZ2, LY75) blood cell traits, suggesting common regulatory pathways with shared genetic architecture among these hematopoietic lineages. Our large-scale Exomechip analyses identified previously undocumented associations with platelet traits and further indicate that several complex quantitative hematological, lipid, and cardiovascular traits share genetic factors. PMID:27346686

  12. RESEARCH TO IDENTIFY COMPONENTS OF ENERGY-RELATED WASTES: A STATE-OF-THE-ART REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pertinent abstracts from a survey of current (post-1976) research projects are categorized according to energy-related activity. Subjects include coal strip mines, oil refineries, oil shale operations, coal-fired power plants, geothermal energy production, coal liquefaction plant...

  13. Creating a Community Capacity Assessment to Identify Agency Outcomes Related to Occupational Therapy Student Community Partnerships.

    PubMed

    Kramlinger, Anne; Strecker Neufeld, Peggy; Berg, Christine

    2016-07-01

    Service-learning experiences immerse students in authentic situations and build partnerships with community agencies to support the health of those we serve in practice. Most occupational therapy curriculum evaluations do not systematically capture community agency benefits. Through the use of qualitative interviews and Q Methodology, the Community Agency Capacity Questionnaire (CACQ) was developed to capture the agency experience in these partnerships. This paper describes the iterative analytic process that resulted in the CACQ with 29 statements covering 6 domains: programming, evaluation, partnership, staff, funding, and marketing. The CACQ offers a means to identify outcomes from the service-learning partners' perspective. PMID:27044639

  14. Using Research to Identify and Address Student Difficulties with Galilean and Special Relativity*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vokos, Stamatis

    1998-04-01

    The Physics Education Group at the University of Washington has been engaged in an ongoing project in which research is used as a guide for the development of curriculum on Galilean and special relativity. Results from the analysis of student interviews, pretests and examinations form the basis for the design of instructional materials to supplement the lecture and textbook of a standard introductory course and an undergraduate course on relativity. Examples of specific student difficulties and instructional strategies to address them will be presented. * This work has been funded in part by NSF grants DUE 9354501 and 9727648, which include support from other Divisions of EHR and the Physics Division of MPS.

  15. Deep Proteome Analysis Identifies Age-Related Processes in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Narayan, Vikram; Ly, Tony; Pourkarimi, Ehsan; Murillo, Alejandro Brenes; Gartner, Anton; Lamond, Angus I; Kenyon, Cynthia

    2016-08-01

    Effective network analysis of protein data requires high-quality proteomic datasets. Here, we report a near doubling in coverage of the C. elegans adult proteome, identifying >11,000 proteins in total with ∼9,400 proteins reproducibly detected in three biological replicates. Using quantitative mass spectrometry, we identify proteins whose abundances vary with age, revealing a concerted downregulation of proteins involved in specific metabolic pathways and upregulation of cellular stress responses with advancing age. Among these are ∼30 peroxisomal proteins, including the PRX-5/PEX5 import protein. Functional experiments confirm that protein import into the peroxisome is compromised in vivo in old animals. We also studied the behavior of the set of age-variant proteins in chronologically age-matched, long-lived daf-2 insulin/IGF-1-pathway mutants. Unexpectedly, the levels of many of these age-variant proteins did not scale with extended lifespan. This indicates that, despite their youthful appearance and extended lifespans, not all aspects of aging are reset in these long-lived mutants. PMID:27453442

  16. Newly identified RNAs of raspberry leaf blotch virus encoding a related group of proteins.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yuwen; McGavin, Wendy; Cock, Peter J A; Schnettler, Esther; Yan, Fei; Chen, Jianping; MacFarlane, Stuart

    2015-11-01

    Members of the genus Emaravirus, including Raspberry leaf blotch virus (RLBV), are enveloped plant viruses with segmented genomes of negative-strand RNA, although the complete genome complement for any of these viruses is not yet clear. Currently, wheat mosaic virus has the largest emaravirus genome comprising eight RNAs. Previously, we identified five genomic RNAs for RLBV; here, we identify a further three RNAs (RNA6-8). RNA6-8 encode proteins that have clear homologies to one another, but not to any other emaravirus proteins. The proteins self-interacted in yeast two-hybrid and bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) experiments, and the P8 protein interacted with the virus nucleocapsid protein (P3) using BiFC. Expression of two of the proteins (P6 and P7) using potato virus X led to an increase in virus titre and symptom severity, suggesting that these proteins may play a role in RLBV pathogenicity; however, using two different tests, RNA silencing suppression activity was not detected for any of the RLBV proteins encoded by RNA2-8. PMID:26358478

  17. Spelling-Related Teacher Knowledge: The Impact of Professional Development on Identifying Appropriate Instructional Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carreker, Suzanne; Joshi, R. Malatesha; Boulware-Gooden, Regina

    2010-01-01

    Informed instruction that adjusts content, materials, or intensity to student needs is critical for students with learning disabilities. Informed literacy instruction requires teachers to have thorough knowledge of literacy-related content, which includes phonemes, syllables, and morphemes. The current study investigated whether teachers who…

  18. An Event-Related Potentials Study of Mental Rotation in Identifying Chemical Structural Formulas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Chin-Fei; Liu, Chia-Ju

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how mental rotation strategies affect the identification of chemical structural formulas. This study conducted event-related potentials (ERPs) experiments. In addition to the data collected in the ERPs, a Chemical Structure Conceptual Questionnaire and interviews were also admin-istered for data…

  19. Oximetry Signal Processing Identifies REM Sleep-Related Vulnerability Trait in Asthmatic Children

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Geovanny F.; Gutierrez, Maria J.; Huseni, Shehlanoor; Pancham, Khrisna; Rodriguez-Martinez, Carlos E.; Nino, Cesar L.; Nino, Gustavo

    2013-01-01

    Rationale. The sleep-related factors that modulate the nocturnal worsening of asthma in children are poorly understood. This study addressed the hypothesis that asthmatic children have a REM sleep-related vulnerability trait that is independent of OSA. Methods. We conducted a retrospective cross-sectional analysis of pulse-oximetry signals obtained during REM and NREM sleep in control and asthmatic children (n = 134). Asthma classification was based on preestablished clinical criteria. Multivariate linear regression model was built to control for potential confounders (significance level P ≤ 0.05). Results. Our data demonstrated that (1) baseline nocturnal respiratory parameters were not significantly different in asthmatic versus control children, (2) the maximal % of SaO2 desaturation during REM, but not during NREM, was significantly higher in asthmatic children, and (3) multivariate analysis revealed that the association between asthma and REM-related maximal % SaO2 desaturation was independent of demographic variables. Conclusion. These results demonstrate that children with asthma have a REM-related vulnerability trait that impacts oxygenation independently of OSA. Further research is needed to delineate the REM sleep neurobiological mechanisms that modulate the phenotypical expression of nocturnal asthma in children. PMID:24288619

  20. A Search Engine to Access PubMed Monolingual Subsets: Proof of Concept and Evaluation in French

    PubMed Central

    Schuers, Matthieu; Soualmia, Lina Fatima; Grosjean, Julien; Kerdelhué, Gaétan; Kergourlay, Ivan; Dahamna, Badisse; Darmoni, Stéfan Jacques

    2014-01-01

    Background PubMed contains numerous articles in languages other than English. However, existing solutions to access these articles in the language in which they were written remain unconvincing. Objective The aim of this study was to propose a practical search engine, called Multilingual PubMed, which will permit access to a PubMed subset in 1 language and to evaluate the precision and coverage for the French version (Multilingual PubMed-French). Methods To create this tool, translations of MeSH were enriched (eg, adding synonyms and translations in French) and integrated into a terminology portal. PubMed subsets in several European languages were also added to our database using a dedicated parser. The response time for the generic semantic search engine was evaluated for simple queries. BabelMeSH, Multilingual PubMed-French, and 3 different PubMed strategies were compared by searching for literature in French. Precision and coverage were measured for 20 randomly selected queries. The results were evaluated as relevant to title and abstract, the evaluator being blind to search strategy. Results More than 650,000 PubMed citations in French were integrated into the Multilingual PubMed-French information system. The response times were all below the threshold defined for usability (2 seconds). Two search strategies (Multilingual PubMed-French and 1 PubMed strategy) showed high precision (0.93 and 0.97, respectively), but coverage was 4 times higher for Multilingual PubMed-French. Conclusions It is now possible to freely access biomedical literature using a practical search tool in French. This tool will be of particular interest for health professionals and other end users who do not read or query sufficiently in English. The information system is theoretically well suited to expand the approach to other European languages, such as German, Spanish, Norwegian, and Portuguese. PMID:25448528

  1. A drug-adverse event extraction algorithm to support pharmacovigilance knowledge mining from PubMed citations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Haerian, Krystl; Salmasian, Hojjat; Harpaz, Rave; Chase, Herbert; Friedman, Carol

    2011-01-01

    Adverse drug events (ADEs) create a serious problem causing substantial harm to patients. An executable standardized knowledgebase of drug-ADE relations which is publicly available would be valuable so that it could be used for ADE detection. The literature is an important source that could be used to generate a knowledgebase of drug-ADE pairs. In this paper, we report on a method that automatically determines whether a specific adverse event (AE) is caused by a specific drug based on the content of PubMed citations. A drug-ADE classification method was initially developed to detect neutropenia based on a pre-selected set of drugs. This method was then applied to a different set of 76 drugs to determine if they caused neutropenia. For further proof of concept this method was applied to 48 drugs to determine whether they caused another AE, myocardial infarction. Results showed that AUROC was 0.93 and 0.86 respectively. PMID:22195210

  2. A Novel Prioritization Method in Identifying Recurrent Venous Thromboembolism-Related Genes

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Ruiqiang; Chen, Binbin; Huang, Hao; Li, Yiran; He, Yuehan; Lv, Junjie; He, Weiming; Chen, Lina

    2016-01-01

    Identifying the genes involved in venous thromboembolism (VTE) recurrence is important not only for understanding the pathogenesis but also for discovering the therapeutic targets. We proposed a novel prioritization method called Function-Interaction-Pearson (FIP) by creating gene-disease similarity scores to prioritize candidate genes underling VTE. The scores were calculated by integrating and optimizing three types of resources including gene expression, gene ontology and protein-protein interaction. As a result, 124 out of top 200 prioritized candidate genes had been confirmed in literature, among which there were 34 antithrombotic drug targets. Compared with two well-known gene prioritization tools Endeavour and ToppNet, FIP was shown to have better performance. The approach provides a valuable alternative for drug targets discovery and disease therapy. PMID:27050193

  3. An integrated approach towards identifying age-related mechanisms of slip initiated falls

    PubMed Central

    Lockhart, Thurmon E.

    2008-01-01

    The causes of slip and fall accidents, both in terms of extrinsic and intrinsic factors and their associations are not yet fully understood. Successful intervention solutions for reducing slip and fall accidents require a more complete understanding of the mechanisms involved. Before effective fall prevention strategies can be put into practice, it is central to examine the chain of events in an accident, comprising the exposure to hazards, initiation of events and the final outcome leading to injury and disability. These events can be effectively identified and analyzed by applying epidemiological, psychophysical, biomechanical and tribological research principles and methodologies. In this manuscript, various methods available to examine fall accidents and their underlying mechanisms are presented to provide a comprehensive array of information to help pinpoint the needs and requirements of new interventions aimed at reducing the risk of falls among the growing elderly population. PMID:17768070

  4. Identifying the relation between trapping force of Laser Tweezers and Size of Microsphere particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diabre, Alexandra

    Optical trapping technique is the method in which micron and sub-micron particles can be studied. In this technique the laser pressure radiation creates the essential force to trap particles. This force depends on several parameters including the particles' indices of refraction, the specification of the beads surrounding environment and the characteristics of the implemented laser. On this work we present the outcome of the experiment we designed to analyze the trapping force. In this experiment we used micro sized beads with different indices of refraction, changed the viscosity of the surrounding environment of the beads and adjusted the power of the laser implemented. By analyzing the motion of the beads in several trials, the trapping force was estimated and its dependency to the parameters mentioned above was identified. Finally the outcomes of our experiment were compared with the theoretical reported results. This work was conducted under the supervision by Dr. Mitra Feizabadi.

  5. A Novel Prioritization Method in Identifying Recurrent Venous Thromboembolism-Related Genes.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jing; Li, Wan; Liang, Binhua; Xie, Ruiqiang; Chen, Binbin; Huang, Hao; Li, Yiran; He, Yuehan; Lv, Junjie; He, Weiming; Chen, Lina

    2016-01-01

    Identifying the genes involved in venous thromboembolism (VTE) recurrence is important not only for understanding the pathogenesis but also for discovering the therapeutic targets. We proposed a novel prioritization method called Function-Interaction-Pearson (FIP) by creating gene-disease similarity scores to prioritize candidate genes underling VTE. The scores were calculated by integrating and optimizing three types of resources including gene expression, gene ontology and protein-protein interaction. As a result, 124 out of top 200 prioritized candidate genes had been confirmed in literature, among which there were 34 antithrombotic drug targets. Compared with two well-known gene prioritization tools Endeavour and ToppNet, FIP was shown to have better performance. The approach provides a valuable alternative for drug targets discovery and disease therapy. PMID:27050193

  6. Emerging issues on comprehensive hemophilia care: preventing, identifying, and monitoring age-related comorbidities.

    PubMed

    Coppola, Antonio; Santoro, Cristina; Franchini, Massimo; Mannucci, Caterina; Mogavero, Selene; Molinari, Angelo Claudio; Schinco, Piercarla; Tagliaferri, Annarita; Santoro, Rita Carlotta

    2013-10-01

    Life expectancy for persons with hemophilia (PWH) has considerably increased in the last decades as a direct result of the availability of modern therapies to control the clotting defect. Because their life expectancy now matches that of the general population, PWH are experiencing age-related comorbidities, such as, cardiovascular diseases, metabolic syndrome, renal diseases, sexuality issues, malignancies, and neurologic problems, that until recently have been rarely seen in this group of patients. In this article, we present a summary of the current knowledge on the aging PWH along with the clinical approaches that may be integrated into the routine comprehensive care of these patients for preventing, diagnosing, and monitoring age-related comorbidities. In general, patients with and without hemophilia should receive similar care, with close collaboration between the physician treating PWH and the specialty expert treating the comorbid disease. PMID:24014070

  7. What makes astronomical heritage valuable? Identifying potential Outstanding Universal Value in cultural properties relating to astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotte, Michel

    2015-08-01

    The communication will present the today situation of astronomical and archaeo-astronomical heritage related to the World Heritage Convention along the past years till today. Some parallel events and works promoted strongly as the IAU - UNESCO initiative for the “year of astronomy” (2009). It was followed by a joint program by IAU and ICOMOS who is an official advisory body assessing the World Heritage Committee for the evaluation of nomination dossiers. Result of that works is an important publication by around 40 authors coming from 20 different countries all around the World: Heritage Sites of Astronomy and Archaeoastronomy in context of the UNESCO World Heritage Convention (2010-2011). A second volume is under preparation (2015). It was also accompanied by some initiatives like “Windows to the Universe” organisation and parallel constitution of local “Starlight Reserves”. Some regional meetings studying specific facets or regional heritage in the field giving significant knowledge progresses also accompanied global trend for astronomical heritage.WH assessment is defined by a relatively strict format and methodology. Key word is “demonstration of an Outstanding Universal Value” to justify the WH Listing by the Committee. Communication first examines requirements and evaluation practices about of the OUV demonstration for a given place in context of astronomical or archaeo-astronomical heritage. That means examination of the tangible attributes, inventory of the property in terms of unmoveable and moveable components and inventory of intangible issues related to the history (history of the place in context of the history of astronomy and cultural history). That is also related to apply to the site concept of integrity and authenticity level of the place and comparison with other similar places (WH site already listed, national WH Tentative List, other similar places in the region).Second issue of the communication is to give a glimpse on the

  8. Insights from an international stakeholder consultation to identify informational needs related to seafood safety.

    PubMed

    Tediosi, Alice; Fait, Gabriella; Jacobs, Silke; Verbeke, Wim; Álvarez-Muñoz, Diana; Diogene, Jorge; Reuver, Marieke; Marques, António; Capri, Ettore

    2015-11-01

    Food safety assessment and communication have a strong importance in reducing human health risks related to food consumption. The research carried out within the ECsafeSEAFOOD project aims to assess seafood safety issues, mainly related to non-regulated priority environmental contaminants, and to evaluate their impact on public health. In order to make the research results accessible and exploitable, and to respond to actual stakeholders' demands, a consultation with international stakeholders was performed by means of a survey. The focus was on policy and decision makers, food producers and processors, and agencies (i.e. EU and National or Regional agencies related to Food Safety or Public Health) and consumer organisations. The survey considered questions related to: seafood safety assessment and mitigation strategies, availability of data, such as the level of information on different contaminants, and communication among different stakeholder groups. Furthermore, stakeholders were asked to give their opinion on how they believe consumers perceive risks associated with environmental contaminants. The survey was distributed to 531 key stakeholders and 91 responses were received from stakeholders from 30 EU and non-EU countries. The main results show that communication between different groups of stakeholders needs to be improved and that there is a deficit of information and data in the field of seafood safety. This pertains mainly to the transfer of contaminants between the environment and seafood, and to the diversity of environmental contaminants such as plastic additives, algal toxins and hormones. On-line tools were perceived to be the most useful communication channel. PMID:26146050

  9. Use of multiple correspondence analysis (MCA) to identify interactive meteorological conditions affecting relative throughfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Stan, John T.; Gay, Trent E.; Lewis, Elliott S.

    2016-02-01

    Forest canopies alter rainfall reaching the surface by redistributing it as throughfall. Throughfall supplies water and nutrients to a variety of ecohydrological components (soil microbial communities, stream water discharge/chemistry, and stormflow pathways) and is controlled by canopy structural interactions with meteorological conditions across temporal scales. This work introduces and applies multiple correspondence analyses (MCAs) to a range of meteorological thresholds (median intensity, median absolute deviation (MAD) of intensity, median wind-driven droplet inclination angle, and MAD of wind speed) for an example throughfall problem: identification of interacting storm conditions corresponding to temporal concentration in relative throughfall beyond the median observation (⩾73% of rain). MCA results from the example show that equalling or exceeding rain intensity thresholds (median and MAD) corresponded with temporal concentration of relative throughfall across all storms. Under these intensity conditions, two wind mechanisms produced significant correspondences: (1) high, steady wind-driven droplet inclination angles increased surface wetting; and (2) sporadic winds shook entrained droplets from surfaces. A discussion is provided showing that these example MCA findings agree well with previous work relying on more historically common methods (e.g., multiple regression and analytical models). Meteorological threshold correspondences to temporal concentration of relative throughfall at our site may be a function of heavy Tillandsia usneoides coverage. Applications of MCA within other forests may provide useful insights to how temporal throughfall dynamics are affected for drainage pathways dependent on different structures (leaves, twigs, branches, etc.).

  10. Individual variability in human blood metabolites identifies age-related differences

    PubMed Central

    Murakami, Itsuo; Takada, Junko; Kondoh, Hiroshi; Yanagida, Mitsuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Metabolites present in human blood document individual physiological states influenced by genetic, epigenetic, and lifestyle factors. Using high-resolution liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS), we performed nontargeted, quantitative metabolomics analysis in blood of 15 young (29 ± 4 y of age) and 15 elderly (81 ± 7 y of age) individuals. Coefficients of variation (CV = SD/mean) were obtained for 126 blood metabolites of all 30 donors. Fifty-five RBC-enriched metabolites, for which metabolomics studies have been scarce, are highlighted here. We found 14 blood compounds that show remarkable age-related increases or decreases; they include 1,5-anhydroglucitol, dimethyl-guanosine, acetyl-carnosine, carnosine, ophthalmic acid, UDP-acetyl-glucosamine, N-acetyl-arginine, N6-acetyl-lysine, pantothenate, citrulline, leucine, isoleucine, NAD+, and NADP+. Six of them are RBC-enriched, suggesting that RBC metabolomics is highly valuable for human aging research. Age differences are partly explained by a decrease in antioxidant production or increasing inefficiency of urea metabolism among the elderly. Pearson’s coefficients demonstrated that some age-related compounds are correlated, suggesting that aging affects them concomitantly. Although our CV values are mostly consistent with those CVs previously published, we here report previously unidentified CVs of 51 blood compounds. Compounds having moderate to high CV values (0.4–2.5) are often modified. Compounds having low CV values, such as ATP and glutathione, may be related to various diseases because their concentrations are strictly controlled, and changes in them would compromise health. Thus, human blood is a rich source of information about individual metabolic differences. PMID:27036001

  11. Individual variability in human blood metabolites identifies age-related differences.

    PubMed

    Chaleckis, Romanas; Murakami, Itsuo; Takada, Junko; Kondoh, Hiroshi; Yanagida, Mitsuhiro

    2016-04-19

    Metabolites present in human blood document individual physiological states influenced by genetic, epigenetic, and lifestyle factors. Using high-resolution liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS), we performed nontargeted, quantitative metabolomics analysis in blood of 15 young (29 ± 4 y of age) and 15 elderly (81 ± 7 y of age) individuals. Coefficients of variation (CV = SD/mean) were obtained for 126 blood metabolites of all 30 donors. Fifty-five RBC-enriched metabolites, for which metabolomics studies have been scarce, are highlighted here. We found 14 blood compounds that show remarkable age-related increases or decreases; they include 1,5-anhydroglucitol, dimethyl-guanosine, acetyl-carnosine, carnosine, ophthalmic acid, UDP-acetyl-glucosamine,N-acetyl-arginine,N6-acetyl-lysine, pantothenate, citrulline, leucine, isoleucine, NAD(+), and NADP(+) Six of them are RBC-enriched, suggesting that RBC metabolomics is highly valuable for human aging research. Age differences are partly explained by a decrease in antioxidant production or increasing inefficiency of urea metabolism among the elderly. Pearson's coefficients demonstrated that some age-related compounds are correlated, suggesting that aging affects them concomitantly. Although our CV values are mostly consistent with those CVs previously published, we here report previously unidentified CVs of 51 blood compounds. Compounds having moderate to high CV values (0.4-2.5) are often modified. Compounds having low CV values, such as ATP and glutathione, may be related to various diseases because their concentrations are strictly controlled, and changes in them would compromise health. Thus, human blood is a rich source of information about individual metabolic differences. PMID:27036001

  12. Identifying attentional bias and emotional response after appearance-related stimuli exposure.

    PubMed

    Cho, Ara; Kwak, Soo-Min; Lee, Jang-Han

    2013-01-01

    The effect of media images has been regarded as a significant variable in the construction or in the activation of body images. Individuals who have a negative body image use avoidance coping strategies to minimize damage to their body image. We identified attentional biases and negative emotional responses following exposure to body stimuli. Female university students were divided into two groups based on their use of avoidance coping strategies (high-level group: high avoidance [HA]; low-group: low avoidance [LA]), and were assigned to two different conditions (exposure to thin body pictures, ET, and exposure to oversized body pictures, EO). Results showed that the HA group paid more attention to slim bodies and reported more negative emotions than the LA group, and that the EO had more negative effects than the ET. We suggest that HAs may attend more to slim bodies as a way of avoiding overweight bodies, influenced by social pressure, and in the search for a compensation of a positive emotional balance. However, attentional bias toward slim bodies can cause an upward comparison process, leading to increased body dissatisfaction, which is the main factor in the development of eating disorders (EDs). Therefore, altering avoidance coping strategies should be considered for people at risk of EDs. PMID:23098249

  13. Identifying and assessing the impact of wine acid-related genes in yeast.

    PubMed

    Chidi, Boredi S; Rossouw, Debra; Bauer, Florian F

    2016-02-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains used for winemaking show a wide range of fermentation phenotypes, and the genetic background of individual strains contributes significantly to the organoleptic properties of wine. This strain-dependent impact extends to the organic acid composition of the wine, an important quality parameter. However, little is known about the genes which may impact on organic acids during grape must fermentation. To generate novel insights into the genetic regulation of this metabolic network, a subset of genes was identified based on a comparative analysis of the transcriptomes and organic acid profiles of different yeast strains showing different production levels of organic acids. These genes showed significant inter-strain differences in their transcription levels at one or more stages of fermentation and were also considered likely to influence organic acid metabolism based on existing functional annotations. Genes selected in this manner were ADH3, AAD6, SER33, ICL1, GLY1, SFC1, SER1, KGD1, AGX1, OSM1 and GPD2. Yeast strains carrying deletions for these genes were used to conduct fermentations and determine organic acid levels at various stages of alcoholic fermentation in synthetic grape must. The impact of these deletions on organic acid profiles was quantified, leading to novel insights and hypothesis generation regarding the role/s of these genes in wine yeast acid metabolism under fermentative conditions. Overall, the data contribute to our understanding of the roles of selected genes in yeast metabolism in general and of organic acid metabolism in particular. PMID:26040556

  14. Environmental Health Related Socio-Spatial Inequalities: Identifying "Hotspots" of Environmental Burdens and Social Vulnerability.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Rehana; Flacke, Johannes; Martinez, Javier; van Maarseveen, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Differential exposure to multiple environmental burdens and benefits and their distribution across a population with varying vulnerability can contribute heavily to health inequalities. Particularly relevant are areas with high cumulative burdens and high social vulnerability termed as "hotspots". This paper develops an index-based approach to assess these multiple burdens and benefits in combination with vulnerability factors at detailed intra-urban level. The method is applied to the city of Dortmund, Germany. Using non-spatial and spatial methods we assessed inequalities and identified "hotspot" areas in the city. We found modest inequalities burdening higher vulnerable groups in Dortmund (CI = -0.020 at p < 0.05). At the detailed intra-urban level, however, inequalities showed strong geographical patterns. Large numbers of "hotspots" exist in the northern part of the city compared to the southern part. A holistic assessment, particularly at a detailed local level, considering both environmental burdens and benefits and their distribution across the population with the different vulnerability, is essential to inform environmental justice debates and to mobilize local stakeholders. Locating "hotspot" areas at this detailed spatial level can serve as a basis to develop interventions that target vulnerable groups to ensure a health conducive equal environment. PMID:27409625

  15. Post-discharge surveillance to identify colorectal surgical site infection rates and related costs.

    PubMed

    Tanner, J; Khan, D; Aplin, C; Ball, J; Thomas, M; Bankart, J

    2009-07-01

    A growing number of surveillance studies have highlighted concerns with relying only on data from inpatients. Without post-discharge surveillance (PDS) data, the rate and burden of surgical site infections (SSIs) are underestimated. PDS data for colorectal surgery in the UK remains to be published. This is an important specialty to study since it is considered to have the highest SSI rate and is among the most expensive to treat. This study of colorectal SSI used a 30 day surveillance programme with telephone interviews and home visits. Each additional healthcare resource used by patients with SSI was documented and costed. Of the 105 patients who met the inclusion criteria and completed the 30 day follow-up, 29 (27%) developed SSI, of which 12 were diagnosed after discharge. The mean number of days to presentation of SSI was 13. Multivariable logistic analysis identified body mass index as the only significant risk factor. The additional cost of treating each infected patient was pound sterling 10,523, although 15% of these additional costs were met by primary care. The 5 month surveillance programme cost pound sterling 5,200 to run. An analysis of the surveillance nurse's workload showed that the nurse could be replaced by a healthcare assistant. PDS to detect SSI after colorectal surgery is necessary to provide complete data with accurate additional costs. PMID:19446918

  16. Identifying and tracking attacks on networks: C3I displays and related technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manes, Gavin W.; Dawkins, J.; Shenoi, Sujeet; Hale, John C.

    2003-09-01

    Converged network security is extremely challenging for several reasons; expanded system and technology perimeters, unexpected feature interaction, and complex interfaces all conspire to provide hackers with greater opportunities for compromising large networks. Preventive security services and architectures are essential, but in and of themselves do not eliminate all threat of compromise. Attack management systems mitigate this residual risk by facilitating incident detection, analysis and response. There are a wealth of attack detection and response tools for IP networks, but a dearth of such tools for wireless and public telephone networks. Moreover, methodologies and formalisms have yet to be identified that can yield a common model for vulnerabilities and attacks in converged networks. A comprehensive attack management system must coordinate detection tools for converged networks, derive fully-integrated attack and network models, perform vulnerability and multi-stage attack analysis, support large-scale attack visualization, and orchestrate strategic responses to cyber attacks that cross network boundaries. We present an architecture that embodies these principles for attack management. The attack management system described engages a suite of detection tools for various networking domains, feeding real-time attack data to a comprehensive modeling, analysis and visualization subsystem. The resulting early warning system not only provides network administrators with a heads-up cockpit display of their entire network, it also supports guided response and predictive capabilities for multi-stage attacks in converged networks.

  17. Identifying the null subject: evidence from event-related brain potentials.

    PubMed

    Demestre, J; Meltzer, S; García-Albea, J E; Vigil, A

    1999-05-01

    Event-related brain potentials (ERPs) were recorded during spoken language comprehension to study the on-line effects of gender agreement violations in controlled infinitival complements. Spanish sentences were constructed in which the complement clause contained a predicate adjective marked for syntactic gender. By manipulating the gender of the antecedent (i.e., the controller) of the implicit subject while holding constant the gender of the adjective, pairs of grammatical and ungrammatical sentences were created. The detection of such a gender agreement violation would indicate that the parser had established the coreference relation between the null subject and its antecedent. The results showed a complex biphasic ERP (i.e., an early negativity with prominence at anterior and central sites, followed by a centroparietal positivity) in the violating condition as compared to the non-violating conditions. The brain reacts to NP-adjective gender agreement violations within a few hundred milliseconds of their occurrence. The data imply that the parser has properly coindexed the null subject of an infinitive clause with its antecedent. PMID:10344021

  18. Human-chromatin-related protein interactions identify a demethylase complex required for chromosome segregation.

    PubMed

    Marcon, Edyta; Ni, Zuyao; Pu, Shuye; Turinsky, Andrei L; Trimble, Sandra Smiley; Olsen, Jonathan B; Silverman-Gavrila, Rosalind; Silverman-Gavrila, Lorelei; Phanse, Sadhna; Guo, Hongbo; Zhong, Guoqing; Guo, Xinghua; Young, Peter; Bailey, Swneke; Roudeva, Denitza; Zhao, Dorothy; Hewel, Johannes; Li, Joyce; Gräslund, Susanne; Paduch, Marcin; Kossiakoff, Anthony A; Lupien, Mathieu; Emili, Andrew; Wodak, Shoshana J; Greenblatt, Jack

    2014-07-10

    Chromatin regulation is driven by multicomponent protein complexes, which form functional modules. Deciphering the components of these modules and their interactions is central to understanding the molecular pathways these proteins are regulating, their functions, and their relation to both normal development and disease. We describe the use of affinity purifications of tagged human proteins coupled with mass spectrometry to generate a protein-protein interaction map encompassing known and predicted chromatin-related proteins. On the basis of 1,394 successful purifications of 293 proteins, we report a high-confidence (85% precision) network involving 11,464 protein-protein interactions among 1,738 different human proteins, grouped into 164 often overlapping protein complexes with a particular focus on the family of JmjC-containing lysine demethylases, their partners, and their roles in chromatin remodeling. We show that RCCD1 is a partner of histone H3K36 demethylase KDM8 and demonstrate that both are important for cell-cycle-regulated transcriptional repression in centromeric regions and accurate mitotic division. PMID:24981860

  19. Identifying Flood-Related Infectious Diseases in Anhui Province, China: A Spatial and Temporal Analysis.

    PubMed

    Gao, Lu; Zhang, Ying; Ding, Guoyong; Liu, Qiyong; Jiang, Baofa

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to explore infectious diseases related to the 2007 Huai River flood in Anhui Province, China. The study was based on the notified incidences of infectious diseases between June 29 and July 25 from 2004 to 2011. Daily incidences of notified diseases in 2007 were compared with the corresponding daily incidences during the same period in the other years (from 2004 to 2011, except 2007) by Poisson regression analysis. Spatial autocorrelation analysis was used to test the distribution pattern of the diseases. Spatial regression models were then performed to examine the association between the incidence of each disease and flood, considering lag effects and other confounders. After controlling the other meteorological and socioeconomic factors, malaria (odds ratio [OR] = 3.67, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.77-7.61), diarrhea (OR = 2.16, 95% CI = 1.24-3.78), and hepatitis A virus (HAV) infection (OR = 6.11, 95% CI = 1.04-35.84) were significantly related to the 2007 Huai River flood both from the spatial and temporal analyses. Special attention should be given to develop public health preparation and interventions with a focus on malaria, diarrhea, and HAV infection, in the study region. PMID:26903612

  20. Public accessibility of biomedical articles from PubMed Central reduces journal readership—retrospective cohort analysis

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Philip M.

    2013-01-01

    Does PubMed Central—a government-run digital archive of biomedical articles—compete with scientific society journals? A longitudinal, retrospective cohort analysis of 13,223 articles (5999 treatment, 7224 control) published in 14 society-run biomedical research journals in nutrition, experimental biology, physiology, and radiology between February 2008 and January 2011 reveals a 21.4% reduction in full-text hypertext markup language (HTML) article downloads and a 13.8% reduction in portable document format (PDF) article downloads from the journals' websites when U.S. National Institutes of Health-sponsored articles (treatment) become freely available from the PubMed Central repository. In addition, the effect of PubMed Central on reducing PDF article downloads is increasing over time, growing at a rate of 1.6% per year. There was no longitudinal effect for full-text HTML downloads. While PubMed Central may be providing complementary access to readers traditionally underserved by scientific journals, the loss of article readership from the journal website may weaken the ability of the journal to build communities of interest around research papers, impede the communication of news and events to scientific society members and journal readers, and reduce the perceived value of the journal to institutional subscribers.—Davis, P. M. Public accessibility of biomedical articles from PubMed Central reduces journal readership—retrospective cohort analysis. PMID:23554455

  1. B56δ-related protein phosphatase 2A dysfunction identified in patients with intellectual disability

    PubMed Central

    Houge, Gunnar; Haesen, Dorien; Vissers, Lisenka E.L.M.; Mehta, Sarju; Parker, Michael J.; Wright, Michael; Vogt, Julie; McKee, Shane; Tolmie, John L.; Cordeiro, Nuno; Kleefstra, Tjitske; Willemsen, Marjolein H.; Reijnders, Margot R.F.; Berland, Siren; Hayman, Eli; Lahat, Eli; Brilstra, Eva H.; van Gassen, Koen L.I.; Zonneveld-Huijssoon, Evelien; de Bie, Charlotte I.; Hoischen, Alexander; Eichler, Evan E.; Holdhus, Rita; Steen, Vidar M.; Døskeland, Stein Ove; Hurles, Matthew E.; FitzPatrick, David R.; Janssens, Veerle

    2015-01-01

    Here we report inherited dysregulation of protein phosphatase activity as a cause of intellectual disability (ID). De novo missense mutations in 2 subunits of serine/threonine (Ser/Thr) protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) were identified in 16 individuals with mild to severe ID, long-lasting hypotonia, epileptic susceptibility, frontal bossing, mild hypertelorism, and downslanting palpebral fissures. PP2A comprises catalytic (C), scaffolding (A), and regulatory (B) subunits that determine subcellular anchoring, substrate specificity, and physiological function. Ten patients had mutations within a highly conserved acidic loop of the PPP2R5D-encoded B56δ regulatory subunit, with the same E198K mutation present in 6 individuals. Five patients had mutations in the PPP2R1A-encoded scaffolding Aα subunit, with the same R182W mutation in 3 individuals. Some Aα cases presented with large ventricles, causing macrocephaly and hydrocephalus suspicion, and all cases exhibited partial or complete corpus callosum agenesis. Functional evaluation revealed that mutant A and B subunits were stable and uncoupled from phosphatase activity. Mutant B56δ was A and C binding–deficient, while mutant Aα subunits bound B56δ well but were unable to bind C or bound a catalytically impaired C, suggesting a dominant-negative effect where mutant subunits hinder dephosphorylation of B56δ-anchored substrates. Moreover, mutant subunit overexpression resulted in hyperphosphorylation of GSK3β, a B56δ-regulated substrate. This effect was in line with clinical observations, supporting a correlation between the ID degree and biochemical disturbance. PMID:26168268

  2. How cooperatively breeding birds identify relatives and avoid incest: New insights into dispersal and kin recognition.

    PubMed

    Riehl, Christina; Stern, Caitlin A

    2015-12-01

    Cooperative breeding in birds typically occurs when offspring - usually males - delay dispersal from their natal group, remaining with the family to help rear younger kin. Sex-biased dispersal is thought to have evolved in order to reduce the risk of inbreeding, resulting in low relatedness between mates and the loss of indirect fitness benefits for the dispersing sex. In this review, we discuss several recent studies showing that dispersal patterns are more variable than previously thought, often leading to complex genetic structure within cooperative avian societies. These empirical findings accord with recent theoretical models suggesting that sex- biased dispersal is neither necessary, nor always sufficient, to prevent inbreeding. The ability to recognize relatives, primarily by learning individual or group-specific vocalizations, may play a more important role in incest avoidance than currently appreciated. PMID:26577076

  3. Identifying the best scenario for using schematic organizers as integration tools for alcohol-related information.

    PubMed

    Peel, J L; Dansereau, D F; Dees, S

    1993-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to examine scenarios for using two schematic organizers--schematic knowledge maps and conceptual matrices--in integrating episodic and semantic knowledge about alcohol. Seventy students from undergraduate general psychology classes participated for course credit. Participants were assigned to either a schematic organizer group or an essay writing group. These groups were subdivided further into two treatment sequences: episodic/semantic and semantic/episodic. The episodic activity required participants to complete materials using their own alcohol-related experiences, whereas the semantic activity required participants to annotate expert materials. Assessment measures used were consumer-satisfaction questionnaires and free-recall tests. While no preferences were established for any one scenario, the episodic activities were rated higher than the semantic activities regardless of integration sequence. The semantic/episodic integration scenario did produce higher recall scores for the expert information. PMID:8487138

  4. Use of Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism to Rapidly Identify Dermatophyte Species Related to Dermatophytosis

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Rasoul; Abastabar, Mahdi; Mirhendi, Hossein; Badali, Hamid; Shadzi, Shahla; Chadeganipour, Mustafa; Pourfathi, Parinaz; Jalalizand, Niloufar; Haghani, Iman

    2015-01-01

    Background: Dermatophytes are a group of keratinophilic fungi worldwide, which can infect the skin, hair and nails of humans and animals. This genus includes several species that present different features of dermatophytosis. Although, laboratory diagnosis of dermatophytes is based on direct microscopy, biochemical tests and culture, these manners are expensive, time consuming and need skilled staff. Therefore, molecular methods like PCR-RFLP are the beneficial tools for identification, which are rapid and sensitive. Thus, dermatophyte species are able to generate characteristic band patterns on agarose gel electrophoresis using PCR-RFLP technique, which leads to successful identification at the species level within a 5-hour period. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to study inter- and intraspecific genomic variations for identification of clinically important dermatophyte species obtained from clinical specimens in Isfahan, Iran using PCR-RFLP. Materials and Methods: From March 2011 to August 2012, 135 clinical isolates were collected from infected patients at Isfahan, Iran. ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region of rDNA was amplified using universal fungal primers. Subsequently, amplified products were digested by the MvaI restriction enzyme. Using discriminating band profiles on agarose gel, dermatophyte species were identified. However, DNA sequencing was used for unidentifiable strains. Results: The specimens were obtained from skin scrapings (70.3%), nail (24.4%) and hair (5.1%) clippings. Most patients were between 21 - 30 years and the ratio of male to female was 93/42. Trichophyton interdigitale was the commonest isolate (52.5%) in our findings, followed by Epidermophyton floccosum (24.4%), T. rubrum (16.2%), Microsporum canis (2.2%), T. erinacei (1.4%), T. violaceum (1.4%), T. tonsurans (0.7%) and M. gypseum (0.7%) based on PCR-RFLP. Conclusions: Combination of traditional methods and molecular techniques considerably improves identification of dermatophytes in

  5. 16S community profiling identifies proton pump inhibitor related differences in gastric, lung and oropharyngeal microflora

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, Rachel; Hu, Lan; Amirault, Janine; Khatwa, Umakanth; Ward, Doyle V.; Onderdonk, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To test the hypothesis that PPI use results in changes in gastric microflora which, through full column reflux, results in lung and oropharyngeal microflora changes. Study design We performed a prospective, cross sectional cohort study of 116 children (57 off and 59 on PPIs) undergoing simultaneous bronchoscopy and upper endoscopy for the evaluation of chronic cough. We performed 16S sequencing on gastric, bronchoalveolar lavage and oropharyngeal fluid. Fifty patients also underwent multichannel intraluminal impedance (pH-MII) testing. Results Streptococcus was more abundant in the gastric fluid of patients taking proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) and there was a significant correlation with PPI dose (mg/kg/day) and abundance of gastric Streptococcus (p=0.01). There was also a significant difference in the abundance of oropharyngeal Streptococcus in PPI treated patients. Eight unique bacterial genera were found in the gastric and lung fluid but not in the oropharyngeal suggesting exchange between the two sites and two of the seven (Lactococcus, Acinetobacter) were more abundant in patients with more full column reflux, suggesting direct aspiration. Principal component analysis revealed greater overlap between gastric and lung than oropharyngeal microflora. Conclusions PPI use was associated with differences in gastric, lung and oropharyngeal microflora. Although microflora exchange can occur between all three sites, gastric and lung microflora are more closely related and the mechanism of exchange between sites may be aspiration of full column reflux. PMID:25661411

  6. Using event related potentials to identify a user's behavioural intention aroused by product form design.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yi; Guo, Fu; Zhang, Xuefeng; Qu, Qingxing; Liu, Weilin

    2016-07-01

    The capacity of product form to arouse user's behavioural intention plays a decisive role in further user experience, even in purchase decision, while traditional methods rarely give a fully understanding of user experience evoked by product form, especially the feeling of anticipated use of product. Behavioural intention aroused by product form designs has not yet been investigated electrophysiologically. Hence event related potentials (ERPs) were applied to explore the process of behavioural intention when users browsed different smart phone form designs with brand and price not taken into account for mainly studying the brain activity evoked by variety of product forms. Smart phone pictures with different anticipated user experience were displayed with equiprobability randomly. Participants were asked to click the left mouse button when certain picture gave them a feeling of behavioural intention to interact with. The brain signal of each participant was recorded by Curry 7.0. The results show that pictures with an ability to arouse participants' behavioural intention for further experience can evoke enhanced N300 and LPPs (late positive potentials) in central-parietal, parietal and occipital regions. The scalp topography shows that central-parietal, parietal and occipital regions are more activated. The results indicate that the discrepancy of ERPs can reflect the neural activities of behavioural intention formed or not. Moreover, amplitude of ERPs occurred in corresponding brain areas can be used to measure user experience. The exploring of neural correlated with behavioural intention provide an accurate measurement method of user's perception and help marketers to know which product can arouse users' behavioural intention, maybe taken as an evaluating indicator of product design. PMID:26995041

  7. A Study to Identify Areas of Relative Strength and Weakness in Support for the Saint Leo College Library Acquisitions Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLeod, Stephen G.

    The practicum sought to identify areas of relative strength and weakness in support for the Saint Leo College (Florida) Library Acquisitions Project, a project to improve library support to the Military Education Program administered by Saint Leo College on military installations throughout the Southeast. Using the Interactive Forces Theory of…

  8. Development and Assessment of a Diagnostic Tool to Identify Organic Chemistry Students' Alternative Conceptions Related to Acid Strength

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClary, LaKeisha M.; Bretz, Stacey Lowery

    2012-01-01

    The central goal of this study was to create a new diagnostic tool to identify organic chemistry students' alternative conceptions related to acid strength. Twenty years of research on secondary and college students' conceptions about acids and bases has shown that these important concepts are difficult for students to apply to qualitative problem…

  9. Building Disease-Specific Drug-Protein Connectivity Maps from Molecular Interaction Networks and PubMed Abstracts

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiao; Zhu, Xiaoyan; Chen, Jake Yue

    2009-01-01

    The recently proposed concept of molecular connectivity maps enables researchers to integrate experimental measurements of genes, proteins, metabolites, and drug compounds under similar biological conditions. The study of these maps provides opportunities for future toxicogenomics and drug discovery applications. We developed a computational framework to build disease-specific drug-protein connectivity maps. We integrated gene/protein and drug connectivity information based on protein interaction networks and literature mining, without requiring gene expression profile information derived from drug perturbation experiments on disease samples. We described the development and application of this computational framework using Alzheimer's Disease (AD) as a primary example in three steps. First, molecular interaction networks were incorporated to reduce bias and improve relevance of AD seed proteins. Second, PubMed abstracts were used to retrieve enriched drug terms that are indirectly associated with AD through molecular mechanistic studies. Third and lastly, a comprehensive AD connectivity map was created by relating enriched drugs and related proteins in literature. We showed that this molecular connectivity map development approach outperformed both curated drug target databases and conventional information retrieval systems. Our initial explorations of the AD connectivity map yielded a new hypothesis that diltiazem and quinidine may be investigated as candidate drugs for AD treatment. Molecular connectivity maps derived computationally can help study molecular signature differences between different classes of drugs in specific disease contexts. To achieve overall good data coverage and quality, a series of statistical methods have been developed to overcome high levels of data noise in biological networks and literature mining results. Further development of computational molecular connectivity maps to cover major disease areas will likely set up a new model for

  10. Building disease-specific drug-protein connectivity maps from molecular interaction networks and PubMed abstracts.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiao; Zhu, Xiaoyan; Chen, Jake Yue

    2009-07-01

    The recently proposed concept of molecular connectivity maps enables researchers to integrate experimental measurements of genes, proteins, metabolites, and drug compounds under similar biological conditions. The study of these maps provides opportunities for future toxicogenomics and drug discovery applications. We developed a computational framework to build disease-specific drug-protein connectivity maps. We integrated gene/protein and drug connectivity information based on protein interaction networks and literature mining, without requiring gene expression profile information derived from drug perturbation experiments on disease samples. We described the development and application of this computational framework using Alzheimer's Disease (AD) as a primary example in three steps. First, molecular interaction networks were incorporated to reduce bias and improve relevance of AD seed proteins. Second, PubMed abstracts were used to retrieve enriched drug terms that are indirectly associated with AD through molecular mechanistic studies. Third and lastly, a comprehensive AD connectivity map was created by relating enriched drugs and related proteins in literature. We showed that this molecular connectivity map development approach outperformed both curated drug target databases and conventional information retrieval systems. Our initial explorations of the AD connectivity map yielded a new hypothesis that diltiazem and quinidine may be investigated as candidate drugs for AD treatment. Molecular connectivity maps derived computationally can help study molecular signature differences between different classes of drugs in specific disease contexts. To achieve overall good data coverage and quality, a series of statistical methods have been developed to overcome high levels of data noise in biological networks and literature mining results. Further development of computational molecular connectivity maps to cover major disease areas will likely set up a new model for

  11. Identifying Liver Cancer-Related Enhancer SNPs by Integrating GWAS and Histone Modification ChIP-seq Data

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yang; Wu, Xiaoliang; Ma, Rui

    2016-01-01

    Many disease-related single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been inferred from genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in recent years. Numerous studies have shown that some SNPs located in protein-coding regions are associated with numerous diseases by affecting gene expression. However, in noncoding regions, the mechanism of how SNPs contribute to disease susceptibility remains unclear. Enhancer elements are functional segments of DNA located in noncoding regions that play an important role in regulating gene expression. The SNPs located in enhancer elements may affect gene expression and lead to disease. We presented a method for identifying liver cancer-related enhancer SNPs through integrating GWAS and histone modification ChIP-seq data. We identified 22 liver cancer-related enhancer SNPs, 9 of which were regulatory SNPs involved in distal transcriptional regulation. The results highlight that these enhancer SNPs may play important roles in liver cancer. PMID:27429976

  12. Identifying Liver Cancer-Related Enhancer SNPs by Integrating GWAS and Histone Modification ChIP-seq Data.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tianjiao; Hu, Yang; Wu, Xiaoliang; Ma, Rui; Jiang, Qinghua; Wang, Yadong

    2016-01-01

    Many disease-related single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been inferred from genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in recent years. Numerous studies have shown that some SNPs located in protein-coding regions are associated with numerous diseases by affecting gene expression. However, in noncoding regions, the mechanism of how SNPs contribute to disease susceptibility remains unclear. Enhancer elements are functional segments of DNA located in noncoding regions that play an important role in regulating gene expression. The SNPs located in enhancer elements may affect gene expression and lead to disease. We presented a method for identifying liver cancer-related enhancer SNPs through integrating GWAS and histone modification ChIP-seq data. We identified 22 liver cancer-related enhancer SNPs, 9 of which were regulatory SNPs involved in distal transcriptional regulation. The results highlight that these enhancer SNPs may play important roles in liver cancer. PMID:27429976

  13. Shifting Sands: Science Researchers on Google Scholar, Web of Science, and PubMed, with Implications for Library Collections Budgets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hightower, Christy; Caldwell, Christy

    2010-01-01

    Science researchers at the University of California Santa Cruz were surveyed about their article database use and preferences in order to inform collection budget choices. Web of Science was the single most used database, selected by 41.6%. Statistically there was no difference between PubMed (21.5%) and Google Scholar (18.7%) as the second most…

  14. Public accessibility of biomedical articles from PubMed Central reduces journal readership--retrospective cohort analysis.

    PubMed

    Davis, Philip M

    2013-07-01

    Does PubMed Central--a government-run digital archive of biomedical articles--compete with scientific society journals? A longitudinal, retrospective cohort analysis of 13,223 articles (5999 treatment, 7224 control) published in 14 society-run biomedical research journals in nutrition, experimental biology, physiology, and radiology between February 2008 and January 2011 reveals a 21.4% reduction in full-text hypertext markup language (HTML) article downloads and a 13.8% reduction in portable document format (PDF) article downloads from the journals' websites when U.S. National Institutes of Health-sponsored articles (treatment) become freely available from the PubMed Central repository. In addition, the effect of PubMed Central on reducing PDF article downloads is increasing over time, growing at a rate of 1.6% per year. There was no longitudinal effect for full-text HTML downloads. While PubMed Central may be providing complementary access to readers traditionally underserved by scientific journals, the loss of article readership from the journal website may weaken the ability of the journal to build communities of interest around research papers, impede the communication of news and events to scientific society members and journal readers, and reduce the perceived value of the journal to institutional subscribers. PMID:23554455

  15. Epigenome-Wide Scans Identify Differentially Methylated Regions for Age and Age-Related Phenotypes in a Healthy Ageing Population

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Tsun-Po; Pidsley, Ruth; Nisbet, James; Glass, Daniel; Mangino, Massimo; Zhai, Guangju; Zhang, Feng; Valdes, Ana; Shin, So-Youn; Dempster, Emma L.; Murray, Robin M.; Grundberg, Elin; Hedman, Asa K.; Nica, Alexandra; Small, Kerrin S.; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T.; McCarthy, Mark I.; Mill, Jonathan; Spector, Tim D.; Deloukas, Panos

    2012-01-01

    Age-related changes in DNA methylation have been implicated in cellular senescence and longevity, yet the causes and functional consequences of these variants remain unclear. To elucidate the role of age-related epigenetic changes in healthy ageing and potential longevity, we tested for association between whole-blood DNA methylation patterns in 172 female twins aged 32 to 80 with age and age-related phenotypes. Twin-based DNA methylation levels at 26,690 CpG-sites showed evidence for mean genome-wide heritability of 18%, which was supported by the identification of 1,537 CpG-sites with methylation QTLs in cis at FDR 5%. We performed genome-wide analyses to discover differentially methylated regions (DMRs) for sixteen age-related phenotypes (ap-DMRs) and chronological age (a-DMRs). Epigenome-wide association scans (EWAS) identified age-related phenotype DMRs (ap-DMRs) associated with LDL (STAT5A), lung function (WT1), and maternal longevity (ARL4A, TBX20). In contrast, EWAS for chronological age identified hundreds of predominantly hyper-methylated age DMRs (490 a-DMRs at FDR 5%), of which only one (TBX20) was also associated with an age-related phenotype. Therefore, the majority of age-related changes in DNA methylation are not associated with phenotypic measures of healthy ageing in later life. We replicated a large proportion of a-DMRs in a sample of 44 younger adult MZ twins aged 20 to 61, suggesting that a-DMRs may initiate at an earlier age. We next explored potential genetic and environmental mechanisms underlying a-DMRs and ap-DMRs. Genome-wide overlap across cis-meQTLs, genotype-phenotype associations, and EWAS ap-DMRs identified CpG-sites that had cis-meQTLs with evidence for genotype–phenotype association, where the CpG-site was also an ap-DMR for the same phenotype. Monozygotic twin methylation difference analyses identified one potential environmentally-mediated ap-DMR associated with total cholesterol and LDL (CSMD1). Our results suggest that in a

  16. Use of positive and negative words in scientific PubMed abstracts between 1974 and 2014: retrospective analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tijdink, Joeri K; Otte, Willem M

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether language used in science abstracts can skew towards the use of strikingly positive and negative words over time. Design Retrospective analysis of all scientific abstracts in PubMed between 1974 and 2014. Methods The yearly frequencies of positive, negative, and neutral words (25 preselected words in each category), plus 100 randomly selected words were normalised for the total number of abstracts. Subanalyses included pattern quantification of individual words, specificity for selected high impact journals, and comparison between author affiliations within or outside countries with English as the official majority language. Frequency patterns were compared with 4% of all books ever printed and digitised by use of Google Books Ngram Viewer. Main outcome measures Frequencies of positive and negative words in abstracts compared with frequencies of words with a neutral and random connotation, expressed as relative change since 1980. Results The absolute frequency of positive words increased from 2.0% (1974-80) to 17.5% (2014), a relative increase of 880% over four decades. All 25 individual positive words contributed to the increase, particularly the words “robust,” “novel,” “innovative,” and “unprecedented,” which increased in relative frequency up to 15 000%. Comparable but less pronounced results were obtained when restricting the analysis to selected journals with high impact factors. Authors affiliated to an institute in a non-English speaking country used significantly more positive words. Negative word frequencies increased from 1.3% (1974-80) to 3.2% (2014), a relative increase of 257%. Over the same time period, no apparent increase was found in neutral or random word use, or in the frequency of positive word use in published books. Conclusions Our lexicographic analysis indicates that scientific abstracts are currently written with more positive and negative words, and provides an insight into the

  17. Health-related quality of life among veterans in addictions treatment: identifying behavioral targets for future intervention

    PubMed Central

    Oppezzo, Marily A.; Michalek, Anne K.; Delucchi, Kevin; Baiocchi, Michael T. M.; Barnett, Paul G.

    2016-01-01

    Background US veterans report lower health-related quality of life (HRQoL) relative to the general population. Identifying behavioral factors related to HRQoL that are malleable to change may inform interventions to improve well-being in this vulnerable group. Purpose The current study sought to characterize HRQoL in a largely male sample of veterans in addictions treatment, both in relation to US norms and in association with five recommended health behavior practices: regularly exercising, managing stress, having good sleep hygiene, consuming fruits and vegetables, and being tobacco free. Methods We assessed HRQoL with 250 veterans in addictions treatment (96 % male, mean age 53, range 24–77) using scales from four validated measures. Data reduction methods identified two principal components reflecting physical and mental HRQoL. Model testing of HRQoL associations with health behaviors adjusted for relevant demographic and treatment-related covariates. Results Compared to US norms, the sample had lower HRQoL scores. Better psychological HRQoL was associated with higher subjective social standing, absence of pain or trauma, lower alcohol severity, and monotonically with the sum of health behaviors (all p < 0.05). Specifically, psychological HRQoL was associated with regular exercise, stress management, and sleep hygiene. Regular exercise also related to better physical HRQoL. The models explained >40 % of the variance in HRQoL. Conclusions Exercise, sleep hygiene, and stress management are strongly associated with HRQoL among veterans in addictions treatment. Future research is needed to test the effect of interventions for improving well-being in this high-risk group. PMID:26886926

  18. A systems biology pipeline identifies new immune and disease related molecular signatures and networks in human cells during microgravity exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Sayak; Saha, Rohini; Palanisamy, Anbarasi; Ghosh, Madhurima; Biswas, Anupriya; Roy, Saheli; Pal, Arijit; Sarkar, Kathakali; Bagh, Sangram

    2016-05-01

    Microgravity is a prominent health hazard for astronauts, yet we understand little about its effect at the molecular systems level. In this study, we have integrated a set of systems-biology tools and databases and have analysed more than 8000 molecular pathways on published global gene expression datasets of human cells in microgravity. Hundreds of new pathways have been identified with statistical confidence for each dataset and despite the difference in cell types and experiments, around 100 of the new pathways are appeared common across the datasets. They are related to reduced inflammation, autoimmunity, diabetes and asthma. We have identified downregulation of NfκB pathway via Notch1 signalling as new pathway for reduced immunity in microgravity. Induction of few cancer types including liver cancer and leukaemia and increased drug response to cancer in microgravity are also found. Increase in olfactory signal transduction is also identified. Genes, based on their expression pattern, are clustered and mathematically stable clusters are identified. The network mapping of genes within a cluster indicates the plausible functional connections in microgravity. This pipeline gives a new systems level picture of human cells under microgravity, generates testable hypothesis and may help estimating risk and developing medicine for space missions.

  19. Genome-wide association identifies SKIV2L and MYRIP as protective factors for age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Kopplin, Laura J; Igo, Robert P; Wang, Yang; Sivakumaran, Theru A; Hagstrom, Stephanie A; Peachey, Neal S; Francis, Peter J; Klein, Michael L; SanGiovanni, John Paul; Chew, Emily Y; Pauer, Gayle JT; Sturgill, Gwen M; Joshi, Tripti; Tian, Liping; Xi, Quansheng; Henning, Alice K; Lee, Kristine E.; Klein, Ronald; Klein, Barbara EK; Iyengar, Sudha K

    2011-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in the elderly in the developed world. We conducted a genome-wide association study in a series of families enriched for AMD and completed a meta-analysis of this new data with results from reanalysis of an existing study of a late-stage case/control cohort. We tested the top findings for replication in 1 896 cases and 1 866 controls and identified two novel genetic protective factors for AMD. In addition to the CFH (p=2.3×10−64) and ARMS2 (p=1.2×10−60) loci, we observed a protective effect at rs429608, an intronic SNP in SKIV2L (p=5.3×10−15), a gene near the C2/BF locus, that indicates the protective effect may be mediated by variants other than the C2/BF variants previously studied. Haplotype analysis at this locus identified three protective haplotypes defined by the rs429608 protective allele. We also identified a new potentially protective effect at rs2679798 in MYRIP (p=2.9×10−4), a gene involved in retinal pigment epithelium melanosome trafficking. Interestingly, MYRIP was initially identified in the family-based scan and was confirmed in the case-control set. From these efforts, we report the identification of two novel protective factors for AMD and confirm the previously known associations at CFH, ARMS2 and C3. PMID:20861866

  20. Assessing Student Pharmacists’ Ability to Identify Drug-Related Problems in Patients Within a Patient-Centered Medical Home

    PubMed Central

    Bulkley, Christina F.; Truong, Teresa; Carter, Sandra M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To quantify, describe, and categorize patient drug-related problems (DRPs) and recommendations identified by fourth-year (P4) student pharmacists during a live medication reconciliation activity within a patient-centered medical home (PCMH). Methods. Fourth-year student pharmacists conducted chart reviews, identified and documented DRPs, obtained live medication histories, and immediately provided findings and recommendations to the attending physicians. Documentation of DRPs and recommendations were analyzed retrospectively. Results. Thirty-eight students completed 99 medication reconciliation sessions from June 2011 to October 2012 during their advanced pharmacy practice experience (APPE). The students obtained 676 patient medication histories and identified or intervened on 1308 DRPs. The most common DRPs reported were incomplete medication list and diagnostic/laboratory testing needed. Physicians accepted 1,018 (approximately 78%) recommendations. Conclusion. Student pharmacists successfully identified and reduced DRPs through a live medication reconciliation process within an academic-based PCMH model. Their medication history-taking skills improved and medication use was optimized. PMID:24558274

  1. A systems biology pipeline identifies new immune and disease related molecular signatures and networks in human cells during microgravity exposure

    PubMed Central

    Mukhopadhyay, Sayak; Saha, Rohini; Palanisamy, Anbarasi; Ghosh, Madhurima; Biswas, Anupriya; Roy, Saheli; Pal, Arijit; Sarkar, Kathakali; Bagh, Sangram

    2016-01-01

    Microgravity is a prominent health hazard for astronauts, yet we understand little about its effect at the molecular systems level. In this study, we have integrated a set of systems-biology tools and databases and have analysed more than 8000 molecular pathways on published global gene expression datasets of human cells in microgravity. Hundreds of new pathways have been identified with statistical confidence for each dataset and despite the difference in cell types and experiments, around 100 of the new pathways are appeared common across the datasets. They are related to reduced inflammation, autoimmunity, diabetes and asthma. We have identified downregulation of NfκB pathway via Notch1 signalling as new pathway for reduced immunity in microgravity. Induction of few cancer types including liver cancer and leukaemia and increased drug response to cancer in microgravity are also found. Increase in olfactory signal transduction is also identified. Genes, based on their expression pattern, are clustered and mathematically stable clusters are identified. The network mapping of genes within a cluster indicates the plausible functional connections in microgravity. This pipeline gives a new systems level picture of human cells under microgravity, generates testable hypothesis and may help estimating risk and developing medicine for space missions. PMID:27185415

  2. A systems biology pipeline identifies new immune and disease related molecular signatures and networks in human cells during microgravity exposure.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, Sayak; Saha, Rohini; Palanisamy, Anbarasi; Ghosh, Madhurima; Biswas, Anupriya; Roy, Saheli; Pal, Arijit; Sarkar, Kathakali; Bagh, Sangram

    2016-01-01

    Microgravity is a prominent health hazard for astronauts, yet we understand little about its effect at the molecular systems level. In this study, we have integrated a set of systems-biology tools and databases and have analysed more than 8000 molecular pathways on published global gene expression datasets of human cells in microgravity. Hundreds of new pathways have been identified with statistical confidence for each dataset and despite the difference in cell types and experiments, around 100 of the new pathways are appeared common across the datasets. They are related to reduced inflammation, autoimmunity, diabetes and asthma. We have identified downregulation of NfκB pathway via Notch1 signalling as new pathway for reduced immunity in microgravity. Induction of few cancer types including liver cancer and leukaemia and increased drug response to cancer in microgravity are also found. Increase in olfactory signal transduction is also identified. Genes, based on their expression pattern, are clustered and mathematically stable clusters are identified. The network mapping of genes within a cluster indicates the plausible functional connections in microgravity. This pipeline gives a new systems level picture of human cells under microgravity, generates testable hypothesis and may help estimating risk and developing medicine for space missions. PMID:27185415

  3. Identifying the tobacco related free radicals by UPCC-QTOF-MS with radical trapping method in mainstream cigarette smoke.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Liu, Misha; Zhu, Yingjing; Cheng, Kuan; Da Wu; Liu, Baizhan; Li, Fengting

    2016-11-01

    Tobacco related free radicals (TFRs) in the cigarette smoke are specific classes of hazardous compounds that merit concern. In this study, we developed a hybrid method to identify TFRs directly based on ultra-performance convergence chromatography with a quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPCC-QTOF MS) combined spin trapping technique. The short-lived TFRs were stabilized successfully in situ through spin trapping procedure and UPCC was applied to facilitate efficient separation of complex derivative products. Coupling of orthogonal partial least squares discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA), UPCC-QTOF MS system enabled us to identify specific potential TFRs with exact chemical formula. Moreover, computational stimulations have been carried out to evaluate the optimized stability of TFRs. This work is a successful demonstration for the application of an advanced hyphenated technique for separation of TFRs with short detection time (less than 7min) and high throughput. PMID:27591593

  4. Meta-analysis identifies multiple loci associated with kidney function-related traits in east Asian populations.

    PubMed

    Okada, Yukinori; Sim, Xueling; Go, Min Jin; Wu, Jer-Yuarn; Gu, Dongfeng; Takeuchi, Fumihiko; Takahashi, Atsushi; Maeda, Shiro; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko; Chen, Peng; Lim, Su-Chi; Wong, Tien-Yin; Liu, Jianjun; Young, Terri L; Aung, Tin; Seielstad, Mark; Teo, Yik-Ying; Kim, Young Jin; Lee, Jong-Young; Han, Bok-Ghee; Kang, Daehee; Chen, Chien-Hsiun; Tsai, Fuu-Jen; Chang, Li-Ching; Fann, S-J Cathy; Mei, Hao; Rao, Dabeeru C; Hixson, James E; Chen, Shufeng; Katsuya, Tomohiro; Isono, Masato; Ogihara, Toshio; Chambers, John C; Zhang, Weihua; Kooner, Jaspal S; Albrecht, Eva; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko; Kubo, Michiaki; Nakamura, Yusuke; Kamatani, Naoyuki; Kato, Norihiro; He, Jiang; Chen, Yuan-Tsong; Cho, Yoon Shin; Tai, E-Shyong; Tanaka, Toshihiro

    2012-08-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD), impairment of kidney function, is a serious public health problem, and the assessment of genetic factors influencing kidney function has substantial clinical relevance. Here, we report a meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies for kidney function-related traits, including 71,149 east Asian individuals from 18 studies in 11 population-, hospital- or family-based cohorts, conducted as part of the Asian Genetic Epidemiology Network (AGEN). Our meta-analysis identified 17 loci newly associated with kidney function-related traits, including the concentrations of blood urea nitrogen, uric acid and serum creatinine and estimated glomerular filtration rate based on serum creatinine levels (eGFRcrea) (P < 5.0 × 10(-8)). We further examined these loci with in silico replication in individuals of European ancestry from the KidneyGen, CKDGen and GUGC consortia, including a combined total of ∼110,347 individuals. We identify pleiotropic associations among these loci with kidney function-related traits and risk of CKD. These findings provide new insights into the genetics of kidney function. PMID:22797727

  5. Patterns of genomic variation in the poplar rust fungus Melampsora larici-populina identify pathogenesis-related factors

    PubMed Central

    Persoons, Antoine; Morin, Emmanuelle; Delaruelle, Christine; Payen, Thibaut; Halkett, Fabien; Frey, Pascal; De Mita, Stéphane; Duplessis, Sébastien

    2014-01-01

    Melampsora larici-populina is a fungal pathogen responsible for foliar rust disease on poplar trees, which causes damage to forest plantations worldwide, particularly in Northern Europe. The reference genome of the isolate 98AG31 was previously sequenced using a whole genome shotgun strategy, revealing a large genome of 101 megabases containing 16,399 predicted genes, which included secreted protein genes representing poplar rust candidate effectors. In the present study, the genomes of 15 isolates collected over the past 20 years throughout the French territory, representing distinct virulence profiles, were characterized by massively parallel sequencing to assess genetic variation in the poplar rust fungus. Comparison to the reference genome revealed striking structural variations. Analysis of coverage and sequencing depth identified large missing regions between isolates related to the mating type loci. More than 611,824 single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) positions were uncovered overall, indicating a remarkable level of polymorphism. Based on the accumulation of non-synonymous substitutions in coding sequences and the relative frequencies of synonymous and non-synonymous polymorphisms (i.e., PN/PS), we identify candidate genes that may be involved in fungal pathogenesis. Correlation between non-synonymous SNPs in genes encoding secreted proteins (SPs) and pathotypes of the studied isolates revealed candidate genes potentially related to virulences 1, 6, and 8 of the poplar rust fungus. PMID:25309551

  6. Identifying Tmem59 related gene regulatory network of mouse neural stem cell from a compendium of expression profiles

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Neural stem cells offer potential treatment for neurodegenerative disorders, such like Alzheimer's disease (AD). While much progress has been made in understanding neural stem cell function, a precise description of the molecular mechanisms regulating neural stem cells is not yet established. This lack of knowledge is a major barrier holding back the discovery of therapeutic uses of neural stem cells. In this paper, the regulatory mechanism of mouse neural stem cell (NSC) differentiation by tmem59 is explored on the genome-level. Results We identified regulators of tmem59 during the differentiation of mouse NSCs from a compendium of expression profiles. Based on the microarray experiment, we developed the parallelized SWNI algorithm to reconstruct gene regulatory networks of mouse neural stem cells. From the inferred tmem59 related gene network including 36 genes, pou6f1 was identified to regulate tmem59 significantly and might play an important role in the differentiation of NSCs in mouse brain. There are four pathways shown in the gene network, indicating that tmem59 locates in the downstream of the signalling pathway. The real-time RT-PCR results shown that the over-expression of pou6f1 could significantly up-regulate tmem59 expression in C17.2 NSC line. 16 out of 36 predicted genes in our constructed network have been reported to be AD-related, including Ace, aqp1, arrdc3, cd14, cd59a, cds1, cldn1, cox8b, defb11, folr1, gdi2, mmp3, mgp, myrip, Ripk4, rnd3, and sncg. The localization of tmem59 related genes and functional-related gene groups based on the Gene Ontology (GO) annotation was also identified. Conclusions Our findings suggest that the expression of tmem59 is an important factor contributing to AD. The parallelized SWNI algorithm increased the efficiency of network reconstruction significantly. This study enables us to highlight novel genes that may be involved in NSC differentiation and provides a shortcut to identifying genes for AD. PMID

  7. Identifying New Candidate Genes and Chemicals Related to Prostate Cancer Using a Hybrid Network and Shortest Path Approach

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Fei; Zhou, You; Wang, Meng; Yang, Jing; Wu, Kai; Lu, Changhong; Kong, Xiangyin; Cai, Yu-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer is a type of cancer that occurs in the male prostate, a gland in the male reproductive system. Because prostate cancer cells may spread to other parts of the body and can influence human reproduction, understanding the mechanisms underlying this disease is critical for designing effective treatments. The identification of as many genes and chemicals related to prostate cancer as possible will enhance our understanding of this disease. In this study, we proposed a computational method to identify new candidate genes and chemicals based on currently known genes and chemicals related to prostate cancer by applying a shortest path approach in a hybrid network. The hybrid network was constructed according to information concerning chemical-chemical interactions, chemical-protein interactions, and protein-protein interactions. Many of the obtained genes and chemicals are associated with prostate cancer. PMID:26504486

  8. The Use of Chemical-Chemical Interaction and Chemical Structure to Identify New Candidate Chemicals Related to Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Mingyue; Kong, Xiangyin; Huang, Tao; Cai, Yu-Dong

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer causes over one million deaths every year worldwide. However, prevention and treatment methods for this serious disease are limited. The identification of new chemicals related to lung cancer may aid in disease prevention and the design of more effective treatments. This study employed a weighted network, constructed using chemical-chemical interaction information, to identify new chemicals related to two types of lung cancer: non-small lung cancer and small-cell lung cancer. Then, a randomization test as well as chemical-chemical interaction and chemical structure information were utilized to make further selections. A final analysis of these new chemicals in the context of the current literature indicates that several chemicals are strongly linked to lung cancer. PMID:26047514

  9. Use of a Drosophila Genome-Wide Conserved Sequence Database to Identify Functionally Related cis-Regulatory Enhancers

    PubMed Central

    Brody, Thomas; Yavatkar, Amarendra S; Kuzin, Alexander; Kundu, Mukta; Tyson, Leonard J; Ross, Jermaine; Lin, Tzu-Yang; Lee, Chi-Hon; Awasaki, Takeshi; Lee, Tzumin; Odenwald, Ward F

    2012-01-01

    Background: Phylogenetic footprinting has revealed that cis-regulatory enhancers consist of conserved DNA sequence clusters (CSCs). Currently, there is no systematic approach for enhancer discovery and analysis that takes full-advantage of the sequence information within enhancer CSCs. Results: We have generated a Drosophila genome-wide database of conserved DNA consisting of >100,000 CSCs derived from EvoPrints spanning over 90% of the genome. cis-Decoder database search and alignment algorithms enable the discovery of functionally related enhancers. The program first identifies conserved repeat elements within an input enhancer and then searches the database for CSCs that score highly against the input CSC. Scoring is based on shared repeats as well as uniquely shared matches, and includes measures of the balance of shared elements, a diagnostic that has proven to be useful in predicting cis-regulatory function. To demonstrate the utility of these tools, a temporally-restricted CNS neuroblast enhancer was used to identify other functionally related enhancers and analyze their structural organization. Conclusions: cis-Decoder reveals that co-regulating enhancers consist of combinations of overlapping shared sequence elements, providing insights into the mode of integration of multiple regulating transcription factors. The database and accompanying algorithms should prove useful in the discovery and analysis of enhancers involved in any developmental process. Developmental Dynamics 241:169–189, 2012. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Key findings A genome-wide catalog of Drosophila conserved DNA sequence clusters. cis-Decoder discovers functionally related enhancers. Functionally related enhancers share balanced sequence element copy numbers. Many enhancers function during multiple phases of development. PMID:22174086

  10. Using Clinical Data, Hypothesis Generation Tools and PubMed Trends to Discover the Association between Diabetic Retinopathy and Antihypertensive Drugs

    SciTech Connect

    Senter, Katherine G; Sukumar, Sreenivas R; Patton, Robert M; Chaum, Ed

    2015-01-01

    Diabetic retinopathy (DR) is a leading cause of blindness and common complication of diabetes. Many diabetic patients take antihypertensive drugs to prevent cardiovascular problems, but these drugs may have unintended consequences on eyesight. Six common classes of antihypertensive drug are angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, alpha blockers, angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs), -blockers, calcium channel blockers, and diuretics. Analysis of medical history data might indicate which of these drugs provide safe blood pressure control, and a literature review is often used to guide such analyses. Beyond manual reading of relevant publications, we sought to identify quantitative trends in literature from the biomedical database PubMed to compare with quantitative trends in the clinical data. By recording and analyzing PubMed search results, we found wide variation in the prevalence of each antihypertensive drug in DR literature. Drug classes developed more recently such as ACE inhibitors and ARBs were most prevalent. We also identified instances of change-over-time in publication patterns. We then compared these literature trends to a dataset of 500 diabetic patients from the UT Hamilton Eye Institute. Data for each patient included class of antihypertensive drug, presence and severity of DR. Graphical comparison revealed that older drug classes such as diuretics, calcium channel blockers, and -blockers were much more prevalent in the clinical data than in the DR and antihypertensive literature. Finally, quantitative analysis of the dataset revealed that patients taking -blockers were statistically more likely to have DR than patients taking other medications, controlling for presence of hypertension and year of diabetes onset. This finding was concerning given the prevalence of -blockers in the clinical data. We determined that clinical use of -blockers should be minimized in diabetic patients to prevent retinal damage.

  11. Validity Evidence for FASTHUG-MAIDENS, a Mnemonic for Identifying Drug-Related Problems in the Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Masson, Sarah C; Mabasa, Vincent H; Malyuk, Douglas L; Perrott, Jerrold L

    2013-01-01

    Background The mnemonic FASTHUG (Feeding, Analgesia, Sedation, Thromboembolic prophylaxis, Head of bed elevation, stress Ulcer prophylaxis, Glucose control) was developed by intensive care unit (ICU) physicians to ensure that key aspects of care are addressed during each patient encounter. Because this tool does not specifically target pharmacotherapy assessments, a modified version, FASTHUG-MAIDENS, was created, by changing the H to mean Hypoactive or Hyperactive delirium and adding M for Medication reconciliation; A for Antibiotics or Anti-infectives; I for Indications for medications; D for drug Dosing; E for Electrolytes, hematology, and other laboratory tests; N for No drug interactions, allergies, duplication, or side effects; and S for Stop dates. Objective: To validate the use of FASTHUG-MAIDENS as a tool for identifying drug-related problems (DRPs) in the ICU. Methods: This randomized, prospective validation study took place between January and May 2011 in the ICUs of 4 hospitals: 2 community-level ICUs and 2 tertiary referral ICUs. Each ICU had a dedicated ICU pharmacist and one or more pharmacy residents completing an ICU rotation as part of their pharmacy practice residency (total of 6 residents). The 6 pharmacy residents were randomly assigned to assess patients admitted to the ICU using FASTHUG-MAIDENS or standard monitoring practice. The mean proportion of DRPs per patient encounter identified by the residents (relative to DRPs identified by the ICU pharmacists) was the primary outcome, and the proportion of total DRPs identified in each group was assessed as a secondary end point. Results: Pharmacy residents using the FASTHUG-MAIDENS mnemonic identified a significantly greater mean proportion of DRPs per patient encounter (73.2% versus 52.4%, p = 0.008) and a greater proportion of total DRPs (77.1% versus 52.5%, p < 0.001) than those assessing patients according to standard monitoring practice. Conclusion: In this sample, the mnemonic FASTHUG

  12. Identifying subtypes of patients with neovascular age-related macular degeneration by genotypic and cardiovascular risk characteristics

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background One of the challenges in the interpretation of studies showing associations between environmental and genotypic data with disease outcomes such as neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is understanding the phenotypic heterogeneity within a patient population with regard to any risk factor associated with the condition. This is critical when considering the potential therapeutic response of patients to any drug developed to treat the condition. In the present study, we identify patient subtypes or clusters which could represent several different targets for treatment development, based on genetic pathways in AMD and cardiovascular pathology. Methods We identified a sample of patients with neovascular AMD, that in previous studies had been shown to be at elevated risk for the disease through environmental factors such as cigarette smoking and genetic variants including the complement factor H gene (CFH) on chromosome 1q25 and variants in the ARMS2/HtrA serine peptidase 1 (HTRA1) gene(s) on chromosome 10q26. We conducted a multivariate segmentation analysis of 253 of these patients utilizing available epidemiologic and genetic data. Results In a multivariate model, cigarette smoking failed to differentiate subtypes of patients. However, four meaningfully distinct clusters of patients were identified that were most strongly differentiated by their cardiovascular health status (histories of hypercholesterolemia and hypertension), and the alleles of ARMS2/HTRA1 rs1049331. Conclusions These results have significant personalized medicine implications for drug developers attempting to determine the effective size of the treatable neovascular AMD population. Patient subtypes or clusters may represent different targets for therapeutic development based on genetic pathways in AMD and cardiovascular pathology, and treatments developed that may elevate CV risk, may be ill advised for certain of the clusters identified. PMID:21682878

  13. Identifying MRI markers to evaluate early treatment-related changes post-laser ablation for cancer pain management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Pallavi; Danish, Shabbar; Madabhushi, Anant

    2014-03-01

    by correcting for intensity drift in order to examine tissue-specific response, and (3) quantification of MRI maps via texture and intensity features to evaluate changes in MR markers pre- and post-LITT. A total of 78 texture features comprising of non-steerable and steerable gradient and second order statistical features were extracted from pre- and post-LITT MP-MRI on a per-voxel basis. Quantitative, voxel-wise comparison of the changes in MRI texture features between pre-, and post-LITT MRI indicate that (a) steerable and non-steerable gradient texture features were highly sensitive as well as specific in predicting subtle micro-architectural changes within and around the ablation zone pre- and post-LITT, (b) FLAIR was identified as the most sensitive MRI protocol in identifying early treatment changes yielding a normalized percentage change of 360% within the ablation zone relative to its pre-LITT value, and (c) GRE was identified as the most sensitive MRI protocol in quantifying changes outside the ablation zone post-LITT. Our preliminary results thus indicate great potential for non-invasive computerized MRI features in determining localized micro-architectural focal treatment related changes post-LITT.

  14. A Genome-Wide Association Study of the Maize Hypersensitive Defense Response Identifies Genes That Cluster in Related Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Venkata, Bala P.; Marla, Sandeep; Ji, Jiabing; Gachomo, Emma; Chu, Kevin; Negeri, Adisu; Benson, Jacqueline; Nelson, Rebecca; Bradbury, Peter; Nielsen, Dahlia; Holland, James B.; Balint-Kurti, Peter J.; Johal, Gurmukh

    2014-01-01

    Much remains unknown of molecular events controlling the plant hypersensitive defense response (HR), a rapid localized cell death that limits pathogen spread and is mediated by resistance (R-) genes. Genetic control of the HR is hard to quantify due to its microscopic and rapid nature. Natural modifiers of the ectopic HR phenotype induced by an aberrant auto-active R-gene (Rp1-D21), were mapped in a population of 3,381 recombinant inbred lines from the maize nested association mapping population. Joint linkage analysis was conducted to identify 32 additive but no epistatic quantitative trait loci (QTL) using a linkage map based on more than 7000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Genome-wide association (GWA) analysis of 26.5 million SNPs was conducted after adjusting for background QTL. GWA identified associated SNPs that colocalized with 44 candidate genes. Thirty-six of these genes colocalized within 23 of the 32 QTL identified by joint linkage analysis. The candidate genes included genes predicted to be in involved programmed cell death, defense response, ubiquitination, redox homeostasis, autophagy, calcium signalling, lignin biosynthesis and cell wall modification. Twelve of the candidate genes showed significant differential expression between isogenic lines differing for the presence of Rp1-D21. Low but significant correlations between HR-related traits and several previously-measured disease resistance traits suggested that the genetic control of these traits was substantially, though not entirely, independent. This study provides the first system-wide analysis of natural variation that modulates the HR response in plants. PMID:25166276

  15. Identification, characterization and HPLC quantification of process-related impurities in Trelagliptin succinate bulk drug: Six identified as new compounds.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hui; Sun, Lili; Zou, Liang; Hui, Wenkai; Liu, Lei; Zou, Qiaogen; Ouyang, Pingkai

    2016-09-01

    A sensitive, selective and stability indicating reversed-phase LC method was developed for the determination of process related impurities of Trelagliptin succinate in bulk drug. Six impurities were identified by LC-MS. Further, their structures were characterized and confirmed utilizing LC-MS/MS, IR and NMR spectral data. The most probable mechanisms for the formation of these impurities were also discussed. To the best of our knowledge, six structures among these impurities are new compounds and have not been reported previously. The superior separation was achieved on an InertSustain C18 (250mm×4.6mm, 5μm) column in a gradient mixture of acetonitrile and 20mmol potassium dihydrogen phosphate with 0.25% triethylamine (pH adjusted to 3.5 with phosphate acid). The method was validated as per regulatory guidelines to demonstrate system suitability, specificity, sensitivity, linearity, robustness, and stability. PMID:27209451

  16. Identifying Psychosocial Stressors of Well-Being and Factors Related to Substance Use Among Latino Day Laborers

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Day labor is largely comprised of young Latino immigrant men, many of who are undocumented, and thus vulnerable to a myriad of workers’ rights abuses. The difficult work and life conditions of this marginalized population may place them at heightened risk for mental health problems and substance use and abuse. However, factors related to Latino day laborers’ well-being and substance misuse are largely unknown. This article utilizes ethnographic and focus group methodology to elucidate participant identified factors associated to well-being and substance use and abuse. This study has implications for informing public health and social service programming as it provides thick description regarding the context and circumstances associated to increased vulnerability to substance abuse and lack of well-being among this hard-to-reach population of Latino immigrants. PMID:21107694

  17. Identifying consumer preferences for specific beef flavor characteristics in relation to cattle production and postmortem processing parameters.

    PubMed

    O'Quinn, T G; Woerner, D R; Engle, T E; Chapman, P L; Legako, J F; Brooks, J C; Belk, K E; Tatum, J D

    2016-02-01

    Sensory analysis of ground LL samples representing 12 beef product categories was conducted in 3 different regions of the U.S. to identify flavor preferences of beef consumers. Treatments characterized production-related flavor differences associated with USDA grade, cattle type, finishing diet, growth enhancement, and postmortem aging method. Consumers (N=307) rated cooked samples for 12 flavors and overall flavor desirability. Samples were analyzed to determine fatty acid content. Volatile compounds produced by cooking were extracted and quantified. Overall, consumers preferred beef that rated high for beefy/brothy, buttery/beef fat, and sweet flavors and disliked beef with fishy, livery, gamey, and sour flavors. Flavor attributes of samples higher in intramuscular fat with greater amounts of monounsaturated fatty acids and lesser proportions of saturated, odd-chain, omega-3, and trans fatty acids were preferred by consumers. Of the volatiles identified, diacetyl and acetoin were most closely correlated with desirable ratings for overall flavor and dimethyl sulfide was associated with an undesirable sour flavor. PMID:26560806

  18. Identifying barriers to recovery from work related upper extremity disorders: use of a collaborative problem solving technique.

    PubMed

    Shaw, William S; Feuerstein, Michael; Miller, Virginia I; Wood, Patricia M

    2003-08-01

    Improving health and work outcomes for individuals with work related upper extremity disorders (WRUEDs) may require a broad assessment of potential return to work barriers by engaging workers in collaborative problem solving. In this study, half of all nurse case managers from a large workers' compensation system were randomly selected and invited to participate in a randomized, controlled trial of an integrated case management (ICM) approach for WRUEDs. The focus of ICM was problem solving skills training and workplace accommodation. Volunteer nurses attended a 2 day ICM training workshop including instruction in a 6 step process to engage clients in problem solving to overcome barriers to recovery. A chart review of WRUED case management reports (n = 70) during the following 2 years was conducted to extract case managers' reports of barriers to recovery and return to work. Case managers documented from 0 to 21 barriers per case (M = 6.24, SD = 4.02) within 5 domains: signs and symptoms (36%), work environment (27%), medical care (13%), functional limitations (12%), and coping (12%). Compared with case managers who did not receive the training (n = 67), workshop participants identified more barriers related to signs and symptoms, work environment, functional limitations, and coping (p < .05), but not to medical care. Problem solving skills training may help focus case management services on the most salient recovery factors affecting return to work. PMID:12934861

  19. Ancient DNA microsatellite analyses of the extinct New Zealand giant moa (Dinornis robustus) identify relatives within a single fossil site.

    PubMed

    Allentoft, M E; Heller, R; Holdaway, R N; Bunce, M

    2015-12-01

    By analysing ancient DNA (aDNA) from 74 (14)C-dated individuals of the extinct South Island giant moa (Dinornis robustus) of New Zealand, we identified four dyads of closely related adult females. Although our total sample included bones from four fossil deposits located within a 10 km radius, these eight individuals had all been excavated from the same locality. Indications of kinship were based on high pairwise genetic relatedness (rXY) in six microsatellite markers genotyped from aDNA, coupled with overlapping radiocarbon ages. The observed rXY values in the four dyads exceeded a conservative cutoff value for potential relatives obtained from simulated data. In three of the four dyads, the kinship was further supported by observing shared and rare mitochondrial haplotypes. Simulations demonstrated that the proportion of observed dyads above the cutoff value was at least 20 times higher than expected in a randomly mating population with temporal sampling, also when introducing population structure in the simulations. We conclude that the results must reflect social structure in the moa population and we discuss the implications for future aDNA research. PMID:26039408

  20. Genomic analysis of snub-nosed monkeys (Rhinopithecus) identifies genes and processes related to high-altitude adaptation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Li; Wang, Guo-Dong; Ruan, Jue; Chen, Yong-Bin; Yang, Cui-Ping; Cao, Xue; Wu, Hong; Liu, Yan-Hu; Du, Zheng-Lin; Wang, Xiao-Ping; Yang, Jing; Cheng, Shao-Chen; Zhong, Li; Wang, Lu; Wang, Xuan; Hu, Jing-Yang; Fang, Lu; Bai, Bing; Wang, Kai-Le; Yuan, Na; Wu, Shi-Fang; Li, Bao-Guo; Zhang, Jin-Guo; Yang, Ye-Qin; Zhang, Cheng-Lin; Long, Yong-Cheng; Li, Hai-Shu; Yang, Jing-Yuan; Irwin, David M; Ryder, Oliver A; Li, Ying; Wu, Chung-I; Zhang, Ya-Ping

    2016-08-01

    The snub-nosed monkey genus Rhinopithecus includes five closely related species distributed across altitudinal gradients from 800 to 4,500 m. Rhinopithecus bieti, Rhinopithecus roxellana, and Rhinopithecus strykeri inhabit high-altitude habitats, whereas Rhinopithecus brelichi and Rhinopithecus avunculus inhabit lowland regions. We report the de novo whole-genome sequence of R. bieti and genomic sequences for the four other species. Eight shared substitutions were found in six genes related to lung function, DNA repair, and angiogenesis in the high-altitude snub-nosed monkeys. Functional assays showed that the high-altitude variant of CDT1 (Ala537Val) renders cells more resistant to UV irradiation, and the high-altitude variants of RNASE4 (Asn89Lys and Thr128Ile) confer enhanced ability to induce endothelial tube formation in vitro. Genomic scans in the R. bieti and R. roxellana populations identified signatures of selection between and within populations at genes involved in functions relevant to high-altitude adaptation. These results provide valuable insights into the adaptation to high altitude in the snub-nosed monkeys. PMID:27399969

  1. Relative brain signature: a population-based feature extraction procedure to identify functional biomarkers in the brain of alcoholics

    PubMed Central

    Karamzadeh, Nader; Ardeshirpour, Yasaman; Kellman, Matthew; Chowdhry, Fatima; Anderson, Afrouz; Chorlian, David; Wegman, Edward; Gandjbakhche, Amir

    2015-01-01

    Background A novel feature extraction technique, Relative-Brain-Signature (RBS), which characterizes subjects' relationship to populations with distinctive neuronal activity, is presented. The proposed method transforms a set of Electroencephalography's (EEG) time series in high dimensional space to a space of fewer dimensions by projecting time series onto orthogonal subspaces. Methods We apply our technique to an EEG data set of 77 abstinent alcoholics and 43 control subjects. To characterize subjects' relationship to the alcoholic and control populations, one RBS vector with respect to the alcoholic and one with respect to the control population is constructed. We used the extracted RBS vectors to identify functional biomarkers over the brain of alcoholics. To achieve this goal, the classification algorithm was used to categorize subjects into alcoholics and controls, which resulted in 78% accuracy. Results and Conclusions Using the results of the classification, regions with distinctive functionality in alcoholic subjects are detected. These affected regions, with respect to their spatial extent, are frontal, anterior frontal, centro-parietal, parieto-occiptal, and occipital lobes. The distribution of these regions over the scalp indicates that the impact of the alcohol in the cerebral cortex of the alcoholics is spatially diffuse. Our finding suggests that these regions engage more of the right hemisphere relative to the left hemisphere of the alcoholics' brain. PMID:26221569

  2. Automated Patent Categorization and Guided Patent Search using IPC as Inspired by MeSH and PubMed

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Document search on PubMed, the pre-eminent database for biomedical literature, relies on the annotation of its documents with relevant terms from the Medical Subject Headings ontology (MeSH) for improving recall through query expansion. Patent documents are another important information source, though they are considerably less accessible. One option to expand patent search beyond pure keywords is the inclusion of classification information: Since every patent is assigned at least one class code, it should be possible for these assignments to be automatically used in a similar way as the MeSH annotations in PubMed. In order to develop a system for this task, it is necessary to have a good understanding of the properties of both classification systems. This report describes our comparative analysis of MeSH and the main patent classification system, the International Patent Classification (IPC). We investigate the hierarchical structures as well as the properties of the terms/classes respectively, and we compare the assignment of IPC codes to patents with the annotation of PubMed documents with MeSH terms. Our analysis shows a strong structural similarity of the hierarchies, but significant differences of terms and annotations. The low number of IPC class assignments and the lack of occurrences of class labels in patent texts imply that current patent search is severely limited. To overcome these limits, we evaluate a method for the automated assignment of additional classes to patent documents, and we propose a system for guided patent search based on the use of class co-occurrence information and external resources. PMID:23734562

  3. Content-rich biological network constructed by mining PubMed abstracts

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hao; Sharp, Burt M

    2004-01-01

    Background The integration of the rapidly expanding corpus of information about the genome, transcriptome, and proteome, engendered by powerful technological advances, such as microarrays, and the availability of genomic sequence from multiple species, challenges the grasp and comprehension of the scientific community. Despite the existence of text-mining methods that identify biological relationships based on the textual co-occurrence of gene/protein terms or similarities in abstract texts, knowledge of the underlying molecular connections on a large scale, which is prerequisite to understanding novel biological processes, lags far behind the accumulation of data. While computationally efficient, the co-occurrence-based approaches fail to characterize (e.g., inhibition or stimulation, directionality) biological interactions. Programs with natural language processing (NLP) capability have been created to address these limitations, however, they are in general not readily accessible to the public. Results We present a NLP-based text-mining approach, Chilibot, which constructs content-rich relationship networks among biological concepts, genes, proteins, or drugs. Amongst its features, suggestions for new hypotheses can be generated. Lastly, we provide evidence that the connectivity of molecular networks extracted from the biological literature follows the power-law distribution, indicating scale-free topologies consistent with the results of previous experimental analyses. Conclusions Chilibot distills scientific relationships from knowledge available throughout a wide range of biological domains and presents these in a content-rich graphical format, thus integrating general biomedical knowledge with the specialized knowledge and interests of the user. Chilibot can be accessed free of charge to academic users. PMID:15473905

  4. 450K Epigenome-Wide Scan Identifies Differential DNA Methylation in Newborns Related to Maternal Smoking during Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Joubert, Bonnie R.; Håberg, Siri E.; Nilsen, Roy M.; Wang, Xuting; Vollset, Stein E.; Murphy, Susan K.; Huang, Zhiqing; Hoyo, Cathrine; Midttun, Øivind; Cupul-Uicab, Lea A.; Ueland, Per M.; Wu, Michael C.; Nystad, Wenche; Bell, Douglas A.; Peddada, Shyamal D.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Epigenetic modifications, such as DNA methylation, due to in utero exposures may play a critical role in early programming for childhood and adult illness. Maternal smoking is a major risk factor for multiple adverse health outcomes in children, but the underlying mechanisms are unclear. Objective: We investigated epigenome-wide methylation in cord blood of newborns in relation to maternal smoking during pregnancy. Methods: We examined maternal plasma cotinine (an objective biomarker of smoking) measured during pregnancy in relation to DNA methylation at 473,844 CpG sites (CpGs) in 1,062 newborn cord blood samples from the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study (MoBa) using the Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip (450K). Results: We found differential DNA methylation at epigenome-wide statistical significance (p-value < 1.06 × 10–7) for 26 CpGs mapped to 10 genes. We replicated findings for CpGs in AHRR, CYP1A1, and GFI1 at strict Bonferroni-corrected statistical significance in a U.S. birth cohort. AHRR and CYP1A1 play a key role in the aryl hydrocarbon receptor signaling pathway, which mediates the detoxification of the components of tobacco smoke. GFI1 is involved in diverse developmental processes but has not previously been implicated in responses to tobacco smoke. Conclusions: We identified a set of genes with methylation changes present at birth in children whose mothers smoked during pregnancy. This is the first study of differential methylation across the genome in relation to maternal smoking during pregnancy using the 450K platform. Our findings implicate epigenetic mechanisms in the pathogenesis of the adverse health outcomes associated with this important in utero exposure. PMID:22851337

  5. Identifying key domains of health-related quality of life for patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease: the patient perspective

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Numerous instruments are available to measure health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD), covering a wide array of domains ranging from symptoms such as dyspnea, cough and wheezing, to social and emotional functioning. Currently no information or guide is available yet to aid the selection of domains for a particular study or disease population. The aim of this paper is to identify which domains of HRQoL are most important with respect to COPD, from the patient perspective. Methods Twenty-one Dutch patients with COPD were asked to describe important domains impacted by COPD freely; second, they were presented with cues (domains from the Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) framework) and were asked to select the domains that were most relevant to them. During the interview, the patients were asked to indicate in which way the selected domains impact their lives. Both the answers to the open question, and the patient statements motivating nomination of PROMIS domains were coded into themes. Results The most relevant (sub)domains of HRQoL for patients with COPD were: physical health (fatigue, physical functioning), social health (instrumental support, ability to participate in social roles and activities, companionship, and emotional support), and coping with COPD. Conclusion We identified which domains of HRQoL are most important to patients with COPD. One of these (coping with COPD) is not explicitly covered by PROMIS, or by traditional questionnaires that are used to measure HRQoL in COPD. PMID:25005552

  6. Using Satellite Maps and Related Spatial Data Sets to Identify Remaining Wild Areas of the Eastern US

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jantz, P.; Goetz, S. J.

    2005-12-01

    Roadless and wild areas of 12 states comprising the eastern United States were derived from a combination of satellite image data products (tree cover, urbanized areas, etc), a road network database, and related spatial data sets. These remote areas were defined as having greater than 60 percent tree cover of at least ~5000 acre (2000 ha) contiguous tracts situated more than 500m from any road. Detailed maps of the region were produced and then overlaid with information on existing parks, protected areas, easements, and state and national forest land boundaries. Statistics were tabulated on a regional and statewide basis, and are presented together with the derived map. A total of 1468 wild areas were mapped in the study area. Forty three percent of those were in areas offering some form of protected land disignation, but only 548 (37 percent) of the areas were at least 50 percent protected. Many of the areas identified as roadless wild lands not known to be currently protected in any form were, not surprisingly, located in the states of Maine and West Virginia. Other significant lands meeting the criteria were identified in New York and Tennessee and, to a lesser extent, Pennsylvania, Vermont and New Hampshire. This work forms, as far as we know, the first quantitative assessment across the region using consistent data sets and accepted national criteria for roadless areas. It underscores the urgent need for reserving some of the remaining wild lands to protect forest resources and biological diversity before exurban development encroaches of the last of these unique resource lands of the East. Our approach may also provide acceptable criteria for a national assessment, and results are discussed in this context.

  7. The National Job Analysis Study. A Project to Identify Cross-Occupational Skills Related to High-Performance Workplaces.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Coll. Testing Program, Iowa City, IA.

    The National Job Analysis Study (NJAS) originated from the work of the Secretary's Commission on Achieving Necessary Skills and was designed to provide research necessary to identify and establish a taxonomy of workplace skills. Phase 1 identified an initial set of core behaviors common across occupations. The process began by identifying task…

  8. Relating Science and Religion: An Ontology of Taxonomies and Development of a Research Tool for Identifying Individual Views

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasri, Pratchayapong; Arthur, Shagufta; Smith, Mike U.; Mancy, Rebecca

    2013-10-01

    Understanding how individuals view the relationship between science and religion shows promise for explaining a range of aspects of teaching and learning in science. Several taxonomies, consisting of different views by which people relate science and religion, can be found in the philosophical literature. However, most of the science education literature uses these taxonomies selectively and with limited justification, hindering comparison between existing and future studies. The first aim of this paper is therefore to provide a comprehensive review of the different taxonomies described in the literature and to organise the different views according to their similarities and differences. The second aim of the paper is to present a new research tool developed on the basis of the findings of the literature review. This tool consists of a short questionnaire allowing educational researchers to identify the different viewpoints held by pre-service teachers, undergraduates majoring in biology and school learners. We present the tool itself and demonstrate its usefulness and versatility for future science education research based on three empirical studies covering a range of geographical areas, religious backgrounds, educational levels, age groups and genders.

  9. Identifying patients with poststroke mild cognitive impairment by pattern recognition of working memory load-related ERP.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoou; Yan, Yuning; Wei, Wenshi

    2013-01-01

    The early detection of subjects with probable cognitive deficits is crucial for effective appliance of treatment strategies. This paper explored a methodology used to discriminate between evoked related potential signals of stroke patients and their matched control subjects in a visual working memory paradigm. The proposed algorithm, which combined independent component analysis and orthogonal empirical mode decomposition, was applied to extract independent sources. Four types of target stimulus features including P300 peak latency, P300 peak amplitude, root mean square, and theta frequency band power were chosen. Evolutionary multiple kernel support vector machine (EMK-SVM) based on genetic programming was investigated to classify stroke patients and healthy controls. Based on 5-fold cross-validation runs, EMK-SVM provided better classification performance compared with other state-of-the-art algorithms. Comparing stroke patients with healthy controls using the proposed algorithm, we achieved the maximum classification accuracies of 91.76% and 82.23% for 0-back and 1-back tasks, respectively. Overall, the experimental results showed that the proposed method was effective. The approach in this study may eventually lead to a reliable tool for identifying suitable brain impairment candidates and assessing cognitive function. PMID:24233152

  10. Large-Scale Phenomics Identifies Primary and Fine-Tuning Roles for CRKs in Responses Related to Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Rayapuram, Channabasavangowda; Idänheimo, Niina; Hunter, Kerri; Kimura, Sachie; Merilo, Ebe; Vaattovaara, Aleksia; Oracz, Krystyna; Kaufholdt, David; Pallon, Andres; Anggoro, Damar Tri; Glów, Dawid; Lowe, Jennifer; Zhou, Ji; Mohammadi, Omid; Puukko, Tuomas; Albert, Andreas; Lang, Hans; Ernst, Dieter; Kollist, Hannes; Brosché, Mikael; Durner, Jörg; Borst, Jan Willem; Collinge, David B.; Karpiński, Stanisław; Lyngkjær, Michael F.; Robatzek, Silke; Wrzaczek, Michael; Kangasjärvi, Jaakko

    2015-01-01

    Cysteine-rich receptor-like kinases (CRKs) are transmembrane proteins characterized by the presence of two domains of unknown function 26 (DUF26) in their ectodomain. The CRKs form one of the largest groups of receptor-like protein kinases in plants, but their biological functions have so far remained largely uncharacterized. We conducted a large-scale phenotyping approach of a nearly complete crk T-DNA insertion line collection showing that CRKs control important aspects of plant development and stress adaptation in response to biotic and abiotic stimuli in a non-redundant fashion. In particular, the analysis of reactive oxygen species (ROS)-related stress responses, such as regulation of the stomatal aperture, suggests that CRKs participate in ROS/redox signalling and sensing. CRKs play general and fine-tuning roles in the regulation of stomatal closure induced by microbial and abiotic cues. Despite their great number and high similarity, large-scale phenotyping identified specific functions in diverse processes for many CRKs and indicated that CRK2 and CRK5 play predominant roles in growth regulation and stress adaptation, respectively. As a whole, the CRKs contribute to specificity in ROS signalling. Individual CRKs control distinct responses in an antagonistic fashion suggesting future potential for using CRKs in genetic approaches to improve plant performance and stress tolerance. PMID:26197346

  11. Use of MRI to identify enlarged inferior gluteal and ischioanal lymph nodes and associated findings related to the primary disease

    PubMed Central

    Uzun, Çağlar; Erden, Ayşe; Atman, Ebru Düşünceli; Üstüner, Evren

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE We aimed to draw attention to the lymph nodes at the inferior gluteal and ischioanal regions and evaluate the lesions accompanying them using 3.0 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). METHODS In total, 22 patients (15 men, 7 women; mean age, 50±11.2 years; age range, 32–71 years) were included in this study. The patients’ medical records were reviewed. MRI data were reviewed on a picture archiving and communication system workstation by two radiologists in consensus. Lymph node location, laterality, number, and size were documented. RESULTS The primary disorders causing the enlargement of inferior gluteal lymph nodes (n=16) were perianal fistula of cryptoglandular origin (n=5), perianal fistula associated with Crohn’s disease (n=2), decubitus ulcers (n=2), presacral abscess (n=1), non-Hodgkin lymphoma (n=2), prostate cancer invading urethra and anorectal junction (n=1), endometrium cancer invading the urethra and vagina (n=1), and anal cancer (n=2). The pathologies causing the enlargement of ischioanal lymph nodes (n=6) were perianal fistula of cryptoglandular origin (n=4), subcutaneous inflammation of gluteal region related to Crohn’s disease (n=1), and prostate cancer (n=1). CONCLUSION The infectious and neoplastic lesions involving the anal canal, distal rectum, gluteal region, prostate, and urethra are the possible causes of inferior gluteal and ischioanal lymph node enlargement. Lymphoproliferative diseases can also affect these node groups. MRI is an important method to identify enlarged inferior gluteal and ischioanal lymph nodes and define associated findings. PMID:27113423

  12. Expression analysis of immune related genes identified from the coelomocytes of sea cucumber (Apostichopus japonicus) in response to LPS challenge.

    PubMed

    Dong, Ying; Sun, Hongjuan; Zhou, Zunchun; Yang, Aifu; Chen, Zhong; Guan, Xiaoyan; Gao, Shan; Wang, Bai; Jiang, Bei; Jiang, Jingwei

    2014-01-01

    The sea cucumber (Apostichopus japonicus) occupies a basal position during the evolution of deuterostomes and is also an important aquaculture species. In order to identify more immune effectors, transcriptome sequencing of A. japonicus coelomocytes in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge was performed using the Illumina HiSeq™ 2000 platform. One hundred and seven differentially expressed genes were selected and divided into four functional categories including pathogen recognition (25 genes), reorganization of cytoskeleton (27 genes), inflammation (41 genes) and apoptosis (14 genes). They were analyzed to elucidate the mechanisms of host-pathogen interactions and downstream signaling transduction. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reactions (qRT-PCRs) of 10 representative genes validated the accuracy and reliability of RNA sequencing results with the correlation coefficients from 0.88 to 0.98 and p-value <0.05. Expression analysis of immune-related genes after LPS challenge will be useful in understanding the immune response mechanisms of A. japonicus against pathogen invasion and developing strategies for resistant markers selection. PMID:25421239

  13. Expression Analysis of Immune Related Genes Identified from the Coelomocytes of Sea Cucumber (Apostichopus japonicus) in Response to LPS Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Ying; Sun, Hongjuan; Zhou, Zunchun; Yang, Aifu; Chen, Zhong; Guan, Xiaoyan; Gao, Shan; Wang, Bai; Jiang, Bei; Jiang, Jingwei

    2014-01-01

    The sea cucumber (Apostichopus japonicus) occupies a basal position during the evolution of deuterostomes and is also an important aquaculture species. In order to identify more immune effectors, transcriptome sequencing of A. japonicus coelomocytes in response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge was performed using the Illumina HiSeq™ 2000 platform. One hundred and seven differentially expressed genes were selected and divided into four functional categories including pathogen recognition (25 genes), reorganization of cytoskeleton (27 genes), inflammation (41 genes) and apoptosis (14 genes). They were analyzed to elucidate the mechanisms of host-pathogen interactions and downstream signaling transduction. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reactions (qRT-PCRs) of 10 representative genes validated the accuracy and reliability of RNA sequencing results with the correlation coefficients from 0.88 to 0.98 and p-value <0.05. Expression analysis of immune-related genes after LPS challenge will be useful in understanding the immune response mechanisms of A. japonicus against pathogen invasion and developing strategies for resistant markers selection. PMID:25421239

  14. Identifying biotic integrity and water chemistry relations in nonwadeable rivers of Wisconsin: Toward the development of nutrient criteria

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weigel, B.M.; Robertson, D.M.

    2007-01-01

    We sampled 41 sites on 34 nonwadeable rivers that represent the types of rivers in Wisconsin, and the kinds and intensities of nutrient and other anthropogenic stressors upon each river type. Sites covered much of United States Environmental Protection Agency national nutrient ecoregions VII-Mostly Glaciated Dairy Region, and VIII-Nutrient Poor, Largely Glaciated upper Midwest. Fish, macroinvertebrates, and three categories of environmental variables including nutrients, other water chemistry, and watershed features were collected using standard protocols. We summarized fish assemblages by index of biotic integrity (IBI) and its 10 component measures, and macroinvertebrates by 2 organic pollution tolerance and 12 proportional richness measures. All biotic and environmental variables represented a wide range of conditions, with biotic measures ranging from poor to excellent status, despite nutrient concentrations being consistently higher than reference concentrations reported for the regions. Regression tree analyses of nutrients on a suite of biotic measures identified breakpoints in total phosphorus (~0.06 mg/l) and total nitrogen (~0.64 mg/l) concentrations at which biotic assemblages were consistently impaired. Redundancy analyses (RDA) were used to identify the most important variables within each of the three environmental variable categories, which were then used to determine the relative influence of each variable category on the biota. Nutrient measures, suspended chlorophyll a, water clarity, and watershed land cover type (forest or row-crop agriculture) were the most important variables and they explained significant amounts of variation within the macroinvertebrate (R 2 = 60.6%) and fish (R 2 = 43.6%) assemblages. The environmental variables selected in the macroinvertebrate model were correlated to such an extent that partial RDA analyses could not attribute variation explained to individual environmental categories, assigning 89% of the explained

  15. Identifying Biotic Integrity and Water Chemistry Relations in Nonwadeable Rivers of Wisconsin: Toward the Development of Nutrient Criteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigel, Brian M.; Robertson, Dale M.

    2007-10-01

    We sampled 41 sites on 34 nonwadeable rivers that represent the types of rivers in Wisconsin, and the kinds and intensities of nutrient and other anthropogenic stressors upon each river type. Sites covered much of United States Environmental Protection Agency national nutrient ecoregions VII—Mostly Glaciated Dairy Region, and VIII—Nutrient Poor, Largely Glaciated upper Midwest. Fish, macroinvertebrates, and three categories of environmental variables including nutrients, other water chemistry, and watershed features were collected using standard protocols. We summarized fish assemblages by index of biotic integrity (IBI) and its 10 component measures, and macroinvertebrates by 2 organic pollution tolerance and 12 proportional richness measures. All biotic and environmental variables represented a wide range of conditions, with biotic measures ranging from poor to excellent status, despite nutrient concentrations being consistently higher than reference concentrations reported for the regions. Regression tree analyses of nutrients on a suite of biotic measures identified breakpoints in total phosphorus (~0.06 mg/l) and total nitrogen (~0.64 mg/l) concentrations at which biotic assemblages were consistently impaired. Redundancy analyses (RDA) were used to identify the most important variables within each of the three environmental variable categories, which were then used to determine the relative influence of each variable category on the biota. Nutrient measures, suspended chlorophyll a, water clarity, and watershed land cover type (forest or row-crop agriculture) were the most important variables and they explained significant amounts of variation within the macroinvertebrate ( R 2 = 60.6%) and fish ( R 2 = 43.6%) assemblages. The environmental variables selected in the macroinvertebrate model were correlated to such an extent that partial RDA analyses could not attribute variation explained to individual environmental categories, assigning 89% of the

  16. Identifying biotic integrity and water chemistry relations in nonwadeable rivers of Wisconsin: toward the development of nutrient criteria.

    PubMed

    Weigel, Brian M; Robertson, Dale M

    2007-10-01

    We sampled 41 sites on 34 nonwadeable rivers that represent the types of rivers in Wisconsin, and the kinds and intensities of nutrient and other anthropogenic stressors upon each river type. Sites covered much of United States Environmental Protection Agency national nutrient ecoregions VII--Mostly Glaciated Dairy Region, and VIII--Nutrient Poor, Largely Glaciated upper Midwest. Fish, macroinvertebrates, and three categories of environmental variables including nutrients, other water chemistry, and watershed features were collected using standard protocols. We summarized fish assemblages by index of biotic integrity (IBI) and its 10 component measures, and macroinvertebrates by 2 organic pollution tolerance and 12 proportional richness measures. All biotic and environmental variables represented a wide range of conditions, with biotic measures ranging from poor to excellent status, despite nutrient concentrations being consistently higher than reference concentrations reported for the regions. Regression tree analyses of nutrients on a suite of biotic measures identified breakpoints in total phosphorus (approximately 0.06 mg/l) and total nitrogen (approximately 0.64 mg/l) concentrations at which biotic assemblages were consistently impaired. Redundancy analyses (RDA) were used to identify the most important variables within each of the three environmental variable categories, which were then used to determine the relative influence of each variable category on the biota. Nutrient measures, suspended chlorophyll a, water clarity, and watershed land cover type (forest or row-crop agriculture) were the most important variables and they explained significant amounts of variation within the macroinvertebrate (R(2) = 60.6%) and fish (R(2) = 43.6%) assemblages. The environmental variables selected in the macroinvertebrate model were correlated to such an extent that partial RDA analyses could not attribute variation explained to individual environmental categories

  17. A Case-Control Study to Identify Risk Factors for Totally Implantable Central Venous Port-Related Bloodstream Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Guk Jin; Hong, Sook Hee; Roh, Sang Young; Park, Sa Rah; Lee, Myung Ah; Chun, Hoo Geun; Hong, Young Seon; Kang, Jin Hyoung; Kim, Sang Il; Kim, Youn Jeong; Chun, Ho Jong; Oh, Jung Suk

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To date, the risk factors for central venous port-related bloodstream infection (CVPBSI) in solid cancer patients have not been fully elucidated. We conducted this study in order to determine the risk factors for CVP-BSI in patients with solid cancer. Materials and Methods A total of 1,642 patients with solid cancer received an implantable central venous port for delivery of chemotherapy between October 2008 and December 2011 in a single center. CVP-BSI was diagnosed in 66 patients (4%). We selected a control group of 130 patients, who were individually matched with respect to age, sex, and catheter insertion time. Results CVP-BSI occurred most frequently between September and November (37.9%). The most common pathogen was gram-positive cocci (n=35, 53.0%), followed by fungus (n=14, 21.2%). Multivariate analysis identified monthly catheter-stay as a risk factor for CVP-BSI (p=0.000), however, its risk was lower in primary gastrointestinal cancer than in other cancer (p=0.002). Initial metastatic disease and long catheter-stay were statistically significant factors affecting catheter life span (p=0.005 and p=0.000). Results of multivariate analysis showed that recent transfusion was a risk factor for mortality in patients with CVP-BSI (p=0.047). Conclusion In analysis of the results with respect to risk factors, prolonged catheter-stay should be avoided as much as possible. It is necessary to be cautious of CVP-BSI in metastatic solid cancer, especially non-gastrointestinal cancer. In addition, avoidance of unnecessary transfusion is essential in order to reduce the mortality of CVP-BSI. Finally, considering the fact that confounding factors may have affected the results, conduct of a well-designed prospective controlled study is warranted. PMID:25038760

  18. Applying DNA Barcodes to Identify Closely Related Species of Ferns: A Case Study of the Chinese Adiantum (Pteridaceae).

    PubMed

    Wang, Fan-Hong; Lu, Jin-Mei; Wen, Jun; Ebihara, Atsushi; Li, De-Zhu

    2016-01-01

    DNA barcoding is a fast-developing technique to identify species by using short and standard DNA sequences. Universal selection of DNA barcodes in ferns remains unresolved. In this study, five plastid regions (rbcL, matK, trnH-psbA, trnL-F and rps4-trnS) and eight nuclear regions (ITS, pgiC, gapC, LEAFY, ITS2, IBR3_2, DET1, and SQD1_1) were screened and evaluated in the fern genus Adiantum from China and neighboring areas. Due to low primer universality (matK) and/or the existence of multiple copies (ITS), the commonly used barcodes matK and ITS were not appropriate for Adiantum. The PCR amplification rate was extremely low in all nuclear genes except for IBR3_2. rbcL had the highest PCR amplification rate (94.33%) and sequencing success rate (90.78%), while trnH-psbA had the highest species identification rate (75%). With the consideration of discriminatory power, cost-efficiency and effort, the two-barcode combination of rbcL+ trnH-psbA seems to be the best choice for barcoding Adiantum, and perhaps basal polypod ferns in general. The nuclear IBR3_2 showed 100% PCR amplification success rate in Adiantum, however, it seemed that only diploid species could acquire clean sequences without cloning. With cloning, IBR3_2 can successfully distinguish cryptic species and hybrid species from their related species. Because hybridization and allopolyploidy are common in ferns, we argue for including a selected group of nuclear loci as barcodes, especially via the next-generation sequencing, as it is much more efficient to obtain single-copy nuclear loci without the cloning procedure. PMID:27603700

  19. Transcriptomic Analysis of a Tertiary Relict Plant, Extreme Xerophyte Reaumuria soongorica to Identify Genes Related to Drought Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Pengshan; Yin, Hengxia; Zhao, Xin; Xiao, Honglang; Li, Xinrong; Chen, Guoxiong; Ma, Xiao-Fei

    2013-01-01

    Background Reaumuria soongorica is an extreme xerophyte shrub widely distributed in the desert regions including sand dune, Gobi and marginal loess of central Asia which plays a crucial role to sustain and restore fragile desert ecosystems. However, due to the lacking of the genomic sequences, studies on R. soongorica had mainly limited in physiological responses to drought stress. Here, a deep transcriptomic sequencing of R. soongorica will facilitate molecular functional studies and pave the path to understand drought adaptation for a desert plant. Methodology/Principal Findings A total of 53,193,660 clean paired-end reads was generated from the Illumina HiSeq™ 2000 platform. By assembly with Trinity, we got 173,700 contigs and 77,647 unigenes with mean length of 677 bp and N50 of 1109 bp. Over 55% (43,054) unigenes were successfully annotated based on sequence similarity against public databases as well as Rfam and Pfam database. Local BLAST and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) maps were used to further exhausting seek for candidate genes related to drought adaptation and a set of 123 putative candidate genes were identified. Moreover, all the C4 photosynthesis genes existed and were active in R. soongorica, which has been regarded as a typical C3 plant. Conclusion/Significance The assembled unigenes in present work provide abundant genomic information for the functional assignments in an extreme xerophyte R. soongorica, and will help us exploit the genetic basis of how desert plants adapt to drought environment in the near future. PMID:23717523

  20. Finding related sentence pairs in MEDLINE

    PubMed Central

    Wilbur, W. John

    2010-01-01

    We explore the feasibility of automatically identifying sentences in different MEDLINE abstracts that are related in meaning. We compared traditional vector space models with machine learning methods for detecting relatedness, and found that machine learning was superior. The Huber method, a variant of Support Vector Machines which minimizes the modified Huber loss function, achieves 73% precision when the score cutoff is set high enough to identify about one related sentence per abstract on average. We illustrate how an abstract viewed in PubMed might be modified to present the related sentences found in other abstracts by this automatic procedure. PMID:21170415

  1. Torsional vestibulo-ocular reflex measurements for identifying otolith asymmetries possibly related to space motion sickness susceptibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterka, Robert J.

    1993-01-01

    Recent studies have identified significant correlations between space motion sickness susceptibility and measures of disconjugate torsional eye movements recorded during parabolic flights. These results support an earlier proposal which hypothesized that an asymmetry of otolith function between the two ears is the cause of space motion sickness. It may be possible to devise experiments that can be performed in the 1 g environment on earth that could identify and quantify the presence of asymmetric otolith function. This paper summarizes the known physiological and anatomical properties of the otolith organs and the properties of the torsional vestibulo-ocular reflex which are relevant to the design of a stimulus to identify otolith asymmetries. A specific stimulus which takes advantage of these properties is proposed.

  2. Torsional vestibulo-ocular reflex measurements for identifying otolith asymmetries possibly related to space motion sickness susceptibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterka, R. J.

    1994-01-01

    Recent studies by Diamond and Markham have identified significant correlations between space motion sickness susceptibility and measures of disconjugate torsional eye movements recorded during parabolic flights. These results support an earlier proposal by von Baumgarten and Thumler which hypothesized that an asymmetry of otolith function between the two ears is the cause of space motion sickness. It may be possible to devise experiments that can be performed in the 1 g environment on earth that could identify and quantify the presence of asymmetric otolith function. This paper summarizes the known physiological and anatomical properties of the otolith organs and the properties of the torsional vestibulo-ocular reflex which are relevant to the design of a stimulus to identify otolith asymmetries. A specific stimulus which takes advantage of these properties is proposed.

  3. The Disruption of Celf6, a Gene Identified by Translational Profiling of Serotonergic Neurons, Results in Autism-Related Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Dougherty, Joseph D.; Maloney, Susan E.; Wozniak, David F.; Rieger, Michael A.; Sonnenblick, Lisa; Coppola, Giovanni; Mahieu, Nathaniel G.; Zhang, Juliet; Cai, Jinlu; Patti, Gary J.; Abrahams, Brett S.; Geschwind, Daniel H.; Heintz, Nathaniel

    2013-01-01

    The immense molecular diversity of neurons challenges our ability to understand the genetic and cellular etiology of neuropsychiatric disorders. Leveraging knowledge from neurobiology may help parse the genetic complexity: identifying genes important for a circuit that mediates a particular symptom of a disease may help identify polymorphisms that contribute to risk for the disease as a whole. The serotonergic system has long been suspected in disorders that have symptoms of repetitive behaviors and resistance to change, including autism. We generated a bacTRAP mouse line to permit translational profiling of serotonergic neurons. From this, we identified several thousand serotonergic-cell expressed transcripts, of which 174 were highly enriched, including all known markers of these cells. Analysis of common variants near the corresponding genes in the AGRE collection implicated the RNA binding protein CELF6 in autism risk. Screening for rare variants in CELF6 identified an inherited premature stop codon in one of the probands. Subsequent disruption of Celf6 in mice resulted in animals exhibiting resistance to change and decreased ultrasonic vocalization as well as abnormal levels of serotonin in the brain. This work provides a reproducible and accurate method to profile serotonergic neurons under a variety of conditions and suggests a novel paradigm for gaining information on the etiology of psychiatric disorders. PMID:23407934

  4. Using Generalized Additive Modeling to Empirically Identify Thresholds within the ITERS in Relation to Toddlers' Cognitive Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Setodji, Claude Messan; Le, Vi-Nhuan; Schaack, Diana

    2013-01-01

    Research linking high-quality child care programs and children's cognitive development has contributed to the growing popularity of child care quality benchmarking efforts such as quality rating and improvement systems (QRIS). Consequently, there has been an increased interest in and a need for approaches to identifying thresholds, or cutpoints,…

  5. Convergent Validity of a Screening Measure Designed to Identify Defendants Feigning Knowledge Deficits Related to Competence to Stand Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Otto, Randy K.; Musick, Jeffrey E.; Sherrod, Christina

    2011-01-01

    Because some defendants undergoing evaluation of their competence to stand trial may feign limitations in their ability to understand and participate in the legal process, assessment of their response style is critical. Preliminary research indicates that the Inventory of Legal Knowledge (ILK) has some potential to identify persons feigning…

  6. USE OF COMPETITIVE DNA HYBRIDIZATION TO IDENTIFY DIFFERENCES IN THE GENOMES OF TWO CLOSELY RELATED FECAL INDICATOR BACTERIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although recent technological advances in DNA sequencing and computational biology now allow scientists to compare entire microbial genomes, comparisons of closely related bacterial species and individual isolates by whole-genome sequencing approaches remains prohibitively expens...

  7. ICEApl1, an Integrative Conjugative Element Related to ICEHin1056, Identified in the Pig Pathogen Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae

    PubMed Central

    Bossé, Janine T.; Li, Yanwen; Fernandez Crespo, Roberto; Chaudhuri, Roy R.; Rogers, Jon; Holden, Matthew T. G.; Maskell, Duncan J.; Tucker, Alexander W.; Wren, Brendan W.; Rycroft, Andrew N.; Langford, Paul R.; Consortium, the BRaDP1T

    2016-01-01

    ICEApl1 was identified in the whole genome sequence of MIDG2331, a tetracycline-resistant (MIC = 8 mg/L) serovar 8 clinical isolate of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, the causative agent of porcine pleuropneumonia. PCR amplification of virB4, one of the core genes involved in conjugation, was used to identify other A. pleuropneumoniae isolates potentially carrying ICEApl1. MICs for tetracycline were determined for virB4 positive isolates, and shotgun whole genome sequence analysis was used to confirm presence of the complete ICEApl1. The sequence of ICEApl1 is 56083 bp long and contains 67 genes including a Tn10 element encoding tetracycline resistance. Comparative sequence analysis was performed with similar integrative conjugative elements (ICEs) found in other members of the Pasteurellaceae. ICEApl1 is most similar to the 59393 bp ICEHin1056, from Haemophilus influenzae strain 1056. Although initially identified only in serovar 8 isolates of A. pleuropneumoniae (31 from the UK and 1 from Cyprus), conjugal transfer of ICEApl1 to representative isolates of other serovars was confirmed. All isolates carrying ICEApl1 had a MIC for tetracycline of 8 mg/L. This is, to our knowledge, the first description of an ICE in A. pleuropneumoniae, and the first report of a member of the ICEHin1056 subfamily in a non-human pathogen. ICEApl1 confers resistance to tetracycline, currently one of the more commonly used antibiotics for treatment and control of porcine pleuropneumonia. PMID:27379024

  8. High-density genotyping of immune-related loci identifies new SLE risk variants in individuals with Asian ancestry.

    PubMed

    Sun, Celi; Molineros, Julio E; Looger, Loren L; Zhou, Xu-Jie; Kim, Kwangwoo; Okada, Yukinori; Ma, Jianyang; Qi, Yuan-Yuan; Kim-Howard, Xana; Motghare, Prasenjeet; Bhattarai, Krishna; Adler, Adam; Bang, So-Young; Lee, Hye-Soon; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Kang, Young Mo; Suh, Chang-Hee; Chung, Won Tae; Park, Yong-Beom; Choe, Jung-Yoon; Shim, Seung Cheol; Kochi, Yuta; Suzuki, Akari; Kubo, Michiaki; Sumida, Takayuki; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko; Lee, Shin-Seok; Kim, Young Jin; Han, Bok-Ghee; Dozmorov, Mikhail; Kaufman, Kenneth M; Wren, Jonathan D; Harley, John B; Shen, Nan; Chua, Kek Heng; Zhang, Hong; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Nath, Swapan K

    2016-02-24

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) has a strong but incompletely understood genetic architecture. We conducted an association study with replication in 4,478 SLE cases and 12,656 controls from six East Asian cohorts to identify new SLE susceptibility loci and better localize known loci. We identified ten new loci and confirmed 20 known loci with genome-wide significance. Among the new loci, the most significant locus was GTF2IRD1-GTF2I at 7q11.23 (rs73366469, Pmeta = 3.75 × 10(-117), odds ratio (OR) = 2.38), followed by DEF6, IL12B, TCF7, TERT, CD226, PCNXL3, RASGRP1, SYNGR1 and SIGLEC6. We identified the most likely functional variants at each locus by analyzing epigenetic marks and gene expression data. Ten candidate variants are known to alter gene expression in cis or in trans. Enrichment analysis highlights the importance of these loci in B cell and T cell biology. The new loci, together with previously known loci, increase the explained heritability of SLE to 24%. The new loci share functional and ontological characteristics with previously reported loci and are possible drug targets for SLE therapeutics. PMID:26808113

  9. Biotea: RDFizing PubMed Central in support for the paper as an interface to the Web of Data

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The World Wide Web has become a dissemination platform for scientific and non-scientific publications. However, most of the information remains locked up in discrete documents that are not always interconnected or machine-readable. The connectivity tissue provided by RDF technology has not yet been widely used to support the generation of self-describing, machine-readable documents. Results In this paper, we present our approach to the generation of self-describing machine-readable scholarly documents. We understand the scientific document as an entry point and interface to the Web of Data. We have semantically processed the full-text, open-access subset of PubMed Central. Our RDF model and resulting dataset make extensive use of existing ontologies and semantic enrichment services. We expose our model, services, prototype, and datasets at http://biotea.idiginfo.org/ Conclusions The semantic processing of biomedical literature presented in this paper embeds documents within the Web of Data and facilitates the execution of concept-based queries against the entire digital library. Our approach delivers a flexible and adaptable set of tools for metadata enrichment and semantic processing of biomedical documents. Our model delivers a semantically rich and highly interconnected dataset with self-describing content so that software can make effective use of it. PMID:23734622

  10. An experimental search strategy retrieves more precise results than PubMed and Google for questions about medical interventions

    PubMed Central

    Dylla, Daniel P.; Megison, Susan D.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. We compared the precision of a search strategy designed specifically to retrieve randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and systematic reviews of RCTs with search strategies designed for broader purposes. Methods. We designed an experimental search strategy that automatically revised searches up to five times by using increasingly restrictive queries as long at least 50 citations were retrieved. We compared the ability of the experimental and alternative strategies to retrieve studies relevant to 312 test questions. The primary outcome, search precision, was defined for each strategy as the proportion of relevant, high quality citations among the first 50 citations retrieved. Results. The experimental strategy had the highest median precision (5.5%; interquartile range [IQR]: 0%–12%) followed by the narrow strategy of the PubMed Clinical Queries (4.0%; IQR: 0%–10%). The experimental strategy found the most high quality citations (median 2; IQR: 0–6) and was the strategy most likely to find at least one high quality citation (73% of searches; 95% confidence interval 68%–78%). All comparisons were statistically significant. Conclusions. The experimental strategy performed the best in all outcomes although all strategies had low precision. PMID:25922798

  11. Genome-wide association study with 1000 genomes imputation identifies signals for nine sex hormone-related phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Ruth, Katherine S; Campbell, Purdey J; Chew, Shelby; Lim, Ee Mun; Hadlow, Narelle; Stuckey, Bronwyn GA; Brown, Suzanne J; Feenstra, Bjarke; Joseph, John; Surdulescu, Gabriela L; Zheng, Hou Feng; Richards, J Brent; Murray, Anna; Spector, Tim D; Wilson, Scott G; Perry, John RB

    2016-01-01

    Genetic factors contribute strongly to sex hormone levels, yet knowledge of the regulatory mechanisms remains incomplete. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified only a small number of loci associated with sex hormone levels, with several reproductive hormones yet to be assessed. The aim of the study was to identify novel genetic variants contributing to the regulation of sex hormones. We performed GWAS using genotypes imputed from the 1000 Genomes reference panel. The study used genotype and phenotype data from a UK twin register. We included 2913 individuals (up to 294 males) from the Twins UK study, excluding individuals receiving hormone treatment. Phenotypes were standardised for age, sex, BMI, stage of menstrual cycle and menopausal status. We tested 7 879 351 autosomal SNPs for association with levels of dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate (DHEAS), oestradiol, free androgen index (FAI), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), prolactin, progesterone, sex hormone-binding globulin and testosterone. Eight independent genetic variants reached genome-wide significance (P<5 × 10−8), with minor allele frequencies of 1.3–23.9%. Novel signals included variants for progesterone (P=7.68 × 10−12), oestradiol (P=1.63 × 10−8) and FAI (P=1.50 × 10−8). A genetic variant near the FSHB gene was identified which influenced both FSH (P=1.74 × 10−8) and LH (P=3.94 × 10−9) levels. A separate locus on chromosome 7 was associated with both DHEAS (P=1.82 × 10−14) and progesterone (P=6.09 × 10−14). This study highlights loci that are relevant to reproductive function and suggests overlap in the genetic basis of hormone regulation. PMID:26014426

  12. Mouse genome-wide association study identifies polymorphisms on chromosomes 4, 11, and 15 for age-related cardiac fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiaoli; Berndt, Annerose; Sundberg, Beth A; Silva, Kathleen A; Kennedy, Victoria E; Cario, Clinton L; Richardson, Matthew A; Chase, Thomas H; Schofield, Paul N; Uitto, Jouni; Sundberg, John P

    2016-06-01

    Dystrophic cardiac calcinosis (DCC), also called epicardial and myocardial fibrosis and mineralization, has been detected in mice of a number of laboratory inbred strains, most commonly C3H/HeJ and DBA/2J. In previous mouse breeding studies between these DCC susceptible and the DCC-resistant strain C57BL/6J, 4 genetic loci harboring genes involved in DCC inheritance were identified and subsequently termed Dyscalc loci 1 through 4. Here, we report susceptibility to cardiac fibrosis, a sub-phenotype of DCC, at 12 and 20 months of age and close to natural death in a survey of 28 inbred mouse strains. Eight strains showed cardiac fibrosis with highest frequency and severity in the moribund mice. Using genotype and phenotype information of the 28 investigated strains, we performed genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and identified the most significant associations on chromosome (Chr) 15 at 72 million base pairs (Mb) (P < 10(-13)) and Chr 4 at 122 Mb (P < 10(-11)) and 134 Mb (P < 10(-7)). At the Chr 15 locus, Col22a1 and Kcnk9 were identified. Both have been reported to be morphologically and functionally important in the heart muscle. The strongest Chr 4 associations were located approximately 6 Mb away from the Dyscalc 2 quantitative trait locus peak within the boundaries of the Extl1 gene and in close proximity to the Trim63 and Cap1 genes. In addition, a single-nucleotide polymorphism association was found on chromosome 11. This study provides evidence for more than the previously reported 4 genetic loci determining cardiac fibrosis and DCC. The study also highlights the power of GWAS in the mouse for dissecting complex genetic traits. PMID:27126641

  13. High-density genotyping of immune-related loci identifies new SLE risk variants in individuals with Asian ancestry

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Celi; Molineros, Julio E.; Looger, Loren L.; Zhou, Xu-jie; Kim, Kwangwoo; Okada, Yukinori; Ma, Jianyang; Qi, Yuan-yuan; Kim-Howard, Xana; Motghare, Prasenjeet; Bhattarai, Krishna; Adler, Adam; Bang, So-Young; Lee, Hye-Soon; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Kang, Young Mo; Suh, Chang-Hee; Chung, Won Tae; Park, Yong-Beom; Choe, Jung-Yoon; Shim, Seung Cheol; Kochi, Yuta; Suzuki, Akari; Kubo, Michiaki; Sumida, Takayuki; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko; Lee, Shin-Seok; Kim, Young Jin; Han, Bok-Ghee; Dozmorov, Mikhail; Kaufman, Kenneth M.; Wren, Jonathan D.; Harley, John B.; Shen, Nan; Chua, Kek Heng; Zhang, Hong; Bae, Sang-Cheol; Nath, Swapan K.

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) has a strong but incompletely understood genetic architecture. We conducted an association study with replication in 4,492 SLE cases and 12,675 controls from six East-Asian cohorts, to identify novel and better localize known SLE susceptibility loci. We identified 10 novel loci as well as 20 known loci with genome-wide significance. Among the novel loci, the most significant was GTF2IRD1-GTF2I at 7q11.23 (rs73366469, Pmeta=3.75×10−117, OR=2.38), followed by DEF6, IL12B, TCF7, TERT, CD226, PCNXL3, RASGRP1, SYNGR1 and SIGLEC6. We localized the most likely functional variants for each locus by analyzing epigenetic marks and gene regulation data. Ten putative variants are known to alter cis- or trans-gene expression. Enrichment analysis highlights the importance of these loci in B- and T-cell biology. Together with previously known loci, the explained heritability of SLE increases to 24%. Novel loci share functional and ontological characteristics with previously reported loci, and are possible drug targets for SLE therapeutics. PMID:26808113

  14. Relating Science and Religion: An Ontology of Taxonomies and Development of a Research Tool for Identifying Individual Views

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yasri, Pratchayapong; Arthur, Shagufta; Smith, Mike U.; Mancy, Rebecca

    2013-01-01

    Understanding how individuals view the relationship between science and religion shows promise for explaining a range of aspects of teaching and learning in science. Several taxonomies, consisting of different views by which people relate science and religion, can be found in the philosophical literature. However, most of the science education…

  15. Identifying the Antecedent in the Relation between Career Interests and Self-Efficacy: Is It One, the Other, or Both?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nauta, Margaret M.; Kahn, Jeffrey H.; Angell, James W.; Cantarelli, Erika A.

    2002-01-01

    Social-cognitive career theory (R. W. Lent, S. D. Brown, & G. Hackett, 1994) postulates that changes in self-efficacy precede changes in interests, but the cross-sectional nature of most research has precluded the examination of temporal precedence in the relation between these variables. The authors assessed college students' career interests and…

  16. Saccadic Eye Movement Task Identifies Cognitive Deficits in Children with Schizophrenia, but Not in Unaffected Child Relatives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Randal G.; Heinlein, Shari; Zerbe, Gary O.; Radant, Allen

    2005-01-01

    Background: The delayed oculomotor response (DOR) task requires response inhibition followed by movement of gaze towards a known spatial location without a current stimulus. Abnormalities in response inhibition and in the spatial accuracy of the eye movement are found in individuals with schizophrenia and in many of their relatives, supporting the…

  17. A Need for Better Studies to Identify Those Populations at Greatest Risk of a Pollutant-Related Health Effect

    EPA Science Inventory

    This invited editorial on a paper accepted for publication in the Journal of Pediatrics details scientific advances needed to improve the identification of those populations at greatest risk of a pollutant-related health effect with a primary focus on air pollution.

  18. Survey of Ontario Postsecondary Educational Institutions to Identify Courses and Programs with Course Content Related to Child Abuse.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ezrin, Sharyn A.; And Others

    A survey of selected program areas in 41 postsecondary educational institutions in Ontario was conducted to gain information on programs and courses with content related to child abuse. A bilingual questionnaire was developed and administered to 139 program heads. An analysis of responses led to the following conclusions: (1) 26 program areas…

  19. Identifying relatively high-risk group of coronary artery calcification based on progression rate: statistical and machine learning methods.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ha-Young; Yoo, Sanghyun; Lee, Jihyun; Kam, Hye Jin; Woo, Kyoung-Gu; Choi, Yoon-Ho; Sung, Jidong; Kang, Mira

    2012-01-01

    Coronary artery calcification (CAC) score is an important predictor of coronary artery disease (CAD), which is the primary cause of death in advanced countries. Early prediction of high-risk of CAC based on progression rate enables people to prevent CAD from developing into severe symptoms and diseases. In this study, we developed various classifiers to identify patients in high risk of CAC using statistical and machine learning methods, and compared them with performance accuracy. For statistical approaches, linear regression based classifier and logistic regression model were developed. For machine learning approaches, we suggested three kinds of ensemble-based classifiers (best, top-k, and voting method) to deal with imbalanced distribution of our data set. Ensemble voting method outperformed all other methods including regression methods as AUC was 0.781. PMID:23366360

  20. Integration of genome-wide association studies with biological knowledge identifies six novel genes related to kidney function

    PubMed Central

    Chasman, Daniel I.; Fuchsberger, Christian; Pattaro, Cristian; Teumer, Alexander; Böger, Carsten A.; Endlich, Karlhans; Olden, Matthias; Chen, Ming-Huei; Tin, Adrienne; Taliun, Daniel; Li, Man; Gao, Xiaoyi; Gorski, Mathias; Yang, Qiong; Hundertmark, Claudia; Foster, Meredith C.; O'Seaghdha, Conall M.; Glazer, Nicole; Isaacs, Aaron; Liu, Ching-Ti; Smith, Albert V.; O'Connell, Jeffrey R.; Struchalin, Maksim; Tanaka, Toshiko; Li, Guo; Johnson, Andrew D.; Gierman, Hinco J.; Feitosa, Mary F.; Hwang, Shih-Jen; Atkinson, Elizabeth J.; Lohman, Kurt; Cornelis, Marilyn C.; Johansson, Åsa; Tönjes, Anke; Dehghan, Abbas; Lambert, Jean-Charles; Holliday, Elizabeth G.; Sorice, Rossella; Kutalik, Zoltan; Lehtimäki, Terho; Esko, Tõnu; Deshmukh, Harshal; Ulivi, Sheila; Chu, Audrey Y.; Murgia, Federico; Trompet, Stella; Imboden, Medea; Coassin, Stefan; Pistis, Giorgio; Harris, Tamara B.; Launer, Lenore J.; Aspelund, Thor; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Mitchell, Braxton D.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Schmidt, Helena; Cavalieri, Margherita; Rao, Madhumathi; Hu, Frank; Demirkan, Ayse; Oostra, Ben A.; de Andrade, Mariza; Turner, Stephen T.; Ding, Jingzhong; Andrews, Jeanette S.; Freedman, Barry I.; Giulianini, Franco; Koenig, Wolfgang; Illig, Thomas; Meisinger, Christa; Gieger, Christian; Zgaga, Lina; Zemunik, Tatijana; Boban, Mladen; Minelli, Cosetta; Wheeler, Heather E.; Igl, Wilmar; Zaboli, Ghazal; Wild, Sarah H.; Wright, Alan F.; Campbell, Harry; Ellinghaus, David; Nöthlings, Ute; Jacobs, Gunnar; Biffar, Reiner; Ernst, Florian; Homuth, Georg; Kroemer, Heyo K.; Nauck, Matthias; Stracke, Sylvia; Völker, Uwe; Völzke, Henry; Kovacs, Peter; Stumvoll, Michael; Mägi, Reedik; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Aulchenko, Yurii S.; Polasek, Ozren; Hastie, Nick; Vitart, Veronique; Helmer, Catherine; Wang, Jie Jin; Stengel, Bénédicte; Ruggiero, Daniela; Bergmann, Sven; Kähönen, Mika; Viikari, Jorma; Nikopensius, Tiit; Province, Michael; Ketkar, Shamika; Colhoun, Helen; Doney, Alex; Robino, Antonietta; Krämer, Bernhard K.; Portas, Laura; Ford, Ian; Buckley, Brendan M.; Adam, Martin; Thun, Gian-Andri; Paulweber, Bernhard; Haun, Margot; Sala, Cinzia; Mitchell, Paul; Ciullo, Marina; Kim, Stuart K.; Vollenweider, Peter; Raitakari, Olli; Metspalu, Andres; Palmer, Colin; Gasparini, Paolo; Pirastu, Mario; Jukema, J. Wouter; Probst-Hensch, Nicole M.; Kronenberg, Florian; Toniolo, Daniela; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Coresh, Josef; Schmidt, Reinhold; Ferrucci, Luigi; Siscovick, David S.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Borecki, Ingrid B.; Kardia, Sharon L.R.; Liu, Yongmei; Curhan, Gary C.; Rudan, Igor; Gyllensten, Ulf; Wilson, James F.; Franke, Andre; Pramstaller, Peter P.; Rettig, Rainer; Prokopenko, Inga; Witteman, Jacqueline; Hayward, Caroline; Ridker, Paul M; Parsa, Afshin; Bochud, Murielle; Heid, Iris M.; Kao, W.H. Linda; Fox, Caroline S.; Köttgen, Anna

    2012-01-01

    In conducting genome-wide association studies (GWAS), analytical approaches leveraging biological information may further understanding of the pathophysiology of clinical traits. To discover novel associations with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), a measure of kidney function, we developed a strategy for integrating prior biological knowledge into the existing GWAS data for eGFR from the CKDGen Consortium. Our strategy focuses on single nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs) in genes that are connected by functional evidence, determined by literature mining and gene ontology (GO) hierarchies, to genes near previously validated eGFR associations. It then requires association thresholds consistent with multiple testing, and finally evaluates novel candidates by independent replication. Among the samples of European ancestry, we identified a genome-wide significant SNP in FBXL20 (P = 5.6 × 10−9) in meta-analysis of all available data, and additional SNPs at the INHBC, LRP2, PLEKHA1, SLC3A2 and SLC7A6 genes meeting multiple-testing corrected significance for replication and overall P-values of 4.5 × 10−4–2.2 × 10−7. Neither the novel PLEKHA1 nor FBXL20 associations, both further supported by association with eGFR among African Americans and with transcript abundance, would have been implicated by eGFR candidate gene approaches. LRP2, encoding the megalin receptor, was identified through connection with the previously known eGFR gene DAB2 and extends understanding of the megalin system in kidney function. These findings highlight integration of existing genome-wide association data with independent biological knowledge to uncover novel candidate eGFR associations, including candidates lacking known connections to kidney-specific pathways. The strategy may also be applicable to other clinical phenotypes, although more testing will be needed to assess its potential for discovery in general. PMID:22962313

  1. Identifying influential nodes in a wound healing-related network of biological processes using mean first-passage time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arodz, Tomasz; Bonchev, Danail

    2015-02-01

    In this study we offer an approach to network physiology, which proceeds from transcriptomic data and uses gene ontology analysis to identify the biological processes most enriched in several critical time points of wound healing process (days 0, 3 and 7). The top-ranking differentially expressed genes for each process were used to build two networks: one with all proteins regulating the transcription of selected genes, and a second one involving the proteins from the signaling pathways that activate the transcription factors. The information from these networks is used to build a network of the most enriched processes with undirected links weighted proportionally to the count of shared genes between the pair of processes, and directed links weighted by the count of relationships connecting genes from one process to genes from the other. In analyzing the network thus built we used an approach based on random walks and accounting for the temporal aspects of the spread of a signal in the network (mean-first passage time, MFPT). The MFPT scores allowed identifying the top influential, as well as the top essential biological processes, which vary with the progress in the healing process. Thus, the most essential for day 0 was found to be the Wnt-receptor signaling pathway, well known for its crucial role in wound healing, while in day 3 this was the regulation of NF-kB cascade, essential for matrix remodeling in the wound healing process. The MFPT-based scores correctly reflected the pattern of the healing process dynamics to be highly concentrated around several processes between day 0 and day 3, and becoming more diffuse at day 7.

  2. Native fluorescence spectroscopy of blood plasma of rats with experimental diabetes: identifying fingerprints of glucose-related metabolic pathways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirshin, Evgeny; Cherkasova, Olga; Tikhonova, Tatiana; Berlovskaya, Elena; Priezzhev, Alexander; Fadeev, Victor

    2015-05-01

    We present the results of a native fluorescence spectroscopy study of blood plasma of rats with experimental diabetes. It was shown that the fluorescence emission band shape at 320 nm excitation is the most indicative of hyperglycemia in the blood plasma samples. We provide the interpretation of this fact based on the changes in reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate concentration due to glucose-related metabolic pathways and protein fluorescent cross-linking formation following nonenzymatic glycation.

  3. Application of Satellite Remote Sensing to Identify Climatic and Anthropogenic Changes Related to Water and Health Conditions in Emerging Megacities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akanda, A. S.; Serman, E. A.; Jutla, A.

    2014-12-01

    By 2050, more than 70% of the world's population is expected to be living in a city. In many of the urbanizing regions in Asia and Africa, most new development is taking place without adequate urban or regional planning, and a majority population is crowded into densely populated unplanned settlements, also known as slums. During the same period, precipitation and temperature patterns are likely to see significant changes in many of these regions while coastal megacities will have to accommodate sea-level rise in their ecosystems. The rapid increase in population is usually observed in fringes of the urban sprawl without adequate water or sanitation facilities or access to other municipal amenities (such as utilities, healthcare, and education). Collectively, these issues make the ever increasing slum dwellers in emerging megacities significantly vulnerable to a combination of climatic and anthropogenic threats. However, how the growth of unplanned urban and peri-urban sprawl and simultaneous change in climatic patterns have impacted public health in the emerging megacities remain largely unexplored due to lack of readily available and usable data. We employ a number of Remote Sensing products (GRACE, LANDSAT, MODIS) to bridge above knowledge gaps and to identify relevant hydrologic and anthropogenic changes in emerging megacities that are most vulnerable due to the climate-water-health nexus. We explore one of the largest and the fastest growing megacities in the world - Dhaka, Bangladesh - on identifying and investigating the changes in the water environment and growth of slum areas, and impact on water services and health outcomes. The hydroclimatology of South Asia is highly seasonal and the asymmetric availability of water affects vast areas of Bangladesh differently in space and time, exposing the population of Dhaka region to both droughts and floods and periodic spring-fall outbreaks of diarrheal diseases, such as cholera and rotavirus. This research

  4. Explorative study to identify novel candidate genes related to oxaliplatin efficacy and toxicity using a DNA repair array

    PubMed Central

    Kweekel, D M; Antonini, N F; Nortier, J W R; Punt, C J A; Gelderblom, H; Guchelaar, H-J

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To identify new polymorphisms (single nucleotide polymorphisms, SNPs) in DNA repair pathways that are associated with efficacy and toxicity in patients receiving oxaliplatin and capecitabine for advanced colorectal cancer (ACC). Methods: We studied progression-free survival (PFS) in 91 ACC patients, of whom germ-line DNA was isolated and genotyped using an Asper Biotech array. Overall survival (OS) and toxicity were studied as secondary end points. A step-wise selection of SNPs was performed, involving univariate and multivariate log-rank tests and Cox regression analysis, with age and performance status as covariates. Results: A total of 81 SNPs in 46 genes on the array were selected for further analysis, based on genotyping success rates and minor allele frequencies. After step-wise selection, we found that homozygosity for the ataxia telangiectasia mutated gene (ATM) rs1801516 or excision repair cross-complementing gene (ERCC5) rs1047768 SNPs was associated with shorter PFS; however there were no significant associations (P>0.01) with OS or toxicity. Discussion: This is the first study describing the pathway gene approach for the selection of new candidate genes involved in oxaliplatin efficacy and toxicity. The results suggest that the ATM and ERCC5 genes may be associated with oxaliplatin efficacy in ACC. PMID:19536092

  5. Yield-related salinity tolerance traits identified in a nested association mapping (NAM) population of wild barley

    PubMed Central

    Saade, Stephanie; Maurer, Andreas; Shahid, Mohammed; Oakey, Helena; Schmöckel, Sandra M.; Negrão, Sónia; Pillen, Klaus; Tester, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Producing sufficient food for nine billion people by 2050 will be constrained by soil salinity, especially in irrigated systems. To improve crop yield, greater understanding of the genetic control of traits contributing to salinity tolerance in the field is needed. Here, we exploit natural variation in exotic germplasm by taking a genome-wide association approach to a new nested association mapping population of barley called HEB-25. The large population (1,336 genotypes) allowed cross-validation of loci, which, along with two years of phenotypic data collected from plants irrigated with fresh and saline water, improved statistical power. We dissect the genetic architecture of flowering time under high salinity and we present genes putatively affecting this trait and salinity tolerance. In addition, we identify a locus on chromosome 2H where, under saline conditions, lines homozygous for the wild allele yielded 30% more than did lines homozygous for the Barke allele. Introgressing this wild allele into elite cultivars could markedly improve yield under saline conditions. PMID:27585856

  6. Carboxylic acids in PM 2.5 over Pinus morrisonicola forest and related photoreaction mechanisms identified via Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Su-Ching; Tsai, Ying I.; Tsai, Cheng-Hsien; Hsieh, Li-Ying

    2011-12-01

    The PM 2.5 aerosol from within an area of Pinus morrisonicola Hayata in Taiwan was collected and analyzed for its low molecular weight carboxylic acid (LMWCAs) content. Oxalic acid was the major LMWCA in the aerosol, followed by acetic, tartaric and maleic acids. This differs significantly from the LMWCA composition of PM 2.5 aerosol reported for a southern Taiwan suburban region (oxalic > succinic > malonic) [Atmospheric Environment 42, 6836-6850 (2008)]. P. morrisonicola Hayata emits oxalic, malic and formic acids and yet there was an abundance of maleic and tartaric acids in the PM 2.5 forest aerosol, indicating that tartaric acid is derived from the transformation of other P. morrisonicola Hayata emissions. Raman spectroscopy was applied and 28 species of LMWCAs and inorganic species were identified. The photochemical mechanisms of maleic and tartaric acids were studied and it was found that the abundant tartaric acid in forest aerosol is most probably the photochemical product from reactions of maleic acid. Furthermore, tartaric acid is photochemically transformed into formic acid and ultimately into CO 2.

  7. Dense genotyping of immune-related disease regions identifies nine new risk loci for primary sclerosing cholangitis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jimmy Z; Hov, Johannes Roksund; Folseraas, Trine; Ellinghaus, Eva; Rushbrook, Simon M; Doncheva, Nadezhda T; Andreassen, Ole A; Weersma, Rinse K; Weismüller, Tobias J; Eksteen, Bertus; Invernizzi, Pietro; Hirschfield, Gideon M; Gotthardt, Daniel Nils; Pares, Albert; Ellinghaus, David; Shah, Tejas; Juran, Brian D; Milkiewicz, Piotr; Rust, Christian; Schramm, Christoph; Müller, Tobias; Srivastava, Brijesh; Dalekos, Georgios; Nöthen, Markus M; Herms, Stefan; Winkelmann, Juliane; Mitrovic, Mitja; Braun, Felix; Ponsioen, Cyriel Y; Croucher, Peter J P; Sterneck, Martina; Teufel, Andreas; Mason, Andrew L; Saarela, Janna; Leppa, Virpi; Dorfman, Ruslan; Alvaro, Domenico; Floreani, Annarosa; Onengut-Gumuscu, Suna; Rich, Stephen S; Thompson, Wesley K; Schork, Andrew J; Næss, Sigrid; Thomsen, Ingo; Mayr, Gabriele; König, Inke R; Hveem, Kristian; Cleynen, Isabelle; Gutierrez-Achury, Javier; Ricaño-Ponce, Isis; van Heel, David; Björnsson, Einar; Sandford, Richard N; Durie, Peter R; Melum, Espen; Vatn, Morten H; Silverberg, Mark S; Duerr, Richard H; Padyukov, Leonid; Brand, Stephan; Sans, Miquel; Annese, Vito; Achkar, Jean-Paul; Boberg, Kirsten Muri; Marschall, Hanns-Ulrich; Chazouillères, Olivier; Bowlus, Christopher L; Wijmenga, Cisca; Schrumpf, Erik; Vermeire, Severine; Albrecht, Mario; Rioux, John D; Alexander, Graeme; Bergquist, Annika; Cho, Judy; Schreiber, Stefan; Manns, Michael P; Färkkilä, Martti; Dale, Anders M; Chapman, Roger W; Lazaridis, Konstantinos N; Franke, Andre; Anderson, Carl A; Karlsen, Tom H

    2013-06-01

    Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) is a severe liver disease of unknown etiology leading to fibrotic destruction of the bile ducts and ultimately to the need for liver transplantation. We compared 3,789 PSC cases of European ancestry to 25,079 population controls across 130,422 SNPs genotyped using the Immunochip. We identified 12 genome-wide significant associations outside the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) complex, 9 of which were new, increasing the number of known PSC risk loci to 16. Despite comorbidity with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in 72% of the cases, 6 of the 12 loci showed significantly stronger association with PSC than with IBD, suggesting overlapping yet distinct genetic architectures for these two diseases. We incorporated association statistics from 7 diseases clinically occurring with PSC in the analysis and found suggestive evidence for 33 additional pleiotropic PSC risk loci. Together with network analyses, these findings add to the genetic risk map of PSC and expand on the relationship between PSC and other immune-mediated diseases. PMID:23603763

  8. Environmental Health Related Socio-Spatial Inequalities: Identifying “Hotspots” of Environmental Burdens and Social Vulnerability

    PubMed Central

    Shrestha, Rehana; Flacke, Johannes; Martinez, Javier; van Maarseveen, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Differential exposure to multiple environmental burdens and benefits and their distribution across a population with varying vulnerability can contribute heavily to health inequalities. Particularly relevant are areas with high cumulative burdens and high social vulnerability termed as “hotspots”. This paper develops an index-based approach to assess these multiple burdens and benefits in combination with vulnerability factors at detailed intra-urban level. The method is applied to the city of Dortmund, Germany. Using non-spatial and spatial methods we assessed inequalities and identified “hotspot” areas in the city. We found modest inequalities burdening higher vulnerable groups in Dortmund (CI = −0.020 at p < 0.05). At the detailed intra-urban level, however, inequalities showed strong geographical patterns. Large numbers of “hotspots” exist in the northern part of the city compared to the southern part. A holistic assessment, particularly at a detailed local level, considering both environmental burdens and benefits and their distribution across the population with the different vulnerability, is essential to inform environmental justice debates and to mobilize local stakeholders. Locating “hotspot” areas at this detailed spatial level can serve as a basis to develop interventions that target vulnerable groups to ensure a health conducive equal environment. PMID:27409625

  9. Yield-related salinity tolerance traits identified in a nested association mapping (NAM) population of wild barley.

    PubMed

    Saade, Stephanie; Maurer, Andreas; Shahid, Mohammed; Oakey, Helena; Schmöckel, Sandra M; Negrão, Sónia; Pillen, Klaus; Tester, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Producing sufficient food for nine billion people by 2050 will be constrained by soil salinity, especially in irrigated systems. To improve crop yield, greater understanding of the genetic control of traits contributing to salinity tolerance in the field is needed. Here, we exploit natural variation in exotic germplasm by taking a genome-wide association approach to a new nested association mapping population of barley called HEB-25. The large population (1,336 genotypes) allowed cross-validation of loci, which, along with two years of phenotypic data collected from plants irrigated with fresh and saline water, improved statistical power. We dissect the genetic architecture of flowering time under high salinity and we present genes putatively affecting this trait and salinity tolerance. In addition, we identify a locus on chromosome 2H where, under saline conditions, lines homozygous for the wild allele yielded 30% more than did lines homozygous for the Barke allele. Introgressing this wild allele into elite cultivars could markedly improve yield under saline conditions. PMID:27585856

  10. Genomics and relative expression analysis identifies key genes associated with high female to male flower ratio in Jatropha curcas L.

    PubMed

    Gangwar, Manali; Sood, Hemant; Chauhan, Rajinder Singh

    2016-04-01

    Jatropha curcas, has been projected as a major source of biodiesel due to high seed oil content (42 %). A major roadblock for commercialization of Jatropha-based biodiesel is low seed yield per inflorescence, which is affected by low female to male flower ratio (1:25-30). Molecular dissection of female flower development by analyzing genes involved in phase transitions and floral organ development is, therefore, crucial for increasing seed yield. Expression analysis of 42 genes implicated in floral organ development and sex determination was done at six floral developmental stages of a J. curcas genotype (IC561235) with inherently higher female to male flower ratio (1:8-10). Relative expression analysis of these genes was done on low ratio genotype. Genes TFL1, SUP, AP1, CRY2, CUC2, CKX1, TAA1 and PIN1 were associated with reproductive phase transition. Further, genes CUC2, TAA1, CKX1 and PIN1 were associated with female flowering while SUP and CRY2 in female flower transition. Relative expression of these genes with respect to low female flower ratio genotype showed up to ~7 folds increase in transcript abundance of SUP, TAA1, CRY2 and CKX1 genes in intermediate buds but not a significant increase (~1.25 folds) in female flowers, thereby suggesting that these genes possibly play a significant role in increased transition towards female flowering by promoting abortion of male flower primordia. The outcome of study has implications in feedstock improvement of J. curcas through functional validation and eventual utilization of key genes associated with female flowering. PMID:26878857

  11. Core subjects at the end of primary school: identifying and explaining relative strengths of children with specific language impairment (SLI)

    PubMed Central

    Durkin, Kevin; Mok, Pearl L H; Conti-Ramsden, Gina

    2015-01-01

    Background In general, children with specific language impairment (SLI) tend to fall behind their typically developing (TD) peers in educational attainment. Less is known about how children with SLI fare in particular areas of the curriculum and what predicts their levels of performance. Aims To compare the distributions of performance of children with SLI in three core school subjects (English, Mathematics and Science); to test the possibility that performance would vary across the core subjects; and to examine the extent to which language impairment predicts performance. Methods & Procedures This study was conducted in England and reports historical data on educational attainments. Teacher assessment and test scores of 176 eleven-year-old children with SLI were examined in the three core subjects and compared with known national norms. Possible predictors of performance were measured, including language ability at ages 7 and 11, educational placement type, and performance IQ. Outcomes & Results Children with SLI, compared with national norms, were found to be at a disadvantage in core school subjects. Nevertheless, some children attained the levels expected of TD peers. Performance was poorest in English; relative strengths were indicated in Science and, to a lesser extent, in Mathematics. Language skills were significant predictors of performance in all three core subjects. PIQ was the strongest predictor for Mathematics. For Science, both early language skills at 7 years and PIQ made significant contributions. Conclusions & Implications Language impacts on the school performance of children with SLI, but differentially across subjects. English for these children is the most challenging of the core subjects, reflecting the high levels of language demand it incurs. Science is an area of relative strength and mathematics appears to be intermediate, arguably because some tasks in these subjects can be performed with less reliance on verbal processing. Many children

  12. Identifying the Source of High-Nitrate Ground Water Related to Artificial Recharge in a Desert Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Densmore, J. N.; Nishikawa, T.; Bohlke, J. K.; Martin, P.

    2002-12-01

    Ground water has been the sole source of water supply for the community of Yucca Valley in the Mojave Desert, California. Domestic wastewater from the community is treated using septic tanks. An imbalance between ground-water recharge and pumpage caused ground-water levels in the ground-water basin to decline by as much as 300 feet from the late 1940s through 1994. In response to this decline, the local water district, Hi-Desert Water District, began an artificial recharge program in February 1995 to replenish the ground water in the basin using imported surface water. The artificial recharge program resulted in water-level recovery of about 250 feet between February 1995 and December 2001; however, nitrate concentrations in some wells also increased from a background concentration of 10 mg/L as NO3 to more than the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency maximum contaminant level of 45 mg/L as NO3, limiting water use for some wells. The largest increase in nitrate concentrations occurred adjacent to the artificial recharge sites where the largest increase in water levels occurred even though the recharge water had low nitrate concentrations. The source of high nitrate concentrations observed in ground water during aquifer recovery was identified by compiling historical water-quality data; monitoring changes in water quality since artificial recharge began; and analyzing selected samples for major-ion chemistry, stable isotopes of H,O, and N, caffeine, and pharmaceuticals. The major-ions and H and O stable-isotope data indicate that ground-water samples that had the highest nitrate concentrations were mixtures of imported water and native ground water. Nitrate-to-chloride ratios, N isotopes and caffeine and pharmaceutical data indicate septic-tank seepage (septage) is the primary source of increases in nitrate concentration. The rapid rise in water levels entrained the large volume of high-nitrate septage stored in the unsaturated zone, resulting in the rapid increase

  13. Constraints in spherically symmetric classical general relativity. II. Identifying the configuration space: A moment of time symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guven, Jemal; Murchadha, Niall O.'

    1995-07-01

    We continue our investigation of the configuration space of general relativity begun in the preceding paper. Here we examine the Hamiltonian constraint when the spatial geometry is momentarily static (MS). We begin with a heuristic description of the presence of apparent horizons and singularities. A peculiarity of MS configurations is that not only do they satisfy the positive quasilocal mass (QLM) theorem, they also satisfy its converse: the QLM is positive everywhere, if and only if the (nontrivial) spatial geometry is nonsingular. We derive an analytical expression for the spatial metric in the neighborhood of a generic singularity. The corresponding curvature singularity shows up in the traceless component of the Ricci tensor. As a consequence of the converse, if the energy density of matter is monotonically decreasing, the geometry cannot be singular. A supermetric on the configuration space which distinguishes between singular geometries and nonsingular ones is constructed explicitly. Global necessary and sufficient criteria for the formation of trapped surfaces and singularities are framed in terms of inequalities which relate some appropriate measure of the material energy content on a given support to a measure of its volume. The sufficiency criteria are cast in the following form: if the material energy exceeds some universal constant times the proper radius l0 of the distribution, the geometry will possess an apparent horizon for one constant and a singularity for some other larger constant. A more appropriate measure of the material energy for casting the necessary criteria is the maximum value of the energy density of matter ρmax: if ρmaxl20< some constant the distribution of matter will not possess a singularity for one constant and an apparent horizon for some other smaller constant. These inequalities provide an approximate characterization of the singular (nonsingular) and trapped (nontrapped) partitions on the configuration space. Their

  14. A predicted T4 secretion system and conserved DNA-repeats identified in a subset of related Arthrobacter plasmids.

    PubMed

    Mihăşan, Marius; Brandsch, Roderich

    2016-10-01

    BLAST analysis of pAO1 ORFs of Arthrobacter nicotinovorans revealed 12 ORFs, including the ORF of a transcriptional regulator, predicted to encode the components of a T4-secretion system involved in bacterial conjugation. These ORFs were conserved and showed synteny among 14 Arthrobacter plasmids. A DNA repeat of about 370 nucleotides was found to be present 5' to the pAO1 ORFs of DUF4192-, DprA- and ParB-like proteins. Similar repeats were present in identical positions on 12 additional Arthrobacter plasmids. The DNA repeats on a particular plasmid are highly identical duplications. The DNA repeats contain alternating GC and AT reach sequences, potential protein DNA-binding sites and purine reach stretches. The sequences end with 5'ATG.AAC3' which results in the amino terminal sequence methionine (M) and asparagine (N) for all predicted DprA, DUF4192 and ParB proteins. The presences of conserved ORFs of a T4-secretion system and of similar DNA repeats suggest that these Arthrobacter plasmids are related and evolved from a common ancestor. The functional significance of the DNA repeats in a coordinated common mechanism of regulation of expression of the dprA-(involved in natural competence), parB- (involved in plasmid partitioning) and duf4192- (unknown function in plasmid life cycle) genes remains to be established. PMID:27524651

  15. Identifying social characteristics of health-related information seeker: a gender-specific approach for cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Jung, Minsoo

    2015-01-01

    While health information-seeking behavior as an indicator of health communication of patients including cancer survivors has been researched, few studies have focused on how socioeconomic position and media use combine to influence health-related information seekers. This study examined social characteristics of health information-seeking behavior taking into account an individual's socioeconomic position and their media use in Korea, a developed country. The data for this study came from a survey of 1,010 respondents drawn from a nationally representative sample in the Republic of Korea. We conducted multivariate logistic regression analyses for gender-specific effects. We found that men who reported high household income were one and half times more likely to seek health information than those with low income status. We also found that women who performed Internet searches by computer at home were almost two times more likely to seek health information than those who did not. Similar results were found for men as well. Our analyses revealed that socioeconomic position and media use are associated with health information-seeking behavior by gender. Studies on information seekers may bring us more effective health promotion and relevant intervention for people with chronic conditions including cancer survivors. PMID:25773838

  16. Comparative epigenomics in distantly related teleost species identifies conserved cis-regulatory nodes active during the vertebrate phylotypic period

    PubMed Central

    Tena, Juan J.; González-Aguilera, Cristina; Fernández-Miñán, Ana; Vázquez-Marín, Javier; Parra-Acero, Helena; Cross, Joe W.; Rigby, Peter W.J.; Carvajal, Jaime J.; Wittbrodt, Joachim; Gómez-Skarmeta, José L.; Martínez-Morales, Juan R.

    2014-01-01

    The complex relationship between ontogeny and phylogeny has been the subject of attention and controversy since von Baer’s formulations in the 19th century. The classic concept that embryogenesis progresses from clade general features to species-specific characters has often been revisited. It has become accepted that embryos from a clade show maximum morphological similarity at the so-called phylotypic period (i.e., during mid-embryogenesis). According to the hourglass model, body plan conservation would depend on constrained molecular mechanisms operating at this period. More recently, comparative transcriptomic analyses have provided conclusive evidence that such molecular constraints exist. Examining cis-regulatory architecture during the phylotypic period is essential to understand the evolutionary source of body plan stability. Here we compare transcriptomes and key epigenetic marks (H3K4me3 and H3K27ac) from medaka (Oryzias latipes) and zebrafish (Danio rerio), two distantly related teleosts separated by an evolutionary distance of 115–200 Myr. We show that comparison of transcriptome profiles correlates with anatomical similarities and heterochronies observed at the phylotypic stage. Through comparative epigenomics, we uncover a pool of conserved regulatory regions (≈700), which are active during the vertebrate phylotypic period in both species. Moreover, we show that their neighboring genes encode mainly transcription factors with fundamental roles in tissue specification. We postulate that these regulatory regions, active in both teleost genomes, represent key constrained nodes of the gene networks that sustain the vertebrate body plan. PMID:24709821

  17. Identifying Individual Risk Factors and Documenting the Pattern of Heat-Related Illness through Analyses of Hospitalization and Patterns of Household Cooling

    PubMed Central

    Schmeltz, Michael T.; Sembajwe, Grace; Marcotullio, Peter J.; Grassman, Jean A.; Himmelstein, David U.; Woolhandler, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    Background As climate change increases the frequency and intensity of extreme heat events researchers and public health officials must work towards understanding the causes and outcomes of heat-related morbidity and mortality. While there have been many studies on both heat-related illness (HRI), there are fewer on heat-related morbidity than on heat-related mortality. Objective To identify individual and environmental risk factors for hospitalizations and document patterns of household cooling. Methods We performed a pooled cross-sectional analysis of secondary U.S. data, the Nationwide Inpatient Sample. Risk ratios were calculated from multivariable models to identify risk factors for hospitalizations. Hierarchical modeling was also employed to identify relationships between individual and hospital level predictors of hospitalizations. Patterns of air conditioning use were analyzed among the vulnerable populations identified. Results Hospitalizations due to HRI increased over the study period compared to all other hospitalizations. Populations at elevated risk for HRI hospitalization were blacks, males and all age groups above the age of 40. Those living in zip-codes in the lowest income quartile and the uninsured were also at an increased risk. Hospitalizations for HRI in rural and small urban clusters were elevated, compared to urban areas. Conclusions Risk factors for HRI include age greater than 40, male gender and hospitalization in rural areas or small urban clusters. Our analysis also revealed an increasing pattern of HRI hospitalizations over time and decreased association between common comorbidities and heat illnesses which may be indicative of underreporting. PMID:25742021

  18. The Design of a Survey Instrument to Aid in Identifying Sex Related Barriers to Employment and the Administration of That Instrument to Rural and Urban Employers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, B. Dolores; Mook, Corena

    A project was conducted to design a survey instrument that would help in identifying sex-related barriers to employment and to administer that instrument to employers in both rural and urban counties of Kansas. It was projected that the data derived from the survey could be used to aid in designing vocational education methods and techniques.…

  19. A Review of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Infection and HPV Vaccine-Related Attitudes and Sexual Behaviors among College-Aged Women in the United States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ratanasiripong, Nop T.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To identify human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and HPV vaccine-related attitudes among college-aged women and the relationship between HPV vaccine uptake and subsequent sexual behaviors. Methods: PubMed, MEDLINE, CINAHL, and Google Scholar searches were performed from 2006, the date after the first HPV vaccine became available, to…

  20. Multiple Genes Related to Muscle Identified through a Joint Analysis of a Two-stage Genome-wide Association Study for Racing Performance of 1,156 Thoroughbreds

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Dong-Hyun; Lee, Jin Woo; Park, Jong-Eun; Choi, Ik-Young; Oh, Hee-Seok; Kim, Hyeon Jeong; Kim, Heebal

    2015-01-01

    Thoroughbred, a relatively recent horse breed, is best known for its use in horse racing. Although myostatin (MSTN) variants have been reported to be highly associated with horse racing performance, the trait is more likely to be polygenic in nature. The purpose of this study was to identify genetic variants strongly associated with racing performance by using estimated breeding value (EBV) for race time as a phenotype. We conducted a two-stage genome-wide association study to search for genetic variants associated with the EBV. In the first stage of genome-wide association study, a relatively large number of markers (~54,000 single-nucleotide polymorphisms, SNPs) were evaluated in a small number of samples (240 horses). In the second stage, a relatively small number of markers identified to have large effects (170 SNPs) were evaluated in a much larger number of samples (1,156 horses). We also validated the SNPs related to MSTN known to have large effects on racing performance and found significant associations in the stage two analysis, but not in stage one. We identified 28 significant SNPs related to 17 genes. Among these, six genes have a function related to myogenesis and five genes are involved in muscle maintenance. To our knowledge, these genes are newly reported for the genetic association with racing performance of Thoroughbreds. It complements a recent horse genome-wide association studies of racing performance that identified other SNPs and genes as the most significant variants. These results will help to expand our knowledge of the polygenic nature of racing performance in Thoroughbreds. PMID:25925054

  1. Multiple Genes Related to Muscle Identified through a Joint Analysis of a Two-stage Genome-wide Association Study for Racing Performance of 1,156 Thoroughbreds.

    PubMed

    Shin, Dong-Hyun; Lee, Jin Woo; Park, Jong-Eun; Choi, Ik-Young; Oh, Hee-Seok; Kim, Hyeon Jeong; Kim, Heebal

    2015-06-01

    Thoroughbred, a relatively recent horse breed, is best known for its use in horse racing. Although myostatin (MSTN) variants have been reported to be highly associated with horse racing performance, the trait is more likely to be polygenic in nature. The purpose of this study was to identify genetic variants strongly associated with racing performance by using estimated breeding value (EBV) for race time as a phenotype. We conducted a two-stage genome-wide association study to search for genetic variants associated with the EBV. In the first stage of genome-wide association study, a relatively large number of markers (~54,000 single-nucleotide polymorphisms, SNPs) were evaluated in a small number of samples (240 horses). In the second stage, a relatively small number of markers identified to have large effects (170 SNPs) were evaluated in a much larger number of samples (1,156 horses). We also validated the SNPs related to MSTN known to have large effects on racing performance and found significant associations in the stage two analysis, but not in stage one. We identified 28 significant SNPs related to 17 genes. Among these, six genes have a function related to myogenesis and five genes are involved in muscle maintenance. To our knowledge, these genes are newly reported for the genetic association with racing performance of Thoroughbreds. It complements a recent horse genome-wide association studies of racing performance that identified other SNPs and genes as the most significant variants. These results will help to expand our knowledge of the polygenic nature of racing performance in Thoroughbreds. PMID:25925054

  2. Preliminary comparison of the Essie and PubMed search engines for answering clinical questions using MD on Tap, a PDA-based program for accessing biomedical literature.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Victoria R; Hauser, Susan E

    2005-01-01

    MD on Tap, a PDA application that searches and retrieves biomedical literature, is specifically designed for use by mobile healthcare professionals. With the goal of improving the usability of the application, a preliminary comparison was made of two search engines (PubMed and Essie) to determine which provided most efficient path to the desired clinically-relevant information. PMID:16779415

  3. Preliminary comparison of the Essie and PubMed search engines for answering clinical questions using MD on Tap, a PDA-based program for accessing biomedical literature

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, Victoria R.; Hauser, Susan E.

    2005-01-01

    MD on Tap, a PDA application that searches and retrieves biomedical literature, is specifically designed for use by mobile healthcare professionals. With the goal of improving the usability of the application, a preliminary comparison was made of two search engines (PubMed and Essie) to determine which provided most efficient path to the desired clinically-relevant information. PMID:16779415

  4. The first case of CDK5RAP2-related primary microcephaly in a non-consanguineous patient identified by next generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Tan, Christopher A; Topper, Scott; Ward Melver, Catherine; Stein, Jennifer; Reeder, Amanda; Arndt, Kelly; Das, Soma

    2014-04-01

    Primary autosomal recessive microcephaly (MCPH) is a genetically heterogeneous condition characterized by congenital microcephaly and intellectual disability. To date, 10 MCPH loci have been identified and due to the genetic heterogeneity of this condition, molecular testing for MCPH can be complicated. Our methods involved employing a next generation sequencing panel of MCPH-related genes allowing for the evaluation of multiple disease loci simultaneously. Next generation sequencing analysis of a 6 year old female with primary microcephaly identified novel compound heterozygous mutations (c.524_528del and c.4005-1G>A) in the CDK5RAP2 gene. A review of the published literature to date reveals that only three mutations have been previously reported in the CDK5RAP2 gene in the homozygous state in three Northern Pakistani and one Somali consanguineous MCPH families. Our patient represents the first non-consanguineous Caucasian individual to have been identified with CDK5RAP2-related MCPH. As only a handful of patients have been reported in the literature with CDK5RAP2-related MCPH, we anticipate the identification of individuals with CDK5RAP2 mutations from all ethnic backgrounds will continue. Our patient contributes to the ethnic and genotypic spectrum of CDK5RAP2-related MCPH and supports the occurrence of this genetic condition beyond that of consanguineous families of certain ethnic populations. Our results also highlight the utility of multi-gene sequencing panels to elucidate the etiology of genetically heterogeneous conditions. PMID:23726037

  5. Clinical use of meconium fatty acid ethyl esters for identifying children at risk for alcohol-related disabilities: the first reported case.

    PubMed

    Zelner, Irene; Shor, Sarit; Lynn, Hazel; Roukema, Henry; Lum, Lisa; Eisinga, Kirsten; Koren, Gideon

    2012-01-01

    Fatty acid ethyl esters (FAEEs) in meconium are validated biomarkers of heavy fetal alcohol exposure that may potentially be used clinically for identifying children at risk for alcohol-related disabilities. However, until now, FAEEs have been largely used anonymously in epidemiological studies, and by child protection authorities in need for verification of heavy alcohol use in pregnancy. Here we describe the first case of a neonate identified as part of a research study on a pilot neonatal screening program for prenatal alcohol exposure. The neonate's meconium tested high for FAEEs (52 nmol/g; positive cut-off ≥ 2 nmol/g), which prompted active follow-up of the infant's development, identifying early neurocognitive problems and allowing initiation of a remedial program. PMID:22247425

  6. MirSNP, a database of polymorphisms altering miRNA target sites, identifies miRNA-related SNPs in GWAS SNPs and eQTLs

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Numerous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with complex diseases have been identified by genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) studies. However, few of these SNPs have explicit biological functions. Recent studies indicated that the SNPs within the 3’UTR regions of susceptibility genes could affect complex traits/diseases by affecting the function of miRNAs. These 3’UTR SNPs are functional candidates and therefore of interest to GWAS and eQTL researchers. Description We developed a publicly available online database, MirSNP (http://cmbi.bjmu.edu.cn/mirsnp), which is a collection of human SNPs in predicted miRNA-mRNA binding sites. We identified 414,510 SNPs that might affect miRNA-mRNA binding. Annotations were added to these SNPs to predict whether a SNP within the target site would decrease/break or enhance/create an miRNA-mRNA binding site. By applying MirSNP database to three brain eQTL data sets, we identified four unreported SNPs (rs3087822, rs13042, rs1058381, and rs1058398), which might affect miRNA binding and thus affect the expression of their host genes in the brain. We also applied the MirSNP database to our GWAS for schizophrenia: seven predicted miRNA-related SNPs (p < 0.0001) were found in the schizophrenia GWAS. Our findings identified the possible functions of these SNP loci, and provide the basis for subsequent functional research. Conclusion MirSNP could identify the putative miRNA-related SNPs from GWAS and eQTLs researches and provide the direction for subsequent functional researches. PMID:23173617

  7. Dissecting the genetics of the human transcriptome identifies novel trait-related trans-eQTLs and corroborates the regulatory relevance of non-protein coding loci†

    PubMed Central

    Kirsten, Holger; Al-Hasani, Hoor; Holdt, Lesca; Gross, Arnd; Beutner, Frank; Krohn, Knut; Horn, Katrin; Ahnert, Peter; Burkhardt, Ralph; Reiche, Kristin; Hackermüller, Jörg; Löffler, Markus; Teupser, Daniel; Thiery, Joachim; Scholz, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Genetics of gene expression (eQTLs or expression QTLs) has proved an indispensable tool for understanding biological pathways and pathomechanisms of trait-associated SNPs. However, power of most genome-wide eQTL studies is still limited. We performed a large eQTL study in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of 2112 individuals increasing the power to detect trans-effects genome-wide. Going beyond univariate SNP-transcript associations, we analyse relations of eQTLs to biological pathways, polygenetic effects of expression regulation, trans-clusters and enrichment of co-localized functional elements. We found eQTLs for about 85% of analysed genes, and 18% of genes were trans-regulated. Local eSNPs were enriched up to a distance of 5 Mb to the transcript challenging typically implemented ranges of cis-regulations. Pathway enrichment within regulated genes of GWAS-related eSNPs supported functional relevance of identified eQTLs. We demonstrate that nearest genes of GWAS-SNPs might frequently be misleading functional candidates. We identified novel trans-clusters of potential functional relevance for GWAS-SNPs of several phenotypes including obesity-related traits, HDL-cholesterol levels and haematological phenotypes. We used chromatin immunoprecipitation data for demonstrating biological effects. Yet, we show for strongly heritable transcripts that still little trans-chromosomal heritability is explained by all identified trans-eSNPs; however, our data suggest that most cis-heritability of these transcripts seems explained. Dissection of co-localized functional elements indicated a prominent role of SNPs in loci of pseudogenes and non-coding RNAs for the regulation of coding genes. In summary, our study substantially increases the catalogue of human eQTLs and improves our understanding of the complex genetic regulation of gene expression, pathways and disease-related processes. PMID:26019233

  8. Proof of concept: A bioinformatic and serological screening method for identifying new peptide antigens for Chlamydia trachomatis related sequelae in women☆

    PubMed Central

    Stansfield, Scott H.; Patel, Pooja; Debattista, Joseph; Armitage, Charles W.; Cunningham, Kelly; Timms, Peter; Allan, John; Mittal, Aruna; Huston, Wilhelmina M.

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to identify new peptide antigens from Chlamydia (C.) trachomatis in a proof of concept approach which could be used to develop an epitope-based serological diagnostic for C. trachomatis related infertility in women. A bioinformatics analysis was conducted examining several immunodominant proteins from C. trachomatis to identify predicted immunoglobulin epitopes unique to C. trachomatis. A peptide array of these epitopes was screened against participant sera. The participants (all female) were categorized into the following cohorts based on their infection and gynecological history; acute (single treated infection with C. trachomatis), multiple (more than one C. trachomatis infection, all treated), sequelae (PID or tubal infertility with a history of C. trachomatis infection), and infertile (no history of C. trachomatis infection and no detected tubal damage). The bioinformatics strategy identified several promising epitopes. Participants who reacted positively in the peptide 11 ELISA were found to have an increased likelihood of being in the sequelae cohort compared to the infertile cohort with an odds ratio of 16.3 (95% c.i. 1.65–160), with 95% specificity and 46% sensitivity (0.19–0.74). The peptide 11 ELISA has the potential to be further developed as a screening tool for use during the early IVF work up and provides proof of concept that there may be further peptide antigens which could be identified using bioinformatics and screening approaches. PMID:24600556

  9. Proof of concept: A bioinformatic and serological screening method for identifying new peptide antigens for Chlamydia trachomatis related sequelae in women.

    PubMed

    Stansfield, Scott H; Patel, Pooja; Debattista, Joseph; Armitage, Charles W; Cunningham, Kelly; Timms, Peter; Allan, John; Mittal, Aruna; Huston, Wilhelmina M

    2013-01-01

    This study aimed to identify new peptide antigens from Chlamydia (C.) trachomatis in a proof of concept approach which could be used to develop an epitope-based serological diagnostic for C. trachomatis related infertility in women. A bioinformatics analysis was conducted examining several immunodominant proteins from C. trachomatis to identify predicted immunoglobulin epitopes unique to C. trachomatis. A peptide array of these epitopes was screened against participant sera. The participants (all female) were categorized into the following cohorts based on their infection and gynecological history; acute (single treated infection with C. trachomatis), multiple (more than one C. trachomatis infection, all treated), sequelae (PID or tubal infertility with a history of C. trachomatis infection), and infertile (no history of C. trachomatis infection and no detected tubal damage). The bioinformatics strategy identified several promising epitopes. Participants who reacted positively in the peptide 11 ELISA were found to have an increased likelihood of being in the sequelae cohort compared to the infertile cohort with an odds ratio of 16.3 (95% c.i. 1.65-160), with 95% specificity and 46% sensitivity (0.19-0.74). The peptide 11 ELISA has the potential to be further developed as a screening tool for use during the early IVF work up and provides proof of concept that there may be further peptide antigens which could be identified using bioinformatics and screening approaches. PMID:24600556

  10. Charge dependence of identified two-hadron correlation relative to the reaction plane in Pb-Pb collisions measured with ALICE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onderwaater, Jacobus; ALICE Collaboration

    2015-05-01

    Recently a non-zero charge dependence of two-particle correlation relative to the reaction plane in relativistic heavy-ion collisions was observed by RHIC and LHC experiments. The interpretation of these results is a hot topic of debate in the heavy-ion community because of its possible implication for our understanding of parity violation in strong interactions. We extend the ALICE measurement of the charge dependent two-particle correlation in Pb-Pb collisions at \\sqrt{sNN} = 2.76 TeV with one identified hadron (pion, kaon, or proton). Correlations are reported as a function of the identified hadron transverse momentum. These new results are important for disentangling contributions from a number of competing physics effects, such as local charge conservation coupled with strong anisotropic flow, flow fluctuations, and possible contribution from parity violation coupled with strong magnetic fields, the so-called chiral magnetic effect.

  11. A computer-based interview to identify HIV risk behaviors and to assess patient preferences for HIV-related health states.

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, G. D.; Owens, D. K.; Padian, N.; Cardinalli, A. B.; Sullivan, A. N.; Nease, R. F.

    1994-01-01

    We developed a computer-based utility assessment tool to assess the preferences of patients towards HIV-related health states and identify risk behaviors (both sexual and drug related) of the patient being interviewed. The reliability of the computer-based interview was assessed through comparison with person-to-person interviews. Our pilot study included 22 patients. Twelve of these patients were also interviewed by the research assistants in person-to-person interviews. The agreement between the person-to-person and computer-based interviews was excellent (3 discrepancies of 180 compared answers), and the majority of the patients preferred to use the computer to disclose sensitive information regarding risk behaviors. Our study suggests that assessment of patient preferences and risk factors can be performed reliably through a computer-based interview. PMID:7949919

  12. Establishing Minimum Flow Requirements Based on Benthic Vegetation: What are Some Issues Related to Identifying Quantity of Inflow and Tools Used to Quantify Ecosystem Response?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, M. J.; Nuttle, W. K.; Cosby, B. J.; Marshall, F. E.

    2005-05-01

    Establishing minimum flow requirements in aquatic ecosystems is one way to stipulate controls on water withdrawals in a watershed. The basis of the determination is to identify the amount of flow needed to sustain a threshold ecological function. To develop minimum flow criteria an understanding of ecological response in relation to flow is essential. Several steps are needed including: (1) identification of important resources and ecological functions, (2) compilation of available information, (3) determination of historical conditions, (4) establishment of technical relationships between inflow and resources, and (5) identification of numeric criteria that reflect the threshold at which resources are harmed. The process is interdisciplinary requiring the integration of hydrologic and ecologic principles with quantitative assessments. The tools used quantify the ecological response and key questions related to how the quantity of flow influences the ecosystem are examined by comparing minimum flow determination in two different aquatic systems in South Florida. Each system is characterized by substantial hydrologic alteration. The first, the Caloosahatchee River is a riverine system, located on the southwest coast of Florida. The second, the Everglades- Florida Bay ecotone, is a wetland mangrove ecosystem, located on the southern tip of the Florida peninsula. In both cases freshwater submerged aquatic vegetation (Vallisneria americana or Ruppia maritima), located in areas of the saltwater- freshwater interface has been identified as a basis for minimum flow criteria. The integration of field studies, laboratory studies, and literature review was required. From this information we developed ecological modeling tools to quantify and predict plant growth in response to varying environmental variables. Coupled with hydrologic modeling tools questions relating to the quantity and timing of flow and ecological consequences in relation to normal variability are addressed.

  13. Perception differences between groups of employees identifying the factors that influence a return to work after a work-related musculoskeletal injury.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Thomas F

    2003-01-01

    Employee health and productivity losses as a result of work-related injury are estimated to be US dollars 1.2 trillion annually to US companies. This is approximately 14.3% of the gross domestic product [6,8,11,35]. Workers' compensation, medical care, and short and long-term disability are a part of these costs. Controlling or eliminating these costs is a problem for US employers [3,6,14,21,29]. The study discussed in this article examined the perceptions of manufacturing employees in identifying factors that influence a return to work after a work-related musculoskeletal injury. The classification of employees who participated in this study were safety professionals, supervisors and workers from the manufacturing industry in central Kentucky. The worker group consisted of material handlers, assembly line workers and quality control inspectors. The participants completed a developed survey instrument, the Return to Work Perception Survey. This survey instrument examined the perception of the participants on factors related to return to work: company policies and procedures, job satisfaction, worker relationships and work environment. The results indicated safety professionals and supervisors perceptions differ from workers on the variables of job satisfaction, worker relationships and work environment. Their perceptions did not differ on the variable relating to company policies and procedures. In addition, the safety professional and supervisor groups rated the items addressing job satisfaction higher than did the worker group. The worker group did not differ from one another on any of the factors. Implications of this study for manufacturing companies suggest (a). identifying those issues contributing to employee job satisfaction, (b). developing a plan for achieving increased job satisfaction and employee recognition at the workplace among all workers, and (c). consider allowing employees to develop new capacities and new learning, thus fostering motivation and

  14. Identifying anti-cancer drug response related genes using an integrative analysis of transcriptomic and genomic variations with cell line-based drug perturbations

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yunqin; Ma, Qin; Wei, Jia; Liu, Qi

    2016-01-01

    Background Clinical responses to anti-cancer therapies often only benefit a defined subset of patients. Predicting the best treatment strategy hinges on our ability to effectively translate genomic data into actionable information on drug responses. Results To achieve this goal, we compiled a comprehensive collection of baseline cancer genome data and drug response information derived from a large panel of cancer cell lines. This data set was applied to identify the signature genes relevant to drug sensitivity and their resistance by integrating CNVs and the gene expression of cell lines with in vitro drug responses. We presented an efficient in-silico pipeline for integrating heterogeneous cell line data sources with the simultaneous modeling of drug response values across all the drugs and cell lines. Potential signature genes correlated with drug response (sensitive or resistant) in different cancer types were identified. Using signature genes, our collaborative filtering-based drug response prediction model outperformed the 44 algorithms submitted to the DREAM competition on breast cancer cells. The functions of the identified drug response related signature genes were carefully analyzed at the pathway level and the synthetic lethality level. Furthermore, we validated these signature genes by applying them to the classification of the different subtypes of the TCGA tumor samples, and further uncovered their in vivo implications using clinical patient data. Conclusions Our work may have promise in translating genomic data into customized marker genes relevant to the response of specific drugs for a specific cancer type of individual patients. PMID:26824188

  15. Identifying systems failures in the pathway to a catastrophic event: an analysis of national incident report data relating to vinca alkaloids

    PubMed Central

    Franklin, Bryony Dean; Panesar, Sukhmeet S; Vincent, Charles; Donaldson, Liam J

    2014-01-01

    Background Catastrophic errors in healthcare are rare, yet the consequences are so serious that where possible, special procedures are put in place to prevent them. As systems become safer, it becomes progressively more difficult to detect the remaining vulnerabilities. Using inadvertent intrathecal administration of vinca alkaloids as an example, we investigated whether analysis of incident report data describing low-harm events could bridge this gap. Methods We studied nine million patient safety incidents reported from England and Wales between November 2003 and May 2013. We searched for reports relating to administration of vinca alkaloids in patients also receiving intrathecal medication, and classified the failures identified against steps in the relevant national protocol. Results Of 38 reports that met our inclusion criteria, none resulted in actual harm. The stage of the medication process most commonly involved was ‘supply, transport and storage’ (15 cases). Seven cases related to dispensing, six to documentation, and four each to prescribing and administration. Defences most commonly breached related to separation of intravenous vinca alkaloids and intrathecal medication in timing (n=16) and location (n=8); potential for confusion due to inadequate separation of these drugs therefore remains. Problems involved in six cases did not align with the procedural defences in place, some of which represented major hazards. Conclusions We identified areas of concern even within the context of a highly controlled standardised national process. If incident reporting systems include and encourage reports of no-harm incidents in addition to actual patient harm, they can facilitate monitoring the resilience of healthcare processes. Patient safety incidents that produce the most serious harm are often rare, and it is difficult to know whether patients are adequately protected. Our approach provides a potential solution. PMID:24643293

  16. Transcriptomic Analysis Identifies Candidate Genes Related to Intramuscular Fat Deposition and Fatty Acid Composition in the Breast Muscle of Squabs (Columba).

    PubMed

    Ye, Manhong; Zhou, Bin; Wei, Shanshan; Ding, MengMeng; Lu, Xinghui; Shi, Xuehao; Ding, Jiatong; Yang, Shengmei; Wei, Wanhong

    2016-01-01

    Despite the fact that squab is consumed throughout the world because of its high nutritional value and appreciated sensory attributes, aspects related to its characterization, and in particular genetic issues, have rarely been studied. In this study, meat traits in terms of pH, water-holding capacity, intramuscular fat content, and fatty acid profile of the breast muscle of squabs from two meat pigeon breeds were determined. Breed-specific differences were detected in fat-related traits of intramuscular fat content and fatty acid composition. RNA-Sequencing was applied to compare the transcriptomes of muscle and liver tissues between squabs of two breeds to identify candidate genes associated with the differences in the capacity of fat deposition. A total of 27 differentially expressed genes assigned to pathways of lipid metabolism were identified, of which, six genes belonged to the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor signaling pathway along with four other genes. Our results confirmed in part previous reports in livestock and provided also a number of genes which had not been related to fat deposition so far. These genes can serve as a basis for further investigations to screen markers closely associated with intramuscular fat content and fatty acid composition in squabs. The data from this study were deposited in the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI)'s Sequence Read Archive under the accession numbers SRX1680021 and SRX1680022. This is the first transcriptome analysis of the muscle and liver tissue in Columba using next generation sequencing technology. Data provided here are of potential value to dissect functional genes influencing fat deposition in squabs. PMID:27175015

  17. Transcriptomic Analysis Identifies Candidate Genes Related to Intramuscular Fat Deposition and Fatty Acid Composition in the Breast Muscle of Squabs (Columba)

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Manhong; Zhou, Bin; Wei, Shanshan; Ding, MengMeng; Lu, Xinghui; Shi, Xuehao; Ding, Jiatong; Yang, Shengmei; Wei, Wanhong

    2016-01-01

    Despite the fact that squab is consumed throughout the world because of its high nutritional value and appreciated sensory attributes, aspects related to its characterization, and in particular genetic issues, have rarely been studied. In this study, meat traits in terms of pH, water-holding capacity, intramuscular fat content, and fatty acid profile of the breast muscle of squabs from two meat pigeon breeds were determined. Breed-specific differences were detected in fat-related traits of intramuscular fat content and fatty acid composition. RNA-Sequencing was applied to compare the transcriptomes of muscle and liver tissues between squabs of two breeds to identify candidate genes associated with the differences in the capacity of fat deposition. A total of 27 differentially expressed genes assigned to pathways of lipid metabolism were identified, of which, six genes belonged to the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor signaling pathway along with four other genes. Our results confirmed in part previous reports in livestock and provided also a number of genes which had not been related to fat deposition so far. These genes can serve as a basis for further investigations to screen markers closely associated with intramuscular fat content and fatty acid composition in squabs. The data from this study were deposited in the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI)’s Sequence Read Archive under the accession numbers SRX1680021 and SRX1680022. This is the first transcriptome analysis of the muscle and liver tissue in Columba using next generation sequencing technology. Data provided here are of potential value to dissect functional genes influencing fat deposition in squabs. PMID:27175015

  18. Six DNA polymorphisms in the low density lipoprotein receptor gene: their genetic relationship and an example of their use for identifying affected relatives of patients with familial hypercholesterolaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Humphries, S; King-Underwood, L; Gudnason, V; Seed, M; Delattre, S; Clavey, V; Fruchart, J C

    1993-01-01

    We have determined the relative allele frequency and estimated linkage disequilibrium between six DNA polymorphisms of the low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor gene. Polymorphisms were detected using the enzymes SfaNI, TaqI, StuI, HincII, AvaII, and NcoI after DNA amplification by the polymerase chain reaction. Strong linkage disequilibrium was detected between many of the pair wise comparisons in a sample of 60 patients heterozygous for familial hypercholesterolaemia (FH). Using the enzymes HincII, NcoI, and SfaNI, 85% of patients were heterozygous for at least one polymorphism and thus potentially informative for cosegregation studies. The polymorphisms were used to follow the inheritance of the defective allele of the LDL receptor gene in the relatives of a patient with FH. Assays of LDL receptor activity on lymphoblastoid cell lines from two members of the family was used to confirm that the proband, but not the hypercholesterolaemic brother, had a defect in the LDL receptor. In the family, none of the children had inherited the allele of the LDL receptor gene inferred to be defective. The problems associated with this cosegregation approach to identify relatives of patients with a clinical diagnosis of FH are discussed. PMID:8098067

  19. Sterylglucoside Catabolism in Cryptococcus neoformans with Endoglycoceramidase-related Protein 2 (EGCrP2), the First Steryl-β-glucosidase Identified in Fungi*

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Takashi; Ito, Tomoharu; Goda, Hatsumi M.; Ishibashi, Yohei; Miyamoto, Tomofumi; Ikeda, Kazutaka; Taguchi, Ryo; Okino, Nozomu; Ito, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Cryptococcosis is an infectious disease caused by pathogenic fungi, such as Cryptococcus neoformans and Cryptococcus gattii. The ceramide structure (methyl-d18:2/h18:0) of C. neoformans glucosylceramide (GlcCer) is characteristic and strongly related to its pathogenicity. We recently identified endoglycoceramidase-related protein 1 (EGCrP1) as a glucocerebrosidase in C. neoformans and showed that it was involved in the quality control of GlcCer by eliminating immature GlcCer during the synthesis of GlcCer (Ishibashi, Y., Ikeda, K., Sakaguchi, K., Okino, N., Taguchi, R., and Ito, M. (2012) Quality control of fungus-specific glucosylceramide in Cryptococcus neoformans by endoglycoceramidase-related protein 1 (EGCrP1). J. Biol. Chem. 287, 368–381). We herein identified and characterized EGCrP2, a homologue of EGCrP1, as the enzyme responsible for sterylglucoside catabolism in C. neoformans. In contrast to EGCrP1, which is specific to GlcCer, EGCrP2 hydrolyzed various β-glucosides, including GlcCer, cholesteryl-β-glucoside, ergosteryl-β-glucoside, sitosteryl-β-glucoside, and para-nitrophenyl-β-glucoside, but not α-glucosides or β-galactosides, under acidic conditions. Disruption of the EGCrP2 gene (egcrp2) resulted in the accumulation of a glycolipid, the structure of which was determined following purification to ergosteryl-3β-glucoside, a major sterylglucoside in fungi, by mass spectrometric and two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance analyses. This glycolipid accumulated in vacuoles and EGCrP2 was detected in vacuole-enriched fraction. These results indicated that EGCrP2 was involved in the catabolism of ergosteryl-β-glucoside in the vacuoles of C. neoformans. Distinct growth arrest, a dysfunction in cell budding, and an abnormal vacuole morphology were detected in the egcrp2-disrupted mutants, suggesting that EGCrP2 may be a promising target for anti-cryptococcal drugs. EGCrP2, classified into glycohydrolase family 5, is the first steryl

  20. Trait Self-Control, Identified-Introjected Religiosity and Health-Related-Feelings in Healthy Muslims: A Structural Equation Model Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Briki, Walid; Chaouachi, Anis; Patrick, Thomas; Chamari, Karim

    2015-01-01

    Aim The present study attempted to test McCullough and Willoughby’s hypothesis that self-control mediates the relationships between religiosity and psychosocial outcomes. Specifically, this study examined whether trait self-control (TSC) mediates the relationship of identified-introjected religiosity with positive and negative health-related-feelings (HRF) in healthy Muslims. Methods Two hundred eleven French-speaking participants (116 females, 95 males; Mage = 28.15, SDage = 6.90) answered questionnaires. One hundred ninety participants were retained for the analyses because they reported to be healthy (105 females, 85 males; Mage = 27.72, SDage = 6.80). To examine the relationships between religiosity, TSC and HRF, two competing mediation models were tested using structural equation model analysis: While a starting model used TSC as mediator of the religiosity-HRF relationship, an alternative model used religiosity as mediator of the TSC-HRF relationship. Results The findings revealed that TSC mediated the relationship between identified religiosity and positive HRF, and that identified religiosity mediated the relationship between TSC and positive and negative HRF, thereby validating both models. Moreover, the comparison of both models showed that the starting model explained 13.211% of the variance (goodness of fit = 1.000), whereas the alternative model explained 6.877% of the variance (goodness of fit = 0.987). Conclusion These results show that the starting model is the most effective model to account for the relationships between religiosity, TSC, and HRF. Therefore, this study provides initial insights into how religiosity influences psychological health through TSC. Important practical implications for the religious education are suggested. PMID:25962179

  1. Identifying the type and appropriateness of the evaluations of selected agriculturally related science and technology-based USAID projects conducted between 1985 and 1995

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayles, Allen E.

    1998-12-01

    A review of the literature indicated that baseline data that described how and what were being evaluated at the project level by agencies involved in third world development had not been published. This was a descriptive study using content analysis of the available evaluative reports for the USAID projects involved with the transfer of agriculturally-related technology identified in the National Science Foundation research project, Assessing the Literature on the Benefits of External Science and Technology Aid Assistance to Developing Countries (Pytlik, Vasudevan, Bayles & Spitznogle, 1997). The research concludes that impact evaluations were not being conducted at the project level. While over 60% of the projects were evaluated, socioeconomic impacts were included in less than 50% of these projects. The most frequent socioeconomic impacts reported were project sustainability and gender equity. Socioeconomic impacts that were infrequently reported were: who benefits, who does not benefit, target group participation, environmental effects, and the impact of the project on the nutritional status of a household.

  2. A genome-wide association study of posttraumatic stress disorder identifies the retinoid-related orphan receptor alpha (RORA) gene as a significant risk locus

    PubMed Central

    Logue, Mark W.; Baldwin, Clinton; Guffanti, Guia; Melista, Efi; Wolf, Erika J.; Reardon, Annemarie F.; Uddin, Monica; Wildman, Derek; Galea, Sandro; Koenen, Karestan C.; Miller, Mark W.

    2012-01-01

    We describe the results of the first genome-wide association study of PTSD performed using trauma-exposed white non-Hispanic participants from a cohort of veterans and their intimate partners (295 cases and 196 controls). Several SNPs yielded evidence of association. One SNP (rs8042149), located in the retinoid-related orphan receptor alpha gene (RORA), reached genome-wide significance. Nominally significant associations were observed for other RORA SNPs in two African American replication samples—one from the veteran cohort (43 cases and 41 controls) and another independent cohort (100 cases and 421 controls). However, only the associated SNP from the veteran African American replication sample survived gene-level multiple testing correction. RORA has been implicated in prior GWAS studies of psychiatric disorders and is known to play an important role in neuroprotection and other behaviorally-relevant processes. This study represents an important step towards identifying the genetic underpinnings of PTSD. PMID:22869035

  3. High-throughput, cell-based screens to identify small-molecule inhibitors of ricin toxin and related category b ribosome inactivating proteins (RIPs).

    PubMed

    Wahome, Paul G; Mantis, Nicholas J

    2013-02-01

    Ricin is a member of the ubiquitous ribosome-inactivating protein (RIP) family of toxins. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) classify ricin and related toxins as Category B biothreat agents. There are currently no antidotes or therapeutics to counteract RIPs in humans. The discovery of effective small-molecule inhibitors of RIPs is increasingly possible, however, due to the availability and accessibility of diverse small-molecule chemical libraries coupled with robust robotics and automated screening methodologies. In this article, we describe a cell-based, high-throughput screening strategy and secondary assays that we have successfully used to identify compounds that target ricin toxin's enzymatic activity and intracellular trafficking, as well as stress-activated signaling pathways associated with cell death. The methods described in the protocol are amenable to the other RIPs. PMID:23408195

  4. A comprehensive, genome-wide analysis of autophagy-related genes identified in tobacco suggests a central role of autophagy in plant response to various environmental cues.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xue-mei; Zhao, Peng; Wang, Wei; Zou, Jie; Cheng, Tian-he; Peng, Xiong-bo; Sun, Meng-xiang

    2015-08-01

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved mechanism in both animals and plants, which has been shown to be involved in various essential developmental processes in plants. Nicotiana tabacum is considered to be an ideal model plant and has been widely used for the study of the roles of autophagy in the processes of plant development and in the response to various stresses. However, only a few autophagy-related genes (ATGs) have been identified in tobacco up to now. Here, we identified 30 ATGs belonging to 16 different groups in tobacco through a genome-wide survey. Comprehensive expression profile analysis reveals an abroad expression pattern of these ATGs, which could be detected in all tissues tested under normal growth conditions. Our series tests further reveal that majority of ATGs are sensitive and responsive to different stresses including nutrient starvation, plant hormones, heavy metal and other abiotic stresses, suggesting a central role of autophagy, likely as an effector, in plant response to various environmental cues. This work offers a detailed survey of all ATGs in tobacco and also suggests manifold functions of autophagy in both normal plant growth and plant response to environmental stresses. PMID:26205094

  5. A comprehensive, genome-wide analysis of autophagy-related genes identified in tobacco suggests a central role of autophagy in plant response to various environmental cues

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xue-mei; Zhao, Peng; Wang, Wei; Zou, Jie; Cheng, Tian-he; Peng, Xiong-bo; Sun, Meng-xiang

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved mechanism in both animals and plants, which has been shown to be involved in various essential developmental processes in plants. Nicotiana tabacum is considered to be an ideal model plant and has been widely used for the study of the roles of autophagy in the processes of plant development and in the response to various stresses. However, only a few autophagy-related genes (ATGs) have been identified in tobacco up to now. Here, we identified 30 ATGs belonging to 16 different groups in tobacco through a genome-wide survey. Comprehensive expression profile analysis reveals an abroad expression pattern of these ATGs, which could be detected in all tissues tested under normal growth conditions. Our series tests further reveal that majority of ATGs are sensitive and responsive to different stresses including nutrient starvation, plant hormones, heavy metal and other abiotic stresses, suggesting a central role of autophagy, likely as an effector, in plant response to various environmental cues. This work offers a detailed survey of all ATGs in tobacco and also suggests manifold functions of autophagy in both normal plant growth and plant response to environmental stresses. PMID:26205094

  6. The European GWAS-identified risk SNP rs457717 within IQGAP2 is not associated with age-related hearing impairment in Han male Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Luo, Huajie; Wu, Hao; Shen, Hailian; Chen, Haifeng; Yang, Tao; Huang, Zhiwu; Jin, Xiaojie; Pang, Xiuhong; Li, Lei; Hu, Xianting; Jiang, Xuemei; Fan, Zhuping; Li, Jiping

    2016-07-01

    This study aimed to test the association between the European GWAS-identified risk IQGAP2 SNP rs457717 (A>G) and age-related hearing impairment (ARHI) in a Han male Chinese (HMC) population. A total of 2420 HMC subjects were divided into two groups [group 70+: >70 years (n = 1306), and group 70-: ≤70 years (n = 1114)]. The participants were categorised into case and control groups according to Z high scores for group 70- and the severity of hearing loss and different audiogram shapes identified by K-means cluster analysis for group 70+. The IQGAP2 tagSNP rs457717 was genotyped in accordance with the different ARHI phenotypes. The genotype distributions of IQGAP2 (AA/AG/GG) were not significantly different between the case and control groups (P = 0.613 for group 70-; P = 0.602 for group 70+). Compared with genotype AA, the ORs of genotypes AG and GG for ARHI were not significantly different following adjustment for other environmental risk factors. We demonstrated that the IQGAP2 TagSNP rs457717 (A/G) was not associated with ARHI in HMC individuals. PMID:26187738

  7. Pharmacist-Led Medication Reviews to Identify and Collaboratively Resolve Drug-Related Problems in Psychiatry – A Controlled, Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Carolin; Pauly, Anne; Mayr, Andreas; Grömer, Teja; Lenz, Bernd; Kornhuber, Johannes; Friedland, Kristina

    2015-01-01

    Aim of the study This prospective, controlled trial aimed to assess the effect of pharmacist-led medication reviews on the medication safety of psychiatric inpatients by the resolution of Drug-Related Problems (DRP). Both the therapy appropriateness measured with the Medication Appropriateness Index (MAI) and the number of unsolved DRP per patient were chosen as primary outcome measures. Methods Depending on their time of admission, 269 psychiatric patients that were admitted to a psychiatric university hospital were allocated in control (09/2012-03/2013) or intervention group (05/2013-12/2013). In both groups, DRP were identified by comprehensive medication reviews by clinical pharmacists at admission, during the hospital stay, and at discharge. In the intervention group, recommendations for identified DRP were compiled by the pharmacists and discussed with the therapeutic team. In the control group, recommendations were not provided except for serious or life threatening DRP. As a primary outcome measure, the changes in therapy appropriateness from admission to discharge as well as from admission to three months after discharge (follow-up) assessed with the MAI were compared between both groups. The second primary outcome was the number of unsolved DRP per patient after completing the study protocol. The DRP type, the relevance and the potential of drugs to cause DRP were also evaluated. Results The intervention led to a reduced MAI score by 1.4 points per patient (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.8–2.0) at discharge and 1.3 points (95% CI: 0.7–1.9) at follow-up compared with controls. The number of unsolved DRP in the intervention group was 1.8 (95% CI: 1.5–2.1) less than in control. Conclusion The pharmaceutical medication reviews with interdisciplinary discussion of identified DRP appears to be a worthy strategy to improve medication safety in psychiatry as reflected by less unsolved DRP per patient and an enhanced appropriateness of therapy. The

  8. Identifying Individual, Cultural and Asthma-Related Risk and Protective Factors Associated With Resilient Asthma Outcomes in Urban Children and Families

    PubMed Central

    McQuaid, Elizabeth L.; Jandasek, Barbara; Kopel, Sheryl J.; Seifer, Ronald; Klein, Robert B.; Potter, Christina; Fritz, Gregory K.

    2012-01-01

    Objective The goal of this study is to identify individual, family/cultural, and illness-related protective factors that may minimize asthma morbidity in the context of multiple urban risks in a sample of inner-city children and families. Methods Participating families are from African-American (33), Latino (51) and non-Latino white (47) backgrounds. A total of 131 children with asthma (56% male), ages 6–13 years and their primary caregivers were included. Results Analyses supported the relationship between cumulative risks and asthma morbidity across children of the sample. Protective processes functioned differently by ethnic group. For example, Latino families exhibited higher levels of family connectedness, and this was associated with lower levels of functional limitation due to asthma, in the context of risks. Conclusions This study demonstrates the utility of examining multilevel protective processes that may guard against urban risks factors to decrease morbidity. Intervention programs for families from specific ethnic groups can be tailored to consider individual, family-based/cultural and illness-related supports that decrease stress and enhance aspects of asthma treatment. PMID:22408053

  9. Outer membrane proteomics of kanamycin-resistant Escherichia coli identified MipA as a novel antibiotic resistance-related protein.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Zhang, Dan-feng; Lin, Xiang-min; Peng, Xuan-xian

    2015-06-01

    Antibiotic-resistant bacteria are a great threat to human health and food safety and there is an urgent need to understand the mechanisms of resistance for combating these bacteria. In the current study, comparative proteomic methodologies were applied to identify Escherichia coli K-12 outer membrane (OM) proteins related to kanamycin resistance. Mass spectrometry and western blotting results revealed that OM proteins TolC, Tsx and OstA were up-regulated, whereas MipA, OmpA, FadL and OmpW were down-regulated in kanamycin-resistant E. coli K-12 strain. Genetic deletion of tolC (ΔtolC-Km) led to a 2-fold decrease in the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of kanamycin and deletion of mipA (ΔmipA-Km) resulted in a 4-fold increase in the MIC of kanamycin. Changes in the MICs for genetically modified strains could be completely recovered by gene complementation. Compared with the wild-type strain, the survival capability of ΔompA-Km was significantly increased and that of Δtsx-Km was significantly decreased. We further evaluated the role and expression of MipA in response to four other antibiotics including nalidixic acid, streptomycin, chloramphenicol and aureomycin, which suggested that MipA was a novel OM protein related to antibiotic resistance. PMID:25940639

  10. Molecular genetics of addiction and related heritable phenotypes: genome wide association approaches identify “connectivity constellation” and drug target genes with pleiotropic effects

    PubMed Central

    Uhl, George R; Drgon, Tomas; Johnson, Catherine; Li, Chuan-Yun; Contoreggi, Carlo; Hess, Judith; Naiman, Daniel; Liu, Qing-Rong

    2013-01-01

    Genome wide association (GWA) can elucidate molecular genetic bases for human individual differences in “complex” phenotypes that include vulnerability to addiction. Here, we review: a) evidence that supports polygenic models with (at least) modest heterogeneity for the genetic architectures of addiction and several related phenotypes; b) technical and ethical aspects of importance for understanding genome wide association data: genotyping in individual samples vs DNA pools, analytic approaches, power estimation and ethical issues in genotyping individuals with illegal behaviors; c) the samples and the data that shape our current understanding of the molecular genetics of individual differences in vulnerability to substance dependence and related phenotypes; d) overlaps between GWA datasets for dependence on different substances; e) overlaps between GWA data for addictions vs other heritable, brain-based phenotypes that include: i) bipolar disorder, ii) cognitive ability, iii) frontal lobe brain volume, iv) ability to successfully quit smoking, v) neuroticism and vi) Alzheimer’s disease. These convergent results identify potential targets for drugs that might modify addictions and play roles in these other phenotypes. They add to evidence that individual differences in the quality and quantity of brain connections make pleiotropic contributions to individual differences in vulnerability to addictions and to related brain disorders and phenotypes. A “connectivity constellation” of brain phenotypes and disorders appears to receive substantial pathogenic contributions from individual differences in a constellation of genes whose variants provide individual differences in the specification of brain connectivities during development and in adulthood. Heritable brain differences that underlie addiction vulnerability thus lie squarely in the midst of the repertoire of heritable brain differences that underlie vulnerability to other common brain disorders and

  11. Genomewide meta-analysis identifies loci associated with IGF-I and IGFBP-3 levels with impact on age-related traits.

    PubMed

    Teumer, Alexander; Qi, Qibin; Nethander, Maria; Aschard, Hugues; Bandinelli, Stefania; Beekman, Marian; Berndt, Sonja I; Bidlingmaier, Martin; Broer, Linda; Cappola, Anne; Ceda, Gian Paolo; Chanock, Stephen; Chen, Ming-Huei; Chen, Tai C; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Chung, Jonathan; Del Greco Miglianico, Fabiola; Eriksson, Joel; Ferrucci, Luigi; Friedrich, Nele; Gnewuch, Carsten; Goodarzi, Mark O; Grarup, Niels; Guo, Tingwei; Hammer, Elke; Hayes, Richard B; Hicks, Andrew A; Hofman, Albert; Houwing-Duistermaat, Jeanine J; Hu, Frank; Hunter, David J; Husemoen, Lise L; Isaacs, Aaron; Jacobs, Kevin B; Janssen, Joop A M J L; Jansson, John-Olov; Jehmlich, Nico; Johnson, Simon; Juul, Anders; Karlsson, Magnus; Kilpelainen, Tuomas O; Kovacs, Peter; Kraft, Peter; Li, Chao; Linneberg, Allan; Liu, Yongmei; Loos, Ruth J F; Lorentzon, Mattias; Lu, Yingchang; Maggio, Marcello; Magi, Reedik; Meigs, James; Mellström, Dan; Nauck, Matthias; Newman, Anne B; Pollak, Michael N; Pramstaller, Peter P; Prokopenko, Inga; Psaty, Bruce M; Reincke, Martin; Rimm, Eric B; Rotter, Jerome I; Saint Pierre, Aude; Schurmann, Claudia; Seshadri, Sudha; Sjögren, Klara; Slagboom, P Eline; Strickler, Howard D; Stumvoll, Michael; Suh, Yousin; Sun, Qi; Zhang, Cuilin; Svensson, Johan; Tanaka, Toshiko; Tare, Archana; Tönjes, Anke; Uh, Hae-Won; van Duijn, Cornelia M; van Heemst, Diana; Vandenput, Liesbeth; Vasan, Ramachandran S; Völker, Uwe; Willems, Sara M; Ohlsson, Claes; Wallaschofski, Henri; Kaplan, Robert C

    2016-10-01

    The growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor (IGF) axis can be manipulated in animal models to promote longevity, and IGF-related proteins including IGF-I and IGF-binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) have also been implicated in risk of human diseases including cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, and cancer. Through genomewide association study of up to 30 884 adults of European ancestry from 21 studies, we confirmed and extended the list of previously identified loci associated with circulating IGF-I and IGFBP-3 concentrations (IGF1, IGFBP3, GCKR, TNS3, GHSR, FOXO3, ASXL2, NUBP2/IGFALS, SORCS2, and CELSR2). Significant sex interactions, which were characterized by different genotype-phenotype associations between men and women, were found only for associations of IGFBP-3 concentrations with SNPs at the loci IGFBP3 and SORCS2. Analyses of SNPs, gene expression, and protein levels suggested that interplay between IGFBP3 and genes within the NUBP2 locus (IGFALS and HAGH) may affect circulating IGF-I and IGFBP-3 concentrations. The IGF-I-decreasing allele of SNP rs934073, which is an eQTL of ASXL2, was associated with lower adiposity and higher likelihood of survival beyond 90 years. The known longevity-associated variant rs2153960 (FOXO3) was observed to be a genomewide significant SNP for IGF-I concentrations. Bioinformatics analysis suggested enrichment of putative regulatory elements among these IGF-I- and IGFBP-3-associated loci, particularly of rs646776 at CELSR2. In conclusion, this study identified several loci associated with circulating IGF-I and IGFBP-3 concentrations and provides clues to the potential role of the IGF axis in mediating effects of known (FOXO3) and novel (ASXL2) longevity-associated loci. PMID:27329260

  12. Genome-wide DNA methylation identifies trophoblast invasion-related genes: Claudin-4 and Fucosyltransferase IV control mobility via altering matrix metalloproteinase activity.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yuxiang; Blair, John D; Yuen, Ryan K C; Robinson, Wendy P; von Dadelszen, Peter

    2015-05-01

    Previously we showed that extravillous cytotrophoblast (EVT) outgrowth and migration on a collagen gel explant model were affected by exposure to decidual natural killer cells (dNK). This study investigates the molecular causes behind this phenomenon. Genome wide DNA methylation of exposed and unexposed EVT was assessed using the Illumina Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip array (450 K array). We identified 444 differentially methylated CpG loci in dNK-treated EVT compared with medium control (P < 0.05). The genes associated with these loci had critical biological roles in cellular development, cellular growth and proliferation, cell signaling, cellular assembly and organization by Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA). Furthermore, 23 mobility-related genes were identified by IPA from dNK-treated EVT. Among these genes, CLDN4 (encoding claudin-4) and FUT4 (encoding fucosyltransferase IV) were chosen for follow-up studies because of their biological relevance from research on tumor cells. The results showed that the mRNA and protein expressions of both CLDN4 and FUT4 in dNK-treated EVT were significantly reduced compared with control (P < 0.01 for both CLDN4 and FUT4 mRNA expression; P < 0.001 for CLDN4 and P < 0.01 for FUT4 protein expression), and were inversely correlated with DNA methylation. Knocking down CLDN4 and FUT4 by small interfering RNA reduced trophoblast invasion, possibly through the altered matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and/or MMP-9 expression and activity. Taken together, dNK alter EVT mobility at least partially in association with an alteration of DNA methylation profile. Hypermethylation of CLDN4 and FUT4 reduces protein expression. CLDN4 and FUT4 are representative genes that participate in modulating trophoblast mobility. PMID:25697377

  13. A genome-wide association study for somatic cell score using the Illumina high-density bovine beadchip identifies several novel QTL potentially related to mastitis susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Meredith, Brian K; Berry, Donagh P; Kearney, Francis; Finlay, Emma K; Fahey, Alan G; Bradley, Daniel G; Lynn, David J

    2013-01-01

    Mastitis is an inflammation-driven disease of the bovine mammary gland that occurs in response to physical damage or infection and is one of the most costly production-related diseases in the dairy industry worldwide. We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) to identify genetic loci associated with somatic cell score (SCS), an indicator trait of mammary gland inflammation. A total of 702 Holstein-Friesian bulls were genotyped for 777,962 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and associated with SCS phenotypes. The SCS phenotypes were expressed as daughter yield deviations (DYD) based on a large number of progeny performance records. A total of 138 SNPs on 15 different chromosomes reached genome-wide significance (corrected p-value ≤ 0.05) for association with SCS (after correction for multiple testing). We defined 28 distinct QTL regions and a number of candidate genes located in these QTL regions were identified. The most significant association (p-value = 1.70 × 10(-7)) was observed on chromosome 6. This QTL had no known genes annotated within it, however, the Ensembl Genome Browser predicted the presence of a small non-coding RNA (a Y RNA gene) in this genomic region. This Y RNA gene was 99% identical to human RNY4. Y RNAs are a rare type of non-coding RNA that were originally discovered due to their association with the autoimmune disease, systemic lupus erythematosus. Examining small-RNA sequencing (RNAseq) data being generated by us in multiple different mastitis-pathogen challenged cell-types has revealed that this Y RNA is expressed (but not differentially expressed) in these cells. Other QTL regions identified in this study also encoded strong candidate genes for mastitis susceptibility. A QTL region on chromosome 13, for example, was found to contain a cluster of β-defensin genes, a gene family with known roles in innate immunity. Due to the increased SNP density, this study also refined the boundaries for several known QTL for SCS and

  14. A genome-wide linkage and association study of musical aptitude identifies loci containing genes related to inner ear development and neurocognitive functions.

    PubMed

    Oikkonen, J; Huang, Y; Onkamo, P; Ukkola-Vuoti, L; Raijas, P; Karma, K; Vieland, V J; Järvelä, I

    2015-02-01

    Humans have developed the perception, production and processing of sounds into the art of music. A genetic contribution to these skills of musical aptitude has long been suggested. We performed a genome-wide scan in 76 pedigrees (767 individuals) characterized for the ability to discriminate pitch (SP), duration (ST) and sound patterns (KMT), which are primary capacities for music perception. Using the Bayesian linkage and association approach implemented in program package KELVIN, especially designed for complex pedigrees, several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) near genes affecting the functions of the auditory pathway and neurocognitive processes were identified. The strongest association was found at 3q21.3 (rs9854612) with combined SP, ST and KMT test scores (COMB). This region is located a few dozen kilobases upstream of the GATA binding protein 2 (GATA2) gene. GATA2 regulates the development of cochlear hair cells and the inferior colliculus (IC), which are important in tonotopic mapping. The highest probability of linkage was obtained for phenotype SP at 4p14, located next to the region harboring the protocadherin 7 gene, PCDH7. Two SNPs rs13146789 and rs13109270 of PCDH7 showed strong association. PCDH7 has been suggested to play a role in cochlear and amygdaloid complexes. Functional class analysis showed that inner ear and schizophrenia-related genes were enriched inside the linked regions. This study is the first to show the importance of auditory pathway genes in musical aptitude. PMID:24614497

  15. CAM on PubMed

    MedlinePlus

    ... Grants & Funding What Will NCCIH Fund? Overview Funding Strategy Funding Opportunities Grantee Policies Application Resources Program Directors Clinical Research Toolbox Types of Grants and Contracts General Award Mechanisms Small Business Research Grant Program (SBIR) All Grant Information Training ...

  16. Nine susceptibility loci for hepatitis B virus-related hepatocellular carcinoma identified by a pilot two-stage genome-wide association study

    PubMed Central

    QU, LI-SHUAI; JIN, FEI; GUO, YAN-MEI; LIU, TAO-TAO; XUE, RU-YI; HUANG, XIAO-WU; XU, MIN; CHEN, TAO-YANG; NI, ZHENG-PING; SHEN, XI-ZHONG

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have indicated that complex interactions among viral, environmental and genetic factors lead to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). To identify susceptibility alleles for hepatitis B virus (HBV)-related HCC, the present study conducted a pilot two-phase genome-wide association study (GWAS) in 660 Han Chinese individuals. In phase 1, a total of 500,447 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were genotyped in 50 HCC cases and 50 controls using Affymetrix GeneChip 500k Array Set. In phase 2, 1,152 SNPs were selected from phase 1 and genotyped in 282 cases and 278 controls using the Illumina GoldenGate platform. The prior probability of HCC in control subjects was assigned at 0.01, and false-positive report probability (FPRP) was utilized to evaluate the statistical significance. In phase 1, one SNP (rs2212522) showed a significant association with HCC (Pallele=5.23×10−8; ORallele=4.96; 95% CI, 2.72–9.03). In phase 2, among 27 SNPs with unadjusted Pallele<0.05, 9 SNPs were associated with HCC based on FPRP criteria (FPRP <0.20). The strongest statistical evidence for an association signal was with rs2120243 (combined ORallele=1.76; 95% CI, 1.39–2.22; P=2.00×10−6), which maps within the fourth intron of VEPH1. The second strongest statistical evidence for an association was identified for rs1350171 (combined ORallele=1.66; 95% CI, 1.33–2.07; P=6.48×10−6), which maps to the region downstream of the FZD4 gene. The other potential susceptibility genes included PCDH9, PRMT6, LHX1, KIF2B and L3MBTL4. In conclusion, this pilot two-phase GWAS provides the evidence for the existence of common susceptibility loci for HCC. These genes involved various signaling pathways, including those associated with transforming growth factor β, insulin/phosphoinositide 3 kinase, Wnt and epidermal growth factor receptor. These associations must be replicated and validated in larger studies. PMID:26870257

  17. Transcriptome Analysis Identifies Candidate Genes Related to Triacylglycerol and Pigment Biosynthesis and Photoperiodic Flowering in the Ornamental and Oil-Producing Plant, Camellia reticulata (Theaceae)

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Qiu-Yang; Huang, Hui; Tong, Yan; Xia, En-Hua; Gao, Li-Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Camellia reticulata, which is native to Southwest China, is famous for its ornamental flowers and high-quality seed oil. However, the lack of genomic information for this species has largely hampered our understanding of its key pathways related to oil production, photoperiodic flowering process and pigment biosynthesis. Here, we first sequenced and characterized the transcriptome of a diploid C. reticulata in an attempt to identify genes potentially involved in triacylglycerol biosynthesis (TAGBS), photoperiodic flowering, flavonoid biosynthesis (FlaBS), carotenoid biosynthesis (CrtBS) pathways. De novo assembly of the transcriptome provided a catalog of 141,460 unigenes with a total length of ~96.1 million nucleotides (Mnt) and an N50 of 1080 nt. Of them, 22,229 unigenes were defined as differentially expressed genes (DEGs) across five sequenced tissues. A large number of annotated genes in C. reticulata were found to have been duplicated, and differential expression patterns of these duplicated genes were commonly observed across tissues, such as the differential expression of SOC1_a, SOC1_b, and SOC1_c in the photoperiodic flowering pathway. Up-regulation of SAD_a and FATA genes and down-regulation of FAD2_a gene in the TAGBS pathway in seeds may be relevant to the ratio of monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFAs) to polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFAs) in seed oil. MYBF1, a transcription regulator gene of the FlaBS pathway, was found with great sequence variation and alteration of expression patterns, probably resulting in functionally evolutionary differentiation in C. reticulata. MYBA1_a and some anthocyanin-specific biosynthetic genes in the FlaBS pathway were highly expressed in both flower buds and flowers, suggesting important roles of anthocyanin biosynthesis in flower development. Besides, a total of 40,823 expressed sequence tag simple sequence repeats (EST-SSRs) were identified in the C. reticulata transcriptome, providing valuable marker resources for

  18. Transcriptome Analysis Identifies Candidate Genes Related to Triacylglycerol and Pigment Biosynthesis and Photoperiodic Flowering in the Ornamental and Oil-Producing Plant, Camellia reticulata (Theaceae).

    PubMed

    Yao, Qiu-Yang; Huang, Hui; Tong, Yan; Xia, En-Hua; Gao, Li-Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Camellia reticulata, which is native to Southwest China, is famous for its ornamental flowers and high-quality seed oil. However, the lack of genomic information for this species has largely hampered our understanding of its key pathways related to oil production, photoperiodic flowering process and pigment biosynthesis. Here, we first sequenced and characterized the transcriptome of a diploid C. reticulata in an attempt to identify genes potentially involved in triacylglycerol biosynthesis (TAGBS), photoperiodic flowering, flavonoid biosynthesis (FlaBS), carotenoid biosynthesis (CrtBS) pathways. De novo assembly of the transcriptome provided a catalog of 141,460 unigenes with a total length of ~96.1 million nucleotides (Mnt) and an N50 of 1080 nt. Of them, 22,229 unigenes were defined as differentially expressed genes (DEGs) across five sequenced tissues. A large number of annotated genes in C. reticulata were found to have been duplicated, and differential expression patterns of these duplicated genes were commonly observed across tissues, such as the differential expression of SOC1_a, SOC1_b, and SOC1_c in the photoperiodic flowering pathway. Up-regulation of SAD_a and FATA genes and down-regulation of FAD2_a gene in the TAGBS pathway in seeds may be relevant to the ratio of monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFAs) to polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFAs) in seed oil. MYBF1, a transcription regulator gene of the FlaBS pathway, was found with great sequence variation and alteration of expression patterns, probably resulting in functionally evolutionary differentiation in C. reticulata. MYBA1_a and some anthocyanin-specific biosynthetic genes in the FlaBS pathway were highly expressed in both flower buds and flowers, suggesting important roles of anthocyanin biosynthesis in flower development. Besides, a total of 40,823 expressed sequence tag simple sequence repeats (EST-SSRs) were identified in the C. reticulata transcriptome, providing valuable marker resources for

  19. Transcriptomics in Interferon-α-Treated Patients Identifies Inflammation-, Neuroplasticity- and Oxidative Stress-Related Signatures as Predictors and Correlates of Depression.

    PubMed

    Hepgul, Nilay; Cattaneo, Annamaria; Agarwal, Kosh; Baraldi, Sara; Borsini, Alessandra; Bufalino, Chiara; Forton, Daniel M; Mondelli, Valeria; Nikkheslat, Naghmeh; Lopizzo, Nicola; Riva, Marco A; Russell, Alice; Hotopf, Matthew; Pariante, Carmine M

    2016-09-01

    Owing to the unique opportunity to assess individuals before and after they develop depression within a short timeframe, interferon-α (IFN-α) treatment for chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is an ideal model to identify molecular mechanisms relevant to major depression, especially in the context of enhanced inflammation. Fifty-eight patients were assessed prospectively, at baseline and monthly over 24 weeks of IFN-α treatment. New-onset cases of depression were determined using the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI). Whole-blood transcriptomic analyses were conducted to investigate the following: (1) baseline gene expression differences associated with future development of IFN-α-induced depression, before IFN-α, and (2) longitudinal gene expression changes from baseline to weeks 4 or 24 of IFN-α treatment, separately in those who did and did not develop depression. Transcriptomics data were analyzed using Partek Genomics Suite (1.4-fold, FDR adjusted p⩽0.05) and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis Software. Twenty patients (34%) developed IFN-α-induced depression. At baseline, 73 genes were differentially expressed in patients who later developed depression compared with those who did not. After 4 weeks of IFN-α treatment, 592 genes were modulated in the whole sample, representing primarily IFN-α-responsive genes. Substantially more genes were modulated only in patients who developed depression (n=506, compared with n=70 in patients who did not), with enrichment in inflammation-, neuroplasticity- and oxidative stress-related pathways. A similar picture was observed at week 24. Our data indicate that patients who develop IFN-α-induced depression have an increased biological sensitivity to IFN-α, as shown by larger gene expression changes, and specific signatures both as predictors and as correlates. PMID:27067128

  20. Identifying Early Paleozoic tectonic relations in a region affected by post-Taconian transcurrent faulting, an example from the PA-DE Piedmont

    SciTech Connect

    Alcock, J. . Dept. of Environmental Science); Wagner, M.E. . Geology); Srogi, L.A. . Dept. of Geology and Astronomy)

    1993-03-01

    Post-Taconian transcurrent faulting in the Appalachian Piedmont presents a significant problem to workers attempting to reconstruct the Early Paleozoic tectonic history. One solution to the problem is to identify blocks that lie between zones of transcurrent faulting and that retain the Early Paleozoic arrangement of litho-tectonic units. The authors propose that a comparison of metamorphic histories of different units can be used to recognize blocks of this type. The Wilmington Complex (WC) arc terrane, the pre-Taconian Laurentian margin rocks (LM) exposed in basement-cored massifs, and the Wissahickon Group metapelites (WS) that lie between them are three litho-tectonic units in the PA-DE Piedmont that comprise a block assembled in the Early Paleozoic. Evidence supporting this interpretation includes: (1) Metamorphic and lithologic differences across the WC-WS contact and detailed geologic mapping of the contact that suggest thrusting of the WC onto the WS; (2) A metamorphic gradient in the WS with highest grade, including spinel-cordierite migmatites, adjacent to the WC indicating that peak metamorphism of the WS resulted from heating by the WC; (3) A metamorphic discontinuity at the WS-LM contact, evidence for emplacement of the WS onto the LM after WS peak metamorphism; (4) A correlation of mineral assemblage in the Cockeysville Marble of the LM with distance from the WS indicating that peak metamorphism of the LM occurred after emplacement of the WS; and (5) Early Paleozoic lower intercept zircon ages for the LM that are interpreted to date Taconian regional metamorphism. Analysis of metamorphism and its timing relative to thrusting suggest that the WS was associated with the WC before the WS was emplaced onto the LM during the Taconian. It follows that these units form a block that has not been significantly disrupted by later transcurrent shear.

  1. Secondary electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry and a novel statistical bioinformatic approach identifies a cancer-related profile in exhaled breath of breast cancer patients: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Lozano Sinues, Pablo; Landoni, Elena; Miceli, Rosalba; Dibari, Vincenza F; Dugo, Matteo; Agresti, Roberto; Tagliabue, Elda; Cristoni, Simone; Orlandi, Rosaria

    2015-09-01

    Breath analysis represents a new frontier in medical diagnosis and a powerful tool for cancer biomarker discovery due to the recent development of analytical platforms for the detection and identification of human exhaled volatile compounds. Statistical and bioinformatic tools may represent an effective complement to the technical and instrumental enhancements needed to fully exploit clinical applications of breath analysis. Our exploratory study in a cohort of 14 breast cancer patients and 11 healthy volunteers used secondary electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (SESI-MS) to detect a cancer-related volatile profile. SESI-MS full-scan spectra were acquired in a range of 40-350 mass-to-charge ratio (m/z), converted to matrix data and analyzed using a procedure integrating data pre-processing for quality control, and a two-step class prediction based on machine-learning techniques, including a robust feature selection, and a classifier development with internal validation. MS spectra from exhaled breath showed an individual-specific breath profile and high reciprocal homogeneity among samples, with strong agreement among technical replicates, suggesting a robust responsiveness of SESI-MS. Supervised analysis of breath data identified a support vector machine (SVM) model including 8 features corresponding to m/z 106, 126, 147, 78, 148, 52, 128, 315 and able to discriminate exhaled breath from breast cancer patients from that of healthy individuals, with sensitivity and specificity above 0.9.Our data highlight the significance of SESI-MS as an analytical technique for clinical studies of breath analysis and provide evidence that our noninvasive strategy detects volatile signatures that may support existing technologies to diagnose breast cancer. PMID:26390050

  2. Transcriptomics in Interferon-α-Treated Patients Identifies Inflammation-, Neuroplasticity- and Oxidative Stress-Related Signatures as Predictors and Correlates of Depression

    PubMed Central

    Hepgul, Nilay; Cattaneo, Annamaria; Agarwal, Kosh; Baraldi, Sara; Borsini, Alessandra; Bufalino, Chiara; Forton, Daniel M; Mondelli, Valeria; Nikkheslat, Naghmeh; Lopizzo, Nicola; Riva, Marco A; Russell, Alice; Hotopf, Matthew; Pariante, Carmine M

    2016-01-01

    Owing to the unique opportunity to assess individuals before and after they develop depression within a short timeframe, interferon-α (IFN-α) treatment for chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is an ideal model to identify molecular mechanisms relevant to major depression, especially in the context of enhanced inflammation. Fifty-eight patients were assessed prospectively, at baseline and monthly over 24 weeks of IFN-α treatment. New-onset cases of depression were determined using the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI). Whole-blood transcriptomic analyses were conducted to investigate the following: (1) baseline gene expression differences associated with future development of IFN-α-induced depression, before IFN-α, and (2) longitudinal gene expression changes from baseline to weeks 4 or 24 of IFN-α treatment, separately in those who did and did not develop depression. Transcriptomics data were analyzed using Partek Genomics Suite (1.4-fold, FDR adjusted p⩽0.05) and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis Software. Twenty patients (34%) developed IFN-α-induced depression. At baseline, 73 genes were differentially expressed in patients who later developed depression compared with those who did not. After 4 weeks of IFN-α treatment, 592 genes were modulated in the whole sample, representing primarily IFN-α-responsive genes. Substantially more genes were modulated only in patients who developed depression (n=506, compared with n=70 in patients who did not), with enrichment in inflammation-, neuroplasticity- and oxidative stress-related pathways. A similar picture was observed at week 24. Our data indicate that patients who develop IFN-α-induced depression have an increased biological sensitivity to IFN-α, as shown by larger gene expression changes, and specific signatures both as predictors and as correlates. PMID:27067128

  3. Network Topology Analysis of Post-Mortem Brain Microarrays Identifies More Alzheimer's Related Genes and MicroRNAs and Points to Novel Routes for Fighting with the Disease.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekaran, Sreedevi; Bonchev, Danail

    2016-01-01

    Network-based approaches are powerful and beneficial tools to study complex systems in their entirety, elucidating the essential factors that turn the multitude of individual elements into a functional system. In this study we used critical network topology descriptors and guilt-by-association rule to explore and understand the significant molecular players, drug targets and underlying biological mechanisms of Alzheimer's disease. Analyzing two post-mortem brain gene microarrays (GSE4757 and GSE28146) with Pathway Studio software package we constructed and analyzed a set of protein-protein interaction, as well as miRNA-target networks. In a 4-step procedure the expression datasets were normalized using Robust Multi-array Average approach, while the modulation of gene expression by the disease was statistically evaluated by the empirical Bayes method from the limma Bioconductor package. Representative set of 214 seed-genes (p<0.01) common for the three brain sections of the two microarrays was thus created. The Pathway Studio analysis of the networks built identified 15 new potential AD-related genes and 17 novel AD-involved microRNAs. Using KEGG pathways relevant in Alzheimer's disease we built an integrated mechanistic network from the interactions between the overlapping genes in these pathways. Routes of possible disease initiation process were thus revealed through the CD4, DCN, and IL8 extracellular ligands. DAVID and IPA enrichment analysis uncovered a number of deregulated biological processes and pathways including neuron projection/differentiation, aging, oxidative stress, chemokine/ neurotrophin signaling, long-term potentiation and others. The findings in this study offer information of interest for subsequent experimental studies. PMID:26784894

  4. Development and application of the Safe Performance Index as a risk-based methodology for identifying major hazard-related safety issues in underground coal mines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinilakodi, Harisha

    The underground coal mining industry has been under constant watch due to the high risk involved in its activities, and scrutiny increased because of the disasters that occurred in 2006-07. In the aftermath of the incidents, the U.S. Congress passed the Mine Improvement and New Emergency Response Act of 2006 (MINER Act), which strengthened the existing regulations and mandated new laws to address the various issues related to a safe working environment in the mines. Risk analysis in any form should be done on a regular basis to tackle the possibility of unwanted major hazard-related events such as explosions, outbursts, airbursts, inundations, spontaneous combustion, and roof fall instabilities. One of the responses by the Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) in 2007 involved a new pattern of violations (POV) process to target mines with a poor safety performance, specifically to improve their safety. However, the 2010 disaster (worst in 40 years) gave an impression that the collective effort of the industry, federal/state agencies, and researchers to achieve the goal of zero fatalities and serious injuries has gone awry. The Safe Performance Index (SPI) methodology developed in this research is a straight-forward, effective, transparent, and reproducible approach that can help in identifying and addressing some of the existing issues while targeting (poor safety performance) mines which need help. It combines three injury and three citation measures that are scaled to have an equal mean (5.0) in a balanced way with proportionate weighting factors (0.05, 0.15, 0.30) and overall normalizing factor (15) into a mine safety performance evaluation tool. It can be used to assess the relative safety-related risk of mines, including by mine-size category. Using 2008 and 2009 data, comparisons were made of SPI-associated, normalized safety performance measures across mine-size categories, with emphasis on small-mine safety performance as compared to large- and

  5. Towards Identify Selective Antibacterial Peptides Based on Abstracts Meaning

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa-Santillán, Liliana I.; Sánchez-Escobar, Juan J.; Calixto-Romo, M. Angeles; Barbosa-Santillán, Luis F.

    2016-01-01

    We present an Identify Selective Antibacterial Peptides (ISAP) approach based on abstracts meaning. Laboratories and researchers have significantly increased the report of their discoveries related to antibacterial peptides in primary publications. It is important to find antibacterial peptides that have been reported in primary publications because they can produce antibiotics of different generations that attack and destroy the bacteria. Unfortunately, researchers used heterogeneous forms of natural language to describe their discoveries (sometimes without the sequence of the peptides). Thus, we propose that learning the words meaning instead of the antibacterial peptides sequence is possible to identify and predict antibacterial peptides reported in the PubMed engine. The ISAP approach consists of two stages: training and discovering. ISAP founds that the 35% of the abstracts sample had antibacterial peptides and we tested in the updated Antimicrobial Peptide Database 2 (APD2). ISAP predicted that 45% of the abstracts had antibacterial peptides. That is, ISAP found that 810 antibacterial peptides were not classified like that, so they are not reported in APD2. As a result, this new search tool would complement the APD2 with a set of peptides that are candidates to be antibacterial. Finally, 20% of the abstracts were not semantic related to APD2. PMID:27366202

  6. Towards Identify Selective Antibacterial Peptides Based on Abstracts Meaning.

    PubMed

    Barbosa-Santillán, Liliana I; Sánchez-Escobar, Juan J; Calixto-Romo, M Angeles; Barbosa-Santillán, Luis F

    2016-01-01

    We present an Identify Selective Antibacterial Peptides (ISAP) approach based on abstracts meaning. Laboratories and researchers have significantly increased the report of their discoveries related to antibacterial peptides in primary publications. It is important to find antibacterial peptides that have been reported in primary publications because they can produce antibiotics of different generations that attack and destroy the bacteria. Unfortunately, researchers used heterogeneous forms of natural language to describe their discoveries (sometimes without the sequence of the peptides). Thus, we propose that learning the words meaning instead of the antibacterial peptides sequence is possible to identify and predict antibacterial peptides reported in the PubMed engine. The ISAP approach consists of two stages: training and discovering. ISAP founds that the 35% of the abstracts sample had antibacterial peptides and we tested in the updated Antimicrobial Peptide Database 2 (APD2). ISAP predicted that 45% of the abstracts had antibacterial peptides. That is, ISAP found that 810 antibacterial peptides were not classified like that, so they are not reported in APD2. As a result, this new search tool would complement the APD2 with a set of peptides that are candidates to be antibacterial. Finally, 20% of the abstracts were not semantic related to APD2. PMID:27366202

  7. A cross-sectional study identifying the pattern of factors related to psychological intimate partner violence exposure in Slovenian family practice attendees: what hurt them the most

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Intimate partner violence (IPV) is yet to be fully acknowledged as a public health problem in Slovenia. This study aimed to explore the health and other patient characteristics associated with psychological IPV exposure and gender-related specificity in family clinic attendees. Methods In a multi-centre cross-sectional study, 960 family practice attendees aged 18 years and above were recruited. In 689 interviews with currently- or previously-partnered patients, the short form of A Domestic Violence Exposure Questionnaire and additional questions about behavioural patterns of exposure to psychological abuse in the past year were given. General practitioners (GPs) reviewed the medical charts of 470 patients who met the IPV exposure criteria. The Domestic Violence Exposure Medical Chart Check List was used, collecting data on the patients’ lives and physical, sexual and reproductive, and psychological health status, as well as sick leave, hospitalisation, visits to family practices and referrals to other clinical specialists in the past year. In multivariate logistic regression modelling the factors associated with past year psychological IPV exposure were identified, with P < 0.05 set as the level of statistical significance. Results Of the participants (n = 470), 12.1% (n = 57) were exposed to psychological IPV in the previous year (46 women and 11 men). They expressed more complaints regarding sexual and reproductive (p = 0.011), and psychological and behavioural status (p <0.001), in the year prior to the survey. Unemployment or working part-time, a college degree, an intimate relationship of six years or more and a history of disputes in the intimate relationship, increased the odds of psychological IPV exposure in the sample, explaining 41% of the variance. In females, unemployment and a history of disputes in the intimate relationship explained 43% of the variance. Conclusions The prevalence of psychological IPV above 10% during the past year

  8. Phylogenetic analysis identifies a 'Candidatus Phytoplasma oryzae'-related strain associated with yellow leaf disease of areca palm (Areca catechu L.) in India.

    PubMed

    Ramaswamy, Manimekalai; Nair, Smita; Soumya, V P; Thomas, George V

    2013-04-01

    Yellow leaf disease (YLD) with phytoplasmal aetiology is a serious disease of arecanut palm in India. The present study was undertaken to characterize the 16S rRNA and secA gene sequences of the Indian arecanut YLD phytoplasma for 'Candidatus Phytoplasma' species assignment and 16Sr group/subgroup classification. Phytoplasma 16S rRNA genes were amplified using three sets of semi-nested/nested primers, 1F7/7R3-1F7/7R2, 4Fwd/3Rev-4Fwd/5Rev and P1/P7-R16F2n/R16R2, producing amplicons of 491, 1150 and 1250 bp, respectively, from diseased samples. The amplicons were cloned and sequenced. A blast search showed that the sequences had 99 % similarity with sugar cane white leaf phytoplasma (16SrXI) and Napier grass stunt phytoplasma (16SrXI). Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene revealed the clustering of YLD phytoplasma with the rice yellow dwarf and Bermuda grass white leaf groups. The YLD phytoplasma F2nR2 sequence shared 97.5 % identity with that of 'Candidatus Phytoplasma oryzae' and 97.8 % identity with that of 'Candidatus Phytoplasma cynodontis'. Hence, for finer differentiation, we examined the secA gene-based phylogeny, where the YLD phytoplasma clustered with Napier grass stunt and sugar cane grassy shoot phytoplasmas, both belonging to the rice yellow dwarf group. Hence, we are assigning the Indian arecanut YLD phytoplasma as a 'Candidatus Phytoplasma oryzae'-related strain. Virtual RFLP analysis of a 1.2 kb fragment of the 16S rRNA gene (F2nR2 region) identified the Indian arecanut YLD phytoplasma as a member of 16SrXI-B subgroup. We name the phytoplasma Indian yellow leaf disease phytoplasma, to differentiate it from the Hainan YLD phytoplasma, which belongs to group 16SrI. PMID:22843718

  9. A saw is first identified as an object used on wood: ERP evidence for temporal differences between Thematic and Functional similarity relations.

    PubMed

    Wamain, Yannick; Pluciennicka, Ewa; Kalénine, Solène

    2015-05-01

    The role of functional and motor information in manipulable artifact object semantic organization is still poorly understood. In particular, several types of semantic relations involving object functional knowledge may be distinguished. Functional similarity relations group objects with similar functions at relatively specific (e.g. saw-axe, both used to cut wood) or general (saw-knife, both used to cut) levels. Thematic relations group objects based on their complementarity in events (saw used upon/with wood). Recent eye-tracking data showed distinct temporal time courses for the different semantic relations, with fastest processing of thematic relations and slowest processing of general function similarity relations. Behavioral data suggest the involvement of distinct cognitive mechanisms in manipulable artifact object semantic processing. The aim of the present study was to assess the neural correlates of thematic, and specific and general function similarity relation processing. Specifically, we investigated whether time course differences between semantic relations could be highlighted at the neurophysiological level. We used a protocol combining semantic priming with electroencephalography, and manipulated the type of semantic relation and the duration of the interval between prime and target objects. Two consistent and complementary results were shown. On N1 and P3 components, semantic priming was observed for thematic relations only. On N400 component, the type of semantic relation interacted with interval duration, and semantic priming was visible for all 3 relations after the longest interval only. Results revealed graded processing time courses for thematic, specific function similarity, and general function similarity relations at the neural level, and further indicate that thematic relations impact object processing during the early stages of object recognition. Findings suggest a hierarchical organization of three types of semantic relations based on

  10. A Data Mining Project to Identify Cardiovascular Related Factors That May Contribute to Changes in Visual Acuity Within the US Astronaut Corps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westby, Christian M.; Stein, Sydney P.; Platts, Steven H.

    2011-01-01

    Many of the cardiovascular-related adaptations that occur in the microgravity environment are due, in part, to a well-characterized cephalad-fluid shift that is evidenced by facial edema and decreased lower limb circumference. It is believed that most of these alterations occur as a compensatory response necessary to maintain a "normal" blood pressure and cardiac output while in space. However, data from both flight and analog research suggest that in some instances these microgravity-induced alterations may contribute to cardiovascular-related pathologies. Most concerning is the potential relation between the vision disturbances experienced by some long duration crewmembers and changes in cerebral blood flow and intra-ocular pressure. The purpose of this project was to identify cardiovascular measures that may potentially distinguish individuals at risk for visual disturbances after long duration space flight. Toward this goal, we constructed a dataset from Medical Operation tilt/stand test evaluations pre- (days L-15-L-5) and immediate post-flight (day R+0) on 20 (3 females, 17 males). We restricted our evaluation to only crewmembers who participated in both shuttle and space station missions. Data analysis was performed using both descriptive and analytical methods (Stata 11.2, College Station, TX) and are presented as means +/- 95% CI. Crewmembers averaged 5207 (3447 - 8934) flight hours across both long (MIR-23 through Expedition16) and short (STS-27 through STS-101) duration missions between 1988 and 2008. The mean age of the crew at the time of their most recent shuttle flight was 41 (34-44) compared to 47 (40-54) years during their time on station. In order to focus our analysis (we did not have codes to separate out subjects by symptomotology) , we performed a visual inspection of each cardiovascular measures captured during testing and plotted them against stand time, pre- to post-flight, and between mission duration. It was found that pulse pressure most

  11. Gang Identifiers and Terminology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cantrell, Mary Lynn

    1992-01-01

    Provides lists of gang identifiers and terminology. Suggests that, to find out names and associated identifiers of local gangs, readers should talk to their local police. Included in listing are descriptions of gang-related symbols, physical signals, graffiti, slogans, right-left rules, colors, clothing, jewelry, hair styles, and fingernails. Also…

  12. A systematic review of patient-related risk factors for catheter-related thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Leung, Amy; Heal, Clare; Perera, Marlon; Pretorius, Casper

    2015-10-01

    To identify patient-related risk factors for venous thrombosis in patients with central venous catheters (CVC) or peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC). We performed a systematic review of the literature assessing patient-related risk factors for thrombosis related to CVC or PICC. The databases PubMed, Ovid and the Cochrane library were searched for observational studies pertaining to patient-related risk factors for CVC and PICC-related thrombosis. The initial search through PubMed, Ovid and the Cochrane library yielded 516 results. After 71 duplicates were removed, 445 articles were assessed for eligibility based on title and abstract. Four hundred and eleven articles were then excluded and 33 full text articles were manually assessed for eligibility. Eight articles were eliminated as they did not contain content relevant to the review. Twenty-five studies were then selected to assess 20 risk factors. There were no consistent significant associations for catheter-related thrombosis across the twenty-five studies. Multiple studies identified age, malignancy, diabetes, obesity, chemotherapy, thrombophilia and a history of thrombosis as significant risk factors for catheter-related thrombosis. Inconsistent findings among studies make it difficult to establish which patient-related risk factors are associated with catheter-related thrombosis. Future studies could include larger sample sizes and more cases of catheter-related thrombosis to produce more significant results. Identification of patient-related risk factors could lead to early recognition of upper limb deep vein thrombosis in patients with catheters, thereby preventing complications. PMID:25680892

  13. Exon array analysis of head and neck cancers identifies a hypoxia related splice variant of LAMA3 associated with a poor prognosis.

    PubMed

    Moller-Levet, Carla S; Betts, Guy N J; Harris, Adrian L; Homer, Jarrod J; West, Catharine M L; Miller, Crispin J

    2009-11-01

    The identification of alternatively spliced transcript variants specific to particular biological processes in tumours should increase our understanding of cancer. Hypoxia is an important factor in cancer biology, and associated splice variants may present new markers to help with planning treatment. A method was developed to analyse alternative splicing in exon array data, using probeset multiplicity to identify genes with changes in expression across their loci, and a combination of the splicing index and a new metric based on the variation of reliability weighted fold changes to detect changes in the splicing patterns. The approach was validated on a cancer/normal sample dataset in which alternative splicing events had been confirmed using RT-PCR. We then analysed ten head and neck squamous cell carcinomas using exon arrays and identified differentially expressed splice variants in five samples with high versus five with low levels of hypoxia-associated genes. The analysis identified a splice variant of LAMA3 (Laminin alpha 3), LAMA3-A, known to be involved in tumour cell invasion and progression. The full-length transcript of the gene (LAMA3-B) did not appear to be hypoxia-associated. The results were confirmed using qualitative RT-PCR. In a series of 59 prospectively collected head and neck tumours, expression of LAMA3-A had prognostic significance whereas LAMA3-B did not. This work illustrates the potential for alternatively spliced transcripts to act as biomarkers of disease prognosis with improved specificity for particular tissues or conditions over assays which do not discriminate between splice variants. PMID:19936049

  14. Metabolomics in nutritional epidemiology: identifying metabolites associated with diet and quantifying their potential to uncover diet-disease relations in populations123

    PubMed Central

    Guertin, Kristin A; Moore, Steven C; Sampson, Joshua N; Huang, Wen-Yi; Xiao, Qian; Stolzenberg-Solomon, Rachael Z; Sinha, Rashmi; Cross, Amanda J

    2014-01-01

    Background: Metabolomics is an emerging field with the potential to advance nutritional epidemiology; however, it has not yet been applied to large cohort studies. Objectives: Our first aim was to identify metabolites that are biomarkers of usual dietary intake. Second, among serum metabolites correlated with diet, we evaluated metabolite reproducibility and required sample sizes to determine the potential for metabolomics in epidemiologic studies. Design: Baseline serum from 502 participants in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovarian (PLCO) Cancer Screening Trial was analyzed by using ultra-high-performance liquid-phase chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry and gas chromatography–mass spectrometry. Usual intakes of 36 dietary groups were estimated by using a food-frequency questionnaire. Dietary biomarkers were identified by using partial Pearson's correlations with Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) between samples collected 1 y apart in a subset of 30 individuals were calculated to evaluate intraindividual metabolite variability. Results: We detected 412 known metabolites. Citrus, green vegetables, red meat, shellfish, fish, peanuts, rice, butter, coffee, beer, liquor, total alcohol, and multivitamins were each correlated with at least one metabolite (P < 1.093 × 10−6; r = −0.312 to 0.398); in total, 39 dietary biomarkers were identified. Some correlations (citrus intake with stachydrine) replicated previous studies; others, such as peanuts and tryptophan betaine, were novel findings. Other strong associations included coffee (with trigonelline-N-methylnicotinate and quinate) and alcohol (with ethyl glucuronide). Intraindividual variability in metabolite levels (1-y ICCs) ranged from 0.27 to 0.89. Large, but attainable, sample sizes are required to detect associations between metabolites and disease in epidemiologic studies, further emphasizing the usefulness of metabolomics in nutritional

  15. Targeted next generation sequencing identifies novel mutations in RP1 as a relatively common cause of autosomal recessive rod-cone dystrophy.

    PubMed

    El Shamieh, Said; Boulanger-Scemama, Elise; Lancelot, Marie-Elise; Antonio, Aline; Démontant, Vanessa; Condroyer, Christel; Letexier, Mélanie; Saraiva, Jean-Paul; Mohand-Saïd, Saddek; Sahel, José-Alain; Audo, Isabelle; Zeitz, Christina

    2015-01-01

    We report ophthalmic and genetic findings in families with autosomal recessive rod-cone dystrophy (arRCD) and RP1 mutations. Detailed ophthalmic examination was performed in 242 sporadic and arRCD subjects. Genomic DNA was investigated using our customized next generation sequencing panel targeting up to 123 genes implicated in inherited retinal disorders. Stringent filtering coupled with Sanger sequencing and followed by cosegregation analysis was performed to confirm biallelism and the implication of the most likely disease causing variants. Sequencing identified 9 RP1 mutations in 7 index cases. Eight of the mutations were novel, and all cosegregated with severe arRCD phenotype, found associated with additional macular changes. Among the identified mutations, 4 belong to a region, previously associated with arRCD, and 5 others in a region previously associated with adRCD. Our prevalence studies showed that RP1 mutations account for up to 2.5% of arRCD. These results point out for the necessity of sequencing RP1 when genetically investigating sporadic and arRCD. It further highlights the interest of unbiased sequencing technique, which allows investigating the implication of the same gene in different modes of inheritance. Finally, it reports that different regions of RP1 can also lead to arRCD. PMID:25692139

  16. Gene-centric Meta-analysis in 87,736 Individuals of European Ancestry Identifies Multiple Blood-Pressure-Related Loci

    PubMed Central

    Tragante, Vinicius; Barnes, Michael R.; Ganesh, Santhi K.; Lanktree, Matthew B.; Guo, Wei; Franceschini, Nora; Smith, Erin N.; Johnson, Toby; Holmes, Michael V.; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Karczewski, Konrad J.; Almoguera, Berta; Barnard, John; Baumert, Jens; Chang, Yen-Pei Christy; Elbers, Clara C.; Farrall, Martin; Fischer, Mary E.; Gaunt, Tom R.; Gho, Johannes M.I.H.; Gieger, Christian; Goel, Anuj; Gong, Yan; Isaacs, Aaron; Kleber, Marcus E.; Leach, Irene Mateo; McDonough, Caitrin W.; Meijs, Matthijs F.L.; Melander, Olle; Nelson, Christopher P.; Nolte, Ilja M.; Pankratz, Nathan; Price, Tom S.; Shaffer, Jonathan; Shah, Sonia; Tomaszewski, Maciej; van der Most, Peter J.; Van Iperen, Erik P.A.; Vonk, Judith M.; Witkowska, Kate; Wong, Caroline O.L.; Zhang, Li; Beitelshees, Amber L.; Berenson, Gerald S.; Bhatt, Deepak L.; Brown, Morris; Burt, Amber; Cooper-DeHoff, Rhonda M.; Connell, John M.; Cruickshanks, Karen J.; Curtis, Sean P.; Davey-Smith, George; Delles, Christian; Gansevoort, Ron T.; Guo, Xiuqing; Haiqing, Shen; Hastie, Claire E.; Hofker, Marten H.; Hovingh, G. Kees; Kim, Daniel S.; Kirkland, Susan A.; Klein, Barbara E.; Klein, Ronald; Li, Yun R.; Maiwald, Steffi; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; O’Brien, Eoin T.; Onland-Moret, N. Charlotte; Palmas, Walter; Parsa, Afshin; Penninx, Brenda W.; Pettinger, Mary; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; Ranchalis, Jane E.; M Ridker, Paul; Rose, Lynda M.; Sever, Peter; Shimbo, Daichi; Steele, Laura; Stolk, Ronald P.; Thorand, Barbara; Trip, Mieke D.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Verschuren, W. Monique; Wijmenga, Cisca; Wyatt, Sharon; Young, J. Hunter; Zwinderman, Aeilko H.; Bezzina, Connie R.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Casas, Juan P.; Caulfield, Mark J.; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Chasman, Daniel I.; Davidson, Karina W.; Doevendans, Pieter A.; Dominiczak, Anna F.; FitzGerald, Garret A.; Gums, John G.; Fornage, Myriam; Hakonarson, Hakon; Halder, Indrani; Hillege, Hans L.; Illig, Thomas; Jarvik, Gail P.; Johnson, Julie A.; Kastelein, John J.P.; Koenig, Wolfgang; Kumari, Meena; März, Winfried; Murray, Sarah S.; O’Connell, Jeffery R.; Oldehinkel, Albertine J.; Pankow, James S.; Rader, Daniel J.; Redline, Susan; Reilly, Muredach P.; Schadt, Eric E.; Kottke-Marchant, Kandice; Snieder, Harold; Snyder, Michael; Stanton, Alice V.; Tobin, Martin D.; Uitterlinden, André G.; van der Harst, Pim; van der Schouw, Yvonne T.; Samani, Nilesh J.; Watkins, Hugh; Johnson, Andrew D.; Reiner, Alex P.; Zhu, Xiaofeng; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Levy, Daniel; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; Munroe, Patricia B.; Keating, Brendan J.

    2014-01-01

    Blood pressure (BP) is a heritable risk factor for cardiovascular disease. To investigate genetic associations with systolic BP (SBP), diastolic BP (DBP), mean arterial pressure (MAP), and pulse pressure (PP), we genotyped ∼50,000 SNPs in up to 87,736 individuals of European ancestry and combined these in a meta-analysis. We replicated findings in an independent set of 68,368 individuals of European ancestry. Our analyses identified 11 previously undescribed associations in independent loci containing 31 genes including PDE1A, HLA-DQB1, CDK6, PRKAG2, VCL, H19, NUCB2, RELA, HOXC@ complex, FBN1, and NFAT5 at the Bonferroni-corrected array-wide significance threshold (p < 6 × 10−7) and confirmed 27 previously reported associations. Bioinformatic analysis of the 11 loci provided support for a putative role in hypertension of several genes, such as CDK6 and NUCB2. Analysis of potential pharmacological targets in databases of small molecules showed that ten of the genes are predicted to be a target for small molecules. In summary, we identified previously unknown loci associated with BP. Our findings extend our understanding of genes involved in BP regulation, which may provide new targets for therapeutic intervention or drug response stratification. PMID:24560520

  17. Gene-centric meta-analysis in 87,736 individuals of European ancestry identifies multiple blood-pressure-related loci.

    PubMed

    Tragante, Vinicius; Barnes, Michael R; Ganesh, Santhi K; Lanktree, Matthew B; Guo, Wei; Franceschini, Nora; Smith, Erin N; Johnson, Toby; Holmes, Michael V; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Karczewski, Konrad J; Almoguera, Berta; Barnard, John; Baumert, Jens; Chang, Yen-Pei Christy; Elbers, Clara C; Farrall, Martin; Fischer, Mary E; Gaunt, Tom R; Gho, Johannes M I H; Gieger, Christian; Goel, Anuj; Gong, Yan; Isaacs, Aaron; Kleber, Marcus E; Mateo Leach, Irene; McDonough, Caitrin W; Meijs, Matthijs F L; Melander, Olle; Nelson, Christopher P; Nolte, Ilja M; Pankratz, Nathan; Price, Tom S; Shaffer, Jonathan; Shah, Sonia; Tomaszewski, Maciej; van der Most, Peter J; Van Iperen, Erik P A; Vonk, Judith M; Witkowska, Kate; Wong, Caroline O L; Zhang, Li; Beitelshees, Amber L; Berenson, Gerald S; Bhatt, Deepak L; Brown, Morris; Burt, Amber; Cooper-DeHoff, Rhonda M; Connell, John M; Cruickshanks, Karen J; Curtis, Sean P; Davey-Smith, George; Delles, Christian; Gansevoort, Ron T; Guo, Xiuqing; Haiqing, Shen; Hastie, Claire E; Hofker, Marten H; Hovingh, G Kees; Kim, Daniel S; Kirkland, Susan A; Klein, Barbara E; Klein, Ronald; Li, Yun R; Maiwald, Steffi; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; O'Brien, Eoin T; Onland-Moret, N Charlotte; Palmas, Walter; Parsa, Afshin; Penninx, Brenda W; Pettinger, Mary; Vasan, Ramachandran S; Ranchalis, Jane E; M Ridker, Paul; Rose, Lynda M; Sever, Peter; Shimbo, Daichi; Steele, Laura; Stolk, Ronald P; Thorand, Barbara; Trip, Mieke D; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Verschuren, W Monique; Wijmenga, Cisca; Wyatt, Sharon; Young, J Hunter; Zwinderman, Aeilko H; Bezzina, Connie R; Boerwinkle, Eric; Casas, Juan P; Caulfield, Mark J; Chakravarti, Aravinda; Chasman, Daniel I; Davidson, Karina W; Doevendans, Pieter A; Dominiczak, Anna F; FitzGerald, Garret A; Gums, John G; Fornage, Myriam; Hakonarson, Hakon; Halder, Indrani; Hillege, Hans L; Illig, Thomas; Jarvik, Gail P; Johnson, Julie A; Kastelein, John J P; Koenig, Wolfgang; Kumari, Meena; März, Winfried; Murray, Sarah S; O'Connell, Jeffery R; Oldehinkel, Albertine J; Pankow, James S; Rader, Daniel J; Redline, Susan; Reilly, Muredach P; Schadt, Eric E; Kottke-Marchant, Kandice; Snieder, Harold; Snyder, Michael; Stanton, Alice V; Tobin, Martin D; Uitterlinden, André G; van der Harst, Pim; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; Samani, Nilesh J; Watkins, Hugh; Johnson, Andrew D; Reiner, Alex P; Zhu, Xiaofeng; de Bakker, Paul I W; Levy, Daniel; Asselbergs, Folkert W; Munroe, Patricia B; Keating, Brendan J

    2014-03-01

    Blood pressure (BP) is a heritable risk factor for cardiovascular disease. To investigate genetic associations with systolic BP (SBP), diastolic BP (DBP), mean arterial pressure (MAP), and pulse pressure (PP), we genotyped ~50,000 SNPs in up to 87,736 individuals of European ancestry and combined these in a meta-analysis. We replicated findings in an independent set of 68,368 individuals of European ancestry. Our analyses identified 11 previously undescribed associations in independent loci containing 31 genes including PDE1A, HLA-DQB1, CDK6, PRKAG2, VCL, H19, NUCB2, RELA, HOXC@ complex, FBN1, and NFAT5 at the Bonferroni-corrected array-wide significance threshold (p < 6 × 10(-7)) and confirmed 27 previously reported associations. Bioinformatic analysis of the 11 loci provided support for a putative role in hypertension of several genes, such as CDK6 and NUCB2. Analysis of potential pharmacological targets in databases of small molecules showed that ten of the genes are predicted to be a target for small molecules. In summary, we identified previously unknown loci associated with BP. Our findings extend our understanding of genes involved in BP regulation, which may provide new targets for therapeutic intervention or drug response stratification. PMID:24560520

  18. Identifying Barriers, Perceptions and Motivations Related to Healthy Eating and Physical Activity among 6th to 8th Grade, Rural, Limited-Resource Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kumar, Janavi; Adhikari, Koushik; Li, Yijing; Lindshield, Erika; Muturi, Nancy; Kidd, Tandalayo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to enable community members to discuss their perceptions of eating habits and physical activity in relation to sixth, seventh, and eighth graders, and reveal facilitators and barriers to healthy eating behavior and physical activity engagement. Design/methodology/approach: Nine focus groups, which included six…

  19. A Pathway Closely Related to the d-Tagatose Pathway of Gram-Negative Enterobacteria Identified in the Gram-Positive Bacterium Bacillus licheniformis

    PubMed Central

    Van der Heiden, Edwige; Lebrun, Sarah; Freichels, Régine; Brans, Alain; Vastenavond, Christian M.; Galleni, Moreno; Joris, Bernard

    2013-01-01

    We report the first identification of a gene cluster involved in d-tagatose catabolism in Bacillus licheniformis. The pathway is closely related to the d-tagatose pathway of the Gram-negative bacterium Klebsiella oxytoca, in contrast to the d-tagatose 6-phosphate pathway described in the Gram-positive bacterium Staphylococcus aureus. PMID:23524682

  20. Single-cell Analysis of Circulating Tumor Cells Identifies Cumulative Expression Patterns of EMT-related Genes in Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chun-Liang; Mahalingam, Devalingam; Osmulski, Pawel; Jadhav, Rohit R.; Wang, Chiou-Miin; Leach, Robin J.; Chang, Tien-Cheng; Weitman, Steven D.; Kumar, Addanki Pratap; Sun, LuZhe; Gaczynska, Maria E.; Thompson, Ian M.; Huang, Tim Hui-Ming

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Prostate tumors shed circulating tumor cells (CTCs) into the blood stream. Increased evidence shows that CTCs are often present in metastatic prostate cancer and can be alternative sources for disease profiling and prognostication. Here we postulate that CTCs expressing genes related to epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) are strong predictors of metastatic prostate cancer. METHODS A microfiltration system was used to trap CTCs from peripheral blood based on size selection of large epithelial-like cells without CD45 leukocyte marker. These cells individually retrieved with a micromanipulator device were assessed for cell membrane physical properties using atomic force microscopy. Additionally, 38 CTCs from eight prostate cancer patients were used to determine expression profiles of 84 EMT-related and reference genes using a microfluidics-based PCR system. RESULTS Increased cell elasticity and membrane smoothness were found in CTCs compared to noncancerous cells, highlighting their potential invasiveness and mobility in the peripheral circulation. Despite heterogeneous expression patterns of individual CTCs, genes that promote mesenchymal transitioning into a more malignant state, including IGF1, IGF2, EGFR, FOXP3, and TGFB3, were commonly observed in these cells. An additional subset of EMT-related genes (e.g., PTPRN2, ALDH1, ESR2, and WNT5A) were expressed in CTCs of castration-resistant cancer, but less frequently in castration-sensitive cancer. CONCLUSIONS The study suggests that an incremental expression of EMT-related genes in CTCs is associated with metastatic castration-resistant cancer. Although CTCs represent a group of highly heterogeneous cells, their unique EMT-related gene signatures provide a new opportunity for personalized treatments with targeted inhibitors in advanced prostate cancer patients. PMID:23280481

  1. Centric relation definition: a historical and contemporary prosthodontic perspective.

    PubMed

    Palaskar, Jayant N; Murali, R; Bansal, Sanjay

    2013-09-01

    Centric relation (CR) is a core topic of dentistry in general and prosthodontics in particular. The term CR has become thoroughly confusing because of many conflicting definitions. Unfortunately definition of CR changed repeatedly over past ten decades. All the existing definitions in the dental literature, for the past 81 years, are segregated into definitions from 1929 to 1970, 1970-1980, and 1980-2010 and are critically analyzed. Both PubMed (key words: centric relation/centric jaw relation) and hand searches were employed, from citation in other publications, to identify relevant articles in English language peer reviewed PubMed journals from 1956 to 2010; although the review is from 1929. Numerous definitions for CR have been given, however, no consensus exists and the definition given by a current glossary of prosthodontic terms is confusing. It relates CR to many clinically invisible parts and cannot guide a dental surgeon to record the CR following its description. The purpose of this article is not only to review all the definitions critically but to propose a self explanatory definition to minimize the confusion in the minds of dental practitioners and students for better understanding of the concept of CR. Centric relation is clinically significant since it is the only clinically repeatable jaw relation and the logical position to fabricate prosthesis. PMID:24431728

  2. Nintendo related injuries and other problems: review

    PubMed Central

    Heineman, Erik; Pierie, Jean-Pierre E N; ten Cate Hoedemaker, Henk O

    2014-01-01

    Objective To identify all reported cases of injury and other problems caused by using a Nintendo video gaming system. Design Review. Data sources and review methods Search of PubMed and Embase in June 2014 for reports on injuries and other problems caused by using a Nintendo gaming system. Results Most of the 38 articles identified were case reports or case series. Injuries and problems ranged from neurological and psychological to surgical. Traditional controllers with buttons were associated with tendinitis of the extensor of the thumb. The joystick on the Nintendo 64 controller was linked to palmar ulceration. The motion sensitive Wii remote was associated with musculoskeletal problems and various traumas. Conclusions Most problems are mild and prevalence is low. The described injuries were related to the way the games are controlled, which varies according to the video game console. PMID:25515525

  3. Rat Hepatocytes Weighted Gene Co-Expression Network Analysis Identifies Specific Modules and Hub Genes Related to Liver Regeneration after Partial Hepatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Yun; Xu, Jiucheng; Liu, Yunqing; Li, Juntao; Chang, Cuifang; Xu, Cunshuan

    2014-01-01

    The recovery of liver mass is mainly mediated by proliferation of hepatocytes after 2/3 partial hepatectomy (PH) in rats. Studying the gene expression profiles of hepatocytes after 2/3 PH will be helpful to investigate the molecular mechanisms of liver regeneration (LR). We report here the first application of weighted gene co-expression network analysis (WGCNA) to analyze the biological implications of gene expression changes associated with LR. WGCNA identifies 12 specific gene modules and some hub genes from hepatocytes genome-scale microarray data in rat LR. The results suggest that upregulated MCM5 may promote hepatocytes proliferation during LR; BCL3 may play an important role by activating or inhibiting NF-kB pathway; MAPK9 may play a permissible role in DNA replication by p38 MAPK inactivation in hepatocytes proliferation stage. Thus, WGCNA can provide novel insight into understanding the molecular mechanisms of LR. PMID:24743545

  4. A Combined Metabonomic and Proteomic Approach Identifies Frontal Cortex Changes in a Chronic Phencyclidine Rat Model in Relation to Human Schizophrenia Brain Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Wesseling, Hendrik; Chan, Man K; Tsang, T M; Ernst, Agnes; Peters, Fabian; Guest, Paul C; Holmes, Elaine; Bahn, Sabine

    2013-01-01

    Current schizophrenia (SCZ) treatments fail to treat the broad range of manifestations associated with this devastating disorder. Thus, new translational models that reproduce the core pathological features are urgently needed to facilitate novel drug discovery efforts. Here, we report findings from the first comprehensive label-free liquid-mass spectrometry proteomic- and proton nuclear magnetic resonance-based metabonomic profiling of the rat frontal cortex after chronic phencyclidine (PCP) intervention, which induces SCZ-like symptoms. The findings were compared with results from a proteomic profiling of post-mortem prefrontal cortex from SCZ patients and with relevant findings in the literature. Through this approach, we identified proteomic alterations in glutamate-mediated Ca2+ signaling (Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, PPP3CA, and VISL1), mitochondrial function (GOT2 and PKLR), and cytoskeletal remodeling (ARP3). Metabonomic profiling revealed changes in the levels of glutamate, glutamine, glycine, pyruvate, and the Ca2+ regulator taurine. Effects on similar pathways were also identified in the prefrontal cortex tissue from human SCZ subjects. The discovery of similar but not identical proteomic and metabonomic alterations in the chronic PCP rat model and human brain indicates that this model recapitulates only some of the molecular alterations of the disease. This knowledge may be helpful in understanding mechanisms underlying psychosis, which, in turn, can facilitate improved therapy and drug discovery for SCZ and other psychiatric diseases. Most importantly, these molecular findings suggest that the combined use of multiple models may be required for more effective translation to studies of human SCZ. PMID:23942359

  5. An Automated High-Throughput Cell-Based Multiplexed Flow Cytometry Assay to Identify Novel Compounds to Target Candida albicans Virulence-Related Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Bernardo, Stella M.; Allen, Christopher P.; Waller, Anna; Young, Susan M.; Oprea, Tudor; Sklar, Larry A.; Lee, Samuel A.

    2014-01-01

    Although three major classes of systemic antifungal agents are clinically available, each is characterized by important limitations. Thus, there has been considerable ongoing effort to develop novel and repurposed agents for the therapy of invasive fungal infections. In an effort to address these needs, we developed a novel high-throughput, multiplexed screening method that utilizes small molecules to probe candidate drug targets in the opportunistic fungal pathogen Candida albicans. This method is amenable to high-throughput automated screening and is based upon detection of changes in GFP levels of individually tagged target proteins. We first selected four GFP-tagged membrane-bound proteins associated with virulence or antifungal drug resistance in C. albicans. We demonstrated proof-of-principle that modulation of fluorescence intensity can be used to assay the expression of specific GFP-tagged target proteins to inhibitors (and inducers), and this change is measurable within the HyperCyt automated flow cytometry sampling system. Next, we generated a multiplex of differentially color-coded C. albicans strains bearing C-terminal GFP-tags of each gene encoding candidate drug targets incubated in the presence of small molecules from the Prestwick Chemical Library in 384-well microtiter plate format. Following incubation, cells were sampled through the HyperCyt system and modulation of protein levels, as indicated by changes in GFP-levels of each strain, was used to identify compounds of interest. The hit rate for both inducers and inhibitors identified in the primary screen did not exceed 1% of the total number of compounds in the small-molecule library that was probed, as would be expected from a robust target-specific, high-throughput screening campaign. Secondary assays for virulence characteristics based on null mutant strains were then used to further validate specificity. In all, this study presents a method for the identification and verification of new

  6. Meta-analyses of Dehalococcoides mccartyi strain 195 transcriptomic profiles identify a respiration rate-related gene expression transition point and interoperon recruitment of a key oxidoreductase subunit.

    PubMed

    Mansfeldt, Cresten B; Rowe, Annette R; Heavner, Gretchen L W; Zinder, Stephen H; Richardson, Ruth E

    2014-10-01

    A cDNA-microarray was designed and used to monitor the transcriptomic profile of Dehalococcoides mccartyi strain 195 (in a mixed community) respiring various chlorinated organics, including chloroethenes and 2,3-dichlorophenol. The cultures were continuously fed in order to establish steady-state respiration rates and substrate levels. The organization of array data into a clustered heat map revealed two major experimental partitions. This partitioning in the data set was further explored through principal component analysis. The first two principal components separated the experiments into those with slow (1.6±0.6 μM Cl-/h)- and fast (22.9±9.6 μM Cl-/h)-respiring cultures. Additionally, the transcripts with the highest loadings in these principal components were identified, suggesting that those transcripts were responsible for the partitioning of the experiments. By analyzing the transcriptomes (n=53) across experiments, relationships among transcripts were identified, and hypotheses about the relationships between electron transport chain members were proposed. One hypothesis, that the hydrogenases Hup and Hym and the formate dehydrogenase-like oxidoreductase (DET0186-DET0187) form a complex (as displayed by their tight clustering in the heat map analysis), was explored using a nondenaturing protein separation technique combined with proteomic sequencing. Although these proteins did not migrate as a single complex, DET0112 (an FdhB-like protein encoded in the Hup operon) was found to comigrate with DET0187 rather than with the catalytic Hup subunit DET0110. On closer inspection of the genome annotations of all Dehalococcoides strains, the DET0185-to-DET0187 operon was found to lack a key subunit, an FdhB-like protein. Therefore, on the basis of the transcriptomic, genomic, and proteomic evidence, the place of the missing subunit in the DET0185-to-DET0187 operon is likely filled by recruiting a subunit expressed from the Hup operon (DET0112). PMID:25063656

  7. Meta-Analyses of Dehalococcoides mccartyi Strain 195 Transcriptomic Profiles Identify a Respiration Rate-Related Gene Expression Transition Point and Interoperon Recruitment of a Key Oxidoreductase Subunit

    PubMed Central

    Mansfeldt, Cresten B.; Rowe, Annette R.; Heavner, Gretchen L. W.; Zinder, Stephen H.

    2014-01-01

    A cDNA-microarray was designed and used to monitor the transcriptomic profile of Dehalococcoides mccartyi strain 195 (in a mixed community) respiring various chlorinated organics, including chloroethenes and 2,3-dichlorophenol. The cultures were continuously fed in order to establish steady-state respiration rates and substrate levels. The organization of array data into a clustered heat map revealed two major experimental partitions. This partitioning in the data set was further explored through principal component analysis. The first two principal components separated the experiments into those with slow (1.6 ± 0.6 μM Cl−/h)- and fast (22.9 ± 9.6 μM Cl−/h)-respiring cultures. Additionally, the transcripts with the highest loadings in these principal components were identified, suggesting that those transcripts were responsible for the partitioning of the experiments. By analyzing the transcriptomes (n = 53) across experiments, relationships among transcripts were identified, and hypotheses about the relationships between electron transport chain members were proposed. One hypothesis, that the hydrogenases Hup and Hym and the formate dehydrogenase-like oxidoreductase (DET0186-DET0187) form a complex (as displayed by their tight clustering in the heat map analysis), was explored using a nondenaturing protein separation technique combined with proteomic sequencing. Although these proteins did not migrate as a single complex, DET0112 (an FdhB-like protein encoded in the Hup operon) was found to comigrate with DET0187 rather than with the catalytic Hup subunit DET0110. On closer inspection of the genome annotations of all Dehalococcoides strains, the DET0185-to-DET0187 operon was found to lack a key subunit, an FdhB-like protein. Therefore, on the basis of the transcriptomic, genomic, and proteomic evidence, the place of the missing subunit in the DET0185-to-DET0187 operon is likely filled by recruiting a subunit expressed from the Hup operon (DET0112). PMID

  8. Development of a pluripotent stem cell derived neuronal model to identify chemically induced pathway perturbations in relation to neurotoxicity: Effects of CREB pathway inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Pistollato, Francesca; Louisse, Jochem; Scelfo, Bibiana; Mennecozzi, Milena; Accordi, Benedetta; Basso, Giuseppe; Gaspar, John Antonydas; Zagoura, Dimitra; Barilari, Manuela; Palosaari, Taina; Sachinidis, Agapios; Bremer-Hoffmann, Susanne

    2014-10-15

    According to the advocated paradigm shift in toxicology, acquisition of knowledge on the mechanisms underlying the toxicity of chemicals, such as perturbations of biological pathways, is of primary interest. Pluripotent stem cells (PSCs), such as human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs), offer a unique opportunity to derive physiologically relevant human cell types to measure molecular and cellular effects of such pathway modulations. Here we compared the neuronal differentiation propensity of hESCs and hiPSCs with the aim to develop novel hiPSC-based tools for measuring pathway perturbation in relation to molecular and cellular effects in vitro. Among other fundamental pathways, also, the cAMP responsive element binding protein (CREB) pathway was activated in our neuronal models and gave us the opportunity to study time-dependent effects elicited by chemical perturbations of the CREB pathway in relation to cellular effects. We show that the inhibition of the CREB pathway, using 2-naphthol-AS-E-phosphate (KG-501), induced an inhibition of neurite outgrowth and synaptogenesis, as well as a decrease of MAP2{sup +} neuronal cells. These data indicate that a CREB pathway inhibition can be related to molecular and cellular effects that may be relevant for neurotoxicity testing, and, thus, qualify the use of our hiPSC-derived neuronal model for studying chemical-induced neurotoxicity resulting from pathway perturbations. - Highlights: • HESCs derived neuronal cells serve as benchmark for iPSC based neuronal toxicity test development. • Comparisons between hESCs and hiPSCs demonstrated variability of the epigenetic state • CREB pathway modulation have been explored in relation to the neurotoxicant exposure KG-501 • hiPSC might be promising tools to translate theoretical AoPs into toxicological in vitro tests.

  9. A surface electromyography based objective method to identify patients with nonspecific chronic low back pain, presenting a flexion related movement control impairment.

    PubMed

    Van Damme, Benedicte; Stevens, Veerle; Perneel, Christiaan; Van Tiggelen, Damien; Neyens, Ellen; Duvigneaud, Nathalie; Moerman, Luc; Danneels, Lieven

    2014-12-01

    Movement control impairments (MCI) are often present in patients with non-specific chronic low back pain (NS-CLBP). Therefore, movement control exercises are widely used to rehabilitate patients. However, the objective assessment remains difficult. The purpose of this study was to develop a statistical model, based on logistic regression analysis, to differentiate patients with NS-CLBP presenting a flexion-related MCI from healthy subjects. This model is based on trunk muscle activation patterns measured by surface electromyography (sEMG), during movement control exercises. Sixty-three healthy male subjects and 36 male patients with a flexion-related MCI participated in this study. Muscle activity of the internal obliques, the external obliques, the lumbar multifidus and the thoracic part of the iliocostalis was registered. Ratios of deep stabilizing to superficial torque producing muscle activity were calculated to examine trunk muscle recruitment patterns during 6 different exercises. Logistic regression analyses were performed (1) to define the ratios and exercises that were most discriminating between patients and non-patients, (2) to make a predictive model. K-Fold cross-validation was used to assess the performance of the predictive model. This study demonstrated that sEMG trunk muscle recruitment patterns during movement control tests, allows differentiating NSCLBP patients with a flexion-related MCI from healthy subjects. PMID:25304196

  10. Dense Genotyping of Immune-Related Loci Identifies Variants Associated with Clearance of HPV among HIV-Positive Women in the HIV Epidemiology Research Study (HERS)

    PubMed Central

    Sudenga, Staci L.; Wiener, Howard W.; King, Caroline C.; Rompalo, Anne M.; Cu-Uvin, Susan; Klein, Robert S.; Shah, Keerti V.; Sobel, Jack D.; Jamieson, Denise J.; Shrestha, Sadeep

    2014-01-01

    Persistent high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) is a necessary and causal factor of cervical cancer. Most women naturally clear HPV infections; however, the biological mechanisms related to HPV pathogenesis have not been clearly elucidated. Host genetic factors that specifically regulate immune response could play an important role. All HIV-positive women in the HIV Epidemiology Research Study (HERS) with a HR-HPV infection and at least one follow-up biannual visit were included in the study. Cervicovaginal lavage samples were tested for HPV using type-specific HPV hybridization assays. Type-specific HPV clearance was defined as two consecutive HPV-negative tests after a positive test. DNA from participants was genotyped for 196,524 variants within 186 known immune related loci using the custom ImmunoChip microarray. To assess the influence of each single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) with HR-HPV clearance, the Cox proportional hazards model with the Wei-Lin-Weissfeld approach was used, adjusting for CD4+ count, low risk HPV (LR-HPV) co-infection, and relevant confounders. Three analytical models were performed: race-specific (African Americans (n = 258), European Americans (n = 87), Hispanics (n = 55), race-adjusted combined analysis, and meta-analysis of pooled independent race-specific analyses. Women were followed for a median time of 1,617 days. Overall, three SNPs (rs1112085, rs11102637, and rs12030900) in the MAGI-3 gene and one SNP (rs8031627) in the SMAD3 gene were associated with HR-HPV clearance (p<10−6). A variant (rs1633038) in HLA-G were also significantly associated in African American. Results from this study support associations of immune-related genes, having potential biological mechanism, with differential cervical HR-HPV infection outcomes. PMID:24918582

  11. Predictive value of the composition of the vaginal microbiota in bacterial vaginosis, a dynamic study to identify recurrence-related flora.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Bingbing; Niu, Xiaoxi; Han, Na; Wang, Ben; Du, Pengcheng; Na, Risu; Chen, Chen; Liao, Qinping

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is a highly prevalent disease in women, and increases the risk of pelvic inflammatory disease. It has been given wide attention because of the high recurrence rate. Traditional diagnostic methods based on microscope providing limited information on the vaginal microbiota increase the difficulty in tracing the development of the disease in bacteria resistance condition. In this study, we used deep-sequencing technology to observe dynamic variation of the vaginal microbiota at three major time points during treatment, at D0 (before treatment), D7 (stop using the antibiotics) and D30 (the 30-day follow-up visit). Sixty-five patients with BV were enrolled (48 were cured and 17 were not cured), and their bacterial composition of the vaginal microbiota was compared. Interestingly, we identified 9 patients might be recurrence. We also introduced a new measurement point of D7, although its microbiota were significantly inhabited by antibiotic and hard to be observed by traditional method. The vaginal microbiota in deep-sequencing-view present a strong correlation to the final outcome. Thus, coupled with detailed individual bioinformatics analysis and deep-sequencing technology, we may illustrate a more accurate map of vaginal microbial to BV patients, which provide a new opportunity to reduce the rate of recurrence of BV. PMID:27253522

  12. Predictive value of the composition of the vaginal microbiota in bacterial vaginosis, a dynamic study to identify recurrence-related flora

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Bingbing; Niu, Xiaoxi; Han, Na; Wang, Ben; Du, Pengcheng; Na, Risu; Chen, Chen; Liao, Qinping

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis (BV) is a highly prevalent disease in women, and increases the risk of pelvic inflammatory disease. It has been given wide attention because of the high recurrence rate. Traditional diagnostic methods based on microscope providing limited information on the vaginal microbiota increase the difficulty in tracing the development of the disease in bacteria resistance condition. In this study, we used deep-sequencing technology to observe dynamic variation of the vaginal microbiota at three major time points during treatment, at D0 (before treatment), D7 (stop using the antibiotics) and D30 (the 30-day follow-up visit). Sixty-five patients with BV were enrolled (48 were cured and 17 were not cured), and their bacterial composition of the vaginal microbiota was compared. Interestingly, we identified 9 patients might be recurrence. We also introduced a new measurement point of D7, although its microbiota were significantly inhabited by antibiotic and hard to be observed by traditional method. The vaginal microbiota in deep-sequencing-view present a strong correlation to the final outcome. Thus, coupled with detailed individual bioinformatics analysis and deep-sequencing technology, we may illustrate a more accurate map of vaginal microbial to BV patients, which provide a new opportunity to reduce the rate of recurrence of BV. PMID:27253522

  13. [Construction and operation of Internet Search Engine specialized in information on asthma. A Search Engine-based investigation to identify asthma-related information needed by Internet users].

    PubMed

    Saito, Naruo

    2003-12-01

    To support asthmatic patients in collecting information through the Internet, we have constructed and operated a search engine specialized in asthma-related information making use of the search engine software available free of charge and other programs. A questionnaire was attached to the bottom of the Web page presenting the search results, asking the users to respond to several questions. During the three-year period since its start of operation on June 1, 2000, there was 66689 visits to this site and 786 responses to the questionnaire were collected. Of all respondents, 19.3% were medical professionals, 63.7% were patients or their family members, and 11.3% belonged to the other categories (5.3% did not specify their position). In each of these three user groups, only about half of the users were able to find a route to the information they needed. This seems to reflect the absence of adequate asthma-related information sources on the Internet in Japanese language. However, more than 70% of all users in each group answered that this search engine site was useful. PMID:14739773

  14. Caenorhabditis elegans expressing the Saccharomyces cerevisiae NADH alternative dehydrogenase Ndi1p, as a tool to identify new genes involved in complex I related diseases

    PubMed Central

    Cossard, Raynald; Esposito, Michela; Sellem, Carole H.; Pitayu, Laras; Vasnier, Christelle; Delahodde, Agnès; Dassa, Emmanuel P.

    2015-01-01

    Isolated complex I deficiencies are one of the most commonly observed biochemical features in patients suffering from mitochondrial disorders. In the majority of these clinical cases the molecular bases of the diseases remain unknown suggesting the involvement of unidentified factors that are critical for complex I function. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae NDI1 gene, encoding the mitochondrial internal NADH dehydrogenase was previously shown to complement a complex I deficient strain in Caenorhabditis elegans with notable improvements in reproduction and whole organism respiration. These features indicate that Ndi1p can functionally integrate the respiratory chain, allowing complex I deficiency complementation. Taking into account the Ndi1p ability to bypass complex I, we evaluate the possibility to extend the range of defects/mutations causing complex I deficiencies that can be alleviated by NDI1 expression. We report here that NDI1 expressing animals unexpectedly exhibit a slightly shortened lifespan, a reduction in the progeny, and a depletion of the mitochondrial genome. However, Ndi1p is expressed and targeted to the mitochondria as a functional protein that confers rotenone resistance to those animals without affecting their respiration rate and ATP content. We show that the severe embryonic lethality level caused by the RNAi knockdowns of complex I structural subunit encoding genes (e.g., NDUFV1, NDUFS1, NDUFS6, NDUFS8, or GRIM-19 human orthologs) in wild type animals is significantly reduced in the Ndi1p expressing worm. All together these results open up the perspective to identify new genes involved in complex I function, assembly, or regulation by screening an RNAi library of genes leading to embryonic lethality that should be rescued by NDI1 expression. PMID:26124772

  15. Identifying panaxynol, a natural activator of nuclear factor erythroid-2 related factor 2 (Nrf2) from American ginseng as a suppressor of inflamed macrophage-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Chen; Li, Bin; Lai, Yimu; Li, Hechu; Windust, Anthony; Hofseth, Lorne J.; Nagarkatti, Mitzi; Nagarkatti, Prakash; Wang, Xing Li; Tang, Dongqi; Janicki, Joseph S.; Tian, Xingsong; Cui, Taixing

    2015-01-01

    Ethnopharmacological relevance American ginseng is capable of ameliorating cardiac dysfunction and activating Nrf2, a master regulator of antioxidant defense, in the heart. This study was designed to isolate compounds from American ginseng and to determine those responsible for the Nrf2-mediated resolution of inflamed macrophage-induced cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Materials and methods A standardized crude extract of American ginseng was supplied by the National Research Council of Canada, Institute for National Measurement Standards. A bioassay-based fractionization of American ginseng was performed to identify the putative substances which could activate Nrf2-mediated suppression of pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in macrophages and macrophage-mediated pro-hypertrophic growth in cardiomyocytes. Results A hexane fraction of an anti-inflammatory crude extract of American ginseng was found to be most effective in suppressing the inflammatory responses in macrophages. Preparative, reverse-phase HPLC and a comparative analysis by analytical scale LC–UV/MS revealed the hexane fraction contains predominantly C17 polyacetylenes and linolenic acid. Panaxynol, one of the major polyacetylenes, was found to be a potent Nrf2 activator. Panaxynol posttranscriptionally activated Nrf2 by inhibiting Kelch-like ECH-associated protein (Keap) 1-mediated degradation without affecting the binding of Keap1 and Nrf2. Moreover, panaxynol suppressed a selected set of cytokine expression via the activation of Nrf2 while minimally regulating nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB)-mediated cytokine expression in macrophages. It also dramatically inhibited the inflamed macrophage-mediated cardiomyocyte death and hypertrophy by activating Nrf2 in macrophages. Conclusions These results demonstrate that American ginseng-derived panaxynol is a specific Nrf2 activator and panaxynol-activated Nrf2 signaling is at least partly responsible for American ginseng-induced health benefit in the heart. PMID

  16. Analysis of undiagnosed tuberculosis-related deaths identified at post-mortem among HIV-infected patients in Russia: a descriptive study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis remains a serious public health threat and economic burden in Russia with escalating rates of drug resistance against a background of growing HIV-epidemic. Samara Oblast is one of the regions of the Russian Federation where more than 1% of the population is affected by the HIV-epidemic; almost half of the cases are concentrated in the largely-industrial city of Togliatti with a population of 800 000. Methods We conducted a retrospective analysis of errors leading to death of HIV-positive patients in general health care hospitals in Togliatti, Russia, in 2008. All (n = 29) cases when tuberculosis was established at autopsy as a cause of death were included. Results Median length of hospital stay was 20 days; in 11 cases the death occurred within the first 24 hours of admission. All cases were known to be HIV-positive prior to admission, however HAART was not initiated for any case, and no relevant tests to assess severity of immunosupression were performed despite their availability. No appropriate diagnostic algorithms were applied to confirm tuberculosis. Major gaps were identified in the work of hospital and consulting physicians including insufficient records keeping. In almost all patients earlier regular HIV-relevant tests were not performed due to poor compliance of patients, many of whom abused alcohol and drugs. Conclusions We conclude that introduction of prompt and accurate diagnostics tests, adequate treatment protocols and intensive training of physicians in management of AIDS and TB is vital. This should include reviewing standards of care for HIV-positive individuals with accompanying social problems. PMID:22008481

  17. Open-Identity Sperm Donation: How Does Offering Donor-Identifying Information Relate to Donor-Conceived Offspring's Wishes and Needs?

    PubMed

    Ravelingien, An; Provoost, Veerle; Pennings, Guido

    2015-09-01

    Over the past years, a growing number of countries have legislated open-identity donation, in which donor-conceived offspring are given access to the donor's identity once the child has reached maturity. It is held that donor anonymity creates identity problems for such children similar to the "genealogical bewilderment" described within the adoption context. The study of the social and psychological effects of open-identity donation is still very much in its infancy, but what has been left unquestioned is whether (and to what extent) offering access to the donor's name and address is an adequate response to such effects. This study has two goals: First, we aim to provide a systematic review of the reasons why donor-conceived (DC) offspring want to know the identity of their sperm donor. Second, we examine to what extent the provision of donor-identifying information can satisfy the reasons mentioned. The most important motivations appear to be: (1) to avoid medical risks and consanguineous relationships; (2) to satisfy curiosity; (3) to learn more about the self or to complete one's identity; (4) to learn more about what kind of person the donor is (biographical information, why he donated, etc.); (5) to form a relationship with the donor and/or his family; and (6) to learn about one's ancestry/genealogy. Our analysis shows that for nearly all of these reasons access to the donor's identity is not necessary. In those cases where it is, moreover, donor identification is not sufficient. What is really needed is (extended) contact with the donor, rather than the mere provision of his name. PMID:24996630

  18. Familial searching: a specialist forensic DNA profiling service utilising the National DNA Database to identify unknown offenders via their relatives--the UK experience.

    PubMed

    Maguire, C N; McCallum, L A; Storey, C; Whitaker, J P

    2014-01-01

    The National DNA Database (NDNAD) of England and Wales was established on April 10th 1995. The NDNAD is governed by a variety of legislative instruments that mean that DNA samples can be taken if an individual is arrested and detained in a police station. The biological samples and the DNA profiles derived from them can be used for purposes related to the prevention and detection of crime, the investigation of an offence and for the conduct of a prosecution. Following the South East Asian Tsunami of December 2004, the legislation was amended to allow the use of the NDNAD to assist in the identification of a deceased person or of a body part where death has occurred from natural causes or from a natural disaster. The UK NDNAD now contains the DNA profiles of approximately 6 million individuals representing 9.6% of the UK population. As the science of DNA profiling advanced, the National DNA Database provided a potential resource for increased intelligence beyond the direct matching for which it was originally created. The familial searching service offered to the police by several UK forensic science providers exploits the size and geographic coverage of the NDNAD and the fact that close relatives of an offender may share a significant proportion of that offender's DNA profile and will often reside in close geographic proximity to him or her. Between 2002 and 2011 Forensic Science Service Ltd. (FSS) provided familial search services to support 188 police investigations, 70 of which are still active cases. This technique, which may be used in serious crime cases or in 'cold case' reviews when there are few or no investigative leads, has led to the identification of 41 perpetrators or suspects. In this paper we discuss the processes, utility, and governance of the familial search service in which the NDNAD is searched for close genetic relatives of an offender who has left DNA evidence at a crime scene, but whose DNA profile is not represented within the NDNAD. We

  19. Identifying factors related to Achilles tendon stress, strain, and stiffness before and after 6 months of growth in youth 10-14 years of age.

    PubMed

    Neugebauer, Jennifer M; Hawkins, David A

    2012-09-21

    The purposes of this study were (1) determine if youth peak Achilles tendon (AT) strain, peak AT stress, and AT stiffness, measured during an isometric plantar flexion, differed after six months (mos) of growth, and (2) determine if sex, physical activity level (Physical Activity Questionnaire (PAQ-C)), and/or growth rate (GR) were related to these properties. AT stress, strain, and stiffness were quantified in 20 boys (13.47±0.81 years) and 22 girls (11.18±0.82 years) at 2 times (0 and 6 mos). GR (change in height in 6 mos) was not significantly different between boys and girls (3.5±1.4 and 3.4±1.1cm/6 mos respectively). Peak AT strain and stiffness (mean 3.8±0.4% and 128.9±153.6N/mm, respectively) did not differ between testing sessions or sex. Peak AT stress (22.1±2.4 and 24.0±2.1MPa at 0 and 6 mos, respectively) did not differ between sex and increased significantly at 6 mos due to a significant decrease in AT cross-sectional area (40.6±1.3 and 38.1±1.6mm(2) at 0 and 6 mos, respectively) with no significant difference in peak AT force (882.3±93.9 and 900.3± 65.5N at 0 and 6 mos, respectively). Peak AT stress was significantly greater in subjects with greater PAQ-C scores (9.1% increase with 1 unit increase in PAQ-C score) and smaller in subjects with faster GRs (13.8% decrease with 1cm/6 mos increase in GR). These results indicate that of the AT mechanical properties quantified, none differed between sex, and only peak AT stress significantly differed after 6 months and was related to GR and physical activity. PMID:22877892

  20. LC-QTOF-MS-based targeted metabolomics of arginine-creatine metabolic pathway-related compounds in plasma: application to identify potential biomarkers in pediatric chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Benito, Sandra; Sánchez, Alicia; Unceta, Nora; Andrade, Fernando; Aldámiz-Echevarria, Luis; Goicolea, M Aránzazu; Barrio, Ramón J

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a major epidemiologic problem which causes several disturbances in adults and in pediatrics. Despite being a worldwide public health problem, information available for CKD in the pediatric population is scarce. For that reason, an ion-pair reversed-phase liquid chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-QTOF-MS) method has been developed and validated in order to analyze 16 amino acids, amino acid derivatives, and analogous compounds related to the arginine-creatine metabolic pathway that are suspicious of being increased or decreased in plasma from patients with CKD. The analytical method involved the addition of dithiothreitol, a reducing agent which reduces disulfide and thus giving total aminothiol concentration, as well as a simple precipitation of plasma proteins. Moreover, despite amino acids being usually derivatized to improve their retention time and to enhance their signal, for this method, an ion-pairing reagent was used, thus avoiding the need for derivatization. Subsequently, analysis of plasma from pediatric patients suffering from CKD and control pediatrics was carried out. As a result, glycine, citrulline, creatinine, asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), and symmetric dimethylarginine (SDMA) were significantly increased in patients with CKD, regardless of their creatinine level, whereas in addition to these compounds dimethylglycine was also increased when CKD patients had plasma creatinine concentrations above 12 μg mL(-1), thus all are suggested as potential biomarkers for renal impairment. PMID:26537926

  1. The impact of long-term water stress on relative growth rate and morphology of needles and shoots of Metasequoia glyptostroboides seedlings: research toward identifying mechanistic models.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanxiang; Equiza, Maria Alejandra; Zheng, Quanshui; Tyree, Melvin T

    2011-09-01

    Leaf morphology in the upper canopy of trees tends to be different from that lower down. The effect of long-term water stress on leaf growth and morphology was studied in seedlings of Metasequoia glyptostroboides to understand how tree height might affect leaf morphology in larger trees. Tree height increases water stress on growing leaves through increased hydraulic resistance to water flow and increased gravitational potential, hence we assume that water stress imposed by soil dehydration will have an effect equivalent to stress induced by height. Seedlings were subjected to well-watered and two constant levels of long-term water stress treatments. Drought treatment significantly reduced final needle count, area and mass per area (leaf mass area, LMA) and increased needle density. Needles from water-stressed plants had lower maximum volumetric elastic modulus (ε(max)), osmotic potential at full turgor (Ψ¹⁰⁰(π)) (and at zero turgor (Ψ⁰(π)) (than those from well-watered plants. Palisade and spongy mesophyll cell size and upper epidermal cell size decreased significantly in drought treatments. Needle relative growth rate, needle length and cell sizes were linear functions of the daily average water potential at the time of leaf growth (r² 0.88-0.999). We conclude that water stress alone does mimic the direction and magnitude of changes in leaf morphology observed in tall trees. The results are discussed in terms of various models for leaf growth rate. PMID:21534977

  2. Relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephani, Hans

    2004-02-01

    Preface; Notation; Part I. Special Relativity: 1. Introduction: inertial systems and Galilei invariance of classical mechanics; 2. Light propagation in moving coordinate systems and Lorentz transformations; 3. Our world as a Minkowski space; 4. Mechanics of special relativity; 5. Optics of plane waves; 6. Four-dimensional vectors and tensors; 7. Electrodynamics in vacuo; 8. Transformation properties of electromagnetic fields: examples; 9. Null vectors and the algebraic properties of electromagnetic field tensors; 10. Charged point particles and their field; 11. Pole-dipole particles and their field; 12. Electrodynamics in media; 13. Perfect fluids and other physical theories; Part II. Riemannian Geometry: 14. Introduction: the force-free motion of particles in Newtonian mechanics; 15. Why Riemannian geometry?; 16. Riemannian space; 17. Tensor algebra; 18. The covariant derivative and parallel transport; 19. The curvature tensor; 20. Differential operators, integrals and integral laws; 21. Fundamental laws of physics in Riemannian spaces; Part III. Foundations of Einstein's Theory of Gravitation: 22. The fundamental equations of Einstein's theory of gravitation; 23. The Schwarzschild solution; 24. Experiments to verify the Schwarzschild metric; 25. Gravitational lenses; 26. The interior Schwarzschild solution; Part IV. Linearized Theory of Gravitation, Far Fields and Gravitational Waves: 27. The linearized Einstein theory of gravity; 28. Far fields due to arbitrary matter distributions and balance equations for momentum and angular momentum; 29. Gravitational waves; 30. The Cauchy problem for the Einstein field equations; Part V. Invariant Characterization of Exact Solutions: 31. Preferred vector fields and their properties; 32. The Petrov classification; 33. Killing vectors and groups of motion; 34. A survey of some selected classes of exact solutions; Part VI. Gravitational Collapse and Black Holes: 35. The Schwarzschild singularity; 36. Gravitational collapse

  3. A Drosophila functional evaluation of candidates from human genome-wide association studies of type 2 diabetes and related metabolic traits identifies tissue-specific roles for dHHEX

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) identify regions of the genome that are associated with particular traits, but do not typically identify specific causative genetic elements. For example, while a large number of single nucleotide polymorphisms associated with type 2 diabetes (T2D) and related traits have been identified by human GWAS, only a few genes have functional evidence to support or to rule out a role in cellular metabolism or dietary interactions. Here, we use a recently developed Drosophila model in which high-sucrose feeding induces phenotypes similar to T2D to assess orthologs of human GWAS-identified candidate genes for risk of T2D and related traits. Results Disrupting orthologs of certain T2D candidate genes (HHEX, THADA, PPARG, KCNJ11) led to sucrose-dependent toxicity. Tissue-specific knockdown of the HHEX ortholog dHHEX (CG7056) directed metabolic defects and enhanced lethality; for example, fat-body-specific loss of dHHEX led to increased hemolymph glucose and reduced insulin sensitivity. Conclusion Candidate genes identified in human genetic studies of metabolic traits can be prioritized and functionally characterized using a simple Drosophila approach. To our knowledge, this is the first large-scale effort to study the functional interaction between GWAS-identified candidate genes and an environmental risk factor such as diet in a model organism system. PMID:23445342

  4. Genome-wide association study of advanced age-related macular degeneration identifies a role of the hepatic lipase gene (LIPC)

    PubMed Central

    Neale, Benjamin M.; Fagerness, Jesen; Reynolds, Robyn; Sobrin, Lucia; Parker, Margaret; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Tan, Perciliz L.; Oh, Edwin C.; Merriam, Joanna E.; Souied, Eric; Bernstein, Paul S.; Li, Binxing; Frederick, Jeanne M.; Zhang, Kang; Brantley, Milam A.; Lee, Aaron Y.; Zack, Donald J.; Campochiaro, Betsy; Campochiaro, Peter; Ripke, Stephan; Smith, R. Theodore; Barile, Gaetano R.; Katsanis, Nicholas; Allikmets, Rando; Daly, Mark J.; Seddon, Johanna M.

    2010-01-01

    Advanced age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of late onset blindness. We present results of a genome-wide association study of 979 advanced AMD cases and 1,709 controls using the Affymetrix 6.0 platform with replication in seven additional cohorts (totaling 5,789 unrelated cases and 4,234 unrelated controls). We also present a comprehensive analysis of copy-number variations and polymorphisms for AMD. Our discovery data implicated the association between AMD and a variant in the hepatic lipase gene (LIPC) in the high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL) pathway (discovery P = 4.53e-05 for rs493258). Our LIPC association was strongest for a functional promoter variant, rs10468017, (P = 1.34e-08), that influences LIPC expression and serum HDL levels with a protective effect of the minor T allele (HDL increasing) for advanced wet and dry AMD. The association we found with LIPC was corroborated by the Michigan/Penn/Mayo genome-wide association study; the locus near the tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 3 was corroborated by our replication cohort for rs9621532 with P = 3.71e-09. We observed weaker associations with other HDL loci (ABCA1, P = 9.73e-04; cholesterylester transfer protein, P = 1.41e-03; FADS1-3, P = 2.69e-02). Based on a lack of consistent association between HDL increasing alleles and AMD risk, the LIPC association may not be the result of an effect on HDL levels, but it could represent a pleiotropic effect of the same functional component. Results implicate different biologic pathways than previously reported and provide new avenues for prevention and treatment of AMD. PMID:20385826

  5. SNP screening of central MHC-identified HLA-DMB as a candidate susceptibility gene for HIV-related Kaposi's sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Aissani, B; Boehme, A K; Wiener, H W; Shrestha, S; Jacobson, L P; Kaslow, R A

    2014-09-01

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region on chromosome 6p21.3 is suspected to host susceptibility loci for HIV-related Kaposi's sarcoma (HIV-KS). A nested case-control study in the Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study was designed to conduct fine genetic association mapping across central MHC. Individuals co-infected with HIV-1 and human herpes virus-8 who later developed KS were defined as cases (n=354) and were matched 1:1 with co-infected KS-free controls. We report data for new independent MHC class II and III susceptibility loci. In particular, class II HLA-DMB emerged as a strong candidate, with the intronic variant rs6902982 A>G associated with a fourfold increase of risk (odds ratio (OR)=4.09; 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.90-8.80; P=0.0003). A striking multiplicative effect on the estimated risk was associated with further carriage of two non-synonymous variants, rs1800453 A>G (Asp697Gly) and rs4148880 A>G (Ile393Val), in the linked TAP1 gene (OR=10.5; 95% CI=2.54-43.6; P=0.0012). The class III susceptibility variant is moderately associated with HIV-KS and lies within a 120-kb-long haplotype (OR=1.52; 95% CI=1.01-2.28; P=0.047) formed by rs7029 A>G (GPANK1 3' untranslated region), rs1065356 G>A (LY6G6C), rs3749953 A>G (MSH5-SAPCD1 read through) and rs707926 G>A (VARS). Our data suggest that antigen processing by MHC class II molecules is a target pathway in the pathogenesis of HIV-KS. PMID:25008864

  6. Improved mutation tagging with gene identifiers applied to membrane protein stability prediction

    PubMed Central

    Winnenburg, Rainer; Plake, Conrad; Schroeder, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Background The automated retrieval and integration of information about protein point mutations in combination with structure, domain and interaction data from literature and databases promises to be a valuable approach to study structure-function relationships in biomedical data sets. Results We developed a rule- and regular expression-based protein point mutation retrieval pipeline for PubMed abstracts, which shows an F-measure of 87% for the mutation retrieval task on a benchmark dataset. In order to link mutations to their proteins, we utilize a named entity recognition algorithm for the identification of gene names co-occurring in the abstract, and establish links based on sequence checks. Vice versa, we could show that gene recognition improved from 77% to 91% F-measure when considering mutation information given in the text. To demonstrate practical relevance, we utilize mutation information from text to evaluate a novel solvation energy based model for the prediction of stabilizing regions in membrane proteins. For five G protein-coupled receptors we identified 35 relevant single mutations and associated phenotypes, of which none had been annotated in the UniProt or PDB database. In 71% reported phenotypes were in compliance with the model predictions, supporting a relation between mutations and stability issues in membrane proteins. Conclusion We present a reliable approach for the retrieval of protein mutations from PubMed abstracts for any set of genes or proteins of interest. We further demonstrate how amino acid substitution information from text can be utilized for protein structure stability studies on the basis of a novel energy model. PMID:19758467

  7. Integrated Stable Isotope Labeling by Amino Acids in Cell Culture (SILAC) and Isobaric Tags for Relative and Absolute Quantitation (iTRAQ) Quantitative Proteomic Analysis Identifies Galectin-1 as a Potential Biomarker for Predicting Sorafenib Resistance in Liver Cancer*

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Chao-Chi; Hsu, Chih-Hung; Shao, Yu-Yun; Ho, Wen-Ching; Tsai, Mong-Hsun; Feng, Wen-Chi; Chow, Lu-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Sorafenib has become the standard therapy for patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Unfortunately, most patients eventually develop acquired resistance. Therefore, it is important to identify potential biomarkers that could predict the efficacy of sorafenib. To identify target proteins associated with the development of sorafenib resistance, we applied stable isotope labelling with amino acids in cell culture (SILAC)-based quantitative proteomic approach to analyze differences in protein expression levels between parental HuH-7 and sorafenib-acquired resistance HuH-7 (HuH-7R) cells in vitro, combined with an isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) quantitative analysis of HuH-7 and HuH-7R tumors in vivo. In total, 2,450 quantified proteins were identified in common in SILAC and iTRAQ experiments, with 81 showing increased expression (>2.0-fold) with sorafenib resistance and 75 showing decreased expression (<0.5-fold). In silico analyses of these differentially expressed proteins predicted that 10 proteins were related to cancer with involvements in cell adhesion, migration, and invasion. Knockdown of one of these candidate proteins, galectin-1, decreased cell proliferation and metastasis in HuH-7R cells and restored sensitivity to sorafenib. We verified galectin-1 as a predictive marker of sorafenib resistance and a downstream target of the AKT/mTOR/HIF-1α signaling pathway. In addition, increased galectin-1 expression in HCC patients' serum was associated with poor tumor control and low response rate. We also found that a high serum galectin-1 level was an independent factor associated with poor progression-free survival and overall survival. In conclusion, these results suggest that galectin-1 is a possible biomarker for predicting the response of HCC patients to treatment with sorafenib. As such, it may assist in the stratification of HCC and help direct personalized therapy. PMID:25850433

  8. Near Identifiability of Dynamical Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadaegh, F. Y.; Bekey, G. A.

    1987-01-01

    Concepts regarding approximate mathematical models treated rigorously. Paper presents new results in analysis of structural identifiability, equivalence, and near equivalence between mathematical models and physical processes they represent. Helps establish rigorous mathematical basis for concepts related to structural identifiability and equivalence revealing fundamental requirements, tacit assumptions, and sources of error. "Structural identifiability," as used by workers in this field, loosely translates as meaning ability to specify unique mathematical model and set of model parameters that accurately predict behavior of corresponding physical system.

  9. Identifying Clients Predisposed To Failure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carnes, G. D.

    1973-01-01

    Studies are reviewed that report the prediction of rehabilitation failure from personality measures. Related research is discussed that suggest the dynamics underlying a key concept, the "hypochondriacally organized personality" which is identifiable from the Rorschach anatomy response percentage. (Author)

  10. Identifying potential academic leaders

    PubMed Central

    White, David; Krueger, Paul; Meaney, Christopher; Antao, Viola; Kim, Florence; Kwong, Jeffrey C.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To identify variables associated with willingness to undertake leadership roles among academic family medicine faculty. Design Web-based survey. Bivariate and multivariable analyses (logistic regression) were used to identify variables associated with willingness to undertake leadership roles. Setting Department of Family and Community Medicine at the University of Toronto in Ontario. Participants A total of 687 faculty members. Main outcome measures Variables related to respondents’ willingness to take on various academic leadership roles. Results Of all 1029 faculty members invited to participate in the survey, 687 (66.8%) members responded. Of the respondents, 596 (86.8%) indicated their level of willingness to take on various academic leadership roles. Multivariable analysis revealed that the predictors associated with willingness to take on leadership roles were as follows: pursuit of professional development opportunities (odds ratio [OR] 3.79, 95% CI 2.29 to 6.27); currently holding at least 1 leadership role (OR 5.37, 95% CI 3.38 to 8.53); a history of leadership training (OR 1.86, 95% CI 1.25 to 2.78); the perception that mentorship is important for one’s current role (OR 2.25, 95% CI 1.40 to 3.60); and younger age (OR 0.97, 95% CI 0.95 to 0.99). Conclusion Willingness to undertake new or additional leadership roles was associated with 2 variables related to leadership experiences, 2 variables related to perceptions of mentorship and professional development, and 1 demographic variable (younger age). Interventions that support opportunities in these areas might expand the pool and strengthen the academic leadership potential of faculty members. PMID:27331226

  11. Identifying and Describing the Impact of Cyclone, Storm and Flood Related Disasters on Treatment Management, Care and Exacerbations of Non-communicable Diseases and the Implications for Public Health

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Benjamin; Franklin, Richard C.; Burkle, Frederick M.; Aitken, Peter; Smith, Erin; Watt, Kerrianne; Leggat, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Over the last quarter of a century the frequency of natural disasters and the burden of non-communicable diseases (NCD) across the globe have been increasing. For individuals susceptible to, or chronically experiencing, NCDs this has become a significant risk. Disasters jeopardize access to essential treatment, care, equipment, water and food, which can result in an exacerbation of existing conditions or even preventable death. Consequently, there is a need to expand the public health focus of disaster management to include NCDs. To provide a platform for this to occur, this article presents the results from a systematic review that identifies and describes the impact of cyclone, flood and storm related disasters on those susceptible to, or experiencing, NCDs. The NCDs researched were: cardiovascular diseases; cancers; chronic respiratory diseases; and diabetes.   Methods: Four electronic publication databases were searched with a date limit of 31 December 2014. The data was analyzed through an aggregation of individual papers to create an overall data description. The data was then grouped by disease to describe the impact of a disaster on treatment management, exacerbation, and health care of people with NCDs. The PRISMA checklist was used to guide presentation of the research. Results:  The review identified 48 relevant articles. All studies represented developed country data. Disasters interrupt treatment management and overall care for people with NCDs, which results in an increased risk of exacerbation of their illness or even death. The interruption may be caused by a range of factors, such as damaged transport routes, reduced health services, loss of power and evacuations. The health impact varied according to the NCD. For people with chronic respiratory diseases, a disaster increases the risk of acute exacerbation. Meanwhile, for people with cancer, cardiovascular diseases and diabetes there is an increased risk of their illness

  12. Proteomic Analysis Identifies an NADPH Oxidase 1 (Nox1)-Mediated Role for Actin-Related Protein 2/3 Complex Subunit 2 (ARPC2) in Promoting Smooth Muscle Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Al Ghouleh, Imad; Rodríguez, Andrés; Pagano, Patrick J.; Csányi, Gábor

    2013-01-01

    A variety of vascular pathologies, including hypertension, restenosis and atherosclerosis, are characterized by vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) hypertrophy and migration. NADPH oxidase 1 (Nox1) plays a pivotal role in these phenotypes via distinct downstream signaling. However, the mediators differentiating these distinct phenotypes and their precise role in vascular disease are still not clear. The present study was designed to identify novel targets of VSMC Nox1 signaling using 2D Differential In-Gel Electrophoresis and Mass Spectrometry (2D-DIGE/MS). VSMC treatment with scrambled (Scrmb) or Nox1 siRNA and incubation with the oxidant hydrogen peroxide (H2O2; 50 μM, 3 h) followed by 2D-DIGE/MS on cell lysates identified 10 target proteins. Among these proteins, actin-related protein 2/3 complex subunit 2 (ARPC2) with no previous link to Nox isozymes, H2O2, or other reactive oxygen species (ROS), was identified and postulated to play an intermediary role in VSMC migration. Western blot confirmed that Nox1 mediates H2O2-induced ARPC2 expression in VSMC. Treatment with a p38 MAPK inhibitor (SB203580) resulted in reduced ARPC2 expression in H2O2-treated VSMC. Additionally, wound-healing “scratch” assay confirmed that H2O2 stimulates VSMC migration via Nox1. Importantly, gene silencing of ARPC2 suppressed H2O2-stimulated VSMC migration. These results demonstrate for the first time that Nox1-mediated VSMC migration involves ARPC2 as a downstream signaling target. PMID:24152438

  13. Mental Health Needs of People Who Identify as Transgender: A Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    McCann, Edward; Sharek, Danika

    2016-04-01

    Transgender people face many challenges in society including accessing and using healthcare systems. However, little is known about the specific mental health service needs and concerns of transgender people in this regard. The aim of the study was to establish the mental health service needs of transgender people through a review of relevant studies that address the experiences and views of this group. A comprehensive search of CINHAL, Cochrane, Google Scholar, PubMed, PsychInfo, PsychLit, Sociological Abstracts, Scopus, and Web of Science databases from inception to January 2014 was conducted. Studies were identified that met specific criteria that included: using qualitative methods, involving transgender people, and addressing issues related to mental health services. The search yielded 217 papers in total. Following the application of rigorous inclusion and exclusion criteria 33 papers were included for retrieval. Finally, 10 papers were considered suitable for the review. The data were analyzed and key themes identified. The review highlighted distinct challenges that exist in terms of mental health service provision. These included accessing appropriate services and treatments, responsiveness of practitioner's, the provision of family supports and potential mental health service developments. The review findings are discussed and key recommendations are made in terms of mental health nursing practice developments, education and research. PMID:26992883

  14. A translational systems biology approach in both animals and humans identifies a functionally related module of accumbal genes involved in the regulation of reward processing and binge drinking in males

    PubMed Central

    Stacey, David; Lourdusamy, Anbarasu; Ruggeri, Barbara; Maroteaux, Matthieu; Jia, Tianye; Cattrell, Anna; Nymberg, Charlotte; Banaschewski, Tobias; Bhattacharyya, Sohinee; Band, Hamid; Barker, Gareth; Bokde, Arun; Buchel, Christian; Carvalho, Fabiana; Conrod, Patricia; Desrivieres, Sylvane; Easton, Alanna; Fauth-Buehler, Mira; Fernandez-Medarde, Alberto; Flor, Herta; Frouin, Vincent; Gallinat, Jurgen; Garavanh, Hugh; Heinz, Andreas; Ittermann, Bernd; Lathrop, Mark; Lawrence, Claire; Loth, Eva; Mann, Karl; Martinot, Jean-Luc; Nees, Frauke; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka; Rietschel, Marcella; Rotter, Andrea; Santos, Eugenio; Smolka, Michael; Sommer, Wolfgang; Mameli, Manuel; Spanagel, Rainer; Girault, Jean-Antoine; Mueller, Christian; Schumann, Gunter

    2016-01-01

    dopamine signalling or by the loss of Rasgrf2 function in the NAcc. Conclusion Taken together, our findings indicate that the accumbal M5 module, initially identified as being dysregulated in male Rasgrf2−/− mice, is also relevant for human alcohol-related phenotypes potentially through the modulation of reinforcement mechanisms in the NAcc. We therefore propose that the genes comprising this module represent important candidates for further elucidation within the context of alcohol-related phenotypes. PMID:26679926

  15. Circulating Endocannabinoids and the Polymorphism 385C>A in Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase (FAAH) Gene May Identify the Obesity Phenotype Related to Cardiometabolic Risk: A Study Conducted in a Brazilian Population of Complex Interethnic Admixture.

    PubMed

    Martins, Cyro José de Moraes; Genelhu, Virginia; Pimentel, Marcia Mattos Gonçalves; Celoria, Bruno Miguel Jorge; Mangia, Rogerio Fabris; Aveta, Teresa; Silvestri, Cristoforo; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Francischetti, Emilio Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The dysregulation of the endocannabinoid system is associated with cardiometabolic complications of obesity. Allelic variants in coding genes for this system components may contribute to differences in the susceptibility to obesity and related health hazards. These data have mostly been shown in Caucasian populations and in severely obese individuals. We investigated a multiethnic Brazilian population to study the relationships among the polymorphism 385C>A in an endocannabinoid degrading enzyme gene (FAAH), endocannabinoid levels and markers of cardiometabolic risk. Fasting plasma levels of endocannabinoids and congeners (anandamide, 2-arachidonoylglycerol, N-oleoylethanolamide and N-palmitoylethanolamide) were measured by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry in 200 apparently healthy individuals of both genders with body mass indices from 22.5 ± 1.8 to 35.9 ± 5.5 kg/m2 (mean ± 1 SD) and ages between 18 and 60 years. All were evaluated for anthropometric parameters, blood pressure, metabolic variables, homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), adiponectin, leptin, C-reactive protein, and genotyping. The endocannabinoid levels increased as a function of obesity and insulin resistance. The homozygous genotype AA was associated with higher levels of anandamide and lower levels of adiponectin versus wild homozygous CC and heterozygotes combined. The levels of anandamide were independent and positively associated with the genotype AA position 385 of FAAH, C-reactive protein levels and body mass index. Our findings provide evidence for an endocannabinoid-related phenotype that may be identified by the combination of circulating anandamide levels with genotyping of the FAAH 385C>A; this phenotype is not exclusive to mono-ethnoracial populations nor to individuals with severe obesity. PMID:26561012

  16. Circulating Endocannabinoids and the Polymorphism 385C>A in Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase (FAAH) Gene May Identify the Obesity Phenotype Related to Cardiometabolic Risk: A Study Conducted in a Brazilian Population of Complex Interethnic Admixture

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Cyro José de Moraes; Genelhu, Virginia; Pimentel, Marcia Mattos Gonçalves; Celoria, Bruno Miguel Jorge; Mangia, Rogerio Fabris; Aveta, Teresa; Silvestri, Cristoforo; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Francischetti, Emilio Antonio

    2015-01-01

    The dysregulation of the endocannabinoid system is associated with cardiometabolic complications of obesity. Allelic variants in coding genes for this system components may contribute to differences in the susceptibility to obesity and related health hazards. These data have mostly been shown in Caucasian populations and in severely obese individuals. We investigated a multiethnic Brazilian population to study the relationships among the polymorphism 385C>A in an endocannabinoid degrading enzyme gene (FAAH), endocannabinoid levels and markers of cardiometabolic risk. Fasting plasma levels of endocannabinoids and congeners (anandamide, 2-arachidonoylglycerol, N-oleoylethanolamide and N-palmitoylethanolamide) were measured by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry in 200 apparently healthy individuals of both genders with body mass indices from 22.5 ± 1.8 to 35.9 ± 5.5 kg/m2 (mean ± 1 SD) and ages between 18 and 60 years. All were evaluated for anthropometric parameters, blood pressure, metabolic variables, homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), adiponectin, leptin, C-reactive protein, and genotyping. The endocannabinoid levels increased as a function of obesity and insulin resistance. The homozygous genotype AA was associated with higher levels of anandamide and lower levels of adiponectin versus wild homozygous CC and heterozygotes combined. The levels of anandamide were independent and positively associated with the genotype AA position 385 of FAAH, C-reactive protein levels and body mass index. Our findings provide evidence for an endocannabinoid-related phenotype that may be identified by the combination of circulating anandamide levels with genotyping of the FAAH 385C>A; this phenotype is not exclusive to mono-ethnoracial populations nor to individuals with severe obesity. PMID:26561012

  17. Substance Use and Mental Health Disorders Among Heterosexual Identified Men and Women Who Have Same-Sex Partners or Same-Sex Attraction: Results from the National Epidemiological Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Sacco, Paul; Cunningham-Williams, Renee M.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined sexual orientation discordance, a mismatch between self-reported sexual identity and sexual behavior or sexual attraction, by describing the characteristics, substance use disorders, and mental health risks of heterosexual identified individuals who endorsed this pattern of sexual identification, behavior, and attraction. Using data from the National Epidemiological Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC), we created three groups based on participants’ reported sexual identity and either their sexual behavior or sexual attraction: heterosexual concordant, homosexual concordant, and heterosexual discordant. Bivariate models assessed the relationship of discordant status and demographic correlates, lifetime substance use disorders, and mental health diagnoses. Logistic regression models tested associations between both behavior discordance and attraction discordance and the likelihood of having lifetime disorders of substance use, major depression, and generalized anxiety. Results of this study provided evidence of varying levels of substance use and mental health disorder risk by gender, discordance status, and discordance type. Behavioral discordance was associated with increased risk of mental health and substance use disorder among women (compared to heterosexual concordance). Findings among men were less consistent with heightened risk of alcohol and inhalant use only. Attraction discordance was notably different from behavioral discordance. The odds of substance use and mental health disorders were the same or lower compared with both the heterosexual and homosexual concordance groups. Future research should begin to test theoretical explanations for these differences. PMID:22549338

  18. Genome-wide association study of age-related macular degeneration identifies associated variants in the TNXB-FKBPL-NOTCH4 region of chromosome 6p21.3.

    PubMed

    Cipriani, Valentina; Leung, Hin-Tak; Plagnol, Vincent; Bunce, Catey; Khan, Jane C; Shahid, Humma; Moore, Anthony T; Harding, Simon P; Bishop, Paul N; Hayward, Caroline; Campbell, Susan; Armbrecht, Ana Maria; Dhillon, Baljean; Deary, Ian J; Campbell, Harry; Dunlop, Malcolm; Dominiczak, Anna F; Mann, Samantha S; Jenkins, Sharon A; Webster, Andrew R; Bird, Alan C; Lathrop, Mark; Zelenika, Diana; Souied, Eric H; Sahel, José-Alain; Léveillard, Thierry; Cree, Angela J; Gibson, Jane; Ennis, Sarah; Lotery, Andrew J; Wright, Alan F; Clayton, David G; Yates, John R W

    2012-09-15

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of visual loss in Western populations. Susceptibility is influenced by age, environmental and genetic factors. Known genetic risk loci do not account for all the heritability. We therefore carried out a genome-wide association study of AMD in the UK population with 893 cases of advanced AMD and 2199 controls. This showed an association with the well-established AMD risk loci ARMS2 (age-related maculopathy susceptibility 2)-HTRA1 (HtrA serine peptidase 1) (P =2.7 × 10(-72)), CFH (complement factor H) (P =2.3 × 10(-47)), C2 (complement component 2)-CFB (complement factor B) (P =5.2 × 10(-9)), C3 (complement component 3) (P =2.2 × 10(-3)) and CFI (P =3.6 × 10(-3)) and with more recently reported risk loci at VEGFA (P =1.2 × 10(-3)) and LIPC (hepatic lipase) (P =0.04). Using a replication sample of 1411 advanced AMD cases and 1431 examined controls, we confirmed a novel association between AMD and single-nucleotide polymorphisms on chromosome 6p21.3 at TNXB (tenascin XB)-FKBPL (FK506 binding protein like) [rs12153855/rs9391734; discovery P =4.3 × 10(-7), replication P =3.0 × 10(-4), combined P =1.3 × 10(-9), odds ratio (OR) = 1.4, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.3-1.6] and the neighbouring gene NOTCH4 (Notch 4) (rs2071277; discovery P =3.2 × 10(-8), replication P =3.8 × 10(-5), combined P =2.0 × 10(-11), OR = 1.3, 95% CI = 1.2-1.4). These associations remained significant in conditional analyses which included the adjacent C2-CFB locus. TNXB, FKBPL and NOTCH4 are all plausible AMD susceptibility genes, but further research will be needed to identify the causal variants and determine whether any of these genes are involved in the pathogenesis of AMD. PMID:22694956

  19. The IncF plasmid pRSB225 isolated from a municipal wastewater treatment plant's on-site preflooder combining antibiotic resistance and putative virulence functions is highly related to virulence plasmids identified in pathogenic E. coli isolates.

    PubMed

    Wibberg, Daniel; Szczepanowski, Rafael; Eikmeyer, Felix; Pühler, Alfred; Schlüter, Andreas

    2013-03-01

    The IncF antibiotic resistance and virulence plasmid pRSB225, isolated from an unknown bacterium released with the purified wastewater from a municipal sewage treatment plant into the environment has been analysed at the genomic level by pyrosequencing. The 164,550bp plasmid comprises 210 coding sequences (cds). It is composed of three replicons (RepFIA, RepFIB, and RepFII) and encodes further plasmid-specific functions for stable maintenance and inheritance and conjugative plasmid transfer. The plasmid is self-transmissible and shows a narrow host range limited to the family Enterobacteriaceae. The accessory modules of the plasmid mainly comprise genes conferring resistance to ampicillin (bla(TEM-1b)), chloramphenicol (catA1), erythromycin (mphA), kanamycin and neomycin (aphA1), streptomycin (strAB), sulphonamides (sul2), tetracycline (tetA(B)) and trimethoprim (dfrA14), as well as mercuric ions (mer genes). In addition, putative virulence-associated genes coding for iron uptake (iutA/iucABCD, sitABCD, and a putative high-affinity Fe²⁺ uptake system) and for a toxin/antitoxin system (vagCD) were identified on the plasmid. All antibiotic and heavy metal resistance genes are located either on class 1 (Tn10-remnant, Tn4352B) and class 2 transposons (Tn2-remnant, Tn21, Tn402-remnant) or a class 1 integron, whereas almost all putative virulence genes are associated with IS elements (IS1, IS26), indicating that transposition and/or recombination events were responsible for acquisition of the accessory pRSB225 modules. Particular modules of plasmid pRSB225 are related to corresponding segments of different virulence plasmids harboured by pathogenic Escherichia coli strains. Moreover, pRSB225 modules were also detected in entero-aggregative-haemorrhagic E. coli (EAHEC) draft genome sequences suggesting that IncF plasmids related to pRSB225 mediated gene transfer into pathogenic E. coli derivatives. PMID:23212116

  20. Network Topology Analysis of Post-Mortem Brain Microarrays Identifies More Alzheimer’s Related Genes and MicroRNAs and Points to Novel Routes for Fighting with the Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chandrasekaran, Sreedevi; Bonchev, Danail

    2016-01-01

    Network-based approaches are powerful and beneficial tools to study complex systems in their entirety, elucidating the essential factors that turn the multitude of individual elements into a functional system. In this study we used critical network topology descriptors and guilt-by-association rule to explore and understand the significant molecular players, drug targets and underlying biological mechanisms of Alzheimer’s disease. Analyzing two post-mortem brain gene microarrays (GSE4757 and GSE28146) with Pathway Studio software package we constructed and analyzed a set of protein-protein interaction, as well as miRNA-target networks. In a 4-step procedure the expression datasets were normalized using Robust Multi-array Average approach, while the modulation of gene expression by the disease was statistically evaluated by the empirical Bayes method from the limma Bioconductor package. Representative set of 214 seed-genes (p<0.01) common for the three brain sections of the two microarrays was thus created. The Pathway Studio analysis of the networks built identified 15 new potential AD-related genes and 17 novel AD-involved microRNAs. Using KEGG pathways relevant in Alzheimer’s disease we built an integrated mechanistic network from the interactions between the overlapping genes in these pathways. Routes of possible disease initiation process were thus revealed through the CD4, DCN, and IL8 extracellular ligands. DAVID and IPA enrichment analysis uncovered a number of deregulated biological processes and pathways including neuron projection/differentiation, aging, oxidative stress, chemokine/ neurotrophin signaling, long-term potentiation and others. The findings in this study offer information of interest for subsequent experimental studies. PMID:26784894

  1. Dendrogeomorphic approaches for identifying the probable occurrence of debris flows and related torrential processes in steep headwater catchments: The Hrubý Jeseník Mountains, Czech Republic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tichavský, Radek; Šilhán, Karel

    2015-10-01

    Culminating parts of mid-mountain ranges in Central Europe are interwoven by a network of high-gradient streams. These parts, together with the surrounding slopes, form a coupling system in which hazardous geomorphic processes, such as landslides, debris flows or flash floods, can occur. In the case of the Hrubý Jeseník Mountains (Eastern Sudetes, Czech Republic), we present an evaluation of the debris flows and related torrential processes in the high-gradient streams of the selected catchment based on dendrogeomorphic methods. In addition to the classical dendrogeomorphic approaches we refined the procedure of identifying certain and probable events using new weighted indexes for event reconstruction. Additionally, because of the steep narrow channels without a characteristic accumulation cone, a new spatial approach is defined based on the spacing of disturbed trees for each event (random distribution or clustering) and location of disturbed trees in an individual section of the valley floor. Using Kernel Density analysis for each event and calculating the particular grids in ArcGIS software, we are able to describe the spatial reach and probable nature of an event (debris flow or hyperconcentrated flow). Dendrogeomorphic analysis of 397 sampled trees (predominantly coniferous trees) revealed 24 torrential events (15 certain, nine probable) since 1928 with peaks in 1991, 1997 and 2010 according to index values. In addition, the spatial distribution of disturbed trees (grouped in clusters) in these years indicates debris flow events in the upper parts of the catchment. It seems that new dendrogeomorphic approaches should be valuable in remote, steep headwater catchments where several types of processes affect the valley floors.

  2. Job-Related Stressors of Classical Instrumental Musicians: A Systematic Qualitative Review.

    PubMed

    Vervainioti, A; Alexopoulos, E C

    2015-12-01

    Epidemiological studies among performing artists have found elevated stress levels and health effects, but scarcely the full range of stressors has been reported. We review here the existing literature on job-related stressors of classical instrumental musicians (orchestra musicians). PubMed, Google Scholar and JSTOR databases were screened for relevant papers indexed up to August 2012. A total of 122 papers was initially identified which, after exclusion of duplicates and those not meeting eligibility criteria, yielded 67 articles for final analysis. We identified seven categories of stressors affecting musicians in their everyday working lives: public exposure, personal hazards, repertoire, competition, job context, injury/illness, and criticism, but with interrelated assigned factors. The proposed categories provide a framework for future comprehensive research on the impact and management of musician stressors. PMID:26614973

  3. Helping You Identify Quality Laboratory Services

    MedlinePlus

    Helping You Identify Quality Laboratory Services Selecting quality health care services for yourself, a relative or friend requires special thought and attention. The Joint Commission has prepared ...

  4. Metal alloy identifier

    DOEpatents

    Riley, William D.; Brown, Jr., Robert D.

    1987-01-01

    To identify the composition of a metal alloy, sparks generated from the alloy are optically observed and spectrographically analyzed. The spectrographic data, in the form of a full-spectrum plot of intensity versus wavelength, provide the "signature" of the metal alloy. This signature can be compared with similar plots for alloys of known composition to establish the unknown composition by a positive match with a known alloy. An alternative method is to form intensity ratios for pairs of predetermined wavelengths within the observed spectrum and to then compare the values of such ratios with similar values for known alloy compositions, thereby to positively identify the unknown alloy composition.

  5. Geometrical scaling for identified particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Praszalowicz, Michal

    2013-12-01

    We show that recently measured transverse momentum spectra of identified particles exhibit geometrical scaling (GS) in scaling variable τ=(( where m=√{m2+pT2}-m. We explore consequences of GS and show that both mid rapidity multiplicity and mean transverse momenta grow as powers of scattering energy. Furthermore, assuming Tsallis-like parametrization of the spectra we calculate the coefficients of this growth. We also show that Tsallis temperature is related to the average saturation scale.

  6. Identifying Technical Vocabulary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chung, Teresa Mihwa; Nation, Paul

    2004-01-01

    This study compared four different approaches to identifying technical words in an anatomy text. The first approach used a four step rating scale, and was used as the comparison for evaluating the other three approaches. It had a high degree of reliability. The least successful approach was that using clues provided by the writer such as labels in…

  7. Identifying and Managing Risk.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abraham, Janice M.

    1999-01-01

    The role of the college or university chief financial officer in institutional risk management is (1) to identify risk (physical, casualty, fiscal, business, reputational, workplace safety, legal liability, employment practices, general liability), (2) to develop a campus plan to reduce and control risk, (3) to transfer risk, and (4) to track and…

  8. Transcriptional regulators transforming growth factor-beta 1 and estrogen-related receptor-alpha identified as putative mediators of calf rumen epithelial tissue development and function during weaning

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Molecular mechanisms controlling rumen epithelial development at weaning remain largely unknown. To identify gene networks and regulatory factors responsive to concentrate versus forage feeding at weaning, Holstein bull calves (n = 18) were fed commercial milk replacer only (MRO) until 42 d of age. ...

  9. Profiles of Elementary-Age English Language Learners with Reading-Related Learning Disabilities (LD) Identified as Speech and Language Impaired Prior to, at, or after Identification as LD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGhee, Belinda Maria Despujols

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the characteristics of 14 English Language Learners classified as having learning disabilities (LD) who were also identified as having speech and language impairments (SI) prior to, at, or after initial identification as LD. Data were collected under the auspices of a longitudinal study, Bilingual Exceptional Students:…

  10. A systematic review on skin complications of bone-anchored hearing aids in relation to surgical techniques.

    PubMed

    Mohamad, Shwan; Khan, Imran; Hey, S Y; Hussain, S S Musheer

    2016-03-01

    A systematic review to study the skin complications associated with the bone-anchored hearing aid in relation to surgical techniques. The following databases have been searched: MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library , Google scholar and the PubMed. The literature search date was from January 1977 until November 2013. Randomised controlled trials and retrospective studies were included. Initial search identified 420 publications. Thirty articles met the inclusion criteria of this review. The most common surgical techniques identified were full-thickness skin graft, Dermatome and linear incision techniques. The result shows that dermatome technique is associated with higher rate of skin complications when compared to linear incision and skin graft techniques. Based on the available literature, the use of a linear incision technique appears to be associated with lower skin complications; however, there is limited data available supporting this. Higher quality studies would allow a more reliable comparison between the surgical techniques. PMID:25503356

  11. Transcriptional regulators transforming growth factor-β1 and estrogen-related receptor-α identified as putative mediators of calf rumen epithelial tissue development and function during weaning.

    PubMed

    Connor, E E; Baldwin, R L; Walker, M P; Ellis, S E; Li, C; Kahl, S; Chung, H; Li, R W

    2014-07-01

    Molecular mechanisms regulating rumen epithelial development remain largely unknown. To identify gene networks and regulatory factors controlling rumen development, Holstein bull calves (n=18) were fed milk replacer only (MRO) until 42 d of age. Three calves each were euthanized at 14 and 42 d of age for tissue collection to represent preweaning, and the remaining calves were provided diets of either milk replacer + orchard grass hay (MH; n=6) to initiate weaning without development of rumen papillae, or milk replacer + calf starter (MG; n=6) to initiate weaning and development of rumen papillae. At 56 and 70 d of age, 3 calves from the MH and MG groups were euthanized for collection of rumen epithelium. Total RNA and protein were extracted for microarray analysis and to validate detected changes in selected protein expression, respectively. As expected, calves fed MRO had no rumen papillae and development of papillae was greater in MG versus MH calves. Differentially expressed genes between the MRO diet at d 42 (preweaning) versus the MG or MH diets at d 56 (during weaning) were identified using permutation analysis of differential expression. Expression of 345 and 519 transcripts was uniquely responsive to MG and MH feeding, respectively. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (Qiagen, Redwood City, CA) indicated that the top-ranked biological function affected by the MG diet was the cell cycle, and TFGB1, FBOX01, and PPARA were identified as key transcriptional regulators of genes responsive to the MG diet and associated with development of rumen papillae. Increased expressions of TGFB1 mRNA and protein in response to the MG diet were confirmed by subsequent analyses. The top-ranking biological function affected by the MH diet was energy production. Receptors for IGF-1 and insulin, ESRRA, and PPARD were identified by ingenuity pathway analysis as transcriptional regulators of genes responsive to the MH diet. Further analysis of TGFB1 and ESRRA mRNA expression in rumen

  12. On identified predictive control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bialasiewicz, Jan T.

    1993-01-01

    Self-tuning control algorithms are potential successors to manually tuned PID controllers traditionally used in process control applications. A very attractive design method for self-tuning controllers, which has been developed over recent years, is the long-range predictive control (LRPC). The success of LRPC is due to its effectiveness with plants of unknown order and dead-time which may be simultaneously nonminimum phase and unstable or have multiple lightly damped poles (as in the case of flexible structures or flexible robot arms). LRPC is a receding horizon strategy and can be, in general terms, summarized as follows. Using assumed long-range (or multi-step) cost function the optimal control law is found in terms of unknown parameters of the predictor model of the process, current input-output sequence, and future reference signal sequence. The common approach is to assume that the input-output process model is known or separately identified and then to find the parameters of the predictor model. Once these are known, the optimal control law determines control signal at the current time t which is applied at the process input and the whole procedure is repeated at the next time instant. Most of the recent research in this field is apparently centered around the LRPC formulation developed by Clarke et al., known as generalized predictive control (GPC). GPC uses ARIMAX/CARIMA model of the process in its input-output formulation. In this paper, the GPC formulation is used but the process predictor model is derived from the state space formulation of the ARIMAX model and is directly identified over the receding horizon, i.e., using current input-output sequence. The underlying technique in the design of identified predictive control (IPC) algorithm is the identification algorithm of observer/Kalman filter Markov parameters developed by Juang et al. at NASA Langley Research Center and successfully applied to identification of flexible structures.

  13. Extreme water-related weather events and waterborne disease.

    PubMed

    Cann, K F; Thomas, D Rh; Salmon, R L; Wyn-Jones, A P; Kay, D

    2013-04-01

    Global climate change is expected to affect the frequency, intensity and duration of extreme water-related weather events such as excessive precipitation, floods, and drought. We conducted a systematic review to examine waterborne outbreaks following such events and explored their distribution between the different types of extreme water-related weather events. Four medical and meteorological databases (Medline, Embase, GeoRef, PubMed) and a global electronic reporting system (ProMED) were searched, from 1910 to 2010. Eighty-seven waterborne outbreaks involving extreme water-related weather events were identified and included, alongside 235 ProMED reports. Heavy rainfall and flooding were the most common events preceding outbreaks associated with extreme weather and were reported in 55·2% and 52·9% of accounts, respectively. The most common pathogens reported in these outbreaks were Vibrio spp. (21·6%) and Leptospira spp. (12·7%). Outbreaks following extreme water-related weather events were often the result of contamination of the drinking-water supply (53·7%). Differences in reporting of outbreaks were seen between the scientific literature and ProMED. Extreme water-related weather events represent a risk to public health in both developed and developing countries, but impact will be disproportionate and likely to compound existing health disparities. PMID:22877498

  14. Genome-wide association study identified PLCE1- rs2797992 and EGFR- rs6950826 were associated with TP53 expression in the HBV-related hepatocellular carcinoma of Chinese patients in Guangxi

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Xiwen; Han, Chuangye; Qin, Wei; Liu, Xiaoguang; Yu, Long; Lu, Sicong; Chen, Zhiwei; Zhu, Guangzhi; Su, Hao; Mo, Zengnan; Qin, Xue; Peng, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The genome-wide association approach was employed to explore the association between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and TP53 expression in the HBV-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) of Chinese patients in Guangxi. Methods: 403 HBV-related HCC patients were recruited into this study and classified according to the TP53 expression in the cancer by immunohistochemistry. DNA was extracted from the cancer and genotyped with the Human ExomeBeadChip 12v1-1 system; quality control and principal-component analysis (PCA) were applied for data analysis. Results: The Genome-wide association analysis indicated that rs2797992 with a P value of 4.35 × 10-5 locus in PLCE1 gene and rs6950826 with a P value of 2.2 × 10-3 locus in EGFR gene were associated with TP53 expression in the HCC. A allele of rs2797992 predicted a decreased risk for TP53 expression in HCC. In contrast, A allele of rs6950826 increased the risk for TP53 expression. There was no strong LD locus in the tested regions. PLCE1 and EGFR were associated with TP53 in pathway and at HCC mRNA level. Conclusion: rs2797992 of PLCE1 gene and rs6950826 of EGFR gene are associated with TP53 expression, but not with the prognosis of HBV-related HCC in HBV-related HCC of Chinese patients in Guangxi. PMID:27186304

  15. List identifies threatened ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2012-09-01

    The International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) announced on 9 September that it will develop a new Red List of Ecosystems that will identify which ecosystems are vulnerable or endangered. The list, which is modeled on the group's Red List of Threatened Species™, could help to guide conservation activities and influence policy processes such as the Convention on Biological Diversity, according to the group. “We will assess the status of marine, terrestrial, freshwater, and subterranean ecosystems at local, regional, and global levels,” stated Jon Paul Rodriguez, leader of IUCN's Ecosystems Red List Thematic Group. “The assessment can then form the basis for concerted implementation action so that we can manage them sustainably if their risk of collapse is low or restore them if they are threatened and then monitor their recovery.”

  16. Epidemiological aspects of rheumatoid arthritis patients affected by oral bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis of the jaws

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    This literature review aims to evaluate the epidemiologic profile of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) that developed a bisphosphonate-related osteonecrosis that affect the jaws (BRONJ), including demographic aspects, as well as clinical and therapeutic issues. A search of PUBMED/MEDLINE, Scopus, and Cochrane databases from January 2003 to September 2011 was conducted with the objective of identifying publications that contained case reports regarding oral BRONJ in RA patients. Patients with RA who develop oral BRONJ are usually women above 60 years taking steroids and long-term alendronate. Most of them have osteoporosis, and lesions, triggered by dental procedures, are usually detected at stage II in the mandible. Although there is no accepted treatment protocol, these patients seem to have better outcomes with conservative approaches that include antibiotic therapy, chlorhexidine, and drug discontinuation. PMID:22376948

  17. Pseudoachondroplasia and Multiple Epiphyseal Dysplasia: A 7-Year Comprehensive Analysis of the Known Disease Genes Identify Novel and Recurrent Mutations and Provides an Accurate Assessment of Their Relative Contribution

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Gail C; Mittaz-Crettol, Laureane; Taylor, Jacqueline A; Mortier, Geert R; Spranger, Juergen; Zabel, Bernhard; Le Merrer, Martine; Cormier-Daire, Valerie; Hall, Christine M; Offiah, Amaka; Wright, Michael J; Savarirayan, Ravi; Nishimura, Gen; Ramsden, Simon C; Elles, Rob; Bonafe, Luisa; Superti-Furga, Andrea; Unger, Sheila; Zankl, Andreas; Briggs, Michael D

    2012-01-01

    Pseudoachondroplasia (PSACH) and multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (MED) are relatively common skeletal dysplasias resulting in short-limbed dwarfism, joint pain, and stiffness. PSACH and the largest proportion of autosomal dominant MED (AD-MED) results from mutations in cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP); however, AD-MED is genetically heterogenous and can also result from mutations in matrilin-3 (MATN3) and type IX collagen (COL9A1, COL9A2, and COL9A3). In contrast, autosomal recessive MED (rMED) appears to result exclusively from mutations in sulphate transporter solute carrier family 26 (SLC26A2). The diagnosis of PSACH and MED can be difficult for the nonexpert due to various complications and similarities with other related diseases and often mutation analysis is requested to either confirm or exclude the diagnosis. Since 2003, the European Skeletal Dysplasia Network (ESDN) has used an on-line review system to efficiently diagnose cases referred to the network prior to mutation analysis. In this study, we present the molecular findings in 130 patients referred to ESDN, which includes the identification of novel and recurrent mutations in over 100 patients. Furthermore, this study provides the first indication of the relative contribution of each gene and confirms that they account for the majority of PSACH and MED. Hum Mutat 33:144–157, 2012. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:21922596

  18. A Metabolomics Study of Retrospective Forensic Data from Whole Blood Samples of Humans Exposed to 3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine: A New Approach for Identifying Drug Metabolites and Changes in Metabolism Related to Drug Consumption.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Kirstine L; Telving, Rasmus; Andreasen, Mette F; Hasselstrøm, Jørgen B; Johannsen, Mogens

    2016-02-01

    The illicit drug 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) has profound physiological cerebral, cardiac, and hepatic effects that are reflected in the blood. Screening of blood for MDMA and other narcotics are routinely performed in forensics analysis using ultra-performance liquid chromatography with high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-HR-TOFMS). The aim of this study was to investigate whether such UPLC-HR-TOFMS data collected over a two-year period could be used for untargeted metabolomics to determine MDMA metabolites as well as endogenous changes related to drug response and toxicology. Whole blood samples from living Danish drivers' positive for MDMA in different concentrations were compared to negative control samples using various statistical methods. The untargeted identification of known MDMA metabolites was used to validate the methods. The results further revealed changes of several acylcarnitines, adenosine monophosphate, adenosine, inosine, thiomorpholine 3-carboxylate, tryptophan, S-adenosyl-l-homocysteine (SAH), and lysophospatidylcholine (lysoPC) species in response to MDMA. These endogenous metabolites could be implicated in an increased energy demand and mechanisms related to the serotonergic syndrome as well as drug induced neurotoxicity. The findings showed that it was possible to extract meaningful results from retrospective UPLC-HR-TOFMS screening data for metabolic profiling in relation to drug metabolism, endogenous physiological effects, and toxicology. PMID:26705142

  19. Identifying Young, Nearby Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, Rich; Song, Inseok; Zuckerman, Ben; Bessell, Mike

    2001-01-01

    Young stars have certain characteristics, e.g., high atmospheric abundance of lithium and chromospheric activity, fast rotation, distinctive space motion and strong X-ray flux compared to that of older main sequence stars. We have selected a list of candidate young (<100Myr) and nearby (<60pc) stars based on their space motion and/or strong X-ray flux. To determine space motion of a star, one needs to know its coordinates (RA, DEC), proper motion, distance, and radial velocity. The Hipparcos and Tycho catalogues provide all this information except radial velocities. We anticipate eventually searching approx. 1000 nearby stars for signs of extreme youth. Future studies of the young stars so identified will help clarify the formation of planetary systems for times between 10 and 100 million years. Certainly, the final output of this study will be a very useful resource, especially for adaptive optics and space based searches for Jupiter-mass planets and dusty proto-planetary disks. We have begun spectroscopic observations in January, 2001 with the 2.3 m telescope at Siding Spring Observatory (SSO) in New South Wales, Australia. These spectra will be used to determine radial velocities and other youth indicators such as Li 6708A absorption strength and Hydrogen Balmer line intensity. Additional observations of southern hemisphere stars from SSO are scheduled in April and northern hemisphere observations will take place in May and July at the Lick Observatory of the University of California. AT SSO, to date, we have observed about 100 stars with a high resolution spectrometer (echelle) and about 50 stars with a medium spectral resolution spectrometer (the "DBS"). About 20% of these stars turn out to be young stars. Among these, two especially noteworthy stars appear to be the closest T-Tauri stars ever identified. Interestingly, these stars share the same space motions as that of a very famous star with a dusty circumstellar disk--beta Pictoris. This new finding better

  20. GeneBrowser 2: an application to explore and identify common biological traits in a set of genes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The development of high-throughput laboratory techniques created a demand for computer-assisted result analysis tools. Many of these techniques return lists of genes whose interpretation requires finding relevant biological roles for the problem at hand. The required information is typically available in public databases, and usually, this information must be manually retrieved to complement the analysis. This process is a very time-consuming task that should be automated as much as possible. Results GeneBrowser is a web-based tool that, for a given list of genes, combines data from several public databases with visualisation and analysis methods to help identify the most relevant and common biological characteristics. The functionalities provided include the following: a central point with the most relevant biological information for each inserted gene; a list of the most related papers in PubMed and gene expression studies in ArrayExpress; and an extended approach to functional analysis applied to Gene Ontology, homologies, gene chromosomal localisation and pathways. Conclusions GeneBrowser provides a unique entry point to several visualisation and analysis methods, providing fast and easy analysis of a set of genes. GeneBrowser fills the gap between Web portals that analyse one gene at a time and functional analysis tools that are limited in scope and usually desktop-based. PMID:20663121

  1. Monoacidic Inhibitors of the Kelch-like ECH-Associated Protein 1: Nuclear Factor Erythroid 2-Related Factor 2 (KEAP1:NRF2) Protein-Protein Interaction with High Cell Potency Identified by Fragment-Based Discovery.

    PubMed

    Davies, Thomas G; Wixted, William E; Coyle, Joseph E; Griffiths-Jones, Charlotte; Hearn, Keisha; McMenamin, Rachel; Norton, David; Rich, Sharna J; Richardson, Caroline; Saxty, Gordon; Willems, Henriëtte M G; Woolford, Alison J-A; Cottom, Joshua E; Kou, Jen-Pyng; Yonchuk, John G; Feldser, Heidi G; Sanchez, Yolanda; Foley, Joseph P; Bolognese, Brian J; Logan, Gregory; Podolin, Patricia L; Yan, Hongxing; Callahan, James F; Heightman, Tom D; Kerns, Jeffrey K

    2016-04-28

    KEAP1 is the key regulator of the NRF2-mediated cytoprotective response, and increasingly recognized as a target for diseases involving oxidative stress. Pharmacological intervention has focused on molecules that decrease NRF2-ubiquitination through covalent modification of KEAP1 cysteine residues, but such electrophilic compounds lack selectivity and may be associated with off-target toxicity. We report here the first use of a fragment-based approach to directly target the KEAP1 Kelch-NRF2 interaction. X-ray crystallographic screening identified three distinct "hot-spots" for fragment binding within the NRF2 binding pocket of KEAP1, allowing progression of a weak fragment hit to molecules with nanomolar affinity for KEAP1 while maintaining drug-like properties. This work resulted in a promising lead compound which exhibits tight and selective binding to KEAP1, and activates the NRF2 antioxidant response in cellular and in vivo models, thereby providing a high quality chemical probe to explore the therapeutic potential of disrupting the KEAP1-NRF2 interaction. PMID:27031670

  2. International flight-related transmission of pandemic influenza A(H1N1)pdm09: an historical cohort study of the first identified cases in the United Kingdom

    PubMed Central

    Young, Nicholas; Pebody, Richard; Smith, Gillian; Olowokure, Babatunde; Shankar, Giri; Hoschler, Katja; Galiano, Monica; Green, Helen; Wallensten, Anders; Hogan, Angela; Oliver, Isabel

    2014-01-01

    Background Transporting over two billion passengers per year, global airline travel has the potential to spread emerging infectious diseases, both via transportation of infectious cases and through in-flight transmission. Current World Health Organization (WHO) guidance recommends contact tracing of passengers seated within two rows of a case of influenza during air travel. Objectives The objectives of this study were to describe flight-related transmission of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 during a commercial flight carrying the first cases reported in the United Kingdom and to test the specific hypothesis that passengers seated within two rows of an infectious case are at greater risk of infection. Methods An historical cohort study, supplemented by contact tracing, enhanced surveillance data and laboratory testing, was used to establish a case status for passengers on board the flight. Results Data were available for 239 of 278 (86·0%) of passengers on the flight, of whom six were considered infectious in-flight and one immune. The attack rate (AR) was 10 of 232 (4·3%; 95% CI 1·7–6·9%). There was no evidence that the AR for those seated within two rows of an infectious case was different from those who were not (relative risk 0·9; 95% CI 0·2–3·1; P = 1·00). Laboratory testing using PCR and/or serology, available for 118 of 239 (49·4%) of the passengers, was largely consistent with clinically defined case status. Conclusions This study of A(H1N1)pdm09 does not support current WHO guidance regarding the contact tracing of passengers seated within two rows of an infectious case of influenza during air travel. PMID:24373291

  3. Meteor fireball sounds identified

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keay, Colin

    1992-01-01

    Sounds heard simultaneously with the flight of large meteor fireballs are electrical in origin. Confirmation that Extra/Very Low Frequency (ELF/VLF) electromagnetic radiation is produced by the fireball was obtained by Japanese researchers. Although the generation mechanism is not fully understood, studies of the Meteorite Observation and Recovery Project (MORP) and other fireball data indicate that interaction with the atmosphere is definitely responsible and the cut-off magnitude of -9 found for sustained electrophonic sounds is supported by theory. Brief bursts of ELF/VLF radiation may accompany flares or explosions of smaller fireballs, producing transient sounds near favorably placed observers. Laboratory studies show that mundane physical objects can respond to electrical excitation and produce audible sounds. Reports of electrophonic sounds should no longer be discarded. A catalog of over 300 reports relating to electrophonic phenomena associated with meteor fireballs, aurorae, and lightning was assembled. Many other reports have been cataloged in Russian. These may assist the full solution of the similar long-standing and contentious mystery of audible auroral displays.

  4. 29 CFR 4010.7 - Identifying information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Identifying information. 4010.7 Section 4010.7 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) PENSION BENEFIT GUARANTY CORPORATION CERTAIN REPORTING AND DISCLOSURE REQUIREMENTS ANNUAL FINANCIAL AND ACTUARIAL INFORMATION REPORTING § 4010.7 Identifying...

  5. 29 CFR 4010.7 - Identifying information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Identifying information. 4010.7 Section 4010.7 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) PENSION BENEFIT GUARANTY CORPORATION CERTAIN REPORTING AND DISCLOSURE REQUIREMENTS ANNUAL FINANCIAL AND ACTUARIAL INFORMATION REPORTING § 4010.7 Identifying...

  6. 29 CFR 4010.7 - Identifying information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Identifying information. 4010.7 Section 4010.7 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) PENSION BENEFIT GUARANTY CORPORATION CERTAIN REPORTING AND DISCLOSURE REQUIREMENTS ANNUAL FINANCIAL AND ACTUARIAL INFORMATION REPORTING § 4010.7 Identifying...

  7. 29 CFR 4010.7 - Identifying information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Identifying information. 4010.7 Section 4010.7 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) PENSION BENEFIT GUARANTY CORPORATION CERTAIN REPORTING AND DISCLOSURE REQUIREMENTS ANNUAL FINANCIAL AND ACTUARIAL INFORMATION REPORTING § 4010.7 Identifying...

  8. A search strategy to identify studies on the prognosis of work disability: a diagnostic test framework

    PubMed Central

    Kok, Rob; Verbeek, Jos A H M; Faber, Babs; van Dijk, Frank J H; Hoving, Jan L

    2015-01-01

    Objective Searching the medical literature for evidence on prognosis is an important aspect of evidence-based disability evaluation. To facilitate this, we aimed to develop and evaluate a comprehensive and efficient search strategy in PubMed, to be used by either researchers or practitioners and that will identify articles on the prognosis of work disability. Methods We used a diagnostic test analytic framework. First, we created a reference set of 225 articles on the prognosis of work disability by screening a total of 65 692 titles and abstracts from10 journals in the period 2000–2009. Included studies had a minimum follow-up of 6 months, participants in the age of 18–64 with a minimum sick leave of 4 weeks or longer or having serious activity limitations in 50% of the cases and outcome measures that reflect impairments, activity limitations or participation restrictions. Using text mining methods, we extracted search terms from the reference set and, according to sensitivity and relative frequency, we combined these into search strings. Results Both the research and the practice search filter outperformed existing filters in occupational health, all combined with the Yale-prognostic filter. The Work Disability Prognosis filter for Research showed a comprehensiveness of 90% (95% CI 86 to 94) and efficiency expressed more user-friendly as Number Needed to Read=20 (95% CI 17 to 34). Conclusions The Work Disability Prognosis filter will help practitioners and researchers who want to find prognostic evidence in the area of work disability evaluation. However, further refining of this filter is possible and needed, especially for the practitioner for whom efficiency is especially important. PMID:25991444

  9. 31P MR spectroscopy and computational modeling identify a direct relation between Pi content of an alkaline compartment in resting muscle and phosphocreatine resynthesis kinetics in active muscle in humans.

    PubMed

    van Oorschot, Joep W M; Schmitz, Joep P J; Webb, Andrew; Nicolay, Klaas; Jeneson, Jeroen A L; Kan, Hermien E

    2013-01-01

    The assessment of mitochondrial properties in skeletal muscle is important in clinical research, for instance in the study of diabetes. The gold standard to measure mitochondrial capacity non-invasively is the phosphocreatine (PCr) recovery rate after exercise, measured by (31)P Magnetic Resonance spectroscopy ((31)P MRS). Here, we sought to expand the evidence base for an alternative method to assess mitochondrial properties which uses (31)P MRS measurement of the Pi content of an alkaline compartment attributed to mitochondria (Pi2; as opposed to cytosolic Pi (Pi1)) in resting muscle at high magnetic field. Specifically, the PCr recovery rate in human quadriceps muscle was compared with the signal intensity of the Pi2 peak in subjects with varying mitochondrial content of the quadriceps muscle as a result of athletic training, and the results were entered into a mechanistic computational model of mitochondrial metabolism in muscle to test if the empirical relation between Pi2/Pi1 ratio and the PCr recovery was consistent with theory. Localized (31)P spectra were obtained at 7T from resting vastus lateralis muscle to measure the intensity of the Pi2 peak. In the endurance trained athletes a Pi2/Pi1 ratio of 0.07 ± 0.01 was found, compared to a significantly lower (p<0.05) Pi2/Pi1 ratio of 0.03 ± 0.01 in the normally active group. Next, PCr recovery kinetics after in magnet bicycle exercise were measured at 1.5T. For the endurance trained athletes, a time constant τPCr 12 ± 3 s was found, compared to 24 ± 5s in normally active subjects. Without any parameter optimization the computational model prediction matched the experimental data well (r(2) of 0.75). Taken together, these results suggest that the Pi2 resonance in resting human skeletal muscle observed at 7T provides a quantitative MR-based functional measure of mitochondrial density. PMID:24098796

  10. Identified EM Earthquake Precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Kenneth, II; Saxton, Patrick

    2014-05-01

    Many attempts have been made to determine a sound forecasting method regarding earthquakes and warn the public in turn. Presently, the animal kingdom leads the precursor list alluding to a transmission related source. By applying the animal-based model to an electromagnetic (EM) wave model, various hypotheses were formed, but the most interesting one required the use of a magnetometer with a differing design and geometry. To date, numerous, high-end magnetometers have been in use in close proximity to fault zones for potential earthquake forecasting; however, something is still amiss. The problem still resides with what exactly is forecastable and the investigating direction of EM. After a number of custom rock experiments, two hypotheses were formed which could answer the EM wave model. The first hypothesis concerned a sufficient and continuous electron movement either by surface or penetrative flow, and the second regarded a novel approach to radio transmission. Electron flow along fracture surfaces was determined to be inadequate in creating strong EM fields, because rock has a very high electrical resistance making it a high quality insulator. Penetrative flow could not be corroborated as well, because it was discovered that rock was absorbing and confining electrons to a very thin skin depth. Radio wave transmission and detection worked with every single test administered. This hypothesis was reviewed for propagating, long-wave generation with sufficient amplitude, and the capability of penetrating solid rock. Additionally, fracture spaces, either air or ion-filled, can facilitate this concept from great depths and allow for surficial detection. A few propagating precursor signals have been detected in the field occurring with associated phases using custom-built loop antennae. Field testing was conducted in Southern California from 2006-2011, and outside the NE Texas town of Timpson in February, 2013. The antennae have mobility and observations were noted for

  11. SPARQL-enabled identifier conversion with Identifiers.org

    PubMed Central

    Wimalaratne, Sarala M.; Bolleman, Jerven; Juty, Nick; Katayama, Toshiaki; Dumontier, Michel; Redaschi, Nicole; Le Novère, Nicolas; Hermjakob, Henning; Laibe, Camille

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: On the semantic web, in life sciences in particular, data is often distributed via multiple resources. Each of these sources is likely to use their own International Resource Identifier for conceptually the same resource or database record. The lack of correspondence between identifiers introduces a barrier when executing federated SPARQL queries across life science data. Results: We introduce a novel SPARQL-based service to enable on-the-fly integration of life science data. This service uses the identifier patterns defined in the Identifiers.org Registry to generate a plurality of identifier variants, which can then be used to match source identifiers with target identifiers. We demonstrate the utility of this identifier integration approach by answering queries across major producers of life science Linked Data. Availability and implementation: The SPARQL-based identifier conversion service is available without restriction at http://identifiers.org/services/sparql. Contact: sarala@ebi.ac.uk PMID:25638809

  12. TRAINING ERRORS AND RUNNING RELATED INJURIES: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW

    PubMed Central

    Buist, Ida; Sørensen, Henrik; Lind, Martin; Rasmussen, Sten

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this systematic review was to examine the link between training characteristics (volume, duration, frequency, and intensity) and running related injuries. Methods: A systematic search was performed in PubMed, Web of Science, Embase, and SportDiscus. Studies were included if they examined novice, recreational, or elite runners between the ages of 18 and 65. Exposure variables were training characteristics defined as volume, distance or mileage, time or duration, frequency, intensity, speed or pace, or similar terms. The outcome of interest was Running Related Injuries (RRI) in general or specific RRI in the lower extremity or lower back. Methodological quality was evaluated using quality assessment tools of 11 to 16 items. Results: After examining 4561 titles and abstracts, 63 articles were identified as potentially relevant. Finally, nine retrospective cohort studies, 13 prospective cohort studies, six case-control studies, and three randomized controlled trials were included. The mean quality score was 44.1%. Conflicting results were reported on the relationships between volume, duration, intensity, and frequency and RRI. Conclusion: It was not possible to identify which training errors were related to running related injuries. Still, well supported data on which training errors relate to or cause running related injuries is highly important for determining proper prevention strategies. If methodological limitations in measuring training variables can be resolved, more work can be conducted to define training and the interactions between different training variables, create several hypotheses, test the hypotheses in a large scale prospective study, and explore cause and effect relationships in randomized controlled trials. Level of evidence: 2a PMID:22389869

  13. Multiplex PCR Method for Identifying Recombinant Vaccine-Related Polioviruses

    PubMed Central

    Kilpatrick, David R.; Ching, Karen; Iber, Jane; Campagnoli, Ray; Freeman, Christopher J.; Mishrik, Nada; Liu, Hong-Mei; Pallansch, Mark A.; Kew, Olen M.

    2004-01-01

    The recent discovery of recombinant circulating vaccine-derived poliovirus (recombinant cVDPV) has highlighted the need for enhanced global poliovirus surveillance to assure timely detection of any future cVDPV outbreaks. Six pairs of Sabin strain-specific recombinant primers were designed to permit rapid screening for VDPV recombinants by PCR. PMID:15365031

  14. Stochastic control system parameter identifiability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, C. H.; Herget, C. J.

    1975-01-01

    The parameter identification problem of general discrete time, nonlinear, multiple input/multiple output dynamic systems with Gaussian white distributed measurement errors is considered. The knowledge of the system parameterization was assumed to be known. Concepts of local parameter identifiability and local constrained maximum likelihood parameter identifiability were established. A set of sufficient conditions for the existence of a region of parameter identifiability was derived. A computation procedure employing interval arithmetic was provided for finding the regions of parameter identifiability. If the vector of the true parameters is locally constrained maximum likelihood (CML) identifiable, then with probability one, the vector of true parameters is a unique maximal point of the maximum likelihood function in the region of parameter identifiability and the constrained maximum likelihood estimation sequence will converge to the vector of true parameters.

  15. Identifying rare events in rare diseases.

    PubMed

    Attiyeh, Edward F; Maris, John M

    2015-04-15

    Utilizing genomic signatures from diagnostic tumor samples to forecast clinical behavior and response to therapy has long been a goal, and we are now poised to further refine how we can identify the relatively rare patients with aggressive neuroblastoma masquerading as patients with a more benign form of the disease. Clin Cancer Res; 21(8); 1782-5. ©2014 AACR. See related article by Oberthuer et al., p. 1904. PMID:25424848

  16. miRTex: A Text Mining System for miRNA-Gene Relation Extraction

    PubMed Central

    Li, Gang; Ross, Karen E.; Arighi, Cecilia N.; Peng, Yifan; Wu, Cathy H.; Vijay-Shanker, K.

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate a wide range of cellular and developmental processes through gene expression suppression or mRNA degradation. Experimentally validated miRNA gene targets are often reported in the literature. In this paper, we describe miRTex, a text mining system that extracts miRNA-target relations, as well as miRNA-gene and gene-miRNA regulation relations. The system achieves good precision and recall when evaluated on a literature corpus of 150 abstracts with F-scores close to 0.90 on the three different types of relations. We conducted full-scale text mining using miRTex to process all the Medline abstracts and all the full-length articles in the PubMed Central Open Access Subset. The results for all the Medline abstracts are stored in a database for interactive query and file download via the website at http://proteininformationresource.org/mirtex. Using miRTex, we identified genes potentially regulated by miRNAs in Triple Negative Breast Cancer, as well as miRNA-gene relations that, in conjunction with kinase-substrate relations, regulate the response to abiotic stress in Arabidopsis thaliana. These two use cases demonstrate the usefulness of miRTex text mining in the analysis of miRNA-regulated biological processes. PMID:26407127

  17. Health-Related Quality of Life of Young Adult Survivors of Childhood Cancer: A Review of Qualitative Studies

    PubMed Central

    Nightingale, Chandylen L.; Quinn, Gwendolyn P.; Shenkman, Elizabeth A.; Curbow, Barbara A.; Zebrack, Bradley J.; Krull, Kevin R.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The occurrence of late effects, combined with traditional growth and developmental issues, can significantly affect the health-related quality of life (HRQOL) of young adult survivors of childhood cancer (YASCC). Limited HRQOL measurement tools have been developed or validated for YASCC. The purpose of this study was to identify the domains of HRQOL that are unique to YASCC by conducting a systematic review of qualitative studies. Specifically, we compared the findings to the classical framework of HRQOL that was developed for survivors of adult-onset cancer and identified specific domains not being assessed in existing HRQOL instruments for YASCC. Methods: We searched qualitative studies published in peer-reviewed journals from 2000 to 2010 in the PsychINFO, PubMed, and EBSCOhost databases. A set of keywords and inclusion/exclusion criteria were utilized to identify eligible studies with a focus on survivorship and HRQOL issues of YASCC. Results: Sixteen studies met the inclusion/exclusion criteria and were investigated in this study. Six important domains of HRQOL were identified (physical, social, psychological, spiritual, fertility/sexual, resilience, and body appearance) with several sub-domains. Conclusion: Use of the classical HRQOL framework and existing instruments is not comprehensive enough for YASCC. Adding unique domains to the classical framework and existing instruments will make them valuable tools for measuring the HRQOL of YASCC and increase health professionals' ability to identify if and when psychosocial services are needed for this unique population. PMID:23610733

  18. Diffraction gratings used as identifying markers

    DOEpatents

    Deason, Vance A.; Ward, Michael B.

    1991-01-01

    A finely detailed defraction grating is applied to an object as an identifier or tag which is unambiguous, difficult to duplicate, or remove and transfer to another item, and can be read and compared with prior readings with relative ease. The exact pattern of the defraction grating is mapped by diffraction moire techniques and recorded for comparison with future readings of the same grating.

  19. Identifying and reducing constraints to potato productivity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Potato yield in Maine has remained relatively constant for over 50 years, despite increased inputs of pesticides, nutrients, and water. Research is needed to identify and reduce the constraints to potato productivity. We evaluated Status Quo, Soil Conserving, Soil Improving, and Disease Suppressive ...

  20. Identifying Ethical Hypernorms for Accounting Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegel, Philip H.; Mintz, Steven; Naser-Tavakolian, Mohsen; O'Shaughnessy, John

    2012-01-01

    Accounting educators have a unique role in academe because students learn about codes of ethics that will guide their actions as professionals. We identify hypernorms related to internal auditing educators that reflect unethical behaviors believed to be universally unacceptable by that community. We then compare the results to a prior survey of…

  1. A gene browser of colorectal cancer with literature evidence and pre-computed regulatory information to identify key tumor suppressors and oncogenes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Min; Liu, Yining; Huang, Fuda; Qu, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a cancer of growing incidence that associates with a high mortality rate worldwide. There is a poor understanding of the heterogeneity of CRC with regard to causative genetic mutations and gene regulatory mechanisms. Previous studies have identified several susceptibility genes in small-scale experiments. However, the information has not been comprehensively and systematically compiled and interpreted. In this study, we constructed the gbCRC, the first literature-based gene resource for investigating CRC-related human genes. The features of our database include: (i) manual curation of experimentally-verified genes reported in the literature; (ii) comprehensive integration of five reliable data sources; and (iii) pre-computed regulatory patterns involving transcription factors, microRNAs and long non-coding RNAs. In total, 2067 genes associating with 2819 PubMed abstracts were compiled. Comprehensive functional annotations associated with all the genes, including gene expression profiles, homologous genes in other model species, protein-protein interactions, somatic mutations, and potential methylation sites. These comprehensive annotations and this pre-computed regulatory information highlighted the importance of the gbCRC with regard to the unexplored regulatory network of CRC. This information is available in a plain text format that is free to download. PMID:27477450

  2. A gene browser of colorectal cancer with literature evidence and pre-computed regulatory information to identify key tumor suppressors and oncogenes

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Min; Liu, Yining; Huang, Fuda; Qu, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a cancer of growing incidence that associates with a high mortality rate worldwide. There is a poor understanding of the heterogeneity of CRC with regard to causative genetic mutations and gene regulatory mechanisms. Previous studies have identified several susceptibility genes in small-scale experiments. However, the information has not been comprehensively and systematically compiled and interpreted. In this study, we constructed the gbCRC, the first literature-based gene resource for investigating CRC-related human genes. The features of our database include: (i) manual curation of experimentally-verified genes reported in the literature; (ii) comprehensive integration of five reliable data sources; and (iii) pre-computed regulatory patterns involving transcription factors, microRNAs and long non-coding RNAs. In total, 2067 genes associating with 2819 PubMed abstracts were compiled. Comprehensive functional annotations associated with all the genes, including gene expression profiles, homologous genes in other model species, protein-protein interactions, somatic mutations, and potential methylation sites. These comprehensive annotations and this pre-computed regulatory information highlighted the importance of the gbCRC with regard to the unexplored regulatory network of CRC. This information is available in a plain text format that is free to download. PMID:27477450

  3. Identifying signs of intimate partner violence.

    PubMed

    Ali, Parveen; McGarry, Julie; Dhingra, Katie

    2016-02-01

    Intimate partner violence is a major public health and social problem that affects people everywhere. Nurses can play an important role in identifying victims who present to healthcare settings with domestic abuse-related health issues. Evidence suggests that most women who present to emergency departments have experienced domestic abuse at some point in their lives, but that only 5% are identified by healthcare professionals. To identify and respond to victims effectively, emergency nurses must understand domestic abuse and its associated complexities. This article provides an overview of these issues, including the different types of abuse, and their prevalence, causes and effects on health. The article also explores how emergency nurses can identify and manage the effects of violence at work. PMID:26853673

  4. Genetics Home Reference: 6q24-related transient neonatal diabetes mellitus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Mellitus, 6q24-Related Transient Neonatal Greeley SA, Tucker SE, Worrell HI, Skowron KB, Bell GI, Philipson LH. ... 0b013e328334f158. Review. Citation on PubMed Mackay DJ, Boonen SE, Clayton-Smith J, Goodship J, Hahnemann JM, Kant ...

  5. Health-related quality of life questionnaires in lung cancer trials: a systematic literature review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Lung cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer deaths. Treatment goals are the relief of symptoms and the increase of overall survival. With the rising number of treatment alternatives, the need for comparable assessments of health-related quality of life (HRQoL) parameters grows. The aim of this paper was to identify and describe measurement instruments applied in lung cancer patients under drug therapy. Methods We conducted a systematic literature review at the beginning of 2011 using the electronic database Pubmed. Results A total of 43 studies were included in the review. About 17 different measurement instruments were identified, including 5 generic, 5 cancer-specific, 4 lung cancer-specific and 3 symptom-specific questionnaires. In 29 studies at least 2 instruments were used. In most cases these were cancer and lung cancer-specific ones. The most frequently used instruments are the EORTC QLQ-C30 and its lung cancer modules LC13 or LC17. Only 5 studies combined (lung) cancer-specific questionnaires with generic instruments. Conclusions The EORTC-C30 and EORTC-LC13 are the most frequently used health-related quality of life measurement instruments in pharmacological lung cancer trials. PMID:23680096

  6. Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQoL) in Idiopathic Inflammatory Myopathy: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Regardt, Malin; Wojcik, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) is a research priority in chronic diseases. We undertook a systematic review (registration #CRD42015024939) to identify, appraise and synthesize the evidence relating to HRQoL in idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM). A comprehensive search was conducted in August 2015 using CINAHL, EMBase and Pubmed to identify studies reporting original data on HRQoL in IIM using generic HRQoL instruments. Characteristics of samples and results from selected studies were extracted and appraised using a standardized approach. Qualitative synthesis of the results was performed. Ten studies including a total of 654 IIM subjects were included in this systematic review. HRQoL was significantly impaired in all subsets of IIM compared with the general population. Disease activity, disease damage and chronic disease course were associated with poorer HRQoL. Insufficient or conflicting results were found in associations between clinical features, treatment, disease duration and mood or illness perception, and HRQoL in IIM. This study suggests that HRQoL is impaired in IIM. However, due to the paucity and heterogeneity of the evidence to date, robust estimates are lacking and significant knowledge gaps persist. There is a need for studies that systematically investigate the correlates and trajectory of HRQoL in IIM. PMID:27504827

  7. MedEvi: Retrieving textual evidence of relations between biomedical concepts from Medline

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jung-jae; Pȩzik, Piotr; Rebholz-Schuhmann, Dietrich

    2008-01-01

    Summary: Search engines running on MEDLINE abstracts have been widely used by biologists to find publications that are related to their research. The existing search engines such as PubMed, however, have limitations when applied for the task of seeking textual evidence of relations between given concepts. The limitations are mainly due to the problem that the search engines do not effectively deal with multi-term queries which may imply semantic relations between the terms. To address this problem, we present MedEvi, a novel search engine that imposes positional restriction on occurrences matching multi-term queries, based on the observation that terms with semantic relations which are explicitly stated in text are not found too far from each other. MedEvi further identifies additional keywords of biological and statistical significance from local context of matching occurrences in order to help users reformulate their queries for better results. Availability: http://www.ebi.ac.uk/tc-test/textmining/medevi/ Contact: kim@ebi.ac.uk PMID:18400773

  8. Topiramate in the treatment of substance related disorders: a critical review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Shinn, Ann K.; Greenfield, Shelly F.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To critically review the literature on topiramate in the treatment of substance related disorders. Data Sources A PubMed search of human studies published in English through January 2009. Study Selection 26 articles were identified and reviewed; these studies examined topiramate in disorders related to alcohol, nicotine, cocaine, methamphetamine, opioids, ecstasy, and benzodiazepines. Data Extraction Study design, sample size, topiramate dose and duration, and study outcomes were reviewed. Data Synthesis There is compelling evidence for the efficacy of topiramate in the treatment of alcohol dependence. Two trials show trends for topiramate’s superiority over oral naltrexone in alcohol dependence, while one trial suggests topiramate is inferior to disulfiram. Despite suggestive animal models, evidence for topiramate in treating alcohol withdrawal in humans is slim. Studies of topiramate in nicotine dependence show mixed results. Human laboratory studies that used acute topiramate dosing show that topiramate actually enhances the pleasurable effects of both nicotine and methamphetamine. Evidence for topiramate in the treatment of cocaine dependence is promising, but limited by small sample size. The data on opioids, benzodiazepines, and ecstasy are sparse. Conclusion Topiramate is efficacious for the treatment of alcohol dependence, but side effects may limit widespread use. While topiramate’s unique pharmacodynamic profile offers a promising theoretical rationale for use across multiple substance related disorders, heterogeneity both across and within these disorders limits topiramate’s broad applicability in treating substance related disorders. Recommendations for future research include exploration of genetic variants for more targeted pharmacotherapies. PMID:20361908

  9. An unsupervised text mining method for relation extraction from biomedical literature.

    PubMed

    Quan, Changqin; Wang, Meng; Ren, Fuji

    2014-01-01

    The wealth of interaction information provided in biomedical articles motivated the implementation of text mining approaches to automatically extract biomedical relations. This paper presents an unsupervised method based on pattern clustering and sentence parsing to deal with biomedical relation extraction. Pattern clustering algorithm is based on Polynomial Kernel method, which identifies interaction words from unlabeled data; these interaction words are then used in relation extraction between entity pairs. Dependency parsing and phrase structure parsing are combined for relation extraction. Based on the semi-supervised KNN algorithm, we extend the proposed unsupervised approach to a semi-supervised approach by combining pattern clustering, dependency parsing and phrase structure parsing rules. We evaluated the approaches on two different tasks: (1) Protein-protein interactions extraction, and (2) Gene-suicide association extraction. The evaluation of task (1) on the benchmark dataset (AImed corpus) showed that our proposed unsupervised approach outperformed three supervised methods. The three supervised methods are rule based, SVM based, and Kernel based separately. The proposed semi-supervised approach is superior to the existing semi-supervised methods. The evaluation on gene-suicide association extraction on a smaller dataset from Genetic Association Database and a larger dataset from publicly available PubMed showed that the proposed unsupervised and semi-supervised methods achieved much higher F-scores than co-occurrence based method. PMID:25036529

  10. Identifying Occupationally Specific Affective Behaviors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pucel, David J.

    1993-01-01

    Data from two groups of cosmetology instructors (n=15) and two groups of machinist instructors (n=17) validated the Occupational Affective Behavior Analysis instrument as capable of identifying affective behaviors viewed as important to success in a given occupation. (SK)

  11. Scientometric methods for identifying emerging technologies

    DOEpatents

    Abercrombie, Robert K; Schlicher, Bob G; Sheldon, Frederick T

    2015-11-03

    Provided is a method of generating a scientometric model that tracks the emergence of an identified technology from initial discovery (via original scientific and conference literature), through critical discoveries (via original scientific, conference literature and patents), transitioning through Technology Readiness Levels (TRLs) and ultimately on to commercial application. During the period of innovation and technology transfer, the impact of scholarly works, patents and on-line web news sources are identified. As trends develop, currency of citations, collaboration indicators, and on-line news patterns are identified. The combinations of four distinct and separate searchable on-line networked sources (i.e., scholarly publications and citation, worldwide patents, news archives, and on-line mapping networks) are assembled to become one collective network (a dataset for analysis of relations). This established network becomes the basis from which to quickly analyze the temporal flow of activity (searchable events) for the example subject domain.

  12. Identifying foot fractures and dislocations.

    PubMed

    Caswell, Fiona; Brown, Craig

    2014-10-01

    As the roles of emergency nurse practitioners expand, more patients with minor injuries are being managed independently by nursing staff. Injuries to the foot and ankle are common among such patients, and X-rays are frequently performed to aid their diagnoses. Some of these fractures and dislocations are subtle and difficult to identify, so practitioners must adopt a structured approach to reading X-rays. This article describes some of these injuries and offers advice, including X-ray illustrations, on how to identify them. PMID:25270819

  13. Biomarkers to identify and isolate senescent cells.

    PubMed

    Matjusaitis, Mantas; Chin, Greg; Sarnoski, Ethan Anders; Stolzing, Alexandra

    2016-08-01

    Aging is the main risk factor for many degenerative diseases and declining health. Senescent cells are part of the underlying mechanism for time-dependent tissue dysfunction. These cells can negatively affect neighbouring cells through an altered secretory phenotype: the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP). The SASP induces senescence in healthy cells, promotes tumour formation and progression, and contributes to other age-related diseases such as atherosclerosis, immune-senescence and neurodegeneration. Removal of senescent cells was recently demonstrated to delay age-related degeneration and extend lifespan. To better understand cell aging and to reap the benefits of senescent cell removal, it is necessary to have a reliable biomarker to identify these cells. Following an introduction to cellular senescence, we discuss several classes of biomarkers in the context of their utility in identifying and/or removing senescent cells from tissues. Although senescence can be induced by a variety of stimuli, senescent cells share some characteristics that enable their identification both in vitro and in vivo. Nevertheless, it may prove difficult to identify a single biomarker capable of distinguishing senescence in all cell types. Therefore, this will not be a comprehensive review of all senescence biomarkers but rather an outlook on technologies and markers that are most suitable to identify and isolate senescent cells. PMID:27212009

  14. Diffraction gratings used as identifying markers

    DOEpatents

    Deason, V.A.; Ward, M.B.

    1991-03-26

    A finely detailed diffraction grating is applied to an object as an identifier or tag which is unambiguous, difficult to duplicate, or remove and transfer to another item, and can be read and compared with prior readings with relative ease. The exact pattern of the diffraction grating is mapped by diffraction moire techniques and recorded for comparison with future readings of the same grating. 7 figures.

  15. Identifying Vocational Education and Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moodie, Gavin

    2002-01-01

    Definitions of vocational education may be classified as epistemological, teleological, hierarchical, or pragmatic. No single classification is adequate to identify it across location and time. A definition should be a composite of the four categories: the development and application of knowledge and skills for middle-level occupations needed by…

  16. Identifying Plant Poisoning in Livestock

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Poisonous plant intoxication is a common and often deadly problem that annually costs the livestock industry more than $340 million in the western United States alone. Despite the cost or frequency, definitively identifying or diagnosing poisoning by plants in livestock is challenging. The purpos...

  17. Identifying Potential Dropouts. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaustad, Joan

    An overview of issues and problems in identifying and predicting dropouts is presented in this Digest. The topics discussed are as follows: factors associated with dropping out; defining and calculating dropouts; problems in prediction; the usefulness of current prediction models; and suggestions for improving prediction. The recommendation is…

  18. Identifying, Assisting the Disturbed Adolescent.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Patricia L.; Schaefer, William

    1986-01-01

    Educators are in an excellent position to identify seriously troubled young people. Major causes of adolescent problems are discussed, including drugs, parental failure, and biochemical disturbances. Educators can best intervene by becoming aware of support services within their own school and community. (TE)

  19. Identifying the Gifted Child Humorist.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fern, Tami L.

    1991-01-01

    This study attempted to identify gifted child humorists among 1,204 children in grades 3-6. Final identification of 13 gifted child humorists was determined through application of such criteria as funniness, originality, and exemplary performance or product. The influence of intelligence, development, social factors, sex differences, family…

  20. Identifying glass compositions in fly ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aughenbaugh, Katherine; Stutzman, Paul; Juenger, Maria

    2016-01-01

    In this study, four Class F fly ashes were studied with a scanning electron microscope; the glassy phases were identified and their compositions quantified using point compositional analysis with k-means clustering and multispectral image analysis. The results showed that while the bulk oxide contents of the fly ashes were different, the four fly ashes had somewhat similar glassy phase compositions. Aluminosilicate glasses (AS), calcium aluminosilicate glasses (CAS), a mixed glass, and, in one case, a high iron glass were identified in the fly ashes. Quartz and iron crystalline phases were identified in each fly ash as well. The compositions of the three main glasses identified, AS, CAS, and mixed glass, were relatively similar in each ash. The amounts of each glass were varied by fly ash, with the highest calcium fly ash containing the most of calcium-containing glass. Some of the glasses were identified as intermixed in individual particles, particularly the calcium-containing glasses. Finally, the smallest particles in the fly ashes, with the most surface area available to react in alkaline solution, such as when mixed with portland cement or in alkali-activated fly ash, were not different in composition than the large particles, with each of the glasses represented. The method used in the study may be applied to a fly ash of interest for use as a cementing material in order to understand its potential for reactivity.

  1. Identifying Surfaces on the Pale Blue Dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cowan, Nicolas B.; Strait, T. E.

    2013-01-01

    The changing color of an unresolved planet hint at its cloud structure and surface features. Principal component analysis has previously been shown to robustly identify the number of surfaces contributing to disk-integrated observations. We have taken an important next step by showing that one can identify the reflectance spectra of unknown surface types, based solely on time-resolved, disk-integrated multi-band photometry. We test our method on disk-integrated observations of Earth taken by the Deep Impact spacecraft as part of the EPOXI mission. Critically, we borrow analysis tools from the remote sensing community, where spatially-resolved spectral data are routinely analyzed in an automated way to identify known (eg. boreal forest) as well as unknown surfaces (eg. military bunkers). Our study indicates that planned missions like the Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) will be able to identify new surfaces on exoplanets, and also offers a relatively model-independent avenue to identifying surface liquid water on other worlds.

  2. Systematic review of employer-sponsored wellness strategies and their economic and health-related outcomes.

    PubMed

    Kaspin, Lisa C; Gorman, Kathleen M; Miller, Ross M

    2013-02-01

    This review determines the characteristics and health-related and economic outcomes of employer-sponsored wellness programs and identifies possible reasons for their success. PubMed, ABI/Inform, and Business Source Premier databases, and Corporate Wellness Magazine were searched. English-language articles published from 2005 to 2011 that reported characteristics of employer-sponsored wellness programs and their impact on health-related and economic outcomes among US employees were accepted. Data were abstracted, synthesized, and interpreted. Twenty references were accepted. Wellness interventions were classified into health assessments, lifestyle management, and behavioral health. Improved economic outcomes were reported (health care costs, return on investment, absenteeism, productivity, workers' compensation, utilization) as well as decreased health risks. Programs associated with favorable outcomes had several characteristics in common. First, the corporate culture encouraged wellness to improve employees' lives, not only to reduce costs. Second, employees and leadership were strongly motivated to support the wellness programs and to improve their health in general. Third, employees were motivated by a participation-friendly corporate policy and physical environment. Fourth, successful programs adapted to the changing needs of the employees. Fifth, community health organizations provided support, education, and treatment. Sixth, successful wellness programs utilized technology to facilitate health risk assessments and wellness education. Improved health-related and economic outcomes were associated with employer-sponsored wellness programs. Companies with successful programs tended to include wellness as part of their corporate culture and supported employee participation in several key ways. PMID:23113636

  3. The role of microRNAs in cellular senescence and age-related conditions of cartilage and bone

    PubMed Central

    Weilner, Sylvia; Grillari-Voglauer, Regina; Redl, Heinz; Grillari, Johannes; Nau, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose We reviewed the current state of research on microRNAs in age-related diseases in cartilage and bone. Methods PubMed searches were conducted using separate terms to retrieve articles on (1) the role of microRNAs on aging and tissue degeneration, (2) specific microRNAs that influence cellular and organism senescence, (3) microRNAs in age-related musculoskeletal conditions, and (4) the diagnostic and therapeutic potential of microRNAs in age-related musculoskeletal conditions. Results An increasing number of studies have identified microRNAs associated with cellular aging and tissue degeneration. Specifically in regard to frailty, microRNAs have been found to influence the onset and course of age-related musculoskeletal conditions such as osteoporosis, osteoarthritis, and posttraumatic arthritis. Both intracellular and extracellular microRNAs may be suitable to function as diagnostic biomarkers. In particular Interpretation The research data currently available suggest that microRNAs play an important role in orchestrating age-related processes and conditions of the musculoskeletal system. Further research may help to improve our understanding of the complexity of these processes at the cellular and extracellular level. The option to develop microRNA biomarkers and novel therapeutic agents for the degenerating diseases of bone and cartilage appears to be promising. PMID:25175665

  4. Energy Contribution and Nutrient Composition of Breakfast and Their Relations to Overweight in Free-living Individuals: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Rosato, Valentina; Edefonti, Valeria; Parpinel, Maria; Milani, Gregorio Paolo; Mazzocchi, Alessandra; Decarli, Adriano; Agostoni, Carlo; Ferraroni, Monica

    2016-05-01

    Previous systematic reviews on the relation between overweight or obesity and breakfast focused on the frequency of consumption and only partially accounted for breakfast nutritional profiles. Given the central role of these factors, we conducted a systematic review of the literature on this putative relation, with a specific focus on breakfast energy intake and/or breakfast composition. Among the 814 articles identified from the literature search in PubMed, 19, mostly cross-sectional, studies met the inclusion criteria (i.e., studies providing a quantitative estimate of the relation between any measure of weight, overweight, and obesity and breakfast energy intake or breakfast macronutrient composition). We excluded studies in subjects with acquired metabolic disorders, such as diabetes or impaired glucose tolerance. Of the 16 studies that evaluated the amount of energy intake at breakfast, 4 found that a lower energy intake at breakfast was significantly associated with obesity in children, adolescents, and adults, whereas 2 partially overlapping studies found that a higher energy intake was significantly associated with a higher body mass index in children. Of the 8 studies investigating breakfast composition, 3 suggested that a breakfast characterized by a higher amount of carbohydrates and a lower amount of fat is significantly related to normal weight in adults, whereas the others reported mixed results. In conclusion, there is some evidence that a lower energy intake at breakfast is related to obesity, although the studies are few and heterogeneous. Studies on the nutrient composition of breakfast have shown inconsistent results. PMID:27184273

  5. Aggregator: A machine learning approach to identifying MEDLINE articles that derive from the same underlying clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Weixiang; Adams, Clive E.; Cohen, Aaron M.; Davis, John M.; McDonagh, Marian S.; Thakurta, Sujata; Yu, Philip S.; Smalheiser, Neil R.

    2014-01-01

    Objective It is important to identify separate publications that report outcomes from the same underlying clinical trial, in order to avoid over-counting these as independent pieces of evidence. Methods We created positive and negative training sets (comprised of pairs of articles reporting on the same condition and intervention) that were, or were not, linked to the same clinicaltrials.gov trial registry number. Features were extracted from MEDLINE and PubMed metadata; pairwise similarity scores were modeled using logistic regression. Results Article pairs from the same trial were identified with high accuracy (F1 score = 0.843). We also created a clustering tool, Aggregator, that takes as input a PubMed user query for RCTs on a given topic, and returns article clusters predicted to arise from the same clinical trial. Discussion Although painstaking examination of full-text may be needed to be conclusive, metadata are surprisingly accurate in predicting when two articles derive from the same underlying clinical trial. PMID:25461812

  6. [Identifying victims of a disaster].

    PubMed

    de Boer, Hans H; Kloosterman, Ate D; de Bruijn, Arie G; Maat, George J R

    2014-01-01

    Identifying the victims of a disaster is important for the next of kin, to issue a death certificate and, if necessary, for forensic investigations. In the Netherlands victims are identified by the Dutch disaster victim identification team, which is part of the national forensic investigation team ('Landelijk Team Forensische Opsporing'). Ante-mortem data are collected during the identification process; these include the victim's specific medical characteristics and the DNA profile of the victim and their family members. The victim's own doctor can play an important role in the ante-mortem investigation because of his or her knowledge of their personal medical details, and of the possible availability of samples for establishing a DNA profile. The ante-mortem data are then compared with post-mortem data. For a definitive identification at least 1 primary identification characteristic has to be established from the physical remains - dermatoglyphics, the DNA profile or the dental status. PMID:25467027

  7. Identifying new targets in leukemogenesis using computational approaches

    PubMed Central

    Jayaraman, Archana; Jamil, Kaiser; Khan, Haseeb A.

    2015-01-01

    There is a need to identify novel targets in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL), a hematopoietic cancer affecting children, to improve our understanding of disease biology and that can be used for developing new therapeutics. Hence, the aim of our study was to find new genes as targets using in silico studies; for this we retrieved the top 10% overexpressed genes from Oncomine public domain microarray expression database; 530 overexpressed genes were short-listed from Oncomine database. Then, using prioritization tools such as ENDEAVOUR, DIR and TOPPGene online tools, we found fifty-four genes common to the three prioritization tools which formed our candidate leukemogenic genes for this study. As per the protocol we selected thirty training genes from PubMed. The prioritized and training genes were then used to construct STRING functional association network, which was further analyzed using cytoHubba hub analysis tool to investigate new genes which could form drug targets in leukemia. Analysis of the STRING protein network built from these prioritized and training genes led to identification of two hub genes, SMAD2 and CDK9, which were not implicated in leukemogenesis earlier. Filtering out from several hundred genes in the network we also found MEN1, HDAC1 and LCK genes, which re-emphasized the important role of these genes in leukemogenesis. This is the first report on these five additional signature genes in leukemogenesis. We propose these as new targets for developing novel therapeutics and also as biomarkers in leukemogenesis, which could be important for prognosis and diagnosis. PMID:26288567

  8. Identifying and managing problem drinkers.

    PubMed Central

    Kahan, M.

    1996-01-01

    Problem drinking is far more common than severe alcohol dependence and is associated with considerable morbidity and health care costs. Whereas patients with alcohol dependence respond best to intensive treatment, one or more brief sessions of physician advice and counseling reduces alcohol consumption among problem drinkers. The two most useful tools to identify problem drinkers are the CAGE and the drinking problem question. PMID:8653034

  9. Identifying Topics in Microblogs Using Wikipedia.

    PubMed

    Yıldırım, Ahmet; Üsküdarlı, Suzan; Özgür, Arzucan

    2016-01-01

    Twitter is an extremely high volume platform for user generated contributions regarding any topic. The wealth of content created at real-time in massive quantities calls for automated approaches to identify the topics of the contributions. Such topics can be utilized in numerous ways, such as public opinion mining, marketing, entertainment, and disaster management. Towards this end, approaches to relate single or partial posts to knowledge base items have been proposed. However, in microblogging systems like Twitter, topics emerge from the culmination of a large number of contributions. Therefore, identifying topics based on collections of posts, where individual posts contribute to some aspect of the greater topic is necessary. Models, such as Latent Dirichlet Allocation (LDA), propose algorithms for relating collections of posts to sets of keywords that represent underlying topics. In these approaches, figuring out what the specific topic(s) the keyword sets represent remains as a separate task. Another issue in topic detection is the scope, which is often limited to specific domain, such as health. This work proposes an approach for identifying domain-independent specific topics related to sets of posts. In this approach, individual posts are processed and then aggregated to identify key tokens, which are then mapped to specific topics. Wikipedia article titles are selected to represent topics, since they are up to date, user-generated, sophisticated articles that span topics of human interest. This paper describes the proposed approach, a prototype implementation, and a case study based on data gathered during the heavily contributed periods corresponding to the four US election debates in 2012. The manually evaluated results (0.96 precision) and other observations from the study are discussed in detail. PMID:26991442

  10. Identifying Topics in Microblogs Using Wikipedia

    PubMed Central

    Yıldırım, Ahmet; Üsküdarlı, Suzan; Özgür, Arzucan

    2016-01-01

    Twitter is an extremely high volume platform for user generated contributions regarding any topic. The wealth of content created at real-time in massive quantities calls for automated approaches to identify the topics of the contributions. Such topics can be utilized in numerous ways, such as public opinion mining, marketing, entertainment, and disaster management. Towards this end, approaches to relate single or partial posts to knowledge base items have been proposed. However, in microblogging systems like Twitter, topics emerge from the culmination of a large number of contributions. Therefore, identifying topics based on collections of posts, where individual posts contribute to some aspect of the greater topic is necessary. Models, such as Latent Dirichlet Allocation (LDA), propose algorithms for relating collections of posts to sets of keywords that represent underlying topics. In these approaches, figuring out what the specific topic(s) the keyword sets represent remains as a separate task. Another issue in topic detection is the scope, which is often limited to specific domain, such as health. This work proposes an approach for identifying domain-independent specific topics related to sets of posts. In this approach, individual posts are processed and then aggregated to identify key tokens, which are then mapped to specific topics. Wikipedia article titles are selected to represent topics, since they are up to date, user-generated, sophisticated articles that span topics of human interest. This paper describes the proposed approach, a prototype implementation, and a case study based on data gathered during the heavily contributed periods corresponding to the four US election debates in 2012. The manually evaluated results (0.96 precision) and other observations from the study are discussed in detail. PMID:26991442

  11. Quantification of Urbanization in Relation to Chronic Diseases in Developing Countries: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Charlie; Hutchinson, Lauren; Arambepola, Carukshi

    2008-01-01

    During and beyond the twentieth century, urbanization has represented a major demographic shift particularly in the developed world. The rapid urbanization experienced in the developing world brings increased mortality from lifestyle diseases such as cancer and cardiovascular disease. We set out to understand how urbanization has been measured in studies which examined chronic disease as an outcome. Following a pilot search of PUBMED, a full search strategy was developed to identify papers reporting the effect of urbanization in relation to chronic disease in the developing world. Full searches were conducted in MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, and GLOBAL HEALTH. Of the 868 titles identified in the initial search, nine studies met the final inclusion criteria. Five of these studies used demographic measures (such as population density) at an area level to measure urbanization. Four studies used more complicated summary measures of individual and area level data (such as distance from a city, occupation, home and land ownership) to define urbanization. The papers reviewed were limited by using simple area level summary measures (e.g., urban rural dichotomy) or having to rely on preexisting data at the individual level. Further work is needed to develop a measure of urbanization that treats urbanization as a process and which is sensitive enough to track changes in “urbanicity” and subsequent emergence of chronic disease risk factors and mortality. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article doi:10.1007/s11524-008-9325-4 contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:18931915

  12. A scoping study to identify opportunities to advance the ethical implementation and scale-up of HIV treatment as prevention: priorities for empirical research

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite the evidence showing the promise of HIV treatment as prevention (TasP) in reducing HIV incidence, a variety of ethical questions surrounding the implementation and “scaling up” of TasP have been articulated by a variety of stakeholders including scientists, community activists and government officials. Given the high profile and potential promise of TasP in combatting the global HIV epidemic, an explicit and transparent research priority-setting process is critical to inform ongoing ethical discussions pertaining to TasP. Methods We drew on the Arksey and O’Malley framework for conducting scoping review studies as well as systematic approaches to identifying empirical and theoretical gaps within ethical discussions pertaining to population-level intervention implementation and scale up. We searched the health science database PubMed to identify relevant peer-reviewed articles on ethical and implementation issues pertaining to TasP. We included English language articles that were published after 2009 (i.e., after the emergence of causal evidence within this field) by using search terms related to TasP. Given the tendency for much of the criticism and support of TasP to occur outside the peer-reviewed literature, we also included grey literature in order to provide a more exhaustive representation of how the ethical discussions pertaining to TasP have and are currently taking place. To identify the grey literature, we systematically searched a set of search engines, databases, and related webpages for keywords pertaining to TasP. Results Three dominant themes emerged in our analysis with respect to the ethical questions pertaining to TasP implementation and scale-up: (a) balancing individual- and population-level interests; (b) power relations within clinical practice and competing resource demands within health care systems; (c) effectiveness considerations and socio-structural contexts of HIV treatment experiences within broader

  13. [Interface between bioethics and international relations].

    PubMed

    Manchola-Castillo, Camilo; Garrafa, Volnei

    2016-08-01

    Recently, bioethics and international relations have gotten closer to one an other, probably as a result of the motivation of bioethics to intervene in global affairs. However, this relationship has only been on the practical level.This study's objective, through a literature review, is to highlight the huge potential that the epistemologies of both areas have to build a more fruitful dialogue. 18 articles relating both areas were retrieved from databases Scopus, Web of Science, Bireme and PubMed. The articles were then grouped in three categories of analysis: bioethics and global health; international organizations and bioethics; and international relations and bioethics. This study concludes that an epistemological approaching between these areas is desirable and proposes the establishment of two new areas of study: international relations in health and international relations from the South, drawing upon the conceptual basis developed by Latin-American bioethics. PMID:27599082

  14. Whole Genome Analysis of Injectional Anthrax Identifies Two Disease Clusters Spanning More Than 13 Years

    PubMed Central

    Keim, Paul; Grunow, Roland; Vipond, Richard; Grass, Gregor; Hoffmaster, Alex; Birdsell, Dawn N.; Klee, Silke R.; Pullan, Steven; Antwerpen, Markus; Bayer, Brittany N.; Latham, Jennie; Wiggins, Kristin; Hepp, Crystal; Pearson, Talima; Brooks, Tim; Sahl, Jason; Wagner, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Government of Germany. This work was supported by funds from the German Ministry of Defense (Sonderforschungsprojekt 25Z1-S-431,214). Support for sequencing was also obtained from Illumina, Inc. These sources had no role in the data generation or interpretation, and had not role in the manuscript preparation. Panel 1: Research in Context Systematic Review We searched PubMed for any article published before Jun. 17, 2015, with the terms “Bacillus anthracis” and “heroin”, or “injectional anthrax”. Other than our previously published work (Price et al., 2012), we found no other relevant studies on elucidating the global phylogenetic relationships of B. anthracis strains associated with injectional anthrax caused by recreational heroin consumption of spore-contaminated drug. There were, however, publically available genome sequences of two strains involved (Price et al., 2012, Grunow et al., 2013) and the draft genome sequence of Bacillus anthracis UR-1, isolated from a German heroin user (Ruckert et al., 2012) with only limited information on the genotyping of closely related strains (Price et al., 2012, Grunow et al., 2013). Lay Person Interpretation Injectional anthrax has been plaguing heroin drug users across Europe for more than 10 years. In order to better understand this outbreak, we assessed genomic relationships of all available injectional anthrax strains from four countries spanning a > 12 year period. Very few differences were identified using genome-based analysis, but these differentiated the isolates into two distinct clusters. This strongly supports a hypothesis of at least two separate anthrax spore contamination events perhaps during the drug production processes. Identification of two events would not have been possible from standard epidemiological analysis. These comprehensive data will be invaluable for classifying future injectional anthrax isolates and for future geographic attribution. PMID:26870786

  15. Metabolites of cannabidiol identified in human urine.

    PubMed

    Harvey, D J; Mechoulam, R

    1990-03-01

    1. Urine from a dystonic patient treated with cannabidiol (CBD) was examined by g.l.c.-mass spectrometry for CBD metabolites. Metabolites were identified as their trimethylsilyl (TMS), [2H9]TMS, and methyl ester/TMS derivatives and as the TMS derivatives of the product of lithium aluminium deuteride reduction. 2. Thirty-three metabolites were identified in addition to unmetabolized CBD, and a further four metabolites were partially characterized. 3. The major metabolic route was hydroxylation and oxidation at C-7 followed by further hydroxylation in the pentyl and propenyl groups to give 1"-, 2"-, 3"-, 4"- and 10-hydroxy derivatives of CBD-7-oic acid. Other metabolites, mainly acids, were formed by beta-oxidation and related biotransformations from the pentyl side-chain and these were also hydroxylated at C-6 or C-7. The major oxidized metabolite was CBD-7-oic acid containing a hydroxyethyl side-chain. 4. Two 8,9-dihydroxy compounds, presumably derived from the corresponding epoxide were identified. 5. Also present were several cyclized cannabinoids including delta-6- and delta-1-tetrahydrocannabinol and cannabinol. 6. This is the first metabolic study of CBD in humans; most observed metabolic routes were typical of those found for CBD and related cannabinoids in other species. PMID:2336840

  16. Characteristics of binge eating disorder in relation to diagnostic criteria.

    PubMed

    Wilfley, Denise E; Citrome, Leslie; Herman, Barry K

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this review was to examine the evidentiary basis for binge eating disorder (BED) with reference to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders - Fifth Edition (DSM-5) diagnostic criteria for BED. A PubMed search restricted to titles and abstracts of English-language reviews, meta-analyses, clinical trials, randomized controlled trials, journal articles, and letters using human participants was conducted on August 7, 2015, using keywords that included "binge eating disorder," DSM-5, DSM-IV, guilt, shame, embarrassment, quantity, psychological, behavior, and "shape and weight concerns." Of the 257 retrieved publications, 60 publications were considered relevant to discussions related to DSM-5 diagnostic criteria and were included in the current review, and 20 additional references were also included on the basis of the authors' knowledge and/or on a review of the reference lists from relevant articles obtained through the literature search. Evidence supports the duration/frequency criterion for BED and the primary importance of loss of control and marked distress in identifying individuals with BED. Although overvaluation of shape/weight is not a diagnostic criterion, its relationship to the severity of BED psychopathology may identify a unique subset of individuals with BED. Additionally, individuals with BED often exhibit a clinical profile consisting of psychiatric (eg, mood, obsessive-compulsive, and impulsive disorders) and medical (eg, gastrointestinal symptoms, metabolic syndrome, and type 2 diabetes) comorbidities and behavioral profiles (eg, overconsumption of calories outside of a binge eating episode and emotional eating). Future revisions of the BED diagnostic criteria should consider the inclusion of BED subtypes, perhaps based on the overvaluation of shape/weight, and an evidence-based reassessment of severity criteria. PMID:27621631

  17. Characteristics of binge eating disorder in relation to diagnostic criteria

    PubMed Central

    Wilfley, Denise E; Citrome, Leslie; Herman, Barry K

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this review was to examine the evidentiary basis for binge eating disorder (BED) with reference to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders – Fifth Edition (DSM-5) diagnostic criteria for BED. A PubMed search restricted to titles and abstracts of English-language reviews, meta-analyses, clinical trials, randomized controlled trials, journal articles, and letters using human participants was conducted on August 7, 2015, using keywords that included “binge eating disorder,” DSM-5, DSM-IV, guilt, shame, embarrassment, quantity, psychological, behavior, and “shape and weight concerns.” Of the 257 retrieved publications, 60 publications were considered relevant to discussions related to DSM-5 diagnostic criteria and were included in the current review, and 20 additional references were also included on the basis of the authors’ knowledge and/or on a review of the reference lists from relevant articles obtained through the literature search. Evidence supports the duration/frequency criterion for BED and the primary importance of loss of control and marked distress in identifying individuals with BED. Although overvaluation of shape/weight is not a diagnostic criterion, its relationship to the severity of BED psychopathology may identify a unique subset of individuals with BED. Additionally, individuals with BED often exhibit a clinical profile consisting of psychiatric (eg, mood, obsessive–compulsive, and impulsive disorders) and medical (eg, gastrointestinal symptoms, metabolic syndrome, and type 2 diabetes) comorbidities and behavioral profiles (eg, overconsumption of calories outside of a binge eating episode and emotional eating). Future revisions of the BED diagnostic criteria should consider the inclusion of BED subtypes, perhaps based on the overvaluation of shape/weight, and an evidence-based reassessment of severity criteria. PMID:27621631

  18. Prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders and related occupational causative factors among electricity linemen: A narrative review.

    PubMed

    Padmanathan, Vinothini; Joseph, Leonard; Omar, Baharudin; Nawawi, Roslizawati

    2016-01-01

    Occupational tasks of linemen are highly associated with the development of work related musculoskeletal disorders (WRMDs). Although linemen are prone to develop WRMDs, there is paucity of information on the prevalence of WRMDs and related occupational causative factors. Therefore, the present review was conducted to report on the prevalence of WRMDs and to outline causative risk factors within occupational tasks in the lineman profession. Literature search was conducted in various databases such as Scopus, PubMed and ScienceDirect for articles published between 1996-2013. The articles were analyzed, selected and retrieved based on predetermined objectives, inclusion criteria and Medical Subject Headings (MeSH). In the review process only articles published in English were considered. The review identified moderate to high prevalence of WRMDs among the linemen population. Back and shoulder regions were highly affected compared to the other body regions. The review also reported occupational tasks such as bar installation, insulator fixation and manual handling of tools as high risk tasks that lead to the development of WRMDs. In addition, occupational tools such as ladders, manual cutters and manual presses were also identified as a potential ergonomic hazard. In conclusion, the current review identified that WRMDs are common in the back and shoulder regions among linemen. Also, a number of occupational risk factors were identified to be associated with WRMDs among the linemen. Hence, future research on prevention and intervention studies concerning lineman profession population in order to develop a good job practice are recommended. Int J Occup Med Environ Health 2016;29(5):725-734. PMID:27518883

  19. A New Methodology to Associate SNPs with Human Diseases According to Their Pathway Related Context

    PubMed Central

    Bakir-Gungor, Burcu; Sezerman, Osman Ugur

    2011-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) with hundreds of żthousands of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are popular strategies to reveal the genetic basis of human complex diseases. Despite many successes of GWAS, it is well recognized that new analytical approaches have to be integrated to achieve their full potential. Starting with a list of SNPs, found to be associated with disease in GWAS, here we propose a novel methodology to devise functionally important KEGG pathways through the identification of genes within these pathways, where these genes are obtained from SNP analysis. Our methodology is based on functionalization of important SNPs to identify effected genes and disease related pathways. We have tested our methodology on WTCCC Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) dataset and identified: i) previously known RA related KEGG pathways (e.g., Toll-like receptor signaling, Jak-STAT signaling, Antigen processing, Leukocyte transendothelial migration and MAPK signaling pathways); ii) additional KEGG pathways (e.g., Pathways in cancer, Neurotrophin signaling, Chemokine signaling pathways) as associated with RA. Furthermore, these newly found pathways included genes which are targets of RA-specific drugs. Even though GWAS analysis identifies 14 out of 83 of those drug target genes; newly found functionally important KEGG pathways led to the discovery of 25 out of 83 genes, known to be used as drug targets for the treatment of RA. Among the previously known pathways, we identified additional genes associated with RA (e.g. Antigen processing and presentation, Tight junction). Importantly, within these pathways, the associations between some of these additionally found genes, such as HLA-C, HLA-G, PRKCQ, PRKCZ, TAP1, TAP2 and RA were verified by either OMIM database or by literature retrieved from the NCBI PubMed module. With the whole-genome sequencing on the horizon, we show that the full potential of GWAS can be achieved by integrating pathway and network

  20. Identifying Network Perturbation in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Logsdon, Benjamin A.; Gentles, Andrew J.; Lee, Su-In

    2016-01-01

    We present a computational framework, called DISCERN (DIfferential SparsE Regulatory Network), to identify informative topological changes in gene-regulator dependence networks inferred on the basis of mRNA expression datasets within distinct biological states. DISCERN takes two expression datasets as input: an expression dataset of diseased tissues from patients with a disease of interest and another expression dataset from matching normal tissues. DISCERN estimates the extent to which each gene is perturbed—having distinct regulator connectivity in the inferred gene-regulator dependencies between the disease and normal conditions. This approach has distinct advantages over existing methods. First, DISCERN infers conditional dependencies between candidate regulators and genes, where conditional dependence relationships discriminate the evidence for direct interactions from indirect interactions more precisely than pairwise correlation. Second, DISCERN uses a new likelihood-based scoring function to alleviate concerns about accuracy of the specific edges inferred in a particular network. DISCERN identifies perturbed genes more accurately in synthetic data than existing methods to identify perturbed genes between distinct states. In expression datasets from patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), breast cancer and lung cancer, genes with high DISCERN scores in each cancer are enriched for known tumor drivers, genes associated with the biological processes known to be important in the disease, and genes associated with patient prognosis, in the respective cancer. Finally, we show that DISCERN can uncover potential mechanisms underlying network perturbation by explaining observed epigenomic activity patterns in cancer and normal tissue types more accurately than alternative methods, based on the available epigenomic data from the ENCODE project. PMID:27145341

  1. Identifying Network Perturbation in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Grechkin, Maxim; Logsdon, Benjamin A; Gentles, Andrew J; Lee, Su-In

    2016-05-01

    We present a computational framework, called DISCERN (DIfferential SparsE Regulatory Network), to identify informative topological changes in gene-regulator dependence networks inferred on the basis of mRNA expression datasets within distinct biological states. DISCERN takes two expression datasets as input: an expression dataset of diseased tissues from patients with a disease of interest and another expression dataset from matching normal tissues. DISCERN estimates the extent to which each gene is perturbed-having distinct regulator connectivity in the inferred gene-regulator dependencies between the disease and normal conditions. This approach has distinct advantages over existing methods. First, DISCERN infers conditional dependencies between candidate regulators and genes, where conditional dependence relationships discriminate the evidence for direct interactions from indirect interactions more precisely than pairwise correlation. Second, DISCERN uses a new likelihood-based scoring function to alleviate concerns about accuracy of the specific edges inferred in a particular network. DISCERN identifies perturbed genes more accurately in synthetic data than existing methods to identify perturbed genes between distinct states. In expression datasets from patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), breast cancer and lung cancer, genes with high DISCERN scores in each cancer are enriched for known tumor drivers, genes associated with the biological processes known to be important in the disease, and genes associated with patient prognosis, in the respective cancer. Finally, we show that DISCERN can uncover potential mechanisms underlying network perturbation by explaining observed epigenomic activity patterns in cancer and normal tissue types more accurately than alternative methods, based on the available epigenomic data from the ENCODE project. PMID:27145341

  2. [Gifted children! How to identify].

    PubMed

    Revol, O; Bléandonu, G

    2012-03-01

    Recognizing the intellectually gifted child allows one to anticipate the onset of behavioral disorders and to respond to them so as to improve quality of life for these children and their family. Certain signs can draw attention to this phenomenon. The decisive criterion has always been IQ. The notion of intelligence should be broadened and researchers have adventured beyond the purely intellectual competencies, which value most prominently the educational sphere. In addition, the modeling of high potential is currently renewing the approach to this question. This article takes this complexity into account and presents the main criteria used for identifying intellectually gifted children. PMID:22325457

  3. Methods for Identifying Pair Halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, Brendan; Caputo, Regina; Atwood, William; Ritz, Steven M.

    2016-01-01

    The flux of very high energy gamma rays from active galactic nuclei (AGN) is attenuated via interactions with extragalactic background photons and is converted into e+e- pairs. With non-zero intergalactic magnetic fields, the electrons and positrons will deflect as they propagate and simultaneously lose energy by upscattering cosmic microwave background photons. "Pair halos," the visible consequences of these electromagnetic cascades, are faint and difficult to observe against their AGN counterparts. We investigate three methods for indirectly identifying pair halos, using a two-component approach to model the AGN core/halo image. We estimate each method's sensitivity by utilizing a new, detailed Monte Carlo pair-halo simulation.

  4. Identifying teaching in wild animals.

    PubMed

    Thornton, Alex; Raihani, Nichola J

    2010-08-01

    After a long period of neglect, the study of teaching in nonhuman animals is beginning to take a more prominent role in research on social learning. Unlike other forms of social learning, teaching requires knowledgeable individuals to play an active role in facilitating learning by the naive. Casting aside anthropocentric requirements for cognitive mechanisms assumed to underpin teaching in our own species, researchers are now beginning to discover evidence for teaching across a wide range of taxa. Nevertheless, unequivocal evidence for teaching remains scarce, with convincing experimental data limited to meerkats, pied babblers, and tandem-running ants. In this review, our aim is to stimulate further research in different species and contexts by providing conceptual and methodological guidelines for identifying teaching, with a focus on natural populations. We begin by highlighting the fact that teaching is a form of cooperative behavior that functions to promote learning in others and show that consideration of these key characteristics is critical in helping to identify suitable targets for future research. We then go on to discuss potential observational, experimental, and statistical techniques that may assist researchers in providing evidence that the criteria that make up the accepted operational definition of teaching have been met. Supplemental materials for this article may be downloaded from http://lb.psychonomic-journals.org/content/supplemental. PMID:20628167

  5. Plantar pressure measurements and running-related injury: A systematic review of methods and possible associations.

    PubMed

    Mann, Robert; Malisoux, Laurent; Urhausen, Axel; Meijer, Kenneth; Theisen, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    Pressure-sensitive measuring devices have been identified as appropriate tools for measuring an array of parameters during running. It is unclear which biomechanical characteristics relate to running-related injury (RRI) and which data-processing techniques are most promising to detect this relationship. This systematic review aims to identify pertinent methodologies and characteristics measured using plantar pressure devices, and to summarise their associations with RRI. PubMed, Embase, CINAHL, ScienceDirect and Scopus were searched up until March 2015. Retrospective and prospective, biomechanical studies on running using any kind of pressure-sensitive device with RRI as an outcome were included. All studies involving regular or recreational runners were considered. The study quality was assessed and the measured parameters were summarised. One low quality, two moderate quality and five high quality studies were included. Five different subdivisions of plantar area were identified, as well as five instants and four phases of measurement during foot-ground contact. Overall many parameters were collated and subdivided as plantar pressure and force, plantar pressure and force location, contact area, timing and stride parameters. Differences between the injured and control group were found for mediolateral and anteroposterior displacement of force, contact area, velocity of force displacement, relative force-time integral, mediolateral force ratio, time to peak force and inter-stride correlative patterns. However, no consistent results were found between studies and no biomechanical risk patterns were apparent. Additionally, conflicting findings were reported for peak force in three studies. Based on these observations, we provide suggestions for improved methodology measurement of pertinent parameters for future studies. PMID:27264395

  6. The Moroccan Genetic Disease Database (MGDD): a database for DNA variations related to inherited disorders and disease susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Charoute, Hicham; Nahili, Halima; Abidi, Omar; Gabi, Khalid; Rouba, Hassan; Fakiri, Malika; Barakat, Abdelhamid

    2014-03-01

    National and ethnic mutation databases provide comprehensive information about genetic variations reported in a population or an ethnic group. In this paper, we present the Moroccan Genetic Disease Database (MGDD), a catalogue of genetic data related to diseases identified in the Moroccan population. We used the PubMed, Web of Science and Google Scholar databases to identify available articles published until April 2013. The Database is designed and implemented on a three-tier model using Mysql relational database and the PHP programming language. To date, the database contains 425 mutations and 208 polymorphisms found in 301 genes and 259 diseases. Most Mendelian diseases in the Moroccan population follow autosomal recessive mode of inheritance (74.17%) and affect endocrine, nutritional and metabolic physiology. The MGDD database provides reference information for researchers, clinicians and health professionals through a user-friendly Web interface. Its content should be useful to improve researches in human molecular genetics, disease diagnoses and design of association studies. MGDD can be publicly accessed at http://mgdd.pasteur.ma. PMID:23860041

  7. Guidelines for identifying suspect/counterfeit material

    SciTech Connect

    1995-09-01

    These guidelines are intended to assist users of products in identifying: substandard, misrepresented, or fraudulently marked items. The guidelines provide information about such topics as: precautions, inspection and testing, dispositioning identified items, installed inspection and reporting suspect/counterfeit materials. These guidelines apply to users who are developing procurement documents, product acceptance/verification methods, company procedures, work instructions, etc. The intent of these SM guidelines in relation to the Quality Assurance Program Description (QAPD) and implementing company Management Control Procedures is not to substitute or replace existing requirements, as defined in either the QAPD or company implementing instructions (Management Control Procedures). Instead, the guidelines are intended to provide a consolidated source of information addressing the issue of Suspect/Counterfeit materials. These guidelines provide an extensive suspect component listing and suspect indications listing. Users can quickly check their suspect items against the list of manufacturers products (i.e., type, LD. number, and nameplate information) by consulting either of these listings.

  8. N-Acetyl Cysteine in the Treatment of Obsessive Compulsive and Related Disorders: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, Georgina; Dean, Olivia; Camfield, David; Blair-West, Scott; Ng, Chee; Berk, Michael; Sarris, Jerome

    2015-01-01

    Objective Obsessive compulsive and related disorders are a collection of debilitating psychiatric disorders in which the role of glutamate dysfunction in the underpinning neurobiology is becoming well established. N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) is a glutamate modulator with promising therapeutic effect. This paper presents a systematic review of clinical trials and case reports exploring the use of NAC for these disorders. A further objective was to detail the methodology of current clinical trials being conducted in the area. Methods PubMed, Web of Science and Cochrane Library Database were searched for human clinical trials or case reports investigating NAC in the treatment of obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) or obsessive compulsive related disorders. Researchers with known involvement in NAC studies were contacted for any unpublished data. Results Four clinical trials and five case reports/series were identified. Study durations were commonly 12-weeks, using 2,400–3,000 mg/day of NAC. Overall, NAC demonstrates activity in reducing the severity of symptoms, with a good tolerability profile and minimal adverse effects. Currently there are three ongoing randomized controlled trials using NAC for OCD (two adults and one pediatric), and one for excoriation. Conclusion Encouraging results have been demonstrated from the few pilot studies that have been conducted. These results are detailed, in addition to a discussion of future potential research. PMID:25912534

  9. The association between statin use and risk of age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Le; Wang, Yafeng; Du, Junhui; Wang, Mingxu; Zhang, Rui; Fu, Yihao

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the association between statin use and the risk of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). A systematic search of the PubMed, EMBASE and ISI web of science databases was used to identify eligible published literatures without language restrictions up to April 2015. Summary relative ratios (RRs) and 95% CIs were estimated using a fixed-effect or random-effects model. A total of 14 studies met the inclusion criteria and were included in this meta-analysis. No significant association was observed between statin use and the risk of any AMD (RR, 0.95; 95% CI, 0.74–1.15); and stratified analysis showed that statins had a significantly different effects on early and late stages of AMD. For early AMD, statin use significantly reduced the risk approximately 17% (RR, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.66–0.99). At the late stage, we observed a significant protective association of statin use with exudative AMD (RR, 0.90; 95% CI, 0.80–0.99), in contrast with the absent association between statins and geographic atrophy (RR, 1.16; 95% CI, 0.77–1.56). These results demonstrated that statin use was protective for early and exudative AMD. Additional large prospective cohort studies and RCTs are required to determine the potential effect of statins on AMD prevention. PMID:26658620

  10. Update on Clinical Trials in Dry Age-related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Taskintuna, Ibrahim; Elsayed, M. E. A. Abdalla; Schatz, Patrik

    2016-01-01

    This review article summarizes the most recent clinical trials for dry age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the most common cause of vision loss in the elderly in developed countries. A literature search through websites https://www.pubmed.org and https://www.clinicaltrials.gov/, both accessed no later than November 04, 2015, was performed. We identified three Phase III clinical trials that were completed over the recent 5 years Age-Related Eye Disease Study 2 (AREDS2), implantable miniature telescope and tandospirone, and several other trials targeting a variety of mechanisms including, oxidative stress, complement inhibition, visual cycle inhibition, retinal and choroidal blood flow, stem cells, gene therapy, and visual rehabilitation. To date, none of the biologically oriented therapies have resulted in improved vision. Vision improvement was reported with an implantable mini telescope. Stem cells therapy holds a potential for vision improvement. The AREDS2 formulas did not add any further reduced risk of progression to advanced AMD, compared to the original AREDS formula. Several recently discovered pathogenetic mechanisms in dry AMD have enabled development of new treatment strategies, and several of these have been tested in recent clinical trials and are currently being tested in ongoing trials. The rapid development and understanding of pathogenesis holds promise for the future. PMID:26957835

  11. Relationship between funding sources and outcomes of obesity-related research.

    PubMed

    Wilde, Parke; Morgan, Emily; Roberts, Jesse; Schpok, Andrea; Wilson, Tawny

    2012-08-20

    This study examined the relationship between funding sources and the outcomes of published obesity-related research. A list of funded projects for human nutrition research linking food intake to obesity in 2001-2005 was drawn from two distinct sources: (a) the federal government's semi-public generic commodity promotion or "checkoff" programs for Fluid Milk and Dairy and (b) the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The Principal Investigator for each funded project was determined. Published literature by that individual was located using an Ovid MEDLINE and PubMed author search. All articles related to both dairy and obesity were included. Financial sponsorship for each article and article conclusions were classified by independent groups of co-investigators. Seventy-nine relevant articles were included in the study. Of these, 62 were sponsored by the checkoff programs and 17 by the NIH. The study did not find consistent evidence that checkoff-funded projects were more likely to support an obesity prevention benefit from dairy consumption. The study did identify a new research methodology for the investigation of bias by source of sponsorship. PMID:22583858

  12. Update on Clinical Trials in Dry Age-related Macular Degeneration.

    PubMed

    Taskintuna, Ibrahim; Elsayed, M E A Abdalla; Schatz, Patrik

    2016-01-01

    This review article summarizes the most recent clinical trials for dry age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the most common cause of vision loss in the elderly in developed countries. A literature search through websites https://www.pubmed.org and https://www.clinicaltrials.gov/, both accessed no later than November 04, 2015, was performed. We identified three Phase III clinical trials that were completed over the recent 5 years Age-Related Eye Disease Study 2 (AREDS2), implantable miniature telescope and tandospirone, and several other trials targeting a variety of mechanisms including, oxidative stress, complement inhibition, visual cycle inhibition, retinal and choroidal blood flow, stem cells, gene therapy, and visual rehabilitation. To date, none of the biologically oriented therapies have resulted in improved vision. Vision improvement was reported with an implantable mini telescope. Stem cells therapy holds a potential for vision improvement. The AREDS2 formulas did not add any further reduced risk of progression to advanced AMD, compared to the original AREDS formula. Several recently discovered pathogenetic mechanisms in dry AMD have enabled development of new treatment strategies, and several of these have been tested in recent clinical trials and are currently being tested in ongoing trials. The rapid development and understanding of pathogenesis holds promise for the future. PMID:26957835

  13. "Geriatricizing" hospitalists: identifying educational opportunities.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Susan M; Gillespie, Suzanne M; Medina-Walpole, Annette M; Caprio, Thomas V; Karuza, Jurgis; McCann, Robert M

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify differences between geriatricians and hospitalists in caring for hospitalized older adults, so as to inform faculty development programs that have the goal of improving older patient care. Eleven hospitalists and 13 geriatricians were surveyed regarding knowledge, confidence, and practice patterns in caring for hospitalized older adults, targeting areas previously defined as central to taking care of older hospitalized patients. Overall, geriatricians had more confidence and more knowledge in caring for older hospitalized adults. The areas in which hospitalists expressed the least confidence were in caring for patients with dementia, self-care issues, and care planning. Geriatricians reported more routine medication reviews, functional and cognitive assessments, and fall evaluations. Geriatricians and hospitalists differ in their approach to older adults. Where these differences reflect lack of knowledge or experience, they set the stage for developing curricula to help narrow these gaps. PMID:23971409

  14. Important caves to be identified

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Criteria to identify significant caves on federal land are being developed by the Interior Department's Bureau of Land Management and the Agriculture Department's Forest Service under requirements of the Federal Cave Resources Protection Act of 1988. The departments gave advance notice of proposed rulemaking March 3 and invited suggestions and comments from the public for 30 days.The law requires protection, to the extent practical, of significant caves on lands administered by the Secretaries of Agriculture and Interior and includes authority to issue and revoke permits for collection and removal of cave resources and special provisions for regulation of cave resources on Indian lands. Final regulations must be published by August 18, 1989.

  15. Identifying methamphetamine exposure in children

    PubMed Central

    Castaneto, Marisol S.; Barnes, Allan J.; Scheidweiler, Karl B.; Schaffer, Michael; Rogers, Kristen K.; Stewart, Deborah; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Methamphetamine (MAMP) use, distribution and manufacture remain a serious public health and safety problem in the United States, and children environmentally exposed to MAMP face a myriad of developmental, social and health risks, including severe abuse and neglect necessitating child protection involvement. It is recommended that drug-endangered children receive medical evaluation and care with documentation of overall physical and mental conditions and have urine drug testing.1 The primary aim of this study was to determine the best biological matrix to detect MAMP, amphetamine (AMP), methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDA) and methylenedioxyethylamphetamine (MDEA) in environmentally exposed children. Method 91 children, environmentally exposed to household MAMP intake, were medically evaluated at the Child and Adolescent Abuse Resource and Evaluation (CAARE) Diagnostic and Treatment Center at the University of California, Davis (UCD) Children's Hospital. MAMP, AMP, MDMA, MDA and MDEA were quantified in urine and oral fluid (OF) by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS) and in hair by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LCMSMS). Results Overall drug detection rates in OF, urine and hair were 6.9%, 22.1% and 77.8%, respectively. Seventy children (79%) tested positive for 1 or more drugs in 1 or more matrices. MAMP was the primary analyte detected in all 3 biological matrices. All positive OF (n=5) and 18 of 19 positive urine specimens also had a positive hair test. Conclusion Hair analysis offered a more sensitive tool for identifying MAMP, AMP and MDMA environmental exposure in children than urine or OF testing. A negative urine, or hair test does not exclude the possibility of drug exposure, but hair testing provided the greatest sensitivity for identifying drug-exposed children. PMID:24263642

  16. BIOADI: a machine learning approach to identifying abbreviations and definitions in biological literature

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background To automatically process large quantities of biological literature for knowledge discovery and information curation, text mining tools are becoming essential. Abbreviation recognition is related to NER and can be considered as a pair recognition task of a terminology and its corresponding abbreviation from free text. The successful identification of abbreviation and its corresponding definition is not only a prerequisite to index terms of text databases to produce articles of related interests, but also a building block to improve existing gene mention tagging and gene normalization tools. Results Our approach to abbreviation recognition (AR) is based on machine-learning, which exploits a novel set of rich features to learn rules from training data. Tested on the AB3P corpus, our system demonstrated a F-score of 89.90% with 95.86% precision at 84.64% recall, higher than the result achieved by the existing best AR performance system. We also annotated a new corpus of 1200 PubMed abstracts which was derived from BioCreative II gene normalization corpus. On our annotated corpus, our system achieved a F-score of 86.20% with 93.52% precision at 79.95% recall, which also outperforms all tested systems. Conclusion By applying our system to extract all short form-long form pairs from all available PubMed abstracts, we have constructed BIOADI. Mining BIOADI reveals many interesting trends of bio-medical research. Besides, we also provide an off-line AR software in the download section on http://bioagent.iis.sinica.edu.tw/BIOADI/. PMID:19958517

  17. Identifying Frailty Among Vulnerable Populations

    PubMed Central

    Salem, Benissa E.; Nyamathi, Adeline; Phillips, Linda R.; Mentes, Janet; Sarkisian, Catherine; Brecht, Lynn

    2014-01-01

    Frailty is a significant public health issue which is experienced by homeless and other vulnerable adults; to date, a frailty framework has not been proposed to guide researchers who study this hard-to-reach population. The Frailty Framework among Homeless and other Vulnerable Populations (FFHVP) has been developed from empirical research and consultation with frailty experts in an effort to characterize antecedents, i.e. situational, health-related, behavioral, resource, biological, and environmental factors which contribute to physical, psychological and social frailty domains and impact adverse outcomes. As vulnerable populations continue to age, a greater understanding of frailty will enable the development of nursing interventions. PMID:24469090

  18. Identifying Botanical Mechanisms of Action

    PubMed Central

    Toh, May Fern

    2010-01-01

    The biological mechanism of action for any botanical extract is a necessary part of discovery to determine pharmacological use and safety. Interestingly, many activities that are governed by endogenous compounds are not fully understood making the characterization of mechanisms elusive. For example, phytoestrogens are being consumed for menopausal symptoms while the biological action of estradiol are still being investigated. Therefore, long term efficacy and safety issues are a challenge in the field. As new activities are associated with new biological pathways, an important component of therapeutic discovery will need to be the re-evaluation of negative or less active natural products to determine their relative use as medicines. PMID:20837111

  19. Priority Planetary Science Missions Identified

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2011-03-01

    The U.S. National Research Council's (NRC) planetary science decadal survey report, released on 7 March, lays out a grand vision for priority planetary science missions for 2013-2022 within a tightly constrained fiscal environment. The cost-conscious report, issued by NRC's Committee on the Planetary Science Decadal Survey, identifies high-priority flagship missions, recommends a number of potential midsized missions, and indicates support for some smaller missions. The report states that the highest-priority flagship mission for the decade is the Mars Astrobiology Explorer-Cacher (MAX-C)—the first of three components of a NASA/European Space Agency Mars sample return campaign—provided that the mission scope can be reduced so that MAX-C costs no more than $2.5 billion. The currently estimated mission cost of $3.5 billion “would take up a disproportionate near-term share of the overall budget for NASA's Planetary Science Division,” the report notes.

  20. Can tests identify creative people?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Peter M.

    It is always a popular pursuit by academic administrators to assess the creativity or innovative qualities of scientists in order to evaluate their research capabilities. Of course, traditionally such evaluations have been fraught with subjectivity (i.e., innovative scientists are commonly thought to be weird, under 40 years old, independent, risk-taking, etc.), and thus such evaluations have not been highly valued. In recent years, through testing, the American Chemical Society (ACS) has attempted to give respectability to the art of predicting the creativity of a scientist. ACS, which draws its members from both industrial and academic laboratories, held a symposium on the subject of evaluating the creativity of scientists. The proceedings were published by ACS as ‘Innovation and U.S. Research: Problems and Recommendations’ (W. N. Smith and C.F. Larson, eds., 1980). In the proceedings, as reported in the July 1982 Chemtec (all quotes here are from the Chemtec article), A. Nisson was able to identify only the following two-part characteristic of an innovative person: (1) a low threshold to ‘a state of discomfort with some aspect of the order of things, the status quo,’ and (2) ‘an extraordinarily high level of mental stamina enabling him or her to persist until the state of discomfort is removed.’

  1. Identifying compartmentalization in gas reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Junkin, J.; Cooper, K.; Sippel, M.

    1997-01-01

    Compartmentalization as a function of depositional systems is now recognized as a common type of reservoir heterogeneity that limits recovery from oil and gas reservoirs. US Department of Energy (DOE) estimates indicate that substantial quantities of gas resources will not be recovered from presently identified reservoirs under historic development practices. The Secondary Natural Gas Recovery (SGR) project sponsored by the Gas Research Institute (GRI), state of Texas and DOE quantified compartmentalization over intervals as large as 2,000 feet in several different fluvial deltaic reservoirs. Early recognition of compartmentalized behavior can be used to pursue a more rapid development plan including efficient well spacing and elimination of redundant wells. Three classes of reservoir compartment sizes were delineated in the SGR project using methods discussed in this article. Forward stochastic modeling of gas recovery from these compartment-size classes established well spacing requirements that would yield maximum gas contact efficiency. The presence of reservoir compartmentalization was also shown to correlate with reserve growth. Also, those reservoirs classified as having smaller compartment sizes exhibited the greatest reserve growth potential. Utilization of tools, such as personal computer-based methods discussed, enables better engineering interpretation of actual field behavior. Some of these tools require minimal production data, which is readily available on CD-ROM or via modem at very low cost.

  2. Identifying and Inactivating Bacterial Spores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newcombe, David; Dekas, Anne; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri

    2009-01-01

    Problems associated with, and new strategies for, inactivating resistant organisms like Bacillus canaveralius (found at Kennedy Space Center during a survey of three NASA cleanrooms) have been defined. Identifying the particular component of the spore that allows its heightened resistance can guide the development of sterilization procedures that are targeted to the specific molecules responsible for resistance, while avoiding using unduly harsh methods that jeopardize equipment. The key element of spore resistance is a multilayered protein shell that encases the spore called the spore coat. The coat of the best-studied spore-forming microbe, B. subtilis, consists of at least 45 proteins, most of which are poorly characterized. Several protective roles for the coat are well characterized including resistance to desiccation, large toxic molecules, ortho-phthalaldehyde, and ultraviolet (UV) radiation. One important long-term specific goal is an improved sterilization procedure that will enable NASA to meet planetary protection requirements without a terminal heat sterilization step. This would support the implementation of planetary protection policies for life-detection missions. Typically, hospitals and government agencies use biological indicators to ensure the quality control of sterilization processes. The spores of B. canaveralius that are more resistant to osmotic stress would serve as a better biological indicator for potential survival than those in use currently.

  3. RECOVIR Software for Identifying Viruses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chakravarty, Sugoto; Fox, George E.; Zhu, Dianhui

    2013-01-01

    Most single-stranded RNA (ssRNA) viruses mutate rapidly to generate a large number of strains with highly divergent capsid sequences. Determining the capsid residues or nucleotides that uniquely characterize these strains is critical in understanding the strain diversity of these viruses. RECOVIR (an acronym for "recognize viruses") software predicts the strains of some ssRNA viruses from their limited sequence data. Novel phylogenetic-tree-based databases of protein or nucleic acid residues that uniquely characterize these virus strains are created. Strains of input virus sequences (partial or complete) are predicted through residue-wise comparisons with the databases. RECOVIR uses unique characterizing residues to identify automatically strains of partial or complete capsid sequences of picorna and caliciviruses, two of the most highly diverse ssRNA virus families. Partition-wise comparisons of the database residues with the corresponding residues of more than 300 complete and partial sequences of these viruses resulted in correct strain identification for all of these sequences. This study shows the feasibility of creating databases of hitherto unknown residues uniquely characterizing the capsid sequences of two of the most highly divergent ssRNA virus families. These databases enable automated strain identification from partial or complete capsid sequences of these human and animal pathogens.

  4. Factors identified for negative appendicectomies.

    PubMed

    Mirza, M R; Habib, L; Jaleel, F

    2009-07-01

    The study was done, to determine the factors for negative appendicectomies. This prospective descriptive study includes patients managed at four non teaching and a teaching hospital of Karachi from March 2006 to February 2008. One hundred and sixty eight patients underwent appendicectomy during the study period. Details of clinical presentations, investigations, operative findings and histopathology were entered and analyzed. Literature search was aimed to see the negative appendicectomy rate (NAR) in last ten years despite using diagnostic tools (clinical scoring, diagnostic imaging and laparoscopy). In this study a total number of 168 patients under went appendicectomy. Normal appendices were found in 31 patients (negative appendicectomy rate was 18.45%) and associated pathology was seen in 13 patients, an incidental finding of Meckel's diverticulum in 5 patients and no other pathology was seen in 13 patients. The different factors which we identified for negative appendicectomies in our practice were non teaching hospitals where diagnostic scoring system was difficult to apply, female gender, selective use of imaging modality, other pathologies presenting with pain in right lower quadrant (RLQ) and requiring surgical intervention, and non-availability of CT scan and laparoscopy. Despite many advances in diagnostic system, acute appendicitis is still a diagnostic dilemma at times. Although there is no substitute for clinical judgment but in sub groups of patients in whom the possibility of negative appendicectomy is high, diagnostic modalities should be used judiciously to decrease the negative exploration. PMID:19623147

  5. Identifying chemicals that are planetary boundary threats.

    PubMed

    MacLeod, Matthew; Breitholtz, Magnus; Cousins, Ian T; de Wit, Cynthia A; Persson, Linn M; Rudén, Christina; McLachlan, Michael S

    2014-10-01

    Rockström et al. proposed a set of planetary boundaries that delimit a "safe operating space for humanity". Many of the planetary boundaries that have so far been identified are determined by chemical agents. Other chemical pollution-related planetary boundaries likely exist, but are currently unknown. A chemical poses an unknown planetary boundary threat if it simultaneously fulfills three conditions: (1) it has an unknown disruptive effect on a vital Earth system process; (2) the disruptive effect is not discovered until it is a problem at the global scale, and (3) the effect is not readily reversible. In this paper, we outline scenarios in which chemicals could fulfill each of the three conditions, then use the scenarios as the basis to define chemical profiles that fit each scenario. The chemical profiles are defined in terms of the nature of the effect of the chemical and the nature of exposure of the environment to the chemical. Prioritization of chemicals in commerce against some of the profiles appears feasible, but there are considerable uncertainties and scientific challenges that must be addressed. Most challenging is prioritizing chemicals for their potential to have a currently unknown effect on a vital Earth system process. We conclude that the most effective strategy currently available to identify chemicals that are planetary boundary threats is prioritization against profiles defined in terms of environmental exposure combined with monitoring and study of the biogeochemical processes that underlie vital Earth system processes to identify currently unknown disruptive effects. PMID:25181298

  6. DNA Microarrays for Identifying Fishes

    PubMed Central

    Nölte, M.; Weber, H.; Silkenbeumer, N.; Hjörleifsdottir, S.; Hreggvidsson, G. O.; Marteinsson, V.; Kappel, K.; Planes, S.; Tinti, F.; Magoulas, A.; Garcia Vazquez, E.; Turan, C.; Hervet, C.; Campo Falgueras, D.; Antoniou, A.; Landi, M.; Blohm, D.

    2008-01-01

    In many cases marine organisms and especially their diverse developmental stages are difficult to identify by morphological characters. DNA-based identification methods offer an analytically powerful addition or even an alternative. In this study, a DNA microarray has been developed to be able to investigate its potential as a tool for the identification of fish species from European seas based on mitochondrial 16S rDNA sequences. Eleven commercially important fish species were selected for a first prototype. Oligonucleotide probes were designed based on the 16S rDNA sequences obtained from 230 individuals of 27 fish species. In addition, more than 1200 sequences of 380 species served as sequence background against which the specificity of the probes was tested in silico. Single target hybridisations with Cy5-labelled, PCR-amplified 16S rDNA fragments from each of the 11 species on microarrays containing the complete set of probes confirmed their suitability. True-positive, fluorescence signals obtained were at least one order of magnitude stronger than false-positive cross-hybridisations. Single nontarget hybridisations resulted in cross-hybridisation signals at approximately 27% of the cases tested, but all of them were at least one order of magnitude lower than true-positive signals. This study demonstrates that the 16S rDNA gene is suitable for designing oligonucleotide probes, which can be used to differentiate 11 fish species. These data are a solid basis for the second step to create a “Fish Chip” for approximately 50 fish species relevant in marine environmental and fisheries research, as well as control of fisheries products. PMID:18270778

  7. Relative Citation Ratio (RCR): A New Metric That Uses Citation Rates to Measure Influence at the Article Level.

    PubMed

    Hutchins, B Ian; Yuan, Xin; Anderson, James M; Santangelo, George M

    2016-09-01

    Despite their recognized limitations, bibliometric assessments of scientific productivity have been widely adopted. We describe here an improved method to quantify the influence of a research article by making novel use of its co-citation network to field-normalize the number of citations it has received. Article citation rates are divided by an expected citation rate that is derived from performance of articles in the same field and benchmarked to a peer comparison group. The resulting Relative Citation Ratio is article level and field independent and provides an alternative to the invalid practice of using journal impact factors to identify influential papers. To illustrate one application of our method, we analyzed 88,835 articles published between 2003 and 2010 and found that the National Institutes of Health awardees who authored those papers occupy relatively stable positions of influence across all disciplines. We demonstrate that the values generated by this method strongly correlate with the opinions of subject matter experts in biomedical research and suggest that the same approach should be generally applicable to articles published in all areas of science. A beta version of iCite, our web tool for calculating Relative Citation Ratios of articles listed in PubMed, is available at https://icite.od.nih.gov. PMID:27599104

  8. Pro-Inflammatory Markers in Relation to Cardiovascular Disease in HIV Infection. A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Vos, Alinda G.; Idris, Nikmah S.; Barth, Roos E.; Klipstein-Grobusch, Kerstin; Grobbee, Diederick E.

    2016-01-01

    Background In the past years many inflammatory markers have been studied in association with clinically manifest cardiovascular disease (CVD) and carotid intima-media thickness (CIMT) in HIV-infected patients, to obtain insights in the increased cardiovascular risk observed in HIV infection. This systematic review provides an oversight of the current knowledge. Methods A search was performed in PubMed, Embase and Cochrane in July 2014, identifying all articles from 1996 onwards addressing the relation between inflammatory markers and CVD or CIMT in HIV-positive adults. Two authors, using predefined criteria, independently conducted the selection of articles, critical appraisal and extraction of the data. Analysis was focused on the immune markers that were most frequently assessed. The review protocol was registered in the PROSPERO database at 11 July 2014 (registration number CRD42014010516). This review was performed according to the PRISMA guideline. Findings Forty articles were selected; eight addressing cardiovascular disease (CVD) and thirty-two addressing CIMT. C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and d-dimer were assessed most frequently in relation to the occurrence of CVD; in four out of eight studies. All three markers were positively related to CVD in three out of four studies. Studies addressing CIMT were too heterogeneous with respect to patient populations, inflammatory markers, CIMT measurement protocols and statistical methods to allow for a formal meta-analysis to obtain summary statistics. CRP, IL-6 and soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule (sVCAM-1) were the most studied markers in relation to CIMT. None of the inflammatory markers showed an association with CIMT. Interpretation This review showed a relation between some inflammatory markers and CVD, however, no consistent relation is observed for CIMT. Statistical approaches that yields effect estimates and standardized CIMT protocols should be chosen. Further research should focus

  9. Health Effects Related to Wind Turbine Noise Exposure: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Jesper Hvass; Klokker, Mads

    2014-01-01

    Background Wind turbine noise exposure and suspected health-related effects thereof have attracted substantial attention. Various symptoms such as sleep-related problems, headache, tinnitus and vertigo have been described by subjects suspected of having been exposed to wind turbine noise. Objective This review was conducted systematically with the purpose of identifying any reported associations between wind turbine noise exposure and suspected health-related effects. Data Sources A search of the scientific literature concerning the health-related effects of wind turbine noise was conducted on PubMed, Web of Science, Google Scholar and various other Internet sources. Study Eligibility Criteria All studies investigating suspected health-related outcomes associated with wind turbine noise exposure were included. Results Wind turbines emit noise, including low-frequency noise, which decreases incrementally with increases in distance from the wind turbines. Likewise, evidence of a dose-response relationship between wind turbine noise linked to noise annoyance, sleep disturbance and possibly even psychological distress was present in the literature. Currently, there is no further existing statistically-significant evidence indicating any association between wind turbine noise exposure and tinnitus, hearing loss, vertigo or headache. Limitations Selection bias and information bias of differing magnitudes were found to be present in all current studies investigating wind turbine noise exposure and adverse health effects. Only articles published in English, German or Scandinavian languages were reviewed. Conclusions Exposure to wind turbines does seem to increase the risk of annoyance and self-reported sleep disturbance in a dose-response relationship. There appears, though, to be a tolerable level of around LAeq of 35 dB. Of the many other claimed health effects of wind turbine noise exposure reported in the literature, however, no conclusive evidence could be found

  10. Time spent on health related activities associated with chronic illness: a scoping literature review

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The management of health care, particularly for people with chronic conditions, combines the activities of health professionals, patients, informal carers and social networks that support them. Understanding the non-professional roles in health management requires information about the health related activities (HRA) that are undertaken by patients and informal carers. This understanding allows management planning that incorporates the capacity of patients and informal carers, as well as identifying the particular skills, knowledge and technical support that are necessary. This review was undertaken to identify how much time people with chronic illness and their informal carers spend on HRA. Methods Literature searches of three electronic databases (CINAHL, Medline, and PubMed) and two journals (Time and Society, Sociology of Health and Illness) were carried out in 2011 using the following search terms (and derivatives): chronic illness AND time AND consumer OR carer. The search was aimed at finding studies of time spent on HRA. A scoping literature review method was utilised. Results Twenty-two peer reviewed articles published between 1990 and 2010 were included for review. The review identified limited but specific studies about time use by people with a chronic illness and/or their carers. While illness work was seen as demanding, few studies combined inquiry about both defined tasks and defined time use. It also identified methodological issues such as consistency of definition and data collection methods, which remain unresolved. Conclusions While HRA are seen as demanding by people doing them, few studies have measured actual time taken to carry out a comprehensive range of HRA. The results of this review suggest that both patients with chronic illness and informal carers may be spending 2 hours a day or more on HRA. Illnesses such as diabetes may be associated with higher time use. More empirical research is needed to understand the time demands

  11. Identifying a reliable boredom induction.

    PubMed

    Markey, Amanda; Chin, Alycia; Vanepps, Eric M; Loewenstein, George

    2014-08-01

    None of the tasks used to induce boredom have undergone rigorous psychometric validation, which creates potential problems for operational equivalence, comparisons across studies, statistical power, and confounding results. This methodological concern was addressed by testing and comparing the effectiveness of six 5-min. computerized boredom inductions (peg turning, audio, video, signature matching, one-back, and an air traffic control task). The tasks were evaluated using standard criteria for emotion inductions: intensity and discreteness. Intensity, the amount of boredom elicited, was measured using a subset of the Multidimensional State Boredom Scale. Discreteness, the extent to which the task elicited boredom and did not elicit other emotions, was measured using a modification of the Differential Emotion Scale. In both a laboratory setting (Study 1; N = 241) and an online setting with Amazon Mechanical Turk workers (Study 2; N = 416), participants were randomly assigned to one of seven tasks (six boredom tasks or a comparison task, a clip from Planet Earth) before rating their boredom using the MSBS and other emotions using the modified DES. In both studies, each task had significantly higher intensity and discreteness than the comparison task, with moderate to large effect sizes. The peg-turning task outperformed the other tasks in both intensity and discreteness, making it the recommended induction. Identification of reliable and valid boredom inductions and systematic comparison of their relative results should help advance state boredom research. PMID:25153752

  12. 28 CFR 22.22 - Revelation of identifiable data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... STATISTICAL INFORMATION § 22.22 Revelation of identifiable data. (a) Except as noted in paragraph (b) of this section, research and statistical information relating to a private person may be revealed in identifiable... Act. (3) Persons or organizations for research or statistical purposes. Information may only...