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Sample records for iga class autoantibodies

  1. Antigenic heterogeneity of IgA anti-GBM disease: new renal targets of IgA autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Ho, Julie; Gibson, Ian W; Zacharias, James; Fervenza, Fernando; Colon, Selene; Borza, Dorin-Bogdan

    2008-10-01

    Anti-glomerular basement membrane (anti-GBM) disease is an aggressive form of glomerulonephritis, usually mediated by immunoglobulin G (IgG) autoantibodies to the noncollagenous (NC1) domain of alpha 3(IV) collagen. Less is known about the target antigen(s) in patients with atypical anti-GBM disease involving IgA autoantibodies. We report a new case of IgA anti-GBM disease in a patient with a history of proliferative lupus nephritis who presented with increasing creatinine levels, proteinuria, and hematuria, but no clinical or serological evidence of lupus recurrence. Renal biopsy showed focal and segmental necrotizing glomerulonephritis with strong linear capillary loop IgA staining by means of immunofluorescence. Serological test results were negative for IgG or IgA autoantibodies against the alpha 3NC1 domain. By means of immunoblotting, IgA from patient serum bound to 38- to 48-kd antigens collagenase-solubilized from human GBM, but not to purified NC1 domains of GBM collagen IV. The target of patient's IgA autoantibodies thus was identified as a novel GBM antigen, distinct from the alpha 3NC1 domain or other known targets of anti-GBM IgA autoantibodies. Clinical resolution was attained by means of conventional treatment with steroids and cyclophosphamide. The diversity of antigens recognized by anti-GBM IgA autoantibodies highlights the importance of renal biopsy for the reliable diagnosis of this rare condition because conventional serological immunoassays likely would yield false-negative results. PMID:18752876

  2. Development of an ELISA for sensitive and specific detection of IgA autoantibodies against BP180 in pemphigoid diseases

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Pemphigoids are rare diseases associated with IgG, IgE and IgA autoantibodies against collagen XVII/BP180. An entity of the pemphigoid group is the lamina lucida-type of linear IgA disease (IgA pemphigoid) characterized by IgA autoantibodies against BP180. While for the detection of IgG and IgE autoantibodies specific to collagen XVII several ELISA systems have been established, no quantitative immunoassay has been yet developed for IgA autoantibodies. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to develop an ELISA to detect IgA autoantibodies against collagen XVII in the sera of patients with pemphigoids. Methods We expressed a soluble recombinant form of the collagen XVII ectodomain in mammalian cells. Reactivity of IgA autoantibodies from patients with IgA pemphigoid was assessed by immunofluorescence microscopy and immunoblot analysis. ELISA test conditions were determined by chessboard titration experiments. The sensitivity, specificity and the cut-off were determined by receiver-operating characteristics analysis. Results The optimized assay was carried out using sera from patients with IgA pemphigoid (n = 30) and healthy donors (n = 105). By receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis, an area under the curve of 0.993 was calculated, indicating an excellent discriminatory capacity. Thus, a sensitivity and specificity of 83.3% and 100%, respectively, was determined for a cut-off point of 0.48. As additional control groups, sera from patients with bullous pemphigoid (n = 31) and dermatitis herpetiformis (n = 50), a disease associated with IgA autoantibodies against epidermal transglutaminase, were tested. In 26% of bullous pemphigoid patients, IgA autoantibodies recognized the ectodomain of collagen XVII. One of 50 (2%) of dermatitis herpetiformis patients sera slightly topped the cut-off value. Conclusions We developed the first ELISA for the specific and sensitive detection of serum IgA autoantibodies specific to collagen XVII in patients

  3. Autoantibodies

    MedlinePlus

    ... services. Advertising & Sponsorship: Policy | Opportunities PLEASE NOTE: Your web browser does not have JavaScript enabled. Unless you enable Javascript , your ability to navigate and access the features of this website will be limited. Home Visit ... Examples | Related Pages What are autoantibodies? Autoantibodies ...

  4. Catalytic autoantibodies against myelin basic protein (MBP) isolated from serum of autistic children impair in vitro models of synaptic plasticity in rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Gronow, Mario; Cuchacovich, Miguel; Francos, Rina; Cuchacovich, Stephanie; Blanco, Angel; Sandoval, Rodrigo; Gomez, Cristian Farias; Valenzuela, Javier A; Ray, Rupa; Pizzo, Salvatore V

    2015-10-15

    Autoantibodies from autistic spectrum disorder (ASD) patients react with multiple proteins expressed in the brain. One such autoantibody targets myelin basic protein (MBP). ASD patients have autoantibodies to MBP of both the IgG and IgA classes in high titers, but no autoantibodies of the IgM class. IgA autoantibodies act as serine proteinases and degrade MBP in vitro. They also induce a decrease in long-term potentiation in the hippocampi of rats either perfused with or previously inoculated with this IgA. Because this class of autoantibody causes myelin sheath destruction in multiple sclerosis (MS), we hypothesized a similar pathological role for them in ASD. PMID:26439953

  5. Effect of HLA Class I and Class II Alleles on Progression From Autoantibody Positivity to Overt Type 1 Diabetes in Children With Risk-Associated Class II Genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Lipponen, Kati; Gombos, Zsofia; Kiviniemi, Minna; Siljander, Heli; Lempainen, Johanna; Hermann, Robert; Veijola, Riitta; Simell, Olli; Knip, Mikael; Ilonen, Jorma

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Class II alleles define the main HLA effect on type 1 diabetes, but there is an independent effect of certain class I alleles. Class II and class I molecules are differently involved in the initiation and effector phases of the immune response, suggesting that class I alleles would be important determinants in the rate of β-cell destruction. To test this hypothesis we analyzed the role of HLA class I and class II gene polymorphisms in the progression from diabetes-associated autoimmunity to clinical disease. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS The effect of HLA-DR-DQ haplotypes and a panel of class I HLA-A and -B alleles on the progression from autoantibody seroconversion to clinical diabetes was studied in 249 children persistently positive for at least one biochemical diabetes-associated autoantibody in addition to islet cell autoantibody. RESULTS The progression to clinical disease was separately analyzed after the appearance of the first and the second persistent biochemical autoantibody using Cox regression. Multivariate analysis demonstrated a significant protective effect of the A*03 allele (odds ratio [OR] 0.61, P = 0.042 after the first and OR 0.55, P = 0.027 after the second autoantibody), whereas the B*39 allele had a promoting effect after seroconversion for the second autoantibody (OR 2.4, P = 0.014). When children with the DR3/DR4 genotype were separately analyzed, HLA-B*39 had a strong effect (OR 6.6, P = 0.004 and OR 7.5, P = 0.007, after the appearance of the first and the second autoantibody, respectively). The protective effect of A*03 was seen only among children without the DR3/DR4 combination. CONCLUSIONS These results confirm that class I alleles affect the progression of diabetes-associated autoimmunity and demonstrate interactions between class I and class II alleles. PMID:20739684

  6. Adalimumab (TNFα Inhibitor) Therapy Exacerbates IgA Glomerulonephritis Acute Renal Injury and Induces Lupus Autoantibodies in a Psoriasis Patient

    PubMed Central

    Wei, S. S.; Sinniah, R.

    2013-01-01

    Adalimumab (Humira) is a tumour necrosis factor α (TNFα) inhibitor that is approved for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, Crohn's disease, ankylosing spondylitis, and juvenile idiopathic arthritis (Sullivan and Preda (2009), Klinkhoff (2004), and Medicare Australia). Use of TNFα inhibitors is associated with the induction of autoimmunity (systemic lupus erythematosus, vasculitis, and sarcoidosis or sarcoid-like granulomas) (Ramos-Casals et al. (2010)). We report a patient with extensive psoriasis presenting with renal failure and seropositive lupus markers without classical lupus nephritis after 18 months treatment with adalimumab. He has renal biopsy proven IgA nephritis instead. Renal biopsy is the key diagnostic tool in patients presenting with adalimumab induced nephritis and renal failure. He made a remarkable recovery after adalimumab cessation and steroid treatment. To our knowledge, this is a unique case of a psoriasis patient presenting with seropositive lupus markers without classical lupus nephritis renal failure and had renal biopsy proven IgA glomerulonephritis after receiving adalimumab. PMID:24558628

  7. Ectopic Lymphoid Structures Support Ongoing Production of Class-Switched Autoantibodies in Rheumatoid Synovium

    PubMed Central

    Manzo, Antonio; Kelly, Stephen; Blades, Mark C; Kirkham, Bruce; Spencer, Jo; Pitzalis, Costantino

    2009-01-01

    Background Follicular structures resembling germinal centres (GCs) that are characterized by follicular dendritic cell (FDC) networks have long been recognized in chronically inflamed tissues in autoimmune diseases, including the synovium of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, it is debated whether these ectopic structures promote autoimmunity and chronic inflammation driving the production of pathogenic autoantibodies. Anti-citrullinated protein/peptide antibodies (ACPA) are highly specific markers of RA, predict a poor prognosis, and have been suggested to be pathogenic. Therefore, the main study objectives were to determine whether ectopic lymphoid structures in RA synovium: (i) express activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), the enzyme required for somatic hypermutation and class-switch recombination (CSR) of Ig genes; (ii) support ongoing CSR and ACPA production; and (iii) remain functional in a RA/severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) chimera model devoid of new immune cell influx into the synovium. Methods and Findings Using immunohistochemistry (IHC) and quantitative Taqman real-time PCR (QT-PCR) in synovial tissue from 55 patients with RA, we demonstrated that FDC+ structures invariably expressed AID with a distribution resembling secondary lymphoid organs. Further, AID+/CD21+ follicular structures were surrounded by ACPA+/CD138+ plasma cells, as demonstrated by immune reactivity to citrullinated fibrinogen. Moreover, we identified a novel subset of synovial AID+/CD20+ B cells outside GCs resembling interfollicular large B cells. In order to gain direct functional evidence that AID+ structures support CSR and in situ manufacturing of class-switched ACPA, 34 SCID mice were transplanted with RA synovium and humanely killed at 4 wk for harvesting of transplants and sera. Persistent expression of AID and Iγ-Cμ circular transcripts (identifying ongoing IgM-IgG class-switching) was observed in synovial grafts expressing FDCs/CD21L. Furthermore, synovial

  8. Microbiota regulate the ability of lung dendritic cells to induce IgA class-switch recombination and generate protective gastrointestinal immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Ruane, Darren; Chorny, Alejo; Lee, Haekyung; Faith, Jeremiah; Pandey, Gaurav; Shan, Meimei; Simchoni, Noa; Rahman, Adeeb; Garg, Aakash; Weinstein, Erica G.; Oropallo, Michael; Gaylord, Michelle; Ungaro, Ryan; Cunningham-Rundles, Charlotte; Alexandropoulos, Konstantina; Mucida, Daniel; Merad, Miriam; Cerutti, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Protective immunoglobulin A (IgA) responses to oral antigens are usually orchestrated by gut dendritic cells (DCs). Here, we show that lung CD103+ and CD24+CD11b+ DCs induced IgA class-switch recombination (CSR) by activating B cells through T cell–dependent or –independent pathways. Compared with lung DCs (LDC), lung CD64+ macrophages had decreased expression of B cell activation genes and induced significantly less IgA production. Microbial stimuli, acting through Toll-like receptors, induced transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) production by LDCs and exerted a profound influence on LDC-mediated IgA CSR. After intranasal immunization with inactive cholera toxin (CT), LDCs stimulated retinoic acid–dependent up-regulation of α4β7 and CCR9 gut-homing receptors on local IgA-expressing B cells. Migration of these B cells to the gut resulted in IgA-mediated protection against an oral challenge with active CT. However, in germ-free mice, the levels of LDC-induced, CT–specific IgA in the gut are significantly reduced. Herein, we demonstrate an unexpected role of the microbiota in modulating the protective efficacy of intranasal vaccination through their effect on the IgA class-switching function of LDCs. PMID:26712806

  9. Microbiota regulate the ability of lung dendritic cells to induce IgA class-switch recombination and generate protective gastrointestinal immune responses.

    PubMed

    Ruane, Darren; Chorny, Alejo; Lee, Haekyung; Faith, Jeremiah; Pandey, Gaurav; Shan, Meimei; Simchoni, Noa; Rahman, Adeeb; Garg, Aakash; Weinstein, Erica G; Oropallo, Michael; Gaylord, Michelle; Ungaro, Ryan; Cunningham-Rundles, Charlotte; Alexandropoulos, Konstantina; Mucida, Daniel; Merad, Miriam; Cerutti, Andrea; Mehandru, Saurabh

    2016-01-11

    Protective immunoglobulin A (IgA) responses to oral antigens are usually orchestrated by gut dendritic cells (DCs). Here, we show that lung CD103(+) and CD24(+)CD11b(+) DCs induced IgA class-switch recombination (CSR) by activating B cells through T cell-dependent or -independent pathways. Compared with lung DCs (LDC), lung CD64(+) macrophages had decreased expression of B cell activation genes and induced significantly less IgA production. Microbial stimuli, acting through Toll-like receptors, induced transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) production by LDCs and exerted a profound influence on LDC-mediated IgA CSR. After intranasal immunization with inactive cholera toxin (CT), LDCs stimulated retinoic acid-dependent up-regulation of α4β7 and CCR9 gut-homing receptors on local IgA-expressing B cells. Migration of these B cells to the gut resulted in IgA-mediated protection against an oral challenge with active CT. However, in germ-free mice, the levels of LDC-induced, CT-specific IgA in the gut are significantly reduced. Herein, we demonstrate an unexpected role of the microbiota in modulating the protective efficacy of intranasal vaccination through their effect on the IgA class-switching function of LDCs. PMID:26712806

  10. Analyzing antibody activity in IgA nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Glassock, Richard J.

    2009-01-01

    IgA nephropathy is a chronic kidney disease defined by deposition of IgA in the glomeruli. An abnormality in the glycosylation of the hinge region of the IgA1 isotype of IgA is fundamental to the origins of this very common form of glomerulonephritis. In this issue of the JCI, Suzuki and coworkers describe the characteristics of IgG autoantibodies to the abnormally glycosylated IgA1 secreted by immortalized B cells derived from patients with sporadic forms of IgA nephropathy (see the related article beginning on page 1668). These IgG autoantibodies displayed remarkably restricted heterogeneity. These observations offer new insights into disease pathogenesis and may lead to new methods of diagnosis, monitoring, and therapy for patients with IgA nephropathy. PMID:19504718

  11. HLA Class I and II Blocks Are Associated to Susceptibility, Clinical Subtypes and Autoantibodies in Mexican Systemic Sclerosis (SSc) Patients

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Reyna, Tatiana S.; Mercado-Velázquez, Pamela; Yu, Neng; Alosco, Sharon; Ohashi, Marina; Lebedeva, Tatiana; Cruz-Lagunas, Alfredo; Núñez-Álvarez, Carlos; Vargas-Alarcón, Gilberto; Granados, Julio; Zúñiga, Joaquin; Yunis, Edmond

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) polymorphism studies in Systemic Sclerosis (SSc) have yielded variable results. These studies need to consider the genetic admixture of the studied population. Here we used our previously reported definition of genetic admixture of Mexicans using HLA class I and II DNA blocks to map genetic susceptibility to develop SSc and its complications. Methods We included 159 patients from a cohort of Mexican Mestizo SSc patients. We performed clinical evaluation, obtained SSc-associated antibodies, and determined HLA class I and class II alleles using sequence-based, high-resolution techniques to evaluate the contribution of these genes to SSc susceptibility, their correlation with the clinical and autoantibody profile and the prevalence of Amerindian, Caucasian and African alleles, blocks and haplotypes in this population. Results Our study revealed that class I block HLA-C*12:03-B*18:01 was important to map susceptibility to diffuse cutaneous (dc) SSc, HLA-C*07:01-B*08:01 block to map the susceptibility role of HLA-B*08:01 to develop SSc, and the C*07:02-B*39:05 and C*07:02-B*39:06 blocks to map the protective role of C*07:02 in SSc. We also confirmed previous associations of HLA-DRB1*11:04 and –DRB1*01 to susceptibility to develop SSc. Importantly, we mapped the protective role of DQB1*03:01 using three Amerindian blocks. We also found a significant association for the presence of anti-Topoisomerase I antibody with HLA-DQB1*04:02, present in an Amerindian block (DRB1*08:02-DQB1*04:02), and we found several alleles associated to internal organ damage. The admixture estimations revealed a lower proportion of the Amerindian genetic component among SSc patients. Conclusion This is the first report of the diversity of HLA class I and II alleles and haplotypes Mexican patients with SSc. Our findings suggest that HLA class I and class II genes contribute to the protection and susceptibility to develop SSc and its different clinical

  12. Intranasal antigen targeting to MHC class II molecules primes local IgA and serum IgG antibody responses in mice.

    PubMed

    Snider, D P; Underdown, B J; McDermott, M R

    1997-03-01

    Covalent conjugates of hen egg lysozyme (HEL) and anti-major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II monoclonal antibodies (mAb) were used to immunize mice intranasally. Three weeks after intranasal (IN) priming, mice responded rapidly to IN challenge with a mixture of HEL and cholera toxin (CT), by producing large titres of anti-HEL IgA and IgG1 antibody in serum, and IgA antibody in nasal secretions. No secondary response to HEL plus CT occurred in mice that received no priming or mice primed with HEL alone. The secondary serum IgG antibody response was dominated by the IgG1 subclass. HEL combined with CT adjuvant worked much better than HEL alone in producing the secondary response. Control conjugates, containing an IgG isotype-matched mAb without specificity for mouse tissues, provided poor priming. Mice expressing MHC class II molecules, to which the anti-MHC II mAb could not bind, produced a weak antibody response compared with those that expressed the appropriate. MHC class II molecule. Our results demonstrate that immunotargeting to MHC class II molecules via the IN route allows priming of the local IgA and circulating IgG antibody, and indicate that this technique is a feasible approach for delivery of subunit vaccines in the upper respiratory tract. PMID:9155636

  13. Autoantibody pain.

    PubMed

    Goebel, Andreas

    2016-06-01

    As autoantibodies bind to target tissues, Fc-region dependent inflammation can induce pain via mediators exciting nociceptors. But recently another possibility has emerged, where autoantibody binding to nociceptors can directly cause pain, without inflammation. This is thought to occur as a result of Fab-region mediated modification of nerve transduction, transmission, or neuropeptide release. In three conditions, complex regional pain syndrome, anti-voltage gated potassium channel complex autoimmunity, and chronic fatigue syndrome, all associated with no or only little inflammation, initial laboratory-, and clinical trial-results have suggested a potential role for autoantibody-mediated mechanisms. More research assessing the pathogenic roles of autoantibodies in these and other chronic pain conditions is required. The concept of autoantibody-mediated pain offers hope for the development of novel therapies for currently intractable pains. PMID:26883460

  14. Islet Autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Lampasona, Vito; Liberati, Daniela

    2016-06-01

    Islet autoantibodies are the main markers of pancreatic autoimmunity in type 1 diabetes (T1D). Islet autoantibodies recognize insulin (IAA), glutamic acid decarboxylase (GADA), protein phosphatase-like IA-2 (IA-2A), and ZnT8 (ZnT8A), all antigens that are found on secretory granules within pancreatic beta cells. Islet antibodies, measured by sensitive and specific liquid phase assays, are the key parameters of the autoimmune response monitored for diagnostics or prognostics in patients with T1D or for disease prediction in at-risk individuals before T1D onset. Islet autoantibodies have been the main tool used to explore the natural history of T1D; this review summarizes the current knowledge about the autoantigens and the phenotype of islets autoantibodies acquired in large prospective studies from birth in children at risk of developing T1D. PMID:27112957

  15. Clinical Relevance of Autoantibodies in Patients with Autoimmune Bullous Dermatosis

    PubMed Central

    Mihályi, Lilla; Kiss, Mária; Dobozy, Attila; Kemény, Lajos; Husz, Sándor

    2012-01-01

    The authors present their experience related to the diagnosis, treatment, and followup of 431 patients with bullous pemphigoid, 14 patients with juvenile bullous pemphigoid, and 273 patients with pemphigus. The detection of autoantibodies plays an outstanding role in the diagnosis and differential diagnosis. Paraneoplastic pemphigoid is suggested to be a distinct entity from the group of bullous pemphigoid in view of the linear C3 deposits along the basement membrane of the perilesional skin and the “ladder” configuration of autoantibodies demonstrated by western blot analysis. It is proposed that IgA pemphigoid should be differentiated from the linear IgA dermatoses. Immunosuppressive therapy is recommended in which the maintenance dose of corticosteroid is administered every second day, thereby reducing the side effects of the corticosteroids. Following the detection of IgA antibodies (IgA pemphigoid, linear IgA bullous dermatosis, and IgA pemphigus), diamino diphenyl sulfone (dapsone) therapy is preferred alone or in combination. The clinical relevance of autoantibodies in patients with autoimmune bullous dermatosis is stressed. PMID:23320017

  16. Autoantibody Profiles in Collagen Disease Patients with Interstitial Lung Disease (ILD): Antibodies to Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I-Related Chain A (MICA) as Markers of ILD.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Hiroshi; Oka, Shomi; Shimada, Kota; Masuo, Kiyoe; Nakajima, Fumiaki; Funano, Shunichi; Tanaka, Yuki; Komiya, Akiko; Fukui, Naoshi; Sawasaki, Tatsuya; Tadokoro, Kenji; Nose, Masato; Tsuchiya, Naoyuki; Tohma, Shigeto

    2015-01-01

    Interstitial lung disease (ILD) is frequently associated with collagen disease. It is then designated as collagen vascular disease-associated ILD (CVD-ILD), and influences patients' prognosis. The prognosis of acute-onset diffuse ILD (AoDILD) occurring in patients with collagen disease is quite poor. Here, we report our investigation of auto-antibody (Ab) profiles to determine whether they may be useful in diagnosing CVD-ILD or AoDILD in collagen disease. Auto-Ab profiles were analyzed using the Lambda Array Beads Multi-Analyte System, granulocyte immunofluorescence test, Proto-Array Human Protein Microarray, AlphaScreen assay, and glutathione S-transferase capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in 34 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) with or without CVD-ILD and in 15 patients with collagen disease with AoDILD. The average anti-major histocompatibility complex class I-related chain A (MICA) Ab levels were higher in RA patients with CVD-ILD than in those without (P = 0.0013). The ratio of the average anti-MICA Ab level to the average anti-human leukocyte antigen class I Ab level (ie, MICA/Class I) was significantly higher in RA patients with CVD-ILD compared with those without (P = 4.47 × 10(-5)). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of auto-Ab profiles in CVD-ILD. The MICA/Class I ratio could be a better marker for diagnosing CVD-ILD than KL-6 (Krebs von den lungen-6). PMID:26327779

  17. Autoantibody Profiles in Collagen Disease Patients with Interstitial Lung Disease (ILD): Antibodies to Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I-Related Chain A (MICA) as Markers of ILD

    PubMed Central

    Furukawa, Hiroshi; Oka, Shomi; Shimada, Kota; Masuo, Kiyoe; Nakajima, Fumiaki; Funano, Shunichi; Tanaka, Yuki; Komiya, Akiko; Fukui, Naoshi; Sawasaki, Tatsuya; Tadokoro, Kenji; Nose, Masato; Tsuchiya, Naoyuki; Tohma, Shigeto

    2015-01-01

    Interstitial lung disease (ILD) is frequently associated with collagen disease. It is then designated as collagen vascular disease-associated ILD (CVD-ILD), and influences patients’ prognosis. The prognosis of acute-onset diffuse ILD (AoDILD) occurring in patients with collagen disease is quite poor. Here, we report our investigation of auto-antibody (Ab) profiles to determine whether they may be useful in diagnosing CVD-ILD or AoDILD in collagen disease. Auto-Ab profiles were analyzed using the Lambda Array Beads Multi-Analyte System, granulocyte immunofluorescence test, Proto-Array Human Protein Microarray, AlphaScreen assay, and glutathione S-transferase capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in 34 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) with or without CVD-ILD and in 15 patients with collagen disease with AoDILD. The average anti-major histocompatibility complex class I-related chain A (MICA) Ab levels were higher in RA patients with CVD-ILD than in those without (P = 0.0013). The ratio of the average anti-MICA Ab level to the average anti-human leukocyte antigen class I Ab level (ie, MICA/Class I) was significantly higher in RA patients with CVD-ILD compared with those without (P = 4.47 × 10−5). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of auto-Ab profiles in CVD-ILD. The MICA/Class I ratio could be a better marker for diagnosing CVD-ILD than KL-6 (Krebs von den lungen-6). PMID:26327779

  18. Autoantibodies against MHC class I polypeptide-related sequence A are associated with increased risk of concomitant autoimmune diseases in celiac patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Overexpression of autologous proteins can lead to the formation of autoantibodies and autoimmune diseases. MHC class I polypeptide-related sequence A (MICA) is highly expressed in the enterocytes of patients with celiac disease, which arises in response to gluten. The aim of this study was to investigate anti-MICA antibody formation in patients with celiac disease and its association with other autoimmune processes. Methods We tested serum samples from 383 patients with celiac disease, obtained before they took up a gluten-free diet, 428 patients with diverse autoimmune diseases, and 200 controls for anti-MICA antibodies. All samples were also tested for anti-endomysium and anti-transglutaminase antibodies. Results Antibodies against MICA were detected in samples from 41.7% of patients with celiac disease but in only 3.5% of those from controls (P <0.0001) and 8.2% from patients with autoimmune disease (P <0.0001). These antibodies disappeared after the instauration of a gluten-free diet. Anti-MICA antibodies were significantly prevalent in younger patients (P <0.01). Fifty-eight patients with celiac disease (15.1%) presented a concomitant autoimmune disease. Anti-MICA-positive patients had a higher risk of autoimmune disease than MICA antibody-negative patients (P <0.0001; odds ratio = 6.11). The risk was even higher when we also controlled for age (odds ratio = 11.69). Finally, we found that the associated risk of developing additional autoimmune diseases was 16 and 10 times as high in pediatric patients and adults with anti-MICA, respectively, as in those without. Conclusions The development of anti-MICA antibodies could be related to a gluten-containing diet, and seems to be involved in the development of autoimmune diseases in patients with celiac disease, especially younger ones. PMID:24565339

  19. IgA Nephropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Kidney Disease and Kidney Failure . [ Top ] How is kidney disease diagnosed? A health care provider diagnoses kidney disease ... levels Control Blood Pressure and Slow Progression of Kidney Disease People with IgA nephropathy that is causing high ...

  20. IgA nephropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... family history of IgA nephropathy or Henoch Schonlein purpura , a form of vasculitis that affects many parts ... End-stage kidney disease Hypersensitivity vasculitis Nephrotic syndrome Purpura Urine - bloody Update Date 9/22/2015 Updated ...

  1. 21 CFR 866.5660 - Multiple autoantibodies immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    .... 866.5660 Section 866.5660 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... the autoantibodies (antibodies produced against the body's own tissues) in serum and other body fluids... the body's own tissues are injured by autoantibodies). (b) Classification. Class II...

  2. 21 CFR 866.5660 - Multiple autoantibodies immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    .... 866.5660 Section 866.5660 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... the autoantibodies (antibodies produced against the body's own tissues) in serum and other body fluids... the body's own tissues are injured by autoantibodies). (b) Classification. Class II...

  3. 21 CFR 866.5660 - Multiple autoantibodies immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    .... 866.5660 Section 866.5660 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... the autoantibodies (antibodies produced against the body's own tissues) in serum and other body fluids... the body's own tissues are injured by autoantibodies). (b) Classification. Class II...

  4. 21 CFR 866.5660 - Multiple autoantibodies immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    .... 866.5660 Section 866.5660 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... the autoantibodies (antibodies produced against the body's own tissues) in serum and other body fluids... the body's own tissues are injured by autoantibodies). (b) Classification. Class II...

  5. 21 CFR 866.5660 - Multiple autoantibodies immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    .... 866.5660 Section 866.5660 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... the autoantibodies (antibodies produced against the body's own tissues) in serum and other body fluids... the body's own tissues are injured by autoantibodies). (b) Classification. Class II...

  6. Anti-Ig autoantibody and complement-mediated destruction of neoplastic cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Towmey, J. J.

    1976-01-01

    Some immune response are effected through immunoglobulins (Ig), of which five classes have been recognized, namely, IgA, IgD, IgE, IgG, and IgM. Auto-antibodies associated with rheumatoid arthritis, termed rheumatoid factors (RF) react with antigenic determinants on IgG heavy chains. RF has predominant but not complete IgM specificity. This auto-antibody response was not detected in treated patients with primary brain tumors (where tissue is sequestered from the immune system by an intact bloodbrain barrier) or with multiple myeloma where humoral immunity is usually impaired. In addition, the prevalence of RF is not increased with solid tumors prior to initiation of chemotherapy or radiotherapy. It is proposed that RF is related to prior chemotherapy or radiotherapy of tumors anatomically accessible to immunologic tissues capable of antibody responses. A primary IgG response occurs, antigen-antibody complexes form, complexed IgG becomes immunologic, and an RF response results.

  7. Gluten exacerbates IgA nephropathy in humanized mice through gliadin-CD89 interaction.

    PubMed

    Papista, Christina; Lechner, Sebastian; Ben Mkaddem, Sanae; LeStang, Marie-Bénédicte; Abbad, Lilia; Bex-Coudrat, Julie; Pillebout, Evangéline; Chemouny, Jonathan M; Jablonski, Mathieu; Flamant, Martin; Daugas, Eric; Vrtovsnik, François; Yiangou, Minas; Berthelot, Laureline; Monteiro, Renato C

    2015-08-01

    IgA1 complexes containing deglycosylated IgA1, IgG autoantibodies, and a soluble form of the IgA receptor (sCD89), are hallmarks of IgA nephropathy (IgAN). Food antigens, notably gluten, are associated with increased mucosal response and IgAN onset, but their implication in the pathology remains unknown. Here, an IgAN mouse model expressing human IgA1 and CD89 was used to examine the role of gluten in IgAN. Mice were given a gluten-free diet for three generations to produce gluten sensitivity, and then challenged for 30 days with a gluten diet. A gluten-free diet resulted in a decrease of mesangial IgA1 deposits, transferrin 1 receptor, and transglutaminase 2 expression, as well as hematuria. Mice on a gluten-free diet lacked IgA1-sCD89 complexes in serum and kidney eluates. Disease severity depended on gluten and CD89, as shown by reappearance of IgAN features in mice on a gluten diet and by direct binding of the gluten-subcomponent gliadin to sCD89. A gluten diet exacerbated intestinal IgA1 secretion, inflammation, and villous atrophy, and increased serum IgA1 anti-gliadin antibodies, which correlated with proteinuria in mice and patients. Moreover, early treatment of humanized mice with a gluten-free diet prevented mesangial IgA1 deposits and hematuria. Thus, gliadin-CD89 interaction may aggravate IgAN development through induction of IgA1-sCD89 complex formation and a mucosal immune response. Hence, early-stage treatment with a gluten-free diet could be beneficial to prevent disease. PMID:25807036

  8. The Origin and Activities of IgA1-Containing Immune Complexes in IgA Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Knoppova, Barbora; Reily, Colin; Maillard, Nicolas; Rizk, Dana V.; Moldoveanu, Zina; Mestecky, Jiri; Raska, Milan; Renfrow, Matthew B.; Julian, Bruce A.; Novak, Jan

    2016-01-01

    IgA nephropathy (IgAN) is the most common primary glomerulonephritis, frequently leading to end-stage renal disease, as there is no disease-specific therapy. IgAN is diagnosed from pathological assessment of a renal biopsy specimen based on predominant or codominant IgA-containing immunodeposits, usually with complement C3 co-deposits and with variable presence of IgG and/or IgM. The IgA in these renal deposits is galactose-deficient IgA1, with less than a full complement of galactose residues on the O-glycans in the hinge region of the heavy chains. Research from the past decade led to the definition of IgAN as an autoimmune disease with a multi-hit pathogenetic process with contributing genetic and environmental components. In this process, circulating galactose-deficient IgA1 (autoantigen) is bound by antiglycan IgG or IgA (autoantibodies) to form immune complexes. Some of these circulating complexes deposit in glomeruli, and thereby activate mesangial cells and induce renal injury through cellular proliferation and overproduction of extracellular matrix components and cytokines/chemokines. Glycosylation pathways associated with production of the autoantigen and the unique characteristics of the corresponding autoantibodies in patients with IgAN have been uncovered. Complement likely plays a significant role in the formation and the nephritogenic activities of these complexes. Complement activation is mediated through the alternative and lectin pathways and probably occurs systemically on IgA1-containing circulating immune complexes as well as locally in glomeruli. Incidence of IgAN varies greatly by geographical location; the disease is rare in central Africa but accounts for up to 40% of native-kidney biopsies in eastern Asia. Some of this variation may be explained by genetically determined influences on the pathogenesis of the disease. Genome-wide association studies to date have identified several loci associated with IgAN. Some of these loci are associated

  9. Glutamic Acid Decarboxylase 65 and Islet Cell Antigen 512/IA-2 Autoantibodies in Relation to Human Leukocyte Antigen Class II DR and DQ Alleles and Haplotypes in Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus ▿

    PubMed Central

    Stayoussef, Mouna; Benmansour, Jihen; Al-Jenaidi, Fayza A.; Said, Hichem B.; Rayana, Chiheb B.; Mahjoub, Touhami; Almawi, Wassim Y.

    2011-01-01

    The frequencies of autoantibodies against glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 (GAD65) and islet cell antigen (ICA) 512/IA-2 (512/IA-2) are functions of the specific human leukocyte antigen (HLA) in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D). We investigated the association of HLA class II (DR and DQ) alleles and haplotypes with the presence of GAD and IA-2 autoantibodies in T1D. Autoantibodies were tested in 88 Tunisian T1D patients and 112 age- and gender-matched normoglycemic control subjects by enzyme immunoassay. Among T1D patients, mean anti-GAD antibody titers were higher in the DRB1*030101 allele (P < 0.001), together with the DRB1*030101/DQB1*0201 (P < 0.001) and DRB1*040101/DQB1*0302 (P = 0.002) haplotypes, while lower anti-GAD titers were associated with the DRB1*070101 (P = 0.001) and DRB1*110101 (P < 0.001) alleles and DRB1*070101/DQB1*0201 (P = 0.001) and DRB1*110101/DQB1*030101 (P = 0.001) haplotypes. Mean anti-IA-2 antibody titers were higher in the DRB1*040101 allele (P = 0.007) and DRB1*040101/DQB1*0302 (P = 0.001) haplotypes but were lower in the DRB1*110101 allele (P = 0.010) and the DRB1*110101 (P < 0.001) and DRB1*110101/DQB1*030101 (P = 0.025) haplotypes. Multinomial regression analysis confirmed the positive association of DRB1*030101 and the negative association of DRB1*110101 and DQB1*030101, along with the DRB1*070101/DQB1*0201 and DRB1*110101/DQB1*030101 haplotypes, with anti-GAD levels. In contrast, only the DRB1*040101/DQB1*0302 haplotype was positively associated with altered anti-IA-2 titers. Increased GAD65 and IA-2 antibody positivity is differentially associated with select HLA class II alleles and haplotypes, confirming the heterogeneous nature of T1D. PMID:21490167

  10. Glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 and islet cell antigen 512/IA-2 autoantibodies in relation to human leukocyte antigen class II DR and DQ alleles and haplotypes in type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Stayoussef, Mouna; Benmansour, Jihen; Al-Jenaidi, Fayza A; Said, Hichem B; Rayana, Chiheb B; Mahjoub, Touhami; Almawi, Wassim Y

    2011-06-01

    The frequencies of autoantibodies against glutamic acid decarboxylase 65 (GAD65) and islet cell antigen (ICA) 512/IA-2 (512/IA-2) are functions of the specific human leukocyte antigen (HLA) in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D). We investigated the association of HLA class II (DR and DQ) alleles and haplotypes with the presence of GAD and IA-2 autoantibodies in T1D. Autoantibodies were tested in 88 Tunisian T1D patients and 112 age- and gender-matched normoglycemic control subjects by enzyme immunoassay. Among T1D patients, mean anti-GAD antibody titers were higher in the DRB1*030101 allele (P < 0.001), together with the DRB1*030101/DQB1*0201 (P < 0.001) and DRB1*040101/DQB1*0302 (P = 0.002) haplotypes, while lower anti-GAD titers were associated with the DRB1*070101 (P = 0.001) and DRB1*110101 (P < 0.001) alleles and DRB1*070101/DQB1*0201 (P = 0.001) and DRB1*110101/DQB1*030101 (P = 0.001) haplotypes. Mean anti-IA-2 antibody titers were higher in the DRB1*040101 allele (P = 0.007) and DRB1*040101/DQB1*0302 (P = 0.001) haplotypes but were lower in the DRB1*110101 allele (P = 0.010) and the DRB1*110101 (P < 0.001) and DRB1*110101/DQB1*030101 (P = 0.025) haplotypes. Multinomial regression analysis confirmed the positive association of DRB1*030101 and the negative association of DRB1*110101 and DQB1*030101, along with the DRB1*070101/DQB1*0201 and DRB1*110101/DQB1*030101 haplotypes, with anti-GAD levels. In contrast, only the DRB1*040101/DQB1*0302 haplotype was positively associated with altered anti-IA-2 titers. Increased GAD65 and IA-2 antibody positivity is differentially associated with select HLA class II alleles and haplotypes, confirming the heterogeneous nature of T1D. PMID:21490167

  11. Autoantibodies, mortality and ageing.

    PubMed

    Richaud-Patin, Y; Villa, A R

    1995-01-01

    Immunological failure may be the cause of predisposition to certain infections, neoplasms, and vascular diseases in adulthood. Mortality risks through life may reflect an undetermined number of causes. This study describes the prevalence of positivity of autoantibodies through life, along with general and specific mortality causes in three countries with different socioeconomic development (Guatemala, Mexico and the United States). Prevalence of autoantibodies by age was obtained from previous reports. In spite of having involved different ethnic groups, the observed trends in prevalence of autoantibodies, as well as mortality through life, showed a similar behavior. Thus, both the increase in autoantibody production and death risk as age rises, may share physiopathological phenomena related to the ageing process. PMID:7539882

  12. [Glycosylation of autoantibodies in autoimmunes diseases].

    PubMed

    Goulabchand, R; Batteux, F; Guilpain, P

    2013-12-01

    Protein glycosylation is one of the most common post-translational modifications, involved in the well described protein biosynthesis process. Protein glycosylation seems to play a major role in the pathogenesis of auto-immune diseases. Herein are described the main alterations of autoantibody glycosylation associated with autoimmunes diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, IgA glomerulonephritis, Schoenlein-Henoch purpura, Sjögren's syndrome, systemic scleroderma, systemic lupus erythematosus, myasthenia gravis and granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegener). Molecular identification of altered immunoglobulin glycosylation could lead to a better understanding of the pathogenesis of those diseases, might allow an evaluation of their biological activity and could even be a new therapeutic target. PMID:24139501

  13. IgA production requires B cell interaction with subepithelial dendritic cells in Peyer's patches.

    PubMed

    Reboldi, Andrea; Arnon, Tal I; Rodda, Lauren B; Atakilit, Amha; Sheppard, Dean; Cyster, Jason G

    2016-05-13

    Immunoglobulin A (IgA) induction primarily occurs in intestinal Peyer's patches (PPs). However, the cellular interactions necessary for IgA class switching are poorly defined. Here we show that in mice, activated B cells use the chemokine receptor CCR6 to access the subepithelial dome (SED) of PPs. There, B cells undergo prolonged interactions with SED dendritic cells (DCs). PP IgA class switching requires innate lymphoid cells, which promote lymphotoxin-β receptor (LTβR)-dependent maintenance of DCs. PP DCs augment IgA production by integrin αvβ8-mediated activation of transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ). In mice where B cells cannot access the SED, IgA responses against oral antigen and gut commensals are impaired. These studies establish the PP SED as a niche supporting DC-B cell interactions needed for TGFβ activation and induction of mucosal IgA responses. PMID:27174992

  14. Autoantibodies and immunoglobulins among atomic bomb survivors

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiwara, Saeko; Akahoshi, Masazumi; Kodama, Kazunori; Shimaoka, Katsutaro; Akiyama, Mitoshi; Carter, R.L.; Yamakido, Michio

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if exposure to atomic bomb radiation affects immune responsiveness, such as the occurrence of autoantibodies and levels of immunoglobulins. Rheumatoid factor, antinuclear antibody, antithyroglobulin antibody, anti-thyroid-microsomal antibody and immunoglobulin levels (IgG, IgM, IgA and IgE) were measured among 2,061 individuals exposed to atomic bomb radiation in Hiroshima and Nagasaki whose estimated doses ranged from 0 to 5.6 Gy. The prevalence and titers of rheumatoid factor were found to be increased in the individuals exposed to higher radiation doses. The IgA level in females and the IgM level in both sexes increased as radiation dose increased, although the effects of radiation exposure were not large. No effect of radiation was found on the prevalence of antinuclear antibody, antithyroglobulin antibody and anti-thyroid-microsomal antibody or on the levels of IgG and IgE. 32 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Interleukin (IL)-21 promotes intestinal IgA response to microbiota.

    PubMed

    Cao, A T; Yao, S; Gong, B; Nurieva, R I; Elson, C O; Cong, Y

    2015-09-01

    Commensal microbiota-specific T helper type 17 (Th17) cells are enriched in the intestines, which can convert into T follicular helper (Tfh) in Peyer's patches, and are crucial for production of intestinal immunoglobulin A (IgA) against microbiota; however, the role of Th17 and Tfh cytokines in regulating the mucosal IgA response to enteric microbiota is still not completely known. In this study, we found that intestinal IgA was impaired in mice deficient in interleukin (IL)-17 or IL-21 signaling. IL-21, but not IL-17, is able to augment B-cell differentiation to IgA(+) cells as mediated by transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ1) and accelerate IgA class switch recombination (CSR). IL-21 and retinoic acid (RA) induce IgA(+) B-cell development and IgA production and drives autocrine TGFβ1 production to initiate IgA CSR. Repletion of T-cell-deficient TCRβxδ(-/-) mice with Th17 cells specific for commensal bacterial antigen increased the levels of IgA(+) B cells and IgA production in the intestine, which was blocked by neutralizing IL-21. Thus IL-21 functions to strongly augment IgA production under intestinal environment. Furthermore, IL-21 promotes intestinal B-cell homing through α4β7 expression, alone or with TGFβ and RA. Together, IL-21 from microbiota-specific Th17 and/or Tfh cells contributes to robust intestinal IgA levels by enhancing IgA(+) CSR, IgA production and B-cell trafficking into the intestine. PMID:25586558

  16. Interleukin (IL)-21 promotes intestinal IgA response to microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Anthony T.; Yao, Suxia; Gong, Bin; Nurieva, Roza I.; Elson, Charles O.; Cong, Yingzi

    2014-01-01

    Commensal microbiota-specific Th17 cells are enriched in the intestines, which can convert into Tfh in Peyer’s patches, and are crucial for production of intestinal IgA against microbiota, however, the role of Th17 and Tfh cytokines in regulating the mucosal IgA response to enteric microbiota is still not completely known. In this study, we found that intestinal IgA was impaired in mice deficient in IL-17 or IL-21 signaling. IL-21, but not IL-17, is able to augment B cell differentiation to IgA+ cells as mediated by TGFβ1, and accelerate IgA class switch recombination (CSR). IL-21 and retinoic acid (RA) induce IgA+ B cell development and IgA production, and drives autocrine TGFβ1 production to initiate IgA CSR. Repletion of T cell-deficient TCRβxδ−/− mice with Th17 cells specific for commensal bacterial antigen, increased levels of IgA+ B cells and IgA production in the intestine, which was blocked by neutralizing IL-21. Thus, IL-21 functions to strongly augment IgA production under intestinal environment. Furthermore, IL-21 promotes intestinal B cell homing through α4β7 expression, alone or with TGFβ and RA. Together, IL-21 from microbiota-specific Th17 and/or Tfh cells contributes to robust intestinal IgA levels by enhancing IgA+ CSR, IgA production, and B cell trafficking into the intestine. PMID:25586558

  17. Autoantibodies in inflammatory arthritis.

    PubMed

    Conigliaro, P; Chimenti, M S; Triggianese, P; Sunzini, F; Novelli, L; Perricone, C; Perricone, R

    2016-07-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic chronic inflammatory disease characterized by extensive synovitis resulting in erosions of articular cartilage and marginal bone with joint destruction. The lack of immunological tolerance in RA represents the first step toward the development of autoimmunity. Susceptible individuals, under the influence of environmental factors, such as tobacco smoke, and silica exposure, develop autoimmune phenomena that result in the presence of autoantibodies. HLA and non-HLA haplotypes play a major role in determining the development of specific autoantibodies differentiating anti-citrullinated antibodies (ACPA)-positive and negative RA patients. Rheumatoid factor (RF) and ACPA are the serological markers for RA, and during the preclinical immunological phase, autoantibody titers increase with a progressive spread of ACPA antigens repertoire. The presence of ACPA represents an independent risk factor for developing RA in patients with undifferentiated arthritis or arthralgia. Moreover, anti-CarP antibodies have been identified in patients with RA as well as in individuals before the onset of clinical symptoms of RA. Several autoantibodies mainly targeting post-translational modified proteins have been investigated as possible biomarkers to improve the early diagnosis, prognosis and response to therapy in RA patients. Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is distinguished from RA by infrequent positivity for RF and ACPA, together with other distinctive clinical features. Actually, specific autoantibodies have not been described. Recently, anti-CarP antibodies have been reported in sera from PsA patients with active disease. Further investigations on autoantibodies showing high specificity and sensibility as well as relevant correlation with disease severity, progression, and response to therapy are awaited in inflammatory arthritides. PMID:26970491

  18. IgA Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    McCoy, Ralph C.; Abramowsky, Carlos R.; Tisher, C. Craig

    1974-01-01

    From a series of 470 specimens of renal tissue examined by immunofluorescence microscopy, 20 specimens were identified and studied in detail from patients without evidence of systemic disease in which IgA was the predominant localizing immunoglobulin. All patients presented with hematuria which was recurrent or persistent, often being exacerbated by upper respiratory infection. Most of the group pursued a benign clinical course with little evidence of decline in renal function. Histopathologic changes in renal biopsy specimens of most of the group consisted of a proliferative glomerulonephritis of variable intensity. Characteristic alterations were seen by electron microscopy which included the presence of electron-dense deposits within the mesangium, the hilar regions of the glomerulus and the basement membrane of Bowman's capsule. Evidence for activation of complement by the alternate pathway at C3 was found with properdin localization in 14 of 15 specimens and with the absence of detectable Clq and C4 in 15 specimens studied for these early acting components. It is concluded that the combined clinical, morphologic and immunologic findings warrant consideration of IgA nephropathy as a distinct clinicopathologic entity. ImagesFig 1Fig 2Fig 3Fig 4Fig 5Fig 6Fig 7Fig 8Fig 9Fig 10Fig 11 PMID:4601708

  19. Autoantigen Microarray for High-throughput Autoantibody Profiling in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Honglin; Luo, Hui; Yan, Mei; Zuo, Xiaoxia; Li, Quan-Zhen

    2015-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a complex autoimmune disease characterized by the production of autoantibodies to a broad range of self-antigens. Profiling the autoantibody repertoire using array-based technology has emerged as a powerful tool for the identification of biomarkers in SLE and other autoimmune diseases. Proteomic microarray has the capacity to hold large number of self-antigens on a solid surface and serve as a high-throughput screening method for the determination of autoantibody specificities. The autoantigen arrays carrying a wide variety of self-antigens, such as cell nuclear components (nucleic acids and associated proteins), cytoplasmic proteins, phospholipid proteins, cell matrix proteins, mucosal/secreted proteins, glomeruli, and other tissue-specific proteins, have been used for screening of autoantibody specificities associated with different manifestations of SLE. Arrays containing synthetic peptides and molecular modified proteins are also being utilized for identification of autoantibodies targeting to special antigenic epitopes. Different isotypes of autoantibodies, including IgG, IgM, IgA, and IgE, as well as other Ig subtypes, can be detected simultaneously with multi-color labeled secondary antibodies. Serum and plasma are the most common biologic materials for autoantibody detection, but other body fluids such as cerebrospinal fluid, synovial fluid, and saliva can also be a source of autoantibody detection. Proteomic microarray as a multiplexed high-throughput screening platform is playing an increasingly-important role in autoantibody diagnostics. In this article, we highlight the use of autoantigen microarrays for autoantibody exploration in SLE. PMID:26415621

  20. Frequency of IgA antibodies in pemphigus, bullous pemphigoid and mucous membrane pemphigoid.

    PubMed

    Cozzani, Emanuele; Drosera, Massimo; Parodi, Aurora; Carrozzo, Marco; Gandolfo, Sergio; Rebora, Alfredo

    2004-01-01

    Circulating and bound IgA antibodies can be found in the autoimmune blistering diseases, but their prevalence, clinical relevance and target antigens remain unknown. Thirty-two patients with pemphigus, 73 with bullous pemphigoid and 28 with mucous membrane pemphigoid were studied retrospectively. Direct immunofluorescence (DIF) analysis of IgG, IgA, IgM and C3 was carried out for all cases. Sera were studied by standard indirect immunofluorescence, indirect immunofluorescence on salt-split skin, immunoblotting for bullous pemphigoid and mucous membrane pemphigoid and ELISA for pemphigus. With DIF, we found IgA autoantibodies in 22 of all 133 cases. Circulating IgA antibodies to skin were detected in 2 of 3 IgA-DIF-positive patients with pemphigus, in 3 of 6 with bullous pemphigoid, and in 6 of 13 with mucous membrane pemphigoid. We confirm that the IgA reactivity is more frequently associated with mucous membrane involvement, especially in cases without critical involvement (5/8). The role of IgA and its antigenic specificity in these diseases remain unclear. PMID:15370705

  1. Evidence for intranasal anti-nuclear autoantibodies in Chronic Rhinosinusitis with Nasal Polyps.

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Bruce K.; Li, Quan-Zhen; Suh, Lydia; Kato, Atsushi; Conley, David B.; Chandra, Rakesh K.; Zhou, Jinchun; Norton, James; Carter, Roderick; Hinchcliff, Monique; Harris, Kathleen; Peters, Anju; Grammer, Leslie C.; Kern, Robert C.; Mohan, Chandra; Schleimer, Robert P.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps (CRSwNP) is an inflammatory condition of the nasal passage and paranasal sinuses characterized by Th2 biased inflammation with elevated levels of BAFF, B-lymphocytes, and immunoglobulins. Since high levels of BAFF are associated with autoimmune diseases, we assessed for evidence of autoimmunity in patients with CRS. OBJECTIVES The objective of this study was to investigate for the presence of autoantibodies in sinonasal tissue from patients with CRS. METHODS Standardized nasal tissue specimens were collected from patients with CRS and control subjects and assayed for immunoglobulin production, autoantibody levels, tissue distribution of immunoglobulins and binding potential of antibodies in nasal tissue using a multiplexed autoantibody microarray, ELISA and immunofluoresence. RESULTS Elevated levels of several specific autoantibodies were found in nasal polyp tissue in comparison with control tissue and inflamed tissue from non-polypoid CRS (CRSsNP) (p<0.05). In particular, nuclear-targeted autoantibodies such as anti-dsDNA IgG and IgA antibodies were found at elevated levels in nasal polyps (p<0.05) and particularly in nasal polyps from patients requiring revision surgery for recurrence. Direct immunofluorescence staining demonstrated diffuse epithelial and sub-epithelial deposition of IgG and increased numbers of IgA secreting plasma cells not seen in control nasal tissue. CONCLUSIONS Autoantibodies, particularly those against nuclear antigens, are present at locally elevated levels in nasal polyps. The presence of autoantibodies suggests that the microenvironment of a nasal polyp promotes the expansion of self-reactive B-cell clones. While the pathogenicity of these antibodies remains to be elucidated, the presence of elevated anti-dsDNA antibodies is associated with a clinically more aggressive form of CRSwNP requiring repeated surgery. PMID:21996343

  2. Autoantibodies interacting with purified native thyrotropin receptor.

    PubMed

    Atger, M; Misrahi, M; Young, J; Jolivet, A; Orgiazzi, J; Schaison, G; Milgrom, E

    1999-11-01

    Native thyrotropin receptor (TSHR) was purified by immunoaffinity chromatography from membrane extracts of stably transfected L cells. An ELISA test was devised to study anti-TSHR autoantibodies directly. Comparison of native TSHR with bacterially expressed, denatured TSHR showed that the latter was not recognized by the autoantibodies, suggesting that they bind to conformational epitopes only present on the native receptor. The use of deglycosylated TSHR and of purified receptor ectodomain (alpha-subunit) showed that the autoantibodies recognized only the protein backbone moiety of the receptor and that their epitopes were localized entirely in its ectodomain. Autoantibodies were detected in 45 of 48 subjects with untreated Graves' disease and in 26 of 47 healthy volunteers. The affinity for the receptor was similar in the two groups (Kd = 0.25-1 x 10-10 M) and the autoantibodies belonged to the IgG class in all cases. Although the concentration of autoantibodies was higher in Graves' disease patients (3.50 +/- 0.36 mg.L-1) than in control subjects (1.76 +/- 0.21) (mean +/- SEM), there was an overlap between the groups. Receptor-stimulating autoantibodies (TSAb) were studied by measuring cAMP synthesis in stably transfected HEK 293 cells. Their characteristics (recognition of alpha-subunit, of deglycosylated TSHR, nonrecognition of bacterially expressed denatured receptor) were similar to those of the antibodies detected by the ELISA test. TSAb were only found in individuals with Graves' disease. The ELISA test measures total anti-TSHR antibodies, whereas the test using adenylate cyclase stimulation measures antibodies that recognize specific epitopes involved in receptor activation. Our observations thus disprove the hypothesis according to which Graves' disease is related to the appearance of anti-TSHR antibodies not present in normal subjects. Actually, anti-TSHR antibodies exist in many euthyroid subjects, in some cases even at concentrations higher than those

  3. Mechanisms underlying the effects of LPS and activation-induced cytidine deaminase on IgA isotype expression.

    PubMed

    Park, Seok-Rae; Kim, Hyun-A; Chun, Sung-Ki; Park, Jae-Bong; Kim, Pyeung-Hyeun

    2005-06-30

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) is needed for Ig class switch recombination (CSR). We explored the effect of LPS on the expression of AID during B cell differentiation, and the role of AID in IgA isotype expression. In normal spleen B cells, LPS increased AID transcription up to 48 h post-stimulation, i.e. around the time of Ig CSR. TGF-b1 and AID were required for IgA expression, and LPS contributed to TGFb1-induced IgA production largely by inducing AID. Interestingly, LPS repressed AID transcription in sIgA+ B cells but still stimulated IgA production mainly by increasing the rate of IgA secretion. Our data indicate that LPS contributes to TGFb1-induced IgA isotype expression in at least two ways: by stimulating AID transcription before CSR and by enhancing the IgA secretion rate after CSR. PMID:15995363

  4. Markers for the progression of IgA nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Maixnerova, Dita; Reily, Colin; Bian, Qi; Neprasova, Michaela; Novak, Jan; Tesar, Vladimir

    2016-08-01

    We have summarized the latest findings on markers for progression of immunoglobulin A (IgA) nephropathy (IgAN), the most common primary glomerulonephritis with a high prevalence among end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients. The clinical predictors of renal outcome in IgAN nephropathy, such as proteinuria, hypertension, and decreased estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) at the time of the diagnosis, are well known. The Oxford classification of IgAN identified four types of histological lesions (known as the MEST score) associated with the development of ESRD and/or a 50 % reduction in eGFR. In addition, the role of genetic risk factors associated with IgAN is being elucidated by genome-wide association studies, with multiple risk alleles described. Recently, biomarkers in serum (galactose-deficient IgA1, IgA/IgG autoantibodies against galactose-deficient IgA1, and soluble CD 89-IgA complexes) and urine (soluble transferrin receptor, interleukin-6/epidermal growth factor ratio, fractalkine, laminin G-like 3 peptide, κ light chains, and mannan-binding lectin) have been identified. Some of these biomarkers may represent candidates for the development of noninvasive diagnostic tests, that would be useful for detection of subclinical disease activity, monitoring disease progression, assessment of treatment, and at the same time circumventing the complications associated with renal biopsies. These advances, along with future disease-specific therapy, will be helpful in improving the treatment effectiveness, prognosis, and the quality of life in connection with IgAN. PMID:27142988

  5. [Autoantibodies in myasthenia gravis].

    PubMed

    Motomura, Masakatsu; Narita Masuda, Tomoko

    2013-04-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is caused by the failure of neuromuscular transmission mediated by pathogenic autoantibodies (Abs). Generally, patients with MG are divided into 3 groups: (1) nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antibody-positive MG (AChR-MG: 80%), (2) muscle-specific receptor tyrosine kinase antibody-positive MG (MuSK-MG: 5-10%), which are AChR-associated transmembrane post-synaptic proteins involved in AChR aggregation, and (3) double-seronegative MG. In 2011, autoantibodies against low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 4 (Lrp4) were identified in Japanese MG patients, and thereafter, have been reported in Germany and USA. We developed a simple technique termed Gaussia luciferase immunoprecipitation (GLIP) for detecting the antibodies to Lrp4. Our results showed that 9 generalized MG patients out of 300 without AChR Ab were positive for Lrp4 antibodies. These antibodies inhibit the binding of Lrp4 to its ligand and predominantly belong to the IgG1 subclass. In other studies, Lrp4 Ab-positive sera inhibited agrin-induced aggregation of AChRs in cultured myotubes, suggesting a pathogenic role in the dysfunction of the neuromuscular endplate. Further understanding of the structure and function of neuromuscular junction (NMJ) through newly discovered autoantibodies may provide specific clinical information and treatment for MG. PMID:23568991

  6. Case of paraneoplastic pemphigus with immunoglobulin (Ig)G and IgA antibodies to various antigens.

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Yohei; Ueno, Takashi; Yamase, Aya; Ito, Michiko; Osada, Shinichi; Kawana, Seiji; Funasaka, Yoko; Teye, Kwesi; Ishii, Norito; Hashimoto, Takashi; Saeki, Hidehisa

    2016-08-01

    A 63-year-old Japanese man with non-Hodgkin B-cell lymphoma presented with erythematous skin lesions on his entire body, with oral, ocular and anal mucosal lesions. The patient was diagnosed with paraneoplastic pemphigus. Immunofluorescence showed both immunoglobulin (Ig)G and IgA antibodies to keratinocyte cell surfaces. Various immunoblot and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays showed both IgG and IgA antibodies to various autoantigens, including desmogleins, desmocollins, envoplakin, periplakin and bullous pemphigoid antigens. This was a unique case with a very rare autoantibody profile in paraneoplastic pemphigus. PMID:26969813

  7. Autoantibodies to intermediate filaments in sera of patients with Schistosoma mansoni infection.

    PubMed Central

    Boehme, M W; Kataaha, P K; Holborow, E J

    1989-01-01

    Autoantibodies to the intermediate filament proteins vimentin and keratin were studied in sera of 50 Caribbean patients with Schistosoma mansoni infection and 50 control subjects. Autoantibodies were detected by indirect immunofluorescence on HEp-2 cells pretreated with colchicine. The incidence of anti-vimentin antibodies in patients' sera was 94% for IgM, 12% for IgG, and 4% for IgA; in the control subjects incidence was 52%, 0%, and 4%, respectively. Anti-keratin antibodies were found in 82%, 4%, and 4% of patients' sera and 42%, 0%, and 2% in controls, respectively. The difference between the geometric means of titres for patients (1:150) and controls (1:26) was highly significant (P less than 0.001). The possible role and genesis of autoantibodies to intermediate filaments is discussed. PMID:2476270

  8. Autoantibodies in Autoimmune Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Smyk, Daniel S.; Rigopoulou, Eirini I.; Koutsoumpas, Andreas L.; Kriese, Stephen; Burroughs, Andrew K.; Bogdanos, Dimitrios P.

    2012-01-01

    Autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) was first used to describe cases of pancreatitis with narrowing of the pancreatic duct, enlargement of the pancreas, hyper-γ-globulinaemia, and antinuclear antibody (ANA) positivity serologically. The main differential diagnosis, is pancreatic cancer, which can be ruled out through radiological, serological, and histological investigations. The targets of ANA in patients with autoimmune pancreatitis do not appear to be similar to those found in other rheumatological diseases, as dsDNA, SS-A, and SS-B are not frequently recognized by AIP-related ANA. Other disease-specific autoantibodies, such as, antimitochondrial, antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies or diabetes-specific autoantibodies are virtually absent. Further studies have focused on the identification of pancreas-specific autoantigens and reported significant reactivity to lactoferrin, carbonic anhydrase, pancreas secretory trypsin inhibitor, amylase-alpha, heat-shock protein, and plasminogen-binding protein. This paper discusses the findings of these investigations and their relevance to the diagnosis, management, and pathogenesis of autoimmune pancreatitis. PMID:22844291

  9. [Hashimoto's encephalopathy and autoantibodies].

    PubMed

    Yoneda, Makoto

    2013-04-01

    Encephalopathy occasionally occurs in association with thyroid disorders, but most of these are treatable. These encephalopathies include a neuropsychiatric disorder associated with hypothyroidism, called myxedema encephalopathy. Moreover, Hashimoto's encephalopathy (HE) has been recognized as a new clinical disease based on an autoimmune mechanism associated with Hashimoto's thyroiditis. Steroid treatment was successfully administered to these patients. Recently, we discovered that the serum autoantibodies against the NH2-terminal of α-enolase (NAE) are highly specific diagnostic biomarkers for HE. Further, we analyzed serum anti-NAE autoantibodies and the clinical features in many cases of HE from institutions throughout Japan and other countries. Approximately half of assessed HE patients carry anti-NAE antibodies. The age was widely distributed with 2 peaks (20-30 years and 50-70 years). Most HE patients were in euthyroid states, and all patients had anti-thyroid (TG) antibodies and anti-thyroid peroxidase (TPO) antibodies. Anti-TSH receptor (TSH-R) antibodies were observed in some cases. The common neuropsychiatry features are consciousness disturbance and psychosis, followed by cognitive dysfunction, involuntary movements, seizures, and ataxia. Abnormalities on electroencephalography (EEG) and decreased cerebral blood flow on brain SPECT were common findings, whereas abnormal findings on brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were rare. HE patients have various clinical phenotypes such as the acute encephalopathy form, the chronic psychiatric form, and other particular clinical forms, including limbic encephalitis, progressive cerebellar ataxia, and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD)-like form. The cerebellar ataxic form of HE clinically mimics spinocerebellar degeneration (SCD) and is characterized by the absence of nystagmus, absent or mild cerebellar atrophy, and lazy background activities on EEG. Taken together, these data suggest that the possibility of

  10. Pneumococcal IgA1 protease subverts specific protection by human IgA1.

    PubMed

    Janoff, E N; Rubins, J B; Fasching, C; Charboneau, D; Rahkola, J T; Plaut, A G; Weiser, J N

    2014-03-01

    Bacterial immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1) proteases may sabotage the protective effects of IgA. In vitro, both exogenous and endogenously produced IgA1 protease inhibited phagocytic killing of Streptococcus pneumoniae by capsule-specific IgA1 human monoclonal antibodies (hMAbs) but not IgA2. These IgA1 proteases cleaved and reduced binding of the the effector Fcα1 heavy chain but not the antigen-binding F(ab)/light chain to pneumococcal surfaces. In vivo, IgA1 protease-resistant IgA2, but not IgA1 protease-sensitive IgA1, supported 60% survival in mice infected with wild-type S. pneumoniae. IgA1 hMAbs protected mice against IgA1 protease-deficient but not -producing pneumococci. Parallel mouse sera with human IgA2 showed more efficient complement-mediated reductions in pneumococci with neutrophils than did IgA1, particularly with protease-producing organisms. After natural human pneumococcal bacteremia, purified serum IgG inhibited IgA1 protease activity in 7 of 11 patients (64%). These observations provide the first evidence in vivo that IgA1 protease can circumvent killing of S. pneumoniae by human IgA. Acquisition of IgA1 protease-neutralizing IgG after infection directs attention to IgA1 protease both as a determinant of successful colonization and infection and as a potential vaccine candidate. PMID:23820749

  11. Mutations in Bruton's tyrosine kinase impair IgA responses.

    PubMed

    Mitsuiki, Noriko; Yang, Xi; Bartol, Sophinus J W; Grosserichter-Wagener, Christina; Kosaka, Yoshiyuki; Takada, Hidetoshi; Imai, Kohsuke; Kanegane, Hirokazu; Mizutani, Shuki; van der Burg, Mirjam; van Zelm, Menno C; Ohara, Osamu; Morio, Tomohiro

    2015-03-01

    X-linked agammaglobulinemia (XLA) is a primary immunodeficiency caused by mutations in Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK), and is characterized by markedly decreased numbers of blood B cells and an absence of all immunoglobulin isotypes. We performed whole exome sequencing in a male pediatric patient with dysgammaglobulinemia with IgA deficiency. Genetic analysis revealed a BTK missense mutation (Thr316Ala). To investigate whether a BTK mutation underlay this antibody deficiency with marked decrease of IgA in this patient, we performed functional analyses of B cells and phagocytes, and molecular analyses of somatic hypermutation and class switch recombination. The BTK missense mutation resulted in B cells with reduced BTK and high IgM expression. Equal proportions of CD19(low) and CD19(normal) fractions were observed, and both included naïve and memory B cells. Calcium influx and phospholipase Cγ2 phosphorylation upon IgM stimulation were marginally impaired in CD19(low), but not in CD19(+) B cells. Similar to XLA patients, IgA transcripts showed low SHM levels, whereas IgG transcripts were hardly affected. Our analyses suggest that the BTK mutation likely underlies the disease in this case, and that hypomorphic BTK mutations can result in normal circulating B cell numbers, but specifically impair IgA responses. PMID:25589397

  12. Multiplex giant magnetoresistive biosensor microarrays identify interferon-associated autoantibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung-Rok; Haddon, D. James; Wand, Hannah E.; Price, Jordan V.; Diep, Vivian K.; Hall, Drew A.; Petri, Michelle; Baechler, Emily C.; Balboni, Imelda M.; Utz, Paul J.; Wang, Shan X.

    2016-01-01

    High titer, class-switched autoantibodies are a hallmark of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Dysregulation of the interferon (IFN) pathway is observed in individuals with active SLE, although the association of specific autoantibodies with chemokine score, a combined measurement of three IFN-regulated chemokines, is not known. To identify autoantibodies associated with chemokine score, we developed giant magnetoresistive (GMR) biosensor microarrays, which allow the parallel measurement of multiple serum antibodies to autoantigens and peptides. We used the microarrays to analyze serum samples from SLE patients and found individuals with high chemokine scores had significantly greater reactivity to 13 autoantigens than individuals with low chemokine scores. Our findings demonstrate that multiple autoantibodies, including antibodies to U1-70K and modified histone H2B tails, are associated with IFN dysregulation in SLE. Further, they show the microarrays are capable of identifying autoantibodies associated with relevant clinical manifestations of SLE, with potential for use as biomarkers in clinical practice. PMID:27279139

  13. Multiplex giant magnetoresistive biosensor microarrays identify interferon-associated autoantibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jung-Rok; Haddon, D. James; Wand, Hannah E.; Price, Jordan V.; Diep, Vivian K.; Hall, Drew A.; Petri, Michelle; Baechler, Emily C.; Balboni, Imelda M.; Utz, Paul J.; Wang, Shan X.

    2016-06-01

    High titer, class-switched autoantibodies are a hallmark of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Dysregulation of the interferon (IFN) pathway is observed in individuals with active SLE, although the association of specific autoantibodies with chemokine score, a combined measurement of three IFN-regulated chemokines, is not known. To identify autoantibodies associated with chemokine score, we developed giant magnetoresistive (GMR) biosensor microarrays, which allow the parallel measurement of multiple serum antibodies to autoantigens and peptides. We used the microarrays to analyze serum samples from SLE patients and found individuals with high chemokine scores had significantly greater reactivity to 13 autoantigens than individuals with low chemokine scores. Our findings demonstrate that multiple autoantibodies, including antibodies to U1-70K and modified histone H2B tails, are associated with IFN dysregulation in SLE. Further, they show the microarrays are capable of identifying autoantibodies associated with relevant clinical manifestations of SLE, with potential for use as biomarkers in clinical practice.

  14. Opposing effects of Arkadia and Smurf on TGFbeta1-induced IgA isotype expression.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seo-Hyun; Seo, Goo-Young; Nam, Eun-Hee; Jeon, Seong-Hyun; Kim, Hyun-A; Park, Jae-Bong; Kim, Pyeung-Hyeun

    2007-10-31

    TGF-beta1 induces Ig germ-line alpha (GLalpha) transcription and subsequent class switching recombination (CSR) to IgA. In the present study, we investigated the roles of two E3-ubiquitin ligases, Smurfs (HECT type) and Arkadia (RING finger type) on TGFbeta1-induced IgA CSR. We found that over-expression of Smurf1 and Smurf2 decreased TGFbeta1-induced GLalpha promoter activity and strengthened the inhibitory effect of Smad7 on the promoter activity. Further, over-expression of Smurf1 and Smurf2 decreased both Smad3/4-mediated and Runx3-mediated GLalpha promoter activities, suggesting that the Smurfs can down-regulate the major TGF-beta1 signaling pathway and decrease GLalpha gene expression. In parallel, the over-expressed Smurf1 decreased the expression of endogenous IgA CSR-predictive transcripts (GLT(alpha), PST(alpha), and CT(alpha)) and also TGFbeta1-induced IgA secretion. Conversely over-expression of Arkadia abolished the inhibitory effect of Smad7 on TGFbeta1-induced GLT(alpha) expression and IgA secretion. Similar results were obtained in the presence of over-expressed Smad7 and Smurf1. These results indicate that Arkadia can amplify TGFbeta1-induced IgA CSR by degrading Smad7, which interacts with Smurf1. We conclude that Smurf and Arkadia have opposite roles in the regulation of TGFbeta1-induced IgA isotype expression. PMID:17978583

  15. Tumor-Associated and Disease-Associated Autoantibody Repertoires in Healthy Colostrum and Maternal and Newborn Cord Sera

    PubMed Central

    Madi, Asaf; Bransburg-Zabary, Sharron; Maayan-Metzger, Ayala; Dar, Gittit; Ben-Jacob, Eshel

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we studied autoantibody repertoires and Ig isotypes in 71 mothers and their 104 healthy newborns (including twins and triplets delivered term or premature). Newborns receive maternal IgG Abs via the placenta before birth, but developing infants must produce their own IgM and IgA Abs. We used an Ag microarray analysis to detect binding to a selection of 295 self-Ags, compared with 27 standard foreign Ags. The magnitude of binding to specific self-Ags was found to be not less than that to the foreign Ags. As expected, each newborn shared with its mother a similar IgG repertoire—manifest as early as the 24th week of gestation. IgM and IgA autoantibody repertoires in cord sera were highly correlated among the newborns and differed from their mothers’ repertoires; the latter differed in sera and milk. The autoantibodies bound to self-Ags known to be associated with tumors and to autoimmune diseases. Thus, autoantibody repertoires in healthy humans—the immunological homunculus—arise congenitally, differ in maternal milk and sera, and mark the potential of the immune system to attack tumors, beneficially, or healthy tissues, harmfully; regulation of the tissue site, the dynamics, and the response phenotype of homuncular autoimmunity very likely affects health. PMID:25917091

  16. Tumor-associated and disease-associated autoantibody repertoires in healthy colostrum and maternal and newborn cord sera.

    PubMed

    Madi, Asaf; Bransburg-Zabary, Sharron; Maayan-Metzger, Ayala; Dar, Gittit; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Cohen, Irun R

    2015-06-01

    In this work, we studied autoantibody repertoires and Ig isotypes in 71 mothers and their 104 healthy newborns (including twins and triplets delivered term or premature). Newborns receive maternal IgG Abs via the placenta before birth, but developing infants must produce their own IgM and IgA Abs. We used an Ag microarray analysis to detect binding to a selection of 295 self-Ags, compared with 27 standard foreign Ags. The magnitude of binding to specific self-Ags was found to be not less than that to the foreign Ags. As expected, each newborn shared with its mother a similar IgG repertoire-manifest as early as the 24th week of gestation. IgM and IgA autoantibody repertoires in cord sera were highly correlated among the newborns and differed from their mothers' repertoires; the latter differed in sera and milk. The autoantibodies bound to self-Ags known to be associated with tumors and to autoimmune diseases. Thus, autoantibody repertoires in healthy humans--the immunological homunculus--arise congenitally, differ in maternal milk and sera, and mark the potential of the immune system to attack tumors, beneficially, or healthy tissues, harmfully; regulation of the tissue site, the dynamics, and the response phenotype of homuncular autoimmunity very likely affects health. PMID:25917091

  17. Development of the gut microbiota and mucosal IgA responses in twins and gnotobiotic mice.

    PubMed

    Planer, Joseph D; Peng, Yangqing; Kau, Andrew L; Blanton, Laura V; Ndao, I Malick; Tarr, Phillip I; Warner, Barbara B; Gordon, Jeffrey I

    2016-06-01

    Immunoglobulin A (IgA), the major class of antibody secreted by the gut mucosa, is an important contributor to gut barrier function. The repertoire of IgA bound to gut bacteria reflects both T-cell-dependent and -independent pathways, plus glycans present on the antibody's secretory component. Human gut bacterial taxa targeted by IgA in the setting of barrier dysfunction are capable of producing intestinal pathology when isolated and transferred to gnotobiotic mice. A complex reorientation of gut immunity occurs as infants transition from passively acquired IgA present in breast milk to host-derived IgA. How IgA responses co-develop with assembly of the microbiota during this period remains poorly understood. Here, we (1) identify a set of age-discriminatory bacterial taxa whose representations define a program of microbiota assembly and maturation during the first 2 postnatal years that is shared across 40 healthy twin pairs in the USA; (2) describe a pattern of progression of gut mucosal IgA responses to bacterial members of the microbiota that is highly distinctive for family members (twin pairs) during the first several postnatal months then generalizes across pairs in the second year; and (3) assess the effects of zygosity, birth mode, and breast feeding. Age-associated differences in these IgA responses can be recapitulated in young germ-free mice, colonized with faecal microbiota obtained from two twin pairs at 6 and 18 months of age, and fed a sequence of human diets that simulate the transition from milk feeding to complementary foods. Most of these responses were robust to diet, suggesting that 'intrinsic' properties of community members play a dominant role in dictating IgA responses. The approach described can be used to define gut mucosal immune development in health and disease states and to help discover ways of repairing or preventing perturbations in this facet of host immunity. PMID:27279225

  18. The occurrence of autoantibodies in infectious mononucleosis

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, R. N. P.; Emond, R. T. D.; Thomas, D. B.; Doniach, D.

    1974-01-01

    Autoantibodies were looked for by immunofluorescence (IFL) in seventy-seven cases of infectious mononucleosis (IM) at the onset of symptoms and on recovery, to determine the time of appearance, duration and range of these responses, and to correlate them with serum immunoglobulin and EB virus antibody titres. Antibodies to lymphocyte membrane demonstrated by IFL, now identified with lymphocytotoxins, were present in 46% of patients in the acute stage, persisting for less than 7 weeks. Antibodies to smooth muscle (SMA) or to contractile fibres in other tissue cells including human thyroid and rat hepatocytes, were present in over 70% of cases, some being entirely of IgM class. The highest titres occurred soon after onset and these antibodies also disappeared during convalescence. By contrast ANA, mitochondrial, microsomal and reticulin antibodies, also thyroid and gastric organ-specific reactivity were seen only occasionally owing to the young age group of the patients. In individual cases there was no correlation between the appearance of lymphocyte antibodies and SMA, or between these and the EB virus antibody titres. The autoantibodies produced in this disease are highly selected. It is suggested that clones of B cells are stimulated to make these antibodies by virtue of being infected with EB virus, and that the T-cell clones in the circulation are more likely expanded in order to terminate the infection. PMID:4619789

  19. Selective deficiency of IgA

    MedlinePlus

    Consider genetic counseling if you have a family history of selective IgA deficiency and you plan to have children. If ... Genetic counseling may be of value to prospective parents with a family history of selective IgA deficiency.

  20. IgA nephropathy and infections.

    PubMed

    Rollino, Cristiana; Vischini, Gisella; Coppo, Rosanna

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we concentrate on the role of infections in IgA nephropathy both from a pathogenetic and clinic point of view. The current hypotheses as regards the role of infections in the pathogenesis of IgA nephropathy are: (a) role of particular pathogens, (b) chronic exposure to mucosal infections, (c) abnormal handling of commensal microbes (gut microbiota). We also focus on particular infections reported in association with classic IgA nephropathy (HIV, malaria, Chlamydia, Lyme disease), as well as on IgA dominant-infection-associated glomerulonephritis. This is a unique form of glomerulonephritis, where IgA deposition is dominant. It is mostly recognized in old, diabetic patients and in association with staphylococcal infection. PMID:26800970

  1. Cleavage of a Recombinant Human Immunoglobulin A2 (IgA2)-IgA1 Hybrid Antibody by Certain Bacterial IgA1 Proteases

    PubMed Central

    Senior, Bernard W.; Dunlop, James I.; Batten, Margaret R.; Kilian, Mogens; Woof, Jenny M.

    2000-01-01

    To understand more about the factors influencing the cleavage of immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1) by microbial IgA1 proteases, a recombinant human IgA2/IgA1 hybrid molecule was generated. In the hybrid, termed IgA2/A1 half hinge, a seven-amino-acid sequence corresponding to one half of the duplicated sequence making up the IgA1 hinge was incorporated into the equivalent site in IgA2. Insertion of the IgA1 half hinge into IgA2 did not affect antigen binding capacity or the functional activity of the hybrid molecule, as judged by its ability to bind to IgA Fcα receptors and trigger respiratory bursts in neutrophils. Although the IgA2/A1 hybrid contained only half of the IgA1 hinge, it was found to be cleaved by a variety of different bacterial IgA1 proteases, including representatives of those that cleave IgA1 in the different duplicated halves of the hinge, namely, those of Prevotella melaninogenica, Streptococcus pneumoniae, S. sanguis, Neisseria meningitidis types 1 and 2, N. gonorrhoeae types 1 and 2, and Haemophilus influenzae type 2. Thus, for these enzymes the recognition site for IgA1 cleavage is contained within half of the IgA1 hinge region; additional distal elements, if required, are provided by either an IgA1 or an IgA2 framework. In contrast, the IgA2/A1 hybrid appeared to be resistant to cleavage with S. oralis and some H. influenzae type 1 IgA1 proteases, suggesting these enzymes require additional determinants for efficient substrate recognition. PMID:10639405

  2. Cleavage of a recombinant human immunoglobulin A2 (IgA2)-IgA1 hybrid antibody by certain bacterial IgA1 proteases.

    PubMed

    Senior, B W; Dunlop, J I; Batten, M R; Kilian, M; Woof, J M

    2000-02-01

    To understand more about the factors influencing the cleavage of immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1) by microbial IgA1 proteases, a recombinant human IgA2/IgA1 hybrid molecule was generated. In the hybrid, termed IgA2/A1 half hinge, a seven-amino-acid sequence corresponding to one half of the duplicated sequence making up the IgA1 hinge was incorporated into the equivalent site in IgA2. Insertion of the IgA1 half hinge into IgA2 did not affect antigen binding capacity or the functional activity of the hybrid molecule, as judged by its ability to bind to IgA Fcalpha receptors and trigger respiratory bursts in neutrophils. Although the IgA2/A1 hybrid contained only half of the IgA1 hinge, it was found to be cleaved by a variety of different bacterial IgA1 proteases, including representatives of those that cleave IgA1 in the different duplicated halves of the hinge, namely, those of Prevotella melaninogenica, Streptococcus pneumoniae, S. sanguis, Neisseria meningitidis types 1 and 2, N. gonorrhoeae types 1 and 2, and Haemophilus influenzae type 2. Thus, for these enzymes the recognition site for IgA1 cleavage is contained within half of the IgA1 hinge region; additional distal elements, if required, are provided by either an IgA1 or an IgA2 framework. In contrast, the IgA2/A1 hybrid appeared to be resistant to cleavage with S. oralis and some H. influenzae type 1 IgA1 proteases, suggesting these enzymes require additional determinants for efficient substrate recognition. PMID:10639405

  3. TGF-β1 improves mucosal IgA dysfunction and dysbiosis following intestinal ischaemia-reperfusion in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xu-Yu; Liu, Zi-Meng; Zhang, Hu-Fei; Li, Yun-Sheng; Wen, Shi-Hong; Shen, Jian-Tong; Huang, Wen-Qi; Liu, Ke-Xuan

    2016-06-01

    Intestinal ischaemia/reperfusion (I/R) severely disrupts gut barriers and leads to high mortality in the critical care setting. Transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 plays a pivotal role in intestinal cellular and immune regulation. However, the effects of TGF-β1 on intestinal I/R injury remain unclear. Thus, we aimed to investigate the effects of TGF-β1 on gut barriers after intestinal I/R and the molecular mechanisms. Intestinal I/R model was produced in mice by clamping the superior mesenteric artery for 1 hr followed by reperfusion. Recombinant TGF-β1 was intravenously infused at 15 min. before ischaemia. The results showed that within 2 hrs after reperfusion, intestinal I/R disturbed intestinal immunoglobulin A class switch recombination (IgA CSR), the key process of mucosal IgA synthesis, and resulted in IgA dysfunction, as evidenced by decreased production and bacteria-binding capacity of IgA. Meanwhile, the disruptions of intestinal microflora and mucosal structure were exhibited. Transforming growth factor-β1 activated IgA CSR as evidenced by the increased activation molecules and IgA precursors. Strikingly, TGF-β1 improved intestinal mucosal IgA dysfunction, dysbiosis and epithelial damage at the early stage after reperfusion. In addition, SB-431542, a specific inhibitor of activating mothers against decapentaplegic homologue (SMAD) 2/3, totally blocked the inductive effect of TGF-β1 on IgA CSR and almost abrogated the above protective effects on intestinal barriers. Taken together, our study demonstrates that TGF-β1 protects intestinal mucosal IgA immunity, microbiota and epithelial integrity against I/R injury mainly through TGF-β receptor 1/SMAD 2/3 pathway. Induction of IgA CSR may be involved in the protection conferred by TGF-β1. PMID:26820382

  4. Spontaneous expression of a low affinity Fc receptor for IgA (Fc alpha R) on human B cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Millet, I; Briere, F; Vincent, C; Rousset, F; Andreoni, C; De Vries, J E; Revillard, J P

    1989-01-01

    Expression of receptors for IgA (Fc alpha Rs) was investigated on a panel of 35 human B cell lines by labelling with human secretory IgA (0.5 mg/ml) and flow cytometry analysis after staining with fluoresceinated goat anti-human secretory component and/or anti-alpha chain F(ab')2 fragments. Receptors for IgA could be demonstrated on one out of nine Burkitt's lymphoma cell lines, three out of five myeloma cell lines and five out of 21 lymphoblastoid cell lines. The percentage of Fc alpha R-positive cells within the same B cell line varied upon repeated examination. Human dimeric IgA1 lambda myeloma protein revealed the same number of IgA receptor positive cells as did secretory IgA, whereas monomeric IgA did not bind to Fc alpha R. Detection of Fc alpha R was not inhibited when the tests were carried out in the presence of human dimeric IgG, IgM, asialo-orosomucoid, and secretory component but it was abrogated by pre-treatment of the cells with trypsin. The binding characteristics of Fc alpha Rs were studied on the myeloma cell line Esteve, using 125I-labelled human dimeric IgA and secretory IgA. The binding was dose-dependent with rapid kinetics and specific inhibition by unlabelled secretory IgA. Scatchard plot analysis resulted in an equilibrium constant K ranging from 3.2 to 4.7 x 10(6) M/l. No correlation was observed between Fc alpha R expression and differentiation stage, monoclonality, polyclonality of the cell lines, or Ig class produced by the B cells. PMID:2788048

  5. Advances in Computer-Based Autoantibodies Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soda, Paolo; Iannello, Giulio

    Indirect Immunofluorescence (IIF) imaging is the recommended me-thod to detect autoantibodies in patient serum, whose common markers are antinuclear autoantibodies (ANA) and autoantibodies directed against double strand DNA (anti-dsDNA). Since the availability of accurately performed and correctly reported laboratory determinations is crucial for the clinicians, an evident medical demand is the development of Computer Aided Diagnosis (CAD) tools supporting physicians' decisions.

  6. Blood Test: Immunoglobulin A (IgA)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Melon Smoothie Pregnant? Your Baby's Growth Blood Test: Immunoglobulin A (IgA) KidsHealth > For Parents > Blood Test: Immunoglobulin ... of immunoglobulin A, one of the most common antibodies in the body. Antibodies are proteins made by ...

  7. Standardisation of the factor H autoantibody assay.

    PubMed

    Watson, Rachael; Lindner, Susanne; Bordereau, Pauline; Hunze, Eva-Maria; Tak, Federico; Ngo, Stéphanie; Zipfel, Peter F; Skerka, Christine; Dragon-Durey, Marie-Agnes; Marchbank, Kevin J

    2014-01-01

    The screening of all atypical haemolytic uraemic syndrome (aHUS) patients for factor H autoantibodies is best practice. However, there is no consensus assay for the reporting of factor H autoantibody titres. In this study, three European complement laboratories with expertise in the field of autoantibody testing address this by systematically evaluating several ELISA methods used for the detection of factor H autoantibodies. All methods tested adequately detect high titre samples. However, this study recommends the Paris method for the detection and reporting of factor H autoantibodies to be used when setting up a factor H autoantibody screen. The importance of individual sample background subtraction in these ELISA tests was established. The use of a relative or arbitrary unit index with a common positive and negative serum allowed for consistent comparison of findings from different test centres. Therefore, it is recommended that a standard arbitrary unit scale based on a titration curve from a common positive anti-serum be adopted to allow future establishment of the relative importance of particular titres of factor H autoantibodies in aHUS. Systematic assay for the presence of factor H autoantibodies in patients using the Paris method will provide the longitudinal analysis needed to fully establish the importance of factor H autoantibodies in disease. This will feed into additional research to clarify whether additional factors have a bearing on the phenotype/outcome of autoimmune aHUS. PMID:23891327

  8. Anti-factor VIII IgA as a potential marker of poor prognosis in acquired hemophilia A: results from the GTH-AH 01/2010 study.

    PubMed

    Tiede, Andreas; Hofbauer, Christoph J; Werwitzke, Sonja; Knöbl, Paul; Gottstein, Saskia; Scharf, Rüdiger E; Heinz, Jürgen; Groß, Jürgen; Holstein, Katharina; Dobbelstein, Christiane; Scheiflinger, Fritz; Koch, Armin; Reipert, Birgit M

    2016-05-12

    Neutralizing autoantibodies against factor VIII (FVIII), also called FVIII inhibitors, are the cause of acquired hemophilia A (AHA). They are quantified in the Bethesda assay or Nijmegen-modified Bethesda assay by their ability to neutralize FVIII in normal human plasma. However, FVIII inhibitors do not represent the whole spectrum of anti-FVIII autoantibodies. Here, we studied isotypes, immunoglobulin G subclasses, and apparent affinities of anti-FVIII autoantibodies to assess their prognostic value for the outcome in AHA. We analyzed baseline samples from patients enrolled in the prospective GTH-AH 01/2010 study. Our data suggest that anti-FVIII immunoglobulin A (IgA) autoantibodies are predictors of poor outcome in AHA. Anti-FVIII IgA-positive patients achieved partial remission similar to anti-FVIII IgA-negative patients but had a higher risk of subsequent recurrence. Consequently, IgA-positive patients achieved complete remission less frequently (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR], 0.35; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.18-0.68; P < .01) and had a higher risk of death (aHR, 2.62; 95% CI, 1.11-6.22; P < .05). Anti-FVIII IgA was the strongest negative predictor of recurrence-free survival after achieving partial remission and remained significant after adjustment for baseline demographic and clinical characteristics. In conclusion, anti-FVIII IgA represents a potential novel biomarker that could be useful to predict prognosis and tailor immunosuppressive treatment of AHA. PMID:26912467

  9. Are There Enhanced MBP Autoantibodies in Autism?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Libbey, Jane E.; Coon, Hilary H.; Kirkman, Nikki J.; Sweeten, Thayne L.; Miller, Judith N.; Stevenson, Edward K.; Lainhart, Janet E.; McMahon, William M.; Fujinami, Robert S.

    2008-01-01

    Autoantibodies to central nervous system antigens, such as myelin basic protein (MBP), may play a role in autism. We measured autoantibody titers to MBP in children with autism, both classic onset and regressive onset forms, controls (healthy age- and gender-matched) and individuals with Tourette syndrome via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. We…

  10. Autoantibodies to the low density lipoprotein receptor in a subject affected by severe hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed Central

    Corsini, A; Roma, P; Sommariva, D; Fumagalli, R; Catapano, A L

    1986-01-01

    We studied a 32-yr-old man with a benign paraproteinemia (IgA) affected by severe nonfamilial hypercholesterolemia. In vitro experiments demonstrated that lipoprotein-deficient serum (LPDS) from the patient inhibited the binding of low density lipoprotein (LDL) to human skin fibroblasts cultured in vitro (up to 70%) whereas LPDS from controls had no effect. Removal of IgA from the patient's serum by immunoprecipitation with mono-specific antisera abolished the inhibition of LDL binding. IgA isolated from the serum of the patient by affinity chromatography inhibited, in a dose-dependent manner, the binding of LDL to human skin fibroblasts in vitro, thus showing an IgA-mediated effect. Ligand-blotting experiments demonstrated that the paraprotein directly interacts with the LDL receptor, thus inhibiting the binding of the lipoprotein. Treatment of the receptor protein with reducing agents blocked the interaction of the antibody with the LDL receptor. From these data we speculate that this autoantibody may be responsible for the severe nonfamilial hypercholesterolemia of the patient. Images PMID:3760193

  11. Prominent role for plasmacytoid dendritic cells in mucosal T cell-independent IgA induction.

    PubMed

    Tezuka, Hiroyuki; Abe, Yukiko; Asano, Jumpei; Sato, Taku; Liu, Jiajia; Iwata, Makoto; Ohteki, Toshiaki

    2011-02-25

    Although both conventional dendritic cells (cDCs) and plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) are present in the gut-associated lymphoid tissues (GALT), the roles of pDCs in the gut remain largely unknown. Here we show a critical role for pDCs in T cell-independent (TI) IgA production by B cells in the GALT. When pDCs of the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs) and Peyer's patches (PPs) (which are representative GALT) were cultured with naive B cells to induce TI IgA class switch recombination (CSR), IgA production was substantially higher than in cocultures of these cells with cDCs. IgA production was dependent on APRIL and BAFF production by pDCs. Importantly, pDC expression of APRIL and BAFF was dependent on stromal cell-derived type I IFN signaling under steady-state conditions. Our findings provide insight into the molecular basis of pDC conditioning to induce mucosal TI IgA production, which may lead to improvements in vaccination strategies and treatment for mucosal-related disorders. PMID:21333555

  12. Lack of cleavage of immunoglobulin A (IgA) from rhesus monkeys by bacterial IgA1 proteases.

    PubMed Central

    Reinholdt, J; Kilian, M

    1991-01-01

    Bacterial immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1) proteases cleaving IgA1 and secretory IgA1 molecules in the hinge region are believed to be important virulence factors. Previous studies have indicated that IgA of humans, gorillas, and chimpanzees are the exclusive substrates of these enzymes. In a recent study, IgA from the rhesus monkey was found to be susceptible to the IgA1 protease activity of Streptococcus pneumoniae. In an attempt to reproduce this observation, we found that neither five isolates of S. pneumoniae nor other IgA1 protease-producing bacteria representing different cleavage specificities caused cleavage of rhesus monkey IgA. Hence, the rhesus monkey does not appear to be a suitable animal model for studies of IgA1 proteases as virulence factors. Images PMID:2037384

  13. Prevalence of Autoantibodies and HLA DR, DQ in Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Usha; Singh, Gyanendra; Agrawal, Neeraj Kumar; Singh, Rana Gopal; Kumar, Shashi Bhushan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Type I diabetes Mellitus (T1DM) is caused by autoimmune destruction of β-cells of pancreas. Two forms of T1DM are known called as 1A (autoimmune) and 1B (idiopathic). Aim Aim was to study the prevalence of Anti-TTG IgA, Anti-TPO, GADA, ZnT8 and IA-2 autoantibodies and HLA DR and DQ genes and its diagnostic value in T1DM. Materials and Methods Thirty four T1DM patients, 59 type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) patients and 28 healthy controls were included in study. Antibodies levels were estimated by ELISA and HLA typing was performed by SSP-PCR method. Result The prevalence of various autoantibodies in T1DM were Anti-TTG 14.7%, Anti-TPO 17.65%, GADA 38.23%, ZnT8 11.76% and IA-2 5.88%. Only GADA and ZnT8 were significantly positive in T1DM. GADA (66.67%) and ZnT8 (33.33%) positivity was more in patients below 15 years age while levels of other antibodies were higher after 15 years age. All autoantibodies were detected in higher frequency in T1DM than in T2DM and controls. HLA DR and DQ typing showed highly significant increase in DRB1*0301 (61.76%, p=0.00) and DQB1*0201 (64.71%, p=0.00) in T1DM. Subjects with HLA DRB1*0301 and DQB1*0201 had 80-100% positive prevalence of GADA, ZnT8, IA-2, Anti-TTG and Anti-TPO autoantibodies. Conclusion Combination of GADA antibody with DRB1 and DQB1 estimation improved diagnosis of T1A than insulin antigen specific antibodies alone.

  14. Therapeutic implications of autoantibodies in rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Aletaha, Daniel; Blüml, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a systemic autoimmune disease characterised by the presence of autoantibodies. Their value for diagnostic/prognostic purposes has been well established. In contrast, their role in established disease and their associations with disease activity is less clear. Moreover, as evidence is accumulating that these autoantibodies are causally involved in certain key aspects of the disease, such as the initiation and perpetuation of joint inflammation or join destruction, autoantibodies in RA can no longer be regarded as mere epiphenomena, but are integral elements of the pathophysiology of RA. PMID:27252890

  15. Regulation of IgA responses in cattle, humans and mice.

    PubMed

    Estes, D Mark

    2010-12-15

    and BlyS which have not yet been fully evaluated in cattle. Many of these factors, namely TGF-beta and Type I interferons block cell cycle progression which is an essential component of Ig class switching and thus these factors require additional regulatory factors such as IL-2 to drive cells through cell cycle resulting in class switch recombination. Among these factors, IgA inducing peptide was originally identified from a bovine gut associated lymphoid tissue expression library and is highly conserved in pigs and humans at >90% at the amino acid level. The factor is regulated differently in various species but is consistently produced by dendritic cells. PMID:21074276

  16. Nephrotic syndrome is a rare manifestation of IGA nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Alshomar, Ahmad A

    2016-01-01

    Nephrotic syndrome is a rare presentation of IgA nephropathy. The degree of proteinuria in IgA nephropathy predicts poor prognosis. We herein report a teenager with IGA nephropathy, the nephrotic syndrome and segmental glomerular scars who after developing complications from high dose corticosteroid therapy was successfully treated with tacrolimus and low dose prednisone. PMID:27610069

  17. Cloning and structural analysis of two highly divergent IgA isotypes, IgA1 and IgA2 from the duck billed platypus, Ornithorhynchus anatinus.

    PubMed

    Vernersson, M; Belov, K; Aveskogh, M; Hellman, L

    2010-01-01

    To trace the emergence of modern IgA isotypes during vertebrate evolution we have studied the immunoglobulin repertoire of a model monotreme, the platypus. Two highly divergent IgA-like isotypes (IgA1 and IgA2) were identified and their primary structures were determined from full-length cDNAs. A comparative analysis of the amino acid sequences for IgA from various animal species showed that the two platypus IgA isotypes form a branch clearly separated from their eutherian (placental) counterparts. However, they still conform to the general structure of eutherian IgA, with a hinge region and three constant domains. This indicates that the deletion of the second domain and the formation of a hinge region in IgA did occur very early during mammalian evolution, more than 166 million years ago. The two IgA isotypes in platypus differ in primary structure and appear to have arisen from a very early gene duplication, possibly preceding the metatherian eutherian split. Interestingly, one of these isotypes, IgA1, appears to be expressed in only the platypus, but is present in the echidna based on Southern blot analysis. The platypus may require a more effective mucosal immunity, with two highly divergent IgA forms, than the terrestrial echidna, due to its lifestyle, where it is exposed to pathogens both on land and in the water. PMID:19913303

  18. [IgA deficiency and Addison's disease].

    PubMed

    Petite, J

    1982-01-30

    A case of Addison's disease and selective IgA deficiency in a 15-year-old male is discussed. The etiology of Addison's disease in this case is unknown. Investigation of HLA-antigens in the family does not yield the usual pattern of autoimmune diseases. Nevertheless, this very rare association does not appear to be fortuitous. PMID:7071576

  19. IgA Antibodies in Rett Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reichelt, K. L.; Skjeldal, O.

    2006-01-01

    The level of IgA antibodies to gluten and gliadin proteins found in grains and to casein found in milk, as well as the level of IgG to gluten and gliadin, have been examined in 23 girls with Rett syndrome and 53 controls. Highly statistically significant increases were found for the Rett population compared to the controls. The reason for this…

  20. Autoantibodies in Systemic Sclerosis: Unanswered Questions

    PubMed Central

    Kayser, Cristiane; Fritzler, Marvin J.

    2015-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is an autoimmune disease characterized by vascular abnormalities, and cutaneous and visceral fibrosis. Serum autoantibodies directed to multiple intracellular antigens are present in more than 95% of patients and are considered a hallmark of SSc. They are helpful biomarkers for the early diagnosis of SSc and are associated with distinctive clinical manifestations. With the advent of more sensitive, multiplexed immunoassays, new and old questions about the relevance of autoantibodies in SSc are emerging. In this review, we discuss the clinical relevance of autoantibodies in SSc emphasizing the more recently published data. Moreover, we will summarize recent advances regarding the stability of SSc autoantibodies over the course of disease, whether they are mutually exclusive and their potential roles in the disease pathogenesis. PMID:25926833

  1. Detection of autoantibodies using chemiluminescence technologies

    PubMed Central

    Mahler, Michael; Bentow, Chelsea; Serra, Josep; Fritzler, Marvin J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Context: Although autoantibody detection methods such as indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) have been available for many years and are still in use the innovation of fast, fully automated instruments using chemiluminescence technology in recent years has led to rapid adoption in autoimmune disease diagnostics. In 2009, BIO-FLASH, a fully automated, random access chemiluminescent analyzer, was introduced, proceeded by the development of the QUANTA Flash chemiluminescent immunoassays (CIA) for autoimmune diagnostics. Objective: To summarize the evolution of CIAs for the detection of autoantibodies and to review their performance characteristics. Methods: Pubmed was screened for publications evaluating novel QUANTA Flash assays and how they compare to traditional methods for the detection of autoantibodies. In addition, comparative studies presented at scientific meetings were summarized. Results: Several studies were identified that compared the novel CIAs with conventional methods for autoantibody detection. The agreements ranged from moderate to excellent depending on the assay. The studies show how the CIA technology has enhanced the analytical and clinical performance characteristics of many autoantibody assays supporting both diagnosis and follow-up testing. Conclusion: CIA has started to improve the diagnostic testing of autoantibodies as an aid in the diagnosis of a broad range of autoimmune diseases. PMID:26525648

  2. Structure and function relationships in IgA.

    PubMed

    Woof, J M; Russell, M W

    2011-11-01

    Immunoglobulin A (IgA) has a critical role in immune defense particularly at the mucosal surfaces, and is equipped to do so by the unique structural attributes of its heavy chain and by its ability to polymerize. Here, we provide an overview of human IgA structure, describing the distinguishing features of the IgA1 and IgA2 subclasses and mapping the sites of interaction with host receptors important for IgA's functional repertoire. Remarkably, these same interaction sites are targeted by binding proteins and proteases produced by various pathogens as a means to subvert the protective IgA response. As interest in the prospect of therapeutic IgA-based monoclonal antibodies grows, the emerging understanding of the relationship between IgA structure and function will be invaluable for maximizing the potential of these novel reagents. PMID:21937984

  3. Serum galactose-deficient IgA1 levels in children with IgA nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Mengjie; Jiang, Xiaoyun; Rong, Liping; Xu, Yuanyuan; Chen, Lizhi; Qiu, Zeting; Mo, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Immunoglobulin A nephropathy (IgAN) is an immunopathologic diagnosis based on a renal biopsy, it is characterized by deposits of IgA-containing immune complexes in the mesangium. Adults with IgAN have a galactose-deficient IgA1 in the circulation and glomerular deposition. There are few studies on the glycosylation of serum IgA1 in children with IgAN. To measure the serum levels of galactose-deficient IgA1 in pediatric patients with IgAN, 72 biopsy-proven IgAN children were divided into 3 groups based on the clinical features: isolated hematuria group (24 patients), hematuria and proteinuria group (22 patients), and nephritic syndrome group (26 patients). They were also divided into 3 groups according to pathologic grading: grade I + II group (25 patients), grade III group (33 patients) and grade IV + V group (14 patients). 30 healthy children were recruited as a control group. We used vicia villosa lectin binding enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to measure the serum levels of galactose-deficient IgA1 in all groups and controls. Serum levels of galactose-deficient IgA1 in children with IgAN were higher than controls (P < 0.01). There were no significant differences in serum levels of galactose-deficient IgA1 among the different clinical and pathologic grading groups. The values of the area under the curve for galactose-deficient IgA1 levels were 0.976 (95% CI, 0.953-1.000). The cutoff point for galactose-deficient IgA1 levels was 0.125, with a sensitivity of 87.5% and a specificity of 83.3%, with a positive predictive value of 92.6% and a negative predictive value of 73.5% (P < 0.01). Children with IgAN presented serum galactose-deficient IgA1, which has shown no relationship with the clinical manifestations and pathologic grading of the disease. Detection of serum galactose-deficient IgA1 levels by vicia villosa lectin binding enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay has a certain clinical value in diagnosis of children with IgAN. PMID:26221341

  4. Serum galactose-deficient IgA1 levels in children with IgA nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Mengjie; Jiang, Xiaoyun; Rong, Liping; Xu, Yuanyuan; Chen, Lizhi; Qiu, Zeting; Mo, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Immunoglobulin A nephropathy (IgAN) is an immunopathologic diagnosis based on a renal biopsy, it is characterized by deposits of IgA-containing immune complexes in the mesangium. Adults with IgAN have a galactose-deficient IgA1 in the circulation and glomerular deposition. There are few studies on the glycosylation of serum IgA1 in children with IgAN. To measure the serum levels of galactose-deficient IgA1 in pediatric patients with IgAN, 72 biopsy-proven IgAN children were divided into 3 groups based on the clinical features: isolated hematuria group (24 patients), hematuria and proteinuria group (22 patients), and nephritic syndrome group (26 patients). They were also divided into 3 groups according to pathologic grading: grade I + II group (25 patients), grade III group (33 patients) and grade IV + V group (14 patients). 30 healthy children were recruited as a control group. We used vicia villosa lectin binding enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to measure the serum levels of galactose-deficient IgA1 in all groups and controls. Serum levels of galactose-deficient IgA1 in children with IgAN were higher than controls (P < 0.01). There were no significant differences in serum levels of galactose-deficient IgA1 among the different clinical and pathologic grading groups. The values of the area under the curve for galactose-deficient IgA1 levels were 0.976 (95% CI, 0.953-1.000). The cutoff point for galactose-deficient IgA1 levels was 0.125, with a sensitivity of 87.5% and a specificity of 83.3%, with a positive predictive value of 92.6% and a negative predictive value of 73.5% (P < 0.01). Children with IgAN presented serum galactose-deficient IgA1, which has shown no relationship with the clinical manifestations and pathologic grading of the disease. Detection of serum galactose-deficient IgA1 levels by vicia villosa lectin binding enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay has a certain clinical value in diagnosis of children with IgAN. PMID:26221341

  5. Spectrum of IgA nephropathy in a single center.

    PubMed

    Das, Uttara; Dakshinamurty, Kaligotla Venkata; Prayaga, Aruna; Uppin, Megha

    2015-09-01

    Immunoglobulin A (IgA) nephropathy (IgAN) is the most common biopsy-proven primary glomerular disease in the world and a major contributor to the worldwide burden of endstage renal failure, with a wide geographical variation. To determine the incidence, clinical profile and histological pattern of IgAN in our institute, we reviewed all the patients who had native kidney biopsies with the diagnosis of primary IgAN during the period from 1998 to 2009 in the context of the clinical features. A total of 116 patients with IgAN were finally analyzed; 85 (73%) of the patients were male, the mean age of the patients was 29.2 ± 12.2 (range 10-70) years and the mean duration of disease was 10.4 ± 18.7 months (median: 2 months). Hypertension was present in 74 (63.2%) cases. Gross hematuria was rare. The most common clinical presentation was nephrotic syndrome, followed by chronic renal failure. The mean proteinuria level was 2.5 ± 2.3 g/day (median: 1.7 g/day) and the mean serum creatinine level was 3.04 ± 3.3 mg/dL (median:1.7 mg/dL). The morphological sub-classification (Haas): Class I was the most common (44.4%), followed by class V (23%). IgA co-deposition with C3 and lambda was the most common finding in the immunofluorescence study. The glomerular filtration rate decreased with advanced histological damage. The incidence of IgAN was 7.5%, which is lower as compared with studies from elsewhere. IgAN in our population had a more severe clinical presentation. PMID:26354591

  6. High Prevalence of Neutrophil Cytoplasmic Autoantibodies in Infants with Food Protein-Induced Proctitis/Proctocolitis: Autoimmunity Involvement?

    PubMed Central

    Sekerkova, Alena; Fuchs, Martin; Cecrdlova, Eva; Svachova, Veronika; Kralova Lesna, Ivana; Striz, Ilja; Tlaskalova-Hogenova, Helena

    2015-01-01

    Background. Food protein-induced proctitis/proctocolitis (FPIP) is the most common noninfectious colitis in children in the first year of life. Along with the overall clinical symptoms, diarrhoea and rectal bleeding are the main manifestations of the disease. There is no routine noninvasive test that would be specific for this type of colitis. The aim of our study was to find a noninvasive laboratory test or tests that may be helpful in differential diagnosis of food protein-induced proctitis/proctocolitis. Methods. ANA, ANCA, ASCA, a-EMA, a-tTg, specific IgE, total IgE, IgG, IgA, IgM, and concentration of serum calprotectin were measured in a group of 25 patients with colitis and 18 children with other diagnoses. Results. Atypical-pANCA antibodies of IgG isotype were detected in the sera of 24 patients by the method of indirect immunofluorescence, and 5 patients showed also the positivity of IgA isotype. In control samples these autoantibodies were not detected. Other autoantibodies were not demonstrated in either patient or control group. Conclusions. Of the parameters tested in noninfectious colitis, atypical-pANCA on ethanol-fixed granulocytes appears to be a suitable serological marker of food protein-induced proctitis/proctocolitis and suggests a possible involvement of an autoimmune mechanisms in the pathogenesis of this disease. PMID:26484355

  7. Role of IgA receptors in the pathogenesis of IgA nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Lechner, Sebastian M; Papista, Christina; Chemouny, Jonathan M; Berthelot, Laureline; Monteiro, Renato C

    2016-02-01

    Immunoglobulin A nephropathy (IgAN) or Berger's disease is the most common form of primary glomerulonephritis in the world and one of the first causes of end-stage renal failure. IgAN is characterized by the accumulation of immune complexes containing polymeric IgA1 in mesangial areas. The pathogenesis of this disease involves the deposition of polymeric and hypogalactosylated IgA1 (Gd-IgA1) in the mesangium. Quantitative and structural changes of Gd-IgA1 play a key role in the development of the disease due to functional abnormalities of two IgA receptors: the FcαRI (CD89) expressed by blood myeloid cells and the transferrin receptor (CD71) on mesangial cells. Abnormal Gd-IgA1 induces release of soluble CD89, which participates in the formation of circulating IgA1 complexes. These complexes are trapped by CD71 that is overexpressed on mesangial cells in IgAN patients together with the crosslinking enzyme transglutaminase 2 allowing pathogenic IgA complex formation in situ and mesangial cell activation. A humanized mouse model expressing IgA1 and CD89 develops IgAN in a similar manner as patients. In this model, a food antigen, the gliadin, was shown to be crucial for circulating IgA1 complex formation and deposition, which could be prevented by a gluten-free diet. Identification of these new partners opens new therapeutic prospects for IgAN treatment. PMID:26572664

  8. IL-1β in eosinophil-mediated small intestinal homeostasis and IgA production

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Y; Wen, T; Mingler, MK; Caldwell, JM; Wang, YH; Chaplin, DD; Lee, EH; Jang, MH; Woo, SY; Seoh, JY; Miyasaka, M; Rothenberg, ME

    2014-01-01

    Eosinophils are multifunctional leukocytes that reside in the gastrointestinal (GI) lamina propria, where their basal function remains largely unexplored. In this study, by examining mice with a selective deficiency of systemic eosinophils (by lineage ablation) or GI eosinophils (eotaxin-1/2 double–deficient or CC chemokine receptor 3–deficient), we show that eosinophils support immunoglobulin A (IgA) class switching, maintain intestinal mucus secretions, affect intestinal microbial composition, and promote the development of Peyer’s patches. Eosinophil-deficient mice showed reduced expression of mediators of secretory IgA production, including intestinal interleukin 1β (IL-1β), inducible nitric oxide synthase, lymphotoxin (LT) α, and LT-β, and reduced levels of retinoic acid-related orphan receptor gamma t–positive (ROR-γt+) innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) while maintaining normal levels of APRIL (a proliferation-inducing ligand), BAFF (B cell–activating factor of the tumor necrosis factor family), and TGF-β (transforming growth factor β). GI eosinophils expressed a relatively high level of IL-1β, and IL-1β–deficient mice manifested the altered gene expression profiles observed in eosinophil-deficient mice and decreased levels of IgA+ cells and ROR-γt+ ILCs. On the basis of these collective data, we propose that eosinophils are required for homeostatic intestinal immune responses including IgA production and that their affect is mediated via IL-1β in the small intestine. PMID:25563499

  9. IL-1β in eosinophil-mediated small intestinal homeostasis and IgA production.

    PubMed

    Jung, Y; Wen, T; Mingler, M K; Caldwell, J M; Wang, Y H; Chaplin, D D; Lee, E H; Jang, M H; Woo, S Y; Seoh, J Y; Miyasaka, M; Rothenberg, M E

    2015-07-01

    Eosinophils are multifunctional leukocytes that reside in the gastrointestinal (GI) lamina propria, where their basal function remains largely unexplored. In this study, by examining mice with a selective deficiency of systemic eosinophils (by lineage ablation) or GI eosinophils (eotaxin-1/2 double deficient or CC chemokine receptor 3 deficient), we show that eosinophils support immunoglobulin A (IgA) class switching, maintain intestinal mucus secretions, affect intestinal microbial composition, and promote the development of Peyer's patches. Eosinophil-deficient mice showed reduced expression of mediators of secretory IgA production, including intestinal interleukin 1β (IL-1β), inducible nitric oxide synthase, lymphotoxin (LT) α, and LT-β, and reduced levels of retinoic acid-related orphan receptor gamma t-positive (ROR-γt(+)) innate lymphoid cells (ILCs), while maintaining normal levels of APRIL (a proliferation-inducing ligand), BAFF (B cell-activating factor of the tumor necrosis factor family), and TGF-β (transforming growth factor β). GI eosinophils expressed a relatively high level of IL-1β, and IL-1β-deficient mice manifested the altered gene expression profiles observed in eosinophil-deficient mice and decreased levels of IgA(+) cells and ROR-γt(+) ILCs. On the basis of these collective data, we propose that eosinophils are required for homeostatic intestinal immune responses including IgA production and that their affect is mediated via IL-1β in the small intestine. PMID:25563499

  10. The generation and evaluation of recombinant human IgA specific for Plasmodium falciparum merozoite surface protein 1-19 (PfMSP119)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Human immunoglobulin G (IgG) plays an important role in mediating protective immune responses to malaria. Although human serum immunoglobulin A (IgA) is the second most abundant class of antibody in the circulation, its contribution, if any, to protective responses against malaria is not clear. Results To explore the mechanism(s) by which IgA may mediate a protective effect, we generated fully human IgA specific for the C-terminal 19-kDa region of Plasmodium falciparum merozoite surface protein 1 (PfMSP119), a major target of protective immune responses. This novel human IgA bound antigen with an affinity comparable to that seen for an epitope-matched protective human IgG1. Furthermore, the human IgA induced significantly higher NADPH-mediated oxidative bursts and degranulation from human neutrophils than the epitope-matched human IgG1 from which it was derived. Despite showing efficacy in in vitro functional assays, the human IgA failed to protect against parasite challenge in vivo in mice transgenic for the human Fcα receptor (FcαRI/CD89). A minority of the animals treated with IgA, irrespective of FcαRI expression, showed elevated serum TNF-α levels and concomitant mouse anti-human antibody (MAHA) responses. Conclusions The lack of protection afforded by MSP119-specific IgA against parasite challenge in mice transgenic for human FcαRI suggests that this antibody class does not play a major role in control of infection. However, we cannot exclude the possibility that protective capacity may have been compromised in this model due to rapid clearance and inappropriate bio-distribution of IgA, and differences in FcαRI expression profile between humans and transgenic mice. PMID:21781305

  11. Corticosteroid therapy in IgA nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Lv, Jicheng; Xu, Damin; Perkovic, Vlado; Ma, Xinxin; Johnson, David W; Woodward, Mark; Levin, Adeera; Zhang, Hong; Wang, Haiyan

    2012-06-01

    The benefits and risks of steroids for the treatment of IgA nephropathy remain uncertain. We systematically searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library for randomized, controlled trials of corticosteroid therapy for IgA nephropathy published between 1966 and March 2011. We identified nine relevant trials that included 536 patients who had urinary protein excretion >1 g/d and normal renal function. Forty-six (8.6%) of these patients developed a kidney failure event, defined as doubling of the serum creatinine/halving of the GFR or ESRD. Overall, steroid therapy was associated with a lower risk for kidney failure (relative risk, 0.32 [95% confidence interval [CI], 0.15-0.67]; P=0.002) and a reduction in proteinuria (weighted mean difference, -0.46 g/d [95% CI, -0.63 to -0.29 g/d]), with no evidence of heterogeneity in these outcomes. Subgroup analysis suggested that the dose modifies the effect of steroids for renal protection (P for heterogeneity=0.030): Relatively high-dose and short-term therapy (prednisone >30 mg/d or high-dose pulse intravenous methylprednisolone with duration ≤1 year) produced significant renal protection, whereas low-dose, long-term steroid use did not. Steroid therapy was associated with a 55% higher risk for adverse events. The quality of included studies was low, however, limiting the generalizability of the results. In conclusion, steroids appear to provide renal protection in patients with IgA nephropathy but increase the risk for adverse events. Reliably defining the efficacy and safety of steroids in IgA nephropathy requires a high-quality trial with a large sample size. PMID:22539830

  12. Induction of lupus autoantibodies by adjuvants

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Satoh, M.; Kuroda, Y.; Yoshida, H.; Behney, K.M.; Mizutani, A.; Akaogi, J.; Nacionales, D.C.; Lorenson, T.D.; Rosenbauer, R.J.; Reeves, W.H.

    2003-01-01

    Exposure to the hydrocarbon oil pristane induces lupus specific autoantibodies in non-autoimmune mice. We investigated whether the capacity to induce lupus-like autoimmunity is a unique property of pristane or is shared by other adjuvant oils. Seven groups of 3-month-old female BALB/cJ mice received a single intraperitoneal injection of pristane, squalene (used in the adjuvant MF59), incomplete Freund's adjuvant (IFA), three different medicinal mineral oils, or saline, respectively. Serum autoantibodies and peritoneal cytokine production were measured. In addition to pristane, the mineral oil Bayol F (IFA) and the endogenous hydrocarbon squalene both induced anti-nRNP/Sm and -Su autoantibodies (20% and 25% of mice, respectively). All of these hydrocarbons had prolonged effects on cytokine production by peritoneal APCs. However, high levels of IL-6, IL-12, and TNF?? production 2-3 months after intraperitoneal injection appeared to be associated with the ability to induce lupus autoantibodies. The ability to induce lupus autoantibodies is shared by several hydrocarbons and is not unique to pristane. It correlates with stimulation of the production of IL-12 and other cytokines, suggesting a relationship with a hydrocarbon's adjuvanticity. The potential to induce autoimmunity may complicate the use of oil adjuvants in human and veterinary vaccines. ?? 2003 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Mechanisms of Action of TSHR Autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Furmaniak, J; Sanders, J; Núñez Miguel, R; Rees Smith, B

    2015-09-01

    The availability of human monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to the TSHR has enabled major advances in our understanding of how TSHR autoantibodies interact with the receptor. These advances include determination of the crystal structures of the TSHR LRD in complex with a stimulating autoantibody (M22) and with a blocking type autoantibody (K1-70). The high affinity of MAbs for the TSHR makes them particularly suitable for use as ligands in assays for patient serum TSHR autoantibodies. Also, M22 and K1-70 are effective at low concentrations in vivo as TSHR agonists and antagonists respectively. K1-70 has important potential in the treatment of the hyperthyroidism of Graves' disease and Graves' ophthalmopathy. Small molecule TSHR antagonists described to date do not appear to have the potency and/or specificity shown by K1-70. New models of the TSHR ECD in complex with various ligands have been built. These models suggest that initial binding of TSH to the TSHR causes a conformational change in the hormone. This opens a positively charged pocket in receptor-bound TSH which attracts the negatively charged sulphated tyrosine 385 on the hinge region of the receptor. The ensuing movement of the receptor's hinge region may then cause activation. Similar activation mechanisms seem to take place in the case of FSH and the FSHR and LH and the LHR. However, stimulating TSHR autoantibodies do not appear to activate the TSHR in the same way as TSH. PMID:26361260

  14. Anti-CD20 IgA can protect mice against lymphoma development: evaluation of the direct impact of IgA and cytotoxic effector recruitment on CD20 target cells

    PubMed Central

    Pascal, Virginie; Laffleur, Brice; Debin, Arnaud; Cuvillier, Armelle; van Egmond, Marjolein; Drocourt, Daniel; Imbertie, Laurent; Pangault, Céline; Tarte, Karin; Tiraby, Gérard; Cogné, Michel

    2012-01-01

    Background While most antibody-based therapies use IgG because of their well-known biological properties, some functional limitations of these antibodies call for the development of derivatives with other therapeutic functions. Although less abundant than IgG in serum, IgA is the most abundantly produced Ig class in humans. Besides the specific targeting of its dimeric form to mucosal areas, IgA was shown to recruit polymorphonuclear neutrophils against certain targets more efficiently than does IgG1. Design and Methods In this study, we investigated the various pathways by which anti-tumor effects can be mediated by anti-CD20 IgA against lymphoma cells. Results We found that polymeric human IgA was significantly more effective than human IgG1 in mediating direct killing or growth inhibition of target cells in the absence of complement. We also demonstrated that this direct killing was able to indirectly induce the classical pathway of the complement cascade although to a lesser extent than direct recruitment of complement by IgG. Recruitment of the alternative complement pathway by specific IgA was also observed. In addition to activating complement for lysis of lymphoma cell lines or primary cells from patients with lymphoma, we showed that monomeric anti-CD20 IgA can effectively protect mice against tumor development in a passive immunization strategy and we demonstrated that this protective effect may be enhanced in mice expressing the human FcαRI receptor on their neutrophils. Conclusions We show that anti-CD20 IgA antibodies have original therapeutic properties against lymphoma cells, with strong direct effects, ability to recruit neutrophils for cell cytotoxicity and even recruitment of complement, although largely through an indirect way. PMID:22689689

  15. Transient Glyco-Engineering to Produce Recombinant IgA1 with Defined N- and O-Glycans in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Dicker, Martina; Tschofen, Marc; Maresch, Daniel; König, Julia; Juarez, Paloma; Orzaez, Diego; Altmann, Friedrich; Steinkellner, Herta; Strasser, Richard

    2016-01-01

    The production of therapeutic antibodies to combat pathogens and treat diseases, such as cancer is of great interest for the biotechnology industry. The recent development of plant-based expression systems has demonstrated that plants are well-suited for the production of recombinant monoclonal antibodies with defined glycosylation. Compared to immunoglobulin G (IgG), less effort has been undertaken to express immunoglobulin A (IgA), which is the most prevalent antibody class at mucosal sites and a promising candidate for novel recombinant biopharmaceuticals with enhanced anti-tumor activity. Here, we transiently expressed recombinant human IgA1 against the VP8* rotavirus antigen in glyco-engineered ΔXT/FT Nicotiana benthamiana plants. Mass spectrometric analysis of IgA1 glycopeptides revealed the presence of complex biantennary N-glycans with terminal N-acetylglucosamine present on the N-glycosylation site of the CH2 domain in the IgA1 alpha chain. Analysis of the peptide carrying nine potential O-glycosylation sites in the IgA1 alpha chain hinge region showed the presence of plant-specific modifications including hydroxyproline formation and the attachment of pentoses. By co-expression of enzymes required for initiation and elongation of human O-glycosylation it was possible to generate disialylated mucin-type core 1 O-glycans on plant-produced IgA1. Our data demonstrate that ΔXT/FT N. benthamiana plants can be engineered toward the production of recombinant IgA1 with defined human-type N- and O-linked glycans. PMID:26858738

  16. Explanatory style and Immunoglobulin A (IgA).

    PubMed

    Brennan, F X; Charnetski, C J

    2000-01-01

    The construct of explanatory style has been related to numerous aspects of human psychology, including health. Our research has focused on the effects of various psychological variables on the immune system, in particular Immunoglobulin A (IgA). We had participants fill out the Attributional Style Questionnaire (ASQ), the predominant measure of explanatory style, and assayed saliva samples for secretory IgA. No relationship was observed between overall ASQ score and IgA, or composite optimism score and IgA. However, we observed significant negative correlations between both the composite pessimism score and IgA, as well as the hopelessness score and IgA. Pessimistic explanatory style may therefore be related to immune system deficits and poor health. PMID:11330488

  17. Preclinical Rheumatoid Arthritis (Autoantibodies): An Updated Review

    PubMed Central

    Deane, Kevin D.

    2014-01-01

    Multiple studies demonstrate that there is a period of development of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) during which there are elevations of disease-related biomarkers, including autoantibodies, in the absence of and prior to the development of RA; this period can be termed ‘preclinical RA’. These ‘preclinical’ autoantibodies including rheumatoid factor and antibodies to citrullinated protein antigens, and more recent studies have also identified a wider variety of autoantibodies and a wide range of inflammatory biomarkers. These findings in conjunction with established and emerging data about genetic and environmental risk factors for RA support a model of disease development where certain factors lead to an initial triggering of RA-related autoimmunity that expands over time to the point where symptomatic arthritis classifiable as RA develops. Herein will be reviewed updates in the field, as well as a discussion of current limitations of our understanding of preclinical RA, and potential future directions for study. PMID:24643396

  18. O-glycosylation of serum IgA1 antibodies against mucosal and systemic antigens in IgA nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Smith, Alice C; Molyneux, Karen; Feehally, John; Barratt, Jonathan

    2006-12-01

    In IgA nephropathy (IgAN), serum IgA1 with abnormal O-glycosylation deposits in the glomerular mesangium. The underlying mechanism of this IgA1 O-glycosylation abnormality is poorly understood, but recent evidence argues against a generic defect in B cell glycosyltransferases, suggesting that only a subpopulation of IgA1-committed B cells are affected. For investigation of whether the site of antigen encounter influences IgA1 O-glycosylation, the O-glycosylation of serum IgA1 antibodies against a systemic antigen, tetanus toxoid (TT), and a mucosal antigen, Helicobacter pylori (HP), was studied in patients with IgAN and control subjects. Serum IgA1 was purified from cohorts of patients with IgAN and control subjects with HP infection and after systemic TT immunization. The IgA1 samples were applied to HP- and TT-coated immunoplates to immobilize specific antibodies, and IgA1 O-glycosylation profiles were assessed by binding of the O-glycan-specific lectin Vicia villosa using a modified ELISA technique. Although total serum IgA1 had raised lectin binding in IgAN, the O-glycosylation of the specific IgA1 antibodies to TT and HP did not differ between patients and control subjects. In both groups, IgA1 anti-HP had higher lectin binding than IgA1 anti-TT. This study demonstrates that IgA1 O-glycosylation normally varies in different immune responses and that patients produce the full spectrum of IgA1 O-glycoforms. IgA1 with high lectin binding was produced in response to mucosal HP infection in all subjects. The raised circulating level of this type of IgA1 in IgAN is likely to be a consequence of abnormal systemic responses to mucosally encountered antigens rather than a fundamental defect in B cell O-glycosylation pathways. PMID:17093066

  19. Anti-neuronal autoantibodies: Current diagnostic challenges.

    PubMed

    Probst, Christian; Saschenbrecker, Sandra; Stoecker, Winfried; Komorowski, Lars

    2014-05-01

    The spectrum of neurological autoimmune diseases has expanded substantially in the last 15 years due to the discovery of new anti-neuronal antibodies. There are at present numerous technical challenges for developing and improving standardized serological test systems for the detection of these autoantibodies, some of which occur very rarely. In particular, the determination of autoantibodies against complex cell surface structures generally requires authentically presented target antigens. Finally, research into syndrome associations benefits from multiplex analyses and accelerates the understanding of the complex autoimmune processes, forming an important basis for the development of novel therapy concepts. PMID:25876468

  20. Tiul1 and TGIF are Involved in Downregulation of TGFbeta1-induced IgA Isotype Expression.

    PubMed

    Park, Kyoung-Hoon; Nam, Eun-Hee; Seo, Goo-Young; Seo, Su Ryeon; Kim, Pyeung-Hyeun

    2009-12-01

    TGF-beta1 is well known to induce Ig germ-line alpha (GLalpha) transcription and subsequent IgA isotype class switching recombination (CSR). Homeodomain protein TG-interacting factor (TGIF) and E3-ubiquitin ligases TGIF interacting ubiquitin ligase 1 (Tiul1) are implicated in the negative regulation of TGF-beta signaling. In the present study, we investigated the roles of Tiul1 and TGIF in TGFbeta1-induced IgA CSR. We found that over-expression of Tiul1 decreased TGFbeta1-induced GLalpha promoter activity and strengthened the inhibitory effect of Smad7 on the promoter activity. Likewise, overexpression of TGIF also diminished GLalpha promoter activity and further strengthened the inhibitory effect of Tiul1, suggesting that Tiul1 and TGIF can down-regulate TGFbeta1-induced GLalpha expression. In parallel, overexpression of Tiul1 decreased the expression of endogenous IgA CSR-predicitive transcripts (GLT(alpha), PST(alpha), and CT(alpha)) and TGFbeta1-induced IgA secretion, but not GLT(gamma3) and IgG3 secretion. Here, over-expressed TGIF further strengthened the inhibitory effect of Tiul1. These results suggest that Tiul1 and TGIF act as negatively regulators in TGFbeta1-induced IgA isotype expression. PMID:20157612

  1. Increased serum concentration of BAFF/APRIL and IgA2 subclass in patients with mixed connective tissue disease complicated by interstitial lung disease.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Toshiyuki; Amano, Hirofumi; Kawano, Shinya; Minowa, Kentaro; Ando, Seiichiro; Watanabe, Takashi; Nakano, Soichiro; Suzuki, Jun; Morimoto, Shinji; Tokano, Yoshiaki; Takasaki, Yoshinari

    2014-03-01

    B cell activating factor (BAFF) and a proliferation-inducing ligand (APRIL) are known to be crucial for B cell maturation and survival, and increased expression of these factors in various autoimmune diseases has been reported. Human B cells produce two IgA subclasses: IgA1 and IgA2, the latter being abundant in the distal intestine, saliva, colostrum and bronchial fluid. We investigated these parameters in patients with mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) complicated by interstitial lung disease (ILD+), and compared them with those in MCTD patients without ILD (ILD-). Sixty-three MCTD patients were divided into two groups: 21 ILD+ patients and 42 ILD- patients. In each patient group we analyzed soluble BAFF/APRIL using ELISA, and IgA1 and IgA2 using double immunodiffusion. Furthermore, we analyzed BAFF-APRIL receptors, BCMA, BAFF-R and TACI, using flow cytometry. The ILD+ patients had significantly higher levels of BAFF/APRIL than the ILD- patients. There were significant correlations between BAFF/APRIL, BAFF/KL-6 and APRIL/KL-6. Although there was no significant inter-group difference in the serum IgA1 level, ILD+ patients had a significantly elevated IgA2 level in comparison with ILD- patients. Moreover, although there were no significant inter-group differences in the expression of BCMA, BAFF-R and TACI on B cells, the expression of BAFF-R was significantly decreased in the ILD+ patients. In recent years, relationships between BAFF/APRIL and IgA subclass have been reported. Our results suggest that an elevated level of BAFF/APRIL drives the maturation of B cells, subsequently leading to IgA2 class switching, and possibly to the development of ILD in patients with MCTD. PMID:24252051

  2. Subchorionic hematomas and the presence of autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Baxi, L V; Pearlstone, M M

    1991-11-01

    Five cases of subchorionic hematoma detected by ultrasonography in patients with threatened abortion are presented. Three of these subjects had antinuclear antibodies, and the remaining two subjects had anticardiolipin antibodies. We recommend that patients with subchorionic hematomas be tested for autoantibodies regardless of their obstetric history. PMID:1957874

  3. Autoantibody formation in patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated with anti-TNFα

    PubMed Central

    Eriksson, C; Engstrand, S; Sundqvist, K; Rantapaa-Dahlqvis..., S

    2005-01-01

    Background: Research on autoantibody formation in patients treated with TNFα inhibitors has produced contradictory results. Objective: To study the prevalence of autoantibodies in patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated with the TNFα inhibitor infliximab. Methods: 53 patients (48 female, 11 male) treated with infliximab for rheumatoid arthritis were followed for autoantibody production before treatment and after 14, 30, and 54 weeks. Six patients treated with etanercept were studied for comparison. The analyses included antibodies against nuclear antigens (ANA), extractable nuclear antigens, double stranded (ds)DNA (by ELISA, IIF on Crithidia luciliae for IgM and IgG, and Farr assay), nucleosomes, cardiolipin, smooth muscle, mitochondria, proteinase 3, and myeloperoxidase antigens. Results: The number of patients treated with infliximab who developed antibodies against dsDNA of both IgG and IgM class (tested by IIF) increased significantly. The prevalence of patients positive for IgG class increased to 66% at 30 weeks and 45% at 54 weeks, and of IgM class to 85% and 70%, respectively. The titre and number of patients expressing antibodies against nucleosomes and ANA also increased significantly. The number of rheumatoid factor or anticardiolipin positive patients was stable and there was no increase in antibodies against the other antigens. A lupus-like syndrome was seen in one patient. No patient treated with etanercept developed any of these autoantibodies. Conclusions: Patients treated with infliximab may develop anti-dsDNA antibodies of both IgM and IgG class, anti-nucleosome antibodies, and ANA, with a gradual increase until 30 weeks. PMID:15297281

  4. Abnormalities of the IgA immune system in members of unrelated pedigrees from patients with IgA nephropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Schena, F P; Scivittaro, V; Ranieri, E; Sinico, R; Benuzzi, S; Di Cillo, M; Aventaggiato, L

    1993-01-01

    In the last few years many investigators have reported the recurrence of primary IgA nephropathy (IgAN) or the presence of persistent microhaematuria and/or proteinuria in family members of patients with IgAN. Our study was undertaken to investigate the relevance of abnormalities in the regulation of the IgA and IgM immune system in microhaematuric and asymptomatic family members of IgAN patients. Fifty-four out of 120 members of nine unrelated pedigrees were examined by urinalysis; polymeric IgA (pIgA), IgA rheumatoid factor (IgARF), IgA1-IgG immune complexes (IgA 1-IgG IC) and IgA 1-IgM IC, and other immunoglobulins were measured in serum samples. Moreover, we studied the production of immunoglobulins, pIgA and IgARF by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in basal conditions and after pokeweed mitogen (PWM) stimulation. Our data demonstrate that persistent microhaematuria was present in 24% of relatives. High serum levels of IgA, mainly pIgA and IgARF, IgA 1-IgG IC and IgA 1-IgM IC occurred in 66% of relatives. Abnormal spontaneous production of IgA by PBMC and after PWM stimulation was present in 64% of family members. Interestingly, high serum levels of IgM and abnormal production of this immunoglobulin by PBMC were observed in relatives. However, the immunological abnormalities did not correlate in any way with the presence of urinary abnormalities such as microhaematuria, which was most likely determined by an underlying glomerular alteration. PMID:8467558

  5. Salivary IgA antibody to glucosyltransferase in man.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, D J; Taubman, M A; Ebersole, J L

    1985-01-01

    Parotid salivas of 97 young adults were screened for IgA antibody to glucosyltransferase (GTF) from laboratory strains of Streptococcus mutans (serotypes c and g). Antibody levels to GTF from serotype c positively correlated with levels to serotype g GTF among these salivas. GTF's were prepared from S. mutans obtained from a subset of individuals in this population. All but one saliva showed IgA antibody activity to all of the GTF tested. In addition, the relative magnitude of each subject's antibody level was generally the highest to the GTF from their own S. mutans. Fractions, enriched for IgA by ammonium sulphate precipitation and gel filtration, showed patterns of functional inhibition of GTF activity which were consistent with patterns of IgA antibody activity in ELISA of unfractionated salivas. These data indicate that detectable levels of IgA antibody to S. mutans GTF exist in many young adult salivas, while this IgA antibody activity reacts with GTF from different biotypes, subjects generally show the highest secretory IgA antibody levels to their own GTF, and the relative amount of IgA antibody to GTF and the ability to inhibit GTF activity are roughly correlated. PMID:2931224

  6. Combined segregation and linkage analysis of Graves disease with a thyroid autoantibody diathesis

    SciTech Connect

    Shields, D.C.; Ratanachaiyavong, S.; McGregor, A.M.; Collins, A.; Morton, N.E.

    1994-09-01

    Combined segregation and linkage analysis is a powerful technique for modeling linkage to diseases whose etiology is more complex than the effect of a well-described single genetic locus and for investigating the influence of single genes on various aspects of the disease phenotype. Graves disease is familial and is associated with human leukocyte antigen (HLA) allele DR3. Probands with Graves disease, as well as close relatives, have raised levels of thyroid autoantibodies. This phenotypic information additional to affection status may be considered by the computer program COMDS for combined segregation and linkage analysis, when normals are classified into diathesis classes of increasing thyroid autoantibody titer. The ordinal model considers the cumulative odds of lying in successive classes, and a single additional parameter is introduced for each gene modeled. Distributional assumptions are avoided by providing estimates of the population frequencies of each class. Evidence for linkage was increased by considering the thyroid autoantibody diathesis and by testing two-locus models. The analysis revealed evidence for linkage to HLA-DR when the strong coupling of the linked locus to allele DR3 was considered (lod score of 6.6). Linkage analysis of the residual variation revealed no evidence of linkage to Gm, but a suggestion of linkage to Km. 32 refs., 10 tabs.

  7. Exposures influencing total IgA level in colostrum.

    PubMed

    Munblit, D; Sheth, S; Abrol, P; Treneva, M; Peroni, D G; Chow, L-Y; Boner, A L; Pampura, A; Warner, J O; Boyle, R J

    2016-02-01

    Immunoglobulin A (IgA) is a predominant immunoglobulin present in human breast milk and is known to play an important role in infant gut immunity maturation. Breast milk composition varies between populations, but the environmental and maternal factors responsible for these variations are still unclear. We examined the relationship between different exposures and levels of IgA in colostrum. The objective of this study was to examine whether exposures analysed influence levels of IgA in colostrum. The present study used 294 colostrum samples from the MecMilk International cohort, collected from women residing in London, Moscow and Verona. Samples were analysed in automated Abbott Architect Analyser. We found an inverse correlation between time postpartum and colostrum total IgA level (r=-0.49, P<0.001). Adjusting for maternal parity, smoking, fresh fruit and fish consumption and allergen sensitization, multiple regression model showed that IgA levels were influenced by colostrum collection time (P<0.0001) and country of collection (P<0.01). Mode of delivery influence did not appear to be significant in univariate comparisons, once adjusted for the above maternal characteristics it showed a significant influence on total IgA (P=0.01). We conclude that the concentration of IgA in colostrum drops rapidly after birth and future studies should always consider this factor in analysis. IgA concentration varied significantly between countries, with the highest level detected in Moscow and lowest in Verona. Mode of delivery effect should be confirmed on larger cohorts. Further work is needed to determine ways to correct for IgA decline over time in colostrum, and to find the cause of variations in IgA levels between the countries. PMID:26387688

  8. Autoantibodies to nervous system-specific proteins are elevated in sera of flight crew members: biomarkers for nervous system injury.

    PubMed

    Abou-Donia, Mohamed B; Abou-Donia, Martha M; ElMasry, Eman M; Monro, Jean A; Mulder, Michel F A

    2013-01-01

    This descriptive study reports the results of assays performed to detect circulating autoantibodies in a panel of 7 proteins associated with the nervous system (NS) in sera of 12 healthy controls and a group of 34 flight crew members including both pilots and attendants who experienced adverse effects after exposure to air emissions sourced to the ventilation system in their aircrafts and subsequently sought medical attention. The proteins selected represent various types of proteins present in nerve cells that are affected by neuronal degeneration. In the sera samples from flight crew members and healthy controls, immunoglobin (IgG) was measured using Western blotting against neurofilament triplet proteins (NFP), tubulin, microtubule-associated tau proteins (tau), microtubule-associated protein-2 (MAP-2), myelin basic protein (MBP), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), and glial S100B protein. Significant elevation in levels of circulating IgG-class autoantibodies in flight crew members was found. A symptom-free pilot was sampled before symptoms and then again afterward. This pilot developed clinical problems after flying for 45 h in 10 d. Significant increases in autoantibodies were noted to most of the tested proteins in the serum of this pilot after exposure to air emissions. The levels of autoantibodies rose with worsening of his condition compared to the serum sample collected prior to exposure. After cessation of flying for a year, this pilot's clinical condition improved, and eventually he recovered and his serum autoantibodies against nervous system proteins decreased. The case study with this pilot demonstrates a temporal relationship between exposure to air emissions, clinical condition, and level of serum autoantibodies to nervous system-specific proteins. Overall, these results suggest the possible development of neuronal injury and gliosis in flight crew members anecdotally exposed to cabin air emissions containing organophosphates. Thus, increased

  9. Purification and Characterisation of Immunoglobulins from the Australian Black Flying Fox (Pteropus alecto) Using Anti-Fab Affinity Chromatography Reveals the Low Abundance of IgA

    PubMed Central

    Shiell, Brian J.; Beddome, Gary; Cowled, Christopher; Peck, Grantley R.; Huang, Jing; Grimley, Samantha L.; Baker, Michelle L.; Michalski, Wojtek P.

    2013-01-01

    There is now an overwhelming body of evidence that implicates bats in the dissemination of a long list of emerging and re-emerging viral agents, often causing illnesses or death in both animals and humans. Despite this, there is a paucity of information regarding the immunological mechanisms by which bats coexist with highly pathogenic viruses. Immunoglobulins are major components of the adaptive immune system. Early studies found bats may have quantitatively lower antibody responses to model antigens compared to conventional laboratory animals. To further understand the antibody response of bats, the present study purified and characterised the major immunoglobulin classes from healthy black flying foxes, Pteropus alecto. We employed a novel strategy, where IgG was initially purified and used to generate anti-Fab specific antibodies. Immobilised anti-Fab specific antibodies were then used to capture other immunoglobulins from IgG depleted serum. While high quantities of IgM were successfully isolated from serum, IgA was not. Only trace quantities of IgA were detected in the serum by mass spectrometry. Immobilised ligands specific to IgA (Jacalin, Peptide M and staphylococcal superantigen-like protein) also failed to capture P. alecto IgA from serum. IgM was the second most abundant serum antibody after IgG. A survey of mucosal secretions found IgG was the dominant antibody class rather than IgA. Our study demonstrates healthy P. alecto bats have markedly less serum IgA than expected. Higher quantities of IgG in mucosal secretions may be compensation for this low abundance or lack of IgA. Knowledge and reagents developed within this study can be used in the future to examine class-specific antibody response within this important viral host. PMID:23308125

  10. Comparative characterization of the iga gene encoding IgA1 protease in Neisseria meningitidis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed

    Lomholt, H; Poulsen, K; Kilian, M

    1995-02-01

    Cloning and sequencing of the IgA1 protease gene (iga) from Neisseria meningitidis strain HF13 showed an overall structure equivalent to iga genes from Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Haemophilus influenzae, although no region corresponding to the gonococcal alpha-peptide was evident. An additional 18 N. meningitidis and 3 H. influenzae iga genes were amplified by the polymerase chain reaction technique and sequenced corresponding approximately to the N-terminal half of the mature enzyme. Comparative analyses of a total of 29 iga genes showed that pathogenic Neisseria have iga genes with a significantly lower degree of heterogeneity than H. influenzae iga genes. Recombinational events indicated by mosaic-like structures corresponding to those found among N. gonorrhoeae protease genes were detected among N. meningitidis iga genes. One region showed characteristic differences in sequence and length which correlated with each of the different cleavage specificities. Meningococci were extremely conserved in this region with no evidence of recombination between isolates of different cleavage specificities. Sequences further downstream showed no obvious relationship with enzyme cleavage type. This region consisted of conserved areas interspersed with highly variable areas. Amino acid sequence homologies in the variable regions of meningococci reflected the antigenic types defined by using polyclonal neutralizing antibodies. PMID:7783620

  11. Clinical significance of autoantibodies in a large cohort of patients with chronic graft-versus-host disease defined by NIH criteria.

    PubMed

    Kuzmina, Zoya; Gounden, Verena; Curtis, Lauren; Avila, Daniele; Rnp, Tiffani Taylor; Baruffaldi, Judy; Cowen, Edward W; Naik, Haley B; Hasni, Sarfaraz A; Mays, Jacqueline W; Mitchell, Sandra; Baird, Kristin; Steinberg, Seth M; Pavletic, Steven Z

    2015-02-01

    There is an unmet need for identifying new clinical biomarkers in chronic Graft-versus-Host-disease (cGVHD) suitable for diagnosis and disease monitoring. Circulating autoantibodies represent an ongoing immune response and suggest a pathogenic role for B cells in cGVHD. Autoantibodies could be useful markers of cGVHD disease activity, severity, or organ specificity; however, their clinical utility is not established. The focus of this study was to determine the incidence and associations of a broad array of clinical autoantibodies with cGVHD manifestations in a large patient cohort characterized by NIH criteria. A panel of 21 circulating antibodies commonly used in clinical medicine was tested in 280 cGVHD patients (70% severe) enrolled in a cross-sectional prospective natural history study. Median cGVHD duration was two years. Patients with circulating autoantibodies (62%) had significantly higher levels of IgM (P < 0.0001), IgG (P < 0.0001), and IgA (P = 0.001), elevated uric acid (P = 0.008) and total protein (P = 0.0004), and higher numbers of CD3+ (P = 0.002), CD4+ (P = 0.001), CD8+ (P = 0.023) T cells, and CD19+ B cells (P < 0.0001). Multiple antibodies were detected in 35% of patients. Prior rituximab therapy (n = 66) was associated with reduced presence of autoantibodies (48 vs. 66% P = 0.01). Only oral cGVHD was significantly associated with presence of autoantibodies in this study (P = 0.028). No significant associations were found between cGVHD activity and severity, and presence of autoantibodies. Circulating autoantibodies are common in patients with advanced cGVHD. Their presence is associated with better quantitative immunologic reconstitution but does not have utility as a clinical biomarker of cGVHD. PMID:25363867

  12. Linear IgA Bullous Dermatosis

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhari, Soham

    2015-01-01

    Linear immunoglobulin A bullous dermatosis is a rare autoimmune mucocutaneous disorder caused by immunoglobulin A autoantibodies produced against several different antigens in the basement membrane zone. Clinically, it is characterized by tense vesicles or bullae, which on histopathological exam demonstrate subepidermal blister with a predominantly neutrophilic infiltrate. A smooth, linear pattern of immunoglobulin A deposition in the basement membrane zone on direct immunofluorescence is considered the gold standard for establishing a diagnosis. Treatment consists of dapsone or sulfapyridine. The authors report a 60-year-old woman who presented with pruritic erythematous patches and plaques on her trunk, back, and legs without blisters, who was diagnosed with eczema for several months with no response to prior treatments. A biopsy was performed, which was consistent with linear immunoglobulin A bullous dermatosis and later confirmed by direct immunofluorescence studies. The authors present this case to increase awareness of this rare disease, which could manifest in a nonclassical, nonblistering fashion. PMID:26557220

  13. Linear immunoglobulin A (IgA) bullous dermatosis of childhood: identification of the target antigens and study of the cellular sources.

    PubMed

    Yamane, Y; Sato, H; Higashi, K; Yaoita, H

    1996-11-01

    A 4-year-old girl developed numerous tense blisters on the body. The blisters healed without scarring. Histopathological and immunofluorescence studies showed findings consistent with linear immunoglobulin A (IgA) bullous dermatosis of childhood. Immunoelectron microscopy revealed deposition of IgA in the lamina lucida of the basement membrane zone of the dermal-epidermal junction. Circulating IgA autoantibody was positive at the titre of 1 : 128 and recognized the antigens located on epidermal sites of 1 mol/l NaCl-split skin. Immunofluorescence staining of cultured normal human fibroblasts and cultured DJM-1 cells (derived from human squamous cell carcinoma of skin) with the patient's sera demonstrated that both of these cells synthesize the antigens in vitro, although fibroblasts produce the antigens more abundantly. When DJM-1 cells were injected intracutaneously into nude mice, the antigens recognized by the sera were present mainly around the tumour cell islands in a linear pattern, while the dermal-epidermal junction of mouse skin was negative, suggesting that epidermal cells may contribute directly to synthesis and deposition of the antigens at the basement membrane. By immunoprecipitation using cultured normal human fibroblasts, the patient's sera could precipitate at least two specific molecules at 100-kDa and 145-kDa molecular weight. PMID:8977683

  14. The influences of hinge length and composition on the susceptibility of human IgA to cleavage by diverse bacterial IgA1 proteases.

    PubMed

    Senior, Bernard W; Woof, Jenny M

    2005-06-15

    The influences of IgA hinge length and composition on its susceptibility to cleavage by bacterial IgA1 proteases were examined using a panel of IgA hinge mutants. The IgA1 proteases of Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus sanguis strains SK4 and SK49, Neisseria meningitidis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and Haemophilus influenzae cleaved IgA2-IgA1 half hinge, an Ab featuring half of the IgA1 hinge incorporated into the equivalent site in IgA1 protease-resistant IgA2, whereas those of Streptococcus mitis, Streptococcus oralis, and S. sanguis strain SK1 did not. Hinge length reduction by removal of two of the four C-terminal proline residues rendered IgA2-IgA1 half hinge resistant to all streptococcal IgA1 metalloproteinases but it remained sensitive to cleavage by the serine-type IgA1 proteases of Neisseria and Haemophilus spp. The four C-terminal proline residues could be substituted by alanine residues or transferred to the N-terminal extremity of the hinge without affect on the susceptibility of the Ab to cleavage by serine-type IgA1 proteases. However, their removal rendered the Ab resistant to cleavage by all the IgA1 proteases. We conclude that the serine-type IgA1 proteases of Neisseria and Haemophilus require the Fab and Fc regions to be separated by at least ten (or in the case of N. gonorrhoeae type I protease, nine) amino acids between Val(222) and Cys(241) (IgA1 numbering) for efficient access and cleavage. By contrast, the streptococcal IgA1 metalloproteinases require 12 or more appropriate amino acids between the Fab and Fc to maintain a minimum critical distance between the scissile bond and the start of the Fc. PMID:15944283

  15. Strategies for building reference standards for autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Sheldon, Joanna; Dellavance, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    Producing robust, certified, traceable reference material for autoantibody testing is a vital element in maintaining the validity of results that are generated in the daily clinical laboratory routine. This is a huge challenge because of the high number of variables involved in the detection and measurement of the autoantibodies. The production of such materials is time consuming and needs rigorous attention to detail; this is best achieved by an overarching independent body who will oversee the process in a "not for profit" manner. Much effort has been made to build international standards for quantitative and qualitative assays based on monoclonal antibodies, obtained from affinity purification and plasmapheresis. The big challenge is to respect individual differences in immune response to the same antigen. A promising ongoing initiative is the construction of pools with monospecific samples from different individuals. PMID:25972866

  16. Anti-C1q autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Kallenberg, Cees G M

    2008-09-01

    Autoantibodies to complement components are associated with various diseases. Anti-C1q antibodies are present in all patients with hypocomplementemic urticarial vasculitis, but also, with varying prevalence, in other conditions. In SLE, these antibodies are neither sensitive nor specific for this condition. They occur, however, more frequently in (proliferative) lupus nephritis, particularly during active disease. Furthermore, levels of anti-C1q rise, in many cases, prior to a relapse of lupus nephritis, suggesting a pathogenic role for the autoantibodies. Indeed, experimental studies strongly support a pathogenic role for anti-C1q in immune complex-mediated renal disease. In addition, anti-C1q may interfere with the clearance of apoptotic cells, so influencing induction and expression of autoimmunity. PMID:18606253

  17. Muscle autoantibodies in myasthenia gravis: beyond diagnosis?

    PubMed Central

    Meriggioli, Matthew N; Sanders, Donald B

    2012-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disorder of the neuromuscular junction. A number of molecules, including ion channels and other proteins at the neuromuscular junction, may be targeted by autoantibodies leading to abnormal neuromuscular transmission. In approximately 85% of patients, autoantibodies, directed against the postsynaptic nicotinic acetylcholine receptor can be detected in the serum and confirm the diagnosis, but in general, do not precisely predict the degree of weakness or response to therapy. Antibodies to the muscle-specific tyrosine kinase are detected in approximately 50% of generalized myasthenia gravis patients who are seronegative for anti-acetylcholine receptor antibodies, and levels of anti-muscle-specific tyrosine kinase antibodies do appear to correlate with disease severity and treatment response. Antibodies to other muscle antigens may be found in the subsets of myasthenia gravis patients, potentially providing clinically useful diagnostic information, but their utility as relevant biomarkers (measures of disease state or response to treatment) is currently unclear. PMID:22882218

  18. Autoantibodies: Focus on anti-DNA antibodies.

    PubMed

    Almqvist, Nina; Winkler, Thomas H; Mårtensson, Inga-Lill

    2011-01-01

    Ever since the days of Ehrlich and the birth of humoral immunity, self-reactivity or 'horror autotoxicus' as referred to by Paul Ehrlich, has been of great concern. For instance, in patients with the autoimmune disease systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), anti-nuclear and anti-DNA antibodies have been recognized for many years. Despite this, the exact mechanism as to how the immune system fails to protect the individual and allows these autoantibodies to develop in this and other systemic autoimmune diseases remains uncertain. So how can we explain their presence? Evidence suggests that B cells expressing autoreactive antibodies do not normally arise but rather undergo negative selection as they develop. In light of this, it might seem contradictory that not all autoreactive B cell clones are eliminated, although this may not even be the intention since autoantibodies are also found in healthy individuals and may even protect from autoimmunity. Here, we will discuss autoantibodies, in particular those recognizing DNA, with regard to their reactivity and their potentially pathogenic or protective properties. PMID:21776330

  19. Characterisation of osteoprotegerin autoantibodies in coeliac disease.

    PubMed

    Real, Ana; Gilbert, Nick; Hauser, Barbara; Kennedy, Nick; Shand, Alan; Gillett, Helen; Gillett, Peter; Goddard, Clive; Cebolla, Ángel; Sousa, Carolina; Fraser, William D; Satsangi, Jack; Ralston, Stuart H; Riches, Philip L

    2015-08-01

    Autoantibodies neutralising the effect of the bone regulatory cytokine osteoprotegerin (OPG) have been described in a patient with severe osteoporosis and coeliac disease. This study aimed to determine the prevalence and epitope specificity of autoantibodies to OPG in patients with coeliac disease, and correlate their presence with bone mineral density. A direct enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was developed and used to screen patients with coeliac disease for autoantibodies to OPG. Recombinant fragments of OPG were made to evaluate the epitope specificity and affinity of these antibodies. Phenotype information of the patients was obtained by case note review. Raised titres of antibodies to OPG were found in 7/71 (9.8 %) patients with coeliac disease, compared with 1/72 (1.4 %) non-coeliac osteoporosis clinic control patients (p < 0.05). Our results suggest that a polyclonal antibody response to OPG is raised in these patients capable of recognising different epitopes of OPG with varying affinity. The titre of OPG antibodies was associated with lower bone mineral density Z-score of the hip in coeliac patients on univariate (p < 0.05) and multivariate analysis including age, sex height and weight as covariates (p < 0.01). Polyclonal antibodies to OPG are more common in patients with coeliac disease and are independently associated with lower bone mineral density Z-scores of the hip. Further work is required to establish the clinical utility of testing for OPG antibodies. PMID:26092508

  20. Presence of secretory IgA in human periapical lesions.

    PubMed

    Torres, J O; Torabinejad, M; Matiz, R A; Mantilla, E G

    1994-02-01

    The concentration of secretory IgA in fluids present in the canals of 33 teeth was determined by the rocket immunoelectrophoresis technique. Except for the presence or absence of communication between the oral cavity and the root canals of the affected teeth, no other clinical finding showed significant statistical correlation with the presence of secretory IgA. The canals which were open to the oral flora had significantly higher concentrations of secretory IgA. Leaving canals open to the oral cavity may result in formation of periapical cysts. PMID:8006572

  1. IgA immunoassay for the diagnosis of bancroftian filariasis.

    PubMed

    Chanteau, S; Cartel, J L; Martin, P M

    1992-06-01

    In some parasitic infection such as toxoplasmosis, specific IgA is a highly reliable marker of active infection. In bancroftian filariasis, only 10 of 20 (50%) and 3 of 20 (15%) of the microfilaremic patients were positive for IgA anti-Brugia malayi using respectively indirect ELISA and immunocapture ELISA tests. As regard to these low sensitivities, the detection of specific IgA is unlikely to be a useful test for the diagnosis of active Wuchereria bancrofti infection. PMID:1519028

  2. [Autoantibodies to glutamate and GABA in opiate addiction].

    PubMed

    Vetrile, L A; Fomina, V G; Nevidimova, T I; Vetlugina, T P; Batukhtina, E I; Savochkina, D N; Zakharova, I A; Davydova, T V

    2015-01-01

    Blood serum from 129 patients with opium addiction at different stages of the disease and 63 donors (control group) was examined for the presence of autoantibodies to the exciting and inhibitory amino acids glutamate and GABA. It was shown enhanced production of autoantibodies to glutamate and GABA. Dependence of the level and frequency of detec- tion of autoantibodies to glutamate and GABA on the stage of the disease was revealed. PMID:26852594

  3. Characterization of pathogenic human monoclonal autoantibodies against GM-CSF

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yanni; Thomson, Christy A.; Allan, Lenka L.; Jackson, Linda M.; Olson, Melanie; Hercus, Timothy R.; Nero, Tracy L.; Turner, Amanda; Parker, Michael W.; Lopez, Angel L.; Waddell, Thomas K.; Anderson, Gary P.; Hamilton, John A.; Schrader, John W.

    2013-01-01

    The origin of pathogenic autoantibodies remains unknown. Idiopathic pulmonary alveolar proteinosis is caused by autoantibodies against granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). We generated 19 monoclonal autoantibodies against GM-CSF from six patients with idiopathic pulmonary alveolar proteinosis. The autoantibodies used multiple V genes, excluding preferred V-gene use as an etiology, and targeted at least four nonoverlapping epitopes on GM-CSF, suggesting that GM-CSF is driving the autoantibodies and not a B-cell epitope on a pathogen cross-reacting with GM-CSF. The number of somatic mutations in the autoantibodies suggests that the memory B cells have been helped by T cells and re-entered germinal centers. All autoantibodies neutralized GM-CSF bioactivity, with general correlations to affinity and off-rate. The binding of certain autoantibodies was changed by point mutations in GM-CSF that reduced binding to the GM-CSF receptor. Those monoclonal autoantibodies that potently neutralize GM-CSF may be useful in treating inflammatory disease, such as rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis, cancer, and pain. PMID:23620516

  4. Epstein-Barr virus transformation of B lymphocytes from IgA nephropathy patients and first-degree relatives results in increased immunoglobulin synthesis not restricted to IgA.

    PubMed

    Jackson, S; Galla, J H; Kirk, K A; Thorn, B T; Julian, B A

    1991-01-01

    In order to study B-cell activation patterns independent of T-cell regulation in patients with IgA nephropathy (IgAN), peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 67 patients with IgAN, 15 first-degree relatives of patients with familial disease, and 13 normal controls were transformed with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). Culture supernatants of these transformed cells were assayed for levels of IgG, IgA, and IgM, and results obtained on the three populations were compared. EBV-transformed cells of IgAN patients, as well as the population of first-degree relatives, secreted significantly elevated levels of all three isotypes as compared with the normal controls. However, in comparing ratios of secreted isotypes, it was determined that more IgA relative to IgG and IgM was synthesized by cells of these two populations as compared with the normal controls. Our results imply that (1) the population of B cells susceptible to EBV activation is increased in IgAN patients; (2) this population of "activatable" B lymphocytes is polyclonal and not restricted to the IgA class; and (3) even though there may be a primary B-cell abnormality in IgAN, an additional defect(s) is probably operative in the pathogenesis, since cells of clinically unaffected relatives behaved in a pattern similar to that of patients. PMID:1846059

  5. Astragalus membranaceus up-regulate Cosmc expression and reverse IgA dys-glycosylation in IgA nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Decreased Core I β3-Gal-T-specific molecular chaperone (Cosmc) expression induced IgA1 aberrant glycosylation is the main characteristic of IgA nephropathy (IgAN). This study tried to elucidate the effect of Astragalus membranaceus on Cosmc expression and IgA O-glycosylation of peripheral B lymphocytes in IgAN patients. Methods Peripheral B lymphocytes of 21 IgAN patients and 10 normal controls were isolated and cultured with or without lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and Astragalus membranaceus injection (AMI). Cosmc mRNA and protein expression levels were measured by real-time RT-PCR and Western blot. IgA1 and glycosylation level were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and VV lectin-binding method. Results Cosmc mRNA expression and IgA1 O-glycosylation level in IgAN patients was significantly lower than normal controls at baseline. Treatment of LPS could obviously inhibit Cosmc expression and increase the IgA1 secretion in peripheral B lymphocytes of IgAN patients, which resulted in a significantly increase in IgA1 aberrant glycosylation level. Addition of AMI could remarkably up regulated Cosmc expression, decrease IgA1 secretion, and reverse glycosylation level in a dose related manner. Conclusion AMI can up-regulate Cosmc expression of peripheral B lymphocytes and reverse IgA1 aberrant O-glycosylation level, which might be the underlying mechanism of AMI therapy in treating IgAN. Trial registration TCTR20140515001 (Registration Date: 2014-05-15) PMID:24942185

  6. Change of antibody levels to ferritin in the sera of foals after birth: possible passive transfer of maternal anti-ferritin autoantibody via colostrum and age-related anti-ferritin autoantibody production.

    PubMed

    Numata, Masami; Kondo, Takashi; Nambo, Yasuo; Yoshikawa, Yasunaga; Watanabe, Kiyotaka; Orino, Koichi

    2013-12-01

    Antibody (immunoglobulin G (IgG), IgM or IgA) levels relative to ferritin in six foal sera (three male and three female) after birth (day 0 and 2, 6, 10, 20, 28, 36, 40, 52 and 56 weeks of age) were semi-quantitatively measured with normalization with antibody activity to ferritin in one adult horse serum. After addition of horse spleen ferritin to the serum sample, the complex formed between antibodies to ferritin in the serum and ferritin was co-immunoprecipitated using antibody to horse spleen ferritin. Antibody classes of the co-immnoprecipitate were detected with antibodies specific for horse IgG, IgM or IgA heavy chain. Six adult horse serum samples were found to have ferritin-binding activities in all immunoglobulin classes examined. Although ferritin antibody activities (IgG, IgM and IgA) were scant in the foal sera before sucking colostrum (day 0), their activities increased at 2 weeks of age. IgG antibodies showed a biphasic response and IgM antibody activity increased up to 40 weeks of age. Antibody (IgG, IgM and IgA) activities to ferritin in three colostrum samples were significantly higher than in adult horse serum samples. These results demonstrate that antibody to ferritin in foal serum is derived from colostrum after birth and is produced thereafter. PMID:23607654

  7. Molecular Insights into the Pathogenesis of IgA Nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Robert, Thomas; Berthelot, Laureline; Cambier, Alexandra; Rondeau, Eric; Monteiro, Renato C

    2015-12-01

    Immunoglobulin IgA nephropathy (IgAN) is the leading form of primary glomerulonephritis associated with end-stage renal failure, requiring either dialysis or renal transplantation. Microscopic hematuria and proteinuria are the most common presentations, and mesangial cell proliferation with IgA deposition are found in renal biopsies. There is growing evidence that IgAN is an immune complex (IC)-mediated disease. To date, three key molecules have been implicated in IC formation, correlating with disease progression/recurrence after transplantation: galactose-deficient IgA1 (Gd-IgA1), IgG anti-Gd-IgA1 antibodies, and soluble CD89 (an Fc receptor for IgA). This review examines recent data on the role of these molecular players in IgAN. Understanding these factors is essential because such knowledge could lead to improved strategies for the future management of patients with IgAN. PMID:26614735

  8. Anti-type II collagen antibodies, anti-CCP, IgA RF and IgM RF are associated with joint damage, assessed eight years after onset of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Early appearance of antibodies specific for native human type II collagen (anti-CII) characterizes an early inflammatory and destructive phenotype in adults with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The objective of this study was to investigate the occurrence of anti-CII, IgM RF, IgA RF and anti-CCP in serum samples obtained early after diagnosis, and to relate the occurrence of autoantibodies to outcome after eight years of disease in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA). Methods The Nordic JIA database prospectively included JIA patients followed for eight years with data on remission and joint damage. From this database, serum samples collected from 192 patients, at a median of four months after disease onset, were analysed for IgG anti-CII, IgM RF, IgA RF and IgG anti-CCP. Joint damage was assessed based on Juvenile Arthritis Damage Index for Articular damage (JADI-A), a validated clinical instrument for joint damage. Results Elevated serum levels of anti-CII occurred in 3.1%, IgM RF in 3.6%, IgA RF in 3.1% and anti-CCP in 2.6% of the patients. Occurrence of RF and anti-CCP did to some extent overlap, but rarely with anti-CII. The polyarticular and oligoarticular extended categories were overrepresented in patients with two or more autoantibodies. Anti-CII occurred in younger children, usually without overlap with the other autoantibodies and was associated with high levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) early in the disease course. All four autoantibodies were significantly associated with joint damage, but not with active disease at the eight-year follow up. Conclusions Anti-CII, anti-CCP, IgA RF and IgM RF detected early in the disease course predicted joint damage when assessed after eight years of disease. The role of anti-CII in JIA should be further studied. PMID:24944545

  9. Induction of Fc receptors for IgA on murine T cell hybridoma by human monoclonal IgA and by high molecular weight IgA in IgA nephropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Chevailler, A; Monteiro, R C; Daëron, M; Lesavre, P

    1987-01-01

    A reproducible immunocyto-adherence assay has been developed to study the modulation of Fc receptors for IgA (Fc alpha R), using a murine T cell hybridoma (T2D4), which expresses Fc receptors for all known isotypes of secreted immunoglobulins. By using sheep red blood cells coated with the hapten 2-4-6 trinitrophenyl (TNP), as indicator cells, and a murine monoclonal IgA (MOPC 315) antibody with anti-TNP activity, we were able to study the Fc alpha R on T2D4 cells. We found that: (a) murine Fc alpha R can bind human monoclonal IgA, and this binding is isotype specific since it was inhibited by human monoclonal IgA but not by human monoclonal IgG or IgM; (b) the expression of murine Fc alpha R is unducible by human monoclonal IgA, and this effect is isotype specific since it is not observed with human monoclonal IgM or IgG (c) sera from patients with IgA nephropathy can also induce Fc alpha R expression; by contrast, no induction was observed with normal human sera, (d) in one serum from an IgA-nephropathy patient, the inducer factor was characterized by affinity chromatography on anti-IgA-Sepharose and by gel filtration: high molecular weight IgA, probably IgA aggregates or immune complexes were recognized to be responsible for the induction of murine Fc alpha R expression. PMID:3497739

  10. [Scarring linear IgA dermatosis in the adult].

    PubMed

    Kurz, K; Mahrle, G

    1986-10-15

    A 54-year-old woman had a six-months history of a scarring blistering disease with clinical signs of dermatitis herpetiformis and bullous pemphigoid. Direct immunofluorescence examination showed homogeneously linear deposits of IgA along the dermo-epidermal junction. Electron microscopic studies revealed blistering above and beneath the lamina densa. Referring to this new case of a scarring linear IgA disease we discuss some other forms of scarring bullous diseases in adults. PMID:3541412

  11. Serum autoantibodies directed against transglutaminase-2 have a low avidity compared with alloantibodies against gliadin in coeliac disease

    PubMed Central

    Gelderman, K A; Drop, A C A D; Trouw, L A; Bontkes, H J; Bouma, G; van Hoogstraten, I M W; von Blomberg, B M E

    2014-01-01

    Coeliac disease is characterized by intolerance to gliadin and related gluten components present in wheat, barley and rye. Coeliac disease patients harbour antibodies directed against alloantigens such as gliadin, but also against the autoantigen transglutaminase-2 (TG2). The type and quality of antibody responses provides insight into the underlying immune activation processes. Therefore, in this study we have analysed the avidity of the antibody response directed against the autoantigen TG2 and compared this with antibody responses against the alloantigens gliadin and Escherichia coli. We observed that the immunoglobulin (Ig)A autoantibody response directed against TG2 is of low avidity compared with the IgA response against the alloantigens gliadin and E. coli in the same patients; the same was true for IgG, both in IgA-deficient and in -sufficient coeliac patients. The observed avidities appear not to be related to disease stage, antibody levels, age or duration of exposure to gluten. In conclusion, in coeliac disease there is a clear difference in avidity of the antibody responses directed against the auto- and alloantigens, indicating different regulation or site of initiation of these responses. PMID:24666357

  12. Metabolic Syndrome in IgA Glomerulonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Kaartinen, Kati; Syrjänen, Jaana; Pörsti, Ilkka; Harmoinen, Aimo; Huhtala, Heini; Mustonen, Jukka

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims Metabolic syndrome (MetS) may have an independent impact on the development of chronic kidney disease. This study examines the prevalence of MetS in subjects with IgA glomerulonephritis (IgAGN) and its impact on disease progression in a retrospective fashion. Patients and Methods Altogether, 174 subjects (104 males) were examined 11 years (first visit) after IgAGN diagnosis and again after 16 years (second visit; 144 subjects responded). Different glomerular filtration markers were utilized. The MetS criteria by Alberti et al. [Circulation 2009;120:1640-1645] were applied, in which the presence of any three of five risk factors (elevated waist circumference, triglycerides, glucose, existence of hypertension, or reduced high-density lipoprotein cholesterol) constitutes the diagnosis. Results The prevalence of MetS at the first visit was 39%, corresponding to that of the general Finnish population. In univariate analyses, MetS was significantly associated with the progression of IgAGN at the second visit. However, in multivariate analyses, the existence of MetS was not a significant prognostic determinant. Conclusion The number of subjects with MetS among IgAGN patients and the general population is equal in Finland. MetS does not seem to be an independent prognostic variable. PMID:25337083

  13. The Treatment of IgA Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Kar Neng; Leung, Joseph C.K.; Tang, Sydney C.W.

    2015-01-01

    Background IgA nephropathy (IgAN) is a very common glomerulonephritis worldwide. Nevertheless, treatment options for primary IgAN are still largely based on opinion or weak evidence. There is a lack of large randomized controlled trials (RCT) that provide a definitive immunosuppressive protocol for IgAN. The recent KDIGO Clinical Practice Guidelines for Glomerulonephritis have assigned low levels of evidence for almost all recommendations and suggestions related to this nephropathy. Summary In this article, we review different treatment options and emphasize that the key to therapeutic decision-making is the assessment of an individual's prognosis. The risk of disease progression is closely related to clinical parameters such as proteinuria, hypertension, and impaired glomerular filtration rate. For patients with minor urinary abnormalities, the mainstay of treatment is long-term regular follow-up to detect renal progression and hypertension. Optimized supportive care aiming to maintain proteinuria <1 g/day is preferred in the typical patient presenting with microhematuria, significant but nonnephrotic proteinuria, hypertension, and variable degrees of renal failure. The atypical patient with overt nephritic syndrome or rapidly progressive kidney injury that represents a vasculitic form of IgAN should be treated with immunosuppression. Finally, the variant of overlapping syndrome of IgAN and lipoid nephrosis that runs a good prognosis should be treated as lipoid nephrosis. Key Message The treatment of IgAN should be structured according to the clinical scenario.

  14. How Relevant Are GFAP Autoantibodies in Autism and Tourette Syndrome?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkman, Nikki J.; Libbey, Jane E.; Sweeten, Thayne L.; Coon, Hilary H.; Miller, Judith N.; Stevenson, Edward K.; Lainhart, Janet E.; McMahon, William M.; Fujinami, Robert S.

    2008-01-01

    Controversy exists over the role of autoantibodies to central nervous system antigens in autism and Tourette Syndrome. We investigated plasma autoantibody titers to glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in children with classic onset (33) and regressive onset (26) autism, controls (25, healthy age- and gender-matched) and individuals with…

  15. 21 CFR 866.5870 - Thyroid autoantibody immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Thyroid autoantibody immunological test system. 866.5870 Section 866.5870 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... the thyroid autoantibodies (antibodies produced against the body's own tissues). Measurement...

  16. 21 CFR 866.5870 - Thyroid autoantibody immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Thyroid autoantibody immunological test system. 866.5870 Section 866.5870 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... the thyroid autoantibodies (antibodies produced against the body's own tissues). Measurement...

  17. 21 CFR 866.5870 - Thyroid autoantibody immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Thyroid autoantibody immunological test system. 866.5870 Section 866.5870 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... the thyroid autoantibodies (antibodies produced against the body's own tissues). Measurement...

  18. 21 CFR 866.5870 - Thyroid autoantibody immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Thyroid autoantibody immunological test system. 866.5870 Section 866.5870 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... the thyroid autoantibodies (antibodies produced against the body's own tissues). Measurement...

  19. Circulating anti-brain autoantibodies in schizophrenia and mood disorders.

    PubMed

    Margari, Francesco; Petruzzelli, Maria Giuseppina; Mianulli, Rossana; Campa, Maria Gloria; Pastore, Adriana; Tampoia, Marilina

    2015-12-15

    In recent years, an inflammatory autoimmune process, autoantibodies mediated, has been porposed as having a role in the development of different psychiatric disorders. The aim of this study was to assay organ-specific and non organ-specific circulating autoantibodies in schizophrenia, mood disorders and healthy controls; among organ-specific autoantibodies we focused on different fluorescence patterns of anti-brain autoantibodies against rat and monkey's sections of hippocampus, hypothalamus and cerebellum. Serum samples from 50 acutelly ill patients (30 schizophrenia and 20 mood disorders) and from 20 healthy controls were collected. Autoantibodies were assayed by indirect immunofluorescence, enzyme linked immunosorbent assay and chemiluminescence immunoassay. We found a significant difference for circulating autoantibodies to hypothalamus, hippocampus and cerebellum and for anti-nuclear autoantibodies in both schizophrenia and mood disorders when compared to the control group. Referring to the two groups of patients only, circulating antibodies anti-hypothalamus were found significant higher in mood disorders rather than in schizophrenia, with specific regard to nuclear and cytoplasmic staining of the neurons. These data suggest an aspecific diffuse brain involvement of anti-brain autoantibodies in acute phases of schizophrenia and mood disorders. The greater involvement of the hypothalamus in mood disorders highlights the close relationship between autoimmunity, hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and affective disorders. PMID:26548982

  20. Infliximab-induced autoantibodies: a multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Vaz, João Luiz Pereira; Fernandes, Vander; Nogueira, Felipe; Arnóbio, Adriano; Levy, Roger A

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess autoantibody incidence in patients treated with infliximab for various diseases, and the development of autoimmune diseases using a multicenter, longitudinal, open-label, phase IV observational study. All patients received anti-tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF) according to local treatment guidelines. The autoantibodies assessed before and after infliximab treatment were ANA, anti-Sm, anti-dsDNA, anticardiolipin IgM/IgG, anti-Scl70, anti-centromere B, anti-chromatin, anti-ribosomal P, anti-Sm-RNP, anti-RNP A, anti-RNP 68 kD, anti-La/SSB, anti-Ro/SSA 52 kD and 60 kD, and anti-Jo1. ANA was determined by indirect immunofluorescence on HEp-2 cells (INOVA); the remaining was assessed using BioPlexTM 2200. The Fisher exact test, Wilcoxon test, and the McNemar were used when appropriate.Two hundred eighty-six patients were included (139 with rheumatoid arthritis, 77 with ankylosing spondylitis, 29 with inflammatory bowel disease, 27 with psoriatic arthritis, and 14 with psoriasis), 167 females and 119 males, with mean age of 46.3 years. Subjects received at least five infusions of infliximab (6-month treatment). A significant difference was observed in antinuclear antibody (ANA) detection between samplings (p = 0.001). Among patients that had ANA before treatment (n = 92), six became ANA-negative, 48 had increased titers, 29 maintained, and nine decreased titers after treatment; a total of 186 patients had a positive ANA after treatment. Fine speckled nuclear pattern was most commonly observed (both before and after infliximab treatment). The number of patients with anti-dsDNA had a statistically significant increase (p = 0.003). No significant differences were noted for anticardiolipin and the remaining autoantibodies tested. Among the 286 patients included in the study, only one (0.35 %) showed clinical signs of drug-induced lupus, presenting elevated ANA and anti-dsDNA titers that normalized once treatment was

  1. Autoantibodies in Sjögren's Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fayyaz, Anum; Kurien, Biji T; Scofield, R Hal

    2016-08-01

    We compiled information on antibodies in Sjögren syndrome, focusing more on clinical manifestations associated with anti-Ro/SSA and anti-La/SSB antibodies and studies regarding novel antibodies. We reviewed previous as well as most recent studies with the subject heading Sjogren in combination with antibodies and congenital heart block (CHB). Almost half of asymptomatic mothers giving birth to children with CHB ultimately develop Sjögren. We discussed studies concerning the presence of antibodies predating clinical manifestations of disease. Studies in the future are required to ascertain the pathogenic mechanisms associated with these antibodies and the specific clinical manifestation related to new autoantibodies. PMID:27431345

  2. Autoantibodies against retinal proteins in paraneoplastic and autoimmune retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Adamus, Grazyna; Ren, Gaoying; Weleber, Richard G

    2004-01-01

    Background Autoimmune retinal degeneration may occur in patients who present with sudden or, less commonly, subacute loss of vision of retinal origin, associated with an abnormal ERG, through the action of autoantibodies against retinal proteins. Often the patients are initially diagnosed with or suspected of having a paraneoplastic retinopathy (PR), such as cancer-associated retinopathy (CAR). However, there is limited information on the occurrence, the specificity of autoantibodies in these patients, and their association with clinical symptoms. Methods Sera were obtained from 193 retinopathy patients who presented with clinical symptoms resembling PR or autoimmune retinopathy (AR), including sudden painless loss of vision, typically associated with visual field defects and photopsias, and abnormal rod and/or cone responses on the electroretinogram (ERG). Sera were tested for the presence of anti-retinal autoantibodies by Western blot analysis using proteins extracted from human retina and by immunohistochemistry. Autoantibody titers against recoverin and enolase were measured by ELISA. Results We identified a higher prevalence of anti-retinal autoantibodies in retinopathy patients. Ninety-one patients' sera (47.1%) showed autoantibodies of various specificities with a higher incidence of antibodies present in retinopathy patients diagnosed with cancer (33/52; 63.5%; p = 0.009) than in retinopathy patients without cancer (58/141; 41.1%). The average age of PR patients was 62.0 years, and that of AR patients was 55.9 years. Autoantibodies against recoverin (p23) were only present in the sera of PR patients, autoantibodies against unknown p35 were more common in patients with AR, while anti-enolase (anti-p46) autoantibodies were nearly equally distributed in the sera of patients with PR and those with AR. In the seropositive patients, the autoantibodies persisted over a long period of time – from months to years. A rebound in anti-recoverin autoantibody titer was

  3. Association of PTPN22 1858C→T polymorphism, HLA-DRB1 shared epitope and autoantibodies with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Raslan, Hala M; Attia, Hanaa R; Salama, Iman; Ibrahim, Mona Hamed; Hassan, Eman Mahmoud; El Hussieny, Mohamed S; El Menyawi, Manal M; Amr, Khalda S

    2016-08-01

    To assess impact of PTPN22 1858C→T polymorphism, HLA shared epitope and autoantibodies on susceptibility and severity of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). A total of 150 RA patients and 150 controls were included in the study. Anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP) and rheumatoid factor isotypes (IgG, IgM and IgA) were assayed by ELISA. PTPN22 1858C→T polymorphism was performed by RFLP analysis and HLA-DRB1 genotyping by PCR-SSP analysis. Single-view, anteroposterior radiographs of the hands and feet were obtained on all RA patients. The results showed association of PTPN22 1858 T allele with RA (OR = 2.3, 95 % CI 1.5-3.5) and bone erosion (OR = 2.9, 95 % CI 1.1-7.6). The associations increased with the combination of positive autoantibodies, HLA-DRB1 SE with PTPN22 1858 T allele carriage. The highest association was with the combination with anti-CCP antibodies (OR = 47.3, 95 % CI 10.9-204.4 for RA and OR = 69.4, 95 % CI 15.8-305.5 for erosion p < 0.001). Combination of PTPN22 1858 T allele carriage with negative RF isotypes or with absence HLA-DRB1 SE showed no significant association with RA. The presence of PTPN22 1858C→T polymorphism with HLA SE and autoantibodies increases risk of RA development and erosive disease. PMID:27324632

  4. Autoantibodies in systemic autoimmune diseases: specificity and pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Suurmond, Jolien; Diamond, Betty

    2015-06-01

    In this Review we focus on the initiation of autoantibody production and autoantibody pathogenicity, with a special emphasis on the targeted antigens. Release of intracellular antigens due to excessive cell death or to ineffective clearance of apoptotic debris, modification of self-antigens during inflammatory responses, and molecular mimicry contribute to the initiation of autoantibody production. We hypothesize that those autoreactive B cells that survive and produce pathogenic autoantibodies have specificity for self-antigens that are TLR ligands. Such B cells experience both B cell receptor (BCR) activation and TLR engagement, leading to an escape from tolerance. Moreover, the autoantibodies they produce form immune complexes that can activate myeloid cells and thereby establish the proinflammatory milieu that further negates tolerance mechanisms of both B and T cells. PMID:25938780

  5. Autoantibodies in chronic hepatitis C: A clinical perspective

    PubMed Central

    Narciso-Schiavon, Janaína Luz; Schiavon, Leonardo de Lucca

    2015-01-01

    Non-organ-specific autoantibodies and thyroid autoantibodies have been frequently found in chronic carriers of hepatitis C virus (HCV). With respect to endomysial antibodies and tissue transglutaminase, it is controversial whether the prevalence of gluten-related seromarkers is higher in patients with HCV. In such cases, in addition to acknowledging any currently existing autoimmune disease, recognizing the risk of the patient developing an autoimmune disease during interferon (IFN)-based treatment must be a principle concern. From a clinical point-of-view, the presence of autoantibodies arouses suspicion that an autoimmune disease may be present or may be precipitated by IFN-based HCV treatment. In this paper, we review the prevalence of autoantibodies in individuals with hepatitis C, the clinical significance of these autoantibodies, and the approach recommended for such situations. PMID:26052396

  6. Demonstration and characterization of anti-human mitochondria autoantibodies in idiopathic hypoparathyroidism and in other conditions.

    PubMed Central

    Betterle, C; Caretto, A; Zeviani, M; Pedini, B; Salviati, C

    1985-01-01

    We studied 32 patients with idiopathic hypoparathyroidism (IHP), 19 patients with organ-specific autoimmune diseases (OSAD) without IHP, 50 normal controls and a known serum with anti-mitochondrial autoantibodies (AMA). Patients' sera were tested by the classical indirect immunofluorescent technique and by the indirect immunofluorescent complement fixation technique on unfixed cryostat sections of normal human parathyroid, pancreas, thyroid, stomach, kidney, and rat kidney. Five out of 32 patients with IHP, three out of 19 patients with OSAD without IHP and one out of 50 normal controls revealed a bright reactivity against oxyphil cells and a weak reactivity against chief cells of normal parathyroid. These sera also brightly reacted with mitochondria-rich cells and weakly with the remaining cells of only human tissues. The absorption of positive sera with human mitochondria completely abolished this positivity but the absorption with rat mitochondria failed to prevent this reaction. This reactivity was due to an anti-human mitochondrial autoantibody (AHMA) of IgG class. By non-competitive ELISA and Western blot we also demonstrated that every AHMA-positive serum mainly reacted against a human mitochondrial membrane-bound protein of approximate mol. wt. of 46 kd, while the AMA-positive serum reacted against different mitochondrial antigens. The present study shows that a specific parathyroid autoantibody was not detectable in patients with IHP. Images Fig. 3 PMID:3910313

  7. Autoantibody recognition mechanisms of p53 epitopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, J. C.

    2016-06-01

    There is an urgent need for economical blood based, noninvasive molecular biomarkers to assist in the detection and diagnosis of cancers in a cost-effective manner at an early stage, when curative interventions are still possible. Serum autoantibodies are attractive biomarkers for early cancer detection, but their development has been hindered by the punctuated genetic nature of the ten million known cancer mutations. A landmark study of 50,000 patients (Pedersen et al., 2013) showed that a few p53 15-mer epitopes are much more sensitive colon cancer biomarkers than p53, which in turn is a more sensitive cancer biomarker than any other protein. The function of p53 as a nearly universal "tumor suppressor" is well established, because of its strong immunogenicity in terms of not only antibody recruitment, but also stimulation of autoantibodies. Here we examine dimensionally compressed bioinformatic fractal scaling analysis for identifying the few sensitive epitopes from the p53 amino acid sequence, and show how it could be used for early cancer detection (ECD). We trim 15-mers to 7-mers, and identify specific 7-mers from other species that could be more sensitive to aggressive human cancers, such as liver cancer. Our results could provide a roadmap for ECD.

  8. Use of antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies in diagnosing vasculitis in a Chinese patient population.

    PubMed

    Li, P K; Leung, J C; Lai, F M; Wang, A; Lui, S F; Leung, C B; Lai, K N

    1994-01-01

    Antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies (ANCA) have been used as markers of systemic vasculitides, including microscopic polyarteritis (MPA) and Wegener's granulomatosis. The diagnostic potential of ANCA assays together with antibodies against the neutrophil enzymes myeloperoxidase (MPO) and proteinase 3 for detecting a systemic vasculitis was tested in a Chinese patient population. 672 sera were received for ANCA assay, and ANCA detected by indirect immunofluorescence was positive in 73 sera from 42 patients. Of the 42 patients, 3 had cytoplasmic ANCA, while 39 had a perinuclear pattern. There was no patient with Wegener's granulomatosis. Two cytoplasmic ANCA positive patients suffered from ulcerative colitis. Another cytoplasmic ANCA positive patient was a carrier of human immunodeficiency virus. Of the 39 perinuclear ANCA positive patients, 10 had MPA. Eight of them were tested for anti-MPO antibody, and all were positive. Other immune disorders that were perinuclear ANCA positive included: 13 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus, 3 with mixed connective tissue disease, 1 with Goodpasture's syndrome, 2 with inflammatory bowel disease, and 2 patients with IgA nephropathy. Anti-MPO antibody was not specific for MPA, and 7 out of the 13 patients with systemic lupus erythematosus were anti-MPO antibody positive. Our study suggests that ANCA and anti-MPO antibody are not specific for MPA in a Chinese population. They would alert the clinician of the possibility of vasculitis, but a clinicopathological correlation is essential in making the diagnosis. PMID:7915885

  9. Sites in the CH3 domain of human IgA1 that influence sensitivity to bacterial IgA1 proteases.

    PubMed

    Senior, Bernard W; Woof, Jenny M

    2006-09-15

    The influence of regions, other than the hinge, on the susceptibility of human IgA1 to cleavage by diverse bacterial IgA1 proteases, was examined using IgA1 mutants bearing amino acid deletions, substitutions, and domain swaps. IgA1 lacking the tailpiece retained its susceptibility to cleavage by all of the IgA1 proteases. The domain swap molecule alpha1alpha2gamma3, in which the CH3 domain of IgA1 was exchanged for that of human IgG1, was resistant to cleavage with the type 1 and 2 serine IgA1 proteases of Neisseria meningitidis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and Haemophilus influenzae, but remained sensitive to cleavage with the metallo-IgA1 proteases of Streptococcus pneumoniae, Streptococcus oralis, Streptococcus sanguis, and Streptococcus mitis. Substitution of the IgA1 Calpha3 domain motif Pro440 -Phe443 into the corresponding position in the Cgamma3 domain of alpha1alpha2gamma3 resulted now in sensitivity to the type 2 IgA1 protease of N. meningitidis, indicating the possible requirement of these amino acids for sensitivity to this protease. For the H. influenzae type 2 protease, resistance of an IgA1 mutant in which the CH3 domain residues 399-409 were exchanged with those from IgG1, but sensitivity of mutant HuBovalpha3 in which the Calpha3 domain of bovine IgA replaces that of human IgA1, suggests that CH3 domain residues Glu403, Gln406, and Thr409 influence sensitivity to this enzyme. Hence, unlike the situation with the metallo-IgA1 proteases of Streptococcus spp., the sensitivity of human IgA1 to cleavage with the serine IgA1 proteases of Neisseria and Haemophilus involves their binding to different sites specifically in the CH3 domain. PMID:16951354

  10. Multiparametric detection of autoantibodies in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Budde, P; Zucht, H-D; Vordenbäumen, S; Goehler, H; Fischer-Betz, R; Gamer, M; Marquart, K; Rengers, P; Richter, J; Lueking, A; Schulz-Knappe, P; Schneider, M

    2016-07-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a heterogeneous disease with respect to disease manifestations, disease progression and treatment response. Therefore, strategies to identify biomarkers that help distinguishing SLE subgroups are a major focus of biomarker research. We reasoned that a multiparametric autoantibody profiling approach combined with data mining tools could be applied to identify SLE patient clusters. We used a bead-based array containing 86 antigens including diverse nuclear and immune defense pathway proteins. Sixty-four autoantibodies were significantly (p < 0.05) increased in SLE (n = 69) compared to healthy controls (HC, n = 59). Using binary cut-off thresholds (95% quantile of HC), hierarchical clustering of SLE patients yields five clusters, which differ qualitatively and in their total number of autoantibodies. In two patient clusters the overall accumulated autoantibody reactivity of all antigens tested was 31% and 48%, respectively. We observed a positive association between the autoantibody signature present in these two patient clusters and the clinical manifestation of glomerulonephritis (GLMN). In addition, groups of autoantibodies directed against distinct intracellular compartments and/or biological motifs characterize the different SLE subgroups. Our findings highlight the relevant potential of multiparametric autoantibody detection and may contribute to a deeper understanding of the clinical and serological diversity of SLE. PMID:27252257

  11. Autoantibodies in the diagnosis and management of liver disease.

    PubMed

    Czaja, Albert J; Norman, Gary L

    2003-10-01

    Autoantibodies are nonpathogenic manifestations of immune reactivity, and they may occur in acute and chronic liver diseases. Autoantibodies may be consequences rather than causes of the liver injury, and they should be regarded as diagnostic clues rather than etiologic markers. Conventional autoantibodies used in the categorization of autoimmune liver disease are antinuclear antibodies, smooth muscle antibodies, antibodies to liver/kidney microsome type 1, antimitochondrial antibodies, and atypical perinuclear anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies. Ancillary autoantibodies that enhance diagnostic specificity, have prognostic connotation, or direct treatment are antibodies to endomysium, tissue transglutaminase, histones, doubled-stranded DNA, and actin. Autoantibodies that have an emerging diagnostic and prognostic significance are antibodies to soluble liver antigen/liver pancreas, asialoglycoprotein receptor, liver cytosol type 1, and nuclear pore complex antigens. Autoantibodies of uncertain clinical value that remain under investigation are antibodies to chromatin, lactoferrin, and Saccharomyces cervisiae. Continued recognition and characterization of autoantibodies should improve diagnostic precision, provide prognostic indices, and elucidate target autoantigens. These advances may in turn clarify pathogenic mechanisms, facilitate the development of animal models, and generate novel site-specific therapies. PMID:14506390

  12. Harmless Pregnancy-Induced Warm Autoantibodies to Red Blood Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sürücü, Gülüstan; Mayer, Beate; Märzacker, Anneliese; Yürek, Salih; Salama, Abdulgabar

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background There is little information concerning the development and significance of autoantibodies (aab) to red blood cells (RBCs) during pregnancy. Methods Unselected pregnant women were routinely screened for the presence of unexpected antibodies to RBCs using standard techniques. Results Between 2009 and 2013, 153,612 pregnant women were tested. The antibody screening test was positive in 1,721 women (1.12%). In 1,602 (1.04%) cases, immune and/or non-immune alloantibodies and cold-reactive aab were detected, whereas warm-reactive aab were found in 119 women (0.08%). In almost all cases, warm-reactive aab belonged to the IgG class. No evidence of the presence of significant haemolysis in affected women was observed. Conclusion Pregnant women may rarely develop aab to RBCs, which do not appear to cause haemolytic anaemia. Further clarification is required on the reasons behind the development of these aab and their clinical insignificance. PMID:26696801

  13. Making Sense of Autoantibodies in Cholestatic Liver Diseases.

    PubMed

    Marzorati, Simona; Invernizzi, Pietro; Lleo, Ana

    2016-02-01

    Primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) and primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) are the most common chronic cholestatic liver diseases (CLD) in adults and are associated with immune mechanisms. PBC is considered a model autoimmune disease, and more than 90% of patients present very specific autoantibodies against mitochondrial antigens. Whether PSC should be considered an autoimmune or merely immune-mediated disease is still under debate. This review addresses the clinical relevance of autoantibodies in CLD and their pathogenic mechanisms and illustrates the technology available for appropriate autoantibody detection. PMID:26593289

  14. IgA EGFR antibodies mediate tumour killing in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Boross, Peter; Lohse, Stefan; Nederend, Maaike; Jansen, Johannes Hendrik Marco; van Tetering, Geert; Dechant, Michael; Peipp, Matthias; Royle, Louise; Liew, Li Phing; Boon, Louis; van Rooijen, Nico; Bleeker, Wim K; Parren, Paul W H I; van de Winkel, Jan G J; Valerius, Thomas; Leusen, Jeanette H W

    2013-01-01

    Currently all approved anti-cancer therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are of the IgG isotype, which rely on Fcgamma receptors (FcγRs) to recruit cellular effector functions. In vitro studies showed that targeting of FcαRI (CD89) by bispecific antibodies (bsAbs) or recombinant IgA resulted in more effective elimination of tumour cells by myeloid effector cells than targeting of FcγR. Here we studied the in vivo anti-tumour activity of IgA EGFR antibodies generated using the variable sequences of the chimeric EGFR antibody cetuximab. Using FcαRI transgenic mice, we demonstrated significant in vivo anti-tumour activity of IgA2 EGFR against A431 cells in peritoneal and lung xenograft models, as well as against B16F10-EGFR cells in a lung metastasis model in immunocompetent mice. IgA2 EGFR was more effective than cetuximab in a short-term syngeneic peritoneal model using EGFR-transfected Ba/F3 target cells. The in vivo cytotoxic activity of IgA2 EGFR was mediated by macrophages and was significantly decreased in the absence of FcαRI. These results support the potential of targeting FcαRI for effective antibody therapy of cancer. The study reveals that IgA antibodies directed against EGFR and engaging Fcalpha receptor (FcαRI) on effector cells, have in vivo anti-cancer activity. These data support the development of novel immunotherapeutic strategies based on targeting FcαRI. PMID:23918228

  15. The genetics and immunobiology of IgA nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Kiryluk, Krzysztof; Novak, Jan

    2014-01-01

    IgA nephropathy (IgAN) represents the leading cause of kidney failure among East Asian populations and the most frequent form of primary glomerulonephritis among Europeans. Patients with IgAN develop characteristic IgA1-containing immune complexes that deposit in the glomerular mesangium, producing progressive kidney injury. Recent studies define IgAN as an autoimmune trait of complex architecture with a strong genetic determination. This Review summarizes new insights into the role of the O-glycosylation pathway, anti-glycan immune response, mucosal immunity, antigen processing and presentation, and the alternative complement pathway in the pathogenesis of IgAN. PMID:24892706

  16. Presence of circulating macromolecular IgA in patients with hematuria due to primary IgA nephropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Valentijn, R.M.; Kauffmann, R.H.; de la Riviere, G.B.; Daha, M.R.; Van, E.S.

    1983-03-01

    The relation between renal histologic features and the presence of circulating immune complexes was studied in 50 patients with hematuria. Primary IgA nephropathy was found in 25 patients, and various other forms of glomerulopathy were seen in the remaining 25 patients. Circulating immune complexes were detected with the 125I-C1q-binding assay, the conglutinin-binding assay, and the anti-IgA inhibition binding assay, the latter detecting specifically IgA-containing immune complex-like material. The 125I-C1q-binding assay gave negative findings for all patients except one. With the conglutinin-binding assay, immune complexes were found in a similar frequency for patients with and without IgA nephropathy. However, the anti-IgA inhibition binding assay gave positive results only in patients with primary IgA nephropathy (68 percent) and in none of the other patients. Sucrose density ultracentrifugation, as well as experiments in which the anti-IgA inhibition binding assay was performed with and without pretreatment of serum with polyethylene glycol, showed the presumed IgA immune complexes to have intermediate sedimentation coefficients (11 to 21S). The presence and level of this macromolecular IgA in the circulation correlated significantly (p less than 0.001) with the presence of hematuria in patients who had this clinical manifestation intermittently. Furthermore, a significant correlation (r . 0.69, p less than 0.0001) was found between the degree of hematuria and the degree of positive findings of the anti-IgA inhibition binding assay. This study shows that in patients presenting with hematuria, a positive finding on the anti-IgA inhibition binding assay is restricted to patients with primary IgA nephropathy and therefore could be of diagnostic value.

  17. DNA Methylation in Cosmc Promoter Region and Aberrantly Glycosylated IgA1 Associated with Pediatric IgA Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Qiang; Zhang, Jianqian; Zhou, Nan; Liu, Xiaorong; Shen, Ying

    2015-01-01

    IgA nephropathy (IgAN) is one of the most common glomerular diseases leading to end-stage renal failure. Elevation of aberrantly glycosylated IgA1 is a key feature of it. The expression of the specific molecular chaperone of core1ß1, 3galactosyl transferase (Cosmc) is known to be reduced in IgAN. We aimed to investigate whether the methylation of CpG islands of Cosmc gene promoter region could act as a possible mechanism responsible for down-regulation of Cosmc and related higher secretion of aberrantly glycosylated IgA1in lymphocytes from children with IgA nephropathy. Three groups were included: IgAN children (n = 26), other renal diseases (n = 11) and healthy children (n = 13). B-lymphocytes were isolated and cultured, treated or not with IL-4 or 5-Aza-2’-deoxycytidine (AZA). The levels of DNA methylation of Cosmc promotor region were not significantly different between the lymphocytes of the three children populations (P = 0.113), but there were significant differences between IgAN lymphocytes and lymphocytes of the other two children populations after IL-4 (P<0.0001) or AZA (P<0.0001). Cosmc mRNA expression was low in IgAN lymphocytes compared to the other two groups (P<0.0001). The level of aberrantly glycosylated IgA1 was markedly higher in IgAN group compared to the other groups (P<0.0001). After treatment with IL-4, the levels of Cosmc DNA methylation and aberrantly glycosylated IgA1 in IgAN lymphocytes were remarkably higher than the other two groups (P<0.0001) with more markedly decreased Cosmc mRNA content (P<0.0001). After treatment with AZA, the levels in IgAN lymphocytes were decreased, but was still remarkably higher than the other two groups (P<0.0001), while Cosmc mRNA content in IgAN lymphocytes were more markedly increased than the other two groups (P<0.0001). The alteration of DNA methylation by IL-4 or AZA specifically correlates in IgAN lymphocytes with alterations in Cosmc mRNA expression and with the level of aberrantly glycosylated IgA1

  18. Molecular Characterization of IgA- and/or IgG-Switched Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia B Cells

    PubMed Central

    Matolcsy, András; Casali, Paolo; Nádor, Roland G.; Liu, Yi-Fang; Knowles, Daniel M.

    2015-01-01

    The immunoglobulin (Ig) variable region (V) genes expressed by IgM chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) B cells display little or no somatic mutations. However, preliminary findings have shown that Ig V genes of IgA and IgG CLLs may be somatically mutated, suggesting that isotype-switched CLLs may represent a “subtype” of the disease. To investigate the degree and nature of somatic mutations and the role of antigen (Ag) in the clonal selection and expansion of isotype-switched CLLs, and to determine whether specific oncogene or tumor suppressor gene mutations are associated with isotype-switched CLLs, we analyzed the expressed Ig VH gene, bcl-1 and bcl-2 proto-oncogene, and p53 tumor suppressor gene configurations of 3 IgA-, 1 IgG-, and 1 IgA/IgG-expressing CLLs. These isotype-switched CLL B cells expressed surface HLA-DR, CD19, CD23, and CD5, and dis played no alterations of the bcl-1 and bcl-2 oncogenes and the p53 tumor-suppressor gene. The cDNA VH-D-JH gene sequence was joined with that of the Cα gene in the B cells of the three IgA CLLs, and with that of the Cγ gene in the IgG CLL B cells. In the IgA/IgG-coexpressing CLL B cells, identical VH-D-JH cDNA sequences were spliced to either Cα or Cγ genes. In all five CLLs, the pattern of Cμ DNA probe hybridization to the digested genomic DNAs was consistent with deletion of the Cm exon from the rearranged Ig gene locus, suggesting that these CLL B cells had undergone DNA switch recombination. In one IgA CLL, the expressed VH gene was unmutated. In all other class-switched CLLs, the Ig VH segment gene was mutated, but the point mutations were not associated with intraclonal diversification. In one IgA and in the IgA/IgG-coexpressing CLL, the nature and distribution of the mutations were consistent with Ag selection. These findings suggest that IgA- and/or IgG-expressing CLLs represent, in their VH gene structure, transformants of B cells at different stages of ontogeny. They also suggest that Ag may play a

  19. Mechanisms of Autoantibody Production in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Han, Shuhong; Zhuang, Haoyang; Shumyak, Stepan; Yang, Lijun; Reeves, Westley H.

    2015-01-01

    Autoantibodies against a panoply of self-antigens are seen in systemic lupus erythematosus, but only a few (anti-Sm/RNP, anti-Ro/La, anti-dsDNA) are common. The common lupus autoantigens are nucleic acid complexes and levels of autoantibodies can be extraordinarily high. We explore why that is the case. Lupus is associated with impaired central or peripheral B-cell tolerance and increased circulating autoreactive B cells. However, terminal differentiation is necessary for autoantibody production. Nucleic acid components of the major lupus autoantigens are immunostimulatory ligands for toll-like receptor (TLR)7 or TLR9 that promote plasma cell differentiation. We show that the levels of autoantibodies against the U1A protein (part of a ribonucleoprotein) are markedly higher than autoantibodies against other antigens, including dsDNA and the non-nucleic acid-associated autoantigens insulin and thyroglobulin. In addition to driving autoantibody production, TLR7 engagement is likely to contribute to the pathogenesis of inflammatory disease in lupus. PMID:26029213

  20. Chronic idiopathic urticaria with functional autoantibodies: 12 years on.

    PubMed

    Sabroe, R A; Greaves, M W

    2006-05-01

    It is now recognized that approximately one-third of patients with chronic idiopathic urticaria (CIU) have histamine-releasing autoantibodies directed against either the high-affinity IgE receptor or, less frequently, against IgE. However, there are several unsolved problems relating to the role of such autoantibodies in the disease. Additionally, it is not clear whether CIU with autoantibodies can be classified as an autoimmune disease. The detection of patients with autoantibodies also poses challenges. Firstly, the only in vivo method, the autologous serum skin test, is at best 80% sensitive and specific using in vitro basophil histamine release assays as the verum. Secondly, in vitro tests are only done in a small number of research laboratories, and are not widely commercially available, and thirdly, there is some divergence between results obtained by different methods (functional and immunoassays) used to detect patients with autoantibodies. The presence of autoantibodies may be important clinically in a small group of severely affected, treatment-resistant patients, where immunomodulatory treatments may be helpful. PMID:16634880

  1. Diagnostic Significance of Reduced IgA in Children

    PubMed Central

    Nurkic, Jasmina; Numanovic, Fatima; Arnautalic, Lejla; Tihic, Nijaz; Halilovic, Dzenan; Jahic, Mahira

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The finding of reduced value of immunoglobulin A (IgA) in children is frequent in daily medical practice. It is important to correctly interpret the findings as adequate further diagnostic evaluation of the patient in order to make the determination on the significance of such findings. In children younger than 4 years always consider the transient impairment of immunoglobulins, maturation of child and his immune system can lead to an improvement in the clinical picture. In older children decreased IgA may lead to serious illnesses that need to be recognize and acknowledge through the appropriate diagnostic methods. At the University Clinical Center Tuzla, children with suspected deficient immune response due to reduced values of IgA, goes through further diagnostic evaluation at the Polyclinic for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Immunology and Department of Microbiology, as well as the Clinic of Radiology. Material and methods: Our study followed 91 patients, for the year 2013, through their medical charts and made evaluation of diagnostic and screening tests. Conclusion: The significance of this paper is to draw attention to the importance of diagnostic approach to IgA deficient pediatric patient and relevance of knowledge of individual diagnostic methods as well as to the proper interpretation of the results thereof. PMID:26543309

  2. Amino acid sequence requirements in the hinge of human immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1) for cleavage by streptococcal IgA1 proteases.

    PubMed

    Batten, Margaret R; Senior, Bernard W; Kilian, Mogens; Woof, Jenny M

    2003-03-01

    The amino acid sequence requirements in the hinge of human immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1) for cleavage by IgA1 proteases of different species of Streptococcus were investigated. Recombinant IgA1 antibodies were generated with point mutations at proline 227 and threonine 228, the residues lying on either side of the peptide bond at which all streptococcal IgA1 proteases cleave wild-type human IgA1. The amino acid substitutions produced no major effect upon the structure of the mutant IgA1 antibodies or their functional ability to bind to Fcalpha receptors. However, the substitutions had a substantial effect upon sensitivity to cleavage with some streptococcal IgA1 proteases, with, in some cases, a single point mutation rendering the antibody resistant to a particular IgA1 protease. This effect was least marked with the IgA1 protease from Streptococcus pneumoniae, which showed no absolute requirement for either proline or threonine at residues 227 to 228. By contrast, the IgA1 proteases of Streptococcus oralis, Streptococcus sanguis, and Streptococcus mitis had an absolute requirement for proline at 227 but not for threonine at 228, which could be replaced by valine. There was evidence in S. mitis that proteases from different strains may have different amino acid requirements for cleavage. Remarkably, some streptococcal proteases appeared able to cleave the hinge at a distant alternative site if substitution prevented efficient cleavage of the original site. Hence, this study has identified key residues required for the recognition of the IgA1 hinge as a substrate by streptococcal IgA1 proteases, and it marks a preliminary step towards development of specific enzyme inhibitors. PMID:12595464

  3. Bronchial hyper-responsiveness in selective IgA deficiency.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulou, Athina; Mermiri, Despina; Taousani, Sofia; Triga, Maria; Nicolaidou, Polyxeni; Priftis, Kostas N

    2005-09-01

    Secretory IgA in mucosal secretions has a broad protective function. The insufficient protection provided by the respiratory mucosa in children with selective IgA deficiency (sIgAD) might facilitate the development of bronchial hyper-responsiveness (BHR) and consequently asthma symptoms. This study was conducted to clarify the prevalence of BHR in sIgAD children and the relationship with atopic status. A cohort of 20 children (group A) aged 6.4-20.1 yr (median: 12.6) with sIgAD (serum IgA <6 mg/dl) were evaluated for BHR using inhaled hypertonic saline test as well as for atopy by skin prick testing (SPT) to eight common aero-allergens. Seventy other children with normal levels of serum IgA, but sensitized to aero-allergens (group B) and 102 with normal IgA and negative SPTs (group C) were also evaluated. Baseline spirometry demonstrated that forced vital capacity (FVC) values in group A were significantly lower than in C. Forced expiratory volume in 1 s values were similar in all groups, but impairment of the forced expiratory flow over the middle half of the FVC was detected in group B. The prevalence of BHR was similar among group A (30.0%) and group B (35.7%) (p = 0.79) but they differed from group C (5.9%) (p = 0.005). An association between BHR and reported current (p = 0.001) but not lifetime asthma symptoms among group A was also observed. There was no association between atopy and BHR in group A but only to mites' sensitization (p = 0.03). In conclusion, these results indicate that sIgAD constitutes a risk factor for development of BHR but it appears to be related to sensitization to mites. PMID:16176396

  4. Amino acid sequence requirements in the human IgA1 hinge for cleavage by streptococcal IgA1 proteases.

    PubMed

    Senior, B W; Batten, M R; Kilian, M; Woof, J M

    2002-08-01

    All the IgA1 proteases of the different pathogenic species of Streptococcus cleave the hinge of the alpha chain of human IgA1 only at one proline-threonine peptide bond. In order to study the importance of these amino acids for cleavage, several hinge mutant recombinant IgA1 antibodies were constructed. The mutations were found to be without major effect upon the structure or functional abilities of the antibodies. However, they had a major effect upon their sensitivity to cleavage by some of the IgA1 proteases. PMID:12196126

  5. Increased dimeric IgA producing B cells in the bone marrow in IgA nephropathy determined by in situ hybridisation for J chain mRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Harper, S J; Allen, A C; Pringle, J H; Feehally, J

    1996-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the possible role of the systemic IgA immune system in the pathogenesis of IgA nephropathy METHODS: J chain mRNA expression in the IgA cells of the bone marrow was studied. Bone marrow trephine biopsy specimens from seven patients with IgA nephropathy and seven matched controls were examined by (1) non-isotopic in situ hybridisation (ISH) and (2) combined immunofluorescence and non-isotopic ISH to identify the plasma cell type. Serum polymeric IgA was also determined using standard high pressure liquid chromatography and sandwich enzyme linked immunosorbent assay. RESULTS: Non-isotopic ISH revealed a similar number of J chain mRNA positive cells/unit length in biopsy specimens from patients (16.5 +/- 2.7 cells/mm) and controls (17.7 +/- 2.4 cells/mm). Combined immunofluorescence and ISH revealed a greater proportion of J chain mRNA positive IgA cells in patients (7.6 +/- 1.45%) compared with controls (3 +/- 0.8%). Serum polymeric IgA was similar in both patients (91 +/- 22 mg/l) and controls (77 +/- 24 mg/l). CONCLUSION: These data suggest that excess production of dimeric IgA occurs in the bone marrow in IgA nephropathy. Images PMID:8666683

  6. Serum Autoantibodies in Chronic Prostate Inflammation in Prostate Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Schlick, Bettina; Massoner, Petra; Lueking, Angelika; Charoentong, Pornpimol; Blattner, Mirjam; Schaefer, Georg; Marquart, Klaus; Theek, Carmen; Amersdorfer, Peter; Zielinski, Dirk; Kirchner, Matthias; Trajanoski, Zlatko; Rubin, Mark A.; Müllner, Stefan; Schulz-Knappe, Peter; Klocker, Helmut

    2016-01-01

    Background Chronic inflammation is frequently observed on histological analysis of malignant and non-malignant prostate specimens. It is a suspected supporting factor for prostate diseases and their progression and a main cause of false positive PSA tests in cancer screening. We hypothesized that inflammation induces autoantibodies, which may be useful biomarkers. We aimed to identify and validate prostate inflammation associated serum autoantibodies in prostate cancer patients and evaluate the expression of corresponding autoantigens. Methods Radical prostatectomy specimens of prostate cancer patients (N = 70) were classified into high and low inflammation groups according to the amount of tissue infiltrating lymphocytes. The corresponding pre-surgery blood serum samples were scrutinized for autoantibodies using a low-density protein array. Selected autoantigens were identified in prostate tissue and their expression pattern analyzed by immunohistochemistry and qPCR. The identified autoantibody profile was cross-checked in an independent sample set (N = 63) using the Luminex-bead protein array technology. Results Protein array screening identified 165 autoantibodies differentially abundant in the serum of high compared to low inflammation patients. The expression pattern of three corresponding antigens were established in benign and cancer tissue by immunohistochemistry and qPCR: SPAST (Spastin), STX18 (Syntaxin 18) and SPOP (speckle-type POZ protein). Of these, SPAST was significantly increased in prostate tissue with high inflammation. All three autoantigens were differentially expressed in primary and/or castration resistant prostate tumors when analyzed in an inflammation-independent tissue microarray. Cross-validation of the inflammation autoantibody profile on an independent sample set using a Luminex-bead protein array, retrieved 51 of the significantly discriminating autoantibodies. Three autoantibodies were significantly upregulated in both screens, MUT

  7. IgA Protease Activity in Haemophilus parasuis in the Absence of a Recognizable IgA Protease Gene

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background. Haemophilus parasuis, the bacterium responsible for Glasser’s disease, is a pathogen of significant concern in modern high-health swine production systems. Little is known regarding the molecular mechanisms of H. parasuis infection. In some Pasteurellaceae species, IgA proteases aid in d...

  8. Terminally differentiated human intestinal B cells. J chain expression of IgA and IgG subclass-producing immunocytes in the distal ileum compared with mesenteric and peripheral lymph nodes.

    PubMed Central

    Bjerke, K; Brandtzaeg, P

    1990-01-01

    Two-colour immunofluorescence staining for intracellular J chain and IgA (or J chain and IgG) was performed on tissue sections of normal human ileal mucosa (eight adult kidney donors), mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN), peripheral lymph nodes, and palatine tonsils. The most prominent J chain positivity was seen for IgA (97.3%) and IgG (81.7%) immunocytes in the ileal lamina propria (LP). Moreover, the proportion of J chain-expressing extrafollicular immunocytes was significantly higher (P less than 0.05) in MLN than in peripheral lymph nodes for the IgA class (58.5% versus 25.6%); the same proportion for the IgG class was 45.9% versus 30.4%. In clinically normal palatine tonsils of adults, extrafollicular J chain expression was much lower than in peripheral lymph nodes; 14.2% for IgA cells and 5.5% for IgG cells. When related to subclass production, J chain expression was found to be higher for IgA2 than for IgA1 cells in all tissues examined (palatine tonsils excluded because of a small number of IgA2 cells), the difference being significant in MLN and ileal LP (P less than 0.05). The J chain positivity tended to be higher for all IgG subclasses in MLN than in peripheral lymph nodes; this difference was significant (P less than 0.05) for IgG2-producing immunocytes. Taking J chain expression as a marker of clonal immaturity, our results may reflect to some extent distribution of newly generated memory B cell clones from gut-associated lymphoid tissue to MLN, peripheral lymph nodes, and palatine tonsils in a strikingly decreasing order. PMID:2122937

  9. Neuronal autoantibodies in patients with Rasmussen's encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Samanci, Bedia; Tektürk, Pınar; Tüzün, Erdem; Erdağ, Ece; Kınay, Demet; Yapıcı, Zuhal; Baykan, Betül

    2016-06-01

    Rasmussen's encephalitis (RE) is a rare disease with unknown pathophysiology. To disclose whether anti-neuronal autoimmunity participates in the aetiology of RE, various neuronal autoantibodies (NAAbs) were investigated in sera of patients with RE and controls. The study included five patients who fulfilled the RE diagnostic criteria (clinical, EEG, and MRI findings) as the patient group, and 50 multiple sclerosis patients and 50 healthy subjects as the control groups. Sera were evaluated for various NAAbs by radioimmunoassay or cell-based assays. All sera were also screened for uncharacterized antibodies to neuronal cell surface or synapse antigens by indirect immunofluorescence using hippocampal cell cultures. The mean age at onset of seizures was 8.3±3.4 years (range: 4-13.5) and mean follow-up time was 11.2±5.4 years (range: 5-19). All patients had unihemispheric atrophy of the cerebral cortex and epilepsia partialis continua. Two of the patients had moderate cognitive impairment, while the others were severely affected, as shown by neuropsychological testing. NAAb positivity was not detected in any of the patients. Immune aetiology is thought to have a role in RE, but the responsible players have not yet been elucidated. Our extensive antibody screening in a small number of patients does not support the presence of antigen-specific anti-neuronal autoimmunity in RE pathophysiology. PMID:27248684

  10. Autoantibodies in nonautoimmune individuals during infections.

    PubMed

    Berlin, Tatiana; Zandman-Goddard, Gisele; Blank, Miri; Matthias, Torsten; Pfeiffer, Sascha; Weis, Ingrid; Toubi, Elias; Singh, Sham; Asherson, Ronald; Fraser, Abigail; Gilburd, Boris; Sapir, Tal; Levy, Yair; Lukac, Janja; Rozman, Blaz; Kveder, Tanja; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2007-06-01

    Infections can act as environmental triggers inducing or promoting autoimmune disease in genetically predisposed individuals. Identification of microbial peptides similar to self-tissues may by molecular mimicry, provide the inducing mechanism for an immune response. The aim of this study was to identify autoantibodies (autoAbs) in nonautoimmune individuals during acute bacterial, viral, or parasitic infections. Specific Abs or specific infections with an increased autoAb load may shed insight into the mechanisms of autoimmune disease. Sera from 88 patients with acute infections (41 bacterial, 23 viral, 17 parasitic, and 7 rickettsial) were tested by the ELISA method for antinuclear antibodies (ANA) 8 Pro, and Abs to thyroid peroxidase (TPO), thyroglobulin, phospholipids, annexin-V, laminin, anti-Saccharomyces cervisiae (ASCA), and prothrombin, along with 80 normal controls. Elevated titers of Abs to annexin-V and prothrombin were the most prevalent in viral, parasitic, and rickettsial infections and to laminin in viral and parasitic infections. Elevated titers of ASCA and ANA were found in viral and bacterial infections. Antiphospholipid Abs were found in parasitic and Q-fever infections. Thirty-four individuals harbored elevated titers of at least two Abs. An autoAb burden was detected in individuals with hepatitis A, hepatitis B, toxoplasma or Q-fever infections. In nonautoimmune individuals with various (bacterial, viral, parasitic, and rickettsial) infections, elevated titers of Abs to annexin-V, prothrombin, laminin, ASCA, ANA, and phospholipids were most frequently detected. PMID:17894023

  11. Binding capacity of in vitro deglycosylated IgA1 to human mesangial cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun-jun; Xu, Li-xia; Zhang, Ying; Zhao, Ming-hui

    2006-04-01

    IgA nephropathy (IgAN) is the most common glomerular disease and it is characterized by deposition of IgA1 molecules in mesangium. Recent studies had demonstrated that serum and mesangial IgA1 in IgAN were deglycosylated and IgA1 could bind to human mesangial cells (HMC) through a novel receptor. The aim of the current study is to investigate and compare the binding capacities of different in vitro deglycosylated IgA1 on human mesangial cells. Serum IgA1 was purified by jacalin affinity chromatography and then was desialylated (DesIgA1) and/or degalactosylated (Des/DeGalIgA1) with neuraminidase and/or beta-galactosidase. The efficacy of deglycosylations was assessed by Peanut agglutinin (PNA) and Vicia villosa (VV) lectin. The sizes of normal IgA1 and deglycosylated IgA1 were determined by Sephacryl S-300 chromatography and binding capacities to primary HMC were evaluated by radioligand binding assays. Normal IgA1 and deglycosylated IgA1 could bind to HMC in a dose-dependent, saturable manner. The maximal binding capacities and binding sites/cell of DesIgA1 and Des/DeGalIgA were significantly higher than that of normal IgA1. However, more aggregated IgA1 was found in DesIgA1 and Des/DeGalIgA1. Scatchard analysis revealed a similar Kd of normal IgA1 and deglycosylated IgA1. The current study suggested that the binding capacities of DesIgA1 and Des/DeGalIgA1 to HMC were significantly higher than that of normal IgA1, which at least in part was due to more macromolecular IgA1 in deglycoslated IgA1. However, there were no significant differences in the affinities of normal IgA1, DesIgA1 and Des/DeGalIgA1 with HMC. Deglycosylated IgA1 might play an important role in pathogenesis of IgAN. PMID:16442846

  12. Purification and characterization of chimeric human IgA1 and IgA2 expressed in COS and Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    PubMed

    Morton, H C; Atkin, J D; Owens, R J; Woof, J M

    1993-11-01

    Ag-specific chimeric human IgA molecules, of the two human subclasses, IgA1 and IgA2, have been expressed in two mammalian cell systems. Analysis of the secreted IgA molecules, purified in milligram quantities from stable Chinese hamster ovary transfectants by Ag affinity chromatography, has allowed a direct comparison of the biologic properties of the two subclasses. HPLC gel filtration analysis revealed that in both subclasses, the IgA molecules associate predominantly into dimers. The monomer units are presumed to interact noncovalently, inasmuch as no dimers are evident when the antibodies are subjected to SDS-PAGE. The recombinant antibodies are glycosylated, inasmuch as a lectin blotting procedure revealed that the H chains of both subclasses are recognized by Con A. When subjected to digestion by preparations of IgA1-specific proteases secreted by two pathogenic streptococcal strains, Streptococcus sanguis and Streptococcus oralis, the recombinant IgA molecules behave just as their natural equivalents. Thus, only the chimeric IgA1 molecule is cleaved, with the IgA2 remaining intact. In terms of interaction with natural effector molecules, both recombinant IgA isotypes were shown to interact with Fc alpha receptors on calcitriol-stimulated HL-60 cells with similar affinity, but neither antibody was found to interact with human C1q. The expression system described readily permits manipulation of the human IgA genes, which should lead to a fuller molecular understanding of how this important antibody mediates its function. PMID:8409433

  13. HLA Antigens in Malay Patients with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: Association with Clinical and Autoantibody Expression

    PubMed Central

    Azizah, MR; Ainol, SS; Kong, NCT; Normaznah, Y; Rahim, MN

    2001-01-01

    Background: Studies have shown that certain genes within the major histocompatibility complex predispose to systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and may influence clinical and autoantibody expression. Thus, we studied the frequency of HLA-DR, -DQA, -DQB and -DPB alleles in ethnic Malays with SLE to determine the role of these genes in determining disease susceptibility and their association with clinical and immunological manifestations. Methods: Fifty-six Malay SLE patients were enrolled into the study. Demographic, clinical and immunological findings were obtained from medical records. HLA-DR, DQ and DP typing were done using modified PCR-RELP. Controls were from ethnically-matched healthy individuals. Results: We found a strongly significant association of the DR2 and DQB1 *0501 and DQB1 *0601 (pcorr=0.03, rr=3.83, pcorr=0.0036, rr=4.56 and pcorr=0.0048 and rr=6.0, respectively). There was also a weak increase of DQB1 *0.201 and DPB1 *0.0901 with a weak decrease of DQA1 *0601 and DQB1 *0503 and *0301 which were not significant after corrections for multiple comparisons were made. There was a significant positive association of DR2 and DQB1 *0501 with renal involvement and DR8 with alopecia. A nonsignificant increase of DQB1 *0503 in patients with photosensitivity was noted. Significant autoantibody associations were also found: DQB1 *0601 with anti-Sm/RNP, DR2 with antiSSA (Ro)/SSB (La), and DR2, DQB1 *0501 and *0601 with antibodies to ds DNA. There was no specific DR, DQ or DP associations with age of disease onset (below 30 years or those at or above 30 years). Conclusion: Our data suggests the role of the HLA class II genes in conferring SLE susceptibility and in clinical and autoantibody expression PMID:11590899

  14. Large Scale Generation and Characterization of Anti-Human IgA Monoclonal Antibody in Ascitic Fluid of Balb/c Mice

    PubMed Central

    Ezzatifar, Fatemeh; Majidi, Jafar; Baradaran, Behzad; Aghebati Maleki, Leili; Abdolalizadeh, Jalal; Yousefi, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Monoclonal antibodies are potentially powerful tools used in biomedical research, diagnosis, and treatment of infectious diseases and cancers. The monoclonal antibody against Human IgA can be used as a diagnostic application to detect infectious diseases. The aim of this study was to improve an appropriate protocol for large-scale production of mAbs against IgA. Methods: For large-scale production of the monoclonal antibody, hybridoma cells that produce monoclonal antibodies against Human IgA were injected intraperitoneally into Balb/c mice that were previously primed with 0.5 ml Pristane. After ten days, ascitic fluid was harvested from the peritoneum of each mouse. The ELISA method was carried out for evaluation of the titration of produced mAbs. The ascitic fluid was investigated in terms of class and subclass by a mouse mAb isotyping kit. MAb was purified from the ascitic fluid by ion exchange chromatography. The purity of the monoclonal antibody was confirmed by SDS-PAGE, and the purified monoclonal antibody was conjugated with HRP. Results: Monoclonal antibodies with high specificity and sensitivity against Human IgA were prepared by hybridoma technology. The subclass of antibody was IgG1 and its light chain was the kappa type. Conclusion: This conjugated monoclonal antibody could have applications in designing ELISA kits in order to diagnose different infectious diseases such as toxoplasmosis and H. Pylori. PMID:25789225

  15. Brief Communication: Maternal Plasma Autoantibodies Screening in Fetal Down Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Charkiewicz, Karol; Zbucka-Kretowska, Monika; Goscik, Joanna; Wolczynski, Slawomir; Lemancewicz, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Imbalance in the metabolites levels which can potentially be related to certain fetal chromosomal abnormalities can stimulate mother's immune response to produce autoantibodies directed against proteins. The aim of the study was to determine the concentration of 9000 autoantibodies in maternal plasma to detect fetal Down syndrome. Method. We performed 190 amniocenteses and found 10 patients with confirmed fetal Down syndrome (15th–18th weeks of gestation). For the purpose of our control we chose 11 women without confirmed chromosomal aberration. To assess the expression of autoantibodies in the blood plasma, we used a protein microarray, which allows for simultaneous determination of 9000 proteins per sample. Results. We revealed 213 statistically significant autoantibodies, whose expression decreased or increased in the study group with fetal Down syndrome. The second step was to create a classifier of Down syndrome pregnancy, which includes 14 antibodies. The predictive value of the classifier (specificity and sensitivity) is 100%, classification errors, 0%, cross-validation errors, 0%. Conclusion. Our findings suggest that the autoantibodies may play a role in the pathophysiology of Down syndrome pregnancy. Defining their potential as biochemical markers of Down syndrome pregnancy requires further investigation on larger group of patients. PMID:27042674

  16. Detection of at-risk pregnancy by means of highly sensitive assays for thyroid autoantibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Stagnaro-Green, A.; Roman, S.H.; Cobin, R.H.; El-Harazy, E.; Alvarez-Marfany, M.; Davies, T.F. )

    1990-09-19

    The authors screened 552 women who presented to their obstetrician in the first trimester of pregnancy using highly sensitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays for the presence of thyroglobulin and thyroidperoxidase autoantibodies and found an incidence of positivity of 19.6%. The tendency to secrete detectable levels of thyroid autoantibodies was significantly correlated with an increased rate of miscarriage. Thyroid autoantibody-positive women miscarried at a rate of 17%, compared with 8.4% for the autoantibody-negative women. Individual levels of thyroglobulin and thyroidperoxidase autoantibodies were similarly related to this increased miscarriage rate, with no evidence of autoantibody specificity in the relationship. Furthermore, the increase in miscarriages could not be explained by differences in thyroid hormone levels, the presence of cardiolipin autoantibodies, maternal age, gestational age at the time of maternal entry into the study, or previous obstetric history. They conclude that thyroid autoantibodies are an independent marker of at-risk pregnancy.

  17. [Chronic bullous dermatosis in childhood (linear IgA dermatosis)].

    PubMed

    Wilk, M; Biwer, E

    1993-07-01

    A 5-year-old boy presented with disseminated, partly grouped blisters indicative of chronic bullous dermatosis of childhood (CBDC) following a gastrointestinal infection 2 weeks earlier. CBDC has long been differentiated from adult linear IgA disease. Clinical and laboratory studies revealed substantial clinical and immunological overlap between the two blistering disorders, whereas recent investigations suggest heterogeneity of the target antigen involved. Pathohistological and immunofluorescence-microscopical characteristics of a subepidermal blister and linear IgA and granular C3 deposition at the basement membrane together with the typical history and clinical signs were decisive in the differential diagnosis. The disease promptly cleared up after daily administration of 16 mg methylprednisolone-21-acetate tapering and 25 mg dapsone. Immunohistological detection of collagen IV at the base of a blister made it possible to localize the split above the lamina densa. The demonstration of collagen IV stresses the importance of immunodermatopathology in the differential diagnosis of subepidermal blistering diseases. PMID:8365883

  18. Retinoic acid acts as a selective human IgA switch factor.

    PubMed

    Seo, Goo-Young; Jang, Young-Saeng; Kim, Jini; Choe, Jongseon; Han, Hye-Ju; Lee, Jeong-Min; Kang, Seong-Ho; Rhee, Ki-Jong; Park, Seok-Rae; Kim, Woan-Sub; Kim, Pyeung-Hyeun

    2014-08-01

    Retinoic acid (RA) is known to have several functions that lead to a potent mucosal IgA response. Nevertheless, its exact role in human IgA synthesis has yet to be elucidated. Thus, we investigated the role of RA in promoting IgA isotype switching in human B cells. We found that RA increased IgA production and the expression of germ-line IgA1 and IgA2 transcripts (GLTα1 and GLTα2). This induction occurred alongside an increase in the frequency of IgA1-secreting B cell clones, as assessed by limiting dilution analysis. Under the same conditions, RA did not increase IgM and IgG production. Am80, an agonist of RA receptor α (RARα), increased IgA production. In addition, RA activity was abrogated by LE540, an antagonist of RAR, suggesting that the RAR pathway is involved in RA-induced IgA production. Taken together, these results indicate that RA induces IgA isotype switching mainly through RARα in human B cells. PMID:24994461

  19. Isolation and detection of human IgA using a streptococcal IgA-binding peptide.

    PubMed

    Sandin, Charlotta; Linse, Sara; Areschoug, Thomas; Woof, Jenny M; Reinholdt, Jesper; Lindahl, Gunnar

    2002-08-01

    Bacterial proteins that bind to the Fc part of IgG have found widespread use in immunology. A similar protein suitable for the isolation and detection of human IgA has not been described. Here, we show that a 50-residue synthetic peptide, designated streptococcal IgA-binding peptide (Sap) and derived from a streptococcal M protein, can be used for single-step affinity purification of human IgA. High affinity binding of IgA required the presence in Sap of a C-terminal cysteine residue, not present in the intact M protein. Passage of human serum through a Sap column caused depletion of >99% of the IgA, and elution of the column allowed quantitative recovery of highly purified IgA, for which the proportions of the IgA1 and IgA2 subclasses were the same as in whole serum. Moreover, immobilized Sap could be used for single-step purification of secretory IgA of both subclasses from human saliva, with a recovery of approximately 45%. The Sap peptide could also be used to specifically detect IgA bound to Ag. Together, these data indicate that Sap is a versatile Fc-binding reagent that may open new possibilities for the characterization of human IgA. PMID:12133959

  20. Characterization of IgA response among women with incident HPV 16 infection.

    PubMed

    Onda, Takashi; Carter, Joseph J; Koutsky, Laura A; Hughes, James P; Lee, Shu-Kuang; Kuypers, Jane; Kiviat, Nancy; Galloway, Denise A

    2003-07-20

    Previous studies have characterized the prevalence and duration of serum IgG antibodies to human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV 16) in a well-studied cohort of college women, using viruslike particle- (VLP) based ELISAs. In this study IgA antibodies in cervical secretions and sera were examined using a newly developed capsomer-based ELISA and the patterns observed for serum IgG, serum IgA, and cervical IgA antibodies were compared. The median time to antibody detection from the first detection of HPV 16 DNA was 10.5 months for IgA in cervical secretions and 19.1 months for serum IgA. Serum IgA antibody conversion was observed less frequently and occurred later than IgA conversion in cervical secretions (P = 0.011) or serum IgG conversion (P = 0.051). The median time to antibody reversion, following seroconversion, was 12.0 months for IgA in cervical secretions and 13.6 months for serum IgA, whereas approximately 20% of women with serum IgG antibodies reverted within 36 months. Thus, the duration of IgA in cervical secretions and sera was shorter than the duration of serum IgG (P = 0.007 and 0.001). PMID:12890634

  1. Autoantibodies to Agrin in Myasthenia Gravis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bealmear, Beverly; Ragheb, Samia; Xiong, Wen-Cheng; Lewis, Richard A.; Lisak, Robert P.; Mei, Lin

    2014-01-01

    To determine if patients with myasthenia gravis (MG) have antibodies to agrin, a proteoglycan released by motor neurons and is critical for neuromuscular junction (NMJ) formation, we collected serum samples from 93 patients with MG with known status of antibodies to acetylcholine receptor (AChR), muscle specific kinase (MuSK) and lipoprotein-related 4 (LRP4) and samples from control subjects (healthy individuals and individuals with other diseases). Sera were assayed for antibodies to agrin. We found antibodies to agrin in 7 serum samples of MG patients. None of the 25 healthy controls and none of the 55 control neurological patients had agrin antibodies. Two of the four triple negative MG patients (i.e., no detectable AChR, MuSK or LRP4 antibodies, AChR-/MuSK-/LRP4-) had antibodies against agrin. In addition, agrin antibodies were detected in 5 out of 83 AChR+/MuSK-/LRP4- patients but were not found in the 6 patients with MuSK antibodies (AChR-/MuSK+/LRP4-). Sera from MG patients with agrin antibodies were able to recognize recombinant agrin in conditioned media and in transfected HEK293 cells. These sera also inhibited the agrin-induced MuSK phosphorylation and AChR clustering in muscle cells. Together, these observations indicate that agrin is another autoantigen in patients with MG and agrin autoantibodies may be pathogenic through inhibition of agrin/LRP4/MuSK signaling at the NMJ. PMID:24632822

  2. Autoantibodies to agrin in myasthenia gravis patients.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bin; Shen, Chengyong; Bealmear, Beverly; Ragheb, Samia; Xiong, Wen-Cheng; Lewis, Richard A; Lisak, Robert P; Mei, Lin

    2014-01-01

    To determine if patients with myasthenia gravis (MG) have antibodies to agrin, a proteoglycan released by motor neurons and is critical for neuromuscular junction (NMJ) formation, we collected serum samples from 93 patients with MG with known status of antibodies to acetylcholine receptor (AChR), muscle specific kinase (MuSK) and lipoprotein-related 4 (LRP4) and samples from control subjects (healthy individuals and individuals with other diseases). Sera were assayed for antibodies to agrin. We found antibodies to agrin in 7 serum samples of MG patients. None of the 25 healthy controls and none of the 55 control neurological patients had agrin antibodies. Two of the four triple negative MG patients (i.e., no detectable AChR, MuSK or LRP4 antibodies, AChR-/MuSK-/LRP4-) had antibodies against agrin. In addition, agrin antibodies were detected in 5 out of 83 AChR+/MuSK-/LRP4- patients but were not found in the 6 patients with MuSK antibodies (AChR-/MuSK+/LRP4-). Sera from MG patients with agrin antibodies were able to recognize recombinant agrin in conditioned media and in transfected HEK293 cells. These sera also inhibited the agrin-induced MuSK phosphorylation and AChR clustering in muscle cells. Together, these observations indicate that agrin is another autoantigen in patients with MG and agrin autoantibodies may be pathogenic through inhibition of agrin/LRP4/MuSK signaling at the NMJ. PMID:24632822

  3. Monoclonal IgA Antibodies for Aflatoxin Immunoassays.

    PubMed

    Ertekin, Özlem; Pirinçci, Şerife Şeyda; Öztürk, Selma

    2016-01-01

    Antibody based techniques are widely used for the detection of aflatoxins which are potent toxins with a high rate of occurrence in many crops. We developed a murine monoclonal antibody of immunoglobulin A (IgA) isotype with a strong binding affinity to aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), aflatoxin B2 (AFB2), aflatoxin G1 (AFG1), aflatoxin G2 (AFG2) and aflatoxin M1 (AFM1). The antibody was effectively used in immunoaffinity column (IAC) and ELISA kit development. The performance of the IACs was compatible with AOAC performance standards for affinity columns (Test Method: AOAC 991.31). The total binding capacity of the IACs containing our antibody was 111 ng, 70 ng, 114 ng and 73 ng for AFB1, AFB2, and AFG1 andAFG2, respectively. Furthermore, the recovery rates of 5 ng of each AF derivative loaded to the IACs were determined as 104.9%, 82.4%, 85.5% and 70.7% for AFB1, AFB2, AFG1 and AFG2, respectively. As for the ELISA kit developed using non-oriented, purified IgA antibody, we observed a detection range of 2-50 µg/L with 40 min total test time. The monoclonal antibody developed in this research is hitherto the first presentation of quadruple antigen binding IgA monoclonal antibodies in mycotoxin analysis and also the first study of their utilization in ELISA and IACs. IgA antibodies are valuable alternatives for immunoassay development, in terms of both sensitivity and ease of preparation, since they do not require any orientation effort. PMID:27187470

  4. Monoclonal IgA Antibodies for Aflatoxin Immunoassays

    PubMed Central

    Ertekin, Özlem; Pirinçci, Şerife Şeyda; Öztürk, Selma

    2016-01-01

    Antibody based techniques are widely used for the detection of aflatoxins which are potent toxins with a high rate of occurrence in many crops. We developed a murine monoclonal antibody of immunoglobulin A (IgA) isotype with a strong binding affinity to aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), aflatoxin B2 (AFB2), aflatoxin G1 (AFG1), aflatoxin G2 (AFG2) and aflatoxin M1 (AFM1). The antibody was effectively used in immunoaffinity column (IAC) and ELISA kit development. The performance of the IACs was compatible with AOAC performance standards for affinity columns (Test Method: AOAC 991.31). The total binding capacity of the IACs containing our antibody was 111 ng, 70 ng, 114 ng and 73 ng for AFB1, AFB2, and AFG1 andAFG2, respectively. Furthermore, the recovery rates of 5 ng of each AF derivative loaded to the IACs were determined as 104.9%, 82.4%, 85.5% and 70.7% for AFB1, AFB2, AFG1 and AFG2, respectively. As for the ELISA kit developed using non-oriented, purified IgA antibody, we observed a detection range of 2–50 µg/L with 40 min total test time. The monoclonal antibody developed in this research is hitherto the first presentation of quadruple antigen binding IgA monoclonal antibodies in mycotoxin analysis and also the first study of their utilization in ELISA and IACs. IgA antibodies are valuable alternatives for immunoassay development, in terms of both sensitivity and ease of preparation, since they do not require any orientation effort. PMID:27187470

  5. Immune Alterations in Patients with Anti-Interferon-γ Autoantibodies

    PubMed Central

    Chruewkamlow, Nuttapol; Mahasongkram, Kodchakorn; Pata, Supansa; Chaiwarith, Romanee; Salee, Parichart; Supparatpinyo, Khuanchai; Kasinrerk, Watchara

    2016-01-01

    Autoantibodies against interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) can cause immunodeficiency and are associated with various opportunistic infections. In the present study, we investigated other cellular immune parameters for a better understanding of the immunodeficiency condition in the patients. The numbers of WBC, monocytes and NK cells were increased in patients with anti-IFN-γ autoantibodies (AAbs). Upon TCR activation, T cell proliferation and IL-2 receptor of the patients remained intact. Nonetheless, the Th1 cytokine (IFN-γ and TNF-α) production was up-regulated. The production of Th2 (IL-4) and Th17 (IL-17) cytokines was unchanged. We suggest that, in addition to the presence of anti-IFN-γ autoantibodies, alterations in the cellular immune functions may also contribute to this immunodeficiency. PMID:26727515

  6. [Autoantibody diagnostics in neurology using native and recombinant antigenic substrates].

    PubMed

    Stöcker, W; Saschenbrecker, S; Rentzsch, K; Komorowski, L; Probst, C

    2013-04-01

    Modern diagnostics for the determination of neurologically relevant autoantibodies are based on indirect immunofluorescence using tissue sections of the hippocampus, cerebellum and other tissues. For monospecific detection human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells transfected with different neurological antigens are used. Biochip mosaics are designed to give a quick overview and contain 20 or more substances positioned next to each other on a reaction field, which are incubated with the serum or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) sample. Western blots based on cerebellum or hippocampus extracts or line blots containing defined recombinant antigens are used additionally. Initial investigations should always comprise the parallel analysis of all major antineural autoantibodies instead of performing only single parameter tests. Up until a few years ago autoantibodies against intracellular neuronal antigens were mainly investigated. Antibodies against structures of the neural cell surface, however, are much more frequently found, especially those against glutamate receptors (type NMDA). PMID:23568169

  7. Autoantibodies to neurofascin-186 and gliomedin in multifocal motor neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Notturno, Francesca; Di Febo, Tiziana; Yuki, Nobuhiro; Fernandez Rodriguez, Blanca M; Corti, Davide; Nobile-Orazio, Eduardo; Carpo, Marinella; De Lauretis, Angelo; Uncini, Antonino

    2014-11-15

    We tested autoantibodies to neurofascin-186 (NF186) and gliomedin in sera from patients with multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN, n=53) and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP, n=95) by ELISA. IgG antibodies to NF186 or gliomedin were found in 62% of MMN and 1% of CIDP sera, and IgM antibodies to the same antigens in 12% of MMN and 1% of CIDP sera. These autoantibodies activated complement. Ten percent of the MMN sera without IgM anti-GM1 reactivity had anti-NF186 antibodies. Because NF186 and gliomedin play a crucial role for salutatory conduction, the autoantibodies may contribute to produce motor nerve conduction block and muscle weakness in MMN. PMID:25283719

  8. DNA-damaging autoantibodies and cancer: the lupus butterfly theory.

    PubMed

    Noble, Philip W; Bernatsky, Sasha; Clarke, Ann E; Isenberg, David A; Ramsey-Goldman, Rosalind; Hansen, James E

    2016-07-01

    Autoantibodies reactive against host DNA are detectable in the circulation of most people with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The long-held view that antibodies cannot penetrate live cells has been disproved. A subset of lupus autoantibodies penetrate cells, translocate to nuclei, and inhibit DNA repair or directly damages DNA. The result of these effects depends on the microenvironment and genetic traits of the cell. Some DNA-damaging antibodies alone have little impact on normal cells, but in the presence of other conditions, such as pre-existing DNA-repair defects, can become highly toxic. These findings raise new questions about autoimmunity and DNA damage, and reveal opportunities for new targeted therapies against malignancies particularly vulnerable to DNA damage. In this Perspectives article, we review the known associations between SLE, DNA damage and cancer, and propose a theory for the effects of DNA-damaging autoantibodies on SLE pathophysiology and cancer risk. PMID:27009542

  9. Alteration of fibroblast phenotype by asbestos-induced autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Pfau, Jean C; Li, Sheng'ai; Holland, Sara; Sentissi, Jami J

    2011-06-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis is a relentlessly progressive disease for which the etiology can be idiopathic or associated with environmental or occupational exposures. There is not a clear explanation for the chronic and progressive nature of the disease, leaving treatment and prevention options limited. However, there is increasing evidence of an autoimmune component, since fibrotic diseases are often accompanied by production of autoantibodies. Because exposure to silicates such as silica and asbestos can lead to both autoantibodies and pulmonary/pleural fibrosis, these exposures provide an excellent tool for examining the relationship between these outcomes. This study explored the possibility that autoantibodies induced by asbestos exposure in mice would affect fibroblast phenotype. L929 fibroblasts and primary lung fibroblasts were treated with serum IgG from asbestos- or saline-treated mice, and tested for binding using cell-based ELISA, and for phenotypic changes using immunofluorescence, laser scanning cytometry and Sirius Red collagen assay. Autoantibodies in the serum of C57Bl/6 mice exposed to asbestos (but not sera from untreated mice) bound to mouse fibroblasts. The autoantibodies induced differentiation to a myofibroblast phenotype, as demonstrated by increased expression of smooth muscle α-actin (SMA), which was lost when the serum was cleared of IgG. Cells treated with purified IgG of exposed mice produced excess collagen. Using ELISA, we tested serum antibody binding to DNA topoisomerase (Topo) I, vimentin, TGFβ-R, and PDGF-Rα. Antibodies to DNA Topo I and to PDGF-Rα were detected, both of which have been shown by others to be able to affect fibroblast phenotype. The anti-fibroblast antibodies (AFA) also induced STAT-1 activation, implicating the PDGF-R pathway as part of the response to AFA binding. These data support the hypothesis that asbestos induces AFA that modify fibroblast phenotype, and suggest a mechanism whereby autoantibodies may mediate

  10. Augmented TLR9-induced Btk activation in PIR-B-deficient B-1 cells provokes excessive autoantibody production and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Kubo, Tomohiro; Uchida, Yuki; Watanabe, Yuko; Abe, Masahiro; Nakamura, Akira; Ono, Masao; Akira, Shizuo; Takai, Toshiyuki

    2009-08-31

    Pathogens are sensed by Toll-like receptors (TLRs) expressed in leukocytes in the innate immune system. However, excess stimulation of TLR pathways is supposed to be connected with provocation of autoimmunity. We show that paired immunoglobulin (Ig)-like receptor B (PIR-B), an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif-harboring receptor for major histocompatibility class I molecules, on relatively primitive B cells, B-1 cells, suppresses TLR9 signaling via Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) dephosphorylation, which leads to attenuated activation of nuclear factor kappaB p65RelA but not p38 or Erk, and blocks the production of natural IgM antibodies, including anti-IgG Fc autoantibodies, particularly rheumatoid factor. The autoantibody production in PIR-B-deficient (Pirb(-/-)) mice was further augmented in combination with the Fas(lpr) mutation, which might be linked to the development of autoimmune glomerulonephritis. These results show the critical link between TLR9-mediated sensing and a simultaneously evoked, PIR-B-mediated inhibitory circuit with a Btk intersection in B-1 cells, and suggest a novel way toward preventing pathogenic natural autoantibody production. PMID:19687229

  11. Mutagenesis of the human IgA1 heavy chain tailpiece that prevents dimer assembly.

    PubMed

    Atkin, J D; Pleass, R J; Owens, R J; Woof, J M

    1996-07-01

    The structural features of the human IgA1 tailpiece required for interaction with J chain in IgA dimer assembly were investigated using a protein engineering approach. Wild-type and mutant forms of IgA1 were expressed in the mouse myeloma cell line, J558L, which endogenously expresses J chain. Wild-type IgA1 was secreted as a mixture of dimers and monomers. Deletion of the entire tailpiece by stop codon introduction completely prevented dimer formation. Similarly, substitution of the penultimate residue of the tailpiece, Cys471, with serine resulted in the secretion of IgA monomers alone. Substitution of Asn459 with alanine to prevent attachment of N-linked carbohydrate to the tailpiece also resulted in markedly reduced dimer assembly. These results indicate the critical role played by the tailpiece, and Cys471 in particular, in IgA dimerization. In addition, we found tailpiece-deleted IgA1 and the Cys to Ser471 mutant IgA1 were secreted as mixtures of covalently associated monomers (alpha 2L2) and alpha L half-molecules. The tailpiece may thus play some role in promoting the association of alpha-chains required for IgA monomer assembly. PMID:8683109

  12. IgA myeloma presenting as Henoch-Schönlein purpura with nephritis.

    PubMed

    Zickerman, A M; Allen, A C; Talwar, V; Olczak, S A; Brownlee, A; Holland, M; Furness, P N; Brunskill, N J; Feehally, J

    2000-09-01

    IgA nephropathy (IgAN) and Henoch-Schönlein purpura (HSP) are both characterized by IgA-mediated tissue injury, including mesangial proliferative glomerulonephritis. Abnormalities of IgA1 glycosylation are described in IgA nephropathy and HSP nephritis. IgA-antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) have been inconsistently described in the serum of patients with HSP. In IgA myeloma, the paraprotein-mediated renal lesion is typically cast nephropathy; IgAN or HSP have only rarely been reported in myeloma even when an IgA paraprotein is circulating in large concentrations. We report the case of a 50-year-old man with IgA myeloma who presented with HSP including nephritis and rapidly progressive renal failure. His IgA1 had altered O-glycosylation in the pattern seen in IgAN and also contained an IgA-ANCA. This case adds further weight to the evidence that IgA1 O-glycosylation abnormalities predispose to mesangial IgA deposition and also that IgA-ANCA may have a pathogenic role in the development of HSP. PMID:10977812

  13. IgA in the horse: cloning of equine polymeric Ig receptor and J chain and characterization of recombinant forms of equine IgA.

    PubMed

    Lewis, M J; Wagner, B; Irvine, R M; Woof, J M

    2010-11-01

    As in other mammals, immunoglobulin A (IgA) in the horse has a key role in immune defense. To better dissect equine IgA function, we isolated complementary DNA (cDNA) clones for equine J chain and polymeric Ig receptor (pIgR). When coexpressed with equine IgA, equine J chain promoted efficient IgA polymerization. A truncated version of equine pIgR, equivalent to secretory component, bound with nanomolar affinity to recombinant equine and human dimeric IgA but not with monomeric IgA from either species. Searches of the equine genome localized equine J chain and pIgR to chromosomes 3 and 5, respectively, with J chain and pIgR coding sequence distributed across 4 and 11 exons, respectively. Comparisons of transcriptional regulatory sequences suggest that horse and human pIgR expression is controlled through common regulatory mechanisms that are less conserved in rodents. These studies pave the way for full dissection of equine IgA function and open up possibilities for immune-based treatment of equine diseases. PMID:20631692

  14. Tumor-associated autoantibodies as diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Heo, Chang-Kyu; Bahk, Young Yil; Cho, Eun-Wie

    2012-01-01

    In the process of tumorigenesis, normal cells are remodeled to cancer cells and protein expression patterns are changed to those of tumor cells. A newly formed tumor microenvironment elicits the immune system and, as a result, a humoral immune response takes place. Although the tumor antigens are undetectable in sera at the early stage of tumorigenesis, the nature of an antibody amplification response to antigens makes tumor-associated autoantibodies as promising early biomarkers in cancer diagnosis. Moreover, the recent development of proteomic techniques that make neo-epitopes of tumor-associated autoantigens discovered concomitantly has opened a new area of ‘immuno-proteomics’, which presents tumor-associated autoantibody signatures and confers information to redefine the process of tumorigenesis. In this article, the strategies recently used to identify and validate serum autoantibodies are outlined and tumor-associated antigens suggested until now as diagnostic/prognostic biomarkers in various tumor types are reviewed. Also, the meaning of autoantibody signatures and their clinical utility in personalized medicine are discussed. [BMB Reports 2012; 45(12): 677-685] PMID:23261052

  15. 21 CFR 866.5870 - Thyroid autoantibody immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... (chronic lymphocytic thyroiditis), nontoxic goiter (enlargement of thyroid gland), Grave's disease (enlargement of the thyroid gland with protrusion of the eyeballs), and cancer of the thyroid. (b... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Thyroid autoantibody immunological test...

  16. Autoantibodies to intracellular antigens: generation and pathogenetic role.

    PubMed

    Racanelli, Vito; Prete, Marcella; Musaraj, Gerta; Dammacco, Franco; Perosa, Federico

    2011-06-01

    Autoantibodies to intracellular antigens form a large family of immunoglobulins directed to a variety of ubiquitously expressed intracellular molecules, including numerous enzymes, some ribonucleoproteins and double-stranded DNA. These anti-self antibodies have been found to be selectively expressed in sera of patients with several systemic (non-organ-specific) autoimmune diseases, such as systemic sclerosis (SSc), SLE, mixed connective tissue disease, Sjögren's syndrome and idiopathic myopathies. Despite their important diagnostic and prognostic value and their utility in assessing disease activity, little is known about the molecular mechanisms involved in their generation and role in autoimmune diseases nor is it known why particular autoantibodies are preferentially expressed in certain diseases. Here, we review the different lines of research which are presently being conducted to understand how these autoantibodies are generated (e.g. through apoptotic body formation, molecular mimicry and other mechanisms) and how they encounter antigen in order to cause an autoimmune disease. The recently reported mechanism of intracellular immunity mediated by Ro52 (or tripartite motif containing 21, TRIM21) in a cellular model of adenovirus infection is opening new perspectives for studying the effects of autoantibodies once they get inside cells. PMID:21397735

  17. Effect of mutations in the human immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1) hinge on its susceptibility to cleavage by diverse bacterial IgA1 proteases.

    PubMed

    Senior, Bernard W; Woof, Jenny M

    2005-03-01

    Components of the human immunoglobulin A1 (IgA1) hinge governing sensitivity to cleavage by bacterial IgA1 proteases were investigated. Recombinant antibodies with distinct hinge mutations were constructed from a hybrid comprised of human IgA2 bearing half of the human IgA1 hinge region. This hybrid antibody and all the mutant antibodies derived from it were resistant to cleavage by the IgA1 proteases from Streptococcus oralis and Streptococcus mitis biovar 1 strains but were cleaved to various degrees by those of Streptococcus pneumoniae, some Streptococcus sanguis strains, and the type 1 and 2 IgA1 proteases of Haemophilus influenzae, Neisseria meningitidis, and Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Remarkably, those proteases that cleave a Pro-Ser peptide bond in the wild-type IgA1 hinge were able to cleave mutant antibodies lacking a Pro-Ser peptide bond in the hinge, and those that cleave a Pro-Thr peptide bond in the wild-type IgA1 hinge were able to cleave mutant antibodies devoid of a Pro-Thr peptide bond in the hinge. Thus, the enzymes can cleave alternatives to their preferred postproline peptide bond when such a bond is unavailable. Peptide sequence analysis of a representative antibody digestion product confirmed this conclusion. The presence of a cleavable peptide bond near the CH2 end of the hinge appeared to result in greater cleavage than if the scissile bond was at the CH1 end of the hinge. Proline-to-serine substitution at residue 230 in a hinge containing potentially cleavable Pro-Ser and Pro-Thr peptide bonds increased the resistance of the antibody to cleavage by many IgA1 proteases. PMID:15731049

  18. Epstein-Barr virus-induced autoimmune responses. I. Immunoglobulin M autoantibodies to proteins mimicking and not mimicking Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen-1.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, J H; Valbracht, J R; Nguyen, M D; Handley, H H; Smith, R S; Patrick, K; Rhodes, G H

    1995-03-01

    In previous studies of infectious mononucleosis, we found IgM autoantibodies which react with hematopoietic cell antigens. Many of these were inhibited by synthetic glycine/alanine peptides representing the glycine/alanine repeat of Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen-1. We have cloned and expressed fragments of genes encoding two of these autoantigens. One gene (p542) encodes a protein containing a glycine-rich 28-mer, which is its chief autoantigenic epitope and which represents a newly identified class of evolutionarily conserved autoepitopes. The other gene (p554) encodes a protein that is not demonstrably cross-reactive with Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen-1 or with any other EBV protein, but forms complexes with other proteins. Immunoaffinity-purified anti-p542 and anti-p554 have relatively high binding affinities, as evidenced by inhibition at 10(6)-10(8) M-1, and neither autoantibody showed polyreactivity with other common antigens. The data thus suggest that neither autoantibody is simply an expression of polyclonal B cell activation. We conclude that the two autoantigens stimulate autoantibody synthesis by different mechanisms. One autoantigen shares homology to a viral protein which generates cross-reacting antibodies to the autoantigenic epitope. The other has no recognizable cross-reaction with the infecting pathogen and may become immunogenic through complexing with other proteins. PMID:7533788

  19. Dopamine Receptor Autoantibodies Correlate with Symptoms in Sydenham's Chorea

    PubMed Central

    Ben-Pazi, Hilla; Stoner, Julie A.; Cunningham, Madeleine W.

    2013-01-01

    Background Sydenham chorea (SC), a neuropsychiatric sequela of group-A streptococcal infection, is associated with basal ganglia autoantibodies. Although autoantibodies have been proposed in neuropsychiatric disorders, little evidence has been shown to link autoimmunity and clinical symptoms. We hypothesized that dopamine receptor-autoantibody interactions may be the basis of neuropsychiatric symptoms in SC. Methods Sera from 22 children with SC (age 10.7±4.5 years) and 22 age-matched controls were studied. Clinical neuropsychiatric symptoms were measured in SC at sample collection using the UFMG-Sydenham's-Chorea-Rating-Scale (USCRS). Anti-dopamine D1 receptor (D1R) and anti-dopamine D2 receptor (D2R) autoantibodies were measured by the enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and were correlated with clinical symptoms. Results Anti-D1R and anti-D2R autoantibodies were significantly higher in SC compared to controls (n = 44; p = 0.010 and p = 0.017, respectively). We found that the ratio (anti-D2R/D1R) of the two anti-dopaminergic receptor antibodies correlated with neuropsychiatric symptoms as determined by USCRS measurements (n = 18; r = 0.53, p = 0.024). In addition, anti-D2R titers correlated with antistreptolysin-O titers (n = 43; r = 0.49, p = 0.0008). Interpretation Our report linked, for the first time, autoimmunity with neuropsychiatric symptoms. The significant correlation was found using ratios of autoantibodies against dopamine receptors (anti-D2R/D1R) rather than the absolute elevated individual anti-D1R or anti-D2R titers. We suggest that autoantibodies may lead to a receptor imbalance and induce greater sensitivity to dopamine signaling potentially leading to neuropsychiatric symptoms in SC. Our novel findings suggesting altered balance in the dopaminergic system may provide a new approach in understanding autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders with possible implications for diagnosis and treatment. PMID:24073196

  20. Detection and identification of antinuclear autoantibodies in the serum of normal blood donors.

    PubMed

    de Vlam, K; De Keyser, F; Verbruggen, G; Vandenbossche, M; Vanneuville, B; D'Haese, D; Veys, E M

    1993-01-01

    The occurrence of antinuclear antibodies (ANA) in the serum of 485 healthy volunteer blood donors was assessed. Sixty two sera displayed nuclear immunofluorescence staining on Hep-2 cells using a polyvalent anti-Ig conjugate. In general, the titer of these antibodies was low (42/62 sera displaying a titer lower than or equal to 1:80). In only 23 sera were the ANA of the IgG isotype, which is the more disease-related immunoglobulin class of autoantibodies. In order to define the frequency of antibodies to extractable nuclear antigens and dsDNA within this population, sera were further analyzed by counterimmunoelectrophoresis. Western blot and the Crithidia luciliae assay. One serum displayed weak antids DNA reactivity; another serum had anti-SSA/Ro activity. On Western blot several patterns were found. They could not be identified with any of the available reference antisera. PMID:8403584

  1. Central MHC genes affect IgA levels in the human: reciprocal effects in IgA deficiency and IgA nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Vance B; Witt, Campbell S; French, Martyn A H; Machulla, Helmut K G; De la Concha, Emilio G; Cheong, Karey Y; Vigil, Patricia; Hollingsworth, Peter N; Warr, Kevin J; Christiansen, Frank T; Price, Patricia

    2002-05-01

    This study investigates the hypothesis that alternative alleles of one or more genes in the central major histocompatibility complex (MHC) predispose carriers to IgA deficiency (IgAD) or IgA Nephropathy (IgAN). Australian caucasian IgAD, IgAN patients, and controls were typed at HLA loci, single nucleotide polymorphisms, and microsatellites in the MHC. Alleles of the D6S273 microsatellite exhibited strong associations with IgAD and IgAN. D6S273*129 and *139 were more frequent in IgAD and less frequent in IgAN patients than controls. The reverse was true for D6S273*133 and *131. Alleles of other microsatellites exhibited weak associations with IgAD or IgAN. D6S273*129 is found on the 65.1 ancestral haplotype [HLA-B14(65),DR1], which has been reported to be increased in IgAD, but the majority of IgAD patients with D6S273*129 did not have other alleles of the haplotype. D6S273*139 is characteristic of the 8.1 ancestral haplotype (HLA-A1,B8,DR3), which was common in IgAD and rare in IgAN patients. Further studies of the 8.1 haplotype in Australian, German and Spanish caucasian subjects revealed that HLA-DR3, in the absence of -B8, is not associated with IgAD. However -B8 is associated with IgAD in the absence of -DR3, consistent with a susceptibility locus in the central MHC. Provisional mapping within this region is discussed. PMID:11975987

  2. Neutrophils negatively regulate induction of mucosal IgA responses after sublingual immunization.

    PubMed

    Jee, J; Bonnegarde-Bernard, A; Duverger, A; Iwakura, Y; Cormet-Boyaka, E; Martin, T L; Steiner, H E; Bachman, R C; Boyaka, P N

    2015-07-01

    Induction of mucosal immunoglobulin-A (IgA) capable of providing a first line of defense against bacterial and viral pathogens remains a major goal of needle-free vaccines given via mucosal routes. Innate immune cells are known to play a central role in induction of IgA responses by mucosal vaccines, but the relative contribution of myeloid cell subsets to these responses has not firmly been established. Using an in vivo model of sublingual vaccination with Bacillus anthracis edema toxin (EdTx) as adjuvant, we examined the role of myeloid cell subsets for mucosal secretory IgA responses. Sublingual immunization of wild-type mice resulted in a transient increase of neutrophils in sublingual tissues and cervical lymph nodes. These mice later developed Ag-specific serum IgG responses, but not serum or mucosal IgA. Interestingly, EdTx failed to increase neutrophils in sublingual tissues and cervical lymph nodes of IKKβ(ΔMye) mice, and these mice developed IgA responses. Partial depletion of neutrophils before immunization of wild-type mice allowed the development of both mucosal and serum IgA responses. Finally, co-culture of B cells with neutrophils from either wild-type or IKKβ(ΔMye) mice suppressed secretion of IgA, but not IgM or IgG. These results identify a new role for neutrophils as negative regulators of IgA responses. PMID:25563500

  3. Transmission of IgA to the rabbit foetus and the suckling rat

    PubMed Central

    Hemmings, W. A.; Jones, R. E.; Williams, E. W.

    1973-01-01

    The transmission of purified preparations of rabbit and human colostral IgA globulin were studied in the rabbit across the yolk-sac splanchnopleur and in the young rat across the gut. Little or no IgA was transferred in either species. PMID:4201824

  4. Neutrophils negatively regulate induction of mucosal IgA responses after sublingual immunization

    PubMed Central

    Jee, Junbae; Bonnegarde-Bernard, Astrid; Duverger, Alexandra; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Cormet-Boyaka, Estelle; Martin, Tara L.; Steiner, Haley E.; Bachman, Ryan C.; Boyaka, Prosper N.

    2015-01-01

    Induction of mucosal IgA capable of providing a first line of defense against bacterial and viral pathogens remains a major goal of needle-free vaccines given via mucosal routes. Innate immune cells are known to play a central role in induction of IgA responses by mucosal vaccines, but the relative contribution of myeloid cell subsets to these responses has not firmly been established. Using an in vivo model of sublingual vaccination with Bacillus anthracis edema toxin (EdTx) as adjuvant, we examined the role of myeloid cell subsets for mucosal secretory IgA responses. Sublingual immunization of wild-type mice resulted in a transient increase of neutrophils in sublingual tissues and cervical lymph nodes. These mice later developed Ag-specific serum IgG responses, but not serum or mucosal IgA. Interestingly, EdTx failed to increase neutrophils in sublingual tissues of IKKβΔMye mice, and these mice developed IgA responses. Partial depletion of neutrophils before immunization of wild-type mice allowed the development of both mucosal and serum IgA responses. Finally, co-culture of B cells with neutrophils from either wild-type or IKKβΔMye mice suppressed production of IgA, but not IgM or IgG. These results identify a new role for neutrophils as negative regulators of IgA responses. PMID:25563500

  5. Prevalence of selected organ-specific autoantibodies in rheumatoid arthritis and primary Sjögren's syndrome patients

    PubMed Central

    Majdan, Maria; Dryglewska, Magdalena; Tabarkiewicz, Jacek

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of the study was to investigate the prevalence of selected organ-specific autoantibodies in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and primary Sjögren's syndrome (pSS) patients, and discuss their clinical significance. Material and methods The study included 121 RA and 30 pSS patients. Sera were tested for the presence of autoantibodies to thyroid peroxidase (anti-TPO), thyroglobulin (anti-TG), TSH receptor (TRAbs), mitochondrial antigen M2 (AMA-M2-3E) and gliadin-analogous fusion peptides (anti-GAF(3X)) using the ELISA method. Non-organ-specific antibodies were determined: rheumatoid factor in IgM class, anti-citrullinated peptide antibodies and antinuclear antibodies. The occurrence of antibodies was also examined with regards to RA activity. Results The following autoantibodies were detected in RA patients: anti-TPO – 13 (10.7%), anti-TG – 6 (5%), AMA-M2-3E – 3 (2.5%), anti-GAF(3X) – 5 (4.1%). The respective levels of these autoantibodies in pSS patients were 3 (10%), 2 (6.7%), 4 (13.3%) and 2 (6.7%). Polyautoimmunity was confirmed in 34 RA patients (including 20 cases of autoimmune thyroid disease [AITD]) and in 6 pSS patients (6 cases of AITD). When RA patients were divided into anti-TPO positive and anti-TPO negative groups, we found a statistically significant relationship between groups regarding age and hemoglobin concentration. In pSS patients the anti-TPO positive group was less likely to use immunosuppressive drugs as compared with the anti-TPO negative group. Anti-TPO was significantly more frequently detected in RA + AITD vs. RA, RA + SS + AITD vs. RA and in pSS + AITD vs. pSS patients. Conclusions Organ-specific autoantibodies are relatively frequently observed in patients with RA and pSS. Their presence is connected with the clinical picture of the diseases.

  6. The heterogeneity of islet autoantibodies and the progression of islet failure in type 1 diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jin; Bian, Lingling; Ji, Li; Chen, Yang; Chen, Heng; Gu, Yong; Ma, Bingqin; Gu, Wei; Xu, Xinyu; Shi, Yun; Wang, Jian; Zhu, Dalong; Sun, Zilin; Ma, Jianhua; Jin, Hui; Shi, Xing; Miao, Heng; Xin, Bing; Zhu, Yan; Zhang, Zhenwen; Bu, Ruifang; Xu, Lan; Shi, Guangde; Tang, Wei; Li, Wei; Zhou, Dongmei; Liang, Jun; Cheng, Xingbo; Shi, Bimin; Dong, Jixiang; Hu, Ji; Fang, Chen; Zhong, Shao; Yu, Weinan; Lu, Weiping; Wu, Chenguang; Qian, Li; Yu, Jiancheng; Gao, Jialin; Fei, Xiaoqiang; Zhang, Qingqing; Wang, Xueqin; Cui, Shiwei; Cheng, Jinluo; Xu, Ning; Wang, Guofeng; Han, Guoqing; Xu, Chunrong; Xie, Yun; An, Minmin; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Zhixiao; Cai, Yun; Fu, Qi; Fu, Yu; Zheng, Shuai; Yang, Fan; Hu, Qingfang; Dai, Hao; Jin, Yu; Zhang, Zheng; Xu, Kuanfeng; Li, Yifan; Shen, Jie; Zhou, Hongwen; He, Wei; Zheng, Xuqin; Han, Xiao; Yu, Liping; She, Jinxiong; Zhang, Mei; Yang, Tao

    2016-09-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus is heterogeneous in many facets. The patients suffered from type 1 diabetes present several levels of islet function as well as variable number and type of islet-specific autoantibodies. This study was to investigate prevalence and heterogeneity of the islet autoantibodies and clinical phenotypes of type 1 diabetes mellitus; and also discussed the process of islet failure and its risk factors in Chinese type 1 diabetic patients. A total of 1,291 type 1 diabetic patients were enrolled in this study. Demographic information was collected. Laboratory tests including mixed-meal tolerance test, human leukocyte antigen alleles, hemoglobinA1c, lipids, thyroid function and islet autoantibodies were conducted. The frequency of islet-specific autoantibody in newly diagnosed T1DM patients (duration shorter than half year) was 73% in East China. According to binary logistic regressions, autoantibody positivity, longer duration and lower Body Mass Index were the risk factors of islet failure. As the disease developed, autoantibodies against glutamic acid decarboxylase declined as well as the other two autoantibodies against zinc transporter 8 and islet antigen 2. The decrease of autoantibodies was positively correlated with aggressive beta cell destruction. Autoantibodies can facilitate the identification of classic T1DM from other subtypes and predict the progression of islet failure. As there were obvious heterogeneity in autoantibodies and clinical manifestation in different phenotypes of the disease, we should take more factors into consideration when identifying type 1 diabetes mellitus. PMID:27225179

  7. Toward a new autoantibody diagnostic orthodoxy: understanding the bad, good and indifferent.

    PubMed

    Fritzler, Marvin J

    2012-08-01

    Rapid advances in diagnostic technologies used to detect autoantibodies have made it difficult for even the most modern laboratory to keep abreast of the changing approaches and platforms, not to mention the clinicians who are hard pressed to keep abreast of evolving diagnostic paradigms attended by these newer techniques. While autoantibody testing is traditionally considered to be primarily serving the realm of diagnostic medicine, there is little doubt that autoantibodies are also being recognized as an approach to providing prognostic and therapeutic information. Accordingly, along with related proteomics, genomics and metabolomics, it is taking on increasing importance in the realm of personalized medicine. In today's world of autoantibody diagnostics, overarching concerns about false-negative and false-positive autoantibodies tests cannot be summarily dismissed by citing pros or cons of any one technology or diagnostic platform, but often point to persisting gaps in our knowledge about, and understanding of, the origin and roles of autoantibodies. Before we can hope to completely understand the enigmas that attend the results of autoantibody diagnostic tests, perhaps it is time to step back and re-examine long-accepted paradigms and beliefs. This review will address some of the issues that impact on autoantibody detection technologies and some of the considerations and issues that will attend a new orthodoxy of autoantibody diagnostics. These issues will be addressed in the context of "bad" (pathogenic), "good" (protective) or "indifferent" (no apparent role in disease) autoantibodies. PMID:26000127

  8. Clinical features of IgA nephropathy with serum ANCA positivity: a retrospective case–control study

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ya-zi; Shi, Su-Fang; Chen, Yu-Qing; Chen, Min; Yang, Yi-He; Xie, Xin-Fang; Zou, Rong; Lv, Ji-Cheng; Liu, Li-Jun; Zhang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Background The coexistence of IgA nephropathy (IgAN) and antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies (ANCAs) is relatively rare. Only a few studies have reported the features of these patients. Methods We studied the clinical and histological features of 20 ANCA-positive IgAN patients. They were compared with ANCA-negative IgAN patients (n = 40) and ANCA-associated systemic vasculitis (AASV) patients (n = 40) with a randomly selected and matched proportion of crescentic glomeruli. Furthermore, 9 ANCA-positive crescentic IgAN patients out of the 20 cases were compared with two control groups with crescentic nephritis. Results ANCA-positive IgAN patients showed older age, lower haemoglobin and higher inflammatory indicator levels at baseline, and a higher percentage of general symptoms and pulmonary involvement, compared with ANCA-negative IgAN patients, and were comparable to AASV patients. Histologically, there was a significantly higher percentage of fibrinoid necrosis in glomeruli in ANCA-positive IgAN patients and in AASV patients compared with ANCA-negative IgAN patients (35, 25 and 0%, respectively, P = 0.003). After immunosuppressive therapy, ANCA-positive crescentic IgAN patients were more likely to withdraw from dialysis (75 versus 9.1%, P = 0.03) and not to reach end-stage renal disease within 6 months (11.1 versus 66.7%, P = 0.01) compared with ANCA-negative crescentic IgAN patients. Conclusions IgAN patients with ANCA positivity showed more severe clinical and histological features when compared with ANCA-negative IgAN patients and were comparable to AASV patients. However, renal prognosis was relatively better in ANCA-positive crescentic IgAN patients after aggressive immunosuppressive therapy in the short term, compared with ANCA-negative patients. PMID:26413270

  9. Regulation of intestinal IgA responses by dietary palmitic acid and its metabolism.

    PubMed

    Kunisawa, Jun; Hashimoto, Eri; Inoue, Asuka; Nagasawa, Risa; Suzuki, Yuji; Ishikawa, Izumi; Shikata, Shiori; Arita, Makoto; Aoki, Junken; Kiyono, Hiroshi

    2014-08-15

    Enhancement of intestinal IgA responses is a primary strategy in the development of oral vaccine. Dietary fatty acids are known to regulate host immune responses. In this study, we show that dietary palmitic acid (PA) and its metabolites enhance intestinal IgA responses. Intestinal IgA production was increased in mice maintained on a PA-enriched diet. These mice also showed increased intestinal IgA responses against orally immunized Ag, without any effect on serum Ab responses. We found that PA directly stimulates plasma cells to produce Ab. In addition, mice receiving a PA-enriched diet had increased numbers of IgA-producing plasma cells in the large intestine; this effect was abolished when serine palmitoyltransferase was inhibited. These findings suggest that dietary PA regulates intestinal IgA responses and has the potential to be a diet-derived mucosal adjuvant. PMID:25031459

  10. Solution structure determination of monomeric human IgA2 by X-ray and neutron scattering, analytical ultracentrifugation and constrained modelling: a comparison with monomeric human IgA1.

    PubMed

    Furtado, Patricia B; Whitty, Patrick W; Robertson, Alexis; Eaton, Julian T; Almogren, Adel; Kerr, Michael A; Woof, Jenny M; Perkins, Stephen J

    2004-05-14

    Immunoglobulin A (IgA), the most abundant human immunoglobulin, mediates immune protection at mucosal surfaces as well as in plasma. It exists as two subclasses IgA1 and IgA2, and IgA2 is found in at least two allotypic forms, IgA2m(1) or IgA2m(2). Compared to IgA1, IgA2 has a much shorter hinge region, which joins the two Fab and one Fc fragments. In order to assess its solution structure, monomeric recombinant IgA2m(1) was studied by X-ray and neutron scattering. Its Guinier X-ray radius of gyration R(G) is 5.18 nm and its neutron R(G) is 5.03 nm, both of which are significantly smaller than those for monomeric IgA1 at 6.1-6.2 nm. The distance distribution function P(r)for IgA2m(1) showed a broad peak with a subpeak and gave a maximum dimension of 17 nm, in contrast to the P(r) curve for IgA1, which showed two distinct peaks and a maximum dimension of 21 nm. The sedimentation coefficients of IgA1 and IgA2m(1) were 6.2S and 6.4S, respectively. These data show that the solution structure of IgA2m(1) is significantly more compact than IgA1. The complete monomeric IgA2m(1) structure was modelled using molecular dynamics to generate random IgA2 hinge structures, to which homology models for the Fab and Fc fragments were connected to generate 10,000 full models. A total of 104 compact best-fit IgA2m(1) models gave good curve fits. These best-fit models were modified by linking the two Fab light chains with a disulphide bridge that is found in IgA2m(1), and subjecting these to energy refinement to optimise this linkage. The averaged solution structure of the arrangement of the Fab and Fc fragments in IgA2m(1) was found to be predominantly T-shaped and flexible, but also included Y-shaped structures. The IgA2 models show full steric access to the two FcalphaRI-binding sites at the Calpha2-Calpha3 interdomain region in the Fc fragment. Since previous scattering modelling had shown that IgA1 also possessed a flexible T-shaped solution structure, such a T-shape may be

  11. The Tetraspanin CD37 Protects Against Glomerular IgA Deposition and Renal Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Rops, Angelique L.; Figdor, Carl G.; van der Schaaf, Alie; Tamboer, Wim P.; Bakker, Marinka A.; Berden, Jo H.; Dijkman, Henry B.P.M.; Steenbergen, Eric J.; van der Vlag, Johan; van Spriel, Annemiek B.

    2010-01-01

    The tetraspanin protein CD37 is a leukocyte-specific transmembrane protein that is highly expressed on B cells. CD37-deficient (CD37−/−) mice exhibit a 15-fold increased level of immunoglobulin A (IgA) in serum and elevated numbers of IgA+ plasma cells in lymphoid organs. Here, we report that CD37−/− mice spontaneously develop renal pathology with characteristics of human IgA nephropathy. In young naïve CD37−/− mice, mild IgA deposition in glomeruli was observed. However, CD37−/− mice developed high titers of IgA immune complexes in serum during aging, which was associated with increased glomerular IgA deposition. Severe mesangial proliferation, fibrosis, and hyalinosis were apparent in aged CD37−/− mice, whereas albuminuria was mild. To further evaluate the role of CD37 in glomerular disease, we induced anti–glomerular basement membrane (GBM) nephritis in mice. CD37−/− mice developed higher IgA serum levels and glomerular deposits of anti-GBM IgA compared with wild-type mice. Importantly, glomerular macrophage and neutrophil influx was significantly higher in CD37−/− mice during both the heterologous and autologous phase of anti-GBM nephritis. Taken together, tetraspanin CD37 controls the formation of IgA-containing immune complexes and glomerular IgA deposition, which induces influx of inflammatory myeloid cells. Therefore, CD37 may protect against the development of IgA nephropathy. PMID:20348240

  12. The Tetraspanin Protein CD37 Regulates IgA Responses and Anti-Fungal Immunity

    PubMed Central

    van Spriel, Annemiek B.; Sofi, Mariam; Gartlan, Kate H.; van der Schaaf, Alie; Verschueren, Ineke; Torensma, Ruurd; Raymakers, Reinier A. P.; Loveland, Bruce E.; Netea, Mihai G.; Adema, Gosse J.

    2009-01-01

    Immunoglobulin A (IgA) secretion by plasma cells in the immune system is critical for protecting the host from environmental and microbial infections. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the generation of IgA+ plasma cells remain poorly understood. Here, we report that the B cell–expressed tetraspanin CD37 inhibits IgA immune responses in vivo. CD37-deficient (CD37−/−) mice exhibit a 15-fold increased level of IgA in serum and significantly elevated numbers of IgA+ plasma cells in spleen, mucosal-associated lymphoid tissue, as well as bone marrow. Analyses of bone marrow chimeric mice revealed that CD37–deficiency on B cells was directly responsible for the increased IgA production. We identified high local interleukin-6 (IL-6) production in germinal centers of CD37−/− mice after immunization. Notably, neutralizing IL-6 in vivo reversed the increased IgA response in CD37−/− mice. To demonstrate the importance of CD37—which can associate with the pattern-recognition receptor dectin-1—in immunity to infection, CD37−/− mice were exposed to Candida albicans. We report that CD37−/− mice are evidently better protected from infection than wild-type (WT) mice, which was accompanied by increased IL-6 levels and C. albicans–specific IgA antibodies. Importantly, adoptive transfer of CD37−/− serum mediated protection in WT mice and the underlying mechanism involved direct neutralization of fungal cells by IgA. Taken together, tetraspanin protein CD37 inhibits IgA responses and regulates the anti-fungal immune response. PMID:19282981

  13. Critical Role of Kupffer Cell CD89 Expression in Experimental IgA Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Lijun; Li, Bingyu; Huang, Mengwen; Xie, Kun; Li, Dong; Li, You; Gu, Hua; Fang, Jianmin

    2016-01-01

    Although IgA nephropathy (IgAN) is the most common primary glomerulonephritis worldwide, its etiology remains only partly understood. It is clear that the pathogenesis of IgAN involves the formation of macromolecular IgA1 complexes and increased levels of serum IgA1 and IgA1-immune complexes(IC), due to defective IgA1 clearance. Previous studies suggest that the blood and tissue myeloid cell-expressed IgA Fc receptor (FcαR/CD89) mediates IgA-IC clearance and its dysfunction, via decreased activity or excessive levels of soluble FcαR/sCD89 induces IgAN. Such a mechanism requires robust stimulation of IgAN levels via forced expression of CD89. In the absence of unequivocal evidence supporting such a mechanism to date, we attempted to test the extent of CD89-evoked IgAN by generating a transgenic mouse strain expressing human CD89 under the control of murine CD14 promotor. No deposition of IgA-CD89 complexes or glomerulonephritis was detected, however. Further studies showed that elimination of murine IgA was mediated by Kupffer cells. In patients, however, CD89/IgA complexes were detected, and injection of patient IgA induced IgAN-like features in CD89 Tg mice. In transgenic mice, IgAN pathogenesis involves impaired clearance of abnormal IgA via CD89, primarily by the Kupffer cells. Conditional IgAN progression in CD89 transgenic mice thus reveals important aspects of IgAN pathogenesis. PMID:27437939

  14. Is there IgA of gut mucosal origin in the serum of HIV1 infected patients?

    PubMed Central

    Quesnel, A; Moja, P; Lucht, F; Touraine, J L; Pozzetto, B; Genin, C

    1994-01-01

    This study was performed in 77 HIV1 seropositive adult patients to characterise the IgA hyperglobulinaemia seen in the serum during the course of HIV infection. It was shown that both IgA1 and IgA2 subclass concentrations were simultaneously increased but the IgA1 increase was predominant. Secretory IgA (SIgA) concentration was significantly increased and IgA activity to gliadin, bovine serum albumin, and casein could be detected and was correlated with SIgA concentration. In contrast, IgA activity to cytomegalovirus and to tetanus toxoid did not correlate with total IgA concentration. These data suggest the presence of IgA from gut mucosal origin in the serum of these patients. Hyper IgA was inversely correlated with the CD4+ cell number. The increase of all parameters studied varied according to the total IgA concentration in the serum but was also directly related to the stage of immune deficiency in patients with hyper IgA. PMID:7517378

  15. Exacerbation of Autoantibody-Mediated Hemolytic Anemia by Viral Infection

    PubMed Central

    Meite, Mory; Léonard, Sabine; Idrissi, Mohammed El Azami El; Izui, Shozo; Masson, Pierre L.; Coutelier, Jean-Paul

    2000-01-01

    Strong enhancement of the pathogenicity of an antierythrocyte monoclonal antibody was observed after infection of mice with lactate dehydrogenase-elevating virus. While injection of the antierythrocyte antibody alone induced only moderate anemia, concomitant infection with this virus, which is harmless in most normal mice, led to a dramatic drop in the hematocrit and to death of infected animals. In vitro and in vivo analyses showed a dramatic increase in the ability of macrophages from infected mice to phagocytose antibody-coated erythrocytes. These results indicate that viruses can trigger the onset of autoimmune disease by enhancing the pathogenicity of autoantibodies. They may explain how unrelated viruses could be implicated in the etiology of autoantibody-mediated autoimmune diseases. PMID:10846087

  16. The role of B cells and autoantibodies in neuropsychiatric lupus.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jing; Stock, Ariel D; Chalmers, Samantha A; Putterman, Chaim

    2016-09-01

    The central nervous system manifestations of SLE (neuropsychiatric lupus, NPSLE) occur frequently, though are often difficult to diagnose and treat. Symptoms of NPSLE can be quite diverse, including chronic cognitive and emotional manifestations, as well as acute presentations, such as stroke and seizures. Although the pathogenesis of NPSLE has yet to be well characterized, B-cell mediated damage is believed to be an important contributor. B-cells and autoantibodies may traverse the blood brain barrier promoting an inflammatory environment consisting of glia activation, neurodegeneration, and consequent averse behavioral outcomes. This review will evaluate the various suggested roles of B-cells and autoantibodies in NPSLE, as well as therapeutic modalities targeting these pathogenic mediators. PMID:27389531

  17. Granulocyte-dependent autoantibody-induced skin blistering.

    PubMed

    Csorba, Kinga; Sitaru, Sebastian; Sitaru, Cassian

    2012-01-01

    Autoimmune phenomena occur in healthy individuals, but when self-tolerance fails, the autoimmune response may result in specific pathology. According to Witebsky's postulates, one of the criteria in diagnosing a disease as autoimmune is the reproduction of the disease in experimental animals by the passive transfer of autoantibodies. For epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (EBA), a prototypic organ-specific autoimmune disease of skin and mucous membranes, several experimental models were recently established. In the animal model described in our present work, purified IgG antibodies against a stretch of 200 amino acids (aa 757-967) of collagen VII are injected repeatedly into mice reproducing the blistering phenotype as well as the histo- and immunopathological features characteristic to human EBA (1). Full-blown widespread disease is usually seen 5-6 days after the first injection and the extent of the disease correlates with the dose of the administered collagen VII-specific IgG. The tissue damage (blister formation) in the experimental EBA is depending on the recruitment and activation of granulocytes by tissue-bound autoantibodies (2,-4). Therefore, this model allows for the dissection of the granulocyte-dependent inflammatory pathway involved in the autoimmune tissue damage, as the model reproduces only the T cell-independent phase of the efferent autoimmune response. Furthermore, its value is underlined by a number of studies demonstrating the blister-inducing potential of autoantibodies in vivo and investigating the mechanism of the blister formation in EBA (1,3,-6). Finally, this model will greatly facilitate the development of new anti-inflammatory therapies in autoantibody-induced diseases. Overall, the passive transfer animal model of EBA is an accessible and instructive disease model and will help researchers to analyze not only EBA pathogenesis but to answer fundamental biologically and clinically essential autoimmunity questions. PMID:23092942

  18. Granulocyte-dependent Autoantibody-induced Skin Blistering

    PubMed Central

    Csorba, Kinga; Sitaru, Sebastian; Sitaru, Cassian

    2012-01-01

    Autoimmune phenomena occur in healthy individuals, but when self-tolerance fails, the autoimmune response may result in specific pathology. According to Witebsky's postulates, one of the criteria in diagnosing a disease as autoimmune is the reproduction of the disease in experimental animals by the passive transfer of autoantibodies. For epidermolysis bullosa acquisita (EBA), a prototypic organ-specific autoimmune disease of skin and mucous membranes, several experimental models were recently established. In the animal model described in our present work, purified IgG antibodies against a stretch of 200 amino acids (aa 757-967) of collagen VII are injected repeatedly into mice reproducing the blistering phenotype as well as the histo- and immunopathological features characteristic to human EBA 1. Full-blown widespread disease is usually seen 5-6 days after the first injection and the extent of the disease correlates with the dose of the administered collagen VII-specific IgG. The tissue damage (blister formation) in the experimental EBA is depending on the recruitment and activation of granulocytes by tissue-bound autoantibodies 2,-4. Therefore, this model allows for the dissection of the granulocyte-dependent inflammatory pathway involved in the autoimmune tissue damage, as the model reproduces only the T cell-independent phase of the efferent autoimmune response. Furthermore, its value is underlined by a number of studies demonstrating the blister-inducing potential of autoantibodies in vivo and investigating the mechanism of the blister formation in EBA 1,3,-6. Finally, this model will greatly facilitate the development of new anti-inflammatory therapies in autoantibody-induced diseases. Overall, the passive transfer animal model of EBA is an accessible and instructive disease model and will help researchers to analyze not only EBA pathogenesis but to answer fundamental biologically and clinically essential autoimmunity questions. PMID:23092942

  19. Pathogenicity of Autoantibodies in Anti-p200 Pemphigoid

    PubMed Central

    Beckmann, Tina; Hirose, Misa; Dworschak, Jenny; Recke, Andreas; Ludwig, Ralf J.; Hashimoto, Takashi; Zillikens, Detlef; Schmidt, Enno

    2012-01-01

    Recently, the C-terminus of laminin γ1 has been identified as target antigen in anti-p200 pemphigoid and the disease was renamed as anti-laminin γ1 pemphigoid. However, the pathogenic relevance of these autoantibodies has not yet been demonstrated. Therefore, we employed an ex vivo model of autoantibody-mediated leukocyte-dependent neutrophil activation and dermal-epidermal separation (DES) using cryosections of human skin. We showed that anti-p200 pemphigoid sera (n = 7) induced DES in a time-dependent manner, in contrast to sera from healthy controls. Furthermore, laminin γ1-specific IgG and serum depleted from anti-laminin γ1 reactivity were generated using the recombinant C-terminus of laminin γ1 (LAMC1-term; amino acids 1364 to 1609). Interestingly, both fractions labeled the dermal-epidermal-junction (DEJ) by indirect immunofluorescence microscopy on human foreskin and recognized a 200 kDa protein by immunoblotting with dermal extract. Human and rabbit IgG against LAMC1-cterm failed to attract neutrophils at the DEJ and to induce DES. In contrast, patient serum depleted from LAMC1-cterm reactivity led to the same extent of DES as non-depleted IgG. Repeated injection of rabbit anti-murine LAMC1-cterm IgG into both neonatal and adult C57BL/6mice as well as repetitive immunization of various mouse strains with murine LAMC1-cterm failed to induce macro- and microscopic lesions. In all mice, circulating anti-LAMC1-cterm antibodies were present, but only in some mice, IgG deposits were seen at the DEJ. We conclude that autoantibodies in anti-p200 pemphigoid sera are pathogenic while pathogenicity is not mediated by autoantibodies against laminin γ1. Further studies are needed to identify the pathogenically relevant autoantigen in anti-p200 pemphigoid. PMID:22911854

  20. [Progress of Autoantibody Examinations for Connective Tissue Diseases].

    PubMed

    Akashi, Kengo; Saegusa, Jun; Morinobu, Akio

    2015-05-01

    Connective tissue diseases are chronic inflammatory diseases that can affect multiple organs and, thus, have a broad spectrum of clinical presentations. Various autoantibodies are detected in patients with connective tissue diseases, represented by anti-nuclear antibody for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), systemic sclerosis (SSc), polymyositis/dermatomyositis (PM/DM), Sjögren's syndrome, and mixed connective tissue disease. Assessment of the autoantibody profile is fundamental for the clinical management of patients with connective tissue diseases, providing important data for the diagnosis, clinical characterization, and disease activity evaluation. Anti-ribosomal P antibody and anti-NMDA receptor antibody are associated with neuropsychiatric SLE. Anti-synthetase syndrome comprises the association of myositis (PM/DM), interstitial lung disease, fever, Raynaud's phenomenon, mechanic's hands, and anti-aminoacyl tRNA synthetase antibodies. Anti-MDA5 antibody is detected in patients with clinically amyopathic DM, often complicated by rapidly progressive interstitial lung disease. Between 50 and 75% of malignancy-associated DM patients are positive for anti-TIF1-γ antibody. Anti-RNA polymerase III antibody is associated with diffuse cutaneous SSc and renal crisis. This review focuses on the importance and usefulness of these autoantibodies for the diagnosis and management of patients with connective tissue diseases in clinical practice. PMID:26524895

  1. Disseminated Talaromyces marneffei and Mycobacterium abscessus in a Patient With Anti-Interferon-γ Autoantibodies

    PubMed Central

    Pruetpongpun, Nattapol; Khawcharoenporn, Thana; Damronglerd, Pansachee; Suthiwartnarueput, Worapop; Apisarnthanarak, Anucha; Rujanavej, Sasinuch; Suwantarat, Nuntra

    2016-01-01

    Anti-interferon (IFN)-γ autoantibodies are increasingly recognized as a cause of adult-onset immunodeficiency and increased risk for infections with intracellular pathogens. We report on disseminated Talaromyces (Penicillium) marneffei and Mycobacterium abscessus infection in a 72-year-old, human immunodeficiency virus noninfected, Thai man with anti-IFN-γ autoantibody. The patient was successfully treated with antimicrobial therapy and rituximab to control B cell-derived autoantibodies. PMID:27419165

  2. Disseminated Talaromyces marneffei and Mycobacterium abscessus in a Patient With Anti-Interferon-γ Autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Pruetpongpun, Nattapol; Khawcharoenporn, Thana; Damronglerd, Pansachee; Suthiwartnarueput, Worapop; Apisarnthanarak, Anucha; Rujanavej, Sasinuch; Suwantarat, Nuntra

    2016-04-01

    Anti-interferon (IFN)-γ autoantibodies are increasingly recognized as a cause of adult-onset immunodeficiency and increased risk for infections with intracellular pathogens. We report on disseminated Talaromyces (Penicillium) marneffei and Mycobacterium abscessus infection in a 72-year-old, human immunodeficiency virus noninfected, Thai man with anti-IFN-γ autoantibody. The patient was successfully treated with antimicrobial therapy and rituximab to control B cell-derived autoantibodies. PMID:27419165

  3. In a SLE mouse model the production of IgG autoantibody requires expression of activation-induced deaminase in early developing B cells

    PubMed Central

    Umiker, Benjamin R.; McDonald, Gabrielle; Larbi, Amma; Medina, Carlos O.; Reth, Michael; Imanishi-Kari, Thereza

    2014-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease characterized by the presence of pathogenic IgG anti-nuclear antibodies. Pathogenic IgG autoantibody production requires B-cell activation, leading to the production of activation-induced deaminase (AID) and class switching of IgM genes to IgG. To understand how and when B cells are activated to produce these IgG autoantibodies, we studied cells from 564Igi, a mouse model of SLE. 564Igi mice develop a disease profile closely resembling that found in human SLE patients, including the presence of IgG anti-nucleic acid antibodies. We have generated 564Igi mice that conditionally express an activation-induced cytidine deaminase transgene (Aicdatg), either in all B cells or only in mature B cells. Here we show that class-switched pathogenic IgG autoantibodies were produced only in 564Igi mice in which AID was functional in early developing B cells, resulting in loss of tolerance. Furthermore, we show that the absence of AID in early developing B cells also results in increased production of self-reactive IgM, indicating that AID, through somatic hypermutation (SHM), contributes to tolerance. Our results suggest that the pathophysiology of clinical SLE might also be dependent on AID expression in early developing B cells. PMID:25044405

  4. Treatment of progressive IgA nephropathy: an update.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weiming; Chen, Nan

    2013-01-01

    IgA nephropathy (IgAN) is the most common primary glomerular disease worldwide. About 25-30% of IgAN patients will progress to end-stage kidney disease in 20-25 years. Early-onset symptoms that are highly suggestive of progressive IgAN include massive proteinuria, hypertension, renal damage, glomerular sclerosis, crescent formation, and tubulointerstitial fibrosis. Progressive IgAN may progress to renal failure in a short time. Optimized supportive therapy is the fundamental treatment for progressive IgAN patients, and includes renin-angiotensin system blockers, blood pressure control, antiplatelet and anticoagulant drugs, statins, and allopurinol. In progressive IgAN patients whose clinical and pathological manifestations are more severe, active therapy may be considered including glucocorticoid therapy, cyclophosphamide, azathioprine, mycophenolate mofetil, tacrolimus, and other immunosuppressants. However, there are currently controversies on the definition and treatment of progressive IgAN. PMID:23689569

  5. A systematic review of serum autoantibodies as biomarkers for pancreatic cancer detection

    PubMed Central

    Dumstrei, Karin; Chen, Hongda; Brenner, Hermann

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the western world. Patients with pancreatic cancer have poor prognosis, partly due to difficulties in detecting it at early stages. While different markers have been associated with pancreatic cancer, many of them show suboptimal sensitivity and specificity. Serum autoantibodies against tumor-associated antigens have recently emerged as early stage biomarkers for different types of cancers. Given the urgent need for early and reliable biomarkers for pancreatic cancer, we undertook a systematic review of the published literature to identify primary articles that evaluated serum autoantibodies in pancreatic cancer detection by searching PubMed and ISI Web of Knowledge. Two reviewers extracted data on study characteristics and results independently. Overall, 31 studies evaluating 124 individual serum autoantibodies in pancreatic cancer detection met the inclusion criteria. In general, single autoantibody markers showed relatively low sensitivities at high specificity. A combination of markers, either multiple serum autoantibodies or serum autoantibodies combined with tumor-associated markers, led to a better diagnostic performance. However, most of the analyzed autoantibodies have only been reported in single studies and therefore need to be independently validated. We conclude that serum autoantibodies might present an option as biomarkers for early detection of pancreatic cancer, but more work is needed to identify and validate autoantibody signatures that are associated with early stage pancreatic cancer. PMID:26840568

  6. Heterogeneity of autoantibodies in 100 patients with autoimmune myositis: insights into clinical features and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Koenig, Martial; Fritzler, Marvin J; Targoff, Ira N; Troyanov, Yves; Senécal, Jean-Luc

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence, mutual associations, clinical manifestations, and diagnoses associated with serum autoantibodies, as detected using recently available immunoassays, in patients with autoimmune myositis (AIM). Sera and clinical data were collected from 100 patients with AIM followed longitudinally. Sera were screened cross-sectionally for 21 autoantibodies by multiplex addressable laser bead immunoassay, line blot immunoassay, immunoprecipitation of in vitro translated recombinant protein, protein A assisted immunoprecipitation, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Diagnoses were determined using the Bohan and Peter classification as well as recently proposed classifications. Relationships between autoantibodies and clinical manifestations were analyzed by multiple logistic regression. One or more autoantibodies encompassing 19 specificities were present in 80% of the patients. The most common autoantibodies were anti-Ro52 (30% of patients), anti-Ku (23%), anti-synthetases (22%), anti-U1RNP (15%), and anti-fibrillarin (14%). In the presence of autoantibodies to Ku, synthetases, U1RNP, fibrillarin, PM-Scl, or scleroderma autoantigens, at least one more autoantibody was detected in the majority of sera and at least two more autoantibodies in over one-third of sera. The largest number of concurrent autoantibodies was six autoantibodies. Overall, 44 distinct combinations of autoantibodies were counted. Most autoantibodies were unrestricted to any AIM diagnostic category. Distinct clinical syndromes and therapeutic responses were associated with anti-Jo-1, anti-fibrillarin, anti-U1RNP, anti-Ro, anti-Ro52, and autoantibodies to scleroderma autoantigens. We conclude that a significant proportion of AIM patients are characterized by complex associations of autoantibodies. Certain myositis autoantibodies are markers for distinct overlap syndromes and predict therapeutic outcomes. The ultimate clinical features, disease course

  7. Evaluation of intra- and extra-epithelial secretory IgA in chlamydial infections

    PubMed Central

    Armitage, Charles W; O’Meara, Connor P; Harvie, Marina C G; Timms, Peter; Wijburg, Odilia L; Beagley, Kenneth W

    2014-01-01

    Immunoglobulin A is an important mucosal antibody that can neutralize mucosal pathogens by either preventing attachment to epithelia (immune exclusion) or alternatively inhibit intra-epithelial replication following transcytosis by the polymeric immunoglobulin receptor (pIgR). Chlamydia trachomatis is a major human pathogen that initially targets the endocervical or urethral epithelium in women and men, respectively. As both tissues contain abundant secretory IgA (SIgA) we assessed the protection afforded by IgA targeting different chlamydial antigens expressed during the extra- and intra-epithelial stages of infection. We developed an in vitro model using polarizing cells expressing the murine pIgR together with antigen-specific mouse IgA, and an in vivo model using pIgR−/− mice. Secretory IgA targeting the extra-epithelial chlamydial antigen, the major outer membrane protein, significantly reduced infection in vitro by 24% and in vivo by 44%. Conversely, pIgR-mediated delivery of IgA targeting the intra-epithelial inclusion membrane protein A bound to the inclusion but did not reduce infection in vitro or in vivo. Similarly, intra-epithelial IgA targeting the secreted protease Chlamydia protease-like activity factor also failed to reduce infection. Together, these data suggest the importance of pIgR-mediated delivery of IgA targeting extra-epithelial, but not intra-epithelial, chlamydial antigens for protection against a genital tract infection. PMID:24827556

  8. Re-thinking the functions of IgA(+) plasma cells.

    PubMed

    Gommerman, Jennifer L; Rojas, Olga L; Fritz, Jörg H

    2014-01-01

    The intestinal mucosa harbors the largest population of antibody (Ab)-secreting plasma cells (PC) in the human body, producing daily several grams of immunoglobulin A (IgA). IgA has many functions, serving as a first-line barrier that protects the mucosal epithelium from pathogens, toxins and food antigens (Ag), shaping the intestinal microbiota, and regulating host-commensal homeostasis. Signals induced by commensal colonization are central for regulating IgA induction, maintenance, positioning and function and the number of IgA(+) PC is dramatically reduced in neonates and germ-free (GF) animals. Recent evidence demonstrates that the innate immune effector molecules tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) are required for IgA(+) PC homeostasis during the steady state and infection. Moreover, new functions ascribed to PC independent of Ab secretion continue to emerge, suggesting that PC, including IgA(+) PC, should be re-examined in the context of inflammation and infection. Here, we outline mechanisms of IgA(+) PC generation and survival, reviewing their functions in health and disease. PMID:25483334

  9. Infant gut immunity: a preliminary study of IgA associations with breastfeeding.

    PubMed

    Bridgman, S L; Konya, T; Azad, M B; Sears, M R; Becker, A B; Turvey, S E; Mandhane, P J; Subbarao, P; Scott, J A; Field, C J; Kozyrskyj, A L

    2016-02-01

    Secretory immunoglobulin A (IgA) plays a critical role in gut mucosal immune defense. Initially provided by breastmilk, IgA production by the infant gut is gradually stimulated by developing gut microbiota. This study reports associations between infant fecal IgA concentrations 4 months after birth, breastfeeding status and other pre/postnatal exposures in 47 infants in the Canadian Healthy Infant Longitudinal Development cohort. Breastfed infants and first-born infants had higher median fecal IgA concentrations (23.11 v. 9.34 µg/g protein, P<0.01 and 22.19 v. 8.23 µg/g protein, P=0.04). IgA levels increased successively with exclusivity of breastfeeding (β-coefficient, 0.37, P<0.05). This statistical association was independent of maternal parity and household pets. In the absence of breastfeeding, female sex and pet exposure elevated fecal IgA to levels found in breastfed infants. In addition to breastfeeding, infant fecal IgA associations with pre/postnatal exposures may affect gut immunity and risk of allergic disease. PMID:26690933

  10. Current Understanding of the Role of Complement in IgA Nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Maillard, Nicolas; Wyatt, Robert J; Julian, Bruce A; Kiryluk, Krzysztof; Gharavi, Ali; Fremeaux-Bacchi, Veronique; Novak, Jan

    2015-07-01

    Complement activation has a role in the pathogenesis of IgA nephropathy, an autoimmune disease mediated by pathogenic immune complexes consisting of galactose-deficient IgA1 bound by antiglycan antibodies. Of three complement-activation pathways, the alternative and lectin pathways are involved in IgA nephropathy. IgA1 can activate both pathways in vitro, and pathway components are present in the mesangial immunodeposits, including properdin and factor H in the alternative pathway and mannan-binding lectin, mannan-binding lectin-associated serine proteases 1 and 2, and C4d in the lectin pathway. Genome-wide association studies identified deletion of complement factor H-related genes 1 and 3 as protective against the disease. Because the corresponding gene products compete with factor H in the regulation of the alternative pathway, it has been hypothesized that the absence of these genes could lead to more potent inhibition of complement by factor H. Complement activation can take place directly on IgA1-containing immune complexes in circulation and/or after their deposition in the mesangium. Notably, complement factors and their fragments may serve as biomarkers of IgA nephropathy in serum, urine, or renal tissue. A better understanding of the role of complement in IgA nephropathy may provide potential targets and rationale for development of complement-targeting therapy of the disease. PMID:25694468

  11. Anti-actin IgA antibodies in severe coeliac disease

    PubMed Central

    Granito, A; Muratori, P; Cassani, F; Pappas, G; Muratori, L; Agostinelli, D; Veronesi, L; Bortolotti, R; Petrolini, N; Bianchi, F B; Volta, U

    2004-01-01

    Anti-actin IgA antibodies have been found in sera of coeliacs. Our aim was to define the prevalence and clinical significance of anti-actin IgA in coeliacs before and after gluten withdrawal. One hundred and two biopsy-proven coeliacs, 95 disease controls and 50 blood donors were studied. Anti-actin IgA were evaluated by different methods: (a) antimicrofilament positivity on HEp-2 cells and on cultured fibroblasts by immunofluorescence; (b) anti-actin positivity by enzyme-linked immuosorbent assay (ELISA); and (c) presence of the tubular/glomerular pattern of anti-smooth muscle antibodies on rat kidney sections by immunofluorescence. Antimicrofilament IgA were present in 27% of coeliacs and in none of the controls. Antimicrofilament antibodies were found in 25 of 54 (46%) coeliacs with severe villous atrophy and in three of 48 (6%) with mild damage (P < 0·0001). In the 20 patients tested, antimicrofilaments IgA disappeared after gluten withdrawal in accordance with histological recovery. Our study shows a significant correlation between antimicrofilament IgA and the severity of intestinal damage in untreated coeliacs. The disappearance of antimicrofilament IgA after gluten withdrawal predicts the normalization of intestinal mucosa and could be considered a useful tool in the follow-up of severe coeliac disease. PMID:15270857

  12. Secretory IgA: Designed for Anti-Microbial Defense

    PubMed Central

    Brandtzaeg, Per

    2013-01-01

    Prevention of infections by vaccination remains a compelling goal to improve public health. Mucosal vaccines would make immunization procedures easier, be better suited for mass administration, and most efficiently induce immune exclusion – a term coined for non-inflammatory antibody shielding of internal body surfaces, mediated principally by secretory immunoglobulin A (SIgA). The exported antibodies are polymeric, mainly IgA dimers (pIgA), produced by local plasma cells (PCs) stimulated by antigens that target the mucose. SIgA was early shown to be complexed with an epithelial glycoprotein – the secretory component (SC). A common SC-dependent transport mechanism for pIgA and pentameric IgM was then proposed, implying that membrane SC acts as a receptor, now usually called the polymeric Ig receptor (pIgR). From the basolateral surface, pIg-pIgR complexes are taken up by endocytosis and then extruded into the lumen after apical cleavage of the receptor – bound SC having stabilizing and innate functions in the secretory antibodies. Mice deficient for pIgR show that this is the only receptor responsible for epithelial export of IgA and IgM. These knockout mice show a variety of defects in their mucosal defense and changes in their intestinal microbiota. In the gut, induction of B-cells occurs in gut-associated lymphoid tissue, particularly the Peyer’s patches and isolated lymphoid follicles, but also in mesenteric lymph nodes. PC differentiation is accomplished in the lamina propria to which the activated memory/effector B-cells home. The airways also receive such cells from nasopharynx-associated lymphoid tissue but by different homing receptors. This compartmentalization is a challenge for mucosal vaccination, as are the mechanisms used by the mucosal immune system to discriminate between commensal symbionts (mutualism), pathobionts, and overt pathogens (elimination). PMID:23964273

  13. Autoantibody profiling to follow evolution of lupus syndromes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Identification of patients who are in early stages of lupus is currently done through clinical evaluation and is not greatly facilitated by available diagnostic tests. Profiling for patient characteristics and antibody specificities that predict disease would enhance the ability of physicians to identify and treat early cases prior to onset of organ damaging illness. Methods A group of 22 patients with 4 or fewer diagnostic criteria for lupus were studied for changes in clinical and autoantibody profiles after a mean follow up period of 2.4 years. An array with more than 80 autoantigens was used to profile immunoglobulin G (IgG) and immunoglobulin M (IgM) autoantibodies. Correlations with clinical disease progression were examined. Results 3 of the 22 patients (14%) added sufficient criteria during follow up to satisfy a diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) or to acquire a diagnosis of SLE renal disease. Patients who progressed were all females and were younger than those who did not progress (P=0.00054). IgG but not IgM autoreactivity showed greater increases in the progressor group than in the non-progressor group (P=0.047). IgG specificities that were higher at baseline in progressors included proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), beta 2 microglobulin, C1q and hemocyanin (P<0.019). Progressors had significant increases in La/SSB and liver cytosol type 1 (LC1) IgG autoantibodies over the period of evaluation (P≤0.0072). A quantitative risk profile generated from baseline demographic and autoantibody variables yielded highly different scores for the progressor and non-progressor groups (P=1.38 × 10-7) Conclusions In addition to demographic features, autoantibody profiles using an expanded array of specificities were correlated with the risk of progressive disease in patients with lupus. These findings suggest the feasibility of developing a simple diagnostic that could be applied by nonspecialists to screen for lupus and permit

  14. Novel lectin-independent approach to detect galactose-deficient IgA1 in IgA nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Yasutake, Junichi; Suzuki, Yusuke; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Hiura, Naoko; Yanagawa, Hiroyuki; Makita, Yuko; Kaneko, Etsuji; Tomino, Yasuhiko

    2015-01-01

    Background Galactose-deficient IgA1 (Gd-IgA1) is a critical effector molecule in the pathogenesis of IgA nephropathy (IgAN). Although many researchers have measured serum levels of Gd-IgA1 using snail helix aspersa agglutinin (HAA) lectin-based assay, the lectin-dependent assay has some serious problems in robustness. In this study, we aimed to establish a more robust and stable enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method that uses a specific monoclonal antibody to recognize a hinge region in human Gd-IgA1 (Gd-IgA1 ELISA). Methods Rats were immunized with human Gd-IgA1 hinge region peptide to obtain Gd-IgA1-specific monoclonal antibody KM55. Gd-IgA1 ELISA for specifically detecting serum Gd-IgA1 was consequently constructed. Serum Gd-IgA1 concentrations in human subjects were measured using KM55 ELISA assay. To further confirm specificity of the Gd-IgA1-specific antibody, KM55 was also applied for immunofluorescence staining of glomerular Gd-IgA1 in paraffin-embedded sections of renal biopsy specimens. Results Measurement of serum levels of Gd-IgA1 in human subjects by Gd-IgA1 ELISA revealed increased serum Gd-IgA1 level in patients with IgAN compared with patients with other renal diseases or non-renal diseases. Importantly, the results obtained from Gd-IgA1 ELISA positively correlated with those from the HAA lectin-based assay (R = 0.75). Immunofluorescence staining of renal biopsy specimens with KM55 detected glomerular co-localization of Gd-IgA1 and IgA. Conclusion This novel lectin-independent method with KM55 for measuring serum levels of Gd-IgA1 can pave the way for more convincing diagnosis and activity assessment of IgAN, and can expedite clinical research to better understand this difficult disease. PMID:26109484

  15. [Disseminated tuberculosis revealing IgA nephropathy with nephrotic syndrome : A case report].

    PubMed

    Morbieu, Caroline; Michel, Pierre-Antoine; Brocheriou, Isabelle; Canestri, Ana; Boffa, Jean-Jacques

    2016-07-01

    A 27-year-old man without any medical history presented concomitantly a pulmonary and urinary tuberculosis and a nephrotic syndrome with hematuria and renal failure. The renal biopsy showed increased mesangial matrix, few focal segmental lesions, and IgA deposits confirming the diagnosis of IgA nephropathy. Nephrotic syndrome remission occurred quickly after antituberculous treatment. The association between tuberculosis and IgA nephropathy has been previously reported in 9 patients. Renal outcome was always favorable with antituberculous treatment. No relapse occurred, with a maximal follow-up of 42 months. Here, we discuss this singular association and previous similar cases. PMID:26907665

  16. Cytokine, chemokine and secretory IgA levels in human milk in relation to atopic disease and IgA production in infants.

    PubMed

    Böttcher, Malin F; Jenmalm, Maria C; Björkstén, Bengt

    2003-02-01

    The relationship between breast-feeding, IgA production and development of atopic disease in children is a matter of controversy. Some of this controversy might be due to individual differences in the composition of breast milk. The aim of this study was to relate the levels of cytokines, chemokines and secretory (S)-IgA antibodies in breast milk to the development of atopic manifestation and salivary IgA production in infants. Cytokine, chemokine and SIgA levels, as measured with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), in colostrum and mature milk were analyzed in relation to the development of positive skin-prick tests (SPT), allergic symptoms and salivary IgA antibody production during the first 2 years of life in 53 infants. There was no association between levels of IL-4, -5, -6, -8, -10, -13, -16, IFN-gamma, TGF-beta1, -beta2, RANTES, eotaxin or SIgA levels in the breast milk with either SPT-positivity, development of allergic symptoms or salivary IgA levels during the first 2 years of life in the infants. Thus, differences in the composition of cytokines, chemokines and SIgA in breast milk did not, to any major degree, affect the development of a positive SPT, atopic symptoms, nor salivary IgA antibody production during the first 2 years of life. PMID:12603709

  17. Why human pemphigoid autoantibodies do not trigger disease by the passive transfer into mice?

    PubMed

    Sesarman, Alina; Oswald, Eva; Chiriac, Mircea T; Csorba, Kinga; Vuta, Vlad; Feldrihan, Vasile; Baican, Adrian; Bruckner-Tuderman, Leena; Sitaru, Cassian

    2012-03-30

    The recapitulation of disease features in animals by the transfer of patient autoantibodies has been used to demonstrate the autoimmune nature of several diseases. Failure of disease induction by the passive transfer of autoantibodies has been assigned to a limited cross-reactivity of the autoantibodies with the murine tissue. However, the possibility that the passively transferred "inflammatory" patient autoantibodies may not be able to unfold their pathogenic potential due to restricted Fc-dependent effector functions has not yet been systematically explored. In this study we analyze the interaction of patients' autoantibodies with murine complement and granulocytes. Bullous pemphigoid is a blistering disease associated with autoantibodies, which are thought to induce subepidermal blistering by activating complement and granulocytes. The passive transfer of patients autoantibodies failed to induce skin blistering in wild type mice. The cross-reactivity of pemphigoid autoantibodies with murine antigens was analyzed in silico, ex vivo and by the passive transfer of IgG in vivo. Complement-fixing ability of patients' autoantibodies was evaluated by complement-binding test. Granulocyte activation was assessed by reactive oxygen species production assay and the cryosection model. We have found that although pemphigoid autoantibodies bound to murine skin in vitro and in vivo, they showed a lower capacity to fix murine complement and a reduced ability to activate murine granulocytes when compared with human complement and cells, respectively. These results indicate that for disease models using the passive transfer of patient autoantibodies, their interaction with the innate factors of the host should be optimized to match the human situation. PMID:22305931

  18. IgA Nephropathy in a Patient Presenting with Pseudotumor Cerebri

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Umair Syed; Bacaj, Patrick; Iqbal, Hafiz Imran; Onder, Songul

    2016-01-01

    IgA nephropathy is the most common glomerulonephritis worldwide and typically has minimal signs for chronicity in histopathology at the time of initial presentation. Pseudotumor cerebri (PTC) is characterized by increased intracranial pressure in the absence of any intracranial lesions, inflammation, or obstruction. PTC has been reported in renal transplant and dialysis patients, but we are unaware of any reports of pseudotumor cerebri in patients with IgA nephropathy. We report a case of a young female who presented with signs and symptoms of pseudotumor cerebri and was subsequently diagnosed with IgA nephropathy and end-stage renal disease. To our knowledge this is the first report of IgA nephropathy presenting as end-stage renal disease in a patient who presented with pseudotumor cerebri. PMID:26989531

  19. IgA Nephropathy in a Patient Presenting with Pseudotumor Cerebri.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Umair Syed; Bacaj, Patrick; Iqbal, Hafiz Imran; Onder, Songul

    2016-01-01

    IgA nephropathy is the most common glomerulonephritis worldwide and typically has minimal signs for chronicity in histopathology at the time of initial presentation. Pseudotumor cerebri (PTC) is characterized by increased intracranial pressure in the absence of any intracranial lesions, inflammation, or obstruction. PTC has been reported in renal transplant and dialysis patients, but we are unaware of any reports of pseudotumor cerebri in patients with IgA nephropathy. We report a case of a young female who presented with signs and symptoms of pseudotumor cerebri and was subsequently diagnosed with IgA nephropathy and end-stage renal disease. To our knowledge this is the first report of IgA nephropathy presenting as end-stage renal disease in a patient who presented with pseudotumor cerebri. PMID:26989531

  20. Isolated Lymphoid Follicles are Dynamic Reservoirs for the Induction of Intestinal IgA

    PubMed Central

    Knoop, Kathryn A.; Newberry, Rodney D.

    2012-01-01

    IgA is one of the most important molecules in the regulation of intestinal homeostasis. Peyer’s patches have been traditionally recognized as sites for the induction of intestinal IgA responses, however more recent studies demonstrate that isolated lymphoid follicles (ILFs) can perform this function as well. ILF development is dynamic, changing in response to the luminal microbial burden, suggesting that ILFs play an important role providing an expandable reservoir of compensatory IgA inductive sites. However, in situations of immune dysfunction, ILFs can over-develop in response to uncontrollable enteric flora, resulting in ILF hyperplasia. The ability of ILFs to expand and respond to help control the enteric flora makes this dynamic reservoir an important arm of IgA inductive sites in intestinal immunity. PMID:22566964

  1. AGONISTIC AUTOANTIBODIES AS VASODILATORS IN ORTHOSTATIC HYPOTENSION: A NEW MECHANISM

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongliang; Kem, David C.; Reim, Sean; Khan, Muneer; Vanderlinde-Wood, Megan; Zillner, Caitlin; Collier, Daniel; Liles, Campbell; Hill, Michael A.; Cunningham, Madeleine W.; Aston, Christopher E.; Yu, Xichun

    2012-01-01

    Agonistic autoantibodies to the β-adrenergic and muscarinic receptors are a novel investigative and therapeutic target for certain orthostatic disorders. We have identified the presence of autoantibodies to β2-adrenergic and/or M3 muscarinic receptors by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in 75% (15 of 20) of patients with significant orthostatic hypotension. Purified serum IgG from all 20 patients and 10 healthy control subjects were examined in a receptor-transfected cell-based cAMP assay for β2 receptor activation and β-arrestin assay for M3 receptor activation. There was a significant increase in IgG-induced activation of β2 and M3 receptors in the patient group compared to controls. A dose response was observed for both IgG activation of β2 and M3 receptors and inhibition of their activation with the non-selective β blocker propranolol and muscarinic blocker atropine. The antibody effects on β2 and/or M3 (via production of nitric oxide) receptor-mediated vasodilation were studied in a rat cremaster resistance arteriole assay. Infusion of IgG from patients with documented β2 and/or M3 receptor agonistic activity produced a dose-dependent vasodilation. Sequential addition of the β blocker propranolol and the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester partially inhibited IgG-induced vasodilation (% of maximal dilatory response: from 57.7±10.4 to 35.3±4.6 and 24.3±5.8, respectively, p<0.01, n=3), indicating antibody activation of vascular β2 and/or M3 receptors may contribute to systemic vasodilation. These data support the concept that circulating agonistic autoantibodies serve as vasodilators and may cause or exacerbate orthostatic hypotension. PMID:22215709

  2. Serum Autoantibody Measurement for the Detection of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Middleton, Catrin H.; Irving, William; Robertson, John F. R.; Murray, Andrea; Parsy-Kowalska, Celine B.; Macdonald, Isabel K.; McElveen, Jane; Allen, Jared; Healey, Graham F.; Thomson, Brian J.; Ryder, Stephen J.; Holdenrieder, Stefan; Chapman, Caroline J.

    2014-01-01

    Background Individuals with liver disease, and especially those with Hepatitis B or C, are at an increased risk of developing hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) which is the third most common cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Inadequate screening tests largely account for presentation of advanced tumours and high mortality rates. Early detection of HCC amongst high-risk groups is paramount in improving prognosis. This research aimed to further characterise the previously described humoral immune response raised to tumour-associated antigens (TAAs) in the serum of patients with HCC. Methods Serum from 96 patients with confirmed HCC, 96 healthy controls matched for age and sex, 78 patients with confirmed liver cirrhosis and 91 patients with confirmed chronic liver disease were analysed for the presence of IgG autoantibodies raised to 41 recombinant TAAs/antigen fragments by ELISA. Results Varying autoantibody specificities (97–100%) and sensitivities (0–10%) were observed to individual TAAs. A 21-antigen panel achieved a specificity of 92% and sensitivity of 45% for the detection of HCC. This same panel identified 21% of 169 high-risk controls as having elevated autoantibody levels. A reproducible panel of 10 antigens achieved a specificity of 91% and sensitivity of 41% in HCC. 15% of 152 high-risk controls gave positive results with this panel. Conclusions This minimally invasive blood test has the potential to offer advantages over currently available tools for the identification of HCC amongst pre-disposed patients. Results are comparable to current gold standards in HCC (Ultrasonography) and to similar tests in other cancers (EarlyCDT-Lung). PMID:25093332

  3. Detection of Autoantibodies Against Myelin Oligodendrocyte Glycoprotein in Multiple Sclerosis and Related Diseases.

    PubMed

    Spadaro, Melania; Meinl, Edgar

    2016-01-01

    Autoantibodies against myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) occur in a proportion of patients with different inflammatory demyelinating diseases of the central nervous system, such as childhood multiple sclerosis (MS), acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM), and neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders (NMOSD). We describe here in detail a sensitive cell-based assay that allows the identification of autoantibodies against MOG in serum. PMID:25814289

  4. Does the autoantibody immunodominant region on thyroid peroxidase include amino acid residues 742-771?

    PubMed

    Xiong, Z; Farilla, L; Guo, J; McLachlan, S; Rapoport, B

    2001-03-01

    Identification of the thyroid peroxidase (TPO) amino acid residues that comprise the autoantibody immunodominant region is an important goal that has proven difficult because of the conformational nature of the epitopes involved. Recent data suggest that the immunodominant region has been located. Thus, by autoantibody recognition of tryptic fragments of native TPO, as well as of conformational portions of TPO expressed as cell-free translates, the autoantibody immunodominant region appears to include amino acid residues 742-771, near the C terminus of the ectodomain. To evaluate this deduction, we expressed as cell-free translates the full TPO ectodomain, as well as TPO truncated after residues 741 and 771. The epitopic integrity of these molecules was first confirmed by immunoprecipitation by patient sera containing TPO autoantibodies. However, autoantibody recognition could involve a minority of TPO autoantibodies with the individual sera, not fulfilling the strict criteria for immunodominance. In order to obtain definitive data, we performed immunoprecipitations on these TPO variants with four recombinant human monoclonal autoantibodies that define the immunodominant region. All four monoclonal autoantibodies immunoprecipitated TPO 1-741 to the same extent as they did TPO 1-771 and the full TPO ectodomain, indicating that the immunodominant region comprises (at least in large part) amino acid residues upstream of residue 741. PMID:11327613

  5. Reactivities of N-acetylgalactosamine-specific lectins with human IgA1 proteins.

    PubMed

    Moore, Jennifer S; Kulhavy, Rose; Tomana, Milan; Moldoveanu, Zina; Suzuki, Hitoshi; Brown, Rhubell; Hall, Stacy; Kilian, Mogens; Poulsen, Knud; Mestecky, Jiri; Julian, Bruce A; Novak, Jan

    2007-04-01

    Lectins are proteins with specificity of binding to certain monosaccharides or oligosaccharides. They can detect abnormal glycosylation patterns on immunoglobulins in patients with various chronic inflammatory diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis and IgA nephropathy (IgAN). However, lectins exhibit binding heterogeneity, depending on their source and methods of isolation. To characterize potential differences in recognition of terminal N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc) on IgA1, we evaluated the binding characteristics of several commercial preparations of GalNAc-specific lectins using a panel of IgA1 and, as controls, IgA2 and IgG myeloma proteins. These lectins originated from snails Helix aspersa (HAA) and Helix pomatia (HPA), and the plant Vicia villosa (VV). Only HAA and HPA bound exclusively to IgA1, with its O-linked glycans composed of GalNAc, galactose, and sialic acid. In contrast, VV reacted with sugars of both IgA subclasses and IgG, indicating that it also recognized N-linked glycans without GalNAc. Furthermore, HAA and HPA from several manufacturers differed in their ability to bind various IgA1 myeloma proteins and other GalNAc-containing glycoproteins in ELISA and Western blot. For serum samples from IgAN patients, HAA was the optimal lectin to study IgA1 glycosylation in ELISA and Western blot assays, including identification of the sites of attachment of the aberrant glycans. The galactose-deficient glycans were site-specific, localized mostly at Thr228 and/or Ser230. Because of the heterogeneity of GalNAc-specific lectins, they should be carefully characterized with appropriate substrates before undertaking any study. PMID:17275907

  6. [Quantitative determination of IgA from human bronchial mucus (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Hayem, A; Laine, A; Bailleul, V; Lebas, J

    1975-05-15

    Before quantitative analysis of bronchial mucus proteins, sputum must be transformed into a homogeneous medium: this is done by ultrasonic action and contact with cationic resin AG 50 W X 2. Then, acid mucins are fixed on Ecteola-cellulose, and proteins extracted by a phosphate/saline buffer at pH 5. IgA is estimated by electroimmunodiffusion. Reproducibility of the method is discussed: the accuracy for IgA values is 4%. PMID:238765

  7. Tear and serum antibody levels in ocular herpetic infection: diagnostic precision of secretory IgA.

    PubMed Central

    Fox, P D; Khaw, P T; McBride, B W; McGill, J I; Ward, K A

    1986-01-01

    A sensitive enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was developed to evaluate the potential of herpes simplex virus (HSV) specific antibodies in the diagnosis of herpetic eye infection. The presence of HSV specific secretory IgA (sIgA) in tears was found to be diagnostic of infection. However, serum and tear HSV specific IgG and IgA were not considered reliable indicators of active infection. PMID:3741822

  8. Autoantibodies against vinculin in patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy.

    PubMed

    Beppu, Minako; Sawai, Setsu; Satoh, Mamoru; Mori, Masahiro; Kazami, Takahiro; Misawa, Sonoko; Shibuya, Kazumoto; Ishibashi, Masumi; Sogawa, Kazuyuki; Kado, Sayaka; Kodera, Yoshio; Nomura, Fumio; Kuwabara, Satoshi

    2015-10-15

    To identify the target molecules of chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP), we used proteomic-based approach in the extracted proteins from porcine cauda equina. Two of 31 CIDP patients had markedly elevated serum autoantibodies against vinculin, a cell adhesion protein. Both of the patients with anti-vinculin antibodies had similar clinical manifestation, which are compatible with those of "typical" CIDP. Immunocytochemistry showed that vinculin was stained at the myelin sheath of the sciatic nerves by serum samples. Our results suggest that vinculin is a possible immunological target molecule in a subpopulation of typical CIDP patients. PMID:26439954

  9. Autoantibodies predicting the outcome of rheumatoid arthritis: evaluation in two subsets of patients according to severity of radiographic damage

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, O; Combe, B; Elias, A; Benali, K; Clot, J; Sany, J; Eliaou, J

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—Autoantibodies such as rheumatoid factor (RF), antikeratin antibodies (AKA), antiperinuclear factor (APF), and anti-RA 33 antibodies are considered of value for the diagnosis of RA. The purpose of this study was to evaluate these autoantibodies as predictors of severe radiographic damage in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). 
PATIENTS AND METHODS—Eighty six patients with RA (70 women, 16 men) fulfilling 1987 ACR criteria were selected from a cohort of 469 patients followed up since the first year of RA onset because they could be divided in two groups according to the severity of the radiographic damage. These 86 patients had a mean (SD) disease duration of eight (four) years: 43 patients had severe radiographic damage (Larsen score ⩾2) and 43 had limited radiographic damage (Larsen score < 2). The two groups were matched by disease duration and sex. The following autoantibodies were looked for: RF, ANA, AKA, APF, and anti-RA 33 antibodies. In addition, HLA class II DR β alleles and standard inflammatory parameters (erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C reactive protein) were determined.
RESULTS—Patients with severe radiographic damage differed from those with limited radiographic damage in that they had higher RF (p=0.01), APF (p<0.02), and AKA (p=0.001) titres. Stepwise regression analysis was done to calculate the odds ratios (OR) for each clinical and laboratory variable; only presence of cutaneous nodules (OR: 14.9; 95% CI: 7, 128), HLA DRB1*04 or DRB1*01 (OR: 7.53; 95% CI: 1.32, 42.9), AKA (OR: 3.11; 95%, CI: 0.58, 16.8 ), a high erthrocyte sedimentation rate (OR: 2.66; 95% CI: 0.60, 11.9), and a high C reactive protein value (OR: 7.4; 95% CI : 1.43, 38.1) were predictive of severe radiographic damage.
CONCLUSION—These data suggest that the risk of severe radiographic damage in RA patients is higher when cutaneous nodules, HLA DRB1*04 or DRB1*01, and/or AKA are present. The other autoantibodies of diagnostic significance are

  10. In vivo activation of complement by IgA in a rat model.

    PubMed Central

    Stad, R K; Bogers, W M; Thoomes-van der Sluys, M E; Van Es, L A; Daha, M R

    1992-01-01

    In this study we investigated the capacity of rat IgA to activate complement (C) in vivo in a rat model. Rat monomeric (m-), dimeric (d-) and polymeric (p-) IgA MoAbs were injected intravenously and assessed for deposition of C3 and C4 on IgA. By ELISA it was shown that both d- and p-IgA bound C3 whereas no binding of C3 by m-IgA was observed. Polymeric IgA was more efficient in binding of C3 as compared with d-IgA. However, in haemolytic assays no consistent decrease of plasma complement levels was observed except for dimeric IgA which induced a marginal consumption of AP50. When rats were pre-treated with cobra venom factor (CVF) to deplete C3, no C3 deposition was found on m-, d- or p-IgA. Neither m- nor d- or p-IgA was able to bind C4 in vivo. In agreement with the results described above, large sized polymeric IgA was shown to be taken up by Kupffer cells (KC) together with C3. No C3 was detected when rats were depleted of C using CVF. Taken together, the experimental data suggest that d- and p-IgA are able to activate C via the alternative pathway in vivo. PMID:1733628