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Sample records for idiopathic juvenile osteoporosis

  1. Idiopathic Juvenile Osteoporosis: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Altan, Halenur; Tosun, Gül; Şen, Yaşar

    2015-08-01

    Idiopathic Juvenile Osteoporosis (IJO) is a very rare disease, self restrictive and shows marked, spontaneous improvement during adolescence. The major clinical features were pain with difficulty walking, growth retardation, oral and dental abnormalities with radiographically porous bone structure. A 13-year-old male referred to paediatric dentistry clinic for toothache. The observations made with extra-intraoral clinic examination that one revealed short and skinny stature, diffuse caries in deciduous teeth, abraded lower incisor, deep bite and dysmorphic appearance in permanent incisor. This report emphasizes the recognized features of IJO as well as describes facio-dental findings that could aid in the diagnosis and management of these patients. PMID:26436063

  2. Idiopathic Juvenile Osteoporosis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Tosun, Gül; Şen, Yaşar

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic Juvenile Osteoporosis (IJO) is a very rare disease, self restrictive and shows marked, spontaneous improvement during adolescence. The major clinical features were pain with difficulty walking, growth retardation, oral and dental abnormalities with radiographically porous bone structure. A 13-year-old male referred to paediatric dentistry clinic for toothache. The observations made with extra-intraoral clinic examination that one revealed short and skinny stature, diffuse caries in deciduous teeth, abraded lower incisor, deep bite and dysmorphic appearance in permanent incisor. This report emphasizes the recognized features of IJO as well as describes facio-dental findings that could aid in the diagnosis and management of these patients. PMID:26436063

  3. Idiopathic juvenile osteoporosis: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Imerci, Ahmet; Canbek, Umut; Haghari, Sema; Sürer, Levent; Kocak, Muge

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Idiopathic Juvenile Osteoporosis is an uncommon condition that has few case reports in the literature. Reported series indicate that it is a condition classically accompanying vertebral and metaphyseal fractures during the immediate pre-puberty years but that seems to develop naturally during puberty. Current clinical treatment is complicated because of lack of understanding on the origins of Idiopathic Juvenile Osteoporosis. Presentation of case The 13-year-old female patient with no former complaints had pain in her left hip while walking 2 years ago. Excluding the secondary osteoporosis reasons, the patient was diagnosed with Idiopathic Juvenile Osteoporosis and after the medical treatment she was followed-up. Discussion The patient was subjected to a rehabilitation program for muscle weakness. She had difficulty in walking as a result of prolonged immobilization. At the end of a two-year treatment, significant improvement was achieved in muscle strength in the extremities, walking distance, and posture. Conclusion With this report, we would like to raise awareness about a possible association of persistent fractures with this rare metabolic disorder, Idiopathic Juvenile Osteoporosis, which should be included in differential diagnosis of patients with persistent appendicular skeleton fractures. PMID:25768278

  4. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Is Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis the same as Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis? Yes, Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) is a new ... of chronic inflammatory diseases that affect children. Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis (JRA) is the older term that was used ...

  5. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA); Juvenile chronic polyarthritis; Still disease; Juvenile spondyloarthritis ... The cause of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is not known. It ... illness . This means the body attacks and destroys healthy body ...

  6. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Bhatt, Krupa H; Karjodkar, Freny R; Sansare, Kaustubh; Patil, Darshana

    2014-01-01

    Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) is the most chronic musculoskeletal disease of pediatric population. The chronic course of disease has a great impact on oral health. Temporomandibular joint is involved in JIA causing limited mouth opening with progressive open bite, retrognathia, microgenia and bird like appearance. Joints of upper and lower extremities are also involved. Effect on upper limb function leads to difficulty with fine motor movements required for brushing and flossing. This increases incidence of caries and periodontal disease in children. The cause of JIA is still poorly understood and none of the available drugs for JIA can cure the disease. However, prognosis has improved as a result of progress in disease classification and management. The dental practitioner should be familiar with the symptoms and oral manifestations of JIA to help manage as multidisciplinary management is essential. PMID:24808703

  7. [Juvenile idiopathic epiretinal membrane].

    PubMed

    Kontopoulou, K; Krause, S; Fili, S; Hayvazov, S; Schilling, H; Kohlhaas, M

    2016-07-01

    Idiopathic epiretinal membrane (iERM) is very rare in adolescent patients. The pathogenesis remains unclear although the role of hyalocytes is of major importance. The clinical features in young patients are different from those in older patients. We describe a case of iERM in a 15-year-old girl who presented with metamorphopsia of the right eye. This case report presents the basis for the decision for surgical treatment as well as the clinical features at follow-up examination 9 months after surgery. PMID:26458892

  8. Mineral Oil Aspiration Related Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Andrew D.; Fischer, Philip R.; Reed, Ann M.; Wylam, Mark E.

    2015-01-01

    We describe the development of rheumatoid factor-positive migratory polyarthritis in a 5-year-old male who had been administered bidaily oral mineral oil as a laxative since birth. Minor respiratory symptoms, radiographic and bronchoscopic findings were consistent with chronic lipoid pneumonia. We speculate that immune sensitization to mineral oil promoted the clinical syndrome of juvenile idiopathic arthritis. PMID:26171269

  9. Mineral Oil Aspiration Related Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Andrew D; Fischer, Philip R; Reed, Ann M; Wylam, Mark E

    2015-01-01

    We describe the development of rheumatoid factor-positive migratory polyarthritis in a 5-year-old male who had been administered bidaily oral mineral oil as a laxative since birth. Minor respiratory symptoms, radiographic and bronchoscopic findings were consistent with chronic lipoid pneumonia. We speculate that immune sensitization to mineral oil promoted the clinical syndrome of juvenile idiopathic arthritis. PMID:26171269

  10. [Juvenile idiopathic arthritis: Definition and classification].

    PubMed

    Deslandre, C

    2016-04-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is a group of diseases defined by the presence of arthritis of more than 6weeks duration in patients aged less than 16years and with unknown etiology. The international classification based on clinical and biological criteria define each type of JIA: systemic, oligoarticular, polyarticular with and without rheumatoid factor, enthesitis-related arthritis, and psoriatic arthritis. However, some discussions persist concerning systemic-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis, whose clinical symptoms and pathogenic mechanisms are quite similar to those observed in autoinflammatory diseases, arthritis with antinuclear factors (poly- and oligoarticular) that could be considered as a homogenous group, and a family history of psoriasis that frequently led to unclassified arthritis. Better knowledge of the pathogenic mechanisms should improve the initial clinical classification with more homogeneous groups of patients and reduce the number of unclassified cases of arthritis. PMID:26968301

  11. Systemic Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis: Diagnosis and Management.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sathish

    2016-04-01

    Systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA) is an inflammatory condition characterized by fever, lymphadenopathy, arthritis, rash and serositis. In sJIA, systemic inflammation has been associated with dysregulation of the innate immune system, suggesting that it is an autoinflammatory disorder. IL-1 and IL-6 play a major role in the pathogenesis of sJIA and treatment with IL-1 and IL-6 inhibitors has shown to be highly effective. Recent data suggests that early cytokine blockage might abrogate chronic, destructive, therapy resistant arthritis phase, reflecting a potential "window of opportunity" in the care of children with sJIA. PMID:26916892

  12. Idiopathic osteoporosis: an evolutionary dys-adaptation?

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, C

    2001-01-01

    Osteoporosis is characterised by simultaneous net bone growth and net resorption on different surfaces, suggesting that systemic factors are not the sole explanation for the findings. The main clinical consequence is fracturing in the largely trabecular bones of the spine, hip, and radius, and the key problem in these areas is finding an explanation for the preferential loss of transverse trabeculae. In normal bone, local maintenance depends on a negative feedback response to intermittent compression strain, and it is concluded, from biomechanical analysis of the response required to achieve negative feedback, that a preferential loss of transverse trabeculae is indicative of a selective deficiency of radial compression loading. The only significant source of radial compression in humans is the induced strain produced by axial tension. This is a necessary component of the lifestyles of quadrupeds and arboreal primates, but in humans occurs only on the convex side when the bone is offset loaded. The resulting strain is a function of the range of movement. It is suggested that the asymmetrical pattern of bone loss in cortical and trabecular osteoporosis reflects chronic underuse of movement range, resulting from the adoption of a bipedal lifestyle. Exercise regimens based on using the whole of the available movement range should better prepare the skeleton to adjust to other factors hostile to bone maintenance.

 PMID:11350841

  13. Systemic-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Cimaz, Rolando

    2016-09-01

    Systemic-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis (SoJIA) is a systemic inflammatory disease which has up to now been classified as a category of juvenile idiopathic arthritis. However, in this context, systemic inflammation has been associated with dysregulation of the innate immune system, suggesting that it may rather be part of the spectrum of autoinflammatory disorders. The disease is in fact unique with regard to the other JIA categories, in terms of clinical manifestations, prognosis, and response to conventional immunosuppressant therapies. It is characterized clinically by fever, lymphadenopathy, arthritis, rash, and serositis. IL-1 and IL-6 play a major role in the pathogenesis of SoJIA, and treatment with IL-1 and IL-6 inhibitors has shown to be highly effective. However, complications of SoJIA, including macrophage activation syndrome, limitations in functional outcome by arthritis and long-term damage from chronic inflammation continue to be a major issue in patients' care. Recent advances on the pathogenesis and treatment have revolutionized the care and prognosis of this potentially life-threatening pediatric condition. PMID:27392503

  14. Osteoporosis in men with idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism

    SciTech Connect

    Finkelstein, J.S.; Klibanski, A.; Neer, R.M.; Greenspan, S.L.; Rosenthal, D.I.; Crowley, W.F. Jr.

    1987-03-01

    To assess the effect of testosterone deficiency on skeletal integrity in men, we determined bone density in 23 hypogonadal men with isolated gonadotropin-releasing hormone deficiency and compared those values with ones from controls. Cortical bone density, as assessed by single-photon absorptiometry of the nondominant radius, ranged from 0.57 to 0.86 g/cm2 (mean +/- SE, 0.71 +/- 0.02) in patients with fused epiphyses and from 0.57 to 0.67 g/cm2 (mean, 0.61 +/- 0.01) in patients with open epiphyses, both of which were significantly (p less than 0.001) lower than normal. Spinal trabecular bone density, as assessed by computed tomography, was similarly decreased (p less than 0.0001) and ranged from 42 to 177 mg K2HPO4/cm3 (mean, 112 +/- 7). Cortical bone density was at least 2 SD below normal in 16 of 23 men, and 8 men had spinal bone densities below the fracture threshold of 80 to 100 mg K2HPO4/cm3. Osteopenia was equally severe in men with immature and mature bone ages, suggesting that abnormal bone development plays an important role in the osteopenia of men with idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism.

  15. Impact of juvenile idiopathic arthritis on schooling

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common arthropathy of childhood. Different diseases affect school attendance to varying degrees. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) on Moroccan children’s schooling. Methods Thirty-three children with JIA were included in this study, having been previously diagnosed according to the classification criteria of the International League of Associations for Rheumatology (ILAR). Seventy-four healthy children were recruited to serve as controls. Data was obtained for all children on their school level, educational performance, and attendance. The rate of absenteeism due to health complications was noted. Results All healthy children were able to attend school (p<0.0001), while 33% of children with JIA were unable to attend school due to their condition. The students with JIA who were able to attend school were absent much more often than controls (63% compared to 20%), with a highly significant p value (p<0.0001). Slightly less than half of the JIA patients (48.5%) failed in their schooling. In univariate analysis, there was an association between absenteeism and tender joints (p=0.02), disease activity score (DAS28) (p=0.007), Childhood Health Assessment Questionnaire (CHAQ) (p=0.01), and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) (p=0.03). In multivariate analysis, the only association persisted between DAS28 and absenteeism. Conclusions Our study suggested that the schooling of children with JIA was negatively impacted due to the disorder. More studies, with a larger sample of children, are needed to confirm our findings. PMID:23289498

  16. Macrophages - silent enemies in juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Świdrowska-Jaros, Joanna; Orczyk, Krzysztof; Smolewska, Elżbieta

    2016-01-01

    The inflammatory response by secretion of cytokines and other mediators is postulated as one of the most significant factors in the pathophysiology of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). The effect of macrophage action depends on the type of their activation. Classically activated macrophages (M1) are responsible for release of molecules crucial for joint inflammation. Alternatively activated macrophages (M2) may recognize self antigens by scavenger receptors and induce the immunological reaction leading to autoimmune diseases such as JIA. Molecules essential for JIA pathophysiology include: TNF-α, the production of which precedes synovial inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis; IL-1 as a key mediator of synovial damage; chemotactic factors for macrophages IL-8 and MCP-1; IL6, the level of which correlates with the radiological joint damage; MIF, promoting the secretion of TNF-α and IL-6; CCL20 and HIF, significant for the hypoxic synovial environment in JIA; GM-CSF, stimulating the production of macrophages; and IL-18, crucial for NK cell functions. Recognition of the role of macrophages creates the potential for a new therapeutic approach. PMID:27383571

  17. [Juvenile idiopathic arthritis and oral health].

    PubMed

    Kobus, Agnieszka; Kierklo, Anna; Sielicka, Danuta; Szajda, Sławomir Dariusz

    2016-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common autoimmune inflammatory disease of connective tissue in children. It is characterized by progressive joint destruction which causes preserved changes in the musculoskeletal system. The literature describes fully clinical symptoms and radiological images in different subtypes of JIA. However, there is still a limited number of studies reporting on the medical condition of the oral cavity of ill children. JIA can affect hard and soft tissues of the oral cavity by: the general condition of the child's health, arthritis of the upper limbs, as the result of the pharmacotherapy, changes in secretion and composition of saliva, inflammation of the temporomandibular joint and facial deformity. The study summarizes the available literature on the condition of the teeth and periodontal and oral hygiene in the course of JIA. The presence of diverse factors that modify the oral cavity, such as facial growth, functioning of salivary glands, or the supervision and care provided by adults, prevents clear identification if JIA leads to severe dental caries and periodontal disease. Despite conflicting results in studies concerning the clinical oral status, individuals with JIA require special attention regarding disease prevention and maintenance of oral health. PMID:27180959

  18. Management of Children with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Viswanathan, Vijay; Murray, Kevin J

    2016-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) comprises a group of heterogeneous disorders of chronic arthritis in childhood and remains the commonest pediatric rheumatic disease associated with significant long-term morbidity. Advances in understanding of the pathogenesis, better definition of disease control/remission measures, and the arrival of biological agents have improved the outcomes remarkably. Methotrexate (Mtx) remains the first-line disease modifying (DMARD) therapy for most children with JIA due to its proven efficacy and safety. Sulphosalazine (SSz) (especially for enthesitis) and leflunomide may also have a secondary role. Tumor necrosis factor inhibitors (TNF-I), alone or in combination with Mtx have shown tremendous benefit in children with polyarticular JIA, enthesitis related arthritis (ERA) and psoriatic arthritis. Tocilizumab appears very efficacious in systemic arthritis and abatacept and tocilizumab also appear to benefit polyarticular JIA; the role of rituximab remains unclear, though clearly beneficial in adult RA. TNF-I with Mtx is also effective in uveitis associated with JIA. Biologicals have demonstrated an impressive safety record in children with JIA, although close monitoring for rare but potentially dangerous adverse events, such as tuberculosis and other infections; paradoxical development of additional autoimmune diseases; and possibly an increased risk of cancers is warranted. PMID:26639461

  19. Genetics Home Reference: juvenile primary osteoporosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... caused by a shortage of calcium and other minerals in bones (decreased bone mineral density), which makes the bones brittle and prone ... protein is involved in the regulation of bone mineral density. LRP5 gene mutations that cause juvenile primary ...

  20. Immune Complexes in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Terry L.

    2016-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) reflects a group of clinically heterogeneous, autoimmune disorders in children characterized by chronic arthritis and hallmarked by elevated levels of circulating immune complexes (CICs) and associated complement activation by-products in their sera. Immune complexes (ICs) have been detected in patients’ sera with JIA utilizing a variety of methods, including the anti-human IgM affinity column, C1q solid-phase assay, polyethylene glycol precipitation, Staphylococcal Protein A separation method, anti-C1q/C3 affinity columns, and FcγRIII affinity method. As many as 75% of JIA patients have had IC detected in their sera. The CIC proteome in JIA patients has been examined to elucidate disease-associated proteins that are expressed in active disease. Evaluation of these ICs has shown the presence of multiple peptide fragments by SDS-PAGE and 2-DE. Subsequently, all isotypes of rheumatoid factor (RF), isotypes of anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (CCP) antibodies, IgG, C1q, C4, C3, and the membrane attack complex (MAC) were detected in these IC. Complement activation and levels of IC correlate with disease activity in JIA, indicating their role in the pathophysiology of the disease. This review will summarize the existing literature and discuss the role of possible protein modification that participates in the generation of the immune response. We will address the possible role of these events in the development of ectopic germinal centers that become the secondary site of plasma cell development in JIA. We will further address possible therapeutic modalities that could be instituted as a result of the information gathered by the presence of ICs in JIA. PMID:27242784

  1. The Etiology of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Rigante, Donato; Bosco, Annalisa; Esposito, Susanna

    2015-10-01

    Over the years, the commonly used term to describe juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) has changed. By definition, JIA includes all types of arthritis with no apparent cause, lasting more than 6 weeks, in patients aged less than 16 years at onset. JIA pathogenesis is still poorly understood: the interaction between environmental factors and multiple genes has been proposed as the most relevant working mechanism to the development of JIA. The concept that various microbes that colonize or infect not only the mucosal surfaces, like the oral cavity, but also the airways and gut might trigger autoimmune processes, resulting in chronic arthritides, and JIA was first drafted at the outset of last century. JIA development might be initiated and sustained by the exposure to environmental factors, including infectious agents which affect people at a young age, depending on the underlying genetic predisposition to synovial inflammation. Many data from patients with JIA suggest a scenario in which different external antigens incite multiple antigen-specific pathways, cytotoxic T cell responses, activation of classical complement cascade, and production of proinflammatory cytokines. In this review, emphasis is paid not only to the potential role of parvovirus B19 and Epstein-Barr virus in primis but also to the general involvement of different bacteria as Salmonella spp., Shigella spp., Campylobacter spp., Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydophila pneumoniae, Bartonella henselae, and Streptococcus pyogenes for the development of immune-mediated arthritides during childhood. No unequivocal evidence favoring or refuting these associations has been clearly proved, and today, the strict definition of JIA etiology remains unknown. The infection can represent a random event in a susceptible individual, or it can be a necessary factor in JIA development, always in combination with a peculiar genetic background. Further studies are needed in order to address the unsolved questions

  2. Immune Complexes in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Moore, Terry L

    2016-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) reflects a group of clinically heterogeneous, autoimmune disorders in children characterized by chronic arthritis and hallmarked by elevated levels of circulating immune complexes (CICs) and associated complement activation by-products in their sera. Immune complexes (ICs) have been detected in patients' sera with JIA utilizing a variety of methods, including the anti-human IgM affinity column, C1q solid-phase assay, polyethylene glycol precipitation, Staphylococcal Protein A separation method, anti-C1q/C3 affinity columns, and FcγRIII affinity method. As many as 75% of JIA patients have had IC detected in their sera. The CIC proteome in JIA patients has been examined to elucidate disease-associated proteins that are expressed in active disease. Evaluation of these ICs has shown the presence of multiple peptide fragments by SDS-PAGE and 2-DE. Subsequently, all isotypes of rheumatoid factor (RF), isotypes of anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (CCP) antibodies, IgG, C1q, C4, C3, and the membrane attack complex (MAC) were detected in these IC. Complement activation and levels of IC correlate with disease activity in JIA, indicating their role in the pathophysiology of the disease. This review will summarize the existing literature and discuss the role of possible protein modification that participates in the generation of the immune response. We will address the possible role of these events in the development of ectopic germinal centers that become the secondary site of plasma cell development in JIA. We will further address possible therapeutic modalities that could be instituted as a result of the information gathered by the presence of ICs in JIA. PMID:27242784

  3. Effect of body composition on bone mineral density in Moroccan patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    El Badri, Dalal; Rostom, Samira; Bouaddi, Ilham; Hassani, Asmae; Chkirate, Bouchra; Amine, Bouchra; Hajjaj-Hassouni, Najia

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The link between bone mass and body composition is widely recognized, but only few works were selectively performed on subjects with juvenile idiopathic arthritis. The aim of our study was to investigate the effect of body composition on bone mineral density (BMD) in Moroccan patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Methods Thirty three children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) were included in a cross-sectional study. The diagnosis of JIA was made according to the criteria of the International League of Association of Rheumatology (ILAR). Body mass index (BMI) was calculated from the ratio of weight/height2(kg/m2). Pubertal status was determined according to the Tanner criteria. Bone status, body composition and bone mineral content (BMC) were analyzed by using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). BMD was assessed at the lumbar spine (L1-L4) and at total body in (g/cm2). Total body fat tissue mass (FTM) and lean tissue mass (LTM) were also analyzed by DXA and expressed in kilograms. In children, low BMD was defined as a Z-score less than -2 and osteoporosis was defined as a Z-score less than -2 with a fracture history. Results A cross-sectional study was conducted in 33 Moroccan patients with JIA aged between 4 and 16 years, Fat mass was not related to bone density; in contrast, BMD was positively associated to LTM in total body(r = =0.41, p= 0.04) but not in lumbar spine (r = 0.29, p= 0.17). There exist significant correlation between BMC and BMD in total body (r = 0.51, p = 0.01). Conclusion This study suggests that the LTM is a determining factor of the BMD during adolescence. Other studies with a broader sample would be useful to confirm this relation. PMID:25120859

  4. Physiotherapy in pauciarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Case study.

    PubMed

    Zuk, Beata; Kaczor, Zofia; Zuk-Drążyk, Berenika; Księżopolska-Orłowska, Krystyna

    2014-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common arthropathy of childhood and adolescence. This term encompasses a group of chronic systemic inflammatory diseases of the connective tissue which cause arthritis in patients under 16 years of age lasting at least 6 weeks. The authors presented the characteristic features of physiotherapy based on functional examination results on the basis of two cases of girls with pauciarticular JIA treated according to an established pharmacological regimen. Physiotherapy should be introduced at an early stage of the disease. Kinesiotherapy preceded by history-taking and a functional examination of the patient, has to focus on both primary and secondary joint lesions. PMID:25041889

  5. Treatment of uveitis associated with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Bou, Rosa; Iglesias, Estíbaliz; Antón, Jordi

    2014-08-01

    Chronic anterior uveitis affects 10-30 % of patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and is still a cause of blindness in childhood. In most patients it is asymptomatic, bilateral, and recurrent, so careful screening and early diagnosis are important to obtain the best long-term prognosis. The treatment of chronic uveitis associated with JIA is challenging. Initial treatment is based on topical steroids and mydriatic drops. Methotrexate is the most common first-line immunomodulatory drug used. For refractory patients, biologicals, mainly the anti-tumor-necrosis-factor (TNF) drugs adalimumab and infliximab, have been revealed to be effective and have changed the outcome for these patients. Collaboration between pediatric rheumatologists and ophthalmologists is important for the successful diagnosis and treatment of patients with uveitis associated with JIA. PMID:24938442

  6. Is it necessary to screen for celiac disease in adult idiopathic osteoporosis?

    PubMed Central

    Shahbazkhani, Bijan; Aletaha, Najmeh; khonche, Ahmad; Farahvash, Benyamin; Malekzadeh, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Aim: the aim of this study was to investigate the necessity of screening for celiac disease in idiopathic osteoporotic patients. Background: Osteopenia and osteoporosis are well-known and prevalent complications of celiac disease. However, the relative prevalence of celiac disease among osteoporotic populations is not known, and the benefit of screening for celiac disease among the osteoporotic population remains controversial. Patients and methods: We evaluated a total of 560 individuals, 460 with osteoporosis and 100 healthy subjects, from the rheumatology clinic in Imam Khomeini and Shariati hospital by IgA anti-tissue transglutaminase (anti-tTG) for celiac disease. Then individuals with positive serologic test underwent upper GI Endoscopy & 2nd part duodenum biopsies. The clinical findings were evaluated in both groups and were compared with each other. Results: Five (1.08%) of 460 patients with osteoporosis and 1 (1%) of 100 subjects without osteoporosis had celiac disease by positive serologic & pathology results. Three patients with positive serology & pathology results were female. All patients in osteoporotic group had at least one other symptom of celiac disease. Two of them had anemia and others had chronic abdominal pain, recurrent oral aphtous lesion & chronic bloating. Conclusion: In the present study, the prevalence of celiac disease in osteoporotic patients is not high enough to justify recommendation for serologic screening of celiac disease in all patients with idiopathic osteoporosis; but in osteoporotic patients with other celiac or gastrointestinal symptoms and signs, for example iron deficiency anemia, chronic dyspepsia and bloating, constipation or diarrhea and recurrent aphtous lesions, it is necessary to evaluate for celiac disease. PMID:25926939

  7. Advances in the treatment of polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Kate; Wedderburn, Lucy R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review To review recent advances in the management strategies of polyarticular course juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and identify unanswered questions and avenues for further research. Recent findings There is evidence for an early, aggressive, treat-to-target approach for polyarticular JIA. Clinical disease activity criteria have been recently defined and validated, including criteria for inactive disease and the juvenile arthritis disease activity score (JADAS). There is a need for evidence-based, defined disease targets and biomarkers for prediction of response, including targets for remission induction, and guidelines on drug withdrawal. Recent treatment consensus plans and guidelines are discussed and compared, including the 2015 NHS England clinical policy statement, the 2014 Childhood Arthritis and Rheumatology Research Alliance (CARRA) treatment plans and the 2011 American College of Rheumatology (ACR) guidelines. Evidence for new agents such as tocilizumab, rituximab, golimumab, ustekinumab, certolizumab and tofacitinib is promising: the recent clinical trials are summarized here. Stratification of individual patient treatment remains a goal, and predictive biomarkers have been shown to predict success in the withdrawal of methotrexate therapy. Summary There are promising advances in the treatment approaches, disease activity criteria, clinical guidelines, pharmaceutical choices and individually stratified therapy choices for polyarticular JIA. PMID:26147756

  8. Immunogenetics of juvenile idiopathic arthritis: A comprehensive review

    PubMed Central

    Hersh, Aimee O.; Prahalad, Sampath

    2016-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common chronic inflammatory arthropathy of childhood. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis is believed to be a complex genetic trait influenced by both genetic and environmental factors. Twin and family studies suggest a substantial role for genetic factors in the predisposition to JIA. Describing the genetics is complicated by the heterogeneity of JIA; the International League of Associations for Rheumatology (ILAR) has defined seven categories of JIA based on distinct clinical and laboratory features. Utilizing a variety of techniques including candidate gene studies, the use of genotyping arrays such as Immunochip, and genome wide association studies (GWAS), both human leukocyte antigen (HLA) and non-HLA susceptibility loci associated with JIA have been described. Several of these polymorphisms (e.g. HLA class II, PTPN22, STAT4) are shared with other common autoimmune conditions; other novel polymorphisms that have been identified may be unique to JIA. Associations with oligoarticular and RF-negative polyarticular JIA are the best characterized. A strong association between HLA DRB1:11:03/04 and DRB1:08:01, and a protective effect of DRB1:15:01 have been described. HLA DPB1:02:01 has also been associated with oligoarticular and RF-negative polyarticular JIA. Besides PTPN22, STAT4 and PTPN2 variants, IL2, IL2RA, IL2RB, as well as IL6 and IL6R loci also harbor variants associated with oligoarticular and RF-negative polyarticular JIA. RF-positive polyarticular JIA is associated with many of the shared epitope encoding HLA DRB1 alleles, as well as PTPN22, STAT4 and TNFAIP3 variants. ERA is associated with HLA B27. Most other associations between JIA categories and HLA or non-HLA variants need confirmation. The formation of International Consortia to ascertain and analyze large cohorts of JIA categories, validation of reported findings in independent cohorts, and functional studies will enhance our understanding of the genetic

  9. Immunogenetics of juvenile idiopathic arthritis: A comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Hersh, Aimee O; Prahalad, Sampath

    2015-11-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common chronic inflammatory arthropathy of childhood. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis is believed to be a complex genetic trait influenced by both genetic and environmental factors. Twin and family studies suggest a substantial role for genetic factors in the predisposition to JIA. Describing the genetics is complicated by the heterogeneity of JIA; the International League of Associations for Rheumatology (ILAR) has defined seven categories of JIA based on distinct clinical and laboratory features. Utilizing a variety of techniques including candidate gene studies, the use of genotyping arrays such as Immunochip, and genome wide association studies (GWAS), both human leukocyte antigen (HLA) and non-HLA susceptibility loci associated with JIA have been described. Several of these polymorphisms (e.g. HLA class II, PTPN22, STAT4) are shared with other common autoimmune conditions; other novel polymorphisms that have been identified may be unique to JIA. Associations with oligoarticular and RF-negative polyarticular JIA are the best characterized. A strong association between HLA DRB1:11:03/04 and DRB1:08:01, and a protective effect of DRB1:15:01 have been described. HLA DPB1:02:01 has also been associated with oligoarticular and RF-negative polyarticular JIA. Besides PTPN22, STAT4 and PTPN2 variants, IL2, IL2RA, IL2RB, as well as IL6 and IL6R loci also harbor variants associated with oligoarticular and RF-negative polyarticular JIA. RF-positive polyarticular JIA is associated with many of the shared epitope encoding HLA DRB1 alleles, as well as PTPN22, STAT4 and TNFAIP3 variants. ERA is associated with HLA B27. Most other associations between JIA categories and HLA or non-HLA variants need confirmation. The formation of International Consortia to ascertain and analyze large cohorts of JIA categories, validation of reported findings in independent cohorts, and functional studies will enhance our understanding of the genetic

  10. Assessment of vascular function in systemic onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Sozeri, Betul; Atikan, Basak Yildiz; Ozdemir, Kadriye; Mir, Sevgi

    2016-07-01

    An increased incidence of cardiovascular disease has been found in rheumatic disorders. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common chronic rheumatic disease in children. Prolonged immunological inflammatory process leads these patients to an early onset of atherosclerosis. We aimed to assess the presence of early vascular dysfunction in patients with systemic onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA) and investigate the role of therapy sJIA in vascular health. Thirty-three patients (22 males, 11 females) diagnosed with sJIA according to the International League of Associations for Rheumatology criteria were compared to 72 age- and sex-matched controls. None of the participants was overweight, obese, or had a history of hypertension, dyslipidemia, diabetes mellitus, or cardiovascular disease. Arterial stiffness (As) was evaluated by measurement of carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity (PWV) and augmentation index (AIx) with a Vicorder. The mean age of patients in this study was 9.96 ± 3.71 years (range 4-16 years) and the mean age of controls was 10.9 ± 3.52 years (range 4-19 years). These two groups were well matched for age, sex, and BMI. The mean age of patients at the onset of disease was 7.06 ± 3.9 years (range 3-15 years). The mean duration of disease and active disease was 79 ± 45 months (range 6-162 months) and 58 ± 49 months (range 1-101 months), respectively. The highest levels of PWV and AIx were found in the patient group. Seven patients had had macrophage activation syndrome at presentation. In these patients, vascular changes were higher than other patients (6.30 ± 0.42 m/s vs 5.17 ± 0.55 m/s, p = 0.01, respectively). The corticosteroid therapy was found associated with higher PWV, (p < 0.05), while there was no difference between vascular parameters and use of non-steroid therapies (methotrexate (MTX), anti-TNF alfa agents). We also find statistically significant correlation between PWV

  11. Laboratory Indicators of Aggrecan Turnover in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Winsz-Szczotka, Katarzyna; Kuźnik-Trocha, Kornelia; Komosińska-Vassev, Katarzyna; Jura-Półtorak, Agnieszka; Olczyk, Krystyna

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. Evaluation of chondroitin sulfate (CS), as an early marker of aggrecan degradation, and chondroitin sulfate 846 epitope (CS846), as a biomarker of CS synthesis, is an attempt at answering the question whether the therapy used in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients contributes to the normalization of biochemical changes in aggrecan. Methods and Results. Serum levels of CS and CS846 as well as catalase (CT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities in erythrocyte were assessed in patients before and after treatment. In the course of JIA, aggrecan metabolism is disturbed, which is reflected by a decrease (p < 0.001) in CS serum level and an increase (p < 0.05) in CS846 concentration. Furthermore, increased (p < 0.001) activities of CT, SOD, and GPx in untreated JIA patients were recorded. The anti-inflammatory treatment resulted in the normalization of CS846 level and SOD and GPx activities. In untreated patients, we have revealed a significant correlation between serum CS and CS846, CT, CRP, ESR, MMP-3, and ADAMTS-4, respectively, as well as between CS846 and CT, GPx, CRP, ESR, and TGF-β1, respectively. Conclusion. The observed changes of CS and CS846 in JIA patients indicate a further need of the therapy continuation aimed at protecting a patient from a possible disability. PMID:26924871

  12. Autoimmune response to transthyretin in juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Clement, Cristina C.; Moncriefe, Halima; Lele, Aditi; Janow, Ginger; Becerra, Aniuska; Bauli, Francesco; Saad, Fawzy A.; Perino, Giorgio; Montagna, Cristina; Cobelli, Neil; Hardin, John; Stern, Lawrence J.; Ilowite, Norman; Porcelli, Steven A.; Santambrogio, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common pediatric rheumatological condition. Although it has been proposed that JIA has an autoimmune component, the autoantigens are still unknown. Using biochemical and proteomic approaches, we identified the molecular chaperone transthyretin (TTR) as an antigenic target for B and T cell immune responses. TTR was eluted from IgG complexes and affinity purified from 3 JIA patients, and a statistically significant increase in TTR autoantibodies was observed in a group of 43 JIA patients. Three cryptic, HLA-DR1–restricted TTR peptides, which induced CD4+ T cell expansion and IFN-γ and TNF-α production in 3 out of 17 analyzed patients, were also identified. Misfolding, aggregation and oxidation of TTR, as observed in the synovial fluid of all JIA patients, enhanced its immunogenicity in HLA-DR1 transgenic mice. Our data point to TTR as an autoantigen potentially involved in the pathogenesis of JIA and to oxidation and aggregation as a mechanism facilitating TTR autoimmunity. PMID:26973882

  13. Polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis – epidemiology and management approaches

    PubMed Central

    Oberle, Edward J; Harris, Julia G; Verbsky, James W

    2014-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is a group of disorders characterized by arthritis persisting for at least 6 weeks with onset before the age of 16 years. Within this cluster of conditions, the polyarticular form (involving more than four joints within the first 6 months) is further divided based on the presence of rheumatoid factor. Children with polyarticular JIA pose unique diagnostic and therapeutic challenges compared to children with involvement of fewer joints. Polyarticular JIA patients tend to have a more refractory course and therefore are at increased risk for joint damage, resulting in poorer functional outcomes and decreased quality of life. Although the ability to treat this disorder continues to improve, especially with the advent of biologic agents, there is still much about the epidemiology and pathogenesis of polyarticular JIA that is unknown. The epidemiology of polyarticular JIA varies worldwide with a vast difference in reported cases between different global regions as well as within individual countries. Several genetic risk loci have been identified conferring increased susceptibility to JIA, many within the human leukocyte antigen region. Beyond the genome, environmental factors also seem to contribute to the etiology of polyarticular JIA. This review article will focus on the epidemiology and current treatments of polyarticular JIA and briefly discuss genetic and environmental influences on the pathogenesis of JIA as well as new and emerging therapies. PMID:25368531

  14. Abatacept in difficult-to-treat juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Kuemmerle-Deschner, Jasmin B; Benseler, SM

    2008-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common chronic rheumatic disease in children and an important cause of short-term and long-term disability. Gene changes in the immune system can predispose to JIA and regulation of the immune system is crucial in the pathogenesis. The goal of therapy is complete disease control using disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDS). Activated T-cells may play a role in the immunopathology of JIA. Therefore, targeting T-cell activation is a rational approach for the treatment of JIA. Abatacept (ABA), a selective co-stimulation modulator, has been shown to be effective in treating all JIA subtypes and is generally safe and well tolerated in JIA. Neutralizing antibodies were found in 6/9 (67%) of seropositive patients, but anti-ABA antibodies did not appear to be associated with disease flare, serious adverse events, acute infusional adverse events, hypersensitivity, autoimmune disorders, or low ABA serum concentrations. Anti-ABA antibodies were more frequent when ABA concentrations were below therapeutic levels. Although information on ABA in JIA is still limited, available data suggest a potential role in difficult to treat JIA patients previously treated with other biologic agents and for non-responders to TNF-blockade. PMID:19707464

  15. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis in Olmsted County, Minnesota, 1960–2013

    PubMed Central

    Krause, Megan L.; Crowson, Cynthia S.; Michet, C. John; Mason, Thomas; Muskardin, Theresa Wampler; Matteson, Eric L.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the incidence and prevalence of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) in Olmsted County, Minnesota in 1994–2013 and trends in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA) in 1960–2013. Methods Cases of arthritis in 1994–2013 were identified by diagnosis code with medical chart review to confirm diagnosis separately for JIA and JRA. Overall incidence rates with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) were age and sex adjusted to the 2010 US white population. Comparisons were made with an earlier (1960–1993) cohort from this same population. Results Seventy-one incident cases of JIA in 1994–2013 were identified, with an overall age- and sex-adjusted incidence rate of 10.3 per 100,000 (95% CI 7.9–12.7). Forty-two (59%) were female, with an incidence of 12.4 per 100,000 (95% CI 8.6–16.2), as compared to 8.3 per 100,000 (95% CI 5.2–11.3) in males. The most common subtype was oligoarthritis (63%). The mean ± SD age at diagnosis was 8.2 ± 5.3 years. The prevalence of JIA on January 1, 2000 and January 1, 2010 was 51.0 per 100,000 (95% CI 25.2–76.8) and 57.6 per 100,000 (95% CI 31.0–94.5), respectively. When the annual incidence of JRA was compared over time from 1960 to 2013, there was no significant change in incidence overall; however, the incidence decreased among females (P = 0.003). A cyclic pattern of incidence was observed, with peaks approximately every 10 years. Similar to the findings with regard to incidence, prevalence did not change overall, but decreased among females (P = 0.048). There were 4 deaths in the cohort of JRA patients diagnosed in 1960–2013; the standardized mortality ratio was 1.50 (95% CI 0.41–3.83). Conclusion Incidence of juvenile arthritis overall in Olmsted County, Minnesota has not changed significantly in the past 53 years. A consistent cyclic pattern was noted. PMID:26316119

  16. Osteoporosis

    MedlinePlus

    Osteoporosis makes your bones weak and more likely to break. Anyone can develop osteoporosis, but it is common in older women. As ... than 50 will break a bone due to osteoporosis. Risk factors include Getting older Being small and ...

  17. Osteoporosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home > ePublications > Our ePublications > Osteoporosis fact sheet ePublications Osteoporosis fact sheet This information in Spanish (en español) Print this fact sheet Osteoporosis fact sheet (PDF, 412 KB) Related information Menopause ...

  18. Incidence of herpes zoster infections in juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients.

    PubMed

    Nimmrich, S; Horneff, G

    2015-03-01

    The risk of herpes zoster among patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) exposed to biologics has not been evaluated. We determined incidence rates of herpes zoster among children with JIA in correlation with medication at time of occurrence and total drug exposure. The German biologics register database was used to identify patients with herpes zoster. Crude infection rates and incidence ratios (IRR) were compared to published rates. Demographics and overall exposure and particular exposure time to corticosteroids, immunosuppressive drugs and biologics were analyzed. The JIA cohort included 3,042 patients with 5,557.9 person-years of follow-up; 1,628 have used corticosteroids, 2,930 methotrexate and 1,685 etanercept. In total, 17 herpes zoster events have been documented [6/1,000 patients (3.5-9.0); 3.1/1,000 patient-years (1.9-4.9)]. Thus, the incidence rate in JIA patients was higher than expected [IRR 2.9 (1.8-4.5), p < 0.001]. In all patients, the event resolved completely. There were two complications, one patient developed intercostal neuralgia, and one had a recurrent herpes zoster. Compared to the healthy population, a significant higher IRR is observed in JIA patients who received a monotherapy with etanercept or in combination with steroids and methotrexate, but not in JIA patients exposed to methotrexate without biologics. In comparison with our control group of patients treated with methotrexate, the IRR was higher for exposure to etanercept monotherapy and combination of etanercept and corticosteroids irrespective of methotrexate use. A generally higher incidence rate in JIA patients treated with etanercept was observed. No serious or refractory manifestations occurred. PMID:25583050

  19. Faecal microbiome in new-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Tejesvi, M V; Arvonen, M; Kangas, S M; Keskitalo, P L; Pirttilä, A M; Karttunen, T J; Vähäsalo, P

    2016-03-01

    Alterations in the intestinal microbial flora have been linked with autoimmune diseases. Our objective was to analyse the composition of the faecal microbiome of children with new-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) compared to healthy controls, and to identify specific gut bacteria associated with JIA. Stool samples from patients were taken at the time of diagnosis of JIA. The microbiome profiles of samples of 30 children with JIA (mean age 6.2 years, 22 girls) were analysed with 16S region-based sequencing profiling and compared to the stool samples of healthy controls (n = 27, mean age 5.4 years, 18 girls). The proportion of bacteria belonging to the phylum Firmicutes was significantly lower in children with JIA [21 % (95 % confident interval [CI]: 17-25 %)] compared to controls [33 % (95 % CI: 26-41 %), p = 0.009]. Bacteria belonging to Bacteroidetes were significantly more abundant in JIA [78 % (95 % CI: 74-82 %)] than in control samples [65 % (95 % CI: 57-73 %), p = 0.008]. Shared operational taxonomic units (OTUs) between the groups revealed that genera Actinobacteria and Fusobacteria were present only in JIA patients and Lentisphaerae only in controls. In summary, faecal flora in JIA is characterised by a low level of Firmicutes and an abundance of Bacteroidetes, resembling the aberration reported in type 1 diabetes. We suggest that alterations in the intestinal microbial flora may challenge the mucosal immune system of genetically susceptible subjects predisposing to local proinflammatory cascades, thus contributing to the development of JIA. PMID:26718942

  20. Imaging of juvenile idiopathic arthritis: a multimodality approach.

    PubMed

    Sheybani, Elizabeth F; Khanna, Geetika; White, Andrew J; Demertzis, Jennifer L

    2013-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is a heterogeneous group of diseases characterized by synovial inflammation and is the most common rheumatic complaint in children. To facilitate research and treatment, JIA has been further classified on the basis of the number of joints involved, additional symptoms, family history, and serologic findings. Imaging in patients with JIA has historically relied on radiography, which allows the accurate assessment of chronic changes of JIA, including growth disturbances, periostitis, and joint malalignment. However, radiographic findings of active inflammation are nonspecific, and, in the past, clinical evaluation has taken precedence over imaging of acute disease. Recent advances in disease-modifying therapeutic agents that can help prevent long-term disability in patients with JIA have led to greater emphasis on the detection of early joint-centered inflammation that cannot be accurately assessed radiographically and may not be evident clinically. Both contrast material-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and Doppler ultrasonography (US) are well suited for this application and are playing an increasingly important role in diagnosis, risk stratification, treatment monitoring, and problem solving. Contrast-enhanced MR imaging is the most sensitive technique for the detection of synovitis and is the only modality that can help detect bone marrow edema, both of which indicate active inflammation. US is more sensitive than radiography for the detection of synovial proliferation and effusions and is particularly useful in the evaluation of small peripheral joints. The complexity of the temporomandibular and sacroiliac joints limits the usefulness of radiographic or US evaluation, and contrast-enhanced MR imaging is the preferred modality for evaluation of these structures. PMID:24025923

  1. Treatment of juvenile idiopathic arthritis: a revolution in care

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A generation ago, children with arthritis faced a lifetime of pain and disability. Today, there are a multitude of treatment options, including a variety of biologics targeting key cytokines and other inflammatory mediators. While non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and corticosteroids were once the mainstay of therapy, they are now largely used as bridge or adjunctive therapies. Among the conventional disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs, methotrexate remains first-line therapy for most children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) due to its long track record of safety and effectiveness in the management of peripheral arthritis. Sulfasalazine and leflunomide may also have a secondary role. The tumor necrosis factor inhibitors (TNFi) have shown tremendous benefit in children with polyarticular JIA and likely in enthesitis-related arthritis and psoriatic JIA as well. There may be additional benefit in combining TNFi with methotrexate. Abatacept and tocilizumab also appear to benefit polyarticular JIA; the role of rituximab remains unclear. For the treatment of systemic JIA, while the TNFi are of less benefit, blockade of interleukin-1 or interleukin-6 is highly effective. Additionally, interleukin-1 blockade appears to be effective treatment of macrophage activation syndrome, one of the most dangerous complications of JIA; specifically, anakinra in combination with cyclosporine and corticosteroids may obviate the need for cytotoxic approaches. In contrast, methotrexate along with the TNFi and abatacept are effective agents for the management of uveitis, another complication of JIA. Overall, the biologics have demonstrated an impressive safety record in children with JIA, although children do need to be monitored for rare but potentially dangerous adverse events, such as tuberculosis and other infections; paradoxical development of additional autoimmune diseases; and possibly an increased risk of malignancy. Finally, there may be a window of opportunity

  2. Trial of Early Aggressive Therapy in Polyarticular Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Carol A.; Giannini, Edward H.; Spalding, Steven J.; Hashkes, Philip J.; O’Neil, Kathleen M.; Zeft, Andrew S.; Szer, Ilona S.; Ringold, Sarah; Brunner, Hermine I.; Schanberg, Laura E.; Sundel, Robert P.; Milojevic, Diana; Punaro, Marilynn G.; Chira, Peter; Gottlieb, Beth S.; Higgins, Gloria C.; Ilowite, Norman T.; Kimura, Yukiko; Hamilton, Stephanie; Johnson, Anne; Huang, Bin; Lovell, Daniel J.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To determine if aggressive treatment initiated early in the course of rheumatoid factor positive or negative polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis (poly-JIA) can induce clinical inactive disease (CID) within 6 months. METHODS Between May 2007 and October 2010 a multi-center, prospective, double blind, randomized, placebo controlled trial of two aggressive treatments was conducted in 85 children aged 2 to 16 years with polyarticular JIA of less than 12 months duration. Patients received either methotrexate 0.5 mg/kg/wk SQ (40 mg max), etanercept 0.8 mg/kg/wk (50 mg max), prednisolone 0.5 mg/kg/d (60 mg max) tapered to 0 by 17 weeks (Arm 1), or methotrexate (same dose as Arm 1), etanercept placebo, and prednisolone placebo (Arm 2). The primary outcome was CID at 6 months. An exploratory phase determined the rate of clinical remission on medication (6 months of continuous CID) at 12 months. RESULTS By 6 months, 17 of 42 (40%) of patients in Arm 1 and 10 of 43 (23%) in Arm 2 had achieved CID (X2 = 2.91; p = 0.088). After 12 months, 9 patients in Arm 1 and 3 in Arm 2 achieved clinical remission on medication (p = 0.0534). There were no significant inter-arm differences in adverse events. CONCLUSIONS Although this study did not meet its primary endpoint, early aggressive therapy in this cohort of children with recent onset polyarticular JIA resulted in substantial proportions of patients in both arms achieving CID by 6 months and clinical remission on medication within 12 months of treatment. PMID:22183975

  3. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis and the temporomandibular joint: A comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    El Assar de la Fuente, S; Angenete, O; Jellestad, S; Tzaribachev, N; Koos, B; Rosendahl, K

    2016-05-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis is the most common inflammatory rheumatic disease of childhood and represents a series of chronic inflammatory arthritides of unknown cause. Involvement of the temporomandibular joint has been reported in up to 87% of children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis when based on magnetic tomography imaging; it can be asymptomatic and may lead to severe long term complications. In this review a summary of the contemporary literature of imaging of the temporomandibular joint in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis will be provided, including ultrasound which is a valuable method for guided joint injections, but does not necessarily allow detection of acute inflammation, cone beam computed tomography, which has emerged as a feasible and accurate low-dose alternative as compared to conventional computed tomography to detect destructive change, and magnetic resonance imaging which is considered the method of choice for assessing acute, inflammatory change, although the lack of normative standards remains a challenge in children. PMID:26924432

  4. A tuber calcanei avulsion fracture developed on the basis of idiopathic osteoporosis in a young male: a case report.

    PubMed

    Terzi, R; Özer, T

    2015-09-01

    Calcaneus fractures constitute 1.2 % of all fractures. Tuber calcanei avulsion fractures constitute 1.3-2.7 % of calcaneus fractures. Osteoporosis, osteomalacia, and diabetes mellitus have been reported to increase the risk of development of these fractures. It has been reported that tuber calcanei avulsion fractures in elderly females might develop due to osteoporosis. As far as we know, no tuber calcanei avulsion fracture developing on the basis of osteoporosis without presence of a trauma has been reported in young males in the literature. In the current case report, a 41-year-old male patient who was admitted with complaints of pain in the left heel and diagnosed with calcaneal avulsion fracture that developed on the basis of idiopathic osteoporosis and who was treated with conservative methods was presented. PMID:25851698

  5. Sexual maturation in Moroccan patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    El Badri, D; Rostom, S; Bouaddi, I; Hassani, A; Chkirate, B; Amine, B; Hajjaj-Hassouni, N

    2014-05-01

    Abnormal puberty is often reported in children suffering from many chronic diseases. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common joint disorder in developing children. The aim of this study was to assess sexual maturation of Moroccan children with JIA and to compare the development of secondary sexual characteristics in children with JIA to children in the general population. Forty children with JIA and 74 healthy controls were included in a cross-sectional study. The diagnosis of JIA was made according to the criteria of the International League of Association of Rheumatology. Every child was examined for the development of genitalia as per criteria given by Tanner. The children with JIA were also divided into 3 groups: pre-puberty (stage 1), puberty (stages 2-3) and post-puberty (stage 4-5), and the association between puberty and cumulative dose of steroids, disease duration, disease activity, height, weight and age was investigated. Forty children with JIA were included (22 male, 18 female); the mean of age of the patients was 11 ± 4.23 years. Puberty in the patients (mean of tanner 2.43 ± 1.36) was lower than controls (2.55 ± 1.36). The prevalence of the children in prepuberty was of 15 (37.5 %) and 8 (20 %) in postpuberty. The prevalence of the children having a delayed puberty was of 6 (15 %) versus 1(1.4 %) in healthy controls (p = 0.005). There was an association between dose of corticosteroids, age at the administration of corticosteroids and the delayed puberty in boys (p = 0.009). In addition, there was no significant association in both sex between this poor puberty and duration of JIA (p = 0.45 in boys and p = 1.99 in girls) and its activity calculated by the DAS28 (p = 0.73 in boys and p = 1). Our study suggests that the puberty is retarded in Moroccan patients with JIA comparing to healthy children and that the dose of corticosteroid and the age at its administration may contribute to delayed puberty in boys

  6. Serological subsets of juvenile idiopathic inflammatory myopathies--an update.

    PubMed

    Tansley, Sarah L; McHugh, Neil J

    2016-01-01

    In this review we explore the different characteristics of the serological phenotypes identified in juvenile-onset myositis and consider how the serological sub-classification of patients with juvenile myositis can be advantageous both in terms of reaching what can be a difficult diagnosis and informing on prognosis. Recent studies have described the autoantibody associated disease phenotypes and outcome for those with juvenile-onset disease and include analyses of large juvenile-onset myositis cohorts. Here we describe the autoantibody associated disease features for patients within juvenile-onset myositis in detail and discuss the expanding opportunities and strategies for myositis specific autoantibody testing in clinical practice. PMID:26651264

  7. 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels and juvenile idiopathic arthritis: is there an association with disease activity?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To examine the association between serum levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] and disease activity in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), to determine the prevalence of vitamin D (VD) deficiency [25(OH)D=19 ng/ml] and insufficiency [25(OH)D 20-29 ng/ml], and to determine factors associated with ...

  8. [Interdisciplinary treatment of temporomandibular inflammation in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis].

    PubMed

    Gönner-Ozkan, V; Meyer, P; Tzaribachev, N

    2010-03-01

    Involvement of the temporomandibular joints in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis usually leads to destruction of the mandibular condyles with consistent growth disturbances and facial anomalies. Due to its frequently silent course, temporomandibular arthritis tends to be a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. In addition to drug therapy, orthodontics and physiotherapy are essential to prevent further progression and restore lost temporomandibular function. PMID:20107815

  9. Osteoporosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... IT? HIV AND OSTEOPOROSIS ANTACIDS AND BONE MINERAL DENSITY HOW DO I KNOW IF I HAVE OSTEOPOROSIS? ... have unusually high rates of low bone mineral density and broken bones. This may be because of ...

  10. Osteoporosis

    SciTech Connect

    Riggs, B.L. Melton III, L.J. )

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 20 chapters. Some of the titles are: Radiology of asteoporosis; Quantitative computed tomography in assessment of osteoporosis; Nuclear medicine and densitometry; Assessment of bone turnover by histormorphometry in osteoporosis; and The biochemistry of bone.

  11. HDL function and subclinical atherosclerosis in juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Mani, Preethi; Uno, Kiyoko; Duong, MyNgan; Wolski, Kathy; Spalding, Steven; Husni, M. Elaine

    2016-01-01

    Background Increasing evidence suggests that inflammation adversely impacts the protective properties of high-density lipoproteins (HDL) and progression of atherosclerosis. The impact of early chronic inflammatory conditions on HDL function and vascular risk has not been well investigated. Methods We compared measures of HDL particle distribution and functionality, in addition to measures of carotid intima-medial thickness (cIMT) in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and age matched controls. Results JIA patients demonstrated lower levels of HDL cholesterol [47.0 (40.0, 56.0) vs. 56.0 (53.0, 61.0) mg/dL, P=0.04], total HDL [29.5 (27.9, 32.3) vs. 32.9 (31.6, 36.3) mg/dL, P=0.05] and large HDL [5.1 (3.7, 7.3) vs. 8.0 (6.7, 9.7) mg/dL, P=0.04] particles. In association JIA patients demonstrated greater cholesterol efflux mediated via ATP binding cassette A1 (ABCA1) [17.3% (12.8, 19.7) vs. 10.0% (5.8, 16.0), P=0.05] and less efflux mediated via ATP binding cassette G-1 (ABCG1) [3.2% (2.0, 3.9) vs. 4.8% (3.5, 5.8), P=0.01] and SR-B1 [6.9% (6.0, 8.4) vs. 9.1% (8.6, 10.2), P=0.002] compared with controls. Exposure of macrophages to serum from JIA patients resulted in a smaller increase in mRNA expression of ABCA1 (2.0±0.95 vs. 7.1±5.7 fold increase, P=0.01) and greater increases in expression of ABCG1 [1.4 (0.9, 1.5) vs. 0.8 (0.7, 1.1) fold increase, P=0.04] and SR-B1 (1.3±0.47 vs. 0.7±0.3 fold increase, P=0.001) compared with controls. Arylesterase (128.9±27.6 vs. 152.0±45.2 umoles/min/mL, P=0.04) activity and endothelial cell migration (491.2±68.9 vs. 634.2±227.4 cells/field, P=0.01) were less in JIA patients. No differences in cIMT were observed between JIA patients and controls. Conclusions The presence of JIA was associated with alterations in HDL particle distribution, cholesterol efflux and non-lipid transporting activities. The ultimate implication of these findings for cardiovascular risk requires further investigation. PMID:26885490

  12. Macrophage activation syndrome in a patient with systemic onset of the juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Hari K.; Rao, Avinash; Mittal, Anshul; Jain, Promil

    2016-01-01

    Systemic onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA) is defined as arthritis affecting one or more joint usually in the juvenile age group (< 16 years of age) with or preceded by fever of at least 2 weeks duration that is documented to be daily (“quotidian”) for at least 3 days which may be associated with evanescent (non-fixed) erythematous rash or generalized lymph node enlargement or hepatomegaly/splenomegaly/both or serositis. Macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) is a life-threatening complication of sJIA marked by sudden onset of non-remitting high fever, profound depression in all three blood cell lines (i.e. leukopenia, anemia, and thrombocytopenia), hepatosplenomegaly, lymphadenopathy, and elevated serum liver enzyme levels. In children with systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis, the clinical picture may mimic sepsis or an exacerbation of the underlying disease. We report a case of a 16-year-old female patient presenting with high grade fever with joint pains and generalized weakness which proved to be systemic onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis with macrophage activation syndrome after ruling out all other differential diagnoses and responded well to intravenous steroids. PMID:27407277

  13. Osteoporosis

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    Osteoporosis is a condition that leads to loss of bone mass. From the outside, osteoporotic bone is shaped like normal bone. However, the inside of ... aware of the presence of the disease. Prevention is the best measure for treating osteoporosis by eating ...

  14. Osteoporosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Having a family history of osteoporosis Taking certain medicines Being a white or Asian woman Having osteopenia, which is low bone density Osteoporosis is a silent disease. You might not know you have it until you break a ... medicines can also help. NIH: National Institute of Arthritis ...

  15. Anti-TNF therapy for juvenile idiopathic arthritis-related uveitis

    PubMed Central

    Semeraro, Francesco; Arcidiacono, Barbara; Nascimbeni, Giuseppe; Angi, Martina; Parolini, Barbara; Costagliola, Ciro

    2014-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis-related uveitis is the most common type of uveitis in childhood and one of the main causes of visual impairment in children. The introduction of biological treatment has widened the range of therapeutic options for children with uveitis refractory to standard nonbiologic immunosuppressants. Data from clinical trials suggest that both adalimumab and infliximab have demonstrated effectiveness and safety in open-label studies, although no large, randomized, controlled trials have been reported so far. The role of etanercept in treating juvenile idiopathic arthritis-related uveitis is not yet well defined. In our experience, anti-tumor necrosis factor therapy has been shown to be more effective than steroids and/or methotrexate in treating uveitis. Up to now, tumor necrosis factor blocking compounds have been reserved for the treatment of the most severe cases of refractory uveitis, and larger prospective clinical trials are required in order to better assess the safety of these new compounds. PMID:24711694

  16. Osteoporosis

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    Osteoporosis is a condition that leads to loss of bone mass. From the outside, osteoporotic bone is shaped like normal bone. ... routine activities, like walking, standing, or bathing. Often, a person will sustain a fracture before becoming aware ...

  17. [Osteoporosis].

    PubMed

    Uebelhart, Brigitte; Rizzoli, René

    2015-01-14

    Bone events related to bariatric surgery remain controversial. Denosumab, used in osteoporosis treatment, is safe and efficient. Romosozumab, an antibody raised against sclerostin, is a promising bone anabolic agent. Odanacatib, a cathepsin-K inhibitor, decreases bone resorption and reduces osteoporotic fracture risk. Denosumab, as bone resorption inhibitor, and Teriparatide, as anabolic agent, have been tested together in patients with osteoporosis. Calcium supplements and cardiovascular risk are still debated. Drug holiday, after long-term treatment with bisphosphonates, is not associated with an increased fracture rate in patients with moderate risk. PMID:25799662

  18. Craniofacial surgical management of a patient with systematic juvenile idiopathic arthritis and Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Kasfikis, Georgios; Georgios, Kasfikis; Antoniades, Helias; Helias, Antoniades; Kyrgidis, Athanassios; Athanassios, Kyrgidis; Markovitsi, Eleni; Eleni, Markovitsi; Antoniades, Konstantinos; Konstantinos, Antoniades

    2009-05-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common chronic inflammatory disease in early age. It affects one or more joints, lasts more than 3 weeks, and appears in patients younger than 16 years. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis is classified according to the International League of Associations for Rheumatology consensus depending on the number of affected joints in the beginning of the disease. When JIA affects the temporomandibular joint, the development of the mandible is constrained. Patients show a tendency toward retrognathism and a vertical facial development pattern. The purpose of this study was to present a rare case of a young teenager who experienced JIA and Crohn's disease at the same time. The patient was referred to the hospital for aesthetic and functional problems, mainly convex facial profile and obstructive sleep apnea caused by the craniofacial abnormality. The patient was treated by sagittal split mandibular advancement osteotomy and advancement genioplasty. The mechanisms of obstructive sleep apnea development and the surgical treatment through osteotomies are commentated on. The surgical outcome is functionally and aesthetically favorable and solid 2 years after the operation. Surgical management of the craniofacial region can be a problem-solving treatment modality for patients with juvenile arthritis. PMID:19461338

  19. Magnetic resonance imaging of the temporomandibular joint in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Meyers, Arthur B; Laor, Tal

    2013-12-01

    For more than a century, it has been known that juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) can affect the temporomandibular joint. With advances in medical imaging in more recent decades, there has been an increase in awareness of the spectrum of pathology that can affect the temporomandibular joint in children with JIA. This pathology can lead to symptoms ranging from decreased chewing ability, jaw and facial pain, headaches and malocclusion to craniofacial morphological changes such as a retrognathic mandible. The purpose of this review is to suggest an MR imaging protocol for the temporomandibular joint and to illustrate normal and abnormal appearances of the joint in children with JIA. PMID:24257698

  20. X-linked agammaglobulinemia combined with juvenile idiopathic arthritis and invasive Klebsiella pneumoniae polyarticular septic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zaihua; Kang, Yuli; Lin, Zhenlang; Huang, Yanjing; Lv, Huoyang; Li, Yasong

    2015-02-01

    X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) is a primary immunodeficiency disease caused by mutations in the Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) gene. XLA can also present in combination with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), the major chronic rheumatologic disease in children. We report herein the first known case of a juvenile patient diagnosed with XLA combined with JIA that later developed into invasive Klebsiella pneumoniae polyarticular septic polyarthritis. An additional comprehensive review of XLA combined with JIA and invasive K. pneumoniae septic arthritis is also presented. XLA was identified by the detection of BTK mutations while the diagnosis of JIA was established by clinical and laboratory assessments. Septic arthritis caused by invasive K. pneumoniae was confirmed by culturing of the synovia and gene detection of the isolates. Invasive K. pneumoniae infections can not only result in liver abscesses but also septic arthritis, although this is rare. XLA combined with JIA may contribute to invasive K. pneumoniae infection. PMID:24567239

  1. [Osteoporosis].

    PubMed

    Hintze, Gerhard; Graf, Dieter

    2016-06-01

    Osteoporosis is among the main causes for bone fractures. In this overview we report on the prevalence of the disease, the diagnostic procedures, and the therapeutic options. The prevalence increases with age and women are more often affected than men. The diagnosis usually is made on the basis of dual X-ray absorptiometry. Prophylactic measures include a sufficient intake of calcium and vitamin D. Bisphosphonates play a central role in the pharmacotherapy of this disease. PMID:27439255

  2. Juvenile Idiopathic Inflammatory Myopathy in a Patient With Dyskeratosis Congenita Due to C16orf57 Mutation.

    PubMed

    Kilic, Sara S; Cekic, Sukru

    2016-03-01

    Dyskeratosis congenita (DC) is a rare inherited disorder characterized by reticular skin pigmentation, oral cavity leukoplakia, and nail dystrophy. A variety of noncutaneous (dental, pulmonary, gastrointestinal, neurological, genitourinary, ophthalmic, and skeletal) abnormalities also have been reported. An 8-year-old boy with DC developed juvenile idiopathic inflammatory myopathy. C16orf57 mutation was identified as a genetic cause of DC. Treatment with methylprednisolone was initiated, followed with methotrexate, prednisolone, and high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin treatment. This is the first report on a patient with juvenile idiopathic inflammatory myopathy and DC. PMID:26535771

  3. Using Patient-Reported Outcome Measures to Capture the Patient's Voice in Research and Care of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Hersh, Aimee O; Salimian, Parissa K; Weitzman, Elissa R

    2016-05-01

    Patient-reported outcome (PRO) measures provide a valuable window into how patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis and their parents perceive their functioning, quality of life, and medication side effects in the context of their disease and treatment. Momentum behind adoption of PRO measures is increasing as these patient-relevant tools capture information pertinent to taking a patient-centered approach to health care and research. This article reviews the clinical and research utility of obtaining PROs across domains applicable to the experience of juvenile idiopathic arthritis and summarizes available self-report and parent-proxy PRO measures. Current challenges and limitations of PRO usage are discussed. PMID:27133493

  4. Developments in the Classification and Treatment of the Juvenile Idiopathic Inflammatory Myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Rider, Lisa G.; Katz, James D.; Jones, Olcay Y.

    2013-01-01

    The juvenile idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (JIIM) are rare, heterogeneous autoimmune diseases that share chronic muscle inflammation and weakness. JIIM broadly includes three major clinicopathologic groups: juvenile dermatomyositis, juvenile polymyositis, and overlap myositis. A growing spectrum of clinicopathologic groups and serologic phenotypes defined by the presence of myositis-specific or myositis-associated autoantibodies are now recognized, each with differing demographics, clinical manifestations, laboratory findings, and prognoses. With the first multi-center collaborative studies and controlled trials using standardized preliminarily validated outcome measures, the therapy of juvenile myositis has advanced. Although daily oral corticosteroids remain the backbone of treatment, disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) are almost always used as adjunctive therapy. Methotrexate is the conventional DMARD for the initial therapy, either alone or combined with intravenous pulse methylprednisolone, and/or intravenous immunoglobulin for patients with moderate to severe disease. Cyclosporine may be added to these or serve as an alternative to methotrexate. Other drugs and biologic therapies, including mycophenolate mofetil, tacrolimus, cyclophosphamide, rituximab, and infliximab, might benefit selected patients with recalcitrant disease, unacceptable steroid toxicity, or patients with risk factors for poor prognosis. The treatment of cutaneous disease, calcinosis, and the role for rehabilitation are also discussed. PMID:24182859

  5. [Macrophage activation syndrome in a patient with systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis].

    PubMed

    Tavares, Anna Carolina Faria Moreira Gomes; Ferreira, Gilda Aparecida; Guimarães, Luciano Junqueira; Guimarães, Raquel Rosa; Santos, Flávia Patrícia Sena Teixeira

    2015-01-01

    Machrophage activation syndrome (MAS) is a rare and potentially fatal disease, commonly associated with chronic rheumatic diseases, mainly juvenile idiopathic arthritis. It is included in the group of secondary forms of haemophagocytic syndrome, and other causes are lymphoproliferative diseases and infections. Its most important clinical and laboratorial manifestations are non-remitting fever, splenomegaly, bleeding, impairment of liver function, cytopenias, hypoalbuminemia, hypertriglyceridemia, hypofibrinogenemia and hyperferritinemia. The treatment needs to be started quickly, and the majority of cases have a good response with corticosteroids and cyclosporine. The Epstein-Barr virus is described as a possible trigger for many cases of MAS, especially in these patients in treatment with tumor necrosis factor (TNF) blockers. In these refractory cases, etoposide (VP16) should be administered, associated with corticosteroids and cyclosporine. Our objective is to describe a rare case of MAS probably due to EBV infection in a subject with systemic-onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis, which achieved complete remission of the disease after therapy guided by 2004-HLH protocol. PMID:25575650

  6. Biological therapies for the treatment of juvenile idiopathic arthritis: Lessons from the adult and pediatric experiences.

    PubMed

    Stoll, Matthew L; Gotte, Alisa C

    2008-06-01

    Biologics have advanced the therapy of adult and pediatric arthritis. They have been linked to rare serious adverse outcomes, but the actual risk of these events is controversial in adults, and largely unknown in pediatrics. Because of the paucity of safety and efficacy data in children, pediatric rheumatologists often rely on the adult literature. Herein, we reviewed the adult and pediatric literature on five classes of medicines: Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors, anakinra, rituximab, abatacept, and tocilizumab. For efficacy, we reviewed randomized controlled studies in adults, but did include lesser qualities of evidence for pediatrics. For safety, we utilized prospective and retrospective studies, rarely including reports from other inflammatory conditions. The review included studies on rheumatoid arthritis and spondyloarthritis, as well as juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Overall, we found that the TNF inhibitors have generally been found safe and effective in adult and pediatric use, although risks of infections and other adverse events are discussed. Anakinra, rituximab, abatacept, and tocilizumab have also shown positive results in adult trials, but there is minimal pediatric data published with the exception of small studies involving the subgroup of children with systemic onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis, in whom anakinra and tocilizumab may be effective therapies. PMID:19707357

  7. LACC1 polymorphisms in inflammatory bowel disease and juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Assadi, G; Saleh, R; Hadizadeh, F; Vesterlund, L; Bonfiglio, F; Halfvarson, J; Törkvist, L; Eriksson, A S; Harris, H E; Sundberg, E; D'Amato, M

    2016-06-01

    The function of the Laccase domain-containing 1 (LACC1) gene is unknown, but genetic variation at this locus has been reported to consistently affect the risk of Crohn's disease (CD) and leprosy. Recently, a LACC1 missense mutation was found in patients suffering from monogenic forms of CD, but also systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis. We tested the hypothesis that LACC1 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), in addition to CD, are associated with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA, non-systemic), and another major form of inflammatory bowel disease, ulcerative colitis (UC). We selected 11 LACC1 tagging SNPs, and tested their effect on disease risk in 3855 Swedish individuals from three case-control cohorts of CD, UC and JIA. We detected false discovery rate corrected significant associations with individual markers in all three cohorts, thereby expanding previous results for CD also to UC and JIA. LACC1's link to several inflammatory diseases suggests a key role in the human immune system and justifies further characterization of its function(s). PMID:27098602

  8. Skin manifestations induced by TNF-alpha inhibitors in juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Pontikaki, Irene; Shahi, Edit; Frasin, Lucretia Adina; Gianotti, Raffaele; Gelmetti, Carlo; Gerloni, Valeria; Meroni, Pier Luigi

    2012-04-01

    The tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) inhibitors have been used with good clinical results in the treatment of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Anti TNFα therapy is generally well tolerated. Besides the site injection reactions, other various cutaneous manifestations have been encountered as adverse events. Here, we report four young patients receiving treatment with anti-TNFα (infliximab, adalimumab, and etanercept) for JIA developing different skin manifestations more than 1 year after the initiation of therapy. They underwent a dermatological exam. All four patients were ACR-Ped 30 responders to anti-TNF drugs. The first patient developed cutaneous vasculitis, the second one had lichen planus manifestations, while the third and the fourth developed psoriatic palmoplantar pustulosis accompanied by plaque-type psoriasis localized to the scalp. None of the patients had a personal or family history of dermatological diseases. In the first two patients, skin lesions healed with topical treatment after the discontinuation of anti-TNF agent, while psoriatic lesions did not resolve despite discontinuation of the drug and dermatological treatment. TNF inhibition can be both anti-inflammatory and pro-inflammatory. Cutaneous manifestations could be considered as a paradoxical adverse event of the anti-TNF-alpha treatment not only in rheumatoid arthritis but also in juvenile idiopathic arthritis. PMID:21403999

  9. [Osteoporosis].

    PubMed

    Al-Khawajah, F F

    2002-01-01

    It is well known that people, especially white people, are getting osteoporosis more often than previously thought. Until now, no direct causative factor has been determined, but genetic factors are very likely to be involved. Usually, affected individuals are initially asymptomatic while the disease process is going on, and they come to the attention of the medical profession only late when their bones are fractured as a result of a simple trauma. Also it is vital to let people know that heavy sports, at times, can be harmful. PMID:15339135

  10. Complexity and Specificity of the Neutrophil Transcriptomes in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zihua; Jiang, Kaiyu; Frank, Mark Barton; Chen, Yanmin; Jarvis, James N

    2016-01-01

    NIH projects such as ENCODE and Roadmap Epigenomics have revealed surprising complexity in the transcriptomes of mammalian cells. In this study, we explored transcriptional complexity in human neutrophils, cells generally regarded as nonspecific in their functions and responses. We studied distinct human disease phenotypes and found that, at the gene, gene isoform, and miRNA level, neutrophils exhibit considerable specificity in their transcriptomes. Thus, even cells whose responses are considered non-specific show tailoring of their transcriptional repertoire toward specific physiologic or pathologic contexts. We also found that miRNAs had a global impact on neutrophil transcriptome and are associated with innate immunity in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). These findings have important implications for our understanding of the link between genes, non-coding transcripts and disease phenotypes. PMID:27271962

  11. Complications of systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis: risk factors and management recommendations.

    PubMed

    Woerner, Andreas; von Scheven-Gête, Annette; Cimaz, Rolando; Hofer, Michaël

    2015-05-01

    Systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (SJIA) is an inflammatory condition characterized by fever, lymphadenopathy, arthritis, rash and serositis. Systemic inflammation has been associated with dysregulation of the innate immune system, suggesting that SJIA is an autoinflammatory disorder. IL-1 and IL-6 play a major role in the pathogenesis of SJIA, and treatment with IL-1 and IL-6 inhibitors has shown to be highly effective. However, complications of SJIA, including macrophage activation syndrome, limitations in functional outcome by arthritis and long-term damage from chronic inflammation, continue to be a major issue in SJIA patients' care. Translational research leading to a profound understanding of the cytokine crosstalk in SJIA and the identification of risk factors for SJIA complications will help to improve long-term outcome. PMID:25843554

  12. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis: will etanercept be an improvement over current therapies?

    PubMed

    De Benedetti, F; Ravelli, A

    2000-08-01

    Overexpression of cytokines in inflamed joints plays an important role in joint inflammation and in damage to articular tissue. Biological agents aimed at specifically antagonising tumour necrosis factor (TNF) are effective in the treatment of adult rheumatoid arthritis. A recent trial of etanercept, a genetically engineered fusion protein consisting of the Fc domain of human IgG1 and the TNF receptor p75, has demonstrated that this agent is also well tolerated and effective in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Etanercept offers a promising new alternative for patients with JIA who have persistently active arthritis despite treatment with methotrexate. Further studies are needed to clarify whether etanercept is equally effective in the various onset types of JIA (oligoarthritis, polyarthritis and systemic arthritis), whether it can modify disease progression and whether it can be administered safely for long periods of time to children. PMID:18034561

  13. Limits of Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells for Gene Expression-Based Biomarkers in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Laiping; Jiang, Kaiyu; Chen, Yanmin; Hennon, Teresa; Holmes, Lucy; Wallace, Carol A.; Jarvis, James N.

    2016-01-01

    Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) is one of the most common chronic disease conditions affecting children in the USA. As with many rheumatic diseases, there is growing interest in using genomic technologies to develop biomarkers for either diagnosis or to guide treatment (“personalized medicine”). Here, we explore the use of gene expression patterns in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) as a first step approach to developing such biomarkers. Although PBMC carry many theoretical advantages for translational research, we have found that sample heterogeneity makes RNASeq on PBMC unsuitable as a first-step method for screening biomarker candidates in JIA. RNASeq studies of homogeneous cell populations are more likely to be useful and informative. PMID:27385437

  14. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis complicated by amyloidosis with secondary nephrotic syndrome – effective treatment with tocilizumab

    PubMed Central

    Kwiatkowska, Małgorzata; Jednacz, Ewa

    2015-01-01

    A case report of a boy with juvenile idiopathic arthritis since the age of 2 years, generalized onset, complicated by nephrotic syndrome due to secondary type A amyloidosis is presented. In the patient the disease had an especially severe course, complicated by frequent infections, making routine treatment difficult. Amyloidosis was diagnosed in the 5th year of the disease based on a rectal biopsy. Since the disease onset the boy has been taking prednisolone and sequentially cyclosporine A, methotrexate, chlorambucil, etanercept, and cyclophosphamide. Clinical and laboratory remission was observed after treatment with tocilizumab. After 42 months of treatment with tocilizumab the boy's condition is good. There is no pain or joint edema, and no signs of nephrotic syndrome.

  15. Complexity and Specificity of the Neutrophil Transcriptomes in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zihua; Jiang, Kaiyu; Frank, Mark Barton; Chen, Yanmin; Jarvis, James N.

    2016-01-01

    NIH projects such as ENCODE and Roadmap Epigenomics have revealed surprising complexity in the transcriptomes of mammalian cells. In this study, we explored transcriptional complexity in human neutrophils, cells generally regarded as nonspecific in their functions and responses. We studied distinct human disease phenotypes and found that, at the gene, gene isoform, and miRNA level, neutrophils exhibit considerable specificity in their transcriptomes. Thus, even cells whose responses are considered non-specific show tailoring of their transcriptional repertoire toward specific physiologic or pathologic contexts. We also found that miRNAs had a global impact on neutrophil transcriptome and are associated with innate immunity in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). These findings have important implications for our understanding of the link between genes, non-coding transcripts and disease phenotypes. PMID:27271962

  16. Nicotinamide Phosphoribosyltransferase Attenuates Methotrexate Response in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis and In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Funk, R S; Singh, R; Pramann, L; Gigliotti, N; Islam, S; Heruth, D P; Ye, S Q; Chan, M A; Leeder, J S; Becker, M L

    2016-06-01

    Variability in response to methotrexate (MTX) in the treatment of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) remains unpredictable and poorly understood. Based on previous studies implicating an interaction between nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT) expression and MTX therapy in inflammatory arthritis, we hypothesized that increased NAMPT expression would be associated with reduced therapeutic response to MTX in patients with JIA. A significant association was found between increased plasma concentrations of NAMPT and reduced therapeutic response in patients with JIA treated with MTX. Inhibition of NAMPT in cell culture by either siRNA-based gene silencing or pharmacological inhibition with FK-866 was found to result in a fourfold increase in the pharmacological activity of MTX. Collectively, these findings provide evidence that NAMPT inhibits the pharmacological activity of MTX and may represent a predictive biomarker of response, as well as a therapeutic target, in the treatment of JIA with MTX. PMID:27166432

  17. Factors influencing the quality of life of Moroccan patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ezzahri, M; Amine, B; Rostom, S; Badri, D; Mawani, N; Gueddari, S; Shyen, S; Wabi, M; Moussa, F; Abouqal, R; Chkirate, B; Hajjaj-Hassouni, N

    2014-11-01

    The aim of our study is to investigate the factors influencing the quality of life, assessed by the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory 4.0 (PedsQL4) Generic Score Scales, in Moroccan patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis. This is a cross-sectional study conducted between January and June 2012, covering children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) seen at the consultations of El Ayachi Hospital and Children's Hospital of the University Hospital of Rabat. Quality of life is assessed by the PedsQL4 which is a questionnaire composed of 23 items, completed by the child and the parent; the response to each item ranges from 0 to 100, so that higher scores indicate a better quality of life. The functional impact is assessed by the Childhood Health Assessment Questionnaire (CHAQ), and the disease activity by the number of tender and swollen joints, visual analogue scale (VAS) activity, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and C-reactive protein. Forty-seven patients are included; the average age of the patients is 11 ± 3.35 years, and 40.4 % are females, with a median disease duration of 4 (2; 6) years. The oligoarticular form presents 26.7 %, the systemic form 24.4 %, and the enthesic form 22.2 %. The median of PedsQL4 is 80.43 (63.19; 92.93), and the median of the CHAQ is 0 (0; 1). Our study shows that some clinical and biological characteristics have significant effects on PedsQL by both parent and child reports. This study suggests that the achievement of the quality of life of our patients with JIA depends on the disease activity measured by swollen joints, the number of awakenings, parent VAS, physician VAS, patient VAS, and the ESR. PMID:24445385

  18. Clinical Observation of Employment of Umbilical Cord Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cell for Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liming; Zhang, Yu; Li, Hongtao; Hong, Jingxin; Chen, Xiaobo; Li, Ming; Bai, Wen; Wang, Jiangang; Liu, Yongjun; Wu, Mingyuan

    2016-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), known as Juvenile rheumatoid arthritis, is the most common type of arthritis in children aged under 17. It may cause sequelae due to lack of effective treatment. The goal of this study is to explore the therapeutic effect of umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (UC-MSCs) for JIA. Ten JIA patients were treated with UC-MSCs and received second infusion three months later. Some key values such as 28-joint disease activity score (DAS28), TNF-α, IL-6, and regulatory T cells (Tregs) were evaluated. Data were collected at 3 months and 6 months after first treatment. DAS28 score of 10 patients was between 2.6 and 3.2 at three months after infusion. WBC, ESR, and CRP were significantly decreased while Tregs were remarkably increased and IL-6 and TNF-α were declined. Similar changes of above values were found after 6 months. At the same time, the amount of NSAIDS and steroid usage in patients was reduced. However, no significant changes were found comparing the data from 3 and 6 months. These results suggest that UC-MSCs can reduce inflammatory cytokines, improve immune network effects, adjust immune tolerance, and effectively alleviate the symptoms and they might provide a safe and novel approach for JIA treatment. PMID:26770214

  19. Vitamin D concentrations and disease activity in Moroccan children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In addition to its important metabolic activities, vitamin D also contributes to the regulation of the immune system. The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between hypovitaminosis D and disease activity in Moroccan children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Methods In this cross-sectional study, forty children with JIA were included, all having been diagnosed according to the classification criteria of International League of Associations for Rheumatology (ILAR). The children underwent anthropometric assessment and clinical evaluation. Disease activity was measured using the Disease Activity Score in 28 joints (DAS28) for polyarticular and oligoarticular JIA and the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI) for enthesitis-related arthritis. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin [25(OH)D] D2 and D3 were measured using radioimmunoassay (RIA). Hypovitaminosis D was defined as serum 25(OH)D <30 ng/ml. Results The average age of participants was 11 years ± 4.23. Hypovitaminosis D was observed in 75% of patients. In univariate analyses, 25(OH)D levels were negatively associated with DAS28 for polyarticular and oligoarticular JIA. No significant relationship was found between 25(OH)D levels and BASDAI for juvenile spondylarthropathy. In multivariate linear regression analysis, no association persisted between 25(OH)D levels and DAS28. Conclusions Our study suggested that serum levels of vitamin D were low in Moroccan children with JIA disease. Future studies with a larger population are needed to confirm our results. PMID:24690195

  20. [The temporomandibular joint in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: what radiologists need to look for on magnetic resonance imaging].

    PubMed

    De La Hoz Polo, M; Navallas, M

    2014-01-01

    The term "juvenile idiopathic arthritis" (JIA) encompasses a group of arthritis of unknown cause with onset before the age of 16 years that last for at least 6 weeks. The prevalence of temporomandibular joint involvement in published series ranges from 17% to 87%. Temporomandibular joint involvement is difficult to detect clinically, so imaging plays a key role in diagnosis and monitoring treatment. MRI is the technique of choice for the study of arthritis of the temporomandibular joint because it is the most sensitive technique for detecting acute synovitis and bone edema. Power Doppler ultrasonography can also detect active synovitis by showing the hypervascularization of the inflamed synovial membrane, but it cannot identify bone edema. This article describes the MRI technique for evaluating the temporomandibular joint in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis, defines the parameters to look for, and illustrates the main findings. PMID:24792314

  1. Adalimumab-Induced Cutaneous Lupus Erythematosus in a 16-Year-Old Girl with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis.

    PubMed

    West, Emily S; Nanda, Kabita; Ofodile, Ope; Rutledge, Joe; Brandling-Bennett, Heather A

    2015-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) antagonists are used in the treatment of numerous autoimmune conditions. Adalimumab is the first monoclonal antibody to TNF-α and is used to treat juvenile idiopathic arthritis. A growing body of literature associates anti-TNF-α therapies with several adverse dermatologic manifestations, including drug-induced lupus erythematosus (LE). We describe a case of cutaneous LE in a 16-year-old girl treated with adalimumab for juvenile idiopathic arthritis. The temporal association between her presenting symptoms and adalimumab initiation and gradual improvement after stopping biologic therapy suggest adalimumab-induced cutaneous LE. With increasing use of anti-TNF therapies in children, the potential for drug-induced LE should not be overlooked. PMID:25845414

  2. Role of KCNQ2 and KCNQ3 genes in juvenile idiopathic epilepsy in Arabian foals.

    PubMed

    Lichter-Peled, Anat; Polani, Sagi; Stanyon, Roscoe; Rocchi, Mariano; Kahila Bar-Gal, Gila

    2013-04-01

    Juvenile idiopathic epilepsy (JIE) in Arabian foals resembles benign-familial neonatal convulsion (BFNC) syndrome, a rare idiopathic epilepsy of new-born humans. BFNC syndrome exhibits genetic heterogeneity, as has been hypothesised to occur in Arabian foals, and is known to be caused by mutations in the voltage-gated potassium channel subunit KCNQ2 and KCNQ3 genes. The close phenotypic characteristics of both Arabian foals and children suggest these epileptic syndromes are caused by the same genetic disorder. In horses, the KCNQ2 and KCNQ3 genes are located on the terminal region of chromosomes 22 and 9, respectively, essentially homologous to their location on chromosomes 20q13.3 and 8q24 in humans. Gene trees for the KCNQ2 and KCNQ3 genes between horses and other mammals, particularly humans and mice, were constructed and compared to widely accepted mammalian phylogenetic trees. The KCNQ2 gene tree exhibited close clustering between horses and humans, relative to horses and mice, in contrast to the evolutionary trees of other mammals. Distance values between the horse and human groups were lower as opposed to those found between the horse and mouse groups. The similarity between the horse and the human, especially for the KCNQ2 gene, where the majority of mutations causing BFNC have been found, supports the hypothesis of similar heritable and genetic patterns of the disease in both species and suggests that contrary to the classic mouse-model concept, humans may be a more suitable model for the study of JIE in Arabian foals. PMID:23182620

  3. Immunological characteristics and T-cell receptor clonal diversity in children with systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis undergoing T-cell-depleted autologous stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Qiong; Pesenacker, Anne M; Stansfield, Alka; King, Douglas; Barge, Dawn; Foster, Helen E; Abinun, Mario; Wedderburn, Lucy R

    2014-01-01

    Children with systemic Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (sJIA), the most severe subtype of JIA, are at risk from destructive polyarthritis and growth failure, and corticosteroids as part of conventional treatment can result in osteoporosis and growth delay. In children where there is failure or toxicity from drug therapies, disease has been successfully controlled by T-cell-depleted autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT). At present, the immunological basis underlying remission after ASCT is unknown. Immune reconstitution of T cells, B cells, natural killer cells, natural killer T cells and monocytes, in parallel with T-cell receptor (TCR) diversity by analysis of the β variable region (TCRVb) complementarity determining region-3 (CDR3) using spectratyping and sequencing, were studied in five children with sJIA before and after ASCT. At time of follow up (mean 11·5 years), four patients remain in complete remission, while one child relapsed within 1 month of transplant. The CD8+ TCRVb repertoire was highly oligoclonal early in immune reconstitution and re-emergence of pre-transplant TCRVb CDR3 dominant peaks was observed after transplant in certain TCRVb families. Further, re-emergence of pre-ASCT clonal sequences in addition to new sequences was identified after transplant. These results suggest that a chimeric TCR repertoire, comprising T-cell clones developed before and after transplant, can be associated with clinical remission from severe arthritis. PMID:24405357

  4. Immunological characteristics and T-cell receptor clonal diversity in children with systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis undergoing T-cell-depleted autologous stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qiong; Pesenacker, Anne M; Stansfield, Alka; King, Douglas; Barge, Dawn; Foster, Helen E; Abinun, Mario; Wedderburn, Lucy R

    2014-06-01

    Children with systemic Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (sJIA), the most severe subtype of JIA, are at risk from destructive polyarthritis and growth failure, and corticosteroids as part of conventional treatment can result in osteoporosis and growth delay. In children where there is failure or toxicity from drug therapies, disease has been successfully controlled by T-cell-depleted autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT). At present, the immunological basis underlying remission after ASCT is unknown. Immune reconstitution of T cells, B cells, natural killer cells, natural killer T cells and monocytes, in parallel with T-cell receptor (TCR) diversity by analysis of the β variable region (TCRVb) complementarity determining region-3 (CDR3) using spectratyping and sequencing, were studied in five children with sJIA before and after ASCT. At time of follow up (mean 11.5 years), four patients remain in complete remission, while one child relapsed within 1 month of transplant. The CD8(+) TCRVb repertoire was highly oligoclonal early in immune reconstitution and re-emergence of pre-transplant TCRVb CDR3 dominant peaks was observed after transplant in certain TCRVb families. Further, re-emergence of pre-ASCT clonal sequences in addition to new sequences was identified after transplant. These results suggest that a chimeric TCR repertoire, comprising T-cell clones developed before and after transplant, can be associated with clinical remission from severe arthritis. PMID:24405357

  5. Land-Jump Performance in Patients with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA): A Comparison to Matched Controls

    PubMed Central

    Ford, Kevin R.; Myer, Gregory D.; Melson, Paula G.; Darnell, Shannon C.; Brunner, Hermine I.; Hewett, Timothy E.

    2009-01-01

    Objective. The purpose of this study was to determine if high functioning children with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) with minimal disease activity have different biomechanics during high loading tasks compared to controls. Patients were included if they had minimal inflammation documented in one or both knees. Methods. The subject groups consisted of eleven patients with JIA and eleven sex, age, height, and weight matched controls. Sagittal plane kinematic and kinetics were calculated during a drop vertical jump maneuver. The Child Health Assessment Questionnaire (CHAQ) was collected on each patient with JIA. Results. The subjects with JIA had increased knee (P = .011) and hip flexion (P < .001) compared to control subjects. Subjects with JIA also demonstrated decreased knee extensor moments during take-off (P = .028) and ankle plantar flexor moments during landing (P = .024) and take-off (P = .004). In the JIA group, increased hip extensor moments were predictive of increased disability (R2 = .477, SEE = .131). Conclusions. Patients with JIA may demonstrate underlying biomechanical deviations compared to controls. In addition, biomechanical assessment of hip extensor mechanics during dynamic tasks may provide an objective assessment tool to determine overall function in patients with JIA. PMID:20148070

  6. Influence of past breast feeding on pattern and severity of presentation of juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Hyrich, Kimme L; Baildam, Eileen; Pickford, Hannah; Chieng, Alice; Davidson, Joyce E; Foster, Helen; Gardner-Medwin, Janet; Wedderburn, Lucy R; Thomson, Wendy

    2016-04-01

    This analysis aimed to study the influence of breast feeding on the pattern and severity of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) at presentation. The association between ever versus never breast feeding and disease severity at onset was compared in 923 children with JIA recruited to the UK Childhood Arthritis Prospective Study at first presentation to rheumatology. Fifty six per cent of children were ever breast fed (median 3.7 months). Breastfed children reported a lower median age at onset, a lower Childhood Health Assessment Questionnaire (CHAQ), a measure of disease severity, lower parent general evaluation scores and lower pain at presentation. There was a trend towards a higher proportion of breastfed children with rheumatoid factor-negative polyarthritis, but lesser enthesitis-related and psoriatic arthritis. There was a statistically significant inverse association between breast feeding and high CHAQ, even after adjusting for differences in socioeconomic status (adjusted OR 0.61 (95% CI 0.39 to 0.95)). Further work to understand the reasons behind these associations is required. PMID:26369575

  7. Methotrexate for the treatment of juvenile idiopathic arthritis: process to approval for JIA indication in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Naruto, Takuya; Imagawa, Tomoyuki; Murata, Takuji; Takei, Syuji; Tomiita, Minako; Itoh, Yasuhiko; Fujikawa, Satoshi; Yokota, Shumpei

    2008-01-01

    Methotrexate (MTX), the primary treatment for the articular-type juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), is effective and brings about radiological improvement. Patient compliance is good, and it is recognized that its known side effects, namely, disruption of liver function and induction of pulmonary lesions, are unlikely to be severe at the low MTX doses that are administered. In Japan, MTX was granted approval in 1999 by the then Ministry of Health and Welfare specifically for treating rheumatoid arthritis in adult patients, allowing it be generally used in medical institutions for patients having National Health Insurance. However, in the pediatric field, its use outside the indications has so far been unavoidable, and has been left to the discretion of the physician. Finally, at the present conference, expansion of the indications of MTX for JIA was approved in Japan. It is noteworthy that this expansion of indications was achieved without requiring clinical trials on children sponsored by the pharmaceutical company: it was achieved rather by collecting necessary information through ongoing efforts (including collection and analysis of information about approval status in foreign countries, adequate evidence from the literature, implementation of a clinical use survey in Japan, etc.). It also merits attention that the maximum dose (10 mg/m2) was set on the basis of pharmacokinetic data from children, rather than relying on the dosing method and dose for adults. PMID:18815725

  8. [A case of severe systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis introduced tocilizumab in early phase of the disease].

    PubMed

    Ikegawa, Takeshi; Yamazaki, Kazuko; Nishimura, Kenichi; Kanetaka, Taichi; Kikuchi, Masako; Nozawa, Tomo; Hara, Ryouki; Sato, Tomomi; Sakurai, Nodoka; Yokota, Shumpei

    2014-01-01

    A 14-year-old boy was admitted in the former hospital with remittent fever, erythematous rash, joint pain, and muscle pain. Antibiotics were ineffectively administered and then, methylprednisolone (mPSL) pulse therapy with methotrexate was introduced under the diagnosis of suspected systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). However, he still had clinical symptoms and signs, and was transferred to our hospital. Re-examination revealed no malignancies including acute leukemia by bone marrow aspiration, no infectious agents by septic work, and no significant increases of antibodies against several viruses including CMV, EBV, HSV, Parvovirus B19, adenovirus, and so forth. FDG-PET demonstrated the accumulation of (18)F-FDG in bone marrows suggesting systemic JIA. Laboratory findings were leukocytosis and granulocytosis, elevated levels of C-reactive protein, D-dimer, ferritin, and interleukin-6. He was finally diagnosed as having severe systemic JIA. Thus, soon after the additional mPSL pulse therapy, tocilizumab (TCZ) was successfully introduced. In conclusion, for systemic JIA patients with severe systemic inflammation, it will be reasonable to introduce tocilizumab earlier than the guideline suggested to reduce side effects of long-term and large amounts of steroids and to protect the transition to macrophage activation syndrome. Further studies will be needed to recommend appropriate timing of tocilizumab introduction. PMID:24974931

  9. Gene Expression Deconvolution for Uncovering Molecular Signatures in Response to Therapy in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Alan M.; Yeung, Rae S. M.; Morris, Quaid

    2016-01-01

    Gene expression-based signatures help identify pathways relevant to diseases and treatments, but are challenging to construct when there is a diversity of disease mechanisms and treatments in patients with complex diseases. To overcome this challenge, we present a new application of an in silico gene expression deconvolution method, ISOpure-S1, and apply it to identify a common gene expression signature corresponding to response to treatment in 33 juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients. Using pre- and post-treatment gene expression profiles only, we found a gene expression signature that significantly correlated with a reduction in the number of joints with active arthritis, a measure of clinical outcome (Spearman rho = 0.44, p = 0.040, Bonferroni correction). This signature may be associated with a decrease in T-cells, monocytes, neutrophils and platelets. The products of most differentially expressed genes include known biomarkers for JIA such as major histocompatibility complexes and interleukins, as well as novel biomarkers including α-defensins. This method is readily applicable to expression datasets of other complex diseases to uncover shared mechanistic patterns in heterogeneous samples. PMID:27244050

  10. The association of PTPN22 rs2476601 with juvenile idiopathic arthritis is specific to females.

    PubMed

    Chiaroni-Clarke, R C; Li, Y R; Munro, J E; Chavez, R A; Scurrah, K J; Pezic, A; Akikusa, J D; Allen, R C; Piper, S E; Becker, M L; Thompson, S D; Lie, B A; Flato, B; Forre, O; Punaro, M; Wise, C; Saffery, R; Finkel, T H; Hakonarson, H; Ponsonby, A-L; Ellis, J A

    2015-10-01

    A preponderance of females develop autoimmune disease, including juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), yet the reason for this bias remains elusive. Evidence suggests that genetic risk of disease may be influenced by sex. PTPN22 rs2476601 is associated with JIA and numerous other autoimmune diseases, and has been reported to show female-specific association with type 1 diabetes. We performed main effect and sex-stratified association analyses to determine whether a sex-specific association exists in JIA. As expected, rs2476601 was associated with JIA in our discovery (413 cases and 690 controls) and replication (1008 cases and 9284 controls) samples. Discovery sample sex-stratified analyses demonstrated an association specifically in females (odds ratio (OR)=2.35, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.52-3.63, P=0.00011) but not males (OR=0.91, 95% CI=0.52-1.60, P=0.75). This was similarly observed in the replication sample. There was evidence for genotype-by-sex interaction (Pinteraction=0.009). The association between rs2476601 and JIA appears restricted to females, partly accounting for the predominance of females with this disease. PMID:26291515

  11. Health and identity: Self-positioning in adolescent chronic fatigue syndrome and juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Fuchs, Coralie E; van Geelen, Stefan M; van Geel, Rolf; Sinnema, Gerben; van de Putte, Elise M; Hermans, Hubert J M; Kuis, Wietse

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this study is to gain more insight into basic aspects of identity, in relation to adolescent chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) and juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). In dialogical self theory, identity is regarded as incorporating multiple self-positions, such as 'I as tired', 'I as pessimistic', or 'I as decisive'. Physical and psychosocial impairment might alter the organization of these self-positions. The Personal Position Repertoire procedure, a quantitative method to analyse the prominence of self-positions, the Child Health Questionnaire, assessing health-related functioning, and the Checklist Individual Strength, measuring fatigue, were completed by 42 adolescents with CFS, 37 adolescents with JIA and 23 healthy teenagers. Adolescents with JIA report impaired physical functioning and general health. However, they position themselves very similar to healthy teenagers - i.e. as strong and healthy. While this self-positioning approach might be adequate and sustainable in adolescence, it could prove too strenuous to maintain throughout adult life. Adolescents with CFS, besides indicating severe physical difficulties, also report more psychosocial problems. They position themselves as significantly less strong and more unwell. With this emphasis on positions relating to their illness, there seems to be little room left for stronger positions. It is regarded of clinical importance to address these issues in this crucial developmental period. PMID:23060600

  12. Assessment of the Body Composition and Parameters of the Cardiovascular Risk in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The study was aimed to evaluate cardiovascular risk parameters, body mass index (BMI) centiles for sex and age, and body fat percentage using the electric bioimpedance method in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). 30 children with JIA participated in the study. A control group included 20 children. Patients were well matched for the age and sex. The body mass and body fat percentage were determined using the segmental body composition analyser; the BMI centiles were determined. All patients had the following parameters determined: lipid profile, hsCRP, homocysteine, and IL-6. The intima media thickness (IMT) was measured. Patients with JIA had significantly lower body weight, BMI, and the BMI centile compared to the control group. The IL-6 levels were significantly higher in patients with JIA compared to the control group. There were no differences between two groups with regard to the lipid profile, % content of the fat tissue, homocysteine levels, hsCRP, and IMT. Further studies are necessary to search for reasons for lower BMI and BMI centile in children with JIA and to attempt to answer the question of whether lower BMI increases the cardiovascular risk in these patients, similarly as in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). PMID:25839035

  13. Body experiences, emotional competence, and psychosocial functioning in juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Bomba, Monica; Meini, Antonella; Molinaro, Anna; Cattalini, Marco; Oggiano, Silvia; Fazzi, Elisa; Neri, Francesca; Plebani, Alessandro; Nacinovich, Renata

    2013-08-01

    We investigated self-image, psychological functioning, and quality of life in children and adolescents with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Thirty-nine children with JIA were compared with 80 healthy peers. We first administered the Human Figure Drawing Test (HFDT) to all subjects; children also completed standardized questionnaires evaluating health-related quality of life (PEDSQL 4.0 Generic Core Scales) and the main aspects of psychological functioning: anxiety (SAFA-A) and depression (CDI). Parents were asked to complete the Child Behaviour Checklist (CBCL) and the PEDSQL 4.0. For each patient with JIA, clinical notes were gathered and a global disease assessment (visual analog scale--VAS) was performed. Compared to healthy peers, patients with JIA reported reduced maturity quotients at HFDT, more depressive traits, greater anxiety, and lower health-related quality of life. Among the subjects with JIA, HFDT revealed that adolescents had a greater impairment in all areas investigated. Furthermore, there was a significant correlation between the physical well-being rated by VAS and the perception of poorer quality of life in patients, mostly in the psychosocial domains. Children and adolescents with JIA exhibit emotional difficulties and a delay of psychological development leading to low self-esteem, a distorted self-image, more anxiety and depression traits, and a worse quality of life, when compared to healthy subjects. PMID:23392772

  14. A Comprehensive Candidate Gene Study on Bronchial Asthma and Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Schubert, K.; von Bonnsdorf, H.; Burke, M.; Ahlert, I.; Braun, S.; Berner, R.; Deichmann, K. A.; Heinzmann, A.

    2006-01-01

    Bronchial asthma and juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) are complex genetic diseases. As both represent chronic inflammatory diseases it is likely that they are at least partially influenced by the same genetic variants. One goal in dissecting the genetics of complex diseases is to identify a genetic risk profile. Therefore it is necessary to genotype polymorphisms in many different pathways. Thus we investigated 48 polymorphisms in 24 genes for association with asthma and/or JIA. Genotpying was performed on 231 asthmatic children, 86 children with JIA and 270 controls. Association analysis was performed by the Armitage’s trend test. Furthermore haplotypes were calculated by FAMHAP. We found association of polymorphisms within IL-4, CTLA4 and TNFalpha with asthma and/or JIA. Furthermore, the polymorphisms showed an inverse distribution between children with asthma and JIA. However, we were not able to confirm association of most of the previously described candidate genes. We conclude from our data that it might be very difficult to identify genetic risk profiles for the development of asthma and/or JIA that would be valid across different populations. However, this study adds further evidence that the common genetic background of asthma and JIA is mainly based on polymorphisms in important TH1 and TH2 cytokines. PMID:16788246

  15. A comprehensive candidate gene study on bronchial asthma and juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Schubert, K; von Bonnsdorf, H; Burke, M; Ahlert, I; Braun, S; Berner, R; Deichmann, K A; Heinzmann, A

    2006-01-01

    Bronchial asthma and juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) are complex genetic diseases. As both represent chronic inflammatory diseases it is likely that they are at least partially influenced by the same genetic variants. One goal in dissecting the genetics of complex diseases is to identify a genetic risk profile. Therefore it is necessary to genotype polymorphisms in many different pathways. Thus we investigated 48 polymorphisms in 24 genes for association with asthma and/or JIA. Genotpying was performed on 231 asthmatic children, 86 children with JIA and 270 controls. Association analysis was performed by the Armitage's trend test. Furthermore haplotypes were calculated by FAMHAP. We found association of polymorphisms within IL-4, CTLA4 and TNFalpha with asthma and/or JIA. Furthermore, the polymorphisms showed an inverse distribution between children with asthma and JIA. However, we were not able to confirm association of most of the previously described candidate genes. We conclude from our data that it might be very difficult to identify genetic risk profiles for the development of asthma and/or JIA that would be valid across different populations. However, this study adds further evidence that the common genetic background of asthma and JIA is mainly based on polymorphisms in important TH1 and TH2 cytokines. PMID:16788246

  16. Ureaplasma septic arthritis in an immunosuppressed patient with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    George, Michael David; Cardenas, Ana Maria; Birnbaum, Belinda K; Gluckman, Stephen J

    2015-06-01

    Mycoplasmas, including Ureaplasma and Mycoplasma species, are uncommon but important causes of septic arthritis, especially affecting immunosuppressed patients. Many of the reported cases have been associated with congenital immunodeficiency disorders, especially hypogammaglobulinemia. Mycoplasmas are difficult to grow in the laboratory, and these infections may be underdiagnosed using culture techniques. We report a case of a 21-year-old woman with juvenile idiopathic arthritis and hip arthroplasties treated with rituximab and adalimumab who developed urogenital infections and soft tissue abscesses followed by knee arthritis with negative routine cultures. Ureaplasma species was identified from synovial fluid on 2 separate occasions using a broad-range 16S ribosomal RNA gene polymerase chain reaction. Azithromycin led to rapid improvement in symptoms, but after completion of therapy, involvement of the hip prosthesis became apparent, and again, 16S rRNA gene polymerase chain reaction was positive for Ureaplasma species. The literature is reviewed with a discussion of risk factors for Mycoplasma septic arthritis, clinical presentation, methods of diagnosis, and treatment. PMID:26010188

  17. Chronic Recurrent Multifocal Osteomyelitis with Concomitant Features of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Tsitsami, Elena; Dermentzoglou, Vasiliki; Moschovi, Mary; Chrousos, George P.

    2011-01-01

    We report a case of a 13-year-old girl with chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO) who developed severe arthritis in four different joints within the first year from the onset of the disease. Her multiple vertebrae lesions showed significant amelioration after a 2-month treatment with prednisolone. In parallel, the initial severe symmetrical arthritis of both knees showing overt synovitis and joint effusion, in the absence of lesions in the metaphyses of the femur or the tibia, responded remarkably well in intra-articular triamcinolone hexacetonide injections. However, upon discontinuation of prednisolone, the patient developed severe arthritis of her right ankle and the proximal interphalangeal joint of her right middle finger. Thus, prednisolone was reinitiated combined with methotrexate, and the patient went into remission, which persists one year after prednisolone tapering. The appearance of arthritis in both knees in the absence of bone lesions and the emergence of severe arthritis of the ankle after remission of spinal bone lesions suggest that CRMO and juvenile idiopathic arthritis may coexist and be causally related. PMID:22937441

  18. Emotion Regulation Predicts Pain and Functioning in Children With Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis: An Electronic Diary Study

    PubMed Central

    Bromberg, Maggie H.; Anthony, Kelly K.; Gil, Karen M.; Franks, Lindsey; Schanberg, Laura E.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives This study utilized e-diaries to evaluate whether components of emotion regulation predict daily pain and function in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Methods 43 children ages 8–17 years and their caregivers provided baseline reports of child emotion regulation. Children then completed thrice daily e-diary assessments of emotion, pain, and activity involvement for 28 days. E-diary ratings of negative and positive emotions were used to calculate emotion variability and to infer adaptive emotion modulation following periods of high or low emotion intensity. Hierarchical linear models were used to evaluate how emotion regulation related to pain and function. Results The attenuation of negative emotion following a period of high negative emotion predicted reduced pain; greater variability of negative emotion predicted higher pain and increased activity limitation. Indices of positive emotion regulation also significantly predicted pain. Conclusions Components of emotion regulation as captured by e-diaries predict important health outcomes in children with JIA. PMID:22037006

  19. Transforming Growth Factor-Beta (TGF-β) Signaling in Paravertebral Muscles in Juvenile and Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis

    PubMed Central

    Kwiecien, Magdalena

    2014-01-01

    Most researchers agree that idiopathic scoliosis (IS) is a multifactorial disease influenced by complex genetic and environmental factors. The onset of the spinal deformity that determines the natural course of the disease, usually occurs in the juvenile or adolescent period. Transforming growth factors β (TGF-βs) and their receptors, TGFBRs, may be considered as candidate genes related to IS susceptibility and natural history. This study explores the transcriptional profile of TGF-βs, TGFBRs, and TGF-β responsive genes in the paravertebral muscles of patients with juvenile and adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (JIS and AIS, resp.). Muscle specimens were harvested intraoperatively and grouped according to the side of the curve and the age of scoliosis onset. The results of microarray and qRT-PCR analysis confirmed significantly higher transcript abundances of TGF-β2, TGF-β3, and TGFBR2 in samples from the curve concavity of AIS patients, suggesting a difference in TGF-β signaling in the pathogenesis of juvenile and adolescent curves. Analysis of TGF-β responsive genes in the transcriptomes of patients with AIS suggested overrepresentation of the genes localized in the extracellular region of curve concavity: LTBP3, LTBP4, ITGB4, and ITGB5. This finding suggests the extracellular region of paravertebral muscles as an interesting target for future molecular research into AIS pathogenesis. PMID:25313366

  20. Physical activity, functional ability, and disease activity in children and adolescents with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Gueddari, S; Amine, B; Rostom, S; Badri, D; Mawani, N; Ezzahri, M; Moussa, F; Shyen, S; Abouqal, R; Chkirat, B; Hajjaj-Hassouni, N

    2014-09-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is a chronic condition known to cause pain-related complications in youth and affect children's physical functioning. There is no data in Arabic children with JIA about the impact of illness upon their physical activity. The objective of this study was to explore physical activity (PA) in children and adolescents with JIA compared with a healthy population and to examine associations between PA, functional ability, and disease activity. Our study included patients with JIA and group control aged between 8 and 17 years. The diagnosis was used according to the International League of Association of Rheumatology (ILAR) criteria 2001. Sociodemographic data and clinical features were collected. Physical activity level and energy expenditure were assessed with a 1-day activity diary and the metabolic equivalent (MET), respectively. Functional ability was assessed with the Moroccan version of the Childhood Health Assessment Questionnaire (CHAQ). Disease activity was measured using the Juvenile Arthritis Disease Activity Score (JADAS). Fifty patients and 50 controls were included (mean ± SD age 11.5 ± 3.3 and 10.5 ± 3.8 years, respectively; p = 0.49) with masculine predominance n = 30 (59.6 %) and n = 29 (58 %), respectively (p = 0.26). The median disease duration was 4.3 years (2-5). The median analog scale (VAS) pain was 20 (10-40). Fourteen patients (28 %) had an active disease. Patient population consisted in majority of oligoarticular arthritis (28 %), 14 patients. The mean of energy expenditure and physical activity were significantly higher in the JIA group. The JIA group spent more time in bed and less time on moderate to vigorous PA than the control group. There is no significant relationship between PA, functional ability, and disease activity. Our study suggests that children and adolescents with JIA have low PA levels and are at risk of losing the benefits of PA. Low PA is not related to

  1. Sleep and its relationship to pain, dysfunction, and disease activity in juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Shyen, S; Amine, B; Rostom, S; E L Badri, D; Ezzahri, M; Mawani, N; Moussa, F; Gueddari, S; Wabi, M; Abouqal, R; Chkirate, B; Hajjaj-Hassouni, N

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the sleep abnormalities that may exist in Moroccan children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and their relationship to pain, dysfunction, and disease activity. Case control study including 47 patients diagnosed with JIA, according to the criteria of the International League of Associations for Rheumatology (ILAR), and 47 healthy children, age and sex matched. Sleep was assessed by Children's Sleep Habits Questionnaire (CSHQ). All parents have filled the 45 items of the CSHQ and grouped into eight subscales: bedtime resistance, sleep onset delay, sleep duration, sleep anxiety, sleep-disordered breathing, night awakenings, parasomnias, and morning awakening/daytime sleepiness. The disease activity was assessed by the number of painful joints, swelling joints, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, c-protein reactive, and Juvenile Arthritis Disease Activity Score (JADAS). Functional assessment was based on the value of Childhood Health Assessment Questionnaire. Pain was assessed by visual analog scale pain. Forty-seven patients were included, with 28 males (59.6 %). Children with JIA had a total score of CSHQ significantly higher than the control cases (p < 0.0001); significant differences were also found in the subscale sleep onset delay, sleep anxiety, sleep-disordered breathing, night awakenings, and parasomnias with a p value of <0.0001, 0.034, <0.0001, 0.001, and 0.00, respectively. Significant association was found between the CSHQ total score and visual analog scale (VAS) physician activity (p = 0.016) and JADAS (p = 0.05). There was a correlation between the sleep-disordered breathing and JADAS (p = 0.04). Sleep onset delay was associated with VAS patient pain (p = 0.05), as nocturnal awakenings and VAS patient pain (p = 0.016). Finally, parasomnias and physician's VAS activity (p = 0.015) and VAS patient pain (p = 0.03) were also correlated. This study suggests that sleep

  2. Characterization of the Inflammatory Properties of Actively Released HMGB1 in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Stridh, Pernilla; Klevenvall, Lena; Jenkins, Rosalind E.; Fischer, Marie; Sundberg, Erik; Andersson, Ulf; Antoine, Daniel J.; Harris, Helena Erlandsson

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Pathogenic effects of the endogenous inflammatory mediator high mobility group box protein 1 (HMGB1) have been described in several inflammatory diseases. Recent reports have underlined the importance of post-translational modifications (PTMs) in determination of HMGB1 function and release mechanisms. We investigated the occurrence of PTMs of HMGB1 obtained from synovial fluid (SF) of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients. Results: Analyses of 17 JIA patients confirmed high HMGB1 levels in SF. Liquid chromatography tandem mass-spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analyses of PTMs revealed that total HMGB1 levels were not associated with increased lactate dehydrogenase activity but strongly correlated with nuclear location sequence 2 (NLS2) hyperacetylation, indicating active release of HMGB1. The correlation between total HMGB1 levels and NLS2 hypoacetylation suggests additional, acetylation-independent release mechanisms. Monomethylation of lysine 43 (K43), a proposed neutrophil-specific PTM, was strongly associated with high HMGB1 levels, implying that neutrophils are a source of released HMGB1. Analysis of cysteine redox isoforms, fully reduced HMGB1, disulfide HMGB1, and oxidized HMGB1, revealed that HMGB1 acts as both a chemotactic and a cytokine-inducing mediator. These properties were associated with actively released HMGB1. Innovation: This is the first report that characterizes HMGB1-specific PTMs during a chronic inflammatory condition. Conclusion: HMGB1 in SF from JIA patients is actively released through both acetylation-dependent and -nondependent manners. The presence of various functional HMGB1 redox isoforms confirms the complexity of their pathogenic role during chronic inflammation. Defining HMGB1 release pathways and redox isoforms is critical for the understanding of the contribution of HMGB1 during inflammatory processes. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 24, 605–619. PMID:25532033

  3. Network analysis identifies protein clusters of functional importance in juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Our objective was to utilise network analysis to identify protein clusters of greatest potential functional relevance in the pathogenesis of oligoarticular and rheumatoid factor negative (RF-ve) polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Methods JIA genetic association data were used to build an interactome network model in BioGRID 3.2.99. The top 10% of this protein:protein JIA Interactome was used to generate a minimal essential network (MEN). Reactome FI Cytoscape 2.83 Plugin and the Disease Association Protein-Protein Link Evaluator (Dapple) algorithm were used to assess the functionality of the biological pathways within the MEN and to statistically rank the proteins. JIA gene expression data were integrated with the MEN and clusters of functionally important proteins derived using MCODE. Results A JIA interactome of 2,479 proteins was built from 348 JIA associated genes. The MEN, representing the most functionally related components of the network, comprised of seven clusters, with distinct functional characteristics. Four gene expression datasets from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), neutrophils and synovial fluid monocytes, were mapped onto the MEN and a list of genes enriched for functional significance identified. This analysis revealed the genes of greatest potential functional importance to be PTPN2 and STAT1 for oligoarticular JIA and KSR1 for RF-ve polyarticular JIA. Clusters of 23 and 14 related proteins were derived for oligoarticular and RF-ve polyarticular JIA respectively. Conclusions This first report of the application of network biology to JIA, integrating genetic association findings and gene expression data, has prioritised protein clusters for functional validation and identified new pathways for targeted pharmacological intervention. PMID:24886659

  4. Self-Reported Pain and Disease Symptoms Persist in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis Despite Treatment Advances

    PubMed Central

    Bromberg, Maggie H.; Connelly, Mark; Anthony, Kelly K.; Gil, Karen M.; Schanberg, Laura E.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To use electronic diaries (e-diaries) to determine whether pain, stiffness, and fatigue continue to be common, disabling symptoms in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) despite the use of aggressive treatments in contemporary medical management. Methods Fifty-nine children with JIA (ages 8–18 years) provided ratings of pain, stiffness, and fatigue intensity and functional limitations using a smartphone e-diary 3 times each day for 1 month. Medication information was collected via parent report and checked for accuracy by chart review. Descriptive analyses were conducted to determine typical symptom intensity, frequency, and variability. Multilevel modeling was used to analyze associations between symptoms and functional outcomes and between medication use and symptom intensity. Results Children reported moments of pain in 66% of e-diary entries. No children were entirely pain-free across the reporting period. In 31% of all e-diary entries the visual analog scale score for pain was >40 (high pain intensity), with 86% of children reporting a high level of pain at least once during the study period. The mean ratings of pain, stiffness, and fatigue intensity were in the mild-to-moderate range. Medication class was not a reliable predictor of differences in symptom intensity, even though 79% of children were prescribed a disease-modifying antirheumatic drug and 47% were prescribed a biologic agent. Moments of higher pain intensity and higher stiffness intensity were each uniquely predictive of higher concurrent functional limitations. Conclusion Self-reported pain, stiffness, and fatigue continue to be common in children with JIA, despite contemporary advances in treatment strategies, including use of biologic agents. These findings are surprisingly consistent with previous results from research using daily paper diaries in the pre-biologics era. There remains a pressing and ongoing need to optimize pain and symptom management in JIA. PMID

  5. Pulmonary Hypertension and Other Potentially Fatal Pulmonary Complications in Systemic Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Yukiko; Weiss, Jennifer E.; Haroldson, Kathryn L.; Lee, Tzielan; Punaro, Marilynn; Oliveira, Sheila; Rabinovich, Egla; Riebschleger, Meredith; Antón, Jordi; Blier, Peter R.; Gerloni, Valeria; Hazen, Melissa M; Kessler, Elizabeth; Onel, Karen; Passo, Murray H; Rennebohm, Robert M; Wallace, Carol A; Woo, Patricia; Wulffraat, Nico

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Systemic Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (sJIA) is characterized by fevers, rash and arthritis, for which IL1 and IL6 inhibitors appear effective. Pulmonary artery hypertension (PAH), interstitial lung disease (ILD) and alveolar proteinosis (AP) have been recently reported in sJIA patients with increased frequency. Our aim was to characterize and compare these cases to a larger cohort of sJIA patients. Methods sJIA patients who developed PAH, ILD and/or AP were identified through an electronic listserv, and their demographic, sJIA and pulmonary disease characteristics, and medication exposure information were collected. These features were compared to a cohort of sJIA patients enrolled in the Childhood Arthritis and Rheumatology Research Alliance (CARRA) Registry. Results Patients (N=25) were significantly (p<0.05) more likely than the CARRA registry cohort (N=389) to be female, have more systemic features, and to have been exposed to an IL-1 inhibitor, tocilizumab, infliximab, corticosteroids, intravenous immunoglobulin, cyclosporine and cyclophosphamide. Eighty% were diagnosed after 2004. Twenty (80%) patients had MAS during their disease course and 15 (60%) had MAS at pulmonary diagnosis. Sixteen patients had PAH, 5 AP and 7 ILD. Seventeen (68%) patients were taking or recently (≤1 month) discontinued a biologic agent at pulmonary symptom onset; 12 (48%) were taking anti-IL1 therapy (primarily anakinra). Seventeen (68%) patients died at a mean of 8.8 months from pulmonary diagnosis. Conclusions PAH, AP and ILD are under-recognized complications of sJIA which are frequently fatal. These may be the result of severe uncontrolled systemic disease activity, and may be influenced by medication exposure. PMID:23139240

  6. Profiling anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Anti-citrullinated protein/peptide antibodies (ACPA), have high specificity for rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Some children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), phenotypically resemble RA and test positive for rheumatoid factor (RF) a characteristic biomarker of RA. We investigated the prevalence of ACPA and its relationship to other serologic markers associated with RA in a well-characterized JIA cohort. Methods Cases were 334 children with JIA, 30 of whom had RF + polyarticular JIA. Sera from all cases and 50 healthy pediatric controls were investigated by ELISA at a single time point for anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP) IgG, RF IgM, IgA and IgG, anti-RA33 IgG, and antinuclear antibodies (ANA). Comparisons between cases and controls were made using Chi-square or Fisher exact tests and T-tests. Results The prevalence of RF was 8% among controls, and 12% among cases (ns). The prevalence of ACPA was 2% in controls and 14.3% in cases (OR 8.2, p <0.01). Children who were ACPA-positive and RF-negative (n = 23) had a significantly earlier onset-age (4.6 years vs. 12.1 years, p <0.00001) and had fewer HLA-DRB1 shared epitope alleles than those positive for both RF and ACPA (n = 25). Prevalence of anti-RA33 was not different between cases and controls. Conclusions ACPAs are detectable in 14% of children with JIA. Children with positive ACPA but negative RF are frequent, and may define a distinct subset of children with JIA. ACPA testing should be included in the classification of JIA. PMID:22931121

  7. Transitional care in clinical networks for young people with juvenile idiopathic arthritis: current situation and challenges.

    PubMed

    Cruikshank, Mary; Foster, Helen E; Stewart, Jane; Davidson, Joyce E; Rapley, Tim

    2016-04-01

    Clinical networks for paediatric and adolescent rheumatology are evolving, and their effect and role in the transition process between paediatric and adult services are unknown. We therefore explored the experiences of those involved to try and understand this further. Health professionals, young people with juvenile idiopathic arthritis and their families were recruited via five national health service paediatric and adolescent rheumatology specialist centres and networks across the UK. Seventy participants took part in focus groups and one-to-one interviews. Data was analysed using coding, memoing and mapping techniques to identify features of transitional services across the sector. Variation and inequities in transitional care exist. Although transition services in networks are evolving, development has lagged behind other areas with network establishment focusing more on access to paediatric rheumatology multidisciplinary teams. Challenges include workforce shortfalls, differences in service priorities, standards and healthcare infrastructures, and managing the legacy of historic encounters. Providing equitable high-quality clinically effective services for transition across the UK has a long way to go. There is a call from within the sector for more protected time, staff and resources to develop transition roles and services, as well as streamlining of local referral pathways between paediatric and adult healthcare services. In addition, there is a need to support professionals in developing their understanding of transitional care in clinical networks, particularly around service design, organisational change and the interpersonal skills required for collaborative working. Key messages • Transitional care in clinical networks requires collaborative working and an effective interface with paediatric and adult rheumatology.• Professional centrism and historic encounters may affect collaborative relationships within clinical networks.• Education

  8. The Pattern of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis in a Single Tertiary Center in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hemairi, Mohammad H.; Albokhari, Shatha M.; Muzaffer, Mohammed A.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) is the most common chronic arthritis in children. Our aim is to describe demographic, clinical, and laboratory characteristics and treatment of JIA patients followed up in Pediatric Rheumatology clinic in a tertiary center in Saudi Arabia. Methods. Medical records of all patients who are followed up between January 2007 and January 2015 were retrospectively reviewed. Data were collected about demographic, clinical, and laboratory features and treatment. Results. Total patients were 82, males were 31 (37.8%), and mean age of JIA onset was 7.1 ± 3.6 yr. Mean follow-up duration was 2.67±1.6 yr. Systemic onset JIA (SoJIA) was the commonest (36.5%), followed by polyarticular in 29.2% and oligoarticular in 28%. Large and small joints are involved in 76 (92%) and 30 (36.6%), respectively. Main extra-articular feature was fever in 34 (41.4%). Uveitis was diagnosed in 7 (8.5%) and in 5 (21.7%) of oligoarticular JIA. Anemia was found in 49 (59.7%), high ESR in 45 (54.8%), and leukocytosis and thrombocytosis in 33 (40.2%). Positive ANA was found in 30 (36.5%) mainly in oligoarticular subtype as 12 (52%) patients (out of 23) had this positive test. 9 patients (10.9%) required NSAIDs only, 6 patients (7.3%) required NSAIDs and intra-articular steroids only, and 19 (23%) required NSAIDs, methotrexate, steroids, and biologics. Conclusion. SoJIA is the most common JIA subtype in our study. A population based rather than a single center study will give more details about JIA characteristics in Saudi Arabia PMID:26966610

  9. Serum Amyloid A Circulating Levels and Disease Activity in Patients with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Giani, Teresa; Fioravanti, Antonella; Iacoponi, Francesca; Simonini, Gabriele; Pagnini, Ilaria; Spreafico, Adriano; Chellini, Federico; Galeazzi, Mauro; Cimaz, Rolando

    2012-01-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate the association between circulating levels of serum amyloid A protein (SAA) and disease activity in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Our study group included 41 JIA patients (9 male, 32 female), classified according to the International League of Associations for Rheumatology (ILAR) criteria (5); 16 had polyarticular onset disease and 25 had oligoarticular onset disease. Among 25 patients with oligoarticular disease, three had extended oligoarthritis. Serum amyloid A (SAA), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and C-reactive protein (CRP) were measured in both patients and 26 healthy controls. SAA levels were higher in JIA patients versus healthy controls (p<0.001). Significant positive correlations were found between SAA and the presence of active joints (rho=0.363, p<0.05), the number of active joints (rho=0.418, p<0.05), ESR (R=0.702, p<0.05) and CRP (R=0.827, p<0.05). No significant correlations between ESR and the presence of active joints (rho=0.221, p=0.225) or between ESR and the number of active joints (rho=0.118, p=0.520) were demonstrated in JIA patients. No significant correlations were obtained between CRP and the presence of active joints (rho=0.034, p=0.855) or between CRP and the number of active joints (rho=0.033, p=0.859). We discovered a significant increase in SAA levels in JIA patients, compared to controls, and a strong positive correlation between SAA level and JIA disease activity. We also discerned SAA to be a more sensitive laboratory marker than ESR and CRP for evaluating the presence and number of active joints. We suggest that SAA can be used as an additional indicator of disease activity in JIA. PMID:22869491

  10. Blueberry Improves the Therapeutic Effect of Etanercept on Patients with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis: Phase III Study.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Yingjie; Wang, Ye; Guo, Jun; Chu, Haifeng; Gao, Yong; Pang, Limin

    2015-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common arthritis in the adolescents under the age of 16. Etanercept, an inhibitor of tumor necrosis factor, is often used to treat JIA despite its significant side effects. Homeopathic remedies, such as blueberries, have anti-inflammatory properties with fewer unwanted effects and should be considered as a primary treatment. We aimed to explore the efficacy and safety of combination therapy of blueberry and etanercept for JIA. Two hundred and one JIA patients were selected, and randomly and evenly assigned to three groups: ETA (50 mg of etanercept twice weekly), ETABJ (matched etanercept and 50 ml blueberry juice daily) and ETAPJ (matched etanercept and placebo juice). The severity of JIA was measured using American College of Rheumatology scales (ACR) 20, 50 and 70. The levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, interleukin-1 (IL1) alpha and IL1 beta, and interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL1RA) were measured by qRT-PCR and ELISA. After a 6-month follow-up, the ACR20, ACR50 and ACR70 in an ETABJ group were higher than those in other two groups (P < 0.05), suggesting clinically meaningful improvement in JIA. Meanwhile, the symptoms and side effects were reduced significantly or absent in an ETABJ group, including mental diseases, retrobulbar optic neuritis, gaining weight, infection, cutaneous vasculitis, diarrhea, uveitis and pancytopenia. Blueberries reduced the levels of IL1 alpha and beta, and increased the level of IL1RA. Thus, a combination therapy of blueberry and etanercept can reduce the severity of JIA and should be developed as a new method for JIA therapy. PMID:26477692

  11. Treatment of patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) in a population-based cohort.

    PubMed

    Zamora-Legoff, Jorge A; Krause, Megan L; Crowson, Cynthia S; Muskardin, Theresa Wampler; Mason, Thomas; Matteson, Eric L

    2016-06-01

    A population-based cohort was utilized to evaluate medications and intra-articular injection utilization for patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) to inform clinical practice and further research. In a geographically defined population, all incident cases of JIA cases were identified between January 1, 1994 and December 31, 2013 based first on diagnosis code followed by medical chart confirmation. Medications and intra-articular glucocorticoid injections were abstracted. Predictors of the first disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (DMARD)/biologic and injections were reported as a hazard ratio (HR) with 95 % confidence intervals (CIs) adjusted for age and sex. Kaplan-Meier methods evaluated therapy at 6 months and 1 year. Injections were reported per 100 person-years (py) with 95 % CI using the Poisson methods. Seventy-one incident cases were identified. Forty-two (59 %) were female with mean age (standard deviation) at diagnosis of 8.2 (5.3) years. Twenty-six (37 %) utilized at least one DMARD or biologic, in which 77 % of these were prescribed in the first 6 months. Subtype of JIA was significantly associated with DMARDs/biologics (p < 0.001). Intra-articular injections were performed in 48 %. The rate of intra-articular injections was 20.7 per 100 py (95 % CI 16.5, 25.6). The rate of joint injections was higher in the first year after diagnosis (p < 0.001) and more common in recent years (p < 0.001). The majority of patients with JIA in a modern population-based cohort do not require DMARDs or biologics. In those who do, the majority receives these within the first 6 months. Intra-articular injections were utilized in almost half of patients with JIA and were increasingly used. PMID:26825065

  12. Polymorphisms of genes encoding interleukin-4 and its receptor in Iranian patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ziaee, Vahid; Rezaei, Arezou; Harsini, Sara; Maddah, Marzieh; Zoghi, Samaneh; Sadr, Maryam; Moradinejad, Mohammad Hassan; Rezaei, Nima

    2016-08-01

    As cytokines, including interleukin-4 (IL-4), seem to have a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), this study is aimed at investigating of association of polymorphisms in IL-4 and IL-4 receptor α (IL-4RA) genes with susceptibility to JIA. A case-control study was conducted on 53 patients with JIA and 139 healthy unrelated controls. Single nucleotide polymorphisms of IL-4 gene at positions -1098, -590, and -33, as well as IL-4RA gene at position +1902 were genotyped using polymerase chain reaction with sequence-specific primers method and compared between patients and healthy individuals. At the allelic level, C allele at IL-4 -33 was found to be more frequent in patients compared to control (P value <0.01). At the genotypic level, CC genotype at IL-4 -590 (P value <0.01), together with CC and TT genotypes at IL-4 -33 (P value <0.01), were significantly higher in patients with JIA, while TC genotypes at IL-4 -590 and -33 positions were found to be lower in case group (P value <0.01). At the haplotypic level, IL-4 (positions -1098, -509, -33) TTC, GCC, and TTT haplotypes were significantly lower than controls (P value <0.01, P value = 0.03, and P value = 0.04, respectively). Although, TCC haplotype at the same positions was found to be higher in patients (P value <0.01). Polymorphic site of +1902 IL-4RA gene did not differ between cases and controls. Polymorphisms in promoter region of IL-4 but not IL-4RA genes confer susceptibility to JIA and may predispose individuals to adaptive immune responses. PMID:26951255

  13. Intra-articular glucocorticoid injections in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis in a Singapore hospital

    PubMed Central

    Leow, Olivia Min Yi; Lim, Lee Kean; Ooi, Pei Ling; Shek, Lynette Pei Chi; Ang, Elizabeth You Ning; Son, Mary Beth

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of intra-articular glucocorticoid (IAG) injections in our institution in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). METHODS This is a retrospective assessment of IAG injections performed by the Department of Paediatrics, National University Hospital, Singapore, from October 2009 to October 2011. A total of 26 procedures were evaluated for efficacy, considering parameters such as clinical response, changes in systemic medication, length of time between repeat injections, safety, consent-taking, pre- and post-procedural advice, compliance with aseptic technique, and post-procedural complications. RESULTS A total of 26 IAG injections of triamcinolone hexacetonide were administered over 17 occasions (i.e. patient encounters) to ten patients with JIA during the study period. After the injections, clinical scoring by a paediatric rheumatologist showed overall improvement by an average of 2.62 points out of 15. Besides six patient encounters that had an increase in systemic medication on the day of the injection, five required an increase within six months post injection, two required no adjustments, and one resulted in a decrease in medications. In all, 21 injections did not require subsequent injections. The mean interval between repeat injections was 7.8 months. Cutaneous side effects were noted in three anatomically difficult joints. Medical documentation with regard to patient progress was found to be lacking. CONCLUSION As per the recommendations of the American College of Rheumatology, we safely used IAG injections as the first-line therapy in our group of patients with oligoarticular JIA, and/or as an adjunct to systemic therapy in our patients with JIA. PMID:24862747

  14. Orthodontic and dentofacial orthopedic management of juvenile idiopathic arthritis: a systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    von Bremen, J; Ruf, S

    2011-08-01

    To systematically review the literature published on orthodontic treatment principles in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Several electronic databases (PubMed, Medpilot, Web of Science, and DIMDI) and orthodontic and rheumatologic literature were systematically searched for studies published until May 2010. The articles were rated by two independent reviewers and included after three selection steps (title-abstract-full text). Articles had to be studies performed on ≥ 5 patients with a disease onset before the age of 16. The selection process resulted in the inclusion of three publications on dentofacial orthopedics and six on combined surgical orthodontic therapy. The three studies on dentofacial orthopedics aimed to improve the mandibular retrusion by means of removable functional appliances (activator). Whereas these orthodontic approaches comprised relatively large and homogeneous patient samples (14, 22, and 72 subjects, aged 6-16), the surgical studies were basically case series with a large age span of the patients (5-12 subjects, aged 10-44). In these surgical treatment approaches, orthodontics was limited to pre-surgical leveling and post-surgical finishing, while the skeletal discrepancy was treated surgically by a variety of techniques (costochondral grafts, bilateral sagittal spilt osteotomy, Le Fort I, and genioplasty). The treatment goals of both approaches were improvement of esthetics and function and/or pain reduction, and both approaches showed satisfactory results. Because of the heterogeneity of the subject material and the low level of evidence of the papers, it is difficult to draw any conclusions on the orthodontic/dentofacial orthopedic management of JIA. It appears as if removable functional appliances may be beneficial in adolescent patients with JIA. PMID:21771266

  15. Complementary and alternative medicine use in adolescents with inflammatory bowel disease and juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The use of complementary alternative medicine (CAM) is potentially prevalent among paediatric patients with chronic diseases but with variable rates among different age groups, diseases and countries. There are no recent reports on CAM use among paediatric patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) in Europe. We hypothesized that CAM use associates with a more severe disease in paediatric IBD and JIA. Methods A cross-sectional questionnaire study among adolescent outpatients with IBD and JIA addressing the frequency and type of CAM use during the past year. The patients were recruited at the Children’s Hospital, University of Helsinki, Finland. Results Of the 147 respondents, 97 had IBD (Crohn’s disease: n = 46; median age 15.5, disease duration 3.4 years) and 50 had JIA (median age 13.8, disease duration 6.9 years). During the past 12 months, 48% regularly used CAM while 81% reported occasional CAM use. Compared to patients with JIA, the use of CAM in IBD patients tended to be more frequent. The most commonly used CAM included probiotics, multivitamins, and mineral and trace element supplements. Self-imposed dietary restrictions were common, involving 27.6% of the non-CAM users but 64.8% of all CAM users. Disease activity was associated with CAM use in JIA but not in IBD. Conclusions CAM use is frequent among adolescents with IBD and JIA and associates with self-imposed dietary restrictions. Reassuringly, adherence to disease modifying drugs is good in young CAM users. In JIA, patients with active disease used more frequently CAM than patients with inactive disease. As CAM use is frequent, physicians should familiarise themselves with the basic concepts of CAM. The potential pharmacological interaction or the toxicity of certain CAM products warrants awareness and hence physicians should actively ask their patients about CAM use. PMID:24708564

  16. Antibiotic Exposure and Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis: A Case–Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Frank I.; Haynes, Kevin; Putt, Mary E.; Rose, Carlos D.; Lewis, James D.; Strom, Brian L.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Recent evidence has linked childhood antibiotic use and microbiome disturbance to autoimmune conditions. This study tested the hypothesis that antibiotic exposure was associated with newly diagnosed juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). METHODS: We performed a nested case–control study in a population-representative medical records database from the United Kingdom. Children with newly diagnosed JIA were compared with age- and gender-matched control subjects randomly selected from general practices containing at least 1 case, excluding those with inflammatory bowel disease, immunodeficiency, or other systemic rheumatic diseases. Conditional logistic regression was used to examine the association between antibacterial antibiotics (including number of antibiotic courses and timing) and JIA after adjusting for significant confounders. RESULTS: Any antibiotic exposure was associated with an increased rate of developing JIA (adjusted odds ratio: 2.1 [95% confidence interval: 1.2–3.5]). This relationship was dose dependent (adjusted odds ratio over 5 antibiotic courses: 3.0 [95% confidence interval: 1.6–5.6]), strongest for exposures within 1 year of diagnosis, and did not substantively change when adjusting for number or type of infections. In contrast, nonbacterial antimicrobial agents (eg, antifungal, antiviral) were not associated with JIA. In addition, antibiotic-treated upper respiratory tract infections were more strongly associated with JIA than untreated upper respiratory tract infections. CONCLUSIONS: Antibiotics were associated with newly diagnosed JIA in a dose- and time-dependent fashion in a large pediatric population. Antibiotic exposure may play a role in JIA pathogenesis, perhaps mediated through alterations in the microbiome. PMID:26195533

  17. Patterns of compensation of functional deficits of the knee joint in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Księżopolska-Orłowska, Krystyna

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is a group of pathological syndromes of unknown aetiology, observed at the developmental age. Their common feature is sustained chronic arthritis with flares and remissions. Clinical signs and symptoms include joint pain, periarticular tissue oedema or articular exudate, frequently associated with hypertrophy of the synovial membrane. The intra- and extra-articular structural damage impairs the motion range and smoothness. The disease process may involve any joint. The knee joint is the most frequently affected in oligo- and polyarthritis. The aim of the study was to determine a direct correlation between disorders of knee joint function and the change in the range of motion of the ankle and hip joints of both lower extremities, and the so-called indirect impact of these changes on patients’ posture. Material and methods The study included 36 JIA patients and 56 healthy controls aged 8–16 years. The evaluation was based on physical examination. Results The results showed differences in the values of quality and range of motion between patients and controls. In the patient group pes planovalgus was more frequently associated with knee joint dysfunction along with the inherent restriction of dorsal flexion of the foot. Shortening of the iliotibial band, increased outward rotation of the right lower extremity with enlarged joint contour and augmented inward rotation of the contralateral healthy extremity all proved significant. Changes in motion range in the joints below and over the knee were associated with alterations of antero-posterior spine curvatures and vertebral rotation along the long spinal axis. Based on the results, the mechanism of the compensation is outlined. Conclusions The observed differences in the range and quality of motion in the ankle, hip and spinal joints between patients and healthy children provide evidence that dysfunction of the knee joint affects the function of the other above

  18. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis activity and function ability: deleterious effects in periodontal disease?

    PubMed

    Pugliese, Camila; van der Vinne, Roberta T A; Campos, Lucia M A; Guardieiro, Priscila R; Saviolli, Cynthia; Bonfá, Eloisa; Pereira, Rosa M R; Viana, Vilma S; Borba, Eduardo F; Silva, Clovis A

    2016-01-01

    The impact of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) in periodontal diseases is controversial probably due to gender and age heterogeneity. We therefore evaluated a homogeneous female post-pubertal JIA population for these conditions. Thirty-five JIA patients and 35 gender/age comparable healthy controls were evaluated according to demographic data, complete periodontal evaluation, fasting lipoproteins, and anti-lipoprotein lipase antibodies. JIA scores, laboratorial tests, X-rays, and treatment were also assessed. Current age was similar in JIA patients and controls (11.90 ± 2.0 vs. 12.50 ± 3.0 years, p = 0.289). Complete periodontal assessments revealed that gingival index, dental plaque, gingival bleeding, and clinical dental attachment indices were alike in JIA patients and controls (p > 0.05), except for gingival enlargement in former group (p < 0.0001). Further analysis of patients with and without gingivitis revealed that cyclosporine use was more often observed in JIA patients with gingivitis (37 vs. 0%, p = 0.01), whereas no differences were evidenced in demographic, JIA scores, inflammatory markers, and lipid profile in both groups. Of note, two parameters of periodontal assessment were correlated with JIA scores [gingival index (GI) and Childhood Health Assessment Questionnaire (CHAQ) (r s  = +0.402, p = 0.020)] and plaque index (PI) and visual analog scale (VAS) physician (r s  = +0.430, p = 0.013). In addition, evaluation of dental assessment demonstrated that JIA activity scores had positive correlation with decayed, missing, and filled teeth (DMF-T) and junvenile athritis disease activity score (JADAS) (r s  = +0.364,p = 0.037), VAS physician (r s  = +0.401,p = 0.021) and VAS patient (r s  = +0.364,p = 0.037). We demonstrated, using rigorous criteria, that periodontal and dental condition in JIA is similar to controls. In spite of that, the finding of a correlation with disease parameters

  19. Association of the IL-10 Gene Family Locus on Chromosome 1 with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA)

    PubMed Central

    Hamaoui, Raja; Bryant, Annette; Hinks, Anne; Ursu, Simona; Wedderburn, Lucy R.; Thomson, Wendy; Lewis, Cathryn M.; Woo, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    Background The cytokine IL-10 and its family members have been implicated in autoimmune diseases and we have previously reported that genetic variants in IL-10 were associated with a rare group of diseases called juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). The aim of this study was to fine map genetic variants within the IL-10 cytokine family cluster on chromosome 1 using linkage disequilibrium (LD)-tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms (tSNPs) approach with imputation and conditional analysis to test for disease associations. Methodology/Principal Findings Fifty-three tSNPs were tested for association between Caucasian paediatric cohorts [219 systemic JIA (sJIA), 187 persistent oligoarticular JIA (pOJIA), and 139 extended OJIA (eOJIA) patients], and controls (Wellcome Trust control cohort, WTCCC2). Significant association with sJIA was detected at rs1400986 in the promoter of IL-20 (odds ratio 1.53; 95% CI 1.21–1.93; p = 0.0004), but in no other subtypes. Imputation analysis identified additional associated SNPs for pOJIA at IL-20 and IL-24, including a rare, functional, missense variant at IL-24 with a p = 0.0002. Penalised logistic regression analysis with HyperLasso and conditional analysis identified several further associations with JIA subtypes. In particular, haplotype analysis refined the sJIA association, with a joint effect at rs1400986 and rs4129024 in intron 1 of MAPKAPK2 (p = 3.2E−5). For pOJIA, a 3-SNP haplotype including rs1878672 in intron 3 of IL-10 showed evidence for association (p = 0.0018). In eOJIA, rs10863962 (3′UTR of FCAMR) and rs12409577 (intron of IL-19) haplotype showed some evidence of association (p = 0.0003). Conclusions This study supports previous association of IL-20 with sJIA. Haplotype analyses provided stronger association signals than single point analyses, while a penalised logistic regression approach also suggested multiple independent association signals. Replication studies are required to confirm or

  20. Prevalence of HLA-B27 antigen in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Turowska-Heydel, Dorota; Sobczyk, Małgorzata; Chudek, Jerzy

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Human leukocyte antigen B27 (HLA-B27) is considered as a risk factor for development of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). The aim of this study was to analyse the prevalence of HLA-B27 antigen in JIA categories and its influence on disease onset and response to conventional therapy. Material and methods The retrospective analysis included 461 unselected children with JIA hospitalized in a single reference rheumatology centre between July 2007 and June 2012. The diagnosis was based on criteria by the International League of Association for Rheumatology. HLA-B27 was determined in 387 of all patients (84%) by hybridization of the amplified, labelled product to immobilize it on the microarray probe. Results HLA-B27 antigen was found in 104 of 383 affected children (27.2%), 48 of 206 girls (23.3%), and 56 of 177 boys (31.6%) – most frequently in patients with enthesitis-related arthritis (71%), psoriatic arthritis (50%) and unclassified cases (86.7%). The age of JIA onset was slightly (by 1 year) but significantly different in patients with and without HLA-B27 antigen [11 (8.5–14) vs. 10 (5–13.5) years.; p < 0.001]. The use of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) and corticosteroids was more frequently clinically ineffective in HLA-B27 positive than negative patients (23.1% vs. 15.2%; p = 0.09). Patients with polyarthritis, systemic, and psoriatic arthritis more frequently received biological therapy. HLA-B27 positive patients with enthesitis-related arthritis received biological therapy more frequently than HLA-B27 negative ones (20.4% vs. 0, respectively; p = 0.09). Conclusions HLA-B27 antigen is a strong risk factor for the development of enthesitis-related arthritis, and to a lesser extent for psoriatic arthritis and extended course of oligoarthritis. The presence of this antigen does not affect the disease onset but seems to predict resistance to therapy with disease-modifying drugs and corticosteroids.

  1. Moroccan parents caring for children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis: positive and negative aspects of their experiences

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) can lead to serious disability in children and adolescents, requiring intensive home care usually provided by parents .These parents must also cope with physical, familial, social and financial constraints. The aim of this study is to evaluate the positive and negative impacts of caregiving on parents to children with JIA, and identify diseases-related variables that affect these outcomes. Methods Cross-sectional study including 47 patients diagnosed with JIA defined by the International League of association for Rheumatology (ILAR) 2001 classification. Socio-demographic, clinical and biological data related to patient and disease were collected. Positive and negative effects of caregiving on parents of children with JIA were assessed via a validated instrument; the Caregiver Reaction Assessment (CRA).The CRA assesses parent’s self-esteem, financial problems, health problems, disrupted schedule and lack of family support. All parents completed the CRA questionnaire. A statistical analysis was conducted to determine the influence of disease-related variables on caregivers. Results Forty-seven patients were included with 40.4% female. The average patient age was 11 years, and a mean patient body mass index (BMI) was 18. Forty patients were in school. Median disease duration of JIA was 4 years. The most frequent arthritis subtype was persistent oligoarthritis in 12-patients. Nearly 15% had extra-articular manifestations most frequently ocular involvement (6.4%). Median of global Visual analogic scale (VAS) was 20 and median Child health assessment questionnaire (CHAQ) was 0. The primary caregiver was the mother for all patients. Mean maternal age was 38 years, 42% of mothers were illiterate, and nearly all (95%) were without employment. The mean values of different dimensions of the CRA were respectively: self-esteem 3.5, financial problems 3.7, health problem 2.4, disrupted schedule 3.6 and familial support 2

  2. Severe idiopathic hypocalcemia in a juvenile western lowland gorilla, Gorilla gorilla gorilla.

    PubMed

    Chatfield, Jenifer; Stones, Greeley; Jalil, Tania

    2012-03-01

    A 6-mo-old, male western lowland gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) was evaluated because of tetany of both hands. The gorilla had alternating periods of constipation, diarrhea, and bloating since birth. A diagnosis of idiopathic hypocalcemia was based on severe hypocalcemia, a normal vitamin D level, response to oral calcium and vitamin D therapy, and eventual resolution. Idiopathic hypocalcemia, an uncommon disease in neonatal humans, should be considered in young gorillas with persistent gastrointestinal problems or acute tetany. PMID:22448527

  3. A Patient-Specific Foot Model for the Estimate of Ankle Joint Forces in Patients with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Prinold, Joe A I; Mazzà, Claudia; Di Marco, Roberto; Hannah, Iain; Malattia, Clara; Magni-Manzoni, Silvia; Petrarca, Maurizio; Ronchetti, Anna B; Tanturri de Horatio, Laura; van Dijkhuizen, E H Pieter; Wesarg, Stefan; Viceconti, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the leading cause of childhood disability from a musculoskeletal disorder. It generally affects large joints such as the knee and the ankle, often causing structural damage. Different factors contribute to the damage onset, including altered joint loading and other mechanical factors, associated with pain and inflammation. The prediction of patients' joint loading can hence be a valuable tool in understanding the disease mechanisms involved in structural damage progression. A number of lower-limb musculoskeletal models have been proposed to analyse the hip and knee joints, but juvenile models of the foot are still lacking. This paper presents a modelling pipeline that allows the creation of juvenile patient-specific models starting from lower limb kinematics and foot and ankle MRI data. This pipeline has been applied to data from three children with JIA and the importance of patient-specific parameters and modelling assumptions has been tested in a sensitivity analysis focused on the variation of the joint reaction forces. This analysis highlighted the criticality of patient-specific definition of the ankle joint axes and location of the Achilles tendon insertions. Patient-specific detection of the Tibialis Anterior, Tibialis Posterior, and Peroneus Longus origins and insertions were also shown to be important. PMID:26374518

  4. Usability Testing of an Online Self-management Program for Adolescents With Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    McGrath, Patrick; Hodnett, Ellen; Feldman, Brian; Duffy, Ciaran; Huber, Adam; Tucker, Lori; Hetherington, Ross; Tse, Shirley; Spiegel, Lynn; Campillo, Sarah; Gill, Navreet; White, Meghan

    2010-01-01

    Background A new bilingual (English and French) Internet-based self-management program, Teens Taking Charge: Managing Arthritis Online, for adolescents with arthritis and their parents was developed following a needs assessment. Objectives This study explored the usability (user performance and satisfaction) of the self-management program for youth with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and their parents to refine the health portal prototype. Methods A qualitative study design with semi-structured, audio taped interviews and observation by a trained observer was undertaken with two iterative cycles to determine the usability (ease of use, efficiency, errors, and user satisfaction) of the user interface and content areas of the intervention. A purposive sample of English-speaking (n = 11; mean age = 15.4, standard deviation [SD] 1.7) and French-speaking (n = 8; mean age = 16.0, SD 1.2) adolescents with JIA and one of their respective parents/caregivers were recruited from 2 Canadian tertiary care centers. Descriptive statistics and simple content analyses were used to organize data into categories that reflected the emerging usability themes. Results All of the participants had access to a computer/Internet at home; however, adolescents were more comfortable using the computer/Internet than their parents. Adolescents and parents provided similar as well as differing suggestions on how the website user interface could be improved in terms of its usability (navigation; presentation and control usage errors; format and layout; as well as areas for further content development). There were no major differences in usability issues between English- and French-speaking participants. Minor changes to the website user interface were made and tested in a second cycle of participants. No further usability problems were identified in the second iterative cycle of testing. Teens and parents responded positively to the appearance and theme of the website (ie, promoting self

  5. Role of adalimumab in the management of children and adolescents with juvenile idiopathic arthritis and other rheumatic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Marzan, Katherine Anne B

    2012-01-01

    Treatment of children and adolescents with juvenile idiopathic arthritis and other pediatric rheumatic diseases has evolved. Where once there was only a limited arsenal of medications, with significant side effects and inadequate efficacy, today, with an increased understanding of the pathogenesis of these diseases, there is a wider variety of more targeted and effective treatments. TNF-α is a cytokine involved in a number of inflammatory pathways in pediatric rheumatic diseases. The emergence of biologic modifiers that target TNF-α has been pivotal in providing the ability to deliver early and aggressive treatment. Adalimumab, a recombinant monoclonal antibody to TNF-α, is an important therapeutic option, which affords children and adolescents with chronic illnesses an improved quality of life. PMID:24600289

  6. Recent advances in the use of Anti-TNFα therapy for the treatment of juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Taddio, Andrea; Cattalini, Marco; Simonini, Gabriele; Cimaz, Rolando

    2016-06-01

    Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) encompasses a group of diseases of unknown etiology having in common arthritis in at least 1 joint that persists for 6 weeks and begins before 16 years of age, with other conditions excluded. With a prevalence of 1 per 1,000 children in the USA, JIA is the most common pediatric rheumatic illness and a major cause of acquired childhood disability. During the last 20 years, the advent of host immune response modifiers known as biologic agents, in particular the anti-TNFα agents (etanercept, infliximab, adalimumab), which directly inhibit the action of pro-inflammatory mediators, has revolutionized the treatment and the expected outcome of JIA. This article highlights treatment indications of anti-TNFα drugs and their more frequent side effects in JIA patients. PMID:26809126

  7. Genome-Wide Data reveals Novel Genes for Methotrexate Response in a Large Cohort of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis Cases

    PubMed Central

    Cobb, Joanna; Cule, Erika; Moncrieffe, Halima; Hinks, Anne; Ursu, Simona; Patrick, Fiona; Kassoumeri, Laura; Flynn, Edward; Bulatović, Maja; Wulffraat, Nico; van Zelst, Bertrand; de Jonge, Robert; Bohm, Marek; Dolezalova, Pavla; Hirani, Shashi; Newman, Stanton; Whitworth, Pamela; Southwood, Taunton R; De Iorio, Maria; Wedderburn, Lucy R; Thomson, Wendy

    2014-01-01

    Clinical response to methotrexate (MTX) treatment for children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) displays considerable heterogeneity. Currently, there are no reliable predictors to identify non-responders: earlier identification could lead to targeted treatment. We genotyped 759 JIA cases from the UK, Netherlands and Czech Republic. Clinical variables were measured at baseline and 6 months after start of treatment. In Phase I analysis samples were analysed for association with MTX response using ordinal regression of ACR-pedi categories and linear regression of change in clinical variables, and identified 31 genetic regions (P<0.001). Phase II analysis increased SNP density in the most strongly associated regions, identifying 14 regions (P<1×10−5): three contain genes of particular biological interest (ZMIZ1, TGIF1 and CFTR). These data suggest a role for novel pathways in MTX response and further investigations within associated regions will help reach our goal of predicting response to MTX in JIA. PMID:24709693

  8. Systemic onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis with macrophage activation syndrome and coronary artery dilatation misdiagnosed as Kawasaki disease.

    PubMed

    Keskindemirci, Gonca; Aktay Ayaz, Nuray; Melikoğlu, Neslihan; Bornaun, Helen; Aydoğmuş, Çiğdem; Aldemir, Esin; Aydoğan, Gönül

    2015-01-01

    Systemic onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis (SoJIA) is characterized by arthritis, fever and visceral organ involvement including hepatosplenomegaly, lympadenopathy and serositis. This is a case of SoJIA misdiagnosed as Kawasaki disease (KD) and developed machrophage activation syndrome (MAS) secondary to Ebstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection. It is presented to point out the conditions that may come along. First of all, SoJIA should be kept in mind while making the differential diagnosis of coronary arterial ectasias and dilatations usually seen in vasculitic diseases like KD. Second, as a very fatal complication MAS should always be considered while following a patient with the diagnosis of SoJIA. Infections like EBV may be the potential triggers for development of MAS especially in immunesupressed patients. PMID:27411422

  9. The uveitis and its relationship with disease activity and quality of life in Moroccan children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ezzahri, M; Amine, B; Rostom, S; Rifay, Y; Badri, D; Mawani, N; Gueddari, S; Shyen, S; Wabi, M; Moussa, F; Abouqal, R; Chkirate, B; Hajjaj-Hassouni, N

    2013-09-01

    The aim of our study is to investigate ocular involvement in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) and its relationship with disease activity and quality of life in Moroccan patients who suffer from JIA. This is a cross-sectional study conducted between January and June 2012 which includes patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (n = 30). All patients have undergone clinical and paraclinical assessment of JIA and a complete eye examination. Functional impairment is assessed by the Childhood Health Assessment Questionnaire while visual function is studied by the Effect of Youngsters' Eyesight in Quality of Life instrument (EYE-Q). Quality of life is assessed using the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory Version 4.0 (PedsQL 4.0). Four patients (13.33 %) have uveitis with a confidence interval between 3.4 and 30.7. Involvement is bilateral in three children (75 %). One patient (25 %) has elevated intraocular pressure with loss of the right eye due to glaucoma. There is a strong but not significant relationship between uveitis and the number of awakenings (r = 0.71, p = 0.69) and morning stiffness (r = 3.05, p = 0, 21). This relationship is moderate with erythrocyte sedimentation rate (r = 0.48, p = 0.78) and C-reactive protein (r = 0.25, p = 0.88). A strong but not significant association is found between the overall quality of life assessed by the PedsQL 4.0 and visual function assessed by EYE-Q in the uveitis group (r = -0.64, p = 0.55). This study suggests that uveitis associated with JIA can present serious complications and could have a direct relationship with the activity of the JIA as well as with the quality of life of the patient. PMID:23636793

  10. Foot function is well preserved in children and adolescents with juvenile idiopathic arthritis who are optimally managed

    PubMed Central

    Hendry, Gordon J.; Rafferty, Danny; Barn, Ruth; Gardner-Medwin, Janet; Turner, Debbie E.; Woodburn, James

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The objective of this study was to compare disease activity, impairments, disability, foot function and gait characteristics between a well described cohort of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients and normal healthy controls using a 7-segment foot model and three-dimensional gait analysis. Methods Fourteen patients with JIA (mean (standard deviation) age of 12.4 years (3.2)) and a history of foot disease and 10 healthy children (mean (standard deviation) age of 12.5 years (3.4)) underwent three-dimensional gait analysis and plantar pressure analysis to measure biomechanical foot function. Localised disease impact and foot-specific disease activity were determined using the juvenile arthritis foot disability index, rear- and forefoot deformity scores, and clinical and musculoskeletal ultrasound examinations respectively. Mean differences between groups with associated 95% confidence intervals were calculated using the t distribution. Results Mild-to-moderate foot impairments and disability but low levels of disease activity were detected in the JIA group. In comparison with healthy subjects, minor trends towards increased midfoot dorsiflexion and reduced lateral forefoot abduction within a 3–5° range were observed in patients with JIA. The magnitude and timing of remaining kinematic, kinetic and plantar pressure distribution variables during the stance phase were similar for both groups. Conclusion In children and adolescents with JIA, foot function as determined by a multi-segment foot model did not differ from that of normal age- and gender-matched subjects despite moderate foot impairments and disability scores. These findings may indicate that tight control of active foot disease may prevent joint destruction and associated structural and functional impairments. PMID:23142184

  11. Determinants of health-related quality of life impairment in Egyptian children and adolescents with juvenile idiopathic arthritis: Sharkia Governorate.

    PubMed

    Abdul-Sattar, Amal B; Elewa, Enass A; El-Shahawy, Eman El-Dessoky; Waly, Eman H

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the possible determinants of impaired health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in Egyptian children and adolescents with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Fifty-eight consecutive patients of JIA aged from 8 to 18 years underwent assessment of socio-economic and demographic characteristics; HRQOL using Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory 4.0 Generic Core Scale, disease activity using the Juvenile Arthritis Disease Activity Score based on 27 joints (JADAS-27), functional ability using the childhood health assessment questionnaire (CHAQ), pain score on visual analog scale and psychological symptoms using the Children's Depression Inventory (CDI) score. Multivariate modeling was applied to determine the factors that associated with HRQOL impairment. A total of 55 % of the patients (32 of 58) had impaired HRQOL (<78.6). In multiple regression analyses, high CHAQ scores (OR 6.0, 95 % CI 2.0-17.5, P = 0.001), pain (OR 3.1, 95 % CI 1.9-6.3, P = 0.01), stop going to school (OR 3.9, 95 % CI 2.0-7.3, P = 0.01), low socioeconomic status (OR 2.3, 95 % CI 1.09-4.7, P = 0.04) and high psychological symptoms (OR 4.2, 95 % CI 2.0-12.6, P = 0.001) were determinants for HRQOL impairment. HRQOL impairment is a significant problem in Egyptian children and adolescents with JIA. These findings underscore the critical need for monitoring of HRQOL in these patients. More attention should be given to JIA patients who stop going to school and who has low socioeconomic status. PMID:24469640

  12. Genome-wide data reveal novel genes for methotrexate response in a large cohort of juvenile idiopathic arthritis cases.

    PubMed

    Cobb, J; Cule, E; Moncrieffe, H; Hinks, A; Ursu, S; Patrick, F; Kassoumeri, L; Flynn, E; Bulatović, M; Wulffraat, N; van Zelst, B; de Jonge, R; Bohm, M; Dolezalova, P; Hirani, S; Newman, S; Whitworth, P; Southwood, T R; De Iorio, M; Wedderburn, L R; Thomson, W

    2014-08-01

    Clinical response to methotrexate (MTX) treatment for children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) displays considerable heterogeneity. Currently, there are no reliable predictors to identify non-responders: earlier identification could lead to a targeted treatment. We genotyped 759 JIA cases from the UK, the Netherlands and Czech Republic. Clinical variables were measured at baseline and 6 months after start of the treatment. In Phase I analysis, samples were analysed for the association with MTX response using ordinal regression of ACR-pedi categories and linear regression of change in clinical variables, and identified 31 genetic regions (P<0.001). Phase II analysis increased SNP density in the most strongly associated regions, identifying 14 regions (P<1 × 10(-5)): three contain genes of particular biological interest (ZMIZ1, TGIF1 and CFTR). These data suggest a role for novel pathways in MTX response and further investigations within associated regions will help to reach our goal of predicting response to MTX in JIA. PMID:24709693

  13. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis and rheumatoid arthritis: bacterial diversity in temporomandibular joint synovial fluid in comparison with immunological and clinical findings.

    PubMed

    Olsen-Bergem, H; Kristoffersen, A K; Bjørnland, T; Reseland, J E; Aas, J A

    2016-03-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) involvement in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) occurs in up to 80% of affected children. The purpose of this study was to investigate the presence of bacterial DNA in synovial fluid, and to compare this with clinical and immunological findings in children with JIA, adults with persistent JIA, and adults with rheumatoid arthritis, in order to detect whether bacteria contribute to inflammation in TMJ arthritis. Synovial fluid and skin swab samples were collected from 30 patients (54 TMJs). Bacterial detection was performed using 16S rRNA pyrosequencing. Bacterial DNA was detected in 31 TMJs (57%) in 19 patients (63%). A positive statistically significant correlation was registered between bacterial DNA detected in TMJ synovial fluid and the following factors: total protein concentration in synovial fluid, interleukin 1β, tumour necrosis factor alpha, adrenocorticotropic hormone, and adiponectin, as well as the duration of the general medical disease. Fourteen different bacterial species were detected in synovial fluid. Bacterial DNA in TMJ synovial fluid without contamination was detected in more than 50% of the patients. Studies are needed to evaluate the consequences of this bacterial DNA in synovial fluid with regard to TMJ arthritis. PMID:26554824

  14. Gene Expression Signatures in Polyarticular Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis Demonstrate Disease Heterogeneity and Offer a Molecular Classification of Disease Subsets

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, Thomas A.; Barnes, Michael G.; Ilowite, Norman T.; Olson, Judyann C.; Sherry, David D.; Gottlieb, Beth S.; Aronow, Bruce J.; Pavlidis, Paul; Hinze, Claas; Thornton, Sherry; Thompson, Susan D.; Grom, Alexei A.; Colbert, Robert A.; Glass, David N.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Microarray analysis was used to determine whether children with recent onset polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) exhibit biologically or clinically informative gene expression signatures in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Methods Peripheral blood samples were obtained from 59 healthy children and 61 children with polyarticular JIA prior to treatment with second-line medications, such as methotrexate or biological agents. RNA was extracted from Ficoll-isolated mononuclear cells, fluorescently labeled and hybridized to Affymetrix U133 Plus 2.0 GeneChips. Data were analyzed using ANOVA at a 5% false discovery rate threshold after Robust Multi-Array Average pre-processing and Distance Weighted Discrimination normalization. Results Initial analysis revealed 873 probe sets for genes that were differentially expressed between polyarticular JIA and controls. Hierarchical clustering of these probe sets distinguished three subgroups within polyarticular JIA. Prototypical subjects within each subgroup were identified and used to define subgroup-specific gene expression signatures. One of these signatures was associated with monocyte markers, another with transforming growth factor β-inducible genes, and a third with immediate-early genes. Correlation of gene expression signatures with clinical and biological features of JIA subgroups suggests relevance to aspects of disease activity and supports the division of polyarticular JIA into distinct subsets. Conclusions PBMC gene expression signatures in recent onset polyarticular JIA reflect discrete disease processes and offer a molecular classification of disease. PMID:19565504

  15. Oral health and quality of life of children and adolescents with juvenile idiopathic arthritis according to their caregivers' perceptions.

    PubMed

    Santos, Débora; Silva, Carlos; Silva, Marlete

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the correlation between oral health indicators and oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL) of children and adolescents with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) according to their caregivers' perceptions. Parents or guardians (mean age, 40.6 years; standard deviation [SD] = 10.97 years) of children and adolescents with JIA (n = 17; mean age, 9.8 years; SD = 2.86) and parents or guardians of healthy children and adolescents (n = 15; mean age, 10.7 years; SD = 2.16) filled the short form of the Brazilian Parental-Caregiver Questionnaire (SF: 13 - B-PCPQ). Dental evaluations were performed on all children. There was no significant difference in SF: 13 - B-PCPQ scores of the two groups. Children and adolescents with JIA had fewer caries in their primary dentition and more gingival bleeding after probing than those without JIA. The frequency of temporomandibular disorders was 50.0% for JIA patients and 46.7% for their healthy counterparts. There was no correlation between oral health indicators and SF: 13 - B-PCPQ scores. As perceived by caregivers, JIA did not negatively impact the well-being of their children and adolescents as related to oral health, and their OHRQoL did not correlate with oral health status. PMID:26255878

  16. Premature subclinical atherosclerosis in children and young adults with juvenile idiopathic arthritis. A review considering preventive measures.

    PubMed

    Bohr, Anna-Helene; Fuhlbrigge, Robert C; Pedersen, Freddy Karup; de Ferranti, Sarah D; Müller, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Many studies show that Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) is associated with early subclinical signs of atherosclerosis. Chronic inflammation per se may be an important driver but other known risk factors, such as dyslipidemia, hypertension, insulin insensitivity, a physically inactive lifestyle, obesity, and tobacco smoking may also contribute substantially. We performed a systematic review of studies through the last 20 years on early signs of subclinical atherosclerosis in children and adolescents with JIA with the purpose of investigating whether possible risk factors, other than inflammation, were considered.We found 13 descriptive cross sectional studies with healthy controls, one intervention study and two studies on adults diagnosed with JIA. Only one study addressed obesity, and physical activity (PA) has only been assessed in one study on adults with JIA and only by self-reporting. This is important as studies on PA in children with JIA have shown that most patients are less physically active than their healthy peers, and as physical inactivity in several large studies of normal schoolchildren is found to be associated with increased clustering of risk factors for cardiovascular disease. It is thus possible that an inactive lifestyle in patients with JIA is an important contributor to development of the subclinical signs of atherosclerosis seen in children with JIA, and that promotion of an active lifestyle in childhood and adolescence may diminish the risk for premature atherosclerotic events in adulthood. PMID:26738563

  17. Understanding inflammation in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: How immune biomarkers guide clinical strategies in the systemic onset subtype.

    PubMed

    Swart, Joost F; de Roock, Sytze; Prakken, Berent J

    2016-09-01

    The translation of basic insight in immunological mechanisms underlying inflammation into clinical practice of inflammatory diseases is still challenging. Here we describe how-through continuous dialogue between bench and bedside-immunological knowledge translates into tangible clinical use in a complex inflammatory disease, juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Systemic JIA (sJIA) is an autoinflammatory disease, leading to the very successful use of IL-1 antagonists. Further immunological studies identified new immune markers for diagnosis, prediction of complications, response to and successful withdrawal of therapy. Myeloid related protein (MRP)8, MRP14, S100A12, and Interleukin-18 are already used daily in clinic as markers for active sJIA. For non-sJIA subtypes, HLA-B27, antinuclear-antibodies, rheumatoid factor, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and C-reactive protein are still used for classification, prognosis or active disease. MRP8, MRP14, and S100A12 are now under study for clinical practice. We believe that with biomarkers, algorithms can soon be designed for the individual risk of disease, complications, damage, prediction of response to, and successful withdrawal of therapy. In that way, less time will be lost and less pain will be suffered by the patients. In this review, we describe the current status of immunological biomarkers used in diagnosis and treatment of JIA. PMID:27461267

  18. Transscleral diode laser cyclophotocoagulation for refractory glaucoma secondary to juvenile idiopathic arthritis: a short term follow-up.

    PubMed

    Dastiridou, Anna I; Androudi, Sofia; Praidou, Anna; Brazitikos, Periklis; Brozou, Catherine G; Tsironi, Evangelia E

    2013-08-01

    To evaluate the success rates of transscleral diode cyclophotocoagulation (TD-CPC) for refractory secondary glaucoma in a paediatric patient with juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Report of a case of a 6-year-old boy suffering from severe uveitis, and secondary open angle glaucoma. The patient had undergone bilateral cataract surgery, two prior trabeculectomies in the left and one in the right eye. He was under systemic immunomodulation with methotrexate and cyclosporine. He presented with medically uncontrolled glaucoma, with an intraocular pressure (IOP) of 36 and 34 mmHg in the right and left eye, respectively, under maximal medical antiglaucoma therapy. TD-CPC was performed under general anesthesia, including a total of 20 spots in the right and 34 in the left eye (2,000 mW, 2 s/spot) applied in one session. Visual acuity remained stable in the right eye and deteriorated in the left eye from 0.1 to no light perception. Postoperative hypotony was present 1 month post op and IOP was 14 mmHg in the left and 17 mmHg in the right eye, respectively, in the 6-month follow-up with a topical beta-blocker. The anterior chamber was quiet in both eyes. TD-CPC was effective in the short term as IOP lowering therapy in a pediatric patient with refractory uveitic glaucoma. PMID:23160822

  19. Autologous stem cell transplantation for refractory juvenile idiopathic arthritis: analysis of clinical effects, mortality, and transplant related morbidity

    PubMed Central

    de Kleer, I M; Brinkman, D; Ferster, A; Abinun, M; Quartier, P; van der Net, J; ten, C; Wedderburn, L; Horneff, G; Oppermann, J; Zintl, F; Foster, H; Prieur, A; Fasth, A; van Rossum, M A J; Kuis, W; Wulffraat, N

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) for refractory juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Design: Retrospective analysis of follow up data on 34 children with JIA who were treated with ASCT in nine different European transplant centres. Rheumatological evaluation employed a modified set of core criteria. Immunological reconstitution and infectious complications were monitored at three month intervals after transplantation. Results: Clinical follow up ranged from 12 to 60 months. Eighteen of the 34 patients (53%) with a follow up of 12 to 60 months achieved complete drug-free remission. Seven of these patients had previously failed treatment with anti-TNF. Six of the 34 patients (18%) showed a partial response (ranging from 30% to 70% improvement) and seven (21%) were resistant to ASCT. Infectious complications were common. There were three cases of transplant related mortality (9%) and two of disease related mortality (6%). Conclusions: ASCT in severely ill patients with JIA induces a drug-free remission of the disease and a profound increase in general wellbeing in a substantial proportion of patients, but the procedure carries a significant mortality risk. The following adjustments are proposed for future protocols: (1) elimination of total body irradiation from the conditioning regimen; (2) prophylactic administration of antiviral drugs and intravenous immunoglobulins until there is a normal CD4+ T cell count. PMID:15361393

  20. Genetic Predictors of Poor Prognosis in Portuguese Patients with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis: Data from Reuma.pt

    PubMed Central

    Mourão, Ana Filipa; Santos, Maria José; Mendonça, Sílvia; Oliveira-Ramos, Filipa; Salgado, Manuel; Estanqueiro, Paula; Melo-Gomes, José; Martins, Fernando; Lopes, Ana; Bettencourt, Bruno Filipe; Bruges-Armas, Jácome; Costa, José; Furtado, Carolina; Figueira, Ricardo; Brito, Iva; Branco, Jaime; Fonseca, João Eurico; Canhão, Helena

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. This study aimed to assess the genetic determinants of poor outcome in Portuguese patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Methods. Our study was conducted in Reuma.pt, the Rheumatic Diseases Portuguese Register, which includes patients with JIA. We collected prospectively patient and disease characteristics and a blood sample for DNA analysis. Poor prognosis was defined as CHAQ/HAQ >0.75 at the last visit and/or the treatment with biological therapy. A selected panel of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with susceptibility was studied to verify if there was association with poor prognosis. Results. Of the 812 patients with JIA registered in Reuma.pt, 267 had a blood sample and registered information used to define “poor prognosis.” In univariate analysis, we found significant associations with poor prognosis for allele A of TNFA1P3/20 rs6920220, allele G of TRAF1/C5 rs3761847, and allele G of PTPN2 rs7234029. In multivariate models, the associations with TRAF1/C5 (1.96 [1.17–3.3]) remained significant at the 5% level, while TNFA1P3/20 and PTPN2 were no longer significant. Nevertheless, none of associations found was significant after the Bonferroni correction was applied. Conclusion. Our study does not confirm the association between a panel of selected SNP and poor prognosis in Portuguese patients with JIA. PMID:26504858

  1. SECONDARY OSTEOPOROSIS: PATHOPHYSIOLOGY AND MANAGEMENT

    PubMed Central

    Mirza, Faryal; Canalis, Ernesto

    2015-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a skeletal disorder characterized by decreased bone mineral density and compromised bone strength predisposing to an increased risk of fractures. Although idiopathic osteoporosis is the most common form of osteoporosis, secondary factors may contribute to the bone loss and increased fracture risk in patients presenting with fragility fractures or osteoporosis. Several medical conditions and medications significantly increase the risk for bone loss and skeletal fragility. This review focuses on some of the common causes of osteoporosis, addressing the underlying mechanisms, diagnostic approach and treatment of low bone mass in the presence of these conditions. PMID:25971649

  2. Operative stabilization of the remaining mobile segment in ankylosed cervical spine in systemic onset - juvenile idiopathic arthritis: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Suhodolčan, Lovro; Mihelak, Marko; Brecelj, Janez; Vengust, Rok

    2016-01-01

    We describe a case of a 19-year-old young man with oligoarthritis type of juvenile idiopathic arthritis, who presented with several month duration of lower neck pain and progressive muscular weakness of all four limbs. X-rays of the cervical spine demonstrated spontaneous apophyseal joint fusion from the occipital condyle to C6 and from C7 to Th2 with marked instability between C6 and C7. Surgical intervention began with anterolateral approach to the cervical spine performing decompression, insertion of cage and anterior vertebral plate and screws, followed by posterior approach and fixation. Care was taken to restore sagittal balance. The condition was successfully operatively managed with multisegmental, both column fixation and fusion, resulting in pain cessation and resolution of myelopathy. Postoperatively, minor swallowing difficulties were noted, which ceased after three days. Patient was able to move around in a wheelchair on the sixth postoperative day. Stiff neck collar was advised for three months postoperatively with neck pain slowly decreasing in the course of first postoperative month. On the follow-up visit six months after the surgery patient exhibited no signs of spastic tetraparesis, X-rays of the cervical spine revealed solid bony fusion at single mobile segment C6-C7. He was able to gaze horizontally while sitting in a wheelchair. Signs of myelopathy with stiff neck and single movable segment raised concerns about intubation, but were successfully managed using awake fiber-optic intubation. Avoidance of tracheostomy enabled us to perform an anterolateral approach without increasing the risk of wound infection. Regarding surgical procedure, the same principles are obeyed as in management of fracture in ankylosing spondylitis or Mb. Forestrier. PMID:27458558

  3. Methotrexate efficacy and tolerability after switching from oral to subcutaneous route of administration in juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Turowska-Heydel, Dorota; Sobczyk, Małgorzata; Banach-Górnicka, Marta; Rusnak, Katarzyna; Piszczek, Anna; Mężyk, Elżbieta

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Methotrexate (MTX) is one of the most frequently used, highly effective disease-modifying drugs in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) therapy. The drug can be administered orally or subcutaneously, but the efficacy and tolerance of these two routes of administration raise doubts in JIA patients. The aim of the study was to evaluate MTX efficacy and tolerability after switching from the oral to the subcutaneous route of administration in children with JIA. Material and methods A single-centre, questionnaire-based assessment of MTX efficacy and tolerance in 126 unselected JIA patients with longer than 6 months of follow-up was performed. In all patients, MTX was initially administered orally. The response to MTX treatment was analysed according to American College of Rheumatology (ACR) paediatric criteria. Results Six-month MTX therapy was effective (ACR score ≥ 30) in 83 children (65.9%). The oral route of MTX administration was changed to subcutaneous in 32 patients after a mean period of 14 months due to intolerance (n = 20) or reluctance to take the oral formulation (n = 12). This group of children was significantly younger (p = 0.02) but did not differ from the group of children that continued oral treatment in other aspects, including MTX dose. Six months after switching from oral to subcutaneous MTX the ACR score remained unchanged. Three children (9.4%) still reported symptoms of drug intolerance. Conclusions The switch from oral to subcutaneous MTX may increase the response rate in JIA patients with intolerance of its oral formulation. The reluctance to take oral MTX can be anticipated in early childhood, and should be considered in the individualization of therapy, having also in mind the lower risk of severe gastrointestinal adverse drug reactions. PMID:27407272

  4. Operative stabilization of the remaining mobile segment in ankylosed cervical spine in systemic onset - juvenile idiopathic arthritis: A case report.

    PubMed

    Suhodolčan, Lovro; Mihelak, Marko; Brecelj, Janez; Vengust, Rok

    2016-07-18

    We describe a case of a 19-year-old young man with oligoarthritis type of juvenile idiopathic arthritis, who presented with several month duration of lower neck pain and progressive muscular weakness of all four limbs. X-rays of the cervical spine demonstrated spontaneous apophyseal joint fusion from the occipital condyle to C6 and from C7 to Th2 with marked instability between C6 and C7. Surgical intervention began with anterolateral approach to the cervical spine performing decompression, insertion of cage and anterior vertebral plate and screws, followed by posterior approach and fixation. Care was taken to restore sagittal balance. The condition was successfully operatively managed with multisegmental, both column fixation and fusion, resulting in pain cessation and resolution of myelopathy. Postoperatively, minor swallowing difficulties were noted, which ceased after three days. Patient was able to move around in a wheelchair on the sixth postoperative day. Stiff neck collar was advised for three months postoperatively with neck pain slowly decreasing in the course of first postoperative month. On the follow-up visit six months after the surgery patient exhibited no signs of spastic tetraparesis, X-rays of the cervical spine revealed solid bony fusion at single mobile segment C6-C7. He was able to gaze horizontally while sitting in a wheelchair. Signs of myelopathy with stiff neck and single movable segment raised concerns about intubation, but were successfully managed using awake fiber-optic intubation. Avoidance of tracheostomy enabled us to perform an anterolateral approach without increasing the risk of wound infection. Regarding surgical procedure, the same principles are obeyed as in management of fracture in ankylosing spondylitis or Mb. Forestrier. PMID:27458558

  5. Expert consensus on dynamics of laboratory tests for diagnosis of macrophage activation syndrome complicating systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Ravelli, Angelo; Minoia, Francesca; Davì, Sergio; Horne, AnnaCarin; Bovis, Francesca; Pistorio, Angela; Aricò, Maurizio; Avcin, Tadej; Behrens, Edward M; De Benedetti, Fabrizio; Filipovic, Alexandra; Grom, Alexei A; Henter, Jan-Inge; Ilowite, Norman T; Jordan, Michael B; Khubchandani, Raju; Kitoh, Toshiyuki; Lehmberg, Kai; Lovell, Daniel J; Miettunen, Paivi; Nichols, Kim E; Ozen, Seza; Pachlopnik Schmid, Jana; Ramanan, Athimalaipet V; Russo, Ricardo; Schneider, Rayfel; Sterba, Gary; Uziel, Yosef; Wallace, Carol; Wouters, Carine; Wulffraat, Nico; Demirkaya, Erkan; Brunner, Hermine I; Martini, Alberto; Ruperto, Nicolino; Cron, Randy Q

    2016-01-01

    Objective To identify which laboratory tests that change over time are most valuable for the timely diagnosis of macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) complicating systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA). Methods A multistep process, based on a combination of expert consensus and analysis of real patient data, was conducted. A panel of experts was first asked to evaluate 115 profiles of patients with MAS, which included the values of laboratory tests at the pre-MAS visit and at MAS onset, and the change in values between the two time points. The experts were asked to choose the 5 laboratory tests in which change was most important for the diagnosis of MAS and to rank the 5 selected tests in order of importance. The relevance of change in laboratory parameters was further discussed and ranked by the same experts at a consensus conference. Results Platelet count was the most frequently selected test, followed by ferritin level, aspartate aminotransferase (AST), white cell count, neutrophil count, and fibrinogen and erythrocyte sedimentation rate. Ferritin was most frequently assigned the highest score. At the end of the process, platelet count, ferritin level and AST were the laboratory tests in which the experts found change over time to be most important. Conclusions We identified the laboratory tests in which change over time is most valuable for the early diagnosis of MAS in sJIA. The dynamics of laboratory values during the course of MAS should be further scrutinised in a prospective study in order to establish the optimal cut-off values for their variation. PMID:26848401

  6. Is high-resolution ultrasonography suitable for the detection of temporomandibular joint involvement in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis?

    PubMed Central

    Assaf, AT; Kahl-Nieke, B; Feddersen, J; Habermann, CR

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study was to determine the potential of high-resolution ultrasonography for the detection of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) changes in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Methods: We investigated prospectively 20 children (17 female and 3 male; mean age 11.06 years, standard deviation 3.43 years) with TMJ disorders caused by JIA, over a period of 16 months. Using a 12 MHz array transducer, four images in each TMJ (160 images) were acquired. Each image was analysed with regard to five different aspects (condylar erosion, thickness of the condylar disc, synovial thickness, joint effusion and enlargement of the intra-articular space). Results: Diagnosis of JIA was ensured for every child and involvement of the TMJ was proven by MRI. Overall 287 changes (35.9%) were detected by using high-resolution ultrasonography. On 124 images (77.5%) condylar erosions were diagnosed; on 55 images (34.4%) synovial thickness was abnormal; on 48 images (30%) we could see higher thickness of the condylar disc; on 40 images (25%) irregularities of the bony surface were detected; and on 20 images (12.5%) we found joint effusion. Conclusion: High-resolution ultrasonography could be a sufficient diagnostic method, especially for the detection of condylar involvement in children with JIA, even if not all parts of the TMJ are visible for ultrasonography. High-resolution ultrasonography is a valuable tool in particular situations: (i) when MRI examination is not available; (ii) when children fear MRI examination; (iii) in more advanced stages of JIA; and (iv) for monitoring the progression of TMJ involvement and response of therapy. PMID:23439686

  7. The impact of disease activity and tumour necrosis factor-α inhibitor therapy on cytokine levels in juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Walters, H M; Pan, N; Lehman, T J A; Adams, A; Kalliolias, G D; Zhu, Y S; Santiago, F; Nguyen, J; Sitaras, L; Cunningham-Rundles, S; Walsh, T J; Toussi, S S

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate prospectively cytokine levels and disease activity in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients treated with and without tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α inhibitors. TNF-α inhibitor-naive JIA subjects were followed prospectively for 6 months. Cytokine levels of TNF-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10 and IL-17 were measured at baseline for JIA subjects and healthy controls (HCs). Cytokine levels were then measured at four time-points after initiation of TNF-α inhibition for anti-TNF-α-treated (anti-TNF) JIA subjects, and at two subsequent time-points for other JIA (non-TNF) subjects. JIA disease activity by Childhood Health Assessment Questionnaire (CHAQ) disability index/pain score and physician joint count/global assessment was recorded. Sixteen anti-TNF, 31 non-TNF and 16 HCs were analysed. Among JIA subjects, those with higher baseline disease activity (subsequent anti-TNFs) had higher baseline TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-8 than those with lower disease activity (non-TNFs) (P < 0·05). TNF-α and IL-10 increased, and IL-6 and IL-8 no longer remained significantly higher after TNF-α inhibitor initiation in anti-TNF subjects. Subgroup analysis of etanercept versus adalimumab-treated subjects showed that TNF-α and IL-17 increased significantly in etanercept but not adalimumab-treated subjects, despite clinical improvement in both groups of subjects. JIA subjects with increased disease activity at baseline had higher serum proinflammatory cytokines. TNF-α inhibition resulted in suppression of IL-6 and IL-8 in parallel with clinical improvement in all anti-TNF-treated subjects, but was also associated with elevated TNF-α and IL-17 in etanercept-treated subjects. PMID:26934060

  8. Body composition in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis: effect of dietary intake of macronutrient: results from a cross sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Hari, Asmae; Rostom, Samira; Hassani, Asmae; El Badri, Dalal; Bouaadi, Ilham; Barakat, Amina; Chkirat, Bouchra; Elkari, Khalid; Amine, Bouchra; Hajjaj-Hassouni, Najia

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between macronutrient intake, body composition (lean body mass and fat mass) and bone mineral content in Moroccan children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Methods A cross-sectional study, conducted between May 2010 and June 2011, covering out patient with JIA. The characteristics of patients were collected. The nutritional status was assessed by a food questionnaire including data of food intake during 7 consecutive days using 24-hour dietary recall. Food intake was quantified using the software Bilnut (Bilnut version 2.01, 1991). Dietary intake of macronutrients was expressed as percentage contribution to total energy. Body composition was evaluated with DXA total-body measurements (bone mineral content BMC expressed in g, lean body mass LBM and fat mass FM expressed in kg). Results 33 patients were included. The mean age was 10.4 ± 4.3 years. The median disease duration was 2 (1-4.5) years. The median of LBM, FM and BMC were 19 kg (13.82-33.14), 5 kg (3.38-9.14) and 1044.90 g (630.40-1808.90) respectively. We found a positive correlation between LBM and dietary intake of carbohydrate (r= 0.4; p = 0.03). There were no significant association between LBM and intake of lipids, or protein. Moreover, no association was found between FM, BMC and intake of carbohydrates, lipids and proteins. Conclusion This study suggests that there is a positive correlation between carbohydrates intake and LBM; however, dietary intake does not influence FM and BMC. Prospective studies with larger numbers of patients appear to be needed to confirm our findings. PMID:26161167

  9. Fever as an Initial Manifestation of Enthesitis-Related Arthritis Subtype of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis: Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Ruru; Cao, Lanfang; Kong, Xianming; Liu, Xuesong; Xue, Haiyan; Shen, Lijuan; Li, Xiaoli

    2015-01-01

    Objective We wished to determine the prevalence of fever as one of the first symptoms of the enthesitis-related arthritis (ERA) subtype of juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Also, we wished to ascertain if ERA patients with fever at disease onset differed from those without fever. Methods Consecutive cases of ERA were diagnosed and followed in a retrospective observational study from 1998 to 2013. Information about clinical/laboratory data, medications, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and disease activity during the study period was also recorded. Results A total of 146 consecutive ERA patients were assessed. Among them, 52 patients (35.6%) had fever as one of the first symptoms at disease onset. Compared with ERA patients without fever at disease onset, patients with fever had significantly more painful joints (3.5 vs. 2.8), more swollen joints (1.1 vs. 0.8), and more enthesitis (1.0 vs. 0.4) (p<0.05 for all comparisons). Patients with fever had significantly higher mean values of erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein, platelet count, and child health assessment questionnaire (CHAQ) scores (40.8 vs. 26.4 mm/h; 20.7 vs. 9.7 mg/dL; 353.2×109/L vs. 275.6×109/L; 1.0 vs. 0.8, respectively; all p<0.05). During two-year follow-up, CHAQ score, number of flares, as well as the number of patients treated with oral non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, corticosteroids and combination therapy with disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs, were significantly higher in ERA patients with fever. Conclusions Fever was a frequent manifestation of ERA. ERA patients with fever had more active disease at disease onset and poorer outcomes than ERA patients without fever. PMID:26030261

  10. Safety of celecoxib and nonselective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: results of the phase 4 registry

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background This study aimed to assess long-term safety and developmental data on juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients treated in routine clinical practice with celecoxib or nonselective nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (nsNSAIDs). Methods Children aged ≥2 to <18 years with rheumatoid-factor–positive or –negative polyarthritis, persistent or extended oligoarthritis, or systemic arthritis were enrolled into this prospective, observational, multicenter standard-of-care registry. Eligible patients were newly or recently prescribed (≤6 months) an nsNSAID or celecoxib. Enrolled patients were followed to the end of the study, whether they remained on the original NSAID, switched, or discontinued therapy altogether. All adverse events (AEs) regardless of severity were captured in the database. Results A total of 274 patients (nsNSAID, n = 219; celecoxib, n = 55) were observed for 410 patient-years of observation. Naproxen, meloxicam, and nabumetone were the most frequently used nsNSAIDs. At baseline, the celecoxib group was older, had a numerically longer median time since diagnosis, and a numerically higher proportion of patients with a history of gastrointestinal-related NSAID intolerance. AEs reported were those frequently observed with NSAID treatment and were similar across groups (nsNSAIDs: 52.0%; celecoxib: 52.9%). Twelve unique patients experienced a total of 18 serious AEs; the most frequent were infections, and none was attributed to NSAID use. Conclusions The safety profile of celecoxib and nsNSAIDs appears similar overall. The results from this registry, ongoing pharmacovigilance, and the phase 3 trial that led to the approval of celecoxib for children with JIA provide evidence that the benefit-risk for celecoxib treatment in JIA remains positive. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT00688545. PMID:25057265

  11. Th1-Induced CD106 Expression Mediates Leukocytes Adhesion on Synovial Fibroblasts from Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Luciani, Cristina; Capone, Manuela; Rossi, Maria Caterina; Chillà, Anastasia; Santarlasci, Veronica; Mazzoni, Alessio; Cimaz, Rolando; Liotta, Francesco; Maggi, Enrico; Cosmi, Lorenzo; Del Rosso, Mario; Annunziato, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that subsets of human T helper cells can orchestrate leukocyte adhesion to synovial fibroblasts (SFbs), thus regulating the retention of leukocytes in the joints of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients. Several cell types, such as monocytes/macrophages, granulocytes, T and B lymphocytes, SFbs and osteoclasts participate in joint tissue damage JIA. Among T cells, an enrichment of classic and non-classic Th1 subsets, has been found in JIA synovial fluid (SF), compared to peripheral blood (PB). Moreover, it has been shown that IL-12 in the SF of inflamed joints mediates the shift of Th17 lymphocytes towards the non-classic Th1 subset. Culture supernatants of Th17, classic and non-classic Th1 clones, have been tested for their ability to stimulate proliferation, and to induce expression of adhesion molecules on SFbs, obtained from healthy donors. Culture supernatants of both classic and non-classic Th1, but not of Th17, clones, were able to induce CD106 (VCAM-1) up-regulation on SFbs. This effect, mediated by tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, was crucial for the adhesion of circulating leukocytes on SFbs. Finally, we found that SFbs derived from SF of JIA patients expressed higher levels of CD106 than those from healthy donors, resembling the phenotype of SFbs activated in vitro with Th1-clones supernatants. On the basis of these findings, we conclude that classic and non-classic Th1 cells induce CD106 expression on SFbs through TNF-α, an effect that could play a role in leukocytes retention in inflamed joints. PMID:27123929

  12. Rare causes of osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Marcucci, Gemma; Brandi, Maria Luisa

    2015-01-01

    Summary Osteoporosis is a metabolic bone disease characterized by loss of bone mass and strength, resulting in increased risk of fractures. It is classically divided into primary (post-menopausal or senile), secondary and idiopathic forms. There are many rare diseases, that cause directly or indirectly osteoporosis. The identification and classification of most of these rare causes of osteoporosis is crucial for the specialists in endocrinology and not, in order to prevent this bone complication and to provide for an early therapy. Several pathogenic mechanisms are involved, including various aspects of bone metabolism such as: decreased bone formation, increased bone resorption, altered calcium, phosphorus and/or vitamin D homeostasis, and abnormal collagen synthesis. In this review, less common forms of primary and secondary osteoporosis are described, specifying, if applicable: genetic causes, epidemiology, clinical features, and pathogenic mechanisms causing osteoporosis. A greater awareness of all rare causes of osteoporosis could reduce the number of cases classified as idiopathic osteoporosis and allow the introduction of appropriate and timely treatments. PMID:26604941

  13. Juvenile Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    Juvenile arthritis (JA) is arthritis that happens in children. It causes joint swelling, pain, stiffness, and loss of motion. It can affect any joint, but ... of JA that children get is juvenile idiopathic arthritis. There are several other forms of arthritis affecting ...

  14. Genetics Home Reference: juvenile Paget disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... juvenile Paget disease: Genetic Testing Registry: Hyperphosphatasemia with bone disease These resources from MedlinePlus offer information about the ... familial osteoectasia hyperostosis corticalis deformans juvenilis hyperphosphatasemia ... idiopathic idiopathic hyperphosphatasia JPD juvenile Paget's ...

  15. Safety and feasibility of a home-based six week resistance training program in juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), among the most common chronic diseases of childhood, can be associated with attenuated physical activity levels, reduced fitness, decreased functionality and pain. This pilot study aimed to determine the safety, feasibility and effect of a six week resistance training program in children with JIA. Methods Youth (8-18 years) with JIA participated in a home-based resistance training program. Participants reported pain on an electronic diary once a day for one week prior to training, then once a day on non-exercise days and three times a day (before-exercise, after-exercise, and end-of-day) on exercise days for the subsequent six weeks of training. Secondary outcome measures included inflammation (assessed by ultrasound), muscle size (assessed by ultrasound), muscle strength (assessed by dynamometer) and functional ability (assessed by childhood health assessment questionnaire), measured at baseline and post-training. Participants were also instructed to wear an accelerometer one week prior to training to estimate baseline physical activity levels. Statistical analyses included safety (pain changes and any adverse events), feasibility (adherence to program and modifications made to exercises) and effect of program (differences in secondary measures pre and post training). An alpha level of p < 0.05 was accepted as significant. Results Seven participants completed an average of 12.7 ± 3.4 (range 8-17) exercise sessions out of a possible 18 (70.6%). No adverse events were reported and pain did not increase over the seven weeks. Secondary measures revealed a significant increase in vastus lateralis thickness from pre to post training (p < 0.05). End-of-day pain intensity was correlated to end-of-day stiffness, fatigue and mood (r = .864, r = .581, r = -.637, respectively, p < 0.001). Pain intensity was also correlated with ratings of perceived exertion of the exercise (r = 0.324, p < 0

  16. Evaluation of anti-citrullinated type II collagen and anti-citrullinated vimentin antibodies in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To determine the prevalence and significance of anti-citrullinated vimentin and anti-citrullinated type II collagen antibodies and elucidate their role in the disease process of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Methods Sera were obtained from 95 patients with various subtypes of JIA, 19 systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients, and 10 healthy children. Antibodies were measured in the sera against citrullinated and native type II collagen and vimentin (vim1-16 and vim 59-74) by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Samples were compared to anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP) antibody and rheumatoid factor (RF) isotypes, and our previously measured anti-citrullinated fibrinogen and α-enolase antibodies on the same patient population, in addition to erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein. The relationship between the anti-citrullinated antibody profile and disease activity and joint damage were also investigated. Results Twenty-three JIA patients (24%) demonstrated reactivity to anti-citrullinated type II collagen. Ten JIA patients (10.5%) demonstrated reactivity to anti-citrullinated vimentin 1–16 antibodies and 7 (7.4%) to anti-citrullinated vimentin 59–74 antibodies. One IgM RF-positive polyarticular patient was positive for all 5 of the citrullinated autoantibodies tested. Thirty-seven different subsets of patients were identified based on their anti-citrullinated autoantibody and RF isotype profile. No significant associations were noted with anti-citrullinated type II collagen and anti-citrullinated vimentin antibodies with joint damage or disease activity. Anti-citrullinated vimentin 59–74 antibodies demonstrated the highest overall specificity at 89.7%, with anti-citrullinated vimentin 1–16 and anti-citrullinated type II collagen antibodies at 86.2%. Conclusion This study demonstrates that antibodies to multiple citrullinated epitopes are present in the sera of patients with various subtypes of JIA. It also

  17. IDO1 Deficiency Does Not Affect Disease in Mouse Models of Systemic Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis and Secondary Hemophagocytic Lymphohistiocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Put, Karen; Brisse, Ellen; Avau, Anneleen; Imbrechts, Maya; Mitera, Tania; Janssens, Rik; Proost, Paul; Fallarino, Francesca; Wouters, Carine H.; Matthys, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase-1 (IDO1) is an immune-modulatory enzyme that catalyzes the degradation of tryptophan (Trp) to kynurenine (Kyn) and is strongly induced by interferon (IFN)-γ. We previously reported highly increased levels of IFN-γ and corresponding IDO activity in patients with hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH), a hyper-inflammatory syndrome. On the other hand, IFN-γ and IDO were low in patients with systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA), an autoinflammatory syndrome. As HLH can occur as a complication of sJIA, the opposing levels of both IFN-γ and IDO are remarkable. In animal models for sJIA and HLH, the role of IFN-γ differs from being protective to pathogenic. In this study, we aimed to unravel the role of IDO1 in the pathogenesis of sJIA and HLH. Methods Wild-type and IDO1-knockout (IDO1-KO) mice were used in 3 models of sJIA or HLH: complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA)-injected mice developed an sJIA-like syndrome and secondary HLH (sHLH) was evoked by either repeated injection of unmethylated CpG oligonucleotide or by primary infection with mouse cytomegalovirus (MCMV). An anti-CD3-induced cytokine release syndrome was used as a non-sJIA/HLH control model. Results No differences were found in clinical, laboratory and hematological features of sJIA/HLH between wild-type and IDO1-KO mice. As IDO modulates the immune response via induction of regulatory T cells and inhibition of T cell proliferation, we investigated both features in a T cell-triggered cytokine release syndrome. Again, no differences were observed in serum cytokine levels, percentages of regulatory T cells, nor of proliferating or apoptotic thymocytes and lymph node cells. Conclusions Our data demonstrate that IDO1 deficiency does not affect inflammation in sJIA, sHLH and a T cell-triggered cytokine release model. We hypothesize that other tryptophan-catabolizing enzymes like IDO2 and tryptophan 2,3-dioxygenase (TDO) might compensate for the lack of IDO1

  18. Osteoporosis in Men

    PubMed Central

    Khosla, Sundeep; Amin, Shreyasee; Orwoll, Eric

    2008-01-01

    With the aging of the population, there is a growing recognition that osteoporosis and fractures in men are a significant public health problem, and both hip and vertebral fractures are associated with increased morbidity and mortality in men. Osteoporosis in men is a heterogeneous clinical entity: whereas most men experience bone loss with aging, some men develop osteoporosis at a relatively young age, often for unexplained reasons (idiopathic osteoporosis). Declining sex steroid levels and other hormonal changes likely contribute to age-related bone loss, as do impairments in osteoblast number and/or activity. Secondary causes of osteoporosis also play a significant role in pathogenesis. Although there is ongoing controversy regarding whether osteoporosis in men should be diagnosed based on female- or male-specific reference ranges (because some evidence indicates that the risk of fracture is similar in women and men for a given level of bone mineral density), a diagnosis of osteoporosis in men is generally made based on male-specific reference ranges. Treatment consists both of nonpharmacological (lifestyle factors, calcium and vitamin D supplementation) and pharmacological (most commonly bisphosphonates or PTH) approaches, with efficacy similar to that seen in women. Increasing awareness of osteoporosis in men among physicians and the lay public is critical for the prevention of fractures in our aging male population. PMID:18451258

  19. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... lots of different symptoms, and some infections, like Lyme disease, have similar symptoms to JIA. So doctors will ... Parents MORE ON THIS TOPIC Lupus Immune System Lyme Disease Bones, Muscles, and Joints Contact Us Print Resources ...

  20. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions Most Common Searches Adult Strabismus Amblyopia Cataract Conjunctivitis Corneal Abrasions Dilating Eye Drops Lazy eye (defined) ... Loading... Most Common Searches Adult Strabismus Amblyopia Cataract Conjunctivitis Corneal Abrasions Dilating Eye Drops Lazy eye (defined) ...

  1. Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... vein that are done regularly at the hospital. Physical Therapy An appropriate physical therapy program is essential to the management of any type of arthritis. A physical therapist will explain the importance of certain activities ...

  2. Idiopathic hypersomnia

    MedlinePlus

    Hypersomnia - idiopathic; Drowsiness - idiopathic; Somnolence - idiopathic ... extremely sleepy. It is different from narcolepsy because idiopathic hypersomnia does not usually involve suddenly falling asleep (sleep ...

  3. In favour of the definition "adolescents with idiopathic scoliosis": juvenile and adolescent idiopathic scoliosis braced after ten years of age, do not show different end results. SOSORT award winner 2014

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The most important factor discriminating juvenile (JIS) from adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) is the risk of deformity progression. Brace treatment can change natural history, even when risk of progression is high. The aim of this study was to compare the end of growth results of JIS subjects, treated after 10 years of age, with final results of AIS. Methods Design: prospective observational controlled cohort study nested in a prospective database. Setting: outpatient tertiary referral clinic specialized in conservative treatment of spinal deformities. Inclusion criteria: idiopathic scoliosis; European Risser 0–2; 25 degrees to 45 degrees Cobb; start treatment age: 10 years or more, never treated before. Exclusion criteria: secondary scoliosis, neurological etiology, prior treatment for scoliosis (brace or surgery). Groups: 27 patients met the inclusion criteria for the AJIS, (Juvenile Idiopathic Scoliosis treated in adolescence), demonstrated by an x-ray before 10 year of age, and treatment start after 10 years of age. AIS group included 45 adolescents with a diagnostic x-ray made after the threshold of age 10 years. Results at the end of growth were analysed; the threshold of 5 Cobb degree to define worsened, improved and stabilized curves was considered. Statistics: Mean and SD were used for descriptive statistics of clinical and radiographic changes. Relative Risk of failure (RR), Chi-square and T-test of all data was calculated to find differences among the two groups. 95% Confidence Interval (CI) , and of radiographic changes have been calculated. Results We did not find any Cobb angle significant differences among groups at baseline and at the end of treatment. The only difference was in the number of patients progressed above 45 degrees, found in the JIS group. The RR of progression of AJIS was, 1.35 (IC95% 0.57-3.17) versus AIS, and it wasn't statistically significant in the AJIS group, in respect to AIS group (p = 0.5338). Conclusion

  4. Male osteoporosis: A review

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, Antonio; Lobo-Escolar, Antonio; Mateo, Jesús; Gil, Jorge; Ibarz, Elena; Gracia, Luis

    2012-01-01

    Osteoporosis in men is a heterogeneous disease that has received little attention. However, one third of worldwide hip fractures occur in the male population. This problem is more prevalent in people over 70 years of age. The etiology can be idiopathic or secondary to hypogonadism, vitamin D deficiency and inadequate calcium intake, hormonal treatments for prostate cancer, use of toxic and every disease or drug use that alters bone metabolism. Risk factors such as a previous history of fragility fracture should be assessed for the diagnosis. However, risk factors in men are very heterogeneous. There are significant differences in the pharmacological treatment of osteoporosis between men and women fundamentally due to the level of evidence in published trials supporting each treatment. New treatments will offer new therapeutic prospects. The goal of this work is a revision of the present status knowledge about male osteoporosis. PMID:23362466

  5. Male osteoporosis: A review.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Antonio; Lobo-Escolar, Antonio; Mateo, Jesús; Gil, Jorge; Ibarz, Elena; Gracia, Luis

    2012-12-18

    Osteoporosis in men is a heterogeneous disease that has received little attention. However, one third of worldwide hip fractures occur in the male population. This problem is more prevalent in people over 70 years of age. The etiology can be idiopathic or secondary to hypogonadism, vitamin D deficiency and inadequate calcium intake, hormonal treatments for prostate cancer, use of toxic and every disease or drug use that alters bone metabolism.Risk factors such as a previous history of fragility fracture should be assessed for the diagnosis. However, risk factors in men are very heterogeneous. There are significant differences in the pharmacological treatment of osteoporosis between men and women fundamentally due to the level of evidence in published trials supporting each treatment. New treatments will offer new therapeutic prospects. The goal of this work is a revision of the present status knowledge about male osteoporosis. PMID:23362466

  6. Genetics of osteoporosis: searching for candidate genes for bone fragility.

    PubMed

    Rocha-Braz, Manuela G M; Ferraz-de-Souza, Bruno

    2016-08-01

    The pathogenesis of osteoporosis, a common disease with great morbidity and mortality, comprises environmental and genetic factors. As with other complex disorders, the genetic basis of osteoporosis has been difficult to identify. Nevertheless, several approaches have been undertaken in the past decades in order to identify candidate genes for bone fragility, including the study of rare monogenic syndromes with striking bone phenotypes (e.g. osteogenesis imperfecta and osteopetroses), the analysis of individuals or families with extreme osteoporotic phenotypes (e.g. idiopathic juvenile and pregnancy-related osteoporosis), and, chiefly, genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in large populations. Altogether, these efforts have greatly increased the understanding of molecular mechanisms behind bone remodelling, which has rapidly translated into the development of novel therapeutic strategies, exemplified by the tales of cathepsin K (CTSK) and sclerostin (SOST). Additional biological evidence of involvement in bone physiology still lacks for several candidate genes arisen from GWAS, opening an opportunity for the discovery of new mechanisms regulating bone strength, particularly with the advent of high-throughput genomic technologies. In this review, candidate genes for bone fragility will be presented in comprehensive tables and discussed with regard to how their association with osteoporosis emerged, highlighting key players such as LRP5, WNT1 and PLS3. Current limitations in our understanding of the genetic contribution to osteoporosis, such as yet unidentified genetic modifiers, may be overcome in the near future with better genotypic and phenotypic characterisation of large populations and the detailed study of candidate genes in informative individuals with marked phenotype. PMID:27533615

  7. Assessment of the Therapeutic Effect of Total Glucosides of Peony for Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yongsong; Yuan, Qiling; Xu, Ke; Zhu, Jialin; Li, Yuanbo; Wu, Xiaoqing; Yang, Le; Qiu, Yusheng; Xu, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common rheumatic disease in children; some clinical trials have reported the effects of total glucosides of peony (TGP) in the treatment of JIA. However, no systematic review has yet been conducted. In this study, we assessed the efficacy and safety in patients with JIA enrolled in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of TGP. We extracted data for studies searched from 8 electronic databases that were searched and also evaluated the methodological quality of the included studies. We assessed the following outcome measures: overall response rate, pain, tender joint count (TJC), swollen joint count (SJC), duration of morning stiffness (DMS), grip strength (GS), rheumatoid factor (RF), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), C-reactive protein (CRP), and adverse effects (AEs) in short term (4-8 weeks), intermediate term (9-26 weeks), and long term (>26 weeks). The final analysis showed that TGP acted as a unique nonbiologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (nonbiologic DMARD), and its therapeutic effects were safe and efficacious for the treatment of JIA with few AEs. However, more high-quality RCTs are needed to confirm these therapeutic effects. PMID:27525026

  8. Assessment of the Therapeutic Effect of Total Glucosides of Peony for Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Yongsong; Yuan, Qiling; Xu, Ke; Zhu, Jialin; Li, Yuanbo; Wu, Xiaoqing; Yang, Le

    2016-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common rheumatic disease in children; some clinical trials have reported the effects of total glucosides of peony (TGP) in the treatment of JIA. However, no systematic review has yet been conducted. In this study, we assessed the efficacy and safety in patients with JIA enrolled in randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of TGP. We extracted data for studies searched from 8 electronic databases that were searched and also evaluated the methodological quality of the included studies. We assessed the following outcome measures: overall response rate, pain, tender joint count (TJC), swollen joint count (SJC), duration of morning stiffness (DMS), grip strength (GS), rheumatoid factor (RF), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), C-reactive protein (CRP), and adverse effects (AEs) in short term (4–8 weeks), intermediate term (9–26 weeks), and long term (>26 weeks). The final analysis showed that TGP acted as a unique nonbiologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drug (nonbiologic DMARD), and its therapeutic effects were safe and efficacious for the treatment of JIA with few AEs. However, more high-quality RCTs are needed to confirm these therapeutic effects. PMID:27525026

  9. A novel reactive epitope-based antigen targeted by serum autoantibodies in oligoarticular and polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis and development of an electrochemical biosensor.

    PubMed

    Araujo, Galber R; Fujimura, Patricia T; Vaz, Emília R; Silva, Tamiris A; Rodovalho, Vinícius R; Britto-Madurro, Ana Graci; Madurro, João M; Fonseca, João E; Silva, Carlos H M; Santos, Paula S; Mourão, Ana F; Canhão, Helena; Goulart, Luiz R; Gonçalves, João; Ueira-Vieira, Carlos

    2016-05-01

    Currently, there are no specific markers for juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) diagnosis, which is based on clinical symptoms and some blood tests for diseases' exclusion. Aiming to select new epitope-based antigens (mimotopes) that could recognize circulating autoantibodies in most JIA forms, we screened a phage displayed random peptide library against IgG antibodies purified from serum of JIA patients. ELISA assay was carried out to confirm immunoreactivity of selected peptides against sera IgG antibodies from JIA patients, healthy children and patients with other autoimmune diseases. The mimotope PRF+1 fused to phage particles was able to efficiently discriminate JIA patients from controls, and for this reason was chosen to be chemically synthesized for validation in a larger sample size. The synthetic peptide was immobilized onto bioelectrodes' surface for antibody detection by electrochemical analyses through differential pulse voltammetry. The PRF+1 synthetic peptide has efficiently discriminated JIA patients from control groups (p<0.0001) with a very good accuracy (AUC>0.84; sensitivity=61%; specificity=91%). The electrochemical platform proved to be fast, low cost and effective in detecting anti-PRF+1 antibodies from JIA patients compared to healthy controls (p=0.0049). Our study describes a novel and promising epitope-based biomarker for JIA diagnosis that can become a useful tool for screening tests, which was successfully incorporated onto an electrochemical biosensor and could be promptly used in field diagnostics. PMID:26806845

  10. Therapeutic Potential of Interferon-γ and Its Antagonists in Autoinflammation: Lessons from Murine Models of Systemic Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis and Macrophage Activation Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Avau, Anneleen; Matthys, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Interferon-γ (IFN-γ) affects immune responses in a complex fashion. Its immunostimulatory actions, such as macrophage activation and induction of T helper 1-type responsiveness, are widely acknowledged, however, as documented by a large body of literature, IFN-γ has also the potential to temper inflammatory processes via other pathways. In autoimmune and autoinflammatory disorders, IFN-γ can either play a disease-enforcing role or act as protective agent, depending on the nature of the disease. In animal models of any particular autoimmune disease, certain changes in the induction procedure can reverse the net outcome of introduction or ablation of IFN-γ. Here, we review the role of endogenous IFN-γ in inflammatory disorders and related murine models, with a focus on systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA) and macrophage activation syndrome (MAS). In particular, we discuss our recent findings in a mouse model of sJIA, in which endogenous IFN-γ acts as a regulatory agent, and compare with results from mouse models of MAS. Also, we elaborate on the complexity in the activity of IFN-γ and the resulting difficulty of predicting its value or that of its antagonists as treatment option. PMID:26610523

  11. Changes in fecal microbiota and metabolomics in a child with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) responding to two treatment periods with exclusive enteral nutrition (EEN).

    PubMed

    Berntson, Lillemor; Agback, Peter; Dicksved, Johan

    2016-06-01

    The microbiome and immune system of the digestive tract are highly important in both health and disease. Exclusive enteral nutrition (EEN) is a common anti-inflammatory treatment in children with Crohn's disease in the European countries, and the mechanism is most likely linked to changes in the intestinal microbiome. In the present study, EEN was given in two treatment periods several months apart to a patient with very severe, disabling juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), with a remarkable clinical response as the result. The aim of the present study was to study how the EEN treatment influenced the microbiome and metabolome of this patient. Fecal samples from before, during, and between treatments with EEN were studied. The microbiome was analyzed by sequencing of 16S rRNA amplicons using Illumina MiSeq, and the metabolome was analyzed using nuclear magnetic resonance. The microbiome changed markedly from treatment with EEN, with a strong reduction of the Bacteroidetes phylum. Metabolic profiles showed clear differences before, during, and between treatment with EEN, where butyrate, propionate, and acetate followed a cyclic pattern with the lowest levels at the end of each treatment period. This patient with JIA showed remarkable clinical improvement after EEN treatment, and we found corresponding changes in both the fecal microbiome and the metabolome. Further studies are needed to explore the pathophysiological role of the intestinal canal in children with JIA. PMID:27021336

  12. Osteoporosis (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Osteoporosis is a condition characterized by progressive loss of bone density, thinning of bone tissue and increased vulnerability to fractures. Osteoporosis may result from disease, dietary or hormonal deficiency ...

  13. Physical activity recommendations for children with specific chronic health conditions: Juvenile idiopathic arthritis, hemophilia, asthma and cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Philpott, J; Houghton, K; Luke, A

    2010-04-01

    As a group, children with a chronic disease or disability are less active than their healthy peers. There are many reasons for suboptimal physical activity, including biological, psychological and social factors. Furthermore, the lack of specific guidelines for 'safe' physical activity participation poses a barrier to increasing activity. Physical activity provides significant general health benefits and may improve disease outcomes. Each child with a chronic illness should be evaluated by an experienced physician for activity counselling and for identifing any contraindications to participation. The present statement reviews the benefits and risks of participation in sport and exercise for children with juvenile arthritis, hemophilia, asthma and cystic fibrosis. Guidelines for participation are included. PMID:21455465

  14. Physical activity recommendations for children with specific chronic health conditions: juvenile idiopathic arthritis, hemophilia, asthma, and cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Philpott, John F; Houghton, Kristin; Luke, Anthony

    2010-05-01

    As a group, children with a chronic disease or disability are less active than their healthy peers. There are many reasons for suboptimal physical activity, including biological, psychological, and social factors. Furthermore, the lack of specific guidelines for 'safe' physical activity participation poses a barrier to increasing activity. Physical activity provides significant general health benefits and may improve disease outcomes. Each child with a chronic illness should be evaluated by an experienced physician for activity counselling and for identifying any contraindications to participation. The present statement reviews the benefits and risks of participation in sport and exercise for children with juvenile arthritis, hemophilia, asthma, and cystic fibrosis. Guidelines for participation are included. PMID:20445355

  15. GABAergic neuron deficit as an idiopathic generalized epilepsy mechanism: the role of BRD2 haploinsufficiency in juvenile myoclonic epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Velíšek, Libor; Shang, Enyuan; Velíšková, Jana; Chachua, Tamar; Macchiarulo, Stephania; Maglakelidze, Giorgi; Wolgemuth, Debra J; Greenberg, David A

    2011-01-01

    Idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE) syndromes represent about 30% of all epilepsies. They have strong, but elusive, genetic components and sex-specific seizure expression. Multiple linkage and population association studies have connected the bromodomain-containing gene BRD2 to forms of IGE. In mice, a null mutation at the homologous Brd2 locus results in embryonic lethality while heterozygous Brd2+/- mice are viable and overtly normal. However, using the flurothyl model, we now show, that compared to the Brd2+/+ littermates, Brd2+/- males have a decreased clonic, and females a decreased tonic-clonic, seizure threshold. Additionally, long-term EEG/video recordings captured spontaneous seizures in three out of five recorded Brd2+/- female mice. Anatomical analysis of specific regions of the brain further revealed significant differences in Brd2+/- vs +/+ mice. Specifically, there were decreases in the numbers of GABAergic (parvalbumin- or GAD67-immunopositive) neurons along the basal ganglia pathway, i.e., in the neocortex and striatum of Brd2+/- mice, compared to Brd2+/+ mice. There were also fewer GABAergic neurons in the substantia nigra reticulata (SNR), yet there was a minor, possibly compensatory increase in the GABA producing enzyme GAD67 in these SNR cells. Further, GAD67 expression in the superior colliculus and ventral medial thalamic nucleus, the main SNR outputs, was significantly decreased in Brd2+/- mice, further supporting GABA downregulation. Our data show that the non-channel-encoding, developmentally critical Brd2 gene is associated with i) sex-specific increases in seizure susceptibility, ii) the development of spontaneous seizures, and iii) seizure-related anatomical changes in the GABA system, supporting BRD2's involvement in human IGE. PMID:21887291

  16. Serum levels of osteoprotegerin and receptor activator of nuclear factor -κB ligand in children with early juvenile idiopathic arthritis: a 2-year prospective controlled study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The clinical relevance of observations of serum levels of osteoprotegerin (OPG) and receptor activator of nuclear factor -κB ligand (RANKL) in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is not clear. To elucidate the potential role of OPG and RANKL in JIA we determined serum levels of OPG and RANKL in patients with early JIA compared to healthy children, and prospectively explored changes in relation to radiographic score, bone and lean mass, severity of the disease, and treatment. Methods Ninety children with early oligoarticular or polyarticular JIA (ages 6-18 years; mean disease duration 19.4 months) and 90 healthy children individually matched for age, sex, race, and county of residence, were examined at baseline and 2-year follow-up. OPG and RANKL were quantified by enzyme-immunoassay. Data were analyzed with the use of t-tests, ANOVA, and multiple regression analyses. Results Serum OPG was significantly lower in patients than controls at baseline, and there was a trend towards higher RANKL and a lower OPG/RANKL ratio. Patients with polyarthritis had significantly higher increments in RANKL from baseline to follow-up, compared to patients with oligoarthritis. RANKL was a significant negative predictor for increments in total body lean mass. Patients who were receiving corticosteroids (CS) or disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) at follow-up had higher OPG/RANKL ratio compared with patients who did not receive this medication. Conclusions The data supports that levels of OPG are lower in patients with JIA compared to healthy children, and higher levels of RANKL is associated with more serious disease. RANKL was a significant negative predictor of lean mass in patients with JIA. The OPG/RANKL ratio was higher in patients on DMARDs or CS treatment. PMID:21134287

  17. The majority of newly diagnosed patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis reach an inactive disease state within the first year of specialised care: data from a German inception cohort

    PubMed Central

    Sengler, Claudia; Niewerth, Martina; Liedmann, Ina; Föll, Dirk; Heiligenhaus, Arnd; Ganser, Gerd; Horneff, Gerd; Haas, Johannes-Peter; Minden, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    Objective To describe the disease characteristics of patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) included in an inception cohort, to analyse how many patients from each JIA category reach an inactive disease state within the first year of specialised care and to determine predictors for attaining inactive disease. Methods Patients with JIA were enrolled in this study at 11 large German paediatric rheumatology units within the first 12 months after diagnosis. Laboratory and clinical parameters such as JIA core criteria and data on the medication used were collected every 3 months. Non-parametric statistical testing was performed for the comparison of the JIA core criteria at follow-up. Generalised linear models were used to analyse differences in the rates at which inactive disease was reached and to determine potential predictors. Results Of the 695 patients with JIA included in this analysis, approximately 75% experienced a period of inactive disease under treatment with disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs and systemic steroids in most cases with systemic-onset JIA or polyarthritis at least once during the first 12 months in ICON. Significant improvements were observed in all JIA core criteria, in disease activity and in functional status from baseline to the 12-month follow-up. Younger age at onset, a shorter duration between symptom onset and diagnosis and a positive antinuclear antibody status increased the probability of attaining an inactive disease state. Conclusions The 12-month outcome of JIA was good under real-life conditions, with half of the patients having attained inactive disease with contemporary treatments. Since a short duration between symptom onset and diagnosis was correlated to a period of inactive disease, children suspected of having JIA should be transferred to specialised care as soon as possible. PMID:26688748

  18. Prospective surveillance study of acute respiratory infections, influenza-like illness and seasonal influenza vaccine in a cohort of juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Acute respiratory infections (ARI) are frequent in children and complications can occur in patients with chronic diseases. We evaluated the frequency and impact of ARI and influenza-like illness (ILI) episodes on disease activity, and the immunogenicity and safety of influenza vaccine in a cohort of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) patients. Methods Surveillance of respiratory viruses was conducted in JIA patients during ARI season (March to August) in two consecutive years: 2007 (61 patients) and 2008 (63 patients). Patients with ARI or ILI had respiratory samples collected for virus detection by real time PCR. In 2008, 44 patients were immunized with influenza vaccine. JIA activity index (ACRPed30) was assessed during both surveillance periods. Influenza hemagglutination inhibition antibody titers were measured before and 30-40 days after vaccination. Results During the study period 105 ARI episodes were reported and 26.6% of them were ILI. Of 33 samples collected, 60% were positive for at least one virus. Influenza and rhinovirus were the most frequently detected, in 30% of the samples. Of the 50 JIA flares observed, 20% were temporally associated to ARI. Influenza seroprotection rates were higher than 70% (91-100%) for all strains, and seroconversion rates exceeded 40% (74-93%). In general, response to influenza vaccine was not influenced by therapy or disease activity, but patients using anti-TNF alpha drugs presented lower seroconversion to H1N1 strain. No significant differences were found in ACRPed30 after vaccination and no patient reported ILI for 6 months after vaccination. Conclusion ARI episodes are relatively frequent in JIA patients and may have a role triggering JIA flares. Trivalent split influenza vaccine seems to be immunogenic and safe in JIA patients. PMID:23510667

  19. Long-Term Health-Related Quality of Life in German Patients with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis in Comparison to German General Population

    PubMed Central

    Barth, Swaantje; Haas, Johannes-Peter; Schlichtiger, Jenny; Molz, Johannes; Bisdorff, Betty; Michels, Hartmut; Hügle, Boris; Radon, Katja

    2016-01-01

    Objective Aims of the study were to investigate health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in adult patients with former diagnosis of Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA), to compare their HRQOL with the general population and to identify factors related to a poor outcome. Methods In 2012, a cross-sectional survey was performed by mailing a questionnaire to a large cohort of former and current patients of the German Centre for Rheumatology in Children and Adolescents. Only adult patients (≥18 years) with a diagnosis compatible with JIA were included (n = 2592; response 66%). The questionnaire included information about HRQOL (EQ5D), disease-related questions and socio-demographics. Prevalence and 95% confidence intervals (CI) of problems with mobility, self-care, usual activities, pain and anxiety/depression were standardized to the German general population. Factors associated with low HRQOL in JIA patients were identified using logistic regression models. Results Sixty-two percent of the study population was female; age range was 18–73 years. In all dimensions, JIA patients reported statistically significantly more problems than the general population with largest differences in the pain dimension (JIA patients 56%; 95%CI 55–58%; general population 28%; 26–29%) and the anxiety/depression dimension (28%; 27–29% vs. 4%; 4–5%). Lower HRQOL in JIA patients was associated with female sex, older age, lower level of education, still being under rheumatic treatment and disability. Conclusions HRQOL in adult JIA patients is considerably lower than in the general population. As this cohort includes historic patients the new therapeutic schemes available today are expected to improve HRQOL in future. PMID:27115139

  20. Tocilizumab in systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis in a real-world clinical setting: results from 1 year of postmarketing surveillance follow-up of 417 patients in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Yokota, Shumpei; Itoh, Yasuhiko; Morio, Tomohiro; Origasa, Hideki; Sumitomo, Naokata; Tomobe, Minako; Tanaka, Kunihiko; Minota, Seiji

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the safety and effectiveness of tocilizumab (TCZ) in patients with systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA) in real-world clinical settings in Japan. Methods Paediatric patients with sJIA initiating TCZ between April 2008 and February 2012 and those previously enrolled in clinical trials who initiated TCZ before April 2008 were enrolled in a Japanese registry surveillance programme. Safety and effectiveness parameters were collected for 52 weeks. Results Of 417 patients enrolled, mean age was 11.2 years and 48.0% were female. TCZ exposure was 407.0 patient-years (PYs). Baseline corticosteroid use was higher than in clinical trials. Rates of total adverse events (AEs) and serious AEs (SAEs) were 224.3/100 PYs and 54.5/100 PYs, respectively, with SAEs higher than previously reported. The most frequent AEs and SAEs were infections and infestations (69.8/100 PYs and 18.2/100 PYs, respectively). 74 serious infections occurred in 55 patients (18.2/100 PYs); higher than previously reported. 26 macrophage activation syndrome events were reported in 24 patients (6.4/100 PYs). Fever and rash symptoms improved from baseline to week 52 (54.6% to 5.6% and 43.0% to 5.6%, respectively). At 4 weeks, 8 weeks and 52 weeks, 90.5%, 96.2% and 99.0% of patients achieved normal C reactive protein levels (<0.3 mg/dL), respectively. Conclusions These first real-world data demonstrated that TCZ was well tolerated, with acceptable safety and effectiveness in patients with sJIA. Higher incidences of SAEs and serious infections may be due to differences, such as corticosteroid use and concomitant diseases, between patient populations enrolled in previously reported clinical trials and this study. PMID:26644233

  1. STAT4 rs7574865 G/T and PTPN22 rs2488457 G/C Polymorphisms Influence the Risk of Developing Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis in Han Chinese Patients

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Zhi-Dan; Wang, Fei-Fei; Huang, Hui; Huang, Na; Ma, Hui-Hui; Guo, Yi-Hong; Zhang, Ya-Yuan; Qian, Xiao-Qing; Yu, Hai-Guo

    2015-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is a common autoimmune disease characterized by environmental influences along with several predisposing genes in the pathogenesis. The protein tyrosine phosphatase nonreceptor 22 (PTPN22) and signal transducer and activator of transcription factor 4 (STAT4) have been recognized as susceptibility genes for numerous autoimmune diseases. Associations of STAT4 rs7574865 G/T and PTPN22 (rs2488457 G/C and rs2476601 C/T) polymorphisms with JIA have repeatedly been replicated in several Caucasian populations. The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of three polymorphisms mentioned above on the risk of developing JIA in Han Chinese patients. Genotyping was performed on a total of 137 Chinese patients with JIA (JIA group) and 150 sex and age frequency-matched healthy volunteers (Control group). The single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) were determined by using direct sequencing of PCR-amplified products. There were significant differences of PTPN22 rs2488457 G/C and STAT4 rs7574865 G/T polymorphisms between both groups. However, no significant difference was observed in distribution frequencies of PTPN22 rs2476601 polymorphism. The association with the PTPN22 rs2488457 G/C polymorphism remained significant in the stratifications by age at onset, ANA status, splenomegaly, lymphadenectasis and involvement joints. As with the STAT4 rs7574865 G/T polymorphisms, the enthesitis-related arthritis and presence of hepatomegaly had strong effect on the association. Our data strengthen STAT4 rs7574865 G/T and PTPN22 rs2488457 G/C polymorphisms as susceptibility factors for JIA. PMID:25781893

  2. Management of endocrine disease: Secondary osteoporosis: pathophysiology and management.

    PubMed

    Mirza, Faryal; Canalis, Ernesto

    2015-09-01

    Osteoporosis is a skeletal disorder characterized by decreased mass and compromised bone strength predisposing to an increased risk of fractures. Although idiopathic osteoporosis is the most common form of osteoporosis, secondary factors may contribute to the bone loss and increased fracture risk in patients presenting with fragility fractures or osteoporosis. Several medical conditions and medications significantly increase the risk for bone loss and skeletal fragility. This review focuses on some of the common causes of osteoporosis, addressing the underlying mechanisms, diagnostic approach and treatment of low bone mass in the presence of these conditions. PMID:25971649

  3. A review of osteoporosis management in younger premenopausal women.

    PubMed

    McLendon, Amber N; Woodis, C Brock

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to describe the available evidence for osteoporosis treatments in young and premenopausal women. A review of articles evaluating the treatment or prevention of osteoporosis in young (age less than 50 years) or premenopausal women was conducted. Several trials evaluating the treatment of anorexia nervosa and use of hormone therapy in those women, the use of bisphosphonates in women undergoing chemotherapy for breast cancer and the use of bisphosphonates, teriparatide and vitamin D in women with glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis are described. Limited data were found to support the treatment of osteoporosis in women with idiopathic osteoporosis or cystic fibrosis, or after kidney transplant. The evidence for treatment of osteoporosis in premenopausal women is not nearly as robust as that for postmenopausal osteoporosis. Although fracture risk in the premenopausal population is low, women with secondary osteoporosis may benefit from treatment with various agents, depending upon the condition. PMID:24328599

  4. Secondary osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Sheu, Angela; Diamond, Terry

    2016-06-01

    Secondary osteoporosis is less common than primary osteoporosis. It may be suspected in patients who present with a fragility fracture despite having no risk factors for osteoporosis. In addition, secondary osteoporosis should be considered if the bone density Z-score is -2.5 or less. Consider the fracture site and presence of other clinical clues to guide investigations for an underlying cause. The tests to use are those that are indicated for the suspected cause. Baseline investigations include tests for bone and mineral metabolism (calcium, phosphate, alkaline phosphatase, 25-hydroxyvitamin D, parathyroid hormone), liver and kidney function, full blood count and thyroid-stimulating hormone. More detailed testing may be required in patients with severe osteoporosis. PMID:27346916

  5. Treating osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Akhil; March, Lyn

    2016-01-01

    summary Osteoporotic fractures are common resulting in increased morbidity and mortality. Exercise can help prevent osteoporosis. It can also benefit patients with osteoporosis, but the exercises must be tailored to the patient. Most Australians should be able to obtain adequate calcium in their diet and vitamin D from the sun. Supplements may be needed in some patients and they are recommended for use with other drugs for osteoporosis. Bisphosphonates, and in some patients denosumab, are first-line drugs for osteoporosis. Raloxifene and strontium ranelate can be considered in patients who cannot take bisphosphonates or denosumab. Teriparatide is reserved for patients with severe osteoporosis and the use of strontium ranelate is declining because of cardiovascular safety concerns. PMID:27340321

  6. Secondary osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Sheu, Angela; Diamond, Terry

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Secondary osteoporosis is less common than primary osteoporosis. It may be suspected in patients who present with a fragility fracture despite having no risk factors for osteoporosis. In addition, secondary osteoporosis should be considered if the bone density Z-score is –2.5 or less. Consider the fracture site and presence of other clinical clues to guide investigations for an underlying cause. The tests to use are those that are indicated for the suspected cause. Baseline investigations include tests for bone and mineral metabolism (calcium, phosphate, alkaline phosphatase, 25-hydroxyvitamin D, parathyroid hormone), liver and kidney function, full blood count and thyroid-stimulating hormone. More detailed testing may be required in patients with severe osteoporosis. PMID:27346916

  7. Health-related quality of life in girls and boys with juvenile idiopathic arthritis: self- and parental reports in a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA) affects children and adolescents with both short-term and long-term disability. These children also report lower health-related quality of life (HRQOL) compared to their healthy peers. However, there seems to be some discrepancies between self- and parent-reports, and gender differences need to be further studied. This study aims to describe HRQOL in girls and boys with JIA, and to explore gender differences in self-reports compared to parent-reports of HRQOL in children with JIA. Methods Fifty-three children and adolescents with JIA (70% girls and 30% boys) with a median age of 14 years (8–18 years), and their parents, participated in this cross-sectional study in Sweden. Data was systematically collected prior to ordinary visits at a Pediatric outpatient clinic, during a period of 16 months (2009–2010). Disability was assessed with the Childhood Health Assessment Questionnaire (CHAQ), and disease activity by physicians’ assessments and Erythrocyte Sedimentation Rate (ESR). The Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory 4.0 Generic Core Scales (PedsQL) was used to assess self- and parent-reports of HRQOL in the child. Results In this sample of children with generally low disease activity and mild to moderate disability, more than half of the children experienced suboptimal HRQOL, equally in girls and boys. Significant differences between self- and parent-reports of child HRQOL were most evident among girls, with lower parent-reports regarding the girl’s physical- and psychosocial health as well as in the total HRQOL score. Except for the social functioning subscale, where parents’ reports were higher compared to their sons, there were no significant differences between boys- and parent-reports. Conclusions More than half of the girls and boys experienced suboptimal HRQOL in this sample, with no gender differences. However, there were differences between self- and parent-reports of child HRQOL, with most significant

  8. Association of microRNA-146a and its target gene IRAK1 polymorphism with enthesitis related arthritis category of juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sushma; Rai, Geeta; Aggarwal, Amita

    2014-10-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are non-coding RNA that modulate the expression of multiple target genes at the post-transcriptional level. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in pre-miRNAs can alter miRNA expression, and polymorphism in target molecules can affect binding to target mRNA. Studies have shown an association between miR-146a gene polymorphism and autoimmune diseases. A target for miR-146a is IRAK1. We studied the SNPs of miRNA-146 and IRAK1 to see their association with susceptibility to juvenile idiopathic arthritis-enthesitis-related arthritis (JIA-ERA). One hundred and fifty patients with JIA-ERA (ILAR criteria) were included in the study. A total of 216 blood donors (201 male) with a mean age of 30.5 years served as controls. miR-146a (rs2910164) and its target IRAK1 (rs1059703) at exon-12 region and IRAK1 (rs3027898) at 3'UTR polymorphisms were analyzed using PCR-RFLP method. Among 150 patients, 133 were males and the mean age at onset of disease was 11 (4-16) years, mean disease duration was 4.5 (0.3-12) years. Twenty-two had uveitis and 21 had positive family history of spondyloarthropathy, 73 had enthesitis, 75 had inflammatory back pain, and all had arthritis. HLA B27 was present in 116 patients. Genotype frequency of miR-146a gene was in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in healthy controls. The genotype frequency for miR-146a was different in controls and patients [GG (51.85 vs. 50.0 %), GC (42.13 vs. 37.29 %) and CC (6.02 vs. 12.71 %), OR = 2.18; 95 % CI 1.02-4.68; p value = 0.0418]. The allele frequencies of IRAK1 (rs1059703) and IRAK1 (rs3027898) in males and genotype frequency in females were similar in controls and patients. The C allele of IRAK1 (rs1059703) was in linkage disequilibrium with T allele of IRAK1 (rs3027898). The CC genotype of the miR-146a rs2910164 polymorphism was significantly associated with the susceptibility to JIA-ERA. PMID:24719227

  9. HLA-DRB1*11 and variants of the MHC class II locus are strong risk factors for systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ombrello, Michael J; Remmers, Elaine F; Tachmazidou, Ioanna; Grom, Alexei; Foell, Dirk; Haas, Johannes-Peter; Martini, Alberto; Gattorno, Marco; Özen, Seza; Prahalad, Sampath; Zeft, Andrew S; Bohnsack, John F; Mellins, Elizabeth D; Ilowite, Norman T; Russo, Ricardo; Len, Claudio; Hilario, Maria Odete E; Oliveira, Sheila; Yeung, Rae S M; Rosenberg, Alan; Wedderburn, Lucy R; Anton, Jordi; Schwarz, Tobias; Hinks, Anne; Bilginer, Yelda; Park, Jane; Cobb, Joanna; Satorius, Colleen L; Han, Buhm; Baskin, Elizabeth; Signa, Sara; Duerr, Richard H; Achkar, J P; Kamboh, M Ilyas; Kaufman, Kenneth M; Kottyan, Leah C; Pinto, Dalila; Scherer, Stephen W; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta E; Docampo, Elisa; Estivill, Xavier; Gül, Ahmet; de Bakker, Paul I W; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Langefeld, Carl D; Thompson, Susan; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Thomson, Wendy; Kastner, Daniel L; Woo, Patricia

    2015-12-29

    Systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA) is an often severe, potentially life-threatening childhood inflammatory disease, the pathophysiology of which is poorly understood. To determine whether genetic variation within the MHC locus on chromosome 6 influences sJIA susceptibility, we performed an association study of 982 children with sJIA and 8,010 healthy control subjects from nine countries. Using meta-analysis of directly observed and imputed SNP genotypes and imputed classic HLA types, we identified the MHC locus as a bona fide susceptibility locus with effects on sJIA risk that transcended geographically defined strata. The strongest sJIA-associated SNP, rs151043342 [P = 2.8 × 10(-17), odds ratio (OR) 2.6 (2.1, 3.3)], was part of a cluster of 482 sJIA-associated SNPs that spanned a 400-kb region and included the class II HLA region. Conditional analysis controlling for the effect of rs151043342 found that rs12722051 independently influenced sJIA risk [P = 1.0 × 10(-5), OR 0.7 (0.6, 0.8)]. Meta-analysis of imputed classic HLA-type associations in six study populations of Western European ancestry revealed that HLA-DRB1*11 and its defining amino acid residue, glutamate 58, were strongly associated with sJIA [P = 2.7 × 10(-16), OR 2.3 (1.9, 2.8)], as was the HLA-DRB1*11-HLA-DQA1*05-HLA-DQB1*03 haplotype [6.4 × 10(-17), OR 2.3 (1.9, 2.9)]. By examining the MHC locus in the largest collection of sJIA patients assembled to date, this study solidifies the relationship between the class II HLA region and sJIA, implicating adaptive immune molecules in the pathogenesis of sJIA. PMID:26598658

  10. Can Seeding in the Clinic Reach a Wide Audience? A Proof of Concept Study on Spreading a Health Message About Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis Using a Shareable Online Video

    PubMed Central

    Fay, Michaela; Rapley, Tim; Foster, Helen; Pain, Clare

    2016-01-01

    Background Shareable online video offers the potential for spreading a health message across online and real world social networks. Seeding a message in a clinical setting may be advantageous. Objective To investigate the potential of an online video to spread a health message about juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) when delivered or seeded in a clinical setting and investigate factors that influence sharing behavior. Methods Multimethod proof of concept study. Concepts for two different styles of video were developed using focus groups and interviews and reviewed by an online market research panel. We compared dissemination of the two videos from two specialist pediatric rheumatology clinics in NHS Hospitals. Participants were 15 patients, family members, and clinical staff with knowledge of JIA at concept stage; 300 market research panel members in development stage; and 38 patients and their parents or guardians in the seeding stage. Newly diagnosed patients with JIA and/or parents or guardians were invited to view and share an online video with a health message about JIA across real-life and electronic social networks. Main outcome measures were viewing statistics, sharing behavior and patterns, and participant feedback. Results Of 38 patients and/or their parents or guardians given links, 26 visited the video webpage and shared the link, 2 visited and did not share, and 10 did not visit. Most links were viewed and shared within a few days. A total of 3314 pageviews were recorded with a mean of 89.6 pageviews per link (range 0-1245). Links were accessed from 26 countries, with most viewers in the United Kingdom (82.5%). Mothers were the most active group of sharers. Conclusions Distribution of a video link in a clinical setting may be an effective way to spread a health message. Parents or guardians of children with JIA are more likely to share a link than young people. Dissemination depends on a small number of active sharers, the content of the video, and

  11. Efficacy and safety of tocilizumab in patients with polyarticular-course juvenile idiopathic arthritis: results from a phase 3, randomised, double-blind withdrawal trial

    PubMed Central

    Brunner, Hermine I; Ruperto, Nicolino; Zuber, Zbigniew; Keane, Caroline; Harari, Olivier; Kenwright, Andrew; Lu, Peng; Cuttica, Ruben; Keltsev, Vladimir; Xavier, Ricardo M; Calvo, Inmaculada; Nikishina, Irina; Rubio-Pérez, Nadina; Alexeeva, Ekaterina; Chasnyk, Vyacheslav; Horneff, Gerd; Opoka-Winiarska, Violetta; Quartier, Pierre; Silva, Clovis A; Silverman, Earl; Spindler, Alberto; Baildam, Eileen; Gámir, M Luz; Martin, Alan; Rietschel, Christoph; Siri, Daniel; Smolewska, Elzbieta; Lovell, Daniel; Martini, Alberto; De Benedetti, Fabrizio

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the interleukin-6 receptor inhibitor tocilizumab for the treatment of patients with polyarticular-course juvenile idiopathic arthritis (pcJIA). Methods This three-part, randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blind withdrawal study (NCT00988221) included patients who had active pcJIA for ≥6 months and inadequate responses to methotrexate. During part 1, patients received open-label tocilizumab every 4 weeks (8 or 10 mg/kg for body weight (BW) <30 kg; 8 mg/kg for BW ≥30 kg). At week 16, patients with ≥JIA-American College of Rheumatology (ACR) 30 improvement entered the 24-week, double-blind part 2 after randomisation 1:1 to placebo or tocilizumab (stratified by methotrexate and steroid background therapy) for evaluation of the primary end point: JIA flare, compared with week 16. Patients flaring or completing part 2 received open-label tocilizumab. Results In part 1, 188 patients received tocilizumab (<30 kg: 10 mg/kg (n=35) or 8 mg/kg (n=34); ≥30 kg: n=119). In part 2, 163 patients received tocilizumab (n=82) or placebo (n=81). JIA flare occurred in 48.1% of patients on placebo versus 25.6% continuing tocilizumab (difference in means adjusted for stratification: −0.21; 95% CI −0.35 to −0.08; p=0.0024). At the end of part 2, 64.6% and 45.1% of patients receiving tocilizumab had JIA-ACR70 and JIA-ACR90 responses, respectively. Rates/100 patient-years (PY) of adverse events (AEs) and serious AEs (SAEs) were 480 and 12.5, respectively; infections were the most common SAE (4.9/100 PY). Conclusions Tocilizumab treatment results in significant improvement, maintained over time, of pcJIA signs and symptoms and has a safety profile consistent with that for adults with rheumatoid arthritis. Trial registration number: NCT00988221. PMID:24834925

  12. The effect of infliximab plus methotrexate on the modulation of inflammatory disease markers in juvenile idiopathic arthritis: analyses from a randomized, placebo-controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background We evaluated the effect of infliximab on markers of inflammation in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Methods In this randomized, placebo-controlled substudy, 122 patients with JIA received infliximab 3 mg/kg + methotrexate (MTX)(n = 60) or placebo + MTX (n = 62) at weeks 0, 2, and 6. At week 14, patients receiving placebo + MTX crossed over to infliximab 6 mg/kg + MTX; patients receiving infliximab 3 mg/kg + MTX continued treatment through week 44. Sera and plasma from eligible patients receiving infliximab 3 mg/kg + MTX (n = 34) and receiving placebo→infliximab 6 mg/kg +MTX (n = 38) were collected at weeks 0, 2, 14, 16, 28, and 52 and analyzed for inflammatory markers (IL-6, IL-12p40, ICAM-1, MMP-3, VEGF, TNF-α, and CRP). Results At week 2, decreases from baseline in IL-6, ICAM-1, MMP-3, TNF-α, and CRP were greater with infliximab versus placebo treatment, and with the exception of CRP, these differences were generally maintained through week 14. The decreases from baseline to week 52 in IL-6, ICAM-1, VEGF, MMP-3, and CRP and increases in IL-12p40 levels were larger in patients receiving placebo→infliximab 6 mg/kg +MTX versus infliximab 3 mg/kg + MTX treatment. Patients receiving infliximab 3 mg/kg+MTX who achieved an American College of Rheumatology Pediatric 30 (ACR-Pedi-30) response had significantly larger decreases from baseline in ICAM-1 (p = 0.0105) and MMP-3 (p = 0.0253) at week 2 and in ICAM-1 (p = 0.0304), MMP-3 (p = 0.0091), and CRP (p = 0.0011) at week 14 versus ACR-Pedi-30 nonresponders. Conclusion Infliximab + MTX attenuated several inflammatory markers in patients with JIA; larger decreases in ICAM-1, MMP-3, and CRP levels were observed in ACR-Pedi-30 responders versus nonresponders. Trial Registration NCT00036374 PMID:20822542

  13. HLA-DRB1*11 and variants of the MHC class II locus are strong risk factors for systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Ombrello, Michael J.; Remmers, Elaine F.; Tachmazidou, Ioanna; Grom, Alexei; Foell, Dirk; Haas, Johannes-Peter; Martini, Alberto; Gattorno, Marco; Özen, Seza; Prahalad, Sampath; Zeft, Andrew S.; Bohnsack, John F.; Mellins, Elizabeth D.; Ilowite, Norman T.; Russo, Ricardo; Len, Claudio; Hilario, Maria Odete E.; Oliveira, Sheila; Yeung, Rae S. M.; Rosenberg, Alan; Wedderburn, Lucy R.; Anton, Jordi; Schwarz, Tobias; Hinks, Anne; Bilginer, Yelda; Park, Jane; Cobb, Joanna; Satorius, Colleen L.; Han, Buhm; Baskin, Elizabeth; Signa, Sara; Duerr, Richard H.; Achkar, J. P.; Kamboh, M. Ilyas; Kaufman, Kenneth M.; Kottyan, Leah C.; Pinto, Dalila; Scherer, Stephen W.; Alarcón-Riquelme, Marta E.; Docampo, Elisa; Estivill, Xavier; Gül, Ahmet; de Bakker, Paul I. W.; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Langefeld, Carl D.; Thompson, Susan; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Thomson, Wendy; Kastner, Daniel L.; Woo, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (sJIA) is an often severe, potentially life-threatening childhood inflammatory disease, the pathophysiology of which is poorly understood. To determine whether genetic variation within the MHC locus on chromosome 6 influences sJIA susceptibility, we performed an association study of 982 children with sJIA and 8,010 healthy control subjects from nine countries. Using meta-analysis of directly observed and imputed SNP genotypes and imputed classic HLA types, we identified the MHC locus as a bona fide susceptibility locus with effects on sJIA risk that transcended geographically defined strata. The strongest sJIA-associated SNP, rs151043342 [P = 2.8 × 10−17, odds ratio (OR) 2.6 (2.1, 3.3)], was part of a cluster of 482 sJIA-associated SNPs that spanned a 400-kb region and included the class II HLA region. Conditional analysis controlling for the effect of rs151043342 found that rs12722051 independently influenced sJIA risk [P = 1.0 × 10−5, OR 0.7 (0.6, 0.8)]. Meta-analysis of imputed classic HLA-type associations in six study populations of Western European ancestry revealed that HLA-DRB1*11 and its defining amino acid residue, glutamate 58, were strongly associated with sJIA [P = 2.7 × 10−16, OR 2.3 (1.9, 2.8)], as was the HLA-DRB1*11—HLA-DQA1*05—HLA-DQB1*03 haplotype [6.4 × 10−17, OR 2.3 (1.9, 2.9)]. By examining the MHC locus in the largest collection of sJIA patients assembled to date, this study solidifies the relationship between the class II HLA region and sJIA, implicating adaptive immune molecules in the pathogenesis of sJIA. PMID:26598658

  14. Health related quality of life and parental perceptions of child vulnerability among parents of a child with juvenile idiopathic arthritis: results from a web-based survey

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background A chronic illness, such as Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis (JIA), has an impact on the whole family, especially on parents caring for the ill child. Therefore the aim of this study is to evaluate parental Health Related Quality of Life (HRQOL) and parental perceptions of child vulnerability (PPCV) and associated variables in parents of a child with JIA. Methods Parents of all JIA patients (0–18 years) in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, were eligible. HRQOL was measured using the TNO-AZL Questionnaire (TAAQOL) and PPCV using the Child Vulnerability Scale (CVS). The HRQOL of parents of a child with JIA was compared to a norm population, and differences between parents of a child with JIA and active arthritis versus parents of a child with JIA without active arthritis were analyzed (ANOVA). For PPCV, parents of a child with JIA were compared to a norm population, including healthy and chronically ill children (Chi2, Mann-Whitney U test). Variables associated with PPCV were identified by logistic regression analyses. Results 155 parents (87.5% mothers) completed online questionnaires. JIA parents showed worse HRQOL than parents of healthy children on one out of twelve domains: fine motor HRQOL (p < .001). Parents of children with active arthritis showed worse HRQOL regarding daily activities (p < .05), cognitive functioning (p < .01) and depressive emotions (p < .05) compared to parents of children without active arthritis. Parents of children with JIA perceived their child as more vulnerable than parents of a healthy child (p < .001) and parents of a chronically ill child (p < .001). Parents of children with active arthritis reported higher levels of PPCV (p < .05) than parents of children without active arthritis. A higher degree of functional disability (p < .01) and shorter disease duration (p < .05) were associated with higher levels of PPCV. Conclusion The HRQOL of JIA parents was comparable to the HRQOL of parents of a

  15. A Systematic Critical Appraisal of Clinical Practice Guidelines in Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis Using the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation II (AGREE II) Instrument

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Christine A. M.; Toupin-April, Karine; Jutai, Jeffrey W.; Duffy, Ciarán M.; Rahman, Prinon; Cavallo, Sabrina; Brosseau, Lucie

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The objectives of this review are to: 1) appraise the methodological quality of clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) in juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) providing pharmacological and/or non-pharmacological intervention recommendations, and 2) summarize the recommendations provided by the included CPGs and compare them where possible. Methods A systematic search was performed. Three trained appraisers independently evaluated the methodological quality of the CPGs using a validated and reliable instrument, the Appraisal of Guidelines in Research and Evaluation II. Six domains were considered: 1) score and purpose; 2) stakeholder involvement; 3) rigor of development; 4) clarity of presentation; 5) applicability; and 6) editorial independence. The domains consist of a total of 23 items each scored on a 7-point scale. High quality CPGs were identified if they had a domain score above 60% in rigor of development, and two other domains. Results Of the three included CPGs, the Royal Australian College of General Practitioners (RACGP) and American College of Rheumatology (ACR) CPGs were considered to be of high quality, but the German Society for Pediatric Rheumatology was of lower quality. Domains one to four had high domain scores across the guidelines (mean (standard deviation)): 72.76 (13.80); 66.67 (9.81); 64.67 (7.77); and 87.00 (9.64), respectively. Lower scores were obtained for applicability (14.00 (5.57)) and editorial independence (43.44 (7.02)). Recommendations varied across CPGs due to differences in context, target audience (general practitioners, rheumatologists, and other multidisciplinary healthcare professionals) and patients’ disease presentations. Despite this variability, progression of pharmacological treatment did not conflict between CPGs. Recommendations for non-pharmacological interventions were vague and the interventions considered varied between CPGs. Conclusions Overall, recommendations were based on a paucity of evidence and

  16. MALE OSTEOPOROSIS

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Lindomar Guimarães; Guimarães, Mara Lucia Rassi

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Population aging is a reality that is being faced worldwide, and Brazil is no different. Osteoporosis was considered to be a postmenopausal women's disease for many years. Men have many development and hormonal factors that differentiate their skeletal maturation, which affects the incidence of osteoporosis and fractures. An up-to-date review of the specific literature within the Medline system is presented. PMID:27022584

  17. Glucocorticoid-associated osteoporosis in chronic inflammatory diseases: epidemiology, mechanisms, diagnosis, and treatment.

    PubMed

    von Scheven, Emily; Corbin, Kathleen Jo; Stagi, Stefano; Stefano, Stagi; Cimaz, Rolando

    2014-09-01

    Children with chronic illnesses such as Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis and Crohn's disease, particularly when taking glucocorticoids, are at significant risk for bone fragility. Furthermore, when childhood illness interferes with achieving normal peak bone mass, life-long fracture risk is increased. Osteopenia and osteoporosis, which is increasingly recognized in pediatric chronic disease, likely results from numerous disease- and treatment-related factors, including glucocorticoid exposure. Diagnosing osteoporosis in childhood is complicated by the limitations of current noninvasive techniques such as DXA, which despite its limitations remains the gold standard. The risk:benefit ratio of treatment is confounded by the potential for spontaneous restitution of bone mass deficits and reshaping of previously fractured vertebral bodies. Bisphosphonates have been used to treat secondary osteoporosis in children, but limited experience and potential long-term toxicity warrant caution in routine use. This article reviews the factors that influence loss of normal bone strength and evidence for effective treatments, in particular in patients with gastrointestinal and rheumatologic disorders who are receiving chronic glucocorticoid therapy. PMID:25001898

  18. The clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of abatacept, adalimumab, etanercept and tocilizumab for treating juvenile idiopathic arthritis: a systematic review and economic evaluation.

    PubMed Central

    Shepherd, Jonathan; Cooper, Keith; Harris, Petra; Picot, Joanna; Rose, Micah

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is characterised by joint pain, swelling and a limitation of movement caused by inflammation. Subsequent joint damage can lead to disability and growth restriction. Treatment commonly includes disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), such as methotrexate. Clinical practice now favours newer drugs termed biologic DMARDs where indicated. OBJECTIVE To assess the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of four biologic DMARDs [etanercept (Enbrel(®), Pfizer), abatacept (Orencia(®), Bristol-Myers Squibb), adalimumab (Humira(®), AbbVie) and tocilizumab (RoActemra(®), Roche) - with or without methotrexate where indicated] for the treatment of JIA (systemic or oligoarticular JIA are excluded). DATA SOURCES Electronic bibliographic databases including MEDLINE, EMBASE, The Cochrane Library and the Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects were searched for published studies from inception to May 2015 for English-language articles. Bibliographies of related papers, systematic reviews and company submissions were screened and experts were contacted to identify additional evidence. REVIEW METHODS Systematic reviews of clinical effectiveness, health-related quality of life and cost-effectiveness were undertaken in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses statement. A cost-utility decision-analytic model was developed to compare the estimated cost-effectiveness of biologic DMARDs versus methotrexate. The base-case time horizon was 30 years and the model took a NHS perspective, with costs and benefits discounted at 3.5%. RESULTS Four placebo-controlled randomised controlled trials (RCTs) met the inclusion criteria for the clinical effectiveness review (one RCT evaluating each biologic DMARD). Only one RCT included UK participants. Participants had to achieve an American College of Rheumatology Pediatric (ACR Pedi)-30 response to open-label lead-in treatment in order to be

  19. Male Osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Drake, Matthew T.; Khosla, Sundeep

    2013-01-01

    Synopsis Osteoporosis is now recognized as a major threat to health in aging men. Morbidity and mortality, particularly following hip fracture, are substantial. Whereas trabecular bone loss starts in early adulthood, loss of cortical bone only appears to occur from mid-life onwards. Declining bioavailable estradiol levels play an integral role in male age-associated bone loss. Both pharmacologic and supportive care interventions are important for optimal care in men at increased fracture risk. PMID:22877433

  20. A randomised controlled trial of the clinical effectiveness, safety and cost-effectiveness of adalimumab in combination with methotrexate for the treatment of juvenile idiopathic arthritis associated uveitis (SYCAMORE Trial)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common rheumatic disease in children. Children with JIA are at risk of inflammation of the uvea in the eye (uveitis). Overall, 20% to 25% of paediatric uveitis is associated with JIA. Major risk factors for development of uveitis in JIA are oligoarticular pattern of arthritis, an age at onset of arthritis of less than seven years of age, and antinuclear antibody positivity. In the initial stages of mild to moderate inflammation the uveitis is asymptomatic. This has led to current practice of screening all children with JIA for uveitis. Approximately 12% to 38% of patients with JIA develop uveitis in seven years following onset of arthritis. In 30% to 50% of children with JIA-associated uveitis structural complications are present at diagnosis. Furthermore about 50% to 75% of those with severe uveitis will eventually develop visual impairment secondary to ocular complications such as cataract and glaucoma. Defining the severity of inflammation and structural complications in uveitis patients is now possible following Standardised Uveitis Nomenclature (SUN) guidelines, and modified to incorporate the consensus of end point and outcome criteria into the design of randomised trials. Despite current screening and therapeutic options (pre-biologics) 10% to 15% of children with JIA-associated uveitis may develop bilateral visual impairment and certified legally blind. To date, there remains no controlled trial evidence of benefits of biologic therapy. Methods/design This study will randomise 154 patients aged 2 to 18 years with active JIA-associated uveitis (despite methotrexate (MTX) treatment for at least 12 weeks). All participants will be treated for 18 months, with follow up of 3 years from randomisation (continuing on MTX throughout). All participants will receive a stable dose of MTX and in addition either adalimumab (20 mg/0.8 ml for patients <30 kg or 40 mg/0.8 ml for patients weighing 30 kg or more

  1. Idiopathic anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Greenberger, Paul A

    2007-05-01

    Idiopathic anaphylaxis is a prednisone-responsive condition without external cause, but it can coexist with food-, medication-, or exercise-induced anaphylaxis. Mast cell activation may occur at night or after foods that have been eaten with impunity many times previously. Idiopathic anaphylaxis can be classified into frequent (if there are six or more episodes per year or two episodes in the last 2 months) or infrequent (if episodes occur less often). Idiopathic anaphylaxis-generalized consists of urticaria or angioedema associated with severe respiratory distress, syncope or hypotension, and gastrointestinal symptoms. Idiopathic anaphylaxis-angioedema consists of massive tongue enlargement or severe pharyngeal or laryngeal swelling with urticaria or peripheral angioedema. The differential diagnosis of idiopathic anaphylaxis is reviewed, and treatment approaches are presented. PMID:17493503

  2. Nandrolone decanoate for men with osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Hamdy, R C; Moore, S W; Whalen, K E; Landy, C

    1998-03-01

    To compare the efficacy and safety of nandrolone decanoate and calcium (NDC) with those of calcium alone (CAL) in men with idiopathic osteoporosis, a 12-month, randomized, prospective, controlled study, was performed in an outpatient clinic. Twenty-one men with idiopathic osteoporosis (as determined by radiological and dual energy x-ray absorptiometry findings) were randomly allocated to either 50 mg nandrolone decanoate intramuscularly (im) weekly and 1,000 mg oral calcium carbonate daily (NDC group) or to 1,000 mg oral calcium carbonate daily (CAL group). Bone densitometry (total body, left femur, and lumbar spine), serum, and urine biochemical parameters were measured at 3-month intervals. In the NDC group, bone mineral density initially increased, reached a plateau, and then decreased to near baseline levels at 12 months. Increases in lean muscle mass mirrored these changes. Free and total testosterone significantly decreased. Hemoglobin increased in all patients in this group. Patients in the CAL group exhibited no significant change in either total body or bone mineral density or biochemical parameters. Thus, nandrolone decanoate, 50 mg im weekly, transiently increases the bone mass of men with idiopathic osteoporosis in this preliminary study. Careful monitoring is necessary. PMID:10099043

  3. Linkage analysis of idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE) and marker loci on chromosome 6p in families of patients with juvenile myocloni epilepsy: No evidence for an epilepsy locus in the HLA region

    SciTech Connect

    Whitehouse, W.P.; Rees, M.; Curtis, D.; Sundqvist, A.; Parker, K.; Chung, E.; Baralle, D.; Gardiner, R.M.

    1993-09-01

    Evidence for a locus (EJM1) in the HLA region of chromosome 6p predisposing to idiopathic generalized epilepsy (IGE) in the families of patients with juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) has been obtained in two previous studies of separately ascertained groups of kindreds. Linkage analysis has been undertaken in a third set of 25 families including a patient with JME and at least one first-degree relative with IGE. Family members were typed for eight polymorphic loci on chromosome 6p: F13A, D6889, D6S109, D6S105, D6S10, C4B, DQA1/A2, and TCTE1. Pairwise and multipoint linkage analysis was carried out assuming autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive inheritance and age-dependent high or low penetrance. No significant evidence in favor of linkage was obtained at any locus. Multipoint linkage analysis generated significant exclusion data (lod score < -2.0) at HLA and for a region 10-30 cM telomeric to HLA, the extent of which varied with the level of penetrance assumed. These observations indicate that genetic heterogeneity exists within this epilepsy phenotype. 39 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. [Juvenile arthritides].

    PubMed

    Horneff, G

    2010-10-01

    Arthritis in children represents a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. The diagnostic spectrum is broad and a very precise indication for diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, especially in small children, is important. In addition to acute arthritides - viral arthritis, reactive arthritis, Lyme arthritis and septic arthritis - secondary chronic arthritis related to an underlying disease as well as juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), the most common chronic inflammatory systemic disease in children, need to be considered. This overview is a guide to the diagnosis of arthritis in childhood and to evidence-based therapy of JIA in particular. This consists of a combination of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, systemic and intraarticular corticosteroids, traditional DMARDs such as sulfasalazine, methotrexate and leflunomide, the TNF inhibitors etanercept, adalimumab and, with restrictions, infliximab, other biopharmaceuticals such as anakinra, canakinumab and rilonacept, and tocilizumab and finally, abatacept. PMID:20798949

  5. Understanding osteoporosis.

    PubMed Central

    Marcus, R.

    1991-01-01

    Considerable progress has been achieved recently in our understanding of the normal process by which bone mass is regulated. Age-related trabecular bone loss is characterized not simply by a global loss of bone but also by cortical porosity and loss of trabecular connections. Because bone strength depends on architectural as well as material properties, bone quantity alone cannot define fracture risk with precision. Traditional therapies for osteoporosis increase bone mass, and estrogen therapy, in particular, profoundly decreases fracture risk. The pharmacologic restoration of bone quantity and quality, however, remains elusive. Modern biotechnology offers the hope that progress may come about through the development of growth factors and other osteotropic compounds for clinical use. Images PMID:1877231

  6. Idiopathic hypersomnia

    MedlinePlus

    ... page, please enable JavaScript. Idiopathic hypersomnia is a sleep disorder in which a person is excessively sleepy ( hypersomnia ) ... other potential causes of excessive daytime sleepiness. Other sleep disorders that may cause daytime sleepiness include: Narcolepsy Obstructive ...

  7. Idiopathic scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Yaman, Onur; Dalbayrak, Sedat

    2014-01-01

    Scoliosis refers to curves exceeding 10 degrees observed through posterioanterior direct radiography. In fact, the diagnosis for idiopathic scoliosis is accepted to exclude already available causes. The aim of this paper was to review the etiopathogenesis, classification systems and the treatment management of idiopathic scoliosis. A search in the National Library of Medicine (Pubmed) database using the key words 'idiopathic' and 'scoliosis' was performed. For the literature review, papers concerning the etiopathogenesis, classification and treatment were selected among these articles. A search in the National Library of Medicine (Pubmed) database using the key words 'idiopathic' and 'scoliosis' yielded 4518 articles published between 1947 and 2013. The main hypothesis put forward included genetic factors, hormonal factors, bone and connective tissue anomalies. King, Lenke, Coonrad and Peking Union Medical College (PUMC) classifications were the main classification systems for idiopathic scoliosis. Exercise, bracing and anterior, posterior or combined surgery when indicated are the choices for the treatment. Every idiopathic scoliosis case has to be managed to its own characteristics. It is the post-operative appearance that the surgeons are perhaps the least interested but the adolescent patients the most interested in. The aim of scoliosis surgery is to restore the spine without neurological deficit. PMID:25269032

  8. Anti-type II collagen antibodies, anti-CCP, IgA RF and IgM RF are associated with joint damage, assessed eight years after onset of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Early appearance of antibodies specific for native human type II collagen (anti-CII) characterizes an early inflammatory and destructive phenotype in adults with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The objective of this study was to investigate the occurrence of anti-CII, IgM RF, IgA RF and anti-CCP in serum samples obtained early after diagnosis, and to relate the occurrence of autoantibodies to outcome after eight years of disease in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Methods The Nordic JIA database prospectively included JIA patients followed for eight years with data on remission and joint damage. From this database, serum samples collected from 192 patients, at a median of four months after disease onset, were analysed for IgG anti-CII, IgM RF, IgA RF and IgG anti-CCP. Joint damage was assessed based on Juvenile Arthritis Damage Index for Articular damage (JADI-A), a validated clinical instrument for joint damage. Results Elevated serum levels of anti-CII occurred in 3.1%, IgM RF in 3.6%, IgA RF in 3.1% and anti-CCP in 2.6% of the patients. Occurrence of RF and anti-CCP did to some extent overlap, but rarely with anti-CII. The polyarticular and oligoarticular extended categories were overrepresented in patients with two or more autoantibodies. Anti-CII occurred in younger children, usually without overlap with the other autoantibodies and was associated with high levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) early in the disease course. All four autoantibodies were significantly associated with joint damage, but not with active disease at the eight-year follow up. Conclusions Anti-CII, anti-CCP, IgA RF and IgM RF detected early in the disease course predicted joint damage when assessed after eight years of disease. The role of anti-CII in JIA should be further studied. PMID:24944545

  9. APL-2, an altered peptide ligand derived from heat-shock protein 60, induces interleukin-10 in peripheral blood mononuclear cell derived from juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients and downregulates the inflammatory response in collagen-induced arthritis model.

    PubMed

    Lorenzo, Norailys; Cantera, Dolores; Barberá, Ariana; Alonso, Amaris; Chall, Elsy; Franco, Lourdes; Ancizar, Julio; Nuñez, Yanetsy; Altruda, Fiorella; Silengo, Lorenzo; Padrón, Gabriel; Del Carmen Dominguez, Maria

    2015-02-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is a heterogeneous group of diseases characterized by autoimmune arthritis of unknown cause with onset before age of 16 years. Methotrexate provides clinical benefits in JIA. For children who do not respond to methotrexate, treatment with anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α is an option. However, some patients do not respond or are intolerant to anti-TNF therapy. Induction of peripheral tolerance has long been considered a promising approach to the treatment of chronic autoimmune diseases. We aimed to evaluate the potentialities of two altered peptide ligands (APLs) derived from human heat-shock protein 60, an autoantigen involved in the pathogenesis of autoimmune arthritis, in JIA patients. Interferon (IFN)-γ, TNF-α and interleukin (IL)-10 levels were determined in ex vivo assays using peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from these patients. Wild-type peptide and one of these APLs increased IFN-γ and TNF-α levels. Unlike, the other APLs (called APL2) increased the IL-10 level without affecting IFN-γ and TNF-α levels. On the other hand, APL2 induces a marked activation of T cells since it transforms cell cycle phase's distribution of CD4+ T cells from these patients. In addition, we evaluated the therapeutic effect of APL2 in collagen-induced arthritis model. Therapy with APL2 reduced arthritis scores and histological lesions in mice. This effect was associated to a decrease in TNF-α and IL-17 levels. These results indicate a therapeutic potentiality of APL2 for JIA. PMID:24474501

  10. 2016 Classification Criteria for Macrophage Activation Syndrome Complicating Systemic Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis: A European League Against Rheumatism/American College of Rheumatology/Paediatric Rheumatology International Trials Organisation Collaborative Initiative.

    PubMed

    Ravelli, Angelo; Minoia, Francesca; Davì, Sergio; Horne, AnnaCarin; Bovis, Francesca; Pistorio, Angela; Aricò, Maurizio; Avcin, Tadej; Behrens, Edward M; De Benedetti, Fabrizio; Filipovic, Lisa; Grom, Alexei A; Henter, Jan-Inge; Ilowite, Norman T; Jordan, Michael B; Khubchandani, Raju; Kitoh, Toshiyuki; Lehmberg, Kai; Lovell, Daniel J; Miettunen, Paivi; Nichols, Kim E; Ozen, Seza; Pachlopnik Schmid, Jana; Ramanan, Athimalaipet V; Russo, Ricardo; Schneider, Rayfel; Sterba, Gary; Uziel, Yosef; Wallace, Carol; Wouters, Carine; Wulffraat, Nico; Demirkaya, Erkan; Brunner, Hermine I; Martini, Alberto; Ruperto, Nicolino; Cron, Randy Q

    2016-03-01

    To develop criteria for the classification of macrophage activation syndrome (MAS) in patients with systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). A multistep process, based on a combination of expert consensus and analysis of real patient data, was conducted. A panel of 28 experts was first asked to classify 428 patient profiles as having or not having MAS, based on clinical and laboratory features at the time of disease onset. The 428 profiles comprised 161 patients with systemic JIA-associated MAS and 267 patients with a condition that could potentially be confused with MAS (active systemic JIA without evidence of MAS, or systemic infection). Next, the ability of candidate criteria to classify individual patients as having MAS or not having MAS was assessed by evaluating the agreement between the classification yielded using the criteria and the consensus classification of the experts. The final criteria were selected in a consensus conference. Experts achieved consensus on the classification of 391 of the 428 patient profiles (91.4%). A total of 982 candidate criteria were tested statistically. The 37 best-performing criteria and 8 criteria obtained from the literature were evaluated at the consensus conference. During the conference, 82% consensus among experts was reached on the final MAS classification criteria. In validation analyses, these criteria had a sensitivity of 0.73 and a specificity of 0.99. Agreement between the classification (MAS or not MAS) obtained using the criteria and the original diagnosis made by the treating physician was high (κ=0.76). We have developed a set of classification criteria for MAS complicating systemic JIA and provided preliminary evidence of its validity. Use of these criteria will potentially improve understanding of MAS in systemic JIA and enhance efforts to discover effective therapies, by ensuring appropriate patient enrollment in studies. PMID:26865703

  11. FastStats: Osteoporosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button NCHS Home Osteoporosis Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Data are ... men 50 years of age and over with osteoporosis of the femur neck or lumbar spine: 4% ...

  12. Osteoporosis: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnston, C. Conrad; Slemenda, Charles

    1987-01-01

    An overview of osteoporosis, its types, causes, diagnosis, and treatment is presented. Risk factors and bone mass measurement are also discussed. This article serves as an introduction to a symposium on osteoporosis containing five other articles in this issue. (MT)

  13. Osteoporosis: Preventing Falls

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Osteoporosis Preventing Falls Past Issues / Winter 2011 Table of ... next to your bed Free NIH Videos About Osteoporosis The NIHSeniorHealth Web site features five brief, informative ...

  14. International Osteoporosis Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Websites IOF International IOF Latin America IOF Asia-Pacific IOF Microsites Capture the Fracture Osteoporosis Essentials course ... on FRAX CME accreditation confirmed for 6th Asia-Pacific Osteoporosis Meeting in Singapore Milk and other dairy ...

  15. Osteoporosis and Hispanic Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... for the elderly, visit: NIH Osteoporosis and Related Bone Diseases ~ National Resource Center Website: http://www.bones.nih. ... Pub. No. 15-7924 NIH Osteoporosis and Related Bone Diseases ~ National Resource Center 2 AMS Circle Bethesda, MD ...

  16. Exercise and Osteoporosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... My Go4Life Get Free Stuff Be a Partner Exercise and Osteoporosis Osteoporosis is a disease that weakens ... calcium and vitamin D. Include regular weight-bearing exercise in your lifestyle. Stop smoking. Limit how much ...

  17. Osteoporosis and Your Spine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Movement › Osteoporosis and Your Spine Osteoporosis and Your Spine Your spine is made up of small bones ... called kyphosis. Kyphosis and Bone Breaks in the Spine The bones in the spine are called vertebrae. ...

  18. Medicines for osteoporosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Raloxifene (Evista); Teriparatide (Forteo); Denosumab (Prolia); Low bone density - medicines; Osteoporosis - medicines ... to fracture (break). With osteoporosis, the bones lose density. Bone density measures the amount of bone tissue ...

  19. Osteoporosis in unstable adult scoliosis

    SciTech Connect

    Velis, K.P.; Healey, J.H.; Schneider, R.

    1988-12-01

    New noninvasive techniques as well as conventional methods were used to evaluate skeletal mass in the following three populations of adult white women as follows: (1) 79 subjects with preexisting idiopathic scoliosis designated as unstable (US) because of the associated presence in the lumbar spine of lateral spondylolisthesis with segmental instability; (2) 67 subjects with preexisting idiopathic scoliosis without lateral spondylolisthesis designated as stable (SS); and (3) 248 age-matched nonscoliotic controls. Ages in all three groups were categorized into premenopausal (25-44 years), perimenopausal (45-54 years), and postmenopausal (55-84 years). The results showed higher scoliosis morbidity in the US compared to the SS populations. The prevalence and severity of osteoporosis were markedly increased in US versus SS populations. Femoral neck density determined by dual-photon absorptiometry techniques averaged 26% to 48% lower in all age categories of US patients compared to controls. These changes were found in the youngest age groups, indicating reductions in bone mineral content earlier in the adult life of white women with a specific type of high-morbidity US characterized by the marker of lateral spondylolisthesis.

  20. Idiopathic hypersomnia.

    PubMed

    Billiard, Michel; Sonka, Karel

    2016-10-01

    Idiopathic hypersomnia continues to evolve from the concept of "sleep drunkenness" introduced by Bedrich Roth in Prague in 1956 and the description of idiopathic hypersomnia with two forms, polysymptomatic and monosymptomatic, by the same Bedrich Roth in 1976. The diagnostic criteria of idiopathic hypersomnia have varied with the successive revisions of the International classifications of sleep disorders, including the recent 3rd edition. No epidemiological studies have been conducted so far. Disease onset occurs most often during adolescence or young adulthood. A familial background is often present but rigorous studies are still lacking. The key manifestation is hypersomnolence. It is often accompanied by sleep of long duration and debilitating sleep inertia. Polysomnography (PSG) followed by a multiple sleep latency test (MSLT) is mandatory, as well as a 24 h PSG or a 2-wk actigraphy in association with a sleep log to ensure a total 24-h sleep time longer than or equal to 66O minutes, when the mean sleep latency on the MSLT is longer than 8 min. Yet, MSLT is neither sensitive nor specific and the polysomnographic diagnostic criteria require continuous readjustment and biologic markers are still lacking. Idiopathic hypersomnia is most often a chronic condition though spontaneous remission may occur. The condition is disabling, sometimes even more so than narcolepsy type 1 or 2. Based on neurochemical, genetic and immunological analyses as well as on exploration of the homeostatic and circadian processes of sleep, various pathophysiological hypotheses have been proposed. Differential diagnosis involves a number of diseases and it is not yet clear whether idiopathic hypersomnia and narcolepsy type 2 are not the same condition. Until now, the treatment of idiopathic hypersomnia has mirrored that of the sleepiness of narcolepsy type 1 or 2. The first randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials of modafinil have just been published, as well as a double

  1. Rationale, design and baseline data of a mixed methods study examining the clinical impact of a brief transition programme for young people with juvenile idiopathic arthritis: the DON'T RETARD project

    PubMed Central

    Hilderson, Deborah; Westhovens, Rene; Wouters, Carine; Van der Elst, Kristien; Goossens, Eva; Moons, Philip

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To describe (1) the content of a transition programme for young people with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) designed as a brief intervention, (2) the rationale and design of a mixed-methods study evaluating the clinical impact of this transition programme and (3) to provide baseline data of the intervention group. Design An ‘embedded experimental’ design is used for the evaluation of the transition programme. A ‘one-group pretest-posttest, with a non-equivalent posttest-only comparison group design’ is used to quantitatively evaluate the impact of the transition programme, applying both longitudinal and comparative analyses. Subsequently, experiences of adolescents and their parents who participated in the experimental group will be analysed qualitatively using content analysis. Setting Participants in the intervention are recruited at a tertiary care centre in Belgium. The comparison group participants are recruited from one tertiary and three secondary care centres in Belgium. Participants The intervention group consists of 33 young people (25 females; 8 males) with a median age of 16 years. Main diagnoses are persistent or extended oligoarticular JIA (33%), polyarticular JIA (30%), enthesitis-related JIA (21%) or systemic arthritis (15%). Intervention The transition programme comprises eight key components: (1) transition coordinator; (2) providing information and education; (3) availability by telephone; (4) information about and contact with an adult care programme; (5) guidance of parents; (6) meeting with peers; (7) transfer plan; and (8) actual transfer to adult care. Primary and secondary outcomes The primary outcome is health status, as perceived by the adolescents. Secondary outcomes are health status, as perceived by the parents; medication adherence; illness-related knowledge; quality of life; fatigue; promotion of independence; support of autonomy; behavioural control and psychological control. Results At baseline, the median

  2. Effect of miR-19a and miR-21 on the JAK/STAT signaling pathway in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of patients with systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    PubMed Central

    LI, HONG-WEI; XIE, YING; LI, FENG; SUN, GUANG-CHAO; CHEN, ZHI; ZENG, HUA-SONG

    2016-01-01

    Overexpression of the components of the Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK/STAT) signaling pathway are key factors of the pathogenic mechanisms underlying systematic juvenile idiopathic arthritis (SJIA). The present study aimed to investigate the association between microRNA (miR)-19a, miR-21 and the JAK/STAT signaling pathway. A total of 20 patients with SJIA were included in the study, and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from 20 normal controls were also collected. RNAiso was used to extract total RNA, and the RNA was then reverse transcribed into cDNA. Primers were designed to detect the mRNA of miR-19a and miR-21, and U6 was set as the internal parameter. In addition, the mRNA of STAT3, suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 (SOCS3), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) was detected, and β-actin was set as the internal parameter. Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction was performed to detect the expression levels of these proteins in patients with SJIA and control subjects, and non-parametric tests were used to analyze the statistical differences in 2−ΔΔCq between the two groups. The expression levels of miR-19a and miR-21 were significantly lower in the SJIA group compared with the control group (P<0.05). SOCS3, TNF-α and STAT3 were shown to be the target genes of miR-19a and miR-21, as determined by Targetscan. The expression levels of STAT3, SOCS3, TNF-α and IL-6 mRNA were significantly higher compared with those of the control group (P<0.05). In the PBMCs of sthe patients with SJIA, miR-19a and miR-21 expression levels were lower compared with those of the control group, and the JAK/STAT signaling pathway was activated, which indicated that miR-19a and miR-21 may participate in the activation of the JAK/STAT signaling pathway. PMID:27284344

  3. Efficacy and safety of open-label etanercept on extended oligoarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis, enthesitis-related arthritis and psoriatic arthritis: part 1 (week 12) of the CLIPPER study

    PubMed Central

    Horneff, Gerd; Burgos-Vargas, Ruben; Constantin, Tamas; Foeldvari, Ivan; Vojinovic, Jelena; Chasnyk, Vyacheslav G; Dehoorne, Joke; Panaviene, Violeta; Susic, Gordana; Stanevica, Valda; Kobusinska, Katarzyna; Zuber, Zbigniew; Mouy, Richard; Rumba-Rozenfelde, Ingrida; Breda, Luciana; Dolezalova, Pavla; Job-Deslandre, Chantal; Wulffraat, Nico; Alvarez, Daniel; Zang, Chuanbo; Wajdula, Joseph; Woodworth, Deborah; Vlahos, Bonnie; Martini, Alberto; Ruperto, Nicolino

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the efficacy and safety of etanercept (ETN) in paediatric subjects with extended oligoarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis (eoJIA), enthesitis-related arthritis (ERA), or psoriatic arthritis (PsA). Methods CLIPPER is an ongoing, Phase 3b, open-label, multicentre study; the 12-week (Part 1) data are reported here. Subjects with eoJIA (2–17 years), ERA (12–17 years), or PsA (12–17 years) received ETN 0.8 mg/kg once weekly (maximum 50 mg). Primary endpoint was the percentage of subjects achieving JIA American College of Rheumatology (ACR) 30 criteria at week 12; secondary outcomes included JIA ACR 50/70/90 and inactive disease. Results 122/127 (96.1%) subjects completed the study (mean age 11.7 years). JIA ACR 30 (95% CI) was achieved by 88.6% (81.6% to 93.6%) of subjects overall; 89.7% (78.8% to 96.1%) with eoJIA, 83.3% (67.2% to 93.6%) with ERA and 93.1% (77.2% to 99.2%) with PsA. For eoJIA, ERA, or PsA categories, the ORs of ETN vs the historical placebo data were 26.2, 15.1 and 40.7, respectively. Overall JIA ACR 50, 70, 90 and inactive disease were achieved by 81.1, 61.5, 29.8 and 12.1%, respectively. Treatment-emergent adverse events (AEs), infections, and serious AEs, were reported in 45 (35.4%), 58 (45.7%), and 4 (3.1%), subjects, respectively. Serious AEs were one case each of abdominal pain, bronchopneumonia, gastroenteritis and pyelocystitis. One subject reported herpes zoster and another varicella. No differences in safety were observed across the JIA categories. Conclusions ETN treatment for 12 weeks was effective and well tolerated in paediatric subjects with eoJIA, ERA and PsA, with no unexpected safety findings. PMID:23696632

  4. Osteoporosis: Therapeutic Options.

    PubMed

    Ivanova, Stefka; Vasileva, Liliya; Ivanova, Stanislava; Peikova, Lily; Obreshkova, Danka

    2016-01-01

    The definition of osteoporosis was originally formulated at a conference of the World Health Organization (WHO) in 1993 as 'a systemic skeletal disease characterized by decreased bone mass and altered micro-architecture of bone tissue, leading to enhanced bone fragility and risk of fractures'. Osteoporosis is characterized by low bone mineral density (BMD) and loss of the structural and bio-mechanical properties that are required to maintain bone homeostasis. This review aims to address the currently available options in prevention and treatment of osteoporosis. Management of osteoporosis includes non-pharmacological treatment - diet rich of calcium and vitamin D, healthy lifestyle, proper exercise plan, and pharmacological therapy. Combination of non-pharmacological and pharmacological treatment options have to be considered for prevention of osteoporosis and minimization of the risk of fractures. Given the heterogeneity of osteoporosis syndrome and lack of significant number of comparative studies, the choice of a pharmacological agents should be individualized. PMID:27180344

  5. Comparing Osteoporosis Drugs: The Bisphosphonates

    MedlinePlus

    Drugs to Treat Low Bone Density Comparing Osteoporosis Drugs: The Bisphosphonates What is osteoporosis (low bone density)? Osteoporosis is a condition in which the body does not build enough new bone. ...

  6. Osteoporosis: Build Up Your Bones!

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Osteoporosis Build Up Your Bones! Past Issues / Winter 2011 ... special needs of people with osteoporosis. A Complete Osteoporosis Program Remember, exercise is only one part of ...

  7. Exercise, Eating, Estrogen, and Osteoporosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Jim

    1986-01-01

    Osteoporosis affects millions of people, especially women. Three methods for preventing or managing osteoporosis are recommended: (1) exercise; (2) increased calcium intake; and (3) estrogen replacement therapy. (CB)

  8. Osteoporosis in women.

    PubMed

    Bowman, M A; Spangler, J G

    1997-03-01

    Many preventive and treatment strategies are now available for osteoporosis, offering many women the opportunity to forego its many complications. Exercise with calcium and vitamin D supplements is recommended for most patients. Estrogens are a preferred treatment but not acceptable to many women. Alendronate, a bisphosphonate, recently became available to treat osteoporosis. Calcitonin, subcutaneous or intranasal, also can be useful. PMID:9016728

  9. Osteoporosis in Gastrointestinal Diseases.

    PubMed

    Krela-Kaźmierczak, Iwona; Szymczak, Aleksandra; Łykowska-Szuber, Liliana; Eder, Piotr; Linke, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    Secondary osteoporosis occurs as an isolated pathology or co-exists with types I and II osteoporosis. The gastroenterologist may come across osteoporosis or osteopenia in a patient with a gastrointestinal disease. This is often a young patient in whom investigations should be carried out and appropriate treatment initiated, aimed at preventing bone fractures and the formation of the best peak bone mass. Osteoporosis occurs in patients with the following conditions: Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis, celiac disease, post gastrectomy patients, patients with short bowel syndrome, chronic hepatitis and cirrhosis, treated with steroids (steroid-induced osteoporosis) and patients using proton pump inhibitors chronically (state of achlorhydria). It is therefore necessary to approve a list of risk factors of secondary osteoporosis, the presence of which would be an indication for screening for osteoporosis, including a DXA study and the development of a separate algorithm for the therapeutic management of secondary osteoporosis accompanying gastrointestinal diseases, especially in premenopausal young women and young men, because there are currently no registered drugs with proven antifracture activity for this group of patients. PMID:26935513

  10. Pituitary Disorders and Osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Jawiarczyk-Przybyłowska, Aleksandra

    2015-01-01

    Various hormonal disorders can influence bone metabolism and cause secondary osteoporosis. The consequence of this is a significant increase of fracture risk. Among pituitary disorders such effects are observed in patients with Cushing's disease, hyperprolactinemia, acromegaly, and hypopituitarism. Severe osteoporosis is the result of the coexistence of some of these disorders and hypogonadism at the same time, which is quite often. PMID:25873948

  11. Genetics Home Reference: juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    MedlinePlus

    ... making a group of related proteins called the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) complex . The HLA complex helps the immune system distinguish the body's own proteins from proteins made by foreign invaders ( ...

  12. [Epidemiology of osteoporosis].

    PubMed

    Scheidt-Nave, C; Ziegler, R; Raspe, H

    1998-03-15

    Epidemiological studies have identified osteoporosis as a disease of significant public health impact and have delineated numerous potential risk factors. Nevertheless, it has proven difficult to establish preventive strategies for several reasons. First, there has been no final agreement on the definition of osteoporosis, which has hampered efforts to characterize the magnitude of the problem as a whole. Secondly, as osteoporosis is a multifactorial chronic disorder, effective programs for risk assessment and intervention depend on the development of complex disease models. In summarizing the contributions of epidemiological studies to the current understanding of osteoporosis this review intends to outline the scientific background for the European Vertebral Osteoporosis Study (EVOS) and its successors. PMID:9564151

  13. [Osteoporosis: a clinical perspective].

    PubMed

    Matikainen, Niina

    2016-01-01

    Osteoporosis is defined by decreased bone density and microarchitectural deterioration that predispose to fragility fractures. The WHO diagnostic criteria of osteoporosis require bone densitometry but treatment is possible on the basis of high clinical fracture risk and can be assessed by the FRAX risk algorithm. All those subject to fracture risk should be advised about proper basic treatment of osteoporosis, including exercise, prevention of falls, smoking cessation, avoidance of alcohol intake, and dietary or supplemental abundance of calcium and vitamin D. Underlying diseases must be studied after diagnosis of osteoporosis even if treatment is initiated without densitometry. When indicated, specific osteoporosis therapy includes bisphosphonates, denosumab, teriparatide, strontium ranelate or SERMs. In hypogonadism, gonadal steroids may be indicated alone or in addition to a specific treatment. Treatment effect and continuation are assessed after 2 to 5 years. PMID:27400591

  14. Subcutaneous Immunoglobulin in Refractory Juvenile Dermatomyositis.

    PubMed

    de Inocencio, Jaime; Enríquez-Merayo, Eugenia; Casado, Rocío; González-Granado, Luis Ignacio

    2016-04-01

    Juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM) is the most common form of juvenile idiopathic inflammatory myopathy. We report a child with steroid-dependent JDM refractory to hydroxychloroquine and subcutaneous methotrexate who experienced systemic reactions to intravenous immunoglobulin and was successfully treated with subcutaneous immunoglobulin. This form of therapy has been shown to be safe, has a very low rate of adverse effects, does not require hospital admission, reduces the number of missed school days, and decreases the costs associated with treatment. PMID:26966131

  15. OSTEOPOROSIS DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Márcio Passini Gonçalves

    2015-01-01

    Articles that update the state of knowledge regarding osteoporosis run the risk of quickly becoming obsolete because research and studies on osteoporosis today are arousing great interest among researchers, the pharmaceutical and medical equipment industries, governments and even WHO. All orthopedists know about osteoporosis because of its most deleterious effect: osteoporotic fracture. Osteoporosis without fractures does not arouse suspicion because this is a pathological condition with a nonspecific clinical profile. Osteoporotic fractures have an economic cost (from treatment), a social cost (from its sequelae) and a medical cost (from deaths). Many fractures could be avoided through diagnosing osteoporosis prior to the first fracture and thus many temporary and permanent disabilities could be avoided and many lives saved. Awareness of the risk factors for osteoporosis raises suspicions and bone densitometry aids in diagnosis. Treatment should be based on the physiopathology of the disease. Hence, for prevention or treatment of osteoporosis, the activity of osteoclasts should be diminished or the activity of osteoblasts should be increased, or both. Treatment that reduces the incidence of fractures by improving the bone geometry and microarchitecture would be ideal. Newly formed bone tissue needs to have good cell and matrix quality, normal mineralization, a good ratio between mineralized (mechanically resistant) and non-mineralized (flexible) bone, and no accumulated damage. The ideal treatment should have a positive remodeling rate and fast and long-lasting therapeutic effects. Such effects need to be easily detectable. They need to be safe. PMID:27022545

  16. [Endocrine disorders and osteoporosis].

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Yuka

    2015-10-01

    Secondary osteoporosis is a bone disease characterized by decreased bone mass that predisposes fractures due to underlying disorders or medication. Disorders of the endocrine system, such as primary hyperparathyroidism, hyperthyroidism, hypogonadism, growth hormone deficiency, Cushing's syndrome, and anorexia nervosa frequently cause secondary osteoporosis. In those diseases, hormone excess or deficiency affects functions of osteoblasts, osteocyte, and osteoclasts, leading to aberrant bone remodeling. Bisphosphonates are the first-choice pharmacological agents for fracture prevention in most patients with secondary osteoporosis along with treatment of the underlying disease. PMID:26529938

  17. What Is Osteoporosis?

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... easily. LAWRENCE RAISZ, M.D.: Osteoporosis and bone health have become enormous problems in the United States ... attention to. People ignore the issue of bone health-- they don't concern themselves about it until ...

  18. International Osteoporosis Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bosnia and Herzegovina - Brazil - Bulgaria - Cameroon - Canada - Chile - China - Colombia - Costa Rica - Croatia - Cuba - Cyprus - Czech Republic - ... warn of osteoporosis threat to Asia’s growing elderly population New drugs may help increase muscle strength and ...

  19. Diagnosis of Osteoporosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wahner, H. W.

    1987-01-01

    Early recognition of osteoporosis is difficult because symptoms are lacking and there are no distinct, readily accessible diagnostic features. This article reviews the standard approach, radiographic and laboratory diagnosis, bone mass measurement techniques, and interpretation of bone mineral data. (MT)

  20. Estrogen and Osteoporosis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindsay, Robert

    1987-01-01

    This article reviews the use of estrogen in the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis. Dosage levels, interactions with other factors, side effects, and the mechanism of estrogen action are discussed. (Author/MT)

  1. Medicines for osteoporosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Evista); Teriparatide (Forteo); Denosumab (Prolia); Low bone density - medicines; Osteoporosis - medicines ... Your doctor may prescribe medicines to help lower your risk of fractures. These medicines make the bones in your hips, spine, and other areas denser. ...

  2. Osteoporosis in Men

    MedlinePlus

    ... formation. Because it requires daily injections and is expensive, doctors usually prescribe it only for men with ... wine, or a single measure of spirits) • Quit smoking. If you already have osteoporosis, you should take ...

  3. Osteoporosis in anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Treasure, J; Serpell, L

    1999-07-01

    Anorexia nervosa is a disorder characterized by low body weight and amenorrhoea (in females). These features lead to a risk of osteoporosis, a condition in which bone loss leads to weakening of bone structure and increased fracture risk. PMID:10605537

  4. Osteoporosis in Men

    MedlinePlus

    ... talk to their doctor about having a bone mineral density (BMD) test. Men should also be tested ... tests. The doctor may also order a bone mineral density test. This test can identify osteoporosis, determine ...

  5. Secondary osteoporosis: pathophysiology & diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Emkey, Gregory R; Epstein, Sol

    2014-12-01

    Osteoporosis is a skeletal disease characterized by decreased bone mass and microarchitectural changes in bone tissue that increase the susceptibility to fracture. Secondary osteoporosis is loosely defined as low bone mineral density or increased risk of fragility fracture caused by any factor other than aging or postmenopausal status. The purpose of this review is to discuss the current understanding of the pathophysiology and contribution to fracture risk of many of the more common causes of secondary osteoporosis, as well as diagnostic considerations, outlined by organ system. While not comprehensive, included are a wide array of diseases, conditions, and medications that have been associated with bone loss and susceptibility to fractures. The hope is to highlight the importance to the general clinician of screening for and treating the osteoporosis in these patients, so to limit the resultant increased morbidity associated with fractures. PMID:25432361

  6. Sarcopenia and Osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Hyung-Min; Han, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Public health strategies designed to accomodate the ever-increasing human lifespan are urgently required. A good clinical understanding of frailty, as well as knowledge regarding how to prevent it, will therefore be required in order to overcome this challenge. Sarcopenia is an important component of the frailty syndrome, and its association with osteoporosis can lead to fractures and incident disability. Therefore, this review examined the literatuire pertaining to the association of sarcopenia with osteoporosis in order to assess preventive strategies.

  7. Idiopathic cardiomegaly*

    PubMed Central

    1968-01-01

    Cardiomyopathies are certain heart diseases of unknown etiology and pathogenesis, occurring mostly in tropical and subtropical areas, where they constitute a major clinical problem and sometimes a public health problem. The need for international co-operation in the study of such forms of heart disease has long been recognized and WHO convened informal meetings of investigators on various aspects of the subject in 1964, 1965 and 1966. Out of these have arisen co-operative studies co-ordinated by WHO. In November 1967 a fourth informal meeting was held in Kingston, Jamaica, to review the following topics: the progress reports from all co-operating laboratories; the different types of cardiomyopathies; past experience with cardiac registries, and the diagnostic importance of coronary angiography. Steps were taken towards the formulation of a standard terminology, since too many confusing names are currently employed to mean “cardiomegaly of unknown origin”. A common name, “idiopathic cardiomegaly”, was therefore suggested for future use. The account presented here was prepared by Dr Z. Fejfar, Chief Medical Officer, Cardiovascular Diseases, World Health Organization, Geneva, on behalf of the other participants and is a précis of some of the information that was exchanged, some of the views that were expressed and of the suggestions that were made. PMID:4235740

  8. Bisphosphonates for Osteoporosis: Benefits and Risks

    MedlinePlus

    ... o es sis : Benefits and Risks What is osteoporosis? Osteoporosis is a condition in which your bones become ... through menopause are especially at risk of developing osteoporosis. Osteoporosis is more common in women than in ...

  9. [Osteoporosis and stress].

    PubMed

    Kumano, Hiroaki

    2005-09-01

    There may be three ways of relationship between stress and osteoporosis. The first is that stress induces some physiological changes leading to osteoporosis. The second is that stress induces behavioral distortion of eating, drinking, exercise, and sleep habits, which leads to osteoporosis. The third is that osteoporosis, on the other hand, brings about anxiety, depression, loss of social roles, and social isolation, which leads to stress. The susceptible sex and age groups are postmenopausal women and young women. The abrupt decrease of estrogen in postmenopausal women promotes reabsorption of bone, and it was also reported that the increase of interleukin-6 (IL-6) that is downstream of estrogen was related to the production of osteoclast and to the development of disability of the aged. Regarding the association with stress, while it was reported that depression or depressive states directly increased inflammation-induced cytokines including IL-6, it was also pointed out that stress-induced easy infectious may produce chronic infection, which indirectly increases inflammation-induced cytokines. Anorexia Nervosa that is assumed to be associated with adolescent developmental stress is noteworthy in young women. Amenorrhea is always present in this disease, and in addition to bone reabsorption associated with estrogen deficiency, the decrease of bone formation associated with malnutrition may be related to the development of osteoporosis. PMID:16137956

  10. Glucocorticoid-induced osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Briot, Karine; Roux, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Corticosteroid-induced osteoporosis is the most common form of secondary osteoporosis and the first cause in young people. Bone loss and increased rate of fractures occur early after the initiation of corticosteroid therapy, and are then related to dosage and treatment duration. The increase in fracture risk is not fully assessed by bone mineral density measurements, as it is also related to alteration of bone quality and increased risk of falls. In patients with rheumatoid arthritis, a treat-to-target strategy focusing on low disease activity including through the use of low dose of prednisone, is a key determinant of bone loss prevention. Bone loss magnitude is variable and there is no clearly identified predictor of the individual risk of fracture. Prevention or treatment of osteoporosis should be considered in all patients who receive prednisone. Bisphosphonates and the anabolic agent parathyroid hormone (1–34) have shown their efficacy in the treatment of corticosteroid-induced osteoporosis. Recent international guidelines are available and should guide management of corticosteroid-induced osteoporosis, which remains under-diagnosed and under-treated. Duration of antiosteoporotic treatment should be discussed at the individual level, depending on the subject's characteristics and on the underlying inflammation evolution. PMID:26509049