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Sample records for igg inhibits testosterone

  1. Aromatase inhibition, testosterone, and seizures.

    PubMed

    Harden, Cynthia; MacLusky, Neil J

    2004-04-01

    The effect of testosterone on brain excitability is unclear. The excitatory aspect of testosterone's action in the brain may be due to its conversion to estrogen via aromatase. We report herein a 61-year-old man with temporal lobe epilepsy and sexual dysfunction due to low testosterone levels. Use of an aromatase inhibitor, letrozole, normalized his testosterone level and improved his sexual functioning. Letrozole, in addition to standard antiseizure medication, was also associated with improved seizure control. This was sustained and, further, was associated with seizure exacerbation after withdrawing letrozole, and subsequent seizure improvement after restarting it. During the course of treatment, his serum testosterone level increased, sex hormone-binding globulin decreased (SHBG), luteinizing hormone (LH), and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) levels increased, while serum estradiol levels remained undetectable. Letrozole may, therefore, have produced a central alteration in the testosterone/estrogen ratio, thereby impairing estrogen-mediated feedback control of the pituitary, resulting in the observed increase in circulating LH and FSH levels. This experience suggests that aromatase inhibitors should be further investigated as a beneficial treatment modality for male patients with epilepsy. PMID:15123030

  2. Testosterone

    MedlinePlus

    Serum testosterone ... In males, the testicles produce most of the testosterone in the body. Levels are most often checked to evaluate signs of abnormal testosterone such as: Early or late puberty (in boys) ...

  3. Testosterone

    MedlinePlus

    Serum testosterone ... In males, the testicles produce most of the testosterone in the body. Levels are most often checked to evaluate signs of low testosterone such as: Early or late puberty (in boys) ...

  4. Green tea polyphenols inhibit testosterone production in rat Leydig cells

    PubMed Central

    Figueiroa, Marina S; César Vieira, Juliany S B; Leite, Disleide S; Filho, Ruben C O Andrade; Ferreira, Fabiano; Gouveia, Patrícia S; Udrisar, Daniel P; Wanderley, Maria I

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the acute effects of green tea extract (GTE) and its polyphenol constituents, (−)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) and (−)-epicatechin (EC), on basal and stimulated testosterone production by rat Leydig cells in vitro. Leydig cells purified in a Percoll gradient were incubated for 3 h with GTE, EGCG or EC and the testosterone precursor androstenedione, in the presence or absence of either protein kinase A (PKA) or protein kinase C (PKC) activators. The reversibility of the effect was studied by pretreating cells for 15 min with GTE or EGCG, allowing them to recover for 1 h and challenging them for 2 h with human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), luteinizing hormone releasing hormone (LHRH), 22(R)-hydroxycholesterol or androstenedione. GTE and EGCG, but not EC, inhibited both basal and kinase-stimulated testosterone production. Under the pretreatment conditions, the inhibitory effect of the higher concentration of GTE/EGCG on hCG/LHRH-stimulated or 22(R)-hydroxycholesterol-induced testosterone production was maintained, whereas androstenedione-supported testosterone production returned to control levels. At the lower concentration of GTE/EGCG, the inhibitory effect of these polyphenols on 22(R)-hydroxycholesterol-supported testosterone production was reversed. The inhibitory effects of GTE may be explained by the action of its principal component, EGCG, and the presence of a gallate group in its structure seems important for its high efficacy in inhibiting testosterone production. The mechanisms underlying the effects of GTE and EGCG involve the inhibition of the PKA/PKC signalling pathways, as well as the inhibition of P450 side-chain cleavage enzyme and 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase function. PMID:19330017

  5. Leptin inhibits testosterone secretion from adult rat testis in vitro.

    PubMed

    Tena-Sempere, M; Pinilla, L; González, L C; Diéguez, C; Casanueva, F F; Aguilar, E

    1999-05-01

    adult rats. In addition, 10(-9) M leptin inhibited LH and FSH secretion by incubated hemi-pituitaries from fasted adult males, whereas, at all doses tested, it was ineffective in modulating PRL release. Our results show that leptin, depending on the state of sexual maturation, is able to inhibit testosterone secretion acting at the testicular level. Furthermore, the present data suggest that the actions of leptin on the reproductive system are complex and are probably carried out at different levels of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. PMID:10320818

  6. Potential Mechanisms for IgG4 Inhibition of Immediate Hypersensitivity Reactions.

    PubMed

    James, Louisa K; Till, Stephen J

    2016-03-01

    IgG4 is the least abundant IgG subclass in human serum, representing less than 5 % of all IgG. Increases in IgG4 occur following chronic exposure to antigen and are generally associated with states of immune tolerance. In line with this, IgG4 is regarded as an anti-inflammatory antibody with a limited ability to elicit effective immune responses. Furthermore, IgG4 attenuates allergic responses by inhibiting the activity of IgE. The mechanism by which IgG4 inhibits IgE-mediated hypersensitivity has been investigated using a variety of model systems leading to two proposed mechanisms. First by sequestering antigen, IgG4 can function as a blocking antibody, preventing cross-linking of receptor bound IgE. Second IgG4 has been proposed to co-stimulate the inhibitory IgG receptor FcγRIIb, which can negatively regulate FcεRI signaling and in turn inhibit effector cell activation. Recent advances in our understanding of the structural features of human IgG4 have shed light on the unique functional and immunologic properties of IgG4. The aim of this review is to evaluate our current understanding of IgG4 biology and reassess the mechanisms by which IgG4 functions to inhibit IgE-mediated allergic responses. PMID:26892721

  7. Inhibiting influence of testosterone on stress responsiveness during adolescence.

    PubMed

    Lürzel, Stephanie; Kaiser, Sylvia; Krüger, Christine; Sachser, Norbert

    2011-11-01

    The maturation of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is a key-component of the changes that occur during adolescence. In guinea pigs, HPA responsiveness during late adolescence depends strongly on the quantity and quality of social interactions: Males that lived in a large mixed-sex colony over the course of adolescence exhibit a lower stress response than males that were kept in pairs (one male/one female). Since colony-housed males have higher testosterone (T) levels than pair-housed males, and inhibiting effects of T on HPA function are well known, we tested the hypothesis that the decrease in stress responsiveness found in colony-housed males is due to their high T concentrations. We manipulated T levels in two experiments: 1) gonadectomy/sham-gonadectomy of colony-housed males (which usually have high T levels), 2) application of T undecanoate/vehicle to pair-housed males (which usually have low T levels). As expected, gonadectomized males showed a significantly increased stress response in comparison with sham-gonadectomized males, and T-injected males had a significantly lower stress response than vehicle-injected males. Both experiments thus confirm an inhibiting effect of T on HPA responsiveness during adolescence, which can mediate the influence of social interactions. The reduction in stress responsiveness is hypothesized to have a biologically adaptive value: A sudden increase in glucocorticoid concentrations can enhance aggressive behavior. Thus, pair-housed males might be adapted to aggressively defend their female ('resource defense strategy'), whereas colony-housed males display little aggressive behavior and are capable of integrating themselves into a colony ('queuing strategy'). PMID:21983230

  8. Dose-dependent platelet stimulation and inhibition induced by anti-PIA1 IgG

    SciTech Connect

    Ryu, T.; Davis, J.M.; Schwartz, K.A. )

    1990-07-01

    The PIA1 antibody produces several clinically distinct and severe thrombocytopenias. Investigations have demonstrated divergent effects on platelet function; prior reports demonstrated inhibition, while a conflicting publication showed platelet activation. We have resolved this conflict using anti-PIA1 IgG produced by a patient with posttransfusion purpura. Relatively low concentrations stimulated platelet aggregation and release of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) whereas high concentrations inhibited platelet function, producing a thrombasthenia-like state. The number of molecules of platelet-associated IgG necessary to initiate aggregation and ATP release (2,086 +/- 556) or produce maximum aggregation (23,420 +/- 3,706) or complete inhibition (63,582 +/- 2654) were measured with a quantitative radiometric assay for bound anti-PIA1. Preincubation of platelets with high concentrations of PIA1 antibody inhibited platelet aggregation with 10 mumol/L adenosine diphosphate and blocked 125I-labeled fibrinogen platelet binding. Platelet activation with nonfibrinogen dependent agonist, 1 U/ml thrombin, was not inhibited by this high concentration of PIA1 IgG. In conclusion, anti-PIAI IgG produces (1) stimulation of platelet aggregation and ATP release that is initiated with 2000 molecules IgG per platelet and is associated with an increase of 125I-fibrinogen binding; (2) conversely, inhibition of platelet aggregation is observed with maximum antibody binding, 63,000 molecules IgG per platelet, and is mediated via a blockade of fibrinogen binding.

  9. High levels of testosterone inhibit ovarian follicle development by repressing the FSH signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tao; Cui, Yu-qian; Zhao, Han; Liu, Hong-bin; Zhao, Shi-dou; Gao, Yuan; Mu, Xiao-li; Gao, Fei; Chen, Zi-jiang

    2015-10-01

    The effect of high concentrations of testosterone on ovarian follicle development was investigated. Primary follicles and granulosa cells were cultured in vitro in media supplemented with a testosterone concentration gradient. The combined effects of testosterone and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) on follicular growth and granulosa cell gonadotropin receptor mRNA expression were also investigated. Follicle growth in the presence of high testosterone concentrations was promoted at early stages (days 1-7), but inhibited at later stage (days 7-14) of in vitro culture. Interestingly, testosterone-induced follicle development arrest was rescued by treatment with high concentrations of FSH (400 mIU/mL). In addition, in cultured granulosa cells, high testosterone concentrations induced cell proliferation, and increased the mRNA expression level of FSH receptor (FSHR), and luteinized hormone/choriogonadotropin receptor. It was concluded that high concentrations of testosterone inhibited follicle development, most likely through regulation of the FSH signaling pathway, although independently from FSHR downregulation. These findings are an important step in further understanding the pathogenesis of polycystic ovary syndrome. PMID:26489629

  10. Effects of aromatase inhibition vs. testosterone in older men with low testosterone: randomized-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Dias, J P; Melvin, D; Simonsick, E M; Carlson, O; Shardell, M D; Ferrucci, L; Chia, C W; Basaria, S; Egan, J M

    2016-01-01

    Aging in men is associated with loss of bone mass, impaired physical function and altered body composition. The objective of this proof-of-concept randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group, single-center trial was to determine the relative effects of testosterone (T) and estradiol (E(2)) on bone mineral density, body composition, and physical performance in older men. The primary outcome was lumbar spine bone mineral density (BMD), and secondary outcomes were body composition, muscle strength, gait speed, and sex hormone concentrations. Forty three men (age range, 65-82 years; mean age 71 years) with low total T levels <350 ng/dL were randomized to one of three groups: 5 g transdermal testosterone gel (TT) (N = 16), anastrozole (AI) 1 mg (N = 14) or placebo daily (N = 13) for 12 months. Outcomes were assessed at baseline, 3, 6, and 12 months. Both TT and AI increased serum TT levels (>500 ng/dL, p < 0.05) compared to baseline; T values remained stable throughout the duration of the trial. At 12 months, TT improved the primary outcome of lumbar spine BMD (p < 0.01).Both interventions improved knee strength at 12 months compared to baseline (p < 0.05) while lean body mass significantly increased only in the AI group at 6 and 12 months (1.49 ± 0.38 kg, p < 0.01; 1.24 ± 0.39 kg, p < 0.05, respectively) compared to baseline. Interestingly, TT improved fast gait speed at 3 and 12 months (p < 0.01, p < 0.05, respectively). In summary, this proof-of-concept study confirms that aromatization of T is required for maintaining BMD in older men with low-T levels. The trial also uncovered the novel finding that aromatization of T is required for improvement in fast gait speed, an observation that needs to be verified in future studies. PMID:26588809

  11. Anabolic effects of testosterone are preserved during inhibition of 5alpha-reductase.

    PubMed

    Borst, Stephen E; Conover, Christine F; Carter, Christy S; Gregory, Chris M; Marzetti, Emanuele; Leeuwenburgh, Christiaan; Vandenborne, Krista; Wronski, Thomas J

    2007-08-01

    At replacement doses, testosterone produces only modest increases in muscle strength and bone mineral density in older hypogonadal men. Although higher doses of testosterone are more anabolic, there is concern over increased adverse effects, notably prostate enlargement. We tested a novel strategy for obtaining robust anabolic effects without prostate enlargement. Orchiectomized (ORX) male rats were treated for 56 days with 1.0 mg testosterone/day, with and without 0.75 mg/day of the 5alpha-reductase inhibitor MK-434. Testosterone administration elevated the prostate dihydrotestosterone concentration and caused prostate enlargement. Both effects were inhibited by MK-434. ORX produced a catabolic state manifested in reduced food intake, blunted weight gain, reduced hemoglobin concentration, decreased kidney mass, and increased bone resorption, and in the proximal tibia there was both decreased cancellous bone volume and a decreased number of trabeculae. In soleus and extensor digitorum longus muscles, ORX reduced both the percentage of type I muscle fibers and the cross-sectional area of type 1 and 2 fibers. Testosterone administration caused a number of anabolic effects, including increases in food intake, hemoglobin concentration, and grip strength, and reversed the catabolic effects of ORX on bone. Testosterone administration also partially reversed ORX-induced changes in muscle fibers. In contrast to the prostate effects of testosterone, the effects on muscle, bone, and hemoglobin concentration were not blocked by MK-434. Our study demonstrates that the effects of testosterone on muscle and bone can be separated from the prostate effects and provides a testable strategy for combating sarcopenia and osteopenia in older hypogonadal men. PMID:17488806

  12. IN VITRO CONAZOLE EXPOSURE INHIBITS TESTOSTERONE PRODUCTION IN ADULT AND NEONATAL RAT TESTIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    IN VITRO CONAZOLE EXPOSURE INHIBITS TESTOSTERONE PRODUCTION IN THE ADULT AND NEONATAL TESTIS
    Chad R. Blystone1, 2, David J. Dix2, and John C. Rockett2
    1Department of Environmental and Molecular Toxicology, Box 7633, NC State University, Raleigh, NC 27695, USA and 2U.S. Envi...

  13. Ketoconazole inhibition of testicular secretion of testosterone and displacement of steroid hormones from serum transport proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Grosso, D S; Boyden, T W; Pamenter, R W; Johnson, D G; Stevens, D A; Galgiani, J N

    1983-01-01

    In vivo perfusion of canine testes with ketoconazole inhibited the stimulation of testosterone production by human chorionic gonadotropin in a dose-dependent manner. Ketoconazole also selectively displaced steroids from serum-binding globulins. Dihydrotestosterone and estradiol binding to sex hormone-binding globulin were inhibited by ketoconazole. Cortisol binding to corticosteroid-binding globulin was unaffected. The concentrations of ketoconazole that inhibited human chorionic gonadotropin stimulation of testicular androgen production and displaced sex steroids from sex hormone-binding globulin were in the range of blood levels found in patients on higher therapeutic dosage regimens. Suppression of testicular testosterone synthesis and displacement of estrogens from sex hormone-binding globulin may decrease the androgen/estrogen ratio of the blood and contribute to the development of gynecomastia that has been reported in some ketoconazole-treated patients. PMID:6301363

  14. Purified IgG from Patients with Obstetric but not IgG from Non-obstetric Antiphospholipid Syndrome Inhibit Trophoblast Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Poulton, Katie; Ripoll, Vera M; Pericleous, Charis; Meroni, Pier Luigi; Gerosa, Maria; Ioannou, Yiannis; Rahman, Anisur; Giles, Ian P

    2015-01-01

    Problem Some patients with antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) suffer pregnancy morbidity (PM) but not vascular thrombosis (VT), whilst others suffer VT only. Therefore, we compared the effects of IgG from VT+/PM− and VT−/PM+ subjects on human first-trimester trophoblast (HTR8) cells. Method of study HTR-8 cells were incubated with APS VT+/PM−, APS VT−/PM+ or healthy control (HC) IgG. We measured trophoblast invasion by cell invasion assay; mRNA expression of TLR4 and adaptor proteins; phosphorylation of p38 MAPK, NFκB and ERK; and expression of interleukin (IL)-8 and IL-6. Results VT−/PM+ IgG, but not VT+/PM− IgG significantly reduced HTR-8 invasion. The effects on invasion were blocked by TLR-4 inhibition. Neither VT+/PM− nor VT−/PM+ IgG altered MyD88 mRNA expression, phosphorylation of signalling molecules or cytokine expression. Conclusions VT−/PM+ IgG exert functionally relevant effects on human trophoblast cells but VT+/PM− IgG do not. PMID:25469631

  15. Inhibition by synthetic peptides from human IgG Fc of OKT4 binding and Fc receptor binding

    SciTech Connect

    Gaarde, W.A.; McClurg, M.R.; Hahn, G.S.; Plummer, J.M.

    1986-03-05

    Synthetic peptides from the Fc region of human IgG were tested for the ability to inhibit IgG rosette formation, /sup 125/I-IgG binding to Fc receptors on lymphocytes, and expression of the T4 cell determinant. The Fc/sub ..gamma../ peptides inhibited IgG rosette formation and competitively inhibited both /sup 125/I-IgG binding to Fc receptors and OKT4 binding to the T4 cell determinant. Peptides containing D-amino acids did not inhibit IgG rosettes, OKT4 binding or /sup 125/I-IgG binding. OKT4 binding to T4 on MNC was inhibited by heat aggregated IgG but not by monomeric IgG. OKT3, OKT8 and OKT11 binding to their determinants was not altered by Fc/sub ..gamma../ peptides, aggregated IgG or monomeric IgG. These results suggest that T4 antigen, Fc receptor for IgG and the Fc/sub ..gamma../ peptide binding site are in close proximity on the cell surface and when occupied by their respective ligands may sterically hinder binding to other sites. Alternatively, Fc/sub ..gamma../ peptides may indirectly regulate cell surface expression of T4 and/or Fc receptors for IgG. These Fc/sub ..gamma../ peptides inhibit the MLR, inhibit antigen induced T cell proliferation and reverse animal models of autoimmune disease. The immunoregulatory activities of these peptides may be related to their selective action on T4 helper/inducer lymphocytes expressing Fc receptors.

  16. Investigation of testosterone-mediated non-transcriptional inhibition of Ca2+ in vascular smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    HU, ZHONGQIAN; MA, RUI; GONG, JIANBIN

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to observe the effect of short-term testosterone treatment on Ca2+ in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) of male rats. Cells were loaded with the Ca2+-sensitive fluorescent indicator Fura-2 and intracellular Ca2+ signals of VSMCs were measured using a Nikon TE2000-E live cell imaging workstation. The baseline level of cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) in resting state VSMCs was ~100 nmol/l. Testosterone alone led to a slow increase in [Ca2+]i, but there was no significant difference compared with the ethanol vehicle control. When VSMCs were stimulated with a high-potassium solution (containing 42 mmol/l of K+), [Ca2+]i rose rapidly and remained at a high plateau level. Short-term treatment using physiological (40 nmol/l) or supraphysiological (4 µmol/l) levels of testosterone at either the plateau phase or the pretreatment stage could significantly inhibit the [Ca2+]i increase induced by high-potassium solutions. Testosterone coupled to bovine serum albumin also had a similar effect and repetitive testosterone interventions over a short time-frame led to inhibition. Testosterone has a non-transcriptional inhibition effect on the [Ca2+]i of VSMCs and acts with the cell membranes of VSMCs to inhibit voltage-gated Ca2+ channel-mediated Ca2+ influx, which may be one of the mechanisms underlying testosterone-mediated vasodilation. PMID:26893838

  17. Paint thinner exposure inhibits testosterone synthesis and secretion in a reversible manner in the rat.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Bayram; Canpolat, Sinan; Sandal, Suleyman; Akpolat, Nusret; Kutlu, Selim; Ilhan, Necip; Kelestimur, Haluk

    2006-11-01

    Occupational exposure and sniffing of toluene-based organic solvents is an important public health problem. In this study, we have investigated the effects of paint thinner inhalation on testosterone synthesis and secretion in the male rat. A control group inhaled normal air ventilation. The remaining animals were divided into three groups and exposed to paint thinner in a glassy cage for 15 and 30 days (2 h/day). A group of rats was allowed to recover for 15 days after 30 days of exposure. Toluene concentration (the largest constituent in thinner, 66%) was set at 1500 ppm in the inhaled air. At the end, all animals were decapitated and blood samples obtained. Testes and seminal vesicles were removed and weighed out. Serum total testosterone levels were determined by chemiluminescence enzyme immunoassay. Testicular tissue specimens were processed for semi-quantitative evaluation of immunohistochemical testosterone staining and light microscopy. Intensity of immunostaining was evaluated on a scale between 0 (no staining), 1 (minimal), 2 (mild), 3 (moderate) and 4 (strong staining). Serum testosterone levels (ng/ml) were decreased by 15-day (3.31+/-0.61) and 30-day (1.17+/-0.54, p<0.02) thinner exposure compared to the controls (3.91+/-1.03). Another group of rats exposed to thinner for 30 days and then allowed to recover for a period of 15 days had significantly elevated levels of testosterone values (3.77+/-1.1; p<0.05). Immunohistochemical testosterone staining of the cytoplasm of Leydig cells was moderate (3+) and mild (2+) in 15 and 30 days thinner inhalation groups, respectively. Strong staining (4+) was restored following the recovery period. Testicular weight was significantly reduced in all test groups compared to the control values (p<0.01). Diameters of seminiferous tubules were significantly decreased in the solvent exposed groups with enlarged connective tissue. The present findings suggest that paint thinner inhalation inhibits testosterone synthesis

  18. Testosterone delays vascular smooth muscle cell senescence and inhibits collagen synthesis via the Gas6/Axl signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yan-Qing; Zhao, Jing; Jin, Cheng-Wei; Li, Yi-Hui; Tang, Meng-Xiong; Wang, Zhi-Hao; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Yun; Li, Li; Zhong, Ming

    2016-06-01

    Testosterone deficiency is associated with a higher incidence of cardiovascular diseases in men. However, its effect on cell senescence, which plays a causal role in vascular aging, remains unclear. Here, we tested the hypothesis that testosterone alleviated vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) senescence and collagen synthesis via growth arrest-specific protein 6 (Gas6)/Axl- and Akt/FoxO1a-dependent pathways. Testosterone significantly ameliorated angiotensin II-induced VSMC senescence and collagen overexpression. In addition, testosterone inhibited angiotensin II-induced matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) activity, which played a pivotal role in facilitating age-related collagen deposition. Testosterone increased the expression of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 but decreased the expression of MMP-2 and membrane type-1 metalloproteinase which contributed to increase MMP-2 activity. The effects on VSMCs senescence and collagen synthesis were mediated by restoration of angiotensin II-induced downregulation of Gas6 and Axl expression and a subsequent reduction of Akt and FoxO1a phosphorylation. The effects of testosterone were reversed by a Gas6 blocker, Axl-Fc, and a specific inhibitor of Axl, R428. Treatment of VSMCs with PI3K inhibitor LY294002 abrogated the downregulating effect of testosterone on MMP-2 activity. Furthermore, when FoxO1a expression was silenced by using a specific siRNA, the inhibitory effect of testosterone on MMP-2 activity was revered as well, that indicated this process was Akt/FoxO1a dependence. Taken together, Gas6/Axl and Akt/FoxO1a were involved in protective effects of testosterone on VSMCs senescence and collagen synthesis. Our results provide a novel mechanism underlying the protective effect of testosterone on vascular aging and may serve as a theoretical basis for testosterone replacement therapy. PMID:27206970

  19. The Spermatogenic Effect of Yacon Extract and Its Constituents and Their Inhibition Effect of Testosterone Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jeong Sook; Han, Kun

    2013-01-01

    We screened the pharmacological effects of a 50% ethanol extract of Yacon tubers and leaves on spermatogenesis in rats. As a result, we found that Yacon tuber extracts increased sperm number and serum testosterone level in rats. It has been reported that the crude extract of Yacon tubers and leaves contain phenolic acids, such as, chlorogenic acid, ferulic acid and caffeic acid by HPLC/MS analysis. We were interested in the contributions made by phenolic acid, particularly chlorogenic acid of Yacon tuber extract to the spermatogenic activity. After administering Yacon tuber extract or chlorogenic acid to rats for 5 weeks, numbers of sperm in epididymis were increased by 34% and 20%, respectively. We also administered ferulic acid, which has been reported to be a metabolite of chlorogenic acid and a constituent of Yacon tuber extract to investigate its spermatogenic activity in rats. Yacon tuber extract and ferulic acid increased sperm numbers by 43% and 37%, respectively. And, Yacon tuber extract, and chlorogenic acid showed significantly inhibition effect of testoeterone degradation in rat liver homogenate. We considered that the spermatogenic effect of Yacon tuber extract might be related to phenolic compounds and their inhibitory effect of testosterone degradation. Yacon showed the possibility as ameliorable agents of infertility by sperm deficiency and late onset hypogonadism syndrome with low level of testosterone. PMID:24009874

  20. The spermatogenic effect of yacon extract and its constituents and their inhibition effect of testosterone metabolism.

    PubMed

    Park, Jeong Sook; Han, Kun

    2013-03-01

    We screened the pharmacological effects of a 50% ethanol extract of Yacon tubers and leaves on spermatogenesis in rats. As a result, we found that Yacon tuber extracts increased sperm number and serum testosterone level in rats. It has been reported that the crude extract of Yacon tubers and leaves contain phenolic acids, such as, chlorogenic acid, ferulic acid and caffeic acid by HPLC/MS analysis. We were interested in the contributions made by phenolic acid, particularly chlorogenic acid of Yacon tuber extract to the spermatogenic activity. After administering Yacon tuber extract or chlorogenic acid to rats for 5 weeks, numbers of sperm in epididymis were increased by 34% and 20%, respectively. We also administered ferulic acid, which has been reported to be a metabolite of chlorogenic acid and a constituent of Yacon tuber extract to investigate its spermatogenic activity in rats. Yacon tuber extract and ferulic acid increased sperm numbers by 43% and 37%, respectively. And, Yacon tuber extract, and chlorogenic acid showed significantly inhibition effect of testoeterone degradation in rat liver homogenate. We considered that the spermatogenic effect of Yacon tuber extract might be related to phenolic compounds and their inhibitory effect of testosterone degradation. Yacon showed the possibility as ameliorable agents of infertility by sperm deficiency and late onset hypogonadism syndrome with low level of testosterone. PMID:24009874

  1. Inhibition of testosterone-induced hyperplasia of the prostate of sprague-dawley rats by pumpkin seed oil.

    PubMed

    Gossell-Williams, M; Davis, A; O'Connor, N

    2006-01-01

    The oil from the pumpkin (Cucurbita pepo) seed is claimed to be useful in the management of benign prostatic hyperplasia. This investigation seeks to examine the effect of pumpkin seed oil on testosterone-induced hyperplasia of the prostate of rats. Hyperplasia was induced by subcutaneous administration of testosterone (0.3 mg/100 g of body weight) for 20 days. Simultaneous oral administration of either pumpkin seed oil (2.0 and 4.0 mg/100 g of body weight) or corn oil (vehicle) was also given for 20 days. The weights of the rats were recorded weekly, and the influence of testosterone and pumpkin seed oil on the weight gain of the rats was examined. On day 21, rats were sacrificed, and the prostate was removed, cleaned, and weighed. The prostate size ratio (prostate weight/rat body weight) was then calculated. Neither testosterone nor pumpkin seed oil had any significant influence on the weight gain of the rats. Testosterone significantly increased prostate size ratio (P < .05), and this induced increase was inhibited in rats fed with pumpkin seed oil at 2.0 mg/100 g of body weight. The protective effect of pumpkin seed oil was significant at the higher pumpkin seed oil dose (P < .02). We conclude pumpkin seed oil can inhibit testosterone-induced hyperplasia of the prostate and therefore may be beneficial in the management of benign prostatic hyperplasia. PMID:16822218

  2. 5α-Reductase Inhibition Suppresses Testosterone-Induced Initial Regrowth of Regressed Xenograft Prostate Tumors in Animal Models

    PubMed Central

    Masoodi, Khalid Z.; Ramos Garcia, Raquel; Pascal, Laura E.; Wang, Yujuan; Ma, Hei M.; O'Malley, Katherine; Eisermann, Kurtis; Shevrin, Daniel H.; Nguyen, Holly M.; Vessella, Robert L.; Nelson, Joel B.; Parikh, Rahul A.

    2013-01-01

    Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is the standard treatment for patients with prostate-specific antigen progression after treatment for localized prostate cancer. An alternative to continuous ADT is intermittent ADT (IADT), which allows recovery of testosterone during off-cycles to stimulate regrowth and differentiation of the regressed prostate tumor. IADT offers patients a reduction in side effects associated with ADT, improved quality of life, and reduced cost with no difference in overall survival. Our previous studies showed that IADT coupled with 5α-reductase inhibitor (5ARI), which blocks testosterone conversion to DHT could prolong survival of animals bearing androgen-sensitive prostate tumors when off-cycle duration was fixed. To further investigate this clinically relevant observation, we measured the time course of testosterone-induced regrowth of regressed LuCaP35 and LNCaP xenograft tumors in the presence or absence of a 5ARI. 5α-Reductase inhibitors suppressed the initial regrowth of regressed prostate tumors. However, tumors resumed growth and were no longer responsive to 5α-reductase inhibition several days after testosterone replacement. This finding was substantiated by bromodeoxyuridine and Ki67 staining of LuCaP35 tumors, which showed inhibition of prostate tumor cell proliferation by 5ARI on day 2, but not day 14, after testosterone replacement. 5α-Reductase inhibitors also suppressed testosterone-stimulated proliferation of LNCaP cells precultured in androgen-free media, suggesting that blocking testosterone conversion to DHT can inhibit prostate tumor cell proliferation via an intracrine mechanism. These results suggest that short off-cycle coupled with 5α-reductase inhibition could maximize suppression of prostate tumor growth and, thus, improve potential survival benefit achieved in combination with IADT. PMID:23671262

  3. 5α-reductase inhibition suppresses testosterone-induced initial regrowth of regressed xenograft prostate tumors in animal models.

    PubMed

    Masoodi, Khalid Z; Ramos Garcia, Raquel; Pascal, Laura E; Wang, Yujuan; Ma, Hei M; O'Malley, Katherine; Eisermann, Kurtis; Shevrin, Daniel H; Nguyen, Holly M; Vessella, Robert L; Nelson, Joel B; Parikh, Rahul A; Wang, Zhou

    2013-07-01

    Androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is the standard treatment for patients with prostate-specific antigen progression after treatment for localized prostate cancer. An alternative to continuous ADT is intermittent ADT (IADT), which allows recovery of testosterone during off-cycles to stimulate regrowth and differentiation of the regressed prostate tumor. IADT offers patients a reduction in side effects associated with ADT, improved quality of life, and reduced cost with no difference in overall survival. Our previous studies showed that IADT coupled with 5α-reductase inhibitor (5ARI), which blocks testosterone conversion to DHT could prolong survival of animals bearing androgen-sensitive prostate tumors when off-cycle duration was fixed. To further investigate this clinically relevant observation, we measured the time course of testosterone-induced regrowth of regressed LuCaP35 and LNCaP xenograft tumors in the presence or absence of a 5ARI. 5α-Reductase inhibitors suppressed the initial regrowth of regressed prostate tumors. However, tumors resumed growth and were no longer responsive to 5α-reductase inhibition several days after testosterone replacement. This finding was substantiated by bromodeoxyuridine and Ki67 staining of LuCaP35 tumors, which showed inhibition of prostate tumor cell proliferation by 5ARI on day 2, but not day 14, after testosterone replacement. 5α-Reductase inhibitors also suppressed testosterone-stimulated proliferation of LNCaP cells precultured in androgen-free media, suggesting that blocking testosterone conversion to DHT can inhibit prostate tumor cell proliferation via an intracrine mechanism. These results suggest that short off-cycle coupled with 5α-reductase inhibition could maximize suppression of prostate tumor growth and, thus, improve potential survival benefit achieved in combination with IADT. PMID:23671262

  4. IN VITRO CONAZOLE EXPOSURE INHIBITS TESTOSTERONE PRODUCTION IN THE ADULT AND NEONATAL RAT TESTIS THROUGH THE INHIBITION OF CYP17 ACTIVITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    IN VITRO CONAZOLE EXPOSURE INHIBITS TESTOSTERONE PRODUCTION IN THE ADULT AND NEONATAL RAT TESTIS THROUGH THE INHIBITION OF CYP17 ACTIVITY

    Chad R. Blystone1, David J. Dix2, and John C. Rockett2
    1Department of Environmental and Molecular Toxicology, NC State University, R...

  5. Testosterone Increases Susceptibility to Amebic Liver Abscess in Mice and Mediates Inhibition of IFNγ Secretion in Natural Killer T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lotter, Hannelore; Helk, Elena; Bernin, Hannah; Jacobs, Thomas; Prehn, Cornelia; Adamski, Jerzy; González-Roldán, Nestor; Holst, Otto; Tannich, Egbert

    2013-01-01

    Amebic liver abscess (ALA), a parasitic disease due to infection with the protozoan Entamoeba histolytica, occurs age and gender dependent with strong preferences for adult males. Using a mouse model for ALA with a similar male bias for the disease, we have investigated the role of female and male sexual hormones and provide evidence for a strong contribution of testosterone. Removal of testosterone by orchiectomy significantly reduced sizes of abscesses in male mice, while substitution of testosterone increased development of ALA in female mice. Activation of natural killer T (NKT) cells, which are known to be important for the control of ALA, is influenced by testosterone. Specifically activated NKT cells isolated from female mice produce more IFNγ compared to NKT cells derived from male mice. This high level production of IFNγ in female derived NKT cells was inhibited by testosterone substitution, while the IFNγ production in male derived NKT cells was increased by orchiectomy. Gender dependent differences were not a result of differences in the total number of NKT cells, but a result of a higher activation potential for the CD4− NKT cell subpopulation in female mice. Taken together, we conclude that the hormone status of the host, in particular the testosterone level, determines susceptibility to ALA at least in a mouse model of the disease. PMID:23424637

  6. Testosterone increases susceptibility to amebic liver abscess in mice and mediates inhibition of IFNγ secretion in natural killer T cells.

    PubMed

    Lotter, Hannelore; Helk, Elena; Bernin, Hannah; Jacobs, Thomas; Prehn, Cornelia; Adamski, Jerzy; González-Roldán, Nestor; Holst, Otto; Tannich, Egbert

    2013-01-01

    Amebic liver abscess (ALA), a parasitic disease due to infection with the protozoan Entamoeba histolytica, occurs age and gender dependent with strong preferences for adult males. Using a mouse model for ALA with a similar male bias for the disease, we have investigated the role of female and male sexual hormones and provide evidence for a strong contribution of testosterone. Removal of testosterone by orchiectomy significantly reduced sizes of abscesses in male mice, while substitution of testosterone increased development of ALA in female mice. Activation of natural killer T (NKT) cells, which are known to be important for the control of ALA, is influenced by testosterone. Specifically activated NKT cells isolated from female mice produce more IFNγ compared to NKT cells derived from male mice. This high level production of IFNγ in female derived NKT cells was inhibited by testosterone substitution, while the IFNγ production in male derived NKT cells was increased by orchiectomy. Gender dependent differences were not a result of differences in the total number of NKT cells, but a result of a higher activation potential for the CD4(-) NKT cell subpopulation in female mice. Taken together, we conclude that the hormone status of the host, in particular the testosterone level, determines susceptibility to ALA at least in a mouse model of the disease. PMID:23424637

  7. Leptin inhibits basal but not gonadotrophin-stimulated testosterone production in the immature mouse and sheep testis.

    PubMed

    Herrid, Muren; Xia, Yin; O'Shea, Tim; McFarlane, James R

    2008-01-01

    The mechanisms whereby leptin regulates testosterone secretion are complex and are likely to involve actions at different levels of the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal axis. In the present study, the effect of leptin on testicular steroidogenesis at different developmental stages in mice and sheep was investigated. Testosterone data from testicular slice and Leydig cells of immature and adult mice testes demonstrated that the action of leptin in the regulation of steroidogenesis appears to be dependent on the developmental stage of the testis. Leptin biphasically modulates basal testosterone production in immature testicular slice cultures: at relatively low concentrations (6.25-12.5 ng mL(-1)) leptin exerts a significant inhibitory effect, but has less of an effect at very low (1.25 ng mL(-1)) or high concentrations (25 ng mL(-1)). However, leptin failed to modulate basal testosterone levels in Leydig cell preparations. In contrast with immature testes, leptin was unable to regulate either basal or human chorionic gonadotrophin (10 IU mL(-1))-stimulated testosterone production in adult testicular slices or Leydig cell cultures. The age- and concentration-dependent regulation pattern was confirmed using sheep testicular slice culture. Leptin (1.56-25 ng mL(-1)) significantly inhibited basal testosterone production in the testis from birth to Day 21, but had no effect on Day 27 or older testes. However, the plasma and testicular concentrations of leptin and testosterone data in the ram indicate that such a regulatory effect of leptin on testis steroidogenesis in vitro is unable to efficiently influence testosterone concentrations in vivo. This does not exclude the possibility of a non-competitive mechanism of interaction between leptin and luteinising hormone to regulate testosterone production. Thus, we hypothesise that leptin is not an important independent regulator of testosterone concentration in the normal physiological state. The physiological significance and

  8. Inhibition of erythrocyte invasion and Plasmodium falciparum merozoite surface protein 1 processing by human immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) and IgG3 antibodies.

    PubMed

    Lazarou, Maria; Guevara Patiño, José A; Jennings, Richard M; McIntosh, Richard S; Shi, Jianguo; Howell, Steven; Cullen, Eilish; Jones, Tarran; Adame-Gallegos, Jaime R; Chappel, Jonathan A; McBride, Jana S; Blackman, Michael J; Holder, Anthony A; Pleass, Richard J

    2009-12-01

    Antigen-specific antibodies (Abs) to the 19-kDa carboxy-terminal region of Plasmodium falciparum merozoite surface protein 1 (MSP1(19)) play an important role in protective immunity to malaria. Mouse monoclonal Abs (MAbs) 12.10 and 12.8 recognizing MSP1(19) can inhibit red cell invasion by interfering with MSP1 processing on the merozoite surface. We show here that this ability is dependent on the intact Ab since Fab and F(ab')(2) fragments derived from MAb 12.10, although capable of binding MSP1 with high affinity and competing with the intact antibody for binding to MSP1, were unable to inhibit erythrocyte invasion or MSP1 processing. The DNA sequences of the variable (V) regions of both MAbs 12.8 and 12.10 were obtained, and partial amino acid sequences of the same regions were confirmed by mass spectrometry. Human chimeric Abs constructed by using these sequences, which combine the original mouse V regions with human gamma1 and gamma3 constant regions, retain the ability to bind to both parasites and recombinant MSP1(19), and both chimeric human immunoglobulin G1s (IgG1s) were at least as good at inhibiting erythrocyte invasion as the parental murine MAbs 12.8 and 12.10. Furthermore, the human chimeric Abs of the IgG1 class (but not the corresponding human IgG3), induced significant NADPH-mediated oxidative bursts and degranulation from human neutrophils. These chimeric human Abs will enable investigators to examine the role of human Fcgamma receptors in immunity to malaria using a transgenic parasite and mouse model and may prove useful in humans for neutralizing parasites as an adjunct to antimalarial drug therapy. PMID:19805526

  9. STRUCTURE ACTIVITY RELATIONSHIP OF PHTHALATE ESTERS TO INHIBITED FETAL TESTICULAR TESTOSTERONE PRODUCTION IN THE SPRAGUE DAWLEY RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several of the phthalate esters (widely used as plasticizers of polyvinyl chloride and other applications) have been shown to inhibit fetal testicular testosterone (T) production and Insl3 mRNA in the laboratory rat. The current study was designed to define the dose response of 7...

  10. Supplementary testosterone inhibits paternal care in a tropically breeding sparrow, Zonotrichia capensis.

    PubMed

    Lynn, Sharon E; Prince, Leslie E; Schook, Derek M; Moore, Ignacio T

    2009-01-01

    In most male birds that exhibit paternal care, elevation in testosterone above the breeding baseline reduces nestling provisioning, which can be detrimental to offspring survival. Mechanisms that may allow some males to avoid this detrimental effect of elevated testosterone include (1) decreased sensitivity to testosterone's effects on behavior and (2) uncoupling of testosterone secretion from territorial challenges (thus reducing the number of transient elevations in testosterone above the breeding baseline). Both of these "cost-avoidance" mechanisms have been documented, but whether selection for these mechanisms is correlated or independent is unknown. We investigated the relationship between elevated testosterone and paternal care in a tropical bird, the rufous-collared sparrow (Zonotrichia capensis). Zonotrichia capensis males exhibit an uncoupling of testosterone secretion from territorial aggression, and this species has a flexible breeding season and a clutch size smaller than those of temperate congeners. We implanted males with testosterone or empty implants and observed paternal behavior 2-3 and 6-7 d posthatch. During both observation periods, 100% of control males fed chicks, whereas 22% and 0% of testosterone-implanted males fed chicks on days 2-3 and 6-7, respectively. Chicks of testosterone-implanted males weighed less than control chicks, but tarsus growth, wing growth, and fledging success did not differ. Thus, we demonstrate a robust negative effect of testosterone on nestling provisioning that may not ultimately affect reproductive success. We suggest that these results relate to extreme flexibility in breeding schedule and the small clutch size in this tropical species. Our data also suggest that selection for the two mechanisms to avoid deleterious effects of elevations in testosterone above the breeding baseline likely occurs independently. PMID:19799502

  11. Plasmodium falciparum infection and age influence parasite growth inhibition mediated by IgG in Beninese infants.

    PubMed

    Adamou, Rafiou; Chénou, Francine; Sadissou, Ibrahim; Sonon, Paulin; Dechavanne, Célia; Djilali-Saïah, Abdelkader; Cottrell, Gilles; Le Port, Agnès; Massougbodji, Achille; Remarque, Edmond J; Luty, Adrian J F; Sanni, Ambaliou; Garcia, André; Migot-Nabias, Florence; Milet, Jacqueline; Courtin, David

    2016-07-01

    Antibodies that impede the invasion of Plasmodium falciparum (P. falciparum) merozoites into erythrocytes play a critical role in anti-malarial immunity. The Growth Inhibition Assay (GIA) is an in vitro measure of the functional capacity of such antibodies to limit erythrocyte invasion and/or parasite growth. Up to now, it is unclear whether growth-inhibitory activity correlates with protection from clinical disease and there are inconsistent results from studies performed with GIA. Studies that have focused on the relationship between IgGs and their in vitro parasite Growth Inhibition Activity (GIAc) in infants aged less than two years old are rare. Here, we used clinical and parasitological data to precisely define symptomatic or asymptomatic infection with P. falciparum in groups of infants followed-up actively for 18 months post-natally. We quantified the levels of IgG1 and IgG3 directed to a panel of candidate P. falciparum vaccine antigens (AMA-1, MSP1, 2, 3 and GLURP) using ELISA and the functional activity of IgG was quantified using GIA. Data were then correlated with individuals' infection status. At 18 months of age, infants harbouring infections at the time of blood sampling had an average 19% less GIAc than those not infected (p=0.004, multivariate linear regression). GIAc decreased from 12 to 18 months of age (p=0.003, Wilcoxon matched pairs test). Antibody levels quantified at 18 months in infants were strongly correlated with their exposure to malarial infection, however GIAc was not correlated with malaria infectious status (asymptomatic and symptomatic groups). In conclusion, both infection status at blood draw and age influence parasite growth inhibition mediated by IgG in the GIA. Both factors must be taken into account when correlations between GIAc and anti-malarial protection or vaccine efficacy have to be made. PMID:27001144

  12. Testosterone improves erectile function through inhibition of reactive oxygen species generation in castrated rats

    PubMed Central

    Li, Rui; Meng, Xianghu; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Tao; Yang, Jun; Niu, Yonghua; Cui, Kai; Wang, Shaogang

    2016-01-01

    Testosterone is overwhelmingly important in regulating erectile physiology. However, the associated molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to explore the effects and mechanisms of testosterone in erectile dysfunction (ED) in castrated rats. Forty male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized to four groups (control, sham-operated, castration and castration-with-testosterone-replacement). Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was measured by dihydroethidium (DHE) staining. Erectile function was assessed by the recording of intracavernous pressure (ICP) and mean arterial blood pressure (MAP). Protein expression levels were examined by western blotting. We found that castration reduced erectile function and that testosterone restored it. Nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activity was decrease in the castrated rats, and testosterone administration attenuated this decrease (each p < 0.05). The testosterone, dihydrotestosterone, cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) concentrations were lower in the castrated rats, and testosterone restored these levels (each p < 0.05). Furthermore, the cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and prostacyclin synthase (PTGIS) expression levels and phospho-endothelial nitric oxide synthase (p-eNOS, Ser1177)/endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) ratio were reduced in the castrated rats compared with the controls (each p < 0.05). In addition, the p40phox and p67phox expression levels were increased in the castrated rats, and testosterone reversed these changes (each p < 0.05). Overall, our results demonstrate that testosterone ameliorates ED after castration by reducing ROS production and increasing the activity of the eNOS/cGMP and COX-2/PTGIS/cAMP signaling pathways. PMID:27168996

  13. Testosterone Buccal

    MedlinePlus

    Testosterone buccal systems are used to treat symptoms of low testosterone in men who have hypogonadism (a condition in which the ... sexual organs and typical male characteristics. Testosterone buccal systems work by replacing testosterone that is normally produced ...

  14. Testosterone Buccal

    MedlinePlus

    ... not produce enough natural testosterone). Testosterone is used only for men with low testosterone levels caused by ... two doses in a row.Testosterone buccal systems only work when applied to the upper gum. Although ...

  15. Inhibition of Rat 5α-Reductase Activity and Testosterone-Induced Sebum Synthesis in Hamster Sebocytes by an Extract of Quercus acutissima Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Koseki, Junichi; Matsumoto, Takashi; Matsubara, Yosuke; Tsuchiya, Kazuaki; Mizuhara, Yasuharu; Sekiguchi, Kyoji; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Watanabe, Junko; Kaneko, Atsushi; Hattori, Tomohisa; Maemura, Kazuya; Kase, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Bokusoku (BK) is an extract from the Quercus cortex used in folk medicine for treatment of skin disorders and convergence, and is present in jumihaidokuto, a traditional Japanese medicine that is prescribed for purulent skin diseases like acne vulgaris. The excess of sebum production induced by androgen is involved in the development of acne. Our aim is to examine whether BK and its constituents inhibit testosterone metabolism and testosterone-induced sebum synthesis. Methods. Measurements of 5α-reductase activity and lipogenesis were performed using rat liver microsomes and hamster sebocytes, respectively. Results. BK dose-dependently reduced the conversion of testosterone to a more active androgen, dihydrotestosterone in a 5α-reductase enzymatic reaction. Twenty polyphenols in BK categorized as gallotannin, ellagitannin, and flavonoid were identified by LC-MS/MS. Nine polyphenols with gallate group, tetragalloyl glucose, pentagalloyl glucose, eugeniin, 1-desgalloyl eugeniin, casuarinin, castalagin, stenophyllanin C, (−)-epicatechin gallate, and (−)-epigallocatechin gallate, inhibited testosterone metabolism. In particular, pentagalloyl glucose showed the strongest activity. BK and pentagalloyl glucose suppressed testosterone-induced lipogenesis, whereas they weakly inhibited the lipogenic action of insulin. Conclusions. BK inhibited androgen-related pathogenesis of acne, testosterone conversion, and sebum synthesis, partially through 5α-reductase inhibition, and has potential to be a useful agent in the therapeutic strategy of acne. PMID:25709710

  16. High concentrations of therapeutic IgG1 antibodies are needed to compensate for inhibition of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity by excess endogenous immunoglobulin G.

    PubMed

    Preithner, Susanne; Elm, Stefanie; Lippold, Sandra; Locher, Mathias; Wolf, Andreas; da Silva, Antonio J; Baeuerle, Patrick A; Prang, Nadja S

    2006-03-01

    A common feature of human IgG1 antibodies used for cancer treatment is that their anti-tumour efficacy requires high serum trough levels and continued therapy for several months. Treatment cycles, thereby, consume several grams of IgG1 translating into significant drug needs and costs. The basis for the low in vivo efficacy, which is in contrast to high in vitro antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), is not well understood. Here, we have explored factors contributing to this discrepancy using adecatumumab (MT201), a fully human monoclonal IgG1 against epithelial cell adhesion molecule (Ep-CAM) and trastuzumab (Herceptin), a humanized IgG1 with specificity for the human epithelial growth factor receptor type 2 (HER-2) antigen. We found that physiological levels of human sera strongly inhibited ADCC of both IgG1 antibodies. Effects showed some dependence on the density of Ep-CAM and HER-2 targets, the tumour cell line tested and on effector cell and serum donors. Removal of IgG by affinity chromatography abolished the inhibitory effect of a serum pool. Inhibition of ADCC was fully restored by adding back the IgG fraction or by an equal amount of IgG from a commercial source. We further demonstrate that CD56-positive lymphocytes within human PBMC contributed >90% to ADCC and that normal serum levels of IgG effectively competed for in vitro binding of an IgG1 antibody to low-affinity Fcgamma receptor type III (CD16), as is present on natural killer (NK) cells. Competition of serum IgG for binding of therapeutic IgG1 to NK cell may be one important reason why high antibody doses are required in the clinic for treatment of cancer by an ADCC-based mechanism. PMID:16102830

  17. Glycyrrhizic acid prevents astrocyte death by neuromyelitis optica-specific IgG via inhibition of C1q binding.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji-Sun; Cheon, Soyoung; Kim, Seung Woo; Kim, Boram; Kim, Heejaung; Park, Ki Duk; Kim, Sung-Min

    2016-09-16

    Neuromyelitis optica (NMO) is an inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system and is mediated by complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) of NMO-specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies (NMO-IgG). Glycyrrhizic acid (GA) has numerous pharmacological effects including inhibition of the complement pathway. We aimed to study the influence of GA on NMO-IgG-induced CDC. NMO-IgG samples from 7 patients with NMO, together with human complement, induced CDC in an aquaporin 4 M23-overexpressing glial cell line, an in vitro NMO model. GA attenuated NMO-IgG-induced CDC in a dose-dependent manner. The mechanism of the GA-related CDC inhibition was sequentially dissected and found to involve inhibition of C1q binding to NMO-IgG. Consequently, GA attenuates NMO-IgG-induced CDC and may be a promising novel therapeutic agent against NMO. PMID:27462020

  18. Advanced glycation end products inhibit testosterone secretion by rat Leydig cells by inducing oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yun-Tao; Qi, Ya-Wei; Hu, Chuan-Yin; Chen, Shao-Hong; Liu, You

    2016-08-01

    Diabetes severely impairs male reproduction. The present study assessed the effects and mechanisms of action of advanced glycation end products (AGEs), which play an important role in the development of diabetes complications, on testosterone secretion by rat Leydig cells. Primary rat Leydig cells were cultured and treated with AGEs (25, 50, 100 and 200 µg/ml). Testosterone production induced by human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) was determined by ELISA. The mRNA and protein expression levels of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme (P450scc) and 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3β-HSD), which are involved in testosterone biosynthesis, were measured by reverse transcription-quantitative PCR and western blot analyssi, respectively. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in Leydig cells was measured using the dichlorofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA) probe. The expression levels of endoplasmic reticulum stress-related proteins [C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP) and glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78)] in the Leydig cells were measured by western blot analysis. We found that the AGEs markedly suppressed testosterone production by rat Leydig cells which was induced by hCG in a concentration-dependent manner compared with the control (P<0.01). The mRNA and protein expression levels of StAR, 3β-HSD and P450scc were downregulated by the AGEs in a dose-dependent manner compared with the control (P<0.01). The antioxidant agent, N-acetyl‑L‑cysteine (NAC), and the endoplasmic reticulum stress inhibitor, tauroursodeoxycholic acid (TUDCA), reversed the inhibitory effects of AGEs. In addition, the content of ROS in Leydig cells treated with AGEs increased significantly. The expression levels of CHOP and GRP78 were markedly upregulated by the AGEs in the Leydig cells. From these findings, it can be concluded that AGEs inhibit testosterone production by rat Leydig cells by inducing oxidative stress and

  19. Fraction of Macroporous Resin from Smilax china L. Inhibits Testosterone Propionate–Induced Prostatic Hyperplasia in Castrated Rats

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jing; Xiong, Chao-Mei; Song, Shan-Shan; Han, Pan

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The present study was conducted to evaluate the effect of a fraction of macroporous resin (FMR), a bioactive component of Smilax china L., on benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) in castrated rats induced by testosterone propionate. Rats were randomly divided into five groups: the negative control group (sham-operated), the model group, two FMR-treated groups (at doses of 300 mg/kg and 600 mg/kg of body weight), and the positive control group (treated with finasteride at the dose of 3 mg/kg). Drugs were administered once a day for three consecutive weeks by gastric gavage. Prostates were weighed, testosterone and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) levels in serum were determined, and histopathological examinations were carried out. FMR treatment inhibited prostatic hyperplasia, reducing the DHT level in serum and improving the prostate gland morphology compared with the model group. The overall results of this study suggest that FMR is effective at inhibiting experimentally induced prostate enlargement, and it presents a valuable resource for the treatment of human BPH. PMID:22510101

  20. Testosterone Topical

    MedlinePlus

    ... in which the body does not produce enough natural testosterone). Testosterone is used only for men with ... topical may control your symptoms but will not cure your condition. Continue to use testosterone topical even ...

  1. Testosterone Topical

    MedlinePlus

    ... not produce enough natural testosterone). Testosterone is used only for men with low testosterone levels caused by ... is a controlled substance. Prescriptions may be refilled only a limited number of times; ask your pharmacist ...

  2. Exogenous testosterone in women enhances and inhibits competitive decision-making depending on victory-defeat experience and trait dominance.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Pranjal H; van Son, Veerle; Welker, Keith M; Prasad, Smrithi; Sanfey, Alan G; Smidts, Ale; Roelofs, Karin

    2015-10-01

    The present experiment tested the causal impact of testosterone on human competitive decision-making. According to prevailing theories about testosterone's role in social behavior, testosterone should directly boost competitive decisions. But recent correlational evidence suggests that testosterone's behavioral effects may depend on specific aspects of the context and person relevant to social status (win-lose context and trait dominance). We tested the causal influence of testosterone on competitive decisions by combining hormone administration with measures of trait dominance and a newly developed social competition task in which the victory-defeat context was experimentally manipulated, in a sample of 54 female participants. Consistent with the hypothesis that testosterone has context- and person-dependent effects on competitive behavior, testosterone increased competitive decisions after victory only among high-dominant individuals but testosterone decreased competitive decisions after defeat across all participants. These results suggest that testosterone flexibly modulates competitive decision-making depending on prior social experience and dominance motivation in the service of enhancing social status. PMID:26209809

  3. Pemphigus vulgaris IgG directly inhibit desmoglein 3-mediated transinteraction.

    PubMed

    Heupel, Wolfgang-Moritz; Zillikens, Detlef; Drenckhahn, Detlev; Waschke, Jens

    2008-08-01

    The autoimmune blistering skin disease pemphigus is caused by autoantibodies against keratinocyte surface Ags. In pemphigus vulgaris (PV), autoantibodies are primarily directed against desmosomal cadherins desmoglein (Dsg) 3 and Dsg 1, whereas pemphigus foliaceus (PF) patients only have Abs against Dsg 1. At present, it is unclear whether Dsg autoantibodies contribute to pemphigus pathogenesis by direct inhibition of Dsg transinteraction. Using atomic force microscopy, we provide evidence that PV-IgG directly interfere with homophilic Dsg 3 but, similar to PF-IgG, not with homophilic Dsg 1 transinteraction, indicating that the molecular mechanisms in PV and PF pathogenesis substantially differ. PV-IgG (containing Dsg 3 or Dsg 1 and Dsg 3 autoantibodies) as well as PV-IgG Fab reduced binding activity of Dsg 3 by approximately 60%, comparable to Ca(2+) depletion. Similarly, the mouse monoclonal PV Ab AK 23 targeting the N-terminal Dsg 3 domain and AK 23 Fab reduced Dsg 3 transinteraction. In contrast, neither PV-IgG nor PF-IgG blocked Dsg 1 transinteraction. In HaCaT monolayers, however, both PV- and PF-IgG caused keratinocyte dissociation as well as loss of Dsg 1 and Dsg 3 transinteraction as revealed by laser tweezer assay. These data demonstrate that PV-IgG and PF-IgG reduce Dsg transinteraction by cell-dependent mechanisms and suggest that in addition, Abs to Dsg 3 contribute to PV by direct inhibition of Dsg transinteraction. PMID:18641320

  4. Comparison of the Hemagglutination Inhibition Test and IgG ELISA in Categorizing Primary and Secondary Dengue Infections Based on the Plaque Reduction Neutralization Test

    PubMed Central

    Lukman, Nurhayati; Susanto, Nugroho Harry; Parwati, Ida; Fitri, Silvita; Alisjahbana, Bachti; Widjaja, Susana; Williams, Maya

    2016-01-01

    Secondary dengue infection by heterotypic serotypes is associated with severe manifestations of disease, that is, dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) and dengue shock syndrome (DSS). The World Health Organization (WHO) has recommended criteria based on the hemagglutination inhibition (HI) test to distinguish between primary and secondary dengue infections. Since the HI test has practical limitations and disadvantages, we evaluated the accuracy of WHO HI criteria and compared it with criteria based on an IgG enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using a plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT) as the gold standard. Both WHO HI criteria and IgG ELISA criteria performed strongly (16/16) in determining primary infection. However, to determine secondary infection, the IgG ELISA criteria performed better (72/73) compared to the WHO HI criteria (23/73). PMID:27446953

  5. Comparison of the Hemagglutination Inhibition Test and IgG ELISA in Categorizing Primary and Secondary Dengue Infections Based on the Plaque Reduction Neutralization Test.

    PubMed

    Lukman, Nurhayati; Salim, Gustiani; Kosasih, Herman; Susanto, Nugroho Harry; Parwati, Ida; Fitri, Silvita; Alisjahbana, Bachti; Widjaja, Susana; Williams, Maya

    2016-01-01

    Secondary dengue infection by heterotypic serotypes is associated with severe manifestations of disease, that is, dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) and dengue shock syndrome (DSS). The World Health Organization (WHO) has recommended criteria based on the hemagglutination inhibition (HI) test to distinguish between primary and secondary dengue infections. Since the HI test has practical limitations and disadvantages, we evaluated the accuracy of WHO HI criteria and compared it with criteria based on an IgG enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using a plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT) as the gold standard. Both WHO HI criteria and IgG ELISA criteria performed strongly (16/16) in determining primary infection. However, to determine secondary infection, the IgG ELISA criteria performed better (72/73) compared to the WHO HI criteria (23/73). PMID:27446953

  6. Direct photodegradation of androstenedione and testosterone in natural sunlight: inhibition by dissolved organic matter and reduction of endocrine disrupting potential.

    PubMed

    Young, Robert B; Latch, Douglas E; Mawhinney, Douglas B; Nguyen, Thanh-Hoa; Davis, Jasmine C C; Borch, Thomas

    2013-08-01

    In surface waters, two of the most commonly observed androgenic steroid hormones are androstenedione (AD) and testosterone (T). This study compares the photodegradation of dilute (<10 μg L(-1)) aqueous solutions of AD and T in natural sunlight, and evaluates the endocrine-disrupting potential of the resulting solutions. This study also examines the effect of dissolved organic matter (DOM) on AD photodegradation. During spring and summer at Henderson, NV, USA (latitude 36.04°N), AD and T underwent direct photodegradation, with half-lives ranging from 3.7 to 10.8 h. In three model DOM solutions, AD's half-life increased by 11% to 35%. Using screening factors to eliminate DOM's inner filter effect, quantum yield calculations suggested that light screening was primarily responsible for AD's increased half-life, and that physical quenching further inhibited AD's photodegradation in two out of three DOM solutions. In vitro androgenic activity of the AD and T solutions decreased approximately as fast as AD and T were removed, suggesting that solar photodegradation reduces the risk of endocrine disruption in surface waters impacted by AD or T, subject to continuing inputs. Reduced in vitro androgenic activity appears to be related to steroid ring cleavage and the formation of highly oxidized photoproducts. PMID:23796267

  7. C-fos down-regulation inhibits testosterone-dependent male sexual behavior and the associated learning

    PubMed Central

    Niessen, Neville-Andrew; Balthazart, Jacques; Ball, Gregory F.; Charlier, Thierry D.

    2013-01-01

    Environmental stimulation results in an increased expression of transcription factors called immediate early genes (IEG) in specific neuronal populations. In male Japanese quail, copulation with a female increases the expression of the IEGs zenk and c-fos in the medial preoptic nucleus (POM), a key nucleus controlling male sexual behavior. The functional significance of this increased IEG expression that follows performance of copulatory behavior is unknown. We addressed this question by repeatedly quantifying the performance of appetitive (learned social proximity response) and consummatory (actual copulation) sexual behavior in castrated, testosterone-treated males that received daily intracerebroventricular injection of an antisense oligodeoxynucleotide targeting c-fos or control vehicle. Daily antisense injections significantly inhibited expression of copulatory behavior as well as acquisition of the learned social proximity response. A strong reduction of the proximity response was still observed in antisense-treated birds that copulated with a female, ruling out the indirect effect of the absence of interactions with females on the learning process. After a two-day interruption of behavioral testing but not of antisense injections, birds were submitted to a final copulatory test that confirmed the behavioral inhibition in antisense-injected birds. Brains were collected 90 min after the behavioral testing for quantification of c-fos immunoreactive cells. A significant reduction of the number of c-fos-positive cells in POM but not in other brain regions was observed following antisense injection. Together, data suggest that c-fos expression in POM modulates copulatory behavior and sexual learning in male quail. PMID:23895306

  8. Inhibition of low- and high-threshold Ca2+ channels of human neuroblastoma IMR32 cells by Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome (LEMS) IgGs.

    PubMed

    Grassi, C; Magnelli, V; Carabelli, V; Sher, E; Carbone, E

    1994-11-01

    IgGs from two LEMS patients applied to human neuroblastoma IMR32 cells reduced the density of low- (LVA; T) and high-threshold (HVA; L and N) Ba2+ currents by different percentages: 36% (LVA) and 56% (HVA) for one and 48% and 45% for the other. A pharmacological assay of IgGs action based on the block of L-type channel by nifedipine and on the delayed activation of N-type channel by noradrenaline, indicated a preferential inhibition of the N-type current in IMR32 cells (55% and 47% for the two patients). The L-type current, contributing to approximately one-third of the total, was also depressed by LEMS IgGs but to a minor degree (49% and 30%). Except for an increase of single N-type channel inactivation, LEMS antibodies preserved the elementary properties of single HVA channels, suggesting that the macroscopic current reduction after IgGs treatment is likely due to a decrease in the number of active HVA Ca2+ channels. PMID:7898770

  9. [Testosterone therapy].

    PubMed

    Diemer, T; Hauptmann, A; Wagenlehner, F M E

    2016-04-01

    Hormone replacement therapy with testosterone has become well-established over the course of time. The initial substantial concerns with respect to complications and potential adverse events, particularly in older patients, were proven to be unfounded over time. Testosterone therapy has therefore gradually become a regular treatment modality in urological practice. It has also been shown to represent a valuable tool as supportive treatment for patients with erectile dysfunction and hypogonadism. A variety of testosterone preparations are available for treatment. Recent pharmaceutical developments have greatly improved the practicability and ease of administration for patients. Several guidelines have been developed that provide clearly formulated standards and instructions for indications, contraindications, application, risk factors and monitoring of testosterone therapy. Adverse events affecting the cardiovascular system and especially diseases of the prostate gland are of great importance, thus making the urologist the primary partner in the treatment of patients with testosterone deficiency. PMID:27067659

  10. Central 5-alpha reduction of testosterone is required for testosterone's inhibition of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis response to restraint stress in adult male rats.

    PubMed

    Handa, Robert J; Kudwa, Andrea E; Donner, Nina C; McGivern, Robert F; Brown, Roger

    2013-09-01

    In rodents, the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is controlled by a precise regulatory mechanism that is influenced by circulating gonadal and adrenal hormones. In males, gonadectomy increases the adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and corticosterone (CORT) response to stressors, and androgen replacement returns the response to that of the intact male. Testosterone (T) actions in regulating HPA activity may be through aromatization to estradiol, or by 5α-reduction to the more potent androgen, dihydrotestosterone (DHT). To determine if the latter pathway is involved, we assessed the function of the HPA axis response to restraint stress following hormone treatments, or after peripheral or central treatment with the 5α-reductase inhibitor, finasteride. Initially, we examined the timecourse whereby gonadectomy alters the CORT response to restraint stress. Enhanced CORT responses were evident within 48 h following gonadectomy. Correspondingly, treatment of intact male rats with the 5α-reductase inhibitor, finasteride, for 48 h, enhanced the CORT and ACTH response to restraint stress. Peripheral injections of gonadectomized male rats with DHT or T for 48 h reduced the ACTH and CORT response to restraint stress. The effects of T, but not DHT, could be blocked by the third ventricle administration of finasteride prior to stress application. These data indicate that the actions of T in modulating HPA axis activity involve 5α-reductase within the central nervous system. These results further our understanding of how T acts to modulate the neuroendocrine stress responses and indicate that 5α reduction to DHT is a necessary step for T action. PMID:23880372

  11. Epicoccum allergy: skin reaction patterns and spore/mycelium disparities recognized by IgG and IgE ELISA inhibition.

    PubMed

    Portnoy, J; Chapman, J; Burge, H; Muilenberg, M; Solomon, W

    1987-07-01

    Comparable degrees of skin reactivity were observed towards spore and mycelium extracts from two isolates of Epicoccum and to one preparation of Alternaria in 35 rural and 120 university patients. The best experimental extracts detected Epicoccum sensitivity in 70% of the group tested while the commercial extract detected sensitivity in only 6%. Skin reaction correlations were greatest within isolates (eg, spore-A/mycelium-A), then for specific fungus parts (eg, spore-A/spore-B), then between isolates and parts (spore-A/mycelium-B). High correlations were found between individual IgG and IgE ELISA values for all antigens using serum from Epicoccum skin-reactive patients. ELISA inhibition results suggested that significant cross-reactivity exists between Epicoccum and Alternaria antigens recognized by IgG but not by IgE. ELISA inhibition cross-reaction patterns among Epicoccum antigens were comparable to skin reactions while IgG patterns showed little variability. Further characterization of spore/mycelium and interstrain recognition patterns among different immunoglobulin isotypes will be necessary before complete standardization of extracts from different parts of fungi will be possible. The use of spore material for skin testing and treatment of Epicoccum sensitivity appears to be both premature and unnecessary at this time. PMID:3605796

  12. Inhibition of NOS-NO System Prevents Autoimmune Orchitis Development in Rats: Relevance of NO Released by Testicular Macrophages in Germ Cell Apoptosis and Testosterone Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Jarazo Dietrich, Sabrina; Fass, Mónica Irina; Jacobo, Patricia Verónica; Sobarzo, Cristian Marcelo Alejandro; Lustig, Livia; Theas, María Susana

    2015-01-01

    Background Although the testis is considered an immunoprivileged organ it can orchestrate immune responses against pathological insults such as infection and trauma. Experimental autoimmune orchitis (EAO) is a model of chronic inflammation whose main histopathological features it shares with human orchitis. In EAO an increased number of macrophages infiltrate the interstitium concomitantly with progressive germ cell degeneration and impaired steroidogenesis. Up-regulation of nitric oxide (NO)-NO synthase (NOS) system occurs, macrophages being the main producers of NO. Objective The aim of our study was to evaluate the role of NO-NOS system in orchitis development and determine the involvement of NO released by testicular macrophages on germ cell apoptosis and testosterone secretion. Method and Results EAO was induced in rats by immunization with testicular homogenate and adjuvants (E group) and a group of untreated normal rats (N) was also studied. Blockage of NOS by i.p. injection of E rats with a competitive inhibitor of NOS, L-NAME (8mg/kg), significantly reduced the incidence and severity of orchitis and lowered testicular nitrite content. L-NAME reduced germ cell apoptosis and restored intratesticular testosterone levels, without variations in serum LH. Co-culture of N testicular fragments with testicular macrophages obtained from EAO rats significantly increased germ cell apoptosis and testosterone secretion, whereas addition of L-NAME lowered both effects and reduced nitrite content. Incubation of testicular fragments from N rats with a NO donor DETA-NOnoate (DETA-NO) induced germ cell apoptosis through external and internal apoptotic pathways, an effect prevented by N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC). DETA-NO inhibited testosterone released from Leydig cells, whereas NAC (from 2.5 to 15 mM) did not prevent this effect. Conclusions We demonstrated that NO-NOS system is involved in the impairment of testicular function in orchitis. NO secreted mainly by testicular

  13. IgG4 inhibits peanut-induced basophil and mast cell activation in peanut-tolerant children sensitized to peanut major allergens

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Alexandra F.; James, Louisa K.; Bahnson, Henry T.; Shamji, Mohammed H.; Couto-Francisco, Natália C.; Islam, Sabita; Houghton, Sally; Clark, Andrew T.; Stephens, Alick; Turcanu, Victor; Durham, Stephen R.; Gould, Hannah J.; Lack, Gideon

    2015-01-01

    Background Most children with detectable peanut-specific IgE (P-sIgE) are not allergic to peanut. We addressed 2 non–mutually exclusive hypotheses for the discrepancy between allergy and sensitization: (1) differences in P-sIgE levels between children with peanut allergy (PA) and peanut-sensitized but tolerant (PS) children and (2) the presence of an IgE inhibitor, such as peanut-specific IgG4 (P-sIgG4), in PS patients. Methods Two hundred twenty-eight children (108 patients with PA, 77 PS patients, and 43 nonsensitized nonallergic subjects) were studied. Levels of specific IgE and IgG4 to peanut and its components were determined. IgE-stripped basophils or a mast cell line were used in passive sensitization activation and inhibition assays. Plasma of PS subjects and patients submitted to peanut oral immunotherapy (POIT) were depleted of IgG4 and retested in inhibition assays. Results Basophils and mast cells sensitized with plasma from patients with PA but not PS patients showed dose-dependent activation in response to peanut. Levels of sIgE to peanut and its components could only partially explain differences in clinical reactivity between patients with PA and PS patients. P-sIgG4 levels (P = .023) and P-sIgG4/P-sIgE (P < .001), Ara h 1–sIgG4/Ara h 1–sIgE (P = .050), Ara h 2–sIgG4/Ara h 2–sIgE (P = .004), and Ara h 3–sIgG4/Ara h 3–sIgE (P = .016) ratios were greater in PS children compared with those in children with PA. Peanut-induced activation was inhibited in the presence of plasma from PS children with detectable P-sIgG4 levels and POIT but not from nonsensitized nonallergic children. Depletion of IgG4 from plasma of children with PS (and POIT) sensitized to Ara h 1 to Ara h 3 partially restored peanut-induced mast cell activation (P = .007). Conclusions Differences in sIgE levels and allergen specificity could not justify the clinical phenotype in all children with PA and PS children. Blocking IgG4 antibodies provide an additional

  14. Testosterone Injection

    MedlinePlus

    ... used in certain women with a type of breast cancer called mammary cancer that has spread to other ... naturally in the body. When used to treat breast cancer, testosterone works by stopping the release of estrogen.

  15. Testosterone Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... of other conditions, such as polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) . ^ Back to top What does the test result ... are normally low. Increased testosterone levels can indicate: PCOS Ovarian or adrenal gland tumor Congenital adrenal hyperplasia ^ ...

  16. The protection of selenium on cadmium-induced inhibition of spermatogenesis via activating testosterone synthesis in mice.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xiang-mei; Wang, Gai-gai; Xu, Dong-qing; Luo, Kang; Liu, Yu-xin; Zhong, Yi-hong; Cai, Yun-qing

    2012-10-01

    Selenium (Se) is an essential trance element in testis. However, the potential protective effects of Se against cadmium (Cd)-induced reproductive toxicity remained to be elucidated. Male ICR mice were orally administered by gavage with Na2SeO3 (0.1, 0.2, 0.4 mg/kg BW) for 1h prior to CdCl2 (5 mg/kg BW) alone or in combination for 15, 25 or 35 days. Cd exposure caused a significant decrease in body weight, sperm concentration and motility as well as plasma testosterone level which was accompanied by decreased antioxidant enzymatic activity of SOD and GSH-Px and by increased lipid peroxidation (as malondialdehyde, MDA). Se pretreatment compensated deficits in the sperm parameters (concentration, motility and morphology) induced by Cd. Se (0.4 mg/kg BW) treatment significantly increased serum testosterone level that was reduced by Cd (on 15th, 25th and 35th day) (P<0.01). Se treatment ameliorated Cd-induced reduction in testicular steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) and 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (17β-HSD) activities. The present study suggest that the protective potential of Se against Cd-induced reprotoxicity might be due to up-regulation StAR and testosterone synthetic enzyme activity, which could be useful for increasing testosterone synthesis for achieving optimum protection in sperm quality and spermatogenesis. PMID:22828241

  17. Inhibition of protein phosphorylation by synthetic peptides from the Fc region of human IgG during the mixed lymphocyte response

    SciTech Connect

    McClurg, M.R.; Hahn, G.S.; Plummer, J.M.

    1986-03-01

    Certain synthetic peptides derived from the Fc region of human IgG suppressed protein, RNA, and DNA synthesis during mixed lymphocyte reactions. Responder mononuclear cells were incubated with medium or agents that alter phosphorylation of cellular proteins before immunomodulatory Fc peptides and stimulator cells were added. Incubating cells with trifluoperazine which inhibits calcium binding to calmodulin and inhibits protein kinase C (PKC) increased inhibition of the MLR induced by Fc peptides. Conversely, incubating cells with dubutyryl cyclic AMP (DBcAMP), calmodulin, 1,2-diolein, or phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) abolished inhibition of the MLR induced by Fc peptides. Inhibition of the MLR by Fc ..gamma.. peptides was not affected when DBcAMP or PMA was added after peptide addition. The PKC activity of cell homogenates was decreased by 69% when Fc..gamma.. peptides were present during the MLR. The in vitro phosphorylation of histone Hl by partially purified PKC from lymphocytes was inhibited 74% in the presence of Fc..gamma.. peptides. These results indicate that suppression of the MLR induced by Fc..gamma.. peptides is dependent on inhibition of protein phosphorylation by kinases including protein kinase C. The inhibition of phosphorylation may be related to the ability of Fc..gamma.. peptides to reverse animal models of autoimmune disease.

  18. Calcineurin Regulates Homologous Desensitization of Natriuretic Peptide Receptor-A and Inhibits ANP-Induced Testosterone Production in MA-10 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Henesy, Michelle B.; Britain, Andrea L.; Zhu, Bing; Amable, Lauren; Honkanen, Richard E.; Corbin, Jackie D.; Francis, Sharron H.; Rich, Thomas C.

    2012-01-01

    Receptor desensitization is a ubiquitous regulatory mechanism that defines the activatable pool of receptors, and thus, the ability of cells to respond to environmental stimuli. In recent years, the molecular mechanisms controlling the desensitization of a variety of receptors have been established. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms that underlie desensitization of natriuretic peptide receptors, including natriuretic peptide receptor-A (NPR-A). Here we report that calcineurin (protein phosphatase 2B, PP2B, PPP3C) regulates homologous desensitization of NPR-A in murine Leydig tumor (MA-10) cells. We demonstrate that both pharmacological inhibition of calcineurin activity and siRNA-mediated suppression of calcineurin expression potentiate atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP)-induced cGMP synthesis. Treatment of MA-10 cells with inhibitors of other phosphoprotein phosphatases had little or no effect on ANP-induced cGMP accumulation. In addition, overexpression of calcineurin blunts ANP-induced cGMP synthesis. We also present data indicating that the inhibition of calcineurin potentiates ANP-induced testosterone production. To better understand the contribution of calcineurin in the regulation of NPR-A activity, we examined the kinetics of ANP-induced cGMP signals. We observed transient ANP-induced cGMP signals, even in the presence of phosphodiesterase inhibitors. Inhibition of both calcineurin and phosphodiesterase dramatically slowed the decay in the response. These observations are consistent with a model in which calcineurin mediated dephosphorylation and desensitization of NPR-A is associated with significant inhibition of cGMP synthesis. PDE activity hydrolyzes cGMP, thus lowering intracellular cGMP toward the basal level. Taken together, these data suggest that calcineurin plays a previously unrecognized role in the desensitization of NPR-A and, thereby, inhibits ANP-mediated increases in testosterone production. PMID:22876290

  19. The TUBEX typhoid test based on particle-inhibition immunoassay detects IgM but not IgG anti-O9 antibodies.

    PubMed

    Tam, Frankie Chi Hang; Lim, Pak Leong

    2003-11-01

    A serological test kit (TUBEX, IDL Biotech, Sweden) developed recently for the diagnosis of typhoid fever detects antibodies to the Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi lipopolysaccharide (LPS) O9 antigen. The antibodies are detected by their ability to inhibit the interaction between two types of reagent particles: (a). indicator latex microspheres sensitized with an anti-O9 monoclonal antibody, and (b). magnetic microspheres sensitized with S. typhi LPS. Following rapid mixing of the serum with these reagents and sedimentation of the magnetic particles by magnetic force, the concentration of indicator particles left in suspension provides a measure of the inhibition. Whereas it was previously assumed that both IgM and IgG antibodies could inhibit in the system, the present study reveals, surprisingly, that only the IgM antibodies do. It is not clear why IgG anti-O9 antibodies, both of mouse and human origin, do not inhibit, although these can bind to the LPS-sensitized magnetic particles as efficiently as the IgM antibodies. In addition, they can also inhibit very well in another detection system (ELISA) which uses a similar assay format and the same antibody and antigen reagents. Increasing the size of the LPS-sensitized microspheres made no difference; microscopic analysis of the TUBEX reaction mixture revealed that while the indicator particles bound abundantly to the IgG-aggregated LPS-sensitized particles, forming large clumps, these only formed a very light decoration on the IgM-aggregated particles. Thus, the TUBEX system is ideally suited for use in the diagnosis of infections as it allows IgM antibodies to be detected easily and rapidly from whole sera. PMID:14604543

  20. Testosterone Nasal Gel

    MedlinePlus

    Testosterone nasal gel is used to treat symptoms of low testosterone in men who have hypogonadism (a condition in which the body does not produce enough natural testosterone). Testosterone nasal gel is used only for men ...

  1. Inhibition and reversal of endotoxin-, aggregated IgG- and paf-induced hypotension in the rat by SRI 63-072, a paf receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Handley, D A; Van Valen, R G; Melden, M K; Flury, S; Lee, M L; Saunders, R N

    1986-08-01

    Platelet activating factor (paf) given intravenously produces systemic hypotension in the rat. Similar effects can be induced using endotoxin or heat-aggregated IgG challenges, which are thought to involve endogenous paf release. Extending this concept, we have examined the ability of the paf antagonist SRI 63-072 to inhibit or reverse systemic hypotension induced with paf, heat-aggregated IgG or endotoxin 0111-B4 in rats. At 100 ng kg-1 paf, there occurred a 38.6 +/- 5.1% decrease in carotid mean arterial pressure (MAP) followed by a 3.2 +/- 0.7 min recovery period (RP) to return to normal pressure values. The ED50 of SRI 63-072 was 0.16 mg kg-1 i.v. (MAP) and 0.25 mg kg-1 (RP) when given 1-5 min before the paf challenge. Endotoxin (15 mg kg-1 i.v.) produced a hypotensive response (54 +/- 8% decrease in MAP) and a corresponding 80% decrease in mesenteric artery blood flow. When given 2-8 min after endotoxin, 1.0 mg kg-1 i.v. SRI 63-072 totally restored blood pressure and artery blood flow. SRI 63-072 similarly reversed heat-aggregated IgG (10 mg kg-1) induced reduction of MAP, with an ED50 of 0.05 mg kg-1 i.v. The observations that SRI 63-072 can inhibit or reverse systemic vascular effects produced from paf and other provocators of endogenous paf release strongly implicates paf as a common final mediator of hypotension and shock. As SRI 63-072 is a competitive receptor antagonist, the hypotensive effects of these provocators appear to be mediated by vascular receptors for paf. PMID:3019921

  2. Inhibition of in vitro human chorionic gonadotropin-stimulated testosterone production in testis and of ovulation in the rat by charcoal-treated rat testicular extract

    SciTech Connect

    de Bellabarba, G.A.; Bishop, W.; Rojas, F.J.

    1984-01-16

    Previously, the authors described the presence of a factor obtained from rat testis that was found to inhibit human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) binding to gonadal receptors. In the present study, similarly prepared testicular extract was tested for its effects on in vitro hCG-stimulated testosterone production by isolated testis interstitial cells and for its effect on spontaneous ovulation in the rat. Incubation of interstitial cells with charcoal-treated extract significantly inhibited the steroidogenic response to hCG in a dose-related manner. This inhibition was also apparent after heating the extract for 10 min at 100/sup 0/C. A single i.p. injection of testicular extract inhibited spontaneous ovulation in the rat. This effect was also observed after heating the extract for 10 min at 100/sup 0/C. It is concluded that the aqueous testicular extract contains a factor able to antagonize the physiological events mediated by luteinizing hormone (LH)/hCG, and that this factor is consistent with the presence of an LH/hCG-binding inhibitory activity in rat testis.

  3. A natural IgM antibody does inhibit polyclonal and antigen-specific IgM but not IgG B-cell responses.

    PubMed

    Kiss, K; Uher, F; Gergely, J

    1994-03-01

    Since a B-cell growth-inhibitory natural IgM antibody was identified in the culture supernatants of LPS-stimulated murine splenic B lymphocytes [11], attempts have been made to define other possible functional role(s) of this antibody. Here we show that this regulatory IgM is able to inhibit not only the proliferation of splenic B cells, but also their IgM secretion during LPS-induced polyclonal, as well as antigen (FITC-KLH)-specific antibody responses. In contrast, IgG1 production of hapten (FITC)-specific B cells neither during restimulation with LPS nor in the presence of carrier-specific T lymphocytes in vitro was affected by regulatory IgM. Therefore, whereas newly emerging naive B cells are highly susceptible, IgG-secreting B cells appear to be completely resistant to inactivation by the regulatory IgM autoantibody. PMID:7518418

  4. Testosterone Nasal Gel

    MedlinePlus

    ... enough natural testosterone). Testosterone nasal gel is used only for men with low testosterone levels caused by ... is a controlled substance. Prescriptions may be refilled only a limited number of times; ask your pharmacist ...

  5. Testosterone Transdermal Patch

    MedlinePlus

    ... not produce enough natural testosterone). Testosterone is used only for men with low testosterone levels caused by ... are a controlled substance. Prescriptions may be refilled only a limited number of times; ask your pharmacist ...

  6. Testosterone deficiency myopathy.

    PubMed Central

    Orrell, R W; Woodrow, D F; Barrett, M C; Press, M; Dick, D J; Rowe, R C; Lane, R J

    1995-01-01

    Testosterone is recognized to have a positive effect on nitrogen balance and muscle development in hypogonadal men, but significantly myopathy secondary to testosterone deficiency has been reported only rarely. We describe a patient who presented with a myopathy associated with testosterone deficiency, and who demonstrated a significant functional and myometric response to treatment. PMID:7562829

  7. Testosterone and Aggression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Archer, John

    1994-01-01

    Studies comparing aggressive and nonaggressive prisoners show higher testosterone levels among the former. While there is limited evidence for a strong association between aggressiveness and testosterone during adolescence, other studies indicate that testosterone levels are responsive to influences from the social environment, particularly those…

  8. Testosterone and aggressive behavior in man.

    PubMed

    Batrinos, Menelaos L

    2012-01-01

    Atavistic residues of aggressive behavior prevailing in animal life, determined by testosterone, remain attenuated in man and suppressed through familial and social inhibitions. However, it still manifests itself in various intensities and forms from; thoughts, anger, verbal aggressiveness, competition, dominance behavior, to physical violence. Testosterone plays a significant role in the arousal of these behavioral manifestations in the brain centers involved in aggression and on the development of the muscular system that enables their realization. There is evidence that testosterone levels are higher in individuals with aggressive behavior, such as prisoners who have committed violent crimes. Several field studies have also shown that testosterone levels increase during the aggressive phases of sports games. In more sensitive laboratory paradigms, it has been observed that participant's testosterone rises in the winners of; competitions, dominance trials or in confrontations with factitious opponents. Aggressive behavior arises in the brain through interplay between subcortical structures in the amygdala and the hypothalamus in which emotions are born and the prefrontal cognitive centers where emotions are perceived and controlled. The action of testosterone on the brain begins in the embryonic stage. Earlier in development at the DNA level, the number of CAG repeats in the androgen receptor gene seems to play a role in the expression of aggressive behavior. Neuroimaging techniques in adult males have shown that testosterone activates the amygdala enhancing its emotional activity and its resistance to prefrontal restraining control. This effect is opposed by the action of cortisol which facilitates prefrontal area cognitive control on impulsive tendencies aroused in the subcortical structures. The degree of impulsivity is regulated by serotonin inhibiting receptors, and with the intervention of this neurotransmitter the major agents of the neuroendocrine

  9. Testosterone and Aggressive Behavior in Man

    PubMed Central

    Batrinos, Menelaos L.

    2012-01-01

    Atavistic residues of aggressive behavior prevailing in animal life, determined by testosterone, remain attenuated in man and suppressed through familial and social inhibitions. However, it still manifests itself in various intensities and forms from; thoughts, anger, verbal aggressiveness, competition, dominance behavior, to physical violence. Testosterone plays a significant role in the arousal of these behavioral manifestations in the brain centers involved in aggression and on the development of the muscular system that enables their realization. There is evidence that testosterone levels are higher in individuals with aggressive behavior, such as prisoners who have committed violent crimes. Several field studies have also shown that testosterone levels increase during the aggressive phases of sports games. In more sensitive laboratory paradigms, it has been observed that participant’s testosterone rises in the winners of; competitions, dominance trials or in confrontations with factitious opponents. Aggressive behavior arises in the brain through interplay between subcortical structures in the amygdala and the hypothalamus in which emotions are born and the prefrontal cognitive centers where emotions are perceived and controlled. The action of testosterone on the brain begins in the embryonic stage. Earlier in development at the DNA level, the number of CAG repeats in the androgen receptor gene seems to play a role in the expression of aggressive behavior. Neuroimaging techniques in adult males have shown that testosterone activates the amygdala enhancing its emotional activity and its resistance to prefrontal restraining control. This effect is opposed by the action of cortisol which facilitates prefrontal area cognitive control on impulsive tendencies aroused in the subcortical structures. The degree of impulsivity is regulated by serotonin inhibiting receptors, and with the intervention of this neurotransmitter the major agents of the neuroendocrine

  10. Alternatives to testosterone replacement: testosterone restoration

    PubMed Central

    McCullough, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The European Male Aging Study has demonstrated that the hypogonadism of male aging is predominantly secondary. Theoretically with appropriate stimulation from the pituitary, the aging testis should be able to produce eugonadal levels of testosterone. The strategies for the treatment of late onset hypogonadism (LOH) have focused on replacement with exogenous testosterone versus restoration of endogenous production. The purpose of this article is to review existing peer-reviewed literature supporting the concept of restoration of endogenous testosterone in the treatment of LOH. PMID:25578932

  11. Transdermal delivery of testosterone.

    PubMed

    Hadgraft, Jonathan; Lane, Majella E

    2015-05-01

    Male hypogonadism has been treated with exogenous testosterone since the 1930s. The early transdermal patches of testosterone became available in the 1980s with gel and solution preparations following subsequent decades. This review focusses on the skin permeation characteristics of testosterone, pharmacokinetics following application of transdermal formulations and formulations currently available. At present, gels dominate the market for transdermal testosterone replacement therapy, presumably because of their greater patient acceptability and non-occlusive nature compared with patches. However, specific incidences of secondary transfer of gels to children with consequent unwanted effects such as precocious puberty have been reported. A regulatory review of all testosterone replacement therapies is currently underway which may have implications for future prescribing practices of transdermal testosterone products. PMID:25709060

  12. Testosterone and Social Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Booth, Alan; Granger, Douglas A.; Mazur, Allan; Kivlighan, Katie T.

    2006-01-01

    Popular perceptions of the effect of testosterone on "manly" behavior are inaccurate. We need to move away from such simplistic notions by treating testosterone as one component along with other physiological, psychological and sociological variables in interactive and reciprocal models of behavior. Several hormones can now be measured in saliva,…

  13. Testosterone and Occupational Achievement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dabbs, James M., Jr.

    1992-01-01

    Archival data on 4,462 military veterans linked higher levels of serum testosterone to lower-status occupations. A structural equation model was supported in which higher testosterone, mediated through lower intellectual ability, greater antisocial behavior, and lower education, leads away from white-collar occupations. Contains 49 references.…

  14. Di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate inhibits testosterone level through disturbed hypothalamic-pituitary-testis axis and ERK-mediated 5α-Reductase 2.

    PubMed

    Ha, Mei; Guan, Xie; Wei, Li; Li, Peng; Yang, Min; Liu, Changjiang

    2016-09-01

    Di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) has reproductive toxicity and can affect male reproductive development. In order to clarify adverse effects of DEHP on testicular physiology and testosterone production, Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were dosed daily with DEHP by gavage for 30days; TM3 cells (mouse Leydig cell line) were treated with DEHP for 24h after pretreatment with vitamin C or U0126. Results indicated that the hypothalamic-pituitary-testis (HPT) axis was disturbed and serum testosterone, LH and FSH levels were decreased following DEHP exposure. Histomorphological changes of rat testes were also observed, such as deformed seminiferous tubules, aggregated chromatin, multiple vacuoles, swollen mitochondria, apoptotic germ cells and Sertoli cells, as well as increased Leydig cell numbers. Moreover, DEHP caused oxidative stress in vivo and in vitro and then induced the ERK pathway, which was required to mediate 5α-Reductase 2 and scavenger receptor class B-1 (SRB1) levels. However, levels of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3β-HSD), 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (17β-HSD), P450 17α-hydroxylase/17.20 lyase (P450c17), and P450 side-chain cleavage enzyme (P450scc) were not significantly altered after DEHP exposure. Taken together, DEHP-disturbed HPT axis and induced 5α-Reductase 2 contribute to the reduction of serum testosterone level. The activated ERK pathway is required to modulate expressions of 5α-Reductase 2 and SRB1. PMID:27155079

  15. Testosterone and the breast.

    PubMed

    Shufelt, Chrisandra L; Braunstein, Glenn D

    2008-09-01

    Although women have been treated with testosterone (T) for female sexual dysfunction since the 1950s, the role of T in normal female physiology is not yet fully defined. One of the major safety concerns of androgen therapy is whether androgens have a stimulatory effect on the breast that could lead to breast carcinomas. The proposed mechanisms for such stimulation include local estrogen production from the aromatase enzyme complex present in the breast tissue or by the direct stimulation of the androgen receptor. Predominant data from in vitro studies have shown that androgens actually have apoptotic and antiproliferative effects and not stimulatory effects. Animal models have shown similar results to in vitro studies, finding that androgens inhibit breast cancer growth. Prospective and retrospective epidemiological analyses have shown mixed outcomes, with no clear consensus regarding androgen use and breast cancer risk. Hyperandrogenism in patients with polycystic ovarian syndrome with elevated levels of endogenous T is not associated with an increased risk of breast cancer and may, in fact, be protective. Another human model with excess of T is female-to-male transgenderism, in which genotypic women are treated with large doses of exogenous T with no increased risk. High-dose androgen therapy also has been effective in treating patients with advanced breast cancer. Thus, the preponderance of data suggests that T use in females is not associated with an increased risk of breast carcinoma. PMID:18714077

  16. Testosterone and musical talent.

    PubMed

    Hassler, M

    1991-01-01

    Two recently published hypotheses on the biological basis of special talents are discussed in relation to experimental data obtained from musical composers, instrumentalists, painters, and non-musicians, and from adolescent boys and girls with different levels of musical capacities. Both hypotheses assign an important influence to prenatal testosterone effects on the developing brain. Geschwind and Galaburda (1985) predict that subjects with special talents may have anomalous hemispheric dominance for verbal material. This was confirmed experimentally in adolescents and in adults using a dichotic listening task to assess functional lateralization. Hassler and Nieschlag (1989) expect musicians of both sexes to be psychologically androgynous and to have current testosterone levels that differ from sex-typed males and females. Salivary testosterone was measured in adults and in adolescents. Creative musical behavior was associated with very low testosterone values in males, and with high testosterone levels in females. Sexual activity level and motivation did not differ between males with testosterone levels less than or equal to 200 pmol/l and those with greater than 220 pmol/l. We tentatively suggest from our data that, among a complex interaction of biological and social factors, an optimal testosterone range may exist for the expression of creative musical behavior. Exceeding the range in the course of adolescence may be detrimental for musical creativity in boys. PMID:1778236

  17. Inducible T-cell co-stimulator ligand (ICOSL) blockade leads to selective inhibition of anti-KLH IgG responses in subjects with systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, B A; Tsuji, W; Kivitz, A; Peng, J; Arnold, G E; Boedigheimer, M J; Chiu, K; Green, C L; Kaliyaperumal, A; Wang, C; Ferbas, J; Chung, J B

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) of single-dose and multiple-dose administration of AMG 557, a human anti-inducible T cell co-stimulator ligand (ICOSL) monoclonal antibody, in subjects with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Methods Patients with mild, stable SLE (n=112) were enrolled in two clinical trials to evaluate the effects of single (1.8–210 mg subcutaneous or 18 mg intravenous) and multiple (6 –210 mg subcutaneous every other week (Q2W)×7) doses of AMG 557. Subjects received two 1 mg intradermal injections 28 days apart of keyhole limpet haemocyanin (KLH), a neoantigen, to assess PD effects of AMG 557. Safety, PK, target occupancy, anti-KLH antibody responses, lymphocyte subset analyses and SLE-associated biomarkers and clinical outcomes were assessed. Results AMG 557 demonstrated an acceptable safety profile. The PK properties were consistent with an antibody directed against a cell surface target, with non-linear PK observed at lower concentrations and linear PK at higher concentrations. Target occupancy by AMG 557 was dose dependent and reversible, and maximal occupancy was achieved in the setting of this trial. Anti-AMG 557 antibodies were observed, but none were neutralising and without impact on drug levels. A significant reduction in the anti-KLH IgG response was observed with AMG 557 administration without discernible changes in the anti-KLH IgM response or on the overall IgG levels. No discernible changes were seen in lymphocyte subsets or in SLE-related biomarkers and clinical measures. Conclusions The selective reduction in anti-KLH IgG demonstrates a PD effect of AMG 557 in subjects with SLE consistent with the biology of the ICOS pathway and supports further studies of AMG 557 as a potential therapeutic for autoimmune diseases. Trial registration numbers NCT02391259 and NCT00774943. PMID:27099766

  18. Neutralization of the neuromuscular inhibition of venom and taipoxin from the taipan (Oxyuranus scutellatus) by F(ab')2 and whole IgG antivenoms.

    PubMed

    Herrera, María; de Cássia de O Collaço, Rita; Villalta, Mauren; Segura, Álvaro; Vargas, Mariángela; Wright, Christine E; Paiva, Owen K; Matainaho, Teatulohi; Jensen, Simon D; León, Guillermo; Williams, David J; Rodrigues-Simioni, Léa; Gutiérrez, José María

    2016-01-22

    The neuromuscular junction activity of Oxyuranus scutellatus venom and its presynaptic neurotoxin, taipoxin, and their neutralization by two antivenoms were examined in mouse phrenic nerve-diaphragm preparations. The action of taipoxin was also studied at 21°C. The efficacy of the antivenoms was also assessed in an in vivo mouse model. Both antivenoms were effective in neutralizing the neuromuscular blocking activity in preincubation-type experiments. In experiments involving independent addition of venom and antivenoms, neutralization depended on the time interval between venom addition and antivenom application. When taipoxin was incubated for 5, 10 or 20min at 21°C, and antivenom added and temperature increased to 37°C, neutralization was achieved only when the toxin was incubated for 5 or 10min. The neutralization by the two antivenoms in an in vivo model showed that both whole IgG and F(ab')2 antivenoms were effective in neutralizing lethality. Our findings highlight the very rapid action of taipan venom at the nerve terminal, and the poor capacity of antivenoms to revert neurotoxicity as the time interval between venom or taipoxin application and antivenom addition increased. Additionally the disparity between molecular masses of the active substances of the two antivenoms did not result in differences in neutralization. PMID:26621539

  19. Compounded Testosterone Troches TO OPTIMIZE HEALTH AND THE TESTOSTERONE CONTROVERSY.

    PubMed

    Guth, Michael A S

    2015-01-01

    As men age, testosterone levels progressively fall and inflammatory biomarkers increase. The gradual decline in testosterone production with aging, known as andropause, is common and may have deleterious effects on men including decreased overall well-being, increased sarcopenia, increased risk of cardiovascular disease, reduced sexual function, and bone loss. Therefore, it comes as no surprise that an increasing number of men worldwide have begun requesting testosterone replacement therapy from their physicians. Occasionally, physicians discourage male patients from getting testosterone replacement therapy based on a few recent studies indicating the therapy causes cardiovascular events, including myocardial infarctions. Yet, an extensive review of the testosterone replacement therapy literature reveals that the majority of clinical studies show that properly administered testosterone replacement therapy, in which estradiol and dihydrotestosterone levels are also controlled, has no adverse effects on myocardial infarction risk. The current state-of-the-art in testosterone replacement therapy comprises compounded testosterone troches; an aromatase inhibitor, such as generic Anastrazole, to control estradiol levels; and a 5α-reductase inhibitor, such as beneric Dutasteride or Finasteride, to control dihydrotestosterone. Compounded testosterone troches easily raise serum testosterone levels to the optimal range, are highly cost effective at $82 for a 180-day supply, and provide affordable access to testosterone replacement therapy to millions of men requesting it. Yet, the Blue Cross Blue Shield-associated firms have largely denied requests for coverage of compounded medications, including testosterone troches. Despite data demonstrating strong links between testosterone deficiency and significant comorbid conditions (including Type 2 diabetes and other metabolic syndrome diseases) as well as the health benefits of testosterone replacement therapy, some physian have

  20. Human IgG4: a structural perspective

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Anna M; Sutton, Brian J

    2015-01-01

    IgG4, the least represented human IgG subclass in serum, is an intriguing antibody with unique biological properties, such as the ability to undergo Fab-arm exchange and limit immune complex formation. The lack of effector functions, such as antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity and complement-dependent cytotoxicity, is desirable for therapeutic purposes. IgG4 plays a protective role in allergy by acting as a blocking antibody, and inhibiting mast cell degranulation, but a deleterious role in malignant melanoma, by impeding IgG1-mediated anti-tumor immunity. These findings highlight the importance of understanding the interaction between IgG4 and Fcγ receptors. Despite a wealth of structural information for the IgG1 subclass, including complexes with Fcγ receptors, and structures for intact antibodies, high-resolution crystal structures were not reported for IgG4-Fc until recently. Here, we highlight some of the biological properties of human IgG4, and review the recent crystal structures of IgG4-Fc. We discuss the unexpected conformations adopted by functionally important Cγ2 domain loops, and speculate about potential implications for the interaction between IgG4 and FcγRs. PMID:26497518

  1. Could you have low testosterone?

    MedlinePlus

    Male menopause; Andropause; Testosterone deficiency; Androgen deficiency of the aging male; Late-onset hypogonadism ... Testosterone makes a man look and feel like a man. In a man, this hormone helps: Keep ...

  2. Testosterone and Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tambo, Amos; Roshan, Mohsin H.K.; Pace, Nikolai P.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease [CVD] is a leading cause of mortality accounting for a global incidence of over 31%. Atherosclerosis is the primary pathophysiology underpinning most types of CVD. Historically, modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors were suggested to precipitate CVD. Recently, epidemiological studies have identified emerging risk factors including hypotestosteronaemia, which have been associated with CVD. Previously considered in the realms of reproductive biology, testosterone is now believed to play a critical role in the cardiovascular system in health and disease. The actions of testosterone as they relate to the cardiac vasculature and its implication in cardiovascular pathology is reviewed. PMID:27014372

  3. Testosterone and Male Infertility.

    PubMed

    Ohlander, Samuel J; Lindgren, Mark C; Lipshultz, Larry I

    2016-05-01

    Hypogonadism and its therapies have a significant impact on male fertility potential. It is necessary to determine the etiology to treat and counsel the patient appropriately on therapeutic options. For the hypogonadal male on exogenous testosterone, management should begin with cessation of the exogenous testosterone and supplemental subcutaneous human chorionic gonadotropin and an oral follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH)-inducing agent to allow reestablishment of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and spermatogenesis. Further supplemental therapy with recombinant FSH in some patients may be necessary to achieve optimal semen parameters. PMID:27132576

  4. PROCHLORAZ INHIBITS TESTOSTERONE PRODUCTION AT DOSAGE BELOW THOSE THAT AFFECT ANDROGEN-DEPENDENT ORGAN WEIGHTS OR THE ONSET OF PUBERTY IN THE MALE SPRAGUE DAWLEY RAT

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT: Since prochloraz (PCZ) is an imidazole fungicide that inhibits gonadal steroidogenesis and antagonizes the androgen receptor (AR), we hypothesized that pubertal exposure to PCZ would delay male rat reproductive development. Sprague Dawley rats were dosed by gavage with...

  5. A single administration of the GnRH antagonist acyline inhibits basal and GnRH-stimulated serum testosterone concentrations in male dogs.

    PubMed

    García Romero, G; Mattioli, G; Rosa, D; Diaz, J D; Abeyá, M; Gobello, C

    2012-06-01

    The objective of this study was to describe testosterone (T) response to GnRH challenge in antagonist-treated dogs over a 30-day period. Eight mongrel dogs were randomly assigned to either the GnRH antagonist acyline 330 μg/kg sc (ACY; n = 4) or a placebo group (PLA; n = 4). The dogs were serially challenged with the GnRH agonist, buserelin 0.2 μg/kg sc on days -1, 1, 3, 7, 10, 14, 21 and 30. On these days, blood samples for T determinations were collected before (-30 min) and 60, 120 and 180 min after the agonist injection. Basal (-30 min) and post-GnRH agonist stimulation T values were compared by anova for repeated measures. Before treatments (day -1), there were no differences in basal T serum concentrations between groups (p > 0.1). After treatments, basal T showed a significant interaction between treatment and day (p < 0.05). Furthermore, when both groups were analysed independently, basal T varied in the ACY (p < 0.01) but not in the PLA group (p > 0.1). On day -1, before treatments, the stimulation tests had only a time effect (p = 0.05) although on days 1 (p < 0.01), 3 (p < 0.01), 7 (p < 0.01), 10 (p < 0.01) and 14 (p < 0.05), the response to the agonist differed between groups, becoming similar on days 21 (p > 0.05) and 30 (p > 0.05). It was concluded that, in dogs, a single administration of the GnRH antagonist prevented canine gonadal axis to physiologically respond to agonistic challenge during 14 days. PMID:22044671

  6. CENTRAL 5-ALPHA REDUCTION OF TESTOSTERONE IS REQUIRED FOR TESTOSTERONE’S INHIBITION OF THE HYPOTHALAMO-PITUITARY-ADRENAL AXIS RESPONSE TO RESTRAINT STRESS IN ADULT MALE RATS

    PubMed Central

    Handa, Robert J.; Kudwa, Andrea E.; Donner, Nina C.; McGivern, Robert F.; Brown, Roger

    2013-01-01

    In rodents, the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is controlled by a precise regulatory mechanism that is influenced by circulating gonadal and adrenal hormones. In males, gonadectomy increases the adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and corticosterone (CORT) response to stressors, and androgen replacement returns the response to that of the intact male. Testosterone (T) actions in regulating HPA activity may be through aromatization to estradiol, or by 5α-reduction to the more potent androgen, dihydrotestosterone (DHT). To determine if the latter pathway is involved, we assessed the function of the HPA axis response to restraint stress following hormone treatments, or after peripheral or central treatment with the 5α-reductase inhibitor, finasteride. Initially, we examined the timecourse whereby gonadectomy alters the CORT response to restraint stress. Enhanced CORT responses were evident within 48hrs following gonadectomy. Correspondingly, treatment of intact male rats with the 5α-reductase inhibitor, finasteride, for 48 hrs, enhanced the CORT and ACTH response to restraint stress. Peripheral injections of gonadectomized male rats with DHT or T for 48 hrs reduced the ACTH and CORT response to restraint stress. The effects of T, but not DHT, could be blocked by the third ventricle administration of finasteride prior to stress application. These data indicate that the actions of T in modulating HPA axis activity involve 5α-reductase within the central nervous system. These results further our understanding of how T acts to modulate the neuroendocrine stress responses and indicate that 5α reduction to DHT is a necessary step for T action. PMID:23880372

  7. Testosterone and Men's Marriages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Booth, Alan; Dabbs, James M., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Among 4,462 former servicemen surveyed, testosterone levels were positively related to not marrying and marital instability, and negatively related to every aspect of marital quality examined. Findings are analyzed in relation to three sociological theories of marital success based on socioeconomic status (educational attainment, income, and…

  8. Inhibition of nitrate transport by anti-nitrate reductase IgG fragments and the identification of plasma membrane associated nitrate reductase in roots of barley seedlings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ward, M. R.; Tischner, R.; Huffaker, R. C.

    1988-01-01

    Membrane associated nitrate reductase (NR) was detected in plasma membrane (PM) fractions isolated by aqueous two-phase partitioning from barley (Hordeum vulgare L. var CM 72) roots. The PM associated NR was not removed by washing vesicles with 500 millimolar NaCl and 1 millimolar EDTA and represented up to 4% of the total root NR activity. PM associated NR was stimulated up to 20-fold by Triton X-100 whereas soluble NR was only increased 1.7-fold. The latency was a function of the solubilization of NR from the membrane. NR, solubilized from the PM fraction by Triton X-100 was inactivated by antiserum to Chlorella sorokiniana NR. Anti-NR immunoglobulin G fragments purified from the anti-NR serum inhibited NO3- uptake by more than 90% but had no effect on NO2- uptake. The inhibitory effect was only partially reversible; uptake recovered to 50% of the control after thorough rinsing of roots. Preimmune serum immunoglobulin G fragments inhibited NO3- uptake 36% but the effect was completely reversible by rinsing. Intact NR antiserum had no effect on NO3- uptake. The results present the possibility that NO3- uptake and NO3- reduction in the PM of barley roots may be related.

  9. PROCHLORAZ INHIBITS TESTOSTERONE PRODUCTION AT DOSAGE LEVELS BELOW THOSE THAT AFFECT ANDROGEN-DEPENDENT ORGAN WEIGHTS OR THE ONSET OF MALE RAT PUBERTY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Prochloraz (PCZ) is an imidazole fungicide that has several endocrine modes of action. In vitro, PCZ inhibits steroidogenesis and acts as an androgen receptor (AR) antagonist. We hypothesized that pubertal exposure to prochloraz would delay preputial separation and growth of an...

  10. Subclass specificity of the Fc receptor for human IgG on K562.

    PubMed

    Chiofalo, M S; Teti, G; Goust, J M; Trifiletti, R; La Via, M F

    1988-07-01

    The erythroleukemic cell line K562 bears a 40-kDa Fc receptor (Fc gamma RII) serologically related to and with a similar molecular weight as the Fc gamma R present on a broad range of leukocytes. The human IgG subclass specificity of the Fc gamma R on K562 was investigated using IgG aggregates of defined size, obtained from purified human myeloma proteins. The monoclonal antibody IV.3, which reacts with the Fc gamma RII present on various cell types, totally prevented binding of 125I-IgG2 trimers to K562. Experiments with radiolabeled IgG2 trimers showed that K562 cells bound a mean of 156,764 +/- 9895 molecules per cell with an association constant (Ka) of 1.8 +/- 0.7 X 10(8) M-1. Similar results were obtained with IgG3 oligomers. IgG3 and IgG2 trimers were about two- to threefold more effective in inhibiting binding of 125I-IgG2 trimers to K562 than IgG1 and IgG4 trimers. These results were confirmed by inhibition experiments using IgG monomers. The subclass specificity of the Fc gamma RII on K562 (i.e., IgG2 = IgG3 greater than IgG1 = IgG4) is quite distinct from the one reported for the Fc gamma RI and III of human cells (i.e., IgG1 = IgG3 greater than IgG4 and IgG2). PMID:2968843

  11. Testosterone therapy and cardiovascular risk.

    PubMed

    Walsh, James P; Kitchens, Anne C

    2015-04-01

    Endogenous testosterone levels are inversely associated with cardiovascular risk in older men and men with cardiovascular disease. Current data on cardiovascular outcomes of testosterone therapy include only observational studies and adverse event monitoring in short-term trials that were not designed to measure cardiovascular outcomes. These studies have yielded conflicting results, and some have raised concerns that testosterone therapy may increase cardiovascular risk. A well-designed, adequately powered, prospective trial will ultimately be required to clarify whether testosterone therapy impacts cardiovascular outcomes. This review describes the findings and limitations of recent studies of cardiovascular risk in older men on testosterone therapy and discusses some of the mechanisms through which testosterone may modify cardiovascular risk. PMID:25467243

  12. Molecular recognition of antibody (IgG) by cellular Fc receptor (FcRI).

    PubMed

    Burton, D R; Jefferis, R; Partridge, L J; Woof, J M

    1988-11-01

    Earlier studies from this and other laboratories have provided indirect evidence for the involvement of the C gamma 2 domain of human IgG in the binding of IgG to the high affinity monocyte Fc receptor (FcRI). Two approaches have been used to extend these studies and to further localize the site of interaction on human IgG. Firstly, monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) directed against different epitopes on IgG were assayed for their capacity to inhibit the binding of radiolabelled IgG to human monocytes or U937 cells. The capacity of the MAbs to interact with their respective epitopes on FcR-bound IgG was also studied using indirect radiobinding and immunofluorescence assays. Secondly, a number of IgGs from several different species and fragments of human IgGs were assayed for their ability to inhibit the binding of radiolabelled IgG to human monocytes. The amino acid sequences of those IgGs exhibiting relatively tight, intermediate or weak binding to monocyte FcRs were compared. On the basis of these studies a possible monocyte FcR-binding site on human IgG is postulated, involving the lower hinge region of IgG (residues Leu 234-Ser 239) with possible involvement of the nearby N-proximal bend and two beta-strands (Gly 316-Lys 338). PMID:2975762

  13. Testosterone and metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Glenn R

    2015-01-01

    Controversies surround the usefulness of identifying patients with the metabolic syndrome (MetS). Many of the components are accepted risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Although the MetS as defined includes many men with insulin resistance, insulin resistance is not universal. The low total testosterone (TT) and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) levels in these men are best explained by the hyperinsulinism and increased inflammatory cytokines that accompany obesity and increased waist circumference. It is informative that low SHBG levels predict future development of the MetS. Evidence is strong relating low TT levels to CVD in men with and without the MetS; however, the relationship may not be causal. The recommendations of the International Diabetes Federation for managing the MetS include cardiovascular risk assessment, lifestyle changes in diet, exercise, weight reduction and treatment of individual components of the MetS. Unfortunately, it is uncommon to see patients with the MetS lose and maintain a 10% weight loss. Recent reports showing testosterone treatment induced dramatic changes in weight, waist circumference, insulin sensitivity, hemoglobin A1c levels and improvements in each of the components of the MetS are intriguing. While some observational studies have reported that testosterone replacement therapy increases cardiovascular events, the Food and Drug Administration in the United States has reviewed these reports and found them to be seriously flawed. Large, randomized, placebo-controlled trials are needed to provide more definitive data regarding the efficacy and safety of this treatment in middle and older men with the MetS and low TT levels. PMID:25652634

  14. Testosterone induces leucocyte migration by NADPH oxidase-driven ROS- and COX2-dependent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Chignalia, Andreia Z; Oliveira, Maria Aparecida; Debbas, Victor; Dull, Randal O; Laurindo, Francisco R M; Touyz, Rhian M; Carvalho, Maria Helena C; Fortes, Zuleica B; Tostes, Rita C

    2015-07-01

    The mechanisms whereby testosterone increases cardiovascular risk are not clarified. However, oxidative stress and inflammation seem to be determinants. Herein, we sought to determine whether exogenous testosterone, at physiological levels, induces leucocyte migration, a central feature in immune and inflammatory responses and the mediating mechanisms. We hypothesized that testosterone induces leucocyte migration via NADPH oxidase (NADPHox)-driven reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cyclooxygenase (COX)-dependent mechanisms. Sixteen-week-old Wistar rats received an intraperitoneal injection (5 ml) of either testosterone (10(-7) mol/l) or saline. Rats were pre-treated with 5 ml of sodium salicylate (SS, non-selective COX inhibitor, 1.25 × 10(-3) mol/l, 1 h prior to testosterone or saline), flutamide (androgen receptor antagonist, 10(-5) mol/l), apocynin (NADPHox inhibitor, 3 × 10(-4) mol/l), N-[2-Cyclohexyloxy-4-nitrophenyl]methanesulfonamide (NS398, COX2 inhibitor, 10(-4) mol/l) or saline, 4 h before testosterone or saline administration. Leucocyte migration was assessed 24 h after testosterone administration by intravital microscopy of the mesenteric bed. Serum levels of testosterone were measured by radioimmunoassay. NADPHox activity was assessed in membrane fractions of the mesenteric bed by dihydroethidium (DHE) fluorescence and in isolated vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) by HPLC. NADPHox subunits and VCAM (vascular cell adhesion molecule) expression were determined by immunoblotting. Testosterone administration did not change serum levels of endogenous testosterone, but increased venular leucocyte migration to the adventia, NADPHox activity and expression (P < 0.05). These effects were blocked by flutamide. SS inhibited testosterone-induced leucocyte migration (P<0.05). Apocynin and NS398 abolished testosterone-induced leucocyte migration and NADPHox activity (P<0.05). Testosterone induces leucocyte migration via NADPHox- and COX2-dependent mechanisms and

  15. Testosterone and Cardiovascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Kloner, Robert A; Carson, Culley; Dobs, Adrian; Kopecky, Stephen; Mohler, Emile R

    2016-02-01

    Testosterone (T) is the principal male sex hormone. As men age, T levels typically fall. Symptoms of low T include decreased libido, vasomotor instability, and decreased bone mineral density. Other symptoms may include depression, fatigue, erectile dysfunction, and reduced muscle strength/mass. Epidemiology studies show that low levels of T are associated with more atherosclerosis, coronary artery disease, and cardiovascular events. However, treating hypogonadism in the aging male has resulted in discrepant results in regard to its effect on cardiovascular events. Emerging studies suggest that T may have a future role in treating heart failure, angina, and myocardial ischemia. A large, prospective, long-term study of T replacement, with a primary endpoint of a composite of adverse cardiovascular events including myocardial infarction, stroke, and/or cardiovascular death, is needed. The Food and Drug Administration recently put additional restrictions on T replacement therapy labeling and called for additional studies to determine its cardiac safety. PMID:26846952

  16. 21 CFR 556.710 - Testosterone propionate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Testosterone propionate. 556.710 Section 556.710... Tolerances for Residues of New Animal Drugs § 556.710 Testosterone propionate. No residues of testosterone, resulting from the use of testosterone propionate, are permitted in excess of the following increments...

  17. 21 CFR 556.710 - Testosterone propionate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Testosterone propionate. 556.710 Section 556.710... Tolerances for Residues of New Animal Drugs § 556.710 Testosterone propionate. No residues of testosterone, resulting from the use of testosterone propionate, are permitted in excess of the following increments...

  18. 21 CFR 556.710 - Testosterone propionate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Testosterone propionate. 556.710 Section 556.710... Tolerances for Residues of New Animal Drugs § 556.710 Testosterone propionate. No residues of testosterone, resulting from the use of testosterone propionate, are permitted in excess of the following increments...

  19. 21 CFR 556.710 - Testosterone propionate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Testosterone propionate. 556.710 Section 556.710... Tolerances for Residues of New Animal Drugs § 556.710 Testosterone propionate. No residues of testosterone, resulting from the use of testosterone propionate, are permitted in excess of the following increments...

  20. 21 CFR 556.710 - Testosterone propionate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Testosterone propionate. 556.710 Section 556.710... Tolerances for Residues of New Animal Drugs § 556.710 Testosterone propionate. No residues of testosterone, resulting from the use of testosterone propionate, are permitted in excess of the following increments...

  1. Controversies in testosterone replacement therapy: testosterone and cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Kathleen; Miner, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The role of testosterone in the cardiovascular (CV) health of men is controversial. Data suggest that both the condition and treatment of clinical hypogonadism is associated with decreased CV mortality; however, two recent studies suggest that hypogonadal subjects treated with testosterone replacement therapy have a higher incidence of new CV events. There has been increased media attention concerning the risk of CV disease in men treated with testosterone. Until date, there are no long-term prospective studies to determine safety. Literature spanning over the past 30 years has suggested that not only is there a possible increased CV risk in men with low levels of testosterone, but the benefits from testosterone therapy may even lower this risk. We review here the recent studies that have garnered such intense scrutiny. This article is intended as a thorough review of testosterone levels and CV risk, providing the clinician with the facts needed to make informed clinical decisions in managing patients with clinical hypogonadism. PMID:25652628

  2. Dose addition predicts the effects of a mixture of five phthalate esters to inhibit fetal testosterone production and gene expression, and postnatal reproductive development in the Sprague Dawley rat

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure to some phthalate esters (PE) during sexual differentiation induces reproductive malformations in male and female rats. In the fetal male, these lesions result from phthalate-induced reductions in testicular testosterone (T) production and insulin-like hormone 3 (insl3) ...

  3. IgG4 subclass antibodies impair antitumor immunity in melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Karagiannis, Panagiotis; Gilbert, Amy E.; Josephs, Debra H.; Ali, Niwa; Dodev, Tihomir; Saul, Louise; Correa, Isabel; Roberts, Luke; Beddowes, Emma; Koers, Alexander; Hobbs, Carl; Ferreira, Silvia; Geh, Jenny L.C.; Healy, Ciaran; Harries, Mark; Acland, Katharine M.; Blower, Philip J.; Mitchell, Tracey; Fear, David J.; Spicer, James F.; Lacy, Katie E.; Nestle, Frank O.; Karagiannis, Sophia N.

    2013-01-01

    Host-induced antibodies and their contributions to cancer inflammation are largely unexplored. IgG4 subclass antibodies are present in IL-10–driven Th2 immune responses in some inflammatory conditions. Since Th2-biased inflammation is a hallmark of tumor microenvironments, we investigated the presence and functional implications of IgG4 in malignant melanoma. Consistent with Th2 inflammation, CD22+ B cells and IgG4+-infiltrating cells accumulated in tumors, and IL-10, IL-4, and tumor-reactive IgG4 were expressed in situ. When compared with B cells from patient lymph nodes and blood, tumor-associated B cells were polarized to produce IgG4. Secreted B cells increased VEGF and IgG4, and tumor cells enhanced IL-10 secretion in cocultures. Unlike IgG1, an engineered tumor antigen-specific IgG4 was ineffective in triggering effector cell–mediated tumor killing in vitro. Antigen-specific and nonspecific IgG4 inhibited IgG1-mediated tumoricidal functions. IgG4 blockade was mediated through reduction of FcγRI activation. Additionally, IgG4 significantly impaired the potency of tumoricidal IgG1 in a human melanoma xenograft mouse model. Furthermore, serum IgG4 was inversely correlated with patient survival. These findings suggest that IgG4 promoted by tumor-induced Th2-biased inflammation may restrict effector cell functions against tumors, providing a previously unexplored aspect of tumor-induced immune escape and a basis for biomarker development and patient-specific therapeutic approaches. PMID:23454746

  4. Could you have low testosterone?

    MedlinePlus

    ... menopause; Andropause; Testosterone deficiency; Androgen deficiency of the aging male; Late-onset hypogonadism ... Some symptoms may be a normal part of aging. For example, it is normal to feel less ...

  5. Controversies in testosterone supplementation therapy.

    PubMed

    Khera, Mohit

    2015-01-01

    Testosterone has now become one of the most widely used medications throughout the world. The rapid growth of the testosterone market in the past 10 years is due to many factors. We currently have a worldwide aging population. In the US, the number of men 65 years old or older is increasing 2-3 times faster than the number of men younger than 65 years. In addition, poor general health and certain medical conditions such as diabetes/metabolic syndrome (MetS), cardiovascular disease (CVD), and osteoporosis have been associated with low serum testosterone levels. [1],[2],[3] There are now fewer concerns regarding the development of prostate cancer (PCa) after testosterone therapy, making it a more attractive treatment option. Finally, the introduction of different forms of testosterone supplementation therapy (TST) with increased promotion, marketing, and direct-to-consumer advertising is also driving market growth. As the demand for TST continues to grow, it is becoming more important for clinicians to understand how to diagnose and treat patients with low testosterone. PMID:25652639

  6. Testosterone, thrombophilia, thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Glueck, Charles J; Friedman, Joel; Hafeez, Ahsan; Hassan, Atif; Wang, Ping

    2014-10-01

    We assessed previously undiagnosed thrombophilia-hypofibrinolysis in 11 testosterone (T)-taking men, five of whom developed deep venous thrombosis (DVT), four pulmonary embolism, one spinal cord infarction, and one osteonecrosis 3.5 months (median) after starting T gel (50-160 mg/day) or T intramuscular (50-250 mg/week). In the order of referral because of thrombosis after starting T, thrombophilia-hypofibrinolysis was studied in 11 men, and, separately, in two control groups without thrombosis - 44 healthy normal male controls and 39 healthy men taking T. Nine men had DVT or DVT-pulmonary embolism after 3.5 months (median) on T, one spinal cord infarction after 5 days on T, and one had osteonecrosis (knee and then hip osteonecrosis after 6 and 18 months on T). Four of the 11 men (36%) had high factor VIII (≥150%) vs. one of 42 (2%) controls (P = 0.005), and vs. one of 25 (4%) T-controls, (P = 0.023). Of the 11 men, two (18%) had factor V Leiden heterozygosity vs. none of 44 controls, (P = 0.04) and vs. none of 39 T-controls(P = 0.045). Of the 11 men, three had 4G4G plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 homozygosity, one prothrombin G20210A heterozygosity, one low protein S, and one high factor XI. When T was continued, second DVT-pulmonary embolism recurred in three of 11 men despite adequate anticoagulation. T interacts with thrombophilia-hypofibrinolysis leading to thrombosis. Men sustaining DVT-pulmonary embolism-osteonecrosis on T should be studied for thrombophilia. Continuation of T in thrombophilic men appears to be contraindicated because of recurrent thrombosis despite adequate anticoagulation. Before starting T, to prevent T-associated thrombosis, we recommend measures of factor V Leiden, factor VIII, and the prothrombin gene. PMID:24732175

  7. Testosterone deficiency: a historical perspective

    PubMed Central

    Nieschlag, Eberhard; Nieschlag, Susan

    2014-01-01

    The biological effects of the testes and testosterone are known since antiquity. Aristotle knew the effects of castration and his hypothesis on fertilization is one of the first scientific encounters in reproductive biology. Over centuries, castration has been performed as punishment and to produce obedient slaves, but also to preserve the soprano voices of prepubertal boys. The Chinese imperial (and other oriental) courts employed castrates as overseers in harems who often obtained high-ranking political positions. The era of testis transplantation and organotherapy was initiated by John Hunter in London who transplanted testes into capons in 1786. The intention of his experiments was to prove the ‘vital principle’ as the basis for modern transplantation medicine, but Hunter did not consider endocrine aspects. Arnold Adolph Berthold postulated internal secretion from his testicular transplantation experiments in 1849 in Göttingen and is thus considered the father of endocrinology. Following his observations, testicular preparations were used for therapy, popularized by self-experiments by Charles-Edouard Brown-Séquard in Paris (1889), which can at best have placebo effects. In the 1920s Sergio Voronoff transplanted testes from animals to men, but their effectiveness was disproved. Today testicular transplantation is being refined by stem cell research and germ cell transplantation. Modern androgen therapy started in 1935 when Enrest Lacquer isolated testosterone from bull testes in Amsterdam. In the same year testosterone was chemically synthesized independently by Adolf Butenandt in Göttingen and Leopold Ruzicka in Basel. Since testosterone was ineffective orally it was either compressed into subcutaneous pellets or was used orally as 17α-methyl testosterone, now obsolete because of liver toxicity. The early phases of testosterone treatment coincide with the first description of the most prominent syndromes of hypogonadism by Klinefelter, by Kallmann, Del

  8. Testosterone deficiency: a historical perspective.

    PubMed

    Nieschlag, Eberhard; Nieschlag, Susan

    2014-01-01

    The biological effects of the testes and testosterone are known since antiquity. Aristotle knew the effects of castration and his hypothesis on fertilization is one of the first scientific encounters in reproductive biology. Over centuries, castration has been performed as punishment and to produce obedient slaves, but also to preserve the soprano voices of prepubertal boys. The Chinese imperial (and other oriental) courts employed castrates as overseers in harems who often obtained high-ranking political positions. The era of testis transplantation and organotherapy was initiated by John Hunter in London who transplanted testes into capons in 1786. The intention of his experiments was to prove the 'vital principle' as the basis for modern transplantation medicine, but Hunter did not consider endocrine aspects. Arnold Adolph Berthold postulated internal secretion from his testicular transplantation experiments in 1849 in Göttingen and is thus considered the father of endocrinology. Following his observations, testicular preparations were used for therapy, popularized by self-experiments by Charles-Edouard Brown-Séquard in Paris (1889), which can at best have placebo effects. In the 1920s Sergio Voronoff transplanted testes from animals to men, but their effectiveness was disproved. Today testicular transplantation is being refined by stem cell research and germ cell transplantation. Modern androgen therapy started in 1935 when Enrest Lacquer isolated testosterone from bull testes in Amsterdam. In the same year testosterone was chemically synthesized independently by Adolf Butenandt in Göttingen and Leopold Ruzicka in Basel. Since testosterone was ineffective orally it was either compressed into subcutaneous pellets or was used orally as 17α-methyl testosterone, now obsolete because of liver toxicity. The early phases of testosterone treatment coincide with the first description of the most prominent syndromes of hypogonadism by Klinefelter, by Kallmann, Del

  9. Protective role of mouse IgG1 in cryoglobulinaemia; insights from an animal model and relevance to human pathology.

    PubMed

    Chemouny, Jonathan Maurice; Hurtado-Nedelec, Margarita; Flament, Héloïse; Ben Mkaddem, Sanae; Daugas, Eric; Vrtovsnik, François; Berthelot, Laureline; Monteiro, Renato C

    2016-08-01

    Strait et al. described a novel mouse model of cryoglobulinaemia by challenging mice deficient in the immunoglobulin (Ig)G1 subclass (γ1(-) mice) with goat anti-mouse IgD [5]. The phenotype of wild-type mice was not remarkable, whereas γ1(-) mice developed IgG3 anti-goat IgG cryoglobulins as well as severe and lethal glomerulonephritis. Renal phenotype could not be rescued in γ1(-) mice by the deletion of C3, fragment crystalline γ receptor (FcγR) or J chain. On the other hand, early injection of IgG1, IgG2a or IgG2b inhibited the pathogenic effects of IgG3 in an antigen-dependent manner even in the absence of the FcγRIIb, an anti-inflammatory receptor. The authors concluded that the pathogenic role of IgG3 and the protective characteristic of IgG1 in this model were not explained by their abilities to bind to FcRs or effector molecules but are rather due to structural discrepancies enhancing the precipitation properties/solubility of IgG3/IgG1-containing immune complexes. The present article aims to discuss the current knowledge on IgG biology and the properties of IgGs explaining their differential propensity to acquire cryoglobulin activity. PMID:26410885

  10. Criteria to indicate testosterone administration.

    PubMed Central

    Kicman, A T; Brooks, R V; Collyer, S C; Cowan, D A; Nanjee, M N; Southan, G J; Wheeler, M J

    1990-01-01

    A detection method for testosterone administration was developed using radioimmunoassay to measure the urinary ratios of testosterone (T) to epitestosterone (E) and to luteinizing hormone (LH). A comparative study of the effect on these ratios of a single intramuscular injection of testosterone heptanoate followed by stimulation with human chorionic gonadotrophin (HCG) in three normal men was undertaken. To allow immediate investigation, a commercially supplied epitestosterone antiserum was used. This study showed that both T/E and T/LH ratios could be used to detect testosterone administration, the latter also being an indicator of HCG use due to cross-reactivity with the LH antiserum. Subsequently, an epitestosterone antiserum of superior specificity was raised and used in a study to demonstrate the insignificant effect of exercise on these ratios. Finally, an intramuscular injection of a combined preparation of testosterone/epitestosterone heptanoates resulted in raised ratios of T/LH but not of T/E. This demonstrated the importance of the T/LH ratio in circumstances where the T/E ratio can be easily circumvented. PMID:2097025

  11. TESTOSTERONE AND SPORT: CURRENT PERSPECTIVES

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Ruth I.; Stanton, Steven J.

    2011-01-01

    Testosterone and other anabolic-androgenic steroids enhance athletic performance in men and women. As a result, exogenous androgen is banned from most competitive sports. However, due to variability in endogenous secretion, and similarities with exogenous testosterone, it has been challenging to establish allowable limits for testosterone in competition. Endogenous androgen production is dynamically regulated by both exercise and winning in competition. Furthermore, testosterone may promote athletic performance, not only through its long-term anabolic actions, but also through rapid effects on behavior. In women, excess production of endogenous testosterone due to inborn disorders of sexual development (DSD) may convey a competitive advantage. For many years, female competitors have been subject to tests of sexual genotype and phenotype known as gender verification. Although gender verification has not identified any normal man competing as a woman, this process has identified women athletes with DSD. As understanding of DSD has expanded in recent years, women with DSD are increasingly able to continue athletic competition. PMID:21983229

  12. Testosterone and benign prostatic hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Jarvis, Thomas R; Chughtai, Bilal; Kaplan, Steven A

    2015-01-01

    The use of testosterone to treat the symptoms of late-onset hypogonadal men has increased recently due to patient and physician awareness. However, concerns regarding the effect of testosterone on the prostate, in particular any possible effect on the risk of prostate cancer have prompted further research in this regard. Surprisingly, numerous retrospective or small, randomized trials have pointed to a possible improvement in male lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) in patients treated with testosterone. The exact mechanism of this improvement is still debated but may have a close relationship to metabolic syndrome. For the clinician, the results of these studies are promising but do not constitute high levels of evidence. A thorough clinical examination (including history, examination and laboratory testing of testosterone) should be undertaken before considering the diagnosis of late-onset hypogonadism or instigating treatment for it. Warnings still remain on the testosterone supplement product labels regarding the risk of urinary retention and worsening LUTS, and these should be explained to patients. PMID:25337845

  13. Testosterone and weight loss: the evidence

    PubMed Central

    Traish, Abdulmaged M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review The purpose of this article is to examine the contemporary data linking testosterone therapy in overweight and obese men with testosterone deficiency to increased lean body mass, decreased fat mass, improvement in overall body composition and sustained weight loss. This is of paramount importance because testosterone therapy in obese men with testosterone deficiency represents a novel and a timely therapeutic strategy for managing obesity in men with testosterone deficiency. Recent findings Long-term testosterone therapy in men with testosterone deficiency produces significant and sustained weight loss, marked reduction in waist circumference and BMI and improvement in body composition. Further, testosterone therapy ameliorates components of the metabolic syndrome. The aforementioned improvements are attributed to improved mitochondrial function, increased energy utilization, increased motivation and vigor resulting in improved cardio-metabolic function and enhanced physical activity. Summary The implication of testosterone therapy in management of obesity in men with testosterone deficiency is of paramount clinical significance, as it produces sustained weight loss without recidivism. On the contrary, alternative therapeutic approaches other than bariatric surgery failed to produce significant and sustained outcome and exhibit a high rate of recidivism. These findings represent strong foundations for testosterone therapy in obese men with testosterone deficiency and should spur clinical research for better understanding of usefulness of testosterone therapy in treatment of underlying pathophysiological conditions of obesity. PMID:25105998

  14. Fulfilling desire: evidence for negative feedback between men's testosterone, sociosexual psychology, and sexual partner number.

    PubMed

    Puts, David A; Pope, Lauramarie E; Hill, Alexander K; Cárdenas, Rodrigo A; Welling, Lisa L M; Wheatley, John R; Marc Breedlove, S

    2015-04-01

    Across human societies and many nonhuman animals, males have greater interest in uncommitted sex (more unrestricted sociosexuality) than do females. Testosterone shows positive associations with male-typical sociosexual behavior in nonhuman animals. Yet, it remains unclear whether the human sex difference in sociosexual psychology (attitudes and desires) is mediated by testosterone, whether any relationships between testosterone and sociosexuality differ between men and women, and what the nature of these possible relationships might be. In studies to resolve these questions, we examined relationships between salivary testosterone concentrations and sociosexual psychology and behavior in men and women. We measured testosterone in all men in our sample, but only in those women taking oral contraception (OC-using women) in order to reduce the influence of ovulatory cycle variation in ovarian hormone production. We found that OC-using women did not differ from normally-ovulating women in sociosexual psychology or behavior, but that circulating testosterone mediated the sex difference in human sociosexuality and predicted sociosexual psychology in men but not OC-using women. Moreover, when sociosexual psychology was controlled, men's sociosexual behavior (number of sexual partners) was negatively related to testosterone, suggesting that testosterone drives sociosexual psychology in men and is inhibited when those desires are fulfilled. This more complex relationship between androgens and male sexuality may reconcile some conflicting prior reports. PMID:25644313

  15. Autoimmune antibody (IgG Kansas) against the fibrin stabilizing factor (factor XIII) system.

    PubMed Central

    Lorand, L; Velasco, P T; Rinne, J R; Amare, M; Miller, L K; Zucker, M L

    1988-01-01

    Serum from a patient who died from massive hemorrhage within 4 months after onset of an acquired bleeding disorder at age 85 contained a potent inhibitor of fibrin stabilization. Other parameters of coagulation and fibrinolysis and his bleeding time were within normal limits. The inhibitor was shown to be an IgG with kappa light chains (IgG Kansas); its specific target was the factor XIII system itself. Although IgG Kansas combined with the virgin [ab] form of the zymogen, it did not block the thrombin-catalyzed conversion to [a'b]. However, IgG Kansas prevented the subsequent Ca2+-mediated activation of [a'b] to a + b, where a denotes the catalytically competent factor XIIIa species. IgG Kansas, in contrast to a previously studied autoimmune antibody from a similar bleeding disorder (IgG Warsaw), could also inhibit the transamidating activity of the preactivated a enzyme. Images PMID:3422419

  16. Testosterone, thrombophilia, thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Freedman, Joel; Glueck, Charles J; Prince, Marloe; Riaz, Rashid; Wang, Ping

    2015-05-01

    We screened previously undiagnosed thrombophilia (V Leiden-prothrombin mutations, Factors VIII and XI, homocysteine, and antiphospholipid antibody [APL] syndrome) in 15 men and 2 women with venous thromboembolism (VTE) or osteonecrosis 7 months (median) after starting testosterone therapy (TT), gel (30-50 mg/d), intramuscular (100-400 mg/wk), or human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) (6000 IU/wk). Thrombophilia was studied in 2 healthy control groups without thrombosis (97 normal controls, 31 subjects on TT) and in a third control group (n = 22) with VTE, not on TT. Of the 17 cases, 76% had ≥1 thrombophilia vs 19% of 97 normal controls (P < 0.0001), vs 29% of 31 TT controls (P = 0.002). Cases differed from normal controls by Factor V Leiden (12% vs 0%, P = 0.021), by high Factor VIII (>150%) (24% vs 7%, P = 0.058), by high homocysteine (29% vs 5%, P = 0.007), and from both normal and TT controls for APL syndrome (18% vs 2%, P = 0.023, vs 0%, P = 0.04). Despite adequate anticoagulation with TT continued after the first deep venous thrombosis-pulmonary embolus (DVT-PE), 1 man sustained 3 DVT-PEs 5, 8, and 11 months later and a second man had 2 DVT-PEs 1 and 2 months later. Of the 10 cases with serum T measured on TT, 6 (60%) had supranormal T (>800 ng/dL) and of 9 with estradiol measured on TT, 7 (78%) had supranormal levels (>42.6 pg/mL). TT interacts with thrombophilia leading to thrombosis. TT continuation in thrombophilic men is contraindicated because of recurrent thrombi despite anticoagulation. Screening for thrombophilia before starting TT should identify subjects at high risk for VTE with an adverse the risk to benefit ratio for TT. PMID:25639953

  17. Testosterone Replacement Therapy and Prostate Cancer Incidence

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    While early studies demonstrated a positive association between testosterone and prostate cancer, evidence on the nature of the relationship has evolved with time and newer data. Studies examining links between baseline testosterone levels as well as testosterone therapy and incident prostate cancer, reveal a more complex relationship. Moreover, investigators have reported their initial experiences with supplementing testosterone in men with a history of both treated and untreated prostate cancer. PMID:26770932

  18. Review of health risks of low testosterone and testosterone administration

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Huanguang; Sullivan, Charles T; McCoy, Sean C; Yarrow, Joshua F; Morrow, Matthew; Borst, Stephen E

    2015-01-01

    Hypogonadism is prevalent in older men and testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) for older hypogonadal men is a promising therapy. However, a number of important clinical concerns over TRT safety remain unsolved due to a lack of large-scale randomized clinical trials directly comparing the health risks of untreated hypogonadism vs long-term use of TRT. Meta-analyses of clinical trials of TRT as of 2010 have identified three major adverse events resulting from TRT: polycythemia, an increase in prostate-related events, and a slight reduction in serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. There are other purported health risks but their incidence can be neither confirmed nor denied based on the small number of subjects that have been studied to date. Furthermore, subsequent literature is equivocal with regard to the safety and utility of TRT and this topic has been subject to contentious debate. Since January 2014, the United States Food and Drug Administration has released two official announcements regarding the safety of TRT and clinical monitoring the risks in TRT users. Additionally, the health risks related to the clinical presentation of low or declining testosterone levels not been resolved in the current literature. Because TRT is prescribed in the context of putative risks resulting from reduced testosterone levels, we reviewed the epidemiology and reported risks of low testosterone levels. We also highlight the current information about TRT utilization, the risks most often claimed to be associated with TRT, and current or emerging alternatives to TRT. PMID:25879005

  19. Gender-Typed Play and Amniotic Testosterone

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knickmeyer, Rebecca Christine; Wheelwright, Sally; Taylor, Kevin; Raggatt, Peter; Hackett, Gerald; Baron-Cohen, Simon

    2005-01-01

    Sex differences in play are apparent in a number of mammalian species, including humans. Prenatal testosterone may contribute to these differences. The authors report the first attempt to correlate gender-typed play in a normative sample of humans with measurements of amniotic testosterone (aT). Testosterone was measured in the amniotic fluid of…

  20. The TRPM8 Protein Is a Testosterone Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Asuthkar, Swapna; Elustondo, Pia A.; Demirkhanyan, Lusine; Sun, Xiaohui; Baskaran, Padmamalini; Velpula, Kiran Kumar; Thyagarajan, Baskaran; Pavlov, Evgeny V.; Zakharian, Eleonora

    2015-01-01

    The transient receptor potential ion channel of the melastatin subfamily, TRPM8, is a major cold receptor in the peripheral nervous system. Along with the sensory neurons, the TRPM8 protein is highly expressed in the prostate epithelial cells, and this expression is regulated by androgens. Here we investigated the expression and intracellular localization of the TRPM8 channel in relationship to androgens. We performed experiments using human prostate tissues obtained from healthy individuals and patients with prostate cancer at various stages of the disease as well as in cultured cells. Using an immunohistochemistry approach, we detected an intensive colocalization pattern of the TRPM8 protein with endogenous androgens in all tissues tested, suggesting possible interactions. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments performed using cultured prostate epithelial cells, prostate cancer cells, and HEK-293 cells stably expressing TRPM8 further confirmed direct binding of the steroid hormone, testosterone, to the TRPM8 protein. Applications of picomolar concentrations of testosterone to the primary human prostate cells, endogenously expressing TRPM8, elicited Ca2+ responses and channel currents, and those were inhibited in the presence of TRPM8 antagonist, N-(2-aminoethyl)-N-(4-(benzyloxy)-3-methoxybenzyl)thiophene-2-carboxamide hydrochloride. These results indicate that the TRPM8 channel is physically associated with testosterone and suggest that, in addition to a genomic role, testosterone plays a role in direct regulation of the TRPM8 channel function. PMID:25480783

  1. COMBINATION DOSE OF TWO PHTHALATES ADDITIVELY DEPRESSES TESTOSTERONE PRODUCTION AND INSL3 GENE EXPRESSION IN MALE RAT FETUSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Diethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) and di(n-butyl) phthalate (DBP) are phthalate esters used to modify plastic and polymer textures. Individually,DEHP and DBP reduce testosterone production, inhibit reproductive tract development, andinduce reproductive organ malformationsin male rats...

  2. The TRPM8 protein is a testosterone receptor: I. Biochemical evidence for direct TRPM8-testosterone interactions.

    PubMed

    Asuthkar, Swapna; Elustondo, Pia A; Demirkhanyan, Lusine; Sun, Xiaohui; Baskaran, Padmamalini; Velpula, Kiran Kumar; Thyagarajan, Baskaran; Pavlov, Evgeny V; Zakharian, Eleonora

    2015-01-30

    The transient receptor potential ion channel of the melastatin subfamily, TRPM8, is a major cold receptor in the peripheral nervous system. Along with the sensory neurons, the TRPM8 protein is highly expressed in the prostate epithelial cells, and this expression is regulated by androgens. Here we investigated the expression and intracellular localization of the TRPM8 channel in relationship to androgens. We performed experiments using human prostate tissues obtained from healthy individuals and patients with prostate cancer at various stages of the disease as well as in cultured cells. Using an immunohistochemistry approach, we detected an intensive colocalization pattern of the TRPM8 protein with endogenous androgens in all tissues tested, suggesting possible interactions. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments performed using cultured prostate epithelial cells, prostate cancer cells, and HEK-293 cells stably expressing TRPM8 further confirmed direct binding of the steroid hormone, testosterone, to the TRPM8 protein. Applications of picomolar concentrations of testosterone to the primary human prostate cells, endogenously expressing TRPM8, elicited Ca(2+) responses and channel currents, and those were inhibited in the presence of TRPM8 antagonist, N-(2-aminoethyl)-N-(4-(benzyloxy)-3-methoxybenzyl)thiophene-2-carboxamide hydrochloride. These results indicate that the TRPM8 channel is physically associated with testosterone and suggest that, in addition to a genomic role, testosterone plays a role in direct regulation of the TRPM8 channel function. PMID:25480783

  3. Testosterone signaling through internalizable surface receptors in androgen receptor-free macrophages.

    PubMed

    Benten, W P; Lieberherr, M; Stamm, O; Wrehlke, C; Guo, Z; Wunderlich, F

    1999-10-01

    Testosterone acts on cells through intracellular transcription-regulating androgen receptors (ARs). Here, we show that mouse IC-21 macrophages lack the classical AR yet exhibit specific nongenomic responses to testosterone. These manifest themselves as testosterone-induced rapid increase in intracellular free [Ca(2+)], which is due to release of Ca(2+) from intracellular Ca(2+) stores. This Ca(2+) mobilization is also inducible by plasma membrane-impermeable testosterone-BSA. It is not affected by the AR blockers cyproterone and flutamide, whereas it is completely inhibited by the phospholipase C inhibitor U-73122 and pertussis toxin. Binding sites for testosterone are detectable on the surface of intact IC-21 cells, which become selectively internalized independent on caveolae and clathrin-coated vesicles upon agonist stimulation. Internalization is dependent on temperature, ATP, cytoskeletal elements, phospholipase C, and G-proteins. Collectively, our data provide evidence for the existence of G-protein-coupled, agonist-sequestrable receptors for testosterone in plasma membranes, which initiate a transcription-independent signaling pathway of testosterone. PMID:10512854

  4. Testosterone Signaling through Internalizable Surface Receptors in Androgen Receptor-free Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Benten, W. Peter M.; Lieberherr, Michèle; Stamm, Olaf; Wrehlke, Christian; Guo, Zhiyong; Wunderlich, Frank

    1999-01-01

    Testosterone acts on cells through intracellular transcription-regulating androgen receptors (ARs). Here, we show that mouse IC-21 macrophages lack the classical AR yet exhibit specific nongenomic responses to testosterone. These manifest themselves as testosterone-induced rapid increase in intracellular free [Ca2+], which is due to release of Ca2+ from intracellular Ca2+ stores. This Ca2+ mobilization is also inducible by plasma membrane-impermeable testosterone-BSA. It is not affected by the AR blockers cyproterone and flutamide, whereas it is completely inhibited by the phospholipase C inhibitor U-73122 and pertussis toxin. Binding sites for testosterone are detectable on the surface of intact IC-21 cells, which become selectively internalized independent on caveolae and clathrin-coated vesicles upon agonist stimulation. Internalization is dependent on temperature, ATP, cytoskeletal elements, phospholipase C, and G-proteins. Collectively, our data provide evidence for the existence of G-protein-coupled, agonist-sequestrable receptors for testosterone in plasma membranes, which initiate a transcription-independent signaling pathway of testosterone. PMID:10512854

  5. Drug Insight: testosterone and selective androgen receptor modulators as anabolic therapies for chronic illness and aging

    PubMed Central

    Bhasin, Shalender; Calof, Olga M; Storer, Thomas W; Lee, Martin L; Mazer, Norman A; Jasuja, Ravi; Montori, Victor M; Gao, Wenqing; Dalton, James T

    2007-01-01

    SUMMARY Several regulatory concerns have hindered development of androgens as anabolic therapies, despite unequivocal evidence that testosterone supplementation increases muscle mass and strength in men; it induces hypertrophy of type I and II muscle fibers, and increases myonuclear and satellite cell number. Androgens promote differentiation of mesenchymal multipotent cells into the myogenic lineage and inhibit their adipogenic differentiation, by facilitating association of androgen receptors with β-catenin and activating T-cell factor 4. Meta-analyses indicate that testosterone supplementation increases fat-free mass and muscle strength in HIV-positive men with weight loss, glucocorticoid-treated men, and older men with low or low-normal testosterone levels. The effects of testosterone on physical function and outcomes important to patients have not, however, been studied. In older men, increased hematocrit and increased risk of prostate biopsy and detection of prostate events are the most frequent, testosterone-related adverse events. Concerns about long-term risks have restrained enthusiasm for testosterone use as anabolic therapy. Selective androgen-receptor modulators that are preferentially anabolic and that spare the prostate hold promise as anabolic therapies. We need more studies to determine whether testosterone or selective androgen-receptor modulators can induce meaningful improvements in physical function and patient-important outcomes in patients with physical dysfunction associated with chronic illness or aging. PMID:16932274

  6. The interaction of testosterone and cortisol is associated with attained status in male executives.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Gary D; Lerner, Jennifer S; Josephs, Robert A; Renshon, Jonathan; Gross, James J

    2016-06-01

    Are hormone levels associated with the attainment of social status? Although endogenous testosterone predicts status-seeking social behaviors, research suggests that the stress hormone cortisol may inhibit testosterone's effects. Thus, individuals with both high testosterone and low cortisol may be especially likely to occupy high-status positions in social hierarchies while individuals with high testosterone and high cortisol may not. We tested this hypothesis by recruiting a sample of real executives and examining testosterone, cortisol, and a concrete indicator of attained status: the number of subordinates over which the executive has authority. Despite the myriad nonhormonal factors that determine organizational promotion, the executives' endogenous testosterone and cortisol interacted to significantly predict hierarchical position: Testosterone positively predicted executives' number of subordinates, but only among low-cortisol executives. The results imply that reducing cortisol levels via stress reduction may be a critical goal not only because doing so will improve health but also because doing so may enhance leadership potential. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26302434

  7. Testosterone and Vascular Function in Aging

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Rhéure A. M.; Neves, Karla B.; Carneiro, Fernando S.; Tostes, Rita C.

    2012-01-01

    Androgen receptors are widely distributed in several tissues, including vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells. Through classic cytosolic androgen receptors or membrane receptors, testosterone induces genomic and non-genomic effects, respectively. Testosterone interferes with the vascular function by increasing the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and arterial thickness. Experimental evidence indicates that sex steroid hormones, such as testosterone modulate the synthesis and bioavailability of NO and, consequently, endothelial function, which is key for a healthy vasculature. Of interest, aging itself is accompanied by endothelial and vascular smooth muscle dysfunction. Aging-associated decline of testosterone levels is accompanied by age-related diseases, such as metabolic and cardiovascular diseases, indicating that very low levels of androgens may contribute to cardiovascular dysfunction observed in these age-related disorders or, in other words, that testosterone may have beneficial effects in the cardiovascular system. However, testosterone seems to play a negative role in the severity of renal disease. In this mini-review, we briefly comment on the interplay between aging and testosterone levels, the vascular actions of testosterone and its implications for vascular aging. Renal effects of testosterone and the use of testosterone to prevent vascular dysfunction in elderly are also addressed. PMID:22514541

  8. Detection of testosterone esters in blood.

    PubMed

    Forsdahl, Guro; Erceg, Damir; Geisendorfer, Thomas; Turkalj, Mirjana; Plavec, Davor; Thevis, Mario; Tretzel, Laura; Gmeiner, Günter

    2015-01-01

    Injections of synthetic esters of testosterone are among the most common forms of testosterone application. In doping control, the detection of an intact ester of testosterone in blood gives unequivocal proof of the administration of exogenous testosterone. The aim of the current project was to investigate the detection window for injected testosterone esters as a mixed substance preparation and as a single substance preparation in serum and plasma. Furthermore, the suitability of different types of blood collection devices was evaluated. Collection tubes with stabilizing additives, as well as non-stabilized serum separation tubes, were tested. A clinical study with six participants was carried out, comprising a single intramuscular injection of either 1000 mg testosterone undecanoate (Nebido(®)) or a mixture of 30 mg testosterone propionate, 60 mg testosterone phenylpropionate, 60 mg testosterone isocaproate, and 100 mg testosterone decanoate (Sustanon(®)). Blood was collected throughout a testing period of 60 days. The applied analytical method for blood analysis included liquid-liquid extraction and preparation of oxime derivatives, prior to TLX-sample clean-up and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) detection. All investigated testosterone esters could be detected in post-administration blood samples. The detection time depended on the type of ester administered. Furthermore, results from the study show that measured blood concentrations of especially short-chained testosterone esters are influenced by the type of blood collection device applied. The testosterone ester detection window, however, was comparable. PMID:26695486

  9. Human immunoglobulin class and IgG subclass regulation: dual action of interleukin-4.

    PubMed

    Kotowicz, K; Callard, R E

    1993-09-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) was used as a polyclonal human B cell mitogen to investigate the regulation of immunoglobulin class and IgG subclass responses by interleukin-4 (IL-4). Activation of tonsillar B cells with EBV resulted in an early peak of polyclonal immunoglobulin secretion between days 13 and 14 consisting of IgM, IgA, and IgG1, IgG2, IgG3 and IgG4, but not IgE. Addition of IL-4 to EBV-activated B cells at concentrations of 100 U/ml or greater induced the production of IgE and enhanced IgG4 secretion, but had no effect, or more often inhibited the other isotypes. In contrast, low concentrations of IL-4 (1-5 U/ml) significantly increased the production of IgM, IgA, IgG1, IgG2 and IgG3, but had no effect on IgG4 or IgE. The increase in immunoglobulin secretion obtained with low concentrations of IL-4 was found to occur only with high-density (resting) B cells, suggesting that IL-4 was not functioning simply as a late-acting differentiation factor. Low concentrations of IL-4 significantly increased IgG1, IgG2, IgG3, and IgA production by surface (s) IgM+ (sIgG-/sIgA-) B cells which is consistent with heavy chain switching. In some experiments, however, IL-4 enhanced IgM secretion by sIgM+ B cells, and IgA, IgG1, IgG2, IgG3 by sIgM- B cells, suggesting that it may have an additional B cell differentiation factor activity which was not isotype specific. The different effect of IL-4 at high and low concentrations were similar to those observed in B cell activation experiments, and may be due to the existence of high- and low-affinity IL-4 receptors. PMID:8396532

  10. Effects of ciprofloxacin on testosterone and cortisol concentrations in healthy males.

    PubMed Central

    Waite, N M; Edwards, D J; Arnott, W S; Warbasse, L H

    1989-01-01

    Several inhibitors of oxidative drug metabolism inhibit the synthesis of endogenous compounds such as testosterone and cortisol. Since ciprofloxacin is a potent inhibitor of the metabolism of a number of drugs, we studied its effect on serum testosterone and cortisol concentrations in eight healthy male subjects. Blood samples were collected over a 12-h period under baseline conditions and following the first and final doses of ciprofloxacin (500 mg orally every 12 h for 4 days). No significant differences in concentrations or area under the concentration-time curve were found when baseline values were compared with those observed for either testosterone or cortisol after ciprofloxacin administration. These results suggest that ciprofloxacin is unlikely to have either antiandrogenic side effects or clinical utility in lowering testosterone or cortisol concentration. PMID:2610498

  11. Testosterone, hemostasis, and cardiovascular diseases in men.

    PubMed

    Brodin, Ellen; Vikan, Torkel; Hansen, John-Bjarne; Svartberg, Johan

    2011-02-01

    Men have a higher incidence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) than women, and adverse thrombotic events increase with age. Recent experimental cross-sectional, and case-control studies have shown that testosterone may affect the hemostatic/fibrinolytic system in men in several ways. It has been hypothesized that physiological doses of testosterone would have a beneficial effect on tissue factor-induced thrombin generation and the development of CVD. The search for eternal youth has created a market for testosterone treatment in aging men during the last few years. However, whether testosterone supplementation could be useful in the treatment of testosterone-deficient elderly men is still controversial. The present review focuses on the coagulation system and CVD from the perspective of testosterone. PMID:21249606

  12. IgG subclass deficiency and sinopulmonary bacterial infections in patients with alcoholic liver disease.

    PubMed

    Spinozzi, F; Cimignoli, E; Gerli, R; Agea, E; Bertotto, A; Rondoni, F; Grignani, F

    1992-01-01

    Abnormalities in IgG subclass distribution were sought in serum samples and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from 15 patients with alcoholic liver disease to explain their increased susceptibility to bacterial respiratory infections. Serum IgG4 deficiency alone or in association with low IgG2 levels was revealed in approximately 30% of patients with alcoholic liver disease. This fact prompted us to further investigate the immunoglobulin concentrations in broncho-alveolar lavage fluid, paying special attention to the distribution of IgA and IgG subclasses. IgA levels were found to be normal or slightly elevated. However, there were substantial defects in total IgG and IgG1 concentrations, often associated with reduced IgG2 and IgG4 levels, in approximately 70% of patients with alcoholic liver disease, which proved to be closely correlated with the number and type (pneumonia) of bacterial respiratory infections. A prospective study of intravenous immunoglobulin substitutive therapy involving two patients with recurrent pneumonia and very low serum IgG2 values demonstrated a reduction in the number of respiratory infectious episodes as well as an increase in both serum and, to a lesser extent, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid IgG1 and IgG2 levels. We identified immune defects that may represent an important pathogenetic mechanism that, when considered together with the alcohol-related suppression of alveolar macrophage and ciliary functions and the inhibition of leukocyte migration into the lungs, should help clarify the complex relationships between alcohol and immune defense. PMID:1728935

  13. T cell–independent B cell activation induces immunosuppressive sialylated IgG antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Hess, Constanze; Winkler, André; Lorenz, Alexandra K.; Holecska, Vivien; Blanchard, Véronique; Eiglmeier, Susanne; Schoen, Anna-Lena; Bitterling, Josephine; Stoehr, Alexander D.; Petzold, Dominique; Schommartz, Tim; Mertes, Maria M.M.; Schoen, Carolin T.; Tiburzy, Ben; Herrmann, Anne; Köhl, Jörg; Manz, Rudolf A.; Madaio, Michael P.; Berger, Markus; Wardemann, Hedda; Ehlers, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Antigen-specific Abs are able to enhance or suppress immune responses depending on the receptors that they bind on immune cells. Recent studies have shown that pro- or antiinflammatory effector functions of IgG Abs are also regulated through their Fc N-linked glycosylation patterns. IgG Abs that are agalactosylated (non-galactosylated) and asialylated are proinflammatory and induced by the combination of T cell–dependent (TD) protein antigens and proinflammatory costimulation. Sialylated IgG Abs, which are immunosuppressive, and Tregs are produced in the presence of TD antigens under tolerance conditions. T cell–independent (TI) B cell activation via B cell receptor (BCR) crosslinking through polysaccharides or via BCR and TLR costimulation also induces IgG Abs, but the Fc glycosylation state of these Abs is unknown. We found in mouse experiments that TI immune responses induced suppressive sialylated IgGs, in contrast to TD proinflammatory Th1 and Th17 immune responses, which induced agalactosylated and asialylated IgGs. Transfer of low amounts of antigen-specific sialylated IgG Abs was sufficient to inhibit B cell activation and pathogenic immune reactions. These findings suggest an immune regulatory function for TI immune responses through the generation of immunosuppressive sialylated IgGs and may provide insight on the role of TI immune responses during infection, vaccination, and autoimmunity. PMID:23979161

  14. Protease inhibitors decrease IgG shedding from Staphylococcus aureus, increasing complement activation and phagocytosis efficiency.

    PubMed

    Fernandez Falcon, Maria F; Echague, Charlene G; Hair, Pamela S; Nyalwidhe, Julius O; Cunnion, Kenji M

    2011-10-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major pathogen for immunologically intact humans and its pathogenesis is a model system for evasion of host defences. Antibodies and complement are essential elements of the humoral immune system for prevention and control of S. aureus infections. The specific hypothesis for the proposed research is that S. aureus modifies humoral host defences by cleaving IgG that has bound to the bacterial surface, thereby inhibiting opsonophagocytosis. S. aureus was coated with pooled, purified human IgG and assayed for the shedding of cleaved IgG fragments using ELISA and Western blot analysis. Surface-bound IgG was shed efficiently from S. aureus in the absence of host blood proteins. Broad-spectrum protease inhibitors prevented cleavage of IgG from the S. aureus surface, suggesting that staphylococcal proteases are responsible for IgG cleavage. Serine protease inhibitors and cysteine protease inhibitors decreased the cleavage of surface-bound IgG; however, a metalloprotease inhibitor had no effect. Using protease inhibitors to prevent the cleavage of surface-bound IgG increased the binding of complement C3 fragments on the surface of S. aureus, increased the association with human neutrophils and increased phagocytosis by human neutrophils. PMID:21636671

  15. Sialylation of IgG Fc domain impairs complement-dependent cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Quast, Isaak; Keller, Christian W; Maurer, Michael A; Giddens, John P; Tackenberg, Björn; Wang, Lai-Xi; Münz, Christian; Nimmerjahn, Falk; Dalakas, Marinos C; Lünemann, Jan D

    2015-11-01

    IgG molecules exert both pro- and antiinflammatory effector functions based on the composition of the fragment crystallizable (Fc) domain glycan. Sialylated IgG Fc domains have antiinflammatory properties that are attributed to their ability to increase the activation threshold of innate effector cells to immune complexes by stimulating the upregulation of the inhibitory Fcγ receptor IIB (FcγRIIB). Here, we report that IgG Fc sialylation of human monoclonal IgG1 molecules impairs their efficacy to induce complement-mediated cytotoxicity (CDC). Fc sialylation of a CD20-targeting antibody had no impact on antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and did not change the affinity of the antibody for activating Fcγ receptors. In contrast, the presence of sialic acid abrogated the increased binding of C1q to Fc-galactosylated IgG1 and resulted in decreased levels of C3b deposition on the cell surface. Similar to monoclonal antibodies, sialic acid inhibited the increased C1q binding to galactosylated Fc fragments in human polyclonal IgG. In sera derived from patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, an autoimmune disease of the peripheral nervous system in which humoral immune responses mediate tissue damage, induction of IgG Fc sialylation was associated with clinical disease remission. Thus, impairment of CDC represents an FcγR-independent mechanism by which Fc-sialylated glycovariants might limit proinflammatory IgG effector functions. PMID:26436649

  16. Sialylation of IgG Fc domain impairs complement-dependent cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Quast, Isaak; Keller, Christian W.; Maurer, Michael A.; Giddens, John P.; Tackenberg, Björn; Wang, Lai-Xi; Münz, Christian; Nimmerjahn, Falk; Dalakas, Marinos C.; Lünemann, Jan D.

    2015-01-01

    IgG molecules exert both pro- and antiinflammatory effector functions based on the composition of the fragment crystallizable (Fc) domain glycan. Sialylated IgG Fc domains have antiinflammatory properties that are attributed to their ability to increase the activation threshold of innate effector cells to immune complexes by stimulating the upregulation of the inhibitory Fcγ receptor IIB (FcγRIIB). Here, we report that IgG Fc sialylation of human monoclonal IgG1 molecules impairs their efficacy to induce complement-mediated cytotoxicity (CDC). Fc sialylation of a CD20-targeting antibody had no impact on antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and did not change the affinity of the antibody for activating Fcγ receptors. In contrast, the presence of sialic acid abrogated the increased binding of C1q to Fc-galactosylated IgG1 and resulted in decreased levels of C3b deposition on the cell surface. Similar to monoclonal antibodies, sialic acid inhibited the increased C1q binding to galactosylated Fc fragments in human polyclonal IgG. In sera derived from patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, an autoimmune disease of the peripheral nervous system in which humoral immune responses mediate tissue damage, induction of IgG Fc sialylation was associated with clinical disease remission. Thus, impairment of CDC represents an FcγR-independent mechanism by which Fc-sialylated glycovariants might limit proinflammatory IgG effector functions. PMID:26436649

  17. Anti-rhesus D prophylaxis in pregnant women is based on sialylated IgG antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Ehlers, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) from a rhesus D (RhD)-positive fetus that reach the bloodstream of an RhD-negative pregnant woman during birth can induce a pathogenic antibody (Ab) response against the RhD-positive RBCs, leading to fetal hemolytic disease in subsequent pregnancies. To prevent a pathogenic immune reaction, the RhD-negative mother receives serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) containing polyclonal RhD-specific IgG Abs that is purified from healthy RhD-negative men immunized with RhD-positive RBCs. However, the protective mechanism of these polyclonal RhD-specific IgG Abs is unclear. It has become increasingly clear that the effector function of IgG Abs is regulated by the glycan pattern linked to the Fc region of IgG Abs. Non-fucosylated (afucosylated) IgG Abs have a higher affinity for activating Fc gamma receptors, and thus induce a stronger Ab-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) reaction than do fucosylated IgG Abs. Agalactosylated and asialylated, autoantigen-specific serum IgG Abs correlate with pro-inflammatory immune responses and disease activity in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. In contrast, galactosylated and sialylated IgG Abs are immunosuppressive and inhibit in form of immune complexes (ICs) dendritic cell (DC) maturation and pro-inflammatory T and B cell immune responses in an antigen-specific manner. However, the galactosylation and sialylation levels of the protective polyclonal RhD-specific IgG Abs are unknown. Here, we purified RhD-specific IgG Abs from the approved commercial product Rhophylac® (CSL Behring) and found that these RhD-specific IgG Abs were even more galactosylated and sialylated than the total Rhophylac® IgG Abs. This result suggests that these galactosylated and sialylated polyclonal RhD-specific IgG Abs are immunosuppressive and induce tolerance against RhD, which would be in strong contrast to a low fucosylated, low galactosylated and low sialylated monoclonal RhD-specific IgG Ab developed to prevent fetal hemolytic

  18. Association of Free Testosterone with Hypogonadal Symptoms in Men with Near-Normal Total Testosterone Levels

    PubMed Central

    Ramasamy, Ranjith; Golan, Ron; Wilken, Nathan; Scovell, Jason M.; Lipshultz, Larry I.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the association between hypogonadal symptoms and free testosterone levels in men with near-normal total testosterone levels (250–350ng/dL) and to determine whether a discriminatory threshold for free testosterone exists below which hypogonadal symptoms become more prevalent. Methods We reviewed the charts of 3,167 men who presented to an outpatient men's health clinic. 231 men had symptoms of “low testosterone” and serum testosterone levels between 250 and 350ng/dL. We evaluated hypogonadal symptoms using the ADAM and qADAM questionnaires. Serum levels of total testosterone and SHBG were collected on the same day that men completed their questionnaires. We used linear regression to determine whether or not a threshold of free testosterone exists for hypogonadal symptoms. We performed univariate and multivariable analyses to evaluate factors that predicted a low free testosterone level. Results The median age was 43.5 y, and the median testosterone and free testosterone levels were 303ng/dL, and 6.3ng/dL respectively. Prevalence and severity of hypogonadal symptoms (ADAM and qADAM) were similar between men with low (<6.4ng/mL) and normal free testosterone levels. There was an association between age and three of the 10 hypogonadal symptoms (decreased enjoyment in life, sadness, and deterioration of work performance) with a low free testosterone on a univariate analysis. Only younger age was positively associated with free testosterone on multivariable analysis. Conclusions We did not observe a relationship between hypogonadal symptoms and free testosterone in men with near-normal testosterone levels. Symptom-specific free testosterone thresholds could not be defined, as age remains an important confounder. PMID:26199166

  19. Cigarette smoking and testosterone in men and women: A systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jie; Leung, June Yue Yan; Lin, Shi Lin; Schooling, C Mary

    2016-04-01

    Recently Health Canada and the Food and Drug Administration warned about the cardiovascular risk of testosterone, making environmental drivers of testosterone potential prevention targets. Cotinine, a tobacco metabolite, inhibits testosterone breakdown. We assessed the association of smoking with testosterone in a systematic review and meta-analysis, searching PubMed and Web of Science through March 2015 using ("testosterone" or "androgen" or "sex hormone") and ("smoking" or "cigarette"). Two reviewers independently searched, selected, assessed quality and abstracted with differences resolved by consensus or reference to a third reviewer. The initial search yielded 2881 studies; 28 met the selection criteria. In 22 studies of 13,317 men, mean age 18-61years, smokers had higher mean testosterone than non-smokers (1.53nmol/L, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.11 to 1.96) using a random effects model with inverse variance weighting. In 6 studies of 6089 women, mean age 28-62years, smoking was not clearly associated with testosterone (0.11nmol/L, 95% CI -0.08 to 0.30). Fixed effects models provided similar results, but suggested a positive association in women. Whether products which raise cotinine, such as e-cigarettes or nicotine replacement, also raise testosterone, should be investigated, to inform any regulatory action for e-cigarettes, which emit nicotine into the surrounding air, with relevance for both active and passive smokers. PMID:26763163

  20. Fulfilling Desire: Evidence for negative feedback between men’s testosterone, sociosexual psychology, and sexual partner number

    PubMed Central

    Puts, David A.; Pope, Lauramarie E.; Hill, Alexander K.; Cárdenas, Rodrigo A.; Welling, Lisa L. M.; Wheatley, John R.; Breedlove, S. Marc

    2015-01-01

    Across human societies and many nonhuman animals, males have greater interest in uncommitted sex (more unrestricted sociosexuality) than do females. Testosterone shows positive associations with male-typical sociosexual behavior in nonhuman animals. Yet, it remains unclear whether the human sex difference in sociosexual psychology (attitudes and desires) is mediated by testosterone, whether any relationships between testosterone and sociosexuality differ between men and women, and what the nature of these possible relationships might be. In studies to resolve these questions, we examined relationships between salivary testosterone concentrations and sociosexual psychology and behavior in men and women. We measured testosterone in all men in our sample, but only in those women taking oral contraception (OC-using women) in order to reduce the influence of ovulatory cycle variation in ovarian hormone production. We found that OC-using women did not differ from normally-ovulating women in sociosexual psychology or behavior, but that circulating testosterone mediated the sex difference in human sociosexuality and predicted sociosexual psychology in men but not OC-using women. Moreover, when sociosexual psychology was controlled, men’s sociosexual behavior (number of sexual partners) was negatively related to testosterone, suggesting that testosterone drives sociosexual psychology in men and is inhibited when those desires are fulfilled. This more complex relationship between androgen and male sexuality may reconcile some conflicting prior reports. PMID:25644313

  1. IgG4-related skin disease.

    PubMed

    Tokura, Y; Yagi, H; Yanaguchi, H; Majima, Y; Kasuya, A; Ito, T; Maekawa, M; Hashizume, H

    2014-11-01

    IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD) is a recently established clinical entity characterized by high levels of circulating IgG4, and tissue infiltration of IgG4(+) plasma cells. IgG4-RD exhibits a distinctive fibroinflammatory change involving multiple organs, such as the pancreas and salivary and lacrimal glands. The skin lesions of IgG4-RD have been poorly characterized and may stem not only from direct infiltration of plasma cells but also from IgG4-mediated inflammation. Based on the documented cases together with ours, we categorized the skin lesions into seven subtypes: (1) cutaneous plasmacytosis (multiple papulonodules or indurations on the trunk and proximal part of the limbs), (2) pseudolymphoma and angiolymphoid hyperplasia with eosinophilia (plaques and papulonodules mainly on the periauricular, cheek and mandible regions), (3) Mikulicz disease (palpebral swelling, sicca syndrome and exophthalmos), (4) psoriasis-like eruption (strikingly mimicking psoriasis vulgaris), (5) unspecified maculopapular or erythematous eruptions, (6) hypergammaglobulinaemic purpura (bilateral asymmetrical palpable purpuric lesions on the lower extremities) and urticarial vasculitis (prolonged urticarial lesions occasionally with purpura) and (7) ischaemic digit (Raynaud phenomenon and digital gangrene). It is considered that subtypes 1-3 are induced by direct infiltration of IgG4(+) plasma cells, while the other types (4-7) are caused by secondary mechanisms. IgG4-related skin disease is defined as IgG4(+) plasma-cell-infiltrating skin lesions that form plaques, nodules or tumours (types 1-3), but may manifest secondary lesions caused by IgG4(+) plasma cells and/or IgG4 (types 4-7). PMID:25065694

  2. MuSK Myasthenia Gravis IgG4 Disrupts the Interaction of LRP4 with MuSK but Both IgG4 and IgG1-3 Can Disperse Preformed Agrin-Independent AChR Clusters

    PubMed Central

    Koneczny, Inga; Cossins, Judith; Waters, Patrick; Beeson, David; Vincent, Angela

    2013-01-01

    A variable proportion of patients with generalized myasthenia gravis (MG) have autoantibodies to muscle specific tyrosine kinase (MuSK). During development agrin, released from the motor nerve, interacts with low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein-4 (LRP4), which then binds to MuSK; MuSK interaction with the intracellular protein Dok7 results in clustering of the acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) on the postsynaptic membrane. In mature muscle, MuSK helps maintain the high density of AChRs at the neuromuscular junction. MuSK antibodies are mainly IgG4 subclass, which does not activate complement and can be monovalent, thus it is not clear how the antibodies cause disruption of AChR numbers or function to cause MG. We hypothesised that MuSK antibodies either reduce surface MuSK expression and/or inhibit the interaction with LRP4. We prepared MuSK IgG, monovalent Fab fragments, IgG1-3 and IgG4 fractions from MuSK-MG plasmas. We asked whether the antibodies caused endocytosis of MuSK in MuSK-transfected cells or if they inhibited binding of LRP4 to MuSK in co-immunoprecipitation experiments. In parallel, we investigated their ability to reduce AChR clusters in C2C12 myotubes induced by a) agrin, reflecting neuromuscular development, and b) by Dok7- overexpression, producing AChR clusters that more closely resemble the adult neuromuscular synapse. Total IgG, IgG4 or IgG1-3 MuSK antibodies were not endocytosed unless cross-linked by divalent anti-human IgG. MuSK IgG, Fab fragments and IgG4 inhibited the binding of LRP4 to MuSK and reduced agrin-induced AChR clustering in C2C12 cells. By contrast, IgG1-3 antibodies did not inhibit LRP4-MuSK binding but, surprisingly, did inhibit agrin-induced clustering. Moreover, both IgG4 and IgG1-3 preparations dispersed agrin-independent AChR clusters in Dok7-overexpressing C2C12 cells. Thus interference by IgG4 antibodies of the LRP4-MuSK interaction will be one pathogenic mechanism of MuSK antibodies, but IgG1-3 Mu

  3. Intravenous IgG (IVIG) and subcutaneous IgG (SCIG) preparations have comparable inhibitory effect on T cell activation, which is not dependent on IgG sialylation, monocytes or B cells.

    PubMed

    Issekutz, Andrew C; Rowter, Derek; Miescher, Sylvia; Käsermann, Fabian

    2015-10-01

    IVIG modulates T cell activation in vitro and inflammatory-autoimmune conditions in vivo. Sialylation of IgG, Fc receptor interactions, modulation of monocyte/macrophage/B cell functions have been implicated in IVIG effects. Subcutaneous IgG (SCIG) therapy is increasingly used for IgG replacement but whether these preparations share the effects of IVIG on T cell modulation is not documented. We compared the potency of SCIG-Hizentra™ (20% IgG preparation) with IVIG-Privigen® (10% IgG) for T cell inhibition, and assessed the involvement of IgG sialylation, monocytes and B cells in this process. Human PBMCs or sorted cells were cultured 3-7 days, and T cells were stimulated with immobilized anti-CD3 mAb or Candida antigen. Thymidine incorporation into DNA was quantitated and cytokines assayed by ELISA/Luminex® assay. IVIG and SCIG both dose-dependently (1-20mg/ml) inhibited (up to >80%) T cell proliferation to anti-CD3 mAb. Response to Candida albicans was comparably inhibited by IVIG and SCIG by 50-80% at 10mg/ml with inhibition even at 3mg/ml (P<0.05). These effects were not affected by depletion of sialic acid containing IgG using neuraminidase treatment or lectin affinity chromatography. With anti-CD3 or Candida stimulation, IL-1β, IL-2, IL-5, IL-6, IL-13, GMCSF, TNF-α, interferon-γ (with anti-CD3) and IL-17 (with Candida) levels were suppressed by IVIG or SCIG, with no effect on IL-4, IL-10, IL-12, IL-15 or TGFβ. Monocytes or B cells were not required for IgG-induced suppression of proliferation, in fact depletion of monocytes potentiated the IgG-induced inhibition. Reconstitution with monocytes restored the original inhibitory effect. These data show that IVIG (Privigen®) and SCIG (Hizentra™) have comparable inhibitory effects on T cell activation, which do not require sialylation of IgG. Inhibition is independent of monocytes or B cells. There is a potent suppression of multiple effector cytokines. Like IVIG, SCIG therapy is expected to show

  4. Depression-like behavior and reduced plasma testosterone levels in the senescence-accelerated mouse.

    PubMed

    Egashira, Nobuaki; Koushi, Emi; Okuno, Ryoko; Shirakawa, Atsunori; Mishima, Kenichi; Iwasaki, Katsunori; Oishi, Ryozo; Fujiwara, Michihiro

    2010-05-01

    During aging, levels of testosterone gradually decline in men and low levels of testosterone in aged men are accompanied by increased incidence of depressive disorders. The senescence-accelerated-prone mouse 10 (SAMP10) is well known as an animal model of aging. The purpose of this study was to investigate the motor function, anxiety levels, depression-related emotional responses, attentional function and plasma levels of testosterone and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) in SAMP10. SAMP10 exhibited a significant prolongation of immobility time compared to that of the aged-matched control senescence-accelerated-resistant mouse 1 (SAMR1) in the tail suspension test for measuring depression. Moreover, significant low levels of plasma testosterone but not DHEA were found in SAMP10, and the testosterone levels were inversely correlated with the depression-like behavior. By contrast, we did not observe any significant differences between SAMP10 and SAMR1 in the open-field, rota-rod, elevated plus-maze, marble-burying behavior, or prepulse inhibition test. The results of the present study indicate that testosterone may play an important role in the depression-like behavior in SAMP10. PMID:20117148

  5. Testosterone-induced responsiveness to androgen in Shionogi mouse carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jung-Testas, I.; Baulieu, E.E. )

    1987-05-01

    Primary cell cultures from an androgen-dependent mouse mammary carcinoma, the Shionogi-SC 115 tumor, were cultured in the presence or absence of testosterone (50 nM). Characteristic changes in cellular morphology and cell growth were observed according to the presence or absence of the androgen. The testosterone-dependent changes were observed in culture as long as cells were maintained in androgen-containing medium. Cellular proteins were analyzed after culture in the presence or absence of testosterone. After ({sup 35}S)methionine labeling of cells and SDS-PAGE of the cytosol, several proteins were specifically synthesized in the presence of testosterone, predominantly a 45 kD protein, which was not seen in the absence of the androgen. Conversely, a protein of 35 kD present in absence of the hormone disappeared in the presence of testosterone. The anti-androgen cyproterone acetate inhibited the characteristic cellular morphology, cell proliferation and protein synthesis observed in the presence of the androgen. The anti-progestin and anti-glucocorticosteroid RU 486 also showed limited anti-androgen activity. The concentration of specific androgen receptor-binding sites did not change significantly after 3 months of culture with or without testosterone, i.e., in responsive and unresponsive cells.

  6. Effect of Voluntary Ethanol Consumption Combined with Testosterone Treatment on Cardiovascular Function in Rats: Influence of Exercise Training.

    PubMed

    Engi, Sheila A; Planeta, Cleopatra S; Crestani, Carlos C

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of voluntary ethanol consumption combined with testosterone treatment on cardiovascular function in rats. Moreover, we investigated the influence of exercise training on these effects. To this end, male rats were submitted to low-intensity training on a treadmill or kept sedentary while concurrently being treated with ethanol for 6 weeks. For voluntary ethanol intake, rats were given access to two bottles, one containing ethanol and other containing water, three 24-hour sessions per week. In the last two weeks (weeks 5 and 6), animals underwent testosterone treatment concurrently with exercise training and exposure to ethanol. Ethanol consumption was not affected by either testosterone treatment or exercise training. Also, drug treatments did not influence the treadmill performance improvement evoked by training. However, testosterone alone, but not in combination with ethanol, reduced resting heart rate. Moreover, combined treatment with testosterone and ethanol reduced the pressor response to the selective α1-adrenoceptor agonist phenylephrine. Treatment with either testosterone or ethanol alone also affected baroreflex activity and enhanced depressor response to acetylcholine, but these effects were inhibited when drugs were coadministrated. Exercise training restored most cardiovascular effects evoked by drug treatments. Furthermore, both drugs administrated alone increased pressor response to phenylephrine in trained animals. Also, drug treatments inhibited the beneficial effects of training on baroreflex function. In conclusion, the present results suggest a potential interaction between toxic effects of testosterone and ethanol on cardiovascular function. Data also indicate that exercise training is an important factor influencing the effects of these substances. PMID:26760038

  7. Effect of Voluntary Ethanol Consumption Combined with Testosterone Treatment on Cardiovascular Function in Rats: Influence of Exercise Training

    PubMed Central

    Engi, Sheila A.; Planeta, Cleopatra S.; Crestani, Carlos C.

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of voluntary ethanol consumption combined with testosterone treatment on cardiovascular function in rats. Moreover, we investigated the influence of exercise training on these effects. To this end, male rats were submitted to low-intensity training on a treadmill or kept sedentary while concurrently being treated with ethanol for 6 weeks. For voluntary ethanol intake, rats were given access to two bottles, one containing ethanol and other containing water, three 24-hour sessions per week. In the last two weeks (weeks 5 and 6), animals underwent testosterone treatment concurrently with exercise training and exposure to ethanol. Ethanol consumption was not affected by either testosterone treatment or exercise training. Also, drug treatments did not influence the treadmill performance improvement evoked by training. However, testosterone alone, but not in combination with ethanol, reduced resting heart rate. Moreover, combined treatment with testosterone and ethanol reduced the pressor response to the selective α1-adrenoceptor agonist phenylephrine. Treatment with either testosterone or ethanol alone also affected baroreflex activity and enhanced depressor response to acetylcholine, but these effects were inhibited when drugs were coadministrated. Exercise training restored most cardiovascular effects evoked by drug treatments. Furthermore, both drugs administrated alone increased pressor response to phenylephrine in trained animals. Also, drug treatments inhibited the beneficial effects of training on baroreflex function. In conclusion, the present results suggest a potential interaction between toxic effects of testosterone and ethanol on cardiovascular function. Data also indicate that exercise training is an important factor influencing the effects of these substances. PMID:26760038

  8. Testosterone improves motor function in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, E; Thomas, D; Burnet, R

    2006-01-01

    In Parkinson's disease (PD) there is increasing evidence that sex steroids such as estradiol and testosterone modulate, either as a positive or negative effect, the clinical expression of a variety of movement disorders involving the nigrostriatum. Testosterone deficiency is common in the older male population and has an increased prevalence in parkinsonian patients. Testosterone therapy has been shown to improve the non-motor symptoms of PD but evidence for a direct effect of testosterone on motor symptoms is lacking. This case report demonstrates a significant improvement in the resting tremor and fine motor control after testosterone administration in a parkinsonian patient with testosterone deficiency (1 nmol/L). Motor symptom change was shown by serial assessment of the patient's handwriting, self-reporting using the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale and measurement of resting tremor amplitude by an accelerometer. The improvement in motor symptoms correlated with serum testosterone levels. The use of testosterone replacement in those men with decreased levels may improve the motor symptoms as well as increase general wellbeing. PMID:16410216

  9. Testosterone, Marital Quality, and Role Overload

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Booth, Alan; Johnson, David R.; Granger, Douglas A.

    2005-01-01

    In a sample of established working- and middle-class families with school-aged children (N= 307 wives and 307 husbands), neither husbands nor wives testosterone showed a direct connection with marital quality. In contrast, the association between husbands' testosterone and positive and negative marital quality (as evaluated by both spouses) was…

  10. REDD1 Is a Major Target of Testosterone Action in Preventing Dexamethasone-Induced Muscle Loss

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yong; Zhao, Weidong; Zhao, Jingbo; Zhang, Yuanfei; Qin, Weiping; Pan, Jiangping; Bauman, William A.; Blitzer, Robert D.; Cardozo, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    Glucocorticoids are a well-recognized and common cause of muscle atrophy that can be prevented by testosterone. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying such protection have not been described. Thus, the global effects of testosterone on dexamethasone-induced changes in gene expression were evaluated in rat gastrocnemius muscle using DNA microarrays. Gene expression was analyzed after 7-d administration of dexamethasone, dexamethasone plus testosterone, or vehicle. Dexamethasone changed expression of 876 probe sets by at least 2-fold. Among these, 474 probe sets were changed by at least 2-fold in the opposite direction in the dexamethasone plus testosterone group (genes in opposition). Major biological themes represented by genes in opposition included IGF-I signaling, myogenesis and muscle development, and cell cycle progression. Testosterone completely prevented the 22-fold increase in expression of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor regulated in development and DNA damage responses 1 (REDD1), and attenuated dexamethasone induced increased expression of eIF4E binding protein 1, Forkhead box O1, and the p85 regulatory subunit of the IGF-I receptor but prevented decreased expression of IRS-1. Testosterone attenuated increases in REDD1 protein in skeletal muscle and L6 myoblasts and prevented dephosphorylation of p70S6 kinase at the mTOR-dependent site Thr389 in L6 myoblast cells. Effects of testosterone on REDD1 mRNA levels occurred within 1 h, required the androgen receptor, were blocked by bicalutamide, and were due to inhibition of transcriptional activation of REDD1 by dexamethasone. These data suggest that testosterone blocks dexamethasone-induced changes in expression of REDD1 and other genes that collectively would otherwise down-regulate mTOR activity and hence also down-regulate protein synthesis. PMID:20032058

  11. Testosterone ethosomes for enhanced transdermal delivery.

    PubMed

    Ainbinder, Denize; Touitou, Elka

    2005-01-01

    Physiological decrease in testosterone levels in men with age causes various changes with clinical significance. Recent testosterone replacement therapy is based mainly on transdermal nonpatch delivery systems. These products have the drawback of application on extremely large areas to achieve required hormone blood levels. The objective of the present study was to design and test a testosterone nonpatch formulation using ethosomes for enhanced transdermal absorption. The ethosomal formulation was characterized by transmission electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering for structure and size distribution and by ultracentrifugation for entrapment capacity. To evaluate the feasibility of this delivery system to enhance testosterone permeation through the skin, first the systemic absorption in rats was compared with a currently used gel (AndroGel). Further, theoretical estimation of testosterone blood concentration following ethosomal application in men was made. For this purpose, in vitro permeation experiments through human skin were performed to establish testosterone skin permeation values. In the design of these experiments, testosterone solubility in various solutions was measured and the effect of the receiver medium on the skin barrier function was assessed by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Theoretical estimation shows that testosterone human plasma concentration value in the upper part of the physiological range could be achieved by application of the ethosomal formulation on an area of 40 cm(2). This area is about 10 times smaller than required with current nonpatch formulations. Our work shows that the ethosomal formulation could enhance testosterone systemic absorption and also be used for designing new products that could solve the weaknesses of the current testosterone replacement therapies. PMID:16188729

  12. Regulation of Sertoli-Germ Cell Adhesion and Sperm Release by FSH and Nonclassical Testosterone Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Shupe, John; Cheng, Jing; Puri, Pawan; Kostereva, Nataliya

    2011-01-01

    Testosterone and FSH act in synergy to produce the factors required to maximize the production of spermatozoa and male fertility. However, the molecular mechanisms by which these hormones support spermatogenesis are not well established. Recently, we identified a nonclassical mechanism of testosterone signaling in cultured rat Sertoli cells. We found that testosterone binding to the androgen receptor recruits and activates Src tyrosine kinase. Src then causes the activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor, which results in the phosphorylation and activation of the ERK MAPK and the cAMP response element-binding protein transcription factor. In this report, we find that FSH inhibits testosterone-mediated activation of ERK and the MAPK pathway in Sertoli cells via the protein kinase A-mediated inhibition of Raf kinase. In addition, FSH, as well as inhibitors of Src and ERK kinase activity, reduced germ cell attachment to Sertoli cells in culture. Using pathway-specific androgen receptor mutants we found that the nonclassical pathway is required for testosterone-mediated increases in germ cell attachment to Sertoli cells. Studies of seminiferous tubule explants determined that Src kinase, but not ERK kinase, activity is required for the release of sperm from seminiferous tubule explants. These findings suggest the nonclassical testosterone-signaling pathway acts via Src and ERK kinases to facilitate the adhesion of immature germ cells to Sertoli cells and through Src to permit the release of mature spermatozoa. In contrast, FSH acts to limit testosterone-mediated ERK kinase activity and germ cell attachment. PMID:21177760

  13. Simvastatin reduces fetal testosterone production and permanently alters reproductive tract development in the male rat

    EPA Science Inventory

    Androgen signaling by fetal Leydig cells is critical in the proper development of the male reproductive tract. As cholesterol is a precursor for hormone biosynthesis,inhibition of the cholesterol pathway during sex differentiation may reduce testosterone {T). We hypothesized tha...

  14. IgG4-related spinal pachymeningitis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhang; Tongxi, Liu; Jie, Luo; Yujuan, Jiao; Wei, Jiang; Xia, Liu; Yumin, Zheng; Xin, Lu

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study is to study the clinical, laboratory, imaging pathology, and prognosis features of IgG4-related spinal pachymeningitis. We worked with a 55-year-old man suffering from IgG4-related spinal pachymeningitis who had the most widespread lesion in his dura mater. We also review previous related studies and discuss the clinical characteristics of this rare disease. In total, eight IgG4-related spinal pachymeningitis patients have been reported in the literature since 2009. They were mostly male patients, 51.7 ± 11.9 years old on average. Cervical and thoracic vertebrae were the most common sites for lesions. The most prominent symptom was varying numbness and weakness of the limbs and/or body associated with spinal cord compression. There was one patient (1/5) with elevated serum IgG4 levels and three patients (3/3) with increased cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) IgG4 index. Positive histopathologic findings are the strongest basis for a diagnosis. All the patients with IgG4-related spinal pachymeningitis responded well to glucocorticoid therapy. IgG4-related spinal pachymeningitis is an orphan disease that mainly occurs in cervical and thoracic vertebrae. Older males are the most susceptible group. Serum IgG4 levels were consistently normal in these cases, so analysis of CSF for IgG4 production (IgG4 index) could become a useful tool. Pathological findings remain the gold standard for diagnosis. Most patients responded favorably to glucocorticoid treatment. PMID:26567899

  15. Testosterone, cortisol, and human competition.

    PubMed

    Casto, Kathleen V; Edwards, David A

    2016-06-01

    Testosterone and cortisol figure prominently in the research literature having to do with human competition. In this review, we track the history of this literature, concentrating particularly on major theoretical and empirical contributions, and provide commentary on what we see as important unresolved issues. In men and women, athletic competition is typically associated with an increase in testosterone (T) and cortisol (C). Hormone changes in response to non-athletic competition are less predictable. Person (e.g., power motivation, mood, aggressiveness, social anxiety, sex, and baseline levels of T and C) and context (e.g., whether a competition is won or lost, the closeness of the competition, whether the outcome is perceived as being influenced by ability vs. chance, provocations) factors can influence hormone responses to competition. From early on, studies pointed to a positive relationship between T and dominance motivation/status striving. Recent research, however, suggests that this relationship only holds for individuals with low levels of C - this is the core idea of the dual-hormone hypothesis, and it is certain that the broadest applications of the hypothesis have not yet been realized. Individuals differ with respect to the extent to which they embrace competition, but the hormonal correlates of competitiveness remain largely unexplored. Although rapid increases in both T and C associated with competition are likely adaptive, we still know very little about the psychological benefits of these hormonal changes. Administration studies have and will continue to contribute to this inquiry. We close with a discussion of what, we think, are important methodological and mechanistic issues for future research. PMID:27103058

  16. Comparative safety of testosterone dosage forms

    PubMed Central

    Layton, J. Bradley; Meier, Christoph R.; Sharpless, Julie L.; Stürmer, Til; Jick, Susan S.; Brookhart, M. Alan

    2015-01-01

    Importance Increases in testosterone use and mixed reports of adverse events have raised concerns about the cardiovascular safety of testosterone. Testosterone is available in several delivery mechanisms with varying pharmacokinetics; injections cause spikes in testosterone levels, while transdermal patches and gels cause more subtle but sustained increases. The comparative cardiovascular safety of gels, injections and patches has not been studied. Objective To determine the comparative cardiovascular safety of testosterone injections, patches, and gels. Design Retrospective cohort study. Setting Administrative claims from a commercially-insured and Medicare population in the United States, and general practitioner records from the United Kingdom, years 2000 – 2012 Participants Adult (18+), male initiators of testosterone patches, gels, or injections following 180 days free of any testosterone use Exposure New initiation of a testosterone dosage form, followed for up to one year Main Outcomes and Measures In- or outpatient medical records, diagnoses, or claims for: cardio- and cerebrovascular events, including myocardial infarction (MI), unstable angina, stroke, composite acute event (MI, unstable angina, or stroke); venous thromboembolism (VTE); mortality, and all-cause hospitalization. Results We identified 431,687 testosterone initiators between the 3 datasets: 36% injection, 9% patch, 55% gel. Medicare had a majority of injection initiators (51%); the US commercially-insured population had majority gel initiators (56%); the United Kingdom had equal proportions of injections and gels (~41%). When compared to gels, injection initiators had higher hazards of CV events (MI, UA, and stroke) (HR=1.26, 95% CI: 1.18–1.35), hospitalization (HR=1.16, 95% CI: 1.13–1.18), and death (HR=1.34, 95% CI: 1.15–1.56), but not VTE (HR=0.92, 95% CI: 0.76–1.11). Patches did not confer increased hazards of CV events compared to gels (HR=1.10, 95% CI: 0.94–1

  17. Normal human IgG prevents endothelial cell activation induced by TNFα and oxidized low-density lipoprotein atherogenic stimuli

    PubMed Central

    RONDA, N; BERNINI, F; GIACOSA, R; GATTI, R; BALDINI, N; BUZIO, C; ORLANDINI, G

    2003-01-01

    Normal human immunoglobulin G (IgG) has anti-inflammatory and immuno-regulatory properties, which are exploited in the therapy of selected diseases. A putative mechanisms of action is the direct regulation of endothelial cell function by natural antiendothelial cell antibodies. Endothelium activation is a critical event in atherosclerosis. We have verified the ability of normal human IgG to modulate endothelial responses to the atherogenic stimuli tumour necrosis factor-α (TNFα) and oxidized low-density lipoproteins (oxLDL) in vitro. Confocal microscopy was used to visualize vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (CD106) expression on endothelial cells, cytoplasmic free calcium ([Ca++]i) modifications and fluorescein-coupled oxLDL internalization. Cytokine secretion was measured by ELISA on cell supernatants. IgG prevented TNFα induced CD106 membrane expression and an increase in [Ca++]i, and inhibited the secretion of interleukin-6 (IL-6) and macrophage-colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF). IgG also inhibited CD106 expression induced by oxLDL and one pathway of their internalization, but were ineffective on oxLDL induced [Ca++]i rise and apoptosis. F(ab)′2 fragments from IgG, but not monoclonal IgG, reproduce IgG effects. These findings point to a regulatory role for specific antibodies included in circulating normal IgG towards proinflammatory responses of endothelial cells in atherogenesis and suggest possible development of new therapeutic strategies. PMID:12869027

  18. Treatment of delayed male puberty: efficacy of aromatase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Dunkel, L; Wickman, S

    2001-01-01

    We hypothesized that inhibition of estrogen synthesis would delay maturation of the growth plates and ultimately result in increased adult height in boys with delayed puberty. We conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study in which we treated boys with constitutional delay of puberty with testosterone plus placebo (testosterone-placebo) or with testosterone plus letrozole (testosterone-letrozole). Letrozole effectively inhibited estrogen synthesis: 17beta-estradiol concentrations increased in the testosterone-placebo group, but in the testosterone-letrozole group, no such increase was observed until letrozole treatment was discontinued. After 1.5 years, bone age had advanced by 1.7 +/- 0.3 years in the testosterone-placebo group, but by only 0.9 +/- 0.2 years in the testosterone-letrozole group (p = 0.02). Predicted adult height did not change significantly in the testosterone-placebo group, whereas in the testosterone-letrozole group the increase was 5.1 +/- 1.2 cm (p = 0.004). Our findings suggest that, if estrogen action is inhibited in growing adolescents, adult height will increase. This observation provides a rationale for studies aimed at delaying bone maturation in several growth disorders. PMID:11837512

  19. Adverse effects of IgG therapy.

    PubMed

    Berger, Melvin

    2013-01-01

    IgG is widely used for patients with immune deficiencies and in a broad range of autoimmune and inflammatory disorders. Up to 40% of intravenous infusions of IgG may be associated with adverse effects (AEs), which are mostly uncomfortable or unpleasant but often are not serious. The most common infusion-related AE is headache. More serious reactions, including true anaphylaxis and anaphylactoid reactions, occur less frequently. Most reactions are related to the rate of infusion and can be prevented or treated just by slowing the infusion rate. Medications such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, antihistamines, or corticosteroids also may be helpful in preventing or treating these common AEs. IgA deficiency with the potential of IgG or IgE antibodies against IgA increases the risk of some AEs but should not be viewed as a contraindication if IgG therapy is needed. Potentially serious AEs include renal dysfunction and/or failure, thromboembolic events, and acute hemolysis. These events usually are multifactorial, related to combinations of constituents in the IgG product as well as risk factors for the recipient. Awareness of these factors should allow minimization of the risks and consequences of these AEs. Subcutaneous IgG is absorbed more slowly into the circulation and has a lower incidence of AEs, but awareness and diligence are necessary whenever IgG is administered. PMID:24565701

  20. Effects of Oxidative Stress and Testosterone on Pro-Inflammatory Signaling in a Female Rat Dopaminergic Neuronal Cell Line.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Shaletha; Singh, Meharvan; Su, Chang; Cunningham, Rebecca L

    2016-07-01

    Parkinson's disease, a progressive neurodegenerative disorder, is associated with oxidative stress and neuroinflammation. These pathological markers can contribute to the loss of dopamine neurons in the midbrain. Interestingly, men have a 2-fold increased incidence for Parkinson's disease than women. Although the mechanisms underlying this sex difference remain elusive, we propose that the primary male sex hormone, testosterone, is involved. Our previous studies show that testosterone, through a putative membrane androgen receptor, can increase oxidative stress-induced neurotoxicity in dopamine neurons. Based on these results, this study examines the role of nuclear factor κ B (NF-κB), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2), and apoptosis in the deleterious effects of androgens in an oxidative stress environment. We hypothesize, under oxidative stress environment, testosterone via a putative membrane androgen receptor will exacerbate oxidative stress-induced NF-κB/COX2 signaling in N27 dopaminergic neurons, leading to apoptosis. Our data show that testosterone increased the expression of COX2 and apoptosis in dopamine neurons. Inhibiting the NF-κB and COX2 pathway with CAPE and ibuprofen, respectively, blocked testosterone's negative effects on cell viability, indicating that NF-κB/COX2 cascade plays a role in the negative interaction between testosterone and oxidative stress on neuroinflammation. These data further support the role of testosterone mediating the loss of dopamine neurons under oxidative stress conditions, which may be a key mechanism contributing to the increased incidence of Parkinson's disease in men compared with women. PMID:27167771

  1. Direct radioimmunoassay (RIA) of salivary testosterone: correlation with free and total serium testosterone

    SciTech Connect

    Vittek, J.; L'Hommedieu, D.G.; Gordon, G.G.; Rappaport, S.C.; Southren, A.L.

    1985-08-26

    Simple and sensitive direct RIA for determination of salivary testosterone was developed by using RSL NOSOLVEX TM (125 1) kit produced by Radioassay System Laboratories (Carcon, California). In addition, a relationship between salivary and serum free and total testosterone concentrations was studied in randomly selected 45 healthy subjects, 5 females on oral contraceptive pills and 28 hypertensive patients on various treatment regimens. The lowest weight of testosterone detectable by the modified method was equivalent to 1 pg/ml of saliva, taking into account analytical variability. Intra- and interassay coefficients of variation were 5.09 +/- 2.7% and 8.2 +/- 5.9% respectively. Statistically significant correlations were found between salivary and serum free testosterone (r = 0.97) and salivary and serum total testosterone concentrations (r = 0.70 - 0.87). The exception to this was a group of hypertensive females in which no correlation (r = 0.14) between salivary and total serum testosterone was found. It is also of interest that, while salivary testosterone was significantly increased in subjects taking oral contraceptives and most of the hypertensive patients, the total serum testosterone concentration was in normal range. These findings suggest that the determination of salivary testosterone is a reliable method to detect changes in the concentration of available biologically active hormone in the circulation. 21 references, 4 figures, 1 table.

  2. Human IgG1 antibodies suppress angiogenesis in a target-independent manner

    PubMed Central

    Bogdanovich, Sasha; Kim, Younghee; Mizutani, Takeshi; Yasuma, Reo; Tudisco, Laura; Cicatiello, Valeria; Bastos-Carvalho, Ana; Kerur, Nagaraj; Hirano, Yoshio; Baffi, Judit Z; Tarallo, Valeria; Li, Shengjian; Yasuma, Tetsuhiro; Arpitha, Parthasarathy; Fowler, Benjamin J; Wright, Charles B; Apicella, Ivana; Greco, Adelaide; Brunetti, Arturo; Ruvo, Menotti; Sandomenico, Annamaria; Nozaki, Miho; Ijima, Ryo; Kaneko, Hiroki; Ogura, Yuichiro; Terasaki, Hiroko; Ambati, Balamurali K; Leusen, Jeanette HW; Langdon, Wallace Y; Clark, Michael R; Armour, Kathryn L; Bruhns, Pierre; Verbeek, J Sjef; Gelfand, Bradley D; De Falco, Sandro; Ambati, Jayakrishna

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant angiogenesis is implicated in diseases affecting nearly 10% of the world’s population. The most widely used anti-angiogenic drug is bevacizumab, a humanized IgG1 monoclonal antibody that targets human VEGFA. Although bevacizumab does not recognize mouse Vegfa, it inhibits angiogenesis in mice. Here we show bevacizumab suppressed angiogenesis in three mouse models not via Vegfa blockade but rather Fc-mediated signaling through FcγRI (CD64) and c-Cbl, impairing macrophage migration. Other approved humanized or human IgG1 antibodies without mouse targets (adalimumab, alemtuzumab, ofatumumab, omalizumab, palivizumab and tocilizumab), mouse IgG2a, and overexpression of human IgG1-Fc or mouse IgG2a-Fc, also inhibited angiogenesis in wild-type and FcγR humanized mice. This anti-angiogenic effect was abolished by Fcgr1 ablation or knockdown, Fc cleavage, IgG-Fc inhibition, disruption of Fc-FcγR interaction, or elimination of FcRγ-initated signaling. Furthermore, bevacizumab’s Fc region potentiated its anti-angiogenic activity in humanized VEGFA mice. Finally, mice deficient in FcγRI exhibited increased developmental and pathological angiogenesis. These findings reveal an unexpected anti-angiogenic function for FcγRI and a potentially concerning off-target effect of hIgG1 therapies. PMID:26918197

  3. Serum Testosterone Levels in Sex Offenders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gurnani, Prem D.; Dwyer, Margretta

    1986-01-01

    Reports that with the increase in diagnosis of offenders across the nation, physicians and psychiatric personnel need to be aware of low testosterone as a possible indicator of hypo-sexuality and possible concurrent offending behavior. (Author/ABB)

  4. Testosterone and disinhibited personality in healthy males.

    PubMed

    Aluja, Anton; García, Luis F; García, Óscar; Blanco, Eduardo

    2016-10-01

    The relationship among testosterone (T), free testosterone (FT), bioavailable testosterone (BT) and personality were studied in a sample of 105 healthy males (26.71±9.68years old). The possible effects of age and other hormones, such as luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG), and albumin (ALB) were controlled. Personality was assessed by the novelty seeking scale of Cloninger's Temperament-Character Inventory (TCI), and a reduced version of the Zuckerman-Kuhlman Personality Questionnaire (ZKPQ). Main results show that there is a weak association among three measures of testosterone with novelty seeking, sociability and, to a lesser extent, with impulsive sensation seeking. Our data, as expected, confirmed previous results and also suggest that these relationships are strongly affected by the age variable. LH, FSH and SHBG hormones play no role in the reported relationships. PMID:27291990

  5. Testosterone abolishes implicit subordination in social anxiety.

    PubMed

    Terburg, David; Syal, Supriya; Rosenberger, Lisa A; Heany, Sarah J; Stein, Dan J; Honk, Jack van

    2016-10-01

    Neuro-evolutionary theories describe social anxiety as habitual subordinate tendencies acquired through a recursive cycle of social defeat and submissive reactions. If so, the steroid hormone testosterone might be of therapeutic value, as testosterone is a main force behind implicit dominance drive in many species including humans. We combined these two theories to investigate whether the tendency to submit to the dominance of others is an implicit mechanism in social anxiety (Study-1), and whether this can be relieved through testosterone administration (Study-2). Using interactive eye-tracking we demonstrate that socially anxious humans more rapidly avert gaze from subliminal angry eye contact (Study-1). We replicate this effect of implicit subordination in social anxiety in an independent sample, which is subsequently completely abolished after a single placebo-controlled sublingual testosterone administration (Study-2). These findings provide crucial evidence for hormonal and behavioral treatment strategies that specifically target mechanisms of dominance and subordination in social anxiety. PMID:27448713

  6. A low-testosterone state associated with endometrioma leads to the apoptosis of granulosa cells.

    PubMed

    Ono, Yoshihiro J; Tanabe, Akiko; Nakamura, Yoko; Yamamoto, Hikaru; Hayashi, Atsushi; Tanaka, Tomohito; Sasaki, Hiroshi; Hayashi, Masami; Terai, Yoshito; Ohmichi, Masahide

    2014-01-01

    Although endometriosis is suspected to be a cause of premature ovarian insufficiency (POI), the mechanism(s) underlying this process have not been elucidated. Recently, androgens were shown to promote oocyte maturation and to play a role in folliculogenesis. In addition, several reports have documented low testosterone levels in the follicular fluid obtained from endometriosis patients. We therefore examined whether the low levels of serum testosterone are associated with the apoptosis of granulosa cells in follicles obtained from endometriosis patients. Serum samples were collected from 46 patients with endometriosis and from 62 patients without endometriosis who received assisted reproductive therapy. Specimens of the ovaries obtained from 10 patients with endometrioma were collected using laparoscopy. The mean serum testosterone concentration in the patients with endometriosis was significantly lower than that observed in the patients without endometriosis. Furthermore, high expression of a pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 member, BimEL, in the follicles was found to be associated with a low serum testosterone level. We clarified the underlying mechanisms using a basic approach employing human immortalized granulosa cells derived from a primary human granulosa cell tumor, the COV434 cell line. The in vitro examination demonstrated that testosterone inhibited apoptosis induced by sex steroids depletion via the PI3K/Akt-FoxO3a pathway in the COV434 cells. In conclusion, we elucidated the mechanism underlying the anti-apoptotic effects of testosterone on granulosa cells, and found that a low-testosterone status is a potentially important step in the development of premature ovarian insufficiency in patients with endometriosis. PMID:25536335

  7. ANDROGENS AND OPIATES: TESTOSTERONE INTERACTION WITH MORPHINE SELF-ADMINISTRATION IN MALE RATS

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Sarah E.; Wood, Ruth I.

    2016-01-01

    Abuse of anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) and opioids intersect in athletics. Evidence from humans and animals suggests that AAS may act in the brain via opioidergic mechanisms, and may potentiate effects of opioids. To determine if AAS enhance motivation for opioid intake, this study treated male rats chronically for 6 weeks with high levels of testosterone (7.5 mg/kg) or vehicle s.c. and tested them for morphine self-administration under fixed (FR) and progressive ratio (PR) schedules. Initially, rats received chronic morphine infusion (16.8–50 mg/kg/day) over 7 days. Subsequently, rats were tested for morphine self-administration (3.2 mg/kg) 6h/day for 3 days under an FR1 schedule, and for 7 days under a PR 9-4 schedule. With FR1, controls self-administered more morphine (95.9±8.5 mg/kg), compared with testosterone-treated rats (63.2±7.2 mg/kg, p<0.05). Under PR, there was no effect of testosterone on morphine intake or operant responding (26.7±5.7 responses vs 30.9±5.9 responses for vehicle; n.s.). To determine if testosterone enhances morphine sedation, additional rats were treated with testosterone or vehicle and evaluated for locomotor behavior and rearing activity over 30 min in response to saline or 10 mg/kg morphine. Morphine inhibited locomotor activity and rearing; testosterone selectively reduced rearing behavior, but did not alter locomotor behavior. These results suggest that testosterone does not increase motivation for morphine. PMID:24488032

  8. Diagnosis and management of testosterone deficiency

    PubMed Central

    McBride, James A; Carson, Culley C; Coward, Robert M

    2015-01-01

    Testosterone supplementation therapy (TST) use has dramatically increased over the past decade, due to the availability of newer agents, aggressive marketing, and an increasing incidence of testosterone deficiency (TD). Despite the increase in TST, a degree of ambiguity remains as to the exact diagnostic criteria of TD, and administration and monitoring of TST. One explanation for this phenomenon is the complex role testosterone plays in multiple physiologic pathways. Numerous medical co-morbidities and medications can alter testosterone levels resulting in a wide range of nonspecific clinical signs and symptoms of TD. The diagnosis is also challenging due to the lack of a definitive serum total testosterone level that reliably correlates with symptoms. This observation is particularly true in the aging male and is exacerbated by inconsistencies between different laboratory assays. Several prominent medical societies have developed guideline statements to clarify the diagnosis, but they differ from each other and with expert opinion in several ways. Aside from diagnostic dilemmas, there are numerous subtle advantages and disadvantages of the various testosterone agents to appreciate. The available TST agents have changed significantly over the past decade similar to the trends in the diagnosis of TD. Therefore, as the usage of TST increases, clinicians will be challenged to maintain an up-to-date understanding of TD and TST. The purpose of this review is to provide a clear description of the current strategies for diagnosis and management of TD. PMID:25532575

  9. Testosterone regulates the autophagic clearance of androgen binding protein in rat Sertoli cells

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Yi; Yang, Hao-Zheng; Xu, Long-Mei; Huang, Yi-Ran; Dai, Hui-Li; Kang, Xiao-Nan

    2015-01-01

    Dysregulation of androgen-binding protein (ABP) is associated with a number of endocrine and andrology diseases. However, the ABP metabolism in Sertoli cells is largely unknown. We report that autophagy degrades ABP in rat Sertoli cells, and the autophagic clearance of ABP is regulated by testosterone, which prolongs the ABP biological half-life by inhibiting autophagy. Further studies identified that the autophagic clearance of ABP might be selectively regulated by testosterone, independent of stress (hypoxia)-induced autophagic degradation. These data demonstrate that testosterone up-regulates ABP expression at least partially by suppressing the autophagic degradation. We report a novel finding with respect to the mechanisms by which ABP is cleared, and by which the process is regulated in Sertoli cells. PMID:25745956

  10. Influence of Selected Exercise on Serum Immunoglobulin, Testosterone and Cortisol in Semi-Endurance Elite Runners

    PubMed Central

    Hejazi, Keyvan; Hosseini, Seyyed-Reza Attarzadeh

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to compare the levels of serum immunoglobulin (IgA, IgM, IgG), testosterone and cortisol in semi-endurance elite runners during general preparation and competition phase of training. Methods Thirteen semi-endurance elite male runners with an average age of 18.92±1.7 years volunteered to take part in this study. The runners participated in the selected training for a period of 14 weeks and 12 sessions per week (in the morning and afternoon). Blood samples were collected during the three phases of training (before-preparation phase, after-preparation phase and before-competition phase). Data were analyzed by repeated measures and Bonferroni post hoc test, at a significance level of P<0.05. Results The levels of serum IgM in semi-endurance elite runners after preparation phase reduced significantly (P=0.004), while these levels during the competition phase increased even though significantly. The levels of serum IgG and IgA also reduced, however not significantly, during both phases. Moreover, after preparation phase, there was no significant change in serum IgA levels; though, these levels reduced, however not significantly, before competition phase. Cortisol levels significantly decrease after preparation phase (P=0.04); although, it increased before competition phase. Testosterone/cortisol ratio increases significantly after preparation phase (P=0.04), and it decreased before competition phase. Testosterone levels intangibility increased and decreased respectively after preparation and before competition phases. Conclusions Findings indicated that long and intensive exercises weaken the immune system, while moderate and short drills strengthened this system. PMID:23012638

  11. Testosterone deficiency and cardiovascular mortality

    PubMed Central

    Morgentaler, Abraham

    2015-01-01

    New concerns have been raised regarding cardiovascular (CV) risks with testosterone (T) therapy (TTh). These concerns are based primarily on two widely reported retrospective studies. However, methodological flaws and data errors invalidate both studies as credible evidence of risk. One showed reduced adverse events by half in T-treated men but reversed this result using an unproven statistical approach. The authors subsequently acknowledged serious data errors including nearly 10% contamination of the dataset by women. The second study mistakenly used the rate of T prescriptions written by healthcare providers to men with recent myocardial infarction (MI) as a proxy for the naturally occurring rate of MI. Numerous studies suggest T is beneficial, including decreased mortality in association with TTh, reduced MI rate with TTh in men with the greatest MI risk prognosis, and reduced CV and overall mortality with higher serum levels of endogenous T. Randomized controlled trials have demonstrated benefits of TTh in men with coronary artery disease and congestive heart failure. Improvement in CV risk factors such as fat mass and glycemic control have been repeatedly demonstrated in T-deficient men treated with T. The current evidence does not support the belief that TTh is associated with increased CV risk or CV mortality. On the contrary, a wealth of evidence accumulated over several decades suggests that low serum T levels are associated with increased risk and that higher endogenous T, as well as TTh itself, appear to be beneficial for CV mortality and risk. PMID:25432501

  12. Effects of age on H1N1-specific serum IgG1 and IgG3 levels evaluated during the 2011–2012 influenza vaccine season

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background We have previously reported an age-related impairment in the serum antibody response to pandemic (p)2009 H1N1, measured by hemagglutination inhibition assay and ELISA. The present study extends these observations and evaluates IgG subclass distribution in healthy individuals of different ages vaccinated during the 2011–2012 season. Results The 2011-2012 vaccination season was characterized by a vaccine containing the pandemic (p)2009 H1N1 strain for the third consecutive year. All of our subjects were previously immunized, and therefore seroprotected at t0. Nevertheless, aging impaired the serum antibody response to H1N1, as antibody titers increased after vaccination in young and less in elderly individuals. The peak of the response was at day 7 (t7), in contrast with what is usually seen at day 21–28, suggesting a memory response characterized by the induction of an IgG subclass with a shorter half-life. We hypothesized that the IgG3 response, with its much shorter half-life, might be more represented. Antibodies were predominantly of the IgG1 subclass in both age groups, although a robust IgG3 response was also induced and accounted for a significant proportion of the overall response. IgG2 and IgG4 antibodies were at indiscernible levels. We showed a much higher percentage of IgG3 (40–50%) than previously in the literature (less than 10%). To explain if this was associated with a particular cytokine profile, we measured H1N1-induced T cell cytokines in vitro and found that IgG3 levels were positively correlated with TNF-α and IL-6. Moreover, activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) mRNA expression, a predictive biomarker of optimal in vivo vaccine response, was found to significantly correlate with IgG3 and also with IgG1 similar to what we have shown previously for total IgG. Conclusions In the 2011–2012 season, the pandemic (p)2009 H1N1 strain was present in the vaccine for the third consecutive year and therefore each individual was

  13. Pathologies Associated with Serum IgG4 Elevation

    PubMed Central

    Ebbo, Mikael; Grados, Aurélie; Bernit, Emmanuelle; Vély, Frederic; Boucraut, José; Harlé, Jean-Robert; Daniel, Laurent; Schleinitz, Nicolas

    2012-01-01

    Statement of Purpose. IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD) is usually associated to an increase of serum IgG4 levels. However other conditions have also been associated to high serum IgG4 levels. Methods. All IgG subclasses analyses performed in our hospital over a one-year period were analyzed. When IgG4 level were over 1.35 g/L, the patient's clinical observation was analyzed and both final diagnosis and reason leading to IgG subclasses analysis were recorded. Only polyclonal increases of IgG4 were considered. Summary of the Results. On 646 IgG subclass analysis performed, 59 patients had serum IgG4 over 1.35 g/L. The final diagnosis associated to serum IgG4 increase was very variable. Most patients (25%) presented with repeated infections, 13.5% with autoimmune diseases, and 10% with IgG4-RD. Other patients presented with cancer, primary immune deficiencies, idiopathic interstitial lung disease, cystic fibrosis, histiocytosis, or systemic vasculitis and 13.5% presented with various pathologies or no diagnosis. Mean IgG4 levels and IgG4/IgG ratio were higher in IgG4-RD than in other pathologies associated to elevated IgG4 levels. Conclusions. Our study confirms that elevation of serum IgG4 is not specific to IgG4-RD. Before retaining IgG4-RD diagnosis in cases of serum IgG4 above 1.35 g/L, several other pathological conditions should be excluded. PMID:22966232

  14. 'Roid rage in rats? Testosterone effects on aggressive motivation, impulsivity and tyrosine hydroxylase.

    PubMed

    Wood, Ruth I; Armstrong, Abigail; Fridkin, Vlad; Shah, Vivek; Najafi, Allison; Jakowec, Michael

    2013-02-17

    In humans and animals, anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) increase aggression, but the underlying behavioral mechanisms are unclear. AAS may increase the motivation to fight. Alternatively, AAS may increase impulsive behavior, consistent with the popular image of 'roid rage. To test this, adolescent male rats were treated chronically with testosterone (7.5mg/kg) or vehicle and tested for aggressive motivation and impulsivity. Rats were trained to respond on a nose-poke on a 10 min fixed-interval schedule for the opportunity to fight in their home cage with an unfamiliar rat. Although testosterone increased aggression (6.3±1.3 fights/5 min vs 2.4±0.8 for controls, p<0.05), there was no difference in operant responding (28.4±1.6 nose-pokes/10 min for testosterone, 32.4±7.0 for vehicle). This suggests that testosterone does not enhance motivation for aggression. To test for impulsivity, rats were trained to respond for food in a delay-discounting procedure. In an operant chamber, one lever delivered one food pellet immediately, the other lever gave 4 pellets after a delay (0, 15, 30 or 45 s). In testosterone- and vehicle-treated rats, body weights and food intake did not differ. However, testosterone-treated rats chose the larger, delayed reward more often (4.5±0.7 times in 10 trials with 45 s delay) than vehicle controls (2.5±0.5 times, p<0.05), consistent with a reduction in impulsive choice. Thus, although chronic high-dose testosterone enhances aggression, this does not include an increase in impulsive behavior or motivation to fight. This is further supported by measurement of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) by Western immunoblot analysis in brain regions important for motivation (nucleus accumbens, Acb) and executive function (medial prefrontal cortex, PFC). There were no differences in TH between testosterone- and vehicle-treated rats in Acb or PFC. However, testosterone significantly reduced TH (to 76.9±3.1% of controls, p<0.05) in the caudate-putamen, a

  15. ‘Roid rage in rats? Testosterone effects on aggressive motivation, impulsivity and tyrosine hydroxylase

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Ruth I.; Armstrong, Abigail; Fridkin, Vlad; Shah, Vivek; Najafi, Allison; Jakowec, Michael

    2013-01-01

    In humans and animals, anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) increase aggression, but the underlying behavioral mechanisms are unclear. AAS may increase the motivation to fight. Alternatively, AAS may increase impulsive behavior, consistent with the popular image of ‘roid rage. To test this, adolescent male rats were treated chronically with testosterone (7.5 mg/kg) or vehicle and tested for aggressive motivation and impulsivity. Rats were trained to respond on a nose-poke on a 10 min fixed-interval schedule for the opportunity to fight in their home cage with an unfamiliar rat. Although testosterone increased aggression (6.3±1.3 fights/5 min vs 2.4±0.8 for controls, p<0.05), there was no difference in operant responding (28.4±1.6 nose-pokes/ 10 min for testosterone, 32.4±7.0 for vehicle). This suggests that testosterone does not enhance motivation for aggression. To test for impulsivity, rats were trained to respond for food in a delay-discounting procedure. In an operant chamber, one lever delivered one food pellet immediately, the other lever gave 4 pellets after a delay (0, 15, 30 or 45 s). In testosterone- and vehicle-treated rats, body weights and food intake did not differ. However, testosterone-treated rats chose the larger, delayed reward more often (4.5±0.7 times in 10 trials with 45 s delay) than vehicle controls (2.5±0.5 times, p<0.05), consistent with a reduction in impulsive choice. Thus, although chronic high-dose testosterone enhances aggression, this does not include an increase in impulsive behavior or motivation to fight. This is further supported by measurement of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) by Western immunoblot analysis in brain regions important for motivation (nucleus accumbens, Acb) and executive function (medial prefrontal cortex, PFC). There were no differences in TH between testosterone- and vehicle-treated rats in Acb or PFC. However, testosterone significantly reduced TH (to 76.9±3.1% of controls, p<0.05) in the caudate-putamen, a

  16. Male prolactinomas presenting with normal testosterone levels.

    PubMed

    Shimon, Ilan; Benbassat, Carlos

    2014-06-01

    In men harboring prolactinoma the most common symptoms are related to hypogonadism, including decreased libido, erectile dysfunction, and gynecomastia. These men characteristically present with elevated serum prolactin (PRL) levels, suppressed gonadotropins, and low testosterone levels. We studied a group of 11 unique men with prolactinomas presenting with testosterone levels within the normal range (≥2.6 ng/ml; cohort A), and compared them to 11 prolactinoma men with borderline baseline testosterone (2.1-2.5 ng/ml; cohort B) and to a cohort of 34 prolactinoma patients with low testosterone levels (≤2 ng/ml; cohort C). Mean testosterone levels at presentation were 3.91 ± 0.9 ng/ml in cohort A (range, 2.6-5.2 ng/ml), 2.44 ± 0.16 ng/ml in cohort B and 0.96 ± 0.6 in cohort C (p < 0.001). Mean baseline PRL levels were >20 times above normal in cohort A compared to >100 times above normal in cohorts B and C. Symptoms of hypogonadism were present in 55, 64 and 76% of men in groups A, B and C, respectively. There was a trend towards a larger tumor size in the low testosterone group (p = 0.06). Visual fields defects at presentation were more prevalent in this cohort (C). With cabergoline, testosterone level increased from 3.91 to 6.42 ng/ml (Δ = 2.51 ng/ml) in cohort A, from 2.44 to 5.63 ng/ml (Δ = 3.19 ng/ml) in cohort B, and from 0.96 to 3.30 ng/ml (Δ = 2.34 ng/ml) in cohort C (p < 0.05 for each group). Symptoms of hypogonadism improved following treatment in 83% of symptomatic men in cohort A. Normal testosterone does not exclude the likelihood of prolactinoma in men. When treated with cabergoline, testosterone levels in these men can increase higher within the normal range together with clinical improvement. PMID:23756784

  17. Serum Testosterone Kinetics After Brachytherapy for Clinically Localized Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Taira, Al V.; Merrick, Gregory S.; Galbreath, Robert W.; Butler, Wayne M.; Lief, Jonathan H.; Allen, Zachariah A.; Wallner, Kent E.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate temporal changes in testosterone after prostate brachytherapy and investigate the potential impact of these changes on response to treatment. Methods and Materials: Between January 2008 and March 2009, 221 consecutive patients underwent Pd-103 brachytherapy without androgen deprivation for clinically localized prostate cancer. Prebrachytherapy prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and serum testosterone were obtained for each patient. Repeat levels were obtained 3 months after brachytherapy and at least every 6 months thereafter. Multiple clinical, treatment, and dosimetric parameters were evaluated to determine an association with temporal testosterone changes. In addition, analysis was conducted to determine if there was an association between testosterone changes and treatment outcomes or the occurrence of a PSA spike. Results: There was no significant difference in serum testosterone over time after implant (p = 0.57). 29% of men experienced an increase {>=}25%, 23% of men experienced a decrease {>=}25%, and the remaining 48% of men had no notable change in testosterone over time. There was no difference in testosterone trends between men who received external beam radiotherapy and those who did not (p = 0.12). On multivariate analysis, preimplant testosterone was the only variable that consistently predicted for changes in testosterone over time. Men with higher than average testosterone tended to experience drop in testosterone (p < 0.001), whereas men with average or below average baseline testosterone had no significant change. There was no association between men who experienced PSA spike and testosterone temporal trends (p = 0.50) nor between initial PSA response and testosterone trends (p = 0.21). Conclusion: Prostate brachytherapy does not appear to impact serum testosterone over time. Changes in serum testosterone do not appear to be associated with PSA spike phenomena nor with initial PSA response to treatment; therefore, PSA response

  18. Prostate Cancer Cells Differ in Testosterone Accumulation, Dihydrotestosterone Conversion, and Androgen Receptor Signaling Response to Steroid 5α-Reductase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yue; Godoy, Alejandro; Azzouni, Faris; Wilton, John H.; Ip, Clement; Mohler, James L.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Blocking 5α-reductase-mediated testosterone conversion to dihydrotestosterone (DHT) with finasteride or dutasteride is the driving hypothesis behind two prostate cancer prevention trials. Factors affecting intracellular androgen levels and the androgen receptor (AR) signaling axis need to be examined systematically in order to fully understand the outcome of interventions using these drugs. METHODS The expression of three 5α-reductase isozymes, as determined by immunohistochemistry and qRT-PCR, was studied in five human prostate cancer cell lines. Intracellular testosterone and DHT were analyzed using mass spectrometry. A luciferase reporter assay and AR-regulated genes were used to evaluate the modulation of AR activity. RESULTS Prostate cancer cells were capable of accumulating testosterone to a level 15–50 times higher than that in the medium. The profile and expression of 5α-reductase isozymes did not predict the capacity to convert testosterone to DHT. Finasteride and dutasteride were able to depress testosterone uptake in addition to lowering intracellular DHT. The inhibition of AR activity following drug treatment often exceeded the expected response due to reduced availability of DHT. The ability to maintain high intracellular testosterone might compensate for the shortage of DHT. CONCLUSIONS The biological effect of finasteride or dutasteride appears to be complex and may depend on the interplay of several factors, which include testosterone turnover, enzymology of DHT production, ability to use testosterone and DHT interchangeably, and propensity of cells for off-target AR inhibitory effect. PMID:23813697

  19. IgG4-Related Kidney Disease and IgG4-Related Retroperitoneal Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Kawano, Mitsuhiro; Yamada, Kazunori

    2016-08-01

    Immunoglobulin G4-related kidney disease (IgG4-RKD) is the collective name encompassing renal parenchymal and renal pelvic lesions. The hallmark of renal parenchymal lesions of IgG4-related disease is plasma cell-rich tubulointerstitial nephritis with numerous IgG4-positive plasma cells and characteristic fibrosis. In addition, glomerular lesions are sometimes present, with membranous glomerulonephritis being the most common. Although IgG4-RKD shows good responsiveness to corticosteroid therapy, follow-up imaging studies have revealed that partial cortical scars persist when the start of therapy is delayed. In this review, the authors provide an overview of the latest knowledge of IgG4-RKD, focusing in particular on its pathological and imaging characteristic features. PMID:27466797

  20. 21 CFR 862.1680 - Testosterone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... measure testosterone (a male sex hormone) in serum, plasma, and urine. Measurement of testosterone are used in the diagnosis and treatment of disorders involving the male sex hormones (androgens),...

  1. 21 CFR 862.1680 - Testosterone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... measure testosterone (a male sex hormone) in serum, plasma, and urine. Measurement of testosterone are used in the diagnosis and treatment of disorders involving the male sex hormones (androgens),...

  2. 21 CFR 862.1680 - Testosterone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... measure testosterone (a male sex hormone) in serum, plasma, and urine. Measurement of testosterone are used in the diagnosis and treatment of disorders involving the male sex hormones (androgens),...

  3. 21 CFR 862.1680 - Testosterone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... measure testosterone (a male sex hormone) in serum, plasma, and urine. Measurement of testosterone are used in the diagnosis and treatment of disorders involving the male sex hormones (androgens),...

  4. 21 CFR 862.1680 - Testosterone test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... measure testosterone (a male sex hormone) in serum, plasma, and urine. Measurement of testosterone are used in the diagnosis and treatment of disorders involving the male sex hormones (androgens),...

  5. Testosterone Affects Song Modulation during Simulated Territorial Intrusions in Male Black Redstarts (Phoenicurus ochruros)

    PubMed Central

    Goymann, Wolfgang; Kipper, Silke

    2012-01-01

    Although it has been suggested that testosterone plays an important role in resource allocation for competitive behavior, details of the interplay between testosterone, territorial aggression and signal plasticity are largely unknown. Therefore, we investigated if testosterone acts specifically on signals that communicate the motivation or ability of individuals to engage in competitive situations in a natural context. We studied the black redstart, a territorial songbird species, during two different life-cycle stages, the early breeding phase in spring and the non-breeding phase in fall. Male territory holders were implanted with the androgen receptor blocker flutamide (Flut) and the aromatase inhibitor letrozole (Let) to inhibit the action of testosterone and its estrogenic metabolites. Controls received a placebo treatment. Three days after implantation birds were challenged with a simulated territorial intrusion (STI). Song was recorded before, during and after the challenge. In spring, both treatment groups increased the number of elements sung in parts of their song in response to the STI. However, Flut/Let-implanted males reacted to the STI with a decreased maximum acoustic frequency of one song part, while placebo-implanted males did not. Instead, placebo-implanted males sang the atonal part of their song with a broader frequency range. Furthermore, placebo-, but not Flut/Let-implanted males, sang shorter songs with shorter pauses between parts in the STIs. During simulated intrusions in fall, when testosterone levels are naturally low in this species, males of both treatment groups sang similar to Flut/Let-implanted males during breeding. The results suggest that song sung during a territorial encounter is of higher competitive value than song sung in an undisturbed situation and may, therefore, convey information about the motivation or quality of the territory holder. We conclude that testosterone facilitates context-dependent changes in song structures

  6. Testosterone affects song modulation during simulated territorial intrusions in male black redstarts (Phoenicurus ochruros).

    PubMed

    Apfelbeck, Beate; Kiefer, Sarah; Mortega, Kim G; Goymann, Wolfgang; Kipper, Silke

    2012-01-01

    Although it has been suggested that testosterone plays an important role in resource allocation for competitive behavior, details of the interplay between testosterone, territorial aggression and signal plasticity are largely unknown. Therefore, we investigated if testosterone acts specifically on signals that communicate the motivation or ability of individuals to engage in competitive situations in a natural context. We studied the black redstart, a territorial songbird species, during two different life-cycle stages, the early breeding phase in spring and the non-breeding phase in fall. Male territory holders were implanted with the androgen receptor blocker flutamide (Flut) and the aromatase inhibitor letrozole (Let) to inhibit the action of testosterone and its estrogenic metabolites. Controls received a placebo treatment. Three days after implantation birds were challenged with a simulated territorial intrusion (STI). Song was recorded before, during and after the challenge. In spring, both treatment groups increased the number of elements sung in parts of their song in response to the STI. However, Flut/Let-implanted males reacted to the STI with a decreased maximum acoustic frequency of one song part, while placebo-implanted males did not. Instead, placebo-implanted males sang the atonal part of their song with a broader frequency range. Furthermore, placebo-, but not Flut/Let-implanted males, sang shorter songs with shorter pauses between parts in the STIs. During simulated intrusions in fall, when testosterone levels are naturally low in this species, males of both treatment groups sang similar to Flut/Let-implanted males during breeding. The results suggest that song sung during a territorial encounter is of higher competitive value than song sung in an undisturbed situation and may, therefore, convey information about the motivation or quality of the territory holder. We conclude that testosterone facilitates context-dependent changes in song structures

  7. Histopathology of IgG4-Related Autoimmune Hepatitis and IgG4-Related Hepatopathy in IgG4-Related Disease.

    PubMed

    Nakanuma, Yasuni; Ishizu, Yoji; Zen, Yoh; Harada, Kenichi; Umemura, Takeji

    2016-08-01

    Immunoglobulin G4-related disease (IgG4-RD) is a systemic disease involving many organs; it includes IgG4-related sclerosing cholangitis and inflammatory pseudotumor in the hepatobiliary system. Two types of hepatic parenchymal involvement have been reported in IgG4-RD: IgG4-related autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) and IgG4-hepatopathy. Moreover, only three cases of IgG4-related AIH have been reported. Immunoglobulin G4-related AIH is clinicopathologically similar to AIH, except for an elevated serum IgG4 level and heavy infiltration of IgG4-positive plasma cells in the liver tissue. Interestingly, IgG4-related AIH can be complicated by well-known IgG4-RD(s). Immunoglobulin G4-hepatopathy, which includes various histopathological lesions encountered in the liver of patients with type I autoimmune pancreatitis, is classified into five histological categories: portal inflammation, large bile duct damage, portal sclerosis, lobular hepatitis, and cholestasis. Immunoglobulin G4-hepatopathy is currently a collective term covering hepatic lesions primarily or secondarily related to IgG4-related sclerosing cholangitis and type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis. In conclusion, the liver is not immune to IgG4-RD, and at least two types of hepatic involvement in IgG4-RD have been reported: IgG4-related AIH and IgG4-hepatopathy. Additional studies are required to clarify their precise clinical significance with respect to IgG4-RD and inherent liver diseases. PMID:27466793

  8. Skin permeation of testosterone and its ester derivatives in rats.

    PubMed

    Kim, M K; Lee, C H; Kim, D D

    2000-04-01

    To establish the optimum conditions for improving the transdermal delivery of testosterone, we studied the relationship between the lipophilicity of testosterone ester derivatives and the rat skin permeation rate of testosterone. We performed a rat skin permeation study of testosterone and its commercially available ester derivatives, testosterone hemisuccinate, testosterone propionate and testosterone-17beta-cypionate, using an ethanol/water co-solvent system. The aqueous solubility and rat skin permeation rate of each drug, saturated in various compositions of an ethanol/water system, was determined at 37 degrees C. The aqueous solubility of testosterone and its ester derivatives increased exponentially as the volume fraction of ethanol increased up to 100% (v/v). The stability of testosterone propionate in both the skin homogenate and the extract was investigated to observe the enzymatic degradation during the skin permeation process. Testosterone propionate was found to be stable in the isotonic buffer solution and in the epidermis-side extract for 10h at 37 degrees C. However, in the skin homogenate and the dermis-side extract testosterone propionate rapidly degraded producing testosterone, implying that testosterone propionate rapidly degraded to testosterone during the skin permeation process. The steady-state permeation rates of testosterone in the ethanol/water systems increased exponentially as the volume fraction of ethanol increased, reaching the maximum value (2.69+/-0.69 microg cm(-2)h(-1)) at 70% (v/v) ethanol in water, and then decreasing with further increases in the ethanol volume fraction. However, in the skin permeation study with testosterone esters saturated in 70% (v/v) ethanol in water system, testosterone esters were hardly detected in the receptor solution, probably due to the rapid degradation to testosterone during the skin permeation process. Moreover, a parabolic relationship was observed between the permeation rate of testosterone and

  9. IgG Subclass Staining in Routine Renal Biopsy Material.

    PubMed

    Hemminger, Jessica; Nadasdy, Gyongyi; Satoskar, Anjali; Brodsky, Sergey V; Nadasdy, Tibor

    2016-05-01

    Immunofluorescence staining plays a vital role in nephropathology, but the panel of antibodies used has not changed for decades. Further classification of immunoglobulin (Ig)G-containing immune-type deposits with IgG subclass staining (IgG1, IgG2, IgG3, and IgG4) has been shown to be of diagnostic utility in glomerular diseases, but their value in the evaluation of renal biopsies has not been addressed systematically in large renal biopsy material. Between January 2007 and June 2014, using direct immunofluorescence, we stained every renal biopsy for the IgG subclasses if there was moderate to prominent glomerular IgG staining and/or IgG-predominant or IgG-codominant glomerular staining. The total number of biopsies stained was 1084, which included 367 cases of membranous glomerulonephritis, 307 cases of lupus nephritis, 74 cases of fibrillary glomerulonephritis, 53 cases of proliferative glomerulonephritis with monoclonal IgG deposits, and 25 cases of antiglomerular basement membrane disease, among others. We found that monoclonality of IgG deposits cannot always be reliably determined on the basis of kappa and lambda light chain staining alone, particularly if concomitant (frequently nonspecific) IgM staining is present. In IgG heavy and heavy and light chain deposition disease (3 cases), subclass staining is very helpful, and in proliferative glomerulonephritis with monoclonal IgG deposits subclass staining is necessary. IgG subclass staining is useful in differentiating primary from secondary membranous glomerulonephritis. In proliferative glomerulonephritis with polyclonal IgG deposition, IgG1 dominance/codominance with concomitant IgG3 and IgG2 but weak or absent IgG4 staining favors an underlying autoimmune disease. IgG subclass staining is a very useful diagnostic method in a selected cohort of renal biopsies, particularly in biopsies with glomerulonephritis with monoclonal IgG deposits. PMID:26848798

  10. Testosterone nasal gel (Natesto) for hypogonadism.

    PubMed

    2015-05-11

    In one study, Natesto nasal gel administered intranasally 3 times daily was effective in raising low serum testosterone levels into the normal range in patients with hypogonadism. Whether patients will find this method of administration more acceptable than an intramuscular injection every 2-4 weeks or once-daily application to the skin remains to be determined. Based on the lack of convincing evidence of benefit in older men and concerns about its safety, the FDA has warned against using testosterone to treat hypogonadism due solely to aging. PMID:25941957

  11. 21 CFR 522.842 - Estradiol benzoate and testosterone propionate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Estradiol benzoate and testosterone propionate... ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.842 Estradiol benzoate and testosterone propionate. (a) Sponsors. See sponsors in... testosterone propionate (one implant consisting of 8 pellets, each pellet containing 2.5 mg estradiol...

  12. 21 CFR 522.842 - Estradiol benzoate and testosterone propionate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Estradiol benzoate and testosterone propionate... ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.842 Estradiol benzoate and testosterone propionate. (a) Sponsors. See sponsors in... testosterone propionate (one implant consisting of 8 pellets, each pellet containing 2.5 mg estradiol...

  13. 21 CFR 522.842 - Estradiol benzoate and testosterone propionate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Estradiol benzoate and testosterone propionate... ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.842 Estradiol benzoate and testosterone propionate. (a) Sponsors. See sponsors in... testosterone propionate (one implant consisting of 8 pellets, each pellet containing 2.5 mg estradiol...

  14. 21 CFR 522.842 - Estradiol benzoate and testosterone propionate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Estradiol benzoate and testosterone propionate... ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.842 Estradiol benzoate and testosterone propionate. (a) Sponsors. See sponsors in... testosterone propionate (one implant consisting of 8 pellets, each pellet containing 2.5 mg estradiol...

  15. 21 CFR 522.842 - Estradiol benzoate and testosterone propionate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Estradiol benzoate and testosterone propionate... ANIMAL DRUGS § 522.842 Estradiol benzoate and testosterone propionate. (a) Sponsors. See sponsors in... testosterone propionate (one implant consisting of 8 pellets, each pellet containing 2.5 mg estradiol...

  16. Testosterone in tropical birds: effects of environmental and social factors.

    PubMed

    Goymann, Wolfgang; Moore, Ignacio T; Scheuerlein, Alexander; Hirschenhauser, Katharina; Grafen, Alan; Wingfield, John C

    2004-09-01

    Previous investigations suggest that male tropical birds have lower plasma testosterone concentrations than northern latitude species. To test whether this generalization is valid, we analyzed all currently available plasma testosterone data of tropical birds. We focused on peak breeding testosterone levels using phylogenetic and conventional statistics. Explanatory variables considered were social mating system, type of territoriality, breeding season length, and altitude. On average, tropical birds had lower mean peak testosterone levels than northern temperate birds. However, in several tropical species, testosterone levels were well within the range of northern latitude birds. Without controlling for phylogeny, breeding season length, type of territoriality, and altitude explained a significant proportion of the variance in testosterone levels. The shorter the breeding season, the higher the testosterone levels. Tropical birds that defend a breeding season territory had higher testosterone levels than birds that were year-round territorial or colonial, and testosterone levels were positively correlated with altitude. When controlling for phylogeny, only breeding season length predicted testosterone levels. In conclusion, we propose to refine previous notions of low plasma testosterone levels in tropical birds: short breeding seasons and perhaps environmental conditions at high altitudes precipitate conditions under which high testosterone levels are beneficial in the tropics. PMID:15478088

  17. Pharmacokinetic studies of passively administered ovine anti-testosterone antibodies given to cattle by the subcutaneous and intravenous routes.

    PubMed Central

    Clayton, J; Rhind, S M; Groves, D J; Morris, B A

    1990-01-01

    Passive immunization of cattle with ovine anti-testosterone antiserum can result in an increased ovulation rate, but the effect is variable and may be influenced by the route of administration. Investigations were made into the pharmacokinetics of these antibodies in cattle when given intravenously (i.v.), subcutaneously (s.c.) or via a combination of these two routes. Serum levels of free residual binding sites were measured by testosterone radioimmunoassay, whilst total circulating ovine IgG was determined using a specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay which shows no cross-reactivity with bovine IgG. The biological half-life of the administered antibodies was longer when it was calculated by measuring titre than when it was calculated by measuring IgG. Subcutaneous injection resulted in a significantly longer half-life of IgG than intravenous injection or the combined route, with a concomitant increase in the area under the curve. No significant differences between the half-lives as measured by titre were noted following the various routes of administration, but the mean value following s.c. injection was longest. The choice of route of administration of antiserum for passive immunization can be used to control the timing and duration of effective antibody levels. The results of the present study suggest that the s.c. or combined i.v. and s.c. routes are the preferred methods of passive immunization if an effect of long duration is required. It may be that it is the period over which the maximum level is maintained, rather than the absolute maximum level, which is important for successful immunomodulation of ovulation rate. PMID:2335379

  18. Metformin Attenuates Testosterone-Induced Prostatic Hyperplasia in Rats: A Pharmacological Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Mosli, Hala H.; Esmat, Ahmed; Atawia, Reem T.; Shoieb, Sherif M.; Mosli, Hisham A.; Abdel-Naim, Ashraf B.

    2015-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is uncontrolled proliferation of prostate tissue. Metformin, a widely prescribed anti-diabetic agent, possesses anticancer activity through induction of apoptotic signaling and cell cycle arrest. This study aimed to investigate the protective effect of metformin against experimentally-induced BPH in rats. Treatment with 500 and 1000 mg/kg metformin orally for 14 days significantly inhibited testosterone-mediated increase in the prostate weight & prostate index (prostate weight/body weight [mg/g]) and attenuated the pathological alterations induced by testosterone. Mechanistically, metformin significantly protected against testosterone-induced elevation of estrogen receptor-α (ER-α) and decrease of estrogen receptor-β (ER-β) expression, with no significant effect of androgen receptor (AR) and 5α-reductase expression. It decreased mRNA expression of IGF-1 and IGF-1R and protein expression ratio of pAkt/total Akt induced by testosterone. Furthermore, it significantly ameliorated testosterone–induced reduction of mRNA expression Bax/Bcl-2 ratio, P21 and phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) and AMPK [PT-172] activity. In conclusion, these findings elucidate the effectiveness of metformin in preventing testosterone-induced BPH in rats. These results could be attributed, at least partly, to its ability to enhance expression ratio of ER-β/ER-α, decrease IGF-1, IGF-1R and pAkt expressions, increase P21, PTEN, Bax/Bcl-2 expressions and activate AMPK with a subsequent inhibition of prostate proliferation. PMID:26492952

  19. Serum levels of testosterone precursors, testosterone and estradiol in 10 animal species.

    PubMed

    Wichmann, U; Wichmann, G; Krause, W

    1984-05-01

    Blood levels of testosterone precursors, i.e. pregnenolone, progesterone, 17 alpha-hydroxyprogesterone, androstendione, DHEA, and delta 5-androstendiol as well as testosterone and estradiol are measured in 10 animals each of 10 different species. The determination is done by radioimmunoassay with steroidspecific antibodies. Precursors of the delta 5-pathway (DHEA, androstendiol) are low in the red deer, dog, cat, rat and guinea pig. Precursors of the delta 4-pathway (progesterone, 17-hydroxprogesterone, androstendione) are lower in the bull, boar, ram, stallion and rabbit thus indicating a predominance of different pathways in the animal species studied herein. Pregnenolone concentrations are of equal height in all animals, testosterone is lowest in the cat and stallion. In the latter species the estradiol/testosterone ratio is spectacular high. PMID:6540697

  20. Effect of protein-synthesis inhibitors on testosterone production in rat testis interstitial tissue and Leydig-cell preparations.

    PubMed Central

    Cooke, B A; Janszen, F H; Clotscher, W F; van der Molen, H J

    1975-01-01

    Luteinizing-hormone-stimulated testosterone biosynthesis was inhibited by cycloheximide during incubation of rat testis intersitial tissue in vitro and also by puromycin and cycloheximide during incubation of Leydig-cell preparations, but not by chloramphenicol. These results suggest that a protein regualtor(s) formed by cytoplasmic protein synthesis is involved in steroidogenesis in the rat testis. The specific effect of cycloheximide and puromycin on protein synthesis rather than on other non-specific processes is suggested by the inhibition of protein synthesis and steroidogenesis with different doses of the inhibitors and the lack of effect of cycloheximide on luteinizing-hormone-induced adenosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate production. Stimulation of testosterone production by luteinizing hormone during superfusion of interstitial tissue was detectable within 10-20 min and reached a maximum of 120 min, and thereafter slowly decreased. Cycloheximide added at maximum steroid production caused a rapid decrease in testosterone synthesis which followed first-order kinetics (half-life 13 min), thus indicating that the protein regulator(s) has a short half-life. No effect of cycloheximide, puromycin or chloramphenicol on testosterone production in the absence of added luteinizing hormone was found, suggesting that the basal production of testosterone is independent of protein synthesis. PMID:174545

  1. Postnatal Testosterone Concentrations and Male Social Development

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Gerianne M.

    2014-01-01

    Converging evidence from over 40 years of behavioral research indicates that higher testicular androgens in prenatal life and at puberty contribute to the masculinization of human behavior. However, the behavioral significance of the transient activation of the hypothalamic–pituitary–gonadal (HPG) axis in early postnatal life remains largely unknown. Although early research on non-human primates indicated that suppression of the postnatal surge in testicular androgens had no measurable effects on the later expression of the male behavioral phenotype, recent research from our laboratory suggests that postnatal testosterone concentrations influence male infant preferences for larger social groups and temperament characteristics associated with the later development of aggression. In later assessment of gender-linked behavior in the second year of life, concentrations of testosterone at 3–4 months of age were unrelated to toy choices and activity levels during toy play. However, higher concentrations of testosterone predicted less vocalization in toddlers and higher parental ratings on an established screening measure for autism spectrum disorder. These findings suggest a role of the transient activation of the HPG axis in the development of typical and atypical male social relations and suggest that it may be useful in future research on the exaggerated rise in testosterone secretion in preterm infants or exposure to hormone disruptors in early postnatal life to include assessment of gender-relevant behavioral outcomes, including childhood disorders with sex-biased prevalence rates. PMID:24600437

  2. Precocious puberty secondary to topical testosterone exposure.

    PubMed

    Franklin, Sherry Lynn; Geffner, Mitchell E

    2003-01-01

    We report a case of pronounced virilization, including marked penile and pubic hair growth, accelerated height velocity and skeletal maturation, and increased muscle mass in a 2.67 year-old boy resulting from presumed inadvertent, long-term exposure to a topical testosterone cream being used by his father. PMID:12585348

  3. Assessment of naturally occurring covalent and total dimer levels in human IgG1 and IgG2.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jane; Goetze, Andrew M; Flynn, Gregory C

    2014-03-01

    Antibody dimers, two self-associated monomers, have been detected on both recombinantly expressed and endogenous human IgG proteins. Nearly 10 years ago, Yoo et al. (2003) described low levels of IgG2 covalent dimer, in human serum, but did not quantify the levels. Here we quantify the total and covalent dimer levels of IgG2 and IgG1 in human blood, and study the origin of covalent dimer formation. Low levels (<1%) of total IgG1 and IgG2 dimers were measured in freshly prepared human plasma. Both IgG1 and IgG2 covalent dimers were also found in plasma. Whereas IgG1 covalent dimer levels were significantly reduced by steps intended to eliminate artifacts during sample preparation, IgG2 covalent dimer levels remain stable in such conditions. About 0.4% of IgG2 in plasma was in a covalent dimer form, yet very little (<0.03%) of IgG1 covalent dimer could be considered naturally occurring. IgG2 dimer also formed in vitro under conditions designed to mimic those in blood, suggesting that formation occurs in vivo during circulation. Thus, small amounts of covalent IgG2 dimer do appear to form naturally. PMID:24321397

  4. COMBINATION DOSE OF TWO PHTHALATES ADDITIVELY DEPRESSES TESTOSTERONE PRODUCTION AND INSL3 GENE EXPRESSION IN MALE RAT FETUSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Diethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) and di(n-butyl) phthalate (DBP) are phthalate esters used to modify plastic and polymer textures. Individually,in uteroexposure to DEHP and DBP inhibit reproductive tract development,induce reproductive organ malformations, and reduce testosterone (T...

  5. Licorice consumption and serum testosterone in healthy man.

    PubMed

    Armanini, D; Bonanni, G; Mattarello, M J; Fiore, C; Sartorato, P; Palermo, M

    2003-09-01

    We have previously found that licorice can reduce serum testosterone in healthy men. These results were not confirmed in another study, where the same amounts of licorice did not decrease salivary testosterone values. In the actual study we treated more cases with the same amount of licorice and reproduced our previous data. The mean testosterone values decreased by 26 % after one week of treatment (p < 0.01). There was also a significant increase in 17-OHP and LH concentrations and a slight, but not significant decrease in free testosterone. Licorice treatment, in addition, did not affect the response of testosterone and 17-OHP to stimulation with beta-HCG. PMID:14520600

  6. Oxytocin, testosterone, and human social cognition.

    PubMed

    Crespi, Bernard J

    2016-05-01

    I describe an integrative social-evolutionary model for the adaptive significance of the human oxytocinergic system. The model is based on a role for this hormone in the generation and maintenance of social familiarity and affiliation across five homologous, functionally similar, and sequentially co-opted contexts: mothers with offspring, female and male mates, kin groups, individuals with reciprocity partners, and individuals within cooperating and competing social groups defined by culture. In each situation, oxytocin motivates, mediates and rewards the cognitive and behavioural processes that underlie the formation and dynamics of a more or less stable social group, and promotes a relationship between two or more individuals. Such relationships may be positive (eliciting neurological reward, reducing anxiety and thus indicating fitness-enhancing effects), or negative (increasing anxiety and distress, and thus motivating attempts to alleviate a problematic, fitness-reducing social situation). I also present evidence that testosterone exhibits opposite effects from oxytocin on diverse aspects of cognition and behaviour, most generally by favouring self-oriented, asocial and antisocial behaviours. I apply this model for effects of oxytocin and testosterone to understanding human psychological disorders centrally involving social behaviour. Reduced oxytocin and higher testosterone levels have been associated with under-developed social cognition, especially in autism. By contrast, some combination of oxytocin increased above normal levels, and lower testosterone, has been reported in a notable number of studies of schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and depression, and, in some cases, higher oxytocin involves maladaptively 'hyper-developed' social cognition in these conditions. This pattern of findings suggests that human social cognition and behaviour are structured, in part, by joint and opposing effects of oxytocin and testosterone, and that extremes of such joint

  7. Testosterone Replacement Therapy Prevents Alterations of Coronary Vascular Reactivity Caused by Hormone Deficiency Induced by Castration

    PubMed Central

    Rouver, Wender Nascimento; Delgado, Nathalie Tristão Banhos; Menezes, Jussara Bezerra; Santos, Roger Lyrio; Moyses, Margareth Ribeiro

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to determine the effects of chronic treatment with different doses of testosterone on endothelium–dependent coronary vascular reactivity in male rats. Adult male rats were divided into four experimental groups: control (SHAM), castrated (CAST), castrated and immediately treated subcutaneously with a physiological dose (0.5 mg/kg/day, PHYSIO group) or supraphysiological dose (2.5 mg/kg/day, SUPRA group) of testosterone for 15 days. Systolic blood pressure (SBP) was assessed at the end of treatment through tail plethysmography. After euthanasia, the heart was removed and coronary vascular reactivity was assessed using the Langendorff retrograde perfusion technique. A dose–response curve for bradykinin (BK) was constructed, followed by inhibition with 100 μM L-NAME, 2.8 μM indomethacin (INDO), L-NAME + INDO, or L-NAME + INDO + 0.75 μM clotrimazole (CLOT). We observed significant endothelium–dependent, BK–induced coronary vasodilation, which was abolished in the castrated group and restored in the PHYSIO and SUPRA groups. Furthermore, castration modulated the lipid and hormonal profiles and decreased body weight, and testosterone therapy restored all of these parameters. Our results revealed an increase in SBP in the SUPRA group. In addition, our data led us to conclude that physiological concentrations of testosterone may play a beneficial role in the cardiovascular system by maintaining an environment that is favourable for the activity of an endothelium–dependent vasodilator without increasing SBP. PMID:26322637

  8. Testosterone Replacement Therapy Prevents Alterations of Coronary Vascular Reactivity Caused by Hormone Deficiency Induced by Castration.

    PubMed

    Rouver, Wender Nascimento; Delgado, Nathalie Tristão Banhos; Menezes, Jussara Bezerra; Santos, Roger Lyrio; Moyses, Margareth Ribeiro

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to determine the effects of chronic treatment with different doses of testosterone on endothelium-dependent coronary vascular reactivity in male rats. Adult male rats were divided into four experimental groups: control (SHAM), castrated (CAST), castrated and immediately treated subcutaneously with a physiological dose (0.5 mg/kg/day, PHYSIO group) or supraphysiological dose (2.5 mg/kg/day, SUPRA group) of testosterone for 15 days. Systolic blood pressure (SBP) was assessed at the end of treatment through tail plethysmography. After euthanasia, the heart was removed and coronary vascular reactivity was assessed using the Langendorff retrograde perfusion technique. A dose-response curve for bradykinin (BK) was constructed, followed by inhibition with 100 μM L-NAME, 2.8 μM indomethacin (INDO), L-NAME + INDO, or L-NAME + INDO + 0.75 μM clotrimazole (CLOT). We observed significant endothelium-dependent, BK-induced coronary vasodilation, which was abolished in the castrated group and restored in the PHYSIO and SUPRA groups. Furthermore, castration modulated the lipid and hormonal profiles and decreased body weight, and testosterone therapy restored all of these parameters. Our results revealed an increase in SBP in the SUPRA group. In addition, our data led us to conclude that physiological concentrations of testosterone may play a beneficial role in the cardiovascular system by maintaining an environment that is favourable for the activity of an endothelium-dependent vasodilator without increasing SBP. PMID:26322637

  9. [Testosterone in the management of metastatic prostate cancer].

    PubMed

    Wolff, J M; Schmid, H P

    2015-11-01

    Background Among all cancer types, prostate cancer (PCa) is the most prevalent cancer and is the third-leading cause of cancer-related death in men. The biologic function of the prostate is decisively influenced by testosterone and its metabolic product dihydrotestosterone. However, there is general uncertainty about the role of testosterone in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). For many years, the androgen hypothesis had been accepted to explain the correlation between testosterone levels and the development or progression of PCa. However, extensive study analyses revealed contradictory results, leading to a reconsideration of the androgen hypothesis. High serum testosterone levels do not predispose to PCa development and low serum testosterone levels are not protective. The importance of testosterone levels in patients with mCRPC has been shown in several registration studies with new drugs, such as abiraterone acetate and enzalutamide. There is growing evidence suggesting a prognostic role of testosterone levels in mCRPC. PMID:26113300

  10. Current topics in testosterone replacement of hypogonadal men.

    PubMed

    Nieschlag, Eberhard

    2015-01-01

    All forms of hypogonadism - primary, secondary and late-onset - require testosterone substitution. The indication is given when the patient presents with symptoms of androgen deficiency and the serum testosterone levels are below normal. Several testosterone preparations and modes of application are available of which those producing physiologic serum levels should be preferred e.g. preferentially transdermal gels and long-acting intramuscular testosterone undecanoate. Testosterone substitution must be monitored at regular intervals, best at 3, 6 and 12 months after initiation and then annually. Parameters for surveillance include well-being, libido and sexual activity, measurement of serum testosterone levels, haemoglobin and haematocrit, PSA and digital rectal examination, and, biannually, bone mineral density. Testosterone has positive effects on comorbidities such as obesity, metabolic syndrome, diabetes type II, cardiovascular diseases and osteoporosis. PMID:25617174

  11. Mannose metabolism in recombinant CHO cells and its effect on IgG glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Slade, Peter G; Caspary, R Guy; Nargund, Shilpa; Huang, Chung-Jr

    2016-07-01

    Understanding the causes of high-mannose (HM) glycosylation of recombinant IgG in CHO cells would facilitate the production of therapeutics. CHO cells grown with mannose as the major carbon source demonstrated a dramatic increase in total HM glycosylation in recombinant IgG, with no effect on cell growth, viability, or titer. Quantitative metabolomics and (13) C flux analysis were used to explore the mechanism for increased HM glycosylation and understand the metabolism of mannose in CHO cells. It was demonstrated that mannose was a good carbon source for CHO cell growth and IgG production, readily entering both glycolysis and the TCA Cycle. Previous mechanisms for increased HM glycosylation during antibody production have been attributed to changes in pH, osmolality, increased specific productivity, and nutrient limitation. The results from this study propose a novel mechanism where an increased carbon flux in the GDP-mannose synthetic pathway increased the intracellular concentration of mannose-containing metabolites. The abnormally high concentration of mannose and mannose-metabolites were shown to inhibit α-mannosidase activity and it was proposed that this inhibition in the ER and Golgi caused the production of IgG with increased high-mannose glycosylation. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1468-1480. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26724786

  12. Testosterone treatment is immunosuppressive in superb fairy-wrens, yet free-living males with high testosterone are more immunocompetent.

    PubMed

    Peters, A

    2000-05-01

    The immunocompetence handicap hypothesis proposes that the immunosuppressive effect of testosterone enforces honesty of sexual signalling via a physiological trade-off between signal intensity and immunocompetence. However, evidence that testosterone is immunosuppressive is scant, particularly in birds. I studied the correlation between immunocompetence and testosterone in superb fairy-wrens (Malurus cyaneus), a species with intense intersexual selection. Males are seasonally dichromatic and testosterone increases during the moult from dull brown eclipse plumage into bright nuptial plumage. I determined the primary antibody response to immunization with sheep red blood cells (SRBCs) in (i) control and testosterone-implanted males in captivity, and (ii) a cross-section of free-living males with basal and elevated testosterone (in eclipse plumage, moulting and in nuptial plumage). Experimental treatment with testosterone decreased the likelihood of an antibody response to SRBCs in captive birds. In contrast, free-living males which had acquired the nuptial plumage and had naturally elevated testosterone were more likely to respond to SRBCs than males in eclipse plumage with basal testosterone levels. The association between higher immunocompetence and higher immunosuppressive testosterone could arise if both are positively correlated with male phenotypic quality In addition, the association could result if males compensate for potential immunosuppression by enhancing their humoral immune responses, particularly since high testosterone is linked to other demanding activities such as moulting and courtship displays. PMID:10853730

  13. Testosterone metabolism in the estuarine mysid neomysis integer (Crustacea; Mysidacea): identification of testosterone metabolites and endogenous vertebrate-type steroids.

    PubMed

    Verslycke, Tim; De Wasch, Katia; De Brabander, Hubert F; Janssen, Colin R

    2002-04-01

    Testosterone metabolism by Neomysis integer (Crustacea; Mysidacea) was assessed to obtain initial data on its metabolic capacity. N. integer were exposed to both testosterone and [(14)C]testosterone. Identification of testosterone metabolites and endogenous steroids was performed using thin-layer chromatography and liquid chromatography with multiple mass spectrometry. Endogenous production of testosterone in mysids was detected for the first time. N. integer were exposed to testosterone and metabolized administered testosterone extensively. At least 11 polar testosterone metabolites (R(f,metabolite) < R(f,testosterone)), androstenedione, dihydrotestosterone, and testosterone were produced in vivo by N. integer. A sex-specific testosterone metabolism was also observed, although this observation requires further confirmation. The anabolic steroid beta-boldenone was also identified for the first time in invertebrates. The metabolic pathway leading to the formation of beta-boldenone remains unknown, since the steroidal precursor androstadienedione could not be detected. These results reveal interesting similarities in enzyme systems in invertebrate and vertebrate species. Alterations in steroid hormone metabolism may be used as a new biomarker for the effects of endocrine disruptors in invertebrates. PMID:12030775

  14. Effect of Benincasa hispida fruits on testosterone-induced prostatic hypertrophy in albino rats

    PubMed Central

    Nandecha, Chetan; Nahata, Alok; Dixit, Vinod Kumar

    2010-01-01

    Background: Benincasa hispida Cogn. has been used traditionally in India for the management of urinary disorders. The fruit of B hispida is used as a diuretic and the seeds have been reported to possess antiangiogenic effects in prostate cells. Objective: The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of petroleum ether extract, ethanolic extract, and B hispida seed oil on hyperplasia of the prostate induced by the subcutaneous administration of testosterone in rats. Methods: In vitro studies were performed to determine the 5α-reductase inhibitory potential of the extracts. The results of those studies paved the way for the pharmacologic screening of the extracts to assess their potential against testosterone-induced hyperplasia in rats. Nine groups containing 10 rats per group were created for this study. Hyperplasia was induced by administration of testosterone (3 mg/kg SC) for 14 days in all the groups except the vehicle-treated group. Simultaneous administration of petroleum ether extract (100 or 200 mg/kg PO), ethanolic extract (100 or 200 mg/kg PO), and B hispida seed oil (20 or 40 mg/kg PO) was conducted. A standard 5α-reductase inhibitor (ie, finasteride) was used as a positive control. The weight of the rats was recorded on day 0 (ie, day 1 of the study) and on day 14, and the influence of testosterone and test extracts on the weight of the rats was determined. On day 14, rats were euthanized; prostates were dissected out, and weighed. The rats' prostate/body weight (P/BW) ratio was then determined. Histologic examinations were performed on prostates from each group. Results: The petroleum ether extract as well as B hispida seed oil exhibited inhibition of 5α-reductase activity in in vitro studies. Ethanolic extract did not exhibit significant inhibitory potential in vitro. Further in vivo study found that testosterone treatment significantly increased the rats' P/BW ratio in all the groups except the vehicle-treated rats, and this increase in

  15. A novel clinical entity, IgG4-related disease (IgG4RD): general concept and details.

    PubMed

    Umehara, Hisanori; Okazaki, Kazuichi; Masaki, Yasufumi; Kawano, Mitsuhiro; Yamamoto, Motohisa; Saeki, Takako; Matsui, Shoko; Sumida, Takayuki; Mimori, Tsuneyo; Tanaka, Yoshiya; Tsubota, Kazuo; Yoshino, Tadashi; Kawa, Shigeyuki; Suzuki, Ritsuro; Takegami, Tsutomu; Tomosugi, Naohisa; Kurose, Nozomu; Ishigaki, Yasuhito; Azumi, Atsushi; Kojima, Masaru; Nakamura, Shigeo; Inoue, Dai

    2012-02-01

    IgG4-related disease (IgG4RD) is a novel clinical disease entity characterized by elevated serum IgG4 concentration and tumefaction or tissue infiltration by IgG4-positive plasma cells. IgG4RD may be present in a certain proportion of patients with a wide variety of diseases, including Mikulicz's disease, autoimmune pancreatitis, hypophysitis, Riedel thyroiditis, interstitial pneumonitis, interstitial nephritis, prostatitis, lymphadenopathy, retroperitoneal fibrosis, inflammatory aortic aneurysm, and inflammatory pseudotumor. Although IgG4RD forms a distinct, clinically independent disease category and is attracting strong attention as a new clinical entity, many questions and problems still remain to be elucidated, including its pathogenesis, the establishment of diagnostic criteria, and the role of IgG4. Here we describe the concept of IgG4RD and up-to-date information on this emerging disease entity. PMID:21881964

  16. Inhibitory effect of rape pollen supercritical CO2 fluid extract against testosterone-induced benign prostatic hyperplasia in rats

    PubMed Central

    YANG, BI-CHENG; JIN, LI-LI; YANG, YI-FANG; LI, KUN; PENG, DAN-MING

    2014-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) can lead to lower urinary tract symptoms. Rape pollen is an apicultural product that is composed of nutritionally valuable and biologically active substances. The aim of the present study was to investigate the protective effect of rape pollen supercritical CO2 fluid extract (SFE-CO2) in BPH development using a testosterone-induced BPH rat model. BPH was induced in the experimental groups by daily subcutaneous injections of testosterone for a period of 30 days. Rape pollen SFE-CO2 was administered daily by oral gavage concurrently with the testosterone injections. Animals were sacrificed at the scheduled termination and the prostates were weighed and subjected to histopathological examination. Testosterone, dihydrotestosterone (DHT), 5α-reductase and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) levels were also measured. BPH-induced animals exhibited an increase in prostate weight with increased testosterone, DHT, 5α-reductase and COX-2 expression levels. However, rape pollen SFE-CO2 treatment resulted in significant reductions in the prostate index and testosterone, DHT, 5α-reductase and COX-2 levels compared with those in BPH-induced animals. Histopathological examination also demonstrated that rape pollen SFE-CO2 treatment suppressed testosterone-induced BPH. These observations indicate that rape pollen SFE-CO2 inhibits the development of BPH in rats and these effects are closely associated with reductions in DHT, 5α-reductase and COX-2 levels. Therefore, the results of the present study clearly indicate that rape pollen SFE-CO2 extract may be a useful agent in BPH treatment. PMID:24944593

  17. The TRPM8 Protein Is a Testosterone Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Asuthkar, Swapna; Demirkhanyan, Lusine; Sun, Xiaohui; Elustondo, Pia A.; Krishnan, Vivek; Baskaran, Padmamalini; Velpula, Kiran Kumar; Thyagarajan, Baskaran; Pavlov, Evgeny V.; Zakharian, Eleonora

    2015-01-01

    Testosterone is a key steroid hormone in the development of male reproductive tissues and the regulation of the central nervous system. The rapid signaling mechanism induced by testosterone affects numerous behavioral traits, including sexual drive, aggressiveness, and fear conditioning. However, the currently identified testosterone receptor(s) is not believed to underlie the fast signaling, suggesting an orphan pathway. Here we report that an ion channel from the transient receptor potential family, TRPM8, commonly known as the cold and menthol receptor is the major component of testosterone-induced rapid actions. Using cultured and primary cell lines along with the purified TRPM8 protein, we demonstrate that testosterone directly activates TRPM8 channel at low picomolar range. Specifically, testosterone induced TRPM8 responses in primary human prostate cells, PC3 prostate cancer cells, dorsal root ganglion neurons, and hippocampal neurons. Picomolar concentrations of testosterone resulted in full openings of the purified TRPM8 channel in planar lipid bilayers. Furthermore, acute applications of testosterone on human skin elicited a cooling sensation. Our data conclusively demonstrate that testosterone is an endogenous and highly potent agonist of TRPM8, suggesting a role of TRPM8 channels well beyond their well established function in somatosensory neurons. This discovery may further imply TRPM8 channel function in testosterone-dependent behavioral traits. PMID:25480785

  18. Physiological levels of testosterone kill salmonid leukocytes in vitro

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Slater, C.H.; Schreck, C.B.

    1997-01-01

    Adult spring chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) elaborate high plasma concentrations of testosterone during sexual maturation, and these levels of testosterone have been shown to reduce the salmonid immune response in vitro. Our search for the mechanism of testosterone's immunosuppressive action has led to the characterization of an androgen receptor in salmonid leukocytes. In the present study we examined the specific effects that testosterone had on salmonid leukocytes. Direct counts of viable leukocytes after incubation with and without physiological levels of testosterone demonstrate a significant loss of leukocytes in cultures exposed to testosterone. At least 5 days of contact with testosterone was required to produce significant immunosuppression and addition of a 'conditioned media' (supernatant from proliferating lymphocytes not exposed to testosterone) did not reverse the immunosuppressive effects of testosterone. These data lead us to conclude that testosterone may exert its immunosuppressive effects by direct action on salmonid leukocytes, through the androgen receptor described, and that this action leads to the death of a significant number of these leukocytes.

  19. Effects of gendered behavior on testosterone in women and men.

    PubMed

    van Anders, Sari M; Steiger, Jeffrey; Goldey, Katherine L

    2015-11-10

    Testosterone is typically understood to contribute to maleness and masculinity, although it also responds to behaviors such as competition. Competition is crucial to evolution and may increase testosterone but also is selectively discouraged for women and encouraged for men via gender norms. We conducted an experiment to test how gender norms might modulate testosterone as mediated by two possible gender→testosterone pathways. Using a novel experimental design, participants (trained actors) performed a specific type of competition (wielding power) in stereotypically masculine vs. feminine ways. We hypothesized in H1 (stereotyped behavior) that wielding power increases testosterone regardless of how it is performed, vs. H2 (stereotyped performance), that wielding power performed in masculine but not feminine ways increases testosterone. We found that wielding power increased testosterone in women compared with a control, regardless of whether it was performed in gender-stereotyped masculine or feminine ways. Results supported H1 over H2: stereotyped behavior but not performance modulated testosterone. These results also supported theory that competition modulates testosterone over masculinity. Our findings thus support a gender→testosterone pathway mediated by competitive behavior. Accordingly, cultural pushes for men to wield power and women to avoid doing so may partially explain, in addition to heritable factors, why testosterone levels tend to be higher in men than in women: A lifetime of gender socialization could contribute to "sex differences" in testosterone. Our experiment opens up new questions of gender→testosterone pathways, highlighting the potential of examining nature/nurture interactions and effects of socialization on human biology. PMID:26504229

  20. Effects of gendered behavior on testosterone in women and men

    PubMed Central

    van Anders, Sari M.; Steiger, Jeffrey; Goldey, Katherine L.

    2015-01-01

    Testosterone is typically understood to contribute to maleness and masculinity, although it also responds to behaviors such as competition. Competition is crucial to evolution and may increase testosterone but also is selectively discouraged for women and encouraged for men via gender norms. We conducted an experiment to test how gender norms might modulate testosterone as mediated by two possible gender→testosterone pathways. Using a novel experimental design, participants (trained actors) performed a specific type of competition (wielding power) in stereotypically masculine vs. feminine ways. We hypothesized in H1 (stereotyped behavior) that wielding power increases testosterone regardless of how it is performed, vs. H2 (stereotyped performance), that wielding power performed in masculine but not feminine ways increases testosterone. We found that wielding power increased testosterone in women compared with a control, regardless of whether it was performed in gender-stereotyped masculine or feminine ways. Results supported H1 over H2: stereotyped behavior but not performance modulated testosterone. These results also supported theory that competition modulates testosterone over masculinity. Our findings thus support a gender→testosterone pathway mediated by competitive behavior. Accordingly, cultural pushes for men to wield power and women to avoid doing so may partially explain, in addition to heritable factors, why testosterone levels tend to be higher in men than in women: A lifetime of gender socialization could contribute to “sex differences” in testosterone. Our experiment opens up new questions of gender→testosterone pathways, highlighting the potential of examining nature/nurture interactions and effects of socialization on human biology. PMID:26504229

  1. Diagnostic performance of serum IgG4 level for IgG4-related disease: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wen-Long; Ling, Ying-Chun; Wang, Zhi-Kai; Deng, Fang

    2016-01-01

    An elevated serum IgG4 level is one of the most useful factors in the diagnosis of IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD). In this study, we performed a meta-analysis of the published articles assessing the diagnostic accuracy of serum IgG4 concentrations for IgG4-RD. The databases of MEDLINE/PubMed, EMBASE and Web of Science were systematically searched for relevant studies. Sensitivities and specificities of serum IgG4 in each study were calculated, and the hierarchical summary receiver operating characteristic (HSROC) model with a random effects model were employed to obtain the individual and pooled estimates of sensitivities and specificities. In total, twenty-three studies comprising 6048 patients with IgG4-RD were included in the meta-analysis. The pooled sensitivity was 85% with a 95% confidence interval (CI) of 78-90%; the pooled specificity was 93% with a 95% CI of 90-95%. The HSROC curve for quantitative serum IgG4 lies closer to the upper left corner of the plot, and the area under the curve (AUC) was 0.95 (95% CI 0.93, 0.97), which suggested a high diagnostic accuracy of serum IgG4 for the entity of IgG4-RD. Our study suggests that serum IgG4 has high sensitivity and specificity in the diagnosis of IgG4-RD. PMID:27558881

  2. Diagnostic performance of serum IgG4 level for IgG4-related disease: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wen-long; Ling, Ying-chun; Wang, Zhi-kai; Deng, Fang

    2016-01-01

    An elevated serum IgG4 level is one of the most useful factors in the diagnosis of IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD). In this study, we performed a meta-analysis of the published articles assessing the diagnostic accuracy of serum IgG4 concentrations for IgG4-RD. The databases of MEDLINE/PubMed, EMBASE and Web of Science were systematically searched for relevant studies. Sensitivities and specificities of serum IgG4 in each study were calculated, and the hierarchical summary receiver operating characteristic (HSROC) model with a random effects model were employed to obtain the individual and pooled estimates of sensitivities and specificities. In total, twenty-three studies comprising 6048 patients with IgG4-RD were included in the meta-analysis. The pooled sensitivity was 85% with a 95% confidence interval (CI) of 78–90%; the pooled specificity was 93% with a 95% CI of 90–95%. The HSROC curve for quantitative serum IgG4 lies closer to the upper left corner of the plot, and the area under the curve (AUC) was 0.95 (95% CI 0.93, 0.97), which suggested a high diagnostic accuracy of serum IgG4 for the entity of IgG4-RD. Our study suggests that serum IgG4 has high sensitivity and specificity in the diagnosis of IgG4-RD. PMID:27558881

  3. Estrogen, testosterone, and sequential movement in men.

    PubMed

    Siegel, Jessica A; Young, Laura A; Neiss, Michelle B; Samuels, Mary H; Roselli, Charles E; Janowsky, Jeri S

    2008-10-01

    Behavioral and physiological data suggest that the striatal dopaminergic system is important in the production and execution of sequential movements. Striatal function is also modulated by sex hormones, and previous studies show that estradiol is related to sequential movement in women. The authors examined whether sex hormones are involved in the production of sequential movement in healthy older and younger men. Testosterone was modified for a 6-week period such that levels in older men matched those of younger men, the conversion of testosterone to estradiol was blocked, the production of testosterone was blocked, or the men received no treatment (placebo). Sequential movement was measured before and after hormone treatment. Older men were slower and more accurate than younger men on the sequential movement task pre- and posttreatment. Hormone manipulation had no effect on movement speed. Hormone levels were not correlated with sequential movement performance in either older or younger men, suggesting that sex hormones do not modulate sequential movement in men, and hormone replacement may not restore a loss of sequential movement ability in elderly men or men with Parkinson's disease. PMID:18823152

  4. Testosterone metabolism in human skin cells in vitro and its interaction with estradiol and dutasteride.

    PubMed

    Münster, U; Hammer, S; Blume-Peytavi, U; Schäfer-Korting, M

    2003-01-01

    Since the limited knowledge of cutaneous drug metabolism can impair the development of specifically acting topical dermatics and transdermal application systems, the cell-type-specific androgen metabolism in human skin and its inhibition by drugs were investigated. Cultured human foreskin and scalp skin keratinocytes and fibroblasts as well as occipital scalp dermal papilla cells (DPC) were incubated with testosterone 10(-6) and 10(-8)M alone and in the presence of 17alpha-estradiol, 17beta-estradiol or dutasteride for 24 h. Androgens extracted from culture supernatants were subjected to thin-layer chromatography and quantified by beta-counting. In keratinocytes and DPC, dihydrotestosterone (DHT) was only formed to a low extent while androstenedione was the main metabolite. In fibroblasts, DHT formation was pronounced following 10(-8)M testosterone. Dutasteride 10(-8)M completely suppressed 5alpha-dihydro metabolite formation. 17alpha-Estradiol and 17beta-estradiol at nontoxic concentrations decreased 17-ketometabolites. Human skin regulates testosterone action by cell-type-specific activation or deactivation. Effects of 17alpha-estradiol in androgenetic alopecia are not due to 5alpha-reductase inhibition. Dutasteride may be useful in acne and androgenetic alopecia. PMID:14528059

  5. The TRPM8 protein is a testosterone receptor: II. Functional evidence for an ionotropic effect of testosterone on TRPM8.

    PubMed

    Asuthkar, Swapna; Demirkhanyan, Lusine; Sun, Xiaohui; Elustondo, Pia A; Krishnan, Vivek; Baskaran, Padmamalini; Velpula, Kiran Kumar; Thyagarajan, Baskaran; Pavlov, Evgeny V; Zakharian, Eleonora

    2015-01-30

    Testosterone is a key steroid hormone in the development of male reproductive tissues and the regulation of the central nervous system. The rapid signaling mechanism induced by testosterone affects numerous behavioral traits, including sexual drive, aggressiveness, and fear conditioning. However, the currently identified testosterone receptor(s) is not believed to underlie the fast signaling, suggesting an orphan pathway. Here we report that an ion channel from the transient receptor potential family, TRPM8, commonly known as the cold and menthol receptor is the major component of testosterone-induced rapid actions. Using cultured and primary cell lines along with the purified TRPM8 protein, we demonstrate that testosterone directly activates TRPM8 channel at low picomolar range. Specifically, testosterone induced TRPM8 responses in primary human prostate cells, PC3 prostate cancer cells, dorsal root ganglion neurons, and hippocampal neurons. Picomolar concentrations of testosterone resulted in full openings of the purified TRPM8 channel in planar lipid bilayers. Furthermore, acute applications of testosterone on human skin elicited a cooling sensation. Our data conclusively demonstrate that testosterone is an endogenous and highly potent agonist of TRPM8, suggesting a role of TRPM8 channels well beyond their well established function in somatosensory neurons. This discovery may further imply TRPM8 channel function in testosterone-dependent behavioral traits. PMID:25480785

  6. Reflexive Testosterone Release: A Model System for Studying the Nongenomic Effects of Testosterone Upon Male Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Nyby, John G.

    2008-01-01

    Male mammals of many species exhibit reflexive testosterone release in mating situations. In house mice (Mus musculus), the dramatic robustness of such release, occurring primarily in response to a novel female, suggests some function. The resulting testosterone elevations typically peak during copulatory behavior and may serve to activate transitory motivational and physiological responses that facilitate reproduction. However, such a function requires that testosterone be working through either nongenomic, or very quick genomic, mechanisms. The first part of the review describes reflexive sex hormone release in house mice. The second part summarizes research implicating testosterone’s fast actions in affecting anxiety, reward, learning, analgesia, and penile reflexes in rodents, all of which could optimize male mating success. The review concludes with a speculative model of how spontaneous and reflexive hormone release might interact to regulate reproductive behavior and why mice appear to be an ideal species for examining testosterone’s quick effects. PMID:17976710

  7. The evidence for seasonal variations of testosterone in men.

    PubMed

    Smith, Ryan P; Coward, Robert M; Kovac, Jason R; Lipshultz, Larry I

    2013-03-01

    Ample evidence exists to support the concept of diurnal variations in testosterone levels; however, substantiation for seasonal fluctuations is sparse and inconsistent. Since circadian disparities exist, laboratory screening for hypogonadism has traditionally been conducted using serum testosterone levels obtained in the early morning. Should circannual variability of testosterone be confirmed, it would make the monitoring of testosterone levels more difficult while forcing the development of seasonal reference standards to allow for comparison. Moreover, decisions to begin treatment and adjustment of practice patterns would likely follow. This review thoroughly explores all of the available evidence concerning seasonal variations in testosterone levels. The impacts of melatonin, vitamin D, sleep-wake cycles, light exposure, physical activity, BMI, and waist circumference are also discussed. Current research suggests that while some evidence exists to support the notion of seasonal testosterone variations, the discussed inconsistencies preclude the incorporation of this concept into current clinical standards. PMID:23294933

  8. Testosterone, cortisol, and psychopathic traits in men and women.

    PubMed

    Welker, Keith M; Lozoya, Elianna; Campbell, Jocelyn A; Neumann, Craig S; Carré, Justin M

    2014-04-22

    Cortisol and testosterone are theorized to independently and jointly influence antisocial behaviors. The current research examined the independent and interactive effects of baseline testosterone and cortisol on individual differences in psychopathic traits in a relatively large non-clinical sample (N=237). Participants completed the Self-Report Psychopathy - Short Form (SRP; Paulhus, Neumann, & Hare, in press) and provided saliva samples. Analyses indicated that testosterone and cortisol were positively correlated with psychopathic traits in men, but beyond these effects, cortisol moderated the relationship between testosterone and psychopathy in men. The relationship between testosterone and psychopathy within men was positive when cortisol levels were high, but negative when cortisol levels were low. These results have implications for work surrounding the dual hormone hypothesis and suggest that nonclinical variability in psychopathy can be predicted by baseline testosterone and cortisol. PMID:24631306

  9. Role of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis in cardiovascular changes following chronic treatment with cocaine and testosterone: a role beyond drug seeking in addiction?

    PubMed

    Cruz, F C; Alves, F H F; Leão, R M; Planeta, C S; Crestani, C C

    2013-12-01

    Neural plasticity has been observed in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST) following exposure to both cocaine and androgenic-anabolic steroids. Here we investigated the involvement of the BNST on changes in cardiovascular function and baroreflex activity following either single or combined administration of cocaine and testosterone for 10 consecutive days in rats. Single administration of testosterone increased values of arterial pressure, evoked rest bradycardia and reduced baroreflex-mediated bradycardia. These effects of testosterone were not affected by BNST inactivation caused by local bilateral microinjections of the nonselective synaptic blocker CoCl2. The single administration of cocaine as well as the combined treatment with testosterone and cocaine increased both bradycardiac and tachycardiac responses of the baroreflex. Cocaine-evoked baroreflex changes were totally reversed after BNST inactivation. However, BNST inhibition in animals subjected to combined treatment with cocaine and testosterone reversed only the increase in reflex tachycardia, whereas facilitation of reflex bradycardia was not affected by local BNST treatment with CoCl2. In conclusion, the present study provides the first direct evidence that the BNST play a role in cardiovascular changes associated with drug abuse. Our findings suggest that alterations in cardiovascular function following subchronic exposure to cocaine are mediated by neural plasticity in the BNST. The single treatment with cocaine and the combined administration of testosterone and cocaine had similar effects on baroreflex activity, however the association with testosterone inhibited cocaine-induced changes in the BNST control of reflex bradycardia. Testosterone-induced cardiovascular changes seem to be independent of the BNST. PMID:23994153

  10. Testosterone Replacement and Cardiovascular Safety: No Straight and Narrow!

    PubMed Central

    Hans, Sartaj S; Dhindsa, Sandeep S; Chemitiganti, Rama

    2015-01-01

    The past decade has seen a tremendous increase in the number of men treated for hypogonadism with the expectation of symptomatic benefit. However, the long-term cardiovascular safety of testosterone replacement remains unknown because retrospective studies of testosterone replacement have been inconsistent, and definitive, prospective, randomized studies are lacking. The purpose of this review is to critically appraise the studies on testosterone replacement and cardiovascular outcomes. PMID:25983562

  11. Diagnostic Value of Serum IgG4 for IgG4-Related Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Mingju; Liu, Min; Fan, Gaowei; Yang, Xin; Li, Jinming

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Many studies about serum IgG4 for the diagnosis of IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD) have been reported. However, these studies had relatively small sample sizes and the diagnostic accuracy values varied much between them. The aim of this study was to perform a meta-analysis to evaluate the diagnostic value of serum IgG4 for IgG4-RD. We conducted a search of relevant articles using MEDLINE, EMBASE, Web of Science, SCOPUS, and Cochrane Library databases published before December 2015. Studies those assessed the diagnostic accuracy of serum IgG4 for IgG4-RD and those provided the cut-off value for serum IgG4 were included. Data were synthesized using the random-effect model. Statistical analysis was performed using STATA with the MIDAS module and Meta-DiSc 1.4 software. A total of 9 case-control studies were analyzed, which included 1235 patients with IgG4-RD and 5696 overall controls. The pooled estimate, for a cut-off value ranged from 135 to 144 mg/dL, produced a sensitivity of 87.2% (95% CI, 85.2–89.0%) and a specificity of 82.6% (95% CI, 81.6–83.6%). The positive likelihood ratio (PLR), negative likelihood ratio (NLR), and diagnostic odds ratio (DOR) were 6.48 (95% CI, 3.98–10.57), 0.14 (95% CI, 0.09–0.21), and 45.15 (95% CI, 23.41–87.06), respectively. The area under the curve (AUC) of the summary receiver operating characteristic curve (SROC) was 0.94 (0.92–0.96). When a cut-off value of 2-fold the upper limit of normal was used (ranged from 270 to 280 mg/dL), the pooled sensitivity was 63% (95% CI, 60.0–66.0%), and the specificity was 94.8% (95% CI, 94.1–95.4%). The PLR, NLR, and DOR were 13.3 (95% CI, 7.39–24.0), 0.41 (95% CI, 0.29–0.58) and 33.42 (95% CI, 13.88–80.43), respectively. The AUC of the SROC was 0.92 (0.90–0.94). Only a relatively small number of studies were included, and significant heterogeneity was observed in this meta-analysis. Serum IgG4 is a modestly effective marker to diagnose IgG4-RD. Doubling the cut

  12. THE TESTOSTERONE TRIALS: THE DESIGN OF SEVEN COORDINATED TRIALS TO DETERMINE IF TESTOSTERONE TREATMENT BENEFITS ELDERLY MEN

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, Peter J; Ellenberg, Susan S; Cunningham, Glenn R; Matsumoto, Alvin M; Bhasin, Shalender; Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth; Gill, Thomas M; Farrar, John T; Cella, David; Rosen, Raymond C; Resnick, Susan M; Swerdloff, Ronald S; Cauley, Jane A; Cifelli, Denise; Fluharty, Laura; Pahor, Marco; Ensrud, Kristine E; Lewis, Cora E; Molitch, Mark E; Crandall, Jill P; Wang, Christina; Budoff, Matthew J; Wenger, Nanette K; Mohler, Emile R; Bild, Diane E; Cook, Nakela L; Keaveny, Tony M; Kopperdahl, David L; Lee, David; Schwartz, Ann V; Storer, Thomas W; Ershler, William B; Roy, Cindy N; Raffel, Leslie J; Romashkan, Sergei; Hadley, Evan

    2014-01-01

    Background The prevalence of low testosterone levels in men increases with age, as does the prevalence of decreased mobility, sexual function, self-perceived vitality, cognitive abilities, bone mineral density, and glucose tolerance, and of increased anemia and coronary artery disease. Similar changes occur in men who have low serum testosterone concentrations due to known pituitary or testicular disease, and testosterone treatment improves the abnormalities. Prior studies of the effect of testosterone treatment in elderly men, however, have produced equivocal results. Purpose To describe a coordinated set of clinical trials designed to avoid the pitfalls of prior studies and determine definitively if testosterone treatment of elderly men with low testosterone is efficacious in improving symptoms and objective measures of age-associated conditions. Methods We present the scientific and clinical rationale for the decisions made in the design of this trial. Results We designed The Testosterone Trials as a coordinated set of seven trials to determine if testosterone treatment of elderly men with low serum testosterone concentrations and also symptoms and objective evidence of impaired mobility and/or diminished libido and/or reduced vitality would be efficacious in improving mobility (Physical Function Trial), sexual function (Sexual Function Trial), fatigue (Vitality Trial), cognitive function (Cognitive Function Trial), hemoglobin (Anemia Trial), bone density (Bone Trial), and coronary artery plaque volume (Cardiovascular Trial). The scientific advantages of this coordination were common eligibility criteria, treatment and monitoring and the ability to pool safety data. The logistical advantages were a single steering committee, data coordinating center and data safety monitoring board (DSMB), the same clinical trial sites, and the possibility of men participating in multiple trials. The major consideration in subject selection was setting the eligibility criterion

  13. Testosterone levels in suicide attempters with bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Sher, Leo; Grunebaum, Michael F.; Sullivan, Gregory M.; Burke, Ainsley K.; Cooper, Thomas B.; Mann, J. John; Oquendo, Maria A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The best known neurobehavioral effects of testosterone are on sexual function and aggression. However, testosterone and other androgens may be involved in the pathophysiology of mood disorders and suicidal behavior. This is the first study to examine whether there is a relation between testosterone levels and clinical parameters in bipolar suicide attempters. Methods Patients with a DSM-IV diagnosis of a bipolar disorder (16 males and 51 females), in a depressive or mixed episode with at least one past suicide attempt were enrolled. Demographic and clinical parameters, including lifetime suicidal behavior, were assessed and recorded. Plasma testosterone was assayed using a double antibody radioimmunoassay procedure. Results The number of major depressive episodes, the maximum lethality of suicide attempts, and the testosterone levels were higher in men compared to women. Current suicidal ideation scores were higher in women compared to men. Controlling for sex, we found that testosterone levels positively correlated with the number of manic episodes and the number of suicide attempts. Conclusion Our findings are consistent with previous observations of the association between testosterone levels and parameters of mood and behavior. This study suggests that testosterone levels may be related to the course of bipolar disorder and suicidal behavior. Further studies of the role of testosterone in the neurobiology of mood disorders and suicidal behavior are merited. PMID:22858352

  14. IgG expression in trophoblasts derived from placenta and gestational trophoblastic disease and its role in regulating invasion.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mei; Ha, Chunfang; Liu, Dan; Xu, Yonghui; Ma, Yuan; Liu, Yufeng; Nian, Yan

    2014-10-01

    Immunoglobulin G (IgG) is an important humoral immune factor, which plays a role in innate immunity of the fetus. IgG immunoreactivity was often seen in trophoblasts of placenta. Traditionally, IgG in trophoblasts was believed to be transported from the maternal blood through neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn). Here, we explored the phenomenon of IgG expression and its role in regulating invasion in trophoblasts derived from normal placenta and gestational trophoblastic disease (GTD). IgG expression was detected with an emphasis on mRNA transcripts by using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and hybridization in situ, besides evaluated at the protein level with immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence. The migration and attachment of normal trophoblast cell line (TEV-1) and choriocarcinoma cell line (JAR) were inhibited with down-regulation of IgG expression. Methotrexate promoted the differentiation of JAR cell line; however, it had little effect on the differentiation of TEV-1 cell line. IgG expression, migration, and attachment of JAR and TEV-1 cell lines were decreased in the presence of methotrexate. Furthermore, statistical analysis showed that the differences in migration and attachment were significant (P < 0.05) for JAR cell line, while no significant difference was found for TEV-1 cell line. Collectively, these results confirmed that with the progression from normal placenta to GTD, the expression of IgG was increased in trophoblasts, which might actively promote the migration and attachment of trophoblasts as an important regulating factor. PMID:24469916

  15. Phase transitions in human IgG solutions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying; Lomakin, Aleksey; Latypov, Ramil F.; Laubach, Jacob P.; Hideshima, Teru; Richardson, Paul G.; Munshi, Nikhil C.; Anderson, Kenneth C.; Benedek, George B.

    2013-01-01

    Protein condensations, such as crystallization, liquid-liquid phase separation, aggregation, and gelation, have been observed in concentrated antibody solutions under various solution conditions. While most IgG antibodies are quite soluble, a few outliers can undergo condensation under physiological conditions. Condensation of IgGs can cause serious consequences in some human diseases and in biopharmaceutical formulations. The phase transitions underlying protein condensations in concentrated IgG solutions is also of fundamental interest for the understanding of the phase behavior of non-spherical protein molecules. Due to the high solubility of generic IgGs, the phase behavior of IgG solutions has not yet been well studied. In this work, we present an experimental approach to study IgG solutions in which the phase transitions are hidden below the freezing point of the solution. Using this method, we have investigated liquid-liquid phase separation of six human myeloma IgGs and two recombinant pharmaceutical human IgGs. We have also studied the relation between crystallization and liquid-liquid phase separation of two human cryoglobulin IgGs. Our experimental results reveal several important features of the generic phase behavior of IgG solutions: (1) the shape of the coexistence curve is similar for all IgGs but quite different from that of quasi-spherical proteins; (2) all IgGs have critical points located at roughly the same protein concentration at ∼100 mg/ml while their critical temperatures vary significantly; and (3) the liquid-liquid phase separation in IgG solutions is metastable with respect to crystallization. These features of phase behavior of IgG solutions reflect the fact that all IgGs have nearly identical molecular geometry but quite diverse net inter-protein interaction energies. This work provides a foundation for further experimental and theoretical studies of the phase behavior of generic IgGs as well as outliers with large propensity to

  16. Phase transitions in human IgG solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ying; Lomakin, Aleksey; Latypov, Ramil F.; Laubach, Jacob P.; Hideshima, Teru; Richardson, Paul G.; Munshi, Nikhil C.; Anderson, Kenneth C.; Benedek, George B.

    2013-09-01

    Protein condensations, such as crystallization, liquid-liquid phase separation, aggregation, and gelation, have been observed in concentrated antibody solutions under various solution conditions. While most IgG antibodies are quite soluble, a few outliers can undergo condensation under physiological conditions. Condensation of IgGs can cause serious consequences in some human diseases and in biopharmaceutical formulations. The phase transitions underlying protein condensations in concentrated IgG solutions is also of fundamental interest for the understanding of the phase behavior of non-spherical protein molecules. Due to the high solubility of generic IgGs, the phase behavior of IgG solutions has not yet been well studied. In this work, we present an experimental approach to study IgG solutions in which the phase transitions are hidden below the freezing point of the solution. Using this method, we have investigated liquid-liquid phase separation of six human myeloma IgGs and two recombinant pharmaceutical human IgGs. We have also studied the relation between crystallization and liquid-liquid phase separation of two human cryoglobulin IgGs. Our experimental results reveal several important features of the generic phase behavior of IgG solutions: (1) the shape of the coexistence curve is similar for all IgGs but quite different from that of quasi-spherical proteins; (2) all IgGs have critical points located at roughly the same protein concentration at ˜100 mg/ml while their critical temperatures vary significantly; and (3) the liquid-liquid phase separation in IgG solutions is metastable with respect to crystallization. These features of phase behavior of IgG solutions reflect the fact that all IgGs have nearly identical molecular geometry but quite diverse net inter-protein interaction energies. This work provides a foundation for further experimental and theoretical studies of the phase behavior of generic IgGs as well as outliers with large propensity to

  17. Colostrogenesis: IgG1 transcytosis mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Baumrucker, Craig R; Bruckmaier, Rupert M

    2014-03-01

    Biological transport of intact proteins across epithelial cells has been documented for many absorptive and secretory tissues. Immunoglobulins were some of the earliest studied proteins in this category. The transcellular transport (transcytosis) of immunoglobulins in neonatal health and development has been recognized; the process is especially significant with ungulates because they do not transcytose immunoglobulins across the placenta to the neonate. Rather, they depend upon mammary secretion of colostrum and intestinal absorption of immunoglobulins in order to provide intestinal and systemic defense until the young ungulate develops its own humoral defense mechanisms. The neonatal dairy calf's ability to absorb immunoglobulins from colostrum is assisted by a ~24 h "open gut" phenomenon where large proteins pass the intestinal epithelial cells and enter the systemic system. However, a critical problem recognized for newborn dairy calves is that an optimum mass of colostrum Immunoglobulin G (IgG) needs to be absorbed within that 24 h window in order to provide maximal resistance to disease. Many calves do not achieve the optimum because of poor quality colostrum. While many studies have focused on calf absorption, the principal cause of the problem resides with the extreme variation (g to kg) in the mammary gland's capacity to transfer blood IgG1 into colostrum. Colostrum is a unique mammary secretory product that is formed during late pregnancy when mammary cells are proliferating and differentiating in preparation for lactation. In addition to the transcytosis of immunoglobulins, the mammary gland also concentrates a number of circulating hormones into colostrum. Remarkably, the mechanisms in the formation of colostrum in ungulates have been rather modestly studied. The mechanisms and causes of this variation in mammary gland transcytosis of IgG1 are examined, evaluated, and in some cases, explained. PMID:24474529

  18. Epitope specificity of rabbit immunoglobulin G (IgG) elicited by pneumococcal type 23F synthetic oligosaccharide- and native polysaccharide-protein conjugate vaccines: comparison with human anti-polysaccharide 23F IgG.

    PubMed Central

    Alonso de Velasco, E; Verheul, A F; van Steijn, A M; Dekker, H A; Feldman, R G; Fernández, I M; Kamerling, J P; Vliegenthart, J F; Verhoef, J; Snippe, H

    1994-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae type 23F capsular polysaccharide (PS23F) consitss of a repeating glycerol-phosphorylated branched tetrasaccharide. The immunogenicities of the following related antigens were investigated: (i) a synthetic trisaccharide comprising the backbone of one repeating unit, (ii) a synthetic tetrasaccharide comprising the complete repeating unit, and (iii) native PS23F (all three conjugated to keyhole limpet hemocyanin [KLH]) and (iv) formalin-killed S. pneumoniae 23F. All antigens except the trisaccharide-KLH conjugate induced relatively high anti-PS23F antibody levels in rabbits. The epitope specificity of such antibodies was then studied by means of an inhibition immunoassay. The alpha(1-->2)-linked L-rhamnose branch was shown to be immunodominant for immunoglobulin G (IgG) induced by tetrasaccharide-KLH, PS23F-KLH, and killed S. pneumoniae 23F: in most sera L-rhamnose totally inhibited the binding of IgG to PS23F. Thus, there appears to be no major difference in epitope specificity between IgG induced by tetrasaccharide-KLH and that induced by antigens containing the polymeric form of PS23F. Human anti-PS23F IgG (either vaccine induced or naturally acquired) had a different epitope specificity: none of the inhibitors used, including L-rhamnose and tetrasaccharide-KLH, exhibited substantial inhibition. These observations suggest that the epitope recognized by human IgG on PS23F is larger than the epitope recognized by rabbit IgG. Both human and rabbit antisera efficiently opsonized type 23F pneumococci, as measured in a phagocytosis assay using human polymorphonuclear leukocytes. PMID:7509318

  19. Environmental and Genetic Contributors to Salivary Testosterone Levels in Infants

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Kai; Yu, Yang; Ahn, Mihye; Zhu, Hongtu; Zou, Fei; Gilmore, John H.; Knickmeyer, Rebecca C.

    2014-01-01

    Transient activation of the hypothalamic–pituitary–gonadal axis in early infancy plays an important role in male genital development and sexual differentiation of the brain, but factors contributing to individual variation in testosterone levels during this period are poorly understood. We measured salivary testosterone levels in 222 infants (119 males, 103 females, 108 singletons, 114 twins) between 2.70 and 4.80 months of age. We tested 16 major demographic and medical history variables for effects on inter-individual variation in salivary testosterone. Using the subset of twins, we estimated genetic and environmental contributions to salivary testosterone levels. Finally, we tested single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within ±5 kb of genes involved in testosterone synthesis, transport, signaling, and metabolism for associations with salivary testosterone using univariate tests and random forest (RF) analysis. We report an association between 5 min APGAR scores and salivary testosterone levels in males. Twin modeling indicated that individual variability in testosterone levels was primarily explained by environmental factors. Regarding genetic variation, univariate tests did not reveal any variants significantly associated with salivary testosterone after adjusting for false discovery rate. The top hit in males was rs10923844, an SNP of unknown function located downstream of HSD3B1 and HSD3B2. The top hits in females were two SNPs located upstream of ESR1 (rs3407085 and rs2295190). RF analysis, which reflects joint and conditional effects of multiple variants, indicated that genes involved in regulation of reproductive function, particularly LHCGR, are related to salivary testosterone levels in male infants, as are genes involved in cholesterol production, transport, and removal, while genes involved in estrogen signaling are related to salivary testosterone levels in female infants. PMID:25400620

  20. The different effector function capabilities of the seven equine IgG subclasses have implications for vaccine strategies.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Melanie J; Wagner, Bettina; Woof, Jenny M

    2008-02-01

    Recombinant versions of the seven equine IgG subclasses were expressed in CHO cells. All assembled into intact immunoglobulins stabilised by disulphide bridges, although, reminiscent of human IgG4, a small proportion of equine IgG4 and IgG7 were held together by non-covalent bonds alone. All seven IgGs were N-glycosylated. In addition IgG3 appeared to be O-glycosylated and could bind the lectin jacalin. Staphylococcal protein A displayed weak binding for the equine IgGs in the order: IgG1>IgG3>IgG4>IgG7>IgG2=IgG5>IgG6. Streptococcal protein G bound strongly to IgG1, IgG4 and IgG7, moderately to IgG3, weakly to IgG2 and IgG6, and not at all to IgG5. Analysis of antibody effector functions revealed that IgG1, IgG3, IgG4, IgG5 and IgG7, but not IgG2 and IgG6, were able to elicit a strong respiratory burst from equine peripheral blood leukocytes, predicting that the former five IgG subclasses are able to interact with Fc receptors on effector cells. IgG1, IgG3, IgG4 and IgG7, but not IgG2, IgG5 and IgG6, were able to bind complement C1q and activate complement via the classical pathway. The differential effector function capabilities of the subclasses suggest that, for maximum efficacy, equine vaccine strategies should seek to elicit antibody responses of the IgG1, IgG3, IgG4, and IgG7 subclasses. PMID:17669496

  1. Brain imaging reveals that engagement of descending inhibitory pain pathways in healthy women in a low endogenous estradiol state varies with testosterone.

    PubMed

    Vincent, Katy; Warnaby, Catherine; Stagg, Charlotte J; Moore, Jane; Kennedy, Stephen; Tracey, Irene

    2013-04-01

    The combined oral contraceptive pill (COCP) has been implicated in the development of a number of chronic pain conditions. Modern COCP formulations produce a low endogenous estradiol, low progesterone environment similar to the early follicular phase of the natural menstrual cycle, with a variable effect on serum androgen levels. We used behavioural measures and functional magnetic resonance imaging to investigate the response to experimental thermal stimuli in healthy women, in both a natural and COCP-induced low endogenous estradiol state, to investigate whether alterations in central pain processing may underlie these observations in COCP users. Although COCP users overall did not require lower temperatures to obtain a fixed pain intensity, alterations in the brain response to these stimuli were observed. In a subgroup of COCP users with significantly reduced serum testosterone, however, lower temperatures were required. Region-of-interest analysis revealed that within key regions of the descending pain inhibitory system, activity in response to noxious stimulation varied with serum testosterone levels in both groups of women. Of particular interest, in COCP users, activity in the rostral ventromedial medulla increased with increasing testosterone and in those women with low testosterone, was significantly reduced compared to controls. These findings suggest that, in a low endogenous estradiol state, testosterone may be a key factor in modulating pain sensitivity via descending pathways. Specifically, failure to engage descending inhibition at the level of the rostral ventromedial medulla may be responsible for the reduction in temperature required by COCP users with low circulating testosterone. PMID:23318125

  2. Testosterone antagonist (flutamide) blocks ovulation and preovulatory surges of progesterone, luteinizing hormone and oestradiol in laying hens.

    PubMed

    Rangel, P L; Sharp, P J; Gutierrez, C G

    2006-06-01

    The preovulatory release of luteinizing hormone (LH) in the domestic hen occurs after the initiation of a preovulatory surge of testosterone. The objective of this study was to determine whether this testosterone surge has functional significance in the endocrine control of ovulation. Groups of laying hens (n = 10-22) were treated with the androgen receptor antagonist, flutamide, at 8 h intervals for 24 h at doses of 0, 31.25, 62.5, 125 and 250 mg. All doses reduced egg laying (P < 0.001), with the highest dose being the most effective. In a second study, laying hens (n = 9) were treated with 250 mg flutamide at 8 h intervals for 24 h with a control group being given placebo (n = 10). Blood samples were taken for hormone measurements at 2 h intervals for 18 h starting 4 h before the onset of darkness. The percentage of hens laying per day did not differ between groups before treatment (control, 88% vs flutamide, 86%). Ovulation was blocked in all hens treated with flutamide within 2 days while the control hens continued to lay at the pretreatment rate (80%). Preovulatory surges of plasma testosterone, progesterone, oestradiol and LH were observed in control hens but with the exception of testosterone, flutamide treatment blocked the progesterone, oestradiol and LH surges. LH concentrations declined progressively with time in the flutamide-treated hens. It is concluded that inhibition of testosterone action blocks egg laying and the preovulatory surges of progesterone, luteinizing hormone and oestradiol demonstrating a key role for the preovulatory release of testosterone in the endocrine control of ovulation in the domestic hen. PMID:16735550

  3. Effects of aqueous extracts of "Betel quid" and its constituents on testosterone production by dispersed mouse interstitial cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Nai-Yen Jack; Kaphle, Krishna; Wang, Pei-Hwa; Jong, De-Shien; Wu, Leang-Shin; Lin, Jen-Hsou

    2004-01-01

    Betel quid (BQ) is a favorite chewing item among many communities in different parts of Asia where it is popular by different names. BQ is a unique combination of nut or fruit from the Areca catechu Linn. (AN) tree, leaf from the Piper betle Linn. (BL) vine, slaked lime, paste of bark from the Acacia catechu tree and other spices. AN has been used successfully in various traditional medicines by different civilizations over several ages. Initially condemned by the medical communities for its health hazards, identification and application of potent pharmacologically bioactive compounds from different constituents of BQ have rekindled growing interest in related investigations. Curious about the stimulating role of BQ, we investigated the potential steroidogenic activity of hot water extract from BQ and its constituents and arecoline on testosterone producing ability in an in vitro experiment. Enzyme dissociated interstitial cells from adult mouse testes (ICR strain) were cultured with/without different doses of the extracts and the level of testosterone produced was assayed by an enzyme immunoassay (EIA) technique. It was found that at lower doses of arecoline, AN and BL extracts had significantly stimulated testosterone production over the basal level (p < 0.05). BQ extract, on the other hand, did not show any significant effect on testosterone production. Combinations of arecoline at low doses with 10 ng/ml ovine leutinizing hormone (oLH) showed increases in testosterone produced, while cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) co-culture showed dose-related inhibition. Our current finding hints at the possible dose-dependent dualistic role of AN and BL extracts and arecoline for testosterone production employing possible non-cAMP-dependent pathway of steroidogenesis. However, the identity of the active compounds besides arecoline and the exact mechanism involved remains to be further investigated. PMID:15633806

  4. Effects of paint thinner exposure on serum LH, FSH and testosterone levels and hypothalamic catecholamine contents in the male rat.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, B; Kutlu, S; Canpolat, S; Sandal, S; Ayar, A; Mogulkoc, R; Kelestimur, H

    2001-02-01

    We have investigated the effects of thinner inhalation on serum LH, FSH and testosterone levels together with changes in hypothalamic catecholaminergic system in the male rat. A control group inhaled normal air ventilation. The remaining animals were divided into two groups and exposed to paint thinner in a glassy cage for 15 or 30 d. Toluene concentration (the largest constituent in thinner, 66%) was set at 3000 ppm in the inhalation air. At the end, all animals were decapitated and blood samples obtained. Serum LH and FSH levels were measured by RIA and testosterone by enzyme immunoassay. Following removal of brains on dry ice, medial preoptic area, suprachiasmatic nucleus, median eminence and arcuate nucleus were isolated by micropunch technique. Noradrenaline, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylglycol (DHPG) and dopamine concentrations of these hypothalamic areas were determined by HPLC-ECD. Fifteen-day thinner inhalation significantly suppressed serum LH and testosterone levels in parallel (p<0.001) compared to control group values (LH: 0.77+/-0.07; testosterone: 2.67+/-0.39). Thirty-day exposure markedly decreased LH levels (p<0.001), but surprisingly had no significant effect on testosterone. Serum FSH levels were not significantly altered in either group. Thinner inhalation for 15 or 30 d did not cause any significant change in noradrenaline, DHPG or dopamine concentrations in the hypothalamic regions examined (except in the arcuate nucleus). These results suggest that paint thinner has an anti-gonadotropic effect and may cause long-term endocrine disturbances in the male. It is thought that the hypothalamic catecholaminergic system is not involved in thinner inhibition of LH and testosterone secretion. PMID:11217085

  5. Food, stress, and circulating testosterone: Cue integration by the testes, not the brain, in male zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata).

    PubMed

    Lynn, Sharon E; Perfito, Nicole; Guardado, Daisy; Bentley, George E

    2015-05-01

    Food abundance is closely associated with reproductive readiness in vertebrates. Food scarcity can activate the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis, decrease sex steroid secretion, and dampen reproductive behavior. However, the mechanisms underlying these transient effects are unclear. Gonadotropin inhibitory hormone (GnIH), a neuropeptide present in the brain and gonads, is also influenced by glucocorticoids and fasting in some species. We investigated whether fasting stress activated the GnIH system in zebra finches (Taeniopygia guttata), with the potential for downstream effects on reproductive physiology and behavior. We fasted or fed males ad libitum for 10h. Fasting increased corticosterone and decreased testosterone in circulation. To assess whether the decrease in testosterone was mediated by changes in the hypothalamus and/or the gonads, we (1) quantified GnRH- and GnIH-positive neurons in the hypothalamus, (2) assessed hypothalamic gene expression for GnRH and GnIH, and (3) examined gene expression for proteins involved in testosterone synthesis in fasted and control birds. No measure of hypothalamic neuropeptides was related to treatment or circulating steroids. However, birds with higher corticosterone had higher testicular GnIH expression and lower testosterone. StAR and LHR expression were lower in the testes of fasted birds than controls. Thus, the decrease in testosterone was not likely mediated by hypothalamic GnIH, but rather by direct actions of fasting and/or corticosterone on the testes, indicating that the testes can integrate and respond to cues of stress directly. Such local inhibition of testosterone synthesis may allow for rapid and reversible changes in physiology and behavior when conditions are inappropriate for breeding. PMID:25849310

  6. Fetal Testosterone, Socio-Emotional Engagement and Language Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farrant, Brad M.; Mattes, Eugen; Keelan, Jeff A.; Hickey, Martha; Whitehouse, Andrew J. O.

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigated the relations among fetal testosterone, child socio-emotional engagement and language development in a sample of 467 children (235 boys) from the Western Australian Pregnancy Cohort (Raine) Study. Bioavailable testosterone concentration measured in umbilical cord blood taken at birth was found to be significantly…

  7. Testosterone and oxidative stress: the oxidation handicap hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Alonso-Alvarez, Carlos; Bertrand, Sophie; Faivre, Bruno; Chastel, Olivier; Sorci, Gabriele

    2006-01-01

    Secondary sexual traits (SST) are usually thought to have evolved as honest signals of individual quality during mate choice. Honesty of SST is guaranteed by the cost of producing/maintaining them. In males, the expression of many SST is testosterone-dependent. The immunocompetence handicap hypothesis has been proposed as a possible mechanism ensuring honesty of SST on the basis that testosterone, in addition to its effect on sexual signals, also has an immunosuppressive effect. The immunocompetence handicap hypothesis has received mixed support. However, the cost of testosterone-based signalling is not limited to immunosuppression and might involve other physiological functions such as the antioxidant machinery. Here, we tested the hypothesis that testosterone depresses resistance to oxidative stress in a species with a testosterone-dependent sexual signal, the zebra finch. Male zebra finches received subcutaneous implants filled with flutamide (an anti-androgen) or testosterone, or kept empty (control). In agreement with the prediction, we found that red blood cell resistance to a free radical attack was the highest in males implanted with flutamide and the lowest in males implanted with testosterone. We also found that cell-mediated immune response was depressed in testosterone-treated birds, supporting the immunocompetence handicap hypothesis. The recent finding that red blood cell resistance to free radicals is negatively associated with mortality in this species suggests that benefits of sexual signalling might trade against the costs derived from oxidation. PMID:17251089

  8. An improved ultrafiltration method for determining free testosterone in serum

    SciTech Connect

    Vlahos, I.; MacMahon, W.; Sgoutas, D.; Bowers, W.; Thompson, J.; Trawick, W.

    1982-11-01

    In this method, we use the Amicon MPS-1 centrifugal ultrafiltration device and the YMB membrane in measuring free testosterone in serum. Two independent assays are combined: total testosterone and the ultrafiltrable fraction of added (/sup 3/H)testosterone. The unbound fraction is determined in 0.15-0.5 mL ultrafiltrates of 0.6 to 1 mL of variably diluted serum that has been equilibrated with (/sup 3/H)testosterone at 37 degrees C. The assay is rapid (less than 1 h), practicable (requires 0.6 mL of serum), and reproducible (CV 3.2% within assay, 3.9% between assays). Accuracy was evaluated as the fraction of free testosterone in the ultrafiltrate of dialyzed serum vs that in a prior dialysate; they were the same confirming the validity of the free testosterone measurement. Samples from ostensibly healthy men and women and from hirsute and pregnant women gave results that agreed with those obtained by equilibrium dialysis. Total testosterone concentrations for normal and hirsute women showed considerable overlap, but data on free testosterone concentrations in these populations were better resolved.

  9. A Mendelian randomization study of testosterone and cognition in men

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jie V.; Lam, Tai Hing; Jiang, Chaoqiang; Cherny, Stacey S.; Liu, Bin; Cheng, Kar Keung; Zhang, Weisen; Leung, Gabriel M.; Schooling, C Mary

    2016-01-01

    Testosterone replacement for older men is increasingly common, with some observations suggesting a protective effect on cognitive function. We examined the association of endogenous testosterone with cognitive function among older men in a Mendelian randomization study using a separate-sample instrumental variable (SSIV) analysis estimator to minimize confounding and reverse causality. A genetic score predicting testosterone was developed in 289 young Chinese men from Hong Kong, based on selected testosterone-related single nucleotide polymorphisms (rs10046, rs1008805 and rs1256031). The association of genetically predicted testosterone with delayed 10-word recall score and Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) score was assessed at baseline and follow-up using generalized estimating equation among 4,212 older Chinese men from the Guangzhou Biobank Cohort Study. Predicted testosterone was not associated with delayed 10-word recall score (−0.02 per nmol/L testosterone, 95% confidence interval (CI) −0.06–0.02) or MMSE score (0.06, 95% CI −0.002–0.12). These estimates were similar after additional adjustment for age, education, smoking, use of alcohol, body mass index and the Framingham score. Our findings do not corroborate observed protective effects of testosterone on cognitive function among older men. PMID:26864717

  10. Lowered testosterone in male obesity: mechanisms, morbidity and management

    PubMed Central

    Fui, Mark Ng Tang; Dupuis, Philippe; Grossmann, Mathis

    2014-01-01

    With increasing modernization and urbanization of Asia, much of the future focus of the obesity epidemic will be in the Asian region. Low testosterone levels are frequently encountered in obese men who do not otherwise have a recognizable hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular (HPT) axis pathology. Moderate obesity predominantly decreases total testosterone due to insulin resistance-associated reductions in sex hormone binding globulin. More severe obesity is additionally associated with reductions in free testosterone levels due to suppression of the HPT axis. Low testosterone by itself leads to increasing adiposity, creating a self-perpetuating cycle of metabolic complications. Obesity-associated hypotestosteronemia is a functional, non-permanent state, which can be reversible, but this requires substantial weight loss. While testosterone treatment can lead to moderate reductions in fat mass, obesity by itself, in the absence of symptomatic androgen deficiency, is not an established indication for testosterone therapy. Testosterone therapy may lead to a worsening of untreated sleep apnea and compromise fertility. Whether testosterone therapy augments diet- and exercise-induced weight loss requires evaluation in adequately designed randomized controlled clinical trials. PMID:24407187

  11. Testosterone and oxidative stress: the oxidation handicap hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Alonso-Alvarez, Carlos; Bertrand, Sophie; Faivre, Bruno; Chastel, Olivier; Sorci, Gabriele

    2007-03-22

    Secondary sexual traits (SST) are usually thought to have evolved as honest signals of individual quality during mate choice. Honesty of SST is guaranteed by the cost of producing/maintaining them. In males, the expression of many SST is testosterone-dependent. The immunocompetence handicap hypothesis has been proposed as a possible mechanism ensuring honesty of SST on the basis that testosterone, in addition to its effect on sexual signals, also has an immunosuppressive effect. The immunocompetence handicap hypothesis has received mixed support. However, the cost of testosterone-based signalling is not limited to immunosuppression and might involve other physiological functions such as the antioxidant machinery. Here, we tested the hypothesis that testosterone depresses resistance to oxidative stress in a species with a testosterone-dependent sexual signal, the zebra finch. Male zebra finches received subcutaneous implants filled with flutamide (an anti-androgen) or testosterone, or kept empty (control). In agreement with the prediction, we found that red blood cell resistance to a free radical attack was the highest in males implanted with flutamide and the lowest in males implanted with testosterone. We also found that cell-mediated immune response was depressed in testosterone-treated birds, supporting the immunocompetence handicap hypothesis. The recent finding that red blood cell resistance to free radicals is negatively associated with mortality in this species suggests that benefits of sexual signalling might trade against the costs derived from oxidation. PMID:17251089

  12. Proof of the effect of testosterone on skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Bhasin, S; Woodhouse, L; Storer, T W

    2001-07-01

    In spite of the widespread abuse of androgenic steroids by athletes and recreational body-builders, the effects of these agents on athletic performance and physical function remain poorly understood. Experimentally induced androgen deficiency is associated with a loss of fat-free mass; conversely, physiologic testosterone replacement of healthy, androgen-deficient men increases fat-free mass and muscle protein synthesis. Testosterone supplementation of HIV-infected men with low testosterone levels and of older men with normally low testosterone concentrations also increases muscle mass. However, we do not know whether physiologic testosterone replacement can improve physical function and health-related quality of life, and reduce the risk of falls and disability in older men or those with chronic illness. Testosterone increases maximal voluntary strength in a dose-dependent manner and thus might improve performance in power-lifting events. However, testosterone has not been shown to improve performance in endurance events. The mechanisms by which testosterone increases muscle mass are not known, but probably involve alterations in the expression of multiple muscle growth regulators. PMID:11431134

  13. Kinetic characterization of the inhibition of acyl coenzyme A: steroid acyltransferases by tributyltin in the eastern mud snail (Ilyanassa obsoleta).

    PubMed

    Sternberg, Robin M; LeBlanc, Gerald A

    2006-06-30

    Exposure to tributyltin (TBT) has been causally associated with the global occurrence of a pseudohermaphroditic condition called imposex in neogastropod species. TBT elevates free testosterone levels in these organisms, and this upsurge in testosterone may be involved in the development of imposex. We investigated the ability of TBT to inhibit acyl coenzyme A:testosterone acyltransferase (ATAT) activity as well as microsomal acyl-coenzyme A:17beta-estradiol acyltransferase (AEAT) in a neogastropod, the eastern mud snail Ilyanassa obsoleta as a mechanism by which TBT elevates free testosterone. TBT significantly inhibited both ATAT and AEAT activities in vitro at toxicologically relevant in vivo concentrations. Kinetic analyses revealed that TBT is a competitive inhibitor of ATAT (K(i)= approximately 9microM) and is a weaker, noncompetitive inhibitor of AEAT (K(i)= approximately 31microM). ATAT and AEAT activities associated with different microsome preparations were significantly correlated, and 17beta-estradiol competitively inhibited the fatty acid esterification of testosterone suggesting that one enzyme is responsible for biotransforming both testosterone and 17beta-estradiol to their corresponding fatty acid esters. Overall, the results of this study supply the much-needed mechanistic support for the hypothesis that TBT elevates free testosterone in neogastropods by inhibiting their major regulatory process for maintaining free testosterone homeostasis-the fatty acid esterification of testosterone. PMID:16638618

  14. Testosterone deficiency in the aging male

    PubMed Central

    McBride, J. Abram; Carson, Culley C.; Coward, Robert M.

    2016-01-01

    Treatment for hypogonadism is on the rise, particularly in the aging population. Yet treatment in this population represents a unique challenge to clinicians. The physiology of normal aging is complex and often shares the same, often vague, symptoms of hypogonadism. In older men, a highly prevalent burden of comorbid medical conditions and polypharmacy complicates the differentiation of signs and symptoms of hypogonadism from those of normal aging, yet this differentiation is essential to the diagnosis of hypogonadism. Even in older patients with unequivocally symptomatic hypogonadism, the clinician must navigate the potential benefits and risks of treatment that are not clearly defined in older men. More recently, a greater awareness of the potential risks associated with treatment in older men, particularly in regard to cardiovascular risk and mortality, have been appreciated with recent changes in the US Food and Drug Administration recommendations for use of testosterone in aging men. The aim of this review is to provide a framework for the clinician evaluating testosterone deficiency in older men in order to identify correctly and treat clinically significant hypogonadism in this unique population while minimizing treatment-associated harm. PMID:26834840

  15. Rapid weight loss decreases serum testosterone.

    PubMed

    Karila, T A M; Sarkkinen, P; Marttinen, M; Seppälä, T; Mero, A; Tallroth, K

    2008-11-01

    To investigate the effects of a rapid weight reduction program under authentic pre-competition conditions, eighteen elite wrestlers were studied with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) before and after two to three weeks' weight reduction regimens. In order to establish the degree of dehydration and hormonal status, blood samples were collected to obtain blood chemistry, electrolytes and endocrinological parameters after both DXA measurements. The mean weight loss was 8.2 +/- 2.3 % and it was constituted by the mean reductions of fat mass of 16 +/- 6.9 % (p < or = 0.001) and lean body mass of 7.9 +/- 2.5 %. The rapid weight reduction caused significant dehydration which was noticed as increased blood hemoglobin (7.8 +/- 5.9 %, p < or = 0.001), hematocrit (11.3 +/- 6.8 %, p < or = 0.001), and serum creatinine (35 +/- 23 %, p < or = 0.001). There was a significant decrease in serum testosterone (63 +/- 33 %, p < or = 0.001) and luteinizing hormone (54 +/- 47 %, p < or = 0.001) concentrations. A reduced body weight correlated with decreased serum testosterone concentration (r = 0.53, p < or = 0.024). Serum sex hormone binding globulin concentration increased significantly (40 +/- 21 %, p < or = 0.001). The results suggest that even short-term weight reduction may have marked effects on body composition, blood chemistry and hormonal parameters. It may constitute a possible health risk at least in a growing adolescent athlete. PMID:18516767

  16. In utero exposure to di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate exerts both short-term and long-lasting suppressive effects on testosterone production in the rat.

    PubMed

    Culty, Martine; Thuillier, Raphael; Li, Wenping; Wang, Yan; Martinez-Arguelles, Daniel B; Benjamin, Carolina Gesteira; Triantafilou, Kostantinos M; Zirkin, Barry R; Papadopoulos, Vassilios

    2008-06-01

    We examined the effects of fetal exposure to a wide range of di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) doses on fetal, neonatal, and adult testosterone production. Pregnant rats were administered DEHP from Gestational Day (GD) 14 to the day of parturition (Postnatal Day 0). Exposure to between 234 and 1250 mg/kg/day of DEHP resulted in increases in the absolute volumes of Leydig cells per adult testis. Despite this, adult serum testosterone levels were reduced significantly compared to those of controls at all DEHP doses. Organ cultures of testes from GD20 rats exposed in utero to DEHP showed dose-dependent reductions in basal testosterone production. Surprisingly, however, no significant effect of DEHP was found on hCG-induced testosterone production by GD20 testes, suggesting that the inhibition of basal steroidogenesis resulted from the alteration of molecular events upstream of the steroidogenic enzymes. Reduced fetal and adult testosterone production in response to in utero DEHP exposure appeared to be unrelated to changes in testosterone metabolism. In view of the DEHP-induced reductions in adult testosterone levels, a decrease in the expression of steroidogenesis-related genes was anticipated. Surprisingly, however, significant increases were seen in the expression of Cyp11a1, Cy17a1, Star, and Tspo transcripts, suggesting that decreased testosterone production after birth could not be explained by decreases in steroidogenic enzymes as seen at GD20. These changes may reflect an increased number of Leydig cells in adult testes exposed in utero to DEHP rather than increased gene expression in individual Leydig cells, but this remains uncertain. Taken together, these results demonstrate that in utero DEHP exposure exerts both short-term and long-lasting effects on testicular steroidogenesis that might involve distinct molecular targets in fetal and adult Leydig cells. PMID:18322279

  17. Current status of testosterone replacement therapy in men.

    PubMed

    Winters, S J

    1999-01-01

    Testosterone plays an essential role in the development of the normal male and in the maintenance of many male characteristics, including muscle mass and strength, bone mass, libido, potency, and spermatogenesis. Androgen deficiency occurs with disorders that damage the testes, including traumatic or surgical castration (primary testicular failure) or disorders in which the gonadotropin stimulation of the testes is reduced (hypogonadotropic hypogonadism). The clinical manifestations of androgen deficiency depend on the age at onset and the severity and duration of the deficiency. In adult males, these manifestations may include reduced body hair, decreased muscle mass and strength, increased fat mass, decreased hematocrit, decreased libido, erectile dysfunction, infertility, osteoporosis, and depressed mood. The forms of androgen replacement currently available in the United States are intramuscular depot injections of testosterone esters, oral tablets of testosterone derivatives, and transdermal patches. For most patients, androgen replacement therapy with testosterone is a safe, effective treatment for testosterone deficiency. PMID:10333822

  18. Understanding testosterone variation in a tropical lek-breeding bird

    PubMed Central

    Ryder, Thomas B.; Horton, Brent M.; Moore, Ignacio T.

    2011-01-01

    Male reproductive coalitions, in which males cooperate to attract females, are a rare strategy among vertebrates. While some studies have investigated ultimate aspects of these relationships, little is known about the mechanistic role that hormones play in modulating cooperative behaviours. Here, we examined male testosterone variation in a tropical lekking bird, the wire-tailed manakin (Pipra filicauda), which exhibits cooperative male–male display coalitions. We found that testosterone levels in territorial males were comparable to those of temperate breeding birds, a surprising result given their environmental, social and reproductive dynamics. In addition, social status rather than plumage was a strong predictor of testosterone variation. Territorial males had significantly higher testosterone levels than did two other plumage classes of floater males, who do not hold territories. We hypothesize that testosterone variation plays an important role in the establishment of male dominance hierarchies (competition), while concurrently facilitating stable display partnerships (cooperation). PMID:21325306

  19. The use of testosterone as a male contraceptive.

    PubMed

    Amory, J K; Bremner, W J

    1998-10-01

    Testosterone functions as a contraceptive by suppressing secretion of the pituitary gonadotropins luteinizing hormone and follicle stimulating hormone. Low levels of these hormones decrease endogenous testosterone secretion from the testis and deprive developing sperm of the signals required for normal maturation. Interference with sperm maturation causes a decline in sperm production and can lead to reversible infertility in men, raising the possibility that testosterone could be utilized in a commercially available contraceptive. To this end, testosterone has been studied alone and in combination with either gonadotropin releasing hormone analogues or progestins in efforts to improve its contraceptive efficacy. In this chapter, we will review efforts to use testosterone to create a safe, convenient, efficacious contraceptive method for men. PMID:10332567

  20. Single dose testosterone administration reduces loss chasing in healthy females.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yin; Liu, Jinting; Qu, Lujing; Eisenegger, Christoph; Clark, Luke; Zhou, Xiaolin

    2016-09-01

    Testosterone has been linked to modulation of impulsivity and risky choice, potentially mediated by changes in reward or punishment sensitivity. This study investigated the effect of testosterone on risk-taking and the adjustment of risk-taking on trials following a gain or a loss. Loss chasing is operationalized herein as the propensity to recover losses by increasing risky choice. Healthy female participants (n=26) received a single-dose of 0.5mg sublingual testosterone in a double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover design. At 240min post-administration, participants performed a gambling task with a high and a low risk option. In the placebo condition, participants were more likely to choose the high risk option following losses compared to wins. This effect was abolished on the testosterone session. Ignoring prior outcomes, no overall changes in risk-taking were observed. Our data indicate that testosterone affects human decision-making via diminishing sensitivity to punishment. PMID:27236486

  1. Bisphenol AF may cause testosterone reduction by directly affecting testis function in adult male rats.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yixing; Yin, Jie; Jiao, Zhihao; Shi, Jiachen; Li, Ming; Shao, Bing

    2012-06-01

    Although in vitro studies have indicated that Bisphenol AF (BPAF) might be a more dangerous endocrine disruptor than Bisphenol A (BPA), no information on reproductive toxicity in animals is available. In this study, the effects of BPAF exposure on the testis and the related mechanisms of toxicity were investigated. Sprague-Dawley (SD) male rats were exposed to BPAF (0, 2, 10, 50 and 200 mg/kg/d) for 14 days. Total cholesterol levels in serum were decreased in rats given a dose of 50 and 200 mg/kg/d. BPAF concentration in the testes increased with increasing doses of BPAF. Reduced serum testosterone and increased luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) levels were observed in rats in the higher dose groups. Furthermore, BPAF exposure resulted in a dramatic decline in genes and protein involved in cholesterol biosynthesis, transport and steroid biosynthesis. Similarly, the testicular mRNA levels of inhibin B, estrogen receptor (ERα) and luteinizing hormone receptor (LHR) also decreased in rats given a dosage of 200 mg/kg/d BPAF. Together, these data demonstrate that BPAF-induced inhibition of testosterone production primarily resulted from the alteration of genes and proteins in the testosterone biosynthesis pathway. PMID:22504055

  2. Seroprevalence of IgG1 and IgG4 class antibodies against Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in Japanese population.

    PubMed

    Otsubo, Shigeru; Cossu, Davide; Eda, Shigetoshi; Otsubo, Yuriko; Sechi, Leonardo Antonio; Suzuki, Tsuyoshi; Iwao, Yumiko; Yamamoto, Shizuo; Kuribayashi, Takashi; Momotani, Eiichi

    2015-10-01

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is the established causative agent of Johne's disease in cattle and other ruminants, and it has also been speculated to be a putative etiological agent of several human autoimmune diseases. It is acknowledged that dairy products deriving from infected animals play a role (could be vehicles) in exposing humans to MAP. MAP could stimulate the human immune system by means of their complex antigen (in the case of lipids, multivalent antigens) and may modulate it, acting as adjuvant molecules such as Freund's complete adjuvant. The immune system might be abnormally stimulated by the constant presence of MAP antigens (for example, in the dairy products), and this might be particularly relevant in genetically predisposed individuals. However, there is limited understanding about the current human exposure to MAP. The present study analyzed the antibody recognition profile of MAP lipophilic antigens in a cohort of 126 healthy Japanese. We measured the serum levels of total immunoglobulin G (IgG) and subclasses targeting MAP surface antigens through ethanol vortex indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (EVELISA) by using serum absorbed with Mycobacterium phlei. Elevated IgG (especially IgG1 and IgG4) responses were observed in 14% of the sera. To assess the specificity of EVELISA, the same samples were analyzed by means of a commercially available Johnelisa II kit. It was noteworthy that a high degree of correlation was observed when comparing the two methodologies (rs=0.7, p<0.0001). Moreover, in order to investigate the specificity of the binding, inhibition assay experiments were carried out also searching for antibodies against Bacillus Calmette-Guérin antigens, but no cross-reaction was observed. The result obtained represents the first evidence implying that the Japanese population is exposed to MAP, and additionally the existence of a foodborne chain of exposure that transmits MAP antigens to humans. PMID

  3. Long-lived testosterone esters in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Borg, W; Shackleton, C H; Pahuja, S L; Hochberg, R B

    1995-01-01

    Over the past decade it has become increasingly clear that steroid hormones are enzymatically esterified with fatty acids. These steroidal esters are the natural analogs of synthetic esters that are used therapeutically. One such family of pharmacological steroids is the synthetic alkyl esters of testosterone, androgens with great hormonal potency. We have investigated whether testosterone esters exist naturally by using the rat as a model. Most tissues of male rats, including blood, have very little if any ester (quantified by immunoassay as a nonpolar saponifiable metabolite), but fat and testes have sizable quantities, approximately 3 ng of testosterone equivalents per g of tissue. Testosterone in fat averages 9 ng/g. The fat from female rats and long-term (> 2 weeks) castrated males has no detectable testosterone ester. The presence of testosterone esters was confirmed by GC/MS, which clearly showed the presence of testosterone in the hydrolyzed ester fraction of fat from intact males but not long-term castrates. Upon castration, testosterone levels in the fat completely disappear within 6 hr. To the contrary, it is not until 48 hr after castration that a measurable fall in the testosterone ester fraction was observed; even after 10 days a small amount of ester is still present in the fat. These experiments demonstrate the existence of a previously unknown androgen with a potentially important physiological impact; testosterone esters, natural analogs of potent therapeutic agents, occur in the fat where they can serve as a reservoir of preformed androgen to stimulate neighboring target tissues. Images Fig. 2 PMID:7878017

  4. Testosterone Therapy Can Interact With Thrombophilia, Leading to Osteonecrosis.

    PubMed

    Glueck, Charles J; Riaz, Rashid; Prince, Marloe; Freiberg, Richard A; Wang, Ping

    2015-12-01

    Although this effect is not widely recognized, testosterone therapy can interact with thrombophilia, causing osteonecrosis. In 12 men and 4 women who had idiopathic osteonecrosis a median of 6 months after the onset of testosterone therapy, the authors examined the interaction between testosterone therapy and previously undiagnosed thrombophilia. The authors hypothesized that patients who had osteonecrosis after starting testosterone therapy were more likely than 110 normal control subjects or 48 patients who had osteonecrosis and were not receiving testosterone therapy to have thrombophilia. Measures of thrombophilia included Factor V Leiden, prothrombin, PAI-1 gene mutations, Factor VIII, Factor XI, anticardiolipin antibody immunoglobulin G or immunoglobulin M, and homocysteine values. In 10 cases, osteonecrosis occurred 6 months or less after the onset of testosterone therapy, and in all 16 cases, it occurred after a median of 6 months of testosterone therapy. Of the 16 cases, 5 (31%) were Factor V Leiden heterozygotes vs 2 of 109 (2%) healthy control subjects (P=.0003) and 4 of 48 patients who had osteonecrosis and were not receiving testosterone therapy (P=.04). Of the 16 cases, 4 (25%) had high (>150%) Factor VIII levels vs 7 of 103 (7%) healthy control subjects (P=.04), and 3 (19%) had high (>150%) Factor XI levels vs 3 of 101 (3%) healthy control subjects (P=.03). Of the 16 patients with osteonecrosis, 14 (88%) had at least 1 abnormal procoagulant value (of the 8 measured) vs 47 of 110 (43%) healthy control subjects (P=.0009). Of the 5 men whose serum estradiol level was measured while they were receiving testosterone therapy, this level was high (≥42.6 pg/mL) in 4. When testosterone therapy is given to patients with thrombophilia, they are at increased risk for osteonecrosis. PMID:26652327

  5. Albumin quotient, IgG concentration, and IgG index determinations in cerebrospinal fluid of neonatal foals.

    PubMed

    Andrews, F M; Geiser, D R; Sommardahl, C S; Green, E M; Provenza, M

    1994-06-01

    Total protein (TP), albumin, and IgG concentrations were measured in CSF from the atlanto-occipital (AO) and lumbosacral (LS) sites and in serum of 15 clinically normal neonatal foals < or = 10 days old (mean, 7.0 days). The albumin quotient (AQ; CSF albumin/serum albumin x 100) and IgG index ([CSF IgG/serum IgG] x [serum albumin/CSF albumin]), indicators of blood-brain barrier permeability and intrathecal IgG production, respectively, were then calculated. Mean +/- SD values obtained from the foals of this study were: serum albumin, 2,900 +/- 240 mg/dl; serum IgG, 1,325 +/- 686 mg/dl; AO CSF total protein (TP), 82.8 +/- 19.2 mg/dl; LS CSF TP, 83.6 +/- 16.1 mg/dl; AO CSF albumin, 52.0 +/- 8.6 mg/dl; LS CSF albumin, 53.8 +/- 15.7 mg/dl; AO CSF IgG, 10.2 +/- 5.5 mg/dl; LS CSF IgG, 9.9 +/- 5.7 mg/dl; AO AQ, 1.86 +/- 0.29; LS AQ, 1.85 +/- 0.51, AO IgG index, 0.52 +/- 0.28; and LS IgG index, 0.48 +/- 0.27. Significant difference between values for the AO and LS sites was not found. A CSF albumin concentration > 85.2 mg/dl or AQ > 2.4, as determined by mean +/- 2 SD, may indicate increased blood-brain barrier permeability. An IgG index value > 1.0 may indicate intrathecal IgG production. Values obtained for foals of this study should serve as baseline for comparison in the evaluation of blood-brain barrier permeability and intrathecal IgG production in neonatal foals with neurologic disease. PMID:7944008

  6. Testosterone regulates FGF-2 expression during testis maturation by an IRES-dependent translational mechanism.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Herrera, Irma G; Prado-Lourenco, Leonel; Pileur, Frédéric; Conte, Caroline; Morin, Aurélie; Cabon, Florence; Prats, Hervé; Vagner, Stephan; Bayard, Francis; Audigier, Sylvie; Prats, Anne-Catherine

    2006-03-01

    Spermatogenesis is a complex process involving cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2) is involved in testicular function, but its role in spermatogenesis has not been fully documented. The control of FGF-2 expression particularly occurs at the translational level, by an internal ribosome entry site (IRES)-dependent mechanism driving the use of alternative initiation codons. To study IRES activity regulation in vivo, we have developed transgenic mice expressing a bicistronic construct coding for two luciferase genes. Here, we show that the FGF-2 IRES is age-dependently activated in mouse testis, whereas EMCV and c-myc IRESs are not. Real-time PCR confirms that this regulation is translational. By using immunohistological techniques, we demonstrate that FGF-2 IRES stimulation occurs in adult, but not in immature, type-A spermatogonias. This is correlated with activation of endogenous FGF-2 expression in spermatogonia; whereas FGF-2 mRNA transcription is known to decrease in adult testis. Interestingly, the FGF-2 IRES activation is triggered by testosterone and is partially inhibited by siRNA directed against the androgen receptor. Two-dimensional analysis of proteins bound to the FGF-2 mRNA 5'UTR after UV cross-linking reveals that testosterone treatment correlates with the binding of several proteins. These data suggest a paracrine loop where IRES-dependent FGF-2 expression, stimulated by Sertoli cells in response to testosterone produced by Leydig cells, would in turn activate Leydig function and testosterone production. In addition, nuclear FGF-2 isoforms could be involved in an intracrine function of FGF-2 in the start of spermatogenesis, mitosis, or meiosis initiation. This report demonstrates that mRNA translation regulation by an IRES-dependent mechanism participates in a physiological process. PMID:16423876

  7. A novel antibody engineering strategy for making monovalent bispecific heterodimeric IgG antibodies by electrostatic steering mechanism.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhi; Leng, Esther C; Gunasekaran, Kannan; Pentony, Martin; Shen, Min; Howard, Monique; Stoops, Janelle; Manchulenko, Kathy; Razinkov, Vladimir; Liu, Hua; Fanslow, William; Hu, Zhonghua; Sun, Nancy; Hasegawa, Haruki; Clark, Rutilio; Foltz, Ian N; Yan, Wei

    2015-03-20

    Producing pure and well behaved bispecific antibodies (bsAbs) on a large scale for preclinical and clinical testing is a challenging task. Here, we describe a new strategy for making monovalent bispecific heterodimeric IgG antibodies in mammalian cells. We applied an electrostatic steering mechanism to engineer antibody light chain-heavy chain (LC-HC) interface residues in such a way that each LC strongly favors its cognate HC when two different HCs and two different LCs are co-expressed in the same cell to assemble a functional bispecific antibody. We produced heterodimeric IgGs from transiently and stably transfected mammalian cells. The engineered heterodimeric IgG molecules maintain the overall IgG structure with correct LC-HC pairings, bind to two different antigens with comparable affinity when compared with their parental antibodies, and retain the functionality of parental antibodies in biological assays. In addition, the bispecific heterodimeric IgG derived from anti-HER2 and anti-EGF receptor (EGFR) antibody was shown to induce a higher level of receptor internalization than the combination of two parental antibodies. Mouse xenograft BxPC-3, Panc-1, and Calu-3 human tumor models showed that the heterodimeric IgGs strongly inhibited tumor growth. The described approach can be used to generate tools from two pre-existent antibodies and explore the potential of bispecific antibodies. The asymmetrically engineered Fc variants for antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity enhancement could be embedded in monovalent bispecific heterodimeric IgG to make best-in-class therapeutic antibodies. PMID:25583986

  8. A Novel Antibody Engineering Strategy for Making Monovalent Bispecific Heterodimeric IgG Antibodies by Electrostatic Steering Mechanism*

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhi; Leng, Esther C.; Gunasekaran, Kannan; Pentony, Martin; Shen, Min; Howard, Monique; Stoops, Janelle; Manchulenko, Kathy; Razinkov, Vladimir; Liu, Hua; Fanslow, William; Hu, Zhonghua; Sun, Nancy; Hasegawa, Haruki; Clark, Rutilio; Foltz, Ian N.; Yan, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Producing pure and well behaved bispecific antibodies (bsAbs) on a large scale for preclinical and clinical testing is a challenging task. Here, we describe a new strategy for making monovalent bispecific heterodimeric IgG antibodies in mammalian cells. We applied an electrostatic steering mechanism to engineer antibody light chain-heavy chain (LC-HC) interface residues in such a way that each LC strongly favors its cognate HC when two different HCs and two different LCs are co-expressed in the same cell to assemble a functional bispecific antibody. We produced heterodimeric IgGs from transiently and stably transfected mammalian cells. The engineered heterodimeric IgG molecules maintain the overall IgG structure with correct LC-HC pairings, bind to two different antigens with comparable affinity when compared with their parental antibodies, and retain the functionality of parental antibodies in biological assays. In addition, the bispecific heterodimeric IgG derived from anti-HER2 and anti-EGF receptor (EGFR) antibody was shown to induce a higher level of receptor internalization than the combination of two parental antibodies. Mouse xenograft BxPC-3, Panc-1, and Calu-3 human tumor models showed that the heterodimeric IgGs strongly inhibited tumor growth. The described approach can be used to generate tools from two pre-existent antibodies and explore the potential of bispecific antibodies. The asymmetrically engineered Fc variants for antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity enhancement could be embedded in monovalent bispecific heterodimeric IgG to make best-in-class therapeutic antibodies. PMID:25583986

  9. IgG4 disease: The great masquerader.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Divya; Liu, Xiuli; Chahal, Prabhleen

    2016-06-01

    Systemic IgG4 disease can have a wide spectrum of clinical presentation, which can mimic several other disease entities. In this report, we describe a series of two patients with IgG4-related disease who were referred to us initially with the diagnosis of acute cholecystitis and the second patient with metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma with peritoneal metastasis respectively. PMID:26164258

  10. IgG4-Related Disease: A Multispecialty Condition

    PubMed Central

    da Fonseca, Emanuela Pimenta; Santiago, Mittermayer Barreto

    2014-01-01

    IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD) is a recently recognized group of conditions, characterized by tumor-like swelling of involved organs, lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate rich in IgG4-positive plasma cells, variable degrees of fibrosis, and elevated serum IgG4 concentrations. Currently IgG4-RD is recognized as a systemic condition that can affect several organs and tissues. Herein we report the case of a 34-year-old male patient who was admitted to our hospital with diffuse abdominal pain, weight loss, and painful stiffness in his neck. He had a history of tumoral mass of the left maxillary region, right palpebral ptosis with protrusion of the eyeball, and chronic dry cough for about 6 years. Laboratory tests revealed polyclonal hypergammaglobulinemia and increased serum IgG4 levels. Immunohistochemical staining of the maxillary biopsy was compatible with IgG4-RD. He had an excellent response to corticosteroid therapy. This case highlights that IgG4-RD should be included in the differential diagnosis with multisystem diseases. PMID:25506457

  11. Liver-X-receptor activator prevents homocysteine-induced production of IgG antibodies from murine B lymphocytes via the ROS-NF-{kappa}B pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Chang Lina; Zhang, Zhenmin; Li Wenjing; Dai Jing; Guan Youfei; Wang Xian . E-mail: xwang@bjmu.edu.cn

    2007-06-08

    Our previous study showed that homosysteine (Hcy) promotes proliferation of mouse splenic B lymphocytes. In this study, we investigated whether Hcy could stimulate the production of IgG antibodies. Hcy significantly increased the production of IgG antibodies from resting B lymphocytes. B lymphocytes from ApoE-knockout mice with hyperhomocysteinemia showed elevated IgG secretion at either the basal Hcy level or in response to lipopolysaccharide. Hcy promoted reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, and free radical scavengers, MnTMPyP decreased Hcy-induced IgG secretion. The inhibitor of NF-{kappa}B (MG132) also significantly reduced Hcy-induced IgG secretion. Furthermore, Hcy-induced formation of ROS, activation of NF-{kappa}B, and secretion of IgG could be inhibited by the liver-X-receptor (LXR) agonist TO 901317. Thus, our data provide strong evidence that HHcy induces IgG production from murine splenic B lymphocytes both in vitro and in vivo. The mechanism might be through the ROS-NF-{kappa}B pathway and can be attenuated by the activation of LXR.

  12. Reactive oxygen species: players in the cardiovascular effects of testosterone.

    PubMed

    Tostes, Rita C; Carneiro, Fernando S; Carvalho, Maria Helena C; Reckelhoff, Jane F

    2016-01-01

    Androgens are essential for the development and maintenance of male reproductive tissues and sexual function and for overall health and well being. Testosterone, the predominant and most important androgen, not only affects the male reproductive system, but also influences the activity of many other organs. In the cardiovascular system, the actions of testosterone are still controversial, its effects ranging from protective to deleterious. While early studies showed that testosterone replacement therapy exerted beneficial effects on cardiovascular disease, some recent safety studies point to a positive association between endogenous and supraphysiological levels of androgens/testosterone and cardiovascular disease risk. Among the possible mechanisms involved in the actions of testosterone on the cardiovascular system, indirect actions (changes in the lipid profile, insulin sensitivity, and hemostatic mechanisms, modulation of the sympathetic nervous system and renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system), as well as direct actions (modulatory effects on proinflammatory enzymes, on the generation of reactive oxygen species, nitric oxide bioavailability, and on vasoconstrictor signaling pathways) have been reported. This mini-review focuses on evidence indicating that testosterone has prooxidative actions that may contribute to its deleterious actions in the cardiovascular system. The controversial effects of testosterone on ROS generation and oxidant status, both prooxidant and antioxidant, in the cardiovascular system and in cells and tissues of other systems are reviewed. PMID:26538238

  13. Testosterone affects language areas of the adult human brain.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Andreas; Kranz, Georg S; Sladky, Ronald; Kaufmann, Ulrike; Ganger, Sebastian; Hummer, Allan; Seiger, Rene; Spies, Marie; Vanicek, Thomas; Winkler, Dietmar; Kasper, Siegfried; Windischberger, Christian; Swaab, Dick F; Lanzenberger, Rupert

    2016-05-01

    Although the sex steroid hormone testosterone is integrally involved in the development of language processing, ethical considerations mostly limit investigations to single hormone administrations. To circumvent this issue we assessed the influence of continuous high-dose hormone application in adult female-to-male transsexuals. Subjects underwent magnetic resonance imaging before and after 4 weeks of testosterone treatment, with each scan including structural, diffusion weighted and functional imaging. Voxel-based morphometry analysis showed decreased gray matter volume with increasing levels of bioavailable testosterone exclusively in Broca's and Wernicke's areas. Particularly, this may link known sex differences in language performance to the influence of testosterone on relevant brain regions. Using probabilistic tractography, we further observed that longitudinal changes in testosterone negatively predicted changes in mean diffusivity of the corresponding structural connection passing through the extreme capsule. Considering a related increase in myelin staining in rodents, this potentially reflects a strengthening of the fiber tract particularly involved in language comprehension. Finally, functional images at resting-state were evaluated, showing increased functional connectivity between the two brain regions with increasing testosterone levels. These findings suggest testosterone-dependent neuroplastic adaptations in adulthood within language-specific brain regions and connections. Importantly, deteriorations in gray matter volume seem to be compensated by enhancement of corresponding structural and functional connectivity. Hum Brain Mapp 37:1738-1748, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26876303

  14. Testosterone Suppression of CRH-stimulated Cortisol in Men

    PubMed Central

    Rubinow, David R.; Roca, Catherine A.; Schmidt, Peter J.; Danaceau, Merry A.; Putnam, Karen; Cizza, Giovanni; Chrousos, George; Nieman, Lynnette

    2005-01-01

    Despite observations of age-dependent sexual dimorphisms in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity, the role of androgens in the regulation of HPA axis activity in men has not been examined. We assessed this role by performing CRH stimulation tests in ten men (ages 18–45) during gonadal suppression with leuprolide acetate and during testosterone addition to leuprolide. CRH-stimulated cortisol levels as well as peak cortisol and greatest cortisol excursion were significantly lower (p < .05, .005, and .01, respectively) during testosterone replacement compared with the induced hypogonadal condition (leuprolide plus placebo); cortisol area under the curve was lower at a trend level (p < .1). Paradoxically, CRH-stimulated ACTH was increased significantly during testosterone replacement (p < .05). The cortisol:ACTH ratio, a measure of adrenal sensitivity, was lower during testosterone replacement (p < .1). A mixed effects regression model showed that testosterone but not estradiol or CBG significantly contributed to the variance of cortisol. These data demonstrate that testosterone regulates CRH-stimulated HPA axis activity in men, with the divergent effects on ACTH and cortisol suggesting a peripheral (adrenal) locus for the suppressive effects on cortisol. Our results further demonstrate that the enhanced stimulated HPA axis activity previously described in young men compared with young women cannot be ascribed to an activational upregulation of the axis by testosterone. PMID:15841103

  15. Testosterone and muscle hypertrophy in female rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhn, F. E.; Max, S. R.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of chronic treatment with testosterone propionate (TP) on compensatory muscle hypertropy in female rats are examined. The 48 female rats were placed in one of four test groups: (1) no overload (synergist removal), no TP, (2) overload, no TP, (3) no overload + TP, and (4) overload + TP. The technique used to administer the TP is described. The preparation of the plantaris muscle, the analysis of pyruvate oxidation and the determination of malate and lactate dehydrogenases and the noncollogen protein are explained. The results which reveal the effect of overload and TP on body weight, noncollogen protein concentration, lactate and malate dehydrogenase activities, and pyruvate oxidation are presented and discussed. It is concluded that in terms of body weight, protein content, pyruvate, glycolysis, and oxidative metabolisms chronic TP treatments do not change compensatory muscle hypertropy.

  16. "Mitochondrial Eve", "Y Chromosome Adam", testosterone, and human evolution.

    PubMed

    Howard, James Michael

    2002-01-01

    I suggest primate evolution began as a consequence of increased testosterone in males which increased aggression and sexuality, therefore, reproduction and success. With time, negative effects of excessive testosterone reduced spermatogenesis and started a decline of the group. Approximately 30-40 million years ago, the gene DAZ (Deleted in AZoospermia) appeared on the Y chromosome, increased spermatogenesis, and rescued the early primates from extinction. (Note: DAZ is considered by some to specifically, positively affect spermatogenesis; others suggest it has no effect on spermatogenesis.) Hominid evolution continued with increasing testosterone. The advent of increased testosterone in females of Homo erectus (or Homo ergaster) increased the female-to-male body size ratio, and eventually produced another era of excessive testosterone. Excessive testosterone caused a reduction in population size (bottleneck) that produced the "Mitochondrial Eve" (ME) mechanism. (Only certain females continued during the bottleneck to transmit their mitochondrial DNA.) That is, the ME mechanism culminated, again, in excessive testosterone and reduced spermatogenesis in the hominid line. Approximately 50,000 to 200,000 years ago, a "doubling" of the DAZ gene occurred on the Y chromosome in hominid males which rescued the hominid line with increased spermatogenesis in certain males. This produced the "Y Chromosome Adam" event. The doubling of DAZ allowed further increases in testosterone in hominids that resulted in the increased size and development of the brain. Modern humans periodically fluctuate between the positive and negative consequences of increased levels of testosterone, currently identifiable as the secular trend, increased infections, and reduced spermatogenesis. PMID:12449688

  17. Ultradian rhythmicity and induced changes in salivary testosterone.

    PubMed

    Beaven, C Martyn; Ingram, John R; Gill, Nicholas D; Hopkins, Will G

    2010-09-01

    Testosterone and cortisol respond to exercise stimuli and modulate adaptation. Episodic basal secretion of these hormones may modify the responsiveness of these hormones. We sought to identify episodic steroid secretion via frequent salivary sampling and investigate any interaction between ultradian rhythmicity and induced changes in testosterone. Salivary testosterone and cortisol concentrations of seven males (age 20-40 years) were measured every 10 min between 0800 and 1600 h on three consecutive days. On either the second or third day, three interventions designed to elicit a hormonal response were randomly assigned: sprint exercise (two 30-s maximal efforts on a cycle ergometer); boxing (two 30-s maximal punching efforts); and a violent video game (10 min of player vs. player combat). On the other days subjects were inactive. Testosterone data on non-intervention days suggested pulsatile secretion with a pulse interval of 47 +/- 9 min (mean +/- SD). The sprint intervention substantially affected hormones: it elicited a small transient elevation in testosterone (by a factor of 1.21; factor 90% confidence limits x/ divided by 1.21) 10 min after exercise, and a moderate elevation in cortisol peaking 50 min post-exercise (factor 2.3; x/ divided by 2.6). The testosterone response correlated with the change in testosterone concentration in the 10 min prior to the sprint (r = 0.78; 90% CL 0.22-0.95) and with a measure of randomness in testosterone fluctuations (r = 0.83; 0.35-0.96). Thus, the salivary testosterone response to exercise may be dependent on the underlying ultradian rhythm and aspects of its regulation. This interaction may have important implications for adaptation to exercise. PMID:20512500

  18. Testosterone as a discriminative stimulus in male rats.

    PubMed

    Wood, Ruth I; Vertelkina, Nina V; Antzoulatos, Eleni

    2011-11-01

    Testosterone and other anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) are reinforcing in animals, as determined by conditioned place preference or self-administration. Most drugs of abuse produce subjective effects on mood and perception that initiate and maintain drug taking. Whether AAS have similar effects is not known. Food-restricted male Sprague-Dawley rats (n=9) were tested for their ability to discriminate an injection of testosterone from the β-cyclodextrin vehicle using a standard two-lever operant paradigm. In drug discrimination, animals use the subjective effects of drug or vehicle to select the appropriate lever to obtain food pellets under an FR10 schedule of reinforcement. All rats demonstrated vigorous responding for food (1415.1±76.1 responses/20 min) with 94.9% of responses on the active lever. For the first 30 days, rats received 1mg/kg testosterone sc 30 min before testing. On Day 14, one rat achieved the discrimination criteria of 9/10 consecutive days with >90% responses on the active lever and ≤5 responses on the inactive lever before the first reinforcement. Subsequently, rats were tested with testosterone at different doses (2, 7.5, 15 mg/kg at 30 min before testing) and times (2mg/kg at 30 or 60 min before testing), each for 20 days. One additional rat demonstrated successful discrimination at Day 54 with 2mg/kg testosterone 60 min before testing. The remaining 7 rats failed to discriminate testosterone within 110 days. When analyzed according to less-stringent standards, 4 additional rats met criteria for testosterone discrimination. However, continued performance was not stable. Thus, testosterone was unable to consistently support drug discrimination. We conclude that testosterone does not produce rapid interoceptive effects (NIH DA12843 to RIW). PMID:21893083

  19. TESTOSTERONE AS A DISCRIMINATIVE STIMULUS IN MALE RATS

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Ruth I.; Vertelkina, Nina V.; Antzoulatos, Eleni

    2011-01-01

    Testosterone and other anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) are reinforcing in animals, as determined by conditioned place preference or self-administration. Most drugs of abuse produce subjective effects on mood and perception that initiate and maintain drug taking. Whether AAS have similar effects is not known. Food-restricted male Sprague-Dawley rats (n=9) were tested for their ability to discriminate an injection of testosterone from the β-cyclodextrin vehicle using a standard two-lever operant paradigm. In drug discrimination, animals use the subjective effects of drug or vehicle to select the appropriate lever to obtain food pellets under an FR10 schedule of reinforcement. All rats demonstrated vigorous responding for food (1415.1±76.1 responses/20 min) with 94.9% of responses on the active lever. For the first 30 days, rats received 1 mg/kg testosterone sc 30 min before testing. On Day 14, one rat achieved the discrimination criteria of 9/10 consecutive days with >90% responses on the active lever and ≤5 responses on the inactive lever before the first reinforcement. Subsequently, rats were tested with testosterone at different doses (2, 7.5, 15 mg/kg at 30 min before testing) and times (2 mg/kg at 30 or 60 min before testing), each for 20 days. One additional rat demonstrated successful discrimination at Day 54 with 2 mg/kg testosterone 60 min before testing. The remaining 7 rats failed to discriminate testosterone within 110 days. When analyzed according to less-stringent standards, 4 additional rats met criteria for testosterone discrimination. However, continued performance was not stable. Thus, testosterone was unable to consistently support drug discrimination. We conclude that testosterone does not produce rapid interoceptive effects. (NIH DA12843 to RIW) PMID:21893083

  20. The endocrine pharmacology of testosterone therapy in men

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oettel, Michael

    The review starts off by outlining the history of the discovery of the male sex hormone testosterone and the historical background to the various, often dubious, approaches to the treatment of age-related endocrine disorders in older men. A discussion of congenital androgen deficiency in young men is followed by methods of diagnosing hypogonadism in older men. Among therapeutic options, the alternatives to direct testosterone replacement are discussed, although none of them have proved to be particularly successful in clinical practice. For testosterone replacement itself, various routes of administration and pharmaceutical formulations are now available, facilitating good monitoring and individualized therapy.

  1. Synthesis of deuterium labeled 17-methyl-testosterone

    SciTech Connect

    Shinohara, Y.; Baba, S.; Kasuya, Y.

    1984-09-01

    The synthesis of two forms of selectively deuterated 17-methyl-testosterone is described. 17-Methyl-d3-testosterone was prepared by the Grignard reaction of dehydroepiandrosterone with deuterium labeled methyl magnesium iodide followed by an Oppenauer oxidation. 17-Methyl-d3-testosterone-19,19,19-d3 was prepared by treating 3,3-ethylenedioxy-5,10-epoxy-5 alpha, 10 alpha-estran-17-one with deuterium labeled methyl magnesium bromide followed by hydrolysis and dehydration of the 5 alpha-hydroxyandrostane derivative.

  2. Late-Onset Hypogonadism and Testosterone Replacement in Older Men.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Rajib K; Bhattacharya, Shelley B

    2015-11-01

    Late-onset hypogonadism is an underdiagnosed and easily treated condition defined by low serum testosterone levels in men older than 65 years. When treated, a significant improvement in quality of life may be reached in this rapidly rising sector of the population. During the evaluation, laboratory tests and a full medication review should be performed to exclude other illnesses or adverse effects from medications. The major goal of treatment in this population is treating the symptoms related to hypogonadism. There has not been clear evidence supporting universally giving older men with low serum testosterone levels and hypogonadal symptoms testosterone replacement therapy. PMID:26476121

  3. [Testosterone therapy in female hypoactive sexual desire disorder].

    PubMed

    Meyer, Patrick

    2016-03-16

    Hypoactive sexual desire disorder (HSDD) is a deficiency of sexual desire that causes marked personal or interpersonal distress. It occurs in approximately 1 in 10 adult women. A number of potential contributory factors (hormonal, neurobiological and psychosocial) have been identified. Testosterone plays an excitatory role in sexual desire but the mechanism is not yet well understood. Treatment with testosterone has been shown to improve sexual desire in menopausal women with HSDD. However, there are limited data concerning premenopausal women and long-term safety. At present, physiological testosterone preparations for use in women are not available in Switzerland. PMID:27149714

  4. Mucosal IgG Levels Correlate Better with Respiratory Syncytial Virus Load and Inflammation than Plasma IgG Levels

    PubMed Central

    Vissers, Marloes; Ahout, Inge M. L.; de Jonge, Marien I.

    2015-01-01

    Maternal vaccination is currently considered a strategy against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections. In RSV-infected infants, high mucosal IgG levels correlated better with reduced RSV load and lower mucosal CXCL10 levels than plasma IgG levels. For future vaccination strategies against RSV, more focus should be on the mucosal humoral immune response. PMID:26656116

  5. Diagnostic Performance of Serum IgG4 Levels in Patients With IgG4-Related Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Kuang-Hui; Chan, Tien-Ming; Tsai, Ping-Han; Chen, Ching-Hui; Chang, Pi-Yueh

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study is to study the clinical features and diagnostic performance of IgG4 in Chinese populations with IgG4-related diseases (IgG4-RDs). The medical records of 2901 adult subjects who underwent serum IgG4 level tests conducted between December 2007 and May 2014 were reviewed. Serum concentrations of IgG4 were measured in 2901 cases, including 161 (5.6%) patients with IgG4-RD and 2740 (94.4%) patients without IgG4-RD (non-IgG4-RD group). The mean age of the IgG4-RD patients was 58.4 ± 16.1 years (range: 21–87), and 48 (29.8%) were women. The mean serum IgG4 level was significantly much higher in IgG4-RD patients than in non-IgG4-RD (1062.6 vs 104.3 mg/dL, P < 0.001) participants. For IgG4 >135 mg/dL, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), likelihood ratio (LR)+, and LR− were 86%, 77%, 18%, 99%, 3.70, and 0.19, respectively. When the upper limit of normal was doubled for an IgG4 >270 mg/dL, the corresponding data were 75%, 94%, 43%, 98%, 12.79, and 0.26, respectively. For IgG4 >405 mg/dL (tripling the upper limit of normal), the corresponding data were 62%, 98%, 68%, 98%, 37.00, and 0.39, respectively. When calculated according to the manufacturer's package insert cutoff (>201 mg/dL) for the diagnosis of IgG4-RD, the corresponding sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV, LR+, and LR− were 80%, 89%, 29%, 99%, 7.00, and 0.23, respectively. For IgG4 >402 mg/dL (>2× the upper limit of the normal range), the corresponding data were 62%, 98%, 68%, 98%, 36.21, and 0.39, respectively. For IgG4 >603 mg/dL (>3× the upper limit of the normal range), the corresponding data were 50%, 99%, 84%, 97%, 90.77 and 0.51, respectively. The optimal cutoff value of serum IgG4 (measured by nephelometry using a Siemens BN ProSpec instrument and Siemens reagent) for the diagnosis of IgG4-RD was 248 mg/dL, the sensitivity and specificity were 77.6% and 92.8%, respectively. The present

  6. IgG transport across mucosal barriers by neonatal Fc receptor for IgG and mucosal immunity.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Masaru; Masuda, Atsuhiro; Kuo, Timothy T; Kobayashi, Kanna; Claypool, Steven M; Takagawa, Tetsuya; Kutsumi, Hiromu; Azuma, Takeshi; Lencer, Wayne I; Blumberg, Richard S

    2006-12-01

    Mucosal secretions of the human gastrointestinal, respiratory, and genital tracts contain significant quantities of IgG. The neonatal Fc receptor for IgG (FcRn) plays a major role in regulating host IgG levels and transporting IgG and associated antigens across polarized epithelial barriers. The FcRn can then recycle the IgG/antigen complex back across the intestinal barrier into the lamina propria for processing by dendritic cells and presentation to CD4(+) T cells in regional organized lymphoid structures. FcRn, through its ability to secrete and absorb IgG, thus integrates luminal antigen encounters with systemic immune compartments and, as such, provides essential host defense and immunoregulatory functions at the mucosal surfaces. PMID:17051393

  7. Pathogenicity and Epitope Characteristics Do Not Differ in IgG Subclass-Switched Anti-Desmoglein 3 IgG1 and IgG4 Autoantibodies in Pemphigus Vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Ellebrecht, Christoph T.; Yu, Xiaocong; Posner, Marshall R.; Payne, Aimee S.

    2016-01-01

    Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) is characterized by IgG1 and IgG4 autoantibodies to desmoglein (Dsg) 3, causing suprabasal blistering of skin and mucous membranes. IgG4 is the dominant autoantibody subclass in PV and correlates with disease activity, whereas IgG1 can be associated with remittent disease. It is unknown if switching the same variable region between IgG4 and IgG1 directly impacts pathogenicity. Here, we tested whether three pathogenic PV monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) from three different patients demonstrate differences in antigen affinity, epitope specificity, or pathogenicity when expressed as IgG1 or IgG4. F706 anti-Dsg3 IgG4 and F779 anti-Dsg3 IgG1, previously isolated as heterohybridomas, and Px43, a monovalent anti-Dsg3/Dsg1 IgG antibody isolated by phage display, were subcloned to obtain paired sets of IgG1 and IgG4 mAbs. Using ELISA and cell surface staining assays, F706 and F779 demonstrated similar antigen binding affinities of IgG1 and IgG4, whereas Px43 showed 3- to 8-fold higher affinity of IgG4 versus IgG1 by ELISA, but identical binding affinities to human skin, perhaps due to targeting of a quaternary epitope best displayed in tissues. All 3 mAb pairs targeted the same extracellular cadherin (EC) domain on Dsg3, caused Dsg3 internalization in primary human keratinocytes, and caused suprabasal blisters in human skin at comparable doses. We conclude that switching IgG1 and IgG4 subclasses of pathogenic PV mAbs does not directly affect their antigen binding or pathogenic properties. PMID:27304671

  8. The use of anti-IgG monoclonal antibodies in mapping the monocyte receptor site on IgG.

    PubMed

    Partridge, L J; Woof, J M; Jefferis, R; Burton, D R

    1986-12-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) directed against epitopes on the C gamma 1, C gamma 2, C gamma 3 and C gamma 2-C gamma 3 interface regions of human IgG were used to attempt to localize the monocyte Fc receptor (FcR) binding site. The MAbs have been assayed for their capacity to inhibit the interaction between 125I-labelled IgG (125I-IgG) and human monocytes or human histiocytic lymphoma U937 cells. Two MAbs specific for epitopes on the N-terminal region of the C gamma 2 domain, and one MAb recognizing an epitope in the C gamma 2-C gamma 3 inter-domain region inhibited binding of 125I-IgG to monocyte FcRs. The remaining MAbs, against a C-terminal C gamma 3 domain epitope, another C gamma 2/C gamma 3 region epitope and the G1m(f) allotope on the C gamma 1 domain did not inhibit the interaction. The capacity of the MAbs to bind to their respective epitopes on cell surface FcR-bound IgG was also studied, using indirect radiobinding and immunofluorescence assays. All of the MAbs, except those with C gamma 2 domain specificities, were able to detect FcR-bound IgG under these conditions. The results confirm the role of the C gamma 2 domain in the interaction of IgG with monocytes and demonstrate that epitopes in the C gamma 3 and C gamma 2-C gamma 3 regions are not involved in the binding site. PMID:2434846

  9. Allergen-specific IgG antibodies purified from mite-allergic patients sera block the IgE recognition of Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus antigens: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Siman, Isabella Lima; de Aquino, Lais Martins; Ynoue, Leandro Hideki; Miranda, Juliana Silva; Pajuaba, Ana Claudia Arantes Marquez; Cunha-Júnior, Jair Pereira; Silva, Deise Aparecida Oliveira; Taketomi, Ernesto Akio

    2013-01-01

    One of the purposes of specific immunotherapy (SIT) is to modulate humoral immune response against allergens with significant increases in allergen-specific IgG levels, commonly associated with blocking activity. The present study investigated in vitro blocking activity of allergen-specific IgG antibodies on IgE reactivity to Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Dpt) in sera from atopic patients. Dpt-specific IgG antibodies were purified by ammonium sulfate precipitation followed by protein-G affinity chromatography. Purity was checked by SDS-PAGE and immunoreactivity by slot-blot and immunoblot assays. The blocking activity was evaluated by inhibition ELISA. The electrophoretic profile of the ammonium sulfate precipitated fraction showed strongly stained bands in ligand fraction after chromatography, compatible with molecular weight of human whole IgG molecule. The purity degree was confirmed by detecting strong immunoreactivity to IgG, negligible to IgA, and no reactivity to IgE and IgM. Dpt-specific IgG fraction was capable of significantly reducing levels of IgE anti-Dpt, resulting in 35%-51% inhibition of IgE reactivity to Dpt in atopic patients sera. This study showed that allergen-specific IgG antibodies purified from mite-allergic patients sera block the IgE recognition of Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus antigens. This approach reinforces that intermittent measurement of serum allergen-specific IgG antibodies will be an important objective laboratorial parameter that will help specialists to follow their patients under SIT. PMID:24069042

  10. Relative stabilities of IgG1 and IgG4 Fab domains: Influence of the light–heavy interchain disulfide bond architecture

    PubMed Central

    Heads, James T; Adams, Ralph; D'Hooghe, Lena E; Page, Matt J T; Humphreys, David P; Popplewell, Andrew G; Lawson, Alastair D; Henry, Alistair J

    2012-01-01

    The stability of therapeutic antibodies is a prime pharmaceutical concern. In this work we examined thermal stability differences between human IgG1 and IgG4 Fab domains containing the same variable regions using the thermofluor assay. It was found that the IgG1 Fab domain is up to 11°C more stable than the IgG4 Fab domain containing the same variable region. We investigated the cause of this difference with the aim of developing a molecule with the enhanced stability of the IgG1 Fab and the biological properties of an IgG4 Fc. We found that replacing the seven residues, which differ between IgG1 CH1 and IgG4 CH1 domains, while retaining the native IgG1 light-heavy interchain disulfide (L–H) bond, did not affect thermal stability. Introducing the IgG1 type L–H interchain disulfide bond (DSB) into the IgG4 Fab resulted in an increase in thermal stability to levels observed in the IgG1 Fab with the same variable region. Conversely, replacement of the IgG1 L–H interchain DSB with the IgG4 type L–H interchain DSB reduced the thermal stability. We utilized the increased stability of the IgG1 Fab and designed a hybrid antibody with an IgG1 CH1 linked to an IgG4 Fc via an IgG1 hinge. This construct has the expected biophysical properties of both the IgG4 Fc and IgG1 Fab domains and may therefore be a pharmaceutically relevant format. PMID:22761163

  11. Neutralization by Acetyl Salicylic Acid of the Testosterone induced Impaired Maspin Synthesis Stimulated by Estriol in Neutrophils through Nitric Oxide Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Manna, Emili; Bank, Sarbashri; Maiti, Smarajit; Jana, Pradipta; Sinha, Asru K.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Maspin, an anti breast cancer protein in the mammary cell and normal neutrophil has been reported to be synthesised by the stimulation of NO production induced by estriol. The role of testosterone was investigated in the synthesis of maspin in relation to that of estriol. Methods: Fifty normal female between the ages of 25-65 years old participated in the study. Maspin synthesis was demonstrated by in vitro translation of maspin mRNA, followed by the quantification of maspin by enzyme linked immune absorbent assay. NO was determined by methomoglobin method. Results: Incubation of the neutrophils in HBSS both with 30 nM estriol resulted in the synthesis of 1.8 ngm maspin with simultaneous increase of NO synthesis. In contrast incubating neutrophils with 20 nM testosterone in the presence of estriol inhibited maspin synthesis to 0.33 nM with simultaneous inhibition of NO synthesis from 1.89 nM to 0 nM at the same time. Addition of 0.2 μM flutamide, a testosterone receptor blocker to the incubation mixture restored the synthesis of maspin by 60.64 %. Incubation of 25 μM aspirin that stimulated NO synthesis restored the inhibition of maspin synthesis by testosterone by 79.1%. I-NAME, an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase, abolished both maspin and NO synthesis. Scatchard plot of estriol binding in the presence of testosterone demonstrated that the male sex hormone inhibited the female sex hormone binding to its receptor by “cross talk” between the receptors. It was found that while 1.02 × 103 molecules of estriol bind each neutrophil at equilibrium, in the presence of testosterone (20 nM) in the binding mixture decreases the binding of estriol to 0.5 × 103 with little change in the dissociation constant compared to controls. Conclution: Estriol was found to stimulate maspin synthesis through the stimulation of NO, testosterone inhibited maspin synthesis through the inhibition of NO synthesis. PMID:26759534

  12. Soluble Monomeric IgG1 Fc*

    PubMed Central

    Ying, Tianlei; Chen, Weizao; Gong, Rui; Feng, Yang; Dimitrov, Dimiter S.

    2012-01-01

    Antibody fragments are emerging as promising biopharmaceuticals because of their relatively small size and other unique properties. However, compared with full-size antibodies, these antibody fragments lack the ability to bind the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) and have reduced half-lives. Fc engineered to bind antigens but preserve interactions with FcRn and Fc fused with monomeric proteins currently are being developed as candidate therapeutics with prolonged half-lives; in these and other cases, Fc is a dimer of two CH2-CH3 chains. To further reduce the size of Fc but preserve FcRn binding, we generated three human soluble monomeric IgG1 Fcs (mFcs) by using a combination of structure-based rational protein design combined with multiple screening strategies. These mFcs were highly soluble and retained binding to human FcRn comparable with that of Fc. These results provide direct experimental evidence that efficient binding to human FcRn does not require human Fc dimerization. The newly identified mFcs are promising for the development of mFc fusion proteins and for novel types of mFc-based therapeutic antibodies of small size and long half-lives. PMID:22518843

  13. Abnormal regulation of IgG production in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Goust, J M; Hogan, E L; Arnaud, P

    1982-03-01

    After stimulation with pokeweed mitogen (PWM), peripheral blood mononuclear cells (MNC) from patients with active multiple sclerosis (MS) produced significantly more IgG (8595 ng per milliliter, p less than 0.01) then MNC from normal age-matched controls (5477 ng per milliliter), whereas those tested during stable periods produced less IgG (4076 ng per milliliter, p less than 0.01). Treatment of MNC with sodium periodate (SP) generated suppressor cells for PWM-driven IgG production in normal controls and in most of the stable MS patients but in only 26% of those during active disease, in whom an increase in IgG production was often seen. This suggests a deficiency of inducible suppressor T cells associated with a supranormal B-cell response to polyclonal activation; T lymphocytes obtained from MS patients during active episodes strongly suppressed IgG production by normal B lymphocytes, whereas their B cells often produced more IgG in the presence of normal T cells. In active MS, a relative B-cell unresponsiveness to activated suppressor T cells would leave helper signals unbalanced, thus leading to increased B-cell activation, which might deplete the pool of inducible suppressor cells for IgG production. PMID:6460946

  14. Glycosylation of plasma IgG in colorectal cancer prognosis.

    PubMed

    Theodoratou, Evropi; Thaçi, Kujtim; Agakov, Felix; Timofeeva, Maria N; Štambuk, Jerko; Pučić-Baković, Maja; Vučković, Frano; Orchard, Peter; Agakova, Anna; Din, Farhat V N; Brown, Ewan; Rudd, Pauline M; Farrington, Susan M; Dunlop, Malcolm G; Campbell, Harry; Lauc, Gordan

    2016-01-01

    In this study we demonstrate the potential value of Immunoglobulin G (IgG) glycosylation as a novel prognostic biomarker of colorectal cancer (CRC). We analysed plasma IgG glycans in 1229 CRC patients and correlated with survival outcomes. We assessed the predictive value of clinical algorithms and compared this to algorithms that also included glycan predictors. Decreased galactosylation, decreased sialylation (of fucosylated IgG glycan structures) and increased bisecting GlcNAc in IgG glycan structures were strongly associated with all-cause (q < 0.01) and CRC mortality (q = 0.04 for galactosylation and sialylation). Clinical algorithms showed good prediction of all-cause and CRC mortality (Harrell's C: 0.73, 0.77; AUC: 0.75, 0.79, IDI: 0.02, 0.04 respectively). The inclusion of IgG glycan data did not lead to any statistically significant improvements overall, but it improved the prediction over clinical models for stage 4 patients with the shortest follow-up time until death, with the median gain in the test AUC of 0.08. These glycan differences are consistent with significantly increased IgG pro-inflammatory activity being associated with poorer CRC prognosis, especially in late stage CRC. In the absence of validated biomarkers to improve upon prognostic information from existing clinicopathological factors, the potential of these novel IgG glycan biomarkers merits further investigation. PMID:27302279

  15. Cysteine Racemization on IgG Heavy and Light Chains

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qingchun; Flynn, Gregory C.

    2013-01-01

    Under basic pH conditions, the heavy chain 220-light chain 214 (H220-L214) disulfide bond, found in the flexible hinge region of an IgG1, can convert to a thioether. Similar conditions also result in racemization of the H220 cysteine. Here, we report that racemization occurs on both H220 and L214 on an IgG1 with a λ light chain (IgG1λ) but almost entirely on H220 of an IgGl with a κ light chain (IgG1κ) under similar conditions. Likewise, racemization was detected at significant levels on H220 and L214 on endogenous human IgG1λ but only at the H220 position on IgG1κ. Low but measurable levels of d-cysteines were found on IgG2 cysteines in the hinge region, both with monoclonal antibodies incubated under basic pH conditions and on antibodies isolated from human serum. A simplified reaction mechanism involving reversible β-elimination on the cysteine is presented that accounts for both base-catalyzed racemization and thioether formation at the hinge disulfide. PMID:24142697

  16. IgG4-related disease of the rectum

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Sung-Bong; Lim, Chul-Hyun; Cha, Myung-Guen

    2016-01-01

    IgG4-related disease is a relatively new disease entity characterized by elevated serum IgG4 levels and marked infiltration of IgG4-positive plasma cells in lesions. Organ enlargement or nodular lesions consisting of abundant infiltration of lymphocytes and IgG4-positive plasma cells and fibrosis are seen in various organs throughout. We encountered a patient with an inflammatory pseudotumor of the rectum, which was histopathologically confirmed to be an IgG4-related disease. The patient was a 28-year-old woman who had constipation for 3 months. The endoluminal ultrasonography showed a lesion that was heterogeneous and low echogenic in lower rectum. The result of colonoscopic biopsy findings was of chronic proctitis with lymphoid aggregates. For a confirmative diagnosis, excision was performed. Histopathological examination represented plasma cell infiltration and fibrosis. Immunohistochemistry revealed prominence of IgG4-positive plasma cells and confirmed the diagnosis of IgG4-related disease. The patient is currently under observation on low-dose oral prednisolone without relapse. PMID:27186575

  17. Glycosylation of plasma IgG in colorectal cancer prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Theodoratou, Evropi; Thaçi, Kujtim; Agakov, Felix; Timofeeva, Maria N.; Štambuk, Jerko; Pučić-Baković, Maja; Vučković, Frano; Orchard, Peter; Agakova, Anna; Din, Farhat V. N.; Brown, Ewan; Rudd, Pauline M.; Farrington, Susan M.; Dunlop, Malcolm G.; Campbell, Harry; Lauc, Gordan

    2016-01-01

    In this study we demonstrate the potential value of Immunoglobulin G (IgG) glycosylation as a novel prognostic biomarker of colorectal cancer (CRC). We analysed plasma IgG glycans in 1229 CRC patients and correlated with survival outcomes. We assessed the predictive value of clinical algorithms and compared this to algorithms that also included glycan predictors. Decreased galactosylation, decreased sialylation (of fucosylated IgG glycan structures) and increased bisecting GlcNAc in IgG glycan structures were strongly associated with all-cause (q < 0.01) and CRC mortality (q = 0.04 for galactosylation and sialylation). Clinical algorithms showed good prediction of all-cause and CRC mortality (Harrell’s C: 0.73, 0.77; AUC: 0.75, 0.79, IDI: 0.02, 0.04 respectively). The inclusion of IgG glycan data did not lead to any statistically significant improvements overall, but it improved the prediction over clinical models for stage 4 patients with the shortest follow-up time until death, with the median gain in the test AUC of 0.08. These glycan differences are consistent with significantly increased IgG pro-inflammatory activity being associated with poorer CRC prognosis, especially in late stage CRC. In the absence of validated biomarkers to improve upon prognostic information from existing clinicopathological factors, the potential of these novel IgG glycan biomarkers merits further investigation. PMID:27302279

  18. On the effects of testosterone on brain behavioral functions

    PubMed Central

    Celec, Peter; Ostatníková, Daniela; Hodosy, Július

    2015-01-01

    Testosterone influences the brain via organizational and activational effects. Numerous relevant studies on rodents and a few on humans focusing on specific behavioral and cognitive parameters have been published. The results are, unfortunately, controversial and puzzling. Dosing, timing, even the application route seem to considerably affect the outcomes. In addition, the methods used for the assessment of psychometric parameters are a bit less than ideal regarding their validity and reproducibility. Metabolism of testosterone contributes to the complexity of its actions. Reduction to dihydrotestosterone by 5-alpha reductase increases the androgen activity; conversion to estradiol by aromatase converts the androgen to estrogen activity. Recently, the non-genomic effects of testosterone on behavior bypassing the nuclear receptors have attracted the interest of researchers. This review tries to summarize the current understanding of the complexity of the effects of testosterone on brain with special focus on their role in the known sex differences. PMID:25741229

  19. Testosterone Therapy in Adult Men with Androgen Deficiency Syndromes

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood levels of testosterone of 300–1,000 ng/dL are considered normal, but these levels may ... blood PSA (prostate specific antigen) level over 4 ng/ mL (which suggests prostate cancer or other prostate ...

  20. Testosterone levels in an aging population: screen, measure, and restore.

    PubMed

    Kells, John; Dollbaum, Charles M

    2011-01-01

    An insufficient level of testosterone in aging men and women is associated with a constellation of adverse conditions (cognitive decline, loss of muscle mass, osteopenia, decreased libido, changes in fat distribution, fragility, depression, a greater risk of fracture). Research has confirmed that supplementary testosterone can ameliorate those signs and symptoms in hypogonadic individuals, but the benefits and risks of that therapy remain controversial. The treatment of such patients should be based on knowledge of the physiologic effects of testosterone in the elderly, effective screening for testosterone deficiency accurate measurement of bioavailable levels of that hormone, and safe and effective treatment options, all of which are examined in this article. In designing hormone replacement regimens, the skill of a compounding pharmacist who can customize dose and dosage forms to answer individual medical needs and preferences can be instrumental in achieving the desired outcome. PMID:23696079

  1. Testosterone Therapy May Boost Older Men's Sex Lives

    MedlinePlus

    ... 159622.html Testosterone Therapy May Boost Older Men's Sex Lives Gel hormone treatment led to improved libido ... experienced a moderate but significant improvement in their sex drive, sexual activity and erectile function compared to ...

  2. Prenatal stimulation and postnatal testosterone affects infanticide in female rats.

    PubMed

    Miley, W M; Blustein, J; Kennedy, K

    1982-04-01

    Prenatal handling, prenatal stress, and early postnatal exogeneous testosterone were examined in female rats for their effects on rat pup-killing and pup retrieval. During each of the last 5 days of pregnancy. Long-Evans rats received either 3 minutes of handling, 45 minutes of restraint and intense illumination or remained untouched. Half of the offspring of each group received testosterone from Day 1 after birth to Day 30. In adulthood, animals that received handling prenatally and testosterone postnatally killed pups more rapidly than any other group and a larger proportion did so than in the control groups. Animals not manipulated at any time retrieved pups more rapidly and a larger proportion did so than the combined other groups. The study suggests that prenatal handling interacts with testosterone presented immediately postnatally to increase infanticide in female rats. A variety of perinatal manipulations seem to suppress pup retrieval. PMID:7200619

  3. Testosterone Supplementation Therapy in the Treatment of Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kovac, Jason R.; Pastuszak, Alexander W.; Lamb, Dolores J.; Lipshultz, Larry I.

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a clinical complex of risk factors including increased waist circumference, high triglycerides, low HDL cholesterol, high blood pressure and insulin resistance whose presence increases the likelihood of developing diabetes and cardiovascular disease. With a quarter of the American adult population affected, MetS has been referred to as the most significant public health threat of the 21st century. While lifestyle modification and weight loss are recommended, no specific pharmacological treatment is known. Given that low levels of testosterone have been implicated in the pathogenesis of MetS and an inverse relationship exists between circulating testosterone and the development of MetS, it is tempting to speculate that men with MetS may benefit from testosterone supplementation therapy (TST). As such, this review seeks to examine the role of testosterone and the use of TST as a treatment modality in men with MetS. PMID:25387223

  4. Crystal growth of steroids in silica gel: Testosterone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalkura, S. Narayana; Devanarayanan, S.

    1989-03-01

    Single crystals of testosterone monohydrate (C 19H 28O 2·H 2O) were grown in silica gel. IR spectroscopic, X-ray powder diffraction, and differential scanning calorimetric (DSC) methods were used to characterize the crystals.

  5. Effect of Dehydroepiandrosterone and Testosterone Supplementation on Systemic Lipolysis.

    PubMed

    Espinosa De Ycaza, Ana E; Rizza, Robert A; Nair, K Sreekumaran; Jensen, Michael D

    2016-04-01

    We evaluated the effects of supplementation with DHEA (in elderly men and women) and testosterone (in elderly men) on postprandial or iv insulin suppression of lipolysis. We found no effect of these hormones on systemic lipolysis. PMID:26885881

  6. Age related IgG subclass concentrations in asthma.

    PubMed

    Hoeger, P H; Niggemann, B; Haeuser, G

    1994-03-01

    The prevalence of IgG subclass deficiency in asthma is still controversial. Earlier studies often included patients receiving treatment with systemic steroids which can induce hypogammaglobulinaemia. Concentrations of IgG subclasses were studies in 200 children (aged 2-17 years) with asthma (mean asthma severity score (ASS) 2, range 1-4) who had not received systemic steroids for at least six weeks before investigation, and in 226 healthy age matched controls. The mean concentrations of IgG subclasses in children with asthma were within the 1SD range of those of the control group. In the group with asthma there was a trend towards higher levels of IgG1 and IgG4, whereas the number of children with low concentrations of IgG2 (< 2 SD of control serum samples; absolute concentrations 0.08-1.25 g/l) was slightly greater than in the group who did not have asthma (4.5 v 2.2%). Patients with subnormal concentrations of IgG2 could not be distinguished clinically or on the basis of case history and additional immunological studies did not show further abnormalities. Patients with severe asthma (ASS 3-4) had significantly higher concentrations of IgG4 (mean (SE) 0.53 (0.09) v 0.26 (0.04) g/l) than patients with mild asthma (ASS 1). No significant difference in subclass concentration was found between patients with atopic and those with non-atopic asthma. It is concluded that in an unselected group of children with asthma the mean IgG subclass concentrations do not differ significantly from a group of healthy age matched controls. PMID:8135559

  7. Supra-physiological dose of testosterone induces pathological cardiac hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Pirompol, Prapawadee; Teekabut, Vassana; Weerachatyanukul, Wattana; Bupha-Intr, Tepmanas; Wattanapermpool, Jonggonnee

    2016-04-01

    Testosterone and androgenic anabolic steroids have been misused for enhancement of physical performance despite many reports on cardiac sudden death. Although physiological level of testosterone provided many regulatory benefits to human health, including the cardiovascular function, supra-physiological levels of the hormone induce hypertrophy of the heart with unclear contractile activation. In this study, dose- and time-dependent effects of high-testosterone treatment on cardiac structure and function were evaluated. Adult male rats were divided into four groups of testosterone treatment for 0, 5, 10, and 20 mg/kg BW for 4, 8, or 12 weeks. Increases in both percentage heart:body weight ratio and cardiomyocyte cross-sectional area in representing hypertrophy of the heart were significantly shown in all testosterone-treated groups to the same degree. In 4-week-treated rats, physiological cardiac hypertrophy was apparent with an upregulation of α-MHC without any change in myofilament contractile activation. In contrast, pathological cardiac hypertrophy was observed in 8- and 12-week testosterone-treated groups, as indicated by suppression of myofilament activation and myocardial collagen deposition without transition of MHC isoforms. Only in 12-week testosterone-treated group, eccentric cardiac hypertrophy was demonstrated with unaltered myocardial stiffness, but significant reductions in the phosphorylation signals of ERK1/2 and mTOR. Results of our study suggest that the outcome of testosterone-induced cardiac hypertrophy is not dose dependent but is rather relied on the factor of exposure to duration in inducing maladaptive responses of the heart. PMID:26850730

  8. Correlation Between Personality Traits and Testosterone Concentrations in Healthy Population

    PubMed Central

    Tajima-Pozo, Kazuhiro; Bayón, Camila; Díaz-Marsá, Marina; Carrasco, Jose Luis

    2015-01-01

    Objective: High plasma testosterone levels have been associated with aggression, sexual behaviour and social status. The aim of this paper was to study the correlation between basal plasma testosterone levels and personality variables in healthy participants. Materials and Methods: Fifty-four participants were randomly enrolled into this study. Basal plasma testosterone levels were measured between 8:30 am and 10 am. After 24 hours of blood drawing, each subject completed personality questionnaires. Results: Positive correlation between basal plasma testosterone levels and anti-social personality traits in both genders was observed (r = 0.336 and P < 0.018). Also, a positive correlation was observed between basal plasmatestosterone levels and criminal thinking traits (r = 0. 376, P < 0.05) and Millon compulsive (r = 0.386, P < 0.010) in both genders. In female participants, a positive correlation between basal plasmatestosterone levels and psychoticism (r = 0. 25, P < 0.019) and Cloninger AUTO TCI (r = 0.507, P < 0.004) was observed. In males participants positive correlation between baseline plasmatic Testosterone levels and Millon Antisocial trait (r = 0. 544, P < 0.19) and Millon Hypomania trait (r = 0. 485, P < 0.41) and Millon Drug Abuse trait (r = 0.632, P < 0.05) was reported. Conclusion: Our results suggest gender differences in clinical and personality variables related with basal plasma testosterone level. In men, high plasma testosterone levels were associated with clinical traits, substance abuse and hypomania. Women with higher basal testosterone levels showed higher scores on personality self-direction traits. PMID:26664080

  9. The Effect of Testosterone on Men With Andropause

    PubMed Central

    Sofimajidpour, Heshmatollah; Teimoori, Taher; Gharibi, Fardin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Andropause is the gradual reduction of the male sex hormone (testosterone) with increasing age. Its symptoms are sexual dysfunction, weakness, fatigue, insomnia, loss of motivation, mood disorders and reduction of bone density. Treatment of andropause with testosterone has been recently considered. Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of testosterone in the treatment of andropause in men. Patients and Methods: For men who met the inclusion criteria (50 years of age and older) laboratory tests and clinical examinations were conducted by an urologist in order to diagnose prostate cancer, prostate disease, urinary tract infection and active urinary retention. After obtaining consent, the patients were enrolled in the study. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 20. Descriptive statistics (frequency and percentage, mean, standard deviation) and the paired t-test were used to compare levels of testosterone. To determine the correlation between age and testosterone levels, the Pearson correlation was used. Finally, to compare the treatment processes during the treatment period the repeated measures ANOVA was used. Results: The mean age of patients was 56.57 ± 3.21 years. A total of 31 patients (39%) were smokers, among them 30% smoked daily, 2.5% weekly and 6% smoked for fun. The mean testosterone level before treatment was 240.6 ± 125.4 and at 1, 3 and 6 months after treatment the level was raised, so that at the end of the sixth months it was 578.7 ± 141.7. The level of increase was statistically significant (P = 0.0001). Conclusions: Treatment with testosterone in men over 50 years with andropause will increase testosterone levels and also quality of life, sexual desire, erection, energy levels, ability to exercise and feel the joy of life more than before. Depression was decreased and they had sleepy feelings after dinner. PMID:26756004

  10. Mechanism of Testosterone Deficiency in the Transgenic Sickle Cell Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Musicki, Biljana; Zhang, Yuxi; Chen, Haolin; Brown, Terry R.; Zirkin, Barry R.; Burnett, Arthur L.

    2015-01-01

    Testosterone deficiency is associated with sickle cell disease (SCD), but its underlying mechanism is not known. We investigated the possible occurrence and mechanism of testosterone deficiency in a mouse model of human SCD. Transgenic sickle male mice (Sickle) exhibited decreased serum and intratesticular testosterone and increased luteinizing hormone (LH) levels compared with wild type (WT) mice, indicating primary hypogonadism in Sickle mice. LH-, dbcAMP-, and pregnenolone- (but not 22-hydroxycholesterol)- stimulated testosterone production by Leydig cells isolated from the Sickle mouse testis was decreased compared to that of WT mice, implying defective Leydig cell steroidogenesis. There also was reduced protein expression of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (STAR), but not cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme (P450scc), in the Sickle mouse testis. These data suggest that the capacity of P450scc to support testosterone production may be limited by the supply of cholesterol to the mitochondria in Sickle mice. The sickle mouse testis exhibited upregulated NADPH oxidase subunit gp91phox and increased oxidative stress, measured as 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal, and unchanged protein expression of an antioxidant glutathione peroxidase-1. Mice heterozygous for the human sickle globin (Hemi) exhibited intermediate hypogonadal changes between those of WT and Sickle mice. These results demonstrate that testosterone deficiency occurs in Sickle mice, mimicking the human condition. The defects in the Leydig cell steroidogenic pathway in Sickle mice, mainly due to reduced availability of cholesterol for testosterone production, may be related to NADPH oxidase-derived oxidative stress. Our findings suggest that targeting testicular oxidative stress or steroidogenesis mechanisms in SCD offers a potential treatment for improving phenotypic changes associated with testosterone deficiency in this disease. PMID:26023917

  11. Human plasma contains cross-reactive Abeta conformer-specific IgG antibodies.

    PubMed

    O'Nuallain, Brian; Acero, Luis; Williams, Angela D; Koeppen, Helen P McWilliams; Weber, Alfred; Schwarz, Hans P; Wall, Jonathan S; Weiss, Deborah T; Solomon, Alan

    2008-11-25

    Two conformers of aggregated Abeta, i.e., fibrils and oligomers, have been deemed important in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. We now report that intravenous immune globulin (IVIG) derived from pools of human plasma contains IgGs that recognize conformational epitopes present on fibrils and oligomers, but not their soluble monomeric precursor. We have used affinity chromatography to isolate these antibodies and have shown that they cross-reacted with comparable nanomolar avidity with both types of Abeta aggregates; notably, binding was not inhibited by soluble Abeta monomers. Our studies provide further support for investigating the therapeutic use of IVIG in Alzheimer's disease. PMID:18956886

  12. Prevalence estimation of tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) antibodies in dogs from Finland using novel dog anti-TBEV IgG MAb-capture and IgG immunofluorescence assays based on recombinant TBEV subviral particles.

    PubMed

    Levanov, Lev; Vera, Cristina Pérez; Vapalahti, Olli

    2016-07-01

    Tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) is one of the most dangerous human neurological infections occurring in Europe and Northern parts of Asia with thousands of cases and millions vaccinated against it. The risk of TBE might be assessed through analyses of the samples taken from wildlife or from animals which are in close contact with humans. Dogs have been shown to be a good sentinel species for these studies. Serological assays for diagnosis of TBE in dogs are mainly based on purified and inactivated TBEV antigens. Here we describe novel dog anti-TBEV IgG monoclonal antibody (MAb)-capture assay which is based on TBEV prME subviral particles expressed in mammalian cells from Semliki Forest virus (SFV) replicon as well as IgG immunofluorescence assay (IFA) which is based on Vero E6 cells transfected with the same SFV replicon. We further demonstrate their use in a small-scale TBEV seroprevalence study of dogs representing different regions of Finland. Altogether, 148 dog serum samples were tested by novel assays and results were compared to those obtained with a commercial IgG enzyme immunoassay (EIA), hemagglutination inhibition test and IgG IFA with TBEV infected cells. Compared to reference tests, the sensitivities of the developed assays were 90-100% and the specificities of the two assays were 100%. Analysis of the dog serum samples showed a seroprevalence of 40% on Åland Islands and 6% on Southwestern archipelago of Finland. In conclusion, a specific and sensitive EIA and IFA for the detection of IgG antibodies in canine sera were developed. Based on these assays the seroprevalence of IgG antibodies in dogs from different regions of Finland was assessed and was shown to parallel the known human disease burden as the Southwestern archipelago and Åland Islands in particular had considerable dog TBEV antibody prevalence and represent areas with high risk of TBE for humans. PMID:27189583

  13. Inhibition of platelet-aggregating activity in thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura plasma by normal adult immunoglobulin G.

    PubMed Central

    Lian, E C; Mui, P T; Siddiqui, F A; Chiu, A Y; Chiu, L L

    1984-01-01

    Plasma from patients with thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) caused the aggregation of autologous and homologous platelets, and effect which was inhibited by normal plasma. IgG purified from seven normal adults at a concentration of 0.7 mg/ml completely inhibited the platelet aggregation induced by plasma obtained from two TTP patients with active disease. The inhibition of platelet aggregation by human adult IgG was concentration dependent, and the inhibitory activity of human IgG was neutralized by rabbit antihuman IgG. Fab fragments inhibited the TTP plasma-induced platelet aggregation as well as intact IgG, whereas Fc fragments had no effect. Platelet aggregation caused by ADP, collagen, epinephrine, or thrombin was not affected by purified human IgG. The prior incubation of IgG with TTP plasma caused a significantly greater reduction of platelet aggregation by TTP plasma than that of IgG and platelet suspension, suggesting that the IgG inhibits TTP plasma-induced platelet aggregation through direct interaction with platelet aggregating factor in TTP plasma. IgG obtained initially from five infants and young children under the age of 4 yr did not possess any inhibitory activity. When one of the children reached 3 yr of age, his IgG inhibited the aggregation induced by one TTP plasma, but not that caused by another plasma. The IgG procured from the same boy at 4 yr of age inhibited the aggregation induced by both TTP plasmas. The IgG purified from the TTP plasma during active disease failed to inhibit the aggregation caused by the same plasma. After recovery, however, the IgG effectively inhibited aggregation. These observations suggest that platelet-aggregating factors present in the TTP plasma are heterogeneous in nature and that the IgG present in the normal adult plasma, which inhibits the TTP plasma-induced platelet aggregation, may be partially responsible for the success of plasma infusion therapy in TTP. Images PMID:6538207

  14. Testosterone affects language areas of the adult human brain

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Andreas; Kranz, Georg S.; Sladky, Ronald; Kaufmann, Ulrike; Ganger, Sebastian; Hummer, Allan; Seiger, Rene; Spies, Marie; Vanicek, Thomas; Winkler, Dietmar; Kasper, Siegfried; Windischberger, Christian; Swaab, Dick F.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Although the sex steroid hormone testosterone is integrally involved in the development of language processing, ethical considerations mostly limit investigations to single hormone administrations. To circumvent this issue we assessed the influence of continuous high‐dose hormone application in adult female‐to‐male transsexuals. Subjects underwent magnetic resonance imaging before and after 4 weeks of testosterone treatment, with each scan including structural, diffusion weighted and functional imaging. Voxel‐based morphometry analysis showed decreased gray matter volume with increasing levels of bioavailable testosterone exclusively in Broca's and Wernicke's areas. Particularly, this may link known sex differences in language performance to the influence of testosterone on relevant brain regions. Using probabilistic tractography, we further observed that longitudinal changes in testosterone negatively predicted changes in mean diffusivity of the corresponding structural connection passing through the extreme capsule. Considering a related increase in myelin staining in rodents, this potentially reflects a strengthening of the fiber tract particularly involved in language comprehension. Finally, functional images at resting‐state were evaluated, showing increased functional connectivity between the two brain regions with increasing testosterone levels. These findings suggest testosterone‐dependent neuroplastic adaptations in adulthood within language‐specific brain regions and connections. Importantly, deteriorations in gray matter volume seem to be compensated by enhancement of corresponding structural and functional connectivity. Hum Brain Mapp 37:1738–1748, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26876303

  15. Low serum testosterone increases mortality risk among male dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Carrero, Juan Jesús; Qureshi, Abdul Rashid; Parini, Paolo; Arver, Stefan; Lindholm, Bengt; Bárány, Peter; Heimbürger, Olof; Stenvinkel, Peter

    2009-03-01

    Men treated with hemodialysis (HD) have a very poor prognosis and an elevated risk of premature cardiovascular disease (CVD). In the general population, associations between low testosterone concentrations and cardiovascular risk have been suggested. We performed a prospective observational study involving a well characterized cohort of 126 men treated with HD to examine the relationship between testosterone concentration and subsequent mortality during a mean follow-up period of 41 mo. Independent of age, serum creatinine, and sexual hormone binding globulin (SHBG), testosterone levels inversely and strongly associated with the inflammatory markers IL-6 and CRP. Patients with a clinical history of CVD had significantly lower testosterone levels. During follow up, 65 deaths occurred, 58% of which were a result of CVD. Men with testosterone values in the lowest tertile had increased all-cause and CVD mortality (crude hazard ratios [HRs] 2.03 [95% CI 1.24 to 3.31] and 3.19 [1.49 to 6.83], respectively), which persisted after adjustment for age, SHBG, previous CVD, diabetes, ACEi/ARB treatment, albumin, and inflammatory markers, but was lost after adjustment for creatinine. In summary, among men treated with HD, testosterone concentrations inversely correlate with all-cause and CVD-related mortality, as well as with markers of inflammation. Hypogonadism may be an additional treatable risk factor for patients with chronic kidney disease. PMID:19144759

  16. Different glycosylation pattern of human IgG1 and IgG3 antibodies isolated from transiently as well as permanently transfected cell lines.

    PubMed

    Vestrheim, A C; Moen, A; Egge-Jacobsen, W; Bratlie, D B; Michaelsen, T E

    2013-05-01

    The effector functions of IgG depend on the presence of carbohydrates attached to asparagine 297 in the Fc-portion. In this report, glycosylation profiles of recombinant wild-type and mutant IgG1 and IgG3 antibodies produced from three cell lines were analysed using LC-ESI-Orbitrap. Clear differences were detected between IgG1 and IgG3 glycoforms, where IgG1 generally contained fucosylated glycoforms, whilst IgG3 mainly were non-fucosylated. When using NS-0 and J558L cells for permanent transfection, IgG1 wt glycoforms differed between the two cell lines, whilst IgG3 wt glycoforms did not. Transiently transfected HEK 293E cells were used to produce IgG1 and IgG3 wt and mutants, affecting complement activation. Cell supernatants were harvested at early and late time points and analysed separately. IgGs harvested late showed simpler and less developed glycosylation structure compared to those harvested early. The IgG harvested early was slightly more effective in complement activation than those harvested late, whilst the antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity was unaltered. Generally, the glycosylation pattern of the mutants tested, including a hinge truncate mutant of IgG3, did not differ significantly from the wild-type IgGs. The striking difference in glycosylation pattern of IgG1 compared to IgG3 therefore appears not to be due to the long hinge region of IgG3 (62 amino acids) relative to the IgG1 hinge region (15 amino acids). Furthermore, mutation variants at or near the C1q binding site showed similar glycosylation structure and difference in their complement activation activity observed earlier is thus most likely due to differences in protein structure only. PMID:23488770

  17. Chronic Testosterone Replacement Exerts Cardioprotection against Cardiac Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury by Attenuating Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Testosterone-Deprived Rats

    PubMed Central

    Pongkan, Wanpitak; Chattipakorn, Siriporn C.; Chattipakorn, Nipon

    2015-01-01

    Background Although testosterone deficiency is associated with increased risks of heart disease, the benefits of testosterone therapy are controversial. Moreover, current understanding on the cardiac effect of testosterone during cardiac ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) periods is unclear. We tested the hypothesis that testosterone replacement attenuates the impairment of left ventricular (LV) function and heart rate variability (HRV), and reduces the infarct size and arrhythmias caused by I/R injury in orchiectomized (ORX) rats. Methodology ORX or sham-operated male Wistar rats (n = 24) were randomly divided and received either testosterone (2 mg/kg, subcutaneously administered) or the vehicle for 8 weeks. The ejection fraction (EF) and HRV were determined at baseline and the 4th and 8th week. I/R was performed by left anterior descending coronary artery ligation for 30 minutes, followed by a 120-minute reperfusion. LV pressure, arrhythmia scores, infarct size and cardiac mitochondrial function were determined. Results Prior to I/R, EF and HRV were impaired in the ORX group, but were restored in the testosterone-treated group. During I/R, arrhythmia scores and the infarct size were greater, and cardiac mitochondrial function was impaired, whereas the time to 1st VT/VF onset and the LV end-systolic pressure were decreased in the ORX group when compared to the sham group. Testosterone replacement attenuated the impairment of these parameters in ORX rats during I/R injury, but did not show any benefit or adverse effect in non-ORX rats. Conclusions Testosterone replacement restores cardiac function and autonomic regulation, and exerts cardioprotective effects during the I/R period via mitochondrial protection in ORX rats. PMID:25822979

  18. The laboratory diagnosis of testosterone deficiency.

    PubMed

    Paduch, Darius A; Brannigan, Robert E; Fuchs, Eugene F; Kim, Edward D; Marmar, Joel L; Sandlow, Jay I

    2014-05-01

    The evaluation and treatment of hypogonadal men has become an important part of urologic practice. Fatigue, loss of libido, and erectile dysfunction are commonly reported, but nonspecific symptoms and laboratory verification of low testosterone (T) are an important part of evaluation in addition to a detailed history and physical examination. Significant intraindividual fluctuations in serum T levels, biologic variation of T action on end organs, the wide range of T levels in human serum samples, and technical limitations of currently available assays have led to poor reliability of T measurements in the clinical laboratory setting. There is no universally accepted threshold of T concentration that distinguishes eugonadal from hypogonadal men; thus, laboratory results have to be interpreted in the appropriate clinical setting. This review focuses on clinical, biological, and technological challenges that affect serum T measurements to educate clinicians regarding technological advances and limitations of the currently available laboratory methods to diagnose hypogonadism. A collaborative effort led by the American Urological Association between practicing clinicians, patient advocacy groups, government regulatory agencies, industry, and professional societies is underway to provide optimized assay platforms and evidence-based normal assay ranges to guide clinical decision making. Until such standardization is commonplace in clinical laboratories, the decision to treat should be based on the presence of signs and symptoms in addition to serum T measurements. Rigid interpretation of T ranges should not dictate clinical decision making or define coverage of treatment by third party payers. PMID:24548716

  19. Effects of fetal testosterone on visuospatial ability.

    PubMed

    Auyeung, Bonnie; Knickmeyer, Rebecca; Ashwin, Emma; Taylor, Kevin; Hackett, Gerald; Baron-Cohen, Simon

    2012-06-01

    This study investigated whether fetal testosterone (FT) measured from second trimester amniotic fluid was related to specific aspects of visuospatial ability, in children aged 7-10 years (35 boys, 29 girls). A series of tasks were used: the children's Embedded Figures Test (EFT) (a test of attention to detail), a ball targeting task (measuring hand-eye coordination), and a computerized mental rotation task (measuring rotational ability). FT was a significant predictor for EFT scores in both boys and girls, with boys also showing a clear advantage for this task. No significant sex differences were observed in targeting. Boys scored higher than girls on mental rotation. However, no significant relationships were observed between FT and targeting or mental rotation. Girls' performance on the mental rotation and targeting tasks was significantly related to age, indicating that these tasks may have been too difficult for the younger children. These results indicate that FT has a significant role in some aspects of cognitive development but that further work is needed to understand its effect on the different aspects of visuospatial ability. PMID:22033667

  20. Anoctamin 1 (TMEM16A) is essential for testosterone-induced prostate hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Joo Young; Wee, Jungwon; Jung, Jooyoung; Jang, Yongwoo; Lee, Byeongjun; Hong, Gyu-Sang; Chang, Beom Chul; Choi, Yoon-La; Shin, Young Kee; Min, Hye-Young; Lee, Ho-Young; Na, Tae-Young; Lee, Mi-Ock; Oh, Uhtaek

    2015-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is characterized by an enlargement of the prostate, causing lower urinary tract symptoms in elderly men worldwide. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the pathogenesis of BPH is unclear. Anoctamin1 (ANO1) encodes a Ca2+-activated chloride channel (CaCC) that mediates various physiological functions. Here, we demonstrate that it is essential for testosterone-induced BPH. ANO1 was highly amplified in dihydrotestosterone (DHT)-treated prostate epithelial cells, whereas the selective knockdown of ANO1 inhibited DHT-induced cell proliferation. Three androgen-response elements were found in the ANO1 promoter region, which is relevant for the DHT-dependent induction of ANO1. Administration of the ANO1 blocker or Ano1 small interfering RNA, inhibited prostate enlargement and reduced histological abnormalities in vivo. We therefore concluded that ANO1 is essential for the development of prostate hyperplasia and is a potential target for the treatment of BPH. PMID:26153424

  1. Peroxynitrite mediates testosterone-induced vasodilation of microvascular resistance vessels.

    PubMed

    Puttabyatappa, Yashoda; Stallone, John N; Ergul, Adviye; El-Remessy, Azza B; Kumar, Sanjiv; Black, Stephen; Johnson, Maribeth; Owen, Mary P; White, Richard E

    2013-04-01

    Our knowledge of how androgens influence the cardiovascular system is far from complete, and this lack of understanding is especially true of how androgens affect resistance vessels. Our aim was to identify the signaling mechanisms stimulated by testosterone (TES) in microvascular arteries and to understand how these mechanisms mediate TES-induced vasodilation. Mesenteric microvessels were isolated from male Sprague-Dawley rats. Tension studies demonstrated a rapid, concentration-dependent, vasodilatory response to TES that did not involve protein synthesis or aromatization to 17β-estradiol. Dichlorofluorescein fluorescence and nitrotyrosine immunoblot experiments indicated that TES stimulated peroxynitrite formation in microvessels, and functional studies demonstrated that TES-induced vasodilation was inhibited by scavenging peroxynitrite. As predicted, TES enhanced the production of both peroxynitrite precursors (i.e., superoxide and nitic oxide), and xanthine oxidase was identified as the likely source of TES-stimulated superoxide production. Functional and biochemical studies indicated that TES signaling involved activity of the phosphoinositide 3 (PI3) kinase-protein kinase B (Akt) cascade initiated by activation of the androgen receptor and culminated in enhanced production of cGMP and microvascular vasodilation. These findings, derived from a variety of analytical and functional approaches, provide evidence for a novel nongenomic signaling mechanism for androgen action in the microvasculature: TES-stimulated vasodilation mediated primarily by peroxynitrite formed from xanthine oxidase-generated superoxide and NO. This response was associated with activation of the PI3 kinase-Akt signaling cascade initiated by activation of the androgen receptor. We propose this mechanism could account for TES-stimulated cGMP production in microvessels and, ultimately, vasodilation. PMID:23318471

  2. Peroxynitrite Mediates Testosterone-Induced Vasodilation of Microvascular Resistance Vessels

    PubMed Central

    Puttabyatappa, Yashoda; Stallone, John N.; Ergul, Adviye; El-Remessy, Azza B.; Kumar, Sanjiv; Black, Stephen; Johnson, Maribeth; Owen, Mary P.

    2013-01-01

    Our knowledge of how androgens influence the cardiovascular system is far from complete, and this lack of understanding is especially true of how androgens affect resistance vessels. Our aim was to identify the signaling mechanisms stimulated by testosterone (TES) in microvascular arteries and to understand how these mechanisms mediate TES-induced vasodilation. Mesenteric microvessels were isolated from male Sprague-Dawley rats. Tension studies demonstrated a rapid, concentration-dependent, vasodilatory response to TES that did not involve protein synthesis or aromatization to 17β-estradiol. Dichlorofluorescein fluorescence and nitrotyrosine immunoblot experiments indicated that TES stimulated peroxynitrite formation in microvessels, and functional studies demonstrated that TES-induced vasodilation was inhibited by scavenging peroxynitrite. As predicted, TES enhanced the production of both peroxynitrite precursors (i.e., superoxide and nitic oxide), and xanthine oxidase was identified as the likely source of TES-stimulated superoxide production. Functional and biochemical studies indicated that TES signaling involved activity of the phosphoinositide 3 (PI3) kinase-protein kinase B (Akt) cascade initiated by activation of the androgen receptor and culminated in enhanced production of cGMP and microvascular vasodilation. These findings, derived from a variety of analytical and functional approaches, provide evidence for a novel nongenomic signaling mechanism for androgen action in the microvasculature: TES-stimulated vasodilation mediated primarily by peroxynitrite formed from xanthine oxidase-generated superoxide and NO. This response was associated with activation of the PI3 kinase-Akt signaling cascade initiated by activation of the androgen receptor. We propose this mechanism could account for TES-stimulated cGMP production in microvessels and, ultimately, vasodilation. PMID:23318471

  3. Reproduction in hens: is testosterone necessary for the ovulatory process?

    PubMed

    Rangel, P L; Gutierrez, C G

    2014-07-01

    Avian reproduction entails complex endocrine interactions at the hypothalamic and ovarian levels. The initiation of the reproductive season is due to the reduction in melatonin and GnIH production as day length increases. The decline in GnIH permits GnRH and gonadotropin secretion starting follicle growth. Follicular steroids stimulate sexual activity and have important roles for the induction of ovulation. Progesterone (P4) is an inductor of the preovulatory surge of LH, while estradiol (E2) acts as a hypothalamic primer to allow P4 receptor development, as well as a stimulator of yolk production. Conversely, the role of testosterone (T) has been more controversial; however, there is now enough evidence, which demonstrates an essential action of T in the ovulatory process. For instance, blockage of endogenous T, by passive or active immunization or by the use of a specific antagonist of T, inhibits ovulation and the preovulatory surges of P4 and LH. This information is supported by the fact that there is a positive correlation between the occurrences of the T preovulatory surge and those of P4 and LH, in which the absence of T caused a lack of P4 and LH increase in almost 90% of the cases. Additionally, it has been observed that T has a paracrine action within the ovary, to promote P4 secretion by granulosa cells from the larger follicles. This has been related with an increased mRNA expression of StAR and P450scc enzymes, which are essential for P4 production, as well as with LH-R mRNA expression in granulosa cells of preovulatory follicles, an effect that should enhance the positive feedback between P4 and LH necessary for ovulation. Lastly, endocrine activity of hierarchical follicles occurs as a result of a complex interaction between the larger follicles (F1-F3) and the smaller follicles (F4-F6), which is necessary to achieve an adequate preovulatory milieu. PMID:24717810

  4. Indel Group in Genomes (IGG) Molecular Genetic Markers.

    PubMed

    Toal, Ted W; Burkart-Waco, Diana; Howell, Tyson; Ron, Mily; Kuppu, Sundaram; Britt, Anne; Chetelat, Roger; Brady, Siobhan M

    2016-09-01

    Genetic markers are essential when developing or working with genetically variable populations. Indel Group in Genomes (IGG) markers are primer pairs that amplify single-locus sequences that differ in size for two or more alleles. They are attractive for their ease of use for rapid genotyping and their codominant nature. Here, we describe a heuristic algorithm that uses a k-mer-based approach to search two or more genome sequences to locate polymorphic regions suitable for designing candidate IGG marker primers. As input to the IGG pipeline software, the user provides genome sequences and the desired amplicon sizes and size differences. Primer sequences flanking polymorphic insertions/deletions are produced as output. IGG marker files for three sets of genomes, Solanum lycopersicum/Solanum pennellii, Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) Columbia-0/Landsberg erecta-0 accessions, and S. lycopersicum/S. pennellii/Solanum tuberosum (three-way polymorphic) are included. PMID:27436831

  5. Coexistence of Acute Crescent Glomerulonephritis and IgG4-Related Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zeyuan; Yin, Jianyong; Bao, Hongda; Jiao, Qiong; Wu, Huijuan; Wu, Rui; Xue, Qin; Wang, Niansong; Zhang, Zhigang; Wang, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Introduction IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD) is a fibroinflammatory disorder that may involve almost each organ or system. IgG4-related kidney disease (IgG4-RKD) refers to renal lesions associated with IgG4-RD. The most frequent morphological type of renal lesions is IgG4-related tubulointerstitial nephritis (IgG4-TIN) which is associated with increased IgG4-positive plasma cell infiltration and interstitial fibrosis. Case Report Herein, we present a rare case with coexisting IgG4-RKD and acute crescent glomerulonephritis with concomitant severe tubulointerstitial lesions instead of classic IgG4-TIN. Conclusion IgG4-RKD and acute crescent glomerulonephritis can occur in the same patient. This case may give us a clearer viewpoint of the disease. PMID:27504450

  6. In vivo metabolism of a monoclonal IgG cryoglobulin

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, G. N.; Waterhouse, Christine; Condemi, J. J.

    1979-01-01

    The metabolism of a monoclonal IgG cryoglobulin was studied in a patient with primary idiopathic cryoglobulinaemia under two different clinical conditions. Early in the illness, cryoprotein levels were diminished to 770 mg% by plasmapheresis and plasma disappearance assayed while serum levels of cryoprotein increased to 1100 mg%, i.e. the study was performed during a period of unstable cryoprotein synthesis. A second study was performed 1 year later when serum levels of cryoglobulin were stable at 1500 mg% which allowed a synthetic rate of 64 mg/kg of body weight per day to be computed. This was the upper limit of normal IgG synthesis. The final slopes of the plasma disappearance curves were nearly identical for both studies, indicating that the same fractional percentage of the cryoglobulin serum pool was degraded regardless of its serum level. T1/2 of 15·5 and 17·0 days were obtained when plasma levels were unstable and stable, respectively. For comparative purposes, the plasma disappearance of pooled normal IgG, IgG3 myeloma proteins and a highly aggregated IgG3 myeloma were also studied when cryoprotein levels were 1500 mg%. Normal IgG synthesis was suppressed and only 8·5 mg/kg body weight per day, but its plasma disappearance curve showed a final slope nearly identical to those for the cryoprotein, indicating that the ability to catabolize normal IgG was unimpaired. IgG3 myelomas were cleared at their normal accelerated rate, while aggregated IgG3 was totally cleared from the circulation within 2 days, indicating that the patient was able to catabolize circulating immune complexes. As controls, the catabolism of cryoprotein was shown to be identical to that of pooled normal IgG in two volunteers. The data support the concept that the build up of circulating IgG cryoprotein in the patient studied was due to an increase in cryoprotein synthesis and not to a lack of ability to catabolize it. PMID:428148

  7. Large vessel involvement by IgG4-related disease

    PubMed Central

    Perugino, Cory A.; Wallace, Zachary S.; Meyersohn, Nandini; Oliveira, George; Stone, James R.; Stone, John H.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objectives: IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD) is an immune-mediated fibroinflammatory condition that can affect multiple organs and lead to tumefactive, tissue-destructive lesions. Reports have described inflammatory aortitis and periaortitis, the latter in the setting of retroperitoneal fibrosis (RPF), but have not distinguished adequately between these 2 manifestations. The frequency, radiologic features, and response of vascular complications to B cell depletion remain poorly defined. We describe the clinical features, radiology findings, and treatment response in a cohort of 36 patients with IgG4-RD affecting large blood vessels. Methods: Clinical records of all patients diagnosed with IgG4-RD in our center were reviewed. All radiologic studies were reviewed. We distinguished between primary large blood vessel inflammation and secondary vascular involvement. Primary involvement was defined as inflammation in the blood vessel wall as a principal focus of disease. Secondary vascular involvement was defined as disease caused by the effects of adjacent inflammation on the blood vessel wall. Results: Of the 160 IgG4-RD patients in this cohort, 36 (22.5%) had large-vessel involvement. The mean age at disease onset of the patients with large-vessel IgG4-RD was 54.6 years. Twenty-eight patients (78%) were male and 8 (22%) were female. Thirteen patients (36%) had primary IgG4-related vasculitis and aortitis with aneurysm formation comprised the most common manifestation. This affected 5.6% of the entire IgG4-RD cohort and was observed in the thoracic aorta in 8 patients, the abdominal aorta in 4, and both the thoracic and abdominal aorta in 3. Three of these aneurysms were complicated by aortic dissection or contained perforation. Periaortitis secondary to RPF accounted for 27 of 29 patients (93%) of secondary vascular involvement by IgG4-RD. Only 5 patients demonstrated evidence of both primary and secondary blood vessel involvement. Of those treated with

  8. Performance of the Elecsys Rubella IgG Assay in the Diagnostic Laboratory Setting for Assessment of Immune Status

    PubMed Central

    Bartelt, Uwe; Knotek, Frank; Bunn, Kristina; Strobel, Sirpa; Dietz, Klaus; Enders, Gisela

    2013-01-01

    Rubella in early pregnancy bears a high risk for congenital defects (e.g., cataracts, hearing loss, and heart disease) and for long-term sequelae in the newborn. Despite implementation of vaccination programs in many regions, the threat of devastating consequences from congenital rubella virus infection remains and careful screening of maternal immune status before and during pregnancy helps to reduce the risk. This study compared the performance of the Elecsys Rubella IgG assay with that of other assays routinely used for screening. Samples from 1,090 women undergoing routine antenatal care were tested using the Elecsys and Enzygnost Rubella IgG assays and the hemagglutination inhibition test. Samples with hemagglutination inhibition titers of <32 (n = 148) were additionally tested using the Vidas, AxSYM, Liaison, and Architect Rubella IgG assays. Agreement of qualitative results from the Elecsys, Enzygnost, and hemagglutination inhibition assays was good in all samples. All assays showed 100.0% specificity. In samples with hemagglutination inhibition titers of <32, the Elecsys, AxSYM, and Enzygnost assays showed higher sensitivity (>90.0%) than the other immunoassays (78.6 to 82.4%). The Elecsys assay reported significantly higher rubella virus IgG levels than the other immunoassays across the whole set of 1,090 samples, with the largest bias and deviation from limits of agreement in Bland-Altman analysis. In conclusion, the Elecsys assay is highly sensitive and specific with regard to qualitative results and suitable for routine automated screening. However, given the considerable variation between quantitative results from different immunoassays, testing methods should be documented and the same assay used throughout an individual's antenatal follow-up wherever possible. PMID:23345585

  9. IgG4-Related Disease in a Urachal Tumor.

    PubMed

    Dum, Travis W; Zhang, Da; Lee, Eugene K

    2014-01-01

    IgG4-related disease is a newly recognized fibroinflammatory disorder that has the ability to affect nearly every organ system. It is characterized by tumefactive lesions and fibrosis and closely mimics neoplasms. Only one case of IgG4-related bladder mass has been reported in the literature, but there are no reports of IgG4-related disease in a urachal mass. Herein, we report a 26-year-old male who initially presented with symptoms of recurrent UTI. Work-up revealed a 6 cm urachal tumor, a 1.4 cm pulmonary lesion, and mediastinal lymphadenopathy; all metabolically active on PET scan and suspicious for urachal adenocarcinoma. Lung lesion fine needle aspiration and TURBT pathology revealed inflammation but no evidence of malignancy. The patient underwent a partial cystectomy and umbilectomy with pathology demonstrating dense plasmacytic cells, a high rate of immunohistochemistry staining positive for IgG4 plasma cells, a storiform pattern of fibrosis, and an obliterative phlebitis. Furthermore, the patient had an elevated serum IgG4 level of 227 mg/dL (range 2.4-121 mg/dL). IgG4-related disease is a newly recognized fibroinflammatory disorder that can mimic neoplastic processes and a high index of suspicion and accurate tissue pathology is necessary for an accurate diagnosis. PMID:25202466

  10. Testosterone influences spatial strategy preferences among adult male rats

    PubMed Central

    Spritzer, Mark D.; Fox, Elliott C.; Larsen, Gregory D.; Batson, Christopher G.; Wagner, Benjamin A.; Maher, Jack

    2013-01-01

    Males outperform females on some spatial tasks, and this may be partially due to the effects of sex steroids on spatial strategy preferences. Previous work with rodents indicates that low estradiol levels bias females toward a striatum-dependent response strategy, whereas high estradiol levels bias them toward a hippocampus-dependent place strategy. We tested whether testosterone influenced the strategy preferences in male rats. All subjects were castrated and assigned to one of three daily injection doses of testosterone (0.125, 0.250, or 0.500 mg/rat) or a control group that received daily injections of the drug vehicle. Three different maze protocols were used to determine rats’ strategy preferences. A low dose of testosterone (0.125 mg) biased males toward a motor-response strategy on a T-maze task. In a water maze task in which the platform itself could be used intermittently as a visual cue, a low testosterone dose (0.125 mg) caused a significant increase in the use of a cued-response strategy relative to control males. Results from this second experiment also indicated that males receiving a high dose of testosterone (0.500 mg) were biased toward a place strategy. A third experiment indicated that testosterone dose did not have a strong influence on the ability of rats to use a nearby visual cue (floating ball) in the water maze. For this experiment, all groups seemed to use a combination of place and cued-response strategies. Overall, the results indicate that the effects of testosterone on spatial strategy preference are dose dependent and task dependent. PMID:23597827

  11. A Novel Testosterone Catabolic Pathway in Bacteria ▿ ‡

    PubMed Central

    Leu, Yann-Lii; Wang, Po-Hsiang; Shiao, Ming-Shi; Ismail, Wael; Chiang, Yin-Ru

    2011-01-01

    Forty years ago, Coulter and Talalay (A. W. Coulter and P. Talalay, J. Biol. Chem. 243:3238–3247, 1968) established the oxygenase-dependent pathway for the degradation of testosterone by aerobes. The oxic testosterone catabolic pathway involves several oxygen-dependent reactions and is not available for anaerobes. Since then, a variety of anaerobic bacteria have been described for the ability to degrade testosterone in the absence of oxygen. Here, a novel, oxygenase-independent testosterone catabolic pathway in such organisms is described. Steroidobacter denitrificansDSMZ18526 was shown to be capable of degrading testosterone in the absence of oxygen and was selected as the model organism in this study. In a previous investigation, we identified the initial intermediates involved in an anoxic testosterone catabolic pathway, most of which are identical to those of the oxic pathway demonstrated in Comamonas testosteroni. In this study, five additional intermediates of the anoxic pathway were identified. We demonstrated that subsequent steps of the anoxic pathway greatly differ from those of the established oxic pathway, which suggests that a novel pathway for testosterone catabolism is present. In the proposed anoxic pathway, a reduction reaction occurs at C-4 and C-5 of androsta-1,4-diene-3,17-dione, the last common intermediate of both the oxic and anoxic pathways. After that, a novel hydration reaction occurs and a hydroxyl group is thus introduced to the C-1α position of C19steroid substrates. To our knowledge, an enzymatic hydration reaction occurring at the A ring of steroid compounds has not been reported before. PMID:21725000

  12. Time for international action on treating testosterone deficiency syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Carruthers, Malcolm

    2009-01-01

    Aim Testosterone deficiency is having an increasing impact on men's health because of global aging, higher levels of obesity, diabetes and metabolic syndrome and adverse environmental factors such as stress xenoestrogens and anti-androgens. The question addressed is to what extent the large body of evidence on the benefits and safety of testosterone therapy is applied in clinical practice. Methods Demographic data for men over the age of 50 from different regions of the world have been compared with the number of men in that age group estimated from sales figures to be receiving testosterone treatment. Results On the basis of estimate that 20% of men over 50 in the general population of each region could be expected to have testosterone deficiency symptoms, on average only these men (0.69%) in most European countries were receiving treatment. Proportion was higher in the UK (1.00%) and Germany (1.89%), but lower in France (0.49%), Italy (0.51%) and Russia (0.54%). Interestingly, Australia had higher figures (1.64%), in spite of tight state control measures on androgen use. The USA has the highest treatment rate (7.96%) and this is increasing rapidly. If the basis for the diagnosis was the more conventional combination of symptoms plus biochemical evidence of low total and free testosterone levels, androgen deficiency would be expected in at least 5% of men over 50, and percentage treatment rates therefore four times higher. However, even on that basis, only in the USA do these exceed 10%. Conclusions International action is urgently needed to raise awareness in the medical profession in the various countries of these remarkably low levels of testosterone treatment. Improvement in this requires education and motivation of doctors and those regulating the healthcare systems. A public awareness campaign is needed to educate men about the symptoms of testosterone deficiency and its impact on their health. PMID:19326293

  13. Testosterone levels of children with a diagnosis of developmental stuttering

    PubMed Central

    Selçuk, Engin Burak; Erbay, Lale Gönenir; Özcan, Özlem Özel; Kartalci, Şükrü; Batcioğlu, Kadir

    2015-01-01

    Background Stuttering is defined as a disruption in the rhythm of speech and language articulation, where the subject knows what he/she wants to say, but is unable to utter the intended word or phrase fluently. The effect of sex on development and chronicity of stuttering is well known; it is more common and chronic in males. We aimed to investigate the relationship between developmental stuttering and serum testosterone levels in this study. Materials and methods In this study, we evaluated a total of 50 children (7–12 years of age); eight (16%) were female and 42 (84%) were male. Twenty-five children who stutter and 25 typically fluent peers with the same demographic properties (ages between 7 years and 12 years) were included in this study. The testosterone levels of the two groups were determined in terms of nanogram per milliliter (ng/mL) by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The difference between the means of the two groups was analyzed. Results The medians of the testosterone levels of the stutterer and control groups were determined as 20 ng/mL (range =12–184 ng/mL) and 5 ng/mL (range =2–30 ng/mL), respectively. Testosterone levels of the stutterer group were significantly higher than in the control group (P=0.001). Besides, there was a significant correlation between the severity of the stuttering and testosterone levels in the stutterer group (P=0.0001). Conclusion The findings of this study show that testosterone may have an effect on the severity of developmental stuttering and on the clinical differences between sexes. However, further investigations are needed to show that testosterone may play a role in the etiology of developmental stuttering. PMID:25999727

  14. Estimation of anti-D IgG in red blood cell eluates using the specific radioactivity of 125I-labeled IgG: effect of unlabeled, cytophilic IgG

    SciTech Connect

    Masouredis, S.P.; Mahan, L.C.; Sudora, E.J.; Langley, J.W.; Victoria, E.J.

    1981-01-01

    The specific radioactivity of conventionally prepared 125I IgG anti-D eluates is significantly less (from 1/5 to 1/20) than that of the 125I IgG fraction used to prepare the eluate. This discrepancy is due to the release of unlabeled, cytophilic IgG from normal red blood cells during eluate preparation and does not represent an underestimation of the eluate anti-D IgG content. Cytophilic IgG content of eluates plays an important role in reducing the nonimmunologic binding of labeled antibody IgG. The results justify the assumption used in numerous studies that the specific radioactivity of 125I IgG fractions can be used to provide a valid estimate of the anti-D IgG content of eluates.

  15. Factor XIa-specific IgG and a reversal agent to probe factor XI function in thrombosis and hemostasis.

    PubMed

    David, Tovo; Kim, Yun Cheol; Ely, Lauren K; Rondon, Isaac; Gao, Huilan; O'Brien, Peter; Bolt, Michael W; Coyle, Anthony J; Garcia, Jorge L; Flounders, Eric A; Mikita, Thomas; Coughlin, Shaun R

    2016-08-24

    Thrombosis is a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Current antithrombotic drugs are not ideal in that they must balance prevention of thrombosis against bleeding risk. Inhibition of coagulation factor XI (FXI) may offer an improvement over existing antithrombotic strategies by preventing some forms of thrombosis with lower bleeding risk. To permit exploration of this hypothesis in humans, we generated and characterized a series of human immunoglobulin Gs (IgGs) that blocked FXIa active-site function but did not bind FXI zymogen or other coagulation proteases. The most potent of these IgGs, C24 and DEF, inhibited clotting in whole human blood and prevented FeCl3-induced carotid artery occlusion in FXI-deficient mice reconstituted with human FXI and in thread-induced venous thrombosis in rabbits at clinically relevant doses. At doses substantially higher than those required for inhibition of intravascular thrombus formation in these models, DEF did not increase cuticle bleeding in rabbits or cause spontaneous bleeding in macaques over a 2-week study. Anticipating the desirability of a reversal agent, we also generated a human IgG that rapidly reversed DEF activity ex vivo in human plasma and in vivo in rabbits. Thus, an active site-directed FXIa-specific antibody can block thrombosis in animal models and, together with the reversal agent, may facilitate exploration of the roles of FXIa in human disease. PMID:27559095

  16. Protective effect of Urtica dioica L against nicotine-induced damage on sperm parameters, testosterone and testis tissue in mice

    PubMed Central

    Jalili, Cyrus; Salahshoor, Mohammad Reza; Naseri, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Background: Nicotine consumption can decrease fertility drive in males by inducing oxidative stress and DNA damage. Urtica dioica L (U.dioica) is a multipurpose herb in traditional medicine for which some anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory properties have been identified. Objective: The main goal is to investigate whether the U.dioica could inhibit nicotine adverse effects on sperm cells viability, count, motility, and testis histology and testosterone hormone. Materials and Methods: In this study, hydro-alcoholic extract of U.dioica was prepared and various doses of U.dioica (0, 10, 20, and 50 mg/kg) and U.dioica plus nicotine (0, 10, 20, and 50 mg/kg) were administered intraperitoneally to 56 male mice for 28 consequent days. These mice were randomly assigned to 8 groups (n=7) and sperm parameters (sperm cells viability, count, motility, and morphology), testis and prostate weight, testis histology and testosterone hormone were analyzed and compared. Results: The results indicated that nicotine administration (0.5 mg/kg) significantly decreased testosterone level, count and motility of sperm cells, and testis weight compared to control group (p=0.00). However, increasing the dose of U.dioica significantly boosted motility, count, normal morphology of sperm cells, seminiferous tubules diameter, and testosterone in all groups compared to control (p=0.00) and testis weight in 20 and 50 mg/kg doses in comparison with control group (p=0.00). Conclusion: It seems that U.dioica hydro-alcoholic extract administration could increase the quality of spermatozoa and inhibits nicotine-induced adverse effects on sperm parameters. PMID:25071848

  17. Evidence that the photoperiod controls the annual changes in testosterone secretion, testicular and body weight in subtropical male goats.

    PubMed

    Delgadillo, José Alberto; Cortez, María Elena; Duarte, Gerardo; Chemineau, Philippe; Malpaux, Benoît

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether the reproductive seasonality of local male goats from subtropical Mexico (26 degrees N) is controlled by photoperiod. The control group (n = 7) remained in an open shed under natural daylight. The two experimental groups (n = 6 each) were placed in light-proof buildings and exposed for 2 years (yr) to alternations of 3 months (mo) of long days and 3 mo of short days. One group was first exposed to long days and the other one to short days. Body and testicular weights were determined every 2 wk. Blood samples were obtained weekly to determine testosterone plasma concentrations. In the control group, the body weight exhibited variations (P < 0.0001) and it increased during the non-breeding season. In both treated groups, long days stimulated weight gain and short days inhibited it (P < 0.0001). In the control group, testicular weight displayed variations (P < 0.0001), and high values were registered in June. In the treated groups, a testicular weight reduction occurred 6-9 mo after the onset of the study. Afterwards, the changes in testicular size varied according to daylength (P < 0.01). The pattern of plasma testosterone concentration in the control group varied over the study (P < 0.0001) and the levels were higher from May-June to November. In both treated groups, the changes in testosterone secretion occurred according to photoperiod changes (P < 0.0001). Short days enhanced testosterone secretion one photoperiodic cycle after the onset of the study and long days inhibited it. Local male goats from subtropical Mexico are sensitive to photoperiodic changes and this environmental cue may control the timing of the breeding season in natural conditions. PMID:15460158

  18. Kinetics of selected di-n-butyl phthalate metabolites and fetal testosterone following repeated and single administration in pregnant rats.

    PubMed

    Clewell, Rebecca A; Kremer, John J; Williams, Carla C; Campbell, Jerry L; Sochaski, Mark A; Andersen, Melvin E; Borghoff, Susan J

    2009-01-01

    Human exposure to phthalic acid diesters occurs through a variety of pathways as a result of their widespread use in consumer products and plastics. Repeated doses of di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP) from gestation day (GD) 12 to 19 disrupt testosterone synthesis and male sexual development in the fetal rat. Currently little is known about the disposition of DBP metabolites, such as monobutyl phthalate (MBP) and its glucuronide conjugate (MBP-G), during gestation after repeated exposure to DBP. In order to gain a better understanding of the effect of repeated dosing on maternal and fetal metabolism and distribution, pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were given a single dose of 500 mg/kg DBP on GD 19 or daily doses of 50, 100, and 500 mg/(kg day) from GD 12 to 19 via corn oil gavage. Dose-response evaluation revealed a non-linear increase in maternal and fetal plasma concentrations of MBP. Maternal and fetal MBP levels were slightly lower in animals after 8 days of dosing at 500 mg/(kg day). Fetal plasma MBP levels closely followed maternal plasma, while the appearance and elimination of MBP-G in fetal plasma were significantly delayed. MBP-G accumulated over time in the amniotic fluid. Inhibition of testosterone was rapid in fetal testes when exposed to DBP (500 mg/(kg day)) on GD 19. Within 24h, the level of inhibition in the fetus was similar between animals exposed to a single or multiple daily doses of 500 mg/(kg day). Examination of testosterone time-course data indicates a rapid recovery to normal levels within 24h post-dosing at DBP doses of 50 and 100 mg/(kg day), with a rebound to higher than normal concentrations at later time-points. MBP kinetics in fetal testes allows direct comparison of active metabolite concentrations and testosterone response in the fetal testes. PMID:19010379

  19. IgG4-Related Lung Disease without Elevation of Serum IgG4 Level: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Kang, Min Kyu; Cho, Yongseon; Han, Minsoo; Jung, Sun Young; Moon, Kyoung Min; Kim, Jinyoung; Kim, Ju Ri; Lee, Dong-Kyu; Park, Jun Hyung; Chung, So Hee

    2016-07-01

    Since IgG4-related pancreatitis was first reported in 2001, IgG4-related disease has been identified in other organs such as salivary gland, gallbladder, thyroid, retroperitoneum and kidney; but lung invasion is rare. A 63-year-old man presented with hemoptysis at the pulmonary clinic and chest computed tomography revealed about 4.1 cm irregular shaped mass with spiculated margin at the left upper lobe. Despite no elevation of serum IgG4 level, he was finally diagnosed as IgG4-related lung disease by transthoracic needle biopsy. After treatment with oral glucocorticoids, hemoptysis disappeared and the size of lung mass was decreased. PMID:27433179

  20. IgG4-Related Lung Disease without Elevation of Serum IgG4 Level: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Min Kyu; Han, Minsoo; Jung, Sun Young; Moon, Kyoung Min; Kim, Jinyoung; Kim, Ju Ri; Lee, Dong-kyu; Park, Jun Hyung; Chung, So Hee

    2016-01-01

    Since IgG4-related pancreatitis was first reported in 2001, IgG4-related disease has been identified in other organs such as salivary gland, gallbladder, thyroid, retroperitoneum and kidney; but lung invasion is rare. A 63-year-old man presented with hemoptysis at the pulmonary clinic and chest computed tomography revealed about 4.1 cm irregular shaped mass with spiculated margin at the left upper lobe. Despite no elevation of serum IgG4 level, he was finally diagnosed as IgG4-related lung disease by transthoracic needle biopsy. After treatment with oral glucocorticoids, hemoptysis disappeared and the size of lung mass was decreased. PMID:27433179

  1. [Testosterone and Induced Humoral Immunity in Male Campbell Dwarf Hamsters (Phodopus campbelli, Thomas, 1905, Rodentia, Cricetidae): Experimental Manipulation of Testosterone Levels].

    PubMed

    Vasilieva, N Yu; Khrushchova, A M; Shekarova, N; Rogovin, K A

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we report the results of testosterone manipulation in the blood of male Campbell dwarf hamsters Phodopus campbelli Thomas, 1905 through castration, followed by testosterone treatment. Under these conditions, we studied antibody production rates in response to injection with sheep red blood cells (SRBC). It was shown that castration induced a dramatic decrease in blood testosterone but had no effect on the humoral response to SRBC. Males that received a testosterone compound with a long-lasting action (omnadren) exhibited a poor response to SRBC following re-exposure in the context of elevated testosterone compared to castrated males inoculated with an oil base of the drug. PMID:26349233

  2. Anti-CTLA-4 antibodies of IgG2a isotype enhance antitumor activity through reduction of intratumoral regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Selby, Mark J; Engelhardt, John J; Quigley, Michael; Henning, Karla A; Chen, Timothy; Srinivasan, Mohan; Korman, Alan J

    2013-07-01

    Antitumor activity of CTLA-4 antibody blockade is thought to be mediated by interfering with the negative regulation of T-effector cell (Teff) function resulting from CTLA-4 engagement by B7-ligands. In addition, a role for CTLA-4 on regulatory T cells (Treg), wherein CTLA-4 loss or inhibition results in reduced Treg function, may also contribute to antitumor responses by anti-CTLA-4 treatment. We have examined the role of the immunoglobulin constant region on the antitumor activity of anti-CTLA-4 to analyze in greater detail the mechanism of action of anti-CTLA-4 antibodies. Anti-CTLA-4 antibody containing the murine immunoglobulin G (IgG)2a constant region exhibits enhanced antitumor activity in subcutaneous established MC38 and CT26 colon adenocarcinoma tumor models compared with anti-CTLA-4 containing the IgG2b constant region. Interestingly, anti-CTLA-4 antibodies containing mouse IgG1 or a mutated mouse IgG1-D265A, which eliminates binding to all Fcγ receptors (FcγR), do not show antitumor activity in these models. Assessment of Teff and Treg populations at the tumor and in the periphery showed that anti-CTLA-4-IgG2a mediated a rapid and dramatic reduction of Tregs at the tumor site, whereas treatment with each of the isotypes expanded Tregs in the periphery. Expansion of CD8(+) Teffs is observed with both the IgG2a and IgG2b anti-CTLA-4 isotypes, resulting in a superior Teff to Treg ratio for the IgG2a isotype. These data suggest that anti-CTLA-4 promotes antitumor activity by a selective reduction of intratumoral Tregs along with concomitant activation of Teffs. PMID:24777248

  3. Effects of hypoxia on testosterone release in rat Leydig cells.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Guey-Shyang; Chen, Szu-Tah; Chen, Te-Jung; Wang, Shyi-Wu

    2009-11-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the effect and action mechanisms of intermittent hypoxia on the production of testosterone both in vivo and in vitro. Male rats were housed in a hypoxic chamber (12% O(2) + 88% N(2), 1.5 l/ml) 8 h/day for 4 days. Normoxic rats were used as control. In an in vivo experiment, hypoxic and normoxic rats were euthanized and the blood samples collected. In the in vitro experiment, the enzymatically dispersed rat Leydig cells were prepared and challenged with forskolin (an adenylyl cyclase activator, 10(-4) M), 8-Br-cAMP (a membrane-permeable analog of cAMP, 10(-4) M), hCG (0.05 IU), the precursors of the biosynthesis testosterone, including 25-OH-C (10(-5) M), pregnenolone (10(-7) M), progesterone (10(-7) M), 17-OH-progesterone (10(-7) M), and androstendione (10(-7)-10(-5) M), nifedipine (L-type Ca(2+) channel blocker, 10(-6)-10(-4) M), nimodipine (L-type Ca(2+) channel blocker, 10(-5) M), tetrandrine (L-type Ca(2+) channel blocker, 10(-5) M), and NAADP (calcium-signaling messenger causing release of calcium from intracellular stores, 10(-6)-10(-4) M). The concentrations of testosterone in plasma and medium were measured by radioimmunoassay. The level of plasma testosterone in hypoxic rats was higher than that in normoxic rats. Enhanced testosterone production was observed in rat Leydig cells treated with hCG, 8-Br-cAMP, or forskolin in both normoxic and hypoxic conditions. Intermittent hypoxia resulted in a further increase of testosterone production in response to the testosterone precursors. The activity of 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase was stimulated by the treatment of intermittent hypoxia in vitro. The intermittent hypoxia-induced higher production of testosterone was accompanied with the influx of calcium via L-type calcium channel and the increase of intracellular calcium via the mechanism of calcium mobilization. These results suggested that the intermittent hypoxia stimulated the secretion of testosterone at least in

  4. Testosterone Administration Decreases Generosity in the Ultimatum Game

    PubMed Central

    Zak, Paul J.; Kurzban, Robert; Ahmadi, Sheila; Swerdloff, Ronald S.; Park, Jang; Efremidze, Levan; Redwine, Karen; Morgan, Karla; Matzner, William

    2009-01-01

    How do human beings decide when to be selfish or selfless? In this study, we gave testosterone to 25 men to establish its impact on prosocial behaviors in a double-blind within-subjects design. We also confirmed participants' testosterone levels before and after treatment through blood draws. Using the Ultimatum Game from behavioral economics, we find that men with artificially raised T, compared to themselves on placebo, were 27% less generous towards strangers with money they controlled (95% CI placebo: (1.70, 2.72); 95% CI T: (.98, 2.30)). This effect scales with a man's level of total-, free-, and dihydro-testosterone (DHT). Men in the lowest decile of DHT were 560% more generous than men in the highest decile of DHT. We also found that men with elevated testosterone were more likely to use their own money punish those who were ungenerous toward them. Our results continue to hold after controlling for altruism. We conclude that elevated testosterone causes men to behave antisocially. PMID:20016825

  5. Testosterone-secreting adrenal adenoma in a peripubertal girl

    SciTech Connect

    Kamilaris, T.C.; DeBold, C.R.; Manolas, K.J.; Hoursanidis, A.; Panageas, S.; Yiannatos, J.

    1987-11-13

    A 15-year-old girl who presented with primary amenorrhea and virilization had an adrenocortical adenoma that secreted predominantly testosterone. To the authors' knowledge, she is the first peripubertal and second youngest patient with a testosterone-secreting adrenal tumor described. Serum dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate and urinary 17-ketosteroid an 17-hydroxycorticosteroid levels were normal. A tumor was located by a computed tomographic (CT) scan and by uptake of 6-..beta..-(/sup 75/Se) selenomethylnorcholesterol. Microscopic examination of the tumor showed typical features of an adrenocortical adenoma with no histologic features characteristic of Leydig cells. Postoperatively, her hirsutism regressed, she rapidly went through puberty, and regular monthly menstruation started four months later. Finding the source of testosterone in a virilized patient can be difficult. Eleven of the 14 previously described patients with testosterone-secreting adrenal tumors initially underwent misdirected surgery on the ovaries. Review of these cases revealed that results of hormone stimulation and suppression tests are unreliable and that these tumors are usually large. Therefore, CT scanning of the adrenal glands is recommended in all patients suspected of having a testosterone-secreting tumor.

  6. Effect of testosterone therapy on the female voice

    PubMed Central

    Glaser, R.; York, A.; Dimitrakakis, C.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objectives This prospective study was designed to investigate the effect of testosterone, delivered by subcutaneous implants, on the female voice. Methods Ten women who had opted for testosterone therapy were recruited for voice analysis. Voices were recorded prior to treatment and at 3 months, 6 months, and 12 months while on testosterone therapy. Acoustic samples were collected with subjects reading a sentence, reading a paragraph, and participating in a conversation. Significant changes in the voice over time were investigated using a repeated-measures analysis of variance with the fundamental frequency (F 0) as a response variable. Demographic variables associated with characteristics of the voice were assessed. Results There were no significant differences in average F 0 related to smoking history, menopausal status, weight, or body mass index. There was no difference in average fundamental speaking frequency (sentence, paragraph, conversation) between the pre-treatment group and any post-treatment group at 3 and 12 months. There was an increase in sentence speech F 0 at 6 months. Two of three patients with lower than expected F 0 at baseline improved on testosterone therapy. Conclusion Therapeutic levels of testosterone, delivered by subcutaneous implant, had no adverse affect on the female voice including lowering or deepening of the voice. PMID:26857354

  7. Effects of Testosterone Administration on Strategic Gambling in Poker Play.

    PubMed

    van Honk, Jack; Will, Geert-Jan; Terburg, David; Raub, Werner; Eisenegger, Christoph; Buskens, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Testosterone has been associated with economically egoistic and materialistic behaviors, but -defensibly driven by reputable status seeking- also with economically fair, generous and cooperative behaviors. Problematically, social status and economic resources are inextricably intertwined in humans, thus testosterone's primal motives are concealed. We critically addressed this issue by performing a placebo-controlled single-dose testosterone administration in young women, who played a game of bluff poker wherein concerns for status and resources collide. The profit-maximizing strategy in this game is to mislead the other players by bluffing randomly (independent of strength of the hand), thus also when holding very poor cards (cold bluffing). The profit-maximizing strategy also dictates the players in this poker game to never call the other players' bluffs. For reputable-status seeking these materialistic strategies are disadvantageous; firstly, being caught cold bluffing damages one's reputation by revealing deceptive intent, and secondly, not calling the other players' bluffs signals submission in blindly tolerating deception. Here we show that testosterone administration in this game of bluff poker significantly reduces random bluffing, as well as cold bluffing, while significantly increasing calling. Our data suggest that testosterone in humans primarily motivates for reputable-status seeking, even when this elicits behaviors that are economically disadvantageous. PMID:26727636

  8. Testosterone administration decreases generosity in the ultimatum game.

    PubMed

    Zak, Paul J; Kurzban, Robert; Ahmadi, Sheila; Swerdloff, Ronald S; Park, Jang; Efremidze, Levan; Redwine, Karen; Morgan, Karla; Matzner, William

    2009-01-01

    How do human beings decide when to be selfish or selfless? In this study, we gave testosterone to 25 men to establish its impact on prosocial behaviors in a double-blind within-subjects design. We also confirmed participants' testosterone levels before and after treatment through blood draws. Using the Ultimatum Game from behavioral economics, we find that men with artificially raised T, compared to themselves on placebo, were 27% less generous towards strangers with money they controlled (95% CI placebo: (1.70, 2.72); 95% CI T: (.98, 2.30)). This effect scales with a man's level of total-, free-, and dihydro-testosterone (DHT). Men in the lowest decile of DHT were 560% more generous than men in the highest decile of DHT. We also found that men with elevated testosterone were more likely to use their own money punish those who were ungenerous toward them. Our results continue to hold after controlling for altruism. We conclude that elevated testosterone causes men to behave antisocially. PMID:20016825

  9. Testosterone and paternal care in East African foragers and pastoralists.

    PubMed

    Muller, Martin N; Marlowe, Frank W; Bugumba, Revocatus; Ellison, Peter T

    2009-01-22

    The 'challenge hypothesis' posits that testosterone facilitates reproductive effort (investment in male-male competition and mate-seeking) at the expense of parenting effort (investment in offspring and mates). Multiple studies, primarily in North America, have shown that men in committed relationships, fathers, or both maintain lower levels of testosterone than unpaired men. Data from non-western populations, however, show inconsistent results. We hypothesized that much of this cross-cultural variation can be attributed to differential investment in mating versus parenting effort, even among married fathers. Here, we directly test this idea by comparing two neighbouring Tanzanian groups that exhibit divergent styles of paternal involvement: Hadza foragers and Datoga pastoralists. We predicted that high levels of paternal care by Hadza fathers would be associated with decreased testosterone in comparison with non-fathers, and that no such difference between fathers and non-fathers would be evident in Datoga men, who provide minimal direct paternal care. Twenty-seven Hadza men and 80 Datoga men between the ages of 17 and 60 provided morning and afternoon saliva samples from which testosterone was assayed. Measurements in both populations confirmed these predictions, adding further support to the hypothesis that paternal care is associated with decreased testosterone production in men. PMID:18826936

  10. Hypothalamic control of the male neonatal testosterone surge.

    PubMed

    Clarkson, Jenny; Herbison, Allan E

    2016-02-19

    Sex differences in brain neuroanatomy and neurophysiology underpin considerable physiological and behavioural differences between females and males. Sexual differentiation of the brain is regulated by testosterone secreted by the testes predominantly during embryogenesis in humans and the neonatal period in rodents. Despite huge advances in understanding how testosterone, and its metabolite oestradiol, sexually differentiate the brain, little is known about the mechanism that actually generates the male-specific neonatal testosterone surge. This review examines the evidence for the role of the hypothalamus, and particularly the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons, in generating the neonatal testosterone surge in rodents and primates. Kisspeptin-GPR54 signalling is well established as a potent and critical regulator of GnRH neuron activity during puberty and adulthood, and we argue here for an equally important role at birth in driving the male-specific neonatal testosterone surge in rodents. The presence of a male-specific population of preoptic area kisspeptin neurons that appear transiently in the perinatal period provide one possible source of kisspeptin drive to neonatal GnRH neurons in the mouse. PMID:26833836

  11. Testosterone regulates metabolism of plasma chylomicrons in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Staprans, I.; Rapp, J.H.; Pan, X.M.; Ong, D.L.; Feingold, K.R. )

    1990-07-01

    Previously we demonstrated a marked sex difference in the metabolism of chylomicrons in adult rats. In males, radiolabeled chylomicrons displayed a longer dwell time on endothelial surfaces, which resulted in a decreased chylomicron uptake by the liver. The increased rate of chylomicron metabolism in females was associated with increased postheparin lipoprotein lipase activity. In the present study, we have investigated the effects of physiological doses of sex steroid hormones on the metabolism of chylomicrons and postheparin lipoprotein lipase activity. No sex differences were found in prepubertal animals. We also found no difference in chylomicron metabolism in control female, castrated female, estrogen-treated female, castrated male, and estrogen-treated male rats. However, control male, testosterone-treated male, and testosterone-treated female rats showed increased endothelial binding of chylomicrons and decreased chylomicron uptake by the liver. Postheparin lipoprotein lipase activity also was decreased by testosterone administration. In parallel with the alterations in chylomicron metabolism, serum high density lipoprotein levels in male rats decreased with testosterone administration. These results indicate that the differences in chylomicron metabolism, postheparin lipoprotein lipase activities, and serum high density lipoprotein levels observed between male and female rats are due to testosterone.

  12. Proteolytic components of serum IgG preparations

    PubMed Central

    Li, L; Kalaga, R; Paul, S

    2000-01-01

    Chemical catalysis, an effector mechanism utilized by fully assembled antibodies, can also be mediated by the isolated antibody subunits. Because trace amounts of free light chains (L chains) are present in IgG preparations, a detailed study was undertaken to identify the constituents responsible for the polyreactive proteolytic activity of IgG purified from human sera, determined as the extent of cleavage of the model peptide substrate Pro-Phe-Arg-methylcoumarinamide. Two proteolytic species with approximate mass of 50 kD and 150 kD were separated by repetitive gel filtration in a denaturing solvent (6 m guanidine hydrochloride). The activity of the renatured 50-kD fraction (in fluorescence units/μg protein) was more than 45-fold greater than of the 150-kD fraction. Both fractions lost the activity following immunoadsorption on immobilized anti-IgG antibody. Fab fragments prepared from the 150-kD IgG fraction retained the activity. Reducing and non-reducing SDS-electrophoresis suggested the 50-kD fraction isolated from the IgG preparations to be a mixture of heavy chain (H chain) monomers and disulphide bonded L chain dimers. Electrophoretically homogeneous monomers of 50-kD H chains and 25-kD L chains were prepared by gel filtration of reduced and alkylated IgG from seven human subjects. Each of the alkylated L chain preparations displayed the proteolytic activity. The activity in alkylated H chains was undetectable or only marginally greater than the background values. L chain dimers appear to be the major species responsible for the polyreactive proteolytic activity of serum IgG preparations, with a smaller contribution furnished by tetrameric IgG. PMID:10792374

  13. The effect of cytochalasin B and vinca alkaloids on EA- and EAC-rosette formation and on the binding of heat-aggregated human IgG by human lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Gutierrez, Carmen; Papamichail, M.; Faulk, W. Page

    1976-01-01

    We report the effect of cytochalasin B and vinca alkaloids on EA- and EAC-rosette formation and on the binding of heat-aggregated human IgG by human lymphocytes. Cytochalasin B inhibits EA- but not EAC-rosette formation, and neither colchicine nor vinblastine have a measurable effect on either reaction. Also, cytochalasin B inhibits the binding of heat-aggregated IgG by human lymphocytes. The inhibition caused by cytochalasin B is reversible, and the cells recover to normal values within 30 min.

  14. Effects of Testosterone Treatment on Synaptic Plasticity and Behavior in Senescence Accelerated Mice.

    PubMed

    Jian-xin, Jia; Cheng-li, Cui; Song, Wei; Yan, Xu-sheng; Huo, Dong-sheng; Wang, He; Yang, Zhan-jun

    2015-01-01

    Learning and memory are known to be influenced by circulating sex steroidal hormones and these behavioral processes are diminished in aging. Thus, the aim of this study was to examine the mechanism underlying testosterone-induced effects on cognitive performance in the senescence accelerated mouse P8 (SAMP8) model. Treatment with testosterone (T) as evidenced by the Morris water maze test produced a significantly shorter escape latency and reduced path length to reach the platform compared to the control (C). No significant differences were noted in mean swim speed among all groups. During the probe trials, the T group spent a significantly greater percent of time in the target quadrant and improved the number of platform crossings. Flutamide (F), an antiandrogen, significantly inhibited the effects of T on behavioral and memory performances indicators. Following Nissl staining, the number of intact pyramidal cells was markedly elevated in the treated mice, and this effect was blocked by F. Immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis showed that the expression levels of NMDAR1, SYN, and p-CREC/CREB protein levels were significantly increased in the T group, while F inhibited the T-mediated effects. Western blot analysis showed that there were no significant differences in the expression levels of SYN, p-CREC/CREB, and NMDAR1 between C, F, and F + T groups. Reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis showed that the mRNA expression levels of NMDAR1 and SYN were significantly increased in T-administered mice, while F inhibited the T-mediated effects. Data suggest that the T-mediated increase in SYN expression levels resulted in improvement in behavioral performances and learning, which may involve stimulation of central nervous system androgen receptors (AR). PMID:26529502

  15. Testosterone biotransformation by the isolated perfused canine pancreas

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez-del Castillo, C.; Diaz-Sanchez, V.; Varela-Fascinetto, G.; Altamirano, A.; Odor-Morales, A.; Lopez-Medrano, R.M.; Robles-Diaz, G. )

    1991-01-01

    There is strong evidence indicating that the pancreas is under the influence of sex steroid hormones, and that it may even participate in their biosynthesis and metabolism. In the present study, (3H)testosterone was perfused into the isolated canine pancreas, and measured in the effluent with several of its metabolites (5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone, androstenedione, and estradiol). Results show that testosterone is readily transformed by the canine pancreas. The main product found in the effluent is androstenedione. The testis and spleen were also perfused with (3H)testosterone and used as controls. In both cases, this hormone appeared mostly unchanged in the effluent as compared to the pancreatic perfusion (p less than 0.0001). From our data, we conclude that the canine pancreas has the capacity to transform sex steroid hormones, and could be considered an extragonadal site of sex steroid biosynthesis.

  16. The role of testosterone in trichloroethylene penetration in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    McCormick, K.; Abdel-Rahman, M.S. )

    1991-02-01

    Sex differences are known to exist in the metabolism and bioavailability of trichloroethylene (TCE). This study revealed that dermal penetration of ({sup 14}C)TCE in vitro was twofold greater in untreated female than in untreated male Sprague-Dawley rats. Since testosterone has been shown to mediate a wide variety of sex differences, its role in dermal penetration of ({sup 14}C)TCE was investigated. Penetration was measured by using an in vitro evaporation-penetration cell with a 10-hour collection period. Depriving male rats of testosterone (by castration) resulted in increased values for total penetration, area under the curve (AUC), and penetration slopes compared to those found in the female control group. Administration of testosterone to female animals produced values for total penetration, AUC, and penetration slopes significantly lower than those of the female control group.

  17. [The influence of testosterone on cardiovascular disease in men].

    PubMed

    Payer, J; Banárová, A

    2010-07-01

    The influence of testosterone on cardiovascular disease is recently discussed question. Testosterone modulates vascular reactivity by genomic and nongenomic modes of action, it has an impact on endothelial function, production of proinflamatory cytokines and lipid profiles. The possible role of sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) in androgen action by plasmatic membrane receptors breaks "the free hormone hypothesis", especially when clinical trials reveal strong association between SHBG and risk factors of cardiovascular disease. The results of last clinical trials mention that androgen deficiency is associated with obesity, insulin resistance and dyslipidaemia. Large clinical trials demonstrated that androgen deficiency predict mortality in elderly men. Testosterone substitution restores vasoreactivity and endothelial function and could potentially reduce cardiovascular disease in men but to confirm this theory more large clinical trials are needed. PMID:20842916

  18. IgG4-unrelated type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Eriko; Kanno, Atsushi; Masamune, Atsushi; Yoshida, Naoki; Hongo, Seiji; Miura, Shin; Takikawa, Tetsuya; Hamada, Shin; Kume, Kiyoshi; Kikuta, Kazuhiro; Hirota, Morihisa; Nakayama, Keisuke; Fujishima, Fumiyoshi; Shimosegawa, Tooru

    2015-01-01

    A 50-year-old male was referred to our hospital for the evaluation of hyperproteinemia. Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography revealed high fluorodeoxyglucose uptake in the pancreas, bilateral lacrimal glands, submandibular glands, parotid glands, bilateral pulmonary hilar lymph nodes, and kidneys. Laboratory data showed an elevation of hepatobiliary enzymes, renal dysfunction, and remarkably high immunoglobulin (Ig) G levels, without elevated serum IgG4. Abdominal computed tomography revealed swelling of the pancreatic head and bilateral kidneys. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography showed an irregular narrowing of the main pancreatic duct in the pancreatic head and stricture of the lower common bile duct. Histological examination by endoscopic ultrasonography-guided fine-needle aspiration revealed findings of lymphoplasmacytic sclerosing pancreatitis without IgG4-positive plasma cells. Abnormal laboratory values and the swelling of several organs were improved by the treatment with steroids. The patient was diagnosed as having type 1 autoimmune pancreatitis (AIP) based on the International Consensus Diagnostic Criteria. Therefore, we encountered a case of compatible type 1 AIP without elevated levels of serum IgG4 or IgG4-positive plasma cells. This case suggests that AIP phenotypes are not always associated with IgG4. PMID:26361429

  19. B-cell-independent sialylation of IgG.

    PubMed

    Jones, Mark B; Oswald, Douglas M; Joshi, Smita; Whiteheart, Sidney W; Orlando, Ron; Cobb, Brian A

    2016-06-28

    IgG carrying terminal α2,6-linked sialic acids added to conserved N-glycans within the Fc domain by the sialyltransferase ST6Gal1 accounts for the anti-inflammatory effects of large-dose i.v. Ig (IVIg) in autoimmunity. Here, B-cell-specific ablation of ST6Gal1 in mice revealed that IgG sialylation can occur in the extracellular environment of the bloodstream independently of the B-cell secretory pathway. We also discovered that secreted ST6Gal1 is produced by cells lining central veins in the liver and that IgG sialylation is powered by serum-localized nucleotide sugar donor CMP-sialic acid that is at least partially derived from degranulating platelets. Thus, antibody-secreting cells do not exclusively control the sialylation-dependent anti-inflammatory function of IgG. Rather, IgG sialylation can be regulated by the liver and platelets through the corresponding release of enzyme and sugar donor into the cardiovascular circulation. PMID:27303031

  20. A comparison of salivary testosterone measurement using immunoassays and tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Welker, Keith M; Lassetter, Bethany; Brandes, Cassandra M; Prasad, Smrithi; Koop, Dennis R; Mehta, Pranjal H

    2016-09-01

    Enzyme immunoassays (EIAs) are widely used to measure salivary testosterone. However, little is known about how accurately different EIAs assess testosterone, partially because estimates across various EIAs differ considerably. We compared testosterone concentrations across EIAs of three commonly used manufacturers (DRG International, Salimetrics, and IBL International) to liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Relative to EIAs from Salimetrics and IBL International, EIAs supplied by DRG International provided the closest approximation to LC-MS/MS testosterone concentrations, followed closely by EIAs from Salimetrics, and then IBL. Additionally, EIAs tended to inflate estimates of lower testosterone concentrations in women. Examining our results and comparing them to existing data revealed that testosterone EIAs had decreased linear correspondence with LC-MS/MS in comparison to cortisol EIAs. Overall, this paper provides researchers with information to better measure testosterone in their research and more accurately compare testosterone measurements across different methods. PMID:27295182

  1. Phthalate-Induced Pathology in the Foetal Testis Involves More Than Decreased Testosterone Production

    EPA Science Inventory

    Foetal exposure to phthalates is known to adversely impact male reproductive development and function. Developmental anomalies of reproductive tract have been attributed to impaired testosterone synthesis. However, species differences in the ability to produce testosterone have...

  2. In vitro modulation of inflammatory cytokine and IgG levels by extracts of Perna canaliculus

    PubMed Central

    Mani, Sachin; Lawson, John W

    2006-01-01

    Background Inflammation is a predominant characteristic of autoimmune diseases which is characterized by the increased expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Soon to be published work from our laboratory has shown that ingestion of Perna canaliculus prevents the development of autoimmune diseases such as Systemic Lupus Erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis in laboratory animals. The current paper attempts to illustrate how Perna can alleviate inflammation by modulating inflammatory cytokines, cyclooxygenase enzymes and Immunoglobulin-G (IgG) levels. Methods In the present study, hydrochloric acid [HCl] and Tween-20 were used to develop extracts of Perna. These extracts were assayed for protein content. Increasing concentrations of these extracts were then tested in cell culture for modulation of inflammatory cytokine, cyclooxygenase enzymes and IgG levels. Parallel tests were run using an available glycogen extract of Perna as a comparison to our in-house laboratory preparations. Results Tween-20 Perna extracts were found to be more stable and less toxic in cell culture than HCl digest of Perna. They also assayed higher in protein content that HCl extracts. Although both extracts inhibited IgG production in V2E9 hybridomas, Tween-20 extracts were more consistent in IgG suppression than HCl extracts. Overall Tween-20 extracts effectively decreased levels of TNF-α, IL-1, IL-2 and IL-6 as observed using cytokine bioassays. Twenty micrograms of Tween-20 Perna extracts induced such significant decreases in inflammatory cytokine production that when tested on sensitive cell lines, they very nearly abolished the decrease in viability induced by these cytokines. Tween-20 extracts effectively inhibited both COX-1 and COX-2 cyclooxygenase activity. As a comparison, the glycogen extract also demonstrated a similar though weaker effect on COX-1 and COX-2 enzymes. The active components of both extracts (Tween-20 and glycogen) were observed to possess molecular weights

  3. Immunoglobulin G kappa [IgG kappa] and IgG lambda paraproteinemia in a child with AIDS and response to highly active antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Seeborg, Filiz Odabasi; Gay, Hannah; Schmiege, Lorenz M; Bernard, David; Shearer, William T

    2005-11-01

    We report an 8-year-old boy with AIDS, extremely elevated serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) concentration and IgG kappa [IgG(kappa)] and IgG lambda [IgG(lambda)] paraproteinemia. This paraproteinemia partially responded to highly active antiretroviral therapy. This case emphasizes the importance of controlling B-cell activation. PMID:16275950

  4. The multiple actions of testosterone in men: nature knows best.

    PubMed

    Funder, John W

    2014-01-01

    In male hormone replacement therapy Finkelstein et al. show that testosterone rather than synthetic "pure" androgens should be prescribed. Testosterone is converted to the superactive androgen dihydrotestosterone and to estradiol, and thus has actions via androgen receptors and both estrogen receptors (ERα, ERβ). Although muscle strength is androgen dependent, estradiol has major physiologic effects in men-on bone, cartilage, and together with androgens, on sexual functioning. Neither dihydrotestosterone nor 'pure' synthetic androgens can be converted to estradiol; those so treated thus risk missing out on the beneficial (and necessary) effects of estrogens in men. PMID:24385014

  5. Trends in Testosterone Prescription and Public Health Concerns.

    PubMed

    Gabrielsen, Joseph Scott; Najari, Bobby B; Alukal, Joseph P; Eisenberg, Michael L

    2016-05-01

    Testosterone supplementation therapy (TST) has become increasingly popular since the turn of the century. Most prescriptions in the U.S. are written by primary care providers, endocrinologists, or urologists. The FDA has requests pharmaceutical companies provide more long term data on efficacy and safety of testosterone products. Results from these studies will help define the appropriate population for TST going forward. It is hoped that these data combined with physician and public education will minimize inappropriate prescribing and allow those likely to benefit from TST to receive it. PMID:27132584

  6. Mate choice and male behaviour following castration and replacement of testosterone in mallards (Anas platyrhynchos ).

    PubMed

    Klint, T

    1985-11-01

    Male sexual behaviour was controlled by castration and testosterone replacement. The first experiment shows that, within a group of similarly coloured and castrated male mallards, females preferred males treated with testosterone. The second experiment shows that a testosterone-treated male was always preferred by the females, irrespective of plumage colour, in a choice between a wild and a white mallard drake. The results shows that testosterone dependent male cues is important in mate choice in the mallard duck. PMID:24896699

  7. Schnitzler's syndrome with IgG kappa gammopathy.

    PubMed

    Akimoto, Ruri; Yoshida, Masami; Matsuda, Rie; Miyasaka, Keiichi; Itoh, Masatoshi

    2002-11-01

    A seventy-year-old man with a variant type of Schnitzler's syndrome is reported. Physical examination showed pruritic urticarial lesions on the extremities, arthralgia of knee joints, and intermittent fever. Laboratory investigations revealed a high level of IgG, an increased enythrocyte sedimentation rate, urinary Bence-Jones protein, and an M-bow in serum protein electrophoresis, which was shown to be a monoclonal IgG kappa type. Histological examination showed perivascular neutrophil and lymphocytic infiltration into the upper dermis and diffuse neutrophilic infiltration in the middle dermis. One of the clinical features of typical Schnitzler's syndrome is IgM macroglobulinemia, and this is a very rare case of this syndrome with IgG gammopathy. PMID:12484437

  8. Increased levels of IgE and autoreactive, polyreactive IgG in wild rodents: implications for the hygiene hypothesis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Devalapalli, A.P.; Lesher, A.; Shieh, K.; Solow, J.S.; Everett, M.L.; Edala, A.S.; Whitt, P.; Long, Renee R.; Newton, N.; Parker, W.

    2006-01-01

    To probe the potential role of Th1 versus Th2 reactivity underlying the hygiene hypothesis, intrinsic levels of Th1-associated and Th2-associated antibodies in the serum of wild rodents were compared with that in various strains of laboratory rodents. Studies using rat lung antigens as a target indicated that wild rats have substantially greater levels of autoreactive, polyreactive immunoglobulin G (IgG), but not autoreactive, polyreactive IgM than do laboratory rats, both on a quantitative and qualitative basis. Increased levels of serum IgG and IgE were observed in both wild rats and wild mice relative to their laboratory-raised counterparts, with the effect being most pronounced for IgE levels. Further, wild rats had greater intrinsic levels of both Th1- and Th2-associated IgG subclasses than did lab rats. The habitat (wild versus laboratory raised) had a more substantial impact on immunoglobulin concentration than did age, strain or gender in the animals studied. The presence in wild rodents of increased intrinsic, presumably protective, non-pathogenic responses similar to both autoimmune (autoreactive IgG, Th1-associated) and allergic (IgE, Th2-associated) reactions as well as increased levels of Th1-associated and Th2-associated IgG subclasses points toward a generally increased stimulation of the immune system in these animals rather than a shift in the nature of the immunoreactivity. It is concluded that, at least to the extent that feedback inhibition is a controlling element of immunoreactivity, an overly hygienic environment may affect the threshold of both types of immune responses more so than the balance between the different responses.

  9. Testosterone and Child and Adolescent Adjustment: The Moderating Role of Parent-Child Relationships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Booth, Alan; Johnson, David R.; Granger, Douglas A.; Crouter, Ann C.; McHale, Susan

    2003-01-01

    In a sample of families with 6- to 18-year-olds, this study found that sons' and daughters' testosterone levels showed little direct connection to risk behavior or depressive symptoms. As parent-child relationship quality increased, testosterone-related adjustment problems were less evident. When relationship quality decreased, testosterone-linked…

  10. Marriage and motherhood are associated with lower testosterone concentrations in women

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Emily S.; Tran, Van; Thurston, Sally; Jasienska, Grazyna; Furberg, Anne-Sofie; Ellison, Peter T.; Thune, Inger

    2012-01-01

    Testosterone has been hypothesized to modulate the trade-off between mating and parenting effort in males. Indeed, evidence from humans and other pair-bonded species suggests that fathers and men in committed relationships have lower testosterone levels than single men and men with no children. To date, only one published study has examined testosterone in relation to motherhood, finding that mothers of young children have lower testosterone than non-mothers. Here, we examine this question in 195 reproductive-age Norwegian women. Testosterone was measured in morning serum samples taken during the early follicular phase of the menstrual cycle, and marital and maternal status were assessed by questionnaire. Mothers of young children (age ≤3) had 14% lower testosterone than childless women and 19% lower testosterone than women who only had children over age 3. Among mothers, age of the youngest child strongly predicted testosterone levels. There was a trend towards lower testosterone among married women compared to unmarried women. All analyses controlled for body mass index (BMI), age, type of testosterone assay, and time of serum sample collection. This is the first study to look at testosterone concentrations in relation to marriage and motherhood in Western women, and it suggests that testosterone may differ with marital and maternal status in women, providing further corroboration of previous findings in both sexes. PMID:23123222

  11. Proliferative Glomerulonephritis with Monoclonal IgG Deposits

    PubMed Central

    Satoskar, Anjali; Markowitz, Glen S.; Valeri, Anthony M.; Appel, Gerald B.; Stokes, Michael B.; Nadasdy, Tibor; D'Agati, Vivette D.

    2009-01-01

    Dysproteinemias that result in monoclonal glomerular deposits of IgG are relatively uncommon. Here, we report the largest series of proliferative glomerulonephritis with monoclonal IgG deposits, a form of renal involvement by monoclonal gammopathy that mimics immune-complex glomerulonephritis. We retrospectively identified 37 patients, most of whom were white (81%), female (62%), or older than 50 yr (65%). At presentation, 49% had nephrotic syndrome, 68% had renal insufficiency, and 77% had hematuria. In 30% of the patients, we identified a monoclonal serum protein with the same heavy- and light-chain isotypes as the glomerular deposits (mostly IgG1 or IgG2), but only one patient had myeloma. Histologic patterns were predominantly membranoproliferative (57%) or endocapillary proliferative (35%) with membranous features. Electron microscopy revealed granular, nonorganized deposits, and immunofluorescence demonstrated glomerular deposits that stained for a single light-chain isotype and a single heavy-chain subtype, most commonly IgG3κ (53%). During an average of 30.3 mo of follow-up for 32 patients with available data, 38% had complete or partial recovery, 38% had persistent renal dysfunction, and 22% progressed to ESRD. Correlates of ESRD on univariate analysis were higher creatinine at biopsy, percentage of glomerulosclerosis, and degree of interstitial fibrosis but not immunomodulatory treatment or presence of a monoclonal spike. On multivariate analysis, higher percentage of glomerulosclerosis was the only independent predictor of ESRD. Only one patient lacking a monoclonal spike at presentation subsequently developed a monoclonal spike and no patient with a monoclonal spike at presentation subsequently developed a hematologic malignancy. We conclude that proliferative glomerulonephritis with monoclonal IgG deposits does not seem to be a precursor of myeloma in the vast majority of patients. PMID:19470674

  12. Simvastatin and Dipentyl Phthalate Lower Ex Vivo Testicular Testosterone Production and Exhibit Additive Effects on Testicular Testosterone and Gene Expression Via Distinct Mechanistic Pathways in the Fetal Rat

    PubMed Central

    Beverly, Brandiese E. J.; Lambright, Christy S.; Furr, Johnathan R.; Sampson, Hunter; Wilson, Vickie S.; McIntyre, Barry S.; Foster, Paul M. D.; Travlos, Gregory; Gray, L. Earl

    2014-01-01

    Sex differentiation of the male reproductive tract in mammals is driven, in part, by fetal androgen production. In utero, some phthalate esters (PEs) alter fetal Leydig cell differentiation, reducing the expression of several genes associated with steroid synthesis/transport, and consequently, lowering fetal androgen and Insl3 hormone levels. Simvastatin (SMV) is a cholesterol-lowering drug that directly inhibits HMG-CoA reductase. SMV may also disrupt steroid biosynthesis, but through a different mode of action (MOA) than the PEs. As cholesterol is a precursor of steroid hormone biosynthesis, we hypothesized that in utero exposure to SMV during the critical period of sex differentiation would lower fetal testicular testosterone (T) production without affecting genes involved in cholesterol and androgen synthesis and transport. Secondly, we hypothesized that a mixture of SMV and a PE, which may have different MOAs, would reduce testosterone levels in an additive manner. Pregnant Sprague Dawley rats were dosed orally with SMV, dipentyl phthalate (DPeP), or SMV plus DPeP from gestational days 14-18, and fetuses were evaluated on GD18. On GD18, SMV lowered fetal T production and serum triglycerides, low density lipoprotein, high density lipoprotein, and total cholesterol levels, and downregulated two genes in the fetal testis that were different from those altered by PEs. When SMV and DPeP were administered as a mixture, fetal T production was significantly reduced in an additive manner, thus demonstrating that a mixture of chemicals can induce additive effects on fetal T production even though they display different MOAs. PMID:25055962

  13. Endogenous testosterone level and testosterone supplementation therapy in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD): a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Atlantis, Evan; Fahey, Paul; Cochrane, Belinda; Wittert, Gary; Smith, Sheree

    2013-01-01

    Objective Low testosterone level may be a reversible risk factor for functional disability and deterioration in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We sought to systematically assess the endogenous testosterone levels and effect of testosterone therapy on exercise capacity and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) outcomes in COPD patients, as well as to inform guidelines and practice. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis. Data sources We searched PubMed, Scopus, Cochrane Library, CINAHL, Health Source Nursing and PsychINFO and the reference lists of retrieved articles published before May 2012. Inclusion criteria Observational studies on endogenous testosterone levels in people with chronic lung disease compared with controls, or randomised controlled trials (RCTs) on testosterone therapy for exercise capacity and/or HRQoL outcomes in COPD patients were eligible. Data extraction and analysis Data on the mean difference in endogenous total testosterone (TT) values, and the mean difference in exercise capacity and HRQoL values were extracted and pooled using random effects meta-analysis. Results Nine observational studies in 2918 men with COPD reported consistently lower levels of TT compared with controls (weighted mean difference was –3.21 nmol/L (95% CI −5.18 to −1.23)). Six RCTs in 287 participants yielded five studies on peak muscle strength and peak cardiorespiratory fitness outcomes (peak oxygen uptake (VO2) and workload) and three studies on HRQoL outcomes. Testosterone therapies significantly improved peak muscle strength (standardised mean difference (SMD) was 0.31 (95% CI 0.05 to 0.56)) and peak workload (SMD was 0.27 (95% CI 0.01 to 0.52)) compared with control conditions (all but one used placebo), but not peak VO2 (SMD was 0.21 (95% CI −0.15 to 0.56)) or HRQoL (SMD was –0.03 (95% CI −0.32 to 0.25)). Conclusions Men with COPD have clinically relevant lower than normal TT levels. Insufficient evidence from

  14. Acute Painful Ptosis Secondary to IgG4 Dacryoadenitis.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Rumana; El-Khyat, Abdul; Berry-Brincat, Antonella

    2016-01-01

    A 48-year-old lorry driver presented with 3 weeks of blurred vision, pain and diplopia. There was a right upper lid ptosis with some restriction of eye movements. A CT revealed an enlarged lacrimal gland and lacrimal gland biopsy showed IgG4-positive plasma cells. The patient responded to oral prednisolone and fully recovered. As a condition which mimics a number of diseases, an IgG4-related disease presents a diagnostic challenge and ought to be considered in both acute and chronic presentations. PMID:27293410

  15. Inhibition of estrogen biosynthesis and its consequences on gonadotrophin secretion in the male.

    PubMed

    Bhatnagar, A S; Müller, P; Schenkel, L; Trunet, P F; Beh, I; Schieweck, K

    1992-03-01

    Of the gonadal steroids in the male, testosterone is the most important regulator of gonadotrophin secretion. However, whether testosterone affects gonadotrophin secretion directly or whether it must first be aromatized to estrogens is controversial. We have reported extensively on the endocrine and anti-tumor effects of the non-steroidal aromatase inhibitors CGS 16949A and CGS 20267 in adult female rats. In these animals, both inhibitors potently and selectively inhibit estrogen biosynthesis. Thus these agents can be effectively used in studying estrogen-dependent processes. CGS 16949A was administered for 14 days to adult male rats, over a dose range which in females suppresses estradiol and elevates LH. In male rats a suppression of estradiol was seen, however, there was no significant effect on either serum LH or on the weights of androgen-dependent organs. CGS 16949A, when administered to healthy men at a dose of 1 mg b.i.d. for 10 days, causes a significant fall in plasma estradiol and significant elevations of plasma FSH and testosterone. Dose-dependent suppression of serum estradiol and an increase in serum testosterone and LH are seen after administration of single oral doses of CGS 20267. These results indicate that in the male rat, inhibition of aromatization of testosterone to estrogens does not influence gonadotrophin secretion whereas in men the negative feedback exerted by testosterone on gonadotrophin secretion is dependent on the aromatization of testosterone to estrogens. PMID:1532903

  16. Nanoscaffold matrices for size-controlled, pulsatile transdermal testosterone delivery: nanosize effects on the time dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malik, Ritu; Tondwal, Shailesh; Venkatesh, K. S.; Misra, Amit

    2008-10-01

    Pulsatile transdermal testosterone (T) has applications in hormone supplementation and male contraception. Pulsatile T delivery was achieved by assembling crystalline and nanoparticulate T in nucleation-inhibiting polymer matrices of controlled porosity. Different interference patterns observed from various polymeric films containing T were due to the various particle sizes of T present in the polymer matrices. Scanning electron microscopy was used to determine the size and shape of T crystals. Skin-adherent films containing T nanoparticles of any size between 10-500 nm could be prepared using pharmaceutically acceptable vinylic polymers. Drug release and skin permeation profiles were studied. The dissolution-diffusion behavior of nanoparticles differed from crystalline and molecular states. Nanosize may thus be used to engineer chronopharmacologically relevant drug delivery.

  17. Testosterone Therapy May Boost Older Men's Sex Lives

    MedlinePlus

    ... Map FAQs Contact Us Health Topics Drugs & Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Latest Health News → Article URL of this page: https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_159622.html Testosterone Therapy May Boost Older Men's Sex Lives Gel hormone treatment led to improved libido ...

  18. Second-to-Fourth Digit Length, Testosterone and Spatial Ability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kempel, P.; Gohlke, B.; Klempau, J.; Zinsberger, P.; Reuter, M.; Hennig, J.

    2005-01-01

    Based on stimulating findings suggesting that prenatal levels of steroids may influence cognitive functions, a study with N=40 healthy volunteers of both sexes was conducted. Prenatal levels of testosterone (T) were estimated by use of the second-to-fourth digit ratio (2D:4D) which is supposed to be controlled by the same genes involved in…

  19. Aromatized testosterone attenuates contextual generalization of fear in male rats.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Joseph F; Vanderhoof, Tyler; Winiecki, Patrick; Latsko, Maeson S; Riccio, David C; Jasnow, Aaron M

    2016-08-01

    Generalization is a common symptom of many anxiety disorders, and females are 60% more likely to suffer from an anxiety disorder than males. We have previously demonstrated that female rats display significantly accelerated rates of contextual fear generalization compared to male rats; a process driven, in part, by activation of ERβ. The current study was designed to determine the impact of estrogens on contextual fear generalization in male rats. For experiment 1, adult male rats were gonadectomized (GDX) and implanted with a capsule containing testosterone proprionate, estradiol, dihydrotestosterone proprionate (DHT), or an empty capsule. Treatment with testosterone or estradiol maintained memory precision when rats were tested in a different (neutral) context 1day after training. However, male rats treated with DHT or empty capsules displayed significant levels of fear generalization, exhibiting high levels of fear in the neutral context. In Experiment 2, we used acute injections of gonadal hormones at a time known to elicit fear generalization in female rats (e.g. 24h before testing). Injection treatment followed the same pattern of results seen in Experiment 1. Finally, animals given daily injections of the aromatase inhibitor, Fadrozole, displayed significant fear generalization. These data suggest that testosterone attenuates fear generalization likely through the aromatization testosterone into estradiol as animals treated with the non-aromatizable androgen, DHT, or animals treated with Fadrozole, displayed significant generalized fear. Overall, these results demonstrate a sex-dependent effect of estradiol on the generalization of contextual fear. PMID:27368147

  20. Fate of estradiol and testosterone in anaerobic lagoon digestors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Laboratory-scale lagoon digestors were constructed, and the fate of 14C-labelled 17ß-estradiol (E2) and testosterone (Test) were monitored for 42 d anaerobically under biological and sterile conditions. Hormone levels decreased in the liquid layer and increased in the sludge with time. At 42 d, 16-2...

  1. Effects of Testosterone Administration on Strategic Gambling in Poker Play

    PubMed Central

    van Honk, Jack; Will, Geert-Jan; Terburg, David; Raub, Werner; Eisenegger, Christoph; Buskens, Vincent

    2016-01-01

    Testosterone has been associated with economically egoistic and materialistic behaviors, but -defensibly driven by reputable status seeking- also with economically fair, generous and cooperative behaviors. Problematically, social status and economic resources are inextricably intertwined in humans, thus testosterone’s primal motives are concealed. We critically addressed this issue by performing a placebo-controlled single-dose testosterone administration in young women, who played a game of bluff poker wherein concerns for status and resources collide. The profit-maximizing strategy in this game is to mislead the other players by bluffing randomly (independent of strength of the hand), thus also when holding very poor cards (cold bluffing). The profit-maximizing strategy also dictates the players in this poker game to never call the other players’ bluffs. For reputable-status seeking these materialistic strategies are disadvantageous; firstly, being caught cold bluffing damages one’s reputation by revealing deceptive intent, and secondly, not calling the other players’ bluffs signals submission in blindly tolerating deception. Here we show that testosterone administration in this game of bluff poker significantly reduces random bluffing, as well as cold bluffing, while significantly increasing calling. Our data suggest that testosterone in humans primarily motivates for reputable-status seeking, even when this elicits behaviors that are economically disadvantageous. PMID:26727636

  2. EFFECTS OF ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMICALS ON FETAL TESTES TESTOSTERONE PRODUCTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Effects of Environmental Chemicals on Fetal Testes Testosterone Production

    Lambright, CS , Wilson, VS , Furr, J, Wolf, CJ, Noriega, N, Gray, LE, Jr.
    US EPA, ORD/NHEERL/RTD, RTP, NC

    Exposure of pregnant rodents to certain environmental chemicals during criti...

  3. Foetal Testosterone, Social Relationships, and Restricted Interests in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knickmeyer, Rebecca; Baron-Cohen, Simon; Raggatt, Peter; Taylor, Kevin

    2005-01-01

    Background: Sex-differences exist in some areas of human social behaviour. In animals, foetal testosterone (fT) plays a central role in organising the brain and in later social behaviour. fT has also been implicated in language development, eye-contact, and spatial ability in humans. Methods: Fifty-eight children (35 male and 23 female), whose fT…

  4. Hostility, testosterone, and vascular reactivity to stress: effects of sex.

    PubMed

    Girdler, S S; Jammer, L D; Shapiro, D

    1997-01-01

    This study investigated the association of personality with cardiovascular stress reactivity (CVR) in men and women. Also, the degree to which testosterone and estradiol reactivity were related to personality and CVR measures was examined. Twenty-six men and 44 women completed the Cook-Medley Hostility Scale, the Beck Depression Inventory, and the Spielberger Trait Anxiety Inventory before speech, Stroop, and math stress. Testosterone (men) and estradiol (subset of women) were sampled once after an initial rest period and again after the last stressor. Cardiovascular reactivity, including cardiac output and total peripheral resistance (TPR), was assessed during stressors. For men, testosterone increased significantly with stress, and testosterone reactivity to stressors was significantly correlated with hostility. However, stepwise multiple regression revealed that hostility was the only independent predictor of CVR to speech, math, and Stroop stress in men, accounting for 13%-32% of the variance in TPR. Baseline systolic blood pressure explained 22% of the variance in TPR reactivity to speech preparation. No evidence was obtained to suggest that hostility, depressive mood, or anxiety predicted CVR in women, and estradiol did not show stress-sensitive effects. These data provide evidence that increased vascular reactivity may be one mechanism linking hostility to increased cardiovascular mortality in men and support the notion that hostility may have different implications for CVR in women. PMID:16250731

  5. The treatment of balanitis xerotica obliterans with testosterone propionate ointment.

    PubMed

    Pasieczny, T A

    1977-01-01

    Balanitis xerotica obliterans (BXO) and kraurosis penis are thought to be synonymous. Clinically and histopathologically they probably represent the same disease process as lichen sclerosus et atrophicus (LSA) but also involve the urethral mucosa. The treatment of choice is considered to be 2 1/2% testosterone propionate ointment which gives better results than strong corticosteroid applications, yet without their side effects. PMID:71837

  6. Effects of Nandrolone Stimulation on Testosterone Biosynthesis in Leydig Cells.

    PubMed

    Pomara, Cristoforo; Barone, Rosario; Marino Gammazza, Antonella; Sangiorgi, Claudia; Barone, Fulvio; Pitruzzella, Alessandro; Locorotondo, Nicola; Di Gaudio, Francesca; Salerno, Monica; Maglietta, Francesca; Sarni, Antonio Luciano; Di Felice, Valentina; Cappello, Francesco; Turillazzi, Emanuela

    2016-06-01

    Anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) are among the drugs most used by athletes for improving physical performance, as well as for aesthetic purposes. A number of papers have showed the side effects of AAS in different organs and tissues. For example, AAS are known to suppress gonadotropin-releasing hormone, luteinizing hormone, and follicle-stimulating hormone. This study investigates the effects of nandrolone on testosterone biosynthesis in Leydig cells using various methods, including mass spectrometry, western blotting, confocal microscopy and quantitative real-time PCR. The results obtained show that testosterone levels increase at a 3.9 μM concentration of nandrolone and return to the basal level a 15.6 μM dose of nandrolone. Nandrolone-induced testosterone increment was associated with upregulation of the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) and downregulation of 17a-hydroxylase/17, 20 lyase (CYP17A1). Instead, a 15.6 µM dose of nandrolone induced a down-regulation of CYP17A1. Further in vivo studies based on these data are needed to better understand the relationship between disturbed testosterone homeostasis and reproductive system impairment in male subjects. PMID:26626779

  7. IQ, Fetal Testosterone and Individual Variability in Children's Functional Lateralization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercure, Evelyne; Ashwin, Emma; Dick, Frederic; Halit, Hanife; Auyeung, Bonnie; Baron-Cohen, Simon; Johnson, Mark H.

    2009-01-01

    Previous event-related potential (ERP) studies have revealed that faces and words show a robust difference in the lateralization of their N170. The present study investigated the development of this differential lateralization in school-age boys. We assessed the potential role of fetal testosterone (FT) level as a factor biasing the prenatal…

  8. Testosterone in sera of workers exposed to acrylonitrile.

    PubMed

    Ivănescu, M; Berinde, M; Simionescu, L

    1990-01-01

    Testosterone was measured through three consecutive years in sera from young and adult male subjects working in a chemical factory exposed to some complex chemical noxae, the major exposure being acrylonitrile (vinylcyanid). In the first yr, (group A), the blood was collected on May 1975 (no 39), the II-nd yr (group B) on March (no 109) and the III-rd yr (group C) on May (no 149). The exposure time varied in each group between 6 mos and 7-10 yrs. For comparison, blood samples were collected from 145 men of comparable age grouped in nonexposed: blood donors (no 37) (group a), new workers (no 23) (group b) and exposed to other chemical noxae in the same factory: Na cyanid (group c, no 23), cyan derivatives (group d, no 22) and pyrolysis (group no 39). The seasonal testosterone variations being considered, the Student's 't' test applied to the hormonal levels in acrylonitrile groups A, B and C showed non significant differences. However, the comparison of the testosterone concentrations in sera of the groups A, B and C vs the control groups investigated during the same month of the year showed much lower levels of the hormone in the first groups (p less than 0.001). These data are suggesting that the exposure to acrylonitrile either by direct participation to the technological chain or by working in the same noxious environment may influence the testosterone synthesis and/or secretion. PMID:2103974

  9. Low cord blood type 14 pneumococcal IgG1 but not IgG2 antibody predicts early infant otitis media.

    PubMed

    Lockhart, N J; Daly, K A; Lindgren, B R; Meland, M; Le, C T; Giebink, G S

    2000-06-01

    Type-specific IgG1 and IgG2 antibodies to Streptococcus pneumoniae capsular polysaccharides 14 and 19F were measured in cord blood samples from 425 neonates, to determine which antibody subclass was most strongly associated with otitis media (OM) during the first 6 months of life (early OM). Early OM was significantly associated with type 14 IgG1 antibody in the lowest antibody quartile (P=.055) but not with type 19F IgG1 antibody or with either IgG2 antibody. IgG1 and IgG2 antibodies were significantly intercorrelated for type 14 (r=.52, P<.001) and type 19F (r=.38, P<.001). Multivariate analysis revealed that having type 14 IgG1 antibody in the lowest quartile, child care attendance, and sibling and maternal OM history were independent risk factors for early OM. Although type-specific pneumococcal IgG2 antibody concentrations were significantly higher than IgG1 concentrations, IgG2 antibodies apparently are not protective against OM during early infancy. PMID:10837178

  10. Diagnosis and Treatment of Low Testosterone among Patients with End-Stage Renal Disease.

    PubMed

    Bao, Yeran; Johansen, Kirsten L

    2015-01-01

    The prevalence of low testosterone level is particularly high among patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and has been associated with mortality. In populations without ESRD, low testosterone level has also been associated with a number of morbidities including cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus, low muscle mass, low bone mass, low physical performance, and frailty. However, there is controversy regarding what constitutes low testosterone level in the aging population and at what level replacement therapy with testosterone is indicated. There are no randomized controlled trials investigating long-term outcomes of testosterone replacement therapy in populations with or without ESRD. Available trial results suggest equivocal improvements in sexual function. Muscle mass and bone mineral density appear to improve, but results in physical function and performance are mixed and there are no data on fracture prevention. Some recent data suggest harm when testosterone was given to men with limited mobility. Finally, there is little evidence that testosterone adds to existing erythropoietin agents in the treatment of anemia in ESRD. Due to lack of evidence supporting long-term use of testosterone, the authors recommend against the routine use of testosterone in ESRD patients with low testosterone levels. Testosterone treatment can be considered in those with low bone mass and total testosterone level <200 ng/dl, or in younger patients with sexual complaints with total testosterone level lower than the reference range. It is important to engage patients in discussion of risks and benefits before initiating testosterone therapy; testosterone therapy should be discontinued if the intended treatment effect is not observed after short-term use. PMID:25376701

  11. Pituitary and testis responsiveness of young male sheep exposed to testosterone excess during fetal development.

    PubMed

    Recabarren, Mónica P; Rojas-Garcia, Pedro P; Einspanier, Ralf; Padmanabhan, Vasantha; Sir-Petermann, Teresa; Recabarren, Sergio E

    2013-06-01

    Prenatal exposure to excess testosterone induces reproductive disturbances in both female and male sheep. In females, it alters the hypothalamus-pituitary-ovarian axis. In males, prenatal testosterone excess reduces sperm count and motility. Focusing on males, this study tested whether pituitary LH responsiveness to GNRH is increased in prenatal testosterone-exposed males and whether testicular function is compromised in the testosterone-exposed males. Control males (n=6) and males born to ewes exposed to twice weekly injections of 30  mg testosterone propionate from days 30 to 90 and of 40  mg testosterone propionate from days 90 to 120 of gestation (n=6) were studied at 20 and 30 weeks of age. Pituitary and testicular responsiveness was tested by administering a GNRH analog (leuprolide acetate). To complement the analyses, the mRNA expression of LH receptor (LHR) and that of steroidogenic enzymes were determined in testicular tissue. Basal LH and testosterone concentrations were higher in the testosterone-exposed-males. While LH response to the GNRH analog was higher in the testosterone-exposed males than in the control males, testosterone responses did not differ between the treatment groups. The testosterone:LH ratio was higher in the control males than in the testosterone-exposed males of 30 weeks of age, suggestive of reduced Leydig cell sensitivity to LH in the testosterone-exposed males. The expression of LHR mRNA was lower in the testosterone-exposed males, but the mRNA expression of steroidogenic enzymes did not differ between the groups. These findings indicate that prenatal testosterone excess has opposing effects at the pituitary and testicular levels, namely increased pituitary sensitivity to GNRH at the level of pituitary and decreased sensitivity of the testes to LH. PMID:23579187

  12. The origin of IgG production and homogeneous IgG components after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    van Tol, M J; Gerritsen, E J; de Lange, G G; van Leeuwen, A M; Jol-van der Zijde, C M; Oudeman-Gruber, N J; de Vries, E; Radl, J; Vossen, J M

    1996-01-15

    Pediatric recipients (n = 25) of an allogeneic bone marrow (BM) graft were selected on the basis of informative IgG allotype (Gm) differences between the BM donor and the recipient. To investigate the kinetics of the appearance of IgG of donor origin and the disappearance of IgG of recipient origin, G1m and G2m allotype levels were quantified in sera obtained at regular intervals between 3 months and 5 years after BM transplantation (BMT). For this quantification, a dot immunobinding assay (DIBA) has been developed. In 19 of 22 informative recipients, the Gm allotype distribution had reached the range of values expected on the basis of the Gm phenotype of the donor within 6 months after BMT. Remarkably, IgG of recipient origin persisted in 15 of 18 informative recipients until last follow up, ie, for several years after BMT. In addition to the origin of total IgG production, the origin of homogeneous IgG components (H-IgG) appearing after BMT was investigated. H-IgG of donor origin could be detected as early as 3 weeks after BMT, but also H-IgG of recipient origin were present in 8 of 13 informative recipients for a period of up to 1 year after BMT. We conclude that host-type IgG-producing cells were not eradicated by the (myeloablative) conditioning regimen and persisted in a high number of graft recipients. It is our hypothesis that lack of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) in the majority of these recipients results in the persistence of IgG-producing cells of host origin. These observations may be relevant for the evaluation of patients who received allogeneic BMT for the treatment of multiple myeloma. PMID:8555508

  13. Conjugation of an anti transferrin receptor IgG3-avidin fusion protein with biotinylated saporin results in significant enhancement of its cytotoxicity against malignant hematopoietic cells.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Tracy R; Ng, Patrick P; Delgado, Tracie; Lynch, Maureen R; Schiller, Gary; Helguera, Gustavo; Penichet, Manuel L

    2007-11-01

    We have previously developed an antibody fusion protein composed of a mouse/human chimeric IgG3 specific for the human transferrin receptor genetically fused to avidin (anti-hTfR IgG3-Av) as a universal delivery system for cancer therapy. This fusion protein efficiently delivers biotinylated FITC into cancer cells via TfR-mediated endocytosis. In addition, anti-hTfR IgG3-Av alone exhibits intrinsic cytotoxic activity and interferes with hTfR recycling, leading to the rapid degradation of the TfR and lethal iron deprivation in certain malignant B-cell lines. We now report on the cytotoxic effects of a conjugate composed of anti-hTfR IgG3-Av and biotinylated saporin 6 (b-SO6), a toxin derived from the plant Saponaria officinalis that inhibits protein synthesis. Conjugation of anti-hTfR IgG3-Av with b-SO6 enhances the cytotoxic effect of the fusion protein in sensitive cells and also overcomes the resistance of malignant cells that show low sensitivity to the fusion protein alone. Our results show for the first time that loading anti-hTfR IgG3-Av with a biotinylated toxin enhances the cytotoxicity of the fusion protein alone. These results suggest that anti-hTfR IgG3-Av has great potential as a therapeutic agent for a wide range of applications due to its intrinsic cytotoxic activity plus its ability to deliver biotinylated molecules into cancer cells. PMID:18025284

  14. Testosterone replacement attenuates cognitive decline in testosterone-deprived lean rats, but not in obese rats, by mitigating brain oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Pintana, Hiranya; Pongkan, Wanpitak; Pratchayasakul, Wasana; Chattipakorn, Nipon; Chattipakorn, Siriporn C

    2015-10-01

    Testosterone replacement improves metabolic parameters and cognitive function in hypogonadism. However, the effects of testosterone therapy on cognition in obese condition with testosterone deprivation have not been investigated. We hypothesized that testosterone replacement improves cognitive function in testosterone-deprived obese rats by restoring brain insulin sensitivity, brain mitochondrial function, and hippocampal synaptic plasticity. Thirty male Wistar rats had either a bilateral orchiectomy (ORX: O, n = 24) or a sham operation (S, n = 6). ORX rats were further divided into two groups fed with either a normal diet (NDO) or a high-fat diet (HFO) for 12 weeks. Then, ORX rats in each dietary group were divided into two subgroups (n = 6/subgroup) and were given either castor oil or testosterone (2 mg/kg/day, s.c.) for 4 weeks. At the end of this protocol, cognitive function, metabolic parameters, brain insulin sensitivity, hippocampal synaptic plasticity, and brain mitochondrial function were determined. We found that testosterone replacement increased peripheral insulin sensitivity, decreased circulation and brain oxidative stress levels, and attenuated brain mitochondrial ROS production in HFO rats. However, testosterone failed to restore hippocampal synaptic plasticity and cognitive function in HFO rats. In contrast, in NDO rats, testosterone decreased circulation and brain oxidative stress levels, attenuated brain mitochondrial ROS production, and restored hippocampal synaptic plasticity as well as cognitive function. These findings suggest that testosterone replacement improved peripheral insulin sensitivity and decreased oxidative stress levels, but failed to restore hippocampal synaptic plasticity and cognitive function in testosterone-deprived obese rats. However, it provided beneficial effects in reversing cognitive impairment in testosterone-deprived non-obese rats. PMID:26277724

  15. Low testosterone levels may be associated with suicidal behavior in older men while high testosterone levels may be related to suicidal behavior in adolescents and young adults: a hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Sher, Leo

    2013-01-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that there is an association between testosterone and suicidal behavior. A link between testosterone and the neurobiology of suicidal behavior may be related to: a) a direct effect of testosterone on suicidality via certain brain mechanisms; and/or b) a testosterone influence on aggression and, consequently, suicidality; and/or c) a testosterone effect on mood and, consequently, suicidality; and/or d) a testosterone effect on cognition and, consequently, suicidality. At least one study has demonstrated a relation between high levels of testosterone and suicide in young people. A significant number of studies suggest that high testosterone levels are associated with aggression in adolescents and adults. Multiple lines of evidence indicate that aggression is associated with suicidal behavior. The effect of high testosterone levels on suicidality in adolescents and young adults may be mediated by testosterone-related elevated aggression. It is also possible that, in young people, high testosterone levels are directly linked to suicidality via certain brain mechanisms. In older men, decreased testosterone levels are associated with depressive symptoms and reduced cognitive function, whereas higher blood levels of testosterone are associated with better mood and cognitive functioning. Depression and reduced cognition are associated with suicidal behavior and may mediate the effect of decreased testosterone levels on suicidality. Therefore, it is reasonable to propose that suicidal behavior in adolescents and young adults is associated with high testosterone levels, whereas suicidality in older men is associated with decreased testosterone secretion. PMID:23893672

  16. Characterization of the subclasses and light chain types of IgG antibodies to rubella.

    PubMed Central

    Skvaril, F; Schilt, U

    1984-01-01

    IgG subclasses of antibodies to rubella were determined in indirect enzyme linked immunoassay (ELISA) with monoclonal antibodies specific for human IgG1, IgG2, IgG3 and IgG4. Eleven sera from women with long past history of rubella, two hyperimmune and five non-hyperimmune immunoglobulin preparations were tested. Light chain types of the antibodies were tested in ELISA with polyclonal specific antibodies to kappa and lambda chains. Antibodies to rubella in the sera as well as in the immunoglobulin preparations were found in the IgG1 subclass only. Both light chain types were present in the antibodies. PMID:6423327

  17. Progressive Improvement of T-Scores in Men with Osteoporosis and Subnormal Serum Testosterone Levels upon Treatment with Testosterone over Six Years.

    PubMed

    Haider, Ahmad; Meergans, Ulrich; Traish, Abdulmaged; Saad, Farid; Doros, Gheorghe; Lips, Paul; Gooren, Louis

    2014-01-01

    Testosterone deficiency leads to bone loss and testosterone treatment has a beneficial effect. This study investigated the effects of normalizing serum testosterone on bone mineral density in 45 men with osteoporosis, diagnosed with testosterone deficiency (serum testosterone levels <12.1 nmol/L, T-scores: (mean ± SD) -3.12 ± 0.45, minimum: -4.10, and maximum: -2.60). In a cumulative, prospective, registry study of hypogonadal men (mean age: 53 ± 7 years) they received parenteral testosterone undecanoate of 1000 mg/12 weeks for up to six years. After one year 44 men were included in the registry, after two years 36 men, after three years 32 men, after four years 25 men, after five years 10 men and after six years 4 men. The declining numbers do not reflect drop-out rates but are a result of the registry design. Over the 6 year period there was a significant and progressive improvement of the T-scores in these men. Normalizing of serum testosterone leads to an improvement of bone mineral density and this improvement was progressive with the time period of testosterone administration. In this study of 6-years many men with testosterone deficiency suffered from classical diagnoses (Klinefelter's syndrome and testicular pathology) hitherto undiagnosed. PMID:24688541

  18. Comparative functional characterization of canine IgG subclasses.

    PubMed

    Bergeron, Lisa M; McCandless, Erin E; Dunham, Steve; Dunkle, Bill; Zhu, Yaqi; Shelly, John; Lightle, Sandra; Gonzales, Andrea; Bainbridge, Graeme

    2014-01-15

    To date, very little is known about the functional characteristics of the four published canine IgG subclasses. It is not clear how each subclass engages the immune system via complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC) or antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC), or how long each antibody may last in serum. Such information is critical for understanding canine immunology and for the discovery of canine therapeutic monoclonal antibodies. Through both in vitro and ex vivo experiments to evaluate canine Fc's for effector function, complement binding, FcRn binding, and ADCC, we are now able to categorize canine subclasses by function. The subclasses share functional properties with the four human IgG subclasses and are reported herein with their function-based human analog. Canine Fc fusions, canine chimeras, and caninized antibodies were characterized. Canine subclasses A and D appear effector-function negative while subclasses B and C bind canine Fc gamma receptors and are positive for ADCC. All canine subclasses bind the neonatal Fc receptor except subclass C. By understanding canine IgGs in this way, we can apply what is known of human immunology toward translational and veterinary medicine. Thus, this body of work lays the foundation for evaluating canine IgG subclasses for therapeutic antibody development and builds upon the fundamental scholarship of canine immunology. PMID:24268690

  19. Salivary testosterone levels in men at a U.S. sex club.

    PubMed

    Escasa, Michelle J; Casey, Jacqueline F; Gray, Peter B

    2011-10-01

    Vertebrate males commonly experience elevations in testosterone levels in response to sexual stimuli, such as presentation of a novel mating partner. Some previous human studies have shown that watching erotic movies increases testosterone levels in males although studies measuring testosterone changes during actual sexual intercourse or masturbation have yielded mixed results. Small sample sizes, "unnatural" lab-based settings, and invasive techniques may help account for mixed human findings. Here, we investigated salivary testosterone levels in men watching (n = 26) versus participating (n = 18) in sexual activity at a large U.S. sex club. The present study entailed minimally invasive sample collection (measuring testosterone in saliva), a naturalistic setting, and a larger number of subjects than previous work to test three hypotheses related to men's testosterone responses to sexual stimuli. Subjects averaged 40 years of age and participated between 11:00 pm and 2:10 am. Consistent with expectations, results revealed that testosterone levels increased 36% among men during a visit to the sex club, with the magnitude of testosterone change significantly greater among participants (72%) compared with observers (11%). Contrary to expectation, men's testosterone changes were unrelated to their age. These findings were generally consistent with vertebrate studies indicating elevated male testosterone in response to sexual stimuli, but also point out the importance of study context since participation in sexual behavior had a stronger effect on testosterone increases in this study but unlike some previous human lab-based studies. PMID:21165688

  20. Forbidden fruit for athletes, but possible divine blessing for rehabilitation: testosterone

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Kyung-Jin; Kim, Khae-Hawn

    2015-01-01

    Testosterone is regarded as an attractive supplement for obtaining masculinity and sexuality; however, there have been pros and cons regarding its application as a treatment. In addition, there is also conventional repulsion on adoption of testosterone to any kind of exercise to anyone with concern with sports. However, we should keep in mind that in terms of rehabilitation, our main concern is not fairness but efficiency. And there are obvious advantages of testosterone in recovery and rejuvenation. We aim to introduce the possibility of testosterone in recovery and rejuvenation and are to bring up a topic the application of testosterone in exercise rehabilitation. Considering the light and darkness in testosterone, moderate use of testosterone under professional medication counseling might be an effective possibility to those with sickness and illness and should be considered as a possible option to assist the recovery from frailty and illness. PMID:25830137

  1. Testosterone, anastrozole, factor V Leiden heterozygosity and osteonecrosis of the jaws.

    PubMed

    Pandit, Ramesh S; Glueck, Charles J

    2014-04-01

    Our specific aim is to describe the development of thrombotic osteonecrosis of the jaws after testosterone-anastrozole therapy in a 55-year-old white man subsequently found to have previously undiagnosed factor V Leiden heterozygosity. Before the diagnosis of V Leiden heterozygosity, he was given testosterone gel, 50 mg/day, and on testosterone, serum testosterone (963 ng/dl) and estradiol were high (50 pg/ml). Anastrozole was started, and testosterone was continued. Six months later, osteonecrosis of the jaws was diagnosed. Exogenous testosterone is aromatized to estradiol and estradiol-induced thrombophilia, when superimposed on underlying familial thrombophilia, as in this case, may lead to thrombosis and osteonecrosis. We recommend that before giving testosterone, at a minimum, screening for the factor V Leiden and G20210A mutations, and factor VIII and XI activity be carried out, to avoid unanticipated thrombosis. PMID:24674881

  2. Enrichment of total serum IgG4 in patients with pemphigus

    PubMed Central

    Funakoshi, T.; Lunardon, L.; Ellebrecht, C.T.; Nagler, A.R.; O’Leary, C.E.; Payne, A.S.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) and pemphigus foliaceus (PF) are potentially fatal blistering diseases caused by autoantibodies targeting desmoglein (Dsg) adhesion proteins. Previous studies have shown an IgG4 > IgG1 predominance of anti-Dsg antibodies in pemphigus; however, no studies have examined total serum IgG4 levels in pemphigus. IgG4 is induced by chronic antigen stimulation, which could occur with persistent skin blistering and potentially elevate the total serum IgG4 relative to other IgG subclasses in patients with pemphigus. Objectives The primary aim of the study was to quantitate total and Dsg-specific IgG subclasses in patients with pemphigus. Methods IgG subclasses and Dsg-specific IgG1 and IgG4 were quantitated in patients with PV and PF, and in sera from age-matched controls using a subclass enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The effectiveness of IgG4 depletion in blocking IgG pathogenicity in PV was determined using a keratinocyte dissociation assay. Results Dsg-specific antibodies comprised a median of 7·1% and 4·2% of total IgG4 in patients with PV and PF, respectively, with eightfold and fourfold enrichment in IgG4 vs. IgG1. Total serum IgG4, but not other IgG subclasses, was enriched in patients with PV and PF compared with age-matched controls (P = 0·004 and P = 0·005, respectively). IgG4 depletion of PV sera reduced pathogenicity in a keratinocyte dissociation assay and showed that affinity-purified IgG4 is more pathogenic than other serum IgG fractions. Conclusions Dsg-specific autoantibodies are significantly enriched in IgG4, which may explain the enrichment of total serum IgG4 in some patients with pemphigus. By preferentially targeting autoimmune rather than beneficial immune antibodies, IgG4-targeted therapies may offer safer treatment options for pemphigus. PMID:22803659

  3. Association between serum total testosterone and Body Mass Index in middle aged healthy men

    PubMed Central

    Shamim, Muhammad Omar; Ali Khan, Farooq Munfaet; Arshad, Rabia

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine correlation of serum total testosterone with body mass index (BMI) and waist hip ratio (WHR) in healthy adult males. Methods: A cross sectional study was conducted on 200 nonsmoker healthy males (aged 30-50 years) university employees. They were selected by convenience sampling technique after a detailed medical history and clinical examination including BMI and Waist Hip Ratio (WHR) calculation. Blood sampling was carried out to measure serum total testosterone (TT) using facilities of Chemiluminescence assay (CLIA) technique in Dow Chemical Laboratory. Independent sample T test was used for mean comparisons of BMI and WHR in between low and normal testosterone groups. (Subjects having < 9.7 nmol/L of total testosterone in blood were placed in low testosterone group and subjects having ≥ 9.7 nmol/L of total testosterone in blood were placed in normal testosterone group). Correlation of testosterone with BMI and WHR was analyzed by Pearson Correlation. Results: Mean (± SD) age of the subjects included in this study was 38.7 (± 6.563) years mean (± SD) total testosterone was 15.92 (±6.322)nmol/L. The mean (± SD) BMI, and WHR were 24.95 (±3.828) kg/m2 and 0.946 (±0.0474) respectively. Statistically significant differences were observed in the mean values of BMI and WHR for the two groups of testosterone. Significant inverse correlation of serum total testosterone with BMI(r = -0.311, p = 0.000) was recorded in this study. However testosterone was not significantly correlated with waist/hip ratio.(r = -0.126, p = 0.076) Conclusion: Middle age men working at DUHS who have low level of serum total testosterone are more obese than individuals with normal total testosterone level. PMID:26101490

  4. The different effector function capabilities of the seven equine IgG subclasses have implications for vaccine strategies

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Melanie J.; Wagner, Bettina; Woof, Jenny M.

    2008-01-01

    Recombinant versions of the seven equine IgG subclasses were expressed in CHO cells. All assembled into intact immunoglobulins stabilised by disulphide bridges, although, reminiscent of human IgG4, a small proportion of equine IgG4 and IgG7 were held together by non-covalent bonds alone. All seven IgGs were N-glycosylated. In addition IgG3 appeared to be O-glycosylated and could bind the lectin jacalin. Staphylococcal protein A displayed weak binding for the equine IgGs in the order: IgG1 > IgG3 > IgG4 > IgG7 > IgG2 = IgG5 > IgG6. Streptococcal protein G bound strongly to IgG1, IgG4 and IgG7, moderately to IgG3, weakly to IgG2 and IgG6, and not at all to IgG5. Analysis of antibody effector functions revealed that IgG1, IgG3, IgG4, IgG5 and IgG7, but not IgG2 and IgG6, were able to elicit a strong respiratory burst from equine peripheral blood leukocytes, predicting that the former five IgG subclasses are able to interact with Fc receptors on effector cells. IgG1, IgG3, IgG4 and IgG7, but not IgG2, IgG5 and IgG6, were able to bind complement C1q and activate complement via the classical pathway. The differential effector function capabilities of the subclasses suggest that, for maximum efficacy, equine vaccine strategies should seek to elicit antibody responses of the IgG1, IgG3, IgG4, and IgG7 subclasses. PMID:17669496

  5. Nasal manifestations of IgG4-related disease: A report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Keiko; Matsuda, Yoko; Arai, Tomio; Kimura, Yurika

    2015-12-01

    IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD) is a recently recognized clinical disease entity characterized by elevated serum IgG4, tumefaction, tissue infiltration of IgG4-positive plasma cells and fibrosis. IgG4-RD may occur, either synchronously or metachronously, in a variety of organs throughout the body. We describe herein two representative cases of the nasal manifestations of IgG4-RD, characterized by diffuse, crusty, erosive lesions on nasal mucosa. Oral steroid administration was effective in treating these nasal manifestations. We report a decrease in IgG4 positive plasma cell infiltrates in nasal mucosa biopsy specimens after steroid therapy, demonstrating that infiltration of IgG4-positive cells is reversible. PMID:26060132

  6. The effects of selected drugs, including chlorpromazine and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents, on polyclonal IgG synthesis and interleukin 1 production by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Martinez, F; Coleman, J W

    1989-05-01

    We tested a range of drugs for their effects on in vitro polyclonal IgG synthesis by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) stimulated with the lectin pokeweed mitogen (PWM). The test drugs were selected on the basis of reported disruptive effects on immune function in vivo. IgG production between day 4 and days 7 or 8 of culture was measured by biotin-streptavidin sandwich ELISA. The anti-psychotic agent chlorpromazine (0.55-1.7 microM) enhanced IgG synthesis to approximately double control levels. In contrast, the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) indomethacin, piroxicam, ibuprofen and aspirin inhibited IgG synthesis by up to 50%, with a rank order of potency that reflects their activity as inhibitors of cyclo-oxygenase. Phenytoin, procainamide, propylthiouracil, methimazole, D-penicillamine and D-penicillamine-L-cysteine all failed to modulate IgG synthesis at non-toxic concentrations. The potentiation and inhibition of IgG synthesis by chlorpromazine and indomethacin, respectively, was observed only when the drug was present during the first 24 h of culture. Neither chlorpromazine nor indomethacin, at non-toxic concentrations, affected PHA- and PWM-stimulated proliferation of PBMC. In addition, chlorpromazine, indomethacin and piroxicam, at concentrations which produced maximal modulation of IgG synthesis, and D-penicillamine and D-penicillamine-L-cysteine at 10 microM failed to influence production of interleukin-1-like activity. We conclude that chlorpromazine and NSAIDs, although they exert opposite effects on IgG synthesis, act at an early stage of B cell differentiation that appears to be independent of interleukin 1 synthesis and early proliferative events. PMID:2788047

  7. IgG1 deficiency exacerbates experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis in BALB/c mice

    PubMed Central

    Huda, Ruksana; Strait, Richard T.; Tüzün, Erdem; Finkelman, Fred D.; Christadoss, Premkumar

    2015-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disease characterized by muscle weakness due to neuromuscular junction (NMJ) damage by anti-acetylcholine receptor (AChR) auto-antibodies and complement. In experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis (EAMG), which is induced by immunization with Torpedo AChR in CFA, anti-AChR IgG2b and IgG1 are the predominant isotypes in the circulation. Complement activation by isotypes such as IgG2b plays a crucial role in EAMG pathogenesis; this suggested the possibility that IgG1, which does not activate complement through the classical pathway, may suppress EAMG. In this study, we show that AChR-immunized BALB/c mice genetically deficient for IgG1 produce higher levels of complement-activating isotypes of anti-AChR, especially IgG3 and IgG2a, and develop increased IgG3/IgG2a deposits at the NMJ, as compared to wild type (WT) BALB/c mice. Consistent with this, AChR-immunized IgG1−/− BALB/c mice lose muscle strength and muscle AChR to a greater extent than AChR-immunized WT mice. These observations demonstrate that IgG1 deficiency leads to increased severity of EAMG associated with an increase in complement activating IgG isotypes. Further studies are needed to dissect the specific role or mechanism of IgG1 in limiting EAMG and that of EAMG exacerbating role of complement activating IgG3 and IgG2a in IgG1 deficiency. PMID:25867470

  8. Recurrent Mastoiditis Mimics IgG4 Related Disease: A Potential Diagnostic Pitfall.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, Vikram; Zane, Nicolas A; Kraft, Stefan; Stone, John H; Faquin, William C

    2016-09-01

    IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD) is a recently recognized entity that causes progressive fibrosis and formation of mass lesions. IgG4-RD can be diagnosed histologically by its hallmarks of storiform fibrosis, prominent lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate, and obliterative phlebitis, accompanied by the infiltration of excessive numbers of IgG4-positive plasma cells as well as elevations in serum IgG4 concentrations. A recent publication reported a case of IgG4-RD in the mastoid sinus, representing a new anatomic location for this disease. We report two additional cases of IgG4-RD occurring in the mastoid and causing clinical mastoiditis. The presenting symptoms were varied-tinnitus, hearing loss, and cranial nerve palsies. All three cases showed a dense lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate, storiform type fibrosis as well as elevated numbers of IgG4 positive plasma cells. The three patients responded to immunosuppressive therapy that included steroids and Rituximab. We further investigated 162 consecutive mastoiditis cases at our institution in order to determine the frequency of IgG4-RD as a previously unrecognized cause of mastoiditis. Within this latter cohort we identified nine cases of mastoiditis that had two of the histologic features of IgG4-RD, specifically storiform fibrosis and a dense lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate. Two of these cases showed >50 IgG4-positive plasma cells per high-power field with IgG4-IgG ratio of >40 %, thus fulfilling histological criteria for IgG4-RD. However, both were due to severe acute or chronic infection. In conclusion, we reaffirm IgG4 related mastoiditis as a distinct but uncommon cause of recurrent mastoiditis. The diagnosis of IgG4-related mastoiditis should be rendered with caution, and only after the exclusion of potential mimickers, particularly infection. PMID:27091207

  9. Aberrant IgG isotype generation in mice with abnormal behaviors.

    PubMed

    Kim, So-Nam; Jo, Gwang-Ho; Kim, Hyoung-Ah; Heo, Yong

    2016-01-01

    BTBR T+tf/J (BTBR) mice were recently cited as a suitable animal model for the study of autism because of their behavioral characteristics and immunological changes similar to those reported from autistic subjects. The BTBR mouse was reported to have significantly higher levels of serum IgG, brain IgG deposits and anti-brain IgG than highly social C57BL/6 mice, suggesting involvement of aberrant immune responses in the occurrence of autism. Up-regulation of IgG production was investigated here, with a focus on the pattern of IgG isotype distribution compared with that in FVB/NJ (FVB) mice, another highly social control strain. The results indicated that levels of serum IgG1, IgG2b and IgG3 in post-natal day 21 BTBR mice was significantly higher than FVB mice, regardless of sex, resulting in higher IgG1:IgG2a ratios in BTBR mice than in FVB mice (statistical significance in males). A similar outcome regarding the IgG1:IgG2a ratio was observed in culture supernatants of bone marrow cells from these hosts. A presence of brain-reactive IgG in the sera of BTBR was higher than in FVB mice; levels of brain-reactive IgG against whole brain homogenates were higher in BTBR than in FVB mice, with significant differences seen in the striatum and substantia nigra regions. Levels of IgG1 deposited in the cerebellum, cortex, hippocampus or striatum of both BTBR male and female mice were significantly higher than in FVB counterparts. Overall, these results suggest that alterations in IgG isotype production or deposition in the brain could be implicated in the aberrant immune reactivities of BTBR mice. PMID:25691089

  10. Induction and maintenance of anti‐influenza antigen‐specific nasal secretory IgA levels and serum IgG levels after influenza infection in adults

    PubMed Central

    Fujimoto, Chisa; Takeda, Noriaki; Matsunaga, Atsushi; Sawada, Ayako; Tanaka, Takeshi; Kimoto, Takashi; Shinahara, Wakako; Sawabuchi, Takako; Yamaguchi, Miyoko; Hayama, Masaki; Yanagawa, Hiroaki; Yano, Mihiro; Kido, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: Fujimoto et al. (2012) Induction and maintenance of anti‐influenza antigen‐specific nasal secretory IgA levels and serum IgG levels after influenza infection in adults. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses 6(6), 396–403. Objectives  To determine the induction and changes in anti‐influenza virus secretory IgA (s‐IgA) levels in nasal washes and serum IgG levels in patients with influenza. Methods  The study recruited 16 patients with influenza aged 35·6 ± 9·6 years in 2007/2008 and 2008/2009 seasons. Nasal washes and serum were obtained throughout the first year. Anti‐viral s‐IgA levels and neutralization activities in nasal washes, and serum anti‐viral IgG levels and hemagglutination inhibition (HI) titers were measured. Results  Anti‐viral(H1N1) s‐IgA to total IgA ratio and neutralizing antibody titer were low in nasal washes of all patients, whereas serum levels of anti‐viral IgG and HI titers varied widely at day 1·4 ± 1·0 postinfection. Both nasal s‐IgA and serum IgG levels later increased significantly, reaching peak levels at day 9·6 ± 3·3 postinfection. The induced nasal s‐IgA then returned toward the initial levels within 300 days, although the levels at day 143 ± 70 were 3·03‐fold of the initial. Individual serum IgG levels also returned toward the initial levels within 300 days, although the mean levels remained high probably because of re‐infection in a subgroup of patients. Although influenza A (H3N2) was a minor epidemic subtype in both flu seasons, a significant rise in nasal anti‐viral (H3N2) s‐IgA levels and a slightly increase in serum IgG levels were noted. Conclusion  Low levels of nasal anti‐viral s‐IgA and neutralizing antibody were noted compared with a wide range of serum anti‐viral IgG and HI titers at the onset of infection. Elevated s‐IgA and IgG returned toward the initial levels within 300 days of infection with minor

  11. Distinct Mechanisms Underlie Boosted Polysaccharide-Specific IgG Responses Following Secondary Challenge with Intact Gram-Negative versus Gram-Positive Extracellular Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kar, Swagata; Arjunaraja, Swadhinya; Akkoyunlu, Mustafa; Pier, Gerald B; Snapper, Clifford M

    2016-06-01

    Priming of mice with intact, heat-killed cells of Gram-negative Neisseria meningitidis, capsular serogroup C (MenC) or Gram-positive group B Streptococcus, capsular type III (GBS-III) bacteria resulted in augmented serum polysaccharide (PS)-specific IgG titers following booster immunization. Induction of memory required CD4(+) T cells during primary immunization. We determined whether PS-specific memory for IgG production was contained within the B cell and/or T cell populations, and whether augmented IgG responses following booster immunization were also dependent on CD4(+) T cells. Adoptive transfer of purified B cells from MenC- or GBS-III-primed, but not naive mice resulted in augmented PS-specific IgG responses following booster immunization. Similar responses were observed when cotransferred CD4(+) T cells were from primed or naive mice. Similarly, primary immunization with unencapsulated MenC or GBS-III, to potentially prime CD4(+) T cells, failed to enhance PS-specific IgG responses following booster immunization with their encapsulated isogenic partners. Furthermore, in contrast to GBS-III, depletion of CD4(+) T cells during secondary immunization with MenC or another Gram-negative bacteria, Acinetobacter baumannii, did not inhibit augmented PS-specific IgG booster responses of mice primed with heat-killed cells. Also, in contrast with GBS-III, booster immunization of MenC-primed mice with isolated MenC-PS, a TI Ag, or a conjugate of MenC-PS and tetanus toxoid elicited an augmented PS-specific IgG response similar to booster immunization with intact MenC. These data demonstrate that memory for augmented PS-specific IgG booster responses to Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria is contained solely within the B cell compartment, with a differential requirement for CD4(+) T cells for augmented IgG responses following booster immunization. PMID:27183619

  12. Atomic softness-based QSAR study of testosterone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, H. K.; Pasha, F. A.; Singh, P. P.

    Ionization potential of an atom in a molecule, electron affinity of an atom in a molecule, and quantum chemical descriptor atomic softness values En‡-based quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) study of testosterone derivatives have been done with the help of PM3 calculations on WinMOPAC 7.21 software. The 3D modeling and geometry optimization of all the compounds have been done with the help of PCMODEL software. The biological activities of testosterone derivatives have been taken from literature. The predicted values of biological activity with the help of multiple linear regression (MLR) analysis is very close to observed biological activity. The cross-validation coefficient and correlation coefficient also indicate that the QSAR model is valuable. Regression analysis shows a very good relationship with biological activity and En‡ values. With the help of these values, prediction of the biological activity of any unknown compound is possible.

  13. Age-independent increases in male salivary testosterone during horticultural activity among Tsimane forager-farmers.

    PubMed

    Trumble, Benjamin C; Cummings, Daniel K; O'Connor, Kathleen A; Holman, Darryl J; Smith, Eric A; Kaplan, Hillard S; Gurven, Michael D

    2013-09-01

    Testosterone plays an important role in mediating male reproductive trade-offs in many vertebrate species, augmenting muscle and influencing behavior necessary for male-male competition and mating-effort. Among humans, testosterone may also play a key role in facilitating male provisioning of offspring as muscular and neuromuscular performance are deeply influenced by acute changes in testosterone. This study examines acute changes in salivary testosterone among 63 Tsimane men ranging in age from 16-80 (mean 38.2) years during one-hour bouts of tree-chopping while clearing horticultural plots. The Tsimane forager-horticulturalists living in the Bolivian Amazon experience high energy expenditure associated with food production, have high levels of parasites and pathogens, and display significantly lower baseline salivary testosterone than age-matched US males. Mixed-effects models controlling for BMI and time of specimen collection reveal increased salivary testosterone (p<0.001) equivalent to a 48.6% rise, after one hour of tree chopping. Age had no effect on baseline (p=0.656) or change in testosterone (p=0.530); self-reported illness did not modify testosterone change (p=0.488). A comparison of these results to the relative change in testosterone during a competitive soccer tournament in the same population reveals larger relative changes in testosterone following resource production (tree chopping), compared to competition (soccer). These findings highlight the importance of moving beyond a unidimensional focus on changes in testosterone and male-male aggression to investigate the importance of testosterone-behavior interactions across additional male fitness-related activities. Acutely increased testosterone during muscularly intensive horticultural food production may facilitate male productivity and provisioning. PMID:24187482

  14. Age-independent increases in male salivary testosterone during horticultural activity among Tsimane forager-farmers

    PubMed Central

    TRUMBLE, BENJAMIN C; CUMMINGS, DANIEL K; O’CONNOR, KATHLEEN A; HOLMAN, DARRYL J; SMITH, ERIC A; KAPLAN, HILLARD S; GURVEN, MICHAEL D

    2013-01-01

    Testosterone plays an important role in mediating male reproductive trade-offs in many vertebrate species, augmenting muscle and influencing behavior necessary for male-male competition and mating-effort. Among humans, testosterone may also play a key role in facilitating male provisioning of offspring as muscular and neuromuscular performance are deeply influenced by acute changes in testosterone. This study examines acute changes in salivary testosterone among 63 Tsimane men ranging in age from 16–80 (mean 38.2) years during one-hour bouts of tree-chopping while clearing horticultural plots. The Tsimane forager-horticulturalists living in the Bolivian Amazon experience high energy expenditure associated with food production, have high levels of parasites and pathogens, and display significantly lower baseline salivary testosterone than age-matched US males. Mixed-effects models controlling for BMI and time of specimen collection reveal increased salivary testosterone (p<0.001) equivalent to a 48.6% rise, after one hour of tree chopping. Age had no effect on baseline (p=0.656) or change in testosterone (p=0.530); self-reported illness did not modify testosterone change (p=0.488). A comparison of these results to the relative change in testosterone during a competitive soccer tournament in the same population reveals larger relative changes in testosterone following resource production (tree chopping), compared to competition (soccer). These findings highlight the importance of moving beyond a unidimensional focus on changes in testosterone and male-male aggression to investigate the importance of testosterone-behavior interactions across additional male fitness-related activities. Acutely increased testosterone during muscularly intensive horticultural food production may facilitate male productivity and provisioning. PMID:24187482

  15. Performance Evaluation of the VIDAS(®) Measles IgG Assay and Its Diagnostic Value for Measuring IgG Antibody Avidity in Measles Virus Infection.

    PubMed

    Dina, Julia; Creveuil, Christian; Gouarin, Stephanie; Viron, Florent; Hebert, Amelie; Freymuth, Francois; Vabret, Astrid

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study is primarily to compare the performance of the VIDAS(®) Measles immunoglobulin (Ig)G assay to that of two other serological assays using an immunoassay technique, Enzygnost(®) Anti-measles Virus/IgG (Siemens) and Measles IgG CAPTURE EIA(®) (Microimmune). The sensitivity and the agreement of the VIDAS(®) Measles IgG assay compared to the Enzygnost(®) Anti-measles Virus/IgG assay and the Measles IgG CAPTURE EIA(®) assay are 100%, 97.2% and 99.0%, 98.4%, respectively. The very low number of negative sera for IgG antibodies does not allow calculation of specificity. As a secondary objective, we have evaluated the ability of the VIDAS(®) Measles IgG assay to measure anti-measles virus IgG antibody avidity with the help of the VIDAS(®) CMV IgG Avidity reagent, using 76 sera from subjects with measles and 238 other sera. Different groups of populations were analyzed. In the primary infection measles group, the mean IgG avidity index was 0.16 (range of 0.07 to 0.93) compared to 0.79 (range of 0.25 to 1) in the serum group positive for IgG antibodies and negative for IgM. These data allow to define a weak anti-measles virus IgG antibody avidity as an avidity index (AI) < 0.3 and a strong avidity as an AI > 0.6. The VIDAS(®) Measles IgG assay has a performance equivalent to that of other available products. Its use, individual and quick, is well adapted to testing for anti-measles immunity in exposed subjects. PMID:27556477

  16. Performance Evaluation of the VIDAS® Measles IgG Assay and Its Diagnostic Value for Measuring IgG Antibody Avidity in Measles Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Dina, Julia; Creveuil, Christian; Gouarin, Stephanie; Viron, Florent; Hebert, Amelie; Freymuth, Francois; Vabret, Astrid

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study is primarily to compare the performance of the VIDAS® Measles immunoglobulin (Ig)G assay to that of two other serological assays using an immunoassay technique, Enzygnost® Anti-measles Virus/IgG (Siemens) and Measles IgG CAPTURE EIA® (Microimmune). The sensitivity and the agreement of the VIDAS® Measles IgG assay compared to the Enzygnost® Anti-measles Virus/IgG assay and the Measles IgG CAPTURE EIA® assay are 100%, 97.2% and 99.0%, 98.4%, respectively. The very low number of negative sera for IgG antibodies does not allow calculation of specificity. As a secondary objective, we have evaluated the ability of the VIDAS® Measles IgG assay to measure anti-measles virus IgG antibody avidity with the help of the VIDAS® CMV IgG Avidity reagent, using 76 sera from subjects with measles and 238 other sera. Different groups of populations were analyzed. In the primary infection measles group, the mean IgG avidity index was 0.16 (range of 0.07 to 0.93) compared to 0.79 (range of 0.25 to 1) in the serum group positive for IgG antibodies and negative for IgM. These data allow to define a weak anti-measles virus IgG antibody avidity as an avidity index (AI) < 0.3 and a strong avidity as an AI > 0.6. The VIDAS® Measles IgG assay has a performance equivalent to that of other available products. Its use, individual and quick, is well adapted to testing for anti-measles immunity in exposed subjects. PMID:27556477

  17. Testosterone deprivation accelerates cardiac dysfunction in obese male rats.

    PubMed

    Pongkan, Wanpitak; Pintana, Hiranya; Sivasinprasasn, Sivaporn; Jaiwongkam, Thidarat; Chattipakorn, Siriporn C; Chattipakorn, Nipon

    2016-06-01

    Low testosterone level is associated with increased risks of cardiovascular diseases. As obese-insulin-resistant condition could impair cardiac function and that the incidence of obesity is increased in aging men, a condition of testosterone deprivation could aggravate the cardiac dysfunction in obese-insulin-resistant subjects. However, the mechanism underlying this adverse effect is unclear. This study investigated the effects of obesity on metabolic parameters, heart rate variability (HRV), left ventricular (LV) function, and cardiac mitochondrial function in testosterone-deprived rats. Orchiectomized or sham-operated male Wistar rats (n=36per group) were randomly divided into groups and were given either a normal diet (ND, 19.77% of energy fat) or a high-fat diet (HFD, 57.60% of energy fat) for 12weeks. Metabolic parameters, HRV, LV function, and cardiac mitochondrial function were determined at 4, 8, and 12weeks after starting each feeding program. We found that insulin resistance was observed after 8weeks of the consumption of a HFD in both sham (HFS) and orchiectomized (HFO) rats. Neither the ND sham (NDS) group nor ND orchiectomized (NDO) rats developed insulin resistance. The development of depressed HRV, LV contractile dysfunction, and increased cardiac mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production was observed earlier in orchiectomized (NDO and HFO) rats at week 4, whereas HFS rats exhibited these impairments later at week 8. These findings suggest that testosterone deprivation accelerates the impairment of cardiac autonomic regulation and LV function via increased oxidative stress and impaired cardiac mitochondrial function in obese-orchiectomized male rats. PMID:27000685

  18. Antitumor effects of L6, an IgG2a antibody that reacts with most human carcinomas.

    PubMed Central

    Hellström, I; Beaumier, P L; Hellström, K E

    1986-01-01

    Mouse monoclonal antibody L6 (IgG2a subtype) recognizes a ganglioside antigen expressed at the surface of cells from human non-small-cell lung carcinomas, breast carcinomas, and colon carcinomas. We now show that this antibody can lyse L6 antigen-positive human tumor cells in the presence of Leu-11b-positive human lymphocytes (i.e., mediate antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity) or human serum (mediate complement-dependent cytotoxicity) and that it can inhibit the outgrowth of an L6 antigen-positive human tumor transplanted onto nude mice. PMID:3462743

  19. Successful hunting increases testosterone and cortisol in a subsistence population

    PubMed Central

    Trumble, Benjamin C.; Smith, Eric A.; O'Connor, Kathleen A.; Kaplan, Hillard S.; Gurven, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    Controversy over the adaptive significance of male hunting in subsistence societies hinges on the relative importance of familial provisioning and mate-quality signalling. This paper examines the proximate and ultimate motivations of hunting behaviour from a neuroendocrine perspective, using salivary testosterone and cortisol data collected before, during and after hunting focal follows from 31 Tsimane hunters aged 18–82 years. Despite circadian declines in hormone levels, testosterone and cortisol of Tsimane hunters increased at the time of a kill, and remained high as successful hunters returned home. Previous studies of hormonal changes during competitions find that high-stakes and success in the presence of relevant audiences result in increased neuroendocrine arousal. If men hunt primarily to provision their families, then an additional audience would not be expected to impact testosterone or cortisol, nor would the size of the animal killed. However, if signalling male quality by ‘showing off’ was a larger relative driver of men's hunting behaviour, one would expect greater hormonal response in cases where men returned with large sharable kills, especially in the presence of community members. Consistent with provisioning models of male hunting motivation, neither kill size nor encountering an audience of villagers while returning from hunting was associated with hormonal changes for successful hunters. PMID:24335989

  20. Testosterone as a biological marker in psychopathy and alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Stålenheim, E G; Eriksson, E; von Knorring, L; Wide, L

    1998-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to clarify the relationships between testosterone and alcohol abuse, alcohol dependence and specific personality characteristics and behaviors in a forensic psychiatric population. Serum levels of total testosterone (TT), free testosterone (FT-DPC) and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) were determined in 61 male subjects undergoing forensic psychiatric examinations. All subjects had been detoxified from drugs and alcohol during previous incarceration in jail or hospital. TT and FT-DPC were found to be highly correlated (r=0.63, P < 0.0001). High concentrations of TT and SHBG were consistently related to type II alcoholism, but not pure alcohol dependence. TT and SHBG were also related to antisocial personality disorder. Furthermore, TT and SHBG were related to socially deviant behavior, reflected in factor 2 in the Psychopathy Checklist (PCL-R). In a multiple regression, FT-DPC was also clearly associated with the psychopathy-related scales of the Karolinska Scales of Personality (KSP) when age and signs of hepatic damage were kept under control. PMID:9541143

  1. Do low testosterone levels contribute to the pathogenesis of asthma?

    PubMed

    Canguven, Onder; Albayrak, Selami

    2011-04-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory airway disorder that causes respiratory hypersensitivity and intermittent obstruction. Airway hyperresponsiveness to both specific and nonspecific stimuli is the hallmark of asthma. Although genetic susceptibility and airway inflammation are believed to play fundamental roles, etiology of asthma is unknown. In most cases, the treatment of asthma focuses on control of factors contributing to asthma severity and pharmacologic therapy including bronchodilator and anti-inflammatory agents. The prevalence of reported asthma is greater in prepubertal boys, with a change to a female predominance after puberty. Many epidemiological studies also suggest that women are at increased risk of developing adult-onset asthma and also suffer from more severe disease than men. This strongly suggests an important role for sex hormones in asthma. Previous articles provided us that, testosterone and/or its metabolites maintain the physiological balance of autoimmunity and protective immunity by preserving the number of regulatory cells. Testosterone is an immunosuppressant and is likely to be protective against immunological and inflammatory processes that trigger asthma. We hypothesized that the testosterone or selective androgen receptor modulators would have beneficial effects on asthma and could decrease the risk of asthmatic attacks. PMID:21282014

  2. Alternative Pathway Dysregulation and the Conundrum of Complement Activation by IgG4 Immune Complexes in Membranous Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Borza, Dorin-Bogdan

    2016-01-01

    Membranous nephropathy (MN), a major cause of nephrotic syndrome, is a non-inflammatory immune kidney disease mediated by IgG antibodies that form glomerular subepithelial immune complexes. In primary MN, autoantibodies target proteins expressed on the podocyte surface, often phospholipase A2 receptor (PLA2R1). Pathology is driven by complement activation, leading to podocyte injury and proteinuria. This article overviews the mechanisms of complement activation and regulation in MN, addressing the paradox that anti-PLA2R1 and other antibodies causing primary MN are predominantly (but not exclusively) IgG4, an IgG subclass that does not fix complement. Besides immune complexes, alterations of the glomerular basement membrane (GBM) in MN may lead to impaired regulation of the alternative pathway (AP). The AP amplifies complement activation on surfaces insufficiently protected by complement regulatory proteins. Whereas podocytes are protected by cell-bound regulators, the GBM must recruit plasma factor H, which inhibits the AP on host surfaces carrying certain polyanions, such as heparan sulfate (HS) chains. Because HS chains present in the normal GBM are lost in MN, we posit that the local complement regulation by factor H may be impaired as a result. Thus, the loss of GBM HS in MN creates a micro-environment that promotes local amplification of complement activation, which in turn may be initiated via the classical or lectin pathways by subsets of IgG in immune complexes. A detailed understanding of the mechanisms of complement activation and dysregulation in MN is important for designing more effective therapies. PMID:27199983

  3. Alternative Pathway Dysregulation and the Conundrum of Complement Activation by IgG4 Immune Complexes in Membranous Nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Borza, Dorin-Bogdan

    2016-01-01

    Membranous nephropathy (MN), a major cause of nephrotic syndrome, is a non-inflammatory immune kidney disease mediated by IgG antibodies that form glomerular subepithelial immune complexes. In primary MN, autoantibodies target proteins expressed on the podocyte surface, often phospholipase A2 receptor (PLA2R1). Pathology is driven by complement activation, leading to podocyte injury and proteinuria. This article overviews the mechanisms of complement activation and regulation in MN, addressing the paradox that anti-PLA2R1 and other antibodies causing primary MN are predominantly (but not exclusively) IgG4, an IgG subclass that does not fix complement. Besides immune complexes, alterations of the glomerular basement membrane (GBM) in MN may lead to impaired regulation of the alternative pathway (AP). The AP amplifies complement activation on surfaces insufficiently protected by complement regulatory proteins. Whereas podocytes are protected by cell-bound regulators, the GBM must recruit plasma factor H, which inhibits the AP on host surfaces carrying certain polyanions, such as heparan sulfate (HS) chains. Because HS chains present in the normal GBM are lost in MN, we posit that the local complement regulation by factor H may be impaired as a result. Thus, the loss of GBM HS in MN creates a micro-environment that promotes local amplification of complement activation, which in turn may be initiated via the classical or lectin pathways by subsets of IgG in immune complexes. A detailed understanding of the mechanisms of complement activation and dysregulation in MN is important for designing more effective therapies. PMID:27199983

  4. IgG4 but no IgG1 antibody production after intralymphatic immunotherapy with recombinant MAT-Feld1 in human.

    PubMed

    Freiberger, S N; Zehnder, M; Gafvelin, G; Grönlund, H; Kündig, T M; Johansen, P

    2016-09-01

    Allergy immunotherapy (AIT) mediates protection against allergen exposure in part due to allergen-specific antibodies. While immunization typically stimulated IgG1 and IgG2, AIT is often associated with production of IgG4. Here, twenty cat dander-sensitized patients were randomized to receive three injections of intralymphatic immunotherapy (ILIT) with MAT-Feld1 adsorbed to aluminum hydroxide or just aluminum hydroxide (placebo) in a double-blind setting (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00718679). Whereas the clinical data, showing benefit of Mat-Feld1 ILIT was published in 2012 (Senti et al., J Allergy Clin Immunol, vol 129(5):1290-1296), the current study investigated the cat allergen-specific antibody responses. Blood was drawn prior to ILIT, as well as 1, 3, and 12 months after first ILIT. The sera were analyzed to characterize all IgG subclasses and IgE antibody responses. ILIT with MAT-Feld1 elicited high levels of total IgG that were maintained for at least 12 months. Interestingly, a strong increase in IgG4 and some increase in IgG2 were observed throughout the study, while production of cat-specific IgG1 and IgG3 was not stimulated by MAT-Feld1 ILIT. The IgE levels remained constant. PMID:27253988

  5. Overlapping dose responses of spermatogenic and extragonadal testosterone actions jeopardize the principle of hormonal male contraception

    PubMed Central

    Oduwole, Olayiwola O.; Vydra, Natalia; Wood, Nicholas E. M.; Samanta, Luna; Owen, Laura; Keevil, Brian; Donaldson, Mandy; Naresh, Kikkeri; Huhtaniemi, Ilpo T.

    2014-01-01

    Testosterone (T), alone or in combination with progestin, provides a promising approach to hormonal male contraception. Its principle relies on enhanced negative feedback of exogenous T to suppress gonadotropins, thereby blocking the testicular T production needed for spermatogenesis, while simultaneously maintaining the extragonadal androgen actions, such as potency and libido, to avoid hypogonadism. A serious drawback of the treatment is that a significant proportion of men do not reach azoospermia or severe oligozoospermia, commensurate with contraceptive efficacy. We tested here, using hypogonadal luteinizing hormone/choriongonadotropin receptor (LHCGR) knockout (LHR−/−) mice, the basic principle of the T-based male contraceptive method, that a specific T dose could maintain extragonadal androgen actions without simultaneously activating spermatogenesis. LHR−/− mice were treated with increasing T doses, and the responses of their spermatogenesis and extragonadal androgen actions (including gonadotropin suppression and sexual behavior) were assessed. Conspicuously, all dose responses to T were practically superimposable, and no dose of T could be defined that would maintain sexual function and suppress gonadotropins without simultaneously activating spermatogenesis. This finding, never addressed in clinical contraceptive trials, is not unexpected in light of the same androgen receptor mediating androgen actions in all organs. When extrapolated to humans, our findings may jeopardize the current approach to hormonal male contraception and call for more effective means of inhibiting intratesticular T production or action, to achieve consistent spermatogenic suppression.—Oduwole, O. O., Vydra, N., Wood, N. E. M., Samanta, L., Owen, L., Keevil, B., Donaldson, M., Naresh, K., Huhtaniemi, I. T. Overlapping dose responses of spermatogenic and extragonadal testosterone actions jeopardize the principle of hormonal male contraception. PMID:24599970

  6. Association between IgG4 Autoantibody and Complement Abnormalities in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Pan, Qingjun; Guo, Linjie; Wu, Jing; Cai, Jun; Liao, Huanjin; Lan, Qiaofen; Peng, Yanxia; He, Yiming; Liu, Hua-Feng

    2016-01-01

    In order to investigate the association between IgG4 autoantibody and complement abnormalities in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), 72 newly diagnosed SLE patients, 67 rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, and 41 healthy normals were employed. Serum levels of antinuclear IgG4 and IgG4-specific IgM-rheumatoid factor (RF) were measured, and the correlations between serum levels of antinuclear IgG4 and several clinical parameters were analyzed. Also, the levels of IgG subclasses, C1q, and C3 deposition in lupus nephritis (LN) were detected. The results showed that serum levels of antinuclear IgG4 were higher in SLE patients relative to healthy normals (P < 0.01). Serum levels of antinuclear IgG4 in SLE patients were positively correlated with serum levels of total IgG4, albumin, and C3 (r = 0.61, P < 0.05; r = 0.40, P < 0.05; and r = 0.54, P < 0.05, resp.) and negatively correlated with 24-hour urinary protein (r = 0.49, P < 0.05). Serum levels of IgG4-specific IgM-RF were higher in RA patients than in SLE patients (P < 0.001). Also, the ratio of the deposition score for IgG4/(IgG1 + IgG2 + IgG3 + IgG4) was negatively correlated with the score for C1q and C3 deposition in LN (r = 0.34, P < 0.05; r = 0.51, P < 0.01, resp.). In summary, the IgG4 autoantibody may dampen the inflammatory response in SLE, thus maybe providing a novel therapeutic target for SLE. PMID:27597802

  7. Association between IgG4 Autoantibody and Complement Abnormalities in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Linjie; Wu, Jing; Liao, Huanjin; Lan, Qiaofen; Peng, Yanxia; He, Yiming

    2016-01-01

    In order to investigate the association between IgG4 autoantibody and complement abnormalities in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), 72 newly diagnosed SLE patients, 67 rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, and 41 healthy normals were employed. Serum levels of antinuclear IgG4 and IgG4-specific IgM-rheumatoid factor (RF) were measured, and the correlations between serum levels of antinuclear IgG4 and several clinical parameters were analyzed. Also, the levels of IgG subclasses, C1q, and C3 deposition in lupus nephritis (LN) were detected. The results showed that serum levels of antinuclear IgG4 were higher in SLE patients relative to healthy normals (P < 0.01). Serum levels of antinuclear IgG4 in SLE patients were positively correlated with serum levels of total IgG4, albumin, and C3 (r = 0.61, P < 0.05; r = 0.40, P < 0.05; and r = 0.54, P < 0.05, resp.) and negatively correlated with 24-hour urinary protein (r = 0.49, P < 0.05). Serum levels of IgG4-specific IgM-RF were higher in RA patients than in SLE patients (P < 0.001). Also, the ratio of the deposition score for IgG4/(IgG1 + IgG2 + IgG3 + IgG4) was negatively correlated with the score for C1q and C3 deposition in LN (r = 0.34, P < 0.05; r = 0.51, P < 0.01, resp.). In summary, the IgG4 autoantibody may dampen the inflammatory response in SLE, thus maybe providing a novel therapeutic target for SLE. PMID:27597802

  8. Aberrant glycosylation of Igg heavy chain in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Aurer, Igor; Lauc, Gordan; Dumić, Jerka; Rendić, Dubravko; Matisić, Danica; Milos, Marija; Heffer-Lauc, Marija; Flogel, Mirna; Labar, Boris

    2007-03-01

    Although the majority of eukaryotic proteins are glycosylated, there is a dearth of knowledge regarding protein sugar moieties and their changes in disease. Most multiple myeloma cases are characterized by production of monoclonal immunoglobulins (Ig). We studied galactosylation and sialylation of IgG heavy chains in 16 patients with IgG myeloma using lectin blotting and densitometry. In comparison to age and sex matched controls, galactosylation was reduced in multiple myeloma (median 317 vs. 362, range 153-410 vs. 309-447 relative units, p = 0.015, Student's t-test). Sialylation was stage dependent; samples from patients with stage IIA had lowest amounts of sialic acid, IIIA intermediate and IIIB highest (142.6 vs. 185.9 vs. 248.5 relative units, correlation coefficient r = 0.55). Both galactosylation and sialylation levels were independent of age, sex, treatment type, response to treatment, disease duration and IgG and b2 microglobulin concentration. These data indicate that multiple myeloma is characterized by aberrant immunoglobulin glycosylation. PMID:17598409

  9. Neutrophil functions and serum IgG in growing foals.

    PubMed

    Demmers, S; Johannisson, A; Gröndahl, G; Jensen-Waern, M

    2001-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the phagocytic and killing capacities as well as expression of CD18 of neutrophils obtained from healthy foals from birth to age 8 months. Blood was taken from 6 Standardbred foals at 7 time-points between ages 2-56 days and thereafter once a month. For comparison, cells from 16 mature horses were evaluated. Neutrophil phagocytosis of yeast cells was assessed by flow cytometry after opsonisation with mature pooled serum, autologous serum or anti-yeast IgG. The killing capacity of the neutrophils, as indicated by the oxidative burst, was monitored by chemiluminescence. Serum IgG concentration was measured by radial immunodiffusion. In addition to clinical examination, the amount of serum amyloid A and the total leucocyte count were used as markers for infection. The phagocytic ability was impaired until age 3 weeks, when autologous serum was used as opsonin. Killing capacity was also low initially but, from 3 months onwards, chemiluminescence values were equal to or higher than in mature horses. Serum IgG decreased from 10 g/l at 2 days to 5 g/l at 2 months and then increased gradually to 10 g/l at the end of the study. These findings may in part explain the increased susceptibility to bacterial infections in young horses. PMID:11770989

  10. Granulocyte-associated IgG in neutropenic disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Cines, D.B.; Passero, F.; Guerry, D.; Bina, M.; Dusak, B.; Schreiber, A.D.

    1982-01-01

    We applied a radiolabeled antiglobulin test to a study of patients with a variety of neutropenic disorders. After defining the nature of the interaction of radiolabeled anti-IgG with the neutrophil, we studied 16 patients with neutropenia of uncertain etiology and adequate bone marrow granulocyte precursors. Twelve of these 16 patients had increased neutrophil-associated IgG (PMN-IgG). Patients with the highest levels of PMN-IgG had the lowest neutrophil counts. The majority of patients with neutropenia and increased PMN-IgG had an underlying immunologic disorder that included immune thrombocytopenic purpura in 5 patients and autoimmune hemolytic anemia in 1 patient. In some patients, elevated PMN-IgG preceded other evidence for immunologic disease. The direct antiglobulin test helped to distinguish neutropenic patients with increased PMN-IgG both from patients with neutropenia due to a known nonimmune disorder and from nonneutropenic patients with rheumatoid arthritis or systemic lupus erythematosis. Each of four patients with increased neutrophil-associated IgG treated with systemic corticosteroids responded clinically with an associated fall in neutrophil IgG and a rise in the circulating neutrophil count. The radiolabeled antiglobulin test appears useful in defining a subpopulation of patients with neutropenia due to an underlying immunologic disorder.

  11. Granulocyte-associated IgG in neutropenic disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Cines, D.B.; Passero, F.; Guerry, D. IV; Bina, M.; Dusak, B.; Schreiber, A.D

    1982-01-01

    We applied a radiolabeled antiglobulin test to a study of patients with a variety of neutropenic disorders. After defining the nature of the interaction of radiolabeled anti-IgG with the neutrophil, we studied 16 patients with neutropenia of uncertain etiology and adequate bone marrow granulocyte precursors. Twelve of these 16 patients had increased neutrophil-associated IgG (PMN-IgG). Patients with the highest levels of PMN-IgG had the lowest neutrophil counts. The majority of patients with neutropenia and increased PMN-IgG had an underlying immunologic disorder that included immune thrombocytopenic purpura in 5 patients and autoimmune hemolytic anemia in 1 patient. In some patients, elevated PMN-IgG preceded other evidence for immunologic disease. The direct antiglobulin test helped to distinguish neutropenic patients with increased PMN-IgG both from patients with neutropenia due to a known nonimmune disorder and from noneutropenic patients with rheumatoid arthritis or systemic lupus erythematosis. Each of four patients with increased neutrophil-associated IgG treated with systemic corticosteroids responded clinically with an associated fall in neutrophil IgG and a rise in the circulating neutrophil count. The radiolabeled antiglobulin test appears useful in defining a subpopulation of patients with neutropenia due to an underlying immunologic disorder.

  12. Serum testosterone concentration, efficiency of estrus detection and libido expression in androgenized beef cows.

    PubMed

    Nix, J P; Spitzer, J C; Chenoweth, P J

    1998-04-15

    Twenty multiparous, cyclic, nonlactating beef cows were blocked by dominance rank and randomly and equally allotted to 1 of 4 treatment groups: an untreated control group, a synovex-treated group which received 8 Synovex-H implants with no additional hormones, a testosterone-treated group which received 500 mg, i.m. and 1500 mg, s.c. testosterone enanthate on Day 1 with additional 1000 mg, s.c. doses of testosterone enanthate every 14 d, and a synovex + testosterone-treated group which received 8 Synovex-H implants with 500 mg, i.m. and 1500 mg, s.c. testosterone enanthate on Day 1 only. Blood samples were collected via jugular venipuncture once a week beginning 3 wk prior to start of treatment. In addition, samples were collected just prior to treatment; once a day for 1 wk after initiation of treatment; and then twice a week until 225 d after treatment. Efficiency of estrus detection was assessed 22 d prior to start of treatment and every 14 d thereafter for 98 d, using estrus detection trials with synchronized females or modified libido tests. Scores for estrus detection trials included total mounts in 1 h and the percentage of estrous cows detected. Libido was scored on a scale of 0 through 6. All testosterone treatments raised plasma testosterone concentrations above control and pretreatment levels (testosterone and synovex + testosterone > synovex > control; all P < 0.05). Synovex-, testosterone- and synovex + testosterone-treated females performed more mounts in 1 h than the controls (18, 9, 6 and 1, respectively; all P < 0.05). All testosterone-treated cows mounted a higher number of estrous females than the controls (P < 0.05). Only synovex + testosterone- and testosterone-treated cows received libido scores above pretreatment and control values. However, libido of testosterone-treated cows decreased over time, while that of synovex + testosterone-treated females remained high until Day 98. Libido scores correlated positively with the number of mounts in 1

  13. Identification of cyclic peptides able to mimic the functional epitope of IgG1-Fc for human FcγRI

    PubMed Central

    Bonetto, Stephane; Spadola, Loredana; Buchanan, Andrew G.; Jermutus, Lutz; Lund, John

    2009-01-01

    Identification of short, structured peptides able to mimic potently protein-protein interfaces remains a challenge in drug discovery. We report here the use of a naive cyclic peptide phage display library to identify peptide ligands able to recognize and mimic IgG1-Fc functions with FcγRI. Selection by competing off binders to FcγRI with IgG1 allowed the isolation of a family of peptides sharing the common consensus sequence TX2CXXθPXLLGCΦXE (θ represents a hydrophobic residue, Φ is usually an acidic residue, and X is any residue) and able to inhibit IgG1 binding to FcγRI. In soluble form, these peptides antagonize superoxide generation mediated by IgG1. In complexed form, they trigger phagocytosis and a superoxide burst. Unlike IgG, these peptides are strictly FcγRI-specific among the FcγRs. Molecular modeling studies suggest that these peptides can adopt 2 distinct and complementary conformers, each able to mimic the discontinuous interface contacts constituted by the Cγ2-A and -B chains of Fc for FcγRI. In addition, by covalent homodimerization, we engineered a synthetic bivalent 37-mer peptide that retains the ability to trigger effector functions. We demonstrate here that it is feasible to maintain IgG-Fc function within a small structured peptide. These peptides represent a new format for modulation of effector functions.—Bonetto, S., Spadola, L., Buchanan, A. G., Jermutus, L. Lund, J. Identification of cyclic peptides able to mimic the functional epitope of IgG1-Fc for human FcγRI. PMID:18957574

  14. MHC Class I-Related Neonatal Fc Receptor for IgG Is Functionally Expressed in Monocytes, Intestinal Macrophages, and Dendritic Cells1

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiaoping; Meng, Gang; Dickinson, Bonny L.; Li, Xiaotong; Mizoguchi, Emiko; Miao, Lili; Wang, Yuansheng; Robert, Caroline; Wu, Benyan; Smith, Phillip D.; Lencer, Wayne I.; Blumberg, Richard S.

    2010-01-01

    The neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) for IgG, an MHC class I-related molecule, functions to transport IgG across polarized epithelial cells and protect IgG from degradation. However, little is known about whether FcRn is functionally expressed in immune cells. We show here that FcRn mRNA was identifiable in human monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells. FcRn heavy chain was detectable as a 45-kDa protein in monocytic U937 and THP-1 cells and in purified human intestinal macrophages, peripheral blood monocytes, and dendritic cells by Western blot analysis. FcRn colocalized in vivo with macrosialin (CD68) and Ncl-Macro, two macrophage markers, in the lamina propria of human small intestine. The heavy chain of FcRn was associated with the β2-microglobulin (β2m) light chain in U937 and THP-1 cells. FcRn bound human IgG at pH 6.0, but not at pH 7.5. This binding could be inhibited by human IgG Fc, but not Fab. FcRn could be detected on the cell surface of activated, but not resting, THP-1 cells. Furthermore, FcRn was uniformly present intracellularly in all blood monocytes and intestinal macrophages. FcRn was detectable on the cell surface of a significant fraction of monocytes at lower levels and on a small subset of tissue macrophages that expressed high levels of FcRn on the cell surface. These data show that FcRn is functionally expressed and its cellular distribution is regulated in monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells, suggesting that it may confer novel IgG binding functions upon these cell types relative to typical FcγRs: FcγRI, FcγRII, and FcγRIII. PMID:11207281

  15. CD14 as a Mediator of the Mineralocorticoid Receptor-Dependent Anti-apolipoprotein A-1 IgG Chronotropic Effect on Cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Mannic, Tiphaine; Satta, Nathalie; Pagano, Sabrina; Python, Magaly; Virzi, Julien; Montecucco, Fabrizio; Frias, Miguel A; James, Richard W; Maturana, Andres D; Rossier, Michel F; Vuilleumier, Nicolas

    2015-12-01

    In vitro and animal studies point to autoantibodies against apolipoprotein A-1 (anti-apoA-1 IgG) as possible mediators of cardiovascular (CV) disease involving several mechanisms such as basal heart rate interference mediated by a mineralocorticoid receptor-dependent L-type calcium channel activation, and a direct pro-inflammatory effect through the engagement of the toll-like receptor (TLR) 2/CD14 complex. Nevertheless, the possible implication of these receptors in the pro-arrhythmogenic effect of anti-apoA-1 antibodies remains elusive. We aimed at determining whether CD14 and TLRs could mediate the anti-apoA-1 IgG chronotropic response in neonatal rat ventricular cardiomyocytes (NRVC). Blocking CD14 suppressed anti-apoA-1 IgG binding to NRVC and the related positive chronotropic response. Anti-apoA-1 IgG alone induced the formation of a TLR2/TLR4/CD14 complex, followed by the phosphorylation of Src, whereas aldosterone alone promoted the phosphorylation of Akt by phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), without affecting the chronotropic response. In the presence of both aldosterone and anti-apoA-1 IgG, the localization of TLR2/TLR4/CD14 was increased in membrane lipid rafts, followed by PI3K and Src activation, leading to an L-type calcium channel-dependent positive chronotropic response. Pharmacological inhibition of the Src pathway led to the decrease of L-type calcium channel activity and abrogated the NRVC chronotropic response. Activation of CD14 seems to be a key regulator of the mineralocorticoid receptor-dependent anti-apoA-1 IgG positive chronotropic effect on NRVCs, involving relocation of the CD14/TLR2/TLR4 complex into lipid rafts followed by PI3K and Src-dependent L-type calcium channel activation. PMID:26393305

  16. Medical Manuscript: Serum Total Testosterone as a Prognostic Indicator in Male Patients With Terminal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Se Won; Hwang, In Cheol; Ahn, Hee Kyung; Kyung, Sun Young; Ahn, Hong Yup

    2016-06-01

    The role of total serum testosterone in the prognosis of terminal cancer is unclear. We retrospectively investigated the total serum testosterone level in 69 male patients with terminal cancer in a palliative care unit. The association between the serum testosterone level and survival was assessed using Cox proportional hazard model. The median value of serum total testosterone was 44.5 ng/dL, far lower than previously reported in patients with advanced cancer. Multivariate analysis revealed thrombocytopenia (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR], 2.68), hypoalbuminemia (aHR, 2.02), azotemia (aHR, 2.67), and lower serum testosterone level (aHR, 2.03) were significantly negatively prognostic of survival. Lower serum testosterone level was an independent unfavorable prognostic factor for life expectancy in male patients with terminal cancer. PMID:25712105

  17. Interest in Babies Negatively Predicts Testosterone Responses to Sexual Visual Stimuli Among Heterosexual Young Men.

    PubMed

    Zilioli, Samuele; Ponzi, Davide; Henry, Andrea; Kubicki, Konrad; Nickels, Nora; Wilson, M Claire; Maestripieri, Dario

    2016-01-01

    Men's testosterone may be an important physiological mechanism mediating motivational and behavioral aspects of the mating/parenting trade-off not only over time but also in terms of stable differences between mating-oriented and parenting-oriented individuals. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that self-reported interest in babies is inversely related to testosterone reactivity to cues of short-term mating among heterosexual young men. Among 100 participants, interest in babies was related to a slow life-history strategy, as assessed by the Mini-K questionnaire, and negatively related to testosterone responses to an erotic video. Interest in babies was not associated with baseline testosterone levels or with testosterone reactivity to nonsexual social stimuli. These results provide the first evidence that differential testosterone reactivity to sexual stimuli may be an important aspect of individual differences in life-history strategies among human males. PMID:26626441

  18. Cardiac lesions induced by testosterone: protective effects of dexrazoxane and trimetazidine.

    PubMed

    Belhani, Dalila; Fanton, Laurent; Vaillant, Fanny; Descotes, Jacques; Manati, Waheed; Tabib, Alain; Bui-Xuan, Bernard; Timour, Quadiri

    2009-06-01

    Further to our previous observation of post-mortem cardiac lesions after sudden death in several athletes with a history of anabolic steroid abuse, this study was intended to reproduce these lesions in rabbits administered testosterone oenanthate, a prototypic anabolic steroid abused by athletes, and to provide evidence for the protective effects of trimetazidine and dexrazoxane that are used as antianginal and cardioprotective drugs, respectively. Groups of six rabbits each were administered saline, testosterone, or a combination of testosterone and either trimetazidine or dexrazoxane for 3 months. Histologic cardiac lesions including necrosis, misshapen cell nuclei, interstitial and endocardial fibrosis, lymphocytic infiltrates, and vascular dystrophies were observed in testosterone-treated rabbits. In contrast, no significant lesions were observed in the animals treated with testosterone combined with either trimetazidine or dexrazoxane. This is the first study providing evidence for testosterone cardiotoxicity following sub-chronic exposure in laboratory animals. In addition, these results suggest the protective role of trimetazidine and dexrazoxane. PMID:19484391

  19. Factors influencing annual fecal testosterone metabolite profiles in captive male polar bears (Ursus maritimus).

    PubMed

    Curry, E; Roth, T L; MacKinnon, K M; Stoops, M A

    2012-12-01

    The objectives of this study were to assess the effects of season, breeding activity, age and latitude on fecal testosterone metabolite concentrations in captive, adult male polar bears (Ursus maritimus). Fourteen polar bears from 13 North American zoos were monitored for 12-36 months, producing 25-year-long testosterone profiles. Results indicated that testosterone was significantly higher during the breeding season (early January through the end of May) compared with the non-breeding season with the highest concentrations excreted from early January through late March. Variations in excretion patterns were observed among individuals and also between years within an individual, with testosterone peaks closely associated with breeding activity. Results indicate that fecal testosterone concentrations are influenced by season, breeding activity and age, but not by latitude. This is the first report describing longitudinal fecal testosterone metabolite concentrations in individual adult male polar bears. PMID:23279504

  20. Hypercatabolism of IgG in mice with lupus-like syndrome.

    PubMed

    Zhou, J; Pop, L M; Ghetie, V

    2005-01-01

    The metabolism of radioiodinated mouse IgG was studied in mice with lupus-like syndrome before and after the onset of the disease. Before the onset of the disease, the pharmacokinetic parameters of IgG in MLR-1pr and Pristane-primed Balb/c mice were within the normal range of values. After the onset of the disease a considerable increase in the catabolic rate of IgG was recorded abbreviating its half life to less than one third of the normal value. The increased catabolism of IgG could not be related to the concentration--catabolism effect or to the presence of rheumatoid factor and autoantibody or to the IgG loss through the kidney and gastrointestinal tract. The hypercatabolism of IgG was explained by disease-induced impairment of the function of the receptor FcRn, which regulates the homeostasis of IgG. PMID:16038110

  1. Orbital Pseudotumor: Uncommon Initial Presentation of IgG4-Related Disease

    PubMed Central

    Carbone, Teresa; Azêdo Montes, Ricardo; Andrade, Beatriz; Lanzieri, Pedro; Mocarzel, Luis

    2015-01-01

    IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD) encompasses a group of fibroinflammatory conditions recognized in recent times. The main clinical features include variable degrees of tissue fibrosis, tumorlike expansions, perivascular lymphocytic infiltration rich in IgG4-positive plasma cells, and elevated serum IgG4. A case has been reported of an elderly patient with an unexplained unilateral exophthalmia; biopsy was performed and revealed lymphocytic infiltration, suggesting IgG4-RD. High serum levels of IgG4, in association with a good response to steroid therapy and to the exclusion of other diagnoses, confirmed the hypothesis of orbital pseudotumor by IgG4-RD. PMID:25838962

  2. Neisseria meningitidis Group A IgG1 and IgG2 Subclass Immune Response in African Children Aged 12–23 Months Following Meningococcal Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Holme, Daniel; Findlow, Helen; Sow, Samba O.; Idoko, Olubukola T.; Preziosi, Marie-Pierre; Carlone, George; Plikaytis, Brian D.; Borrow, Ray

    2015-01-01

    Background. A group A meningococcal conjugate vaccine, PsA-TT, was licensed in 2010 and was previously studied in a phase 2 clinical trial to evaluate its safety and immunogenicity in African children 12–23 months of age. Methods. Subjects received either PsA-TT; meningococcal group A, C, W, Y polysaccharide vaccine (PsACWY); or Haemophilus influenzae type b conjugate vaccine (Hib-TT). Forty weeks following primary vaccination, the 3 groups were further randomized to receive either PsA-TT, one-fifth dose of PsACWY, or Hib-TT. Group A–specific immunoglobulin G (IgG) subclass response was characterized using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results. The predominant IgG subclass response, regardless of vaccine, was IgG1. One month following primary vaccination, the geometric mean concentrations (GMCs) of IgG1 and IgG2 in the PsA-TT group were 21.73 µg/mL and 6.27 µg/mL, whereas in the PsACWY group the mean GMCs were 2.01 µg/mL and 0.97 µg/mL, respectively (P < .0001). Group A–specific IgG1 and IgG2 GMCs remained greater in the PsA-TT group than in the PsACWY group 40 weeks following primary vaccination (P < .0001). One week following revaccination, those given 2 doses of PsA-TT had the greatest IgG1 and IgG2 GMCs of 125.23 µg/mL and 36.12 µg/mL, respectively (P = .0008), and demonstrated a significant increase in IgG1:IgG2 mean ratio, indicative of the T-cell–dependent response associated with conjugate vaccines. Conclusions. Vaccination of African children aged 12–24 months with either PsA-TT or PsACWY elicited a predominantly IgG1 response. The IgG1:IgG2 mean ratio decreased following successive vaccination with PsACWY, indicating a shift toward IgG2, suggestive of the T-cell–independent immune response commonly associated with polysaccharide antigens. Clinical Trials Registration. SRCTN78147026. PMID:26553689

  3. Can Serum Testosterone Be Used as a Marker of Overall Health?

    PubMed Central

    Mederos, Michael A; Bernie, Aaron M; Scovell, Jason M; Ramasamy, Ranjith

    2015-01-01

    Low serum testosterone has been associated with obesity, type 2 diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and atherosclerosis. Individuals with these comorbidities are at increased risk of premature death and other adverse health effects. Clinical data portend low testosterone as a risk factor for developing these conditions which are supported by the hypogonadal-obesity-adipocytokine hypothesis. The authors support comprehensive evaluation for these comorbid conditions in men found to have low serum testosterone. PMID:26839520

  4. The Effects of Testosterone Supplementation on Cognitive Functioning in Older Men.

    PubMed

    Wahjoepramono, Eka J; Asih, Prita R; Aniwiyanti, Vilia; Taddei, Kevin; Dhaliwal, Satvinder S; Fuller, Stephanie J; Foster, Jonathan; Carruthers, Malcolm; Verdile, Giuseppe; Sohrabi, Hamid R; Martins, Ralph N

    2016-01-01

    Reduction in testosterone levels in men during aging is associated with cognitive decline and risk of dementia. Animal studies have shown benefits for testosterone supplementation in improving cognition and reducing Alzheimer's disease pathology. In a randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover study of men with subjective memory complaint and low testosterone levels, we investigated whether testosterone treatment significantly improved performance on various measures of cognitive functioning. Forty-four men were administered a battery of neuropsychological tests to establish the baseline prior to being randomly divided into two groups. The first group (Group A) received 24 weeks of testosterone treatment (T treatment) followed by 4 weeks washout, and then 24 weeks of placebo (P); the second group (Group B) received the same treatments, in reverse order (Placebo, washout, and then T treatment). In group A (TèP), compared to baseline, there was a modest (1 point) but significant improvement in general cognitive functioning as measured by the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) following testosterone treatment. This improvement from baseline was sustained following the washout period and crossover to placebo treatment. Similar Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) scores were observed when comparing testosterone treatment with placebo. In group B (PèT) a significant increase was observed from baseline following testosterone treatment and a trend towards an increase when compared to placebo treatment. Improvements in baseline depression scores (assessed by Geriatric Depression Scale) were observed following testosterone/placebo treatment in both groups, and no difference was observed when comparing testosterone with placebo treatment. Our findings indicate a modest improvement on global cognition with testosterone treatment. Larger clinical trials with a longer follow- up and with the inclusion of blood and brain imaging markers are now needed to conclusively

  5. Effect of Adiantum Capillus veneris Linn on an Animal Model of Testosterone-Induced Hair Loss

    PubMed Central

    Noubarani, Maryam; Rostamkhani, Hossein; Erfan, Mohammad; Kamalinejad, Mohammad; Eskandari, Mohammad Reza; Babaeian, Mohammad; Salamzadeh, Jamshid

    2014-01-01

    Androgenetic alopecia is the most common form of hair loss in men. The present study was designed to evaluate the hair growth-promoting activity of a preparation of the Adiantum capillus-veneris Linn. (A. capillus-veneris) on albino mice using a testosterone-induced alopecia model. Five groups of albino mice were studied: (A) Testosterone solution only (n=6); (B) Testosterone + Finasteride solution (2%) (n=6); (C) Testosterone + vehicle (n=6); (D) Testosterone + A. capillus-veneris solution (1%) (n=6); (E) intact control (n=2, without testosterone). Alopecia was induced in all intervention groups by testosterone 1.0 mg subcutaneous. A. capillus-veneris solution was applied topically to the back skin of animals in the respective group. Hair growth was evaluated by visual observation and histological study of several skin sections via various parameters as follicle density (number of follicles/mm) and anagen/telogen ratio. After 21 days, a patch of diffuse hair loss was seen in animals received testosterone while animals treated with A. capillus-veneris showed less hair loss as compared to those treated with testosterone only. The follicular density observed in the A. capillus-veneris-treated group was 1.92 ± 0.47, compared to 1.05 ± 0.21 in testosterone-group and 2.05 ± 0.49 in finasteride-treated animals. Anagen/telogen ratio was significantly affected by A. capillus-veneris, which was 0.92 ± 0.06 as compared with 0.23 ± 0.03 and 1.12 ± 0.06 for testosterone and finasteride treated groups, respectively. According to visual observation and quantitative data (follicular density and anagen/telogen ratio), A. capillus-veneris was found to possess good activity against testosterone-induced alopecia. PMID:24711836

  6. Status-appropriate singing behavior, testosterone and androgen receptor immunolabeling in male European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris).

    PubMed

    Cordes, M A; Stevenson, S A; Riters, L V

    2014-04-01

    Vocalizations convey information about an individual's motivational, internal, and social status. As circumstances change, individuals respond by adjusting vocal behavior accordingly. In European starlings, a male that acquires a nest site socially dominates other males and dramatically increases courtship song. Although circulating testosterone is associated with social status and vocal production it is possible that steroid receptors fine-tune status-appropriate changes in behavior. Here we explored a possible role for androgen receptors. Male starlings that acquired nest sites produced high rates of courtship song. For a subset of males this occurred even in the absence of elevated circulating testosterone. Immunolabeling for androgen receptors (ARir) was highest in the medial preoptic nucleus (POM) in males with both a nest site and elevated testosterone. For HVC, ARir was higher in dominant males with high testosterone (males that sang longer songs) than dominant males with low testosterone (males that sang shorter songs). ARir in the dorsal medial portion of the nucleus intercollicularis (DM) was elevated in males with high testosterone irrespective of dominance status. Song bout length related positively to ARir in POM, HVC and DM, and testosterone concentrations related positively to ARir in POM and DM. Results suggest that the role of testosterone in vocal behavior differs across brain regions and support the hypothesis that testosterone in POM underlies motivation, testosterone in HVC relates to song quality, and testosterone in DM stimulates vocalizations. Our data also suggest that singing may influence AR independent of testosterone and that alternative androgen-independent pathways regulate status-appropriate singing behavior. PMID:24594286

  7. Status-appropriate singing behavior, testosterone and androgen receptor immunolabeling in male European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris)

    PubMed Central

    Cordes, M.A.; Stevenson, S.A.; Riters, L.V.

    2014-01-01

    Vocalizations convey information about an individual’s motivational, internal, and social status. As circumstances change, individuals respond by adjusting vocal behavior accordingly. In European starlings, a male that acquires a nest site socially dominates other males and dramatically increases courtship song. Although circulating testosterone is associated with social status and vocal production it is possible that steroid receptors fine-tune status-appropriate changes in behavior. Here we explored a possible role for androgen receptors. Male starlings that acquired nest sites produced high rates of courtship song. For a subset of males this occurred even in the absence of elevated circulating testosterone. Immunolabeling for androgen receptors (ARir) was highest in the medial preoptic nucleus (POM) in males with both a nest site and elevated testosterone. For HVC, ARir was higher in dominant males with high testosterone (males that sang longer songs) than dominant males with low testosterone (males that sang shorter songs). ARir in the dorsal medial portion of the nucleus intercollicularis (DM) was elevated in males with high testosterone irrespective of dominance status. Song bout length related positively to ARir in POM, HVC and DM, and testosterone concentrations related positively to ARir in POM and DM. Results suggest the role of testosterone in vocal behavior differs across brain regions and support the hypothesis that testosterone in POM underlies motivation, testosterone in HVC relates to song quality, and testosterone in DM stimulates vocalizations. Our data also suggest that singing may influence AR independent of testosterone and that alternative androgen-independent pathways regulate status-appropriate singing behavior. PMID:24594286

  8. Extensive Metastatic Cholangiocarcinoma Associated With IgG4-Related Sclerosing Cholangitis Misdiagnosed as Isolated IgG4-Related Sclerosing Cholangitis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi-An; Shen, Xi-Zhong; Zhu, Ji-Min; Liu, Tao-Tao

    2015-01-01

    Abstract As cholangiographic features of IgG4-related sclerosing cholangitis (IgG4-SC) resemble those of cholangiocarcinoma, it is highly confusing between the 2 conditions on the basis of cholangiographic findings. This study presents a case of extensive metastatic cholangiocarcinoma with IgG4-SC misdiagnosed as isolated IgG4-SC, and reviews recent studies of the 2 diseases. A 56-year-old man with no family history of malignant tumors or liver diseases presented with recurrent mild abdominal pain and distention for 3 months. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography showed a 3.7 cm nodular lesion with unclear boundary in segment VI of the liver. Serum IgG4 and CA19-9 were slightly elevated. Histopathological examination was consistent with the consensus statement on the pathology of IgG4-SC. IgG4-SC was thus considered. Due to his mild symptoms, glucocorticoid was not given at first. However, 3 months after his first admission, he had more severe abdominal pain and further elevated serum CA19-9. Actually he was found suffering from extensive metastatic cholangiocarcinoma with IgG4-SC by exploratory laparotomy. The present case serves as a reminder that extensive metastatic cholangiocarcinoma with or without IgG4-SC may be misdiagnosed as an isolated IgG4-SC case if one relies solely on elevated serum and tissue IgG4 levels. We emphasize on the importance of repeated core needle biopsy or exploratory laparoscopy/laparotomy before immunosuppressive drugs are given, and on follow-up of imaging findings and serum CA19-9 once immunosuppressive therapy is started. PMID:26559312

  9. IgG Suppresses Antibody Responses in Mice Lacking C1q, C3, Complement Receptors 1 and 2, or IgG Fc-Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Bergström, Joakim J. E.; Heyman, Birgitta

    2015-01-01

    Antigen-specific IgG antibodies, passively administered to mice or humans together with large particulate antigens like erythrocytes, can completely suppress the antibody response against the antigen. This is used clinically in Rhesus prophylaxis, where administration of IgG anti-RhD prevents RhD-negative women from becoming immunized against RhD-positive fetal erythrocytes aquired transplacentally. The mechanisms by which IgG suppresses antibody responses are poorly understood. We have here addressed whether complement or Fc-receptors for IgG (FcγRs) are required for IgG-mediated suppression. IgG, specific for sheep red blood cells (SRBC), was administered to mice together with SRBC and the antibody responses analyzed. IgG was able to suppress early IgM- as well as longterm IgG-responses in wildtype mice equally well as in mice lacking FcγRIIB (FcγRIIB knockout mice) or FcγRI, III, and IV (FcRγ knockout mice). Moreover, IgG was able to suppress early IgM responses equally well in mice lacking C1q (C1qA knockout mice), C3 (C3 knockout mice), or complement receptors 1 and 2 (Cr2 knockout mice) as in wildtype mice. Owing to the previously described severely impaired IgG responses in the complement deficient mice, it was difficult to assess whether passively administered IgG further decreased their IgG response. In conclusion, Fc-receptor binding or complement-activation by IgG does not seem to be required for its ability to suppress antibody responses to xenogeneic erythrocytes. PMID:26619292

  10. FcR blocking activity in serum of actively enhanced rat renal allograft recipients due to IgG anti-class II MHC alloantibody.

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, H E; Bolton, E M; Gracie, J A; Cocker, J E; Sandilands, G P; Bradley, J A

    1990-01-01

    In some rat strain combinations, pre-operative donor-specific blood transfusion produces long-term renal allograft survival, although the underlying mechanisms are unclear. This study has examined whether Fc receptor (FcR)-blocking activity could be detected in the serum of unmodified PVG strain recipients bearing a rejecting renal allograft and in recipients bearing an actively enhanced graft following pre-operative blood transfusion. Serum harvested on Day 5 from actively enhanced PVG recipients of DA rat renal allografts was shown to specifically inhibit erythrocyte-antibody (EA) rosette formation with donor strain, but not third-party, splenocytes, while the levels of EA rosette inhibition (EAI) in Day 5 serum from rejecting rats remained markedly lower. This FcR-blocking activity was present in enhanced serum fractions, prepared by discontinuous density gradient centrifugation, which corresponded to the 7 S peak. Purified IgG prepared from enhanced serum was also found to inhibit EA rosette formation with donor splenocytes, and absorption of the IgG preparations with donor strain erythrocytes failed to abrogate EA rosette inhibition. Further experiments, in which absorbed IgG from enhanced animals was tested for FcR blocking activity against splenocytes of defined major histocompatability complex (MHC) subregion specificities, established that FcR-blocking activity was mediated by IgG alloantibodies directed against donor MHC class II antigens. Whether the presence of such antibodies early after transplantation contributes to the beneficial effect of blood transfusion on graft survival remains to be determined. PMID:2312162

  11. Effect of 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone and testosterone on apoptosis in human dermal papilla cells.

    PubMed

    Winiarska, A; Mandt, N; Kamp, H; Hossini, A; Seltmann, H; Zouboulis, C C; Blume-Peytavi, U

    2006-01-01

    Pathogenetic mechanisms in androgenetic alopecia are not yet fully understood; however, it is commonly accepted that androgens like testosterone (T) and 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone (5alpha-DHT) inhibit hair follicle activity with early induction of the catagen. Thus, we investigated the influence of T and 5alpha-DHT on proliferation, cell death and bcl-2/bax expression in cultured dermal papilla cells (DPC) from nonbalding scalp regions of healthy volunteers. T and 5alpha-DHT induced apoptosis in DPC in a dose-dependent and time-related manner; in addition a necrotic effect due to T at 10(-5) M was found. Interestingly, bcl-2 protein expression was decreased in T- and 5alpha-DHT-treated cells, leading to an increase in the bax/bcl-2 ratio. In addition, T and 5alpha-DHT induced proteolytic cleavage of caspase 8 and inhibited proliferation of DPC at 10(-5) M. High concentrations of T and 5alpha-DHT were needed to induce apoptotic effects in DPC. These data suggest that DPC from nonbalding scalp regions do have the capacity to undergo apoptosis, but need a high androgen stimulus. The present study provides an interesting new pathogenetic approach in androgenetic alopecia. PMID:16931898

  12. Multicentric Castleman Disease With Tubulointerstitial Nephritis Mimicking IgG4-related Disease: Two Case Reports.

    PubMed

    Zoshima, Takeshi; Yamada, Kazunori; Hara, Satoshi; Mizushima, Ichiro; Yamagishi, Masakazu; Harada, Kenichi; Sato, Yasuharu; Kawano, Mitsuhiro

    2016-04-01

    Multicentric Castleman disease is a benign lymphoproliferative disorder with heterogenous clinical symptoms and involves systemic organs in addition to lymph nodes. Elevated serum IgG4 levels and IgG4-positive plasma cell (IgG4+PC) infiltrates have been reported in lymph nodes, lung and skin in some multicentric Castleman disease cases, resembling IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD) histologically. However, no report has been available regarding IgG4+PC infiltration in the kidneys of multicentric Castleman disease. Here, we report 2 cases of multicentric Castleman disease complicated by IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD) histologically. However, there has been no report published on PC-rich tubulointerstitial nephritis, lymphadenopathy, with numerous IgG4+PC infiltration, and elevated serum IgG4 levels, mimicking IgG4-RD. The blood examinations revealed systemic inflammation and elevated C-reactive protein and interleukin-6 levels. Corticosteroid therapy was partially effective in both cases, and combination therapy of corticosteroid and tocilizumab was needed in both cases. Moreover, after triple therapy with corticosteroid, rituximab and cyclophosphamide were used in 1 case to tame the severe inflammation. The present cases suggest that if continuously elevated serum C-reactive protein levels and partial corticosteroid responsiveness are encountered, multicentric Castleman disease should be considered rather than IgG4-RD as a differential diagnosis even if serum IgG4 is elevated and IgG4+PCs infiltrate systemic organs. PMID:26598921

  13. Covariance structures of fat and protein influence the estimation of IgG in bovine colostrum.

    PubMed

    Løkke, Mette Marie; Engelbrecht, Rikke; Wiking, Lars

    2016-02-01

    On-farm instruments for assessing colostrum quality are needed in order to ensure that the calf is supplied with enough IgG to avoid failure of passive transfer. The aim of this study was to evaluate methods for estimating the IgG concentration in cows' colostrum. This research included 126 colostrum samples from 21 Danish farms with different breeds, ensuring a broad variation pattern in IgG, total protein and fat concentration. Approximately one third of the samples did not fulfil the recommendation of >50 g IgG/l colostrum, and the IgG concentration decreased with time from calving to milking. The ratio of IgG to total protein varied from 6 to 61%, however IgG and total protein were correlated with r2 = 0.70. The variation in fat was independent of variations in protein and IgG. The IgG concentration was measured by ELISA and compared to fast measurements by specific gravity by colostrometer, Brix by refractometer and prediction from infrared spectroscopy. The three fast methods were all correlated to the total protein concentration of colostrum; however specific gravity was also influenced by the fat concentration. Furthermore, specific gravity generally overestimated the IgG concentration, and the cut-off level should be raised to 1050 in order to ensure adequate IgG in colostrum. None of the methods estimated IgG concentration better than the correlation of total protein and IgG, meaning that they all depended on the indirect correlation between total protein and IgG. The results suggest that using a refractometer for quality control of colostrum is an easy and feasible method, and a cut-off level of Brix 22 seems sufficient to assure adequate IgG concentration in colostrum fed to the calf. PMID:26869112

  14. Testosterone hormone replacement therapy: state-of-the-art and emerging technologies.

    PubMed

    Leichtnam, Marie-Laure; Rolland, Hervé; Wüthrich, Patrick; Guy, Richard H

    2006-06-01

    In the human male, testosterone is the major circulating androgen. The clinical effects of androgen are numerous, and testosterone deficiency is associated with a number of clinical abnormalities. At present, a variety of preparations containing testosterone is available for the treatment of androgen deficiency. Ideally, those treatments have to produce and maintain physiologic serum concentrations of the hormone. This article reviews the current existing testosterone dosage forms on the market with their advantages and drawbacks and examines new and emerging technology developments concerning this therapy. In particular, the latest innovations in transdermal delivery are explored. PMID:16755346

  15. First case report of testosterone assay-interference in a female taking maca (Lepidium meyenii)

    PubMed Central

    Srikugan, L; Sankaralingam, A; McGowan, B

    2011-01-01

    A young female with prolonged intermenstrual bleeding was found to have raised total plasma testosterone of 25.8 nmol/l (NR<2.9 nmol/l) using the Roche Elecsys Testosterone I immunoassay without clinical features of virulisation. Few months ago investigations for lethargy and low libido had shown normal total testosterone of 0.8 nmol/l. Further history revealed that she was using maca extract to improve her lethargy and low libido. Maca is traditionally used for its aphrodisiac and fertility-enhancing properties. Maca use has not been shown to affect serum testosterone in mice and human studies. Immunoassay interference with maca was suspected. Testosterone immunoassays use monoclonal antibodies specifically directed against testosterone. They are prone to interference from androgenic compounds. Reanalysis of the original serum sample using Elecsys Testosterone II assay, a higher affinity assay, revealed a total testosterone level of 2.9 nmol/l. It is important to exclude assay interference when testosterone level is greater than 5 nmol/l without supportive clinical signs. PMID:22700073

  16. First case report of testosterone assay-interference in a female taking maca (Lepidium meyenii).

    PubMed

    Srikugan, L; Sankaralingam, A; McGowan, B

    2011-01-01

    A young female with prolonged intermenstrual bleeding was found to have raised total plasma testosterone of 25.8 nmol/l (NR<2.9 nmol/l) using the Roche Elecsys Testosterone I immunoassay without clinical features of virulisation. Few months ago investigations for lethargy and low libido had shown normal total testosterone of 0.8 nmol/l. Further history revealed that she was using maca extract to improve her lethargy and low libido. Maca is traditionally used for its aphrodisiac and fertility-enhancing properties. Maca use has not been shown to affect serum testosterone in mice and human studies. Immunoassay interference with maca was suspected. Testosterone immunoassays use monoclonal antibodies specifically directed against testosterone. They are prone to interference from androgenic compounds. Reanalysis of the original serum sample using Elecsys Testosterone II assay, a higher affinity assay, revealed a total testosterone level of 2.9 nmol/l. It is important to exclude assay interference when testosterone level is greater than 5 nmol/l without supportive clinical signs. PMID:22700073

  17. Single dose testosterone administration alleviates gaze avoidance in women with Social Anxiety Disorder.

    PubMed

    Enter, Dorien; Terburg, David; Harrewijn, Anita; Spinhoven, Philip; Roelofs, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Gaze avoidance is one of the most characteristic and persistent social features in people with Social Anxiety Disorder (SAD). It signals social submissiveness and hampers adequate social interactions. Patients with SAD typically show reduced testosterone levels, a hormone that facilitates socially dominant gaze behavior. Therefore we tested as a proof of principle whether single dose testosterone administration can reduce gaze avoidance in SAD. In a double-blind, within-subject design, 18 medication-free female participants with SAD and 19 female healthy control participants received a single dose of 0.5mg testosterone and a matched placebo, at two separate days. On each day, their spontaneous gaze behavior was recorded using eye-tracking, while they looked at angry, happy, and neutral facial expressions. Testosterone enhanced the percentage of first fixations to the eye-region in participants with SAD compared to healthy controls. In addition, SAD patients' initial gaze avoidance in the placebo condition was associated with more severe social anxiety symptoms and this relation was no longer present after testosterone administration. These findings indicate that single dose testosterone administration can alleviate gaze avoidance in SAD. They support theories on the dominance enhancing effects of testosterone and extend those by showing that effects are particularly strong in individuals featured by socially submissive behavior. The finding that this core characteristic of SAD can be directly influenced by single dose testosterone administration calls for future inquiry into the clinical utility of testosterone in the treatment of SAD. PMID:26402923

  18. Management of Hypogonadism in Cardiovascular Patients: What Are the Implications of Testosterone Therapy on Cardiovascular Morbidity?

    PubMed

    Tanna, Monique S; Schwartzbard, Arthur; Berger, Jeffery S; Underberg, James; Gianos, Eugenia; Weintraub, Howard S

    2016-05-01

    Testosterone replacement therapy is recommended for men with clinical androgen deficiency with decades of evidence supporting its use for treatment of sexual, physical, and psychological consequences of male hypogonadism. In this updated review, the authors discuss the implications of testosterone deficiency and conflicting evidence regarding testosterone replacement therapy and its effects on the cardiovascular system. Based on mounting evidence, the authors conclude that testosterone therapy can be safely considered in men with appropriately diagnosed clinical androgen deficiency and concurrent cardiovascular risk factors and even manifest cardiovascular disease after a thorough discussion of potential risks and with guideline-recommended safety monitoring. PMID:27132583

  19. Testosterone deficiency and quality of life in Australasian testicular cancer survivors: a prospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    O'Carrigan, B; Fournier, M; Olver, I N; Stockler, M R; Whitford, H; Toner, G C; Thomson, D B; Davis, I D; Hanning, F; Singhal, N; Underhill, C; Clingan, P; McDonald, A; Boland, A; Grimison, P

    2014-08-01

    This is the first prospective study in a contemporary Australian/New Zealand population to determine the prevalence of testosterone deficiency in testicular cancer survivors at 12 months from treatment, and any association with poorer quality of life. Hormone assays from 54 evaluable patients in a prospective cohort study revealed biochemical hypogonadism in 18 patients (33%) and low-normal testosterone in 13 patients (24%). We found no association between testosterone levels and quality of life (all P > 0.05). Hypogonadal patients should be considered for testosterone replacement to prevent long-term morbidity. PMID:25081047

  20. The effects of castration followed testosterone supplementation in prostatic complex of Artibeus planirostris (Chiroptera: Phyllostomidae).

    PubMed

    Puga, Cíntia C I; Beguelini, Mateus R; Morielle-Versute, Eliana; Vilamaior, Patricia S L; Taboga, Sebastião R

    2016-06-01

    The prostatic complex (ventral and dorsal regions) of Artibeus planirostris exhibits seasonal variations throughout the year. Circulating testosterone was correlated with prostate weight, showing an increase from autumn to summer, with the highest peak in summer corresponding to the largest breeding season. This indicates that the level of serum testosterone influences variations in both testicular and prostatic weights. Serum testosterone levels seem to be closely related to the different responses of these glands throughout the year. The castration (consequent suppression of testosterone) and subsequent hormone supplementation may elucidate the relationship of these two glandular types with testosterone. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of castration and the testosterone supplementation in the male prostatic complex of A. planirostris. The results indicated that both prostatic regions were affected by the ablation of testosterone, presenting a decrease in cell proliferation and an increase in apoptosis. Similarly, the prostate was responsive to hormonal supplementation, having a recovery of the active morphophysiological pattern with testosterone supplementation. However, data have shown that the ventral region was more sensitive to changes in testosterone than the dorsal, presenting greater cell renewal. PMID:27032910

  1. Influence of testosterone gel treatment on spermatogenesis in men with hypogonadism.

    PubMed

    George, Mskhalaya; Yulia, Tishova; Svetlana, Kalinchenko

    2014-10-01

    The prevalence of androgen deficiency in reproductive-aged men is increasing and needs new approach to long-term hypogonadism treatment that can preserve fertility. An open non-controlled pilot study included 18 men with eugonadotropic hypogonadism, who received transdermal testosterone gel treatment for 3 months. Sperm analysis was made before treatment and after 3 month of testosterone therapy. Testosterone level was normalized in all patients, but no negative effect was observed on spermatogenesis. Testosterone gel therapy may be a therapy of choice in hypogonadal men of reproductive age but further studies are needed. PMID:25200823

  2. The Effects of Testosterone on Oxidative Stress Markers in Mice with Spinal Cord Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Choobineh, Hamid; Sadighi Gilani, Mohammad Ali; Pasalar, Parvin; Jahanzad, Issa; Ghorbani, Rostam; Hassanzadeh, Gholamreza

    2016-01-01

    Background Spinal cord injury (SCI) causes infertility in male patients through erectile dysfunction, ejaculatory dysfunction, semen and hormone abnormalities. Oxidative stress (OS) is involved in poor semen quality and subsequent infertility in males with SCI. The aim of this study is to examine the effects of SCI on the level of testosterone hormone. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, we evaluated the effects of exogenous testosterone on the activity of the antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) as well as the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) and protein carbonylation (PCO), as markers of OS, in 10 groups of SCI mice. Total antioxidant capacity (TAC) was determined using the 2,29-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline- 6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) radical cation assay. Results Exogenous testosterone administration in mice with SCI significantly reduced SOD and GPx enzyme activities and MDA level. There was no significant decrease in PCO content. In addition, TAC remarkably increased in the sham and SCI groups not treated with testosterone but remained unchanged in all other experimental groups. Exogenous testosterone also reduced serum testosterone levels in all groups except the positive control group. Conclusion Our cumulative data indicated that SCI could cause sterility by disturbing the plasmatic testosterone balance. The normal level of endogenous testosterone was not completely restored by exogenous testosterone administration. PMID:27123205

  3. [The role of testosterone in regulating the aggressive behavior of male laboratory mice of different strains].

    PubMed

    Diuzhikova, N A

    1994-01-01

    The influence of testosterone on aggressive behaviour, on urinal pheromonal activity, on weight of the preputial gland, seminal vesicles and coagulating glands of male mouse CBA, C57BL/6 and hybrids CBAB6F1 was studied. The interstrain differences in reactivity to testosterone in aggressive behaviour tests and in seminal vesicles and coagulating gland weight were found. The urinal pheromonal characteristics were not changed by testosterone influence. No significant correlations between the aggressive behaviour parameters, urinal pheromonal activity, testosterone plasma levels and reactivity to its action were discovered. PMID:7941714

  4. Chimeric Anti-CD14 IGG2/4 Hybrid Antibodies for Therapeutic Intervention in Pig and Human Models of Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Corinna; Gunnarsen, Kristin S.; Høydahl, Lene S.; Andersen, Jan Terje; Berntzen, Gøril; Pharo, Anne; Lindstad, Julie K.; Ludviksen, Judith K.; Brekke, Ole-Lars; Barratt-Due, Andreas; Nielsen, Erik Waage; Stokes, Christopher R.; Espevik, Terje; Sandlie, Inger

    2013-01-01

    CD14 is a key recognition molecule of innate immune responses, interacting with several TLRs. TLR signaling cross-talks extensively with the complement system, and combined CD14 and complement inhibition has been proved effective in attenuating inflammatory responses. Pig models of human diseases have emerged as valuable tools to study therapeutic intervention, but suitable neutralizing Abs are rare. Undesired Fc-mediated functions, such as platelet activation and IL-8 release induced by the porcine CD14-specific clone Mil2, limit further studies. Therefore, an inert human IgG2/IgG4 hybrid C region was chosen for an rMil2. As revealed in ex vivo and in vivo pig experiments, rMil2 inhibited the CD14-mediated proinflammatory cytokine response similar to the original clone, but lacked the undesired Fc-effects, and inflammation was attenuated further by simultaneous complement inhibition. Moreover, rMil2 bound porcine FcRn, a regulator of t1/2 and biodistribution. Thus, rMil2, particularly combined with complement inhibitors, should be well suited for in vivo studies using porcine models of diseases, such as sepsis and ischemia-reperfusion injury. Similarly, the recombinant anti-human CD14 IgG2/4 Ab, r18D11, was generated with greatly reduced Fc-mediated effects and preserved inhibitory function ex vivo. Such Abs might be drug candidates for the treatment of innate immunity-mediated human diseases. PMID:24062486

  5. IgG subclass responses to proinflammatory fraction of Brugia malayi in human filariasis

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, S.K.; Verma, S.K.; Sahoo, M.K.; Sharma, A.; Srivastava, M.; Reddy, M.V.R.; Murthy, P.K.

    2012-01-01

    Background & objectives: Earlier we demonstrated that immunization with F6, a proinflammatory molecular fraction isolated from the human filarial parasite Brugia malayi, protected the host and eliminated the infection in Mastomys coucha by a Th1/Th2 response including IgG2a antibody response. Whether F6 molecules become accessible to human host during natural course of infection and elicit similar response is not known. The present study was undertaken to determine the profile of IgG subclasses specifically reactive to F6 in different categories of bancroftian filariasis cases to infer any relationship between the levels of a particular F6-specific IgG subclass and the infection or disease status. Methods: Serum samples of normal individuals from filariasis non-endemic regions of India like Jammu & Kashmir, Uttarakhand, and Chandigarh [(NEN-W; n=10), healthy subjects from USA (NEN-U; n=10) and three categories of bancroftian filariasis cases from endemic areas: endemic normals (EN; n=10) with no symptoms and no microfilariae, asymptomatic microfilaremics (ASM; n=10) and chronic symptomatic amicrofilaremics (CL; n=10) were assayed for F6-specific IgG1, IgG2, IgG3 and IgG4 by ELISA using SDS-PAGE-isolated F6 fraction of B. malayi adult worms. Results: Significantly high levels of F6-specific IgG1, IgG2 and IgG3 were found in CL (P<0.001) and EN (P<0.01-0.001) bancroftian filariasis cases compared to NEN-U. Significant levels of F6-specific IgG1 (P<0.01) and IgG2 (P<0.01) but not IgG3 were found in ASM cases compared to NEN-U. The most abundant was IgG2 which when compared to NEN-U, was significantly high in CL (P<0.001) and EN cases (P<0.001), followed by ASM (P<0.01). F6-specific IgG4 response in EN, ASM and CL subjects was not significantly different from the levels of NEN-U. Among the non-endemic normals, the NEN-W subjects showed significant reactivity with IgG2 (P<0.001) but not with IgG1, IgG3 and IgG4 as compared to NEN-U subjects. IgG subclass levels were

  6. Pronounced induction of testicular PGF(2 alpha) and suppression of testosterone by cadmium-prevention by zinc.

    PubMed

    Gunnarsson, David; Svensson, Mona; Selstam, Gunnar; Nordberg, Gunnar

    2004-07-15

    In order to investigate the effects of cadmium (Cd) on testicular prostaglandin F(2 alpha) (PGF(2 alpha)) production, adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to CdCl(2) by subcutaneous injections. Dose-response as well as temporal-response experiments were performed, and PGF(2 alpha) levels were determined by radioimmunoassay (RIA). The highest cadmium dose (10 micromol/kg) caused a dramatic elevation of testicular PGF(2 alpha), which was established to occur 48 h after exposure. At this point of time, cadmium-treated animals displayed PGF(2 alpha) levels 16.7 times higher than saline-injected controls. No significant differences were found with the lower doses used (1 and 5 micromol/kg). In addition, the influence of pre-treatment with zinc (Zn) was assessed. The very strong stimulatory effect on PGF(2 alpha) synthesis (22.3-fold) detected after exposure to 20 micromol/kg cadmium, was completely absent in the group given zinc (1 mmol/kg) prior to cadmium exposure. Plasma testosterone concentrations were determined in the three experiments, and all groups with strongly elevated PGF(2 alpha) levels showed drastically lowered concentrations of testosterone. Zinc pre-treatment abolished not only the cadmium-induced rise in PGF(2 alpha) but also the testosterone reduction. Additionally, cadmium was found to inhibit the expression of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR), which is responsible for the rate-limiting step in steroidogenesis. The present findings establish that cadmium can cause a strong induction of testicular PGF(2 alpha) production, which might help to explain the well-known antisteroidogenic effect of this heavy metal. Such an inhibitory effect could be due to reduced levels of StAR. PMID:15158563

  7. The effects of testosterone and oestrogen on gonadectomised and intact male rat anterior pituitary mitotic and apoptotic activity.

    PubMed

    Nolan, L A; Levy, A

    2006-03-01

    We have used a direct, non-immunochemical and highly accurate method to quantify the effects of testosterone and oestrogen on mitotic and apoptotic activity in the young, male rat anterior pituitary in vivo. Surgical gonadectomy resulted in a 3-fold increase in mitotic activity by the fourth post-operative day, which returned gradually to levels seen in intact animals over the subsequent 3-4 weeks. Both a single dose of Sustanon, a mixture of long-acting testosterone esters in arachis oil, and the same dose divided over 7 days (starting 6 days after gonadectomy), initially suppressed mitotic activity to levels seen in intact animals, but was associated after 48-96 h with a wave of increased mitotic activity. The latter was blocked by co-administration of Sustanon with the non-steroidal aromatase inhibitor letrozole and was not seen when the non-aromatisable androgen dihydrotestosterone was substituted for Sustanon. Oestrogen alone in gonadectomised and intact rats produced a marked increase in mitosis as expected. With the exception of a transient increase in response to a single high-dose injection of Sustanon in gonadectomised animals, apoptotic activity was unaffected by all of the above. This study suggests that pituitary mitotic activity is tonically inhibited by gonadal hormone production (at least in the short term) in adult male rats. The study also suggests that supraphysiological testosterone treatment -- while unable to reduce anterior pituitary mitotic activity in untreated, intact animals --suppresses the early increase in mitotic activity induced by gonadectomy. Oestrogen, either exogenous or generated locally by aromatisation, stimulates anterior pituitary mitotic activity in a time-dependent manner. PMID:16522719

  8. Depigmented Allergoids Reveal New Epitopes with Capacity to Induce IgG Blocking Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    López-Matas, M. Angeles; Gallego, Mayte; Iraola, Víctor; Robinson, Douglas; Carnés, Jerónimo

    2013-01-01

    Background. The synthesis of allergen-specific blocking IgGs that interact with IgE after allergen immunotherapy (SIT) has been related to clinical efficacy. The objectives were to investigate the epitope specificity of IgG-antibodies induced by depigmented-polymerized (Dpg-Pol) allergoids and unmodified allergen extracts, and examine IgE-blocking activity of induced IgG-antibodies. Methods. Rabbits were immunized with native and Dpg-Pol extracts of birch pollen, and serum samples were obtained. Recognition of linear IgG-epitopes of Bet v 1 and Bet v 2 and the capacity of these IgG-antibodies to block binding of human-IgE was determined. Results. Serum from rabbits immunized with native extracts recognised 11 linear epitopes from Bet v 1, while that from Dpg-Pol-immunized animals recognised 8. For Bet v 2, 8 epitopes were recognized by IgG from native immunized animals, and 9 from Dpg-Pol immunized one. Dpg-Pol and native immunized serum did not always recognise the same epitopes, but specific-IgG from both could block human-IgE binding sites for native extract. Conclusions. Depigmented-polymerized birch extract stimulates the synthesis of specific IgG-antibodies which recognize common but also novel epitopes compared with native extracts. IgG-antibodies induced by Dpg-Pol effectively inhibit human-IgE binding to allergens which may be part of the mechanism of action of SIT. PMID:24222901

  9. Small-Angle X-ray Scattering Screening Complements Conventional Biophysical Analysis: Comparative Structural and Biophysical Analysis of Monoclonal Antibodies IgG1, IgG2, and IgG4

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Xinsheng; Langkilde, Annette E; Thorolfsson, Matthias; Rasmussen, Hanne B; Vestergaard, Bente

    2014-01-01

    A crucial step in the development of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies is the selection of robust pharmaceutical candidates and screening of efficacious protein formulations to increase the resistance toward physicochemical degradation and aggregation during processing and storage. Here, we introduce small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) to characterize antibody solution behavior, which strongly complements conventional biophysical analysis. First, we apply a variety of conventional biophysical techniques for the evaluation of structural, conformational, and colloidal stability and report a systematic comparison between designed humanized IgG1, IgG2, and IgG4 with identical variable regions. Then, the high information content of SAXS data enables sensitive detection of structural differences between three IgG subclasses at neutral pH and rapid formation of dimers of IgG2 and IgG4 at low pH. We reveal subclass-specific variation in intermolecular repulsion already at low and medium protein concentrations, which explains the observed improved stability of IgG1 with respect to aggregation. We show how excipients dramatically influence such repulsive effects, hence demonstrating the potential application of extensive SAXS screening in antibody selection, eventual engineering, and formulation development. PMID:24700358

  10. Bovine IgG2a antibodies to Haemophilus somnus and allotype expression.

    PubMed Central

    Corbeil, L B; Gogolewski, R P; Kacskovics, I; Nielsen, K H; Corbeil, R R; Morrill, J L; Greenwood, R; Butler, J E

    1997-01-01

    Bovine IgG2a has been implicated in protection against pyogenic infections, including those caused by Haemophilus somnus. To further investigate the role of IgG2a in defense against H. somnus, IgG1 and IgG2a antibodies were purified from antiserum against an immunodominant 40 kDa outer membrane protein (p40) of H. somnus, which was previously shown to passively protect calves against H. somnus pneumonia. The passive protective capacity of anti-p40 IgG1 or IgG2a was evaluated in vivo in calves. Purified anti-p40 IgG1 or IgG2a was incubated with H. somnus for 15 min before intrabronchial inoculation of calves. Bacteria incubated with anti-p40 IgG1 or IgG2a were inoculated into one caudal lung lobe and bacteria incubated with IgG1 or IgG2a from the respective preimmunization serum were inoculated into the contralateral lobe. The volumes of pneumonia in the right and left lungs were determined 24 h later. The difference in volume of pneumonia with H. somnus preincubated in IgG1 pre- and postimmunization anti p40 was less (16 cm3, P = 0.298) than the difference in volume of pneumonia with H. somnus preincubated in IgG2a pre- and postimmunization anti p40 (30 cm3, P = 0.146). Although the differences in lesion size between pre- and postimmunization serum were not statistically significant, the trend suggests IgG2a may be more protective than IgG1. To examine this further, the peptide specificity of these IgG1 and IgG2a antibodies to p40 was examined. After limited proteolysis of p40, IgG2a antibodies reacted with 2 peptides not recognized by IgG1 antibodies. Other peptides were recognized by both isotypes. Since these studies suggested that IgG2a may be important in protection against infection, we then investigated some aspects of the role of the 2 IgG2a allotypes, A1 and A2. In retrospective studies of age differences in expression of IgG2a allotypes, no heterozygotes were detected in calves of 60 d old or less, and fewer heterozygotes were detected in calves 61-120 d

  11. Testosterone Replacement Therapy and Mortality in Older Men.

    PubMed

    Hackett, G I

    2016-02-01

    While US testosterone prescriptions have tripled in the last decade with lower trends in Europe, debate continues over the risks, benefits and appropriate use of testosterone replacement therapy (TRT). Several authors blame advertising and the availability of more convenient formulations, whilst others have pointed out that the routine testing of men with erectile dysfunction (ED) (a significant marker of cardiovascular risk) and those with diabetes would inevitably increase the diagnosis of hypogonadism and lead to an increase in totally appropriate prescribing. They commented that this was merely an appropriate correction of previous under-diagnosis and under-treatment in line with evidence based guidelines. It is unlikely that persuasive advertising or convenient formulations could grow a market over such a sustained period if the treatment was not effective. Urologists and primary care physicians are the most frequent initiators of TRT usually for ED. Benefits are clearly established for sexual function, increase in lean muscle mass and strength, mood and cognitive function, with a possible reduction in frailty and osteoporosis. There remains no evidence that TRT is associated with increased risk of prostate cancer or symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia, yet the decision to initiate and continue therapy is often decided by urologists. The cardiovascular issues associated with TRT have been clarified by recent studies showing that therapy associated with clear increases in serum testosterone levels to the normal range is associated with reduced all-cause mortality. Studies reporting to show increased risk have been subject to flawed designs with inadequate baseline diagnosis and follow-up testing. Effectively, they have compared non-treated patients with under-treated or non-compliant subjects involving a range of different therapy regimes. Recent evidence suggests long-acting injections may be associated with decreased cardiovascular risk, but the

  12. IgG Conformer's Binding to Amyloidogenic Aggregates

    PubMed Central

    Phay, Monichan; Welzel, Alfred T.; Williams, Angela D.; McWilliams-Koeppen, Helen P.; Blinder, Veronika; O'Malley, Tiernan T.; Solomon, Alan; Walsh, Dominic M.; O'Nuallain, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Amyloid-reactive IgGs isolated from pooled blood of normal individuals (pAbs) have demonstrated clinical utility for amyloid diseases by in vivo targeting and clearing amyloidogenic proteins and peptides. We now report the following three novel findings on pAb conformer's binding to amyloidogenic aggregates: 1) pAb aggregates have greater activity than monomers (HMW species > dimers > monomers), 2) pAbs interactions with amyloidogenic aggregates at least partially involves unconventional (non-CDR) interactions of F(ab) regions, and 3) pAb's activity can be easily modulated by trace aggregates generated during sample processing. Specifically, we show that HMW aggregates and dimeric pAbs present in commercial preparations of pAbs, intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg), had up to ~200- and ~7-fold stronger binding to aggregates of Aβ and transthyretin (TTR) than the monomeric antibody. Notably, HMW aggregates were primarily responsible for the enhanced anti-amyloid activities of Aβ- and Cibacron blue-isolated IVIg IgGs. Human pAb conformer's binding to amyloidogenic aggregates was retained in normal human sera, and mimicked by murine pAbs isolated from normal pooled plasmas. An unconventional (non-CDR) component to pAb's activity was indicated from control human mAbs, generated against non-amyloid targets, binding to aggregated Aβ and TTR. Similar to pAbs, HMW and dimeric mAb conformers bound stronger than their monomeric forms to amyloidogenic aggregates. However, mAbs had lower maximum binding signals, indicating that pAbs were required to saturate a diverse collection of binding sites. Taken together, our findings strongly support further investigations on the physiological function and clinical utility of the inherent anti-amyloid activities of monomeric but not aggregated IgGs. PMID:26367058

  13. Ophthalmic immunoglobulin G4-related disease IgG4-RD Current concepts.

    PubMed

    Mulay, Kaustubh; Wick, Mark R

    2016-05-01

    IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD) is a distinct entity that frequently occurs in an ophthalmic location. As such, IgG4-RD is not limited to the orbit but may also involve other anatomical structures in and around the eye. Hence, the term 'ophthalmic IgG4-RD' is preferred over 'orbital IgG4-RD.' A high level of suspicion for the diagnosis can be derived from careful clinicoradiologic ex