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Sample records for ignar antibodies evidence

  1. Maturation of Shark Single-Domain (IgNAR) Antibodies: Evidence for Induced-Fit Binding

    SciTech Connect

    Stanfield, R.L.; Dooley, H.; Verdino, P.; Flajnik, M.F.; Wilson, I.A.; /Scripps Res. Inst. /Maryland U.

    2007-07-13

    Sharks express an unusual heavy-chain isotype called IgNAR, whose variable regions bind antigen as independent soluble domains. To further probe affinity maturation of the IgNAR response, we structurally characterized the germline and somatically matured versions of a type II variable (V) region, both in the presence and absence of its antigen, hen egg-white lysozyme. Despite a disulfide bond linking complementarity determining regions (CDRs) 1 and 3, both germline and somatically matured V regions displayed significant structural changes in these CDRs upon complex formation with antigen. Somatic mutations in the IgNAR V region serve to increase the number of contacts with antigen, as reflected by a tenfold increase in affinity, and one of these mutations appears to stabilize the CDR3 region. In addition, a residue in the HV4 loop plays an important role in antibody-antigen interaction, consistent with the high rate of somatic mutations in this non-CDR loop.

  2. The Shark Strikes Twice: Hypervariable Loop 2 of Shark IgNAR Antibody Variable Domains and Its Potential to Function as an Autonomous Paratope.

    PubMed

    Zielonka, Stefan; Empting, Martin; Könning, Doreen; Grzeschik, Julius; Krah, Simon; Becker, Stefan; Dickgießer, Stephan; Kolmar, Harald

    2015-08-01

    In this present study, we engineered hypervariable loop 2 (HV2) of the IgNAR variable domain in a way that it solely facilitates antigen binding, potentially functioning as an autonomous paratope. For this, the surface-exposed loop corresponding to HV2 was diversified and antigen-specific variable domain of IgNAR antibody (vNAR) molecules were isolated by library screening using yeast surface display (YSD) as platform technology. An epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM)-specific vNAR was used as starting material, and nine residues in HV2 were randomized. Target-specific clones comprising a new HV2-mediated paratope were isolated against cluster of differentiation 3ε (CD3ε) and human Fcγ while retaining high affinity for EpCAM. Essentially, we demonstrate that a new paratope comprising moderate affinities against a given target molecule can be engineered into the vNAR scaffold that acts independent of the original antigen-binding site, composed of complementarity-determining region 3 (CDR3) and CDR1. PMID:26003538

  3. Isolation of a pH-Sensitive IgNAR Variable Domain from a Yeast-Displayed, Histidine-Doped Master Library.

    PubMed

    Könning, Doreen; Zielonka, Stefan; Sellmann, Carolin; Schröter, Christian; Grzeschik, Julius; Becker, Stefan; Kolmar, Harald

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, engineering of pH-sensitivity into antibodies as well as antibody-derived fragments has become more and more attractive for biomedical and biotechnological applications. Herein, we report the isolation of the first pH-sensitive IgNAR variable domain (vNAR), which was isolated from a yeast-displayed, semi-synthetic master library. This strategy enables the direct identification of pH-dependent binders from a histidine-enriched CDR3 library. Displayed vNAR variants contained two histidine substitutions on average at random positions in their 12-residue CDR3 loop. Upon screening of seven rounds against the proof-of-concept target EpCAM (selection for binding at pH 7.4 and decreased binding at pH 6.0), a single clone was obtained that showed specific and pH-dependent binding as characterized by yeast surface display and biolayer interferometry. Potential applications for such pH-dependent vNAR domains include their employment in tailored affinity chromatography, enabling mild elution protocols. Moreover, utilizing a master library for the isolation of pH-sensitive vNAR variants may be a generic strategy to obtain binding entities with prescribed characteristics for applications in biotechnology, diagnostics, and therapy. PMID:26838965

  4. Antibody

    MedlinePlus

    An antibody is a protein produced by the body's immune system when it detects harmful substances, called antigens. Examples ... microorganisms (bacteria, fungi, parasites, and viruses) and chemicals. Antibodies may be produced when the immune system mistakenly ...

  5. Evidence of a saturable hepatic receptor for mouse monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    De Nardo, G.L.; De Nardo, S.J.; Peng, J.S.; O'Grady, L.F.; Mills, S.L.; Epstein, A.L.; Cardiff, R.D.

    1985-05-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAb) can be labeled with I-123 at high specific activities, so that large amounts of radioactivity attached to small amounts of protein can be injected for radioimmunoimaging. This conserves antibody and decreases the opportunity for foreign protein reactions and target tissue binding site saturation. In order to assess the effects on pharmacokinetics and imaging, the authors administered microgram amounts of I-123-MAb (Lyn-1, IgG2a or B6.01, IgGl with and following 4-5 milligram preloading with MAb on separate occasions to 4 patients with a target tumor (B cell lymphoma) and 2 patients without a target tumor (breast cancer). Pharmacokinetics were observed in blood and urine by counting whole samples and HPLC fractions of these samples and in organs by serial imaging. Early blood clearance and urinary excretion were faster after injection of microgram amounts of MAb, but subsequently were comparable to those obtained after preload. This paper concludes that the amount of administered MAb dramatically influences the pharmacokinetics of mouse MAb. Saturable hepatic Fc receptors are probably the source of these observations. Reports of accelerated deiodination of MAb are related to this phenomenon. Optimal imaging and treatment with MAb requires saturation of these hepatic receptors.

  6. Leptospiral Antibodies in Cattle in Alberta and Evidence of an Emerging Serovar

    PubMed Central

    Kingscote, Barbara

    1988-01-01

    Antibodies to Leptospira interrogans serovars hardjo and pomona were present in 8.3% and 0.5% of sera respectively, from adult female cattle in Alberta surveyed in 1984-85. Criterion for a positive serum sample was 50% agglutination at 1/100 dilution in the microscopic agglutination test. A positive herd contained one or more cows with positive serum. Prevalences were calculated on sample sizes that would give 80-95% reliability. Hardjo antibody prevalences and hardjo-positive herd prevalences were 0-53.9% and 0-83.3%, respectively, among 65 municipalities surveyed. Pomona prevalences by comparison were 0-3.4% and 0-11.7% respectively. Hardjo had increased significantly since 1980-82, and antibodies were found throughout the province. Pomona occurred mainly in southeastern Alberta, where it was isolated from cattle, swine and skunks. Hardjo was isolated only from cattle and it was found in many areas. Antibodies to icterohaemorrhagiae were present in 0.4% of sera from parts of Alberta surveyed in 1980; evidence of the presence of leptospires related to this serovar in bovine and porcine urinary tracts was obtained by immunofluorescence. ImagesFigure 3. PMID:17423101

  7. Aspergillus fumigatus-specific antibodies in allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis and aspergilloma: evidence for a polyclonal antibody response.

    PubMed Central

    Brummund, W; Resnick, A; Fink, J N; Kurup, V P

    1987-01-01

    Patients with the Aspergillus-induced diseases allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis (ABPA), aspergilloma (fungus ball), and Aspergillus skin test-positive asthma were differentiated immunologically by radioimmunoassay based on their total immunoglobulin E (IgE) and Aspergillus fumigatus-specific IgE levels. In this study, a new, highly sensitive biotin-avidin-linked immunosorbent assay was used to evaluate A. fumigatus-specific antibodies of all immunoglobulin classes. Studied populations included 13 patients with ABPA, 12 with aspergilloma, 9 with Aspergillus skin test-positive asthma, and 9 normal individuals without asthma. A. fumigatus-specific antibodies of all classes were elevated in patients with ABPA, variably elevated in those with aspergilloma, and lowest in the other two groups. This assay demonstrated significantly higher specific IgE antibody levels in the ABPA group over those of the other groups, even with 1:1,000 dilutions of the sera. This study demonstrated that ABPA is a disease characterized by a polyclonal antibody response to Aspergillus antigen and not just a response to IgE and IgG antibody classes. The measurement of other antibody classes, particularly IgD and IgA, could enhance the immunodiagnosis of ABPA. The biotin-avidin-linked immunosorbent assay was found to be a highly sensitive assay that can be a clinically useful alternative to radioimmunoassay in the measurement of A. fumigatus-specific antibodies. PMID:3539998

  8. Rigidity Emerges during Antibody Evolution in Three Distinct Antibody Systems: Evidence from QSFR Analysis of Fab Fragments

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tong; Tracka, Malgorzata B.; Uddin, Shahid; Casas-Finet, Jose; Jacobs, Donald J.; Livesay, Dennis R.

    2015-01-01

    The effects of somatic mutations that transform polyspecific germline (GL) antibodies to affinity mature (AM) antibodies with monospecificity are compared among three GL-AM Fab pairs. In particular, changes in conformational flexibility are assessed using a Distance Constraint Model (DCM). We have previously established that the DCM can be robustly applied across a series of antibody fragments (VL to Fab), and subsequently, the DCM was combined with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to similarly characterize five thermostabilizing scFv mutants. The DCM is an ensemble based statistical mechanical approach that accounts for enthalpy/entropy compensation due to network rigidity, which has been quite successful in elucidating conformational flexibility and Quantitative Stability/Flexibility Relationships (QSFR) in proteins. Applied to three disparate antibody systems changes in QSFR quantities indicate that the VH domain is typically rigidified, whereas the VL domain and CDR L2 loop become more flexible during affinity maturation. The increase in CDR H3 loop rigidity is consistent with other studies in the literature. The redistribution of conformational flexibility is largely controlled by nonspecific changes in the H-bond network, although certain Arg to Asp salt bridges create highly localized rigidity increases. Taken together, these results reveal an intricate flexibility/rigidity response that accompanies affinity maturation. PMID:26132144

  9. Structural insights and biomedical potential of IgNAR scaffolds from sharks

    PubMed Central

    Zielonka, Stefan; Empting, Martin; Grzeschik, Julius; Könning, Doreen; Barelle, Caroline J; Kolmar, Harald

    2015-01-01

    In addition to antibodies with the classical composition of heavy and light chains, the adaptive immune repertoire of sharks also includes a heavy-chain only isotype, where antigen binding is mediated exclusively by a small and highly stable domain, referred to as vNAR. In recent years, due to their high affinity and specificity combined with their small size, high physicochemical stability and low-cost of production, vNAR fragments have evolved as promising target-binding scaffolds that can be tailor-made for applications in medicine and biotechnology. This review highlights the structural features of vNAR molecules, addresses aspects of their generation using immunization or in vitro high throughput screening methods and provides examples of therapeutic, diagnostic and other biotechnological applications. PMID:25523873

  10. Atypical antigen recognition mode of a shark immunoglobulin new antigen receptor (IgNAR) variable domain characterized by humanization and structural analysis.

    PubMed

    Kovalenko, Oleg V; Olland, Andrea; Piché-Nicholas, Nicole; Godbole, Adarsh; King, Daniel; Svenson, Kristine; Calabro, Valerie; Müller, Mischa R; Barelle, Caroline J; Somers, William; Gill, Davinder S; Mosyak, Lidia; Tchistiakova, Lioudmila

    2013-06-14

    The immunoglobulin new antigen receptors (IgNARs) are a class of Ig-like molecules of the shark immune system that exist as heavy chain-only homodimers and bind antigens by their single domain variable regions (V-NARs). Following shark immunization and/or in vitro selection, V-NARs can be generated as soluble, stable, and specific high affinity monomeric binding proteins of ∼12 kDa. We have previously isolated a V-NAR from an immunized spiny dogfish shark, named E06, that binds specifically and with high affinity to human, mouse, and rat serum albumins. Humanization of E06 was carried out by converting over 60% of non-complementarity-determining region residues to those of a human germ line Vκ1 sequence, DPK9. The resulting huE06 molecules have largely retained the specificity and affinity of antigen binding of the parental V-NAR. Crystal structures of the shark E06 and its humanized variant (huE06 v1.1) in complex with human serum albumin (HSA) were determined at 3- and 2.3-Å resolution, respectively. The huE06 v1.1 molecule retained all but one amino acid residues involved in the binding site for HSA. Structural analysis of these V-NARs has revealed an unusual variable domain-antigen interaction. E06 interacts with HSA in an atypical mode that utilizes extensive framework contacts in addition to complementarity-determining regions that has not been seen previously in V-NARs. On the basis of the structure, the roles of various elements of the molecule are described with respect to antigen binding and V-NAR stability. This information broadens the general understanding of antigen recognition and provides a framework for further design and humanization of shark IgNARs. PMID:23632026

  11. Evidence for a novel human-specific xeno-auto-antibody response against vascular endothelium.

    PubMed

    Pham, Tho; Gregg, Christopher J; Karp, Felix; Chow, Renee; Padler-Karavani, Vered; Cao, Hongzhi; Chen, Xi; Witztum, Joseph L; Varki, Nissi M; Varki, Ajit

    2009-12-10

    Humans are genetically unable to synthesize the common mammalian sialic acid N-glycolylneuraminic acid (Neu5Gc). However, Neu5Gc can be metabolically incorporated and covalently expressed on cultured human cell surfaces. Meanwhile, humans express varying and sometimes high titers of polyclonal anti-Neu5Gc antibodies. Here, a survey of human tissues by immunohistochemistry with both a monospecific chicken anti-Neu5Gc antibody and with affinity-purified human anti-Neu5Gc antibodies demonstrates endothelial expression of Neu5Gc, likely originating from Neu5Gc-rich foods like red meats. We hypothesized that the combination of Neu5Gc incorporation and anti-Neu5Gc antibodies can induce endothelial activation. Indeed, the incubation of high-titer human sera with Neu5Gc-fed endothelial cells led to Neu5Gc-dependent antibody binding, complement deposition, endothelial activation, selectin expression, increased cytokine secretion, and monocyte binding. The proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor-alpha also selectively enhanced human anti-Neu5Gc antibody reactivity. Anti-Neu5Gc antibodies affinity-purified from human serum also directed Neu5Gc-dependent complement deposition onto cultured endothelial cells. These data indicate a novel human-specific mechanism in which Neu5Gc-rich foods deliver immunogenic Neu5Gc to the endothelium, giving anti-Neu5Gc antibody- and complement-dependent activation, and potentially contributing to human vascular pathologies. In the case of atherosclerosis, Neu5Gc is present both in endothelium overlying plaques and in subendothelial regions, providing multiple pathways for accelerating inflammation in this disease. PMID:19828701

  12. Immune escape by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 from neutralizing antibodies: evidence for multiple pathways.

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, B A; Reitz, M S; Wilson, C A; Aldrich, K; Davis, A E; Robert-Guroff, M

    1993-01-01

    Sera from many HIV-1-infected individuals contain broadly reactive, specific neutralizing antibodies. Despite their broad reactivity, variant viruses, resistant to neutralization, can be selected in vitro in the presence of such antisera. We have previously shown that neutralization resistance of an escape mutant with an amino acid substitution in the transmembrane protein (A582T) occurs because of alteration of a conformational epitope that is recognized by neutralizing antibodies directed against the CD4 binding site. In this report we demonstrate that immune escape via a single-amino-acid substitution (A281V) within a conserved region of the envelope glycoprotein gp120 confers neutralization resistance against a broadly reactive neutralizing antiserum from a seropositive individual. We show this alteration affects V3 and additional regions unrelated to V3 or the CD4 binding site. Together with previous studies on escape mutants selected in vitro, our findings suggest that immune-selective pressure can arise by multiple pathways. PMID:7693973

  13. Humans Have Antibodies against a Plant Virus: Evidence from Tobacco Mosaic Virus

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ruolan; Vaishnav, Radhika A.; Roberts, Andrew M.; Friedland, Robert P.

    2013-01-01

    Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV), a widespread plant pathogen, is found in tobacco (including cigarettes and smokeless tobacco) as well as in many other plants. Plant viruses do not replicate or cause infection in humans or other mammals. This study was done to determine whether exposure to tobacco products induces an immune response to TMV in humans. Using a sandwich ELISA assay, we detected serum anti-TMV antibodies (IgG, IgG1, IgG3, IgG4, IgA, and IgM) in all subjects enrolled in the study (20 healthy smokers, 20 smokeless-tobacco users, and 20 non-smokers). Smokers had a higher level of serum anti-TMV IgG antibodies than non-smokers, while the serum level of anti-TMV IgA from smokeless tobacco users was lower than smokers and non-smokers. Using bioinformatics, we also found that the human protein TOMM40L (an outer mitochondrial membrane 40 homolog – like translocase) contains a strong homology of six contiguous amino acids to the TMV coat protein, and TOMM40L peptide exhibited cross-reactivity with anti-TMV antibodies. People who smoke cigarettes or other tobacco products experience a lower risk of developing Parkinson’s disease, but the mechanism by which this occurs is unclear. Our results showing molecular mimicry between TMV and human TOMM40L raise the question as to whether TMV has a potential role in smokers against Parkinson’s disease development. The potential mechanisms of molecular mimicry between plant viruses and human disease should be further explored. PMID:23573274

  14. Monoclonal antibody evidence for structural similarities between the central rod regions of actinin and dystrophin.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, T M; Ellis, J M; Ginjaar, I B; van Paassen, M M; van Ommen, G J; Moorman, A F; Cartwright, A J; Morris, G E

    1990-10-15

    A monoclonal antibody, MANDYS141, binds to both dystrophin and actinin on Western blots (SDS-denatured), but only to actinin in frozen sections of human muscle (native conformation). It differs from a polyclonal cross-reacting antiserum in that it binds to several muscle isoforms of actinin (smooth, fast and slow) from man, mouse and chicken and recognises a quite different part of the proposed triple-helical region of dystrophin (amino acids 1750-2248). The results suggest that structural homologies between actinin and dystrophin occur more than once in their central helical regions and provide experimental support for an actinin-like central rod model for dystrophin. PMID:1699800

  15. Serological evidence of antibodies to Neospora caninum in stray and owned Grenadian dogs.

    PubMed

    Sharma, R; Kimmitt, T; Tiwari, K; Chikweto, A; Thomas, D; Lanza Perea, M; Bhaiyat, M I

    2015-06-01

    Neospora caninum causes abortion in cattle and neuromuscular disease in dogs, world wide. Cattle become infected by ingesting oocysts voided by dogs. The aim of this study was to estimate the seroprevalence of Neospora caninum in two populations of dogs (stray and owned) in Grenada, West Indies. Sera were collected from 625 dogs from all parishes in Grenada. Three hundred and sixty eight dogs were stray, while 257 dogs were owned. Sera were tested for the presence of antibodies against N. caninum using an indirect enzyme linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA) IDvet, France. Antibodies to N. caninum were found in 6 (1.6%) (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.32% to 2.88%) of the stray dogs and in 3 (1.2%, 95% CI: 0.13% to 2.53%) of the owned dogs. Seroprevalence did not differ significantly between the two populations (p=0.74) and between the males and females (p=1). These results suggest that the prevalence of N. caninum infection in dogs in Grenada is low. PMID:26691257

  16. Ara h 1 protein-antibody dissociation study: evidence for binding inhomogeneities on a molecular scale.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Ruiz, E; Spasic, D; Gils, A; van IJzendoorn, L J; Prins, M W J; Lammertyn, J

    2015-09-25

    The characterization of biomolecular interactions is essential when designing novel biosensors, since the interaction between the bioreceptor and the ligand determines important biosensing parameters such as sensitivity and selectivity. In this paper we study the interaction of the trimeric Ara h 1 protein with a monoclonal anti-Ara h 1 antibody by means of magnetic force-induced dissociation. The proteins were bound to magnetic particles and polystyrene surfaces by EDC/NHS reaction chemistry and by physisorption, respectively. Two different molecular configurations have been investigated, with either the Ara h 1 protein on the particles or the Ara h 1 protein on the polystyrene surface. A model with a Gaussian distribution of energy barriers for dissociation gives an adequate description for the measured multi-exponential decays. We hypothesize that distributions of molecular orientations as well as experimentally induced variations may underlay the observed distributions. The two molecular configurations show a different peak value of the energy distribution. Similarly, SPR experiments for two distinct configurations (either Ara h 1 protein on the surface, or anti-Ara h 1 antibody on the surface) also show clear differences in dissociation behavior. We hypothesize that the multivalency of the involved molecules leads to different modes of binding. The results of this work highlight the importance of molecular inhomogeneities when studying the interaction processes of biomolecular complexes. PMID:25686720

  17. Positive hepatitis B virus core antibody in HIV infection--false positive or evidence of previous infection?

    PubMed

    Pallawela, S N S; Sonnex, C; Mabayoje, D; Bloch, E; Chaytor, S; Johnson, M A; Carne, C; Webster, D P

    2015-02-01

    Isolated HBV core antibody (anti-HBc) is defined as the presence of anti-HBc with a negative HBV surface antigen (HBsAg) and HBV surface antibody (anti-HBs <10 IU/l). In patients infected with HIV with isolated anti-HBc, the aim was to determine: The prevalence of isolated positive anti-HBc; The most effective method of identifying which patients have had previous Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) infection; The prevalence of false positive anti-HBc. HBV serology results were identified from 539 patients infected with HIV sampled between January 2010 and December 2012. In those with an isolated anti-HBc and negative anti-HBe, a second anti-HBc test was carried out using a different assay. Samples were also screened for HBV DNA. The anti-retroviral regimens at time of screening were documented. 101/539 had an isolated anti-HBc. Of these, 32 (32%) had a positive anti-HBe (including 1 equivocal) and 69(68%) were anti-HBe negative. Of those negative for anti-HBe, 32 were tested for both DNA and a second anti-HBc. Of these 26 (81%) were on cART at time of HBV testing, with 25 (78%) on ART with anti-HBV activity. The prevalence of isolated anti-HBc was 19%. Only 32% were also anti-HBe positive, whereas 97% of those anti-HBe negative were positive on a second anti-HBc assay suggesting lack of utility of anti-HBe in resolving serological quandaries. One subject (3%) had a false positive anti-HBc. There was no evidence of chronic HBV but 78% patients were on HBV-suppressive combination anti-retroviral therapy. PMID:25174739

  18. Epitope mapping by a Wnt-blocking antibody: evidence of the Wnt binding domain in heparan sulfate.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wei; Xu, Yongmei; Liu, Jian; Ho, Mitchell

    2016-01-01

    Heparan sulfate (HS) is a polysaccharide known to modulate many important biological processes, including Wnt signaling. However, the biochemical interaction between HS and Wnt molecules is not well characterized largely due to the lack of suitable methods. To determine the Wnt binding domain in HS, we used a Wnt signaling-inhibitory antibody (HS20) and a panel of synthetic HS oligosaccharides with distinct lengths and sulfation modifications. We found that the binding of HS20 to heparan sulfate required sulfation at both the C2 position (2-O-sulfation) and C6 position (6-O-sulfation). The oligosaccharides with the greatest competitive effect for HS20 binding were between six and eight saccharide residues in length. Additionally, a four residue-long oligosaccharide could also be recognized by HS20 if an additional 3-O-sulfation modification was present. Furthermore, similar oligosaccharides with 2-O, 6-O and 3-O-sulfations showed inhibition for Wnt activation. These results have revealed that HS20 and Wnt recognize a HS structure containing IdoA2S and GlcNS6S, and that the 3-O-sulfation in GlcNS6S3S significantly enhances the binding of both HS20 and Wnt. This study provides the evidence for identifying the Wnt binding domain in HS and suggests a therapeutic approach to target the interaction of Wnt and HS in cancer and other diseases. PMID:27185050

  19. Epitope mapping by a Wnt-blocking antibody: evidence of the Wnt binding domain in heparan sulfate

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Wei; Xu, Yongmei; Liu, Jian; Ho, Mitchell

    2016-01-01

    Heparan sulfate (HS) is a polysaccharide known to modulate many important biological processes, including Wnt signaling. However, the biochemical interaction between HS and Wnt molecules is not well characterized largely due to the lack of suitable methods. To determine the Wnt binding domain in HS, we used a Wnt signaling-inhibitory antibody (HS20) and a panel of synthetic HS oligosaccharides with distinct lengths and sulfation modifications. We found that the binding of HS20 to heparan sulfate required sulfation at both the C2 position (2-O-sulfation) and C6 position (6-O-sulfation). The oligosaccharides with the greatest competitive effect for HS20 binding were between six and eight saccharide residues in length. Additionally, a four residue-long oligosaccharide could also be recognized by HS20 if an additional 3-O-sulfation modification was present. Furthermore, similar oligosaccharides with 2-O, 6-O and 3-O-sulfations showed inhibition for Wnt activation. These results have revealed that HS20 and Wnt recognize a HS structure containing IdoA2S and GlcNS6S, and that the 3-O-sulfation in GlcNS6S3S significantly enhances the binding of both HS20 and Wnt. This study provides the evidence for identifying the Wnt binding domain in HS and suggests a therapeutic approach to target the interaction of Wnt and HS in cancer and other diseases. PMID:27185050

  20. Selection of cell lines resistant to anti-transferrin receptor antibody: evidence for a mutation in transferrin receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Lesley, J F; Schulte, R J

    1984-01-01

    Some anti-murine transferrin receptor monoclonal antibodies block iron uptake in mouse cell lines and inhibit cell growth. We report here the selection and characterization of mutant murine lymphoma cell lines which escape this growth inhibition by anti-transferrin receptor antibody. Growth assays and immunoprecipitation of transferrin receptor in hybrids between independently derived mutants or between mutants and antibody-susceptible parental cell lines indicate that all of the selected lines have a similar genetic alteration that is codominantly expressed in hybrids. Anti-transferrin receptor antibodies and transferrin itself still bind to the mutant lines with saturating levels and Kd values very similar to those of the parental lines. However, reciprocal clearing experiments by immunoprecipitation and reciprocal blocking of binding to the cell surface with two anti-transferrin receptor antibodies indicate that the mutant lines have altered a fraction of their transferrin receptors such that the growth-inhibiting antibody no longer binds, whereas another portion of their transferrin receptors is similar to those of the parental lines and binds both antibodies. These results argue that the antibody-selected mutant cell lines are heterozygous in transferrin receptor expression, probably with a mutation in one of the transferrin receptor structural genes. Images PMID:6092931

  1. Markers of Endothelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition: Evidence for Antibody-Endothelium Interaction during Antibody-Mediated Rejection in Kidney Recipients.

    PubMed

    Xu-Dubois, Yi-Chun; Peltier, Julie; Brocheriou, Isabelle; Suberbielle-Boissel, Caroline; Djamali, Arjang; Reese, Shannon; Mooney, Nuala; Keuylian, Zela; Lion, Julien; Ouali, Nacéra; Levy, Pierre P; Jouanneau, Chantal; Rondeau, Eric; Hertig, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR) is a leading cause of allograft loss. Treatment efficacy depends on accurate diagnosis at an early stage. However, sensitive and reliable markers of antibody-endothelium interaction during ABMR are not available for routine use. Using immunohistochemistry, we retrospectively studied the diagnostic value of three markers of endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EndMT), fascin1, vimentin, and heat shock protein 47, for ABMR in 53 renal transplant biopsy specimens, including 20 ABMR specimens, 24 cell-mediated rejection specimens, and nine normal grafts. We validated our results in an independent set of 74 unselected biopsy specimens. Endothelial cells of the peritubular capillaries in grafts with ABMR expressed fascin1, vimentin, and heat shock protein 47 strongly, whereas those from normal renal grafts did not. The level of EndMT marker expression was significantly associated with current ABMR criteria, including capillaritis, glomerulitis, peritubular capillary C4d deposition, and donor-specific antibodies. These markers allowed us to identify C4d-negative ABMR and to predict late occurrence of disease. EndMT markers were more specific than capillaritis for the diagnosis and prognosis of ABMR and predicted late (up to 4 years after biopsy) renal graft dysfunction and proteinuria. In the independent set of 74 renal graft biopsy specimens, the EndMT markers for the diagnosis of ABMR had a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 85%. Fascin1 expression in peritubular capillaries was also induced in a rat model of ABMR. In conclusion, EndMT markers are a sensitive and reliable diagnostic tool for detecting endothelial activation during ABMR and predicting late loss of allograft function. PMID:25995444

  2. Human monoclonal antiphospholipid antibodies disrupt the annexin A5 anticoagulant crystal shield on phospholipid bilayers: evidence from atomic force microscopy and functional assay.

    PubMed

    Rand, Jacob H; Wu, Xiao-Xuan; Quinn, Anthony S; Chen, Pojen P; McCrae, Keith R; Bovill, Edwin G; Taatjes, Douglas J

    2003-09-01

    The antiphospholipid (aPL) syndrome is an autoimmune condition that is marked by recurrent pregnancy losses and/or systemic vascular thrombosis in patients who have antibodies against phospholipid/co-factor complexes. The mechanism(s) for pregnancy losses and thrombosis in this condition is (are) not known. Annexin A5 is a potent anticoagulant protein, expressed by placental trophoblasts and endothelial cells, that crystallizes over anionic phospholipids, shielding them from availability for coagulation reactions. We previously presented data supporting the hypothesis that aPL antibody-mediated disruption of the anticoagulant annexin A5 shield could be a thrombogenic mechanism in the aPL syndrome. However, this has remained a subject of controversy. We therefore used atomic force microscopy, a method previously used to study the crystallization of annexin A5, to image the effects of monoclonal human aPL antibodies on the crystal structure of the protein over phospholipid bilayers. In the presence of the aPL monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and beta(2)-GPI, the major aPL co-factor, structures presumed to be aPL mAb-antigen complexes were associated with varying degrees of disruption to the annexin A5 crystallization pattern over the bilayer. In addition, measurements of prothrombinase activity on the phospholipid bilayers showed that the aPL mAbs reduced the anti-coagulant effect of annexin A5 and promoted thrombin generation. These data provide morphological evidence that support the hypothesis that aPL antibodies can disrupt annexin A5 binding to phospholipid membranes and permit increased generation of thrombin. The aPL antibody-mediated disruption of the annexin A5 anticoagulant shield may be an important prothrombotic mechanism in the aPL syndrome. PMID:12937161

  3. Humanization of predicted T-cell epitopes reduces the immunogenicity of chimeric antibodies: new evidence supporting a simple method.

    PubMed

    Roque-Navarro, Lourdes; Mateo, Cristina; Lombardero, Josefa; Mustelier, Geraudis; Fernández, Alicia; Sosa, Katya; Morrison, Sherrie L; Pérez, Rolando

    2003-08-01

    Genetic engineering has provided several approaches to reduce immunogenicity of murine antibodies. We described previously a new method based on the humanization of the linear epitopes presented to T cells. In brief, potential immunogenic epitopes in the variable region were identified and subjected to point mutations to make them human and/or to modify amphipatic motifs. The resulting recombinant antibody retained its antigen binding affinity and was less immunogenic in monkeys than their murine or chimeric predecessors are. The present study provides two new examples of this T-cell epitope humanization approach: ior-t1A murine monoclonal antibody (mMAb), which recognizes the human-CD6 molecule, and ior-C5 mMAb, which recognizes a novel glycoprotein expressed on the surface of malignant colorectal cells. Seven amino acids were substituted in ior-C5 and eleven residues in ior-t1A, by the corresponding residues from the highest homologous human sequences. Surprisingly, the homology between re-shaped chimeric antibody variable region frameworks and human sequences was 80-90%. Experiments in monkeys showed that T1AhT and C5hT "detopes" antibodies were less immunogenic than their chimeric analogues while they retained 30-50% of antigen binding affinities. The proposed method might be of general applicability to reduce immunogenicity of chimeric antibodies with therapeutic potential. PMID:14511570

  4. Evidence that Equine Rhinitis A Virus VP1 Is a Target of Neutralizing Antibodies and Participates Directly in Receptor Binding

    PubMed Central

    Warner, Simone; Hartley, Carol A.; Stevenson, Rachel A.; Ficorilli, Nino; Varrasso, Annalisa; Studdert, Michael J.; Crabb, Brendan S.

    2001-01-01

    Equine rhinitis A virus (ERAV) is a respiratory pathogen of horses and is classified as an Aphthovirus, the only non-Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) member of this genus. In FMDV, virion protein 1 (VP1) is a major target of protective antibodies and is responsible for viral attachment to permissive cells via an RGD motif located in a distal surface loop. Although both viruses share considerable sequence identity, ERAV VP1 does not contain an RGD motif. To investigate antibody and receptor-binding properties of ERAV VP1, we have expressed full-length ERAV VP1 in Escherichia coli as a glutathione S-transferase (GST) fusion protein (GST-VP1). GST-VP1 reacted specifically with antibodies present in serum from a rabbit immunized with purified ERAV virions and also in convalescent-phase sera from horses experimentally infected with ERAV. An antiserum raised in rabbits to GST-VP1 reacted strongly with viral VP1 and effectively neutralized ERAV infection in vitro. Using a flow cytometry-based binding assay, we found that GST-VP1, but not other GST fusion proteins, bound to cell surface receptors. This binding was reduced in a dose-dependent manner by the addition of purified ERAV virions, demonstrating the specificity of this interaction. A separate cell-binding assay also implicated GST-VP1 in receptor binding. Importantly, anti-GST-VP1 antibodies inhibited the binding of ERAV virions to Vero cells, suggesting that these antibodies exert their neutralizing effect by blocking viral attachment. Thus ERAV VP1, like its counterpart in FMDV, appears to be both a target of protective antibodies and involved directly in receptor binding. This study reveals the potential of recombinant VP1 molecules to serve as vaccines and diagnostic reagents for the control of ERAV infections. PMID:11533189

  5. Direct evidence for role of anti-saliva antibodies against salivary gland homogenate of P. argentipes in modulation of protective Th1-immune response against Leishmania donovani.

    PubMed

    Pushpanjali; Thakur, Ajit K; Purkait, Bidyut; Jamal, Fauzia; Singh, Manish K; Ahmed, Ghufran; Bimal, Sanjiva; Kumar, Vijay; Singh, Subhankar K; Keshri, Srikant; Das, Pradeep; Narayan, Shyam

    2016-10-01

    Currently the main concerns regarding control of visceral leishmaniasis (VL) caused by L. donovani are immunosuppression, relating toxicity of anti-leishmanial drug and little development in appropriate vaccine and vector (P. argentipes) control. Reports available from ex-vivo studies reflect significance of vector salivary gland homogenate (SGH) in reverting immunosuppression of infected VL subjects and as such the immunogenic nature of SGH can be a strategy to modulate immune system and anti-leishmanial function to enable immune response to control the disease. Several related studies also identified a better utility of vector anti-saliva antibodies in achieving such effects by an adoptive transfer approach instead of direct stimulation with SGH protein. However, conclusive evidences on VL cases are far beyond satisfactory to suggest role of SGH into modulation of host immune response in VL subjects in India. This study was under taken to make comparison on change in cytokines (TH1 and TH2) response pattern and anti-leishmanial macrophage (Mϕ) function following stimulation of their PBMCS with SGH protein derived from P. argentipes sand fly vector for VL or anti SGH antibodies raised in rabbit. This study reports for the first time that L. donovani sensitized healthy subject demonstrates an up-regulated Interferon-γ (TH1) and down regulate Interleukin-10 (TH2) production following stimulation of their PBMCs by P. argentipes anti-saliva antibodies accompanied with an improvement in anti-leishmanial Mϕ function for nitric oxide (NO) production. Subsequent experiments suggest that P. argentipes based anti-SGH antibodies when used to stimulate LD infected PBMCs in healthy subjects resulted in better clearance of Leishmania amastigotes load compare to SGH protein. Possibly the immunogenic components of anti-saliva an antibody maintains the level of protective cytokine (INF-γ) and seems to restrict the infection by host protection by vector saliva. PMID:27484246

  6. First molecular and biochemical analysis of in vivo affinity maturation in an ectothermic vertebrate

    PubMed Central

    Dooley, Helen; Stanfield, Robyn L.; Brady, Rebecca A.; Flajnik, Martin F.

    2006-01-01

    The cartilaginous fish are the oldest phylogenetic group in which Igs have been found. Sharks produce a unique Ig isotype, IgNAR, a heavy-chain homodimer that does not associate with light chains. Instead, the variable (V) regions of IgNAR bind antigen as soluble single domains. Our group has shown that IgNAR plays an integral part in the humoral response of nurse sharks (Ginglymostoma cirratum) upon antigen challenge. Here, we generated phage-displayed libraries of IgNAR V regions from an immunized animal and found a family of clones derived from the same rearrangement event but differentially mutated during expansion. Because of the cluster organization of shark Ig genes and the paucicopy nature of IgNAR, we were able to construct the putative ancestor of this family. By studying mutations in the context of clone affinities, we found evidence that affinity maturation occurs for this isotype. Subsequently, we were able to identify mutations important in the affinity improvement of this family. Because the family clones were all obtained after immunization, they provide insight into the in vivo maturation mechanisms, in general, and for single-domain antibody fragments. PMID:16446445

  7. Aggregation of Antibody Drug Conjugates at Room Temperature: SAXS and Light Scattering Evidence for Colloidal Instability of a Specific Subpopulation.

    PubMed

    Frka-Petesic, B; Zanchi, D; Martin, N; Carayon, S; Huille, S; Tribet, C

    2016-05-17

    Coupling a hydrophobic drug onto monoclonal antibodies via lysine residues is a common route to prepare antibody-drug conjugates (ADC), a promising class of biotherapeutics. But a few chemical modifications on protein surface often increase aggregation propensity, without a clear understanding of the aggregation mechanisms at stake (loss of colloidal stability, self-assemblies, denaturation, etc.), and the statistical nature of conjugation introduces polydispersity in the ADC population, which raises questions on whether the whole ADC population becomes unstable. To characterize the average interactions between ADC, we monitored small-angle X-ray scattering in solutions of monoclonal IgG1 human antibody drug conjugate, with average degree of conjugation of 0, 2, or 3 drug molecules per protein. To characterize stability, we studied the kinetics of aggregation at room temperature. The intrinsic Fuchs stability ratio of the ADC was estimated from the variation over time of scattered light intensity and hydrodynamic radius, in buffers of varying pH, and at diverse sucrose (0% or 10%) and NaCl (0 or 100 mM) concentrations. We show that stable ADC stock solutions became unstable upon pH shift, well below the pH of maximum average attraction between IgGs. Data indicate that aggregation can be ascribed to a fraction of ADC population usually representing less than 30 mol % of the sample. In contrast to the case of (monodisperse) monoclonal antibodies, our results suggest that a poor correlation between stability and average interaction parameters should be expected as a corollary of dispersity of ADC conjugation. In practice, the most unstable fraction of the ADC population can be removed by filtration, which affects remarkably the apparent stability of the samples. Finally, the lack of correlation between the kinetic stability and variations of the average inter-ADC interactions is tentatively attributed to the uneven nature of charge distributions and the presence of

  8. Serological Evidence of MERS-CoV Antibodies in Dromedary Camels (Camelus dromedaries) in Laikipia County, Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Deem, Sharon L.; Fèvre, Eric M.; Kinnaird, Margaret; Browne, A. Springer; Muloi, Dishon; Godeke, Gert-Jan; Koopmans, Marion; Reusken, Chantal B.

    2015-01-01

    Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) is a recently identified virus causing severe viral respiratory illness in people. Little is known about the reservoir in the Horn of Africa. In Kenya, where no human MERS cases have been reported, our survey of 335 dromedary camels, representing nine herds in Laikipia County, showed a high seroprevalence (46.9%) to MERS-CoV antibodies. Between herd differences were present (14.3%– 82.9%), but was not related to management type or herd isolation. Further research should focus on identifying similarity between MERS-CoV viral isolates in Kenya and clinical isolates from the Middle East and elsewhere. PMID:26473733

  9. Immunoreactivity of anti-streptococcal monoclonal antibodies to human heart valves. Evidence for multiple cross-reactive epitopes.

    PubMed Central

    Gulizia, J. M.; Cunningham, M. W.; McManus, B. M.

    1991-01-01

    Association of group A streptococci with acute rheumatic fever and valvular heart disease is well established; however the basis of valve injury remains unclear. In this study, anti-streptococcal monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) cross-reactive with myocardium were reacted with sections from 22 rheumatic valves, nine normal, five endocarditic, one 'floppy,' and one Marfan valve. In immunohistochemical studies, MAb reactivity was observed with cardiac myocytes, smooth muscle cells, cell surface and cytoplasm of endothelial cells lining valves, and valvular interstitial cells. Endothelial basement membrane and elastin fibrils reacted with the MAbs, whereas collagen was unreactive. Similar reactivity was seen with sera from acute rheumatic fever patients. The anti-streptococcal MAbs reacted with intravalvular myosin and vimentin in Western blots, and purified elastin competitively inhibited the binding of the anti-streptococcal MAbs to whole group A streptococci. The data show that human heart valves have numerous sites of immunoreactivity with anti-streptococcal MAbs and acute rheumatic fever sera of potential importance in the pathogenesis of rheumatic valvular injury. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 PMID:1704188

  10. Conservation of arthropod midline netrin accumulation revealed with a cross-reactive antibody provides evidence for midline cell homology

    PubMed Central

    Simanton, Wendy; Clark, Stephanie; Clemons, Anthony; Jacowski, Caitlin; Farrell-VanZomeren, Adrienne; Beach, Paul; Browne, William E.; Duman-Scheel, Molly

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Although many similarities in arthropod CNS development exist, differences in axonogenesis and the formation of midline cells, which regulate axon growth, have been observed. For example, axon growth patterns in the ventral nerve cord of Artemia franciscana differ from that of Drosophila melanogaster. Despite such differences, conserved molecular marker expression at the midline of several arthropod species indicates that midline cells may be homologous in distantly related arthropods. However, data from additional species are needed to test this hypothesis. In this investigation, nerve cord formation and the putative homology of midline cells were examined in distantly related arthropods, including: long- and short-germ insects (D. melanogaster, Aedes aeygypti, and Tribolium castaneum), branchiopod crustaceans (A. franciscana and Triops longicauditus), and malacostracan crustaceans (Porcellio laevis and Parhyale hawaiensis). These comparative analyses were aided by a cross-reactive antibody generated against the Netrin (Net) protein, a midline cell marker and regulator of axonogenesis. The mechanism of nerve cord formation observed in Artemia is found in Triops, another branchiopod, but is not found in the other arthropods examined. Despite divergent mechanisms of midline cell formation and nerve cord development, Net accumulation is detected in a well-conserved subset of midline cells in branchiopod crustaceans, malacostracan crustaceans, and insects. Notably, the Net accumulation pattern is also conserved at the midline of the amphipod P. hawaiensis, which undergoes split germ-band development. Conserved Net accumulation patterns indicate that arthropod midline cells are homologous, and that Nets function to regulate commissure formation during CNS development of Tetraconata. PMID:19469853

  11. Human B cell activation. Evidence for diverse signals provided by various monoclonal anti-IgM antibodies

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    Seven murine monoclonal antibodies (mAb) with different binding characteristics for human IgM varied markedly in their ability to induce proliferation of T cell-depleted human splenocytes. Two mAb (HB57 and 5D7) that bound to distinct epitopes on IgM were highly effective initiators of B cell proliferation at very low concentrations, in the presence of a T cell factor source. In the absence of T cell supernatant, both HB57 and 5D7 mAbs produced a markedly reduced degree of stimulation at all concentrations. Two additional anti-IgM mAb (VIIIE11 and Mu53) were distinctive in that, even at high concentrations, only limited proliferation was observed compared with the first group of mAb. This proliferation depended on the presence of T cell supernatant. Competitive-binding studies revealed that the epitope recognized by mAb Mu53 may be identical or very proximate to that recognized by HB57. Three other mAb (1G6, XG9, and P24) induced little or no proliferation. 1G6 bound to a unique epitope on the IgM molecule, whereas XG9 shared a determinant with VIIIE11 mAb. Regulatory influences of Fc receptor binding cannot account for all the diversity in proliferation observed with the individual anti-IgM mAb. Markedly augmented proliferation was obtained when B cells were cultured with certain combinations of anti-IgM mAb in the presence of exogenous T cell supernatant. The proliferation induced in the absence of T cell supernatant by high concentrations of mAb mixtures that included 1G6 approached that observed for the same mixtures in the presence of T cell supernatant. The data suggest that certain signals delivered through membrane IgM can bypass the need for T cell supernatant in the activation of human B lymphocytes. PMID:2413155

  12. Immunoglobulin G subclasses of fluorescent anti-Treponema pallidum antibodies: evidence for sequential development of specific anti-T. pallidum immunoglobulin G responses in patients with early syphilis.

    PubMed Central

    van der Sluis, J J; van Reede, E C; Boer, M

    1986-01-01

    The development of immunoglobulin G (IgG) subclass-specific anti-Treponema pallidum antibodies during the course of syphilis in humans was studied with sera from 50 untreated male patients. The patients were divided into five diagnosis groups. In the fluorescent treponemal antibody test, which delineates the presence of cross-reacting antibodies, as well as specific antitreponema antibodies, IgG1, IgG2, and IgG3 subclass antibodies were already present during the seronegative primary stage. Specific antibodies, which were detected by the fluorescent treponemal antibody absorption test, were first present during the serotype-variable primary stage. These antibodies were almost exclusively of the IgG1 and IgG3 subclasses. In later stages, antibodies of other subclasses were detectable. Titration of IgG1 antitreponema antibodies in three electrophoretically different IgG fractions revealed an asymmetric distribution in these fractions during primary syphilis. The antibodies were largely confined to the most basic fraction during primary syphilis. A sudden change in the distribution was noted between the end of the primary stage and the secondary stage; an even distribution of IgG1 antitreponema antibodies existed in the late latent stage. These findings confirm and extend previous results from our laboratory. The development of antibodies detected by both tests is discussed in terms of a sequential stimulation of the immune system due to the presence of an extracellular layer covering the treponemas or, alternatively, in terms of a suppression of the immune response during early syphilis. PMID:3531229

  13. Monoclonal Antibodies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Killington, R. A.; Powell, K. L.

    1984-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies have provided an exciting addition to the "armory" of the molecular biologist and immunologist. This article discusses briefly the concept of, techniques available for, production of, and possible uses of monoclonal antibodies. (Author)

  14. Antimitochondrial antibody

    MedlinePlus

    ... antibodies (AMA) are substances ( antibodies ) that form against mitochondria. The mitochondria are an important part of cells. They are ... often, in people with other kinds of liver disease and some autoimmune diseases. Risks Risks for having ...

  15. Monoclonal Antibodies for Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Weiner, Louis M.; Dhodapkar, Madhav V.; Ferrone, Soldano

    2008-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies have emerged as effective therapeutic agents for many human malignancies. However, the ability of antibodies to initiate tumor antigen-specific immune responses has not received as much attention as other mechanisms of antibody action. Here we describe the rationale and evidence for developing anti-cancer antibodies that can stimulate host tumor antigen-specific immune responses. This may be accomplished by inducing antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity, by promoting antibody-targeted cross-presentation of tumor antigens or by triggering the idiotypic network. Future treatment modifications or combinations should be able to prolong, amplify and shape these immune responses to increase the clinical benefits of antibody therapy of human cancer. PMID:19304016

  16. Interleukin 6 dependence of anti-DNA antibody production: evidence for two pathways of autoantibody formation in pristane-induced lupus.

    PubMed

    Richards, H B; Satoh, M; Shaw, M; Libert, C; Poli, V; Reeves, W H

    1998-09-01

    Pristane induces a lupus-like syndrome in nonautoimmune mice characterized by the development of glomerulonephritis and lupus-associated autoantibodies. This is accompanied by overproduction of interleukin (IL)-6, a cytokine linked with autoimmune phenomena. The goal of this study was to evaluate the role of IL-6 in autoantibody production in pristane-induced lupus. BALB/cAn IL-6-deficient (-/-) and -intact (+/+) mice were treated with pristane or phosphate-buffered saline, and autoantibody production was evaluated. Pristane induced high levels of immunoglobulin (Ig)G anti-single-stranded DNA, -double-stranded (ds)DNA, and -chromatin antibodies in IL-6(+/+), but not IL-6(-/-) mice by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. High titer IgG anti-dsDNA antibodies also were detected in sera from +/+, but not -/-, mice by Crithidia luciliae kinetoplast staining. The onset of IgG anti-dsDNA antibody production in +/+ mice occurred >5 mo after pristane treatment, well after the onset of nephritis, suggesting that these antibodies are not directly responsible for inducing renal disease. In contrast to anti-DNA, the frequencies of anti-nRNP/Sm and anti-Su antibodies were similar in pristane-treated IL-6(-/-) and IL-6(+/+) mice. However, levels were higher in the +/+ group. These results suggest that IgG anti-DNA and chromatin antibodies in pristane-treated mice are strictly IL-6 dependent, whereas induction of anti-nRNP/Sm and Su autoantibodies is IL-6 independent. The IL-6 dependence of anti-DNA, but not anti-nRNP/Sm, may have implications for understanding the patterns of autoantibody production in lupus. Anti-DNA antibodies are produced transiently, mainly during periods of disease activity, whereas anti-nRNP/Sm antibody levels are relatively insensitive to disease activity. This may reflect the differential IL-6 dependence of the two responses. PMID:9730900

  17. Antithyroid microsomal antibody

    MedlinePlus

    Thyroid antimicrosomal antibody; Antimicrosomal antibody; Microsomal antibody; Thyroid peroxidase antibody; TPOAb ... test is done to confirm the cause of thyroid problems, including Hashimoto thyroiditis . The test is also ...

  18. Direct evidence that decreased serum opsonization of Streptococcus pneumoniae via the alternative complement pathway in sickle cell disease is related to antibody deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Bjornson, A B; Lobel, J S

    1987-01-01

    Two approaches were used to demonstrate that reduction in serum opsonization of Streptococcus pneumoniae via the alternative complement pathway in children with sickle cell disease is related to a deficiency of antibodies to pneumococcal capsular polysaccharide. First, opsonization of S. pneumoniae mediated by the alternative pathway in patients' sera was restored to normal by addition of the purified IgG or IgM fraction of goat antiserum to capsular polysaccharide of the homologous serotype. Secondly, IgG antibody titers to capsular polysaccharide in patients' sera correlated significantly with alternative pathway-mediated opsonization; the correlation between titers of IgM anticapsular antibodies and opsonization approached statistical significance. The sum of the IgG and IgM anticapsular antibody titers correlated most significantly with opsonization. Our results suggest that reduction in alternative pathway-mediated opsonization in sera from children with sickle cell disease is related to low levels of both IgG and IgM anticapsular antibodies. Images PMID:3805275

  19. Direct evidence that decreased serum opsonization of Streptococcus pneumoniae via the alternative complement pathway in sickle cell disease is related to antibody deficiency.

    PubMed

    Bjornson, A B; Lobel, J S

    1987-02-01

    Two approaches were used to demonstrate that reduction in serum opsonization of Streptococcus pneumoniae via the alternative complement pathway in children with sickle cell disease is related to a deficiency of antibodies to pneumococcal capsular polysaccharide. First, opsonization of S. pneumoniae mediated by the alternative pathway in patients' sera was restored to normal by addition of the purified IgG or IgM fraction of goat antiserum to capsular polysaccharide of the homologous serotype. Secondly, IgG antibody titers to capsular polysaccharide in patients' sera correlated significantly with alternative pathway-mediated opsonization; the correlation between titers of IgM anticapsular antibodies and opsonization approached statistical significance. The sum of the IgG and IgM anticapsular antibody titers correlated most significantly with opsonization. Our results suggest that reduction in alternative pathway-mediated opsonization in sera from children with sickle cell disease is related to low levels of both IgG and IgM anticapsular antibodies. PMID:3805275

  20. Antithyroglobulin antibody

    MedlinePlus

    ... may be due to: Graves disease Hashimoto thyroiditis Hypothyroidism Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) Thyrotoxicosis Type 1 diabetes ... Antibody Chronic thyroiditis (Hashimoto disease) Graves disease Hyperthyroidism Hypothyroidism Systemic lupus erythematosus T3 test Update Date 5/ ...

  1. Evidence of a pro-apoptotic effect of specific antibodies in a bovine macrophage model of infection with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Jolly, Ana; Lompardía, Silvina; Hajos, Silvia E; Mundo, Silvia L

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) is the causative agent of Johne's disease (JD), a chronic granulomatous enteritis in ruminants. Understanding the protective immune response following infection is crucial to improve the diagnosis and the development of vaccines against this disease. The goal of this work was to assess whether specific antibodies were able to modulate the macrophage response to MAP infection by evaluating apoptosis and TNF-α secretion in an in vitro model. Sera from healthy (n=2), MAP-infected (n=3) and lipoarabinomannan (LAM)-immunized (n=3) bovines were evaluated. LAM was chosen as immunogen due to its relevant role in mycobacterial pathogenesis. We demonstrated by two different techniques (Acridine Orange/Ethidium Bromide microscopy and Annexin V/7-Amino-Actinomycin D flow cytometry) that the immune sera from both, MAP-infected and LAM-immunized bovines, significantly increased macrophage apoptosis in infected cultures. Comparable levels of apoptosis were detected when MAP was pre-incubated with purified specific antibodies instead of whole serum. Furthermore, this effect was accompanied by a significantly higher secretion of TNF-α. These results strongly suggest that specific antibodies could limit the impact of MAP on the apoptosis of bovine cells. This work would contribute to elucidate the role of the specific antibody response in bovine JD and its prevention. PMID:26827838

  2. Natural antibody - Biochemistry and functions.

    PubMed

    Rahyab, Ali Seyar; Alam, Amit; Kapoor, Aricka; Zhang, Ming

    2011-01-01

    Natural antibodies have been common knowledge in the scientific community for more than half a century. Initially disregarded, their functions have garnered a newfound interest recently. Natural antibodies are usually polyreactive IgM antibodies and are implicated in numerous physiologic and pathologic processes. Current research demonstrates they play a role in adaptive and innate immune responses, autoimmunity, and apoptosis. Evidence exists that they are involved in the modulation of neurodegenerative disorders and malignancy. Furthermore, natural antibodies have been implicated in ischemia reperfusion injury and atherosclerosis. As such the study of natural antibodies may provide new insight into normal physiologic processes whilst concurrently paving the road for a wide-range of possible therapeutic options. PMID:25309852

  3. Bispecific antibodies.

    PubMed

    Kontermann, Roland E; Brinkmann, Ulrich

    2015-07-01

    Bispecific antibodies (bsAbs) combine specificities of two antibodies and simultaneously address different antigens or epitopes. BsAbs with 'two-target' functionality can interfere with multiple surface receptors or ligands associated, for example with cancer, proliferation or inflammatory processes. BsAbs can also place targets into close proximity, either to support protein complex formation on one cell, or to trigger contacts between cells. Examples of 'forced-connection' functionalities are bsAbs that support protein complexation in the clotting cascade, or tumor-targeted immune cell recruiters and/or activators. Following years of research and development (R&D), the first bsAb was approved in 2009. Another bsAb entered the market in December 2014 and several more are in clinical trials. Here, we describe the potentials of bsAbs to become the next wave of antibody-based therapies, focusing on molecules in clinical development. PMID:25728220

  4. A Mouse Model for Conditional Secretion of Specific Single-Chain Antibodies Provides Genetic Evidence for Regulation of Cortical Plasticity by a Non-cell Autonomous Homeoprotein Transcription Factor

    PubMed Central

    Bertini, Eva; Ribot, Jérôme; Di Nardo, Ariel A.; Volovitch, Michel; Prochiantz, Alain

    2016-01-01

    During postnatal life the cerebral cortex passes through critical periods of plasticity allowing its physiological adaptation to the environment. In the visual cortex, critical period onset and closure are influenced by the non-cell autonomous activity of the Otx2 homeoprotein transcription factor, which regulates the maturation of parvalbumin-expressing inhibitory interneurons (PV cells). In adult mice, the maintenance of a non-plastic adult state requires continuous Otx2 import by PV cells. An important source of extra-cortical Otx2 is the choroid plexus, which secretes Otx2 into the cerebrospinal fluid. Otx2 secretion and internalization requires two small peptidic domains that are part of the DNA-binding domain. Thus, mutating these “transfer” sequences also modifies cell autonomous transcription, precluding this approach to obtain a cell autonomous-only mouse. Here, we develop a mouse model with inducible secretion of an anti-Otx2 single-chain antibody to trap Otx2 in the extracellular milieu. Postnatal secretion of this single-chain antibody by PV cells delays PV maturation and reduces plasticity gene expression. Induced adult expression of this single-chain antibody in cerebrospinal fluid decreases Otx2 internalization by PV cells, strongly induces plasticity gene expression and reopens physiological plasticity. We provide the first mammalian genetic evidence for a signaling mechanism involving intercellular transfer of a homeoprotein transcription factor. Our single-chain antibody mouse model is a valid strategy for extracellular neutralization that could be applied to other homeoproteins and signaling molecules within and beyond the nervous system. PMID:27171438

  5. A Mouse Model for Conditional Secretion of Specific Single-Chain Antibodies Provides Genetic Evidence for Regulation of Cortical Plasticity by a Non-cell Autonomous Homeoprotein Transcription Factor.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Clémence; Vincent, Clémentine; Testa, Damien; Bertini, Eva; Ribot, Jérôme; Di Nardo, Ariel A; Volovitch, Michel; Prochiantz, Alain

    2016-05-01

    During postnatal life the cerebral cortex passes through critical periods of plasticity allowing its physiological adaptation to the environment. In the visual cortex, critical period onset and closure are influenced by the non-cell autonomous activity of the Otx2 homeoprotein transcription factor, which regulates the maturation of parvalbumin-expressing inhibitory interneurons (PV cells). In adult mice, the maintenance of a non-plastic adult state requires continuous Otx2 import by PV cells. An important source of extra-cortical Otx2 is the choroid plexus, which secretes Otx2 into the cerebrospinal fluid. Otx2 secretion and internalization requires two small peptidic domains that are part of the DNA-binding domain. Thus, mutating these "transfer" sequences also modifies cell autonomous transcription, precluding this approach to obtain a cell autonomous-only mouse. Here, we develop a mouse model with inducible secretion of an anti-Otx2 single-chain antibody to trap Otx2 in the extracellular milieu. Postnatal secretion of this single-chain antibody by PV cells delays PV maturation and reduces plasticity gene expression. Induced adult expression of this single-chain antibody in cerebrospinal fluid decreases Otx2 internalization by PV cells, strongly induces plasticity gene expression and reopens physiological plasticity. We provide the first mammalian genetic evidence for a signaling mechanism involving intercellular transfer of a homeoprotein transcription factor. Our single-chain antibody mouse model is a valid strategy for extracellular neutralization that could be applied to other homeoproteins and signaling molecules within and beyond the nervous system. PMID:27171438

  6. Antithyroid microsomal antibody

    MedlinePlus

    ... Thyroid antimicrosomal antibody; Antimicrosomal antibody; Microsomal antibody; Thyroid peroxidase antibody; TPOAb Images Blood test References Guber HA, Faraq AF. Evaluation of endocrine function. In: McPherson RA, Pincus MR, eds. Henry's Clinical ...

  7. Antibodies to cardiac receptors.

    PubMed

    Boivin-Jahns, V; Schlipp, A; Hartmann, S; Panjwani, P; Klingel, K; Lohse, M J; Ertl, G; Jahns, R

    2012-12-01

    Inflammation of cardiac tissue is generally associated with an activation of the host's immune system. On the one hand, this activation is mandatory to protect the heart by fighting the invading microbial agents or toxins and by engaging myocardial reparation and healing processes. On the other hand, uncontrolled activation of the immune defense has the risk of an arousal of auto- or cross-reactive immune cells, which in some cases bring more harm than good. Dependent on the individual genetic predisposition, such heart-directed autoimmune reactions most likely occur as a result of myocyte apoptosis or necrosis and subsequent liberation of self-antigens previously hidden to the immune system. During the past two decades, evidence for a pathogenic relevance of autoimmunity in human heart disease has substantially increased. Conformational cardiac (auto)antibodies affecting cardiac function and, in particular, (auto)antibodies that target G protein-coupled cardiac membrane receptors are thought to play a key role in the development of heart failure. Clinical pilot studies even suggest that such antibodies negatively affect survival in heart failure patients. However, the true prevalence and clinical impact of many cardiac (auto)antibodies in human heart diseases are still unclear, as are the events triggering their formation, their titer course, and their patterns of clearance and/or persistence. The present article summarizes current knowledge in the field of cardiac receptor (auto)antibodies including recent efforts to address some of the aforementioned gaps of knowledge, thereby attempting to pave the way for novel, more specific therapeutic approaches. PMID:23183584

  8. Evidence that antibodies against recombinant SnSAG1 of Sarcocystis neurona merozoites are involved in infection and immunity in equine protozoal myeloencephalitis.

    PubMed

    Ellison, Siobhan; Witonsky, Sharon

    2009-07-01

    Sarcocystis neurona is the principal etiologic agent of equine protozoal myeloencephalitis (EPM). An immunodominant protein of S. neurona, SnSAG-1, is expressed by the majority of S. neurona merozoites isolated from spinal tissues of horses diagnosed with EPM and may be a candidate for diagnostic tests and prophylaxis for EPM. Five horses were vaccinated with adjuvanted recombinant SnSAG1 (rSnSAG1) and 5 control (sham vaccinated) horses were vaccinated with adjuvant only. Serum was evaluated pre- and post-vaccination, prior to challenge, for antibodies against rSnSAG1 and inhibitory effects on the infectivity of S. neurona by an in vitro serum neutralization assay. The effect of vaccination with rSnSAG1 on in vivo infection by S. neurona was evaluated by challenging all the horses with S. neurona merozoites. Blinded daily examinations and 4 blinded neurological examinations were used to evaluate the presence of clinical signs of EPM. The 5 vaccinated horses developed serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) titers of SnSAG1, detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), post-vaccination. Post-vaccination serum from vaccinated horses was found to have an inhibitory effect on merozoites, demonstrated by in vitro bioassay. Following the challenge, the 5 control horses displayed clinical signs of EPM, including ataxia. While 4 of the 5 vaccinated horses did not become ataxic. One rSnSAG-1 vaccinated horse showed paresis in 1 limb with muscle atrophy. All horses showed mild, transient, cranial nerve deficits; however, disease did not progress to ataxia in rSnSAG-1 vaccinated horses. The study showed that vaccination with rSnSAG-1 produced antibodies in horses that neutralized merozoites when tested by in vitro culture and significantly reduced clinical signs demonstrated by in vivo challenge. PMID:19794889

  9. Antibody Engineering and Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Almagro, Juan Carlos; Gilliland, Gary L; Breden, Felix; Scott, Jamie K; Sok, Devin; Pauthner, Matthias; Reichert, Janice M; Helguera, Gustavo; Andrabi, Raiees; Mabry, Robert; Bléry, Mathieu; Voss, James E; Laurén, Juha; Abuqayyas, Lubna; Barghorn, Stefan; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Crowe, James E; Huston, James S; Johnston, Stephen Albert; Krauland, Eric; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof; Marasco, Wayne A; Parren, Paul WHI; Xu, Kai Y

    2014-01-01

    The 24th Antibody Engineering & Therapeutics meeting brought together a broad range of participants who were updated on the latest advances in antibody research and development. Organized by IBC Life Sciences, the gathering is the annual meeting of The Antibody Society, which serves as the scientific sponsor. Preconference workshops on 3D modeling and delineation of clonal lineages were featured, and the conference included sessions on a wide variety of topics relevant to researchers, including systems biology; antibody deep sequencing and repertoires; the effects of antibody gene variation and usage on antibody response; directed evolution; knowledge-based design; antibodies in a complex environment; polyreactive antibodies and polyspecificity; the interface between antibody therapy and cellular immunity in cancer; antibodies in cardiometabolic medicine; antibody pharmacokinetics, distribution and off-target toxicity; optimizing antibody formats for immunotherapy; polyclonals, oligoclonals and bispecifics; antibody discovery platforms; and antibody-drug conjugates. PMID:24589717

  10. Evidence of Dengue Virus Transmission and Factors Associated with the Presence of Anti-Dengue Virus Antibodies in Humans in Three Major Towns in Cameroon

    PubMed Central

    Demanou, Maurice; Pouillot, Régis; Grandadam, Marc; Boisier, Pascal; Kamgang, Basile; Hervé, Jean Pierre; Rogier, Christophe; Rousset, Dominique; Paupy, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    Background Dengue is not well documented in Africa. In Cameroon, data are scarce, but dengue infection has been confirmed in humans. We conducted a study to document risk factors associated with anti-dengue virus Immunoglobulin G seropositivity in humans in three major towns in Cameroon. Methodology/Principal Findings A cross sectional survey was conducted in Douala, Garoua and Yaounde, using a random cluster sampling design. Participants underwent a standardized interview and were blood sampled. Environmental and housing characteristics were recorded. Randomized houses were prospected to record all water containers, and immature stages of Aedes mosquitoes were collected. Sera were screened for anti-dengue virus IgG and IgM antibodies. Risk factors of seropositivity were tested using logistic regression methods with random effects. Anti-dengue IgG were found from 61.4% of sera in Douala (n = 699), 24.2% in Garoua (n = 728) and 9.8% in Yaounde (n = 603). IgM were found from 0.3% of Douala samples, 0.1% of Garoua samples and 0.0% of Yaounde samples. Seroneutralization on randomly selected IgG positive sera showed that 72% (n = 100) in Douala, 80% (n = 94) in Garoua and 77% (n = 66) in Yaounde had antibodies specific for dengue virus serotype 2 (DENV-2). Age, temporary house walls materials, having water-storage containers, old tires or toilets in the yard, having no TV, having no air conditioning and having travelled at least once outside the city were independently associated with anti-dengue IgG positivity in Douala. Age, having uncovered water containers, having no TV, not being born in Garoua and not breeding pigs were significant risk factors in Garoua. Recent history of malaria, having banana trees and stagnant water in the yard were independent risk factors in Yaounde. Conclusion/Significance In this survey, most identified risk factors of dengue were related to housing conditions. Poverty and underdevelopment are central to the dengue

  11. Patient-Derived Antibody Targets Tumor Cells

    Cancer.gov

    An NCI Cancer Currents blog on an antibody derived from patients that killed tumor cells in cell lines of several cancer types and slowed tumor growth in mouse models of brain and lung cancer without evidence of side effects.

  12. Monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    2009-01-01

    The ability to produce and exploit monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) has revolutionized many areas of biological sciences. The unique property of an mAb is that it is a single species of immunoglobulin (IG) molecule. This means that the specificity of the interaction of the paratopes on the IG, with the epitopes on an antigenic target, is the same on every molecule. This property can be used to great benefit in immunoassays to provide tests of defined specificity and sensitivity, which improve the possibilities of standardization. The performance of assays can often be determined relating the actual weight of antibody (hence the number of molecules) to the activity. Often the production of an mAb against a specific epitope is the only way that biological entities can be differentiated. This chapter outlines the areas involving the development of assays based on mAbs. The problems involved address include the physical aspects of mAbs and how they may affect assay design and also the implications of results based on monospecific reagents. Often these are not fully understood, leading to assays that are less than satisfactory, which does not justify the relatively high cost of preparing and screening of mAbs. There are many textbooks and reviews dealing with the preparation of mAbs, the principles involved, and various purification and manipulative methods for the preparation of fragments and conjugation. There has been little general information attempting to summarize the best approaches to assay design using mAbs. Much time can be wasted through bad planning, and this is particularly relevant to mAbs. A proper understanding of some basic principles is essential. It is beyond the scope of this chapter to discuss all aspects, but major areas are highlighted. PMID:19219589

  13. Serum herpes simplex antibodies

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/ency/article/003352.htm Serum herpes simplex antibodies To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Serum herpes simplex antibodies is a blood test that looks for antibodies ...

  14. Back to the future: recombinant polyclonal antibody therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xian-zhe; Coljee, Vincent W.; Maynard, Jennifer A.

    2013-01-01

    Antibody therapeutics are one of the fastest growing classes of pharmaceuticals, with an annual US market over $20 billion, developed to treat a variety of diseases including cancer, auto-immune and infectious diseases. Most are currently administered as a single molecule to treat a single disease, however there is mounting evidence that cocktails of multiple antibodies, each with a unique binding specificity and protective mechanism, may improve clinical efficacy. Here, we review progress in the development of oligoclonal combinations of antibodies to treat disease, focusing on identification of synergistic antibodies. We then discuss the application of modern antibody engineering technologies to produce highly potent antibody preparations, including oligoclonal antibody cocktails and truly recombinant polyclonal antibodies. Specific examples illustrating the synergy conferred by multiple antibodies will be provided for diseases caused by botulinum toxin, cancer and immune thrombocytopenia. The bioprocessing and regulatory options for these preparations will be discussed. PMID:24443710

  15. Back to the future: recombinant polyclonal antibody therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xian-Zhe; Coljee, Vincent W; Maynard, Jennifer A

    2013-11-01

    Antibody therapeutics are one of the fastest growing classes of pharmaceuticals, with an annual US market over $20 billion, developed to treat a variety of diseases including cancer, auto-immune and infectious diseases. Most are currently administered as a single molecule to treat a single disease, however there is mounting evidence that cocktails of multiple antibodies, each with a unique binding specificity and protective mechanism, may improve clinical efficacy. Here, we review progress in the development of oligoclonal combinations of antibodies to treat disease, focusing on identification of synergistic antibodies. We then discuss the application of modern antibody engineering technologies to produce highly potent antibody preparations, including oligoclonal antibody cocktails and truly recombinant polyclonal antibodies. Specific examples illustrating the synergy conferred by multiple antibodies will be provided for diseases caused by botulinum toxin, cancer and immune thrombocytopenia. The bioprocessing and regulatory options for these preparations will be discussed. PMID:24443710

  16. Selection of antibodies from synthetic antibody libraries.

    PubMed

    Harel Inbar, Noa; Benhar, Itai

    2012-10-15

    More than 2 dozen years had passed since the field of antibody engineering was established, with the first reports of bacterial [1-3] and mammalian cells [4] expression of recombinant antibody fragments, and in that time a lot of effort was dedicated to the development of efficient technological means, intended to assist in the creation of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Research focus was given to two intertwined technological aspects: the selection platform and the recombinant antibody repertoires. In accordance with these areas of interest, it is the goal of this chapter to describe the various selection tools and antibody libraries existing, with emphasis on the later, and their applications. This chapter gives a far from exhaustive, subjective "historic account" of the field, describing the selection platforms, the different formats of antibody repertoires and the applications of both for selecting recombinant antibodies. Several excellent books provide detailed protocols for constructing antibody libraries and selecting antibodies from those libraries [5-13]. Such books may guide a newcomer to the field in the fine details of antibody engineering. We would like to offer advice to the novice: although seemingly simple, effective library construction and antibody isolation provide best benefits in the hands of professionals. It is an art as much as it is science. PMID:22244834

  17. Humoral immune response of the small-spotted catshark, Scyliorhinus canicula.

    PubMed

    Crouch, Kathryn; Smith, Lauren E; Williams, Rebecca; Cao, Wei; Lee, Mike; Jensen, Allan; Dooley, Helen

    2013-05-01

    Cartilaginous fishes are the oldest group in which an adaptive immune system based on immunoglobulin-superfamily members is found. This manuscript compares humoral immune function in small-spotted catshark (Scyliorhinus canicula) with that described for spiny dogfish (Squalus acanthias), another member of the Squalomorphi superorder, and nurse shark, the model for humoral immunity in elasmobranchs and a member of the Galeomorphi superorder. Although small-spotted catshark and nurse shark are separated by over 200 million years we found that immunoglobulin isoforms are well conserved between the two species. However, the plasma protein profile of small-spotted catshark was most similar to that of spiny dogfish, with low levels of pentameric IgM, and IgNAR present as a multimer in plasma rather than a monomer. We show that an antigen-specific monomeric IgM response, with a profile similar to that described previously for nurse sharks, can be raised in small-spotted catshark. Lacking polyclonal or monoclonal antibody reagents for detecting catshark IgNAR we investigated phage-display and recombinant Fc-fusion protein expression as alternative methods to look for an antigen-specific response for this isotype. However, we could find no evidence of an antigen-specific IgNAR in the animals tested using either of these techniques. Thus, unlike nurse sharks where antigen-specific monomeric IgM and IgNAR appear together, it seems there may be a temporal or complete 'uncoupling' of these isotypes during a humoral response in the small-spotted catshark. PMID:23439398

  18. Antibodies and Selection of Monoclonal Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Hanack, Katja; Messerschmidt, Katrin; Listek, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies are universal binding molecules with a high specificity for their target and are indispensable tools in research, diagnostics and therapy. The biotechnological generation of monoclonal antibodies was enabled by the hybridoma technology published in 1975 by Köhler and Milstein. Today monoclonal antibodies are used in a variety of applications as flow cytometry, magnetic cell sorting, immunoassays or therapeutic approaches. First step of the generation process is the immunization of the organism with appropriate antigen. After a positive immune response the spleen cells are isolated and fused with myeloma cells in order to generate stable, long-living antibody-producing cell lines - hybridoma cells. In the subsequent identification step the culture supernatants of all hybridoma cells are screened weekly for the production of the antibody of interest. Hybridoma cells producing the antibody of interest are cloned by limited dilution till a monoclonal hybridoma is found. This is a very time-consuming and laborious process and therefore different selection strategies were developed since 1975 in order to facilitate the generation of monoclonal antibodies. Apart from common automation of pipetting processes and ELISA testing there are some promising approaches to select the right monoclonal antibody very early in the process to reduce time and effort of the generation. In this chapter different selection strategies for antibody-producing hybridoma cells are presented and analysed regarding to their benefits compared to conventional limited dilution technology. PMID:27236550

  19. Systems immunology: Beyond antibody titers.

    PubMed

    Cao, Raquel; Mejias, Asuncion; Ramilo, Octavio

    2016-07-01

    Despite the evident success of currently available vaccines to prevent infectious diseases, we still lack a full understanding of the mechanisms by which vaccines induce protective immune responses. Systems immunology applies multifaceted analytical tools to better understand the immune responses to vaccines by deep characterization of the cellular components, regulatory pathways, antibody responses and immune gene profiles with the ultimate goal of identifying the complex cellular, genetic and regulatory factors and mechanisms that contribute to effective and protective immune responses. PMID:27180310

  20. Antibody-Mediated Lung Transplant Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Hachem, Ramsey

    2012-01-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection after lung transplantation remains enigmatic. However, emerging evidence over the past several years suggests that humoral immunity plays an important role in allograft rejection. Indeed, the development of donor-specific antibodies after transplantation has been identified as an independent risk factor for acute cellular rejection and bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome. Furthermore, cases of acute antibody-mediated rejection resulting in severe allograft dysfunction have been reported, and these demonstrate that antibodies can directly injure the allograft. However, the incidence and toll of antibody-mediated rejection are unknown because there is no widely accepted definition and some cases may be unrecognized. Clearly, humoral immunity has become an important area for research and clinical investigation. PMID:23002428

  1. Novel Antibody Vectors for Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Olafsen, Tove; Wu, Anna M.

    2010-01-01

    Non-invasive molecular imaging approaches include nuclear, optical, MRI, CT, ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging, which require accumulation of a signal delivered by a probe at the target site. Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are high affinity molecules that can be used for specific, high signal delivery to cell surface molecules. However, their long circulation time in blood makes them unsuitable as imaging probes. Efforts to improve antibodies pharmacokinetics without compromising affinity and specificity have been made through protein engineering. Antibody variants that differ in antigen binding sites and size have been generated and evaluated as imaging probes to target tissues of interest. Fast clearing fragments such as single-chain Fv (scFv; 25 kDa) with one antigen binding site (monovalent) demonstrated low accumulation in tumors due the low exposure time to the target. Using scFv as building block to produce larger, bivalent fragments such as scFv dimers (diabodies, 50 kDa) and scFv-fusion proteins (80 kDa minibodies and 105 kDa scFv-Fc) resulted in higher tumor accumulation due to their longer residence time in blood. Imaging studies with these fragments following radiolabeling have demonstrated excellent, high contrast images in gamma cameras and PET scanners. Several studies have also investigated antibody fragments conjugated to fluorescence (near infrared dyes), bioluminescence (luciferases) and quantum dots for optical imaging and iron oxides nanoparticles for MRI. However, these studies indicate that there are several factors that influence successful targeting and imaging. These include stability of the antibody fragment, the labeling chemistry (direct or indirect), whether critical residues are modified, the number of antigen expressed on the cell, and whether the target has a rapid recycling rate or internalizes upon binding. The preclinical data presented are compelling and it is evident that antibody-based molecular imaging tracers will play an

  2. How to successfully patent therapeutic antibodies.

    PubMed

    Lahrtz, Fritz

    2015-04-01

    Therapeutic antibodies have become an established class of drugs for the treatment of a variety of diseases, especially cancer and autoimmune/inflammatory disorders, and a sufficient patent protection is a prerequisite for their successful commercialization. As monoclonal antibodies and their therapeutic potential have been well known for decades, the mere production of yet another therapeutic antibody is in many jurisdictions not considered a patentable invention. In contrast, antibodies with novel structural features and/or improved properties may be patentable. When drafting the claims, care should be taken to obtain a broad patent scope that protects both the antibody of interest and related antibodies having the same functional features, thereby preventing competitors from marketing a functionally equivalent antibody. Furthermore, the application should contain experimental evidence showing the improved properties of the claimed antibody. After the filing of a priority patent application, patent protection should be initiated at least in countries that are of particular commercial importance. Subsequent inventions relating to novel uses, formulations, dosage regimens, and combinations with other treatment modalities should be protected by further patent applications to extend patent term. PMID:25614506

  3. Antibodies and antibody-derived analytical biosensors.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Shikha; Byrne, Hannah; O'Kennedy, Richard J

    2016-06-30

    The rapid diagnosis of many diseases and timely initiation of appropriate treatment are critical determinants that promote optimal clinical outcomes and general public health. Biosensors are now being applied for rapid diagnostics due to their capacity for point-of-care use with minimum need for operator input. Antibody-based biosensors or immunosensors have revolutionized diagnostics for the detection of a plethora of analytes such as disease markers, food and environmental contaminants, biological warfare agents and illicit drugs. Antibodies are ideal biorecognition elements that provide sensors with high specificity and sensitivity. This review describes monoclonal and recombinant antibodies and different immobilization approaches crucial for antibody utilization in biosensors. Examples of applications of a variety of antibody-based sensor formats are also described. PMID:27365031

  4. Antibodies and antibody-derived analytical biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Shikha; Byrne, Hannah

    2016-01-01

    The rapid diagnosis of many diseases and timely initiation of appropriate treatment are critical determinants that promote optimal clinical outcomes and general public health. Biosensors are now being applied for rapid diagnostics due to their capacity for point-of-care use with minimum need for operator input. Antibody-based biosensors or immunosensors have revolutionized diagnostics for the detection of a plethora of analytes such as disease markers, food and environmental contaminants, biological warfare agents and illicit drugs. Antibodies are ideal biorecognition elements that provide sensors with high specificity and sensitivity. This review describes monoclonal and recombinant antibodies and different immobilization approaches crucial for antibody utilization in biosensors. Examples of applications of a variety of antibody-based sensor formats are also described. PMID:27365031

  5. Antibody Blood Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... discovered that people with celiac disease who eat gluten have higher than normal levels of certain antibodies ... rye and barley that are generically known as “gluten.” Antibody Testing: Only A First Step To help ...

  6. RBC Antibody Screen

    MedlinePlus

    ... be limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? RBC Antibody Screen Share this page: Was this page ... Screen Related tests: Direct Antiglobulin Test ; Blood Typing ; RBC Antibody Identification ; Type and Screen; Crossmatch All content ...

  7. Antiparietal cell antibody test

    MedlinePlus

    ... Gastric ulcer - anti-gastric parietal cell antibody; Pernicious anemia - anti-gastric parietal cell antibody; Vitamin B12 - anti- ... may use this test to help diagnose pernicious anemia. Pernicious anemia is a decrease in red blood ...

  8. Lyme disease antibody

    MedlinePlus

    ... JavaScript. The Lyme disease blood test looks for antibodies in the blood to the bacteria that causes ... needed. A laboratory specialist looks for Lyme disease antibodies in the blood sample using the ELISA test . ...

  9. Anti-acetylcholine receptor antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, A; Newsom Davis, J

    1980-01-01

    Early suggestions that a humoral factor might be implicated in the disorder of neuromuscular transmission in myasthenia gravis have been confirmed by the detection of anti-AChR antibody in 85-90% of the patients with generalised disease and in 75% of cases with restricted ocular myasthenia. Plasma exchange reveals that serum anti-AChR usually has an inverse relationship to muscle strength and present evidence indicates that patients responding to thymectomy and immunosuppressive durg treatment usually show a consistent decline in serum anti-AChR titres. The antibody is heterogeneous and can lead to a loss of muscle AChR by several mechanisms. Anti-AChR is produced in the thymus in relatively small amounts. Anti-AChR antibody synthesis by thymic lymphocytes and pokeweed stimulated peripheral lymphocytes in culture provides a means of studying the effect of different lymphocyte populations in vitro. Analysis of clinical, immunological and HLA antigen characteristics in MG suggest that more than one mechanism may underlie the breakdown in tolerance to AChR, leading to the production of anti-AChR antibodies. PMID:7400823

  10. Modeling Antibody Diversity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, William P.; Moore, Cathy Ronstadt

    1998-01-01

    Understanding antibody structure and function is difficult for many students. The rearrangement of constant and variable regions during antibody differentiation can be effectively simulated using a paper model. Describes a hands-on laboratory exercise which allows students to model antibody diversity using readily available resources. (PVD)

  11. Antibody Therapeutics in Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Wold, Erik D; Smider, Vaughn V; Felding, Brunhilde H

    2016-01-01

    One of the newer classes of targeted cancer therapeutics is monoclonal antibodies. Monoclonal antibody therapeutics are a successful and rapidly expanding drug class due to their high specificity, activity, favourable pharmacokinetics, and standardized manufacturing processes. Antibodies are capable of recruiting the immune system to attack cancer cells through complement-dependent cytotoxicity or antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity. In an ideal scenario the initial tumor cell destruction induced by administration of a therapeutic antibody can result in uptake of tumor associated antigens by antigen-presenting cells, establishing a prolonged memory effect. Mechanisms of direct tumor cell killing by antibodies include antibody recognition of cell surface bound enzymes to neutralize enzyme activity and signaling, or induction of receptor agonist or antagonist activity. Both approaches result in cellular apoptosis. In another and very direct approach, antibodies are used to deliver drugs to target cells and cause cell death. Such antibody drug conjugates (ADCs) direct cytotoxic compounds to tumor cells, after selective binding to cell surface antigens, internalization, and intracellular drug release. Efficacy and safety of ADCs for cancer therapy has recently been greatly advanced based on innovative approaches for site-specific drug conjugation to the antibody structure. This technology enabled rational optimization of function and pharmacokinetics of the resulting conjugates, and is now beginning to yield therapeutics with defined, uniform molecular characteristics, and unprecedented promise to advance cancer treatment. PMID:27081677

  12. Engineering antibody therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Mark L; Gilliland, Gary L

    2016-06-01

    The successful introduction of antibody-based protein therapeutics into the arsenal of treatments for patients has within a few decades fostered intense innovation in the production and engineering of antibodies. Reviewed here are the methods currently used to produce antibodies along with how our knowledge of the structural and functional characterization of immunoglobulins has resulted in the engineering of antibodies to produce protein therapeutics with unique properties, both biological and biophysical, that are leading to novel therapeutic approaches. Antibody engineering includes the introduction of the antibody combining site (variable regions) into a host of architectures including bi and multi-specific formats that further impact the therapeutic properties leading to further advantages and successes in patient treatment. PMID:27525816

  13. Recombinant renewable polyclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Ferrara, Fortunato; D’Angelo, Sara; Gaiotto, Tiziano; Naranjo, Leslie; Tian, Hongzhao; Gräslund, Susanne; Dobrovetsky, Elena; Hraber, Peter; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof; Saragozza, Silvia; Sblattero, Daniele; Kiss, Csaba; Bradbury, Andrew RM

    2015-01-01

    Only a small fraction of the antibodies in a traditional polyclonal antibody mixture recognize the target of interest, frequently resulting in undesirable polyreactivity. Here, we show that high-quality recombinant polyclonals, in which hundreds of different antibodies are all directed toward a target of interest, can be easily generated in vitro by combining phage and yeast display. We show that, unlike traditional polyclonals, which are limited resources, recombinant polyclonal antibodies can be amplified over one hundred million-fold without losing representation or functionality. Our protocol was tested on 9 different targets to demonstrate how the strategy allows the selective amplification of antibodies directed toward desirable target specific epitopes, such as those found in one protein but not a closely related one, and the elimination of antibodies recognizing common epitopes, without significant loss of diversity. These recombinant renewable polyclonal antibodies are usable in different assays, and can be generated in high throughput. This approach could potentially be used to develop highly specific recombinant renewable antibodies against all human gene products. PMID:25530082

  14. Expression of Recombinant Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Frenzel, André; Hust, Michael; Schirrmann, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant antibodies are highly specific detection probes in research, diagnostics, and have emerged over the last two decades as the fastest growing class of therapeutic proteins. Antibody generation has been dramatically accelerated by in vitro selection systems, particularly phage display. An increasing variety of recombinant production systems have been developed, ranging from Gram-negative and positive bacteria, yeasts and filamentous fungi, insect cell lines, mammalian cells to transgenic plants and animals. Currently, almost all therapeutic antibodies are still produced in mammalian cell lines in order to reduce the risk of immunogenicity due to altered, non-human glycosylation patterns. However, recent developments of glycosylation-engineered yeast, insect cell lines, and transgenic plants are promising to obtain antibodies with “human-like” post-translational modifications. Furthermore, smaller antibody fragments including bispecific antibodies without any glycosylation are successfully produced in bacteria and have advanced to clinical testing. The first therapeutic antibody products from a non-mammalian source can be expected in coming next years. In this review, we focus on current antibody production systems including their usability for different applications. PMID:23908655

  15. Antibodies as effectors.

    PubMed

    Corbeil, L B

    2002-09-10

    Antibodies are critical in protection against extracellular microbial pathogens. Although antibodies also play a role in transplant/tumor rejection and in autoimmune disease, this paper focuses on defense against bovine infections. Effector mechanisms of different bovine isotypes, subisotypes and allotypes are discussed. The importance of antigen specificity is also stressed. PMID:12072231

  16. Production Of Human Antibodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sammons, David W.; Neil, Garry A.

    1993-01-01

    Process for making human monoclonal antibodies based on combination of techniques. Antibodies made active against specific antigen. Process involves in vivo immunization of human B lymphocyte cells in mice. B cells of interest enriched in vitro before fusion. Method potentially applicable to any antigen. Does not rely on use of Epstein-Barr virus at any step. Human lymphocytes taken from any source.

  17. Therapeutic Recombinant Monoclonal Antibodies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bakhtiar, Ray

    2012-01-01

    During the last two decades, the rapid growth of biotechnology-derived techniques has led to a myriad of therapeutic recombinant monoclonal antibodies with significant clinical benefits. Recombinant monoclonal antibodies can be obtained from a number of natural sources such as animal cell cultures using recombinant DNA engineering. In contrast to…

  18. Affinity purification of antibodies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Antibodies are provided in a variety of formats that includes antiserum, hybridoma culture supernatant or ascites. They can all be used successfully in crude form for the detection of target antigens by immunoassay. However, it is advantageous to use purified antibody in defined quantity to facil...

  19. Antibodies in Plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The expression of antibodies in plants has several promising applications that are currently being developed. Plants are being considered for the large scale production of antibodies needed for medical purposes. The benefit of using plants is that they are able to perform post-translational modifi...

  20. Anti Transglutaminase Antibodies Cause Ataxia in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Boscolo, Sabrina; Lorenzon, Andrea; Sblattero, Daniele; Florian, Fiorella; Stebel, Marco; Marzari, Roberto; Not, Tarcisio; Aeschlimann, Daniel; Ventura, Alessandro; Hadjivassiliou, Marios; Tongiorgi, Enrico

    2010-01-01

    Background Celiac disease (CD) is an autoimmune gastrointestinal disorder characterized by the presence of anti-transglutaminase 2 (TG2) and anti-gliadin antibodies. Amongst the neurological dysfunctions associated with CD, ataxia represents the most common one. Methods We analyzed by immunohistochemistry, the anti-neural reactivity of the serum from 20 CD patients. To determine the role of anti-TG2 antibodies in ataxia, two anti-TG2 single chain variable fragments (scFv), isolated from a phage-display IgA antibody library, were characterized by immunohistochemistry and ELISA, and injected in mice to study their effects on motor coordination. We found that 75% of the CD patient population without evidence of neurological involvement, has circulating anti-neural IgA and/or IgG antibodies. Two anti-TG2 scFvs, cloned from one CD patient, stained blood vessels but only one reacted with neurons. This anti-TG2 antibody showed cross reactivity with the transglutaminase isozymes TG3 and TG6. Intraventricular injection of the anti-TG2 or the anti-TG2/3/6 cross-reactive scFv provoked transient, equally intensive ataxia in mice. Conclusion The serum from CD patients contains anti-TG2, TG3 and TG6 antibodies that may potentially cause ataxia. PMID:20300628

  1. [Recombinant antibodies against bioweapons].

    PubMed

    Thullier, Philippe; Pelat, Thibaut; Vidal, Dominique

    2009-12-01

    The threat posed by bioweapons (BW) could lead to the re-emergence of such deadly diseases as plague or smallpox, now eradicated from industrialized countries. The development of recombinant antibodies allows tackling this risk because these recombinant molecules are generally well tolerated in human medicine, may be utilized for prophylaxis and treatment, and because antibodies neutralize many BW. Recombinant antibodies neutralizing the lethal toxin of anthrax, botulinum toxins and the smallpox virus have in particular been isolated recently, with different technologies. Our approach, which uses phage-displayed immune libraries built from non-human primates (M. fascicularis) to obtain recombinant antibodies, which may later be super-humanized (germlinized), has allowed us to obtain such BWs-neutralizing antibodies. PMID:20035695

  2. [Antiphospholipid antibodies in practice].

    PubMed

    Miyara, M; Diemert, M-C; Amoura, Z; Musset, L

    2012-04-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is an autoimmune disorder characterized by the occurrence of thrombotic or obstetrical events associated with the presence in the serum of patients of antibodies that are associated with thrombosis. For the diagnosis of APS, the presence of either lupus anticoagulant, anticardiolipin or anti-β2-glycoprotein1 antibodies of IgG or IgM isotype is required through laboratory testing. Other autoantibodies such as antiphosphatidylethanolamin or antiphosphatidylserin/prothrombin complex antibodies may be interesting in the diagnosis of APS when common antiphospholipid antibodies are missing. These autoantibodies are still under evaluation for their diagnostic contribution. Despite numerous attempts, the assays that are available for the identification of antiphospholipid antibodies have not been standardized yet, which leads to high variability between reagents and laboratories. Thus, to optimize the biological monitoring of APS syndromes, it is mandatory to have consecutive samples analyzed in the same laboratory. PMID:22100197

  3. Affinity Purification of Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Hnasko, Robert M; McGarvey, Jeffery A

    2015-01-01

    Antibodies are provided in a variety of formats that include antiserum, hybridoma culture supernatant, or ascites. They can all be used successfully in crude form for the detection of target antigens by immunoassay. However, it is advantageous to use purified antibody in defined quantity to facilitate assay reproducibility, economy, and reduced interference of nonspecific components as well as improved storage, stability, and bio-conjugation. Although not always necessary, the relative simplicity of antibody purification using commercially available protein-A, protein-G, or protein-L resins with basic chromatographic principles warrants purification when antibody source material is available in sufficient quantity. Here, we define three simple methods using immobilized (1) protein-A, (2) protein-G, and (3) protein-L agarose beads to yield highly purified antibody. PMID:26160561

  4. Selection of Recombinant Human Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Tomszak, Florian; Weber, Susanne; Zantow, Jonas; Schirrmann, Thomas; Hust, Michael; Frenzel, André

    2016-01-01

    Since the development of therapeutic antibodies the demand of recombinant human antibodies is steadily increasing. Traditionally, therapeutic antibodies were generated by immunization of rat or mice, the generation of hybridoma clones, cloning of the antibody genes and subsequent humanization and engineering of the lead candidates. In the last few years, techniques were developed that use transgenic animals with a human antibody gene repertoire. Here, modern recombinant DNA technologies can be combined with well established immunization and hybridoma technologies to generate already affinity maturated human antibodies. An alternative are in vitro technologies which enabled the generation of fully human antibodies from antibody gene libraries that even exceed the human antibody repertoire. Specific antibodies can be isolated from these libraries in a very short time and therefore reduce the development time of an antibody drug at a very early stage.In this review, we describe different technologies that are currently used for the in vitro and in vivo generation of human antibodies. PMID:27236551

  5. The INNs and outs of antibody nonproprietary names

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Tim D.; Carter, Paul J.; Plückthun, Andreas; Vásquez, Max; Holgate, Robert G.E.; Hötzel, Isidro; Popplewell, Andrew G.; Parren, Paul W.H.I.; Enzelberger, Markus; Rademaker, Hendrik J.; Clark, Michael R.; Lowe, David C.; Dahiyat, Bassil I.; Smith, Victoria; Lambert, John M.; Wu, Herren; Reilly, Mary; Haurum, John S.; Dübel, Stefan; Huston, James S.; Schirrmann, Thomas; Janssen, Richard A.J.; Steegmaier, Martin; Gross, Jane A.; Bradbury, Andrew R.M.; Burton, Dennis R.; Dimitrov, Dimiter S.; Chester, Kerry A.; Glennie, Martin J.; Davies, Julian; Walker, Adam; Martin, Steve; McCafferty, John; Baker, Matthew P.

    2016-01-01

    An important step in drug development is the assignment of an International Nonproprietary Name (INN) by the World Health Organization (WHO) that provides healthcare professionals with a unique and universally available designated name to identify each pharmaceutical substance. Monoclonal antibody INNs comprise a –mab suffix preceded by a substem indicating the antibody type, e.g., chimeric (-xi-), humanized (-zu-), or human (-u-). The WHO publishes INN definitions that specify how new monoclonal antibody therapeutics are categorized and adapts the definitions to new technologies. However, rapid progress in antibody technologies has blurred the boundaries between existing antibody categories and created a burgeoning array of new antibody formats. Thus, revising the INN system for antibodies is akin to aiming for a rapidly moving target. The WHO recently revised INN definitions for antibodies now to be based on amino acid sequence identity. These new definitions, however, are critically flawed as they are ambiguous and go against decades of scientific literature. A key concern is the imposition of an arbitrary threshold for identity against human germline antibody variable region sequences. This leads to inconsistent classification of somatically mutated human antibodies, humanized antibodies as well as antibodies derived from semi-synthetic/synthetic libraries and transgenic animals. Such sequence-based classification implies clear functional distinction between categories (e.g., immunogenicity). However, there is no scientific evidence to support this. Dialog between the WHO INN Expert Group and key stakeholders is needed to develop a new INN system for antibodies and to avoid confusion and miscommunication between researchers and clinicians prescribing antibodies. PMID:26716992

  6. The INNs and outs of antibody nonproprietary names.

    PubMed

    Jones, Tim D; Carter, Paul J; Plückthun, Andreas; Vásquez, Max; Holgate, Robert G E; Hötzel, Isidro; Popplewell, Andrew G; Parren, Paul W H I; Enzelberger, Markus; Rademaker, Hendrik J; Clark, Michael R; Lowe, David C; Dahiyat, Bassil I; Smith, Victoria; Lambert, John M; Wu, Herren; Reilly, Mary; Haurum, John S; Dübel, Stefan; Huston, James S; Schirrmann, Thomas; Janssen, Richard A J; Steegmaier, Martin; Gross, Jane A; Bradbury, Andrew R M; Burton, Dennis R; Dimitrov, Dimiter S; Chester, Kerry A; Glennie, Martin J; Davies, Julian; Walker, Adam; Martin, Steve; McCafferty, John; Baker, Matthew P

    2016-01-01

    An important step in drug development is the assignment of an International Nonproprietary Name (INN) by the World Health Organization (WHO) that provides healthcare professionals with a unique and universally available designated name to identify each pharmaceutical substance. Monoclonal antibody INNs comprise a -mab suffix preceded by a substem indicating the antibody type, e.g., chimeric (-xi-), humanized (-zu-), or human (-u-). The WHO publishes INN definitions that specify how new monoclonal antibody therapeutics are categorized and adapts the definitions to new technologies. However, rapid progress in antibody technologies has blurred the boundaries between existing antibody categories and created a burgeoning array of new antibody formats. Thus, revising the INN system for antibodies is akin to aiming for a rapidly moving target. The WHO recently revised INN definitions for antibodies now to be based on amino acid sequence identity. These new definitions, however, are critically flawed as they are ambiguous and go against decades of scientific literature. A key concern is the imposition of an arbitrary threshold for identity against human germline antibody variable region sequences. This leads to inconsistent classification of somatically mutated human antibodies, humanized antibodies as well as antibodies derived from semi-synthetic/synthetic libraries and transgenic animals. Such sequence-based classification implies clear functional distinction between categories (e.g., immunogenicity). However, there is no scientific evidence to support this. Dialog between the WHO INN Expert Group and key stakeholders is needed to develop a new INN system for antibodies and to avoid confusion and miscommunication between researchers and clinicians prescribing antibodies. PMID:26716992

  7. NMDA receptor antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Ramberger, Melanie; Bsteh, Gabriel; Schanda, Kathrin; Höftberger, Romana; Rostásy, Kevin; Baumann, Matthias; Aboulenein-Djamshidian, Fahmy; Lutterotti, Andreas; Deisenhammer, Florian; Berger, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To analyze the frequency of NMDA receptor (NMDAR) antibodies in patients with various inflammatory demyelinating diseases of the CNS and to determine their clinical correlates. Methods: Retrospective case-control study from 2005 to 2014 with the detection of serum IgG antibodies to NMDAR, aquaporin-4, and myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein by recombinant live cell-based immunofluorescence assays. Fifty-one patients with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, 41 with neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders, 34 with clinically isolated syndrome, and 89 with multiple sclerosis (MS) were included. Due to a known association of NMDAR antibodies with seizures and behavioral symptoms, patients with those clinical manifestations were preferentially included and are therefore overrepresented in our cohort. Nine patients with NMDAR encephalitis, 94 patients with other neurologic diseases, and 48 healthy individuals were used as controls. Results: NMDAR antibodies were found in all 9 patients with NMDAR encephalitis but in only 1 of 215 (0.5%) patients with inflammatory demyelination and in none of the controls. This patient had relapsing-remitting MS with NMDAR antibodies present at disease onset, with an increase in NMDAR antibody titer with the onset of psychiatric symptoms and cognitive deficits. Conclusion: In demyelinating disorders, NMDAR antibodies are uncommon, even in those with symptoms seen in NMDAR encephalitis. PMID:26309901

  8. Monoclonal antibody "gold rush".

    PubMed

    Maggon, Krishan

    2007-01-01

    The market, sales and regulatory approval of new human medicines, during the past few years, indicates increasing number and share of new biologics and emergence of new multibillion dollar molecules. The global sale of monoclonal antibodies in 2006 were $20.6 billion. Remicade had annual sales gain of $1 billion during the past 3 years and five brands had similar increase in 2006. Rituxan with 2006 sales of $4.7 billion was the best selling monoclonal antibody and biological product and the 6th among the top selling medicinal brand. It may be the first biologic and monoclonal antibody to reach $10 billion annual sales in the near future. The strong demand from cancer and arthritis patients has surpassed almost all commercial market research reports and sales forecast. Seven monoclonal antibody brands in 2006 had sales exceeding $1 billion. Humanized or fully human monoclonal antibodies with low immunogenicity, enhanced antigen binding and reduced cellular toxicity provide better clinical efficacy. The higher technical and clinical success rate, overcoming of technical hurdles in large scale manufacturing, low cost of market entry and IND filing, use of fully human and humanized monoclonal antibodies has attracted funds and resources towards R&D. Review of industry research pipeline and sales data during the past 3 years indicate a real paradigm shift in industrial R&D from pharmaceutical to biologics and monoclonal antibodies. The antibody bandwagon has been joined by 200 companies with hundreds of new projects and targets and has attracted billions of dollars in R&D investment, acquisitions and licensing deals leading to the current Monoclonal Antibody Gold Rush. PMID:17691940

  9. Heart antibodies in cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed Central

    Trueman, T; Thompson, R A; Cummins, P; Littler, W A

    1981-01-01

    The reported frequency of circulating heart reactive antibodies in cardiomyopathies has varied and their significance is unknown. In this study such antibodies were sought in patients with primary congestive and hypertrophic cardiomyopathies and other heart diseases. Standard "single sandwich" and the more sensitive "double sandwich" indirect immunofluorescence techniques failed to disclose a significant difference between any cardiomyopathic group and controls in repeated experiments. With both techniques results were subject to considerable method-specific artefacts and observer variation. No published work associating heart antibodies detected by immunofluorescence methods with cariomyopathies adequately takes these into account. PMID:7028058

  10. Anti-sulfotyrosine antibodies

    DOEpatents

    Bertozzi, Carolyn R.; Kehoe, John; Bradbury, Andrew M.

    2009-09-15

    The invention provides anti-sulfotyrosine specific antibodies capable of detecting and isolating polypeptides that are tyrosine-sulfated. The sulfotyrosine antibodies and antibody fragments of the invention may be used to discriminate between the non-sulfated and sulfated forms of such proteins, using any number of immunological assays, such ELISAs, immunoblots, Western Blots, immunoprecipitations, and the like. Using a phage-display system, single chain antibodies (scFvs) were generated and screened against tyrosine-sulfated synthetic peptide antigens, resulting in the isolation of scFvs that specifically recognize sulfotyrosine-containing peptides and/or demonstrate sulfotyrosine-specific binding in tyrosine sulfated proteins. The VH and VL genes from one such sulfotyrosine-specific scFv were employed to generate a full length, sulfotyrosine-specific immunoglobulin.

  11. HIV Antibody Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... despite the fact that the person is infected ( false negative ). If an HIV antibody test is negative ... infection (around 28 days) and may give a false-negative result. ^ Back to top Is there anything ...

  12. Platelet associated antibodies

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the following: For unknown reasons (idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, or ITP ) Side effect of certain drugs such ... 2012:chap 134. Read More Antibody Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) Platelet count Serum globulin electrophoresis Thrombocytopenia Update ...

  13. Monoclonal antibodies and cancer therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Reisfeld, R.A.; Sell, S.

    1985-01-01

    These proceedings collect papers on the subject of monoclonal antibodies. Topics include: Monoclonal antibody, biochemical effects and cancer therapeutic potential of tunicamycin, use of monoclonal antibodies for detection of lymph node metastases, active specific immunotherapy, and applications of monoclonal antibodies to investigations of growth factors.

  14. Infection of CD4{sup +} T lymphocytes by the human T cell leukemia virus type 1 is mediated by the glucose transporter GLUT-1: Evidence using antibodies specific to the receptor's large extracellular domain

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Qingwen; Agrawal, Lokesh; VanHorn-Ali, Zainab; Alkhatib, Ghalib . E-mail: galkhati@iupui.edu

    2006-05-25

    To analyze HTLV-1 cytotropism, we developed a highly sensitive vaccinia virus-based assay measuring activation of a reporter gene upon fusion of two distinct cell populations. We used this system in a functional cDNA screening to isolate and confirm that the glucose transporter protein 1 (GLUT-1) is a receptor for HTLV-1. GLUT-1 is a ubiquitously expressed plasma membrane glycoprotein with 12 transmembrane domains and 6 extracellular loops (ECL). We demonstrate for the first time that peptide antibodies (GLUT-IgY) raised in chicken to the large extracellular loop (ECL1) detect GLUT-1 at the cell surface and inhibit envelope (Env)-mediated fusion and infection. Efficient GLUT-IgY staining was detected with peripheral blood CD4{sup +} lymphocytes purified by positive selection. Further, GLUT-IgY caused efficient inhibition of Env-mediated fusion and infection of CD4{sup +} T and significantly lower inhibition of CD8{sup +} T lymphocytes. The specificity of GLUT-IgY antibodies to GLUT-1 was demonstrated by ECL1 peptide competition studies. Grafting ECL1 of GLUT-1 onto the receptor-negative GLUT-3 conferred significant receptor activity. In contrast, grafting ECL1 of GLUT-3 onto GLUT-1 resulted in a significant loss of the receptor activity. The ECL1-mediated receptor activity was efficiently blocked with four different human monoclonal antibody (HMab) to HTLV-1 Env. The ECL1-derived peptide blocked HTLV-1 Env-mediated fusion with several nonhuman mammalian cell lines. The results demonstrate the utilization of cell surface GLUT-1 in HTLV-1 infection of CD4{sup +} T lymphocytes and implicate a critical role for the ECL1 region in viral tropism.

  15. Neuronal Surface Antibody-Mediated Autoimmune Encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Linnoila, Jenny J.; Rosenfeld, Myrna R.; Dalmau, Josep

    2016-01-01

    In the past few years, many autoimmune encephalitides have been identified, with specific clinical syndromes and associated antibodies against neuronal surface antigens. There is compelling evidence that many of these antibodies are pathogenic and most of these encephalitides are highly responsive to immunotherapies. The clinical spectra of some of these antibody-mediated syndromes, especially those reported in only a few patients, are evolving. Others, such as anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor encephalitis, are well characterized. Diagnosis involves recognizing the specific syndromes and identifying the antibody in a patient’s cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and/or serum. These syndromes are associated with variable abnormalities in CSF, magnetic resonance imaging, and electroencephalography. Treatment is often multidisciplinary and should be focused upon neutralizing the effects of antibodies and eliminating their source. Overlapping disorders have been noted, with some patients having more than one neurologic autoimmune disease. In other patients, viral infections such as herpes simplex virus encephalitis trigger robust antineuronal autoimmune responses. PMID:25369441

  16. Viral antibody dynamics in a chiropteran host.

    PubMed

    Baker, Kate S; Suu-Ire, Richard; Barr, Jennifer; Hayman, David T S; Broder, Christopher C; Horton, Daniel L; Durrant, Christopher; Murcia, Pablo R; Cunningham, Andrew A; Wood, James L N

    2014-03-01

    Bats host many viruses that are significant for human and domestic animal health, but the dynamics of these infections in their natural reservoir hosts remain poorly elucidated. In these, and other, systems, there is evidence that seasonal life-cycle events drive infection dynamics, directly impacting the risk of exposure to spillover hosts. Understanding these dynamics improves our ability to predict zoonotic spillover from the reservoir hosts. To this end, we followed henipavirus antibody levels of >100 individual E. helvum in a closed, captive, breeding population over a 30-month period, using a powerful novel antibody quantitation method. We demonstrate the presence of maternal antibodies in this system and accurately determine their longevity. We also present evidence of population-level persistence of viral infection and demonstrate periods of increased horizontal virus transmission associated with the pregnancy/lactation period. The novel findings of infection persistence and the effect of pregnancy on viral transmission, as well as an accurate quantitation of chiropteran maternal antiviral antibody half-life, provide fundamental baseline data for the continued study of viral infections in these important reservoir hosts. PMID:24111634

  17. Pre-existing Antibody: Biotherapeutic Modality-Based Review.

    PubMed

    Gorovits, Boris; Clements-Egan, Adrienne; Birchler, Mary; Liang, Meina; Myler, Heather; Peng, Kun; Purushothama, Shobha; Rajadhyaksha, Manoj; Salazar-Fontana, Laura; Sung, Crystal; Xue, Li

    2016-03-01

    Pre-existing antibodies to biotherapeutic drugs have been detected in drug-naïve subjects for a variety of biotherapeutic modalities. Pre-existing antibodies are immunoglobulins that are either specific or cross-reacting with a protein or glycan epitopes on a biotherapeutic compound. Although the exact cause for pre-existing antibodies is often unknown, environmental exposures to non-human proteins, glycans, and structurally similar products are frequently proposed as factors. Clinical consequences of the pre-existing antibodies vary from an adverse effect on patient safety to no impact at all and remain highly dependent on the biotherapeutic drug modality and therapeutic indication. As such, pre-existing antibodies are viewed as an immunogenicity risk factor requiring a careful evaluation. Herein, the relationships between biotherapeutic modalities to the nature, prevalence, and clinical consequences of pre-existing antibodies are reviewed. Initial evidence for pre-existing antibody is often identified during anti-drug antibody (ADA) assay development. Other interfering factors known to cause false ADA positive signal, including circulating multimeric drug target, rheumatoid factors, and heterophilic antibodies, are discussed. PMID:26821802

  18. Antinuclear antibodies in mice

    PubMed Central

    Teague, P. O.; Friou, G. J.

    1969-01-01

    Seven-week-old and 16-week-old A/Jax mice were injected with viable spleen cells or homogenates of spleen cells obtained from older syngeneic mice which either had autoimmune anti-deoxyribonucleoprotein (DNP) antibody in their sera or lacked this activity. None of the 7-week-old recipients developed detectable anti-DNP antibody. However, most of the animals in the 16-week-old group developed this autoantibody. The viability of the cells and the presence of or absence of anti-DNP antibody in the donor's sera did not appear to influence the autoimmune response of these recipients. When viable thymus cells which were obtained from young A/Jax mice were transferred to groups of older syngeneic animals that had developed anti-DNP antibody spontaneously, the anti-DNP decreased or disappeared from the sera of most recipients. Untreated controls did not show this variation. When 36-week-old A/Jax mice which lacked anti-DNP antibody were injected with thymus or spleen cells obtained from young donors, none of the recipients or untreated controls developed anti-DNP antibody. After specific immunization with DNP, however, the control animals began to produce autoimmune anti-DNP antibody while the animals treated with thymus or spleen cells remained unresponsive. These observations support the hypothesis that in A/Jax mice: (1) autoimmunity to DNP may result from failure of normal homeostasis mechanisms which allow proliferation of autoimmune cells; (2) the number of cells with autoimmune potential may increase during ageing; (3) the efficiency of the homeostasis system may decrease during ageing as the result of microbial or genetic factors; and (4) cells which participate in homeostasis are found in the thymus and spleen of young mice and may be the thymus dependent lymphocytes. PMID:5307745

  19. Dissecting Epigenetic Dysregulation of Primary Antibody Deficiencies.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Cortez, Virginia C; Del Pino-Molina, Lucia; Rodríguez-Ubreva, Javier; López-Granados, Eduardo; Ballestar, Esteban

    2016-05-01

    Primary antibody deficiencies (PADs), the most prevalent inherited primary immunodeficiencies (PIDs), are associated with a wide range of genetic alterations (both monogenic or polygenic) in B cell-specific genes. However, correlations between the genotype and clinical manifestations are not evident in all cases indicating that genetic interactions, environmental and epigenetic factors may have a role in PAD pathogenesis. The recent identification of key defects in DNA methylation in common variable immunodeficiency as well as the multiple evidences on the role of epigenetic control during B cell differentiation, activation and during antibody formation highlight the importance of investing research efforts in dissecting the participation of epigenetic defects in this group of diseases. This review focuses on the role of epigenetic control in B cell biology which can provide clues for the study of potential novel pathogenic defects involved in PADs. PMID:26984849

  20. Polyreactive Antibodies: Function and Quantification

    PubMed Central

    Gunti, Sreenivasulu; Notkins, Abner Louis

    2015-01-01

    Polyreactive antibodies, a major component of the natural antibody repertoire, bind with low affinity to a variety of structurally unrelated antigens. Many of these antibodies are germline or near germline in sequence. Little is known, however, about the function of these antibodies. In the present mini-review we show: (1) that the broad antibacterial activity of the natural antibody repertoire is largely due to polyreactive antibodies, which in the presence of complement lyse bacteria and enhance phagocytosis; (2) that polyreactive antibodies bind to UV- or human immunodeficiency virus-induced apoptotic cells and with complement enhance the phagocytosis of these cells by macrophages; and (3) that dinitrophenol can be used as a surrogate for quantitating the level of polyreactive antibodies in serum. We conclude that polyreactive antibodies protect the host against both foreign invaders and its own damaged/apoptotic cells. PMID:26116731

  1. Accommodation and antibodies.

    PubMed

    Dehoux, Jean-Paul; Gianello, Pierre

    2009-06-01

    Accommodation refers to the condition in which an organ transplant functions normally by acquiring resistance to immune-mediated injury (especially), despite the presence of anti-transplant antibodies in the recipient. This status is associated with several modifications in the recipient as well as in the graft, such as previous depletion of anti-graft antibodies and their slow return once the graft is placed; expression of several protective genes in the graft; a Th2 immune response in the recipient; and inhibition of the membrane attack complex of complement. PMID:18973811

  2. Antibody determination in the diagnosis of Wuchereria bancrofti infection in man

    PubMed Central

    Dissanayake, S.; Ismail, M. M.

    1981-01-01

    The levels of IgG and IgE antibodies reacting with somatic antigens of adult Setaria digitata and Wuchereria bancrofti microfilariae were determined in sera of 90 patients with Bancroftian filariasis and 379 non-filarial subjects. Antibodies reacting with adult antigens and with soluble microfilarial antigens were seen in both microfilaraemic and amicrofilaraemic patients. Antibodies reacting with surface antigens of W. bancrofti microfilariae were seen only in amicrofilaraemic subjects. IgE antibodies were detected with the adult antigen only in both microfilaraemic and amicrofilaraemic patients. The absolute levels of IgG antibodies were significantly higher than those of IgE antibodies. It is concluded that the determination of serum antibodies reacting with adult antigens is suitable for the diagnosis of both the microfilaraemic and amicrofilaraemic phases of infection, and the determination of antibody to microfilarial surface antigens is applicable in patients with clinically evident disease. PMID:7032737

  3. Reshaping Antibody Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Feng; Ekiert, Damian C.; Ahmad, Insha; Yu, Wenli; Zhang, Yong; Bazirgan, Omar; Torkamani, Ali; Raudsepp, Terje; Mwangi, Waithaka; Criscitiello, Michael F.; Wilson, Ian A.; Schultz, Peter G.; Smider, Vaughn V.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Unlike humans or mice, some species have limited genome encoded combinatorial diversity potential, yet mount a robust antibody response. Cows are unusual in having exceptionally long CDR H3 loops and few V-regions, but the mechanism for creating diversity is not understood. Deep sequencing revealed that ultralong CDR H3s contain a remarkable complexity of cysteines, suggesting that disulfide-bonded mini-domains may arise during repertoire development. Indeed, crystal structures of two cow antibodies reveal that these CDR H3s form a very unusual architecture composed of a β-strand “stalk” that supports a structurally diverse, disulfide-bonded, “knob” domain. Sequence analysis suggests that diversity arises from somatic hypermutation of an ultralong DH with a severe codon bias towards mutation to cysteine. These unusual antibodies can be elicited to recognize defined antigens through the knob domain. Thus, the bovine immune system produces an antibody repertoire composed of CDR H3s of unprecedented length that fold into a diversity of mini-domains generated through combinations of somatically generated disulfides. PMID:23746848

  4. Monoclonal Antibodies against Pectin

    PubMed Central

    Liners, Françoise; Letesson, Jean-Jacques; Didembourg, Christian; Van Cutsem, Pierre

    1989-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies have been produced that recognize a conformation of homopolygalacturonic acid (pectic acid) induced by an optimum concentration of calcium and sodium of about 1 and 150 millinormal, respectively. The epitope recognized is probably part of the dimers of pectin chains associated according to the `egg box' model. Images Figure 2 PMID:16667195

  5. Demonstration of Usutu virus antibodies in horses, Croatia.

    PubMed

    Barbic, Ljubo; Vilibic-Cavlek, Tatjana; Listes, Eddy; Stevanovic, Vladimir; Gjenero-Margan, Ira; Ljubin-Sternak, Suncanica; Pem-Novosel, Iva; Listes, Irena; Mlinaric-Galinovic, Gordana; Di Gennaro, Annapia; Savini, Giovanni

    2013-10-01

    We report the first serological evidence of Usutu virus (USUV) infection in horses in Croatia. During 2011, 1380 horse serum samples from healthy animals were collected from six northern Croatian counties. All samples were first screened for West Nile virus (WNV) immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Sixty-nine WNV ELISA-reactive samples were further tested for WNV antibodies by a virus neutralization assay (VN assay) and plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT), and USUV by a VN assay and tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) antibodies by PRNT. During the same period, 306 human serum samples from patients coming for routine testing with no symptoms of acute febrile disease were tested for USUV IgG using ELISA. Reactive samples were tested for both USUV and WNV using a VN assay. USUV-specific neutralizing antibodies were detected in two of 69 WNV ELISA-reactive horse serum samples. Seropositive animals were found in two different regions of Croatia. One additional sample showed specific WNV-neutralizing antibodies that cross-neutralized USUV. Only one human sample (0.3%) was reactive to USUV antibodies in an ELISA test. In a confirmatory test, WNV-neutralizing antibodies were detected, indicating cross-reactive antibodies with USUV in ELISA. The exposure to USUV was documented in two WNV ELISA-reactive horses at distant locations. These results indicate the presence of USUV in northern Croatia. PMID:23808977

  6. Detection of novel diagnostic antibodies in ankylosing spondylitis: An overview.

    PubMed

    Quaden, Dana H F; De Winter, Liesbeth M; Somers, Veerle

    2016-08-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a debilitating, chronic, rheumatic disease characterized by inflammation and new bone formation resulting in fusion of the spine and sacroiliac joints. Since early treatment is impeded by a delayed diagnosis, it is highly important to find new biomarkers that improve early diagnosis and may also contribute to a better assessment of disease activity, prognosis and therapy response in AS. Because of the absence of rheumatoid factor, AS was long assumed to have a seronegative character and antibodies are thus not considered a hallmark of the disease. However, emerging evidence suggests plasma cells and autoantibodies to be involved in the disease course. In this review, the role of B cells and antibodies in AS is discussed. Furthermore, an overview is provided of antibodies identified in AS up till now, and their diagnostic potential. Many of these antibody responses were based on small study populations and further validation is lacking. Moreover, most were identified by a hypothesis-driven approach and thus limited to antibodies against targets that are already known to be involved in AS pathogenesis. Hence, we propose an unbiased approach to identify novel diagnostic antibodies. The already successfully applied techniques cDNA phage display and serological antigen selection will be used to identify antibodies against both known and new antigen targets in AS plasma. These newly identified antibodies will enhance early diagnosis of AS and provide more insight into the underlying disease pathology, resulting in a more effective treatment strategy and eventually an improved disease outcome. PMID:27288842

  7. Lupus anticoagulants and antiphospholipid antibodies

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000547.htm Lupus anticoagulants and antiphospholipid antibodies To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Lupus anticoagulants are antibodies against substances in the lining ...

  8. Red Blood Cell Antibody Identification

    MedlinePlus

    ... be limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? RBC Antibody Identification Share this page: Was this page helpful? Also known as: Alloantibody Identification; Antibody ID, RBC; RBC Ab ID Formal name: Red Blood Cell ...

  9. Anti-smooth muscle antibody

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003531.htm Anti-smooth muscle antibody To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Anti-smooth muscle antibody is a blood test that detects the ...

  10. Humanized Antibodies for Antiviral Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Co, Man Sung; Deschamps, Marguerite; Whitley, Richard J.; Queen, Cary

    1991-04-01

    Antibody therapy holds great promise for the treatment of cancer, autoimmune disorders, and viral infections. Murine monoclonal antibodies are relatively easy to produce but are severely restricted for therapeutic use by their immunogenicity in humans. Production of human monoclonal antibodies has been problematic. Humanized antibodies can be generated by introducing the six hypervariable regions from the heavy and light chains of a murine antibody into a human framework sequence and combining it with human constant regions. We humanized, with the aid of computer modeling, two murine monoclonal antibodies against herpes simplex virus gB and gD glycoproteins. The binding, virus neutralization, and cell protection results all indicate that both humanized antibodies have retained the binding activities and the biological properties of the murine monoclonal antibodies.

  11. Lupus anticoagulants and antiphospholipid antibodies

    MedlinePlus

    ... may make the diagnosis of antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APS) if: You have had a blood clot or ... your risk of blood clots. ANTIPHOSPHOLIPID ANTIBODY SYNDROME (APS) In general you will need long-term treatment ...

  12. The Art of Making Antibodies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Headon, Denis R.

    1986-01-01

    Provides background information for teachers on the nature and production of antibodies. Points out that the production of monoclonal antibodies blends the malignant with the beneficial to create a medical tool of exciting potential. (JN)

  13. Anti-insulin antibody test

    MedlinePlus

    Insulin antibodies - serum; Insulin Ab test ... Normally, there are no antibodies against insulin in your blood. Normal value ranges may vary slightly among different laboratories. Some labs use different measurements or ...

  14. Therapeutic antibodies in ophthalmology

    PubMed Central

    Magdelaine-Beuzelin, Charlotte; Pinault, Coralie; Paintaud, Gilles

    2010-01-01

    More than a century after the first successful use of serotherapy, antibody-based therapy has been renewed by the availability of recombinant monoclonal antibodies. As in the past, current clinical experience has prompted new pharmacological questions and induced much debate among practitioners, notably in the field of ophthalmology. An examination of the history of antibodies as treatments for ocular disorders reveals interesting parallels to the modern era. The fact that a treatment administered by a systemic route could be efficacious in a local disease was not widely accepted and the “chemical” nature of antibodies was not clearly understood in the late 19th century. Clinical studies by Henry Coppez, a Belgian ophthalmologist, established in 1894 that antidiphtheric antitoxins could be used to treat conjunctival diphtheria. Nearly 20 years later, Coppez and Danis described age-related macular degeneration, a disorder which today benefits from ranibizumab therapy. The product, a locally-administered recombinant monoclonal Fab fragment, is directed against vascular endothelial growth factor A. Interestingly, its full-size counterpart, bevacizumab, which is approved for the treatment of solid tumors, has also demonstrated efficacy in age-related macular degeneration when administered either intravenously or locally, which raises new questions about antibody pharmacology and biodistribution. In order to shed some light on this debate, we recount the early history of serotherapy applied to ophthalmology, review the exact molecular differences between ranibizumab and bevacizumab, and discuss what is known about IgG and the blood-retina barrier and the possible role of FcRn, an IgG transporter. PMID:21358858

  15. Trifunctional antibody ertumaxomab

    PubMed Central

    Diermeier-Daucher, Simone; Ortmann, Olaf; Buchholz, Stefan; Brockhoff, Gero

    2012-01-01

    Background: The trifunctional antibody ertumaxomab bivalently targets the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (Her2) on epithelial (tumor) cells and the T cell specific CD3 antigen, and its Fc region is selectively recognized by Fcγ type I/III receptor-positive immune cells. As a trifunctional immunoglobulin, ertumaxomab therefore not only targets Her2 on cancer cells, but also triggers immunological effector mechanisms mediated by T and accessory cells (e.g., macrophages, dendritic cells, natural killer cells). Whether molecular effects, however, might contribute to the cellular antitumor efficiency of ertumaxomab are largely unknown. Methods: Potential molecular effects of ertumaxomab on Her2-overexpressing BT474 and SK-BR-3 breast cancer cells were evaluated. The dissociation constant Kd of ertumaxomab was calculated from titration curves that were recorded by flow cytometry. Treatment-induced changes in Her2 homodimerization were determined by flow cytometric fluorescence resonance energy transfer measurements on a cell-by-cell basis. Potential activation / deactivation of Her2, ERK1/2, AKT and STAT3 were analyzed by western blotting, Immunochemistry and immunofluorescent cell staining. Results: The Kd of ertumaxomab for Her2-binding was determined at 265 nM and the ertumaxomab binding epitope was found to not overlap with that of the therapeutic anti-Her2 monoclonal antibodies trastuzumab and pertuzumab. Ertumaxomab caused an increase in Her2 phosphorylation at higher antibody concentrations, but changed neither the rate of Her2-homodimerization /-phosphorylation nor the activation state of key downstream signaling proteins analyzed. Conclusions: The unique mode of action of ertumaxomab, which relies more on activation of immune-mediated mechanisms against tumor cells compared with currently available therapeutic antibodies for breast cancer treatment, suggests that modular or sequential treatment with the trifunctional bivalent antibody might complement

  16. Antibody-gold cluster conjugates

    DOEpatents

    Hainfeld, J.F.

    1988-06-28

    Antibody- or antibody fragment-gold cluster conjugates are shown wherein the conjugate size can be about 5.0 nm. Methods and reagents are disclosed in which antibodies or Fab' fragments thereof are covalently bound to a stable cluster of gold atoms. 2 figs.

  17. Natural antibodies and the host immune responses to xenografts.

    PubMed

    Cramer, D V

    2000-05-01

    Natural antibodies are present in the serum of individuals in the absence of known antigenic stimulation. These antibodies are primarily IgM, polyreactive, and encoded by immunoglobulin V genes in germline configuration. Natural antibodies are produced by B-1 lymphocytes, cells that form the primary cell of the fetal and newborn B cell repertoire and may represent the basic foundation upon which the adult repertoire of B cell antibodies is based. Natural antibodies react with a variety of endogenous and exogenous antigens, including xenoantigens expressed by tissues between unrelated species. These antibodies are capable of causing the immediate rejection of grafts exchanged across species barriers. One of the central issues related to our understanding of the immunopathologic mechanisms responsible for rejection of xenografts is whether pre-formed natural antibodies and new antibodies induced following xenotransplantation are produced by the same pathways of B cell antibody production. We have established in studies conducted in rodents and humans that the initial phases of antibody production xenogeneic tissues involves the use of a restricted population of Ig germline genes to encode xenoantibody binding. As the humoral xenoantibody response matures, the same closely-related groups of Ig V genes are used to encode antibody binding and there is evidence for an isotype switch to IgG antibody production and the appearance of somatic mutations consistent with antigen-driven affinity maturation. Our findings in both rodent and human studies form the basis for our proposal that the xenograft response reflects the use of B cell natural antibody repertoires originally intended to provide protection against infection. The host humoral response is inadvertently recruited to mount antibody responses against foreign grafts because they display carbohydrate antigens that are shared by common environmental microbes. This model of xenoantibody responses is being tested in our

  18. Antibody mimetics: promising complementary agents to animal-sourced antibodies.

    PubMed

    Baloch, Abdul Rasheed; Baloch, Abdul Wahid; Sutton, Brian J; Zhang, Xiaoying

    2016-01-01

    Despite their wide use as therapeutic, diagnostic and detection agents, the limitations of polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies have inspired scientists to design the next generation biomedical agents, so-called antibody mimetics that offer many advantages over conventional antibodies. Antibody mimetics can be constructed by protein-directed evolution or fusion of complementarity-determining regions through intervening framework regions. Substantial progress in exploiting human, butterfly (Pieris brassicae) and bacterial systems to design and select mimetics using display technologies has been made in the past 10 years, and one of these mimetics [Kalbitor® (Dyax)] has made its way to market. Many challenges lie ahead to develop mimetics for various biomedical applications, especially those for which conventional antibodies are ineffective, and this review describes the current characteristics, construction and applications of antibody mimetics compared to animal-sourced antibodies. The possible limitations of mimetics and future perspectives are also discussed. PMID:25264572

  19. Antibody Engineering and Therapeutics Conference

    PubMed Central

    Almagro, Juan Carlos; Gilliland, Gary L; Scott, Jamie; Larrick, James W; Plückthun, Andreas; Veldman, Trudi; Adams, Gregory P; Parren, Paul WHI; Chester, Kerry A; Bradbury, Andrew; Reichert, Janice M; Huston, James S

    2013-01-01

    The Antibody Engineering and Therapeutics conference, which serves as the annual meeting of The Antibody Society, will be held in Huntington Beach, CA from Sunday December 8 through Thursday December 12, 2013. The scientific program will cover the full spectrum of challenges in antibody research and development, and provide updates on recent progress in areas from basic science through approval of antibody therapeutics. Keynote presentations will be given by Leroy Hood (Institute of System Biology), who will discuss a systems approach for studying disease that is enabled by emerging technology; Douglas Lauffenburger (Massachusetts Institute of Technology), who will discuss systems analysis of cell communication network dynamics for therapeutic biologics design; David Baker (University of Washington), who will describe computer-based design of smart protein therapeutics; and William Schief (The Scripps Research Institute), who will discuss epitope-focused immunogen design.   In this preview of the conference, the workshop and session chairs share their thoughts on what conference participants may learn in sessions on: (1) three-dimensional structure antibody modeling; (2) identifying clonal lineages from next-generation data sets of expressed VH gene sequences; (3) antibodies in cardiometabolic medicine; (4) the effects of antibody gene variation and usage on the antibody response; (5) directed evolution; (6) antibody pharmacokinetics, distribution and off-target toxicity; (7) use of knowledge-based design to guide development of complementarity-determining regions and epitopes to engineer or elicit the desired antibody; (8) optimizing antibody formats for immunotherapy; (9) antibodies in a complex environment; (10) polyclonal, oligoclonal and bispecific antibodies; (11) antibodies to watch in 2014; and (12) polyreactive antibodies and polyspecificity.

  20. Targeting antibodies to the cytoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Marschall, Andrea L J; Frenzel, André; Schirrmann, Thomas; Schüngel, Manuela

    2011-01-01

    A growing number of research consortia are now focused on generating antibodies and recombinant antibody fragments that target the human proteome. A particularly valuable application for these binding molecules would be their use inside a living cell, e.g., for imaging or functional intervention. Animal-derived antibodies must be brought into the cell through the membrane, whereas the availability of the antibody genes from phage display systems allows intracellular expression. Here, the various technologies to target intracellular proteins with antibodies are reviewed. PMID:21099369

  1. [Antibody therapy for Alzheimer's disease].

    PubMed

    Tabira, Takeshi; Matsumoto, Shin-Ei; Jin, Haifeng

    2011-11-01

    In order to avoid Abeta-induced autoimmune encephalitis, several monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies are in clinical trials. These are bapineuzumab, solanezumab, ponezumab, gantenerumab, BAN2401, gammaguard and octagam. Since each antibody has a different antigen epitope of Abeta, anti-amyloid activities are different. It is unknown which antibody is effective for Alzheimer disease, and we must wait for the result of clinical trials. Some patients who developed tissue amyloid plaque immuno-reactive (TAPIR) antibody showed slower decline after AN-1792 vaccination. We developed TAPIR-like monoclonal antibody, which was found to react with Abeta oligomers preferentially. PMID:22277519

  2. Monoclonal antibodies to gonadotropin subunits

    SciTech Connect

    Ehrlich, P.H.; Moyle, W.R.; Canfield, R.E.

    1985-01-01

    The production of monoclonal antibodies to peptide hormones, with their unifocal binding sites, can provide tools for understanding hormone structure and function. The paper focuses on techniques that are important for the study of monoclonal antibodies to chorionic gonadotropin (hCG), including hybridoma production, methods of screening for desired clones, properties of the monoclonal antibodies, effect of antibodies on hormone-receptor interaction, inhibition of binding of radiolabeled hCG, inhibition of hCG induced steroidogenesis, determination of relative orientation of epitopes, and synergistic actions of monoclonal antibodies to hCG.

  3. Therapeutic antibodies against cancer

    PubMed Central

    Adler, Mark J.; Dimitrov, Dimiter S.

    2012-01-01

    Antibody-based therapeutics against cancer are highly successful in clinic and currently enjoy unprecedented recognition of their potential; 13 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been approved for clinical use in the European Union and in the United States (one, mylotarg, was withdrawn from market in 2010). Three of the mAbs (bevacizumab, rituximab, trastuzumab) are in the top six selling protein therapeutics with sales in 2010 of more than $5 bln each. Hundreds of mAbs including bispecific mAbs and multispecific fusion proteins, mAbs conjugated with small molecule drugs and mAbs with optimized pharmacokinetics are in clinical trials. However, challenges remain and it appears that deeper understanding of mechanisms is needed to overcome major problems including resistance to therapy, access to targets, complexity of biological systems and individual variations. PMID:22520975

  4. Antibody Therapy for Histoplasmosis

    PubMed Central

    Nosanchuk, Joshua D.; Zancopé-Oliveira, Rosely M.; Hamilton, Andrew J.; Guimarães, Allan J.

    2012-01-01

    The endemic human pathogenic fungus Histoplasma capsulatum is a major fungal pathogen with a broad variety of clinical presentations, ranging from mild, focal pulmonary disease to life-threatening systemic infections. Although azoles, such as itraconazole and voriconazole, and amphotericin B have significant activity against H. capsulatum, about 1 in 10 patients hospitalized due to histoplasmosis die. Hence, new approaches for managing disease are being sought. Over the past 10 years, studies have demonstrated that monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) can modify the pathogenesis of histoplasmosis. Disease has been shown to be impacted by mAbs targeting either fungal cell surface proteins or host co-stimulatory molecules. This review will detail our current knowledge regarding the impact of antibody therapy on histoplasmosis. PMID:22347215

  5. Antibody-mediated radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Bloomer, W.D.; Lipsztein, R.; Dalton, J.F.

    1985-05-01

    Antibodies that react with antigens on the surface of tumor cells but not normal cells have great potential for cancer detection and therapy. If radiolabeled without loss of immunologic specificity, such antibodies may be able to deliver cytoxic amounts of radiation. Target- cell specificity and a high extraction coefficient are necessary with any radionuclide in order to minimize normal tissue irradiation. Tumor- cell-retention time and the rate of catabolized radionuclide will also influence ultimate applicability. Among the unanswered questions for choosing a radionuclide is the choice of particle emitter. Although classic beta emitters have been used in a number of clinical situations, they have not had a major impact on disease outcome except in diseases of the thyroid. Unfortunately, Auger emitters such as iodine 125 are cytotoxic only when localized within close proximity to the genome. On the other hand, alpha emitters such as astatine 211 eliminate the need for subcellular sequestration but not cell-specific localization. 34 references.

  6. Prediction of Antibody Epitopes.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Morten; Marcatili, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Antibodies recognize their cognate antigens in a precise and effective way. In order to do so, they target regions of the antigenic molecules that have specific features such as large exposed areas, presence of charged or polar atoms, specific secondary structure elements, and lack of similarity to self-proteins. Given the sequence or the structure of a protein of interest, several methods exploit such features to predict the residues that are more likely to be recognized by an immunoglobulin. Here, we present two methods (BepiPred and DiscoTope) to predict linear and discontinuous antibody epitopes from the sequence and/or the three-dimensional structure of a target protein. PMID:26424260

  7. Immunopotentiating Effect of Vinca Alkaloids on the Antibody Response to Sheep Red Blood Cells in the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Byrd, J. Randall; Isa, Abdallah M.

    1981-01-01

    Evidence is presented that the vinca alkaloids (vinblastine, vincristine, and vindesine) exert an immunopotentiating effect on the antibody response to sheep red blood cells (SRBC). The primary antibody response, measured by the rosette-forming cell (RFC) and hemagglutination (HA) assays, was enhanced by vincristine and vindesine treatments. Neither drug had any effect on the secondary antibody response. Vinblastine, while having no effect on the primary response, augmented the secondary antibody response to SRBC. PMID:7265281

  8. Commercial antibodies and their validation

    PubMed Central

    Voskuil, JLA

    2014-01-01

    Despite an impressive growth in the business of research antibodies a general lack of trust in commercial antibodies remains in place. A variety of issues, each one potentially causing an antibody to fail, underpin the frustrations that scientists endure. Lots of money goes to waste in buying and trying one failing antibody after the other without realizing all the pitfalls that come with the product: Antibodies can get inactivated, both the biological material and the assay itself can potentially be flawed, a single antibody featuring in many different catalogues can be deemed as a set of different products, and a bad choice of antibody type, wrong dilutions, and lack of proper validation can all jeopardize the intended experiments. Antibodies endorsed by scientific research papers do not always meet the scientist’s requirements either due to flawed specifications, or due to batch-to-batch variations. Antibodies can be found with Quality Control data obtained from previous batches that no longer represent the batch on sale. In addition, one cannot assume that every antibody is fit for every application. The best chance of success is to try an antibody that already was confirmed to perform correctly in the required platform. PMID:25324967

  9. Antibody Production with Synthetic Peptides.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bao-Shiang; Huang, Jin-Sheng; Jayathilaka, Lasanthi P; Lee, Jenny; Gupta, Shalini

    2016-01-01

    Peptides (usually 10-20 amino acid residues in length) can be used as effectively as proteins in raising antibodies producing both polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies routinely with titers higher than 20,000. Peptide antigens do not function as immunogens unless they are conjugated to proteins. Production of high quality antipeptide antibodies is dependent upon peptide sequence selection, the success of peptide synthesis, peptide-carrier protein conjugation, the humoral immune response in the host animal, the adjuvant used, the peptide dose administered, the injection method, and the purification of the antibody. Peptide sequence selection is probably the most critical step in the production of antipeptide antibodies. Although the process for designing peptide antigens is not exact, several guidelines and computational B-cell epitope prediction methods can help maximize the likelihood of producing antipeptide antibodies that recognize the protein. Antibodies raised by peptides have become essential tools in life science research. Virtually all phospho-specific antibodies are now produced using phosphopeptides as antigens. Typically, 5-20 mg of peptide is enough for antipeptide antibody production. It takes 3 months to produce a polyclonal antipeptide antibody in rabbits that yields ~100 mL of serum which corresponds to ~8-10 mg of the specific antibody after affinity purification using a peptide column. PMID:27515072

  10. A monoclonal antibody against leptin.

    PubMed

    Mahmoudian, Jafar; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood; Bayat, Ali Ahmad; Mahmoudi, Ahmad Reza; Vojgani, Yasaman; Tavangar, Banafsheh; Hadavi, Reza; Zarei, Saeed

    2012-10-01

    Leptin is an important protein that regulates energy storage and homeostasis in humans and animals. Leptin deficiency results in various abnormalities such as diabetes, obesity, and infertility. Producing a high affinity monoclonal antibody against human leptin provides an important tool to monitor and trace leptin function in different biological fluids. In this study, recombinant human leptin was conjugated to KLH and injected into mice. After immunization, mouse myeloma SP2/0 cells were fused with murine splenocytes followed by selection of antibody-producing hybridoma cells. After screening of different hybridoma colonies by ELISA, a high affinity antibody was selected and purified by affinity chromatography. The affinity constant of the antibody was measured by ELISA. Western blot, immunocytochemistry, and flow cytometry experiments were used to characterize the antibody. The anti-leptin antibody had a high affinity (around 1.13 × 10(-9) M) for its antigen. The saturation of the antibody with leptin (20 moles leptin per 1 mole antibody) in Western blot analysis proved that the antibody had specific binding to its antigen. Immunocytochemistry and flow cytometry on JEG-3 (human placental choriocarcinoma cell) cells revealed that the anti-leptin antibody recognized intracellular leptin. In conclusion, we report here the production and characterization of a murine anti-leptin antibody with high affinity for human leptin. PMID:23098305

  11. Antibody therapy for Ebola

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Xiangguo; Kobinger, Gary P

    2014-01-01

    Ebola viruses can cause severe hemorrhagic fever in humans and nonhuman primates with fatality rates up to 90%, and are identified as biosafety level 4 pathogens and CDC Category A Agents of Bioterrorism. To date, there are no approved therapies and vaccines available to treat these infections. Antibody therapy was estimated to be an effective and powerful treatment strategy against infectious pathogens in the late 19th, early 20th centuries but has fallen short to meet expectations to widely combat infectious diseases. Passive immunization for Ebola virus was successful in 2012, after over 15 years of failed attempts leading to skepticism that the approach would ever be of potential benefit. Currently, monoclonal antibody (mAbs)-based therapies are the most efficient at reversing the progression of a lethal Ebola virus infection in nonhuman primates, which recapitulate the human disease with the highest similarity. Novel combinations of mAbs can even fully cure lethally infected animals after clinical symptoms and circulating virus have been detected, days into the infection. These new developments have reopened the door for using antibody-based therapies for filovirus infections. Furthermore, they are reigniting hope that these strategies will contribute to better control the spread of other infectious agents and provide new tools against infectious diseases. PMID:24503566

  12. Primary antibody deficiency syndromes.

    PubMed

    Wood, P

    2009-03-01

    The primary antibody deficiency syndromes are a group of rare disorders characterized by an inability to produce clinically effective immunoglobulin responses. Some of these disorders result from genetic mutations in genes involved in B cell development, whereas others appear to be complex polygenic disorders. They most commonly present with recurrent infections due to encapsulated bacteria, although in the most common antibody deficiency, Common Variable Immunodeficiency, systemic and organ-specific autoimmunity can be a presenting feature. Diagnostic delay in this group of disorders remains a problem, and the laboratory has a vital role in the detection of abnormalities in immunoglobulin concentration and function. It is critical to distinguish this group of disorders from secondary causes of hypogammaglobulinaemia, in particular lymphoid malignancy, and appropriate laboratory investigations are of critical importance. Treatment of primary antibody deficiencies involves immunoglobulin replacement therapy, either via the intravenous or subcutaneous route. Patients remain at risk of a wide variety of complications, not all linked to diagnostic delay and inadequate therapy. In common variable immunodeficiency (CVID) in particular, patients remain at significantly increased risk of lymphoid malignancy, and regular clinical and laboratory monitoring is required. This review aims to give an overview of these conditions for the general reader, covering pathogenesis, clinical presentation, laboratory investigation, therapy and clinical management. PMID:19151170

  13. Maturation Pathways of Cross-Reactive HIV-1 Neutralizing Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Xiaodong; Chen, Weizao; Feng, Yang; Dimitrov, Dimiter S.

    2009-01-01

    Several human monoclonal antibodies (hmAbs) and antibody fragments, including the best characterized in terms of structure-function b12 and Fab X5, exhibit relatively potent and broad HIV-1 neutralizing activity. However, the elicitation of b12 or b12-like antibodies in vivo by vaccine immunogens based on the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) has not been successful. B12 is highly divergent from the closest corresponding germline antibody while X5 is less divergent. We have hypothesized that the relatively high degree of specific somatic hypermutations may preclude binding of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) to closest germline antibodies, and that identifying antibodies that are intermediates in the pathways to maturation could help design novel vaccine immunogens to guide the immune system for their enhanced elicitation. In support of this hypothesis we have previously found that a germline-like b12 (monovalent and bivalent scFv as an Fc fusion protein or IgG) lacks measurable binding to an Env as measured by ELISA with a sensitivity in the μM range [1]; here we present evidence confirming and expanding these findings for a panel of Envs. In contrast, a germline-like scFv X5 bound Env with high (nM) affinity. To begin to explore the maturation pathways of these antibodies we identified several possible b12 intermediate antibodies and tested their neutralizing activity. These intermediate antibodies neutralized only some HIV-1 isolates and with relatively weak potency. In contrast, germline-like scFv X5 neutralized a subset of the tested HIV-1 isolates with comparable efficiencies to that of the mature X5. These results could help explain the relatively high immunogenicity of the coreceptor binding site on gp120 and the abundance of CD4-induced (CD4i) antibodies in HIV-1-infected patients (X5 is a CD4i antibody) as well as the maturation pathway of X5. They also can help identify antigens that can bind specifically to b12 germline and intermediate antibodies

  14. Serum lymphocytotoxic antibodies and neurocognitive function in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed Central

    Long, A A; Denburg, S D; Carbotte, R M; Singal, D P; Denburg, J A

    1990-01-01

    The hypothesis that lymphocytotoxic antibodies are associated with neuropsychiatric involvement in systemic lupus erythematosus (NP-SLE) is re-evaluated in this study. In an unselected cohort of 98 women with SLE a cross-sectional study has been performed to analyse associations among standardised clinical, neurological, and neuropsychological assessments and lymphocytotoxic antibodies measured by microcytotoxicity assay. Fifty patients showed objective clinical evidence of continuing or past NP-SLE and 54 patients had cognitive impairment. In accordance with previous observations 44% (24/54) of the cognitively impaired group did not have clinically detectable evidence of NP-SLE. Although lymphocytotoxic antibodies were found to be only marginally more prevalent in those patients with a clinical diagnosis of NP-SLE than in those without (32% v 23%), these antibodies were significantly associated with cognitive impairment (chi 2 = 5.42; p less than 0.02). No association was detected between lymphocytotoxic antibodies and either overall systemic disease activity or other organ system involvement, suggesting that the association between lymphocytotoxic antibodies and cognitive dysfunction in SLE is specific. PMID:2339907

  15. Antibody-mediated neutralization of African swine fever virus: myths and facts.

    PubMed

    Escribano, José M; Galindo, Inmaculada; Alonso, Covadonga

    2013-04-01

    Almost all viruses can be neutralized by antibodies. However, there is some controversy about antibody-mediated neutralization of African swine fever virus (ASFV) with sera from convalescent pigs and about the protective relevance of antibodies in experimentally vaccinated pigs. At present, there is no vaccine available for this highly lethal and economically relevant virus and all classical attempts to generate a vaccine have been unsuccessful. This failure has been attributed, in part, to what many authors describe as the absence of neutralizing antibodies. The findings of some studies clearly contradict the paradigm of the impossibility to neutralize ASFV by means of monoclonal or polyclonal antibodies. This review discusses scientific evidence of these types of antibodies in convalescent and experimentally immunized animals, the nature of their specificity, the neutralization-mediated mechanisms demonstrated, and the potential relevance of antibodies in protection. PMID:23159730

  16. Antibodies to West Nile Virus in Wild and Farmed Crocodiles in Southeastern Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Machain-Williams, Carlos; Padilla-Paz, Sergio E.; Weber, Manuel; Cetina-Trejo, Rosa; Juarez-Ordaz, José Alfredo; Loroño-Pino, María Alba; Ulloa, Armando; Wang, Chong; Garcia-Rejon, Julián; Blitvich, Bradley J.

    2013-01-01

    Surveillance for evidence of West Nile virus (WNV) infection in Morelet’s crocodiles (Crocodylus moreletii) was conducted in Campeche State, Mexico, in 2007. Sera from 62 crocodiles (32 free-ranging and 30 captive) were assayed for antibodies to WNV by epitope-blocking enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Antibodies to WNV were detected in 13 (41%) wild and nine (30%) captive crocodiles, and the overall antibody prevalence was 35%. Although evidence of WNV infection in captive crocodiles has been reported in Mexico, we provide the first evidence of WNV exposure in wild crocodiles in Mexico. PMID:23778623

  17. Antibodies to West Nile virus in wild and farmed crocodiles in southeastern Mexico.

    PubMed

    Machain-Williams, Carlos; Padilla-Paz, Sergio E; Weber, Manuel; Cetina-Trejo, Rosa; Juarez-Ordaz, José Alfredo; Loroño-Pino, María Alba; Ulloa, Armando; Wang, Chong; Garcia-Rejon, Julián; Blitvich, Bradley J

    2013-07-01

    Surveillance for evidence of West Nile virus (WNV) infection in Morelet's crocodiles (Crocodylus moreletii) was conducted in Campeche State, Mexico, in 2007. Sera from 62 crocodiles (32 free-ranging and 30 captive) were assayed for antibodies to WNV by epitope-blocking enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Antibodies to WNV were detected in 13 (41%) wild and nine (30%) captive crocodiles, and the overall antibody prevalence was 35%. Although evidence of WNV infection in captive crocodiles has been reported in Mexico, we provide the first evidence of WNV exposure in wild crocodiles in Mexico. PMID:23778623

  18. NMDA receptor antibodies associated with distinct white matter syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Hacohen, Yael; Absoud, Michael; Hemingway, Cheryl; Jacobson, Leslie; Lin, Jean-Pierre; Pike, Mike; Pullaperuma, Sunil; Siddiqui, Ata; Wassmer, Evangeline; Waters, Patrick; Irani, Sarosh R.; Buckley, Camilla

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To report the clinical and radiologic findings of children with NMDA receptor (NMDAR) antibodies and white matter disorders. Method: Ten children with significant white matter involvement, with or without anti-NMDAR encephalitis, were identified from 46 consecutive NMDAR antibody–positive pediatric patients. Clinical and neuroimaging features were reviewed and the treatment and outcomes of the neurologic syndromes evaluated. Results: Three distinct clinicoradiologic phenotypes were recognized: brainstem encephalitis (n = 3), leukoencephalopathy following herpes simplex virus encephalitis (HSVE) (n = 2), and acquired demyelination syndromes (ADS) (n = 5); 3 of the 5 with ADS had myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein as well as NMDAR antibodies. Typical NMDAR antibody encephalitis was seen in 3 patients remote from the first neurologic syndrome (2 brainstem, 1 post-HSVE). Six of the 7 patients (85%) who were treated acutely, during the original presentation with white matter involvement, improved following immunotherapy with steroids, IV immunoglobulin, and plasma exchange, either individually or in combination. Two patients had escalation of immunotherapy at relapse resulting in clinical improvement. The time course of clinical features, treatments, and recoveries correlated broadly with available serum antibody titers. Conclusion: Clinicoradiologic evidence of white matter involvement, often distinct, was identified in 22% of children with NMDAR antibodies and appears immunotherapy responsive, particularly when treated in the acute phase of neurologic presentation. When observed, this clinical improvement is often mirrored by reduction in NMDAR antibody levels, suggesting that these antibodies may mediate the white matter disease. PMID:25340058

  19. Antineurofilament and antiretinal antibodies in AIDS patients with cytomegalovirus retinitis.

    PubMed Central

    Rosberger, D F; Tshering, S L; Polsky, B; Heinemann, M H; Klein, R F; Cunningham-Rundles, S

    1994-01-01

    Sera obtained from AIDS patients with cytomegalovirus (CMV) retinitis before and after treatment with foscarnet, AIDS patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) retinopathy, AIDS patients without retinal disease, and normal healthy controls with and without positive CMV serologies were assayed for the presence of antibodies against the 200-kDa outer, 160-kDa middle, and 68-kDa core subunits of the neurofilament triplet. Additional studies were performed to determine the presence of antibodies reactive with proteins extracted from crude human retinal antigen preparations. Antibodies against the 200-, 260-, and 68-kDa proteins of the neurofilament triplet were detected in 15 of 15 AIDS patients with CMV retinitis. The expression of these antibodies was unaffected, qualitatively, by successful treatment with foscarnet. In contrast, only 30% of patients with HIV retinopathy unrelated to CMV, fewer than 35% of AIDS patients with positive CMV titers but without evident retinitis, and fewer than 25% of healthy controls with positive or negative CMV titers possessed antibodies against any of the triplet proteins (P < 0.001). Antibodies against several clusters of retinal antigens were also identified in the sera of patients with CMV retinitis. In summary, the data indicate that retinal elements damaged by CMV infection induce an antibody response against the 200-, 160-, and 68kDa components of the neurofilament triplet as well as other, as yet undefined retinal antigens. Images PMID:8556483

  20. Antibody dependent enhancement of frog virus 3 infection

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Viruses included in the family Iridoviridae are large, icosahedral, dsDNA viruses that are subdivided into 5 genera. Frog virus 3 (FV3) is the type species of the genus Ranavirus and the best studied iridovirus at the molecular level. Typically, antibodies directed against a virus act to neutralize the virus and limit infection. Antibody dependent enhancement occurs when viral antibodies enhance infectivity of the virus rather than neutralize it. Results Here we show that anti-FV3 serum present at the time of FV3 infection enhances infectivity of the virus in two non-immune teleost cell lines. We found that antibody dependent enhancement of FV3 was dependent on the Fc portion of anti-FV3 antibodies but not related to complement. Furthermore, the presence of anti-FV3 serum during an FV3 infection in a non-immune mammalian cell line resulted in neutralization of the virus. Our results suggest that a cell surface receptor specific to teleost cell lines is responsible for the enhancement. Conclusions This report represents the first evidence of antibody dependent enhancement in iridoviruses. The data suggests that anti-FV3 serum can either neutralize or enhance viral infection and that enhancement is related to a novel antibody dependent enhancement pathway found in teleosts that is Fc dependent. PMID:20167100

  1. Antibody Therapy for Pediatric Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Vedi, Aditi; Ziegler, David S.

    2014-01-01

    Despite increasing cure rates for pediatric leukemia, relapsed disease still carries a poor prognosis with significant morbidity and mortality. Novel targeted therapies are currently being investigated in an attempt to reduce adverse events and improve survival outcomes. Antibody therapies represent a form of targeted therapy that offers a new treatment paradigm. Monoclonal antibodies are active in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and are currently in Phase III trials. Antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) are the next generation of antibodies where a highly potent cytotoxic agent is bound to an antibody by a linker, resulting in selective targeting of leukemia cells. ADCs are currently being tested in clinical trials for pediatric acute myeloid leukemia and ALL. Bispecific T cell engager (BiTE) antibodies are a construct whereby each antibody contains two binding sites, with one designed to engage the patient’s own immune system and the other to target malignant cells. BiTE antibodies show great promise as a novel and effective therapy for childhood leukemia. This review will outline recent developments in targeted agents for pediatric leukemia including monoclonal antibodies, ADCs, and BiTE antibodies. PMID:24795859

  2. Induction of antihemagglutinin antibodies by polyclonal antiidiotype antibodies.

    PubMed

    Dinca, L; Neuwirth, S; Schulman, J; Bona, C

    1993-01-01

    Antiidiotypic antibodies can be envisioned as an alternative approach in the development of vaccines against influenza virus, which exhibits natural antigenic variations. In our work, we obtained two polyclonal cross-reactive anti-Id antibodies against PY102, VM113, and VM202 mAbs, which in turn are specific respectively for PR8 virus and laboratory-induced virus variants (PY102-V1 and VM113-V1). With these cross-reactive anti-Id antibodies, we were able to elicit anti-HA antibodies in mice. In comparing the anti-HA antibody response in animals injected with anti-Id antibodies to those immunized with PR8 influenza virus, we demonstrated that the HI titer was higher after virus immunization and that the PR8 virus boost was more efficient in this group. Our results showed that the polyclonal cross-reactive anti-Id antibodies were more efficient than the individual anti-Ids at eliciting responses. At the same time, we demonstrated that PR8-primed T cells, cultured with B cells from animals immunized with anti-Id antibodies, were able to produce anti-PR8 antibodies subsequent to stimulation with influenza virus. PMID:8476510

  3. How antibodies use complement to regulate antibody responses.

    PubMed

    Sörman, Anna; Zhang, Lu; Ding, Zhoujie; Heyman, Birgitta

    2014-10-01

    Antibodies, forming immune complexes with their specific antigen, can cause complete suppression or several 100-fold enhancement of the antibody response. Immune complexes containing IgG and IgM may activate complement and in such situations also complement components will be part of the immune complex. Here, we review experimental data on how antibodies via the complement system upregulate specific antibody responses. Current data suggest that murine IgG1, IgG2a, and IgG2b upregulate antibody responses primarily via Fc-receptors and not via complement. In contrast, IgM and IgG3 act via complement and require the presence of complement receptors 1 and 2 (CR1/2) expressed on both B cells and follicular dendritic cells. Complement plays a crucial role for antibody responses not only to antigen complexed to antibodies, but also to antigen administered alone. Lack of C1q, but not of Factor B or MBL, severely impairs antibody responses suggesting involvement of the classical pathway. In spite of this, normal antibody responses are found in mice lacking several activators of the classical pathway (complement activating natural IgM, serum amyloid P component (SAP), specific intracellular adhesion molecule-grabbing non-integrin R1 (SIGN-R1) or C-reactive protein. Possible explanations to these observations will be discussed. PMID:25001046

  4. Antibody Glossary —

    Cancer.gov

    The components of the immune system have diverse roles in the initial development of cancers, progression of early-stage malignancies to invasive tumors, establishment of metastatic lesions, tumor dormancy, and response or resistance to therapy. Characterizing the components of the immune system and their functional status in tissues and in tumors requires the use of highly specific reagents. Researchers employ antibodies in a variety of in vitro and in vivo applications to delineate, enrich, or deplete specific immune subsets in order to understand their role(s) in tumorigenesis. This is a glossary of validated reagents and protocols that are useful for functional phenotyping of the immune system in murine cancer models.

  5. [Targeted therapy by monoclonal antibodies].

    PubMed

    Ohnuma, Kei; Morimoto, Chikao

    2010-10-01

    Human monoclonal antibodies are virtually indispensable for immunotherapy of cancer, infectious diseases, autoimmune diseases, or organ transplantation. The hybridoma technique, developed by Georges Köhler and César Milstein in 1975, has been shown to be most and highly producible method for generating murine monoclonal antibodies. However, poor results were obtained when it was administered in human bodies. With development of biotechnology, human monoclonal antibodies have been manufactured with higher efficiency. A major hindrance of producing therapeutic human monoclonal antibodies is the lack of an appropriate strategy for determining and selecting the antibodies that would be effective in vivo. In this review, we give an overview of the present techniques on therapeutic monoclonal antibodies. PMID:20954327

  6. Antiphospholipid antibodies: Paradigm in transition

    PubMed Central

    Horstman, Lawrence L; Jy, Wenche; Bidot, Carlos J; Ahn, Yeon S; Kelley, Roger E; Zivadinov, Robert; Maghzi, Amir H; Etemadifar, Masoud; Mousavi, Seyed Ali; Minagar, Alireza

    2009-01-01

    Objectives This is a critical review of anti-phospholipid antibodies (aPL). Most prior reviews focus on the aPL syndrome (APS), a thrombotic condition often marked by neurological disturbance. We bring to attention recent evidence that aPL may be equally relevant to non-thrombotic autoimmune conditions, notably, multiple sclerosis and ITP. Organization After a brief history, the recent proliferation of aPL target antigens is reviewed. The implication is that many more exist. Theories of aPL in thrombosis are then reviewed, concluding that all have merit but that aPL may have more diverse pathological consequences than now recognized. Next, conflicting results are explained by methodological differences. The lupus anticoagulant (LA) is then discussed. LA is the best predictor of thrombosis, but why this is true is not settled. Finally, aPL in non-thrombotic disorders is reviewed. Conclusion The current paradigm of aPL holds that they are important in thrombosis, but they may have much wider clinical significance, possibly of special interest in neurology. PMID:19154576

  7. Antibody Affinity Maturation in Fishes—Our Current Understanding

    PubMed Central

    Magor, Brad G.

    2015-01-01

    It has long been believed that fish lack antibody affinity maturation, in part because they were thought to lack germinal centers. Recent research done on sharks and bony fishes indicates that these early vertebrates are able to affinity mature their antibodies. This article reviews the functionality of the fish homologue of the immunoglobulin (Ig) mutator enzyme activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID). We also consider the protein and molecular evidence for Ig somatic hypermutation and antibody affinity maturation. In the context of recent evidence for a putative proto-germinal center in fishes we propose some possible reasons that observed affinity maturation in fishes often seems lacking and propose future work that might shed further light on this process in fishes. PMID:26264036

  8. Empowered Antibody Therapies - IBC conference.

    PubMed

    Herold, Jens

    2010-10-01

    The Empowered Antibody Therapies conference, held in Burlingame, CA, USA, included topics covering new therapeutic developments in the field of multispecific antibodies. This conference report highlights selected presentations on DVD-Igs from Abbott Laboratories, ImmTACs from Immunocore, 'Dock-and-Lock' technology from Immunomedics, the bispecific BiTE antibody blinatumomab from Micromet, and Triomabs from TRION Pharma and Fresenius Biotech. PMID:20878591

  9. Antibodies as stratagems against cancer.

    PubMed

    Papageorgiou, Louis; Cuong, Nguyen Tien; Vlachakis, Dimitrios

    2016-06-21

    Antibodies have been in the frontline of anticancer research during the last few decades, since a number of different ways have been discovered to utilize them as parts or main components of anticancer drugs. Antibodies are used as the only component of some anticancer drugs, but they can also be conjugated with a variety of substances. Antibody engineering methods such as humanization, chimerization and Fc engineering are applied in order to modify their properties according to the requirements of anticancer drug application. Given the continuous advances in biology and informatics, the role of antibodies in anticancer treatment is expected to be prominent. PMID:26738941

  10. Monoclonal antibodies and neuroblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Miraldi, F. )

    1989-10-01

    Several antineuroblastoma monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) have been described and two have been used in radioimmunoimaging and radioimmunotherapy in patients. MoAb 3F8 is a murine IgG3 antibody specific for the ganglioside GD2. Radioiodine-labeled 3F8 has been shown to specifically target human neuroblastoma in patients, and radioimmunoimaging with this agent has provided consistently high uptakes with tumor-to-background ratios of greater than or equal to 10:1. Radioimmunotherapy has been attempted with both MoAb 3F8 and MoAb UJ13A, and although encouraging results have been obtained, dosimetry data and tissue dose response information for these agents is lacking, which impedes the development of such therapy. 124I, a positron emitter, can be used with 3F8 in positron emission tomography (PET) scanning to provide dosimetry information for radioimmunotherapy. The tumor radiation dose response from radiolabeled MoAb also can be followed with PET images with fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) scanning of neuroblastoma tumors. Results to date indicate that radioimmunoimaging has clinical use in the diagnosis of neuroblastoma and the potential for radioimmunotherapy for this cancer remains high.48 references.

  11. Immunological effects of the anti-programmed death-1 antibody on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Yasuto; Nonomura, Chizu; Kondou, Ryota; Miyata, Haruo; Ashizawa, Tadashi; Maeda, Chie; Mitsuya, Koichi; Hayashi, Nakamasa; Nakasu, Yoko; Yamaguchi, Ken

    2016-09-01

    Immune checkpoint antibody-mediated blockade has gained attention as a new cancer immunotherapy strategy. Accumulating evidence suggests that this therapy imparts a survival benefit to metastatic melanoma and non-small cell lung cancer patients. A substantial amount of data on immune checkpoint antibodies has been collected from clinical trials; however, the direct effect of the antibodies on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) has not been exclusively investigated. In this study, we developed an anti-programmed death-1 (PD-1) antibody (with biosimilarity to nivolumab) and examined the effects of the antibody on PBMCs derived from cancer patients. Specifically, we investigated the effects of the anti-PD-1 antibody on proliferation, cytokine production, cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) and regulatory T cells. These investigations yielded several important results. First, the anti-PD-1 antibody had no obvious effect on resting PBMCs; however, high levels of the anti-PD-1 antibody partly stimulated PBMC proliferation when accompanied by an anti-CD3 antibody. Second, the anti-PD-1 antibody restored the growth inhibition of anti-CD3 Ab-stimulated PBMCs mediated by PD-L1. Third, the anti-PD-1 antibody exhibited a moderate inhibitory effect on the induction of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) by anti-CD3 antibody stimulation. Additionally, the presence of the anti-PD-1 antibody promoted antigen-specific CTL induction, which suggests that combining anti-PD-1 antibody and conventional immunotherapy treatments may have beneficial effects. These results indicate that specific cellular immunological mechanisms are partly responsible for the antitumor effect exhibited by the anti-PD-1 antibody against advanced cancers in clinical trials. PMID:27573705

  12. An association between antibodies specific for endothelial cells and renal transplant failure.

    PubMed

    Perrey, C; Brenchley, P E; Johnson, R W; Martin, S

    1998-06-01

    Human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-specific antibodies, present at the time of transplant, cause renal transplant rejection but cases of rejection of HLA-identical renal transplants indicate that antibodies to non-HLA antigens may also be detrimental. There is increasing evidence that antibodies to antigens present on endothelial cells and monocytes, and on endothelial cells alone, are associated with transplant rejection. We investigated 105 patients with failed renal transplants for the presence of endothelial cell reactive antibodies and compared them with 94 successful transplant patients to determine the role of non-HLA antibodies in transplant failure. Patient sera were tested by enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay (ELISA) using as a target fixed cells either from the endothelial/epithelial cell line EAHy.926 or primary cultures of human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Antibody binding was detected using an alkaline phosphatase-conjugated anti-human immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody. Fourteen of the 105 failed transplant patients had endothelial cell-reactive antibodies as compared with only three of the 94 patients with successful transplants (Fisher's exact test, p = 0.02). Antibody-positive sera were absorbed with the epithelial cell line A549 to remove antibodies directed against the epithelial component of EAHy.926 and with a pool of lymphoblastoid cell line cells to remove HLA-specific antibodies. Absorption did not reduce antibody activity showing the antibodies to be directed against endothelial cell determinants. Antibody-positive sera were also tested by flow cytometry against the monocyte cell line THP-1 and 13 of the 14 patients were negative. In conclusion, we have demonstrated the presence of IgG antibodies directed against endothelial cell determinants in renal transplant recipients in association with renal transplant failure. PMID:9777698

  13. Prospects for engineering HIV-specific antibodies for enhanced effector function and half-life

    PubMed Central

    Boesch, Austin W.; Alter, Galit; Ackerman, Margaret E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review A wealth of recent animal model data suggests that as exciting possibilities for the use of antibodies in passive immunotherapy strategies continue to develop, it will be important to broadly consider how antibodies achieve anti-HIV-1 effect in vivo. Recent findings Beyond neutralization breadth and potency, substantial evidence from natural infection, vaccination, and studies in animal models points to a critical role for antibody Fc receptor (FcR) engagement in reducing risk of infection, decreasing postinfection viremia, and delaying viral rebound. Supporting these findings in the setting of HIV, the clinical maturation of recombinant antibody therapeutics has reinforced the importance of Fc-driven activity in vivo across many disease settings, as well as opportunely resulted in the development and exploration of a number of engineered Fc sequence and glycosylation variants that possess differential binding to FcRs. Exploiting these variants as tools, the individual and concerted effects of antibody effector functions such as antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity, antibody-dependent cell-mediated virus inhibition, phagocytosis, complement-dependent cytotoxicity, antibody half-life, and compartmentalization are now being explored. As exciting molecular therapies are advanced, these studies promise to provide insight into optimal in-vivo antibody activity profiles. Summary Careful consideration of recent progress in understanding protective antibody activities in vivo can point toward how tailoring antibody activity via Fc domain modification may enable optimization of HIV prevention and eradication strategies. PMID:25700208

  14. Creating Ordered Antibody Arrays with Antibody-Polymer Conjugates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Xuehui; Obermeyer, Allie; Olsen, Bradley

    Antibodies are a category of functional proteins that play crucial roles in the immune system and have been widely applied in the area of cancer therapeutics, targeting delivery, signal detection, and sensors. Due to the extremely large size and lack of specific functional groups on the surface, it is challenging to functionalize antibodies and manipulate the ordered packing of antibodies in an array with high density and proper orientation, which is critical to achieve outstanding performance in materials. In this work, we demonstrate an efficient and facile approach for preparing antibody-polymer conjugates with two-step sequential ``click'' reaction to form antibody-polymer block copolymers. Highly ordered nanostructures are fabricated based on the principles of block copolymer self-assembly. The nanostructures are studied with both small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Lamellae with alternating antibody domain and polymer domain are observed with an overall domain size of ~50 nm. The nanostructure not only increases the packing density and promotes proper orientation of the antibody, but also provides possible channel to facilitate substrate transportation and improves the stability of the antibody.

  15. Constant Domain-regulated Antibody Catalysis*

    PubMed Central

    Sapparapu, Gopal; Planque, Stephanie; Mitsuda, Yukie; McLean, Gary; Nishiyama, Yasuhiro; Paul, Sudhir

    2012-01-01

    Some antibodies contain variable (V) domain catalytic sites. We report the superior amide and peptide bond-hydrolyzing activity of the same heavy and light chain V domains expressed in the IgM constant domain scaffold compared with the IgG scaffold. The superior catalytic activity of recombinant IgM was evident using two substrates, a small model peptide that is hydrolyzed without involvement of high affinity epitope binding, and HIV gp120, which is recognized specifically by noncovalent means prior to the hydrolytic reaction. The catalytic activity was inhibited by an electrophilic phosphonate diester, consistent with a nucleophilic catalytic mechanism. All 13 monoclonal IgMs tested displayed robust hydrolytic activities varying over a 91-fold range, consistent with expression of the catalytic functions at distinct levels by different V domains. The catalytic activity of polyclonal IgM was superior to polyclonal IgG from the same sera, indicating that on average IgMs express the catalytic function at levels greater than IgGs. The findings indicate a favorable effect of the remote IgM constant domain scaffold on the integrity of the V-domain catalytic site and provide a structural basis for conceiving antibody catalysis as a first line immune function expressed at high levels prior to development of mature IgG class antibodies. PMID:22948159

  16. Antibodies: Protective, destructive and regulatory role

    SciTech Connect

    Milgrom, F.; Abeyounis, C.J.; Albini, B.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains papers under 10 subject headings. The headings are: Production and Function of Antibodies, Protective Role of Antibodies, Antibodies to Foreign and Neoplastic Cells, Autoantibodies, Regulatory Mechanisms, Allergy, Immune Complexes, Antibodies in Pregnancy and Aging, Administration of Antibodies for Prevention and Therapy, and Abstracts of Poster Presentations.

  17. Antinuclear Antibodies (ANA)

    MedlinePlus

    ... drugs you take. ANA testing can produce a “false positive.” This typically signals the presence of antinuclear ... keep looking. In fact, you may have a “false positive” ANA, which means that the evidence is ...

  18. New engineered antibodies against prions

    PubMed Central

    Škrlj, Nives; Dolinar, Marko

    2014-01-01

    A number of recently developed and approved therapeutic agents based on highly specific and potent antibodies have shown the potential of antibody therapy. As the next step, antibody-based therapeutics will be bioengineered in a way that they not only bind pathogenic targets but also address other issues, including drug targeting and delivery. For antibodies that are expected to act within brain tissue, like those that are directed against the pathogenic prion protein isoform, one of the major obstacles is the blood-brain barrier which prevents efficient transfer of the antibody, even of the engineered single-chain variants. We recently demonstrated that a specific prion-specific antibody construct which was injected into the murine tail vein can be efficiently transported into brain tissue. The novelty of the work was in that the cell penetrating peptide was used as a linker connecting both specificity-determining domains of the antibody peptide, thus eliminating the need for the standard flexible linker, composed of an arrangement of three consecutive (Gly4Ser) repeats. This paves the road toward improved bioengineered antibody variants that target brain antigens. PMID:23941991

  19. [The significance of antiphospholipid antibodies].

    PubMed

    Fojtík, Z

    2004-04-01

    Antiphospholipid antibodies (APLA) present very heterogeneous groups of antibodies which can significantly influence processes on different levels of coagulation cascade depending on effects of phospholipid surfaces on blood coagulation. This usually leads to a particular level of thrombophylia. Clinical syndrome accompanying positive APLA, such as antiphospholipid syndrome, was defined by clinical and laboratory symptoms. This clinical syndrome can be a primary syndrome, if other disorders with ability to induce generation of antibodies can be excluded, or a secondary syndrome. The most often in cases of systemic tissue disease. APLA can be divided according to the presence of lupus anticoagulant and anticardiolipin antibodies. According to a definition lupus anticoagulants are antibodies able to inhibit and prolong in vitro one or more blood clotting processes dependent on phospholipid surfaces. Anticardiolipin antibodies are antibodies measured by ELISA method with cardiolipin used as an antibody. Findings show that some APLA are directed against proteins bound to phospholipid surfaces. Main cofactor proteins include beta 2-GPI and prothrombin. Because of their heterogeneous specificity, APLA are directed against negative phospholipids or proteins bound to phospholipid surfaces and have important pathophysiology role in development of antiphospholipid syndrome. PMID:15214303

  20. Production of monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Freysd'ottir, J

    2000-01-01

    The discovery of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) produced by "hybridoma technology" by George Köhler and Cesar Milstein in 1975 has had a great impact both on basic biological research and on clinical medicine. However, this impact was not immediately recognized. It took around 10 years to appreciate the importance of using these mAbs in various fields of science other than immunology, such as cell biology, biochemistry, microbiology, virology, para-sitology, physiology, genetics, and molecular biology; and also in areas of clinical medicine, such as pathology, hematology, oncology, and infectious disease. The contribution of mAbs to science and clinical medicine was recognized in 1984 by the award of the Nobel Prize for Medicine to Köhler and Milstein. PMID:21337095

  1. Micromechanical antibody sensor

    DOEpatents

    Thundat, Thomas G.; Jacobson, K. Bruce; Doktycz, Mitchel J.; Kennel, Stephen J.; Warmack, Robert J.

    2001-01-01

    A sensor apparatus is provided using a microcantilevered spring element having a coating of a detector molecule such as an antibody or antigen. A sample containing a target molecule or substrate is provided to the coating. The spring element bends in response to the stress induced by the binding which occurs between the detector and target molecules. Deflections of the cantilever are detected by a variety of detection techniques. The microcantilever may be approximately 1 to 200 .mu.m long, approximately 1 to 50 .mu.m wide, and approximately 0.3 to 3.0 .mu.m thick. A sensitivity for detection of deflections is in the range of 0.01 nanometers.

  2. Monoclonal antibodies in myeloma.

    PubMed

    Sondergeld, Pia; van de Donk, Niels W C J; Richardson, Paul G; Plesner, Torben

    2015-09-01

    The development of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) for the treatment of disease goes back to the vision of Paul Ehrlich in the late 19th century; however, the first successful treatment with a mAb was not until 1982, in a lymphoma patient. In multiple myeloma, mAbs are a very recent and exciting addition to the therapeutic armamentarium. The incorporation of mAbs into current treatment strategies is hoped to enable more effective and targeted treatment, resulting in improved outcomes for patients. A number of targets have been identified, including molecules on the surface of the myeloma cell and components of the bone marrow microenvironment. Our review focuses on a small number of promising mAbs directed against molecules on the surface of myeloma cells, including CS1 (elotuzumab), CD38 (daratumumab, SAR650984, MOR03087), CD56 (lorvotuzumab mertansine), and CD138/syndecan-1 (BT062/indatuximab ravtansine). PMID:26452191

  3. [Antithrombotic recombinant antibodies].

    PubMed

    Muzard, Julien; Loyau, Stéphane; Ajzenberg, Nadine; Billiald, Philippe; Jandrot-Perrus, Martine

    2006-01-01

    Coronary syndromes, stroke and other ischaemic arterial diseases are the leading cause of death in the world and will probably remain it at least until 2020. Cardiovascular diseases kill 17 million people each year with an expected increase to 20 million in 2020 and 24 million in 2030. The global impact of recurrence and death during the 6 months following an acute coronary syndrome remains at 8-15% in the present state of medical practice. Acute ischaemic syndromes have a common aetiology that is the formation of a platelet-rich clot at the site of severe coronary stenosis and of eroded atherosclerotic plaques. Therapy consists of medical treatments associating thrombolysis, antiplatelet drugs, and the re-opening of the coronary artery by angioplasty. But these treatments do not prevent morbidity and mortality reaching 15% at 6 months. Finally the treatment of stroke is very limited. There is thus a real clinical need to improve existing treatments and to discover new molecules. Platelet activation is a critical step in ischaemic cardiovascular diseases. This is the reason why antiplatelet drugs are most often prescribed in these cases. Currently, only one recombinant antithrombotic antibody is used in therapy. This is a chimeric Fab, c7E3 or abciximab, which inhibits the final phase of platelet aggregation. Abciximab is prescribed in acute coronary syndromes treated by angioplasty. However, treatment by abciximab can induce severe complications, principally, hemorrages and thrombopenia. Other platelet receptors involved in the earlier steps of platelet activation, such as the phases of contact with and of activation by the subendothelium matrix, have been identified as potential targets for the development of antithrombotic antibodies and are described in this revue. PMID:17652972

  4. Antibody responses to Bordetella bronchiseptica in vaccinated and infected dogs

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, John; Rhodes, Carrie; Lacoste, Stacey; Krakowka, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Bordetella bronchiseptica (Bb) whole cell bacterins have been replaced with acelluar vaccines. We evaluated the response to the acellular Bb vaccines in Bb-seropositive commingled laboratory beagles and client-owned dogs with various lifestyles and vaccination histories. A single parenteral dose of the acellular Bb vaccine resulted in consistent anamnestic IgG, and to a lesser, but notable extent, IgA, Bb-reactive antibody responses in the seropositive beagles. Associated with the increase in antibodies measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was an increase in the complement (C)-dependent IgG antibody mediated bactericidal effect on Bb in vitro. Antibody responses in client-owned dogs were more variable and were dependent upon the vaccination history and serological evidence of previous Bb exposure. Antibodies from vaccinated dogs recognized several Bb proteins, notably P68 (pertactin) and P220 (fimbrial hemagglutinin), the response to which has been shown to be disease-sparing in Bp infections. These antibody responses were similar to those in experimentally infected dogs and in dogs that had received a widely used whole cell bacterin. PMID:25183893

  5. Naturally acquired antibodies against Clostridium perfringens epsilon toxin in goats.

    PubMed

    Veschi, Josir Laine A; Bruzzone, Octavio A; Losada-Eaton, Daniela M; Dutra, Iveraldo S; Fernandez-Miyakawa, Mariano E

    2008-09-15

    Clostridium perfringens type D-producing epsilon toxin is a common cause of death in sheep and goats worldwide. Although anti-epsilon toxin serum antibodies have been detected in healthy non-vaccinated sheep, the information regarding naturally acquired antibodies in ruminants is scanty. The objective of the present report was to characterize the development of naturally acquired antibodies against C. perfringens epsilon toxin in goats. The levels of anti-epsilon toxin antibodies in blood serum of goat kids from two different herds were examined continuously for 14 months. Goats were not vaccinated against any clostridial disease and received heterologous colostrums from cows that were not vaccinated against any clostridial disease. During the survey one of these flocks suffered an unexpectedly severe C. perfringens type D enterotoxemia outbreak. The results showed that natural acquired antibodies against C. perfringens epsilon toxin can appear as early as 6 weeks in young goats and increase with the age without evidence of clinical disease. The enterotoxemia outbreak was coincident with a significant increase in the level of anti-epsilon toxin antibodies. PMID:18538416

  6. Metrics for antibody therapeutics development.

    PubMed

    Reichert, Janice M

    2010-01-01

    A wide variety of full-size monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and therapeutics derived from alternative antibody formats can be produced through genetic and biological engineering techniques. These molecules are now filling the preclinical and clinical pipelines of every major pharmaceutical company and many biotechnology firms. Metrics for the development of antibody therapeutics, including averages for the number of candidates entering clinical study and development phase lengths for mAbs approved in the United States, were derived from analysis of a dataset of over 600 therapeutic mAbs that entered clinical study sponsored, at least in part, by commercial firms. The results presented provide an overview of the field and context for the evaluation of on-going and prospective mAb development programs. The expansion of therapeutic antibody use through supplemental marketing approvals and the increase in the study of therapeutics derived from alternative antibody formats are discussed. PMID:20930555

  7. Antibodies - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Cancer.gov

    NCI announces the release of monoclonal antipeptide antibodies from rabbit for distribution on the antibody portal. There are 60 recently added monoclonal antibodies, with 56 generated from mouse and 4 generated from rabbit.

  8. Epstein-Barr virus antibody test

    MedlinePlus

    Epstein-Barr virus antibody test is a blood test to detect antibodies to the Epstein-Barr virus ( EBV ). ... specialist looks for antibodies to the Epstein-Barr virus. In the first stages of an illness, little ...

  9. Brief Report: Seminal Plasma Anti-HIV Antibodies Trigger Antibody-dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity: Implications for HIV Transmission.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Matthew S; Madhavi, Vijaya; Ana-Sosa-Batiz, Fernanda; Center, Rob J; Wilson, Kim M; Bunupuradah, Torsak; Ruxrungtham, Kiat; Kent, Stephen J

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence from HIV vaccine trials in humans and non-human primates suggests that nonneutralizing antibody functions, such as antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), are an important component of vaccine-mediated protection. Whether anti-HIV ADCC antibodies are present in seminal fluid, however, is not known. We assessed whether anti-HIV antibodies within seminal plasma mediate ADCC and activate natural killer (NK) cells. Using matched blood and seminal plasma samples, we detected anti-HIV IgG within samples from all 11 HIV-infected donors. Furthermore, anti-HIV antibodies within the seminal plasma triggered detectable ADCC in 9 of 11 donors and activated NK cells in 6 of 11 donors. The ability of seminal plasma-derived IgG to activate NK cells in an anti-HIV antibody-dependent manner was enhanced when IgG were enriched and other seminal plasma components were removed. These observations have relevance for understanding natural immunity to HIV infection and provide assistance with HIV vaccine design. PMID:26761269

  10. Cold denaturation of monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Lazar, Kristi L; Patapoff, Thomas W

    2010-01-01

    The susceptibility of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to undergo cold denaturation remains unexplored. In this study, the phenomenon of cold denaturation was investigated for a mAb, mAb1, through thermodynamic and spectroscopic analyses. tryptophan fluorescence and circular dichroism (CD) spectra were recorded for the guanidine hydrochloride (GuHCl)-induced unfolding of mAb1 at pH 6.3 at temperatures ranging from −5 to 50°C. A three-state unfolding model incorporating the linear extrapolation method was fit to the fluorescence data to obtain an apparent free energy of unfolding, ΔGu, at each temperature. CD studies revealed that mAb1 exhibited polyproline II helical structure at low temperatures and at high GuHCl concentrations. the Gibbs-Helmholtz expression fit to the ΔGu versus temperature data from fluorescence gave a ΔCp of 8.0 kcal mol−1 K−1, a maximum apparent stability of 23.7 kcal mol−1 at 18°C, and an apparent cold denaturation temperature (TCD) of −23°C. ΔGu values for another mAb (mAb2) with a similar framework exhibited less stability at low temperatures, suggesting a depressed protein stability curve and a higher relative TCD. Direct experimental evidence of the susceptibility of mAb1 and mAb2 to undergo cold denaturation in the absence of denaturant was confirmed at pH 2.5. thus, mAbs have a potential to undergo cold denaturation at storage temperatures near −20°C (pH 6.3), and this potential needs to be evaluated independently for individual mAbs. PMID:20093856

  11. Inhibitory and neutral antibodies to Plasmodium falciparum MSP119 form ring structures with their antigen.

    PubMed

    Dekker, Carien; Uthaipibull, Chairat; Calder, Lesley J; Lock, Matthew; Grainger, Munira; Morgan, William D; Dodson, Guy G; Holder, Anthony A

    2004-09-01

    Blood-stage malaria vaccine candidates include surface proteins of the merozoite. Antibodies to these proteins may either block essential steps during invasion or render the merozoite susceptible to phagocytosis or complement-mediated degradation. Structural information on merozoite surface proteins complexed to antibodies provides crucial information for knowledge-based vaccine design. The major merozoite surface protein MSP1 is an abundant surface molecule in Plasmodium falciparum. Only a subset of antibodies against MSP119 inhibits invasion (inhibitory antibodies), whereas other antibodies binding to MSP119 have no effect on invasion (neutral antibodies). Here we report on the complex of MSP119 with both inhibitory monoclonal antibody 12.10 and neutral monoclonal antibody 2F10. The complexes were established using both whole IgG's and Fab fragments, and analysed by dynamic light scattering, electron microscopy and analytical ultra centrifugation. Specific ring structures were formed in the ternary complex with the two antibodies, providing direct evidence of non-overlapping epitopes on MSP119. Mutational studies also indicated that the epitopes of the inhibitory and neutral antibodies are spatially remote. PMID:15279960

  12. Site-targeted mutagenesis for stabilization of recombinant monoclonal antibody expressed in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants

    PubMed Central

    Hehle, Verena K.; Paul, Matthew J.; Roberts, Victoria A.; van Dolleweerd, Craig J.; Ma, Julian K.-C.

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the degradation pattern of a murine IgG1κ monoclonal antibody expressed in and extracted from transformed Nicotiana tabacum. Gel electrophoresis of leaf extracts revealed a consistent pattern of recombinant immunoglobulin bands, including intact and full-length antibody, as well as smaller antibody fragments. N-terminal sequencing revealed these smaller fragments to be proteolytic cleavage products and identified a limited number of protease-sensitive sites in the antibody light and heavy chain sequences. No strictly conserved target sequence was evident, although the peptide bonds that were susceptible to proteolysis were predominantly and consistently located within or near to the interdomain or solvent-exposed regions in the antibody structure. Amino acids surrounding identified cleavage sites were mutated in an attempt to increase resistance. Different Guy’s 13 antibody heavy and light chain mutant combinations were expressed transiently in N. tabacum and demonstrated intensity shifts in the fragmentation pattern, resulting in alterations to the full-length antibody-to-fragment ratio. The work strengthens the understanding of proteolytic cleavage of antibodies expressed in plants and presents a novel approach to stabilize full-length antibody by site-directed mutagenesis.—Hehle, V. K., Paul, M. J., Roberts, V. A., van Dolleweerd, C. J., Ma, J. K.-C. Site-targeted mutagenesis for stabilization of recombinant monoclonal antibody expressed in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants. PMID:26712217

  13. Site-targeted mutagenesis for stabilization of recombinant monoclonal antibody expressed in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants.

    PubMed

    Hehle, Verena K; Paul, Matthew J; Roberts, Victoria A; van Dolleweerd, Craig J; Ma, Julian K-C

    2016-04-01

    This study examined the degradation pattern of a murine IgG1κ monoclonal antibody expressed in and extracted from transformedNicotiana tabacum Gel electrophoresis of leaf extracts revealed a consistent pattern of recombinant immunoglobulin bands, including intact and full-length antibody, as well as smaller antibody fragments. N-terminal sequencing revealed these smaller fragments to be proteolytic cleavage products and identified a limited number of protease-sensitive sites in the antibody light and heavy chain sequences. No strictly conserved target sequence was evident, although the peptide bonds that were susceptible to proteolysis were predominantly and consistently located within or near to the interdomain or solvent-exposed regions in the antibody structure. Amino acids surrounding identified cleavage sites were mutated in an attempt to increase resistance. Different Guy's 13 antibody heavy and light chain mutant combinations were expressed transiently inN. tabacumand demonstrated intensity shifts in the fragmentation pattern, resulting in alterations to the full-length antibody-to-fragment ratio. The work strengthens the understanding of proteolytic cleavage of antibodies expressed in plants and presents a novel approach to stabilize full-length antibody by site-directed mutagenesis.-Hehle, V. K., Paul, M. J., Roberts, V. A., van Dolleweerd, C. J., Ma, J. K.-C. Site-targeted mutagenesis for stabilization of recombinant monoclonal antibody expressed in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants. PMID:26712217

  14. [Monoclonal antibody for cancer treatment].

    PubMed

    Achiwa, Hiroyuki; Sato, Shigeki; Ueda, Ryuzo

    2002-04-01

    Antibodies have for many decades been viewed as ideal molecules for cancer therapy. Although promising from the start, it has taken much of more than two decades to reach the level of clinical application. Genetic engineering of antibodies; that is novel technologies for chimeric or humanizing monoclonal antibodies, has greatly advanced their utility in molecular targeting therapies, and in the past four years some therapeutic monoclonal antibodies for hematologic malignancies and solid tumors, such as Rituximab for B-cell lymphoma and Trastuzumab for metastatic breast cancer, have provided sufficient efficacy and safety to support regulatory approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. They were subsequently approved by the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare in 2001. Many molecular biological and immunological studies have revealed the targeting properties of the host immune system and the biological mechanism of cancer cells for a more specific anticancer effect. Many clinical trials of monoclonal antibodies as a single agent, or in combination protocol with current standard chemotherapy or immunoconjugates have shown promise in the treatment of specific diseases. Furthermore, novel antibody designs and improved understanding of the mode of action of current antibodies lend great hope to the future of this therapeutic approach. The accumulating results from many basic, clinical and translational studies may lead to more individualized therapeutic strategies using these agent directed at specific genetic and immunologic targets. PMID:11977531

  15. The therapeutic monoclonal antibody market

    PubMed Central

    Ecker, Dawn M; Jones, Susan Dana; Levine, Howard L

    2015-01-01

    Since the commercialization of the first therapeutic monoclonal antibody product in 1986, this class of biopharmaceutical products has grown significantly so that, as of November 10, 2014, forty-seven monoclonal antibody products have been approved in the US or Europe for the treatment of a variety of diseases, and many of these products have also been approved for other global markets. At the current approval rate of ∼ four new products per year, ∼70 monoclonal antibody products will be on the market by 2020, and combined world-wide sales will be nearly $125 billion. PMID:25529996

  16. Reducing heterophilic antibody interference in immunoassays using single chain antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Baird, Cheryl L.; Tan, Ruimin; Fischer, Christopher J.; Victry, Kristin D.; Zangar, Richard C.; Rodland, Karin D.

    2011-12-15

    Sandwich ELISA microarrays have the potential to simultaneously quantify the levels of multiple diagnostic targets in a biological sample. However, as seen with traditional ELISA diagnostics, heterophilic antibodies (HA) in patient sera have the potential to cause interference in these assays. We demonstrate here that reducing the diagnostic capture antibody to its minimal functional unit, the variable heavy and light domains artificially connected with a short polypeptide linker (scFv), is an effective strategy for reducing the HA assay interference.

  17. Immunotoxicity of monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are large molecules intended to bind to specific targets often expressed on the immune system, and to treat various immunopathological conditions. Therefore, mAbs can be considered to have a high potential for immunotoxicity, which is reflected in the clinical experience accumulated on mAbs-induced adverse effects related to immunosuppression, immunostimulation and hypersensitivity (immunogenicity). So far, non clinical immunotoxicity studies have been inadequate to address all safety issues in relation to the possible immunotoxicity of mAbs, because they are fraught with limitations and pitfalls primarily related to the lack of relevant animal species. In addition, clinical studies rarely include validated end-points dedicated to the prediction of immunotoxicity. With the ongoing development of mAbs as novel therapeutic strategies for a wide variety of diseases, efforts should be paid to improve our understanding of mAbs-induced immunotoxic effects and design dedicated strategies to assess their immunological safety, both non clinically and clinically. PMID:20061816

  18. Novel antibody-antibiotic conjugate eliminates intracellular S. aureus.

    PubMed

    Lehar, Sophie M; Pillow, Thomas; Xu, Min; Staben, Leanna; Kajihara, Kimberly K; Vandlen, Richard; DePalatis, Laura; Raab, Helga; Hazenbos, Wouter L; Morisaki, J Hiroshi; Kim, Janice; Park, Summer; Darwish, Martine; Lee, Byoung-Chul; Hernandez, Hilda; Loyet, Kelly M; Lupardus, Patrick; Fong, Rina; Yan, Donghong; Chalouni, Cecile; Luis, Elizabeth; Khalfin, Yana; Plise, Emile; Cheong, Jonathan; Lyssikatos, Joseph P; Strandh, Magnus; Koefoed, Klaus; Andersen, Peter S; Flygare, John A; Wah Tan, Man; Brown, Eric J; Mariathasan, Sanjeev

    2015-11-19

    Staphylococcus aureus is considered to be an extracellular pathogen. However, survival of S. aureus within host cells may provide a reservoir relatively protected from antibiotics, thus enabling long-term colonization of the host and explaining clinical failures and relapses after antibiotic therapy. Here we confirm that intracellular reservoirs of S. aureus in mice comprise a virulent subset of bacteria that can establish infection even in the presence of vancomycin, and we introduce a novel therapeutic that effectively kills intracellular S. aureus. This antibody-antibiotic conjugate consists of an anti-S. aureus antibody conjugated to a highly efficacious antibiotic that is activated only after it is released in the proteolytic environment of the phagolysosome. The antibody-antibiotic conjugate is superior to vancomycin for treatment of bacteraemia and provides direct evidence that intracellular S. aureus represents an important component of invasive infections. PMID:26536114

  19. Functional effects of anticardiolipin antibodies.

    PubMed

    Harris, E N; Pierangeli, S S

    1996-10-01

    The 'lupus anticoagulant' phenomenon is the best documented functional effect of antiphospholipid (aPL) antibodies, occurring either by inhibition of the prothrombinase and/or Factor X activation reactions. Understanding the mechanism by which aPL antibodies inhibit phospholipid dependent coagulation reactions may yield important clues about their 'thrombogenic effects' in vivo. We conducted a series of studies to determine the specificity, diversity, and mechanism by which aPL antibodies inhibit phospholipid dependent reactions. Results showed that purified immunoglobulins with lupus anticoagulant and anti-cardiolipin activities were absorbed by negatively charged phospholipids and both activities were recovered from the phospholipid-antibody precipitate. Purified aPL antibodies inhibited the prothrombinase reaction in a plasma free system in which beta 2-glycoprotein 1 (beta 2-GP1) was absent. Affinity purified aPL antibodies had 25-50 times the inhibitory activity of immunoglobulin preparations. The phospholipid binding proteins, beta 2-GPI and placental anticoagulant protein I (PAP I), independently inhibited the prothrombinase reaction, and when these proteins were combined with aPL, inhibition of the prothrombinase reaction was additive. Antibodies of syphilis had no inhibitory effect, partially accounted for by lack of specificity for phosphotidylserine (PS). Although aPL antibodies inhibited the protein C activation reaction, there was no correlation of these activities with inhibition of the prothrombinase reaction. Together, these results show that aPL exert their effects by interaction with negatively charged phospholipids, in particular phosphotidylserine, but lack of correlation between inhibition of the prothrombinase and protein C activation reactions, suggests that the nature of the coagulation protein is also important. PMID:8902763

  20. Antibodies to watch in 2014.

    PubMed

    Reichert, Janice M

    2014-01-01

    Since 2010, mAbs has documented the biopharmaceutical industry's progress in transitioning antibody therapeutics to first Phase 3 clinical studies and regulatory review, and its success at gaining first marketing approvals for antibody-based products. This installment of the "Antibodies to watch" series outlines events anticipated to occur between December 2013 and the end of 2014, including first regulatory actions on marketing applications for vedolizumab, siltuximab, and ramucirumab, as well as the Fc fusion proteins Factor IX-Fc and Factor VIII-Fc; and the submission of first marketing applications for up to five therapeutics (secukinumab, ch14.18, onartuzumab, necitumumab, gevokizumab). Antibody therapeutics in Phase 3 studies are described, with an emphasis on those with study completion dates in 2014, including antibodies targeting interleukin-17a or the interleukin-17a receptor (secukinumab, ixekizumab, brodalumab), proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (alirocumab, evolocumab, bococizumab), and programmed death 1 receptor (lambrolizumab, nivolumab). Five antibodies with US Food and Drug Administration's Breakthrough Therapy designation (obinutuzumab, ofatumumab, lambrolizumab, bimagrumab, daratumumab) are also discussed. PMID:24284914

  1. Natural monoclonal antibodies and cancer.

    PubMed

    Vollmers, Peter H; Brändlein, Stephanie

    2008-06-01

    Immunity is responsible for recognition and elimination of infectious particles and for removal of cellular waste, modified self structures and transformed cells. Innate or natural immunity acts as a first line defense and is also the link to acquired immunity and memory. By using the human hybridoma technology, a series of monoclonal antibodies and several new tumor-specific targets could be identified. A striking phenomenon of immunity against malignant cells is that all so far isolated tumor-specific antibodies were germ-line coded natural IgM antibodies. And neither in animals nor in humans affinity-maturated tumor-specific IgG antibodies have been detected so far. These IgM's preferentially bind to carbohydrate epitopes on post-transcriptionally modified surface receptors, which are recently patented and preferentially remove malignant cells by inducing apoptosis to avoid inflammatory processes. Our "biology-" or "function-driven" method represents a unique yet powerful approach compared to the typical approaches on screening compounds or antibodies against non-validated targets (mostly differentially expressed). Moreover, the approach creates a competitive patenting strategy of creating proprietary antibodies and validated targets at the same time, which has the potential of further streamlining the discovery of new cancer therapies. PMID:18537750

  2. Antibodies to watch in 2015

    PubMed Central

    Reichert, Janice M

    2015-01-01

    The commercial pipeline of recombinant antibody therapeutics is robust and dynamic. As of early December 2014, a total of 6 such products (vedolizumab, siltuximab, ramucirumab, pembrolizumab, nivolumab, blinatumomab) were granted first marketing approvals in 2014. As discussed in this perspective on antibodies in late-stage development, the outlook for additional approvals, potentially still in 2014 and certainly in 2015, is excellent as marketing applications for 6 antibody therapeutics (secukinumab, evolocumab, mepolizumab, dinutuximab, nivolumab, necitumumab) are undergoing a first regulatory review in the EU or US. Of the 39 novel mAbs currently in Phase 3 studies, a marketing application for one (alirocumab) may be submitted in late 2014, and marketing application submissions for at least 4 (reslizumab, ixekizumab, ocrelizumab, obiltoxaximab) are expected in 2015. Other ‘antibodies to watch’ are those in Phase 3 studies with estimated primary completion dates in late 2014 or 2015, which includes 13 for non-cancer indications (brodalumab, bimagrumab, bococizumab, MABp1, gevokizumab, dupilumab, sirukumab, sarilumab, tildrakizumab, guselkumab, epratuzumab, combination of actoxumab + bezlotoxumab, romosozumab) and 2 (racotumomab and clivatuzumab tetraxetan) undergoing evaluation as treatments for cancer. In addition to the novel antibody therapeutics mentioned, biosimilar infliximab and biosimilar trastuzumab are ‘antibodies to watch’ in 2015 because of their potential for entry into the US market and regulatory review, respectively. PMID:25484055

  3. Avian Diagnostic and Therapeutic Antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, David Sherman

    2012-12-31

    A number of infectious agents have the potential of causing significant clinical symptomology and even death, but dispite this, the number of incidence remain below the level that supports producing a vaccine. Therapeutic antibodies provide a viable treatment option for many of these diseases. We proposed that antibodies derived from West Nile Virus (WNV) immunized geese would be able to treat WNV infection in mammals and potential humans. We demonstrated that WNV specific goose antibodies are indeed successful in treating WNV infection both prophylactically and therapeutically in a golden hamster model. We demonstrated that the goose derived antibodies are non-reactogenic, i.e. do not cause an inflammatory response with multiple exposures in mammals. We also developed both a specific pathogen free facility to house the geese during the antibody production phase and a patent-pending purification process to purify the antibodies to greater than 99% purity. Therefore, the success of these study will allow a cost effective rapidly producible therapeutic toward clinical testing with the necessary infrastructure and processes developed and in place.

  4. Antibodies to watch in 2014

    PubMed Central

    Reichert, Janice M

    2014-01-01

    Since 2010, mAbs has documented the biopharmaceutical industry’s progress in transitioning antibody therapeutics to first Phase 3 clinical studies and regulatory review, and its success at gaining first marketing approvals for antibody-based products. This installment of the “Antibodies to watch” series outlines events anticipated to occur between December 2013 and the end of 2014, including first regulatory actions on marketing applications for vedolizumab, siltuximab, and ramucirumab, as well as the Fc fusion proteins Factor IX-Fc and Factor VIII-Fc; and the submission of first marketing applications for up to five therapeutics (secukinumab, ch14.18, onartuzumab, necitumumab, gevokizumab). Antibody therapeutics in Phase 3 studies are described, with an emphasis on those with study completion dates in 2014, including antibodies targeting interleukin-17a or the interleukin-17a receptor (secukinumab, ixekizumab, brodalumab), proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (alirocumab, evolocumab, bococizumab), and programmed death 1 receptor (lambrolizumab, nivolumab). Five antibodies with US Food and Drug Administration’s Breakthrough Therapy designation (obinutuzumab, ofatumumab, lambrolizumab, bimagrumab, daratumumab) are also discussed. PMID:24284914

  5. Novel antibodies as anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Zafir-Lavie, I; Michaeli, Y; Reiter, Y

    2007-05-28

    In recent years antibodies, whether generated by traditional hybridoma technology or by recombinant DNA strategies, have evolved from Paul Ehrlich's 'magic bullets' to a modern age 'guided missile'. In the recent years of immunologic research, we are witnessing development in the fields of antigen screening and protein engineering in order to create specific anticancer remedies. The developments in the field of recombinant DNA, protein engineering and cancer biology have let us gain insight into many cancer-related mechanisms. Moreover, novel techniques have facilitated tools allowing unique distinction between malignantly transformed cells, and regular ones. This understanding has paved the way for the rational design of a new age of pharmaceuticals: monoclonal antibodies and their fragments. Antibodies can select antigens on both a specific and a high-affinity account, and further implementation of these qualities is used to target cancer cells by specifically identifying exogenous antigens of cancer cell populations. The structure of the antibody provides plasticity resonating from its functional sites. This review will screen some of the many novel antibodies and antibody-based approaches that are being currently developed for clinical applications as the new generation of anticancer agents. PMID:17530025

  6. Cancer therapy with radiolabeled and drug/toxin-conjugated antibodies.

    PubMed

    Govindan, Serengulam V; Griffiths, Gary L; Hansen, Hans J; Horak, Ivan D; Goldenberg, David M

    2005-08-01

    Radioimmunotherapy and antibody-directed chemotherapy have emerged as cancer treatment modalities with the regulatory approval of products for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and acute myeloid leukemia. Antibody-toxin therapy is likewise on the verge of clinical fruition. Accumulating evidence suggests that radioimmunotherapy may have the best impact in minimal-disease and adjuvant settings, especially with radioresistant solid tumors. For the latter, ongoing efforts in 'pretargeting' to increase deliverable tumor radiation dose, combination therapies, and locoregional applications are also of importance. Antibody-drug conjugates have the potential to increase the therapeutic index of chemotherapy by minimizing systemic toxicity and improving tumor targeting. The design of optimal drug conjugates in this regard is predicated upon the proper choice of the target antigen, the cleavable-linker, and the drug. In respect of antibody-toxin conjugates, considerable progress has been made in chemical and recombinant immunotoxin designs, and in the advancement of many products to clinical trials. Continued development of antibody-directed therapies should expand the options available for the management of cancer. PMID:16029057

  7. Alternative downstream processes for production of antibodies and antibody fragments.

    PubMed

    Arakawa, Tsutomu; Tsumoto, Kouhei; Ejima, Daisuke

    2014-11-01

    Protein-A or Protein-L affinity chromatography and virus inactivation are key processes for the manufacturing of therapeutic antibodies and antibody fragments. These two processes often involve exposure of therapeutic proteins to denaturing low pH conditions. Antibodies have been shown to undergo conformational changes at low pH, which can lead to irreversible damages on the final product. Here, we review alternative downstream approaches that can reduce the degree of low pH exposure and consequently damaged product. We and others have been developing technologies that minimize or eliminate such low pH processes. We here cover facilitated elution of antibodies using arginine in Protein-A and Protein-G affinity chromatography, a more positively charged amidated Protein-A, two Protein-A mimetics (MEP and Mabsorbent), mixed-mode and steric exclusion chromatography, and finally enhanced virus inactivation by solvents containing arginine. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Recent advances in molecular engineering of antibody. PMID:24859179

  8. Macrophage Internal HIV-1 Is Protected from Neutralizing Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Koppensteiner, Herwig; Banning, Carina; Schneider, Carola; Hohenberg, Heinrich

    2012-01-01

    In macrophages, HIV-1 accumulates in intracellular vesicles designated virus-containing compartments (VCCs). These might play an important role in the constitution of macrophages as viral reservoirs and allow HIV-1 to evade the immune system by sequestration in an internal niche, which is difficult to access from the exterior. However, until now, evidence of whether internal virus accumulations are protected from the host's humoral immune response is still lacking. In order to be able to study the formation and antibody accessibility of VCCs, we generated HIV-1 with green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged Gag replicating in primary macrophages. Live-cell observations revealed faint initial cytosolic Gag expression and subsequent large intracellular Gag accumulations which stayed stable over days. Taking advantage of the opportunity to study the accessibility of intracellular VCCs via the cell surface, we demonstrate that macrophage internal HIV-1-containing compartments cannot be targeted by neutralizing antibodies. Furthermore, HIV-1 was efficiently transferred from antibody-treated macrophages to T cells. Three-dimensional reconstruction of electron microscopic slices revealed that Gag accumulations correspond to viral particles within enclosed compartments and convoluted membranes. Thus, although some VCCs were connected to the plasma membrane, the complex membrane architecture of the HIV-1-containing compartment might shield viral particles from neutralizing antibodies. In sum, our study provides evidence that HIV-1 is sequestered into a macrophage internal membranous web, posing an obstacle for the elimination of this viral reservoir. PMID:22205742

  9. Antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and skin disease

    SciTech Connect

    Norris, D.A.; Lee, L.A.

    1985-07-01

    Antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) is a recently described mechanism of immunologic lysis in which cellular targets sensitized by specific antibodies are efficiently and selectively lysed by Fc receptor (FcR) bearing nonspecific effectors. Immunoglobulins of various classes (IgG, IgM, IgA, IgE) and various cellular effectors (large granular lymphocytes, monocyte/macrophages, T lymphocytes, neutrophils, and eosinophils) can induce ADCC in vitro, and the importance of ADCC in vivo is being tested experimentally in resistance to viral, bacterial, and parasitic infection, in tumor surveillance, in allograft rejection, and in inflammatory diseases. There is much indirect evidence that ADCC may be the mechanism of damage of different cellular targets in skin diseases, but the best direct evidence concerns immunologic keratinocyte damage, especially in cutaneous lupus erythematosus (LE). The authors have shown that keratinocytes of several species are highly susceptible to lymphocyte and monocyte-mediated ADCC, but not to neutrophil or eosinophil ADCC in vitro using two different cytotoxicity assays. In contrast, complement was a relatively ineffective mediator of lysis of metabolically intact keratinocyte targets. Patients with certain cutaneous lupus syndromes have serum antibodies capable of inducing monocyte and lymphocyte ADCC of targets coated with extractable nuclear antigens. The authors have shown that these antigens apparently move to the cell membrane of keratinocytes in vitro following ultraviolet irradiation. In an animal model, they have shown that antibodies to SSA/Ro bind to human keratinocytes in vivo, especially after ultraviolet irradiation.

  10. Biological Activities of Rabbit Immunoglobulin M and Immunoglobulin G Antibodies to Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Bjornson, Ann B.; Michael, J. Gabriel

    1970-01-01

    Immunoglobulin (Ig)M and IgG antibodies, prepared in the rabbit against the protective antigen of Pseudomonas aeruginosa P4, were compared as to their biological activities in vitro and in vivo. In vitro biological activities of these antibodies were determined by passive hemagglutination, bactericidal, and opsonophagocytic tests. Increased effectiveness of IgM over IgG on a molar basis was demonstrated in all of these tests. However, in mouse protection tests, in which the purified globulins were injected intraperitoneally 4 hr prior to challenge with P. aeruginosa suspended in hog gastric mucin, IgM anticapsular antibody was found to be less effective than IgG antibody. The exact mechanism whereby IgG antibody exerts more protective ability than IgM antibody is still unknown. We present evidence to suggest that the difference in activity between the two classes of antibody is due to the ability of the IgG antibody to enter the bloodstream more rapidly than the IgM antibody and also to the ability of IgG to diffuse rapidly through the tissues of the organs. PMID:16557861

  11. Autoantibodies: Focus on anti-DNA antibodies.

    PubMed

    Almqvist, Nina; Winkler, Thomas H; Mårtensson, Inga-Lill

    2011-01-01

    Ever since the days of Ehrlich and the birth of humoral immunity, self-reactivity or 'horror autotoxicus' as referred to by Paul Ehrlich, has been of great concern. For instance, in patients with the autoimmune disease systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), anti-nuclear and anti-DNA antibodies have been recognized for many years. Despite this, the exact mechanism as to how the immune system fails to protect the individual and allows these autoantibodies to develop in this and other systemic autoimmune diseases remains uncertain. So how can we explain their presence? Evidence suggests that B cells expressing autoreactive antibodies do not normally arise but rather undergo negative selection as they develop. In light of this, it might seem contradictory that not all autoreactive B cell clones are eliminated, although this may not even be the intention since autoantibodies are also found in healthy individuals and may even protect from autoimmunity. Here, we will discuss autoantibodies, in particular those recognizing DNA, with regard to their reactivity and their potentially pathogenic or protective properties. PMID:21776330

  12. Antibody-Mediated Autoimmune Encephalopathies and Immunotherapies.

    PubMed

    Gastaldi, Matteo; Thouin, Anaïs; Vincent, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Over the last 15 years it has become clear that rare but highly recognizable diseases of the central nervous system (CNS), including newly identified forms of limbic encephalitis and other encephalopathies, are likely to be mediated by antibodies (Abs) to CNS proteins. The Abs are directed against membrane receptors and ion channel-associated proteins that are expressed on the surface of neurons in the CNS, such as N-methyl D-aspartate receptors and leucine-rich, glioma inactivated 1 protein and contactin-associated protein like 2, that are associated with voltage-gated potassium channels. The diseases are not invariably cancer-related and are therefore different from the classical paraneoplastic neurological diseases that are associated with, but not caused by, Abs to intracellular proteins. Most importantly, the new antibody-associated diseases almost invariably respond to immunotherapies with considerable and sometimes complete recovery, and there is convincing evidence of their pathogenicity in the relatively limited studies performed so far. Treatments include first-line steroids, intravenous immunoglobulins, and plasma exchange, and second-line rituximab and cyclophosphamide, followed in many cases by steroid-sparing agents in the long-term. This review focuses mainly on N-methyl D-aspartate receptor- and voltage-gated potassium channel complex-related Abs in adults, the clinical phenotypes, and treatment responses. Pediatric cases are referred to but not reviewed in detail. As there have been very few prospective studies, the conclusions regarding immunotherapies are based on retrospective studies. PMID:26692392

  13. MERS-CoV Antibodies in Humans, Africa, 2013-2014.

    PubMed

    Liljander, Anne; Meyer, Benjamin; Jores, Joerg; Müller, Marcel A; Lattwein, Erik; Njeru, Ian; Bett, Bernard; Drosten, Christian; Corman, Victor Max

    2016-06-01

    Dromedaries in Africa and elsewhere carry the Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV). To search for evidence of autochthonous MERS-CoV infection in humans, we tested archived serum from livestock handlers in Kenya for MERS-CoV antibodies. Serologic evidence of infection was confirmed for 2 persons sampled in 2013 and 2014. PMID:27071076

  14. MERS-CoV Antibodies in Humans, Africa, 2013–2014

    PubMed Central

    Liljander, Anne; Meyer, Benjamin; Jores, Joerg; Müller, Marcel A.; Lattwein, Erik; Njeru, Ian; Bett, Bernard; Corman, Victor Max

    2016-01-01

    Dromedaries in Africa and elsewhere carry the Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV). To search for evidence of autochthonous MERS-CoV infection in humans, we tested archived serum from livestock handlers in Kenya for MERS-CoV antibodies. Serologic evidence of infection was confirmed for 2 persons sampled in 2013 and 2014. PMID:27071076

  15. Investigating the structural biofunctionality of antibodies conjugated to magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Occhipinti, Emanuela; Verderio, Paolo; Natalello, Antonino; Galbiati, Elisabetta; Colombo, Miriam; Mazzucchelli, Serena; Salvadè, Agnese; Tortora, Paolo; Doglia, Silvia Maria; Prosperi, Davide

    2011-02-01

    We present the synthesis of trastuzumab-functionalized pegylated iron oxide nanoparticles and provide an FTIR-based approach to gain a direct evidence of the actual conservation of the native structure of conjugated antibody. Their target-selectivity to specific cancer cell receptors has been also assessed.We present the synthesis of trastuzumab-functionalized pegylated iron oxide nanoparticles and provide an FTIR-based approach to gain a direct evidence of the actual conservation of the native structure of conjugated antibody. Their target-selectivity to specific cancer cell receptors has been also assessed. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details, TEM images, DLS and relaxivity plots, additional FT-IR spectra and analyses. See DOI: 10.1039/c0nr00436g

  16. Transfusion significance of LWa allo-antibodies.

    PubMed

    Napier, J A; Rowe, G P

    1987-01-01

    An example of anti-LWa, arising as a complication during a RhD immunization programme, has been studied for evidence of its likely in vivo haemolytic properties. In vitro testing of the anti-LWa showed it to be largely IgG1 acting by the antiglobulin technique. Results of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity and macrophage phagocytic assays were both negative. However, 99mTc-labelled Lw(a+) donor cells showed a slight reduction in t1/2 (18 h) compared with the normal survival of autologous cells. Despite this observation, and bearing in mind the difficulties of interpreting apparently accelerated destruction of small serologically incompatible red cells, it was concluded that the presence of this example of anti-LWa should not be a bar to urgent transfusion. PMID:3125687

  17. Antibodies: an alternative for antibiotics?

    PubMed

    Berghman, L R; Abi-Ghanem, D; Waghela, S D; Ricke, S C

    2005-04-01

    In 1967, the success of vaccination programs, combined with the seemingly unstoppable triumph of antibiotics, prompted the US Surgeon General to declare that "it was time to close the books on infectious diseases." We now know that the prediction was overly optimistic and that the fight against infectious diseases is here to stay. During the last 20 yr, infectious diseases have indeed made a staggering comeback for a variety of reasons, including resistance against existing antibiotics. As a consequence, several alternatives to antibiotics are currently being considered or reconsidered. Passive immunization (i.e., the administration of more or less pathogen-specific antibodies to the patient) prior to or after exposure to the disease-causing agent is one of those alternative strategies that was almost entirely abandoned with the introduction of chemical antibiotics but that is now gaining interest again. This review will discuss the early successes and limitations of passive immunization, formerly referred to as "serum therapy," the current use of antibody administration for prophylaxis or treatment of infectious diseases in agriculture, and, finally, recent developments in the field of antibody engineering and "molecular farming" of antibodies in various expression systems. Especially the potential of producing therapeutic antibodies in crops that are routine dietary components of farm animals, such as corn and soy beans, seems to hold promise for future application in the fight against infectious diseases. PMID:15844826

  18. Antibodies to watch in 2016.

    PubMed

    Reichert, Janice M

    2016-01-01

    The number of novel antibody therapeutics that received first marketing approvals in 2015 met expectations, with 6 (alirocumab (Praluent®), evolocumab (Repatha®), daratumumab (Darzalex®), dinutuximab (Unituxin®), idarucizumab (Praxbind®), mepolizumab (Nucala®)) granted first approvals as of mid-November*. Seven novel antibody therapeutics (begelomab, brodalumab, elotuzumab, ixekizumab, necitumumab, obiltoxaximab, reslizumab) are in regulatory review, and thus a similar number, if not more, are projected to gain first approvals in 2016. Commercial late-stage antibody therapeutics development exceeded expectations by increasing from 39 candidates in Phase 3 studies as of late 2014 to 53 as of late 2015. Of the 53 candidates, transitions to regulatory review by the end of 2016 are projected for 8 (atezolizumab, benralizumab, bimagrumab, durvalumab, inotuzumab ozogamicin, lebrikizumab, ocrelizumab, tremelimumab). Other "antibodies to watch" include 15 candidates (bavituximab, bococizumab, dupilumab, fasinumab, fulranumab, gevokizumab, guselkumab, ibalizumab, LY2951742, onartuzumab, REGN2222, roledumab, romosozumab, sirukumab, Xilonix) undergoing evaluation in Phase 3 studies that have estimated primary completion dates in 2016. As evidenced by the antibody therapeutics discussed in this perspective, the biopharmaceutical industry has a highly active late-stage clinical pipeline that may deliver numerous new products to the global market in the near future. *See Note added in proof for updates through December 31, 2015. PMID:26651519

  19. Antibody persistence and T-cell balance: Two key factors confronting HIV vaccine development

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, George K.; DeVico, Anthony L.; Gallo, Robert C.

    2014-01-01

    The quest for a prophylactic AIDS vaccine is ongoing, but it is now clear that the successful vaccine must elicit protective antibody responses. Accordingly, intense efforts are underway to identify immunogens that elicit these responses. Regardless of the mechanism of antibody-mediated protection, be it neutralization, Fc-mediated effector function, or both, antibody persistence and appropriate T-cell help are significant problems confronting the development of a successful AIDS vaccine. Here, we discuss the evidence illustrating the poor persistence of antibody responses to Env, the envelope glycoprotein of HIV-1, and the related problem of CD4+ T-cell responses that compromise vaccine efficacy by creating excess cellular targets of HIV-1 infection. Finally, we propose solutions to both problems that are applicable to all Env-based AIDS vaccines regardless of the mechanism of antibody-mediated protection. PMID:25349379

  20. Enhancing Blockade of Plasmodium falciparum Erythrocyte Invasion: Assessing Combinations of Antibodies against PfRH5 and Other Merozoite Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Miura, Kazutoyo; Illingworth, Joseph J.; Choudhary, Prateek; Murungi, Linda M.; Furze, Julie M.; Diouf, Ababacar; Miotto, Olivo; Crosnier, Cécile; Wright, Gavin J.; Kwiatkowski, Dominic P.; Fairhurst, Rick M.; Long, Carole A.; Draper, Simon J.

    2012-01-01

    No vaccine has yet proven effective against the blood-stages of Plasmodium falciparum, which cause the symptoms and severe manifestations of malaria. We recently found that PfRH5, a P. falciparum-specific protein expressed in merozoites, is efficiently targeted by broadly-neutralizing, vaccine-induced antibodies. Here we show that antibodies against PfRH5 efficiently inhibit the in vitro growth of short-term-adapted parasite isolates from Cambodia, and that the EC50 values of antigen-specific antibodies against PfRH5 are lower than those against PfAMA1. Since antibody responses elicited by multiple antigens are speculated to improve the efficacy of blood-stage vaccines, we conducted detailed assessments of parasite growth inhibition by antibodies against PfRH5 in combination with antibodies against seven other merozoite antigens. We found that antibodies against PfRH5 act synergistically with antibodies against certain other merozoite antigens, most notably with antibodies against other erythrocyte-binding antigens such as PfRH4, to inhibit the growth of a homologous P. falciparum clone. A combination of antibodies against PfRH4 and basigin, the erythrocyte receptor for PfRH5, also potently inhibited parasite growth. This methodology provides the first quantitative evidence that polyclonal vaccine-induced antibodies can act synergistically against P. falciparum antigens and should help to guide the rational development of future multi-antigen vaccines. PMID:23144611

  1. Communication: Antibody stability and behavior on surfaces.

    PubMed

    Bush, Derek B; Knotts, Thomas A

    2015-08-14

    Antibody microarrays have the potential to revolutionize molecular detection in scientific, medical, and other biosensor applications, but their current use is limited because of poor reliability. It is hypothesized that one reason for their poor performance results from strong antibody-surface interactions that destabilize the antibody structure and create steric interference for antigen recognition. Using a recently developed coarse-grain protein-surface model that has been parameterized against experimental data, antibody-surface interactions for two antibody orientations on two types of surfaces have been investigated. The results show that regardless of attachment geometry, antibodies tend to collapse onto hydrophobic surfaces and exhibit lower overall stability compared to antibodies on hydrophilic surfaces or in bulk solution. The results provide an unprecedented view into the dynamics of antibodies on surfaces and offer new insights into the poor performance exhibited by current antibody microarrays. PMID:26277119

  2. Uses of monoclonal antibody 8H9

    DOEpatents

    Cheung, Nai-Kong V.

    2013-04-09

    This invention provides a composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a suitable carrier. This invention provides a pharmaceutical composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier. This invention also provides an antibody other than the monoclonal antibody 8H9 comprising the complementary determining regions of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof, capable of binding to the same antigen as the monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention provides a substance capable of competitively inhibiting the binding of monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention also provides an isolated scFv of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof. This invention also provides the 8H9 antigen. This invention also provides different uses of the monoclonal antibody 8H9 or its derivative.

  3. Uses of monoclonal antibody 8H9

    DOEpatents

    Cheung, Nai-Kong V.

    2010-06-22

    This invention provides a composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a suitable carrier. This invention provides a pharmaceutical composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier. This invention also provides an antibody other than the monoclonal antibody 8H9 comprising the complementary determining regions of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof, capable of binding to the same antigen as the monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention provides a substance capable of competitively inhibiting the binding of monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention also provides an isolated scFv of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof. This invention also provides the 8H9 antigen. This invention also provides different uses of the monoclonal antibody 8H9 or its derivative.

  4. Communication: Antibody stability and behavior on surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, Derek B.; Knotts, Thomas A.

    2015-08-01

    Antibody microarrays have the potential to revolutionize molecular detection in scientific, medical, and other biosensor applications, but their current use is limited because of poor reliability. It is hypothesized that one reason for their poor performance results from strong antibody-surface interactions that destabilize the antibody structure and create steric interference for antigen recognition. Using a recently developed coarse-grain protein-surface model that has been parameterized against experimental data, antibody-surface interactions for two antibody orientations on two types of surfaces have been investigated. The results show that regardless of attachment geometry, antibodies tend to collapse onto hydrophobic surfaces and exhibit lower overall stability compared to antibodies on hydrophilic surfaces or in bulk solution. The results provide an unprecedented view into the dynamics of antibodies on surfaces and offer new insights into the poor performance exhibited by current antibody microarrays.

  5. Antisperm antibodies and in vitro fertilization.

    PubMed

    Janssen, H J; Bastiaans, B A; Goverde, H J; Hollanders, H M; Wetzels, A A; Schellekens, L A

    1992-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of antisperm antibodies in the male, the female, or both partners on the outcome of in vitro fertilization treatment. The results in terms of ongoing pregnancies in the male and female antibody-positive group were the same as in the antibody-negative group. In the double antibody-positive group two of the three patients became pregnant. When high levels of antisperm antibodies were present on the spermatozoa, the fertilization rate was significantly reduced. In the female positive group no clear relationship between the antibody titer and the fertilization percentage could be detected. Abnormal semen quality was responsible for a much lower fertilization rate than the presence of antibodies. The conclusion of this study is that in vitro fertilization provides an equal change of conception in couples with antisperm antibodies in comparison with couples with no antibodies if the other semen parameters are normal. PMID:1472812

  6. Remembering antibodies coming of age.

    PubMed

    Melchers, Fritz

    2016-01-01

    Fifty years ago, Norbert Hilschmann discovered that antibodies have variable immunoglobulin domains to bind antigens, and constant domains to carry out effector functions in the immune system. Just as this happened, the author of this perspective entered the field of immunology. Ten years later, the genetic basis of antibody variability was discovered by Susumu Tonegawa and his colleagues at the Basel Institute for Immunology, where the author had become a scientific member. At the same time, Georges Köhler, a former graduate student of the author's at the Basel Institute, invented with Cesar Milstein at the Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge, England, the method to produce monoclonal antibodies. The author describes here his memories connected to these three monumental, paradigm-changing discoveries, which he observed in close proximity. PMID:27144253

  7. Antibodies to watch in 2013

    PubMed Central

    Reichert, Janice M

    2013-01-01

    The transitions of antibody therapeutics to late-stage clinical development, regulatory review and the market are proceeding at a rapid pace in 2013. Since late 2012, two monoclonal antibody (mAb) therapeutics (itolizumab, trastuzumab emtansine) received their first approvals, first marketing applications for three mAbs (vedolizumab, ramucirumab, obinutuzumab) were submitted to regulatory agencies, and five mAbs (brodalumab, MABp1, moxetumomab pasudotox, tildrakizumab, rilotumumab) entered their first Phase 3 studies. The current total of commercially-sponsored antibody therapeutics undergoing evaluation in late-stage studies is 30. Recently announced study results for farletuzumab, naptumomab estafenatox, and tabalumab indicate that clinical endpoints were not met in some Phase 3 studies of these product candidates. PMID:23727858

  8. Molecular-specific urokinase antibodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atassi, M. Zouhair (Inventor); Morrison, Dennis R. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Antibodies have been developed against the different molecular forms of urokinase using synthetic peptides as immunogens. The peptides were synthesized specifically to represent those regions of the urokinase molecules which are exposed in the three-dimensional configuration of the molecule and are uniquely homologous to urokinase. Antibodies are directed against the lysine 158-isoleucine 159 peptide bond which is cleaved during activation from the single-chain (ScuPA) form to the bioactive double chain (54 KDa and 33 KDa) forms of urokinase and against the lysine 135 lysine 136 bond that is cleaved in the process of removing the alpha-chain from the 54 KDa form to produce the 33 KDa form of urokinase. These antibodies enable the direct measurement of the different molecular forms of urokinase from small samples of conditioned medium harvested from cell cultures.

  9. Electron Microscopic Studies of the Antigen-Antibody Complex

    PubMed Central

    Easty, G. C.; Mercer, E. H.

    1958-01-01

    Electron micrographs of the ferritin antibody (rabbit) and ferritin (horse) complex have been obtained. The high iron content of the ferritin molecule (23 per cent Fe) allows its molecules to be recognized within the particles of precipitate. Three methods of visualizing the molecular distribution have been developed: (a) small particles of the precipitated complex have been dried on to electron microscope grids and either examined directly or first shadowed with metal and then examined, (b) the precipitate has been centrifuged to a plug which was embedded and thin sections cut from it for examination, (c) the bands formed by allowing antibody and antigen to diffuse together in agar gels have been fixed, embedded and sectioned. All methods have yielded pictures of the distribution of the ferritin within the complex which are broadly similar to what might have been expected from a somewhat irregular lattice as pictured in the Marrack-Heidelberger Lattice Theory. The antibody molecules are not clearly defined but appear as a halo of low density enveloping the ferritin clusters. The distance, centre to centre, between the ferritin molecules is variable, but is, on the average, in the range 200–400 Å. This is greater than the ferritin-ferritin contact distance (100 Å) and is thought to mean that the ferritin molecules are bridged by antibody molecules as pictured in the Lattice Theory. The bands produced in the gel-diffusion test contain islands of ferritin-antibody complex. When equivalent concentrations of reagents are used a single band of precipitate is formed. When excess of either antigen or antibody is used multiple bands of precipitate are formed which contain islands of ferritin antibody complex indistinguishable from those formed in the single band at equivalent concentrations, providing direct evidence for the formation of multiple bands from a single antigen. Ferritin-ferritin contacts have been observed within the complex. Under all the conditions of

  10. Antinuclear antibodies in domestic animals.

    PubMed

    Gershwin, Laurel J

    2005-06-01

    Antinuclear antibodies in domestic animal species have been commonly detected for many years, with the greatest frequency occurring in dogs as well as horses and cats. Most commonly, the assay used in diagnostic laboratories is indirect immunofluorescence on HEP-2 cells, similar to that used in human medicine, but with the exception that species-specific antiglobulin reagents are used instead of antihuman immunoglobulin. To a lesser extent, the Crithidia luciliae test for antibodies to double-stranded DNA has been used. Several research groups have used other assays. PMID:16014553

  11. Antinuclear antibodies and anticytoplasmic antibodies in bronchial asthma.

    PubMed

    Menon, P; Menon, V; Hilman, B C; Wolf, R; Bairnsfather, L

    1989-12-01

    The presence of antinuclear antibodies and anticytoplasmic antibodies was evaluated in the sera of 50 patients with bronchial asthma and 35 matched control subjects with miscellaneous medical diseases with the use of an indirect immunofluorescent assay with HEp-2 cells as substrate. The results were compared to age, sex, atopic status, dose, and duration of the antiasthmatic medication, immunotherapy, severity of the disease, and presence or absence of myalgia. The patients had mild to moderate asthma. The incidence of fluorescent anticytoplasmic antibodies (FACA) in the sera of patients with asthma was statistically significant (p = 0.02) in comparison to FACA in the sera of the control subjects. The combined incidence of fluorescent antinuclear antibodies (FANA) and FACA was found to be significantly higher among atopic subjects with asthma (p = 0.03) and the subjects with asthma and with myalgia (p less than 0.05). The 20% incidence of FACA in this group of subjects with asthma was significantly greater (p less than 0.0001) than the reported 2.7% incidence of FACA in a group of patients with various rheumatologic diseases. Variables, such as dose and duration of antiasthma medications and immunotherapy did not appear to influence the presence of FANA and FACA in their sera. The significance of positive FANA and FACA in this group of subjects with asthma is not known and needs to be evaluated by long-term studies. PMID:2689497

  12. Antibody profiling sensitivity through increased reporter antibody layering

    DOEpatents

    Apel, William A.; Thompson, Vicki S

    2010-04-13

    A method for analyzing a biological sample by antibody profiling for identifying forensic samples or for detecting the presence of an analyte. In an embodiment of the invention, the analyte is a drug, such as marijuana, Cocaine (crystalline tropane alkaloid), methamphetamine, methyltestosterone, or mesterolone. The method comprises attaching antigens to a surface of a solid support in a preselected pattern to form an array wherein locations of the antigens are known; contacting the array with the biological sample such that a portion of antibodies in the sample reacts with and binds to the antigens in the array to form immune complexes; washing away antibodies that do form immune complexes; and detecting the immune complexes, to form an antibody profile. Forensic samples are identified by comparing a sample from an unknown source with a sample from a known source. Further, an assay, such as a test for illegal drug use, can be coupled to a test for identity such that the results of the assay can be positively correlated to the subject's identity.

  13. Antibody profiling sensitivity through increased reporter antibody layering

    DOEpatents

    Apel, William A.; Thompson, Vicki S.

    2013-02-26

    A method for analyzing a biological sample by antibody profiling for identifying forensic samples or for detecting the presence of an analyte. In an embodiment of the invention, the analyte is a drug, such as marijuana, Cocaine (crystalline tropane alkaloid), methamphetamine, methyltestosterone, or mesterolone. The method comprises attaching antigens to a surface of a solid support in a preselected pattern to form an array wherein locations of the antigens are known; contacting the array with the biological sample such that a portion of antibodies in the sample reacts with and binds to the antigens in the array to form immune complexes; washing away antibodies that do form immune complexes; and detecting the immune complexes, to form an antibody profile. Forensic samples are identified by comparing a sample from an unknown source with a sample from a known source. Further, an assay, such as a test for illegal drug use, can be coupled to a test for identity such that the results of the assay can be positively correlated to the subject's identity.

  14. Monoclonal Antibodies for the Treatment of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shuptrine, Casey; Surana, Rishi; Weiner, Louis M.

    2012-01-01

    Over the past decade, the clinical utility of monoclonal antibodies has been realized and antibodies are now a mainstay for the treatment of cancer. Antibodies have the unique capacity to target and kill tumor cells while simultaneously activating immune effectors to kill tumor cells through the complement cascade or antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). This multifaceted mechanism of action combined with target specificity underlies the capacity of antibodies to elicit anti-tumor responses while minimizing the frequency and magnitude of adverse events. This review will focus on mechanisms of action, clinical applications and putative mechanisms of resistance to monoclonal antibody therapy in the context of cancer. PMID:22245472

  15. Antibody response and antibody affinity maturation in cats with experimental proliferative immune complex glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Bishop, S A; Bailey, M; Lucke, V M; Stokes, C R

    1992-07-01

    alteration in IgM affinity occurred at a late stage, as serum IgM levels increased, in cats which progressed to develop GN. These findings suggested that an increase in both serum IgG and IgM anti-HSA values, in particular IgM, was associated with the development of a more severe immune complex renal disease in these cats. Although there was no evidence that differences in the average affinity of either the IgG or IgM antibody populations for HSA, were associated with the development of disease, the increase in IgM values was also accompanied by a concomitant alteration in IgM affinity for antigen.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:1430350

  16. Three major uncertainties in the antibody therapy of cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stevenson, George T.

    2014-01-01

    Antibodies against surface molecules of human tumors are now frequently administered in combination with strong chemotherapy, increasing therapeutic efficacy but making the task of elucidating immunological events more difficult. Experiments on genetically manipulated mice indicate that antibody efficacy is greatest when IgG antibody coating tumor cells is engaged by the Fcγ-receptors of effector cells, chiefly the monocyte/macrophage lineage. Evidence suggests lesser roles for NK cells, neutrophils, receptor-mediated cytotoxicity and complement-mediated cytotoxicity. The classical mode of killing employed by macrophages is phagocytosis, but much has to be learned about optimally activating macrophages for this task, and about any other modes of cytotoxicity used. There is renewed interest in antigenic modulation, which implies removal of therapeutic antibody linked with antigen from target-cell surfaces. It is now apparent that this removal of immune complexes can be achieved either by internalization by the target cell, or by transfer of the complexes to another cell by trogocytosis. In trials, anti-idiotype antibodies surprisingly proved therapeutically more effective than anti-CD20, despite anti-idiotype being more effectively removed from target-cell surfaces by antigenic modulation. This anomalous result might reflect the fact that persistence of anti-CD20 immune complexes in large amounts induces serious effector modulation, which paralyzes macrophage attacks on antibody-coated cells. The case for effector modulation is argued by analogy with the therapeutic suppression of autoimmune inflammation by effector modulation, achieved by infusion either of normal IgG in large amounts, or of anti-red cell IgG in relatively small amounts. PMID:25271313

  17. The mechanism of hepatic uptake of a radiolabelled monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Boyle, C C; Paine, A J; Mather, S J

    1992-04-01

    Clinical and experimental scintigraphic studies have found that radiolabelled antibodies are not only taken up by tumour(s) but also by normal liver. The accumulation of radionuclides in this organ poses a major problem to the use of radiolabelled antibodies as diagnostic and therapeutic tools. In an attempt to understand the mechanism of hepatic uptake and clearance of radiolabelled antibodies, the intrahepatic biodistribution of an 111In-labelled MAb (HMFG1), was determined following i.v. administration to normal male rats. Two hours after administration the liver contained 15% of the injected dose, with most of the remaining radioactivity in the blood. The hepatic burden of the 111In MAb remained constant over the next 72 hr in the face of decreasing blood levels of radioactivity as well as its urinary and faecal excretion. At 2 and 72 hr after injection, 50% and 10% respectively of the hepatic radiolabel was due to blood borne antibody. Following a collagenase-cell isolation procedure, only 23% of the amount remaining in the liver at 2 hr was found to be cell-associated; 66% was lost during the cell isolation and purification procedure. Cellular uptake increased with time so that, by 72 hr after administration, 58% was cell-associated and 29% freely removable. At all timepoints, the parenchymal cells contained more activity than non-parenchymal cells. No evidence of antibody-receptor interactions could be obtained either in vivo or in cultures of hepatic parenchymal and non-parenchymal cells. Our data suggest that the bulk of the hepatic burden of 111In MAb results from extravascular pooling of the antibody. PMID:1555890

  18. Anti-survivin antibody responses in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Karanikas, Vaios; Khalil, Sanaa; Kerenidi, Theodora; Gourgoulianis, Konstantinos I; Germenis, Anastasios E

    2009-09-18

    Existing evidence regarding spontaneous anti-survivin humoral responses in lung cancer is inconclusive. Moreover, despite that cancer cell death elicited by radiotherapy and some chemotherapeutic agents seems to be immunogenic, information about the possible effect of treatment on these responses, is lacking. Serum samples from 33 small cell lung cancer (SCLC) and 117 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients upon diagnosis, and from 100 controls, were tested by ELISA for anti-survivin antibodies. Cutoff was set to the mean+2SD of controls. 7.7% of NSCLC, none of the SCLC patients and 2% of the controls appeared with elevated antibody levels (OR 3.6, 95% CI 0.7-17.3 for NSCLC, OR 0.6, 95% CI 0.03-12.6 for SCLC). Measurement of antibodies in 76 NSCLC patients post therapies and during their follow-up, revealed that in 12 NSCLC patients the antibody levels increased up to 2-38 times, and in seven others, they decreased by 2-8 times. No significant correlation was uncovered between either the antibody levels upon diagnosis or their changes post therapies and during follow-up, and any clinicopathological parameter, their response to therapy and survival. Survivin does not induce considerable humoral responses in lung cancer. Potentially, however, strong anti-survivin antibody responses can be elicited during the post therapy and follow-up of the patients, whose clinical significance remains to be elucidated. These findings, together with our previous data concerning survivin expression and the related cytolytic T cell responses in lung cancer, signify a high tolerogenic potential of this tumor-associated antigen. PMID:19380192

  19. The European antibody network's practical guide to finding and validating suitable antibodies for research

    PubMed Central

    Roncador, Giovanna; Engel, Pablo; Maestre, Lorena; Anderson, Amanda P.; Cordell, Jacqueline L.; Cragg, Mark S.; Šerbec, Vladka Č.; Jones, Margaret; Lisnic, Vanda J.; Kremer, Leonor; Li, Demin; Koch-Nolte, Friedrich; Pascual, Núria; Rodríguez-Barbosa, Jose-Ignacio; Torensma, Ruurd; Turley, Helen; Pulford, Karen; Banham, Alison H.

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies are widely exploited as research/diagnostic tools and therapeutics. Despite providing exciting research opportunities, the multitude of available antibodies also offers a bewildering array of choice. Importantly, not all companies comply with the highest standards, and thus many reagents fail basic validation tests. The responsibility for antibodies being fit for purpose rests, surprisingly, with their user. This paper condenses the extensive experience of the European Monoclonal Antibody Network to help researchers identify antibodies specific for their target antigen. A stepwise strategy is provided for prioritising antibodies and making informed decisions regarding further essential validation requirements. Web-based antibody validation guides provide practical approaches for testing antibody activity and specificity. We aim to enable researchers with little or no prior experience of antibody characterization to understand how to determine the suitability of their antibody for its intended purpose, enabling both time and cost effective generation of high quality antibody-based data fit for publication. PMID:26418356

  20. Polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies in clinic.

    PubMed

    Wootla, Bharath; Denic, Aleksandar; Rodriguez, Moses

    2014-01-01

    Immunoglobulins (Ig) or antibodies are heavy plasma proteins, with sugar chains added to amino-acid residues by N-linked glycosylation and occasionally by O-linked glycosylation. The versatility of antibodies is demonstrated by the various functions that they mediate such as neutralization, agglutination, fixation with activation of complement and activation of effector cells. Naturally occurring antibodies protect the organism against harmful pathogens, viruses and infections. In addition, almost any organic chemical induces antibody production of antibodies that would bind specifically to the chemical. These antibodies are often produced from multiple B cell clones and referred to as polyclonal antibodies. In recent years, scientists have exploited the highly evolved machinery of the immune system to produce structurally and functionally complex molecules such as antibodies from a single B clone, heralding the era of monoclonal antibodies. Most of the antibodies currently in the clinic, target components of the immune system, are not curative and seek to alleviate symptoms rather than cure disease. Our group used a novel strategy to identify reparative human monoclonal antibodies distinct from conventional antibodies. In this chapter, we discuss the therapeutic relevance of both polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies in clinic. PMID:24037837

  1. Establishment of the first WHO Erythropoietin antibody reference panel: Report of an international collaborative study.

    PubMed

    Wadhwa, Meenu; Mytych, Daniel T; Bird, Chris; Barger, Troy; Dougall, Thomas; Han, Hong; Rigsby, Peter; Kromminga, Arno; Thorpe, Robin

    2016-08-01

    A panel of 9 fully human monoclonal antibodies against human erythropoietin (EPO) with defined characteristics (non-neutralizing, neutralizing, various isotypes, affinities) representative of those evident in antibody-mediated pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) and non-PRCA patients were formulated and lyophilized. The panel was evaluated in a multi-centre international collaborative study comprising eighteen different laboratories using different assay platforms including those in routine use. These included binding assays, some based on use of novel technologies and neutralization assays predominantly employing EPO responsive cell-lines. Results showed that detection and titre varied depending on antibody characteristics and the method used. Only selective assay platforms were capable of detecting the diverse repertoire of EPO antibodies in the panel indicating that some clinically relevant antibodies are likely to be missed in some assays. Importantly, the clinical samples from PRCA patients were distinguished as antibody-positive and the healthy donor serum as antibody negative across all different platforms tested. For neutralization, data was generally consistent across the assays for the different samples regardless of the cell-line and the assay conditions. The heterogeneity in data from the study clearly indicated the need for reference standards for consistency in detecting and measuring EPO antibodies across different assay platforms for monitoring the safety and efficacy of erythropoiesis stimulating agents. Therefore, the WHO ECBS at its meeting in October'15 established the EPO antibody panel, available from NIBSC, to facilitate decision-making on assay selection for testing antibodies against human EPO, for evaluating assay performance of antibody assays for clinical use, for assay validation and for standardization. PMID:27173074

  2. Differential Killing of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhi by Antibodies Targeting Vi and Lipopolysaccharide O:9 Antigen

    PubMed Central

    Hart, Peter J.; O’Shaughnessy, Colette M.; Siggins, Matthew K.; Bobat, Saeeda; Kingsley, Robert A.; Goulding, David A.; Crump, John A.; Reyburn, Hugh; Micoli, Francesca; Dougan, Gordon; Cunningham, Adam F.; MacLennan, Calman A.

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi expresses a capsule of Vi polysaccharide, while most Salmonella serovars, including S. Enteritidis and S. Typhimurium, do not. Both S. Typhi and S. Enteritidis express the lipopolysaccharide O:9 antigen, yet there is little evidence of cross-protection from anti-O:9 antibodies. Vaccines based on Vi polysaccharide have efficacy against typhoid fever, indicating that antibodies against Vi confer protection. Here we investigate the role of Vi capsule and antibodies against Vi and O:9 in antibody-dependent complement- and phagocyte-mediated killing of Salmonella. Using isogenic Vi-expressing and non-Vi-expressing derivatives of S. Typhi and S. Typhimurium, we show that S. Typhi is inherently more sensitive to serum and blood than S. Typhimurium. Vi expression confers increased resistance to both complement- and phagocyte-mediated modalities of antibody-dependent killing in human blood. The Vi capsule is associated with reduced C3 and C5b-9 deposition, and decreased overall antibody binding to S. Typhi. However, purified human anti-Vi antibodies in the presence of complement are able to kill Vi-expressing Salmonella, while killing by anti-O:9 antibodies is inversely related to Vi expression. Human serum depleted of antibodies to antigens other than Vi retains the ability to kill Vi-expressing bacteria. Our findings support a protective role for Vi capsule in preventing complement and phagocyte killing of Salmonella that can be overcome by specific anti-Vi antibodies, but only to a limited extent by anti-O:9 antibodies. PMID:26741681

  3. Western Blotting Inaccuracies with Unverified Antibodies: Need for a Western Blotting Minimal Reporting Standard (WBMRS)

    PubMed Central

    Gilda, Jennifer E.; Ghosh, Rajeshwary; Cheah, Jenice X.; West, Toni M.; Bodine, Sue C.; Gomes, Aldrin V.

    2015-01-01

    Western blotting is a commonly used technique in biological research. A major problem with Western blotting is not the method itself, but the use of poor quality antibodies as well as the use of different experimental conditions that affect the linearity and sensitivity of the Western blot. Investigation of some conditions that are commonly used and often modified in Western blotting, as well as some commercial antibodies, showed that published articles often fail to report critical parameters needed to reproduce the results. These parameters include the amount of protein loaded, the blocking solution and conditions used, the amount of primary and secondary antibodies used, the antibody incubation solutions, the detection method and the quantification method utilized. In the present study, comparison of ubiquitinated proteins in rat heart and liver samples showed different results depending on the antibody utilized. Validation of five commercial ubiquitin antibodies using purified ubiquitinated proteins, ubiquitin chains and free ubiquitin showed that these antibodies differ in their ability to detect free ubiquitin or ubiquitinated proteins. Investigating proteins modified with interferon-stimulated gene 15 (ISG15) in young and old rat hearts using six commercially available antibodies showed that most antibodies gave different semi-quantitative results, suggesting large variability among antibodies. Evidence showing the importance of the Western blot buffer and the concentration of antibody used is presented. Hence there is a critical need for comprehensive reporting of experimental conditions to improve the accuracy and reproducibility of Western blot analysis. A Western blotting minimal reporting standard (WBMRS) is suggested to improve the reproducibility of Western blot analysis. PMID:26287535

  4. Antibody-drug conjugate payloads.

    PubMed

    Anderl, Jan; Faulstich, Heinz; Hechler, Torsten; Kulke, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Toxin payloads, or drugs, are the crucial components of therapeutic antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs). This review will give an introduction on the requirements that make a toxic compound suitable to be used in an antitumoral ADC and will summarize the structural and mechanistic features of four drug families that yielded promising results in preclinical and clinical studies. PMID:23913141

  5. Studies on antiplague haemagglutinating antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Sosuke; Chikasato, Yoshio; Hotta, Susumu

    1974-01-01

    The indirect haemagglutination (IHA) test has been widely applied in the detection of antiplague antibodies in rodent sera. In the present study, acetone treatment of the test serum was tried in order to improve the specificity of the reaction. It was shown that the IHA titres of acetone-treated sera correlated well with those of untreated sera measured by the standard method recommended by WHO. Essentially the same results were obtained with sera from experimentally immunized rodents and from captured wild rats. In addition to acetone treatment, the sera were treated with 2-mercaptoethanol (ME). The results obtained indicated that the antiplague IHA antibodies produced early after the inoculation of plague bacilli were ME-sensitive, whereas those detected in the later stages or after a second inoculation were ME-resistant. The data suggest that acetone treatment of sera could be useful for the screening of antiplague antibodies, and that treatment with ME is helpful in assessing the time of past plague infections. The present survey has also shown that the positive rates of antiplague antibodies in wild rats trapped in Kobe, one of the largest sea ports in Japan, have so far been very low. PMID:4549347

  6. Alloimmunization due to red cell antibodies in Rhesus positive Omani Pregnant Women: Maternal and Perinatal outcome

    PubMed Central

    Al-Dughaishi, Tamima; Al-Rubkhi, Ikhlass S.; Al-Duhli, Maymoona; Al-Harrasi, Yusra; Gowri, Vaidyanathan

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study is aimed to determine the prevalence of alloimmunization due to antibodies to red blood cell (RBC) antigens (other than rhesus [Rh] antigen) and report the maternal, perinatal, and neonatal outcomes. Materials and Methods: A retrospective review of medical records of all patients with minor RBCs antibodies alloimmunization who were followed and delivered at Sultan Qaboos University Hospital, Oman from June 2011 to June 2013. Maternal characteristics, antibody type, antibody titer in addition to perinatal and neonatal outcomes were reviewed. Results: There were 1160 patients with Rh positive status in the study. The most common ABO blood group was O, followed by A, B, and AB. We found 33 out of 1160 Rh positive women alloimmunized with minor RBCs antibodies that gave a prevalence of minor RBCs alloimmunization of 2.7%. The most frequent antibody was anti-E 38%, followed by anti-c 17% and anti-kell 17%. 6 of these 33 patients were identified to have significant antibody titer, and two cases showed evidence of fetal anemia. Only one case required an intrauterine blood transfusion. The most common neonatal complication was jaundice in 53%, followed by respiratory distress syndrome in 28%. Two cases complicated by neonatal anemia required a postnatal blood transfusion. Conclusion: Alloimmunization with anti-E, anti-c, and anti-kell were the most common antibodies among the study group. Minor RBCs alloimmunization was an important cause of neonatal morbidity. PMID:26420934

  7. Systematic fractionation of serum antibodies using multiple antigen homologous peptides as affinity ligands.

    PubMed

    Tribbick, G; Triantafyllou, B; Lauricella, R; Rodda, S J; Mason, T J; Geysen, H M

    1991-06-01

    The fractionation of polyclonal antibodies on multiple peptide ligands is described. The method is an application of a procedure for the synthesis of large numbers of peptides on individual polyethylene pins (Geysen et al., 1987). In this application, each pin-bound peptide is used as an affinity support. Antibodies bound to the peptides are then eluted, using buffers of either high or low pH. Each eluted antibody is then tested for specific binding to peptides or proteins, using ELISA procedures. A rabbit antiserum raised to gonococcal pilin was fractionated on a complete set of octapeptides homologous with the sequence of the pilin protein. Antibodies eluted from some of the peptides bound to pilin in solution. In a second example three hyperimmune sera raised to three different potyviruses were fractionated on their respective homologous peptide sequences. Testing the eluted antibodies on the three virus coat proteins revealed peptides which bound cross-reacting antibodies. Thus the method can be used to confirm direct peptide binding evidence for sequential epitopes. These peptides can then be used in affinity chromatography to increase the specificity of polyclonal sera. This can be achieved either by elution of the specific antibody from the peptide or by removal of cross-reacting antibodies from the whole serum by absorption on peptide. PMID:1904463

  8. Cryptococcus neoformans: paradigm for the role of antibody immunity against fungi?

    PubMed

    Pirofski, L A; Casadevall, A

    1996-08-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is an encapsulated fungus that is a frequent cause of life-threatening infections in patients with AIDS. C. neoformans has many similarities with encapsulated bacteria such as S. pneumoniae and H. influenzae for which antibody immunity is important in protection. However the role of antibody immunity in protection against C. neoformans has been controversial. Experiments with polyclonal sera have produced conflicting evidence for and against the importance of antibody immunity in host defense. Experiments with monoclonal antibodies (mAb) to the C. neoformans capsular polysaccharide (CPS) have revealed the existence of protective, non-protective and disease-enhancing mAbs, suggesting that the divergent results obtained with polyclonal preparations may be a result of relative proportion of protective and non-protective antibodies in immune sera. Administration of protective mAbs can prolong survival, decrease organ fungal burden, and reduce serum polysaccharide antigen. In vitro experiments suggests that protective mAbs modify the course of infection by enhancing effector cell function against C. neoformans. Addition of mAb to antifungal drugs enhances their efficacy against C. neoformans in vivo and in vitro. Human-mouse chimeric antibodies with activity against C. neoformans have been constructed. A highly immunogenic capsular polysaccharide-protein vaccine has been synthesized that elicits protective antibodies in mice. Antibody immunity elicited by conjugate vaccines or provided by passive administration may be useful in the prevention treatment of human cryptococcal infections. PMID:8899968

  9. Temporal Variation in Sindbis Virus Antibody Prevalence in Bird Hosts in an Endemic Area in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Hesson, Jenny Christina; Lundström, Jan O; Tok, Atalay; Östman, Örjan; Lundkvist, Åke

    2016-01-01

    Sindbis virus (SINV) is a mosquito-borne bird virus that occasionally causes human disease in Fennoscandia, suggested to have cyclic 7-year intervals between outbreaks. Reliable data on human infections in Sweden is however lacking. Here we investigated the SINV antibody prevalence among birds in a Swedish area endemic to SINV to scrutinize if a cyclic variation in antibody prevalence is present in the natural host of SINV. Serum from birds were sampled in the summers of 2002-2004 and 2009 in the floodplains of the River Dalälven in central Sweden, with 2002 and 2009 representing hypothesized years of SINV outbreaks. A total of 963 birds from 52 species (mainly passerines) were tested for the presence of SINV antibodies using a plaque reduction neutralization test. The highest SINV antibody prevalence was found in Turdidae species, specifically Fieldfare, Redwing and Song thrush in which more than 70% of sampled individuals had antibodies to SINV in 2009. The SINV antibody prevalence significantly varied between years with 2% in 2002, 8% in 2003, 14% in 2004 and 37% in 2009. Antibodies were found equally often in hatchlings and in adults and increased from early to late in the season. Clearly, the SINV antibody prevalence was not elevated in the bird hosts in the predicted outbreak year 2002, thus solid evidence of a cyclic occurrence of SINV in Sweden is still lacking. PMID:27579607

  10. Ecological and life-history factors influencing the evolution of maternal antibody allocation: a phylogenetic comparison

    PubMed Central

    Addison, BriAnne; Klasing, Kirk C.; Robinson, W. Douglas; Austin, Suzanne H.; Ricklefs, Robert E.

    2009-01-01

    Maternally derived yolk antibodies provide neonates with immune protection in early life at negligible cost to mothers. However, developmental effects on the neonate's future immunity are potentially costly and thus could limit yolk antibody deposition. The benefits to neonatal immunity must be balanced against costs, which may depend on neonate vulnerability to pathogens, developmental trajectories and the immunological strategies best suited to a species' pace of life. We measured yolk antibodies and life-history features of 23 species of small Neotropical birds and assessed the evidence for each of several hypotheses for life history and ecological effects on the evolution of yolk antibody levels. Developmental period and yolk antibodies are negatively related, which possibly reflect the importance of humoral immune priming through antigen exposure, and selection to avoid autoimmunity, in species with a slower pace of life. There is also a strong relationship between body size and yolk antibody concentration, suggesting that larger species are architecturally equipped to produce and transfer higher concentrations of antibodies. These results suggest that developmental effects of maternally derived antibodies, such as imprinting effects on B-cell diversity or autoimmune effects, are important and deserve more consideration in future research. PMID:19710063

  11. Detection of Campylobacter species using monoclonal antibodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Colin R.; Lee, Alice; Stanker, Larry H.

    1999-01-01

    A panel of species specific monoclonal antibodies were raised to Campylobacter coli, Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter lari. The isotypes, and cross-reactivity profiles of each monoclonal antibody against an extensive panel of micro- organisms, were determined.

  12. Progranulin antibodies in autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Thurner, Lorenz; Preuss, Klaus-Dieter; Fadle, Natalie; Regitz, Evi; Klemm, Philipp; Zaks, Marina; Kemele, Maria; Hasenfus, Andrea; Csernok, Elena; Gross, Wolfgang L; Pasquali, Jean-Louis; Martin, Thierry; Bohle, Rainer Maria; Pfreundschuh, Michael

    2013-05-01

    Systemic vasculitides constitute a heterogeneous group of diseases. Autoimmunity mediated by B lymphocytes and their humoral effector mechanisms play a major role in ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV) as well as in non-ANCA associated primary systemic vasculitides and in the different types of autoimmune connective tissue disorders and rheumatoid arthritis. In order to detect autoantibodies in systemic vasculitides, we screened protein macroarrays of human cDNA expression libraries with sera from patients with ANCA-associated and ANCA-negative primary systemic vasculitides. This approach led to the identification of antibodies against progranulin, a 88 kDA secreted glycoprotein with strong anti-inflammatory activity in the course of disease of giant-cell arteritis/polymyalgia rheumatica (14/65), Takayasu's arteritis (4/13), classical panarteritis nodosa (4/10), Behcet's disease (2/6) and in the course of disease in granulomatosis with polyangiitis (31/75), Churg-Strauss syndrome (7/23) and in microscopic polyangiitis (7/19). In extended screenings the progranulin antibodies were also detected in other autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus (39/91) and rheumatoid arthritis (16/44). Progranulin antibodies were detected only in 1 of 97 healthy controls. Anti-progranulin positive patients with systemic vasculitides, systemic lupus erythematosus or rheumatoid arthritis had significant lower progranulin plasma levels, indicating a neutralizing effect. In light of the anti-inflammatory effects of progranulin, progranulin antibodies might exert pro-inflammatory effects thus contributing to the pathogenesis of the respective autoimmune diseases and might serve as a marker for disease activity. This hypothesis is supported by the fact that a positive progranulin antibody status was associated with active disease in granulomatosis with polyangiitis. PMID:23149338

  13. Use of an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of antibodies in sheep naturally infected with Salmonella Abortusovis.

    PubMed

    Wirz-Dittus, Sophie; Belloy, Luc; Doherr, Marcus G; Hüssy, Daniela; Sting, Reinhard; Gabioud, Patricia; Waldvogel, Andreas S

    2010-07-01

    An indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was modified and validated to detect antibodies against Salmonella Abortusovis in naturally infected sheep. The ELISA was validated with 44 positive and 45 negative control serum samples. Compared with the immunoblot, the sensitivity and specificity of the assay were 98% and 100%, respectively. To follow antibody levels over time, samples from 12 infected ewes were collected at 1, 3, and 10 months after abortion. All animals showed antibody levels above the cutoff value throughout the observation period. One and 3 months after abortion, high antibody levels could be detected in all but one animal, whereas after 10 months, 9 animals had markedly lower but still positive antibody levels. The test characteristics and evidence for the persistence of detectable antibody levels in all infected animals for up to 10 months indicates that the ELISA can be used for herd surveillance testing. PMID:20622222

  14. Mechanisms of resistance to HER family targeting antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Kruser, Tim J.; Wheeler, Deric L.

    2010-04-15

    The epidermal growth factor (EGF) family of receptor tyrosine kinases consists of four members: EGFR (HER1/ErbB1), HER2/neu (ErbB2), HER3 (ErbB3) and HER4 (ErbB4). Receptor activation via ligand binding leads to downstream signaling that influence cell proliferation, angiogenesis, invasion and metastasis. Aberrant expression or activity of EGFR and HER2 have been strongly linked to the etiology of several human epithelial cancers including but not limited to head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), colorectal cancer (CRC), and breast cancer. With this, intense efforts have been made to inhibit the activity of the EGFR and HER2 by designing antibodies against the ligand binding domains (cetuximab, panitumumab and trastuzumab) or small molecules against the tyrosine kinase domains (erlotinib, gefitinib, and lapatinib). Both approaches have shown considerable clinical promise. However, increasing evidence suggests that the majority of patients do not respond to these therapies, and those who show initial response ultimately become refractory to treatment. While mechanisms of resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitors have been extensively studied, resistance to monoclonal antibodies is less well understood, both in the laboratory and in the clinical setting. In this review, we discuss resistance to antibody-based therapies against the EGFR and HER2, similarities between these resistance profiles, and strategies to overcome resistance to HER family targeting monoclonal antibody therapy.

  15. Regulation of Immune Response by Autogenous Antibody against Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Kluskens, L.; Köhler, H.

    1974-01-01

    BALB/c mice repeatedly immunized with Pneumococcus R36A vaccine produce antibodies to phosphorylcholine having the TEPC-15 myeloma idiotype (murine IgA myeloma protein that binds phosphorylcholine). The plaque-forming cell response to phosphorylcholine shows a decrease with repeated immunizations. In contrast, spleen cells from multiply immunized mice responded better in vitro than spleen cells from nonimmunized mice. The serum of animals immunized four or five times agglutinates TEPC-15-coated sheep erythrocytes. Inhibition of hemagglutination shows that the agglutinating activity is directed against the TEPC-15 idiotype. Sera from these mice, when added to cultures of normal spleen cells, specifically suppress the response to phosphorylcholine. The suppressive activity in the serum can be removed by solid absorption with TEPC-15. Evidently, repeated immunization with antigen induces two kinds of antibody responses: one directed against antigen and the other directed against the antibody to the antigen. It is proposed that this “auto” antibody against receptor is involved in the regulation of the immune response. PMID:4140517

  16. The Use of Monoclonal Antibodies in Human Prion Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodemer, Walter

    Detection of PrP and its pathological isoform(s) is the key to understanding the etiology and pathogenesis of transmissible spongiform encephalopathy. There is ample evidence that PrP isoforms constitute a major component of an unknown and perhaps unconventional infectious agent. An etiological relationship between human and zoonotic transmissible spongiform encephalopathies may be revealed with monoclonal antibodies. Knowledge of the conformational transition rendering a nonpathogenic, almost ubiquitous cellular protein into a pathogenic one is crucial to defining pathomechanisms. The stepwise or even continuous formation of pathogenic molecules can be monitored. Any improvement in the early diagnosis could help to conceive new therapeutic measures which are not currently available. Determination of PrP isoforms in tissue, cells, or body fluids may be of prognostic value. Many experimental approaches in molecular medicine and molecular biology of the prion protein already rely on monoclonal antibodies. Recombinant antibodies such as the single-chain Fv may soon replace traditional hybridoma techniques. Binding affinity can easily be manipulated by a number of techniques, including in vitro mutagenesis - a step which could never be carried out using the traditional hybridoma technology. Monoclonal antibodies are and will remain an essential support for ongoing research on the prion protein in general and on the unconventional infectious prions.

  17. Anti-DNA antibodies in SLE

    SciTech Connect

    Voss, E.W.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 8 chapters. Some of the titles are: Anti-DNA Antibodies in SLE: Historical Perspective; Specificity of Anti-DNA Antibodies in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus; Monoclonial Autoimmune Anti-DNA Antibodies; and Structure--Function Analyses of Anti-DNA Autoantibodies.

  18. Synopsis of antinuclear antibodies in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Michael M; Heffernan, Michael P

    2002-06-01

    Antinuclear antibodies (ANA) provide a powerful tool in diagnosing the connective tissue diseases. The fundamentals of antinuclear antibody testing and the sensitivity, specificity, and prognostic value of antinuclear antibodies and their associated illnesses will be discussed. As skin manifestations are common with connective tissue diseases, knowledge of the diagnostic and prognostic value of ANA testing is essential to the nurse in dermatology. PMID:12099064

  19. Antibodies against mumps virus component proteins.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, Keita; Iwata, Satoshi; Nakayama, Tetsuo

    2012-08-01

    The neutralization (NT) test is regarded as the most reliable method for detection of protective antibodies, but is labor-intensive and time consuming. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (EIA) is frequently used in sero-epidemiological studies because of its simplicity and ease of use. In this study, immunofluorescent (IF) antibodies against nucleocapsid (N), fusion (F), and hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) proteins were investigated in comparison with NT and EIA antibodies. The antibody against N protein was dominant in serum samples obtained from patients with a previous history of mumps infection. Titers of antibodies against F and HN proteins were very low. Many serum samples were positive for EIA but negative for NT, and no significant correlation was noted between NT and EIA antibodies. Among the three component proteins, correlation of EIA and IF antibodies with N protein was relatively good. After vaccination with mumps vaccine, EIA positivity was closely related to the IF antibodies against N protein, and after vaccination NT-positive sera became positive for IF antibodies against F and HN proteins. IF antibodies against F and HN proteins were considered to have a strong association with NT antibodies, and those against N protein were considered to have a strong association with EIA antibodies. PMID:22215227

  20. Effects of medium concentration on antibody production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J.

    1984-01-01

    Antibody production by two different cell lines was measured as the media were supplemented with varied amounts of glucose and fetal bovine serum. Both cell lines elaborated antidinitrophenyl hapten antibodies. Two basic media were used: RPMI 1640 and Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium. The production of antibodies was followed from 0 to 180 h and was assayed by radioimmunoassay.

  1. Specific antibody for pesticide residue determination produced by antibody-pesticide complex

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A new method for specific antibody production was developed using antibody (Ab)-pesticide complex as a unique immunogen. Parathion (PA) was the targeted pesticide, and rabbit polyclonal antibody (Pab) and mouse monoclonal antibody (Mab) were used as carrier proteins. The Ab-PA complexes were genera...

  2. New Insights into the Functional Behavior of Antibodies as Revealed by Binding Studies on an Anti-Uranium Monoclonal Antibody

    SciTech Connect

    Blake, Diane A.; Xia Li; Haini Yu; Blake, Robert C.

    2004-03-17

    As part of an ongoing effort to develop immunoassays for chelated uranium(VI) on a hand-held flow fluorimeter, an anti-uranium monoclonal antibody designated as 8A11 was fluorescently labeled using two different strategies. When 8A11 was coupled via reactive lysines to either ALEXATM 488 or Cy5TM, the resulting fluorescent antibody conjugate exhibited positive cooperativity in the presence of its antigen, U(VI) chelated with 2,9-dicarboxy-1,10-phenanthroline (U(VI)-DCP). That is, when one of the two binding sites on the covalently modified 8A11 was occupied with bound antigen, the affinity of the remaining site on the antibody for U(VI)-DCP appeared to increase. Unmodified 8A11 bound U(VI)-DCP with the expected hyperbolic dependence on the concentration of antigen, consistent with independent and equal binding of ligand at both sites. Proteolytic cleavage of the fluorescently conjugated 8A11 to produce the fluorescent monovalent Fab fragment yielded an active preparation that now bound U(VI)-DCP with no evidence of positive cooperativity. Although, in principle, any divalent antibody has the potential to exhibit positive cooperativity in its binding interactions with its antigen, very little literature precedent for this type of behavior exists. Native 8A11 was also noncovalently labeled with highly fluorescent ZENONTM reagents. These reagents are fluorescently-labeled Fab fragments of goat anti-mouse antibodies that bind to the Fc portion of 8A11. These high-affinity, monovalent fluorescent reagents permitted the intact 8A11 mouse antibody to be labeled in situ with no covalent modifications. Incubation of the 8A11 with ZENON 647 produced a fluorescent protein complex that showed an 8-fold higher affinity for U(VI)-DCP than did the free 8A11 alone. Again, very few literature precedents exist for this phenomenon, where agents that bind to the Fc portion of an intact antibody change the affinity of the antibody for the antigen at the structurally distant Fab portion

  3. Antibody biosimilars: Fears or opportunities?

    PubMed Central

    Guillon-Munos, Audrey; Daguet, Arnaud; Watier, Hervé

    2014-01-01

    The annual “LabEx MAbImprove industrial workshops” are primarily intended to provide scientists involved in therapeutic antibodies, a comprehensive view about topics of interest for the pharmaceutical industry. They are organized by the “LabEx MAbImprove industrial committee”, for this first edition especially in partnership with ARITT, the regional agency for innovation and technology transfer which operates in the French Région Centre, the 1st French region for pharmaceutical production. The 2013 edition, held May 28 at the Vinci Center of Tours, was dedicated to antibody biosimilars. Depending on opinions, the impending expiry of antibody patents and the imminent marketing approval of competitors to blockbusters can be perceived as good or bad things. Fears or opportunities? Risks for patients? Breath of fresh air for the health systems? Opportunity for re-industrializing France? In this context, it is necessary for people to form a fair and informed opinion on the current landscape of antibody biosimilars. In particular, this is especially important for scientists from the academic world, from the industry or from the regulation agencies, for pharmacists, for pharmacovigilance specialists, for health authorities, and staff from health insurance and decision makers. The first session was devoted to market and regulatory issues, and included both an overview of the evolution of the patent landscape and a description of biosimilars regulation in the European Union (EU). This session was closed by a talk on manufacturing processes for biosimilars. In the next session, quality control attributes of biosimilars were discussed and compared with the consistent quality of biotechnology products to raise the question: “How close is close enough?” In vitro assays for evaluating the Fc function of therapeutic antibodies were also discussed. The third session focused on development of biosimilars and primarily on the stepwise process for introducing an antibody

  4. Neutralizing Antibodies Against Interferon-Beta

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    The development of neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) is a major problem in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients treated with interferon-beta (IFN-ß). Whereas binding antibodies (BAbs) can be demonstrated in the vast majority of patients, only a smaller proportion of patients develop NAbs. The principle in NAb in vitro assays is the utilization of cultured cell lines that are responsive to IFN-ß. The cytopathic effect (CPE) assay measures the capacity of NAbs to neutralize IFN- ß's protective effect on cells challenged with virus and the MxA induction assay measures the ability of NAbs to reduce the IFN-ß-induced expression of MxA, either at the mRNA or the protein level. A titer of >20 neutralizing units/ml traditionally defines NAb posi-tivity. NAbs in high titers completely abrogate the in vivo response to IFN-ß, whereas the effect of low and intermediate titers is unpredictable. As clinically important NAbs appear only after 9-18 months IFN- ß0 therapy, short-term studies of two years or less are unsuitable for evaluation of clinical NAb effects. All long-term trials of three years or more concordantly show evidence of a detrimental effect of NAbs on relapses, disease activity on MRI, or on disease progression. Persistent high titers of NAbs indicate an abrogation of the biological response and, hence, absence of therapeutic efficacy, and this observation should lead to a change of therapy. As low and medium titers are ambiguous treatment decisions in patients with low NAb titres should be guided by determination of in vivo mRNA MxA induction and clinical disease activity. PMID:21180570

  5. Anti-brain antibodies in PANDAS versus uncomplicated streptococcal infection.

    PubMed

    Pavone, Piero; Bianchini, Rio; Parano, Enrico; Incorpora, Gemma; Rizzo, Renata; Mazzone, Luigi; Trifiletti, Rosario R

    2004-02-01

    The objective of this study was to assess brain involvement through the presence of antineuronal antibodies in Pediatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorders Associated with Streptococcus (PANDAS) and in uncomplicated active Group A streptococcal infection. We compared serum antibrain antibody to human basal ganglia sections assessed by indirect tissue immunofluorescence in two groups: a PANDAS group, comprised of 22 patients (mean age 10.1 years; 20 male, 2 female) who met strict National Institutes of Mental Health diagnostic criteria for PANDAS and had clinically active tics or obsessive-compulsive disorder, or both; and a GABHS control group consisting of 22 patients (mean age 9.1 years; 15 mol/L, 7 female) with clinical evidence of active Group A beta-hemolytic streptococcal (GABHS) infection confirmed by throat culture and elevated antistreptolysin O titers but without history or clinical evidence of tics or obsessive-compulsive disorder. We observed positive anti-basal ganglia staining (defined as detectable staining at 1:10 serum dilution) in 14/22 patients in the PANDAS group (64%) but only 2/22 (9%) in the GABHS control group (P < 0.001, Fisher's exact test). These results suggest that antibrain antibodies are present in children with PANDAS that cannot be explained merely by a history of GABHS infection. PMID:14984902

  6. Monoclonal antibodies against Vibrio cholerae lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Gustafsson, B; Rosén, A; Holme, T

    1982-01-01

    A cell line producing monoclonal antibodies directed against the core region of Vibrio cholerae lipopolysaccharide has been established. These antibodies were inhibited by lipopolysaccharide preparations of both O-group 1 vibrios and some non-O-group 1 vibrios as detected in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay-inhibition experiments. Coagglutination experiments with monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies adsorbed to protein A-carrying staphylococci were performed. All V. cholerae strains tested, regardless of serotype, were agglutinated when mixed with staphylococci coated with the monoclonal antibodies, whereas staphylococci coated with group-specific (O1) polyclonal antibodies only agglutinated with O-group 1 vibrios. Images PMID:6183214

  7. Production of Monoclonal Antibody against Human Nestin.

    PubMed

    Hadavi, Reza; Zarnani, Amir Hassan; Ahmadvand, Negah; Mahmoudi, Ahmad Reza; Bayat, Ali Ahmad; Mahmoudian, Jafar; Sadeghi, Mohammad-Reza; Soltanghoraee, Haleh; Akhondi, Mohammad Mehdi; Tarahomi, Majid; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood; Rabbani, Hodjattallah

    2010-04-01

    We have employed a peptide-based antibody generation protocol for producing antibody against human nestin. Using a 12-mer synthetic peptide from repetitive region of human nestin protein devoid of any N- or O-glyco-sylation sequences, we generated a mouse monoclonal antibody capable of recognizing human, mouse, bovine, and rat nestin. A wide variety of nestin proteins ranging from 140-250 kDa was detected by this antibody. This antibody is highly specific and functional in applications such as ELISA, flow cytometry, immunocytochemistry, and Western blot assays. PMID:23407796

  8. Production of Monoclonal Antibody against Human Nestin

    PubMed Central

    Hadavi, Reza; Zarnani, Amir Hassan; Ahmadvand, Negah; Mahmoudi, Ahmad Reza; Bayat, Ali Ahmad; Mahmoudian, Jafar; Sadeghi, Mohammad-Reza; Soltanghoraee, Haleh; Akhondi, Mohammad Mehdi; Tarahomi, Majid; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood; Rabbani, Hodjattallah

    2010-01-01

    We have employed a peptide-based antibody generation protocol for producing antibody against human nestin. Using a 12-mer synthetic peptide from repetitive region of human nestin protein devoid of any N- or O-glyco-sylation sequences, we generated a mouse monoclonal antibody capable of recognizing human, mouse, bovine, and rat nestin. A wide variety of nestin proteins ranging from 140–250 kDa was detected by this antibody. This antibody is highly specific and functional in applications such as ELISA, flow cytometry, immunocytochemistry, and Western blot assays. PMID:23407796

  9. The role of antibodies in myasthenia gravis.

    PubMed

    De Baets, M; Stassen, M H W

    2002-10-15

    Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disease associated with antibodies directed to the postsynaptic acetylcholine receptor. These antibodies reduce the number of receptors. Autoantibodies against AChR and other muscle antigens can be used for the diagnosis of myasthenia gravis and related disorders. The origin and the role of these antibodies in the disease are discussed. Experimental autoimmune myasthenia gravis, an experimental model closely mimicking the disease, has provided answers to many questions about the role of antibodies, complement macrophages and AChR anchor proteins. Genetically modified anti-AChR antibodies may also be used in the future to treat myasthenia. PMID:12220686

  10. Antibody engineering and therapeutics conference

    PubMed Central

    Larrick, James W; Parren, Paul WHI; Huston, James S; Plückthun, Andreas; Bradbury, Andrew; Tomlinson, Ian M; Chester, Kerry A; Burton, Dennis R; Adams, Gregory P; Weiner, Louis M; Scott, Jamie K; Alfenito, Mark R; Veldman, Trudi; Reichert, Janice M

    2014-01-01

    The 25th anniversary of the Antibody Engineering & Therapeutics Conference, the Annual Meeting of The Antibody Society, will be held in Huntington Beach, CA, December 7–11, 2014. Organized by IBC Life Sciences, the event will celebrate past successes, educate participants on current activities and offer a vision of future progress in the field. Keynote addresses will be given by academic and industry experts Douglas Lauffenburger (Massachusetts Institute of Technology), Ira Pastan (National Cancer Institute), James Wells (University of California, San Francisco), Ian Tomlinson (GlaxoSmithKline) and Anthony Rees (Rees Consulting AB and Emeritus Professor, University of Bath). These speakers will provide updates of their work, placed in the context of the substantial growth of the industry over the past 25 years. PMID:25517297

  11. Antibody-independent activation of the classical pathway of complement by Epstein-Barr virus.

    PubMed

    Martin, H; McConnell, I; Gorick, B; Hughes-Jones, N C

    1987-03-01

    A purified preparation of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) has been shown to activate the classical complement pathway by direct interaction with the first component of complement, C1, without the intervention of antibody. No evidence was found for activation of the alternative pathway. Following classical pathway activation the specific affinity of EBV for B cells can be presumed to be lost since the virus will become opsonized for clearance by phagocytic cells bearing complement receptors, CR1 and CR3. This activation is further evidence that complement plays a role in defence mechanisms independently of antibody activity. PMID:3038440

  12. Mechanisms of transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI): anti-leukocyte antibodies.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Brian R; McFarland, Janice G

    2006-05-01

    There is abundant evidence that leukocyte antibodies in blood donor products are somehow involved in transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI). Human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I, HLA class II, and neutrophil-specific antibodies in the plasma of both blood donors and recipients have been implicated in the pathogenesis of TRALI. The case for a relationship between leukocyte antibodies and TRALI is more compelling if concordance between the antigen specificity of the leukocyte antibodies in the donor plasma and the corresponding antigen on the cells of the affected recipient is demonstrated. Such antibody-antigen concordance can be investigated by typing the recipient for the cognate leukocyte antigens or by cross-matching the donor plasma against the recipient's leukocytes. Two proposed pathophysiologic mechanisms for TRALI have received the most attention: the antibody hypothesis and the two-event hypothesis. The final common pathway in all of the proposed pathogenic mechanisms of TRALI is increased pulmonary capillary permeability, which results in movement of plasma into the alveolar space causing pulmonary edema. A typical TRALI serologic workup consists of tests for HLA class I and II and neutrophil-specific antibodies. The use of flow cytometry and HLA-coated microbeads is recommended for detection of HLA antibodies in plasma of implicated blood donors and a combination of the granulocyte agglutination test and granulocyte immunofluorescence test for detection of neutrophil-specific antibodies. Genotyping for class I and II HLA and for a limited number of neutrophil antigens may also be helpful in establishing antibody-antigen concordance. PMID:16617255

  13. Topographic antigenic determinants recognized by monoclonal antibodies on human choriogonadotropin beta-subunit

    SciTech Connect

    Bidart, J.M.; Troalen, F.; Salesse, R.; Bousfield, G.R.; Bohuon, C.J.; Bellet, D.H.

    1987-06-25

    We describe a first attempt to study the antibody-combining sites recognized by monoclonal antibodies raised against the beta-subunit of human choriogonadotropin (hCG). Two groups of antibodies were first defined by their ability to recognize only the free beta-subunit or the free and combined subunit. Antibodies FBT-11 and FBT-11-L bind only to hCG beta-subunit but not to hCG, whereas antibodies FBT-10 and D1E8 bind to both the beta-subunit and the hormone. In both cases, the antigenic determinants were localized to the core of the protein (residues 1-112), indicating the weak immunogenicity of the specific carboxyl-terminal extension of hCG-beta. Nine synthetic peptides spanning different regions of hCG-beta and lutropin-beta were assessed for their capacity to inhibit antibody binding. A synthetic peptide inclusive of the NH2-terminal region (residues 1-7) of the hCG beta-subunit was found to inhibit binding to the radiolabeled subunit of a monoclonal antibody specific for free hCG-beta (FBT-11). Further delineation of the antigenic site recognized by this antibody provided evidence for the involvement of fragment 82-92. Moreover, monoclonal antibody FBT-11 inhibited the recombination of hCG-beta to hCG-alpha, indicating that its antigenic determinant might be located nearby or in the hCG-beta portion interacting with the alpha-subunit. Binding of monoclonal antibody FBT-10, corresponding to the second antigenic determinant, was weakly inhibited by fragment 82-105 and did not impair the recombination of the hCG beta-subunit to the hCG alpha-subunit. Its combining site appeared to be located in a region of the intact native choriogonadotropin present at the surface of the hormone-receptor complex.

  14. Barcode-Enabled Sequencing of Plasmablast Antibody Repertoires in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Yann-Chong; Kongpachith, Sarah; Blum, Lisa K.; Ju, Chia-Hsin; Lahey, Lauren J.; Lu, Dan R.; Cai, Xiaoyong; Wagner, Catriona A.; Lindstrom, Tamsin M.; Sokolove, Jeremy; Robinson, William H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective A hallmark of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is the production of autoantibodies, including anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (ACPAs). Nevertheless, the specific targets of these autoantibodies remain incompletely defined. During an immune response, B cells specific for the inciting antigen(s) are activated and differentiate into “plasmablasts”, which are released into the blood. In this study we sequence the plasmablast antibody repertoire to define the targets of the active immune response in RA. Methods We developed a novel DNA barcoding method to sequence the cognate heavy- and light-chain pairs of antibodies expressed by individual blood plasmablasts in RA. The method uses a universal 5’ adapter that enables full-length sequencing of the antibodies’ variable regions and recombinant expression of the paired antibody chains. The sequence datasets were bioinformatically analyzed to generate phylogenetic trees that identify clonal families of antibodies sharing heavy- and light-chain VJ sequences. Representative antibodies were expressed, and their binding properties characterized using CCP2 ELISA and antigen microarrays. Results We used our sequencing method to generate phylogenetic trees representing the antibody repertoires of peripheral blood plasmablasts of 4 individuals with anti-CCP+ RA, and recombinantly expressed 14 antibodies that were either “singleton” antibodies or representative of clonal antibody families. CCP2 ELISA identified four ACPAs, and antigen microarray analysis identified ACPAs that differentially targeted epitopes on α-enolase, citrullinated fibrinogen, and citrullinated histone 2B. Conclusions Our data provide evidence that autoantibodies targeting α-enolase, citrullinated fibrinogen, and citrullinated histone 2B are produced by the ongoing activated B cell response in, and thus may contribute to the pathogenesis of, RA. PMID:24965753

  15. Methods of identification employing antibody profiles

    DOEpatents

    Francoeur, Ann-Michele

    1993-12-14

    An identification method, applicable to the identification of animals or inanimate objects, is described. The method takes advantage of the set of individual-specific antibodies that are part of the unique antibody repertoire present in animals, by reacting an effective amount of such antibodies with a particular panel, of n-dimensional array (where n is typically one or two) consisting of an effective amount of many different antigens (typically greater than one thousand), to give antibody-antigen complexes. The profile or pattern formed by the antigen-antibody complexes, termed an antibody fingerprint, when revealed by an effective amount of an appropriate detector molecule, is uniquely representative of a particular individual. The method can similarly be used to distinguish genetically, or otherwise similar individuals, or their body parts containing individual-specific antibodies.

  16. Antibodies directed against receptor tyrosine kinases

    PubMed Central

    FAUVEL, Bénédicte; Yasri, Aziz

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 30 therapeutic monoclonal antibodies have already been approved for cancers and inflammatory diseases, and monoclonal antibodies continue to be one of the fastest growing classes of therapeutic molecules. Because aberrant signaling by receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) is a commonly observed factor in cancer, most of the subclasses of RTKs are being extensively studied as potential targets for treating malignancies. The first two RTKs that have been targeted by antibody therapy, with five currently marketed antibodies, are the growth factor receptors EGFR and HER2. However, due to systemic side effects, refractory patients and the development of drug resistance, these treatments are being challenged by emerging therapeutics. This review examines current monoclonal antibody therapies against RTKs. After an analysis of agents that have already been approved, we present an analysis of antibodies in clinical development that target RTKs. Finally, we highlight promising RTKs that are emerging as new oncological targets for antibody-based therapy. PMID:24859229

  17. Human antibodies to vascular endothelium

    PubMed Central

    Lindqvist, K. J.; Osterland, C. K.

    1971-01-01

    Certain human sera were found to produce specific staining of vascular endothelium by the immunofluorescent technique. The antibody nature of this reaction was confirmed by using fluorescein-conjugated antisera specific for human immunoglobulins and the component of complement, and by physicochemical characterization of isolated immunoglobulins giving this reaction. This activity was present in sera from patients with a wide variety of diseases (17·8%). The highest incidence was found in chronic pulmonary tuberculosis (26·6%). An incidence of 14% was found in presumably normal blood donors. The stimulus for the production of these antibodies is unknown. The antigen is fairly widely distributed among different species, since tissues from a variety of animals could be used as substrate in the reaction. Experiments have shown that neither the classic Forssman antigen nor ABO blood groups are involved. The possible role of these antibodies in human disease remains to be elucidated. The finding of anti-endothelial activity in two recipients of renal transplants may be significant. PMID:4945736

  18. Monoclonal antibody purification with hydroxyapatite.

    PubMed

    Gagnon, Pete

    2009-06-01

    Hydroxyapatite (HA) has been used for IgG purification since its introduction in the 1950s. Applications expanded to include IgA and IgM in the 1980s, along with elucidation of its primary binding mechanisms and the development of ceramic HA media. With the advent of recombinant monoclonal antibodies, HA was demonstrated to be effective for removal of antibody aggregates, as well as host cell proteins and leached protein A. HA's inherent abilities have been enhanced by the development of elution strategies that permit differential control of its primary binding mechanisms: calcium metal affinity and phosphoryl cation exchange. These strategies support reduction of antibody aggregate content from greater than 60% to less than 0.1%, in conjunction with enhanced removal of DNA, endotoxin, and virus. HA also has a history of discriminating various immunological constructs on the basis of differences in their variable regions, or discriminating Fab fragments from Fc contaminants in papain digests of purified monoclonal IgG. Continuing development of novel elution strategies, alternative forms of HA, and application of robotic high throughput screening systems promise to expand HA's utility in the field. PMID:19491046

  19. Improved monoclonal antibodies to halodeoxyuridine

    DOEpatents

    Vanderlaan, M.; Dolbeare, F.A.; Gray, J.W.; Thomas, C.B.

    1983-10-18

    The development, method of production, characterization and methods of use of two hybridomas, CIdU-1 (ATCC Accession No. HB-8321) and CIdU-2 (ATCC Accession No. HB-8320), are described. These secrete IgG/sub 1/(K) immunoglobulins that react with halodeoxyuridine (HdU or halodU) such as bromo, chloro, fluoro and iodo deoxyuridine (BrdU, CldU, FdU and IdU), whether these are free in solution or incorporated into single stranded DNA in whole cells. The antibodies do not react with naturally occurring free nucleic acids or with deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) or ribonucleic acid (RNA) polymers. These antibodies are suitable for use in enzyme immunoassays for free CldU, FdU, IdU and BrdU and for detecting cells with these nucleotides incorporated into them. The monoclonal antibodies are useful in the detection of the sensitivity of tumor cells to specific chemotherapeutic agents, in the measurement of the rate of cellular DNA synthesis, in the measurement of the rate of proliferation of normal and malignant cells and in the detection of HPRT deficiency in cells. 1 tab.

  20. Single-Chain Antibody Library

    DOE Data Explorer

    Baird, Cheryl

    Researchers at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) have constructed a nonimmune library consisting of 109 human antibody scFv fragments, which have been cloned and expressed on the surface of yeast. Nanomolar-affinity scFvs are routinely obtained by magnetic bead screening and flow cytometric sorting. The yeast library can be amplified 1010 fold without measurable loss of clonal diversity. This allows for indefinite expansion of the library. All scFv clones can be assessed directly on the yeast cell surface by immunofluorescent labeling and flow cytometry, obviating separate subcloning, expression, and purification steps. The ability to use multiplex library screening demonstrates the utility of this approach for high-throughput antibody isolation for proteomic applications. The yeast library may be used for research projects or teaching performed for U.S. Government purposes only. If you would like to request an aliquot of the single-chain antibody library for your research, please print and fill out the Materials Transfer Agreement (MTA) [PDF, 20K]. The website provides the contact information for mailing the MTA. [copied from http://www.sysbio.org/dataresources/singlechain.stm

  1. Advances in monoclonal antibody application in myocarditis*

    PubMed Central

    Han, Li-na; He, Shuang; Wang, Yu-tang; Yang, Li-ming; Liu, Si-yu; Zhang, Ting

    2013-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies have become a part of daily preparation technologies in many laboratories. Attempts have been made to apply monoclonal antibodies to open a new train of thought for clinical treatments of autoimmune diseases, inflammatory diseases, cancer, and other immune-associated diseases. This paper is a prospective review to anticipate that monoclonal antibody application in the treatment of myocarditis, an inflammatory disease of the heart, could be a novel approach in the future. In order to better understand the current state of the art in monoclonal antibody techniques and advance applications in myocarditis, we, through a significant amount of literature research both domestic and abroad, developed a systematic elaboration of monoclonal antibodies, pathogenesis of myocarditis, and application of monoclonal antibodies in myocarditis. This paper presents review of the literature of some therapeutic aspects of monoclonal antibodies in myocarditis and dilated cardiomyopathy to demonstrate the advance of monoclonal antibody application in myocarditis and a strong anticipation that monoclonal antibody application may supply an effective therapeutic approach to relieve the severity of myocarditis in the future. Under conventional therapy, myocarditis is typically associated with congestive heart failure as a progressive outcome, indicating the need for alternative therapeutic strategies to improve long-term results. Reviewing some therapeutic aspects of monoclonal antibodies in myocarditis, we recently found that monoclonal antibodies with high purity and strong specificity can accurately act on target and achieve definite progress in the treatment of viral myocarditis in rat model and may meet the need above. However, several issues remain. The technology on how to make a higher homologous and weak immunogenic humanized or human source antibody and the treatment mechanism of monoclonal antibodies may provide solutions for these open issues. If we are to

  2. A review of monoclonal antibody therapies in lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Teo, Esmeralda Chi-yuan; Chew, Yveline; Phipps, Colin

    2016-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (moAb) represent a novel way of delivering therapy through specific target antigens expressed on lymphoma cells and minimizes the collateral damage that is common with conventional chemotherapy. The paradigm of this approach is the targeting of CD20 by rituximab. Since its FDA approval in 1997, rituximab has become the standard of care in almost every line of therapy in most B-cell lymphomas. This review will briefly highlight some of the key rituximab trials while looking more closely at the evidence that is bringing other antibodies, including next generation anti-CD20 moAbs, and anti-CD30 moAbs, among others to the forefront of lymphoma therapy. PMID:26318093

  3. Broadly neutralizing antibodies abrogate established hepatitis C virus infection

    PubMed Central

    de Jong, Ype P.; Dorner, Marcus; Mommersteeg, Michiel C.; Xiao, Jing W.; Balazs, Alejandro B.; Robbins, Justin B.; Winer, Benjamin Y.; Gerges, Sherif; Vega, Kevin; Labitt, Rachael N.; Donovan, Bridget M.; Giang, Erick; Krishnan, Anuradha; Chiriboga, Luis; Charlton, Michael R.; Burton, Dennis R.; Baltimore, David; Law, Mansun; Rice, Charles M.; Ploss, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) establishes a chronic infection in the majority of exposed individuals and can cause cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. The role of antibodies directed against HCV in disease progression is poorly understood. Neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) can prevent HCV infection in vitro and in animal models. However, the effects of nAbs on an established HCV infection are unclear. Here, we demonstrate that three broadly nAbs, AR3A, AR3B and AR4A, delivered with adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors can confer protection against viral challenge in humanized mice. Furthermore, we provide evidence that nAbs can abrogate an ongoing HCV infection in primary hepatocyte cultures and in a human liver chimeric mouse model. These results showcase a novel therapeutic approach to interfere with HCV infection exploiting a previously unappreciated need for HCV to continuously infect new hepatocytes in order to sustain chronicity. PMID:25232181

  4. Acquired antiprothrombin antibodies: an unusual cause of bleeding.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Cristiana; Viveiro, Carolina; Maia, Paulo; Rezende, Teresa

    2013-01-01

    Acquired inhibitors of coagulation causing bleeding manifestations are rare in children. They emerge, normally in the context of autoimmune diseases or drug ingestion, but transient and self-limiting cases can occur after viral infection. We describe, an otherwise healthy, 7-year-old girl who had gingival bleeding after a tooth extraction. The prothrombin time (PT) and the activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) were both prolonged with evidence of an immediate acting inhibitor (lupic anticoagulant). Further coagulation studies demonstrated prothrombin (FII) deficiency and prothrombin directed (FII) antibodies. The serological tests to detect an underlying autoimmune disease were all negative. The coagulation studies normalised alongside the disappearance of the antibody. This article presents lupus anticoagulant hypoprothrombinaemia syndrome (LAHS) as a rare case of acquired bleeding diathesis in childhood. PMID:23299692

  5. Glycine receptor antibodies in PERM and related syndromes: characteristics, clinical features and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Carvajal-González, Alexander; Leite, M. Isabel; Waters, Patrick; Woodhall, Mark; Coutinho, Ester; Balint, Bettina; Lang, Bethan; Pettingill, Philippa; Carr, Aisling; Sheerin, Una-Marie; Press, Raomand; Lunn, Michael P.; Lim, Ming; Maddison, Paul; Meinck, H.-M.; Vandenberghe, Wim

    2014-01-01

    monoclonal antibodies to glycine receptor-α1. Ten glycine receptor antibody positive samples were also identified in a retrospective cohort of 56 patients with stiff person syndrome and related syndromes. Glycine receptor antibodies are strongly associated with spinal and brainstem disorders, and the majority of patients have progressive encephalomyelitis with rigidity and myoclonus. The antibodies demonstrate in vitro evidence of pathogenicity and the patients respond well to immunotherapies, contrasting with earlier studies of this syndrome, which indicated a poor prognosis. The presence of glycine receptor antibodies should help to identify a disease that responds to immunotherapies, but these treatments may need to be sustained, relapses can occur and maintenance immunosuppression may be required. PMID:24951641

  6. Seroepidemiological investigation of Brucella canis antibodies in different human population groups.

    PubMed Central

    Monroe, P W; Silberg, S L; Morgan, P M; Adess, M

    1975-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the prevalence of Brucella canis antibodies in specified groups based on their exposure to dogs. The method used was a microtiter technique, and the presence of antibodies at a 1:12 or greater dilution of serum was considered a positive test. Eleven (5.7%) of the newborn infants had evidence of maternal antibodies, and 67.8% of the persons with an average exposure to dogs had B. canis antibodies, with a 62.1% prevalence in males and a 72.4% prevalence in females (P less than or equal to 0.001). Veterinarians had a much higher rate of infection (72.6%) than male blood donors (56.9%) (P less than or equal to 0.01). Patients with fevers of undetermined origin had significantly higher antibody titers to B. canis than all other patients (P less than or equal to 0.001). This study presents evidence that the prevalence of B. canis antibodies in humans is high, and that the incidence of brucellosis may increase when physicians consider B. canis as a possible etiological agent in febrile illnesses. PMID:1194405

  7. Clearance of circulating radio-antibodies using streptavidin or second antibodies in a xenograft model.

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, D.; Pedley, R. B.; Boden, J. A.; Boden, R.; Begent, R. H.

    1994-01-01

    The improved tumour to non-tumour ratios needed for effective tumour targeting with antibodies requires that blood background radioactivity is reduced. We investigated the effect of streptavidin as a clearing agent for 125I-labelled biotinylated anti-CEA antibodies in a human colon carcinoma xenograft model. By comparing the biodistribution of the monoclonal antibody A5B7 with four, nine or 22 biotins per antibody molecule, we investigated how the degree of biotinylation of the primary radiolabelled antibody affects its clearance with streptavidin. Limiting the degree of biotinylation limited blood clearance, whereas nine or 22 biotins per antibody molecule resulted in a 13- to 14-fold reduction in blood radioactivity, the streptavidin-biotinylated antibody complexes clearing rapidly via the liver and spleen. Although a reduction in tumour activity was also seen, a 6.6-fold improvement in the tumour to blood ratio was achieved. A comparative study of streptavidin versus second antibody clearance was carried out using the polyclonal antibody PK4S biotinylated with 12 biotins per antibody molecule. This study indicated that second antibody was superior for clearance of the polyclonal antibody, resulting in a larger and faster reduction in blood radioactivity and improved tumour to blood ratios. In this case the primary antibody was polyclonal, and therefore non-uniformity of biotinylation may affect complexation with streptavidin. Therefore, the degree of biotinylation and type of antibody must be carefully considered before the use of streptavidin clearance. PMID:8123481

  8. Protective antiviral antibodies that lack neutralizing activity: precedents and evolution of concepts.

    PubMed

    Schmaljohn, Alan L

    2013-07-01

    Antibody-mediated resistance to viral disease is often attributed solely to neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) despite a body of evidence -- more than 30 years in the making -- to show that other populations of antibodies (protective non-neutralizing antibodies, PnNAbs) can also contribute and are sometimes pivotal in host resistance to viruses. Recently, interest in varieties of PnNAbs has been restored and elevated by an HIV vaccine trial in which virus-specific nNAbs have been highlighted as a positive correlate of immunity. Here, I briefly review some of the historical precedents with many viruses other than HIV, along with the emergence of data over the course of some four decades, pointing emphatically to the importance of subsets of antiviral antibodies that operate by mechanisms other than classical virus neutralization. Foremost among suspected mechanisms of protection by PnNAbs is antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicty (ADCC), but additional mechanisms have sometimes been incriminated or not experimentally excluded. Examples are given for the diversity of proteins and cognate epitopes bound by PnNAbs. Some such epitopes are restricted to virus-infected cell surfaces or found on secreted proteins; others may be associated with virions but unavailable to antibodies during much of the viral cycle; these are epitopes variously described as cryptic, transitional, dynamic, or reversibly masked. PMID:24191933

  9. Antibody-mediated disruption of the mechanics of CS20 fimbriae of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Singh, Bhupender; Mortezaei, Narges; Uhlin, Bernt Eric; Savarino, Stephen J; Bullitt, Esther; Andersson, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    Preventive vaccines against enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) are being developed, many of which target common fimbrial colonization factors as the major constituent, based on empirical evidence that these function as protective antigens. Particularly, passive oral administration of ETEC anti-fimbrial antibodies prevent ETEC diarrhea. Little is, however, known regarding the specific mechanisms by which intestinal antibodies against ETEC fimbriae function to prevent disease. Using coli surface antigen 20 (CS20) fimbriae as a model ETEC colonization factor, we show using force spectroscopy that anti-fimbrial antibodies diminish fimbrial elasticity by inhibiting their natural capacity to unwind and rewind. In the presence of anti-CS20 antibodies the force required to unwind a single fimbria was increased several-fold and the extension length was shortened several-fold. Similar measurements in the presence of anti-CS20 Fab fragments did not show any effect, indicating that bivalent antibody binding is required to reduce fimbrial elasticity. Based on these findings, we propose a model for an in-vivo mechanism whereby antibody-mediated disruption of the biomechanical properties of CS20 fimbriae impedes sustained adhesion of ETEC to the intestinal mucosal surface. Further elucidation of the role played by intestinal antibodies in mechanical disruption of fimbrial function may provide insights relevant to ETEC vaccine development. PMID:26411657

  10. Profiling serum antibodies to Mycobacterium tuberculosis proteins in rhesus monkeys with nontuberculous Mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    Min, Fangui; Pan, Jinchun; Wu, Ruike; Chen, Meiling; Kuang, Huiwen; Zhao, Weibo

    2016-02-14

    Recent evidence indicates that the prevalence of diseases caused by nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) has been increasing in both human and animals. In this study, antibody profiles of NTM in rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) were determined and compared with those of monkeys infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC). Antibodies against 10 M. tuberculosis proteins, purified protein derivative (PPD), and mammalian old tuberculin (MOT) were detected in 14 monkeys naturally infected with NTM by indirect ELISA. Sera from 10 monkeys infected with MTBC and 10 healthy monkeys were set as controls. All antigens showed high serological reactivities to MTBC infections and low reactivities in healthy monkeys. NTM infections showed strong antibody responses to MOT and PPD; moderate antibody responses to 16kDa, U1, MPT64L, 14kDa, and TB16.3; and low antibody responses to 38kDa, Ag85b, CFP10, ESAT-6, and CFP10-ESAT-6. According to the criteria of MTBC, only CFP10, ESAT-6, and CFP10-ESAT-6 showed negative antibody responses in all NTM infections. Taken together, these results suggest that positive results of a PPD/MOT-based ELISA in combination with results of antibodies to M. tuberculosis-specific antigens, such as CFP10 and ESAT-6, could discriminate NTM and MTBC infections. Two positive results indicate an MTBC infection, and a negative result for an M. tuberculosis-specific antigen may preliminarily predict an NTM infection. PMID:26437786

  11. Antibody-mediated disruption of the mechanics of CS20 fimbriae of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Bhupender; Mortezaei, Narges; Uhlin, Bernt Eric; Savarino, Stephen J.; Bullitt, Esther; Andersson, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    Preventive vaccines against enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) are being developed, many of which target common fimbrial colonization factors as the major constituent, based on empirical evidence that these function as protective antigens. Particularly, passive oral administration of ETEC anti-fimbrial antibodies prevent ETEC diarrhea. Little is, however, known regarding the specific mechanisms by which intestinal antibodies against ETEC fimbriae function to prevent disease. Using coli surface antigen 20 (CS20) fimbriae as a model ETEC colonization factor, we show using force spectroscopy that anti-fimbrial antibodies diminish fimbrial elasticity by inhibiting their natural capacity to unwind and rewind. In the presence of anti-CS20 antibodies the force required to unwind a single fimbria was increased several-fold and the extension length was shortened several-fold. Similar measurements in the presence of anti-CS20 Fab fragments did not show any effect, indicating that bivalent antibody binding is required to reduce fimbrial elasticity. Based on these findings, we propose a model for an in-vivo mechanism whereby antibody-mediated disruption of the biomechanical properties of CS20 fimbriae impedes sustained adhesion of ETEC to the intestinal mucosal surface. Further elucidation of the role played by intestinal antibodies in mechanical disruption of fimbrial function may provide insights relevant to ETEC vaccine development. PMID:26411657

  12. Suitability of Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor α7 and Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor 3 Antibodies for Immune Detection

    PubMed Central

    Rommel, Frank R.; Raghavan, Badrinarayanan; Paddenberg, Renate; Kummer, Wolfgang; Tumala, Susanne; Lochnit, Günter; Gieler, Uwe

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence reveals a crucial role for acetylcholine and its receptors in the regulation of inflammation, particularly of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor α7 (Chrna7) and muscarinic acetylcholine receptor 3 (Chrm3). Immunohistochemistry is a key tool for their cellular localization in functional tissues. We evaluated nine different commercially available antibodies on back skin tissue from wild-type (Wt) and gene-deficient (KO) mice. In the immunohistochemical analysis, we focused on key AChR-ligand sensitive skin cells (mast cells, nerve fibers and keratinocytes). All five antibodies tested for Chrm3 and the first three Chrna7 antibodies stained positive in both Wt and respective KO skin. With the 4th antibody (ab23832) nerve fibers were unlabeled in the KO mice. By western blot analysis, this antibody detected bands in both Wt and Chrna7 KO skin and brain. qRT-PCR revealed mRNA amplification with a primer set for the undeleted region in both Wt and KO mice, but none with a primer set for the deleted region in KO mice. By 2D electrophoresis, we found β-actin and β-enolase cross reactivity, which was confirmed by double immunolabeling. In view of the present results, the tested antibodies are not suitable for immunolocalization in skin and suggest thorough control of antibody specificity is required if histomorphometry is intended. PMID:25673288

  13. Dengue Virus (DENV) Neutralizing Antibody Kinetics in Children After Symptomatic Primary and Postprimary DENV Infection.

    PubMed

    Clapham, Hannah E; Rodriguez-Barraquer, Isabel; Azman, Andrew S; Althouse, Benjamin M; Salje, Henrik; Gibbons, Robert V; Rothman, Alan L; Jarman, Richard G; Nisalak, Ananda; Thaisomboonsuk, Butsaya; Kalayanarooj, Siripen; Nimmannitya, Suchitra; Vaughn, David W; Green, Sharone; Yoon, In-Kyu; Cummings, Derek A T

    2016-05-01

    The immune response to dengue virus (DENV) infection is complex and not fully understood. Using longitudinal data from 181 children with dengue in Thailand who were followed for up to 3 years, we describe neutralizing antibody kinetics following symptomatic DENV infection. We observed that antibody titers varied by serotype, homotypic vs heterotypic responses, and primary versus postprimary infections. The rates of change in antibody titers over time varied between primary and postprimary responses. For primary infections, titers increased from convalescence to 6 months. By comparing homotypic and heterotypic antibody titers, we saw an increase in type specificity from convalescence to 6 months for primary DENV3 infections but not primary DENV1 infections. In postprimary cases, there was a decrease in titers from convalescence up until 6 months after infection. Beginning 1 year after both primary and postprimary infections, there was evidence of increasing antibody titers, with greater increases in children with lower titers, suggesting that antibody titers were boosted due to infection and that higher levels of neutralizing antibody may be more likely to confer a sterilizing immune response. These findings may help to model virus transmission dynamics and provide baseline data to support the development of vaccines and therapeutics. PMID:26704615

  14. ROLE OF ANTIBODIES IN DEVELOPING DRUGS THAT TARGET G PROTEIN-COUPLED RECEPTOR DIMERS

    PubMed Central

    Hipser, Chris; Bushlin, Ittai; Gupta, Achla; Gomes, Ivone; Devi, Lakshmi A.

    2010-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are important molecular targets in drug discovery. These receptors play a pivotal role in physiological signaling pathways and are targeted by nearly 50% of currently available drugs. Mounting evidence suggests that GPCRs form dimers and various studies have shown that dimerization is necessary for receptor maturation, signaling and trafficking. However, the physiological implications of dimerization in vivo have not been well explored since detection of GPCR dimers in endogenous systems has been a challenging task. One exciting new approach to this challenge is the generation of antibodies against specific GPCR dimers. Such antibodies could be used as tools for characterization of heteromer-specific function, as reagents for their purification, tissue localization and regulation in vivo and as probes for mapping their functional domains. In addition, such antibodies could serve as alternative ligands for GPCR heteromers. Thus, heteromer-specific antibodies represent novel tools for the exploration and manipulation of GPCR dimer pharmacology. PMID:20687183

  15. Circulating immune complexes containing anti-VIII antibodies in multi-transfused patients with haemophilia A.

    PubMed

    Kazatchkine, M D; Sultan, Y; Burton-Kee, E J; Mowbray, J F

    1980-02-01

    Evidence for the presence of circulating immune complexes was found in thirty-four out of fifty-five samples from forty-seven patients with haemophilia A. In eleven patients the complexes, precipitated from the blood with polyethylene glycol, were digested with pepsin. The F(ab')2 antibody was tested, and found to have neutralizing activity against coagulant Factor VIII in two patients. In one of these no free antibody had ever been found in the plasma, while in the other the antibody was concentrated tenfold in the complex. In two other samples free without complexed antibody was found. In comparison, IgG-containing complexes were found in nine out of nineteen patients with von Willebrand's disease and no complexes were found in the sera from twelve multi-transfused thalassaemics. PEG precipitation is a useful technique for the preparation of concentrated immune complexes for further study such as antigen identification. PMID:6771074

  16. An Uncoordinated-5 Homolog B Receptor Monoclonal Antibody Regulates A375 Melanoma Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Yuanling; He, Jun; Zhao, Yiming; He, Yang

    2014-01-01

    Uncoordinated-5 homolog B receptor (UNC5B) was first found to mediate neural chemorepulsive effects by binding to its ligand netrin-1 in the nervous system. Newer evidence indicated that UNC5B also has functions outside the nervous system. In this study, we report on the generation of a monoclonal antibody specific to the outer-membrane immunoglobulin-like domains of UNC5B using the hybridoma technique. Western blot, immunofluorescence, and flow cytometry analyses showed that the antibody specifically bound to UNC5B protein. Interestingly, the antibody blocked the Netrin-1-induced inhibitory effect on the mobility of melanoma A375 cells by wound healing assay and transwell migration assay, whereas it had no effects on cell proliferation measured by CCK-8 assay. Thus, the functional antibody may provide a useful tool for the study of UNC5B expression profiles and functions outside the nervous system. PMID:25171009

  17. Individual-specific antibody identification methods

    DOEpatents

    Francoeur, Ann -Michele

    1989-11-14

    An identification method, applicable to the identification of animals or inanimate objects, is described. The method takes advantage of a hithertofore unknown set of individual-specific, or IS antibodies, that are part of the unique antibody repertoire present in animals, by reacting an effective amount of IS antibodies with a particular panel, or n-dimensional array (where n is typically one or two) consisting of an effective amount of many different antigens (typically greater than one thousand), to give antibody-antigen complexes. The profile or pattern formed by the antigen-antibody complexes, termed an antibody fingerprint, when revealed by an effective amount of an appropriate detector molecule, is uniquely representative of a particular individual. The method can similarly by used to distinguish genetically, or otherwise similar individuals, or their body parts containing IS antibodies. Identification of inanimate objects, particularly security documents, is similarly affected by associating with the documents, an effective amount of a particular individual's IS antibodies, or conversely, a particular panel of antigens, and forming antibody-antigen complexes with a particular panel of antigens, or a particular individual's IS antibodies, respectively. One embodiment of the instant identification method, termed the blocked fingerprint assay, has applications in the area of allergy testing, autoimmune diagnostics and therapeutics, and the detection of environmental antigens such as pathogens, chemicals, and toxins.

  18. Characterization of germline antibody libraries from human umbilical cord blood and selection of monoclonal antibodies to viral envelope glycoproteins: Implications for mechanisms of immune evasion and design of vaccine immunogens.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weizao; Streaker, Emily D; Russ, Daniel E; Feng, Yang; Prabakaran, Ponraj; Dimitrov, Dimiter S

    2012-01-27

    We have previously observed that all known HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) are highly divergent from germline antibodies in contrast to bnAbs against Hendra virus, Nipah virus and SARS coronavirus (SARS CoV). We have hypothesized that because the germline antibodies are so different from the mature HIV-1-specific bnAbs they may not bind the epitopes of the mature antibodies and provided the first evidence to support this hypothesis by using individual putative germline-like predecessor antibodies. To further validate the hypothesis and understand initial immune responses to different viruses, two phage-displayed human cord blood-derived IgM libraries were constructed which contained mostly germline antibodies or antibodies with very low level of somatic hypermutations. They were panned against different HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins (Envs), SARS CoV protein receptor-binding domain (RBD), and soluble Hendra virus G protein (sG). Despite a high sequence and combinatorial diversity observed in the cord blood-derived IgM antibody repertoire, no enrichment for binders of Envs was observed in contrast to considerable specific enrichments produced with panning against RBD and sG; one of the selected monoclonal antibodies (against the RBD) was of high (nM) affinity with only few somatic mutations. These results further support and expand our initial hypothesis for fundamental differences in immune responses leading to elicitation of bnAbs against HIV-1 compared to SARS CoV and Hendra virus. HIV-1 uses a strategy to minimize or eliminate strong binding of germline antibodies to its Env; in contrast, SARS CoV and Hendra virus, and perhaps other viruses causing acute infections, can bind germline antibody or minimally somatically mutated antibodies with relatively high affinity which could be one of the reasons for the success of sG and RBD as vaccine immunogens. PMID:22226962

  19. Liver injury caused by antibodies against dengue virus nonstructural protein 1 in a murine model.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chiou-Feng; Wan, Shu-Wen; Chen, Mei-Chun; Lin, Shin-Chao; Cheng, Chu-Chen; Chiu, Shu-Chen; Hsiao, Yu-Ling; Lei, Huan-Yao; Liu, Hsiao-Sheng; Yeh, Trai-Ming; Lin, Yee-Shin

    2008-10-01

    Clinical manifestations of severe dengue diseases include thrombocytopenia, vascular leakage, and liver damage. Evidence shows that hepatic injury is involved in the pathogenesis of dengue infection; however, the mechanisms are not fully resolved. Our previous in vitro studies suggested a mechanism of molecular mimicry in which antibodies directed against dengue virus (DV) nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) cross-reacted with endothelial cells and caused inflammatory activation and apoptosis. In this study, the pathogenic effects of anti-DV NS1 antibodies were further examined in a murine model. We found, in liver sections, that anti-DV NS1 antibodies bound to naive mouse vessel endothelium and the binding activity was inhibited by preabsorption of antibodies with DV NS1. Active immunization with DV NS1 resulted in antibody deposition to liver vessel endothelium, and also apoptotic cell death of liver endothelium. Liver tissue damage was observed in DV NS1-immunized mice by histological examination. The serum levels of aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) were increased in mice either actively immunized with DV NS1 protein or passively immunized with antibodies obtained from DV NS1-immunized mice. Furthermore, histological examination revealed mononuclear phagocyte infiltration and cell apoptosis in mice passively immunized with antibodies obtained from mice immunized with DV NS1. Increased AST and ALT levels were observed in mice passively immunized with purified immunoglobulin G (IgG) from dengue patients compared with normal control human IgG-immunized mice. The increased AST and ALT levels were inhibited when dengue patient serum IgG was preabsorbed with DV NS1. In conclusion, active immunization with DV NS1 protein causes immune-mediated liver injury in mice. Passive immunization provides additional evidence that anti-DV NS1 antibodies may play a role in liver damage, which is a pathologic manifestation in dengue virus disease. PMID

  20. Nanoliposome-mediated targeting of antibodies to tumors: IVIG antibodies as a model.

    PubMed

    Nikpoor, Amin Reza; Tavakkol-Afshari, Jalil; Gholizadeh, Zahra; Sadri, Kayvan; Babaei, Mohammad Hossein; Chamani, Jamshidkhan; Badiee, Ali; Jalali, Seyed Amir; Jaafari, Mahmoud Reza

    2015-11-10

    Monoclonal antibodies are routinely used as tools in immunotherapies against solid tumors. However, administration of monoclonal antibodies may cause undesired side effects due to their accumulation in non-targeted organs. Nanoliposomes of less than 200 nm can target antibodies to tumors by enhanced permeation and retention (EPR) mechanisms. To direct monoclonal antibodies to tumors, nanoliposomes encapsulating intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) as a model antibody were prepared. The liposomes had average diameters of 100 nm and encapsulation efficiencies of 31 to 46%. They showed less than 10% release in plasma at 37°C up to seven days. The secondary and tertiary structures of liposome-encapsulated antibodies were analyzed by circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. The near and far-UV spectra analyses revealed no obvious conformational changes in the structures of the encapsulated antibodies. The biodistribution of free and liposome-encapsulated iodinated antibodies was investigated in mice bearing C-26 colon carcinoma tumors. The accumulation of liposome-encapsulated antibodies in tumors was significantly greater than that of free antibodies due to the EPR effect. The PEGylated liposomes were more efficient in the delivery of antibodies to the tumor site than non-PEGylated liposomes. We conclude that administration of monoclonal antibodies in PEGylated liposomes is more efficient than administration of non-encapsulated monoclonal antibodies for solid tumor immunotherapy. PMID:26302860

  1. Antibody Based Imaging Strategies of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Warram, Jason M; de Boer, Esther; Sorace, Anna G; Chung, Thomas K; Kim, Hyunki; Pleijhuis, Rick G; van Dam, Gooitzen M; Rosenthal, Eben L

    2014-01-01

    Although mainly developed for preclinical research and therapeutic use, antibodies have high antigen specificity, which can be used as a courier to selectively deliver a diagnostic probe or therapeutic agent to cancer. It is generally accepted that the optimal antigen for imaging will depend on both the expression in the tumor relative to normal tissue and the homogeneity of expression throughout the tumor mass and between patients. For the purpose of diagnostic imaging, novel antibodies can be developed to target antigens for disease detection, or current FDA-approved antibodies can be repurposed with the covalent addition of an imaging probe. Reuse of therapeutic antibodies for diagnostic purposes reduces translational costs since the safety profile of the antibody is well defined and the agent is already available under conditions suitable for human use. In this review, we will explore a wide range of antibodies and imaging modalities that are being translated to the clinic for cancer identification and surgical treatment. PMID:24913898

  2. Antibodies to laminin in Chagas' disease

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    We have found that sera from humans with Chagas' disease and Rhesus monkeys infected with Trypanosoma cruzi contain IgM and IgG antibodies, which react with structures in a variety of connective tissues. These antibodies react with laminin but not with various other purified connective tissue components like collagen types I, III, IV, and V, fibronectin, heparan sulfate (BM-1) proteoglycan, or chondronectin. The tissue-reacting antibodies were isolated by absorption to a laminin- Sepharose column. The bound fraction contained all the tissue-reacting antibodies. These antibodies strongly stained trypomastigotes and amastigotes, but weakly stained epimastigotes. These studies show that sera from T. cruzi-infected primates contain antilaminin antibodies, which may be produced by those host in response to a laminin-like molecule present in the parasite. PMID:6801186

  3. Phase Separation in Solutions of Monoclonal Antibodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedek, George; Wang, Ying; Lomakin, Aleksey; Latypov, Ramil

    2012-02-01

    We report the observation of liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS) in a solution of humanized monoclonal antibodies, IgG2, and the effects of human serum albumin, a major blood protein, on this phase separation. We find a significant reduction of phase separation temperature in the presence of albumin, and a preferential partitioning of the albumin into the antibody-rich phase. We provide a general thermodynamic analysis of the antibody-albumin mixture phase diagram and relate its features to the magnitude of the effective inter-protein interactions. Our analysis suggests that additives (HSA in this report), which have moderate attraction with antibody molecules, may be used to forestall undesirable protein condensation in antibody solutions. Our findings are relevant to understanding the stability of pharmaceutical solutions of antibodies and the mechanisms of cryoglobulinemia.

  4. B Cells and Antibodies in Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Alice; Mariat, Christophe; Mousson, Christiane; Wood, Kathryn J; Rifle, Gérard; Thaunat, Olivier

    2016-07-01

    Overlooked for decades, the humoral alloimmune response is increasingly recognized as a leading cause of graft loss after transplantation. However, improvement in the diagnosis of antibody-mediated rejection has not yet translated into better outcomes for transplanted patients. After an update on B cell physiology and antibody generation, the 2015 Beaune Seminar in Transplant Research challenged the conventional view of antibody-mediated rejection pathophysiology and discussed the latest promising therapeutic approaches. PMID:26845305

  5. Optimization of monoclonal antibody delivery via the lymphatics: the dose dependence

    SciTech Connect

    Steller, M.A.; Parker, R.J.; Covell, D.G.; Holton, O.D. 3d.; Keenan, A.M.; Sieber, S.M.; Weinstein, J.N.

    1986-04-01

    After interstitial injection in mice, antibody molecules enter local lymphatic vessels, flow with the lymph to regional lymph nodes, and bind to target antigens there. Compared with i.v. administration, delivery via the lymphatics provides a more efficient means for localizing antibody in lymph nodes. An IgG2a (36-7-5) directed against the murine class I major histocompatibility antigen H-2Kk has proved useful for studying the pharmacology of lymphatic delivery. At very low doses, most of the antibody remains at the injection site in Kk-positive animals. As the dose is progressively increased, most effective labeling occurs first in nodes proximal to the injection site and then in the next group of nodes along the lymphatic chain. At higher doses, antibody overflows the lymphatic system and enters the blood-stream via the thoracic duct and other lymphatic-venous connections. Once in the blood, antibody is rapidly cleared, apparently by binding to Kk-bearing cells. These findings indicate that the single-pass distribution of monoclonal antibodies in the lymphatics can be strongly dose dependent, a principle which may be of clinical significance in the improvement of immunolymphoscintigraphic imaging, especially with antibodies directed against normal and malignant lymphoid cells. Monoclonal antibodies directed against normal cell types in the lymph node may be useful for assessing the integrity of lymphatic chains by immunolymphoscintigraphy or, more speculatively, for altering the status of regional immune function. The results presented here indicate that a low or intermediate antibody dose may optimize the signal:noise ratio for imaging. In Kk-negative animals, the percentage of dose taken up in the major organs was essentially independent of the dose administered; there was no evidence for saturable sites of nonspecific binding.

  6. Uses of monoclonal antibody 8H9

    DOEpatents

    Cheung, Nai-Kong V

    2013-08-06

    This invention provides a composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a suitable carrier. This invention provides a pharmaceutical composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier. This invention also provides an antibody other than the monoclonal antibody 8H9 comprising the complementary determining regions of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof, capable of binding to the same antigen as the monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention provides a substance capable of competitively inhibiting the binding of monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention also provides an isolated scFv of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof. This invention also provides the 8H9 antigen. This invention also provides a method of inhibiting the growth of tumor cells comprising contacting said tumor cells with an appropriate amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof.

  7. Uses of monoclonal antibody 8H9

    DOEpatents

    Cheung, Nai-Kong V.

    2010-06-15

    This invention provides a composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a suitable carrier. This invention provides a pharmaceutical composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier. This invention also provides an antibody other than the monoclonal antibody 8H9 comprising the complementary determining regions of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof, capable of binding to the same antigen as the monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention provides a substance capable of competitively inhibiting the binding of monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention also provides an isolated scFv of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof. This invention also provides the 8H9 antigen. This invention also provides a method of inhibiting the growth of tumor cells comprising contacting said tumor cells with an appropriate amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof.

  8. Monoclonal antibodies that detect live salmonellae.

    PubMed Central

    Torensma, R; Visser, M J; Aarsman, C J; Poppelier, M J; van Beurden, R; Fluit, A C; Verhoef, J

    1992-01-01

    Nine immunoglobulin G and nine immunoglobulin M murine monoclonal antibody-producing hybridomas reactive with live Salmonella bacteria were obtained from several fusions of immune spleen cells and Sp2/0 myeloma cells. The antibodies were selected by the magnetic immunoluminescence assay. The monoclonal antibodies were reactive with serogroups A, B, C1, C2, D, E, and K and Salmonella choleraesuis subsp. diarizonae. Each monoclonal antibody proved to be reactive with a distinct serotype. Clinical isolates belonging to these Salmonella serogroups could be detected. Reactivity with non-Salmonella bacteria proved to be minor. Images PMID:1476430

  9. Reducing the cost of HIV antibody testing.

    PubMed

    Tamashiro, H; Maskill, W; Emmanuel, J; Fauquex, A; Sato, P; Heymann, D

    1993-07-10

    Available tests to detect antibody to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have a range of applications, and injudicious selection and inappropriate use can add a significant financial burden to budgets for AIDS programmes in developing countries. There are several ways by which the cost of HIV antibody testing can be reduced; they include use of tests appropriate for existing laboratory capabilities; adoption of cost-effective testing strategies; pooling of serum samples before testing; and ensuring best possible purchase prices. Each approach can significantly reduce the cost of HIV antibody testing alone or in combination, which increases the potential sustainability of antibody testing programmes, even in settings of limited resources. PMID:8100916

  10. Enhanced HIV-1 neutralization by antibody heteroligation

    PubMed Central

    Mouquet, Hugo; Warncke, Malte; Scheid, Johannes F.; Seaman, Michael S.; Nussenzweig, Michel C.

    2012-01-01

    Passive transfer of broadly neutralizing human antibodies against HIV-1 protects macaques against infection. However, HIV-1 uses several strategies to escape antibody neutralization, including mutation of the gp160 viral surface spike, a glycan shield to block antibody access to the spike, and expression of a limited number of viral surface spikes, which interferes with bivalent antibody binding. The latter is thought to decrease antibody apparent affinity or avidity, thereby interfering with neutralizing activity. To test the idea that increasing apparent affinity might enhance neutralizing activity, we engineered bispecific anti–HIV-1 antibodies (BiAbs) that can bind bivalently by virtue of one scFv arm that binds to gp120 and a second arm to the gp41 subunit of gp160. The individual arms of the BiAbs preserved the binding specificities of the original anti-HIV IgG antibodies and together bound simultaneously to gp120 and gp41. Heterotypic bivalent binding enhanced neutralization compared with the parental antibodies. We conclude that antibody recognition and viral neutralization of HIV can be improved by heteroligation. PMID:22219363

  11. 5th Annual Monoclonal Antibodies Conference

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The conference, which was organized by Visiongain and held at the BSG Conference Center in London, provided an excellent opportunity for participants to exchange views on the development, production and marketing of therapeutic antibodies, and discuss the current business environment. The conference included numerous interactive panel and group discussions on topics such as isotyping for therapeutic antibodies (panel chair: Nick Pullen, Pfizer), prospects for fully human monoclonal antibodies (chair: Christian Rohlff, Oxford BioTherapeutics), perspectives on antibody manufacturing and development (chair: Bo Kara, Avecia), market impact and post-marketing issues (chair: Keith Rodgers, Bodiam Consulting) and angiogenesis inhibitors (chair: David Blakey, AstraZeneca). PMID:20073132

  12. Exceptional Antibodies Produced by Successive Immunizations.

    PubMed

    Gearhart, Patricia J; Castiblanco, Diana P; Russell Knode, Lisa M

    2015-12-01

    Antibodies stand between us and pathogens. Viruses mutate quickly to avoid detection, and antibodies mutate at similar rates to hunt them down. This death spiral is fueled by specialized proteins and error-prone polymerases that change DNA sequences. Here, we explore how B lymphocytes stay in the race by expressing activation-induced deaminase, which unleashes a tsunami of mutations in the immunoglobulin loci. This produces random DNA substitutions, followed by selection for the highest affinity antibodies. We may be able to manipulate the process to produce better antibodies by expanding the repertoire of specific B cells through successive vaccinations. PMID:26641938

  13. Development of humanized antibodies as cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Qu, Zhengxing; Griffiths, Gary L; Wegener, William A; Chang, Chien-Hsing; Govindan, Serengulam V; Horak, Ivan D; Hansen, Hans J; Goldenberg, David M

    2005-05-01

    Recent success in the development of monoclonal antibody-based anti-cancer drugs has largely benefitted from the advancements made in recombinant technologies and cell culture production. These reagents, derived from the antibodies of mouse origin, while maintaining the exquisite specificity and affinity to the tumor antigens, have low immunogenicity and toxicity in human. High-level expressing cell clones are generated and used to produce large quantities of the recombinant antibodies in bioreactors in order to meet the clinical demand for therapeutic applications. In this report, the systems and general methodologies developed by us to construct and produce humanized antibodies from the parent mouse antibodies are described. Once the humanized antibodies are available, they can be applied in three principal forms for cancer therapy: (1) naked antibodies, (2) drug- or toxin conjugates, and (3) radioconjugates. Using the humanized anti-CD22 (epratuzumab) and anti-carcinoembryonic antigen (ant-CEA; labetuzumab) antibody prototypes, clinical applications of naked and radiolabeled humanized monoclonal antibodies are described. PMID:15848077

  14. Single-domain antibodies for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Krah, Simon; Schröter, Christian; Zielonka, Stefan; Empting, Martin; Valldorf, Bernhard; Kolmar, Harald

    2016-01-01

    Single-domain antibodies are the smallest antigen-binding units of antibodies, consisting either only of one variable domain or one engineered constant domain that solely facilitates target binding. This class of antibody derivatives comprises naturally occurring variable domains derived from camelids and sharks as well as engineered human variable or constant antibody domains of the heavy or light chain. Because of their high affinity and specificity as well as stability, small size and benefit of multiple re-formatting opportunities, those molecules emerged as promising candidates for biomedical applications and some of these entities have already proven to be successful in clinical development. PMID:26551147

  15. Preparation of astatine-labeled monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Milesz, S.; Norseev, Yu.V.; Szucs, Z. |

    1995-07-01

    In the cationic state astatine forms a stable complex with diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid. Thanks to this complex, astatine can be bound to monoclonal antibodies of the RYa{sub 1} type. The most favorable conditions for preparing astatine-labeled antibodies are established. The chromatographic analysis and electromigration experiments showed that astatine is firmly linked to a biomolecule in vitro and it did not escape from labeled monoclonal antibodies even under treatment with such highly effective astatine-complexing agent as thiourea. The immune activity of astatine-labeled antibodies did not change even after 20 h.

  16. Antibody therapeutics for Ebola virus disease.

    PubMed

    Zeitlin, Larry; Whaley, Kevin J; Olinger, Gene G; Jacobs, Michael; Gopal, Robin; Qiu, Xiangguo; Kobinger, Gary P

    2016-04-01

    With the unprecedented scale of the 2014-2016 West Africa outbreak, the clinical and scientific community scrambled to identify potential therapeutics for Ebola virus disease (EVD). Passive administration of antibodies has a long successful history for prophylaxis and therapy of a variety of infectious diseases, but the importance of antibodies in EVD has been unclear and is the subject of some debate. Recent studies in non-human primates have renewed interest in the potential of antibodies to impact EVD. Currently ongoing clinical evaluation of polyclonal and monoclonal antibody therapy in EVD patients in West Africa may finally offer a definitive answer to this debate. PMID:26826442

  17. Monoclonal Antibody That Defines Human Myoepithelium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dairkee, Shahnaz Hashmi; Blayney, Carlene; Smith, Helene S.; Hackett, Adeline J.

    1985-11-01

    We have isolated a mouse monoclonal antibody that, upon immunohistochemical localization in frozen sections, displays specificity for human myoepithelial cells in the resting mammary gland, sweat glands, and salivary glands. Furthermore, this antibody was strongly and homogeneously reactive with frozen sections of 3 of 60 breast carcinoma specimens. Using immunolocalization techniques in conjunction with polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, we have determined that the reactivity of this monoclonal antibody is directed toward a 51,000-dalton keratin polypeptide. The potential uses of this antibody in the prognosis of human mammary carcinoma and in understanding the role of the myoepithelium in development and differentiation are discussed.

  18. Mouse monoclonal antibodies against estrogen receptor.

    PubMed

    De Rosa, Caterina; Rossi, Valentina; Abbondanza, Ciro

    2014-01-01

    The production of monoclonal antibodies, by cloning hybridoma derived from the fusion of myeloma cells and spleen lymphocytes, has allowed to obtain great advances in many fields of biological knowledge. The use of specific antibodies to the estrogen receptor, in fact, has been an invaluable method to bring out its mechanisms of action and its effects, both genomic and extra-genomic. Here we describe, step by step, the production of monoclonal antibodies, starting from protocol for antigen preparation to the selection of antibody-secreting hybridoma. PMID:25182770

  19. Monoclonal antibodies with group specificity toward sulfonamides: Selection of hapten and antibody selectivity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although many antibodies to sulfonamides have been generated, immunoassays based on the current available antibodies for large multi-sulfonamide screening programs have properties dependent on the immunizing hapten structure and have always suffered from high selectivity for individual sulfonamides....

  20. Antibody Staining in Drosophila Germaria.

    PubMed

    Lie-Jensen, Anette; Haglund, Kaisa

    2016-01-01

    Drosophila oogenesis is a powerful model for studying a wide spectrum of cellular and developmental processes in vivo. Oogenesis starts in a specialized structure called the germarium, which harbors the stem cells for both germ and somatic cells. The germarium produces egg chambers, each of which will develop into an egg. Active areas of research in Drosophila germaria include stem cell self-renewal, division, and maintenance, cell cycle control and differentiation, oocyte specification, intercellular communication, and signaling, among others. The solid knowledge base, the genetic tractability of the Drosophila model, as well as the availability and fast development of tools and imaging techniques for oogenesis research ensure that studies in this model will keep being instrumental for novel discoveries within cell and developmental biology also in the future. This chapter focuses on antibody staining in Drosophila germaria and provides a protocol for immunostaining as well as an overview of commonly used antibodies for visualization of different cell types and cellular structures. The protocol is well-suited for subsequent confocal microscopy analyses, and in addition we present key adaptations of the protocol that are useful when performing structured illumination microscopy (SIM) super-resolution imaging. PMID:27557571

  1. Monoclonal Antibodies for Lipid Management.

    PubMed

    Feinstein, Matthew J; Lloyd-Jones, Donald M

    2016-07-01

    In recent years, biochemical and genetic studies have identified proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) as a major mediator of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c) levels and thereby a potential novel target for reducing risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). These observations led to the development of PCSK9 inhibitors, which lower LDL-c levels more than any other non-invasive lipid-lowering therapy presently available. The PCSK9 inhibitors furthest along in clinical trials are subcutaneously injected monoclonal antibodies. These PCSK9 inhibitors have demonstrated LDL-c-lowering efficacy with acceptable safety in phase III clinical trials and may offer a useful therapy in addition to maximally tolerated HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) in certain patient groups. Longer-term data are required to ensure sustained efficacy and safety of this new class of medications. This review provides an overview of the biology, genetics, development, and clinical trials of monoclonal antibodies designed to inhibit PCSK9. PMID:27221501

  2. Single radial haemolysis: a survey of antibody titres in the highland region of Scotland to recent strains of influenza A.

    PubMed Central

    Joss, A. W.; McPherson, J. K.; Williams, H.

    1978-01-01

    The single radial haemolysis test is conveniently practical and economical and promises to have wide applicability in the study of influenza antibodies in human populations. It can also be adapted for preliminary examination of new virus isolates during epidemics. Using this test a rather higher proportion of the population in the Highland Region of Scotland were found to possess antibody to a recent epidemic strain of influenza (A/Scotland/74) than was the case in the south of England. Antibody was detected and apparently evenly spread throughout all but the most remote island communities. Some evidence of the spread of the subsequent variant, A/Victoria/75, was obtained. Most of the school children in our study had high antibody titres to recent strains but the proportion with high antibody titres to these strains declined speedily from the age of 17 years onwards. PMID:621377

  3. COMPARISONS OF ELISA AND WESTERN BLOT ASSAYS FOR DETECTION OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM ANTIBODY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A seroprevalence survey was conducted using ELISA and Western blot (WB) assays for antibody to three Cryptosporidium antigens on 380 blood donors in Jackson County, Oregon. The purpose was to determine if either assay could detect serological evidence of an outbreak which occurre...

  4. Neutralising antibodies for Mayaro virus in Pantanal, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Pauvolid-Corrêa, Alex; Juliano, Raquel Soares; Campos, Zilca; Velez, Jason; Nogueira, Rita Maria Ribeiro; Komar, Nicholas

    2015-02-01

    The Pantanal hosts diverse wildlife species and therefore is a hotspot for arbovirus studies in South America. A serosurvey for Mayaro virus (MAYV), eastern (EEEV), western (WEEV) and Venezuelan (VEEV) equine encephalitis viruses was conducted with 237 sheep, 87 free-ranging caimans and 748 equids, including 37 collected from a ranch where a neurologic disorder outbreak had been recently reported. Sera were tested for specific viral antibodies using plaque-reduction neutralisation test. From a total of 748 equids, of which 264 were immunised with vaccine composed of EEEV and WEEV and 484 had no history of immunisation, 10 (1.3%) were seropositive for MAYV and two (0.3%) for VEEV using criteria of a ≥ 4-fold antibody titre difference. Among the 484 equids without history of immunisation, 48 (9.9%) were seropositive for EEEV and four (0.8%) for WEEV using the same criteria. Among the sheep, five were sero- positive for equine encephalitis alphaviruses, with one (0.4%) for EEEV, one (0.4%) for WEEV and three (1.3%) for VEEV. Regarding free-ranging caimans, one (1.1%) and three (3.4%), respectively, had low titres for neutralising antibodies to VEEV and undetermined alphaviruses. The neurological disorder outbreak could not be linked to the alphaviruses tested. Our findings represent strong evidence that MAYV and all equine encephalitis alphaviruses circulated in the Pantanal. PMID:25742272

  5. Antibody profiling as an identification tool for forensic samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Vicki S.; Barrett, Karen B.; Davis, Tilton; Nieto, Sylvia R.; Unger, Thomas F.

    1999-02-01

    A novel identification technique called antibody profiling was examined as an alternative to DNA-based methods for matching crime scene evidence to a suspect. This technique provides results within 2 hours, is 1/100 the cost of DNA tests, and does not require skilled technicians or expensive equipment. A matrix of 422 blood samples were prepared to mimic typical crime scene conditions and provide validation for the technique. The effects of sample size, drying temperature, binary and ternary blood mixtures, adulteration with chemicals, and placement on a variety of surfaces were examined. Using the antibody profiling method, 91% of the 422 samples were correctly identified. In addition, binary blood mixtures could be identified with up to 40% contaminating blood. Temperatures at or above 60 degree(s)C and the presence of soil in the samples interfered with the ability to correctly identify samples. In this study, the antibody profiling technique was shown to be an excellent alternative to DNA-based identification methods. This method will find applications in situations where results are needed rapidly, where it is necessary to screen multiple suspects, and in remote areas where the equipment and technical skills needed for DNA testing are not available.

  6. Heparanase-neutralizing antibodies attenuate lymphoma tumor growth and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Weissmann, Marina; Arvatz, Gil; Horowitz, Netanel; Feld, Sari; Naroditsky, Inna; Zhang, Yi; Ng, Mary; Hammond, Edward; Nevo, Eviatar; Vlodavsky, Israel; Ilan, Neta

    2016-01-01

    Heparanase is an endoglycosidase that cleaves heparan sulfate side chains of proteoglycans, resulting in disassembly of the extracellular matrix underlying endothelial and epithelial cells and associating with enhanced cell invasion and metastasis. Heparanase expression is induced in carcinomas and sarcomas, often associating with enhanced tumor metastasis and poor prognosis. In contrast, the function of heparanase in hematological malignancies (except myeloma) was not investigated in depth. Here, we provide evidence that heparanase is expressed by human follicular and diffused non-Hodgkin's B-lymphomas, and that heparanase inhibitors restrain the growth of tumor xenografts produced by lymphoma cell lines. Furthermore, we describe, for the first time to our knowledge, the development and characterization of heparanase-neutralizing monoclonal antibodies that inhibit cell invasion and tumor metastasis, the hallmark of heparanase activity. Using luciferase-labeled Raji lymphoma cells, we show that the heparanase-neutralizing monoclonal antibodies profoundly inhibit tumor load in the mouse bones, associating with reduced cell proliferation and angiogenesis. Notably, we found that Raji cells lack intrinsic heparanase activity, but tumor xenografts produced by this cell line exhibit typical heparanase activity, likely contributed by host cells composing the tumor microenvironment. Thus, the neutralizing monoclonal antibodies attenuate lymphoma growth by targeting heparanase in the tumor microenvironment. PMID:26729870

  7. Molecular Pathways: Sensitivity and Resistance to Anti-EGFR Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Bertotti, Andrea; Sassi, Francesco

    2015-08-01

    Monoclonal antibodies targeting the EGF receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase, such as cetuximab and panitumumab, achieve clinically meaningful responses in patients affected by head and neck and colorectal cancers. Despite this evidence of efficacy, no genomic abnormalities that robustly predict sensitivity to EGFR blockade have been yet identified. This suggests that, in some tumor contexts, EGFR dependency is not acquired during neoplastic transformation and rather reflects an aberrant declination of physiologic traits typical of normal tissue counterparts. Indeed, EGFR signals are crucial for the reconstitution of damaged mucosa in the context of acute inflammation, and their sustained activation is likely to turn into a pro-oncogenic cue during chronic inflammation. Although positive predictors of response to anti-EGFR antibodies remain unknown, multiple determinants of resistance have been described, including alterations interfering with antibody-receptor interaction, deregulation of parallel signaling pathways, and mutations in downstream transducers. These findings provide new opportunities for the optimization of therapeutic strategies based on drug combinations. However, the emerging notion that genetic interactions and compensatory mechanisms may affect-both positively and negatively-the efficacy of targeted therapies complicates the rational design of combinatorial approaches and implies a rethinking of the criteria required to prioritize laboratory findings for clinical validation in investigational trials. PMID:26071484

  8. Neutralising antibodies for Mayaro virus in Pantanal, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Pauvolid-Corrêa, Alex; Juliano, Raquel Soares; Campos, Zilca; Velez, Jason; Nogueira, Rita Maria Ribeiro; Komar, Nicholas

    2015-01-01

    The Pantanal hosts diverse wildlife species and therefore is a hotspot for arbovirus studies in South America. A serosurvey for Mayaro virus (MAYV), eastern (EEEV), western (WEEV) and Venezuelan (VEEV) equine encephalitis viruses was conducted with 237 sheep, 87 free-ranging caimans and 748 equids, including 37 collected from a ranch where a neurologic disorder outbreak had been recently reported. Sera were tested for specific viral antibodies using plaque-reduction neutralisation test. From a total of 748 equids, of which 264 were immunised with vaccine composed of EEEV and WEEV and 484 had no history of immunisation, 10 (1.3%) were seropositive for MAYV and two (0.3%) for VEEV using criteria of a ≥ 4-fold antibody titre difference. Among the 484 equids without history of immunisation, 48 (9.9%) were seropositive for EEEV and four (0.8%) for WEEV using the same criteria. Among the sheep, five were sero- positive for equine encephalitis alphaviruses, with one (0.4%) for EEEV, one (0.4%) for WEEV and three (1.3%) for VEEV. Regarding free-ranging caimans, one (1.1%) and three (3.4%), respectively, had low titres for neutralising antibodies to VEEV and undetermined alphaviruses. The neurological disorder outbreak could not be linked to the alphaviruses tested. Our findings represent strong evidence that MAYV and all equine encephalitis alphaviruses circulated in the Pantanal. PMID:25742272

  9. Passive antibody transfer in chickens to model maternal antibody after avian influenza vaccination

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Birds transfer maternal antibodies (MAb) to their offspring through the egg yolk where the antibody is absorbed and enters the circulatory system. Maternal antibodies provide early protection from disease, but may interfere with the vaccination efficacy in the chick. MAb are thought to interfere wit...

  10. Passive antibody transfer in chickens to model maternal antibody after avian influenza vaccination

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Birds transfer maternal antibodies (MAb) to their offspring through the egg yolk where the antibody is absorbed and enters the circulatory system. These maternal antibodies, depending on the pathogen, can provide early protection from some diseases, but it may also interfere with the vaccination re...

  11. Fluorescent antibody responses to adenoviruses in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Ariyawansa, J P; Tobin, J O

    1976-01-01

    Specific IgG, IgA, and IgM immunoglobulin antibody responses to adenovirus infections were studied by the indirect immunofluorescent technique in six pairs of human sera obtained during acute and convalescent phases of the illness. In addition, 70 single specimens of sera showing adenovirus IgG antibody from different age groups from birth to the 60th year of life were titrated for the same antibody to adenovirus types 1, 2, 3, 5, and 7, and 170 serum specimens from the same age groups were screened for specific immunoglobulin antibodies against types 1 and 5. Specific immunoglobulin antibodies lacked type specificity and in acute infections measured heterologous antibody response as well. On the other hand, IgG antibodies detected in single specimens of sera by immunofluorescence correlate with surveys of the isolation of virus from patients and neutralizing antibody studies by other workers. Fluorescent antibodies appeared in all three fractions of the immunoglobulins in acute adenovirus infections. Although this technique may be used in the diagnosis of adenovirus infections there is no advantage compared to complement-fixation testing. However, the use of sera absorbed with group antigen may have a more useful place in serological epidemiology than in diagnostic work. In five pairs of sera obtained during acute and convalescent phases of adenoviral illness and in 70 random single specimens from different age groups, "T" antibodies were detected only in the IgG fraction. The paired sera did not show a significant rise to indicate the usefulness of "T" antibody study in diagnosis. PMID:180061

  12. Fluorescent antibody responses to adenoviruses in humans.

    PubMed

    Ariyawansa, J P; Tobin, J O

    1976-05-01

    Specific IgG, IgA, and IgM immunoglobulin antibody responses to adenovirus infections were studied by the indirect immunofluorescent technique in six pairs of human sera obtained during acute and convalescent phases of the illness. In addition, 70 single specimens of sera showing adenovirus IgG antibody from different age groups from birth to the 60th year of life were titrated for the same antibody to adenovirus types 1, 2, 3, 5, and 7, and 170 serum specimens from the same age groups were screened for specific immunoglobulin antibodies against types 1 and 5. Specific immunoglobulin antibodies lacked type specificity and in acute infections measured heterologous antibody response as well. On the other hand, IgG antibodies detected in single specimens of sera by immunofluorescence correlate with surveys of the isolation of virus from patients and neutralizing antibody studies by other workers. Fluorescent antibodies appeared in all three fractions of the immunoglobulins in acute adenovirus infections. Although this technique may be used in the diagnosis of adenovirus infections there is no advantage compared to complement-fixation testing. However, the use of sera absorbed with group antigen may have a more useful place in serological epidemiology than in diagnostic work. In five pairs of sera obtained during acute and convalescent phases of adenoviral illness and in 70 random single specimens from different age groups, "T" antibodies were detected only in the IgG fraction. The paired sera did not show a significant rise to indicate the usefulness of "T" antibody study in diagnosis. PMID:180061

  13. Complement receptors and the shaping of the natural antibody repertoire.

    PubMed

    Holers, V Michael

    2005-03-01

    Complement and complement receptors have been known for several decades to play important roles in immune effector mechanisms related to pathogen elimination and tissue inflammation. In addition, studies over the last 10 years have clearly demonstrated a key role for the complement C3d activation fragment receptor designated CR2 (complement receptor type 2) in the switched-isotype, high-affinity and memory humoral immune responses to T-dependent foreign antigens. More recent studies have extended those observations to include a key role for CR2 and C3d in the humoral immune response to T-independent foreign antigens. Conversely, as these studies have proceeded, a parallel series of analyses have linked defects in expression or function of complement C4 and other classical pathway activation pathway proteins, as well as CR2 and the closely related CR1, to the loss of self tolerance to nuclear antigens such as double-stranded DNA and chromatin in systemic lupus erythematosus. With regard to the topic of this issue, it is now becoming increasingly clear that CR2 also plays a major role in the development of the natural antibody repertoire. Specifically, in the absence of this receptor natural IgM and IgG develop in the naïve animal that demonstrate clearly altered recognition patterns for specific natural antibody targets. This repertoire change is important physiologically in at least one setting because these CR2-dependent natural antibodies are necessary for the recognition of ischemic self tissues. In addition, it is possible that certain of the phenotypes manifest by CR2-deficient mice may be strongly influenced not only by effects on later stages of B cell activation and maturation, as commonly thought, but also by alterations in the pre-existing pool of natural antibodies that are influenced by this receptor. This review will examine the evidence that has accumulated over the last few years supporting these hypotheses. PMID:15614507

  14. IBC’s 23rd Annual Antibody Engineering, 10th Annual Antibody Therapeutics International Conferences and the 2012 Annual Meeting of The Antibody Society

    PubMed Central

    Klöhn, Peter-Christian; Wuellner, Ulrich; Zizlsperger, Nora; Zhou, Yu; Tavares, Daniel; Berger, Sven; Zettlitz, Kirstin A.; Proetzel, Gabriele; Yong, May; Begent, Richard H.J.; Reichert, Janice M

    2013-01-01

    The 23rd Annual Antibody Engineering, 10th Annual Antibody Therapeutics international conferences, and the 2012 Annual Meeting of The Antibody Society, organized by IBC Life Sciences with contributions from The Antibody Society and two Scientific Advisory Boards, were held December 3–6, 2012 in San Diego, CA. The meeting drew over 800 participants who attended sessions on a wide variety of topics relevant to antibody research and development. As a prelude to the main events, a pre-conference workshop held on December 2, 2012 focused on intellectual property issues that impact antibody engineering. The Antibody Engineering Conference was composed of six sessions held December 3–5, 2012: (1) From Receptor Biology to Therapy; (2) Antibodies in a Complex Environment; (3) Antibody Targeted CNS Therapy: Beyond the Blood Brain Barrier; (4) Deep Sequencing in B Cell Biology and Antibody Libraries; (5) Systems Medicine in the Development of Antibody Therapies/Systematic Validation of Novel Antibody Targets; and (6) Antibody Activity and Animal Models. The Antibody Therapeutics conference comprised four sessions held December 4–5, 2012: (1) Clinical and Preclinical Updates of Antibody-Drug Conjugates; (2) Multifunctional Antibodies and Antibody Combinations: Clinical Focus; (3) Development Status of Immunomodulatory Therapeutic Antibodies; and (4) Modulating the Half-Life of Antibody Therapeutics. The Antibody Society’s special session on applications for recording and sharing data based on GIATE was held on December 5, 2012, and the conferences concluded with two combined sessions on December 5–6, 2012: (1) Development Status of Early Stage Therapeutic Antibodies; and (2) Immunomodulatory Antibodies for Cancer Therapy. PMID:23575266

  15. Geographic pattern of serum antibody prevalence for Brucella spp. in caribou, grizzly bears, and wolves from Alaska, 1975-1998.

    PubMed

    Zarnke, Randall L; Ver Hoef, Jay M; DeLong, Robert A

    2006-07-01

    Blood samples were collected from 2,635 caribou (Rangifer tarandus), 1,238 grizzly bears (Ursus arctos), and 930 wolves (Canis lupus) from throughout mainland Alaska during 1975-98. Sera were tested for evidence of exposure to Brucella spp. Serum antibody prevalences were highest in the northwestern region of the state. In any specific area, antibody prevalences for caribou and wolves were of a similar magnitude, whereas antibody prevalence for bears in these same areas were two to three times higher. PMID:17092888

  16. Serum antibody prevalence for Herpesvirus sylvilagus, Bacillus piliformis and California serogroup arboviruses in cottontail rabbits from Pennsylvania.

    PubMed

    Dressler, R L; Ganaway, J R; Storm, G L; Tzilkowski, W M

    1988-04-01

    A serologic survey of 60 eastern cottontail rabbits (Sylvilagus floridanus) from three counties in Pennsylvania was conducted in March 1983. Serum antibody prevalences for Herpesvirus sylvilagus and La Crosse virus (California serogroup) were less than 4%. There was no evidence of previous exposure to either Jamestown Canyon or snowshoe hare viruses (California serogroup). Antibody to trivittatus virus (California serogroup) was found in 60% of the 20 cottontails from York County. No cottontails had antibodies to Bacillus piliformis, the etiologic agent of Tyzzer's disease. PMID:3373643

  17. Anti-influenza M2e antibody

    DOEpatents

    Bradbury, Andrew M.

    2013-04-16

    Humanized recombinant and monoclonal antibodies specific for the ectodomain of the influenza virus M2 ion channel protein are disclosed. The antibodies of the invention have anti-viral activity and may be useful as anti-viral therapeutics and/or prophylactic/vaccine agents for inhibiting influenza virus replication and for treating individuals infected with influenza.

  18. Anti-influenza M2e antibody

    DOEpatents

    Bradbury, Andrew M.

    2011-12-20

    Humanized recombinant and monoclonal antibodies specific for the ectodomain of the influenza virus M2 ion channel protein are disclosed. The antibodies of the invention have anti-viral activity and may be useful as anti-viral therapeutics and/or prophylactic/vaccine agents for inhibiting influenza virus replication and for treating individuals infected with influenza.

  19. Monoclonal Antibody Therapy for Advanced Neuroblastoma

    Cancer.gov

    NCI is sponsoring two clinical trials of a monoclonal antibody called ch14.18, in combination with other drugs, to see if the antibody may be helpful for children or young adults (up to age 21) with relapsed or refractory neuroblastoma.

  20. Use of second antibody in radioimmunotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Begent, R.H.; Bagshawe, K.D.; Pedley, R.B.; Searle, F.; Ledermann, J.A.; Green, A.J.; Keep, P.A.; Chester, K.A.; Glaser, M.G.; Dale, R.G.

    1987-01-01

    In this study, a second antibody was directed against the first antitumor antibody to accelerate clearance of the /sup 131/I-labeled first antibody and improve tumor to normal tissue ratios of radioactivity. The value of this method in improving the therapeutic index of radioimmunotherapy with /sup 131/I-antibody to CEA has been investigated in nude mice bearing xenografts of human colon carcinoma and in 5 patients with colorectal cancer. The xenografts did not become saturated with anti-CEA as the administered dose was increased to therapeutic levels. At these high dose levels, the second antibody increased tumor to blood ratios to a maximum of 155:1, 48 times the level in controls that did not receive the second antibody. In 5 patients given 50 mCi of anti-CEA, there was no significant toxicity with the second antibody; clearance of radioactivity was accelerated; and tumor imaging was enhanced. The second antibody appears to have the potential to improve the therapeutic index of radioimmunotherapy.

  1. Antibody-drug conjugates: Intellectual property considerations.

    PubMed

    Storz, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Antibody-drug conjugates are highly complex entities that combine an antibody, a linker and a toxin. This complexity makes them demanding both technically and from a regulatory point of view, and difficult to deal with in their patent aspects. This article discusses different issues of patent protection and freedom to operate with regard to this promising new class of drugs. PMID:26292154

  2. Mechanisms of Neonatal Mucosal Antibody Protection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Following an abrupt transition at birth from the sterile uterus to an environment with abundant commensal and pathogenic microbes, neonatal mammals are protected by maternal antibodies at mucosal surfaces. We show in mice that different antibody isotypes work in distinct ways to protect the neonatal...

  3. Antibody-drug conjugates: Intellectual property considerations

    PubMed Central

    Storz, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Antibody-drug conjugates are highly complex entities that combine an antibody, a linker and a toxin. This complexity makes them demanding both technically and from a regulatory point of view, and difficult to deal with in their patent aspects. This article discusses different issues of patent protection and freedom to operate with regard to this promising new class of drugs. PMID:26292154

  4. 8th Annual European Antibody Congress 2012

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Alain; Carter, Paul J.; Gerber, Hans-Peter; Lugovskoy, Alexey A.; Wurch, Thierry; Junutula, Jagath R.; Kontermann, Roland E; Mabry, Robert

    2013-01-01

    The 8th European Antibody Congress (EAC), organized by Terrapin Ltd., was again held in Geneva, Switzerland, following on the tradition established with the 4th EAC. The new agenda format for 2012 included three parallel tracks on: (1) naked antibodies; (2) antibody drug conjugates (ADCs); and (3) bispecific antibodies and alternative scaffolds. The meeting started and closed with three plenary lectures to give common background and to share the final panel discussion and conclusions. The two day event included case studies and networking for nearly 250 delegates who learned of the latest advances and trends in the global development of antibody-based therapeutics. The monoclonal antibody track was focused on understanding the structure-function relationships, optimization of antibody design and developability, and processes that allow better therapeutic candidates to move through the clinic. Discussions on novel target identification and validation were also included. The ADC track was dedicated to evaluation of the ongoing success of the established ADC formats alongside the rise of the next generation drug-conjugates. The bispecific and alternative scaffold track was focused on taking stock of the multitude of bispecific formats being investigated and gaining insight into recent innovations and advancements. Mechanistic understanding, progression into the clinic and the exploration of multispecifics, redirected T cell killing and alternative scaffolds were extensively discussed. In total, nearly 50 speakers provided updates of programs related to antibody research and development on-going in the academic, government and commercial sectors. PMID:23493119

  5. 7th Annual European Antibody Congress 2011

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The 7th European Antibody Congress (EAC), organized by Terrapin Ltd., was again held in Geneva, Switzerland, following on the tradition established with the 4th EAC. The 2011 version of the EAC was attended by nearly 250 delegates who learned of the latest advances and trends in the global development of antibody-based therapeutics. The first day focused on advances in understanding structure-function relationships, choosing the best format, glycoengineering biobetter antibodies, improving the efficacy and drugability of mAbs and epitope mapping. On the second day, the discovery of novel targets for mAb therapy, clinical pipeline updates, use of antibody combinations to address resistance, generation and identification of mAbs against new targets and biosimilar mAb development were discussed. Antibody-drug conjugates, domain antibodies and new scaffolds and bispecific antibodies were the topics of the third day. In total, nearly 50 speakers provided updates of programs related to antibody research and development on-going in the academic, government and commercial sectors. PMID:22453093

  6. Bioconjugation of antibodies to horseradish peroxidase (hrp)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The bioconjugation of an antibody to an enzymatic reporter such as horseradish peroxidase (HRP) affords an effective mechanism by which immunoassay detection of a target antigen can be achieved. The use of heterobifunctional cross—linkers to covalently link antibodies to HRP provides a simple and c...

  7. Quality Issues of Research Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Weller, Michael G.

    2016-01-01

    According to several recent studies, an unexpectedly high number of landmark papers seem to be not reproducible by independent laboratories. Nontherapeutic antibodies used for research, diagnostic, food analytical, environmental, and other purposes play a significant role in this matter. Although some papers have been published offering suggestions to improve the situation, they do not seem to be comprehensive enough to cover the full complexity of this issue. In addition, no obvious improvements could be noticed in the field as yet. This article tries to consolidate the remarkable variety of conclusions and suggested activities into a more coherent conception. It is concluded that funding agencies and journal publishers need to take first and immediate measures to resolve these problems and lead the way to a more sustainable way of bioanalytical research, on which all can rely with confidence. PMID:27013861

  8. B Cells, Antibodies, and More

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, William; Lakkis, Fadi G.

    2016-01-01

    B cells play a central role in the immunopathogenesis of glomerulonephritides and transplant rejection. B cells secrete antibodies that contribute to tissue injury via multiple mechanisms. In addition, B cells contribute to disease pathogenesis in autoimmunity and alloimmunity by presenting antigens as well as providing costimulation and cytokines to T cells. B cells also play an immunomodulatory role in regulating the immune response by secreting cytokines that inhibit disease onset and/or progression. B cell–targeted approaches for treating immune diseases of the kidney and other organs have gained significant momentum. However, much remains to be understood about B-cell biology in order to determine the timing, duration, and context of optimal therapeutic response to B cell–targeted approaches. In this review, we discuss the multifaceted roles of B cells as enhancers and regulators of immunity with relevance to kidney disease and transplantation. PMID:26700440

  9. Clinical considerations for biosimilar antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Mellstedt, Håkan

    2013-01-01

    Biosimilar agents are approximate copies of branded biologic therapies. Since the first biosimilar was authorized in the European Union in 2006, fifteen additional agents have been approved by the European Medicines Agency, including two biosimilar monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Biosimilar mAbs represent a distinct class given their large molecular size, complex protein structure, and post-translational modifications. While guidelines have been established for the development, approval, and use of biosimilars, further scrutiny and discussion is necessary to fully understand their potential impact on clinical outcomes. This review takes a critical look at the structural complexity of biosimilar mABs, the feasibility of indication extrapolation, the impact of product variability on immunogenicity, the importance of comprehensive pharmacovigilance, and the potential for ongoing pharmacoeconomic impact. PMID:26217160

  10. B Cells, Antibodies, and More.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, William; Lakkis, Fadi G; Chalasani, Geetha

    2016-01-01

    B cells play a central role in the immunopathogenesis of glomerulonephritides and transplant rejection. B cells secrete antibodies that contribute to tissue injury via multiple mechanisms. In addition, B cells contribute to disease pathogenesis in autoimmunity and alloimmunity by presenting antigens as well as providing costimulation and cytokines to T cells. B cells also play an immunomodulatory role in regulating the immune response by secreting cytokines that inhibit disease onset and/or progression. B cell-targeted approaches for treating immune diseases of the kidney and other organs have gained significant momentum. However, much remains to be understood about B-cell biology in order to determine the timing, duration, and context of optimal therapeutic response to B cell-targeted approaches. In this review, we discuss the multifaceted roles of B cells as enhancers and regulators of immunity with relevance to kidney disease and transplantation. PMID:26700440

  11. Anti-miroestrol polyclonal antibodies: a comparison of immunogen preparations used to obtain desired antibody properties.

    PubMed

    Kitisripanya, Tharita; Jutathis, Kamonthip; Inyai, Chadathorn; Komaikul, Jukrapun; Udomsin, Orapin; Yusakul, Gorawit; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Putalun, Waraporn

    2016-04-01

    Immunogen quality is one important factor that contributes to desirable antibody characteristics. Highly specific antibodies against miroestrol can be used to develop a quality control immunoassay for Pueraria candollei products. In this study, we investigated how various immunogen preparations affect antibody properties. The results show that immunogen prepared using the Mannich reaction provides antibodies with higher specificity and sensitivity against miroestrol than immunogen prepared with the periodate reaction. The results suggest the Mannich reaction maintains the original structure of miroestrol and generates useful antibodies for developing immunoassays. PMID:26563142

  12. Interpreting Evidence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munsart, Craig A.

    1993-01-01

    Presents an activity that allows students to experience the type of discovery process that paleontologists necessarily followed during the early dinosaur explorations. Students are read parts of a story taken from the "American Journal of Science" and interpret the evidence leading to the discovery of Triceratops and Stegosaurus. (PR)

  13. Synthetic Antibodies for Reversible Cell Recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jing Zhou

    2011-12-01

    Antibody-mediated cell recognition plays a critical role in various biological and biomedical applications. However, strong antibody-cell interactions can lead to the difficulty of separating antibodies from the bound cells in a simple and non-destructive manner, which is often necessary to numerous applications such as cell sorting or separation. Thus, this thesis research is aimed to create an antibody-like nanomaterial with the function of reversible cell recognition It was hypothesized that nucleic acid aptamer and dendrimer could be used as fundamental structural components to develop an antibody-like nanomaterial. The aptamer functions as the binding site of an antibody; the dendrimer is used as a robust, defined nano-scaffold to support the aptamer and to carry small molecules (e.g., fluorophores). To test this hypothesis, a novel method was first developed to discover the essential nucleotides of full-length aptamers to mimic the binding sites of antibodies. The essential nucleotides were further conjugated with a dendrimer to synthesize a monovalent aptamer-dendrimer nanomaterial. The results clearly showed that the essential nucleotides could maintain high affinity and specificity after tethered on dendrimer surface. To further test the hypothesis that antibody-like nanomaterials can be rationally designed to acquire the capability of reversible cell recognition, an aptamer that was selected at 0 °C was used as a model to synthesize a "Y-shaped" nanomaterial by conjugating two aptamers to the same dendrimer. The results showed that the nanomaterial-cell interaction could be affected by the distance between two binding aptamers. In addition, the "Y-shaped" antibody-like nanomaterial could bind target cells more strongly than its monovalent control. Importantly, the strong cell-nanomaterial interaction could be rapidly reversed when the temperature was shifted from 0 °C to 37 °C. In summary, we developed a synthetic antibody that can not only mimic the

  14. Acute thrombocytopenia in patients treated with amiodarone is caused by antibodies specific for platelet membrane glycoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Sahud, Mervyn A.; Caulfield, Michael; Clarke, Nigel; Koch, Robert; Bougie, Daniel; Aster, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Summary Amiodarone has been implicated as a cause of thrombocytopenia but the responsible mechanism is unknown. We performed studies in three patients to characterize the pathogenesis of this complication. No amiodarone-dependent, platelet-reactive antibodies were identified using conventional serological techniques. However, water-insoluble amiodarone solubilized in methanol and diluted to 1·0 mg/ml in aqueous buffer reproducibly promoted binding of IgG antibodies in patient serum to platelets. Solid phase assays identified drug-dependent antibodies specific for platelet gly coproteins (GP)Ia/IIa (integrin α2β1) in each patient and a second antibody specific for GPIIb/IIIa (αIIbβ3 integrin) in one patient. When studied by ion mobility analysis and transmission electron microscopy, the serologically active amiodarone preparation, a milky suspension, was found to consist of particles 2–30 nm in diameter, typical of a coacervate, a state characteristic of amiodarone in aqueous medium. The findings provide evidence that thrombocytopenia in the three patients studied was caused by drug-dependent antibodies specific for platelet glycoproteins GPIa/IIa and/or GPIIb/IIIa. We postulate that, in vivo, amiodarone may become incorporated into occult lipophilic domains in platelet glycoproteins, producing structural modifications that are immunogenic in some individuals, and that the resulting antibodies can cause platelet destruction in a person taking this drug. PMID:23952260

  15. Antibody-Mediated Immobilization of Cryptococcus neoformans Promotes Biofilm Formation▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Emma J.; Casadevall, Arturo

    2009-01-01

    Most microbes, including the fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans, can grow as biofilms. Biofilms confer upon microbes a range of characteristics, including an ability to colonize materials such as shunts and catheters and increased resistance to antibiotics. Here, we provide evidence that coating surfaces with a monoclonal antibody to glucuronoxylomannan, the major component of the fungal capsular polysaccharide, immobilizes cryptococcal cells to a surface support and, subsequently, promotes biofilm formation. We used time-lapse microscopy to visualize the growth of cryptococcal biofilms, generating the first movies of fungal biofilm growth. We show that when fungal cells are immobilized using surface-attached specific antibody to the capsule, the initial stages of biofilm formation are significantly faster than those on surfaces with no antibody coating or surfaces coated with unspecific monoclonal antibody. Time-lapse microscopy revealed that biofilm growth was a dynamic process in which cells shuffled position during budding and was accompanied by emergence of planktonic variant cells that left the attached biofilm community. The planktonic variant cells exhibited mobility, presumably by Brownian motion. Our results indicate that microbial immobilization by antibody capture hastens biofilm formation and suggest that antibody coating of medical devices with immunoglobulins must exclude binding to common pathogenic microbes and the possibility that this effect could be exploited in industrial microbiology. PMID:19251903

  16. Angiogenic cytokines are antibody targets during graft-versus-leukemia reactions

    PubMed Central

    Piesche, Matthias; Ho, Vincent T.; Kim, Haesook; Nakazaki, Yukoh; Nehil, Michael; Yaghi, Nasser; Kolodin, Dmitriy; Weiser, Jeremy; Altevogt, Peter; Kiefel, Helena; Alyea, Edwin P.; Antin, Joseph H.; Cutler, Corey; Koreth, John; Canning, Christine; Ritz, Jerome; Soiffer, Robert J.; Dranoff, Glenn

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) reaction is an important example of immune-mediated tumor destruction. A coordinated humoral and cellular response accomplishes leukemia cell killing, but the specific targets remain largely uncharacterized. To learn more about the antigens that elicit antibodies during GVL reactions, we analyzed advanced myelodysplasia (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients who received an autologous, granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) secreting tumor cell vaccine early after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Experimental Design A combination of tumor-derived cDNA expression library screening, protein microarrays, and antigen-specific ELISAs were employed to characterize sera obtained longitudinally from 15 AML/MDS patients who were vaccinated early after allogeneic HSCT. Results A broad, therapy-induced antibody response was uncovered, which primarily targeted intracellular proteins that function in growth, transcription/translation, metabolism, and homeostasis. Unexpectedly, antibodies were also elicited against eight secreted angiogenic cytokines that play critical roles in leukemogenesis. Antibodies to the angiogenic cytokines were evident early after therapy, and in some patients manifested a diversification in reactivity over time. Patients that developed antibodies to multiple angiogenic cytokines showed prolonged remission and survival. Conclusions These results reveal a potent humoral response during GVL reactions induced with vaccination early after allogeneic HSCT and raise the possibility that antibodies, in conjunction with NK cells and T lymphocytes, may contribute to immune-mediated control of myeloid leukemias. PMID:25538258

  17. Anti-centromere protein A antibodies in systemic sclerosis: Significance and origin.

    PubMed

    Perosa, Federico; Prete, Marcella; Di Lernia, Giuseppe; Ostuni, Carmela; Favoino, Elvira; Valentini, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is systemic, autoimmune, connective tissue disorder characterized by vascular abnormalities, collagen deposition (fibrosis), and the production of autoantibodies to nuclear proteins. About 20%-40% of patients have antibodies to centromere protein (CENP)-A or -B. Despite the known association of anti-CENP antibodies with certain clinical features of SSc, the role of these antibodies in SSc physiopathology is still poorly understood. To better understand the clinical significance and origin of these antibodies, we and others have been studying the epitopic motifs (amino acid contact sites) on CENP-A with the aim of determining whether other proteins can prime or be targeted by them. Here, we review published and ongoing studies aimed at defining the fine specificity and origin of anti-CENP-A antibodies. We describe progress made in identifying the CENP-A epitopic motif amino acids, and the discovery of one of these motifs in forkhead box protein E3 (FOXE-3), a transcription factor previously studied only for its role in the development of lens fiber cells. Moreover, we discuss preliminary evidence for a possible role of FOXE-3 in SSc pathogenesis and for the association of different subsets of anti-CENP-A antibodies, heterogeneously expressed among SSc patients, with some clinical correlates. PMID:26455561

  18. Iron as the Key Modulator of Hepcidin Expression in Erythroid Antibody-Mediated Hypoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, J. C.; Garrido, P.; Ribeiro, S.; Rocha-Pereira, P.; Bronze-da-Rocha, E.; Belo, L.; Costa, E.; Reis, F.; Santos-Silva, A.

    2014-01-01

    Erythroid hypoplasia (EH) is a rare complication associated with recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) therapies, due to development of anti-rHuEPO antibodies; however, the underlying mechanisms remain poorly clarified. Our aim was to manage a rat model of antibody-mediated EH induced by rHuEPO and study the impact on iron metabolism and erythropoiesis. Wistar rats treated during 9 weeks with a high rHuEPO dose (200 IU) developed EH, as shown by anemia, reduced erythroblasts, reticulocytopenia, and plasmatic anti-rHuEPO antibodies. Serum iron was increased and associated with mRNA overexpression of hepatic hepcidin and other iron regulatory mediators and downregulation of matriptase-2; overexpression of divalent metal transporter 1 and ferroportin was observed in duodenum and liver. Decreased EPO expression was observed in kidney and liver, while EPO receptor was overexpressed in liver. Endogenous EPO levels were normal, suggesting that anti-rHuEPO antibodies blunted EPO function. Our results suggest that anti-rHuEPO antibodies inhibit erythropoiesis causing anemia. This leads to a serum iron increase, which seems to stimulate hepcidin expression despite no evidence of inflammation, thus suggesting iron as the key modulator of hepcidin synthesis. These findings might contribute to improving new therapeutic strategies against rHuEPO resistance and/or development of antibody-mediated EH in patients under rHuEPO therapy. PMID:25580431

  19. Altered tumor growth in vivo after immunization of mice with antitumor antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Gorczynski, R.M.; Kennedy, M.; Polidoulis, I.; Price, G.B.

    1984-08-01

    A comparison has been made between the growth patterns of two spontaneously appearing mammary adenocarcinomas in murine bone marrow radiation chimeras and in mice preimmunized with monoclonal antibodies (MAb) detecting embryo-associated antigenic determinants. A correlation was seen between the ability of the embryo-immunized chimeras to produce cytotoxic antibody to the tumors, as assessed by an antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxic assay, and the permissiveness of the mice for growth of a tumor transplant. In addition, mice deliberately preimmunized with cytotoxic MAb (antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxic assay) allowed more rapid growth specifically of that tumor earlier found to be most sensitive to the MAb used for immunization. By comparing the changing antigenic phenotype of tumor cells serially passaged through different immunized, nonimmunized mice, evidence was found suggesting that immunization could cause either antigen modulation of transferred tumor cells or a (transient) selective advantage to antigenically discrete subpopulations within the heterogeneous tumor population. Finally, a study has been made of the growth pattern of tumor cells transplanted into mice immunized with rabbit antibodies directed against the murine MAb. In this case, tumor growth was slowed preferentially for the tumor reactive with the specific MAb, and again, predictable changes in the antigenic spectrum of tumor cells harvested from these animals were observed. Our overall findings are interpreted in terms of the involvement of networks of antibodies reacting with embryo-associated antigens in the regulation of growth of the murine mammary adenocarcinomas studied.

  20. Prevalence of antibodies anti-Bartonella henselae in western Sicily: children, blood donors, and cats.

    PubMed

    Mansueto, Pasquale; Pepe, Ilenia; Cillari, Enrico; Arcoleo, Francesco; Micalizzi, Anna; Bonura, Floriana; Seidita, Aurelio; Palillo, Letizia; Di Gregorio, Maria Francesca; Affronti, Mario; Di Rosa, Salvatore; Rini, Giovambattista; Vitale, Giustina

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate seroprevalence of B. henselae infection both in Sicilian children and healthy blood donors. Furthermore, circulation of Bartonella in the natural reservoir was also studied. Two hundred forty-three children, living in Sicily (Palermo), affected by various diseases, without clinical features suggesting B. henselae infection, together with 122 healthy blood donors were serologically investigated for IgG and IgM antibodies by indirect fluorescent antibody test (IFAT). One hundred twenty stray and 62 pet cats were also analyzed only for IgG. Among children 25.1% had IgG antibodies to B. henselae; 18.5% showed a titer 1:64, 2.4% 1:128, 2.4% 1:256, 0.8% 1:512, 0.4% 1:1024, and 0.4% 1:5120. Among healthy blood donors 11.4% had IgG class antibodies to B. henselae; 9.8% showed a titer 1:64 and 1.6% 1:128. All the human serum samples did not show positive results for B. henselae IgM class antibodies. Stray cats (68.3%) and pet cats (35.4%) also had IgG class antibodies to B. henselae. We demonstrated high frequency of serologic evidence of past B. henselae infection, in young Italian children, affected by various diseases, apparently free of any clinical features suggesting B. henselae infection. This observation is supported by high circulation of Bartonella in cats. PMID:22181817

  1. Trends in Malignant Glioma Monoclonal Antibody Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chekhonin, Ivan; Gurina, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Although new passive and active immunotherapy methods are emerging, unconjugated monoclonal antibodies remain the only kind of biological preparations approved for high-grade glioma therapy in clinical practice. In this review, we combine clinical and experimental data discussion. As antiangiogenic therapy is the standard of care for recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), we analyze major clinical trials and possible therapeutic combinations of bevacizumab, the most common monoclonal antibody to vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Another humanized antibody to gain recognition in GBM is epidermal growth factor (EGFR) antagonist nimotuzumab. Other antigens (VEGF receptor, platelet-derived growth factor receptor, hepatocyte growth factor and c-Met system) showed significance in gliomas and were used to create monoclonal antibodies applied in different malignant tumors. We assess the role of genetic markers (isocitrate dehydrogenase, O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransnsferase) in GBM treatment outcome prediction. Besides antibodies studied in clinical trials, we focus on perspective targets and briefly list other means of passive immunotherapy.

  2. Antibodies in the treatment of aplastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Almaguer, David; Jaime-Pérez, Jose Carlos; Ruiz-Arguelles, Guillermo J

    2012-04-01

    Antibodies have been the cornerstone of treatment of acquired aplastic anemia for more than 25 years. Treatment with antithymocyte globulin (ATG) is considered pivotal and the addition of cyclosporine improves the overall response rate. This antibody is heterogeneous and horse ATG is apparently more effective than rabbit ATG. Several issues remain unsolved in relation to the combination of ATG and cyclosporine: cost, toxicity and late clonal disorders. In recent years, alternative immunosuppressive therapy has been proposed and new antibodies have emerged: porcine ATG, alemtuzumab, daclizumab, and rituximab. Experience with these antibodies is limited to a few studies with alemtuzumab being the most promising, but the results are interesting and provocative. More studies are needed to find the perfect antibody. PMID:22307362

  3. Dual targeting strategies with bispecific antibodies

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies are widely used for the treatment of cancer, inflammatory and infectious diseases and other disorders. Most of the marketed antibodies are monospecific and therefore capable of interacting and interfering with a single target. However, complex diseases are often multifactorial in nature, and involve redundant or synergistic action of disease mediators or upregulation of different receptors, including crosstalk between their signaling networks. Consequently, blockade of multiple, different pathological factors and pathways may result in improved therapeutic efficacy. This result can be achieved by combining different drugs, or use of the dual targeting strategies applying bispecific antibodies that have emerged as an alternative to combination therapy. This review discusses the various dual targeting strategies for which bispecific antibodies have been developed and provides an overview of the established bispecific antibody formats. PMID:22453100

  4. Radiolabeled antibodies for therapy of infectious diseases

    PubMed Central

    Dadachova, Ekaterina; Casadevall, Arturo

    2014-01-01

    Novel approaches to treatment of infectious diseases are urgently needed. This need has resulted in renewing the interest in antibodies for therapy of infectious diseases. Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) is a cancer treatment modality, which utilizes radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). During the last decade we have translated RIT into the field of experimental fungal, bacterial and HIV infections. In addition, successful proof of principle experiments with radiolabeled pan-antibodies that bind to antigens shared by major pathogenic fungi were performed in vitro. The armamentarium of pan-antibodies would result in reducing the dependence on microorganism-specific antibodies and thus would speed up the development of RIT of infections. We believe that the time is ripe for deploying RIT into the clinic to combat infectious diseases. PMID:25599011

  5. Competition between Serum IgG, IgM, and IgA Anti-Glycan Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Muthana, Saddam M.; Xia, Li; Campbell, Christopher T.; Zhang, Yalong; Gildersleeve, Jeffrey C.

    2015-01-01

    Anti-glycan antibodies are an abundant subpopulation of serum antibodies with critical functions in many immune processes. Changes in the levels of these antibodies can occur with the onset of disease, exposure to pathogens, or vaccination. As a result, there has been significant interest in exploiting anti-glycan antibodies as biomarkers for many diseases. Serum contains a mixture of anti-glycan antibodies that can recognize the same antigen, and competition for binding can potentially influence the detection of antibody subpopulations that are more relevant to disease processes. The most abundant antibody isotypes in serum are IgG, IgM, and IgA, but little is known regarding how these different isotypes compete for the same glycan antigen. In this study, we developed a multiplexed glycan microarray assay and applied it to evaluate how different isotypes of anti-glycan antibodies (IgA, IgG, and IgM) compete for printed glycan antigens. While IgG and IgA antibodies typically outcompete IgM for peptide or protein antigens, we found that IgM outcompete IgG and IgA for many glycan antigens. To illustrate the importance of this effect, we provide evidence that IgM competition can account for the unexpected observation that IgG of certain antigen specificities appear to be preferentially transported from mothers to fetuses. We demonstrate that IgM in maternal sera compete with IgG resulting in lower than expected IgG signals. Since cord blood contains very low levels of IgM, competition only affects maternal IgG signals, making it appear as though certain IgG antibodies are higher in cord blood than matched maternal blood. Taken together, the results highlight the importance of competition for studies involving anti-glycan antibodies. PMID:25807519

  6. Cutaneous Vasculitis in a Patient with Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sheth, Khushboo; Parke, Ann

    2016-02-01

    Antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APS) is an acquired thrombophilia, caused by autoantibodies to anticardiolipin (aCL), or antibeta 2 glycoprotein I, or the presence of lupus anticoagulant (LA) in plasma. It is characterized by recurrent venous and/or arterial thrombi and/or pregnancy related morbidities. We present the case of a 52-year-old female with long-standing APS, who developed cutaneous vasculitis following a common cold. Most of the cutaneous manifestations of APS have been found to be thrombotic on histopathology without evidence of perivascular inflammation. Vasculitis is usually seen in APS patients with coexistent Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE). However, our patient had evidence of vasculitis on skin biopsy and did not have SLE. Though rare, this is a disease process which must be considered in patients with primary APS which must be closely monitored for other vasculitic complications of APS, particularly diffuse alveolar hemorrhage. PMID:27024977

  7. Detection of Anti-Isoniazid and Anti-CYP Antibodies in Patients with Isoniazid-Induced Liver Failure

    PubMed Central

    Metushi, Imir G; Sanders, Corron; Lee, William M.; Uetrecht, Jack

    2016-01-01

    Isoniazid (INH)-induced hepatotoxicity remains one of the most common causes of drug-induced idiosyncratic liver injury and liver failure. This form of liver injury is not believed to be immune-mediated because it is not usually associated with fever or rash, does not recur more rapidly on rechallenge, and previous studies have failed to identify anti-INH antibodies. In this paper we found antibodies present in the sera of 15/19 cases of INH-induced liver failure. Anti-INH antibodies were present in 8; 11 sera had anti-CYP2E1 antibodies, 14 sera had antibodies against CYP2E1 modified by INH, 14 sera had anti-CYP3A4 antibodies, and 10 sera had anti-CYP2C9 antibodies. INH was found to form covalent adducts with CYP2E1, CYP3A4, and CYP2C9. None of these antibodies were detected in sera from INH-treated controls without significant liver injury. The presence of a range of anti-drug and autoantibodies has been observed in other drug-induced liver injury that is presumed to be immune-mediated. Conclusion These data provide strong evidence that INH induces an immune response that causes INH-induced liver injury. PMID:23775837

  8. Isolation of Balamuthia mandrillaris-specific antibody fragments from a bacteriophage antibody display library.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Ruqaiyyah; Kulsoom, Huma; Lalani, Salima; Khan, Naveed Ahmed

    2016-07-01

    Balamuthia mandrillaris is a protist pathogen that can cause encephalitis with a mortality rate of more than 95%. Early diagnosis followed by aggressive treatment is a pre-requisite for successful prognosis. Current methods for identifying this organism rely on culture and microscopy, antibody-based methods using animals, or involve the use of molecular tools that are expensive. Here, we describe the isolation of antibody fragments that can be used for the unequivocal identification of B. mandrillaris. B. mandrillaris-specific antibody fragments were isolated from a bacteriophage antibody display library. Individual clones were studied by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and immunofluorescence. Four antibody clones showed specific binding to B. mandrillaris. The usefulness of phage antibody display technology as a diagnostic tool for isolating antibody fragments against B. mandrillaris antigens and studying their biological role(s) is discussed further. PMID:27055361

  9. Vector-Mediated In Vivo Antibody Expression.

    PubMed

    Schnepp, Bruce C; Johnson, Philip R

    2014-08-01

    This article focuses on a novel vaccine strategy known as vector-mediated antibody gene transfer, with a particular focus on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). This strategy provides a solution to the problem of current vaccines that fail to generate neutralizing antibodies to prevent HIV-1 infection and AIDS. Antibody gene transfer allows for predetermination of antibody affinity and specificity prior to "immunization" and avoids the need for an active humoral immune response against the HIV envelope protein. This approach uses recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vectors, which have been shown to transduce muscle with high efficiency and direct the long-term expression of a variety of transgenes, to deliver the gene encoding a broadly neutralizing antibody into the muscle. Following rAAV vector gene delivery, the broadly neutralizing antibodies are endogenously synthesized in myofibers and passively distributed to the circulatory system. This is an improvement over classical passive immunization strategies that administer antibody proteins to the host to provide protection from infection. Vector-mediated gene transfer studies in mice and monkeys with anti-HIV and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-neutralizing antibodies demonstrated long-lasting neutralizing activity in serum with complete protection against intravenous challenge with virulent HIV and SIV. These results indicate that existing potent anti-HIV antibodies can be rapidly moved into the clinic. However, this methodology need not be confined to HIV. The general strategy of vector-mediated antibody gene transfer can be applied to other difficult vaccine targets such as hepatitis C virus, malaria, respiratory syncytial virus, and tuberculosis. PMID:26104192

  10. Radiohalogenated half-antibodies and maleimide intermediate therefor

    DOEpatents

    Kassis, Amin I.; Khawli, Leslie A.

    1991-01-01

    N-(m-radiohalophenyl) maleimide can be conjugated with a reduced antibody having a mercapto group to provide a radiolabelled half-antibody having immunological specific binding characteristics of whole antibody.

  11. Radiohalogenated half-antibodies and maleimide intermediate therefor

    DOEpatents

    Kassis, A.I.; Khawli, L.A.

    1991-02-19

    N-(m-radiohalophenyl) maleimide can be conjugated with a reduced antibody having a mercapto group to provide a radiolabeled half-antibody having immunological specific binding characteristics of whole antibody. No Drawings

  12. Antibody-guided irradiation of hepatic metastases using intrahepatically administered radiolabelled anti-CEA antibodies with simultaneous and reversible hepatic blood flow stasis using biodegradable starch microspheres.

    PubMed

    Epenetos, A A; Courtenay-Luck, N; Dhokia, B; Snook, D; Hooker, G; Lavender, J P; Hemmingway, A; Carr, D; Paraharalambous, M; Bosslet, K

    1987-12-01

    Two monoclonal antibodies to carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) were radiolabelled with 131I and used for the treatment of hepatic metastases in a patient who had a primary colonic carcinoma. Approximately 100 mCi of 131I-labelled antibody were administered via the hepatic artery on two occasions. On the second occasion, radiolabelled antibody was given concurrently with biodegradable starch microspheres in an attempt to enhance tumour uptake of antibody by achieving temporary stasis or delay of hepatic blood flow. The procedure was carried out uneventfully. There was clinical improvement and a fall in circulating CEA levels after each course of treatment. Furthermore, after the second course of therapy the clinical improvement was sustained for a longer period (more than 3 months) and there was evidence of diminution in the size of some of the liver metastases. Regional administration of 131I-labelled anti-CEA antibody concurrently with biodegradable starch microspheres appears to be a promising new method for the treatment of hepatic metastases from colonic carcinoma. PMID:3449789

  13. Phylogenetic diversification of immunoglobulin genes and the antibody repertoire.

    PubMed

    Litman, G W; Rast, J P; Shamblott, M J; Haire, R N; Hulst, M; Roess, W; Litman, R T; Hinds-Frey, K R; Zilch, A; Amemiya, C T

    1993-01-01

    Immunoglobulins are encoded by a large multigene system that undergoes somatic rearrangement and additional genetic change during the development of immunoglobulin-producing cells. Inducible antibody and antibody-like responses are found in all vertebrates. However, immunoglobulin possessing disulfide-bonded heavy and light chains and domain-type organization has been described only in representatives of the jawed vertebrates. High degrees of nucleotide and predicted amino acid sequence identity are evident when the segmental elements that constitute the immunoglobulin gene loci in phylogenetically divergent vertebrates are compared. However, the organization of gene loci and the manner in which the independent elements recombine (and diversify) vary markedly among different taxa. One striking pattern of gene organization is the "cluster type" that appears to be restricted to the chondrichthyes (cartilaginous fishes) and limits segmental rearrangement to closely linked elements. This type of gene organization is associated with both heavy- and light-chain gene loci. In some cases, the clusters are "joined" or "partially joined" in the germ line, in effect predetermining or partially predetermining, respectively, the encoded specificities (the assumption being that these are expressed) of the individual loci. By relating the sequences of transcribed gene products to their respective germ-line genes, it is evident that, in some cases, joined-type genes are expressed. This raises a question about the existence and/or nature of allelic exclusion in these species. The extensive variation in gene organization found throughout the vertebrate species may relate directly to the role of intersegmental (V<==>D<==>J) distances in the commitment of the individual antibody-producing cell to a particular genetic specificity. Thus, the evolution of this locus, perhaps more so than that of others, may reflect the interrelationships between genetic organization and function. PMID

  14. Development and use of amicroagglutination test to detect antibodies to Alcaligenes faecalis in turkeys.

    PubMed

    Jackwood, D J; Saif, Y M

    1980-01-01

    A neotetrazolium-chloride-stained Alcaligenes faecalis antigen was developed for use in the microagglutination (MA) test. The test was used to detect serum antibodies in naturally and experimentally infected turkeys. The highest titer observed in naturally infected birds was 1:320. In one commercial flock, antibodies were detected at 12 and 15 weeks after the initial disease outbreak. Four experiments were conducted to study the serologic responses of turkeys to A. faecalis. Antibodies were first detected at 2 weeks postexposure (PE) in poults that were exposed to the organism at 1 week of age. Peak antibody titers were detected at 3 weeks PE; isolations of the organism then declined. No antibodies were detected at 7 weeks PE in these birds. Birds infected at 5 weeks of age via various routes developed maximum antibody titers 2 weeks PE. Birds inoculated subcutaneously had the highest titers, whereas those inoculated intramuscularly had the lowest titers. Antibodies were still detected at 56 days PE in some birds. Hens vaccinated with an inactivated A. faecalis bacterin developed antibody titers. Titers not higher than 1:40 were detected at hatching in progeny of these hens. However, these poults were not protected from disease after challenge. There was some evidence that birds exposed to live or inactivated A. faecalis develop some protection against challenge. Antigens were prepared using 4 Ohio A. faecalis isolates (A, B, C, and D) and 1 North Carolina isolate for use in the MA test. The results indicated that the 5 isolates were antigenically similar. Antigens prepared using isolate B reacted best in the MA test. PMID:7447837

  15. [Congenital heart block associated with maternal anti SSA/SSB antibodies :a report of four cases].

    PubMed

    Ayed, K; Gorgi, Y; Sfar, I; Khrouf, M

    2004-04-01

    Congenital heart block (CHB) associated with maternal anti-SSA/SSB antibodies: a report of four cases. CHB detected in utero is strongly associated with maternal antibodies to SSA (Ro) and SSB (La). Their pathogenic role in the development of CHB has been established in several studies. The mothers of affected infants frequently had autoimmune disease (systemic lupus erythematosus, Sjögren's syndrome) or were entirely asymptomatic. It is very difficult to identify pregnant asymptomatic mothers carrying anti-SSA/SSB antibodies. We report four cases of infants born to asymptomatic mothers with anti-SSA/SSB antibodies, three of them developed isolated congenital cardiac heart block and one with no evidence of CHB. All three CHB are detected during pregnancy between 16 and 24 weeks of gestation. All maternal sera contained antibodies to SSA alone or the both SSA and SSB. Three of four subsequent pregnancies were complicated by heart block. One child affected died in utero. While the two other newborns with CHB required pacemaker insertion during the first 3 months of life. Although the association of anti-SSA/SSB with CHB is widely accepted, the precise mechanism by which these antibodies cause cardiac conduction abnormalities remains to be defined. Antibodies to SSA/SSB have been proposed to be a serologic marker for neonatal lupus syndrome and CHB. Fetal and neonatal diseases are presumed to be due to the transplacental passage of these IgG autoantibodies from the mother into the fetal circulation. Since these antibodies may have a pathogenic role in CHB, screening of infants with isolated CHB or neonatal lupus and their mothers for the presence of anti-SSA and anti-SSB is strongly recommended. PMID:15063933

  16. Seroprevalence of unexpected red blood cell antibodies among pregnant women in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Eipl, K; Nakabiito, C; Bwogi, K; Motevalli, M; Roots, A; Blagg, L; Jackson, J B

    2012-01-01

    We conducted a population-based, cross-sectional study among pregnant women in Kampala, Uganda, to determine ABO and D blood types and to determine the percentage who have unexpected red blood cell (RBC) antibodies and their specificities. De-identified blood samples from routine testing of 1001 pregnant women at the Mulago Hospital antenatal clinics in Kampala were typed for ABO and D and screened for the presence of unexpected RBC antibodies with confirmation and subsequent antibody identification. Of the 1001 blood samples tested, 48.9 percent, 26.4 percent, 21.0 percent, and 3.8 percent tested positive for blood groups 0, A, B, and AB, respectively. Of these samples, 23 (2.3%)were negative forD, and 55 (5.5%) showed initial reactivity with at least one screening RBC. The RBC antibody screen was repeated on these 55 samples, and antibody identification was performed at the Johns Hopkins Hospital Blood Bank in Baltimore, Maryland. Twenty-one of the 55 samples were confirmed to have evidence of agglutination. Nine of the 21 samples demonstrated the presence of clinically significant RBC antibodies with anti-S being the most common, 8 samples demonstrated the presence of benign or naturally occurring antibodies, and 4 had only inconclusive reactivity. This study revealed a relatively high frequency of D and a low frequency of demonstrable clinically significant alloantibodies that may cause hemolytic disease of the newborn or hemolytic transfusion reactions among pregnant women in Kampala, with anti-S being the most frequent antibody specificity. PMID:23421539

  17. Anti-neosporal IgG and IgE antibodies in canine neosporosis.

    PubMed

    Jesus, E E V; Almeida, M A O; Atta, A M

    2007-01-01

    Neospora caninum infection provokes neurological disorders, recurrent abortion and death in dogs and cattle. Dogs are both intermediate and definitive host of N. caninum. Thus, the development of sensitive and specific immunoassays to diagnose canine neosporosis is essential to control this disease. This work investigated serum anti-neosporal IgG and IgE antibodies in 140 dogs represented by 30 healthy animals (group I), 11 dogs showing acute N. caninum infection (group II), 50 urban dogs with serological evidence of canine neosporosis in indirect fluorescent antibody test (IFAT) (group III) and 49 urban dogs without clinical and laboratory evidences of neosporosis (group IV). Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and western immunoblotting, both using a soluble N. caninum tachyzoite antigen (SNA), investigated these two isotypes of antibodies, while a Urea-ELISA measured the avidity of the IgG antibodies. Anti-Toxoplasma gondii IgG antibodies were also investigated in the animals. Anti-neosporal IgG was found in all animals from groups II and III, whereas 32.7% (16/49) of dogs from group IV were reactive. IgG antibodies of low avidity were demonstrated in dogs from group II (median 35.3%), while animals from groups III and IV had IgG antibodies of high avidity (medians of 61.5% and 61.7% respectively). IgE antibodies were found in four (13.3%) and five (16.6%) dogs from groups III and IV respectively. Dogs presenting acute infection (group II) or chronic infection (group III) had IgG antibodies to several neosporal antigens, mainly of 29-30 and 35 kDa, while 13 of 16 dogs from group IV recognized antigens from 14 to 170 kDa. Antibodies to T. gondii were detected in 36 of 50 (72%) sera from group III and 25 of 49 (51%) sera from group IV. We concluded that IgG-ELISA and Urea-ELISA with SNA may substitute for IFAT in both laboratory routine and epidemiological studies of canine neosporosis. PMID:18035978

  18. Antibody Engineering & Therapeutics, the annual meeting of The Antibody Society December 7-10, 2015, San Diego, CA, USA.

    PubMed

    Pauthner, Matthias; Yeung, Jenny; Ullman, Chris; Bakker, Joost; Wurch, Thierry; Reichert, Janice M; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof; Bradbury, Andrew R M; Carter, Paul J; Melis, Joost P M

    2016-01-01

    The 26th Antibody Engineering & Therapeutics meeting, the annual meeting of The Antibody Society united over 800 participants from all over the world in San Diego from 6-10 December 2015. The latest innovations and advances in antibody research and development were discussed, covering a myriad of antibody-related topics by more than 100 speakers, who were carefully selected by The Antibody Society. As a prelude, attendees could join the pre-conference training course focusing, among others, on the engineering and enhancement of antibodies and antibody-like scaffolds, bispecific antibody engineering and adaptation to generate chimeric antigen receptor constructs. The main event covered 4 d of scientific sessions that included antibody effector functions, reproducibility of research and diagnostic antibodies, new developments in antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs), preclinical and clinical ADC data, new technologies and applications for bispecific antibodies, antibody therapeutics for non-cancer and orphan indications, antibodies to harness the cellular immune system, building comprehensive IgVH-gene repertoires through discovering, confirming and cataloging new germline IgVH genes, and overcoming resistance to clinical immunotherapy. The Antibody Society's special session focused on "Antibodies to watch" in 2016. Another special session put the spotlight on the limitations of the new definitions for the assignment of antibody international nonproprietary names introduced by the World Health Organization. The convention concluded with workshops on computational antibody design and on the promise and challenges of using next-generation sequencing for antibody discovery and engineering from synthetic and in vivo libraries. PMID:26909869

  19. Evidence for two immunologically distinct acetyl-coenzyme A synthetases in yeast

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Satyanarayana, T.; Mandel, A. D.; Klein, H. P.

    1974-01-01

    Evidence is presented that clearly establishes the presence of two acetyl-CoA synthetases in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, one elaborated under 'aerobic' conditions, the other under 'nonaerobic' conditions. The antibody produced by each enzyme is immunologically specific.

  20. Monoclonal antibodies in the treatment of cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Dillman, R.O.

    1984-01-01

    Potential uses of monoclonal antibodies in anti-cancer treatment include passive serotherapy, radioisotope conjugates, toxin-linked conjugates, and chemotherapy-monoclonal antibody conjugates. The bases for these applications have been founded in research with heterologous antisera, and in some cases with monoclonal antibodies in animal tumor models. Human trials with passive serotherapy have already begun in both hematopoietic and solid tumor malignancies. Promising results have been reported in cutaneous T cell lymphoma with anti-T cell monoclonal antibody, and in nodular lymphoma with anti-idiotype monoclonal antibody. Radioisotope conjugate work appears promising for imaging in both animals and humans, and this work will lay the foundation for possible therapeutic application of radio-immunotherapy. Toxin-linked conjugates are promising in vitro and may have application in autologous bone marrow transplantation. Research with chemotherapy conjugates is also underway. Preliminary results suggest that murine monoclonal antibodies will be well tolerated clinically except in the setting of circulating cells which bear the target antigen, where rapid infusions may be associated with intolerable side effects. In certain diseases, production of endogenous anti-mouse antibodies may also limit application. Advances in the technology for human-human hybridoma production may help solve some of these problems. 132 references.

  1. Screening for antibodies associated with halothane hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Hastings, K L; Thomas, C; Hubbard, A K; Gandolfi, A J

    1991-12-01

    The diagnosis of halothane hepatitis (HH) may be assisted by detection of antibodies reacting to trifluoroacetylated proteins (anti-TFA antibodies). An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) utilizing trifluoroacetylated rabbit serum albumin (TFA-RSA) as antigen detected anti-TFA antibodies in 67% of sera from patients for whom a clinical diagnosis of HH was made. Anti-TFA antibodies were detected in 33% of sera when using an ELISA with liver microsomal protein from halothane-treated rabbits as antigen. Absorption of the sera with untreated rabbit liver microsomal protein before using the microsomal protein ELISA resulted in detection of anti-TFA antibodies in 42% of sera. Using the presumptive hapten N-epsilon-trifluoroacetyl-1-lysine to block antibody binding in an ELISA resulted in positive detection in 50% of sera: the results did not always agree with the other ELISA methods. The TFA-RSA ELISA was the most sensitive method and, combined with the TFA-lysine blocking ELISA, resulted in 92% of sera from HH patients testing positive for HH-associated antibodies. PMID:1768541

  2. Engineering antibodies for clinical applications in cancer.

    PubMed

    Chester, Kerry; Pedley, Barbara; Tolner, Berend; Violet, John; Mayer, Astrid; Sharma, Surinder; Boxer, Geoff; Green, Alan; Nagl, Sylvia; Begent, Richard

    2004-01-01

    The 'magic bullet' concept predicted over a century ago that antibodies would be used to target cancer therapy. Since then initial problems that were related to specificity, purity and immungenicity of antibody-based reagents have slowly been overcome due to developments in technology and increased knowledge. As a result, antibodies are in use for many clinical applications and now comprise the second largest category of medicines in clinical development after vaccines. For antibody-based cancer therapeutics the last 20 years have met with an explosion of knowledge about the biology of the disease and potential targets as well as new technology which allows cloning and manipulation of multifunctional antibody-based molecules. However, the focus still remains on developing therapeutics that will have potential for treating cancer in people and this is efficiently assessed in mechanistic clinical trials that feed back to the laboratory for further development. This review illustrates the mechanistic approach to making new molecules for antibody imaging and therapy of cancer. It is illustrated by examples of radioimmunotherapy and antibody-directed enzyme prodrug therapy developed by the authors. PMID:15192316

  3. Next generation of antibody therapy for cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Zhenping; Yan, Li

    2011-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have become a major class of therapeutic agents providing effective alternatives to treating various human diseases. To date, 15 mAbs have been approved by regulatory agencies in the world for clinical use in oncology indications. The selectivity and specificity, the unique pharmacokinetics, and the ability to engage and activate the host immune system differentiate these biologics from traditional small molecule anticancer drugs. mAb-based regimens have brought clinical benefits, including improvements in overall survival, to patients with a variety of cancers. Many challenges still remain, however, to fully realize the potential of these new medicines. With our further understanding of cancer biology, mechanism of antibody action, and advancement of antibody engineering technologies, many novel antibody formats or antibody-derived molecules are emerging as promising new generation therapeutics. Carefully designed and engineered, they retain the advantage of specificity and selectivity of original antibodies, but in the meantime acquire additional special features such as improved pharmacokinetics, increased selectivity, and enhanced anticancer efficacy. Promising clinical results are being generated with these newly improved antibody-based therapeutics. PMID:21527062

  4. Strategies for Eliciting HIV-1 Inhibitory Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Tomaras, Georgia D.; Haynes, Barton F.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of review Major roadblocks persist in the development of vaccines that elicit potent neutralizing antibodies targeting diverse HIV-1 strains, similar to known broadly neutralizing HIV-1 human monoclonal antibodies. Alternatively, other types of anti-HIV-1 envelope antibodies that may not neutralize HIV-1 in traditional neutralization assays but have other anti-HIV-1 activities (hereafter termed HIV-1 inhibitory antibodies) can be elicited by current vaccine strategies, and numerous studies are exploring their roles in preventing HIV-1 acquisition. We review examples of strategies for eliciting potentially protective HIV-1 inhibitory antibodies. Recent Findings Heterologous prime-boost strategies can yield anti-HIV immune responses; although only one (canarypox prime, Env protein boost) has been tested and shown positive results in an efficacy trial (RV144). Although the immune correlates of protection are as yet undefined, the reduced rate of acquisition without a significant effect on initial viral loads or CD4+ T cell counts, have raised the hypothesis of an RV144 vaccine-elicited transient protective B cell response. Summary In light of the RV144 trial, there is a critical need to define the entire functional spectrum of anti-HIV-1 antibodies, how easily each can be elicited, and how effective different types of antibody effector mechanisms can be in prevention of HIV-1 transmission. PMID:20978384

  5. Glycosylation of plant produced human antibodies.

    PubMed

    Kallolimath, Somanath; Steinkellner, Herta

    2015-12-23

    Human immunoglobulins circulate as highly heterogeneously glycosylated mixture of otherwise homogeneous protein backbones. A series of studies, mainly on IgG, have unequivocally proven that antibodies modulate their effector function through sugars present in the Fc domain. However, our limited technology in producing complex proteins such as antibodies, with defined glycan structures hamper in depths studies. This review introduces a plant based expression platform enabling engineering of antibody glycans. The procedure is based on the simultaneous delivery of appropriate constructs, carrying cDNAs of target proteins (e.g. heavy and light chain of antibodies) in combination with human glycosylation enzymes into plant leaves. Harvesting of recombinant proteins one week post construct delivery allows high speed and flexibility. Major achievements include the production of functional active slialylated pentameric IgMs in tobacco leaves. The system provides a viable approach to the generation of antibodies with defined glycoforms on demand, contributing to studies on antibody glycans and the development of novel antibody based drugs. PMID:27472861

  6. Immunoperoxidase inhibition assay for rabies antibody detection.

    PubMed

    Batista, H B C R; Lima, F E S; Maletich, D; Silva, A C R; Vicentini, F K; Roehe, L R; Spilki, F R; Franco, A C; Roehe, P M

    2011-06-01

    An immunoperoxidase inhibition assay (IIA) for detection of rabies antibodies in human sera is described. Diluted test sera are added to microplates with paraformaldehyde-fixed, CER cells infected with rabies virus. Antibodies in test sera compete with a rabies polyclonal rabbit antiserum which was added subsequently. Next, an anti-rabbit IgG-peroxidase conjugate is added and the reaction developed by the addition of the substrate 3-amino-9-ethylcarbazole (AEC). The performance of the assay was compared to that of the "simplified fluorescence inhibition microtest" (SFIMT), an established virus neutralization assay, by testing 422 human sera. The IIA displayed 97.6% sensitivity, 98% specificity and 97.6% accuracy (Kappa correlation coefficient=0.9). The IIA results can be read by standard light microscopy, where the clearly identifiable specific staining is visible in antibody-negative sera, in contrast to the absence of staining in antibody-positive samples. The assay does not require monoclonal antibodies or production of large amounts of virus; furthermore, protein purification steps or specialized equipment are not necessary for its performance. The IIA was shown to be suitable for detection of rabies antibodies in human sera, with sensitivity, specificity and accuracy comparable to that of a neutralization-based assay. This assay may be advantageous over other similar methods designed to detect rabies-specific binding antibodies, in that it can be easily introduced into laboratories, provided basic cell culture facilities are available. PMID:21458492

  7. Antiphospholipid Antibodies in Lupus Nephritis.

    PubMed

    Parodis, Ioannis; Arnaud, Laurent; Gerhardsson, Jakob; Zickert, Agneta; Sundelin, Birgitta; Malmström, Vivianne; Svenungsson, Elisabet; Gunnarsson, Iva

    2016-01-01

    Lupus nephritis (LN) is a major manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). It remains unclear whether antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) alter the course of LN. We thus investigated the impact of aPL on short-term and long-term renal outcomes in patients with LN. We assessed levels of aPL cross-sectionally in SLE patients diagnosed with (n = 204) or without (n = 294) LN, and prospectively in 64 patients with active biopsy-proven LN (52 proliferative, 12 membranous), before and after induction treatment (short-term outcomes). Long-term renal outcome in the prospective LN cohort was determined by the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and the Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) stage, after a median follow-up of 11.3 years (range: 3.3-18.8). Cross-sectional analysis revealed no association between LN and IgG/IgM anticardiolipin or anti-β2-glycoprotein I antibodies, or lupus anticoagulant. Both aPL positivity and levels were similar in patients with active LN and non-renal SLE. Following induction treatment for LN, serum IgG/IgM aPL levels decreased in responders (p<0.005 for all), but not in non-responders. Both at active LN and post-treatment, patients with IgG, but not IgM, aPL had higher creatinine levels compared with patients without IgG aPL. Neither aPL positivity nor levels were associated with changes in eGFR from either baseline or post-treatment through long-term follow-up. Moreover, aPL positivity and levels both at baseline and post-treatment were similar in patients with a CKD stage ≥3 versus 1-2 at the last follow-up. In conclusion, neither aPL positivity nor levels were found to be associated with the occurrence of LN in SLE patients. However, IgG aPL positivity in LN patients was associated with a short-term impairment of the renal function while no effect on long-term renal outcome was observed. Furthermore, IgG and IgM aPL levels decreased following induction treatment only in responders, indicating that aPL levels are affected by

  8. Antiphospholipid Antibodies in Lupus Nephritis

    PubMed Central

    Arnaud, Laurent; Gerhardsson, Jakob; Zickert, Agneta; Sundelin, Birgitta; Malmström, Vivianne; Svenungsson, Elisabet; Gunnarsson, Iva

    2016-01-01

    Lupus nephritis (LN) is a major manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). It remains unclear whether antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) alter the course of LN. We thus investigated the impact of aPL on short-term and long-term renal outcomes in patients with LN. We assessed levels of aPL cross-sectionally in SLE patients diagnosed with (n = 204) or without (n = 294) LN, and prospectively in 64 patients with active biopsy-proven LN (52 proliferative, 12 membranous), before and after induction treatment (short-term outcomes). Long-term renal outcome in the prospective LN cohort was determined by the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and the Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) stage, after a median follow-up of 11.3 years (range: 3.3–18.8). Cross-sectional analysis revealed no association between LN and IgG/IgM anticardiolipin or anti-β2-glycoprotein I antibodies, or lupus anticoagulant. Both aPL positivity and levels were similar in patients with active LN and non-renal SLE. Following induction treatment for LN, serum IgG/IgM aPL levels decreased in responders (p<0.005 for all), but not in non-responders. Both at active LN and post-treatment, patients with IgG, but not IgM, aPL had higher creatinine levels compared with patients without IgG aPL. Neither aPL positivity nor levels were associated with changes in eGFR from either baseline or post-treatment through long-term follow-up. Moreover, aPL positivity and levels both at baseline and post-treatment were similar in patients with a CKD stage ≥3 versus 1–2 at the last follow-up. In conclusion, neither aPL positivity nor levels were found to be associated with the occurrence of LN in SLE patients. However, IgG aPL positivity in LN patients was associated with a short-term impairment of the renal function while no effect on long-term renal outcome was observed. Furthermore, IgG and IgM aPL levels decreased following induction treatment only in responders, indicating that aPL levels are affected by

  9. Labeling of monoclonal antibodies with radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Bhargava, K.K.; Acharya, S.A. )

    1989-07-01

    Antibodies, specifically monoclonal antibodies, are potentially very useful and powerful carriers of therapeutic agents to target tissues and diagnostic agents. The loading or charging of antibodies with agents, especially radiotracers, is reviewed here. The choice of radioisotope for immunodetection and/or immunotherapy is based on its availability, half-life, nature of the radiation emitted, and the metabolic pathways of the radionuclide in the body. Most important of all are the derivatization techniques available for labeling the antibody with the given radionuclide. Isotopes of iodine and divalent metal ions are the most commonly used radionuclides. Antibodies labeled with iodine at tyrosine residues are metabolized rapidly in vivo. This leads to the incorporation of metabolized radioactive iodine into various tissues, mainly the thyroid gland and stomach, and to the accumulation of high levels of circulating iodine in the blood, which masks tumor uptake considerably. To overcome these limitations, the use of iodohippurate as an iodine-anchoring molecule to the protein should be considered. When divalent or multivalent metal ions are used as the preferred radionuclide, bifunctional chelating reagents such as EDTA or DTPA are first coupled to the protein or antibody. These chelating molecules are attached to the protein by formation of an isopeptide linkage between the carboxylate of the chelating reagent and the amino group of the protein. Several procedures are available to generate the isopeptide linkage. When the anchoring of the chelating agent through isopeptide linkage results in the inactivation of the antibody, periodate oxidation of the carbohydrate moiety of the antibody, followed by reductive coupling of chelator, could be considered as an alternative. There is still a need for better, simpler, and more direct methods for labeling antibodies with radionuclides. 78 references.

  10. Distinct Therapeutic Mechanisms of Tau Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Funk, Kristen E.; Mirbaha, Hilda; Jiang, Hong; Holtzman, David M.; Diamond, Marc I.

    2015-01-01

    Tauopathies are neurodegenerative diseases characterized by accumulation of Tau amyloids, and include Alzheimer disease and certain frontotemporal dementias. Trans-neuronal propagation of amyloid mediated by extracellular Tau may underlie disease progression. Consistent with this, active and passive vaccination studies in mouse models reduce pathology, although by unknown mechanisms. We previously reported that intracerebroventricular administration of three anti-Tau monoclonal antibodies (HJ8.5, HJ9.3, and HJ9.4) reduces pathology in a model overexpressing full-length mutant (P301S) human Tau. We now study effects of these three antibodies and a negative control antibody (HJ3.4) on Tau aggregate uptake into BV2 microglial-like cells and primary neurons. Antibody-independent Tau uptake into BV2 cells was blocked by heparin, consistent with a previously described role for heparan sulfate proteoglycans. Two therapeutic antibodies (HJ8.5 and HJ9.4) promoted uptake of full-length Tau fibrils into microglia via Fc receptors. Surprisingly, HJ9.3 promoted uptake of fibrils composed of the Tau repeat domain or Alzheimer disease-derived Tau aggregates, but failed to influence full-length recombinant Tau fibrils. Size fractionation of aggregates showed that antibodies preferentially promote uptake of larger oligomers (n ≥∼20-mer) versus smaller oligomers (n ∼10-mer) or monomer. No antibody inhibited uptake of full-length recombinant fibrils into primary neurons, but HJ9.3 blocked neuronal uptake of Tau repeat domain fibrils and Alzheimer disease-derived Tau. Antibodies thus have multiple potential mechanisms, including clearance via microglia and blockade of neuronal uptake. However these effects are epitope- and aggregate size-dependent. Establishing specific mechanisms of antibody activity in vitro may help in design and optimization of agents that are more effective in vivo. PMID:26126828

  11. Antibodies Against Three Forms of Urokinase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Dennis R.; Atassi, M. Zouhair

    2007-01-01

    Antibodies that bind to preselected regions of the urokinase molecule have been developed. These antibodies can be used to measure small quantities of each of three molecular forms of urokinase that could be contained in microsamples or conditioned media harvested from cultures of mammalian cells. Previously available antibodies and assay techniques do not yield both clear distinctions among, and measurements of, all three forms. Urokinase is a zymogen that is synthesized in a single-chain form, called ScuPA, which is composed of 411 amino acid residues (see figure). ScuPA has very little enzyme activity, but it can be activated in two ways: (1) by cleavage of the peptide bond lysine 158/isoleucine 159 and the loss of lysine 158 to obtain the high molecular-weight (HMW) form of the enzyme or (2) by cleavage of the bond lysine 135/lysine 136 to obtain the low-molecular-weight (LMW) form of the enzyme. The antibodies in question were produced in mice and rabbits by use of peptides as immunogens. The peptides were selected to obtain antibodies that bind to regions of ScuPA that include the lysine 158/isoleucine 159 and the lysine 135/lysine 136 bonds. The antibodies include monoclonal and polyclonal ones that yield indications as to whether either of these bonds is intact. The polyclonal antibodies include ones that preferentially bind to the HMW or LMW forms of the urokinase molecule. The monoclonal antibodies include ones that discriminate between the ScuPA and the HMW form. A combination of these molecular-specific antibodies will enable simultaneous assays of the ScuPA, HMW, and LMW forms in the same specimen of culture medium.

  12. HIV-1 resistance to neutralizing antibodies: Determination of antibody concentrations leading to escape mutant evolution.

    PubMed

    Magnus, Carsten; Reh, Lucia; Trkola, Alexandra

    2016-06-15

    Broadly neutralizing antibodies against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) are considered vital components of novel therapeutics and blueprints for vaccine research. Yet escape to even the most potent of these antibodies is imminent in natural infection. Measures to define antibody efficacy and prevent mutant selection are thus urgently needed. Here, we derive a mathematical framework to predict the concentration ranges for which antibody escape variants can outcompete their viral ancestors, referred to as mutant selection window (MSW). When determining the MSW, we focus on the differential efficacy of neutralizing antibodies against HIV-1 in two canonical infection routes, free-virus infection and cell-cell transmission. The latter has proven highly effective in vitro suggesting its importance for both in vivo spread as well as for escaping targeted intervention strategies. We observed a range of MSW patterns that highlight the potential of mutants to arise in both transmission pathways and over wide concentration ranges. Most importantly, we found that only when the arising mutant has both, residual sensitivity to the neutralizing antibody and reduced infectivity compared to the parental virus, antibody dosing outside of the MSW to restrict mutant selection is possible. Emergence of mutants that provide complete escape and have no considerable fitness loss cannot be prevented by adjusting antibody doses. The latter may in part explain the ubiquitous resistance to neutralizing antibodies observed in natural infection and antibody treatment. Based on our findings, combinations of antibodies targeting different epitopes should be favored for antibody-based interventions as this may render complete resistance less likely to occur and also increase chances that multiple escapes result in severe fitness loss of the virus making longer-term antibody treatment more feasible. PMID:26494166

  13. The antibody approach of labeling blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S.C.

    1991-12-31

    Although the science of blood cell labeling using monoclonal antibodies directed against specific cellular antigens is still in its early stages, considerable progress has recently been accomplished in this area. The monoclonal antibody approach offers the promise of greater selectivity and enhanced convenience since specific cell types can be labeled in vivo, thus eliminating the need for complex and damaging cell separation procedures. This article focuses on these developments with primary emphasis on antibody labeling of platelets and leukocytes. The advantages and the shortcomings of the recently reported techniques are criticality assessed and evaluated.

  14. The antibody approach of labeling blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S.C.

    1991-01-01

    Although the science of blood cell labeling using monoclonal antibodies directed against specific cellular antigens is still in its early stages, considerable progress has recently been accomplished in this area. The monoclonal antibody approach offers the promise of greater selectivity and enhanced convenience since specific cell types can be labeled in vivo, thus eliminating the need for complex and damaging cell separation procedures. This article focuses on these developments with primary emphasis on antibody labeling of platelets and leukocytes. The advantages and the shortcomings of the recently reported techniques are criticality assessed and evaluated.

  15. Uses of monoclonial antibody 8H9

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, Nai-Kong V.

    2015-06-23

    This invention provides an antibody that binds the same antigen as that of monoclonal antibody 8H9, wherein the heavy chain CDR (Complementary Determining Region)1 comprises NYDIN, heavy chain CDR2 comprises WIFPGDGSTQY, heavy chain CDR3 comprises QTTATWFAY, and the light chain CDR1 comprises RASQSISDYLH, light chain CDR2 comprises YASQSIS, and light chain CDR3 comprises QNGHSFPLT. In another embodiment, there is provided a polypeptide that binds the same antigen as that of monoclonal antibody 8H9, wherein the polypeptide comprises NYDIN, WIFPGDGSTQY, QTTATWFAY, RASQSISDYLH, YASQSIS, and QNGHSFPLT.

  16. Reshaping Human Antibodies: Grafting an Antilysozyme Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verhoeyen, Martine; Milstein, Cesar; Winter, Greg

    1988-03-01

    The production of therapeutic human monoclonal antibodies by hybridoma technology has proved difficult, and this has prompted the ``humanizing'' of mouse monoclonal antibodies by recombinant DNA techniques. It was shown previously that the binding site for a small hapten could be grafted from the heavy-chain variable domain of a mouse antibody to that of a human myeloma protein by transplanting the hypervariable loops. It is now shown that a large binding site for a protein antigen (lysozyme) can also be transplanted from mouse to human heavy chain. The success of such constructions may be facilitated by an induced-fit mechanism.

  17. Production of monoclonal antibodies against avidin.

    PubMed

    Ashorn, R; Ashorn, P; Kulomaa, M; Tuohimaa, P; Krohn, K

    1985-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies of the IgG1 subclass were generated against chicken avidin. These antibodies were shown to be as sensitive as polyclonal antiserum in detecting avidin by radioimmunoassay (RIA) and enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) methods. Furthermore, the monoclonal antibodies were considerably more specific. Our results with a monoclonal anti-avidin RIA support previous findings that in inflammatory conditions avidin is synthesized also in other organs than the oviduct, although in the liver a major part of the activity detected by polyclonal anti-avidin RIA or biotin-bentonite assay was not due to avidin. PMID:4053566

  18. Intellectual property protection: strategies for antibody inventions.

    PubMed

    Storz, Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    In the last decade, therapeutic antibodies have become one of the commercially most successful classes of biopharmaceutical drugs. Major drug manufacturers who have successfully managed to occupy this new market, as well as biotechnology firms, some of which have experienced a quick growth and are now on par with the former, owe part of their success to suitable intellectual property strategies. This article provides an overview of the current thinking on antibody-related patents, and discusses strategies for protecting the antibody products of the future. PMID:21494091

  19. The antibody approach of labeling blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S.C.

    1992-12-31

    Although the science of blood cell labeling using monoclonal antibodies directed against specific cellular antigens is still in its early stages, considerable progress has recently been accomplished in this area. The monoclonal antibody approach offers the promise of greater selectivity and enhanced convenience since specific cell types can be labeled in vivo, thus eliminating the need for complex and damaging cell separation procedures. This article focuses on these developments with primary emphasis on antibody labeling of platelets and leukocytes. The advantages and the shortcomings of the recently reported techniques are critically assessed and evaluated.

  20. [Anti-basal ganglia antibody].

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Masaharu

    2013-04-01

    Sydenham's chorea (SC) is a major manifestation of rheumatic fever, and the production of anti-basal ganglia antibodies (ABGA) has been proposed in SC. The pathogenesis is hypothesized as autoimmune targeting of the basal ganglia via molecular mimicry, triggered by streptococcal infection. The spectrum of diseases in which ABGA may be involved has been broadened to include other extrapyramidal movement disorders, such as tics, dystonia, and Parkinsonism, as well as other psychiatric disorders. The autoimmune hypothesis in the presence and absence of ABGA has been suggested in Tourette's syndrome (TS), early onset obsessive-compulsive disorders (OCD), and pediatric autoimmune neuropsychiatric disorders associated with streptococcal infections (PANDAS). Recently, the relationship between ABGA and dopamine neurons in the basal ganglia has been examined, and autoantibodies against dopamine receptors were detected in the sera from patients with basal ganglia encephalitis. In Japan, the occurrence of subacute encephalitis, where patients suffer from episodes of altered behavior and involuntary movements, has increased. Immune-modulating treatments are effective, indicating the involvement of an autoimmune mechanism. We aimed to detect the anti-neuronal autoantibodies in such encephalitis, using immunohistochemical assessment of patient sera. The sera from patients showing involuntary movements had immunoreactivity for basal ganglia neurons. Further epitopes for ABGA will be investigated in basal ganglia disorders other than SC, TS, OCD, and PANDAS. PMID:23568985

  1. ANTIBODIES TO INTESTINAL MICROVILLOUS MEMBRANES

    PubMed Central

    Mackenzie, Iain L.; Donaldson, Robert M.; Kopp, William L.; Trier, Jerry S.

    1968-01-01

    Microvillous membranes isolated from the distal, but not proximal, half of hamster small bowel induced in rabbits the formation of antisera which inhibited intrinsic factor-mediated uptake of vitamin B12 by hamster brush borders. The extent of inhibition was directly proportional to the concentration of antiserum, and an excess of IF-bound vitamin B12 could overcome the inhibitory effect. The inhibitory factor was absorbed from antisera by brush borders isolated from the distal, but not proximal, half of the hamster intestine. Fractionation of antisera by gel filtration and DEAE-cellulose chromatography established that immunoglobulin G contained the inhibitory factor. Antisera capable of completely blocking uptake of IF-bound vitamin B12 did not react with hamster IF or with the IF-vitamin B12 complex, did not inhibit brush border disaccharidase activity and did not impair glucose transport by everted sacs of hamster intestine. These results demonstrate that an antibody to distal microvillous membranes competes with the IF-vitamin B12 complex for a specific binding site or receptor located on the surface of distal hamster intestine. PMID:19867301

  2. Advances in recombinant antibody manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Kunert, Renate; Reinhart, David

    2016-04-01

    Since the first use of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells for recombinant protein expression, production processes have steadily improved through numerous advances. In this review, we have highlighted several key milestones that have contributed to the success of CHO cells from the beginning of their use for monoclonal antibody (mAb) expression until today. The main factors influencing the yield of a production process are the time to accumulate a desired amount of biomass, the process duration, and the specific productivity. By comparing maximum cell densities and specific growth rates of various expression systems, we have emphasized the limiting parameters of different cellular systems and comprehensively described scientific approaches and techniques to improve host cell lines. Besides the quantitative evaluation of current systems, the quality-determining properties of a host cell line, namely post-translational modifications, were analyzed and compared to naturally occurring polyclonal immunoglobulin fractions from human plasma. In summary, numerous different expression systems for mAbs are available and also under scientific investigation. However, CHO cells are the most frequently investigated cell lines and remain the workhorse for mAb production until today. PMID:26936774

  3. Optimising testing for phospholipid antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Helbert, M; Bodger, S; Cavenagh, J; D'Cruz, D; Thomas, J; MacCallum, P

    2001-01-01

    Aim—To compare anticardiolipin (ACL) and anti-ß2 glycoprotein 1 (ß2gp1) enzyme linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) in the diagnosis of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) and to incorporate these results into a meta-analysis of published data. Method—Three representative commercial ACL ELISAs and an in house ß2gp1 assay were optimised and then assessed on 124 sera from normal donors, patients with infection, or patients with APS. A Medline search was screened for papers meeting defined criteria to conduct a meta-analysis. The performance of the assays used in this study was included. Results—A non-quantitative ACL assay performed at least as well as the anti-ß2gp1 assay in the diagnosis of APS. Meta-analysis confirmed that neither assay is perfect, although the anti-ß2gp1 assay had a higher specificity and lower sensitivity than the ACL assay. Conclusions—The pooled data suggest that the ACL assay is used to investigate thrombosis without overt underlying pathology and that the improved specificity of the anti-ß2gp1 assay is exploited where infection, connective tissue disease, or atheroma are present. Key Words: antiphospholipid syndrome • anticardiolipin antibodies • anti-ß2 glycoprotein 1 • sensitivity PMID:11533076

  4. Antibody Response to Hypervariable Region 1 Interferes with Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies to Hepatitis C Virus

    PubMed Central

    Keck, Zhen-yong; Girard-Blanc, Christine; Wang, Wenyan; Lau, Patrick; Zuiani, Adam; Rey, Felix A.; Krey, Thomas; Diamond, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hypervariable region 1 (HVR1) (amino acids [aa] 384 to 410) on the E2 glycoprotein of hepatitis C virus contributes to persistent infection by evolving escape mutations that attenuate binding of inhibitory antibodies and by blocking access of broadly neutralizing antibodies to their epitopes. A third proposed mechanism of immune antagonism is that poorly neutralizing antibodies binding to HVR1 interfere with binding of other superior neutralizing antibodies. Epitope mapping of human monoclonal antibodies (HMAbs) that bind to an adjacent, conserved domain on E2 encompassing aa 412 to 423 revealed two subsets, designated HC33 HMAbs. While both subsets have contact residues within aa 412 to 423, alanine-scanning mutagenesis suggested that one subset, which includes HC33.8, has an additional contact residue within HVR1. To test for interference of anti-HVR1 antibodies with binding of antibodies to aa 412 to 423 and other E2 determinants recognized by broadly neutralizing HMAbs, two murine MAbs against HVR1 (H77.16) and aa 412 to 423 (H77.39) were studied. As expected, H77.39 inhibited the binding of all HC33 HMAbs. Unexpectedly, H77.16 also inhibited the binding of both subsets of HC33 HMAbs. This inhibition also was observed against other broadly neutralizing HMAbs to epitopes outside aa 412 to 423. Combination antibody neutralization studies by the median-effect analysis method with H77.16 and broadly reactive HMAbs revealed antagonism between these antibodies. Structural studies demonstrated conformational flexibility in this antigenic region, which supports the possibility of anti-HVR1 antibodies hindering the binding of broadly neutralizing MAbs. These findings support the hypothesis that anti-HVR1 antibodies can interfere with a protective humoral response against HCV infection. IMPORTANCE HVR1 contributes to persistent infection by evolving mutations that escape from neutralizing antibodies to HVR1 and by shielding broadly neutralizing antibodies from

  5. Generalized platform for antibody detection using the antibody catalyzed water oxidation pathway.

    PubMed

    Welch, M Elizabeth; Ritzert, Nicole L; Chen, Hongjun; Smith, Norah L; Tague, Michele E; Xu, Youyong; Baird, Barbara A; Abruña, Héctor D; Ober, Christopher K

    2014-02-01

    Infectious diseases, such as influenza, present a prominent global problem including the constant threat of pandemics that initiate in avian or other species and then pass to humans. We report a new sensor that can be specifically functionalized to detect antibodies associated with a wide range of infectious diseases in multiple species. This biosensor is based on electrochemical detection of hydrogen peroxide generated through the intrinsic catalytic activity of all antibodies: the antibody catalyzed water oxidation pathway (ACWOP). Our platform includes a polymer brush-modified surface where specific antibodies bind to conjugated haptens with high affinity and specificity. Hydrogen peroxide provides an electrochemical signal that is mediated by Resorufin/Amplex Red. We characterize the biosensor platform, using model anti-DNP antibodies, with the ultimate goal of designing a versatile device that is inexpensive, portable, reliable, and fast. We demonstrate detection of antibodies at concentrations that fall well within clinically relevant levels. PMID:24410628

  6. Enzyme-linked immunospecific antibody test for detecting antibody to Klebsiella.

    PubMed

    Rissing, J P; Buxton, T B; Moore, W L; Ozawa, T; Moore, W L

    1978-12-01

    The enzyme-linked immunospecific antibody test was performed in standard test tubes and microtiter plates to meausre high-titer antibody against Klebsiella capsular polysaccharide. Initial studies were conducted with rabbit sera; other studies were conducted with the serum of a patient infected with type 9 Klebsiella. Both immunized rabbits and an infected patient disclosed high titers of anticapsular antibody. Control sera from other immunized rabbits and other infected humans failed to show this substantial antibody titer against type 9 Klebsiella. Comparisons between counterimmunoelectrophoresis and indirect immunofluorescence disclosed that the sensitivity of the enzyme-linked immunospecific antibody test for anti-Klebsiella antibody ranged between 400 and 10,000 times that of these tests. PMID:370145

  7. Enzyme-linked immunospecific antibody test for detecting antibody to Klebsiella.

    PubMed Central

    Rissing, J P; Buxton, T B; Moore, W L; Ozawa, T; Moore, W L

    1978-01-01

    The enzyme-linked immunospecific antibody test was performed in standard test tubes and microtiter plates to meausre high-titer antibody against Klebsiella capsular polysaccharide. Initial studies were conducted with rabbit sera; other studies were conducted with the serum of a patient infected with type 9 Klebsiella. Both immunized rabbits and an infected patient disclosed high titers of anticapsular antibody. Control sera from other immunized rabbits and other infected humans failed to show this substantial antibody titer against type 9 Klebsiella. Comparisons between counterimmunoelectrophoresis and indirect immunofluorescence disclosed that the sensitivity of the enzyme-linked immunospecific antibody test for anti-Klebsiella antibody ranged between 400 and 10,000 times that of these tests. PMID:370145

  8. Antibody Fc: Linking Adaptive and Innate Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Reichert, Janice M.

    2014-01-01

    Antibody Fc: Linking Adaptive and Innate Immunity, edited by Margaret E. Ackerman and Falk Nimmerjahn and published by Academic Press, provides a highly detailed examination of the involvement of the antibody Fc in mechanisms critical to both innate and adaptive immune responses. Despite a recent increase in format diversity, most marketed antibodies are full-length IgG molecules and the majority of the commercial clinical pipeline of antibody therapeutics is composed of Fc-containing IgG molecules, which underscores the importance of understanding how the Fc domain affects biological responses. The book is divided into six sections that include a total of 20 chapters. In order of their appearance, the sections provide extensive coverage of effector mechanisms, effector cells, Fc receptors, variability of the Fc domain, genetic associations, and evolving areas.

  9. Broadly neutralizing antibodies against influenza viruses

    PubMed Central

    Laursen, Nick S.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2014-01-01

    Despite available antivirals and vaccines, influenza infections continue to be a major cause of mortality worldwide. Vaccination generally induces an effective, but strain-specific antibody response. As the virus continually evolves, new vaccines have to be administered almost annually when a novel strain becomes dominant. Furthermore, the sporadic emerging resistance to neuraminidase inhibitors among circulating strains suggests an urgent need for new therapeutic agents. Recently, several cross-reactive antibodies have been described, which neutralize an unprecedented spectrum of influenza viruses. These broadly neutralizing antibodies generally target conserved functional regions on the major influenza surface glycoprotein hemagglutinin (HA). The characterization of their neutralization breadth and epitopes on HA could stimulate the development of new antibody-based antivirals and broader influenza vaccines. PMID:23583287

  10. Gut Microbial Metabolites Fuel Host Antibody Responses.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myunghoo; Qie, Yaqing; Park, Jeongho; Kim, Chang H

    2016-08-10

    Antibody production is a metabolically demanding process that is regulated by gut microbiota, but the microbial products supporting B cell responses remain incompletely identified. We report that short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), produced by gut microbiota as fermentation products of dietary fiber, support host antibody responses. In B cells, SCFAs increase acetyl-CoA and regulate metabolic sensors to increase oxidative phosphorylation, glycolysis, and fatty acid synthesis, which produce energy and building blocks supporting antibody production. In parallel, SCFAs control gene expression to express molecules necessary for plasma B cell differentiation. Mice with low SCFA production due to reduced dietary fiber consumption or microbial insufficiency are defective in homeostatic and pathogen-specific antibody responses, resulting in greater pathogen susceptibility. However, SCFA or dietary fiber intake restores this immune deficiency. This B cell-helping function of SCFAs is detected from the intestines to systemic tissues and conserved among mouse and human B cells, highlighting its importance. PMID:27476413

  11. Antibodies as Mediators of Brain Pathology.

    PubMed

    Brimberg, Lior; Mader, Simone; Fujieda, Yuichiro; Arinuma, Yoshiyuki; Kowal, Czeslawa; Volpe, Bruce T; Diamond, Betty

    2015-11-01

    The brain is normally sequestered from antibody exposure by the blood brain barrier. However, antibodies can access the brain during fetal development before the barrier achieves full integrity, and in disease states when barrier integrity is compromised. Recent studies suggest that antibodies contribute to brain pathology associated with autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus and neuromyelitis optica, and can lead to transient or permanent behavioral or cognitive abnormalities. We review these findings here and examine the circumstances associated with antibody entry into the brain, the routes of access and the mechanisms that then effect pathology. Understanding these processes and the nature and specificity of neuronal autoantibodies may reveal therapeutic strategies toward alleviating or preventing the neurological pathologies and behavioral abnormalities associated with autoimmune disease. PMID:26494046

  12. How Is Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... signs of internal bleeding and when to seek emergency care. (For more information, go to "Living With Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome." ) Treatment During Pregnancy Pregnant women who have APS can have successful ...

  13. Antibodies as Mediators of Brain Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Brimberg, Lior; Mader, Simone; Fujieda, Yuichiro; Arinuma, Yoshiyuki; Kowal, Czeslawa; Volpe, Bruce T.; Diamond, Betty

    2016-01-01

    The brain is normally sequestered from antibody exposure by the blood brain barrier. However, antibodies can access the brain during fetal development before the barrier achieves full integrity, and in disease states when barrier integrity is compromised. Recent studies suggest that antibodies contribute to brain pathology associated with autoimmune diseases such as systemic lupus erythematosus and neuromyelitis optica, and can lead to transient or permanent behavioral or cognitive abnormalities. We review these findings here and examine the circumstances associated with antibody entry into the brain, the routes of access and the mechanisms that then effect pathology. Understanding these processes and the nature and specificity of neuronal autoantibodies may reveal therapeutic strategies toward alleviating or preventing the neurological pathologies and behavioral abnormalities associated with autoimmune disease. PMID:26494046

  14. Antibody deficiency in Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome.

    PubMed

    Herriot, R; Miedzybrodzka, Z

    2016-03-01

    The developmental disorder Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome (RTS) is frequently complicated by recurrent respiratory infections. In many cases this is likely to be the result of microaspiration or gastro-oesophageal reflux but, in a proportion, underlying antibody deficiency is a potentially modifiable susceptibility factor for infection. Relatively subtle, specific defects of pneumococcal antibody production have previously been described in the context of RTS. Here, we report a rare association between the syndrome and an overt, major primary antibody deficiency disorder (common variable immune deficiency) which was successfully managed with immunoglobulin replacement therapy. Early recognition and investigation for antibody deficiency associated with RTS allied to effective and optimized treatment are essential to minimize morbidity and mortality and improve quality and duration of life. PMID:26307339

  15. Brain-Reactive Antibodies and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Diamond, B.; Honig, G.; Mader, S.; Brimberg, L.; Volpe, B.T.

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune diseases currently affect 5–7% of the world's population; in most diseases there are circulating autoantibodies. Brain-reactive antibodies are present in approximately 2–3% of the general population but do not usually contribute to brain pathology. These antibodies penetrate brain tissue only early in development or under pathologic conditions. This restriction on their pathogenicity and the lack of correlation between serum titers and brain pathology have, no doubt, contributed to a delayed appreciation of the contribution of autoantibodies in diseases of the central nervous system. Nonetheless, it is increasingly clear that antibodies can cause damage in the brain and likely initiate or aggravate multiple neurologic conditions; brain-reactive antibodies contribute to symptomatology in autoimmune disease, infectious disease, and malignancy. PMID:23516983

  16. New haptens and antibodies for ractopamine.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhanhui; Liu, Meixuan; Shi, Weimin; Li, Chenglong; Zhang, Suxia; Shen, Jianzhong

    2015-09-15

    In this work, three unreported immunizing haptens of ractopamine (RAC) were synthesized and used to produce highly sensitive and specific polyclonal antibody. The spacer arms of haptens for coupling to protein carrier were located on different position of RAC with different length. High affinity polyclonal antibodies were obtained and characterized in terms of titer and sensitivity by using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The best antibody employed in a heterologous competitive ELISA exhibited an IC50 value as low as 0.12ngmL(-1) and could not recognize other 10 β-agonists including clenbuterol and salbutamol. The heterologous competitive ELISA was preliminary applied to swine urine and the results showed the new antibody was sufficiently sensitive and specific, and potentially used for the detection of RAC at trace level in real samples. PMID:25863617

  17. Polynucleotides encoding anti-sulfotyrosine antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Bertozzi, Carolyn R.; Kehoe, John; Bradbury, Andrew M.

    2011-01-11

    The invention provides anti-sulfotyrosine specific antibodies capable of detecting and isolating polypeptides that are tyrosine-sulfated. The sulfotyrosine antibodies and antibody fragments of the invention may be used to discriminate between the non-sulfated and sulfated forms of such proteins, using any number of immunological assays, such ELISAs, immunoblots, Western Blots, immunoprecipitations, and the like. Using a phage-display system, single chain antibodies (scFvs) were generated and screened against tyrosine-sulfated synthetic peptide antigens, resulting in the isolation of scFvs that specifically recognize sulfotyrosine-containing peptides and/or demonstrate sulfotyrosine-specific binding in tyrosine sulfated proteins. The VH and VL genes from one such sulfotyrosine-specific scFv were employed to generate a full length, sulfotyrosine-specific immunoglobulin.

  18. Antibody conjugates with unnatural amino acids.

    PubMed

    Hallam, Trevor J; Wold, Erik; Wahl, Alan; Smider, Vaughn V

    2015-06-01

    Antibody conjugates are important in many areas of medicine and biological research, and antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) are becoming an important next generation class of therapeutics for cancer treatment. Early conjugation technologies relied upon random conjugation to multiple amino acid side chains, resulting in heterogeneous mixtures of labeled antibody. Recent studies, however, strongly support the notion that site-specific conjugation produces a homogeneous population of antibody conjugates with improved pharmacologic properties over randomly coupled molecules. Genetically incorporated unnatural amino acids (uAAs) allow unique orthogonal coupling strategies compared to those used for the 20 naturally occurring amino acids. Thus, uAAs provide a novel paradigm for creation of next generation ADCs. Additionally, uAA-based site-specific conjugation could also empower creation of additional multifunctional conjugates important as biopharmaceuticals, diagnostics, or reagents. PMID:25898256

  19. Chemical biology: How to minimalize antibodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rader, Christoph

    2015-02-01

    The success of antibodies as pharmaceuticals has triggered interest in crafting much smaller mimics. A crucial step forward has been taken with the chemical synthesis of small molecules that recruit immune cells to attack cancer cells.

  20. Immunoglobulin Classification Using the Colored Antibody Graph.

    PubMed

    Bonissone, Stefano R; Pevzner, Pavel A

    2016-06-01

    The somatic recombination of V, D, and J gene segments in B-cells introduces a great deal of diversity, and divergence from reference segments. Many recent studies of antibodies focus on the population of antibody transcripts that show which V, D, and J gene segments have been favored for a particular antigen, a repertoire. To properly describe the antibody repertoire, each antibody must be labeled by its constituting V, D, and J gene segment, a task made difficult by somatic recombination and hypermutation events. While previous approaches to repertoire analysis were based on sequential alignments, we describe a new de Bruijn graph-based algorithm to perform VDJ labeling and benchmark its performance. PMID:27149636

  1. Deep sequencing and human antibody repertoire analysis.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Scott D; Crowe, James E

    2016-06-01

    In the past decade, high-throughput DNA sequencing (HTS) methods and improved approaches for isolating antigen-specific B cells and their antibody genes have been applied in many areas of human immunology. This work has greatly increased our understanding of human antibody repertoires and the specific clones responsible for protective immunity or immune-mediated pathogenesis. Although the principles underlying selection of individual B cell clones in the intact immune system are still under investigation, the combination of more powerful genetic tracking of antibody lineage development and functional testing of the encoded proteins promises to transform therapeutic antibody discovery and optimization. Here, we highlight recent advances in this fast-moving field. PMID:27065089

  2. Comparison of nephelometric and hemolytic techniques for determination of antistreptolysin O antibodies.

    PubMed

    Pacifico, L; Mancuso, G; Properzi, E; Ravagnan, G; Pasquino, A M; Chiesa, C

    1995-04-01

    The sensitivity of a newly devised nephelometric method for determining antistreptolysin O antibodies was compared with the hemolytic inhibition assay. Three hundred-thirty single serum samples from children with and without evidence of group A streptococcal infection were analyzed by the two techniques. The nephelometric method results correlated well with those of the reference test (concordance: r = 0.88). Furthermore, 134 pairs of acute and convalescent phase sera from patients with culture-proven GAS infection and 50 pairs from children who served as control subjects were examined. The nephelometric assay was more sensitive in detecting significant ASO antibody rises than the hemolytic assay. The automated nephelometric method appears to be a much simpler and sensitive procedure for testing ASO antibodies. PMID:7726133

  3. Vitamin A and Retinoic Acid in the Regulation of B-Cell Development and Antibody Production

    PubMed Central

    Ross, A. Catharine; Chen, Qiuyan; Ma, Yifan

    2013-01-01

    Signaling by vitamin A through its active metabolite retinoic acid (RA) is critical for the normal development and functions of the hematopoietic and immune systems. B cells, as both factories for antibody production and part of the immune regulatory system, are critical to a successful vaccination response. RA is a factor in the development and competence of mature B cells, in B cell proliferation, and in the regulation of transcription factors associated with B cell differentiation, class switch recombination, and the generation of antibody-secreting plasma cells. Emerging evidence suggests that RA can function alone and in combination with other immune system stimuli to augment the formation of germinal centers, leading to increased primary and secondary antibody responses. Taken together, RA could be a useful component in vaccine strategies and/or for immunotherapy. PMID:21419269

  4. Autoimmune Hepatitis with Anti Centromere Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Lodh, Moushumi; Pradhan, Debkant; Parida, Ashok

    2013-01-01

    We present the case report of a 49-year-old type 2 diabetes mellitus patient presenting with abdominal pain and black stool for 15 days. A proper workup of laboratory investigations helped us diagnose autoimmune hepatitis with anticentromere antibodies. The authors would like to highlight that screening AIH patients for anticentromere antibody is not mandatory but can be considered, especially in the presence of disease-related symptomatology for quicker, more accurate diagnosis and optimum management. PMID:25379307

  5. History and Practice: Antibodies in Infectious Diseases.

    PubMed

    Hey, Adam

    2015-04-01

    Antibodies and passive antibody therapy in the treatment of infectious diseases is the story of a treatment concept which dates back more than 120 years, to the 1890s, when the use of serum from immunized animals provided the first effective treatment options against infections with Clostridium tetani and Corynebacterium diphtheriae. However, after the discovery of penicillin by Fleming in 1928, and the subsequent introduction of the much cheaper and safer antibiotics in the 1930s, serum therapy was largely abandoned. However, the broad and general use of antibiotics in human and veterinary medicine has resulted in the development of multi-resistant strains of bacteria with limited to no response to existing treatments and the need for alternative treatment options. The combined specificity and flexibility of antibody-based treatments makes them very valuable tools for designing specific antibody treatments to infectious agents. These attributes have already caused a revolution in new antibody-based treatments in oncology and inflammatory diseases, with many approved products. However, only one monoclonal antibody, palivizumab, for the prevention and treatment of respiratory syncytial virus, is approved for infectious diseases. The high cost of monoclonal antibody therapies, the need for parallel development of diagnostics, and the relatively small markets are major barriers for their development in the presence of cheap antibiotics. It is time to take a new and revised look into the future to find appropriate niches in infectious diseases where new antibody-based treatments or combinations with existing antibiotics, could prove their value and serve as stepping stones for broader acceptance of the potential for and value of these treatments. PMID:26104697

  6. Broadening Horizons: New Antibodies Against Influenza.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Katherine J L; Boyd, Scott D

    2016-07-28

    Seasonal influenza vaccine formulation efforts struggle to keep up with viral antigenic variation. Two studies now report engineered or naturally occurring human antibodies targeting the influenza hemagglutinin (HA) stem, with exceptional neutralizing breadth (Joyce et al., 2016; Kallewaard et al., 2016). Antibodies with similar structural features are elicited in multiple subjects, suggesting that modified vaccine regimens could provide broad protection. PMID:27471961

  7. Indirect hemagglutination test for chlamydial antibodies.

    PubMed

    Lewis, V J; Thacker, W L; Engelman, H M

    1972-07-01

    An indirect hemagglutination (IHA) test is described for chlamydial antibodies in psittacosis diagnostic sera; for this test tanned sheep erythrocytes sensitized with a deoxycholate extract of Chlamydia psittaci grown in Vero cell monolayers were used. Adaptation of the IHA test to the Microtiter system decreased sensitivity; nevertheless, the Microtiter-IHA test was more sensitive than the complement fixation test. Lymphogranuloma venereum antibodies also were detected by using antigen extracted from C. psittaci. PMID:4626906

  8. Generation of novel recombinant antibodies against nitrotyrosine by antibody phage display.

    PubMed

    Hof, Danielle; Cooksley-Decasper, Seraina; Moergeli, Sandra; von Eckardstein, Arnold

    2011-01-01

    Nitrotyrosine is a posttranslational protein modification that occurs under oxidative and nitrosative stress, and plays an important role in numerous pathological conditions. To analyse nitrotyrosine formation several commercial monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies reacting with 3-nitrotyrosine have been developed which however do not work properly in all required assays. Here, antibody phage display was used to select recombinant antibodies that specifically react with nitrotyrosine in various protein contexts. Nine initial selections were carried out, using synthetic peptides, peroxynitrite-modified proteins and conjugated proteins as antigens. Four antibodies were isolated that each exhibited a characteristic binding reactivity that greatly depended on the antigens that were used for their selections. In general, the selections using small, synthetic and biotinylated peptides were the most successful approach. Subsequently, antibody 11B1 was affinity matured by error prone mutagenesis, resulting in the isolation of two antibodies, designated 47A7 and 47B1. Competition ELISA and immunoblotting after treatment with sodium dithionite further demonstrated the specificity of antibody 47B1 for nitrotyrosine. The results presented here demonstrate that antibody phage display is a useful method to isolate antibodies against posttranslational modifications, which are powerful tools in the proteomic era. PMID:21558620

  9. Competitive exclusion by autologous antibodies can prevent broad HIV-1 antibodies from arising

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Shishi; Perelson, Alan S.

    2015-08-31

    The past decade has seen the discovery of numerous broad and potent monoclonal antibodies against HIV type 1 (HIV-1). Eliciting these antibodies via vaccination appears to be remarkably difficult, not least because they arise late in infection and are highly mutated relative to germline antibody sequences. Here, using a computational model, we show that broad antibodies could in fact emerge earlier and be less mutated, but that they may be prevented from doing so as a result of competitive exclusion by the autologous antibody response. We further find that this competitive exclusion is weaker in infections founded by multiple distinct strains, with broadly neutralizing antibodies emerging earlier than in infections founded by a single strain. Our computational model simulates coevolving multitype virus and antibody populations. Broadly neutralizing antibodies may therefore be easier for the adaptive immune system to generate than previously thought. As a result, if less mutated broad antibodies exist, it may be possible to elicit them with a vaccine containing a mixture of diverse virus strains.

  10. Competitive exclusion by autologous antibodies can prevent broad HIV-1 antibodies from arising

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Shishi; Perelson, Alan S.

    2015-01-01

    The past decade has seen the discovery of numerous broad and potent monoclonal antibodies against HIV type 1 (HIV-1). Eliciting these antibodies via vaccination appears to be remarkably difficult, not least because they arise late in infection and are highly mutated relative to germline antibody sequences. Here, using a computational model, we show that broad antibodies could in fact emerge earlier and be less mutated, but that they may be prevented from doing so as a result of competitive exclusion by the autologous antibody response. We further find that this competitive exclusion is weaker in infections founded by multiple distinct strains, with broadly neutralizing antibodies emerging earlier than in infections founded by a single strain. Our computational model simulates coevolving multitype virus and antibody populations. Broadly neutralizing antibodies may therefore be easier for the adaptive immune system to generate than previously thought. If less mutated broad antibodies exist, it may be possible to elicit them with a vaccine containing a mixture of diverse virus strains. PMID:26324897

  11. Competitive exclusion by autologous antibodies can prevent broad HIV-1 antibodies from arising

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Luo, Shishi; Perelson, Alan S.

    2015-08-31

    The past decade has seen the discovery of numerous broad and potent monoclonal antibodies against HIV type 1 (HIV-1). Eliciting these antibodies via vaccination appears to be remarkably difficult, not least because they arise late in infection and are highly mutated relative to germline antibody sequences. Here, using a computational model, we show that broad antibodies could in fact emerge earlier and be less mutated, but that they may be prevented from doing so as a result of competitive exclusion by the autologous antibody response. We further find that this competitive exclusion is weaker in infections founded by multiple distinctmore » strains, with broadly neutralizing antibodies emerging earlier than in infections founded by a single strain. Our computational model simulates coevolving multitype virus and antibody populations. Broadly neutralizing antibodies may therefore be easier for the adaptive immune system to generate than previously thought. As a result, if less mutated broad antibodies exist, it may be possible to elicit them with a vaccine containing a mixture of diverse virus strains.« less

  12. Boosting antibody developability through rational sequence optimization

    PubMed Central

    Seeliger, Daniel; Schulz, Patrick; Litzenburger, Tobias; Spitz, Julia; Hoerer, Stefan; Blech, Michaela; Enenkel, Barbara; Studts, Joey M; Garidel, Patrick; Karow, Anne R

    2015-01-01

    The application of monoclonal antibodies as commercial therapeutics poses substantial demands on stability and properties of an antibody. Therapeutic molecules that exhibit favorable properties increase the success rate in development. However, it is not yet fully understood how the protein sequences of an antibody translates into favorable in vitro molecule properties. In this work, computational design strategies based on heuristic sequence analysis were used to systematically modify an antibody that exhibited a tendency to precipitation in vitro. The resulting series of closely related antibodies showed improved stability as assessed by biophysical methods and long-term stability experiments. As a notable observation, expression levels also improved in comparison with the wild-type candidate. The methods employed to optimize the protein sequences, as well as the biophysical data used to determine the effect on stability under conditions commonly used in the formulation of therapeutic proteins, are described. Together, the experimental and computational data led to consistent conclusions regarding the effect of the introduced mutations. Our approach exemplifies how computational methods can be used to guide antibody optimization for increased stability. PMID:25759214

  13. Working towards a consensus for antibody validation.

    PubMed

    Reiss, Peter D; Min, Danxi; Leung, Mei Y

    2014-01-01

    Commercial research antibodies are the most commonly used product in the life science tools market, and their applications represent a significant investment of time and resources for researchers. Frequently however, the quality of antibodies does not meet the expectations of consumers, causing loss of valuable time and money. This can delay research efforts and scientific discovery, or even lead to false, irreproducible results to be published in the scientific literature. This raises the question of whether there should be universal standards for validating antibodies.   During the 1 (st) International Antibody Validation Forum, hosted by St John's Laboratory Ltd on October 15 (th) 2014 at Queen Mary University of London, scientists from academia and industry presented data highlighting quality issues arising from lack of antibody validation. While the forum identified significant current problems in the antibody market, it also discussed future opportunities for improved quality and transparency by encouraging data disclosure and data sharing. This article highlights the key issues and conclusions reached at the forum. PMID:25580232

  14. Allosteric antibody inhibition of human hepsin protease.

    PubMed

    Koschubs, Tobias; Dengl, Stefan; Dürr, Harald; Kaluza, Klaus; Georges, Guy; Hartl, Christiane; Jennewein, Stefan; Lanzendörfer, Martin; Auer, Johannes; Stern, Alvin; Huang, Kuo-Sen; Packman, Kathryn; Gubler, Ueli; Kostrewa, Dirk; Ries, Stefan; Hansen, Silke; Kohnert, Ulrich; Cramer, Patrick; Mundigl, Olaf

    2012-03-15

    Hepsin is a type II transmembrane serine protease that is expressed in several human tissues. Overexpression of hepsin has been found to correlate with tumour progression and metastasis, which is so far best studied for prostate cancer, where more than 90% of such tumours show this characteristic. To enable improved future patient treatment, we have developed a monoclonal humanized antibody that selectively inhibits human hepsin and does not inhibit other related proteases. We found that our antibody, hH35, potently inhibits hepsin enzymatic activity at nanomolar concentrations. Kinetic characterization revealed non-linear, slow, tight-binding inhibition. This correlates with the crystal structure we obtained for the human hepsin-hH35 antibody Fab fragment complex, which showed that the antibody binds hepsin around α3-helix, located far from the active centre. The unique allosteric mode of inhibition of hH35 is distinct from the recently described HGFA (hepatocyte growth factor activator) allosteric antibody inhibition. We further explain how a small change in the antibody design induces dramatic structural rearrangements in the hepsin antigen upon binding, leading to complete enzyme inactivation. PMID:22132769

  15. Decay of maternal antibodies in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Gharaibeh, Saad; Mahmoud, Kamel

    2013-09-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the decay rate of maternal antibodies against major broiler chicken pathogens. A total of 30 one-day-old broiler chicks were obtained from a commercial hatchery and reared in isolation. These chicks were retrieved from a parent flock that received a routine vaccination program. Chicks were bled at hatch and sequentially thereafter every 5 d through 30 d of age. Maternal antibody titers were measured by ELISA for avian encephalomyelitis (AEV), avian influenza virus (AIV), chicken anemia virus (CAV), infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV), infectious bronchitis virus (IBV), infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV), Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG), Mycoplasma synoviae (MS), and reovirus (Reo). Maternal antibody titers for Newcastle disease virus (NDV) were measured using a hemagglutination inhibition test. Half-life estimates of maternal antibody titers were 5.3, 4.2, 7, 5.1, 3.9, 3.8, 4.9, 4.1, 6.3, and 4.7 d for AEV, AIV, CAV, IBDV, IBV, ILTV, MG, MS, NDV, and Reo, respectively. The statistical analysis revealed significant differences among half-lives of maternal antibody titers against certain pathogens. Furthermore, all maternal antibody titers were depleted by 10 d of age except for IBDV. PMID:23960115

  16. Delivery of antibodies to the cytosol

    PubMed Central

    Marschall, Andrea LJ; Zhang, Congcong; Frenzel, André; Schirrmann, Thomas; Hust, Michael; Perez, Franck; Dübel, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    The use of antibodies to target their antigens in living cells is a powerful analytical tool for cell biology research. Not only can molecules be localized and visualized in living cells, but interference with cellular processes by antibodies may allow functional analysis down to the level of individual post-translational modifications and splice variants, which is not possible with genetic or RNA-based methods. To utilize the vast resource of available antibodies, an efficient system to deliver them into the cytosol from the outside is needed. Numerous strategies have been proposed, but the most robust and widely applicable procedure still remains to be identified, since a quantitative ranking of the efficiencies has not yet been done. To achieve this, we developed a novel efficiency evaluation method for antibody delivery based on a fusion protein consisting of a human IgG1 Fc and the recombination enzyme Cre (Fc-Cre). Applied to suitable GFP reporter cells, it allows the important distinction between proteins trapped in endosomes and those delivered to the cytosol. Further, it ensures viability of positive cells and is unsusceptible to fixation artifacts and misinterpretation of cellular localization in microscopy and flow cytometry. Very low cytoplasmic delivery efficiencies were found for various profection reagents and membrane penetrating peptides, leaving electroporation as the only practically useful delivery method for antibodies. This was further verified by the successful application of this method to bind antibodies to cytosolic components in living cells. PMID:24848507

  17. Quality control of antibodies for assay development.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Sarah; Seitz, Harald

    2016-09-25

    Antibodies are used as powerful tools in basic research, for example, in biomarker identification, and in various forms for diagnostics, for example, identification of allergies or autoimmune diseases. Due to their robustness and ease of handling, immunoassays are favourite methods for investigation of various biological or medical questions. Nevertheless in many cases, additional analyses such as mass spectrometry are used to validate or confirm the results of immunoassays. To minimize the workload and to increase confidence in immunoassays, there are urgent needs for antibodies which are both highly specific and well validated. Unfortunately many commercially available antibodies are neither well characterized nor fully tested for cross-reactivities. Adequate quality control and validation of an antibody is time-consuming and can be frustrating. Such validation needs to be performed for every assay/application. However, where an antibody validation is successful, a highly specific and stable reagent will be on hand. This article describes the validation processes of antibodies, including some often neglected factors, as well as unspecific binding to other sample compounds in a multiparameter diagnostic assay. The validation consists of different immunological methods, with important assay controls, and is performed in relation to the development of a diagnostic test. PMID:26873787

  18. Monoclonal antibodies in acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Susan; Ravandi, Farhad; Kantarjian, Hagop

    2015-01-01

    With modern intensive combination polychemotherapy, the complete response (CR) rate in adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is 80% to 90%, and the cure rate is 40% to 50%. Hence, there is a need to develop effective salvage therapies and combine novel agents with standard effective chemotherapy. ALL leukemic cells express several surface antigens amenable to target therapies, including CD20, CD22, and CD19. Monoclonal antibodies target these leukemic surface antigens selectively and minimize off-target toxicity. When added to frontline chemotherapy, rituximab, an antibody directed against CD20, increases cure rates of adults with Burkitt leukemia from 40% to 80% and those with pre-B ALL from 35% to 50%. Inotuzumab ozogamicin, a CD22 monoclonal antibody bound to calicheamicin, has resulted in marrow CR rates of 55% and a median survival of 6 to 7 months when given to patients with refractory-relapsed ALL. Blinatumomab, a biallelic T cell engaging the CD3-CD19 monoclonal antibody, also resulted in overall response rates of 40% to 50% and a median survival of 6.5 months in a similar refractory-relapsed population. Other promising monoclonal antibodies targeting CD20 (ofatumumab and obinutuzumab) or CD19 or CD20 and bound to different cytotoxins or immunotoxins are under development. Combined modalities of chemotherapy and the novel monoclonal antibodies are under investigation. PMID:25999456

  19. Antinuclear antibodies in patients on anticonvulsant therapy

    PubMed Central

    Alarcón-Segovia, D.; Fishbein, Eugenia; Reyes, P. A.; Díes, H.; Shwadsky, S.

    1972-01-01

    Antinuclear antibodies to calf thymus nuclei, NP, DNA, sDNA, sNP and Sm antigen were investigated in sera from 170 patients on various programmes of prolonged anticonvulsant treatment. Findings were compared to those on 214 tuberculous patients on isoniazid, 109 SLE patients and 66 healthy subjects. Patients on anticonvulsants had a significantly higher incidence of ANA to DNA, sDNA, sNP and Sm antigen than the controls but had a lower incidence of ANA to all antigens, except sNP, than the SLE patients. Patients on isoniazid did not have DNA antibodies, but had antibodies to whole nuclei and to NP which were practically absent in the anticonvulsant group. Of all patients on anticonvulsants only those receiving hydantoins had ANA to Sm antigen, while those receiving only primidone had antibodies to sNP but no antibodies to DNA. Alteration of sNP with isoniazid did not result in an increased incidence of ANA in the anticonvulsant group as it does in isoniazid treated subjects. It is concluded that the SLE-activating properties of diverse anticonvulsants probably resides in their potential to induce ANA. Although all anticonvulsants elicit ANA directed primarily to sNP, each may do so by different mechanisms or by altering different sites in the sNP molecule. The mechanisms by which anticonvulsant and isoniazid intake results in ANA probably differ. Presence of DNA antibodies in some patients on anticonvulsants may indicate that their convulsions were due to SLE. PMID:4117275

  20. Bispecific antibody mimicking factor VIII.

    PubMed

    Nogami, Keiji

    2016-05-01

    There are some issues in the current factor (F)VIII replacement therapy for severe hemophilia A. One is mental and physical burden for the multiple intravenous infusions, and the other is difficulty in the hemostatic treatment for the patients with FVIII inhibitor. The development of novel drug with fully hemostatic effect, simply procedure, and long-acting reaction has been expected. Recently, FVIIIa-mimicking humanized recombinant bispecific antibody (ACE910) against FIXa and FX was developed. In the non-human clinical study, primate model of acquired hemophilia A demonstrated that the ACE910 was effective on both on-going and spontaneous bleedings. A phase I clinical study was conducted in healthy adults by single subcutaneous infusion of ACE910, followed by the patients' part study, Japanese patients with severe hemophilia A without or with inhibitor were treated with once-weekly subcutaneous injection of ACE910 at three dose levels for 12 successive weeks. There was no significant adverse event related to ACE910 in the clinical and laboratorial findings, and t1/2 of ACE910 was ∼30 days. The median annual bleeding rates were reduced very markedly dose-dependently, independently of inhibitor. Furthermore, among the patients with dose escalation, bleeding rate was decreased as ACE910 dose was increased. In conclusion, ACE910 would have a number of promising features: its high subcutaneous bioavailability and long half-life make the patients possible to be injected subcutaneously with a once-a-week or less frequency. In addition, ACE910 would provide the bleeding prophylactic efficacy, independently of inhibitor. PMID:27207420

  1. Antibody responses of swine following infection with Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, M. hyorhinis, M. hyosynoviae and M. flocculare.

    PubMed

    Gomes Neto, João Carlos; Strait, Erin L; Raymond, Matthew; Ramirez, Alejandro; Minion, F Chris

    2014-11-01

    Several mycoplasma species possessing a range of virulence have been described in swine. The most commonly described are Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae, Mycoplasma hyorhinis, Mycoplasma hyosynoviae, and Mycoplasma flocculare. They are ubiquitious in many pig producing areas of the world, and except for M. hyopneumoniae, commercial antibody-based assays are lacking for most of these. Antibody cross-reactivity among these four mycoplasma species is not well characterized. Recently, the use of pen-based oral fluids for herd surveillance is of increasing interest. Thus, this study sought to measure pig antibody responses and the level of cross-reactivity in serum and pen-based oral fluids after challenge with four species of swine mycoplasmas. Four groups of four mycoplasma-free growing pigs were separately inoculated with the different mycoplasma species. Pen-based oral fluids and serum samples were collected weekly until necropsy. Species-specific Tween 20 ELISAs were used to measure antibody responses along with four other commercial M. hyopneumoniae ELISAs. Animals from all groups seroconverted to the challenge species of mycoplasma and no evidence of cross-contamination was observed. A delayed antibody response was seen with all but M. hyorhinis-infected pigs. Cross-reactive IgG responses were detected in M. hyopneumoniae- and M. flocculare-infected animals by the M. hyorhinis Tween 20 ELISA, while sera from M. hyosynoviae and M. flocculare-infected pigs were positive in one commercial assay. In pen-based oral fluids, specific anti-M. hyopneumoniae IgA responses were detected earlier after infection than serum IgG responses. In summary, while some antibody-based assays may have the potential for false positives, evidence of this was observed in the current study. PMID:25240775

  2. Avian Diagnostic and Therapeutic Antibodies to Viral Emerging Pathogens

    SciTech Connect

    David Bradley

    2011-03-31

    During the current period the following key objectives were achieved: demonstration of high titer antibody production by geese following immunization with inactived H1N1 virus; completion of the epitope mapping of West Nile Virus-specific goose antibodies and initiation of epitope mapping of H1N1 flu-specific goose antibodies; advancement in scalable purification of goose antibodies.

  3. 21 CFR 866.5100 - Antinuclear antibody immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Antinuclear antibody immunological test system....5100 Antinuclear antibody immunological test system. (a) Identification. An antinuclear antibody... the autoimmune antibodies in serum, other body fluids, and tissues that react with cellular...

  4. Elemental evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlowicz, Michael

    He set out to prove that ocean sediments contain elevated levels of the rare element iridium because of the natural weathering of the continents. Instead, what Ariel Anbar found was new evidence that a meteorite may have had a role in the mass extinctions that marked the end of the Cretaceous era.By studying the geochemical properties of iridium, Anbar, a professor of earth and environmental sciences and chemistry at the University of Rochester, found that the residence time—a measure of the rate at which an element settles out of water into sediments—of iridium in ocean water is 2000 to 20,000 years. That finding suggests that a large deposit of iridium could have lingered in the world's oceans long enough to explain the thickness of the iridium-rich sediment layers at the K-T boundary.

  5. Fishy evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adding to the ongoing debate over the mass extinctions that marked the end of the Cretaceous period, a paleontologist from Purdue University recently uncovered a bed of 65-million-year old fish bones that bears the fingerprints of a meteorite impact. Gathering the fossils from Seymour Island, near the Antarctic Peninsula, William Zinsmeister discovered what he has termed a "horizon of death," a 12-square-kilometer bone bed resting just above a layer of iridium. The element is rare on Earth but common to most meteorites.The Purdue professor of geosciences believes the site provides strong evidence that the impact of an extraterrestrial object played at least some part in the mass extinctions that marked the end of the Cretaceous.

  6. Ex vivo and in vivo capture and deactivation of circulating tumor cells by dual-antibody-coated nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jingjing; Gao, Yu; Zhao, Rongli; Sinko, Patrick J; Gu, Songen; Wang, Jichuang; Li, Yuanfang; Lu, Yusheng; Yu, Suhong; Wang, Lie; Chen, Shuming; Shao, Jingwei; Jia, Lee

    2015-07-10

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have been detected by us and others in cancer patient blood. However, little is known about how to specifically capture and deactivate CTCs in vivo, which may lead to successful metastasis prevention in asymptomatic cancer survivors after surgery. We hypothesize that the dual antibody conjugates may have the advantage of capturing CTCs specifically over their single antibody counterparts. Here we show that the surface-functionalized dendrimers can be sequentially coated with two antibodies directed to surface biomarkers (EpCAM and Slex) of human colorectal CTCs. The dual antibody-coated dendrimers exhibit a significantly enhanced specificity in capturing CTCs in the presence of interfering blood cells, and in both eight-patient bloods and nude mice administered with the labeled CTCs in comparison to their single antibody-coated counterparts. The dual antibody-coated conjugates down-regulate the captured CTCs. This study provides the first conceptual evidence that two antibodies can be biocompatibly conjugated to a nanomaterial to capture and down-regulate CTCs in vivo with the enhanced specificity. PMID:25933713

  7. Localization of intrinsic factor and complement fixing intrinsic factor–intrinsic factor antibody complex in parietal cell of man

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Elizabeth; Glass, G. B. J.

    1971-01-01

    In an attempt to localize intrinsic factor in the human parietal cell, and to study its intracellular union with the intrinsic factor antibody and complement, intrinsic factor antibody was separated from coexisting parietal cell antibody in pernicious anaemia sera by gel filtration. Intrinsic factor antibody of both `binding' and `blocking' type was also produced in rabbits by immunization with semi-purified human intrinsic factor–[57Co]B12 complex. Intrinsic factor antibody obtained from both sources produced fluorescence in the human parietal cells in the indirect Coons' test in the presence of fluoresceinated anti-human IgG. The fluorescence was localized peripherally, at the cell membrane. When instead of the fluoresceinated anti-human IgG a fluoresceinated anti-human complement (C) serum and normal complement containing serum were used, intrinsic factor antibody from both sources produced fluorescence of the entire parietal cell cytoplasm of the human mucosa. Thus, intrinsic factor was localized at highest concentration at the membrane of the parietal cell in man, the intrinsic factor antibody–intrinsic factor complex was demonstrated within the human parietal cell, and evidence was obtained that this antigen–antibody complex fixes complement (C). The possible role of the intrinsic factor–intrinsic factor antibody–complement complex in the development of gastric atrophy in pernicious anaemia has been considered. ImagesFIG. 3FIG. 4FIG. 5 PMID:4995933

  8. Antibody responses to Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax blood-stage and sporozoite antigens in the postpartum period

    PubMed Central

    McLean, Alistair R. D.; Boel, Machteld E.; McGready, Rose; Ataide, Ricardo; Drew, Damien; Tsuboi, Takafumi; Beeson, James G.; Nosten, François; Simpson, Julie A.; Fowkes, Freya J. I.

    2016-01-01

    During pregnancy a variety of immunological changes occur to accommodate the fetus. It is unknown whether these changes continue to affect humoral immunity postpartum or how quickly they resolve. IgG levels were measured to P. falciparum and P. vivax antigens in 201 postpartum and 201 controls over 12 weeks. Linear mixed-effects models assessed antibody maintenance over time and the effect of microscopically confirmed Plasmodium spp. infection on antibody levels, and whether this was different in postpartum women compared with control women. Postpartum women had reduced Plasmodium spp. antibody levels compared to controls at baseline. Over 12 weeks, mean antibody levels in postpartum women increased to levels observed in control women. Microscopically confirmed P. falciparum and P. vivax infections during follow-up were associated with an increase in species-specific antibodies with similar magnitudes of boosting observed in postpartum and control women. Antibodies specific for pregnancy-associated, VAR2CSA-expressing parasites did not rapidly decline postpartum and did not boost in response to infection in either postpartum or control women. After pregnancy, levels of malaria-specific antibodies were reduced, but recovered to levels seen in control women. There was no evidence of an impaired ability to mount a boosting response in postpartum women. PMID:27558000

  9. Antibody responses to Plasmodium falciparum and Plasmodium vivax blood-stage and sporozoite antigens in the postpartum period.

    PubMed

    McLean, Alistair R D; Boel, Machteld E; McGready, Rose; Ataide, Ricardo; Drew, Damien; Tsuboi, Takafumi; Beeson, James G; Nosten, François; Simpson, Julie A; Fowkes, Freya J I

    2016-01-01

    During pregnancy a variety of immunological changes occur to accommodate the fetus. It is unknown whether these changes continue to affect humoral immunity postpartum or how quickly they resolve. IgG levels were measured to P. falciparum and P. vivax antigens in 201 postpartum and 201 controls over 12 weeks. Linear mixed-effects models assessed antibody maintenance over time and the effect of microscopically confirmed Plasmodium spp. infection on antibody levels, and whether this was different in postpartum women compared with control women. Postpartum women had reduced Plasmodium spp. antibody levels compared to controls at baseline. Over 12 weeks, mean antibody levels in postpartum women increased to levels observed in control women. Microscopically confirmed P. falciparum and P. vivax infections during follow-up were associated with an increase in species-specific antibodies with similar magnitudes of boosting observed in postpartum and control women. Antibodies specific for pregnancy-associated, VAR2CSA-expressing parasites did not rapidly decline postpartum and did not boost in response to infection in either postpartum or control women. After pregnancy, levels of malaria-specific antibodies were reduced, but recovered to levels seen in control women. There was no evidence of an impaired ability to mount a boosting response in postpartum women. PMID:27558000

  10. Suitability of Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor α7 and Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptor 3 Antibodies for Immune Detection: Evaluation in Murine Skin.

    PubMed

    Rommel, Frank R; Raghavan, Badrinarayanan; Paddenberg, Renate; Kummer, Wolfgang; Tumala, Susanne; Lochnit, Günter; Gieler, Uwe; Peters, Eva M J

    2015-05-01

    Recent evidence reveals a crucial role for acetylcholine and its receptors in the regulation of inflammation, particularly of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor α7 (Chrna7) and muscarinic acetylcholine receptor 3 (Chrm3). Immunohistochemistry is a key tool for their cellular localization in functional tissues. We evaluated nine different commercially available antibodies on back skin tissue from wild-type (Wt) and gene-deficient (KO) mice. In the immunohistochemical analysis, we focused on key AChR-ligand sensitive skin cells (mast cells, nerve fibers and keratinocytes). All five antibodies tested for Chrm3 and the first three Chrna7 antibodies stained positive in both Wt and respective KO skin. With the 4th antibody (ab23832) nerve fibers were unlabeled in the KO mice. By western blot analysis, this antibody detected bands in both Wt and Chrna7 KO skin and brain. qRT-PCR revealed mRNA amplification with a primer set for the undeleted region in both Wt and KO mice, but none with a primer set for the deleted region in KO mice. By 2D electrophoresis, we found β-actin and β-enolase cross reactivity, which was confirmed by double immunolabeling. In view of the present results, the tested antibodies are not suitable for immunolocalization in skin and suggest thorough control of antibody specificity is required if histomorphometry is intended. PMID:25673288

  11. RA8, A human anti-CD25 antibody against human treg cells

    SciTech Connect

    Arias, Robyn; Flanagan, Meg; Miller, Keith D.; Nien, Yu-Chih; Hu, Peisheng; Gray, Dixon; Khawli, Leslie A.; Epstein, Alan L.

    2007-06-01

    Although anti-CD25 antibodies exist for clinical use in patients, there is a need for the development of a human Treg antibody that will abrogate the immunosuppressive function of this small but critical T cell subtype. Based upon mounting evidence that the level of Treg cells in the tumor microenvironment correlates with clinical prognosis and stage in man, it appears that Treg cells play an important role in the tumor's ability to overcome host immune responses. In mice, the rat anti-mouse CD25 antibody PC61 causes depletion of CD25-bearing Treg cells both peripherally in lymphatic tissues and in the tumor microenvironment, without inducing symptoms of autoimmunity. A similar antibody, though with the ability to delete Treg cells specifically, would be an important new tool for reversing tumor escape associated with Treg immunosuppression in man. To begin to generate such a reagent, we now describe the development of a human anti-CD25 antibody using a novel yeast display library. The target antigen CD25-Fc was constructed and used for five rounds of selection using a non-immune yeast display library that contained as many as 109 single chain variable fragments (scFv). Two unique clones with low KD values (RA4 and RA8) were then selected to construct fully human anti-CD25 antibodies (IgG1/kappa) for stable expression. One antibody, RA8, showed excellent binding to human CD25+ cell lines and to human Treg cells and appears to be an excellent candidate for the generation of a human reagent that may be used in man for the immunotherapy of cancer.

  12. Generation and characterization of novel conformation-specific monoclonal antibodies for α-synuclein pathology.

    PubMed

    Vaikath, Nishant N; Majbour, Nour K; Paleologou, Katerina E; Ardah, Mustafa T; van Dam, Esther; van de Berg, Wilma D J; Forrest, Shelley L; Parkkinen, Laura; Gai, Wei-Ping; Hattori, Nobutaka; Takanashi, Masashi; Lee, Seung-Jae; Mann, David M A; Imai, Yuzuru; Halliday, Glenda M; Li, Jia-Yi; El-Agnaf, Omar M A

    2015-07-01

    α-Synuclein (α-syn), a small protein that has the intrinsic propensity to aggregate, is implicated in several neurodegenerative diseases including Parkinson's disease (PD), dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), and multiple system atrophy (MSA), which are collectively known as synucleinopathies. Genetic, pathological, biochemical, and animal modeling studies provided compelling evidence that α-syn aggregation plays a key role in the pathogenesis of PD and related synucleinopathies. It is therefore of utmost importance to develop reliable tools that can detect the aggregated forms of α-syn. We describe here the generation and characterization of six novel conformation-specific monoclonal antibodies that recognize specifically α-syn aggregates but not the soluble, monomeric form of the protein. The antibodies described herein did not recognize monomers or fibrils generated from other amyloidogenic proteins including β-syn, γ-syn, β-amyloid, tau protein, islet amyloid polypeptide and ABri. Interestingly, the antibodies did not react to overlapping linear peptides spanning the entire sequence of α-syn, confirming further that they only detect α-syn aggregates. In immunohistochemical studies, the new conformation-specific monoclonal antibodies showed underappreciated small micro-aggregates and very thin neurites in PD and DLB cases that were not observed with generic pan antibodies that recognize linear epitope. Furthermore, employing one of our conformation-specific antibodies in a sandwich based ELISA, we observed an increase in levels of α-syn oligomers in brain lysates from DLB compared to Alzheimer's disease and control samples. Therefore, the conformation-specific antibodies portrayed herein represent useful tools for research, biomarkers development, diagnosis and even immunotherapy for PD and related pathologies. PMID:25937088

  13. Antibodies against high-risk human papillomavirus proteins as markers for invasive cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Combes, Jean-Damien; Pawlita, Michael; Waterboer, Tim; Hammouda, Doudja; Rajkumar, Thangarajan; Vanhems, Philippe; Snijders, Peter; Herrero, Rolando; Franceschi, Silvia; Clifford, Gary

    2014-11-15

    Different human papillomavirus (HPV) genes are expressed during the various phases of the HPV life cycle and may elicit immune responses in the process towards malignancy. To evaluate their association with cervical cancer, antibodies against proteins from HPV16 (L1, E1, E2, E4, E6 and E7) and HPV18/31/33/35/45/52/58 (L1, E6 and E7) were measured in serum of 307 invasive cervical cancer cases and 327 controls from Algeria and India. Antibody response was evaluated using a glutathione S-transferase-based multiplex serology assay and HPV DNA detected from exfoliated cervical cells using a GP5+/6+-mediated PCR assay. Among HPV16 DNA-positive cases, seroprevalence of HPV16 antibodies ranged from 16% for HPV16 E1 to 50% for HPV16 E6 and all were significantly higher than controls. Seroprevalence of E6, E7 and L1 antibodies for HPV18 and for at least one of HPV31/33/35/45/52/58 were also higher in cases positive for DNA of the corresponding type (50% and 30% for E6 of HPV18 and HPV31/33/35/45/52/58 combined, respectively). E6 and E7 antibodies were rarely found in controls, but cross-reactivity was evident among cancer cases positive for DNA of closely phylogenetically-related HPV types. E6 or E7 antibodies against any of the eight HPV types were detected in 66.1% of all cervical cancer cases, as compared to 10.1% of controls. E6, and to a lesser extent E7, antibodies appear to be specific markers of HPV-related malignancy. However, even among cases positive for the same type of HPV DNA, approximately one-third of cervical cancer cases show no detectable immune response to either E6 or E7. PMID:24729277

  14. Antibodies against "DANGER" in the dynamic of post-transplant circulation.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, Michiko

    2013-01-01

    Evidence that has accumulated about the impact of non-human leukocyte antigen (HLA) antibodies against tissue-restricted antigens supports the concept that humoral targets can be constantly altered by transplant-associated stresses such as ischemia-reperfusion (IR) injury, organ preservation, immunosuppressive drugs, and pre-existing diseases. This accounts for the growing interest in "danger" signals--in the form of damage-induced molecules--expanding our understanding of the humoral cause of allograft rejection and failure from thinking it is caused only by genetically determined HLA mismatches to seeing the role played by antibody recognition of antigens modified posttransplant. The heterogeneous repertoire of antibodies was evidenced by the recent protein microarray analysis that revealed increased posttransplant levels of heterogeneous antibodies against the targets localized in specific kidney compartments. Antibodies can also be developed against molecules dynamically generated in the circulation as damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) that are the endogenous version of exogenous pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). Antibodies against some DAMP molecules have been identified in many autoimmune diseases, but mostly have been elusive in transplant immunology. Those humoral DAMP targets include the well-studied high-mobility group box 1, IR injury-induced proteins, and oxidation-specific epitopes exposed on oxidized low-density lipoprotein. Moreover, understanding the intersection of endogenous DAMPs and exogenous PAMPs in transplant immunology may reveal a new aspect of humoral reactions. Recently reported cross-recognition by polyreactive antibodies of apoptotic cells may be one of many unidentified recognition patterns that indicate existence of an immune system strategy for defending against a number of stress-induced targets as a set of "danger." Given all these findings, the recent approach of identifying disease-specific panels of up

  15. [Current situations and the future prospect of monoclonal antibody products].

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Teruhide

    2014-01-01

    Monoclonal antibody products and monoclonal antibody-based biopharmaceuticals have shown considerable effectiveness in the treatment for variety of diseases; cancer, auto-immune/auto-inflammation diseases and so on. Significant advance in monoclonal antibody products for cancer treatments was made with antibody-drug conjugates (ADC), and antibodies for blockade of immune checkpoints. Already 3 ADCs and 2 anti-immune-checkpoint antibodies products have been approved, and these monoclonal antibody-related product pipelines reach over 30. On the other hand, EU approved first monoclonal-antibody biosimilar, RemsimaTM (infliximab), suggesting that other monoclonal-antibody biosmilars will follow to the market. In this paper, several new issues about monoclonal antibody products will be discussed. PMID:25707201

  16. IgM and IgG antibodies to hepatitis C virus in patients with mixed cryoglobulinaemia.

    PubMed Central

    L'Abbate, A; Cutrupi, S; Rognetta, M; Fabiano, C; Craxi, A

    1993-01-01

    To assess the relationship between hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and essential mixed cryoglobulinaemia (EMC), sera from 23 patients with EMC were tested for IgG and IgM antibodies to HCV antigens and for HCV RNA. Quantitative HCV antibody studies were performed on serum and purified cryoglobulin fractions. HCV antibodies of both IgG and IgM class were found in 22 (96%) patients. Ten of these were also HCV-RNA positives. Higher titres of anti-HCV IgM were present in the 11 patients with evidence of liver damage. Anti-HCV IgG antibodies were shown to be concentrated in the IgG fraction of cryoglobulins in all eight patients studied. These results strongly suggest a role for HCV in the pathogenesis of EMC. PMID:7693384

  17. Antibody validation of immunohistochemistry for biomarker discovery: Recommendations of a consortium of academic and pharmaceutical based histopathology researchers

    PubMed Central

    Howat, William J.; Lewis, Arthur; Jones, Phillipa; Kampf, Caroline; Pontén, Fredrik; van der Loos, Chris M.; Gray, Neil; Womack, Chris; Warford, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    As biomarker discovery takes centre-stage, the role of immunohistochemistry within that process is increasing. At the same time, the number of antibodies being produced for “research use” continues to rise and it is important that antibodies to be used as biomarkers are validated for specificity and sensitivity before use. This guideline seeks to provide a stepwise approach for the validation of an antibody for immunohistochemical assays, reflecting the views of a consortium of academic and pharmaceutical based histopathology researchers. We propose that antibodies are placed into a tier system, level 1–3, based on evidence of their usage in immunohistochemistry, and that the degree of validation required is proportionate to their place on that tier. PMID:24525140

  18. Antibody validation of immunohistochemistry for biomarker discovery: recommendations of a consortium of academic and pharmaceutical based histopathology researchers.

    PubMed

    Howat, William J; Lewis, Arthur; Jones, Phillipa; Kampf, Caroline; Pontén, Fredrik; van der Loos, Chris M; Gray, Neil; Womack, Chris; Warford, Anthony

    2014-11-01

    As biomarker discovery takes centre-stage, the role of immunohistochemistry within that process is increasing. At the same time, the number of antibodies being produced for "research use" continues to rise and it is important that antibodies to be used as biomarkers are validated for specificity and sensitivity before use. This guideline seeks to provide a stepwise approach for the validation of an antibody for immunohistochemical assays, reflecting the views of a consortium of academic and pharmaceutical based histopathology researchers. We propose that antibodies are placed into a tier system, level 1-3, based on evidence of their usage in immunohistochemistry, and that the degree of validation required is proportionate to their place on that tier. PMID:24525140

  19. Selection and maturation of antibodies by phage display through fusion to pIX.

    PubMed

    Tornetta, Mark; Reddy, Ramachandra; Wheeler, John C

    2012-09-01

    Antibody discovery and optimization by M13 phage display have evolved significantly over the past twenty years. Multiple methods of antibody display and selection have been developed - direct display on pIII or indirect display through a Cysteine disulfide linkage or a coiled-coil adapter protein. Here we describe display of Fab libraries on the smaller pIX protein at the opposite end of the virion and its application to discovery of novel antibodies from naive libraries. Antibody selection based on pIX-mediated display produces results comparable to other in vitro methods and uses an efficient direct infection of antigen-bound phages, eliminating any chemical dissociation step(s). Additionally, some evidence suggests that pIX-mediated display can be more efficient than pIII-mediated display in affinity selections. Functional assessment of phage-derived antibodies can be hindered by insufficient affinities or lack of epitopic diversity. Here we describe an approach to managing primary hits from our Fab phage libraries into epitope bins and subsequent high-throughput maturation of clones to isolate epitope- and sequence-diverse panels of high affinity binders. Use of the Octet biosensor was done to examine Fab binding in a facile label-free method and determine epitope competition groups. A receptor extracellular domain and chemokine were subjected to this method of binning and affinity maturation. Parental clones demonstrated improvement in affinity from 1-100nM to 10-500pM. PMID:22841960

  20. The prevalence of antiphospholipid antibody syndrome among systemic lupus erythematosus patients.

    PubMed

    McMahon, M A; Keogan, M; O'Connell, P; Kearns, G

    2006-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease characterised by excess autoantibody production. It typically affects women of childbearing age. Antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APLAs) is associated with serious co-morbidity to mother and child characterized by recurrent vascular thrombosis and/or pregnancy associated morbidity. We reviewed SLE patients attending a specialist connective tissue disease clinic both to assess the occurrence of APLAs and its clinical presentations and to audit the effectiveness of screening for APL antibodies in a specialist clinic. 204 patients attended the newly established connective tissue disease outpatient clinic over a twenty-seven month period; 42 (34 female, 8 male) with a diagnosis of SLE. Ten patients (24%), eight female and 2 male with a median age of 38.5 years (range 20 to 64 years) fulfilled the ACR criteria for secondary APLAs (Table 2). The commonest clinical presentation was pulmonary embolus (five patients). Overall 37 patients (88%) with SLE were screened for APLAs during the study period: 94% of females and 62.5% of males were screened (for anticardiolipin antibodies, lupus anticoagulant or both), 27% had evidence of APLAs, 24% had positive antibodies but were asymptomatic. There is a significant occurrence of APLAs among SLE patients. Given the important clinical implications of this disorder including substantial risk of fetal loss and patient morbidity or mortality, routine screening of all SLE patients for APL antibodies is recommended. PMID:17274170

  1. Plasmodium malaria and antimalarial antibodies in the first year of life.

    PubMed

    Dobbs, Katherine R; Dent, Arlene E

    2016-02-01

    Malaria is one of the most serious infectious diseases with most of the severe disease caused by Plasmodium falciparum (Pf). Naturally acquired immunity develops over time after repeated infections and the development of antimalarial antibodies is thought to play a crucial role. Neonates and young infants are relatively protected from symptomatic malaria through mechanisms that are poorly understood. The prevailing paradigm is that maternal antimalarial antibodies transferred to the fetus in the last trimester of pregnancy protect the infant from early infections. These antimalarial antibodies wane by approximately 6 months of age leaving the infant vulnerable to malaria, however direct evidence supporting this epidemiologically based paradigm is lacking. As infants are the target population for future malaria vaccines, understanding how they begin to develop immunity to malaria and the gaps in their responses is key. This review summarizes the antimalarial antibody responses detected in infants and how they change over time. We focus primarily on Pf antibody responses and will briefly mention Plasmodium vivax responses in infants. PMID:26743626

  2. Prevalence of antibodies against hepatitis E virus among urban and rural populations in Venezuela.

    PubMed

    Pujol, F H; Favorov, M O; Marcano, T; Esté, J A; Magris, M; Liprandi, F; Khudyakov, Y E; Khudyakova, N S; Fields, H A

    1994-03-01

    Antibodies against hepatitis E virus (HEV) were detected in sera by a synthetic peptide-based enzyme immunoassay (EIA) from different populations in Venezuela. Antibodies against HEV were found in 1.6% (3/184) of urban pregnant woman (Caracas), in 3.9% (8/204) of rural populations (San Camilo, Edo Apure), and in 5.4% (12/223) of rural Amerindians (Padamo, Edo Amazonas). Positivity was confirmed by a neutralization EIA based on the use of competing soluble free peptides. The prevalence of antibodies in the Amerindian group was significantly higher than in urban pregnant women. No relation was found between age and HEV prevalence in rural populations. Three of 21 positive sera were also weakly positive by Western blot for IgM antibodies. This result, together with the low optical density values observed by EIA, suggested that the presence of antibodies in these sera reflects past infections. Based on these results, Venezuela does not seem to be highly endemic for hepatitis E. This is the first report of serological evidence of infection by HEV in South America. PMID:8006635

  3. The antibody paradox: trying on a pair of genes.

    PubMed

    Fleischman, J B

    1985-01-01

    Rodney Porter's separation of antibody molecules into Fab and Fc fragments engendered the notion that a single antibody polypeptide chain might be coded by two or more genes. This concept profoundly influenced the development of molecular immunology over the past 25 years. Our current knowledge of antibody gene organization has enabled investigators to recombine antibody genes to create 'chimeric' antibodies with a number of potentially useful applications. PMID:3938300

  4. An Unusual Case of Anti-GBM Antibody Elevation in HIV-Associated Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Makary, Raafat; Poenariu, Andreea

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. The most commonly seen glomerular disease in HIV infected patients is HIV-associated nephropathy (HIVAN); however, a multitude of other nephropathies can occur in HIV infection with an almost equal cumulative frequency. We report an unusual case of a patient with clinical and histological evidence of HIVAN in which the diagnosis was initially confounded by the finding of an elevated serum anti-glomerular basement membrane (anti-GBM) antibody. Case Presentation. We present a case of a 27-year-old African American female with a history of schizophrenia, cocaine abuse, and HIV infection who upon admission to our hospital was found to have severe acute kidney injury requiring hemodialysis. Urine studies revealed nephrotic range proteinuria and a serological workup was positive for anti-GBM antibody elevation with a value of 91 units (normal: 0–20 units). A renal biopsy revealed HIVAN with no evidence of crescentic glomerulonephritis or anti-GBM disease. Conclusion. This case highlights the need for careful interpretation of anti-GBM antibody tests in HIV infected patients with kidney disease and, in particular, the need for biopsy confirmation of the diagnosis prior to starting therapy. More research is needed to study the prognostic correlation between the degree of anti-GBM antibody elevation in HIVAN and disease severity. PMID:24995137

  5. Interfacial dilatational deformation accelerates particle formation in monoclonal antibody solutions.

    PubMed

    Lin, Gigi L; Pathak, Jai A; Kim, Dong Hyun; Carlson, Marcia; Riguero, Valeria; Kim, Yoen Joo; Buff, Jean S; Fuller, Gerald G

    2016-04-14

    Protein molecules are amphiphilic moieties that spontaneously adsorb at the air/solution (A/S) interface to lower the surface energy. Previous studies have shown that hydrodynamic disruptions to these A/S interfaces can result in the formation of protein aggregates that are of concern to the pharmaceutical industry. Interfacial hydrodynamic stresses encountered by protein therapeutic solutions under typical manufacturing, filling, and shipping conditions will impact protein stability, prompting a need to characterize the contribution of basic fluid kinematics to monoclonal antibody (mAb) destabilization. We demonstrate that dilatational surface deformations are more important to antibody stability when compared to constant-area shear of the A/S interface. We have constructed a dilatational interfacial rheometer that utilizes simultaneous pressure and bubble shape measurements to study the mechanical stability of mAbs under interfacial aging. It has a distinct advantage over methods utilizing the Young-Laplace equation, which incorrectly describes viscoelastic interfaces. We provide visual evidence of particle ejection from dilatated A/S interfaces and spectroscopic data of ejected mAb particles. These rheological studies frame a molecular understanding of the protein-protein interactions at the complex-fluid interface. PMID:26891116

  6. Tumor size: effect on monoclonal antibody uptake in tumor models

    SciTech Connect

    Hagan, P.L.; Halpern, S.E.; Dillman, R.O.; Shawler, D.L.; Johnson, D.E.; Chen, A.; Krishnan, L.; Frincke, J.; Bartholomew, R.M.; David, G.S.

    1986-03-01

    Studies were performed to determine the effect of tumor size on the incorporation of radiolabeled monoclonal antitumor antibodies (MoAbs) into human tumors growing in nude mice. The colon tumors ranged in size from 0.03-1.6 g, the melanoma from 0.1 to 6.7 g, and the lymphoma from 0.06 to 10.2 g. Indium-111 was primarily used as the radiolabel, however, both 125I and 111In were used as tracers for the MoAb in one experiment. The per g radiopharmaceutical uptake by tumors was inversely proportional to tumor size when tumor specific MoAb was administered. This finding was independent of the radiolabel and was demonstrable when the mice bore two tumors of differing size. When the MoAb was not specific for the tumor, the data were less well defined and a statistically significant correlation with size did not occur. These data are strong evidence for a decrease in per g uptake of labeled tumor specific antibodies as tumors increase in size.

  7. Tregalizumab – A Monoclonal Antibody to Target Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    König, Martin; Rharbaoui, Faiza; Aigner, Silke; Dälken, Benjamin; Schüttrumpf, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) represent a subpopulation of CD4+ T cells, which are essential for the maintenance of immunological tolerance. The absence or dysfunction of Tregs can lead to autoimmunity and allergies. The restoration of functional Tregs and/or Treg cell numbers represents a novel and attractive approach for the treatment of autoimmune diseases, e.g., rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The CD4 cell surface receptor is a target for modulation of T cell function. Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against CD4 have previously been tested for the treatment of autoimmune diseases, including RA. Furthermore, in model systems, anti-CD4 antibodies are able to induce tolerance and mediate immunomodulatory effects through a variety of mechanisms. Despite the availability of innovative and effective therapies for RA, many patients still have persistently active disease or experience adverse events that can limit use. A growing body of evidence suggests that Treg modulation could offer a new therapeutic strategy in RA and other autoimmune disorders. Here, we describe tregalizumab (BT-061), which is a novel, non-depleting IgG1 mAb that binds to a unique epitope of CD4. Tregalizumab represents the first humanized anti-CD4 mAb that selectively induces Treg activation. PMID:26834751

  8. Which Antibody Functions are Important for an HIV Vaccine?

    PubMed Central

    Su, Bin; Moog, Christiane

    2014-01-01

    HIV antibody (Ab) functions capable of preventing mucosal cell-free or cell-to-cell HIV transmission are critical for the development of effective prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines. In addition to CD4+ T cells, other potential HIV-target cell types including antigen-presenting cells (APCs) (dendritic cells, macrophages) residing at mucosal sites are infected. Moreover, the interactions between APCs and HIV lead to HIV cell-to-cell transmission. Recently discovered broadly neutralizing antibodies (NAbs) are able to neutralize a broad spectrum of HIV strains, inhibit cell-to-cell transfer, and efficiently protect from infection in the experimentally challenged macaque model. However, the 31% protection observed in the RV144 vaccine trial in the absence of detectable NAbs in blood samples pointed to the possible role of additional Ab inhibitory functions. Increasing evidence suggests that IgG Fcγ receptor (FcγR)-mediated inhibition of Abs present at the mucosal site may play a role in protection against HIV mucosal transmission. Moreover, mucosal IgA Abs may be determinant in protection against HIV sexual transmission. Therefore, defining Ab inhibitory functions that could lead to protection is critical for further HIV vaccine design. Here, we review different inhibitory properties of HIV-specific Abs and discuss their potential role in protection against HIV sexual transmission. PMID:24995008

  9. Paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration with anti-Yo antibodies - a review.

    PubMed

    Venkatraman, Anand; Opal, Puneet

    2016-08-01

    The ataxic syndrome associated with Anti-Yo antibody, or Purkinje cell cytoplasmic antibody type 1 (PCA1), is the most common variant of paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration (PCD). The typical presentation involves the subacute development of pancerebellar deficits with a clinical plateau within 6 months. The vast majority of cases have been reported in women with pelvic or breast tumors. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain is often normal in the early stages, with cerebellar atrophy seen later. The underlying mechanism is believed to be an immunological reaction to cerebellar degeneration-related protein 2 (CDR2), a protein usually found in the cerebellum that is ectopically produced by tumor cells. Although both B- and T-cell abnormalities are seen, there is debate about the relative importance of the autoantibodies and cytotoxic T lymphocytes in the neuronal loss. Cerebrospinal fluid abnormalities, primarily elevated protein, lymphocytic pleocytosis, and oligoclonal bands, are common in the early stages. The low prevalence of this condition has not allowed for large-scale randomized controlled trials. Immunotherapies, such as steroids, intravenous immune globulins, and plasma exchange, have been extensively used in managing this condition, with limited success. Although some reports indicate benefit from antitumor therapies like surgery and chemotherapy, this has not been consistently observed. The prognosis for anti-Yo PCD is almost uniformly poor, with most patients left bedridden. Further studies are required to clarify the pathophysiology and provide evidence-based treatment options. PMID:27606347

  10. Antibody-based Protein Profiling of the Human Chromosome 21*

    PubMed Central

    Uhlén, Mathias; Oksvold, Per; Älgenäs, Cajsa; Hamsten, Carl; Fagerberg, Linn; Klevebring, Daniel; Lundberg, Emma; Odeberg, Jacob; Pontén, Fredrik; Kondo, Tadashi; Sivertsson, Åsa

    2012-01-01

    The Human Proteome Project has been proposed to create a knowledge-based resource based on a systematical mapping of all human proteins, chromosome by chromosome, in a gene-centric manner. With this background, we here describe the systematic analysis of chromosome 21 using an antibody-based approach for protein profiling using both confocal microscopy and immunohistochemistry, complemented with transcript profiling using next generation sequencing data. We also describe a new approach for protein isoform analysis using a combination of antibody-based probing and isoelectric focusing. The analysis has identified several genes on chromosome 21 with no previous evidence on the protein level, and the isoform analysis indicates that a large fraction of human proteins have multiple isoforms. A chromosome-wide matrix is presented with status for all chromosome 21 genes regarding subcellular localization, tissue distribution, and molecular characterization of the corresponding proteins. The path to generate a chromosome-specific resource, including integrated data from complementary assay platforms, such as mass spectrometry and gene tagging analysis, is discussed. PMID:22042635

  11. IgM anti-idiotypes that block anti-HLA antibodies: naturally occurring or immune antibodies?

    PubMed Central

    Urlacher, A; Tongio, M M; Pasquali, J L

    1991-01-01

    Using dithiothreitol (DTT) technique, IgM anti-HLA anti-idiotypic antibodies were detected in a multiparous multitransfused woman. These antibodies were able to inhibit the binding of specific IgG anti-HLA antibodies on their corresponding antigen. The recognized determinants were cross-reactive determinants since they were partially found on anti-HLA antibodies from unrelated individuals. By studying the patient's sera over a period of 2 years, no IgM-IgG switch was observed but the presence of these antibodies was stable in time, despite the disappearance of the idiotypes (anti-HLA antibodies). However, when looking at the patient's earlier serum, it was shown that these IgM anti-idiotypic antibodies were absent from the first available serum. Thus, these anti-idiotypic antibodies seem to behave both like natural and immune antibodies. The incidence of such antibodies in pretransplant patients is discussed. PMID:1703054

  12. A multi-Fc-species system for recombinant antibody production

    PubMed Central

    Moutel, Sandrine; El Marjou, Ahmed; Vielemeyer, Ole; Nizak, Clément; Benaroch, Philippe; Dübel, Stefan; Perez, Franck

    2009-01-01

    Background Genomic, transcriptomic and proteomic projects often suffer from a lack of functional validation creating a strong demand for specific and versatile antibodies. Antibody phage display represents an attractive approach to select rapidly in vitro the equivalent of monoclonal antibodies, like single chain Fv antibodies, in an inexpensive and animal free way. However, so far, recombinant antibodies have not managed to impose themselves as efficient alternatives to natural antibodies. Results We developed a series of vectors that allow one to easily fuse single chain Fv antibodies to Fc domains of immunoglobulins, improving their sensitivity and facilitating their use. This series enables the fusion of single chain Fv antibodies with human, mouse or rabbit Fc so that a given antibody is no longer restricted to a particular species. This opens up unlimited multiplexing possibilities and gives additional value to recombinant antibodies. We also show that this multi-Fc species production system can be applied to natural monoclonal antibodies cloned as single chain Fv antibodies and we converted the widely used 9E10 mouse anti-Myc-tag antibody into a human and a rabbit antibody. Conclusion Altogether, this new expression system, that brings constant quality, sensitivity and unique versatility, will be important to broaden the use of recombinant and natural monoclonal antibodies both for laboratory and diagnosis use. PMID:19245715

  13. Higher cytotoxicity of divalent antibody-toxins than monovalent antibody-toxins

    SciTech Connect

    Won, JaeSeon; Nam, PilWon; Lee, YongChan; Choe, MuHyeon

    2009-04-24

    Recombinant antibody-toxins are constructed via the fusion of a 'carcinoma-specific' antibody fragment to a toxin. Due to the high affinity and high selectivity of the antibody fragments, antibody-toxins can bind to surface antigens on cancer cells and kill them without harming normal cells [L.H. Pai, J.K. Batra, D.J. FitzGerald, M.C. Willingham, I. Pastan, Anti-tumor activities of immunotoxins made of monoclonal antibody B3 and various forms of Pseudomonas exotoxin, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 88 (1991) 3358-3362]. In this study, we constructed the antibody-toxin, Fab-SWn-PE38, with SWn (n = 3, 6, 9) sequences containing n-time repeated (G{sub 4}S) between the Fab fragment and PE38 (38 kDa truncated form of Pseudomonas exotoxin A). The SWn sequence also harbored one cysteine residue that could form a disulfide bridge between two Fab-SWn-PE38 monomers. We assessed the cytotoxicity of the monovalent (Fab-SWn-PE38), and divalent ([Fab-SWn-PE38]{sub 2}) antibody-toxins. The cytotoxicity of the dimer against the CRL1739 cell line was approximately 18.8-fold higher than that of the monomer on the ng/ml scale, which was approximately 37.6-fold higher on the pM scale. These results strongly indicate that divalency provides higher cytotoxicity for an antibody-toxin.

  14. The antibody mining toolbox: an open source tool for the rapid analysis of antibody repertoires.

    PubMed

    D'Angelo, Sara; Glanville, Jacob; Ferrara, Fortunato; Naranjo, Leslie; Gleasner, Cheryl D; Shen, Xiaohong; Bradbury, Andrew R M; Kiss, Csaba

    2014-01-01

    In vitro selection has been an essential tool in the development of recombinant antibodies against various antigen targets. Deep sequencing has recently been gaining ground as an alternative and valuable method to analyze such antibody selections. The analysis provides a novel and extremely detailed view of selected antibody populations, and allows the identification of specific antibodies using only sequencing data, potentially eliminating the need for expensive and laborious low-throughput screening methods such as enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay. The high cost and the need for bioinformatics experts and powerful computer clusters, however, have limited the general use of deep sequencing in antibody selections. Here, we describe the AbMining ToolBox, an open source software package for the straightforward analysis of antibody libraries sequenced by the three main next generation sequencing platforms (454, Ion Torrent, MiSeq). The ToolBox is able to identify heavy chain CDR3s as effectively as more computationally intense software, and can be easily adapted to analyze other portions of antibody variable genes, as well as the selection outputs of libraries based on different scaffolds. The software runs on all common operating systems (Microsoft Windows, Mac OS X, Linux), on standard personal computers, and sequence analysis of 1-2 million reads can be accomplished in 10-15 min, a fraction of the time of competing software. Use of the ToolBox will allow the average researcher to incorporate deep sequence analysis into routine selections from antibody display libraries. PMID:24423623

  15. Passive antibody transfer in chickens to model maternal antibody after avian influenza vaccination.

    PubMed

    Faulkner, Olivia B; Estevez, Carlos; Yu, Qingzhong; Suarez, David L

    2013-04-15

    Birds transfer maternal antibodies (MAb) to their offspring through the egg yolk where the antibody is absorbed and enters the circulatory system. Maternal antibodies provide early protection from disease, but may interfere with the vaccination efficacy in the chick. MAb are thought to interfere with vaccine antigen processing that reduces the subsequent immune response. Once MAb titers are depleted, the chick will respond to vaccination, but they are also susceptible to viral infection. This study examines the effect of MAb on seroconversion to different viral-vectored avian influenza virus (AIV) vaccines. Chicks were given passively transferred antibodies (PTA) using AIV hyperimmunized serum, and subsequently vaccinated with a fowlpox-AIV recombinant vaccine (FPr) or a Newcastle disease virus-AIV recombinant vaccine (NDVr). Our results indicate that passively transferred antibodies led to significant reduction of seroconversion and clinical protection from virulent challenge in recombinant virus vaccinated chicks thus demonstrating maternal antibody interference to vaccination. The passive antibody transfer model system provides an important tool to evaluate maternal antibody interference to vaccination. PMID:23398721

  16. Antibody-Mediated Internalization of Infectious HIV-1 Virions Differs among Antibody Isotypes and Subclasses.

    PubMed

    Tay, Matthew Zirui; Liu, Pinghuang; Williams, LaTonya D; McRaven, Michael D; Sawant, Sheetal; Gurley, Thaddeus C; Xu, Thomas T; Dennison, S Moses; Liao, Hua-Xin; Chenine, Agnès-Laurence; Alam, S Munir; Moody, M Anthony; Hope, Thomas J; Haynes, Barton F; Tomaras, Georgia D

    2016-08-01

    Emerging data support a role for antibody Fc-mediated antiviral activity in vaccine efficacy and in the control of HIV-1 replication by broadly neutralizing antibodies. Antibody-mediated virus internalization is an Fc-mediated function that may act at the portal of entry whereby effector cells may be triggered by pre-existing antibodies to prevent HIV-1 acquisition. Understanding the capacity of HIV-1 antibodies in mediating internalization of HIV-1 virions by primary monocytes is critical to understanding their full antiviral potency. Antibody isotypes/subclasses differ in functional profile, with consequences for their antiviral activity. For instance, in the RV144 vaccine trial that achieved partial efficacy, Env IgA correlated with increased risk of HIV-1 infection (i.e. decreased vaccine efficacy), whereas V1-V2 IgG3 correlated with decreased risk of HIV-1 infection (i.e. increased vaccine efficacy). Thus, understanding the different functional attributes of HIV-1 specific IgG1, IgG3 and IgA antibodies will help define the mechanisms of immune protection. Here, we utilized an in vitro flow cytometric method utilizing primary monocytes as phagocytes and infectious HIV-1 virions as targets to determine the capacity of Env IgA (IgA1, IgA2), IgG1 and IgG3 antibodies to mediate HIV-1 infectious virion internalization. Importantly, both broadly neutralizing antibodies (i.e. PG9, 2G12, CH31, VRC01 IgG) and non-broadly neutralizing antibodies (i.e. 7B2 mAb, mucosal HIV-1+ IgG) mediated internalization of HIV-1 virions. Furthermore, we found that Env IgG3 of multiple specificities (i.e. CD4bs, V1-V2 and gp41) mediated increased infectious virion internalization over Env IgG1 of the same specificity, while Env IgA mediated decreased infectious virion internalization compared to IgG1. These data demonstrate that antibody-mediated internalization of HIV-1 virions depends on antibody specificity and isotype. Evaluation of the phagocytic potency of vaccine

  17. The clinical significance of anticytoplasmic antibodies found on fluorescent antinuclear antibody testing.

    PubMed

    Tesser, J R; Rothberger, H; Agudelo, C

    1983-04-01

    We evaluated anticytoplasmic antibodies (FACA) found on immunofluorescent antinuclear antibody tests (FANA). Of 1830 sera submitted to our laboratory for FANA testing, we found a 2.7% incidence of FACA as compared to a 21.5% incidence of FANA. Patients with FACA had rheumatologic and other systemic diseases closely resembling those present in controls with FANA, indicating that FACA provide a pathologic marker independent of FANA. Among FACA+ patients studied further, 59% were found to have serum antibodies to mitochondrial (Mit) and/or smooth muscle (SMus) antigens, largely in the absence of liver disease. By contrast, sera from FANA+ controls lacked anti-Mit and anti-SMus antibodies, but did contain antibodies to SSA, SSB, dsDNA, Sm, and RNP in much higher frequency than FACA+ sera. PMID:6345769

  18. Platform for high-throughput antibody selection using synthetically-designed antibody libraries.

    PubMed

    Batonick, Melissa; Holland, Erika G; Busygina, Valeria; Alderman, Dawn; Kay, Brian K; Weiner, Michael P; Kiss, Margaret M

    2016-09-25

    Synthetic humanized antibody libraries are frequently generated by random incorporation of changes at multiple positions in the antibody hypervariable regions. Although these libraries have very large theoretical diversities (>10(20)), the practical diversity that can be achieved by transformation of Escherichia coli is limited to about 10(10). To constrain the practical diversity to sequences that more closely mimic the diversity of natural human antibodies, we generated a scFv phage library using entirely pre-defined complementarity determining regions (CDR). We have used this library to select for novel antibodies against four human protein targets and demonstrate that identification of enriched sequences at each of the six CDRs in early selection rounds can be used to reconstruct a consensus antibody with selectivity for the target. PMID:26607994

  19. Antibodies to H5 subtype avian influenza virus and Japanese encephalitis virus in northern pintails (Anas acuta) sampled in Japan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ramey, Andy M.; Spackman, Erica; Yeh, Jung-Yong; Fujita, Go; Konishi, Kan; Reed, John A.; Wilcox, Benjamin R.; Brown, Justin D.; Stallknecht, David E.

    2013-01-01

    Blood samples from 105 northern pintails (Anas acuta) captured on Hokkaido, Japan were tested for antibodies to avian influenza virus (AIV), Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), and West Nile virus (WNV) to assess possible involvement of this species in the spread of economically important and potentially zoonotic pathogens. Antibodies to AIV were detected in 64 of 105 samples (61%). Of the 64 positives, 95% and 81% inhibited agglutination of two different H5 AIV antigens (H5N1 and H5N9), respectively. Antibodies to JEV and WNV were detected in five (5%) and none of the samples, respectively. Results provide evidence for prior exposure of migrating northern pintails to H5 AIV which couldhave implications for viral shedding and disease occurrence. Results also provide evidence for limited involvement of this species in the transmission and spread of flaviviruses during spring migration.

  20. Ability to develop broadly neutralizing HIV-1 antibodies is not restricted by the germline immunoglobulin gene repertoire1

    PubMed Central

    Scheepers, Cathrine; Shrestha, Ram K.; Lambson, Bronwen E.; Jackson, Katherine J. L.; Wright, Imogen A.; Naicker, Dshanta; Goosen, Mark; Berrie, Leigh; Ismail, Arshad; Garrett, Nigel; Karim, Quarraisha Abdool; Karim, Salim S. Abdool; Moore, Penny L.; Travers, Simon A.; Morris, Lynn

    2015-01-01

    The human immunoglobulin repertoire is vast, producing billions of unique antibodies from a limited number of germline immunoglobulin genes. The immunoglobulin heavy chain variable region (IGHV) is central to antigen binding and is comprised of 48 functional genes. Here we analyzed whether HIV-1 infected individuals who develop broadly neutralizing antibodies show a distinctive germline IGHV profile. Using both 454 and Illumina technologies we sequenced the IGHV repertoire of 28 HIV-infected South African women from the Center for the AIDS Programme of Research in South African (CAPRISA) 002 and 004 cohorts, 13 of whom developed broadly neutralizing antibodies. Of the 259 IGHV alleles identified in this study, approximately half were not found in the International Immunogenetics Database (IMGT). This included 85 entirely novel alleles and 38 alleles that matched rearranged sequences in non-IMGT databases. Analysis of the rearranged H chain V region genes of monoclonal antibodies isolated from 7 of the CAPRISA women and previously isolated broadly neutralizing antibodies from other donors provided evidence that at least 8 novel or non-IMGT alleles contributed to functional antibodies. Importantly, we found that despite a wide range in the number of IGHV alleles in each individual, including alleles used by known broadly neutralizing antibodies, there were no significant differences in germline IGHV repertoires between individuals who do and do not develop broadly neutralizing antibodies. This study reports novel IGHV repertoires and highlights the importance of a fully comprehensive immunoglobulin database for germline gene usage prediction. Furthermore, these data suggest a lack of genetic bias in broadly neutralizing antibody development in HIV-1 infection, with implications for HIV vaccine design. PMID:25825450

  1. Prevalence of antileptospiral serum antibodies in dogs in Ireland.

    PubMed

    Schuller, S; Arent, Z J; Gilmore, C; Nally, J

    2015-08-01

    A total of 474 serum samples from client owned Irish dogs were tested for the presence of antibodies to serovars Canicola, Icterohaemorrhagiae, Bratislava, Autumnalis, Pomona, Altodouro, Grippotyphosa, Mozdok, Hardjobovis and Ballum. Six per cent of dogs presented to veterinary practitioners for problems unrelated to leptospirosis showed evidence of prior exposure to leptospiral serovars belonging to the serogropus Ballum, Australis, Pomona and Sejroe. One unvaccinated dog suspected to have leptospirosis showed seroconversion to serogroup Icterohaemorrhagiae. Based on these results the authors conclude that canine exposure to serogroup Ballum should be monitored because dogs may serve as sentinels for this serovar in the environment. Vaccination with multivalent vaccines containing serovar Bratislava in addition to serogroups Icterohaemorrhagiae and Canicola is advisable. PMID:26198210

  2. Monoclonal antibody disulfide reduction during manufacturing

    PubMed Central

    Hutterer, Katariina M.; Hong, Robert W.; Lull, Jonathon; Zhao, Xiaoyang; Wang, Tian; Pei, Rex; Le, M. Eleanor; Borisov, Oleg; Piper, Rob; Liu, Yaoqing Diana; Petty, Krista; Apostol, Izydor; Flynn, Gregory C.

    2013-01-01

    Manufacturing-induced disulfide reduction has recently been reported for monoclonal human immunoglobulin gamma (IgG) antibodies, a widely used modality in the biopharmaceutical industry. This effect has been tied to components of the intracellular thioredoxin reduction system that are released upon cell breakage. Here, we describe the effect of process parameters and intrinsic molecule properties on the extent of reduction. Material taken from cell cultures at the end of production displayed large variations in the extent of antibody reduction between different products, including no reduction, when subjected to the same reduction-promoting harvest conditions. Additionally, in a reconstituted model in which process variables could be isolated from product properties, we found that antibody reduction was dependent on the cell line (clone) and cell culture process. A bench-scale model using a thioredoxin/thioredoxin reductase regeneration system revealed that reduction susceptibility depended on not only antibody class but also light chain type; the model further demonstrates that the trend in reducibility was identical to DTT reduction sensitivity following the order IgG1λ > IgG1κ > IgG2λ > IgG2κ. Thus, both product attributes and process parameters contribute to the extent of antibody reduction during production. PMID:23751615

  3. Single-domain antibodies and their utility.

    PubMed

    Baral, Toya Nath; MacKenzie, Roger; Arbabi Ghahroudi, Mehdi

    2013-01-01

    Engineered monoclonal antibody fragments have gained market attention due to their versatility and tailor-made potential and are now considered to be an important part of future immunobiotherapeutics. Single-domain antibodies (sdAbs), also known as nanobodies, are derived from VHHs [variable domains (V) of heavy-chain-only antibodies (HCAb)] of camelid heavy-chain antibodies. These nature-made sdAbs are well suited for various applications due to their favorable characteristics such as small size, ease of genetic manipulation, high affinity and solubility, overall stability, resistance to harsh conditions (e.g., low pH, high temperature), and low immunogenicity. Most importantly, sdAbs have the feature of penetrating into cavities and recognizing hidden epitopes normally inaccessible to conventional antibodies, mainly due to their protruding CDR3/H3 loops. In this unit, we will present and discuss comprehensive and step-by-step protocols routinely practiced in our laboratory for isolating sdAbs from immunized llamas (or other members of the Camelidae family) against target antigens using phage-display technology. Expression, purification, and characterization of the isolated sdAbs will then be described, followed by presentation of several examples of applications of sdAbs previously characterized in our laboratory and elsewhere. PMID:24510545

  4. Adaptive responses to antibody based therapy.

    PubMed

    Rodems, Tamara S; Iida, Mari; Brand, Toni M; Pearson, Hannah E; Orbuch, Rachel A; Flanigan, Bailey G; Wheeler, Deric L

    2016-02-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) represent a large class of protein kinases that span the cellular membrane. There are 58 human RTKs identified which are grouped into 20 distinct families based upon their ligand binding, sequence homology and structure. They are controlled by ligand binding which activates intrinsic tyrosine-kinase activity. This activity leads to the phosphorylation of distinct tyrosines on the cytoplasmic tail, leading to the activation of cell signaling cascades. These signaling cascades ultimately regulate cellular proliferation, apoptosis, migration, survival and homeostasis of the cell. The vast majority of RTKs have been directly tied to the etiology and progression of cancer. Thus, using antibodies to target RTKs as a cancer therapeutic strategy has been intensely pursued. Although antibodies against the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) have shown promise in the clinical arena, the development of both intrinsic and acquired resistance to antibody-based therapies is now well appreciated. In this review we provide an overview of the RTK family, the biology of EGFR and HER2, as well as an in-depth review of the adaptive responses undertaken by cells in response to antibody based therapies directed against these receptors. A greater understanding of these mechanisms and their relevance in human models will lead to molecular insights in overcoming and circumventing resistance to antibody based therapy. PMID:26808665

  5. Cytolytic antibodies to melanocytes in vitiligo.

    PubMed

    Cui, J; Arita, Y; Bystryn, J C

    1993-06-01

    Patients with vitiligo have been found to have circulating antibodies to pigment cells. To evaluate the functional activity of these antibodies, a highly sensitive europium release assay was used to compare complement-mediated cytolysis of human melanocytes by sera of 56 patients with vitiligo (20 with active disease, 25 with inactive disease, 11 with unidentified disease activity) and 47 control individuals. Significant melanocyte lysis was mediated by 32 (57%) of the patients with vitiligo but by only three (6%) of the control sera (p < 0.001), and by 17 (85%) of 20 patients with active vitiligo versus 11 (44%) of 25 patients with inactive disease (p < 0.025). Mean melanocyte lysis by vitiligo sera was 24% versus 6% by control sera (p < 0.0001). A subset of 12 vitiligo sera with high titers of cytolytic antibodies to melanocytes (34% mean cytolysis) reacted minimally (< 2% mean cytolysis) to a panel of control cells that included human and murine melanomas, human fibroblasts, lung carcinoma, and rhabdomyosarcoma. These findings indicate that antibodies present in patients with vitiligo have the functional ability to selectively kill melanocytes and are more common in active disease. These observations support, but do not prove, the hypothesis that vitiligo is an autoimmune disease and that anti-pigment cell antibodies have a role in inducing the disease. PMID:8496621

  6. 4th European Antibody Congress 2008

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The Fourth European Antibody meeting, organized by Terrapin Ltd., was held in Geneva, a center of the European biopharmaceutical industry. Merck-Serono, NovImmune, Pierre Fabre and Therapeomic are located nearby, as are R&D centers of Boehringer-Ingelheim, Novartis, Roche and Sanofi-Aventis. Over 40 speakers and more than 200 delegates attended the event. Companies represented included Abbott, Ablynx, Adnexus/ BMS, Astra-Zeneca/ CAT/ Medimmune, BiogenIdec, BioRad, Centocor (Johnson & Johnson), Crucell/DSM, Domantis, Dyax, Genmab, Genzyme, Glycart/ Roche, Haptogen, Immunogen, Kyowa-Kirin, LFB, Medarex, Merck-Serono, Micromet, Novartis, Pierre Fabre Laboratories, Roche, Sanofi-Aventis, Seattle-Genetics, Transgene, UCB Celltech and Wyeth. Other attendees included those based in academe or government (University of Amsterdam, University of Zurich, Univeristy Hospital-Lyon, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, INSERM, Tufts University, US National Institutes of Health), consultants, and patent attorneys (Edwards, Angell, Palmer & Dodge). The meeting was very interactive and included exchanges during the many scheduled networking times (exhibitions, speed-networking, lunches and evening receptions). The first day of the three day conference was dedicated to advances in understanding antibody structure-function relationships. Challenges and opportunities in antibody development were the focus of the second day and the third day featured discussion of innovative antibodies and antibody alternatives. PMID:20061813

  7. Homogeneity of Antibody Responses in Tuberculosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Samanich, K.; Belisle, J. T.; Laal, S.

    2001-01-01

    The goals of the present study were twofold: (i) to compare the repertoires of antigens in culture filtrates of in vitro-grown Mycobacterium tuberculosis that are recognized by antibodies from noncavitary and cavitary tuberculosis (TB) patients and (ii) to determine the extent of variation that exists between the antigen profiles recognized by individual TB patients. Lipoarabinomannan-free culture filtrate proteins of M. tuberculosis were fractionated by one-dimensional (1-D) and 2-D polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and the Western blots were probed with sera from non-human immunodeficiency virus (non-HIV)-infected cavitary and noncavitary TB patients and from HIV-infected, noncavitary TB patients. In contrast to earlier studies based on recombinant antigens of M. tuberculosis which suggested that antibody responses in TB patients were heterogeneous (K. Lyashchenko et al., 1998, Infect. Immun. 66:3936–3940, 1998), our studies with native culture filtrate proteins show that the antibody responses in TB patients show significant homogeneity in being directed against a well-defined subset of antigens. Thus, there is a well-defined subset of culture filtrate antigens that elicits antibodies during noncavitary and cavitary disease. In addition, another set of antigens is recognized primarily by cavitary TB patients. The mapping with individual patient sera presented here suggests that serodiagnostic tests based on the subset of antigens recognized during both noncavitary and cavitary TB will enhance the sensitivity of antibody detection in TB patients, especially in difficult-to-diagnose, smear-negative, noncavitary TB patients. PMID:11402004

  8. Antibody phage display technology and its applications.

    PubMed

    Hoogenboom, H R; de Bruïne, A P; Hufton, S E; Hoet, R M; Arends, J W; Roovers, R C

    1998-06-01

    In recent years, the use of display vectors and in vitro selection technologies has transformed the way in which we generate ligands, such as antibodies and peptides, for a given target. Using this technology, we are now able to design repertoires of ligands from scratch and use the power of phage selection to select those ligands having the desired (biological) properties. With phage display, tailor-made antibodies may be synthesized and selected to acquire the desired affinity of binding and specificity for in vitro and in vivo diagnosis, or for immunotherapy of human disease. This review addresses recent progress in the construction of, and selection from phage antibody libraries, together with novel approaches for screening phage antibodies. As the quality of large naïve and synthetic antibody repertoires improves and libraries becomes more generally available, new and exciting applications are pioneered such as the identification of novel antigens using differential selection and the generation of receptor a(nta)gonists. A combination of the design and generation of millions to billions of different ligands, together with phage display for the isolation of binding ligands and with functional assays for identifying (and possibly selecting) bio-active ligands, will open even more challenging applications of this inspiring technology, and provide a powerful tool for drug and target discovery well into the next decade. PMID:9661810

  9. Preclinical development of monoclonal antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Pullen, Nick; Coney, Lee; Dempster, Maggie; Andrews, Laura; Bajramovic, Jeffrey; Baldrick, Paul; Buckley, Lorrene; Jacobs, Abby; Hale, Geoff; Green, Colin; Ragan, Ian; Robinson, Vicky

    2009-01-01

    The development of mAbs remains high on the therapeutic agenda for the majority of pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies. Often, the only relevant species for preclinical safety assessment of mAbs are non-human primates (NHPs), and this raises important scientific, ethical and economic issues. To investigate evidence-based opportunities to minimize the use of NHPs, an expert working group with representatives from leading pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies, contract research organizations and institutes from Europe and the USA, has shared and analyzed data on mAbs for a range of therapeutic areas. This information has been applied to hypothetical examples to recommend scientifically appropriate development pathways and study designs for a variety of potential mAbs. The addendum of ICHS6 provides a timely opportunity for the scientific and regulatory community to embrace strategies which minimize primate use and increase efficiency of mAb development. PMID:20065651

  10. Antibodies as a source of anti-infective peptides: an update.

    PubMed

    Magliani, Walter; Giovati, Laura; Ciociola, Tecla; Sperindè, Martina; Santinoli, Claudia; Conti, Giorgio; Conti, Stefania; Polonelli, Luciano

    2015-01-01

    This review focuses on antibodies (Abs) and their function in immune protection, with particular emphasis on microbicidal Abs. Some aspects of Abs and Ab-drug conjugates as targeting therapeutic agents are also discussed. The main aim, however, is devoted to Ab-derived peptides modulating functions of the immune system and to the latest experimental evidence of Abs as a source of anti-infective and antitumor peptides derived from their complementarity determining regions and constant regions. PMID:26119210

  11. Broadly neutralizing HIV antibodies define a glycan-dependent epitope on the pre-fusion conformation of the gp41 protein on cleaved Envelope trimers

    PubMed Central

    Falkowska, Emilia; Le, Khoa M.; Ramos, Alejandra; Doores, Katie J.; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Blattner, Claudia; Ramirez, Alejandro; Derking, Ronald; van Gils, Marit J.; Liang, Chi-Hui; Mcbride, Ryan; von Bredow, Benjamin; Shivatare, Sachin S.; Wu, Chung-Yi; Chan-Hui, Po-Ying; Liu, Yan; Feizi, Ten; Zwick, Michael B.; Koff, Wayne C.; Seaman, Michael S.; Swiderek, Kristine; Moore, John P.; Evans, David; Paulson, James C.; Wong, Chi-Huey; Ward, Andrew B.; Wilson, Ian A.; Sanders, Rogier W.; Poignard, Pascal; Burton, Dennis R.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Broadly neutralizing antibodies to HIV are much sought-after (a) to guide vaccine design, both as templates and to inform on the authenticity of vaccine candidates, (b) to assist in structural studies and (c) as potential therapeutics. However, the number of targets on the viral envelope spike for such antibodies is limited. Here, we describe a set of human monoclonal antibodies that define a previously undefined target on HIV Env. The antibodies recognize a glycan-dependent epitope on the prefusion conformation of gp41 and unambiguously distinguish cleaved from uncleaved Env trimers, an important property given increasing evidence that cleavage is required for vaccine candidates that seek to mimic the functional HIV envelope spike. The availability of this set of antibodies expands the number of vaccine targets on HIV and provides reagents to characterize the native envelope spike. PMID:24768347

  12. Antibody-specific model of amino acid substitution for immunological inferences from alignments of antibody sequences.

    PubMed

    Mirsky, Alexander; Kazandjian, Linda; Anisimova, Maria

    2015-03-01

    Antibodies are glycoproteins produced by the immune system as a dynamically adaptive line of defense against invading pathogens. Very elegant and specific mutational mechanisms allow B lymphocytes to produce a large and diversified repertoire of antibodies, which is modified and enhanced throughout all adulthood. One of these mechanisms is somatic hypermutation, which stochastically mutates nucleotides in the antibody genes, forming new sequences with different properties and, eventually, higher affinity and selectivity to the pathogenic target. As somatic hypermutation involves fast mutation of antibody sequences, this process can be described using a Markov substitution model of molecular evolution. Here, using large sets of antibody sequences from mice and humans, we infer an empirical amino acid substitution model AB, which is specific to antibody sequences. Compared with existing general amino acid models, we show that the AB model provides significantly better description for the somatic evolution of mice and human antibody sequences, as demonstrated on large next generation sequencing (NGS) antibody data. General amino acid models are reflective of conservation at the protein level due to functional constraints, with most frequent amino acids exchanges taking place between residues with the same or similar physicochemical properties. In contrast, within the variable part of antibody sequences we observed an elevated frequency of exchanges between amino acids with distinct physicochemical properties. This is indicative of a sui generis mutational mechanism, specific to antibody somatic hypermutation. We illustrate this property of antibody sequences by a comparative analysis of the network modularity implied by the AB model and general amino acid substitution models. We recommend using the new model for computational studies of antibody sequence maturation, including inference of alignments and phylogenetic trees describing antibody somatic hypermutation in

  13. Method for altering antibody light chain interactions

    DOEpatents

    Stevens, Fred J.; Stevens, Priscilla Wilkins; Raffen, Rosemarie; Schiffer, Marianne

    2002-01-01

    A method for recombinant antibody subunit dimerization including modifying at least one codon of a nucleic acid sequence to replace an amino acid occurring naturally in the antibody with a charged amino acid at a position in the interface segment of the light polypeptide variable region, the charged amino acid having a first polarity; and modifying at least one codon of the nucleic acid sequence to replace an amino acid occurring naturally in the antibody with a charged amino acid at a position in an interface segment of the heavy polypeptide variable region corresponding to a position in the light polypeptide variable region, the charged amino acid having a second polarity opposite the first polarity. Nucleic acid sequences which code for novel light chain proteins, the latter of which are used in conjunction with the inventive method, are also provided.

  14. Monoclonal antibodies specific for sickle cell hemoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, R.H.; Vanderlaan, M.; Grabske, R.J.; Branscomb, E.W.; Bigbee, W.L.; Stanker, L.H.

    1985-01-01

    Two mouse hybridoma cell lines were isolated which produce monoclonal antibodies that bind hemoglobin S. The mice were immunized with peptide-protein conjugates to stimulate a response to the amino terminal peptide of the beta chain of hemoglobin S, where the single amino acid difference between A and S occurs. Immunocharacterization of the antibodies shows that they bind specifically to the immunogen peptide and to hemoglobin S. The specificity for S is high enough that one AS cell in a mixture with a million AA cells is labeled by antibody, and such cells can be analyzed by flow cytometry. Immunoblotting of electrophoretic gels allows definitive identification of hemoglobin S as compared with other hemoglobins with similar electrophoretic mobility. 12 references, 4 figures.

  15. Antibody-Mediated Pathogen Resistance in Plants.

    PubMed

    Peschen, Dieter; Schillberg, Stefan; Fischer, Rainer

    2016-01-01

    The methods described in this chapter were developed in order to produce transgenic plants expressing pathogen-specific single-chain variable fragment (scFv) antibodies fused to antifungal peptides (AFPs), conferring resistance against fungal pathogens. We describe the selection from a phage display library of avian scFv antibodies that recognize cell surface proteins on fungi from the genus Fusarium, and the construction of scFv-AFP fusion protein constructs followed by their transient expression in tobacco (Nicotiana spp.) plants and stable expression in Arabidopsis thaliana plants. Using these techniques, the antibody fusion with the most promising in vitro activity can be used to generate transgenic plants that are resistant to pathogens such as Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. matthiolae. PMID:26614296

  16. Non-antibody protein-based biosensors.

    PubMed

    Ko Ferrigno, Paul

    2016-06-30

    Biosensors that depend on a physical or chemical measurement can be adversely affected by non-specific interactions. For example, a biosensor designed to measure specifically the levels of a rare analyte can give false positive results if there is even a small amount of interaction with a highly abundant but irrelevant molecule. To overcome this limitation, the biosensor community has frequently turned to antibody molecules as recognition elements because they are renowned for their exquisite specificity. Unfortunately antibodies can often fail when immobilised on inorganic surfaces, and alternative biological recognition elements are needed. This article reviews the available non-antibody-binding proteins that have been successfully used in electrical and micro-mechanical biosensor platforms. PMID:27365032

  17. Non-antibody protein-based biosensors

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Biosensors that depend on a physical or chemical measurement can be adversely affected by non-specific interactions. For example, a biosensor designed to measure specifically the levels of a rare analyte can give false positive results if there is even a small amount of interaction with a highly abundant but irrelevant molecule. To overcome this limitation, the biosensor community has frequently turned to antibody molecules as recognition elements because they are renowned for their exquisite specificity. Unfortunately antibodies can often fail when immobilised on inorganic surfaces, and alternative biological recognition elements are needed. This article reviews the available non-antibody-binding proteins that have been successfully used in electrical and micro-mechanical biosensor platforms. PMID:27365032

  18. Method for preparation of single chain antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Cheung, Nai-Kong V.; Guo, Hong-fen

    2012-04-03

    This invention provides a method for identifying cells expressing a target single chain antibody (scFv) directed against a target antigen from a collection of cells that includes cells that do not express the target scFv, comprising the step of combining the collection of cells with an anti-idiotype directed to an antibody specific for the target antigen and detecting interaction, if any, of the anti-idiotype with the cells, wherein the occurrence of an interaction identifies the cell as one which expresses the target scFv. This invention also provides a method for making a single chain antibody (scFv) directed against an antigen, wherein the selection of clones is made based upon interaction of those clones with an appropriate anti-idiotype, and heretofore inaccessible scFv so made. This invention provides the above methods or any combination thereof. Finally, this invention provides various uses of these methods.

  19. Antidrug Antibodies: B Cell Immunity Against Therapy.

    PubMed

    Fogdell-Hahn, A

    2015-09-01

    Chronic inflammatory diseases are now treated with a range of different biopharmaceuticals, often requiring lifelong parenteral administrations. This exposure to drugs is unnatural and can trigger the immune system and result in the formation of antidrug antibodies. Drug-specific antibodies will, if of sufficiently high titre and affinity, block the intended effect of the drug, increase its clearance and make continued treatment worthless. We expect the immune system to react towards therapies against which tolerance has never been established, which is the case for factor VIII treatment in patients with haemophilia A. However, even biopharmaceutical molecules that we should be tolerant against can elicit antidrug antibodies, for instance in treatment of multiple sclerosis patients with recombinant human interferon-beta. Possible immunological mechanisms behind the breaking of tolerance against drugs, the impact this has on continuous treatment success, clinical practice and drug development, will be discussed in this review. PMID:26098690

  20. Current status of antibody therapy in ALL.

    PubMed

    Ai, Jing; Advani, Anjali

    2015-02-01

    Despite the significant advances in modern chemotherapy, it remains challenging to treat adult patients with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). The relapse rate remains high, and the outcome at the time of relapse is dismal. Antibody-based therapies have demonstrated promising results in this patient group. Variable mechanisms have been applied to target surface antigens (CD20 [also termed MS4A1], CD22, CD52 and CD19) that are commonly expressed on malignant leukaemia cells. In this review, we will focus on the clinical application of such therapies in adult ALL, including the naked antibodies: Rituximab, Ofatumumab, Epratuzumab and Alemtuzumab; the immunotoxins: BL22 and Combotox; the immunoconjugates: inotuzumab and SAR 3419; as well as the Bi-specific T cell engaging (BiTE)-specific antibody, Blinatumomab. PMID:25382151

  1. Prevalence of coronavirus antibodies in Iowa swine.

    PubMed Central

    Wesley, R D; Woods, R D; McKean, J D; Senn, M K; Elazhary, Y

    1997-01-01

    Three hundred and forty-seven serum samples from 22 Iowa swine herds were screened for TGEV/PRCV neutralizing antibody. Ninety-one percent of the sera and all 22 herds were positive. These sera were then tested by the blocking ELISA test to distinguish TGEV and PRCV antibody. The ELISA test confirmed the high percentage of TGEV/PRCV positive sera. By the blocking ELISA test, 12 herds were PRCV positive, 6 herds were TGEV positive and 4 herds were mixed with sera either positive for TGEV or PRCV antibody. The results suggest a recent increase in TGEV/PRCV seroprevalence in Iowa swine most likely due to subclinical PRCV infections. PMID:9342456

  2. Antibody-based biological toxin detection

    SciTech Connect

    Menking, D.E.; Goode, M.T.

    1995-12-01

    Fiber optic evanescent fluorosensors are under investigation in our laboratory for the study of drug-receptor interactions for detection of threat agents and antibody-antigen interactions for detection of biological toxins. In a direct competition assay, antibodies against Cholera toxin, Staphylococcus Enterotoxin B or ricin were noncovalently immobilized on quartz fibers and probed with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) - labeled toxins. In the indirect competition assay, Cholera toxin or Botulinum toxoid A was immobilized onto the fiber, followed by incubation in an antiserum or partially purified anti-toxin IgG. These were then probed with FITC-anti-IgG antibodies. Unlabeled toxins competed with labeled toxins or anti-toxin IgG in a dose dependent manner and the detection of the toxins was in the nanomolar range.

  3. Antibody engineering & therapeutics, the annual meeting of the antibody society December 7–10, 2015, San Diego, CA, USA

    PubMed Central

    Pauthner, Matthias; Yeung, Jenny; Ullman, Chris; Bakker, Joost; Wurch, Thierry; Reichert, Janice M.; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof; Bradbury, Andrew R.M.; Carter, Paul J.; Melis, Joost P.M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The 26th Antibody Engineering & Therapeutics meeting, the annual meeting of The Antibody Society united over 800 participants from all over the world in San Diego from 6–10 December 2015. The latest innovations and advances in antibody research and development were discussed, covering a myriad of antibody-related topics by more than 100 speakers, who were carefully selected by The Antibody Society. As a prelude, attendees could join the pre-conference training course focusing, among others, on the engineering and enhancement of antibodies and antibody-like scaffolds, bispecific antibody engineering and adaptation to generate chimeric antigen receptor constructs. The main event covered 4 d of scientific sessions that included antibody effector functions, reproducibility of research and diagnostic antibodies, new developments in antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs), preclinical and clinical ADC data, new technologies and applications for bispecific antibodies, antibody therapeutics for non-cancer and orphan indications, antibodies to harness the cellular immune system, building comprehensive IgVH-gene repertoires through discovering, confirming and cataloging new germline IgVH genes, and overcoming resistance to clinical immunotherapy. The Antibody Society's special session focused on “Antibodies to watch” in 2016. Another special session put the spotlight on the limitations of the new definitions for the assignment of antibody international nonproprietary names introduced by the World Health Organization. The convention concluded with workshops on computational antibody design and on the promise and challenges of using next-generation sequencing for antibody discovery and engineering from synthetic and in vivo libraries. PMID:26909869

  4. Utility of feline coronavirus antibody tests.

    PubMed

    Addie, Diane D; le Poder, Sophie; Burr, Paul; Decaro, Nicola; Graham, Elizabeth; Hofmann-Lehmann, Regina; Jarrett, Oswald; McDonald, Michael; Meli, Marina L

    2015-02-01

    Eight different tests for antibodies to feline coronavirus (FCoV) were evaluated for attributes that are important in situations in veterinary practice. We compared four indirect immunofluorescent antibody tests (IFAT), one enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) (FCoV Immunocomb; Biogal) and three rapid immunochromatographic (RIM) tests against a panel of samples designated by consensus as positive or negative. Specificity was 100% for all but the two IFATs based on transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV), at 83.3% and 97.5%. The IFAT and ELISA tests were best for obtaining an antibody titre and for working in the presence of virus. The RIM tests were the best for obtaining a result quickly (10-15 mins); of these, the Speed F-Corona was the most sensitive, at 92.4%, followed by FASTest feline infectious peritonitis (FIP; 84.6%) and Anigen Rapid FCoV antibody test (64.1%). Sensitivity was 100% for the ELISA, one FCoV IFAT and one TGEV IFAT; and 98.2% for a second TGEV IFA and 96.1% for a second FCoV IFAT. All tests worked with effusions, even when only blood products were stipulated in the instruction manual. The ELISA and Anigen RIM tests were best for small quantities of sample. The most appropriate FCoV antibody test to use depends on the reason for testing: in excluding a diagnosis of FIP, sensitivity, specificity, small sample quantity, rapidity and ability to work in the presence of virus all matter. For FCoV screening, speed and sensitivity are important, and for FCoV elimination antibody titre is essential. PMID:24966245

  5. Molecular Imaging of Pancreatic Cancer with Antibodies

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Development of novel imaging probes for cancer diagnostics remains critical for early detection of disease, yet most imaging agents are hindered by suboptimal tumor accumulation. To overcome these limitations, researchers have adapted antibodies for imaging purposes. As cancerous malignancies express atypical patterns of cell surface proteins in comparison to noncancerous tissues, novel antibody-based imaging agents can be constructed to target individual cancer cells or surrounding vasculature. Using molecular imaging techniques, these agents may be utilized for detection of malignancies and monitoring of therapeutic response. Currently, there are several imaging modalities commonly employed for molecular imaging. These imaging modalities include positron emission tomography (PET), single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, optical imaging (fluorescence and bioluminescence), and photoacoustic (PA) imaging. While antibody-based imaging agents may be employed for a broad range of diseases, this review focuses on the molecular imaging of pancreatic cancer, as there are limited resources for imaging and treatment of pancreatic malignancies. Additionally, pancreatic cancer remains the most lethal cancer with an overall 5-year survival rate of approximately 7%, despite significant advances in the imaging and treatment of many other cancers. In this review, we discuss recent advances in molecular imaging of pancreatic cancer using antibody-based imaging agents. This task is accomplished by summarizing the current progress in each type of molecular imaging modality described above. Also, several considerations for designing and synthesizing novel antibody-based imaging agents are discussed. Lastly, the future directions of antibody-based imaging agents are discussed, emphasizing the potential applications for personalized medicine. PMID:26620581

  6. "Diabodies": small bivalent and bispecific antibody fragments.

    PubMed Central

    Holliger, P; Prospero, T; Winter, G

    1993-01-01

    Bivalent and bispecific antibodies and their fragments have immense potential for practical application. Here we describe the design of small antibody fragments with two antigen-binding sites. The fragments comprise a heavy-chain variable domain (VH) connected to a light-chain variable domain (VL) on the same polypeptide chain (VH-VL). By using a linker that is too short to allow pairing between the two domains on the same chain, the domains are forced to pair with the complementary domains of another chain and create two antigen-binding sites. As indicated by a computer graphic model of the dimers, the two pairs of domains can pack together with the antigen-binding sites pointing in opposite directions. The dimeric antibody fragments, or "diabodies," can be designed for bivalent or bispecific interactions. Starting from the monoclonal antibodies NQ11.7.22 (NQ11) and D1.3 directed against the hapten phenyloxazolone and hen egg lysozyme, respectively, we built bivalent fragments (VHNQ11-VLNQ11)2 and (VHD1.3-VLD1.3)2 and bispecific fragments VHNQ11-VLD1.3 and VHD1.3-VLNQ11. The fragments were expressed by secretion from bacteria and shown to bind specifically to the hapten and/or antigen. Those with 5- and 15-residue linkers had similar binding affinities to the parent antibodies, but a fragment with the VH domain joined directly to the VL domain was found to have slower dissociation kinetics and an improved affinity for hapten. Diabodies offer a ready means of constructing small bivalent and bispecific antibody fragments in bacteria. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 PMID:8341653

  7. Hybridoma antibodies to the lipid-binding site(s) in the amino-terminal region of fibronectin inhibits binding of streptococcal lipoteichoic acid.

    PubMed

    Stanislawski, L; Courtney, H S; Simpson, W A; Hasty, D L; Beachey, E H; Robert, L; Ofek, I

    1987-08-01

    In this report, we present evidence to suggest that streptococci and lipoteichoic acid (LTA) interact with a fatty acid binding site located near the NH2-terminus of fibronectin. The evidence is based on the following observations. Antibodies directed against a synthetic peptide (residues 1-30 of the amino-terminus of fibronectin) reacted with the two thermolysin-generated peptides (24 and 28 kilodaltons [kDa]) that were adsorbed by and eluted from streptococci. The adsorption of the 24- and 28-kDa peptides to streptococci was inhibited by LTA. The two monoclonal antibodies that inhibited the binding of LTA to fibronectin reacted only with the 24- and 28-kDa fragments of fibronectin. Conversely, LTA, as well as lauric acid and oleic acid, blocked the binding of the same monoclonal antibodies to fibronectin. LTA had no effect on the binding of hybridoma antibodies directed against the collagen or cell-binding domain. PMID:3298457

  8. Behaviour of Non-Donor Specific Antibodies during Rapid Re-Synthesis of Donor Specific HLA Antibodies after Antibody Incompatible Renal Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Nithya S.; Zehnder, Daniel; Daga, Sunil; Lowe, Dave; Lam, F. T.; Kashi, Habib; Tan, Lam Chin; Imray, Christopher; Hamer, Rizwan; Briggs, David; Raymond, Neil; Higgins, Robert M.

    2013-01-01

    Background HLA directed antibodies play an important role in acute and chronic allograft rejection. During viral infection of a patient with HLA antibodies, the HLA antibody levels may rise even though there is no new immunization with antigen. However it is not known whether the converse occurs, and whether changes on non-donor specific antibodies are associated with any outcomes following HLA antibody incompatible renal transplantation. Methods 55 patients, 31 women and 24 men, who underwent HLAi renal transplant in our center from September 2005 to September 2010 were included in the studies. We analysed the data using two different approaches, based on; i) DSA levels and ii) rejection episode post transplant. HLA antibody levels were measured during the early post transplant period and corresponding CMV, VZV and Anti-HBs IgG antibody levels and blood group IgG, IgM and IgA antibodies were quantified. Results Despite a significant DSA antibody rise no significant non-donor specific HLA antibody, viral or blood group antibody rise was found. In rejection episode analyses, multiple logistic regression modelling showed that change in the DSA was significantly associated with rejection (p = 0.002), even when adjusted for other antibody levels. No other antibody levels were predictive of rejection. Increase in DSA from pre treatment to a post transplant peak of 1000 was equivalent to an increased chance of rejection with an odds ratio of 1.47 (1.08, 2.00). Conclusion In spite of increases or decreases in the DSA levels, there were no changes in the viral or the blood group antibodies in these patients. Thus the DSA rise is specific in contrast to the viral, blood group or third party antibodies post transplantation. Increases in the DSA post transplant in comparison to pre-treatment are strongly associated with occurrence of rejection. PMID:23922659

  9. Effects of interferon on antibody formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, G.

    1984-01-01

    Studies of the effects of interferon on primary and secondary antibody responses and of the relationship of interferon to other cytokines, or cell products, are presented. Dosage- and timing-dependent immunoenhancing and immunosuppressive activities of interferon are documented for mouse spleen cell cultures and for mice infected with murine hepatitis virus (MHV-3). A possibility that altered interferon production might lead to immunopathological disorders, such as lupus erythematosus, AIDS, arthritis, etc., is discussed. Latest technological developments are presented that indicate that interferon does apparently play a major role in the regulation of antibody responses.

  10. Basic immunology of antibody targeted radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Jeffrey Y.C. . E-mail: jwong@coh.org

    2006-10-01

    Antibody targeted radiotherapy brings an important new treatment modality to Radiation oncology clinic. Radiation dose to tumor and normal tissues are determined by a complex interplay of antibody, antigen, tumor, radionuclide, and host-related factors. A basic understanding of these immunologic and physiologic factors is important to optimally utilize this therapy in the clinic. Preclinical and clinical studies need to be continued to broaden our understanding and to develop new strategies to further improve the efficacy of this promising form of targeted therapy.

  11. Detection of antitrophoblast antibodies in the sera of patients with anticardiolipin antibodies and fetal loss.

    PubMed

    McCrae, K R; DeMichele, A M; Pandhi, P; Balsai, M J; Samuels, P; Graham, C; Lala, P K; Cines, D B

    1993-11-01

    Women with anticardiolipin antibodies (ACLA) are at increased risk for fetal loss. One potential explanation for this outcome is that sera from these individuals contain antibodies reactive with trophoblast cells, which are involved in the establishment of the uteroplacental vasculature and maintenance of placental blood fluidity. To examine this hypothesis, we compared the incidence of trophoblast-reactive antibodies in 27 patients with ACLA and a history of fetal loss with that in 29 normal pregnant women. Sera from 20 patients, but only one control, contained trophoblast-reactive antibodies (P < .001). These antibodies were not directed against major histocompatibility class I antigens, and reacted with both term and first-trimester trophoblast cells. In most cases, sera from which ACLA were adsorbed by cardiolipin-containing liposomes maintained reactivity against cells. In addition, patient Ig fractions immunoprecipitated an approximately 62-kD protein from the trophoblast cell surface, stimulated the release of arachidonic acid and thromboxane A2 by trophoblasts, and inhibited the binding of prourokinase to trophoblast urokinase receptors. These observations show that sera from women with ACLA and a history of fetal loss contain antitrophoblast antibodies. These antibodies may be serologically distinct from ACLA, and may contribute to the pathogenesis of fetal demise. PMID:7693045

  12. Analysis of acetylcholine receptor phosphorylation sites using antibodies to synthetic peptides and monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Safran, A; Neumann, D; Fuchs, S

    1986-01-01

    Three peptides corresponding to residues 354-367, 364-374, 373-387 of the acetylcholine receptor (AChR) delta subunit were synthesized. These peptides represent the proposed phosphorylation sites of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase, the tyrosine-specific protein kinase and the calcium/phospholipid-dependent protein kinase respectively. Using these peptides as substrates for phosphorylation by the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase it was shown that only peptides 354-367 was phosphorylated whereas the other two were not. These results verify the location of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase phosphorylation site within the AChR delta subunit. Antibodies elicited against these peptides reacted with the delta subunit. The antipeptide antibodies and two monoclonal antibodies (7F2, 5.46) specific for the delta subunit were tested for their binding to non-phosphorylated receptor and to receptor phosphorylated by the catalytic subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase. Antibodies to peptide 354-367 were found to react preferentially with non-phosphorylated receptor whereas the two other anti-peptide antibodies bound equally to phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated receptors. Monoclonal antibody 7F2 reacted preferentially with the phosphorylated form of the receptor whereas monoclonal antibody 5.46 did not distinguish between the two forms. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:3816758

  13. Anti-transferrin receptor antibody and antibody-drug conjugates cross the blood-brain barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Friden, P.M.; Walus, L.R.; Musso, G.F.; Taylor, M.A.; Malfroy, B.; Starzyk, R.M. )

    1991-06-01

    Delivery of nonlipophilic drugs to the brain is hindered by the tightly apposed capillary endothelial cells that make up the blood-brain barrier. The authors have examined the ability of a monoclonal antibody (OX-26), which recognizes the rat transferrin receptor, to function as a carrier for the delivery of drugs across the blood-brain barrier. This antibody, which was previously shown to bind preferentially to capillary endothelial cells in the brain after intravenous administration, labels the entire cerebrovascular bed in a dose-dependent manner. The initially uniform labeling of brain capillaries becomes extremely punctate {approximately} 4 hr after injection, suggesting a time-dependent sequestering of the antibody. Capillary-depletion experiments, in which the brain is separated into capillary and parenchymal fractions, show a time-dependent migration of radiolabeled antibody from the capillaries into the brain parenchyma, which is consistent with the transcytosis of compounds across the blood-brain barrier. Antibody-methotrexate conjugates were tested in vivo to assess the carrier ability of this antibody. Immunohistochemical staining for either component of an OX-26-methotrexate conjugate revealed patterns of cerebrovascular labeling identical to those observed with the unaltered antibody. Accumulation of radiolabeled methotrexate in the brain parenchyma is greatly enhanced when the drug is conjugated to OX-26.

  14. Nephropathia epidemica in Norway: antigen and antibodies in rodent reservoirs and antibodies in selected human populations.

    PubMed Central

    Traavik, T.; Sommer, A. I.; Mehl, R.; Berdal, B. P.; Stavem, K.; Hunderi, O. H.; Dalrymple, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    Nephropathia epidemica (NE) antigen was detected by IFAT (indirect fluorescent antibody technique) in the lungs of 14 of 97 bank voles (Clethrionomys glareolus) collected in three endemic areas. The distribution of antigen positive voles within an endemic location was scattered. Antibodies to Korean hemorrhagic fever (KHF) virus antigens were detected by IFAT in 12 of 14 NE antigen positive bank voles and in 15 of 83 that were antigen negative. NE antigen positive voles exhibited higher antibody titres. Antibodies to KHF were demonstrated in sera from C. rutilus and C. rufocanus collected more than 200 km north of the distribution area for C. glareolus. It appears likely that these vole species can serve as virus vectors for NE cases occurring north of the bank vole area. NE antibodies cross-reacting with KHF virus seem to diminish with time after infection in some NE patients, while for others such cross-reacting antibodies were detected up to 12 years after the disease. Antibodies to KHF were detected in eight of 106 healthy forestry workers with no clinical history of NE. No serological cross-reactions were detected between NE/KHF antigens and representative Bunyaviridae present in Norway. NE/KHF-like viruses appear widespread in Norway, both within and outside of the distribution area of the bank vole. PMID:6146649

  15. What Lies Beneath: Antibody Dependent Natural Killer Cell Activation by Antibodies to Internal Influenza Virus Proteins.

    PubMed

    Vanderven, Hillary A; Ana-Sosa-Batiz, Fernanda; Jegaskanda, Sinthujan; Rockman, Steven; Laurie, Karen; Barr, Ian; Chen, Weisan; Wines, Bruce; Hogarth, P Mark; Lambe, Teresa; Gilbert, Sarah C; Parsons, Matthew S; Kent, Stephen J

    2016-06-01

    The conserved internal influenza proteins nucleoprotein (NP) and matrix 1 (M1) are well characterised for T cell immunity, but whether they also elicit functional antibodies capable of activating natural killer (NK) cells has not been explored. We studied NP and M1-specific ADCC activity using biochemical, NK cell activation and killing assays with plasma from healthy and influenza-infected subjects. Healthy adults had antibodies to M1 and NP capable of binding dimeric FcγRIIIa and activating NK cells. Natural symptomatic and experimental influenza infections resulted in a rise in antibody dependent NK cell activation post-infection to the hemagglutinin of the infecting strain, but changes in NK cell activation to M1 and NP were variable. Although antibody dependent killing of target cells infected with vaccinia viruses expressing internal influenza proteins was not detected, opsonising antibodies to NP and M1 likely contribute to an antiviral microenvironment by stimulating innate immune cells to secrete cytokines early in infection. We conclude that effector cell activating antibodies to conserved internal influenza proteins are common in healthy and influenza-infected adults. Given the significance of such antibodies in animal models of heterologous influenza infection, the definition of their importance and mechanism of action in human immunity to influenza is essential. PMID:27428437

  16. [Inhibition of adenovirus reproduction in cell culture by specific antibodies].

    PubMed

    Povnytsia, O Iu; Nosach, L M; Zhovnovata, V L; Zahorodnia, S D; Vantsak, N P; Tokarchuk, L V; Polishchuk, O M; Diachenko, N S

    2009-01-01

    The capacity of specific antibodies to inhibit the reproduction of homo- and heterologous adenoviruses in Hela cell added to culture medium after virus adsorption was studied. The inhibiting effect of polyclonal antivirus and monospecific antihexone antibodies to homo- and heterologous adenoviruses was shown. The effect was more expressed when using antibodies to homologous antibodies. The intensity of inhibition depended on antibodies concentration in the medium and infecting dose of the virus. Essential reduction of the quantity of infected cells and a decrease of the titer of adenovirus synthesized in the presence of homo- and heterologous antibodies was shown but adenovirus reproduction was not inhibited completely. PMID:19663330

  17. Modeling single cell antibody excretion on a biosensor.

    PubMed

    Stojanović, Ivan; Baumgartner, Wolfgang; van der Velden, Thomas J G; Terstappen, Leon W M M; Schasfoort, Richard B M

    2016-07-01

    We simulated, using Comsol Multiphysics, the excretion of antibodies by single hybridoma cells and their subsequent binding on a surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi) sensor. The purpose was to confirm that SPRi is suitable to accurately quantify antibody (anti-EpCAM) excretion. The model showed that antibody loss by diffusion away from the sensor was less than 1%. Unexpectedly, more than 99% of the excreted antibodies were captured on the sensor. These data prove the remarkable phenomenon that the SPRi output of cellular antibody excretion and its subsequent binding, performed under the conditions described here, is directly usable for quantification of single cell antibody production rates. PMID:27040182

  18. Antibody-mediated immune suppression is improved when blends of anti-RBC monoclonal antibodies are used in mice.

    PubMed

    Bernardo, Lidice; Amash, Alaa; Marjoram, Danielle; Lazarus, Alan H

    2016-08-25

    Although the prevention of hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn is highly effective using polyclonal anti-D, a recombinant alternative is long overdue. Unfortunately, anti-D monoclonal antibodies have been, at best, disappointing. To determine the primary attribute defining an optimal antibody, we assessed suppression of murine red blood cell (RBC) immunization by single-monoclonal antibodies vs defined blends of subtype-matched antibodies. Allogeneic RBCs expressing the HOD antigen (hen egg lysozyme [HEL]-ovalbumin-human transmembrane Duffy(b)) were transfused into naïve mice alone or together with selected combinations of HEL-specific antibodies, and the resulting suppressive effect was assessed by evaluating the antibody response. Polyclonal HEL antibodies dramatically inhibited the antibody response to the HOD antigen, whereas single-monoclonal HEL antibodies were less effective despite the use of saturating doses. A blend of monoclonal HEL-specific antibodies reactive with different HEL epitopes significantly increased the suppressive effect, whereas a blend of monoclonal antibodies that block each other's binding to the HEL protein did not increase suppression. In conclusion, these data show that polyclonal antibodies are superior to monoclonal antibodies at suppressing the immune response to the HOD cells, a feature that can be completely recapitulated using monoclonal antibodies to different epitopes. PMID:27330002

  19. Efficient generation of monoclonal antibodies from single rhesus macaque antibody secreting cells

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Weixu; Li, Leike; Xiong, Wei; Fan, Xuejun; Deng, Hui; Bett, Andrew J; Chen, Zhifeng; Tang, Aimin; Cox, Kara S; Joyce, Joseph G; Freed, Daniel C; Thoryk, Elizabeth; Fu, Tong-Ming; Casimiro, Danilo R; Zhang, Ningyan; A Vora, Kalpit; An, Zhiqiang

    2015-01-01

    Nonhuman primates (NHPs) are used as a preclinical model for vaccine development, and the antibody profiles to experimental vaccines in NHPs can provide critical information for both vaccine design and translation to clinical efficacy. However, an efficient protocol for generating monoclonal antibodies from single antibody secreting cells of NHPs is currently lacking. In this study we established a robust protocol for cloning immunoglobulin (IG) variable domain genes from single rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) antibody secreting cells. A sorting strategy was developed using a panel of molecular markers (CD3, CD19, CD20, surface IgG, intracellular IgG, CD27, Ki67 and CD38) to identify the kinetics of B cell response after vaccination. Specific primers for the rhesus macaque IG genes were designed and validated using cDNA isolated from macaque peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Cloning efficiency was averaged at 90% for variable heavy (VH) and light (VL) domains, and 78.5% of the clones (n = 335) were matched VH and VL pairs. Sequence analysis revealed that diverse IGHV subgroups (for VH) and IGKV and IGLV subgroups (for VL) were represented in the cloned antibodies. The protocol was tested in a study using an experimental dengue vaccine candidate. About 26.6% of the monoclonal antibodies cloned from the vaccinated rhesus macaques react with the dengue vaccine antigens. These results validate the protocol for cloning monoclonal antibodies in response to vaccination from single macaque antibody secreting cells, which have general applicability for determining monoclonal antibody profiles in response to other immunogens or vaccine studies of interest in NHPs. PMID:25996084

  20. Treatment of leukemia with radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Sgouros, G; Scheinberg, D A

    1993-01-01

    In contrast to radioimmunotherapy of solid disease, wherein the primary obstacle to success is access of radiolabeled antibody to antigen-positive cells, in the treatment of leukemia delivering a lethal absorbed dose to the isolated cell appears to be the primary obstacle. The isolated cell is defined as one that is exposed only to self-irradiation (from internalized or surface-bound radiolabeled antibody) and to irradiation from free antibody in the blood. It is isolated in the sense that the particulate (beta, electron, alpha) emissions from its nearest neighboring antigen-positive cell do not contribute to its absorbed dose. Disease in the bone marrow and other tissues, since it is confined to a smaller volume, is more easily eradicated because the absorbed dose to a given cell nucleus is enhanced by emissions from adjacent cells (a smaller fraction of the emission energy is 'wasted'). The optimization simulations presented above for the M195 antibody suggest that the optimum dose of antibody that should be administered is that required to yield a concentration within the distribution volume of the antibody that is approximately equal to the concentration of antigen sites as determined by the tumor burden. Although not specifically considered in the modeling example presented above, antibody internalization and catabolism may be expected to play an important role in radioimmunotherapy treatment planning of leukemia. Depending upon the kinetics of internalization and catabolism, the absorbed dose to the red marrow and to antigen-positive cells may be reduced considerably, since catabolism, assuming that it is followed by rapid extrusion of the radioactive label, would decrease the cells' exposure time considerably. The recently demonstrated effectiveness of radioimmunotherapy in certain cases of B-cell lymphoma and in reducing tumor burden in acute myelogenous leukemia suggests that radioimmunotherapy is beginning to fulfill the promise held when it was initially